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Sample records for generator-produced rubidium-82 positron

  1. Noninvasive assessment of coronary stenoses by myocardial perfusion imaging during pharmacologic coronary vasodilation. VIII. Clinical feasibility of positron cardiac imaging without a cyclotron using generator-produced rubidium-82

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, K.L.; Goldstein, R.A.; Mullani, N.A.; Kirkeeide, R.L.; Wong, W.H.; Tewson, T.J.; Berridge, M.S.; Bolomey, L.A.; Hartz, R.K.; Smalling, R.W.

    1986-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the clinical feasibility of diagnosing significant coronary artery disease by positron imaging of myocardial perfusion without a cyclotron, using generator-produced rubidium-82 (/sup 82/Rb). Fifty patients underwent positron emission tomography of the entire heart using a multislice positron camera and intravenous /sup 82/Rb or nitrogen-13 ammonia (/sup 13/NH/sub 3/) before and after intravenous dipyridamole combined with handgrip stress. Images were read by two observers blinded as to clinical or arteriographic data. Automated quantitative coronary arteriography was obtained for the arteriographic determination of coronary flow reserve, previously demonstrated to be a single integrated measure of stenosis severity accounting for all its geometric dimensions of length, absolute diameter, percent narrowing and asymmetry by quantitative analysis of cine films. Significant coronary artery disease was defined as an arteriographically determined coronary flow reserve of less than 3.0 based on all stenosis dimensions. Any single geometric measure of stenosis severity alone was an inadequate reference standard for comparison with perfusion images. Sensitivity of identifying patients with coronary artery disease having an arteriographically determined coronary flow reserve of less than 3.0 was 95% by positron imaging with a specificity of 100%. The single case that was missed, studied with /sup 13/NH/sub 3/, had a 43% diameter narrowing of a small ramus intermedius off the left coronary artery with no significant narrowing of the major coronary arteries. Positron emission tomography of myocardial perfusion before and after intravenous dipyridamole combined with handgrip stress utilizing generator-produced /sup 82/Rb provides sensitive and specific diagnosis of reduced coronary flow reserve due to coronary artery disease in humans.

  2. Economic analysis of clinical positron emission tomography of the heart with rubidium-82

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, K.L.; Goldstein, R.A.; Mullani, N.A.

    1989-05-01

    This report describes a cost analysis for clinical positron emission tomography (PET) of the heart using generator produced rubidium-82 (/sup 82/Rb). Considered sequentially are the clinical problem, current noninvasive radionuclide methods, positron emission tomograph, and the cost of PET per study. Also analyzed are the costs of PET versus thallium imaging in the management of chest pain, for screening asymptomatic men at high risk for coronary artery disease and for evaluating myocardial viability after myocardial infarction or thrombolytic therapy. Noninvasive assessment of coronary artery stenosis and myocardial ischemia/viability in symptomatic or asymptomatic subjects remains a major medical problem because the sensitivity and specificity of thallium imaging are only 70-85% and 50-70%, respectively, in recent studies. Cardiac positron imaging has an accuracy for noninvasive diagnosis of coronary artery disease in symptomatic or asymptomatic patients with a sensitivity and specificity of 95-98%. It can also be used for assessing physiologic stenosis severity, for imaging myocardial infarction and viability, for assessing effects of interventions such as thrombolysis, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) or bypass surgery on myocardial perfusion, metabolism or coronary flow reserve, for assessing collateral function noninvasively in man, and for diagnosing cardiomyopathy not due to coronary artery disease. Although the cost for cardiac PET with /sup 82/Rb may be modestly higher than for /sup 201/Tl, the greater diagnostic yield of PET results in comparable or lower overall medical management costs than no diagnostic tests/interventions and lower overall costs compared to thallium imaging for evaluating patients with chest pain, asymptomatic high risk males, and patients after acute myocardial infarction/thrombolysis for myocardial viability.

  3. Prognostic value of rubidium-82 positron emission tomography in patients after heart transplant.

    PubMed

    Mc Ardle, Brian A; Davies, Ross A; Chen, Li; Small, Gary R; Ruddy, Terrence D; Dwivedi, Girish; Yam, Yeung; Haddad, Haissam; Mielniczuk, Lisa M; Stadnick, Ellamae; Hessian, Renee; Guo, Ann; Beanlands, Rob S; deKemp, Robert A; Chow, Benjamin J W

    2014-11-01

    Cardiac allograft vasculopathy is a key prognostic determinant after heart transplant. Detection and risk stratification of patients with cardiac allograft vasculopathy are problematic. Positron emission tomography using rubidium-82 allows quantification of absolute myocardial blood flow and may have utility for risk stratification in this population. Patients with a history of heart transplant undergoing dipyridamole rubidium-82 positron emission tomography were prospectively enrolled. Myocardial perfusion and left ventricular ejection fraction were recorded. Absolute flow quantification at rest and after dipyridamole stress as well as the ratio of mean global flow at stress and at rest, termed myocardial flow reserve, were calculated. Patients were followed for all-cause death, acute coronary syndrome, and heart failure hospitalization. A total of 140 patients (81% men; median age, 62 years; median follow-up, 18.2 months) were included. There were 14 events during follow-up (9 deaths, 1 acute coronary syndrome, and 4 heart failure admissions). In addition to baseline clinical variables (estimated glomerular filtration rate, previously documented cardiac allograft vasculopathy), relative perfusion defects, mean myocardial flow reserve, and mean stress myocardial blood flow were significant predictors of adverse outcome. Abnormalities on rubidium-82 positron emission tomography were predictors of adverse events in heart transplant patients. Larger prospective studies are required to confirm these findings. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Extracardiac abnormalities on rubidium-82 cardiac positron emission tomography/computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Mirpour, Sahar; Khandani, Amir H

    2011-04-01

    The role of rubidium-82 (Rb) in recognizing extracardiac diseases is minimally investigated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency and incremental added value of extracardiac findings on Rb cardiac positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) studies. The study included all consecutive patients who were referred from July 2008 to June 2010 for Rb cardiac PET/CT to our institution. A blinded reader reviewed the images retrospectively to assess abnormal extracardiac PET findings. Images of 406 patients (142 men; 264 women) with a mean age±standard deviation of 59.72±12.93 years (range: 18-91 years) were reviewed. Incidental extracardiac abnormalities were found in 67 of 406 patients (16.5%). Among them, eight patients had malignant etiologies (1.9%). Incidental extracardiac findings were present in a significant portion of patients undergoing Rb cardiac PET/CT studies. Although most of the extracardiac findings on Rb cardiac PET/CT studies represented clinically known pathologies, these incidental findings on routine Rb cardiac PET/CT scans may have a significant clinical impact on a small number of patients, and offer the referring physician the chance to obtain additional clinically relevant information.

  5. Test-Retest Repeatability of Myocardial Blood Flow Measurements using Rubidium-82 Positron Emission Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efseaff, Matthew

    Rubidium-82 positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has been proposed for routine myocardial blood flow (MBF) quantification. Few studies have investigated the test-retest repeatability of this method. Same-day repeatability of rest MBF imaging was optimized with a highly automated analysis program using image-derived input functions and a dual spillover correction (SOC). The effects of heterogeneous tracer infusion profiles and subject hemodynamics on test-retest repeatability were investigated at rest and during hyperemic stress. Factors affecting rest MBF repeatability included gender, suspected coronary artery disease, and dual SOC (p < 0.001). The best repeatability coefficient for same-day rest MBF was 0.20 mL/min/g using a six-minute scan-time, iterative reconstruction, dual SOC, resting rate-pressure-product (RPP) adjustment, and a left atrium image-derived input function. The serial study repeatabilities of the optimized protocol in subjects with homogeneous RPPs and tracer infusion profiles was 0.19 and 0.53 mL/min/g at rest and stress, and 0.95 for stress / rest myocardial flow reserve (MFR). Subjects with heterogeneous tracer infusion profiles and hemodynamic conditions had significantly less repeatable MBF measurements at rest, stress, and stress/rest flow reserve (p < 0.05).

  6. Planar positron imaging of rubidium-82 for myocardial infarction: A comparison with thallium-201 and regional wall motion

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, K.A.; Ryan, J.W.; Resnekov, L.; Stark, V.; Peterson, E.L.; Gustafson, G.C.; Martin, W.B.; Freier, P.A.; Harper, P.V. )

    1989-09-01

    Rubidium-82 (Rb-82) is a generator-produced, short half-life (76 seconds) positron emitting potassium analog. Using a mobile gamma camera equipped with a rotating tungsten collimator and high-energy shielding, we examined the use of Rb-82 in the coronary care unit and clinical laboratory for detection of perfusion defects due to myocardial infarction. We studied 31 subjects, 10 patients with acute myocardial infarction, 12 with remote myocardial infarction, and nine controls. Rb-82 images were compared with Tl-201 and regional wall motion for detection of infarct-related arteries. Of the 22 patients with myocardial infarction, 16 were identified with Rb-82 and Tl-201. In nine control subjects, eight were normal with each method. Correlation between Rb-82 and Tl-201 defect scores was excellent. Sensitivity and specificity for infarct-related arteries were similar for Rb-82, Tl-201, and wall motion imaging. Thus planar Rb-82 imaging can detect MI reliably in the coronary care unit and in the clinical laboratory.

  7. Early risk stratification using Rubidium-82 positron emission tomography in STEMI patients.

    PubMed

    Ghotbi, Adam Ali; Hasbak, Philip; Nepper-Christensen, Lars; Lønborg, Jacob; Atharovski, Kiril; Christensen, Thomas; Holmvang, Lene; Engstrøm, Thomas; Ripa, Rasmus Sejersten; Kjær, Andreas

    2017-07-17

    Assessment of infarct size after myocardial infarction is predictive of subsequent morphological changes and clinical outcome. This study aimed to assess subacute post-intervention Rubidium-82 ((82)Rb)-PET imaging in predicting left ventricle ejection fraction, regional wall motion, and final infarct size by CMR at 3-months after STEMI. STEMI patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention were included prospectively. Rest-only (82)Rb-PET perfusion imaging was performed at median 36 hours [IQR: 22 to 50] after the treatment. The extent of hypoperfusion and absolute blood flow (mL·min·g) were estimated on a global and a 17-segment model with dedicated software. At 3-months follow-up patients completed the CMR functional and late gadolinium enhancement imaging. 42 patients were included, but only 35 had follow-up CMR and constituted the study population. Absolute blood flow was significantly lower in the infarct-related territory compared to remote myocardium, P < .005. Extent of hypoperfusion correlated with final infarct size, r = 0.58, P < .001, while blood flow correlated with ejection fraction, r = 0.41, P < .05. In linear mixed models, higher subacute absolute blood flow (β = 4.6, confidence interval [3.5; 5.2], P < .001, R (2) = 0.67) was associated with greater wall motion. Segmental extent of subacute hypoperfusion (β = 0.43 [0.38; 0.49], P < .001, R (2) = 0.58) was associated with the degree of late gadolinium enhancement at 3-months. Subacute rest-only (82)Rb-PET is feasible following STEMI and seems predictive of myocardial function and infarct size at 3-months.

  8. Added prognostic value of myocardial blood flow quantitation in rubidium-82 positron emission tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Farhad, Hoshang; Dunet, Vincent; Bachelard, Kim; Allenbach, Gilles; Kaufmann, Philipp A; Prior, John O

    2013-12-01

    We studied the respective added value of the quantitative myocardial blood flow (MBF) and the myocardial flow reserve (MFR) as assessed with (82)Rb positron emission tomography (PET)/CT in predicting major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs) in patients with suspected myocardial ischaemia. Myocardial perfusion images were analysed semi-quantitatively (SDS, summed difference score) and quantitatively (MBF, MFR) in 351 patients. Follow-up was completed in 335 patients and annualized MACE (cardiac death, myocardial infarction, revascularization, or hospitalization for congestive heart failure or de novo stable angor) rates were analysed with the Kaplan-Meier method in 318 patients after excluding 17 patients with early revascularizations (<60 days). Independent predictors of MACEs were identified by multivariate analysis. During a median follow-up of 624 days (inter-quartile range 540-697), 35 MACEs occurred. An annualized MACE rate was higher in patients with ischaemia (SDS >2) (n = 105) than those without [14% (95% CI = 9.1-22%) vs. 4.5% (2.7-7.4%), P < 0.0001]. The lowest MFR tertile group (MFR <1.8) had the highest MACE rate [16% (11-25%) vs. 2.9% (1.2-7.0%) and 4.3% (2.1-9.0%), P < 0.0001]. Similarly, the lowest stress MBF tertile group (MBF <1.8 mL/min/g) had the highest MACE rate [14% (9.2-22%) vs. 7.3% (4.2-13%) and 1.8% (0.6-5.5%), P = 0.0005]. Quantitation with stress MBF or MFR had a significant independent prognostic power in addition to semi-quantitative findings. The largest added value was conferred by combining stress MBF to SDS. This holds true even for patients without ischaemia. Perfusion findings in (82)Rb PET/CT are strong MACE outcome predictors. MBF quantification has an added value allowing further risk stratification in patients with normal and abnormal perfusion images.

  9. Comparison of rubidium-82 positron emission tomography and thallium-201 SPECT imaging for detection of coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, R.E.; Schwaiger, M.; Molina, E.; Popma, J.; Gacioch, G.M.; Kalus, M.; Squicciarini, S.; al-Aouar, Z.R.; Schork, A.; Kuhl, D.E. )

    1991-06-15

    The diagnostic performance of rubidium-82 (Rb-82) positron emission tomography (PET) and thallium-201 (Tl-201) single-photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT) for detecting coronary artery disease was investigated in 81 patients (52 men, 29 women). PET studies using 60 mCi of Rb-82 were performed at baseline and after intravenous infusion of 0.56 mg/kg dipyridamole in conjunction with handgrip stress. Tl-201 SPECT was performed after dipyridamole-handgrip stress and, in a subset of patients, after treadmill exercise. Sensitivity, specificity and overall diagnostic accuracy were assessed using both visually and quantitatively interpreted coronary angiograms. The overall sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of PET for detection of coronary artery disease (greater than 50% diameter stenosis) were 84, 88 and 85%, respectively. In comparison, the performance of SPECT revealed a sensitivity of 84%, specificity of 53% (p less than 0.05 vs PET) and accuracy of 79%. Similar results were obtained using either visual or quantitative angiographic criteria for severity of coronary artery disease. In 43 patients without prior myocardial infarction, the sensitivity for detection of disease was 71 and 73%, respectively, similar for both PET and SPECT. There was no significant difference in diagnostic performance between imaging modalities when 2 different modes of stress (exercise treadmill vs intravenous dipyridamole plus handgrip) were used with SPECT imaging. Thus, Rb-82 PET provides improved specificity compared with Tl-201 SPECT for identifying coronary artery disease, most likely due to the higher photon energy of Rb-82 and attenuation correction provided by PET. However, post-test referral cannot be entirely excluded as a potential explanation for the lower specificity of Tl-201 SPECT.

  10. Assessment of a protocol for routine simultaneous myocardial blood flow measurement and standard myocardial perfusion imaging with rubidium-82 on a high count rate positron emission tomography system.

    PubMed

    Tout, Deborah; Tonge, Christine M; Muthu, Sivakumar; Arumugam, Parthiban

    2012-11-01

    High count rate positron emission tomography (PET) systems offer the potential for accurate myocardial blood flow (MBF) quantification during first-pass dynamic imaging in conjunction with standard rubidium-82 (Rb-82) PET myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). We investigate the feasibility of this using a Siemens Biograph mCT. Current routine clinical PET MPI is performed with 1480 MBq (40 mCi) Rb-82. Dynamic first-pass images from 217 consecutive patients were reviewed for evidence of detector saturation, indicating that count rate limits had been exceeded. Phantom acquisitions in the presence of high count rates were performed to assess the effect of detector saturation on quantitative accuracy. Accurate MBF quantification and perfusion imaging using current protocols was successful in 85% of clinical cases. Detector block saturation was observed in 15% of cases, and phantom acquisitions indicate that saturation may have an adverse effect on quantitative accuracy. Visualization of transit or pooling of Rb-82 in the vessels in the axilla was the most consistent feature when saturation occurred. Reduction of administered activity to 1110 MBq (30 mCi) and subsequent evaluation of 159 patients ensured successful MBF quantification while maintaining good diagnostic quality perfusion imaging in 99% of cases. MBF quantification and good-quality standard perfusion imaging can be performed on a high count rate PET system using a single-acquisition protocol. The administered activity requires optimization and we recommend 1110 MBq for PET MPI with a Biograph mCT.

  11. Quantification of myocardial perfusion using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging correlates significantly to rubidium-82 positron emission tomography in patients with severe coronary artery disease: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Qayyum, Abbas A; Hasbak, Philip; Larsson, Henrik B W; Christensen, Thomas E; Ghotbi, Adam A; Mathiasen, Anders B; Vejlstrup, Niels G; Kjaer, Andreas; Kastrup, Jens

    2014-07-01

    Aim was to compare absolute myocardial perfusion using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) based on Tikhonov's procedure of deconvolution and rubidium-82 positron emission tomography (Rb-82 PET). Fourteen patients with coronary artery stenosis underwent rest and adenosine stress imaging by 1.5-Tesla MR Scanner and a mCT/PET 64-slice Scanner. CMRI were analyzed based on Tikhonov's procedure of deconvolution without specifying an explicit compartment model using our own software. PET images were analyzed using standard clinical software. CMRI and PET data was compared with Spearman's rho and Bland-Altman analysis. CMRI results were strongly and significantly correlated with PET results for the absolute global myocardial perfusion differences (r=0.805, p=0.001) and for global myocardial perfusion reserve (MPR) (r=0.886, p<0.001). At vessel territorial level, CMRI results were also significantly correlated with absolute PET myocardial perfusion differences (r=0.737, p<0.001) and MPR (r=0.818, p<0.001). Each vessel territory had similar strong correlation for absolute myocardial perfusion differences (right coronary artery (RCA): r=0.787, p=0.001; left anterior descending artery (LAD): r=0.796, p=0.001; left circumflex artery (LCX): r=0.880, p<0.001) and for MPR (RCA: r=0.895, p<0.001; LAD: r=0.886, p<0.001; LCX: r=0.886, p<0.001). On a global and vessel territorial basis, CMRI-measured absolute myocardial perfusion differences and MPR were strongly and significantly correlated with the Rb-82 PET findings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Review: comparison of PET rubidium-82 with conventional SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ghotbi, Adam A; Kjær, Andreas; Hasbak, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear cardiology has for many years been focused on gamma camera technology. With ever improving cameras and software applications, this modality has developed into an important assessment tool for ischaemic heart disease. However, the development of new perfusion tracers has been scarce. While cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) so far largely has been limited to centres with on-site cyclotron, recent developments with generator produced perfusion tracers such as rubidium-82, as well as an increasing number of PET scanners installed, may enable a larger patient flow that may supersede that of gamma camera myocardial perfusion imaging. PMID:24028171

  13. Review: comparison of PET rubidium-82 with conventional SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Ghotbi, Adam A; Kjaer, Andreas; Hasbak, Philip

    2014-05-01

    Nuclear cardiology has for many years been focused on gamma camera technology. With ever improving cameras and software applications, this modality has developed into an important assessment tool for ischaemic heart disease. However, the development of new perfusion tracers has been scarce. While cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) so far largely has been limited to centres with on-site cyclotron, recent developments with generator produced perfusion tracers such as rubidium-82, as well as an increasing number of PET scanners installed, may enable a larger patient flow that may supersede that of gamma camera myocardial perfusion imaging. © 2013 The Authors. Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine.

  14. Semi-quantitative myocardial perfusion measured by computed tomography in patients with refractory angina: a head-to-head comparison with quantitative rubidium-82 positron emission tomography as reference.

    PubMed

    Qayyum, Abbas Ali; Kühl, Jørgen Tobias; Kjaer, Andreas; Hasbak, Philip; Kofoed, Klaus Fuglsang; Kastrup, Jens

    2017-09-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a novel method for assessment of myocardial perfusion and has not yet been compared to rubidium-82 positron emission tomography (PET). We aimed to compare CT measured semi-quantitative myocardial perfusion with absolute quantified myocardial perfusion using PET and to detect stenotic territories in patients with severe coronary artery disease. Eighteen patients with stenosis narrowing coronary arteries ≥70% demonstrated on invasive coronary angiography underwent rest and adenosine stress imaging obtained by 320-multidetector CT scanner and CT/PET 64-slice scanner. CT measured myocardial attenuation density (AD) and perfusion index (PI) were correlated to absolute PET myocardial perfusion values. Rest AD, rest and stress PI did not correlate to PET findings (r = 0·412, P = 0·113; r = 0·300, P = 0·259; and r = 0·508, P = 0·064, respectively). However, there was a significant correlation between stress AD and stress PET values (r = 0·670, P = 0·009) and between stress and rest differences for AD and PI with PET differences (r = 0·620, P = 0·006; and r = 0·639, P = 0·004, respectively). Furthermore, significant differences were observed between remote and stenotic territories for rest and stress AD (48 ± 14HU and 37 ± 16HU, P = 0·002; 76 ± 19HU and 58 ± 13HU, P<0·001, respectively), PI (9·6 ± 2·9 and 7·5 ± 3·1, P = 0·002; 21·6 ± 4·1 and 16·9 ± 3·9, P<0·001, respectively) and PET (0·96 ± 0·37 ml g(-1)  min(-1) and 0·86 ± 0·26 ml g(-1)  min(-1) , P = 0·036; 2·07 ± 0·76 ml g(-1)  min(-1) and 1·61 ± 0·76 ml g(-1)  min(-1) , P = 0·006, respectively). Semi-quantitative CT parameters may be useful in the detection of myocardium subtended by stenotic coronary arteries. © 2015 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Myocardial perfusion with rubidium-82. II. Effects of metaolic and pharmacologic interventions. [Dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, R.A.; Mullani, N.A.; Marani, S.K.; Fisher,D.J.; Gould, K.L.; O'Brien, H.A. Jr.

    1983-10-01

    In order to validate a new method for quantifying coronary blood flow, a bolus of rubidium-82 (Rb-82) was injected intravenously into 28 open-chested dogs under a wide range of flow and physiologic conditions, using beta probes to monitor myocardial radioactivity. Extraction fraction and perfusion were measured using a functional model that separates the data into the free and trapped myocardial rubidium. Extraction and uptake of rubidium were lower during acidosis than during alkalosis and were unchanged by glucose-insulin, digoxin, or propranolol. Myocardial flow, as indicated by rubidium, correlated linearly with simultaneous measurements of flow by microspheres in the same sample volume over a wide range of flow (r = 0.97, n = 106, range 0.02 to 7.75 ml/min/g). Regional myocardial blood flow can be accurately determined using generator-produced Rb-82. Studies using current state-of-the-art, fast positron-emission tomographic cameras are required to determine the utility of this approach in man.

  16. Recovery of strontium activity from a strontium-82/rubidium-82 generator

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Wayne A.; Phillips, Dennis R.; Sosnowski, Kenneth M.

    1999-10-12

    Strontium-82 is recovered from spent strontium-82/rubidium-82 generators to provide a source of strontium-82 for additional strontium-82/rubidium-82 generators. The process involves stripping of the strontium-82 from used strontium-82/rubidium-82 generators followed by purification of the strontium-82 material to remove additional metal contaminants to desired levels.

  17. Quantitative myocardial blood flow with Rubidium-82 PET: a clinical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Hagemann, Christoffer E; Ghotbi, Adam A; Kjær, Andreas; Hasbak, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) allows assessment of myocardial blood flow in absolute terms (ml/min/g). Quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF) and myocardial flow reserve (MFR) extend the scope of conventional semi-quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI): e.g. in 1) identification of the extent of a multivessel coronary artery disease (CAD) burden, 2) patients with balanced 3-vessel CAD, 3) patients with subclinical CAD, and 4) patients with regional flow variance, despite of a high global MFR. A more accurate assessment of the ischemic burden in patients with intermediate pretest probability of CAD can support the clinical decision-making in treatment of CAD patients as a complementary tool to the invasive coronary angiography (CAG). Recently, several studies have proven Rubidium-82 (82Rb) PET’s long-term prognostic value by a significant association between compromised global MFR and major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE), and together with new diagnostic possibilities from measuring the longitudinal myocardial perfusion gradient, cardiac 82Rb PET faces a promising clinical future. This article reviews current evidence on quantitative 82Rb PET’s ability to diagnose and risk stratify CAD patients, while assessing the potential of the modality in clinical practice. PMID:26550537

  18. Initial human experience with Rubidium-82 renal PET/CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Tahari, Abdel K; Bravo, Paco E; Rahmim, Arman; Bengel, Frank M; Szabo, Zsolt

    2014-02-01

    Preclinical data have shown that Rubidium-82 chloride ((82)Rb) is a radiotracer with high first pass extraction and slow washout in the kidneys. The goal of this study was to investigate the feasibility of human kidney imaging with (82)Rb positron emission tomography (PET) and obtain quantitative data of its uptake non-invasively. Eight healthy volunteers underwent dynamic PET/CT imaging with (82)Rb. A preprogrammed pump was used to insure reproducible injections. Tissue time activity curves were generated from the renal cortex. An input function was derived from the left ventricular blood pool (LVBP), the descending thoracic aorta and the abdominal aorta. Renal blood flow was estimated by applying a two-compartment kinetic model. Results obtained with different input functions were compared. Radiotracer accumulation was rapid and reached a plateau within 15-30 s after the bolus entered the kidneys. The derived K1 and k2 parameters were reproducible using input functions obtained from diverse vascular locations. K1 averaged 1.98 ± 0.14 mL/min/g. The average k2 was 0.35 ± 0.11/min. Correlation between K1 values obtained from the LVBP from different bed positions when the kidneys and abdominal aorta were in the same field of view was excellent (R = 0.95). Non-invasive quantitative human kidney imaging with (82)Rb PET is feasible. Advantages of renal PET with (82)Rb include excellent image quality with high image resolution and contrast. (82)Rb has potential as a clinical renal imaging agent in humans. © 2013 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  19. Rubidium-82 PET imaging is feasible in a rat myocardial infarction model.

    PubMed

    Ghotbi, Adam Ali; Clemmensen, Andreas; Kyhl, Kasper; Follin, Bjarke; Hasbak, Philip; Engstrøm, Thomas; Ripa, Rasmus Sejersten; Kjaer, Andreas

    2017-07-18

    Small-animal myocardial infarct models are frequently used in the assessment of new cardioprotective strategies. A validated quantification of perfusion using a non-cyclotron-dependent PET tracer would be of importance in monitoring response to therapy. We tested whether myocardial PET perfusion imaging is feasible with Rubidium-82 ((82)Rb) in a small-animal scanner using a rat myocardial infarct model. 18 Sprague-Dawley rats underwent permanent coronary artery ligation (infarct group), and 11 rats underwent ischemia-reperfusion (reperfusion group) procedure. (82)Rb-PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were conducted before and after the intervention. Perfusion was compared to both left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF) and infarct size assessed by MRI. Follow-up global (82)Rb-uptake correlated significantly with infarct size (infarct group: r = -0.81, P < 0.001 and reperfusion group: r = -0.61, P = 0.04). Only (82)Rb-uptake in the infarct group correlated with LVEF. At follow-up, a higher segmental (82)Rb-uptake in the infarct group was associated with better wall motion (β = 0.034, CI [0.028;0.039], P < 0.001, R (2) = 0.30), and inversely associated with scar transmurality (β = -2.4 [-2.6; -2.2], P < 0.001, R (2) = 0.59). The associations were similar for the reperfusion group. (82)Rb-PET is feasible in small animal scanners despite the long positron range and enables fast and time-efficient myocardial perfusion imaging in rat models.

  20. A prospective comparison of rubidium-82 PET and thallium-201 SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging utilizing a single dipyridamole stress in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Go, R.T.; Marwick, T.H.; MacIntyre, W.J.; Saha, G.B.; Neumann, D.R.; Underwood, D.A.; Simpfendorfer, C.C. )

    1990-12-01

    The purpose of the present study is to prospectively compare myocardial perfusion imaging with rubidium-82 ({sup 82}Rb) by positron emission tomography (PET) with thallium-201 ({sup 201}Tl) imaging by single-photon emission tomography (SPECT) by recording both studies with a single dipyridamole handgrip stress, and reading both sets of images with the same display technique. In a series of 202 patients with previous coronary arteriography, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of {sup 82}Rb PET were 93%, 78%, and 90% and for {sup 201}Tl SPECT 76%, 80%, and 77%, respectively. When 70 patients with previous therapeutic interventions were excluded, the remaining 132 patients showed a sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 95%, 82% and 92% for {sup 82}Rb PET and 79%, 76%, and 78% for {sup 201}Tl SPECT. The improved contrast resolution of PET resulted in markedly superior images and a more confident identification of defects.

  1. Impact of pharmacological stress agent on patient motion during rubidium-82 myocardial perfusion PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Memmott, Matthew J; Tonge, Christine M; Saint, Kimberley J; Arumugam, Parthiban

    2017-01-04

    Patient motion has been demonstrated to have a significant impact on the quality and accuracy of rubidium-82 myocardial perfusion PET/CT. This study aimed to investigate the effect on patient motion of two pharmacological stressing agents, adenosine and regadenoson. Dynamic data were retrospectively analyzed in 90 patients undergoing adenosine (n = 30), incremental adenosine (n = 30), or regadenoson (n = 30) rubidium-82 myocardial perfusion PET/CT. Severity of motion was scored qualitatively using a four-point (0-3) scale and quantitatively using frame-to-frame pixel shifts. The type of motion, returning or non-returning, and the frame in which it occurred were also recorded. There were significant differences in both the qualitative and quantitative scores comparing regadenoson to adenosine (P = .025 and P < .001) and incremental adenosine (P = .014, P = .015), respectively. The difference in scores between adenosine and incremental adenosine was not significant. Where motion was present, significantly more adenosine patients were classed as non-returning (P = .018). The median frames for motion occurring were 12 for regadenoson and 14 for both adenosine cohorts. The choice of stressing protocol impacts significantly on patient motion. Patients stressed with regadenoson have significantly lower motion scores than those stressed with adenosine, using local protocols. This motion is more likely to be associated with a drift of the heart away from a baseline position, coinciding with the termination of infusion.

  2. Story of Rubidium-82 and Advantages for Myocardial Perfusion PET Imaging.

    PubMed

    Chatal, Jean-François; Rouzet, François; Haddad, Ferid; Bourdeau, Cécile; Mathieu, Cédric; Le Guludec, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Rubidium-82 has a long story, starting in 1954. After preclinical studies in dogs showing that myocardial uptake of this radionuclide was directly proportional to myocardial blood flow (MBF), clinical studies were performed in the 80s leading to an approval in the USA in 1989. From that time, thousands of patients have been tested and their results have been reported in three meta-analyses. Pooled patient-based sensitivity and specificity were, respectively, 0.91 and 0.90. By comparison with (99m)Tc-SPECT, (82)Rb PET had a much better diagnostic accuracy, especially in obese patients with body mass index ≥30 kg/m(2) (85 versus 67% with SPECT) and in women with large breasts. A great advantage of (82)Rb PET is its capacity to accurately quantify MBF. Quite importantly, it has been recently shown that coronary flow reserve is associated with adverse cardiovascular events independently of luminal angiographic severity. Moreover, coronary flow reserve is a functional parameter particularly useful in the estimate of microvascular dysfunction, such as in diabetes mellitus. Due to the very short half-life of rubidium-82, the effective dose calculated for a rest/stress test is roughly equivalent to the annual natural exposure and even less when stress-only is performed with a low activity compatible with a good image quality with the last generation 3D PET scanners. There is still some debate on the relative advantages of (82)Rb PET with regard to (99m)Tc-SPECT. For the last 10 years, great technological advances substantially improved performances of SPECT with its accuracy getting closer to this of (82)Rb/PET. Currently, the main advantages of PET are its capacity to accurately quantify MBF and to deliver a low radiation exposure.

  3. The impact of prompt gamma compensation on myocardial blood flow measurements with rubidium-82 dynamic PET.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Ian S; Memmott, Matthew J; Tonge, Christine M; Arumugam, Parthiban

    2016-09-13

    Rubidium-82 myocardial perfusion imaging is a well-established technique for assessing myocardial ischemia. With continuing interest on myocardial blood flow (MBF) and myocardial flow reserve (MFR) measurements, there is a requirement to fully appreciate the impact of technical aspects of the process. One such factor for rubidium-82 is prompt gamma compensation (PGC). This study aims to assess the impact of PGC on MBF and MFR calculated from dynamic Rb-82 data. Dynamic rest and stress images were acquired on a Siemens Biograph mCT and reconstructed with and without PGC in 50 patients (29 male). MBF and MFR were measured in the three main coronary territories as well as globally. With PGC, statistically significant reductions in MBF were observed in LAD (-6.9%), LCx (-4.8%), and globally (-6.5%) but only in obese patients. Significant increases in MBF were observed in RCA (+6.4%) in only nonobese patients. In very obese patients, differences of up to 40% in MBF were observed between PGC and non-PGC images. In nearly all cases, similar PGC differences were observed at stress and rest so there were no significant differences in MFR; however, in a small number of very obese patients, differences in excess of 20% were observed. PGC results in statistically significant changes in MBF, with the greatest reductions observed in the LAD and LCx territories of obese patients. In most cases, the impact on stress and rest data is of similar relative magnitudes and changes to MFR are small.

  4. Story of Rubidium-82 and Advantages for Myocardial Perfusion PET Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chatal, Jean-François; Rouzet, François; Haddad, Ferid; Bourdeau, Cécile; Mathieu, Cédric; Le Guludec, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Rubidium-82 has a long story, starting in 1954. After preclinical studies in dogs showing that myocardial uptake of this radionuclide was directly proportional to myocardial blood flow (MBF), clinical studies were performed in the 80s leading to an approval in the USA in 1989. From that time, thousands of patients have been tested and their results have been reported in three meta-analyses. Pooled patient-based sensitivity and specificity were, respectively, 0.91 and 0.90. By comparison with 99mTc-SPECT, 82Rb PET had a much better diagnostic accuracy, especially in obese patients with body mass index ≥30 kg/m2 (85 versus 67% with SPECT) and in women with large breasts. A great advantage of 82Rb PET is its capacity to accurately quantify MBF. Quite importantly, it has been recently shown that coronary flow reserve is associated with adverse cardiovascular events independently of luminal angiographic severity. Moreover, coronary flow reserve is a functional parameter particularly useful in the estimate of microvascular dysfunction, such as in diabetes mellitus. Due to the very short half-life of rubidium-82, the effective dose calculated for a rest/stress test is roughly equivalent to the annual natural exposure and even less when stress-only is performed with a low activity compatible with a good image quality with the last generation 3D PET scanners. There is still some debate on the relative advantages of 82Rb PET with regard to 99mTc-SPECT. For the last 10 years, great technological advances substantially improved performances of SPECT with its accuracy getting closer to this of 82Rb/PET. Currently, the main advantages of PET are its capacity to accurately quantify MBF and to deliver a low radiation exposure. PMID:26442267

  5. Kinetics of rubidium-82 after coronary occlusion and reperfusion. Assessment of patency and viability in open-chested dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, R A

    1985-01-01

    Currently available noninvasive techniques are unable to rapidly assess artery patency and tissue viability during acute myocardial infarction. In prior studies, rubidium-82 (Rb-82), a short-lived positron emitter obtained from a generator, was validated as an indicator of flow with a model that included the rate constants for transfer into and out of the cell. Accordingly, in the current study, 20 open-chested dogs with experimental infarction were studied serially at base line, after coronary occlusion, and at reperfusion. Time-activity curves acquired with beta probes on the epicardial surface were used to measure flow and net transfer of rubidium. Flow decreased to 0.41 +/- 0.08 ml/min per gram during occlusion and increased to 2.73 +/- 0.56 ml/min per gram in potentially viable ischemic tissue, whereas flows were 0.32 +/- 0.08 during occlusion (P less than 0.05 vs. viable) and 1.58 ml/min per gram (P less than 0.002 vs. viable) in irreversibly injured tissue. The transfer rate constant for Rb-82, kT, at base line was +1.22 +/- 0.60 X 10(-3) s-1 and did not change significantly during occlusion in viable vs. nonviable samples (+1.41 +/- 1.27 vs. +0.93 +/- 1.51 X 10(-3) s-1, respectively), except that 4 out of 11 nonviable tissue samples had negative kTs. At reperfusion, viable myocardial samples were all positive (+1.26 +/- 1.58 X 10(-3) s-1), whereas all irreversibly injured tissues had a negative kT, indicating leakage of tracer (-1.50 +/- 1.10 X 10(-3) s-1, P less than 0.001). This study suggests that Rb-82 time-activity curves can be useful to determine patency of an infarct related artery and potential viability after reperfusion during myocardial infarction. Images PMID:3988934

  6. Myocardial metabolism of fluorodeoxyglucose compared to cell membrane integrity for the potassium analogue rubidium-82 for assessing infarct size in man by PET

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, K.L.; Yoshida, K.; Hess, M.J.; Haynie, M.; Mullani, N.; Smalling, R.W. )

    1991-01-01

    Potassium loss from damaged myocardial cells is linearly related to CPK enzyme loss reflecting extent of necrosis. The potassium analog, rubidium-82 (82Rb), is extracted after i.v. injection and retained in viable myocardium but is not trapped or washed out of necrotic regions. To compare myocardial cell metabolism with membrane dysfunction as indicators of necrosis/viability, 43 patients with evolving myocardial infarction and coronary arteriography had positron emission tomography using fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and the potassium analog 82Rb. Percent of heart showing FDG defects and 82Rb washout on sequential images indicating failure to retain the potassium analogue were visually assessed and quantified by automated software. Infarct size based on rubidium kinetics correlated closely with size and location on FDG images (visual r = 0.93, automated r = 0.82), suggesting that loss of cell membrane integrity for trapping the potassium analog 82Rb parallels loss of intracellular glucose metabolism, both comparable quantitative markers of myocardial necrosis/viability.

  7. Normal Myocardial Flow Reserve in HIV-Infected Patients on Stable Antiretroviral Therapy: A Cross-Sectional Study Using Rubidium-82 PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Andreas; Christensen, Thomas E; Ghotbi, Adam Ali; Hasbak, Philip; Lebech, Anne-Mette; Kjær, Andreas; Ripa, Rasmus Sejersten

    2015-10-01

    Studies have found HIV-infected patients to be at increased risk of myocardial infarction, which may be caused by coronary microvascular dysfunction. For the first time among HIV-infected patients, we assessed the myocardial flow reserve (MFR) by Rubidium-82 (82Rb) positron emission tomography (PET), which can quantify the coronary microvascular function. MFR has proved highly predictive of future coronary artery disease and cardiovascular events in the general population.In a prospective cross-sectional study, HIV-infected patients all receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) with full viral suppression and HIV-uninfected controls were scanned using 82Rb PET/computed tomography at rest and adenosine-induced stress, thereby obtaining the MFR (stress flow/rest flow), stratified into low ≤1.5, borderline >1.5 to 2.0, or normal >2.0.Fifty-six HIV-infected patients and 25 controls were included. The HIV-infected patients had a mean age of 53 years (range 37-68 years) with 23% active smokers. The controls had a mean age of 52 years (range 36-68 years) and 26% active smokers. In the HIV-infected group 73% had a normal MFR, 17% borderline, and 10% low values of MFR. Among controls these values were 71%, 19%, and 10%, respectively (P = 0.99). However, the HIV-infected group had lower values of stress myocardial blood flow (MBF) (2.63 ± 0.09 mL/g/min vs 2.99 ± 0.14 mL/g/min; P = 0.03). We found no evidence of decreased MFR as assessed by 82Rb PET among HIV-infected patients on stable ART with full viral suppression compared with HIV-uninfected controls. We did notice a decreased MBF during stress.

  8. Myocardial perfusion with rubidium-82. III. Theory relating severity of coronary stenosis to perfusion deficit

    SciTech Connect

    Mullani, N.A.

    1984-11-01

    The relation between the quantitative perfusion deficit, as measured by emission computerized tomography, and the severity of coronary artery stenosis is important for the noninvasive clinical evaluation of coronary artery disease in man. Positron emission tomography allows direct noninvasive measurement of myocardial perfusion and quantification of the size of the perfusion defect. Given this important imformation, a mathematical model has been derived to gauge the severity of a coronary stenosis from quantitative perfusion measurements in the normal and poststenotic regions of the heart. The theoretical basis is presented for relating regional myocardial perfusion and regional perfusion resistance to total, coronary blood flow and resistance at normal resting flow and during maximal coronary vasodilation. The concept of perfusion reserve is presented as a clinical measure of the severity of a stenosis.

  9. Comparison of rubidium-82 myocardial blood flow quantification with coronary calcium score for evaluation of coronary artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Meintjes, Marguerite; Sathekge, Mike; Makanjee, Chandra R; Dickson, John C; Endozo, Raymond; Rheeder, Paul; Bomanji, Jamshed

    2016-02-01

    PET myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) is the standard technique for assessing myocardial function, but provides limited information on the anatomy of cardiac structures whereas the coronary artery calcium (CAC) score provides information on calcified plaque burden and the anatomical structure of the coronary arteries. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between quantitative myocardial blood flow (MBF), CAC, and coronary artery disease (CAD). This work also aims to determine whether MBF quantification and/or CAC add value to relative MPI, and aid in the reclassification of patients with CAD. This way, a 'gatekeeper' study could be identified to predict coronary artery stenosis and improve our clinical service. Rubidium-82 PET/CT MPI, calcium score, and computed tomographic coronary angiography imaging were performed in 128 patients with known or suspected CAD. The presence of ischemia was assessed from qualitative reporting of rubidium-82 MPI, and using the same data, quantitative values of MBF and coronary flow reserve (CFR) were derived. Calcium score images were quantitatively analyzed and categorized into three groups defined by CAC values of 0, 1-400, and >400. Significant stenosis was classified as stenosis of 50% or more on computed tomographic angiography. A total of 120 patients were included in the final analysis (77 men, 43 women). Our results showed an inverse correlation between stress MBF, CFR, and the percentage stenosis as well as an inverse correlation compared with CAC. A direct correlation between CAC and the percentage stenosis was observed, indicating that an increase in coronary calcification in individual coronary arteries is related to the severity of the coronary stenosis. These results proved that the addition of stress MBF to relative MPI (32%) resulted in a significantly higher sensitivity (48%, P=0.002), which increased significantly more with the addition of CFR (58%, P≤0.001). The further addition of CAC resulted

  10. Skeletal muscle blood flow in vivo: detection with rubidium-82 and effects of glucose, insulin, and exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Mossberg, K.A.; Mullani, N.; Gould, K.L.; Taegtmeyer, H.

    1987-07-01

    In order to assess the effects of glucose, insulin, and exercise on skeletal muscle blood flow in vivo, we measured positron emission from the thigh muscle of anesthetized rabbits after simultaneous aortic bolus injection of /sup 82/Rb and radiolabeled microspheres (15 micron diameter). Estimates of flow with /sup 82/Rb were based on first-pass regional extraction of /sup 82/Rb by skeletal muscle. Flow estimates were made serially as a function of variations in plasma glucose and insulin and changing the muscle contractile state by electrical stimulation. Flow ranged from 3.1 ml/min/100 g at rest to 71 ml/min/100 g during stimulation. There was good agreement between the two methods of flow measurement over the entire range of flows (r = 0.96 at a slope of 0.90). Flow measured by either method did not vary significantly from baseline over a range of plasma glucose from 5 to 30 mM and plasma insulin from 0 to 20 microU/ml. When flow was increased up to 20-fold by electrical stimulation there was a decrease in extraction of /sup 82/Rb proportional to the increase in flow. However, at pharmacologic levels of insulin (greater than 150 microU/ml) flow was increased twofold as measured by radiolabeled microspheres, but not as measured by rubidium. There was no apparent decrease in extraction of /sup 82/Rb with high insulin. The discrepancy between the microsphere measured flow and rubidium measured flow with high plasma insulin levels can be explained by the assumption that the expected decrease in the extraction fraction was counteracted by an increase in Na+/K+-ATPase activity. It is concluded that the first-pass flow model gives valid estimates of skeletal muscle blood flow in vivo with /sup 82/Rb, provided that plasma insulin levels are normal.

  11. Subacute cardiac rubidium-82 positron emission tomography ((82)Rb-PET) to assess myocardial area at risk, final infarct size, and myocardial salvage after STEMI.

    PubMed

    Ghotbi, Adam Ali; Kjaer, Andreas; Nepper-Christensen, Lars; Ahtarovski, Kiril Aleksov; Lønborg, Jacob Thomsen; Vejlstrup, Niels; Kyhl, Kasper; Christensen, Thomas Emil; Engstrøm, Thomas; Kelbæk, Henning; Holmvang, Lene; Bang, Lia E; Ripa, Rasmus Sejersten; Hasbak, Philip

    2016-10-14

    Determining infarct size and myocardial salvage in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is important when assessing the efficacy of new reperfusion strategies. We investigated whether rest (82)Rb-PET myocardial perfusion imaging can estimate area at risk, final infarct size, and myocardial salvage index when compared to cardiac SPECT and magnetic resonance (CMR). Twelve STEMI patients were injected with (99m)Tc-Sestamibi intravenously immediate prior to reperfusion. SPECT, (82)Rb-PET, and CMR imaging were performed post-reperfusion and at a 3-month follow-up. An automated algorithm determined area at risk, final infarct size, and hence myocardial salvage index. SPECT, CMR, and PET were performed 2.2 ± 0.5, 34 ± 8.5, and 32 ± 24.4 h after reperfusion, respectively. Mean (± SD) area at risk were 35.2 ± 16.6%, 34.7 ± 11.3%, and 28.1 ± 16.1% of the left ventricle (LV) in SPECT, CMR, and PET, respectively, P = 0.04 for difference. Mean final infarct size estimates were 12.3 ± 15.4%, 13.7 ± 10.4%, and 11.9 ± 14.6% of the LV in SPECT, CMR, and PET imaging, respectively, P = .72. Myocardial salvage indices were 0.64 ± 0.33 (SPECT), 0.65 ± 0.20 (CMR), and 0.63 ± 0.28 (PET), (P = .78). (82)Rb-PET underestimates area at risk in patients with STEMI when compared to SPECT and CMR. However, our findings suggest that PET imaging seems feasible when assessing the clinical important parameters of final infarct size and myocardial salvage index, although with great variability, in a selected STEMI population with large infarcts. These findings should be confirmed in a larger population.

  12. Progressive failure of coronary flow during reperfusion of myocardial infarction: Documentation of the no reflow phenomenon with positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Jeremy, R.W.; Links, J.M.; Becker, L.C. )

    1990-09-01

    During reperfusion of a myocardial infarct, development of microvascular occlusion may result in regional hypoperfusion (no reflow) despite a patent infarct-related artery. This study examined the extent and time course of no reflow with use of rubidium-82 positron emission tomography. In 12 anesthetized dogs, the left anterior descending coronary artery was occluded for 90 min and then freely reperfused. Regional myocardial perfusion was imaged by serial rubidium-82 positron emission tomography during coronary occlusion and every 30 min during reperfusion. After 4 h of reperfusion, infarct size and no reflow zone were measured postmortem by triphenyltetrazolium and thioflavin staining, respectively. Perfusion defects evident on rubidium-82 images during coronary occlusion rapidly resolved during the early reflow period. However, a recurrent perfusion defect appeared after 1 to 2 h of reflow in all dogs. The severity of recurrent perfusion defects progressed with time; after 5 min of reflow, relative perfusion in the left anterior descending artery territory was 97 +/- 6% of that in the normal circumflex artery region, but perfusion decreased progressively to 68 +/- 5% after 2 h (p less than 0.05) and to 55 +/- 4% after 4 h of reperfusion (p less than 0.05 versus 2 h). As measured by radioactive tracer microspheres, endocardial blood flow decreased similarly in the postischemic left anterior descending artery region from 1.2 +/- 0.2 ml/min per g after 5 min of reflow to 0.4 +/- 0.1 ml/min per g after 3 h of reflow (p less than 0.01). Residual infarct perfusion, measured by rubidium-82 after 4 h of reflow, was related to both infarct size (r = -0.88) and the extent of the no reflow zone (r = -0.84) in the postmortem left ventricular sections. Thus, serial positron emission tomography with rubidium-82 demonstrates a progressive loss of infarct perfusion.

  13. Altered myocardial glucose utilization and the reverse mismatch pattern on rubidium-82 perfusion/F-18-FDG PET during the sub-acute phase following reperfusion of acute anterior myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Anselm, Daniel D; Anselm, Anjali H; Renaud, Jennifer; Atkins, Harold L; de Kemp, Robert; Burwash, Ian G; Williams, Kathryn A; Guo, Ann; Kelly, Cathy; Dasilva, Jean; Beanlands, Rob S B; Glover, Christopher A

    2011-08-01

    Reperfused myocardium post-acute myocardial infarction (AMI) may have altered metabolism with implications for therapy response and function recovery. We explored glucose utilization and the "reverse mismatch" (RMM) pattern (decreased F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake relative to perfusion) in patients who underwent mechanical reperfusion with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for AMI. Thirty-one patients with anterior wall AMI treated with acute reperfusion, with left ventricular ejection fraction ≤45%, underwent rest rubidium-82 (Rb-82) and FDG PET 2-10 days post-AMI. Resting echocardiograms were used to assess wall motion abnormalities. Significant RMM occurred in 15 (48%) patients and was associated with a shorter time to PCI of 2.9 hours (2.2, 13.3 hours) compared to patients without significant RMM: 11.4 hours (3.9, 22.4 hours) (P = .03). Within the peri-infarct regions, segments with significant RMM were more likely to have wall motion abnormalities (OR = 2.3 (1.1, 4.7), P = .02) compared to segments without significant RMM. RMM is a common pattern on perfusion/FDG PET during the sub-acute phase following reperfusion of AMI and is associated with shorter times to PCI. Within the peri-infarct region, RMM occurs frequently and is more often associated with wall motion abnormalities than segments without RMM. Whether this represents a myocardial metabolic shift during the sub-acute phase of recovery warrants further study.

  14. Cyclotrons and positron emission tomography radiopharmaceuticals for clinical imaging.

    PubMed

    Saha, G B; MacIntyre, W J; Go, R T

    1992-07-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) requires positron-emitting radionuclides that emit 511-keV photons detectable by PET imagers. Positron-emitting radionuclides are commonly produced in charged particle accelerators, eg, linear accelerators or cyclotrons. The most widely available radiopharmaceuticals for PET imaging are carbon-11-, nitrogen-13-, and oxygen-15-labeled compounds, many of which, either in their normal state or incorporated in other compounds, serve as physiological tracers. Other useful PET radiopharmaceuticals include fluorine-18-, bromine-75-, gallium-68 (68Ga)-, rubidium-82 (82Rb)-, and copper-62 (62Cu)-labeled compounds. Many positron emitters have short half-lives and thus require on-site cyclotrons for application, and others (68Ga, 82Rb, and 62Cu) are available from radionuclides generators using relatively long-lived parent radionuclides. This review is divided into two sections: cyclotrons and PET radiopharmaceuticals for clinical imaging. In the cyclotron section, the principle of operation of the cyclotron, types of cyclotrons, medical cyclotrons, and production of radionuclides are discussed. In the section on PET radiopharmaceuticals, the synthesis and clinical use of PET radiopharmaceuticals are described.

  15. Principles and clinical applications of positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Gardner, S F; Green, J A; Bednarczyk, E M; Farnett, L; Miraldi, F

    1992-06-01

    The basics of positron emission tomography (PET) are presented, including the physics, instrumentation, and radiopharmaceuticals involved; the clinical and research applications; and the cost. In PET, organic molecules labeled with positron-emitting radionuclides are injected or inhaled, and the high-energy photons produced by annihilation events are detected by paired, integrated crystal detectors. A computer uses the lines of origin of these photons to reconstruct a three-dimensional map of a functioning organ system. The positron-emitting radionuclides most often used are carbon 11, oxygen 15, nitrogen 13, fluorine 18, and rubidium 82. PET imaging centers usually consist of a cyclotron facility, a radiochemistry facility, a PET scanner, and computers for image reconstruction. Radiopharmaceuticals used in PET may be divided into blood flow-imaging agents, metabolic imaging agents, and drug receptor-imaging agents. Although PET is still primarily a research tool, it has shown diagnostic potential in neurology, cardiology, and oncology. It has also shown promise as a tool for pharmacologic assessment, as in studies of the effects of the fluorinated quinolones on cerebral blood flow and glucose metabolism. PET may become important in drug development because it yields specific information relatively noninvasively. A single study carries an average break-even price tag of $1500-$2000; rigorous cost-benefit analyses should be conducted before society is asked to subsidize such costs. Positron emission tomography is a frontier technology for which valuable clinical applications are being discovered. Pharmacists can contribute enormously to PET applications and at the same time establish a unique subspecialty for the profession.

  16. Future direction of renal positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Zsolt; Xia, Jinsong; Mathews, William B; Brown, Phillip R

    2006-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is perfectly suited for quantitative imaging of the kidneys, and the recent improvements in detector technology, computer hardware, and image processing software add to its appeal. Multiple positron emitting radioisotopes can be used for renal imaging. Some, including carbon-11, nitrogen-13, and oxygen-15, can be used at institutions with an on-site cyclotron. Other radioisotopes that may be even more useful in a clinical setting are those that either can be obtained from radionuclide generators (rubidium-82, copper-62) or have a sufficiently long half-life for transportation (fluorine-18). The clinical use of functional renal PET studies (blood flow, glomerular filtration rate) has been slow, in part because of the success of concurrent technologies, including single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and planar gamma camera imaging. Renal blood flow studies can be performed with O-15-labeled water, N-13-labeled ammonia, rubidium-82, and copper-labeled PTSM. With these tracers, renal blood flow can be quantified using a modified microsphere kinetic model. Glomerular filtration can be imaged and quantified with gallium-68 EDTA or cobalt-55 EDTA. Measurements of renal blood flow with PET have potential applications in renovascular disease, in transplant rejection or acute tubular necrosis, in drug-induced nephropathies, ureteral obstruction, before and after revascularization, and before and after the placement of ureteral stents. The most important clinical application for imaging glomerular function with PET would be renovascular hypertension. Molecular imaging of the kidneys with PET is rather limited. At present, research is focused on the investigation of metabolism (acetate), membrane transporters (organic cation and anion transporters, pepT1 and pepT2, GLUT, SGLT), enzymes (ACE), and receptors (AT1R). Because many nephrological and urological disorders are initiated at the molecular and organelle levels and may

  17. Feasibility of stress only rubidium-82 PET myocardial perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Sean R; Kikut, Janusz; Pinckney, Richard G; Keating, Friederike K

    2013-12-01

    Stress only SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) is a validated strategy to streamline cardiac diagnostic imaging. The potential use of Rb82 PET stress only MPI has not been investigated. Stress images from 200 Rb82 PET-MPI were reviewed by two blinded readers and categorized as not requiring additional rest images (normal) or requiring additional images (abnormal or equivocal). No additional images were deemed necessary for 95 (48%) and 99 (50%) by the two blinded readers. The stress only interpretation was compared to the previous read of the complete rest-stress study. The rate of detecting a normal result with stress only reading was 76%-79% with a negative predictive value of 94%-95%. Clinical predictors of a normal stress only PET-MPI included lower age, the absence of CAD, and female gender, but not body mass index. Blinded reads of 50 additional consecutive PET-MPI from patients with selected clinical predictors (age <65 years, no known CAD) were then performed. Of these, 40 (80%) were normal by previous rest-stress reading, and 34 (68%) were categorized as not requiring additional images after stress only reading. PET stress only imaging would have resulted in a mean reduction of radiation exposure of 2.4 mSv per study according to a published radiation estimate. Stress only Rb82 PET-MPI is a feasible strategy to reduce resource utilization and radiation exposure associated with MPI. This strategy would be most applicable to patients with a lower pretest likelihood.

  18. Positron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hulett, L.D. Jr.; Xu, J.

    1995-02-01

    The negative work function property that some materials have for positrons make possible the development of positron reemission microscopy (PRM). Because of the low energies with which the positrons are emitted, some unique applications, such as the imaging of defects, can be made. The history of the concept of PRM, and its present state of development will be reviewed. The potential of positron microprobe techniques will be discussed also.

  19. (Development of an inexpensive high resolution positron multiwire proportional counter). Progress report, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The development of surgical and medical techniques for the treatment of coronary artery disease has dramatized the need for a safe, relatively non-traumatic measure of regional perfusion. This is particularly critical during the early stages of coronary artery disease, well before symptoms become severe enough to warrant characterization. The primary limitation in the implementation of this new technique is the lack of a high resolution, relatively inexpensive positron detecting system to enable myocardial perfusion scintigraphy with rubidium-82 to be performed as a screening test in hospitals without direct access to cyclotron facilities. The positron multiwire proportional counter which will result from the proposed projects will solve this problem. The dispersion of the absorbing material will be achieved by stringing wires of high Z material, such as tungsten, in a cross pattern. By stacking the wires, an efficiency of 30% can be obtained for 0.5 MeV photons. The wire layers will be at graded voltages; the ionization from the photoelectrons is thereby drifted through the stack and picked up by sense wires operating in the proportional mode. Resolutions within the 3 mm range should also be achievable. 15 figs.

  20. Identification of ischemic and hibernating myocardium: feasibility of post-exercise F-18 deoxyglucose positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Marwick, T.H.; MacIntyre, W.J.; Salcedo, E.E.; Go, R.T.; Saha, G.; Beachler, A. )

    1991-02-01

    The identification of ischemic and hibernating myocardium facilitates the selection of patients most likely to benefit from revascularization. This study examined the feasibility of metabolic imaging, using post-exercise F-18 deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) for the diagnosis of both ischemia and hibernation in 27 patients with known coronary anatomy. Normal post-exercise FDG uptake was defined in each patient by reference to normal resting perfusion and normal coronary supply. Abnormal elevation of FDG (ischemia or hibernation) was compared in 13 myocardial segments in each patient, with the results of dipyridamole stress perfusion imaging performed by rubidium-82 positron emission tomography (Rb-PET). Myocardial ischemia was diagnosed by either FDG-PET or Rb-PET in 34 segments subtended by significant local coronary stenoses. Increased FDG uptake was present in 32/34 (94%) and a reversible perfusion defect was identified by Rb-PET in 22/34 (65%, p less than .01). In 3 patients, ischemia was identified by metabolic imaging alone. In 16 patients with previous myocardial infarction, perfusion defects were present at rest in 89 regions, 30 of which (34%) demonstrated increased FDG uptake, consistent with the presence of hibernation. Increased post-exercise FDG uptake appears to be a sensitive indicator of ischemia and myocardial hibernation. Increased post-exercise FDG uptake, appears to be a sensitive indicator of ischemia and myocardial hibernation. This test may be useful in selecting post-infarction patients for revascularization.

  1. Positron Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drachman, Richard J.

    2003-01-01

    I will give a review of the history of low-energy positron physics, experimental and theoretical, concentrating on the type of work pioneered by John Humberston and the positronics group at University College. This subject became a legitimate subfield of atomic physics under the enthusiastic direction of the late Sir Harrie Massey, and it attracted a diverse following throughout the world. At first purely theoretical, the subject has now expanded to include high brightness beams of low-energy positrons, positronium beams, and, lately, experiments involving anti-hydrogen atoms. The theory requires a certain type of persistence in its practitioners, as well as an eagerness to try new mathematical and numerical techniques. I will conclude with a short summary of some of the most interesting recent advances.

  2. Positron Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drachman, Richard J.

    2003-01-01

    I will give a review of the history of low-energy positron physics, experimental and theoretical, concentrating on the type of work pioneered by John Humberston and the positronics group at University College. This subject became a legitimate subfield of atomic physics under the enthusiastic direction of the late Sir Harrie Massey, and it attracted a diverse following throughout the world. At first purely theoretical, the subject has now expanded to include high brightness beams of low-energy positrons, positronium beams, and, lately, experiments involving anti-hydrogen atoms. The theory requires a certain type of persistence in its practitioners, as well as an eagerness to try new mathematical and numerical techniques. I will conclude with a short summary of some of the most interesting recent advances.

  3. Processing of generator-produced 68Ga for medical application.

    PubMed

    Zhernosekov, Konstantin P; Filosofov, Dimitry V; Baum, Richard P; Aschoff, Peter; Bihl, Heiner; Razbash, Anatoli A; Jahn, Markus; Jennewein, Mark; Rösch, Frank

    2007-10-01

    The (68)Ge/(68)Ga generator provides an excellent source of positron-emitting (68)Ga. However, newly available "ionic" (68)Ge/(68)Ga radionuclide generators are not necessarily optimized for the synthesis of (68)Ga-labeled radiopharmaceuticals. The eluates have rather large volumes, a high concentration of H(+) (pH of 1), a breakthrough of (68)Ge, increasing with time or frequency of use, and impurities such as stable Zn(II) generated by the decay of (68)Ga, Ti(IV) as a constituent of the column material, and Fe(III) as a general impurity. We have developed an efficient route for the processing of generator-derived (68)Ga eluates, including the labeling and purification of biomolecules. Preconcentration and purification of the initial generator eluate are performed using a miniaturized column with organic cation-exchanger resin and hydrochloric acid/acetone eluent. The purified fraction was used for the labeling of nanomolar amounts of octreotide derivatives either in pure aqueous solution or in buffers. Using the generator post-eluate processing system, >97% of the initially eluated (68)Ga activity was obtained within 4 min as a 0.4-mL volume of a hydrochloric acid/acetone fraction. The initial amount of (68)Ge(IV) was decreased by a factor of 10(4), whereas initial amounts of Zn(II), Ti(IV), and Fe(III) were reduced by factors of 10(5), 10(2), and 10, respectively. The processed (68)Ga fraction was directly transferred to solutions containing labeling precursors-for example, DOTA-dPhe(1)-Tyr(3)-octreotide (DOTATOC) (DOTA = 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N',N'',N'''-tetraacetic acid). Labeling yields of >95% were achieved within 10 min. Overall yields reached 70% at 20 min after generator elution relative to the eluted (68)Ga activity, not corrected for decay. Specific activities of (68)Ga-DOTATOC were 50 MBq/nmol using a standard protocol, reaching 450 MBq/nmol under optimized conditions. Processing on a cation-exchanger in hydrochloric acid/acetone media

  4. Positron emission tomography demonstrates that coronary sinus retroperfusion can restore regional myocardial perfusion and preserve metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    O'Byrne, G.T.; Nienaber, C.A.; Miyazaki, A.; Araujo, L.; Fishbein, M.C.; Corday, E.; Schelbert, H.R. )

    1991-07-01

    Positron emission tomography was used to image blood flow and metabolic tracers in risk zone myocardium after left anterior descending coronary artery occlusion during synchronized coronary venous retroperfusion. Six control and seven intervention open chest dogs had occlusion of the mid left anterior descending coronary artery. Synchronized retroperfusion commenced 25 min later. Flow tracers (rubidium-82 and nitrogen-13 ammonia) were injected retrogradely. Three hours after coronary occlusion, fluorine-18 (F-18) deoxyglucose uptake in the control and treatment groups was compared. At 200 min of occlusion, infarct size was assessed. Retrograde flow tracer uptake was observed in the risk zone in the seven intervention dogs. Fluorine-18 deoxyglucose uptake in the risk zone was increased in five of the six intervention dogs but was reduced in five of the six control dogs. The risk zone to normal zone F-18 deoxyglucose count ratio was higher in the intervention than the control group (1.13 {plus minus} 0.39 vs. 0.59 {plus minus} 0.51; p less than 0.05). The endocardial subsegment risk zone to normal zone F-18 deoxyglucose count ratio was also significantly higher in the intervention group. Percent infarction in the risk zone was 70% lower in the group treated with synchronized retroperfusion than in the control group (18.4 {plus minus} 22.6% vs. 61.2 {plus minus} 25.4%; p less than 0.02). Thus, positron emission tomography revealed that retroperfusion could deliver oxygenated blood and maintain metabolism in risk zone myocardium. Infarct size was limited to 30% of that of control. In acute closure of the left anterior descending coronary artery, synchronized retroperfusion might be considered for maintaining viability of the jeopardized myocardium if the artery cannot be reopened rapidly.

  5. Evidence for regional catecholamine uptake and storage sites in the transplanted human heart by positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Schwaiger, M.; Hutchins, G.D.; Kalff, V.; Rosenspire, K.; Haka, M.S.; Mallette, S.; Deeb, G.M.; Abrams, G.D.; Wieland, D. )

    1991-05-01

    Positron emission tomography in combination with the newly introduced catecholamine analogue ({sup 11}C)hydroxyephedrine (({sup 11}C)HED) enables the noninvasive delineation of sympathetic nerve terminals of the heart. To address the ongoing controversy over possible reinnervation of the human transplant, 5 healthy control subjects and 11 patients were studied after cardiac transplant by this imaging approach. Regional ({sup 11}C)HED retention was compared to regional blood flow as assessed by rubidium-82. Transplant patients were divided into two groups. Group I had recent (less than 1 yr, 4.4 +/- 2.3 mo) surgery, while group II patients underwent cardiac transplantation more than 2 yr before imaging (3.5 +/- 1.3 yr). ({sup 11}C)HED retention paralleled blood flow in normals, but was homogeneously reduced in group I. In contrast, group II patients revealed heterogeneous ({sup 11}C)HED retention, with increased uptake in the proximal anterior and septal wall. Quantitative evaluation of ({sup 11}C)HED retention revealed a 70% reduction in group I and 59% reduction in group II patients (P less than 0.001). In group II patients, ({sup 11}C)HED retention reached 60% of normal in the proximal anterior wall. These data suggest the presence of neuronal tissue in the transplanted human heart, which may reflect regional sympathetic reinnervation.

  6. Precision-controlled elution of a 82Sr/82Rb generator for cardiac perfusion imaging with positron emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, R.; Adler, A.; Beanlands, R. S.; de Kemp, R. A.

    2007-02-01

    A rubidium-82 (82Rb) elution system is described for use with positron emission tomography. Due to the short half-life of 82Rb (76 s), the system physics must be modelled precisely to account for transport delay and the associated activity decay and dispersion. Saline flow is switched between a 82Sr/82Rb generator and a bypass line to achieve a constant-activity elution of 82Rb. Pulse width modulation (PWM) of a solenoid valve is compared to simple threshold control as a means to simulate a proportional valve. A predictive-corrective control (PCC) algorithm is developed which produces a constant-activity elution within the constraints of long feedback delay and short elution time. The system model parameters are adjusted through a self-tuning algorithm to minimize error versus the requested time-activity profile. The system is self-calibrating with 2.5% repeatability, independent of generator activity and elution flow rate. Accurate 30 s constant-activity elutions of 10-70% of the total generator activity are achieved using both control methods. The combined PWM-PCC method provides significant improvement in precision and accuracy of the requested elution profiles. The 82Rb elution system produces accurate and reproducible constant-activity elution profiles of 82Rb activity, independent of parent 82Sr activity in the generator. More reproducible elution profiles may improve the quality of clinical and research PET perfusion studies using 82Rb.

  7. Occupational radiation dose associated with Rb-82 myocardial perfusion positron emission tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Schleipman, A Robert; Castronovo, Frank P; Di Carli, Marcelo F; Dorbala, Sharmila

    2006-01-01

    We determined staff radiation dose during rest and stress rubidium 82 myocardial perfusion positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Patients received 1,587 +/- 163 MBq (42.9 +/- 4.4 mCi) Rb-82 during rest or pharmacologic stress. A pressurized ion chamber was used to monitor radiation exposure in 50 examinations. For comparison, staff exposure during pharmacologic stress in 20 other patients receiving 1,204 +/- 55.5 MBq (32.54 +/- 1.5 mCi) technetium 99m 2-methoxy isobutyl isonitrile (MIBI) was measured. For Rb-82 infusion and PET acquisition, the mean dose was 0.45 +/- 0.25 microSv (0.045 +/- 0.025 mrem). Exposure for routine stress testing at variable distances from the patient was equivalent to background. Similar exposure for pharmacologic stress testing through 7 minutes after injection of Tc-99m MIBI at variable distances was 1.075 +/- 0.32 microSv (0.108 +/- 0.03 mrem). However, exposure for stress tests starting 7 minutes after Rb-82 infusion at 0.5 m was estimated at 0.4 microSv (0.04 mrem). To determine the potential radiation dose for those responding to a medical emergency or otherwise in close proximity to a patient, we measured the mean cumulative dose at 0.5 m from 0 to 7 minutes of Rb-82 infusion, which resulted in 19.1 +/- 5.8 microSv (1.9 +/- 0.58 mrem). Radiation doses for all tasks during routine Rb-82 stress-rest PET are lower than measured Tc-99m MIBI values. However, the radiation dose in close proximity to the patient during or immediately after Rb-82 infusion can be considerably higher, underscoring the need for strict attention to source distance and contact times.

  8. Positron emission tomographic measurement of blood-to-brain and blood-to-tumor transport of 82Rb: the effect of dexamethasone and whole-brain radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jarden, J.O.; Dhawan, V.; Poltorak, A.; Posner, J.B.; Rottenberg, D.A.

    1985-12-01

    Unidirectional blood-to-brain and blood-to-tumor transport rate constants for rubidium 82 were determined using dynamic positron emission tomography in patients with primary or metastatic brain tumors. Regional influx rate constants (K1) and plasma water volume (Vp) were estimated from the time course of blood and brain radioactivity following a bolus injection of tracer. Eight patients were studied before and 24 to 72 hours after treatment using pharmacological doses of dexamethasone, and 6 additional patients with metastatic brain tumors were studied before and within 60 to 90 minutes after 200- to 600-rad whole-brain radiation therapy. Steroid treatment was associated with a 9 to 48% decrease in tumor K1 and a 21% mean decrease in tumor Vp. No consistent changes in K1 or Vp were observed in control brain regions. Tumor K1 and Vp did not increase in patients undergoing whole-brain radiation therapy, all of whom were taking dexamethasone at the time of study. These data suggest that corticosteroids decrease the permeability of tumor capillaries to small hydrophilic molecules (including those of some chemotherapeutic agents) and that steroid pretreatment prevents acute, and potentially dangerous, increases in tumor capillary permeability following cranial irradiation.

  9. Acute myocardial infarction associated with intravenous dipyridamole for rubidium-82 PET imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Marwick, T.H.; Hollman, J. )

    1990-03-01

    This report describes the occurrence of chest pain and electrocardiographic features of acute myocardial infarction following intravenous dipyridamole-handgrip stress. Myocardial perfusion imaging (Rb-82 PET) demonstrated a stress-induced perfusion defect. Following failure to respond to medical therapy, urgent cardiac catheterization demonstrated total occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery. The vessel was revascularized, with limitation of myocardial damage evidenced by failure to develop anterior Q waves and only modest elevation of cardiac enzyme levels. Complications of intravenous dipyridamole stress are rare, this case constituting the first major problem in over 500 such procedures at this institution. However, this experience demonstrates the importance of vigilant observation during the performance of this technique.

  10. Regadenoson pharmacologic rubidium-82 PET: a comparison of quantitative perfusion and function to dipyridamole.

    PubMed

    Cullom, S James; Case, James A; Courter, Staci A; McGhie, A Iain; Bateman, Timothy M

    2013-02-01

    Dipyridamole is used for stress (82)rubidium chloride ((82)RbCl) PET because of its long hyperemic duration. Regadenoson has advantages of a fixed dose and favorable symptom profile, but its mean maximal hyperemia is only 2.3 minutes. To determine its suitability for (82)RbCl PET, we imaged subjects using a regadenoson protocol based on its hyperemic response and compared the images in the same subjects having dipyridamole PET. In 32 subjects (23 M), we assessed visually by blinded interpretation and quantitatively compared summed stress and difference scores, total perfusion deficit (TPD), LVEF, LV volumes, and change in stress-rest function. Linear correlation and Bland-Altman analysis of the paired measurements were applied for evaluation of differences. Paired t test and Pearson's correlation were applied for testing of significance. The images were interpreted the same by visual assessment. Twenty-six (26) subjects had reversible defects; by quantitation the SSS was 12.9 ± 7.0 and 14.1 ± 6.4 (P = .23) and SDS was 7.0 ± 6.8 versus 7.6 ± 6.2 (P = .40) for dipyridamole and regadenoson, respectively. Six (6) subjects had <5% likelihood of CAD and were normal by both. All paired measurements showed a high positive correlation between regadenoson and dipyridamole; stress segmental perfusion Reg = 0.93Dip + 4.4, r = 0.88; TPD Reg = 0.94Dip + 0.41, r = 0.93; LVEF Reg = 0.92Dip + 4.7, r = 0.95; stress minus rest LVEF Reg = 0.87Dip - 0.99, r = 0.82. Regadenoson stress (82)RbCl PET perfusion defect and cardiac function measurements are visually and quantitatively equivalent to dipyridamole studies and can be obtained with the clinical advantages of regadenoson.

  11. Positron-rubidium scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mceachran, R. P.; Horbatsch, M.; Stauffer, A. D.

    1990-01-01

    A 5-state close-coupling calculation (5s-5p-4d-6s-6p) was carried out for positron-Rb scattering in the energy range 3.7 to 28.0 eV. In contrast to the results of similar close-coupling calculations for positron-Na and positron-K scattering the (effective) total integrated cross section has an energy dependence which is contrary to recent experimental measurements.

  12. Positrons in surface physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugenschmidt, Christoph

    2016-12-01

    Within the last decade powerful methods have been developed to study surfaces using bright low-energy positron beams. These novel analysis tools exploit the unique properties of positron interaction with surfaces, which comprise the absence of exchange interaction, repulsive crystal potential and positron trapping in delocalized surface states at low energies. By applying reflection high-energy positron diffraction (RHEPD) one can benefit from the phenomenon of total reflection below a critical angle that is not present in electron surface diffraction. Therefore, RHEPD allows the determination of the atom positions of (reconstructed) surfaces with outstanding accuracy. The main advantages of positron annihilation induced Auger-electron spectroscopy (PAES) are the missing secondary electron background in the energy region of Auger-transitions and its topmost layer sensitivity for elemental analysis. In order to enable the investigation of the electron polarization at surfaces low-energy spin-polarized positrons are used to probe the outermost electrons of the surface. Furthermore, in fundamental research the preparation of well defined surfaces tailored for the production of bound leptonic systems plays an outstanding role. In this report, it is envisaged to cover both the fundamental aspects of positron surface interaction and the present status of surface studies using modern positron beam techniques.

  13. Positrons for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Ecklund, S.

    1987-11-01

    The requirements of a positron source for a linear collider are briefly reviewed, followed by methods of positron production and production of photons by electromagnetic cascade showers. Cross sections for the electromagnetic cascade shower processes of positron-electron pair production and Compton scattering are compared. A program used for Monte Carlo analysis of electromagnetic cascades is briefly discussed, and positron distributions obtained from several runs of the program are discussed. Photons from synchrotron radiation and from channeling are also mentioned briefly, as well as positron collection, transverse focusing techniques, and longitudinal capture. Computer ray tracing is then briefly discussed, followed by space-charge effects and thermal heating and stress due to showers. (LEW)

  14. Positron diffusion in Si

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, B.; Lynn, K.G.; Vehanen, A.; Schultz, P.J.

    1985-06-01

    Positron diffusion in Si(100) and Si(111) has been studied using a variable energy positron beam. The positron diffusion coefficient is found to be D/sub +/ = 2.7 +- 0.3 cm/sup 2//sec using a Makhov-type positron implantation profile, which is demonstrated to fit the data more reliably than the more commonly applied exponential profile. The diffusion related parameter, E/sub 0/, which results from the exponential profile, is found to be 4.2 +- 0.2 keV, significantly longer than previously reported values. A drastic reduction in E/sub 0/ is found after annealing the sample at 1300 K, showing that previously reported low values of E/sub 0/ are probably associated with the thermal history of the sample.

  15. A Generator-Produced Gallium-68 Radiopharmaceutical for PET Imaging of Myocardial Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vijay; Sivapackiam, Jothilingam; Harpstrite, Scott E.; Prior, Julie L.; Gu, Hannah; Rath, Nigam P.; Piwnica-Worms, David

    2014-01-01

    Lipophilic cationic technetium-99m-complexes are widely used for myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). However, inherent uncertainties in the supply chain of molybdenum-99, the parent isotope required for manufacturing 99Mo/99mTc generators, intensifies the need for discovery of novel MPI agents incorporating alternative radionuclides. Recently, germanium/gallium (Ge/Ga) generators capable of producing high quality 68Ga, an isotope with excellent emission characteristics for clinical PET imaging, have emerged. Herein, we report a novel 68Ga-complex identified through mechanism-based cell screening that holds promise as a generator-produced radiopharmaceutical for PET MPI. PMID:25353349

  16. A generator-produced gallium-68 radiopharmaceutical for PET imaging of myocardial perfusion.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vijay; Sivapackiam, Jothilingam; Harpstrite, Scott E; Prior, Julie L; Gu, Hannah; Rath, Nigam P; Piwnica-Worms, David

    2014-01-01

    Lipophilic cationic technetium-99m-complexes are widely used for myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). However, inherent uncertainties in the supply chain of molybdenum-99, the parent isotope required for manufacturing 99Mo/99mTc generators, intensifies the need for discovery of novel MPI agents incorporating alternative radionuclides. Recently, germanium/gallium (Ge/Ga) generators capable of producing high quality 68Ga, an isotope with excellent emission characteristics for clinical PET imaging, have emerged. Herein, we report a novel 68Ga-complex identified through mechanism-based cell screening that holds promise as a generator-produced radiopharmaceutical for PET MPI.

  17. Alternative positron-target design for electron-positron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Donahue, R.J. ); Nelson, W.R. )

    1991-04-01

    Current electron-positron linear colliders are limited in luminosity by the number of positrons which can be generated from targets presently used. This paper examines the possibility of using an alternate wire-target geometry for the production of positrons via an electron-induced electromagnetic cascade shower. 39 refs., 38 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Positron sources for Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Gai Wei; Liu Wanming

    2009-09-02

    Positron beams have many applications and there are many different concepts for positron sources. In this paper, only positron source techniques for linear colliders are covered. In order to achieve high luminosity, a linear collider positron source should have a high beam current, high beam energy, small emittance and, for some applications, a high degree of beam polarization. There are several different schemes presently being developed around the globe. Both the differences between these schemes and their common technical challenges are discussed.

  19. Positron excitation of neon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parcell, L. A.; Mceachran, R. P.; Stauffer, A. D.

    1990-01-01

    The differential and total cross section for the excitation of the 3s1P10 and 3p1P1 states of neon by positron impact were calculated using a distorted-wave approximation. The results agree well with experimental conclusions.

  20. Positron implantation in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, V.J.; Lynn, K.G.; Welch, D.O.

    1993-12-31

    The Monte Carlo technique for modeling positron prior to annihilation and electron implantation in semi-infinite metals is described. Particle implantation is modelled as a multistep process, a series of collisions with the atoms of the host material. In elastic collisions with neutral atoms there is no transfer of energy. The particle loses energy by several different channels, excitation of the electron gas, ionization of the ion cores, or, at low energies, by phonon excitation. These competing scattering mechanisms have been incorporated into the Monte Carlo framework and several different models are being used. Brief descriptions of these Monte Carlo schemes, as well as an analytic model for positron implantation are included. Results of the Monte Carlo simulations are presented and compared with expermental data. Problems associated with modeling positron implantation are discuss and the need for more expermental data on energy-loss in different materials is stressed. Positron implantation in multilayers of different metals is briefly described and extensions of this work to include a study of multilayers and heterostructures is suggested.

  1. The Japanese Positron Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, S.; Sunaga, H.; Kaneko, H.; Takizawa, H.; Kawasuso, A.; Yotsumoto, K.; Tanaka, R.

    1999-06-01

    The Positron Factory has been planned at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). The factory is expected to produce linac-based monoenergetic positron beams having world-highest intensities of more than 1010e+/sec, which will be applied for R&D of materials science, biotechnology and basic physics & chemistry. In this article, results of the design studies are demonstrated for the following essential components of the facilities: 1) Conceptual design of a high-power electron linac with 100 MeV in beam energy and 100 kW in averaged beam power, 2) Performance tests of the RF window in the high-power klystron and of the electron beam window, 3) Development of a self-driven rotating electron-to-positron converter and the performance tests, 4) Proposal of multi-channel beam generation system for monoenergetic positrons, with a series of moderator assemblies based on a newly developed Monte Carlo simulation and the demonstrative experiment, 5) Proposal of highly efficient moderator structures, 6) Conceptual design of a local shield to suppress the surrounding radiation and activation levels.

  2. Cardiac positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Geltman, E.M.

    1985-12-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a new technique for noninvasively assessing myocardial metabolism and perfusion. It has provided new insight into the dynamics of myocardial fatty acid and glucose metabolism in normal subjects, patients with ischemic heart disease and those with cardiomyopathies, documenting regionally depressed fatty acid metabolism during myocardial ischemia and infarction and spatial heterogeneity of fatty acid metabolism in patients with cardiomyopathy. Regional myocardial perfusion has been studied with PET using water, ammonia and rubidium labeled with positron emitters, permitting the noninvasive detection of hypoperfused zones at rest and during vasodilator stress. With these techniques the relationship between perfusion and the metabolism of a variety of substrates has been studied. The great strides that have been made in developing faster high-resolution instruments and producing new labeled intermediates indicate the promise of this technique for facilitating an increase in the understanding of regional metabolism and blood flow under normal and pathophysiologic conditions. 16 references, 9 figures, 2 tables.

  3. Generation of monoenergetic positrons

    SciTech Connect

    Hulett, L.D. Jr.; Dale, J.M.; Miller, P.D. Jr.; Moak, C.D.; Pendyala, S.; Triftshaeuser, W.; Howell, R.H.; Alvarez, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    Many experiments have been performed in the generation and application of monoenergetic positron beams using annealed tungsten moderators and fast sources of /sup 58/Co, /sup 22/Na, /sup 11/C, and LINAC bremstrahlung. This paper will compare the degrees of success from our various approaches. Moderators made from both single crystal and polycrystal tungsten have been tried. Efforts to grow thin films of tungsten to be used as transmission moderators and brightness enhancement devices are in progress.

  4. Generator produced I-122 labeled amines and diamines for brain blood flow measurements in neurologic disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Mathis, C.A.; Budinger, T.F.; Sargent, T. III; Shulgin, A.T.; Kung, H.F.

    1985-05-01

    In response to a need for an extracted brain blood flow tracer for positron tomograhy, the authors have developed from our original iodoamphetamine an I-122 radiopharmaceutical produced from a 20h Xe-122 generator and have demonstrated its application in animals and humans. The I-122 (t1/2 3.6m) is collected in the reaction vessel by a 10 min ingrowth from the Xe-122. The radiopharmaceutical, 2,4-dimethoxy-N,N-dimethyl-5(I-122)iodophenylisorpropylamine (5-(I-122)-2,4-DNNA), is synthesized using I-122 and chloramine-T, purified and sterilized for injection in 3 min. Synthesis can be repeated every 20-30 min. The diamine HIPDM was also labeled with I-122 by an exchange reaction for comparison. Using the Donner 280 crystal tomography system, anesthetized dogs showed rapid uptake of the activity in the brain using 5-(I-122)-2,4-DNNA and I-122 HIPDM. The ratio of activity in the brain to surrounding tissue was 6.1 and the distribution was the same as that from 18-FDG injected 30 min later.

  5. Positron lifetime spectrometer using a DC positron beam

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Jun; Moxom, Jeremy

    2003-10-21

    An entrance grid is positioned in the incident beam path of a DC beam positron lifetime spectrometer. The electrical potential difference between the sample and the entrance grid provides simultaneous acceleration of both the primary positrons and the secondary electrons. The result is a reduction in the time spread induced by the energy distribution of the secondary electrons. In addition, the sample, sample holder, entrance grid, and entrance face of the multichannel plate electron detector assembly are made parallel to each other, and are arranged at a tilt angle to the axis of the positron beam to effectively separate the path of the secondary electrons from the path of the incident positrons.

  6. Laser Created Relativistic Positron Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Wilks, S C; Meyerhofer, D D; Bonlie, J; Chen, C D; Chen, S N; Courtois, C; Elberson, L; Gregori, G; Kruer, W; Landoas, O; Mithen, J; Murphy, C; Nilson, P; Price, D; Scheider, M; Shepherd, R; Stoeckl, C; Tabak, M; Tommasini, R; Beiersdorder, P

    2009-10-08

    Electron-positron jets with MeV temperature are thought to be present in a wide variety of astrophysical phenomena such as active galaxies, quasars, gamma ray bursts and black holes. They have now been created in the laboratory in a controlled fashion by irradiating a gold target with an intense picosecond duration laser pulse. About 10{sup 11} MeV positrons are emitted from the rear surface of the target in a 15 to 22-degree cone for a duration comparable to the laser pulse. These positron jets are quasi-monoenergetic (E/{delta}E {approx} 5) with peak energies controllable from 3-19 MeV. They have temperatures from 1-4 MeV in the beam frame in both the longitudinal and transverse directions. Positron production has been studied extensively in recent decades at low energies (sub-MeV) in areas related to surface science, positron emission tomography, basic antimatter science such as antihydrogen experiments, Bose-Einstein condensed positronium, and basic plasma physics. However, the experimental tools to produce very high temperature positrons and high-flux positron jets needed to simulate astrophysical positron conditions have so far been absent. The MeV temperature jets of positrons and electrons produced in our experiments offer a first step to evaluate the physics models used to explain some of the most energetic phenomena in the universe.

  7. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET. 22 figs.

  8. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Welch, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET.

  9. Quantum positron acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Metref, Hassina; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2014-12-15

    Nonlinear quantum positron-acoustic (QPA) waves are investigated for the first time, within the theoretical framework of the quantum hydrodynamic model. In the small but finite amplitude limit, both deformed Korteweg-de Vries and generalized Korteweg-de Vries equations governing, respectively, the dynamics of QPA solitary waves and double-layers are derived. Moreover, a full finite amplitude analysis is undertaken, and a numerical integration of the obtained highly nonlinear equations is carried out. The results complement our previously published results on this problem.

  10. Portable Positron Measurement System (PPMS)

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    Portable Positron Measurement System (PPMS) is an automated, non-destructive inspection system based on positron annihilation, which characterizes a material's in situatomic-level properties during the manufacturing processes of formation, solidification, and heat treatment. Simultaneous manufacturing and quality monitoring now are possible. Learn more about the lab's project on our facebook site http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  11. Cyclotrons and positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, A.P.; Fowler, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    The state of the art of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) technology as related to cyclotron use and radiopharmaceutical production is reviewed. The paper discusses available small cyclotrons, the positron emitters which can be produced and the yields possible, target design, and radiopharmaceutical development and application. 97 refs., 12 tabs. (ACR)

  12. Portable Positron Measurement System (PPMS)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Portable Positron Measurement System (PPMS) is an automated, non-destructive inspection system based on positron annihilation, which characterizes a material's in situatomic-level properties during the manufacturing processes of formation, solidification, and heat treatment. Simultaneous manufacturing and quality monitoring now are possible. Learn more about the lab's project on our facebook site http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  13. Undulator Production of Polarized Positrons

    SciTech Connect

    William M. Bugg

    2008-08-27

    E-166 at SLAC has demonstrated the feasibilty of production of polarized positrons for the International Linear Collider using a helical undulator to produce polarized photons which are converted in a thin target to polarized positrons. The success of the experim ent has resulted in the choice of this technique for the baseline design of ILC.

  14. Radiolabeling of DOTA-like conjugated peptides with generator-produced 68Ga and using NaCl-based cationic elution method

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Dirk; Breeman, Wouter A P; Klette, Ingo; Gottschaldt, Michael; Odparlik, Andreas; Baehre, Manfred; Tworowska, Izabela; Schultz, Michael K

    2017-01-01

    Gallium-68 (68Ga) is a generator-produced radionuclide with a short half-life (t½ = 68 min) that is particularly well suited for molecular imaging by positron emission tomography (PET). Methods have been developed to synthesize 68Ga-labeled imaging agents possessing certain drawbacks, such as longer synthesis time because of a required final purification step, the use of organic solvents or concentrated hydrochloric acid (HCl). In our manuscript, we provide a detailed protocol for the use of an advantageous sodium chloride (NaCl)-based method for radiolabeling of chelator-modified peptides for molecular imaging. By working in a lead-shielded hot-cell system, 68Ga3+ of the generator eluate is trapped on a cation exchanger cartridge (100 mg, ∼8 mm long and 5 mm diameter) and then eluted with acidified 5 M NaCl solution directly into a sodium acetate-buffered solution containing a DOTA (1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid) or DOTA-like chelator-modified peptide. The main advantages of this procedure are the high efficiency and the absence of organic solvents. It can be applied to a variety of peptides, which are stable in 1 M NaCl solution at a pH value of 3–4 during reaction. After labeling, neutralization, sterile filtration and quality control (instant thin-layer chromatography (iTLC), HPLC and pH), the radiopharmaceutical can be directly administered to patients, without determination of organic solvents, which reduces the overall synthesis-to-release time. This procedure has been adapted easily to automated synthesis modules, which leads to a rapid preparation of 68Ga radiopharmaceuticals (12–16 min). PMID:27172166

  15. Radiolabeling of DOTA-like conjugated peptides with generator-produced (68)Ga and using NaCl-based cationic elution method.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Dirk; Breeman, Wouter A P; Klette, Ingo; Gottschaldt, Michael; Odparlik, Andreas; Baehre, Manfred; Tworowska, Izabela; Schultz, Michael K

    2016-06-01

    Gallium-68 ((68)Ga) is a generator-produced radionuclide with a short half-life (t½ = 68 min) that is particularly well suited for molecular imaging by positron emission tomography (PET). Methods have been developed to synthesize (68)Ga-labeled imaging agents possessing certain drawbacks, such as longer synthesis time because of a required final purification step, the use of organic solvents or concentrated hydrochloric acid (HCl). In our manuscript, we provide a detailed protocol for the use of an advantageous sodium chloride (NaCl)-based method for radiolabeling of chelator-modified peptides for molecular imaging. By working in a lead-shielded hot-cell system,(68)Ga(3+) of the generator eluate is trapped on a cation exchanger cartridge (100 mg, ∼8 mm long and 5 mm diameter) and then eluted with acidified 5 M NaCl solution directly into a sodium acetate-buffered solution containing a DOTA (1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid) or DOTA-like chelator-modified peptide. The main advantages of this procedure are the high efficiency and the absence of organic solvents. It can be applied to a variety of peptides, which are stable in 1 M NaCl solution at a pH value of 3-4 during reaction. After labeling, neutralization, sterile filtration and quality control (instant thin-layer chromatography (iTLC), HPLC and pH), the radiopharmaceutical can be directly administered to patients, without determination of organic solvents, which reduces the overall synthesis-to-release time. This procedure has been adapted easily to automated synthesis modules, which leads to a rapid preparation of (68)Ga radiopharmaceuticals (12-16 min).

  16. Dependency of cardiac rubidium-82 imaging quantitative measures on age, gender, vascular territory, and software in a cardiovascular normal population.

    PubMed

    Sunderland, John J; Pan, Xiao-Bo; Declerck, Jerome; Menda, Yusuf

    2015-02-01

    Recent technological improvements to PET imaging equipment combined with the availability of software optimized to calculate regional myocardial blood flow (MBF) and myocardial flow reserve (MFR) create a paradigm shifting opportunity to provide new clinically relevant quantitative information to cardiologists. However, clinical interpretation of the MBF and MFR is entirely dependent upon knowledge of MBF and MFR values in normal populations and subpopulations. This work reports Rb-82-based MBF and MFR measurements for a series of 49 verified cardiovascularly normal subjects as a preliminary baseline for future clinical studies. Forty-nine subjects (24F/25M, ages 41-69) with low probability for coronary artery disease and with normal exercise stress test were included. These subjects underwent rest/dipyridamole stress Rb-82 myocardial perfusion imaging using standard clinical techniques (40 mCi injection, 6-minute acquisition) using a Siemens Biograph 40 PET/CT scanner with high count rate detector option. List mode data was rehistogrammed into 26 dynamic frames (12 × 5 seconds, 6 × 10 seconds, 4 × 20 seconds, 4 × 40 seconds). Cardiac images were processed, and MBF and MFR calculated using Siemens syngo MBF, PMOD, and FlowQuant software using a single compartment Rb-82 model. Global myocardial blood flow under pharmacological stress for the 24 females as measured by PMOD, syngo MBF, and FlowQuant were 3.10 ± 0.72, 2.80 ± 0.66, and 2.60 ± 0.63 mL·minute(-1)·g(-1), and for the 25 males was 2.60 ± 0.84, 2.33 ± 0.75, 2.15 ± 0.62 mL·minute(-1)·g(-1), respectively. Rest flows for PMOD, syngo MBF, and FlowQuant averaged 1.32 ± 0.42, 1.20 ± 0.33, and 1.06 ± 0.38 mL·minute(-1)·g(-1) for the female subjects, and 1.12 ± 0.29, 0.90 ± 0.26, and 0.85 ± 0.24 mL·minute(-1)·g(-1) for the males. Myocardial flow reserves for PMOD, syngo MBF, and FlowQuant for the female normals were calculated to be 2.50 ± 0.80, 2.53 ± 0.67, 2.71 ± 0.90, and 2.50 ± 1.19, 2.85 ± 1.19, 2.94 ± 1.31 mL·minute(-1)·g(-1) for males. Quantitative normal MBF and MFR values averaged for age and sex have been compiled for three commercial pharmacokinetic software packages. The current collection of data consisting of 49 subjects resulted in several statistically significant conclusions that support the need for a software specific, age, and sex-matched database to aid in interpretation of quantitative clinical myocardial perfusion studies.

  17. Positron emission mammography imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, William W.

    2003-10-02

    This paper examines current trends in Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) instrumentation and the performance tradeoffs inherent in them. The most common geometry is a pair of parallel planes of detector modules. They subtend a larger solid angle around the breast than conventional PET cameras, and so have both higher efficiency and lower cost. Extensions to this geometry include encircling the breast, measuring the depth of interaction (DOI), and dual-modality imaging (PEM and x-ray mammography, as well as PEM and x-ray guided biopsy). The ultimate utility of PEM may not be decided by instrument performance, but by biological and medical factors, such as the patient to patient variation in radiotracer uptake or the as yet undetermined role of PEM in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  18. Intense source of slow positrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, P.; Rosowsky, A.

    2004-10-01

    We describe a novel design for an intense source of slow positrons based on pair production with a beam of electrons from a 10 MeV accelerator hitting a thin target at a low incidence angle. The positrons are collected with a set of coils adapted to the large production angle. The collection system is designed to inject the positrons into a Greaves-Surko trap (Phys. Rev. A 46 (1992) 5696). Such a source could be the basis for a series of experiments in fundamental and applied research and would also be a prototype source for industrial applications, which concern the field of defect characterization in the nanometer scale.

  19. Cosmic Ray Positrons from Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2010-01-01

    Pulsars are potential Galactic sources of positrons through pair cascades in their magnetospheres. There are, however, many uncertainties in establishing their contribution to the local primary positron flux. Among these are the local density of pulsars, the cascade pair multiplicities that determine the injection rate of positrons from the pulsar, the acceleration of the injected particles by the pulsar wind termination shock, their rate of escape from the pulsar wind nebula, and their propagation through the interstellar medium. I will discuss these issues in the context of what we are learning from the new Fermi pulsar detections and discoveries.

  20. Positron trapping at grain boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Dupasquier, A. ); Romero, R.; Somoza, A. )

    1993-10-01

    The standard positron trapping model has often been applied, as a simple approximation, to the interpretation of positron lifetime spectra in situations of diffusion-controlled trapping. This paper shows that this approximation is not sufficiently accurate, and presents a model based on the correct solution of the diffusion equation, in the version appropriate for studying positron trapping at grain boundaries. The model is used for the analysis of new experimental data on positron lifetime spectra in a fine-grained Al-Ca-Zn alloy. Previous results on similar systems are also discussed and reinterpreted. The analysis yields effective diffusion coefficients not far from the values known for the base metals of the alloys.

  1. High Power Polarized Positron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailichenko, Alexander

    2009-09-01

    We discuss the basics of polarized positron production by low energy polarized electrons. Efficiency of conversion ˜0.1-1% might be interesting for the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) and the International Linear Collider (ILC).

  2. Resolvability of positron decay channels

    SciTech Connect

    Fluss, M.J.; Howell, R.H.; Rosenberg, I.J.; Meyer, P.

    1985-03-07

    Many data analysis treatments of positron experiments attempt to resolve two or more positron decay or exist channels which may be open simultaneously. Examples of the need to employ such treatments of the experimental results can be found in the resolution of the constituents of a defect ensemble, or in the analysis of the complex spectra which arise from the interaction of slow positrons at or near the surfaces of solids. Experimental one- and two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation experiments in Al single crystals have shown that two defect species (mono- and divacancies) can be resolved under suitable conditions. Recent experiments at LLNL indicate that there are a variety of complex exit channels open to positrons interacting at surfaces, and ultimely these decay channels must also be suitably resolved from one another. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Modelling Positron Interactions with Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, G.; Petrovic, Z.; White, R.; Buckman, S.

    2011-05-01

    In this work we link fundamental measurements of positron interactions with biomolecules, with the development of computer codes for positron transport and track structure calculations. We model positron transport in a medium from a knowledge of the fundamental scattering cross section for the atoms and molecules comprising the medium, combined with a transport analysis based on statistical mechanics and Monte-Carlo techniques. The accurate knowledge of the scattering is most important at low energies, a few tens of electron volts or less. The ultimate goal of this work is to do this in soft condensed matter, with a view to ultimately developing a dosimetry model for Positron Emission Tomography (PET). The high-energy positrons first emitted by a radionuclide in PET may well be described by standard formulas for energy loss of charged particles in matter, but it is incorrect to extrapolate these formulas to low energies. Likewise, using electron cross-sections to model positron transport at these low energies has been shown to be in serious error due to the effects of positronium formation. Work was supported by the Australian Research Council, the Serbian Government, and the Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación, Spain.

  4. Method for photon activation positron annihilation analysis

    DOEpatents

    Akers, Douglas W.

    2006-06-06

    A non-destructive testing method comprises providing a specimen having at least one positron emitter therein; determining a threshold energy for activating the positron emitter; and determining whether a half-life of the positron emitter is less than a selected half-life. If the half-life of the positron emitter is greater than or equal to the selected half-life, then activating the positron emitter by bombarding the specimen with photons having energies greater than the threshold energy and detecting gamma rays produced by annihilation of positrons in the specimen. If the half-life of the positron emitter is less then the selected half-life, then alternately activating the positron emitter by bombarding the specimen with photons having energies greater then the threshold energy and detecting gamma rays produced by positron annihilation within the specimen.

  5. [Tau Positron Emission Tomography].

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Makoto

    2017-07-01

    Accumulation of fibrillar tau protein aggregates is a neuropathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related neurodegenerative dementias, including a subgroup of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Visualization of tau lesions in the brains of living subjects enables a pathology-based diagnosis of dementing illnesses in the prodromal stage, and offers objective measures of disease progression and outcomes of disease-modifying therapies. With this rationale, diverse classes of low-molecular-weight chemicals capable of binding to a β-pleated sheet structure have been developed to be used for in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) of tau pathologies. Clinical PET studies of AD patients with such tau probes have provided the following insights: (1) Tau fibrils accumulate in the hippocampal formation in an age-dependent manner that is independent of amyloid-beta peptide (Aβ) pathology; (2) The deposition of Aβ may trigger a spatial expansion of tau pathology, in transition from normal aging to advanced AD; and (3) Tau accumulation is intimately associated with local neuronal loss, leading to cortical atrophy and focal symptoms. In contrast, studies of FTLD have shown a limited performance of first-generation PET probes in capturing non-AD-type tau lesions. New compounds have accordingly been developed and clinically tested, proving to yield a high contrast for tau deposits with high specificity. These second-generation probes are being evaluated primarily by pharmaceutical companies, in line with their growing demands for neuroimaging-based biomarkers serving for clinical trials of anti-Aβ and anti-tau therapies. Meanwhile, a consortium flexibly linking academia and industry to facilitate the utilization of research tools, including tau PET probes, has been established in Japan, for the ultimate purpose of elucidating the molecular etiology of tauopathies and creating diagnostic and therapeutic agents based on such an understanding.

  6. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.

    1987-05-22

    This invention involved a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide in activators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography. 2 figs.

  7. Positron-alkali atom scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mceachran, R. P.; Horbatsch, M.; Stauffer, A. D.; Ward, S. J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron-alkali atom scattering was recently investigated both theoretically and experimentally in the energy range from a few eV up to 100 eV. On the theoretical side calculations of the integrated elastic and excitation cross sections as well as total cross sections for Li, Na and K were based upon either the close-coupling method or the modified Glauber approximation. These theoretical results are in good agreement with experimental measurements of the total cross section for both Na and K. Resonance structures were also found in the L = 0, 1 and 2 partial waves for positron scattering from the alkalis. The structure of these resonances appears to be quite complex and, as expected, they occur in conjunction with the atomic excitation thresholds. Currently both theoretical and experimental work is in progress on positron-Rb scattering in the same energy range.

  8. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, Joanna S.; MacGregor, Robert R.; Wolf, Alfred P.; Langstrom, Bengt

    1990-01-01

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  9. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.; Langstrom, B.

    1990-04-03

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  10. Positron spectroscopy for materials characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, P.J.; Snead, C.L. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    One of the more active areas of research on materials involves the observation and characterization of defects. The discovery of positron localization in vacancy-type defects in solids in the 1960's initiated a vast number of experimental and theoretical investigations which continue to this day. Traditional positron annihilation spectroscopic techniques, including lifetime studies, angular correlation, and Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation, are still being applied to new problems in the bulk properties of simple metals and their alloys. In addition new techniques based on tunable sources of monoenergetic positron beams have, in the last 5 years, expanded the horizons to studies of surfaces, thin films, and interfaces. In the present paper we briefly review these experimental techniques, illustrating with some of the important accomplishments of the field. 40 refs., 19 figs.

  11. Positron scattering from simple molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Suvam; Dutta, Sangita; Naghma, Rahla; Antony, Bobby

    2017-07-01

    A modified version of spherical complex optical potential formalism is employed to calculate the positron scattering cross sections over a wide energy range from near positronium formation threshold to 5000 eV. In the present study, the interaction potential of the positron-target scattering system is developed under an optical potential framework for the calculation of positron scattering total cross sections for CH4, CO, CO2, H2, N2O and NO molecules. The results obtained are in good agreement with most of the available experimental and theoretical values in terms of its shape and magnitude. A characteristic increase in cross section is observed for all the molecules near the positronium formation threshold, which signifies the emergence of positronium formation along with other inelastic channels.

  12. Positron Emission Tomography - Computed Tomography (PET/CT)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index A-Z Positron Emission Tomography - Computed Tomography (PET/CT) Positron emission tomography (PET) uses small amounts of ... CT)? What is Positron Emission Tomography – Computed Tomography (PET/CT) Scanning? Positron emission tomography, also called PET imaging ...

  13. Particle physics. Positrons ride the wave

    DOE PAGES

    Piot, Philippe

    2015-08-26

    Here, experiments reveal that positrons — the antimatter equivalents of electrons — can be rapidly accelerated using a plasma wave. The findings pave the way to high-energy electron–positron particle colliders.

  14. Particle physics. Positrons ride the wave

    SciTech Connect

    Piot, Philippe

    2015-08-26

    Here, experiments reveal that positrons — the antimatter equivalents of electrons — can be rapidly accelerated using a plasma wave. The findings pave the way to high-energy electron–positron particle colliders.

  15. Study on low-energy positron polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schälicke, A.; Alexander, G.; Dollan, R.; Laihem, K.; Lohse, T.; Riemann, S.; Starovoitov, P.; Ushakov, A.

    2007-12-01

    A polarised positron source has been proposed for the design of the international linear collider (ILC). In order to optimise the positron beam, a measurement of its degree of polarisation close to the positron creation point is desired. In this contribution, methods for determining the positron polarisation at low energies are reviewed. A newly developed polarisation extension to GEANT4 will provide the basis for further polarimeter investigations.

  16. Studies of positron induced luminescence from polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, J.; Hulett, L.D. Jr.; Lewis, T.A.; Tolk, N.H.

    1994-06-01

    Light emission from polymers (anthracene dissolved in polystryrene) induced by low-energy positrons and electrons has been studied. Results indicate a clear difference between optical emissions under positron and electron bombardment. The positron-induced luminescence spectrum is believed to be generated by both collisional and annihilation processes.

  17. Positron-acoustic shock waves associated with cold viscous positron fluid in superthermal electron-positron-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Uddin, M. J. Alam, M. S.; Mamun, A. A.

    2015-06-15

    A theoretical investigation is made on the positron-acoustic (PA) shock waves (SHWs) in an unmagnetized electron-positron-ion plasma containing immobile positive ions, cold mobile positrons, and hot positrons and electrons following the kappa (κ) distribution. The cold positron kinematic viscosity is taken into account, and the reductive perturbation method is used to derive the Burgers equation. It is found that the viscous force acting on cold mobile positron fluid is a source of dissipation and is responsible for the formation of the PA SHWs. It is also observed that the fundamental properties of the PA SHWs are significantly modified by the effects of different parameters associated with superthermal (κ distributed) hot positrons and electrons.

  18. Heat Deposition in Positron Sources for ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Bharadwaj, V.; Pitthan, R.; Sheppard, J.; Vincke, H.; Wang, J.W.; /SLAC

    2006-03-15

    In the International Linear Collider (ILC) positron source, multi-GeV electrons or multi-MeV photons impinge on a metal target to produce the needed positrons in the resulting electromagnetic showers. The incoming beam power is hundreds of kilowatts. Various computer programs -- such as FLUKA or MARS -- can calculate how the incoming beam showers in the target and can track the particle showers through the positron source system. Most of the incoming energy ends up as heat in the various positron source elements. This paper presents results from such calculations and their impact on the design of a positron source for the ILC.

  19. Positron microanalysis with high intensity beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hulett, L.D. Jr.; Donohue, D.L.

    1990-01-01

    One of the more common applications for a high intensity slow positron facility will be microanalysis of solid materials. In the first section of this paper some examples are given of procedures that can be developed. Since most of the attendees of this workshop are experts in positron spectroscopy, comprehensive descriptions will be omitted. With the exception of positron emission microscopy, most of the procedures will be based on those already in common use with broad beams. The utility of the methods have all been demonstrated, but material scientists use very few of them because positron microbeams are not generally available. A high intensity positron facility will make microbeams easier to obtain and partially alleviate this situation. All microanalysis techniques listed below will have a common requirement, which is the ability to locate the microscopic detail or area of interest and to focus the positron beam exclusively on it. The last section of this paper is a suggestion of how a high intensity positron facility might be designed so as to have this capability built in. The method will involve locating the specimen by scanning it with the microbeam of positrons and inducing a secondary electron image that will immediately reveal whether or not the positron beam is striking the proper portion of the specimen. This scanning positron microscope' will be a somewhat prosaic analog of the conventional SEM. It will, however, be an indispensable utility that will enhance the practicality of positron microanalysis techniques. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  20. High intensity positron program at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Asoka-Kumar, P.; Howell, R.H.; Stoeffl, W.

    1998-09-23

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is the home of the world's highest current beam of keV positrons. The potential for establishing a national center for materials analysis using positron annihilation techniques around this capability is being actively pursued. The high LLNL beam current will enable investigations in several new areas. We are developing a positron microprobe that will produce a pulsed, focused positron beam for 3-dimensional scans of defect size and concentration with submicron resolution. Below we summarize the important design features of this microprobe. Several experimental end stations will be available that can utilize the high current beam with a time distribution determined by the electron linac pulse structure, quasi-continuous, or bunched at 20 MHz, and can operate in an electrostatic or (and) magnetostatic environment. Some of the planned early experiments are: two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation of thin films and buried interfaces, positron diffraction holography, positron induced desorption, and positron induced Auger spectra.

  1. Slow positron beam generator for lifetime studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J. (Inventor); Eftekhari, Abe (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A slow positron beam generator uses a conductive source residing between two test films. Moderator pieces are placed next to the test film on the opposite side of the conductive source. A voltage potential is applied between the moderator pieces and the conductive source. Incident energetic positrons: (1) are emitted from the conductive source; (2) are passed through test film; and (3) isotropically strike moderator pieces before diffusing out of the moderator pieces as slow positrons, respectively. The slow positrons diffusing out of moderator pieces are attracted to the conductive source which is held at an appropriate potential below the moderator pieces. The slow positrons have to pass through the test films before reaching the conductive source. A voltage is adjusted so that the potential difference between the moderator pieces and the conductive source forces the positrons to stop in the test films. Measurable annihilation radiation is emitted from the test film when positrons annihilate (combine) with electrons in the test film.

  2. Spin polarized low-energy positron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, V. N.; Samarin, S. N.; Sudarshan, K.; Pravica, L.; Guagliardo, P.; Williams, J. F.

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents an investigation of spin polarization of positrons from a source based on the decay of 22Na isotopes. Positrons are moderated by transmission through a tungsten film and electrostatically focussed and transported through a 90 deg deflector to produce a slow positron beam with polarization vector normal to the linear momentum. The polarization of the beam was determined to be about 10% by comparison with polarized electron scattering asymmetries from a thin Fe film on W(110) at 10-10 Torr. Low energy electron emission from Fe layer on W(100) surfaces under positron impact is explored. It is shown that the intensity asymmetry of the electron emission as a function of the incident positron energy can be used to estimate the polarization of the positron beam. Also several materials with long mean free paths for spin relaxation are considered as possible moderators with increased polarization of the emergent positrons.

  3. Design of the NLC positron source

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, H.; Emma, P.; Gross, G.; Kulikov, A.; Li, Z.; Miller, R.; Rinolfi, L.; Turner, J.; Yeremian, D.

    1996-08-01

    The design of the positron source for the Next Linear Collider (NLC) is presented. The key features of this design include accelerating positrons at an L-band frequency (1428 MHz) and using a rotating positron target with multi-stage differential pumping. Positron yield simulations show that the L-band design yields at the source 2.5 times the beam intensity required at the interaction point and is easily upgrade to higher intensities required for the 1 TeV NLC upgrade. Multi-bunch beam loading compensation schemes in the positron capture and booster accelerators and the optics design of the positron booster accelerator are described. For improved source efficiency, the design boasts two parallel positron vaults adequately shielded from each other such that one serves as an on-line spare.

  4. Capture and polarization of positrons in a proposed NLC polarized positron source

    SciTech Connect

    Batygin, Yuri K

    2003-05-28

    A proposed NLC polarized positron source utilizes a 150 GeV electron beam passing through a helical undulator. The resulting flux of polarized photons is converted in a thin positron production target. Spin polarized positrons are captured using a high field flux concentrator followed by an accelerator section immersed in a solenoidal field. Positron tracking through the accelerating and focusing systems is done together with integration of spin precession. Optimization of the collection system is performed to insure high positron yield into the 6-dimensional acceptance of the subsequent pre-damping ring while keeping the high value of positron beam polarization.

  5. Positron confinement in embedded lithium nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Huis, M. A.; van Veen, A.; Schut, H.; Falub, C. V.; Eijt, S. W.; Mijnarends, P. E.; Kuriplach, J.

    2002-02-01

    Quantum confinement of positrons in nanoclusters offers the opportunity to obtain detailed information on the electronic structure of nanoclusters by application of positron annihilation spectroscopy techniques. In this work, positron confinement is investigated in lithium nanoclusters embedded in monocrystalline MgO. These nanoclusters were created by means of ion implantation and subsequent annealing. It was found from the results of Doppler broadening positron beam analysis that approximately 92% of the implanted positrons annihilate in lithium nanoclusters rather than in the embedding MgO, while the local fraction of lithium at the implantation depth is only 1.3 at. %. The results of two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation confirm the presence of crystalline bulk lithium. The confinement of positrons is ascribed to the difference in positron affinity between lithium and MgO. The nanocluster acts as a potential well for positrons, where the depth of the potential well is equal to the difference in the positron affinities of lithium and MgO. These affinities were calculated using the linear muffin-tin orbital atomic sphere approximation method. This yields a positronic potential step at the MgO||Li interface of 1.8 eV using the generalized gradient approximation and 2.8 eV using the insulator model.

  6. Nonplanar positron-acoustic Gardner solitary waves in electron-positron-ion plasmas with superthermal electrons and positrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, M. J.; Alam, M. S.; Mamun, A. A.

    2015-02-01

    Nonplanar (cylindrical and spherical) positron-acoustic (PA) Gardner solitary waves (SWs) in an unmagnetized plasma system consisting of immobile positive ions, mobile cold positrons, and superthermal (kappa distributed) hot positrons and electrons are investigated. The modified Gardner equation is derived by using the reductive perturbation technique. The effects of cylindrical and spherical geometries, superthermal parameter of hot positrons and electrons, relative temperature ratios, and relative number density ratios on the PA Gardner SWs are studied by using the numerical simulations. The implications of our results in various space and laboratory plasma environments are briefly discussed.

  7. Nonplanar positron-acoustic Gardner solitary waves in electron-positron-ion plasmas with superthermal electrons and positrons

    SciTech Connect

    Uddin, M. J. Alam, M. S.; Mamun, A. A.

    2015-02-15

    Nonplanar (cylindrical and spherical) positron-acoustic (PA) Gardner solitary waves (SWs) in an unmagnetized plasma system consisting of immobile positive ions, mobile cold positrons, and superthermal (kappa distributed) hot positrons and electrons are investigated. The modified Gardner equation is derived by using the reductive perturbation technique. The effects of cylindrical and spherical geometries, superthermal parameter of hot positrons and electrons, relative temperature ratios, and relative number density ratios on the PA Gardner SWs are studied by using the numerical simulations. The implications of our results in various space and laboratory plasma environments are briefly discussed.

  8. Positron annihilation induced Auger electron spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, Alex; Koymen, A. R.; Mehl, David; Jensen, K. O.; Lei, Chun; Lee, K. H.

    1990-01-01

    Recently, Weiss et al. have demonstrated that it is possible to excite Auger transitions by annihilating core electrons using a low energy (less than 30eV) beam of positrons. This mechanism makes possible a new electron spectroscopy, Positron annihilation induced Auger Electron Spectroscopy (PAES). The probability of exciting an Auger transition is proportional to the overlap of the positron wavefunction with atomic core levels. Since the Auger electron energy provides a signature of the atomic species making the transition, PAES makes it possible to determine the overlap of the positron wavefunction with a particular element. PAES may therefore provide a means of detecting positron-atom complexes. Measurements of PAES intensities from clean and adsorbate covered Cu surfaces are presented which indicate that approx. 5 percent of positrons injected into CU at 25eV produce core annihilations that result in Auger transitions.

  9. Recent Advances in Electron and Positron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Clendenin, James E

    2000-07-20

    Recent advances in electron and positron sources have resulted in new capabilities driven in most cases by the increasing demands of advanced accelerating systems. Electron sources for brighter beams and for high average-current beams are described. The status and remaining challenges for polarized electron beams are also discussed. For positron sources, recent activity in the development of polarized positron beams for future colliders is reviewed. Finally, a new proposal for combining laser cooling with beam polarization is presented.

  10. Positron study of annealing of gallium arsenide

    SciTech Connect

    Rice-Evans, P.C.; Smith, D.L.; Evans, H.E.; Gledhill, G.A. )

    1991-02-01

    A positron beam has been used to investigate the sub-surface changes in semi-insulating gallium arsenide which had been annealed to a range of temperatures. The variations of the Doppler S parameter as a function of positron implantation energy, when subjected to a diffusion analysis, indicate variations in positron trapping at different depths. The results indicate the changes in the type of point defect that accompany the annealing.

  11. Initial results of positron ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donohue, D. L.; Hulett, L. D., Jr.; Mcluckey, S. A.; Glish, G. L.; Eckenrode, B. A.

    1990-01-01

    The use of monoenergetic positrons for the ionization of organic molecules in the gas phase is described. The ionic products are analyzed with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer and detected to produce a mass spectrum. The ionization mechanisms which can be studied in this way include positron impact at energies above the ionization limit of the target molecules, positronium formation in the Ore gap energy range, and positron attachment at energies less than 1eV. The technique of positron ionization mass spectrometry (PIMS) may have analytical utility in that chemical selectivity is observed for one or more of these processes.

  12. KEK-IMSS Slow Positron Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyodo, T.; Wada, K.; Yagishita, A.; Kosuge, T.; Saito, Y.; Kurihara, T.; Kikuchi, T.; Shirakawa, A.; Sanami, T.; Ikeda, M.; Ohsawa, S.; Kakihara, K.; Shidara, T.

    2011-12-01

    The Slow Positron Facility at the Institute of Material Structure Science (IMSS) of High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) is a user dedicated facility with an energy tunable (0.1 - 35 keV) slow positron beam produced by a dedicated 55MeV linac. The present beam line branches have been used for the positronium time-of-flight (Ps-TOF) measurements, the transmission positron microscope (TPM) and the photo-detachment of Ps negative ions (Ps-). During the year 2010, a reflection high-energy positron diffraction (RHEPD) measurement station is going to be installed. The slow positron generator (converter/ moderator) system will be modified to get a higher slow positron intensity, and a new user-friendly beam line power-supply control and vacuum monitoring system is being developed. Another plan for this year is the transfer of a 22Na-based slow positron beam from RIKEN. This machine will be used for the continuous slow positron beam applications and for the orientation training of those who are interested in beginning researches with a slow positron beam.

  13. Applications and advances of positron beam spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R., LLNL

    1998-03-18

    Over 50 scientists from DOE-DP, DOE-ER, the national laboratories, academia and industry attended a workshop held on November 5-7, 1997 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Workshop participants were charged to address two questions: Is there a need for a national center for materials analysis using positron techniques and can the capabilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory serve this need. To demonstrate the need for a national center, the workshop participants discussed the technical advantages enabled by high positron currents and advanced measurement techniques, the role that these techniques would play in materials analysis and the demand for the data. Livermore now leads the world in materials analysis capabilities by positrons due to developments in response to demands of stockpile stewardship. The Livermore facilities now include the world`s highest current beam of keV positrons, a scanning pulsed positron microprobe under development capable of three dimensional maps of defect size and concentration, an MeV positron beam for defect analysis of large samples, and electron momentum spectroscopy by positrons. It was concluded that the positron microprobe under development at LLNL and other new instruments that would be relocated at LLNL at the high current keV source are an exciting step forward in providing results for the positron technique. These new data will impact a wide variety of applications.

  14. Positronic complexes with unnatural parity

    SciTech Connect

    Bromley, M. W. J.; Mitroy, J.; Varga, K.

    2007-06-15

    The structure of the unnatural parity states of PsH, LiPs, NaPs, and KPs are investigated with the configuration interaction and stochastic variational methods. The binding energies (in hartree) are found to be 8.17x10{sup -4}, 4.42x10{sup -4}, 15.14x10{sup -4}, and 21.80x10{sup -4}, respectively. These states are constructed by first coupling the two electrons into a configuration which is predominantly {sup 3}P{sup e}, and then adding a p-wave positron. All the active particles are in states in which the relative angular momentum between any pair of particles is at least L=1. The LiPs state is Borromean since there are no three-body bound subsystems (of the correct symmetry) of the (Li{sup +}, e{sup -}, e{sup -}, e{sup +}) particles that make up the system. The dominant decay mode of these states will be radiative decay into a configuration that autoionizes or undergoes positron annihilation.

  15. Distribution of positron annihilation radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milne, Peter A.

    2006-10-01

    The SPI instrument on-board the ESA/INTEGRAL satellite is engaged in a mission-long study of positron annihilation radiation from the Galaxy. Early results suggest that the disk component is only weakly detected at 511 keV by SPI. We review CGRO/OSSE, TGRS and SMM studies of 511 keV line and positronium continuum emission from the Galaxy in light of the early INTEGRAL/SPI findings. We find that when similar spatial distributions are compared, combined fits to the OSSE/SMM/TGRS data-sets produce bulge and disk fluxes similar in total flux and in B/D ratio to the fits reported for SPI observations. We further find that the 511 keV line width reported by SPI is similar to the values reported by TGRS, particularly when spectral fits include both narrow-line and broad-line components. Collectively, the consistency between these four instruments suggests that all may be providing an accurate view of positron annihilation in the Galaxy.

  16. Positron collisions with alkali-metal atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gien, T. T.

    1990-01-01

    The total cross sections for positron and electron collisions with potassium, sodium, lithium and rubidium are calculated, employing the modified Glauber approximation. The Modified Glauber cross sections for positron collision with potassium and sodium at low intermediate energies are found to agree reasonably well with existing experimental data.

  17. Electron and Positron Stopping Powers of Materials

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 7 NIST Electron and Positron Stopping Powers of Materials (PC database for purchase)   The EPSTAR database provides rapid calculations of stopping powers (collisional, radiative, and total), CSDA ranges, radiation yields and density effect corrections for incident electrons or positrons with kinetic energies from 1 keV to 10 GeV, and for any chemically defined target material.

  18. Ionisation of atomic hydrogen by positron impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spicher, Gottfried; Olsson, Bjorn; Raith, Wilhelm; Sinapius, Guenther; Sperber, Wolfgang

    1990-01-01

    With the crossed beam apparatus the relative impact-ionization cross section of atomic hydrogen by positron impact was measured. A layout of the scattering region is given. The first measurements on the ionization of atomic hydrogen by positron impact are also given.

  19. Compact Positron Tomograph for Prostate Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    Qi, W. Moses, R. Huesman, and T. Budinger, at "Conceptual design of a compact positron tomograph for prostate imag- Cr 3000 ing’ IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci...35, pp. 598-602, 1988.2000 [4] L. E. Adam, J. S. Karp, and G. Brix , "Investigation of scattered radiotion in 3D whole-body positron emission using

  20. 21 CFR 892.1110 - Positron camera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Positron camera. 892.1110 Section 892.1110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1110 Positron camera. (a) Identification. A...

  1. 21 CFR 892.1110 - Positron camera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Positron camera. 892.1110 Section 892.1110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1110 Positron camera. (a) Identification. A...

  2. 21 CFR 892.1110 - Positron camera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Positron camera. 892.1110 Section 892.1110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1110 Positron camera. (a) Identification. A...

  3. 21 CFR 892.1110 - Positron camera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Positron camera. 892.1110 Section 892.1110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1110 Positron camera. (a) Identification. A...

  4. 21 CFR 892.1110 - Positron camera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Positron camera. 892.1110 Section 892.1110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1110 Positron camera. (a) Identification. A...

  5. The Truly Conventional Positron Source for Ilc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omori, Tsunehiko; Urakawa, Junji; Takahashi, Tohru; Kawada, Shin-Ichi; Riemann, Sabine; Gai, Wei; Liu, Wanming; Gao, Jie; Pei, Guoxi; Okuda, Natsuki; Ushakov, Andriy

    2013-10-01

    We propose the conventional positron source driven by a several-GeV electron beam for ILC. Thermal load of the positron production target was a risk of the conventional positron source. To cure it, we employ a 300 Hz electron linac to create positrons with stretched pulse length. In ILC, the bunch timing structures and pulse timing structures can be diffecent in the positron source, in the DR, and in the main linac. We have some flexibility to choose timing structures in positron source and we use it for time stretching. ILC requires about 2600 bunches in a train in the main linac which pulse length is 1 ms. In the conventional source, about 130 positron bunches are created by each pulse of the 300Hz linac. Then 2600 bunches are created in 63 ms. We optimized parameters such as drive beam energy, beam size on the target, and target thickness to maximize the capture efficiency and to mitigate the target thermal load. A slow rotating tungsten disk is employed as positron production target.

  6. On the method of positron lifetime measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishiyama, F.; Shizuma, K.; Nasai, H.; Nishi, M.

    1983-01-01

    A fast-slow coincidence system was constructed for the measurement of positron lifetimes in material. The time resolution of this system was 270 ps for the (60)Co gamma rays. Positron lifetime spectra for 14 kinds of alkali halides were measured with this system. Two lifetime components and their intensities were derived from analyses of the lifetime spectra.

  7. Nondestructive examination using neutron activated positron annihilation

    DOEpatents

    Akers, Douglas W.; Denison, Arthur B.

    2001-01-01

    A method is provided for performing nondestructive examination of a metal specimen using neutron activated positron annihilation wherein the positron emitter source is formed within the metal specimen. The method permits in situ nondestructive examination and has the advantage of being capable of performing bulk analysis to determine embrittlement, fatigue and dislocation within a metal specimen.

  8. Applications of slow positrons to cancer research: Search for selectivity of positron annihilation to skin cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean, Y. C.; Li, Ying; Liu, Gaung; Chen, Hongmin; Zhang, Junjie; Gadzia, Joseph E.

    2006-02-01

    Slow positrons and positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) have been applied to medical research in searching for positron annihilation selectivity to cancer cells. We report the results of positron lifetime and Doppler broadening energy spectroscopies in human skin samples with and without cancer as a function of positron incident energy (up to 8 μm depth) and found that the positronium annihilates at a significantly lower rate and forms at a lower probability in the samples having either basal cell carcinoma (BCC) or squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) than in the normal skin. The significant selectivity of positron annihilation to skin cancer may open a new research area of developing positron annihilation spectroscopy as a novel medical tool to detect cancer formation externally and non-invasively at the early stages.

  9. Design Issues for the ILC Positron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Bharadwaj, V.; Batygin, Yu.K.; Pitthan, R.; Schultz, D.C.; Sheppard, J.; Vincke, H.; Wang, J.W.; Gronberg, J.; Stein, W.; /LLNL, Livermore

    2006-02-15

    A positron source for the International Linear Collider (ILC) can be designed using either a multi-GeV electron beam or a multi-MeV photon beam impinging on a metal target. The major design issues are: choice of drive beam and its generation, choice of target material, the target station, positron capture section, target vault and beam transport to the ILC positron damping ring complex. This paper lists the ILC positron source requirements and their implications for the design of the positron source. A conceptual design for the ILC is expected to be finished in the next two years. With emphasis on this timescale, source design issues and possible solutions are discussed.

  10. Positron beam studies of transients in semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beling, C. D.; Ling, C. C.; Cheung, C. K.; Naik, P. S.; Zhang, J. D.; Fung, S.

    2006-02-01

    Vacancy-sensing positron deep level transient spectroscopy (PDLTS) is a positron beam-based technique that seeks to provide information on the electronic ionization levels of vacancy defects probed by the positron through the monitoring of thermal transients. The experimental discoveries leading to the concept of vacancy-sensing PDLTS are first reviewed. The major problem associated with this technique is discussed, namely the strong electric fields establish in the near surface region of the sample during the thermal transient which tend to sweep positrons into the contact with negligible defect trapping. New simulations are presented which suggest that under certain conditions a sufficient fraction of positrons may be trapped into ionizing defects rendering PDLTS technique workable. Some suggestions are made for techniques that might avoid the problematic electric field problem, such as optical-PDLTS where deep levels are populated using light and the use of high forward bias currents for trap filling.

  11. Simulation of a Positron Source for CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    S. Golge; A. Freyberger; C. Hyde-Wright

    2007-08-01

    A positron source for the 6 GeV (or the proposed 12 GeV upgrade) recirculating linacs at Jefferson Lab is presented. The proposed 100nA CW positron source has several unique characteristics; high incident beam power (100kW), 10 MeV incident electron beam energy, CW incident beam and CW production. Positron production with 10 MeV electrons has several advantages; the energy is below neutron threshold so the production target will not become activated during use and the absolute energy spread is bounded by the low incident energy. These advantages are offset by the large angular distribution of the outgoing positrons. Results of simulations of the positron production, capture, acceleration and injection into the recirculating linac are presented. Energy flow and thermal management of the production target present a challenge and are included in the simulations.

  12. Positron emission tomography wrist detector

    DOEpatents

    Schlyer, David J.; O'Connor, Paul; Woody, Craig; Junnarkar, Sachin Shrirang; Radeka, Veljko; Vaska, Paul; Pratte, Jean-Francois

    2006-08-15

    A method of serially transferring annihilation information in a compact positron emission tomography (PET) scanner includes generating a time signal representing a time-of-occurrence of an annihilation event, generating an address signal representing a channel detecting the annihilation event, and generating a channel signal including the time and address signals. The method also includes generating a composite signal including the channel signal and another similarly generated channel signal concerning another annihilation event. An apparatus that serially transfers annihilation information includes a time signal generator, address signal generator, channel signal generator, and composite signal generator. The time signal is asynchronous and the address signal is synchronous to a clock signal. A PET scanner includes a scintillation array, detection array, front-end array, and a serial encoder. The serial encoders include the time signal generator, address signal generator, channel signal generator, and composite signal generator.

  13. Evaluation of copper-labeled Cu(II) bis(thiosemicarbazone) complexes as blood flow tracers for positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Bott, A.J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emmision tomography (PET) is an imaging technique not widely available for clinical diagnosis due to the costs of producing positron-emitting radiolabels. The development of radiotracers labeled with generator-produced positron emitters would facilitate the use of PET by eliminating the need for an in-house cyclotron. Copper-62 is a generator-produced positron emitter potentially useful for labeling PET radiopharmaceuticals. Copper-62 labeled Cu(II) pyruvaldehyde bis(N[sup 4]-methylthiosemicarbazone), Cu(PTSM), is a proposed PET perfusion tracer of the brain, heart, and kidneys. After IV injection in animals, copper-labeled Cu(PTSM) affords high initial uptake followed by prolonged retention of radiocopper in these organs. This retention is thought to be a result of reductive decomposition of the copper-labeled copper(II) complex by intracellular glutathione, GSH. To validate copper-62 labeled Cu(PTSM) as a myocardial and renal perfusion tracer, the regional radiocopper level afforded by intravenous copper-67 labeled Cu(PTSM) was compared to the absolute blood flow measured with labeled microspheres in normal dog kidneys and surgically infarcted myocardia. In the heart and randomly sectioned kidneys, an excellent correlation resulted. In kidneys dissected to separate anatomical regions, radiocopper levels increased montonically with increasing blood flows for individual dogs, but a linear correlation was observed when data from 12 animals was combined. Should the distribution of Cu(PTSM) vary with naturally occuring GSH fluctuations, the clinical utility of this radiotracer would be limited. Therefore, to validate further copper-62 labeled Cu(PTSM), the biodistribution of copper-67 labeled (PTSM) was determined in GSH-depleted rats. Relatively large GSH reductions in the experimental animals caused only slight changes in the distribution of Cu(PTSM). Another 23 copper-67 labeled compounds were tested.

  14. Integrin αvβ3 as a Promising Target to Image Neoangiogenesis Using In-House Generator-Produced Positron Emitter (68)Ga-Labeled DOTA-Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic Acid (RGD) Ligand.

    PubMed

    Vatsa, Rakhee; Bhusari, Priya; Kumar, Sunil; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Dash, Ashutosh; Singh, Gurpreet; Dhawan, Devinder Kumar; Shukla, Jaya; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2015-06-01

    For the growth and spread of a tumor beyond 2 mm, angiogenesis plays a crucial role, and association of various integrins with angiogenesis is evidential. The aim of the study was radiolabeling of DOTA-chelated RGD (arginine-glycine-aspartic acid) peptide with (68)Ga for PET imaging in locally advanced breast carcinoma. DOTA-RGD was incubated with (68)GaCl3, eluted in 0.05 m HCl. Elution volume, peptide amount, and reaction pH were studied. Radio-ITLC, gas chromatography, endotoxin, and sterility testing were performed. Serial (n=3) and whole-body (n=2) PET/CT imaging was done on patients post i.v. injection of 111-185 MBq of (68)Ga-DOTA-RGD. Maximum radiolabeling yield was achieved with 3 mL elution volume of 15-20 μg peptide at pH 3.5-4.0 with 10 minutes of incubation at 95°C. Product samples were sterile having 99.5% radiochemical purity with residual ethanol content and endotoxins in injectable limits. Intense radiotracer uptake was noticed in the tumor with SUVmax 15.3 at 45 minutes in serial images. Physiological radiotracer uptake was seen in the liver, spleen, ventricles, and thyroid with excretion through the kidneys. The authors concluded that (68)Ga-DOTA-RGD has the potential for imaging α,vβ3 integrin-expressing tumors.

  15. Prototyping of the ILC Baseline Positron Target

    SciTech Connect

    Gronberg, J; Brooksby, C; Piggott, T; Abbott, R; Javedani, J; Cook, E

    2012-02-29

    The ILC positron system uses novel helical undulators to create a powerful photon beam from the main electron beam. This beam is passed through a titanium target to convert it into electron-positron pairs. The target is constructed as a 1 m diameter wheel spinning at 2000 RPM to smear the 1 ms ILC pulse train over 10 cm. A pulsed flux concentrating magnet is used to increase the positron capture efficiency. It is cooled to liquid nitrogen temperatures to maximize the flatness of the magnetic field over the 1 ms ILC pulse train. We report on prototyping effort on this system.

  16. The Buffer-Gas Positron Accumulator and Resonances in Positron-Molecule Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surko, C.M.

    2007-01-01

    This is a personal account of the development of our buffer-gas positron trap and the new generation of cold beams that these traps enabled. Dick Drachman provided much appreciated advice to us from the time we started the project. The physics underlying trap operation is related to resonances (or apparent resonances) in positron-molecule interactions. Amusingly, experiments enabled by the trap allowed us to understand these processes. The positron-resonance "box score" to date is one resounding "yes," namely vibrational Feshbach resonances in positron annihilation on hydrocarbons; a "probably" for positron-impact electronic excitation of CO and NZ;an d a "maybe" for vibrational excitation of selected molecules. Two of these processes enabled the efficient operation of the trap, and one almost killed it in infancy. We conclude with a brief overview of further applications of the trapping technology discussed here, such as "massive" positron storage and beams with meV energy resolution.

  17. Addiction Studies with Positron Emission Tomography

    ScienceCinema

    Joanna Fowler

    2016-07-12

    Brookhaven scientist Joanna Fowler describes Positron Emission Technology (PET) research at BNL which for the past 30 years has focused in the integration of basic research in radiotracer chemistry with the tools of neuroscience to develop new scientific

  18. Addiction Studies with Positron Emission Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Joanna Fowler

    2008-10-13

    Brookhaven scientist Joanna Fowler describes Positron Emission Technology (PET) research at BNL which for the past 30 years has focused in the integration of basic research in radiotracer chemistry with the tools of neuroscience to develop new scientific

  19. Electron and positron induced processes. POSMOL 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limão-Vieira, Paulo; Campeanu, Radu; Hoshino, Masamitsu; Ingólfsson, Oddur; Mason, Nigel; Nagashima, Yasuyuki; Tanuma, Hajime

    2014-09-01

    POSMOL 2013, the international meeting on electron and positron induced processes comprising the XVII International Workshop on Low-Energy Positron and Positronium Physics and the XVIII International Symposium on Electron-Molecule Collisions and Swarms, was held at Kanazawa Bunka Hall, Kanazawa, Ishikawa, Japan, from 19-21 July 2013. The XVII Workshop encompassed all aspects of positron, positronium and antiproton interactions with electrons, atoms, molecules and solid surfaces, and topics related to these, whereas the XVIII Symposium encompassed all aspects of electron interactions with molecules in both gaseous and condensed phases. Particular topics include studies of electron interactions with biomolecules, electron induced surface chemistry and the study of plasma processes. Recent research on the study of electron swarms was also highlighted. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Electron and Positron Induced Processes", edited by Michael Brunger, Radu Campeanu, Masamitsu Hoshino, Oddur Ingólfsson, Paulo Limão-Vieira, Nigel Mason, Yasuyuki Nagashima and Hajime Tanuma.

  20. Positron kinetics in an idealized PET environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robson, R. E.; Brunger, M. J.; Buckman, S. J.; Garcia, G.; Petrović, Z. Lj.; White, R. D.

    2015-08-01

    The kinetic theory of non-relativistic positrons in an idealized positron emission tomography PET environment is developed by solving the Boltzmann equation, allowing for coherent and incoherent elastic, inelastic, ionizing and annihilating collisions through positronium formation. An analytic expression is obtained for the positronium formation rate, as a function of distance from a spherical source, in terms of the solutions of the general kinetic eigenvalue problem. Numerical estimates of the positron range - a fundamental limitation on the accuracy of PET, are given for positrons in a model of liquid water, a surrogate for human tissue. Comparisons are made with the ‘gas-phase’ assumption used in current models in which coherent scattering is suppressed. Our results show that this assumption leads to an error of the order of a factor of approximately 2, emphasizing the need to accurately account for the structure of the medium in PET simulations.

  1. Electric charges of positrons and antiprotons

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.J. ); Deutch, B.I. )

    1992-07-27

    Tests of the electric charges carried by the positron and antiproton are derived from recent measurements of the cyclotron frequencies of these particles, and from the spectroscopy of exotic atoms in which they are constituents.

  2. Method of processing positron lifetime spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Valuev, N.P.; Klimov, A.B.; Zhikharev, A.N.

    1985-05-01

    This paper describes a method for the processing of spectra of positron annihilation which permits a much more relaible determination of the lifetime during numerical processing of spectra by computer.

  3. Bulk Materials Analysis Using High-Energy Positron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Glade, S C; Asoka-Kumar, P; Nieh, T G; Sterne, P A; Wirth, B D; Dauskardt, R H; Flores, K M; Suh, D; Odette, G R

    2002-11-11

    This article reviews some recent materials analysis results using high-energy positron beams at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. We are combining positron lifetime and orbital electron momentum spectroscopic methods to provide electron number densities and electron momentum distributions around positron annihilation sites. Topics covered include: correlation of positron annihilation characteristics with structural and mechanical properties of bulk metallic glasses, compositional studies of embrittling features in nuclear reactor pressure vessel steel, pore characterization in Zeolites, and positron annihilation characteristics in alkali halides.

  4. Positron annihilation induced Auger electron emission

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, A.; Jibaly, M.; Lei, Chun; Mehl, D.; Mayer, R.; Lynn, K.G.

    1988-01-01

    We report on measurements of Auger electron emission from Cu and Fe due to core hole excitations produced by the removal of core electrons by matter-antimatter annihilation. Estimates are developed of the probability of positrons annihilating with a 3p electron in these materials. Several important advantages of Positron annihilation induced Auger Electron Spectroscopy (PAES) for surface analysis are suggested. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Thermal positron interactions with alkali covered tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Takashi; Iida, Shimpei; Terabe, Hiroki; Nagashima, Yasuyuki

    2016-11-01

    The branching ratios of positron reemission, positronium emission, positronium negative ion emission and capture to the surface state for thermalized positrons at polycrystalline tungsten surfaces coated with Na, K and Cs have been measured. The data shows that the ratios depend on the coverage of the alkali-metal coating. The fraction of the emitted positronium increases with the coverage of the coating up to 90%.

  6. Modulation of a quantum positron acoustic wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, M. R.

    2015-09-01

    Amplitude modulation of a positron acoustic wave is considered in a four-component electron-positron plasma in the quantum magnetohydrodynamic regime. The important ingredients of this study are the inclusion of the particle exchange-correlation potential, quantum diffraction effects via the Bohm potential, and dissipative effect due to viscosity in the momentum balance equation of the charged carriers. A modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation is derived for the evolution of the slowly varying amplitude of the quantum positron acoustic wave by employing the standard reductive perturbation technique. Detailed analysis of the linear and nonlinear dispersions of the quantum positron acoustic wave is presented. For a typical parameter range, relevant to some dense astrophysical objects, it is found that the quantum positron acoustic wave is modulationally unstable above a certain critical wavenumber. Effects of the exchange-correlation potential and the Bohm potential in the wave dynamics are also studied. It is found that the quantum effect due to the particle exchange-correlation potential is significant in comparison to the effect due to the Bohm potential for smaller values of the carrier wavenumber. However, for comparatively larger values of the carrier wavenumber, the Bohm potential effect overtakes the effect of the exchange-correlation potential. It is found that the critical wavenumber for the modulation instability depends on the ratio of the equilibrium hot electron number density and the cold positron number density and on the ratio of the equilibrium hot positron number density and the cold positron number density. A numerical result on the growth rate of the modulation instability is also presented.

  7. Positron annihilation studies of organic superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, H.L.; Lou, Y.; Ali, E.H.

    1994-09-01

    The positron lifetimes of two organic superconductors, {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu(NCS){sub 2} and {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Br, are measured as a function of temperature across {Tc}. A drop of positron lifetime below {Tc} is observed. Positron-electron momentum densities are measured by using 2D-ACAR to search for the Fermi surface in {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Br. Positron density distributions and positron-electron overlaps are calculated by using the orthogonalized linear combination atomic orbital (OLCAO) method to interprete the temperature dependence due to the local charge transfer which is inferred to relate to the superconducting transition. 2D-ACAR results in {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Br are compared with theoretical band calculations based on a first-principles local density approximation. Importance of performing accurate band calculations for the interpretation of positron annihilation data is emphasized.

  8. Undulator-based production of polarized positrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, G.; Barley, J.; Batygin, Y.; Berridge, S.; Bharadwaj, V.; Bower, G.; Bugg, W.; Decker, F.-J.; Dollan, R.; Efremenko, Y.; Flöttmann, K.; Gharibyan, V.; Hast, C.; Iverson, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Kovermann, J. W.; Laihem, K.; Lohse, T.; McDonald, K. T.; Mikhailichenko, A. A.; Moortgat-Pick, G. A.; Pahl, P.; Pitthan, R.; Pöschl, R.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Riemann, S.; Schälicke, A.; Schüler, K. P.; Schweizer, T.; Scott, D.; Sheppard, J. C.; Stahl, A.; Szalata, Z.; Walz, D. R.; Weidemann, A.

    2009-11-01

    Full exploitation of the physics potential of a future International Linear Collider will require the use of polarized electron and positron beams. Experiment E166 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) has demonstrated a scheme in which an electron beam passes through a helical undulator to generate photons (whose first-harmonic spectrum extended to 7.9 MeV) with circular polarization, which are then converted in a thin target to generate longitudinally polarized positrons and electrons. The experiment was carried out with a 1-m-long, 400-period, pulsed helical undulator in the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) operated at 46.6 GeV. Measurements of the positron polarization have been performed at five positron energies from 4.5 to 7.5 MeV. In addition, the electron polarization has been determined at 6.7 MeV, and the effect of operating the undulator with a ferrofluid was also investigated. To compare the measurements with expectations, detailed simulations were made with an upgraded version of G EANT4 that includes the dominant polarization-dependent interactions of electrons, positrons, and photons with matter. The measurements agree with calculations, corresponding to 80% polarization for positrons near 6 MeV and 90% for electrons near 7 MeV.

  9. Intense low energy positron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, K.G.; Jacobsen, F.M.

    1993-12-31

    Intense positron beams are under development or being considered at several laboratories. Already today a few accelerator based high intensity, low brightness e{sup +} beams exist producing of the order of 10{sup 8} {minus} 10{sup 9} e{sup +}/sec. Several laboratories are aiming at high intensity, high brightness e{sup +} beams with intensities greater than 10{sup 9} e{sup +}/sec and current densities of the order of 10{sup 13} {minus} 10{sup 14} e{sup +} sec{sup {minus}} {sup 1}cm{sup {minus}2}. Intense e{sup +} beams can be realized in two ways (or in a combination thereof) either through a development of more efficient B{sup +} moderators or by increasing the available activity of B{sup +} particles. In this review we shall mainly concentrate on the latter approach. In atomic physics the main trust for these developments is to be able to measure differential and high energy cross-sections in e{sup +} collisions with atoms and molecules. Within solid state physics high intensity, high brightness e{sup +} beams are in demand in areas such as the re-emission e{sup +} microscope, two dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation, low energy e{sup +} diffraction and other fields. Intense e{sup +} beams are also important for the development of positronium beams, as well as exotic experiments such as Bose condensation and Ps liquid studies.

  10. Dynamics of the positron acoustic waves in electron-positron-ion magnetoplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Rustam; Saha, Asit; Chatterjee, Prasanta

    2017-01-01

    Dynamics of the positron acoustic waves in electron-positron-ion (e-p-i) magnetoplasmas with κ-distributed hot electrons and positrons is investigated in the frameworks of the Kadomtsev-Petviashili (KP) and modified Kadomtsev-Petviashili (mKP) equations. Employing the reductive perturbation technique, the KP and mKP equations are derived. Using the bifurcation theory of planar dynamical systems, the positron acoustic solitary wave solutions, the kink and anti-kink wave solutions are obtained. Considering an external periodic perturbation in the electron-positron-ion magnetoplasmas, the perturbed KP and mKP equations are studied via some qualitative and quantitative approaches. To corroborate in the fact that the perturbed KP and mKP equations can indeed give rise to the quasiperiodic and chaotic motions, the phase plane plots, time series plots, and the Poincaré section are used. The quasiperiodic and developed chaos can be observed for the perturbed positron acoustic waves. The frequency (ω ) of the external periodic perturbation plays the role of the switching parameter in chaotic motions of the perturbed positron acoustic waves through quasiperiodic route to chaos. This work can be useful to understand the dynamics of nonlinear electromagnetic perturbations in space and laboratory plasmas consisting of κ-distributed hot electrons and positrons.

  11. Investigation of Positron Moderator Materials for Electron-Linac-Based Slow Positron Beamlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Ryoichi; Ohdaira, Toshiyuki; Uedono, Akira; Cho, Yang; Yoshida, Sadafumi; Ishida, Yuuki; Ohshima, Takeshi; Itoh, Hisayoshi; Chiwaki, Mitsukuni; Mikado, Tomohisa; Yamazaki, Tetsuo; Tanigawa, Shoichiro

    1998-08-01

    Positron re-emission properties were studied on moderator materials in order to improve the positron moderation system of electron-linac-based intense slow positron beamlines. The re-emitted positron fraction was measured on tungsten, SiC, GaN, SrTiO3, and hydrogen-terminated Si with a variable-energy pulsed positron beam. The results suggested that tungsten is the best material for the primary moderator of the positron beamlines while epitaxially grown n-type 6H SiC is the best material for the secondary moderator. Defect characterization by monoenergetic positron beams and surface characterization by Auger electron spectroscopy were carried out to clarify the mechanism of tungsten moderator degradation induced by high-energy electron irradiation. The characterization experiments revealed that the degradation is due to both radiation-induced vacancy clusters and surface carbon impurities. For the restoration of degraded tungsten moderators, oxygen treatment at ˜900°C is effective. Furthermore, it was found that oxygen at the tungsten surface inhibits positronium formation; as a result, it can increase the positron re-emission fraction.

  12. Van de Graaff based positron source production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, Kasey Roy

    The anti-matter counterpart to the electron, the positron, can be used for a myriad of different scientific research projects to include materials research, energy storage, and deep space flight propulsion. Currently there is a demand for large numbers of positrons to aid in these mentioned research projects. There are different methods of producing and harvesting positrons but all require radioactive sources or large facilities. Positron beams produced by relatively small accelerators are attractive because they are easily shut down, and small accelerators are readily available. A 4MV Van de Graaff accelerator was used to induce the nuclear reaction 12C(d,n)13N in order to produce an intense beam of positrons. 13N is an isotope of nitrogen that decays with a 10 minute half life into 13C, a positron, and an electron neutrino. This radioactive gas is frozen onto a cryogenic freezer where it is then channeled to form an antimatter beam. The beam is then guided using axial magnetic fields into a superconducting magnet with a field strength up to 7 Tesla where it will be stored in a newly designed Micro-Penning-Malmberg trap. Several source geometries have been experimented on and found that a maximum antimatter beam with a positron flux of greater than 0.55x10 6 e+s-1 was achieved. This beam was produced using a solid rare gas moderator composed of krypton. Due to geometric restrictions on this set up, only 0.1-1.0% of the antimatter was being frozen to the desired locations. Simulations and preliminary experiments suggest that a new geometry, currently under testing, will produce a beam of 107 e+s-1 or more.

  13. Development of spin-polarized slow positron beam using a 68Ge-68Ga positron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maekawa, Masaki; Fukaya, Yuki; Yabuuchi, Atsushi; Mochizuki, Izumi; Kawasuso, Atsuo

    2013-08-01

    A 68Ge-68Ga positron source was produced from the 69Ga(p, 2n)68Ge nuclear reaction by irradiating a GaN substrate with 20 MeV protons. Fast positrons from the source were converted to slow positrons using tungsten meshes and foils and were then electrostatically transported to the sample chamber. The spin polarization of the positron beam was determined as 47 ± 8% from the magnetic field dependence of the para-positronium intensity in fused silica. The Doppler broadening of the annihilation radiation spectra of polycrystalline Fe showed asymmetry upon field reversal. The spin-polarized positron beam generated by the 68Ge-68Ga source may be applicable to study the magnetic properties associated with surfaces, interfaces, and thin films.

  14. Calculation of Positron Binding Energies and Implications for Feshbach-Resonant Positron-Uracil Annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanniarachchi, Indika; Morgan, Caroline

    2010-04-01

    Here we investigate by first-principles calculations the possible role of vibrational Feshbach resonances in enhancing positron annihilation for low-energy positron beams incident on uracil, a base found in RNA. Geometries, vibrational polarizabilities, and dipole moments for uracil and 5-halouracils are calculated with density functional theory, DFT-B3LYP with a 6-31G+(d, p) basis set, and are used to determine positron-uracil and positron-5-halouracil binding energies. The energy of the Feshbach resonances is then determined by the law of energy conservation. Experimental work on positron interactions with uracil and 5-halouracils in conjunction with the theoretical work reported here is underway.

  15. Pharmacologic intervention as an alternative to exercise stress

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, K.L.

    1987-04-01

    Although thallium exercise imaging has served an important role in clinical cardiology, it is significantly limited by suboptimal sensitivity and specificity, particularly in asymptomatic man. The increasing recognition of silent myocardial ischemia, the significant prevalence of coronary artery disease in asymptomatic middle age men, and the frequent occurrence of myocardial infarction without preceding symptoms in 60% of cases emphasizes the need for a more definitive, noninvasive diagnostic test for the presence of coronary artery disease suitable for screening in asymptomatic or symptomatic patients. Intravenous dipyridamole combined with handgrip stress provides a potent stimulus for purposes of diagnostic perfusion imaging. Although planar and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging also have played an important role, these techniques are seriously hindered by their inability to quantitate radiotracer uptake or image modest differences in maximum relative flow caused by coronary artery stenosis. Accordingly, the combination of dipyridamole-handgrip stress with positron imaging of myocardial perfusion has become a powerful diagnostic tool suitable for routine clinical use. With the availability of generator-produced rubidium-82, dedicated clinically oriented positron cameras, the routine application of positron imaging to clinical cardiology has become feasible. 75 references.

  16. Elastic and inelastic scattering of positrons in gases and solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgowan, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    Three apparatuses were designed and built: The first, which is now operative, was designed to study the details of positron thermalization in solids and the subsequent emission of the low energy positrons from moderating foils; The second apparatus now under test is a positron bottle similar in design to an electron trap. It was built to store positrons at a fixed energy and to look at the number of stored positrons (storage time) as a function of a scattering gas in the vacuum chamber. The third apparatus is a crossed beam apparatus where positron-, alkali scattering will be studied. Much of the apparatus is now under test with electrons.

  17. Electron capture from solids by positrons

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R.

    1987-08-01

    The capture of electrons in solids is modified from that in gasses by several factors. The most important is the collective interaction of the electrons which results in a density of electron states in the solid in wide bands. Also the high density of electrons in many solids gives a high frequency of interaction as compared to gasses, and quickly destroys any electron-positron states in the metal matrix. Consequently, most positrons implanted in a metal will rapidly thermalize, and unless they reach the surface will annihilate with an electron in an uncorrelated state. Positronium formation from positrons scattered at a metal surface is analogous to ion neutralization however, most of the positronium comes from positrons passing through the surface from the bulk. The dominant motivation for studying positronium formation has been the hope that the distribution of the electrons at the surface would be obtained through the annihilation properties of positrons trapped at the surface or through analysis of the energy and angular distributions of the positronium emitted into the vacuum. These distributions have been measured and are included in this paper. 17 refs.

  18. Positron annihilation in solid and liquid Ni

    SciTech Connect

    Fluss, M.J.; Smedskjaer, L.C.; Chakraborty, B.; Chason, M.K.

    1982-03-01

    New techniques have been developed for the study of metals via positron annihilation which provide for the in-situ melting of the samples and subsequent measurements via Doppler broadening of positron-annihilation radiation. Here we report these metods currently in use at our laboratory; ion implantation of /sup 58/Co and the use of Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ crucibles for in-situ melting followed by the decomposition of the Doppler-broadened spectrum into a parabolic and a Gaussian component. Our earliest results obtained for pure Ni in the polycrystalline solid and in the liquid state are compared. An interesting similarity is reported for the distributions of the high-momentum (Gaussian) component for positrons annihilating in vacancies at high temperatures and those annihilating in liquid Ni.

  19. Defects in metals. [Positron annihilation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, R.W.

    1982-06-01

    The application of positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) to the study of defects in metals has led to increased knowledge on lattice-defect properties during the past decade in two areas: the determination of atomic defect properties, particularly those of monovacancies, and the monitoring and characterization of vacancy-like microstructure development during post-irradiation and post-quench annealing. The study of defects in metals by PAS is reviewed within the context of the other available techniques for defect studies. The strengths and weaknesses of PAS as a method for the characterization of defect microstructures are considered. The additional possibilities for using the positron as a localized probe of the atomic and electronic structures of atomic defects are discussed, based upon theoretical calculations of the annihilation characteristics of defect-trapped positrons and experimental observations. Finally, the present status and future potential of PAS as a tool for the study of defects in metals is considered. 71 references, 9 figures.

  20. Unthermalized positrons in gamma ray burst sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tkaczyk, W.; Karakula, S.

    1992-01-01

    The spectra of the broadening 0.511 MeV annihilation line produced by high temperatures was calculated in the case of unthermalized plasma; i.e., T sub e(+) is not = T sub e(-). The flattening in the spectrum of the annihilation lines for large differences of electron and positron temperatures is a strong indication that the observed features of the hard tailed spectrum of the gamma bursts can be well described by annihilation of unthermalized positrons. It is proposed that the charge separation occurring in Eddington limited accretion onto a neutron star or the one photon pair production in strong magnetic fields as a mechanism for the production of unthermalized positrons in the sources of gamma bursts. From the best fit of experimental spectra by the model, the parameters of sources for which the regions with different plasma temperatures can exist is evaluated.

  1. Trapped positrons observed by PAMELA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, V. V.; Adriani, O.; Barbarino, G.; Bazilevskaya, G. A.; Bellotti, R.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Bongi, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Bottai, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F. S.; Campana, D.; Carbone, R.; Carlson, P.; Casolino, M.; Castellini, G.; Consiglio, L.; De Santis, C.; De Simone, N.; Di Felice, V.; Galper, A. M.; Karelin, A. V.; Koldashov, S. V.; Koldobsky, S.; Krutkov, S. Yu; Kvashnin, A. N.; Leonov, A. A.; Malakhov, V. V.; Marcelli, L.; Martucci, M.; Mayorov, A. G.; Menn, W.; Merge, M.; Mocchiutti, E.; Monaco, A.; Mori, N.; Munini, R.; Osteria, G.; Papini, P.; Palma, F.; Panico, B.; Pearce, M.; Picozza, P.; Ricci, M.; Ricciarini, S. B.; Sarkar, R.; Scotti, V.; Simon, M.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Stozhkov, Yu I.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Vasiliev, G. I.; Voronov, S. A.; Yurkin, Yu T.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.

    2016-02-01

    Measurements of electron and positron spatial distributions in energy range from 80 MeV to several GeV below the geomagnetic cutoff rigidity were carried out using the PAMELA magnetic spectrometer. The instrument is installed on board the Resurs-DK satellite which was launched June 15th 2006 on an elliptical orbit with the inclination 70 degrees and the altitude 350-600 km. The procedure of trajectories calculations in the geomagnetic filed gives a way to separate stably trapped and short lived albedo components produced in interactions of cosmic ray protons with the residual atmosphere. The work presents spatial distributions of trapped, quasitrapped and short-lived albedo electrons and positrons in the near Earth space. Electron to positron ratio points out on different production mechanism of trapped and quasitrapped particles.

  2. Positron transport: The plasma-gas interface

    SciTech Connect

    Marler, J. P.; Petrovic, Z. Lj.; Bankovic, A.; Dujko, S.; Suvakov, M.; Malovic, G.; Buckman, S. J.

    2009-05-15

    Motivated by an increasing number of applications, new techniques in the analysis of electron transport have been developed over the past 30 years or so, but similar methods had yet to be applied to positrons. Recently, an in-depth look at positron transport in pure argon gas has been performed using a recently established comprehensive set of cross sections and well-established Monte Carlo simulations. The key novelty as compared to electron transport is the effect of positronium formation which changes the number of particles and has a strong energy dependence. This coupled with spatial separation by energy of the positron swarm leads to counterintuitive behavior of some of the transport coefficients. Finally new results in how the presence of an applied magnetic field affects the transport coefficients are presented.

  3. Nonlinear excitations for the positron acoustic shock waves in dissipative nonextensive electron-positron-ion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Asit

    2017-03-01

    Positron acoustic shock waves (PASHWs) in unmagnetized electron-positron-ion (e-p-i) plasmas consisting of mobile cold positrons, immobile positive ions, q-nonextensive distributed electrons, and hot positrons are studied. The cold positron kinematic viscosity is considered and the reductive perturbation technique is used to derive the Burgers equation. Applying traveling wave transformation, the Burgers equation is transformed to a one dimensional dynamical system. All possible vector fields corresponding to the dynamical system are presented. We have analyzed the dynamical system with the help of potential energy, which helps to identify the stability and instability of the equilibrium points. It is found that the viscous force acting on cold mobile positron fluid is a source of dissipation and is responsible for the formation of the PASHWs. Furthermore, fully nonlinear arbitrary amplitude positron acoustic waves are also studied applying the theory of planar dynamical systems. It is also observed that the fundamental features of the small amplitude and arbitrary amplitude PASHWs are significantly affected by the effect of the physical parameters q e , q h , μ e , μ h , σ , η , and U. This work can be useful to understand the qualitative changes in the dynamics of nonlinear small amplitude and fully nonlinear arbitrary amplitude PASHWs in solar wind, ionosphere, lower part of magnetosphere, and auroral acceleration regions.

  4. Monoenergetic positron beam at the reactor based positron source at FRM-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugenschmidt, C.; Kögel, G.; Repper, R.; Schreckenbach, K.; Sperr, P.; Straßer, B.; Triftshäuser, W.

    2002-05-01

    The principle of the in-pile positron source at the Munich research reactor FRM-II is based on absorption of high energy prompt γ-rays from thermal neutron capture in 113Cd. For this purpose, a cadmium cap is placed inside the tip of the inclined beam tube SR-11 in the moderator tank of the reactor, where an undisturbed thermal neutron flux up to 2×10 14n cm-2 s-1 is expected. Inside the cadmium cap a structure of platinum foils is placed for converting high energy γ-radiation into positron-electron pairs. Due to the negative positron work function, moderation in annealed platinum leads to emission of monoenergetic positrons. Therefore, platinum will also be used as moderator, since its moderation property seems to yield long-term stability under reactor conditions and it is much easier to handle than tungsten. Model calculations were performed with SIMION-7.0w to optimise geometry and potential of Pt-foils and electrical lenses. It could be shown that the potentials between the Pt-foils must be chosen in the range of 1-10 V to extract moderated positrons. After successive acceleration to 5 keV by four electrical lenses the beam is magnetically guided in a solenoid field of 7.5 mT resulting in a beam diameter of about 25 mm. An intensity of about 10 10 slow positrons per second is expected in the primary positron beam. Outside of the reactor shield a W(1 0 0) single crystal remoderation stage will lead to an improvement of the positron beam brilliance before the positrons are guided to the experimental facilities.

  5. Apparatus for photon activation positron annihilation analysis

    DOEpatents

    Akers, Douglas W.

    2007-06-12

    Non-destructive testing apparatus according to one embodiment of the invention comprises a photon source. The photon source produces photons having predetermined energies and directs the photons toward a specimen being tested. The photons from the photon source result in the creation of positrons within the specimen being tested. A detector positioned adjacent the specimen being tested detects gamma rays produced by annihilation of positrons with electrons. A data processing system operatively associated with the detector produces output data indicative of a lattice characteristic of the specimen being tested.

  6. NLC Positron Target Heating(LCC-0065)

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, D

    2003-10-07

    The NLC requires an intense beam with a large number of positrons. These positrons are produced by a high energy electron beam impinging on a solid tungsten-rhenium alloy target. The particle shower that develops in the solid target deposits significant energy in the material, leading to target stresses and potentially to target damage. The stresses can be analyzed once the magnitude and extent of the energy deposition is known. This note details the modeling of the energy deposition using EGS, performed for the NLC and the SLC targets and for possible NLC targets made of copper or nickel instead of WRe.

  7. Heuristic theory of positron-helium scattering.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drachman, R. J.

    1971-01-01

    An error in a previous modified adiabatic approximation (Drachman, 1966), due to a lack of generality in the form of the short-range correlation part of the wave function for L greater than zero, is corrected heuristically by allowing the monopole suppression parameter to depend on L. An L-dependent local potential is constructed to fit the well-known positron-hydrogen s, p, and d wave phase shifts below the rearrangement threshold. The same form of potential yields a positron-helium cross-section in agreement with a recent experimental measurement near threshold.

  8. Preferential positron heating and acceleration by synchrotron maser instabilities in relativistic positron-electron-proton plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoshino, Masahiro; Arons, Jonathan

    1991-01-01

    A new process of the preferential strong heating of positrons through the ion synchrotron maser instability in positron-electron-proton magnetized plasmas is investigated using particle-in-cell simulations. It is shown that the positrons form a nonthermal power-law-like energy distribution via their gyroresonant interaction with the extraordinary modes emitted by the ions. It is noted that this process may be of significance in connection with the shock excitation of nonthermal synchrotron radiation from astrophysical systems powered by relativistic outflows from compact central objects, e.g., supernova remnants powered by pulsars and jets from active galactic nuclei.

  9. Mathematical removal of positron range blurring in high resolution tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Derenzo, S.E.

    1985-10-01

    Positron range blurring can be removed from PET projection data by Fourier deconvolution. The method uses previously measured positron range spread functions whose 'cusp-like' shape retains some of the higher spatial frequency information. Although the deconvolution process amplifies the statistical noise, especially for narrow projection bins and for isotopes with high positron energy, it can significantly improve the ability to estimate the amount of positron activity in each region of quantitation. 16 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. The multilayer Fe/Hf studied with slow positron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murashige, Y.; Tashiro, M.; Nakajyo, T.; Koizumi, T.; Kanazawa, I.; Komori, F.; Ito, Y.

    1997-04-01

    The positron annihilation parameter versus the incident positron energy is measured in the thin Fe films and the Fe/Hf bilayer on silica substrate, by means of the variable energetic slow-positron beam technique. We have analyzed the change in open-volume spaces and vacancy-type defects among the Fe microcrystals in these thin films with the deposition temperature.

  11. Three Dimensional Positron Annihilation Momentum Spectroscopy of Lithium Tetraborate Crystals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-21

    common reactions which generate a β + particle, an energetic positron. In addition to a positron, positive beta decay generates a neutrino as well...from [8]. 22 Na undergoes positive beta decay, ejecting a positron which has a rest mass-energy of 511 keV, and a neutrino . The maximum overall

  12. Positron emission tomography - a new approach to brain chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, H.G.

    1988-11-11

    Positron emission tomography permits examination of the chemistry of the brain in living beings. Until recently, positron emission tomography had been considered a research tool, but it is rapidly moving into clinical practice. This report describes the uses and applications of positron emission tomography in examinations of patients with strokes, epilepsy, malignancies, dementias, and schizophrenia and in basic studies of synaptic neurotransmission.

  13. Physics perspectives at JLab with a polarized positron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Voutier, Eric J.-M.

    2014-06-01

    Polarized positron beams are in some respect mandatory complements to polarized electron beams. The advent of the PEPPo concept for polarized positron production opens the possibility for the developement at the Jefferson Laboratory of a continuous polarized positron beam. The benefits of such a beam for hadronic structure studies are discussed, together with the technical and technological challenges to face.

  14. Positron Scattering from Molecules: An Experimental Cross Section Compilation for Positron Transport Studies and Benchmarking Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunger, M. J.; Buckman, S. J.; Ratnavelu, K.

    2017-06-01

    We present a compilation of recommended positron-molecule cross sections for a range of scattering processes including elastic scattering, vibrational excitation, discrete electronic-state excitation, positronium formation, ionization, and also for the grand total cross section. Where possible, in particular for possible application in positron transport simulations for a given molecule, we try and list data for energies in the range 0.1-1000 eV although in practice the actual energy is highly target-molecule and scattering process specific. Aside from being relevant to positron transport studies, through, for example, Monte Carlo simulations, the present compilation should also be germane for benchmarking the validity and accuracy of positron-molecule scattering calculations and, just as importantly, to allow a comparison with corresponding electron scattering results. That latter comparison can shed real light on the projectile-target interactions that underpin the scattering dynamics.

  15. Propagation of solitary waves in relativistic electron-positron-ion plasmas with kappa distributed electrons and positrons

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Asif; Mahmood, S.; Haque, Q.

    2011-11-15

    Electrostatic ion acoustic solitary waves are studied in a plasma system comprising of relativistic ions, kappa distributed electrons, and positrons. The increase in the relativistic streaming factor and positron and electron kappa parameters cause the soliton amplitude to thrive. However, the soliton amplitude diminishes as the positron concentration is increased in the system. Our results are general and may be helpful, in understanding nonlinear phenomena in the presence of kappa distibuted electrons, positrons, and relativistically streaming ions.

  16. Positron Annihilation in the Bipositronium Ps2

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, David H.; Frolov, Alexei M.

    2005-07-01

    The electron-positron-pair annihilation in the bipositronium PS2 is considered. In particular, the two-, three-, one- and zero-photon annihilation rates are determined to high accuracy. The corresponding analytical expressions are also presented. Also, a large number of bound state properties have been determined for this system.

  17. Advanced Instrumentation for Positron Emission Tomography [PET

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Derenzo, S. E.; Budinger, T. F.

    1985-04-01

    This paper summarizes the physical processes and medical science goals that underlay modern instrumentation design for Positron Emission Tomography. The paper discusses design factors such as detector material, crystalphototube coupling, shielding geometry, sampling motion, electronics design, time-of-flight, and the interrelationships with quantitative accuracy, spatial resolution, temporal resolution, maximum data rates, and cost.

  18. Positron Spectroscopy of Hydrothermally Grown Actinide Oxides

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-27

    In this method, the powdered material is placed in a solution which contains extremely powerful mineralizers, such as cesium fluoride for actinide...the isotope that acts as a positron source is sodium -22, which has a relatively short half-life (2.6 y) and emits a characteristic gamma photon (at

  19. Excitation of helium ion by positron impact

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, P.; Ghosh, A.S.

    1986-01-01

    Three (1s,2s,2p) and five (1s,2s,2p,3s-bar,3p-bar) -state close-coupling methods have been employed to calculate the n = 2 excitation cross sections of helium ion by positron impact. The effect of pseudostate is found to be very pronounced in the case of 1s-2s excitation.

  20. Low-energy positron scattering upon endohedrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amusia, M. Ya.; Chernysheva, L. V.

    2017-07-01

    We investigate positron scattering upon endohedrals and compare it with electron-endohedral scattering. We show that the polarization of the fullerene shell considerably alters the polarization potential of an atom, stuffed inside a fullerene. This essentially affects both the positron and electron elastic scattering phases as well as corresponding cross sections. Of great importance is also the interaction between the incoming positron and the target electrons that leads to formation of the virtual positronium P˜s. We illustrate the general trend by concrete examples of positron and electron scattering upon endohedrals He@C60 and Ar@C60, and compare it to scattering upon fullerene C60. To obtain the presented results, we have employed new simplified approaches that permit to incorporate the effect of fullerenes polarizability into the He@C60 and Ar@C60 polarization potential and to take into account the virtual positronium formation. Using these approaches, we obtained numeric results that show strong variations in shape and magnitudes of scattering phases and cross sections due to effect of endohedral polarization and P˜s formation.

  1. Positrons observed to originate from thunderstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishman, Gerald J.

    2011-05-01

    Thunderstorms are the result of warm, moist air moving rapidly upward, then cooling and condensing. Electrification occurs within thunderstorms (as noted by Benjamin Franklin), produced primarily by frictional processes among ice particles. This leads to lightning discharges; the types, intensities, and rates of these discharges vary greatly among thunderstorms. Even though scientists have been studying lightning since Franklin's time, new phenomena associated with thunderstorms are still being discovered. In particular, a recent finding by Briggs et al. [2011], based on observations by the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) instrument on NASA's satellite-based Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi), shows that positrons are also generated by thunderstorms. Positrons are the antimatter form of electrons—they have the same mass and charge as an electron but are of positive rather than negative charge; hence the name positron. Observations of positrons from thunderstorms may lead to a new tool for understanding the electrification and high-energy processes occurring within thunderstorms. New theories, along with new observational techniques, are rapidly evolving in this field.

  2. Positron Interactions with Atoms and Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, Anand K.

    2012-01-01

    Dirac, in 1928, combining the ideas of quantum mechanics and the ideas of relativity invented the well-known relativistic wave equation. In his formulation, he predicted an antiparticle of the electron of spin n-bar/2. He thought that this particle must be a proton. Dirac published his interpretation in a paper 'A theory of electrons and protons.' It was shown later by the mathematician Hermann Weyl that the Dirac theory was completely symmetric between negative and positive particles and the positive particle must have the same mass as that of the electron. In his J. Robert Oppenheimer Memorial Prize Acceptance Speech, Dirac notes that 'Blackett was really the first person to obtain hard evidence for the existence of a positron but he was afraid to publish it. He wanted confirmation, he was really over cautious.' Positron, produced by the collision of cosmic rays in a cloud chamber, was detected experimentally by Anderson in 1932. His paper was published in Physical Review in 1933. The concept of the positron and its detection were the important discoveries of the 20th century. I have tried to discuss various processes involving interactions of positrons with atoms and ions. This includes scattering, bound states and resonances. It has not been possible to include the enormous work which has been carried out during the last 40 or 50 years in theory and measurements.

  3. Electron--positron beam--plasma experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, S. J.; Kurz, C. K.; Greaves, R. G.; Surko, C. M.

    1997-11-01

    Electron-positron plasmas possess unique properties due to inherent symmetries between the charge species. The ability to accumulate large numbers of positron.html>cold positrons in Penning-Malmberg traps has made the study of such plasmas possible in the laboratory.(R.G. Greaves, M.D. Tinkle and C.M. Surko, Phys. Plas.) 1 1439 (1994) In the first experiment of this type we studied a beam-plasma system by transmitting an electron beam through a positron plasma in a Penning trap.(R.G. Greaves and C.M. Surko, Phys. Rev. Lett.), 74 3846 (1995) These earlier measurements were obtained using a hot cathode electron source, for which the large beam energy spreads ( ~ 0.5 eV) made it impossible to explore the low energy regime of this beam-plasma system, where the strongest interaction occurs. We report new growth rate measurements obtained using a novel low-energy, cold (Δ E ≈ 0.05 eV) electron beam based on the extraction of electrons stored in a Penning trap.(S.J. Gilbert et al.), Appl. Phys. Lett., 70 1944 (1997). The measured growth rates for a transit time instability are found to be in excellent agreement with a cold fluid theory by D.H.E. Dubin over the range of accessible energies (0.1--3 eV).

  4. Resonances in Positron-molecule Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surko, C. M.

    2006-05-01

    The development of cold, trap-based beams has enabled high-resolution, energy-resolved studies of positron scattering and annihilation processes [1]. This talk focuses on three topics in this area. For hydrocarbon molecules such as alkanes (CnH2n+2), giant enhancements in annihilation rates are observed due to vibrational Feshbach resonances. The dependence of the rates on positron energy provides evidence that positrons bind to these molecules and a measure of the binding energies [1]. Recent results include evidence for a second, ``positronically excited'' bound state and new data for the methane series, CH3X, where X is a halogen. Other ``resonance-like features'' are sharp increases in the near-threshold electronic excitation cross sections for CO and N2 [2], and in the vibrational excitation cross sections for CO, CO2 and CH4 [3, 4]. Outstanding questions and the relationship of these observations to available theoretical predictions will be discussed.1. C. M. Surko, G. F. Gribakin, and S. J. Buckman, J. Phys. B 38, R57 (2005).2. J. P. Marler and C. M. Surko, Phys. Rev. A 72, 062713 (2005).3. J. P. Marler and C. M. Surko, Phys. Rev. A 72, 062702 (2005).4. J. P. Marler, G. F. Gribakin and C. M. Surko, Nuclear Instrum. and Meth. B, in press (2006).

  5. Positron elastic scattering from alkaline earth targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poveda, Luis A.; Assafrão, Denise; Mohallem, José R.

    2016-07-01

    A previously reported model potential approach [Poveda et al., Phys. Rev. A 87, 052702 (2013)] was extended to study low energy positron elastic scattering from beryllium and magnesium. The cross sections were computed for energies ranging from 10-5 eV up to well above the positronium formation threshold. The present results are in good agreement with previous reports, including the prediction of a p-wave resonance in the cross section for magnesium. The emergence of this shape resonance is connected to a trend observed in the evolution of the partial wave cross section in going from Be to Mg target. This trend lead us to speculate that a sharp d-wave resonance should be observed in positron elastic scattering from calcium. The positron-target binding energies are investigated in detail, both using the scattering information and by direct computation of the bound state energies using the model potentials. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page at http://dx.doi.org/10.1140/epjd/e2016-70120-y

  6. Positron source position sensing detector and electronics

    DOEpatents

    Burnham, Charles A.; Bradshaw, Jr., John F.; Kaufman, David E.; Chesler, David A.; Brownell, Gordon L.

    1985-01-01

    A positron source, position sensing device, particularly with medical applications, in which positron induced gamma radiation is detected using a ring of stacked, individual scintillation crystals, a plurality of photodetectors, separated from the scintillation crystals by a light guide, and high resolution position interpolation electronics. Preferably the scintillation crystals are several times more numerous than the photodetectors with each crystal being responsible for a single scintillation event from a received gamma ray. The light guide will disperse the light emitted from gamma ray absorption over several photodetectors. Processing electronics for the output of the photodetectors resolves the location of the scintillation event to a fraction of the dimension of each photodetector. Because each positron absorption results in two 180.degree. oppositely traveling gamma rays, the detection of scintillation in pairs permits location of the positron source in a manner useful for diagnostic purposes. The processing electronics simultaneously responds to the outputs of the photodetectors to locate the scintillations to the source crystal. While it is preferable that the scintillation crystal include a plurality of stacked crystal elements, the resolving power of the processing electronics is also applicable to continuous crystal scintillators.

  7. Advanced instrumentation for Positron Emission Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Derenzo, S.E.; Budinger, T.F.

    1985-04-01

    This paper summarizes the physical processes and medical science goals that underly modern instrumentation design for Positron Emission Tomography. The paper discusses design factors such as detector material, crystalphototube coupling, shielding geometry, sampling motion, electronics design, time-of-flight, and the interrelationships with quantitative accuracy, spatial resolution, temporal resolution, maximum data rates, and cost. 71 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Progress Towards a Practical Multicell Positron Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielson, J. R.

    2013-10-01

    The physics and technology of positron confinement is central to a range of applications at the forefront of antimatter science. Progress in this area has been driven by the development of a suite of novel non-neutral plasma techniques whereby up to 4 ×109 positrons have now been trapped and stored. However the next generation of experiments will require orders of magnitude more positrons. This talk describes techniques to increase storage capacity to >=1012 using a novel multi-cell trap architecture. Plasmas will be stored in separate Penning-Malmberg traps (``cells'') arranged in parallel off the magnetic axis to maximize use of the magnetic field volume while minimizing the required confinement voltages. Experiments with electrons in a test structure will be described to explore the basic physics and technology of the multicell concept and to set the design of a 21-cell trap for 1012 positrons. Over 50% of a trapped plasma has been injected into an off-axis cell, and hour-long confinement of 2 ×108 particles has been achieved using rotating electric fields. Experiments are under way to identify the limits of the injection process and demonstrate confinement >1010 particles in a single off-axis cell using kilovolt confinement potentials. In collaboration with N. C. Hurst, C. J. Baker, and C. M. Surko. This work is supported by U.S. DTRA and the U.S. DOE/NSF plasma partnership.

  9. Intense positron beam as a source for production of electron-positron plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoneking, M. R.; Horn-Stanja, J.; Stenson, E. V.; Pedersen, T. Sunn; Saitoh, H.; Hergenhahn, U.; Niemann, H.; Paschkowski, N.; Hugenschmidt, C.; Piochacz, C.

    2016-10-01

    We aim to produce magnetically confined, short Debye length electron-positron plasma and test predicted properties for such systems. A first challenge is obtaining large numbers of positrons; a table-top experiment (system size 5 cm) with a temperature less than 5 eV requires about 1010 positrons to have more than 10 Debye lengths in the system. The NEPOMUC facility at the FRM II research reactor in Germany is one of the world's most intense positron sources. We report on characterization (using a retarding field energy analyzer with magnetic field gradient) of the NEPOMUC beam as delivered to the open beam port at various beam energies and in both the re-moderated and primary beam configurations in order to design optimal trapping (and accumulation) schemes for production of electron-positron plasma. The intensity of the re-moderated (primary) beam is in the range 2 -3 x 107 /s (1 - 5 x 108 /s). The re-moderated beam is currently the most promising for direct injection and confinement experiments; it has a parallel energy spread of 15 - 35% and the transverse energy spread is 6 - 15% of the parallel energy. We report on the implications for injection and trapping in a dipole magnetic field as well as plans for beam development, in situ re-moderation, and accumulation. We also report results demonstrating a difference in phosphor luminescent response to low energy positrons versus electrons.

  10. Positron and positronium interactions with Cu

    SciTech Connect

    Bromley, M.W.J.; Mitroy, J.

    2002-12-01

    The configuration-interaction (CI) method is used to investigate the interactions of positrons and positronium with copper at low energies. The calculations were performed within the framework of the fixed-core approximation with semiempirical polarization potentials used to model dynamical interactions between the active particles and the (1s-3d) core. Initially, calculations upon the e{sup +}Li system were used to refine the numerical procedures and highlighted the extreme difficulties of using an orthodox CI calculation to describe the e{sup +} Li system. The positron binding energy of e{sup +}Cu derived from a CI calculation which included electron and positron orbitals with l{<=}18 was 0.005 12 hartree while the spin-averaged annihilation rate was 0.507x10{sup 9} s{sup -1}. The configuration basis used for the bound-state calculation was also used as a part of the trial wave function for a Kohn variational calculation of positron-copper scattering. The positron-copper system has a scattering length of about 13.1a{sub 0} and the annihilation parameter Z{sub eff} at threshold was 72.9. The dipole polarizability of the neutral copper ground state was computed and found to be 41.6a{sub 0}{sup 3}. The structure of CuPs was also studied with the CI method and it was found to have a binding energy of 0.0143 hartree and an annihilation rate of {approx}2x10{sup 9} s{sup -1}.

  11. A CF4 based positron trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marjanović, Srdjan; Banković, Ana; Cassidy, David; Cooper, Ben; Deller, Adam; Dujko, Saša; Petrović, Zoran Lj

    2016-11-01

    All buffer-gas positron traps in use today rely on N2 as the primary trapping gas due to its conveniently placed {{{a}}}1{{\\Pi }} electronic excitation cross-section. The energy loss per excitation in this process is 8.5 eV, which is sufficient to capture positrons from low-energy moderated beams into a Penning-trap configuration of electric and magnetic fields. However, the energy range over which this cross-section is accessible overlaps with that for positronium (Ps) formation, resulting in inevitable losses and setting an intrinsic upper limit on the overall trapping efficiency of ∼25%. In this paper we present a numerical simulation of a device that uses CF4 as the primary trapping gas, exploiting vibrational excitation as the main inelastic capture process. The threshold for such excitations is far below that for Ps formation and hence, in principle, a CF4 trap can be highly efficient; our simulations indicate that it may be possible to achieve trapping efficiencies as high as 90%. We also report the results of an attempt to re-purpose an existing two-stage N2-based buffer-gas positron trap. Operating the device using CF4 proved unsuccessful, which we attribute to back scattering and expansion of the positron beam following interactions with the CF4 gas, and an unfavourably broad longitudinal beam energy spread arising from the magnetic field differential between the source and trap regions. The observed performance was broadly consistent with subsequent simulations that included parameters specific to the test system, and we outline the modifications that would be required to realise efficient positron trapping with CF4. However, additional losses appear to be present which require further investigation through both simulation and experiment.

  12. Positron annihilation studies of moisture in graphite-reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Holt, W. H.; Mock, W., Jr.; Buckingham, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    The positron lifetime technique of monitoring absorbed moisture is applied to several composites, including graphite/polymides which are candidates for high-temperature (over 260 C) applications. The experimental setup is a conventional fast-slow coincidence system wherein the positron lifetime is measured with respect to a reference time determined by the detection of a nuclear gamma ray emitted simultaneously with the positron. From the experiments, a rate of change of positron mean lifetime per unit mass of water can be determined for each type of specimen. Positron lifetime spectra are presented for a graphite/polyimide composite and for a pure polyimide.

  13. Relativistic Positron Creation Using Ultra-Intense Short Pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Wilks, S; Bonlie, J; Liang, E; Myatt, J; Price, D; Meyerhofer, D; Beiersdorfer, P

    2008-08-25

    We measure up to 2 x 10{sup 10} positrons per steradian ejected out the back of {approx}mm thick gold targets when illuminated with short ({approx} 1 ps) ultra-intense ({approx} 1 x 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}) laser pulses. Positrons produced predominately by the Bethe-Heitler process and have an effective temperature of 2-4 MeV, with the distribution peaking at 4-7 MeV. The angular distribution of the positrons is anisotropic. The measurements indicate the laser produced, relativistic positron densities ({approx} 10{sup 16} positrons/cm{sup 3}) are the highest ever created in the laboratory.

  14. Relativistic Positron Creation Using Ultraintense Short Pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Hui; Wilks, Scott C.; Bonlie, James D.; Price, Dwight F.; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Liang, Edison P.; Myatt, Jason; Meyerhofer, David D.

    2009-03-13

    We measure up to 2x10{sup 10} positrons per steradian ejected out the back of {approx}mm thick gold targets when illuminated with short ({approx}1 ps) ultraintense ({approx}1x10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}) laser pulses. Positrons are produced predominately by the Bethe-Heitler process and have an effective temperature of 2-4 MeV, with the distribution peaking at 4-7 MeV. The angular distribution of the positrons is anisotropic. Modeling based on the measurements indicate the positron density to be {approx}10{sup 16} positrons/cm{sup 3}, the highest ever created in the laboratory.

  15. Positron affinity in Zn1-xCdxSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benosman, N.; Amrane, N.; Méçabih, S.; Aourag, H.

    2000-11-01

    The independent particle model (IPM) coupled with the use of the virtual crystal approximation (VCA) which incorporates compositional disorder as an effective potential was used to compute the positron charge distribution in the cubic structured ternary alloy Zn1-xCdxSe. The positron charge density with respect to the variation of the mole fraction is discussed. The results show that positrons have a strong affinity for the anion than for the cation. This relative positron affinity should lead to the positron preferentially annihilating with the anion rather than the cation.

  16. Evaluation of a potential generator-produced PET tracer for cerebral perfusion imaging: single-pass cerebral extraction measurements and imaging with radiolabeled Cu-PTSM.

    PubMed

    Mathias, C J; Welch, M J; Raichle, M E; Mintun, M A; Lich, L L; McGuire, A H; Zinn, K R; John, E K; Green, M A

    1990-03-01

    Copper(II) pyruvaldehyde bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) (Cu-PTSM), copper(II) pyruvaldehyde bis(N4-dimethylthiosemicarbazone) (Cu-PTSM2), and copper(II) ethylglyoxal bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) (Cu-ETSM), have been proposed as PET tracers for cerebral blood flow (CBF) when labeled with generator-produced 62Cu (t1/2 = 9.7 min). To evaluate the potential of Cu-PTSM for CBF PET studies, baboon single-pass cerebral extraction measurements and PET imaging were carried out with the use of 67Cu (t1/2 = 2.6 days) and 64Cu (t1/2 = 12.7 hr), respectively. All three chelates were extracted into the brain with high efficiency. There was some clearance of all chelates in the 10-50-sec time frame and Cu-PTSM2 continued to clear. Cu-PTSM and Cu-ETSM have high residual brain activity. PET imaging of baboon brain was carried out with the use of [64Cu]-Cu-PTSM. For comparison with the 64Cu brain image, a CBF (15O-labeled water) image (40 sec) was first obtained. Qualitatively, the H2(15)O and [64Cu]-Cu-PTSM images were very similar; for example, a comparison of gray to white matter uptake resulted in ratios of 2.42 for H2(15)O and 2.67 for Cu-PTSM. No redistribution of 64Cu was observed in 2 hr of imaging, as was predicted from the single-pass study results. Quantitative determination of blood flow using Cu-PTSM showed good agreement with blood flow determined with H2(15)O. This data suggests that [62Cu]-Cu-PTSM may be a useful generator-produced radiopharmaceutical for blood flow studies with PET.

  17. First platinum moderated positron beam based on neutron capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugenschmidt, C.; Kögel, G.; Repper, R.; Schreckenbach, K.; Sperr, P.; Triftshäuser, W.

    2002-12-01

    A positron beam based on absorption of high energy prompt γ-rays from thermal neutron capture in 113Cd was installed at a neutron guide of the high flux reactor at the ILL in Grenoble. Measurements were performed for various source geometries, dependent on converter mass, moderator surface and extraction voltages. The results lead to an optimised design of the in-pile positron source which will be implemented at the Munich research reactor FRM-II. The positron source consists of platinum foils acting as γ-e +e --converter and positron moderator. Due to the negative positron work function moderation in heated platinum leads to emission of monoenergetic positrons. The positron work function of polycrystalline platinum was determined to 1.95(5) eV. After acceleration to several keV by four electrical lenses the beam was magnetically guided in a solenoid field of 7.5 mT leading to a NaI-detector in order to detect the 511 keV γ-radiation of the annihilating positrons. The positron beam with a diameter of less than 20 mm yielded an intensity of 3.1×10 4 moderated positrons per second. The total moderation efficiency of the positron source was about ɛ=1.06(16)×10 -4. Within the first 20 h of operation a degradation of the moderation efficiency of 30% was observed. An annealing procedure at 873 K in air recovers the platinum moderator.

  18. Methods and apparatus for producing and storing positrons and protons

    DOEpatents

    Akers, Douglas W [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-07-06

    Apparatus for producing and storing positrons may include a trap that defines an interior chamber therein and that contains an electric field and a magnetic field. The trap may further include a source material that includes atoms that, when activated by photon bombardment, become positron emitters to produce positrons. The trap may also include a moderator positioned adjacent the source material. A photon source is positioned adjacent the trap so that photons produced by the photon source bombard the source material to produce the positron emitters. Positrons from the positron emitters and moderated positrons from the moderator are confined within the interior chamber of the trap by the electric and magnetic fields. Apparatus for producing and storing protons are also disclosed.

  19. High-yield positron systems for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Clendenin, J.E.

    1989-04-01

    Linear colliders, such as the SLC, are among those accelerators for which a high-yield positron source operating at the repetition rate of the accelerator is desired. The SLC, having electron energies up to 50 GeV, presents the possibility of generating positron bunches with useful charge even exceeding that of the initial electron bunch. The exact positron yield to be obtained depends on the particular capture, transport and damping system employed. Using 31 GeV electrons impinging on a W-type converter phase-space at the target to the acceptance of the capture rf section, the SLC source is capable of producing, for every electron, up to two positrons within the acceptance of the positron damping ring. The design of this source and the performance of the positron system as built are described. Also, future prospects and limitations for high-yield positron systems are discussed. 11 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Positron Beam Propagation in a Meter Long Plasma Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, K.A.; Blue, B.E.; Clayton, C.E.; Joshi, C.; Mori, W.B.; Decker, F.-J.; Hogan, M.J.; Iverson, R.; O'Connell, C.; Raimondi, P.; Siemann, Robert H.; Walz, D.; Katsouleas, T.C.; Muggli, P.; /Southern California U.

    2008-03-17

    Recent experiments and simulations have shown that positron beams propagating in plasmas can be focused and also create wakes with large accelerating gradients. For similar parameters, the wakes driven by positron beams are somewhat smaller compared to the case of an electron beam. Simulations have shown that the wake amplitude can be increased if the positron beam is propagated in a hollow plasma channel (Ref. 1). This paper, compares experimentally, the propagation and beam dynamics of a positron beam in a meter scale homogeneous plasma, to a positron beam hollow channel plasma. The results show that positron beams in hollow channels are less prone to distortions and deflections. Hollow channels were observed to guide the positron beam onto the channel axis. Beam energy loss was also observed implying the formation of a large wake amplitude. The experiments were carried out as part of the E-162 plasma wakefield experiments at SLAC.

  1. Optimization of positrons generation based on laser wakefield electron acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yuchi; Han, Dan; Zhang, Tiankui; Dong, Kegong; Zhu, Bin; Yan, Yonghong; Gu, Yuqiu

    2016-08-01

    Laser based positron represents a new particle source with short pulse duration and high charge density. Positron production based on laser wakefield electron acceleration (LWFA) has been investigated theoretically in this paper. Analytical expressions for positron spectra and yield have been obtained through a combination of LWFA and cascade shower theories. The maximum positron yield and corresponding converter thickness have been optimized as a function of driven laser power. Under the optimal condition, high energy (>100 MeV ) positron yield up to 5 ×1011 can be produced by high power femtosecond lasers at ELI-NP. The percentage of positrons shows that a quasineutral electron-positron jet can be generated by setting the converter thickness greater than 5 radiation lengths.

  2. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy at a superconducting electron accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, A.; Anwand, W.; Attallah, A. G.; Dornberg, G.; Elsayed, M.; Enke, D.; Hussein, A. E. M.; Krause-Rehberg, R.; Liedke, M. O.; Potzger, K.; Trinh, T. T.

    2017-01-01

    The Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf operates a superconducting linear accelerator for electrons with energies up to 35 MeV and average beam currents up to 1.6 mA. The electron beam is employed for production of several secondary beams including X-rays from bremsstrahlung production, neutrons, and positrons. The secondary positron beam after moderation feeds the Monoenergetic Positron Source (MePS) where positron annihilation lifetime (PALS) and positron annihilation Doppler-broadening experiments in materials science are performed in parallel. The adjustable repetition rate of the continuous-wave electron beams allows matching of the pulse separation to the positron lifetime in the sample under study. The energy of the positron beam can be set between 0.5 keV and 20 keV to perform depth resolved defect spectroscopy and porosity studies especially for thin films.

  3. Clinical applications with the HIDAC positron camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, P.; Schaller, G.; Christin, A.; Townsend, D.; Tochon-Danguy, H.; Wensveen, M.; Donath, A.

    1988-06-01

    A high density avalanche chamber (HIDAC) positron camera has been used for positron emission tomographic (PET) imaging in three different human studies, including patients presenting with: (I) thyroid diseases (124 cases); (II) clinically suspected malignant tumours of the pharynx or larynx (ENT) region (23 cases); and (III) clinically suspected primary malignant and metastatic tumours of the liver (9 cases, 19 PET scans). The positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals used for the three studies were Na 124I (4.2 d half-life) for the thyroid, 55Co-bleomycin (17.5 h half-life) for the ENT-region and 68Ga-colloid (68 min half-life) for the liver. Tomographic imaging was performed: (I) 24 h after oral Na 124I administration to the thyroid patients, (II) 18 h after intraveneous administration of 55Co-bleomycin to the ENT patients and (III) 20 min following the intraveneous injection of 68Ga-colloid to the liver tumour patients. Three different imaging protocols were used with the HIDAC positron camera to perform appropriate tomographic imaging in each patient study. Promising results were obtained in all three studies, particularly in tomographic thyroid imaging, where a significant clinical contribution is made possible for diagnosis and therapy planning by the PET technique. In the other two PET studies encouraging results were obtained for the detection and precise localisation of malignant tumour disease including an estimate of the functional liver volume based on the reticulo-endothelial-system (RES) of the liver, obtained in vivo, and the three-dimensional display of liver PET data using shaded graphics techniques. The clinical significance of the overall results obtained in both the ENT and the liver PET study, however, is still uncertain and the respective role of PET as a new imaging modality in these applications is not yet clearly established. To appreciate the clinical impact made by PET in liver and ENT malignant tumour staging needs further investigation

  4. Positron scattering and annihilation from hydrogenlike ions

    SciTech Connect

    Novikov, S.A.; Bromley, M.W.J.; Mitroy, J.

    2004-05-01

    The Kohn variational method is used with a configuration-interaction-type wave function to determine the J=0 and J=1 phase shifts and annihilation parameter Z{sub eff} for positron-hydrogenic ion scattering. The phase shifts are within 1-2% of the best previous calculations. The values of Z{sub eff} are small and do not exceed unity for any of the momenta considered. At thermal energies Z{sub eff} is minute with a value of order 10{sup -50} occurring for He{sup +} at k=0.05a{sub 0}{sup -1}. In addition to the variational calculations, analytic expressions for the phase shift and annihilation parameters within the Coulomb wave Born approximation are derived and used to help elucidate the dynamics of positron collisions with positive ions.

  5. Positron Emission Tomography Imaging of Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Lapi, Suzanne E.; Voller, Thomas F.; Welch, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Hypoxia imaging has applications in functional recovery in ischemic events such as stroke and myocardial ischemia, but especially in tumors in which hypoxia can be predictive of treatment response and overall prognosis. Recently there has been development of imaging agents utilizing positron emission tomography for non-invasive imaging of hypoxia. Many of these PET agents have come to the forefront of hypoxia imaging. Halogenated PET nitroimidazole imaging agents labeled with 18F (t1/2 = 110 m) and 124I (t1/2 = 110 m) have been under investigation for the last 25 years, with radiometal agents (64Cu-ATSM) being developed more recently. This review focuses on these positron emission tomography imaging agents for hypoxia. PMID:20046923

  6. Cold Positrons from Decaying Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Boubekeur, Lotfi; Dodelson, Scott; Vives, Oscar

    2012-11-01

    Many models of dark matter contain more than one new particle beyond those in the Standard Model. Often heavier particles decay into the lightest dark matter particle as the Universe evolves. Here we explore the possibilities that arise if one of the products in a (Heavy Particle) $\\rightarrow$ (Dark Matter) decay is a positron, and the lifetime is shorter than the age of the Universe. The positrons cool down by scattering off the cosmic microwave background and eventually annihilate when they fall into Galactic potential wells. The resulting 511 keV flux not only places constraints on this class of models but might even be consistent with that observed by the INTEGRAL satellite.

  7. Application of positron annihilation in materials science

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, R.W.; Fluss, M.J.; Smedskjaer, L.C.

    1984-05-01

    Owing to the ability of the positron to annihilate from a variety of defect-trapped states, positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) has been applied increasingly to the characterization and study of defects in materials in recent years. In metals particularly, it has been demonstrated that PAS can yield defect-specific information which, by itself or in conjunction with more traditional experimental techniques, has already made a significant impact upon the determination of atomic-defect properties and the monitoring and characterization of vacancy-like microstructure development, as occurs during post-irradiation annealing. The applications of PAS are now actively expanding to the study of more complex defect-related phenomena in irradiated or deformed metals and alloys, phase transformations and structural disorder, surfaces and near-surface defect characterization. A number of these applications in materials science are reviewed and discussed with respect to profitable future directions.

  8. Experimental study of a crystal positron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chehab, R.; Cizeron, R.; Sylvia, C.; Baier, V.; Beloborodov, K.; Bukin, A.; Burdin, S.; Dimova, T.; Drozdetsky, A.; Druzhinin, V.; Dubrovin, M.; Golubev, V.; Serednyakov, S.; Shary, V.; Strakhovenko, V.; Artru, X.; Chevallier, M.; Dauvergne, D.; Kirsch, R.; Lautesse, Ph.; Poizat, J.-C.; Remillieux, J.; Jejcic, A.; Keppler, P.; Major, J.; Gatignon, L.; Bochek, G.; Kulibaba, V.; Maslov, N.; Bogdanov, A.; Potylitsin, A.; Vnukov, I.

    2002-01-01

    Tungsten crystals oriented on their <111> axis, were submitted to 6 and 10 GeV electron beams on the SPS-CERN transfer lines. The crystals, 4 and 8 mm thick, used alone or associated to 4 mm thick amorphous disk, were studied as positron sources. The emerging positrons were detected by a Drift Chamber partially immersed in a magnetic field, where their trajectories were reconstructed providing the energy spectrum and the angular distribution. Significant enhancements were observed for the crystal source when compared to the amorphous one of the same thickness. The gain was larger than 3 and 2 for the 4 mm and 8 mm targets, respectively. The presented results look very promising for e+e- linear colliders.

  9. Positron annihilation study of P implanted Si

    SciTech Connect

    Asoka-Kumar, P.; Au, H.L.; Lynn, K.G. ); Sferlazzo, P. . SED Division)

    1992-01-01

    High-energy ion implantation (above 200 keV) is now commonly used in a variety of VLSI processes. The high energy required for these implants is often achieved by implanting multiply charged ions, which inevitably brings in the problem of low-energy ion contamination. The low-energy contamination is difficult to diagnose and detect. Positron annihilation spectroscopy is used to examine the defect distributions in these high energy implants with varying degrees of contamination.

  10. Positron annihilation study of P implanted Si

    SciTech Connect

    Asoka-Kumar, P.; Au, H.L.; Lynn, K.G.; Sferlazzo, P.

    1992-12-01

    High-energy ion implantation (above 200 keV) is now commonly used in a variety of VLSI processes. The high energy required for these implants is often achieved by implanting multiply charged ions, which inevitably brings in the problem of low-energy ion contamination. The low-energy contamination is difficult to diagnose and detect. Positron annihilation spectroscopy is used to examine the defect distributions in these high energy implants with varying degrees of contamination.

  11. Positron studies of defected metals, metallic surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Bansil, A.

    1991-01-01

    Specific problems proposed under this project included the treatment of electronic structure and momentum density in various disordered and defected systems. Since 1987, when the new high-temperature superconductors were discovered, the project focused extensively on questions concerning the electronic structure and Fermiology of high-[Tc] superconductors, in particular, (i) momentum density and positron experiments, (ii) angle-resolved photoemission intensities, (iii) effects of disorder and substitutions in the high-[Tc]'s.

  12. Positron-inert gas differential elastic scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kauppila, W. E.; Smith, Steven J.; Kwan, C. K.; Stein, T. S.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements are being made in a crossed beam experiment of the relative elastic differential cross section (DCS) for 5 to 300 eV positrons scattering from inert gas atoms (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) in the angular range from 30 to 134 deg. Results obtained at energies around the positronium (Ps) formation threshold provide evidence that Ps formation and possibly other inelastic channels have an effect on the elastic scattering channel.

  13. COSMIC-RAY POSITRONS FROM MILLISECOND PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Venter, C.; Kopp, A.; Büsching, I.; Harding, A. K.; Gonthier, P. L.

    2015-07-10

    Observations by the Fermi Large Area Telescope of γ-ray millisecond pulsar (MSP) light curves imply copious pair production in their magnetospheres, and not exclusively in those of younger pulsars. Such pair cascades may be a primary source of Galactic electrons and positrons, contributing to the observed enhancement in positron flux above ∼10 GeV. Fermi has also uncovered many new MSPs, impacting Galactic stellar population models. We investigate the contribution of Galactic MSPs to the flux of terrestrial cosmic-ray electrons and positrons. Our population synthesis code predicts the source properties of present-day MSPs. We simulate their pair spectra invoking an offset-dipole magnetic field. We also consider positrons and electrons that have been further accelerated to energies of several TeV by strong intrabinary shocks in black widow (BW) and redback (RB) systems. Since MSPs are not surrounded by pulsar wind nebulae or supernova shells, we assume that the pairs freely escape and undergo losses only in the intergalactic medium. We compute the transported pair spectra at Earth, following their diffusion and energy loss through the Galaxy. The predicted particle flux increases for non-zero offsets of the magnetic polar caps. Pair cascades from the magnetospheres of MSPs are only modest contributors around a few tens of GeV to the lepton fluxes measured by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, PAMELA, and Fermi, after which this component cuts off. The contribution by BWs and RBs may, however, reach levels of a few tens of percent at tens of TeV, depending on model parameters.

  14. Cosmic-ray Positrons from Millisecond Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venter, C.; Kopp, A.; Harding, A. K.; Gonthier, P. L.; Büsching, I.

    2015-07-01

    Observations by the Fermi Large Area Telescope of γ-ray millisecond pulsar (MSP) light curves imply copious pair production in their magnetospheres, and not exclusively in those of younger pulsars. Such pair cascades may be a primary source of Galactic electrons and positrons, contributing to the observed enhancement in positron flux above ∼10 GeV. Fermi has also uncovered many new MSPs, impacting Galactic stellar population models. We investigate the contribution of Galactic MSPs to the flux of terrestrial cosmic-ray electrons and positrons. Our population synthesis code predicts the source properties of present-day MSPs. We simulate their pair spectra invoking an offset-dipole magnetic field. We also consider positrons and electrons that have been further accelerated to energies of several TeV by strong intrabinary shocks in black widow (BW) and redback (RB) systems. Since MSPs are not surrounded by pulsar wind nebulae or supernova shells, we assume that the pairs freely escape and undergo losses only in the intergalactic medium. We compute the transported pair spectra at Earth, following their diffusion and energy loss through the Galaxy. The predicted particle flux increases for non-zero offsets of the magnetic polar caps. Pair cascades from the magnetospheres of MSPs are only modest contributors around a few tens of GeV to the lepton fluxes measured by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, PAMELA, and Fermi, after which this component cuts off. The contribution by BWs and RBs may, however, reach levels of a few tens of percent at tens of TeV, depending on model parameters.

  15. The Clic Electron and Positron Polarized Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinolfi, L.

    2011-01-01

    The CLIC polarized electron source is based on a DC gun where the photocathode is illuminated by a laser beam. Each micro-bunch has a charge of 6 × 109 e-, a width of 100 ps and a repetition rate of 2 GHz. A peak current of 10 A in the micro-bunch is a challenge for the surface charge limit of the photo-cathode. Two options are feasible to generate the 2 GHz e- bunch train: 100 ps micro-bunches can be extracted from the photo-cathode either by a 2 GHz laser system or by generating a macro-bunch using a ~200 ns laser pulse and a subsequent RF bunching system to produce the appropriate micro-bunch structure. Recent results obtained by SLAC, for the latter case, are presented. The polarized positron source is based on a positron production scheme in which polarized photons are produced by a laser Compton scattering process. The resulting circularly-polarized gamma photons are sent onto a target, producing pairs of longitudinally polarized electrons and positrons. The Compton backscattering process occurs either in a Compton ring, where a 1 GeV electron beam interacts with circularly-polarized photons in an optical resonator or in a 1.8 GeV Compton Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) or in a 6 GeV Linac with several optical cavities. The undulator scheme is also studied. The nominal CLIC e+ bunch population is 6.7 × 109 particles per bunch at 200 MeV. The tradeoff between e+ yield and level of polarization is an important topic. The overall scheme for both polarized electron and positron beams is described.

  16. Positrons for Antihydrogen with ATRAP: efficient transfer of large positron numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storry, Cody; Comeau, Daniel; Dror, Asaf; Fitzakerley, Daniel; George, Matthew; Hessels, Eric; Weel, Matthew

    2012-06-01

    Positrons accumulated in a room-temperature buffer-gas-cooled positron accumulator are efficiently transferred into a superconducting solenoid which houses the ATRAP cryogenic Penning trap for antihydrogen research. The positrons are guided along a 9-meter-long magnetic guide which connects the central field lines of the 0.15-tesla field in the positron accumulator to central magnetic field lines of the superconducting solenoid. Seventy independently-controllable electromagnets are required to overcome the fringing field of the large-bore superconducting solenoid. The guide includes both a 15 degree upward bend and a 105 degree downward bend to account for the orthogonal orientation of the accumulator with respect to the cryogenic Penning trap. Low-energy positrons ejected from the accumulator follow the magnetic field lines within the guide and are transferred into the superconducting solenoid with nearly 100% efficiency. 7 meters of 5-cm-diameter stainless-steel tube, and a 20-mm-long, 1.5-mm-diameter cryogenic pumping restriction ensure that the 10-2 mbar pressure in the accumulator is well isolated from the extreme vacuum required in the Penning trap to allow long antimatter storage times.

  17. Dipole configuration for confinement of positrons and electron-positron plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenson, E. V.; Saitoh, H.; Horn-Stanja, J.; Hergenhahn, U.; Paschkowski, N.; Sunn Pedersen, T.; Stoneking, M. R.; Dickmann, M.; Singer, M.; Vohburger, S.; Hugenschmidt, C.; Schweikhard, L.; Danielson, J. R.; Surko, C. M.

    2016-10-01

    Laboratory creation and confinement of electron-positron plasmas, which are expected to exhibit atypical plasma physics characteristics, would enable tests of many theory and simulation predictions (e.g., the stabilization of anomalous transport mechanisms). This is the goal of APEX/PAX (A Positron-Electron eXperiment/Positron Accumulation eXperiment). Following demonstration of efficient (38%) E ×B injection and subsequent confinement (τ = 3-5 ms) of cold positrons in a dipole magnetic field, the system is undergoing upgrades from a supported permanent magnet to a supported HTSC (high-temperature superconductor) coil, then to a levitated HTSC coil suitable for the simultaneous confinement of electrons and positrons. This contribution will report on the design and testing of the new systems and subsystems (e.g., for cooling, excitation, and levitation) and, if available, on results of upcoming experiments using a ``rotating wall'' to generate inward particle flux deeper into the confinement region. on behalf of the APEX/PAX team and collaborators.

  18. Advances in positron and electron scattering*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limão-Vieira, Paulo; García, Gustavo; Krishnakumar, E.; Petrović, Zoran; Sullivan, James; Tanuma, Hajime

    2016-10-01

    The topical issue on Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering" combines contributions from POSMOL 2015 together with others devoted to celebrate the unprecedented scientific careers of our loyal colleagues and trusted friends Steve Buckman (Australian National University, Australia) and Michael Allan (University of Fribourg, Switzerland) on the occasion of their retirements. POSMOL 2015, the XVIII International Workshop on Low-Energy Positron and Positronium Physics and the XIX International Symposium on Electron-Molecule Collisions and Swarms, was held at Universidade NOVA de Lisboa, Lisboa, Portugal, from 17-20 July 2015. The international workshop and symposium allowed to achieve a very privileged forum of sharing and developing our scientific expertise on current aspects of positron, positronium and antiproton interactions with electrons, atoms, molecules and solid surfaces, and related topics, as well as electron interactions with molecules in both gaseous and condensed phases. Particular topics include studies of electron interactions with biomolecules, electron induced surface chemistry and the study of plasma processes. Recent developments in the study of swarms are also fully addressed.

  19. New generation electron-positron factories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zobov, Mikhail

    2011-09-01

    In 2010 we celebrate 50 years since commissioning of the first particle storage ring ADA in Frascati (Italy) that also became the first electron-positron collider in 1964. After that date the particle colliders have increased their intensity, luminosity and energy by several orders of magnitude. Namely, because of the high stored beam currents and high rate of useful physics events (luminosity) the modern electron-positron colliders are called "factories". However, the fundamental physics has required luminosities by 1-2 orders of magnitudes higher with respect to those presently achieved. This task can be accomplished by designing a new generation of factories exploiting the potential of a new collision scheme based on the Crab Waist (CW) collision concept recently proposed and successfully tested at Frascati. In this paper we discuss the performance and limitations of the present generation electron-positron factories and give a brief overview of new ideas and collision schemes proposed for further collider luminosity increase. In more detail we describe the CW collision concept and the results of the crab waist collision tests in DAϕNE, the Italian ϕ-factory. Finally, we briefly describe most advanced projects of the next generation factories based on the CW concept: SuperB in Italy, SuperKEKB in Japan and SuperC-Tau in Russia.

  20. Monte Carlo investigation of positron annihilation in medical positron emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, P. W.; Spyrou, N. M.

    2007-09-01

    A number of Monte Carlo codes are available for simulating positron emission tomography (PET), however, physics approximations differ. A number of radiation processes are deemed negligible, some without rigorous investigation. Some PET literature quantify approximations to be valid, without citing the data source. The radiation source is the first step in Monte Carlo simulations, for some codes this is 511 keV photons 180° apart, not polyenergetic positrons with radiation histories of their own. Without prior assumptions, we investigated electron-positron annihilation under clinical PET conditions. Just before annihilation, we tallied the positron energy and position. Right after annihilation, we tallied the energy and separation angle of photon pairs. When comparing PET textbooks with theory, PENELOPE and EGSnrc, only the latter three agreed. From 10 6 radiation histories, a positron source of 15O in a chest phantom annihilated at as high as 1.58 MeV, producing photons with energies 0.30-2.20 MeV, 79-180° apart. From 10 6 radiation histories, an 18F positron source in a head phantom annihilated at energies as high as 0.56 MeV, producing 0.33-1.18 MeV photons 109-180° apart. 2.5% and 0.8% annihilation events occurred inflight in the chest and the head phantoms, respectively. PET textbooks typically either do not mention any deviation from 180°, or state a deviation of 0.25° or 0.5°. Our findings are founded on the well-established Heitler cross-sections and relativistic kinematics, both adopted unanimously by PENELOPE, EGSnrc and GEANT4. Our results highlight the effects of annihilation in-flight, a process sometimes forgotten within the PET community.

  1. High-field capture section for SLC positron source

    SciTech Connect

    Hoag, H.A.; Deruyter, H.; Kramer, J.; Yao, C.G.

    1986-05-01

    The positron source for SLC is being installed at the two-thirds point on the SLAC linac. Electron bunches at 33 GeV impinge upon a Tantalum/Tungsten target, producing showers of positrons with energies extending from approximately 2 to 20 MeV, with most positrons at the low end of this range. Positrons with low energies and finite transverse momenta slip phase during the processes of reacceleration and reinjection into the SLC system, increasing the energy spread and reducing the overall yield of the positron source. This reduction in yield has to be minimized by ''capturing'' the positrons with a high-field accelerator section placed as soon after the target as possible. The design, fabrication and RF testing of this accelerator section are described.

  2. Detecting positron-atom bound states through resonant annihilation.

    PubMed

    Dzuba, V A; Flambaum, V V; Gribakin, G F

    2010-11-12

    A method is proposed for detecting positron-atom bound states by observing enhanced positron annihilation due to electronic Feshbach resonances at electron-volt energies. The method is applicable to a range of open-shell transition-metal atoms which are likely to bind the positron: Fe, Co, Ni, Tc, Ru, Rh, Sn, Sb, Ta, W, Os, Ir, and Pt. Estimates of their binding energies are provided.

  3. Recent status of A Positron-Electron Experiment (APEX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitoh, H.; Pedersen, T. S.; Hergenhahn, U.; Stenson, E. V.; Paschkowski, N.; Hugenschmidt, C.

    2014-04-01

    A project is underway to generate an electron-positron plasma by using the NEPOMUC positron source at the FRM-II facility combined with a multicell-type Penning trap (PAX) and a superconducting dipole magnetic field trap (APEX). In the APEX project, proof-of principle experiments are proposed for the development of efficient injection methods of positrons by using a small dipole magnetic field trap with a permanent magnet. Plans for the APEX project and its recent status are reported.

  4. What is the fate of runaway positrons in tokamaks?

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Jian; Qin, Hong; Fisch, Nathaniel J.; ...

    2014-06-19

    In this study, massive runaway positrons are generated by runaway electrons in tokamaks. The fate of these positrons encodes valuable information about the runaway dynamics. The phase space dynamics of a runaway position is investigated using a Lagrangian that incorporates the tokamak geometry, loop voltage, radiation and collisional effects. It is found numerically that runaway positrons will drift out of the plasma to annihilate on the first wall, with an in-plasma annihilation possibility less than 0.1%. The dynamics of runaway positrons provides signatures that can be observed as diagnostic tools.

  5. Recent Developments in the Design of the NLC Positron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Kotseroglou, T.; Bharadwaj, V.; Clendenin, J.E.; Ecklund, S,; Frisch, J.; Krejcik, P,; Kukikov, A.V.; Liu, J.; Maruyama, T.; Millage, K.K.; Mulhollan, G.; Nelson, W.R.; Schultz, D.C.; Sheppard, J.C.; Turner, J.; Van Bibber, K.; Flottmann, K.; Namito, Y.

    1999-11-05

    Recent developments in the design of the Next Linear Collider (NLC) positron source based on updated beam parameters are described. The unpolarized NLC positron source [1,2] consists of a dedicated 6.2 GeV S-band electron accelerator, a high-Z positron production target, a capture system and an L-band positron linac. The 1998 failure of the SLC target, which is currently under investigation, may lead to a variation of the target design. Progress towards a polarized positron source is also presented. A moderately polarized positron beam colliding with a highly polarized electron beam results in an effective polarization large enough to explore new physics at NLC. One of the schemes towards a polarized positron source incorporates a polarized electron source, a 50 MeV electron accelerator, a thin target for positron production and a new capture system optimized for high-energy, small angular-divergence positrons. The yield for such a process, checked using the EGS4 code, is of the order of 10{sup -3}. The EGS4 code has being enhanced to include the effect of polarization in bremsstrahlung and pair-production process.

  6. Positron-molecule bound states and positive ion production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leventhal, M.; Passner, A.; Surko, C. M.

    1990-01-01

    The interaction was studied of low energy positrons with large molecules such as alkanes. These data provide evidencce for the existence of long lived resonances and bound states of positrons with neutral molecules. The formation process and the nature of these resonances are discussed. The positive ions produced when a positron annihilates with an electron in one of these resonances were observed and this positive ion formation process is discussed. A review is presented of the current state of the understanding of these positron-molecule resonances and the resulting positive ion formation. A number of outstanding issues in this area is also discussed.

  7. Search for a positron anisotropy with PAMELA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panico, B.; Adriani, O.; Barbarino, G. C.; Bazilevskaya, G. A.; Bellotti, R.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Bongi, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Bottai, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Carlson, P.; Casolino, M.; Castellini, G.; De Donato, C.; De Santis, C.; De Simone, N.; Di Felice, V.; Formato, V.; Galper, A. M.; Giaccari, U.; Karelin, A. V.; Koldashov, S. V.; Koldobskiy, S.; Krutkov, S. Y.; Kvashnin, A. N.; Leonov, A.; Malakhov, V.; Marcelli, L.; Martucci, M.; Mayorov, A. G.; Menn, W.; Mergé, M.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Monaco, A.; Mori, N.; Munini, R.; Osteria, G.; Palma, F.; Pearce, M.; Picozza, P.; Ricci, M.; Ricciarini, S. B.; Sarkar, R.; Scotti, V.; Simon, M.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Stozhkov, Y. I.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Vasilyev, G. I.; Voronov, S. A.; Yurkin, Y. T.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.

    2015-09-01

    The PAMELA experiment has been collecting data since 2006; its results indicate a rise in the positron fraction with respect to the sum of electrons and positrons in the cosmic-ray (CR) spectrum above 10 GeV. This excess can be due to additional sources, as SNRs or pulsars, which can lead to an anisotropy in the local CR positron, detectable from current experiments. We report on the analysis on spatial distributions of positron events collected by PAMELA, taking into account also the geomagnetic field effects. No significant deviation from the isotropy has been observed.

  8. Probing the positron moderation process using high-intensity, highly polarized slow-positron beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van House, J.; Zitzewitz, P. W.

    1984-01-01

    A highly polarized (P = 0.48 + or - 0.02) intense (500,000/sec) beam of 'slow' (Delta E = about 2 eV) positrons (e+) is generated, and it is shown that it is possible to achieve polarization as high as P = 0.69 + or - 0.04 with reduced intensity. The measured polarization of the slow e+ emitted by five different positron moderators showed no dependence on the moderator atomic number (Z). It is concluded that only source positrons with final kinetic energy below 17 keV contribute to the slow-e+ beam, in disagreement with recent yield functions derived from low-energy measurements. Measurements of polarization and yield with absorbers of different Z between the source and moderator show the effects of the energy and angular distributions of the source positrons on P. The depolarization of fast e+ transmitted through high-Z absorbers has been measured. Applications of polarized slow-e+ beams are discussed.

  9. Positron autoradiography for intravascular imaging: feasibility evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikhaliev, Polad M.; Xu, Tong; Ducote, Justin L.; Easwaramoorthy, Balasubramaniam; Mukherjee, Jogeshwar; Molloi, Sabee

    2006-02-01

    Approximately 70% of acute coronary artery disease is caused by unstable (vulnerable) plaques with an inflammation of the overlying cap and high lipid content. A rupturing of the inflamed cap of the plaque results in propagation of the thrombus into the lumen, blockage of the artery and acute ischaemic syndrome or sudden death. Morphological imaging such as angiography or intravascular ultrasound cannot determine inflammation status of the plaque. A radiotracer such as 18F-FDG is accumulated in vulnerable plaques due to higher metabolic activity of the inflamed cap and could be used to detect a vulnerable plaque. However, positron emission tomography (PET) cannot detect the FDG-labelled plaques because of respiratory and heart motions, small size and low activity of the plaques. Plaques can be detected using a miniature particle (positron) detector inserted into the artery. In this work, a new detector concept is investigated for intravascular imaging of the plaques. The detector consists of a storage phosphor tip bound to the end of an intravascular catheter. It can be inserted into an artery, absorb the 18F-FDG positrons from the plaques, withdrawn from the artery and read out. Length and diameter of the storage phosphor tip can be matched to the length and the diameter of the artery. Monte Carlo simulations and experimental evaluations of coronary plaque imaging with the proposed detector were performed. It was shown that the sensitivity of the storage phosphor detector to the positrons of 18F-FDG is sufficient to detect coronary plaques with 1 mm and 2 mm sizes and 590 Bq and 1180 Bq activities in the arteries with 2 mm and 3 mm diameters, respectively. An experimental study was performed using plastic tubes with 2 mm diameter filled with an FDG solution, which simulates blood. FDG spots simulating plaques were placed over the surface of the tube. A phosphor tip was inserted into the tube and imaged the plaques. Exposure time was 1 min in all simulations and

  10. Liquid Metal Target for NLC Positron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppard, John C.

    2002-08-19

    Possibility of creating the liquid lead target with parameters, optimum for the NLC positron source, is investigated. Target has a form of titanium vessel, filled with liquid lead, pumped through. The energy deposition in target is characterized by 35 kW average power and up to 250 J/g specific energy at optimum beam sigma 0.6 mm. The use of pumped through liquid lead as target material solves both the problems of power evacuation and target survival. The window for beam exit is made of both temperature and pressure resistive material--the diamond-like ceramic BN.

  11. Positron autoradiography for intravascular imaging: feasibility evaluation.

    PubMed

    Shikhaliev, Polad M; Xu, Tong; Ducote, Justin L; Easwaramoorthy, Balasubramaniam; Mukherjee, Jogeshwar; Molloi, Sabee

    2006-02-21

    Approximately 70% of acute coronary artery disease is caused by unstable (vulnerable) plaques with an inflammation of the overlying cap and high lipid content. A rupturing of the inflamed cap of the plaque results in propagation of the thrombus into the lumen, blockage of the artery and acute ischaemic syndrome or sudden death. Morphological imaging such as angiography or intravascular ultrasound cannot determine inflammation status of the plaque. A radiotracer such as 18F-FDG is accumulated in vulnerable plaques due to higher metabolic activity of the inflamed cap and could be used to detect a vulnerable plaque. However, positron emission tomography (PET) cannot detect the FDG-labelled plaques because of respiratory and heart motions, small size and low activity of the plaques. Plaques can be detected using a miniature particle (positron) detector inserted into the artery. In this work, a new detector concept is investigated for intravascular imaging of the plaques. The detector consists of a storage phosphor tip bound to the end of an intravascular catheter. It can be inserted into an artery, absorb the 18F-FDG positrons from the plaques, withdrawn from the artery and read out. Length and diameter of the storage phosphor tip can be matched to the length and the diameter of the artery. Monte Carlo simulations and experimental evaluations of coronary plaque imaging with the proposed detector were performed. It was shown that the sensitivity of the storage phosphor detector to the positrons of 18F-FDG is sufficient to detect coronary plaques with 1 mm and 2 mm sizes and 590 Bq and 1180 Bq activities in the arteries with 2 mm and 3 mm diameters, respectively. An experimental study was performed using plastic tubes with 2 mm diameter filled with an FDG solution, which simulates blood. FDG spots simulating plaques were placed over the surface of the tube. A phosphor tip was inserted into the tube and imaged the plaques. Exposure time was 1 min in all simulations and

  12. Positron emission tomography (PET) for cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Breitenstein, S.; Apestegui, C.

    2008-01-01

    The combination of positron emission tomography (PET) with computed tomography (PET-CT) provides simultaneous metabolic and anatomic information on tumors in the same imaging session. Sensitivity of PET/PET-CT is higher for intrahepatic (>90%) than for extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) (about 60%). The detection rate of distant metastasis is 100%. PET, and particularly PET-CT, improves the results and impacts on the oncological management in CCA compared with other imaging modalities. Therefore, PET-CT is recommended in the preoperative staging of intrahepatic (strength of recommendation: moderate) and extrahepatic (strength of recommendation: low) CCA. PMID:18773069

  13. Semiempirical potentials for positron scattering by atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Assafrao, Denise; Walters, H. R. J.; Arretche, Felipe; Dutra, Adriano; Mohallem, J. R.

    2011-08-15

    We report calculations of differential and integral cross sections for positron scattering by noble gas and alkaline-earth atoms within the same methodology. The scattering potentials are constructed by scaling adiabatic potentials so that their minima coincide with the covalent radii of the target atoms. Elastic differential and integral cross sections are calculated for Ne, Ar, Be, and Mg, and the results are very close to experimental and best theoretical data. Particularly, elastic differential cross sections for Be and Mg at low energies are reported.

  14. Positron-annihilation radiation from neutron stars.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Borner, G.; Cohen, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    Matter accreted on the surfaces of neutron stars consists of energetic particles of a few tens to one or two hundred MeV per nucleon, depending on the neutron-star mass. In addition to heat, such particles produce nuclear reactions with the surface material. It is proposed that the recently observed 473 plus or minus 30 keV spectral feature from the galactic center is gravitationally redshifted positron-annihilation radiation produced at the surfaces of neutron stars. The principal observational tests of the model would be the detection of nuclear gamma-ray lines from the galactic center.

  15. Clinical oncologic positron emission tomography: an introduction.

    PubMed

    Turkington, Timothy G; Coleman, R Edward

    2002-04-01

    PET imaging is a molecular imaging technology that is diffusing into imaging departments quite rapidly. The unique characteristics of positron emitting radionuclides such as fluorine-18 provide high-quality images with reasonable acquisition times. The imaging instrumentation continues to improve with new detector materials and combinations of PET scanners and CT scanners. FDG is now readily available to most hospitals in the United States. Third-party payers now recognize the importance of PET imaging in multiple malignancies. The number of PET scans performed annually will continue to increase as the indications increase and the instrumentation is more available.

  16. Positron Scanner for Locating Brain Tumors

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Rankowitz, S.; Robertson, J. S.; Higinbotham, W. A.; Rosenblum, M. J.

    1962-03-01

    A system is described that makes use of positron emitting isotopes for locating brain tumors. This system inherently provides more information about the distribution of radioactivity in the head in less time than existing scanners which use one or two detectors. A stationary circular array of 32 scintillation detectors scans a horizontal layer of the head from many directions simultaneously. The data, consisting of the number of counts in all possible coincidence pairs, are coded and stored in the memory of a Two-Dimensional Pulse-Height Analyzer. A unique method of displaying and interpreting the data is described that enables rapid approximate analysis of complex source distribution patterns. (auth)

  17. Positron lifetime calculations for defects in Zn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campillo, J. M.; Plazaola, F.; de Diego, N.

    2000-11-01

    The effect of the lattice relaxation at vacancy clusters and interstitial-type dislocation loops on the lifetime of positrons in Zn has been studied. Defective relaxed structures have been generated for the lifetime calculations by using a many-body potential for Zn. From the results, it is inferred that the effect of the atomic relaxation is mainly significant for small vacancy clusters. The lifetime associated with interstitial-type loops is very sensitive to the loop structure and its surroundings. Previous experimental results are compared with the theoretical calculations.

  18. Possible resonance in positron-lithium scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Raouf, M. A.; Wood, R. F.

    1990-09-01

    The possible appearance of resonances in the partial cross sections of the inelastic collisions of positrons with lithium atoms at energies below 5 eV is investigated. It is assumed that only elastic and rearrangement channels are open, while excitation channels are closed. A coupled static formalism, in which the polarization potentials of the lithium and positronium are switched on, is employed. The basis set of Clementi and Roetti [At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 14, 177 (1974)] is used for describing the target model. Comparison between the resulting total cross sections and those obtained by other authors is presented.

  19. Positron Emission Tomography: Its 65 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Guerra, A.; Belcari, N.; Bisogni, M.

    2016-04-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a well-established imaging technique for in vivo molecular imaging. In this review after a brief history of PET there are presented its physical principles and the technology that has been developed for bringing PET from a bench experiment to a clinical indispensable instrument. The limitations and performance of the PET tomographs are discussed, both as for the hardware and software aspects. The status of art of clinical, pre-clinical and hybrid scanners (, PET/CT and PET/MR) is reported. Finally the actual trend and the recent and future technological developments are fully illustrated.

  20. Positron impact ionization of atomic hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Acacia, P.; Campeanu, R.I.; Horbatsch, M.

    1993-05-01

    We will present integrated cross sections for ionization of atomic hydrogen by positrons. These have been calculated in a distorted-wave approximation using energy-dependent effective charges in the final channel as well as static and polarization potentials in the initial channel. We present two models for calculating the energy-dependent effective charges both of which produce results in good agreement with the recent experimental measurements of Spicher et al. This is in contrast to previous distorted-wave calculations which used fixed effective charges as well as classical trajectory calculations. Both of these latter methods produced results which were substantially below ours and the experimental data.

  1. ELECTRON-POSITRON FLOWS AROUND MAGNETARS

    SciTech Connect

    Beloborodov, Andrei M.

    2013-11-10

    The twisted magnetospheres of magnetars must sustain a persistent flow of electron-positron plasma. The flow dynamics is controlled by the radiation field around the hot neutron star. The problem of plasma motion in the self-consistent radiation field is solved using the method of virtual beams. The plasma and radiation exchange momentum via resonant scattering and self-organize into the 'radiatively locked' outflow with a well-defined, decreasing Lorentz factor. There is an extended zone around the magnetar where the plasma flow is ultra-relativistic; its Lorentz factor is self-regulated so that it can marginally scatter thermal photons. The flow becomes slow and opaque in an outer equatorial zone, where the decelerated plasma accumulates and annihilates; this region serves as a reflector for the thermal photons emitted by the neutron star. The e {sup ±} flow carries electric current, which is sustained by a moderate induced electric field. The electric field maintains a separation between the electron and positron velocities, against the will of the radiation field. The two-stream instability is then inevitable, and the induced turbulence can generate low-frequency emission. In particular, radio emission may escape around the magnetic dipole axis of the star. Most of the flow energy is converted to hard X-ray emission, which is examined in an accompanying paper.

  2. Positron Emission Tomography: A Basic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerbacher, M. E.; Deaton, J. W.; Phinney, L. C.; Mitchell, L. J.; Duggan, J. L.

    2007-10-01

    Positron Emission Tomography is useful in detecting biological abnormalities. The technique involves attaching radiotracers to a material used inside the body, in many cases glucose. Glucose is absorbed most readily in areas of unusual cell growth or uptake of nutrients so through natural processes the treated glucose highlights regions of tumors and other degenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. The higher the concentration of isotopes, the more dynamic the area. Isotopes commonly used as tracers are 11C, 18F, 13N, and 15O due to their easy production and short half-lives. Once the tracers have saturated an area of tissue they are detected using coincidence detectors collinear with individual isotopes. As the isotope decays it emits a positron which, upon annihilating an electron, produces two oppositely directioned gamma rays. The PET machine consists of several pairs of detectors, each 180 degrees from their partner detector. When the oppositely positioned detectors are collinear with the area of the isotope, a computer registers the location of the isotope and can compile an image of the activity of the highlighted area based on the position and strength of the isotopes.

  3. Analysis of positron lifetime spectra in polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Mall, Gerald H.; Sprinkle, Danny R.

    1988-01-01

    A new procedure for analyzing multicomponent positron lifetime spectra in polymers was developed. It requires initial estimates of the lifetimes and the intensities of various components, which are readily obtainable by a standard spectrum stripping process. These initial estimates, after convolution with the timing system resolution function, are then used as the inputs for a nonlinear least squares analysis to compute the estimates that conform to a global error minimization criterion. The convolution integral uses the full experimental resolution function, in contrast to the previous studies where analytical approximations of it were utilized. These concepts were incorporated into a generalized Computer Program for Analyzing Positron Lifetime Spectra (PAPLS) in polymers. Its validity was tested using several artificially generated data sets. These data sets were also analyzed using the widely used POSITRONFIT program. In almost all cases, the PAPLS program gives closer fit to the input values. The new procedure was applied to the analysis of several lifetime spectra measured in metal ion containing Epon-828 samples. The results are described.

  4. Electron-Positron Flows around Magnetars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beloborodov, Andrei M.

    2013-11-01

    The twisted magnetospheres of magnetars must sustain a persistent flow of electron-positron plasma. The flow dynamics is controlled by the radiation field around the hot neutron star. The problem of plasma motion in the self-consistent radiation field is solved using the method of virtual beams. The plasma and radiation exchange momentum via resonant scattering and self-organize into the "radiatively locked" outflow with a well-defined, decreasing Lorentz factor. There is an extended zone around the magnetar where the plasma flow is ultra-relativistic; its Lorentz factor is self-regulated so that it can marginally scatter thermal photons. The flow becomes slow and opaque in an outer equatorial zone, where the decelerated plasma accumulates and annihilates; this region serves as a reflector for the thermal photons emitted by the neutron star. The e ± flow carries electric current, which is sustained by a moderate induced electric field. The electric field maintains a separation between the electron and positron velocities, against the will of the radiation field. The two-stream instability is then inevitable, and the induced turbulence can generate low-frequency emission. In particular, radio emission may escape around the magnetic dipole axis of the star. Most of the flow energy is converted to hard X-ray emission, which is examined in an accompanying paper.

  5. Positron-annihilation study of radiation defects in sodium azide

    SciTech Connect

    Etin, G.I.; Ryabykh, S.M.

    1987-07-01

    Annihilation-photon angular correlation has been used to examine radiation defects in sodium azide capable of trapping positrons. The calculated and measured characteristics have been determined for various defects, including micropores filled by radiolytic nitrogen. The positron annihilation rates have been determined for the regions around radiation defects.

  6. Moisture determination in composite materials using positron lifetime techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Holt, W. R.; Mock, W., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A technique was developed which has the potential of providing information on the moisture content as well as its depth in the specimen. This technique was based on the dependence of positron lifetime on the moisture content of the composite specimen. The positron lifetime technique of moisture determination and the results of the initial studies are described.

  7. Recent Developments in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Instrumentation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Derenzo, S. E.; Budinger, T. F.

    1986-04-01

    This paper presents recent detector developments and perspectives for positron emission tomography (PET) instrumentation used for medical research, as well as the physical processes in positron annihilation, photon scattering and detection, tomograph design considerations, and the potentials for new advances in detectors.

  8. A Simple Estimate of the Mass of the Positron.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Goronwy Tudor

    1993-01-01

    Discusses a small part of the final state of a high-energy neutrino interaction: a head-on collision of a positron and a stationary electron. Provides a bubble chamber picture and describes the resulting particle effects. Uses momentum to determine the mass of the positron. (MVL)

  9. A Simple Estimate of the Mass of the Positron.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Goronwy Tudor

    1993-01-01

    Discusses a small part of the final state of a high-energy neutrino interaction: a head-on collision of a positron and a stationary electron. Provides a bubble chamber picture and describes the resulting particle effects. Uses momentum to determine the mass of the positron. (MVL)

  10. Towards laboratory produced relativistic electron–positron pair plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hui; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Wilks, S. C.; Cauble, R.; Dollar, F.; Falk, K.; Gregori, G.; Hazi, A.; Moses, E. I.; Murphy, C. D.; Myatt, J.; Park, J.; Seely, J.; Shepherd, R.; Spitkovsky, A.; Stoeckl, C.; Szabo, C. I.; Tommasini, R.; Zulick, C.; Beiersdorfer, P.

    2011-12-01

    We review recent experimental results on the path to producing electron–positron pair plasmas using lasers. Relativistic pair-plasmas and jets are believed to exist in many astrophysical objects and are often invoked to explain energetic phenomena related to Gamma Ray Bursts and Black Holes. On earth, positrons from radioactive isotopes or accelerators are used extensively at low energies (sub-MeV) in areas related to surface science positron emission tomography and basic antimatter science. Experimental platforms capable of producing the high-temperature pair-plasma and high-flux jets required to simulate astrophysical positron conditions have so far been absent. In the past few years, we performed extensive experiments generating positrons with intense lasers where we found that relativistic electron and positron jets are produced by irradiating a solid gold target with an intense picosecond laser pulse. The positron temperatures in directions parallel and transverse to the beam both exceeded 0.5 MeV, and the density of electrons and positrons in these jets are of order 1016 cm-3 and 1013 cm-3, respectively. With the increasing performance of high-energy ultra-short laser pulses, we expect that a high-density, up to 1018 cm-3, relativistic pair-plasma is achievable, a novel regime of laboratory-produced hot dense matter.

  11. Energy loss of relativistic electrons and positrons traversing cosmic matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    Questions of adiabatic expansion are considered along with aspects of Compton scattering, bremsstrahlung, electronic excitation, synchrotron radiation, and electron-positron pair production. It is found that, unless the intergalactic magnetic field is very small, synchrotron radiation will dominate all other energy loss processes at ultrahigh electron and positron energies. The dependence of the loss rates on the cosmic epoch is also discussed.

  12. Towards laboratory produced relativistic electron-positron pair plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hui; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Wilks, S. C.; Cauble, R.; Dollar, F.; Falk, K.; Gregori, G.; Hazi, A.; Moses, E. I.; Murphy, C. D.; Myatt, J.; Park, J.; Seely, J.; Shepherd, R.; Spitkovsky, A.; Stoeckl, C.; Szabo, C. I.; Tommasini, R.; Zulick, C.; Beiersdorfer, P.

    2011-12-01

    We review recent experimental results on the path to producing electron-positron pair plasmas using lasers. Relativistic pair-plasmas and jets are believed to exist in many astrophysical objects and are often invoked to explain energetic phenomena related to Gamma Ray Bursts and Black Holes. On earth, positrons from radioactive isotopes or accelerators are used extensively at low energies (sub-MeV) in areas related to surface science positron emission tomography and basic antimatter science. Experimental platforms capable of producing the high-temperature pair-plasma and high-flux jets required to simulate astrophysical positron conditions have so far been absent. In the past few years, we performed extensive experiments generating positrons with intense lasers where we found that relativistic electron and positron jets are produced by irradiating a solid gold target with an intense picosecond laser pulse. The positron temperatures in directions parallel and transverse to the beam both exceeded 0.5 MeV, and the density of electrons and positrons in these jets are of order 10 16 cm -3 and 10 13 cm -3, respectively. With the increasing performance of high-energy ultra-short laser pulses, we expect that a high-density, up to 10 18 cm -3, relativistic pair-plasma is achievable, a novel regime of laboratory-produced hot dense matter.

  13. Electrons and positrons from expanding supernova envelopes in dense clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, S. A.

    1985-01-01

    If antiprotons in cosmic rays are produced as secondary particles in sources, it is expected that positrons are also created by the same process. The interstellar spectra of positrons and electrons are calculated by taking into account such sources. Spectra are then compared with observations.

  14. Formation of a high intensity low energy positron string

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donets, E. D.; Donets, E. E.; Syresin, E. M.; Itahashi, T.; Dubinov, A. E.

    2004-05-01

    The possibility of a high intensity low energy positron beam production is discussed. The proposed Positron String Trap (PST) is based on the principles and technology of the Electron String Ion Source (ESIS) developed in JINR during the last decade. A linear version of ESIS has been used successfully for the production of intense highly charged ion beams of various elements. Now the Tubular Electron String Ion Source (TESIS) concept is under study and this opens really new promising possibilities in physics and technology. In this report, we discuss the application of the tubular-type trap for the storage of positrons cooled to the cryogenic temperatures of 0.05 meV. It is intended that the positron flux at the energy of 1-5 eV, produced by the external source, is injected into the Tubular Positron Trap which has a similar construction as the TESIS. Then the low energy positrons are captured in the PST Penning trap and are cooled down because of their synchrotron radiation in the strong (5-10 T) applied magnetic field. It is expected that the proposed PST should permit storing and cooling to cryogenic temperature of up to 5×109 positrons. The accumulated cooled positrons can be used further for various physics applications, for example, antihydrogen production.

  15. Recent developments in positron emission tomography (PET) instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Derenzo, S.E.; Budinger, T.F.

    1986-04-01

    This paper presents recent detector developments and perspectives for positron emission tomography (PET) instrumentation used for medical research, as well as the physical processes in positron annihilation, photon scattering and detection, tomograph design considerations, and the potentials for new advances in detectors. 117 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Monte Carlo modelling of positron transport in real world applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marjanović, S.; Banković, A.; Šuvakov, M.; Petrović, Z. Lj

    2014-05-01

    Due to the unstable nature of positrons and their short lifetime, it is difficult to obtain high positron particle densities. This is why the Monte Carlo simulation technique, as a swarm method, is very suitable for modelling most of the current positron applications involving gaseous and liquid media. The ongoing work on the measurements of cross-sections for positron interactions with atoms and molecules and swarm calculations for positrons in gasses led to the establishment of good cross-section sets for positron interaction with gasses commonly used in real-world applications. Using the standard Monte Carlo technique and codes that can follow both low- (down to thermal energy) and high- (up to keV) energy particles, we are able to model different systems directly applicable to existing experimental setups and techniques. This paper reviews the results on modelling Surko-type positron buffer gas traps, application of the rotating wall technique and simulation of positron tracks in water vapor as a substitute for human tissue, and pinpoints the challenges in and advantages of applying Monte Carlo simulations to these systems.

  17. Development of a Positron Source for JLab at the IAC

    SciTech Connect

    Forest, Tony

    2013-10-12

    We report on the research performed towards the development of a positron sour for Jefferson Lab's (JLab) Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) in Newport News, VA. The first year of work was used to benchmark the predictions of our current simulation with positron production efficiency measurements at the IAC. The second year used the benchmarked simulation to design a beam line configuration which optimized positron production efficiency while minimizing radioactive waste as well as design and construct a positron converter target. The final year quantified the performance of the positron source. This joint research and development project brought together the experiences of both electron accelerator facilities. Our intention is to use the project as a spring board towards developing a program of accelerator based research and education which will train students to meet the needs of both facilities as well as provide a pool of trained scientists.

  18. Relativistic Quasimonoenergetic Positron Jets from Intense Laser-Solid Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hui; Wilks, S. C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Bonlie, J.; Chen, C. D.; Chen, S. N.; Courtois, C.; Elberson, L.; Gregori, G.; Kruer, W.; Landoas, O.; Mithen, J.; Myatt, J.; Murphy, C. D.; Nilson, P.; Price, D.; Schneider, M.; Shepherd, R.; Stoeckl, C.; Tabak, M.; Tommasini, R.; Beiersdorfer, P.

    2010-07-01

    Detailed angle and energy resolved measurements of positrons ejected from the back of a gold target that was irradiated with an intense picosecond duration laser pulse reveal that the positrons are ejected in a collimated relativistic jet. The laser-positron energy conversion efficiency is ˜2×10-4. The jets have ˜20 degree angular divergence and the energy distributions are quasimonoenergetic with energy of 4 to 20 MeV and a beam temperature of ˜1MeV. The sheath electric field on the surface of the target is shown to determine the positron energy. The positron angular and energy distribution is controlled by varying the sheath field, through the laser conditions and target geometry.

  19. Testing of a nuclear-reactor-based positron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Veen, A.; Labohm, F.; Schut, H.; de Roode, J.; Heijenga, T.; Mijnarends, P. E.

    1997-05-01

    This paper describes the testing of a positron beam which is primarily based on copper activation near the core of a nuclear reactor and extraction of the positrons through a beam guide tube. An out-of-core test with a 22Na source and an in-core test with the reactor at reduced power have been performed. Both tests indicated a high reflectivity of moderated positrons at the tungsten surfaces of the moderation discs which enhanced the expected yield. Secondary electrons generated in the source materials during the in-core test caused electrical field distortions in the electrode system of the system by charging of the insulators. At 100 kW reactor power during one hour, positrons were observed with an intensity of 4.4 × 10 4 e + s -1 of which 90% was due to positrons created by pair formation and 10% by copper activation.

  20. Positron emitting [68Ga]Ga-based imaging agents: chemistry and diversity.

    PubMed

    Velikyan, Irina

    2011-09-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) field and, in particular utilization of (68)Ga radiometal is getting momentum. The development of new imaging agents for targeted, pre-targeted, non-targeted imaging and their clinical applications is accelerating worldwide. The pharmacopoeia monographs regarding generator produced (68)Ga radionuclide and (68)Ga-labeled somatostatin (SST) analogues are in progress. The number of commercial generators and automated synthesizers for (68)Ga-labeling chemistry is increasing constantly. Development of a molecular imaging agent is a complex process including identification of the biological target, respective lead compound, synthesis of the imaging agent, its chemical characterization, pre-clinical, and clinical evaluation. The introduction of new radiopharmaceuticals and their accessibility are important factors determining the expansion of clinical nuclear medicine for early disease detection and personalized medicine with higher therapeutic efficiency. Further, the availability of the technology for GMP compliant automated tracer production can facilitate the introduction of new radiopharmaceuticals due to the ability to conduct standardized and harmonized multi-center studies for regulatory approval. This review reflects on the current status of (68)Ga in PET field with the focus on the achievements in the chemistry as well as diversity and potential of the resulting tracers.

  1. Roles of superthermal electrons and positrons on positron-acoustic solitary waves and double layers in electron-positron-ion plasmas.

    PubMed

    Alam, M S; Uddin, M J; Masud, M M; Mamun, A A

    2014-09-01

    Positron-acoustic (PA) solitary waves (SWs) and double layers (DLs) in four-component plasmas consisting of immobile positive ions, mobile cold positrons, and superthermal (kappa distributed) hot positrons and electrons are investigated both numerically and analytically by deriving Korteweg-de Vries (K-dV), modified K-dV (mK-dV), and Gardner equations along with their DLs solutions using the reductive perturbation method. It is examined that depending on the plasma parameters, the K-dV SWs, Gardner SWs, and DLs support either compressive or rarefactive structures, whereas mK-dV SWs support only compressive structure. It is also found that the presence of superthermal (kappa distributed) hot positrons and hot electrons significantly modify the basic features of PA SWs as well as PA DLs. Besides, the critical number density ratio of hot positrons and cold positrons play an important role in the polarity of PA SWs and DLs. The implications of our results in different space as well as laboratory plasma environments are briefly discussed.

  2. The impact of positrons beam on the propagation of super freak waves in electron-positron-ion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali Shan, S.; El-Tantawy, S. A.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we examine the nonlinear propagation of planar ion-acoustic freak waves in an unmagnetized plasma consisting of cold positive ions and superthermal electrons subjected to cold positrons beam. For this purpose, the reductive perturbation method is used to derive a nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) for the evolution of electrostatic potential wave. We determine the domain of the plasma parameters where the rogue waves exist. The effect of the positron beam on the modulational instability of the ion-acoustic rogue waves is discussed. It is found that the region of the modulational stability is enhanced with the increase of positron beam speed and positron population. Second as positrons beam increases the nonlinearities of the plasma system, large amplitude ion acoustic rogue waves are pointed out. The present results will be helpful in providing a good fit between the theoretical analysis and real applications in future laboratory plasma experiments.

  3. The impact of positrons beam on the propagation of super freak waves in electron-positron-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ali Shan, S.; El-Tantawy, S. A.

    2016-07-15

    In this work, we examine the nonlinear propagation of planar ion-acoustic freak waves in an unmagnetized plasma consisting of cold positive ions and superthermal electrons subjected to cold positrons beam. For this purpose, the reductive perturbation method is used to derive a nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) for the evolution of electrostatic potential wave. We determine the domain of the plasma parameters where the rogue waves exist. The effect of the positron beam on the modulational instability of the ion-acoustic rogue waves is discussed. It is found that the region of the modulational stability is enhanced with the increase of positron beam speed and positron population. Second as positrons beam increases the nonlinearities of the plasma system, large amplitude ion acoustic rogue waves are pointed out. The present results will be helpful in providing a good fit between the theoretical analysis and real applications in future laboratory plasma experiments.

  4. Applicability of modified effective-range theory to positron-atom and positron-molecule scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Idziaszek, Zbigniew; Karwasz, Grzegorz

    2006-06-15

    We analyze low-energy scattering of positrons on Ar atoms and N{sub 2} molecules using the modified effective-range theory (MERT) developed by O'Malley, et al. [J. Math. Phys. 2, 491 (1961)]. We use the formulation of MERT based on exact solutions of the Schroedinger equation with polarization potential rather than low-energy expansions of phase shifts into momentum series. We show that MERT describes the experimental data well, provided that effective-range expansion is performed both for s- and p-wave scattering, which dominate in the considered regime of positron energies (0.4-2 eV). We estimate the values of the s-wave scattering length and the effective range for e{sup +}-Ar and e{sup +}-N{sub 2} collisions.

  5. The source and distribution of Galactic positrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purcell, W. R.; Dixon, D. D.; Cheng, L.-X.; Leventhal, M.; Kinzer, R. L.; Kurfess, J. D.; Skibo, J. G.; Smith, D. M.; Tueller, J.

    1997-01-01

    The oriented scintillation spectrometer experiment (OSSE) observations of the Galactic plane and the Galactic center region were combined with observations acquired with other instruments in order to produce a map of the Galactic 511 keV annihilation radiation. Two mapping techniques were applied to the data: the maximum entropy method, and the basis pursuit inversion method. The resulting maps are qualitatively similar and show evidence for a central bulge and a weak galactic disk component. The weak disk is consistent with that expected from positrons produced by the decay of radioactive Al-26 in the interstellar medium. Both maps suggest an enhanced region of emission near l = -4 deg, b = 7 deg, with a flux of approximately 50 percent of that of the bulge. The existence of this emission appears significant, although the location is not well determined. The source of this enhanced emission is presently unknown.

  6. Compact conscious animal positron emission tomography scanner

    DOEpatents

    Schyler, David J.; O'Connor, Paul; Woody, Craig; Junnarkar, Sachin Shrirang; Radeka, Veljko; Vaska, Paul; Pratte, Jean-Francois; Volkow, Nora

    2006-10-24

    A method of serially transferring annihilation information in a compact positron emission tomography (PET) scanner includes generating a time signal for an event, generating an address signal representing a detecting channel, generating a detector channel signal including the time and address signals, and generating a composite signal including the channel signal and similarly generated signals. The composite signal includes events from detectors in a block and is serially output. An apparatus that serially transfers annihilation information from a block includes time signal generators for detectors in a block and an address and channel signal generator. The PET scanner includes a ring tomograph that mounts onto a portion of an animal, which includes opposing block pairs. Each of the blocks in a block pair includes a scintillator layer, detection array, front-end array, and a serial encoder. The serial encoder includes time signal generators and an address signal and channel signal generator.

  7. Positron Emission Tomography of the Heart

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Schelbert, H. R.; Phelps, M. E.; Kuhl, D. E.

    1979-01-01

    Positron emission computed tomography (PCT) represents an important new tool for the noninvasive evaluation and, more importantly, quantification of myocardial performance. Most currently available techniques permit assessment of only one aspect of cardiac function, i.e., myocardial perfusion by gamma scintillation camera imaging with Thallium-201 or left ventricular function by echocardiography or radionuclide angiocardiography. With PCT it may become possible to study all three major segments of myocardial performance, i.e., regional blood flow, mechanical function and, most importantly, myocardial metabolism. Each of these segments can either be evaluated separately or in combination. This report briefly describes the principles and technological advantages of the imaging device, reviews currently available radioactive tracers and how they can be employed for the assessment of flow, function and metabolism; and, lastly, discusses possible applications of PCT for the study of cardiac physiology or its potential role in the diagnosis of cardiac disease.

  8. Positron Emission Tomography with improved spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Drukier, A.K.

    1990-04-01

    Applied Research Corporation (ARC) proposed the development of a new class of solid state detectors called Superconducting Granular Detectors (SGD). These new detectors permit considerable improvements in medical imaging, e.g. Positron Emission Tomography (PET). The biggest impact of this technique will be in imaging of the brain. It should permit better clinical diagnosis of such important diseases as Altzheimer's or schizophrenia. More specifically, we will develop an improved PET-imager; a spatial resolution 2 mm may be achievable with SGD. A time-of-flight capability(t {approx} 100 psec) will permit better contrast and facilitate 3D imaging. In the following, we describe the results of the first 9 months of the development.

  9. Quantitative positron emission tomography in brain research.

    PubMed

    Heurling, Kerstin; Leuzy, Antoine; Jonasson, My; Frick, Andreas; Zimmer, Eduardo R; Nordberg, Agneta; Lubberink, Mark

    2017-09-01

    The application of positron emission tomography (PET) in brain research has increased substantially during the past 20years, and is still growing. PET provides a unique insight into physiological and pathological processes in vivo. In this article we introduce the fundamentals of PET, and the methods available for acquiring quantitative estimates of the parameters of interest. A short introduction to different areas of application is also given, including basic research of brain function and in neurology, psychiatry, drug receptor occupancy studies, and its application in diagnostics of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Our aim is to inform the unfamiliar reader of the underlying basics and potential applications of PET, hoping to inspire the reader into considering how the technique could be of benefit for his or her own research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Tumor Quantification in Clinical Positron Emission Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Bing; Bading, James; Conti, Peter S

    2013-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is used extensively in clinical oncology for tumor detection, staging and therapy response assessment. Quantitative measurements of tumor uptake, usually in the form of standardized uptake values (SUVs), have enhanced or replaced qualitative interpretation. In this paper we review the current status of tumor quantification methods and their applications to clinical oncology. Factors that impede quantitative assessment and limit its accuracy and reproducibility are summarized, with special emphasis on SUV analysis. We describe current efforts to improve the accuracy of tumor uptake measurements, characterize overall metabolic tumor burden and heterogeneity of tumor uptake, and account for the effects of image noise. We also summarize recent developments in PET instrumentation and image reconstruction and their impact on tumor quantification. Finally, we offer our assessment of the current development needs in PET tumor quantification, including practical techniques for fully quantitative, pharmacokinetic measurements. PMID:24312151

  11. Imaging tumour hypoxia with positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, I N; Manavaki, R; Blower, P J; West, C; Williams, K J; Harris, A L; Domarkas, J; Lord, S; Baldry, C; Gilbert, F J

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia, a hallmark of most solid tumours, is a negative prognostic factor due to its association with an aggressive tumour phenotype and therapeutic resistance. Given its prominent role in oncology, accurate detection of hypoxia is important, as it impacts on prognosis and could influence treatment planning. A variety of approaches have been explored over the years for detecting and monitoring changes in hypoxia in tumours, including biological markers and noninvasive imaging techniques. Positron emission tomography (PET) is the preferred method for imaging tumour hypoxia due to its high specificity and sensitivity to probe physiological processes in vivo, as well as the ability to provide information about intracellular oxygenation levels. This review provides an overview of imaging hypoxia with PET, with an emphasis on the advantages and limitations of the currently available hypoxia radiotracers. PMID:25514380

  12. Semiempirical Approach to Positron Annihilation in Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Laricchia, G.; Wilkin, C.

    1997-09-01

    Anomalously large annihilation rates of positrons in binary collisions with molecules are interpreted as originating from the formation of virtual positronium accompanied by pick-off annihilation with one of the {ital other} molecular electrons. On this basis, a semiempirical {open_quotes}universal{close_quotes} formula is obtained which relates the annihilation rate to the molecular ionization energy in a manner similar to that originally discovered by Murphy and Surko [Phys.Rev.Lett.{bold 67}, 2954 (1991)]. This approach is found to lead to an explanation of the variation of Z{sub eff} over several orders of magnitude and to reproduce the correct general trends found among different molecular families. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  13. Instrumentation optimization for positron emission mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, William W.; Qi, Jinyi

    2003-06-05

    The past several years have seen designs for PET cameras optimized to image the breast, commonly known as Positron Emission Mammography or PEM cameras. The guiding principal behind PEM instrumentation is that a camera whose field of view is restricted to a single breast has higher performance and lower cost than a conventional PET camera. The most common geometry is a pair of parallel planes of detector modules, although geometries that encircle the breast have also been proposed. The ability of the detector modules to measure the depth of interaction (DOI) is also a relevant feature. This paper finds that while both the additional solid angle coverage afforded by encircling the breast and the decreased blurring afforded by the DOI measurement improve performance, the ability to measure DOI is more important than the ability to encircle the breast.

  14. Positrons and Antiprotons in Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowsik, R.

    2016-10-01

    I consider the impact of recent measurements of positron and antiproton spectra in cosmic rays on our understanding of the origins and propagation of cosmic rays, as well as on the annihilation and decay characteristics of particles of Galactic dark matter, from the perspective of current models postulating energy-dependent leakage of cosmic rays from the Galaxy and of the nested leaky-box model, in which the leakage from the Galaxy is independent of energy. The nested leaky-box model provides a straightforward and consistent explanation of the observed spectral intensities, and finds no compelling need for a contribution from the annihilation or decay of Galactic dark matter. Improved observations and modeling efforts are needed to probe the properties of dark matter deeply enough to be significant to particle physics and cosmology.

  15. Making Relativistic Positrons Using Ultra-Intense Short Pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Wilks, S; Bonlie, J; Chen, C; Chen, S; Cone, K; Elberson, L; Gregori, G; Liang, E; Price, D; Van Maren, R; Meyerhofer, D D; Mithen, J; Murphy, C V; Myatt, J; Schneider, M; Shepherd, R; Stafford, D; Tommasini, R; Beiersdorfer, P

    2009-08-24

    This paper describes a new positron source produced using ultra-intense short pulse lasers. Although it has been studied in theory since as early as the 1970s, the use of lasers as a valuable new positron source was not demonstrated experimentally until recent years, when the petawatt-class short pulse lasers were developed. In 2008 and 2009, in a series of experiments performed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, a large number of positrons were observed after shooting a millimeter thick solid gold target. Up to 2 x 10{sup 10} positrons per steradian ejected out the back of {approx}mm thick gold targets were detected. The targets were illuminated with short ({approx}1 ps) ultra-intense ({approx}1 x 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}) laser pulses. These positrons are produced predominantly by the Bethe-Heitler process, and have an effective temperature of 2-4 MeV, with the distribution peaking at 4-7 MeV. The angular distribution of the positrons is anisotropic. For a wide range of applications, this new laser based positron source with its unique characteristics may complements the existing sources using radioactive isotopes and accelerators.

  16. Making relativistic positrons using ultraintense short pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Hui; Wilks, S. C.; Bonlie, J. D.; Chen, S. N.; Cone, K. V.; Elberson, L. N.; Price, D. F.; Schneider, M. B.; Shepherd, R.; Stafford, D. C.; Tommasini, R.; Van Maren, R.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Gregori, G.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Myatt, J.

    2009-12-15

    This paper describes a new positron source using ultraintense short pulse lasers. Although it has been theoretically studied since the 1970s, the use of lasers as a valuable new positron source was not demonstrated experimentally until recent years, when the petawatt-class short pulse lasers were developed. In 2008 and 2009, in a series of experiments performed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, a large number of positrons were observed after shooting a millimeter thick solid gold target. Up to 2x10{sup 10} positrons/s ejected at the back of approximately millimeter thick gold targets were detected. The targets were illuminated with short (approx1 ps) ultraintense (approx1x10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}) laser pulses. These positrons are produced predominantly by the Bethe-Heitler process and have an effective temperature of 2-4 MeV, with the distribution peaking at 4-7 MeV. The angular distribution of the positrons is anisotropic. For a wide range of applications, this new laser-based positron source with its unique characteristics may complement the existing sources based on radioactive isotopes and accelerators.

  17. A combined matrix isolation spectroscopy and cryosolid positron moderation apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Molek, Christopher D.; Michael Lindsay, C.; Fajardo, Mario E.

    2013-03-15

    We describe the design, construction, and operation of a novel apparatus for investigating efficiency improvements in thin-film cryogenic solid positron moderators. We report results from solid neon, argon, krypton, and xenon positron moderators which illustrate the capabilities and limitations of our apparatus. We integrate a matrix isolation spectroscopy diagnostic within a reflection-geometry positron moderation system. We report the optical thickness, impurity content, and impurity trapping site structures within our moderators determined from infrared absorption spectra. We use a retarding potential analyzer to modulate the flow of slow positrons, and report positron currents vs. retarding potential for the different moderators. We identify vacuum ultraviolet emissions from irradiated Ne moderators as the source of spurious signals in our channel electron multiplier slow positron detection channel. Our design is also unusual in that it employs a sealed radioactive Na-22 positron source which can be translated relative to, and isolated from, the cryogenic moderator deposition substrate. This allows us to separate the influences on moderator efficiency of surface contamination by residual gases from those of accumulated radiation damage.

  18. Positron scattering measurements for application to medical physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, James

    2015-09-01

    While the use of positrons in medical imaging is now well established, there is still much to learn regarding the transport of positrons through the body, and the subsequent damage induced. Current models of dosimetry use only a crude approximation of the collision physics involved, and at low energies misrepresent the thermalisation process to a considerable degree. Recently, collaborative work has commenced to attempt to refine these models, incorporating a better representation of the underlying physics and trying to gain a better understanding of the damage done after the emission of a positron from a medical radioisotope. This problem is being attacked from several different angles, with new models being developed based upon established techniques in plasma and swarm physics. For all these models, a realistic representation of the collision processes of positrons with relevant molecular species is required. At the Australian National University, we have undertaken a program of measurements of positron scattering from a range of molecules that are important in biological systems, with a focus on analogs to DNA. This talk will present measurements of positron scattering from a range of these molecules, as well as describing the experimental techniques employed to make such measurements. Targets have been measured that are both liquid and solid at room temperature, and new approaches have been developed to get absolute cross section data. The application of the data to various models of positron thermalisation will also be described.

  19. Data for modeling of positron collisions and transport in gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrović, Z. Lj.; Banković, A.; Dujko, S.; Marjanović, S.; Malović, G.; Sullivan, J. P.; Buckman, S. J.

    2013-07-01

    We review the current status of positron cross sections for collisions with atoms and molecules from the viewpoint of their use in studies of positron transport processes in gases, liquids and human tissue. The data include cross sections for positron scattering in rare gases, molecular gases (eg., for N2, H2, CO2, CF4) and in particular for organic molecules and those relevant for applications in medicine (e.g. formic acid and water vapor). The cross sections were taken from an assessment of previously published positron-target cross sections. All of the cross sections are based on binary collision measurements and theoretical calculations, and they were not explicitly modified according to the standard swarm analysis. The main reason for this is systematic lack of experimental data for positron transport properties in gases. However, we believe that our compiled sets of cross sections are at level of sophistication, and of sufficient accuracy, to provide correct interpretation of future positron-based experiments. Using these cross sections as an input in our Monte Carlo simulations and Boltzmann equation treatment, we review some interesting points observed in the profiles of various transport coefficients for positrons in gases. Particular emphasis is placed upon the analysis of kinetic phenomena generated by the explicit influence of Ps formation.

  20. Extracting the Size of the Cosmic Electron-Positron Anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auchettl, Katie; Balazs, C.

    2011-09-01

    Over the last few decades, numerous observations have hinted at an excess of high energy positrons in our locality. The most recent of these experiments has been the positron fraction measured by the PAMELA satellite and the electron plus positron spectrum as measured by the Fermi-LAT satellite. Since the release of these measurements, there have been a plethora of papers where authors invoke new physics ranging from, modification of the cosmic ray propagation, supernova remnants and dark matter annihilation. Using a Bayesian likelihood analysis, we isolate the anomalous contribution of the cosmic electron-positron flux. A significant tension was found between the electron positron related data and non-electron-positron cosmic ray fluxes. Using 219 recent cosmic ray datum, we extracted the preferred values of the selected cosmic ray propagation parameters from the non-electron-positron related measurements. Based on these parameter values we calculated background predictions with uncertainties for PAMELA and Fermi-LAT. We found a deviation between the PAMELA and Fermi-LAT data and the predicted background even when uncertainties, including systematics, were taken into account. Interpreting this as a hint of new physics, we subtracted the background from the data extracting the size, shape and uncertainty of the anomalous contribution in a model independent fashion. We briefly compared the extracted signal to some theoretical results predicting such an anomaly.

  1. The Calibration of the PEPPo Polarimeter for Electrons and Positrons

    SciTech Connect

    Adeyemi, Adeleke Hakeem; Voutier, Eric J-.M.

    2013-06-01

    The PEPPo (Polarized Electrons for Polarized Positrons) experiment at Jefferson Laboratory investigated the polarization transfer from longitudinally polarized electrons to longitudinally polarized positrons, with the aim of developing this technology for a low energy (~MeV) polarized positron source. Polarization of the positrons was measured by means of a Compton transmission polarimeter where incoming positrons transfer their polarization into circularly polarized photons that were subsequently analyzed by a thick polarized iron target. The measurement of the transmitted photon flux with respect to the orientation of the target polarization (+-) or the helicity (+-) of the incoming leptons provided the measurement of their polarization. Similar measurements with a known electron beam were also performed for calibration purposes. This presentation will describe the apparatus and calibrations performed at the injector at the Jefferson Laboratory to measure positron polarization in the momentum range 3.2-6.2 MeV/c, specifically to quantify the positron analyzing power from electron experimental data measured over a comparable momentum range.

  2. Scattering of positrons and electrons by alkali atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, T. S.; Kauppila, W. E.; Kwan, C. K.; Lukaszew, R. A.; Parikh, S. P.; Wan, Y. J.; Zhou, S.; Dababneh, M. S.

    1990-01-01

    Absolute total scattering cross sections (Q sub T's) were measured for positrons and electrons colliding with sodium, potassium, and rubidium in the 1 to 102 eV range, using the same apparatus and experimental approach (a beam transmission technique) for both projectiles. The present results for positron-sodium and -rubidium collisions represent the first Q sub T measurements reported for these collision systems. Features which distinguish the present comparisons between positron- and electron-alkali atom Q sub T's from those for other atoms and molecules (room-temperature gases) which have been used as targets for positrons and electrons are the proximity of the corresponding positron- and electron-alkali atom Q sub T's over the entire energy range of overlap, with an indication of a merging or near-merging of the corresponding positron and electron Q sub T's near (and above) the relatively low energy of about 40 eV, and a general tendency for the positron-alkali atom Q sub T's to be higher than the corresponding electron values as the projectile energy is decreased below about 40 eV.

  3. Applications and advances of positron beam spectroscopy: appendix a

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R. H., LLNL

    1997-11-05

    Over 50 scientists from DOE-DP, DOE-ER, the national laboratories, academia and industry attended a workshop held on November 5-7, 1997 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory jointly sponsored by the DOE-Division of Materials Science, The Materials Research Institute at LLNL and the University of California Presidents Office. Workshop participants were charged to address two questions: Is there a need for a national center for materials analysis using positron techniques and can the capabilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory serve this need. To demonstrate the need for a national center the workshop participants discussed the technical advantages enabled by high positron currents and advanced measurement techniques, the role that these techniques will play in materials analysis and the demand for the data. There were general discussions lead by review talks on positron analysis techniques, and their applications to problems in semiconductors, polymers and composites, metals and engineering materials, surface analysis and advanced techniques. These were followed by focus sessions on positron analysis opportunities in these same areas. Livermore now leads the world in materials analysis capabilities by positrons due to developments in response to demands of science based stockpile stewardship. There was a detailed discussion of the LLNL capabilities and a tour of the facilities. The Livermore facilities now include the worlds highest current beam of keV positrons, a scanning pulsed positron microprobe under development capable of three dimensional maps of defect size and concentration, an MeV positron beam for defect analysis of large samples, and electron momentum spectroscopy by positrons. This document is a supplement to the written summary report. It contains a complete schedule, list of attendees and the vuegraphs for the presentations in the review and focus sessions.

  4. Positronic molecule calculations using Monte Carlo configuration interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coe, Jeremy P.; Paterson, Martin J.

    2016-02-01

    We modify the Monte Carlo configuration interaction procedure to model atoms and molecules combined with a positron. We test this method with standard quantum chemistry basis sets on a number of positronic systems and compare results with the literature and full configuration interaction when appropriate. We consider positronium hydride, positronium hydroxide, lithium positride and a positron interacting with lithium, magnesium or lithium hydride. We demonstrate that we can capture much of the full configuration interaction results, but often require less than 10% of the configurations of these multireference wavefunctions. The effect of the number of frozen orbitals is also discussed.

  5. Positrons in the Galaxy: Their Births, Marriages and Deaths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, Gerald K.

    2010-01-01

    High energy (approximately GeV) positrons are seen within cosmic rays and observation of a narrow line at 511 keV shows that positrons are annihilating in the galaxy after slowing down to approximately keV energies or less. Our state of knowledge of the origin of these positrons, of the formation of positronium 'atoms', and of the circumstances of their annihilation or escape from the galaxy are reviewed and the question of whether the two phenomena are linked is discussed.

  6. Anti-hydrogen production with positron beam ion trap

    SciTech Connect

    Itahashi, Takahisa

    2008-08-08

    In low-energy antiproton physics, it is advantageous to be able to manipulate anti-particles as freely as normal particles. A robust production and storage system for high-quality positrons and antiprotons would be a substantial advance for the development of anti-matter science. The idea of electron beam ion trap could be applied for storage of anti-particle when the electron beam could be replaced by the positron beam. The bright positron beam would be brought about using synchrotron radiation source with a superconducting wiggler. The new scheme for production of anti-particles is proposed by using new accelerator technologies.

  7. Progress toward positron-electron pair plasma experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Stenson, E. V.; Stanja, J.; Hergenhahn, U.; Saitoh, H.; Niemann, H.; Pedersen, T. Sunn; Marx, G. H.; Schweikhard, L.; Danielson, J. R.; Surko, C. M.; Hugenschmidt, C.

    2015-06-29

    Electron-positron plasmas have been of theoretical interest for decades, due to the unique plasma physics that arises from all charged particles having precisely identical mass. It is only recently, though, that developments in non-neutral plasma physics (both in linear and toroidal geometries) and in the flux of sources for cold positrons have brought the goal of conducting electron-positron pair plasma experiments within reach. The APEX/PAX collaboration is working on a number of projects in parallel toward that goal; this paper provides an overview of recent, current, and upcoming activities.

  8. Threshold law for positron-atom impact ionisation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temkin, A.

    1982-01-01

    The threshold law for ionisation of atoms by positron impact is adduced in analogy with our approach to the electron-atom ionization. It is concluded the Coulomb-dipole region of the potential gives the essential part of the interaction in both cases and leads to the same kind of result: a modulated linear law. An additional process which enters positron ionization is positronium formation in the continuum, but that will not dominate the threshold yield. The result is in sharp contrast to the positron threshold law as recently derived by Klar on the basis of a Wannier-type analysis.

  9. High intensity positron beam and angular correlation experiments at Livermore

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R.H.; Rosenberg, I.J.; Meyer, P.; Fluss, M.J.

    1985-03-01

    A positron beam apparatus that produces a variable energy positron beam with sufficient intensity to perform new positron experiments in an ultrahigh vacuum environment has been installed at the Lawrence Livermore 100 MeV electron linac. We have installed two large area position sensitive gamma-ray detectors to measure angular correlations in two dimensions and a separate highly collimated detector to measure positronium energy distributions by time-of-flight velocity determination. Data from measurements on single crystals of Cu will be described.

  10. Coherent pair creation as a positron source for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P. ); Palmer, R.B. Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY )

    1992-11-01

    We propose a positron source for future linear colliders which uses the mechanism of coherent pair creation process from the collision of a high energy electron beam and a monochromatic photon beam. We show that there is a sharp spike in the pair-produced positron energy spectrum at an energy much lower than the primary beam energy. The transverse emittance is damped'', yielding final positrons with lower normalized emittance than the initial electrons. Numerical examples invoking conventional lasers and Free Electron Lasers (FEL) for the photon beams are considered.

  11. Coherent pair creation as a positron source for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.; Palmer, R.B. |

    1992-11-01

    We propose a positron source for future linear colliders which uses the mechanism of coherent pair creation process from the collision of a high energy electron beam and a monochromatic photon beam. We show that there is a sharp spike in the pair-produced positron energy spectrum at an energy much lower than the primary beam energy. The transverse emittance is ``damped``, yielding final positrons with lower normalized emittance than the initial electrons. Numerical examples invoking conventional lasers and Free Electron Lasers (FEL) for the photon beams are considered.

  12. Methods and applications of positron-based medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, H.

    2007-02-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a diagnostic imaging method to examine metabolic functions and their disorders. Dedicated ring systems of scintillation detectors measure the 511 keV γ-radiation produced in the course of the positron emission from radiolabelled metabolically active molecules. A great number of radiopharmaceuticals labelled with 11C, 13N, 15O, or 18F positron emitters have been applied both for research and clinical purposes in neurology, cardiology and oncology. The recent success of PET with rapidly increasing installations is mainly based on the use of [ 18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) in oncology where it is most useful to localize primary tumours and their metastases.

  13. Orientation dependence of relativistic-positron annihilation in single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Kalashnikov, N. P.; Mazur, E. A. Olchak, A. S.

    2016-05-15

    An effect of the orientation dependence of the cross section for the single-photon annihilation of relativistic positrons with atomic electrons in a crystal is predicted. It is shown that the probability for the single-photon annihilation of a channeled positron in a crystal may be either suppressed in a crystal in relation to a homogeneous medium or, on the contrary, enhanced. The reason is that, depending on their incidence angle, the positrons may be either in the vicinity of ion planes of the crystal, where the electron density is higher, or far away from them, where the electron density is lower.

  14. Progress toward positron-electron pair plasma experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenson, E. V.; Saitoh, H.; Stanja, J.; Niemann, H.; Hergenhahn, U.; Pedersen, T. Sunn; Marx, G. H.; Schweikhard, L.; Danielson, J. R.; Surko, C. M.; Hugenschmidt, C.

    2015-06-01

    Electron-positron plasmas have been of theoretical interest for decades, due to the unique plasma physics that arises from all charged particles having precisely identical mass. It is only recently, though, that developments in non-neutral plasma physics (both in linear and toroidal geometries) and in the flux of sources for cold positrons have brought the goal of conducting electron-positron pair plasma experiments within reach. The APEX/PAX collaboration is working on a number of projects in parallel toward that goal; this paper provides an overview of recent, current, and upcoming activities.

  15. Theoretical survey on positronium formation and ionisation in positron atom scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basu, Madhumita; Ghosh, A. S.

    1990-01-01

    The recent theoretical studies are surveyed and reported on the formation of exotic atoms in positron-hydrogen, positron-helium and positron-lithium scattering specially at intermediate energy region. The ionizations of these targets by positron impact was also considered. Theoretical predictions for both the processes are compared with existing measured values.

  16. Influence of defect-impurity complexes on slow positron yield of a tungsten moderator: Positron annihilation, Auger, and SIMS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amarendra, G.; Rajaraman, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Suzuki, R.; Ohdaira, T.

    2004-03-01

    Polycrystalline tungsten foil annealed at successively higher temperature up to ˜2300 K has been investigated for slow positron moderation yield. LINAC-based intense positron beam lifetime studies have revealed that reemitted slow positron and positronium fractions gradually improve upon high-temperature annealing. So as to correlate the presence of defects and chemical impurities with the improvement in slow positron yield, positron annihilation, Auger electron spectroscopy, and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS), studies have been carried out on virgin and high-temperature (˜2300 K) annealed W foils. The positron beam S parameter shows a large value throughout the sample depth corresponding to the virgin sample, while it is lower for annealed samples. This indicates that, as compared to virgin sample, the annealed W sample has a lower concentration of vacancylike defects. Auger studies revealed that in virgin state the surface is fully contaminated with carbon, while the annealed foil shows prominent W peaks. Corroborative SIMS concentration profiles have indicated that the carbon content is much lower in an annealed sample over a large depth region. From these studies, it is concluded that improvement in slow positron yield upon high-temperature annealing is obtained due to the removal of the surface tungsten-carbide layer as well as carbon-vacancy complexes present throughout the sample depth.

  17. Enhanced positron trapping by Ag nanoclusters at low temperatures: A challenge of positron sensitivity to quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, B.; Qi, N.; Liu, Z. W.; Chen, Z. Q.; Liu, H. Q.; Yi, D. Q.; Tang, Z.

    2017-03-01

    Microstructure evolution of three Al-Ag alloys with different Ag contents (1 wt. % Ag, 5 wt. % Ag, and 15 wt. % Ag) was studied by positron annihilation spectroscopy during the aging process. In situ measurements of the positron lifetime and Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation indicate the fast formation of Ag-rich clusters during natural aging of the alloys. The formation of Ag-rich clusters was further confirmed by coincidence Doppler broadening measurements. The Ag signal reflected by the Coincidence Doppler broadening spectrum increases with increasing Ag content and is further enhanced after subsequent artificial aging at 140 °C. This might be due to the increase in the size of Ag clusters. The temperature dependence of the Doppler broadening spectra between 10 K and 290 K was measured for the Al-Ag alloys after natural and artificial aging. Detrapping of positrons from Ag clusters with increasing temperature was observed for all the three Al-Ag alloys after natural aging and for the Al-1 wt. % Ag after artificial aging. This indicates that Ag clusters act as shallow positron trapping centers. The thermal detrapping of positrons becomes ambiguous with increasing Ag content in the alloy and is nearly invisible in the artificially aged Al-5 wt. % Ag and Al-15 wt. % Ag. The positron binding energy of the Ag cluster is roughly estimated to be about 18.8 meV and 50 meV in the Al-1 wt. % Ag sample after natural aging and artificial aging at 140 °C, respectively, which suggests that the confinement of positrons in the quantum-dot like state depends on the size or chemical composition of clusters. Theoretical calculations confirm positron trapping by Ag nanoclusters, and the confinement of positrons is enhanced with increasing Ag cluster size.

  18. Positron acceleration in plasma bubble wakefield driven by an ultraintense laser

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Ya-Juan; Wan, Feng; Sang, Hai-Bo Xie, Bai-Song

    2016-01-15

    The dynamics of positrons accelerating in electron-positron-ion plasma bubble fields driven by an ultraintense laser is investigated. The bubble wakefield is obtained theoretically when laser pulses are propagating in the electron-positron-ion plasma. To restrict the positrons transversely, an electron beam is injected. Acceleration regions and non-acceleration ones of positrons are obtained by the numerical simulation. It is found that the ponderomotive force causes the fluctuation of the positrons momenta, which results in the trapping of them at a lower ion density. The energy gaining of the accelerated positrons is demonstrated, which is helpful for practical applications.

  19. Qualitative analysis of the positron-acoustic waves in electron-positron-ion plasmas with κ deformed Kaniadakis distributed electrons and hot positrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Asit; Tamang, Jharna

    2017-08-01

    Qualitative analysis of the positron acoustic (PA) waves in a four-component plasma system consisting of static positive ions, mobile cold positron, and Kaniadakis distributed hot positrons and electrons is investigated. Using the reductive perturbation technique, the Korteweg-de Vries (K-dV) equation and the modified KdV equation are derived for the PA waves. Variations of the total energy of the conservative systems corresponding to the KdV and mKdV equations are presented. Applying numerical computations, effect of parameter (κ), number density ratio (μ1) of electrons to ions and number density (μ2) of hot positrons to ions, and speed (U) of the traveling wave are discussed on the positron acoustic solitary wave solutions of the KdV and mKdV equations. Furthermore, it is found that the parameter κ has no effect on the solitary wave solution of the KdV equation, whereas it has significant effect on the solitary wave solution of the modified KdV equation. Considering an external periodic perturbation, the perturbed dynamical systems corresponding to the KdV and mKdV equations are analyzed by employing three dimensional phase portrait analysis, time series analysis, and Poincare section. Chaotic motions of the perturbed PA waves occur through the quasiperiodic route to chaos.

  20. Multiple-ionization of xenon atoms by positron impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruse, Georg; Quermann, Andreas; Raith, Wilhelm; Sinapius, Guenther

    1990-01-01

    Previously the cross sections were measured for positronium formation and single ionization by positron impact for He and H2. With the same apparatus, slightly modified, the single and multiple ionization of xenon is now investigated. The principle of the method is the detection of ion and positron in time correlation which allows the discrimination of positronium formation (whereby the positron vanishes) and the destinction of single, double and triple impact ionization (which lead to different ion flight times from the gas target to the ion detector). By using secondary electrons from the positron moderator, similar measurements were performed on electron impact ionization. By comparing with literature values for electron multiple ionization cross sections, the detection-probability ratios were determined for the differently charged ions.

  1. The Role of Chemistry in Positron Emission Tomography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feliu, Anthony L.

    1988-01-01

    Investigates use of positron emission tomography (PET) to study in-vivo metabolic processes. Discusses methodology of PET and medical uses. Outlines the production of different radioisotopes used in PET radiotracers. Includes selected bibliography. (ML)

  2. Positron Computed Tomography: Current State, Clinical Results and Future Trends

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Schelbert, H. R.; Phelps, M. E.; Kuhl, D. E.

    1980-09-01

    An overview is presented of positron computed tomography: its advantages over single photon emission tomography, its use in metabolic studies of the heart and chemical investigation of the brain, and future trends. (ACR)

  3. Probing of Unembedded Metallic Quantum Dots with Positrons

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, C G; Denison, A B; Weber, M H; Wilcoxon, J P; Woessner, S; Lynn, K G

    2003-08-01

    We employed the two detector coincident Doppler Broadening Technique (coPAS) to investigate Ag, Au and Ag/Au alloy quantum dots of varying sizes which were deposited in thin layers on glass slides. The Ag quantum dots range from 2 to 3 nm in diameter, while the Ag/Au alloy quantum dots exhibit Ag cores of 2 nm and 3 nm and Au shells of varying thickness. We investigate the possibility of positron confinement in the Ag core due to positron affinity differences between Ag and Au. We describe the results and their significance to resolving the issue of whether positrons annihilate within the quantum dot itself or whether surface and positron escape effects play an important role.

  4. Positrons from heavy ions: A puzzle for physicists

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, B.

    1986-10-15

    A review of experimental data and models for positron production in relativistic heavy ion reactions is presented. The mass range of nuclei is A = 180--247 (nuclear charge range is Z1+Z2 = 163--188). (AIP)

  5. An Undulator Based Polarized Positron Source for CLIC

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wanming; Gai, Wei; Rinolfi, Louis; Sheppard, John; /SLAC

    2012-07-02

    A viable positron source scheme is proposed that uses circularly polarized gamma rays generated from the main 250 GeV electron beam. The beam passes through a helical superconducting undulator with a magnetic field of {approx} 1 Tesla and a period of 1.15 cm. The gamma-rays produced in the undulator in the energy range between {approx} 3 MeV - 100 MeV will be directed to a titanium target and produce polarized positrons. The positrons are then captured, accelerated and transported to a Pre-Damping Ring (PDR). Detailed parameter studies of this scheme including positron yield, and undulator parameter dependence are presented. Effects on the 250 GeV CLIC main beam, including emittance growth and energy loss from the beam passing through the undulator are also discussed.

  6. Positron lifetime calculation for the elements of the periodic table.

    PubMed

    Campillo Robles, J M; Ogando, E; Plazaola, F

    2007-04-30

    Theoretical positron lifetime values have been calculated systematically for most of the elements of the periodic table. Self-consistent and non-self-consistent schemes have been used for the calculation of the electronic structure in the solid, as well as different parametrizations for the positron enhancement factor and correlation energy. The results obtained have been studied and compared with experimental data, confirming the theoretical trends. As is known, positron lifetimes in bulk show a periodic behaviour with atomic number. These calculations also confirm that monovacancy lifetimes follow the same behaviour. The effects of enhancement factors used in calculations have been commented upon. Finally, we have analysed the effects that f and d electrons have on positron lifetimes.

  7. Resolvability of defect ensembles with positron annihilation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Fluss, M.J.; Howell, R.H.; Rosenberg, I.J.; Meyer, P.

    1984-11-12

    Recent advances in the use of positron annihilation to study defect ensembles in and on the surfaces of metals, are pointing the way towards studies where particular positron-electron annihilation modes may be identified and studied in the presence of one another. Although a great deal is understood about the annihilation of positrons in ostensibly defect-free metals, much less is understood when the positron annihilates in complex defect systems such as liquid metals, amorphous solids, or at or near the vacuum-solid interface. In this paper the results of three experiments, all of which demonstrate means by which we can resolve various poistron annihilation channels from one another, are discussed.

  8. Positron computed tomography: current state, clinical results and future trends

    SciTech Connect

    Schelbert, H.R.; Phelps, M.E.; Kuhl, D.E.

    1980-09-01

    An overview is presented of positron computed tomography: its advantages over single photon emission tomography, its use in metabolic studies of the heart and chemical investigation of the brain, and future trends. (ACR)

  9. Cosmic-ray positron energy spectrum measured by PAMELA.

    PubMed

    Adriani, O; Barbarino, G C; Bazilevskaya, G A; Bellotti, R; Bianco, A; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bongi, M; Bonvicini, V; Bottai, S; Bruno, A; Cafagna, F; Campana, D; Carbone, R; Carlson, P; Casolino, M; Castellini, G; De Donato, C; De Santis, C; De Simone, N; Di Felice, V; Formato, V; Galper, A M; Karelin, A V; Koldashov, S V; Koldobskiy, S A; Krutkov, S Y; Kvashnin, A N; Leonov, A; Malakhov, V; Marcelli, L; Martucci, M; Mayorov, A G; Menn, W; Mergé, M; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Monaco, A; Mori, N; Munini, R; Osteria, G; Palma, F; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Pizzolotto, C; Ricci, M; Ricciarini, S B; Rossetto, L; Sarkar, R; Scotti, V; Simon, M; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Stochaj, S J; Stockton, J C; Stozhkov, Y I; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G I; Voronov, S A; Yurkin, Y T; Zampa, G; Zampa, N; Zverev, V G

    2013-08-23

    Precision measurements of the positron component in the cosmic radiation provide important information about the propagation of cosmic rays and the nature of particle sources in our Galaxy. The satellite-borne experiment PAMELA has been used to make a new measurement of the cosmic-ray positron flux and fraction that extends previously published measurements up to 300 GeV in kinetic energy. The combined measurements of the cosmic-ray positron energy spectrum and fraction provide a unique tool to constrain interpretation models. During the recent solar minimum activity period from July 2006 to December 2009, approximately 24,500 positrons were observed. The results cannot be easily reconciled with purely secondary production, and additional sources of either astrophysical or exotic origin may be required.

  10. Positron annihilation characteristics in mesostructural silica films with various porosities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Bangyun; Mao, Wenfeng; Tang, Xiuqin; He, Chunqing

    2014-03-01

    Porous silica films with various porosities were prepared via a sol-gel method using a nonionic amphiphilic triblock copolymer F127 as the structure-directing agent. Doppler broadening of positron annihilation radiation (DBAR) spectra were collected for the prepared films using a variable energy slow positron beam. Different linear relationships between positron annihilation line shape parameters S and W are found for the as-deposited films and calcined ones, indicative of the decomposition of the copolymer porogen in the as-deposited films upon calcination. This also reveals the variation of positron annihilation sites as a function of F127 loading or porosity. Strong correlations between positronium 3γ annihilation fraction, S parameter and porosity of the mesoporous silica films with isolated pores are obtained, which may provide a complementary method to determine closed porosities of mesoporous silica films by DBAR.

  11. The Role of Chemistry in Positron Emission Tomography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feliu, Anthony L.

    1988-01-01

    Investigates use of positron emission tomography (PET) to study in-vivo metabolic processes. Discusses methodology of PET and medical uses. Outlines the production of different radioisotopes used in PET radiotracers. Includes selected bibliography. (ML)

  12. Positron beam facility at Kyoto University Research Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Q.; Sato, K.; Yoshiie, T.; Sano, T.; Kawabe, H.; Nagai, Y.; Nagumo, K.; Inoue, K.; Toyama, T.; Oshima, N.; Kinomura, A.; Shirai, Y.

    2014-04-01

    A positron beam facility is presently under construction at the Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR), which is a light-water moderated tank-type reactor operated at a rated thermal power of 5 MW. A cadmium (Cd) - tungsten (W) source similar to that used in NEPOMUC was chosen in the KUR because Cd is very efficient at producing γ-rays when exposed to thermal neutron flux, and W is a widely used in converter and moderator materials. High-energy positrons are moderated by a W moderator with a mesh structure. Electrical lenses and a solenoid magnetic field are used to extract the moderated positrons and guide them to a platform outside of the reactor, respectively. Since Japan is an earthquake-prone country, a special attention is paid for the design of the in-pile positron source so as not to damage the reactor in the severe earthquake.

  13. Resonances in low-energy positron-alkali scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horbatsch, M.; Ward, S. J.; Mceachran, R. P.; Stauffer, A. D.

    1990-01-01

    Close-coupling calculations were performed with up to five target states at energies in the excitation threshold region for positron scattering from Li, Na and K. Resonances were discovered in the L = 0, 1 and 2 channels in the vicinity of the atomic excitation thresholds. The widths of these resonances vary between 0.2 and 130 MeV. Evidence was found for the existence of positron-alkali bound states in all cases.

  14. Short-lived positron emitter labeled radiotracers - present status

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; Wolf, A.P.

    1982-01-01

    The preparation of labelled compounds is important for the application of positron emission transaxial tomography (PETT) in biomedical sciences. This paper describes problems and progress in the synthesis of short-lived positron emitter (/sup 11/C, /sup 18/F, /sup 13/N) labelled tracers for PETT. Synthesis of labelled sugars, amino acids, and neurotransmitter receptors (pimozide and spiroperidol tagged with /sup 11/C) is discussed in particular. (DLC)

  15. Neutrino annihilation of an electron-positron pair

    SciTech Connect

    Samsonenko, N.V.; Lal, K.C.

    1987-01-01

    In this study the authors carry out the analysis of the differential cross sections of the electron-positron pair annihilation process by simultaneously taking into account the spin effects, the interference of the charged and neutral currents, and also the possible nonzero neutrino rest mass. The differential cross sections are calculated in the COM system to first order in the weak interaction coupling constant with arbitrary electron and positron spin orientations and arbitrary neutrino and antineutrino polarizations.

  16. Electron positron pair production at RHIC and LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Cem Gueclue, M.

    2008-11-11

    The STAR Collaboration at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider present data on electron-positron pair production accompanied by nuclear breakup at small impact parameters where the simultaneous excitation of the two ions, mainly the giant dipole resonance GDR, can occur. We calculate the electron-positron pair production cross section relevant for the STAR experimental setup, and compare our results with the other calculations. We have also predictions for the LHC energies.

  17. Positronium formation from positron impact on hydrogen and helium targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naginey, T. C.; Stacy, Eric W.; Pollock, B. B.; Walters, H. R. J.; Whelan, Colm T.

    2014-06-01

    Charge-exchange cross sections are presented for collisions of positrons with hydrogen and neutral and singly ionized helium targets using a variant of the classical trajectory Monte Carlo approach. As a check on the method a comparison is made with the corresponding proton results. An extended error analysis is presented. Reasonable agreement with available experimental data is found, and the charge-exchange cross section for positrons on He+ is predicted.

  18. Positron transport and thermalization - the plasma-gas interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marler, Joan

    2008-11-01

    Low energy positrons are now used in many fields including atomic physics, material science and medicine [1]. Plasma physics is providing new tools for this research, including Penning-Malmberg buffer-gas traps to accumulate positrons and the use of rotating electric fields (the ``rotating wall'' technique) to compress positrons radially and create tailored beams [1]. These devices (now available commercially), which rely in key instances on positron-neutral interactions, are a convenient way to create plasmas and beams for a variety of applications. A deeper understanding of the relevant cooling and loss mechanisms is required to take full advantage of this technology. This talk focuses on a recent study of positrons in such a tenuous gaseous environment in the presence of an applied electric field [2]. Energy-resolved collision cross sections and a Monte Carlo code modified to include positrionium (Ps) formation are used to obtain transport coefficients and the thermalization and Ps-formation rates. A markedly different type of negative differential conductivity is observed (i.e., not seen in electron systems), due to the non-conservative nature of the Ps-formation process. It is particularly prominent in gases with large, highly energy dependent Ps-formation cross sections. The relevance of these calculations to other positron applications will also be discussed, including a currently planned study of positrons in gaseous water. It is hoped that these calculations will inspire a new generation of positron transport experiments.*Work done in collaboration with Z.Lj. Petrovi'c, A. Bankovi'c, M. Suvakov, G. Malovi'c, S. Dujko, S.J. Buckman. 1. C. M. Surko and R. G. Greaves, Phys. Plasmas 11, 2333-2348 (2004).2. A. Bankovi'c, J. P. Marler, M. Suvakov, G. Malovi'c, and Z. Lj. Petrovi'c, Nucl. Instrum. and Meth. in Phys. Res. B 266, 462-465 (2008).

  19. Positron emission tomographic imaging of tumors using monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Zalutsky, M.R.

    1992-08-01

    This research project is developing methods for utilizing positron emission tomography (PET) to increase the clinical potential of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). This report describes the development of methods for labeling MAbs and their fragments with positron-emitting halogen nuclides, fluorine-18 and iodine-124. These nulides were selected because of the widespread availability of F-18 and because of our extensive experience in the development of new protein radiohalogenation methods.

  20. Antihydrogen formation in laser-assisted positron-antiproton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shu-Min; Miao, Yan-Gang; Zhou, Zi-Fang; Chen, Ji; Liu, Yao-Yang

    1998-09-01

    Antihydrogen formation in the laser-assisted positron-antiproton (nonrelativistic) radiative recombination is investigated. The state of incident positron is given by the Coulomb-Volkov wave function. The perturbative dressed wave function of the atom is obtained in the soft-photon approximation. Our calculation shows that for a geometry of laser polarization parallel to the incident direction, the formation cross section of antihydrogen is greatly reduced. Especially at high impact energy, the reduction is remarkable.

  1. A method to detect positron anisotropies with Pamela data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panico, B.; Adriani, O.; Barbarino, G. C.; Bazilevskaya, G. A.; Bellotti, R.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Bongi, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Bottai, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Carbone, R.; Carlson, P.; Casolino, M.; Castellini, G.; De Donato, C.; De Santis, C.; De Simone, N.; Di Felice, V.; Formato, V.; Galper, A. M.; Giaccari, U.; Karelin, A. V.; Koldashov, S. V.; Koldobskiy, S.; Krutkov, S. Y.; Kvashnin, A. N.; Leonov, A.; Malakhov, V.; Marcelli, L.; Martucci, M.; Mayorov, A. G.; Menn, W.; Merge, M.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Monaco, A.; Mori, N.; Munini, R.; Osteria, G.; Palma, F.; Papini, P.; Pearce, M.; Picozza, P.; Pizzolotto, C.; Ricci, M.; Ricciarini, S. B.; Sarkar, R.; Scotti, V.; Simon, M.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Stozhkov, Y. I.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Vasilyev, G. I.; Voronov, S. A.; Yurkin, Y. T.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.; Zverev, V. G.

    2014-11-01

    The PAMELA experiment is collecting data since 2006; its results indicate the presence of a large flux of positron with respect to electrons in the CR spectrum above 10 GeV. This excess might also be originated in objects such as pulsars and microquasars or through dark matter annihilation. Here the electrons and positrons events collected by PAMELA have been analized searching for anisotropies. The analysis is performed at different angular scales and results will be presented at the conference.

  2. A Multicell Trap for Positron Accumulation and Storage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-21

    device to accumulate N >_ 1012 positrons (i.e., an increase of a factor of 1000 over current performance) and to store this collection of antimatter ...would be an important step toward the development of even more flexible, portable reservoirs of antimatter with few logistic requirements. The first...N > 1012 positrons (i.e., an increase of a factor of 1000 over current performance) and to store this collection of antimatter as a plasma for times

  3. Positron annihilation in TiBe/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect

    Manuel, A.A.; Hoffmann, L.; Singh, A.K.; Jarlborg, T.; Peter, M.; Smith, J.L.; Fisk, Z.; Pecora, L.M.; Ehrlich, A.C.

    1988-01-01

    We report positron annihilation measurements on TiBe/sub 2/. Calculations using LMTO band structure method are also presented. The good agreement with the experimental data leads to the conclusion that the unusual magnetic properties of this compound can be well explained in terms of its electronic structure. A reconstruction of the electron-positron momentum distribution from calculated and measured 2D-ACPAR is discussed. 10 refs., 3 figs.

  4. PhytoBeta imager: a positron imager for plant biology

    SciTech Connect

    Weisenberger, Andrew G; Lee, Seungjoon; McKisson, John; McKisson, J E; Xi, Wenze; Zorn, Carl; Reid, Chantal D; Howell, Calvin R; Crowell, Alexander S; Cumberbatch, Laurie; Fallin, Brent; Stolin, Alexander; Smith, Mark F

    2012-06-01

    Several positron emitting radioisotopes such as 11C and 13N can be used in plant biology research. The 11CO2 tracer is used to facilitate plant biology research toward optimization of plant productivity, biofuel development and carbon sequestration in biomass. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has been used to study carbon transport in live plants using 11CO2. Because plants typically have very thin leaves, little medium is present for the emitted positrons to undergo an annihilation event. The emitted positrons from 11C (maximum energy 960 keV) could require up to approximately 4 mm of water equivalent material for positron annihilation. Thus many of the positrons do not annihilate inside the leaf, resulting in limited sensitivity for PET imaging. To address this problem we have developed a compact beta-positive, beta-minus particle imager (PhytoBeta imager) for 11CO2 leaf imaging. The detector is based on a Hamamatsu H8500 position sensitive photomultiplier tube optically coupled via optical grease to a 0.5 mm thick Eljen EJ-212 plastic scintillator. The detector is equipped with a flexible arm to allow its placement and orientation over or under the leaf to be studied while maintaining the leaf's original orientation. To test the utility of the system the detector was used to measure carbon translocation in a leaf of the spicebush (Lindera benzoin) under two transient light conditions.

  5. Positron dynamics in surface-charged solid argon

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, L.V.; Merrison, J.P.; Deutch, B.I.; Charlton, M.; Jones, G.O.

    1995-10-15

    Studies have been made of the reemission of positrons incident at low energies upon solid argon to which electric fields were applied by charging an overlayer of molecular oxygen. An enhancement in positron reemission was observed which reached a maximum for an applied field of around 7 kV mm{sup {minus}1}. At this field strength the same yield was observed for implantation energies ranging from 1 to 10 keV, consistent with enhancement due to field-induced positron drift to the exit surface. At higher electric fields, the observed gradual decrease in enhancement was attributed to the heating of the positron energy distribution above the positronium formation threshold. Quantitative agreement with our experimental results has been obtained using a Monte Carlo simulation from which estimates for the positron diffusion length and mobility of 1.7(+2.0,{minus}0.4) {mu}m and 4.7(+2.9,{minus}0.4){times}10{sup {minus}3} m{sup 2} V{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}, respectively, have been derived. This model was also able to successfully reproduce previous results obtained using surface-charged argon {beta}{sup +} moderators. An abrupt and almost complete reduction in positron reemission was observed for applied surface potentials above a value which showed a weak dependence on film thickness.

  6. PEPPo: Using a Polarized Electron Beam to Produce Polarized Positrons

    SciTech Connect

    Adeyemi, Adeleke H.

    2015-09-01

    Polarized positron beams have been identified as either an essential or a significant ingredient for the experimental program of both the present and next generation of lepton accelerators (JLab, Super KEK B, ILC, CLIC). An experiment demonstrating a new method for producing polarized positrons has been performed at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility at Jefferson Lab. The PEPPo (Polarized Electrons for Polarized Positrons) concept relies on the production of polarized e⁻/e⁺ pairs from the bremsstrahlung radiation of a longitudinally polarized electron beam interacting within a high-Z conversion target. PEPPo demonstrated the effective transfer of spin-polarization of an 8.2 MeV/c polarized (P~85%) electron beam to positrons produced in varying thickness tungsten production targets, and collected and measured in the range of 3.1 to 6.2 MeV/c. In comparison to other methods this technique reveals a new pathway for producing either high-energy or thermal polarized positron beams using a relatively low polarized electron beam energy (~10MeV) .This presentation will describe the PEPPo concept, the motivations of the experiment and high positron polarization achieved.

  7. Positron Injector Accelerator and RF System for the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.W.; Adolphsen, C.; Bharadwaj, V.; Bowden, G.; Jongewaard, E.; Li, Z.; Miller, R.; Sheppard, J.C.; /SLAC

    2007-03-28

    Due to the extremely high energy deposition from positrons, electrons, photons and neutrons behind the positron target, and because a solenoid is required to focus the large emittance positron beam, the 1.3 GHz preaccelerator has to use normal conducting structures up to energy of 400 MeV. There are many challenges in the design of the normal-conducting portion of the ILC positron injector system such as obtaining high positron yield with required emittance, achieving adequate cooling with the high RF and particle loss heating, and sustaining high accelerator gradients during millisecond-long pulses in a strong magnetic field. Considering issues of feasibility, reliability and cost savings for the ILC, the proposed design for the positron injector contains both standing-wave (SW) and traveling-wave (TW) L-band accelerator structures. A short version of the new type of the SW section is under fabrication and testing. An updated status report is given. This paper also covers acceleration vs. deceleration for pre-accelerator sections, SW vs. TW structures, as well as longitudinal matching from target to linac and linac to damping ring.

  8. A slow positron beam generator for lifetime studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Eftekhari, Abe; St.clair, Terry L.

    1989-01-01

    A slow positron beam generator using well-annealed polycrystalline tungsten moderators and a Na-22 positron source was developed. A 250 micro c source, deposited on a 2.54 micron thick aluminized mylar, is sandwiched between two (2.54 cm x 2.54 cm x 0.0127 cm) tungsten pieces. Two (2.54 cm x 2.54 cm x t cm) test polymer films insulate the two tungsten moderator pieces from the aluminized mylar source holder (t=0.00127 to 0.0127). A potential difference of 10 to 100 volts--depending on the test polymer film thickness (t)--is applied between the tungsten pieces and the source foil. Thermalized positrons diffusing out of the moderator pieces are attracted to the source foil held at an appropriate potential below the moderator pieces. These positrons have to pass through the test polymer films before they can reach the source foil. The potential difference between the moderator pieces and the aluminized mylar is so adjusted as to force the positrons to stop in the test polymer films. Thus the new generator becomes an effective source of positrons for assaying thin polymer films for their molecular morphology.

  9. Image enhancement in positron emission mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavine, Nikolai V.; Seiler, Stephen; McColl, Roderick W.; Lenkinski, Robert E.

    2017-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate an efficient iterative deconvolution method (RSEMD) for improving the quantitative accuracy of previously reconstructed breast images by commercial positron emission mammography (PEM) scanner. Materials and Methods: The RSEMD method was tested on breast phantom data and clinical PEM imaging data. Data acquisition was performed on a commercial Naviscan Flex Solo II PEM camera. This method was applied to patient breast images previously reconstructed with Naviscan software (MLEM) to determine improvements in resolution, signal to noise ratio (SNR) and contrast to noise ratio (CNR.) Results: In all of the patients' breast studies the post-processed images proved to have higher resolution and lower noise as compared with images reconstructed by conventional methods. In general, the values of SNR reached a plateau at around 6 iterations with an improvement factor of about 2 for post-processed Flex Solo II PEM images. Improvements in image resolution after the application of RSEMD have also been demonstrated. Conclusions: A rapidly converging, iterative deconvolution algorithm with a novel resolution subsets-based approach RSEMD that operates on patient DICOM images has been used for quantitative improvement in breast imaging. The RSEMD method can be applied to clinical PEM images to improve image quality to diagnostically acceptable levels and will be crucial in order to facilitate diagnosis of tumor progression at the earliest stages. The RSEMD method can be considered as an extended Richardson-Lucy algorithm with multiple resolution levels (resolution subsets).

  10. Low-energy positron scattering by pyrimidine.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Alessandra Souza; Pastega, Diego F; Bettega, Márcio H F

    2015-12-28

    This work reports elastic integral and differential cross sections for positron collisions with pyrimidine, for energies up to 20 eV. The cross sections were computed with the Schwinger multichannel method in the static plus polarization approximation. We also employed the Born closure procedure to account for the long range potential due to the permanent dipole moment of the molecule. Our results are compared with the experimental total cross section of Zecca et al. [J. Phys. B 43, 215204 (2010)], the experimental grand-total, quasi-elastic integral and differential cross section of Palihawadana et al. [Phys. Rev. A 88, 12717 (2013)]. We also compare our results with theoretical integral and differential cross sections obtained by Sanz et al. [Phys. Rev. A 88, 62704 (2013)] with the R-matrix and the independent atom model with screening-corrected additivity rule methods, and with the results computed by Franz and Gianturco [Phys. Rev. A 88, 042711 (2013)] using model correlation-polarization potentials. The agreement between the theory and the experiment is encouraging.

  11. Low-energy positron scattering by pyrimidine

    SciTech Connect

    Barbosa, Alessandra Souza; Pastega, Diego F.; Bettega, Márcio H. F.

    2015-12-28

    This work reports elastic integral and differential cross sections for positron collisions with pyrimidine, for energies up to 20 eV. The cross sections were computed with the Schwinger multichannel method in the static plus polarization approximation. We also employed the Born closure procedure to account for the long range potential due to the permanent dipole moment of the molecule. Our results are compared with the experimental total cross section of Zecca et al. [J. Phys. B 43, 215204 (2010)], the experimental grand-total, quasi-elastic integral and differential cross section of Palihawadana et al. [Phys. Rev. A 88, 12717 (2013)]. We also compare our results with theoretical integral and differential cross sections obtained by Sanz et al. [Phys. Rev. A 88, 62704 (2013)] with the R-matrix and the independent atom model with screening-corrected additivity rule methods, and with the results computed by Franz and Gianturco [Phys. Rev. A 88, 042711 (2013)] using model correlation-polarization potentials. The agreement between the theory and the experiment is encouraging.

  12. Data acquisition with a positron emission tomograph

    SciTech Connect

    Freifelder, R.; Karp, J.S.

    1997-12-31

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a clinical imaging modality used in Nuclear Medicine. PET measures functionality rather than anatomical features and is therefore invaluable in the treatment of diseases which are characterized by functional changes in organs rather than anatomical changes. Typical diseases for which PET is used are cancer, epilepsy, and heart disease. While the scanners are not very complex, the performance demands on the devices are high. Excellent spatial resolution, 4-5 mm, and high sensitivity are key to maintaining high image quality. Compensation or suppression of scattered radiation is also necessary for good image quality. The ability to acquire data under high counting rates is also necessary in order to minimize the injected dose to the patient, minimize the patient`s time in the scanner, and finally to minimize blurring due to patient motion. We have adapted various techniques in our data acquisition system which will be reported on in this talk. These include pulse clipping using lumped delay lines, flash ADCs with short sampling time, the use of a local positioning algorithm to limit the number of data words being used in subsequent second level software triggers and calculations, and finally the use of high speed dedicated calculator boards for on-line rebinning and reduction of the data. Modifications to the system to allow for transmission scanning will also be discussed.

  13. Positron emission tomography in generalized seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Theodore, W.H.; Brooks, R.; Margolin, R.; Patronas, N.; Sato, S.; Porter, R.J.; Mansi, L.; Bairamian, D.; DiChiro, G.

    1985-05-01

    The authors used /sup 18/F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) to study nine patients with clinical absence or generalized seizures. One patient had only absence seizures, two had only generalized tonic-clonic seizures, and six had both seizure types. Interictal scans in eight failed to reveal focal or lateralized hypometabolism. No apparent abnormalities were noted. Two patients had PET scans after isotope injection during hyperventilation-induced generalized spike-wave discharges. Diffusely increased metabolic rates were found in one compared with an interictal scan, and in another compared with control values. Another patient had FDG injected during absence status: EEG showed generalized spike-wave discharges (during which she was unresponsive) intermixed with slow activity accompanied by confusion. Metabolic rates were decreased, compared with the interictal scan, throughout both cortical and subcortical structures. Interictal PET did not detect specific anatomic regions responsible for absence seizure onset in any patient, but the results of the ictal scans did suggest that pathophysiologic differences exist between absence status and single absence attacks.

  14. Hypoxia imaging agents labeled with positron emitters.

    PubMed

    Hoigebazar, Lathika; Jeong, Jae Min

    2013-01-01

    Imaging hypoxia using positron emission tomography (PET) is of great importance for therapy of cancer. [(18)F]Fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) was the first PET agent for hypoxia imaging, and various radiolabeled nitroimidazole derivatives such as [(18)F]fluoroerythronitroimidazole (FETNIM), [(18)F]1-α-D: -(2-deoxy-2-fluoroarabinofuranosyl)-2-nitroimidazole (FAZA), [(18)F]2-(2-nitro-1H-imidazol-1-yl)-N-(2,2,3,3,3-pentafluoropropyl) acetamide (EF-5), and [(18)F]fluoroetanidazole (FETA) have been developed successively. To overcome the high cost of cyclotron installation, (68)Ga-labeled nitroimidazole derivatives also have been developed. Another important hypoxia imaging agent is (64)Cu-diacetyl-bis(N (4)-methylthiosemicarbazone) ((64)Cu-ATSM), which can distribute in cancer tissue rapidly due to high lipophilicity. However, its application is limited due to high cost of radionuclide production. Although various hypoxia imaging agents have been reported and tested, hypoxia PET images still have to be improved, because of the low blood flow in hypoxic tissues and resulting low uptake of the agents.

  15. SLC positron damping ring optics design

    SciTech Connect

    Delahaye, J.P.; Rivkin, L.

    1984-12-01

    The basic SLAC Linear Collider operation scheme assumes the use of two damping rings, one for the e/sup -/, one for the e/sup +/, in order to reduce the colliding beam normalized emittances to 30..pi.. ..mu..radm hence raising the corresponding luminosity by a factor 170. The e/sup -/ damping ring which optics was designed by H. Wiedemann, has been extensively studied and modelled since it's completion at the end of 1982. The e/sup +/ damping ring to be built soon will be based on the same design except for some modifications resulting from the studies on the e/sup -/ damping ring which clearly pointed out two major optics weak points: the extracted normalized emittances are 30 to 60% bigger than the design values, which already left no margin for unavoidable blow-up between the damping rings and the SLC interaction point, and the chromaticity correction based on distributed sextupole components provided by shaping the ends of the bending magnet poles was insufficient. Moreover the QDI quadrupoles introduce a strong coupling between transverse planes due to an undesirable skew component. The present note describes the basic modifications of the ring lattice and main equipment positions in order to improve the first two points in the Positron Damping Ring. The QDI quadrupole design has already been modified and magnets of a new type will be implemented in both damping rings.

  16. Resistive plate chambers in positron emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo, Paulo; Blanco, Alberto; Couceiro, Miguel; Ferreira, Nuno C.; Lopes, Luís; Martins, Paulo; Ferreira Marques, Rui; Fonte, Paulo

    2013-07-01

    Resistive plate chambers (RPC) were originally deployed for high energy physics. Realizing how their properties match the needs of nuclear medicine, a LIP team proposed applying RPCs to both preclinical and clinical positron emission tomography (RPC-PET). We show a large-area RPC-PET simulated scanner covering an axial length of 2.4m —slightly superior to the height of the human body— allowing for whole-body, single-bed RPC-PET acquisitions. Simulations following NEMA (National Electrical Manufacturers Association, USA) protocols yield a system sensitivity at least one order of magnitude larger than present-day, commercial PET systems. Reconstruction of whole-body simulated data is feasible by using a dedicated, direct time-of-flight-based algorithm implemented onto an ordered subsets estimation maximization parallelized strategy. Whole-body RPC-PET patient images following the injection of only 2mCi of 18-fluorodesoxyglucose (FDG) are expected to be ready 7 minutes after the 6 minutes necessary for data acquisition. This compares to the 10-20mCi FDG presently injected for a PET scan, and to the uncomfortable 20-30minutes necessary for its data acquisition. In the preclinical field, two fully instrumented detector heads have been assembled aiming at a four-head-based, small-animal RPC-PET system. Images of a disk-shaped and a needle-like 22Na source show unprecedented sub-millimeter spatial resolution.

  17. Amorphous silicon detectors in positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Conti, M. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA ); Perez-Mendez, V. )

    1989-12-01

    The physics of the detection process is studied and the performances of different Positron Emission Tomography (PET) system are evaluated by theoretical calculation and/or Monte Carlo Simulation (using the EGS code) in this paper, whose table of contents can be summarized as follows: a brief introduction to amorphous silicon detectors and some useful equation is presented; a Tantalum/Amorphous Silicon PET project is studied and the efficiency of the systems is studied by Monte Carlo Simulation; two similar CsI/Amorphous Silicon PET projects are presented and their efficiency and spatial resolution are studied by Monte Carlo Simulation, light yield and time characteristics of the scintillation light are discussed for different scintillators; some experimental result on light yield measurements are presented; a Xenon/Amorphous Silicon PET is presented, the physical mechanism of scintillation in Xenon is explained, a theoretical estimation of total light yield in Xenon and the resulting efficiency is discussed altogether with some consideration of the time resolution of the system; the amorphous silicon integrated electronics is presented, total noise and time resolution are evaluated in each of our applications; the merit parameters {epsilon}{sup 2}{tau}'s are evaluated and compared with other PET systems and conclusions are drawn; and a complete reference list for Xenon scintillation light physics and its applications is presented altogether with the listing of the developed simulation programs.

  18. Positron-emission tomography and personality disorders.

    PubMed

    Goyer, P F; Andreason, P J; Semple, W E; Clayton, A H; King, A C; Compton-Toth, B A; Schulz, S C; Cohen, R M

    1994-02-01

    This study used positron-emission tomography to examine cerebral metabolic rates of glucose (CMRG) in 17 patients with DSM III-R diagnoses of personality disorder. Within the group of 17 personality disorder patients, there was a significant inverse correlation between a life history of aggressive impulse difficulties and regional CMRG in the frontal cortex of the transaxial plane approximately 40 mm above the canthomeatal line (CML) (r = -.56, p = 0.17). Diagnostic groups included antisocial (n = 6), borderline (n = 6), dependent (n = 2), and narcissistic (n = 3). Regional CMRG in the six antisocial patients and in the six borderline patients was compared to a control group of 43 subjects using an analysis of covariance with age and sex as covariates. In the borderline personality disorder group, there was a significant decrease in frontal cortex metabolism in the transaxial plane approximately 81 mm above the CML and a significant increase in the transaxial plane approximately 53 mm above the CML (F[1,45] = 8.65, p = .005; and F[1,45] = 7.68, p = .008, respectively.

  19. Positron-attachment to small molecules: Vibrational enhancement of positron affinities with configuration interaction level of multi-component molecular orbital approach

    SciTech Connect

    Tachikawa, Masanori

    2015-12-31

    To theoretically demonstrate the binding of a positron to small polarized molecules, we have calculated the vibrational averaged positron affinity (PA) values along the local vibrational contribution with the configuration interaction level of multi-component molecular orbital method. This method can take the electron-positron correlation contribution into account through single electronic - single positronic excitation configurations. The PA values are enhanced by including the local vibrational contribution from vertical PA values due to the anharmonicity of the potential.

  20. An Alternative Approach to Understanding the Observed Positron Fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Israel, Martin H.

    2014-10-01

    Space-based observations by PAMELA (Adriani et al., Nature 458, 607, 2009), Fermi-LAT (Ackerman et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 01103, 2012), and AMS (Aguilar et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 141102, 2013) have demonstrated that the positron fraction (e+/total-e) increases with increasing energy above about 10 GeV. According to the propagation model for Galactic cosmic rays in widespread use (Moskalenko & Strong, Astrophys. J. 493, 693, 1998), the production of secondary positrons from interaction of cosmic-ray protons and heavier nuclei with the interstellar medium gives a generally falling positron fraction between 10 and 100 GeV, with secondary positrons accounting for only ˜20 % of the observed positron fraction at 100 GeV; so some other physical phenomena have been proposed to explain the data. An alternative approach to interpreting the positron observations is to consider these data as presenting an opportunity for re-examining models of Galactic cosmic-ray propagation. Following release of the PAMELA data, three groups published propagation models (Shaviv, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 111302, 2009, Cowsik and Burch, Phys. Rev. D. 82, 023009, 2010, Katz et al., Mon. Not. R. Aston. Soc. 405, 1458 2010) in which the observed positron fraction is explained entirely by secondary positrons produced in the interstellar medium. In May of this year, stimulated by the AMS extension of the positron data to higher energy with excellent statistics, two of those groups presented further development of their calculations (Cowsik et al. 2013, Blum et al. 2013), again concluding that the observed positrons can be understood as secondaries. None of the authors of these five papers was registered for the 33rd International Cosmic Ray Conference (ICRC). Although I am not an author of any of these papers, I have some close familiarity with one of these recent papers, so the conference organizers invited me to bring this alternative approach to the attention of the conference. The

  1. Plasma Wakefield Acceleration of an Intense Positron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Blue, B

    2004-04-21

    The Plasma Wakefield Accelerator (PWFA) is an advanced accelerator concept which possess a high acceleration gradient and a long interaction length for accelerating both electrons and positrons. Although electron beam-plasma interactions have been extensively studied in connection with the PWFA, very little work has been done with respect to positron beam-plasma interactions. This dissertation addresses three issues relating to a positron beam driven plasma wakefield accelerator. These issues are (a) the suitability of employing a positron drive bunch to excite a wake; (b) the transverse stability of the drive bunch; and (c) the acceleration of positrons by the plasma wake that is driven by a positron bunch. These three issues are explored first through computer simulations and then through experiments. First, a theory is developed on the impulse response of plasma to a short drive beam which is valid for small perturbations to the plasma density. This is followed up with several particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations which study the experimental parameter (bunch length, charge, radius, and plasma density) range. Next, the experimental setup is described with an emphasis on the equipment used to measure the longitudinal energy variations of the positron beam. Then, the transverse dynamics of a positron beam in a plasma are described. Special attention is given to the way focusing, defocusing, and a tilted beam would appear to be energy variations as viewed on our diagnostics. Finally, the energy dynamics imparted on a 730 {micro}m long, 40 {micro}m radius, 28.5 GeV positron beam with 1.2 x 10{sup 10} particles in a 1.4 meter long 0-2 x 10{sup 14} e{sup -}/cm{sup 3} plasma is described. First the energy loss was measured as a function of plasma density and the measurements are compared to theory. Then, an energy gain of 79 {+-} 15 MeV is shown. This is the first demonstration of energy gain of a positron beam in a plasma and it is in good agreement with the predictions

  2. Radioisotope generators for short-lived positron emitters applicable to positron emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Y.

    1989-04-01

    Radioisotope generators provide short-lived positron emitters for positron emission tomography (PET) without the need for an on-site cyclotron. These generators consist of a long-lived parent radionuclide, generally produced on an accelerator, from which the short-lived daughter radionuclide is separated and used as needed. Generators developed and applied to PET studies include 288 d 68Ge for 68 min 68Ga, 25 d 82Sr for 76 s 82Rb and 20.1 h 122Xe for 3.6 min 122I. These radiotracers have been used for the assessment of myocardial and brain blood flow in patient studies. Additionally, 82Rb has been used to determine the breakdown in the blood brain barrier in brain tumor patients who have undergone radiation therapy. When used in conjunction with 18F-fluorodeoxylucose produced on a regional cyclotron for the measurement of glucose utilization in brain tumors, differential diagnosis can be made between tumor regrowth and radiation therapy necrosis. Other possible applications include the detection of vascular lesions with 68Ga labeled platelets or porphyrins.

  3. Plasma and trap-based techniques for science with positrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielson, J. R.; Dubin, D. H. E.; Greaves, R. G.; Surko, C. M.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a wealth of new science involving low-energy antimatter (i.e., positrons and antiprotons) at energies ranging from 102 to less than 10-3 eV . Much of this progress has been driven by the development of new plasma-based techniques to accumulate, manipulate, and deliver antiparticles for specific applications. This article focuses on the advances made in this area using positrons. However, many of the resulting techniques are relevant to antiprotons as well. An overview is presented of relevant theory of single-component plasmas in electromagnetic traps. Methods are described to produce intense sources of positrons and to efficiently slow the typically energetic particles thus produced. Techniques are described to trap positrons efficiently and to cool and compress the resulting positron gases and plasmas. Finally, the procedures developed to deliver tailored pulses and beams (e.g., in intense, short bursts, or as quasimonoenergetic continuous beams) for specific applications are reviewed. The status of development in specific application areas is also reviewed. One example is the formation of antihydrogen atoms for fundamental physics [e.g., tests of invariance under charge conjugation, parity inversion, and time reversal (the CPT theorem), and studies of the interaction of gravity with antimatter]. Other applications discussed include atomic and materials physics studies and the study of the electron-positron many-body system, including both classical electron-positron plasmas and the complementary quantum system in the form of Bose-condensed gases of positronium atoms. Areas of future promise are also discussed. The review concludes with a brief summary and a list of outstanding challenges.

  4. Positrons as imaging agents and probes in nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Suzanne V.

    2009-09-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) tracks a positron emitting radiopharmaceutical injected into the body and generates a 3-dimensional image of its location. Introduced in the early 70s, it has now developed into a powerful medical diagnostic tool for routine clinical use as well as in drug development. Unrivalled as a highly sensitive, specific and non-invasive imaging tool, PET unfortunately lacks the resolution of Computer Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). As the resolution of PET depends significantly on the energy of the positron incorporated in the radiopharmaceutical and its interaction with its surrounding tissue, there is growing interest in expanding our understanding of how positrons interact at the atomic and molecular level. A better understanding of these interactions will contribute to improving the resolution of PET and assist in the design of better imaging agents. Positrons are also used in Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS) to determine electron density and or presence and incidence of micro- and mesopores (0.1 to 10 nm) in materials. The control of porosity in engineered materials is crucial for applications such as controlled release or air and water resistant films. Equally important to the design of nano and microtechnologies, is our understanding of the microenvironments within these pores and on surfaces. Hence as radiopharmaceuticals are designed to track disease, nuclear probes (radioactive molecules) are synthesized to investigate the chemical properties within these pores. This article will give a brief overview of the present role of positrons in imaging as well as explore its potential to contribute in the engineering of new materials to the marketplace.

  5. Study of electron-positron interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Abashian, A.; Gotow, K.; Philonen, L.

    1990-09-15

    For the past seven years, this group has been interested in the study of tests of the Standard Model of Electroweak interactions. The program has centered about the AMY experiment which examines the nature of the final state products in electron-positron collisions in the center of mass energy range near 60 GeV. Results of these measurements have shown a remarkable consistency with the predictions of the minimal model of 3 quark and lepton generations and single charged and neutral intermediate bosons. No new particles or excited states have been observed nor has any evidence for departures in cross sections or angular asymmetries from expectations been observed. These conclusions have been even more firmly established by the higher energy results from the LEP and SLC colliders at center of mass energies of about 90 GeV. Our focus is shifting to the neutrino as a probe to electroweak interactions. The relative merit of attempting to observe neutrinos from point sources versus observing neutrinos generally is not easy to predict. The improved ability to interpret is offset by the probably episodic nature of the emission and irreproducibility of the results. In this phase of development, it is best to be sensitive to both sources of neutrinos. As a second phase of our program at Virginia Tech, we are studying the feasibility of detecting cosmic ray neutrinos in a proposed experiment which we have called NOVA. the results of the test setup will be instrumental in developing an optimum design. A third program we are involved in is the MEGA experiment at Los Alamos, an experiment to place a limit on the rate of muon decay to electron plus photon which is forbidden by the Standard Model.

  6. Positron Accumulator Ring (PAR) power supply

    SciTech Connect

    Fathizadeh, M.

    1995-08-01

    The Positron Accumulator Ring (PAR) consists of 8 dipole magnets connected in series. These magnets are energized via one 12-pulse dc power supply. The power supply consists of four phase controlled half-wave wye group converters. Each of the two half-wave converters are connected through an interphase transformer to obtain a full-wave converter with 120{degrees} conduction. The input voltage for these two half-wave converters are 180{degrees} apart. The two full-wave converters are connected in parallel through a third interphase transformer. This type of connection of the converters not only provides the required output current, it also improves the input power factor of the power supply. The output of the wye group converters is filtered through a passive L-R-C filter to reduce the ripple content of the output current. At low current values of the power supply the current ripple is high, thus a large filter is needed, which adds to the cost of the power supply, however at high output current levels, the current ripple is less severe. The large size of the filter can be reduced by adding an anti-parallel rectifier diode(D1) to the output of the power supply. A freewheeling diode(D2) is connected before the choke to circulate the current once the power supply is turned off. In order to measure the current in the magnet a high precision, low drift, zero flux current transductor is used. This transductor senses the magnet current which provides a feedback signal to control the gating of the converter`s thyristors. A true 14 bit Digital to Analog Converter (DAC) is programmed by the control computer for the required current value, providing a reference for the current regulator. Fast correction of the line transients is provided by a relatively fast voltage loop controlled by a high gain slow response current loop.

  7. Positron Emission Mammography with Multiple Angle Acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Mark F. Smith; Stan Majewski; Raymond R. Raylman

    2002-11-01

    Positron emission mammography (PEM) of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in breast tumors with dedicated detectors typically has been accomplished with two planar detectors in a fixed position with the breast under compression. The potential use of PEM imaging at two detector positions to guide stereotactic breast biopsy has motivated us to use PEM coincidence data acquired at two or more detector positions together in a single image reconstruction. Multiple angle PEM acquisition and iterative image reconstruction were investigated using point source and compressed breast phantom acquisitions with 5, 9, 12 and 15 mm diameter spheres and a simulated tumor:background activity concentration ratio of 6:1. Image reconstruction was performed with an iterative MLEM algorithm that used coincidence events between any two detector pixels on opposed detector heads at each detector position. This present study compared two acquisition protocols: 2 angle acquisition with detector angular positions of -15 and +15 degrees and 11 angle acquisition with detector positions spaced at 3 degree increments over the range -15 to +15 degrees. Three- dimensional image resolution was assessed for the point source acquisitions, and contrast and signal-to-noise metrics were evaluated for the compressed breast phantom with different simulated tumor sizes. Radial and tangential resolutions were similar for the two protocols, while normal resolution was better for the 2 angle acquisition. Analysis is complicated by the asymmetric point spread functions. Signal- to-noise vs. contrast tradeoffs were better for 11 angle acquisition for the smallest visible 9 mm sphere, while tradeoff results were mixed for the larger and more easily visible 12 mm and 15 mm diameter spheres. Additional study is needed to better understand the performance of limited angle tomography for PEM. PEM tomography experiments with complete angular sampling are planned.

  8. Positron Emission Mammography with Multiple Angle Acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Mark F. Smith; Stan Majewski; Raymond R. Raylman

    2002-11-01

    Positron emission mammography (PEM) of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FbG) uptake in breast tumors with dedicated detectors typically has been accomplished with two planar detectors in a fixed position with the breast under compression. The potential use of PEM imaging at two detector positions to guide stereotactic breast biopsy has motivated us to use PEM coincidence data acquired at two or more detector positions together in a single image reconstruction. Multiple angle PEM acquisition and iterative image reconstruction were investigated using point source and compressed breast phantom acquisitions with 5, 9, 12 and 15 mm diameter spheres and a simulated tumor:background activity concentration ratio of 6:1. Image reconstruction was performed with an iterative MLEM algorithm that used coincidence events between any two detector pixels on opposed detector heads at each detector position. This present study compared two acquisition protocols: 2 angle acquisition with detector angular positions of -15 and +15 degrees and 11 angle acquisition with detector positions spaced at 3 degree increments over the range -15 to +15 degrees. Three-dimensional image resolution was assessed for the point source acquisitions, and contrast and signal-to-noise metrics were evaluated for the compressed breast phantom with different simulated tumor sizes. Radial and tangential resolutions were similar for the two protocols, while normal resolution was better for the 2 angle acquisition. Analysis is complicated by the asymmetric point spread functions. Signal- to-noise vs. contrast tradeoffs were better for 11 angle acquisition for the smallest visible 9 mm sphere, while tradeoff results were mixed for the larger and more easily visible 12 mm and 15 mm diameter spheres. Additional study is needed to better understand the performance of limited angle tomography for PEM. PEM tomography experiments with complete angular sampling are planned.

  9. Radiofluorinated carbohydrates for positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Mun, Jiyoung

    2013-01-01

    2-Deoxy-2-[(18)F]fluoro-D-glucose (2-(18)FDG) has represented radiofluorinated carbohydrates as the most successful tracer for positron emission tomography (PET). 2-(18)FDG uptake depends on glucose metabolism, which is related to a disease progression. 2-(18)FDG has been widely used in oncology, neurology, cardiology, infectious diseases, and inflammation, to complement anatomical modalities such as CT and MRI. Followed by the success of 2-(18)FDG, various radiofluorinated carbohydrates have been evaluated as PET tracers, which include analogs of D-ribose, D-mannose, D-galactose, D-talose, D-fructose, D-allose, lactose, L-fucose, N-acetylneuraminic acid, and L-ascorbic acid. Among those radiofluorinated carbohydrates, several have implied potential for further development. 2-Deoxy-2-[(18)F]fluoro-D-galactose has been developed to assess liver function and diagnose hepatic carcinoma. 6-Deoxy-6-[(18)F]fluoro-D-fructose showed promising characteristics for diagnosis of breast cancer. Three radiofluorinated analogs of lactose have been designed as the substrates of the overexpressed hepatocarcinoma-intestine-pancreas/pancreatitis-associated protein in peritumoral pancreatic tissue for early diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. The metabolism of 6-[(18)F]fluoro-L-fucose suggested that it is a bioactive analog of L-fucose in the synthesis of glycoconjugate macromolecules. 6-Deoxy-6-[(18)F]fluoro-L-ascorbic acid was evaluated to assess antioxidant function of L-ascorbic acid in rodent models of transient global ischemia and glutathione deficiency.

  10. Acceleration of positrons in supernova shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellison, Donald C.

    1992-01-01

    During this project we investigated the acceleration of leptons (electrons and positrons) in collisionless shock waves. In particular, we were interested in how leptons are accelerated in the blast waves existing in the remnants of supernova explosions. Supernova remnants (SNRs) have long been considered as the most likely source of galactic cosmic rays but no definite connection between SNRs and the cosmic rays seen at earth can be made. Only by understanding lepton acceleration in shocks can the rich SNR data base be properly used to understand cosmic ray origins. Our project was directed at the neglected aspects of lepton acceleration. We showed that the efficiency of lepton acceleration depended critically on the lepton injection energy. We showed that, even when infection effects are not important, that proton and lepton distribution functions produced by shocks are quite different in the critical energy range for producing the observed synchrotron emission. We also showed that transrelativistic effects produced proton spectra that were not in agreement with standard results from radio observations, but that the lepton spectra were, in fact, consistent with observations. We performed simulations of relativistic shocks (shocks where the flow speed is a sizable fraction of the speed of light) and discovered some interesting effects. We first demonstrated the power of the Monte Carlo technique by determining the shock jump conditions in relativistic shocks. We then proceeded to determine how relativistic shocks accelerate particles. We found that nonlinear relativistic shocks treat protons and leptons even more differently than nonrelativistic shocks. The transrelativistic effects on the shock structure from the heavy ion component reduces the lepton acceleration to a tiny fraction of the ion acceleration. This effect is dramatic even if high energy leptons (many times thermal energy) are injected, and was totally unexpected. Our results have important

  11. A new look at the cosmic ray positron fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudaud, M.; Aupetit, S.; Caroff, S.; Putze, A.; Belanger, G.; Genolini, Y.; Goy, C.; Poireau, V.; Poulin, V.; Rosier, S.; Salati, P.; Tao, L.; Vecchi, M.

    2015-03-01

    Context. The positron fraction in cosmic rays has recently been measured with improved accuracy up to 500 GeV, and it was found to be a steadily increasing function of energy above ~10 GeV. This behaviour contrasts with standard astrophysical mechanisms, in which positrons are secondary particles, produced in the interactions of primary cosmic rays during their propagation in the interstellar medium. The observed anomaly in the positron fraction triggered a lot of excitement, as it could be interpreted as an indirect signature of the presence of dark matter species in the Galaxy, the so-called weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). Alternatively, it could be produced by nearby sources, such as pulsars. Aims: These hypotheses are probed in light of the latest AMS-02 positron fraction measurements. As regards dark matter candidates, regions in the annihilation cross section to mass plane, which best fit the most recent data, are delineated and compared to previous measurements. The explanation of the anomaly in terms of a single nearby pulsar is also explored. Methods: The cosmic ray positron transport in the Galaxy is described using a semi-analytic two-zone model. Propagation is described with Green functions as well as with Bessel expansions. For consistency, the secondary and primary components of the positron flux are calculated together with the same propagation model. The above mentioned explanations of the positron anomaly are tested using χ2 fits. The numerical package MicrOMEGAs is used to model the positron flux generated by dark matter species. The description of the positron fraction from conventional astrophysical sources is based on the pulsar observations included in the Australia Telescope National Facility (ATNF) catalogue. Results: The masses of the favoured dark matter candidates are always larger than 500 GeV, even though the results are very sensitive to the lepton flux. The Fermi measurements point systematically to much heavier

  12. Production of intense positron beams at the VEPP-5 injection complex

    SciTech Connect

    Astrelina, K. V.; Blinov, M. F.; Vsevolozhskaya, T. A.; Dikanskii, N. S.; Emanov, F. A.; Lapik, R. M.; Logachev, P. V.; Martyshkin, P. V.; Petrenko, A. V.; Rybitskaya, T. V.; Skrinskii, A. N.; Shiyankov, S. V.; Yaskina, T. A.

    2008-01-15

    A source of positrons allowing 5 x 10{sup 8} positrons accelerated to the energy of 70 MeV to be produced per pulse has been developed. The process of electron-positron pair production in an electromagnetic shower is used for production of positrons. The electromagnetic shower is generated in a tantalum target by a beam of 2 x 10{sup 10} electrons with energy 270 MeV. A high efficiency of positron collection (positron yield Y {approx} 0.1 GeV{sup -1}) is ensured by a unique design of the matching device.

  13. Production of intense positron beams at the VEPP-5 injection complex

    SciTech Connect

    Astrelina, K. V.; Blinov, M. F.; Vsevolozhskaya, T. A.; Dikanskii, N. S.; Emanov, F. A.; Lapik, R. M.; Logachev, P. V.; Martyshkin, P. V.; Petrenko, A. V.; Rybitskaya, T. V.; Skrinskii, A. N.; Shiyankov, S. V.; Yaskina, T. A.

    2008-01-15

    A source of positrons allowing 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} positrons accelerated to the energy of 70 MeV to be produced per pulse has been developed. The process of electron-positron pair production in an electromagnetic shower is used for production of positrons. The electromagnetic shower is generated in a tantalum target by a beam of 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} electrons with energy 270 MeV. A high efficiency of positron collection (positron yield Y Almost-Equal-To 0.1 GeV{sup -1}) is ensured by a unique design of the matching device.

  14. Compact Beta Particle/Positron Imager for Plant Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Weisenberger, Andrew; Lee, Seung Joon; McKisson, John; Xi, Wenze; Zorn, Carl; Stolin, Alexander; Majewski, Stan; Majewski, Stanislaw; Howell, Calvin; Crowell, Alec; Smith, Mark

    2011-06-01

    The 11CO2 tracer is used to facilitate plant biology research towards optimization of plant productivity, biofuel development and carbon sequestration in biomass. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has been used to study carbon transport in live plants using 11CO2. Plants typically have very thin leaves resulting in little medium for the emitted positrons to undergo an annihilation event. For the emitted positron from 11C decay approximately 1mm of water equivalent material is needed for positron annihilation. Thus most of the positrons do not annihilate inside the leaf, resulting in limited sensitivity for PET imaging. To address this problem we have developed a compact beta-positive beta-minus particle (BPBM) imager for 11CO2 leaf imaging. The detector is based on a Hamamatsu H8500 position sensitive photomultiplier tube optically coupled via optical grease and a 3mm thick glass plate to a 0.5mm thick Eljin EJ-212 plastic scintillator. The detector is equipped with a flexible arm to allow its placement and orientation on the leaf of the plant of interest while maintaining the leaf's original orientation. We are planning to utilize the imaging device at the Duke University Phytotron to investigate dynamic carbon transport differences between invasive and native species.

  15. High-intensity positron microprobe at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Golge, Serkan; Vlahovic, Branislav; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan B.

    2014-06-19

    We present a conceptual design for a novel continuous wave electron-linac based high-intensity slow-positron production source with a projected intensity on the order of 1010 e+/s. Reaching this intensity in our design relies on the transport of positrons (T+ below 600 keV) from the electron-positron pair production converter target to a low-radiation and low-temperature area for moderation in a high-efficiency cryogenic rare gas moderator, solid Ne. The performance of the integrated beamline has been verified through computational studies. The computational results include Monte Carlo calculations of the optimized electron/positron beam energies, converter target thickness, synchronized raster system, transport of the beam from the converter target to the moderator, extraction of the beam from the channel, and moderation efficiency calculations. For the extraction of positrons from the magnetic channel a magnetic field terminator plug prototype has been built and experimental data on the effectiveness of this prototype are presented. The dissipation of the heat away from the converter target and radiation protection measures are also discussed.

  16. High-intensity positron microprobe at Jefferson Lab

    DOE PAGES

    Golge, Serkan; Vlahovic, Branislav; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan B.

    2014-06-19

    We present a conceptual design for a novel continuous wave electron-linac based high-intensity slow-positron production source with a projected intensity on the order of 1010 e+/s. Reaching this intensity in our design relies on the transport of positrons (T+ below 600 keV) from the electron-positron pair production converter target to a low-radiation and low-temperature area for moderation in a high-efficiency cryogenic rare gas moderator, solid Ne. The performance of the integrated beamline has been verified through computational studies. The computational results include Monte Carlo calculations of the optimized electron/positron beam energies, converter target thickness, synchronized raster system, transport of themore » beam from the converter target to the moderator, extraction of the beam from the channel, and moderation efficiency calculations. For the extraction of positrons from the magnetic channel a magnetic field terminator plug prototype has been built and experimental data on the effectiveness of this prototype are presented. The dissipation of the heat away from the converter target and radiation protection measures are also discussed.« less

  17. Anisotropies in the flux of cosmic ray electrons and positrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manconi, S.; Di Mauro, M.; Donato, F.

    2017-05-01

    High energy cosmic ray electrons and positrons probe the local properties of our galaxy. In fact, regardless of the production mechanism, electromagnetic energy losses limit the typical propagation scale of GeV-TeV electrons and positrons to a few kpc. In the diffusion model, the presence of nearby and dominant sources may produce an observable dipole anisotropy in the cosmic ray fluxes. We present a detailed study on the role of anisotropies from nearby sources in the interpretation of present cosmic ray electron and positrons fluxes. Predictions for the dipole anisotropy from known astrophysical sources as Supernova Remnants (SNRs) and pulsars taken from the Green and the Australia Telescope National Facility (ATNF) catalogs are shown. The results are obtained from models compatible with the most recent AMS-02 data on electrons and positrons fluxes. In particular, anisotropies for single sources as well as for a distribution of catalog sources are discussed. We compare our results with current anisotropy upper limits from the Fermi-LAT and PAMELA experiments, showing that the search of anisotropy in the electron and positron fluxes represents a complementary tool to inspect the properties of close SNRs, as for example the Vela SNR.

  18. Interpretation of AMS-02 electrons and positrons data

    SciTech Connect

    Mauro, M. Di; Donato, F.; Fornengo, N.; Vittino, A.; Lineros, R. E-mail: donato@to.infn.it E-mail: rlineros@ific.uv.es

    2014-04-01

    We perform a combined analysis of the recent AMS-02 data on electrons, positrons, electrons plus positrons and positron fraction, in a self-consistent framework where we realize a theoretical modeling of all the astrophysical components that can contribute to the observed fluxes in the whole energy range. The primary electron contribution is modeled through the sum of an average flux from distant sources and the fluxes from the local supernova remnants in the Green catalog. The secondary electron and positron fluxes originate from interactions on the interstellar medium of primary cosmic rays, for which we derive a novel determination by using AMS-02 proton and helium data. Primary positrons and electrons from pulsar wind nebulae in the ATNF catalog are included and studied in terms of their most significant (while loosely known) properties and under different assumptions (average contribution from the whole catalog, single dominant pulsar, a few dominant pulsars). We obtain a remarkable agreement between our various modeling and the AMS-02 data for all types of analysis, demonstrating that the whole AMS-02 leptonic data admit a self-consistent interpretation in terms of astrophysical contributions.

  19. The effect of direct positron production on relativistic feedback rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vodopiyanov, I. B.; Dwyer, J. R.; Lucia, R. J.; Cramer, E. S.; Arabshahi, S.; Rassoul, H.

    2013-12-01

    Relativistic feedback produces a self-sustaining runaway electron discharge via the production of backward propagating positrons and back-scattered x-rays. To date, only positrons created from pair-production by gamma-rays interacting with the air have been considered. In contrast, direct pair-production involves the creation of electron-positron pairs directly from the interaction of energetic runaway electrons with nuclei, and so it does not require the generation of bremsstrahlung gamma-rays. For high electric fields, where the runaway electron avalanche length scales are short, pair-production involving bremsstrahlung gamma-rays makes a smaller contribution to the total relativistic feedback rates than at lower fields, since both the bremsstrahlung interaction and the pair-production need to occur over a short length. On the other hand, for high fields, because direct positron production only involves one interaction, it may make a significant contribution to relativistic feedback rates in some cases. In this poster, we shall present the direct positron production cross-sections and calculate the effects on the relativistic feedback rates due to this process.

  20. Four-dimensional positron age-momentum correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, Ulrich; Löwe, Benjamin; Dickmann, Marcel; Mitteneder, Johannes; Sperr, Peter; Egger, Werner; Reiner, Markus; Dollinger, Günther

    2016-11-01

    We have performed first four-dimensional age-momentum correlation (4D-AMOC) measurements at a pulsed high intensity positron micro beam and determined the absolute value of the three-dimensional momentum of the electrons annihilating with the positrons in coincidence with the positron age in the sample material. We operated two position sensitive detectors in coincidence to measure the annihilation radiation: a pixelated HPGe-detector and a microchannel plate image intensifier with a CeBr3 scintillator pixel array. The transversal momentum resolution of the 4D-AMOC setup was measured to be about 17 × 10-3 {m}0c (FWHM) and was circa 3.5 times larger than the longitudinal momentum resolution. The total time resolution was 540 ps (FWHM). We measured two samples: a gold foil and a carbon tape at a positron implantation energy of 2 keV. For each sample discrete electron momentum states and their respective positron lifetimes were extracted.

  1. Progress toward positron accumulation for use in pair plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenson, E. V.; Hergenhahn, U.; Niemann, H.; Paschkowski, N.; Pedersen, T. Sunn; Saitoh, H.; Stanja, J.; Marx, G. H.; Schweikhard, L.; Hugenschmidt, C.; Danielson, J. R.; Surko, C. M.

    2014-10-01

    A Positron-Electron Experiment (APEX) is being developed to create and investigate magnetically confined matter-antimatter pair plasmas in the laboratory. These plasmas, whose oppositely charged species have precisely equal mass, have long been a topic of theoretical and astrophysical interest. The accompanying Positron Accumulation Experiment (PAX) comprises a series of non-neutral plasma traps. PAX will provide a bridge between the parameters of the NEPOMUC (Neutron-Induced Positron Source Munich) beam, from which APEX will receive its positrons, and the parameters needed to achieve at least 10 Debye lengths within APEX's flux surfaces. Presented here is an overview of work from the PAX team. Topics include the following: diagnostics for non-neutral plasmas, including a comparison of phosphor luminescence in response to electrons versus positrons, as well as work on a nonperturbative potential probe; progress to date on injection into and trapping within various sub-components of the experiment (buffer gas trap, accumulator, and high-field trap); and a discussion of design considerations for the next-generation, multi-cell trap to be built for the high-field magnet. on behalf of the APEX/PAX Team and Collaborators.

  2. Resonances and Bound States in Positron Annihilation on Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surko, C. M.

    2007-10-01

    Positron annihilation is important in such diverse areas as study of metabolic processes in the human brain and the characterization of materials. Annihilation on molecules has been a subject of keen interest for decades. In particular, annihilation rates can be orders of magnitude greater than those expected for simple collisions. Recent results put our understanding of many aspects of this long-standing problem on a firm footing. We now understand that the annihilation proceeds by vibrational Feshbach resonances (VFR). A prerequisite for the existence of these VFR is that the positron binds to the target. The annihilation energy spectra provide the best measures to date of positron binding energies. Predictions of a new theory of VFR-enhanced annihilation in small molecules (methyl halides) [1] show excellent, quantitative agreement with experiment. New data and analyses for larger molecules (e.g., hydrocarbons with more than two carbon atoms) show that annihilation rates depend strongly on the number of vibrational degrees of freedom but, surprisingly, only weakly on positron binding energy. This places important constraints on theories of annihilation in these molecules. Results for second bound (i.e., positronically excited) states and overtone and combination-mode VFR, as well as outstanding questions, will also be discussed. This work is done in collaboration with Jason Young. [1] G. F. Gribakin and C. M. R. Lee, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 193201 (2006).

  3. Linear and non-linear propagation of electrostatic positron-acoustic waves and envelope solitons in 4-component quantum plasma containing relativistically degenerate electrons and positrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Rashid; Gul, Nabi; Adnan, Muhammad; Tribeche, Mouloud; Khattak, Fida Younus

    2017-04-01

    A hydrodynamic model is employed to investigate the linear and non-linear propagation of electrostatic positron acoustic waves (EPAWs) in a 4-component relativistic-degenerate electron-positron-ion plasma. The plasma constituents are cold positrons, hot relativistic-degenerate electrons and positrons, and cold static ions in the background. The hot electrons and positrons are treated as inertialess, and the cold positrons provide the inertia while the restoring force comes from the hot species. A dispersion relation for low-frequency EPAWs is derived. It is observed that an increase in the relative density of hot positrons to cold positrons and relativistic effects tend to reduce the speed of the EPAWs. Employing the standard Reductive Perturbation Technique, a Korteweg de Vries (KdV)-type equation is derived, and the existence of KdV solitons is demonstrated. In this case, an increase in the relative density of hot to cold positrons and relativistic effects decreases both the amplitude and width of the solitons. Furthermore, a Non-Linear Schrödinger (NLS) equation is also derived. The variation in the group velocity shows less change with the wavenumber for the higher concentration of positrons and also with the stronger relativistic effects. The interchange in the behaviour of group velocity with the positron concentration is observed for values k > 1. The growth rate of modulation instability is derived, and its dependence on the positron concentration and relativistic effects are discussed. The relativistic effects reduce the stability region while the growth rate is enhanced while moving from weak-relativistic to ultra-relativistic cases. The hot positron concentration makes the wave modulationally stable for an extended region of the wavenumber k. The solution of the NLS equation admits the existence of both bright and dark envelope solitons. The profiles of the envelope solitons show inverse dependence on the positron concentration and on the relativistic

  4. Tungsten mesh as positron transmission moderator in a monoenergetic positron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, H. M.; Ling, C. C.; Beling, C. D.; Fung, S.; Cheung, C. K.; Kwan, P. Y.; Hui, I. P.

    2004-09-01

    The slow positron yield has been measured for various tungsten (W) moderator samples from a 22Na radioactive source. Multi-folded W mesh, W(1 0 0) single crystal foil and W polycrystalline foil samples have been investigated. It is found that the fast to slow conversion efficiency of the W mesh moderator depends on: (1) the annealing pretreatments, (2) the chemical etching duration and (3) the number of the folding layers. With the raw W mesh material having a wire diameter of 20 μm and transmission efficiency of 92.5%, an optimal efficiency of 1.2 × 10 -3 was achieved with 5 min etching duration and a folding number of 12 layers.

  5. Spectral and spatial characterisation of laser-driven positron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Sarri, G.; Warwick, J.; Schumaker, W.; Poder, K.; Cole, J.; Doria, D.; Dzelzainis, T.; Krushelnick, K.; Kuschel, S.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Najmudin, Z.; Romagnani, L.; Samarin, G. M.; Symes, D.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Yeung, M.; Zepf, M.

    2016-10-18

    The generation of high-quality relativistic positron beams is a central area of research in experimental physics, due to their potential relevance in a wide range of scientific and engineering areas, ranging from fundamental science to practical applications. There is now growing interest in developing hybrid machines that will combine plasma-based acceleration techniques with more conventional radio-frequency accelerators, in order to minimise the size and cost of these machines. Here we report on recent experiments on laser-driven generation of high-quality positron beams using a relatively low energy and potentially table-top laser system. Lastly, the results obtained indicate that current technology allows to create, in a compact setup, positron beams suitable for injection in radio-frequency accelerators.

  6. Electron-positron pairs production in a macroscopic charged core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffini, Remo; Xue, She-Sheng

    2011-02-01

    Classical and semi-classical energy states of relativistic electrons bounded by a massive and charged core with the charge-mass radio Q/M and macroscopic radius R are discussed. We show that the energies of semi-classical (bound) states can be much smaller than the negative electron mass-energy (-mc2), and energy-level crossing to negative energy continuum occurs. Electron-positron pair production takes place by quantum tunneling, if these bound states are not occupied. Electrons fill into these bound states and positrons go to infinity. We explicitly calculate the rate of pair-production, and compare it with the rates of electron-positron production by the Sauter-Euler-Heisenberg-Schwinger in a constant electric field. In addition, the pair-production rate for the electro-gravitational balance ratio Q/M=10-19 is much larger than the pair-production rate due to the Hawking processes.

  7. Spectral and spatial characterisation of laser-driven positron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarri, G.; Warwick, J.; Schumaker, W.; Poder, K.; Cole, J.; Doria, D.; Dzelzainis, T.; Krushelnick, K.; Kuschel, S.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Najmudin, Z.; Romagnani, L.; Samarin, G. M.; Symes, D.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Yeung, M.; Zepf, M.

    2017-01-01

    The generation of high-quality relativistic positron beams is a central area of research in experimental physics, due to their potential relevance in a wide range of scientific and engineering areas, ranging from fundamental science to practical applications. There is now growing interest in developing hybrid machines that will combine plasma-based acceleration techniques with more conventional radio-frequency accelerators, in order to minimise the size and cost of these machines. Here we report on recent experiments on laser-driven generation of high-quality positron beams using a relatively low energy and potentially table-top laser system. The results obtained indicate that current technology allows to create, in a compact setup, positron beams suitable for injection in radio-frequency accelerators.

  8. Spectral and spatial characterisation of laser-driven positron beams

    DOE PAGES

    Sarri, G.; Warwick, J.; Schumaker, W.; ...

    2016-10-18

    The generation of high-quality relativistic positron beams is a central area of research in experimental physics, due to their potential relevance in a wide range of scientific and engineering areas, ranging from fundamental science to practical applications. There is now growing interest in developing hybrid machines that will combine plasma-based acceleration techniques with more conventional radio-frequency accelerators, in order to minimise the size and cost of these machines. Here we report on recent experiments on laser-driven generation of high-quality positron beams using a relatively low energy and potentially table-top laser system. Lastly, the results obtained indicate that current technology allowsmore » to create, in a compact setup, positron beams suitable for injection in radio-frequency accelerators.« less

  9. Recent progress in tailoring trap-based positron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Natisin, M. R.; Hurst, N. C.; Danielson, J. R.; Surko, C. M.

    2013-03-19

    Recent progress is described to implement two approaches to specially tailor trap-based positron beams. Experiments and simulations are presented to understand the limits on the energy spread and pulse duration of positron beams extracted from a Penning-Malmberg (PM) trap after the particles have been buffer-gas cooled (or heated) in the range of temperatures 1000 {>=} T {>=} 300 K. These simulations are also used to predict beam performance for cryogenically cooled positrons. Experiments and simulations are also presented to understand the properties of beams formed when plasmas are tailored in a PM trap in a 5 tesla magnetic field, then non-adiabatically extracted from the field using a specially designed high-permeability grid to create a new class of electrostatically guided beams.

  10. Positron imaging techniques for process engineering: recent developments at Birmingham

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, D. J.; Leadbeater, T. W.; Fan, X.; Hausard, M. N.; Ingram, A.; Yang, Z.

    2008-09-01

    For over 20 years the University of Birmingham has been using positron-emitting radioactive tracers to study engineering processes. The imaging technique of positron emission tomography (PET), widely used for medical applications, has been adapted for these studies, and the complementary technique of positron emission particle tracking (PEPT) has been developed. The radioisotopes are produced using the Birmingham MC40 cyclotron, and a variety of techniques are employed to produce suitable tracers in a wide range of forms. Detectors originally designed for medical use have been modified for engineering applications, allowing measurements to be made on real process equipment, at laboratory or pilot plant scale. This paper briefly reviews the capability of the techniques and introduces a few of the many processes to which they have been applied.

  11. Galactic Positron Annihilation Radiation as observed with INTEGRAL/SPI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidenspointner, G.; Lonjou, V.; Knoedlseder, J.; Jean, P.; Allain, M.; von Ballmoos, P.; Harris, M. J.; Skinner, G. K.; Vedrenne, G.; Teegarden, B. J.; Gehrels, N.; Guessoum, N.; Schoenfelder, V.; Chapuis, C.; Durouchoux, P.; Cisana, E.; Valesia, M.

    2004-08-01

    The origin of the positrons whose annihilation gives rise to an appreciable flux of gamma rays from the central regions of our Galaxy is one of the mysteries of high energy astrophysics. SPI, one of the two main instruments on board the INTEGRAL observatory, is uniquely suited to study this positron annihilation radiation. It is a high resolution Ge spectrometer (FWHM 2.1 keV at 511 keV) which can image the sky at an angular resolution of about 3 degrees using a coded mask. Early in the mission, the 511 keV annihilation line has already been detected by SPI from the inner Galaxy. We summarize here 1.5 years of SPI observations of annihilation radiation, and discuss the implications of these results for the origin of positrons in the Galaxy. G.W. acknowledges funding by ESA through an external fellowship.

  12. An Affordable Concurrent Approach to Positron Polarization Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Patrick J.; Gibson, Thomas L.

    2000-06-01

    In order to extend our work on low-energy positron-matter collisions to larger target molecules, we are in the process of purchasing and installing a high-performance, parallel computer for less than $15,000. The system will be constructed from commodity PC-class components, such as Intel Celeron Processors with standard memory, hard drives, and fast ethernet cards. The operating system software, compilers, and standard message-passing routines for this system are available for free from the Beowulf Project. Our modified quantum chemistry codes for generating positron-molecule interaction potentials within the Distributed Positron Model are being converted to parallel form and will be made available for download over the internet. We will present details of our work along with some comparative results.

  13. Chemical stability of positronic complexes with atoms and atomic ions

    SciTech Connect

    Karl, M.W.; Nakanishi, H.; Schrader, D.M.

    1984-10-01

    A simple theory for establishing the stability or instability of positron-atomic systems against dissociation is presented. The theory consists of assuming that Morse-potential parameters for protonic diatoms are transferrable to the corresponding positronic molecules, and making appropriate reduced-mass modifications in the calculation of binding energies. The surprisingly good reliability of the method is established by appealing to the well-known positronium affinities of atomic hydrogen and fluorine. Positronium (Ps) binding is found for about half of the 42 atoms tested. In addition, instability is indicated for all nine positron-atom systems tested, and stability is indicated for seven of eight negatively charged systems tested; e.g., PsO/sup -/.

  14. Positrons from quantum evaporation of primordial black-holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durouchoux, P.; Wallyn, P.; Dubus, G.

    1997-01-01

    The unconfirmed prediction of quantum evaporation of primordial black holes (PBHs) is considered together with the related unanswered questions of whether PBHs ever existed and whether any could still exist. The behavior of the positrons from PHBs is modeled in relation to three facts. Firstly, the integrated emitted number spectrum of positrons is six to eight times larger than that of photons. Secondly, positrons emitted from PBHs lose energy and annihilate, producing a prominent line at 511 keV which is redshifted by the expansion of the universe. Thirdly, these photons may be detectable in the X-ray and low gamma ray energy ranges. The model predicts a flux which is significantly inferior to the instrument sensitivities of the foreseeable future.

  15. A conventional positron source for international linear collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omori, Tsunehiko; Takahashi, Tohru; Riemann, Sabine; Gai, Wei; Gao, Jie; Kawada, Shin-ichi; Liu, Wanming; Okuda, Natsuki; Pei, Guoxi; Urakawa, Junji; Ushakov, Andriy

    2012-04-01

    A possible solution to realize a conventional positron source driven by a several-GeV electron beam for the International Linear Collider is proposed. A 300 Hz electron linac is employed to create positrons with stretching pulse length in order to cure target thermal load. ILC requires about 2600 bunches in a train which pulse length is 1 ms. Each pulse of the 300 Hz linac creates about 130 bunches, then 2600 bunches are created in 63 ms. Optimized parameters such as drive beam energy, beam size, and target thickness, are discussed assuming a L-band capture system to maximize the capture efficiency and to mitigate the target thermal load. A slow rotating tungsten disk is employed as positron generation target.

  16. Relativistic electron-positron beams in gamma-ray bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, I. A.; Epstein, Richard I.

    1993-01-01

    Beams of relativistic electrons and/or positrons leaving the surface of a strongly magnetized neutron star may give rise to gamma-ray bursts. The beams could be accelerated by strong, magnetically aligned electric fields that are produced by oscillations of the stellar surface. Here we investigate the particle acceleration in these electric fields, the resulting electron-positron pair cascade, and the gamma-ray emission. We find that beams of electrons and positrons moving parallel to the magnetic field are generated, with a reported differential energy distribution. These beams produce the bulk of the gamma-ray burst radiation below about 1 MeV by the resonant Compton scattering of thermal photons emitted from the stellar surface. The escaping synchrotron radiation from the cascade dominates the radiation spectrum above about 1 MeV.

  17. Electron- and positron-proton elastic scattering in CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, L. B.

    2009-09-02

    There is a significant disagreement between measurements of the proton electric form factor, G{sup p}{sub E}, using Rosenbluth separations and polarization transfer. This disagreement, if not explained, could pose a fundamental challenge to our understanding of electron scattering or proton structure. Two-photon exchange (TPE) processes, although not fully calculable, are the most likely explanation of this disagreement. We will definitively test this assertion by comparing the electron-proton and positron-proton elastic scattering cross section in the Jefferson Lab CLAS. We will make a mixed identical electron and positron tertiary beam by passing a 5.5 GeV primary electron beam through a radiator to make a photon beam and then passing the photon beam through a converter to make electron-positron pairs. Measuring the elastic cross sections simultaneously using identical lepton beams should significantly reduce systematic uncertainties.

  18. Electron- and positron-proton elastic scattering in CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    L.B. Weinstein

    2009-08-01

    There is a significant disagreement between measurements of the proton electric form factor, G{sup p}{sub E}, using Rosenbluth separations and polarization transfer. This disagreement, if not explained, could pose a fundamental challenge to our understanding of electron scattering or proton structure. Two-photon exchange (TPE) processes, although not fully calculable, are the most likely explanation of this disagreement. We will definitively test this assertion by comparing the electron-proton and positron-proton elastic scattering cross section in the Jefferson Lab CLAS. We will make a mixed identical electron and positron tertiary beam by passing a 5.5 GeV primary electron beam through a radiator to make a photon beam and then passing the photon beam through a converter to make electron-positron pairs. Measuring the elastic cross sections simultaneously using identical lepton beams should significantly reduce systematic uncertainties.

  19. Inelastic cross sections for positron scattering from atomic hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, M.; Hofmann, A.; Raith, W.; Sperber, W.; Jacobsen, F.; Lynn, K.G.

    1994-12-31

    Positronium formation (Ps) cross sections for positrons impinging on atomic hydrogen were measured in the impact energy range from 13eV to 255eV at the High Intensity Positron (HIP) beam at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The Ps-formation cross section was found to rise rapidly from the threshold at 6.8eV to a maximum value of (2.98 {plus_minus} 0.18) {times} 10{sup {minus}16} cm{sup 2} for {approx} 15eV positrons. By 75eV it drops below the detection limit of 0.17 {times} 10{sup {minus}16} cm{sup 2} which is the present level of statistical uncertainty. The experiment was modified to enable the measurement of doubly differential scattering cross sections.

  20. Progress toward positron-electron pair plasma experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanja, J.; Hergenhahn, U.; Niemann, H.; Paschkowski, N.; Sunn Pedersen, T.; Saitoh, H.; Stenson, E. V.; Hugenschmidt, Ch.; Marx, G. H.; Schweikhard, L.; Danielson, J. R.; Surko, C. M.

    2014-10-01

    Matter-antimatter pair plasmas have been of great theoretical and astrophysical interest for a long time. A Positron-Electron Experiment (APEX) aims for the creation and study of such a plasma in the laboratory. It will be operated at the NEPOMUC facility which provides a cold and high-intensity positron beam. To achieve at least 10 Debye length within APEX's flux surfaces the beam needs to initially pass through several stages of manipulation. Presented here is an overview of work from the APEX team. Topics include E-> × B-> beam handling for separation into multiple beams in order to reduce the energy spread of the positron beam; injection and trapping of electrons in a prototype dipole field device with a permanent magnet; and design plans for the next generation of confinement device. on behalf of the APEX/PAX Team and Collaborators.

  1. A new scheme to accumulate positrons in a Penning-Malmberg trap with a linac-based positron pulsed source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupré, P.

    2013-03-01

    The Gravitational Behaviour of Antimatter at Rest experiment (GBAR) is designed to perform a direct measurement of the weak equivalence principle on antimatter by measuring the acceleration of anti-hydrogen atoms in the gravitational field of the Earth. The experimental scheme requires a high density positronium (Ps) cloud as a target for antiprotons, provided by the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) - Extra Low Energy Antiproton Ring (ELENA) facility at CERN. The Ps target will be produced by a pulse of few 1010 positrons injected onto a positron-positronium converter. For this purpose, a slow positron source using an electron Linac has been constructed at Saclay. The present flux is comparable with that of 22Na-based sources using solid neon moderator. A new positron accumulation scheme with a Penning-Malmberg trap has been proposed taking advantage of the pulsed time structure of the beam. In the trap, the positrons are cooled by interaction with a dense electron plasma. The overall trapping efficiency has been estimated to be ˜70% by numerical simulations.

  2. Dynamic behavior of ion acoustic waves in electron-positron-ion magnetoplasmas with superthermal electrons and positrons

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Asit E-mail: prasantachatterjee1@rediffmail.com; Pal, Nikhil; Chatterjee, Prasanta E-mail: prasantachatterjee1@rediffmail.com

    2014-10-15

    The dynamic behavior of ion acoustic waves in electron-positron-ion magnetoplasmas with superthermal electrons and positrons has been investigated in the framework of perturbed and non-perturbed Kadomtsev-Petviashili (KP) equations. Applying the reductive perturbation technique, we have derived the KP equation in electron-positron-ion magnetoplasma with kappa distributed electrons and positrons. Bifurcations of ion acoustic traveling waves of the KP equation are presented. Using the bifurcation theory of planar dynamical systems, the existence of the solitary wave solutions and the periodic traveling wave solutions has been established. Two exact solutions of these waves have been derived depending on the system parameters. Then, using the Hirota's direct method, we have obtained two-soliton and three-soliton solutions of the KP equation. The effect of the spectral index κ on propagations of the two-soliton and the three-soliton has been shown. Considering an external periodic perturbation, we have presented the quasi periodic behavior of ion acoustic waves in electron-positron-ion magnetoplasmas.

  3. Exploring positron characteristics utilizing two new positron-electron correlation schemes based on multiple electronic structure calculation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wen-Shuai; Gu, Bing-Chuan; Han, Xiao-Xi; Liu, Jian-Dang; Ye, Bang-Jiao

    2015-10-01

    We make a gradient correction to a new local density approximation form of positron-electron correlation. The positron lifetimes and affinities are then probed by using these two approximation forms based on three electronic-structure calculation methods, including the full-potential linearized augmented plane wave (FLAPW) plus local orbitals approach, the atomic superposition (ATSUP) approach, and the projector augmented wave (PAW) approach. The differences between calculated lifetimes using the FLAPW and ATSUP methods are clearly interpreted in the view of positron and electron transfers. We further find that a well-implemented PAW method can give near-perfect agreement on both the positron lifetimes and affinities with the FLAPW method, and the competitiveness of the ATSUP method against the FLAPW/PAW method is reduced within the best calculations. By comparing with the experimental data, the new introduced gradient corrected correlation form is proved to be competitive for positron lifetime and affinity calculations. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11175171 and 11105139).

  4. Development of a spin-polarized positron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasuso, A.; Fukaya, Y.; Maekawa, M.; Yabuuchi, A.

    2010-04-01

    We have started the development of a spin-polarized positron beam. In order to obtain a highly spin polarized positron beam, a 68Ge-68Ga source will be produced using a nuclear reaction of 69Ga(p,2n)68Ge. The optimum proton bombardment energy for 69Ga target is simulated to be 25 MeV using the Induced Radioactivity Analysis Code (IRAC). A newly designed 69Ga target holder will also be used as a 68Ge-68Ga source capsule.

  5. Positron plasma control techniques for the production of cold antihydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funakoshi, R.; Amoretti, M.; Bonomi, G.; Bowe, P. D.; Canali, C.; Carraro, C.; Cesar, C. L.; Charlton, M.; Doser, M.; Fontana, A.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Genova, P.; Hangst, J. S.; Hayano, R. S.; Jørgensen, L. V.; Kellerbauer, A.; Lagomarsino, V.; Landua, R.; Lodi Rizzini, E.; Macrì, M.; Madsen, N.; Manuzio, G.; Mitchard, D.; Montagna, P.; Posada, L. G. C.; Rotondi, A.; Testera, G.; Variola, A.; Venturelli, L.; van der Werf, D. P.; Yamazaki, Y.; Zurlo, N.

    2007-07-01

    An observation of a clear dependence of antihydrogen production on positron plasma shapes is reported. For this purpose a plasma control method has been developed combining the plasma rotating-wall technique with a mode diagnostic system. With the help of real-time and nondestructive observations, the rotating-wall parameters have been optimized. The positron plasma can be manipulated into a wide range of shapes (aspect ratio 6.5⩽α≲80 ) and densities (1.5×108⩽n≲7×109cm-3) within a short duration (25s) compatible with the ATHENA antihydrogen production cycle.

  6. Liquid xenon scintillators for imaging of positron emitters.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, L

    The current understanding of xenon scintillation physics is summarized and keyed to the use of xenon as a gamma-ray detector in medical radioisotope imaging systems. Liquid xenon has a short scintillation pulse (approximately 10(8) sec) and high gamma-ray absorption and scintillation efficiencies. The fast pulse may facilitate imaging in vivo distributions of hot positron sources and allow recovery of additional spatial information by time-of-flight techniques. We begin by describing our own study of the feasibility of making a practical positron scanning system, and consider the problems of scintillation decay time, linearity, efficiency, purity, and electricfield amplifcation. The prospects for a practical instrument are considered.

  7. Positron-annihilation spectroscopy of vacancy defects in aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, B.; Berko, S.; Fluss, M.J.; Hoffmann, K.; Lippel, P.; Siegel, R.W.

    1982-06-01

    Positron-annihilation characteristics in a monovacancy and a divacancy in aluminium have been calculated self-consistently using a local density functional formalism, into which the many-body enhancement effects have been incorporated. Results for the theoretical two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation spectra are compared to experimental results obtained from an aluminum single crystal at 20/sup 0/C, where positrons annihilate from a Bloch-state, and at higher temperatures, 500/sup 0/C and 630/sup 0/C, where they annihilate primarily from vacancy-trapped states.

  8. Observation of Polarized Positrons from an Undulator-Based Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, G.; Barley, J.; Batygin, Y.; Berridge, S.; Bharadwaj, V.; Bower, G.; Bugg, W.; Decker, F.-J.; Dollan, R.; Efremenko, Y.; Gharibyan, V.; Hast, C.; Iverson, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Kovermann, J.; Laihem, K.; Lohse, T.; McDonald, K. T.; Mikhailichenko, A. A.; Moortgat-Pick, G. A.; Pahl, P.; Pitthan, R.; Pöschl, R.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Riemann, S.; Schälicke, A.; Schüler, K. P.; Schweizer, T.; Scott, D.; Sheppard, J. C.; Stahl, A.; Szalata, Z. M.; Walz, D.; Weidemann, A. W.

    2008-05-01

    An experiment (E166) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center has demonstrated a scheme in which a multi-GeV electron beam passed through a helical undulator to generate multi-MeV, circularly polarized photons which were then converted in a thin target to produce positrons (and electrons) with longitudinal polarization above 80% at 6 MeV. The results are in agreement with Geant4 simulations that include the dominant polarization-dependent interactions of electrons, positrons, and photons in matter.

  9. Observation of polarized positrons from an undulator-based source.

    PubMed

    Alexander, G; Barley, J; Batygin, Y; Berridge, S; Bharadwaj, V; Bower, G; Bugg, W; Decker, F-J; Dollan, R; Efremenko, Y; Gharibyan, V; Hast, C; Iverson, R; Kolanoski, H; Kovermann, J; Laihem, K; Lohse, T; McDonald, K T; Mikhailichenko, A A; Moortgat-Pick, G A; Pahl, P; Pitthan, R; Pöschl, R; Reinherz-Aronis, E; Riemann, S; Schälicke, A; Schüler, K P; Schweizer, T; Scott, D; Sheppard, J C; Stahl, A; Szalata, Z M; Walz, D; Weidemann, A W

    2008-05-30

    An experiment (E166) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center has demonstrated a scheme in which a multi-GeV electron beam passed through a helical undulator to generate multi-MeV, circularly polarized photons which were then converted in a thin target to produce positrons (and electrons) with longitudinal polarization above 80% at 6 MeV. The results are in agreement with GEANT4 simulations that include the dominant polarization-dependent interactions of electrons, positrons, and photons in matter.

  10. Positron beam studies of saponite film prepared by precipitation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Numata, K.; Sato, K.; Fujimoto, K.; Ito, K.

    2017-01-01

    Micrometer-sized saponite particles were isolated by means of gravitational sedimentation method applying Stokes’ law. The sample prepared with this method was film-like state with a thickness of ~ 30 μm and was semitransparent, indicating that the particles are homogeneously stacked all together. Positron lifetime spectroscopy using a slow positron beam yielded two components for ortho-positronium with lifetimes of 1.5 ns and 8.4 ns with the respective relative intensities of 13 % and 10 %. The results suggest that the self-assembly of the larger particles toward structural densification is suppressed for the present film in comparison with the smaller nanoparticles.

  11. What can we learn from a sharply falling positron fraction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delahaye, Timur; Kotera, Kumiko; Silk, Joseph

    2015-12-01

    Recent results from the AMS-02 data have confirmed that the cosmic ray positron fraction increases with energy between 10 and 200 GeV. This quantity should not exceed 50%, and it is hence expected that it will either converge towards 50% or fall. We study the possibility that future data may show the positron fraction dropping down abruptly to the level expected with only secondary production, and forecast the implications of such a feature in term of possible injection mechanisms that include both Dark Matter and pulsars.

  12. Positron plasma control techniques for the production of cold antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Funakoshi, R.; Hayano, R. S.; Amoretti, M.; Macri, M.; Testera, G.; Variola, A.; Bonomi, G.; Bowe, P. D.; Hangst, J. S.; Madsen, N.; Canali, C.; Carraro, C.; Lagomarsino, V.; Manuzio, G.; Cesar, C. L.; Charlton, M.; Joergensen, L. V.; Mitchard, D.; Werf, D. P. van der; Doser, M.

    2007-07-15

    An observation of a clear dependence of antihydrogen production on positron plasma shapes is reported. For this purpose a plasma control method has been developed combining the plasma rotating-wall technique with a mode diagnostic system. With the help of real-time and nondestructive observations, the rotating-wall parameters have been optimized. The positron plasma can be manipulated into a wide range of shapes (aspect ratio 6.5{<=}{alpha} < or approx. 80) and densities (1.5x10{sup 8}{<=}n < or approx. 7x10{sup 9} cm{sup -3}) within a short duration (25 s) compatible with the ATHENA antihydrogen production cycle.

  13. Positronium formation in positron-rubidium inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Raouf, M. A.

    1988-04-01

    Eight partial cross sections of positron-rubidium ( 37Rb) inelastic scattering (corresponding to 0 ⩽ l⩽ 7, where l is the total angular momentum) are calculated at 25 values of the incident energy ranging from 0.1 to 1000 eV. The calculations are carried out using Clementi-Roetti's wavefunctions, and a combination of the coupled-static and frozen-core approximations. A comparison between the total positronium formation cross sections of the collisions of positrons with four different alkali atoms (lithium, sodium, potassium and rubidium) is presented.

  14. Observation of Polarized Positrons from an Undulator-Based Source

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, G; Barley, J.; Batygin, Y.; Berridge, S.; Bharadwaj, V.; Bower, G.; Bugg, W.; Decker, F.-J.; Dollan, R.; Efremenko, Y.; Gharibyan, V.; Hast, C.; Iverson, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Kovermann, J.; Laihem, K.; Lohse, T.; McDonald, K.T.; Mikhailichenko, A.A.; Moortgat-Pick, G.A.; Pahl, P.; /Tel Aviv U. /Cornell U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /Tennessee U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /DESY /Yerevan Phys. Inst. /Aachen, Tech. Hochsch. /DESY, Zeuthen /Princeton U. /Durham U. /Daresbury

    2008-03-06

    An experiment (E166) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) has demonstrated a scheme in which a multi-GeV electron beam passed through a helical undulator to generate multi-MeV, circularly polarized photons which were then converted in a thin target to produce positrons (and electrons) with longitudinal polarization above 80% at 6 MeV. The results are in agreement with Geant4 simulations that include the dominant polarization-dependent interactions of electrons, positrons and photons in matter.

  15. Positron emission tomography: the conceptual idea using a multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Paans, Anne M J; van Waarde, Aren; Elsinga, Philip H; Willemsen, Antoon T M; Vaalburg, Willem

    2002-07-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a method for quantitatively measuring biochemical and physiological processes in vivo by using radiopharmaceuticals labeled with positron-emitting radionuclides such as 11C, 13N, 15O, and 18F and by measuring the annihilation radiation using a coincidence technique. This technique is also used for measurement of the pharmacokinetics of labeled drugs and measurement of the effects of drugs on metabolism. Deviations from normal metabolism can be measured and insight into biological processes responsible for diseases can be obtained.

  16. Positronics of radiation-induced effects in chalcogenide glassy semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Shpotyuk, O.; Kozyukhin, S. A.; Shpotyuk, M.; Ingram, A.; Szatanik, R.

    2015-03-15

    Using As{sub 2}S{sub 3} and AsS{sub 2} glasses as an example, the principal possibility of using positron annihilation spectroscopy methods for studying the evolution of the free volume of hollow nanoobjects in chalcogenide glassy semiconductors exposed to radiation is shown. The results obtained by measurements of the positron annihilation lifetime and Doppler broadening of the annihilation line in reverse chronological order are in full agreement with the optical spectroscopy data in the region of the fundamental absorption edge, being adequately described within coordination defect-formation and physical-aging models.

  17. 77 FR 71802 - Guidance on Investigational New Drug Applications for Positron Emission Tomography Drugs...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-04

    ... ``Investigational New Drug Applications for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Drugs.'' The guidance is intended to assist manufacturers of PET drugs in submitting investigational new drug applications (INDs). DATES... guidance entitled ``Investigational New Drug Applications for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Drugs...

  18. Conceptual design of an intense positron source based on an LIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Ji-Dong; Yang, Zhen; Dong, Pan; Shi, Jin-Shui

    2012-04-01

    Accelerator based positron sources are widely used due to their high intensity. Most of these accelerators are RF accelerators. An LIA (linear induction accelerator) is a kind of high current pulsed accelerator used for radiography. A conceptual design of an intense pulsed positron source based on an LIA is presented in the paper. One advantage of an LIA is its pulsed power being higher than conventional accelerators, which means a higher amount of primary electrons for positron generations per pulse. Another advantage of an LIA is that it is very suitable to decelerate the positron bunch generated by bremsstrahlung pair process due to its ability to adjustably shape the voltage pulse. By implementing LIA cavities to decelerate the positron bunch before it is moderated, the positron yield could be greatly increased. These features may make the LIA based positron source become a high intensity pulsed positron source.

  19. Monte carlo simulation of positron induced secondary electrons in thin carbon foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, L. H.; Yang, B.; Ling, C. C.; Beling, C. D.; Fung, S.

    2011-01-01

    Emission of secondary electrons induced by the passage of low energy positrons through thin carbon foils was studied by the Monte Carlo method. The positron and electron elastic cross sections were calculated by partial wave analysis. The inelastic positron-valence-electron was described by the energy loss function obtained from dielectric theory. The positron-core-electron interaction was modelled by the Gryzinski's excitation function. Positron transport inside the carbon foil was simulated in detail. Secondary electrons created by positrons and high energy secondary electrons through inelastic interactions were tracked through the foil. The positron transmission coefficient and secondary electron yielded in forward and backward geometry are calculated and dependences on positron energy and carbon foil thickness are discussed.

  20. Effects of ion mobility and positron fraction on solitary waves in weak relativistic electron-positron-ion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ding; Li, Zi-Liang; Xie, Bai-Song

    2013-09-01

    The effects of ion mobility and positron fraction on the solitary waves of the laser field envelope and the potential of the electrostatic field in weak relativistic electron-positron-ion plasma are investigated. The parameter region for the existence of solitary waves is obtained analytically, and a reasonable choice of parameters is clarified. Both cases of mobile and immobile ions are considered. It is found that the amplitudes of solitary waves in the former case are larger compared to the latter case. For small plasma density, the localized solitary wave solutions in terms of the approximate perturbation analytical method are very consistent with those by exact numerical calculations. However, as the plasma density increases the analytical method loses its validity more and more. The influence of the positron fraction on the amplitudes of solitary waves shows a monotonous increasing relation. The implications of our results to particle acceleration are also discussed briefly.

  1. A low energy positron accumulator for the plasma confinement in a compact magnetic mirror trap

    SciTech Connect

    Higaki, Hiroyuki Kaga, Chikato; Nagayasu, Katsushi; Okamoto, Hiromi; Nagata, Yugo; Kanai, Yasuyuki; Yamazaki, Yasunori

    2015-06-29

    A low energy positron accumulator was constructed at RIKEN for the purpose of confining an electron-positron plasma. The use of 5 mCi {sup 22}Na RI source with a standard solid Ne moderator and N{sub 2} buffer gas cooling resulted in a low energy positron yield of ∼ 3 × 10{sup 5} e+/s. So far, 2 × 10{sup 6} positrons have been accumulated in 120s.

  2. Acceleration of positrons by a relativistic electron beam in the presence of quantum effects

    SciTech Connect

    Niknam, A. R.; Aki, H.; Khorashadizadeh, S. M.

    2013-09-15

    Using the quantum magnetohydrodynamic model and obtaining the dispersion relation of the Cherenkov and cyclotron waves, the acceleration of positrons by a relativistic electron beam is investigated. The Cherenkov and cyclotron acceleration mechanisms of positrons are compared together. It is shown that growth rate and, therefore, the acceleration of positrons can be increased in the presence of quantum effects.

  3. Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy Study of Barnett Shale Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ameena, Fnu; Alsleben, Helge; Quarles, Carroll A.

    Measurements are reported of positron annihilation lifetime and Doppler broadening parameters on 14 samples of Barnett shale core selected from 196 samples ranging from depths of 6107 to 6402 feet. The Barnett shale core was taken from EOG well Two-O-Five 2H located in Johnson county TX. The selected samples are dark clay-rich mudstone consisting of fine-grained clay minerals. The samples are varied in shape, typically a few inches long and about 1/2 inch in width and thickness, and are representative of the predominant facies in the core. X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD), petrographic analysis and geochemical analysis of total organic carbon (TOC) were already available for each of the selected samples. The lifetime data are analyzed in terms of three lifetime components with the shortest lifetime fixed at 125 ps. The second lifetime is attributed to positron annihilation in the bulk and positron trapping; and the third lifetime is due to positronium. Correlations of the lifetimes, intensities, the average lifetime and S and W parameters with TOC, XRF and XRD parameters are discussed. The observed correlations suggest that positron spectroscopy may be a useful tool in characterizing shale.

  4. Search for bound-state electron+positron pair decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosch, F.; Hagmann, S.; Hillenbrand, P.-M.; Lane, G. J.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Reed, M. W.; Sanjari, M. S.; Stöhlker, Th.; Torilov, S. Yu.; Tu, X. L.; Walke, P. M.

    2016-09-01

    The heavy ion storage rings coupled to in-flight radioactive-ion beam facilities, namely the ability to produce and store for extended periods of time radioactive nuclides in high atomic charge states, for the searchof yet unobserved decay mode - bound-state electron-positron pair decay.

  5. Positron lifetime studies in vinyl polymers of medical importance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira Marques, M. F.; Gordo, P. M.; Gil, C. Lopes; Kajcsos, Zs.; Gil, M. H.; Mariz, M. J.; de Lima, A. P.

    2003-10-01

    Vinyl polymers used as artificial lens implants in ophthalmology were investigated by positron lifetime spectroscopy. The structure of these polymers with free volumes offers the possibility of charging them with anti-inflammatory drugs for sustained release. A correlation between the amount of normalised free volume and the ratio of the methyl methacrylate to ethyl-hexyl-acrylate, used as polymerisation monomers, was found.

  6. Cosmic ray positron research and silicon track detector development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. Vernon; Wefel, John P.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose was to conduct research on: (1) position sensing detector systems, particularly those based upon silicon detectors, for use in future balloon and satellite experiments; and (2) positrons, electrons, proton, anti-protons, and helium particles as measured by the NASA NMSU Balloon Magnet Facility.

  7. MR imaging and positron emission tomography of cortical heterotopia

    SciTech Connect

    Bairamian, D.; Di Chiro, G.; Theodore, W.H.; Holmes, M.D.; Dorwart, R.H.; Larson, S.M.

    1985-11-01

    Heterotopia of the gray matter is a developmental malformation in which ectopic cortex is found in the white matter of the brain. A case of a 33-year-old man with cortical heterotopia who had a lifelong history of seizures and psychomotor retardation is reported, including the results of cerebral CT, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography using YF-2-deoxyglucose.

  8. Plasma Focusing of High Energy Density Electron and Positron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Johnny S.T.

    2000-10-09

    We present results from the SLAC E-150 experiment on plasma focusing of high energy density electron and, for the first time, positron beams. We also present results on plasma lens-induced synchrotron radiation, longitudinal dynamics of plasma focusing, and laser- and beam-plasma interactions.

  9. Industrial positron-based imaging: Principles and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, D. J.; Hawkesworth, M. R.; Broadbent, C. J.; Fowles, P.; Fryer, T. D.; McNeil, P. A.

    1994-09-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) has great potential as a non-invasive flow imaging technique in engineering, since 511 keV gamma-rays can penetrate a considerable thickness of (e.g.) steel. The RAL/Birmingham multiwire positron camera was constructed in 1984, with the initial goal of observing the lubricant distribution in operating aero-engines, automotive engines and gearboxes, and has since been used in a variety of industrial fields. The major limitation of the camera for conventional tomographic PET studies is its restricted logging rate, which limits the frequency with which images can be acquired. Tracking a single small positron-emitting tracer particle provides a more powerful means of observing high speed motion using such a camera. Following a brief review of the use of conventional PET in engineering, and the capabilities of the Birmingham camera, this paper describes recent developments in the Positron Emission Particle Tracking (PEPT) technique, and compares the results obtainable by PET and PEPT using, as an example, a study of axial diffusion of particles in a rolling cylinder.

  10. Simulation of tail distributions in electron-positron circular colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Irwin, J.

    1992-02-01

    In addition to the Gaussian shaped core region, particle bunches in electron-positron circular colliders have a rarefied halo region of importance in determining beam lifetimes and backgrounds in particle detectors. A method is described which allows simulation of halo particle distributions.

  11. Theoretical Formalism To Estimate the Positron Scattering Cross Section.

    PubMed

    Singh, Suvam; Dutta, Sangita; Naghma, Rahla; Antony, Bobby

    2016-07-21

    A theoretical formalism is introduced in this article to calculate the total cross sections for positron scattering. This method incorporates positron-target interaction in the spherical complex optical potential formalism. The study of positron collision has been quite subtle until now. However, recently, it has emerged as an interesting area due to its role in atomic and molecular structure physics, astrophysics, and medicine. With the present method, the total cross sections for simple atoms C, N, and O and their diatomic molecules C2, N2, and O2 are obtained and compared with existing data. The total cross section obtained in the present work gives a more consistent shape and magnitude than existing theories. The characteristic dip below 10 eV is identified due to the positronium formation. The deviation of the present cross section with measurements at energies below 10 eV is attributed to the neglect of forward angle-discrimination effects in experiments, the inefficiency of additivity rule for molecules, empirical treatment of positronium formation, and the neglect of annihilation reactions. In spite of these deficiencies, the present results show consistent behavior and reasonable agreement with previous data, wherever available. Besides, this is the first computational model to report positron scattering cross sections over the energy range from 1 to 5000 eV.

  12. Investigational study of iodine-124 with a positron camera

    SciTech Connect

    Lambrecht, R.M.; Woodhouse, N.; Phillips, R.; Wolczak, D.; Qureshi, A.; Reyes, E.D.; Graser, C.; Al-Yanbawi, S.; Al-Rabiah, A.; Meyer, W.

    1988-01-01

    A case is presented where I-124 produced by a clinical cyclotron was used with a positron emission tomography camera for clinical usage. This represents the first report of the utilization of this modality with this radionuclide. We feel the increased spatial resolution of PET should be of value in looking at thyroid disease.

  13. Advances in defect characterizations of semiconductors using positrons

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, K.G.; Asoka-Kumar, P.

    1996-12-31

    Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy (PAS) is a sensitive probe for studying the electronic structure of defects in solids. The authors summarize recent developments in defect characterization of semiconductors using depth-resolved PAS. The progress achieved in extending the capabilities of the PAS method is also described.

  14. On positron annihilation in concentrated random alloys and superconducting cuprates

    SciTech Connect

    Szotek, Z.; Temmerman, W.M.; Gyorffy, B.L.; Stocks, G.M.

    1988-01-01

    We discuss an application of a generalisation of the Lock-Crisp-West theorem to concentrated random alloys. Using a theory developed for binary random alloys we explore a possibility of positron localisation in the new high temperature superconductors. 7 refs., 1 fig.

  15. An outline of positron measurements of superconducting oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R.H.; Fluss, M.J.

    1991-03-01

    Positron measurements on superconducting oxides have gone through an evolution from divergent results of low statistical precision on samples of suspect quality to convergent results of higher statistical precision on high quality samples. We outline the elements affecting the progress of these experiments and questions that can be addressed at our present state of the art. 11 refs.

  16. Simulation of tail distributions in electron-positron circular colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Irwin, J.

    1992-02-01

    In addition to the Gaussian shaped core region, particle bunches in electron-positron circular colliders have a rarefied halo region of importance in determining beam lifetimes and backgrounds in particle detectors. A method is described which allows simulation of halo particle distributions.

  17. Design of a pulsed positron system at Trombay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, S.; Sharma, S. K.; Maheshwari, Priya; Gupta, S. K.; Pujari, P. K.

    2015-06-01

    We present here the design of a pulsed beam setup to deliver narrow time width positron pulses. The major constituents of the setup include- 22Na radioactive source and moderator assembly, ExB deflector for filtering out high energy positron and gamma rays, chopper-prebuncher-buncher assembly for time bunching of the slow positrons. In the ExB section, crossed electric and magnetic fields guide the slow positrons through an off-centered hole in a tungsten block. The initial beam will then be time bunched by using a reflection type chopper and a double gap prebuncher. The main buncheris designed as a quarter wave resonator with base frequency of 150 MHz.To prevent the sagging of the cantilevered inner tube of the resonator, we will support the inner conductor using an alumina post. There will be provision of tuning the frequency by using a tuner made of conducting material. The incident beam energy will be varied by biasing the sample.

  18. Positron Emission Tomography: Human Brain Function and Biochemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelps, Michael E.; Mazziotta, John C.

    1985-01-01

    Describes the method, present status, and application of positron emission tomography (PET), an analytical imaging technique for "in vivo" measurements of the anatomical distribution and rates of specific biochemical reactions. Measurements and image dynamic biochemistry link basic and clinical neurosciences with clinical findings…

  19. The low-energy positron scattering upon endohedrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amusia, M. Ya.; Chernysheva, L. V.

    2017-06-01

    We investigate positron scattering upon endohedrals and compare it with electron-endohedral scattering. We show that the polarization of the fullerene shell considerably alters the polarization potential of an atom, stuffed inside a fullerene. This essentially affects both the positron and electron elastic scattering phases as well as corresponding cross-sections. Of great importance is also the interaction between the incoming positron and the target electrons that leads to formation of the virtual positronium \\widetilde Ps . We illustrate the general trend by concrete examples of positron and electron scattering upon endohedrals He@C60 and Ar@C60, and compare it to scattering upon fullerene C60. To obtain the presented results, we have employed new simplified approaches that permit to incorporate the effect of fullerenes polarizability into the He@C60 and Ar@C60 polarization potential and to take into account the virtual positronium formation. Using these approaches, we obtained numeric results that show strong variations in shape and magnitudes of scattering phases and cross-sections due to effect of endohedral polarization and \\widetilde Ps formation.

  20. A novel design for a variable energy positron lifetime spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D.; Zhang, J. D.; Cheng, C. C.; Beling, C. D.; Fung, S.

    2008-10-01

    We present computer simulations of a new design of a variable energy positron lifetime beam that uses for a start signal the secondary electron emission from a 25-nm thick carbon foil (C-foil) located in front of the sample. A needle of ˜30 μm diameter is positioned on-axis right behind the foil, creating a radial electric field that deflects the secondary electrons radially outward so as to miss the sample and to hit the micro-channel plate (MCP) detector placed down beam. The MCP signal provides the start signal for the positron lifetime spectrometer. A grid can be further introduced between the sample holder and the MCP to yield a cleaner signal by preventing the positrons with large transmitted scattering angle from hitting the MCP. The cylindrical symmetry of this design reduces the experimental complexity and offers good timing resolution. We show that the design is robust against the transmitted energy and angle of the secondary electrons and positrons.

  1. Initial results on positron confinement in a magnetospheric configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitoh, Haruhiko; Yoshida, Zensho; Yano, Yoshihisa; Morikawa, Junji

    2011-10-01

    Creation of positron-electron plasma in a laboratory is an interesting and challenging subject, which may open many scientific applications. Although single-component plasma is stably confined in linear traps, for example Penning-Malmberg trap, it is not straightforward to simultaneously confine electrons and positrons as plasma. Toroidal geometries have advantages for solving this problem. For this purpose, studies on toroidal non-neutral plasma have been conducted in the levitated magnetospheric configuration, RT-1. Stable confinement and self-organization of toroidal non-neutral plasma was realized in RT-1; rigid-rotating pure electron plasma is confined for more than 300s [Z. Yoshida et al., PRL 104, 235004 (2010)]. As the initial step toward the formation of magnetospheric antimatter plasmas, we installed a 1MBq Na-22 radiation source in RT-1. Annihilation gamma-rays were observed by a NaI(TI) scintillator detector, for the estimation of basic injection and confinement properties of positrons in the magnetospheric configuration. Numerical analysis of positron orbits in RT-1 and the initial experimental results will be presented. Work funded by MEXT of Japan (23224014, 23654201).

  2. Positron emission tomographic imaging of cardiac sympathetic innervation and function

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, D.S.; Chang, P.C.; Eisenhofer, G.; Miletich, R.; Finn, R.; Bacher, J.; Kirk, K.L.; Bacharach, S.; Kopin, I.J. )

    1990-05-01

    Sites of uptake, storage, and metabolism of ({sup 18}F)fluorodopamine and excretion of ({sup 18}F)fluorodopamine and its metabolites were visualized using positron emission tomographic (PET) scanning after intravenous injection of the tracer into anesthetized dogs. Radioactivity was concentrated in the renal pelvis, heart, liver, spleen, salivary glands, and gall bladder. Uptake of 18F by the heart resulted in striking delineation of the left ventricular myocardium. Pretreatment with desipramine markedly decreased cardiac positron emission, consistent with dependence of the heart on neuronal uptake (uptake-1) for removal of circulating catecholamines. In reserpinized animals, cardiac positron emission was absent within 30 minutes after injection of ({sup 18}F)-6-fluorodopamine, demonstrating that the emission in untreated animals was from radioactive labeling of the sympathetic storage vesicles. Decreased positron emission from denervated salivary glands confirmed that the tracer was concentrated in sympathetic neurons. Radioactivity in the gall bladder and urinary system depicted the hepatic and renal excretion of the tracer and its metabolites. Administration of tyramine or nitroprusside increased and ganglionic blockade with trimethaphan decreased the rate of loss of myocardial radioactivity. The results show that PET scanning after administration of ({sup 18}F)fluorodopamine can be used to visualize sites of sympathetic innervation, follow the metabolism and renal and hepatic excretion of catecholamines, and examine cardiac sympathetic function.

  3. Positron annihilation spectroscopy study of materials for reactor vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grafutin, V. I.; Prokop'ev, E. P.; Krsjak, V.; Burcl, R.; Hähner, P.; Zeman, A.; Ilyukhina, O. V.; Erak, D.; Mogilevskyi, M. A.; Myasischeva, G. G.; Funtikov, Yu. V.

    2011-02-01

    Steels used in the nuclear industry have been experimentally studied by positron annihilation spectroscopy. Analysis of the experimental results and their comparison with the existing data make it possible to reveal vacancy defects, in particular, those caused by neutron radiation, and to determine their size.

  4. Positron Emission Tomography: Human Brain Function and Biochemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelps, Michael E.; Mazziotta, John C.

    1985-01-01

    Describes the method, present status, and application of positron emission tomography (PET), an analytical imaging technique for "in vivo" measurements of the anatomical distribution and rates of specific biochemical reactions. Measurements and image dynamic biochemistry link basic and clinical neurosciences with clinical findings…

  5. Studies of Positron Generation from Ultraintense Laser-Matter Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Gerald Jackson

    Laser-produced pair jets possess unique characteristics that offer great potential for their use in laboratory-astrophysics experiments to study energetic phenomenon such as relativistic shock accelerations. High-flux, high-energy positron sources may also be used to study relativistic pair plasmas and useful as novel diagnostic tools for high energy density conditions. Copious amounts of positrons are produced with MeV energies from directly irradiating targets with ultraintense lasers where relativistic electrons, accelerated by the laser field, drive positron-electron pair production. Alternatively, laser wakefield accelerated electrons can produce pairs by the same mechanisms inside a secondary converter target. This dissertation describes a series of novel experiments that investigate the characteristics and scaling of pair production from ultraintense lasers, which are designed to establish a robust platform for laboratory-based relativistic pair plasmas. Results include a simple power-law scaling to estimate the effective positron yield for elemental targets for any Maxwellian electron source, typical of direct laser-target interactions. To facilitate these measurements, a solenoid electromagnetic coil was constructed to focus emitted particles, increasing the effective collection angle of the detector and enabling the investigation of pair production from thin targets and low-Z materials. Laser wakefield electron sources were also explored as a compact, high repetition rate platform for the production of high energy pairs with potential applications to the creation of charge-neutral relativistic pair plasmas. Plasma accelerators can produce low-divergence electron beams with energies approaching a GeV at Hz frequencies. It was found that, even for high-energy positrons, energy loss and scattering mechanisms in the target create a fundamental limit to the divergence and energy spectrum of the emitted positrons. The potential future application of laser

  6. Generator-produced alpha-emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzadeh, S.

    1996-12-31

    This review briefly describes the nuclear characteristics and production parameters for 7.2-h {sup 211}At, 60.6-min {sup 212}Bi, 45.6-min {sup 213}Bi, 11-d {sup 233}Ra, and 20-h {sup 255}Fm. These a-emitting radioisotopes are the subject of current interest for a-particle-mediated radioimmunotherapy.

  7. RANDOM PULSE GENERATOR PRODUCING FIDUCIAL MARKS

    DOEpatents

    Nielsen, W.F.

    1960-02-01

    The apparatus for automatically applying a fiducial marking, having a nonrepetitive pattern, to a plurality of simultaneously made records comprises, in series, a bypass filter, a trigger circuit, and a pulse generator, with printing means connected to and controlled by the pulse generator for simultaneously making the visible fiducial marks on a plurality of simultaneously produced records.

  8. Monte Carlo modeling and optimization of buffer gas positron traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marjanović, Srđan; Petrović, Zoran Lj

    2017-02-01

    Buffer gas positron traps have been used for over two decades as the prime source of slow positrons enabling a wide range of experiments. While their performance has been well understood through empirical studies, no theoretical attempt has been made to quantitatively describe their operation. In this paper we apply standard models as developed for physics of low temperature collision dominated plasmas, or physics of swarms to model basic performance and principles of operation of gas filled positron traps. The Monte Carlo model is equipped with the best available set of cross sections that were mostly derived experimentally by using the same type of traps that are being studied. Our model represents in realistic geometry and fields the development of the positron ensemble from the initial beam provided by the solid neon moderator through voltage drops between the stages of the trap and through different pressures of the buffer gas. The first two stages employ excitation of N2 with acceleration of the order of 10 eV so that the trap operates under conditions when excitation of the nitrogen reduces the energy of the initial beam to trap the positrons without giving them a chance to become annihilated following positronium formation. The energy distribution function develops from the assumed distribution leaving the moderator, it is accelerated by the voltage drops and forms beams at several distinct energies. In final stages the low energy loss collisions (vibrational excitation of CF4 and rotational excitation of N2) control the approach of the distribution function to a Maxwellian at room temperature but multiple non-Maxwellian groups persist throughout most of the thermalization. Optimization of the efficiency of the trap may be achieved by changing the pressure and voltage drops and also by selecting to operate in a two stage mode. The model allows quantitative comparisons and test of optimization as well as development of other properties.

  9. Threshold for Trapping Positrons in the Wake Driven by a Ultra-relativistic Electron Bunch

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.; Muggli, P.; Katsouleas, T.; Ischebeck, R.; Hogan, M. J.; Joshi, C.; Mori, W. B.

    2009-01-22

    We have recently proposed a new concept for generating, injecting and accelerating positrons in a plasma using a double-pulse electron bunch. Monte Carlo simulations show that the number of the positrons produced in a foil target has an exponentially decay energy spectrum. The energy threshold for the trapping of these positrons in a ultra-relativistic electron wake is investigated numerically. For a typical 28.5 GeV electron drive bunch, the trapping threshold for the positrons is a few MeV, and therefore a majority of positrons generated in the foil target are focused and accelerated by the plasma wake.

  10. Production of Highly Polarized Positrons Using Polarized Electrons at MeV Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, D.; Adderley, P.; Adeyemi, A.; Aguilera, P.; Ali, M.; Areti, H.; Baylac, M.; Benesch, J.; Bosson, G.; Cade, B.; Camsonne, A.; Cardman, L. S.; Clark, J.; Cole, P.; Covert, S.; Cuevas, C.; Dadoun, O.; Dale, D.; Dong, H.; Dumas, J.; Fanchini, E.; Forest, T.; Forman, E.; Freyberger, A.; Froidefond, E.; Golge, S.; Grames, J.; Guèye, P.; Hansknecht, J.; Harrell, P.; Hoskins, J.; Hyde, C.; Josey, B.; Kazimi, R.; Kim, Y.; Machie, D.; Mahoney, K.; Mammei, R.; Marton, M.; McCarter, J.; McCaughan, M.; McHugh, M.; McNulty, D.; Mesick, K. E.; Michaelides, T.; Michaels, R.; Moffit, B.; Moser, D.; Muñoz Camacho, C.; Muraz, J. -F.; Opper, A.; Poelker, M.; Réal, J. -S.; Richardson, L.; Setiniyaz, S.; Stutzman, M.; Suleiman, R.; Tennant, C.; Tsai, C.; Turner, D.; Ungaro, M.; Variola, A.; Voutier, E.; Wang, Y.; Zhang, Y.

    2016-05-27

    The Polarized Electrons for Polarized Positrons experiment at the injector of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility has demonstrated for the first time the efficient transfer of polarization from electrons to positrons produced by the polarized bremsstrahlung radiation induced by a polarized electron beam in a high-Z target. Positron polarization up to 82% have been measured for an initial electron beam momentum of 8.19~MeV/c, limited only by the electron beam polarization. We report that this technique extends polarized positron capabilities from GeV to MeV electron beams, and opens access to polarized positron beam physics to a wide community.

  11. Production of Highly Polarized Positrons Using Polarized Electrons at MeV Energies

    DOE PAGES

    Abbott, D.; Adderley, P.; Adeyemi, A.; ...

    2016-05-27

    The Polarized Electrons for Polarized Positrons experiment at the injector of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility has demonstrated for the first time the efficient transfer of polarization from electrons to positrons produced by the polarized bremsstrahlung radiation induced by a polarized electron beam in a high-Z target. Positron polarization up to 82% have been measured for an initial electron beam momentum of 8.19~MeV/c, limited only by the electron beam polarization. We report that this technique extends polarized positron capabilities from GeV to MeV electron beams, and opens access to polarized positron beam physics to a wide community.

  12. In vitro positron emission tomography (PET): use of positron emission tracers in functional imaging in living brain slices.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, K; Bergström, M; Onoe, H; Takechi, H; Westerberg, G; Antoni, G; Bjurling, P; Jacobson, G B; Långström, B; Watanabe, Y

    1995-05-01

    Positron-emitting radionuclides have short half-lives and high radiation energies compared with radioisotopes generally used in biomedical research. We examined the possibility of applying positron emitter-labeled compounds to functional imaging in brain slices kept viable in an oxygenated buffer solution. Brain slices (300 microns thick) containing the striatum were incubated with positron emitter-labeled tracers for 30-45 min. The slices were then rinsed and placed on the bottom of a Plexiglas chamber filled with oxygenated Krebs-Ringer solution. The bottom of the chamber consisted of a thin polypropylene film to allow good penetration of beta+ particles from the brain slices. The chamber was placed on a storage phosphor screen, which has a higher sensitivity and a wider dynamic range than X-ray films. After an exposure period of 15-60 min, the screen was scanned by the analyzer and radioactivity images of brain slices were obtained within 20 min. We succeeded in obtaining quantitative images of (1) [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose uptake, (2) dopamine D2 receptor binding, (3) dopa-decarboxylase activity, and (4) release of [11C]dopamine preloaded as L-[11C]DOPA in the brain slice preparation. These results demonstrate that positron emitter-labeled tracers in combination with storage phosphor screens are useful for functional imaging of living brain slices as a novel neuroscience technique.

  13. The “accumulation effect” of positrons in the stack of foils, detected by measurements of the positron implantation profile

    SciTech Connect

    Dryzek, Jerzy; Siemek, Krzysztof

    2013-12-14

    The profiles of positrons implanted from the radioactive source {sup 22}Na into a stack of foils and plates are the subject of our experimental and theoretical studies. The measurements were performed using the depth scanning of positron implantation profile method, and the theoretical calculations using the phenomenological multi-scattering model (MSM). Several stacks consisting of silver, gold and aluminum foils, and titanium and germanium plates were investigated. We notice that the MSM describes well the experimental profiles; however when the stack consisting of silver and gold foils, the backscattering and linear absorption coefficients differ significantly from those reported in the literature. We suggest the energy dependency of the backscattering coefficient for silver and gold. In the stacks which comprise titanium and germanium plates, there were observed the features, which indicate the presence of the “accumulation effect” in the experimental implantation profile. This effect was previously detected in implantation profiles in Monte Carlo simulations using the GEANT4 tool kit, and it consists in higher localization of positrons close the interface. We suppose that this effect can be essential for positron annihilation in any heterogeneous materials.

  14. Nonlinear electrostatic drift waves in dense electron-positron-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Haque, Q.; Mahmood, S.; Mushtaq, A.

    2008-08-15

    The Korteweg-de Vries-Burgers (KdVB)-type equation is obtained using the quantum hydrodynamic model in an inhomogeneous electron-positron-ion quantum magnetoplasma with neutral particles in the background. The KdV-type solitary waves, Burgers-type monotonic, and oscillatory shock like solutions are discussed in different limits. The quantum parameter is also dependent on the positron concentration in dense multicomponent plasmas. It is found that both solitary hump and dip are formed and their amplitude and width are dependent on percentage presence of positrons in electron-ion plasmas. The height of the monotonic shock is decreased with the increase of positron concentration and it is independent of the quantum parameter in electron-positron-ion magnetized quantum plasmas. However, the amplitude of the oscillatory shock is dependent on positron concentration and quantum parameter in electron-positron-ion plasmas.

  15. Rectifying barrier at GaN/SiC hetero-junction studied with positron annihilation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yi-Fan; Beling, D. C.

    2005-11-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy on GaN films grown on SiC substrate with MBE are presented. It is shown that the GaN/SiC interface is rectifying towards positrons, such that positrons can only travel from SiC to GaN and not vice versa. Potential steps seen by the positron at the GaN/SiC interface are calculated from experimental values of electron and positron work function. This ``rectifying'' effect has been successfully mimicked by inserting a thin region of very high electric field in the Variable Energy Positron Fit (VEPF) analysis. The built-in electric field is attributed to different positron affinities, dislocation and/or interface defects at the GaN/SiC interface.

  16. Positron beam lifetime spectroscopy of atomic scale defect distributions in bulk and microscopic volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R.H.; Cowan, T.E.; Hartley, J.; Sterne, P.; Brown, B.

    1996-05-01

    We are developing a defect analysis capability based on two positron beam lifetime spectrometers: the first is based on a 3 MeV electrostatic accelerator and the second on our high current linac beam. The high energy beam lifetime spectrometer is operational and positron lifetime analysis is performed with a 3 MeV positron beam on thick samples. It is being used for bulk sample analysis and analysis of samples encapsulated in controlled environments for {ital in}{ital situ} measurements. A second, low energy, microscopically focused, pulsed positron beam for defect analysis by positron lifetime spectroscopies is under development at the LLNL high current positron source. This beam will enable defect specific, 3-D maps of defect concentration with sub-micron location resolution and when coupled with first principles calculations of defect specific positron lifetimes it will enable new levels of defect concentration mapping and defect identification.

  17. Positron emission particle tracking and its application to granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, D. J.

    2017-05-01

    Positron emission particle tracking (PEPT) is a technique for tracking a single radioactively labelled particle. Accurate 3D tracking is possible even when the particle is moving at high speed inside a dense opaque system. In many cases, tracking a single particle within a granular system provides sufficient information to determine the time-averaged behaviour of the entire granular system. After a general introduction, this paper describes the detector systems (PET scanners and positron cameras) used to record PEPT data, the techniques used to label particles, and the algorithms used to process the data. This paper concentrates on the use of PEPT for studying granular systems: the focus is mainly on work at Birmingham, but reference is also made to work from other centres, and options for wider diversification are suggested.

  18. Elastic positron-cadmium scattering at low energies

    SciTech Connect

    Bromley, M. W. J.; Mitroy, J.

    2010-05-15

    The elastic and annihilation cross sections for positron-cadmium scattering are reported up to the positronium-formation threshold (at 2.2 eV). The low-energy phase shifts for the elastic scattering of positrons from cadmium were derived from the bound and pseudostate energies of a very large basis configuration-interaction calculation of the e{sup +}-Cd system. The s-wave binding energy is estimated to be 126{+-}42 meV, with a scattering length of A{sub scat}=(14.2{+-}2.1)a{sub 0}, while the threshold annihilation parameter, Z{sub eff}, was 93.9{+-}26.5. The p-wave phase shift exhibits a weak shape resonance that results in a peak Z{sub eff} of 91{+-}17 at a collision energy of about 490{+-}50 meV.

  19. Development of positron annihilation spectroscopy for characterizing neutron irradiated tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    C.N. Taylor; M. Shimada; D.W. Akers; M.W. Drigert; B.J. Merrill; Y. Hatano

    2013-05-01

    Tungsten samples (6 mm diameter, 0.2 mm thick) were irradiated to 0.025 and 0.3 dpa with neutrons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Samples were then exposed to deuterium plasma in the tritium plasma experiment (TPE) at 100, 200 and 500ºC to a total fluence of 1 x 1026 m-2. Nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) and Doppler broadening positron annihilation spectroscopy (DB-PAS) were performed at various stages to characterize damage and retention. We present the first known results of neutron damaged tungsten characterized by DB-PAS in order to study defect concentration. Two positron sources, 22Na and 68Ge, probe ~58 µm and through the entire 200 µm thick samples, respectively. DB-PAS results reveal clear differences between the various irradiated samples. These results, and the calibration of DB-PAS to NRA data are presented.

  20. Positron emission tomography reveals a leiomyosarcoma causing proteinuria.

    PubMed

    Hegner, B; Krakamp, B; Hedde, J P; Brockmann, M; Weber, M; Schulze-Lohoff, E

    2003-08-01

    Obstruction of the renal veins may result in proteinuria and is frequently caused by thrombosis or tumorous processes. Since thrombosis and malignancy may occur simultaneously in the venous outflow of the kidneys, search for an underlying intraluminal tumor may be impeded by extensive thrombosis in the lumen of renal and caval veins. We report the case of a 30-year-old man with moderate proteinuria which was caused by an obstructing process of the vena cava inferior and the renal veins. While the obstructive mass was initially misdiagnosed as thrombosis, positron emission tomography helped to reveal the tumorous character of the lesion and fine-needle biopsy allowed rapid diagnosis of a leiomyosarcoma originating from the caval or renal veins. We conclude that undelayed diagnosis of the cause of renal and caval vein obstruction is facilitated by early positron emission tomography and subsequent fine-needle biopsy to identify possible tumorous lesions.

  1. Correlations in laser-induced electron-positron pair creation

    SciTech Connect

    Krajewska, K.; Kaminski, J. Z.

    2011-09-15

    Probability rates of electron-positron pair creation in head-on laser-beam-proton collisions are investigated, using an exact treatment of the colliding proton as a finite-mass particle. We observe that the recoil effects become more important when passing from the perturbative multiphoton regime to the nonperturbative above-threshold regime of laser-matter coupling. Thus we concentrate on the latter case. In this regime, our detailed analysis shows that energy supplied by the colliding proton makes the process more effective, and that the electrons and positrons that are created during the collision are more energetic than in the case when the momentum transfer from the proton is neglected. A number of similarities to above-threshold atomic ionization are also illustrated.

  2. Positron scattering from hydrogen atom embedded in weakly coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoshal, Arijit; Kamali, M. Z. M.; Ratnavelu, K.

    2013-01-01

    The positron-hydrogen collision problem in weakly coupled plasma environment has been investigated by applying a formulation of the three-body collision problem in the form of coupled multi-channel two-body Lippmann-Schwinger equations. The interactions among the charged particles in the plasma have been represented by Debye-Huckel potentials. A simple variational hydrogenic wave function has been employed to calculate the partial-wave scattering amplitude. Plasma screening effects on various possible mode of fragmentation of the system e++H(1s) during the collision, such as 1s →1s and 2s→2s elastic collisions, 1s→2s excitation, positronium formation, elastic proton-positronium collisions, have been reported. Furthermore, a detailed study has been made on differential and total cross sections of the above processes in the energy range 13.6-350 eV of the incident positron.

  3. Bruno Touschek: From Betatrons to Electron-Positron Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardini, Carlo; Pancheri, Giulia; Pellegrini, Claudio

    Bruno Touschek’s life as a physicist spanned the period from World War II to the 1970s. He was a key figure in the developments of electron-positron colliders and storage rings, and made important contributions to theoretical high energy physics. Storage rings, initially developed for high energy physics, are being widely used in many countries as synchrotron radiation sources and are a tool for research in physics, chemistry, biology, environmental sciences and cultural heritage studies. We describe Touschek’s life in Austria, where he was born, in Germany, where he participated in the construction of a betatron during WWII, and in Italy, where he proposed and led to completion the first electron-positron storage ring in 1960, in Frascati. We highlight how his central European culture influenced his lifestyle and work, and his main contributions to physics, such as the discovery of the Touschek effect and beam instabilities in the larger storage ring ADONE.

  4. Bruno Touschek: From Betatrons to Electron-Positron Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardini, Carlo; Pancheri, Giulia; Pellegrini, Claudio

    Bruno Touschek's life as a physicist spanned the period from World War II to the 1970s. He was a key figure in the developments of electron-positron colliders and storage rings, and made important contributions to theoretical high energy physics. Storage rings, initially developed for high energy physics, are being widely used in many countries as synchrotron radiation sources and are a tool for research in physics, chemistry, biology, environmental sciences and cultural heritage studies. We describe Touschek's life in Austria, where he was born, in Germany, where he participated in the construction of a betatron during WWII, and in Italy, where he proposed and led to completion the first electron-positron storage ring in 1960, in Frascati. We highlight how his central European culture influenced his lifestyle and work, and his main contributions to physics, such as the discovery of the Touschek effect and beam instabilities in the larger storage ring ADONE.

  5. Nonlinear Electromagnetic Waves in a Degenerate Electron-Positron Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Labany, S. K.; El-Taibany, W. F.; El-Samahy, A. E.; Hafez, A. M.; Atteya, A.

    2015-08-01

    Using the reductive perturbation technique (RPT), the nonlinear propagation of magnetosonic solitary waves in an ultracold, degenerate (extremely dense) electron-positron (EP) plasma (containing ultracold, degenerate electron, and positron fluids) is investigated. The set of basic equations is reduced to a Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation for the lowest-order perturbed magnetic field and to a KdV type equation for the higher-order perturbed magnetic field. The solutions of these evolution equations are obtained. For better accuracy and searching on new features, the new solutions are analyzed numerically based on compact objects (white dwarf) parameters. It is found that including the higher-order corrections results as a reduction (increment) of the fast (slow) electromagnetic wave amplitude but the wave width is increased in both cases. The ranges where the RPT can describe adequately the total magnetic field including different conditions are discussed.

  6. Moisture dependence of positron lifetime in Kevlar-49

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Holt, William H.; Mock, Willis, Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Because of filamentary character of Kevlar-49 aramid fibers, there is some concern about the moisture uptake and its effect on plastic composites reinforced with Kevlar-49 fibers. As part of continuing studies of positron lifetime in polymers, we have measured positron lifetime spectra in Kevlar-49 fibers as a function of their moisture content. The long lifetime component intensities are rather low, being only of the order of 2-3 percent. The measured values of long component lifetimes at various moisture levels in the specimens are as follows: 2072 +/- 173 ps (dry); 2013 +/- 193 ps (20.7 percent saturation); 1665 +/- 85 ps (25.7 percent saturation); 1745 +/- 257 ps (32.1 percent saturation); and 1772 +/- 217 ps (100 percent saturation). It is apparent that the long component lifetime at first decreases and then increases as the specimen moisture content increases. These results have been compared with those inferred from Epon-815 and Epon-815/K-49 composite data.

  7. Langmuir rogue waves in electron-positron plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Moslem, W. M.

    2011-03-15

    Progress in understanding the nonlinear Langmuir rogue waves which accompany collisionless electron-positron (e-p) plasmas is presented. The nonlinearity of the system results from the nonlinear coupling between small, but finite, amplitude Langmuir waves and quasistationary density perturbations in an e-p plasma. The nonlinear Schroedinger equation is derived for the Langmuir waves' electric field envelope, accounting for small, but finite, amplitude quasistationary plasma slow motion describing the Langmuir waves' ponderomotive force. Numerical calculations reveal that the rogue structures strongly depend on the electron/positron density and temperature, as well as the group velocity of the envelope wave. The present study might be helpful to understand the excitation of nonlinear rogue pulses in astrophysical environments, such as in active galactic nuclei, in pulsar magnetospheres, in neutron stars, etc.

  8. Positron emission particle tracking and its application to granular media.

    PubMed

    Parker, D J

    2017-05-01

    Positron emission particle tracking (PEPT) is a technique for tracking a single radioactively labelled particle. Accurate 3D tracking is possible even when the particle is moving at high speed inside a dense opaque system. In many cases, tracking a single particle within a granular system provides sufficient information to determine the time-averaged behaviour of the entire granular system. After a general introduction, this paper describes the detector systems (PET scanners and positron cameras) used to record PEPT data, the techniques used to label particles, and the algorithms used to process the data. This paper concentrates on the use of PEPT for studying granular systems: the focus is mainly on work at Birmingham, but reference is also made to work from other centres, and options for wider diversification are suggested.

  9. Positron emission tomographic imaging of tumors using monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Zalutsky, M.R.

    1990-12-01

    The overall objective for this research project is to develop methods for utilizing Positron Emission Tomography (PET) to increase the clinical potential of radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). By labeling MAbs with positron-emitting nuclides, it should be possible to quantitate the dynamics of their three-dimensional distribution in vivo. Our long term goals are to apply this approach to investigate the following: normal tissue toxicity; radiation dose to the tumor; and early tumor imaging. The research plans of this proposal include the following specific aims: optimize labeling of MAbs with fluorine 18, bromine 76 and bromine 75; label MAb Mel-14 (reactive against human gliomas and melanomas) and its Fab and F(ab{prime}){sub 2} fragments while retaining immunoreactivity; determine the distribution of Mel-14 in athymic mice bearing human gliomas; determine pharmacokinetics of Mel-14 in nonhuman primates. Experiments with another MAb, TP-1, and iodine 124 and 131 are also planned. 8 figs.

  10. Open volume in bioadhesive detected by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rätzke, Klaus; Wiegemann, Maja; Shaikh, Muhammad Qasim; Harms, Stephan; Adelung, Rainer; Egger, Werner; Sperr, Peter

    2010-07-01

    Barnacles attach to a wide variety of surfaces underwater and show substrate-specific adhesion mechanisms. Investigating and understanding these mechanisms is a key for developing new technical adhesives. We expected open volume (porosity) at the sub-nanometre scale to occur in barnacle adhesive. With positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) it is possible to detect porosity at the nanometre scale by determining the lifetime of positrons. This method has not been applied to bioadhesives so far. We showed that PALS is a suitable technique for the investigation of the barnacle base and its adhesive with respect to open volume. The results were interpreted using a standard model adapted from polymers. We thereby estimated pore sizes of 0.5 nm.

  11. Positron-annihilation spectroscopy of defects in metals: an assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, R.W.

    1982-06-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) has made significant contributions to our knowledge regarding lattice defects in metals in two areas: (i) the determination of atomic defect properties, particularly those of monovacancies, and (ii) the monitoring and characterization of vacancy-like microstructure development during post-irradiation of post-quench annealing. The application of PAS to the study of defects in metals is selectively reviewed and critically assessed within the context of other available techniques for such investigations. Possibilities for using the positron as a localized probe of the structure of atomic defects are discussed. Finally, the present status and future potential of PAS as a tool for the study of defects in metals are considered relative to other available techniques. 92 references, 20 figures.

  12. What could we learn from a sharply falling positron fraction?

    SciTech Connect

    Delahaye, Timur; Kotera, Kumiko; Silk, Joseph

    2014-10-20

    Recent results from the AMS-02 data have confirmed that the cosmic-ray positron fraction increases with energy between 10 and 200 GeV. This quantity should not exceed 50%, and it is hence expected that it will either converge toward 50% or fall. We study the possibility that future data may show the positron fraction dropping down abruptly to the level expected with only secondary production, and forecast the implications of such a feature in term of possible injection mechanisms that include both dark matter and pulsars. Were a sharp steepening to be found, rather surprisingly, we conclude that pulsar models would do at least as well as dark matter scenarios in terms of accounting for any spectral cut-off.

  13. Polarized positrons and electrons at the linear collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moortgat-Pick, G.; Abe, T.; Alexander, G.; Ananthanarayan, B.; Babich, A. A.; Bharadwaj, V.; Barber, D.; Bartl, A.; Brachmann, A.; Chen, S.; Clarke, J.; Clendenin, J. E.; Dainton, J.; Desch, K.; Diehl, M.; Dobos, B.; Dorland, T.; Dreiner, H. K.; Eberl, H.; Ellis, J.; Flöttmann, K.; Fraas, H.; Franco-Sollova, F.; Franke, F.; Freitas, A.; Goodson, J.; Gray, J.; Han, A.; Heinemeyer, S.; Hesselbach, S.; Hirose, T.; Hohenwarter-Sodek, K.; Juste, A.; Kalinowski, J.; Kernreiter, T.; Kittel, O.; Kraml, S.; Langenfeld, U.; Majerotto, W.; Martinez, A.; Martyn, H.-U.; Mikhailichenko, A.; Milstene, C.; Menges, W.; Meyners, N.; Mönig, K.; Moffeit, K.; Moretti, S.; Nachtmann, O.; Nagel, F.; Nakanishi, T.; Nauenberg, U.; Nowak, H.; Omori, T.; Osland, P.; Pankov, A. A.; Paver, N.; Pitthan, R.; Pöschl, R.; Porod, W.; Proulx, J.; Richardson, P.; Riemann, S.; Rindani, S. D.; Rizzo, T. G.; Schälicke, A.; Schüler, P.; Schwanenberger, C.; Scott, D.; Sheppard, J.; Singh, R. K.; Sopczak, A.; Spiesberger, H.; Stahl, A.; Steiner, H.; Wagner, A.; Weber, A. M.; Weiglein, G.; Wilson, G. W.; Woods, M.; Zerwas, P.; Zhang, J.; Zomer, F.

    2008-05-01

    The proposed International Linear Collider (ILC) is well-suited for discovering physics beyond the Standard Model and for precisely unraveling the structure of the underlying physics. The physics return can be maximized by the use of polarized beams. This report shows the paramount role of polarized beams and summarizes the benefits obtained from polarizing the positron beam, as well as the electron beam. The physics case for this option is illustrated explicitly by analyzing reference reactions in different physics scenarios. The results show that positron polarization, combined with the clean experimental environment provided by the linear collider, allows to improve strongly the potential of searches for new particles and the identification of their dynamics, which opens the road to resolve shortcomings of the Standard Model. The report also presents an overview of possible designs for polarizing both beams at the ILC, as well as for measuring their polarization.

  14. Ion acceleration and positron production and annihilation in solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guessoum, Nidhal

    I first review: a) the current state of knowledge of ion acceleration in solar flares; b) the physics of positron production and annihilation; and c) recent RHESSI data on solar flare annihilation radiation. I then show how the modeling of the positron production and annihilation in the chromosphere, coupled with the newly available high-resolution data on the 511 keV annihilation line, can have important physical implications w. r. t. the models: a) information on the temperature and density of the chromosphere; b) constraints on some of the physical characteristics of the flare and to some extent on the acceleration process.Although I do mention past instruments (SMM and Yohkoh), this review focuses on the RHESSI satellite, considering the quantum leap it has constituted in the quality of the data it is providing and consequently the constraints it can place on models (of ion acceleration, annihilation environment, etc.).

  15. Pumping Electron-Positron Pairs from a Well Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; Liu, Jie; Fu, Li-Bin

    2016-04-01

    In the presence of very deep well potential, electrons will spontaneously occupy the empty embedded bound states and electron-positron pairs are created by means of a non-perturbative tunneling process. In this work, by slowly oscillating the width or depth, the population transfer channels are opened and closed periodically. We find and clearly show that by the non-synchronous ejections of particles, the saturation of pair number in a static super-critical well can be broken, and electrons and positrons can be pumped inexhaustibly from vacuum with a constant production rate. In the adiabatic limit, final pair number after a single cycle has quantized values as a function of the upper boundary of the oscillating, and the critical upper boundaries indicate the diving points of the bound states.

  16. Positron Emission Tomography: Principles, Technology, and Recent Developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Sibylle I.

    2005-04-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a nuclear medical imaging technique for quantitative measurement of physiologic parameters in vivo (an overview of principles and applications can be found in [P.E. Valk, et al., eds. Positron Emission Tomography. Basic Science and Clinical Practice. 2003, Springer: Heidelberg]), based on the detection of small amounts of posi-tron-emitter-labelled biologic molecules. Various radiotracers are available for neuro-logical, cardiological, and oncological applications in the clinic and in research proto-cols. This overview describes the basic principles, technology, and recent develop-ments in PET, followed by a section on the development of a tomograph with ava-lanche photodiodes dedicated for small animal imaging as an example of efforts in the domain of high resolution tomographs.

  17. Dechanneling of Positrons in Disordered Lattices Effect of Anharmonic Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Assy, M. K.; El-Ashry, M. Y.; Mohamed, A. A.

    2005-01-01

    Dechanneling of positrons due to lattice disorder has been investigated for two stable configurations of the disordered face-centered cubic(fcc) lattices, Dumb-bell configuration (DBC) and Body-centered interstitial (BCI) for channeled positrons with incident energy (10 200) MeV in Cu single crystal in the planar direction (100). The effects of anharmonic terms in the channeling potential have been considered in the calculations. The calculations covered the transition-channeling probability, dechanneling probability, transmission and dechanneling coefficients. It has been found that the transition-channeling probability from the normal into the disordered region occurs only for the transitions n (normal) → n (disordered). Also the dependence of the transmission and dechanneling coefficients on the incident beam position has been studied by using a planar potential function based on shell structure model and compared with the results of a planar potential based on Lindhard's model.

  18. Pumping Electron-Positron Pairs from a Well Potential

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiang; Liu, Jie; Fu, Li-bin

    2016-01-01

    In the presence of very deep well potential, electrons will spontaneously occupy the empty embedded bound states and electron-positron pairs are created by means of a non-perturbative tunneling process. In this work, by slowly oscillating the width or depth, the population transfer channels are opened and closed periodically. We find and clearly show that by the non-synchronous ejections of particles, the saturation of pair number in a static super-critical well can be broken, and electrons and positrons can be pumped inexhaustibly from vacuum with a constant production rate. In the adiabatic limit, final pair number after a single cycle has quantized values as a function of the upper boundary of the oscillating, and the critical upper boundaries indicate the diving points of the bound states. PMID:27125998

  19. Pure hemidystonia with basal ganglion abnormalities on positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Perlmutter, J.S.; Raichle, M.E.

    1984-03-01

    We present a patient with hemidystonia and an abnormality of the contralateral basal ganglion seen only with positron emission tomography. A 50-year-old sinistral man suffered minor trauma to the right side of his head and neck. Within 20 minutes he developed paroxysmal intermittent dystonic posturing of his right face, forearm, hand, and foot, with weaker contractions of the left foot, lasting several seconds and recurring every few minutes. Neurological findings between spells were normal. The following were also normal: electrolyte, calcium, magnesium, and arterial blood gas levels, and findings of drug screen, cerebrospinal fluid examination, electroencephalography with nasopharyngeal leads, computed tomographic scanning (initially and four weeks later), and cerebral angiography. Positron emission tomographic scanning revealed abnormalities in the left basal ganglion region, including decreased oxygen metabolism, decreased oxygen extraction, increased blood volume, and increased blood flow.

  20. Laser-assisted positron-impact ionization of atomic hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Pan, Juan; Li, Shu-Min; Berakdar, Jamal

    2007-03-15

    We study the ionization of atomic hydrogen by a fast positron in the presence of an external linearly polarized laser field. We concentrate on the limit of a small momentum transfer and describe the fast positron's continuum states by Volkov wave functions. The ejected electron is described by a Coulomb-Volkov wave function. We are limited to small laser intensities such that the dressed state of the target is treatable within the time-dependent perturbation theory, even though the laser intensity is still quite high by laboratory standards. Numerical results for the triply differential cross sections and their dependencies on laser-field parameters are discussed and compared with the results of laser-assisted ionization by electron impact.

  1. Positronium formation in positron-hydrogen collisions with Debye potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, J.; Cheng, Y.; Wang, Y. C.; Zhou, Y.

    2012-06-01

    Positronium (Ps) formation cross sections (n = 1, 2) in positron-hydrogen collisions in Debye plasma environment are calculated using the screening approximation model for various Debye screening lengths from the Ps formation thresholds to 50 eV. The effect of the screened Coulomb potential on Ps formation process is investigated by using the Debye-Hückel potential. The present results are compared with available theoretical calculations.

  2. ECC study in positron impact ionization in molecular hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campeanu, R. I.; Zohouri Haghian, N.

    2012-12-01

    The electron capture to the continuum phenomenon in positron impact ionization of molecular hydrogen is studied with the distorted wave Born approximation. Our theoretical model produces results which are in better agreement with the experiment than the more elaborate models of [J. Fiol, V.D. Rodriguez, R.O. Barrachina, J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 34, 933 (2001)] and [A. Benedek, R.I. Campeanu, J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 40, 1589 (2007)] previously employed in this study.

  3. Positron-HF collisions: Prediction of a weakly bound state

    SciTech Connect

    Danby, G.; Tennyson, J.

    1988-12-12

    Ab initio molecular R-matrix calculations are presented for collisions of low-energy positrons with the hydrogen fluoride molecule as a function of HF internuclear separation. Calculations presented are for ..sigma.. total symmetry with and without polarization effects. These calculations mirror recent electron-HF scattering calculations by Morgan and Burke. Strong evidence is obtained for the presence of a bound state of the e/sup +/HF system. The experimental consequences of this result are discussed.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography of band heterotopia.

    PubMed

    Miura, K; Watanabe, K; Maeda, N; Matsumoto, A; Kumagai, T; Ito, K; Kato, T

    1993-01-01

    A case of band heterotopia was reported with findings of positron emission tomography (PET). The patient was an 8-year-old girl who had mild mental retardation and intractable partial epilepsy. Her MRI showed another diffuse layer of gray matter underlying the normal-looking cortex and separated from it by an apparently normal layer of white matter. PET scan with [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose revealed that band heterotopia had the same degree of glucose metabolism as that of the overlying cortex.

  5. Technology related parameters affecting quantification in positron emission tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Visvikis, D; Turzo, A; Bizais, Y; Cheze-Le Rest, C

    2004-07-01

    Some of the issues associated with positron emission tomography (PET) technology which still pose challenges for the recovery of quantitative images are discussed. Through these issues reference to what is today considered as the 'gold standard' in quantitative PET imaging is also presented. A brief comparison of 2-D and 3-D PET is given, together with a short discussion of combined PET/CT imaging devices.

  6. Inelastic collisions of positrons with one-valence-electron targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdel-Raouf, Mohamed Assad

    1990-01-01

    The total elastic and positronium formation cross sections of the inelastic collisions between positrons and various one-valence-electron atoms, (namely hydrogen, lithium, sodium, potassium and rubidium), and one-valence-electron ions, (namely hydrogen-like, lithium-like and alkaline-earth positive ions) are determined using an elaborate modified coupled-static approximation. Special attention is devoted to the behavior of the Ps cross sections at the energy regions lying above the Ps formation thresholds.

  7. Positron brain imaging--normal patterns and asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Finklestein, S.; Alpert, N.M.; Ackerman, R.H.; Correia, J.A.; Buonanno, F.S.; Chang, J.; Brownell, G.L.; Taveras, J.M.

    1982-07-01

    Regional brain physiology was investigated in 11 normal resting right-handed subjects using positron emission tomography. Cerebral blood flow was studied in all subjects. Cerebral oxygen metabolism was studied in six subjects, and cerebral glucose metabolism was also studied in one subject. In five subjects, physiological activity was higher in left frontotemporal regions than right. These findings may be related to structural cerebral asymmetries or to activation of brain language centers.

  8. Transparency of an instantaneously created electron-positron-photon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bégué, D.; Vereshchagin, G. V.

    2014-03-01

    The problem of the expansion of a relativistic plasma generated when a large amount of energy is released in a small volume has been considered by many authors. We use the analytical solution of Bisnovatyi-Kogan and Murzina for the spherically symmetric relativistic expansion. The light curves and the spectra from transparency of an electron-positron-photon plasma are obtained. We compare our results with the work of Goodman.

  9. Collisionless Reconnection in an Electron-Positron Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bessho, N.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2005-12-09

    Electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations of fast collisionless reconnection in a two-dimensional electron-positron plasma (without an equilibrium guide field) are presented. A generalized Ohm's law in which the Hall current cancels out exactly is given. It is suggested that the key to fast reconnection in this plasma is the localization caused by the off-diagonal components of the pressure tensors, which produce an effect analogous to a spatially localized resistivity.

  10. Resonances in positron-hydrogen scattering in dense quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Zishi; Zhang, Yong-Zhi; Kar, Sabyasachi

    2015-05-15

    We have investigated the S-wave resonance states in positron-hydrogen system embedded in dense quantum plasmas using Hylleraas-type wave functions within the framework of the stabilization method. The effect of quantum plasmas has been incorporated using the exponential-cosine-screened Coulomb (modified Yukawa-type) potential. Resonance parameters (both position and width) below the Ps n = 2 threshold are reported as functions of plasma screening parameters.

  11. Current and future technological trends in positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Karp, J S; Freifelder, R

    1992-04-01

    Current trends in positron emission tomography (PET) instrumentation are examined, with an emphasis on providing information suitable to the prospective PET user. Basic principles underlying PET are explained and information on performance measurements, techniques, and quantitation are given in order to allow the user to compare and contrast different types of PET scanners. These scanner designs are described. Specific examples are given and the combination of PET with other modalities is discussed.

  12. Optimization of an hybrid positron source using channeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaikovska, I.; Chehab, R.; Guler, H.; Sievers, P.; Artru, X.; Chevallier, M.; Suwada, T.; Satoh, M.; Kamitani, T.; Furukawa, K.; Miyahara, F.; Umemori, K.; Jin, S.

    2017-07-01

    The hybrid positron source made of a crystal-radiator, as a source of channeling radiation, and an amorphous converter is briefly described. Optimization of the heating effects and thermal shocks led to a granular converter made of small tungsten spheres. Simulation results with application to two linear collider projects CLIC and ILC are presented. A test operated with this kind of source at KEK is described and the results gathered last year, reported. Plans for the future are briefly described.

  13. Design and performance of a positron-sensitive surgical probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fang

    We report the design and performance of a portable positron-sensitive surgical imaging probe. The probe is designed to be sensitive to positrons and capable of rejecting background gammas including 511 keV. The probe consists of a multi-anode PMT and an 8 x 8 array of thin 2 mm x 2 mm plastic scintillators coupled 1:1 to GSO crystals. The probe uses three selection criteria to identify positrons. An energy threshold on the plastic signals reduces the false positron signals in the plastic due to background gammas; a second energy threshold on the PMT sum signal greatly reduces background gammas in the GSO. Finally, a timing window accepts only 511 keV gammas from the GSO that arrive within 15 ns of the plastic signals, reducing accidental coincidences to a negligible level. The first application being investigated is sentinel lymph node (SLN) surgery, to identify in real-time the location of SLNs in the axilla with high 18F-FDG uptake, which may indicate metastasis. Our simulations and measurements show that the probe's pixel separation ability in terms of peak-to-valley ratio is ˜3.5. The performance measurements also show that the 64-pixel probe has a sensitivity of 4.7 kcps/muCi using optimal signal selection criteria. For example, it is able to detect in 10 seconds a ˜4 mm lesion with a true-to-background ratio of ˜3 at a tumor uptake ratio of ˜8:1. The signal selection criteria can be fine-tuned, either for higher sensitivity, or for a higher image contrast.

  14. A General Quantum Mechanical Method to Predict Positron Spectroscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    converter (ADC) on the “slow” side. At the heart of the system is a pair of BaF2 scintillation detectors with XP2020Q photomultiplier tubes (PMTs), which...spectroscopy (PAS) experiments are widely used to study materials defects, including point defects in semiconductors and voids in composite materials... semiconductors , the thermalized positrons, at room temper- ature, are often trapped in negatively-charged defect sites such as vacancies, vacancy ag

  15. Interpretation of the cosmic ray positron and antiproton fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipari, Paolo

    2017-03-01

    The spectral shape of cosmic ray positrons and antiprotons has been accurately measured in the broad kinetic energy range 1-350 GeV. In the higher part of this range (E ≳30 GeV ), the e+ and p ¯ are both well described by power laws with spectral indices γe+≃2.77 ±0.02 and γp ¯≃2.78 ±0.04 that are approximately equal to each other and to the spectral index of protons. In the same energy range, the positron-antiproton flux ratio has the approximately constant value 2.04 ±0.04 , that is consistent with being equal to the ratio e+/p ¯ calculated for the conventional mechanism of production, where the antiparticles are created as secondaries in the inelastic interactions of primary cosmic rays with interstellar gas. The positron-antiproton ratio at lower energy is significantly higher (reaching a value e+/p ¯≈100 for E ≈1 GeV ), but, in the entire energy range 1-350 GeV, the flux ratio is consistent with being equal to the ratio of the production rates in the conventional mechanism, as the production of low-energy antiprotons is kinematically suppressed in collisions with a target at rest. These results strongly suggest that cosmic ray positrons and antiprotons have a common origin as secondaries in hadronic interactions. This conclusion has broad implications for the astrophysics of cosmic rays in the Galaxy.

  16. Positron emission tomographic map reconstruction using fuzzy-median filter

    SciTech Connect

    Mondal, Partha Pratim

    2006-10-09

    Positron emission tomography is widely used in medical physics for the reconstruction of the distribution of radionuclei molecules for analyzing regional physiological functions. The existing maximum a posteriori reconstruction methodologies produce artifacts such as oversmoothing and streaking. In this letter, the author proposes a potential function based on fuzzy-median filter for noise-free image reconstruction. The reconstruction methodology is therefore very useful for obtaining artifact-free reconstruction of biomedical specimens.

  17. Positron-emitting radioligands for imaging neuroleptic receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Arnett, C.D.; Fowler, J.S.; Wolf, A.P.; Shiue, C.Y.; Logan, J.

    1985-01-01

    A series of /sup 18/F-labeled butyrophenones (benperidol, haloperidol, spiroperidol and N-methylspiroperidol) were evaluated in baboons and rats with respect to potential utility as radioligands for studying neuroleptic receptors in the living human brain by positron emission tomography. These compounds were administered to baboons, and the radioactivity distributions to the striatum, and to the cerebellum were determined by PET at times up to 8 hours after isotope injection. 4 refs. (DT)

  18. Differential cross sections for positron-xenon elastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Marler, J. P.; Surko, C. M.; McEachran, R. P.; Stauffer, A. D.

    2006-06-15

    Absolute measurements of differential cross sections for the elastic scattering of positrons from xenon are made at 2, 5 and 8 eV using a trap-based beam and the technique of measuring scattering cross sections in a strong magnetic field. Calculations are carried out using the relativistic Dirac equations with a static plus polarization potential. Generally good absolute agreement is found between experiment and theory.

  19. Defect identification in semiconductors with positron annihilation: experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuomisto, Filip

    2015-03-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy is a very powerful technique for the detection, identification and quantification of vacancy-type defects in semiconductors. In the past decades, it has been used to reveal the relationship between opto-electronic properties and specific defects in a wide variety of materials - examples include parasitic yellow luminescence in GaN, dominant acceptor defects in ZnO and broad-band absorption causing brown coloration in natural diamond. In typical binary compound semiconductors, the selective sensitivity of the technique is rather strongly limited to cation vacancies that possess significant open volume and suitable charge (negative of neutral). On the other hand, oxygen vacancies in oxide semiconductors are a widely debated topic. The properties attributed to oxygen vacancies include the inherent n-type conduction, poor p-type dopability, coloration (absorption), deep level luminescence and non-radiative recombination, while the only direct experimental evidence of their existence has been obtained on the crystal surface. We will present recent advances in combining state-of-the-art positron annihilation experiments and ab initio computational approaches. The latter can be used to model both the positron lifetime and the electron-positron momentum distribution - quantities that can be directly compared with experimental results. We have applied these methods to study vacancy-type defects in III-nitride semiconductors (GaN, AlN, InN) and oxides such as ZnO, SnO2, In2O3andGa2O3. We will show that cation-vacancy-related defects are important compensating centers in all these materials when they are n-type. In addition, we will show that anion (N, O) vacancies can be detected when they appear as complexes with cation vacancies.

  20. Low energy positrons at the Ga-rich (100) surface of GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazleev, Nail G.; Fry, John L.; Starnes, Shannon G.; Weiss, Alex H.

    2000-03-01

    We present results of theoretical studies of positron surface states and annihilation characteristics at the Ga-rich (100) surface of GaAs with different reconstructions. Calculations are based on a treatment of a positron as a single charged particle trapped in a "correlation well" in the proximity of surface atoms. Positron surface and bulk states are calculated numerically by solving the positron Schrödinger equation using the finite-difference method. The Hartree part of the positron potential is constructed taking into consideration the electronic reorganization due to interatomic bondings and surface stoichoimetry effects. Estimates of positron surface-state binding energies and work functions are provided. Computed positron surface-state characteristics and annihilation probabilities with relevant core electrons are used to analyze positron annihilation induced Auger-electron spectroscopy (PAES) spectrum from the Ga-rich GaAs (100) surface. The effect of deposition of Al on the (100) surface of GaAs on the localization of the positron surface state and on positron annihilation probabilities is also discussed.

  1. Electron and Positron Scattering from C3H6 Isomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makochekanwa, Casten; Sueoka, Osamu; Kimura, Mineo; Hoshino, Masamitsu; Tanaka, Takahiro; Kitajima, Masashi; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2004-09-01

    Hydrocarbons play an important role in high temperature plasmas in Tokamak fusion devices in plasma processing and many other fields [1]. In this paper we report experiments for 0.4-1000 eV electron and 0.2-1000 eV positron total cross sections (TCS) measured using a linear time-of-flight apparatus [2], and electron differential cross sections (DCS) for elastic, vibrational and electronic excitations covering the ranges 1.5 to 100 eV and 15 deg to 130 deg, measured using the crossed beam and relative flow method [3]. The continuum multiple scattering (CMS) [4] calculations have also been performed for the theoretical analysis of the observed features in our cross sections. We observe the isomer effect in both electron and positron TCSs and DCSs. The presence of a dipole moment in propene molecules shows up in enhanced forward scattering in DCSs, leading to larger TCSs and integral cross sections compared to cyclopropane at energies less than 20 eV. However, both electron and positron TCSs for these two molecules nearly equal each other above 100 eV, i.e. the molecular size effect. [1] W. L. Moragn, Adv. At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 43, 79 (2000). [2] O. Sueoka, S. Mori and A. Hamada, J. Phys. B 27, 1453 (1994). [3] H. Tanaka, L. Boesten, D. Matsunaga and T. Kudo, J. Phys. B 21, 1255 (1988). [4] M. Kimura and H. Sato, Comments At. Mol. Phys. 26, 333 (1991).

  2. Positron Anomaly in Galactic Cosmic Rays: Constraining Dark Matter Contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagdeev, Roald; Malkov, Mikhail; Diamond, Patrick

    2016-10-01

    An explanation of the unexpected rise in the positron fraction of the cosmic ray (CR) leptonic energy spectrum, is proposed. It is argued that the e+/- spectra are different because they are accelerated by a charge-sign selective mechanism. This premise was hinted at by a recent result from the AMS-02 spectrometer that revealed a difference between e+ and antiproton spectra, which both are secondary CRs but of the opposite charges. The new mechanism extends the diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) to make it charge-sign selective. The DSA, operating in Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) shocks, is held responsible for the production of the bulk of the CRs. The new mechanism was found to account for the positron data with an excellent agreement, except in a limited energy range between 100-300 GeV. In this range, the data exceed the theoretical prediction systematically, thus opening a window for a contribution from dark matter decay or annihilation as well as nearby pulsars. The charge-sign selectivity of the DSA arises from an electric field induced by the CR protons illuminating the neutral gas clumps in the SNR surroundings. The electric field expels positrons from the clump but traps electrons and secondary antiprotons, thus suppressing their acceleration in such SNRs. Work supported by NASA ATP-program under Grant NNX14AH36G, and by the US Department of Energy under Award No. DE-FG02-04ER54738.

  3. Induced Positron Annihiliation Investigation of Cadmium Zinc Telluride Crystal Microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    D. W. Akers

    2005-06-01

    Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) crystals are used in semiconductor radiation detectors for the detection of x-ray and gamma radiation. However, production of detector grade crystals is difficult as small variations in compositional uniformity and primarily the zinc content can significantly affect the ability of the CZT crystal to function as a radiation detector. Currently there are no known nondestructive methods that can be used to identify detector grade crystals. The current test method is to fabricate and test the detector to determine if the crystal is sufficiently uniform and of the correct composition to be considered a detector grade crystal. Consequently, nondestructive detection methods are needed to identify detector grade crystals prior to the fabrication process. The purpose of this feasibility study was to perform a preliminary assessment of the ability of several new, nondestructive technologies based on Induced Positron Annihilation (IPA) to determine if detector grade CZT crystals can be identified. Results of measurements performed on specimens from Fisk University and EV Products, Inc. indicate that both the near surface Distributed Source Positron Annihilation (up to 3 mm penetration) and the volumetric Photon Induced Positron Annihilation methods may be suitable for determining CZT crystal quality. Further work on CZT crystals with a broader range of compositions and detector characteristics is needed to provide a well defined, calibrated, method for assessing CZT crystal quality.

  4. [Methods and clinical applications of positron emission tomography in endocrinology].

    PubMed

    De Landsheere, C; Lamotte, D

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) allows to detect in coincidence photons issued from annihilation between positrons and electrons nearby situated. Tomographic detection (plane by plane) and tomographic reconstruction will lead to the quantitation of radioactive distribution per voxel, in the organ of interest. Recent tomographs can acquire simultaneously several transaxial slices, with a high sensitivity and a spatial resolution of 3-5 mm. Commonly used positron emitters have a short half-life: 2, 10, 20 and 110 min for 150, 13N, 11C and 18F, respectively. The use of these isotopes requires on line production of radionuclides and synthesis of selected molecules. In endocrinology, PET allows among others to study noninvasively the receptor density of hormone-dependent neoplasms such as breast, uterus, prostate tumors and prolactinomas. These last tumors represent a particular entity because of several combined characteristics: high turnover rate of amino acids, high density of dopaminergic receptors and response to bromocriptine (analogue of dopamine inhibiting the secretion of prolactin) in relation to the level of receptors. Because PET permits to evaluate the density of dopaminergic receptors and the metabolism of amino acids, theoretical response of the prolactinoma to bromocriptine can be predicted, the achieved therapeutic efficacy can be estimated and the long-term follow up of tumor growth can be assessed. This example illustrates the clinical value of PET in endocrinology.

  5. Clumpiness of dark matter and the positron annihilation signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavalle, J.; Pochon, J.; Salati, P.; Taillet, R.

    2007-02-01

    Context: The small-scale distribution of dark matter in galactic halos is poorly known. Several studies suggest that it could be very clumpy, which is of paramount importance when investigating the annihilation signal from exotic particles (e.g. supersymmetric or Kaluza-Klein). Aims: We focus on the annihilation signal in positrons. We estimate the associated uncertainty, that is due to the fact that we do not know exactly how the clumps are distributed in the Galactic halo. Methods: We perform a statistical study based on analytical computations, as well as numerical simulations. We study the average and variance of the annihilation signal over many Galactic halos having the same statistical properties. Results: We find that the so-called boost factor used by many authors should be used with caution, as i) it depends on energy and ii) it may be different for positrons, antiprotons and gamma rays, a fact which has not been discussed before. As an illustration, we use our results to discuss the positron spectrum measurements by the HEAT experiment.

  6. Design and implementation of a real-time positron imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, Pranab S.; Beling, Christopher D.; Fung, Stevenson

    2004-05-01

    In this paper we are going to present the first real-time S-parameter positron imager. This is a useful tool in solid state technology for mapping the lateral defect types and concentrations on a material sample. This technology has been developed for two major categories of researchers, the first being those that have a focused low energy positron beam and second those that do not. Here we describe the design and implementation of a real-time automated scanning system that rasters a sample surface with a 0.5mm diameter positron source (or beam focus) so as to give an S-parameter image of a sample. The source (or beam) rasters across a region of a semiconductor sample in rectilinear motion while gamma ray energies Eγ are processed using a standard HP Ge spectroscopy system and a 14 bit nuclear ADC. Two other ADCs are used to obtain the x, y coordinate data corresponding to each event by storing voltage pulses from the x & y stepper motor drives (or saddle coil currents) gated with the event pulses. Using these event data triplets (x, y, Eγ) the S-parameter is computed in real time for each pixel region and is used to refresh a color image display on the screen coordinates. Optimal use is made of processing time and the system resources. This user-friendly system is efficient for producing high resolution S-parameter images of the sample. (patent pending 2003)

  7. Positron Production in Multiphoton Light-by-Light Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Koffas, Thomas

    2003-07-28

    We present the results of an experimental study on e{sup +}e{sup -} pair production during the collision of a low emittance 46.6 GeV electron beam with terawatt laser pulses from a Nd:glass laser at 527 nm wavelength and with linear polarization. The experiment was conducted at the Final Focus Test Beam facility in the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Results with a 49.1 GeV electron beam are also included. A signal of 106 {+-} 14 positrons for the 46.6 GeV electron beam case and of 22 {+-} 10 positrons for the 49.1 GcV case above background, has been detected. We interpret the positrons as the products of a two-step process during which laser photons are backscattered to high energy gamma photons that absorb in their turn several laser photons in order to produce a e{sup +}e{sup -} pair. The data compare well with the existing theoretical models. This is the first observation in the laboratory of inelastic Light-by-Light scattering with only real photons. Alternatively, the data are interpreted as a manifestation of the spontaneous breakdown of the vacuum under the influence of an intense external alternating electric field.

  8. Positron Impact Ionization in Noble Gas Atoms and Diatomic Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marler, J. P.

    2005-05-01

    Results are presented for absolute positronium formation and direct ionization by positron impact on Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, N2, CO and O2 at energies from threshold up to 90 eV. The experiments use a high-resolution, trap-based positron beam and exploit the properties of positron orbits in a magnetic field [1]. Results for the noble gases are compared with theoretical predictions and with measurements obtained using a significantly different method [2]. Results for diatomic molecules are compared to other available measurements and theoretical calculations where available. There is generally good agreement between the experimental measurements, providing an important benchmark for theoretical calculations. Intriguing features in Ar and O2 will be discussed. [1] J.P. Sullivan, S.J. Gilbert, J.P. Marler, R.G. Greaves, S.J. Buckman and C.M. Surko., Phys. Rev. A. 66, 042708 (2002) [2] J.P. Marler, J.P. Sullivan and C.M. Surko, Phys. Rev. A (2005), in press.

  9. Positron-electron correlation-polarization potentials for the calculation of positron collisions with atoms and molecules*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, Jan

    2017-02-01

    We present correlation-polarization potentials for the calculation of scattering cross sections of positrons with atoms and molecules. The potentials are constructed from a short-range correlation term and a long-range polarization term. For the short-range correlation term we present four different potentials that are derived from multi-component density functionals. For the long-range polarization term we employ a multi-term expansion. Quantum scattering calculations are presented for low energy collisions of positrons with two atomic targets (argon and krypton) and two molecular targets (nitrogen and methane). For collision energies below the threshold for Positronium formation our calculations of scattering cross sections are in good agreement with recent data sets from experiments and theory. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Low-Energy Interactions related to Atmospheric and Extreme Conditions", edited by S. Ptasinska, M. Smialek-Telega, A. Milosavljevic and B. Sivaraman.

  10. Non-linear Ion-Wake Excitation by Plasma Electron Wakefields of an Electron or Positron Beam for Positron Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsouleas, Thomas; Sahai, Aakash

    2015-11-01

    The excitation of a non-linear ion-wake by a train of non-linear electron wake of an electron and a positron beam is modeled and its use for positron acceleration is explored. The ion-wake is shown to be a driven non-linear ion-acoustic wave in the form of a cylindrical ion-soliton similar to the solution of the cKdV equation. The phases of the oscillating radial electric fields of the slowly-propagating electron wake are asymmetric in time and excite time-averaged inertial ion motion radially. The radial field of the electron compression region sucks-in the ions and the field of space-charge region of the wake expels them, driving a cylindrical ion-soliton structure with on-axis and bubble-edge density-spikes. Once formed, the channel-edge density-spike is driven radially outwards by the thermal pressure of the thermalized wake energy. Its channel-like structure due to the flat-residue left behind by the propagating ion-soliton, is independent of the energy-source driving the non-linear electron wake. We explore the use of the partially-filled channel formed by the cylindrical ion-soliton for a novel regime of positron acceleration. PIC simulations are used to study the ion-wake soliton structure, its driven propagation and its use for positron acceleration (arXiv:1504.03735). Work supported by the US Department of Energy under DE-SC0010012 and the National Science Foundation under NSF-PHY-0936278.

  11. Inward Transport, Compression and Manipulation of Positron Plasmas and Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surko, Clifford M.

    2000-10-01

    Nonneutral plasma techniques have proven to be crucial in using low-energy positrons to study a wide range of matter-antimatter interactions including electron-positron plasmas.(R.G. Greaves and C.M. Surko, Phys. Plasmas 4), 1528 (1997), and AIP Conf. Proc. #498, pp. 19-28 (1999); C.M. Surko et al., ibid, pp. 3-18 (1999). A technique was recently developed to use a rotating electric field (i.e., a ``rotating wall'') to produce inward transport and radial compression of single-component electron or ion plasmas.(F. Anderegg, et al.), Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 4875 (1998).^,(X.-P. Huang et al.), Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 875 (1997) and 80, 73 (1998); E.H. Hollmann, et al., Phys. Plasmas, in press. This talk describes use of the rotating wall to compress positron plasmas.(R.G. Greaves and C.M. Surko, Phys. Rev. Lett., submitted May 2000.) The plasmas are confined in a Penning-Malmberg trap in a 0.1 T field. Rotating dipole electric fields at frequencies 1.5 <= f <= 3.3 MHz produce rapid (i.e., dotn /n ~ 15 s-1) radial plasma compression. It was found that the polyatomic gases CF4 or SF6 at pressures 4 × 10-8 torr can provide the necessary cooling to balance the heating due to the rf fields. Coupling to the plasma is believed to occur via low-order Trivelpiece-Gould modes. Compression was obtained in short plasmas (L ~ 6 cm) in which the wave phase velocity ω/k ~ v_th, and so the modes are expected to be heavily damped. Careful tuning to a plasma mode is not required for rapid compression, in contrast to previous studies done in electron plasmas in which the modes were weakly damped.^2 Compression from plasma radii ~ 3.3 mm to 0.7 mm was achieved, corresponding to density increases of a factor ~ 20 and final positron densities ~ 8 × 10^7 cm-3. The ultimate limits of this technique have yet to be explored. We have also developed a method to produce cold positron beams (parallel energies ~ 18 meV, FWHM).(S.J. Gilbert, et al.), Appl. Phys. Lett. 70, 1944 (1997). It is expected

  12. Surfaces of colloidal PbSe nanocrystals probed by thin-film positron annihilation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chai, L.; Schut, H.; Schaarenburg, L. C. van; Eijt, S. W. H.; Al-Sawai, W.; Barbiellini, B.; Bansil, A.; Gao, Y.; Houtepen, A. J.; Mijnarends, P. E.; Huis, M. A. van; Ravelli, L.; Egger, W.; Kaprzyk, S.

    2013-08-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and positron-electron momentum density (PEMD) studies on multilayers of PbSe nanocrystals (NCs), supported by transmission electron microscopy, show that positrons are strongly trapped at NC surfaces, where they provide insight into the surface composition and electronic structure of PbSe NCs. Our analysis indicates abundant annihilation of positrons with Se electrons at the NC surfaces and with O electrons of the oleic ligands bound to Pb ad-atoms at the NC surfaces, which demonstrates that positrons can be used as a sensitive probe to investigate the surface physics and chemistry of nanocrystals inside multilayers. Ab initio electronic structure calculations provide detailed insight in the valence and semi-core electron contributions to the positron-electron momentum density of PbSe. Both lifetime and PEMD are found to correlate with changes in the particle morphology characteristic of partial ligand removal.

  13. Sgr A* as Source of the Positrons Observed in the Galactic Center Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean, Pierre; Guessoum, Nidhal; Ferrière, Katia

    2017-01-01

    We explore the possibility that a substantial fraction of the positrons observed to annihilate in the central region of our Galaxy come from the supermassive black hole Sgr A* that lies at the center. This idea was proposed by several authors, but the propagation of the emitted positrons into the bulge and beyond remained a serious problem for models of the origin of GC positrons. We assume models of positron production with different energies. The propagation of positrons from their production site is followed in detail with Monte-Carlo simulations, taking into account the physical conditions of the propagation regions as well as various physical interactions. Using the known physics of positron annihilation in astrophysical environments, we calculate the properties of the annihilation emission (time evolution and spatial distribution) for the different models under consideration. We present the results of these simulations and the conclusions/constraints that can be inferred from them.

  14. Computational Study of Positron-Monovacancy Interaction in d-Block Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishibashi, Shoji

    2015-08-01

    The positron-monovacancy interaction in d-block metals (except for Mn, Tc, and Hg) has been studied by the two-component density-functional-theory formalism [E. Boroński and R. M. Nieminen, http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevB.34.3820, Phys. Rev. B 34, 3820 (1986)]. On the unrelaxed structure, the positron lifetime calculated with the presence of a positron is generally longer than that obtained neglecting the positron effect. When the atomic positions are relaxed, the difference is widened, especially for the group V metals. The inward relaxation of the atoms surrounding the monovacancy is suppressed when the positron effect is taken into account. The difference in the positron lifetime can be also related to the bulk modulus and the cohesive energy.

  15. Apparatus for the analysis of surfaces in gas environments using Positron Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satyal, Suman; Lim, Lawrence; Joglekar, Prasad; Kalaskar, Sushant; Shastry, Karthik; Weiss, Alexander

    2011-03-01

    Positron spectroscopy performed with low energy beams can provide highly surface specific information due to the trapping of positrons in an image potential surface state at the time of annihilation. Here we present design details of a new positron beam system for the analysis of surfaces gas environments. The new system will employ differential pumping to transport the positrons most of the way from the source to the sample under high vacuum. The positrons will then be transported through a thin gas layer surrounding the sample. The positrons will be implanted into the sample at energies less than ~ 10 keV ensuring that a large fraction will diffuse back to the surface before annihilation. The Elemental content of the surface interacting with the gas environment will then be determined from the Doppler broadened gamma spectra. Welch Y1100, NSF DMR 0907679.

  16. Numerical analysis of electrostatic ion cyclotron instability in an electron-positron-ion plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Khorashadizadeh, S. M. Barati Moqadam Niyat, M.; Niknam, A. R.

    2016-06-15

    This paper presents a theoretical study of the effects of positron density on the electrostatic ion cyclotron instability in an electron-positron-ion plasma using the kinetic theory approach. It is supposed that positrons and electrons can drift parallel to the magnetic field either in the same or the opposite directions. The dispersion relation for the electrostatic ion cyclotron waves in an electron-positron-ion plasma is derived, and the numerical results are investigated. It is found that an increase in positron concentration increases the critical drift velocity for excitation of the instability in both configurations. It is also found that as the positron concentration increases the growth rate of instability decreases. In addition, it is shown that at low velocities the maximum instability growth rate for the unidirectional case is higher than the counter-streaming case; however, after a certain velocity, the maximum growth rate in the counter-streaming case dominates that of the unidirectional case.

  17. Positron production at extreme light infrastructure – nuclear physics (ELI-NP)

    SciTech Connect

    Oprisa, A. Balascuta, S. Ur, C. A.

    2015-02-24

    Applied and material physics studies with positron beams of Fermi–surfaces, defects, interfaces etc. offer excellent diagnostics tools. At ELI-NP, an intense γ beam of about 10{sup 11} photons/s with energies up to 3.5 MeV will be used to generate a positron beam via pair production in a tungsten converter target. To obtain a high intensity beam of moderated positrons the design of the positron source is of high importance. The design of a dedicated positron source at ELI–NP is being investigated based on extensive GEANT4 simulations. The goal of the simulations is to optimize the geometry of the target and the gamma beam collimation. We present here the characteristics of the positron beam obtained for different geometries of the converter target.

  18. The effect of direct electron-positron pair production on relativistic feedback rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vodopiyanov, I. B.; Dwyer, J. R.; Cramer, E. S.; Lucia, R. J.; Rassoul, H. K.

    2015-01-01

    Runaway electron avalanches developing in thunderclouds in high electric field become self-sustaining due to relativistic feedback via the production of backward propagating positrons and backscattered X-rays. To date, only positrons created from pair production by gamma rays interacting with the air have been considered. In contrast, direct electron-positron pair production, also known as "trident process," occurs from the interaction of energetic runaway electrons with atomic nuclei, and so it does not require the generation of a gamma ray mediator. The positrons produced in this process contribute to relativistic feedback and become especially important when the feedback factor value approaches unity. Then the steady state flux of runaway electrons increases significantly. In certain cases, when the strong electrostatic field forms in a narrow area, the direct positrons become one of processes dominating relativistic feedback. Calculations of the direct positron production contribution to relativistic feedback are presented for different electric field configurations.

  19. Positron acceleration by sheath field in ultra-intense laser–solid interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yonghong; Wu, Yuchi; Chen, Jia; Yu, Minghai; Dong, Kegong; Gu, Yuqiu

    2017-04-01

    A positron production experiment was performed by irradiating an ultra-intense picosecond laser on solid tantalum targets. Quasi-monoenergetic positron beams were obtained owing to the sheath field on the back of the target. The experiment shows that the peak energy of the positron spectrum has a linear relation with the reciprocal of the target diameter. A simple analytical model of the sheath field was constructed to explain the experimental data, which predicts the positron peak energy in terms of the target diameter and hot electron parameters. Based on the field model, Monte Carlo simulations were conducted to treat the positron production and acceleration self-consistently. The simulated spectra are in good agreement with most experiment results. The disagreement of the 1 mm diameter data reveals that the hot electron propagation along the target flank surface plays an important role in the sheath field set up. Several aspects involved in the positron acceleration are discussed.

  20. Positron accumulation for the fueling of matter-antimatter pair plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenson, E. V.; Pedersen, T. Sunn; Hergenhahn, U.; Saitoh, H.; Sarasola, X.; Paschkowski, N.; Schauer, F.; Marx, G. H.; Schweikhard, L.; Hugenschmidt, C.; Danielson, J. R.; Surko, C. M.

    2013-10-01

    Pair plasmas have been a topic of theoretical and astrophysical interest for decades. APEX (A Positron-Electron Experiment) aims to create them in the laboratory by building upon recent advancements in several areas: devices that can magnetically confine both quasi-neutral and non-neutral plasmas, the strength of positron beams, and the manipulation of non-neutral plasmas. This last is the focus of the Positron Accumulation Experiment (PAX). PAX will provide a necessary bridge between the source of APEX's positrons (Neutron-Induced Positron Source Munich) and the magnetic confinement device for the pair plasma. PAX will cool and store incoming positrons over a 10-15 minute period, thereby accumulating them at sufficiently low energies and in sufficiently high numbers that the resulting plasma will extend at least 10 Debye lengths. The current status of PAX's construction and tests will be presented.