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Sample records for genes per1 per2

  1. Rigid Cooperation of Per1 and Per2 proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tamiya, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Sumito; Ouchi, Yasuyoshi; Akishita, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Period circadian clock (Per) genes Per1 and Per2 have essential roles in circadian oscillation. In this study, we identified a new role of Per1-Per2 cooperation, and its mechanism, using our new experimental methods. Under constant light conditions, the period length of Per1 and Per2 knockout mice depended on the copy number ratio of Per1:Per2. We then established a light-emitting diode-based lighting system that can generate any pattern of light intensity. Under gradually changing light in the absence of phase shift with different periods, both Per1(−/−) and Per2(−/−) mice were entrained to a broader range of period length than wild-type mice. To analyse Per1-Per2 cooperative roles at the cell culture level, we established a Per2 knockout-rescue system, which can detect period shortening in a familial advanced sleep phase syndrome (FASPS) mutant. Upon introduction of the Per1 coding region in this system, we saw period shortening. In conclusion, short period-associated protein Per1 and long period-associated Per2 cooperated to rigidly confine the circadian period to “circa” 24-h. These results suggest that the rigid circadian rhythm maintained through the cooperation of Per1-Per2 could negatively impact modern society, in which the use of artificial lighting is ubiquitous, and result in circadian disorders, including delirium. PMID:27609640

  2. Histone monoubiquitination by Clock-Bmal1 complex marks Per1 and Per2 genes for circadian feedback.

    PubMed

    Tamayo, Alfred G; Duong, Hao A; Robles, Maria S; Mann, Matthias; Weitz, Charles J

    2015-10-01

    Circadian rhythms in mammals are driven by a feedback loop in which the transcription factor Clock-Bmal1 activates expression of Per and Cry proteins, which together form a large nuclear complex (Per complex) that represses Clock-Bmal1 activity. We found that mouse Clock-Bmal1 recruits the Ddb1-Cullin-4 ubiquitin ligase to Per (Per1 and Per2), Cry (Cry1 and Cry2) and other circadian target genes. Histone H2B monoubiquitination at Per genes was rhythmic and depended on Bmal1, Ddb1 and Cullin-4a. Depletion of Ddb1-Cullin-4a or an independent decrease in H2B monoubiquitination caused defective circadian feedback and decreased the association of the Per complex with DNA-bound Clock-Bmal1. Clock-Bmal1 thus covalently marks Per genes for subsequent recruitment of the Per complex. Our results reveal a chromatin-mediated signal from the positive to the negative limb of the clock that provides a licensing mechanism for circadian feedback.

  3. Time-place learning and memory persist in mice lacking functional Per1 and Per2 clock genes.

    PubMed

    Mulder, C; Van Der Zee, E A; Hut, R A; Gerkema, M P

    2013-12-01

    With time-place learning, animals link a stimulus with the location and the time of day. This ability may optimize resource localization and predator avoidance in daily changing environments. Time-place learning is a suitable task to study the interaction of the circadian system and memory. Previously, we showed that time-place learning in mice depends on the circadian system and Cry1 and/or Cry2 clock genes. We questioned whether time-place learning is Cry specific or also depends on other core molecular clock genes. Here, we show that Per1/Per2 double mutant mice, despite their arrhythmic phenotype, acquire time-place learning similar to wild-type mice. As well as an established role in circadian rhythms, Per genes have also been implicated in the formation and storage of memory. We found no deficiencies in short-term spatial working memory in Per mutant mice compared to wild-type mice. Moreover, both Per mutant and wild-type mice showed similar long-term memory for contextual features of a paradigm (a mild foot shock), measured in trained mice after a 2-month nontesting interval. In contrast, time-place associations were lost in both wild-type and mutant mice after these 2 months, suggesting a lack of maintained long-term memory storage for this type of information. Taken together, Cry-dependent time-place learning does not require Per genes, and Per mutant mice showed no PER-specific short-term or long-term memory deficiencies. These results limit the functional role of Per clock genes in the circadian regulation of time-place learning and memory.

  4. Cadmium-induced changes in Per 1 and Per 2 gene expression in rat hypothalamus and anterior pituitary: effect of melatonin.

    PubMed

    Cano, Pilar; Poliandri, Ariel H B; Jiménez, Vanessa; Cardinali, Daniel P; Esquifino, Ana I

    2007-08-01

    Chronic cadmium (Cd) administration affects the circadian release of pituitary hormones in rats. To assess whether Cd modifies expression of two major clock genes, period (Per) 1 and Per 2, in the hypothalamic-pituitary unit and to what extent the changes could be prevented by melatonin, rats were exposed to CdCl(2) (5ppm in drinking water) with or without melatonin (3 microg/mL drinking water) for 1 month and were killed at two time intervals, i.e. a the beginning of the rest span (09:00h) and at the middle of the activity span (01:00h). Hypothalamic and pituitary mRNA levels encoding Per 1 and Per 2 were measured by real-time PCR analysis. Cd treatment decreased expression of hypothalamic Per 1 gene at both time intervals, of hypothalamic Per 2 gene at 01:00h, and of adenohypophysial Per 1 and Per 2 genes at 09:00h. Melatonin administration counteracted most of the effects of Cd and augmented hypothalamic Per 2, and adenohypophysial Per 1 and Per 2 gene expression. The results indicate that Cd administered chronically in the drinking water to rats affected expression of clock genes in the hypothalamic-pituitary unit, an effect prevented by melatonin.

  5. Circadian Clock Genes Per1 and Per2 Regulate the Response of Metabolism-Associated Transcripts to Sleep Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Eichele, Gregor; Lehnert, Hendrik; Oster, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Human and animal studies demonstrate that short sleep or poor sleep quality, e.g. in night shift workers, promote the development of obesity and diabetes. Effects of sleep disruption on glucose homeostasis and liver physiology are well documented. However, changes in adipokine levels after sleep disruption suggest that adipocytes might be another important peripheral target of sleep. Circadian clocks regulate metabolic homeostasis and clock disruption can result in obesity and the metabolic syndrome. The finding that sleep and clock disruption have very similar metabolic effects prompted us to ask whether the circadian clock machinery may mediate the metabolic consequences of sleep disruption. To test this we analyzed energy homeostasis and adipocyte transcriptome regulation in a mouse model of shift work, in which we prevented mice from sleeping during the first six hours of their normal inactive phase for five consecutive days (timed sleep restriction – TSR). We compared the effects of TSR between wild-type and Per1/2 double mutant mice with the prediction that the absence of a circadian clock in Per1/2 mutants would result in a blunted metabolic response to TSR. In wild-types, TSR induces significant transcriptional reprogramming of white adipose tissue, suggestive of increased lipogenesis, together with increased secretion of the adipokine leptin and increased food intake, hallmarks of obesity and associated leptin resistance. Some of these changes persist for at least one week after the end of TSR, indicating that even short episodes of sleep disruption can induce prolonged physiological impairments. In contrast, Per1/2 deficient mice show blunted effects of TSR on food intake, leptin levels and adipose transcription. We conclude that the absence of a functional clock in Per1/2 double mutants protects these mice from TSR-induced metabolic reprogramming, suggesting a role of the circadian timing system in regulating the physiological effects of sleep

  6. Circadian clock genes Per1 and Per2 regulate the response of metabolism-associated transcripts to sleep disruption.

    PubMed

    Husse, Jana; Hintze, Sophie Charlotte; Eichele, Gregor; Lehnert, Hendrik; Oster, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Human and animal studies demonstrate that short sleep or poor sleep quality, e.g. in night shift workers, promote the development of obesity and diabetes. Effects of sleep disruption on glucose homeostasis and liver physiology are well documented. However, changes in adipokine levels after sleep disruption suggest that adipocytes might be another important peripheral target of sleep. Circadian clocks regulate metabolic homeostasis and clock disruption can result in obesity and the metabolic syndrome. The finding that sleep and clock disruption have very similar metabolic effects prompted us to ask whether the circadian clock machinery may mediate the metabolic consequences of sleep disruption. To test this we analyzed energy homeostasis and adipocyte transcriptome regulation in a mouse model of shift work, in which we prevented mice from sleeping during the first six hours of their normal inactive phase for five consecutive days (timed sleep restriction--TSR). We compared the effects of TSR between wild-type and Per1/2 double mutant mice with the prediction that the absence of a circadian clock in Per1/2 mutants would result in a blunted metabolic response to TSR. In wild-types, TSR induces significant transcriptional reprogramming of white adipose tissue, suggestive of increased lipogenesis, together with increased secretion of the adipokine leptin and increased food intake, hallmarks of obesity and associated leptin resistance. Some of these changes persist for at least one week after the end of TSR, indicating that even short episodes of sleep disruption can induce prolonged physiological impairments. In contrast, Per1/2 deficient mice show blunted effects of TSR on food intake, leptin levels and adipose transcription. We conclude that the absence of a functional clock in Per1/2 double mutants protects these mice from TSR-induced metabolic reprogramming, suggesting a role of the circadian timing system in regulating the physiological effects of sleep disruption.

  7. Housing under abnormal light-dark cycles attenuates day/night expression rhythms of the clock genes Per1, Per2, and Bmal1 in the amygdala and hippocampus of mice.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Shunpei; Tahara, Yu; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Ishigooka, Jun; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2015-10-01

    Although the results of previous studies have suggested that disruptions in circadian rhythms are involved in the pathogenesis of depression, no studies have examined the interaction of clock gene expression deficit and depression state. In this study, we examined clock gene expression levels and depressive-like behavior in mice housed under 3.5h light, 3.5h dark (T = 7) conditions to investigate the association between clock gene expression and depressive state. C57BL/6J mice were housed under a T = 24 cycle (12h light, 12h dark) or a T = 7 cycle and clock gene expression levels in the hippocampus and the amygdala were measured by real-time RT-PCR. Depressive state was evaluated by the forced swim test (FST). Although circadian rhythms of Per1 and Per2 clock gene expression in the hippocampus and amygdala were still detected under T = 7 conditions, rhythmicity and expression levels of both significantly decreased. Mice housed with a T = 7 cycle showed increased immobile time in the FST than those with a T = 24 cycle. The present results suggest that the presence of a depressive state around the early active phase of activity may be related to impairment of rhythmicity and expression levels of Per1 and Per2 genes under abnormal light-dark conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  8. Differential induction and localization of mPer1 and mPer2 during advancing and delaying phase shifts

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Lily; Silver, Rae

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism whereby brief light exposure resets the mammalian circadian clock in a phase dependent manner is not known, but is thought to involve Per gene expression. At the behavioural level, a light pulse produces phase delays in early subjective night, phase advances in late subjective night, and no phase shifts in mid-subjective night or subjective day. To understand the relationship between Per gene activity and behavioural phase shifts, we examined light-induced mPer1 and mPer2 expression in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the mouse, in the subjective night, with a view to understanding SCN heterogeneity. In the VIP-containing region of the SCN (termed `core'), light-induced mPer1 expression occurs at all times of the subjective night, while mPer2 induction is seen only in early subjective night. In the remaining regions of the SCN (termed `shell'), a phase delaying light pulse produces no mPer1 but significant mPer2 expression, while a phase advancing light pulse produces no mPer2 but substantial mPer1 induction. Moreover, following a light pulse during mid-subjective night, neither mPer1 nor mPer2 are induced in the shell. The results reveal that behavioural phase shifts occur only when light-induced Per gene expression spreads from the core to the shell SCN, with mPer1 expression in shell corresponding to phase advances, and mPer2 corresponding to phase delays. The results indicate that the time course and the localization of light-induced Per gene expression in SCN reveals important aspects of intra-SCN communication. PMID:12405967

  9. Homeostatic sleep regulation is preserved in mPer1 and mPer2 mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Kopp, Caroline; Albrecht, Urs; Zheng, Binhai; Tobler, Irene

    2002-09-01

    A limited set of genes, Clock, Bmal1, mPer1, mPer2, mCry1 and mCry2, has been shown to be essential for the generation of circadian rhythms in mammals. It has been recently suggested that circadian genes might be involved in sleep regulation. We investigated the role of mPer1 and mPer2 genes in the homeostatic regulation of sleep by comparing sleep of mice lacking mPER1 (mPer1 mutants) or a functional mPER2 (mPer2 mutants), and wild-type controls (WT) after 6 h of sleep deprivation (SD). Our main result showed that after SD, all mice displayed the typical increase of slow-wave activity (SWA; EEG power density between 0.75 and 4 Hz) in nonREM sleep, reflecting the homeostatic response to SD. This increase was more prominent over the frontal cortex as compared to the occipital cortex. The genotypes did not differ in the effect of SD on the occipital EEG, while the effect on the frontal EEG was initially diminished in both mPer mutants. Differences between the genotypes were seen in the 24-h distribution of sleep, reflecting especially the phase advance of motor activity onset observed in mPer2 mutants. While the daily distribution of sleep was modulated by mPer1 and mPer2 genes, sleep homeostasis reflected by the SWA increase after 6-h SD was preserved in the mPer mutants. The results provide further evidence for the independence of the circadian and the homeostatic components underlying sleep regulation.

  10. Tetrodotoxin administration in the suprachiasmatic nucleus prevents NMDA-induced reductions in pineal melatonin without influencing Per1 and Per2 mRNA levels.

    PubMed

    Paul, Ketema N; Gamble, Karen L; Fukuhara, Chiaki; Novak, Colleen M; Tosini, Gianluca; Albers, H Elliott

    2004-05-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the anterior hypothalamus contains a light-entrainable circadian pacemaker. Neurons in the SCN are part of a circuit that conveys light information from retinal efferents to the pineal gland. Light presented during the night acutely increases mRNA levels of the circadian clock genes Per1 and Per2 in the SCN, and acutely suppresses melatonin levels in the pineal gland. The present study investigated whether the ability of light to increase Per1 and Per2 mRNA levels and suppress pineal melatonin levels requires sodium-dependent action potentials in the SCN. Per1 and Per2 mRNA levels in the SCN and pineal melatonin levels were measured in Syrian hamsters injected with tetrodotoxin (TTX) prior to light exposure or injection of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA). TTX inhibited the ability of light to increase Per1 and Per2 mRNA levels and suppress pineal melatonin levels. TTX did not, however, influence the ability of NMDA to increase Per1 and Per2 mRNA levels, though it did inhibit the ability of NMDA to suppress pineal melatonin levels. These results demonstrate that action potentials in the SCN are not necessary for NMDA receptor activation to increase Per1 and Per2 mRNA levels, but are necessary for NMDA receptor activation to decrease pineal melatonin levels. Taken together, these data support the hypothesis that the mechanism through which light information is conveyed to the pacemaker in the SCN is separate from and independent of the mechanism through which light information is conveyed to the SCN cells whose efferents suppress pineal melatonin levels.

  11. Melatonin Signal Transduction Pathways Require E-Box-Mediated Transcription of Per1 and Per2 to Reset the SCN Clock at Dusk

    PubMed Central

    Kandalepas, Patty C.; Mitchell, Jennifer W.; Gillette, Martha U.

    2016-01-01

    Melatonin is released from the pineal gland into the circulatory system at night in the absence of light, acting as “hormone of darkness” to the brain and body. Melatonin also can regulate circadian phasing of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). During the day-to-night transition, melatonin exposure advances intrinsic SCN neural activity rhythms via the melatonin type-2 (MT2) receptor and downstream activation of protein kinase C (PKC). The effects of melatonin on SCN phasing have not been linked to daily changes in the expression of core genes that constitute the molecular framework of the circadian clock. Using real-time RT-PCR, we found that melatonin induces an increase in the expression of two clock genes, Period 1 (Per1) and Period 2 (Per2). This effect occurs at CT 10, when melatonin advances SCN phase, but not at CT 6, when it does not. Using anti-sense oligodeoxynucleotides (α ODNs) to Per 1 and Per 2, as well as to E-box enhancer sequences in the promoters of these genes, we show that their specific induction is necessary for the phase-altering effects of melatonin on SCN neural activity rhythms in the rat. These effects of melatonin on Per1 and Per2 were mediated by PKC. This is unlike day-active non-photic signals that reset the SCN clock by non-PCK signal transduction mechanisms and by decreasing Per1 expression. Rather, this finding extends roles for Per1 and Per2, which are critical to photic phase-resetting, to a nonphotic zeitgeber, melatonin, and suggest that the regulation of these clock gene transcripts is required for clock resetting by diverse regulatory cues. PMID:27362940

  12. Clock gene Per2 as a controller of liver carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mteyrek, Ali; Filipski, Elisabeth; Guettier, Catherine; Okyar, Alper; Lévi, Francis

    2016-01-01

    Environmental disruption of molecular clocks promoted liver carcinogenesis and accelerated cancer progression in rodents. We investigated the specific role of clock gene Period 2 (Per2) for liver carcinogenesis and clock-controlled cellular proliferation, genomic instability and inflammation. We assessed liver histopathology, and determined molecular and physiology circadian patterns in mice on chronic diethylnitrosamine (DEN) exposure according to constitutive Per2 mutation. First, we found that Per2m/m liver displayed profound alterations in proliferation gene expression, including c-Myc derepression, phase-advanced Wee1, and arrhythmic Ccnb1 and K-ras mRNA expressions, as well as deregulated inflammation, through arrhythmic liver IL-6 protein concentration, in the absence of any DEN exposure. These changes could then make Per2m/m mice more prone to subsequently develop liver cancers on DEN. Indeed, primary liver cancers were nearly fourfold as frequent in Per2m/m mice as compared to wild-type (WT), 4 months after DEN exposure. The liver molecular clock was severely disrupted throughout the whole carcinogenesis process, including the initiation stage, i.e. within the initial 17 days on DEN. Per2m/m further exhibited increased c-Myc and Ccnb1 mean 24h expressions, lack of P53 response, and arrhythmic ATM, Wee1 and Ccnb1 expressions. DEN-induced tumor related inflammation was further promoted through increased protein concentrations of liver IL-6 and TNF-α as compared to WT during carcinogenesis initiation. Per2 mutation severely deregulated liver gene or protein expressions related to three cancer hallmarks, including uncontrolled proliferation, genomic instability, and tumor promoting inflammation, and accelerated liver carcinogenesis several-fold. Clock gene Per2 acted here as a liver tumor suppressor from initiation to progression. PMID:27494874

  13. The core clock gene Per1 phases molecular and electrical circadian rhythms in SCN neurons

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jeff R.

    2016-01-01

    The brain’s biological clock, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), exhibits endogenous 24-hour rhythms in gene expression and spontaneous firing rate; however, the functional relationship between these neuronal rhythms is not fully understood. Here, we used a Per1::GFP transgenic mouse line that allows for the simultaneous quantification of molecular clock state and firing rate in SCN neurons to examine the relationship between these key components of the circadian clock. We find that there is a stable, phased relationship between E-box-driven clock gene expression and spontaneous firing rate in SCN neurons and that these relationships are independent of light input onto the system or of GABAA receptor-mediated synaptic activity. Importantly, the concordant phasing of gene and neural rhythms is disrupted in the absence of the homologous clock gene Per1, but persists in the absence of the core clock gene Per2. These results suggest that Per1 plays a unique, non-redundant role in phasing gene expression and firing rate rhythms in SCN neurons to increase the robustness of cellular timekeeping. PMID:27602274

  14. EGR1 regulates hepatic clock gene amplitude by activating Per1 transcription

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Weiwei; Wu, Jing; Zhang, Qian; Lai, Shan-Shan; Jiang, Shan; Jiang, Chen; Xu, Ying; Xue, Bin; Du, Jie; Li, Chao-Jun

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian clock system is composed of a master clock and peripheral clocks. At the molecular level, the rhythm-generating mechanism is controlled by a molecular clock composed of positive and negative feedback loops. However, the underlying mechanisms for molecular clock regulation that affect circadian clock function remain unclear. Here, we show that Egr1 (early growth response 1), an early growth response gene, is expressed in mouse liver in a circadian manner. Consistently, Egr1 is transactivated by the CLOCK/BMAL1 heterodimer through a conserved E-box response element. In hepatocytes, EGR1 regulates the transcription of several core clock genes, including Bmal1, Per1, Per2, Rev-erbα and Rev-erbβ, and the rhythm amplitude of their expression is dependent on EGR1’s transcriptional function. Further mechanistic studies indicated that EGR1 binds to the proximal region of the Per1 promoter to activate its transcription directly. When the peripheral clock is altered by light or feeding behavior transposition in Egr1-deficient mice, the expression phase of hepatic clock genes shifts normally, but the amplitude is also altered. Our data reveal a critical role for EGR1 in the regulation of hepatic clock circuitry, which may contribute to the rhythm stability of peripheral clock oscillators. PMID:26471974

  15. Opposing actions of Per1 and Cry2 in the regulation of Per1 target gene expression in the liver and kidney

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Jacob; All, Sean; Skopis, George; Cheng, Kit-Yan; Compton, Brandy; Srialluri, Nitya; Stow, Lisa; Jeffers, Lauren A.

    2013-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that the circadian clock plays an integral role in the regulation of many physiological processes including blood pressure, renal function, and metabolism. The canonical molecular clock functions via activation of circadian target genes by Clock/Bmal1 and repression of Clock/Bmal1 activity by Per1–3 and Cry1/2. However, we have previously shown that Per1 activates genes important for renal sodium reabsorption, which contradicts the canonical role of Per1 as a repressor. Moreover, Per1 knockout (KO) mice exhibit a lowered blood pressure and heavier body weight phenotype similar to Clock KO mice, and opposite that of Cry1/2 KO mice. Recent work has highlighted the potential role of Per1 in repression of Cry2. Therefore, we postulated that Per1 potentially activates target genes through a Cry2-Clock/Bmal1-dependent mechanism, in which Per1 antagonizes Cry2, preventing its repression of Clock/Bmal1. This hypothesis was tested in vitro and in vivo. The Per1 target genes αENaC and Fxyd5 were identified as Clock targets in mpkCCDc14 cells, a model of the renal cortical collecting duct. We identified PPARα and DEC1 as novel Per1 targets in the mouse hepatocyte cell line, AML12, and in the liver in vivo. Per1 knockdown resulted in upregulation of Cry2 in vitro, and this result was confirmed in vivo in mice with reduced expression of Per1. Importantly, siRNA-mediated knockdown of Cry2 and Per1 demonstrated opposing actions for Cry2 and Per1 on Per1 target genes, supporting the potential Cry2-Clock/Bmal1-dependent mechanism underlying Per1 action in the liver and kidney. PMID:23824961

  16. Diurnal Expression of the Per2 Gene and Protein in the Lateral Habenular Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhigong; Xu, Haiyan; Liu, Yongmao; Mu, Li; Xiao, Jinyu; Zhao, Hua

    2015-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus plays an important role in generating circadian rhythms in mammals. The lateral habenular nucleus (LHb) is closely linked to this structure. Interestingly, the LHb shows a rhythmic firing rate in vivo and in vitro, and sustained oscillation of rhythmic genes in vitro. However, under the in vivo condition, whether rhythmic gene expression in the LHb has circadian rhythms remains unknown. In this study, we examined LHb tissue in rats to determine Period2 (Per2) gene and protein expression at six zeitgeber time points (ZT2, ZT6, ZT10, ZT14, ZT18, and ZT22) in a 12-h light and 12-h dark (LD) environment. We found that in the LD environment, Per2 gene expression and PER2 protein levels in the LHb were higher in the day and lower in the night, showing periodic oscillation, with a peak at ZT10 and a trough at ZT22 (Per2 mRNA) and ZT18 (PER2 protein). We conclude that Per2 expression and PER2 protein levels in the LHb have rhythmic oscillation in vivo. This study provides a basis for further study on the role of the LHb in the circadian rhythm system. PMID:26213916

  17. THE mPER2 CLOCK GENE MODULATES COCAINE ACTIONS IN THE MOUSE CIRCADIAN SYSTEM

    PubMed Central

    Brager, Allison J.; Stowie, Adam C.; Prosser, Rebecca A.; Glass, J. David

    2014-01-01

    Cocaine is a potent disruptor of photic and non-photic pathways for circadian entrainment of the master circadian clock of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). These actions of cocaine likely involve its modulation of molecular (clock gene) components for SCN clock timekeeping. At present, however, the physiological basis of such an interaction is unclear. To address this question, we compared photic and non-photic phase-resetting responses between wild-type (WT) and Per2 mutant mice expressing nonfunctional PER2 protein to systemic and intra-SCN cocaine administrations. In the systemic trials, cocaine was administered i.p. (20 mg/kg) either at midday or prior to a light pulse in the early night to assess its non-photic and photic behavioral phase-resetting actions, respectively. In the intra-SCN trial, cocaine was administered by reverse microdialysis at midday to determine if the SCN is a direct target for its non-photic phase-resetting action. Non-photic phase-advancing responses to i.p. cocaine at midday were significantly (~3.5-fold) greater in Per2 mutants than WTs. However, the phase-advancing action of intra-SCN cocaine perfusion at midday did not differ between genotypes. In the light pulse trial, Per2 mutants exhibited larger photic phase-delays than did WTs, and the attenuating action of cocaine on this response was proportionately larger than in WTs. These data indicate that the Per2 clock gene is a potent modulator of cocaine’s actions in the circadian system. With regard to non-photic phase-resetting, the SCN is confirmed as a direct target of cocaine action; however, Per2 modulation of this effect likely occurs outside of the SCN. PMID:23333842

  18. Three circadian clock genes Per2, Arntl, and Npas2 contribute to winter depression.

    PubMed

    Partonen, Timo; Treutlein, Jens; Alpman, Asude; Frank, Josef; Johansson, Carolina; Depner, Martin; Aron, Liviu; Rietschel, Marcella; Wellek, Stefan; Soronen, Pia; Paunio, Tiina; Koch, Andreas; Chen, Ping; Lathrop, Mark; Adolfsson, Rolf; Persson, Maj-Liz; Kasper, Siegfried; Schalling, Martin; Peltonen, Leena; Schumann, Gunter

    2007-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence suggest that the circadian clock contributes to the pathogenesis of winter depression or seasonal affective disorder (SAD). We hypothesized that sequence variations in three genes, including Per2, Arntl, and Npas2, which form a functional unit at the core of the circadian clock, predispose to winter depression. In silico analysis of the biological effects of allelic differences suggested the target single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to be analyzed in a sample of 189 patients and 189 matched controls. The most relevant SNP in each gene was identified for the interaction analysis and included in the multivariate assessment of the combined effects of all three SNPs on the disease risk. SAD was associated with variations in each of the three genes in gene-wise logistic regression analysis. In combination analysis of variations of Per2, Arntl, and Npas2, we found additive effects and identified a genetic risk profile for the disorder. Carriers of the risk genotype combination had the odds ratio of 4.43 of developing SAD as compared with the remaining genotypes, and of 10.67 as compared with the most protective genotype combination. Variations in the three circadian clock genes Per2, Arntl, and Npas2 are associated with the disease, supporting the hypothesis that the circadian clock mechanisms contribute to winter depression.

  19. High prevalence of the PER-1 gene among carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Aly, M M; Abu Alsoud, N M; Elrobh, M S; Al Johani, S M; Balkhy, H H

    2016-11-01

    The prevalence of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in Saudi Arabia and their resistance genetic mechanisms are yet to be identified. We studied the prevalence and genetic diversity of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase genes, particularly the PER-1 gene, among carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii strains from patients at a tertiary care hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia between 2006 and 2014. Fresh subcultured samples were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). Total genomic DNA was extracted from each isolate and further used for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) genotyping, sequence-based typing (SBT) of PER-1 and OXA-51-like gene, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of positive isolates. Randomly selected clinical isolates (n = 100) were subjected to MLST. A total of 503 isolates were characterized as multidrug-resistant (MDR) using the MIC. Isolates were further PCR tested for bla -TEM and bla -PER-1 resistance genes (n = 503). The genotyping results showed that 68/503 (14 %) isolates were positive to bla TEM. The genotyping results of PER-1-like genes showed that 384/503 (76.3 %) were positive among MDR Acinetobacter isolates. Based on SBT, the majority of these isolates were clustered into three main groups including isolates harboring PER-1: AB11 (bla -PER-1), isolate AB16 (bla -PER-1), and, finally, the plasmid pAB154 (bla -PER-7). Remarkably, many isolates were concealing the PER-1 gene and harboring the TEM resistance genes as well. MLST results for selected isolates (n = 100) identified four main sequence types (STs: 2, 19, 20, and 25) and four novel isolates (ST 486-489). We report 76.3 % prevalence of the PER-1 resistance gene among Acinetobacter clinical isolates from Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Further work is needed to explore the clinical risks and patient outcome with such resistance related to healthcare-associated infections and investigate the genetic and molecular mechanisms that confer the MDR

  20. Molecular cloning, tissue distribution, and daily rhythms of expression of per1 gene in European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax).

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Jose Antonio; Madrid, Juan Antonio; Sánchez-Vázquez, Francisco Javier

    2010-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are controlled by interlocked autoregulatory feedback loops consisting of interactions of a group of circadian clock genes and their proteins. The Period family is a group of genes that are essential components of the molecular clock. In the present study, we cloned a period gene (per1) of the European sea bass, a marine teleost of chronobiological interest. The cloned sequence encoded a protein consisting of 1436 amino acids that homology and phylogenic analyses showed to be related with fish PER1 proteins possessing very high identity with Oryzias latipes (Medaka) per1. Polymerase chain reaction screening of per1 expression showed that this gene is expressed in all the tissues analyzed (brain, heart, liver, gill, muscle, digestive tract, adipose tissue, spleen, and retina). In addition, a daily expression rhythm, with an acrophase (peak time) approximately ZT0 (lights-on), was found in the two tissue types investigated: neural (brain) and peripheral (liver and heart). In conclusion, identification and characterization of the gene encoding sea bass per1 provide valuable information for understanding the circadian mechanism at the molecular level in this species, although further research is needed to clarify the exact role that per1 plays in the circadian oscillator and the dual behavior of European sea bass.

  1. Role of the circadian clock gene Per2 in adaptation to cold temperature.

    PubMed

    Chappuis, Sylvie; Ripperger, Jürgen Alexander; Schnell, Anna; Rando, Gianpaolo; Jud, Corinne; Wahli, Walter; Albrecht, Urs

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive thermogenesis allows mammals to resist to cold. For instance, in brown adipose tissue (BAT) the facultative uncoupling of the proton gradient from ATP synthesis in mitochondria is used to generate systemic heat. However, this system necessitates an increase of the Uncoupling protein 1 (Ucp1) and its activation by free fatty acids. Here we show that mice without functional Period2 (Per2) were cold sensitive because their adaptive thermogenesis system was less efficient. Upon cold-exposure, Heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) induced Per2 in the BAT. Subsequently, PER2 as a co-activator of PPARα increased expression of Ucp1. PER2 also increased Fatty acid binding protein 3 (Fabp3), a protein important to transport free fatty acids from the plasma to mitochondria to activate UCP1. Hence, in BAT PER2 is important for the coordination of the molecular response of mice exposed to cold by synchronizing UCP1 expression and its activation.

  2. Association of Per1 and Npas2 with autistic disorder: support for the clock genes/social timing hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, B; Rudrasingham, V; Nash, S; Kirov, G; Owen, M J; Wimpory, D C

    2007-06-01

    Clock gene anomalies have been suggested as causative factors in autism. We screened eleven clock/clock-related genes in a predominantly high-functioning Autism Genetic Resource Exchange sample of strictly diagnosed autistic disorder progeny and their parents (110 trios) for association of clock gene variants with autistic disorder. We found significant association (P<0.05) for two single-nucleotide polymorphisms in per1 and two in npas2. Analysis of all possible combinations of two-marker haplotypes for each gene showed that in npas2 40 out of the 136 possible two-marker combinations were significant at the P<0.05 level, with the best result between markers rs1811399 and rs2117714, P=0.001. Haplotype analysis within per1 gave a single significant result: a global P=0.027 for the markers rs2253820-rs885747. No two-marker haplotype was significant in any of the other genes, despite the large number of tests performed. Our findings support the hypothesis that these epistatic clock genes may be involved in the etiology of autistic disorder. Problems in sleep, memory and timing are all characteristics of autistic disorder and aspects of sleep, memory and timing are each clock-gene-regulated in other species. We identify how our findings may be relevant to theories of autism that focus on the amygdala, cerebellum, memory and temporal deficits. We outline possible implications of these findings for developmental models of autism involving temporal synchrony/social timing.

  3. Biochemical Characterization of PER-2 and Genetic Environment of blaPER-2

    PubMed Central

    Power, Pablo; Di Conza, José; Rodríguez, María Margarita; Ghiglione, Bárbara; Ayala, Juan A.; Casellas, José María; Radice, Marcela; Gutkind, Gabriel

    2007-01-01

    PER-2 was the first detected and the second most prevalent extended-spectrum β-lactamase in clinical pathogens isolated in Argentina and was also reported only in other South American countries. Citrobacter freundii 33587 was isolated in 1999 in Buenos Aires and was resistant to all tested β-lactams except cephamycins and carbapenems. The strain produced both plasmid-borne TEM-1 and PER-2 (pI 5.4), which could be transferred by conjugation. By PCR screening, thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR, and DNA sequencing, we detected an ISPa12/IS1387a insertion sequence upstream of blaPER-2, previously reported as also being associated with blaPER-1. The presence of similar structures upstream of blaPER-1 and blaPER-2 suggests a common origin and mobilization. Compared to blaPER-1 genes, an additional putative promoter for blaPER-2 was found. PER-2 kinetic analysis showed its high hydrolysis efficiencies toward both CTX and CAZ (kcat/Km, 0.76 and 0.43 μM−1·s−1, respectively). PMID:17438050

  4. Genetic and clinical factors predict lithium's effects on PER2 gene expression rhythms in cells from bipolar disorder patients.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, M J; Wei, H; Marnoy, Z; Darvish, R M; McPhie, D L; Cohen, B M; Welsh, D K

    2013-10-22

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is associated with abnormal circadian rhythms. In treatment responsive BD patients, lithium (Li) stabilizes mood and reduces suicide risk. Li also affects circadian rhythms and expression of 'clock genes' that control them. However, the extent to which BD, Li and the circadian clock share common biological mechanisms is unknown, and there have been few direct measurements of clock gene function in samples from BD patients. Hence, the role of clock genes in BD and Li treatment remains unclear. Skin fibroblasts from BD patients (N=19) or healthy controls (N=19) were transduced with Per2::luc, a rhythmically expressed, bioluminescent circadian clock reporter gene, and rhythms were measured for 5 consecutive days. Rhythm amplitude and period were compared between BD cases and controls with and without Li. Baseline period was longer in BD cases than in controls. Li 1 mM increased amplitude in controls by 36%, but failed to do so in BD cases. Li 10 mM lengthened period in both BD cases and controls. Analysis of clock gene variants revealed that PER3 and RORA genotype predicted period lengthening by Li, whereas GSK3β genotype predicted rhythm effects of Li, specifically among BD cases. Analysis of BD cases by clinical history revealed that cells from past suicide attempters were more likely to show period lengthening with Li 1 mM. Finally, Li enhanced the resynchronization of damped rhythms, suggesting a mechanism by which Li could act therapeutically in BD. Our work suggests that the circadian clock's response to Li may be relevant to molecular pathology of BD.

  5. A Circadian Clock Gene, PER2, Activates HIF-1 as an Effector Molecule for Recruitment of HIF-1α to Promoter Regions of Its Downstream Genes.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Minoru; Morinibu, Akiyo; Koyasu, Sho; Goto, Yoko; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Harada, Hiroshi

    2017-09-30

    Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) is a transcription factor functioning in cellular adaptive responses to hypoxia. Recent studies have suggested that HIF-1 activity is upregulated by one of the important circadian clock genes, period circadian clock 2 (PER2); however, its underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here, we show that PER2 functions as an effector protein for the recruitment of HIF-1α to its cognate enhancer sequence, the hypoxia-response element (HRE). We found that the forced expression of PER2 enhanced HIF-1 activity without influencing expression levels of the regulatory subunit of HIF-1, HIF-1α, at either mRNA or protein levels. A series of co-immunoprecipitation-based experiments revealed that PER2 interacted with HIF-1α and facilitated the recruitment of HIF-1α to HRE derived from vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) promoter. The PER2-mediated activation of HIF-1 was observed only when the asparagine residue at position 803 of HIF-1α (HIF-1α N803) was kept unhydroxylated by hypoxic stimulation, by introducing an N803A point mutation, or by an inhibitor of N803-dioxygenase, deferoxamine. However, the extent of PER-2-HIF-1α interaction was equivalent regardless of the N803 hydroxylation status. Taken together, these results suggest that, with the help of an unknown sensor molecule for the N803 hydroxylation status, PER2 functions as an effector molecule for the recruitment of HIF-1 to promoter regions of its downstream genes. Our findings reveal a novel regulatory step in the activation of HIF-1, which can be targeted to develop therapeutic strategies against HIF-1-related diseases, such as cancers. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Circadian Clock genes Per2 and clock regulate steroid production, cell proliferation, and luteinizing hormone receptor transcription in ovarian granulosa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, Takashi; Hirai, Yuko; Murayama, Chiaki; Miyamoto, Akio; Miyazaki, Hitoshi; Miyazaki, Koyomi

    2011-08-19

    Highlights: {yields} Treatment with Per2 and Clock siRNAs decreased the number of granulosa cells and LHr expression. {yields}Per2 siRNA treatment did not stimulate the production of estradiol and expression of P450arom. {yields} Clock siRNA treatment inhibited the production of estradiol and expression of P450arom mRNA. {yields}Per2 and Clock siRNA treatment increased and unchanged, respectively, progesterone production in FSH-treated granulosa cells. {yields} The expression of StAR mRNA was increased by Per2 siRNA and unchanged by Clock siRNA. -- Abstract: Circadian Clock genes are associated with the estrous cycle in female animals. Treatment with Per2 and Clock siRNAs decreased the number of granulosa cells and LHr expression in follicle-stimulating hormone FSH-treated granulosa cells. Per2 siRNA treatment did not stimulate the production of estradiol and expression of P450arom, whereas Clock siRNA treatment inhibited the production of estradiol and expression of P450arom mRNA. Per2 and Clock siRNA treatment increased and unchanged, respectively, progesterone production in FSH-treated granulosa cells. Similarly, expression of StAR mRNA was increased by Per2 siRNA and unchanged by Clock siRNA. Our data provide a new insight that Per2 and Clock have different action on ovarian granulosa cell functions.

  7. [Circadian rhythm variation of the clock genes Per1 and cell cycle related genes in different stages of carcinogenesis of buccal mucosa in animal model].

    PubMed

    Tan, Xuemei; Ye, Hua; Yang, Kai; Chen, Dan; Tang, Hong

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the expression and circadian rhythm variation of biological clock gene Per1 and cell cycle genes p53, CyclinD1, cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK1), CyclinB1 in different stages of carcinogenesis in buccal mucosa and its relationship with the development of buccal mucosa carcinoma. Ninety golden hamsters were housed under 12 hours light-12 hours dark cycles, and the model of buccal squamous cell carcinoma was established by using the dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA) to smear the golden hamster buccal mucosa. Before the DMBA was used and after DMBA was used 6 weeks and 14 weeks respectively, the golden hamsters were sacrificed at 6 different time points (5 rats per time point) within 24 hour, including 4, 8, 12, 16, 20 and 24 hour after lights onset (HALO), and the normal buccal mucosa, precancerous lesions and cancer tissue were obtained, respectively. HE stained sections were prepared to observe the canceration of each tissue. Real time RT-PCR was used to detect the mRNA expression of Per1, p53, CyclinD1, CDK1 and CyclinB1, and a cosine analysis method was applied to determine the circadian rhythm variation of Per1, p53, CyclinD1, CDK1 and CyclinB1 mRNA expression, which were characterized by median, amplitude and acrophase. The expression of Per1, p53, CDK1 and CyclinD1 mRNA in 6 different time points within 24 hours in the tissues of three different stages of carcinogenesis had circadian rhythm, respectively. However, the CyclinB1 mRNA was expressed with circadian rhythm just in normal and cancer tissue (P < 0.05), while in precancerous lesions the circadian rhythm was in disorder (P > 0.05). As the development of carcinoma, the median of Per1 and p53 mRNA expression were significantly decreased (P < 0.05), yet the median of CDK1, CyclinB1 and CyclinD1 mRNA expression were significantly increased (P < 0.05). The amplitude of Per1, p53 and CyclinD1 mRNA expression was significantly decreased as the development of carcinoma (P < 0.05), however the

  8. Decreased Bone Volume and Bone Mineral Density in the Tibial Trabecular Bone Is Associated with Per2 Gene by 405 nm Laser Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Yeong-Min; Lee, Myung-Han; Park, Ji Hyung; Seo, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Sangyeob; Jung, Byungjo; Kim, Han Sung; Bae, Kiho

    2015-11-16

    Low-level laser therapy/treatment (LLLT) using a minimally invasive laser needle system (MILNS) might enhance bone formation and suppress bone resorption. In this study, the use of 405 nm LLLT led to decreases in bone volume and bone mineral density (BMD) of tibial trabecular bone in wild-type (WT) and Per2 knockout (KO) mice. Bone volume and bone mineral density of tibial trabecular bone was decreased by 405 nm LLLT in Per2 KO compared to WT mice at two and four weeks. To determine the reduction in tibial bone, mRNA expressions of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and Per2 were investigated at four weeks after 405 nm laser stimulation using MILNS. ALP gene expression was significantly reduced in the LLLT-stimulated right tibial bone of WT and Per2 KO mice compared to the non-irradiated left tibia (p < 0.001). Per2 mRNA expression in WT mice was significantly reduced in the LLLT-stimulated right tibial bone compared to the non-irradiated left tibia (p < 0.001). To identify the decrease in tibial bone mediated by the Per2 gene, levels of runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and ALP mRNAs were determined in non-irradiated WT and Per2 KO mice. These results demonstrated significant downregulation of Runx2 and ALP mRNA levels in Per2 KO mice (p < 0.001). Therefore, the reduction in tibial trabecular bone resulting from 405 nm LLLT using MILNS might be associated with Per2 gene expression.

  9. Decreased Bone Volume and Bone Mineral Density in the Tibial Trabecular Bone Is Associated with Per2 Gene by 405 nm Laser Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Yeong-Min; Lee, Myung-Han; Park, Ji Hyung; Seo, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Sangyeob; Jung, Byungjo; Kim, Han Sung; Bae, Kiho

    2015-01-01

    Low-level laser therapy/treatment (LLLT) using a minimally invasive laser needle system (MILNS) might enhance bone formation and suppress bone resorption. In this study, the use of 405 nm LLLT led to decreases in bone volume and bone mineral density (BMD) of tibial trabecular bone in wild-type (WT) and Per2 knockout (KO) mice. Bone volume and bone mineral density of tibial trabecular bone was decreased by 405 nm LLLT in Per2 KO compared to WT mice at two and four weeks. To determine the reduction in tibial bone, mRNA expressions of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and Per2 were investigated at four weeks after 405 nm laser stimulation using MILNS. ALP gene expression was significantly reduced in the LLLT-stimulated right tibial bone of WT and Per2 KO mice compared to the non-irradiated left tibia (p < 0.001). Per2 mRNA expression in WT mice was significantly reduced in the LLLT-stimulated right tibial bone compared to the non-irradiated left tibia (p < 0.001). To identify the decrease in tibial bone mediated by the Per2 gene, levels of runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and ALP mRNAs were determined in non-irradiated WT and Per2 KO mice. These results demonstrated significant downregulation of Runx2 and ALP mRNA levels in Per2 KO mice (p < 0.001). Therefore, the reduction in tibial trabecular bone resulting from 405 nm LLLT using MILNS might be associated with Per2 gene expression. PMID:26580614

  10. Repeat variation in the human PER2 gene as a new genetic marker associated with cocaine addiction and brain dopamine D2 receptor availability.

    PubMed

    Shumay, E; Fowler, J S; Wang, G-J; Logan, J; Alia-Klein, N; Goldstein, R Z; Maloney, T; Wong, C; Volkow, N D

    2012-03-06

    Low dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) levels in the striatum are consistently reported in cocaine abusers; inter-individual variations in the degree of the decrease suggest a modulating effect of genetic makeup on vulnerability to addiction. The PER2 (Period 2) gene belongs to the clock genes family of circadian regulators; circadian oscillations of PER2 expression in the striatum was modulated by dopamine through D2Rs. Aberrant periodicity of PER2 contributes to the incidence and severity of various brain disorders, including drug addiction. Here we report a newly identified variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) polymorphism in the human PER2 gene (VNTR in the third intron). We found significant differences in the VNTR alleles prevalence across ethnic groups so that the major allele (4 repeats (4R)) is over-represented in non-African population (4R homozygosity is 88%), but not in African Americans (homozygosity 51%). We also detected a biased PER2 genotype distribution among healthy controls and cocaine-addicted individuals. In African Americans, the proportion of 4R/three repeat (3R) carriers in healthy controls is much lower than that in cocaine abusers (23% vs 39%, P=0.004), whereas among non-Africans most 3R/4R heterozygotes are healthy controls (10.5% vs 2.5%, P=0.04). Analysis of striatal D2R availability measured with positron emission tomography and [(11)C]raclopride revealed higher levels of D2R in carriers of 4R/4R genotype (P<0.01). Taken together, these results provide preliminary evidence for the role of the PER2 gene in regulating striatal D2R availability in the human brain and in vulnerability for cocaine addiction.

  11. Expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and period 1 (PER1) clock gene products in different sleep stages of patients with cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Ing-Jy; Liu, Hsing-Cheng; Yuan, Rey-Yue; Sheu, Jau-Jiuan; Yu, Jia-Ming; Hu, Chaur-Jong

    2010-09-01

    Circadian and sleep disturbances are common behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia; circadian rhythm-related molecules may be altered in dementia patients. This study investigated the expression of the period 1 clock gene product (PER1), which is involved in circadian rhythms, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), thought to generate nitric oxide, important in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep regulation. Specifically, we investigated the difference in expression of these two genes between patients with cognitive impairment and controls. We studied iNOS and PER1 mRNA expression using real-time polymerase chain reaction in peripheral leukocytes during REM sleep, non-REM sleep and wake stages in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD, n=5), patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI, n=8) and controls (n=9) during polysomnography examination. Expression of iNOS significantly increased during REM sleep in AD patients compared to MCI patients and controls. There were no significant differences in PER1 expression between the three groups, but an increase in PER1 expression during the wake stage was observed for all participants. Increased expression of iNOS during REM sleep of patients with AD might be a compensation mechanism for maintaining REM sleep. However, the precise role of nocturnal expression of iNOS in patients with AD requires further investigation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Susceptibility Pattern and Distribution of Oxacillinases and blaPER-1 Genes among Multidrug Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in a Teaching Hospital in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri Josheghani, Sareh; Moniri, Rezvan; Firoozeh, Farzaneh; Sehat, Mojtaba; Dasteh Goli, Yasaman

    2015-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) is an important nosocomial pathogen in healthcare institutions. β-Lactamase-mediated resistance is the most common mechanism for carbapenem resistance in A. baumannii. The aim of this study was to determine the antibiotic resistance pattern, to detect OXA encoding genes, class A, blaPER-1, and to detect the presence of ISAba1. A total of 124 A. baumannii isolates were collected from hospitalized patients in a teaching hospital in Kashan, Iran. The susceptibility of isolates to different antibiotics was determined by disk-diffusion method. PCR was used to detect blaPER-1, blaOXA-23, blaOXA-24, blaOXA-51, blaOXA-58, and ISAba1 genes. All isolates were resistant to ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, and cefotaxime. All of the isolates revealed susceptibility to polymyxin B and colistin. Ninety-six percent of the isolates were extensive drug resistance (XDR), 5.6% extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL), and 54.8% metallo-beta-lactamase (MBL). All isolates were positive for blaOXA-51 and ISAba1. blaOXA-23,  blaOXA-24, and blaOXA-58 were found in 79.8%, 25%, and 3.2%, respectively. The frequency rate of blaPER-1 gene was 52.4%. Multidrug resistant A. baumannii isolates are increasing in our setting and extensively limit therapeutic options. The high rate presence of class D carbapenemase-encoding genes, mainly blaOXA-23 carbapenemases, is worrying and alarming as an emerging threat in our hospital. PMID:26881082

  13. Integrated Genome-wide association and hypothalamus eQTL studies indicate a link between the circadian rhythm-related gene PER1 and coping behavior.

    PubMed

    Ponsuksili, Siriluck; Zebunke, Manuela; Murani, Eduard; Trakooljul, Nares; Krieter, Joachim; Puppe, Birger; Schwerin, Manfred; Wimmers, Klaus

    2015-11-05

    Animal personality and coping styles are basic concepts for evaluating animal welfare. Struggling response of piglets in so-called backtests early in life reflects their coping strategy. Behavioral reactions of piglets in backtests have a moderate heritability, but their genetic basis largely remains unknown. Here, latency, duration and frequency of struggling attempts during one-minute backtests were repeatedly recorded of piglets at days 5, 12, 19, and 26. A genome-wide association study for backtest traits revealed 465 significant SNPs (FDR ≤ 0.05) mostly located in QTL (quantitative trait locus) regions on chromosome 3, 5, 12 and 16. In order to capture genes in these regions, 37 transcripts with significant SNPs were selected for expressionQTL analysis in the hypothalamus. Eight genes (ASGR1, CPAMD8, CTC1, FBXO39, IL19, LOC100511790, RAD51B, UBOX5) had cis- and five (RANGRF, PER1, PDZRN3, SH2D4B, LONP2) had trans-expressionQTL. In particular, for PER1, with known physiological implications for maintenance of circadian rhythms, a role in coping behavior was evidenced by confirmed association in an independent population. For CTC1 a cis-expression QTL and the consistent relationship of gene polymorphism, mRNA expression level and backtest traits promoted its link to coping style. GWAS and eQTL analyses uncovered positional and functional gene candidates for coping behavior.

  14. Dual regulation of clock gene Per2 expression in discrete brain areas by the circadian pacemaker and methamphetamine-induced oscillator in rats.

    PubMed

    Natsubori, Akiyo; Honma, Ken-ichi; Honma, Sato

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral rhythms induced by methamphetamine (MAP) treatment in rats are independent of the circadian pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). To know the site and mechanism of an underlying oscillation (MAP-induced oscillator; MAO), extra-SCN circadian rhythms in the discrete brain areas were examined in rats with and without the SCN. To fix the phase of MAO, MAP was supplied in drinking water at a restricted time of day for 14 days (R-MAP) and subsequently given ad libitum (ad-MAP). Plain water was given to the controls at the same restricted time (R-Water). Clock gene Per2 expression was measured by a bioluminescence reporter in cultured brain tissues. In SCN-intact rats, MAO was induced by R-MAP and behavioral rhythms were phase-delayed from the restricted time under ad-MAP with relative coordination. Circadian Per2 rhythms in R-MAP rats were not affected in the SCN but were slightly phase-advanced in the olfactory bulb (OB), caudate-putamen (CPU) and substantia nigra (SN) as compared with R-Water rats. Following SCN lesion, R-MAP-induced MAO phase-shifted more slowly and did not show a sign of relative coordination. In these rats, circadian Per2 rhythms were significantly phase-shifted in the OB and SN as compared with SCN-intact rats. These findings indicate that MAO was induced by MAP given at a restricted time of day in association with phase-shifts of the extra-SCN circadian oscillators in the brain dopaminergic areas. The findings also suggest that these extra-SCN oscillators are the components of MAO and receive dual regulation by MAO and the SCN circadian pacemaker. © 2013 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Expression of circadian rhythm genes CLOCK, BMAL1, and PER1 in buccal epithelial cells of patients with essential arterial hypertension in dependence on polymorphic variants of CLOCK and BMAL1 genes.

    PubMed

    Kurbatova, I V; Topchieva, L V; Korneva, V A; Kolomeichuk, S N; Nemova, N N

    2014-07-01

    The transcript levels of circadian rhythm genes CLOCK, BMAL1, and PER1 in buccal epithelial cells of the patients with essential arterial hypertension was analyzed in relation to polymorphic variants of CLOCK and BMAL1 genes. These levels were assessed with realtime PCR method at daily hours 9, 13, and 17. The significant differences were revealed in transcript levels of the examined genes in patients with various genotypes at the polymorphic markers 3111TC and 257TG regulatory regions of CLOCK gene. The study detected no significant differences among the carriers of various genotypes at polymorphic markers 862TC and 2121GA of CLOCK gene and 56445TC of BMAL1 gene.

  16. Glucose Alters Per2 Rhythmicity Independent of AMPK, Whereas AMPK Inhibitor Compound C Causes Profound Repression of Clock Genes and AgRP in mHypoE-37 Hypothalamic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Oosterman, Johanneke E.; Belsham, Denise D.

    2016-01-01

    Specific neurons in the hypothalamus are regulated by peripheral hormones and nutrients to maintain proper metabolic control. It is unclear if nutrients can directly control clock gene expression. We have therefore utilized the immortalized, hypothalamic cell line mHypoE-37, which exhibits robust circadian rhythms of core clock genes. mHypoE-37 neurons were exposed to 0.5 or 5.5 mM glucose, comparable to physiological levels in the brain. Per2 and Bmal1 mRNAs were assessed every 3 hours over 36 hours. Incubation with 5.5 mM glucose significantly shortened the period and delayed the phase of Per2 mRNA levels, but had no effect on Bmal1. Glucose had no significant effect on phospho-GSK3β, whereas AMPK phosphorylation was altered. Thus, the AMPK inhibitor Compound C was utilized, and mRNA levels of Per2, Bmal1, Cryptochrome1 (Cry1), agouti-related peptide (AgRP), carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1C (Cpt1c), and O-linked N-acetylglucosamine transferase (Ogt) were measured. Remarkably, Compound C dramatically reduced transcript levels of Per2, Bmal1, Cry1, and AgRP, but not Cpt1c or Ogt. Because AMPK was not inhibited at the same time or concentrations as the clock genes, we suggest that the effect of Compound C on gene expression occurs through an AMPK-independent mechanism. The consequences of inhibition of the rhythmic expression of clock genes, and in turn downstream metabolic mediators, such as AgRP, could have detrimental effects on overall metabolic processes. Importantly, the effects of the most commonly used AMPK inhibitor Compound C should be interpreted with caution, considering its role in AMPK-independent repression of specific genes, and especially clock gene rhythm dysregulation. PMID:26784927

  17. Glucose Alters Per2 Rhythmicity Independent of AMPK, Whereas AMPK Inhibitor Compound C Causes Profound Repression of Clock Genes and AgRP in mHypoE-37 Hypothalamic Neurons.

    PubMed

    Oosterman, Johanneke E; Belsham, Denise D

    2016-01-01

    Specific neurons in the hypothalamus are regulated by peripheral hormones and nutrients to maintain proper metabolic control. It is unclear if nutrients can directly control clock gene expression. We have therefore utilized the immortalized, hypothalamic cell line mHypoE-37, which exhibits robust circadian rhythms of core clock genes. mHypoE-37 neurons were exposed to 0.5 or 5.5 mM glucose, comparable to physiological levels in the brain. Per2 and Bmal1 mRNAs were assessed every 3 hours over 36 hours. Incubation with 5.5 mM glucose significantly shortened the period and delayed the phase of Per2 mRNA levels, but had no effect on Bmal1. Glucose had no significant effect on phospho-GSK3β, whereas AMPK phosphorylation was altered. Thus, the AMPK inhibitor Compound C was utilized, and mRNA levels of Per2, Bmal1, Cryptochrome1 (Cry1), agouti-related peptide (AgRP), carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1C (Cpt1c), and O-linked N-acetylglucosamine transferase (Ogt) were measured. Remarkably, Compound C dramatically reduced transcript levels of Per2, Bmal1, Cry1, and AgRP, but not Cpt1c or Ogt. Because AMPK was not inhibited at the same time or concentrations as the clock genes, we suggest that the effect of Compound C on gene expression occurs through an AMPK-independent mechanism. The consequences of inhibition of the rhythmic expression of clock genes, and in turn downstream metabolic mediators, such as AgRP, could have detrimental effects on overall metabolic processes. Importantly, the effects of the most commonly used AMPK inhibitor Compound C should be interpreted with caution, considering its role in AMPK-independent repression of specific genes, and especially clock gene rhythm dysregulation.

  18. Comparative analysis of period genes in teleost fish genomes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han

    2008-07-01

    Period (Per) is a canonical circadian clock gene. The fruit fly, an invertebrate, has one per gene, while the human, a tetrapod vertebrate, has three Per genes. Per1, Per2, and Per3 of the tetrapods were generated from two rounds of ancient genome duplications from the ancestral chordate Per gene. Searching for five teleost fish genomes in a combination of phylogenetic, splicing site, and syntenic analyses revealed that zebrafish have two per1 genes, per1a and per1b, one per2, and one per3; medaka, fugu, and tetraodon each have two per2 genes, per2a and per2b, one per1, and one per3; sticklebacks also have per2a, per2b, and one per1 but lack per3; and per1a/per1b in zebrafish and per2a/per2b in madaka, fugu, tetraodon, and stickleback are ancient duplicates. While the dN/dS ratios of the five fish per duplicates are all <1, suggesting that they likely have been subject to purifying selection, the Tajima relative rate test showed that zebrafish per1a/per1b and fugu and medaka per2a/per2b have asymmetric evolutionary rates, implicating that one of these duplicates might have been under positive selection or relaxed functional constraint. Further, in situ hybridization showed that zebrafish per1a and per1b clearly have distinct patterns of temporal and spatial expression. These results support the notion that extra copies of teleost per genes were generated from the fish-specific genome duplication, and divergent resolution after the duplication resulted in retention of different per duplicates in different fish, most of which have diverged significantly.

  19. Cardiac Per2 Functions as Novel Link between Fatty Acid Metabolism and Myocardial Inflammation during Ischemia and Reperfusion Injury of the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Bonney, Stephanie; Kominsky, Doug; Brodsky, Kelley; Eltzschig, Holger; Walker, Lori; Eckle, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    Disruption of peripheral circadian rhyme pathways dominantly leads to metabolic disorders. Studies on circadian rhythm proteins in the heart indicated a role for Clock or Per2 in cardiac metabolism. In contrast to Clock−/−, Per2−/− mice have larger infarct sizes with deficient lactate production during myocardial ischemia. To test the hypothesis that cardiac Per2 represents an important regulator of cardiac metabolism during myocardial ischemia, we measured lactate during reperfusion in Per1−/−, Per2−/− or wildtype mice. As lactate measurements in whole blood indicated an exclusive role of Per2 in controlling lactate production during myocardial ischemia, we next performed gene array studies using various ischemia-reperfusion protocols comparing wildtype and Per2−/− mice. Surprisingly, high-throughput gene array analysis revealed dominantly lipid metabolism as the differentially regulated pathway in wildtype mice when compared to Per2−/−. In all ischemia-reperfusion protocols used, the enzyme enoyl-CoA hydratase, which is essential in fatty acid beta-oxidation, was regulated in wildtype animals only. Studies using nuclear magnet resonance imaging (NMRI) confirmed altered fatty acid populations with higher mono-unsaturated fatty acid levels in hearts from Per2−/− mice. Unexpectedly, studies on gene regulation during reperfusion revealed solely pro inflammatory genes as differentially regulated ‘Per2-genes’. Subsequent studies on inflammatory markers showed increasing IL-6 or TNFα levels during reperfusion in Per2−/− mice. In summary, these studies reveal an important role of cardiac Per2 for fatty acid metabolism and inflammation during myocardial ischemia and reperfusion, respectively. PMID:23977055

  20. AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist DNQX blocks the acute increase of Per2 mRNA levels in most but not all areas of the SCN.

    PubMed

    Paul, Ketema N; Fukuhara, Chiaki; Karom, Mary; Tosini, Gianluca; Albers, H Elliott

    2005-09-13

    The daily light:dark cycle synchronizes the circadian timing system by resetting the phase of the circadian pacemaker on a daily basis. Light acutely increases mRNA levels of the clock genes Per1 and Per2 in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the site of the primary circadian pacemaker in mammals. Light is conveyed to the SCN through the retinohypothalamic tract (RHT), an efferent projection from retinal ganglion cells that releases the excitatory amino acid (EAA) neurotransmitter glutamate in the SCN. EAA receptor activation in the SCN is critical for the ability of light to phase-shift the circadian pacemaker. In a previous study, we demonstrated that EAA receptor activation is necessary and sufficient for light to acutely increase Per1 mRNA levels in the SCN. In the current study, we determined whether EAA receptor activation in the SCN is necessary for the ability of light to increase Per2 mRNA levels in the SCN in Syrian hamsters. The NMDA receptor antagonist AP5 and the AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist DNQX inhibited the ability of light and NMDA to acutely increase Per2 mRNA levels in the SCN. In hamsters injected with DNQX, Per1 and Per2 mRNA levels remained slightly elevated in the ventrolateral SCN, suggesting that AMPA/kainate receptor activation in this region is not critical for the effects of light on the circadian pacemaker.

  1. Control of mammalian circadian rhythm by CKIepsilon-regulated proteasome-mediated PER2 degradation.

    PubMed

    Eide, Erik J; Woolf, Margaret F; Kang, Heeseog; Woolf, Peter; Hurst, William; Camacho, Fernando; Vielhaber, Erica L; Giovanni, Andrew; Virshup, David M

    2005-04-01

    The mammalian circadian regulatory proteins PER1 and PER2 undergo a daily cycle of accumulation followed by phosphorylation and degradation. Although phosphorylation-regulated proteolysis of these inhibitors is postulated to be essential for the function of the clock, inhibition of this process has not yet been shown to alter mammalian circadian rhythm. We have developed a cell-based model of PER2 degradation. Murine PER2 (mPER2) hyperphosphorylation induced by the cell-permeable protein phosphatase inhibitor calyculin A is rapidly followed by ubiquitination and degradation by the 26S proteasome. Proteasome-mediated degradation is critically important in the circadian clock, as proteasome inhibitors cause a significant lengthening of the circadian period in Rat-1 cells. CKIepsilon (casein kinase Iepsilon) has been postulated to prime PER2 for degradation. Supporting this idea, CKIepsilon inhibition also causes a significant lengthening of circadian period in synchronized Rat-1 cells. CKIepsilon inhibition also slows the degradation of PER2 in cells. CKIepsilon-mediated phosphorylation of PER2 recruits the ubiquitin ligase adapter protein beta-TrCP to a specific site, and dominant negative beta-TrCP blocks phosphorylation-dependent degradation of mPER2. These results provide a biochemical mechanism and functional relevance for the observed phosphorylation-degradation cycle of mammalian PER2. Cell culture-based biochemical assays combined with measurement of cell-based rhythm complement genetic studies to elucidate basic mechanisms controlling the mammalian clock.

  2. Electrophysiological effects of melatonin on mouse Per1 and non-Per1 suprachiasmatic nuclei neurones in vitro.

    PubMed

    Scott, F F; Belle, M D C; Delagrange, P; Piggins, H D

    2010-11-01

    The master circadian pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) regulates the nocturnal secretion of the pineal hormone melatonin. Melatonin, in turn, has feedback effects on SCN neuronal activity rhythms via high affinity G protein-coupled receptors (MT(1) and MT(2) ). However, the precise effects of melatonin on the electrical properties of individual SCN neurones are unclear. In the present study, we investigated the acute effects of exogenous melatonin on SCN neurones using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in brain slices prepared from Per1::d2EGFP-expressing transgenic mice. In current-clamp mode, bath applied melatonin, at near-physiological concentrations (1 nM), hyperpolarised the majority (63.7%) of SCN neurones tested at all times of the projected light/dark cycle. In addition, melatonin depolarised a small proportion of cells (11.0%). No differences were observed for the effects of melatonin between Per1::GFP or non-Per1::GFP SCN neurones. Melatonin-induced effects were blocked by the MT(1)/MT(2) antagonist, luzindole (1 μM) and the proportion of SCN neurones responsive to melatonin was greatly reduced in the presence of either tetrodotoxin (200 or 500 nM) or gabazine (20 μM). In voltage-clamp recordings, 1 nM melatonin increased the frequency of GABA-mediated currents. These findings indicate, for the first time, that exogenous melatonin can alter neuronal excitability in the majority of SCN neurones, regardless of whether or not they overtly express the core clock gene Per1. The results also suggest that melatonin acts mainly by modulating inhibitory GABAergic transmission within the SCN. This may explain why exogenous application of melatonin has heterogenous effects on individual SCN neurones. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Neuroendocrinology © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Epigenetic Suppression of Mouse Per2 Expression in the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus by the Inhalational Anesthetic, Sevoflurane

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Keisuke; Iijima, Norio; Higo, Shimpei; Aikawa, Satoko; Matsuo, Izumi; Takumi, Ken; Sakamoto, Atsuhiro; Ozawa, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    Background We previously reported that sevoflurane anesthesia reversibly suppresses the expression of the clock gene, Period2 (Per2), in the mouse suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this suppression remain unclear. In this study, we examined the possibility that sevoflurane suppresses Per2 expression via epigenetic modification of the Per2 promoter. Methods Mice were anesthetized with a gas mixture of 2.5% sevoflurane/40% oxygen at a 6 L/min flow for 1 or 4 h. After termination, brains were removed and samples of SCN tissue were derived from frozen brain sections. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays using anti-acetylated-histone antibodies were performed to investigate the effects of sevoflurane on histone acetylation of the Per2 promoter. Interaction between the E’-box (a cis-element in the Per2 promoter) and CLOCK (the Clock gene product) was also assessed by a ChIP assay using an anti-CLOCK antibody. The SCN concentration of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+), a CLOCK regulator, was assessed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Results Acetylation of histone H4 in the proximal region of the Per2 promoter was significantly reduced by sevoflurane. This change in the epigenetic profile of the Per2 gene was observed prior to suppression of Per2 expression. Simultaneously, a reduction in the CLOCK-E’-box interaction in the Per2 promoter was observed. Sevoflurane treatment did not affect the concentration of NAD+ in the SCN. Conclusions Independent of NAD+ concentration in the SCN, sevoflurane decreases CLOCK binding to the Per2 promoter E’-box motif, reducing histone acetylation and leading to suppression of Per2 expression. PMID:24498074

  4. Imported PER-1 producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa, PER-1 producing Acinetobacter baumanii and VIM-2-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains in Hungary

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, Dora; Szentandrássy, Julia; Juhász, Zsuzsa; Katona, Katalin; Nagy, Károly; Rókusz, László

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumanii are important nosocomial pathogens with wide intrinsic resistance. However, due to the dissemination of the acquired resistance mechanisms, such as extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) and metallo beta-lactamase (MBL) production, multidrug resistant strains have been isolated more often. Case presentation We report a case of a Hungarian tourist, who was initially hospitalized in Egypt and later transferred to Hungary. On the day of admission PER-1-producing P. aeruginosa, PER-1 producing A. baumannii, SHV-5-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae and VIM-2-producing P. aeruginosa isolates were subcultured from the patient's samples in Hungary. Comparing the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns of the P. aeruginosa strains from the patient to the P. aeruginosa strains occurring in this hospital, we can state that the PER-1-producing P. aeruginosa and VIM-2-producing P. aeruginosa had external origin. Conclusion This is the first report of PER-1-producing P. aeruginosa,and PER-1-producing A. baumanii strains in Hungary. This case highlights the importance of spreading of the beta-lactamase-mediated resistance mechanisms between countries and continents, showing the importance of careful screening and the isolation of patients arriving from a different country. PMID:18513394

  5. Negative reciprocal regulation between Sirt1 and Per2 modulates the circadian clock and aging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui-Hong; Zhao, Tingrui; Cui, Kairong; Hu, Gangqing; Chen, Qiang; Chen, Weiping; Wang, Xin-Wei; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro; Zhao, Keji; Deng, Chu-Xia

    2016-01-01

    Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) is involved in both aging and circadian-clock regulation, yet the link between the two processes in relation to SIRT1 function is not clear. Using Sirt1-deficient mice, we found that Sirt1 and Period 2 (Per2) constitute a reciprocal negative regulation loop that plays important roles in modulating hepatic circadian rhythmicity and aging. Sirt1-deficient mice exhibited profound premature aging and enhanced acetylation of histone H4 on lysine16 (H4K16) in the promoter of Per2, the latter of which leads to its overexpression; in turn, Per2 suppresses Sirt1 transcription through binding to the Sirt1 promoter at the Clock/Bmal1 site. This negative reciprocal relationship between SIRT1 and PER2 was also observed in human hepatocytes. We further demonstrated that the absence of Sirt1 or the ectopic overexpression of Per2 in the liver resulted in a dysregulated pace of the circadian rhythm. The similar circadian rhythm was also observed in aged wild type mice. The interplay between Sirt1 and Per2 modulates aging gene expression and circadian-clock maintenance. PMID:27346580

  6. Negative reciprocal regulation between Sirt1 and Per2 modulates the circadian clock and aging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui-Hong; Zhao, Tingrui; Cui, Kairong; Hu, Gangqing; Chen, Qiang; Chen, Weiping; Wang, Xin-Wei; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro; Zhao, Keji; Deng, Chu-Xia

    2016-06-27

    Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) is involved in both aging and circadian-clock regulation, yet the link between the two processes in relation to SIRT1 function is not clear. Using Sirt1-deficient mice, we found that Sirt1 and Period 2 (Per2) constitute a reciprocal negative regulation loop that plays important roles in modulating hepatic circadian rhythmicity and aging. Sirt1-deficient mice exhibited profound premature aging and enhanced acetylation of histone H4 on lysine16 (H4K16) in the promoter of Per2, the latter of which leads to its overexpression; in turn, Per2 suppresses Sirt1 transcription through binding to the Sirt1 promoter at the Clock/Bmal1 site. This negative reciprocal relationship between SIRT1 and PER2 was also observed in human hepatocytes. We further demonstrated that the absence of Sirt1 or the ectopic overexpression of Per2 in the liver resulted in a dysregulated pace of the circadian rhythm. The similar circadian rhythm was also observed in aged wild type mice. The interplay between Sirt1 and Per2 modulates aging gene expression and circadian-clock maintenance.

  7. [Investigation of the frequency of PER-1 type beta-lactamase and antimicrobial resistance rates in nosocomial isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa].

    PubMed

    Atilla, Aynur; Eroğlu, Cafer; Esen, Saban; Sünbül, Mustafa; Leblebicioğlu, Hakan

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa which is a common cause of nosocomial infections, usually leads to treatment difficulties due to multi-drug resistance. PER-1 type extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing bacteria are shown to be common in Turkey. Since limited number of antibiotics such as antipseudomonal penicillins, cephalosporins, aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones and carbapenems are available for the treatment of P.aeruginosa infections, it is essential to monitor and eventually control the spread of antibiotic resistance genes. The aims of this study were to investigate the presence of PER-1 type ESBLs in nosocomial P.aeruginosa isolates and to evaluate their resistance to some commonly used antibiotics. A total of 110 P.aeruginosa strains isolated from clinical samples [40 urine, 26 exudate, 20 blood, 24 others (sputum, tracheal aspirate, tissue biopsy, cerebrospinal fluid, pleural fluid, conjunctiva)] of the inpatients who were proven to have nosocomial infections in Ondokuz Mayıs University Faculty of Medicine Hospital between May 2002-June 2003 were included in the study. Identification of the isolates was performed by ATB system ID 32 GN (bio-Merieux, France). Antibiotic susceptibilities were detected by standard disk diffusion method and PER-1 type ESBL was searched by polymerase chain reaction using PER-1 and PER- 2 primers. PER-1 positivity was detected in 62 of 110 (56.4%) P.aeruginosa isolates and 51 of 65 (78.5%) ceftazidime-resistant strains. The highest susceptibility rate was detected for ciprofloxacin (76.4%), while the lowest susceptibility rate was for ticarcillin-clavulanic acid (22.7%). Rates of resistance to beta-lactam agents (excluding piperacillin/tazobactam), amikacin and gentamicin were statistically significantly higher for PER-1 positive strains than PER-1 negative ones. Resistance rates to ceftazidime, cefepime, aztreonam, piperacillin and ticarcillin-clavulanic acid in PER-1 positive isolates versus negative ones were as 82.3% vs

  8. Transcriptional regulation of NHE3 and SGLT1 by the circadian clock protein Per1 in proximal tubule cells

    PubMed Central

    Solocinski, Kristen; Richards, Jacob; All, Sean; Cheng, Kit-Yan; Khundmiri, Syed J.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that the circadian clock protein period (Per)1 coordinately regulates multiple genes involved in Na+ reabsorption in renal collecting duct cells. Consistent with these results, Per1 knockout mice exhibit dramatically lower blood pressure than wild-type mice. The proximal tubule is responsible for a majority of Na+ reabsorption. Previous work has demonstrated that expression of Na+/H+ exchanger 3 (NHE3) oscillates with a circadian pattern and Na+-glucose cotransporter (SGLT)1 has been demonstrated to be a circadian target in the colon, but whether these target genes are regulated by Per1 has not been investigated in the kidney. The goal of the present study was to determine if Per1 regulates the expression of NHE3, SGLT1, and SGLT2 in the kidney. Pharmacological blockade of nuclear Per1 entry resulted in decreased mRNA expression of SGLT1 and NHE3 but not SGLT2 in the renal cortex of mice. Per1 small interfering RNA and pharmacological blockade of Per1 nuclear entry in human proximal tubule HK-2 cells yielded the same results. Examination of heterogeneous nuclear RNA suggested that the effects of Per1 on NHE3 and SGLT1 expression occurred at the level of transcription. Per1 and the circadian protein CLOCK were detected at promoters of NHE3 and SGLT1. Importantly, both membrane and intracellular protein levels of NHE3 and SGLT1 were decreased after blockade of nuclear Per1 entry. This effect was associated with reduced activity of Na+-K+-ATPase. These data demonstrate a role for Per1 in the transcriptional regulation of NHE3 and SGLT1 in the kidney. PMID:26377793

  9. A role for the circadian clock protein Per1 in the regulation of aldosterone levels and renal Na+ retention

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Jacob; Cheng, Kit-Yan; All, Sean; Skopis, George; Jeffers, Lauren; Jeanette Lynch, I.; Wingo, Charles S.

    2013-01-01

    The circadian clock plays an important role in the regulation of physiological processes, including renal function and blood pressure. We have previously shown that the circadian protein period (Per)1 regulates the expression of multiple Na+ transport genes in the collecting duct, including the α-subunit of the renal epithelial Na+ channel. Consistent with this finding, Per1 knockout mice exhibit dramatically lower blood pressure than wild-type mice. We have also recently demonstrated the potential opposing actions of cryptochrome (Cry)2 on Per1 target genes. Recent work by others has demonstrated that Cry1/2 regulates aldosterone production through increased expression of the adrenal gland-specific rate-limiting enzyme 3β-dehydrogenase isomerase (3β-HSD). Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that Per1 plays a role in the regulation of aldosterone levels and renal Na+ retention. Using RNA silencing and pharmacological blockade of Per1 nuclear entry in the NCI-H295R human adrenal cell line, we showed that Per1 regulates 3β-HSD expression in vitro. These results were confirmed in vivo: mice with reduced levels of Per1 had decreased levels of plasma aldosterone and decreased mRNA expression of 3β-HSD. We postulated that mice with reduced Per1 would have a renal Na+-retaining defect. Indeed, metabolic cage experiments demonstrated that Per1 heterozygotes excreted more urinary Na+ compared with wild-type mice. Taken together, these data support the hypothesis that Per1 regulates aldosterone levels and that Per1 plays an integral role in the regulation of Na+ retention. PMID:24154698

  10. Phase Resetting Light Pulses Induce Per1 and Persistent Spike Activity in a Subpopulation of Biological Clock Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kuhlman, Sandra J.; Silver, Rae; Le Sauter, Joseph; Bult-Ito, Abel; McMahon, Douglas G.

    2012-01-01

    The endogenous circadian clock of the mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) can be reset by light to synchronize the biological clock of the brain with the external environment. This process involves induction of immediate-early genes such as the circadian clock gene Period1 (Per1) and results in a stable shift in the timing of behavioral and physiological rhythms on subsequent days. The mechanisms by which gene activation permanently alters the phase of clock neuron activity are unknown. To study the relationship between acute gene activation and persistent changes in the neurophysiology of SCN neurons, we recorded from SCN neurons marked with a dynamic green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter of Per1 gene activity. Phase-resetting light pulses resulted in Per1 induction in a distinct subset of SCN neurons that also exhibited a persistent increase in action potential frequency 3–5 hr after a light pulse. By simultaneously quantifying Per1 gene activation and spike frequency in individual neurons, we found that the degree of Per1 induction was highly correlated with neuronal spike frequency on a cell-by-cell basis. Increased neuronal activity was mediated by membrane potential depolarization as a result of a reduction in outward potassium current. Double-label immunocytochemistry revealed that vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-expressing cells, but not arginine vasopressin (AVP)-expressing cells, exhibited significant Per1 induction by light pulses. Rhythmic GFP expression occurred in both VIP and AVP neurons. Our results indicate that the steps that link acute molecular events to permanent changes in clock phase involve persistent suppression of potassium current, downstream of Per1 gene induction, in a specific subset of Per1-expressing neurons enriched for VIP. PMID:12598633

  11. mPer1 promotes morphine-induced locomotor sensitization and conditioned place preference via histone deacetylase activity.

    PubMed

    Perreau-Lenz, Stéphanie; Hoelters, Laura-Sophie; Leixner, Sarah; Sanchis-Segura, Carla; Hansson, Anita; Bilbao, Ainhoa; Spanagel, Rainer

    2017-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that repeated exposure to drugs of abuse is associated with changes in clock genes expression and that mice strains with various mutations in clock genes show alterations in drug-induced behaviors. The objective of this study is to characterize the role of the clock gene mPer1 in the development of morphine-induced behaviors and a possible link to histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity. In Per1 (Brdm1) null mutant mice and wild-type (WT) littermates, we examined whether there were any differences in the development of morphine antinociception, tolerance to antinociception, withdrawal, sensitization to locomotion, and conditioned place preference (CPP). Per1 (Brdm1) mutant mice did not show any difference in morphine antinociception, tolerance development, nor in physical withdrawal signs precipitated by naloxone administration compared to WT. However, morphine-induced locomotor sensitization and CPP were significantly impaired in Per1 (Brdm1) mutant mice. Because a very similar dissociation between tolerance and dependence vs. sensitization and CPP was recently observed after the co-administration of morphine and the HDAC inhibitor sodium butyrate (NaBut), we studied a possible link between mPer1 and HDAC activity. As opposed to WT controls, Per1 (Brdm1) mutant mice showed significantly enhanced striatal global HDAC activity within the striatum when exposed to a locomotor-sensitizing morphine administration regimen. Furthermore, the administration of the HDAC inhibitor NaBut restored the ability of morphine to promote locomotor sensitization and reward in Per1 (Brdm1) mutant mice. Our results reveal that although the mPer1 gene does not alter morphine-induced antinociception nor withdrawal, it plays a prominent role in the development of morphine-induced behavioral sensitization and reward via inhibitory modulation of striatal HDAC activity. These data suggest that PER1 inhibits deacetylation to promote drug-induced neuroplastic changes.

  12. Regulation of behavioral circadian rhythms and clock protein PER1 by the deubiquitinating enzyme USP2

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yaoming; Duguay, David; Bédard, Nathalie; Rachalski, Adeline; Baquiran, Gerardo; Na, Chan Hyun; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Storch, Kai-Florian; Peng, Junmin; Wing, Simon S.; Cermakian, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Summary Endogenous 24-hour rhythms are generated by circadian clocks located in most tissues. The molecular clock mechanism is based on feedback loops involving clock genes and their protein products. Post-translational modifications, including ubiquitination, are important for regulating the clock feedback mechanism. Previous work has focused on the role of ubiquitin ligases in the clock mechanism. Here we show a role for the rhythmically-expressed deubiquitinating enzyme ubiquitin specific peptidase 2 (USP2) in clock function. Mice with a deletion of the Usp2 gene (Usp2 KO) display a longer free-running period of locomotor activity rhythms and altered responses of the clock to light. This was associated with altered expression of clock genes in synchronized Usp2 KO mouse embryonic fibroblasts and increased levels of clock protein PERIOD1 (PER1). USP2 can be coimmunoprecipitated with several clock proteins but directly interacts specifically with PER1 and deubiquitinates it. Interestingly, this deubiquitination does not alter PER1 stability. Taken together, our results identify USP2 as a new core component of the clock machinery and demonstrate a role for deubiquitination in the regulation of the circadian clock, both at the level of the core pacemaker and its response to external cues. PMID:23213472

  13. Food-anticipatory activity and liver per1-luc activity in diabetic transgenic rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Alec J.; Stokkan, Karl-Arne; Yamazaki, Shin; Menaker, Michael

    2002-01-01

    The mammalian Per1 gene is an important component of the core cellular clock mechanism responsible for circadian rhythms. The rodent liver and other tissues rhythmically express Per1 in vitro but typically damp out within a few cycles. In the liver, the peak of this rhythm occurs in the late subjective night in an ad lib-fed rat, but will show a large phase advance in response to restricted availability of food during the day. The relationship between this shift in the liver clock and food-anticipatory activity (FAA), the circadian behavior entrained by daily feeding, is currently unknown. Insulin is released during feeding in mammals and could serve as an entraining signal to the liver. To test the role of insulin in the shift in liver Per1 expression and the generation of FAA, per-luciferase transgenic rats were made diabetic with a single injection of streptozotocine. Following 1 week of restricted feeding and locomotor activity monitoring, liver was collected for per-luc recording. In two separate experiments, FAA emerged and liver Per1 phase-shifted in response to daytime 8-h food restriction. The results rule out insulin as a necessary component of this system.

  14. Food-anticipatory activity and liver per1-luc activity in diabetic transgenic rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Alec J.; Stokkan, Karl-Arne; Yamazaki, Shin; Menaker, Michael

    2002-01-01

    The mammalian Per1 gene is an important component of the core cellular clock mechanism responsible for circadian rhythms. The rodent liver and other tissues rhythmically express Per1 in vitro but typically damp out within a few cycles. In the liver, the peak of this rhythm occurs in the late subjective night in an ad lib-fed rat, but will show a large phase advance in response to restricted availability of food during the day. The relationship between this shift in the liver clock and food-anticipatory activity (FAA), the circadian behavior entrained by daily feeding, is currently unknown. Insulin is released during feeding in mammals and could serve as an entraining signal to the liver. To test the role of insulin in the shift in liver Per1 expression and the generation of FAA, per-luciferase transgenic rats were made diabetic with a single injection of streptozotocine. Following 1 week of restricted feeding and locomotor activity monitoring, liver was collected for per-luc recording. In two separate experiments, FAA emerged and liver Per1 phase-shifted in response to daytime 8-h food restriction. The results rule out insulin as a necessary component of this system.

  15. A common polymorphism near PER1 and the timing of human behavioral rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Andrew S.P.; Chang, Anne-Marie; Shulman, Joshua M.; Raj, Towfique; Chibnik, Lori B.; Cain, Sean W.; Rothamel, Katherine; Benoist, Christophe; Myers, Amanda J.; Czeisler, Charles A.; Buchman, Aron S.; Bennett, David A.; Duffy, Jeanne F.; Saper, Clifford B.; De Jager, Philip L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Circadian rhythms influence the timing of behavior, neurological diseases, and even death. Rare mutations in homologs of evolutionarily conserved clock genes are found in select pedigrees with extreme sleep timing, and there is suggestive evidence that certain common polymorphisms may be associated with self-reported day/night preference. However, no common polymorphism has been associated with the timing of directly observed human behavioral rhythms or other physiological markers of circadian timing at the population level. Methods We performed a candidate-gene association study with replication, evaluating associations between polymorphisms in homologs of evolutionarily conserved clock genes and the timing of behavioral rhythms measured by actigraphy. For validated polymorphisms, we evaluated associations with transcript expression and time of death in additional cohorts. Results rs7221412, a common polymorphism near period homolog 1 (PER1), was associated with the timing of activity rhythms in both the discovery and replication cohorts (joint p=2·1×10−7). Mean activity timing was delayed by 67 minutes in rs7221412GG vs. rs7221412AA homozygotes. rs7221412 also showed a suggestive time-dependent relationship with both cerebral cortex (p=0.05) and CD14+CD16− monocyte (p=0.02) PER1 expression and an interesting association with time of death (p=0.015) in which rs7221412GG individuals had a mean time of death nearly seven hours later than rs7221412AA/AG. Interpretation A common polymorphism near PER1 is associated with the timing of human behavioral rhythms, and shows evidence of association with time of death. This may be mediated by differential PER1 expression. These results may facilitate individualized scheduling of shift-work, medical treatments, or monitoring of vulnerable patient populations. PMID:23034908

  16. Fibroblast PER2 Circadian Rhythmicity Depends on Cell Density

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Takako; Wang, Lexie L.; Welsh, David K.

    2013-01-01

    Like neurons in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the master circadian pacemaker in the brain, single fibroblasts can function as independent oscillators. In the SCN, synaptic and paracrine signaling among cells creates a robust, synchronized circadian oscillation, whereas there is no evidence for such integration in fibroblast cultures. However, interactions among single-cell fibroblast oscillators cannot be completely excluded, because fibroblasts were not isolated in previous work. In this study, we tested the autonomy of fibroblasts as single-cell circadian oscillators in high and low density culture, by single-cell imaging of cells from PER2::LUC circadian reporter mice. We found greatly reduced PER2::LUC rhythmicity in low density cultures, which could result from lack of either constitutive or rhythmic paracrine signals from neighboring fibroblasts. To discriminate between these two possibilities, we mixed PER2::LUC wild type (WT) cells with non-luminescent, non-rhythmic Bmal1−/− cells, so that density of rhythmic cells was low but overall cell density remained high. In this condition, WT cells showed clear rhythmicity similar to high density cultures. We also mixed PER2::LUC WT cells with non-luminescent, long period Cry2−/− cells. In this condition, WT cells showed a period no different from cells cultured with rhythmic WT cells or non-rhythmic Bmal1−/− cells. In previous work, we found that low K+ suppresses fibroblast rhythmicity, and we and others have found that either low K+ or low Ca2+ suppresses SCN rhythmicity. Therefore, we attempted to rescue rhythmicity of low density fibroblasts with high K+ (21 mM), high Ca2+ (3.6 mM), or conditioned medium. Conditioned medium from high density fibroblast cultures rescued rhythmicity of low density cultures, whereas high K+ or Ca2+ medium did not consistently rescue rhythmicity. These data suggest that fibroblasts require paracrine signals from adjacent cells for normal expression of rhythmicity

  17. Circadian nursing induces PER1 protein in neuroendocrine tyrosine hydroxylase neurones in the rabbit doe.

    PubMed

    Meza, E; Waliszewski, S M; Caba, M

    2011-06-01

    Rabbit does nurse their pups once a day with circadian periodicity and pups ingest up to 35% of their body weight in milk in < 5 min. In the doe, there is a massive release of prolactin. We hypothesised that periodic suckling synchronises dopaminergic populations that control prolactin secretion. We explored this by immunohistochemical colocalisation of PER1 protein, the product of the clock gene Per1 on tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) cells in three dopaminergic populations: tuberoinfundibular dopaminergic (TIDA), periventricular hypophyseal dopaminergic (PHDA) and incertohypothalamic dopaminergic (IHDA) cells. PER1/TH colocalisation was explored every 4 h through a complete 24-h cycle at postpartum day 7 in does that nursed their pups either at 10.00 h (ZT03) or at 02.00 h (ZT19; ZT0 = 07.00 h, time of lights on). Nonpregnant, nonlactating females were used as controls. In control females, there was a rhythm of PER1 that peaks at ZT15. By contrast, in nursed does, the PER1 peak shifted in parallel to scheduled nursing in TIDA and PHDA cells but not in IHDA cells, which are not related to the control of prolactin. Next, we determined that the absence of suckling for 48 h significantly decreases the number of PER1/TH colocalised cells in PHDA but not TIDA cells. Locomotor behaviour in control subjects was maximal at around the time of lights on but, in nursed females, shifted at around the time of scheduled nursing. Finally, in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, there is a maximal expression of PER1 at ZT11 in the three groups. However, this maximal expression was significantly lower in the nursed groups in relation to the control group and in the groups deprived of nursing for 48 h. We conclude that suckling synchronises dopaminergic cells related to the control of prolactin and appears to be a nonphotic stimulus for the suprachiasmatic nucleus. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Neuroendocrinology © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Construction of recombinant pEGFP-N1-hPer2 plasmid and its expression in osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Anyuan; Zhang, Yan; Mei, Hongjun; Fang, Shuo; Ji, Peng; Yang, Jian; Yu, Ling; Guo, Weichun

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to construct the eukaryotic expression vector pEGFP-N1-hPer2 and assess its expression in the human osteosarcoma cell line MG63. Total mRNA was extracted from human osteosarcoma MG63 cells, the human period 2 (hPer2) gene was obtained by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and cloned into the pEGFP-N1 vector, then the recombinant pEGFP-N1-hPer2 plasmid was constructed and transfected into MG63 cells using Lipofectamine 2000. The expression of hPer2 in MG63 cells was measured by quantitative RT-PCR and western blot analysis. The accurate construction of pEGFP-N1-hPer2 was verified by double enzyme digestion and DNA sequencing. hPer2 gene expression in the transfected cells was assessed by RT-qPCR and western blot analysis. In conclusion, the recombinant pEGFP-N1-hPer2 plasmid was constructed successfully, and expressed effectively in MG63 cells.

  19. Association of PER2 genotype and stressful life events with alcohol drinking in young adults.

    PubMed

    Blomeyer, Dorothea; Buchmann, Arlette F; Lascorz, Jesus; Zimmermann, Ulrich S; Esser, Günter; Desrivieres, Sylvane; Schmidt, Martin H; Banaschewski, Tobias; Schumann, Gunter; Laucht, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    Clock genes govern circadian rhythms and shape the effect of alcohol use on the physiological system. Exposure to severe negative life events is related to both heavy drinking and disturbed circadian rhythmicity. The aim of this study was 1) to extend previous findings suggesting an association of a haplotype tagging single nucleotide polymorphism of PER2 gene with drinking patterns, and 2) to examine a possible role for an interaction of this gene with life stress in hazardous drinking. Data were collected as part of an epidemiological cohort study on the outcome of early risk factors followed since birth. At age 19 years, 268 young adults (126 males, 142 females) were genotyped for PER2 rs56013859 and were administered a 45-day alcohol timeline follow-back interview and the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT). Life stress was assessed as the number of severe negative life events during the past four years reported in a questionnaire and validated by interview. Individuals with the minor G allele of rs56013859 were found to be less engaged in alcohol use, drinking at only 72% of the days compared to homozygotes for the major A allele. Moreover, among regular drinkers, a gene x environment interaction emerged (p = .020). While no effects of genotype appeared under conditions of low stress, carriers of the G allele exhibited less hazardous drinking than those homozygous for the A allele when exposed to high stress. These findings may suggest a role of the circadian rhythm gene PER2 in both the drinking patterns of young adults and in moderating the impact of severe life stress on hazardous drinking in experienced alcohol users. However, in light of the likely burden of multiple tests, the nature of the measures used and the nominal evidence of interaction, replication is needed before drawing firm conclusions.

  20. Early doors (Edo) mutant mouse reveals the importance of period 2 (PER2) PAS domain structure for circadian pacemaking

    PubMed Central

    Militi, Stefania; Maywood, Elizabeth S.; Sandate, Colby R.; Chesham, Johanna E.; Parsons, Michael J.; Vibert, Jennifer L.; Joynson, Greg M.; Partch, Carrie L.; Hastings, Michael H.; Nolan, Patrick M.

    2016-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) defines 24 h of time via a transcriptional/posttranslational feedback loop in which transactivation of Per (period) and Cry (cryptochrome) genes by BMAL1–CLOCK complexes is suppressed by PER–CRY complexes. The molecular/structural basis of how circadian protein complexes function is poorly understood. We describe a novel N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-induced mutation, early doors (Edo), in the PER-ARNT-SIM (PAS) domain dimerization region of period 2 (PER2) (I324N) that accelerates the circadian clock of Per2Edo/Edo mice by 1.5 h. Structural and biophysical analyses revealed that Edo alters the packing of the highly conserved interdomain linker of the PER2 PAS core such that, although PER2Edo complexes with clock proteins, its vulnerability to degradation mediated by casein kinase 1ε (CSNK1E) is increased. The functional relevance of this mutation is revealed by the ultrashort (<19 h) but robust circadian rhythms in Per2Edo/Edo; Csnk1eTau/Tau mice and the SCN. These periods are unprecedented in mice. Thus, Per2Edo reveals a direct causal link between the molecular structure of the PER2 PAS core and the pace of SCN circadian timekeeping. PMID:26903623

  1. Detection of the frequency of PER-1 type extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates in Turkey: a multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Aşik, Gülşah; Özdemir, Mehmet; Kurtoğlu, Muhammet Güzel; Yağci, Server; Öksüz, Lütfiye; Gül, Mustafa; Koçoğlu, Mücahide Esra; Sesli Çetin, Emel; Seyrek, Adnan; Berktaş, Mustafa; Ayyildiz, Ahmet; Çiftci, İhsan Hakkı

    2014-01-01

    β-Lactamases are an important resistance mechanism in Acinetobacter baumannii. Pseudomonas extended-resistance (PER-1) type β-lactamase-producing strains have been reported from various geographic locations; however, PER-1 type β-lactamases from Turkish hospitals have not been investigated extensively. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of PER-1 type β-lactamases in A. baumannii isolates in various regions of Turkey. A total of 763 clinical A. baumannii isolates were collected from 9 university hospitals and 2 state hospitals between 2008 and 2011. Molecular amplification of the OXA-51 gene from the A. baumannii genome was performed in order to verify identification of the species. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to detect blaPER-1 genes. PER-1 was detected in 24.6% of the isolates. The annual frequencies of the PER-1 enzyme were detected as 52.2%, 35.9%, and 8.3% in 2008, 2009, and 2010, respectively. PER-1 prevalence decreased gradually over time. The differences observed in PER-1 prevalence among the regions of Turkey were statistically significant (chi-square test; P < 0.001). These data demonstrate that the frequency of detection of PER-1 type β-lactamases in A. baumannii species has decreased in Turkey. However, the increased carbapenem resistance, together with multidrug resistance, has created a worrisome situation regarding this pathogen.

  2. PER2 variants are associated with abdominal obesity, psycho-behavioral factors and attrition in the dietary treatment of obesity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The purpose was to test for association between polymorphisms in the circadian clock-related gene PER2 and attrition in patients prone to withdrawal from a behavioral weight-reduction-program based on the Mediterranean Diet. 454 overweight/obese subjects (women= 380, men= 74), aged 20-65 years, who ...

  3. Sequence analysis of PER-1 extended-spectrum beta-lactamase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and comparison with class A beta-lactamases.

    PubMed Central

    Nordmann, P; Naas, T

    1994-01-01

    We have determined the nucleotide sequence (EMBL accession number, Z 21957) of the cloned chromosomal PER-1 extended-spectrum beta-lactamase gene from a Pseudomonas aeruginosa RNL-1 clinical isolate, blaPER-1 corresponds to a 924-bp open reading frame which encodes a polypeptide of 308 amino acids. This open reading frame is preceded by a -10 and a -35 region consistent with a putative P. aeruginosa promoter. Primer extension analysis of the PER-1 mRNA start revealed that this promoter was active in P. aeruginosa but not in Escherichia coli, in which PER-1 expression was driven by vector promoter sequences. N-terminal sequencing identified the PER-1 26-amino-acid leader peptide and enabled us to calculate the molecular mass (30.8 kDa) of the PER-1 mature form. Analysis of the percent GC content of blaPER-1 and of its 5' upstream sequences, as well as the codon usage for blaPER-1, indicated that blaPER-1 may have been inserted into P. aeruginosa genomic DNA from a nonpseudomonad bacterium. The PER-1 gene showed very low homology with other beta-lactamase genes at the DNA level. By using computer methods, assessment of the extent of identity between PER-1 and 10 beta-lactamase amino acid sequences indicated that PER-1 is a class A beta-lactamase. PER-1 shares around 27% amino acid identity with the sequenced extended-spectrum beta-lactamases of the TEM-SHV series and MEN-1 from Enterobacteriaceae species. The use of parsimony methods showed that PER-1 is not more closely related to gram-negative than to gram-positive bacterial class A beta-lactamases. Surprisingly, among class A beta-lactamases, PER-1 was most closely related to the recently reported CFXA from Bacteroides vulgatus, with which it shared 40% amino acid identity. This work indicates that non-Enterobacteriaceae species such as P. aeruginosa may possess class A extended-spectrum beta-lactamase genes possibly resulting from intergeneric DNA transfer. Images PMID:8141562

  4. Mice lacking Period 1 and Period 2 circadian clock genes exhibit blue cone photoreceptor defects.

    PubMed

    Ait-Hmyed, Ouafa; Felder-Schmittbuhl, Marie-Paule; Garcia-Garrido, Marina; Beck, Susanne; Seide, Christina; Sothilingam, Vithiyanjali; Tanimoto, Naoyuki; Seeliger, Mathias; Bennis, Mohammed; Hicks, David

    2013-04-01

    Many aspects of retinal physiology are modulated by circadian clocks, but it is unclear whether clock malfunction impinges directly on photoreceptor survival, differentiation or function. Eyes from wild-type (WT) and Period1 (Per1) and Period2 (Per2) mutant mice (Per1(Brdm1) Per2(Brdm1) ) were examined for structural (histology, in vivo imaging), phenotypical (RNA expression, immunohistochemistry) and functional characteristics. Transcriptional levels of selected cone genes [red/green opsin (Opn1mw), blue cone opsin (Opn1sw) and cone arrestin (Arr3)] and one circadian clock gene (RORb) were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Although there were no changes in general retinal histology or visual responses (electroretinograms) between WT and Per1(Brdm1) Per2(Brdm1) mice, compared with age-matched controls, Per1(Brdm1) Per2(Brdm1) mice showed scattered retinal deformations by fundus inspection. Also, mRNA expression levels and immunostaining of blue cone opsin were significantly reduced in mutant mice. Especially, there was an alteration in the dorsal-ventral patterning of blue cones. Decreased blue cone opsin immunoreactivity was present by early postnatal stages, and remained throughout maturation. General photoreceptor differentiation was retarded in young mutant mice. In conclusion, deletion of both Per1 and Per2 clock genes leads to multiple discrete changes in retina, notably patchy tissue disorganization, reductions in cone opsin mRNA and protein levels, and altered distribution. These data represent the first direct link between Per1 and Per2 clock genes, and cone photoreceptor differentiation and function. © 2013 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. [Identification of proteins interacting with the circadian clock protein PER1 in tumors using bacterial two-hybrid system technique].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Yao, Youlin; Jiang, Siyuan; Lu, Yilu; Liu, Yunqiang; Tao, Dachang; Zhang, Sizhong; Ma, Yongxin

    2015-04-01

    To identify protein-protein interaction partners of PER1 (period circadian protein homolog 1), key component of the molecular oscillation system of the circadian rhythm in tumors using bacterial two-hybrid system technique. Human cervical carcinoma cell Hela library was adopted. Recombinant bait plasmid pBT-PER1 and pTRG cDNA plasmid library were cotransformed into the two-hybrid system reporter strain cultured in a special selective medium. Target clones were screened. After isolating the positive clones, the target clones were sequenced and analyzed. Fourteen protein coding genes were identified, 4 of which were found to contain whole coding regions of genes, which included optic atrophy 3 protein (OPA3) associated with mitochondrial dynamics and homo sapiens cutA divalent cation tolerance homolog of E. coli (CUTA) associated with copper metabolism. There were also cellular events related proteins and proteins which are involved in biochemical reaction and signal transduction-related proteins. Identification of potential interacting proteins with PER1 in tumors may provide us new insights into the functions of the circadian clock protein PER1 during tumorigenesis.

  6. Circadian Rhythms of PER2::LUC in Individual Primary Mouse Hepatocytes and Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Molyneux, Penny C.; Yu, Jimmy K.; Li, Alexander S.; Leise, Tanya L.; Harrington, Mary E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Hepatocytes, the parenchymal cells of the liver, express core clock genes, such as Period2 and Cryptochrome2, which are involved in the transcriptional/translational feedback loop of the circadian clock. Whether or not the liver is capable of sustaining rhythms independent of a central pacemaker is controversial. Whether and how circadian information may be shared among cells in the liver in order to sustain oscillations is currently unknown. Results In this study we isolated primary hepatocytes from transgenic Per2Luc mice and used bioluminescence as a read-out of the state of the circadian clock. Hepatocytes cultured in a collagen gel sandwich configuration exhibited persistent circadian rhythms for several weeks. The amplitude of the rhythms damped, but medium changes consistently reset the phase and amplitude of the cultures. Cry2−/− Per2Luc cells oscillated robustly and expressed a longer period. Co-culturing with wildtype cells did not significantly shorten the period, indicating that coupling among hepatocytes is insufficient to synchronize cells with significantly differing periods. However, spatial patterns revealed by cellular imaging of wildtype cultures provided evidence of weak local coupling among the hepatocytes. Conclusions Our results with primary hepatocyte cultures demonstrate that cultured hepatocytes are weakly coupled. While this coupling is not sufficient to sustain global synchrony, it does increase local synchrony, which may stabilize the circadian rhythms of peripheral oscillators, such as the liver, against noise in the entraining signals. PMID:24498336

  7. Refeeding after fasting elicits insulin-dependent regulation of Per2 and Rev-erbα with shifts in the liver clock.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Yu; Otsuka, Makiko; Fuse, Yuta; Hirao, Akiko; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2011-06-01

    The mammalian circadian clock is known to be entrained by both a daily light-dark cycle and daily feeding cycle. However, the mechanisms of feeding-induced entrainment are not as fully understood as those of light entrainment. To elucidate the first step of entrainment of the liver clock, we identified the circadian clock gene(s) that show both phase advance and acute change of gene expression during the early term of the daytime refeeding schedule in mice. The expressions of liver Per2 and Rev-erbα genes were phase-advanced within 1 day of refeeding. Additionally, the upregulation of Per2 mRNA and down-regulation of Rev-erbα mRNA were induced within 2 hours, not only by food intake but also by insulin injection in intact mice. These expression changes by food intake were not revealed in streptozotocin-treated insulin-deficient mice, but insulin injection was able to recover the impairment of Per2 and Rev-erbα gene expression. Furthermore, we demonstrated using an ex vivo luciferase monitoring system that insulin injection during the daytime causes a phase advance of liver Per2 expression rhythm in Per2::luciferase knock-in mice. In embryonic fibroblasts from Per2::luciferase knock-in mice, insulin infusion caused an acute increase of Per2 gene expression and a similar phase advance of Per2 expression rhythm. Our results indicate that an acute change of Per2 and Rev-erbα gene expression mediated by refeeding-induced insulin secretion is a critical step mediating the early phase of feeding-induced entrainment of the liver clock.

  8. Tissue-specific and time-dependent regulation of the endothelin axis by the circadian clock protein Per1

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Jacob; Welch, Amanda K.; Barilovits, Sarah J.; All, Sean; Cheng, Kit-Yan; Wingo, Charles S.; Cain, Brian D.; Gumz, Michelle L.

    2015-01-01

    Aims The present study is designed to consider a role for the circadian clock protein Per1 in the regulation of the endothelin axis in mouse kidney, lung, liver and heart. Renal endothelin-1 (ET-1) is a regulator of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) and blood pressure (BP), via activation of both endothelin receptors, ETA and ETB. However, ET-1 mediates many complex events in other tissues. Main methods Tissues were collected in the middle of murine rest and active phases, at noon and midnight, respectively. ET-1, ETA and ETB mRNA expressions were measured in the lung, heart, liver, renal inner medulla and renal cortex of wild type and Per1 heterozygous mice using real-time quantitative RT-PCR. Key findings The effect of reduced Per1 expression on levels of mRNAs and the time-dependent regulation of expression of the endothelin axis genes appeared to be tissue-specific. In the renal inner medulla and the liver, ETA and ETB exhibited peaks of expression in opposite circadian phases. In contrast, expressions of ET-1, ETA and ETB in the lung did not appear to vary with time, but ET-1 expression was dramatically decreased in this tissue in Per1 heterozygous mice. Interestingly, ET-1 and ETA, but not ETB, were expressed in a time-dependent manner in the heart. Significance Per1 appears to regulate expression of the endothelin axis genes in a tissue-specific and time-dependent manner. These observations have important implications for our understanding of the best time of day to deliver endothelin receptor antagonists. PMID:24721511

  9. Compartmentalized expression of light-induced clock genes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the diurnal grass rat (Arvicanthis niloticus)

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Chidambaram; Campbell, Amy; Tomczak, Ashley; Nunez, Antonio A.; Smale, Laura; Yan, Lily

    2009-01-01

    Photic responses of the circadian system are mediated through light-induced clock gene expression in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). In nocturnal rodents, depending on the timing of light exposure, Per1 and Per2 gene expression shows distinct compartmentalized patterns that correspond to the behavioral responses. Whether the gene-and region-specific induction patterns are unique to nocturnal animals, or are also present in diurnal species is unknown. We explored this question by examining the light-induced Per1 and Per2 gene expression in functionally distinct SCN sub regions, using diurnal grass rats Arvicanthis niloticus. Light exposure during nighttime induced Per1 and Per2 expression in the SCN, showing unique spatiotemporal profiles depending on the phase of the light exposure. After a phase delaying light pulse (LP) in the early night, strong Per1 induction was observed in the retinorecipient core region of the SCN, while strong Per2 induction was observed throughout the entire SCN. After a phase advancing LP in the late night, Per1 was first induced in the core and then extended into the whole SCN, accompanied by a weak Per2 induction. This compartmentalized expression pattern is very similar to that observed in nocturnal rodents, suggesting that the same molecular and intercellular pathways underlying acute photic responses are present in both diurnal and nocturnal species. However, after a LP in early subjective day, which induces phase advances in diurnal grass rats, but not in nocturnal rodents, we did not observe any Per1 or Per2 induction in the SCN. This result suggests that in spite of remarkable similarities in the SCN of diurnal and nocturnal rodents, unique mechanisms are involved in mediating the phase shifts of diurnal animals during the subjective day. PMID:19393297

  10. CLOCK, PER2 and BMAL1 DNA methylation: association with obesity and metabolic syndrome characteristics and monounsaturated fat intake.

    PubMed

    Milagro, Fermín I; Gómez-Abellán, Purificación; Campión, Javier; Martínez, J Alfredo; Ordovás, Jose M; Garaulet, Marta

    2012-11-01

    The circadian clock system instructs 24-h rhythmicity on gene expression in essentially all cells, including adipocytes, and epigenetic mechanisms may participate in this regulation. The aim of this research was to investigate the influence of obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetS) features in clock gene methylation and the involvement of these epigenetic modifications in the outcomes. Sixty normal-weight, overweight and obese women followed a 16-weeks weight reduction program. DNA methylation levels at different CpG sites of CLOCK, BMAL1 and PER2 genes were analyzed by Sequenom's MassARRAY in white blood cells obtained before the treatment. Statistical differences between normal-weight and overweight + obese subjects were found in the methylation status of different CpG sites of CLOCK (CpGs 1, 5-6, 8 and 11-14) and, with lower statistical significance, in BMAL1 (CpGs 6-7, 8, 15 and 16-17). The methylation pattern of different CpG sites of the three genes showed significant associations with anthropometric parameters such as body mass index and adiposity, and with a MetS score. Moreover, the baseline methylation levels of CLOCK CpG 1 and PER2 CpGs 2-3 and 25 correlated with the magnitude of weight loss. Interestingly, the percentage of methylation of CLOCK CpGs 1 and 8 showed associations with the intake of monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids. This study demonstrates for the first time an association between methylation status of CpG sites located in clock genes (CLOCK, BMAL1 and PER2) with obesity, MetS and weight loss. Moreover, the methylation status of different CpG sites in CLOCK and PER2 could be used as biomarkers of weight-loss success, particularly CLOCK CPGs 5-6.

  11. CIRCADIAN CLOCK AND CELL CYCLE GENE EXPRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Metz, Richard P.; Qu, Xiaoyu; Laffin, Brian; Earnest, David; Porter, Weston W.

    2009-01-01

    Mouse mammary epithelial cells (HC-11) and mammary tissues were analyzed for developmental changes in circadian clock, cellular proliferation and differentiation marker genes. Expression of the clock genes, Per1 and Bmal1, were elevated in differentiated HC-11 cells whereas Per2 mRNA levels were higher in undifferentiated cells. This differentiation-dependent profile of clock gene expression was consistent with that observed in mouse mammary glands as Per1 and Bmal1 mRNA levels were elevated in late pregnant and lactating mammary tissues, while Per2 expression was higher in proliferating virgin and early pregnant glands. In both HC-11 cells and mammary glands, elevated Per2 expression was positively correlated with c-Myc and Cyclin D1 mRNA levels while Per1 and Bmal1 expression changed in conjunction with ß-casein mRNA levels. Interestingly, developmental stage had differential effects on rhythms of clock gene expression in the mammary gland. These data suggest that circadian clock genes may play a role in mouse mammary gland development and differentiation. PMID:16261617

  12. Fibroblast circadian rhythms of PER2 expression depend on membrane potential and intracellular calcium.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Takako; Wang, Connie W; Pan, Haiyun; Welsh, David K

    2012-07-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus synchronizes circadian rhythms of cells and tissues throughout the body. In SCN neurons, rhythms of clock gene expression are suppressed by manipulations that hyperpolarize the plasma membrane or lower intracellular Ca(2+). However, whether clocks in other cells also depend on membrane potential and calcium is unknown. In this study, the authors investigate the effects of membrane potential and intracellular calcium on circadian rhythms in mouse primary fibroblasts. Rhythms of clock gene expression were monitored using a PER2::LUC knockin reporter. Rhythms were lost or delayed at lower (hyperpolarizing) K(+) concentrations. Bioluminescence imaging revealed that this loss of rhythmicity in cultures was due to loss of rhythmicity of single cells rather than loss of synchrony among cells. In lower Ca(2+) concentrations, rhythms were advanced or had shorter periods. Buffering intracellular Ca(2+) by the calcium chelator 1,2-Bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid tetrakis acetoxymethyl ester (BAPTA-AM) or manipulation of inositol triphosphate (IP(3))-sensitive intracellular calcium stores by thapsigargin delayed rhythms. These results suggest that the circadian clock in fibroblasts, as in SCN neurons, is regulated by membrane potential and Ca(2+). Changes in intracellular Ca(2+) may mediate the effects of membrane potential observed in this study.

  13. Fibroblast Circadian Rhythms of PER2 Expression Depend on Membrane Potential and Intracellular Calcium

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Takako; Wang, Connie W.; Pan, Haiyun

    2012-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus synchronizes circadian rhythms of cells and tissues throughout the body. In SCN neurons, rhythms of clock gene expression are suppressed by manipulations that hyperpolarize the plasma membrane or lower intracellular Ca2+. However, whether clocks in other cells also depend on membrane potential and calcium is unknown. In this study, we investigate the effects of membrane potential and intracellular calcium on circadian rhythms in mouse primary fibroblasts. Rhythms of clock gene expression were monitored using a PER2::LUC knockin reporter. We found that rhythms were lost or delayed at lower (hyperpolarizing) K+ concentrations. Bioluminescence imaging revealed that this loss of rhythmicity in cultures was due to loss of rhythmicity of single cells rather than desynchrony among cells. In lower Ca2+ concentrations, rhythms were advanced or had shorter periods. Buffering intracellular Ca2+ by the calcium chelator 1,2-Bis(2-aminophenoxy) ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid tetrakis acetoxymethyl ester (BAPTA-AM) or manipulation of IP3-sensitive intracellular calcium stores by thapsigargin delayed rhythms. These results suggest that the circadian clock in fibroblasts, as in SCN neurons, is regulated by membrane potential and Ca2+. Changes in intracellular Ca2+ may mediate the effects of membrane potential that we observed. PMID:22734566

  14. DEC2-E4BP4 Heterodimer Represses the Transcriptional Enhancer Activity of the EE Element in the Per2 Promoter.

    PubMed

    Tanoue, Shintaro; Fujimoto, Katsumi; Myung, Jihwan; Hatanaka, Fumiyuki; Kato, Yukio; Takumi, Toru

    2015-01-01

    The circadian oscillation of clock gene expression in mammals is based on the interconnected transcriptional/translational feedback loops of Period (Per) and Bmal1. The Per feedback loop initiates transcription through direct binding of the BMAL1-CLOCK (NPAS2) heterodimer to the E-box of the Per2 promoter region. Negative feedback of PER protein on this promoter subsequently represses transcription. Other circadian transcription regulators, particularly E4BP4 and DEC2, regulate the amplitude and phase of Per2 expression rhythms. Moreover, a direct repeat of E-box-like (EE) elements in the Per2 promoter is required for its cell-autonomous circadian rhythm. However, the detailed mechanism for repression of the two core sequences of the EE element in the Per2 promoter region is unknown. Here, we show that E4BP4 binds to the Per2 EE element with DEC2 to repress transcription and identify the DEC2-E4BP4 heterodimer as a key repressor of the tightly interlocked Per2 feedback loop in the mammalian circadian oscillator. Our results suggest an additional modulatory mechanism for tuning of the phase of cell-autonomous Per2 gene expression cycling.

  15. Role of Per1 and the mineralocorticoid receptor in the coordinate regulation of αENaC in renal cortical collecting duct cells

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Jacob; Jeffers, Lauren A.; All, Sean C.; Cheng, Kit-Yan; Gumz, Michelle L.

    2013-01-01

    Renal function and blood pressure (BP) exhibit a circadian pattern of variation, but the molecular mechanism underlying this circadian regulation is not fully understood. We have previously shown that the circadian clock protein Per1 positively regulates the basal and aldosterone-mediated expression of the alpha subunit of the renal epithelial sodium channel (αENaC). The mechanism of this regulation has not been determined however. To further elucidate the mechanism of mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and Per1 action, site-directed mutagenesis, DNA pull-down assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) methods were used to investigate the coordinate regulation of αENaC by Per1 and MR. Mutation of two circadian response E-boxes in the human αENaC promoter abolished both basal and aldosterone-mediated promoter activity. DNA pull down assays demonstrated the interaction of both MR and Per1 with the E-boxes from the αENaC promoter. These observations were corroborated by ChIP experiments showing increased occupancy of MR and Per1 on an E-box of the αENaC promoter in the presence of aldosterone. This is the first report of an aldosterone-mediated increase in Per1 on a target gene promoter. Taken together, these results demonstrate the novel finding that Per1 and MR mediate the aldosterone response of αENaC through DNA/protein interaction in renal collecting duct cells. PMID:24062694

  16. A Fear-Inducing Odor Alters PER2 and c-Fos Expression in Brain Regions Involved in Fear Memory

    PubMed Central

    Pantazopoulos, Harry; Dolatshad, Hamid; Davis, Fred C.

    2011-01-01

    Evidence demonstrates that rodents learn to associate a foot shock with time of day, indicating the formation of a fear related time-stamp memory, even in the absence of a functioning SCN. In addition, mice acquire and retain fear memory better during the early day compared to the early night. This type of memory may be regulated by circadian pacemakers outside of the SCN. As a first step in testing the hypothesis that clock genes are involved in the formation of a time-stamp fear memory, we exposed one group of mice to fox feces derived odor (TMT) at ZT 0 and one group at ZT 12 for 4 successive days. A separate group with no exposure to TMT was also included as a control. Animals were sacrificed one day after the last exposure to TMT, and PER2 and c-Fos protein were quantified in the SCN, amygdala, hippocampus, and piriform cortex. Exposure to TMT had a strong effect at ZT 0, decreasing PER2 expression at this time point in most regions except the SCN, and reversing the normal rhythm of PER2 expression in the amygdala and piriform cortex. These changes were accompanied by increased c-Fos expression at ZT0. In contrast, exposure to TMT at ZT 12 abolished the rhythm of PER2 expression in the amygdala. In addition, increased c-Fos expression at ZT 12 was only detected in the central nucleus of the amygdala in the TMT12 group. TMT exposure at either time point did not affect PER2 or c-Fos in the SCN, indicating that under a light-dark cycle, the SCN rhythm is stable in the presence of repeated exposure to a fear-inducing stimulus. Taken together, these results indicate that entrainment to a fear-inducing stimulus leads to changes in PER2 and c-Fos expression that are detected 24 hours following the last exposure to TMT, indicating entrainment of endogenous oscillators in these regions. The observed effects on PER2 expression and c-Fos were stronger during the early day than during the early night, possibly to prepare appropriate systems at ZT 0 to respond to a fear

  17. Per2 participates in AKT-mediated drug resistance in A549/DDP lung adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo; Tan, Yaoxi; Liang, Yan; Li, Yan; Chen, Lei; Wu, Shuangshuang; Xu, Wei; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Weihong; Wu, Jianqing

    2017-01-01

    Period2 (Per2) is a key mammalian circadian clock protein, and additionally has a tumor suppressive function. The present study aimed to investigate its role in drug resistance in A549/cisplatin (DDP) lung adenocarcinoma cells. Per2 knockdown and overexpression in A549/DDP cells were used to compare cell proliferation (by MTT assay), apoptosis (active-caspase 3 western blot) and clone forming assay. The activation of AKT/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) was investigated by a western blot assay. The Per2 expression level was decreased in A549/DDP cells compared with A549 cells. Per2 knockdown by short hairpin RNA protects A549/DDP cells from apoptosis, and promotes proliferation and migration. Per2 knockdown results in increased activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway. Overexpression of Per2 in A549/DDP cells may reduce the activity of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway, and promote apoptosis of A549 cells. The results of the present study suggest that Per2 participates in AKT-mediated drug resistance in A549/DDP lung adenocarcinoma cells.

  18. Per2 participates in AKT-mediated drug resistance in A549/DDP lung adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bo; Tan, Yaoxi; Liang, Yan; Li, Yan; Chen, Lei; Wu, Shuangshuang; Xu, Wei; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Weihong; Wu, Jianqing

    2017-01-01

    Period2 (Per2) is a key mammalian circadian clock protein, and additionally has a tumor suppressive function. The present study aimed to investigate its role in drug resistance in A549/cisplatin (DDP) lung adenocarcinoma cells. Per2 knockdown and overexpression in A549/DDP cells were used to compare cell proliferation (by MTT assay), apoptosis (active-caspase 3 western blot) and clone forming assay. The activation of AKT/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) was investigated by a western blot assay. The Per2 expression level was decreased in A549/DDP cells compared with A549 cells. Per2 knockdown by short hairpin RNA protects A549/DDP cells from apoptosis, and promotes proliferation and migration. Per2 knockdown results in increased activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway. Overexpression of Per2 in A549/DDP cells may reduce the activity of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway, and promote apoptosis of A549 cells. The results of the present study suggest that Per2 participates in AKT-mediated drug resistance in A549/DDP lung adenocarcinoma cells. PMID:28123577

  19. Exploring the Landscape of Diazabicyclooctane (DBO) Inhibition: Avibactam (AVI) Inactivation of PER-2 β-Lactamase.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, Melina; Papp-Wallace, Krisztina M; Taracila, Magdalena A; Mojica, Maria F; Bethel, Christopher R; Rudin, Susan D; Zeiser, Elise T; Gutkind, Gabriel; Bonomo, Robert A; Power, Pablo

    2017-03-27

    PER β-lactamases are an emerging family of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL) found in Gram negative bacteria. PER β-lactamases are unique among class A enzymes as they possess an inverted Ω loop and extended B3 β-strand. These singular structural differences are hypothesized to contribute to their hydrolytic profile against oxyimino-cephalosporins (e.g., cefotaxime and ceftazidime). Here, we tested the ability of avibactam (AVI), a novel non-β-lactam β-lactamase inhibitor to inactivate PER-2. Interestingly, the PER-2 inhibition constants (i.e., k2/K = 2 ± 0.1 × 10(3) M(-1)s(-1)) that were obtained when testing AVI were reminiscent of values observed testing class C and D β-lactamases (i.e., k2/K range ≈10(3) M(-1)s(-1)) and not class A β-lactamases (i.e., k2/K range, 10(4)-10(5) M(-1)s(-1)). Once AVI was bound, AVI formed a stable complex with PER-2 as observed via mass spectrometry (e.g., 31,389 ± 3 amu → 31,604 ± 3 amu for 24 hr). Molecular modeling of PER-2 with AVI showed that the carbonyl of AVI was located in the oxyanion hole of the β-lactamase and that the sulfate of AVI formed interactions with the β-lactam carboxylate binding site of the PER-2 β-lactamase. However, hydrophobic patches near the PER-2 active site (by Ser70 and B3-B4 β-strands) may affect the binding of necessary catalytic water molecules thus slowing acylation (k2/K) of AVI onto PER-2. As a result, the magnitude of k2/K resembles class D enzymes. Similarities in electrostatics and hydrophobicity of the active site were also observed between OXA-48 and PER-2, while CTX-M-15 was more hydrophilic. To overcome the enhanced cephalosporinase activity of PER-2 β-lactamase, we tested β-lactam-AVI combinations. As a result of lowering MICs to ≤ 2 mg/L, the ceftaroline-AVI combination could represent a favorable therapeutic option against Enterobacteriaceae expressing blaPER-2 Our studies define the inactivation of the PER-2 ESBL by AVI and suggest that the biophysical

  20. Detection of blaPER-1 & blaOxa10 among imipenem resistant isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from burn patients hospitalized in Shiraz Burn Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Emami, Amir; Bazargani, Abdollah; Mohammadi, Ali Akbar; Zardosht, Mitra; Seyed Jafari, Seyed Morteza

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most important Gram negative opportunistic bacteria which causes infection among burn patients. Resistance to the antibiotics in this group of bacteria is increased due to the activity of extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBLs) genes. In the current study, we investigated the prevalence of two genes (blaPER-1 & blaOxa10) related β-lactamase genes among imipenem resistance clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa in hospitalized patients. Materials and Methods: From May 2010 to March 2011, 270 P. aeruginosa isolated from hospitalized burned patients’ wounds in Shiraz Burn Hospital, were tested for Imipenem resistance by disk diffusion method. Presence of ESBLs exo-enzyme, blaPER-1 and blaOxa10 genes were also evaluated in the resistant isolate. Results: 210 (77.7%) of 270 P. aeruginosa isolates were resistant to imipenem. blaPER-1 and blaOxa10 were detected among 168 (80.0%) of imipenem resistant isolates. Furthermore, 160 (76.2%) of them had blaOxa10 gene and 84 (40.0%) of them had blaPER-1 while 63 (30.0%) resistant isolates contained both genes simultaneously. Conclusion: This study showed a high prevalence of blaPER-1 and blaOxa10 genes in hospitalized burn patients in south west of Iran. Therefore, it’s highly recommended to perform such tests routinely to evaluate the resistance pattern in order to better antibiotic selection in the burned patients. PMID:26644867

  1. Multifocal Detection of Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Producing the PER-1 Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase in Northern Italy

    PubMed Central

    Pagani, Laura; Mantengoli, Elisabetta; Migliavacca, Roberta; Nucleo, Elisabetta; Pollini, Simona; Spalla, Melissa; Daturi, Rossana; Romero, Egidio; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2004-01-01

    Forty-four nonreplicate clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa that were resistant to extended-spectrum cephalosporins (ceftazidime and cefepime) and aztreonam, that putatively produced an acquired extended- spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL), according to the results of a double-disk synergy test, and that had been involved in nosocomial outbreaks were obtained from six different hospitals in northern Italy and screened for the presence of blaPER ESBL determinants. Twenty isolates, associated with nine independent outbreaks that occurred in five hospitals in the Milan area and its surroundings during 1995-2000, were found to carry an acquired blaPER-1 gene. PER-1 producers representative of the nine outbreaks exhibited a multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype, including resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins, aztreonam, meropenem, aminoglycosides, and in most cases, imipenem and ciprofloxacin. An analysis of macrorestriction profiles of their genomic DNAs by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed an overall clonal diversity of the PER-1 producers, although interhospital clonal spread was also observed. The blaPER-1 gene was not transferable and appeared to be chromosomally located. An analysis of the EcoRI and EcoRV restriction fragment length polymorphisms of the blaPER-1 locus revealed identical patterns for all isolates, and the characterization of a 1.9-kb region containing blaPER-1 revealed a conserved structure in representatives of the various clonal lineages. The present findings indicate that MDR P. aeruginosa clones producing the PER-1 ESBL are endemic to this area of northern Italy, where they have been circulating since the mid-1990s and have been associated with several nosocomial outbreaks. PMID:15184430

  2. PER2 Differentially Regulates Clock Phosphorylation versus Transcription by Reciprocal Switching of CK1ε Activity

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Ximing; Mori, Tetsuya; Zhang, Yunfei; Johnson, Carl Hirschie

    2015-01-01

    Casein kinase 1ε (CK1ε) performs key phosphorylation reactions in the circadian clock mechanism that determine period. We show that the central clock protein PERIOD2 (PER2) not only acts as a transcriptional repressor but also inhibits the autoinactivation of CK1ε, thereby promoting CK1ε activity. Moreover, PER2 reciprocally regulates CK1ε’s ability to phosphorylate other substrates. On output pathway substrates (e.g., P53), PER2 inhibits the activity of CK1ε. However, in the case of central clock proteins (e.g., CRYPTOCHROME2), PER2 stimulates the CK1ε-mediated phosphorylation of CRY2. CK1ε activity is temperature compensated on the core clock substrate CRY2 but not on output substrates, for example, the physiological output protein substrate P53 and its nonphysiological correlate, bovine serum albumin (BSA). These results indicate heretofore unrecognized pivotal roles of PER2; it not only regulates the central transcription/translation feedback loop but also differentially controls kinase activity CK1ε in its phosphorylation of central clock (e.g., CRY2) versus output (e.g., P53) substrates. PMID:25994100

  3. Melatonin Entrains PER2::LUC Bioluminescence Circadian Rhythm in the Mouse Cornea

    PubMed Central

    Baba, Kenkichi; Davidson, Alec J.; Tosini, Gianluca

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Previous studies have reported the presence of a circadian rhythm in PERIOD2::LUCIFERASE (PER2::LUC) bioluminescence in mouse photoreceptors, retina, RPE, and cornea. Melatonin (MLT) modulates many physiological functions in the eye and it is believed to be one of the key circadian signals within the eye. The aim of the present study was to investigate the regulation of the PER2::LUC circadian rhythm in mouse cornea and to determine the role played by MLT. Methods Corneas were obtained from PER2::LUC mice and cultured to measure bioluminescence rhythmicity in isolated tissue using a Lumicycle or CCD camera. To determine the time-dependent resetting of the corneal circadian clocks in response to MLT or IIK7 (a melatonin type 2 receptor, MT2, agonist) was added to the cultured corneas at different times of the day. We also defined the location of the MT2 receptor within different corneal layers using immunohistochemistry. Results A long-lasting bioluminescence rhythm was recorded from cultured PER2::LUC cornea and PER2::LUC signal was localized to the corneal epithelium and endothelium. MLT administration in the early night delayed the cornea rhythm, whereas administration of MLT at late night to early morning advanced the cornea rhythm. Treatment with IIK7 mimicked the MLT phase-shifting effect. Consistent with these results, MT2 immunoreactivity was localized to the corneal epithelium and endothelium. Conclusions Our work demonstrates that MLT entrains the PER2::LUC bioluminescence rhythm in the cornea. Our data indicate that the cornea may represent a model to study the molecular mechanisms by which MLT affects the circadian clock. PMID:26207312

  4. Melatonin Entrains PER2::LUC Bioluminescence Circadian Rhythm in the Mouse Cornea.

    PubMed

    Baba, Kenkichi; Davidson, Alec J; Tosini, Gianluca

    2015-07-01

    Previous studies have reported the presence of a circadian rhythm in PERIOD2::LUCIFERASE (PER2::LUC) bioluminescence in mouse photoreceptors, retina, RPE, and cornea. Melatonin (MLT) modulates many physiological functions in the eye and it is believed to be one of the key circadian signals within the eye. The aim of the present study was to investigate the regulation of the PER2::LUC circadian rhythm in mouse cornea and to determine the role played by MLT. Corneas were obtained from PER2::LUC mice and cultured to measure bioluminescence rhythmicity in isolated tissue using a Lumicycle or CCD camera. To determine the time-dependent resetting of the corneal circadian clocks in response to MLT or IIK7 (a melatonin type 2 receptor, MT2, agonist) was added to the cultured corneas at different times of the day. We also defined the location of the MT2 receptor within different corneal layers using immunohistochemistry. A long-lasting bioluminescence rhythm was recorded from cultured PER2::LUC cornea and PER2::LUC signal was localized to the corneal epithelium and endothelium. MLT administration in the early night delayed the cornea rhythm, whereas administration of MLT at late night to early morning advanced the cornea rhythm. Treatment with IIK7 mimicked the MLT phase-shifting effect. Consistent with these results, MT2 immunoreactivity was localized to the corneal epithelium and endothelium. Our work demonstrates that MLT entrains the PER2::LUC bioluminescence rhythm in the cornea. Our data indicate that the cornea may represent a model to study the molecular mechanisms by which MLT affects the circadian clock.

  5. Daily variations in plasma melatonin and melatonin receptor (MT1), PER1 and CRY1 expression in suprachiasmatic nuclei of tropical squirrel, Funambulus pennanti.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sameer; Haldar, Chandana; Singh, Sarika

    2013-09-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) plays a major role in photoperiodic regulation of seasonal functions by modulating the melatonin signal. To date no report exists regarding the role of the ambient photoperiod in the regulation of melatonin receptor MT1 and clock gene (PER1 and CRY1) expression in the SCN of any tropical rodent that experiences the least variation in the photoperiod. We noted the expression of MT1, PER1 and CRY1 in the SCN of a tropical squirrel, Funambulus pennanti, along with the plasma level of melatonin over 24 h during the reproductively active (summer) and inactive (winter) phases. The seasonal day length affected the peripheral melatonin, which was inversely related with the MT1 expression in the SCN. The timing for peak expression of PER1 was the same in both phases, while the decline in PER1 expression was delayed by 4 h during the inactive phase. The CRY1 peak advanced by 4 h during the active phase, while the interval between the peak and decline of CRY1 remained the same in both phases. It can be suggested that seasonally changing melatonin levels modulate MT1 expression dynamics in the SCN, altering its functional state, and gate SCN molecular "clock" gene profiles through changes in PER/CRY expression. Such a regulation is important for photo-physiological adaptation (reproduction/immunity) in seasonal breeders.

  6. NPY-Induced Phase Shifts of PER2::LUC Rhythms are Mediated by Long-Term Suppression of Neuronal Excitability in a Phase-Specific Manner

    PubMed Central

    Besing, Rachel C.; Hablitz, Lauren M.; Paul, Jodi R.; Johnson, Russell L.; Prosser, Rebecca A.; Gamble, Karen L.

    2013-01-01

    Endogenous circadian rhythms are entrained to the 24-h light/dark cycle by both light and nonphotic stimuli. During the day, nonphotic stimuli, such as novel-wheel induced exercise, produce large phase advances. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) release from the thalamus onto suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) neurons at least partially mediates this nonphotic signal. We examined the hypothesis that NPY-induced phase advances are accompanied by suppression of PER2 and are mediated by long-term depression of neuronal excitability in a phase-specific manner. First, we found that NPY-induced phase advances in PER2::LUC SCN cultures are largest when NPY (2.35 µM) is given in the early part of the day (circadian time [CT] 0–6). In addition, PER2::LUC levels in NPY-treated (compared to vehicle-treated) samples were suppressed beginning 6–7 h after treatment. Similar NPY application to organotypic Per1::GFP SCN cultures resulted in long-term suppression of spike rate of GFP+ cells when slices were treated with NPY during the early or middle of the day (zeitgeber time [ZT] 2 or 6), but not during the late day (ZT 10). Furthermore, 1-h bath application of NPY to acute SCN brain slices decreased general neuronal activity measured through extracellular recordings. Finally, NPY-induced phase advances of PER2::LUC rhythms were blocked by latent depolarization with 34.5 mM [K+] 3 h after NPY application. These results suggest that NPY-induced phase advances may be mediated by long-term depression of neuronal excitability. This model is consistent with findings in other brain regions that NPY-induced persistent hyperpolarization underlies mechanisms of energy homeostasis, anxiety-related behavior, and thalamocortical synchronous firing. PMID:22324550

  7. Synchronization of PER1 protein in Parabrachial nucleus in a natural model of food anticipatory activity

    PubMed Central

    Juárez, Claudia; Morgado, Elvira; Waliszewski, Stefan M.; Martínez, Armando J.; Meza, Enrique; Caba, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Rabbit pups represent a natural model of food anticipatory activity (FAA). FAA is the behavioral output of a putative food entrainable oscillator (FEO). It had been suggested that the FEO is comprised of a distributed system of clocks that work in concert in response to gastrointestinal input by food. Scheduled food intake synchronizes several nuclei in the brain, and the hypothalamus has received particular attention. On the contrary, brainstem nuclei, despite being among the brain structures to first receive food cues, have been scarcely studied. Here we analyzed by immunohistochemistry possible oscillation of FOS and PER1 proteins through a complete 24 h cycle in the dorsal vagal complex (DVC) and parabrachial nucleus (PBN) of seven to eight day old rabbit pups scheduled to nurse during the night (02:00) or day (10:00) and also in fasted subjects to explore the possible persistence of oscillations. We found a clear induction of FOS that peaks 1.5 h after nursing in all nuclei studied. PER1 was only synchronized in the PBN, reaching highest values 12 h after nursing. Only PER1 oscillations persisted in fasted subjects. We conclude that the DVC nuclei are probably more related to the transmission of food cues to other brain regions but that the PBN participates in the integration of information essential for FAA. Our results support previous findings suggesting that the DVC nuclei, but not PBN, are not essential for FAA. We suggest that PBN is a key component of the proposed distributed system of clocks involved in FAA. PMID:22471601

  8. Synchronization of PER1 protein in parabrachial nucleus in a natural model of food anticipatory activity.

    PubMed

    Juárez, Claudia; Morgado, Elvira; Waliszewski, Stefan M; Martínez, Armando J; Meza, Enrique; Caba, Mario

    2012-05-01

    Rabbit pups represent a natural model of food anticipatory activity (FAA). FAA is the behavioral output of a putative food entrainable oscillator (FEO). It had been suggested that the FEO is comprised of a distributed system of clocks that work in concert in response to gastrointestinal input by food. Scheduled food intake synchronizes several nuclei in the brain, and the hypothalamus has received particular attention. On the contrary, brainstem nuclei, despite being among the brain structures to first receive food cues, have been scarcely studied. Here we analysed by immunohistochemistry possible oscillation of FOS and PER1 proteins through a complete 24-h cycle in the dorsal vagal complex (DVC) and parabrachial nucleus (PBN) of 7-8-day-old rabbit pups scheduled to nurse during the night (02:00 h) or day (10:00 h), and also in fasted subjects to explore the possible persistence of oscillations. We found a clear induction of FOS that peaks 1.5 h after nursing in all nuclei studied. PER1 was only synchronized in the PBN, reaching highest values 12 h after nursing. Only PER1 oscillations persisted, with a shift, in fasted subjects. We conclude that the DVC nuclei are probably more related to the transmission of food cues to other brain regions, but that the PBN participates in the integration of information essential for FAA. Our results support previous findings suggesting that the DVC nuclei, but not PBN, are not essential for FAA. We suggest that PBN is a key component of the proposed distributed system of clocks involved in FAA. © 2012 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience © 2012 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Warm water bath stimulates phase-shifts of the peripheral circadian clocks in PER2::LUCIFERASE mouse.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Nobuaki; Tahara, Yu; Kuriki, Daisuke; Haraguchi, Atsushi; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2014-01-01

    Circadian clocks in the peripheral tissues of mice are known to be entrained by pulse stimuli such as restricted feeding, novel wheel running, and several other agents. However, there are no reports on high temperature pulse-mediated entrainment on the phase-shift of peripheral clocks in vivo. Here we show that temperature treatment of mice for two days at 41°C, instead of 37°C, for 1-2 h during the inactive period, using a temperature controlled water bath stimulated phase-advance of peripheral clocks in the kidney, liver, and submandibular gland of PER2::LUCIFERASE mice. On the other hand, treatment for 2 days at 35°C ambient room temperature for 2 h did not cause a phase-advance. Maintenance of mice at 41°C in a water bath, sustained the core body temperature at 40-41°C. However, the use of 37°C water bath or the 35°C ambient room temperature elevated the core body temperature to 38.5°C, suggesting that at least a core body temperature of 40-41°C is necessary to cause phase-advance under light-dark cycle conditions. The temperature pulse stimulation at 41°C, instead of 37°C water bath for 2 h led to the elevated expression of Per1 and Hsp70 in the peripheral tissue of mice. In summary, the present study demonstrates that transient high temperature pulse using water bath during daytime causes phase-advance in mouse peripheral clocks in vivo. The present results suggest that hot water bath may affect the phase of peripheral clocks.

  10. Warm Water Bath Stimulates Phase-Shifts of the Peripheral Circadian Clocks in PER2::LUCIFERASE Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Kuriki, Daisuke; Haraguchi, Atsushi; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2014-01-01

    Circadian clocks in the peripheral tissues of mice are known to be entrained by pulse stimuli such as restricted feeding, novel wheel running, and several other agents. However, there are no reports on high temperature pulse-mediated entrainment on the phase-shift of peripheral clocks in vivo. Here we show that temperature treatment of mice for two days at 41°C, instead of 37°C, for 1–2 h during the inactive period, using a temperature controlled water bath stimulated phase-advance of peripheral clocks in the kidney, liver, and submandibular gland of PER2::LUCIFERASE mice. On the other hand, treatment for 2 days at 35°C ambient room temperature for 2 h did not cause a phase-advance. Maintenance of mice at 41°C in a water bath, sustained the core body temperature at 40–41°C. However, the use of 37°C water bath or the 35°C ambient room temperature elevated the core body temperature to 38.5°C, suggesting that at least a core body temperature of 40–41°C is necessary to cause phase-advance under light-dark cycle conditions. The temperature pulse stimulation at 41°C, instead of 37°C water bath for 2 h led to the elevated expression of Per1 and Hsp70 in the peripheral tissue of mice. In summary, the present study demonstrates that transient high temperature pulse using water bath during daytime causes phase-advance in mouse peripheral clocks in vivo. The present results suggest that hot water bath may affect the phase of peripheral clocks. PMID:24933288

  11. Role of Per1-interacting protein of the suprachiasmatic nucleus in NGF mediated neuronal survival

    SciTech Connect

    Kiyama, Atsuko . E-mail: kiyama@pu-hiroshima.ac.jp; Isojima, Yasushi; Nagai, Katsuya

    2006-01-13

    We previously identified Per1-interacting protein of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (PIPS) in rats. To reveal its role, its tissue distribution was examined by immunoblotting. PIPS-like immunoreactive substance (PIPSLS) was observed in Brain, adrenal gland, and PC12 cells. Since PIPS, which has no nuclear localization signal (NLS), is translocated into nuclei of COS-7 cells in the presence of mPer1, the effect of NGF on nuclear localization of PIPS was examined using PC12 cells. NGF caused nuclear translocation of either PIPSLS or GFP-PIPS. NGF mediated nuclear translocation of PIPSLS was blocked by K252a, a TrkA-inhibitor, or wortmannin, a PI3K-inhibitor. Gab1, which is implicated in TrkA signaling and has NLS, co-immunoprecipitated with PIPSLS from PC12 cells using an anti-PIPS antibody. Inhibition of PIPS expression by RNAi increased levels of apoptosis in PC12 cells. These findings suggest that nuclear translocation of PIPS is involved in NGF mediated neuronal survival via TrkA, PI3K, and Gab1 signaling pathway.

  12. Gastrin Releasing Peptide Modulates Fast Delayed Rectifier Potassium Current in Per1-Expressing SCN Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gamble, Karen L.; Kudo, Takashi; Colwell, Christopher S.; McMahon, Douglas G.

    2011-01-01

    The mammalian circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) drives and maintains 24-h physiological rhythms, the phases of which are set by the local environmental light-dark cycle. Gastrin releasing peptide (GRP) communicates photic phase setting signals in the SCN by increasing neurophysiological activity of SCN neurons. Here, the ionic basis for persistent GRP-induced changes in neuronal activity was investigated in SCN slice cultures from Per1::GFP reporter mice during the early night. Recordings from Per1-fluorescent neurons in SCN slices several hours after GRP treatment revealed a significantly greater action potential frequency, a significant increase in voltage-activated outward current at depolarized potentials, and a significant increase in 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) sensitive fast delayed rectifier (fDR) potassium currents when compared to vehicle-treated slices. In addition, the persistent increase in spike rate following early night GRP application was blocked in SCN neurons from mice deficient in Kv3 channel proteins. Because fDR currents are regulated by the clock and are elevated in amplitude during the day, the present results support the model that GRP delays the phase of the clock during the early night by prolonging day-like membrane properties of SCN cells. Furthermore, these findings implicate fDR currents in the ionic basis for GRP-mediated entrainment of the primary mammalian circadian pacemaker. PMID:21454290

  13. Divergent roles of clock genes in retinal and suprachiasmatic nucleus circadian oscillators.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Guo-Xiang; Gamble, Karen L; Risner, Michael L; Young, Laurel A; McMahon, Douglas G

    2012-01-01

    The retina is both a sensory organ and a self-sustained circadian clock. Gene targeting studies have revealed that mammalian circadian clocks generate molecular circadian rhythms through coupled transcription/translation feedback loops which involve 6 core clock genes, namely Period (Per) 1 and 2, Cryptochrome (Cry) 1 and 2, Clock, and Bmal1 and that the roles of individual clock genes in rhythms generation are tissue-specific. However, the mechanisms of molecular circadian rhythms in the mammalian retina are incompletely understood and the extent to which retinal neural clocks share mechanisms with the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the central neural clock, is unclear. In the present study, we examined the rhythmic amplitude and period of real-time bioluminescence rhythms in explants of retina from Per1-, Per2-, Per3-, Cry1-, Cry2-, and Clock-deficient mice that carried transgenic PERIOD2::LUCIFERASE (PER2::LUC) or Period1::luciferase (Per1::luc) circadian reporters. Per1-, Cry1- and Clock-deficient retinal and SCN explants showed weakened or disrupted rhythms, with stronger effects in retina compared to SCN. Per2, Per3, and Cry2 were individually dispensable for sustained rhythms in both tissues. Retinal and SCN explants from double knockouts of Cry1 and Cry2 were arrhythmic. Gene effects on period were divergent with reduction in the number of Per1 alleles shortening circadian period in retina, but lengthening it in SCN, and knockout of Per3 substantially shortening retinal clock period, but leaving SCN unaffected. Thus, the retinal neural clock has a unique pattern of clock gene dependence at the tissue level that it is similar in pattern, but more severe in degree, than the SCN neural clock, with divergent clock gene regulation of rhythmic period.

  14. Eugenol confers resistance to Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) by regulating the expression of SlPer1 in tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei-Jie; Lv, Wen-Jing; Li, Li-Na; Yin, Gan; Hang, Xiaofang; Xue, Yanfeng; Chen, Jian; Shi, Zhiqi

    2016-05-25

    Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) is one of the most devastating plant diseases, and poses a significant agricultural concern because of the lack of an efficient control method. Eugenol is a plant-derived natural compound that has been widely used as a food additive and in medicine. In the present study, we demonstrated the potential of eugenol to enhance the resistance of tomato plants to TYLCV. The anti-TYLCV efficiency of eugenol was significantly higher than that of moroxydine hydrochloride (MH), a widely used commercial antiviral agent. Eugenol application stimulated the production of endogenous nitric oxide (NO) and salicylic acid (SA) in tomato plants. The full-length cDNA of SlPer1, which has been suggested to be a host R gene specific to TYLCV, was isolated from tomato plants. A sequence analysis suggested that SlPer1 might be a nucleobase-ascorbate transporter (NAT) belonging to the permease family. The transcript levels of SlPer1 increased markedly in response to treatment with eugenol or TYLCV inoculation. The results of this study also showed that SlPer1 expression was strongly induced by SA, MeJA (jasmonic acid methyl ester), and NO. Thus, we propose that the increased transcription of SlPer1 contributed to the high anti-TYLCV efficiency of eugenol, which might involve in the generation of endogenous SA and NO. Such findings provide the basis for the development of eugenol as an environmental-friendly agricultural antiviral agent. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Involvement of calcium-calmodulin protein kinase but not mitogen-activated protein kinase in light-induced phase delays and Per gene expression in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hamster.

    PubMed

    Yokota, S; Yamamoto, M; Moriya, T; Akiyama, M; Fukunaga, K; Miyamoto, E; Shibata, S

    2001-04-01

    It is known that Ca(2+)-dependent phosphorylation of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) and the rapid induction of mPer1 and mPer2, mouse period genes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) are associated with light-induced phase shifting. The CREB/CRE transcriptional pathway has been shown to be activated by calcium/calmodulin dependent kinase II (CaMKII) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK); however, there is a lack of evidence concerning whether the activation of CaMKII and/or MAPK elicited by photic stimuli are associated with the change in Per gene expression and behavioral phase shifting. In this experiment, we found there was an inhibitory effect by KN93, CaMKII inhibitor, on hamster Per1 and Per2 expression in the SCN and on phase delays in wheel running rhythm induced by light pulses. PD98059 and U0126, MAPK kinase inhibitors, however, affected neither light-induced Per1 and Per2 expression nor behavioral phase delays, even though PD98059 attenuated the light-induced phosphorylation of MAPK in the SCN. The present findings demonstrate that the light-induced activation of CaMKII plays an important role in the induction of Per1 and Per2 mRNA in the hamster SCN as well as phase shifting. These results suggest that gated induction of Per1 and/or Per2 genes through CaMKII-CREB/CRE accompanied with photic stimuli may be a critical step in phase shifting.

  16. Sleep Deprivation Influences Circadian Gene Expression in the Lateral Habenula

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yanxia

    2016-01-01

    Sleep is governed by homeostasis and the circadian clock. Clock genes play an important role in the generation and maintenance of circadian rhythms but are also involved in regulating sleep homeostasis. The lateral habenular nucleus (LHb) has been implicated in sleep-wake regulation, since LHb gene expression demonstrates circadian oscillation characteristics. This study focuses on the participation of LHb clock genes in regulating sleep homeostasis, as the nature of their involvement is unclear. In this study, we observed changes in sleep pattern following sleep deprivation in LHb-lesioned rats using EEG recording techniques. And then the changes of clock gene expression (Per1, Per2, and Bmal1) in the LHb after 6 hours of sleep deprivation were detected by using real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). We found that sleep deprivation increased the length of Non-Rapid Eye Movement Sleep (NREMS) and decreased wakefulness. LHb-lesioning decreased the amplitude of reduced wake time and increased NREMS following sleep deprivation in rats. qPCR results demonstrated that Per2 expression was elevated after sleep deprivation, while the other two genes were unaffected. Following sleep recovery, Per2 expression was comparable to the control group. This study provides the basis for further research on the role of LHb Per2 gene in the regulation of sleep homeostasis. PMID:27413249

  17. Sleep Deprivation Influences Circadian Gene Expression in the Lateral Habenula.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Beilin; Gao, Yanxia; Li, Yang; Yang, Jing; Zhao, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Sleep is governed by homeostasis and the circadian clock. Clock genes play an important role in the generation and maintenance of circadian rhythms but are also involved in regulating sleep homeostasis. The lateral habenular nucleus (LHb) has been implicated in sleep-wake regulation, since LHb gene expression demonstrates circadian oscillation characteristics. This study focuses on the participation of LHb clock genes in regulating sleep homeostasis, as the nature of their involvement is unclear. In this study, we observed changes in sleep pattern following sleep deprivation in LHb-lesioned rats using EEG recording techniques. And then the changes of clock gene expression (Per1, Per2, and Bmal1) in the LHb after 6 hours of sleep deprivation were detected by using real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). We found that sleep deprivation increased the length of Non-Rapid Eye Movement Sleep (NREMS) and decreased wakefulness. LHb-lesioning decreased the amplitude of reduced wake time and increased NREMS following sleep deprivation in rats. qPCR results demonstrated that Per2 expression was elevated after sleep deprivation, while the other two genes were unaffected. Following sleep recovery, Per2 expression was comparable to the control group. This study provides the basis for further research on the role of LHb Per2 gene in the regulation of sleep homeostasis.

  18. Existence of a photoinducible phase for ovarian development and photoperiod-related alteration of clock gene expression in a damselfish.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Yuki; Hada, Noriko; Imamura, Satoshi; Hur, Sung-Pyo; Bouchekioua, Selma; Takemura, Akihiro

    2015-10-01

    The sapphire devil, Chrysiptera cyanea, is a reef-associated damselfish and their ovarian development can be induced by a long photoperiod. In this study, we demonstrated the existence of a photoinducible phase for the photoperiodic ovarian development in the sapphire devil. Induction of ovarian development under night-interruption light schedules and Nanda-Hamner cycles revealed that the photoinducible phase appeared in a circadian manner between ZT12 and ZT13. To characterize the effect of photoperiod on clock gene expression in the brain of this species, we determined the expression levels of the sdPer1, sdPer2, sdCry1, and sdCry2 clock genes under constant light and dark conditions (LL and DD) and photoperiodic (short and long photoperiods). The expression of sdPer1 exhibited clear circadian oscillation under both LL and DD conditions, while sdPer2 and sdCry1 expression levels were lower under DD than under LL conditions and sdCry2 expression was lower under LL than under DD conditions. These results suggest a key role for sdPer1 in circadian clock cycling and that sdPer2, sdCry1, and sdCry2 are light-responsive clock genes in the sapphire devil. After 1 week under a long photoperiod, we observed photoperiod-related changes in sdPer1, sdPer2, and sdCry2 expression, but not in sdCry1 expression. These results suggest that the expression patterns of some clock genes exhibit seasonal variation according to seasonal changes in day length and that such seasonal alteration of clock gene expression may contribute to seasonal recognition by the sapphire devil.

  19. A Role for the Circadian Clock Protein Per1 in the Regulation of the NaCl Co-transporter (NCC) and the with-no-lysine Kinase (WNK) Cascade in Mouse Distal Convoluted Tubule Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Jacob; Ko, Benjamin; All, Sean; Cheng, Kit-Yan; Hoover, Robert S.; Gumz, Michelle L.

    2014-01-01

    It has been well established that blood pressure and renal function undergo circadian fluctuations. We have demonstrated that the circadian protein Per1 regulates multiple genes involved in sodium transport in the collecting duct of the kidney. However, the role of Per1 in other parts of the nephron has not been investigated. The distal convoluted tubule (DCT) plays a critical role in renal sodium reabsorption. Sodium is reabsorbed in this segment through the actions of the NaCl co-transporter (NCC), which is regulated by the with-no-lysine kinases (WNKs). The goal of this study was to test if Per1 regulates sodium transport in the DCT through modulation of NCC and the WNK kinases, WNK1 and WNK4. Pharmacological blockade of nuclear Per1 entry resulted in decreased mRNA expression of NCC and WNK1 but increased expression of WNK4 in the renal cortex of mice. These findings were confirmed by using Per1 siRNA and pharmacological blockade of Per1 nuclear entry in mDCT15 cells, a model of the mouse distal convoluted tubule. Transcriptional regulation was demonstrated by changes in short lived heterogeneous nuclear RNA. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated interaction of Per1 and CLOCK with the promoters of NCC, WNK1, and WNK4. This interaction was modulated by blockade of Per1 nuclear entry. Importantly, NCC protein expression and NCC activity, as measured by thiazide-sensitive, chloride-dependent 22Na uptake, were decreased upon pharmacological inhibition of Per1 nuclear entry. Taken together, these data demonstrate a role for Per1 in the transcriptional regulation of NCC, WNK1, and WNK4. PMID:24610784

  20. A role for the circadian clock protein Per1 in the regulation of the NaCl co-transporter (NCC) and the with-no-lysine kinase (WNK) cascade in mouse distal convoluted tubule cells.

    PubMed

    Richards, Jacob; Ko, Benjamin; All, Sean; Cheng, Kit-Yan; Hoover, Robert S; Gumz, Michelle L

    2014-04-25

    It has been well established that blood pressure and renal function undergo circadian fluctuations. We have demonstrated that the circadian protein Per1 regulates multiple genes involved in sodium transport in the collecting duct of the kidney. However, the role of Per1 in other parts of the nephron has not been investigated. The distal convoluted tubule (DCT) plays a critical role in renal sodium reabsorption. Sodium is reabsorbed in this segment through the actions of the NaCl co-transporter (NCC), which is regulated by the with-no-lysine kinases (WNKs). The goal of this study was to test if Per1 regulates sodium transport in the DCT through modulation of NCC and the WNK kinases, WNK1 and WNK4. Pharmacological blockade of nuclear Per1 entry resulted in decreased mRNA expression of NCC and WNK1 but increased expression of WNK4 in the renal cortex of mice. These findings were confirmed by using Per1 siRNA and pharmacological blockade of Per1 nuclear entry in mDCT15 cells, a model of the mouse distal convoluted tubule. Transcriptional regulation was demonstrated by changes in short lived heterogeneous nuclear RNA. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated interaction of Per1 and CLOCK with the promoters of NCC, WNK1, and WNK4. This interaction was modulated by blockade of Per1 nuclear entry. Importantly, NCC protein expression and NCC activity, as measured by thiazide-sensitive, chloride-dependent (22)Na uptake, were decreased upon pharmacological inhibition of Per1 nuclear entry. Taken together, these data demonstrate a role for Per1 in the transcriptional regulation of NCC, WNK1, and WNK4.

  1. PER1 rs3027172 Genotype Interacts with Early Life Stress to Predict Problematic Alcohol Use, but Not Reward-Related Ventral Striatum Activity

    PubMed Central

    Baranger, David A. A.; Ifrah, Chloé; Prather, Aric A.; Carey, Caitlin E.; Corral-Frías, Nadia S.; Drabant Conley, Emily; Hariri, Ahmad R.; Bogdan, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that the circadian and stress regulatory systems contribute to alcohol use disorder (AUD) risk, which may partially arise through effects on reward-related neural function. The C allele of the PER1 rs3027172 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) reduces PER1 expression in cells incubated with cortisol and has been associated with increased risk for adult AUD and problematic drinking among adolescents exposed to high levels of familial psychosocial adversity. Using data from undergraduate students who completed the ongoing Duke Neurogenetics Study (DNS) (n = 665), we tested whether exposure to early life stress (ELS; Childhood Trauma Questionnaire) moderates the association between rs3027172 genotype and later problematic alcohol use (Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test) as well as ventral striatum (VS) reactivity to reward (card-guessing task while functional magnetic resonance imaging data were acquired). Initial analyses found that PER1 rs3027172 genotype interacted with ELS to predict both problematic drinking and VS reactivity; minor C allele carriers, who were also exposed to elevated ELS reported greater problematic drinking and exhibited greater ventral striatum reactivity to reward-related stimuli. When gene × covariate and environment × covariate interactions were controlled for, the interaction predicting problematic alcohol use remained significant (p < 0.05, corrected) while the interaction predicting VS reactivity was no longer significant. These results extend our understanding of relationships between PER1 genotype, ELS, and problematic alcohol use, and serve as a cautionary tale on the importance of controlling for potential confounders in studies of moderation including gene × environment interactions. PMID:27065929

  2. Circadian PER2::LUC rhythms in the olfactory bulb of freely moving mice depend on the suprachiasmatic nucleus but not on behaviour rhythms.

    PubMed

    Ono, Daisuke; Honma, Sato; Honma, Ken-Ichi

    2015-12-01

    The temporal order of physiology and behaviour in mammals is regulated by the coordination of the master circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and peripheral clocks in various tissues outside the SCN. Because the circadian oscillator(s) in the olfactory bulb (OB) is regarded as SCN independent, we examined the relationship between the SCN master clock and the circadian clock in the OB. We also examined the role of vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor 2 in the circadian organization of the OB. We continuously monitored the circadian rhythms of a clock gene product PER2 in the SCN and OB of freely moving mice by means of a bioluminescence reporter and an optical fibre implanted in the brain. Robust circadian rhythms were detected in the OB and SCN for up to 19 days. Bilateral SCN lesions abolished the circadian behaviour rhythms and disorganized the PER2 rhythms in the OB. The PER2 rhythms in the OB showed more than one oscillatory component of a similar circadian period, suggesting internal desynchronization of constituent oscillators. By contrast, significant circadian PER2 rhythms were detected in the vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor 2-deficient mice, despite the substantial deterioration or abolition of circadian behavioural rhythms. These findings indicate that the circadian clock in the OB of freely moving mice depends on the SCN master clock but not on the circadian behavioural rhythms. The circadian PER2::LUC rhythm in the cultured OB was as robust as that in the cultured SCN but reset by slice preparation, suggesting that culturing of the slice reinforces the circadian rhythm. © 2015 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. The PERS(2) ON score for systemic assessment of symptomatology in palliative care: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Masel, E K; Berghoff, A S; Schur, S; Maehr, B; Schrank, B; Simanek, R; Preusser, M; Marosi, C; Watzke, H H

    2016-07-01

    The comprehensive assessment of symptoms is the basis for effective, individualised palliative treatment. Established scoring systems provide in-depth information but are often lengthy and hence unsuitable. We introduce the PERS(2) ON score as a short and practically feasible score to evaluate symptom burden. Fifty patients admitted to a Palliative Care Unit rated seven items, i.e. pain, eating (loss of appetite/weight loss), rehabilitation (physical impairment), social situation (possibility for home care), suffering (anxiety/burden of disease/depression), O2 (dyspnoea) and nausea/emesis, on a scale ranging from 0 (absence) to 10 (worst imaginable), resulting in a score ranging from 0 to 70. Assessments were performed at admission, 7 days after admission and at the day of discharge. Symptom intensity scores were calculated, and change over time was evaluated. A significant improvement was observed from the PERS²ON score between admission and 7 days (P < 0.001; paired t-test). Significant improvement from baseline evaluation to evaluation on the day of discharge was observed (P = 0.001; paired t-test). This study provides initial evidence that the PERS²ON score is both feasible and sensitive to changes of the most prominent symptoms in palliative care. It may be useful in clinical practice to direct palliative treatment strategies and provide targeted symptom management. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Development of Clock Genes Expression in Rat Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Pramong, Ratchadaporn; Wongchitrat, Prapimpun; Govitrapong, Piyarat; Phansuwan-Pujito, Pansiri

    2015-10-01

    The circadian rhythms in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), a central clock, are generated by autoregulatory network composed ofclock genes that encode transcriptionalfactors. There is a gradual development ofclock gene expression in the SCN during ontogenesis. Moreover clock genes are expressed in the adult hippocampus with circadian fashion. It is of interest to examine daily profiles ofthe clock gene mRNA and protein expressions in rat hippocampus during development. Daily profiles ofthree clock genes (Per1, Per2, and Bmal1) mRNA, and their protein expressions were analyzed in the rat hippocampus ofpups at postnatal (P) day 4 and 8 (P4 and P8), pre-weaning stage (P16), early pubertal stage (P32), and adult (P60) by real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. The entire studied clock gene mRNAs and proteins did not exhibit circadian rhythm in early postnatal P4-P16. Rhythmic expression of Per1 and Per2 mRNA started at P32, whereas Bmal1 began at adult. However, their proteins showed circadian expression together at adult. The present study suggests that rat hippocampal molecular clock works gradually develop after birth and slower than that in the central clock SCN. It was possible that ontogenetic development of clock gene in hippocampus was waitingfor central clocksynchronization.

  5. Transduction of light in the suprachiasmatic nucleus: evidence for two different neurochemical cascades regulating the levels of Per1 mRNA and pineal melatonin.

    PubMed

    Paul, K N; Fukuhara, C; Tosini, G; Albers, H E

    2003-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) contains a circadian clock and regulates melatonin synthesis in the pineal gland. Light exposure during the subjective night acutely increases the mRNA levels of the Period (Per)1 gene in the SCN and acutely suppresses melatonin levels in the pineal gland. Activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the SCN has been demonstrated to phase-shift the circadian clock in a manner similar to light. We tested the hypothesis that activation of excitatory amino acid (EAA) receptors in the SCN mediates the acute effects of light on Per1 mRNA levels and pineal melatonin. NMDA, injected into the SCN of Syrian hamsters during the night, acutely suppressed melatonin levels in the pineal gland. Both the NMDA receptor antagonist 2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP5) and the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazoleproprionic acid (AMPA)/kainate receptor antagonist 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX) inhibited the light-induced increase of Per1 mRNA levels in the SCN. In the same animals, however, these antagonists had no effect on the ability of light to suppress pineal melatonin. These results support the hypothesis that EAA receptor activation in the SCN is necessary for the acute effects of light on Per1 mRNA levels. They also indicate that NMDA receptor activation in the SCN is sufficient but may not be necessary for the acute effects of light on pineal melatonin. These data suggest that there may be at least two different neurochemical cascades that transduce the effects of light in the SCN

  6. Time-related dynamics of variation in core clock gene expression levels in tissues relevant to the immune system.

    PubMed

    Mazzoccoli, G; Sothern, R B; Greco, A; Pazienza, V; Vinciguerra, M; Liu, S; Cai, Y

    2011-01-01

    Immune parameters show rhythmic changes with a 24-h periodicity driven by an internal circadian timing system that relies on clock genes (CGs). CGs form interlocked transcription-translation feedback loops to generate and maintain 24-h mRNA and protein oscillations. In this study we evaluate and compare the profiles and the dynamics of variation of CG expression in peripheral blood, and two lymphoid tissues of mice. Expression levels of seven recognized key CGs (mBmal1, mClock, mPer1, mPer2, mCry1, mCry2, and Rev-erbalpha) were evaluated by quantitative RT- PCR in spleen, thymus and peripheral blood of C57BL/6 male mice housed on a 12-h light (L)-dark (D) cycle and sacrificed every 4 h for 24 h (3-4 mice/time point). We found a statistically significant time-effect in spleen (S), thymus (T) and blood (B) for the original values of expression level of mBmal1 (S), mClock (T, B), mPer1 (S, B), mPer2 (S), mCry1 (S), mCry2 (B) and mRev-Erbalpha (S, T, B) and for the fractional variation calculated between single time-point expression value of mBmal1 (B), mPer2 (T), mCry2 (B) and mRev-Erbalpha (S). A significant 24-h rhythm was validated for five CGs in blood (mClock, mPer1, mPer2, mCry2, mRev-Erbalpha), for four CGs in the spleen (mBmal1, mPer1, mPer2, mRev-Erbalpha), and for three CGs in the thymus (mClock, mPer2, mRev-Erbalpha). The original values of acrophases for mBmal1, mClock, mPer1, mPer2, mCry1 and mCry2 were very similar for spleen and thymus and advanced by several hours for peripheral blood compared to the lymphoid tissues, whereas the phases of mRev-Erbalpha were coincident for all three tissues. In conclusion, central and peripheral lymphoid tissues in the mouse show different sequences of activation of clock gene expression compared to peripheral blood. These differences may underlie the compartmental pattern of web functioning in the immune system.

  7. Light-induced phase-shifts in the circadian expression rhythm of mammalian period genes in the mouse heart.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, K; Ishida, N

    2000-11-01

    To investigate the molecular mechanism that regulates circadian rhythms in mammalian peripheral tissues, we examined the phase shifts evoked by light exposure in the circadian mRNA expression rhythms of mammalian Period genes (mPer1, mPer2 and mPer3) and a clock-controlled gene Dbp, in the mouse heart, by Northern blot analysis. The light pulse did not induce any acute mRNA expression of mPer in the heart, but the pulse gave rise to phase shifts in the circadian mRNA rhythms. On the first day after the exposure, only mPer1 mRNA showed a phase shift, whereas obvious phase shifts were not observed in the rhythms of mPer2, mPer3 and Dbp mRNAs. On the second day, phase shifts occurred to a similar extent in the mRNA rhythms of all four genes examined. The rhythm of mPer1 mRNA shifted fastest among those of the three mPers. Therefore mPer1 seems to play an important role in phase resetting of mammalian peripheral oscillators. Immediate responses to light pulses in mRNA expression of mPers may not be required for phase shifting of peripheral circadian oscillators. Our findings suggest that mammals require more than one day to have peripheral oscillators entrained to a new daily schedule.

  8. Combination of starvation interval and food volume determines the phase of liver circadian rhythm in Per2::Luc knock-in mice under two meals per day feeding.

    PubMed

    Hirao, Akiko; Nagahama, Hiroki; Tsuboi, Takuma; Hirao, Mizuho; Tahara, Yu; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2010-11-01

    Although the circadian liver clock is entrained by the feeding cycle, factors such as food volume and starvation interval are poorly understood. Per2::Luc knock-in mice were given two meals per day with different food volume sizes and/or with different intervals of starvation between two mealtimes with the total food volume per day fixed at 3.6 g (80 food pellets, ∼75% of free feeding) per mouse. The bioluminescence rhythm in the liver produced a unimodal peak but not bimodal peak under the regimen of two meals per day over 14-15 days. Peak Per2 expression occurred concurrently with the mealtime of the larger food volume, when the first and second meal were given as different food volume ratios under a 12 h feeding interval. When an equal volume of food was given under different starvation interval (8 h:16 h), the peak of the Per2 rhythm was close to peak by mealtime after long starvation (16 h). When food volumes for each mealtime were changed under 8 h:16 h, the peak rhythm was influenced by combined factors of food volume and starvation interval. Food intake after the 16-h starvation caused a significant increase in liver Per2, Dec1, and Bmal1 gene expression compared with food intake after the 8-h starvation with 8 h:16 h feeding intervals. In conclusion, the present results clearly demonstrate that food-induced entrainment of the liver clock is dependent on both food volume and the starvation interval between two meals. Therefore, normal feeding habits may help to maintain normal clock function in the liver organ.

  9. Disruption of period gene expression alters the inductive effects of dioxin on the AhR signaling pathway in the mouse liver

    SciTech Connect

    Qu Xiaoyu; Metz, Richard P.; Porter, Weston W.; Cassone, Vincent M.; Earnest, David J.

    2009-02-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and AhR nuclear translocator (ARNT) are transcription factors that express Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) DNA-binding motifs and mediate the metabolism of drugs and environmental toxins in the liver. Because these transcription factors interact with other PAS genes in molecular feedback loops forming the mammalian circadian clockworks, we determined whether targeted disruption or siRNA inhibition of Per1 and Per2 expression alters toxin-mediated regulation of the AhR signaling pathway in the mouse liver and Hepa1c1c7 hepatoma cells in vitro. Treatment with the prototypical Ahr ligand, 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), had inductive effects on the primary targets of AhR signaling, Cyp1A1 and Cyp1B1, in the liver of all animals, but genotype-based differences were evident such that the toxin-mediated induction of Cyp1A1 expression was significantly greater (2-fold) in mice with targeted disruption of Per1 (Per1{sup ldc} and Per1{sup ldc}/Per2{sup ldc}). In vitro experiments yielded similar results demonstrating that siRNA inhibition of Per1 significantly increases the TCDD-induced expression of Cyp1A1 and Cyp1B1 in Hepa1c1c7 cells. Per2 inhibition in siRNA-infected Hepa1c1c7 cells had the opposite effect and significantly decreased both the induction of these p450 genes as well as AhR and Arnt expression in response to TCDD treatment. These findings suggest that Per1 may play a distinctive role in modulating AhR-regulated responses to TCDD in the liver.

  10. Effects of Per2 overexpression on growth inhibition and metastasis, and on MTA1, nm23-H1 and the autophagy-associated PI3K/PKB signaling pathway in nude mice xenograft models of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaoxia; Li, Li; Wang, Yang

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between Period2 (Per2) and the occurrence and development of ovarian cancer, in addition to evaluating the effect of this gene on the growth and metastasis of ovarian cancer in nude mice xenograft models. The detection of Per2 by reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT‑qPCR) and western blotting methods at various stages of ovarian cancer in tumor tissue samples was conducted. Nude mice xenograft models of ovarian cancer were constructed using an ovarian cancer cell line and, using a gene transfection technique, exogenous infusion of the recombinant gene, Per2, was performed. To assess for the successful and stable expression of Per2 in the tumor tissue, levels of Per2 expression in the nude mice xenograft models were detected by RT‑qPCR. During the experimental period, the tumor volumes were measured every three days. Two weeks following treatment cessation, the nude mice were sacrificed and the tumor weight and volume were measured. Furthermore, detection of the changes in expression levels of metastasis‑associated gene 1 (MTA‑1) and tumor metastasis suppressor gene, non‑metastasis protein 23‑H1 (nm23‑H1), and the expression change of autophagy‑associated signal transduction pathway, phosphatidylinositol 3‑kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (PKB) kinase were analyzed. The findings demonstrated that with ovarian cancer stage development, the expression of Per2 gradually reduced or ceased. In addition, exogenous Per2 was successfully and stably expressed in nude mice tumor tissue samples. Furthermore, in the Per2 overexpression group, MTA‑1 protein expression was significantly reduced when compared with the phosphate‑buffered saline (PBS) control and empty plasmid groups, while nm23‑H1 protein expression was significantly higher when compared with those two groups. The expression levels of PI3K and PKB kinase, which are marker proteins of the autophagy

  11. Genetic analysis of a PER-2 producing Shewanella spp. strain harboring a variety of mobile genetic elements and antibiotic resistant determinants.

    PubMed

    Almuzara, Marisa; Montaña, Sabrina; Lazzaro, Terese; Uong, Sylvia; Parmeciano Di Noto, Gisela; Traglia, German; Bakai, Romina; Centrón, Daniela; Iriarte, Andrés; Quiroga, Cecilia; Ramirez, Maria Soledad

    2017-07-28

    The goal of this work is to investigate the molecular mechanisms that explain the multidrug resistant phenotype found in a novel clinical Shewanella spp. strain (Shew256) recovered from a diabetic patient. The whole-genome shotgun sequencing was obtained with Illumina MiSeq-I and Nextera XT DNA library. De novo assembly was performed with SPADES. RAST was used to predict the open reading frames and the predictions were confirmed using BLAST. Further genomic analysis was carried out using average nucleotide identity (ANI), ACT (Artemis), OrthoMCL, ARG-ANNOT, ISFinder, PHAST, tRNAscan-SE, plasmidSPAdes, PlasmidFinder and MAUVE. PCR reactions and plasmid extraction were also performed. The genomic analysis revealed a total of 456 predicted genes, which are unique to Shew256 when compared with the other Shewanella genomes. Moreover, the presence of different resistance genes, including the presence of a blaPER-2, were found. A complex class 1 integron containing the ISCR1 gene, disrupted by two putative transposase genes were identified. Furthermore, other resistance genes, a transposon containing aph(3'), insertion sequences, phages, and non-coding RNAs were also found. Evidences of acquisition of resistance genes and mobile elements that could explain the multidrug resistance phenotype were observed. This Shewanella species represents a prime example of how antibiotic resistance determinants can be acquired by uncommon pathogens. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Chemotherapy of Infection and Cancer. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of angiotensin II on rhythmic per2 expression in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and heart and daily rhythm of activity in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Herichová, Iveta; Šoltésová, Dorota; Szántóová, Kristína; Mravec, Boris; Neupauerová, Denisa; Veselá, Anna; Zeman, Michal

    2013-09-10

    Endogenous daily rhythms are generated by the hierarchically organized circadian system predominantly synchronized by the external light (L): dark (D) cycle. During recent years several humoral signals have been found to influence the generation and manifestation of daily rhythm. Since most studies have been performed under in vitro conditions, the mechanisms employed under in vivo conditions need to be investigated. Our study focused on angiotensin II (angII)-mediated regulation of Per2 expression in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) and heart and spontaneous locomotor activity in Wistar rats under synchronized conditions. Angiotensin II was infused (100ng/kg/min) via subcutaneously implanted osmotic minipumps for 7 or 28days. Samples were taken in 4-h intervals during a 24hcycle and after a light pulse applied in the first and second part of the dark phase. Gene expression was measured using real time PCR. Locomotor activity was monitored using an infrared camera with a remote control installed in the animal facility. Seven days of angII infusion caused an increase in blood pressure and heart/body weight index and 28days of angII infusion also increased water intake in comparison with controls. We observed a distinct daily rhythm in Per2 expression in the SCN and heart of control rats and infused rats. Seven days of angII infusion did not influence Per2 expression in the heart. 28days of angII treatment caused significant phase advance and a decrease in nighttime expression of Per2 and influenced expression of clock controlled genes Rev-erb alpha and Dbp in the heart compared to the control. Four weeks of angII infusion decreased the responsiveness of Per2 expression in the SCN to a light pulse at the end of the dark phase of the 24hcycle. Expression of mRNA coding angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) showed a daily rhythm in the heart of control rats. Four weeks of angII infusion caused a decrease in amplitude of rhythmic

  13. Clock gene expression in mouse kidney and testis: analysis of periodical and dynamical patterns.

    PubMed

    Mazzoccoli, G; Francavilla, M; Giuliani, F; Aucella, F; Vinciguerra, M; Pazienza, V; Piepoli, A; Benegiamo, G; Liu, S; Cai, Y

    2012-01-01

    Molecular clocks drive circadian rhythmicity of cellular functions in peripheral tissues and organs, kidney included, whereas in the testis this clockwork seems constitutively active. We have evaluated the periodicity and the dynamics of expression of the clock genes BMAL1, CLOCK, PER1, PER2, CRY1, CRY2 and REV ERBalpha over 24 h in the kidney and testis using a mouse model. The periodicity was explored by single cosinor, and dynamics were explored by calculation of fractional variations of gene expression related to time intervals. Kidney and testis were harvested at 4-h intervals over a 24-h period from eight-week-old C57BL/6 male mice housed individually on a 12 h light (L)-dark (D) cycle (lights on at 08:00 h; lights off at 20:00 h) and mRNA was extracted and analyzed by Quantitative Real-time Reverse Transcription PCR. A statistically significant difference was evidenced between kidney and testis for the original values of expression level of BMAL1, PER1, PER2 CRY1, CRY2 and REV ERBα. A statistically significant difference was evidenced between kidney and testis for the fractional variation of BMAL1, PER2, CRY1, CRY2 and REV ERBα. A significant 24-h rhythmic component was found for BMAL1, CLOCK, PER1, PER2, CRY1, CRY2 and REV ERBα in the kidney, whereas no core clock gene showed circadian rhythmicity in the testis. Fractional variations provided significant circadian rhythms for BMAL1, PER2, CRY, CRY2 and REV ERBα in the kidney, whereas in the testis the fractional variation calculations showed no circadian rhythmicity, but quantitative comparison showed statistically significant differences in only 16.7 percent of the time points studied. In conclusion, in the kidney the clock gene machinery shows circadian oscillation of mRNA levels and time-related variations in the rate of change of clock gene expression. In the testis the clock genes do not show circadian rhythmicity of expression and the dynamics of variation are not characterized by

  14. 2,2,2-Tribromoethanol phase-shifts the circadian rhythm of the liver clock in Per2::Luciferase knockin mice: lack of dependence on anesthetic activity.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Yuji; Tahara, Yu; Hirao, Akiko; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2012-03-01

    Comprehensive gene expression profiling in mice in response to the inhalation of sevoflurane has revealed that circadian clock gene expression is affected strongly in the liver, heart, lung, and kidney, in this order, but moderately in the spleen and slightly in the brain. Therefore, we examined whether the administration of general anesthetics at different times of the day induces phase shifts of the liver clock in Per2::Luciferase knockin mice. One to 4 days of intraperitoneal injection of 2,2,2-tribromoethanol (240 mg/kg, anesthetic time 60 min) or 2,2,2-trichloroethanol (240 mg/kg, 60 min), common anesthetics in veterinary surgery, caused phase delays when injected during the daytime and phase advances when injected during the nighttime. Inhalation administration of isoflurane for 30 or 60 min during the daytime did not induce a phase delay. Injection of propofol (300 mg/kg, 17 min) during the daytime induced an insignificant phase delay of the Per2 bioluminescence rhythm. Injection of 2,2,2-tribromoethanol did not induce a phase shift in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, the main oscillator, or in behavioral locomotor rhythms, suggesting that 2,2,2-tribromoethanol induced phase shifts of the liver clock independent of the main suprachiasmatic clock. The expression of clock genes, such as Bmal1 and Clock, in mouse liver was decreased strongly 1 and 4 h after a single injection of 2,2,2-tribromoethanol. These results demonstrate that 2,2,2-tribromoethanol or 2,2,2-trichloroethanol produce phase shifts of the peripheral clock, independent of anesthetic activity. These anesthetics may cause circadian rhythm disorders in peripheral organs when administered as general anesthetics several times during the day.

  15. Crystal structure of the extended-spectrum β-lactamase PER-2 and insights into the role of specific residues in the interaction with β-lactams and β-lactamase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, Melina; Kerff, Frédéric; Herman, Raphaël; Sapunaric, Frédéric; Galleni, Moreno; Gutkind, Gabriel; Charlier, Paulette; Sauvage, Eric; Power, Pablo

    2014-10-01

    PER-2 belongs to a small (7 members to date) group of extended-spectrum β-lactamases. It has 88% amino acid identity with PER-1 and both display high catalytic efficiencies toward most β-lactams. In this study, we determined the X-ray structure of PER-2 at 2.20 Å and evaluated the possible role of several residues in the structure and activity toward β-lactams and mechanism-based inhibitors. PER-2 is defined by the presence of a singular trans bond between residues 166 to 167, which generates an inverted Ω loop, an expanded fold of this domain that results in a wide active site cavity that allows for efficient hydrolysis of antibiotics like the oxyimino-cephalosporins, and a series of exclusive interactions between residues not frequently involved in the stabilization of the active site in other class A β-lactamases. PER β-lactamases might be included within a cluster of evolutionarily related enzymes harboring the conserved residues Asp136 and Asn179. Other signature residues that define these enzymes seem to be Gln69, Arg220, Thr237, and probably Arg/Lys240A ("A" indicates an insertion according to Ambler's scheme for residue numbering in PER β-lactamases), with structurally important roles in the stabilization of the active site and proper orientation of catalytic water molecules, among others. We propose, supported by simulated models of PER-2 in combination with different β-lactams, the presence of a hydrogen-bond network connecting Ser70-Gln69-water-Thr237-Arg220 that might be important for the proper activity and inhibition of the enzyme. Therefore, we expect that mutations occurring in these positions will have impacts on the overall hydrolytic behavior.

  16. Crystal Structure of the Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase PER-2 and Insights into the Role of Specific Residues in the Interaction with β-Lactams and β-Lactamase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ruggiero, Melina; Kerff, Frédéric; Herman, Raphaël; Sapunaric, Frédéric; Galleni, Moreno; Gutkind, Gabriel; Charlier, Paulette; Sauvage, Eric

    2014-01-01

    PER-2 belongs to a small (7 members to date) group of extended-spectrum β-lactamases. It has 88% amino acid identity with PER-1 and both display high catalytic efficiencies toward most β-lactams. In this study, we determined the X-ray structure of PER-2 at 2.20 Å and evaluated the possible role of several residues in the structure and activity toward β-lactams and mechanism-based inhibitors. PER-2 is defined by the presence of a singular trans bond between residues 166 to 167, which generates an inverted Ω loop, an expanded fold of this domain that results in a wide active site cavity that allows for efficient hydrolysis of antibiotics like the oxyimino-cephalosporins, and a series of exclusive interactions between residues not frequently involved in the stabilization of the active site in other class A β-lactamases. PER β-lactamases might be included within a cluster of evolutionarily related enzymes harboring the conserved residues Asp136 and Asn179. Other signature residues that define these enzymes seem to be Gln69, Arg220, Thr237, and probably Arg/Lys240A (“A” indicates an insertion according to Ambler's scheme for residue numbering in PER β-lactamases), with structurally important roles in the stabilization of the active site and proper orientation of catalytic water molecules, among others. We propose, supported by simulated models of PER-2 in combination with different β-lactams, the presence of a hydrogen-bond network connecting Ser70-Gln69-water-Thr237-Arg220 that might be important for the proper activity and inhibition of the enzyme. Therefore, we expect that mutations occurring in these positions will have impacts on the overall hydrolytic behavior. PMID:25070104

  17. Postnatal ontogeny of the circadian expression of the adrenal clock genes and corticosterone rhythm in male rats.

    PubMed

    Ruiz Roa, Silvia Liliana; Martinez, Edson Zangiacomi; Martins, Clarissa Silva; Antonini, Sonir Rauber; de Castro, Margaret; Moreira, Ayrton Custódio

    2017-01-25

    The postnatal synchronization of the circadian variation of the adrenal clock genes in mammals remains unknown. We evaluated the postnatal ontogeny of daily variation of clock genes (Clock/Bmal1/Per1/Per2/Per3/Cry1/Cry2/Rorα/Rev-Erbα) and steroidogenesis-related genes (Star and Mc2r) in rat adrenals and its relationship with the emergence of plasma corticosterone rhythm using Cosinor analysis. Plasma corticosterone circadian rhythm was detected from postnatal day (P) P1, with morning acrophase, between zeitgeber time (ZT) ZT0 and ZT2. From P14, there was a nocturnal acrophase of corticosterone at ZT20, which was associated with pups' eye opening. Since P3 there was a circadian variation of the mRNA expression of Bmal1, Per2, Per3, Cry1 genes with morning acrophase whereas Rev-Erbα had nocturnal acrophase. From P14, Bmal1, Per2, Per3, Cry1 acrophases advanced by approximately 10h, as compared to early neonatal days, becoming vespertine-nocturnal. In all postnatal ages, Per2 and Cry1 circadian profiles were synchronized in phase while Bmal1 was in antiphase with the circadian rhythm of plasma corticosterone. Adult-like Star circadian rhythm profile was observed only from P21. In conclusion, our original data demonstrated a progressive postnatal maturation of the circadian variation of the adrenal clock genes in synchrony with the development of the corticosterone circadian rhythm in rats.

  18. Characterization of sevoflurane effects on Per2 expression using ex vivo bioluminescence imaging of the suprachiasmatic nucleus in transgenic rats.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Izumi; Iijima, Norio; Takumi, Ken; Higo, Shimpei; Aikawa, Satoko; Anzai, Megumi; Ishii, Hirotaka; Sakamoto, Atsuhiro; Ozawa, Hitoshi

    2016-06-01

    The inhalation anesthetic sevoflurane suppresses Per2 expression in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in rodents. Here, we investigated the intra-SCN regional specificity, time-dependency, and pharmacological basis of sevoflurane-effects. Bioluminescence image was taken from the SCN explants of mPer2 promoter-destabilized luciferase transgenic rats, and each small regions of interest (ROI) of the image was analyzed. Sevoflurane suppressed bioluminescence in all ROIs, suggesting that all regions in the SCN are sensitive to sevoflurane. Clear time-dependency in sevoflurane effects were also observed; application during the trough phase of the bioluminescence cycle suppressed the subsequent increase in bioluminescence and resulted in a phase delay of the cycle; sevoflurane applied during the middle of the ascending phase induced a phase advance; sevoflurane on the descending phase showed no effect. These results indicate that the sevoflurane effect may depend on the intrinsic state of circadian machinery. Finally, we examined the involvement of GABAergic signal transduction in the sevoflurane effect. Co-application of both GABAA and GABAB receptor antagonists completely blocked the effect of sevoflurane on the bioluminescence rhythm, suggesting that sevoflurane inhibits Per2 expression via GABAergic signal transduction. Current study elucidated the anesthetic effects on the molecular mechanisms of circadian rhythm.

  19. Is the Target of 1 Day of Stay per 1% Total Body Surface Area Burned Achieved in Chemical Burns?

    PubMed

    Tan, Teresa; Wong, David S Y

    2016-02-01

    The length of hospital stay (LOS) is a standard parameter used to reflect quality and evaluate outcomes in acute burn care. This study aims to assess whether the target of 1 day of stay per 1% total body surface area (TBSA) burned was achieved in acute chemical burns management and factors affecting the LOS. A retrospective analysis of the records of patients who suffered from chemical burn injuries admitted to a university burn center over a continuous 14-year period was performed.A total of 118 patients were admitted over the period for chemical burns. Only 14% of cases achieved the target stated. Factors associated with lengthening of the hospital stay included TBSA, ocular involvement, the cause of injury, and the need for surgery during the same admission.The LOS in chemical burns frequently exceeds 1 day of stay per 1% TBSA burned. Many factors can contribute to a patient's LOS and are worth exploring in order to see if the impact of these factors could be minimized. Early surgical intervention should help to reduce the LOS if reliable methods of burn wound depth assessment are available.

  20. Time-restricted feeding of rapidly digested starches causes stronger entrainment of the liver clock in PER2::LUCIFERASE knock-in mice.

    PubMed

    Itokawa, Misa; Hirao, Akiko; Nagahama, Hiroki; Otsuka, Makiko; Ohtsu, Teiji; Furutani, Naoki; Hirao, Kazuko; Hatta, Tamao; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2013-02-01

    Restricting feeding to daytime can entrain circadian clocks in peripheral organs of rodents, and nutrients that rapidly increase the blood glucose level are suitable for inducing entrainment. However, dietetic issues, for example, whether or not the diet comprises heated food, have not been fully explored. We therefore hypothesized that rapidly digested starch causes stronger entrainment than slowly digested starch. The entrainment ability of the liver clock in PER2::LUCIFERASE knock-in mice, blood glucose levels, insulin levels, and acute changes in liver clock gene expression were compared between a β-starch (native)-substituted AIN-93M standard diet and an α-starch (gelatinized)-substituted diet. β-Corn and β-rice starch induced larger phase delays of the liver clock, larger blood glucose increases, and higher Per2 gene expression in the liver compared with β-potato starch. Starch granule size, as examined by electron microscopy, was larger for β-potato starch than for β-corn or β-rice starch. After heating, we obtained gelatinized α-potato, α-corn, and α-rice starch, which showed destruction of the crystal structure and a high level of gelatinization. No difference in the increase of blood glucose or insulin levels was observed between β-corn and α-corn starch, or between β-rice and α-rice starch. In contrast, α-potato starch caused higher levels of glucose and insulin compared with β-potato starch. An α-potato starch-substituted diet induced larger phase delays of the liver clock than did β-potato starch. Therefore, rapidly digested starch is appropriate for peripheral clock entrainment. Dietetic issues (heated vs unheated) are important when applying basic mouse data to humans.

  1. Daily differential expression of melatonin-related genes and clock genes in rat cumulus-oocyte complex: changes after pinealectomy.

    PubMed

    Coelho, L A; Peres, R; Amaral, F G; Reiter, R J; Cipolla-Neto, J

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the maturational stage (immature and mature ovaries) differences of mRNA expression of melatonin-forming enzymes (Aanat and Asmt), melatonin membrane receptors (Mt1 and Mt2) and putative nuclear (Rorα) receptors, and clock genes (Clock, Bmal1, Per1, Per2, Cry1, Cry2) in cumulus-oocyte complexes (COC) from weaning Wistar rats. We also examined the effects of pinealectomy and of melatonin pharmacological replacement on the daily expression of these genes in COC. qRT-PCR analysis revealed that in oocytes, the mRNA expression of Asmt, Mt2, Clock, Bmal1, Per2, and Cry1 were higher (P < 0.05) in immature ovaries than in the mature ones. In cumulus cells, the same pattern of mRNA expression for Asmt, Aanat, Rorα, Clock, Per1, Cry1, and Cry2 genes was observed. In oocytes, pinealectomy altered the daily mRNA expression profiles of Asmt, Mt1, Mt2, Clock, Per1, Cry1, and Cry2 genes. In cumulus cells, removal of the pineal altered the mRNA expression profiles of Mt1, Mt2, Rorα, Aanat, Asmt, Clock, Bmal1, Per2, Cry1, and Cry2 genes. Melatonin treatment partially or completely re-established the daily mRNA expression profiles of most genes studied. The mRNA expression of melatonin-related genes and clock genes in rat COC varies with the maturational stage of the meiotic cellular cycle in addition to the hour of the day. This suggests that melatonin might act differentially in accordance with the maturational stage of cumulus/oocyte complex. In addition, it seems that circulating pineal melatonin is very important in the design of the daily profile of mRNA expression of COC clock genes and genes related to melatonin synthesis and action. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. The Transcriptional Repressor ID2 Can Interact with the Canonical Clock Components CLOCK and BMAL1 and Mediate Inhibitory Effects on mPer1 Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Sarah M.; Fernando, Shanik J.; Hou, Tim Y.; Duffield, Giles E.

    2010-01-01

    ID2 is a rhythmically expressed HLH transcriptional repressor. Deletion of Id2 in mice results in circadian phenotypes, highlighted by disrupted locomotor activity rhythms and an enhanced photoentrainment response. ID2 can suppress the transactivation potential of the positive elements of the clock, CLOCK-BMAL1, on mPer1 and clock-controlled gene (CCG) activity. Misregulation of CCGs is observed in Id2−/− liver, and mutant mice exhibit associated alterations in lipid homeostasis. These data suggest that ID2 contributes to both input and output components of the clock and that this may be via interaction with the bHLH clock proteins CLOCK and BMAL1. The aim of the present study was to explore this potential interaction. Coimmunoprecipitation analysis revealed the capability of ID2 to complex with both CLOCK and BMAL1, and mammalian two-hybrid analysis revealed direct interactions of ID2, ID1 and ID3 with CLOCK and BMAL1. Deletion of the ID2 HLH domain rendered ID2 ineffective at inhibiting CLOCK-BMAL1 transactivation, suggesting that interaction between the proteins is via the HLH region. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed overlapping localization of ID2 with CLOCK and BMAL1 in the cytoplasm. Overexpression of CLOCK and BMAL1 in the presence of ID2 resulted in a significant reduction in their nuclear localization, revealing that ID2 can sequester CLOCK and BMAL1 to the cytoplasm. Serum stimulation of Id2−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts resulted in an enhanced induction of mPer1 expression. These data provide the basis for a molecular mechanism through which ID2 could regulate aspects of both clock input and output through a time-of-day specific interaction with CLOCK and BMAL1. PMID:20861012

  3. PER2 promotes glucose storage to liver glycogen during feeding and acute fasting by inducing Gys2 PTG and G L expression.

    PubMed

    Zani, Fabio; Breasson, Ludovic; Becattini, Barbara; Vukolic, Ana; Montani, Jean-Pierre; Albrecht, Urs; Provenzani, Alessandro; Ripperger, Juergen A; Solinas, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    The interplay between hepatic glycogen metabolism and blood glucose levels is a paradigm of the rhythmic nature of metabolic homeostasis. Here we show that mice lacking a functional PER2 protein (Per2 (Brdm1) ) display reduced fasting glycemia, altered rhythms of hepatic glycogen accumulation, and altered rhythms of food intake. Per2 (Brdm1) mice show reduced hepatic glycogen content and altered circadian expression during controlled fasting and refeeding. Livers from Per2 (Brdm1) mice display reduced glycogen synthase protein levels during refeeding, and increased glycogen phosphorylase activity during fasting. The latter is explained by PER2 action on the expression of the adapter proteins PTG and GL, which target the protein phosphatase-1 to glycogen to decrease glycogen phosphorylase activity. Finally, PER2 interacts with genomic regions of Gys2, PTG, and G L . These results indicate an important role for PER2 in the hepatic transcriptional response to feeding and acute fasting that promotes glucose storage to liver glycogen.

  4. Regulation of core clock genes in human islets.

    PubMed

    Stamenkovic, Jelena A; Olsson, Anders H; Nagorny, Cecilia L; Malmgren, Siri; Dekker-Nitert, Marloes; Ling, Charlotte; Mulder, Hindrik

    2012-07-01

    Nearly all mammalian cells express a set of genes known as clock genes. These regulate the circadian rhythm of cellular processes by means of negative and positive autoregulatory feedback loops of transcription and translation. Recent genomewide association studies have demonstrated an association between a polymorphism near the circadian clock gene CRY2 and elevated fasting glucose. To determine whether clock genes could play a pathogenetic role in the disease, we examined messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of core clock genes in human islets from donors with or without type 2 diabetes mellitus. Microarray and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analyses were used to assess expression of the core clock genes CLOCK, BMAL-1, PER1 to 3, and CRY1 and 2 in human islets. Insulin secretion and insulin content in human islets were measured by radioimmunoassay. The mRNA levels of PER2, PER3, and CRY2 were significantly lower in islets from donors with type 2 diabetes mellitus. To investigate the functional relevance of these clock genes, we correlated their expression to insulin content and glycated hemoglobin levels: mRNA levels of PER2 (ρ = 0.33, P = .012), PER3 (ρ = 0.30, P = .023), and CRY2 (ρ = 0.37, P = .0047) correlated positively with insulin content. Of these genes, expression of PER3 and CRY2 correlated negatively with glycated hemoglobin levels (ρ = -0.44, P = .0012; ρ = -0.28, P = .042). Furthermore, in an in vitro model mimicking pathogenetic conditions, the PER3 mRNA level was reduced in human islets exposed to 16.7 mmol/L glucose per 1 mmol/L palmitate for 48 hours (P = .003). Core clock genes are regulated in human islets. The data suggest that perturbations of circadian clock components may contribute to islet pathophysiology in human type 2 diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Hypoxia disrupts the expression levels of circadian rhythm genes in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chao; Yang, Sheng-Li; Fang, Xiefan; Jiang, Jian-Xin; Sun, Cheng-Yi; Huang, Tao

    2015-05-01

    Disturbance in the expression of circadian rhythm genes is a common feature in certain types of cancer, however the mechanisms mediating this disturbance remain to be elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of hypoxia on the expression of circadian rhythm genes in liver cancer cells and to identify the mechanisms underlying this effect in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The HCC cell line, PLC/PRF/5. was treated with either a vehicle control or CoCl2 at 50, 100 or 200 µΜ for 24 h. Following treatment, the protein expression levels of hypoxia‑inducible factor (HIF)‑1α and HIF‑2α were detected by western blotting and the mRNA expression levels of circadian rhythm genes, including circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (Clock), brain and muscle Arnt‑like 1 (Bmal1), period (Per)1, Per2, Per3, cryptochrome (Cry)1, Cry2 and casein kinase Iε (CKIε), were detected by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT‑qPCR). Expression plasmids containing HIF‑1α or HIF‑2α were transfected into the PLC/PRF/5 cells using liposomes and RT‑qPCR was used to determine the effects of the transfections on the expression levels of circadian rhythm genes. Following treatment with CoCl2, the protein expression levels of HIF‑1α and HIF‑2α were upregulated in a CoCl2 concentration‑dependent manner. The mRNA expression levels of Clock, Bmal1 and Cry2 were increased, and the mRNA expression levels of Per1, Per2, Per3, Cry1 and CKIε were decreased following CoCl2 treatment (P<0.05). In the PLC/PRF/5 cells transfected with the plasmid containing HIF‑1α, the mRNA expression levels of Clock, Bmal1 and Cry2 were increased, and the mRNA expression levels of Per1, Per2, Per3, Cry1 and CKIε were decreased. In the PLC/PRF/5 cells transfected with the plasmid containing HIF‑2α, the mRNA expression levels of Clock, Bmal1, Per1, Cry1, Cry2 and CKIε were upregulated, and the mRNA expression levels of Per2 and Per3 were

  6. Effect of circadian rhythm disturbance on morphine preference and addiction in male rats: Involvement of period genes and dopamine D1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Garmabi, B; Vousooghi, N; Vosough, M; Yoonessi, A; Bakhtazad, A; Zarrindast, M R

    2016-05-13

    It is claimed that a correlation exists between disturbance of circadian rhythms by factors such as alteration of normal light-dark cycle and the development of addiction. However, the exact mechanisms involved in this relationship are not much understood. Here we have studied the effect of constant light on morphine voluntary consumption and withdrawal symptoms and also investigated the involvement of Per1, Per2 and dopamine D1 receptor in these processes. Male wistar rats were kept under standard (LD) or constant light (LL) conditions for one month. The plasma concentration of melatonin was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Real-time PCR was used to determine the mRNA expression of Per1, Per2 and dopamine D1 receptor in the striatum and prefrontal cortex. Morphine preference (50mg/L) was evaluated in a two-bottle-choice paradigm for 10 weeks and withdrawal symptoms were recorded after administration of naloxone (3mg/kg). One month exposure to constant light resulted in a significant decrease of melatonin concentration in the LL group. In addition, mRNA levels of Per2 and dopamine D1 receptor were up-regulated in both the striatum and prefrontal cortex of the LL group. However, expression of Per1 gene was only up-regulated in the striatum of LL rats in comparison to LD animals. Furthermore, after one month exposure to constant light, morphine consumption and preference ratio and also severity of naloxone-induced withdrawal syndrome were significantly greater in LL animals. It is concluded that exposure to constant light by up-regulation of Per2 and dopamine D1 receptor in the striatum and prefrontal cortex and up-regulation of Per1 in the striatum and the possible involvement of melatonin makes animals vulnerable to morphine preference and addiction.

  7. Differential responses of circadian Per2 expression rhythms in discrete brain areas to daily injection of methamphetamine and restricted feeding in rats.

    PubMed

    Natsubori, Akiyo; Honma, Ken-ichi; Honma, Sato

    2013-01-01

    Behavioral rhythms induced by methamphetamine (MAP) and daily restricted feeding (RF) in rats are independent of the circadian pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), and have been regarded to share a common oscillatory mechanism. In the present study, in order to examine the responses of brain oscillatory systems to MAP and RF, circadian rhythms in clock gene, Period2, expression were measured in several brain areas in rats. Transgenic rats carrying a bioluminescence reporter of Period2-dLuciferase were subjected to either daily injection of MAP or RF of 2 h at a fixed time of day for 14 days. As a result, spontaneous movement and wheel-running activity were greatly enhanced following MAP injection and prior to daily meal under RF. Circadian Per2 rhythms were measured in the cultured brain tissues containing one of the following structures: the olfactory bulb; caudate-putamen; parietal cortex; substantia nigra; and SCN. Except for the SCN, the circadian Per2 rhythms in the brain tissues were significantly phase-delayed by 1.9 h on average in MAP-injected rats as compared with the saline-controls. On the other hand, the circadian rhythms outside the SCN were significantly phase-advanced by 6.3 h on average in rats under RF as compared with those under ad libitum feeding. These findings indicate that the circadian rhythms in specific brain areas of the central dopaminergic system respond differentially to MAP injection and RF, suggesting that different oscillatory mechanisms in the brain underlie the MAP-induced behavior and pre-feeding activity under RF.

  8. Clock gene expression in peripheral leucocytes of patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ando, H; Takamura, T; Matsuzawa-Nagata, N; Shima, K R; Eto, T; Misu, H; Shiramoto, M; Tsuru, T; Irie, S; Fujimura, A; Kaneko, S

    2009-02-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated relationships between circadian clock function and the development of metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes. We investigated whether the peripheral circadian clock is impaired in patients with type 2 diabetes. Peripheral leucocytes were obtained from eight patients with diabetes and six comparatively young non-diabetic volunteers at 09:00, 15:00, 21:00 and 03:00 hours (study 1) and from 12 male patients with diabetes and 14 age-matched men at 09:00 hours (study 2). Transcript levels of clock genes (CLOCK, BMAL1 [also known as ARNTL], PER1, PER2, PER3 and CRY1) were determined by real-time quantitative PCR. In study 1, mRNA expression patterns of BMAL1, PER1, PER2 and PER3 exhibited 24 h rhythmicity in the leucocytes of all 14 individuals. The expression levels of these mRNAs were significantly (p < 0.05) lower in patients with diabetes than in non-diabetic individuals at one or more time points. Moreover, the amplitudes of mRNA expression rhythms of PER1 and PER3 genes tended to diminish in patients with diabetes. In study 2, leucocytes obtained from patients with diabetes expressed significantly (p < 0.05) lower transcript levels of BMAL1, PER1 and PER3 compared with leucocytes from control individuals, and transcript expression was inversely correlated with HbA(1c) levels (rho = -0.47 to -0.55, p < 0.05). These results suggest that rhythmic mRNA expression of clock genes is dampened in peripheral leucocytes of patients with type 2 diabetes. The impairment of the circadian clock appears to be closely associated with the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes in humans.

  9. ABCD2 score and secondary stroke prevention: meta-analysis and effect per 1,000 patients triaged.

    PubMed

    Wardlaw, Joanna M; Brazzelli, Miriam; Chappell, Francesca M; Miranda, Hector; Shuler, Kirsten; Sandercock, Peter A G; Dennis, Martin S

    2015-07-28

    Patients with TIA have high risk of recurrent stroke and require rapid assessment and treatment. The ABCD2 clinical risk prediction score is recommended for patient triage by stroke risk, but its ability to stratify by known risk factors and effect on clinic workload are unknown. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of all studies published between January 2005 and September 2014 that reported proportions of true TIA/minor stroke or mimics, risk factors, and recurrent stroke rates, dichotomized to ABCD2 score per 1,000 patients triaged on stroke prevention services. Twenty-nine studies, 13,766 TIA patients (range 69-1,679), were relevant: 48% calculated the ABCD2 score retrospectively; few reported on the ABCD2 score's ability to identify TIA mimics or use by nonspecialists. Meta-analysis showed that ABCD2 ≥4 was sensitive (86.7%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 81.4%-90.7%) but not specific (35.4%, 95% CI 33.3%-37.6%) for recurrent stroke within 7 days. Additionally, 20% of patients with ABCD2 <4 had >50% carotid stenosis or atrial fibrillation (AF); 35%-41% of TIA mimics, and 66% of true TIAs, had ABCD2 score ≥4. Among 1,000 patients attending stroke prevention services, including the 45% with mimics, 52% of patients would have an ABCD2 score ≥4. The ABCD2 score does not reliably discriminate those at low and high risk of early recurrent stroke, identify patients with carotid stenosis or AF needing urgent intervention, or streamline clinic workload. Stroke prevention services need adequate capacity for prompt specialist clinical assessment of all suspected TIA patients for correct patient management. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  10. Mammalian complex I pumps 4 protons per 2 electrons at high and physiological proton motive force in living cells.

    PubMed

    Ripple, Maureen O; Kim, Namjoon; Springett, Roger

    2013-02-22

    Mitochondrial complex I couples electron transfer between matrix NADH and inner-membrane ubiquinone to the pumping of protons against a proton motive force. The accepted proton pumping stoichiometry was 4 protons per 2 electrons transferred (4H(+)/2e(-)) but it has been suggested that stoichiometry may be 3H(+)/2e(-) based on the identification of only 3 proton pumping units in the crystal structure and a revision of the previous experimental data. Measurement of proton pumping stoichiometry is challenging because, even in isolated mitochondria, it is difficult to measure the proton motive force while simultaneously measuring the redox potentials of the NADH/NAD(+) and ubiquinol/ubiquinone pools. Here we employ a new method to quantify the proton motive force in living cells from the redox poise of the bc(1) complex measured using multiwavelength cell spectroscopy and show that the correct stoichiometry for complex I is 4H(+)/2e(-) in mouse and human cells at high and physiological proton motive force.

  11. Forced rather than voluntary exercise entrains peripheral clocks via a corticosterone/noradrenaline increase in PER2::LUC mice

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Hattori, Yuta; Ikeda, Yuko; Kamagata, Mayo; Iwami, Shiho; Yasuda, Shinnosuke; Tahara, Yu; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2016-01-01

    Exercise during the inactive period can entrain locomotor activity and peripheral circadian clock rhythm in mice; however, mechanisms underlying this entrainment are yet to be elucidated. Here, we showed that the bioluminescence rhythm of peripheral clocks in PER2::LUC mice was strongly entrained by forced treadmill and forced wheel-running exercise rather than by voluntary wheel-running exercise at middle time during the inactivity period. Exercise-induced entrainment was accompanied by increased levels of serum corticosterone and norepinephrine in peripheral tissues, similar to the physical stress-induced response. Adrenalectomy with norepinephrine receptor blockers completely blocked the treadmill exercise-induced entrainment. The entrainment of the peripheral clock by exercise is independent of the suprachiasmatic nucleus clock, the main oscillator in mammals. The present results suggest that the response of forced exercise, but not voluntary exercise, may be similar to that of stress, and possesses the entrainment ability of peripheral clocks through the activation of the adrenal gland and the sympathetic nervous system. PMID:27271267

  12. Mammalian Complex I Pumps 4 Protons per 2 Electrons at High and Physiological Proton Motive Force in Living Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Ripple, Maureen O.; Kim, Namjoon; Springett, Roger

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial complex I couples electron transfer between matrix NADH and inner-membrane ubiquinone to the pumping of protons against a proton motive force. The accepted proton pumping stoichiometry was 4 protons per 2 electrons transferred (4H+/2e−) but it has been suggested that stoichiometry may be 3H+/2e− based on the identification of only 3 proton pumping units in the crystal structure and a revision of the previous experimental data. Measurement of proton pumping stoichiometry is challenging because, even in isolated mitochondria, it is difficult to measure the proton motive force while simultaneously measuring the redox potentials of the NADH/NAD+ and ubiquinol/ubiquinone pools. Here we employ a new method to quantify the proton motive force in living cells from the redox poise of the bc1 complex measured using multiwavelength cell spectroscopy and show that the correct stoichiometry for complex I is 4H+/2e− in mouse and human cells at high and physiological proton motive force. PMID:23306206

  13. The hippocampal autophagic machinery is depressed in the absence of the circadian clock protein PER1 that may lead to vulnerability during cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Rami, Abdelhaq; Fekadu, Julia; Rawashdeh, Oliver

    2017-06-18

    Autophagy is an intracellular bulk self-degrading process in which cytoplasmic contents of abnormal proteins and excess or damaged organelles are sequestered into autophagosomes, and degraded upon fusion with lysosomes. Although autophagy is generally considered to be pro-survival, it also functions in cell death processes. We recently reported on the hippocampal higher vulnerability to cerebral ischemia in mice lacking the circadian clock protein PERIOD1 (PER1), a phenomenon we found to be linked to a PER1-dependent modulation of the expression patterns of apoptotic/autophagic markers. To exclude the contribution of vascular or glial factors to the innate vulnerability of Per1 knockout-mice (Per1-/--mice) to cerebral ischemia in vivo, we compared the autophagic machinery between primary hippocampal cultures from wild-type (WT)- and Per1-/--mice, using the lipophilic macrolide antibiotic, Rapamycin to induce autophagy. Development of autophagy in WT cells involved an increased LC3-II-to-LC3-I ratio (microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3) and an overall increase in the level of LC3-II. In addition, immunostaining of LC3 in WT cells revealed the typical transformation of LC3 localization from a diffused staining to a dot- and ring-like pattern. In contrast, Per1-/--hippocampal cells were resistant to Rapamycin induced alterations of autophagy hallmarks. Our in vitro data suggests that basal activity of autophagy seems to be modulated by PER1, and confirms the in vivo data by showing that the autophagic machinery is depressed in Per1-/--hippocampal neurons.The implication of both autophagy and circadian dysfunction in the pathogenesis of cerebral ischemia suggests that a functional connection between the two processes may exist. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. Sodium, saturated fat, and trans fat content per 1,000 kilocalories: temporal trends in fast-food restaurants, United States, 2000-2013.

    PubMed

    Urban, Lorien E; Roberts, Susan B; Fierstein, Jamie L; Gary, Christine E; Lichtenstein, Alice H

    2014-12-31

    Intakes of sodium, saturated fat, and trans fat remain high despite recommendations to limit these nutrients for cardiometabolic risk reduction. A major contributor to intake of these nutrients is foods prepared outside the home, particularly from fast-food restaurants. We analyzed the nutrient content of frequently ordered items from 3 US national fast-food chains: fried potatoes (large French fries), cheeseburgers (2-oz and 4-oz), and a grilled chicken sandwich. We used an archival website to obtain data on sodium, saturated fat, and trans fat content for these items from 2000 through 2013. The amount of each nutrient per 1,000 kcal was calculated to determine whether there were trends in product reformulation. Sodium content per 1,000 kcal differed widely among the 3 chains by food item, precluding generalizations across chains. During the 14-year period, sodium content per 1,000 kcal for large French fries remained high for all 3 chains, although the range narrowed from 316-2,000 mg per 1,000 kcal in 2000 to 700-1,420 mg per 1,000 kcal in 2013. Among the items assessed, cheeseburgers were the main contributor of saturated fat, and there was little change in content per 1,000 kcal for this item during the 14-year period. In contrast, there was a sharp decline in saturated and trans fat content of large French fries per 1,000 kcal. Post-2009, the major contributor of trans fat per 1,000 kcal was cheeseburgers; trans fat content of this item remained stable during the 14-year period. With the exception of French fries, little evidence was found during the 14-year period of product reformulation by restaurants to become more consistent with dietary guidance to reduce intakes of sodium and saturated fat.

  15. Sodium, Saturated Fat, and Trans Fat Content Per 1,000 Kilocalories: Temporal Trends in Fast-Food Restaurants, United States, 2000–2013

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Lorien E.; Roberts, Susan B.; Fierstein, Jamie L.; Gary, Christine E.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Intakes of sodium, saturated fat, and trans fat remain high despite recommendations to limit these nutrients for cardiometabolic risk reduction. A major contributor to intake of these nutrients is foods prepared outside the home, particularly from fast-food restaurants. Methods We analyzed the nutrient content of frequently ordered items from 3 US national fast-food chains: fried potatoes (large French fries), cheeseburgers (2-oz and 4-oz), and a grilled chicken sandwich. We used an archival website to obtain data on sodium, saturated fat, and trans fat content for these items from 2000 through 2013. The amount of each nutrient per 1,000 kcal was calculated to determine whether there were trends in product reformulation. Results Sodium content per 1,000 kcal differed widely among the 3 chains by food item, precluding generalizations across chains. During the 14-year period, sodium content per 1,000 kcal for large French fries remained high for all 3 chains, although the range narrowed from 316–2,000 mg per 1,000 kcal in 2000 to 700–1,420 mg per 1,000 kcal in 2013. Among the items assessed, cheeseburgers were the main contributor of saturated fat, and there was little change in content per 1,000 kcal for this item during the 14-year period. In contrast, there was a sharp decline in saturated and trans fat content of large French fries per 1,000 kcal. Post-2009, the major contributor of trans fat per 1,000 kcal was cheeseburgers; trans fat content of this item remained stable during the 14-year period. Conclusion With the exception of French fries, little evidence was found during the 14-year period of product reformulation by restaurants to become more consistent with dietary guidance to reduce intakes of sodium and saturated fat. PMID:25551183

  16. Altered Expression Pattern of Clock Genes in a Rat Model of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, SL; Bouzinova, EV; Fahrenkrug, J

    2016-01-01

    Background: Abnormalities in circadian rhythms may be causal factors in development of major depressive disorder. The biology underlying a causal relationship between circadian rhythm disturbances and depression is slowly being unraveled. Although there is no direct evidence of dysregulation of clock gene expression in depressive patients, many studies have reported single-nucleotide polymorphisms in clock genes in these patients. Methods: In the present study we investigated whether a depression-like state in rats is associated with alternations of the diurnal expression of clock genes. The validated chronic mild stress (CMS) animal model of depression was used to investigate rhythmic expression of three clock genes: period genes 1 and 2 (Per1 and Per2) and Bmal1. Brain and liver tissue was collected from 96 animals after 3.5 weeks of CMS (48 control and 48 depression-like rats) at a 4h sampling interval within 24h. We quantified expression of clock genes on brain sections in the prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, pineal gland, suprachiasmatic nucleus, substantia nigra, amygdala, ventral tegmental area, subfields of the hippocampus, and the lateral habenula using in situ hybridization histochemistry. Expression of clock genes in the liver was monitored by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results: We found that the effect of CMS on clock gene expression was selective and region specific. Per1 exhibits a robust diurnal rhythm in most regions of interest, whereas Bmal1 and in particular Per2 were susceptible to CMS. Conclusion: The present results suggest that altered expression of investigated clock genes is likely associated with the induction of a depression-like state in the CMS model. PMID:27365111

  17. Effects of Electroacupuncture on the Daily Rhythmicity of Intestinal Movement and Circadian Rhythmicity of Colonic Per2 Expression in Rats with Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xueqiang; Zhang, Wenyi; Xie, Bin; Zhu, Zhaojin; Lu, Yuemei

    2016-01-01

    Background. Spinal cord injury (SCI) leads to bowel dysfunction. Electroacupuncture (EA) may improve bowel function. Objective. To assess EA on daily rhythmicity of intestinal movement and circadian rhythmicity of colonic Per2 expression in rats with SCI. Methods. Rats were randomized to the sham, SCI, and SCI+EA groups. EA was performed at bilateral Zusanli point (ST36) during daytime (11:00–11:30) for 14 days following SCI. Intestinal transit and daily rhythmicity of intestinal movement were assessed. Circadian rhythmicity of colonic Per2 expression was assessed by real-time RT-PCR. Results. EA shortened the stool efflux time and increased the dry fecal weight within 24 h in SCI rats. Daily rhythmicity of intestinal movements was unaffected by SCI. The expression of colonic Per2 peaked at 20:00 and the nadir was observed at 8:00 in the SCI and sham groups. In the SCI+EA group, colonic Per2 expression peaked at 12:00 and 20:00, and the nadir was observed at 8:00. Conclusion. SCI did not change the circadian rhythmicity of colonic Per2 expression in rats, and daily intestinal movement rhythmicity was retained. EA changed the daily rhythmicity of intestinal movement and the circadian rhythmicity of colonic Per2 expression in rats with SCI, increasing Per2 expression shortly after EA treatment. PMID:27999821

  18. Variations in Phase and Amplitude of Rhythmic Clock Gene Expression across Prefrontal Cortex, Hippocampus, Amygdala, and Hypothalamic Paraventricular and Suprachiasmatic Nuclei of Male and Female Rats.

    PubMed

    Chun, Lauren E; Woodruff, Elizabeth R; Morton, Sarah; Hinds, Laura R; Spencer, Robert L

    2015-10-01

    The molecular circadian clock is a self-regulating transcription/translation cycle of positive (Bmal1, Clock/Npas2) and negative (Per1,2,3, Cry1,2) regulatory components. While the molecular clock has been well characterized in the body's master circadian pacemaker, the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), only a few studies have examined both the positive and negative clock components in extra-SCN brain tissue. Furthermore, there has yet to be a direct comparison of male and female clock gene expression in the brain. This comparison is warranted, as there are sex differences in circadian functioning and disorders associated with disrupted clock gene expression. This study examined basal clock gene expression (Per1, Per2, Bmal1 mRNA) in the SCN, prefrontal cortex (PFC), rostral agranular insula, hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN), amygdala, and hippocampus of male and female rats at 4-h intervals throughout a 12:12 h light:dark cycle. There was a significant rhythm of Per1, Per2, and Bmal1 in the SCN, PFC, insula, PVN, subregions of the hippocampus, and amygdala with a 24-h period, suggesting the importance of an oscillating molecular clock in extra-SCN brain regions. There were 3 distinct clock gene expression profiles across the brain regions, indicative of diversity among brain clocks. Although, generally, the clock gene expression profiles were similar between male and female rats, there were some sex differences in the robustness of clock gene expression (e.g., females had fewer robust rhythms in the medial PFC, more robust rhythms in the hippocampus, and a greater mesor in the medial amygdala). Furthermore, females with a regular estrous cycle had attenuated aggregate rhythms in clock gene expression in the PFC compared with noncycling females. This suggests that gonadal hormones may modulate the expression of the molecular clock.

  19. Hepatitis B virus X protein disrupts the balance of the expression of circadian rhythm genes in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sheng-Li; Yu, Chao; Jiang, Jian-Xin; Liu, Li-Ping; Fang, Xiefan; Wu, Chao

    2014-12-01

    The human circadian rhythm is controlled by at least eight circadian clock genes and disruption of the circadian rhythm is associated with cancer development. The present study aims to elucidate the association between the expression of circadian clock genes and the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and also to reveal whether the hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) is the major regulator that contributes to the disturbance of circadian clock gene expression. The mRNA levels of circadian clock genes in 30 HCC and the paired peritumoral tissues were determined by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). A stable HBx-expressing cell line, Bel-7404-HBx, was established through transfection of HBx plasmids. The mRNA level of circadian clock genes was also detected by RT-qPCR in these cells. Compared with the paired peritumoral tissues, the mRNA levels of the Per1, Per2, Per3 and Cry2 genes in HCC tissue were significantly lower (P<0.05), while no significant difference was observed in the expression levels of CLOCK, BMAL1, Cry1 and casein kinase 1ɛ (CK1ɛ; P>0.05). Compared with Bel-7404 cells, the mRNA levels of the CLOCK, Per1 and Per2 genes in Bel-7404-HBx cells were significantly increased, while the mRNA levels of the BMAL1, Per3, Cry1, Cry2 and CKIɛ genes were decreased (P<0.05). Thus, the present study identified that disturbance of the expression of circadian clock genes is common in HCC. HBx disrupts the expression of circadian clock genes and may, therefore, induce the development of HCC.

  20. Deregulated expression of circadian clock genes in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Gastric cancer (GC), an aggressive malignant tumor of the alimentary tract, is a leading cause of cancer-related death. Circadian rhythm exhibits a 24-hour variation in physiological processes and behavior, such as hormone levels, metabolism, gene expression, sleep and wakefulness, and appetite. Disruption of circadian rhythm has been associated with various cancers, including chronic myeloid leukemia, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, endometrial carcinoma, and breast cancer. However, the expression of circadian clock genes in GC remains unexplored. Methods In this study, the expression profiles of eight circadian clock genes (PER1, PER2, PER3, CRY1, CRY2, CKIϵ, CLOCK, and BMAL1) of cancerous and noncancerous tissues from 29 GC patients were investigated using real-time quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and validated through immunohistochemical analysis. Results We found that PER2 was significantly up-regulated in cancer tissues (p < 0.005). Up-regulated CRY1 expression was significantly correlated with more advanced stages (stage III and IV) (p < 0.05). Conclusions Our results suggest deregulated expressions of circadian clock genes exist in GC and circadian rhythm disturbance may be associated with the development of GC. PMID:24708606

  1. Effects of a free-choice high-fat high-sugar diet on brain PER2 and BMAL1 protein expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Blancas-Velazquez, Aurea; la Fleur, Susanne E; Mendoza, Jorge

    2017-10-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) times the daily rhythms of behavioral processes including feeding. Beyond the SCN, the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC), involved in feeding regulation and metabolism, and the epithalamic lateral habenula (LHb), implicated in reward processing, show circadian rhythmic activity. These brain oscillators are functionally coupled to coordinate the daily rhythm of food intake. In rats, a free choice high-fat high-sugar (fcHFHS) diet leads to a rapid increase of calorie intake and body weight gain. Interestingly, under a fcHFHS condition, rats ingest a similar amount of sugar during day time (rest phase) as during night time (active phase), but keep the rhythmic intake of regular chow-food. The out of phase between feeding patterns of regular (chow) and highly rewarding food (sugar) may involve alterations of brain circadian oscillators regulating feeding. Here, we report that the fcHFHS diet is a successful model to induce calorie intake, body weight gain and fat tissue accumulation in mice, extending its effectiveness as previously reported in rats. Moreover, we observed that whereas in the SCN the day-night difference in the PER2 clock protein expression was similar between chow-fed and fcHFHS-fed animals, in the LHb, this day-night difference was altered in fcHFHS-exposed animals compared to control chow mice. These findings confirm previous observations in rats showing disrupted daily patterns of feeding behavior under a fcHFHS diet exposure, and extend our insights on the effects of the diet on circadian gene expression in brain clocks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Brief daily suckling shifts locomotor behavior and induces PER1 protein in paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei, but not in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, of rabbit does.

    PubMed

    Meza, Enrique; Juárez, Claudia; Morgado, Elvira; Zavaleta, Yael; Caba, Mario

    2008-10-01

    Nursing in the rabbit is a circadian event during which mother and pups interact for a period of < 5 min every day. Here we explored behavioral and neuronal changes in the mother by analyzing the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), and oxytocinergic (OT) neurons in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and the supraoptic nucleus (SON). We maintained lactating does in a light-dark cycle (lights on at 07 : 00 hours; ZT0); they were scheduled to nurse during either the day (ZT03) or the night (ZT19). Groups of intact and nursing females was perfused, one at each 4-h point through a 24-h cycle. We explored, by immunohistochemistry, the PER1 expression and double-labeling, with OT antibody, of neurons in the PVN and SON at lactation on day 7. In the SCN, intact and lactating groups had peak PER1 expression at ZT11; however, there was a reduction in PER1 at peak time in the nursing groups. There was a locomotor activity rhythm with increased activity around the time of lights-on in intact subjects and around the time of suckling in lactating does. There was an induction of PER1 in OT cells in the PVN and SON that shifted in phase with timing of nursing. We further explored the maintenance of the PER1 expression in OT cells in nursing-deprived does and found a significant decrease at 24 and 48 h after the last nursing. We conclude that suckling induced PER1 in the PVN and SON, but not in the SCN, in nursing does, and also shifted their locomotor behavior.

  3. Phase shifts in circadian peripheral clocks caused by exercise are dependent on the feeding schedule in PER2::LUC mice.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Hattori, Yuta; Ikeda, Yuko; Kamagata, Mayo; Iwami, Shiho; Yasuda, Shinnosuke; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are regulated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) clock, which is the main oscillator and peripheral clock. SCN clock can be entrained by both photic and non-photic stimuli, and an interaction exists between photic and non-photic entrainment. Moreover, peripheral circadian clocks can be entrained not only by scheduled restricted feeding, but also by scheduled exercise. Thus, the entrainment of peripheral circadian clocks may be the result of an interaction between the entrainment caused by feeding and exercise. In this study, we examined the effect of wheel-running exercise on the phase of the peripheral clocks (kidney, liver and submandibular gland) in PER2::LUC mice under various feeding schedules. Phase and waveforms of the peripheral clocks were not affected by voluntary wheel-running exercise. Exercise for a period of 4 h during the early dark period (morning) delayed the peripheral clocks, while exercise for the same duration during the late dark period (evening) advanced the peripheral clocks. The feeding phase was advanced and delayed by evening and morning exercise, respectively, suggesting that the feeding pattern elicited by the scheduled exercise may entrain the peripheral clocks. Exercise did not affect the phase of the peripheral clock under the 1 meal per day schedule. When the phase of the peripheral clocks was advanced by the feeding schedule of 2 or 4 meals per day during light and/or dark periods, wheel-running exercise during the morning period significantly and equally shifted the phase of all organs back to the original positions observed in mice maintained under free-feeding conditions and with no exercise. When the schedule of 2 meals per day during the dark period failed to affect the phase of peripheral clock, morning exercise did not affect the phase. Wheel-running exercise increased the levels of serum corticosterone, and the injection of dexamethasone/corticosterone instead of exercise shifted a phase that had

  4. From blue light to clock genes in zebrafish ZEM-2S cells.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Bruno C R; Moraes, Maria Nathália C M; Poletini, Maristela O; Lima, Leonardo H R G; Castrucci, Ana Maria L

    2014-01-01

    Melanopsin has been implicated in the mammalian photoentrainment by blue light. This photopigment, which maximally absorbs light at wavelengths between 470 and 480 nm depending on the species, is found in the retina of all classes of vertebrates so far studied. In mammals, melanopsin activation triggers a signaling pathway which resets the circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Unlike mammals, Drosophila melanogaster and Danio rerio do not rely only on their eyes to perceive light, in fact their whole body may be capable of detecting light and entraining their circadian clock. Melanopsin, teleost multiple tissue (tmt) opsin and others such as neuropsin and va-opsin, are found in the peripheral tissues of Danio rerio, however, there are limited data concerning the photopigment/s or the signaling pathway/s directly involved in light detection. Here, we demonstrate that melanopsin is a strong candidate to mediate synchronization of zebrafish cells. The deduced amino acid sequence of melanopsin, although being a vertebrate opsin, is more similar to invertebrate than vertebrate photopigments, and melanopsin photostimulation triggers the phosphoinositide pathway through activation of a G(q/11)-type G protein. We stimulated cultured ZEM-2S cells with blue light at wavelengths consistent with melanopsin maximal absorption, and evaluated the time course expression of per1b, cry1b, per2 and cry1a. Using quantitative PCR, we showed that blue light is capable of slightly modulating per1b and cry1b genes, and drastically increasing per2 and cry1a expression. Pharmacological assays indicated that per2 and cry1a responses to blue light are evoked through the activation of the phosphoinositide pathway, which crosstalks with nitric oxide (NO) and mitogen activated protein MAP kinase (MAPK) to activate the clock genes. Our results suggest that melanopsin may be important in mediating the photoresponse in Danio rerio ZEM-2S cells, and provide new insights about the

  5. From Blue Light to Clock Genes in Zebrafish ZEM-2S Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Bruno C. R.; Moraes, Maria Nathália C. M.; Poletini, Maristela O.; Lima, Leonardo H. R. G.; Castrucci, Ana Maria L.

    2014-01-01

    Melanopsin has been implicated in the mammalian photoentrainment by blue light. This photopigment, which maximally absorbs light at wavelengths between 470 and 480 nm depending on the species, is found in the retina of all classes of vertebrates so far studied. In mammals, melanopsin activation triggers a signaling pathway which resets the circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Unlike mammals, Drosophila melanogaster and Danio rerio do not rely only on their eyes to perceive light, in fact their whole body may be capable of detecting light and entraining their circadian clock. Melanopsin, teleost multiple tissue (tmt) opsin and others such as neuropsin and va-opsin, are found in the peripheral tissues of Danio rerio, however, there are limited data concerning the photopigment/s or the signaling pathway/s directly involved in light detection. Here, we demonstrate that melanopsin is a strong candidate to mediate synchronization of zebrafish cells. The deduced amino acid sequence of melanopsin, although being a vertebrate opsin, is more similar to invertebrate than vertebrate photopigments, and melanopsin photostimulation triggers the phosphoinositide pathway through activation of a Gq/11-type G protein. We stimulated cultured ZEM-2S cells with blue light at wavelengths consistent with melanopsin maximal absorption, and evaluated the time course expression of per1b, cry1b, per2 and cry1a. Using quantitative PCR, we showed that blue light is capable of slightly modulating per1b and cry1b genes, and drastically increasing per2 and cry1a expression. Pharmacological assays indicated that per2 and cry1a responses to blue light are evoked through the activation of the phosphoinositide pathway, which crosstalks with nitric oxide (NO) and mitogen activated protein MAP kinase (MAPK) to activate the clock genes. Our results suggest that melanopsin may be important in mediating the photoresponse in Danio rerio ZEM-2S cells, and provide new insights about the

  6. Potent Effects of Flavonoid Nobiletin on Amplitude, Period, and Phase of the Circadian Clock Rhythm in PER2::LUCIFERASE Mouse Embryonic Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Shinozaki, Ayako; Misawa, Kenichiro; Ikeda, Yuko; Haraguchi, Atsushi; Kamagata, Mayo; Tahara, Yu; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2017-01-01

    Flavonoids are natural polyphenols that are widely found in plants. The effects of flavonoids on obesity and numerous diseases such as cancer, diabetes, and Alzheimer’s have been well studied. However, little is known about the relationships between flavonoids and the circadian clock. In this study, we show that continuous or transient application of flavonoids to the culture medium of embryonic fibroblasts from PER2::LUCIFERASE (PER2::LUC) mice induced various modifications in the circadian clock amplitude, period, and phase. Transient application of some of the tested flavonoids to cultured cells induced a phase delay of the PER2::LUC rhythm at the down slope phase. In addition, continuous application of the polymethoxy flavonoids nobiletin and tangeretin increased the amplitude and lengthened the period of the PER2::LUC rhythm. The nobiletin-induced phase delay was blocked by co-treatment with U0126, an ERK inhibitor. In summary, among the tested flavonoids, polymethoxy flavones increased the amplitude, lengthened the period, and delayed the phase of the PER2::LUC circadian rhythm. Therefore, foods that contain polymethoxy flavones may have beneficial effects on circadian rhythm disorders and jet lag. PMID:28152057

  7. Potent Effects of Flavonoid Nobiletin on Amplitude, Period, and Phase of the Circadian Clock Rhythm in PER2::LUCIFERASE Mouse Embryonic Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Shinozaki, Ayako; Misawa, Kenichiro; Ikeda, Yuko; Haraguchi, Atsushi; Kamagata, Mayo; Tahara, Yu; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2017-01-01

    Flavonoids are natural polyphenols that are widely found in plants. The effects of flavonoids on obesity and numerous diseases such as cancer, diabetes, and Alzheimer's have been well studied. However, little is known about the relationships between flavonoids and the circadian clock. In this study, we show that continuous or transient application of flavonoids to the culture medium of embryonic fibroblasts from PER2::LUCIFERASE (PER2::LUC) mice induced various modifications in the circadian clock amplitude, period, and phase. Transient application of some of the tested flavonoids to cultured cells induced a phase delay of the PER2::LUC rhythm at the down slope phase. In addition, continuous application of the polymethoxy flavonoids nobiletin and tangeretin increased the amplitude and lengthened the period of the PER2::LUC rhythm. The nobiletin-induced phase delay was blocked by co-treatment with U0126, an ERK inhibitor. In summary, among the tested flavonoids, polymethoxy flavones increased the amplitude, lengthened the period, and delayed the phase of the PER2::LUC circadian rhythm. Therefore, foods that contain polymethoxy flavones may have beneficial effects on circadian rhythm disorders and jet lag.

  8. Twist1 Is a TNF-Inducible Inhibitor of Clock Mediated Activation of Period Genes.

    PubMed

    Meier, Daniel; Lopez, Martin; Franken, Paul; Fontana, Adriano

    2015-01-01

    Activation of the immune system affects the circadian clock. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and Interleukin (IL)-1β inhibit the expression of clock genes including Period (Per) genes and the PAR-bZip clock-controlled gene D-site albumin promoter-binding protein (Dbp). These effects are due to cytokine-induced interference of E-box mediated transcription of clock genes. In the present study we have assessed the two E-box binding transcriptional regulators Twist1 and Twist2 for their role in cytokine induced inhibition of clock genes. The expression of the clock genes Per1, Per2, Per3 and of Dbp was assessed in NIH-3T3 mouse fibroblasts and the mouse hippocampal neuronal cell line HT22. Cells were treated for 4h with TNF and IL-1β. The functional role of Twist1 and Twist2 was assessed by siRNAs against the Twist genes and by overexpression of TWIST proteins. In luciferase (luc) assays NIH-3T3 cells were transfected with reporter gene constructs, which contain a 3xPer1 E-box or a Dbp E-box. Quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) was performed using antibodies to TWIST1 and CLOCK, and the E-box consensus sequences of Dbp (CATGTG) and Per1 E-box (CACGTG). We report here that siRNA against Twist1 protects NIH-3T3 cells and HT22 cells from down-regulation of Period and Dbp by TNF and IL-1β. Overexpression of Twist1, but not of Twist2, mimics the effect of the cytokines. TNF down-regulates the activation of Per1-3xE-box-luc, the effect being prevented by siRNA against Twist1. Overexpression of Twist1, but not of Twist2, inhibits Per1-3xE-box-luc or Dbp-E-Box-luc activity. ChIP experiments show TWIST1 induction by TNF to compete with CLOCK binding to the E-box of Period genes and Dbp. Twist1 plays a pivotal role in the TNF mediated suppression of E-box dependent transactivation of Period genes and Dbp. Thereby Twist1 may provide a link between the immune system and the circadian timing system.

  9. Circadian expression of clock genes in mouse macrophages, dendritic cells, and B cells

    PubMed Central

    Silver, Adam C.; Arjona, Alvaro; Hughes, Michael E.; Nitabach, Michael N.; Fikrig, Erol

    2012-01-01

    In mammals, circadian and daily rhythms influence nearly all aspects of physiology, ranging from behavior to gene expression. Functional molecular clocks have been described in the murine spleen and splenic NK cells. The aim of our study was to investigate the existence of molecular clock mechanisms in other immune cells. Therefore, we measured the circadian changes in gene expression of clock genes (Per1, Per2, Bmal1, and Clock) and clock-controlled transcription factors (Rev-erbα and Dbp) in splenic enriched macrophages, dendritic cells, and B cells in both mice entrained to a light-dark cycle and under constant environmental conditions. Our study reveals the existence of functional molecular clock mechanisms in splenic macrophages, dendritic cells, and B cells. PMID:22019350

  10. Mitomycin C modulates the circadian oscillation of clock gene period 2 expression through attenuating the glucocorticoid signaling in mouse fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kusunose, Naoki; Matsunaga, Naoya; Kimoto, Kenichi; Akamine, Takahiro; Hamamura, Kengo; Koyanagi, Satoru; Ohdo, Shigehiro; Kubota, Toshiaki

    2015-11-06

    Clock gene regulates the circadian rhythm of various physiological functions. The expression of clock gene has been shown to be attenuated by certain drugs, resulting in a rhythm disorder. Mitomycin C (MMC) is often used in combination with ophthalmic surgery, especially in trabeculectomy, a glaucoma surgical procedure. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of MMC on clock gene expression in fibroblasts, the target cells of MMC. Following MMC treatment, Bmal1 mRNA levels was significantly decreased, whereas Dbp, Per1, and Rev-erbα mRNA levels were significantly increased in the mouse fibroblast cell line NIH3T3 cells. Microarray analysis was performed to explore of the gene(s) responsible for MMC-induced alteration of clock gene expression, and identified Nr3c1 gene encoding glucocorticoid receptor (GR) as a candidate. MMC suppressed the induction of Per1 mRNA by dexamethasone (DEX), ligand of GR, in NIH3T3 cells. MMC also modulated the DEX-driven circadian oscillations of Per2::Luciferase bioluminescence in mouse-derived ocular fibroblasts. Our results demonstrate a previously unknown effect of MMC in GR signaling and the circadian clock system. The present findings suggest that MMC combined with trabeculectomy could increase the risk for a local circadian rhythm-disorder at the ocular surface.

  11. Loss of circadian clock gene expression is associated with tumor progression in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Cadenas, Cristina; van de Sandt, Leonie; Edlund, Karolina; Lohr, Miriam; Hellwig, Birte; Marchan, Rosemarie; Schmidt, Marcus; Rahnenführer, Jörg; Oster, Henrik; Hengstler, Jan G

    2014-01-01

    Several studies suggest a link between circadian rhythm disturbances and tumorigenesis. However, the association between circadian clock genes and prognosis in breast cancer has not been systematically studied. Therefore, we examined the expression of 17 clock components in tumors from 766 node-negative breast cancer patients that were untreated in both neoadjuvant and adjuvant settings. In addition, their association with metastasis-free survival (MFS) and correlation to clinicopathological parameters were investigated. Aiming to estimate functionality of the clockwork, we studied clock gene expression relationships by correlation analysis. Higher expression of several clock genes (e.g., CLOCK, PER1, PER2, PER3, CRY2, NPAS2 and RORC) was found to be associated with longer MFS in univariate Cox regression analyses (HR<1 and FDR-adjusted P < 0.05). Stratification according to molecular subtype revealed prognostic relevance for PER1, PER3, CRY2 and NFIL3 in the ER+/HER2- subgroup, CLOCK and NPAS2 in the ER-/HER2- subtype, and ARNTL2 in HER2+ breast cancer. In the multivariate Cox model, only PER3 (HR = 0.66; P = 0.016) and RORC (HR = 0.42; P = 0.003) were found to be associated with survival outcome independent of established clinicopathological parameters. Pairwise correlations between functionally-related clock genes (e.g., PER2-PER3 and CRY2-PER3) were stronger in ER+, HER2- and low-grade carcinomas; whereas, weaker correlation coefficients were observed in ER- and HER2+ tumors, high-grade tumors and tumors that progressed to metastatic disease. In conclusion, loss of clock genes is associated with worse prognosis in breast cancer. Coordinated co-expression of clock genes, indicative of a functional circadian clock, is maintained in ER+, HER2-, low grade and non-metastasizing tumors but is compromised in more aggressive carcinomas.

  12. miR-92a Corrects CD34+ Cell Dysfunction in Diabetes by Modulating Core Circadian Genes Involved in Progenitor Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Bhatwadekar, Ashay D; Yan, Yuanqing; Stepps, Valerie; Hazra, Sugata; Korah, Maria; Bartelmez, Stephen; Chaqour, Brahim; Grant, Maria B

    2015-12-01

    Autologous CD34(+) cells are widely used for vascular repair; however, in individuals with diabetes and microvascular disease these cells are dysfunctional. In this study, we examine expression of the clock genes Clock, Bmal, Per1, Per2, Cry1, and Cry2 in CD34(+) cells of diabetic and nondiabetic origin and determine the small encoding RNA (miRNA) profile of these cells. The degree of diabetic retinopathy (DR) was assessed. As CD34(+) cells acquired mature endothelial markers, they exhibit robust oscillations of clock genes. siRNA treatment of CD34(+) cells revealed Per2 as the only clock gene necessary to maintain the undifferentiated state of CD34(+) cells. Twenty-five miRNAs targeting clock genes were identified. Three of the miRNAs (miR-18b, miR-16, and miR-34c) were found only in diabetic progenitors. The expression of the Per2-regulatory miRNA, miR-92a, was markedly reduced in CD34(+) cells from individuals with DR compared with control subjects and patients with diabetes with no DR. Restoration of miR-92a levels in CD34(+) cells from patients with diabetes with DR reduced the inflammatory phenotype of these cells and the diabetes-induced propensity toward myeloid differentiation. Our studies suggest that restoring levels of miR-92a could enhance the usefulness of CD34(+) cells in autologous cell therapy.

  13. Mutations at Arg220 and Thr237 in PER-2 β-lactamase: impact on conformation, activity and susceptibility to inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, Melina; Curto, Lucrecia; Brunetti, Florencia; Sauvage, Eric; Galleni, Moreno; Power, Pablo; Gutkind, Gabriel

    2017-03-20

    PER-2 accounts for up to 10% of oxyimino-cephalosporin resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli in Argentina, and hydrolyzes both cefotaxime and ceftazidime with high catalytic efficiencies (kcat/Km). Through crystallographic analyses, we recently proposed the existence of a hydrogen-bond network connecting Ser70-Gln69-oxyanion water-Thr237-Arg220 that might be important for the activity and inhibition of the enzyme. Mutations at Arg244 in most class A β-lactamases (as TEM and SHV) reduce susceptibility to mechanism-based inactivators, and Arg220 in PER β-lactamases is equivalent to Arg244. Alterations in the hydrogen bond network of the active site in PER-2, through modifications in key residues such as Arg220 and (to a much lesser extent) Thr237, dramatically impact the overall susceptibility to inactivation, with up to ∼300 and 500-fold reduction in the kinact/KI values for clavulanic acid and tazobactam, respectively. Hydrolysis on cephalosporins and aztreonam was also affected although in different extents compared to wild-type PER-2; for cefepime, only Arg220Gly mutation resulted in a strong reduction in the catalytic efficiency. Mutations at Arg220 entail modifications in the catalytic activity of PER-2, and probably local perturbations in the protein, but not global conformational changes. Therefore, the apparent structural stability of the mutants suggests that these enzymes could be possibly selected in vivo.

  14. Site-specific phosphorylation of casein kinase 1 δ (CK1δ) regulates its activity towards the circadian regulator PER2.

    PubMed

    Eng, Gracie Wee Ling; Edison; Virshup, David M

    2017-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are intrinsic ~24 hour cycles that regulate diverse aspects of physiology, and in turn are regulated by interactions with the external environment. Casein kinase 1 delta (CK1δ, CSNK1D) is a key regulator of the clock, phosphorylating both stabilizing and destabilizing sites on the PER2 protein, in a mechanism known as the phosphoswitch. CK1δ can itself be regulated by phosphorylation on its regulatory domain, but the specific sites involved, and the role this plays in control of circadian rhythms as well as other CK1-dependent processes is not well understood. Using a sensitized PER2::LUC reporter assay, we identified a specific phosphorylation site, T347, on CK1δ, that regulates CK1δ activity towards PER2. A mutant CK1δ T347A was more active in promoting PER2 degradation. This CK1δ regulatory site is phosphorylated in cells in trans by dinaciclib- and staurosporine-sensitive kinases, consistent with their potential regulation by cyclin dependent and other proline-directed kinases. The regulation of CK1δ by site-specific phosphorylation via the cell cycle and other signaling pathways provides a mechanism to couple external stimuli to regulation of CK1δ-dependent pathways including the circadian clock.

  15. Rapid down-regulation of mammalian Period genes during behavioral resetting of the circadian clock

    PubMed Central

    Maywood, E. S.; Mrosovsky, N.; Field, M. D.; Hastings, M. H.

    1999-01-01

    The pervasive role of circadian clocks in regulating physiology and behavior is widely recognized. Their adaptive value is their ability to be entrained by environmental cues such that the internal circadian phase is a reliable predictor of solar time. In mammals, both light and nonphotic behavioral cues can entrain the principal oscillator of the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN). However, although light can advance or delay the clock during circadian night, behavioral events trigger phase advances during the subjective day, when the clock is insensitive to light. The recent identification of Period (Per) genes in mammals, homologues of dperiod, which encodes a core element of the circadian clockwork in Drosophila, now provides the opportunity to explain circadian timing and entrainment at a molecular level. In mice, expression of mPer1 and mPer2 in the SCN is rhythmic and acutely up-regulated by light. Moreover, the temporal relations between mRNA and protein cycles are consistent with a clock based on a transcriptional/translational feedback loop. Here we describe circadian oscillations of Per1 and Per2 in the SCN of the Syrian hamster, showing that PER1 protein and mRNA cycles again behave in a manner consistent with a negative-feedback oscillator. Furthermore, we demonstrate that nonphotic resetting has the opposite effect to light: acutely down-regulating these genes. Their sensitivity to nonphotic resetting cues supports their proposed role as core elements of the circadian oscillator. Moreover, this study provides an explanation at the molecular level for the contrasting but convergent effects of photic and nonphotic cues on the clock. PMID:10611364

  16. Sleep loss reduces the DNA-binding of BMAL1, CLOCK, and NPAS2 to specific clock genes in the mouse cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Mongrain, Valérie; La Spada, Francesco; Curie, Thomas; Franken, Paul

    2011-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that clock genes contribute to the homeostatic aspect of sleep regulation. Indeed, mutations in some clock genes modify the markers of sleep homeostasis and an increase in homeostatic sleep drive alters clock gene expression in the forebrain. Here, we investigate a possible mechanism by which sleep deprivation (SD) could alter clock gene expression by quantifying DNA-binding of the core-clock transcription factors CLOCK, NPAS2, and BMAL1 to the cis-regulatory sequences of target clock genes in mice. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), we first showed that, as reported for the liver, DNA-binding of CLOCK and BMAL1 to target clock genes changes in function of time-of-day in the cerebral cortex. Tissue extracts were collected at ZT0 (light onset), -6, -12, and -18, and DNA enrichment of E-box or E'-box containing sequences was measured by qPCR. CLOCK and BMAL1 binding to Cry1, Dbp, Per1, and Per2 depended on time-of-day, with maximum values reached at around ZT6. We then observed that SD, performed between ZT0 and -6, significantly decreased DNA-binding of CLOCK and BMAL1 to Dbp, consistent with the observed decrease in Dbp mRNA levels after SD. The DNA-binding of NPAS2 and BMAL1 to Per2 was also decreased by SD, although SD is known to increase Per2 expression in the cortex. DNA-binding to Per1 and Cry1 was not affected by SD. Our results show that the sleep-wake history can affect the clock molecular machinery directly at the level of chromatin binding thereby altering the cortical expression of Dbp and Per2 and likely other targets. Although the precise dynamics of the relationship between DNA-binding and mRNA expression, especially for Per2, remains elusive, the results also suggest that part of the reported circadian changes in DNA-binding of core clock components in tissues peripheral to the suprachiasmatic nuclei could, in fact, be sleep-wake driven.

  17. Sleep Loss Reduces the DNA-Binding of BMAL1, CLOCK, and NPAS2 to Specific Clock Genes in the Mouse Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Curie, Thomas; Franken, Paul

    2011-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that clock genes contribute to the homeostatic aspect of sleep regulation. Indeed, mutations in some clock genes modify the markers of sleep homeostasis and an increase in homeostatic sleep drive alters clock gene expression in the forebrain. Here, we investigate a possible mechanism by which sleep deprivation (SD) could alter clock gene expression by quantifying DNA-binding of the core-clock transcription factors CLOCK, NPAS2, and BMAL1 to the cis-regulatory sequences of target clock genes in mice. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), we first showed that, as reported for the liver, DNA-binding of CLOCK and BMAL1 to target clock genes changes in function of time-of-day in the cerebral cortex. Tissue extracts were collected at ZT0 (light onset), −6, −12, and −18, and DNA enrichment of E-box or E'-box containing sequences was measured by qPCR. CLOCK and BMAL1 binding to Cry1, Dbp, Per1, and Per2 depended on time-of-day, with maximum values reached at around ZT6. We then observed that SD, performed between ZT0 and −6, significantly decreased DNA-binding of CLOCK and BMAL1 to Dbp, consistent with the observed decrease in Dbp mRNA levels after SD. The DNA-binding of NPAS2 and BMAL1 to Per2 was also decreased by SD, although SD is known to increase Per2 expression in the cortex. DNA-binding to Per1 and Cry1 was not affected by SD. Our results show that the sleep-wake history can affect the clock molecular machinery directly at the level of chromatin binding thereby altering the cortical expression of Dbp and Per2 and likely other targets. Although the precise dynamics of the relationship between DNA-binding and mRNA expression, especially for Per2, remains elusive, the results also suggest that part of the reported circadian changes in DNA-binding of core clock components in tissues peripheral to the suprachiasmatic nuclei could, in fact, be sleep-wake driven. PMID:22039518

  18. Diurnal Corticosterone Presence and Phase Modulate Clock Gene Expression in the Male Rat Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Lauren E.; Hinds, Laura R.; Spencer, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    Mood disorders are associated with dysregulation of prefrontal cortex (PFC) function, circadian rhythms, and diurnal glucocorticoid (corticosterone [CORT]) circulation. Entrainment of clock gene expression in some peripheral tissues depends on CORT. In this study, we characterized over the course of the day the mRNA expression pattern of the core clock genes Per1, Per2, and Bmal1 in the male rat PFC and suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) under different diurnal CORT conditions. In experiment 1, rats were left adrenal-intact (sham) or were adrenalectomized (ADX) followed by 10 daily antiphasic (opposite time of day of the endogenous CORT peak) ip injections of either vehicle or 2.5 mg/kg CORT. In experiment 2, all rats received ADX surgery followed by 13 daily injections of vehicle or CORT either antiphasic or in-phase with the endogenous CORT peak. In sham rats clock gene mRNA levels displayed a diurnal pattern of expression in the PFC and the SCN, but the phase differed between the 2 structures. ADX substantially altered clock gene expression patterns in the PFC. This alteration was normalized by in-phase CORT treatment, whereas antiphasic CORT treatment appears to have eliminated a diurnal pattern (Per1 and Bmal1) or dampened/inverted its phase (Per2). There was very little effect of CORT condition on clock gene expression in the SCN. These experiments suggest that an important component of glucocorticoid circadian physiology entails CORT regulation of the molecular clock in the PFC. Consequently, they also point to a possible mechanism that contributes to PFC disrupted function in disorders associated with abnormal CORT circulation. PMID:26901093

  19. Daily rhythm and regulation of clock gene expression in the rat pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Simonneaux, V; Poirel, V-J; Garidou, M-L; Nguyen, D; Diaz-Rodriguez, E; Pévet, P

    2004-01-05

    Rhythms in pineal melatonin synthesis are controlled by the biological clock located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei. The endogenous clock oscillations rely upon genetic mechanisms involving clock genes coding for transcription factors working in negative and positive feedback loops. Most of these clock genes are expressed rhythmically in other tissues. Because of the peculiar role of the pineal gland in the photoneuroendocrine axis regulating biological rhythms, we studied whether clock genes are expressed in the rat pineal gland and how their expression is regulated.Per1, Per3, Cry2 and Cry1 clock genes are expressed in the pineal gland and their transcription is increased during the night. Analysis of the regulation of these pineal clock genes indicates that they may be categorized into two groups. Expression of Per1 and Cry2 genes shows the following features: (1) the 24 h rhythm persists, although damped, in constant darkness; (2) the nocturnal increase is abolished following light exposure or injection with a beta-adrenergic antagonist; and (3) the expression during daytime is stimulated by an injection with a beta-adrenergic agonist. In contrast, Per3 and Cry1 day and night mRNA levels are not responsive to adrenergic ligands (as previously reported for Per2) and daily expression of Per3 and Cry1 appears strongly damped or abolished in constant darkness. These data show that the expression of Per1 and Cry2 in the rat pineal gland is regulated by the clock-driven changes in norepinephrine, in a similar manner to the melatonin rhythm-generating enzyme arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase. The expression of Per3 and Cry1 displays a daily rhythm not regulated by norepinephrine, suggesting the involvement of another day/night regulated transmitter(s).

  20. Poor Sleep Quality Is Associated with Dawn Phenomenon and Impaired Circadian Clock Gene Expression in Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuan; Tao, Xiaoming

    2017-01-01

    Aims. We investigated whether poor sleep quality is associated with both dawn phenomenon and impaired circadian clock gene expression in subjects with diabetes. Methods. 81 subjects with diabetes on continuous glucose monitoring were divided into two groups according to the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. The magnitude of dawn phenomenon was quantified by its increment from nocturnal nadir to prebreakfast. Peripheral leucocytes were sampled from 81 subjects with diabetes and 28 normal controls at 09:00. Transcript levels of circadian clock genes (BMAL1, PER1, PER2, and PER3) were determined by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results. The levels of HbA1c and fasting glucose and the magnitude of dawn phenomenon were significantly higher in the diabetes group with poor sleep quality than that with good sleep quality. Peripheral leucocytes from subjects with poor sleep quality expressed significantly lower transcript levels of BMAL1 and PER1 compared with those with good sleep quality. Poor sleep quality was significantly correlated with magnitude of dawn phenomenon. Multiple linear regression showed that sleep quality and PER1 were significantly independently correlated with dawn phenomenon. Conclusions. Dawn phenomenon is associated with sleep quality. Furthermore, mRNA expression of circadian clock genes is dampened in peripheral leucocytes of subjects with poor sleep quality. PMID:28352282

  1. Photoperiod regulates multiple gene expression in the suprachiasmatic nuclei and pars tuberalis of the Siberian hamster (Phodopus sungorus).

    PubMed

    Johnston, Jonathan D; Ebling, Francis J P; Hazlerigg, David G

    2005-06-01

    Photoperiod regulates the seasonal physiology of many mammals living in temperate latitudes. Photoperiodic information is decoded by the master circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the hypothalamus and then transduced via pineal melatonin secretion. This neurochemical signal is interpreted by tissues expressing melatonin receptors (e.g. the pituitary pars tuberalis, PT) to drive physiological changes. In this study we analysed the photoperiodic regulation of the circadian clockwork in the SCN and PT of the Siberian hamster. Female hamsters were exposed to either long or short photoperiod for 8 weeks and sampled at 2-h intervals across the 24-h cycle. In the SCN, rhythmic expression of the clock genes Per1, Per2, Cry1, Rev-erbalpha, and the clock-controlled genes arginine vasopressin (AVP) and d-element binding protein (DBP) was modulated by photoperiod. All of these E-box-containing genes tracked dawn, with earlier peak mRNA expression in long, compared to short, photoperiod. This response occurred irrespective of the presence of additional regulatory cis-elements, suggesting photoperiodic regulation of SCN gene expression through a common E-box-related mechanism. In long photoperiod, expression of Cry1 and Per1 in the PT tracked the onset and offset of melatonin secretion, respectively. However, whereas Cry1 tracked melatonin onset in short period, Per1 expression was not detectably rhythmic. We therefore propose that, in the SCN, photoperiodic regulation of clock gene expression primarily occurs via E-boxes, whereas melatonin-driven signal transduction drives the phasing of a subset of clock genes in the PT, independently of the E-box.

  2. Cadmium-Induced Disruption in 24-h Expression of Clock and Redox Enzyme Genes in Rat Medial Basal Hypothalamus: Prevention by Melatonin

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Ortega, Vanesa; Cano-Barquilla, Pilar; Scacchi, Pablo A.; Cardinali, Daniel P.; Esquifino, Ana I.

    2011-01-01

    In a previous study we reported that a low daily p.o. dose of cadmium (Cd) disrupted the circadian expression of clock and redox enzyme genes in rat medial basal hypothalamus (MBH). To assess whether melatonin could counteract Cd activity, male Wistar rats (45 days of age) received CdCl2 (5 ppm) and melatonin (3 μg/mL) or vehicle (0.015% ethanol) in drinking water. Groups of animals receiving melatonin or vehicle alone were also included. After 1 month, MBH mRNA levels were measured by real-time PCR analysis at six time intervals in a 24-h cycle. In control MBH Bmal1 expression peaked at early scotophase, Per1 expression at late afternoon, and Per2 and Cry2 expression at mid-scotophase, whereas neither Clock nor Cry1 expression showed significant 24-h variations. This pattern was significantly disrupted (Clock, Bmal1) or changed in phase (Per1, Per2, Cry2) by CdCl2 while melatonin counteracted the changes brought about by Cd on Per1 expression only. In animals receiving melatonin alone the 24-h pattern of MBH Per2 and Cry2 expression was disrupted. CdCl2 disrupted the 24-h rhythmicity of Cu/Zn- and Mn-superoxide dismutase (SOD), nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-1, NOS-2, heme oxygenase (HO)-1, and HO-2 gene expression, most of the effects being counteracted by melatonin. In particular, the co-administration of melatonin and CdCl2 increased Cu/Zn-SOD gene expression and decreased that of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GSR), and HO-2. In animals receiving melatonin alone, significant increases in mean Cu/Zn and Mn-SOD gene expression, and decreases in that of GPx, GSR, NOS-1, NOS-2, HO-1, and HO-2, were found. The results indicate that the interfering effect of melatonin on the activity of a low dose of CdCl2 on MBH clock and redox enzyme genes is mainly exerted at the level of redox enzyme gene expression. PMID:21442002

  3. Cadmium-Induced Disruption in 24-h Expression of Clock and Redox Enzyme Genes in Rat Medial Basal Hypothalamus: Prevention by Melatonin.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Ortega, Vanesa; Cano-Barquilla, Pilar; Scacchi, Pablo A; Cardinali, Daniel P; Esquifino, Ana I

    2011-01-01

    In a previous study we reported that a low daily p.o. dose of cadmium (Cd) disrupted the circadian expression of clock and redox enzyme genes in rat medial basal hypothalamus (MBH). To assess whether melatonin could counteract Cd activity, male Wistar rats (45 days of age) received CdCl(2) (5 ppm) and melatonin (3 μg/mL) or vehicle (0.015% ethanol) in drinking water. Groups of animals receiving melatonin or vehicle alone were also included. After 1 month, MBH mRNA levels were measured by real-time PCR analysis at six time intervals in a 24-h cycle. In control MBH Bmal1 expression peaked at early scotophase, Per1 expression at late afternoon, and Per2 and Cry2 expression at mid-scotophase, whereas neither Clock nor Cry1 expression showed significant 24-h variations. This pattern was significantly disrupted (Clock, Bmal1) or changed in phase (Per1, Per2, Cry2) by CdCl(2) while melatonin counteracted the changes brought about by Cd on Per1 expression only. In animals receiving melatonin alone the 24-h pattern of MBH Per2 and Cry2 expression was disrupted. CdCl(2) disrupted the 24-h rhythmicity of Cu/Zn- and Mn-superoxide dismutase (SOD), nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-1, NOS-2, heme oxygenase (HO)-1, and HO-2 gene expression, most of the effects being counteracted by melatonin. In particular, the co-administration of melatonin and CdCl(2) increased Cu/Zn-SOD gene expression and decreased that of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GSR), and HO-2. In animals receiving melatonin alone, significant increases in mean Cu/Zn and Mn-SOD gene expression, and decreases in that of GPx, GSR, NOS-1, NOS-2, HO-1, and HO-2, were found. The results indicate that the interfering effect of melatonin on the activity of a low dose of CdCl(2) on MBH clock and redox enzyme genes is mainly exerted at the level of redox enzyme gene expression.

  4. Effects of Photoperiod Extension on Clock Gene and Neuropeptide RNA Expression in the SCN of the Soay Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Dardente, Hugues; Wyse, Cathy A.; Lincoln, Gerald A.; Wagner, Gabriela C.; Hazlerigg, David G.

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, changing daylength (photoperiod) is the main synchronizer of seasonal functions. The photoperiodic information is transmitted through the retino-hypothalamic tract to the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), site of the master circadian clock. To investigate effects of day length change on the sheep SCN, we used in-situ hybridization to assess the daily temporal organization of expression of circadian clock genes (Per1, Per2, Bmal1 and Fbxl21) and neuropeptides (Vip, Grp and Avp) in animals acclimated to a short photoperiod (SP; 8h of light) and at 3 or 15 days following transfer to a long photoperiod (LP3, LP15, respectively; 16h of light), achieved by an acute 8-h delay of lights off. We found that waveforms of SCN gene expression conformed to those previously seen in LP acclimated animals within 3 days of transfer to LP. Mean levels of expression for Per1-2 and Fbxl21 were nearly 2-fold higher in the LP15 than in the SP group. The expression of Vip was arrhythmic and unaffected by photoperiod, while, in contrast to rodents, Grp expression was not detectable within the sheep SCN. Expression of the circadian output gene Avp cycled robustly in all photoperiod groups with no detectable change in phasing. Overall these data suggest that synchronizing effects of light on SCN circadian organisation proceed similarly in ungulates and in rodents, despite differences in neuropeptide gene expression. PMID:27458725

  5. The Light Wavelength Affects the Ontogeny of Clock Gene Expression and Activity Rhythms in Zebrafish Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Di Rosa, Viviana; Frigato, Elena; López-Olmeda, José F.; Sánchez-Vázquez, Francisco J.; Bertolucci, Cristiano

    2015-01-01

    Light plays a key role in synchronizing rhythms and setting the phase of early development. However, to date, little is known about the impact of light wavelengths during the ontogeny of the molecular clock and the behavioural rhythmicity. The aim of this research was to determine the effect of light of different wavelengths (white, blue and red) on the onset of locomotor activity and clock gene (per1b, per2, clock1, bmal1 and dbp) expression rhythms. For this purpose, 4 groups of zebrafish embryo/larvae were raised from 0 to 7 days post-fertilization (dpf) under the following lighting conditions: three groups maintained under light:dark (LD) cycles with white (full visible spectrum, LDW), blue (LDB), or red light (LDR), and one group raised under constant darkness (DD). The results showed that lighting conditions influenced activity rhythms. Larvae were arrhythmic under DD, while under LD cycles they developed wavelength-dependent daily activity rhythms which appeared earlier under LDB (4 dpf) than under LDW or LDR (5 dpf). The results also revealed that development and lighting conditions influenced clock gene expression. While clock1 rhythmic expression appeared in all lighting conditions at 7 dpf, per1b, per2 and dbp showed daily variations already at 3 dpf. Curiously, bmal1 showed consistent rhythmic expression from embryonic stage (0 dpf). Summarizing, the data revealed that daily rhythms appeared earlier in the larvae reared under LDB than in those reared under LDW and LDR. These results emphasize the importance of lighting conditions and wavelengths during early development for the ontogeny of daily rhythms of gene expression and how these rhythms are reflected on the behavioural rhythmicity of zebrafish larvae. PMID:26147202

  6. The Light Wavelength Affects the Ontogeny of Clock Gene Expression and Activity Rhythms in Zebrafish Larvae.

    PubMed

    Di Rosa, Viviana; Frigato, Elena; López-Olmeda, José F; Sánchez-Vázquez, Francisco J; Bertolucci, Cristiano

    2015-01-01

    Light plays a key role in synchronizing rhythms and setting the phase of early development. However, to date, little is known about the impact of light wavelengths during the ontogeny of the molecular clock and the behavioural rhythmicity. The aim of this research was to determine the effect of light of different wavelengths (white, blue and red) on the onset of locomotor activity and clock gene (per1b, per2, clock1, bmal1 and dbp) expression rhythms. For this purpose, 4 groups of zebrafish embryo/larvae were raised from 0 to 7 days post-fertilization (dpf) under the following lighting conditions: three groups maintained under light:dark (LD) cycles with white (full visible spectrum, LDW), blue (LDB), or red light (LDR), and one group raised under constant darkness (DD). The results showed that lighting conditions influenced activity rhythms. Larvae were arrhythmic under DD, while under LD cycles they developed wavelength-dependent daily activity rhythms which appeared earlier under LDB (4 dpf) than under LDW or LDR (5 dpf). The results also revealed that development and lighting conditions influenced clock gene expression. While clock1 rhythmic expression appeared in all lighting conditions at 7 dpf, per1b, per2 and dbp showed daily variations already at 3 dpf. Curiously, bmal1 showed consistent rhythmic expression from embryonic stage (0 dpf). Summarizing, the data revealed that daily rhythms appeared earlier in the larvae reared under LDB than in those reared under LDW and LDR. These results emphasize the importance of lighting conditions and wavelengths during early development for the ontogeny of daily rhythms of gene expression and how these rhythms are reflected on the behavioural rhythmicity of zebrafish larvae.

  7. mRNA levels of circadian clock components Bmal1 and Per2 alter independently from dosing time-dependent efficacy of combination treatment with valsartan and amlodipine in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Potucek, Peter; Radik, Michal; Doka, Gabriel; Kralova, Eva; Krenek, Peter; Klimas, Jan

    2017-06-30

    Chronopharmacological effects of antihypertensives play a role in the outcome of hypertension therapy. However, studies produce contradictory findings when combination of valsartan plus amlodipine (VA) is applied. Here, we hypothesized different efficacy of morning versus evening dosing of VA in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and the involvement of circadian clock genes Bmal1 and Per2. We tested the therapy outcome in short-term and also long-term settings. SHRs aged between 8 and 10 weeks were treated with 10 mg/kg of valsartan and 4 mg/kg of amlodipine, either in the morning or in the evening with treatment duration 1 or 6 weeks and compared with parallel placebo groups. After short-term treatment, only morning dosing resulted in significant blood pressure (BP) control (measured by tail-cuff method) when compared to placebo, while after long-term treatment, both dosing groups gained similar superior results in BP control against placebo. However, mRNA levels of Bmal1 and Per2 (measured by RT-PCR) exhibited an independent pattern, with similar alterations in left and right ventricle, kidney as well as in aorta predominantly in groups with evening dosing in both, short-term and also long-term settings. This was accompanied by increased cardiac mRNA expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. In summary, morning dosing proved to be advantageous due to earlier onset of antihypertensive action; however, long-term treatment was demonstrated to be effective regardless of administration time. Our findings also suggest that combination of VA may serve as an independent modulator of circadian clock and might influence disease progression beyond the primary BP lowering effect.

  8. p75 Neurotrophin Receptor Is a Clock Gene That Regulates Oscillatory Components of Circadian and Metabolic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Baeza-Raja, Bernat; Eckel-Mahan, Kristin; Zhang, Luoying; Vagena, Eirini; Tsigelny, Igor F.; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo; Ptáček, Louis J.

    2013-01-01

    The p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily with a widespread pattern of expression in tissues such as the brain, liver, lung, and muscle. The mechanisms that regulate p75NTR transcription in the nervous system and its expression in other tissues remain largely unknown. Here we show that p75NTR is an oscillating gene regulated by the helix-loop-helix transcription factors CLOCK and BMAL1. The p75NTR promoter contains evolutionarily conserved noncanonical E-box enhancers. Deletion mutagenesis of the p75NTR-luciferase reporter identified the −1039 conserved E-box necessary for the regulation of p75NTR by CLOCK and BMAL1. Accordingly, gel-shift assays confirmed the binding of CLOCK and BMAL1 to the p75NTR−1039 E-box. Studies in mice revealed that p75NTR transcription oscillates during dark and light cycles not only in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), but also in peripheral tissues including the liver. Oscillation of p75NTR is disrupted in Clock-deficient and mutant mice, is E-box dependent, and is in phase with clock genes, such as Per1 and Per2. Intriguingly, p75NTR is required for circadian clock oscillation, since loss of p75NTR alters the circadian oscillation of clock genes in the SCN, liver, and fibroblasts. Consistent with this, Per2::Luc/p75NTR−/− liver explants showed reduced circadian oscillation amplitude compared with those of Per2::Luc/p75NTR+/+. Moreover, deletion of p75NTR also alters the circadian oscillation of glucose and lipid homeostasis genes. Overall, our findings reveal that the transcriptional activation of p75NTR is under circadian regulation in the nervous system and peripheral tissues, and plays an important role in the maintenance of clock and metabolic gene oscillation. PMID:23785138

  9. Restricted wheel access following a light cycle inversion slows re-entrainment without internal desynchrony as measured in Per2Luc mice.

    PubMed

    Castillo, C; Molyneux, P; Carlson, R; Harrington, M E

    2011-05-19

    Circadian rhythms are physiological and behavioral oscillations that have period lengths of approximately 24 h. In mammals, circadian rhythms are driven by a master pacemaker in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). These rhythms can be entrained to light:dark cycles through photic and non-photic cues. Current research suggests that the SCN re-entrains rapidly to new light:dark (LD) cycles with the first photic cues, whereas peripheral tissues re-entrain more slowly, leading to a transient state of internal disorder while the organism adjusts to the new timing of photic input. To assess internal temporal order during the readjustment we used dim light to slow the rate of re-entrainment following a 12-h inversion of the LD cycle. We also used a wheel-restriction paradigm, which can block behavioral evidence of re-entrainment. Per2(Luc) mice were entrained to a 12:12 dim LD cycle with wheel access ad libitum. Following a 12-h shift in the LD cycle, some animals were subjected to wheel restriction; wheels were locked during the new dark period and available during the new light period. Other mice had wheels available ad lib throughout the experiment. Behavioral actograms of general locomotor activity as measured with motion sensors indicated that mice with ad lib access to wheels were able to re-entrain at a rate significantly faster than mice with restricted wheel access. Up to 2 weeks following the LD inversion many wheel-restricted animals were still active predominantly in the new light period. Phase of the PER2::LUC bioluminescence rhythms in SCN and four peripheral tissues (lung, esophagus, thymus, and spleen), measured ex vivo on days 2, 9, and 16 following the inversion, indicated that within each condition the SCN and peripheral tissues shifted at the same rate, whereas the rate of re-entrainment for the tissues differed between conditions. Ex vivo data showed that the PER2::LUC peaks in SCN and peripheral tissues were closely linked to time of

  10. Transcriptional oscillation of canonical clock genes in mouse peripheral tissues.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takuro; Nakahata, Yasukazu; Soma, Haruhiko; Akashi, Makoto; Mamine, Takayoshi; Takumi, Toru

    2004-10-09

    The circadian rhythm of about 24 hours is a fundamental physiological function observed in almost all organisms from prokaryotes to humans. Identification of clock genes has allowed us to study the molecular bases for circadian behaviors and temporal physiological processes such as hormonal secretion, and has prompted the idea that molecular clocks reside not only in a central pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of hypothalamus in mammals, but also in peripheral tissues, even in immortalized cells. Furthermore, previous molecular dissection revealed that the mechanism of circadian oscillation at a molecular level is based on transcriptional regulation of clock and clock-controlled genes. We systematically analyzed the mRNA expression of clock and clock-controlled genes in mouse peripheral tissues. Eight genes (mBmal1, mNpas2, mRev-erbalpha, mDbp, mRev-erbbeta, mPer3, mPer1 and mPer2; given in the temporal order of the rhythm peak) showed robust circadian expressions of mRNAs in all tissues except testis, suggesting that these genes are core molecules of the molecular biological clock. The bioinformatics analysis revealed that these genes have one or a combination of 3 transcriptional elements (RORE, DBPE, and E-box), which are conserved among human, mouse, and rat genome sequences, and indicated that these 3 elements may be responsible for the biological timing of expression of canonical clock genes. The observation of oscillatory profiles of canonical clock genes is not only useful for physiological and pathological examination of the circadian clock in various organs but also important for systematic understanding of transcriptional regulation on a genome-wide basis. Our finding of the oscillatory expression of canonical clock genes with a temporal order provides us an interesting hypothesis, that cyclic timing of all clock and clock-controlled genes may be dependent on several transcriptional elements including 3 known elements, E-box, RORE, and DBPE.

  11. Changes in Gene Expression Patterns of Circadian-Clock, Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid-1 and Nerve Growth Factor in Inflamed Human Esophagus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shu-Chuan; Chen, Chien-Lin; Yi, Chih-Hsun; Liu, Tso-Tsai; Shieh, Kun-Ruey

    2015-09-04

    Circadian rhythm is driven by the molecular circadian-clock system and regulates many physiological functions. Diurnal rhythms in the gastrointestinal tract are known to be related to feeding pattern, but whether these rhythms are also related to the gastrointestinal damage or injuries; for example, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), is unclear. This study was conducted to determine whether expression of circadian-clock genes or factors involved in vagal stimulation or sensitization were altered in the esophagus of GERD patients. Diurnal patterns of PER1, PER2, BMAL1, CRY2, TRPV1, and NGF mRNA expression were found in patient controls, and these patterns were altered and significantly correlated to the GERD severity in GERD patients. Although levels of CRY1, TIM, CB1, NHE3, GDNF, and TAC1 mRNA expression did not show diurnal patterns, they were elevated and also correlated with GERD severity in GERD patients. Finally, strong correlations among PER1, TRPV1, NGF and CRY2 mRNA expression, and among PER2, TRPV1 and CRY2 expression were found. Expression levels of CRY1 mRNA highly correlated with levels of TIM, CB1, NHE3, GDNF and TAC1. This study suggests that the circadian rhythm in the esophagus may be important for the mediation of and/or the response to erosive damage in GERD patients.

  12. Changes in Gene Expression Patterns of Circadian-Clock, Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid-1 and Nerve Growth Factor in Inflamed Human Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shu-Chuan; Chen, Chien-Lin; Yi, Chih-Hsun; Liu, Tso-Tsai; Shieh, Kun-Ruey

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythm is driven by the molecular circadian-clock system and regulates many physiological functions. Diurnal rhythms in the gastrointestinal tract are known to be related to feeding pattern, but whether these rhythms are also related to the gastrointestinal damage or injuries; for example, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), is unclear. This study was conducted to determine whether expression of circadian-clock genes or factors involved in vagal stimulation or sensitization were altered in the esophagus of GERD patients. Diurnal patterns of PER1, PER2, BMAL1, CRY2, TRPV1, and NGF mRNA expression were found in patient controls, and these patterns were altered and significantly correlated to the GERD severity in GERD patients. Although levels of CRY1, TIM, CB1, NHE3, GDNF, and TAC1 mRNA expression did not show diurnal patterns, they were elevated and also correlated with GERD severity in GERD patients. Finally, strong correlations among PER1, TRPV1, NGF and CRY2 mRNA expression, and among PER2, TRPV1 and CRY2 expression were found. Expression levels of CRY1 mRNA highly correlated with levels of TIM, CB1, NHE3, GDNF and TAC1. This study suggests that the circadian rhythm in the esophagus may be important for the mediation of and/or the response to erosive damage in GERD patients. PMID:26337663

  13. Genetic variation and haplotype structures of innate immunity genes in eastern India

    PubMed Central

    Bairagya, Bijan B.; Bhattacharya, Paramita; Bhattacharya, Sujit K.; Dey, Biplab; Dey, Uposoma; Ghosh, Trina; Maiti, Sujit; Majumder, Partha P.; Mishra, Kankadeb; Mukherjee, Sinchita; Mukherjee, Souvik; Narayanasamy, K.; Poddar, Sonia; Roy, Neeta Sarkar; Sengupta, Priya; Sharma, Sangeeta; Sur, Dipika; Sutradhar, Debabrata; Wagener, Diane K.

    2009-01-01

    This study reports results of an extensive and comprehensive study of genetic diversity in 12 genes of the innate immune system in a population of eastern India. Genomic variation was assayed in 171 individuals by resequencing ~75 kb of DNA comprising these genes in each individual. Almost half of the 548 DNA variants discovered was novel. DNA sequence comparisons with human and chimpanzee reference sequences revealed evolutionary features indicative of natural selection operating among individuals, who are residents of an area with a high load of microbial and other pathogens. Significant differences in allele and haplotype frequencies of the study population were observed with the HapMap populations. Gene and haplotype diversities were observed to be high. The genetic positioning of the study population among the HapMap populations based on data of the innate immunity genes substantially differed from what has been observed for Indian populations based on data of other genes. The reported range of variation in SNP density in the human genome is one SNP per 1.19 kb (chromosome 22) to one SNP per 2.18 kb (chromosome 19). The SNP density in innate immunity genes observed in this study (>3 SNPs kb−1) exceeds the highest density observed for any autosomal chromosome in the human genome. The extensive genomic variation and the distinct haplotype structure of innate immunity genes observed among individuals have possibly resulted from the impact of natural selection. PMID:18396467

  14. Restricted feeding phase shifts clock gene and sodium glucose cotransporter 1 (SGLT1) expression in rats.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Anita; Stearns, Adam T; Ashley, Stanley W; Tavakkolizadeh, Ali; Rhoads, David B

    2010-05-01

    The intestine exhibits striking diurnal rhythmicity in glucose uptake, mediated by the sodium glucose cotransporter (SGLT1); however, regulatory pathways for these rhythms remain incompletely characterized. We hypothesized that SGLT1 rhythmicity is linked to the circadian clock. To investigate this, we examined rhythmicity of Sglt1 and individual clock genes in rats that consumed food ad libitum (AL). We further compared phase shifts of Sglt1 and clock genes in a second group of rats following restricted feeding to either the dark (DF) or light (LF) phase. Rats fed during the DF were pair-fed to rats fed during the LF. Jejunal mucosa was harvested across the diurnal period to generate expression profiles of Sglt1 and clock genes Clock, Bmal1 (brain-muscle Arnt-like 1), ReverbA/B, Per(Period) 1/2, and Cry (Cryptochrome) 1/2. All clock genes were rhythmic in AL rats (P < 0.05). Sglt1 also exhibited diurnal rhythmicity, with peak expression preceding nutrient arrival (P < 0.05). Light-restricted feeding shifted the expression rhythms of Sglt1 and most clock genes (Bmal1, ReverbA and B, Per1, Per2, and Cry1) compared with dark-restricted feeding (P < 0.05). The Sglt1 rhythm shifted in parallel with rhythms of Per1 and ReverbB. These effects of restricted feeding highlight luminal nutrients as a key Zeitgeber in the intestine, capable of simultaneously shifting the phases of transporter and clock gene expression, and suggest a role for clock genes in regulating Sglt1 and therefore glucose uptake. Understanding the regulatory cues governing rhythms in intestinal function may allow new therapeutic options for conditions of dysregulated absorption such as diabetes and obesity.

  15. Daily and seasonal expression of clock genes in the pituitary of the European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax).

    PubMed

    Herrero, María Jesús; Lepesant, Julie M J

    2014-11-01

    The expression of select clock genes (clock, bmal, per1, per2, cry1, cry2) was investigated throughout the day and across the four seasons for two consecutive years in the pituitary of adult sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax). A rhythmic pattern of daily expression was consistently observed in summer and autumn, while arrhythmicity was observed for some clock genes during spring and winter, concomitant with low water temperatures. The expression of clock and bmal showed highest values at the end of the day and during the night, while that of per and cry was mostly antiphasic, with high values during the day. Melatonin affects clock-gene expression in the pituitary of mammals. We therefore sought to test the effect of melatonin on clock-gene expression in the pituitary of sea bass both in vivo and in vitro. Melatonin modestly affected the expression of some clock genes (in particular cry genes) when added to the fish diet or the culture medium of pituitary glands. Our data show that clock genes display rhythmic daily expression in the pituitary of adult sea bass, which are profoundly modified according to the season. We suggest that the effect of photoperiod on clock gene expression may be mediated, at least in part, by melatonin, and that temperature may have a key role adjusting seasonal variations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Thermal stress in Danio rerio: a link between temperature, light, thermo-TRP channels, and clock genes.

    PubMed

    Jerônimo, Rodrigo; Moraes, Maria Nathália; de Assis, Leonardo Vinícius Monteiro; Ramos, Bruno César; Rocha, Thainá; Castrucci, Ana Maria de Lauro

    2017-08-01

    It is believed that the biological systems perceiving temperature and light daily cycles were subjected to the simultaneous selective pressures, which resulted in their co-evolutionary association. We investigated the influence of 1h 33°C heat shock on the expression of clock and heat shock protein genes, as well as the role of the thermo-TRP channel, TRPV1, in ZEM-2S cells of the teleost Danio rerio, in constant dark (DD) or light-dark cycles (LD). After heat shock, we observed an acute increase of hsp90 aa1 levels in both DD and LD conditions. Interestingly, the expression of hsp90 aa1 was two-fold lower in LD than in DD, what suggests an antagonistic effect of white light on heat shock action. Regarding clock genes, no effect was found in cells subjected to the heat shock in DD. When cells were kept in LD, the expression of per1, per2, cry1a, and cry1b increased in response to heat shock, indicating that heat shock only affects clock core of LD-synchronized ZEM-2S cells. We then evaluated whether TRPV1 played a role in heat-mediated hsp90 aa1 and per2 responses: hsp90 aa1 increase was unaffected whereas per2 increase was partially blocked by TRPV1 inhibitor, demonstrating the channel participation in clock gene regulation by heat shock. Taken together, our results open a novel investigative perspective regarding the relationship between temperature and clock genes, placing a new player in the regulation of this phenomenon: the TRPV1 channel. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Estradiol differently affects melanin synthesis of malignant and normal melanocytes: a relationship with clock and clock-controlled genes.

    PubMed

    Poletini, Maristela Oliveira; de Assis, Leonardo Vinicius Monteiro; Moraes, Maria Nathalia; Castrucci, Ana Maria de Lauro

    2016-10-01

    Melanin production within melanocytes is regulated, among others, by estradiol, whose effects on melanogenesis are still not completely elucidated. Here we show that although 10(-7) M 17β-estradiol (E2) increased tyrosinase mRNA levels in B16-F10 malignant melanocytes, there was a transient decrease and abolishment of the temporal variation of melanin content. Both parameters were much higher in the malignant than in normal Melan-a cells. Considering that silencing clock machinery in human melanocytes increases melanogenesis, we investigated clock gene expression in those cell lines. Except for Melan-a Bmal1 and B16-F10 Per2 expression of control cells, Per1, Per2, and Bmal1 expression increased independently of cell type or E2 treatment after 24 h. However, melanoma cells showed a marked increase in Per1 and Bma11 expression in response to E2 at the same time points, what may rule out E2 as a synchronizer agent since the expression of those genes were not in antiphase. Next, we investigated the expression of Xpa, a clock-controlled gene, which in Melan-a cells, peaked at 18 h, and E2 treatment shifted this peak to 24 h, whereas B16-F10 Xpa expression peaked at 24 h in both control and E2 group, and it was higher compared to Melan-a cells in both groups. Therefore, malignant and normal melanocytes display profound differences on core elements of the local clock, and how they respond to E2, what is most probably determinant of the differences seen on melanin synthesis and Tyrosinase and Xpa expression. Understanding these processes at the molecular level could bring new strategies to treat melanoma.

  18. The effect of high fat diet on daily rhythm of the core clock genes and muscle functional genes in the skeletal muscle of Chinese soft-shelled turtle (Trionyx sinensis).

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Jiang, Guomin; Peng, Zhitao; Li, Yulong; Li, Jinlong; Zou, Li; He, Zhigang; Wang, Xiaoqing; Chu, Wuying

    2017-11-01

    In the present study, we sought to investigate the influence of high fat diet on the core clock genes and the muscle functional genes daily expression in the skeletal muscle of Chinese soft-shelled turtle. The turtles were fed by two diets including a control fat diet (the CON treatment, 7.98% lipid) and a high fat diet (the HFD treatment, 13.86% lipid) for six weeks and administrated by the photophase regimen of 24h light/dark (12L:12D) cycle. After the feeding trial experiment, we measured the daily expression levels of 17 core clock genes (Clock, Bmal1/2, NPAS2, Tim, Cry1/2, Per1/2, DBP, AANAT, NIFL3, BHLHE40, NR1D2, RORA, RORB, RORC) and 12 muscle functional genes (FBXO32, MBNL1, MSTN, Myf5, Myf6, MyoD, MyoG, MyoM1, PPARa, PDK4, Trim63, UCP3) in the skeletal muscle of the two treatments. The results showed that except for Bmal1, NPAS2, Per2 and RORB, the expression of the other 13 core clock genes exhibited circadian oscillation in the CON treatment. Among the 12 muscle functional genes, MBNL1, PDK4 and MyoM1 did not exhibit circadian oscillation in the CON treatment. In the HFD treatment, the circadian rhythms expressional patterns of the 8 core clock genes (Clock, Bmal2, Cry2, Per1, DBP, NFIL3, BHLHE40 and RORA) and 6 muscle functional genes (MSTN, Myf5, MyoD, MyoG, PPARa and Trim63) were disrupted. In addition, compared with the CON treatment, the circadian expression of the 5 core clock genes (Tim, Cry1, AANAT, NR1D2, RORC) and the 3 muscle functional genes (FBXO32, Myf6, UCP3) showed the advanced or delayed expression peaks in the HFD treatment. In CON treatment, the circadian expression of the MyoG, MyoD, Myf6, FBXO32 and PPARa showed positive or negative correlation with the transcription pattern of Clock, Bmal2, Cry1/2, Per1/2. However, only the FBXO32 and Myf6 presented positive or negative correlation with the circadian expression of Cry1, RORB, AANAT and Tim in HFD treatment. In summary, these results demonstrate that the disruption of the circadian

  19. Passionflower Extract Induces High-amplitude Rhythms without Phase Shifts in the Expression of Several Circadian Clock Genes in Vitro and in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Toda, Kazuya; Hitoe, Shoketsu; Takeda, Shogo; Shimizu, Norihito; Shimoda, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Circadian rhythms play key roles in the regulation of physiological and behavioral systems including wake-sleep cycles. We evaluated the effects of passionflower (aerial parts of Passiflora incarnata Linnaeus) extract (PFE) on circadian rhythms using NIH3T3 cells and mice. PFE (100 μg/mL) induced high-amplitude rhythms in the expression of period circadian protein (Per) 2, cryptochrome (Cry) 1, superoxide dismutase (SOD) 1, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in vitro from 12 h after a treatment with serum-rich medium. Isovitexin 2"-O-glucoside, isoschaftoside, and homoorientin, which were purified from PFE, also significantly enhanced Per2 mRNA expression at 20 h. An oral treatment with PFE (100 mg/kg/day) at zeitgeber time (ZT) 0 h for 15 days improved sleep latencies and sleeping times in the pentobarbital-induced sleep test in mice, similar to muscimol (0.2 mg/kg, i.p.). PFE induced high-amplitude rhythms without obvious phase shifts in serum corticosterone levels and the expression of Per1, Per2, and Cry1 in the liver as well as NIH3T3 cells. However, in the cerebrum, PFE enhanced the circadian expression of brain-muscle ARNT-like protein (Bmal) 1, circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (Clock), and Per1. Regarding this difference, we suggest the involvement of several neurotransmitters that influence the circadian rhythm. Indeed, PFE significantly increased dopamine levels at ZT 18 h, and then affected the mRNA expression of the synthetic and metabolic enzymes such as monoamine oxidase (MAO), catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD). The results obtained show that PFE positively modulates circadian rhythms by inducing high-amplitude rhythms in the expression of several circadian clock genes. PMID:28824345

  20. Passionflower Extract Induces High-amplitude Rhythms without Phase Shifts in the Expression of Several Circadian Clock Genes in Vitro and in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Toda, Kazuya; Hitoe, Shoketsu; Takeda, Shogo; Shimizu, Norihito; Shimoda, Hiroshi

    2017-06-01

    Circadian rhythms play key roles in the regulation of physiological and behavioral systems including wake-sleep cycles. We evaluated the effects of passionflower (aerial parts of Passiflora incarnata Linnaeus) extract (PFE) on circadian rhythms using NIH3T3 cells and mice. PFE (100 μg/mL) induced high-amplitude rhythms in the expression of period circadian protein (Per) 2, cryptochrome (Cry) 1, superoxide dismutase (SOD) 1, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in vitro from 12 h after a treatment with serum-rich medium. Isovitexin 2"-O-glucoside, isoschaftoside, and homoorientin, which were purified from PFE, also significantly enhanced Per2 mRNA expression at 20 h. An oral treatment with PFE (100 mg/kg/day) at zeitgeber time (ZT) 0 h for 15 days improved sleep latencies and sleeping times in the pentobarbital-induced sleep test in mice, similar to muscimol (0.2 mg/kg, i.p.). PFE induced high-amplitude rhythms without obvious phase shifts in serum corticosterone levels and the expression of Per1, Per2, and Cry1 in the liver as well as NIH3T3 cells. However, in the cerebrum, PFE enhanced the circadian expression of brain-muscle ARNT-like protein (Bmal) 1, circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (Clock), and Per1. Regarding this difference, we suggest the involvement of several neurotransmitters that influence the circadian rhythm. Indeed, PFE significantly increased dopamine levels at ZT 18 h, and then affected the mRNA expression of the synthetic and metabolic enzymes such as monoamine oxidase (MAO), catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD). The results obtained show that PFE positively modulates circadian rhythms by inducing high-amplitude rhythms in the expression of several circadian clock genes.

  1. Effects of caffeine on circadian phase, amplitude and period evaluated in cells in vitro and peripheral organs in vivo in PER2::LUCIFERASE mice.

    PubMed

    Narishige, Seira; Kuwahara, Mari; Shinozaki, Ayako; Okada, Satoshi; Ikeda, Yuko; Kamagata, Mayo; Tahara, Yu; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2014-12-01

    Caffeine is one of the most commonly used psychoactive substances. Circadian rhythms consist of the main suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) clocks and peripheral clocks. Although caffeine lengthens circadian rhythms and modifies phase changes in SCN-operated rhythms, the effects on caffeine on the phase, period and amplitude of peripheral organ clocks are not known. In addition, the role of cAMP/Ca(2+) signalling in effects of caffeine on rhythm has not been fully elucidated. We examined whether chronic or transient application of caffeine affects circadian period/amplitude and phase by evaluating bioluminescence rhythm in PER2::LUCIFERASE knock-in mice. Circadian rhythms were monitored in vitro using fibroblasts and ex vivo and in vivo for monitoring of peripheral clocks. Chronic application of caffeine (0.1-10 mM) increased period and amplitude in vitro. Transient application of caffeine (10 mM) near the bottom of the decreasing phase of bioluminescence rhythm caused phase advance in vitro. Caffeine (0.1%) intake caused a phase delay under light-dark or constant dark conditions, suggesting a period-lengthening effect in vivo. Caffeine (20 mg·kg(-1) ) at daytime or at late night-time caused phase advance or delay in bioluminescence rhythm in the liver and kidney respectively. The complicated roles of cAMP/Ca(2+) signalling may be involved in the caffeine-induced increase of period and amplitude in vitro. Caffeine affects circadian rhythm in mice by lengthening the period and causing a phase shift of peripheral clocks. These results suggest that caffeine intake with food/drink may help with food-induced resetting of peripheral circadian clocks. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  2. Effects of caffeine on circadian phase, amplitude and period evaluated in cells in vitro and peripheral organs in vivo in PER2::LUCIFERASE mice

    PubMed Central

    Narishige, Seira; Kuwahara, Mari; Shinozaki, Ayako; Okada, Satoshi; Ikeda, Yuko; Kamagata, Mayo; Tahara, Yu; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Caffeine is one of the most commonly used psychoactive substances. Circadian rhythms consist of the main suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) clocks and peripheral clocks. Although caffeine lengthens circadian rhythms and modifies phase changes in SCN-operated rhythms, the effects on caffeine on the phase, period and amplitude of peripheral organ clocks are not known. In addition, the role of cAMP/Ca2+ signalling in effects of caffeine on rhythm has not been fully elucidated. Experimental Approach We examined whether chronic or transient application of caffeine affects circadian period/amplitude and phase by evaluating bioluminescence rhythm in PER2::LUCIFERASE knock-in mice. Circadian rhythms were monitored in vitro using fibroblasts and ex vivo and in vivo for monitoring of peripheral clocks. Key Results Chronic application of caffeine (0.1–10 mM) increased period and amplitude in vitro. Transient application of caffeine (10 mM) near the bottom of the decreasing phase of bioluminescence rhythm caused phase advance in vitro. Caffeine (0.1%) intake caused a phase delay under light–dark or constant dark conditions, suggesting a period-lengthening effect in vivo. Caffeine (20 mg·kg−1) at daytime or at late night-time caused phase advance or delay in bioluminescence rhythm in the liver and kidney respectively. The complicated roles of cAMP/Ca2+ signalling may be involved in the caffeine-induced increase of period and amplitude in vitro. Conclusions and Implications Caffeine affects circadian rhythm in mice by lengthening the period and causing a phase shift of peripheral clocks. These results suggest that caffeine intake with food/drink may help with food-induced resetting of peripheral circadian clocks. PMID:25160990

  3. Effects of bright light exposure during daytime on peripheral clock gene expression in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Maki; Wakamura, Tomoko; Morita, Takeshi; Okamoto, Akihiko; Akashi, Makoto; Matsui, Takuya; Sato, Motohiko

    2016-12-01

    Light is the strongest synchronizer controlling circadian rhythms. The intensity and duration of light change throughout the year, thereby influencing body weight, food preferences, and melatonin secretion in humans and animals. Although the expression of clock genes has been examined using human samples, it currently remains unknown whether bright light during the daytime affects the expression of these genes in humans. Therefore, we herein investigated the effects of bright light exposure during the daytime on clock gene expression in the hair follicular and root cells of the human scalp. Seven healthy men (20.4 ± 2.2 years old; 172.3 ± 5.8 cm; 64.3 ± 8.5 kg; BMI 21.7 ± 3.1 kg/m2, mean ± SD) participated in this study. Subjects completed 3-day experimental sessions twice in 1 month during which they were exposed to bright and dim light conditions. The mRNA expression of Per1-3, Cry1-2, Rev-erb-α (Nr1d1), Rev-erb-β (Nr1d2), and Dec1 was analyzed using branched DNA probes. No significant changes were observed in the expression of Per1, Per2, Per3, Cry1, Cry2, Rev-erb-α (Nr1d1), or Dec1 following exposure to bright light conditions. However, the expression of Rev-erb-β (Nr1d2) tended to be stronger under bright light than dim light conditions. These results suggest that the bright light stimulus did not influence the expression of clock genes in humans. Long-lasting bright light exposure during the daytime may be required to change the expression of clock genes in humans.

  4. Genes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Search MedlinePlus GO GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Genes URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/ ...

  5. Distinct patterns of Period gene expression in the suprachiasmatic nucleus underlie circadian clock photoentrainment by advances or delays.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, William J; Tavakoli-Nezhad, Mahboubeh; Lambert, Christopher M; Weaver, David R; de la Iglesia, Horacio O

    2011-10-11

    The circadian clock in the mammalian hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is entrained by the ambient light/dark cycle, which differentially acts to cause the clock to advance or delay. Light-induced changes in the rhythmic expression of SCN clock genes are believed to be a critical step in this process, but how the two entrainment modalities--advances vs. delays--engage the molecular clockwork remains incompletely understood. We investigated molecular substrates of photic entrainment of the clock in the SCN by stably entraining hamsters to T cycles (non-24-h light/dark cycles) consisting of a single 1-h light pulse repeated as either a short (23.33-h) or a long (24.67-h) cycle; under these conditions, the light pulse of the short cycle acts as "dawn," whereas that of the long cycle acts as "dusk." Analyses of the expression of the photoinducible and rhythmic clock genes Period 1 and 2 (Per1 and Per2) in the SCN revealed fundamental differences under these two entrainment modes. Light at dawn advanced the clock, advancing the onset of the Per1 mRNA rhythm and acutely increasing mRNA transcription, whereas light at dusk delayed the clock, delaying the offset of the Per2 mRNA rhythm and tonically increasing mRNA stability. The results suggest that the underlying molecular mechanisms of circadian entrainment differ with morning (advancing) or evening (delaying) light exposure, and such differences may reflect how entrainment takes place in nocturnal animals under natural conditions.

  6. Plastic oscillators and fixed rhythms: changes in the phase of clock-gene rhythms in the PVN are not reflected in the phase of the melatonin rhythm of grass rats.

    PubMed

    Martin-Fairey, C A; Ramanathan, C; Stowie, A; Walaszczyk, E; Smale, L; Nunez, A A

    2015-03-12

    The same clock-genes, including Period (PER) 1 and 2, that show rhythmic expression in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) are also rhythmically expressed in other brain regions that serve as extra-SCN oscillators. Outside the hypothalamus, the phase of these extra-SCN oscillators appears to be reversed when diurnal and nocturnal mammals are compared. Based on mRNA data, PER1 protein is expected to peak in the late night in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) of nocturnal laboratory rats, but comparable data are not available for a diurnal species. Here we use the diurnal grass rat (Arvicanthis niloticus) to describe rhythms of PER1 and 2 proteins in the PVN of animals that either show the species-typical day-active (DA) profile, or that adopt a night-active (NA) profile when given access to running wheels. For DA animals housed with or without wheels, significant rhythms of PER1 or PER2 protein expression featured peaks in the late morning; NA animals showed patterns similar to those expected from nocturnal laboratory rats. Since the PVN is part of the circuit that controls pineal rhythms, we also measured circulating levels of melatonin during the day and night in DA animals with and without wheels and in NA wheel runners. All three groups showed elevated levels of melatonin at night, with higher levels during both the day and night being associated with the levels of activity displayed by each group. The differential phase of rhythms in the clock-gene protein in the PVN of diurnal and nocturnal animals presents a possible mechanism for explaining species differences in the phase of autonomic rhythms controlled, in part, by the PVN. The present study suggests that the phase of the oscillator of the PVN does not determine that of the melatonin rhythm in diurnal and nocturnal species or in diurnal and nocturnal chronotypes within a species.

  7. Plastic oscillators and fixed rhythms: Changes in the phase of clock-gene rhythms in the PVN are not reflected in the phase of the melatonin rhythm of grass rats

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Fairey, Carmel A.; Ramanathan, Chidambaram; Stowie, Adam; Walaszczyk, Erin; Smale, Laura; Nunez, Antonio A.

    2015-01-01

    The same clock-genes, including Period (PER) 1 and 2, that show rhythmic expression in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) are also rhythmically expressed in other brain regions that serve as extra-SCN oscillators. Outside the hypothalamus, the phase of these extra-SCN oscillators appears to be reversed when diurnal and nocturnal mammals are compared. Based on mRNA data, PER1 protein is expected to peak in the late night in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) of nocturnal laboratory rats, but comparable data are not available for a diurnal species. Here we use the diurnal grass rat (Arvicanthis niloticus) to describe rhythms of PER1 and 2 protein in the PVN of animals that either show the species-typical day-active profile, or that adopt a night-active profile when given access to running wheels. For day-active animals housed with or without wheels, significant rhythms of PER1 or PER2 protein expression featured peaks in the late morning; night-active animals showed patterns similar to those expected from nocturnal laboratory rats. Since the PVN is part of the circuit that controls pineal rhythms, we also measured circulating levels of melatonin during the day and night in day-active animals with and without wheels and in night-active wheel runners. All three groups showed elevated levels of melatonin at night, with higher levels during both the day and night being associated with the levels of activity displayed by each group. The differential phase of rhythms in clock-gene protein in the PVN of diurnal and nocturnal animals presents a possible mechanism for explaining species differences in the phase of autonomic rhythms controlled, in part, by the PVN. The present study suggests that the phase of the oscillator of the PVN does not determine that of the melatonin rhythm in diurnal and nocturnal species or in diurnal and nocturnal chronotypes within a species. PMID:25575946

  8. Circadian and ultradian rhythms of clock gene expression in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of freely moving mice.

    PubMed

    Ono, Daisuke; Honma, Ken-ichi; Honma, Sato

    2015-07-21

    In mammals, the temporal order of physiology and behavior is primarily regulated by the circadian pacemaker located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Rhythms are generated in cells by an auto-regulatory transcription/translation feedback loop, composed of several clock genes and their protein products. Taking advantage of bioluminescence reporters, we have succeeded in continuously monitoring the expression of clock gene reporters Per1-luc, PER2::LUC and Bmal1-ELuc in the SCN of freely moving mice for up to 3 weeks in constant darkness. Bioluminescence emitted from the SCN was collected with an implanted plastic optical fiber which was connected to a cooled photomultiplier tube. We found robust circadian rhythms in the clock gene expression, the phase-relation of which were the same as those observed ex vivo. The circadian rhythms were superimposed by episodic bursts which had ultradian periods of approximately 3.0 h. Episodic bursts often accompanied activity bouts, but stoichiometric as well as temporal analyses revealed no causality between them. Clock gene expression in the SCN in vivo is regulated by the circadian pacemaker and ultradian rhythms of unknown origin.

  9. Circadian and ultradian rhythms of clock gene expression in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of freely moving mice

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Daisuke; Honma, Ken-ichi; Honma, Sato

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, the temporal order of physiology and behavior is primarily regulated by the circadian pacemaker located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Rhythms are generated in cells by an auto-regulatory transcription/translation feedback loop, composed of several clock genes and their protein products. Taking advantage of bioluminescence reporters, we have succeeded in continuously monitoring the expression of clock gene reporters Per1-luc, PER2::LUC and Bmal1-ELuc in the SCN of freely moving mice for up to 3 weeks in constant darkness. Bioluminescence emitted from the SCN was collected with an implanted plastic optical fiber which was connected to a cooled photomultiplier tube. We found robust circadian rhythms in the clock gene expression, the phase-relation of which were the same as those observed ex vivo. The circadian rhythms were superimposed by episodic bursts which had ultradian periods of approximately 3.0 h. Episodic bursts often accompanied activity bouts, but stoichiometric as well as temporal analyses revealed no causality between them. Clock gene expression in the SCN in vivo is regulated by the circadian pacemaker and ultradian rhythms of unknown origin. PMID:26194231

  10. Chronic ethanol consumption disrupts the core molecular clock and diurnal rhythms of metabolic genes in the liver without affecting the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Filiano, Ashley N; Millender-Swain, Telisha; Johnson, Russell; Young, Martin E; Gamble, Karen L; Bailey, Shannon M

    2013-01-01

    Chronic ethanol consumption disrupts several metabolic pathways including β-oxidation and lipid biosynthesis, facilitating the development of alcoholic fatty liver disease. Many of these same metabolic pathways are directly regulated by cell autonomous circadian clocks, and recent studies suggest that disruption of daily rhythms in metabolism contributes to multiple common cardiometabolic diseases (including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease). However, it is not known whether ethanol disrupts the core molecular clock in the liver, nor whether this, in turn, alters rhythms in lipid metabolism. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that chronic ethanol consumption disrupts the molecular circadian clock in the liver and potentially changes the diurnal expression patterns of lipid metabolism genes. Consistent with previous studies, male C57BL/6J mice fed an ethanol-containing diet exhibited higher levels of liver triglycerides compared to control mice, indicating hepatic steatosis. Further, the diurnal oscillations of core clock genes (Bmal1, Clock, Cry1, Cry2, Per1, and Per2) and clock-controlled genes (Dbp, Hlf, Nocturnin, Npas2, Rev-erbα, and Tef) were altered in livers from ethanol-fed mice. In contrast, ethanol had only minor effects on the expression of core clock genes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). These results were confirmed in Per2(Luciferase) knock-in mice, in which ethanol induced a phase advance in PER2::LUC bioluminescence oscillations in liver, but not SCN. Further, there was greater variability in the phase of PER2::LUC oscillations in livers from ethanol-fed mice. Ethanol consumption also affected the diurnal oscillations of metabolic genes, including Adh1, Cpt1a, Cyp2e1, Pck1, Pdk4, Ppargc1a, Ppargc1b and Srebp1c, in the livers of C57BL/6J mice. In summary, chronic ethanol consumption alters the function of the circadian clock in liver. Importantly, these results suggest that chronic ethanol consumption, at levels sufficient to cause steatosis

  11. Chronic Ethanol Consumption Disrupts the Core Molecular Clock and Diurnal Rhythms of Metabolic Genes in the Liver without Affecting the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Filiano, Ashley N.; Millender-Swain, Telisha; Johnson, Russell; Young, Martin E.; Gamble, Karen L.; Bailey, Shannon M.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic ethanol consumption disrupts several metabolic pathways including β-oxidation and lipid biosynthesis, facilitating the development of alcoholic fatty liver disease. Many of these same metabolic pathways are directly regulated by cell autonomous circadian clocks, and recent studies suggest that disruption of daily rhythms in metabolism contributes to multiple common cardiometabolic diseases (including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease). However, it is not known whether ethanol disrupts the core molecular clock in the liver, nor whether this, in turn, alters rhythms in lipid metabolism. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that chronic ethanol consumption disrupts the molecular circadian clock in the liver and potentially changes the diurnal expression patterns of lipid metabolism genes. Consistent with previous studies, male C57BL/6J mice fed an ethanol-containing diet exhibited higher levels of liver triglycerides compared to control mice, indicating hepatic steatosis. Further, the diurnal oscillations of core clock genes (Bmal1, Clock, Cry1, Cry2, Per1, and Per2) and clock-controlled genes (Dbp, Hlf, Nocturnin, Npas2, Rev-erbα, and Tef) were altered in livers from ethanol-fed mice. In contrast, ethanol had only minor effects on the expression of core clock genes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). These results were confirmed in Per2Luciferase knock-in mice, in which ethanol induced a phase advance in PER2::LUC bioluminescence oscillations in liver, but not SCN. Further, there was greater variability in the phase of PER2::LUC oscillations in livers from ethanol-fed mice. Ethanol consumption also affected the diurnal oscillations of metabolic genes, including Adh1, Cpt1a, Cyp2e1, Pck1, Pdk4, Ppargc1a, Ppargc1b and Srebp1c, in the livers of C57BL/6J mice. In summary, chronic ethanol consumption alters the function of the circadian clock in liver. Importantly, these results suggest that chronic ethanol consumption, at levels sufficient to cause steatosis

  12. Daily rhythms of serotonin metabolism and the expression of clock genes in suprachiasmatic nucleus of rotenone-induced Parkinson's disease male Wistar rat model and effect of melatonin administration.

    PubMed

    Mattam, Ushodaya; Jagota, Anita

    2015-02-01

    The circadian system in suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) involves regulated serotonin levels and coordinated expression of various clock genes. To understand circadian disfunction in the age-related neurodegenerative disorder Parkinson's disease (PD), the rotenone-induced PD (RIPD) male Wistar rat model was used. The alterations in the rhythmic dynamic equilibrium of interactions between the various components of serotonin metabolism and the molecular clock were measured. There was significant decrease in the mean 24 h levels of tryptophan, 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP), serotonin (5-HT), N-acetyl serotonin (NAS) and melatonin (MEL) by approximately 63, 51, 76 and 96% respectively ( p ≤ 0.05). However significant increase in 5-methoxy indole acetic acid (5-MIAA), 5-methoxy tryptophol (5-MTOH), 5-hydroxy tryptophol (5-HTOH) indicated increased serotonin catabolism with the abolition of daily rhythms of MEL, 5-HTP and 5-MIAA in RIPD. 24 h mean levels of rPer1, rCry1, rBmal1 reduced by about 0.5, 0.74 and 0.39-fold and increased for rPer2 by about 1.7-fold. The daily pulse of rPer2, rCry1, rCry2 and rBmal1 significantly decreased by 0.36, 0.6, 0.14, 0.1 and 0.2-fold. As melatonin, an antioxidant and an endogenous synchronizer of rhythm declined in RIPD male Wistar rat model, the effects of melatonin-administration on the rhythmic expression of various clock genes were studied. Interestingly, melatonin-administration resulted in restoration of the phase of rPer1 daily rhythm in RIPD indicating differential sensitivity of various clock components towards melatonin. The animals which were administered both rotenone and MEL for 48 days interestingly showed neuroprotective effects in dark phase on correlations between expression of various genes.

  13. Differential responses of circadian Per2 rhythms in cultured slices of discrete brain areas from rats showing internal desynchronisation by methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Natsubori, Akiyo; Honma, Ken-Ichi; Honma, Sato

    2013-08-01

    Chronic methamphetamine (MAP) treatment desynchronises the behavior rhythms of rats from light-dark cycles. Our previous study (Masubuchi et al., 2000) demonstrated the phase reversal of circadian rhythms in clock gene expression in several brain areas of rats treated with MAP. However, for technical reasons, it was not clear whether the phase shifts were the consequence of phase-shifted behavior rhythms or reflected phase shifts of extra-suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) oscillators in these areas. In the present study, circadian gene expression rhythms in discrete brain areas were continuously monitored in slice cultures of MAP-treated rats. Methamphetamine was given to rats carrying a Period2-dLuciferase reporter system via the drinking water for more than 2 weeks. When behavior rhythms were completely phase reversed, the brain was sampled for slice cultures and circadian bioluminescence rhythms were measured for 5 days in the SCN and four areas of the dopaminergic system, the olfactory bulb, caudate putamen, parietal cortex and substantia nigra. The circadian rhythms in the SCN and caudate putamen were not significantly phase shifted, whereas those in the parietal cortex and substantia nigra showed significant phase-delay shifts of 6-8 h and that in the olfactory bulb showed phase-advance shifts of ca. 8 h. Neither the period nor the amplitude of the circadian rhythm was changed by MAP treatment. These findings indicate that the extra-SCN oscillators in several brain areas are desynchronised from the SCN circadian pacemaker by MAP treatment in parallel with the desynchronisation of behavior rhythms in rats. As the direction and extent of phase shifts of circadian rhythms were different among the areas examined, the brain extra-SCN oscillators responded differentially to MAP. © 2013 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Circadian Regulation Gene Polymorphisms are Associated with Sleep Disruption and Duration, and Circadian Phase and Rhythm in Adults with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kathryn A.; Gay, Caryl; Byun, Eeeseung; Lerdal, Anners; Pullinger, Clive R.; Aouizerat, Bradley E.

    2016-01-01

    Genes involved in circadian regulation, such as circadian locomotor output cycles kaput [CLOCK], cryptochrome [CRY1], and period [PER], have been associated with sleep outcomes in prior animal and human research. However, it is unclear whether polymorphisms in these genes are associated with the sleep disturbances commonly experienced by adults living with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS). Thus, the purpose of this study was to describe polymorphisms in selected circadian genes that are associated with sleep duration or disruption as well as the sleep-wake rhythm strength and phase timing among adults living with HIV/AIDS. A convenience sample of 289 adults with HIV/AIDS was recruited from HIV clinics and community sites in the San Francisco Bay Area. A wrist actigraph was worn for 72 hours on weekdays to estimate sleep duration or total sleep time (TST), sleep disruption or percentage of wake after sleep onset (WASO), and several circadian rhythm parameters: mesor, amplitude, the ratio of mesor to amplitude (circadian quotient), and 24-hour autocorrelation. Circadian phase measures included clock time for peak activity (acrophase) from actigraphy movement data, and bed time and final wake time from actigraphy and self-report. Genotyping was conducted for polymorphisms in 5 candidate genes involved in circadian regulation: CLOCK, CRY1, PER1, PER2, and PER3. Demographic and clinical variables were evaluated as potential covariates. Interactions between genotype and HIV variables (i.e., viral load, years since HIV diagnosis) were also evaluated. Controlling for potentially confounding variables (e.g., race, gender, CD4+ T-cell count, waist circumference, medication use, smoking, depressive symptoms), CLOCK was associated with WASO, 24-hour autocorrelation, and objectively-measured bed time; CRY1 was associated with circadian quotient; PER1 was associated with mesor and self-reported habitual wake time; PER2 was associated

  15. Circadian regulation gene polymorphisms are associated with sleep disruption and duration, and circadian phase and rhythm in adults with HIV.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kathryn A; Gay, Caryl; Byun, Eeeseung; Lerdal, Anners; Pullinger, Clive R; Aouizerat, Bradley E

    2015-01-01

    Genes involved in circadian regulation, such as circadian locomotor output cycles kaput [CLOCK], cryptochrome [CRY1] and period [PER], have been associated with sleep outcomes in prior animal and human research. However, it is unclear whether polymorphisms in these genes are associated with the sleep disturbances commonly experienced by adults living with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS). Thus, the purpose of this study was to describe polymorphisms in selected circadian genes that are associated with sleep duration or disruption as well as the sleep-wake rhythm strength and phase timing among adults living with HIV/AIDS. A convenience sample of 289 adults with HIV/AIDS was recruited from HIV clinics and community sites in the San Francisco Bay Area. A wrist actigraph was worn for 72 h on weekdays to estimate sleep duration or total sleep time (TST), sleep disruption or percentage of wake after sleep onset (WASO) and several circadian rhythm parameters: mesor, amplitude, the ratio of mesor to amplitude (circadian quotient), and 24-h autocorrelation. Circadian phase measures included clock time for peak activity (acrophase) from actigraphy movement data, and bed time and final wake time from actigraphy and self-report. Genotyping was conducted for polymorphisms in five candidate genes involved in circadian regulation: CLOCK, CRY1, PER1, PER2 and PER3. Demographic and clinical variables were evaluated as potential covariates. Interactions between genotype and HIV variables (i.e. viral load, years since HIV diagnosis) were also evaluated. Controlling for potentially confounding variables (e.g. race, gender, CD4+ T-cell count, waist circumference, medication use, smoking and depressive symptoms), CLOCK was associated with WASO, 24-h autocorrelation and objectively-measured bed time; CRY1 was associated with circadian quotient; PER1 was associated with mesor and self-reported habitual wake time; PER2 was associated with TST

  16. Weight cycling promotes fat gain and altered clock gene expression in adipose tissue in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Dankel, S N; Degerud, E M; Borkowski, K; Fjære, E; Midtbø, L K; Haugen, C; Solsvik, M H; Lavigne, A M; Liaset, B; Sagen, J V; Kristiansen, K; Mellgren, G; Madsen, L

    2014-01-15

    Repeated attempts to lose weight by temporary dieting may result in weight cycling, eventually further gain of body fat, and possible metabolic adaptation. We tested this with a controlled experiment in C57BL/6J mice subjected to four weight cycles (WC), continuous hypercaloric feeding (HF), or low-fat feeding (LF). To search for genes involved in an adaptive mechanism to former weight cycling and avoid acute effects of the last cycle, the last hypercaloric feeding period was prolonged by an additional 2 wk before euthanization. Total energy intake was identical in WC and HF. However, compared with HF, the WC mice gained significantly more total body mass and fat mass and showed increased levels of circulating leptin and lipids in liver. Both the HF and WC groups showed increased adipocyte size and insulin resistance. Despite these effects, we also observed an interesting maintenance of circulating adiponectin and free fatty acid levels after WC, whereas changes in these parameters were observed in HF mice. Global gene expression was analyzed by microarrays. Weight-cycled mice were characterized by a downregulation of several clock genes (Dbp, Tef, Per1, Per2, Per3, and Nr1d2) in adipose tissues, which was confirmed by quantitative PCR. In 3T3-L1 cells, we found reduced expression of Dbp and Tef early in adipogenic differentiation, which was mediated via cAMP-dependent signaling. Our data suggest that clock genes in adipose tissue may play a role in metabolic adaptation to weight cycling.

  17. Circadian rhythms of clock gene expression in the cerebellum of serotonin-deficient Pet-1 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Paulus, Erin V; Mintz, Eric M

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin plays an important role in the central regulation of circadian clock function. Serotonin levels are generally higher in the brain during periods of high activity, and these periods are in turn heavily regulated by the circadian clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. However, the role of serotonin as a regulator of circadian rhythms elsewhere in the brain has not been extensively examined. In this study, we examined circadian rhythms of clock gene expression in the cerebellum in mice lacking the Pet-1 transcription factor, which results in a developed brain that is deficient in serotonin neurons. If serotonin helps to synchronize rhythms in brain regions other than the suprachiasmatic nucleus, we would expect to see differences in clock gene expression in these serotonin deficient mice. We found minor differences in the expression of Per1 and Per2 in the knockout mice as compared to wild type, but these differences were small and of questionable functional importance. We also measured the response of cerebellar clocks to injections of the serotonin agonist 8-OH-DPAT during the early part of the night. No effect on clock genes was observed, though the immediate-early gene Fos showed increased expression in wild type mice but not the knockouts. These results suggest that serotonin is not an important mediator of circadian rhythms in the cerebellum in a way that parallels its regulation of the circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

  18. Shift Work or Food Intake during the Rest Phase Promotes Metabolic Disruption and Desynchrony of Liver Genes in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Salgado-Delgado, Roberto C.; Saderi, Nadia; Basualdo, María del Carmen; Guerrero-Vargas, Natali N.; Escobar, Carolina; Buijs, Ruud M.

    2013-01-01

    In the liver, clock genes are proposed to drive metabolic rhythms. These gene rhythms are driven by the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) mainly by food intake and via autonomic and hormonal pathways. Forced activity during the normal rest phase, induces also food intake, thus neglecting the signals of the SCN, leading to conflicting time signals to target tissues of the SCN. The present study explored in a rodent model of night-work the influence of food during the normal sleep period on the synchrony of gene expression between clock genes and metabolic genes in the liver. Male Wistar rats were exposed to forced activity for 8 h either during the rest phase (day) or during the active phase (night) by using a slow rotating wheel. In this shift work model food intake shifts spontaneously to the forced activity period, therefore the influence of food alone without induced activity was tested in other groups of animals that were fed ad libitum, or fed during their rest or active phase. Rats forced to be active and/or eating during their rest phase, inverted their daily peak of Per1, Bmal1 and Clock and lost the rhythm of Per2 in the liver, moreover NAMPT and metabolic genes such as Pparα lost their rhythm and thus their synchrony with clock genes. We conclude that shift work or food intake in the rest phase leads to desynchronization within the liver, characterized by misaligned temporal patterns of clock genes and metabolic genes. This may be the cause of the development of the metabolic syndrome and obesity in individuals engaged in shift work. PMID:23565183

  19. Shift work or food intake during the rest phase promotes metabolic disruption and desynchrony of liver genes in male rats.

    PubMed

    Salgado-Delgado, Roberto C; Saderi, Nadia; Basualdo, María del Carmen; Guerrero-Vargas, Natali N; Escobar, Carolina; Buijs, Ruud M

    2013-01-01

    In the liver, clock genes are proposed to drive metabolic rhythms. These gene rhythms are driven by the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) mainly by food intake and via autonomic and hormonal pathways. Forced activity during the normal rest phase, induces also food intake, thus neglecting the signals of the SCN, leading to conflicting time signals to target tissues of the SCN. The present study explored in a rodent model of night-work the influence of food during the normal sleep period on the synchrony of gene expression between clock genes and metabolic genes in the liver. Male Wistar rats were exposed to forced activity for 8 h either during the rest phase (day) or during the active phase (night) by using a slow rotating wheel. In this shift work model food intake shifts spontaneously to the forced activity period, therefore the influence of food alone without induced activity was tested in other groups of animals that were fed ad libitum, or fed during their rest or active phase. Rats forced to be active and/or eating during their rest phase, inverted their daily peak of Per1, Bmal1 and Clock and lost the rhythm of Per2 in the liver, moreover NAMPT and metabolic genes such as Pparα lost their rhythm and thus their synchrony with clock genes. We conclude that shift work or food intake in the rest phase leads to desynchronization within the liver, characterized by misaligned temporal patterns of clock genes and metabolic genes. This may be the cause of the development of the metabolic syndrome and obesity in individuals engaged in shift work.

  20. Exposure to Fluorescent Light Triggers Down Regulation of Genes Involved with Mitotic Progression in Xiphophorus Skin

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Ronald B.; Walter, Dylan J.; Boswell, William T.; Caballero, Kaela L.; Boswell, Mikki; Lu, Yuan; Chang, Jordan; Savage, Markita G.

    2015-01-01

    We report RNA-Seq results from skin of X. maculatus Jp 163 B after exposure to various doses of “cool white” fluorescent light (FL). We show that FL exposure incites a genetic transcriptional response in skin nearly as great as observed for UVB exposure; however, the gene sets modulated due to exposure to the two light sources are quite different. Known light responsive genes involved in maintaining circadian cycling (e.g., clock, cry2a, cry1b, per1b, per2, per3, arntl1a, etc.) exhibited expected shifts in transcriptional expression upon FL exposure. Exposure to FL also resulted in down-regulated transcription of many genes involved with cell cycle progression (e.g., cdc20, cdc45, cdca7b, plk1, cdk1, ccnb-3, cdca7a, etc.) and chromosome segregation (e.g., cenpe, cenpf, cenpi, cenpk, cenpo, cenpp, and cenpu; cep70; knstrm, kntc, mcm2, mcm5; smc2, etc.). In addition, several DNA replication and recombination repair genes (e.g., pola1, pole, rec52, rad54l, rpa1, parpbp, etc.) exhibit reduced expression in FL exposed X. maculatus skin. Some genes down modulated by FL are known to be associated with DNA repair and human diseases (e.g., atm2, brip1, fanc1, fancl, xrcc4, etc.). The overall suppression of genes involved with mitotic progression in the skin of adult fish is consistent with entry into the light phase of the circadian cycle. Current efforts are aimed at determining specific wavelengths that may lead to differential expression among the many genes affected by fluorescent light exposure. PMID:26334372

  1. Melatonin biosynthesizing enzyme genes and clock genes in ovary and whole brain of zebrafish (Danio rerio): Differential expression and a possible interplay.

    PubMed

    Khan, Zeeshan Ahmad; Yumnamcha, Thangal; Rajiv, Chongtham; Devi, Haobijam Sanjita; Mondal, Gopinath; Devi, Sh Dharmajyoti; Bharali, Rupjyoti; Chattoraj, Asamanja

    2016-07-01

    The present study on zebrafish (Danio rerio) is the first attempt to demonstrate the circadian mRNA expression of melatonin biosynthesizing enzyme genes (Tph1a, Aanat1, Aanat2 and Hiomt) and clock associated genes (Bmal1a, Clock1a, Per1b, Per2 and Cry2a) in the ovary with a comparison to whole brain in normal (LD=12h L:12h D) and altered photic conditions (continuous dark, DD; continuous light, LL). Moreover, the present study also confirmed the ability of zebrafish ovary to biosynthesize melatonin both in vivo and in vitro with a significant difference at day and night. qRT-PCR analysis of genes revealed a dark acrophase of Aanat2 in both organs while Tph1 is in whole brain in LD condition. On the contrary, Bmal1a and Clock1a giving their peak in light, thereby showing a negative correlation with Tph1a and Aanat2. In LD-ovary, the acrophase of Tph1a, Bmal1a and Clock1a is in light and thus display a positive correlation. This trend of relationship in respect to Tph1a is not changing in altered photic conditions in both organs (except in DD-ovary). On the other hand this association for Aanat2 is varying in ovary under altered photic conditions but only in DD-whole brain. Both in LD and LL the expression of Aanat2 in brain presenting an opposite acrophase with both Bmal1a and Clock1a of ovary and consequently displaying a strong negative correlation among them. Interestingly, all ovarian clock associated genes become totally arrhythmic in DD, representing a loss of correlation between the melatonin synthesizing genes in brain and clock associated genes in ovary. The result is also indicating the formation of two heterodimers namely Clock1a:Bmal1a and Per2:Cry2a in the functioning of clock genes in both organs, irrespective of photic conditions, as they are exhibiting a strong significant positive correlation. Collectively, our data suggest that ovary of zebrafish is working as peripheral oscillator having its own melatonin biosynthesizing machinery and signifying a

  2. Altered dynamics in the circadian oscillation of clock genes in dermal fibroblasts of patients suffering from idiopathic hypersomnia.

    PubMed

    Lippert, Julian; Halfter, Hartmut; Heidbreder, Anna; Röhr, Dominik; Gess, Burkhard; Boentert, Mathias; Osada, Nani; Young, Peter

    2014-01-01

    From single cell organisms to the most complex life forms, the 24-hour circadian rhythm is important for numerous aspects of physiology and behavior such as daily periodic fluctuations in body temperature and sleep-wake cycles. Influenced by environmental cues - mainly by light input -, the central pacemaker in the thalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) controls and regulates the internal clock mechanisms which are present in peripheral tissues. In order to correlate modifications in the molecular mechanisms of circadian rhythm with the pathophysiology of idiopathic hypersomnia, this study aimed to investigate the dynamics of the expression of circadian clock genes in dermal fibroblasts of idiopathic hypersomniacs (IH) in comparison to those of healthy controls (HC). Ten clinically and polysomnographically proven IH patients were recruited from the department of sleep medicine of the University Hospital of Muenster. Clinical diagnosis was done by two consecutive polysomnographies (PSG) and Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT). Fourteen clinical healthy volunteers served as control group. Dermal fibroblasts were obtained via punch biopsy and grown in cell culture. The expression of circadian clock genes was investigated by semiquantitative Reverse Transcriptase-PCR qRT-PCR analysis, confirming periodical oscillation of expression of the core circadian clock genes BMAL1, PER1/2 and CRY1/2. The amplitude of the rhythmically expressed BMAL1, PER1 and PER2 was significantly dampened in dermal fibroblasts of IH compared to HC over two circadian periods whereas the overall expression of only the key transcriptional factor BMAL1 was significantly reduced in IH. Our study suggests for the first time an aberrant dynamics in the circadian clock in IH. These findings may serve to better understand some clinical features of the pathophysiology in sleep - wake rhythms in IH.

  3. Differential association of circadian genes with mood disorders: CRY1 and NPAS2 are associated with unipolar major depression and CLOCK and VIP with bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Soria, Virginia; Martínez-Amorós, Erika; Escaramís, Geòrgia; Valero, Joaquín; Pérez-Egea, Rosario; García, Cecilia; Gutiérrez-Zotes, Alfonso; Puigdemont, Dolors; Bayés, Mònica; Crespo, José M; Martorell, Lourdes; Vilella, Elisabet; Labad, Antonio; Vallejo, Julio; Pérez, Víctor; Menchón, José M; Estivill, Xavier; Gratacòs, Mònica; Urretavizcaya, Mikel

    2010-05-01

    Disruptions in circadian rhythms have been described in mood disorders (MD), but the involvement of genetic variation in genes pertaining to the molecular circadian machinery in the susceptibility to MD has not been conclusively determined. We examined 209 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) covering 19 circadian genes (ADCYAP1, ARNTL, ARNTL2, BHLHB2, BHLHB3, CLOCK, CRY1, CRY2, CSNK1E, DBP, NPAS2, NR1D1, PER1, PER2, PER3, RORA, TIMELESS, VIP, and VIPR2) in a sample of 534 MD patients (335 with unipolar major mood depression (MDD) and 199 with bipolar disorder (BD)) and 440 community-based screened controls. Nominally, statistically significant associations were found in 15 circadian genes. The gene-wide test, corrected for the number of SNPs analyzed in each gene, identified significant associations in CRY1 (rs2287161), NPAS2 (rs11123857), and VIPR2 (rs885861) genes with the combined MD sample. In the MDD subsample, the same SNPs in CRY1 and NPAS2 of the combined sample remained associated, whereas in the BD subsample CLOCK (rs10462028) and VIP (rs17083008) were specifically associated. The association with an SNP located 3' near CRY1 gene in MDD remained statistically significant after permutation correction at experiment level (p=0.007). Significant additive effects were found between the SNPs that were statistically significant at the gene-wide level. We also found evidence of associations between two-marker haplotypes in CRY1 and NPAS2 genes and MD. Our data support the contribution of the circadian system to the genetic susceptibility to MD and suggest that different circadian genes may have specific effects on MD polarity.

  4. Differential Association of Circadian Genes with Mood Disorders: CRY1 and NPAS2 are Associated with Unipolar Major Depression and CLOCK and VIP with Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Soria, Virginia; Martínez-Amorós, Èrika; Escaramís, Geòrgia; Valero, Joaquín; Pérez-Egea, Rosario; García, Cecilia; Gutiérrez-Zotes, Alfonso; Puigdemont, Dolors; Bayés, Mònica; Crespo, José M; Martorell, Lourdes; Vilella, Elisabet; Labad, Antonio; Vallejo, Julio; Pérez, Víctor; Menchón, José M; Estivill, Xavier; Gratacòs, Mònica; Urretavizcaya, Mikel

    2010-01-01

    Disruptions in circadian rhythms have been described in mood disorders (MD), but the involvement of genetic variation in genes pertaining to the molecular circadian machinery in the susceptibility to MD has not been conclusively determined. We examined 209 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) covering 19 circadian genes (ADCYAP1, ARNTL, ARNTL2, BHLHB2, BHLHB3, CLOCK, CRY1, CRY2, CSNK1E, DBP, NPAS2, NR1D1, PER1, PER2, PER3, RORA, TIMELESS, VIP, and VIPR2) in a sample of 534 MD patients (335 with unipolar major mood depression (MDD) and 199 with bipolar disorder (BD)) and 440 community-based screened controls. Nominally, statistically significant associations were found in 15 circadian genes. The gene-wide test, corrected for the number of SNPs analyzed in each gene, identified significant associations in CRY1 (rs2287161), NPAS2 (rs11123857), and VIPR2 (rs885861) genes with the combined MD sample. In the MDD subsample, the same SNPs in CRY1 and NPAS2 of the combined sample remained associated, whereas in the BD subsample CLOCK (rs10462028) and VIP (rs17083008) were specifically associated. The association with an SNP located 3′ near CRY1 gene in MDD remained statistically significant after permutation correction at experiment level (p=0.007). Significant additive effects were found between the SNPs that were statistically significant at the gene-wide level. We also found evidence of associations between two-marker haplotypes in CRY1 and NPAS2 genes and MD. Our data support the contribution of the circadian system to the genetic susceptibility to MD and suggest that different circadian genes may have specific effects on MD polarity. PMID:20072116

  5. Transcriptome Profiling of the Lungs Reveals Molecular Clock Genes Expression Changes after Chronic Exposure to Ambient Air Particles

    PubMed Central

    Song, Pengcheng; Li, Zhigang; Li, Xiaoqian; Yang, Lixin; Zhang, Lulu; Li, Nannan; Guo, Chen; Lu, Shuyu; Wei, Yongjie

    2017-01-01

    The symptoms of asthma, breathlessness, insomnia, etc. all have relevance to pulmonary rhythmic disturbances. Epidemiology and toxicology studies have demonstrated that exposure to ambient air particles can result in pulmonary dysfunction. However, there are no data directly supporting a link between air pollution and circadian rhythm disorder. In the present study, we found that breathing highly polluted air resulted in changes of the molecular clock genes expression in lung by transcriptome profiling analyses in a rodent model. Compared to those exposed to filtered air, in both pregnant and offspring rats in the unfiltered group, key clock genes (Per1, Per2, Per3, Rev-erbα and Dbp) expression level decreased and Bmal1 expression level increased. In both rat dams and their offspring, after continuous exposure to unfiltered air, we observed significant histologic evidence for both perivascular and peribronchial inflammation, increased tissue and systemic oxidative stress in the lungs. Our results suggest that chronic exposure to particulate matter can induce alterations of clock genes expression, which could be another important pathway for explaining the feedbacks of ambient particle exposure in addition to oxidative stress and inflammation. PMID:28106813

  6. Glucocorticoids mediate circadian timing in peripheral osteoclasts resulting in the circadian expression rhythm of osteoclast-related genes.

    PubMed

    Fujihara, Yuko; Kondo, Hisataka; Noguchi, Toshihide; Togari, Akifumi

    2014-04-01

    Circadian rhythms are prevalent in bone metabolism. However, the molecular mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Recently, we suggested that output signals from the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) are transmitted from the master circadian rhythm to peripheral osteoblasts through β-adrenergic and glucocorticoid signaling. In this study, we examined how the master circadian rhythm is transmitted to peripheral osteoclasts and the role of clock gene in osteoclast. Mice were maintained under 12-hour light/dark periods and sacrificed at Zeitgeber times 0, 4, 8, 12, 16 and 20. mRNA was extracted from femur (cancellous bone) and analyzed for the expression of osteoclast-related genes and clock genes. Osteoclast-related genes such as cathepsin K (CTSK) and nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1) showed circadian rhythmicity like clock genes such as period 1 (PER1), PER2 and brain and muscle Arnt-like protein 1 (BMAL1). In an in vitro study, not β-agonist but glucocorticoid treatment remarkably synchronized clock and osteoclast-related genes in cultured osteoclasts. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay showed the interaction between BMAL1 proteins and promoter region of CTSK and NFATc1. To examine whether endogenous glucocorticoids influence the osteoclast circadian rhythms, mice were adrenalectomized (ADX) and maintained under 12-hour light/dark periods at least two weeks before glucocorticoid injection. A glucocorticoid injection restarted the circadian expression of CTSK and NFATc1 in ADX mice. These results suggest that glucocorticoids mediate circadian timing to peripheral osteoclasts and osteoclast clock contributes to the circadian expression of osteoclast-related genes such as CTSK and NFATc1.

  7. The circadian protein period 1 contributes to blood pressure control and coordinately regulates renal sodium transport genes.

    PubMed

    Stow, Lisa R; Richards, Jacob; Cheng, Kit-Yan; Lynch, I Jeanette; Jeffers, Lauren A; Greenlee, Megan M; Cain, Brian D; Wingo, Charles S; Gumz, Michelle L

    2012-06-01

    The circadian clock protein period 1 (Per1) contributes to the regulation of expression of the α subunit of the renal epithelial sodium channel at the basal level and in response to the mineralocorticoid hormone aldosterone. The goals of the present study were to define the role of Per1 in the regulation of additional renal sodium handling genes in cortical collecting duct cells and to evaluate blood pressure (BP) in mice lacking functional Per1. To determine whether Per1 regulates additional genes important in renal sodium handling, a candidate gene approach was used. Immortalized collecting duct cells were transfected with a nontarget small interfering RNA or a Per1-specific small interfering RNA. Expression of the genes for α-epithelial sodium channel and Fxyd5, a positive regulator of Na, K-ATPase activity, decreased in response to Per1 knockdown. Conversely, mRNA expression of caveolin 1, Ube2e3, and ET-1, all negative effectors of epithelial sodium channel, was induced after Per1 knockdown. These results led us to evaluate BP in Per1 KO mice. Mice lacking Per1 exhibit significantly reduced BP and elevated renal ET-1 levels compared with wild-type animals. Given the established role of renal ET-1 in epithelial sodium channel inhibition and BP control, elevated renal ET-1 is one possible explanation for the lower BP observed in Per1 KO mice. These data support a role for the circadian clock protein Per1 in the coordinate regulation of genes involved in renal sodium reabsorption. Importantly, the lower BP observed in Per1 KO mice compared with wild-type mice suggests a role for Per1 in BP control as well.

  8. Temporal Expression Patterns of Clock Genes and Aquaporin 5/Anoctamin 1 in Rat Submandibular Gland Cells.

    PubMed

    Satou, Ryouichi; Sato, Masaki; Kimura, Maki; Ishizuka, Yoichi; Tazaki, Masakazu; Sugihara, Naoki; Shibukawa, Yoshiyuki

    2017-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are essential for health and regulate various physiological functions. These rhythms are regulated by a negative-feedback loop involving clock genes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and peripheral tissues. The rate of secretion of salivary substances, ions, and water follows a circadian rhythm, however, the relationship between the molecular mechanism of salivary secretion and peripheral circadian rhythm is not yet clear. Anoctamin 1 (ANO1, also known as TMEM16A) and Aquaporin 5 (AQP5) play an important role in the transport of ions and water in the submandibular glands (SGs). We examined the interaction between the rhythmic expression pattern of the clock genes, Ano1 and Aqp5, in rat whole SGs as well as isolated acinar and ductal cells. Circadian rhythmic expression for Bmal1, Per1, Per2, Clock, Cry1, Cry2, Rorα, and Rev-erbα mRNAs, also called the clock genes, was observed in rat SGs by semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis. We also observed rhythmic patterns in Ano1 and Aqp5 mRNA expression. The expression of ANO1 protein also showed circadian rhythm, as confirmed by western blot analysis. We could not observe any time delay between the peak expression of ANO1 protein and its mRNA. Expression levels of the clock gene mRNAs in the ductal cells was higher than that in acinar cells, however, rhythmic oscillations were observed in both. Our results suggest that SGs have peripheral clocks, and rhythmic expressions of Ano1 and Aqp5 along with the clock genes, may play an important role in the circadian regulation of salivary secretion.

  9. Temporal Expression Patterns of Clock Genes and Aquaporin 5/Anoctamin 1 in Rat Submandibular Gland Cells

    PubMed Central

    Satou, Ryouichi; Sato, Masaki; Kimura, Maki; Ishizuka, Yoichi; Tazaki, Masakazu; Sugihara, Naoki; Shibukawa, Yoshiyuki

    2017-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are essential for health and regulate various physiological functions. These rhythms are regulated by a negative-feedback loop involving clock genes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and peripheral tissues. The rate of secretion of salivary substances, ions, and water follows a circadian rhythm, however, the relationship between the molecular mechanism of salivary secretion and peripheral circadian rhythm is not yet clear. Anoctamin 1 (ANO1, also known as TMEM16A) and Aquaporin 5 (AQP5) play an important role in the transport of ions and water in the submandibular glands (SGs). We examined the interaction between the rhythmic expression pattern of the clock genes, Ano1 and Aqp5, in rat whole SGs as well as isolated acinar and ductal cells. Circadian rhythmic expression for Bmal1, Per1, Per2, Clock, Cry1, Cry2, Rorα, and Rev-erbα mRNAs, also called the clock genes, was observed in rat SGs by semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis. We also observed rhythmic patterns in Ano1 and Aqp5 mRNA expression. The expression of ANO1 protein also showed circadian rhythm, as confirmed by western blot analysis. We could not observe any time delay between the peak expression of ANO1 protein and its mRNA. Expression levels of the clock gene mRNAs in the ductal cells was higher than that in acinar cells, however, rhythmic oscillations were observed in both. Our results suggest that SGs have peripheral clocks, and rhythmic expressions of Ano1 and Aqp5 along with the clock genes, may play an important role in the circadian regulation of salivary secretion. PMID:28588500

  10. Period-2: a tumor suppressor gene in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Shulin; Coffelt, Seth B; Mao, Lulu; Yuan, Lin; Cheng, Qi; Hill, Steven M

    2008-01-01

    Previous reports have suggested that the ablation of the Period 2 gene (Per 2) leads to enhanced development of lymphoma and leukemia in mice. Employing immunoblot analyses, we have demonstrated that PER 2 is endogenously expressed in human breast epithelial cell lines but is not expressed or is expressed at significantly reduced level in human breast cancer cell lines. Expression of PER 2 in MCF-7 breast cancer cells significantly inhibited the growth of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells, and, when PER 2 was co-expressed with the Crytochrome 2 (Cry 2) gene, an even greater growth-inhibitory effect was observed. The inhibitory effect of PER 2 on breast cancer cells was also demonstrated by its suppression of the anchorage-independent growth of MCF-7 cells as evidenced by the reduced number and size of colonies. A corresponding blockade of MCF-7 cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle was also observed in response to the expression of PER 2 alone or in combination with CRY 2. Expression of PER 2 also induced apoptosis of MCF-7 breast cancer cells as demonstrated by an increase in PARP [poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase] cleavage. Finally, our studies demonstrate that PER 2 expression in MCF-7 breast cancer cells is associated with a significant decrease in the expression of cyclin D1 and an up-regulation of p53 levels. PMID:18334030

  11. Period-2: a tumor suppressor gene in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Shulin; Coffelt, Seth B; Mao, Lulu; Yuan, Lin; Cheng, Qi; Hill, Steven M

    2008-03-11

    Previous reports have suggested that the ablation of the Period 2 gene (Per 2) leads to enhanced development of lymphoma and leukemia in mice. Employing immunoblot analyses, we have demonstrated that PER 2 is endogenously expressed in human breast epithelial cell lines but is not expressed or is expressed at significantly reduced level in human breast cancer cell lines. Expression of PER 2 in MCF-7 breast cancer cells significantly inhibited the growth of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells, and, when PER 2 was co-expressed with the Crytochrome 2 (Cry 2) gene, an even greater growth-inhibitory effect was observed. The inhibitory effect of PER 2 on breast cancer cells was also demonstrated by its suppression of the anchorage-independent growth of MCF-7 cells as evidenced by the reduced number and size of colonies. A corresponding blockade of MCF-7 cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle was also observed in response to the expression of PER 2 alone or in combination with CRY 2. Expression of PER 2 also induced apoptosis of MCF-7 breast cancer cells as demonstrated by an increase in PARP [poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase] cleavage. Finally, our studies demonstrate that PER 2 expression in MCF-7 breast cancer cells is associated with a significant decrease in the expression of cyclin D1 and an up-regulation of p53 levels.

  12. Diabetic retinopathy alters light-induced clock gene expression and dopamine levels in the mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Lahouaoui, Hasna; Coutanson, Christine; Cooper, Howard M.; Bennis, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Diabetic retinopathy is one of the most common consequences of diabetes that affects millions of working-age adults worldwide and leads to progressive degeneration of the retina, visual loss, and blindness. Diabetes is associated with circadian disruption of the central and peripheral circadian clocks, but the mechanisms responsible for such alterations are unknown. Using a streptozotocin (STZ)-induced model of diabetes, we investigated whether diabetes alters 1) the circadian regulation of clock genes in the retina and in the central clocks, 2) the light response of clock genes in the retina, and/or 3) light-driven retinal dopamine (DA), a major output marker of the retinal clock. Methods To quantify circadian expression of clock and clock-controlled genes, retinas and suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) from the same animals were collected every 4 h in circadian conditions, 12 weeks post-diabetes. Induction of Per1, Per2, and c-fos mRNAs was quantified in the retina after the administration of a pulse of monochromatic light (480 nm, 1.17×1014 photons/cm2/s, 15 min) at circadian time 16. Gene expression was assessed with real-time reverse transcription PCR (RT–PCR). Pooled retinas from the control and STZ-diabetic mice were collected 2 h after light ON and light OFF (Zeitgeber time (ZT)2 and ZT14), and DA and its metabolite were analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Results We found variable effects of diabetes on the expression of clock genes in the retina and only slight differences in phase and/or amplitude in the SCN. c-fos and Per1 induction by a 480 nm light pulse was abolished in diabetic animals at 12 weeks post-induction of diabetes in comparison with the control mice, suggesting a deficit in light-induced neuronal activation of the retinal clock. Finally, we quantified a 56% reduction in the total number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunopositive cells, associated with a decrease in DA levels during the subjective day (ZT2

  13. The rhythmic expression of clock genes attenuated in human plaque-derived vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Changpo; Tang, Xiao; Zhu, Zhu; Liao, Xiaohong; Zhao, Ran; Fu, Weiguo; Chen, Bin; Jiang, Junhao; Qian, Ruizhe; Guo, Daqiao

    2014-01-13

    Acute myocardial infarction and stroke are more likely to occur in the early morning. Circadian pacemakers are considered to be involved in the process. Many peripheral tissues and cells also contain clock systems. In this study, we examined whether the primary cultured human plaque-derived vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) process circadian rhythmicity; furthermore, we investigated the expression difference of clock genes between normal human carotid VSMCs and human plaque-derived VSMCs. Fifty-six human carotid plaques provided the atherosclerotic tissue, and 21 samples yielded viable cultured primary VSMCs. The normal carotid VSMCs were cultured from donors' normal carotids. The mRNA levels of the target genes were measured by Quantitative Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (qRT-PCR). After serum shock, both types of cells showed clear circadian expressions of Bmal1, Cry1, Cry2, Per1, Per2, Per3 and Rev-erbα mRNA; meanwhile the Clock mRNA show a rhythmic expression in plaque-derived SMCs but not in normal carotid VSMCs. The expression levels of these main clock genes were significantly attenuated in human plaque-derived VSMCs compared with normal human carotid VSMCs. The rhythm of Bmal1 mRNA in plaque-derived VSMCs was changed. The present results demonstrate that the human plaque-derived VSMCs possess different circadian rhythmicity from that of normal carotid VSMCs. The rhythm changes of clock genes in plaque-derived VSMCs may be involved in the process of atherosclerosis and finally promote the rupture of plaque.

  14. Atypical expression of circadian clock genes in denervated mouse skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Reiko; Yamamoto, Saori; Horikawa, Kazumasa; Yasumoto, Yuki; Nikawa, Takeshi; Mukai, Chiaki; Oishi, Katsutaka

    2015-05-01

    The central circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus synchronizes peripheral clocks through neural and humoral signals in most mammalian tissues. Here, we analyzed the effects of unilateral sciatic denervation on the expression of circadian clock- and clock-controlled genes in the gastrocnemius muscles of mice twice per day on days 0, 3, 7, 9, 11 and 14 after denervation and six times on each of days 7 and 28 after denervation to assess the regulation mechanism of the circadian clock in skeletal muscle. Sciatic denervation did not affect systemic circadian rhythms since core body temperature (Day 7), corticosterone secretion (Days 7 and 28), and hepatic clock gene expression remained intact (Days 7 and 28). Expression levels of most circadian clock-related genes such as Arntl, Per1, Rora, Nr1d1 and Dbp were reduced in accordance with the extent of muscle atrophy, although circadian Per2 expression was significantly augmented (Day 28). Cosinor analysis revealed that the circadian expression of Arntl (Days 7 and 28) and Dbp (Day 28) was phase advanced in denervated muscle. The mRNA expression of Clock was significantly increased in denervated muscle on Day 3 when the severe atrophy was absent, and it was not affected by atrophic progression for 28 days. Sciatic denervation did not affect the expression of these genes in the contralateral muscle (Days 7 and 28), suggesting that humoral changes were not involved in denervation-induced muscle clock disruption. We then analyzed genome-wide gene expression using microarrays to determine the effects of disrupting the molecular clock in muscle on circadian rhythms at Day 7. Among 478 circadian genes, 313 lost rhythmicity in the denervated muscles. These denervation-sensitive genes included the lipid metabolism-related genes, Nrip1, Bbs1, Ptgis, Acot1, Scd2, Hpgd, Insig1, Dhcr24, Ldlr and Mboat1. Our findings revealed that sciatic denervation disrupts the circadian expression of clock and clock

  15. Disruption of CLOCK-BMAL1 Transcriptional Activity Is Responsible for Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor–Mediated Regulation of Period1 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Can-Xin; Krager, Stacey L.; Liao, Duan-Fang; Tischkau, Shelley A.

    2010-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a period-aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear transporter-simple minded domain transcription factor that shares structural similarity with circadian clock genes and readily interacts with components of the molecular clock. Activation of AhR by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) alters behavioral circadian rhythms and represses the Period1 (Per1) gene in murine hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Per1 expression is driven by circadian locomotor activity cycles kaput-brain muscle ARNT-like (CLOCK-BMAL1)–dependent activation of Eboxes in the Per1 promoter. We hypothesized that the effects of AhR activation on the circadian clock are mediated by disruption of CLOCK-BMAL1 function and subsequent Per1 gene suppression. Effects of AhR activation on rhythmic Per1 transcripts were examined in livers of mice after treatment with the AhR agonist, TCDD; the molecular mechanisms of Per1 repression by AhR were determined in hepatoma cells using TCDD and β-napthoflavone as AhR activators. This study reports, for the first time, that AhR activation by TCDD alters the Per1 rhythm in the mouse liver and that Per1 gene suppression depends upon the presence of AhR. Furthermore, AhR interaction with BMAL1 attenuates CLOCK-BMAL1 activity and decreases CLOCK binding at Ebox1 and Ebox3 in the Per1 promoter. Taken together, these data suggest that AhR activation represses Per1 through disrupting CLOCK-BMAL1 activity, producing dysregulation of rhythmic Per1 gene expression. These data define alteration of the Per1 rhythm as novel signaling events downstream of AhR activation. Downregulation of Per1 could contribute to metabolic disease, cancer, and other detrimental effects resulting from exposure to certain environmental pollutants. PMID:20106950

  16. The effect of white light on normal and malignant murine melanocytes: A link between opsins, clock genes, and melanogenesis.

    PubMed

    de Assis, L V M; Moraes, M N; da Silveira Cruz-Machado, S; Castrucci, A M L

    2016-06-01

    The skin possesses a photosensitive system comprised of opsins whose function is not fully understood, and clock genes which exert an important regulatory role in skin biology. Here, we evaluated the presence of opsins in normal (Melan-a cells) and malignant (B16-F10 cells) murine melanocytes. Both cell lines express Opn2, Opn4--for the first time reported in these cell types--as well as S-opsin. OPN4 protein was found in a small area capping the cell nuclei of B16-F10 cells kept in constant dark (DD); twenty-four hours after the white light pulse (WLP), OPN4 was found in the cell membrane. Despite the fact that B16-F10 cells expressed less Opn2 and Opn4 than Melan-a cells, our data indicate that the malignant melanocytes exhibited increased photoresponsiveness. The clock gene machinery is also severely downregulated in B16-F10 cells as compared to Melan-a cells. Per1, Per2, and Bmal1 expression increased in B16-F10 cells in response to WLP. Although no response in clock gene expression to WLP was observed in Melan-a cells, gene correlational data suggest a minor effect of WLP. In contrast to opsins and clock genes, melanogenesis is significantly upregulated in malignant melanocytes in comparison to Melan-a cells. Tyrosinase expression increased after WLP only in B16-F10 cells; however no increase in melanin content after WLP was seen in either cell line. Our findings may prove useful in the treatment and the development of new pharmacological approaches of depigmentation diseases and skin cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. WOMEN IN CANCER THEMATIC REVIEW: Circadian rhythmicity and the influence of 'clock' genes on prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Zsofia; Ghosh, Paramita M

    2016-11-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) plays a key role in the development and progression of prostate cancer (CaP). Since the mid-1990s, reports in the literature pointed out higher incidences of CaP in some select groups, such as airline pilots and night shift workers in comparison with those working regular hours. The common finding in these 'high-risk' groups was that they all experienced a deregulation of the body's internal circadian rhythm. Here, we discuss how the circadian rhythm affects androgen levels and modulates CaP development and progression. Circadian rhythmicity of androgen production is lost in CaP patients, with the clock genes Per1 and Per2 decreasing, and Bmal1 increasing, in these individuals. Periodic expression of the clock genes was restored upon administration of the neurohormone melatonin, thereby suppressing CaP progression. Activation of the melatonin receptors and the AR antagonized each other, and therefore the tumour-suppressive effects of melatonin and the clock genes were most clearly observed in the absence of androgens, that is, in conjunction with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). In addition, a large-scale study found that high-dose radiation was more effective in CaP patients when it was delivered before 17:00 h, compared with those delivered after 17:00 h, suggesting that the therapy was more effective when delivered in synchrony with the patient's circadian clock. As CaP patients are shown to become easily resistant to new therapies, perhaps circadian delivery of these therapeutic agents or delivery in conjunction with melatonin and its novel analogs should be tested to see if they prevent this resistance. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  18. Disrupted light-dark cycle abolishes circadian expression of peripheral clock genes without inducing behavioral arrhythmicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Katsutaka; Higo-Yamamoto, Sayaka; Yamamoto, Saori; Yasumoto, Yuki

    2015-03-06

    The environmental light-dark (LD) cycle entrains the central circadian clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of mammals. The present study examined the effects of disrupted LD cycles on peripheral clocks in mice housed under a normal 12 h light-12 h dark cycle (LD 12:12) or an ultradian LD 3:3 cycle. Drinking behavior seemed to be free-running with a long period (26.03 h) under ultradian LD 3:3 cycles, in addition to light-induced direct suppression (masking effect). Core body temperature completely lost robust circadian rhythm and acquired a 6-h rhythm with a low amplitude under LD 3:3. Robust circadian expression of Per1, Per2, Clock and Bmal1 mRNAs was similarly flattened to intermediate levels in the liver, heart and white adipose tissue under LD 3:3. Robust circadian expression of Rev-erbα mRNA was completely damped in these tissues. Circadian expression of Dbp, a clock-controlled gene, was also disrupted in these tissues from mice housed under LD 3:3. The aberrant LD cycle seemed to induce the loss of circadian gene expression at the level of transcription, because rhythmic pre-mRNA expression of these genes was also abolished under LD 3:3. In addition to the direct effect of the aberrant LD cycle, abolished systemic time cues such as those of plasma corticosterone and body temperature might be involved in the disrupted expression of these circadian genes under LD 3:3. Our findings suggest that disrupted environmental LD cycles abolish the normal oscillation of peripheral clocks and induce internal desynchrony in mammals.

  19. Cell type-specific functions of period genes revealed by novel adipocyte and hepatocyte circadian clock models.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Chidambaram; Xu, Haiyan; Khan, Sanjoy K; Shen, Yang; Gitis, Paula J; Welsh, David K; Hogenesch, John B; Liu, Andrew C

    2014-04-01

    In animals, circadian rhythms in physiology and behavior result from coherent rhythmic interactions between clocks in the brain and those throughout the body. Despite the many tissue specific clocks, most understanding of the molecular core clock mechanism comes from studies of the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the hypothalamus and a few other cell types. Here we report establishment and genetic characterization of three cell-autonomous mouse clock models: 3T3 fibroblasts, 3T3-L1 adipocytes, and MMH-D3 hepatocytes. Each model is genetically tractable and has an integrated luciferase reporter that allows for longitudinal luminescence recording of rhythmic clock gene expression using an inexpensive off-the-shelf microplate reader. To test these cellular models, we generated a library of short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) against a panel of known clock genes and evaluated their impact on circadian rhythms. Knockdown of Bmal1, Clock, Cry1, and Cry2 each resulted in similar phenotypes in all three models, consistent with previous studies. However, we observed cell type-specific knockdown phenotypes for the Period and Rev-Erb families of clock genes. In particular, Per1 and Per2, which have strong behavioral effects in knockout mice, appear to play different roles in regulating period length and amplitude in these peripheral systems. Per3, which has relatively modest behavioral effects in knockout mice, substantially affects period length in the three cellular models and in dissociated SCN neurons. In summary, this study establishes new cell-autonomous clock models that are of particular relevance to metabolism and suitable for screening for clock modifiers, and reveals previously under-appreciated cell type-specific functions of clock genes.

  20. Chronic mild stress and imipramine treatment elicit opposite changes in behavior and in gene expression in the mouse prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Erburu, M; Cajaleon, L; Guruceaga, E; Venzala, E; Muñoz-Cobo, I; Beltrán, E; Puerta, E; Tordera, R M

    2015-08-01

    Many studies suggest that the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is a target limbic region for stress response because a dysfunction here is linked to anhedonia, a decrease in reactivity to rewards, and to anxiety. It is suggested that stress-induced persistent molecular changes in this brain region could bring some light on the mechanisms perpetuating depressive episodes. In order to address this issue, here we have studied the long-term PFC gene expression pattern and behavioral effects induced by a chronic mild stress (CMS) model and antidepressant treatment in mice. CMS was applied to mice for six weeks and imipramine (10mg/kg, i.p.) or saline treatment was administered for five weeks starting from the third week of CMS. Mice were sacrificed one month after CMS and following two weeks after the discontinuation of drug treatment and the PFC was dissected and prepared for gene (mRNA) and protein expression studies. Using the same experimental design, a separate group of mice was tested for anhedonia, recognition memory, social interaction and anxiety. CMS induced a long-term altered gene expression profile in the PFC that was partially reverted by imipramine. Specifically, the circadian rhythm signaling pathway and functions such as gene expression, cell proliferation, survival and apoptosis as well as neurological and psychiatric disorders were affected. Of these, some changes of the circadian rhythm pathway (Hdac5, Per1, and Per2) were validated by RT-PCR and western-blot. Moreover, CMS induced long-lasting anhedonia that was reverted by imipramine treatment. Impaired memory, decreased social interaction and anxiety behavior were also induced by chronic stress. We have identified in the PFC molecular targets oppositely regulated by CMS and imipramine that could be relevant for chronic depression and antidepressant action. Among these, a possible candidate for further investigation could be the circadian rhythm pathway.

  1. [Effects of feeding mode on biological clock and circadian expression of lipid metabolism-related genes in mice].

    PubMed

    Wen, Min; Dong, Zhe; Cui, Jie

    2014-09-01

    To explore the effects of feeding mode on biological clock and circadian expression of lipids metabolism-related genes in mice. Ninety healthy male ICR mice were divided into 3 groups with 30 in each: ad libitum-feeding, daytime-feeding and nighttime-feeding groups, in a 12 h to 12 h light-dark cycle. After two weeks of feeding the animals was sacrificed in batches (5 in each batch) at 4, 8, 12, 16, 20 and 24 h, the circadian expression of lipids metabolism-related genes in the liver and brain was detected by real time quantitative RT PCR at 6 time points. The circadian oscillator in the brain was more sensitive to alteration of feeding mode than that in the liver, nighttime feeding decreased peak mRNA levels of Cry2, Per1, and Per2 (5.5, 4.3 and 7.1 folds, respectively) in the brain. However, there was no difference in the expression rhythm of hepatic clock genes between nighttime-feeding and ad libitum group. In addition, changed feeding mode significantly decreased the peak value of Rev erbα (2 folds for daytime feeding, 3.4 folds for nighttime feeding) and Dbp (10.6 folds for daytime feeding, 2.8 folds for nighttime feeding), which two had opposite expression mode in different feeding modes. Different expression rhythm of lipid metabolism related genes SREBP1-c, PPARα, FAS, and CPT was shown with decreased mRNA expression levels of SREBP1-c and PPARα in daytime feeding (5.5 folds, 4 folds) and nighttime feeding (4.4 folds, 4.8 folds). Changing the feeding mode could entrain circadian oscillators both in the brain and liver. What is more, hepatic circadian oscillators couple with the feeding time.

  2. Effect of cadmium on 24-hour pattern in expression of redox enzyme and clock genes in rat medial basal hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Ortega, Vanesa; Cardinali, Daniel P; Fernández-Mateos, María P; Ríos-Lugo, María J; Scacchi, Pablo A; Esquifino, Ana I

    2010-04-01

    The effect of cadmium (Cd) in the brain has been attributed to an increase in reactive oxygen species in cells, particularly when high amounts of the metal are given. In this study we examined the effect of a low dose of Cd (7.5 microg/day) on 24-h changes in expression of redox pathway enzyme and circadian genes in rat medial basal hypothalamus (MBH). Rats receiving CdCl(2) (5 ppm in drinking water) or tap water for 1 month were killed at six different time intervals throughout a 24 h cycle. MBH mRNA levels were measured by real-time PCR analysis. In CdCl(2) treated rats a disruption of 24-h pattern of hypothalamic gene expression of nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-1 and -2, heme oxygenase (HO)-1 and -2, Mn- superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase was detectable. Mean levels of MBH mRNA for HO-2, Mn-SOD and catalase augmented after Cd intake, whereas those of NOS-2 decreased. After CdCl(2) intake rats the 24-h pattern of clock gene expression in MBH seen in controls was significantly suppressed (Bmal1) or changed in phase (Per1, Per2, Cry2) while in the case of Clock significant 24-h variations were induced. The results are compatible with the view that a low amount of Cd given in tap water brought about significant changes in circadian expression of redox enzyme and clock genes in rat MBH.

  3. The hypersensitive glucocorticoid response specifically regulates period 1 and expression of circadian genes.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Timothy E; Gertz, Jason; Crawford, Gregory E; Garabedian, Michael J; Myers, Richard M

    2012-09-01

    Glucocorticoids regulate gene expression by binding and activating the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). While ligand affinity determines the global sensitivity of the response, additional proteins act on the genome to tune sensitivity of some genes. However, the genomic extent and specificity of dose-specific glucocorticoid responses are unknown. We show that dose-specific glucocorticoid responses are extraordinarily specific at the genomic scale, able to distinctly express a single gene, the circadian rhythm gene for Period 1 (PER1), at concentrations consistent with the nighttime nadir of human cortisol. We mapped the PER1 response to a single GR binding site. The specific GR binding sequence did not impact sensitivity, and we instead attributed the response to a combination of additional transcription factors and chromatin accessibility acting in the same locus. The PER1 hypersensitive response element is conserved in the mouse, where we found similar upregulation of Per1 in pituitary cells. Targeted and transient overexpression of PER1 led to regulation of additional circadian rhythm genes hours later, suggesting that hypersensitive expression of PER1 impacts circadian gene expression. These findings show that hypersensitive GR binding occurs throughout the genome, drives targeted gene expression, and may be important to endocrine mediation of peripheral circadian rhythms.

  4. Genes and Gene Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... correctly, a child can have a genetic disorder. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to ... or prevent disease. The most common form of gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene to replace an ...

  5. Acute morphine affects the rat circadian clock via rhythms of phosphorylated ERK1/2 and GSK3β kinases and Per1 expression in the rat suprachiasmatic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Pačesová, Dominika; Volfová, Barbora; Červená, Kateřina; Hejnová, Lucie; Novotný, Jiří; Bendová, Zdeňka

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Opioids affect the circadian clock and may change the timing of many physiological processes. This study was undertaken to investigate the daily changes in sensitivity of the circadian pacemaker to an analgesic dose of morphine, and to uncover a possible interplay between circadian and opioid signalling. Experimental Approach A time-dependent effect of morphine (1 mg·kg−1, i.p.) applied either during the day or during the early night was followed, and the levels of phosphorylated ERK1/2, GSK3β, c-Fos and Per genes were assessed by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. The effect of morphine pretreatment on light-induced pERK and c-Fos was examined, and day/night difference in activity of opioid receptors was evaluated by [35S]-GTPγS binding assay. Key Results Morphine stimulated a rise in pERK1/2 and pGSK3β levels in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) when applied during the day but significantly reduced both kinases when applied during the night. Morphine at night transiently induced Period1 but not Period2 in the SCN and did not attenuate the light-induced level of pERK1/2 and c-Fos in the SCN. The activity of all three principal opioid receptors was high during the day but decreased significantly at night, except for the δ receptor. Finally, we demonstrated daily profiles of pERK1/2 and pGSK3β levels in the rat ventrolateral and dorsomedial SCN. Conclusions and Implications Our data suggest that the phase-shifting effect of opioids may be mediated via post-translational modification of clock proteins by means of activated ERK1/2 and GSK3β. PMID:25828914

  6. A 122.5-kilobase deletion of the P gene underlies the high prevalence of oculocutaneous albinism type 2 in the Navajo population.

    PubMed

    Yi, Zanhua; Garrison, Nanibaa'; Cohen-Barak, Orit; Karafet, Tatiana M; King, Richard A; Erickson, Robert P; Hammer, Michael F; Brilliant, Murray H

    2003-01-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder. There are four known types of OCA: OCA1-OCA4. The clinical manifestations of all types of OCA include skin and hair hypopigmentation and visual impairment. Although there are a few documented observations of high frequency of albinism among Native Americans, including the Hopi, Zuni, Kuna, Jemez, Laguna, San Juan, and Navajo, no causative molecular defect has been previously reported. In the present study, we show that albinism in one Native American population, the Navajo, is caused by a LINE-mediated 122.5-kilobase deletion of the P gene, thus demonstrating that albinism in this population is OCA2. This deletion appears to be Navajo specific, because this allele was not detected in 34 other individuals with albinism who listed other Native American origins, nor has it been reported in any other ethnic group. The molecular characterization of this deletion allele allowed us to design a three-primer polymerase chain reaction system to estimate the carrier frequency in the Navajo population by screening 134 unrelated normally pigmented Navajos. The carrier frequency was found to be approximately 4.5%. The estimated prevalence of OCA2 in Navajos is between approximately 1 per 1,500 and 1 per 2,000. We further estimate that this mutation originated 400-1,000 years ago from a single founder.

  7. A 122.5-Kilobase Deletion of the P Gene Underlies the High Prevalence of Oculocutaneous Albinism Type 2 in the Navajo Population

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Zanhua; Garrison, Nanibaa’; Cohen-Barak, Orit; Karafet, Tatiana M.; King, Richard A.; Erickson, Robert P.; Hammer, Michael F.; Brilliant, Murray H.

    2003-01-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder. There are four known types of OCA: OCA1–OCA4. The clinical manifestations of all types of OCA include skin and hair hypopigmentation and visual impairment. Although there are a few documented observations of high frequency of albinism among Native Americans, including the Hopi, Zuni, Kuna, Jemez, Laguna, San Juan, and Navajo, no causative molecular defect has been previously reported. In the present study, we show that albinism in one Native American population, the Navajo, is caused by a LINE-mediated 122.5-kilobase deletion of the P gene, thus demonstrating that albinism in this population is OCA2. This deletion appears to be Navajo specific, because this allele was not detected in 34 other individuals with albinism who listed other Native American origins, nor has it been reported in any other ethnic group. The molecular characterization of this deletion allele allowed us to design a three-primer polymerase chain reaction system to estimate the carrier frequency in the Navajo population by screening 134 unrelated normally pigmented Navajos. The carrier frequency was found to be ∼4.5%. The estimated prevalence of OCA2 in Navajos is between ∼1 per 1,500 and 1 per 2,000. We further estimate that this mutation originated 400–1,000 years ago from a single founder. PMID:12469324

  8. The effect of chronic morphine or methadone exposure and withdrawal on clock gene expression in the rat suprachiasmatic nucleus and AA-NAT activity in the pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Pačesová, D; Novotný, J; Bendová, Z

    2016-07-18

    The circadian rhythms of many behavioral and physiological functions are regulated by the major circadian pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Long-term opiate addiction and drug withdrawal may affect circadian rhythmicity of various hormones or the sleep/activity pattern of many experimental subjects; however, limited research has been done on the long-term effects of sustained opiate administration on the intrinsic rhythmicity in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and pineal gland. Here we compared the effects of repeated daily treatment of rats with morphine or methadone and subsequent naloxone-precipitated withdrawal on the expression of the Per1, Per2, and Avp mRNAs in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and on arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase activity in the pineal gland. We revealed that 10-day administration and withdrawal of both these drugs failed to affect clock genes and Avp expression in the SCN. Our results indicate that opioid-induced changes in behavioral and physiological rhythms originate in brain structures downstream of the suprachiasmatic nucleus regulatory output pathway. Furthermore, we observed that acute withdrawal from methadone markedly extended the period of high night AA-NAT activity in the pineal gland. This suggests that withdrawal from methadone, a widely used drug for the treatment of opioid dependence, may have stronger impact on melatonin synthesis than withdrawal from morphine.

  9. Melanopsin resets circadian rhythms in cells by inducing clock gene Period1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Shuhei; Uehara, Tomoe; Matsuo, Minako; Kikuchi, Yo; Numano, Rika

    2014-02-01

    The biochemical, physiological and behavioral processes are under the control of internal clocks with the period of approximately 24 hr, circadian rhythms. The expression of clock gene Period1 (Per1) oscillates autonomously in cells and is induced immediately after a light pulse. Per1 is an indispensable member of the central clock system to maintain the autonomous oscillator and synchronize environmental light cycle. Per1 expression could be detected by Per1∷luc and Per1∷GFP plasmid DNA in which firefly luciferase and Green Fluorescence Protein were rhythmically expressed under the control of the mouse Per1 promoter in order to monitor mammalian circadian rhythms. Membrane protein, MELANOPSIN is activated by blue light in the morning on the retina and lead to signals transduction to induce Per1 expression and to reset the phase of circadian rhythms. In this report Per1 induction was measured by reporter signal assay in Per1∷luc and Per1∷GFP fibroblast cell at the input process of circadian rhythms. To the result all process to reset the rhythms by Melanopsin is completed in single cell like in the retina projected to the central clock in the brain. Moreover, the phase of circadian rhythm in Per1∷luc cells is synchronized by photo-activated Melanopsin, because the definite peak of luciferase activity in one dish was found one day after light illumination. That is an available means that physiological circadian rhythms could be real-time monitor as calculable reporter (bioluminescent and fluorescent) chronological signal in both single and groups of cells.

  10. Effects of circadian clock genes and health-related behavior on metabolic syndrome in a Taiwanese population: Evidence from association and interaction analysis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Eugene; Kuo, Po-Hsiu; Liu, Yu-Li; Yang, Albert C; Kao, Chung-Feng; Tsai, Shih-Jen

    2017-01-01

    Increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome (MetS) has been associated with the circadian clock genes. In this study, we assessed whether 29 circadian clock-related genes (including ADCYAP1, ARNTL, ARNTL2, BHLHE40, CLOCK, CRY1, CRY2, CSNK1D, CSNK1E, GSK3B, HCRTR2, KLF10, NFIL3, NPAS2, NR1D1, NR1D2, PER1, PER2, PER3, REV1, RORA, RORB, RORC, SENP3, SERPINE1, TIMELESS, TIPIN, VIP, and VIPR2) are associated with MetS and its individual components independently and/or through complex interactions in a Taiwanese population. We also analyzed the interactions between environmental factors and these genes in influencing MetS and its individual components. A total of 3,000 Taiwanese subjects from the Taiwan Biobank were assessed in this study. Metabolic traits such as waist circumference, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and fasting glucose were measured. Our data showed a nominal association of MetS with several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in five key circadian clock genes including ARNTL, GSK3B, PER3, RORA, and RORB; but none of these SNPs persisted significantly after performing Bonferroni correction. Moreover, we identified the effect of GSK3B rs2199503 on high fasting glucose (P = 0.0002). Additionally, we found interactions among the ARNTL rs10832020, GSK3B rs2199503, PER3 rs10746473, RORA rs8034880, and RORB rs972902 SNPs influenced MetS (P < 0.001 ~ P = 0.002). Finally, we investigated the influence of interactions between ARNTL rs10832020, GSK3B rs2199503, PER3 rs10746473, and RORB rs972902 with environmental factors such as alcohol consumption, smoking status, and physical activity on MetS and its individual components (P < 0.001 ~ P = 0.002). Our study indicates that circadian clock genes such as ARNTL, GSK3B, PER3, RORA, and RORB genes may contribute to the risk of MetS independently as well as through gene-gene and gene-environment interactions.

  11. Effects of circadian clock genes and health-related behavior on metabolic syndrome in a Taiwanese population: Evidence from association and interaction analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Eugene; Kuo, Po-Hsiu; Liu, Yu-Li; Yang, Albert C.; Kao, Chung-Feng; Tsai, Shih-Jen

    2017-01-01

    Increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome (MetS) has been associated with the circadian clock genes. In this study, we assessed whether 29 circadian clock-related genes (including ADCYAP1, ARNTL, ARNTL2, BHLHE40, CLOCK, CRY1, CRY2, CSNK1D, CSNK1E, GSK3B, HCRTR2, KLF10, NFIL3, NPAS2, NR1D1, NR1D2, PER1, PER2, PER3, REV1, RORA, RORB, RORC, SENP3, SERPINE1, TIMELESS, TIPIN, VIP, and VIPR2) are associated with MetS and its individual components independently and/or through complex interactions in a Taiwanese population. We also analyzed the interactions between environmental factors and these genes in influencing MetS and its individual components. A total of 3,000 Taiwanese subjects from the Taiwan Biobank were assessed in this study. Metabolic traits such as waist circumference, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and fasting glucose were measured. Our data showed a nominal association of MetS with several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in five key circadian clock genes including ARNTL, GSK3B, PER3, RORA, and RORB; but none of these SNPs persisted significantly after performing Bonferroni correction. Moreover, we identified the effect of GSK3B rs2199503 on high fasting glucose (P = 0.0002). Additionally, we found interactions among the ARNTL rs10832020, GSK3B rs2199503, PER3 rs10746473, RORA rs8034880, and RORB rs972902 SNPs influenced MetS (P < 0.001 ~ P = 0.002). Finally, we investigated the influence of interactions between ARNTL rs10832020, GSK3B rs2199503, PER3 rs10746473, and RORB rs972902 with environmental factors such as alcohol consumption, smoking status, and physical activity on MetS and its individual components (P < 0.001 ~ P = 0.002). Our study indicates that circadian clock genes such as ARNTL, GSK3B, PER3, RORA, and RORB genes may contribute to the risk of MetS independently as well as through gene-gene and gene-environment interactions. PMID:28296937

  12. Abnormal clock gene expression and locomotor activity rhythms in two month-old female APPSwe/PS1dE9 mice.

    PubMed

    Oyegbami, Olaide; Collins, Hilary M; Pardon, Marie C; Ebling, Fran Jp; Heery, David M; Moran, Paula M

    2017-03-17

    In addition to cognitive decline, Alzheimer's disease (AD) is also characterized by agitation and disruptions in activity and sleep. These symptoms typically occur in the evening or at night and have been referred to as 'sundowning'. These symptoms are especially difficult for carers and there are no specific drug treatments. There is increasing evidence that these symptoms reflect an underlying pathology of circadian rhythm generation and transmission. We investigated whether a transgenic mouse model relevant to AD (APPswe/PS1dE9) exhibits circadian alterations in locomotor activity and expression of clock genes involved in the regulation of the circadian cycle. Female mice at 2 months of age were investigated in their home cage. Results show that the APPswe/PS1dE9 transgene alters levels and patterns in circadian rhythm of locomotor activity. Expression of the clock genes Per1, Per2, Cry1 and Cry2 was found to increase at night compared to day in wild-type control mice in the medulla/pons. This effect was blunted for Cry1 and Cry2 gene expression in APPswe/PS1dE9. In summary, this study suggests altered circadian regulation of locomotor activity is abnormal in female APPswe/PS1dE9 mice and that this alteration has biomolecular analogies in a widely available model of AD. Furthermore, the early age at which these effects are manifest suggests that these circadian effects may precede plaque development. The APPswe/PS1dE9 mouse genetic model may have potential to serve as a tool in understanding the neuropathology of circadian abnormalities in AD and as a model system to test novel therapeutic agents for these symptoms.

  13. Expression of the circadian clock gene Period2 in the hippocampus: possible implications for synaptic plasticity and learned behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Louisa M-C; Dragich, Joanna M; Kudo, Takashi; Odom, Irene H; Welsh, David K; O'Dell, Thomas J; Colwell, Christopher S

    2009-01-01

    Genes responsible for generating circadian oscillations are expressed in a variety of brain regions not typically associated with circadian timing. The functions of this clock gene expression are largely unknown, and in the present study we sought to explore the role of the Per2 (Period 2) gene in hippocampal physiology and learned behaviour. We found that PER2 protein is highly expressed in hippocampal pyramidal cell layers and that the expression of both protein and mRNA varies with a circadian rhythm. The peaks of these rhythms occur in the late night or early morning and are almost 180° out-of-phase with the expression rhythms measured from the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the same animals. The rhythms in Per2 expression are autonomous as they are present in isolated hippocampal slices maintained in culture. Physiologically, Per2-mutant mice exhibit abnormal long-term potentiation. The underlying mechanism is suggested by the finding that levels of phosphorylated cAMP-response-element-binding protein, but not phosphorylated extracellular-signal-regulated kinase, are reduced in hippocampal tissue from mutant mice. Finally, Per2-mutant mice exhibit deficits in the recall of trace, but not cued, fear conditioning. Taken together, these results provide evidence that hippocampal cells contain an autonomous circadian clock. Furthermore, the clock gene Per2 may play a role in the regulation of long-term potentiation and in the recall of some forms of learned behaviour. PMID:19570032

  14. Melatonin adjusts the expression pattern of clock genes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and induces antidepressant-like effect in a mouse model of seasonal affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Andras David; Iwamoto, Ayaka; Kawai, Misato; Goda, Ryosei; Matsuo, Haruka; Otsuka, Tsuyoshi; Nagasawa, Mao; Furuse, Mitsuhiro; Yasuo, Shinobu

    2015-05-01

    Recently, we have shown that C57BL/6J mice exhibit depression-like behavior under short photoperiod and suggested them as an animal model for investigating seasonal affective disorder (SAD). In this study, we tested if manipulations of the circadian clock with melatonin treatment could effectively modify depression-like and anxiety-like behaviors and brain serotonergic system in C57BL/6J mice. Under short photoperiods (8-h light/16-h dark), daily melatonin treatments 2 h before light offset have significantly altered the 24-h patterns of mRNA expression of circadian clock genes (per1, per2, bmal1 and clock) within the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) mostly by increasing amplitude in their expressional rhythms without inducing robust phase shifts in them. Melatonin treatments altered the expression of genes of serotonergic neurotransmission in the dorsal raphe (tph2, sert, vmat2 and 5ht1a) and serotonin contents in the amygdala. Importantly, melatonin treatment reduced the immobility in forced swim test, a depression-like behavior. As a key mechanism of melatonin-induced antidepressant-like effect, the previously proposed phase-advance hypothesis of the circadian clock could not be confirmed under conditions of our experiment. However, our findings of modest adjustments in both the amplitude and phase of the transcriptional oscillators in the SCN as a result of melatonin treatments may be sufficient to associate with the effects seen in the brain serotonergic system and with the improvement in depression-like behavior. Our study confirmed a predictive validity of C57BL/6J mice as a useful model for the molecular analysis of links between the clock and brain serotonergic system, which could greatly accelerate our understanding of the pathogenesis of SAD, as well as the search for new treatments.

  15. Restricted Feeding Schedules Modulate in a Different Manner the Expression of Clock Genes in Rat Hypothalamic Nuclei

    PubMed Central

    De Araujo, Leonardo D.; Roa, Silvia L.; Bueno, Ana C.; Coeli-Lacchini, Fernanda B.; Martins, Clarissa S.; Uchoa, Ernane T.; Antunes-Rodrigues, Jose; Elias, Lucila L.; Elias, Paula C.; Moreira, Ayrton C.; De Castro, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    Food access restriction is associated to changes in gene expression of the circadian clock system. However, there are only a few studies investigating the effects of non-photic synchronizers, such as food entrainment, on the expression of clock genes in the central oscillators. We hypothesized that different feeding restriction patterns could modulate the expression of clock genes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) “master” clock and in extra-SCN oscillators such as the paraventricular (PVN) and arcuate (ARC) hypothalamic nuclei. Wistar rats were divided into four groups: Control group (CG; food available ad libitum), Restricted night-fed (RF-n; food access during 2 h at night), Restricted day-fed (RF-d; food access during 2 h at daytime), Day-fed (DF; food access during 12 h at daytime). After 21 days, rats were decapitated between ZT2-ZT3 (0800–0900 h); ZT11-ZT12 (1700–1800 h), or ZT17-18 (2300–2400 h). Plasma corticosterone was measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA). The expression of Clock, Bmal1, Per1, Per2, Per3, Cry1, Cry2, Rev-erbα, and Rorα were assessed in SCN, PVN, and ARC hypothalamic nuclei by RT-PCR and calculated by the 2[−DeltaDeltaCT(Cyclethreshold)](2−ΔΔCT) method. Restricted food availability during few h led to decreased body weight in RF-n and RF-d groups compared to controls and DF group. We also observed an anticipatory corticosterone peak before food availability in RF-n and RF-d groups. Furthermore, the pattern of clock gene expression in response to RF-n, RF-d, and DF schedules was affected differently in the SCN, PVN, and ARC hypothalamic nuclei. In conclusion, the master oscillator in SCN as well as the oscillator in PVN and ARC, all brain areas involved in food intake, responds in a tissue-specific manner to feeding restriction. PMID:28003802

  16. Immunoglobulin genes

    SciTech Connect

    Honjo, T. ); Alt, F.W. . Hudson Labs.); Rabbitts, T.H. )

    1989-01-01

    This book reports on the structure, function, and expression of the genes encoding antibodies in normal and neoplastic cells. Topics covered are: B Cells; Organization and rearrangement of immunoglobin genes; Immunoglobin genes in disease; Immunoglobin gene expression; and Immunoglobin-related genes.

  17. Studying Genes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sheets What are genes? Genes are segments of DNA that contain instructions for building the molecules that ... proteins. Parents pass their genes to their offspring. DNA is shaped like a corkscrew-twisted ladder, called ...

  18. l-Ornithine affects peripheral clock gene expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Takafumi; Haraguchi, Atsushi; Kuwahara, Mari; Nakamura, Kaai; Hamaguchi, Yutaro; Ikeda, Yuko; Ishida, Yuko; Wang, Guanying; Shirakawa, Chise; Tanihata, Yoko; Ohara, Kazuaki; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2016-10-05

    The peripheral circadian clock is entrained by factors in the external environment such as scheduled feeding, exercise, and mental and physical stresses. In addition, recent studies in mice demonstrated that some food components have the potential to control the peripheral circadian clock during scheduled feeding, although information about these components remains limited. l-Ornithine is a type of non-protein amino acid that is present in foods and has been reported to have various physiological functions. In human trials, for example, l-ornithine intake improved a subjective index of sleep quality. Here we demonstrate, using an in vivo monitoring system, that repeated oral administration of l-ornithine at an early inactive period in mice induced a phase advance in the rhythm of PER2 expression. By contrast, l-ornithine administration to mouse embryonic fibroblasts did not affect the expression of PER2, indicating that l-ornithine indirectly alters the phase of PER2. l-Ornithine also increased plasma levels of insulin, glucose and glucagon-like peptide-1 alongside mPer2 expression, suggesting that it exerts its effects probably via insulin secretion. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that l-ornithine affects peripheral clock gene expression and may expand the possibilities of L-ornithine as a health food.

  19. l-Ornithine affects peripheral clock gene expression in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Takafumi; Haraguchi, Atsushi; Kuwahara, Mari; Nakamura, Kaai; Hamaguchi, Yutaro; Ikeda, Yuko; Ishida, Yuko; Wang, Guanying; Shirakawa, Chise; Tanihata, Yoko; Ohara, Kazuaki; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2016-01-01

    The peripheral circadian clock is entrained by factors in the external environment such as scheduled feeding, exercise, and mental and physical stresses. In addition, recent studies in mice demonstrated that some food components have the potential to control the peripheral circadian clock during scheduled feeding, although information about these components remains limited. l-Ornithine is a type of non-protein amino acid that is present in foods and has been reported to have various physiological functions. In human trials, for example, l-ornithine intake improved a subjective index of sleep quality. Here we demonstrate, using an in vivo monitoring system, that repeated oral administration of l-ornithine at an early inactive period in mice induced a phase advance in the rhythm of PER2 expression. By contrast, l-ornithine administration to mouse embryonic fibroblasts did not affect the expression of PER2, indicating that l-ornithine indirectly alters the phase of PER2. l-Ornithine also increased plasma levels of insulin, glucose and glucagon-like peptide-1 alongside mPer2 expression, suggesting that it exerts its effects probably via insulin secretion. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that l-ornithine affects peripheral clock gene expression and may expand the possibilities of L-ornithine as a health food. PMID:27703199

  20. Gene Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells in an effort to treat or stop disease. Genes contain your DNA — the code that controls much of your body's form and function, from making you grow taller to regulating your body systems. Genes that don't work properly can cause disease. Gene therapy replaces a faulty gene or adds ...

  1. Na⁺/Ca²⁺ Exchanger 2 (NCX2) in the Circadian Clock of the Rat Suprachiasmatic Nucleus: Colocalization with Neuropeptides and Daily Profiles of Gene Expression and Protein Levels.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Pi-Cheng; Chen, Ya-Shuan; Huang, Rong-Chi

    2017-08-31

    The plasmalemmal Na⁺/Ca²⁺ changer (NCX) regulates intracellular Ca²⁺ by exchanging 3 Na⁺ for 1 Ca²⁺ in either the Ca²⁺ exit or Ca²⁺ entry mode. All three NCX isoforms NCX1, NCX2, and NCX3 are expressed in the rat brain, with isoform-specific differential distribution. In the central clock of suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), intracellular Ca²⁺ controls the circadian release of major neuropeptides, which are the arginine vasopressin (AVP), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and gastrin releasing peptide (GRP), and the NCX, most likely NCX1, rapidly clears depolarization-induced somatic Ca²⁺ influx. However, the role of NCX2 in the SCN remains unknown. This study aimed to investigate the colocalization of NCX2 with neuropeptides and daily expression profiles of NCX2 in mRNA and protein levels. Consistent with the restricted distribution of NCX2 in the retinorecipient ventral SCN, the immunostaining results showed colocalization of NCX2 with VIP, GRP and VIP/GRP in the ventral SCN, but not with AVP in the dorsal SCN, or markers for astrocyte and major input pathways. Importantly, the presynaptic marker Bassoon was found to colocalize with NCX2/GRP and NCX2/ VIP, indicating localization of both VIP/NCX2 and GRP/NCX2 at the presynaptic sites. Furthermore, real-time PCR and western blotting revealed no day-night difference in NCX2 mRNA and protein levels, in contrast to a robust circadian rhythm in the expression of clock genes Per1 and Per2. Together the results suggest a role of NCX2 in the regulation of the release of VIP and GRP.

  2. Gene Positioning

    PubMed Central

    Ferrai, Carmelo; de Castro, Inês Jesus; Lavitas, Liron; Chotalia, Mita; Pombo, Ana

    2010-01-01

    Eukaryotic gene expression is an intricate multistep process, regulated within the cell nucleus through the activation or repression of RNA synthesis, processing, cytoplasmic export, and translation into protein. The major regulators of gene expression are chromatin remodeling and transcription machineries that are locally recruited to genes. However, enzymatic activities that act on genes are not ubiquitously distributed throughout the nucleoplasm, but limited to specific and spatially defined foci that promote preferred higher-order chromatin arrangements. The positioning of genes within the nuclear landscape relative to specific functional landmarks plays an important role in gene regulation and disease. PMID:20484389

  3. A cross-sectional study on the relationships among the polymorphism of period2 gene, work stress, and insomnia.

    PubMed

    Li, Ju; Huang, Chan; Lan, Yajia; Wang, Yongwei

    2015-12-01

    Work-related stress factors are commonly considered to be increasing the risk of insomnia. But the association between circadian-rhythm gene period2 (per2) and insomnia remains unknown. The paper aimed to examine the relationships among the polymorphism in rs7602358 of Per2 gene, work stress, and insomnia. In the cross-sectional study of a total of 364 Chinese workers recruited, 218 had insomnia tested by the Athens Insomnia Scale (AIS-5). Work stress was assessed using the General Job Stress Questionnaire (GJSQ). Per2 genotypes were determined by SNaPshot technology. Unconditional logistic regression analysis was used to examine the interaction between polymorphism of Per2 and work stress in insomnia. The genotype AC or allele C of Per2 significantly increased the risk of insomnia (OR, 5.41; 95 % CI, 2.23-13.1) (OR, 3.29; 95 % CI, 1.55-6.98). Compared to low work stress, high work stress had a higher risk of insomnia (OR, 2.73; 95 % CI, 1.77-4.22). A significant interaction between Per2 and work stress in the risk of insomnia was found. Compared to workers with low work stress and genotype AA, those with high work stress and genotype AC had a higher risk of insomnia (OR, 15.12; 95 % CI, 3.46-66.09). The effect of genotype AC or allele C of Per2 on insomnia was relatively stronger than that of high work stress, suggesting that individual's susceptibility should be taken into consideration when intervening and controlling insomnia of workers.

  4. Sleep interruption associated with house staff work schedules alters circadian gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ming Zhu; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela; Kelly-McNeil, Kathie; Kipen, Howard; Crabtree, Benjamin; Lew, Jenny Pan; Zarbl, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Background Epidemiological studies indicate that disruption of circadian rhythm by shift work increases the risk of breast and prostate cancer. Our studies demonstrated that carcinogens disrupt the circadian expression of circadian genes (CGs) and circadian-controlled genes (CCGs) during the early stages of rat mammary carcinogenesis. A chemopreventive regimen of methylselenocysteine (MSC) restored the circadian expression of CGs and CCGs, including PERIOD 2 (PER2) and estrogen receptor β (ERS2), to normal. The present study evaluated whether changes in CG and CCG expression in whole blood can serve as indicators of circadian disruption in shift workers. Methods Fifteen shift workers were recruited to a crossover study. Blood samples were drawn before (6 PM) and after (8 AM) completing a night shift after at least 7 days on floating night-shift rotation, and before (8 AM), during (1 PM), and after (6 PM) completing 7 days on day shift. The plasma melatonin level and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of PER2, nuclear receptor subfamily 1, group d, member 1 (NR1D1), and ERS2 were measured, and the changes in levels of melatonin and gene expression were evaluated with statistical analyses. Results The mRNA expression of PER2 was affected by shift (p = 0.0079); the levels were higher in the evening for the night shift, but higher in the morning for the day shift. Increased PER2 expression (p = 0.034) was observed in the evening on the night versus day shifts. The melatonin level was higher in the morning for both day shifts (p = 0.013) and night shifts (p < 0.0001). Conclusion Changes in the level of PER2 gene expression can serve as a biomarker of disrupted circadian rhythm in blood cells. Therefore, they can be a useful intermediate indicator of efficacy in future MSC-mediated chemoprevention studies. PMID:26498241

  5. Sleep interruption associated with house staff work schedules alters circadian gene expression.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ming Zhu; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela; Kelly-McNeil, Kathie; Kipen, Howard; Crabtree, Benjamin F; Lew, Jenny Pan; Zarbl, Helmut

    2015-11-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that disruption of circadian rhythm by shift work increases the risk of breast and prostate cancer. Our studies demonstrated that carcinogens disrupt the circadian expression of circadian genes (CGs) and circadian-controlled genes (CCGs) during the early stages of rat mammary carcinogenesis. A chemopreventive regimen of methylselenocysteine (MSC) restored the circadian expression of CGs and CCGs, including PERIOD 2 (PER2) and estrogen receptor β (ERS2), to normal. The present study evaluated whether changes in CG and CCG expression in whole blood can serve as indicators of circadian disruption in shift workers. Fifteen shift workers were recruited to a crossover study. Blood samples were drawn before (6 PM) and after (8 AM) completing a night shift after at least seven days on floating night-shift rotation, and before (8 AM), during (1 PM), and after (6 PM) completing seven days on day shift. The plasma melatonin level and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of PER2, nuclear receptor subfamily 1, group d, member 1 (NR1D1), and ERS2 were measured, and the changes in levels of melatonin and gene expression were evaluated with statistical analyses. The mRNA expression of PER2 was affected by shift (p = 0.0079); the levels were higher in the evening for the night shift, but higher in the morning for the day shift. Increased PER2 expression (p = 0.034) was observed in the evening on the night versus day shifts. The melatonin level was higher in the morning for both day shifts (p = 0.013) and night shifts (p <0.0001). Changes in the level of PER2 gene expression can serve as a biomarker of disrupted circadian rhythm in blood cells. Therefore, they can be a useful intermediate indicator of efficacy in future MSC-mediated chemoprevention studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Identification of the key genes implicated in the transformation of OLP to OSCC using RNA-sequencing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiaozhen; Guo, Bin; Sun, Hongying; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Shangfeng; Hexige, Saiyin; Yu, Xuedi; Wang, Xiaxia

    2017-04-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic inflammatory disease that may transform to oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), while its carcinogenesis mechanisms are not entirely clear. This study was designed to identify the important genes involved in the malignant transformation of OLP to OSCC. After RNA-sequencing, the differently expressed genes (DEGs) in OLP vs. normal and OSCC vs. normal groups, respectively, were identified by limma package in R language, and then clustering analysis were conducted by Pheatmap package in R language. Weighed gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) was performed for the DEGs to screen disease-associated modules. Using Cytoscape software, co-expression networks were constructed for the genes involved in the modules. Enrichment analysis was conducted for the genes involved in the co-expression networks using GOstat package in R language. Finally, quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) experiments were conducted to validate the key genes. There were, respectively, 223 and 548 DEGs in OLP vs. normal and OSCC vs. normal groups. WGCNA identified the blue modules for the DEGs in the two groups as disease-associated modules. Moreover, 19 common DEGs (including upregulated BCL9L, PER2 and TSPAN33, and downregulated GMPS and HES1) associated with both OLP and OSCC were identified. In the co-expression networks, BCL9L, HES1, PER2 and TSPAN33 might function in OLP via interactions (such as BCL9L-TSPAN33 and HES1-PER2). qRT-PCR analysis showed that BCL9L, PER2 and TSPAN33 were significantly upregulated, and GMP and HES1 were downregulated. These findings indicated that BCL9L, GMPS, HES1, PER2 and TSPAN33 affected the transformation of OLP to OSCC.

  7. Crosstalk of clock gene expression and autophagy in aging

    PubMed Central

    Kalfalah, Faiza; Janke, Linda; Schiavi, Alfonso; Tigges, Julia; Ix, Alexander; Ventura, Natascia; Boege, Fritz; Reinke, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy and the circadian clock counteract tissue degeneration and support longevity in many organisms. Accumulating evidence indicates that aging compromises both the circadian clock and autophagy but the mechanisms involved are unknown. Here we show that the expression levels of transcriptional repressor components of the circadian oscillator, most prominently the human Period homologue PER2, are strongly reduced in primary dermal fibroblasts from aged humans, while raising the expression of PER2 in the same cells partially restores diminished autophagy levels. The link between clock gene expression and autophagy is corroborated by the finding that the circadian clock drives cell-autonomous, rhythmic autophagy levels in immortalized murine fibroblasts, and that siRNA-mediated downregulation of PER2 decreases autophagy levels while leaving core clock oscillations intact. Moreover, the Period homologue lin-42 regulates autophagy and life span in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, suggesting an evolutionarily conserved role for Period proteins in autophagy control and aging. Taken together, this study identifies circadian clock proteins as set-point regulators of autophagy and puts forward a model, in which age-related changes of clock gene expression promote declining autophagy levels. PMID:27574892

  8. Gene doping.

    PubMed

    Azzazy, Hassan M E

    2010-01-01

    Gene doping abuses the legitimate approach of gene therapy. While gene therapy aims to correct genetic disorders by introducing a foreign gene to replace an existing faulty one or by manipulating existing gene(s) to achieve a therapeutic benefit, gene doping employs the same concepts to bestow performance advantages on athletes over their competitors. Recent developments in genetic engineering have contributed significantly to the progress of gene therapy research and currently numerous clinical trials are underway. Some athletes and their staff are probably watching this progress closely. Any gene that plays a role in muscle development, oxygen delivery to tissues, neuromuscular coordination, or even pain control is considered a candidate for gene dopers. Unfortunately, detecting gene doping is technically very difficult because the transgenic proteins expressed by the introduced genes are similar to their endogenous counterparts. Researchers today are racing the clock because assuring the continued integrity of sports competition depends on their ability to develop effective detection strategies in preparation for the 2012 Olympics, which may mark the appearance of genetically modified athletes.

  9. Gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Williamson, B

    1982-07-29

    Gene therapy is not yet possible, but may become feasible soon, particularly for well understood gene defects. Although treatment of a patient raises no ethical problems once it can be done well, changing the genes of an early embryo is more difficult, controversial and unlikely to be required clinically.

  10. Regulation of period 1 expression in cultured rat pineal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fukuhara, Chiaki; Dirden, James C.; Tosini, Gianluca

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the in vitro expression of Period 1 (Per1), Period 2 (Per2) and arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AA-NAT) genes in the rat pineal gland to understand the mechanism(s) regulating the expression of these genes in this organ. Pineals, when maintained in vitro for 5 days, did not show circadian rhythmicity in the expression of any of the three genes monitored. Norepinephrine (NE) induced AA-NAT and Per1, whereas its effect on Per2 was negligible. Contrary to what was observed in other systems, NE stimulation did not induce circadian expression of Per1. The effect of NE on Per1 level was dose- and receptor subtype-dependent, and both cAMP and cGMP induced Per1. Per1 was not induced by repeated NE - or forskolin - stimulation. Protein synthesis was not necessary for NE-induced Per1, but it was for reduction of Per1 following NE stimulation. Per1 transcription in pinealocytes was activated by BMAL1/CLOCK. Our results indicate that important differences are present in the regulation of these genes in the mammalian pineal. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Regulation of period 1 expression in cultured rat pineal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fukuhara, Chiaki; Dirden, James C.; Tosini, Gianluca

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the in vitro expression of Period 1 (Per1), Period 2 (Per2) and arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AA-NAT) genes in the rat pineal gland to understand the mechanism(s) regulating the expression of these genes in this organ. Pineals, when maintained in vitro for 5 days, did not show circadian rhythmicity in the expression of any of the three genes monitored. Norepinephrine (NE) induced AA-NAT and Per1, whereas its effect on Per2 was negligible. Contrary to what was observed in other systems, NE stimulation did not induce circadian expression of Per1. The effect of NE on Per1 level was dose- and receptor subtype-dependent, and both cAMP and cGMP induced Per1. Per1 was not induced by repeated NE - or forskolin - stimulation. Protein synthesis was not necessary for NE-induced Per1, but it was for reduction of Per1 following NE stimulation. Per1 transcription in pinealocytes was activated by BMAL1/CLOCK. Our results indicate that important differences are present in the regulation of these genes in the mammalian pineal. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Scheller, E.L.; Krebsbach, P.H.

    2009-01-01

    Gene therapy is defined as the treatment of disease by transfer of genetic material into cells. This review will explore methods available for gene transfer as well as current and potential applications for craniofacial regeneration, with emphasis on future development and design. Though non-viral gene delivery methods are limited by low gene transfer efficiency, they benefit from relative safety, low immunogenicity, ease of manufacture, and lack of DNA insert size limitation. In contrast, viral vectors are nature’s gene delivery machines that can be optimized to allow for tissue-specific targeting, site-specific chromosomal integration, and efficient long-term infection of dividing and non-dividing cells. In contrast to traditional replacement gene therapy, craniofacial regeneration seeks to use genetic vectors as supplemental building blocks for tissue growth and repair. Synergistic combination of viral gene therapy with craniofacial tissue engineering will significantly enhance our ability to repair and replace tissues in vivo. PMID:19641145

  13. Glucocorticoid-mediated Period2 induction delays the phase of circadian rhythm

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Solmi; Park, Noheon; Cho, Sehyung; Kim, Kyungjin

    2013-01-01

    Glucocorticoid (GC) signaling synchronizes the circadian rhythm of individual peripheral cells and induces the expression of circadian genes, including Period1 (Per1) and Period2 (Per2). However, no GC response element (GRE) has been reported in the Per2 promoter region. Here we report the molecular mechanisms of Per2 induction by GC signaling and its relevance to the regulation of circadian timing. We found that GC prominently induced Per2 expression and delayed the circadian phase. The overlapping GRE and E-box (GE2) region in the proximal Per2 promoter was responsible for GC-mediated Per2 induction. The GRE in the Per2 promoter was unique in that brain and muscle ARNT-like protein-1 (BMAL1) was essential for GC-induced Per2 expression, whereas other GRE-containing promoters, such as Per1 and mouse mammary tumor virus, responded to dexamethasone in the absence of BMAL1. This specialized regulatory mechanism was mediated by BMAL1-dependent binding of the GC receptor to GRE in Per2 promoter. When Per2 induction was abrogated by the mutation of the GRE or E-box, the circadian oscillation phase failed to be delayed compared with that of the wild-type. Therefore, the current study demonstrates that the rapid Per2 induction mediated by GC is crucial for delaying the circadian rhythm. PMID:23620290

  14. Glucocorticoid-mediated Period2 induction delays the phase of circadian rhythm.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Solmi; Park, Noheon; Cho, Sehyung; Kim, Kyungjin

    2013-07-01

    Glucocorticoid (GC) signaling synchronizes the circadian rhythm of individual peripheral cells and induces the expression of circadian genes, including Period1 (Per1) and Period2 (Per2). However, no GC response element (GRE) has been reported in the Per2 promoter region. Here we report the molecular mechanisms of Per2 induction by GC signaling and its relevance to the regulation of circadian timing. We found that GC prominently induced Per2 expression and delayed the circadian phase. The overlapping GRE and E-box (GE2) region in the proximal Per2 promoter was responsible for GC-mediated Per2 induction. The GRE in the Per2 promoter was unique in that brain and muscle ARNT-like protein-1 (BMAL1) was essential for GC-induced Per2 expression, whereas other GRE-containing promoters, such as Per1 and mouse mammary tumor virus, responded to dexamethasone in the absence of BMAL1. This specialized regulatory mechanism was mediated by BMAL1-dependent binding of the GC receptor to GRE in Per2 promoter. When Per2 induction was abrogated by the mutation of the GRE or E-box, the circadian oscillation phase failed to be delayed compared with that of the wild-type. Therefore, the current study demonstrates that the rapid Per2 induction mediated by GC is crucial for delaying the circadian rhythm.

  15. [Analysis of gene expression data regulated by clock-genes: methodological approach and optimization].

    PubMed

    Vuillaume, M-L; Kwiatkowski, F; Uhrhammer, N; Bidet, Y; Bignon, Y-J

    2013-10-01

    In microarray data, wide-scale correlations are numerous and increase the number of genes correlated to a test condition (phenotype, mutation status, etc.) either positively or negatively. Several methods have been developed to limit the effect of such correlations on the false discovery rate, but these may reject too many genes that have a mild or indirect impact on the studied condition. We propose here a simple methodology to correct this spurious effect without eliminating weak but true correlations. This methodology was applied to a microarray dataset designed to distinguish heterozygous BRCA1 mutation carriers from non-carriers. As our samples were collected at different times in the morning, we evaluated the effect of correlations due to circadian rhythm. The circadian system is a well-known correlation network, regulated by a small number of period genes whose expression varies throughout the day in predictable ways. The downstream effects of this variation on the expression of other genes, however, are incompletely characterized. We used two different strategies to correct this correlation bias, by either dividing or multiplying the expression of correlated genes by the expression of the considered period gene according to the sign of the correlation between the period gene and correlated gene (respectively positive or negative). We observed a linear relationship between the number of false-positive/negative genes and the strength of the correlation of the candidate gene to the test condition. BRCA1 was highly correlated to the period gene Per1; our correction methodology enabled us to recover genes coding for BRCA1-interacting proteins which were not selected in the initial direct analysis. This methodology may be valuable for other studies and can be applied very easily in case of well-known correlation networks. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Gene dispensability.

    PubMed

    Korona, Ryszard

    2011-08-01

    Genome-wide mutagenesis studies indicate that up to about 90% of genes in bacteria and 80% in eukaryotes can be inactivated individually leaving an organism viable, often seemingly unaffected. Several strategies are used to learn what these apparently dispensable genes contribute to fitness. Assays of growth under hundreds of physical and chemical stresses are among the most effective experimental approaches. Comparative studies of genomic DNA sequences continue to be valuable in discriminating between the core bacterial genome and the more variable niche-specific genes. The concept of the core genome appears currently unfeasible for eukaryotes but progress has been made in understanding why they contain numerous gene duplicates.

  17. Exercise influences circadian gene expression in equine skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Murphy, B A; Wagner, A L; McGlynn, O F; Kharazyan, F; Browne, J A; Elliott, J A

    2014-07-01

    Circadian rhythms are endogenously generated 24-h oscillations that coordinate numerous aspects of mammalian physiology, metabolism and behaviour. The existence of a molecular circadian clock in equine skeletal muscle has previously been demonstrated. This study investigates how the circadian 24-h expression of exercise-relevant genes in skeletal muscle is influenced by a regular exercise regime. Mid-gluteal, percutaneous muscle biopsies were obtained over a 24-h period from six Thoroughbred mares before and after an 8-week exercise programme. Real-time qPCR assays were used to assess the expression patterns of core clock genes ARNTL, PER2, NR1D1, clock-controlled gene DBP, and muscle genes MYF6, UCP3, VEGFA, FOXO1, MYOD1, PPARGC1A, PPARGC1B, FBXO32 and PDK4. Two-way repeated measures ANOVA revealed a significant interaction between circadian time and exercise for muscle genes MYF6, UCP3, MYOD1 and PDK4. A significant effect of time was observed for all genes with the exception of VEGFA, where a main effect of exercise was observed. By cosinor analysis, the core clock genes, ARNTL (P <0.01) and NR1D1 (P <0.05), showed 24-h rhythmicity both pre- and post-exercise, while PER2 expression was rhythmic post-exercise (P <0.05) but not pre-exercise. The expression profiles of muscle genes MYOD1 and MYF6 showed significant fits to a 24-h cosine waveform indicative of circadian rhythmicity post-exercise only (P <0.01). This study suggests that the metabolic capacity of muscle is influenced by scheduled exercise and that optimal athletic performance may be achieved when exercise times and competition times coincide.

  18. Trichoderma genes

    DOEpatents

    Foreman, Pamela [Los Altos, CA; Goedegebuur, Frits [Vlaardingen, NL; Van Solingen, Pieter [Naaldwijk, NL; Ward, Michael [San Francisco, CA

    2012-06-19

    Described herein are novel gene sequences isolated from Trichoderma reesei. Two genes encoding proteins comprising a cellulose binding domain, one encoding an arabionfuranosidase and one encoding an acetylxylanesterase are described. The sequences, CIP1 and CIP2, contain a cellulose binding domain. These proteins are especially useful in the textile and detergent industry and in pulp and paper industry.

  19. Gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Drugan, A; Miller, O J; Evans, M I

    1987-01-01

    Severe genetic disorders are potentially correctable by the addition of a normal gene into tissues. Although the technical problems involving integration, stable expression, and insertional damage to the treated cell are not yet fully solved, enough scientific progress has already been made to consider somatic cell gene therapy acceptable from both the ethical and scientific viewpoints. The resolutions to problems evolving from somatic cell gene therapy will help to overcome the technical difficulties encountered presently with germ line gene manipulation. This procedure would then become morally permissible as it will cause, in time, a reduction in the pool of abnormal genes in the population. Enhancement genetic engineering is technically feasible but morally unacceptable. Eugenic genetic engineering is not technically possible or ethically permissible in the foreseeable future.

  20. Effect of Mefloquine, a Gap Junction Blocker, on Circadian Period2 Gene Oscillation in the Mouse Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Jinmi; Choe, Han Kyoung; Kim, Hee-Dae; Chun, Sung Kook; Son, Gi Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Background In mammals, the master circadian pacemaker is localized in an area of the ventral hypothalamus known as the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Previous studies have shown that pacemaker neurons in the SCN are highly coupled to one another, and this coupling is crucial for intrinsic self-sustainability of the SCN central clock, which is distinguished from peripheral oscillators. One plausible mechanism underlying the intercellular communication may involve direct electrical connections mediated by gap junctions. Methods We examined the effect of mefloquine, a neuronal gap junction blocker, on circadian Period 2 (Per2) gene oscillation in SCN slice cultures prepared from Per2::luciferase (PER2::LUC) knock-in mice using a real-time bioluminescence measurement system. Results Administration of mefloquine causes instability in the pulse period and a slight reduction of amplitude in cyclic PER2::LUC expression. Blockade of gap junctions uncouples PER2::LUC-expressing cells, in terms of phase transition, which weakens synchrony among individual cellular rhythms. Conclusion These findings suggest that neuronal gap junctions play an important role in synchronizing the central pacemaker neurons and contribute to the distinct self-sustainability of the SCN master clock. PMID:25491783

  1. Daily Rhythmicity of Clock Gene Transcripts in Atlantic Cod Fast Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Lazado, Carlo C.; Kumaratunga, Hiruni P. S.; Nagasawa, Kazue; Babiak, Igor; Giannetto, Alessia; Fernandes, Jorge M. O.

    2014-01-01

    The classical notion of a centralized clock that governs circadian rhythmicity has been challenged with the discovery of peripheral oscillators that enable organisms to cope with daily changes in their environment. The present study aimed to identify the molecular clock components in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) and to investigate their daily gene expression in fast skeletal muscle. Atlantic cod clock genes were closely related to their orthologs in teleosts and tetrapods. Synteny was conserved to varying degrees in the majority of the 18 clock genes examined. In particular, aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator-like 2 (arntl2), RAR-related orphan receptor A (rora) and timeless (tim) displayed high degrees of conservation. Expression profiling during the early ontogenesis revealed that some transcripts were maternally transferred, namely arntl2, cryptochrome 1b and 2 (cry1b and cry2), and period 2a and 2b (per2a and per2b). Most clock genes were ubiquitously expressed in various tissues, suggesting the possible existence of multiple peripheral clock systems in Atlantic cod. In particular, they were all detected in fast skeletal muscle, with the exception of neuronal PAS (Per-Arnt-Single-minded) domain-containing protein (npas1) and rora. Rhythmicity analysis revealed 8 clock genes with daily rhythmic expression, namely arntl2, circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (clock), npas2, cry2, cry3 per2a, nuclear receptor subfamily 1, group D, member 1 (nr1d1), and nr1d2a. Transcript levels of the myogenic genes myogenic factor 5 (myf5) and muscleblind-like 1 (mbnl1) strongly correlated with clock gene expression. This is the first study to unravel the molecular components of peripheral clocks in Atlantic cod. Taken together, our data suggest that the putative clock system in fast skeletal muscle of Atlantic cod has regulatory implications on muscle physiology, particularly in the expression of genes related to myogenesis. PMID:24921252

  2. [Gene and gene sequence patenting].

    PubMed

    Bergel, S D

    1998-01-01

    According to the author, the patenting of elements isolated or copied from the human body boils down to the issue of genes and gene sequences. He describes the current situation from the comparative law standpoint (U.S. and Spanish law mainly) and then esamines the biotechnology industry's position.

  3. [Sleep genes].

    PubMed

    Prospéro-García, O; Guzmán, K; Méndez-Diaz, M; Herrera-Solís, A; Ruiz-Contreras, A

    Sleep is a non-learned adaptive strategy that depends on the expression of several neurotransmitters and other molecules. The expression of some of these molecules depends on a number of different genes. Sleep disorders are associated with an inadequate expression of some molecules, which therefore indicates that these genes that code for these molecules participate in the regulation of normal sleep. To discuss the evidence on gene regulation over the occurrence of sleep and its architecture, as well as of sleep disorders, which supports the participation of specific genes. We describe the evidence on sleep in mammals, particularly in humans, in addition to studies with twins that demonstrate the influence of genes on sleep regulation. We also discuss several sleep disorders, which in this study only serves to emphasise how certain specific genes, under normal conditions, participate in the expression of sleep. Furthermore, evidence is also provided for other molecules, such as endocannibinoids, involved in sleep regulation. Lastly, we report on studies conducted with different strains of mice that show differences in the amount of sleep they express, possibly as an epiphenomenon of their different genetic loads. A number of different genes have been described as those responsible for making us sleep, although sleeping also depends on our interaction with the environment. This interaction is what makes us express sleep at times that are best suited to favouring our survival.

  4. Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Thorne, Barb; Takeya, Ryan; Vitelli, Francesca; Swanson, Xin

    2017-03-14

    Gene therapy refers to a rapidly growing field of medicine in which genes are introduced into the body to treat or prevent diseases. Although a variety of methods can be used to deliver the genetic materials into the target cells and tissues, modified viral vectors represent one of the more common delivery routes because of its transduction efficiency for therapeutic genes. Since the introduction of gene therapy concept in the 1970s, the field has advanced considerably with notable clinical successes being demonstrated in many clinical indications in which no standard treatment options are currently available. It is anticipated that the clinical success the field observed in recent years can drive requirements for more scalable, robust, cost effective, and regulatory-compliant manufacturing processes. This review provides a brief overview of the current manufacturing technologies for viral vectors production, drawing attention to the common upstream and downstream production process platform that is applicable across various classes of viral vectors and their unique manufacturing challenges as compared to other biologics. In addition, a case study of an industry-scale cGMP production of an AAV-based gene therapy product performed at 2,000 L-scale is presented. The experience and lessons learned from this largest viral gene therapy vector production run conducted to date as discussed and highlighted in this review should contribute to future development of commercial viable scalable processes for vial gene therapies.

  5. Genes V.

    SciTech Connect

    Lewin, B.

    1994-12-31

    This fifth edition book encompasses a wide range of topics covering 1,272 pages. The book is arranged into nine parts with a total of 36 chapters. These nine parts include Introduction; DNA as a Store of Information; Translation; Constructing Cells; Control of Prokaryotypic Gene Expression; Perpetuation of DNA; Organization of the Eukaryotypic Genome; Eukaryotypic Transcription and RNA Processing; The Dynamic Genome; and Genes in Development.

  6. Mechanisms of Organophosphorus (OP) Injury: Sarin-Induced Hippocampal Gene Expression Changes and Pathway Perturbation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    inflammation and/or a role for prostanoid signaling in activity- dependent plasticity. Expression Ptgs2 can be induced by cytokines and mitogens, which...probably by ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated) or ATR (ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3 related). Per1 negatively regulates transactivation induced by...i AFRL-RH-FS-TR-2012-0008 Mechanisms of Organophosphorus (OP) Injury: Sarin- Induced Hippocampal Gene Expression Changes and Pathway

  7. Rat retina shows robust circadian expression of clock and clock output genes in explant culture.

    PubMed

    Buonfiglio, Daniella C; Malan, André; Sandu, Cristina; Jaeger, Catherine; Cipolla-Neto, José; Hicks, David; Felder-Schmittbuhl, Marie-Paule

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are central to vision and retinal physiology. A circadian clock located within the retina controls various rhythmic processes including melatonin synthesis in photoreceptors. In the present study, we evaluated the rhythmic expression of clock genes and clock output genes in retinal explants maintained for several days in darkness. Retinas were dissected from Wistar rats, either wild-type or from the Per1-luciferase transgenic line housed under a daily 12 h:12 h light-dark cycle (LD12/12), and put in culture at zeitgeber time (ZT) 12 on semipermeable membranes. Explants from wild-type rats were collected every 4 h over 3 days, and total RNA was extracted, quantified, and reverse transcribed. Gene expression was assessed with quantitative PCR, and the periodicity of the relative mRNA amounts was assessed with nonlinear least squares fitting to sine wave functions. Bioluminescence in explants from Per1-luciferase rats was monitored for several days under three different culture protocols. Rhythmic expression was found for all studied clock genes and for clock downstream targets such as c-fos and arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (Aanat) genes. Clock and output genes cycled with relatively similar periods and acrophases (peaks of expression during subjective night, except c-fos, which peaked around the end of the subjective day). Data for Per1 were confirmed with bioluminescence monitoring, which also permitted culture conditions to be optimized to study the retina clock. Our work shows the free-running expression profile of multiple clock genes and potential clock targets in mammalian retinal explants. This research further strengthens the notion that the retina contains a self-sustained oscillator that can be functionally characterized in organotypic culture.

  8. Sexual Dimorphism in Clock Genes Expression in Human Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Abellán, P.; Madrid, J. A.; Luján, J. A.; Frutos, M. D.; González, R.; Martínez-Augustín, O.; de Medina, F. Sánchez; Ordovás, J. M.; Garaulet, M.

    2015-01-01

    Background This study was carried out to investigate whether sex-related differences exist in the adipocyte expression of clock genes from subcutaneous abdominal and visceral fat depots in severely obese patients. Methods We investigated 16 morbidly obese patients, eight men and eight women (mean age 45±20 years; mean BMI 46±6 kg/m2), undergoing laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery. Biopsies were taken as paired samples [subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue (AT)] at the beginning of the surgical process at 11:00 h in the morning. Metabolic syndrome features such as waist circumference, plasma glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) were also studied. The expression of clock genes (PER2, BMAL1, and CRY1) was measured by quantitative real-time PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemical analysis. Results Gene expression was significantly higher in women than in men for the three genes studied in both ATs (P<0.05). In visceral fat, these differences were more marked. (P<0.001). Western blot analysis partially confirmed these results since statistical differences were observed for PER2 in both ATs and for CRY1 in subcutaneous adipose tissue. There were no differences in BMAL1 protein expression. Interestingly, clock gene expression level was correlated with LDL-C and HDL-C (P<0.05). Moreover, we found significant associations with body fat mass in women and with age in men. Conclusions Clock genes expression is sex dependent in human adipose tissue from morbidly obese subjects and correlates to a decreased in metabolic syndrome-related traits. These preliminary results make necessary to go deep into the knowledge of the molecular basis of the sexual dimorphism in chronobiology. PMID:22081238

  9. Angiotensin II-regulated transcription regulatory genes in adrenal steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Romero, Damian G; Gomez-Sanchez, Elise P; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E

    2010-11-29

    Transcription regulatory genes are crucial modulators of cell physiology and metabolism whose intracellular levels are tightly controlled in response to extracellular stimuli. We previously reported a set of 29 transcription regulatory genes modulated by angiotensin II in H295R human adrenocortical cells and their roles in regulating the expression of the last and unique enzymes of the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid biosynthetic pathways, 11β-hydroxylase and aldosterone synthase, respectively, using gene expression reporter assays. To study the effect of this set of transcription regulatory genes on adrenal steroidogenesis, H295R cells were transfected by high-efficiency nucleofection and aldosterone and cortisol were measured in cell culture supernatants under basal and angiotensin II-stimulated conditions. BCL11B, BHLHB2, CITED2, ELL2, HMGA1, MAFF, NFIL3, PER1, SERTAD1, and VDR significantly stimulated aldosterone secretion, while EGR1, FOSB, and ZFP295 decreased aldosterone secretion. BTG2, HMGA1, MITF, NR4A1, and ZFP295 significantly increased cortisol secretion, while BCL11B, NFIL3, PER1, and SIX2 decreased cortisol secretion. We also report the effect of some of these regulators on the expression of endogenous aldosterone synthase and 11β-hydroxylase under basal and angiotensin II-stimulated conditions. In summary, this study reports for the first time the effects of a set of angiotensin II-modulated transcription regulatory genes on aldosterone and cortisol secretion and the expression levels of the last and unique enzymes of the mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid biosynthetic pathways. Abnormal regulation of mineralocorticoid or glucocorticoid secretion is involved in several pathophysiological conditions. These transcription regulatory genes may be involved in adrenal steroidogenesis pathologies; thus they merit additional study as potential candidates for therapeutic intervention.

  10. The Zebrafish Period2 Protein Positively Regulates the Circadian Clock through Mediation of Retinoic Acid Receptor (RAR)-related Orphan Receptor α (Rorα)*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingyong; Zhong, Zhaomin; Zhong, Yingbin; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Han

    2015-01-01

    We report the characterization of a null mutant for zebrafish circadian clock gene period2 (per2) generated by transcription activator-like effector nuclease and a positive role of PER2 in vertebrate circadian regulation. Locomotor experiments showed that per2 mutant zebrafish display reduced activities under light-dark and 2-h phase delay under constant darkness, and quantitative real time PCR analyses showed up-regulation of cry1aa, cry1ba, cry1bb, and aanat2 but down-regulation of per1b, per3, and bmal1b in per2 mutant zebrafish, suggesting that Per2 is essential for the zebrafish circadian clock. Luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that Per2 represses aanat2 expression through E-box and enhances bmal1b expression through the Ror/Rev-erb response element, implicating that Per2 plays dual roles in the zebrafish circadian clock. Cell transfection and co-immunoprecipitation assays revealed that Per2 enhances bmal1b expression through binding to orphan nuclear receptor Rorα. The enhancing effect of mouse PER2 on Bmal1 transcription is also mediated by RORα even though it binds to REV-ERBα. Moreover, zebrafish Per2 also appears to have tissue-specific regulatory roles in numerous peripheral organs. These findings help define the essential functions of Per2 in the zebrafish circadian clock and in particular provide strong evidence for a positive role of PER2 in the vertebrate circadian system. PMID:25544291

  11. Attention Genes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posner, Michael I.; Rothbart, Mary K.; Sheese, Brad E.

    2007-01-01

    A major problem for developmental science is understanding how the cognitive and emotional networks important in carrying out mental processes can be related to individual differences. The last five years have seen major advances in establishing links between alleles of specific genes and the neural networks underlying aspects of attention. These…

  12. Designer Genes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Judith; Miller, Mark

    1983-01-01

    Genetic technologies may soon help fill some of the most important needs of humanity from food to energy to health care. The research of major designer genes companies and reasons why the initial mad rush for biotechnology has slowed are reviewed. (SR)

  13. Designer Genes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Judith; Miller, Mark

    1983-01-01

    Genetic technologies may soon help fill some of the most important needs of humanity from food to energy to health care. The research of major designer genes companies and reasons why the initial mad rush for biotechnology has slowed are reviewed. (SR)

  14. Attention Genes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posner, Michael I.; Rothbart, Mary K.; Sheese, Brad E.

    2007-01-01

    A major problem for developmental science is understanding how the cognitive and emotional networks important in carrying out mental processes can be related to individual differences. The last five years have seen major advances in establishing links between alleles of specific genes and the neural networks underlying aspects of attention. These…

  15. [Evolution of gene orders in genomes of cyanobacteria].

    PubMed

    Markov, A V; Zakharov, I A

    2009-08-01

    Genomes of 23 strains of cyanobacteria were comparatively analyzed using quantitative methods of estimation of gene order similarity. It has been found that reconstructions of phylogenesis of cyanobacteria based on the comparison of the orders of genes in chromosomes and nucleotide sequences appear to be similar. This confirms the applicability of quantitative measures of similarity of gene orders for phylogenetic reconstructions. In the evolution of marine unicellular plankton cyanobacteria, genome rearrangements are fixed with a low rate (about 3% of gene order changes per 1% of 16S rRNA changes), whereas in other groups of cyanobacteria the gene order can change several times more rapidly. The gene orders in genomes of cyanobacteria and chloroplasts preserve a considerable degree of similarity. The closest relatives of chloroplasts among the analyzed cyanobacteria are likely to be strains from hot springs belonging to the genus Synechococcus. Comparative analysis of gene orders and nucleotide sequences strongly suggests that Synechococcus strains from diferent environments (sea, fresh waters, hot springs) are not related and belong to evolutionally distant lines.

  16. A noradrenergic sensitive endogenous clock is present in the rat pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Wongchitrat, Prapimpun; Felder-Schmittbuhl, Marie-Paule; Govitrapong, Piyarat; Phansuwan-Pujito, Pansiri; Simonneaux, Valérie

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the occurrence of endogenous oscillations of Per1, Per2, Bmal1 and Rev-erbα genes in rat pineal explants and to investigate their regulation by adrenergic ligands. Our results show a significant and sustained rhythm of Per2,Bmal1 and Rev-erbα gene expression for up to 48 h in cultured pineal gland with a pattern similar to that observed in vivo. By contrast, the rhythms of Per1 and Aa-nat, the rate-limiting enzyme for melatonin synthesis, were strongly attenuated after 24 h in culture. Addition of the exogenous adrenergic agonist isoproterenol on cultured pineal glands induced a short-term increase in mRNA levels of Per1 and Aa-nat, but not those of Per2,Bmal1 and Rev-erbα. This study demonstrates that the rat pineal gland hosts a circadian oscillator as evidenced by the sustained, noradrenergic-independent, endogenous oscillations of Per2, Bmal1 and Rev-erbα mRNA levels in cultured tissues. Only expression of Per1 was stimulated by adrenergic ligands suggesting that, in vivo, the adrenergic input could synchronize the pineal clock by acting selectively on Per1.

  17. Endothelial Genes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    Suppression subtractive hybridization re- Cancer: principles and practice of oncology. Philadelphia: Lippincott- vealed an RNA sequence (GenBank accession...Lau YC, Campbell AP, et al. Suppression subtractive hybridization : A method for generating differentially regulated or tissue-tissues, EG-1 appears to...this gene, we investigated its interaction with Src and members of the called suppression subtractive hybridization (12). In human mitogen-activated

  18. Dexamethasone Modulates Nonvisual Opsins, Glucocorticoid Receptor, and Clock Genes in Danio rerio ZEM-2S Cells.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Jennifer Caroline; Magalhães-Marques, Keila Karoline; da Silveira Cruz-Machado, Sanseray; Moraes, Maria Nathalia; Castrucci, Ana Maria de Lauro

    2017-01-01

    Here we report, for the first time, the differential cellular distribution of two melanopsins (Opn4m1 and Opn4m2) and the effects of GR agonist, dexamethasone, on the expression of these opsins and clock genes, in the photosensitive D. rerio ZEM-2S embryonic cells. Immunopositive labeling for Opn4m1 was detected in the cell membrane whereas Opn4m2 labeling shows nuclear localization, which did not change in response to light. opn4m1, opn4m2, gr, per1b, and cry1b presented an oscillatory profile of expression in LD condition. In both DD and LD condition, dexamethasone (DEX) treatment shifted the peak expression of per1b and cry1b transcripts to ZT16, which corresponds to the highest opn4m1 expression. Interestingly, DEX promoted an increase of per1b expression when applied in LD condition but a decrease when the cells were kept under DD condition. Although DEX effects are divergent with different light conditions, the response resulted in clock synchronization in all cases. Taken together, these data demonstrate that D. rerio ZEM-2S cells possess a photosensitive system due to melanopsin expression which results in an oscillatory profile of clock genes in response to LD cycle. Moreover, we provide evidence that glucocorticoid acts as a circadian regulator of D. rerio peripheral clocks.

  19. Vulnerability genes or plasticity genes?

    PubMed Central

    Belsky, J; Jonassaint, C; Pluess, M; Stanton, M; Brummett, B; Williams, R

    2009-01-01

    The classic diathesis–stress framework, which views some individuals as particularly vulnerable to adversity, informs virtually all psychiatric research on behavior–gene–environment (G × E) interaction. An alternative framework of ‘differential susceptibility' is proposed, one which regards those most susceptible to adversity because of their genetic make up as simultaneously most likely to benefit from supportive or enriching experiences—or even just the absence of adversity. Recent G × E findings consistent with this perspective and involving monoamine oxidase-A, 5-HTTLPR (5-hydroxytryptamine-linked polymorphic region polymorphism) and dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4) are reviewed for illustrative purposes. Results considered suggest that putative ‘vulnerability genes' or ‘risk alleles' might, at times, be more appropriately conceptualized as ‘plasticity genes', because they seem to make individuals more susceptible to environmental influences—for better and for worse. PMID:19455150

  20. T7 Endonuclease I Mediates Error Correction in Artificial Gene Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Sequeira, Ana Filipa; Guerreiro, Catarina I P D; Vincentelli, Renaud; Fontes, Carlos M G A

    2016-09-01

    Efficacy of de novo gene synthesis largely depends on the quality of overlapping oligonucleotides used as template for PCR assembly. The error rate associated with current gene synthesis protocols limits the efficient and accurate production of synthetic genes, both in the small and large scales. Here, we analysed the ability of different endonuclease enzymes, which specifically recognize and cleave DNA mismatches resulting from incorrect impairments between DNA strands, to remove mutations accumulated in synthetic genes. The gfp gene, which encodes the green fluorescent protein, was artificially synthesized using an integrated protocol including an enzymatic mismatch cleavage step (EMC) following gene assembly. Functional and sequence analysis of resulting artificial genes revealed that number of deletions, insertions and substitutions was strongly reduced when T7 endonuclease I was used for mutation removal. This method diminished mutation frequency by eightfold relative to gene synthesis not incorporating an error correction step. Overall, EMC using T7 endonuclease I improved the population of error-free synthetic genes, resulting in an error frequency of 0.43 errors per 1 kb. Taken together, data presented here reveal that incorporation of a mutation-removal step including T7 endonuclease I can effectively improve the fidelity of artificial gene synthesis.

  1. Clock Gene Expression in Gravid Uterus and Extra-Embryonic Tissues During Late Gestation in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Ratajczak, Christine K.; Herzog, Erik D.; Muglia, Louis J.

    2013-01-01

    Evidence in humans and rodents suggests the importance of circadian rhythmicity in parturition. A molecular clock underlies the generation of circadian rhythmicity. While this molecular clock has been identified in numerous tissues, the expression and regulation of clock genes in tissues relevant to parturition is largely undefined. Here, we examine the expression and regulation of the clock genes Bmal1, Clock, Cry(Cryptochrome)1/2, and Per(Period)1/2 in the murine gravid uterus, placenta, and fetal membranes during late gestation. All clock genes examined were expressed in the tissues of interest throughout the last third of gestation. Upregulation of a subset of these clock genes was observed in each of these tissues in the final two days of gestation. Oscillating expression of mRNA for a subset of the examined clock genes was detected in the gravid uterus, placenta, and fetal membranes. Furthermore, bioluminescence recording on explants from gravid Per2::luciferase mice indicated rhythmic expression of PER2 protein in these tissues. These data demonstrate expression and rhythmicity of clock genes in tissues relevant to parturition indicating a potential contribution of peripheral molecular clocks to this process. PMID:20450826

  2. The circadian clock in murine chondrocytes regulates genes controlling key aspects of cartilage homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Gossan, Nicole; Zeef, Leo; Hensman, James; Hughes, Alun; Bateman, John F; Rowley, Lynn; Little, Christopher B; Piggins, Hugh D; Rattray, Magnus; Boot-Handford, Raymond P; Meng, Qing-Jun

    2013-09-01

    To characterize the circadian clock in murine cartilage tissue and identify tissue-specific clock target genes, and to investigate whether the circadian clock changes during aging or during cartilage degeneration using an experimental mouse model of osteoarthritis (OA). Cartilage explants were obtained from aged and young adult mice after transduction with the circadian clock fusion protein reporter PER2::luc, and real-time bioluminescence recordings were used to characterize the properties of the clock. Time-series microarrays were performed on mouse cartilage tissue to identify genes expressed in a circadian manner. Rhythmic genes were confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction using mouse tissue, primary chondrocytes, and a human chondrocyte cell line. Experimental OA was induced in mice by destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM), and articular cartilage samples were microdissected and subjected to microarray analysis. Mouse cartilage tissue and a human chondrocyte cell line were found to contain intrinsic molecular circadian clocks. The cartilage clock could be reset by temperature signals, while the circadian period was temperature compensated. PER2::luc bioluminescence demonstrated that circadian oscillations were significantly lower in amplitude in cartilage from aged mice. Time-series microarray analyses of the mouse tissue identified the first circadian transcriptome in cartilage, revealing that 615 genes (∼3.9% of the expressed genes) displayed a circadian pattern of expression. This included genes involved in cartilage homeostasis and survival, as well as genes with potential importance in the pathogenesis of OA. Several clock genes were disrupted in the early stages of cartilage degeneration in the DMM mouse model of OA. These results reveal an autonomous circadian clock in chondrocytes that can be implicated in key aspects of cartilage biology and pathology. Consequently, circadian disruption (e.g., during aging

  3. Compare Gene Profiles

    SciTech Connect

    2014-05-31

    Compare Gene Profiles (CGP) performs pairwise gene content comparisons among a relatively large set of related bacterial genomes. CGP performs pairwise BLAST among gene calls from a set of input genome and associated annotation files, and combines the results to generate lists of common genes, unique genes, homologs, and genes from each genome that differ substantially in length from corresponding genes in the other genomes. CGP is implemented in Python and runs in a Linux environment in serial or parallel mode.

  4. Compare Gene Profiles

    SciTech Connect

    2014-05-31

    Compare Gene Profiles (CGP) performs pairwise gene content comparisons among a relatively large set of related bacterial genomes. CGP performs pairwise BLAST among gene calls from a set of input genome and associated annotation files, and combines the results to generate lists of common genes, unique genes, homologs, and genes from each genome that differ substantially in length from corresponding genes in the other genomes. CGP is implemented in Python and runs in a Linux environment in serial or parallel mode.

  5. Gene and enhancer traps for gene discovery.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Pierce, Marcela; Springer, Patricia S

    2003-01-01

    Gene traps and enhancer traps provide a valuable tool for gene discovery. With this system, genes can be identified based solely on the expression pattern of an inserted reporter gene. The use of a reporter gene, such as beta-glucuoronidase (GUS), provides a very sensitive assay for the identification of tissue- and cell-type specific expression patterns. In this chapter, protocols for examining and documenting GUS reporter gene activity in individual lines are described. Methods for the amplification of sequences flanking transposant insertions and subsequent molecular and genetic characterization of individual insertions are provided.

  6. Gene gymnastics

    PubMed Central

    Vijayachandran, Lakshmi S; Thimiri Govinda Raj, Deepak B; Edelweiss, Evelina; Gupta, Kapil; Maier, Josef; Gordeliy, Valentin; Fitzgerald, Daniel J; Berger, Imre

    2013-01-01

    Most essential activities in eukaryotic cells are catalyzed by large multiprotein assemblies containing up to ten or more interlocking subunits. The vast majority of these protein complexes are not easily accessible for high resolution studies aimed at unlocking their mechanisms, due to their low cellular abundance and high heterogeneity. Recombinant overproduction can resolve this bottleneck and baculovirus expression vector systems (BEVS) have emerged as particularly powerful tools for the provision of eukaryotic multiprotein complexes in high quality and quantity. Recently, synthetic biology approaches have begun to make their mark in improving existing BEVS reagents by de novo design of streamlined transfer plasmids and by engineering the baculovirus genome. Here we present OmniBac, comprising new custom designed reagents that further facilitate the integration of heterologous genes into the baculovirus genome for multiprotein expression. Based on comparative genome analysis and data mining, we herein present a blueprint to custom design and engineer the entire baculovirus genome for optimized production properties using a bottom-up synthetic biology approach. PMID:23328086

  7. Molecular detection of genes related to biofilm formation in multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from clinical settings.

    PubMed

    Badmasti, Farzad; Siadat, Seyed Davar; Bouzari, Saeid; Ajdary, Soheila; Shahcheraghi, Fereshteh

    2015-05-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a Gram-negative bacteria associated with hospital-acquired infections. Definitely, antimicrobial resistance and biofilm formation capabilities of clinical isolates have threading potential to persistence in the hospital environment and colonization on medical equipment. Twenty-seven multidrug-resistant clinical isolates were selected from a collection of A. baumannii samples isolated from clinical settings. PCR assays showed the frequencies of genes related to biofilm formation: ompA (100%), bap (30%) and blaPER-1 (44%). Polyclonal antibodies against recombinant AbOmpA8-346 and Bap1-487 proteins were obtained by the mouse immunization method. Western blotting revealed all isolates expressed AbOmpA and only eight isolates were positive for Bap factor. Two strains that had their bap gene disrupted with ISAba125 did not express Bap protein. Our findings showed that all double-negative bap/blaPER-1 isolates were recovered from the bloodstream and had low biofilm formation capabilities, and mostly belonged to type D wrinkled colony morphology. However, clinical isolates extracted from the throats of patients were blaPER-1-positive and had a great capacity to form biofilm, and also mostly belonged to type C wrinkled colony morphology. © 2015 The Authors.

  8. The Circadian Clock Gene Period1 Connects the Molecular Clock to Neural Activity in the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Block, Gene D.; Colwell, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    The neural activity patterns of suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) neurons are dynamically regulated throughout the circadian cycle with highest levels of spontaneous action potentials during the day. These rhythms in electrical activity are critical for the function of the circadian timing system and yet the mechanisms by which the molecular clockwork drives changes in the membrane are not well understood. In this study, we sought to examine how the clock gene Period1 (Per1) regulates the electrical activity in the mouse SCN by transiently and selectively decreasing levels of PER1 through use of an antisense oligodeoxynucleotide. We found that this treatment effectively reduced SCN neural activity. Direct current injection to restore the normal membrane potential partially, but not completely, returned firing rate to normal levels. The antisense treatment also reduced baseline [Ca2+]i levels as measured by Fura2 imaging technique. Whole cell patch clamp recording techniques were used to examine which specific potassium currents were altered by the treatment. These recordings revealed that the large conductance [Ca2+]i-activated potassium currents were reduced in antisense-treated neurons and that blocking this current mimicked the effects of the anti-sense on SCN firing rate. These results indicate that the circadian clock gene Per1 alters firing rate in SCN neurons and raise the possibility that the large conductance [Ca2+]i-activated channel is one of the targets. PMID:26553726

  9. Rhythmic clock gene expression in heart, kidney and some brain nuclei involved in blood pressure control in hypertensive TGR(mREN-2)27 rats.

    PubMed

    Herichová, Iveta; Mravec, Boris; Stebelová, Katarína; Krizanová, Ol'ga; Jurkovicová, Dana; Kvetnanský, Richard; Zeman, Michal

    2007-02-01

    Hypertensive TGR(mREN-2)27 rats exerting inverted blood pressure (BP) profile were used to study clock gene expression in structures responsible for BP control. TGR and control Sprague Dawley male rats were synchronized to the light:dark cycle 12:12 with food and water ad libitum. Daily rhythm in per2, bmal1, clock and dbp expression in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), heart and kidney was determined in both groups. Sampling occurred in regular 4 h intervals when rats of both strains were 11-weeks-old. Blood pressure and relative heart weight were significantly elevated in TGR rats in comparison with control. Expression of bmal1 and clock was up regulated in SCN of TGR rats but daily rhythm in per2 and dbp expression was similar in both groups. Mesor of per2 expression in RVLM was significantly higher in TGR than in control rats. In NTS of TGR rats expression of per2 was phase delayed by 3.5 h in comparison with control and bmal1 did not exert rhythmic pattern. Our study provided the first evidence about modified function of central and peripheral circadian oscillators in TGR rats at the level of clock gene expression. Expression of clock genes exerted up regulation in SCN and RVLM and down regulation in NTS. Circadian oscillators in selected brain structures were influenced more than oscillators in the heart and kidney by additional renin gene. Interactions of RAS and circadian system probably contribute to the development of inverted BP profile in TGR rats.

  10. Gene doping: gene delivery for olympic victory.

    PubMed

    Gould, David

    2013-08-01

    With one recently recommended gene therapy in Europe and a number of other gene therapy treatments now proving effective in clinical trials it is feasible that the same technologies will soon be adopted in the world of sport by unscrupulous athletes and their trainers in so called 'gene doping'. In this article an overview of the successful gene therapy clinical trials is provided and the potential targets for gene doping are highlighted. Depending on whether a doping gene product is secreted from the engineered cells or is retained locally to, or inside engineered cells will, to some extent, determine the likelihood of detection. It is clear that effective gene delivery technologies now exist and it is important that detection and prevention plans are in place.

  11. Circadian disruption alters mouse lung clock gene expression and lung mechanics.

    PubMed

    Hadden, Hélène; Soldin, Steven J; Massaro, Donald

    2012-08-01

    Most aspects of human physiology and behavior exhibit 24-h rhythms driven by a master circadian clock in the brain, which synchronizes peripheral clocks. Lung function and ventilation are subject to circadian regulation and exhibit circadian oscillations. Sleep disruption, which causes circadian disruption, is common in those with chronic lung disease, and in the general population; however, little is known about the effect on the lung of circadian disruption. We tested the hypothesis circadian disruption alters expression of clock genes in the lung and that this is associated with altered lung mechanics. Female and male mice were maintained on a 12:12-h light/dark cycle (control) or exposed for 4 wk to a shifting light regimen mimicking chronic jet lag (CJL). Airway resistance (Rn), tissue damping (G), and tissue elastance (H) did not differ between control and CJL females. Rn at positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) of 2 and 3 cmH(2)O was lower in CJL males compared with controls. G, H, and G/H did not differ between CJL and control males. Among CJL females, expression of clock genes, Bmal1 and Rev-erb alpha, was decreased; expression of their repressors, Per2 and Cry 2, was increased. Among CJL males, expression of Clock was decreased; Per 2 and Rev-erb alpha expression was increased. We conclude circadian disruption alters lung mechanics and clock gene expression and does so in a sexually dimorphic manner.

  12. Effect of sleep deprivation on rhythms of clock gene expression and melatonin in humans.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Katrin; Plomp, Rosina; Lao, Oscar; Middleton, Benita; Revell, Victoria L; Skene, Debra J; Kayser, Manfred

    2013-08-01

    This study investigated the impact of sleep deprivation on the human circadian system. Plasma melatonin and cortisol levels and leukocyte expression levels of 12 genes were examined over 48 h (sleep vs. no-sleep nights) in 12 young males (mean±SD: 23±5 yrs). During one night of total sleep deprivation, BMAL1 expression was suppressed, the heat shock gene HSPA1B expression was induced, and the amplitude of the melatonin rhythm increased, whereas other high-amplitude clock gene rhythms (e.g., PER1-3, REV-ERBα) remained unaffected. These data suggest that the core clock mechanism in peripheral oscillators is compromised during acute sleep deprivation.

  13. Role of monochromatic light on daily variation of clock gene expression in the pineal gland of chick.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Nan; Wang, Zixu; Cao, Jing; Dong, Yulan; Chen, Yaoxing

    2016-11-01

    The avian pineal gland is a master clock that can receive external photic cues and translate them into output rhythms. To clarify whether a shift in light wavelength can influence the circadian expression in chick pineal gland, a total of 240 Arbor Acre male broilers were exposed to white light (WL), red light (RL), green light (GL) or blue light (BL). After 2weeks light illumination, circadian expressions of seven core clock genes in pineal gland and the level of melatonin in plasma were examined. The results showed after illumination with monochromatic light, 24h profiles of all clock gene mRNAs retained circadian oscillation, except that RL tended to disrupt the rhythm of cCry2. Compared to WL, BL advanced the acrophases of the negative elements (cCry1, cCry2, cPer2 and cPer3) by 0.1-1.5h and delayed those of positive elements (cClock, cBmal1 and cBmal2) by 0.2-0.8h. And, RL advanced all clock genes except cClock and cPer2 by 0.3-2.1h, while GL delayed all clock genes by 0.5-1.5h except cBmal2. Meanwhile, GL increased the amplitude and mesor of positive and reduced both parameters of negative clock genes, but RL showed the opposite pattern. Although the acrophase of plasma melatonin was advanced by both GL and RL, the melatonin level was significantly increased in GL and decreased in RL. This tendency was consistent with the variations in the positive clock gene mRNA levels under monochromatic light and contrasted with those of negative clock genes. Therefore, we speculate that GL may enhance positive clock genes expression, leading to melatonin synthesis, whereas RL may enhance negative genes expression, suppressing melatonin synthesis.

  14. Anatomical distribution and daily profile of gper1b gene expression in brain and peripheral structures of goldfish (Carassius auratus).

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Bretaño, Aída; Gueguen, Marie-M; Cano-Nicolau, Joel; Kah, Olivier; Alonso-Gómez, Ángel L; Delgado, María J; Isorna, Esther

    2015-01-01

    The functional organization of the circadian system and the location of the main circadian oscillators vary through phylogeny. Present study investigates by in situ hybridization the anatomical location of the clock gene gPer1b in forebrain and midbrain, pituitary, and in two peripheral locations, the anterior intestine and liver, in a teleost fish, the goldfish (Carassius auratus). Moreover, the daily expression profiles of this gene were also studied by quantitative Real Time-PCR. Goldfish were maintained under a 12L-12D photoperiod and fed daily at 2 h after lights were switched on. A wide distribution of gPer1b mRNA in goldfish brain and pituitary was found in telencephalon, some hypothalamic nuclei (including the homologous to mammalian SCN), habenular nucleus, optic tectum, cerebellum and torus longitudinalis. Moreover, gPer1b expression was observed, for the first time in teleosts, in the pituitary, liver and anterior intestine. Day/night differences in gper1b mRNA abundance were found by in situ hybridization, with higher signal at nighttime that correlates with the results obtained by RT-PCR, where a rhythmic gPer1b expression was found in all tissues with acrophases at the end of the night. Amplitudes of gper1b rhythms vary among tissues, being higher in liver and intestine than in the brain, maybe because different cues entrain clocks in these locations. These results support the existence of functional clocks in many central and peripheral locations in goldfish coordinated, ticking at the same time.

  15. Gene Cluster Statistics with Gene Families

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Dannie

    2009-01-01

    Identifying genomic regions that descended from a common ancestor is important for understanding the function and evolution of genomes. In distantly related genomes, clusters of homologous gene pairs are evidence of candidate homologous regions. Demonstrating the statistical significance of such “gene clusters” is an essential component of comparative genomic analyses. However, currently there are no practical statistical tests for gene clusters that model the influence of the number of homologs in each gene family on cluster significance. In this work, we demonstrate empirically that failure to incorporate gene family size in gene cluster statistics results in overestimation of significance, leading to incorrect conclusions. We further present novel analytical methods for estimating gene cluster significance that take gene family size into account. Our methods do not require complete genome data and are suitable for testing individual clusters found in local regions, such as contigs in an unfinished assembly. We consider pairs of regions drawn from the same genome (paralogous clusters), as well as regions drawn from two different genomes (orthologous clusters). Determining cluster significance under general models of gene family size is computationally intractable. By assuming that all gene families are of equal size, we obtain analytical expressions that allow fast approximation of cluster probabilities. We evaluate the accuracy of this approximation by comparing the resulting gene cluster probabilities with cluster probabilities obtained by simulating a realistic, power-law distributed model of gene family size, with parameters inferred from genomic data. Surprisingly, despite the simplicity of the underlying assumption, our method accurately approximates the true cluster probabilities. It slightly overestimates these probabilities, yielding a conservative test. We present additional simulation results indicating the best choice of parameter values for data

  16. Developmental expression of stress response genes in Theobroma cacao leaves and their response to Nep1 treatment and a compatible infection by Phytophthora megakarya.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Bryan A; Bae, Hanhong; Strem, Mary D; Antúnez de Mayolo, Gabriela; Guiltinan, Mark J; Verica, Joseph A; Maximova, Siela N; Bowers, John H

    2005-06-01

    Developmental expression of stress response genes in Theobroma cacao leaves and their response to Nep1 and a compatible infection by Phytophthora megakarya were studied. Ten genes were selected to represent genes involved in defense (TcCaf-1, TcGlu1,3, TcChiB, TcCou-1, and TcPer-1), gene regulation (TcWRKY-1 and TcORFX-1), cell wall development (TcCou-1, TcPer-1, and TcGlu-1), or energy production (TcLhca-1 and TcrbcS). Leaf development was separated into unexpanded (UE), young red (YR), immature green (IG), and mature green (MG). Our data indicates that the constitutive defense mechanisms used by cacao leaves differ between different developmental stages. TcWRKY-1 and TcChiB were highly expressed in MG leaves, and TcPer-1, TcGlu-1, and TcCou-1 were highly expressed in YR leaves. TcGlu1,3 was highly expressed in UE and YR leaves, TcCaf-1 was highly expressed in UE leaves, and TcLhca-1 and TcrbcS were highly expressed in IG and MG leaves. NEP1 encodes the necrosis inducing protein Nep1 produced by Fusarium oxysporum and has orthologs in Phytophthora species. Nep1 caused cellular necrosis on MG leaves and young pods within 24 h of application. Necrosis was observed on YR leaves 10 days after treatment. Expression of TcWRKY-1, TcORFX-1, TcPer-1, and TcGlu-1 was enhanced and TcLhca-1 and TcrbcS were repressed in MG leaves after Nep1 treatment. Expression of TcWRKY-1 and TcORFX-1 was enhanced in YR leaves after Nep1 treatment. Infection of MG leaf disks by P. megakarya zoospores enhanced expression of TcGlu-1, TcWRKY-1, and TcPer-1 and repressed expression of TcChiB, TcLhca-1 and TcrbcS. Five of the six genes that were responsive to Nep1 were responsive to infection by P. megakarya. Susceptibility of T. cacao to P. megakarya includes altered plant gene expression and phytotoxic molecules like Nep1 may contribute to susceptibility.

  17. Compare Gene Calls

    SciTech Connect

    Ecale Zhou, Carol L.

    2016-07-05

    Compare Gene Calls (CGC) is a Python code used for combining and comparing gene calls from any number of gene callers. A gene caller is a computer program that predicts the extends of open reading frames within genomes of biological organisms.

  18. Autism and Genes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institutes of Health, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This document defines and discusses autism and how genes play a role in the condition. Answers to the following questions are covered: (1) What are genes? (2) What is autism? (3) What causes autism? (4) Why study genes to learn about autism? (5) How do researchers look for the genes involved in autism? (screen the whole genome; conduct cytogenetic…

  19. Epilepsy-associated genes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Lin, Zhi-Jian; Liu, Liu; Xu, Hai-Qing; Shi, Yi-Wu; Yi, Yong-Hong; He, Na; Liao, Wei-Ping

    2017-01-01

    Development in genetic technology has led to the identification of an increasing number of genes associated with epilepsy. These discoveries will both provide the basis for including genetic tests in clinical practice and improve diagnosis and treatment of epilepsy. By searching through several databases (OMIM, HGMD, and EpilepsyGene) and recent publications on PubMed, we found 977 genes that are associated with epilepsy. We classified these genes into 4 categories according to the manifestation of epilepsy in phenotypes. We found 84 genes that are considered as epilepsy genes: genes that cause epilepsies or syndromes with epilepsy as the core symptom. 73 genes were listed as neurodevelopment-associated genes: genes associated with both brain-development malformations and epilepsy. Several genes (536) were epilepsy-related: genes associated with both physical or other systemic abnormalities and epilepsy or seizures. We found 284 additional genes putatively associated with epilepsy; this requires further verification. These integrated data will provide new insights useful for both including genetic tests in the clinical practice and evaluating the results of genetic tests. We also summarized the epilepsy-associated genes according to their function, with the goal to better characterize the association between genes and epilepsies and to further understand the mechanisms underlying epilepsy.

  20. Ramipril modulates circadian gene expression in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Sauermann, Robert; Schmidt, Wolfgang M; Krebs, Michael; Brunner, Martin; Müller, Markus

    2011-11-01

    Treatment with angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitors favorably affects glucose metabolism and the development of diabetes mellitus by largely elusive mechanisms. To identify these mechanisms, we studied the effect of ACE-inhibition on gene expression in skeletal muscle, a primary target tissue for insulin in glucose homeostasis. A subject-blinded and analyst-blinded, placebo-controlled study was conducted in nine healthy men. Two consecutive muscle biopsies were conducted before and 9 h after a single dose of either 10-mg ramipril (n=6) or placebo (n=3), (randomly allocated). Muscle ribonucleic acid was subjected to transcriptome profiling. In both ramipril-treated or placebo-treated individuals, the majority of genes with differential expression between the two time points belonged to the family of diurnally regulated genes, such as the NR1D1 and NR1D2 genes (nuclear receptor subfamily 1, group D, members 1 and 2) or members of the period homolog family (PER1-3). Ramipril significantly modulated the expression of other diurnally regulated genes, such as aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator-like (ARNTL), encoding aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator-like, a core component of the circadian clock (P=0.02). Concomitant attenuation of NR1D1 downregulation (-2.4-fold compared with -4.1-fold in placebo; P=0.04), a transcriptional repressor of ARNTL, supported the view that ramipril might modulate glucose homeostasis pathways involving the NR1D1 ARNTL axis. As circadian rhythms are deranged in patients who are diabetic, modulated expression of circadian clock genes by ramipril could explain the favorable metabolic effects of therapeutic ACE-inhibition.

  1. Diurnal profiles of hypothalamic energy balance gene expression with photoperiod manipulation in the Siberian hamster, Phodopus sungorus.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Claire; Moar, Kim M; Logie, Tracy J; Ross, Alexander W; Morgan, Peter J; Mercer, Julian G

    2008-04-01

    Hypothalamic energy balance genes have been examined in the context of seasonal body weight regulation in the Siberian hamster. Most of these long photoperiod (LD)/short photoperiod (SD) comparisons have been of tissues collected at a single point in the light-dark cycle. We examined the diurnal expression profile of hypothalamic genes in hamsters killed at 3-h intervals throughout the light-dark cycle after housing in LD or SD for 12 wk. Gene expression of neuropeptide Y, agouti-related peptide, proopiomelanocortin, cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript, long-form leptin receptor, suppressor of cytokine signaling-3, melanocortin-3 receptor, melanocortin-4 receptor, and the clock gene Per1 as control were measured by in situ hybridization in hypothalamic nuclei. Effects of photoperiod on gene expression and leptin levels were generally consistent with previous reports. A clear diurnal variation was observed for Per1 in the suprachiasmatic nucleus in both photoperiods. Temporal effects on expression of energy balance genes were restricted to long-form leptin receptor in the arcuate nucleus and ventromedial nucleus, where similar diurnal expression profiles were observed, and melanocortin-4 receptor in the paraventricular nucleus; these effects were only observed in LD hamsters. There was no variation in serum leptin concentration. The 24-h profiles of hypothalamic energy balance gene expression broadly confirm photoperiodic differences that were observed previously, based on single time point comparisons, support the growing consensus that these genes have a limited role in seasonal body weight regulation, and further suggest limited involvement in daily rhythms of food intake.

  2. Folate deprivation modulates the expression of autophagy- and circadian-related genes in HT-22 hippocampal neuron cells through GR-mediated pathway.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qinwei; Yang, Yang; Li, Xi; He, Bin; Jia, Yimin; Zhang, Nana; Zhao, Ruqian

    2016-08-01

    Folic acid (FA) is an extremely important nutrient for brain formation and development. FA deficiency is highly linked to brain degeneration and age-related diseases, which are also associated with autophagic activities and circadian rhythm in hippocampal neurons. However, little is known how autophagy- and circadian-related genes in hippocampal neurons are regulated under FA deficiency. Here, hippocampal neuroncells (HT-22) were employed to determine the effect of FA deprivation (FD) on the expression of relevant genes and to reveal the potential role of glucocorticoid receptor (GR). FD increased autophagic activities in HT-22 cells, associated with significantly (P<0.05) enhanced GR activation indicated by higher ratio of GR phosphorylation. Out of 17 autophagy-related genes determined, 8 was significantly (P<0.05) up-regulated in FD group, which includes ATG2b, ATG3, ATG4c, ATG5, ATG10, ATG12, ATG13 and ATG14. Meanwhile, 4 out of 7 circadian-related genes detected, Clock, Cry1, Cry2 and Per2, were significantly (P<0.05) up-regulated. The protein content of autophagy markers, LC3A and LC3B, was also increased significantly (P<0.05). ChIP assay showed that FD promoted (P<0.05) GR binding to the promoter sequence of ATG3 and Per2. Moreover, MeDIP analysis demonstrated significant (P<0.05) hypomethylation in the promoter sequence of ATG12, ATG13 and Per2 genes. Together, we speculate that FD increases the transcription of autophagy- and circadian-related genes through, at least partly, GR-mediated pathway. Our results provide a basis for future investigations into the intracellular regulatory network in response to folate deficiency.

  3. Speciation genes in plants

    PubMed Central

    Rieseberg, Loren H.; Blackman, Benjamin K.

    2010-01-01

    Background Analyses of speciation genesgenes that contribute to the cessation of gene flow between populations – can offer clues regarding the ecological settings, evolutionary forces and molecular mechanisms that drive the divergence of populations and species. This review discusses the identities and attributes of genes that contribute to reproductive isolation (RI) in plants, compares them with animal speciation genes and investigates what these genes can tell us about speciation. Scope Forty-one candidate speciation genes were identified in the plant literature. Of these, seven contributed to pre-pollination RI, one to post-pollination, prezygotic RI, eight to hybrid inviability, and 25 to hybrid sterility. Genes, gene families and genetic pathways that were frequently found to underlie the evolution of RI in different plant groups include the anthocyanin pathway and its regulators (pollinator isolation), S RNase-SI genes (unilateral incompatibility), disease resistance genes (hybrid necrosis), chimeric mitochondrial genes (cytoplasmic male sterility), and pentatricopeptide repeat family genes (cytoplasmic male sterility). Conclusions The most surprising conclusion from this review is that identities of genes underlying both prezygotic and postzygotic RI are often predictable in a broad sense from the phenotype of the reproductive barrier. Regulatory changes (both cis and trans) dominate the evolution of pre-pollination RI in plants, whereas a mix of regulatory mutations and changes in protein-coding genes underlie intrinsic postzygotic barriers. Also, loss-of-function mutations and copy number variation frequently contribute to RI. Although direct evidence of positive selection on speciation genes is surprisingly scarce in plants, analyses of gene family evolution, along with theoretical considerations, imply an important role for diversifying selection and genetic conflict in the evolution of RI. Unlike in animals, however, most candidate speciation

  4. MicroRNA-433 Dampens Glucocorticoid Receptor Signaling, Impacting Circadian Rhythm and Osteoblastic Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Smith, Spenser S; Dole, Neha S; Franceschetti, Tiziana; Hrdlicka, Henry C; Delany, Anne M

    2016-10-07

    Serum glucocorticoids play a critical role in synchronizing circadian rhythm in peripheral tissues, and multiple mechanisms regulate tissue sensitivity to glucocorticoids. In the skeleton, circadian rhythm helps coordinate bone formation and resorption. Circadian rhythm is regulated through transcriptional and post-transcriptional feedback loops that include microRNAs. How microRNAs regulate circadian rhythm in bone is unexplored. We show that in mouse calvaria, miR-433 displays robust circadian rhythm, peaking just after dark. In C3H/10T1/2 cells synchronized with a pulse of dexamethasone, inhibition of miR-433 using a tough decoy altered the period and amplitude of Per2 gene expression, suggesting that miR-433 regulates rhythm. Although miR-433 does not directly target the Per2 3'-UTR, it does target two rhythmically expressed genes in calvaria, Igf1 and Hif1α. miR-433 can target the glucocorticoid receptor; however, glucocorticoid receptor protein abundance was unaffected in miR-433 decoy cells. Rather, miR-433 inhibition dramatically enhanced glucocorticoid signaling due to increased nuclear receptor translocation, activating glucocorticoid receptor transcriptional targets. Last, in calvaria of transgenic mice expressing a miR-433 decoy in osteoblastic cells (Col3.6 promoter), the amplitude of Per2 and Bmal1 mRNA rhythm was increased, confirming that miR-433 regulates circadian rhythm. miR-433 was previously shown to target Runx2, and mRNA for Runx2 and its downstream target, osteocalcin, were also increased in miR-433 decoy mouse calvaria. We hypothesize that miR-433 helps maintain circadian rhythm in osteoblasts by regulating sensitivity to glucocorticoid receptor signaling.

  5. Human Gene Therapy: Genes without Frontiers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Eric J.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the latest advancements and setbacks in human gene therapy to provide reference material for biology teachers to use in their science classes. Focuses on basic concepts such as recombinant DNA technology, and provides examples of human gene therapy such as severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome, familial hypercholesterolemia, and…

  6. Human Gene Therapy: Genes without Frontiers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Eric J.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the latest advancements and setbacks in human gene therapy to provide reference material for biology teachers to use in their science classes. Focuses on basic concepts such as recombinant DNA technology, and provides examples of human gene therapy such as severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome, familial hypercholesterolemia, and…

  7. Gene regulation in cancer gene therapy strategies.

    PubMed

    Scanlon, Ian; Lehouritis, Panos; Niculescu-Duvaz, Ion; Marais, Richard; Springer, Caroline J

    2003-10-01

    Regulation of expression in gene therapy is considered to be a very desirable goal, preventing toxic effects and improving biological efficacy. A variety of systems have been reported in an ever widening range of applications, this paper describes these systems with specific reference to cancer gene therapy.

  8. Evolution by gene loss.

    PubMed

    Albalat, Ricard; Cañestro, Cristian

    2016-07-01

    The recent increase in genomic data is revealing an unexpected perspective of gene loss as a pervasive source of genetic variation that can cause adaptive phenotypic diversity. This novel perspective of gene loss is raising new fundamental questions. How relevant has gene loss been in the divergence of phyla? How do genes change from being essential to dispensable and finally to being lost? Is gene loss mostly neutral, or can it be an effective way of adaptation? These questions are addressed, and insights are discussed from genomic studies of gene loss in populations and their relevance in evolutionary biology and biomedicine.

  9. Acute stress enhances heterodimerization and binding of corticosteroid receptors at glucocorticoid target genes in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Mifsud, Karen R; Reul, Johannes M H M

    2016-10-04

    A stressful event results in secretion of glucocorticoid hormones, which bind to mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) and glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) in the hippocampus to regulate cognitive and affective responses to the challenge. MRs are already highly occupied by low glucocorticoid levels under baseline conditions, whereas GRs only become substantially occupied by stress- or circadian-driven glucocorticoid levels. Currently, however, the binding of MRs and GRs to glucocorticoid-responsive elements (GREs) within hippocampal glucocorticoid target genes under such physiological conditions in vivo is unknown. We found that forced swim (FS) stress evoked increased hippocampal RNA expression levels of the glucocorticoid-responsive genes FK506-binding protein 5 (Fkbp5), Period 1 (Per1), and serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1 (Sgk1). Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis showed that this stressor caused substantial gene-dependent increases in GR binding and surprisingly, also MR binding to GREs within these genes. Different acute challenges, including novelty, restraint, and FS stress, produced distinct glucocorticoid responses but resulted in largely similar MR and GR binding to GREs. Sequential and tandem ChIP analyses showed that, after FS stress, MRs and GRs bind concomitantly to the same GRE sites within Fkbp5 and Per1 but not Sgk1 Thus, after stress, MRs and GRs seem to bind to GREs as homo- and/or heterodimers in a gene-dependent manner. MR binding to GREs at baseline seems to be restricted, whereas after stress, GR binding may facilitate cobinding of MR. This study reveals that the interaction of MRs and GRs with GREs within the genome constitutes an additional level of complexity in hippocampal glucocorticoid action beyond expectancies based on ligand-receptor interactions.

  10. Acute stress enhances heterodimerization and binding of corticosteroid receptors at glucocorticoid target genes in the hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A stressful event results in secretion of glucocorticoid hormones, which bind to mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) and glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) in the hippocampus to regulate cognitive and affective responses to the challenge. MRs are already highly occupied by low glucocorticoid levels under baseline conditions, whereas GRs only become substantially occupied by stress- or circadian-driven glucocorticoid levels. Currently, however, the binding of MRs and GRs to glucocorticoid-responsive elements (GREs) within hippocampal glucocorticoid target genes under such physiological conditions in vivo is unknown. We found that forced swim (FS) stress evoked increased hippocampal RNA expression levels of the glucocorticoid-responsive genes FK506-binding protein 5 (Fkbp5), Period 1 (Per1), and serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1 (Sgk1). Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis showed that this stressor caused substantial gene-dependent increases in GR binding and surprisingly, also MR binding to GREs within these genes. Different acute challenges, including novelty, restraint, and FS stress, produced distinct glucocorticoid responses but resulted in largely similar MR and GR binding to GREs. Sequential and tandem ChIP analyses showed that, after FS stress, MRs and GRs bind concomitantly to the same GRE sites within Fkbp5 and Per1 but not Sgk1. Thus, after stress, MRs and GRs seem to bind to GREs as homo- and/or heterodimers in a gene-dependent manner. MR binding to GREs at baseline seems to be restricted, whereas after stress, GR binding may facilitate cobinding of MR. This study reveals that the interaction of MRs and GRs with GREs within the genome constitutes an additional level of complexity in hippocampal glucocorticoid action beyond expectancies based on ligand–receptor interactions. PMID:27655894

  11. Human gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, J S; Keating, A; Hozumi, N

    1997-01-01

    Human gene therapy and its application for the treatment of human genetic disorders, such as cystic fibrosis, cancer, and other diseases, are discussed. Gene therapy is a technique in which a functioning gene is inserted into a human cell to correct a genetic error or to introduce a new function to the cell. Many methods, including retroviral vectors and non-viral vectors, have been developed for both ex vivo and in vivo gene transfer into cells. Vectors need to be developed that efficiently transfer genes to target cells, and promoter systems are required that regulate gene expression according to physiologic needs of the host cell. There are several safety and ethical issues related to manipulating the human genome that need to be resolved. Current gene therapy efforts focus on gene insertion into somatic cells only. Gene therapy has potential for the effective treatment of genetic disorders, and gene transfer techniques are being used for basic research, for example, in cancer, to examine the underlying mechanism of disease. There are still many technical obstacles to be overcome before human gene therapy can become a routine procedure. The current human genome project provides the sequences of a vast number of human genes, leading to the identification, characterization, and understanding of genes that are responsible for many human diseases.

  12. Effect of leucine uptake on hepatic and skeletal muscle gene expression in rats: a microarray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Wookwang

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was performed to explore the physiological functions of leucine by exploring genes with leucine-dependent variability using DNA microarray. [Methods] Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 20) were separated into a HPD (30% High Protein Diet, n = 10) group and a NPD (0% Non Protein Diet, n = 10) group and fed a protein diet for 2 weeks. At the end of the 2-week period, the rats were fasted for 12-16 hours, further separated into subgroups within the HPD (Saline, n = 5, Leucine, n = 5) and NPD (Saline, n = 5, Leucine, n = 5) groups and administered with a leucine solution. The liver and muscles were harvested after 2 hours for RNA extraction. RNA purification from the isolated muscles and target gene identification using DNA chip were performed. The target gene was determined based on the results of the DNA chip experiment, and mRNA expression of the target gene was analyzed using Real-Time PCR. [Results] In the skeletal muscle, 27 genes were upregulated while 52 genes were down regulated after leucine administration in the NPD group. In the liver, 160 genes were up-regulated while 126 were down-regulated. The per2 gene was one of the genes with leucine-dependent induction in muscles and liver. [Conclusion] This study was performed to explore the physiological functions of leucine, however, a large number of genes showed variability. Therefore, it was difficult to definitively identify the genes linked with a particular physiological function. Various nutritional effects of leucine were observed. High variability in cytokines, receptors, and various membrane proteins were observed, which suggests that leucine functions as more than a nutrient. The interpretation may depend on investigators’ perspectives, therefore, discussion with relevant experts and the BCAA (Branched-Chain Amino Acids) society may be needed for effective utilization of this data. PMID:26244133

  13. Chronic mild stress alters circadian expressions of molecular clock genes in the liver.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kei; Yamada, Tetsuya; Tsukita, Sohei; Kaneko, Keizo; Shirai, Yuta; Munakata, Yuichiro; Ishigaki, Yasushi; Imai, Junta; Uno, Kenji; Hasegawa, Yutaka; Sawada, Shojiro; Oka, Yoshitomo; Katagiri, Hideki

    2013-02-01

    Chronic stress is well known to affect metabolic regulation. However, molecular mechanisms interconnecting stress response systems and metabolic regulations have yet to be elucidated. Various physiological processes, including glucose/lipid metabolism, are regulated by the circadian clock, and core clock gene dysregulation reportedly leads to metabolic disorders. Glucocorticoids, acting as end-effectors of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, entrain the circadian rhythms of peripheral organs, including the liver, by phase-shifting core clock gene expressions. Therefore, we examined whether chronic stress affects circadian expressions of core clock genes and metabolism-related genes in the liver using the chronic mild stress (CMS) procedure. In BALB/c mice, CMS elevated and phase-shifted serum corticosterone levels, indicating overactivation of the HPA axis. The rhythmic expressions of core clock genes, e.g., Clock, Npas2, Bmal1, Per1, and Cry1, were altered in the liver while being completely preserved in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuculeus (SCN), suggesting that the SCN is not involved in alterations in hepatic core clock gene expressions. In addition, circadian patterns of glucose and lipid metabolism-related genes, e.g., peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (Ppar) α, Pparγ-1, Pparγ-coactivator-1α, and phosphoenolepyruvate carboxykinase, were also disturbed by CMS. In contrast, in C57BL/6 mice, the same CMS procedure altered neither serum corticosterone levels nor rhythmic expressions of hepatic core clock genes and metabolism-related genes. Thus, chronic stress can interfere with the circadian expressions of both core clock genes and metabolism-related genes in the liver possibly involving HPA axis overactivation. This mechanism might contribute to metabolic disorders in stressful modern societies.

  14. Gene therapy for blindness.

    PubMed

    Sahel, José-Alain; Roska, Botond

    2013-07-08

    Sight-restoring therapy for the visually impaired and blind is a major unmet medical need. Ocular gene therapy is a rational choice for restoring vision or preventing the loss of vision because most blinding diseases originate in cellular components of the eye, a compartment that is optimally suited for the delivery of genes, and many of these diseases have a genetic origin or genetic component. In recent years we have witnessed major advances in the field of ocular gene therapy, and proof-of-concept studies are under way to evaluate the safety and efficacy of human gene therapies. Here we discuss the concepts and recent advances in gene therapy in the retina. Our review discusses traditional approaches such as gene replacement and neuroprotection and also new avenues such as optogenetic therapies. We conjecture that advances in gene therapy in the retina will pave the way for gene therapies in other parts of the brain.

  15. Circadian Gene Clock Regulates Psoriasis-Like Skin Inflammation in Mice.

    PubMed

    Ando, Noriko; Nakamura, Yuki; Aoki, Rui; Ishimaru, Kayoko; Ogawa, Hideoki; Okumura, Ko; Shibata, Shigenobu; Shimada, Shinji; Nakao, Atsuhito

    2015-12-01

    There are several reports suggesting that the pathophysiology of psoriasis may be associated with aberrant circadian rhythms. However, the mechanistic link between psoriasis and the circadian time-keeping system, "the circadian clock," remains unclear. This study determined whether the core circadian gene, Clock, had a regulatory role in the development of psoriasis. For this purpose, we compared the development of psoriasis-like skin inflammation induced by the Toll-like receptor 7 ligand imiquimod (IMQ) between wild-type mice and mice with a loss-of-function mutation of Clock. We also compared the development of IMQ-induced dermatitis between wild-type mice and mice with a loss-of-function mutation of Period2 (Per2), another key circadian gene that inhibits CLOCK activity. We found that Clock mutation ameliorated IMQ-induced dermatitis, whereas the Per2 mutation exaggerated IMQ-induced dermatitis, when compared with wild-type mice associated with decreased or increased IL-23 receptor (IL-23R) expression in γ/δ+ T cells, respectively. In addition, CLOCK directly bound to the promoter of IL-23R in γ/δ+ T cells, and IL-23R expression in the mouse skin was under circadian control. These findings suggest that Clock is a novel regulator of psoriasis-like skin inflammation in mice via direct modulation of IL-23R expression in γ/δ+ T cells, establishing a mechanistic link between psoriasis and the circadian clock.

  16. Myocardial gene therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isner, Jeffrey M.

    2002-01-01

    Gene therapy is proving likely to be a viable alternative to conventional therapies in coronary artery disease and heart failure. Phase 1 clinical trials indicate high levels of safety and clinical benefits with gene therapy using angiogenic growth factors in myocardial ischaemia. Although gene therapy for heart failure is still at the pre-clinical stage, experimental data indicate that therapeutic angiogenesis using short-term gene expression may elicit functional improvement in affected individuals.

  17. Evolution of Gene Expression after Gene Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Nelson; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Yongrui; Messing, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    We took a rather unique approach to investigate the conservation of gene expression of prolamin storage protein genes across two different subfamilies of the Poaceae. We took advantage of oat plants carrying single maize chromosomes in different cultivars, called oat–maize addition (OMA) lines, which permitted us to determine whether regulation of gene expression was conserved between the two species. We found that γ-zeins are expressed in OMA7.06, which carries maize chromosome 7 even in the absence of the trans-acting maize prolamin-box-binding factor (PBF), which regulates their expression. This is likely because oat PBF can substitute for the function of maize PBF as shown in our transient expression data, using a γ-zein promoter fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP). Despite this conservation, the younger, recently amplified prolamin genes in maize, absent in oat, are not expressed in the corresponding OMAs. However, maize can express the oldest prolamin gene, the wheat high-molecular weight glutenin Dx5 gene, even when maize Pbf is knocked down (through PbfRNAi), and/or another maize transcription factor, Opaque-2 (O2) is knocked out (in maize o2 mutant). Therefore, older genes are conserved in their regulation, whereas younger ones diverged during evolution and eventually acquired a new repertoire of suitable transcriptional activators. PMID:25912045

  18. Reading and Generalist Genes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haworth, Claire M. A.; Meaburn, Emma L.; Harlaar, Nicole; Plomin, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Twin-study research suggests that many (but not all) of the same genes contribute to genetic influence on diverse learning abilities and disabilities, a hypothesis called "generalist genes". This generalist genes hypothesis was tested using a set of 10 DNA markers (single nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs]) found to be associated with early reading…

  19. Reading and Generalist Genes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haworth, Claire M. A.; Meaburn, Emma L.; Harlaar, Nicole; Plomin, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Twin-study research suggests that many (but not all) of the same genes contribute to genetic influence on diverse learning abilities and disabilities, a hypothesis called "generalist genes". This generalist genes hypothesis was tested using a set of 10 DNA markers (single nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs]) found to be associated with early reading…

  20. Gene hunting in autoinflammation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Steady progress in our understanding of the genetic basis of autoinflammatory diseases has been made over the past 16 years. Since the discovery of the familial Mediterranean fever gene MEFV (also known as marenostrin) in 1997, 18 other genes responsible for monogenic autoinflammatory diseases have been identified to date. The discovery of these genes was made through the utilisation of many genetic mapping techniques, including next generation sequencing platforms. This review article clearly describes the gene hunting approaches, methods of data analysis and the technological platforms used, which has relevance to all those working within the field of gene discovery for Mendelian disorders. PMID:24070009

  1. Gene therapy review.

    PubMed

    Moss, Joseph Anthony

    2014-01-01

    The use of genes to treat disease, more commonly known as gene therapy, is a valid and promising tool to manage and treat diseases that conventional drug therapies cannot cure. Gene therapy holds the potential to control a wide range of diseases, including cystic fibrosis, heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and blood diseases. This review assesses the current status of gene therapy, highlighting therapeutic methodologies and applications, terminology, and imaging strategies. This article presents an overview of roadblocks associated with each therapeutic methodology, along with some of the scientific, social, and ethical issues associated with gene therapy.

  2. Unconjugated Bile Acids Influence Expression of Circadian Genes: A Potential Mechanism for Microbe-Host Crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    Govindarajan, Kalaimathi; MacSharry, John; Casey, Patrick G.; Shanahan, Fergus

    2016-01-01

    Disruptions to circadian rhythm in mice and humans have been associated with an increased risk of obesity and metabolic syndrome. The gut microbiota is known to be essential for the maintenance of circadian rhythm in the host suggesting a role for microbe-host interactions in the regulation of the peripheral circadian clock. Previous work suggested a role for gut bacterial bile salt hydrolase (BSH) activity in the regulation of host circadian gene expression. Here we demonstrate that unconjugated bile acids, known to be generated through the BSH activity of the gut microbiota, are potentially chronobiological regulators of host circadian gene expression. We utilised a synchronised Caco-2 epithelial colorectal cell model and demonstrated that unconjugated bile acids, but not the equivalent tauro-conjugated bile salts, enhance the expression levels of genes involved in circadian rhythm. In addition oral administration of mice with unconjugated bile acids significantly altered expression levels of circadian clock genes in the ileum and colon as well as the liver with significant changes to expression of hepatic regulators of circadian rhythm (including Dbp) and associated genes (Per2, Per3 and Cry2). The data demonstrate a potential mechanism for microbe-host crosstalk that significantly impacts upon host circadian gene expression. PMID:27907092

  3. Unconjugated Bile Acids Influence Expression of Circadian Genes: A Potential Mechanism for Microbe-Host Crosstalk.

    PubMed

    Govindarajan, Kalaimathi; MacSharry, John; Casey, Patrick G; Shanahan, Fergus; Joyce, Susan A; Gahan, Cormac G M

    2016-01-01

    Disruptions to circadian rhythm in mice and humans have been associated with an increased risk of obesity and metabolic syndrome. The gut microbiota is known to be essential for the maintenance of circadian rhythm in the host suggesting a role for microbe-host interactions in the regulation of the peripheral circadian clock. Previous work suggested a role for gut bacterial bile salt hydrolase (BSH) activity in the regulation of host circadian gene expression. Here we demonstrate that unconjugated bile acids, known to be generated through the BSH activity of the gut microbiota, are potentially chronobiological regulators of host circadian gene expression. We utilised a synchronised Caco-2 epithelial colorectal cell model and demonstrated that unconjugated bile acids, but not the equivalent tauro-conjugated bile salts, enhance the expression levels of genes involved in circadian rhythm. In addition oral administration of mice with unconjugated bile acids significantly altered expression levels of circadian clock genes in the ileum and colon as well as the liver with significant changes to expression of hepatic regulators of circadian rhythm (including Dbp) and associated genes (Per2, Per3 and Cry2). The data demonstrate a potential mechanism for microbe-host crosstalk that significantly impacts upon host circadian gene expression.

  4. Differential resetting process of circadian gene expression in rat pineal glands after the reversal of the light/dark cycle via a 24 h light or dark period transition.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tao; Dong, Yue; Yang, Zhiqiu; Kato, Hisanori; Ni, Yinhua; Fu, Zhengwei

    2009-07-01

    Although studies involving the circadian response to time-zone transitions indicate that the circadian clock usually takes much longer to phase advance than delay, the discrepancy between the circadian resetting induced by photoperiod alteration via a dark or light period transition has yet to be investigated. In mammals, the pineal gland is an important component in the photoneuroendocrine axis, regulating biological rhythms. However, few studies have systematically examined the resetting process of pineal clock-gene expression to date. We investigated the resetting processes of four clock genes (Bmal1, Cry1, Per1, Dec1) and AANAT in the rat pineal gland after the light-dark (LD) reversal via a 24 h light or dark period transition. The resynchronization of the SCN-driven gene AANAT was nearly complete in three days in both situations, displaying similar resetting rates and processes after the differential LD reversals. The resetting processes of the clock genes were characterized by gene-specific, phase-shift modes and differential phase-shift rates between the two different LD reversal modes. The resetting processes of these clock genes were noticeably lengthened after the LD reversal via the light period transition in comparison to via the dark period transition. In addition, among the four examined clock genes, Per1 adjusted most rapidly after the differential LD reversals, while the rhythmic Cry1 expression adjusted most slowly.

  5. Gene therapy in periodontics.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Anirban; Singh, Nidhi; Saluja, Mini

    2013-03-01

    GENES are made of DNA - the code of life. They are made up of two types of base pair from different number of hydrogen bonds AT, GC which can be turned into instruction. Everyone inherits genes from their parents and passes them on in turn to their children. Every person's genes are different, and the changes in sequence determine the inherited differences between each of us. Some changes, usually in a single gene, may cause serious diseases. Gene therapy is 'the use of genes as medicine'. It involves the transfer of a therapeutic or working gene copy into specific cells of an individual in order to repair a faulty gene copy. Thus it may be used to replace a faulty gene, or to introduce a new gene whose function is to cure or to favorably modify the clinical course of a condition. It has a promising era in the field of periodontics. Gene therapy has been used as a mode of tissue engineering in periodontics. The tissue engineering approach reconstructs the natural target tissue by combining four elements namely: Scaffold, signaling molecules, cells and blood supply and thus can help in the reconstruction of damaged periodontium including cementum, gingival, periodontal ligament and bone.

  6. Regulated Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Breger, Ludivine; Wettergren, Erika Elgstrand; Quintino, Luis; Lundberg, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy represents a promising approach for the treatment of monogenic and multifactorial neurological disorders. It can be used to replace a missing gene and mutated gene or downregulate a causal gene. Despite the versatility of gene therapy, one of the main limitations lies in the irreversibility of the process: once delivered to target cells, the gene of interest is constitutively expressed and cannot be removed. Therefore, efficient, safe and long-term gene modification requires a system allowing fine control of transgene expression.Different systems have been developed over the past decades to regulate transgene expression after in vivo delivery, either at transcriptional or post-translational levels. The purpose of this chapter is to give an overview on current regulatory system used in the context of gene therapy for neurological disorders. Systems using external regulation of transgenes using antibiotics are commonly used to control either gene expression using tetracycline-controlled transcription or protein levels using destabilizing domain technology. Alternatively, specific promoters of genes that are regulated by disease mechanisms, increasing expression as the disease progresses or decreasing expression as disease regresses, are also examined. Overall, this chapter discusses advantages and drawbacks of current molecular methods for regulated gene therapy in the central nervous system.

  7. Conventional murine gene targeting.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Albert G; Sun, Yue

    2013-01-01

    Murine gene knockout models engineered over the last two decades have continued to demonstrate their potential as invaluable tools in understanding the role of gene function in the context of normal human development and disease. The more recent elucidation of the human and mouse genomes through sequencing has opened up the capability to elucidate the function of every human gene. State-of-the-art mouse model generation allows, through a multitude of experimental steps requiring careful standardization, gene function to be reliably and predictably ablated in a live model system. The application of these standardized methodologies to directly target gene function through murine gene knockout has to date provided comprehensive and verifiable genetic models that have contributed tremendously to our understanding of the cellular and molecular pathways underlying normal and disease states in humans. The ensuing chapter provides an overview of the latest steps and procedures required to ablate gene function in a murine model.

  8. Retrieval with gene queries.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Aditya K; Srinivasan, Padmini

    2006-04-21

    Accuracy of document retrieval from MEDLINE for gene queries is crucially important for many applications in bioinformatics. We explore five information retrieval-based methods to rank documents retrieved by PubMed gene queries for the human genome. The aim is to rank relevant documents higher in the retrieved list. We address the special challenges faced due to ambiguity in gene nomenclature: gene terms that refer to multiple genes, gene terms that are also English words, and gene terms that have other biological meanings. Our two baseline ranking strategies are quite similar in performance. Two of our three LocusLink-based strategies offer significant improvements. These methods work very well even when there is ambiguity in the gene terms. Our best ranking strategy offers significant improvements on three different kinds of ambiguities over our two baseline strategies (improvements range from 15.9% to 17.7% and 11.7% to 13.3% depending on the baseline). For most genes the best ranking query is one that is built from the LocusLink (now Entrez Gene) summary and product information along with the gene names and aliases. For others, the gene names and aliases suffice. We also present an approach that successfully predicts, for a given gene, which of these two ranking queries is more appropriate. We explore the effect of different post-retrieval strategies on the ranking of documents returned by PubMed for human gene queries. We have successfully applied some of these strategies to improve the ranking of relevant documents in the retrieved sets. This holds true even when various kinds of ambiguity are encountered. We feel that it would be very useful to apply strategies like ours on PubMed search results as these are not ordered by relevance in any way. This is especially so for queries that retrieve a large number of documents.

  9. Reduced histone H3K9 acetylation of clock genes and abnormal glucose metabolism in ob/ob mice.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa-Kobayashi, Eiko; Ushijima, Kentarou; Ando, Hitoshi; Maekawa, Tomohiro; Takuma, Masashi; Furukawa, Yusuke; Fujimura, Akio

    2012-10-01

    Recent chronobiological studies found significant correlation between lack of clock function and metabolic abnormalities. We previously showed that clock gene expressions were dampened in the peripheral tissues of obese and diabetic ob/ob mice. However, the molecular mechanism of the disturbance remained to be determined. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time that acetylation levels of histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9) at the promoter regions of clock genes, such as Dbp, Per2, and Bmal1, in the adipose tissue of ob/ob mice were significantly reduced compared with those of its control C57BL/6J mice. Treatment with histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors increased Dbp, but not Per2 or Bmal1, mRNA expression in adipose tissue, and it decreased blood glucose in these animals. In addition, 2-deoxyglucose uptake activity was significantly suppressed by silencing Dbp expression in cultured adipocytes. These results suggest that reduced H3K9 acetylation and subsequent decreased mRNA expression of the Dbp gene in adipose tissue are involved in the mechanism of development of abnormal glucose metabolism in ob/ob mice.

  10. Inhibitory role of REV-ERBα in the expression of bone morphogenetic protein gene family in rat uterus endometrium stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Tasaki, Hirotaka; Zhao, Lijia; Isayama, Keishiro; Chen, Huatao; Yamauchi, Nobuhiko; Shigeyoshi, Yasufumi; Hashimoto, Seiichi; Hattori, Masa-aki

    2015-04-01

    Uterus circadian rhythms have been implicated in the gestation processes of mammals through entraining of the clock proteins to numerous downstream genes. Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), having clock-controlled regulatory sites in their gene promoters, are expressed in the uterus during decidualization, but the regulation of the Bmp gene expression is poorly understood. The present study was designed to dissect the physiological roles of the uterus oscillators in the Bmp expression using the uterus endometrial stromal cells (UESCs) isolated from Per2-dLuc transgenic rats on day 4.5 of gestation. The in vitro decidualization of UESCs was induced by medroxyprogesterone acetate and 2-O-dibutyryl cAMP. A significant decline of Per2-dLuc bioluminescence activity was induced in decidual cells, and concomitantly, the expression of canonical clock genes was downregulated. Conversely, the expression of the core Bmp genes Bmp2, Bmp4, Bmp6, and Bmp7 was upregulated. In UESCs transfected with Bmal1-specific siRNA, in which Rev-erbα expression was downregulated, Bmp genes, such as Bmp2, Bmp4, and Bmp6 were upregulated. However, Bmp1, Bmp7, and Bmp8a were not significantly affected by Bmal1 silencing. The expression of all Bmp genes was enhanced after treatment with the REV-ERBα antagonist (SR8278), although their rhythmic profiles were differed from each other. The binding of REV-ERBα to the proximal regions of the Bmp2 and Bmp4 promoters was revealed by chromatin immunoprecipitation-PCR analysis. Collectively, these results indicate that the Bmp genes are upregulated by the attenuation of the cellular circadian clock; in particular, its core component REV-ERBα functions as a transcriptional silencer in the Bmp gene family. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  11. The zebrafish period2 protein positively regulates the circadian clock through mediation of retinoic acid receptor (RAR)-related orphan receptor α (Rorα).

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingyong; Zhong, Zhaomin; Zhong, Yingbin; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Han

    2015-02-13

    We report the characterization of a null mutant for zebrafish circadian clock gene period2 (per2) generated by transcription activator-like effector nuclease and a positive role of PER2 in vertebrate circadian regulation. Locomotor experiments showed that per2 mutant zebrafish display reduced activities under light-dark and 2-h phase delay under constant darkness, and quantitative real time PCR analyses showed up-regulation of cry1aa, cry1ba, cry1bb, and aanat2 but down-regulation of per1b, per3, and bmal1b in per2 mutant zebrafish, suggesting that Per2 is essential for the zebrafish circadian clock. Luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that Per2 represses aanat2 expression through E-box and enhances bmal1b expression through the Ror/Rev-erb response element, implicating that Per2 plays dual roles in the zebrafish circadian clock. Cell transfection and co-immunoprecipitation assays revealed that Per2 enhances bmal1b expression through binding to orphan nuclear receptor Rorα. The enhancing effect of mouse PER2 on Bmal1 transcription is also mediated by RORα even though it binds to REV-ERBα. Moreover, zebrafish Per2 also appears to have tissue-specific regulatory roles in numerous peripheral organs. These findings help define the essential functions of Per2 in the zebrafish circadian clock and in particular provide strong evidence for a positive role of PER2 in the vertebrate circadian system. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Variation in genes that regulate blood pressure are associated with glomerular filtration rate in Chinese.

    PubMed

    Montasser, May E; Shimmin, Lawrence C; Gu, Dongfeng; Chen, Jing; Gu, Charles; Kelly, Tanika N; Jaquish, Cashell E; Rice, Treva K; Rao, Dabeeru C; Cao, Jie; Chen, Jichun; De-PeLiu; Whelton, Paul K; Hamm, Lotuce Lee; He, Jiang; Hixson, James E

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) can be a consequence of diabetes, hypertension, immunologic disorders, and other exposures, as well as genetic factors that are still largely unknown. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR), which is widely used to measure kidney function, has a heritability ranging from 25% to 75%, but only 1.5% of this heritability is explained by genetic loci that have been identified to date. In this study we tested for associations between GFR and 234 SNPs in 26 genes from pathways of blood pressure regulation in 3,025 rural Chinese participants of the "Genetic Epidemiology Network of Salt Sensitivity" (GenSalt) study. We estimated GFR (eGFR) using baseline serum creatinine measurements obtained prior to dietary intervention. We identified significant associations between eGFR and 12 SNPs in 6 genes (ACE, ADD1, AGT, GRK4, HSD11B1, and SCNN1G). The cumulative effect of the protective alleles was an increase in mean eGFR of 4 mL/min per 1.73 m2, while the cumulative effect of the risk alleles was a decrease in mean eGFR of 3 mL/min per 1.73 m2. In addition, we identified a significant interaction between SNPs in CYP11B1 and ADRB2. We have identified common variants in genes from pathways that regulate blood pressure and influence kidney function as measured by eGFR, providing new insights into the genetic determinants of kidney function. Complex genetic effects on kidney function likely involve interactions among genes as we observed for CYP11B1 and ADRB2.

  13. Human HOX gene disorders.

    PubMed

    Quinonez, Shane C; Innis, Jeffrey W

    2014-01-01

    The Hox genes are an evolutionarily conserved family of genes, which encode a class of important transcription factors that function in numerous developmental processes. Following their initial discovery, a substantial amount of information has been gained regarding the roles Hox genes play in various physiologic and pathologic processes. These processes range from a central role in anterior-posterior patterning of the developing embryo to roles in oncogenesis that are yet to be fully elucidated. In vertebrates there are a total of 39 Hox genes divided into 4 separate clusters. Of these, mutations in 10 Hox genes have been found to cause human disorders with significant variation in their inheritance patterns, penetrance, expressivity and mechanism of pathogenesis. This review aims to describe the various phenotypes caused by germline mutation in these 10 Hox genes that cause a human phenotype, with specific emphasis paid to the genotypic and phenotypic differences between allelic disorders. As clinical whole exome and genome sequencing is increasingly utilized in the future, we predict that additional Hox gene mutations will likely be identified to cause distinct human phenotypes. As the known human phenotypes closely resemble gene-specific murine models, we also review the homozygous loss-of-function mouse phenotypes for the 29 Hox genes without a known human disease. This review will aid clinicians in identifying and caring for patients affected with a known Hox gene disorder and help recognize the potential for novel mutations in patients with phenotypes informed by mouse knockout studies.

  14. Do Housekeeping Genes Exist?

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bingyun

    2015-01-01

    The searching of human housekeeping (HK) genes has been a long quest since the emergence of transcriptomics, and is instrumental for us to understand the structure of genome and the fundamentals of biological processes. The resolved genes are frequently used in evolution studies and as normalization standards in quantitative gene-expression analysis. Within the past 20 years, more than a dozen HK-gene studies have been conducted, yet none of them sampled human tissues completely. We believe an integration of these results will help remove false positive genes owing to the inadequate sampling. Surprisingly, we only find one common gene across 15 examined HK-gene datasets comprising 187 different tissue and cell types. Our subsequent analyses suggest that it might not be appropriate to rigidly define HK genes as expressed in all tissue types that have diverse developmental, physiological, and pathological states. It might be beneficial to use more robustly identified HK functions for filtering criteria, in which the representing genes can be a subset of genome. These genes are not necessarily the same, and perhaps need not to be the same, everywhere in our body. PMID:25970694

  15. Primetime for Learning Genes

    PubMed Central

    Keifer, Joyce

    2017-01-01

    Learning genes in mature neurons are uniquely suited to respond rapidly to specific environmental stimuli. Expression of individual learning genes, therefore, requires regulatory mechanisms that have the flexibility to respond with transcriptional activation or repression to select appropriate physiological and behavioral responses. Among the mechanisms that equip genes to respond adaptively are bivalent domains. These are specific histone modifications localized to gene promoters that are characteristic of both gene activation and repression, and have been studied primarily for developmental genes in embryonic stem cells. In this review, studies of the epigenetic regulation of learning genes in neurons, particularly the brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene (BDNF), by methylation/demethylation and chromatin modifications in the context of learning and memory will be highlighted. Because of the unique function of learning genes in the mature brain, it is proposed that bivalent domains are a characteristic feature of the chromatin landscape surrounding their promoters. This allows them to be “poised” for rapid response to activate or repress gene expression depending on environmental stimuli. PMID:28208656

  16. Primetime for Learning Genes.

    PubMed

    Keifer, Joyce

    2017-02-11

    Learning genes in mature neurons are uniquely suited to respond rapidly to specific environmental stimuli. Expression of individual learning genes, therefore, requires regulatory mechanisms that have the flexibility to respond with transcriptional activation or repression to select appropriate physiological and behavioral responses. Among the mechanisms that equip genes to respond adaptively are bivalent domains. These are specific histone modifications localized to gene promoters that are characteristic of both gene activation and repression, and have been studied primarily for developmental genes in embryonic stem cells. In this review, studies of the epigenetic regulation of learning genes in neurons, particularly the brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene (BDNF), by methylation/demethylation and chromatin modifications in the context of learning and memory will be highlighted. Because of the unique function of learning genes in the mature brain, it is proposed that bivalent domains are a characteristic feature of the chromatin landscape surrounding their promoters. This allows them to be "poised" for rapid response to activate or repress gene expression depending on environmental stimuli.

  17. Acute Sleep Loss Induces Tissue-Specific Epigenetic and Transcriptional Alterations to Circadian Clock Genes in Men.

    PubMed

    Cedernaes, Jonathan; Osler, Megan E; Voisin, Sarah; Broman, Jan-Erik; Vogel, Heike; Dickson, Suzanne L; Zierath, Juleen R; Schiöth, Helgi B; Benedict, Christian

    2015-09-01

    Shift workers are at increased risk of metabolic morbidities. Clock genes are known to regulate metabolic processes in peripheral tissues, eg, glucose oxidation. This study aimed to investigate how clock genes are affected at the epigenetic and transcriptional level in peripheral human tissues following acute total sleep deprivation (TSD), mimicking shift work with extended wakefulness. In a randomized, two-period, two-condition, crossover clinical study, 15 healthy men underwent two experimental sessions: x sleep (2230-0700 h) and overnight wakefulness. On the subsequent morning, serum cortisol was measured, followed by skeletal muscle and subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsies for DNA methylation and gene expression analyses of core clock genes (BMAL1, CLOCK, CRY1, PER1). Finally, baseline and 2-h post-oral glucose load plasma glucose concentrations were determined. In adipose tissue, acute sleep deprivation vs sleep increased methylation in the promoter of CRY1 (+4%; P = .026) and in two promoter-interacting enhancer regions of PER1 (+15%; P = .036; +9%; P = .026). In skeletal muscle, TSD vs sleep decreased gene expression of BMAL1 (-18%; P = .033) and CRY1 (-22%; P = .047). Concentrations of serum cortisol, which can reset peripheral tissue clocks, were decreased (2449 ± 932 vs 3178 ± 723 nmol/L; P = .039), whereas postprandial plasma glucose concentrations were elevated after TSD (7.77 ± 1.63 vs 6.59 ± 1.32 mmol/L; P = .011). Our findings demonstrate that a single night of wakefulness can alter the epigenetic and transcriptional profile of core circadian clock genes in key metabolic tissues. Tissue-specific clock alterations could explain why shift work may disrupt metabolic integrity as observed herein.

  18. Parkinson's disease: gene therapies.

    PubMed

    Coune, Philippe G; Schneider, Bernard L; Aebischer, Patrick

    2012-04-01

    With the recent development of effective gene delivery systems, gene therapy for the central nervous system is finding novel applications. Here, we review existing viral vectors and discuss gene therapy strategies that have been proposed for Parkinson's disease. To date, most of the clinical trials were based on viral vectors to deliver therapeutic transgenes to neurons within the basal ganglia. Initial trials used genes to relieve the major motor symptoms caused by nigrostriatal degeneration. Although these new genetic approaches still need to prove more effective than existing symptomatic treatments, there is a need for disease-modifying strategies. The investigation of the genetic factors implicated in Parkinson's disease is providing precious insights in disease pathology that, combined with innovative gene delivery systems, will hopefully offer novel opportunities for gene therapy interventions to slow down, or even halt disease progression.

  19. Green genes gleaned.

    PubMed

    Beale, Samuel I

    2005-07-01

    A recent paper by Ayumi Tanaka and colleagues identifying an Arabidopsis thaliana gene for 3,8-divinyl(proto)chlorophyllide 8-vinyl reductase brings a satisfying conclusion to the hunt for genes encoding enzymes for the steps in the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. Now, at least in angiosperm plants represented by Arabidopsis, genes for all 15 steps in the pathway from glutamyl-tRNA to chlorophylls a and b have been identified.

  20. Cell and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Rao, Rajesh C; Zacks, David N

    2014-01-01

    Replacement or repair of a dysfunctional gene combined with promoting cell survival is a two-pronged approach that addresses an unmet need in the therapy of retinal degenerative diseases. In this chapter, we discuss various strategies toward achieving both goals: transplantation of wild-type cells to replace degenerating cells and to rescue gene function, sequential gene and cell therapy, and in vivo reprogramming of rods to cones. These approaches highlight cutting-edge advances in cell and gene therapy, and cellular lineage conversion in order to devise new therapies for various retinal degenerative diseases.

  1. Gene-Category Analysis.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    Gene-category analysis is one important knowledge integration approach in biomedical sciences that combines knowledge bases such as Gene Ontology with lists of genes or their products, which are often the result of high-throughput experiments, gained from either wet-lab or synthetic experiments. In this chapter, we will motivate this class of analyses and describe an often used variant that is based on Fisher's exact test. We show that this approach has some problems in the context of Gene Ontology of which users should be aware. We then describe some more recent algorithms that try to address some of the shortcomings of the standard approach.

  2. Gene therapy for haemophilia.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Akshay; Easow Mathew, Manu; Sriganesh, Vasumathi; Neely, Jessica A; Kalipatnapu, Sasank

    2014-11-14

    Haemophilia is a genetic disorder which is characterized by spontaneous or provoked, often uncontrolled, bleeding into joints, muscles and other soft tissues. Current methods of treatment are expensive, challenging and involve regular administration of clotting factors. Gene therapy has recently been prompted as a curative treatment modality. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of gene therapy for treating people with haemophilia A or B. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis & Genetic Disorders Group's Coagulopathies Trials Register, compiled from electronic database searches and handsearching of journals and conference abstract books. We also searched the reference lists of relevant articles and reviews.Date of last search: 06 November 2014. Eligible trials included randomised or quasi-randomised clinical trials, including controlled clinical trials comparing gene therapy (with or without standard treatment) with standard treatment (factor replacement) or other 'curative' treatment such as stem cell transplantation individuals with haemophilia A or B of all ages who do not have inhibitors to factor VIII or IX. No trials of gene therapy for haemophilia were found. No trials of gene therapy for haemophilia were identified. No randomised or quasi-randomised clinical trials of gene therapy for haemophilia were identified. Thus, we are unable to determine the effects of gene therapy for haemophilia. Gene therapy for haemophilia is still in its nascent stages and there is a need for well-designed clinical trials to assess the long-term feasibility, success and risks of gene therapy for people with haemophilia.

  3. Antiangiogenic Eye Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Corydon, Thomas J

    2015-08-01

    The idea of treating disease in humans with genetic material was conceived over two decades ago and with that a promising journey involving development and efficacy studies in cells and animals of a large number of novel therapeutic reagents unfolded. In the footsteps of this process, successful gene therapy treatment of genetic conditions in humans has shown clear signs of efficacy. Notably, significant advancements using gene supplementation and silencing strategies have been made in the field of ocular gene therapy, thereby pinpointing ocular gene therapy as one of the compelling "actors" bringing gene therapy to the clinic. Most of all, this success has been facilitated because of (1) the fact that the eye is an effortlessly accessible, exceedingly compartmentalized, and immune-privileged organ offering a unique advantage as a gene therapy target, and (2) significant progress toward efficient, sustained transduction of cells within the retina having been achieved using nonintegrating vectors based on recombinant adeno-associated virus and nonintegrating lentivirus vectors. The results from in vivo experiments and trials suggest that treatment of inherited retinal dystrophies, ocular angiogenesis, and inflammation with gene therapy can be both safe and effective. Here, the progress of ocular gene therapy is examined with special emphasis on the potential use of RNAi- and protein-based antiangiogenic gene therapy to treat exudative age-related macular degeneration.

  4. History of gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Wirth, Thomas; Parker, Nigel; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2013-08-10

    Two decades after the initial gene therapy trials and more than 1700 approved clinical trials worldwide we not only have gained much new information and knowledge regarding gene therapy in general, but also learned to understand the concern that has persisted in society. Despite the setbacks gene therapy has faced, success stories have increasingly emerged. Examples for these are the positive recommendation for a gene therapy product (Glybera) by the EMA for approval in the European Union and the positive trials for the treatment of ADA deficiency, SCID-X1 and adrenoleukodystrophy. Nevertheless, our knowledge continues to grow and during the course of time more safety data has become available that helps us to develop better gene therapy approaches. Also, with the increased understanding of molecular medicine, we have been able to develop more specific and efficient gene transfer vectors which are now producing clinical results. In this review, we will take a historical view and highlight some of the milestones that had an important impact on the development of gene therapy. We will also discuss briefly the safety and ethical aspects of gene therapy and address some concerns that have been connected with gene therapy as an important therapeutic modality.

  5. Towards Consensus Gene Ages

    PubMed Central

    Liebeskind, Benjamin J.; McWhite, Claire D.; Marcotte, Edward M.

    2016-01-01

    Correctly estimating the age of a gene or gene family is important for a variety of fields, including molecular evolution, comparative genomics, and phylogenetics, and increasingly for systems biology and disease genetics. However, most studies use only a point estimate of a gene’s age, neglecting the substantial uncertainty involved in this estimation. Here, we characterize this uncertainty by investigating the effect of algorithm choice on gene-age inference and calculate consensus gene ages with attendant error distributions for a variety of model eukaryotes. We use 13 orthology inference algorithms to create gene-age datasets and then characterize the error around each age-call on a per-gene and per-algorithm basis. Systematic error was found to be a large factor in estimating gene age, suggesting that simple consensus algorithms are not enough to give a reliable point estimate. We also found that different sources of error can affect downstream analyses, such as gene ontology enrichment. Our consensus gene-age datasets, with associated error terms, are made fully available at so that researchers can propagate this uncertainty through their analyses (geneages.org). PMID:27259914

  6. PERIOD1-associated proteins modulate the negative limb of the mammalian circadian oscillator.

    PubMed

    Brown, Steven A; Ripperger, Juergen; Kadener, Sebastian; Fleury-Olela, Fabienne; Vilbois, Francis; Rosbash, Michael; Schibler, Ueli

    2005-04-29

    The clock proteins PERIOD1 (PER1) and PERIOD2 (PER2) play essential roles in a negative transcriptional feedback loop that generates circadian rhythms in mammalian cells. We identified two PER1-associated factors, NONO and WDR5, that modulate PER activity. The reduction of NONO expression by RNA interference (RNAi) attenuated circadian rhythms in mammalian cells, and fruit flies carrying a hypomorphic allele were nearly arrhythmic. WDR5, a subunit of histone methyltransferase complexes, augmented PER-mediated transcriptional repression, and its reduction by RNAi diminished circadian histone methylations at the promoter of a clock gene.

  7. Diurnal expression of clock genes in pineal gland and brain and plasma levels of melatonin and cortisol in Atlantic salmon parr and smolts.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tien-sheng; Ruoff, Peter; Fjelldal, Per G

    2010-10-01

    In Atlantic salmon, the preadaptation to a marine life, i.e., parr-smolt transformation, and melatonin production in the pineal gland are regulated by the photoperiod. However, the clock genes have never been studied in the pineal gland of this species. The aim of the present study was to describe the diurnal expression of clock genes (Per1-like, Cry2, and Clock) in the pineal gland and brain of Atlantic salmon parr and smolts in freshwater, as well as plasma levels of melatonin and cortisol. By employing an out-of-season smolt production model, the parr-smolt transformation was induced by subjecting triplicate groups of parr to 6 wks (wks 0 to 6) under a 12 h:12 h light-dark (LD) regime followed by 6 wks (wks 6 to 12) of continuous light (LL). The measured clock genes in both pineal gland and brain and the plasma levels of melatonin and cortisol showed significant daily variations in parr under LD in wk 6, whereas these rhythms were abolished in smolts under LL in wk 12. In parr, the pineal Per1-like and Cry2 expression peaked in the dark phase, whereas the pineal Clock expression was elevated during the light phase. Although this study presents novel findings on the clock gene system in the teleost pineal gland, the role of this system in the regulation of smoltification needs to be studied in more detail.

  8. [Quantitative analysis of sigma genes expression in Mycobacterium tuberculosis cultures exposed to rifampicin and isoniazid].

    PubMed

    Pendzich, Joanna; Maksymowicz-Mazur, Wanda; Mazurek, Urszula; Dworniczak, Szymon; Oklek, Kazimierz; Kozielski, Jerzy; Wilczok, Tadeusz

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the study was quantitative analysis of five genes encoding Mycobacterium tuberculosis sigma factors sigA, sigE, sigF, sigH, and sigI as well as the 85B reference gene known as the mycobacterial viability marker, in cultures exposed to rifampicin and isoniazid. The mRN levels were assessed using QRT-PCR technique, in the automated system of real time quantification with the ABI PRISM 7700 Sequence Detector System (TaqMan). The number of each analyzed gene transcript copies was expressed as a number of mRNA per 1 eg of isolated total RNA. In cultures exposed to the tested chemicals the number of 85B mRNA copies declined as compared to the controls (without tested chemicals). There was no detectable expression of sigA and sigI in the control cultures. Both, rifampicin and isoniazid induced expression of sigA and sigI genes. The sigE gene expression increased during exposure to isoniazid and decreased under rifampicin exposure conditions. The sigF mRNA was detected neither in the control culture, nor in cultures exposed to rifampicin or isoniazid. Both tested chemicals caused decrease of sigH expression.

  9. Cucumber gene list 2017

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This is an update of the 2010 version of Cucumber Gene List. Since the release of the cucumber draft genome in 2009, significant progress has been made in developing cucumber genetic and genomics resources. A number of genes or QTLs have been tagged with molecular markers, which provides us a better...

  10. Smart Genes, Stupid Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randerson, Sherman; Mahadeva, Madhu N.

    1983-01-01

    Because many people still believe that specific, identifiable genes dictate the level of human intelligence and that the number/quality of these genes can be evaluated, presents evidence from human genetics (related to nervous system development) to counter this view. Also disputes erroneous assumptions made in "heritability studies" of human…

  11. A victory for genes.

    PubMed

    2013-07-01

    The ability to patent human genes has been costly to researchers and patients, and has restricted competition in the biotech marketplace. The recent US Supreme Court decision making isolated human genes unpatentable will bring freedom of choice to the patient, and level the playing field for research and development.

  12. Genes, genome and Gestalt.

    PubMed

    Grisolia, Cesar Koppe

    2005-03-31

    According to Gestalt thinking, biological systems cannot be viewed as the sum of their elements, but as processes of the whole. To understand organisms we must start from the whole, observing how the various parts are related. In genetics, we must observe the genome over and above the sum of its genes. Either loss or addition of one gene in a genome can change the function of the organism. Genomes are organized in networks of genes, which need to be well integrated. In the case of genetically modified organisms (GMOs), for example, soybeans, rats, Anopheles mosquitoes, and pigs, the insertion of an exogenous gene into a receptive organism generally causes disturbance in the networks, resulting in the breakdown of gene interactions. In these cases, genetic modification increased the genetic load of the GMO and consequently decreased its adaptability (fitness). Therefore, it is hard to claim that the production of such organisms with an increased genetic load does not have ethical implications.

  13. [Gene therapy and ethics].

    PubMed

    Müller, H; Rehmann-Sutter, C

    1995-01-10

    Gene therapy represents a new strategy to treat human disorders. It was originally conceived as a cure for severe monogenetic disorders. Since its conception, the spectrum of possible application for gene therapy has been to include the treatment of acquired diseases, such as various forms of cancer and some viral infections, most notably human immune deficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis B virus. Since somatic gene therapy does not cause substantially new ethical problems, it has gained broad approval. This is by no means the case with germ-line gene therapy. Practically all bodies who were evaluating the related ethical aspects wanted to ban its medical application on grounds of fundamental and pragmatic considerations. In this review, practical and ethical views concerning gene therapy are summarized which were presented at the "Junitagung 1994" of the Swiss Society for Biomedical Ethics in Basle.

  14. Transcriptional profiling of SHR/NCrl prefrontal cortex shows hyperactivity-associated genes responsive to amphetamine challenge.

    PubMed

    Dela Peña, I J I; Dela Peña, I; de la Peña, J B; Kim, H J; Sohn, A; Shin, C Y; Han, D H; Kim, B-N; Ryu, J H; Cheong, J H

    2017-09-01

    Several studies suggest a strong genetic component of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), a complex neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by inappropriate levels of hyperactivity, impulsivity and inattention. Determining specific genetic risk variants for each symptom dimension of ADHD may aid in the identification of the biological risk factors of the disorder. In this study, we explored the potential genetic underpinnings of the hyperactive phenotype of ADHD. To this end, we examined differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of SHR/NCrl, an animal model of ADHD, compared with its genetic control, the Wistar Kyoto (WKY/NCrl) rat and the Wistar rat, strain used to represent the 'normal' heterogeneous population. Relative to WKY/NCrl and Wistar controls, SHR/NCrl showed hyperactivity in the open-field test. Treatment with the ADHD drug, amphetamine (AMPH) reduced hyperactivity in SHR/NCrl. Meanwhile, AMPH increased locomotor activity in WKY/NCrl and Wistar rats. Gene expression analysis found 21 common upregulated and 36 downregulated genes in the PFC of drug-naive SHR/NCrl when compared with WKY/NCrl and Wistar rats. Of these DEGs, expression levels of two genes, Atxn7 and Per2, which are involved in transcription and circadian rhythm, respectively, were downregulated following AMPH treatment in SHR/NCrl. Quantitative real-time-polymerase chain reaction analyses verified expression patterns of these genes in the PFC of drug-naïve and AMPH-treated SHR/NCrl. The present findings indicate genetic risk variants that may be associated with the hyperactive phenotype in ADHD. Further studies are warranted to establish the roles of Atxn7 and Per2 in mediating hyperactivity. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  15. GIPC gene family (Review).

    PubMed

    Katoh, Masaru

    2002-06-01

    GIPC1/GIPC/RGS19IP1, GIPC2, and GIPC3 genes constitute the human GIPC gene family. GIPC1 and GIPC2 show 62.0% total-amino-acid identity. GIPC1 and GIPC3 show 59.9% total-amino-acid identity. GIPC2 and GIPC3 show 55.3% total-amino-acid identity. GIPCs are proteins with central PDZ domain and GIPC homology (GH1 and GH2) domains. PDZ, GH1, and GH2 domains are conserved among human GIPCs, Xenopus GIPC/Kermit, and Drosophila GIPC/ LP09416. Bioinformatics revealed that GIPC genes are linked to prostanoid receptor genes and DNAJB genes in the human genome as follows: GIPC1 gene is linked to prostaglandin E receptor 1 (PTGER1) gene and DNAJB1 gene in human chromosome 19p13.2-p13.1 region; GIPC2 gene to prostaglandin F receptor (PTGFR) gene and DNAJB4 gene in human chromosome 1p31.1-p22.3 region; GIPC3 gene to thromboxane A2 receptor (TBXA2R) gene in human chromosome 19p13.3 region. GIPC1 and GIPC2 mRNAs are expressed together in OKAJIMA, TMK1, MKN45 and KATO-III cells derived from diffuse-type of gastric cancer, and are up-regulated in several cases of primary gastric cancer. PDZ domain of GIPC family proteins interact with Frizzled-3 (FZD3) class of WNT receptor, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF1) receptor, receptor tyrosine kinase TrkA, TGF-beta type III receptor (TGF-beta RIII), integrin alpha6A subunit, transmembrane glycoprotein 5T4, and RGS19/RGS-GAIP. Because RGS19 is a member of the RGS family that regulate heterotrimeric G-protein signaling, GIPCs might be scaffold proteins linking heterotrimeric G-proteins to seven-transmembrane-type WNT receptor or to receptor tyrosine kinases. Therefore, GIPC1, GIPC2 and GIPC3 might play key roles in carcinogenesis and embryogenesis through modulation of growth factor signaling and cell adhesion.

  16. 4. AERIAL VIEW OF GENE WASH RESERVOIR AND GENE CAMP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. AERIAL VIEW OF GENE WASH RESERVOIR AND GENE CAMP LOOKING SOUTHWEST. DAM AND SPILLWAY VISIBLE IN BOTTOM OF PHOTO. - Gene Wash Reservoir & Dam, 2 miles west of Parker Dam, Parker Dam, San Bernardino County, CA

  17. Regulation of the clock gene expression in human adipose tissue by weight loss.

    PubMed

    Pivovarova, O; Gögebakan, Ö; Sucher, S; Groth, J; Murahovschi, V; Kessler, K; Osterhoff, M; Rudovich, N; Kramer, A; Pfeiffer, A F H

    2016-06-01

    The circadian clock coordinates numerous metabolic processes to adapt physiological responses to light-dark and feeding regimens and is itself regulated by metabolic cues. The implication of the circadian clock in the regulation of energy balance and body weight is widely studied in rodents but not in humans. Here we investigated (1) whether the expression of clock genes in human adipose tissue is changed by weight loss and (2) whether these alterations are associated with metabolic parameters. Subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) samples were collected before and after 8 weeks of weight loss on an 800 kcal per day hypocaloric diet (plus 200 g per day vegetables) at the same time of the day. Fifty overweight subjects who lost at least 8% weight after 8 weeks were selected for the study. The expression of 10 clock genes and key metabolic and inflammatory genes in adipose tissue was determined by quantitative real-time PCR. The expression of core clock genes PER2 and NR1D1 was increased after the weight loss. Correlations of PERIOD expression with body mass index (BMI) and serum total, high-density lipoprotein and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels and of NR1D1 expression with total and LDL cholesterol were found that became non-significant after correction for multiple testing. Clock gene expression levels and their weight loss-induced changes tightly correlated with each other and with genes involved in fat metabolism (FASN, CPT1A, LPL, PPARG, PGC1A, ADIPOQ), energy metabolism (SIRT1), autophagy (LC3A, LC3B) and inflammatory response (NFKB1, NFKBIA, NLRP3, EMR1). Clock gene expression in human SAT is regulated by body weight changes and associated with BMI, serum cholesterol levels and the expression of metabolic and inflammatory genes. Our data confirm the tight crosstalk between molecular clock and metabolic and inflammatory pathways involved in adapting adipose tissue metabolism to changes of the energy intake in humans.

  18. The Tibetan medicine Zuotai influences clock gene expression in the liver of mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huan; Li, Wen-Kai; Lu, Yuan-Fu; Wei, Li-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Background. The circadian clock is involved in drug metabolism, efficacy and toxicity. Drugs could in turn affect the biological clock as a mechanism of their actions. Zuotai is an essential component of many popular Tibetan medicines for sedation, tranquil and “detoxification,” and is mainly composed of metacinnabar (β-HgS). The pharmacological and/or toxicological basis of its action is unknown. This study aimed to examine the effect of Zuotai on biological clock gene expression in the liver of mice. Materials and methods. Mice were orally given Zuotai (10 mg/kg, 1.5-fold of clinical dose) daily for 7 days, and livers were collected every 4 h during the 24 h period. Total RNA was extracted and subjected to real-time RT-PCR analysis of circadian clock gene expression. Results. Zuotai decreased the oscillation amplitude of the clock core gene Clock, neuronal PAS domain protein 2 (Npas2), Brain and muscle Arnt-like protein-1 (Bmal1) at 10:00. For the clock feedback negative control genes, Zuotai had no effect on the oscillation of the clock gene Cryptochrome (Cry1) and Period genes (Per1–3). For the clock-driven target genes, Zuotai increased the oscillation amplitude of the PAR-bZip family member D-box-binding protein (Dbp), decreased nuclear factor interleukin 3 (Nfil3) at 10:00, but had no effect on thyrotroph embryonic factor (Tef); Zuotai increased the expression of nuclear receptor Rev-Erbα (Nr1d1) at 18:00, but had little influence on the nuclear receptor Rev-Erbβ (Nr1d2) and RORα. Conclusion. The Tibetan medicine Zuotai could influence the expression of clock genes, which could contribute to pharmacological and/or toxicological effects of Zuotai. PMID:26855871

  19. Third party annotation gene data set of eutherian lysozyme genes.

    PubMed

    Premzl, Marko

    2014-12-01

    The eutherian comparative genomic analysis protocol annotated most comprehensive eutherian lysozyme gene data set. Among 209 potential coding sequences, the third party annotation gene data set of eutherian lysozyme genes included 116 complete coding sequences that first described seven major gene clusters. As one new framework of future experiments, the present integrated gene annotations, phylogenetic analysis and protein molecular evolution analysis proposed new classification and nomenclature of eutherian lysozyme genes.

  20. Gene therapy for hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Chuah, M K; Evens, H; VandenDriessche, T

    2013-06-01

    Hemophilia A and B are X-linked monogenic disorders resulting from deficiencies of factor VIII and FIX, respectively. Purified clotting factor concentrates are currently intravenously administered to treat hemophilia, but this treatment is non-curative. Therefore, gene-based therapies for hemophilia have been developed to achieve sustained high levels of clotting factor expression to correct the clinical phenotype. Over the past two decades, different types of viral and non-viral gene delivery systems have been explored for hemophilia gene therapy research with a variety of target cells, particularly hepatocytes, hematopoietic stem cells, skeletal muscle cells, and endothelial cells. Lentiviral and adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based vectors are among the most promising vectors for hemophilia gene therapy. In preclinical hemophilia A and B animal models, the bleeding phenotype was corrected with these vectors. Some of these promising preclinical results prompted clinical translation to patients suffering from a severe hemophilic phenotype. These patients receiving gene therapy with AAV vectors showed long-term expression of therapeutic FIX levels, which is a major step forwards in this field. Nevertheless, the levels were insufficient to prevent trauma or injury-induced bleeding episodes. Another challenge that remains is the possible immune destruction of gene-modified cells by effector T cells, which are directed against the AAV vector antigens. It is therefore important to continuously improve the current gene therapy approaches to ultimately establish a real cure for hemophilia.

  1. Fecundity genes in sheep.

    PubMed

    Davis, G H

    2004-07-01

    Since 1980 there has been increasing interest in the identification and utilisation of major genes for prolificacy in sheep. Mutations that increase ovulation rate have been discovered in the BMPR-1B, BMP15 and GDF9 genes, and others are known to exist from the expressed inheritance patterns although the mutations have not yet been located. In the case of BMP15, four different mutations have been discovered but each produces the same phenotype. The modes of inheritance of the different prolificacy genes include autosomal dominant genes with additive effects on ovulation rate (BMPR-1B; Lacaune), autosomal over-dominant genes with infertility in homozygous females (GDF9), X-linked over-dominant genes with infertility in homozygous females (BMP15), and X-linked maternally imprinted genes (FecX2). The size of the effect of one copy of a mutation on ovulation rate ranges from an extra 0.4 ovulations per oestrus for the FecX2 mutation to an extra 1.5 ovulations per oestrus for the BMPR-1B mutation. DNA tests enable some of these mutations to be used in genetic improvement programmes based on marker assisted selection.

  2. Gene therapy for haemophilia.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Akshay; Easow Mathew, Manu; Sriganesh, Vasumathi; Reiss, Ulrike M

    2016-12-20

    Haemophilia is a genetic disorder characterized by spontaneous or provoked, often uncontrolled, bleeding into joints, muscles and other soft tissues. Current methods of treatment are expensive, challenging and involve regular administration of clotting factors. Gene therapy has recently been prompted as a curative treatment modality. This is an update of a published Cochrane Review. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of gene therapy for treating people with haemophilia A or B. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis & Genetic Disorders Group's Coagulopathies Trials Register, compiled from electronic database searches and handsearching of journals and conference abstract books. We also searched the reference lists of relevant articles and reviews.Date of last search: 18 August 2016. Eligible trials include randomised or quasi-randomised clinical trials, including controlled clinical trials comparing gene therapy (with or without standard treatment) with standard treatment (factor replacement) or other 'curative' treatment such as stem cell transplantation for individuals with haemophilia A or B of all ages who do not have inhibitors to factor VIII or IX. No trials of gene therapy for haemophilia were found. No trials of gene therapy for haemophilia were identified. No randomised or quasi-randomised clinical trials of gene therapy for haemophilia were identified. Thus, we are unable to determine the safety and efficacy of gene therapy for haemophilia. Gene therapy for haemophilia is still in its nascent stages and there is a need for well-designed clinical trials to assess the long-term feasibility, success and risks of gene therapy for people with haemophilia.

  3. FlyBase: genes and gene models

    PubMed Central

    Drysdale, Rachel A.; Crosby, Madeline A.

    2005-01-01

    FlyBase (http://flybase.org) is the primary repository of genetic and molecular data of the insect family Drosophilidae. For the most extensively studied species, Drosophila melanogaster, a wide range of data are presented in integrated formats. Data types include mutant phenotypes, molecular characterization of mutant alleles and aberrations, cytological maps, wild-type expression patterns, anatomical images, transgenic constructs and insertions, sequence-level gene models and molecular classification of gene product functions. There is a growing body of data for other Drosophila species; this is expected to increase dramatically over the next year, with the completion of draft-quality genomic sequences of an additional 11 Drosphila species. PMID:15608223

  4. Differentially Coexpressed Disease Gene Identification Based on Gene Coexpression Network.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xue; Zhang, Han; Quan, Xiongwen

    2016-01-01

    Screening disease-related genes by analyzing gene expression data has become a popular theme. Traditional disease-related gene selection methods always focus on identifying differentially expressed gene between case samples and a control group. These traditional methods may not fully consider the changes of interactions between genes at different cell states and the dynamic processes of gene expression levels during the disease progression. However, in order to understand the mechanism of disease, it is important to explore the dynamic changes of interactions between genes in biological networks at different cell states. In this study, we designed a novel framework to identify disease-related genes and developed a differentially coexpressed disease-related gene identification method based on gene coexpression network (DCGN) to screen differentially coexpressed genes. We firstly constructed phase-specific gene coexpression network using time-series gene expression data and defined the conception of differential coexpression of genes in coexpression network. Then, we designed two metrics to measure the value of gene differential coexpression according to the change of local topological structures between different phase-specific networks. Finally, we conducted meta-analysis of gene differential coexpression based on the rank-product method. Experimental results demonstrated the feasibility and effectiveness of DCGN and the superior performance of DCGN over other popular disease-related gene selection methods through real-world gene expression data sets.

  5. Differentially Coexpressed Disease Gene Identification Based on Gene Coexpression Network

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Xiongwen

    2016-01-01

    Screening disease-related genes by analyzing gene expression data has become a popular theme. Traditional disease-related gene selection methods always focus on identifying differentially expressed gene between case samples and a control group. These traditional methods may not fully consider the changes of interactions between genes at different cell states and the dynamic processes of gene expression levels during the disease progression. However, in order to understand the mechanism of disease, it is important to explore the dynamic changes of interactions between genes in biological networks at different cell states. In this study, we designed a novel framework to identify disease-related genes and developed a differentially coexpressed disease-related gene identification method based on gene coexpression network (DCGN) to screen differentially coexpressed genes. We firstly constructed phase-specific gene coexpression network using time-series gene expression data and defined the conception of differential coexpression of genes in coexpression network. Then, we designed two metrics to measure the value of gene differential coexpression according to the change of local topological structures between different phase-specific networks. Finally, we conducted meta-analysis of gene differential coexpression based on the rank-product method. Experimental results demonstrated the feasibility and effectiveness of DCGN and the superior performance of DCGN over other popular disease-related gene selection methods through real-world gene expression data sets. PMID:28042568

  6. Genes and social behavior.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Gene E; Fernald, Russell D; Clayton, David F

    2008-11-07

    What genes and regulatory sequences contribute to the organization and functioning of neural circuits and molecular pathways in the brain that support social behavior? How does social experience interact with information in the genome to modulate brain activity? Here, we address these questions by highlighting progress that has been made in identifying and understanding two key "vectors of influence" that link genes, the brain, and social behavior: (i) Social information alters gene expression in the brain to influence behavior, and (ii) genetic variation influences brain function and social behavior. We also discuss how evolutionary changes in genomic elements influence social behavior and outline prospects for a systems biology of social behavior.

  7. Catabolic cytokines disrupt the circadian clock and the expression of clock-controlled genes in cartilage via an NFкB-dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Guo, B.; Yang, N.; Borysiewicz, E.; Dudek, M.; Williams, J.L.; Li, J.; Maywood, E.S.; Adamson, A.; Hastings, M.H.; Bateman, J.F.; White, M.R.H.; Boot-Handford, R.P.; Meng, Q.J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective To define how the catabolic cytokines (Interleukin 1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα)) affect the circadian clock mechanism and the expression of clock-controlled catabolic genes within cartilage, and to identify the downstream pathways linking the cytokines to the molecular clock within chondrocytes. Methods Ex vivo cartilage explants were isolated from the Cry1-luc or PER2::LUC clock reporter mice. Clock gene dynamics were monitored in real-time by bioluminescence photon counting. Gene expression changes were studied by qRT-PCR. Functional luc assays were used to study the function of the core Clock/BMAL1 complex in SW-1353 cells. NFкB pathway inhibitor and fluorescence live-imaging of cartilage were performed to study the underlying mechanisms. Results Exposure to IL-1β severely disrupted circadian gene expression rhythms in cartilage. This effect was reversed by an anti-inflammatory drug dexamethasone, but not by other clock synchronizing agents. Circadian disruption mediated by IL-1β was accompanied by disregulated expression of endogenous clock genes and clock-controlled catabolic pathways. Mechanistically, NFкB signalling was involved in the effect of IL-1β on the cartilage clock in part through functional interference with the core Clock/BMAL1 complex. In contrast, TNFα had little impact on the circadian rhythm and clock gene expression in cartilage. Conclusion In our experimental system (young healthy mouse cartilage), we demonstrate that IL-1β (but not TNFα) abolishes circadian rhythms in Cry1-luc and PER2::LUC gene expression. These data implicate disruption of the chondrocyte clock as a novel aspect of the catabolic responses of cartilage to pro-inflammatory cytokines, and provide an additional mechanism for how chronic joint inflammation may contribute to osteoarthritis (OA). PMID:26521744

  8. Catabolic cytokines disrupt the circadian clock and the expression of clock-controlled genes in cartilage via an NFкB-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Guo, B; Yang, N; Borysiewicz, E; Dudek, M; Williams, J L; Li, J; Maywood, E S; Adamson, A; Hastings, M H; Bateman, J F; White, M R H; Boot-Handford, R P; Meng, Q J

    2015-11-01

    To define how the catabolic cytokines (Interleukin 1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα)) affect the circadian clock mechanism and the expression of clock-controlled catabolic genes within cartilage, and to identify the downstream pathways linking the cytokines to the molecular clock within chondrocytes. Ex vivo cartilage explants were isolated from the Cry1-luc or PER2::LUC clock reporter mice. Clock gene dynamics were monitored in real-time by bioluminescence photon counting. Gene expression changes were studied by qRT-PCR. Functional luc assays were used to study the function of the core Clock/BMAL1 complex in SW-1353 cells. NFкB pathway inhibitor and fluorescence live-imaging of cartilage were performed to study the underlying mechanisms. Exposure to IL-1β severely disrupted circadian gene expression rhythms in cartilage. This effect was reversed by an anti-inflammatory drug dexamethasone, but not by other clock synchronizing agents. Circadian disruption mediated by IL-1β was accompanied by disregulated expression of endogenous clock genes and clock-controlled catabolic pathways. Mechanistically, NFкB signalling was involved in the effect of IL-1β on the cartilage clock in part through functional interference with the core Clock/BMAL1 complex. In contrast, TNFα had little impact on the circadian rhythm and clock gene expression in cartilage. In our experimental system (young healthy mouse cartilage), we demonstrate that IL-1β (but not TNFα) abolishes circadian rhythms in Cry1-luc and PER2::LUC gene expression. These data implicate disruption of the chondrocyte clock as a novel aspect of the catabolic responses of cartilage to pro-inflammatory cytokines, and provide an additional mechanism for how chronic joint inflammation may contribute to osteoarthritis (OA). Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Signatures of selection in mammalian clock genes with coding trinucleotide repeats: Implications for studying the genomics of high-pace adaptation.

    PubMed

    Prentice, Melanie B; Bowman, Jeff; Lalor, Jillian L; McKay, Michelle M; Thomson, Lindsay A; Watt, Cristen M; McAdam, Andrew G; Murray, Dennis L; Wilson, Paul J

    2017-09-01

    Climate change is predicted to affect the reproductive ecology of wildlife; however, we have yet to understand if and how species can adapt to the rapid pace of change. Clock genes are functional genes likely critical for adaptation to shifting seasonal conditions through shifts in timing cues. Many of these genes contain coding trinucleotide repeats, which offer the potential for higher rates of change than single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at coding sites, and, thus, may translate to faster rates of adaptation in changing environments. We characterized repeats in 22 clock genes across all annotated mammal species and evaluated the potential for selection on repeat motifs in three clock genes (NR1D1,CLOCK, and PER1) in three congeneric species pairs with different latitudinal range limits: Canada lynx and bobcat (Lynx canadensis and L. rufus), northern and southern flying squirrels (Glaucomys sabrinus and G. volans), and white-footed and deer mouse (Peromyscus leucopus and P. maniculatus). Signatures of positive selection were found in both the interspecific comparison of Canada lynx and bobcat, and intraspecific analyses in Canada lynx. Northern and southern flying squirrels showed differing frequencies at common CLOCK alleles and a signature of balancing selection. Regional excess homozygosity was found in the deer mouse at PER1 suggesting disruptive selection, and further analyses suggested balancing selection in the white-footed mouse. These preliminary signatures of selection and the presence of trinucleotide repeats within many clock genes warrant further consideration of the importance of candidate gene motifs for adaptation to climate change.

  10. Extra-hypothalamic brain clocks in songbirds: Photoperiodic state dependent clock gene oscillations in night-migratory blackheaded buntings, Emberiza melanocephala.

    PubMed

    Singh, Devraj; Kumar, Vinod

    2017-04-01

    The avian circadian pacemaker system is comprised of independent clocks in the retina, pineal and hypothalamus, as shown by daily and circadian oscillations of core clock genes (Per2, Cry1, Bmal1 and Clock) in several birds including migratory blackheaded buntings (Emberiza melanocephala). This study investigated the extra-hypothalamic brain circadian clocks in blackheaded buntings, and measured Per2, Cry1, Cry2, Bmal1 and Clock mRNA expressions at 4h intervals over 24h beginning 1h after light-on in the left and right telencephalon, optic tectum and cerebellum, the brain regions involved in several physiological and cognitive functions. Because of seasonal alterations in the circadian clock dependent brain functions, we measured daily clock gene oscillations in buntings photoperiod-induced with the non-migratory state under short days (SDnM), and the pre-migratory (LDpM), migratory (LDM) and post-migratory (refractory, LDR) states under long days. Daily Per2 oscillations were not altered with changes in the photoperiodic states, except for about 2-3h phase difference in the optic tectum between the SDnM and LDpM states. However, there were about 3-5h differences in the phase and 2 to 4 fold change in the amplitude of daily Bmal1 and Cry1 mRNA oscillations between the photoperiod-induced states. Further, Cry2 and Clock genes lacked a significant oscillation, except in Cb (Cry2) and TeO and Rt (Clock) under LDR state. Overall, these results show the presence of circadian clocks in extra-hypothalamic brain regions of blackheaded buntings, and suggest tissue-dependent alterations in the waveforms of mRNA oscillations with transitions in the photoperiod-induced seasonal states in a long-day species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Genes underlying altruism.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Graham J; Hurd, Peter L; Crespi, Bernard J

    2013-01-01

    William D. Hamilton postulated the existence of 'genes underlying altruism', under the rubric of inclusive fitness theory, a half-century ago. Such genes are now poised for discovery. In this article, we develop a set of intuitive criteria for the recognition and analysis of genes for altruism and describe the first candidate genes affecting altruism from social insects and humans. We also provide evidence from a human population for genetically based trade-offs, underlain by oxytocin-system polymorphisms, between alleles for altruism and alleles for non-social cognition. Such trade-offs between self-oriented and altruistic behaviour may influence the evolution of phenotypic diversity across all social animals.

  12. Genes underlying altruism

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Graham J.; Hurd, Peter L.; Crespi, Bernard J.

    2013-01-01

    William D. Hamilton postulated the existence of ‘genes underlying altruism’, under the rubric of inclusive fitness theory, a half-century ago. Such genes are now poised for discovery. In this article, we develop a set of intuitive criteria for the recognition and analysis of genes for altruism and describe the first candidate genes affecting altruism from social insects and humans. We also provide evidence from a human population for genetically based trade-offs, underlain by oxytocin-system polymorphisms, between alleles for altruism and alleles for non-social cognition. Such trade-offs between self-oriented and altruistic behaviour may influence the evolution of phenotypic diversity across all social animals. PMID:24132092

  13. "Bad genes" & criminal responsibility.

    PubMed

    González-Tapia, María Isabel; Obsuth, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    The genetics of the accused is trying to break into the courts. To date several candidate genes have been put forward and their links to antisocial behavior have been examined and documented with some consistency. In this paper, we focus on the so called "warrior gene", or the low-activity allele of the MAOA gene, which has been most consistently related to human behavior and specifically to violence and antisocial behavior. In preparing this paper we had two objectives. First, to summarize and analyze the current scientific evidence, in order to gain an in depth understanding of the state of the issue and determine whether a dominant line of generally accepted scientific knowledge in this field can be asserted. Second, to derive conclusions and put forward recommendations related to the use of genetic information, specifically the presence of the low-activity genotype of the MAOA gene, in modulation of criminal responsibility in European and US courts.

  14. Clock genes and sleep.

    PubMed

    Landgraf, Dominic; Shostak, Anton; Oster, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    In most species--from cyanobacteria to humans--endogenous clocks have evolved that drive 24-h rhythms of behavior and physiology. In mammals, these circadian rhythms are regulated by a hierarchical network of cellular oscillators controlled by a set of clock genes organized in a system of interlocked transcriptional feedback loops. One of the most prominent outputs of the circadian system is the synchronization of the sleep-wake cycle with external (day-) time. Clock genes also have a strong impact on many other biological functions, such as memory formation, energy metabolism, and immunity. Remarkably, large overlaps exist between clock gene and sleep (loss) mediated effects on these processes. This review summarizes sleep clock gene interactions for these three phenomena, highlighting potential mediators linking sleep and/or clock function to physiological output in an attempt to better understand the complexity of diurnal adaptation and its consequences for health and disease.

  15. GeneLab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berrios, Daniel C.; Thompson, Terri G.

    2015-01-01

    NASA GeneLab is expected to capture and distribute omics data and experimental and process conditions most relevant to research community in their statistical and theoretical analysis of NASAs omics data.

  16. Cystic fibrosis modifier genes.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Jane; Alton, Eric; Griesenbach, Uta

    2005-01-01

    Since the recognition that CFTR genotype was not a good predictor of pulmonary disease severity in CF, several candidate modifier genes have been identified. It is unlikely that a single modifier gene will be found, but more probable that several haplotypes in combination may contribute, which in itself presents a major methodological challenge. The aims of such studies are to increase our understanding of disease pathogenesis, to aid prognosis and ultimately to lead to the development of novel treatments. PMID:16025767

  17. Evolutionary Fingerprinting of Genes

    PubMed Central

    Kosakovsky Pond, Sergei L.; Scheffler, Konrad; Gravenor, Michael B.; Poon, Art F.Y.; Frost, Simon D.W.

    2010-01-01

    Over time, natural selection molds every gene into a unique mosaic of sites evolving rapidly or resisting change—an “evolutionary fingerprint” of the gene. Aspects of this evolutionary fingerprint, such as the site-specific ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitution rates (dN/dS), are commonly used to identify genetic features of potential biological interest; however, no framework exists for comparing evolutionary fingerprints between genes. We hypothesize that protein-coding genes with similar protein structure and/or function tend to have similar evolutionary fingerprints and that comparing evolutionary fingerprints can be useful for discovering similarities between genes in a way that is analogous to, but independent of, discovery of similarity via sequence-based comparison tools such as Blast. To test this hypothesis, we develop a novel model of coding sequence evolution that uses a general bivariate discrete parameterization of the evolutionary rates. We show that this approach provides a better fit to the data using a smaller number of parameters than existing models. Next, we use the model to represent evolutionary fingerprints as probability distributions and present a methodology for comparing these distributions in a way that is robust against variations in data set size and divergence. Finally, using sequences of three rapidly evolving RNA viruses (HIV-1, hepatitis C virus, and influenza A virus), we demonstrate that genes within the same functional group tend to have similar evolutionary fingerprints. Our framework provides a sound statistical foundation for efficient inference and comparison of evolutionary rate patterns in arbitrary collections of gene alignments, clustering homologous and nonhomologous genes, and investigation of biological and functional correlates of evolutionary rates. PMID:19864470

  18. Interkingdom gene fusions.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Y I; Kondrashov, A S; Koonin, E V

    2000-01-01

    Genome comparisons have revealed major lateral gene transfer between the three primary kingdoms of life - Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya. Another important evolutionary phenomenon involves the evolutionary mobility of protein domains that form versatile multidomain architectures. We were interested in investigating the possibility of a combination of these phenomena, with an invading gene merging with a pre-existing gene in the recipient genome. Complete genomes of fifteen bacteria, four archaea and one eukaryote were searched for interkingdom gene fusions (IKFs); that is, genes coding for proteins that apparently consist of domains originating from different primary kingdoms. Phylogenetic analysis supported 37 cases of IKF, each of which includes a 'native' domain and a horizontally acquired 'alien' domain. IKFs could have evolved via lateral transfer of a gene coding for the alien domain (or a larger protein containing this domain) followed by recombination with a native gene. For several IKFs, this scenario is supported by the presence of a gene coding for a second, stand-alone version of the alien domain in the recipient genome. Among the genomes investigated, the greatest number of IKFs has been detected in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, where they are almost always accompanied by a stand-alone alien domain. For most of the IKF cases detected in other genomes, the stand-alone counterpart is missing. The results of comparative genome analysis show that IKF formation is a real, but relatively rare, evolutionary phenomenon. We hypothesize that IKFs are formed primarily via the proposed two-stage mechanism, but other than in the Actinomycetes, in which IKF generation seems to be an active, ongoing process, most of the stand-alone intermediates have been eliminated, perhaps because of functional redundancy.

  19. Circadian clock components in the rat neocortex: daily dynamics, localization and regulation.

    PubMed

    Rath, Martin F; Rohde, Kristian; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Møller, Morten

    2013-03-01

    The circadian master clock of the mammalian brain resides in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. At the molecular level, the clock of the SCN is driven by a transcriptional/posttranslational autoregulatory network with clock gene products as core elements. Recent investigations have shown the presence of peripheral clocks in extra-hypothalamic areas of the central nervous system. However, knowledge on the clock gene network in the cerebral cortex is limited. We here show that the mammalian clock genes Per1, Per2, Per3, Cry1, Cry2, Bmal1, Clock, Nr1d1 and Dbp are expressed in the rat neocortex. Among these, Per1, Per2, Per3, Cry1, Bmal1, Nr1d1 and Dbp were found to exhibit daily rhythms. The amplitude of circadian oscillation in neocortical clock gene expression was damped and the peak delayed as compared with the SCN. Lesions of the SCN revealed that rhythmic clock gene expression in the neocortex is dependent on the SCN. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry showed that products of the canonical clock gene Per2 are located in perikarya throughout all areas of the neocortex. These findings show that local circadian oscillators driven by the SCN reside within neurons of the neocortex.

  20. Gene therapy for hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Hortelano, G; Chang, P L

    2000-01-01

    Hemophilia A and B are X-linked genetic disorders caused by deficiency of the coagulation factors VIII and IX, respectively. Because of the health hazards and costs of current product replacement therapy, much effort is devoted to the development of gene therapy for these disorders. Approaches to gene therapy for the hemophilias include: ex vivo gene therapy in which cells from the intended recipients are explanted, genetically modified to secrete Factor VIII or IX, and reimplanted into the donor; in vivo gene therapy in which Factor VIII or IX encoding vectors are directly injected into the recipient; and non-autologous gene therapy in which universal cell lines engineered to secrete Factor VIII or IX are enclosed in immuno-protective devices before implantation into recipients. Research into these approaches is aided by the many murine and canine models available. While problems of achieving high and sustained levels of factor delivery, and issues related to efficacy, safety and cost are still to be resolved, progress in gene therapy for the hemophilias has been encouraging and is likely to reach human clinical trial in the foreseeable future.

  1. Gene therapy for newborns.

    PubMed

    Kohn, D B; Parkman, R

    1997-07-01

    Application of gene therapy to treat genetic and infectious diseases may have several advantages if performed in newborns. Because of the minimal adverse effect of the underlying disease on cells of the newborn, the relatively small size of infants, and the large amount of future growth, gene therapy may be more successful in newborns than in older children or adults. The presence of umbilical cord blood from newborns provides a unique and susceptible target for the genetic modification of hematopoietic stem cells. In our first trial of gene therapy in newborns, we inserted a normal adenosine deaminase gene into umbilical cord blood cells of three neonates with a congenital immune deficiency. The trial demonstrated the successful transduction and engraftment of stem cells, which continue to contribute to leukocyte production more than 3 years later. A similar approach may be taken to insert genes that inhibit replication of HIV-1 into umbilical cord blood cells of HIV-1-infected neonates. Many other metabolic and infectious disorders could be treated by gene therapy during the neonatal period if prenatal diagnoses are made and the appropriate technical and regulatory requirements have been met.

  2. Evidence for homosexuality gene

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, R.

    1993-07-16

    A genetic analysis of 40 pairs of homosexual brothers has uncovered a region on the X chromosome that appears to contain a gene or genes for homosexuality. When analyzing the pedigrees of homosexual males, the researcheres found evidence that the trait has a higher likelihood of being passed through maternal genes. This led them to search the X chromosome for genes predisposing to homosexuality. The researchers examined the X chromosomes of pairs of homosexual brothers for regions of DNA that most or all had in common. Of the 40 sets of brothers, 33 shared a set of five markers in the q28 region of the long arm of the X chromosome. The linkage has a LOD score of 4.0, which translates into a 99.5% certainty that there is a gene or genes in this area that predispose males to homosexuality. The chief researcher warns, however, that this one site cannot explain all instances of homosexuality, since there were some cases where the trait seemed to be passed paternally. And even among those brothers where there was no evidence that the trait was passed paternally, seven sets of brothers did not share the Xq28 markers. It seems likely that homosexuality arises from a variety of causes.

  3. GeneClinics

    PubMed Central

    Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter; Shannon, Paul; Baskin, Patty; Espeseth, Miriam; Pagon, Roberta A.

    2000-01-01

    GeneClinics is an online genetic information resource consisting of descriptions of specific inherited disorders (“disease profiles”) as well as information on the role of genetic testing in the diagnosis, management, and genetic counseling of patients with these inherited conditions. GeneClinics is intended to promote the use of genetic services in medical care and personal decision making by providing health care practitioners and patients with information on genetic testing for specific inherited disorders. GeneClinics is implemented as an object-oriented database containing a combination of data and semistructured text that is rendered as HTML for publishing a given “disease profile” on the Web. Content is acquired from authors via templates, converted to an XML document reflecting the underlying database schema (with tagging of embedded data), and then loaded into the database and subjected to peer review. The initial implementation of a production system and the first phase of population of the GeneClinics database content are complete. Further expansion of the content to cover more disease, significant scaling up of rate of content creation, and evaluation redesign are under way. The ultimate goal is to have an entry in GeneClinics for each entry in the GeneTests directory of medical genetics laboratories—that is, for each disease for which clinical genetic testing is available. PMID:10833163

  4. Transposons for gene therapy!

    PubMed

    Ivics, Zoltán; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna

    2006-10-01

    Gene therapy is a promising strategy for the treatment of several inherited and acquired human diseases. Several vector platforms exist for the delivery of therapeutic nucleic acids into cells. Vectors based on viruses are very efficient at introducing gene constructs into cells, but their use has been associated with genotoxic effects of vector integration or immunological complications due to repeated administration in vivo. Non-viral vectors are easier to engineer and manufacture, but their efficient delivery into cells is a major challenge, and the lack of their chromosomal integration precludes long-term therapeutic effects. Transposable elements are non-viral gene delivery vehicles found ubiquitously in nature. Transposon-based vectors have the capacity of stable genomic integration and long-lasting expression of transgene constructs in cells. Molecular reconstruction of Sleeping Beauty, an ancient transposon in fish, represents a cornerstone in applying transposition-mediated gene delivery in vertebrate species, including humans. This review summarizes the state-of-the-art in the application of transposable elements for therapeutic gene transfer, and identifies key targets for the development of transposon-based gene vectors with enhanced efficacy and safety for human applications.

  5. Gene Expression Patterns Define Key Transcriptional Events InCell-Cycle Regulation By cAMP And Protein Kinase A

    SciTech Connect

    Zambon, Alexander C.; Zhang, Lingzhi; Minovitsky, Simon; Kanter, Joan R.; Prabhakar, Shyam; Salomonis, Nathan; Vranizan, Karen; Dubchak Inna,; Conklin, Bruce R.; Insel, Paul A.

    2005-06-01

    Although a substantial number of hormones and drugs increase cellular cAMP levels, the global impact of cAMP and its major effector mechanism, protein kinase A (PKA), on gene expression is not known. Here we show that treatment of murine wild-type S49 lymphoma cells for 24 h with 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-cAMP (8-CPTcAMP), a PKA-selective cAMP analog, alters the expression of approx equal to 4,500 of approx. equal to 13,600 unique genes. By contrast, gene expression was unaltered in Kin- S49 cells (that lack PKA) incubated with 8-CPTcAMP. Changes in mRNA and protein expression of several cell cycle regulators accompanied cAMP-induced G1-phase cell-cycle arrest of wild-type S49 cells. Within 2h, 8-CPT-cAMP altered expression of 152 genes that contain evolutionarily conserved cAMP-response elements within 5 kb of transcriptional start sites, including the circadian clock gene Per1. Thus, cAMP through its activation of PKA produces extensive transcriptional regulation in eukaryotic cells. These transcriptional networks include a primary group of cAMP-response element-containing genes and secondary networks that include the circadian clock.

  6. Novel ISCR1-linked resistance genes found in multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria in southern China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fengping; Wu, Kuihai; Sun, Jingjing; Wang, Qian; Chen, Qing; Yu, Shouyi; Rui, Yongyu

    2012-11-01

    Non-duplicate multidrug-resistant (MDR) Gram-negative bacteria (n=1329) isolated from southern China between January 2008 and December 2009 were investigated for the presence of ISCR1 as well as characterisation of ISCR1-linked resistance genes. Of 433 ISCR1-positive strains, 151 appeared to carry ISCR1-linked resistance genes. Seven different ISCR1-linked resistance gene arrays were identified by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and DNA sequencing analysis. Many of these arrays are reported in some species for the first time. A total of 12 genes, including a novel ABC transporter (GenBank accession no. GU944725), qnrA1, qnrB2, qnrB6, bla(DHA-1), ampR, bla(CTX-M-9), bla(PER-1), insB, sapA-like peptide transport periplasmic protein, putative glutathione S-transferase and short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase, were detected. This study was the first to employ PCR-RFLP using HinfI and RsaI to analyse ISCR1-linked genes. ISCR1 was widely disseminated among MDR Gram-negative bacteria and was in close association with quinolone resistance and β-lactamase genes (class A and class C) in southern China.

  7. Associations between polymorphisms in the antiviral TRIM genes and measles vaccine immunity.

    PubMed

    Ovsyannikova, Inna G; Haralambieva, Iana H; Vierkant, Robert A; O'Byrne, Megan M; Poland, Gregory A

    2013-06-01

    The role of polymorphisms within the antiviral tripartite motif (TRIM) genes in measles vaccine adaptive immune responses was examined. A limited association was found between TRIM5 (rs7122620) and TRIM25 (rs205499) gene polymorphisms and measles-specific antibody levels. However, many associations were found between TRIM gene SNPs and variations in cellular responses (IFN-γ Elispot and secreted cytokines IL-2, IL-6, IL-10, IFN-γ, and TNF-α). TRIM22 rs2291841 was significantly associated with an increased IFN-γ Elispot response (35 vs. 102 SFC per 2×10(5)PBMC, p=0.009, q=0.71) in Caucasians. A non-synonymous TRIM25 rs205498 (in LD with other SNPs, r(2)≥0.56), as well as the TRIM25 AAAGGAAAGGAGT haplotype, was associated with a decreased IFN-γ Elispot response (t-statistic -2.32, p=0.02) in African-Americans. We also identified polymorphisms in the TRIM5, TRIM22, and TRIM25 genes that were associated with significant differences in cytokine responses. Additional studies are necessary to replicate our findings and to examine the functional consequences of these associations.

  8. Pinealectomy interferes with the circadian clock genes expression in white adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    de Farias, Talita da Silva Mendes; de Oliveira, Ariclécio Cunha; Andreotti, Sandra; do Amaral, Fernanda Gaspar; Chimin, Patrícia; de Proença, André Ricardo Alves; Leal, Francisco Leonardo Torres; Sertié, Rogério Antonio Laurato; Campana, Amanda Baron; Lopes, Andressa Bolsoni; de Souza, Arnaldo Henrique; Cipolla-Neto, José; Lima, Fabio Bessa

    2015-04-01

    Melatonin, the main hormone produced by the pineal gland, is secreted in a circadian manner (24-hr period), and its oscillation influences several circadian biological rhythms, such as the regulation of clock genes expression (chronobiotic effect) and the modulation of several endocrine functions in peripheral tissues. Assuming that the circadian synchronization of clock genes can play a role in the regulation of energy metabolism and it is influenced by melatonin, our study was designed to assess possible alterations as a consequence of melatonin absence on the circadian expression of clock genes in the epididymal adipose tissue of male Wistar rats and the possible metabolic repercussions to this tissue. Our data show that pinealectomy indeed has impacts on molecular events: it abolishes the daily pattern of the expression of Clock, Per2, and Cry1 clock genes and Pparγ expression, significantly increases the amplitude of daily expression of Rev-erbα, and affects the pattern of and impairs adipokine production, leading to a decrease in leptin levels. However, regarding some metabolic aspects of adipocyte functions, such as its ability to synthesize triacylglycerols from glucose along 24 hr, was not compromised by pinealectomy, although the daily profile of the lipogenic enzymes expression (ATP-citrate lyase, malic enzyme, fatty acid synthase, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase) was abolished in pinealectomized animals. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Circadian clock genes are rhythmically expressed in specific segments of the hen oviduct.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z C; Wang, Y G; Li, L; Yin, H D; Li, D Y; Wang, Y; Zhao, X L; Liu, Y P; Zhu, Q

    2016-07-01

    In animals, core clock genes are expressed in many peripheral tissues throughout the body that contribute to tissue specific temporal regulation including those that comprise the reproductive system. The chicken ovulatory cycle seems to provide an example of a system in which circadian and interval timing mechanisms operate during ovulation-oviposition. However, little is known about the possible role of circadian regulation during egg formation and laying. To this end, we determined the rhythmic expression of several known canonical clock genes and clock controlled genes in the 4 segments of the chicken oviduct (infundibulum, magnum, isthmus, and uterus) taken from the same biological state (laying sequence and oviposition time) using real time RT-PCR. Except for Cry1, the other genes we analyzed were expressed in all 4 segments of the oviduct. Intriguingly, in a daily light-dark cycle, Bmal1, Clock, Per2, Per3, Cry2, and Rev-erbβ have highly significant rhythmic expression in the infundibulum and uterus but not in the magnum and isthmus. These results show that there is spatial specificity in the localization of clock cells in the hen reproductive tract and that peripheral clocks might have a direct role in the infundibulum and uterus where yolk is captured and the eggshell is formed, respectively. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  10. Atorvastatin alters the expression of genes related to bile acid metabolism and circadian clock in livers of mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Kai; Li, Huan; Lu, Yuan-Fu; Li, Ying-Ying; Fu, Zidong Donna; Liu, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Atorvastatin is a HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor used for hyperlipidemia. Atorvastatin is generally safe but may induce cholestasis. The present study aimed to examine the effects of atorvastatin on hepatic gene expression related to bile acid metabolism and homeostasis, as well as the expression of circadian clock genes in livers of mice. Adult male mice were given atorvastatin (10, 30, and 100 mg/kg, po) daily for 30 days, and blood biochemistry, histopathology, and gene expression were examined. Repeated administration of atorvastatin did not affect animal body weight gain or liver weights. Serum enzyme activities were in the normal range. Histologically, the high dose of atorvastatin produced scattered swollen hepatocytes, foci of feathery-like degeneration, together with increased expression of Egr-1 and metallothionein-1. Atorvastatin increased the expression of Cyp7a1 in the liver, along with FXR and SHP. In contract, atorvastatin decreased the expression of bile acid transporters Ntcp, Bsep, Ostα, and Ostβ. The most dramatic change was the 30-fold induction of Cyp7a1. Because Cyp7a1 is a circadian clock-controlled gene, we further examined the effect of atorvastatin on clock gene expression. Atorvastatin increased the expression of clock core master genes Bmal1 and Npas2, decreased the expression of clock feedback genes Per2, Per3, and the clock targeted genes Dbp and Tef, whereas it had no effect on Cry1 and Nr1d1 expression. Repeated administration of atorvastatin affects bile acid metabolism and markedly increases the expression of the bile acid synthesis rate-limiting enzyme gene Cyp7a1, together with alterations in the expression of circadian clock genes.

  11. Maternal obesity disrupts circadian rhythms of clock and metabolic genes in the offspring heart and liver.

    PubMed

    Wang, Danfeng; Chen, Siyu; Liu, Mei; Liu, Chang

    2015-06-01

    Early life nutritional adversity is tightly associated with the development of long-term metabolic disorders. Particularly, maternal obesity and high-fat diets cause high risk of obesity in the offspring. Those offspring are also prone to develop hyperinsulinemia, hepatic steatosis and cardiovascular diseases. However, the precise underlying mechanisms leading to these metabolic dysregulation in the offspring remain unclear. On the other hand, disruptions of diurnal circadian rhythms are known to impair metabolic homeostasis in various tissues including the heart and liver. Therefore, we investigated that whether maternal obesity perturbs the circadian expression rhythms of clock, metabolic and inflammatory genes in offspring heart and liver by using RT-qPCR and Western blotting analysis. Offspring from lean and obese dams were examined on postnatal day 17 and 35, when pups were nursed by their mothers or took food independently. On P17, genes examined in the heart either showed anti-phase oscillations (Cpt1b, Pparα, Per2) or had greater oscillation amplitudes (Bmal1, Tnf-α, Il-6). Such phase abnormalities of these genes were improved on P35, while defects in amplitudes still existed. In the liver of 17-day-old pups exposed to maternal obesity, the oscillation amplitudes of most rhythmic genes examined (except Bmal1) were strongly suppressed. On P35, the oscillations of circadian and inflammatory genes became more robust in the liver, while metabolic genes were still kept non-rhythmic. Maternal obesity also had a profound influence in the protein expression levels of examined genes in offspring heart and liver. Our observations indicate that the circadian clock undergoes nutritional programing, which may contribute to the alternations in energy metabolism associated with the development of metabolic disorders in early life and adulthood.

  12. Gene indexing: characterization and analysis of NLM's GeneRIFs.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Joyce A; Aronson, Alan R; Mork, James G; Folk, Lillian C; Humphrey, Susanne M; Ward, Janice M

    2003-01-01

    We present an initial analysis of the National Library of Medicine's (NLM) Gene Indexing initiative. Gene Indexing occurs at the time of indexing for all 4600 journals and over 500,000 articles added to PubMed/MEDLINE each year. Gene Indexing links articles about the basic biology of a gene or protein within eight model organisms to a specific record in the NLM's LocusLink database of gene products. The result is an entry called a Gene Reference Into Function (GeneRIF) within the LocusLink database. We analyzed the numbers of GeneRIFs produced in the first year of GeneRIF production. 27,645 GeneRIFs were produced, pertaining to 9126 loci over eight model organisms. 60% of these were associated with human genes and 27% with mouse genes. About 80% discuss genes with an established MeSH Heading or other MeSH term. We developed a prototype functional alerting system for researchers based on the GeneRIFs, and a strategy to find all of the literature related to genes. We conclude that the Gene Indexing initiative adds considerable value to the life sciences research community.

  13. Harnessing gene expression networks to prioritize candidate epileptic encephalopathy genes.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Karen L; Lukic, Vesna; Thorne, Natalie P; Berkovic, Samuel F; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Bahlo, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    We apply a novel gene expression network analysis to a cohort of 182 recently reported candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes to identify those most likely to be true Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. These candidate genes were identified as having single variants of likely pathogenic significance discovered in a large-scale massively parallel sequencing study. Candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes were prioritized according to their co-expression with 29 known Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. We utilized developing brain and adult brain gene expression data from the Allen Human Brain Atlas (AHBA) and compared this to data from Celsius: a large, heterogeneous gene expression data warehouse. We show replicable prioritization results using these three independent gene expression resources, two of which are brain-specific, with small sample size, and the third derived from a heterogeneous collection of tissues with large sample size. Of the nineteen genes that we predicted with the highest likelihood to be true Epileptic Encephalopathy genes, two (GNAO1 and GRIN2B) have recently been independently reported and confirmed. We compare our results to those produced by an established in silico prioritization approach called Endeavour, and finally present gene expression networks for the known and candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. This highlights sub-networks of gene expression, particularly in the network derived from the adult AHBA gene expression dataset. These networks give clues to the likely biological interactions between Epileptic Encephalopathy genes, potentially highlighting underlying mechanisms and avenues for therapeutic targets.

  14. 5. OVERHEAD VIEW OF GENE CAMP LOOKING SOUTH. GENE PUMP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. OVERHEAD VIEW OF GENE CAMP LOOKING SOUTH. GENE PUMP PLANT IS AT CENTER WITH ADMINISTRATIVE COMPLEX IN FOREGROUND AND RESIDENTIAL AREA BEYOND PLANT. - Gene Pump Plant, South of Gene Wash Reservoir, 2 miles west of Whitsett Pump Plant, Parker Dam, San Bernardino County, CA

  15. Harnessing Gene Expression Networks to Prioritize Candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy Genes

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Karen L.; Lukic, Vesna; Thorne, Natalie P.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Bahlo, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    We apply a novel gene expression network analysis to a cohort of 182 recently reported candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes to identify those most likely to be true Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. These candidate genes were identified as having single variants of likely pathogenic significance discovered in a large-scale massively parallel sequencing study. Candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes were prioritized according to their co-expression with 29 known Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. We utilized developing brain and adult brain gene expression data from the Allen Human Brain Atlas (AHBA) and compared this to data from Celsius: a large, heterogeneous gene expression data warehouse. We show replicable prioritization results using these three independent gene expression resources, two of which are brain-specific, with small sample size, and the third derived from a heterogeneous collection of tissues with large sample size. Of the nineteen genes that we predicted with the highest likelihood to be true Epileptic Encephalopathy genes, two (GNAO1 and GRIN2B) have recently been independently reported and confirmed. We compare our results to those produced by an established in silico prioritization approach called Endeavour, and finally present gene expression networks for the known and candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. This highlights sub-networks of gene expression, particularly in the network derived from the adult AHBA gene expression dataset. These networks give clues to the likely biological interactions between Epileptic Encephalopathy genes, potentially highlighting underlying mechanisms and avenues for therapeutic targets. PMID:25014031

  16. Hox genes and study of Hox genes in crustacean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Lin; Chen, Zhijuan; Xu, Mingyu; Lin, Shengguo; Wang, Lu

    2004-12-01

    Homeobox genes have been discovered in many species. These genes are known to play a major role in specifying regional identity along the anterior-posterior axis of animals from a wide range of phyla. The products of the homeotic genes are a set of evolutionarily conserved transcription factors that control elaborate developmental processes and specify cell fates in metazoans. Crustacean, presenting a variety of body plans not encountered in any other class or phylum of the Metazoa, has been shown to possess a single set of homologous Hox genes like insect. The ancestral crustacean Hox gene complex comprised ten genes: eight homologous to the hometic Hox genes and two related to nonhomeotic genes presented within the insect Hox complexes. The crustacean in particular exhibits an abundant diversity segment specialization and tagmosis. This morphological diversity relates to the Hox genes. In crustacean body plan, different Hox genes control different segments and tagmosis.

  17. Classification of genes based on gene expression analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Angelova, M. Myers, C. Faith, J.

    2008-05-15

    Systems biology and bioinformatics are now major fields for productive research. DNA microarrays and other array technologies and genome sequencing have advanced to the point that it is now possible to monitor gene expression on a genomic scale. Gene expression analysis is discussed and some important clustering techniques are considered. The patterns identified in the data suggest similarities in the gene behavior, which provides useful information for the gene functionalities. We discuss measures for investigating the homogeneity of gene expression data in order to optimize the clustering process. We contribute to the knowledge of functional roles and regulation of E. coli genes by proposing a classification of these genes based on consistently correlated genes in expression data and similarities of gene expression patterns. A new visualization tool for targeted projection pursuit and dimensionality reduction of gene expression data is demonstrated.

  18. Functional polymorphisms of circadian negative feedback regulation genes are associated with clinical outcome in hepatocellular carcinoma patients receiving radical resection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaohui; Ma, Fei; Zhou, Feng; Chen, Yibing; Wang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Hongxin; Zhu, Yong; Bi, Jianwei; Zhang, Yiguan

    2014-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that circadian negative feedback loop genes play an important role in the development and progression of many cancers. However, the associations between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in these genes and the clinical outcomes of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after surgical resection have not been studied so far. Thirteen functional SNPs in circadian genes were genotyped using the Sequenom iPLEX genotyping system in a cohort of 489 Chinese HCC patients who received radical resection. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards model and Kaplan-Meier curve were used for the prognosis analysis. Cumulative effect analysis and survival tree analysis were used for the multiple SNPs analysis. Four individual SNPs, including rs3027178 in PER1, rs228669 and rs2640908 in PER3 and rs3809236 in CRY1, were significantly associated with overall survival (OS) of HCC patients, and three SNPs, including rs3027178 in PER1, rs228729 in PER3 and rs3809236 in CRY1, were significantly associated with recurrence-free survival (RFS). Moreover, we observed a cumulative effect of significant SNPs on OS and RFS (P for trend < 0.001 for both). Survival tree analysis indicated that wild genotype of rs228729 in PER3 was the primary risk factor contributing to HCC patients' RFS. Our study suggests that the polymorphisms in circadian negative feedback loop genes may serve as independent prognostic biomarkers in predicting clinical outcomes for HCC patients who received radical resection. Further studies with different ethnicities are needed to validate our findings and generalize its clinical utility.

  19. GeneCards Version 3: the human gene integrator.

    PubMed

    Safran, Marilyn; Dalah, Irina; Alexander, Justin; Rosen, Naomi; Iny Stein, Tsippi; Shmoish, Michael; Nativ, Noam; Bahir, Iris; Doniger, Tirza; Krug, Hagit; Sirota-Madi, Alexandra; Olender, Tsviya; Golan, Yaron; Stelzer, Gil; Harel, Arye; Lancet, Doron

    2010-08-05

    GeneCards (www.genecards.org) is a comprehensive, authoritative compendium of annotative information about human genes, widely used for nearly 15 years. Its gene-centric content is automatically mined and integrated from over 80 digital sources, resulting in a web-based deep-linked card for each of >73,000 human gene entries, encompassing the following categories: protein coding, pseudogene, RNA gene, genetic locus, cluster and uncategorized. We now introduce GeneCards Version 3, featuring a speedy and sophisticated search engine and a revamped, technologically enabling infrastructure, catering to the expanding needs of biomedical researchers. A key focus is on gene-set analyses, which leverage GeneCards' unique wealth of combinatorial annotations. These include the GeneALaCart batch query facility, which tabulates user-selected annotations for multiple genes and GeneDecks, which identifies similar genes with shared annotations, and finds set-shared annotations by descriptor enrichment analysis. Such set-centric features address a host of applications, including microarray data analysis, cross-database annotation mapping and gene-disorder associations for drug targeting. We highlight the new Version 3 database architecture, its multi-faceted search engine, and its semi-automated quality assurance system. Data enhancements include an expanded visualization of gene expression patterns in normal and cancer tissues, an integrated alternative splicing pattern display, and augmented multi-source SNPs and pathways sections. GeneCards now provides direct links to gene-related research reagents such as antibodies, recombinant proteins, DNA clones and inhibitory RNAs and features gene-related drugs and compounds lists. We also portray the GeneCards Inferred Functionality Score annotation landscape tool for scoring a gene's functional information status. Finally, we delineate examples of applications and collaborations that have benefited from the GeneCards suite. Database

  20. Direct gene transfer in the Gottingen minipig CNS using stereotaxic lentiviral microinjections.

    PubMed

    Norgaard Glud, Andreas; Hedegaard, Claus; Nielsen, Mette Slot; Sørensen, Jens Christian; Bendixen, Christian; Jensen, Poul Henning; Larsen, Knud; Bjarkam, Carsten Reidies

    2010-01-01

    We aim to induce direct viral mediated gene transfer in the substantia nigra (SN) of the Gottingen minipig using MRI guided stereotaxic injections of lentiviral vectors encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Nine female Gottingen minipigs were injected unilaterally into the SN with 6 per 2.5 microliters lentivirus capable of transducing cells and mediating expression of recombinant EGFP. The animals were euthanized after four (n=3) or twenty weeks (n=6). Fresh brain tissue from three animals was used for PCR. The remaining six brains were cryo- or paraffin-sectioned for fluorescence, Nissl-, and immunohistochemical EGFP visualization. EGFP was seen in nigral neurons, axons, glial cells, endothelial cells, and in nigral fibers targeting the striatum. PCR-based detection confirmed the presence of the transgene in SN, whereas all other examined brain areas were negative, indicating that the immunohistochemically detected EGFP in the striatum derived from transfected nigral cells.

  1. Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) and pomegranate influence circadian gene expression and period length.

    PubMed

    Loizides-Mangold, Ursula; Koren-Gluzer, Marie; Skarupelova, Svetlana; Makhlouf, Anne-Marie; Hayek, Tony; Aviram, Michael; Dibner, Charna

    2016-01-01

    The circadian timing system regulates key aspects of mammalian physiology. Here, we analyzed the effect of the endogenous antioxidant paraoxonase 1 (PON1), a high-density lipoprotein-associated lipolactonase that hydrolyses lipid peroxides and attenuates atherogenesis, on circadian gene expression in C57BL/6J and PON1KO mice fed a normal chow diet or a high-fat diet (HFD). Expression levels of core-clock transcripts Nr1d1, Per2, Cry2 and Bmal1 were altered in skeletal muscle in PON1-deficient mice in response to HFD. These findings were supported by circadian bioluminescence reporter assessments in mouse C2C12 and human primary myotubes, synchronized in vitro, where administration of PON1 or pomegranate juice modulated circadian period length.

  2. Circadian Rhythm and Cartilage Extracellular Matrix Genes in Osseointegration: A Genome-Wide Screening of Implant Failure by Vitamin D Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Mengatto, Cristiane Machado; Mussano, Federico; Honda, Yoshitomo; Colwell, Christopher S.; Nishimura, Ichiro

    2011-01-01

    Background Successful dental and orthopedic implants require the establishment of an intimate association with bone tissue; however, the mechanistic explanation of how biological systems accomplish osseointegration is still incomplete. We sought to identify critical gene networks involved in osseointegration by exploring the implant failure model under vitamin D deficiency. Methodology Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to control or vitamin D-deficient diet prior to the osteotomy surgery in the femur bone and the placement of T-shaped Ti4Al6V implant. Two weeks after the osteotomy and implant placement, tissue formed at the osteotomy site or in the hollow chamber of T-shaped implant was harvested and total RNA was evaluated by whole genome microarray analyses. Principal Findings Two-way ANOVA of microarray data identified 103 genes that were significantly (>2 fold) modulated by the implant placement and vitamin D deficiency. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) analyses assigned the highest z-score to the circadian rhythm pathway including neuronal PAS domain 2 (NPAS2), and period homolog 2 (Per2). NPAS2 and Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator-like (ARNTL/Bmal 1) were upregulated around implant and diminished by vitamin D deficiency, whereas the expression pattern of Per2 was complementary. Hierarchical cluster analysis further revealed that NPAS2 was in a group predominantly composed of cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) genes. Whereas the expression of bone ECM genes around implant was not significantly affected by vitamin D deficiency, cartilage ECM genes were modulated by the presence of the implant and vitamin D status. In a proof-of-concept in vitro study, the expression of cartilage type II and X collagens was found upregulated when mouse mesenchymal stem cells were cultured on implant disk with 1,25D supplementation. Conclusions This study suggests that the circadian rhythm system and cartilage extracellular matrix may be

  3. Neighboring Genes Show Correlated Evolution in Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Ghanbarian, Avazeh T; Hurst, Laurence D

    2015-07-01

    When considering the evolution of a gene's expression profile, we commonly assume that this is unaffected by its genomic neighborhood. This is, however, in contrast to what we know about the lack of autonomy between neighboring genes in gene expression profiles in extant taxa. Indeed, in all eukaryotic genomes genes of similar expression-profile tend to cluster, reflecting chromatin level dynamics. Does it follow that if a gene increases expression in a particular lineage then the genomic neighbors will also increase in their expression or is gene expression evolution autonomous? To address this here we consider evolution of human gene expression since the human-chimp common ancestor, allowing for both variation in estimation of current expression level and error in Bayesian estimation of the ancestral state. We find that in all tissues and both sexes, the change in gene expression of a focal gene on average predicts the change in gene expression of neighbors. The effect is highly pronounced in the immediate vicinity (<100 kb) but extends much further. Sex-specific expression change is also genomically clustered. As genes increasing their expression in humans tend to avoid nuclear lamina domains and be enriched for the gene activator 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, we conclude that, most probably owing to chromatin level control of gene expression, a change in gene expression of one gene likely affects the expression evolution of neighbors, what we term expression piggybacking, an analog of hitchhiking.

  4. Hox genes and evolution.

    PubMed

    Hrycaj, Steven M; Wellik, Deneen M

    2016-01-01

    Hox proteins are a deeply conserved group of transcription factors originally defined for their critical roles in governing segmental identity along the antero-posterior (AP) axis in Drosophila. Over the last 30 years, numerous data generated in evolutionarily diverse taxa have clearly shown that changes in the expression patterns of these genes are closely associated with the regionalization of the AP axis, suggesting that Hox genes have played a critical role in the evolution of novel body plans within Bilateria. Despite this deep functional conservation and the importance of these genes in AP patterning, key questions remain regarding many aspects of Hox biology. In this commentary, we highlight recent reports that have provided novel insight into the origins of the mammalian Hox cluster, the role of Hox genes in the generation of a limbless body plan, and a novel putative mechanism in which Hox genes may encode specificity along the AP axis. Although the data discussed here offer a fresh perspective, it is clear that there is still much to learn about Hox biology and the roles it has played in the evolution of the Bilaterian body plan.

  5. Engineered Gene Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasty, Jeff

    2003-03-01

    Uncovering the structure and function of gene regulatory networks has become one of the central challenges of the post-genomic era. Theoretical models of protein-DNA feedback loops and gene regulatory networks have long been proposed, and recently, certain qualitative features of such models have been experimentally corroborated. This talk will focus on model and experimental results that demonstrate how a naturally occurring gene network can be used as a ``parts list'' for synthetic network design. The model formulation leads to computational and analytical approaches relevant to nonlinear dynamics and statistical physics, and the utility of such a formulation will be demonstrated through the consideration of specific design criteria for several novel genetic devices. Fluctuations originating from small molecule-number effects will be discussed in the context of model predictions, and the experimental validation of these stochastic effects underscores the importance of internal noise in gene expression. Potential biotech applications will be highlighted within the framework of cellular control schemes. Specifically, the coupling of an oscillating cellular process to a synthetic oscillator will be considered, and the resulting model behavior will be analyzed in the context of synchronization. The underlying methodology highlights the utility of engineering-based methods in the design of synthetic gene regulatory networks.

  6. Selenoprotein Gene Nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Gladyshev, Vadim N; Arnér, Elias S; Berry, Marla J; Brigelius-Flohé, Regina; Bruford, Elspeth A; Burk, Raymond F; Carlson, Bradley A; Castellano, Sergi; Chavatte, Laurent; Conrad, Marcus; Copeland, Paul R; Diamond, Alan M; Driscoll, Donna M; Ferreiro, Ana; Flohé, Leopold; Green, Fiona R; Guigó, Roderic; Handy, Diane E; Hatfield, Dolph L; Hesketh, John; Hoffmann, Peter R; Holmgren, Arne; Hondal, Robert J; Howard, Michael T; Huang, Kaixun; Kim, Hwa-Young; Kim, Ick Young; Köhrle, Josef; Krol, Alain; Kryukov, Gregory V; Lee, Byeong Jae; Lee, Byung Cheon; Lei, Xin Gen; Liu, Qiong; Lescure, Alain; Lobanov, Alexei V; Loscalzo, Joseph; Maiorino, Matilde; Mariotti, Marco; Sandeep Prabhu, K; Rayman, Margaret P; Rozovsky, Sharon; Salinas, Gustavo; Schmidt, Edward E; Schomburg, Lutz; Schweizer, Ulrich; Simonović, Miljan; Sunde, Roger A; Tsuji, Petra A; Tweedie, Susan; Ursini, Fulvio; Whanger, Philip D; Zhang, Yan

    2016-11-11

    The human genome contains 25 genes coding for selenocysteine-containing proteins (selenoproteins). These proteins are involved in a variety of functions, most notably redox homeostasis. Selenoprotein enzymes with known functions are designated according to these functions: TXNRD1, TXNRD2, and TXNRD3 (thioredoxin reductases), GPX1, GPX2, GPX3, GPX4, and GPX6 (glutathione peroxidases), DIO1, DIO2, and DIO3 (iodothyronine deiodinases), MSRB1 (methionine sulfoxide reductase B1), and SEPHS2 (selenophosphate synthetase 2). Selenoproteins without known functions have traditionally been denoted by SEL or SEP symbols. However, these symbols are sometimes ambiguous and conflict with the approved nomenclature for several other genes. Therefore, there is a need to implement a rational and coherent nomenclature system for selenoprotein-encoding genes. Our solution is to use the root symbol SELENO followed by a letter. This nomenclature applies to SELENOF (selenoprotein F, the 15-kDa selenoprotein, SEP15), SELENOH (selenoprotein H, SELH, C11orf31), SELENOI (selenoprotein I, SELI, EPT1), SELENOK (selenoprotein K, SELK), SELENOM (selenoprotein M, SELM), SELENON (selenoprotein N, SEPN1, SELN), SELENOO (selenoprotein O, SELO), SELENOP (selenoprotein P, SeP, SEPP1, SELP), SELENOS (selenoprotein S, SELS, SEPS1, VIMP), SELENOT (selenoprotein T, SELT), SELENOV (selenoprotein V, SELV), and SELENOW (selenoprotein W, SELW, SEPW1). This system, approved by the HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee, also resolves conflicting, missing, and ambiguous designations for selenoprotein genes and is applicable to selenoproteins across vertebrates.

  7. On sports and genes.

    PubMed

    Zilberman-Schapira, Gili; Chen, Jieming; Gerstein, Mark

    2012-12-01

    Our genes influence our athletic ability. However, the causal genetic factors and mechanisms, and the extent of their effects, remain largely elusive. Many studies investigate this association between specific genes and athletic performance. Such studies have increased in number over the past few years, as recent developments and patents in DNA sequencing have made large amounts of sequencing data available for such analysis. In this paper, we consider four of the most intensively studied genes in relation to athletic ability: angiotensin I-converting enzyme, alpha-actinin 3, peroxismose proliferator-activator receptor alpha and nitric oxide synthase 3. We investigate the connection between genotype and athletic phenotype in the context of these four genes in various sport fields and across different ethnicities and genders. We do an extensive literature survey on these genes and the polymorphisms (single nucleotide polymorphisms or indels) found to be associated with athletic performance. We also present, for each of these polymorphisms, the allele frequencies in the different ethnicities reported in the pilot phase of the 1000 Genomes Project - arguably the largest human genome-sequencing endeavor to date. We discuss the considerable success, and significant drawbacks, of past research along these lines, and propose interesting directions for future research.

  8. Gene therapy for hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Ponder, Katherine P

    2006-09-01

    This review will highlight the progress achieved in the past 2 years on using gene therapy to treat hemophilia in animals and humans. There has been substantial progress in using gene therapy to treat animals with hemophilia. Novel approaches for hemophilia A in mice include expression of Factor VIII in blood cells or platelets derived from ex-vivo transduced hematopoietic stem cells, or in-vivo transfer of transposons expressing Factor VIII into endothelial cells or hepatocytes. Advances in large-animal models include the demonstration that neonatal administration of a retroviral vector expressing canine Factor VIII completely corrected hemophilia A in dogs, and that double-stranded adeno-associated virus vectors resulted in expression of Factor IX that is 28-fold that obtained using single-stranded adeno-associated virus vectors. In humans, one hemophilia B patient achieved 10% of normal activity after liver-directed gene therapy with a single-stranded adeno-associated virus vector expressing human Factor IX. Expression fell at 1 month, however, which was likely due to an immune response to the modified cells. Gene therapy has been successful in a patient with hemophilia B, but expression was unstable due to an immune response. Abrogating immune responses is the next major hurdle for achieving long-lasting gene therapy.

  9. The gene ontology categorizer.

    PubMed

    Joslyn, Cliff A; Mniszewski, Susan M; Fulmer, Andy; Heaton, Gary

    2004-08-04

    The Gene Ontology Categorizer, developed jointly by the Los Alamos National Laboratory and Procter & Gamble Corp., provides a capability for the categorization task in the Gene Ontology (GO): given a list of genes of interest, what are the best nodes of the GO to summarize or categorize that list? The motivating question is from a drug discovery process, where after some gene expression analysis experiment, we wish to understand the overall effect of some cell treatment or condition by identifying 'where' in the GO the differentially expressed genes fall: 'clustered' together in one place? in two places? uniformly spread throughout the GO? 'high', or 'low'? In order to address this need, we view bio-ontologies more as combinatorially structured databases than facilities for logical inference, and draw on the discrete mathematics of finite partially ordered sets (posets) to develop data representation and algorithms appropriate for the GO. In doing so, we have laid the foundations for a general set of methods to address not just the categorization task, but also other tasks (e.g. distances in ontologies and ontology merger and exchange) in both the GO and other bio-ontologies (such as the Enzyme Commission database or the MEdical Subject Headings) cast as hierarchically structured taxonomic knowledge systems.

  10. Hox genes and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Hrycaj, Steven M.; Wellik, Deneen M.

    2016-01-01

    Hox proteins are a deeply conserved group of transcription factors originally defined for their critical roles in governing segmental identity along the antero-posterior (AP) axis in Drosophila. Over the last 30 years, numerous data generated in evolutionarily diverse taxa have clearly shown that changes in the expression patterns of these genes are closely associated with the regionalization of the AP axis, suggesting that Hox genes have played a critical role in the evolution of novel body plans within Bilateria. Despite this deep functional conservation and the importance of these genes in AP patterning, key questions remain regarding many aspects of Hox biology. In this commentary, we highlight recent reports that have provided novel insight into the origins of the mammalian Hox cluster, the role of Hox genes in the generation of a limbless body plan, and a novel putative mechanism in which Hox genes may encode specificity along the AP axis. Although the data discussed here offer a fresh perspective, it is clear that there is still much to learn about Hox biology and the roles it has played in the evolution of the Bilaterian body plan. PMID:27239281

  11. The outer atmospheres of cool M giants: High-dispersion ultraviolet spectra of Rho Per, 2 Cen, and g Her

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, Joel A.; Johnson, Hollis R.

    1986-01-01

    Long duration IUE spectra were obtained to extend coverage of cool giants studied in the ultraviolet at high dispersion to M6. The chromospheric spectra of the three stars, which consist of a profusion of Fe II lines and a few lines of Mg II, Mg I, Al II, C II, C I, Cr II, and Fe I, are remarkably similar, both among themselves and with respect to stars of earlier spectral type. These lines present a picture of a warm chromosphere that is static in the average but may be far from uniform in density and ionization. The Mg II emission lines of 2 Cen show 2 unresolved absorption components, the shorter at the velocity of the local interstellar medium. The longer is blueshifted from the star by 12 to 18 km/sec and must be one of very few observed shell lines uncontaminated by interstellar absorption.

  12. [Gene studies and nobel prize].

    PubMed

    Guo, Jun-Ming; Xiao, Bing-Xiu

    2005-01-01

    Gene is a DNA sequence which can be expressed and produces gene products (protein or RNA). By 2003, there are 51 Nobel Prize owners related to gene studies. Among them, 44 persons are in physiology or medicine (account for 24.72% of total 178), 7 persons are in chemistry (account for 5.69% of total 123). The paper reviews them in following 6 aspects: Drosophlie melanogaster is a good material for gene study; the double helix model of DNA structure provides a hard foundation in gene study; the studies on gene regulation illuminate many functions of gene; genetic central dogma researches created 11 Noble Prize laureates; gene engineering technologies make possible to modify and use genes; and the thorough studies of gene characteristic made us easier to understand many life phenomena.

  13. GeneCards Version 3: the human gene integrator

    PubMed Central

    Safran, Marilyn; Dalah, Irina; Alexander, Justin; Rosen, Naomi; Iny Stein, Tsippi; Shmoish, Michael; Nativ, Noam; Bahir, Iris; Doniger, Tirza; Krug, Hagit; Sirota-Madi, Alexandra; Olender, Tsviya; Golan, Yaron; Stelzer, Gil; Harel, Arye; Lancet, Doron

    2010-01-01

    GeneCards (www.genecards.org) is a comprehensive, authoritative compendium of annotative information about human genes, widely used for nearly 15 years. Its gene-centric content is automatically mined and integrated from over 80 digital sources, resulting in a web-based deep-linked card for each of >73 000 human gene entries, encompassing the following categories: protein coding, pseudogene, RNA gene, genetic locus, cluster and uncategorized. We now introduce GeneCards Version 3, featuring a speedy and sophisticated search engine and a revamped, technologically enabling infrastructure, catering to the expanding needs of biomedical researchers. A key focus is on gene-set analyses, which leverage GeneCards’ unique wealth of combinatorial annotations. These include the GeneALaCart batch query facility, which tabulates user-selected annotations for multiple genes and GeneDecks, which identifies similar genes with shared annotations, and finds set-shared annotations by descriptor enrichment analysis. Such set-centric features address a host of applications, including microarray data analysis, cross-database annotation mapping and gene-disorder associations for drug targeting. We highlight the new Version 3 database architecture, its multi-faceted search engine, and its semi-automated quality assurance system. Data enhancements include an expanded visualization of gene expression patterns in normal and cancer tissues, an integrated alternative splicing pattern display, and augmented multi-source SNPs and pathways sections. GeneCards now provides direct links to gene-related research reagents such as antibodies, recombinant proteins, DNA clones and inhibitory RNAs and features gene-related drugs and compounds lists. We also portray the GeneCards Inferred Functionality Score annotation landscape tool for scoring a gene’s functional information status. Finally, we delineate examples of applications and collaborations that have benefited from the GeneCards suite

  14. FunGene: the functional gene pipeline and repository

    PubMed Central

    Fish, Jordan A.; Chai, Benli; Wang, Qiong; Sun, Yanni; Brown, C. Titus; Tiedje, James M.; Cole, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA genes have become the standard molecular markers for microbial community analysis for good reasons, including universal occurrence in cellular organisms, availability of large databases, and ease of rRNA gene region amplification and analysis. As markers, however, rRNA genes have some significant limitations. The rRNA genes are often present in multiple copies, unlike most protein-coding genes. The slow rate of change in rRNA genes means that multiple species sometimes share identical 16S rRNA gene sequences, while many more species share identical sequences in the short 16S rRNA regions commonly analyzed. In addition, the genes involved in many important processes are not distributed in a phylogenetically coherent manner, potentially due to gene loss or horizontal gene transfer. While rRNA genes remain the most commonly used markers, key genes in ecologically important pathways, e.g., those involved in carbon and nitrogen cycling, can provide important insights into community composition and function not obtainable through rRNA analysis. However, working with ecofunctional gene data requires some tools beyond those required for rRNA analysis. To address this, our Functional Gene Pipeline and Repository (FunGene; http://fungene.cme.msu.edu/) offers databases of many common ecofunctional genes and proteins, as well as integrated tools that allow researchers to browse these collections and choose subsets for further analysis, build phylogenetic trees, test primers and probes for coverage, and download aligned sequences. Additional FunGene tools are specialized to process coding gene amplicon data. For example, FrameBot produces frameshift-corrected protein and DNA sequences from raw reads while finding the most closely related protein reference sequence. These tools can help provide better insight into microbial communities by directly studying key genes involved in important ecological processes. PMID:24101916

  15. Gene therapy prospects--intranasal delivery of therapeutic genes.

    PubMed

    Podolska, Karolina; Stachurska, Anna; Hajdukiewicz, Karolina; Małecki, Maciej

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy is recognized to be a novel method for the treatment of various disorders. Gene therapy strategies involve gene manipulation on broad biological processes responsible for the spreading of diseases. Cancer, monogenic diseases, vascular and infectious diseases are the main targets of gene therapy. In order to obtain valuable experimental and clinical results, sufficient gene transfer methods are required. Therapeutic genes can be administered into target tissues via gene carriers commonly defined as vectors. The retroviral, adenoviral and adeno-associated virus based vectors are most frequently used in the clinic. So far, gene preparations may be administered directly into target organs or by intravenous, intramuscular, intratumor or intranasal injections. It is common knowledge that the number of gene therapy clinical trials has rapidly increased. However, some limitations such as transfection efficiency and stable and long-term gene expression are still not resolved. Consequently, great effort is focused on the evaluation of new strategies of gene delivery. There are many expectations associated with intranasal delivery of gene preparations for the treatment of diseases. Intranasal delivery of therapeutic genes is regarded as one of the most promising forms of pulmonary gene therapy research. Gene therapy based on inhalation of gene preparations offers an alternative way for the treatment of patients suffering from such lung diseases as cystic fibrosis, alpha-1-antitrypsin defect, or cancer. Experimental and first clinical trials based on plasmid vectors or recombinant viruses have revealed that gene preparations can effectively deliver therapeutic or marker genes to the cells of the respiratory tract. The noninvasive intranasal delivery of gene preparations or conventional drugs seems to be very encouraging, although basic scientific research still has to continue.

  16. Down-weighting overlapping genes improves gene set analysis.

    PubMed

    Tarca, Adi Laurentiu; Draghici, Sorin; Bhatti, Gaurav; Romero, Roberto

    2012-06-19

    The identification of gene sets that are significantly impacted in a given condition based on microarray data is a crucial step in current life science research. Most gene set analysis methods treat genes equally, regardless how specific they are to a given gene set. In this work we propose a new gene set analysis method that computes a gene set score as the mean of absolute values of weighted moderated gene t-scores. The gene weights are designed to emphasize the