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Sample records for genes recombinant antibody

  1. Recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Fortunato; D'Angelo, Sara; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Naranjo, Leslie; Tian, Hongzhao; Gräslund, Susanne; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Hraber, Peter; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Saragozza, Silvia; Sblattero, Daniele; Kiss, Csaba; Bradbury, Andrew R M

    2015-01-01

    Only a small fraction of the antibodies in a traditional polyclonal antibody mixture recognize the target of interest, frequently resulting in undesirable polyreactivity. Here, we show that high-quality recombinant polyclonals, in which hundreds of different antibodies are all directed toward a target of interest, can be easily generated in vitro by combining phage and yeast display. We show that, unlike traditional polyclonals, which are limited resources, recombinant polyclonal antibodies can be amplified over one hundred million-fold without losing representation or functionality. Our protocol was tested on 9 different targets to demonstrate how the strategy allows the selective amplification of antibodies directed toward desirable target specific epitopes, such as those found in one protein but not a closely related one, and the elimination of antibodies recognizing common epitopes, without significant loss of diversity. These recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies are usable in different assays, and can be generated in high throughput. This approach could potentially be used to develop highly specific recombinant renewable antibodies against all human gene products.

  2. Selection of Recombinant Human Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Tomszak, Florian; Weber, Susanne; Zantow, Jonas; Schirrmann, Thomas; Hust, Michael; Frenzel, André

    2016-01-01

    Since the development of therapeutic antibodies the demand of recombinant human antibodies is steadily increasing. Traditionally, therapeutic antibodies were generated by immunization of rat or mice, the generation of hybridoma clones, cloning of the antibody genes and subsequent humanization and engineering of the lead candidates. In the last few years, techniques were developed that use transgenic animals with a human antibody gene repertoire. Here, modern recombinant DNA technologies can be combined with well established immunization and hybridoma technologies to generate already affinity maturated human antibodies. An alternative are in vitro technologies which enabled the generation of fully human antibodies from antibody gene libraries that even exceed the human antibody repertoire. Specific antibodies can be isolated from these libraries in a very short time and therefore reduce the development time of an antibody drug at a very early stage.In this review, we describe different technologies that are currently used for the in vitro and in vivo generation of human antibodies.

  3. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  4. Immune deficiency enhances expression of recombinant human antibody in mice after nonviral in vivo gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Kitaguchi, Kohji; Toda, Mikako; Takekoshi, Masataka; Maeda, Fumiko; Muramatsu, Tatsuo; Murai, Atsushi

    2005-10-01

    A cDNA encoding human antibody against hepatitis B virus was expressed in normal and severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) mice to clarify whether or not host immune status affects circulating levels of the recombinant human antibody (RhAb) after nonviral in vivo gene transfer. For transferring genes, either electroporation (EP) or hydrodynamics-based transfection (HD) was employed. The former was applied to the leg muscle to express the gene, while the latter primarily targeted foreign gene expression in the liver. The expressed RhAb was secreted into the blood circulation, and its existence was assayed by ELISA. Prior to the investigation of host immune status, suitable forms of plasmid expression vectors and types of electrodes were determined in normal mice. Results showed that the vector encoding both the light and heavy chains driven by the CMV promoter had the highest plasma RhAb concentrations, and a pair of pincette-type electrodes conferred the best performance. In both EP and HD, the SCID state showed an increased and prolonged RhAb production in the blood circulation due probably to suppressed recognition of RhAb as a foreign protein to the host animal. The difference in gene transfer methods demonstrated a characteristic pattern: an early and sharp rise followed by a relatively rapid decrease in HD, in contrast to a gradual rise followed by a plateau level maintained in EP. As a result, with the same amount of gene transferred, the plasma RhAb concentrations for the first 7 or 8 weeks were higher in HD than EP, while the reverse was true for the latter period. Multiple gene transfer contributed to maintaining and prolonging high RhAb concentrations in plasma by both methods with similar characteristic patterns accompanying the respective gene transfer method. These results suggest the importance of host immunological potency for maintaining plasma RhAb concentrations if these gene transfer technologies are used for clinical and therapeutic purposes.

  5. Expression of recombinant antibodies.

    PubMed

    Frenzel, André; Hust, Michael; Schirrmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant antibodies are highly specific detection probes in research, diagnostics, and have emerged over the last two decades as the fastest growing class of therapeutic proteins. Antibody generation has been dramatically accelerated by in vitro selection systems, particularly phage display. An increasing variety of recombinant production systems have been developed, ranging from Gram-negative and positive bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi, insect cell lines, mammalian cells to transgenic plants and animals. Currently, almost all therapeutic antibodies are still produced in mammalian cell lines in order to reduce the risk of immunogenicity due to altered, non-human glycosylation patterns. However, recent developments of glycosylation-engineered yeast, insect cell lines, and transgenic plants are promising to obtain antibodies with "human-like" post-translational modifications. Furthermore, smaller antibody fragments including bispecific antibodies without any glycosylation are successfully produced in bacteria and have advanced to clinical testing. The first therapeutic antibody products from a non-mammalian source can be expected in coming next years. In this review, we focus on current antibody production systems including their usability for different applications.

  6. Expression of Recombinant Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Frenzel, André; Hust, Michael; Schirrmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant antibodies are highly specific detection probes in research, diagnostics, and have emerged over the last two decades as the fastest growing class of therapeutic proteins. Antibody generation has been dramatically accelerated by in vitro selection systems, particularly phage display. An increasing variety of recombinant production systems have been developed, ranging from Gram-negative and positive bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi, insect cell lines, mammalian cells to transgenic plants and animals. Currently, almost all therapeutic antibodies are still produced in mammalian cell lines in order to reduce the risk of immunogenicity due to altered, non-human glycosylation patterns. However, recent developments of glycosylation-engineered yeast, insect cell lines, and transgenic plants are promising to obtain antibodies with “human-like” post-translational modifications. Furthermore, smaller antibody fragments including bispecific antibodies without any glycosylation are successfully produced in bacteria and have advanced to clinical testing. The first therapeutic antibody products from a non-mammalian source can be expected in coming next years. In this review, we focus on current antibody production systems including their usability for different applications. PMID:23908655

  7. Generation of recombinant antibodies and means for increasing their affinity.

    PubMed

    Altshuler, E P; Serebryanaya, D V; Katrukha, A G

    2010-12-01

    Highly specific interaction with foreign molecules is a unique feature of antibodies. Since 1975, when Keller and Milstein proposed the method of hybridoma technology and prepared mouse monoclonal antibodies, many antibodies specific to various antigens have been obtained. Recent development of methods for preparation of recombinant DNA libraries and in silico bioinformatics approaches for protein structure analysis makes possible antibody preparation using gene engineering approaches. The development of gene engineering methods allowed creating recombinant antibodies and improving characteristics of existing antibodies; this significantly extends the applicability of antibodies. By modifying biochemical and immunochemical properties of antibodies by changing their amino acid sequences it is possible to create antibodies with properties optimal for certain tasks. For example, application of recombinant technologies resulted in antibody preparation of high affinity significantly exceeding the initial affinity of natural antibodies. In this review we summarize information about the structure, modes of preparation, and application of recombinant antibodies and their fragments and also consider the main approaches used to increase antibody affinity.

  8. Recombinant antibodies and their use in biosensors.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiangqun; Shen, Zhihong; Mernaugh, Ray

    2012-04-01

    Inexpensive, noninvasive immunoassays can be used to quickly detect disease in humans. Immunoassay sensitivity and specificity are decidedly dependent upon high-affinity, antigen-specific antibodies. Antibodies are produced biologically. As such, antibody quality and suitability for use in immunoassays cannot be readily determined or controlled by human intervention. However, the process through which high-quality antibodies can be obtained has been shortened and streamlined by use of genetic engineering and recombinant antibody techniques. Antibodies that traditionally take several months or more to produce when animals are used can now be developed in a few weeks as recombinant antibodies produced in bacteria, yeast, or other cell types. Typically most immunoassays use two or more antibodies or antibody fragments to detect antigens that are indicators of disease. However, a label-free biosensor, for example, a quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) needs one antibody only. As such, the cost and time needed to design and develop an immunoassay can be substantially reduced if recombinant antibodies and biosensors are used rather than traditional antibody and assay (e.g. enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay, ELISA) methods. Unlike traditional antibodies, recombinant antibodies can be genetically engineered to self-assemble on biosensor surfaces, at high density, and correctly oriented to enhance antigen-binding activity and to increase assay sensitivity, specificity, and stability. Additionally, biosensor surface chemistry and physical and electronic properties can be modified to further increase immunoassay performance above and beyond that obtained by use of traditional methods. This review describes some of the techniques investigators have used to develop highly specific and sensitive, recombinant antibody-based biosensors for detection of antigens in simple or complex biological samples.

  9. Developing recombinant antibodies for biomarker detection

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, Cheryl L.; Fischer, Christopher J.; Pefaur, Noah B.; Miller, Keith D.; Kagen, Jacob; Srivastava, Sudhir; Rodland, Karin D.

    2010-10-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have an essential role in biomarker validation and diagnostic assays. A barrier to pursuing these applications is the reliance on immunization and hybridomas to produce mAbs, which is time-consuming and may not yield the desired mAb. We recommend a process flow for affinity reagent production that utilizes combinatorial protein display systems (eg, yeast surface display or phage display) rather than hybridomas. These systems link a selectable phenotype-binding conferred by an antibody fragment-with a means for recovering the encoding gene. Recombinant libraries obtained from immunizations can produce high-affinity antibodies (<10 nM) more quickly than other methods. Non-immune libraries provide an alternate route when immunizations are not possible, or when suitable mAbs are not recovered from an immune library. Directed molecular evolution (DME) is an integral part of optimizing mAbs obtained from combinatorial protein display, but can also be used on hybridoma-derived mAbs. Variants can easily be obtained and screened to increase the affinity of the parent mAb (affinity maturation). We discuss examples where DME has been used to tailor affinity reagents to specific applications. Combinatorial protein display also provides an accessible method for identifying antibody pairs, which are necessary for sandwich-type diagnostic assays.

  10. Advances in recombinant antibody manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Kunert, Renate; Reinhart, David

    2016-04-01

    Since the first use of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells for recombinant protein expression, production processes have steadily improved through numerous advances. In this review, we have highlighted several key milestones that have contributed to the success of CHO cells from the beginning of their use for monoclonal antibody (mAb) expression until today. The main factors influencing the yield of a production process are the time to accumulate a desired amount of biomass, the process duration, and the specific productivity. By comparing maximum cell densities and specific growth rates of various expression systems, we have emphasized the limiting parameters of different cellular systems and comprehensively described scientific approaches and techniques to improve host cell lines. Besides the quantitative evaluation of current systems, the quality-determining properties of a host cell line, namely post-translational modifications, were analyzed and compared to naturally occurring polyclonal immunoglobulin fractions from human plasma. In summary, numerous different expression systems for mAbs are available and also under scientific investigation. However, CHO cells are the most frequently investigated cell lines and remain the workhorse for mAb production until today.

  11. Modern affinity reagents: Recombinant antibodies and aptamers.

    PubMed

    Groff, Katherine; Brown, Jeffrey; Clippinger, Amy J

    2015-12-01

    Affinity reagents are essential tools in both basic and applied research; however, there is a growing concern about the reproducibility of animal-derived monoclonal antibodies. The need for higher quality affinity reagents has prompted the development of methods that provide scientific, economic, and time-saving advantages and do not require the use of animals. This review describes two types of affinity reagents, recombinant antibodies and aptamers, which are non-animal technologies that can replace the use of animal-derived monoclonal antibodies. Recombinant antibodies are protein-based reagents, while aptamers are nucleic-acid-based. In light of the scientific advantages of these technologies, this review also discusses ways to gain momentum in the use of modern affinity reagents, including an update to the 1999 National Academy of Sciences monoclonal antibody production report and federal incentives for recombinant antibody and aptamer efforts. In the long-term, these efforts have the potential to improve the overall quality and decrease the cost of scientific research.

  12. Human genetic variants of homologous recombination repair genes first found to be associated with Epstein-Barr virus antibody titers in healthy Cantonese.

    PubMed

    Shen, Guo-Ping; Pan, Qing-Hua; Hong, Ming-Huang; Qin, Hai-De; Xu, Ya-Fei; Chen, Li-Zhen; Feng, Qi-Sheng; Jorgensen, Timothy J; Shugart, Yin Yao; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Jia, Wei-Hua

    2011-09-15

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is a major risk factor for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Despite high prevalence of infection among the general population worldwide, only a small proportion of infected individuals presents with seropositivity for EBV-specific IgA antibodies. This seropositive subgroup of EBV carriers has an elevated cumulative risk for NPC during their lifetime. Previous studies reported that the host homologous recombination repair (HRR) system participates in EBV lytic replication, suggesting a potential mechanism to influence EBV reactivation status and thus seropositivity. To investigate whether genetic variants of HRR genes are associated with the serostatus in a healthy population, we investigated the association between seropositivity for anti-VCA-IgA and 156 tagging SNPs in 35 genes connected with HRR in an observational study among 755 healthy Cantonese speakers in southern China. Six variant alleles of MDC1, RAD54L, TP53BP1, RPA1, LIG3 and RFC1 exhibited associations with seropositivity (p(trend) from 0.0085 to 0.00027). Our study provides evidence that genetic variation within the HRR might affect an individual's propensity for EBV seropositive status of anti-VCA IgA antibody.

  13. Ethanol precipitation for purification of recombinant antibodies.

    PubMed

    Tscheliessnig, Anne; Satzer, Peter; Hammerschmidt, Nikolaus; Schulz, Henk; Helk, Bernhard; Jungbauer, Alois

    2014-10-20

    Currently, the golden standard for the purification of recombinant humanized antibodies (rhAbs) from CHO cell culture is protein A chromatography. However, due to increasing rhAbs titers alternative methods have come into focus. A new strategy for purification of recombinant human antibodies from CHO cell culture supernatant based on cold ethanol precipitation (CEP) and CaCl2 precipitation has been developed. This method is based on the cold ethanol precipitation, the process used for purification of antibodies and other components from blood plasma. We proof the applicability of the developed process for four different antibodies resulting in similar yield and purity as a protein A chromatography based process. This process can be further improved using an anion-exchange chromatography in flowthrough mode e.g. a monolith as last step so that residual host cell protein is reduced to a minimum. Beside the ethanol based process, our data also suggest that ethanol could be replaced with methanol or isopropanol. The process is suited for continuous operation.

  14. Hybridization-based antibody cDNA recovery for the production of recombinant antibodies identified by repertoire sequencing.

    PubMed

    Valdés-Alemán, Javier; Téllez-Sosa, Juan; Ovilla-Muñoz, Marbella; Godoy-Lozano, Elizabeth; Velázquez-Ramírez, Daniel; Valdovinos-Torres, Humberto; Gómez-Barreto, Rosa E; Martinez-Barnetche, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing of the antibody repertoire is enabling a thorough analysis of B cell diversity and clonal selection, which may improve the novel antibody discovery process. Theoretically, an adequate bioinformatic analysis could allow identification of candidate antigen-specific antibodies, requiring their recombinant production for experimental validation of their specificity. Gene synthesis is commonly used for the generation of recombinant antibodies identified in silico. Novel strategies that bypass gene synthesis could offer more accessible antibody identification and validation alternatives. We developed a hybridization-based recovery strategy that targets the complementarity-determining region 3 (CDRH3) for the enrichment of cDNA of candidate antigen-specific antibody sequences. Ten clonal groups of interest were identified through bioinformatic analysis of the heavy chain antibody repertoire of mice immunized with hen egg white lysozyme (HEL). cDNA from eight of the targeted clonal groups was recovered efficiently, leading to the generation of recombinant antibodies. One representative heavy chain sequence from each clonal group recovered was paired with previously reported anti-HEL light chains to generate full antibodies, later tested for HEL-binding capacity. The recovery process proposed represents a simple and scalable molecular strategy that could enhance antibody identification and specificity assessment, enabling a more cost-efficient generation of recombinant antibodies.

  15. Experimental and in silico modelling analyses of the gene expression pathway for recombinant antibody and by-product production in NS0 cell lines.

    PubMed

    Mead, Emma J; Chiverton, Lesley M; Spurgeon, Sarah K; Martin, Elaine B; Montague, Gary A; Smales, C Mark; von der Haar, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are commercially important, high value biotherapeutic drugs used in the treatment of a variety of diseases. These complex molecules consist of two heavy chain and two light chain polypeptides covalently linked by disulphide bonds. They are usually expressed as recombinant proteins from cultured mammalian cells, which are capable of correctly modifying, folding and assembling the polypeptide chains into the native quaternary structure. Such recombinant cell lines often vary in the amounts of product produced and in the heterogeneity of the secreted products. The biological mechanisms of this variation are not fully defined. Here we have utilised experimental and modelling strategies to characterise and define the biology underpinning product heterogeneity in cell lines exhibiting varying antibody expression levels, and then experimentally validated these models. In undertaking these studies we applied and validated biochemical (rate-constant based) and engineering (nonlinear) models of antibody expression to experimental data from four NS0 cell lines with different IgG4 secretion rates. The models predict that export of the full antibody and its fragments are intrinsically linked, and cannot therefore be manipulated individually at the level of the secretory machinery. Instead, the models highlight strategies for the manipulation at the precursor species level to increase recombinant protein yields in both high and low producing cell lines. The models also highlight cell line specific limitations in the antibody expression pathway.

  16. Experimental and In Silico Modelling Analyses of the Gene Expression Pathway for Recombinant Antibody and By-Product Production in NS0 Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Mead, Emma J.; Chiverton, Lesley M.; Spurgeon, Sarah K.; Martin, Elaine B.; Montague, Gary A.; Smales, C. Mark; von der Haar, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are commercially important, high value biotherapeutic drugs used in the treatment of a variety of diseases. These complex molecules consist of two heavy chain and two light chain polypeptides covalently linked by disulphide bonds. They are usually expressed as recombinant proteins from cultured mammalian cells, which are capable of correctly modifying, folding and assembling the polypeptide chains into the native quaternary structure. Such recombinant cell lines often vary in the amounts of product produced and in the heterogeneity of the secreted products. The biological mechanisms of this variation are not fully defined. Here we have utilised experimental and modelling strategies to characterise and define the biology underpinning product heterogeneity in cell lines exhibiting varying antibody expression levels, and then experimentally validated these models. In undertaking these studies we applied and validated biochemical (rate-constant based) and engineering (nonlinear) models of antibody expression to experimental data from four NS0 cell lines with different IgG4 secretion rates. The models predict that export of the full antibody and its fragments are intrinsically linked, and cannot therefore be manipulated individually at the level of the secretory machinery. Instead, the models highlight strategies for the manipulation at the precursor species level to increase recombinant protein yields in both high and low producing cell lines. The models also highlight cell line specific limitations in the antibody expression pathway. PMID:23071804

  17. Expression of recombinant antibody (single chain antibody fragment) in transgenic plant Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi.

    PubMed

    Dobhal, S; Chaudhary, V K; Singh, A; Pandey, D; Kumar, A; Agrawal, S

    2013-12-01

    Plants offer an alternative inexpensive and convenient technology for large scale production of recombinant proteins especially recombinant antibodies (plantibodies). In this paper, we describe the expression of a model single chain antibody fragment (B6scFv) in transgenic tobacco. Four different gene constructs of B6scFv with different target signals for expression in different compartments of a tobacco plant cell with and without endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention signal were used. Agrobacterium mediated plant transformation of B6scFv gene was performed with tobacco leaf explants and the gene in regenerated plants was detected using histochemical GUS assay and PCR. The expression of B6scFv gene was detected by western blotting and the recombinant protein was purified from putative transgenic tobacco plants using metal affinity chromatography. The expression level of recombinant protein was determined by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The highest accumulation of protein was found up to 3.28 % of the total soluble protein (TSP) in plants expressing B6scFv 1003 targeted to the ER, and subsequently expression of 2.9 % of TSP in plants expressing B6scFv 1004 (with target to apoplast with ER retention signal). In contrast, lower expression of 0.78 and 0.58 % of TSP was found in plants expressing antibody fragment in cytosol and apoplast, without ER retention signal. The described method/system could be used in the future for diverse applications including expression of other recombinant molecules in plants for immunomodulation, obtaining pathogen resistance against plant pathogens, altering metabolic pathways and also for the expression of different antibodies of therapeutic and diagnostic uses.

  18. High level transient production of recombinant antibodies and antibody fusion proteins in HEK293 cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The demand of monospecific high affinity binding reagents, particularly monoclonal antibodies, has been steadily increasing over the last years. Enhanced throughput of antibody generation has been addressed by optimizing in vitro selection using phage display which moved the major bottleneck to the production and purification of recombinant antibodies in an end-user friendly format. Single chain (sc)Fv antibody fragments require additional tags for detection and are not as suitable as immunoglobulins (Ig)G in many immunoassays. In contrast, the bivalent scFv-Fc antibody format shares many properties with IgG and has a very high application compatibility. Results In this study transient expression of scFv-Fc antibodies in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells was optimized. Production levels of 10-20 mg/L scFv-Fc antibody were achieved in adherent HEK293T cells. Employment of HEK293-6E suspension cells expressing a truncated variant of the Epstein Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen (EBNA) 1 in combination with production under serum free conditions increased the volumetric yield up to 10-fold to more than 140 mg/L scFv-Fc antibody. After vector optimization and process optimization the yield of an scFv-Fc antibody and a cytotoxic antibody-RNase fusion protein further increased 3-4-fold to more than 450 mg/L. Finally, an entirely new mammalian expression vector was constructed for single step in frame cloning of scFv genes from antibody phage display libraries. Transient expression of more than 20 different scFv-Fc antibodies resulted in volumetric yields of up to 600 mg/L and 400 mg/L in average. Conclusion Transient production of recombinant scFv-Fc antibodies in HEK293-6E in combination with optimized vectors and fed batch shake flasks cultivation is efficient and robust, and integrates well into a high-throughput recombinant antibody generation pipeline. PMID:23802841

  19. [Recombinant Antibodies and Their Employment in Cancer Therapy].

    PubMed

    Růčková, E; Müller, P; Vojtěšek, B

    2015-01-01

    Development of recombinant therapeutic antibodies is recently one of the fastest growing disciplines of applied biomedical research. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies are increasingly applied in biological therapy of many serious human diseases and are currently an irreplaceable part of a comprehensive cancer therapy. First mouse therapeutic antibodies had only limited applicability due to the strong immune response; however, technological advances enabled engineering of antibodies with increased specificity and efficacy, and on the other hand with reduced adverse effects due to lower antigenicity. This review provides a summary of knowledge about recombinant therapeutic antibodies, their mechanism of action and approaches how to improve their efficacy.

  20. Targeted In Vivo Inhibition of Specific Protein–Protein Interactions Using Recombinant Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Zábrady, Matej; Hrdinová, Vendula; Müller, Bruno; Conrad, Udo; Hejátko, Jan; Janda, Lubomír

    2014-01-01

    With the growing availability of genomic sequence information, there is an increasing need for gene function analysis. Antibody-mediated “silencing” represents an intriguing alternative for the precise inhibition of a particular function of biomolecules. Here, we describe a method for selecting recombinant antibodies with a specific purpose in mind, which is to inhibit intrinsic protein–protein interactions in the cytosol of plant cells. Experimental procedures were designed for conveniently evaluating desired properties of recombinant antibodies in consecutive steps. Our selection method was successfully used to develop a recombinant antibody inhibiting the interaction of ARABIDOPSIS HISTIDINE PHOSPHOTRANSFER PROTEIN 3 with such of its upstream interaction partners as the receiver domain of CYTOKININ INDEPENDENT HISTIDINE KINASE 1. The specific down-regulation of the cytokinin signaling pathway in vivo demonstrates the validity of our approach. This selection method can serve as a prototype for developing unique recombinant antibodies able to interfere with virtually any biomolecule in the living cell. PMID:25299686

  1. A global RNA-seq-driven analysis of CHO host and production cell lines reveals distinct differential expression patterns of genes contributing to recombinant antibody glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Könitzer, Jennifer D; Müller, Markus M; Leparc, Germán; Pauers, Martin; Bechmann, Jan; Schulz, Patrick; Schaub, Jochen; Enenkel, Barbara; Hildebrandt, Tobias; Hampel, Martin; Tolstrup, Anne B

    2015-09-01

    Boehringer Ingelheim uses two CHO-DG44 lines for manufacturing biotherapeutics, BI-HEX-1 and BI-HEX-2, which produce distinct cell type-specific antibody glycosylation patterns. A recently established CHO-K1 descended host, BI-HEX-K1, generates antibodies with glycosylation profiles differing from CHO-DG44. Manufacturing process development is significantly influenced by these unique profiles. To investigate the underlying glycosylation related gene expression, we leveraged our CHO host and production cell RNA-seqtranscriptomics and product quality database together with the CHO-K1 genome. We observed that each BI-HEX host and antibody producing cell line has a unique gene expression fingerprint. CHO-DG44 cells only transcribe Fut10, Gfpt2 and ST8Sia6 when expressing antibodies. BI-HEX-K1 cells express ST8Sia6 at host cell level. We detected a link between BI-HEX-1/BI-HEX-2 antibody galactosylation and mannosylation and the gene expression of the B4galt gene family and genes controlling mannose processing. Furthermore, we found major differences between the CHO-DG44 and CHO-K1 lineages in the expression of sialyl transferases and enzymes synthesizing sialic acid precursors, providing a rationale for the lack of immunogenic NeuGc/NGNA synthesis in CHO. Our study highlights the value of systems biotechnology to understand glycoprotein synthesis and product glycoprofiles. Such data improve future production clone selection and process development strategies for better steering of biotherapeutic product quality.

  2. Schistosoma japonicum: screening of cercariae cDNA library by specific single-chain antibody against SIEA26-28 ku and immunization experiment of the recombinant plasmids containing the selected genes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Dong-mei; Wang, Shi-ping; He, Zhuo; Fung, Ming-chiu; Liu, Ming-she; Yu, Lu-xin; Chen, Xiu-chun

    2010-06-01

    To obtain the gene encoding SIEA26-28 ku, which has been proven to be a potential anti-schistosomiasis vaccine candidate, screening Schistosoma japonicum (Sj) cercariae cDNA library with soluble specific single-chain antibody (SIEA26-28 ku-scFv) was performed. A large amount of specific single-chain antibody was harvested through construction of recombinant expression vector pET32a/scFv. The protein was purified and characterized. By using this protein (PET32a-scFv) as a probe, S. japonicum cercariae cDNA library was screened. Two strong positive clones were selected, and their eukaryotic recombinant plasmids were constructed. These genes were named as S. japonicum ribosomal protein S4 (SjRPS4) and S. japonicum ribosomal protein L7 (SjRPL7), respectively. Experiments of mice showed that both SjRPS4 and SjRPL7 DNA vaccines could induce significant immunoprotection. Result of these experiments further proved that the specific single-chain antibody is a very valuable tool in screening of cDNA library to get the corresponding molecules.

  3. Recombinant Mouse-Human Chimeric Antibodies as Calibrators in Immunoassays That Measure Antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Hackett, John; Hoff-Velk, Jane; Golden, Alan; Brashear, Jeff; Robinson, John; Rapp, Margaret; Klass, Michael; Ostrow, David H.; Mandecki, Wlodek

    1998-01-01

    In the present study, we examined the feasibility of using recombinant antibodies containing murine variable regions and human constant regions as calibrators or controls in immunoassays. As a model system, we chose the Abbott IMx Toxo immunoglobulin M (IgM) and Toxo IgG assays designed to detect antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii. Two mouse monoclonal antibodies were selected based on their reactivity to the T. gondii antigens P30 and P66. Heavy- and light-chain variable-region genes were cloned from both hybridomas and transferred into immunoglobulin expression vectors containing human kappa and IgG1 or IgM constant regions. The constructs were stably transfected into Sp2/0-Ag14 cells. In the IMx Toxo IgG assay, immunoreactivity of the anti-P30 chimeric IgG1 antibody paralleled that of the positive human plasma-derived assay calibrators. Signal generated with the anti-P66 chimeric IgG1 antibody was observed to plateau below the maximal reactivity observed for the assay calibrator. Examination of the IgM chimeric antibodies in the IMx Toxo IgM assay revealed that both the anti-P30 and anti-P66 antibodies matched the assay index calibrator manufactured with human Toxo IgM-positive plasma. When evaluated with patient samples, the correlation between results obtained with the chimeric antibody calibrators and the positive human plasma calibrators was ≥0.985. These data demonstrate that chimeric mouse-human antibodies are a viable alternative to high-titer positive human plasma for the manufacture of calibrators and controls for diagnostic assays. PMID:9574691

  4. Single-batch production of recombinant human polyclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Lars S; Baer, Alexandra; Müller, Christian; Gregersen, Kristian; Mønster, Nina T; Rasmussen, Søren K; Weilguny, Dietmar; Tolstrup, Anne B

    2010-07-01

    We have previously described the development and implementation of a strategy for production of recombinant polyclonal antibodies (rpAb) in single batches employing CHO cells generated by site-specific integration, the Sympress I technology. The Sympress I technology is implemented at industrial scale, supporting a phase II clinical development program. Production of recombinant proteins by site-specific integration, which is based on incorporation of a single copy of the gene of interest, makes the Sympress I technology best suited to support niche indications. To improve titers while maintaining a cost-efficient, highly reproducible single-batch manufacturing mode, we have evaluated a number of different approaches. The most successful results were obtained using random integration in a new producer cell termed ECHO, a CHO DG44 cell derivative engineered for improved productivity at Symphogen. This new expression process is termed the Sympress II technology. Here we describe proof-of-principle data demonstrating the feasibility of the Sympress II technology for single-batch rpAb manufacturing using two model systems each composed of six target-specific antibodies. The compositional stability and the batch-to-batch reproducibility of rpAb produced by the ECHO cells were at least as good as observed previously using site-specific integration technology. Furthermore, the new process had a significant titer increase.

  5. Back to the future: recombinant polyclonal antibody therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xian-zhe; Coljee, Vincent W.; Maynard, Jennifer A.

    2013-01-01

    Antibody therapeutics are one of the fastest growing classes of pharmaceuticals, with an annual US market over $20 billion, developed to treat a variety of diseases including cancer, auto-immune and infectious diseases. Most are currently administered as a single molecule to treat a single disease, however there is mounting evidence that cocktails of multiple antibodies, each with a unique binding specificity and protective mechanism, may improve clinical efficacy. Here, we review progress in the development of oligoclonal combinations of antibodies to treat disease, focusing on identification of synergistic antibodies. We then discuss the application of modern antibody engineering technologies to produce highly potent antibody preparations, including oligoclonal antibody cocktails and truly recombinant polyclonal antibodies. Specific examples illustrating the synergy conferred by multiple antibodies will be provided for diseases caused by botulinum toxin, cancer and immune thrombocytopenia. The bioprocessing and regulatory options for these preparations will be discussed. PMID:24443710

  6. Frequency and genetic characterization of V(DD)J recombinants in the human peripheral blood antibody repertoire.

    PubMed

    Briney, Bryan S; Willis, Jordan R; Hicar, Mark D; Thomas, James W; Crowe, James E

    2012-09-01

    Antibody heavy-chain recombination that results in the incorporation of multiple diversity (D) genes, although uncommon, contributes substantially to the diversity of the human antibody repertoire. Such recombination allows the generation of heavy chain complementarity determining region 3 (HCDR3) regions of extreme length and enables junctional regions that, because of the nucleotide bias of N-addition regions, are difficult to produce through normal V(D)J recombination. Although this non-classical recombination process has been observed infrequently, comprehensive analysis of the frequency and genetic characteristics of such events in the human peripheral blood antibody repertoire has not been possible because of the rarity of such recombinants and the limitations of traditional sequencing technologies. Here, through the use of high-throughput sequencing of the normal human peripheral blood antibody repertoire, we analysed the frequency and genetic characteristics of V(DD)J recombinants. We found that these recombinations were present in approximately 1 in 800 circulating B cells, and that the frequency was severely reduced in memory cell subsets. We also found that V(DD)J recombination can occur across the spectrum of diversity genes, indicating that virtually all recombination signal sequences that flank diversity genes are amenable to V(DD)J recombination. Finally, we observed a repertoire bias in the diversity gene repertoire at the upstream (5') position, and discovered that this bias was primarily attributable to the order of diversity genes in the genomic locus.

  7. Construction of human antibody gene libraries and selection of antibodies by phage display.

    PubMed

    Frenzel, André; Kügler, Jonas; Wilke, Sonja; Schirrmann, Thomas; Hust, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Antibody phage display is the most commonly used in vitro selection technology and has yielded thousands of useful antibodies for research, diagnostics, and therapy.The prerequisite for successful generation and development of human recombinant antibodies using phage display is the construction of a high-quality antibody gene library. Here, we describe the methods for the construction of human immune and naive scFv gene libraries.The success also depends on the panning strategy for the selection of binders from these libraries. In this article, we describe a panning strategy that is high-throughput compatible and allows parallel selection in microtiter plates.

  8. Progress towards recombinant anti-infective antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Jennifer C.; Sutherland, Jamie N.; Maynard, Jennifer A.

    2009-01-01

    The global market for monoclonal antibody therapeutics reached a total of $11.2 billion in 2004, with an impressive 42% growth rate over the previous five years and is expected to reach ~$34 billion by 2010. Coupled with this growth are stream-lined product development, production scale-up and regulatory approval processes for the highly conserved antibody structure. While only one of the 21 current FDA-approved antibodies, and one of the 38 products in advanced clinical trials target infectious diseases, there is increasing academic, government and commercial interest in this area. Synagis, an antibody neutralizing respiratory syncitial virus (RSV), garnered impressive sales of $1.1 billion in 2006 in spite of its high cost and undocumented effects on viral titres in human patients. The success of anti-RSV passive immunization has motivated the continued development of anti-infectives to treat a number of other infectious diseases, including those mediated by viruses, toxins and bacterial/fungal cells. Concurrently, advances in antibody technology suggest that cocktails of several monoclonal antibodies with unique epitope specificity or single monoclonal antibodies with broad serotype specificity may be the most successful format. Recent patents and patent applications in these areas will be discussed as predictors of future anti-infective therapeutics. PMID:19149692

  9. The Structure of Natural and Recombinant Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hui; O'Kennedy, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Immunoglobulins (Ig) isotypes A, D, E, G, and M are glycoproteins which are mainly composed of a "Y"-shaped Ig monomer (~150 kDa), consisting of two light and two heavy chains. Both light and heavy chains contain variable (N-terminal) and constant regions (C-terminal). Each light chain consists of one variable domain and one constant domain, whereas each heavy chain has one variable domain and three constant domains. However, heavy-chain antibodies consisting of only heavy chains and lacking the light chains are found in camelids and cartilaginous fishes. Unlike other immunoglobulins, the heavy chain of avian antibody IgY (~180 kDa) consists of four constant domains. The single-chain variable fragment (scFv; ~25 kDa) of an antibody contains variable regions of antibody heavy and light chains. The fragment antigen-binding (Fab; ~50 kDa) region has the full antibody light chain but the heavy chain is composed of a variable region and one constant domain.

  10. Recombinant genetic libraries and human monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Adams, Jarrett J; Nelson, Bryce; Sidhu, Sachdev S

    2014-01-01

    In order to comprehensively manipulate the human proteome we require a vast repertoire of pharmacological reagents. To address these needs we have developed repertoires of synthetic antibodies by phage display, where diversified oligonucleotides are used to modify the complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) of a human antigen-binding fragment (Fab) scaffold. As diversity is produced outside the confines of the mammalian immune system, synthetic antibody libraries allow us to bypass several limitations of hybridoma technology while improving the experimental parameters under which pharmacological reagents are produced. Here we describe the methodologies used to produce synthetic antibody libraries from a single human framework with diversity restricted to four CDRs. These synthetic repertoires can be extremely functional as they produce highly selective, high affinity Fabs to the majority of soluble human antigens. Finally we describe selection methodologies that allow us to overcome immuno-dominance in our selections to target a variety of epitopes per antigen. Together these methodologies allow us to produce human monoclonal antibodies to manipulate the human proteome.

  11. Three Recombinant Engineered Antibodies against Recombinant Tags with High Affinity and Specificity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongyu; Shen, Ao; Xiang, Yang K; Corey, David P

    2016-01-01

    We describe three recombinant engineered antibodies against three recombinant epitope tags, constructed with divalent binding arms to recognize divalent epitopes and so achieve high affinity and specificity. In two versions, an epitope is inserted in tandem into a protein of interest, and a homodimeric antibody is constructed by fusing a high-affinity epitope-binding domain to a human or mouse Fc domain. In a third, a heterodimeric antibody is constructed by fusing two different epitope-binding domains which target two different binding sites in GFP, to polarized Fc fragments. These antibody/epitope pairs have affinities in the low picomolar range and are useful tools for many antibody-based applications.

  12. Three Recombinant Engineered Antibodies against Recombinant Tags with High Affinity and Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hongyu; Shen, Ao; Xiang, Yang K.; Corey, David P.

    2016-01-01

    We describe three recombinant engineered antibodies against three recombinant epitope tags, constructed with divalent binding arms to recognize divalent epitopes and so achieve high affinity and specificity. In two versions, an epitope is inserted in tandem into a protein of interest, and a homodimeric antibody is constructed by fusing a high-affinity epitope-binding domain to a human or mouse Fc domain. In a third, a heterodimeric antibody is constructed by fusing two different epitope-binding domains which target two different binding sites in GFP, to polarized Fc fragments. These antibody/epitope pairs have affinities in the low picomolar range and are useful tools for many antibody-based applications. PMID:26943906

  13. Human germline antibody gene segments encode polyspecific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Willis, Jordan R; Briney, Bryan S; DeLuca, Samuel L; Crowe, James E; Meiler, Jens

    2013-04-01

    Structural flexibility in germline gene-encoded antibodies allows promiscuous binding to diverse antigens. The binding affinity and specificity for a particular epitope typically increase as antibody genes acquire somatic mutations in antigen-stimulated B cells. In this work, we investigated whether germline gene-encoded antibodies are optimal for polyspecificity by determining the basis for recognition of diverse antigens by antibodies encoded by three VH gene segments. Panels of somatically mutated antibodies encoded by a common VH gene, but each binding to a different antigen, were computationally redesigned to predict antibodies that could engage multiple antigens at once. The Rosetta multi-state design process predicted antibody sequences for the entire heavy chain variable region, including framework, CDR1, and CDR2 mutations. The predicted sequences matched the germline gene sequences to a remarkable degree, revealing by computational design the residues that are predicted to enable polyspecificity, i.e., binding of many unrelated antigens with a common sequence. The process thereby reverses antibody maturation in silico. In contrast, when designing antibodies to bind a single antigen, a sequence similar to that of the mature antibody sequence was returned, mimicking natural antibody maturation in silico. We demonstrated that the Rosetta computational design algorithm captures important aspects of antibody/antigen recognition. While the hypervariable region CDR3 often mediates much of the specificity of mature antibodies, we identified key positions in the VH gene encoding CDR1, CDR2, and the immunoglobulin framework that are critical contributors for polyspecificity in germline antibodies. Computational design of antibodies capable of binding multiple antigens may allow the rational design of antibodies that retain polyspecificity for diverse epitope binding.

  14. Immunochemical method for detection of antibody against HTLV-III core protein based upon recombinant HTLV-III gag gene encoded protein

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, N.T.; Ghrayeb, J.

    1989-02-28

    A method is described of detecting antibody against HTLV-III core protein in a biological fluid, comprising the steps of: a. providing an antigen immunoadsorbent comprising a solid phase to which is attached a HTLV-III core antigen which is a chimeric antigen comprising an amino acid sequence beginning at amino acid number 1 through 99, and extending to amino acid number 228, the chimeric antigen being immunoreactive with antibody against HTLV-III core protein; b. incubating the immunoadsorbent with a sample of the biological fluid to be tested under conditions which allow antibody in the sample to complex with the antigen immunoadsorbent; c. separating the immmunoadsorbent from the sample; and d. determining antibody bound to the iuumoadsorbent as an indication of antibody against HTLV-III core protein in the sample.

  15. Expression of recombinant vaccines and antibodies in plants.

    PubMed

    Ko, Kisung

    2014-06-01

    Plants are able to perform post-translational maturations of therapeutic proteins required for their functional biological activity and suitable in vivo pharmacokinetics. Plants can be a low-cost, large-scale production platform of recombinant biopharmaceutical proteins such as vaccines and antibodies. Plants, however, lack mechanisms of processing authentic human N-glycosylation, which imposes a major limitation in their use as an expression system for therapeutic glycoproducts. Efforts have been made to circumvent plant-specific N-glycosylation, as well as to supplement the plant's endogenous system with human glycosyltransferases for non-immunogenic and humanized N-glycan production. Herein we review studies on the potential of plants to serve as production systems for therapeutic and prophylactic biopharmaceuticals. We have especially focused on recombinant vaccines and antibodies and new expression strategies to overcome the existing problems associated with their production in plants.

  16. Recombinant anti-tenascin antibody constructs

    SciTech Connect

    ZALUTSKY, MICHAEL R

    2006-08-29

    The general objective of this research is to combine genetically derived molecular constructs reactive with tenascin, with appropriate radionuclides and labeling methods in order to generate more effective diagnostic and therapeutic reagents for oncologic nuclear medicine. Tenascin, a polymorphic extracellular matrix glycoprotein, is of interest because of its high expression on glioma, melanoma, as well as prostate and breast carcinoma. Recently, we have also documented high levels of tenascin in lymphomas, particularly those of higher grade, making the potential clinical impact of tenascin-specific radiodiagnostics and therapeutics even greater. An essential feature of our work plan is the ability to exploit our extensive clinical experience in order to design second-generation constructs with properties which could improve clinical efficacy. To date, we have treated over 150 brain tumor patients with 131I-labeled murine 81C6, an antibody which binds specifically to the alternatively spliced fibronectin type III repeats CD of the tenascin molecule. During the current grant period, we have made several observations which form the basis for our proposed specific aims. First, tissue distribution and catabolism experiments in animal models have demonstrated enhanced stability for a chimeric construct composed of murine variable regions and human IgG2 constant domains. Furthermore, pharmacokinetic studies in patients with 131I-labeled chimeric 81C6 have shown significantly longer retention in glioma tumor resection cavities compared with its murine parent. Second, we have initiated the first clinical trial of an endoradiotherapeutic labeled with the 7.2-hr -particle emitter 211At. Twelve glioma patients have received 211At-labeled chimeric 81C6 directly into their brain tumor resection cavity, and very encouraging results have been obtained. Now that the feasibility of human studies with 211At, has been demonstrated, the development and evaluation of anti

  17. Vector-mediated antibody gene transfer for infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Schnepp, Bruce C; Johnson, Philip R

    2015-01-01

    This chapter discusses the emerging field of vector-mediated antibody gene transfer as an alternative vaccine for infectious disease, with a specific focus on HIV. However, this methodology need not be confined to HIV-1; the general strategy of vector-mediated antibody gene transfer can be applied to other difficult vaccine targets like hepatitis C virus, malaria, respiratory syncytial virus, and tuberculosis. This approach is an improvement over classical passive immunization strategies that administer antibody proteins to the host to provide protection from infection. With vector-mediated gene transfer, the antibody gene is delivered to the host, via a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector; this in turn results in long-term endogenous antibody expression from the injected muscle that confers protective immunity. Vector-mediated antibody gene transfer can rapidly move existing, potent broadly cross-neutralizing HIV-1-specific antibodies into the clinic. The gene transfer products demonstrate a potency and breadth identical to the original product. This strategy eliminates the need for immunogen design and interaction with the adaptive immune system to generate protection, a strategy that so far has shown limited promise.

  18. Immunoproteomics using polyclonal antibodies and stable isotope-labeled affinity-purified recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Edfors, Fredrik; Boström, Tove; Forsström, Björn; Zeiler, Marlis; Johansson, Henrik; Lundberg, Emma; Hober, Sophia; Lehtiö, Janne; Mann, Matthias; Uhlen, Mathias

    2014-06-01

    The combination of immuno-based methods and mass spectrometry detection has great potential in the field of quantitative proteomics. Here, we describe a new method (immuno-SILAC) for the absolute quantification of proteins in complex samples based on polyclonal antibodies and stable isotope-labeled recombinant protein fragments to allow affinity enrichment prior to mass spectrometry analysis and accurate quantification. We took advantage of the antibody resources publicly available from the Human Protein Atlas project covering more than 80% of all human protein-coding genes. Epitope mapping revealed that a majority of the polyclonal antibodies recognized multiple linear epitopes, and based on these results, a semi-automated method was developed for peptide enrichment using polyclonal antibodies immobilized on protein A-coated magnetic beads. A protocol based on the simultaneous multiplex capture of more than 40 protein targets showed that approximately half of the antibodies enriched at least one functional peptide detected in the subsequent mass spectrometry analysis. The approach was further developed to also generate quantitative data via the addition of heavy isotope-labeled recombinant protein fragment standards prior to trypsin digestion. Here, we show that we were able to use small amounts of antibodies (50 ng per target) in this manner for efficient multiplex analysis of quantitative levels of proteins in a human HeLa cell lysate. The results suggest that polyclonal antibodies generated via immunization of recombinant protein fragments could be used for the enrichment of target peptides to allow for rapid mass spectrometry analysis taking advantage of a substantial reduction in sample complexity. The possibility of building up a proteome-wide resource for immuno-SILAC assays based on publicly available antibody resources is discussed.

  19. Selection of Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae) Specific Recombinant Monoclonal Phage Display Antibodies for Prey Detection Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Monzó, César; Urbaneja, Alberto; Ximénez-Embún, Miguel; García-Fernández, Julia; García, José Luis; Castañera, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Several recombinant antibodies against the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Tephritidae), one of the most important pests in agriculture worldwide, were selected for the first time from a commercial phage display library of human scFv antibodies. The specificity and sensitivity of the selected recombinant antibodies were compared with that of a rabbit polyclonal serum raised in parallel using a wide range of arthropod species as controls. The selected recombinant monoclonal antibodies had a similar or greater specificity when compared with classical monoclonal antibodies. The selected recombinant antibodies were successfully used to detect the target antigen in the gut of predators and the scFv antibodies were sequenced and compared. These results demonstrate the potential for recombinant scFv antibodies to be used as an alternative to the classical monoclonal antibodies or even molecular probes in the post-mortem analysis studies of generalist predators. PMID:23272105

  20. Selection of Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae) specific recombinant monoclonal phage display antibodies for prey detection analysis.

    PubMed

    Monzó, César; Urbaneja, Alberto; Ximénez-Embún, Miguel; García-Fernández, Julia; García, José Luis; Castañera, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Several recombinant antibodies against the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Tephritidae), one of the most important pests in agriculture worldwide, were selected for the first time from a commercial phage display library of human scFv antibodies. The specificity and sensitivity of the selected recombinant antibodies were compared with that of a rabbit polyclonal serum raised in parallel using a wide range of arthropod species as controls. The selected recombinant monoclonal antibodies had a similar or greater specificity when compared with classical monoclonal antibodies. The selected recombinant antibodies were successfully used to detect the target antigen in the gut of predators and the scFv antibodies were sequenced and compared. These results demonstrate the potential for recombinant scFv antibodies to be used as an alternative to the classical monoclonal antibodies or even molecular probes in the post-mortem analysis studies of generalist predators.

  1. Development of a Recombinant Antibody with Specificity for Chelated Uranyl Ions

    SciTech Connect

    X. Li; A.M. Kriegel; T.C. Bishop; R.C. Blake; E. Figueiredo; H. Yu; D.A. Blake

    2005-04-18

    The goal of our project is to continue the development of new techniques for rapid, automated identification of radionuclides, metals, and chelators that may contaminant sur face and groundwater at DOE sites. One of the four specific aims of the present project is to develop new technologies in antibody engineering that will enhance our immunosensor program. Recombinant antibodies have potential advantages over monoclonal antibodies produced by standard hybridoma technology. The cloned genes represent a stable, recoverable source for antibody production. In addition, the recombinant format offers opportunities for protein engineering that enhances antibody performance and for studies that relate antibody sequence to binding activity. In this study, a hybridoma that synthesized an antibody (12F6) that recognized a 1:1 complex between 2,9-dicarboxyl-1,10- phenanthroline (DCP) and UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} was used as a source of RNA for the development of a recombinant (Fab){sub 2} fragment. RNA was isolated from the 12F6 hybridoma and the cDNA encoding the entire {kappa} light chain and the linked VH and C1 portions of the heavy chain were amplified from total RNA. cDNA sequences were verified by comparison with the N-terminal amino acid sequences of the light and heavy chains of the native 12F6 monoclonal antibody. A leader sequence and appropriate restriction sites were added to each chain, and the fragments were ligated into a commercial dicistronic vector (pBudCE4.1, Invitrogen, Inc.). COS-1 cells were transfected with this vector and the culture supernatant was assayed for activity and the (Fab){sub 2} protein. Cells transfected with vector containing 12F6 cDNA synthesized and secreted recombinant (Fab){sub 2} fragments that bound to the UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}-DCP complex with an affinity indistinguishable from that of a (Fab){sub 2} fragment prepared from the native antibody. Molecular models of the heavy and light chain variable domains were constructed according to the

  2. Intracellular interference of tick-borne flavivirus infection by using a single-chain antibody fragment delivered by recombinant Sindbis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, W; Venugopal, K; Gould, E A

    1995-01-01

    A single-chain antibody fragment that identifies a neutralizing epitope on the envelope protein of louping ill and some other tick-borne flaviviruses was previously expressed in soluble form from bacteria and shown to be functionally active in vitro. To see whether or not the single-chain antibody could bind and inactivate infectious virus in vivo, we have used recombinant Sindbis virus as a delivery vehicle for intracellular expression of the antibody fragment. The variable genes and interchain linker encoding the single-chain antibody were cloned into a double subgenomic Sindbis virus expression vector to generate recombinant Sindbis virus. Infection with this recombinant Sindbis virus provided high-level cytoplasmic expression of the antibody fragment in mammalian cells. We demonstrate (i) that the antibody fragment was antigen binding and (ii) that louping ill virus infectivity was significantly reduced in the presence of intracellular antibody expressed by the superinfecting recombinant Sindbis virus. PMID:7815482

  3. Generating Recombinant Antibodies against Putative Biomarkers of Retinal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kierny, Michael R.; Cunningham, Thomas D.; Bouhenni, Rachida A.; Edward, Deepak P.; Kay, Brian K.

    2015-01-01

    Candidate biomarkers, indicative of disease or injury, are beginning to overwhelm the process of validation through immunological means. Recombinant antibodies developed through phage-display offer an alternative means of generating monoclonal antibodies faster than traditional immunization of animals. Peptide segments of putative biomarkers of laser induced injury in the rabbit, discovered through mass spectrometry, were used as targets for a selection against a library of phage-displayed human single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies. Highly specific antibodies were isolated to four of these unique peptide sequences. One antibody against the retinal protein, Guanine Nucleotide-Binding Protein Beta 5 (GBB5), had a dissociation constant ~300 nM and recognized the full-length endogenous protein in retinal homogenates of three different animal species by western blot. Alanine scanning of the peptide target identified three charged and one hydrophobic amino acid as the critical binding residues for two different scFvs. To enhance the utility of the reagent, one scFv was dimerized through a Fragment-crystallizable hinge region (i.e., Fc) and expressed in HEK-293 cells. This dimeric reagent yielded a 25-fold lower detection limit in western blots. PMID:25902199

  4. Generating Recombinant Antibodies against Putative Biomarkers of Retinal Injury.

    PubMed

    Kierny, Michael R; Cunningham, Thomas D; Bouhenni, Rachida A; Edward, Deepak P; Kay, Brian K

    2015-01-01

    Candidate biomarkers, indicative of disease or injury, are beginning to overwhelm the process of validation through immunological means. Recombinant antibodies developed through phage-display offer an alternative means of generating monoclonal antibodies faster than traditional immunization of animals. Peptide segments of putative biomarkers of laser induced injury in the rabbit, discovered through mass spectrometry, were used as targets for a selection against a library of phage-displayed human single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies. Highly specific antibodies were isolated to four of these unique peptide sequences. One antibody against the retinal protein, Guanine Nucleotide-Binding Protein Beta 5 (GBB5), had a dissociation constant ~300 nM and recognized the full-length endogenous protein in retinal homogenates of three different animal species by western blot. Alanine scanning of the peptide target identified three charged and one hydrophobic amino acid as the critical binding residues for two different scFvs. To enhance the utility of the reagent, one scFv was dimerized through a Fragment-crystallizable hinge region (i.e., Fc) and expressed in HEK-293 cells. This dimeric reagent yielded a 25-fold lower detection limit in western blots.

  5. Detection of biomarkers using recombinant antibodies coupled to nanostructured platforms

    PubMed Central

    Kierny, Michael R.; Cunningham, Thomas D.; Kay, Brian K.

    2012-01-01

    The utility of biomarker detection in tomorrow's personalized health care field will mean early and accurate diagnosis of many types of human physiological conditions and diseases. In the search for biomarkers, recombinant affinity reagents can be generated to candidate proteins or post-translational modifications that differ qualitatively or quantitatively between normal and diseased tissues. The use of display technologies, such as phage-display, allows for manageable selection and optimization of affinity reagents for use in biomarker detection. Here we review the use of recombinant antibody fragments, such as scFvs and Fabs, which can be affinity-selected from phage-display libraries, to bind with both high specificity and affinity to biomarkers of cancer, such as Human Epidermal growth factor Receptor 2 (HER2) and Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). We discuss how these recombinant antibodies can be fabricated into nanostructures, such as carbon nanotubes, nanowires, and quantum dots, for the purpose of enhancing detection of biomarkers at low concentrations (pg/mL) within complex mixtures such as serum or tissue extracts. Other sensing technologies, which take advantage of ‘Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering’ (gold nanoshells), frequency changes in piezoelectric crystals (quartz crystal microbalance), or electrical current generation and sensing during electrochemical reactions (electrochemical detection), can effectively provide multiplexed platforms for detection of cancer and injury biomarkers. Such devices may soon replace the traditional time consuming ELISAs and Western blots, and deliver rapid, point-of-care diagnostics to market. PMID:22833780

  6. Characterization of oxidative carbonylation on recombinant monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Stella, Cinzia; Wang, Weiru; Schöneich, Christian; Gennaro, Lynn

    2014-05-20

    In the biotechnology industry, oxidative carbonylation as a post-translational modification of protein pharmaceuticals has not been studied in detail. Using Quality by Design (QbD) principles, understanding the impact of oxidative carbonylation on product quality of protein pharmaceuticals, particularly from a site-specific perspective, is critical. However, comprehensive identification of carbonylation sites has so far remained a very difficult analytical challenge for the industry. In this paper, we report for the first time the identification of specific carbonylation sites on recombinant monoclonal antibodies with a new analytical approach via derivatization with Girard's Reagent T (GRT) and subsequent peptide mapping with high-resolution mass spectrometry. Enhanced ionization efficiency and high quality MS(2) data resulted from GRT derivatization were observed as key benefits of this approach, which enabled direct identification of carbonylation sites without any fractionation or affinity enrichment steps. A simple data filtering process was also incorporated to significantly reduce false positive assignments. Sensitivity and efficiency of this approach were demonstrated by identification of carbonylation sites on both unstressed and oxidized antibody bulk drug substances. The applicability of this approach was further demonstrated by identification of 14 common carbonylation sites on three highly similar IgG1s. Our approach represents a significant improvement to the existing analytical methodologies and facilitates extended characterization of oxidative carbonylation on recombinant monoclonal antibodies and potentially other protein pharmaceuticals in the biotechnology industry.

  7. EASE vectors for rapid stable expression of recombinant antibodies.

    PubMed

    Aldrich, Teri L; Viaje, Aurora; Morris, Arvia E

    2003-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, monoclonal antibodies and antibody fragments have become an increasingly important source of therapeutic molecules in the biotechnology industry. Drug development strategies rely on screening large numbers of candidate molecules in search of an optimized drug candidate. This strategy requires efficient production of ten to a few hundred milligrams of candidate molecules for screening in bioassays and animal models. Typically, this amount of recombinant protein expression involves large numbers of transient transfections or cloning of a recombinant cell line. Both of these approaches are time-consuming and labor-intensive. In this report, we describe the application of an EASE vector system that is capable of generating stable pools of transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells. These pooled populations of cells produce high quantities of antibody candidates without labor-intensive cloning in a 3-5 week time frame. When an optimal drug candidate has been selected, pools generated with EASE-containing vectors can also be used in subsequent cloning steps to make cell lines with improved expression levels. We demonstrate that EASE increases expression in nonamplified pools in addition to increasing amplification and viability of clonal cell lines generated with the EASE-containing vectors compared with pools and cell lines generated without EASE.

  8. Enhancement of antibody class switch recombination by the cumulative activity of four separate elements1

    PubMed Central

    Dunnick, Wesley A.; Shi, Jian; Zerbato, Jennifer M.; Fontaine, Clinton A.; Collins, John T.

    2011-01-01

    Class switch recombination of antibody isotype is mediated by a recombinational DNA deletion event, and must be robustly upregulated during antigen-driven differentiation of B cells. The enhancer region 3′ of the Cα gene is important for the upregulation of switch recombination. Using a transgene of the entire heavy chain constant region locus, we now demonstrate that it is the four 3′ enhancer elements themselves (a total of 4.7 kb) that are responsible for the upregulation, rather than the 24 kb of DNA in between them. Neither allelic exclusion nor transgenic μ expression is reduced by deletion of the four 3′ enhancers. We also test deletions of two or three of the 3′ enhancers, and show that deletion of more 3′ enhancers results in a progressive reduction in both switch recombination and germline transcription of all heavy chain genes. Nevertheless, we find evidence for special roles for some 3′ enhancers--different heavy chain genes are affected by different 3′ enhancer deletions. Thus, we find that the dramatic induction of class switch recombination during antigen-driven differentiation is the result of an interaction among four separated regulatory elements. PMID:21949022

  9. Production of a single-chain fragment of the murine anti-idiotypic antibody ACA125 as phage-displayed and soluble antibody by recombinant phage antibody technique.

    PubMed

    Schlebusch, H; Reinartz, S; Kaiser, R; Grünn, U; Wagner, U

    1997-02-01

    The F(ab')2 fragment of the murine monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibody ACA125 mimicking the tumor-associated antigen CA125 is used as a vaccine for the induction of an anti-tumoral immunity in patients with ovarian carcinoma. We tried to generate a single-chain fragment (ScFv) composed of ACA125 heavy- and light-chain variable domains connected by a polypeptide linker as an alternative to the corresponding F(ab')2 fragment. Heavy- and light-chain genes of antibody-producing mouse hybridoma cell line were amplified separately and assembled into a ScFv gene with linker DNA by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The ScFv gene was ligated into the phagemid vector pCANTAB5E, which allows the production of both phage-displayed and soluble ScFv. Transformed Escherichia coli TG1 cells were infected with M13K07 helper phage to yield recombinant phage, which display ScFv fragments as a g3p fusion protein on the surface of the filamentous phage M13. Recombinant phages could be selected by binding to the idiotypic antibody OC125 after one round of panning and directly used to reinfect E. coli TG1 cells. The E. coli nonsuppressor strain HB2151 was infected with an antigen-positive phage clone, previously screened by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), to express soluble ScFv fragments. Functional soluble ScFv binding to the idiotypic antibody OC125 F(ab')2 could be detected in the bacterial periplasm by Western blot and ELISA. The variable heavy- and light-chain genes of the ACA125 ScFv fragment were further sequenced and compared with known antibody sequences.

  10. The neutralizing human recombinant antibodies to pathogenic Orthopoxviruses derived from a phage display immune library.

    PubMed

    Tikunova, Nina; Dubrovskaya, Viktoriya; Morozova, Vera; Yun, Tatiana; Khlusevich, Yana; Bormotov, Nikolai; Laman, Aleksandr; Brovko, Fedor; Shvalov, Aleksandr; Belanov, Eugeni

    2012-01-01

    A panel of recombinant human antibodies to orthopoxviruses was isolated from a combinatorial phage display library of human scFv antibodies constructed from the Vh and Vl genes cloned from the peripheral blood lymphocytes of Vaccinia virus (VACV) immune donors. Plaque-reduction neutralization tests showed that seven selected phage-displaying scFv antibodies (pdAbs) neutralized both CPXV and VACV, and five of them neutralized Monkeypox virus (MPXV). Western blot analysis of VACV and CPXV proteins demonstrated that seven neutralizing antibodies recognized a 35 kDa protein. To identify this target protein, we produced a recombinant J3L protein of CPXV and showed that all the selected neutralizing antibodies recognized this protein. Neutralizing pdAb b9 was converted into fully human mAb b9 (fh b9), and scFv b9 displayed high binding affinities (K(d) of 0.7 and 3.2 nM). The fh b9 reduced VACV plaque formation in a dose-dependent manner.

  11. Lepidopteran cells, an alternative for the production of recombinant antibodies?

    PubMed Central

    Cérutti, Martine; Golay, Josée

    2012-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are used with great success in many different therapeutic domains. In order to satisfy the growing demand and to lower the production cost of these molecules, many alternative systems have been explored. Among them, the baculovirus/insect cells system is a good candidate. This system is very safe, given that the baculoviruses have a highly restricted host range and they are not pathogenic to vertebrates or plants. But the major asset is the speed with which it is possible to obtain very stable recombinant viruses capable of producing fully active proteins whose glycosylation pattern can be modulated to make it similar to the human one. These features could ultimately make the difference by enabling the production of antibodies with very low costs. However, efforts are still needed, in particular to increase production rates and thus make this system commercially viable for the production of these therapeutic agents. PMID:22531440

  12. Discovery and characterization of hydroxylysine in recombinant monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Qing; Moore, Benjamin; Beardsley, Richard L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tryptic peptide mapping analysis of a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-expressed, recombinant IgG1 monoclonal antibody revealed a previously unreported +16 Da modification. Through a combination of MSn experiments, and preparation and analysis of known synthetic peptides, the possibility of a sequence variant (Ala to Ser) was ruled out and the presence of hydroxylysine was confirmed. Post-translational hydroxylation of lysine was found in a consensus sequence (XKG) known to be the site of modification in other proteins such as collagen, and was therefore presumed to result from the activity of the CHO homolog of the lysyl hydroxylase complex. Although this consensus sequence was present in several locations in the antibody sequence, only a single site on the heavy-chain Fab was found to be modified. PMID:26651858

  13. Somatic generation of hybrid antibody H chain genes in transgenic mice via interchromosomal gene conversion

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    We have constructed lines of mice with transgenes containing an antibody heavy (H) chain variable region (VHDJH) gene and various amounts of natural immunoglobulin (Ig) and plasmid flanking DNA. In these lines, recombination of the transgene and the endogenous Igh locus takes place in B cells, leading to the expression of functional H chains partially encoded by the transgenic VHDJH gene. Here, we demonstrate that the transgenic VHDJH gene, and various amounts of flanking sequence are recombined with Igh locus DNA via interchromosomal gene conversion. The structures of the resulting "hybrid" transgene-Igh H chain loci are consistent with the 3' end of the conversion occurring in regions of sequence identity, and the 5' end taking place between regions of little or no homology. This mode of antibody transgene recombination with the Igh locus is fundamentally different from the previously reported "trans H chain class switching" that results in reciprocal translocations. In contrast, this recombination resembles events previously observed in mammalian tissue culture cells between adjacent homologous chromosomal sequences, or transfected DNA and a homologous chromosomal target. Our data indicate that this recombination takes place at a low frequency, and that the frequency is influenced by both the length and extent of homology between the transgene and the Igh locus, but is not greatly affected by transgene copy number. This recombination pathway provides a novel approach for the subtle alteration of the clonal composition of the mouse B cell compartment in vivo using VH genes with defined structures and functions. PMID:8270869

  14. Culture temperature modulates aggregation of recombinant antibody in cho cells.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Natalia; Subramanian, Jayashree; Ouyang, Jun; Nguyen, Mary D H; Hutchinson, Matthew; Sharma, Vikas K; Lin, Andy A; Yuk, Inn H

    2012-01-01

    During production of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAb), it is highly desirable to remove and control antibody aggregates in the manufacturing process to minimize the potential risk of immunogenicity to patients. During process development for the production of a recombinant IgG in a CHO cell line, we observed atypical high variability from 1 to 20% mAb aggregates formed during cell culture that negatively impacted antibody purification. Analytical characterization revealed the IgG aggregates were mediated by hydrophobic interactions likely caused by misfolded antibody during intracellular processing. Strikingly, data analysis showed an inverse correlation of lower cell culture temperature producing higher aggregate levels. All cultures at 37°C exhibited ≤ 5% aggregates at harvest. Aggregate levels increased 4-12-fold in 33°C cultures when compared to 37°C, with a corresponding 2-4-fold increase in heavy chain (HC) and light chain (LC) mRNA. Additionally, 37°C cases showed a greater excess of LC to HC mRNA levels. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone expression and ER size also increased 25-75% at 33°C versus 37°C but to a lesser extent than LC and HC mRNA, consistent with a potential limiting ER folding capacity at 33°C for this cell line. Finally, we identified a 2-5-fold increase in mAb aggregate formation at 33°C compared to 37°C cultures for three additional CHO cell lines. Taken together, our observations indicate that low culture temperature can increase antibody aggregate formation in CHO cells by increasing LC and HC transcripts coupled with limited ER machinery.

  15. Antibody Gene Transfer for HIV Immunoprophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Balazs, Alejandro B.; West, Anthony P.

    2015-01-01

    Antibody gene transfer, which involves the delivery of genes that encode potent, broadly neutralizing anti-HIV antibodies, is a promising new strategy to prevent HIV infection. A satellite symposium at the AIDS Vaccine 2012 conference brought together many of the groups working in this field. PMID:23238748

  16. Antibody gene transfer for HIV immunoprophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Balazs, Alejandro B; West, Anthony P

    2013-01-01

    Antibody gene transfer, which involves the delivery of genes that encode potent, broadly neutralizing antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), is a promising new strategy for preventing HIV infection. A satellite symposium at the AIDS Vaccine 2012 conference brought together many of the groups working in this field.

  17. Production of specific IgY antibody to the recombinant FanC protein produced in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Nasiri, Khadijeh; Zibaee, Saeed; Nassiri, Mohammadreza; Tahmoorespur, Mojtaba; Haghparast, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are one of the primary causes of diarrhea in newborn calves and in humans, pigs, and sheep. IgY technology has been identified as a promising alternative to generating a mass amount of specific antibody for use in immunotherapy and immunodiagnostics. The purpose of this study was to produce specific antibody by egg yolk antibody (IgY) to recombinant FanC protein from ETEC. Materials and Methods: FanC (K99) gene was amplified from ETEC by specific primers and polymerase chain reaction. The gene was cloned and subcloned into pTZ57R/T and pET32a (+) vectors, respectively. Recombinant vector was transferred into E. coli BL21 CodonPlus (DE3). Protein expression was investigated by 1 mM IPTG induction. Hens were immunized by the purified recombinant FanC protein. The activity and specificity of the IgY antibody were detected by dot-blotting, Western blotting, and indirect ELISA. Results: We obtained FanC specific IgYs by immunizing the hens with the recombinant FanC protein. The anti-FanC IgY showed binding specifically to the FanC protein of ETEC. Conclusion: The results emphasize that specific IgY against the recombinant FanC protein could be recommended as a candidate for passive immunization against ETEC infection in animals and humans. PMID:27746871

  18. Targeting uPAR with antagonistic recombinant human antibodies in aggressive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    LeBeau, Aaron M; Duriseti, Sai; Murphy, Stephanie T; Pepin, Francois; Hann, Byron; Gray, Joe W; VanBrocklin, Henry F; Craik, Charles S

    2013-04-01

    Components of the plasminogen activation system, which are overexpressed in aggressive breast cancer subtypes, offer appealing targets for development of new diagnostics and therapeutics. By comparing gene expression data in patient populations and cultured cell lines, we identified elevated levels of the urokinase plasminogen activation receptor (uPAR, PLAUR) in highly aggressive breast cancer subtypes and cell lines. Recombinant human anti-uPAR antagonistic antibodies exhibited potent binding in vitro to the surface of cancer cells expressing uPAR. In vivo these antibodies detected uPAR expression in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) tumor xenografts using near infrared imaging and (111)In single-photon emission computed tomography. Antibody-based uPAR imaging probes accurately detected small disseminated lesions in a tumor metastasis model, complementing the current clinical imaging standard (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose at detecting non-glucose-avid metastatic lesions. A monotherapy study using the antagonistic antibodies resulted in a significant decrease in tumor growth in a TNBC xenograft model. In addition, a radioimmunotherapy study, using the anti-uPAR antibodies conjugated to the therapeutic radioisotope (177)Lu, found that they were effective at reducing tumor burden in vivo. Taken together, our results offer a preclinical proof of concept for uPAR targeting as a strategy for breast cancer diagnosis and therapy using this novel human antibody technology.

  19. Generation, characterization, and docking studies of DNA-hydrolyzing recombinant F(ab) antibodies.

    PubMed

    Zein, Haggag S; El-Sehemy, Ahmed A; Fares, Mohamed O; ElHefnawi, Mahmoud; da Silva, Jaime A Teixeira; Miyatake, Kazutaka

    2011-01-01

    Previously we established a series of catalytic antibodies (catAbs) capable of hydrolyzing DNA prepared by hybridoma technology. A group of these catAbs exhibited high reactivity and substrate specificity. To determine the molecular basis for these catAbs, we cloned, sequenced, and expressed the variable regions of this group of antibodies as functional F(ab) fragments. The nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of the expressed light chain (Vκ) germline gene assignments confidently belonged to germline family Vκ1A, gene bb1.1 and GenBank accession number EF672207 while heavy chain variable region V(H) genes belonged to V(H) 1/V(H) J558, gene V130.3 and GenBank accession number EF672221. A well-established expression system based on the pARA7 vector was examined for its ability to produce catalytically active antibodies. Recombinant F(ab) (rF(ab) ) fragments were purified and their hydrolyzing activity was analyzed against supercoiled pUC19 plasmid DNA (scDNA). The study of rF(ab) provides important information about the potential catalytic activities of antibodies whose structure allows us to understand their basis of catalysis. Molecular surface analysis and docking studies were performed on the molecular interactions between the antibodies and poly(dA9), poly(dG9), poly(dT9), and poly(dC9) oligomers. Surface analysis identified the important sequence motifs at the binding sites, and different effects exerted by arginine and tyrosine residues at different positions in the light and heavy chains. This study demonstrates the potential usefulness of the protein DNA surrogate in the investigation of the origin of anti-DNA antibodies. These studies may define important features of DNA catAbs.

  20. Vaccine safety and efficacy evaluation of a recombinant bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) with deletion of the SH gene and subunit vaccines based on recombinant human RSV proteins: N-nanorings, P and M2-1, in calves with maternal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Blodörn, Krister; Hägglund, Sara; Fix, Jenna; Dubuquoy, Catherine; Makabi-Panzu, Boby; Thom, Michelle; Karlsson, Per; Roque, Jean-Louis; Karlstam, Erika; Pringle, John; Eléouët, Jean-François; Riffault, Sabine; Taylor, Geraldine; Valarcher, Jean François

    2014-01-01

    The development of safe and effective vaccines against both bovine and human respiratory syncytial viruses (BRSV, HRSV) to be used in the presence of RSV-specific maternally-derived antibodies (MDA) remains a high priority in human and veterinary medicine. Herein, we present safety and efficacy results from a virulent BRSV challenge of calves with MDA, which were immunized with one of three vaccine candidates that allow serological differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA): an SH gene-deleted recombinant BRSV (ΔSHrBRSV), and two subunit (SU) formulations based on HRSV-P, -M2-1, and -N recombinant proteins displaying BRSV-F and -G epitopes, adjuvanted by either oil emulsion (Montanide ISA71VG, SUMont) or immunostimulating complex matrices (AbISCO-300, SUAbis). Whereas all control animals developed severe respiratory disease and shed high levels of virus following BRSV challenge, ΔSHrBRSV-immunized calves demonstrated almost complete clinical and virological protection five weeks after a single intranasal vaccination. Although mucosal vaccination with ΔSHrBRSV failed to induce a detectable immunological response, there was a rapid and strong anamnestic mucosal BRSV-specific IgA, virus neutralizing antibody and local T cell response following challenge with virulent BRSV. Calves immunized twice intramuscularly, three weeks apart with SUMont were also well protected two weeks after boost. The protection was not as pronounced as that in ΔSHrBRSV-immunized animals, but superior to those immunized twice subcutaneously three weeks apart with SUAbis. Antibody responses induced by the subunit vaccines were non-neutralizing and not directed against BRSV F or G proteins. When formulated as SUMont but not as SUAbis, the HRSV N, P and M2-1 proteins induced strong systemic cross-protective cell-mediated immune responses detectable already after priming. ΔSHrBRSV and SUMont are two promising DIVA-compatible vaccines, apparently inducing protection by

  1. Nonreplicating vaccinia vector efficiently expresses recombinant genes.

    PubMed

    Sutter, G; Moss, B

    1992-11-15

    Modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA), a highly attenuated vaccinia virus strain that has been safety tested in humans, was evaluated for use as an expression vector. MVA has multiple genomic deletions and is severely host cell restricted: it grows well in avian cells but is unable to multiply in human and most other mammalian cells tested. Nevertheless, we found that replication of viral DNA appeared normal and that both early and late viral proteins were synthesized in human cells. Proteolytic processing of viral structural proteins was inhibited, however, and only immature virus particles were detected by electron microscopy. We constructed an insertion plasmid with the Escherichia coli lacZ gene under the control of the vaccinia virus late promoter P11, flanked by sequences of MVA DNA, to allow homologous recombination at the site of a naturally occurring 3500-base-pair deletion within the MVA genome. MVA recombinants were isolated and propagated in permissive avian cells and shown to express the enzyme beta-galactosidase upon infection of nonpermissive human cells. The amount of enzyme made was similar to that produced by a recombinant of vaccinia virus strain Western Reserve, which also had the lacZ gene under control of the P11 promoter, but multiplied to high titers. Since recombinant gene expression is unimpaired in nonpermissive human cells, MVA may serve as a highly efficient and exceptionally safe vector.

  2. Somatic recombination, gene amplification and cancer.

    PubMed

    Ramel, C; Cederberg, H; Magnusson, J; Vogel, E; Natarajan, A T; Mullender, L H; Nivard, J M; Parry, J M; Leyson, A; Comendador, M A; Sierra, L M; Ferreiro, J A; Consuegra, S

    1996-06-12

    The principle objective of this research programme, to analyse chemical induction of somatic recombination and related endpoints, i.e., mobilization of transposing elements and gene amplification, has been approached by means of several assay systems. These have included Drosophila, Saccharomyces and mammalian cell cultures. 6.1. Screening assays for mitotic recombination. A large number of chemicals have been investigated in the three Drosophila assay systems employed--the multiple wing hair/flare wing spot system developed by Graf et al., 1984, the white-ivory system developed by Green et al., 1986 and the white/white+ eye spot assay developed by Vogel (Vogel and Nivard, 1993). Particularly the screening of 181 chemicals, covering a wide array of chemical classes, by the last mentioned assay has shown that measurement of somatic recombination in Drosophila constitutes a sensitive and efficient short-term test which shows a remarkably good correlation with the agent score of 83 short-term tests analysed by ICPEMC (Mendelsohn et al., 1992; Table 2) as well as the assay performance in international collaborative programmes measuring carcinogen/non-carcinogens (de Serres and Ashby, 1981; Ashby et al., 1985, 1988). Also the wing spot assay has gained wide international recognition as a similarly sensitive test. These two assay systems in Drosophila measure both intrachromosomal events and interchromosomal recombination. The white-ivory system on the other hand is based on the loss of a tandem duplication in the white locus, the mechanism of which is less known, but probably involves intrachromosomal recombination. The difference in the mechanism between this assay and the former two was indicated by the lack of response to methotrexate in the white-ivory assay, while this compound was strongly recombinogenic in both the wing spot and white/white+ assays. The use of different strains of Drosophila with the white/white+ assay demonstrated the importance of the

  3. Preparation of Recombinant Human Monoclonal Antibody Fab Fragments Specific for Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Tachibana, Hiroshi; Cheng, Xun-Jia; Watanabe, Katsuomi; Takekoshi, Masataka; Maeda, Fumiko; Aotsuka, Satoshi; Kaneda, Yoshimasa; Takeuchi, Tsutomu; Ihara, Seiji

    1999-01-01

    Genes coding for human antibody Fab fragments specific for Entamoeba histolytica were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Lymphocytes were separated from the peripheral blood of a patient with an amebic liver abscess. Poly(A)+ RNA was isolated from the lymphocytes, and then genes coding for the light chain and Fd region of the heavy chain were amplified by a reverse transcriptase PCR. The amplified DNA fragments were ligated with a plasmid vector and were introduced into Escherichia coli. Three thousand colonies were screened for the production of antibodies to E. histolytica HM-1:IMSS by an indirect fluorescence-antibody (IFA) test. Lysates from five Escherichia coli clones were positive. Analysis of the DNA sequences of the five clones showed that three of the five heavy-chain sequences and four of the five light-chain sequences differed from each other. When the reactivities of the Escherichia coli lysates to nine reference strains of E. histolytica were examined by the IFA test, three Fab fragments with different DNA sequences were found to react with all nine strains and another Fab fragment was found to react with seven strains. None of the four human monoclonal antibody Fab fragments reacted with Entamoeba dispar reference strains or with other enteric protozoan parasites. These results indicate that the bacterial expression system reported here is effective for the production of human monoclonal antibodies specific for E. histolytica. The recombinant human monoclonal antibody Fab fragments may be applicable for distinguishing E. histolytica from E. dispar and for use in the serodiagnosis of amebiasis. PMID:10225840

  4. Novel recombinant papillomavirus genomes expressing selectable genes

    PubMed Central

    Van Doorslaer, Koenraad; Porter, Samuel; McKinney, Caleb; Stepp, Wesley H.; McBride, Alison A.

    2016-01-01

    Papillomaviruses infect and replicate in keratinocytes, but viral proteins are initially expressed at low levels and there is no effective and quantitative method to determine the efficiency of infection on a cell-to-cell basis. Here we describe human papillomavirus (HPV) genomes that express marker proteins (antibiotic resistance genes and Green Fluorescent Protein), and can be used to elucidate early stages in HPV infection of primary keratinocytes. To generate these recombinant genomes, the late region of the oncogenic HPV18 genome was replaced by CpG free marker genes. Insertion of these exogenous genes did not affect early replication, and had only minimal effects on early viral transcription. When introduced into primary keratinocytes, the recombinant marker genomes gave rise to drug-resistant keratinocyte colonies and cell lines, which maintained the extrachromosomal recombinant genome long-term. Furthermore, the HPV18 “marker” genomes could be packaged into viral particles (quasivirions) and used to infect primary human keratinocytes in culture. This resulted in the outgrowth of drug-resistant keratinocyte colonies containing replicating HPV18 genomes. In summary, we describe HPV18 marker genomes that can be used to quantitatively investigate many aspects of the viral life cycle. PMID:27892937

  5. Construction of Recombinant Single Chain Variable Fragment (ScFv) Antibody Against Superantigen for Immunodetection Using Antibody Phage Display Technology.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pawan Kumar; Agrawal, Ranu; Kamboj, D V; Singh, Lokendra

    2016-01-01

    Superantigens are a class of antigens that bind to the major histocompatibility complex class (MHC) II and T-cell receptor (TCR) and cause the nonspecific activation of T cells, resulting in a massive release of pro-inflammatory mediators. They are produced by the gram-positive organisms Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes, and by a variety of other microbes such as viruses and mycoplasma, and cause toxic shock syndrome (TSS) and even death in some cases. The immunodetection of superantigens is difficult due to the polyclonal activation of T-cells leading to nonspecific antibody production. The production of recombinant monoclonal antibodies against superantigens can solve this problem and are far better than polyclonal antibodies in terms of detection. Here, we describe the construction of recombinant single chain variable fragments (ScFv) antibodies against superantigens with specific reference to SEB (staphylococcal enterotoxin B) using antibody phage display technology.

  6. Recombinant fungal entomopathogen RNAi target insect gene.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qiongbo; Wu, Wei

    2016-11-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) technology is considered as an alternative for control of pests. However, RNAi has not been used in field conditions yet, since delivering exogenous ds/siRNA to target pests is very difficult. The laboratory methods of introducing the ds/siRNA into insects through feeding, micro feeding / dripping and injecting cannot be used in fields. Transgenic crop is perhaps the most effective application of RNAi for pest control, but it needs long-time basic researches in order to reduce the cost and evaluate the safety. Therefore, transgenic microbe is maybe a better choice. Entomopathogenic fungi generally invade the host insects through cuticle like chemical insecticides contact insect to control sucking sap pests. Isaria fumosorosea is a common fungal entomopathogen in whitefly, Bemisia tabaci. We constructed a recombinant strain of I. fumosorosea expressing specific dsRNA of whitefly's TLR7 gene. It could silence the TLR7 gene and improve the virulence against whitefly. Transgenic fungal entomopathogen has shown great potential to attain the application of RNAi technology for pests control in fields. In the future, the research interests should be focused on the selection of susceptible target pests and their vital genes, and optimizing the methods for screening genes and recombinants as well.

  7. Identification of a Putative Crf Splice Variant and Generation of Recombinant Antibodies for the Specific Detection of Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Schütte, Mark; Thullier, Philippe; Pelat, Thibaut; Wezler, Xenia; Rosenstock, Philip; Hinz, Dominik; Kirsch, Martina Inga; Hasenberg, Mike; Frank, Ronald; Schirrmann, Thomas; Gunzer, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Background Aspergillus fumigatus is a common airborne fungal pathogen for humans. It frequently causes an invasive aspergillosis (IA) in immunocompromised patients with poor prognosis. Potent antifungal drugs are very expensive and cause serious adverse effects. Their correct application requires an early and specific diagnosis of IA, which is still not properly achievable. This work aims to a specific detection of A. fumigatus by immunofluorescence and the generation of recombinant antibodies for the detection of A. fumigatus by ELISA. Results The A. fumigatus antigen Crf2 was isolated from a human patient with proven IA. It is a novel variant of a group of surface proteins (Crf1, Asp f9, Asp f16) which belong to the glycosylhydrolase family. Single chain fragment variables (scFvs) were obtained by phage display from a human naive antibody gene library and an immune antibody gene library generated from a macaque immunized with recombinant Crf2. Two different selection strategies were performed and shown to influence the selection of scFvs recognizing the Crf2 antigen in its native conformation. Using these antibodies, Crf2 was localized in growing hyphae of A. fumigatus but not in spores. In addition, the antibodies allowed differentiation between A. fumigatus and related Aspergillus species or Candida albicans by immunofluorescence microscopy. The scFv antibody clones were further characterized for their affinity, the nature of their epitope, their serum stability and their detection limit of Crf2 in human serum. Conclusion Crf2 and the corresponding recombinant antibodies offer a novel approach for the early diagnostics of IA caused by A. fumigatus. PMID:19675673

  8. Avian influenza in ovo vaccination with replication defective recombinant adenovirus in chickens: vaccine potency, antibody persistence, and maternal antibody transfer.

    PubMed

    Mesonero, Alexander; Suarez, David L; van Santen, Edzard; Tang, De-Chu C; Toro, Haroldo

    2011-06-01

    Protective immunity against avian influenza (AI) can be elicited in chickens in a single-dose regimen by in ovo vaccination with a replication-competent adenovirus (RCA)-free human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad)-vector encoding the AI virus (AIV) hemagglutinin (HA). We evaluated vaccine potency, antibody persistence, transfer of maternal antibodies (MtAb), and interference between MtAb and active in ovo or mucosal immunization with RCA-free recombinant Ad expressing a codon-optimized AIV H5 HA gene from A/turkey/WI/68 (AdTW68.H5(ck)). Vaccine coverage and intrapotency test repeatability were based on anti-H5 hemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody levels detected in in ovo vaccinated chickens. Even though egg inoculation of each replicate was performed by individuals with varying expertise and with different vaccine batches, the average vaccine coverage of three replicates was 85%. The intrapotency test repeatability, which considers both positive as well as negative values, varied between 0.69 and 0.71, indicating effective vaccination. Highly pathogenic (HP) AIV challenge of chicken groups vaccinated with increasing vaccine doses showed 90% protection in chickens receiving > or = 10(8) ifu (infectious units)/bird. The protective dose 50% (PD50) was determined to be 10(6.5) ifu. Even vaccinated chickens that did not develop detectable antibody levels were effectively protected against HP AIV challenge. This result is consistent with previous findings ofAd-vector eliciting T lymphocyte responses. Higher vaccine doses significantly reduced viral shedding as determined by AIV RNA concentration in oropharyngeal swabs. Assessment of antibody persistence showed that antibody levels of in ovo immunized chickens continued to increase until 12 wk and started to decline after 18 wk of age. Intramuscular (IM) booster vaccination with the same vaccine at 16 wk of age significantly increased the antibody responses in breeder hens, and these responses were maintained at high

  9. Recombinant Encephalomyocarditis Viruses Elicit Neutralizing Antibodies against PRRSV and CSFV in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shu; Guo, Xin; Keyes, Lisa R.; Yang, Hanchun; Ge, Xinna

    2015-01-01

    Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) is capable of infecting a wide range of species and the infection can cause myocarditis and reproductive failure in pigs as well as febrile illness in human beings. In this study, we introduced the entire ORF5 of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) or the neutralization epitope regions in the E2 gene of the classical swine fever virus (CSFV), into the genome of a stably attenuated EMCV strain, T1100I. The resultant viable recombinant viruses, CvBJC3m/I-ΔGP5 and CvBJC3m/I-E2, respectively expressed partial PRRSV envelope protein GP5 or CSFV neutralization epitope A1A2 along with EMCV proteins. These heterologous proteins fused to the N-terminal of the nonstructural leader protein could be recognized by anti-GP5 or anti-E2 antibody. We also tested the immunogenicity of these fusion proteins by immunizing BALB/c mice with the recombinant viruses. The immunized animals elicited neutralizing antibodies against PRRSV and CSFV. Our results suggest that EMCV can be engineered as an expression vector and serve as a tool in the development of novel live vaccines in various animal species. PMID:26076449

  10. In vitro and in vivo modifications of recombinant and human IgG antibodies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongcheng; Ponniah, Gomathinayagam; Zhang, Hui-Min; Nowak, Christine; Neill, Alyssa; Gonzalez-Lopez, Nidia; Patel, Rekha; Cheng, Guilong; Kita, Adriana Z; Andrien, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Tremendous knowledge has been gained in the understanding of various modifications of IgG antibodies, driven mainly by the fact that antibodies are one of the most important groups of therapeutic molecules and because of the development of advanced analytical techniques. Recombinant monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapeutics expressed in mammalian cell lines and endogenous IgG molecules secreted by B cells in the human body share some modifications, but each have some unique modifications. Modifications that are common to recombinant mAb and endogenous IgG molecules are considered to pose a lower risk of immunogenicity. On the other hand, modifications that are unique to recombinant mAbs could potentially pose higher risk. The focus of this review is the comparison of frequently observed modifications of recombinant monoclonal antibodies to those of endogenous IgG molecules.

  11. In vitro and in vivo modifications of recombinant and human IgG antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongcheng; Ponniah, Gomathinayagam; Zhang, Hui-Min; Nowak, Christine; Neill, Alyssa; Gonzalez-Lopez, Nidia; Patel, Rekha; Cheng, Guilong; Kita, Adriana Z; Andrien, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Tremendous knowledge has been gained in the understanding of various modifications of IgG antibodies, driven mainly by the fact that antibodies are one of the most important groups of therapeutic molecules and because of the development of advanced analytical techniques. Recombinant monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapeutics expressed in mammalian cell lines and endogenous IgG molecules secreted by B cells in the human body share some modifications, but each have some unique modifications. Modifications that are common to recombinant mAb and endogenous IgG molecules are considered to pose a lower risk of immunogenicity. On the other hand, modifications that are unique to recombinant mAbs could potentially pose higher risk. The focus of this review is the comparison of frequently observed modifications of recombinant monoclonal antibodies to those of endogenous IgG molecules. PMID:25517300

  12. CHO expression of a novel human recombinant IgG1 anti-RhD antibody isolated by phage display.

    PubMed

    Miescher, S; Zahn-Zabal, M; De Jesus, M; Moudry, R; Fisch, I; Vogel, M; Kobr, M; Imboden, M A; Kragten, E; Bichler, J; Mermod, N; Stadler, B M; Amstutz, H; Wurm, F

    2000-10-01

    Replacement of the hyperimmune anti-Rhesus (Rh) D immunoglobulin, currently used to prevent haemolytic disease of the newborn, by fully recombinant human anti-RhD antibodies would solve the current logistic problems associated with supply and demand. The combination of phage display repertoire cloning with precise selection procedures enables isolation of specific genes that can then be inserted into mammalian expression systems allowing production of large quantities of recombinant human proteins. With the aim of selecting high-affinity anti-RhD antibodies, two human Fab libraries were constructed from a hyperimmune donor. Use of a new phage panning procedure involving bromelin-treated red blood cells enabled the isolation of two high-affinity Fab-expressing phage clones. LD-6-3 and LD-6-33, specific for RhD. These showed a novel reaction pattern by recognizing the D variants D(III), D(IVa), D(IVb), D(Va), D(VI) types I and II. D(VII), Rh33 and DFR. Full-length immunoglobulin molecules were constructed by cloning the variable regions into expression vectors containing genomic DNA encoding the immunoglobulin constant regions. We describe the first, stable, suspension growth-adapted Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line producing a high affinity recombinant human IgG1 anti-RhD antibody adapted to pilot-scale production. Evaluation of the Fc region of this recombinant antibody by either chemiluminescence or antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity (ADCC) assays demonstrated macrophage activation and lysis of red blood cells by human lymphocytes. A consistent source of recombinant human anti-RhD immunoglobulin produced by CHO cells is expected to meet the stringent safety and regulatory requirements for prophylactic application.

  13. Induction of antinuclear antibodies in patients with rheumatoid arthritis receiving treatment with human recombinant interferon gamma.

    PubMed Central

    Seitz, M; Franke, M; Kirchner, H

    1988-01-01

    Of six patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated with human recombinant interferon gamma for two to eight months, three developed antinuclear antibodies (ANAs). This was accompanied by a simultaneous clinical exacerbation of the disease activity. In this study both anti-inflammatory and immunostimulatory effects of human recombinant interferon gamma in patients with RA were observed. PMID:3137901

  14. Recombinant multi-epitope vaccine induce predefined epitope-specific antibodies against HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Liu, Zu-Qiang; Ding, Jian; Chen, Ying-Hua

    2002-11-01

    Monoclonal antibody 2F5 recognizing ELDKWA-epitope on HIV-1 gp41 has significant neutralization potency against 90% of the investigated viruses of African, Asia, American and European strains, but antibodies responses to ELDKWA-epitope in HIV-1 infected individuals were very low. Based on the epitope-vaccine strategy suggested by us, a recombinant glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion protein (GST-MELDKWAGELDKWAGELDKWAVDIGPGRAFYGPGRAFYGPGRAFY) as vaccine antigen containing three repeats of neutralizing epitope ELDKWA on gp41 and GPGRAFY on gp120 was designed and expressed in Escherichia coli. After vaccination course, the recombinant multi-epitope vaccine could induce high levels of predefined multi-epitope-specific antibodies in mice. These antibodies in sera could bind to both neutralizing epitopes on gp41 peptide, V3 loop peptide and recombinant soluble gp41 (aa539-684) in ELISA assay (antisera dilution: 1:1,600-25,600), while normal sera did not. Moreover, these antibodies in sera could recognize the CHO-WT cells which expressed HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein on the cell surfaces, indicating that the predefined epitope-specific antibodies could recognize natural envelope protein of HIV-1 though these antibodies were induced by recombinant multi-epitope-vaccine. These experimental results suggested a possible way to develop recombinant multi-epitope vaccine inducing multi-antiviral activities against HIV-1.

  15. Evaluation of recombinant Lig antigen-based ELISA for detection of leptospiral antibodies in canine sera.

    PubMed

    La-Ard, Anchalee; Amavisit, Patamaporn; Sukpuaram, Thavajchai; Wajjwalku, Worawidh

    2011-01-01

    Abstract. The objectives of this study were to clone the conserved region of leptospiral immunoglobulin-like protein (lig) gene and evaluate the utility of the recombinant Lig as an ELISA antigen for detection of leptospiral antibodies in canine sera. Leptospira kirschneri serovar Grippotyposa strain Moskva V was chosen to be a target for cloning the conserved region of Lig gene. This assay was evaluated with canine sera (n = 91) that were MAT-negative (< 1:100 dilution) and sera (n = 103) that were MAT-positive (> or = 1:100 dilution) using 24 serovars. The ELISA showed a relative sensitivity as compared to MAT of 84.5% whereas the specificity was 76.9%. This assay is simple and can be routinely prepared in large amounts. It was concluded that the GST.Lig recombinant protein-based ELISA could be used as a screening test for serodiagnosis of canine leptospirosis with also for confirmation of MAT-positive test results.

  16. Recombinant Carcinoembryonic Antigen as a Reporter Gene for Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kenanova, Vania; Barat, Bhaswati; Olafsen, Tove; Chatziioannou, Arion; Herschman, Harvey R.; Braun, Jonathan; Wu, Anna M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Reporter genes can provide a way of non-invasively assessing gene activity in vivo. However, current reporter gene strategies may be limited by the immunogenicity of foreign reporter proteins, endogenous expression or unwanted biological activity. We have developed a reporter gene based on carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), a human protein with limited normal tissue expression. Methods To construct a CEA reporter gene for PET, a CEA minigene (N-A3) was fused to the extracellular and transmembrane domains of the human FcγRIIb receptor. The NA3-FcγRIIb recombinant gene, driven by a CMV promoter, was transfected in Jurkat (human T cell leukemia) cells. Expression was analyzed by flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry (IHC), and microPET imaging. Results Flow cytometry identified Jurkat clones stably expressing NA3-FcγRIIb at low, medium, and high levels. High and medium NA3-FcγRIIb expression could also be detected by Western blot. Reporter gene positive and negative Jurkat cells were used to establish xenografts in athymic mice. IHC showed staining of the tumor with high reporter gene expression; medium and low N-A3 expression was not detected. MicroPET imaging, using an anti-CEA 124I-labeled scFv-Fc antibody fragment, demonstrated that only high N-A3 expression could be detected. Specific accumulation of activity was visualized at the N-A3 positive tumor as early as 4h. MicroPET image quantitation showed tumor activity of 1.8(±0.2), 15.2(±1.3) and 4.6(±1.2) %ID/g at 4h, 20h and 48h, respectively. Biodistribution at 48h, demonstrated tumor uptake of 4.8(±0.8) %ID/g. Conclusion The CEA N-A3 minigene has the potential to be used as a reporter gene for imaging cells in vivo. PMID:18719907

  17. Directed Selection of Recombinant Human Monoclonal Antibodies to Herpes Simplex Virus Glycoproteins from Phage Display Libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanna, Pietro Paolo; Williamson, R. Anthony; de Logu, Alessandro; Bloom, Floyd E.; Burton, Dennis R.

    1995-07-01

    Human monoclonal antibodies have considerable potential in the prophylaxis and treatment of viral disease. However, only a few such antibodies suitable for clinical use have been produced to date. We have previously shown that large panels of human recombinant monoclonal antibodies against a plethora of infectious agents, including herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2, can be established from phage display libraries. Here we demonstrate that facile cloning of recombinant Fab fragments against specific viral proteins in their native conformation can be accomplished by panning phage display libraries against viral glycoproteins "captured" from infected cell extracts by specific monoclonal antibodies immobilized on ELISA plates. We have tested this strategy by isolating six neutralizing recombinant antibodies specific for herpes simplex glycoprotein gD or gB, some of which are against conformationally sensitive epitopes. By using defined monoclonal antibodies for the antigen-capture step, this method can be used for the isolation of antibodies to specific regions and epitopes within the target viral protein. For instance, monoclonal antibodies to a nonneutralizing epitope can be used in the capture step to clone antibodies to neutralizing epitopes, or antibodies to a neutralizing epitope can be used to clone antibodies to a different neutralizing epitope. Furthermore, by using capturing antibodies to more immunodominant epitopes, one can direct the cloning to less immunogenic ones. This method should be of value in generating antibodies to be used both in the prophylaxis and treatment of viral infections and in the characterization of the mechanisms of antibody protective actions at the molecular level.

  18. HSV Recombinant Vectors for Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Manservigi, Roberto; Argnani, Rafaela; Marconi, Peggy

    2010-01-01

    The very deep knowledge acquired on the genetics and molecular biology of herpes simplex virus (HSV), has allowed the development of potential replication-competent and replication-defective vectors for several applications in human healthcare. These include delivery and expression of human genes to cells of the nervous systems, selective destruction of cancer cells, prophylaxis against infection with HSV or other infectious diseases, and targeted infection to specific tissues or organs. Replication-defective recombinant vectors are non-toxic gene transfer tools that preserve most of the neurotropic features of wild type HSV-1, particularly the ability to express genes after having established latent infections, and are thus proficient candidates for therapeutic gene transfer settings in neurons. A replication-defective HSV vector for the treatment of pain has recently entered in phase 1 clinical trial. Replication-competent (oncolytic) vectors are becoming a suitable and powerful tool to eradicate brain tumours due to their ability to replicate and spread only within the tumour mass, and have reached phase II/III clinical trials in some cases. The progress in understanding the host immune response induced by the vector is also improving the use of HSV as a vaccine vector against both HSV infection and other pathogens. This review briefly summarizes the obstacle encountered in the delivery of HSV vectors and examines the various strategies developed or proposed to overcome such challenges. PMID:20835362

  19. CHO-gmt5, a novel CHO glycosylation mutant for producing afucosylated and asialylated recombinant antibodies.

    PubMed

    Haryadi, Ryan; Zhang, Peiqing; Chan, Kah Fai; Song, Zhiwei

    2013-01-01

    Engineered zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) are powerful tools for creating double-stranded-breaks (DSBs) in genomic DNA in a site-specific manner. These DSBs generated by ZFNs can be repaired by homology-directed repair or nonhomologous end joining, in which the latter can be exploited to generate insertion or deletion mutants. Based on published literature, we designed a pair of zinc-finger nucleases and inactivated the GDP-fucose transporter gene (Slc35c1) in a previously reported CHO mutant that has a dysfunctional CMP-sialic acid transporter gene (Slc35a1). The resulting mutant cell line, CHO-gmt5, lacks functional GDP-fucose transporter and CMP-sialic acid transporter. As a result, these cells can only produce asialylated and afucosylated glycoproteins. It is now widely recognized that removal of the core fucose from the N-glycans attached to Asn(297) of human IgG1 significantly enhances its binding to its receptor, FcγRIIIa, and thereby dramatically improves antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). Recent reports showed that removal of sialic acid from IgG1 also enhances ADCC. Therefore, CHO-gmt5 may represent a more advantageous cell line for the production of recombinant antibodies with enhanced ADCC. These cells show comparable growth rate to wild type CHO-K1 cells and uncompromised transfection efficiency, which make them desirable for use as a production line.

  20. Isolation of recombinant antibodies directed against surface proteins of Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Shirvan, Ali Nazari; Aitken, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile has emerged as an increasingly important nosocomial pathogen and the prime causative agent of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and pseudomembranous colitis in humans. In addition to toxins A and B, immunological studies using antisera from patients infected with C. difficile have shown that a number of other bacterial factors contribute to the pathogenesis, including surface proteins, which are responsible for adhesion, motility and other interactions with the human host. In this study, various clostridial targets, including FliC, FliD and cell wall protein 66, were expressed and purified. Phage antibody display yielded a large panel of specific recombinant antibodies, which were expressed, purified and characterised. Reactions of the recombinant antibodies with their targets were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay; and Western blotting suggested that linear rather than conformational epitopes were recognised. Binding of the recombinant antibodies to surface-layer proteins and their components showed strain specificity, with good recognition of proteins from C. difficile 630. However, no reaction was observed for strain R20291-a representative of the 027 ribotype. Binding of the recombinant antibodies to C. difficile M120 extracts indicated that a component of a surface-layer protein of this strain might possess immunoglobulin-binding activities. The recombinant antibodies against FliC and FliD proteins were able to inhibit bacterial motility.

  1. Recombinant Brucella abortus gene expressing immunogenic protein

    SciTech Connect

    Mayfield, J.E.; Tabatabai, L.B.

    1991-06-11

    This patent describes a synthetic recombinant DNA molecule containing a DNA sequence. It comprises a gene of Brucella abortus encoding an immunogenic protein having a molecular weight of approximately 31,000 daltons as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under denaturing conditions, the protein having an isoelectric point around 4.9, and containing a twenty-five amino acid sequence from its amino terminal end consisting of Gln-Ala-Pro-Thr-Phe-Phe-Arg-Ile-Gly-Thr-Gly-Gly-Thr-Ala-Gly-Thr-Tyr-Tyr-Pro-Ile-Gly-Gly-Leu-Ile-Ala, wherein Gln, Ala, Pro, Thr, Phe, Arg, Ile, Gly, Tyr, and Leu, respectively, represent glutamine, alanine, proline, threonine, phenylalanine, arginine, isolecuine, glycine, tyrosine, and leucine.

  2. Human recombinant antimannan immunoglobulin G1 antibody confers resistance to hematogenously disseminated candidiasis in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mason X; Bohlman, M Charlotte; Itatani, Carol; Burton, Dennis R; Parren, Paul W H I; St Jeor, Stephen C; Kozel, Thomas R

    2006-01-01

    Mannan is a major cell wall component found in Candida species. Natural antimannan antibody is present in sera from most normal adults, but its role in host resistance to hematogenously disseminated candidiasis is unknown. The purpose of this study was to develop recombinant human antimannan antibody and to study its protective function. A phage Fab display combinatorial library containing Fab genes from bone marrow lymphocytes was screened with Candida albicans yeast cells and chemically purified mannan. One antimannan Fab, termed M1, was converted to a full-length immunoglobulin G1 antibody, M1g1, and M1g1 was produced in CHO cells. The M1g1 epitope was found in C. albicans serotypes A and B, Candida tropicalis, Candida guilliermondii, Candida glabrata, and Candida parapsilosis. Its expression was active at both 23 degrees C and 37 degrees C and uniform over the cell surface. BALB/c mice passively immunized with M1g1 were more resistant than control mice to a lethal hematogenous infection by C. albicans, as evidenced by extension of survival in an M1g1 dose-dependent manner (P, 0.08 to <0.001) and by reduction in number of infection foci and their size in the kidney. In vitro studies found that M1g1 promoted phagocytosis and phagocytic killing of C. albicans yeast cells by mouse peritoneal macrophages and was required for activation of the mouse complement cascade. Thus, human antimannan antibody may have a protective role in host resistance to systemic candidiasis.

  3. [Construction of combinatorial immune library of single chain human antibodies to orthopoxviruses and selection from this library antibodies to recombinant protein prA30L of variola virus].

    PubMed

    Dubrovskaia, V V; Ulitin, A B; Laman, A G; Gileva, I P; Bormotov, N I; Il'ichev, A A; Brovko, F A; Shchelkunov, S N; Belanov, E F; Tikunova, N V

    2007-01-01

    A combinatorial immune library of human single-chain antibody fragments (scFv) was constructed on the base of genes encoding variable domains of heavy and light chains of immunoglobulins cloned from the lymphocytes of four vaccinia virus (VACV) vaccinated donors. The size of the library was 3 x 10(7) independent clones. After the library was enriched with the clones producing scFv against recombinant analogue of variola virus surface protein prA30L, a panel of unique antibodies specific to both prA30L and VACV was selected from the library. A plaque reduction neutralization test was performed for all selected antibodies and two antibodies were shown to be able to neutralize plaque formation of VACV in Vero E6 cells monolayer. Binding specificities of these antibodies were confirmed using ELISA and Western blot analysis. To determine the amino acid sequences of neutralizing antibodies their genes were sequenced.

  4. Generation of Recombinant Human IgG Monoclonal Antibodies from Immortalized Sorted B Cells.

    PubMed

    Nogales-Gadea, Gisela; Saxena, Abhishek; Hoffmann, Carolin; Hounjet, Judith; Coenen, Daniëlle; Molenaar, Peter; Losen, Mario; Martinez-Martinez, Pilar

    2015-06-05

    Finding new methods for generating human monoclonal antibodies is an active research field that is important for both basic and applied sciences, including the development of immunotherapeutics. However, the techniques to identify and produce such antibodies tend to be arduous and sometimes the heavy and light chain pair of the antibodies are dissociated. Here, we describe a relatively simple, straightforward protocol to produce human recombinant monoclonal antibodies from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells using immortalization with Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) and Toll-like receptor 9 activation. With an adequate staining, B cells producing antibodies can be isolated for subsequent immortalization and clonal expansion. The antibody transcripts produced by the immortalized B cell clones can be amplified by PCR, sequenced as corresponding heavy and light chain pairs and cloned into immunoglobulin expression vectors. The antibodies obtained with this technique can be powerful tools to study relevant human immune responses, including autoimmunity, and create the basis for new therapeutics.

  5. Biotechnological applications of recombinant single-domain antibody fragments

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Single-domain antibody fragments possess structural features, such as a small dimension, an elevated stability, and the singularity of recognizing epitopes non-accessible for conventional antibodies that make them interesting for several research and biotechnological applications. Results The discovery of the single-domain antibody's potentials has stimulated their use in an increasing variety of fields. The rapid accumulation of articles describing new applications and further developments of established approaches has made it, therefore, necessary to update the previous reviews with a new and more complete summary of the topic. Conclusions Beside the necessary task of updating, this work analyses in detail some applicative aspects of the single-domain antibodies that have been overseen in the past, such as their efficacy in affinity chromatography, as co-crystallization chaperones, protein aggregation controllers, enzyme activity tuners, and the specificities of the unconventional single-domain fragments. PMID:21658216

  6. PVX-tolerant potato development using a nucleic acid-hydrolyzing recombinant antibody.

    PubMed

    Yang, J-G; Hwang, K-H; Kil, E-J; Park, J; Cho, S; Lee, Y-G; Auh, C-K; Rhee, Y; Lee, S

    2017-01-01

    3D8 scFv, a catalytic recombinant antibody developed in the MRL mouse, exhibits nucleic acid-hydrolyzing activity. Previous studies have demonstrated that tobacco plants harboring 3D8 scFv antibodies showed broad-spectrum resistance to infection by both DNA and RNA viruses. In this study, potatoes were transformed with the 3D8 scFv gene and screened by potato virus X (PVX) challenge. Starting with the T0 and T1 potato lines, PVX-tolerant T1 potatoes were identified in the field and characterized by ELISA and RT-PCR analysis. T2 potatoes were propagated for T3 generation and additional virus challenges in the field, and 44% of the 3D8 scFv T3 transgenic potatoes grown in GMO fields were found to be tolerant to PVX infection. Tubers from PVX-tolerant T3 lines were 60% bigger and 24% heavier, compared with tubers from PVX-susceptible transgenic lines and wild-type potatoes. Three-step virus challenge experiments and molecular characterization techniques were used for plants grown in growth chambers or fields to identify 3D8 scFv-transgenic, PVX-tolerant potatoes. These studies also revealed that the viral tolerance enabled by 3D8 scFv persisted during asexual propagation.

  7. Utilisation of antibody microarrays for the selection of specific and informative antibodies from recombinant library binders of unknown quality.

    PubMed

    Kibat, Janek; Schirrmann, Thomas; Knape, Matthias J; Helmsing, Saskia; Meier, Doris; Hust, Michael; Schröder, Christoph; Bertinetti, Daniela; Winter, Gerhard; Pardes, Khalid; Funk, Mia; Vala, Andrea; Giese, Nathalia; Herberg, Friedrich W; Dübel, Stefan; Hoheisel, Jörg D

    2016-09-25

    Many diagnostic and therapeutic concepts require antibodies of high specificity. Recombinant binder libraries and related selection approaches allow the efficient isolation of antibodies against almost every target of interest. Nevertheless, it cannot be guaranteed that selected antibodies perform well and interact specifically enough with analytes unless an elaborate characterisation is performed. Here, we present an approach to shorten this process by combining the selection of suitable antibodies with the identification of informative target molecules by means of antibody microarrays, thereby reducing the effort of antibody characterisation by concentrating on relevant molecules. In a pilot scheme, a library of 456 single-chain variable fragment (scFv) binders to 134 antigens was used. They were arranged in a microarray format and incubated with the protein content of clinical tissue samples isolated from pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and healthy pancreas, as well as recurrent and non-recurrent bladder tumours. We observed significant variation in the expression of the E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase (CHFR) as well as the glutamate receptor interacting protein 2 (GRIP2), for example, always with more than one of the scFvs binding to these targets. Only the relevant antibodies were then characterised further on antigen microarrays and by surface plasmon resonance experiments so as to select the most specific and highest affinity antibodies. These binders were in turn used to confirm a microarray result by immunohistochemistry analysis.

  8. Derivation and characterization of cholesterol-independent non-GS NS0 cell lines for production of recombinant antibodies.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Taymar E; Sar, Nalin; Genereux, Kimberly; Barritt, Diana S; He, Yimin; Burky, John E; Wesson, Mark C; Tso, J Yun; Tsurushita, Naoya; Zhou, Weichang; Sauer, Paul W

    2007-02-01

    Presented is an antibody production platform based on the fed-batch culture of recombinant NS0-derived cell lines. NS0 host cells, obtained from the European Collection of Cell Cultures (ECACC, Salisbury, UK, Part No. 85110503), were first adapted to grow in a protein-free, cholesterol-free medium. The resulting host cell line was designated NS0-PFCF (protein-free, cholesterol-free). The five production cell lines presented here were generated using a common protocol consisting of transfection by electroporation and subcloning. The NS0-PFCF host cell line was transfected using a single expression vector containing the Escherichia coli xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase gene (gpt), and the antibody heavy and light chain genes driven by the CMV promoter. The five cell lines were chosen after one to three rounds of iterative subcloning, which resulted in a 19-64% increase in antibody productivity when four mother-daughter cell pairs were cultured in a fed-batch bioreactor process. The production cell lines were genetically characterized to determine antibody gene integrity, nucleotide sequences, copy number, and the number of insertion sites in the NS0 cell genome. Genetic characterization data indicate that each of the five production cell lines has a single stably integrated copy of the antibody expression vector, and that the antibody genes are correctly expressed. Stability of antibody production was evaluated for three of the five cell lines by comparing the early stage seed bank with the Working Cell Bank (WCB). Antibody productivity was shown to be stable in two of three cell lines evaluated, while one of the cell lines exhibited a 20% drop in productivity after passaging for approximately 4 weeks. These five NS0-derived production cell lines were successfully cultured to produce antibodies with acceptable product quality attributes in a standardized fed-batch bioreactor process, consistently achieving an average specific productivity of 20-60 pg

  9. [Construction of a recombinant baculovirus transfer vector with two promoters expressing the anti-human CD28 chimeric antibody by using TP-PCR method].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yan; Chen, Yong-Jing; Qiu, Yu-Hua; Zheng, Feng-Feng; Zhu, Jiang

    2005-09-01

    CD28, a cell surface glycoprotein, predominantly expressed on T cells, belongs to the Ig superfamily and provides critical co-stimulatory signals. The data which have published indicate that the monoclonal antibody against CD28 can decrease curative effects when it was applied in vivo for a long time. In order to avoid the human-anti-mouse action, anti-CD28 mAb must be humanized before it can be used in clinical study. Chimeric antibody, consisting of variable regions of mouse antibody and the constant regions of human IgG1, is often chosen by designers in generating humanized antibody. In this study, to prepare the anti-human CD28 chimeric antibody, the genes coding variable regions of anti-CD28 mAb and the constant regions of human IgG1 were cloned by PCR method. Then, the target genes were assembled by TP-PCR, a novel method developed for fusing genes without designing endonuclease sites at the both end of the target genes, and inserted into the baculovirus transfer vector pAcUW3 respectively. Thus, the recombinant baculovirus transfer vector with two strong promoters, ph and p10 was successfully constructed, which can express two different foreign genes at the same time. The recombinant vector was identified by the methods of restriction digesting, electrophoresis, PCR amplification and further verified by DNA sequence analysis. This work will contribute to expressing the chimeric CD28 antibody in insect cells.

  10. Generation of polyclonal antibodies against recombinant human glucocerebrosidase produced in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Novo, Juliana Branco; Oliveira, Maria Leonor Sarno; Magalhães, Geraldo Santana; Morganti, Ligia; Raw, Isaías; Ho, Paulo Lee

    2010-11-01

    Deficiency of the lysosomal glucocerebrosidase (GCR) enzyme results in Gaucher's disease, the most common inherited storage disorder. Treatment consists of enzyme replacement therapy by the administration of recombinant GCR produced in Chinese hamster ovary cells. The production of anti-GCR antibodies has already been described with placenta-derived human GCR that requires successive chromatographic procedures. Here, we report a practical and efficient method to obtain anti-GCR polyclonal antibodies against recombinant GCR produced in Escherichia coli and further purified by a single step through nickel affinity chromatography. The purified GCR was used to immunize BALB/c mice and the induction of anti-GCR antibodies was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The specificity of the antiserum was also evaluated by western blot analysis against recombinant GCR produced by COS-7 cells or against endogenous GCR of human cell lines. GCR was strongly recognized by the produced antibodies, either as cell-associated or as secreted forms. The detected molecular masses of 59-66 kDa are in accordance to the expected size for glycosylated GCR. The GCR produced in E. coli would facilitate the production of polyclonal (shown here) and monoclonal antibodies and their use in the characterization of new biosimilar recombinant GCRs coming in the near future.

  11. Rapid characterization of binding specificity and cross-reactivity of antibodies using recombinant human protein arrays.

    PubMed

    Kijanka, Gregor; Ipcho, Simon; Baars, Sabine; Chen, Hong; Hadley, Katie; Beveridge, Allan; Gould, Edith; Murphy, Derek

    2009-01-30

    Antibodies are routinely used as research tools, in diagnostic assays and increasingly as therapeutics. Ideally, these applications require antibodies with high sensitivity and specificity; however, many commercially available antibodies are limited in their use as they cross-react with non-related proteins. Here we describe a novel method to characterize antibody specificity. Six commercially available monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies were screened on high-density protein arrays comprising of ~10,000 recombinant human proteins (Imagenes). Two of the six antibodies examined; anti-pICln and anti-GAPDH, bound exclusively to their target antigen and showed no cross-reactivity with non-related proteins. However, four of the antibodies, anti-HSP90, anti-HSA, anti-bFGF and anti-Ro52, showed strong cross-reactivity with other proteins on the array. Antibody-antigen interactions were readily confirmed using Western immunoblotting. In addition, the redundant nature of the protein array used, enabled us to define the epitopic region within HSP90 of the anti-HSP90 antibody, and identify possible shared epitopes in cross-reacting proteins. In conclusion, high-density protein array technology is a fast and effective means for determining the specificity of antibodies and can be used to further improve the accuracy of antibody applications.

  12. Quantitation of a recombinant monoclonal antibody in monkey serum by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongcheng; Manuilov, Anton V; Chumsae, Chris; Babineau, Michelle L; Tarcsa, Edit

    2011-07-01

    A method including protein A purification, limited Lys-C digestion, and mass spectrometry analysis was used in the study to quantify a recombinant monoclonal antibody in cynomolgus monkey serum. The same antibody that was isotopically labeled was used as an internal standard. Interferences from serum proteins were first significantly reduced by protein A purification and then by limited Lys-C digestion of protein A bound IgG, including both monkey and the recombinant IgG. Fab fragment of the recombinant human IgG was analyzed directly by LC-MS, while monkey IgG and the Fc fragment of the recombinant human IgG remained bound to protein A resin. Quantitation was achieved by measuring the peak intensity of the Fab from the recombinant human IgG and comparing it to that of the Fab from the stable isotope-labeled internal standard. The results were in good agreement with the values from ELISA. LC-MS can therefore be used as a complementary approach to ELISA to quantify recombinant monoclonal antibodies in serum for pharmacokinetics studies and it can also be used where specific reagents such as antigens are not readily available for ELISA.

  13. A tool kit for rapid cloning and expression of recombinant antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Dodev, Tihomir S.; Karagiannis, Panagiotis; Gilbert, Amy E.; Josephs, Debra H.; Bowen, Holly; James, Louisa K.; Bax, Heather J.; Beavil, Rebecca; Pang, Marie O.; Gould, Hannah J.; Karagiannis, Sophia N.; Beavil, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last four decades, molecular cloning has evolved tremendously. Efficient products allowing assembly of multiple DNA fragments have become available. However, cost-effective tools for engineering antibodies of different specificities, isotypes and species are still needed for many research and clinical applications in academia. Here, we report a method for one-step assembly of antibody heavy- and light-chain DNAs into a single mammalian expression vector, starting from DNAs encoding the desired variable and constant regions, which allows antibodies of different isotypes and specificity to be rapidly generated. As a proof of principle we have cloned, expressed and characterized functional recombinant tumor-associated antigen-specific chimeric IgE/κ and IgG1/κ, as well as recombinant grass pollen allergen Phl p 7 specific fully human IgE/λ and IgG4/λ antibodies. This method utilizing the antibody expression vectors, available at Addgene, has many applications, including the potential to support simultaneous processing of antibody panels, to facilitate mechanistic studies of antigen-antibody interactions and to conduct early evaluations of antibody functions. PMID:25073855

  14. A High Through-put Platform for Recombinant Antibodies to Folded Proteins.

    PubMed

    Hornsby, Michael; Paduch, Marcin; Miersch, Shane; Sääf, Annika; Matsuguchi, Tet; Lee, Brian; Wypisniak, Karolina; Doak, Allison; King, Daniel; Usatyuk, Svitlana; Perry, Kimberly; Lu, Vince; Thomas, William; Luke, Judy; Goodman, Jay; Hoey, Robert J; Lai, Darson; Griffin, Carly; Li, Zhijian; Vizeacoumar, Franco J; Dong, Debbie; Campbell, Elliot; Anderson, Stephen; Zhong, Nan; Gräslund, Susanne; Koide, Shohei; Moffat, Jason; Sidhu, Sachdev; Kossiakoff, Anthony; Wells, James

    2015-10-01

    Antibodies are key reagents in biology and medicine, but commercial sources are rarely recombinant and thus do not provide a permanent and renewable resource. Here, we describe an industrialized platform to generate antigens and validated recombinant antibodies for 346 transcription factors (TFs) and 211 epigenetic antigens. We describe an optimized automated phage display and antigen expression pipeline that in aggregate produced about 3000 sequenced Fragment antigen-binding domain that had high affinity (typically EC50<20 nm), high stability (Tm∼80 °C), good expression in E. coli (∼5 mg/L), and ability to bind antigen in complex cell lysates. We evaluated a subset of Fabs generated to homologous SCAN domains for binding specificities. These Fragment antigen-binding domains were monospecific to their target SCAN antigen except in rare cases where they cross-reacted with a few highly related antigens. Remarkably, immunofluorescence experiments in six cell lines for 270 of the TF antigens, each having multiple antibodies, show that ∼70% stain predominantly in the cytosol and ∼20% stain in the nucleus which reinforces the dominant role that translocation plays in TF biology. These cloned antibody reagents are being made available to the academic community through our web site recombinant-antibodies.org to allow a more system-wide analysis of TF and chromatin biology. We believe these platforms, infrastructure, and automated approaches will facilitate the next generation of renewable antibody reagents to the human proteome in the coming decade.

  15. A High Through-put Platform for Recombinant Antibodies to Folded Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Hornsby, Michael; Paduch, Marcin; Miersch, Shane; Sääf, Annika; Matsuguchi, Tet; Lee, Brian; Wypisniak, Karolina; Doak, Allison; King, Daniel; Usatyuk, Svitlana; Perry, Kimberly; Lu, Vince; Thomas, William; Luke, Judy; Goodman, Jay; Hoey, Robert J.; Lai, Darson; Griffin, Carly; Li, Zhijian; Vizeacoumar, Franco J.; Dong, Debbie; Campbell, Elliot; Anderson, Stephen; Zhong, Nan; Gräslund, Susanne; Koide, Shohei; Moffat, Jason; Sidhu, Sachdev; Kossiakoff, Anthony; Wells, James

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies are key reagents in biology and medicine, but commercial sources are rarely recombinant and thus do not provide a permanent and renewable resource. Here, we describe an industrialized platform to generate antigens and validated recombinant antibodies for 346 transcription factors (TFs) and 211 epigenetic antigens. We describe an optimized automated phage display and antigen expression pipeline that in aggregate produced about 3000 sequenced Fragment antigen-binding domain that had high affinity (typically EC50<20 nm), high stability (Tm∼80 °C), good expression in E. coli (∼5 mg/L), and ability to bind antigen in complex cell lysates. We evaluated a subset of Fabs generated to homologous SCAN domains for binding specificities. These Fragment antigen-binding domains were monospecific to their target SCAN antigen except in rare cases where they cross-reacted with a few highly related antigens. Remarkably, immunofluorescence experiments in six cell lines for 270 of the TF antigens, each having multiple antibodies, show that ∼70% stain predominantly in the cytosol and ∼20% stain in the nucleus which reinforces the dominant role that translocation plays in TF biology. These cloned antibody reagents are being made available to the academic community through our web site recombinant-antibodies.org to allow a more system-wide analysis of TF and chromatin biology. We believe these platforms, infrastructure, and automated approaches will facilitate the next generation of renewable antibody reagents to the human proteome in the coming decade. PMID:26290498

  16. Prevalence and Gene Characteristics of Antibodies with Cofactor-induced HIV-1 Specificity*

    PubMed Central

    Lecerf, Maxime; Scheel, Tobias; Pashov, Anastas D.; Jarossay, Annaelle; Ohayon, Delphine; Planchais, Cyril; Mesnage, Stephane; Berek, Claudia; Kaveri, Srinivas V.; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sébastien; Dimitrov, Jordan D.

    2015-01-01

    The healthy immune repertoire contains a fraction of antibodies that bind to various biologically relevant cofactors, including heme. Interaction of heme with some antibodies results in induction of new antigen binding specificities and acquisition of binding polyreactivity. In vivo, extracellular heme is released as a result of hemolysis or tissue damage; hence the post-translational acquisition of novel antigen specificities might play an important role in the diversification of the immunoglobulin repertoire and host defense. Here, we demonstrate that seronegative immune repertoires contain antibodies that gain reactivity to HIV-1 gp120 upon exposure to heme. Furthermore, a panel of human recombinant antibodies was cloned from different B cell subpopulations, and the prevalence of antibodies with cofactor-induced specificity for gp120 was determined. Our data reveal that upon exposure to heme, ∼24% of antibodies acquired binding specificity for divergent strains of HIV-1 gp120. Sequence analyses reveal that heme-sensitive antibodies do not differ in their repertoire of variable region genes and in most of the molecular features of their antigen-binding sites from antibodies that do not change their antigen binding specificity. However, antibodies with cofactor-induced gp120 specificity possess significantly lower numbers of somatic mutations in their variable region genes. This study contributes to the understanding of the significance of cofactor-binding antibodies in immunoglobulin repertoires and of the influence that the tissue microenvironment might have in shaping adaptive immune responses. PMID:25564611

  17. Development and Testing of Recombinant Single Domain Antibodies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-31

    critical insights to the basis of the sdAb-target interaction and sdAb properties. (a) Papers published in peer-reviewed journals (N/A for none) Structures...Goldman E.R. 2010 Binding Kinetics of anti-Ricin Single Domain Antibodies and Improved Detection Using a B-chain Specific Binder. Analytical...Library. Anal. Chem. 78:8245-55 List of papers submitted or published that acknowledge ARO support during this reporting period. List the papers

  18. Expression of the ’Bacillus anthracis’ Protective Antigen Gene by Baculovirus and Vaccinia Virus Recombinants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-01

    T’ansfocl~on Baculovitus Genom . DMA Homoogos vSpodopt...a A~cob~n.ion ~ecob~naonlFrugipoida Coll VERtO Coll IPlatt" Assay 4 3 -GA). PA Gene Postive...localization was not determined. Baculovirus recombinant- genome DNA into SF-9 cells followed by homologous re- infected SF-9 cells were also...baculovirus genome and pAcYMI. The PA gene epitopes defined by a battery of monoclonal antibodies were was inserted into the baculovirus polyhcdrin gene under

  19. A Recombinant Secondary Antibody Mimic as a Target-specific Signal Amplifier and an Antibody Immobilizer in Immunoassays

    PubMed Central

    Min, Junseon; Song, Eun Kyung; Kim, Hansol; Kim, Kyoung Taek; Park, Tae Joo; Kang, Sebyung

    2016-01-01

    We construct a novel recombinant secondary antibody mimic, GST-ABD, which can bind to the Fc regions of target-bound primary antibodies and acquire multiple HRPs simultaneously. We produce it in tenth of mg quantities with a bacterial overexpression system and simple purification procedures, significantly reducing the manufacturing cost and time without the use of animals. GST-ABD is effectively conjugated with 3 HRPs per molecule on an average and selectively bind to the Fc region of primary antibodies derived from three different species (mouse, rabbit, and rat). HRP-conjugated GST-ABD (HRP-GST-ABD) is successfully used as an alternative to secondary antibodies to amplify target-specific signals in both ELISA and immunohistochemistry regardless of the target molecules and origin of primary antibodies used. GST-ABD also successfully serves as an anchoring adaptor on the surface of GSH-coated plates for immobilizing antigen-capturing antibodies in an orientation-controlled manner for sandwich-type indirect ELISA through simple molecular recognition without any complicated chemical modification. PMID:27063487

  20. Utility of recombinant Fragment C for assessment of anti-tetanus antibodies in plasma

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Girija; Pedersen, Karl; Guenette, Denis; Sink, Joyce; Haque, Rashidul; Petri, William A.; Herbein, Joel; Gilchrist, Carol A.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-tetanus antibodies in biological samples are typically detected using an ELISA based on toxoided tetanus neurotoxin as antigen. We demonstrate that recombinantly produced Fragment C of the toxin heavy chain (rFragC) is an effective alternative antigen for assessment of tetanus- immune status in plasma samples. PMID:25749462

  1. Major psychological factors affecting acceptance of gene-recombination technology.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yutaka

    2004-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to verify the validity of a causal model that was made to predict the acceptance of gene-recombination technology. A structural equation model was used as a causal model. First of all, based on preceding studies, the factors of perceived risk, perceived benefit, and trust were set up as important psychological factors determining acceptance of gene-recombination technology in the structural equation model. An additional factor, "sense of bioethics," which I consider to be important for acceptance of biotechnology, was added to the model. Based on previous studies, trust was set up to have an indirect influence on the acceptance of gene-recombination technology through perceived risk and perceived benefit in the model. Participants were 231 undergraduate students in Japan who answered a questionnaire with a 5-point bipolar scale. The results indicated that the proposed model fits the data well, and showed that acceptance of gene-recombination technology is explained largely by four factors, that is, perceived risk, perceived benefit, trust, and sense of bioethics, whether the technology is applied to plants, animals, or human beings. However, the relative importance of the four factors was found to vary depending on whether the gene-recombination technology was applied to plants, animals, or human beings. Specifically, the factor of sense of bioethics is the most important factor in acceptance of plant gene-recombination technology and animal gene-recombination technology, and the factors of trust and perceived risk are the most important factors in acceptance of human being gene-recombination technology.

  2. Accessing of recombinant human monoclonal antibodies from patient libraries by eukaryotic ribosome display.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jie; Wang, Lin; Markiv, Anatoliy; Jeffs, Simon A; Dreja, Hanna; McKnight, Áine; He, Mingyue; Kang, Angray S

    2012-01-01

    What are effective antibodies and when do they arise to prevent or delay disease onset during a natural infection or in the course of vaccination? To address these questions at a molecular level requires longitudinal studies, capturing and analyzing the antibody repertoire at regular intervals following exposure or sero-conversion. Such studies require a method that allows the rapid generation and evaluation of monoclonal antibodies from relatively small volumes of blood. Here we describe an approach for rapidly generating human monoclonal antibodies in vitro by directly screening single-chain antibody repertories derived from donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells using ribosome display. Two single-chain antibody libraries were constructed using RNA extracted from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of two HIV-1 long-term non-progressor donors (K530 and M325). Both libraries were subjected to a single round of in vitro ribosome display for enrichment of human monoclonal antibodies against recombinant gp120(K530), derived from virus isolated from donor K530. This study has validated a novel, in vitro method for the rapid generation of human monoclonal antibodies. An antibody library could be constructed from as little as 3 μg of total RNA, the equivalent of 3-5 mL of human blood.

  3. Optimized selection of anti-tumor recombinant antibodies from phage libraries on intact cells.

    PubMed

    Pavoni, Emiliano; Vaccaro, Paola; Anastasi, Anna Maria; Minenkova, Olga

    2014-02-01

    Generation of human recombinant antibody libraries displayed on the surface of the filamentous phage and selection of specific antibodies against desirable targets allows production of fully human antibodies usable for repeated administration in humans. Various lymphoid tissues from immunized donors, such as lymph nodes or peripheral blood lymphocytes from individuals with tumor or lymphocytes infiltrating tumor masses may serve as a source of specific anti-tumor antibody repertoire for generation of tumor-focused phage display libraries. In the case of lack of tumor-associated antigens in the purified form, high affinity anti-tumor antibodies can be isolated through library panning on whole cells expressing these antigens. However, affinity selection against cell surface specific antigens within highly heterogeneous population of molecules is not a very efficient process that often results in the selection of unspecific antibodies or antibodies against intracellular antigens that are generally useless for targeted immunotherapy. In this work, we developed a new cell-based antibody selection protocol that, by eliminating the contamination of dead cells from the cell suspension, dramatically improves the selection frequency of anti-tumor antibodies recognizing cell surface antigens.

  4. Expression of an anti-botulinum toxin A neutralizing single-chain Fv recombinant antibody in transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed

    Almquist, Kurt C; McLean, Michael D; Niu, Yongqing; Byrne, Greg; Olea-Popelka, Fernando C; Murrant, Coral; Barclay, Jack; Hall, J Christopher

    2006-03-15

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most poisonous substances known and are thus classified as high-risk threats for use as bioterror agents. To examine the potential of transgenic plants as bioreactors for the production of BoNT antidotes, we transformed tobacco with an optimized, synthetic gene encoding a botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) neutralizing single-chain Fv (scFv) recombinant antibody fragment. In vitro mouse muscle twitch assays demonstrated the functional utility of this scFv extracted from tobacco for neutralizing the paralytic effects of BoNT/A at neuromuscular junctions. Based on the efficiency of the scFv capture process and the dose required to antidote a human being, 1-2 ha of this tobacco could yield up to 4 kg of scFv, which would be enough to contribute to the manufacture of 1,000,000 therapeutic doses of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) cocktail capable of neutralizing the effects of BoNT poisoning. Transgenic plants could provide an inexpensive production platform for expression of multiple mAbs toward the creation of polyclonal therapies (i.e. pooled mAbs) as the next improvement in recombinant antibody therapy.

  5. A replicating adenovirus capsid display recombinant elicits antibodies against Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites in Aotus nancymaae monkeys.

    PubMed

    Karen, Kasey A; Deal, Cailin; Adams, Robert J; Nielsen, Carolyn; Ward, Cameron; Espinosa, Diego A; Xie, Jane; Zavala, Fidel; Ketner, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Decades of success with live adenovirus vaccines suggest that replication-competent recombinant adenoviruses (rAds) could serve as effective vectors for immunization against other pathogens. To explore the potential of a live rAd vaccine against malaria, we prepared a viable adenovirus 5 (Ad5) recombinant that displays a B-cell epitope from the circumsporozoite protein (CSP) of Plasmodium falciparum on the virion surface. The recombinant induced P. falciparum sporozoite-neutralizing antibodies in mice. Human adenoviruses do not replicate in mice. Therefore, to examine immunogenicity in a system in which, as in humans, the recombinant replicates, we constructed a similar recombinant in an adenovirus mutant that replicates in monkey cells and immunized four Aotus nancymaae monkeys. The recombinant replicated in the monkeys after intratracheal instillation, the first demonstration of replication of human adenoviruses in New World monkeys. Immunization elicited antibodies both to the Plasmodium epitope and the Ad5 vector. Antibodies from all four monkeys recognized CSP on intact parasites, and plasma from one monkey neutralized sporozoites in vitro and conferred partial protection against P. falciparum sporozoite infection after passive transfer to mice. Prior enteric inoculation of two animals with antigenically wild-type adenovirus primed a response to the subsequent intratracheal inoculation, suggesting a route to optimizing performance. A vaccine is not yet available against P. falciparum, which induces the deadliest form of malaria and kills approximately one million children each year. The live capsid display recombinant described here may constitute an early step in a critically needed novel approach to malaria immunization.

  6. Real time detection of anthrax spores using highly specific anti-EA1 recombinant antibodies produced by competitive panning.

    PubMed

    Love, Tracey E; Redmond, Caroline; Mayers, Carl N

    2008-05-20

    We describe a targeted approach for the production of biological recognition elements capable of fast, specific detection of anthrax spores on biosensor surfaces. The aim was to produce single chain antibodies (scFvs) to EA1, a Bacillus anthracis S-layer protein that is also present, although not identical, in related to Bacillus species. The aim of the work was to produce antibodies that would detect B. anthracis EA1 protein and intact spores with a high degree of specificity, but would not detect other Bacillus species. Existing monoclonal antibodies were evaluated and found to recognise B. anthracis EA1 and S-layer proteins from other closely related Bacillus species. Recombinant anti-EA1 scFvs were isolated from B. anthracis immune library that contained antibody genes raised against B. anthracis spores and purified exosporium. Two approaches for scFv selection were used; standard (non-competitive) panning, and competitive panning. The non-competitive biopanning strategy isolated scFvs that recognised EA1 from B. anthracis, but also cross-reacted with other Bacillus species. In contrast, the competitive panning approach used S-layer proteins from other Bacillus species to generate scFvs that were highly specific to B. anthracis EA1 and demonstrated apparent nanomolar binding affinities. Specific, real time detection of B. anthracis spores was demonstrated with these scFvs using an evanescent wave biosensor, the Resonant Mirror. The approach described can be used to generate specific antibodies to any desired target where homologous proteins also exist in closely related species, and demonstrates clear advantages to using recombinant technology to produce biological recognition elements for detection of biological threat agents.

  7. Evaluation of Solid Supports for Slide- and Well-Based Recombinant Antibody Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Gerdtsson, Anna S.; Dexlin-Mellby, Linda; Delfani, Payam; Berglund, Erica; Borrebaeck, Carl A. K.; Wingren, Christer

    2016-01-01

    Antibody microarrays have emerged as an important tool within proteomics, enabling multiplexed protein expression profiling in both health and disease. The design and performance of antibody microarrays and how they are processed are dependent on several factors, of which the interplay between the antibodies and the solid surfaces plays a central role. In this study, we have taken on the first comprehensive view and evaluated the overall impact of solid surfaces on the recombinant antibody microarray design. The results clearly demonstrated the importance of the surface-antibody interaction and showed the effect of the solid supports on the printing process, the array format of planar arrays (slide- and well-based), the assay performance (spot features, reproducibility, specificity and sensitivity) and assay processing (degree of automation). In the end, two high-end recombinant antibody microarray technology platforms were designed, based on slide-based (black polymer) and well-based (clear polymer) arrays, paving the way for future large-scale protein expression profiling efforts. PMID:27600082

  8. Characterization of four monoclonal antibodies to recombinant human tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Takashi; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Miyazaki, Shuichi; Hokari, Shigeru; Komoda, Tsugikazu

    2002-06-01

    In this study we produced a recombinant human Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) enzyme from baculovirus-infected insect cells, generated four monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) 15A4, 13B9, 1C6 and 3G7, to the enzyme, and characterized these antibodies. In the human serum and lung specimen, all four antibodies appeared to have a high specificity for native TRAP enzyme in western blot analysis, immunohistochemical analysis and enzyme immunoassay. These antibodies may react with respective conformational determinants, therefore, they may be useful for detection of active TRAP. Only one of the antibodies, 15A4 also reacted with a denatured epitope, therefore, it is suitable for western blot analysis, enzyme immunoassay and for immunohistochemistry in the rat. Taken together, having characterized properties of four monoclonal antibodies against recombinant human TRAP enzyme may be useful for development of TRAP specific immunoassays in pathology and hematology of the bone. They will certainly be of use for the study of biosynthesis, regulation and function of the TRAP enzyme.

  9. Evaluation of Solid Supports for Slide- and Well-Based Recombinant Antibody Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Gerdtsson, Anna S; Dexlin-Mellby, Linda; Delfani, Payam; Berglund, Erica; Borrebaeck, Carl A K; Wingren, Christer

    2016-06-08

    Antibody microarrays have emerged as an important tool within proteomics, enabling multiplexed protein expression profiling in both health and disease. The design and performance of antibody microarrays and how they are processed are dependent on several factors, of which the interplay between the antibodies and the solid surfaces plays a central role. In this study, we have taken on the first comprehensive view and evaluated the overall impact of solid surfaces on the recombinant antibody microarray design. The results clearly demonstrated the importance of the surface-antibody interaction and showed the effect of the solid supports on the printing process, the array format of planar arrays (slide- and well-based), the assay performance (spot features, reproducibility, specificity and sensitivity) and assay processing (degree of automation). In the end, two high-end recombinant antibody microarray technology platforms were designed, based on slide-based (black polymer) and well-based (clear polymer) arrays, paving the way for future large-scale protein expression profiling efforts.

  10. Potent neutralization of botulinum neurotoxin by recombinant oligoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    Nowakowski, A.; Wang, C.; Powers, D. B.; Amersdorfer, P.; Smith, T. J.; Montgomery, V. A.; Sheridan, R.; Blake, R.; Smith, L. A.; Marks, J. D.

    2002-01-01

    The botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) cause the paralytic human disease botulism and are one of the highest-risk threat agents for bioterrorism. To generate a pharmaceutical to prevent or treat botulism, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were generated by phage display and evaluated for neutralization of BoNT serotype A (BoNT/A) in vivo. Although no single mAb significantly neutralized toxin, a combination of three mAbs (oligoclonal Ab) neutralized 450,000 50% lethal doses of BoNT/A, a potency 90 times greater than human hyperimmune globulin. The potency of oligoclonal Ab was primarily due to a large increase in functional Ab binding affinity. The results indicate that the potency of the polyclonal humoral immune response can be deconvoluted to a few mAbs binding nonoverlapping epitopes, providing a route to drugs for preventing and treating botulism and diseases caused by other pathogens and biologic threat agents. PMID:12177434

  11. In Vitro and In Vivo Gene Delivery by Recombinant Baculoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Tani, Hideki; Limn, Chang Kwang; Yap, Chan Choo; Onishi, Masayoshi; Nozaki, Masami; Nishimune, Yoshitake; Okahashi, Nobuo; Kitagawa, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Rie; Mochizuki, Rika; Moriishi, Kohji; Matsuura, Yoshiharu

    2003-01-01

    Although recombinant baculovirus vectors can be an efficient tool for gene transfer into mammalian cells in vitro, gene transduction in vivo has been hampered by the inactivation of baculoviruses by serum complement. Recombinant baculoviruses possessing excess envelope protein gp64 or other viral envelope proteins on the virion surface deliver foreign genes into a variety of mammalian cell lines more efficiently than the unmodified baculovirus. In this study, we examined the efficiency of gene transfer both in vitro and in vivo by recombinant baculoviruses possessing envelope proteins derived from either vesicular stomatitis virus (VSVG) or rabies virus. These recombinant viruses efficiently transferred reporter genes into neural cell lines, primary rat neural cells, and primary mouse osteal cells in vitro. The VSVG-modified baculovirus exhibited greater resistance to inactivation by animal sera than the unmodified baculovirus. A synthetic inhibitor of the complement activation pathway circumvented the serum inactivation of the unmodified baculovirus. Furthermore, the VSVG-modified baculovirus could transduce a reporter gene into the cerebral cortex and testis of mice by direct inoculation in vivo. These results suggest the possible use of the recombinant baculovirus vectors in combination with the administration of complement inhibitors for in vivo gene therapy. PMID:12941888

  12. Therapeutic antibody gene transfer: an active approach to passive immunity.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Joost M; Bleeker, Wim K; Parren, Paul W H I

    2004-09-01

    Advances in gene transfer approaches are enabling the possibility of applying therapeutic antibodies using DNA. In particular gene transfer in combination with electroporation is promising and can result in generating in vivo antibody concentrations in the low therapeutic range. However, several important problems need to be dealt with before antibody gene transfer can become a valuable supplement to the current therapies. As antibody production following gene transfer is difficult to control, the danger of inducing autoimmune conditions or uncontrollable side effects occurs in cases in which autologous antigens are targeted. It is suggested that the most promising area of application therefore appears to be infectious disease in which heterologous antigens are targeted and concerns for long-term antibody exposure are minimal. Finally, genes encoding fully human antibodies will enhance long-term expression and decrease problems linked to immunogenicity.

  13. Determination of equilibrium dissociation constants for recombinant antibodies by high-throughput affinity electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yuchen; Sackmann, Eric K; Wypisniak, Karolina; Hornsby, Michael; Datwani, Sammy S; Herr, Amy E

    2016-12-23

    High-quality immunoreagents enhance the performance and reproducibility of immunoassays and, in turn, the quality of both biological and clinical measurements. High quality recombinant immunoreagents are generated using antibody-phage display. One metric of antibody quality - the binding affinity - is quantified through the dissociation constant (KD) of each recombinant antibody and the target antigen. To characterize the KD of recombinant antibodies and target antigen, we introduce affinity electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) in a high-throughput format suitable for small volume samples. A microfluidic card comprised of free-standing polyacrylamide gel (fsPAG) separation lanes supports 384 concurrent EMSAs in 30 s using a single power source. Sample is dispensed onto the microfluidic EMSA card by acoustic droplet ejection (ADE), which reduces EMSA variability compared to sample dispensing using manual or pin tools. The KD for each of a six-member fragment antigen-binding fragment library is reported using ~25-fold less sample mass and ~5-fold less time than conventional heterogeneous assays. Given the form factor and performance of this micro- and mesofluidic workflow, we have developed a sample-sparing, high-throughput, solution-phase alternative for biomolecular affinity characterization.

  14. Determination of equilibrium dissociation constants for recombinant antibodies by high-throughput affinity electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yuchen; Sackmann, Eric K.; Wypisniak, Karolina; Hornsby, Michael; Datwani, Sammy S.; Herr, Amy E.

    2016-01-01

    High-quality immunoreagents enhance the performance and reproducibility of immunoassays and, in turn, the quality of both biological and clinical measurements. High quality recombinant immunoreagents are generated using antibody-phage display. One metric of antibody quality – the binding affinity – is quantified through the dissociation constant (KD) of each recombinant antibody and the target antigen. To characterize the KD of recombinant antibodies and target antigen, we introduce affinity electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) in a high-throughput format suitable for small volume samples. A microfluidic card comprised of free-standing polyacrylamide gel (fsPAG) separation lanes supports 384 concurrent EMSAs in 30 s using a single power source. Sample is dispensed onto the microfluidic EMSA card by acoustic droplet ejection (ADE), which reduces EMSA variability compared to sample dispensing using manual or pin tools. The KD for each of a six-member fragment antigen-binding fragment library is reported using ~25-fold less sample mass and ~5-fold less time than conventional heterogeneous assays. Given the form factor and performance of this micro- and mesofluidic workflow, we have developed a sample-sparing, high-throughput, solution-phase alternative for biomolecular affinity characterization. PMID:28008969

  15. Neutralizing antibodies respond to a bivalent dengue DNA vaccine or/and a recombinant bivalent antigen.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Shan; Weng, Yu-Wei; Huang, Hai-Long; Zhang, Jian-Ming; Yan, Yan-Sheng

    2015-02-01

    There is currently no effective vaccine to prevent dengue infection, despite the existence of multiple studies on potential methods of immunization. The aim of the present study was to explore the effect of DNA and/or recombinant protein on levels of neutralizing antibodies. For this purpose, envelope domain IIIs of dengue serotypes 1 and 2 (DEN-1/2)were spliced by a linker (Gly‑Gly‑Ser‑Gly‑Ser)3 and cloned into the prokaryotic expression plasmid pET30a (+) and eukaryotic vector pcDNA3.1 (+). The chimeric bivalent protein was expressed in Escherichia coli, and one‑step purification by high‑performance liquid chromatography was conducted. Protein expression levels of the DNA plasmid were tested in BHK‑21 cells by indirect immunofluorescent assay. In order to explore a more effective immunization strategy and to develop neutralizing antibodies against the two serotypes, mice were inoculated with recombinant bivalent protein, the DNA vaccine, or the two given simultaneously. Presence of the specific antibodies was tested by ELISA and the presence of the neutralizing antibodies was determined by plaque reduction neutralization test. Results of the analysis indicated that the use of a combination of DNA and protein induced significantly higher titers of neutralizing antibodies against either DEN‑1 or DEN‑2 (1:64.0 and 1:76.1, respectively) compared with the DNA (1:24.7 and 1:26.9, DEN‑1 and DEN‑2, respectively) or the recombinant protein (1:34.9 and 1:45.3 in DEN‑1 and DEN‑2, respectively). The present study demonstrated that the combination of recombinant protein and DNA as an immunization strategy may be an effective method for the development of a vaccine to prevent dengue virus infection.

  16. Quasispecies theory for horizontal gene transfer and recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, Enrique; Park, Jeong-Man; Deem, Michael W.

    2008-12-01

    We introduce a generalization of the parallel, or Crow-Kimura, and Eigen models of molecular evolution to represent the exchange of genetic information between individuals in a population. We study the effect of different schemes of genetic recombination on the steady-state mean fitness and distribution of individuals in the population, through an analytic field theoretic mapping. We investigate both horizontal gene transfer from a population and recombination between pairs of individuals. Somewhat surprisingly, these nonlinear generalizations of quasispecies theory to modern biology are analytically solvable. For two-parent recombination, we find two selected phases, one of which is spectrally rigid. We present exact analytical formulas for the equilibrium mean fitness of the population, in terms of a maximum principle, which are generally applicable to any permutation invariant replication rate function. For smooth fitness landscapes, we show that when positive epistatic interactions are present, recombination or horizontal gene transfer introduces a mild load against selection. Conversely, if the fitness landscape exhibits negative epistasis, horizontal gene transfer or recombination introduces an advantage by enhancing selection towards the fittest genotypes. These results prove that the mutational deterministic hypothesis holds for quasispecies models. For the discontinuous single sharp peak fitness landscape, we show that horizontal gene transfer has no effect on the fitness, while recombination decreases the fitness, for both the parallel and the Eigen models. We present numerical and analytical results as well as phase diagrams for the different cases.

  17. Baculovirus expression of the glycoprotein gene of Lassa virus and characterization of the recombinant protein.

    PubMed

    Hummel, K B; Martin, M L; Auperin, D D

    1992-09-01

    A recombinant baculovirus was constructed that expresses the glycoprotein gene of Lassa virus (Josiah strain) under the transcriptional control of the polyhedrin promoter. The expressed protein (B-LSGPC) comigrated with the authentic viral glycoprotein as observed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), was reactive with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) in Western blots, and was glycosylated. Although the recombinant protein was not processed into the mature glycoproteins, G1 and G2, it demonstrated reactivity with all known epitopes as measured by indirect immunofluorescence (IFA), and it was immunogenic, eliciting antisera in rabbits that recognized whole virus in IFAs. Regarding future applications to diagnostic assays, the recombinant glycoprotein proved to be an effective substitute for Lassa virus-infected mammalian cells in IFAs and it was able to distinguish sera from several human cases of Lassa fever, against a panel of known negative sera of African origin, in an enzyme immunoassay (EIA).

  18. Technical Advances of the Recombinant Antibody Microarray Technology Platform for Clinical Immunoproteomics

    PubMed Central

    Delfani, Payam; Dexlin Mellby, Linda; Nordström, Malin; Holmér, Andreas; Ohlsson, Mattias; Borrebaeck, Carl A. K.; Wingren, Christer

    2016-01-01

    In the quest for deciphering disease-associated biomarkers, high-performing tools for multiplexed protein expression profiling of crude clinical samples will be crucial. Affinity proteomics, mainly represented by antibody-based microarrays, have during recent years been established as a proteomic tool providing unique opportunities for parallelized protein expression profiling. But despite the progress, several main technical features and assay procedures remains to be (fully) resolved. Among these issues, the handling of protein microarray data, i.e. the biostatistics parts, is one of the key features to solve. In this study, we have therefore further optimized, validated, and standardized our in-house designed recombinant antibody microarray technology platform. To this end, we addressed the main remaining technical issues (e.g. antibody quality, array production, sample labelling, and selected assay conditions) and most importantly key biostatistics subjects (e.g. array data pre-processing and biomarker panel condensation). This represents one of the first antibody array studies in which these key biostatistics subjects have been studied in detail. Here, we thus present the next generation of the recombinant antibody microarray technology platform designed for clinical immunoproteomics. PMID:27414037

  19. Probing the soybean Bowman-Birk inhibitor using recombinant antibody fragments.

    PubMed

    Muzard, Julien; Fields, Conor; O'Mahony, James John; Lee, Gil U

    2012-06-20

    The nutritional and health benefits of soy protein have been extensively studied over recent decades. The Bowman-Birk inhibitor (BBI), derived from soybeans, is a double-headed inhibitor of chymotrypsin and trypsin with anticarcinogenic and anti-inflammatory properties, which have been demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. However, the lack of analytical and purification methodologies complicates its potential for further functional and clinical investigations. This paper reports the construction of anti-BBI antibody fragments based on the principle of protein design. Recombinant antibody (scFv and diabody) molecules targeting soybean BBI were produced and characterized in vitro (K(D)~1.10(-9) M), and the antibody-binding site (epitope) was identified as part of the trypsin-specific reactive loop. Finally, an extremely fast purification strategy for BBI from soybean extracts, based on superparamagnetic particles coated with antibody fragments, was developed. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first report on the design and characterization of recombinant anti-BBI antibodies and their potential application in soybean processing.

  20. Recombination in the hemagglutinin gene of the 1918 "Spanish flu".

    PubMed

    Gibbs, M J; Armstrong, J S; Gibbs, A J

    2001-09-07

    When gene sequences from the influenza virus that caused the 1918 pandemic were first compared with those of related viruses, they yielded few clues about its origins and virulence. Our reanalysis indicates that the hemagglutinin gene, a key virulence determinant, originated by recombination. The "globular domain" of the 1918 hemagglutinin protein was encoded by a part of a gene derived from a swine-lineage influenza, whereas the "stalk" was encoded by parts derived from a human-lineage influenza. Phylogenetic analyses showed that this recombination, which probably changed the virulence of the virus, occurred at the start of, or immediately before, the pandemic and thus may have triggered it.

  1. A sensitive enzyme immunoassay for amygdalin in food extracts using a recombinant antibody.

    PubMed

    Cho, A-Yeon; Shin, Kum-Joo; Chung, Junho; Oh, Sangsuk

    2008-10-01

    Amygdalin (laterile) is a cyanogenic glycoside commonly found in the pits of many fruits and raw nuts. When amygdalin-containing seeds are crushed and moistened, free cyanide is formed. Pits and nuts containing unusually high levels of amygdalin can therefore cause cyanide poisoning, and detection of amygdalin in food extracts can be a life-saving measure. In this study, we generated recombinant antibodies against amygdalin from a phage display of a combinatorial rabbit/human chimeric antibody library and used it in a sensitive competition enzyme immunoassay system to detect amygdalin in extracts of pits and nuts. The detection limit was determined to be 1 x 10(-9) M.

  2. Plant Cell-Based Recombinant Antibody Manufacturing with a 200 L Orbitally Shaken Disposable Bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Raven, Nicole; Schillberg, Stefan; Rasche, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Tobacco BY-2 cells are an attractive platform for the manufacture of a variety of biopharmaceutical proteins, including antibodies. Here, we describe the scaled-up cultivation of human IgG-secreting BY-2 cells in a 200 L orbitally shaken disposable bioreactor, resulting in cell growth and recombinant protein yields that are proportionately comparable with those obtained from cultivations in 500 mL shake flasks. Furthermore, we present an efficient downstream process for antibody recovery from the viscous spent culture medium using expanded bed adsorption (EBA) chromatography.

  3. Genetic Recombination Is Targeted towards Gene Promoter Regions in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Auton, Adam; Rui Li, Ying; Kidd, Jeffrey; Oliveira, Kyle; Nadel, Julie; Holloway, J. Kim; Hayward, Jessica J.; Cohen, Paula E.; Greally, John M.; Wang, Jun; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Boyko, Adam R.

    2013-01-01

    The identification of the H3K4 trimethylase, PRDM9, as the gene responsible for recombination hotspot localization has provided considerable insight into the mechanisms by which recombination is initiated in mammals. However, uniquely amongst mammals, canids appear to lack a functional version of PRDM9 and may therefore provide a model for understanding recombination that occurs in the absence of PRDM9, and thus how PRDM9 functions to shape the recombination landscape. We have constructed a fine-scale genetic map from patterns of linkage disequilibrium assessed using high-throughput sequence data from 51 free-ranging dogs, Canis lupus familiaris. While broad-scale properties of recombination appear similar to other mammalian species, our fine-scale estimates indicate that canine highly elevated recombination rates are observed in the vicinity of CpG rich regions including gene promoter regions, but show little association with H3K4 trimethylation marks identified in spermatocytes. By comparison to genomic data from the Andean fox, Lycalopex culpaeus, we show that biased gene conversion is a plausible mechanism by which the high CpG content of the dog genome could have occurred. PMID:24348265

  4. Genetic recombination is targeted towards gene promoter regions in dogs.

    PubMed

    Auton, Adam; Rui Li, Ying; Kidd, Jeffrey; Oliveira, Kyle; Nadel, Julie; Holloway, J Kim; Hayward, Jessica J; Cohen, Paula E; Greally, John M; Wang, Jun; Bustamante, Carlos D; Boyko, Adam R

    2013-01-01

    The identification of the H3K4 trimethylase, PRDM9, as the gene responsible for recombination hotspot localization has provided considerable insight into the mechanisms by which recombination is initiated in mammals. However, uniquely amongst mammals, canids appear to lack a functional version of PRDM9 and may therefore provide a model for understanding recombination that occurs in the absence of PRDM9, and thus how PRDM9 functions to shape the recombination landscape. We have constructed a fine-scale genetic map from patterns of linkage disequilibrium assessed using high-throughput sequence data from 51 free-ranging dogs, Canis lupus familiaris. While broad-scale properties of recombination appear similar to other mammalian species, our fine-scale estimates indicate that canine highly elevated recombination rates are observed in the vicinity of CpG rich regions including gene promoter regions, but show little association with H3K4 trimethylation marks identified in spermatocytes. By comparison to genomic data from the Andean fox, Lycalopex culpaeus, we show that biased gene conversion is a plausible mechanism by which the high CpG content of the dog genome could have occurred.

  5. Intensive pharmacological immunosuppression allows for repetitive liver gene transfer with recombinant adenovirus in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Fontanellas, Antonio; Hervás-Stubbs, Sandra; Mauleón, Itsaso; Dubrot, Juan; Mancheño, Uxua; Collantes, María; Sampedro, Ana; Unzu, Carmen; Alfaro, Carlos; Palazón, Asis; Smerdou, Cristian; Benito, Alberto; Prieto, Jesús; Peñuelas, Iván; Melero, Ignacio

    2010-04-01

    Repeated administration of gene therapies is hampered by host immunity toward vectors and transgenes. Attempts to circumvent antivector immunity include pharmacological immunosuppression or alternating different vectors and vector serotypes with the same transgene. Our studies show that B-cell depletion with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody and concomitant T-cell inhibition with clinically available drugs permits repeated liver gene transfer to a limited number of nonhuman primates with recombinant adenovirus. Adenoviral vector-mediated transfer of the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) reporter gene was visualized in vivo with a semiquantitative transgene-specific positron emission tomography (PET) technique, liver immunohistochemistry, and immunoblot for the reporter transgene in needle biopsies. Neutralizing antibody and T cell-mediated responses toward the viral capsids were sequentially monitored and found to be repressed by the drug combinations tested. Repeated liver transfer of the HSV1-tk reporter gene with the same recombinant adenoviral vector was achieved in macaques undergoing a clinically feasible immunosuppressive treatment that ablated humoral and cellular immune responses. This strategy allows measurable gene retransfer to the liver as late as 15 months following the first adenoviral exposure in a macaque, which has undergone a total of four treatments with the same adenoviral vector.

  6. Isolation and characterization of recombinant antigens from Leishmania aethiopica that react with human antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Osland, A; Beyene, D; Ashenafi, S; Beetsma, A

    1992-01-01

    A genomic expression library of Leishmania aethiopica was constructed in lambda gt11 and screened with patient sera and sera from healthy people living in an area of endemicity. Forty-five recombinant clones were isolated and partly characterized. Clone-specific antibodies were prepared and used with sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western immunoblot analysis to estimate the molecular masses of the parasite-derived antigens containing the reactive epitope(s). Antigens with apparent molecular masses of 90, 85, 63, 50, 41, 25 and 24 kDa as well as several antigens with lower molecular masses were detected. The clone-specific antibodies from patients with diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis reacted with high-molecular-weight antigens (30,000 less than Mr less than 90,000), whereas antibodies from patients with localized cutaneous leishmaniasis recognized low-molecular-weight antigens (Mr less than 25,000). Nine different purified recombinant antigens were obtained from lysogens in Escherichia coli Y1089 by immunoaffinity chromatography on anti-beta-galactosidase columns and were subsequently tested with patient sera. It is suggested that some of these recombinant antigens might be used for immunodiagnostic purposes. Images PMID:1372294

  7. Recombinant antibodies specific for the Plasmodium falciparum histidine-rich protein 2

    PubMed Central

    Ravaoarisoa, Elisabeth; Zamanka, Halima; Fusai, Thierry; Bellalou, Jacques; Bedouelle, Hugues; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile

    2010-01-01

    Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are key elements of malaria control programs in endemic areas. A major step forward in recent years has been the production and use of rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) in settings where microscopy is impracticable. Many current RDTs target the Plasmodium falciparum histidine-rich protein 2 (PfHRP2) released in the plasma of infected individuals. These RDTs have had an indisputably positive effect on malaria management, but still present several limitations, including the poor characterization of the commercial monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) used for PfHRP2 detection, variable sensitivity and specificity and high costs. RDT use is further limited by impaired stability caused by temperature fluctuations during transport and uncontrolled storage in field-based facilities. To circumvent such drawbacks, an alternative could be the development of well-characterized, stabilized recombinant antibodies, with high binding affinity and specificity. Here, we report the characterization of the cDNA sequences encoding the Fab fragment of F1110 and F1546, two novel anti-PfHRP2 mAbs. FabF1546 was produced in the Escherichia coli periplasm. Its properties of binding to the parasite and to a recombinant PfHRP-2 antigen were similar to those of the parental mAb. As the affinity and stability of recombinant antibodies can be improved by protein engineering, our results open a novel approach for the development of an improved RDT for malaria diagnosis. PMID:20581462

  8. Recombination Rate Heterogeneity within Arabidopsis Disease Resistance Genes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyuha; Reinhard, Carsten; Serra, Heïdi; Ziolkowski, Piotr A; Underwood, Charles J; Zhao, Xiaohui; Hardcastle, Thomas J; Yelina, Nataliya E; Griffin, Catherine; Jackson, Matthew; Mézard, Christine; McVean, Gil; Copenhaver, Gregory P; Henderson, Ian R

    2016-07-01

    Meiotic crossover frequency varies extensively along chromosomes and is typically concentrated in hotspots. As recombination increases genetic diversity, hotspots are predicted to occur at immunity genes, where variation may be beneficial. A major component of plant immunity is recognition of pathogen Avirulence (Avr) effectors by resistance (R) genes that encode NBS-LRR domain proteins. Therefore, we sought to test whether NBS-LRR genes would overlap with meiotic crossover hotspots using experimental genetics in Arabidopsis thaliana. NBS-LRR genes tend to physically cluster in plant genomes; for example, in Arabidopsis most are located in large clusters on the south arms of chromosomes 1 and 5. We experimentally mapped 1,439 crossovers within these clusters and observed NBS-LRR gene associated hotspots, which were also detected as historical hotspots via analysis of linkage disequilibrium. However, we also observed NBS-LRR gene coldspots, which in some cases correlate with structural heterozygosity. To study recombination at the fine-scale we used high-throughput sequencing to analyze ~1,000 crossovers within the RESISTANCE TO ALBUGO CANDIDA1 (RAC1) R gene hotspot. This revealed elevated intragenic crossovers, overlapping nucleosome-occupied exons that encode the TIR, NBS and LRR domains. The highest RAC1 recombination frequency was promoter-proximal and overlapped CTT-repeat DNA sequence motifs, which have previously been associated with plant crossover hotspots. Additionally, we show a significant influence of natural genetic variation on NBS-LRR cluster recombination rates, using crosses between Arabidopsis ecotypes. In conclusion, we show that a subset of NBS-LRR genes are strong hotspots, whereas others are coldspots. This reveals a complex recombination landscape in Arabidopsis NBS-LRR genes, which we propose results from varying coevolutionary pressures exerted by host-pathogen relationships, and is influenced by structural heterozygosity.

  9. Recombination Rate Heterogeneity within Arabidopsis Disease Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Heïdi; Ziolkowski, Piotr A.; Yelina, Nataliya E.; Jackson, Matthew; Mézard, Christine; McVean, Gil; Henderson, Ian R.

    2016-01-01

    Meiotic crossover frequency varies extensively along chromosomes and is typically concentrated in hotspots. As recombination increases genetic diversity, hotspots are predicted to occur at immunity genes, where variation may be beneficial. A major component of plant immunity is recognition of pathogen Avirulence (Avr) effectors by resistance (R) genes that encode NBS-LRR domain proteins. Therefore, we sought to test whether NBS-LRR genes would overlap with meiotic crossover hotspots using experimental genetics in Arabidopsis thaliana. NBS-LRR genes tend to physically cluster in plant genomes; for example, in Arabidopsis most are located in large clusters on the south arms of chromosomes 1 and 5. We experimentally mapped 1,439 crossovers within these clusters and observed NBS-LRR gene associated hotspots, which were also detected as historical hotspots via analysis of linkage disequilibrium. However, we also observed NBS-LRR gene coldspots, which in some cases correlate with structural heterozygosity. To study recombination at the fine-scale we used high-throughput sequencing to analyze ~1,000 crossovers within the RESISTANCE TO ALBUGO CANDIDA1 (RAC1) R gene hotspot. This revealed elevated intragenic crossovers, overlapping nucleosome-occupied exons that encode the TIR, NBS and LRR domains. The highest RAC1 recombination frequency was promoter-proximal and overlapped CTT-repeat DNA sequence motifs, which have previously been associated with plant crossover hotspots. Additionally, we show a significant influence of natural genetic variation on NBS-LRR cluster recombination rates, using crosses between Arabidopsis ecotypes. In conclusion, we show that a subset of NBS-LRR genes are strong hotspots, whereas others are coldspots. This reveals a complex recombination landscape in Arabidopsis NBS-LRR genes, which we propose results from varying coevolutionary pressures exerted by host-pathogen relationships, and is influenced by structural heterozygosity. PMID:27415776

  10. Human DNA repair and recombination genes

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.H.; Weber, C.A.; Jones, N.J.

    1988-09-01

    Several genes involved in mammalian DNA repair pathways were identified by complementation analysis and chromosomal mapping based on hybrid cells. Eight complementation groups of rodent mutants defective in the repair of uv radiation damage are now identified. At least seven of these genes are probably essential for repair and at least six of them control the incision step. The many genes required for repair of DNA cross-linking damage show overlap with those involved in the repair of uv damage, but some of these genes appear to be unique for cross-link repair. Two genes residing on human chromosome 19 were cloned from genomic transformants using a cosmid vector, and near full-length cDNA clones of each gene were isolated and sequenced. Gene ERCC2 efficiently corrects the defect in CHO UV5, a nucleotide excision repair mutant. Gene XRCC1 normalizes repair of strand breaks and the excessive sister chromatid exchange in CHO mutant EM9. ERCC2 shows a remarkable /approximately/52% overall homology at both the amino acid and nucleotide levels with the yeast RAD3 gene. Evidence based on mutation induction frequencies suggests that ERCC2, like RAD3, might also be an essential gene for viability. 100 refs., 4 tabs.

  11. Intravenous immunoglobulin products contain specific antibodies to recombinant human tau protein.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lynnae M; Coffey, Mary P; Klaver, Andrea C; Loeffler, David A

    2013-08-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) products are prepared from plasma immunoglobulins from healthy donors. Pilot studies suggest that IVIG may stabilize cognitive functioning in patients with mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease. This study measured antibodies to recombinant human tau protein in the IVIG products Gammagard (Baxter), Gamunex (Talecris), and Flebogamma (Grifols). Anti-tau antibodies were measured by ELISA, subtracting IVIG's polyvalent binding from its binding to tau-coated wells to calculate specific anti-tau antibody levels. Because polyvalent binding of IVIG products may interfere with ELISA measurement of their specific antibody levels, the percentage of binding of each IVIG product to tau-coated wells that was specific for tau was also determined. Specific anti-tau antibodies were detected in all three IVIG products, with significant differences between these products (p<0.001) even when Flebogamma's anti-tau antibodies were doubled to account for its preparation as a 5% solution vs. 10% solutions for Gammagard and Gamunex (means: Gammagard, 3.1 μg/ml; Gamunex, 2.5 μg/ml; Flebogamma, 1.2 μg/ml). The percentages of each IVIG product's specific binding to tau-coated wells also varied between the various products (p<0.001) and between all pairs of IVIG products (means: Gammagard, 73.1%; Flebogamma, 54.5%; Gamunex, 37.4%; p<0.01 for all pairwise comparisons). These findings indicate that IVIG products contain specific anti-tau antibodies. The concentrations of these antibodies and the percentages of specific binding of IVIG to tau-coated wells vary between IVIG products. Further studies are indicated to determine if IVIG also contains antibodies to pathologic forms of tau.

  12. Human recombinant antibodies against Trypanosoma cruzi ribosomal P2β protein.

    PubMed

    Grippo, Vanina; Niborski, Leticia L; Gomez, Karina A; Levin, Mariano J

    2011-05-01

    Patients with chronic Chagas' Heart Disease (cChHD) develop an antibody response that is suspected to be involved in the cardiac pathogenesis. The response against Trypanosoma cruzi ribosomal P proteins is of particular interest, as these antibodies can cross-react with host cardiac receptors causing electrophysiological alterations. To better understand the humoral anti-P response we constructed a single-chain variable fragment library derived from a cChHD patient. The variable heavy and light regions were amplified from bone-marrow RNA and subcloned into the vector pComb3X. The phage library was subsequently panned against T. cruzi ribosomal P2β protein (TcP2β). We obtained 3 different human recombinant antibodies that specifically reacted with TcP2β in ELISA and Western blots. Two of them reacted with the C-terminal region of TcP2β, peptide R13, as the recombinant autoanti-P antibodies from Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) patients. Interestingly, the third one was specific for TcP2β but did not recognize R13, confirming the specific nature of the anti-P response in Chagas disease. Neither sequence nor VH usage similarities between Chagas and SLE anti-P autoantibodies were observed. Herein, the first human mAbs against TcP2β have been obtained and characterized showing that the humoral anti-P response is directed against the parasite and does not include an autoimmune component.

  13. Antiepoetin antibody-related pure red cell aplasia: successful remission with cessation of recombinant erythropoietin alone.

    PubMed

    Katagiri, Daisuke; Shibata, Maki; Katsuki, Takashi; Masumoto, Shoichi; Katsuma, Ai; Minami, Eri; Hoshino, Taro; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Tada, Manami; Hinoshita, Fumihiko

    2010-10-01

    An elderly patient with pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) with antierythropoietin (anti-EPO) antibodies is described. PRCA due to alloimmunization is a rare and severe complication of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHu-EPO) therapy. Most reported patients with PRCA were cured primarily by immunosuppressive drug therapy. The patient in this case, however, did not want to receive any immunosuppressive drugs. Therefore, rHu-EPO injection was simply discontinued, the severe anemia gradually improved, and the hemoglobin approached normal range. This case is very rare and significant in that there have been few such elderly patients with rHu-EPO-induced PRCA in whom PRCA remission was achieved, with decreasing antibody titers, after cessation of rHu-EPO alone. Further cases are needed to assess how PRCA should be treated in patients with anti-EPO antibodies.

  14. Multi-isotype antibody responses against the multimeric Salmonella Typhi recombinant hemolysin E antigen.

    PubMed

    Ong, Eugene Boon Beng; Ignatius, Joshua; Anthony, Amy Amilda; Aziah, Ismail; Ismail, Asma; Lim, Theam Soon

    2015-01-01

    The detection and measurement of different antibody isotypes in the serum provide valuable indicators of the different stages of typhoid infection. Here, the ability of S. Typhi recombinant hemolysin E (HlyE) to detect multi-isotype antibody responses in sera of patients with typhoid and paratyphoid A was investigated using an indirect antibody immunoassay. Nanogram amounts of HlyE were found to be sufficient for detection of IgG and IgA isotypes and, in a study of individuals' sera (n = 100), the immunoassay was able to distinguish between typhoid and non-typhoid sera. The overall sensitivity, specificity and efficiency of the ELISA were 70% (39/56), 100% (44/44) and 83% respectively.

  15. Effect of recombinant canine distemper vaccine on antibody titers in previously vaccinated dogs.

    PubMed

    Larson, L J; Hageny, T L; Haase, C J; Schultz, R D

    2006-01-01

    Two canine distemper virus (CDV) vaccine types are currently commercially available: modified-live virus (MLV) vaccines and a canarypox recombinant CDV (rCDV) vaccine (Recombitek, Merial). This study compared the ability of the rCDV vaccine and MLV vaccines to significantly enhance (boost) the antibody response of previously immunized adult and juvenile dogs. A significant (fourfold or greater) increase in titer occurred in significantly more dogs revaccinated with Recombitek C-4 or Recombitek C-6 than with the MLV-CDV vaccines. This study demonstrates that Recombitek, the only vaccine for dogs containing rCDV, is more likely to significantly boost the CDV antibody response in previously vaccinated dogs than are the MLV-CDV vaccines. Because rCDV vaccine can boost the antibody titer of dogs previously vaccinated with an MLV vaccine, it can and should be used when core vaccines are readministered.

  16. Expression of recombinant HA1 protein for specific detection of influenza A/H1N1/2009 antibodies in human serum.

    PubMed

    Luo, Lizhong; Nishi, Krista; Macleod, Erin; Sabara, Marta I; Coleman, Brenda L; Gubbay, Jonathan B; Li, Yan

    2013-01-01

    The hemagglutinin genes (HA1 subunit) from human and animal 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus isolates were expressed with a baculovirus vector. Recombinant HA1 (rHA1) protein-based ELISA was evaluated for detection of specific influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 antibodies in serum samples from vaccinated humans. It was found that rHA1 ELISA consistently differentiated between antibodies recognizing the seasonal influenza H1N1 and pdm09 viruses, with a concordance of 94% as compared to the hemagglutination inhibition test. This study suggests the utility of rHA1 ELISA in serosurveillance.

  17. Cancer genes: rare recombinants instead of activated oncogenes (a review).

    PubMed Central

    Duesberg, P H

    1987-01-01

    The 20 known transforming (onc) genes of retroviruses are defined by sequences that are transduced from cellular genes termed protooncogenes or cellular oncogenes. Based on these sequences, viral onc genes have been postulated to be transduced cellular cancer genes, and proto-onc genes have been postulated to be latent cancer genes that can be activated from within the cell to cause virus-negative tumors. The hypothesis is popular because it promises direct access to cellular cancer genes. However, the existence of latent cancer genes presents a paradox, since such genes are clearly undesirable. The hypothesis predicts that viral onc genes and proto-onc genes are isogenic; that expression of proto-onc genes induces tumors; that activated proto-onc genes transform diploid cells upon transfection, like viral onc genes; and that diploid tumors exist. As yet, none of these predictions is confirmed. Instead: Structural comparisons between viral onc genes, essential retroviral genes, and proto-onc genes show that all viral onc genes are indeed new genes, rather than transduced cellular cancer genes. They are recombinants put together from truncated viral and truncated proto-onc genes. Proto-onc genes are frequently expressed in normal cells. To date, not one activated proto-onc gene has been isolated that transforms diploid cells. Above all, no diploid tumors with activated proto-onc genes have been found. Moreover, the probability of spontaneous transformation in vivo is at least 10(9) times lower than predicted from the mechanisms thought to activate proto-onc genes. Therefore, the hypothesis that proto-onc genes are latent cellular oncogenes appears to be an overinterpretation of sequence homology to structural and functional homology with viral onc genes. Here it is proposed that only rare truncations and illegitimate recombinations that alter the germ-line configuration of cellular genes generate viral and possibly cellular cancer genes. The clonal chromosome

  18. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone/human chorionic gonadotropin beta based recombinant antibodies and vaccines.

    PubMed

    Talwar, G P; Vyas, Hemant K; Purswani, Shilpi; Gupta, Jagdish C

    2009-12-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) are unique targets for the control of fertility. Immunological approaches to neutralizing these hormones have additional utility in cancer treatment. Vaccines have been developed against both GnRH and hCG and these have undergone Phase I/II clinical trials documenting their safety, reversibility and efficacy. The heterospecies dimer hCG vaccine prevented pregnancy in women of proven fertility without impairment of ovulation or derangement of menstrual regularity and bleeding profiles. The protective threshold of antibody titers to achieve efficacy was determined in these first-ever trials. Recently, a recombinant vaccine against the beta subunit of hCG linked to the B subunit of heat labile enterotoxin has been made and expressed as a glycosylated conjugate in Pichia pastoris. Experiments indicate its ability to generate antibodies above the protective threshold in all immunized Balb/c mice. Ectopic expression of hCG/hCGbeta is observed in many advanced stage cancers of various origins. A chimeric high affinity and specific recombinant antibody against hCGbeta linked to curcumin kills hCGbeta expressing T lymphoblastic leukemia cells without any deleterious effect. Several synthetic and recombinant vaccines have been developed against GnRH. These reduce serum testosterone to castration levels causing atrophy of the prostate. Three Phase I/II clinical trials conducted in India and Austria have shown that these vaccines elicit non-surgical reduction of testosterone, a fall in prostate specific antigen and clinical improvement of prostate carcinoma patients. A multimer recombinant vaccine against GnRH has high efficacy for sterilization of pigs and other animals.

  19. Expression of HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies mediated by recombinant adeno-associated virus 8 in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yongjiao; Fu, Lu; Jiang, Xiaoyu; Guan, Shanshan; Kuai, Ziyu; Kong, Wei; Shi, Yuhua; Shan, Yaming

    2016-12-01

    Despite unremitting efforts since the discovery of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), an effective vaccine has not been generated. Viral vector-mediated transfer for expression of HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies (BnAbs) is an attractive strategy. In this study, a recombinant adeno-associated virus 8 (rAAV8) vector was used to encode full-length antibodies against HIV-1 in 293T cells and Balb/c mice after gene transfer. The 10E8 or NIH45-46 BnAb was expressed from a single open reading frame by linking the heavy and light chains with a furin cleavage and a 2A self-processing peptide (F2A). The results showed that the BnAbs could be expressed in the 293T cell culture medium. A single intramuscular injection of rAAV8 led to long-term expression of BnAbs in Balb/c mice. The expressed antibodies in the supernatant of 293T cells and in Balb/c mice showed neutralization effects against HIV-1 pseudoviruses. Combined immunization of rAAV8 expressing 10E8 and rAAV8 expressing NIH45-46 in Balb/c mice could increase these neutralization effects on strains of HIV-1 sensitive to 10E8 or NIH45-46 antibody compared with a single injection of rAAV8 expressing either antibody alone. Therefore, the combined immunization may be a potential vaccine approach against HIV-1.

  20. Efficient neutralizing activity of cocktailed recombinant human antibodies against hepatitis A virus infection in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jingyuan; Meng, Shufang; Li, Chuan; Ji, Yan; Meng, Qingling; Zhang, Quanfu; Liu, Feng; Li, Jiandong; Bi, Shengli; Li, Dexin; Liang, Mifang

    2008-07-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is the major pathogen responsible for acute infectious hepatitis A, a disease that is prevalent worldwide. Although HAV immunization effectively prevents infection, primary immunizations must be administered at least 2 weeks prior to HAV exposure. In contrast, passive immunization with pooled human immunoglobulin (Ig) can provide immediate and rapid protection from HAV infection. Because the use of human sera-derived Igs carries the risk of contamination, we sought to develop recombinant HAV-neutralizing human antibodies. We prepared a combinatorial phage display library of recombinant human anti-HAV antibodies from RNA extracted from the blood lymphocytes of a convalescent hepatitis A patient. Two recombinant human IgG antibodies, HAIgG16 and HAIgG78, were screened from the antibody library by their ability to bind with high affinity to purified, inactivated HAV virions. These antibodies recognized different epitopes of the HAV virion capsid, and competed with both patient sera and well-characterized neutralizing mouse monoclonal antibodies. A cocktailed mixture of HAIgG16 and HAIgG78 at a 3:1 ratio was prepared to compare its combined biological activity with that conferred by each antibody individually. The cocktailed antibodies displayed a stronger neutralizing activity in vitro than that observed with either HAIgG16 and HAIgG78 alone. To determine the in vivo neutralizing abilities of these antibodies, rhesus monkeys were inoculated with cocktailed antibodies and challenged with HAV. Whereas control animals developed hepatitis A and seroconverted to the HAV antibody, animals receiving cocktailed antibodies were protected either from viral infection or from developing clinical hepatitis. These results demonstrate that recombinant human antibody preparations could be used to prevent or treat early-stage HAV infection.

  1. Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus-Mediated Expression of Methamphetamine Antibody Attenuates Methamphetamine-Induced Hyperactivity in Mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun-Hsiang; Wu, Kuo-Jen; Wu, Kuang-Lun; Wu, Kun-Lieh; Tsai, Ho-Min; Chen, Mao-Liang; Chen, Yi-Wei; Hsieh, Wei; Lin, Chun-Ming; Wang, Yun

    2017-04-07

    Methamphetamine (Meth) is one of the most frequently abused drugs worldwide. Recent studies have indicated that antibodies with high affinity for Meth reduce its pharmacological effects. The purpose of this study was to develop a technique for virus-based passive immunization against Meth effects. We generated a recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype-8 vector (AAV-MethAb) carrying the gene for a Meth-specific monoclonal antibody (MethAb). Infection of 293 cells with AAV-MethAb resulted in the expression and secretion of antibodies which bind to Meth. The viral vector was then examined in adult ICR mice. Systemic administration of AAV-MethAb resulted in long-term expression of MethAb in the serum for up to 29 weeks. Serum collected from the animals receiving AAV-MethAb retained a high specificity for (+)-Meth. Animals were challenged with Meth five weeks after viral injection. Meth levels in the brain and serum were reduced while Meth-induced locomotor activity was significantly attenuated. In conclusion, AAV-MethAb administration effectively depletes Meth from brain and serum while reducing the behavioral response to Meth, and thus is a potential therapeutic approach for Meth abuse.

  2. Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus-Mediated Expression of Methamphetamine Antibody Attenuates Methamphetamine-Induced Hyperactivity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yun-Hsiang; Wu, Kuo-Jen; Wu, Kuang-Lun; Wu, Kun-Lieh; Tsai, Ho-Min; Chen, Mao-Liang; Chen, Yi-Wei; Hsieh, Wei; Lin, Chun-Ming; Wang, Yun

    2017-01-01

    Methamphetamine (Meth) is one of the most frequently abused drugs worldwide. Recent studies have indicated that antibodies with high affinity for Meth reduce its pharmacological effects. The purpose of this study was to develop a technique for virus-based passive immunization against Meth effects. We generated a recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype-8 vector (AAV-MethAb) carrying the gene for a Meth-specific monoclonal antibody (MethAb). Infection of 293 cells with AAV-MethAb resulted in the expression and secretion of antibodies which bind to Meth. The viral vector was then examined in adult ICR mice. Systemic administration of AAV-MethAb resulted in long-term expression of MethAb in the serum for up to 29 weeks. Serum collected from the animals receiving AAV-MethAb retained a high specificity for (+)-Meth. Animals were challenged with Meth five weeks after viral injection. Meth levels in the brain and serum were reduced while Meth-induced locomotor activity was significantly attenuated. In conclusion, AAV-MethAb administration effectively depletes Meth from brain and serum while reducing the behavioral response to Meth, and thus is a potential therapeutic approach for Meth abuse. PMID:28387350

  3. A pilot study comparing the development of EIAV Env-specific antibodies induced by DNA/recombinant vaccinia-vectored vaccines and an attenuated Chinese EIAV vaccine.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qinglai; Lin, Yuezhi; Ma, Jian; Ma, Yan; Zhao, Liping; Li, Shenwei; Yang, Kai; Zhou, Jianhua; Shen, Rongxian; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Shao, Yiming

    2012-12-01

    Data from successful attenuated lentiviral vaccine studies indicate that fully mature Env-specific antibodies characterized by high titer, high avidity, and the predominant recognition of conformational epitopes are associated with protective efficacy. Although vaccination with a DNA prime/recombinant vaccinia-vectored vaccine boost strategy has been found to be effective in some trials with non-human primate/simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) models, it remains unclear whether this vaccination strategy could elicit mature equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) Env-specific antibodies, thus protecting vaccinated horses against EIAV infection. Therefore, in this pilot study we vaccinated horses using a strategy based on DNA prime/recombinant Tiantan vaccinia (rTTV)-vectored vaccines encoding EIAV env and gag genes, and observed the development of Env-specific antibodies, neutralizing antibodies, and p26-specific antibodies. Vaccination with DNA induced low titer, low avidity, and the predominant recognition of linear epitopes by Env-specific antibodies, which was enhanced by boosting vaccinations with rTTV vaccines. However, the maturation levels of Env-specific antibodies induced by the DNA/rTTV vaccines were significantly lower than those induced by the attenuated vaccine EIAV(FDDV). Additionally, DNA/rTTV vaccines did not elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies. After challenge with a virulent EIAV strain, all of the vaccinees and control horses died from EIAV disease. These data indicate that the regimen of DNA prime/rTTV vaccine boost did not induce mature Env-specific antibodies, which might have contributed to immune protection failure.

  4. Economics of recombinant antibody production processes at various scales: Industry-standard compared to continuous precipitation.

    PubMed

    Hammerschmidt, Nikolaus; Tscheliessnig, Anne; Sommer, Ralf; Helk, Bernhard; Jungbauer, Alois

    2014-06-01

    Standard industry processes for recombinant antibody production employ protein A affinity chromatography in combination with other chromatography steps and ultra-/diafiltration. This study compares a generic antibody production process with a recently developed purification process based on a series of selective precipitation steps. The new process makes two of the usual three chromatographic steps obsolete and can be performed in a continuous fashion. Cost of Goods (CoGs) analyses were done for: (i) a generic chromatography-based antibody standard purification; (ii) the continuous precipitation-based purification process coupled to a continuous perfusion production system; and (iii) a hybrid process, coupling the continuous purification process to an upstream batch process. The results of this economic analysis show that the precipitation-based process offers cost reductions at all stages of the life cycle of a therapeutic antibody, (i.e. clinical phase I, II and III, as well as full commercial production). The savings in clinical phase production are largely attributed to the fact that expensive chromatographic resins are omitted. These economic analyses will help to determine the strategies that are best suited for small-scale production in parallel fashion, which is of importance for antibody production in non-privileged countries and for personalized medicine.

  5. The rapid generation of recombinant functional monoclonal antibodies from individual, antigen-specific bone marrow-derived plasma cells isolated using a novel fluorescence-based method

    PubMed Central

    Clargo, Alison M; Hudson, Ashley R; Ndlovu, Welcome; Wootton, Rebecca J; Cremin, Louise A; O'Dowd, Victoria L; Nowosad, Carla R; Starkie, Dale O; Shaw, Sophie P; Compson, Joanne E; White, Dominic P; MacKenzie, Brendon; Snowden, James R; Newnham, Laura E; Wright, Michael; Stephens, Paul E; Griffiths, Meryn R; Lawson, Alastair DG; Lightwood, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    Single B cell technologies, which avoid traditional hybridoma fusion and combinatorial display, provide a means to interrogate the naturally-selected antibody repertoire of immunized animals. Many methods enable the sampling of memory B cell subsets, but few allow for the direct interrogation of the plasma cell repertoire, i.e., the subset of B cells responsible for producing immunoglobulin in serum. Here, we describe the use of a robust and simple fluorescence-based technique, called the fluorescent foci method, for the identification and isolation of antigen-specific IgG-secreting cells, such as plasma cells, from heterogeneous bone marrow preparations. Following micromanipulation of single cells, cognate pairs of heavy and light chain variable region genes were recovered by reverse transcription (RT)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR). During the PCR, variable regions were combined with a promoter fragment and a relevant constant region fragment to produce two separate transcriptionally-active PCR (TAP) fragments that were directly co-transfected into a HEK-293F cell line for recombinant antibody expression. The technique was successfully applied to the generation of a diverse panel of high-affinity, functional recombinant antibodies to human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor 2 and TNF derived from the bone marrow of immunized rabbits and rats, respectively. Progression from a bone marrow sample to a panel of functional recombinant antibodies was possible within a 2-week timeframe. PMID:24423622

  6. Detection, characterization and quantitation of coxsackievirus A16 using polyclonal antibodies against recombinant capsid subunit proteins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingwei; Ku, Zhiqiang; Cai, Yicun; Sun, Bing; Leng, Qibin; Huang, Zhong

    2011-04-01

    Coxsackievirus A16 (CVA16), together with enterovirus type 71 (EV71), is responsible for most cases of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) worldwide. Recent findings suggest that the recombination between CVA16 and EV71, and co-circulation of these two viruses may have contributed to the increase of HFMD cases in China over the past few years. Thus, for CVA16, further understanding of its virology, epidemiology and development of diagnostic tests and vaccines are of importance. The present study aimed to develop reagents and protocols for the detection, characterization and quantitation of CVA16. Recombinant CVA16 capsid subunit proteins VP0, VP3 and truncated VP1, were produced in Escherichia coli and used to immunize guinea pigs to generate polyclonal antibodies. The resultant three antisera detected specifically CVA16 propagated in Vero cells by immunostaining, ELISA and Western blotting. The antisera was used to show that CVA16 capsids were composed of correctly processed VP0, VP1 and VP3 subunits, and were present in the form of efficiently assembled particles. A method for the quantitation of the yield of CVA16 in Vero cells was established based on a Western blotting protocol using the recombinant VP0 as a reference standard and anti-VP0 as the detection antibody. This study shows the development and validation of reagents and methods, for qualitative and quantitative determination of CVA16, which are essential for the development of vaccines.

  7. Optimizing Production of Antigens and Fabs in the Context of Generating Recombinant Antibodies to Human Proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Nan; Loppnau, Peter; Seitova, Alma; Ravichandran, Mani; Fenner, Maria; Jain, Harshika; Bhattacharya, Anandi; Hutchinson, Ashley; Paduch, Marcin; Lu, Vincent; Olszewski, Michal; Kossiakoff, Anthony A; Dowdell, Evan; Koide, Akiko; Koide, Shohei; Huang, Haiming; Nadeem, Vincent; Sidhu, Sachdev S; Greenblatt, Jack F; Marcon, Edyta; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Edwards, Aled M; Gräslund, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    We developed and optimized a high-throughput project workflow to generate renewable recombinant antibodies to human proteins involved in epigenetic signalling. Three different strategies to produce phage display compatible protein antigens in bacterial systems were compared, and we found that in vivo biotinylation through the use of an Avi tag was the most productive method. Phage display selections were performed on 265 in vivo biotinylated antigen domains. High-affinity Fabs (<20nM) were obtained for 196. We constructed and optimized a new expression vector to produce in vivo biotinylated Fabs in E. coli. This increased average yields up to 10-fold, with an average yield of 4 mg/L. For 118 antigens, we identified Fabs that could immunoprecipitate their full-length endogenous targets from mammalian cell lysates. One Fab for each antigen was converted to a recombinant IgG and produced in mammalian cells, with an average yield of 15 mg/L. In summary, we have optimized each step of the pipeline to produce recombinant antibodies, significantly increasing both efficiency and yield, and also showed that these Fabs and IgGs can be generally useful for chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) protocols.

  8. Development and characterization of new monoclonal antibodies against human recombinant CA XII.

    PubMed

    Dekaminaviciute, Dovile; Lasickiene, Rita; Parkkila, Seppo; Jogaite, Vaida; Matuliene, Jurgita; Matulis, Daumantas; Zvirbliene, Aurelija

    2014-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are enzymes that catalyse the reversible hydration of CO2 to bicarbonate. CA XII is considered a potential biomarker of tumor cells and a promising target for specific therapies. The aim of the current study was to develop new monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against human recombinant CA XII and evaluate their diagnostic potential. An extracellular catalytic domain of human CA XII was expressed in E. coli and used as an immunogen. Seven stable hybridoma cell lines producing high-affinity IgG antibodies against human CA XII were generated. The majority of MAbs were highly specific to CA XII and did not cross-react with human recombinant CA I, CA II, CA VII, and CA XIII. In order to demonstrate the diagnostic value of the MAbs, they were employed for the immunohistochemistry analysis of CA XII expression in tissues. Two MAbs (15A4 and 4A6) demonstrated a strong and specific immunostaining of CA XII in human tissue specimens. Flow cytometry analysis of 5 human tumor cell lines with the MAb 15A4 revealed its immunoreactivity with cellular CA XII. In conclusion, the MAbs raised against recombinant catalytic domain of CA XII recognize cellular CA XII and represent a promising diagnostic tool for the immunodetection of CA XII-expressing cells.

  9. Optimizing Production of Antigens and Fabs in the Context of Generating Recombinant Antibodies to Human Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Nan; Loppnau, Peter; Seitova, Alma; Ravichandran, Mani; Fenner, Maria; Jain, Harshika; Bhattacharya, Anandi; Hutchinson, Ashley; Paduch, Marcin; Lu, Vincent; Olszewski, Michal; Kossiakoff, Anthony A.; Dowdell, Evan; Koide, Akiko; Koide, Shohei; Huang, Haiming; Nadeem, Vincent; Sidhu, Sachdev S.; Greenblatt, Jack F.; Marcon, Edyta; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Edwards, Aled M.; Gräslund, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    We developed and optimized a high-throughput project workflow to generate renewable recombinant antibodies to human proteins involved in epigenetic signalling. Three different strategies to produce phage display compatible protein antigens in bacterial systems were compared, and we found that in vivo biotinylation through the use of an Avi tag was the most productive method. Phage display selections were performed on 265 in vivo biotinylated antigen domains. High-affinity Fabs (<20nM) were obtained for 196. We constructed and optimized a new expression vector to produce in vivo biotinylated Fabs in E. coli. This increased average yields up to 10-fold, with an average yield of 4 mg/L. For 118 antigens, we identified Fabs that could immunoprecipitate their full-length endogenous targets from mammalian cell lysates. One Fab for each antigen was converted to a recombinant IgG and produced in mammalian cells, with an average yield of 15 mg/L. In summary, we have optimized each step of the pipeline to produce recombinant antibodies, significantly increasing both efficiency and yield, and also showed that these Fabs and IgGs can be generally useful for chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) protocols. PMID:26437229

  10. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibody specific to recombinant dengue multi-epitope protein.

    PubMed

    Abhyankar, Ajay Vinayak; Bhargava, Rakesh; Jana, Asha Mukul; Sahni, Ajay Kumar; Rao, P V Lakshmana

    2008-06-01

    Monoclonal antibodies against novel dengue recombinant protein were produced following immunization of Balb/c mice with recombinant dengue multi-epitope protein (r-DMEP) expressed in Escherichia coli vector and purified in a single-step chromatography system. Antigenicity of r-DMEP was evaluated by dot enzyme immunoassay. Mice were immunized intraperitoneally with five doses each of 100 microg of this novel antigen at 1-week intervals and a final intravenous booster dose prior to the fusion. Hybridomas resulted from fusion of myeloma cells and splenocytes using PEG-1500 as an additive. Selection of the hybrids was done using HAT medium, and the hybrids thus selected were finally screened qualitatively and quantitatively by dot and plate immunoassays, respectively. Five antibody secretory hybrid clones exhibited specific reactivity against r-DMEP by dot-ELISA, whereas a lone clone was found to be cross-reactive with Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV). Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific to r-DME protein recognized the envelope and non-structural epitopes by Western blot analysis. These MAbs were further checked for their diagnostic efficacy using dengue suspected clinical samples and found overall sensitivity and specificity for DRDE dipstick ELISA. MAb-based dipstick ELISA results were 85%, 75% and 85%, 90%, respectively.

  11. Recombinant levels of Escherichia coli K-12 mutants deficient in various replication, recombination, or repair genes.

    PubMed Central

    Zieg, J; Maples, V F; Kushner, S R

    1978-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains containing mutations in lexA, rep, uvrA, uvrD, uvrE, lig, polA, dam, or xthA were constructed and tested for conjugation and transduction proficiencies and ability to form Lac+ recombinants in an assay system utilizing a nontandem duplication of two partially deleted lactose operons (lacMS286phi80dIIlacBK1). lexA and rep mutants were as deficient (20% of wild type) as recB and recC strains in their ability to produce Lac+ progeny. All the other strains exhibited increased frequencies of Lac+ recombinant formation, compared with wild type, ranging from 2- to 13-fold. Some strains showed markedly increased conjugation proficiency (dam uvrD) compared to wild type, while others appeared deficient (polA107). Some differences in transduction proficiency were also observed. Analysis of the Lac+ recombinants formed by the various mutants indicated that they were identical to the recombinants formed by a wild-type strain. The results indicate that genetic recombination in E. coli is a highly regulated process involving multiple gene products. PMID:350859

  12. Recombinant production and characterization of human anti-influenza virus monoclonal antibodies identified from hybridomas fused with human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Misaki, Ryo; Fukura, Natsuko; Kajiura, Hiroyuki; Yasugi, Mayo; Kubota-Koketsu, Ritsuko; Sasaki, Tadahiro; Momota, Masatoshi; Ono, Ken-Ichiro; Ohashi, Takao; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi; Fujiyama, Kazuhito

    2016-09-01

    In previous studies, hybridomas producing human immunoglobulin G, the antibodies 5E4 and 5A7 against influenza A and B virus were established using a novel human lymphocyte fusion partner, SPYMEG. In the present study, we succeeded in achieving the recombinant production and secretion of 5E4 and 5A7 in Chinese hamster ovary cells. Our N-glycan analysis by intact-mass detection and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry showed that recombinant 5E4 and 5A7 have one N-glycan and the typical mammalian-type N-glycan structures similar to those in hybridomas. However, the glycan distribution was slightly different among these antibodies. The amount of high-mannose-type structures was under 10% of the total N-glycans of recombinant 5E4 and 5A7, compared to 20% of the 5E4 and 5A7 produced in hybridomas. The amount of galactosylated N-glycans was increased in recombinants. Approximately 80% of the N-glycans of all antibodies was fucosylated, and no sialylated N-glycan was found. Recombinant 5E4 and 5A7 neutralized pandemic influenza A virus specifically, and influenza B virus broadly, quite similar to the 5E4 and 5A7 produced in hybridomas, respectively. Here we demonstrated that recombinants of antibodies identified from hybridomas fused with SPYMEG have normal N-glycans and that their neutralizing activities bear comparison with those of the original antibodies.

  13. Recombination and Gene Flux Caused by Gene Conversion and Crossing over in Inversion Heterokaryotypes

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, A.; Betran, E.; Barbadilla, A.; Ruiz, A.

    1997-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of the effects of inversions on recombination and gene flux between arrangements caused by gene conversion and crossing over was carried out. Two different mathematical models of recombination were used: the Poisson model (without interference) and the Counting model (with interference). The main results are as follows. (1) Recombination and gene flux are highly site-dependent both inside and outside the inverted regions. (2) Crossing over overwhelms gene conversion as a cause of gene flux in large inversions, while conversion becomes relatively significant in short inversions and in regions around the breakpoints. (3) Under the Counting model the recombination rate between two markers depends strongly on the position of the markers along the inverted segment. Two equally spaced markers in the central part of the inverted segment have less recombination than if they are in a more extreme position. (4) Inversions affect recombination rates in the uninverted regions of the chromosome. Recombination increases in the distal segment and decreases in the proximal segment. These results provide an explanation for a number of observations reported in the literature. Because inversions are ubiquitous in the evolutionary history of many Drosophila species, the effects of inversions on recombination are expected to influence DNA variation patterns. PMID:9178017

  14. Recombinant capripoxvirus expressing the hemagglutinin protein gene of rinderpest virus: protection of cattle against rinderpest and lumpy skin disease viruses.

    PubMed

    Romero, C H; Barrett, T; Chamberlain, R W; Kitching, R P; Fleming, M; Black, D N

    1994-10-01

    A cDNA clone containing the complete coding sequence of the hemagglutinin (H) protein gene of the RBOK vaccine strain of rinderpest virus, under the control of the vaccinia late promoter p11, was inserted by homologous recombination into the thymidine kinase gene of the KS-1 strain of capripoxvirus. The recombinant virus produced authentic H protein as judged by its electrophoretic mobility, transport to the cell surface of infected lamb testis cells, and reactivity with monoclonal antibodies specific for the H protein of rinderpest virus. The recombinant virus induced significant levels of rinderpest virus neutralizing antibodies in vaccinated cattle and protected them from clinical rinderpest after challenge with a lethal dose of a highly virulent heterologous strain of the virus. Protection was achieved using vaccine doses lower than those used with a similar recombinant expressing the fusion protein gene of rinderpest. The parental KS-1 virus is widely used as a vaccine against capripox viruses and so the rinderpest recombinant acts as a dual vaccine to protect cattle against both rinderpest and lumpy skin disease.

  15. Horizontal gene transfer and recombination in Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis

    PubMed Central

    McNeilly, Celia L.; McMillan, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis (SDSE) is a human pathogen that colonizes the skin or throat, and causes a range of diseases from relatively benign pharyngitis to potentially fatal invasive diseases. While not as virulent as the close relative Streptococcus pyogenes the two share a number of virulence factors and are known to coexist in a human host. Both pre- and post-genomic studies have revealed that horizontal gene transfer (HGT) and recombination occurs between these two organisms and plays a major role in shaping the population structure of SDSE. This review summarizes our current knowledge of HGT and recombination in the evolution of SDSE. PMID:25566202

  16. [Targeted Delivery of Quantum Dots to HER2-Expressing Tumor Using Recombinant Antibodies].

    PubMed

    Balalaeva, I V; Zdobnova, T A; Sokolova, E A; Deyev, S M

    2015-01-01

    Targeted delivery of semiconductor quantum dots (Q Ds) to tumors overexpressing HER2 cancer marker has been. demonstrated on immunocompromised mice bearing human breast cancer xenografts. To obtain targeted QDs complexes we applied the approach based on the use of protein adaptor system, RNAase barnase and its inhibitor barstar. Specific binding to target cancer marker was achieved through bivalent fusion protein containing two fragments of4D5scFv recombinant antibody and a fragment of barnase. QDs were conjugated to barstar, and final assembly of targeted complexes was obtained through non-covalent specific interaction of barstar, attached to QD, and barnase, that is part of the recombinant targeting protein. The efficient delivery of QDs to HER2-expressing tumor demonstrates the possibilities and prospects of the approach for targeted delivery of nanoparticles to cancer cells in vivo as the way to improve the efficiency of diagnosis and promote development of therapies based on the use of nanoparticles.

  17. Trypanosome Surface Antigen Genes: Analysis Using Recombinant DNA.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-15

    glycoprotein ( VSG ) genes. umerous syringe passaged and cyclically transmitted, frequently expressed VATs have been isolated, monoclonal antibodies prepared...to their VSGs , and he expressed VSG genes have been cloned. We have shown that many diverse tocks express VSG epitopes related to the early IsTst...epitopes. The VSG ene organization in the genome and sequence organization has been haracterized. We have confirmed sequence homology at the 3’ terminus

  18. Specific activities of poetam preparation (superlow-doses of antibodies to erythropoietin) and recombinant erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Dygai, A M; Zhdanov, V V; Udut, E V; Simanina, E V; Gur'yantseva, L A; Khrichkova, T Yu; Epshtein, O I; Sergeeva, S A

    2006-09-01

    We compared the capacity of superlow-dose of antibodies to erythropoietin (Poetam) and recombinant erythropoietin (Recormon) to stimulate the recovery of adriamycin-suppressed erythropoiesis in mice. Both preparations exhibited high erythron activation capacity and considerably increased the content of erythrocytes and reticulocytes in the peripheral blood and content of erythrokaryocytes and erythroid precursors in the hemopoietic tissue of experimental animals. The effect of Recormon manifested immediately after injection, while the effect of Poetam was somewhat delayed, but more lasting (due to activation of host erythropoietin system).

  19. Preparation of Recombinant Viral Glycoproteins for Novel and Therapeutic Antibody Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Yee-Peng; Yan, Lianying; Feng, Yan-Ru; Broder, Christopher C.

    2010-01-01

    Neutralizing antibodies are a critical component in the protection or recovery from viral infections. In the absence of available vaccines or antiviral drugs for many important human viral pathogens, the identification and characterization of new human monoclonal antibodies (hmAbs) able to neutralize viruses offers the possibility for effective pre- and/or post-exposure therapeutic modalities. Such hmAbs may also help in our understanding of the virus entry process, the mechanisms of virus neutralization and in the eventual development of specific entry inhibitors, vaccines and research tools. The majority of the more recently developed antiviral hmAbs have come from the use of antibody phage-display technologies using both naïve and immune libraries. Many of these agents are also enveloped viruses possessing important neutralizing determinants within their membrane-anchored envelope glycoproteins and the use of recombinant, soluble versions of these viral glycoproteins is often critical in the isolation and development of antiviral hmAbs. This chapter will detail several methods that have been successfully employed to produce, purify and characterize soluble and secreted versions of several viral envelope glycoproteins which have been successfully used as antigens to capture and isolate human phage-displayed monoclonal antibodies. PMID:19252850

  20. The Development of a Recombinant scFv Monoclonal Antibody Targeting Canine CD20 for Use in Comparative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Jain, Saurabh; Aresu, Luca; Comazzi, Stefano; Shi, Jianguo; Worrall, Erin; Clayton, John; Humphries, William; Hemmington, Sandra; Davis, Paul; Murray, Euan; Limeneh, Asmare A; Ball, Kathryn; Ruckova, Eva; Muller, Petr; Vojtesek, Borek; Fahraeus, Robin; Argyle, David; Hupp, Ted R

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are leading agents for therapeutic treatment of human diseases, but are limited in use by the paucity of clinically relevant models for validation. Sporadic canine tumours mimic the features of some human equivalents. Developing canine immunotherapeutics can be an approach for modeling human disease responses. Rituximab is a pioneering agent used to treat human hematological malignancies. Biologic mimics that target canine CD20 are just being developed by the biotechnology industry. Towards a comparative canine-human model system, we have developed a novel anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (NCD1.2) that binds both human and canine CD20. NCD1.2 has a sub-nanomolar Kd as defined by an octet red binding assay. Using FACS, NCD1.2 binds to clinically derived canine cells including B-cells in peripheral blood and in different histotypes of B-cell lymphoma. Immunohistochemical staining of canine tissues indicates that the NCD1.2 binds to membrane localized cells in Diffuse Large B-cell lymphoma, Marginal Zone Lymphoma, and other canine B-cell lymphomas. We cloned the heavy and light chains of NCD1.2 from hybridomas to determine whether active scaffolds can be acquired as future biologics tools. The VH and VL genes from the hybridomas were cloned using degenerate primers and packaged as single chains (scFv) into a phage-display library. Surprisingly, we identified two scFv (scFv-3 and scFv-7) isolated from the hybridoma with bioactivity towards CD20. The two scFv had identical VH genes but different VL genes and identical CDR3s, indicating that at least two light chain mRNAs are encoded by NCD1.2 hybridoma cells. Both scFv-3 and scFv-7 were cloned into mammalian vectors for secretion in CHO cells and the antibodies were bioactive towards recombinant CD20 protein or peptide. The scFv-3 and scFv-7 were cloned into an ADEPT-CPG2 bioconjugate vector where bioactivity was retained when expressed in bacterial systems. These data identify a recombinant anti-CD20

  1. The Development of a Recombinant scFv Monoclonal Antibody Targeting Canine CD20 for Use in Comparative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Saurabh; Aresu, Luca; Comazzi, Stefano; Shi, Jianguo; Worrall, Erin; Clayton, John; Humphries, William; Hemmington, Sandra; Davis, Paul; Murray, Euan; Limeneh, Asmare A.; Ball, Kathryn; Ruckova, Eva; Muller, Petr; Vojtesek, Borek; Fahraeus, Robin; Argyle, David; Hupp, Ted R.

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are leading agents for therapeutic treatment of human diseases, but are limited in use by the paucity of clinically relevant models for validation. Sporadic canine tumours mimic the features of some human equivalents. Developing canine immunotherapeutics can be an approach for modeling human disease responses. Rituximab is a pioneering agent used to treat human hematological malignancies. Biologic mimics that target canine CD20 are just being developed by the biotechnology industry. Towards a comparative canine-human model system, we have developed a novel anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (NCD1.2) that binds both human and canine CD20. NCD1.2 has a sub-nanomolar Kd as defined by an octet red binding assay. Using FACS, NCD1.2 binds to clinically derived canine cells including B-cells in peripheral blood and in different histotypes of B-cell lymphoma. Immunohistochemical staining of canine tissues indicates that the NCD1.2 binds to membrane localized cells in Diffuse Large B-cell lymphoma, Marginal Zone Lymphoma, and other canine B-cell lymphomas. We cloned the heavy and light chains of NCD1.2 from hybridomas to determine whether active scaffolds can be acquired as future biologics tools. The VH and VL genes from the hybridomas were cloned using degenerate primers and packaged as single chains (scFv) into a phage-display library. Surprisingly, we identified two scFv (scFv-3 and scFv-7) isolated from the hybridoma with bioactivity towards CD20. The two scFv had identical VH genes but different VL genes and identical CDR3s, indicating that at least two light chain mRNAs are encoded by NCD1.2 hybridoma cells. Both scFv-3 and scFv-7 were cloned into mammalian vectors for secretion in CHO cells and the antibodies were bioactive towards recombinant CD20 protein or peptide. The scFv-3 and scFv-7 were cloned into an ADEPT-CPG2 bioconjugate vector where bioactivity was retained when expressed in bacterial systems. These data identify a recombinant anti-CD20

  2. Generation and characterization of neutralizing human recombinant antibodies against antigenic site II of rabies virus glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lina; Chen, Zhe; Yu, Li; Wei, Jingshuang; Li, Chuan; Jin, Jing; Shen, Xinxin; Lv, Xinjun; Tang, Qing; Li, Dexin; Liang, Mifang

    2012-10-01

    The currently recommended treatment for individuals exposed to rabies virus (RV) is post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) through the combined administration of rabies vaccine and rabies immune globulin (RIG). Human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that neutralize RV offer an opportunity to replace RIG for rabies PEP. Here, a combinatorial human Fab library was constructed using antibody genes derived from the blood of RV-vaccinated donors. Selections of this library against purified RV virions resulted in the identification of 11 unique Fab antibodies specific for RV glycoprotein. Of the Fab antibodies, five were converted to full human IgG1 format. The human IgG antibodies revealed high binding affinity and neutralizing activities against RV fixed strains through a rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test in vitro as well as the early stage protective function after exposure to RV infection in vivo. Furthermore, epitope mapping and binding competition analysis showed that all of obtained human neutralizing and protective antibodies were directed to the antigenic site II of RV glycoprotein. Our results provide not only important insight into the protective immune response to RV in humans, but also more candidates eligible for use in a mAb cocktail aimed at replacing RIG for rabies post-exposure prophylaxis.

  3. Immunogenicity of recombinant L7/L12 ribosomal protein of Neisseria meningitidis--high prevalence of specific antibodies in humans but limited immunogenicity for T cells.

    PubMed

    Nolte, Oliver; Förch, Christian; Ehrhard, Ingrid; Sonntag, Hans-Günther

    2002-05-01

    The rplL gene, coding for ribosomal protein L7/L12 of Neisseria meningitidis was cloned and expressed as a fusion protein. The recombinant protein was used in Western blots and lymphocyte proliferation assays to study the prevalence of specific antibodies in human sera and the immunogenicity for the cellular immune system. Most of the serum samples studied were found to be positive for L7/L12-specific antibodies. A number of peripheral blood mononuclear cell preparations tested displayed activation in lymphocyte proliferation assays. The magnitude of activation (stimulation index) was moderate, and there was no correlation with a history of meningococcal disease. The high prevalence of specific antibodies is explained by the high carriage rate of meningococci in the normal population or cross-reactivity to ribosomal proteins of other bacteria, thus indicating immunogenicity. However, meningococcal L7/L12 does not seem to be a potential T cell antigen.

  4. Insulin antibodies in patients with type 2 diabetic receiving recombinant human insulin injection: A report of 12 cases.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaolei; Ma, Xiaowen; Wang, Xin; Zhao, Xiuli; Xu, Xuling; Gong, Hui; Chen, Fengling; Sun, Junjie

    2015-12-01

    We report 12 cases of patients with type 2 diabetic receiving recombinant human insulin injection, who had uncontrolled hyperglycemia or frequent episodes of hypoglycemia, high levels of serum insulin and positive insulin antibodies. The clinical characteristics and insulin antibodies pharmacokinetics parameters were analyzed. After administration of glucocorticoids, changing insulin formulations or discontinuing the insulin and switching to oral antidiabetic agents, the level of insulin antibodies decreased and the plasma glucose restored. Thus, we recommend to identify the presence of high insulin antibodies in patients with type 2 diabetes who experience unexplained high plasma glucose or frequent reoccurrence of hypoglycemia.

  5. Genetically Engineered Poxviruses for Recombinant Gene Expression, Vaccination, and Safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, Bernard

    1996-10-01

    Vaccinia virus, no longer required for immunization against smallpox, now serves as a unique vector for expressing genes within the cytoplasm of mammalian cells. As a research tool, recombinant vaccinia viruses are used to synthesize and analyze the structure--function relationships of proteins, determine the targets of humoral and cell-mediated immunity, and investigate the types of immune response needed for protection against specific infectious diseases and cancer. The vaccine potential of recombinant vaccinia virus has been realized in the form of an effective oral wild-life rabies vaccine, although no product for humans has been licensed. A genetically altered vaccinia virus that is unable to replicate in mammalian cells and produces diminished cytopathic effects retains the capacity for high-level gene expression and immunogenicity while promising exceptional safety for laboratory workers and potential vaccine recipients.

  6. Three faces of recombination activating gene 1 (RAG1) mutations.

    PubMed

    Patiroglu, Turkan; Akar, Himmet Haluk; Van Der Burg, Mirjam

    2015-12-01

    Severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) is a group of genetic disorder associated with development of T- and/or B-lymphocytes. Recombination-activating genes (RAG1/2) play a critical role on VDJ recombination process that leads to the production of a broad T-cell receptor (TCR) and B-cell receptor (BCR) repertoire in the development of T and B cells. RAG1/2 genes mutations result in various forms of primary immunodeficiency, ranging from classic SCID to Omenn syndrome (OS) to atypical SCID with such as granuloma formation and autoimmunity. Herein, we reported 4 patients with RAG1 deficiency: classic SCID was seen in two patients who presented with recurrent pneumonia and chronic diarrhoea, and failure to thrive. OS was observed in one patient who presented with chronic diarrhoea, skin rash, recurrent lower respiratory infections, and atypical SCID was seen in one patient who presented with Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) and had novel RAG1 mutation.

  7. TRAIL-R2-specific antibodies and recombinant TRAIL can synergise to kill cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tuthill, M H; Montinaro, A; Zinngrebe, J; Prieske, K; Draber, P; Prieske, S; Newsom-Davis, T; von Karstedt, S; Graves, J; Walczak, H

    2015-04-16

    Tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) induces apoptosis in cancer cells while sparing normal tissues. Despite promising preclinical results, few patients responded to treatment with recombinant TRAIL (Apo2L/Dulanermin) or TRAIL-R2-specific antibodies, such as conatumumab (AMG655). It is unknown whether this was due to intrinsic TRAIL resistance within primary human cancers or insufficient agonistic activity of the TRAIL-receptor (TRAIL-R)-targeting drugs. Fcγ receptors (FcγR)-mediated crosslinking increases the cancer-cell-killing activity of TRAIL-R2-specific antibodies in vivo. We tested this phenomenon using FcγR-expressing immune cells from patients with ovarian cancer. However, even in the presence of high numbers of FcγR-expressing immune cells, as found in ovarian cancer ascites, AMG655-induced apoptosis was not enabled to any significant degree, indicating that this concept may not translate into clinical use. On the basis of these results, we next set out to determine whether AMG655 possibly interferes with apoptosis induction by endogenous TRAIL, which could be expressed by immune cells. To do so, we tested how AMG655 affected apoptosis induction by recombinant TRAIL. This, however, resulted in the surprising discovery of a striking synergy between AMG655 and non-tagged TRAIL (Apo2L/TRAIL) in killing cancer cells. This combination was as effective in killing cancer cells as highly active recombinant isoleucine-zipper-tagged TRAIL (iz-TRAIL). The increased killing efficiency was due to enhanced formation of the TRAIL death-inducing signalling complex, enabled by concomitant binding of Apo2L/TRAIL and AMG655 to TRAIL-R2. The synergy of AMG655 with Apo2L/TRAIL extended to primary ovarian cancer cells and was further enhanced by combination with the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib or a second mitochondrial-derived activator of caspases (SMAC) mimetic. Importantly, primary human hepatocytes were not killed by the AMG655-Apo2L

  8. Mapping the AAV Capsid Host Antibody Response toward the Development of Second Generation Gene Delivery Vectors.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Yu-Shan; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis

    2014-01-01

    The recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) gene delivery system is entering a crucial and exciting phase with the promise of more than 20 years of intense research now realized in a number of successful human clinical trials. However, as a natural host to AAV infection, anti-AAV antibodies are prevalent in the human population. For example, ~70% of human sera samples are positive for AAV serotype 2 (AAV2). Furthermore, low levels of pre-existing neutralizing antibodies in the circulation are detrimental to the efficacy of corrective therapeutic AAV gene delivery. A key component to overcoming this obstacle is the identification of regions of the AAV capsid that participate in interactions with host immunity, especially neutralizing antibodies, to be modified for neutralization escape. Three main approaches have been utilized to map antigenic epitopes on AAV capsids. The first is directed evolution in which AAV variants are selected in the presence of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) or pooled human sera. This results in AAV variants with mutations on important neutralizing epitopes. The second is epitope searching, achieved by peptide scanning, peptide insertion, or site-directed mutagenesis. The third, a structure biology-based approach, utilizes cryo-electron microscopy and image reconstruction of AAV capsids complexed to fragment antibodies, which are generated from MAbs, to directly visualize the epitopes. In this review, the contribution of these three approaches to the current knowledge of AAV epitopes and success in their use to create second generation vectors will be discussed.

  9. Mapping the AAV Capsid Host Antibody Response toward the Development of Second Generation Gene Delivery Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Yu-Shan; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis

    2013-01-01

    The recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) gene delivery system is entering a crucial and exciting phase with the promise of more than 20 years of intense research now realized in a number of successful human clinical trials. However, as a natural host to AAV infection, anti-AAV antibodies are prevalent in the human population. For example, ~70% of human sera samples are positive for AAV serotype 2 (AAV2). Furthermore, low levels of pre-existing neutralizing antibodies in the circulation are detrimental to the efficacy of corrective therapeutic AAV gene delivery. A key component to overcoming this obstacle is the identification of regions of the AAV capsid that participate in interactions with host immunity, especially neutralizing antibodies, to be modified for neutralization escape. Three main approaches have been utilized to map antigenic epitopes on AAV capsids. The first is directed evolution in which AAV variants are selected in the presence of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) or pooled human sera. This results in AAV variants with mutations on important neutralizing epitopes. The second is epitope searching, achieved by peptide scanning, peptide insertion, or site-directed mutagenesis. The third, a structure biology-based approach, utilizes cryo-electron microscopy and image reconstruction of AAV capsids complexed to fragment antibodies, which are generated from MAbs, to directly visualize the epitopes. In this review, the contribution of these three approaches to the current knowledge of AAV epitopes and success in their use to create second generation vectors will be discussed. PMID:24523720

  10. Gene targeting in maize by somatic ectopic recombination.

    PubMed

    Ayar, Ayhan; Wehrkamp-Richter, Sophie; Laffaire, Jean-Baptiste; Le Goff, Samuel; Levy, Julien; Chaignon, Sandrine; Salmi, Hajer; Lepicard, Alexandra; Sallaud, Christophe; Gallego, Maria E; White, Charles I; Paul, Wyatt

    2013-04-01

    Low transformation efficiency and high background of non-targeted events are major constraints to gene targeting in plants. We demonstrate here applicability in maize of a system that reduces the constraint from transformation efficiency. The system requires regenerable transformants in which all of the following elements are stably integrated in the genome: (i) donor DNA with the gene of interest adjacent to sequence for repair of a defective selectable marker, (ii) sequence encoding a rare-cutting endonuclease such as I-SceI, (iii) a target locus (TL) comprising the defective selectable marker and I-SceI cleavage site. Typically, this requires additional markers for the integration of the donor and target sequences, which may be assembled through cross-pollination of separate transformants. Inducible expression of I-SceI then cleaves the TL and facilitates homologous recombination, which is assayed by selection for the repaired marker. We used bar and gfp markers to identify assembled transformants, a dexamethasone-inducible I-SceI::GR protein, and selection for recombination events that restored an intact nptII. Applying this strategy to callus permitted the selection of recombination into the TL at a frequency of 0.085% per extracted immature embryo (29% of recombinants). Our results also indicate that excision of the donor locus (DL) through the use of flanking I-SceI cleavage sites may be unnecessary, and a source of unwanted repair events at the DL. The system allows production, from each assembled transformant, of many cells that subsequently can be treated to induce gene targeting. This may facilitate gene targeting in plant species for which transformation efficiencies are otherwise limiting.

  11. Progress in the development of immunoanalytical methods incorporating recombinant antibodies to small molecular weight biotoxins.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, Owen; Elliott, Christopher T; Campbell, Katrina

    2015-04-01

    Rapid immunoanalytical screening of food and environmental samples for small molecular weight (hapten) biotoxin contaminations requires the production of antibody reagents that possess the requisite sensitivity and specificity. To date animal-derived polyclonal (pAb) and monoclonal (mAb) antibodies have provided the binding element of the majority of these assays but recombinant antibodies (rAb) isolated from in vitro combinatorial phage display libraries are an exciting alternative due to (1) circumventing the need for experimental animals, (2) speed of production in commonly used in vitro expression systems and (3) subsequent molecular enhancement of binder performance. Short chain variable fragments (scFv) have been the most commonly employed rAb reagents for hapten biotoxin detection over the last two decades but antibody binding fragments (Fab) and single domain antibodies (sdAb) are increasing in popularity due to increased expression efficiency of functional binders and superior resistance to solvents. rAb-based immunochromatographic assays and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors have been reported to detect sub-regulatory levels of fungal (mycotoxins), marine (phycotoxins) and aquatic biotoxins in a wide range of food and environmental matrices, however this technology has yet to surpass the performances of the equivalent mAb- and pAb-based formats. As such the full potential of rAb technology in hapten biotoxin detection has yet to be achieved, but in time the inherent advantages of engineered rAb are set to provide the next generation of ultra-high performing binder reagents for the rapid and specific detection of hapten biotoxins.

  12. Characterization of a recombinant humanized anti-cocaine monoclonal antibody and its Fab fragment

    PubMed Central

    Kirley, Terence L; Norman, Andrew B

    2015-01-01

    Variations of post-translational modifications are important for stability and in vivo behavior of therapeutic antibodies. A recombinant humanized anti-cocaine monoclonal antibody (h2E2) was characterized for heterogeneity of N-linked glycosylation and disulfide bonds. In addition, charge heterogeneity, which is partially due to the presence or absence of C-terminal lysine on the heavy chains, was examined. For cocaine overdose therapy, Fab fragments may be therapeutic, and thus, a simplified method of generation, purification, and characterization of the Fab fragment generated by Endoproteinase Lys-C digestion was devised. Both the intact h2E2 antibody and purified Fab fragments were analyzed for their affinities for cocaine and 2 of its metabolites, benzoylecgonine and cocaethylene, by fluorescence quenching of intrinsic antibody tyrosine and tryptophan fluorescence resulting from binding of these drugs. Binding constants obtained from fluorescence quenching measurements are in agreement with recently published radioligand and ELISA binding assays. The dissociation constants determined for the h2E2 monoclonal and its Fab fragment are approximately 1, 5, and 20 nM for cocaethylene, cocaine, and benzoylecgonine, respectively. Tryptophan fluorescence quenching (emission at 330 nm) was measured after either excitation of tyrosine and tryptophan (280 nm) or selective excitation of tryptophan alone (295 nm). More accurate binding constants are obtained using tryptophan selective excitation at 295 nm, likely due to interfering absorption of cocaine and metabolites at 280 nm. These quenching results are consistent with multiple tryptophan and tyrosine residues in or near the predicted binding location of cocaine in a previously published 3-D model of this antibody's variable region. PMID:25692880

  13. Characterization of a recombinant humanized anti-cocaine monoclonal antibody and its Fab fragment.

    PubMed

    Kirley, Terence L; Norman, Andrew B

    2015-01-01

    Variations of post-translational modifications are important for stability and in vivo behavior of therapeutic antibodies. A recombinant humanized anti-cocaine monoclonal antibody (h2E2) was characterized for heterogeneity of N-linked glycosylation and disulfide bonds. In addition, charge heterogeneity, which is partially due to the presence or absence of C-terminal lysine on the heavy chains, was examined. For cocaine overdose therapy, Fab fragments may be therapeutic, and thus, a simplified method of generation, purification, and characterization of the Fab fragment generated by Endoproteinase Lys-C digestion was devised. Both the intact h2E2 antibody and purified Fab fragments were analyzed for their affinities for cocaine and 2 of its metabolites, benzoylecgonine and cocaethylene, by fluorescence quenching of intrinsic antibody tyrosine and tryptophan fluorescence resulting from binding of these drugs. Binding constants obtained from fluorescence quenching measurements are in agreement with recently published radioligand and ELISA binding assays. The dissociation constants determined for the h2E2 monoclonal and its Fab fragment are approximately 1, 5, and 20 nM for cocaethylene, cocaine, and benzoylecgonine, respectively. Tryptophan fluorescence quenching (emission at 330 nm) was measured after either excitation of tyrosine and tryptophan (280 nm) or selective excitation of tryptophan alone (295 nm). More accurate binding constants are obtained using tryptophan selective excitation at 295 nm, likely due to interfering absorption of cocaine and metabolites at 280 nm. These quenching results are consistent with multiple tryptophan and tyrosine residues in or near the predicted binding location of cocaine in a previously published 3-D model of this antibody's variable region.

  14. New Genes Originated via Multiple Recombinational Pathways in the β-Globin Gene Family of Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Federico G.; Opazo, Juan C.; Storz, Jay F.

    2008-01-01

    Species differences in the size or membership composition of multigene families can be attributed to lineage-specific additions of new genes via duplication, losses of genes via deletion or inactivation, and the creation of chimeric genes via domain shuffling or gene fusion. In principle, it should be possible to infer the recombinational pathways responsible for each of these different types of genomic change by conducting detailed comparative analyses of genomic sequence data. Here, we report an attempt to unravel the complex evolutionary history of the β-globin gene family in a taxonomically diverse set of rodent species. The main objectives were: 1) to characterize the genomic structure of the β-globin gene cluster of rodents; 2) to assign orthologous and paralogous relationships among duplicate copies of β-like globin genes; and 3) to infer the specific recombinational pathways responsible for gene duplications, gene deletions, and the creation of chimeric fusion genes. Results of our comparative genomic analyses revealed that variation in gene family size among rodent species is mainly attributable to the differential gain and loss of later expressed β-globin genes via unequal crossing-over. However, two distinct recombinational mechanisms were implicated in the creation of chimeric fusion genes. In muroid rodents, a chimeric γ/ε fusion gene was created by unequal crossing-over between the embryonic ε- and γ-globin genes. Interestingly, this γ/ε fusion gene was generated in the same fashion as the “anti-Lepore” 5′-δ-(β/δ)-β-3′ duplication mutant in humans (the reciprocal exchange product of the pathological hemoglobin Lepore deletion mutant). By contrast, in the house mouse, Mus musculus, a chimeric β/δ fusion pseudogene was created by a β-globin → δ-globin gene conversion event. Although the γ/ε and β/δ fusion genes share a similar chimeric gene structure, they originated via completely different recombinational pathways. PMID

  15. Recombinant Rift Valley fever vaccines induce protective levels of antibody in baboons and resistance to lethal challenge in mice.

    PubMed

    Papin, James F; Verardi, Paulo H; Jones, Leslie A; Monge-Navarro, Francisco; Brault, Aaron C; Holbrook, Michael R; Worthy, Melissa N; Freiberg, Alexander N; Yilma, Tilahun D

    2011-09-06

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a zoonotic disease endemic in Africa and the Arabian Peninsula caused by the highly infectious Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) that can be lethal to humans and animals and results in major losses in the livestock industry. RVF is exotic to the United States; however, mosquito species native to this region can serve as biological vectors for the virus. Thus, accidental or malicious introduction of this virus could result in RVFV becoming endemic in North America. Such an event would likely lead to significant morbidity and mortality in humans, and devastating economic effects on the livestock industry. Currently, there are no licensed vaccines for RVF that are both safe and efficacious. To address this issue, we developed two recombinant RVFV vaccines using vaccinia virus (VACV) as a vector for use in livestock. The first vaccine, vCOGnGc, was attenuated by the deletion of a VACV gene encoding an IFN-γ binding protein, insertional inactivation of the thymidine kinase gene, and expression of RVFV glycoproteins, Gn and Gc. The second vaccine, vCOGnGcγ, is identical to the first and also expresses the human IFN-γ gene to enhance safety. Both vaccines are extremely safe; neither resulted in weight loss nor death in severe combined immunodeficient mice, and pock lesions were smaller in baboons compared with the controls. Furthermore, both vaccines induced protective levels of antibody titers in vaccinated mice and baboons. Mice were protected from lethal RVFV challenge. Thus, we have developed two safe and efficacious recombinant vaccines for RVF.

  16. Recombinant Rift Valley fever vaccines induce protective levels of antibody in baboons and resistance to lethal challenge in mice

    PubMed Central

    Papin, James F.; Verardi, Paulo H.; Jones, Leslie A.; Monge-Navarro, Francisco; Brault, Aaron C.; Holbrook, Michael R.; Worthy, Melissa N.; Freiberg, Alexander N.; Yilma, Tilahun D.

    2011-01-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a zoonotic disease endemic in Africa and the Arabian Peninsula caused by the highly infectious Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) that can be lethal to humans and animals and results in major losses in the livestock industry. RVF is exotic to the United States; however, mosquito species native to this region can serve as biological vectors for the virus. Thus, accidental or malicious introduction of this virus could result in RVFV becoming endemic in North America. Such an event would likely lead to significant morbidity and mortality in humans, and devastating economic effects on the livestock industry. Currently, there are no licensed vaccines for RVF that are both safe and efficacious. To address this issue, we developed two recombinant RVFV vaccines using vaccinia virus (VACV) as a vector for use in livestock. The first vaccine, vCOGnGc, was attenuated by the deletion of a VACV gene encoding an IFN-γ binding protein, insertional inactivation of the thymidine kinase gene, and expression of RVFV glycoproteins, Gn and Gc. The second vaccine, vCOGnGcγ, is identical to the first and also expresses the human IFN-γ gene to enhance safety. Both vaccines are extremely safe; neither resulted in weight loss nor death in severe combined immunodeficient mice, and pock lesions were smaller in baboons compared with the controls. Furthermore, both vaccines induced protective levels of antibody titers in vaccinated mice and baboons. Mice were protected from lethal RVFV challenge. Thus, we have developed two safe and efficacious recombinant vaccines for RVF. PMID:21873194

  17. Biotechnology and genetic engineering in the new drug development. Part II. Monoclonal antibodies, modern vaccines and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Stryjewska, Agnieszka; Kiepura, Katarzyna; Librowski, Tadeusz; Lochyński, Stanisław

    2013-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies, modern vaccines and gene therapy have become a major field in modern biotechnology, especially in the area of human health and fascinating developments achieved in the past decades are impressive examples of an interdisciplinary interplay between medicine, biology and engineering. Among the classical products from cells one can find viral vaccines, monoclonal antibodies, and interferons, as well as recombinant therapeutic proteins. Gene therapy opens up challenging new areas. In this review, a definitions of these processes are given and fields of application and products, as well as the future prospects, are discussed.

  18. "Active" cancer immunotherapy by anti-Met antibody gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Vigna, Elisa; Pacchiana, Giovanni; Mazzone, Massimiliano; Chiriaco, Cristina; Fontani, Lara; Basilico, Cristina; Pennacchietti, Selma; Comoglio, Paolo M

    2008-11-15

    Gene therapy provides a still poorly explored opportunity to treat cancer by "active" immunotherapy as it enables the transfer of genes encoding antibodies directed against specific oncogenic proteins. By a bidirectional lentiviral vector, we transferred the cDNA encoding the heavy and light chains of a monoclonal anti-Met antibody (DN-30) to epithelial cancer cells. In vitro, the transduced cells synthesized and secreted correctly assembled antibodies with the expected high affinity, inducing down-regulation of the Met receptor and strong inhibition of the invasive growth response. The inhibitory activity resulted (a) from the interference of the antibody with the Met receptor intracellular processing ("cell autonomous activity," in cis) and (b) from the antibody-induced cleavage of Met expressed at the cell surface ("bystander effect," in trans). The monoclonal antibody gene transferred into live animals by systemic administration or by local intratumor delivery resulted in substantial inhibition of tumor growth. These data provide proof of concept both for targeting the Met receptor and for a gene transfer-based immunotherapy strategy.

  19. Selection and characterization of single-chain recombinant antibodies against phosphoprotein of Newcastle disease virus.

    PubMed

    Li, Benqiang; Ye, Jiaxin; Lin, Yuan; Wang, Man; Jia, Rui; Zhu, Jianguo

    2014-09-01

    Phosphoprotein (P), involved in virus RNA replication and transcription, had become a new target for the research on treating Newcastle disease virus (NDV). Here we described the cloning and expression of phosphoprotein from NDV, and then screened the anti-P antibodies from the chicken single chain fragment variable (scFv) library, which were generated from chickens immunized with the ND vaccines. As a first step, the recombinant expression vector pET28a-P was successfully constructed. In a following step, two anti-P positive scFv clones from the scFv library were selected by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. The sequence analysis of two positive clones showed that there were more variation in complementary determine region (CDR) of VH and VL, and the CDR3 in VH exhibited a significant change in amino acid number and type. In another experiment, the purified scFv antibodies used in the assay was shown to be specific for NDV-P by western blot. The results indicated that the strategy we used in this experiment proved to be convenient way for screening scFv antibody, which paved a new way for the immunization diagnosis and the exploration of integrated control of NDV.

  20. Gene Delivery into Plant Cells for Recombinant Protein Production

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant proteins are primarily produced from cultures of mammalian, insect, and bacteria cells. In recent years, the development of deconstructed virus-based vectors has allowed plants to become a viable platform for recombinant protein production, with advantages in versatility, speed, cost, scalability, and safety over the current production paradigms. In this paper, we review the recent progress in the methodology of agroinfiltration, a solution to overcome the challenge of transgene delivery into plant cells for large-scale manufacturing of recombinant proteins. General gene delivery methodologies in plants are first summarized, followed by extensive discussion on the application and scalability of each agroinfiltration method. New development of a spray-based agroinfiltration and its application on field-grown plants is highlighted. The discussion of agroinfiltration vectors focuses on their applications for producing complex and heteromultimeric proteins and is updated with the development of bridge vectors. Progress on agroinfiltration in Nicotiana and non-Nicotiana plant hosts is subsequently showcased in context of their applications for producing high-value human biologics and low-cost and high-volume industrial enzymes. These new advancements in agroinfiltration greatly enhance the robustness and scalability of transgene delivery in plants, facilitating the adoption of plant transient expression systems for manufacturing recombinant proteins with a broad range of applications. PMID:26075275

  1. A Recombinant Bispecific CD20×CD95 Antibody With Superior Activity Against Normal and Malignant B-cells

    PubMed Central

    Nalivaiko, Kristina; Hofmann, Martin; Kober, Karina; Teichweyde, Nadine; Krammer, Peter H; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Grosse-Hovest, Ludger; Jung, Gundram

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies directed to the B-cell-specific CD20-antigen are successfully used for the treatment of lymphomas and autoimmune diseases. Here, we compare the anti-B-cell activity of three different antibodies directed to CD20: (i) a chimeric, monospecific antibody, (ii) an Fc-optimized variant thereof, and (iii) a bispecific CD20×CD95-antibody in a newly developed recombinant format, termed Fabsc. The bispecific antibody specifically triggers the CD95 death receptor on malignant, as well as activated, normal B-cells. We found that the capability of this antibody to suppress the growth of malignant B-cells in vitro and in vivo and to specifically deplete normal, activated B-cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cultures was superior to that of the Fc-optimized monospecific antibody. This antibody in turn was more effective than its nonoptimized variant. Moreover, the bispecific antibody was the only reagent capable of significantly suppressing antibody production in vitro. Our findings imply that the bispecific CD20×CD95-antibody might become a new, prototypical reagent for the treatment of B-cell-mediated autoimmune disease. PMID:26581163

  2. Characterisation of antibody responses in pigs induced by recombinant oncosphere antigens from Taenia solium.

    PubMed

    Jayashi, César M; Gonzalez, Armando E; Castillo Neyra, Ricardo; Kyngdon, Craig T; Gauci, Charles G; Lightowlers, Marshall W

    2012-12-14

    Recombinant antigens cloned from the oncosphere life cycle stage of the cestode parasite Taenia solium (T. solium) have been proven to be effective as vaccines for protecting pigs against infections with T. solium. Previous studies have defined three different host protective oncosphere antigens, TSOL18, TSOL16 and TSOL45. In this study, we evaluated the potential for combining the antigens TSOL16 and TSOL18 as a practical vaccine. Firstly, in a laboratory trial, we compared the immunogenicity of the combined antigens (TSOL16/18) versus the immunogenicity of the antigens separately. Secondly, in a field trial, we tested the ability of the TSOL16/18 vaccine to induce detectable antibody responses in animals living under environmental stress and traditionally reared in areas where T. solium cysticercosis is endemic; and finally, we characterised the immune response of the study population. Pigs of 8-16 weeks of age were vaccinated with 200 μg each of TSOL16 and TSOL18, plus 5mg of Quil-A. Specific total IgG, IgG(1) and IgG(2) antibody responses induced by TSOL16 and TSOL18 were determined with ELISA. The immunogenicity of both antigens was retained in the combined TSOL16/18 vaccine. The combined vaccine TSOL16/18 induced detectable specific anti-TSOL18 antibody responses in 100% (113/113) and specific anti-TSOL16 in 99% (112/113) of the vaccinated animals measured at 2 weeks following the booster vaccination. From the two IgG antibody subtypes analysed we found there was stronger response to IgG(2).

  3. Detection and Quantitation of Afucosylated N-Linked Oligosaccharides in Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies Using Enzymatic Digestion and LC-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yi; May, Kimberly; Xu, Wei; Liu, Hongcheng

    2012-07-01

    The presence of N-linked oligosaccharides in the CH2 domain has a significant impact on the structure, stability, and biological functions of recombinant monoclonal antibodies. The impact is also highly dependent on the specific oligosaccharide structures. The absence of core-fucose has been demonstrated to result in increased binding affinity to Fcγ receptors and, thus, enhanced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). Therefore, a method that can specifically determine the level of oligosaccharides without the core-fucose (afucosylation) is highly desired. In the current study, recombinant monoclonal antibodies and tryptic peptides from the antibodies were digested using endoglycosidases F2 and H, which cleaves the glycosidic bond between the two primary GlcNAc residues. As a result, various oligosaccharides of either complex type or high mannose type that are commonly observed for recombinant monoclonal antibodies are converted to either GlcNAc residue only or GlcNAc with the core-fucose. The level of GlcNAc represents the sum of all afucosylated oligosaccharides, whereas the level of GlcNAc with the core-fucose represents the sum of all fucosylated oligosaccharides. LC-MS analysis of the enzymatically digested antibodies after reduction provided a quick estimate of the levels of afucosylation. An accurate determination of the level of afucosylation was obtained by LC-MS analysis of glycopeptides after trypsin digestion.

  4. Recombinant cells that highly express chromosomally-integrated heterologous gene

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, Brent E.

    2007-03-20

    Recombinant host cells are obtained that comprise (A) a heterologous, polypeptide-encoding polynucleotide segment, stably integrated into a chromosome, which is under transcriptional control of an endogenous promoter and (B) a mutation that effects increased expression of the heterologous segment, resulting in enhanced production by the host cells of each polypeptide encoded by that segment, relative to production of each polypeptide by the host cells in the absence of the mutation. The increased expression thus achieved is retained in the absence of conditions that select for cells displaying such increased expression. When the integrated segment comprises, for example, ethanol-production genes from an efficient ethanol producer like Zymomonas mobilis, recombinant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacterial cells within the present invention are capable of converting a wide range of biomass-derived sugars efficiently to ethanol.

  5. Recombinant cells that highly express chromosomally-integrated heterologous genes

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, L.O.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, B.E.

    1998-10-13

    Recombinant host cells are obtained that comprise (A) a heterologous, polypeptide-encoding polynucleotide segment, stably integrated into a chromosome, which is under transcriptional control of an endogenous promoter and (B) a mutation that effects increased expression of the heterologous segment, resulting in enhanced production by the host cells of each polypeptide encoded by that segment, relative to production of each polypeptide by the host cells in the absence of the mutation. The increased expression thus achieved is retained in the absence of conditions that select for cells displaying such increased expression. When the integrated segment comprises, for example, ethanol-production genes from an efficient ethanol producer like Zymomonas mobilis, recombinant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacterial cells within the present invention are capable of converting a wide range of biomass-derived sugars efficiently to ethanol. 13 figs.

  6. Recombinant cells that highly express chromosomally-integrated heterologous genes

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, Brent E.

    2000-08-22

    Recombinant host cells are obtained that comprise (A) a heterologous, polypeptide-encoding polynucleotide segment, stably integrated into a chromosome, which is under transcriptional control of an endogenous promoter and (B) a mutation that effects increased expression of the heterologous segment, resulting in enhanced production by the host cells of each polypeptide encoded by that segment, relative to production of each polypeptide by the host cells in the absence of the mutation. The increased expression thus achieved is retained in the absence of conditions that select for cells displaying such increased expression. When the integrated segment comprises, for example, ethanol-production genes from an efficient ethanol producer like Zymomonas mobilis, recombinant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacterial cells within the present invention are capable of converting a wide range of biomass-derived sugars efficiently to ethanol.

  7. Recombinant cells that highly express chromosomally-integrated heterologous genes

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, Brent E.

    1998-01-01

    Recombinant host cells are obtained that comprise (A) a heterologous, polypeptide-encoding polynucleotide segment, stably integrated into a chromosome, which is under transcriptional control of an endogenous promoter and (B) a mutation that effects increased expression of the heterologous segment, resulting in enhanced production by the host cells of each polypeptide encoded by that segment, relative to production of each polypeptide by the host cells in the absence of the mutation. The increased expression thus achieved is retained in the absence of conditions that select for cells displaying such increased expression. When the integrated segment comprises, for example, ethanol-production genes from an efficient ethanol producer like Zymomonas mobilis, recombinant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacterial cells within the present invention are capable of converting a wide range of biomass-derived sugars efficiently to ethanol.

  8. Induction of type I interferon secretion through recombinant Newcastle disease virus expressing measles virus hemagglutinin stimulates antibody secretion in the presence of maternal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dhohyung; Martinez-Sobrido, Luis; Choi, Changsun; Petroff, Natasha; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Niewiesk, Stefan; Carsillo, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Measles virus (MV) vaccine effectively protects seronegative individuals against infection. However, inhibition of vaccine-induced seroconversion by maternal antibodies after vaccination remains a problem, as it leaves infants susceptible to MV infection. In cotton rats, passive transfer of MV-specific IgG mimics maternal antibodies and inhibits vaccine-induced seroconversion. Here, we report that immunization in the presence of passively transferred IgG inhibits the secretion of neutralizing antibodies but not the generation of MV-specific B cells. This finding suggested that MV-specific B cells require an additional stimulus to mature into antibody-secreting plasma cells. In order to provide such a stimulus, we generated a recombinant Newcastle disease virus (NDV) expressing the MV hemagglutinin (NDV-H). In contrast to MV, NDV-H induced high levels of type I interferon in plasmacytoid dendritic cells and in lung tissue. In cotton rats immunized with NDV-H, neutralizing antibodies were also generated in the presence of passively transferred antibodies. In the latter case, however, the level and kinetics of antibody generation were reduced. In vitro, alpha interferon stimulated the activation of MV-specific B cells from MV-immune spleen cells. NDV infection (which induces alpha interferon) had the same effect, and stimulation could be abrogated by antibodies neutralizing alpha interferon, but not interleukin 6 (IL-6). In vivo, coapplication of UV-inactivated MV with NDV led to increased MV-specific antibody production in the presence and absence of passively transferred antibodies. These data indicate that MV-specific B cells are being generated after immunization in the presence of maternal antibodies and that the provision of alpha interferon as an additional signal leads to antibody secretion.

  9. Detection of antibodies to Hypoderma lineatum in cattle by Western blotting with recombinant hypodermin C antigen.

    PubMed

    Boldbaatar, D; Xuan, X; Kimbita, E; Huang, X; Igarashi, I; Byambaa, B; Battsetseg, B; Battur, B; Battsetseg, G; Batsukh, Z; Nagasawa, H; Fujisaki, K; Mikami, T

    2001-08-01

    The cDNA encoding the entire mature hypodermin C (HC) of Hypoderma lineatum was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli as a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein using pGEX vector. The recombinant HC protein (rHC) was tested by Western blotting to detect antibodies to H. lineatum in cattle. Western blotting with rHC as antigen clearly differentiated between H. lineatum-infested cattle sera and normal cattle sera. Forty-six out of forty-eight serum samples from cattle in Central Mongolia were positive, whereas all 30 serum samples from cows in Hokkaido, Japan, were negative by Western blotting. The result of Western blotting was identical to that of a previously developed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. These data demonstrated that Western blotting, with rHC expressed in E. coli, might be a useful method for the diagnosis of cattle hypodermosis.

  10. Targeted Multiplex Imaging Mass Spectrometry with Single Chain Fragment Variable (scfv) Recombinant Antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiery, Gwendoline; Mernaugh, Ray L.; Yan, Heping; Spraggins, Jeffrey M.; Yang, Junhai; Parl, Fritz F.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2012-10-01

    Recombinant scfv antibodies specific for CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 P450 enzymes were combined with targeted imaging mass spectrometry to simultaneously detect the P450 enzymes present in archived, paraffin-embedded, human breast cancer tissue sections. By using CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 specific scfv, each coupled to a unique reporter molecule (i.e., a mass tag) it was possible to simultaneously detect multiple antigens within a single tissue sample with high sensitivity and specificity using mass spectrometry. The capability of imaging multiple antigens at the same time is a significant advance that overcomes technical barriers encountered when using present day approaches to develop assays that can simultaneously detect more than a single antigen in the same tissue sample.

  11. Targeted Multiplex Imaging Mass Spectrometry with Single Chain Fragment Variable (scfv) Recombinant Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Thiery, Gwendoline; Mernaugh, Ray L.; Yan, Heping; Spraggins, Jeffrey M.; Yang, Junhai; Parl, Fritz F.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    Recombinant scfv antibodies specific for CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 P450 enzymes were combined with targeted imaging mass spectrometry to simultaneously detect the P450 enzymes present in archived, paraffin-embedded, human breast cancer tissue sections. By using CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 specific scfv, each coupled to a unique reporter molecule (i.e., a mass tag) it was possible to simultaneously detect multiple antigens within a single tissue sample with high sensitivity and specificity using mass spectrometry. The capability of imaging multiple antigens at the same time is a significant advance that overcomes technical barriers encountered when using present day approaches to develop assays that can simultaneously detect more than a single antigen in the same tissue sample. PMID:22869296

  12. Combining Yeast Display and Competitive FACS to Select Rare Hapten-Specific Clones from Recombinant Antibody Libraries.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yue; Ban, Bhupal; Bradbury, Andrew; Ansari, G A Shakeel; Blake, Diane A

    2016-09-20

    The development of antibodies to low molecular weight haptens remains challenging due to both the low immunogenicity of many haptens and the cross-reactivity of the protein carriers used to generate the immune response. Recombinant antibodies and novel display technologies have greatly advanced antibody development; however, new techniques are still required to select rare hapten-specific antibodies from large recombinant libraries. In the present study, we used a combination of phage and yeast display to screen an immune antibody library (size, 4.4 × 10(6)) against hapten markers for petroleum contamination (phenanthrene and methylphenanthrenes). Selection via phage display was used first to enrich the library between 20- and 100-fold for clones that bound to phenanthrene-protein conjugates. The enriched libraries were subsequently transferred to a yeast display system and a newly developed competitive FACS procedure was employed to select rare hapten-specific clones. Competitive FACS increased the frequency of hapten-specific scFvs in our yeast-displayed scFvs from 0.025 to 0.005% in the original library to between 13 and 35% in selected pools. The presence of hapten-specific scFvs was confirmed by competitive ELISA using periplasmic protein. Three distinct antibody clones that recognize phenanthrene and methylphenanthrenes were selected, and their distinctive binding properties were characterized. To our knowledge, these are first antibodies that can distinguish between methylated (petrogenic) versus unmethylated (pyrogenic) phenanthrenes; such antibodies will be useful in detecting the sources of environmental contamination. This selection method could be generally adopted in the selection of other hapten-specific recombinant antibodies.

  13. Combining Yeast Display and Competitive FACS to Select Rare Hapten-Specific Clones from Recombinant Antibody Libraries

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The development of antibodies to low molecular weight haptens remains challenging due to both the low immunogenicity of many haptens and the cross-reactivity of the protein carriers used to generate the immune response. Recombinant antibodies and novel display technologies have greatly advanced antibody development; however, new techniques are still required to select rare hapten-specific antibodies from large recombinant libraries. In the present study, we used a combination of phage and yeast display to screen an immune antibody library (size, 4.4 × 106) against hapten markers for petroleum contamination (phenanthrene and methylphenanthrenes). Selection via phage display was used first to enrich the library between 20- and 100-fold for clones that bound to phenanthrene–protein conjugates. The enriched libraries were subsequently transferred to a yeast display system and a newly developed competitive FACS procedure was employed to select rare hapten-specific clones. Competitive FACS increased the frequency of hapten-specific scFvs in our yeast-displayed scFvs from 0.025 to 0.005% in the original library to between 13 and 35% in selected pools. The presence of hapten-specific scFvs was confirmed by competitive ELISA using periplasmic protein. Three distinct antibody clones that recognize phenanthrene and methylphenanthrenes were selected, and their distinctive binding properties were characterized. To our knowledge, these are first antibodies that can distinguish between methylated (petrogenic) versus unmethylated (pyrogenic) phenanthrenes; such antibodies will be useful in detecting the sources of environmental contamination. This selection method could be generally adopted in the selection of other hapten-specific recombinant antibodies. PMID:27571429

  14. Recombinant fowlpox viruses coexpressing chicken type I IFN and Newcastle disease virus HN and F genes: influence of IFN on protective efficacy and humoral responses of chickens following in ovo or post-hatch administration of recombinant viruses.

    PubMed

    Karaca, K; Sharma, J M; Winslow, B J; Junker, D E; Reddy, S; Cochran, M; McMillen, J

    1998-10-01

    We have constructed recombinant (r) fowl pox viruses (FPVs) coexpressing chicken type I interferon (IFN) and/or hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and fusion (F) proteins of Newcastle disease virus (NDV). We administered rFPVs and FPV into embryonated chicken eggs at 17 days of embryonation or in chickens after hatch. Administration of FPV or rFPVs did not influence hatchability and survival of hatched chicks. In ovo or after hatch vaccination of chickens with the recombinant viruses resulted in protection against challenge with virulent FPV and NDV. Chickens vaccinated with FPV or FPV-NDV recombinant had significantly lower body weight 2 weeks following vaccination. This loss in body weight was not detected in chickens receiving FPV-IFN and FPV-NDV-IFN recombinants. Chickens vaccinated with FPV coexpressing IFN and NDV genes produced less antibodies against NDV in comparison with chickens vaccinated with FPV expressing NDV genes.

  15. Antibodies induced with recombinant VP1 from human rhinovirus exhibit cross-neutralisation.

    PubMed

    Edlmayr, J; Niespodziana, K; Popow-Kraupp, T; Krzyzanek, V; Focke-Tejkl, M; Blaas, D; Grote, M; Valenta, R

    2011-01-01

    Human rhinoviruses (HRVs) are the major cause of the common cold and account for 30-50% of all acute respiratory illnesses. Although HRV infections are usually harmless and invade only the upper respiratory tract, several studies demonstrate that HRV is involved in the exacerbation of asthma. VP1 is one of the surface-exposed proteins of the viral capsid that is important for the binding of rhinoviruses to the corresponding receptors on human cells. Here we investigated its potential usefulness for vaccination against the common cold. We expressed VP1 proteins from two distantly related HRV strains, HRV89 and HRV14, in Escherichia coli. Mice and rabbits were immunised with the purified recombinant proteins. The induced antibodies reacted with natural VP1 and with whole virus particles as shown by immunoblotting and immunogold electron microscopy. They exhibited strong cross-neutralising activity for different HRV strains. Therefore, recombinant VP1 may be considered a candidate HRV vaccine to prevent HRV-induced asthma exacerbations.

  16. Pichia pastoris: a recombinant microfactory for antibodies and human membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, A M; Pedro, A Q; Maia, C; Sousa, F; Queiroz, J A; Passarinha, L A

    2013-05-01

    During the last few decades, it has become evident that the compatibility of the yeast biochemical environment with the ability to process and translate the RNA transcript, along with its capacity to modify a translated protein, are relevant requirements for selecting this host cell for protein expression in several pharmaceutical and clinical applications. In particular, Pichia pastoris is used as an industrial host for recombinant protein and metabolite production, showing a powerful capacity to meet required biomolecular target production levels in high-throughput assays for functional genomics and drug screening. In addition, there is a great advantage to using P. pastoris for protein secretion, even at high molecular weights, since the recovery and purification steps are simplified owing to relatively low levels of endogenous proteins in the extracellular medium. Clearly, no single microexpression system can provide all of the desired properties for human protein production. Moreover, chemical and physical bioprocess parameters, including culture medium formulation, temperature, pH, agitation, aeration rates, induction, and feeding strategies, can highly influence product yield and quality. In order to benefit from the currently available wide range of biosynthesis strategies using P. pastoris, this mini review focuses on the developments and technological fermentation achievements, providing both a comparative and an overall integration analysis. The main aim is to highlight the relevance and versatility of the P. pastoris biosystem to the design of more cost-effective microfactories to meet the increasing demands for recombinant membrane proteins and clinical antibodies for several therapeutic applications.

  17. Ipr gene control of the anti-DNA antibody response.

    PubMed

    Pisetsky, D S; Caster, S A; Roths, J B; Murphy, E D

    1982-05-01

    The influence of the Ipr gene on the anti-DNA antibody response was investigated in MRL and B6 Ipr/Ipr inbred mice, MRL +/+ mice less than a yr of age produced low levels of anti-DNA antibody, whereas older animals of this strain demonstrated levels in some instances comparable to those of the more severely affected MRL Ipr/Ipr mice. This result indicates a tendency to autoreactivity in MRL mice independent of the Ipr gene. To determine whether other mice bearing the Ipr gene would also express autoantibodies, the anti-DNA antibody responses of B6 Ipr/Ipr mice were studied. This strain was development by matings to transfer the Ipr gene into another inbred background and allow evaluation of the action independent of other disturbances of the MRL mice. Mice of this strain produced antibodies to DNA, with female animals displaying significantly higher levels than males. This result demonstrates that the Ipr gene can stimulate autoantibody production in mice other than the MRL strain and does not require abnormalities unique to this background to potentiate autoreactivity.

  18. Characterization of mechanical properties of transgenic tobacco roots expressing a recombinant monoclonal antibody against tooth decay.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Sally; Liu, Wei; Ma, Julian K-C; Thomas, Colin R; Keshavarz-Moore, Eli

    2008-07-01

    In this article, we describe a new approach that allows the determination of the magnitude of force required to break single plant roots. Roots were taken from transgenic tobacco plants, expressing a secreted monoclonal antibody. They were divided into four key developmental stages. A novel micromanipulation technique was used to pull to breakage, single tobacco roots in buffer in order to determine their breaking force. A characteristic uniform step-wise increase in the force up to a peak force for breakage was observed. The mean breaking force and mean work done were 101mN and 97microJ per root respectively. However, there was a significant increase in breaking force from the youngest white roots to the oldest, dark red-brown roots. We speculate that this was due to increasing lignin deposition with root stage of development (shown by phloroglucinol staining). No significant differences between fresh root mass, original root length, or mean root diameter for any of the root categories were found, displaying their uniformity, which would be beneficial for bioprocessing. In addition, no significant difference in antibody yield from the different root categories was found. These data show that it is possible to characterise the force requirements for root breakage and should assist in the optimisation of recombinant protein extraction from these roots.

  19. Anti-erythropoietin and anti-thrombopoietin antibodies induced after administration of recombinant human erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sug Kyun; Pack, Seung Pil; Oh, Jin-Gyo; Kang, Nam Kyu; Chang, Myung Hee; Chung, Yoon Hee; Kim, Sung-Jo; Lee, Jong Wook; Heo, Tae-Hwe

    2011-12-01

    Recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) has been successfully used for correcting renal anemia. However, recent studies have raised some concerns about the safety of rhEPO treatment due to its immunogenic side effect - pure red cell aplasia (PRCA). We now report a case of development of anti-EPO neutralizing antibodies (Abs) implicated in thrombocytopenia as well as erythrocytopenia. A 35-year-old man had a history of administering rhEPO (epoetin alfa, epoetin beta and darbepoetin alfa) for 2years to treat renal anemia. The hematological parameters were collected. Anti-EPO, anti-platelet, and anti-thrombopoietin (TPO) Ab assays were performed to test the presence of autoreactive Abs. After performing antibody assays due to severe resistance to rhEPO treatment, a high titer of anti-EPO neutralizing Abs was detected. However, unexpectedly, this patient also showed thrombocytopenia rather than PRCA. We investigated the cause of the marked thrombocytopenia and found anti-TPO Abs in patient serum. To our best knowledge, this is the first report of the development of anti-TPO Abs during rhEPO treatment for anemia.

  20. Production of cocktail of polyclonal antibodies using bacterial expressed recombinant protein for multiple virus detection.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Reetika; Mandal, Bikash; Paul, Prabir Kumar; Chigurupati, Phaneendra; Jain, Rakesh Kumar

    2014-02-01

    Cocktail of polyclonal antibodies (PAb) were produced that will help in multiple virus detection and overcome the limitation of individual virus purification, protein expression and purification as well as immunization in multiple rabbits. A dual fusion construct was developed using conserved coat protein (CP) sequences of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) and Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) in an expression vector, pET-28a(+). The fusion protein (∼40kDa) was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Likewise, a triple fusion construct was developed by fusing conserved CP sequences of CMV and PRSV with conserved nucleocapsid protein (N) sequence of Groundnut bud necrosis virus (GBNV) and expressed as a fusion protein (∼50kDa) in pET-28a(+). PAb made separately to each of these three viruses recognized the double and triple fusion proteins in Western blot indicating retention of desired epitopes for binding with target antibodies. The fusion proteins (∼40kDa and ∼50kDa) were used to produce cocktail of PAb by immunizing rabbits, which simultaneously detected natural infection of CMV and PRSV or CMV, PRSV and GBNV in Cucurbitaceous, Solanaceous and other hosts in DAC-ELISA. This is the first report on production of a cocktail of PAb to recombinant fusion protein of two or three distinct viruses.

  1. Isolation and purification of recombinant proteins, antibodies and plasmid DNA with hydroxyapatite chromatography.

    PubMed

    Hilbrig, Frank; Freitag, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite and related stationary phases increasingly play a role in the downstream processing of high-value biological materials, such as recombinant proteins, therapeutic antibodies and pharmaceutical-grade plasmid DNA. Chromatographic hydroxyapatite is an inorganic, ceramic material identical in composition, if not in structure, to calcium phosphate found in human bones and teeth. The interaction of hydroxyapatite with biomacromolecules is complex and highly dynamic, which can make predicting performance difficult, but also allows the design of very selective isolation processes. This review discusses the currently commercially available chromatographic materials, different retention mechanisms supported by these materials and differential exploitation for the design of highly specific isolation procedures. The state of the art of antibody purification by hydroxy- and fluoroapatite is reviewed together with tested routines for method development and implementation. Finally, the isolation of plasmid DNA is discussed, since the purification of DNA therapeutics at a sufficiently large scale is an emerging need in bioprocess development and perhaps the area in bioseparation where apatite chromatography can make its most important contribution to date.

  2. Recombinant adenovirus vectors for gene therapy and clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Nász, I; Adám, E

    2001-01-01

    In the last decade adenovirus (AdV) vectors have emerged as promising technology in gene therapy. They have been used for genetic modification of a variety of somatic cells in vitro and in vivo. They have been widely used as gene delivery vectors in experiments both with curative and preventive purposes. AdV vectors have been used in the experimental and in some extent in the clinical gene therapy of a variety of cancers. The combination of recombinant AdV technology with chemotherapy (pro drug system) seems to be promising, too. AdV vectors offer several advantages over other vectors. Replication defective vectors can be produced in very high titers (10(11) pfu/ml) thus allowing a substantially greater efficiency of direct gene transfer; they have the capacity to infect both replicating and nonreplicating (quiescent) cells from a variety of tissues and species. Several important limitations of adenovirus mediated gene transfer are also known, such as the relatively short-term (transient) expression of foreign genes, induction of the host humoral and cellular immune response to viral proteins and viral infected cells, which may substantially inhibit the effect of repeated treatment with AdV vectors, the limited cloning capacity and the lack of target cell specificity. However, the well-understood structure, molecular biology and host cell interactions of AdV-s offer some potential solutions to these limitations.

  3. Homosubtypic and heterosubtypic antibodies against highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 recombinant proteins in H5N1 survivors and non-H5N1 subjects.

    PubMed

    Noisumdaeng, Pirom; Pooruk, Phisanu; Prasertsopon, Jarunee; Assanasen, Susan; Kitphati, Rungrueng; Auewarakul, Prasert; Puthavathana, Pilaipan

    2014-04-01

    Six recombinant vaccinia viruses containing HA, NA, NP, M or NS gene insert derived from a highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus, and the recombinant vaccinia virus harboring plasmid backbone as the virus control were constructed. The recombinant proteins were characterized for their expression and subcellular locations in TK(-) cells. Antibodies to the five recombinant proteins were detected in all 13 sequential serum samples collected from four H5N1 survivors during four years of follow-up; and those directed to rVac-H5 HA and rVac-NA proteins were found in higher titers than those directed to the internal proteins as revealed by indirect immunofluorescence assay. Although all 28 non-H5N1 subjects had no neutralizing antibodies against H5N1 virus, they did have cross-reactive antibodies to those five recombinant proteins. A significant increase in cross-reactive antibody titer to rVac-H5 HA and rVac-NA was found in paired blood samples from patients infected with the 2009 pandemic virus.

  4. Detection of Leptospira-Specific Antibodies Using a Recombinant Antigen-Based Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua-Wei; Zhang, Zhiwen; Halsey, Eric S.; Guevara, Carolina; Canal, Enrique; Hall, Eric; Maves, Ryan; Tilley, Drake H.; Kochel, Tadeusz J.; Ching, Wei-Mei

    2013-01-01

    We produced three highly purified recombinant antigens rLipL32, rLipL41, and rLigA-Rep (leptospiral immunoglobulin-like A repeat region) for the detection of Leptospira-specific antibodies in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The performance of these recombinant antigens was evaluated using 121 human sera. Among them, 63 sera were microscopic agglutination test (MAT)-confirmed positive sera from febrile patients in Peru, 22 sera were indigenous MAT-negative febrile patient sera, and 36 sera were from patients with other febrile diseases from Southeast Asia, where leptospirosis is also endemic. Combining the results of immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG detection from these three antigens, the overall sensitivity is close to 90% based on the MAT. These results suggest that an ELISA using multiple recombinant antigens may be used as an alternative method for the detection of Leptospira-specific antibodies. PMID:24166046

  5. Passive immunization against HIV/AIDS by antibody gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lili; Wang, Pin

    2014-01-27

    Despite tremendous efforts over the course of many years, the quest for an effective HIV vaccine by the classical method of active immunization remains largely elusive. However, two recent studies in mice and macaques have now demonstrated a new strategy designated as Vectored ImmunoProphylaxis (VIP), which involves passive immunization by viral vector-mediated delivery of genes encoding broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) for in vivo expression. Robust protection against virus infection was observed in preclinical settings when animals were given VIP to express monoclonal neutralizing antibodies. This unorthodox approach raises new promise for combating the ongoing global HIV pandemic. In this article, we survey the status of antibody gene transfer, review the revolutionary progress on isolation of extremely bnAbs, detail VIP experiments against HIV and its related virus conduced in humanized mice and macaque monkeys, and discuss the pros and cons of VIP and its opportunities and challenges towards clinical applications to control HIV/AIDS endemics.

  6. Characterization of recombinant bacteriophages containing mosquito ribosomal RNA genes

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y.J.

    1988-01-01

    A family of nine recombinant bacteriophages containing rRNA genes from cultured cells of the mosquito, Aedes albopictus, has been isolated by screening two different genomic DNA libraries - Charon 30 and EMBL 3 using {sup 32}P-labeled 18S and 28S rRNA as probes. These nine recombinant bacteriophages were characterized by restriction mapping, Southern blotting, and S1 nuclease analysis. The 18S rRNA coding region contains an evolutionarily conserved EcoRI site near the 3{prime}-end, and measures 1800 bp. The 28S rRNA genes were divided into {alpha} and {beta} coding regions measuring 1750 bp and 2000 bp, respectively. The gap between these two regions measures about 340 bp. No insertion sequences were found in the rRNA coding regions. The entire rDNA repeat unit had a minimum length of 15.6 kb, including a nontranscribed spacer region. The non-transcribed spacer region of cloned A. albopictus rDNA contained a common series of seven PvuI sites within a 1250 bp region upstream of the 18S rRNA coding region, and a proportion of this region also showed heterogeneity both in the length and in the restriction sites.

  7. Detection of African Swine Fever Virus Antibodies in Serum and Oral Fluid Specimens Using a Recombinant Protein 30 (p30) Dual Matrix Indirect ELISA.

    PubMed

    Giménez-Lirola, Luis G; Mur, Lina; Rivera, Belen; Mogler, Mark; Sun, Yaxuan; Lizano, Sergio; Goodell, Christa; Harris, D L Hank; Rowland, Raymond R R; Gallardo, Carmina; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, José Manuel; Zimmerman, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    In the absence of effective vaccine(s), control of African swine fever caused by African swine fever virus (ASFV) must be based on early, efficient, cost-effective detection and strict control and elimination strategies. For this purpose, we developed an indirect ELISA capable of detecting ASFV antibodies in either serum or oral fluid specimens. The recombinant protein used in the ELISA was selected by comparing the early serum antibody response of ASFV-infected pigs (NHV-p68 isolate) to three major recombinant polypeptides (p30, p54, p72) using a multiplex fluorescent microbead-based immunoassay (FMIA). Non-hazardous (non-infectious) antibody-positive serum for use as plate positive controls and for the calculation of sample-to-positive (S:P) ratios was produced by inoculating pigs with a replicon particle (RP) vaccine expressing the ASFV p30 gene. The optimized ELISA detected anti-p30 antibodies in serum and/or oral fluid samples from pigs inoculated with ASFV under experimental conditions beginning 8 to 12 days post inoculation. Tests on serum (n = 200) and oral fluid (n = 200) field samples from an ASFV-free population demonstrated that the assay was highly diagnostically specific. The convenience and diagnostic utility of oral fluid sampling combined with the flexibility to test either serum or oral fluid on the same platform suggests that this assay will be highly useful under the conditions for which OIE recommends ASFV antibody surveillance, i.e., in ASFV-endemic areas and for the detection of infections with ASFV isolates of low virulence.

  8. Detection of African Swine Fever Virus Antibodies in Serum and Oral Fluid Specimens Using a Recombinant Protein 30 (p30) Dual Matrix Indirect ELISA

    PubMed Central

    Giménez-Lirola, Luis G.; Mur, Lina; Rivera, Belen; Mogler, Mark; Sun, Yaxuan; Lizano, Sergio; Goodell, Christa; Harris, D. L. Hank; Rowland, Raymond R. R.; Gallardo, Carmina; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, José Manuel; Zimmerman, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    In the absence of effective vaccine(s), control of African swine fever caused by African swine fever virus (ASFV) must be based on early, efficient, cost-effective detection and strict control and elimination strategies. For this purpose, we developed an indirect ELISA capable of detecting ASFV antibodies in either serum or oral fluid specimens. The recombinant protein used in the ELISA was selected by comparing the early serum antibody response of ASFV-infected pigs (NHV-p68 isolate) to three major recombinant polypeptides (p30, p54, p72) using a multiplex fluorescent microbead-based immunoassay (FMIA). Non-hazardous (non-infectious) antibody-positive serum for use as plate positive controls and for the calculation of sample-to-positive (S:P) ratios was produced by inoculating pigs with a replicon particle (RP) vaccine expressing the ASFV p30 gene. The optimized ELISA detected anti-p30 antibodies in serum and/or oral fluid samples from pigs inoculated with ASFV under experimental conditions beginning 8 to 12 days post inoculation. Tests on serum (n = 200) and oral fluid (n = 200) field samples from an ASFV-free population demonstrated that the assay was highly diagnostically specific. The convenience and diagnostic utility of oral fluid sampling combined with the flexibility to test either serum or oral fluid on the same platform suggests that this assay will be highly useful under the conditions for which OIE recommends ASFV antibody surveillance, i.e., in ASFV-endemic areas and for the detection of infections with ASFV isolates of low virulence. PMID:27611939

  9. Dynamics and Predictive Potential of Antibodies against Insect-Derived Recombinant Leishmania infantum Proteins during Chemotherapy of Naturally Infected Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Todolí, Felicitat; Galindo, Inmaculada; Gómez-Sebastián, Silvia; Pérez-Filgueira, Mariano; Escribano, José M.; Alberola, Jordi; Rodríguez-Cortés, Alhelí

    2010-01-01

    A predictive marker for the success treatment of canine leishmaniasis is required for the application of a more rational therapy protocol, which must improve the probability of cure and reduce Leishmania resistance to drugs. We investigated the dynamics and predictive value of antibodies against insect-derived recombinant L. infantum proteins rKMPII and rTRYP by using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with retrospective serum samples from 36 dogs during treatment of canine leishmaniasis. In the entire group of dogs, concentrations of antibodies against rKMPII and rTRYP significantly decreased earlier than concentrations of antibodies against crude total Leishmania antigen (one versus six months), which suggested that the dynamics of antibodies against recombinant proteins may be useful for assessing clinical improvement after treatment. Interestingly, decreases in antibody concentrations against rKMPII occurred earlier in disease-free dogs than in dogs that remain clinically ill one year after beginning of treatment, which suggested that these antibodies may be useful for predicting disease-free survival one year after the beginning of therapy against canine leishmaniasis. PMID:20439957

  10. Dynamics and predictive potential of antibodies against insect-derived recombinant Leishmania infantum proteins during chemotherapy of naturally infected dogs.

    PubMed

    Todolí, Felicitat; Galindo, Inmaculada; Gómez-Sebastián, Silvia; Pérez-Filgueira, Mariano; Escribano, José M; Alberola, Jordi; Rodríguez-Cortés, Alhelí

    2010-05-01

    A predictive marker for the success treatment of canine leishmaniasis is required for the application of a more rational therapy protocol, which must improve the probability of cure and reduce Leishmania resistance to drugs. We investigated the dynamics and predictive value of antibodies against insect-derived recombinant L. infantum proteins rKMPII and rTRYP by using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with retrospective serum samples from 36 dogs during treatment of canine leishmaniasis. In the entire group of dogs, concentrations of antibodies against rKMPII and rTRYP significantly decreased earlier than concentrations of antibodies against crude total Leishmania antigen (one versus six months), which suggested that the dynamics of antibodies against recombinant proteins may be useful for assessing clinical improvement after treatment. Interestingly, decreases in antibody concentrations against rKMPII occurred earlier in disease-free dogs than in dogs that remain clinically ill one year after beginning of treatment, which suggested that these antibodies may be useful for predicting disease-free survival one year after the beginning of therapy against canine leishmaniasis.

  11. Tissue-specific expressed antibody variable gene repertoires.

    PubMed

    Briney, Bryan S; Willis, Jordan R; Finn, Jessica A; McKinney, Brett A; Crowe, James E

    2014-01-01

    Recent developments in genetic technologies allow deep analysis of the sequence diversity of immune repertoires, but little work has been reported on the architecture of immune repertoires in mucosal tissues. Antibodies are the key to prevention of infections at the mucosal surface, but it is currently unclear whether the B cell repertoire at mucosal surfaces reflects the dominant antibodies found in the systemic compartment or whether mucosal tissues harbor unique repertoires. We examined the expressed antibody variable gene repertoires from 10 different human tissues using RNA samples derived from a large number of individuals. The results revealed that mucosal tissues such as stomach, intestine and lung possess unique antibody gene repertoires that differed substantially from those found in lymphoid tissues or peripheral blood. Mutation frequency analysis of mucosal tissue repertoires revealed that they were highly mutated, with little evidence for the presence of naïve B cells, in contrast to blood. Mucosal tissue repertoires possessed longer heavy chain complementarity determining region 3 loops than lymphoid tissue repertoires. We also noted a large increase in frequency of both insertions and deletions in the small intestine antibody repertoire. These data suggest that mucosal immune repertoires are distinct in many ways from the systemic compartment.

  12. Prevalence and persistence of antibody titers to recombinant HIV-1 core and matrix proteins in HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Janvier, B; Mallet, F; Cheynet, V; Dalbon, P; Vernet, G; Besnier, J M; Choutet, P; Goudeau, A; Mandrand, B; Barin, F

    1993-08-01

    Numerous studies have established the correlation between antibodies to the core protein p24 of HIV-1 and the progression of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. In this study, we analyzed the immune response to two recombinant gag proteins, p24 and p17, in order to evaluate their diagnostic or prognostic significance. Immune response to the immunodominant domain of the transmembrane glycoprotein gp41 was used as a reference. Sera collected from individuals from France and Burundi (Central Africa) at various CDC stages of HIV-1 infection were tested using three sandwich enzyme-linked immunoassays developed with a synthetic peptide corresponding to the immunodominant domain of gp41, SP gp41, or recombinant p24 and p17 cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. These assays allowed detection of titer antibodies to the three cited antigens. Antibodies to SP gp41 were detected in every HIV-1-positive patient from France and Burundi, generally at a high and stable level. Results obtained with p24 confirmed the value of antibodies to p24 as a prognostic marker only in European and North American populations, since the African population had very high levels of these antibodies even at an advanced stage of the disease. They also confirmed that initial antibody response to p24 is more predictive of outcome than antibody titer change over time. Although antibodies to p17 decline during progression to AIDS, they are frequently absent in French patients at early, asymptomatic stages and therefore could not be used as a prognostic marker. In contrast, antibodies to p17 are significantly less common in African patients with AIDS when compared with symptomless HIV-1-infected African individuals.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Recombinant proteinase 3 produced in different expression systems: recognition by anti-PR3 antibodies.

    PubMed

    van der Geld, Y M; Oost-Kort, W; Limburg, P C; Specks, U; Kallenberg, C G

    2000-10-20

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasm autoantibodies (ANCA) directed against proteinase 3 (PR3) are highly sensitive and specific markers for Wegener's granulomatosis (WG). Consequently, antigen-specific assays for detection of PR3-ANCA are helpful for the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with WG. Purification of PR3 is laborious and requires large amounts of granulocytes. Therefore, several attempts have been made to produce recombinant PR3 that is recognized by PR3-ANCA. The purpose of this study was to compare the recognition of different recombinant forms of PR3 (rPR3) by anti-PR3 antibodies. Recombinant PR3 produced in E. coli (rcPR3), P. pastoris (rpPR3), insect cells using the baculovirus system (rbPR3), the human mast cell line, HMC-1 (HMC-1/PR3-S176A), or the human epithelial cell line, 293 (Delta-rPR3-S176A) as well as purified neutrophil PR3 (nPR3) were used. Recognition of these rPR3s by anti-PR3 antibodies was determined by direct and capture ELISA with 19 PR3-ANCA sera, 13 anti-PR3 mAbs and a rabbit serum raised against human PR3. In the capture ELISA rabbit anti-PR3 strongly bound nPR3 and all rPR3 products. By capture ELISA rcPR3 and rpPR3 were recognized by 11 (57%) and 13 (68%) of the 19 PR3-ANCA sera, respectively, whereas rbPR3, HMC-1/PR3-S176A, Delta-rPR3-S176A and nPR3 were recognized by all PR3-ANCA sera. By direct ELISA rabbit anti-PR3 strongly bound nPR3 and all tested rPR3 products. Using the direct ELISA none of the PR3-ANCA sera recognized rcPR3, whereas rpPR3 and rbPR3 were recognized by two (11%) and 17 (89%) of the 19 PR3-ANCA sera, respectively. All 13 anti-PR3 mAbs recognized nPR3 in the direct as well as in the capture ELISA. The rcPR3 was recognized by two mAbs in the capture ELISA but by none of the mAbs in the direct ELISA. The rpPR3 was recognized by seven mAbs in the capture ELISA and only by two mAbs in the direct ELISA. All but one of the anti-PR3 mAbs recognized rbPR3, whereas HMC-1/PR3-S176A and Delta-rPR3-S176A were recognized by

  14. Site-specific immobilization of recombinant antibody fragments through material-binding peptides for the sensitive detection of antigens in enzyme immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Kumada, Yoichi

    2014-11-01

    The immobilization of an antibody is one of the key technologies that are used to enhance the sensitivity and efficiency of the detection of target molecules in immunodiagnosis and immunoseparation. Recombinant antibody fragments such as VHH, scFv and Fabs produced by microorganisms are the next generation of ligand antibodies as an alternative to conventional whole Abs due to a smaller size and the possibility of site-directed immobilization with uniform orientation and higher antigen-binding activity in the adsorptive state. For the achievement of site-directed immobilization, affinity peptides for a certain ligand molecule or solid support must be introduced to the recombinant antibody fragments. In this mini-review, immobilization technologies for the whole antibodies (whole Abs) and recombinant antibody fragments onto the surfaces of plastics are introduced. In particular, the focus here is on immobilization technologies of recombinant antibody fragments utilizing affinity peptide tags, which possesses strong binding affinity towards the ligand molecules. Furthermore, I introduced the material-binding peptides that are capable of direct recognition of the target materials. Preparation and immobilization strategies for recombinant antibody fragments linked to material-binding peptides (polystyrene-binding peptides (PS-tags) and poly (methyl methacrylate)-binding peptide (PMMA-tag)) are the focus here, and are based on the enhancement of sensitivity and a reduction in the production costs of ligand antibodies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Recent advances in molecular engineering of antibody.

  15. Immunomodulatory gene therapy prevents antibody formation and lethal hypersensitivity reactions in murine pompe disease.

    PubMed

    Sun, Baodong; Kulis, Michael D; Young, Sarah P; Hobeika, Amy C; Li, Songtao; Bird, Andrew; Zhang, Haoyue; Li, Yifan; Clay, Timothy M; Burks, Wesley; Kishnani, Priya S; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2010-02-01

    Infantile Pompe disease progresses to a lethal cardiomyopathy in absence of effective treatment. Enzyme-replacement therapy (ERT) with recombinant human acid alpha-glucosidase (rhGAA) has been effective in most patients with Pompe disease, but efficacy was reduced by high-titer antibody responses. Immunomodulatory gene therapy with a low dose adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector (2 x 10(10) particles) containing a liver-specific regulatory cassette significantly lowered immunoglobin G (IgG), IgG1, and IgE antibodies to GAA in Pompe disease mice, when compared with mock-treated mice (P < 0.05). AAV-LSPhGAApA had the same effect on GAA-antibody production whether it was given prior to, following, or simultaneously with the initial GAA injection. Mice given AAV-LSPhGAApA had significantly less decrease in body temperature (P < 0.001) and lower anaphylactic scores (P < 0.01) following the GAA challenge. Mouse mast cell protease-1 (MMCP-1) followed the pattern associated with hypersensitivity reactions (P < 0.05). Regulatory T cells (Treg) were demonstrated to play a role in the tolerance induced by gene therapy as depletion of Treg led to an increase in GAA-specific IgG (P < 0.001). Treg depleted mice were challenged with GAA and had significantly stronger allergic reactions than mice given gene therapy without subsequent Treg depletion (temperature: P < 0.01; symptoms: P < 0.05). Ubiquitous GAA expression failed to prevent antibody formation. Thus, immunomodulatory gene therapy could provide adjunctive therapy in lysosomal storage disorders treated by enzyme replacement.

  16. Immunomodulatory Gene Therapy Prevents Antibody Formation and Lethal Hypersensitivity Reactions in Murine Pompe Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Baodong; Kulis, Michael D; Young, Sarah P; Hobeika, Amy C; Li, Songtao; Bird, Andrew; Zhang, Haoyue; Li, Yifan; Clay, Timothy M; Burks, Wesley; Kishnani, Priya S; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2009-01-01

    Infantile Pompe disease progresses to a lethal cardiomyopathy in absence of effective treatment. Enzyme-replacement therapy (ERT) with recombinant human acid α-glucosidase (rhGAA) has been effective in most patients with Pompe disease, but efficacy was reduced by high-titer antibody responses. Immunomodulatory gene therapy with a low dose adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector (2 × 1010 particles) containing a liver-specific regulatory cassette significantly lowered immunoglobin G (IgG), IgG1, and IgE antibodies to GAA in Pompe disease mice, when compared with mock-treated mice (P < 0.05). AAV-LSPhGAApA had the same effect on GAA-antibody production whether it was given prior to, following, or simultaneously with the initial GAA injection. Mice given AAV-LSPhGAApA had significantly less decrease in body temperature (P < 0.001) and lower anaphylactic scores (P < 0.01) following the GAA challenge. Mouse mast cell protease-1 (MMCP-1) followed the pattern associated with hypersensitivity reactions (P < 0.05). Regulatory T cells (Treg) were demonstrated to play a role in the tolerance induced by gene therapy as depletion of Treg led to an increase in GAA-specific IgG (P < 0.001). Treg depleted mice were challenged with GAA and had significantly stronger allergic reactions than mice given gene therapy without subsequent Treg depletion (temperature: P < 0.01; symptoms: P < 0.05). Ubiquitous GAA expression failed to prevent antibody formation. Thus, immunomodulatory gene therapy could provide adjunctive therapy in lysosomal storage disorders treated by enzyme replacement. PMID:19690517

  17. Construction of gene-targeting vectors by recombineering.

    PubMed

    Lee, Song-Choon; Wang, Wei; Liu, Pentao

    2009-01-01

    Recombineering is a technology that utilizes the efficient homologous recombination functions encoded by gamma phage to manipulate DNA in Escherichia coli. Construction of knockout vectors has been greatly facilitated by recombineering as it allows one to choose any genomic region to manipulate. We describe here an efficient recombineering-based protocol for making mouse conditional knockout targeting vectors.

  18. Targeting TARP, a novel breast and prostate tumor-associated antigen, with T cell receptor-like human recombinant antibodies.

    PubMed

    Epel, Malka; Carmi, Irit; Soueid-Baumgarten, Sharon; Oh, Sang Kon; Bera, Tapan; Pastan, Ira; Berzofsky, Jay; Reiter, Yoram

    2008-06-01

    MHC class I molecules are important components of immune surveillance. There are no available methods to directly visualize and determine the quantity and distribution of MHC/peptide complexes on individual cells or to detect such complexes on antigen-presenting cells in tissues. MHC-restricted recombinant antibodies with the same specificity of T cell receptors (TCR) may become a valuable tool to address these questions. They may also serve as valuable targeting molecules that mimic the specificity of cytotoxic T cells. We isolated by phage display a panel of human recombinant Fab antibodies with peptide-specific, MHC-restricted TCR-like reactivity directed toward HLA-A2-restricted T cell epitopes derived from a novel antigen termed TCRgamma alternative reading frame protein (TARP) which is expressed on prostate and breast cancer cells. We have characterized one of these recombinant antibodies and demonstrated its capacity to directly detect specific HLA-A2/TARP T cell epitopes on antigen-presenting cells that have complexes formed by naturally occurring active intracellular processing of the antigen, as well as on the surface of tumor cells. Moreover, by genetic fusion we armed the TCR-like antibody with a potent toxin and demonstrated that it can serve as a targeting moiety killing tumor cells in a peptide-specific, MHC-restricted manner similar to cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

  19. Recombinant antibody mediated delivery of organelle-specific DNA pH sensors along endocytic pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modi, Souvik; Halder, Saheli; Nizak, Clément; Krishnan, Yamuna

    2013-12-01

    DNA has been used to build nanomachines with potential in cellulo and in vivo applications. However their different in cellulo applications are limited by the lack of generalizable strategies to deliver them to precise intracellular locations. Here we describe a new molecular design of DNA pH sensors with response times that are nearly 20 fold faster. Further, by changing the sequence of the pH sensitive domain of the DNA sensor, we have been able to tune their pH sensitive regimes and create a family of DNA sensors spanning ranges from pH 4 to 7.6. To enable a generalizable targeting methodology, this new sensor design also incorporates a `handle' domain. We have identified, using a phage display screen, a set of three recombinant antibodies (scFv) that bind sequence specifically to the handle domain. Sequence analysis of these antibodies revealed several conserved residues that mediate specific interactions with the cognate DNA duplex. We also found that all three scFvs clustered into different branches indicating that their specificity arises from mutations in key residues. When one of these scFvs is fused to a membrane protein (furin) that traffics via the cell surface, the scFv-furin chimera binds the `handle' and ferries a family of DNA pH sensors along the furin endocytic pathway. Post endocytosis, all DNA nanodevices retain their functionality in cellulo and provide spatiotemporal pH maps of retrogradely trafficking furin inside living cells. This new molecular technology of DNA-scFv-protein chimeras can be used to site-specifically complex DNA nanostructures for bioanalytical applications.DNA has been used to build nanomachines with potential in cellulo and in vivo applications. However their different in cellulo applications are limited by the lack of generalizable strategies to deliver them to precise intracellular locations. Here we describe a new molecular design of DNA pH sensors with response times that are nearly 20 fold faster. Further, by changing

  20. Isolation and characterisation of Ebolavirus-specific recombinant antibody fragments from murine and shark immune libraries.

    PubMed

    Goodchild, Sarah A; Dooley, Helen; Schoepp, Randal J; Flajnik, Martin; Lonsdale, Stephen G

    2011-09-01

    Members of the genus Ebolavirus cause fulminating outbreaks of disease in human and non-human primate populations with a mortality rate up to 90%. To facilitate rapid detection of these pathogens in clinical and environmental samples, robust reagents capable of providing sensitive and specific detection are required. In this work recombinant antibody libraries were generated from murine (single chain variable domain fragment; scFv) and nurse shark, Ginglymostoma cirratum (IgNAR V) hosts immunised with Zaire ebolavirus. This provides the first recorded IgNAR V response against a particulate antigen in the nurse shark. Both murine scFv and shark IgNAR V libraries were panned by phage display technology to identify useful antibodies for the generation of immunological detection reagents. Two murine scFv were shown to have specificity to the Zaire ebolavirus viral matrix protein VP40. Two isolated IgNAR V were shown to bind to the viral nucleoprotein (NP) and to capture viable Zaire ebolavirus with a high degree of sensitivity. Assays developed with IgNAR V cross-reacted to Reston ebolavirus, Sudan ebolavirus and Bundibugyo ebolavirus. Despite this broad reactivity, neither of IgNAR V showed reactivity to Côte d'Ivoire ebolavirus. IgNAR V was substantially more resistant to irreversible thermal denaturation than murine scFv and monoclonal IgG in a comparative test. The demonstrable robustness of the IgNAR V domains may offer enhanced utility as immunological detection reagents in fieldable biosensor applications for use in tropical or subtropical countries where outbreaks of Ebolavirus haemorrhagic fever occur.

  1. Recombinant antibody mediated delivery of organelle-specific DNA pH sensors along endocytic pathways.

    PubMed

    Modi, Souvik; Halder, Saheli; Nizak, Clément; Krishnan, Yamuna

    2014-01-21

    DNA has been used to build nanomachines with potential in cellulo and in vivo applications. However their different in cellulo applications are limited by the lack of generalizable strategies to deliver them to precise intracellular locations. Here we describe a new molecular design of DNA pH sensors with response times that are nearly 20 fold faster. Further, by changing the sequence of the pH sensitive domain of the DNA sensor, we have been able to tune their pH sensitive regimes and create a family of DNA sensors spanning ranges from pH 4 to 7.6. To enable a generalizable targeting methodology, this new sensor design also incorporates a 'handle' domain. We have identified, using a phage display screen, a set of three recombinant antibodies (scFv) that bind sequence specifically to the handle domain. Sequence analysis of these antibodies revealed several conserved residues that mediate specific interactions with the cognate DNA duplex. We also found that all three scFvs clustered into different branches indicating that their specificity arises from mutations in key residues. When one of these scFvs is fused to a membrane protein (furin) that traffics via the cell surface, the scFv-furin chimera binds the 'handle' and ferries a family of DNA pH sensors along the furin endocytic pathway. Post endocytosis, all DNA nanodevices retain their functionality in cellulo and provide spatiotemporal pH maps of retrogradely trafficking furin inside living cells. This new molecular technology of DNA-scFv-protein chimeras can be used to site-specifically complex DNA nanostructures for bioanalytical applications.

  2. Plasmapheresis eliminates the negative impact of AAV antibodies on microdystrophin gene expression following vascular delivery.

    PubMed

    Chicoine, L G; Montgomery, C L; Bremer, W G; Shontz, K M; Griffin, D A; Heller, K N; Lewis, S; Malik, V; Grose, W E; Shilling, C J; Campbell, K J; Preston, T J; Coley, B D; Martin, P T; Walker, C M; Clark, K R; Sahenk, Z; Mendell, J R; Rodino-Klapac, L R

    2014-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a monogenic disease potentially treatable by gene replacement. Use of recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) will ultimately require a vascular approach to broadly transduce muscle cells. We tested the impact of preexisting AAV antibodies on microdystrophin expression following vascular delivery to nonhuman primates. Rhesus macaques were treated by isolated limb perfusion using a fluoroscopically guided catheter. In addition to serostatus stratification, the animals were placed into one of the three immune suppression groups: no immune suppression, prednisone, and triple immune suppression (prednisone, tacrolimus, and mycophenolate mofetil). The animals were analyzed for transgene expression at 3 or 6 months. Microdystrophin expression was visualized in AAV, rhesus serotype 74 sero-negative animals (mean: 48.0 ± 20.8%) that was attenuated in sero-positive animals (19.6 ± 18.7%). Immunosuppression did not affect transgene expression. Importantly, removal of AAV binding antibodies by plasmapheresis in AAV sero-positive animals resulted in high-level transduction (60.8 ± 18.0%), which is comparable with that of AAV sero-negative animals (53.7 ± 7.6%), whereas non-pheresed sero-positive animals demonstrated significantly lower transduction levels (10.1 ± 6.0%). These data support the hypothesis that removal of AAV binding antibodies by plasmapheresis permits successful and sustained gene transfer in the presence of preexisting immunity (natural infection) to AAV.

  3. Vaccination against canine distemper virus infection in infant ferrets with and without maternal antibody protection, using recombinant attenuated poxvirus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Welter, J; Taylor, J; Tartaglia, J; Paoletti, E; Stephensen, C B

    2000-07-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) infection of ferrets is clinically and immunologically similar to measles, making this a useful model for the human disease. The model was used to determine if parenteral or mucosal immunization of infant ferrets at 3 and 6 weeks of age with attenuated vaccinia virus (NYVAC) or canarypox virus (ALVAC) vaccine strains expressing the CDV hemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) protein genes (NYVAC-HF and ALVAC-HF) would induce serum neutralizing antibody and protect against challenge infection at 12 weeks of age. Ferrets without maternal antibody that were vaccinated parenterally with NYVAC-HF (n = 5) or ALVAC-HF (n = 4) developed significant neutralizing titers (log(10) inverse mean titer +/- standard deviation of 2.30 +/- 0.12 and 2.20 +/- 0.34, respectively) by the day of challenge, and all survived with no clinical or virologic evidence of infection. Ferrets without maternal antibody that were vaccinated intranasally (i.n.) developed lower neutralizing titers, with NYVAC-HF producing higher titers at challenge (1.11 +/- 0.57 versus 0.40 +/- 0.37, P = 0.02) and a better survival rate (6/7 versus 0/5, P = 0.008) than ALVAC-HF. Ferrets with maternal antibody that were vaccinated parenterally with NYVAC-HF (n = 7) and ALVAC-HF (n = 7) developed significantly higher antibody titers (1.64 +/- 0. 54 and 1.28 +/- 0.40, respectively) than did ferrets immunized with an attenuated CDV vaccine (0.46 +/- 0.59; n = 7) or the recombinant vectors expressing rabies glycoprotein (RG) (0.19 +/- 0.32; n = 8, P = 7 x 10(-6)). The NYVAC vaccine also protected against weight loss, and both the NYVAC and attenuated CDV vaccines protected against the development of some clinical signs of infection, although survival in each of the three vaccine groups was low (one of seven) and not significantly different from the RG controls (none of eight). Combined i.n.-parenteral immunization of ferrets with maternal antibody using NYVAC-HF (n = 9) produced higher titers (1

  4. Intragastric immunization with recombinant Lactobacillus casei expressing flagellar antigen confers antibody-independent protective immunity against Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Kajikawa, Akinobu; Satoh, Eiichi; Leer, Rob J; Yamamoto, Shigeki; Igimi, Shizunobu

    2007-05-04

    A recombinant Lactobacillus casei expressing a flagellar antigen from Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis was constructed and evaluated as a mucosal vaccine. Intragastric immunization of the recombinant strain conferred protective immunity against Salmonella infection in mice. This immunization did not result in antigen-specific antibody in either feces or sera but induced the release of IFN-gamma on restimulation of primed lymphocytes ex vivo. The results suggested that the protective efficacy provided by flagellin-expressing L. casei is mainly attributable to cell-mediated immune responses. In addition, an adjuvant-type effect of the antigen delivery system with L. casei was also observed.

  5. An empirical modeling platform to evaluate the relative control discrete CHO cell synthetic processes exert over recombinant monoclonal antibody production process titer.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Jane; O'Callaghan, Peter M; Pybus, Leon P; Wilkinson, Stephen J; Root, Tracy; Racher, Andrew J; James, David C

    2011-09-01

    In this study we have combined empirically derived mathematical models of intracellular Mab synthesis to quantitatively compare the degree to which individual cellular processes limit recombinant IgG(4) monoclonal antibody production by GS-CHO cells throughout a state-of-the-art industrial fed-batch culture process. Based on the calculation of a production process control coefficient for each stage of the intracellular Mab synthesis and secretion pathway, we identified the major cellular restrictions on Mab production throughout the entire culture process to be recombinant heavy chain gene transcription and heavy chain mRNA translation. Surprisingly, despite a substantial decline in the rate of cellular biomass synthesis during culture, with a concomitant decline in the calculated rate constants for energy-intensive Mab synthetic processes (Mab folding/assembly and secretion), these did not exert significant control of Mab synthesis at any stage of production. Instead, cell-specific Mab production was maintained by increased Mab gene transcription which offset the decline in cellular biosynthetic rates. Importantly, this study shows that application of this whole-process predictive modeling strategy should rationally precede and inform cell engineering approaches to increase production of a recombinant protein by a mammalian host cell--where control of productivity is inherently protein product and cell line specific.

  6. Protection against Friend retrovirus-induced leukemia by recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing the gag gene.

    PubMed Central

    Miyazawa, M; Nishio, J; Chesebro, B

    1992-01-01

    High sequence variability in the envelope gene of human immunodeficiency virus has provoked interest in nonenvelope antigens as potential immunogens against retrovirus infection. However, the role of core protein antigens encoded by the gag gene in protective immunity against retroviruses is unclear. By using recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing the Friend murine leukemia helper virus (F-MuLV) gag gene, we could prime CD4+ T-helper cells and protectively immunize susceptible strains of mice against Friend retrovirus infection. Recovery from leukemic splenomegaly developed more slowly after immunization with vaccinia virus-F-MuLV gag than with vaccinia virus-F-MuLV env; however, genetic nonresponders to the envelope protein could be partially protected with Gag vaccines. Class switching of F-MuLV-neutralizing antibodies from immunoglobulin M to immunoglobulin G after challenge with Friend virus complex was facilitated in mice immunized with the Gag antigen. Sequential deletion of the gag gene revealed that the major protective epitope was located on the N-terminal hydrophobic protein p15. Images PMID:1534853

  7. RNA Structures Facilitate Recombination-Mediated Gene Swapping in HIV-1 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Simon-Loriere, Etienne; Martin, Darren P.; Weeks, Kevin M.; Negroni, Matteo

    2010-01-01

    Many viruses, including retroviruses, undergo frequent recombination, a process which can increase their rate of adaptive evolution. In the case of HIV, recombination has been responsible for the generation of numerous intersubtype recombinant variants with epidemiological importance in the AIDS pandemic. Although it is known that fragments of genetic material do not combine randomly during the generation of recombinant viruses, the mechanisms that lead to preferential recombination at specific sites are not fully understood. Here we reanalyze recent independent data defining (i) the structure of a complete HIV-1 RNA genome and (ii) favorable sites for recombination. We show that in the absence of selection acting on recombinant genomes, regions harboring RNA structures in the NL4-3 model strain are strongly predictive of recombination breakpoints in the HIV-1 env genes of primary isolates. In addition, we found that breakpoints within recombinant HIV-1 genomes sampled from human populations, which have been acted upon extensively by natural selection, also colocalize with RNA structures. Critically, junctions between genes are enriched in structured RNA elements and are also preferred sites for generating functional recombinant forms. These data suggest that RNA structure-mediated recombination allows the virus to exchange intact genes rather than arbitrary subgene fragments, which is likely to increase the overall viability and replication success of the recombinant HIV progeny. PMID:20881047

  8. RNA structures facilitate recombination-mediated gene swapping in HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Simon-Loriere, Etienne; Martin, Darren P; Weeks, Kevin M; Negroni, Matteo

    2010-12-01

    Many viruses, including retroviruses, undergo frequent recombination, a process which can increase their rate of adaptive evolution. In the case of HIV, recombination has been responsible for the generation of numerous intersubtype recombinant variants with epidemiological importance in the AIDS pandemic. Although it is known that fragments of genetic material do not combine randomly during the generation of recombinant viruses, the mechanisms that lead to preferential recombination at specific sites are not fully understood. Here we reanalyze recent independent data defining (i) the structure of a complete HIV-1 RNA genome and (ii) favorable sites for recombination. We show that in the absence of selection acting on recombinant genomes, regions harboring RNA structures in the NL4-3 model strain are strongly predictive of recombination breakpoints in the HIV-1 env genes of primary isolates. In addition, we found that breakpoints within recombinant HIV-1 genomes sampled from human populations, which have been acted upon extensively by natural selection, also colocalize with RNA structures. Critically, junctions between genes are enriched in structured RNA elements and are also preferred sites for generating functional recombinant forms. These data suggest that RNA structure-mediated recombination allows the virus to exchange intact genes rather than arbitrary subgene fragments, which is likely to increase the overall viability and replication success of the recombinant HIV progeny.

  9. Identification of antigenic differences of recombinant and pituitary bovine growth hormone using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Erhard, M H; Kellner, J; Schmidhuber, S; Schams, D; Lösch, U

    1994-02-01

    For characterization and determination of recombinant bovine GH (rbGH) eight monoclonal antibodies (MAb) were produced against rbGH from Monsanto. The various MAb showed different affinities to rbGH, pituitary bovine GH (pbGH), and pituitary ovine GH (poGH). With epitope analysis several MAb were shown to recognize different epitopes of rbGH. The MAb MUC-rbGH-3A11 and MUC-rbGH-1E5 were used to develop a Sandwich ELISA. By checking the specificity of the assay no cross reactivity was found with pituitary porcine GH, pituitary human GH, bovine or ovine prolactin and little cross reactivity with poGH could be found. The Sandwich ELISA detected various rbGH (Monsanto, Elanco, Cyanamid) with different N-terminal amino acids and discriminated between rbGH and pituitary bovine GH by an affinity factor of 2.0. The detection level was 2 ng rbGH per ml PBS buffer. The recovery was about 86% in bovine serum. It might therefore be possible to detect rbGH-treated cows using a Sandwich ELISA, but this would need a field study.

  10. Clinical gene therapy using recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors.

    PubMed

    Mueller, C; Flotte, T R

    2008-06-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors possess a number of properties that may make them suitable for clinical gene therapy, including being based upon a virus for which there is no known pathology and a natural propensity to persist in human cells. Wild-type adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) are now known to be very diverse and ubiquitous in humans and nonhuman primates, which adds to the degree of confidence one may place in the natural history of AAV, namely that it has never been associated with any human tumors or other acute pathology, other than sporadic reports of having been isolated from spontaneously aborted fetuses. On the basis of this understanding of AAV biology and a wide range of preclinical studies in mice, rabbits, dogs and nonhuman primates, a growing number of clinical trials have been undertaken with this class of vectors. Altogether, over 40 clinical trials have now been approved. Although all previous trials were undertaken using AAV serotype 2 vectors, at least two current trials utilize AAV2 vector genomes cross-packaged or pseudotyped into AAV1 capsids, which appear to mediate more efficient gene delivery to muscle. The explosion of capsid isolates available for use as vectors to over 120 has now provided the potential to broaden the application of AAV-based gene therapy to other cell types.

  11. Recombinant human monoclonal antibodies to human cytomegalovirus glycoprotein B neutralize virus in a complement-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Akane; Fujita, Ayano; Murayama, Tsugiya; Iba, Yoshitaka; Kurosawa, Yoshikazu; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Asano, Yoshizo

    2009-11-01

    Human antibodies specific for HCMV are currently considered as potential anti-HCMV therapeutic agents. In this study, we used a combinatorial human antibody library to isolate and characterize complete human monoclonal antibodies that effectively neutralize HCMV in a complement-dependent manner. One hundred and six clones were isolated in two independent screens using HCMV virions and recombinant glycoprotein B, gB654, as antigens. All of the clones recognized the same molecule gB and were classified into 14 groups based on the amino acid sequence of the V(H) region. Seven representative clones from these 14 groups had a strong gB654 binding affinity by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). A pairwise binding competition analysis suggested that there were three groups based on differences in the gB recognition sites. Although Fab fragments of the seven groups showed strong affinity for gB, none of the Fab fragments neutralized HCMV infectivity in vitro. In contrast, complete human IgG(1) antibodies of at least three groups neutralized HCMV in a complement-dependent manner. These data suggest that potent therapeutic antibodies can be obtained from a human antibody library, including most of the functional antibodies that mediate humoral immunity to the selected pathogen.

  12. An improved affinity tag based on the FLAG peptide for the detection and purification of recombinant antibody fragments.

    PubMed

    Knappik, A; Plückthun, A

    1994-10-01

    The commercially available monoclonal antibodies M1 and M2 were raised against and bind the FLAG sequence DYKDDDDK with high specificity. Using the calcium-dependent M1 antibody and the FLAG tag attached to the N terminus of various fragments of the antibody McPC603 expressed in Escherichia coli, we found that the M1 antibody binds with almost the same affinity to a much shorter version of this sequence (DYKD). Since most antibody light chains start with an aspartate, the addition of only three additional amino acids to the N terminus is sufficient to detect and quantify the expressed antibody fragments using standard immunological methods. Similarly, the heavy chain can be detected specifically with the sequence DYKD, which requires four additional amino acids since most heavy chains do not start with Asp. The signal sequence of both chains that is necessary for the transport of the chains to the periplasm of E. coli is processed correctly. Furthermore, we investigated the influence of the amino acid at the fifth position of the FLAG sequence on the binding affinity of the M1 antibody and found that a glutamate at this position increased the sensitivity in Western blots sixfold over the original long FLAG sequence containing an aspartate residue at this position. Together, the improved FLAG is a versatile tool for both sensitive detection and one-step purification of recombinant proteins.

  13. Human anti-EGFL7 recombinant full-length antibodies selected from a mammalian cell-based antibody display library.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Liu, Yan-Hong; Li, Yan-Wen; Ju, Qian; Chen, Lin; Xie, Ping-Li; Li, Yue-Hui; Li, Guan-Cheng

    2012-06-01

    Epidermal growth factor-like domain 7 (EGFL7) has been implicated in promoting solid tumor growth and metastasis via stimulating tumor-associated angiogenesis. The advent of antibody display technology (phage, bacteria, and yeast) led to an enormous revival in the use of antibodies as diagnostic and therapeutic tools for fighting cancer. However, problems with protein folding, posttranslational modification, and codon usage still limit the number of improved antibodies that can be obtained. We describe here the isolation of an EGFL7-specific antibody from a mammalian cell-based full-length antibody display library generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. Using a novel vector, contained glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor and restriction enzyme sites NheI and ClaI, antibody libraries are displayed as whole IgG molecules on the cell surface and screened for specific antigen binding by a combination of magnetic beads and measured by cell ELISA. Anti-EGFL7 antibody was successfully isolated from the library. The mammalian cell-based full-length antibody display library is a great potential application for rapid identification and cloning of human mAbs of targeting hepatocellular carcinoma.

  14. Molecular mechanisms of recombination restriction in the envelope gene of the human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Simon-Loriere, Etienne; Galetto, Roman; Hamoudi, Meriem; Archer, John; Lefeuvre, Pierre; Martin, Darren P; Robertson, David L; Negroni, Matteo

    2009-05-01

    The ability of pathogens to escape the host's immune response is crucial for the establishment of persistent infections and can influence virulence. Recombination has been observed to contribute to this process by generating novel genetic variants. Although distinctive recombination patterns have been described in many viral pathogens, little is known about the influence of biases in the recombination process itself relative to selective forces acting on newly formed recombinants. Understanding these influences is important for determining how recombination contributes to pathogen genome and proteome evolution. Most previous research on recombination-driven protein evolution has focused on relatively simple proteins, usually in the context of directed evolution experiments. Here, we study recombination in the envelope gene of HIV-1 between primary isolates belonging to subtypes that recombine naturally in the HIV/AIDS pandemic. By characterizing the early steps in the generation of recombinants, we provide novel insights into the evolutionary forces that shape recombination patterns within viral populations. Specifically, we show that the combined effects of mechanistic processes that determine the locations of recombination breakpoints across the HIV-1 envelope gene, and purifying selection acting against dysfunctional recombinants, can explain almost the entire distribution of breakpoints found within this gene in nature. These constraints account for the surprising paucity of recombination breakpoints found in infected individuals within this highly variable gene. Thus, the apparent randomness of HIV evolution via recombination may in fact be relatively more predictable than anticipated. In addition, the dominance of purifying selection in localized areas of the HIV genome defines regions where functional constraints on recombinants appear particularly strong, pointing to vulnerable aspects of HIV biology.

  15. Molecular Mechanisms of Recombination Restriction in the Envelope Gene of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Simon-Loriere, Etienne; Galetto, Roman; Hamoudi, Meriem; Archer, John; Lefeuvre, Pierre; Martin, Darren P.; Robertson, David L.; Negroni, Matteo

    2009-01-01

    The ability of pathogens to escape the host's immune response is crucial for the establishment of persistent infections and can influence virulence. Recombination has been observed to contribute to this process by generating novel genetic variants. Although distinctive recombination patterns have been described in many viral pathogens, little is known about the influence of biases in the recombination process itself relative to selective forces acting on newly formed recombinants. Understanding these influences is important for determining how recombination contributes to pathogen genome and proteome evolution. Most previous research on recombination-driven protein evolution has focused on relatively simple proteins, usually in the context of directed evolution experiments. Here, we study recombination in the envelope gene of HIV-1 between primary isolates belonging to subtypes that recombine naturally in the HIV/AIDS pandemic. By characterizing the early steps in the generation of recombinants, we provide novel insights into the evolutionary forces that shape recombination patterns within viral populations. Specifically, we show that the combined effects of mechanistic processes that determine the locations of recombination breakpoints across the HIV-1 envelope gene, and purifying selection acting against dysfunctional recombinants, can explain almost the entire distribution of breakpoints found within this gene in nature. These constraints account for the surprising paucity of recombination breakpoints found in infected individuals within this highly variable gene. Thus, the apparent randomness of HIV evolution via recombination may in fact be relatively more predictable than anticipated. In addition, the dominance of purifying selection in localized areas of the HIV genome defines regions where functional constraints on recombinants appear particularly strong, pointing to vulnerable aspects of HIV biology. PMID:19424420

  16. Delineation of BmSXP antibody V-gene usage from a lymphatic filariasis based immune scFv antibody library.

    PubMed

    Rahumatullah, Anizah; Ahmad, Azimah; Noordin, Rahmah; Lim, Theam Soon

    2015-10-01

    Phage display technology is an important tool for antibody generation or selection. This study describes the development of a scFv library and the subsequent analysis of identified monoclonal antibodies against BmSXP, a recombinant antigen for lymphatic filariasis. The immune library was generated from blood of lymphatic filariasis infected individuals. A TA based intermediary cloning approach was used to increase cloning efficiency for the library construction process. A diverse immune scFv library of 10(8) was generated. Six unique monoclonal antibodies were identified from the 50 isolated clones against BmSXP. Analysis of the clones showed a bias for the IgHV3 and Vκ1 (45.5%) and IgHV2 and Vκ3 (27.3%) gene family. The most favored J segment for light chain is IgKJ1 (45.5%). The most favored D and J segment for heavy chain are IgHD6-13 (75%) and IgHJ3 (47.7%). The information may suggest a predisposition of certain V genes in antibody responses against lymphatic filariasis.

  17. Inhibition of preS1-hepatocyte interaction by an array of recombinant human antibodies from naturally recovered individuals

    PubMed Central

    Sankhyan, Anurag; Sharma, Chandresh; Dutta, Durgashree; Sharma, Tarang; Chosdol, Kunzang; Wakita, Takaji; Watashi, Koichi; Awasthi, Amit; Acharya, Subrat K.; Khanna, Navin; Tiwari, Ashutosh; Sinha, Subrata

    2016-01-01

    Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies are being found to be increasingly useful in viral infections. In hepatitis B infection, antibodies are proven to be useful for passive prophylaxis. The preS1 region (21–47a.a.) of HBV contains the viral hepatocyte-binding domain crucial for its attachment and infection of hepatocytes. Antibodies against this region are neutralizing and are best suited for immune-based neutralization of HBV, especially in view of their not recognizing decoy particles. Anti-preS1 (21–47a.a.) antibodies are present in serum of spontaneously recovered individuals. We generated a phage-displayed scFv library using circulating lymphocytes from these individuals and selected four preS1-peptide specific scFvs with markedly distinct sequences from this library. All the antibodies recognized the blood-derived and recombinant preS1 containing antigens. Each scFv showed a discrete binding signature, interacting with different amino acids within the preS1-peptide region. Ability to prevent binding of the preS1 protein (N-terminus 60a.a.) to HepG2 cells stably expressing hNTCP (HepG2-hNTCP-C4 cells), the HBV receptor on human hepatocytes was taken as a surrogate marker for neutralizing capacity. These antibodies inhibited preS1-hepatocyte interaction individually and even better in combination. Such a combination of potentially neutralizing recombinant antibodies with defined specificities could be used for preventing/managing HBV infections, including those by possible escape mutants. PMID:26888694

  18. Inhibition of preS1-hepatocyte interaction by an array of recombinant human antibodies from naturally recovered individuals.

    PubMed

    Sankhyan, Anurag; Sharma, Chandresh; Dutta, Durgashree; Sharma, Tarang; Chosdol, Kunzang; Wakita, Takaji; Watashi, Koichi; Awasthi, Amit; Acharya, Subrat K; Khanna, Navin; Tiwari, Ashutosh; Sinha, Subrata

    2016-02-18

    Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies are being found to be increasingly useful in viral infections. In hepatitis B infection, antibodies are proven to be useful for passive prophylaxis. The preS1 region (21-47a.a.) of HBV contains the viral hepatocyte-binding domain crucial for its attachment and infection of hepatocytes. Antibodies against this region are neutralizing and are best suited for immune-based neutralization of HBV, especially in view of their not recognizing decoy particles. Anti-preS1 (21-47a.a.) antibodies are present in serum of spontaneously recovered individuals. We generated a phage-displayed scFv library using circulating lymphocytes from these individuals and selected four preS1-peptide specific scFvs with markedly distinct sequences from this library. All the antibodies recognized the blood-derived and recombinant preS1 containing antigens. Each scFv showed a discrete binding signature, interacting with different amino acids within the preS1-peptide region. Ability to prevent binding of the preS1 protein (N-terminus 60a.a.) to HepG2 cells stably expressing hNTCP (HepG2-hNTCP-C4 cells), the HBV receptor on human hepatocytes was taken as a surrogate marker for neutralizing capacity. These antibodies inhibited preS1-hepatocyte interaction individually and even better in combination. Such a combination of potentially neutralizing recombinant antibodies with defined specificities could be used for preventing/managing HBV infections, including those by possible escape mutants.

  19. Overexpression of Recombinant Human Teriparatide, rhPTH (1–34) in Escherichia coli : An Innovative Gene Fusion Approach

    PubMed Central

    Bakhtiari, Nahid; Amini Bayat, Zahra; Sagharidouz, Sepideh; Vaez, Mohsen

    2017-01-01

    Background: Parathyroid hormone is an 84-amino acid peptide secreted by the parathyroid glands. Its physiological role is maintenance of normal serum calcium level and bone remodeling. Biological activity of this hormone is related to N-terminal 1–34 amino acids. The recombinant form of hormone (1–34) has been approved for treatment of osteoporosis from 2002. In this study, a novel fusion partner has been developed for preparation of high yield recombinant 1–34 amino acids of hPTH. Methods: Novel nucleotide cassette designed encoding a chimeric fusion protein comprising of a fusion partner consisting of a His-tag in N-terminal, 53 amino acids belong to Escherichia coli (E. coli) β-galactosidase (LacZ) gene, a linker sequence for increasing of expression and protection of target peptide structure from fusion tag effect, an Enteropeptidase cleavage site, rhPTH (1–34) gene fragment. Optimized fusion gene was synthesized and ligated into pET-28a vector under control of T7 promoter, and then transformed in E. coli (DH5α) cells. Positive clones containing this gene were double digested with NcoI and-BamHI and also approved by sequencing. Gene overexpression was observed in SDS-PAGE after induction with 0.2 mM IPTG. Confirmation of gene expression was performed by western blotting using anti-His-tag antibody conjugated with peroxidase. Results: By this fusion gene design approach, we achieved a high level expression of the rhPTH, where it represented at least 43.7% of the total protein as determined by SDS-PAGE and confirmed by western blotting. Conclusion: In addition to high level expression of the designed gene in this work, specific amino acid sequence of bacterial β-galactosidase was selected as major part of carrier tag for protection of this hormone as important step of recombinant rhPTH with relevant isoelectronic point (pI). This innovation resulted in recombinant production of hPTH very well and the gene construct could be applied as a pattern for

  20. Gene Disruption by Homologous Recombination in the Xylella fastidiosa Citrus Variegated Chlorosis Strain

    PubMed Central

    Gaurivaud, Patrice; Souza, Leonardo C. A.; Virgílio, Andrea C. D.; Mariano, Anelise G.; Palma, Renê R.; Monteiro, Patrícia B.

    2002-01-01

    Mutagenesis by homologous recombination was evaluated in Xylella fastidiosa by using the bga gene, coding for β-galactosidase, as a model. Integration of replicative plasmids by homologous recombination between the cloned truncated copy of bga and the endogenous gene was produced by one or two crossover events leading to β-galactosidase mutants. A promoterless chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene was used to monitor the expression of the target gene and to select a cvaB mutant. PMID:12200328

  1. High-level secretion of recombinant monomeric murine and human single-chain Fv antibodies from Drosophila S2 cells.

    PubMed

    Gilmartin, Allissia A; Lamp, Benjamin; Rümenapf, Till; Persson, Mats A A; Rey, Félix A; Krey, Thomas

    2012-02-01

    Single-chain variable fragment (scFvs) antibodies are small polypeptides (∼26 kD) containing the heavy (V(H)) and light (V(L)) immunoglobulin domains of a parent antibody connected by a flexible linker. In addition to being frequently used in diagnostics and therapy for an increasing number of human diseases, scFvs are important tools for structural biology as crystallization chaperones. Although scFvs can be expressed in many different organisms, the expression level of an scFv strongly depends on its particular amino acid sequence. We report here a system allowing for easy and efficient cloning of (i) scFvs selected by phage display and (ii) individual heavy and light chain sequences from hybridoma cDNA into expression plasmids engineered for secretion of the recombinant fragment produced in Drosophila S2 cells. We validated the method by producing five scFvs derived from human and murine parent antibodies directed against various antigens. The production yields varied between 5 and 12 mg monomeric scFv per liter of supernatant, indicating a relative independence on the individual sequences. The recombinant scFvs bound their cognate antigen with high affinity, comparable with the parent antibodies. The suitability of the produced recombinant fragments for structural studies was demonstrated by crystallization and structure determination of one of the produced scFvs, derived from a broadly neutralizing antibody against the major glycoprotein E2 of the hepatitis C virus. Structural comparison with the Protein Data Bank revealed the typical spatial organization of V(H) and V(L) domains, further validating the here-reported expression system.

  2. Duplication of chicken defensin7 gene generated by gene conversion and homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi Ok; Bornelöv, Susanne; Andersson, Leif; Lamont, Susan J.; Chen, Junfeng; Womack, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Defensins constitute an evolutionary conserved family of cationic antimicrobial peptides that play a key role in host innate immune responses to infection. Defensin genes generally reside in complex genomic regions that are prone to structural variation, and defensin genes exhibit extensive copy number variation in humans and in other species. Copy number variation of defensin genes was examined in inbred lines of Leghorn and Fayoumi chickens, and a duplication of defensin7 was discovered in the Fayoumi breed. Analysis of junction sequences confirmed the occurrence of a simple tandem duplication of defensin7 with sequence identity at the junction, suggesting nonallelic homologous recombination between defensin7 and defensin6. The duplication event generated two chimeric promoters that are best explained by gene conversion followed by homologous recombination. Expression of defensin7 was not elevated in animals with two genes despite both genes being transcribed in the tissues examined. Computational prediction of promoter regions revealed the presence of several putative transcription factor binding sites generated by the duplication event. These data provide insight into the evolution and possible function of large gene families and specifically, the defensins. PMID:27849592

  3. The haemagglutinin gene, but not the neuraminidase gene, of 'Spanish flu' was a recombinant.

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, M J; Armstrong, J S; Gibbs, A J

    2001-01-01

    Published analyses of the sequences of three genes from the 1918 Spanish influenza virus have cast doubt on the theory that it came from birds immediately before the pandemic. They showed that the virus was of the H1N1 subtype lineage but more closely related to mammal-infecting strains than any known bird-infecting strain. They provided no evidence that the virus originated by gene reassortment nor that the virus was the direct ancestor of the two lineages of H1N1 viruses currently found in mammals; one that mostly infects human beings, the other pigs. The unusual virulence of the virus and why it produced a pandemic have remained unsolved. We have reanalysed the sequences of the three 1918 genes and found conflicting patterns of relatedness in all three. Various tests showed that the patterns in its haemagglutinin (HA) gene were produced by true recombination between two different parental HA H1 subtype genes, but that the conflicting patterns in its neuraminidase and non-structural-nuclear export proteins genes resulted from selection. The recombination event that produced the 1918 HA gene probably coincided with the start of the pandemic, and may have triggered it. PMID:11779383

  4. Duplication of chicken defensin7 gene generated by gene conversion and homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi Ok; Bornelöv, Susanne; Andersson, Leif; Lamont, Susan J; Chen, Junfeng; Womack, James E

    2016-11-29

    Defensins constitute an evolutionary conserved family of cationic antimicrobial peptides that play a key role in host innate immune responses to infection. Defensin genes generally reside in complex genomic regions that are prone to structural variation, and defensin genes exhibit extensive copy number variation in humans and in other species. Copy number variation of defensin genes was examined in inbred lines of Leghorn and Fayoumi chickens, and a duplication of defensin7 was discovered in the Fayoumi breed. Analysis of junction sequences confirmed the occurrence of a simple tandem duplication of defensin7 with sequence identity at the junction, suggesting nonallelic homologous recombination between defensin7 and defensin6 The duplication event generated two chimeric promoters that are best explained by gene conversion followed by homologous recombination. Expression of defensin7 was not elevated in animals with two genes despite both genes being transcribed in the tissues examined. Computational prediction of promoter regions revealed the presence of several putative transcription factor binding sites generated by the duplication event. These data provide insight into the evolution and possible function of large gene families and specifically, the defensins.

  5. Pangenome Analysis of Burkholderia pseudomallei: Genome Evolution Preserves Gene Order despite High Recombination Rates.

    PubMed

    Spring-Pearson, Senanu M; Stone, Joshua K; Doyle, Adina; Allender, Christopher J; Okinaka, Richard T; Mayo, Mark; Broomall, Stacey M; Hill, Jessica M; Karavis, Mark A; Hubbard, Kyle S; Insalaco, Joseph M; McNew, Lauren A; Rosenzweig, C Nicole; Gibbons, Henry S; Currie, Bart J; Wagner, David M; Keim, Paul; Tuanyok, Apichai

    2015-01-01

    The pangenomic diversity in Burkholderia pseudomallei is high, with approximately 5.8% of the genome consisting of genomic islands. Genomic islands are known hotspots for recombination driven primarily by site-specific recombination associated with tRNAs. However, recombination rates in other portions of the genome are also high, a feature we expected to disrupt gene order. We analyzed the pangenome of 37 isolates of B. pseudomallei and demonstrate that the pangenome is 'open', with approximately 136 new genes identified with each new genome sequenced, and that the global core genome consists of 4568±16 homologs. Genes associated with metabolism were statistically overrepresented in the core genome, and genes associated with mobile elements, disease, and motility were primarily associated with accessory portions of the pangenome. The frequency distribution of genes present in between 1 and 37 of the genomes analyzed matches well with a model of genome evolution in which 96% of the genome has very low recombination rates but 4% of the genome recombines readily. Using homologous genes among pairs of genomes, we found that gene order was highly conserved among strains, despite the high recombination rates previously observed. High rates of gene transfer and recombination are incompatible with retaining gene order unless these processes are either highly localized to specific sites within the genome, or are characterized by symmetrical gene gain and loss. Our results demonstrate that both processes occur: localized recombination introduces many new genes at relatively few sites, and recombination throughout the genome generates the novel multi-locus sequence types previously observed while preserving gene order.

  6. Recombinant Pvs48/45 Antigen Expressed in E. coli Generates Antibodies that Block Malaria Transmission in Anopheles albimanus Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam; Vallejo, Andrés F.; Rubiano, Kelly; Solarte, Yezid; Marin, Catherin; Castellanos, Angélica; Céspedes, Nora; Herrera, Sócrates

    2015-01-01

    Transmission of malaria parasites from humans to Anopheles mosquitoes can be inhibited by specific antibodies elicited during malaria infection, which target surface Plasmodium gametocyte/gamete proteins. Some of these proteins may have potential for vaccine development. Pvs48/45 is a P. vivax gametocyte surface antigen orthologous to Pfs48/45, which may play a role during parasite fertilization and thus has potential for transmission blocking (TB) activity. Here we describe the expression of a recombinant Pvs48/45 protein expressed in Escherichia coli as a ∼60kDa construct which we tested for antigenicity using human sera and for its immunogenicity and transmission blocking activity of specific anti-mouse and anti-monkey Pvs48/45 antibodies. The protein reacted with sera of individuals from malaria-endemic areas and in addition induced specific IgG antibody responses in BALB/c mice and Aotus l. griseimembra monkeys. Sera from both immunized animal species recognized native P. vivax protein in Western blot (WB) and immunofluorescence assays. Moreover, sera from immunized mice and monkeys produced significant inhibition of parasite transmission to An. Albimanus mosquitoes as shown by membrane feeding assays. Results indicate the presence of reactive epitopes in the Pvs48/45 recombinant product that induce antibodies with TB activity. Further testing of this protein is ongoing to determine its vaccine potential. PMID:25775466

  7. Production of polyclonal antibody to a recombinant non-structural protein Nsp1a of human astrovirus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Liu, Wen-Hui; Kan, Li-Li; Li, Xin; Li, Yong-gang; Zhao, Wei

    2014-12-01

    Human astrovirus (HAstV) are important pathogens that cause acute viral diarrhea in infants. Little is known about the mechanisms of astrovirus-induced diarrhea. Previous studies have suggested that an apoptosis inducer may be encoded in the non-structural protein (nsP1a) of astrovirus and contribute to virus-induced diarrhea. To study the biological function of nsP1a and to gain further insight into nsP1a protein-host cell interactions, good quality antibodies must be produced. The nsP1agene of HAstV-1 was cloned into a bacterial expression vector Pgex-6P-1. The recombinant plasmid Pgex-6P-nsP1a was transformed into Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) and expressed as a fusion protein that contains N-terminal GST tags. The expressed recombinant protein was purified and used as an antigen to produce an nsP1a antiserum in rabbits. ELISA was used to detect the titer of specific antibodies. Specificity activity was detected by Western blot and immunofluorescence analysis. The titer of specific antibodies was up to 1:30,000. Western blotting and immunofluorescence analysis indicated that the polyclonal antibody could recognize specifically the HAstV-1 nsP1a protein.

  8. Recombinant Pvs48/45 antigen expressed in E. coli generates antibodies that block malaria transmission in Anopheles albimanus mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam; Vallejo, Andrés F; Rubiano, Kelly; Solarte, Yezid; Marin, Catherin; Castellanos, Angélica; Céspedes, Nora; Herrera, Sócrates

    2015-01-01

    Transmission of malaria parasites from humans to Anopheles mosquitoes can be inhibited by specific antibodies elicited during malaria infection, which target surface Plasmodium gametocyte/gamete proteins. Some of these proteins may have potential for vaccine development. Pvs48/45 is a P. vivax gametocyte surface antigen orthologous to Pfs48/45, which may play a role during parasite fertilization and thus has potential for transmission blocking (TB) activity. Here we describe the expression of a recombinant Pvs48/45 protein expressed in Escherichia coli as a ∼60kDa construct which we tested for antigenicity using human sera and for its immunogenicity and transmission blocking activity of specific anti-mouse and anti-monkey Pvs48/45 antibodies. The protein reacted with sera of individuals from malaria-endemic areas and in addition induced specific IgG antibody responses in BALB/c mice and Aotus l. griseimembra monkeys. Sera from both immunized animal species recognized native P. vivax protein in Western blot (WB) and immunofluorescence assays. Moreover, sera from immunized mice and monkeys produced significant inhibition of parasite transmission to An. Albimanus mosquitoes as shown by membrane feeding assays. Results indicate the presence of reactive epitopes in the Pvs48/45 recombinant product that induce antibodies with TB activity. Further testing of this protein is ongoing to determine its vaccine potential.

  9. Regeneration of recombinant antigen microarrays for the automated monitoring of antibodies against zoonotic pathogens in swine sera.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Verena K; Kober, Catharina; Niessner, Reinhard; Seidel, Michael

    2015-01-23

    The ability to regenerate immobilized proteins like recombinant antigens (rAgs) on surfaces is an unsolved problem for flow-based immunoassays on microarray analysis systems. The regeneration on microarray chip surfaces is achieved by changing the protein structures and desorption of antibodies. Afterwards, reactivation of immobilized protein antigens is necessary for reconstitution processes. Any backfolding should be managed in a way that antibodies are able to detect the protein antigens in the next measurement cycle. The regeneration of rAg microarrays was examined for the first time on the MCR3 flow-based chemiluminescence (CL) microarray analysis platform. The aim was to reuse rAg microarray chips in order to reduce the screening effort and costs. An antibody capturing format was used to detect antibodies against zoonotic pathogens in sera of slaughtered pigs. Different denaturation and reactivation buffers were tested. Acidic glycine-SDS buffer (pH 2.5) and 8 M guanidinium hydrochloride showed the best results in respect of denaturation efficiencies. The highest CL signals after regeneration were achieved with a carbonate buffer containing 10 mM DTT and 0.1% BSA for reactivation. Antibodies against Yersinia spp. and hepatitis E virus (HEV) were detected in swine sera on one immunochip over 4 days and 25 measurement cycles. Each cycle took 10 min for detection and regeneration. By using the rAg microarray chip, a fast and automated screening of antibodies against pathogens in sera of slaughtered pigs would be possible for zoonosis monitoring.

  10. Affinity Chromatography of Native and Recombinant Proteins from Receptors for Insulin and IGF-I to Recombinant Single Chain Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Fujita-Yamaguchi, Yoko

    2015-01-01

    Affinity chromatography is an efficient method to isolate proteins by taking advantage of their affinities for specific molecules such as substrates, inhibitors, antigens, ligands, antibodies, and other interacting molecules, including subunits. Nowadays, we take the effectiveness and excellence of this technology for granted. This essay will mainly cover the use of affinity chromatography based on my experience. PMID:26579073

  11. Persistent expression of biologically active anti-HER2 antibody by AAVrh.10-mediated gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Wang, G; Qiu, J; Wang, R; Krause, A; Boyer, J L; Hackett, N R; Crystal, R G

    2010-08-01

    Trastuzumab (Herceptin) is a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody (mAb) directed against an extracellular region of the human epidermal growth-factor receptor type 2 (HER2) protein. We hypothesized that a single adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated genetic delivery of an anti-HER2 antibody should be effective in mediating long-term production of anti-HER2 and in suppressing the growth of human tumors in a xenograft model in nude mice. The adeno-associated virus gene transfer vector AAVrh.10alphaHER2 was constructed based on a non-human primate AAV serotype rh.10 to express the complementary DNAs for the heavy and light chains of mAb 4D5, the murine precursor to trastuzumab. The data show that genetically transferred anti-HER2 selectively bound human HER2 protein and suppressed the proliferation of HER2(+) tumor cell lines. A single administration of AAVrh.10alphaHER2 provided long-term therapeutic levels of anti-HER2 antibody expression without inducing an anti-idiotype response, suppressed the growth of HER2(+) tumors and increased the survival of tumor bearing mice. In the context that trastuzumab therapy requires frequent and repeated administration, this strategy might be developed as an alternate platform for delivery of anti-HER2 therapy.

  12. Novel monoclonal antibodies broadly reactive to human recombinant sapovirus-like particles.

    PubMed

    Kitamoto, Noritoshi; Oka, Tomoichiro; Katayama, Kazuhiko; Li, Tian-Cheng; Takeda, Naokazu; Kato, Yoji; Miyoshi, Tatsuya; Tanaka, Tomoyuki

    2012-11-01

    Sapovirus (SaV), a member of the family Caliciviridae, is an important cause of acute epidemic gastroenteritis in humans. Human SaV is genetically and antigenically diverse and can be classified into four genogroups (GI, GII, GIV, and GV) and 16 genotypes (7 GI [GI.1-7], 7 GII, [GII.1-7], 1 GIV and 1 GV), based on capsid sequence similarities. Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) are powerful tools for examining viruses and proteins. PAI myeloma cells were fused with spleen cells from mice immunized with a single type of recombinant human SaV virus-like particles (VLPs) (GI.1, GI.5, GI.6, GII.3, GIV, or GV). Sixty-five hybrid clones producing MAbs were obtained. Twenty-four MAbs were characterized by ELISA, according to their cross-reactivity to each VLP (GI.1, GI.5, GI.6, GII.2, GII.3, GII.4, GII.7, GIV, and GV). The MAbs were classified by this method into: (i) MAbs broadly cross-reactive to all GI, GII, GIV and GV strains; (ii) those reactive in a genogroup-specific; and (iii) those reactive in a genotype-specific manner. Further analysis of three broadly cross-reactive MAbs with a competitive ELISA demonstrated that at least two different common epitopes are located on the capsid protein of human SaVs in the four genogroups. The MAbs generated and characterized in this study will be useful tools for further study of the antigenic and structural topography of the human SaV virion and for developing new diagnostic assays for human SaV.

  13. A novel human recombinant antibody fragment capable of neutralizing Mexican scorpion toxins.

    PubMed

    Riaño-Umbarila, Lidia; Olamendi-Portugal, Timoteo; Morelos-Juárez, Citlalli; Gurrola, Georgina B; Possani, Lourival D; Becerril, Baltazar

    2013-12-15

    Using phage display and directed evolution, our group has progressed in the construction of a second family of human single chain variable fragments (scFv) which bind to scorpion toxins dangerous to mammals. It was observed that scFv C1 only bound initially to toxin Cn2, which constitutes 6.8% of whole venom from the scorpion Centruroides noxius Hoffman. Only a few amino acid changes were necessary to extend its recognition to other similar toxins and without affecting the recognition for its primary antigen (Cn2 toxin). One variant of scFv C1 (scFv 202F) was selected after two cycles of directed evolution against Cll1 toxin, the second major toxic component from the venom of the Mexican scorpion Centruroides limpidus limpidus Karsh (0.5% of the whole venom). scFv 202F is also capable of recognizing Cn2 toxin. Despite not having the highest affinity for toxins Cll1 (KD = 25.1 × 10(-9) M) or Cn2 (KD = 8.1 × 10(-9) M), this antibody fragment neutralized one LD50 of each one of these toxins. Additionally, scFv 202F moderately recognized Cll2 toxin which constitutes 1.5% of the venom from C. limpidus. Based on our previous experience, we consider that these results are promising; consequently, we continue working on generating new optimized variants from scFv C1 that could be part of a recombinant scorpion anti-venom from human origin, that might reach the market in the near future.

  14. The development of antibody-based immunotherapy for methamphetamine abuse: immunization, and virus-mediated gene transfer approaches.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun-Hsiang; Chen, Chia-Hsiang

    2013-02-01

    Methamphetamine is a highly addictive psychostimulant that has been seriously abused worldwide, and currently there are no approved medications for the treatment of its abuse. Conventional treatments for drug addiction mainly seek to use small molecule agonists or antagonists to target the drug receptors in the brain, but unfortunately it is difficult to find a similar small molecule for the treatment of methamphetamine dependence. Alternatively, anti-methamphetamine antibodies can sequester the drug in the bloodstream and reduce the amount of drug available to the central nervous system, acting as peripheral pharmacokinetic antagonists. This review describes the development of antibody-based immunotherapies, classified into active and passive immunizations, for the treatment of methamphetamine addiction. Furthermore, an alternative therapeutic approach, using a recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated gene transfer technique to achieve in vivo expression of characterized anti-methamphetamine monoclonal antibodies, is proposed in this article.

  15. Light chain replacement: a new model for antibody gene rearrangement

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    A functional B cell antigen receptor is thought to regulate antibody gene rearrangement either by stopping further rearrangement (exclusion) or by promoting additional rearrangement (editing). We have developed a new model to study the regulation of antibody gene rearrangement. In this model, we used gene targeting to replace the J kappa region with a functional V kappa-J kappa light chain gene. Two different strains of mice were created; one, V kappa 4R, has a V kappa 4-J kappa 4 rearrangement followed by a downstream J kappa 5 segment, while the other, V kappa 8R, has a V kappa 8-J kappa 5 light chain. Here, we analyze the influence of these functional light chains on light chain rearrangement. We show that some V kappa 4R and V kappa 8R B cells only have the V kappa R light chain rearrangement, whereas others undergo additional rearrangements. Additional rearrangement can occur not only at the other kappa allele or isotype (lambda), but also at the targeted locus in both V kappa 4R and V kappa 8R. Rearrangement to the downstream J kappa 5 segment is observed in V kappa 4R, as is deletion of the targeted locus in both V kappa 4R and V kappa 8R. The V kappa R models illustrate that a productively rearranged light chain can either terminate further rearrangement or allow further rearrangement. We attribute the latter to editing of autoantibodies and to corrections of dysfunctional receptors. PMID:7629511

  16. Vaccinia Virus Recombinants: Expression of VSV Genes and Protective Immunization of Mice and Cattle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackett, M.; Yilma, T.; Rose, J. K.; Moss, B.

    1985-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) causes a contagious disease of horses, cattle, and pigs. When DNA copies of messenger RNA's for the G or N proteins of VSV were linked to a vaccinia virus promoter and inserted into the vaccinia genome, the recombinants retained infectivity and synthesized VSV polypeptides. After intradermal vaccination with live recombinant virus expressing the G protein, mice produced VSV-neutralizing antibodies and were protected against lethal encephalitis upon intravenous challenge with VSV. In cattle, the degree of protection against intradermalingually injected VSV was correlated with the level of neutralizing antibody produced following vaccination.

  17. E. coli recA gene improves gene targeted homologous recombination in Mycoplasma hyorhinis.

    PubMed

    Ishag, Hassan Z A; Xiong, Qiyan; Liu, Maojun; Feng, Zhixin; Shao, Guoqing

    2017-05-01

    Mycoplasma hyorhinis is an opportunistic pathogen of pigs. Recently, it has been shown to transform cell cultures, increasing the attention of the researchers. Studies on the pathogenesis require specific genetic tool that is not yet available for the pathogen. To address this limitation, we constructed two suicide plasmids pGEMT-tetM/LR and pGEMT-recA-tetM/LR having a tetracycline resistance marker flanked by two hemolysin gene arms. The latter plasmid encodes an E. coli recA, a gene involved in DNA recombination, repair and maintenance of DNA. Using inactivation of the hemolysin gene, which results in a detectable and measurable phenotype, we found that each plasmid can disrupt the hemolysin gene of M. hyorhinis through a double cross-over homologous recombination. However, inclusion of the E. coli recA gene in the construct resulted in 9-fold increase in the frequency of hemolysin gene mutants among the screened tetracycline resistance colonies. The resultant hemolysin mutant strain lacks the ability to lyse mouse bed blood cells (RBC) when tested in vitro (p<0.001). The host-plasmid system described in this study, has applications for the genetic manipulation of this pathogen and potentially other mycoplasmas.

  18. A Robust High Throughput Platform to Generate Functional Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies Using Rabbit B Cells from Peripheral Blood

    PubMed Central

    Seeber, Stefan; Ros, Francesca; Thorey, Irmgard; Tiefenthaler, Georg; Kaluza, Klaus; Lifke, Valeria; Fischer, Jens André Alexander; Klostermann, Stefan; Endl, Josef; Kopetzki, Erhard; Pashine, Achal; Siewe, Basile; Kaluza, Brigitte; Platzer, Josef; Offner, Sonja

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a robust platform to generate and functionally characterize rabbit-derived antibodies using B cells from peripheral blood. The rapid high throughput procedure generates a diverse set of antibodies, yet requires only few animals to be immunized without the need to sacrifice them. The workflow includes (i) the identification and isolation of single B cells from rabbit blood expressing IgG antibodies, (ii) an elaborate short term B-cell cultivation to produce sufficient monoclonal antigen specific IgG for comprehensive phenotype screens, (iii) the isolation of VH and VL coding regions via PCR from B-cell clones producing antigen specific and functional antibodies followed by the sequence determination, and (iv) the recombinant expression and purification of IgG antibodies. The fully integrated and to a large degree automated platform (demonstrated in this paper using IL1RL1 immunized rabbits) yielded clonal and very diverse IL1RL1-specific and functional IL1RL1-inhibiting rabbit antibodies. These functional IgGs from individual animals were obtained at a short time range after immunization and could be identified already during primary screening, thus substantially lowering the workload for the subsequent B-cell PCR workflow. Early availability of sequence information permits one to select early-on function- and sequence-diverse antibodies for further characterization. In summary, this powerful technology platform has proven to be an efficient and robust method for the rapid generation of antigen specific and functional monoclonal rabbit antibodies without sacrificing the immunized animal. PMID:24503933

  19. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay employing a recombinant antigen for detection of protective antibody against swine erysipelas.

    PubMed

    Imada, Yumiko; Mori, Yasuyuki; Daizoh, Masaji; Kudoh, Kazuma; Sakano, Tetsuya

    2003-11-01

    The specificities and sensitivities of five recombinant proteins of the surface protective antigen (SpaA) of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae were examined by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with the aim of developing a reliable serological test for the detection of protective antibody against E. rhusiopathiae. Fully mature protein and the N-terminal 416 amino acids (SpaA416) showed sufficient antigenicities, and further examination was done with SpaA416 because of its higher yield. The antibody titers of pigs experimentally immunized with commercial live vaccine and two types of inactivated vaccines clearly increased after immunization, and all pigs were completely protected against challenge with virulent strains. On the other hand, the antibody titers of nonimmunized control pigs remained very low until they were challenged, and all showed severe symptoms or subsequently died. Interference with the production of antibody against live vaccine by maternal antibody or porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus infection 1 week after vaccination was also clearly detected. Because the ELISA titer correlated well with the protection results, the specificity and sensitivity of the ELISA were further evaluated with sera collected from pigs reared on 1 farm on which animals had acute septicemia, 2 farms on which the animals were infected or free from infection, and 10 farms on which the animals were vaccinated with live vaccine, among others. The ELISA titers clearly revealed the conditions of the herds. These results indicate that the SpaA416 ELISA is an effective method not only for evaluating pigs for the presence of protective antibody levels resulting from vaccination or maternal antibody but also for detecting antibody produced by natural infection. This test has important potential for the effective control of swine erysipelas.

  20. In vivo gene targeting of IL-3 into immature hematopoietic cells through CD117 receptor mediated antibody gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Chapel, Alain; Deas, Olivier; Bensidhoum, Morad; François, Sabine; Mouiseddine, Moubarak; Poncet, Pascal; Dürrbach, Antoine; Aigueperse, Jocelyne; Gourmelon, Patrick; Gorin, Norbert C; Hirsch, François; Thierry, Dominique

    2004-01-01

    Background Targeted gene transfection remains a crucial issue to permit the real development of genetic therapy. As such, in vivo targeted transfection of specific subsets of hematopoietic stem cells might help to sustain hematopoietic recovery from bone marrow aplasia by providing local production of growth factors. Methods Balb/C mice were injected intravenously, with an anti-mouse c-kit (CD117) monoclonal antibody chemically coupled to a human IL-3 gene-containing plasmid DNA. Mice were sacrificed for tissue analyses at various days after injection of the conjugates. Results By ELISA, the production of human IL-3 was evidenced in the sera of animals 5 days after treatment. Cytofluorometric analysis after in vivo transfection of a reporter gene eGFP demonstrated transfection of CD117+/Sca1+ hematopoietic immature cells. By PCR analysis of genomic DNA and RNA using primer specific pIL3 sequences, presence and expression of the human IL-3-transgene were detected in the bone marrow up to 10 days in transfected mice but not in control animals. Conclusions These data clearly indicate that antibody-mediated endocytosis gene transfer allows the expression of the IL-3 transgene into hematopoietic immature cells, in vivo. While availability of marketed recombinant growth factors is restricted, this targeting strategy should permit delivery of therapeutic genes to tissues of interest through systemic delivery. In particular, the ability to specifically target growth factor expression into repopulating hematopoietic stem cells may create new opportunities for the treatment of primary or radiation-induced marrow failures. PMID:15509303

  1. Use of antibody gene library for the isolation of specific single chain antibodies by ampicillin-antigen conjugates.

    PubMed

    Neumann-Schaal, Meina; Messerschmidt, Katrin; Grenz, Nicole; Heilmann, Katja

    2013-03-01

    Isolation of recombinant antibodies from antibody libraries is commonly performed by different molecular display formats including phage display and ribosome display or different cell-surface display formats. We describe a new method which allows the selection of Escherichia coli cells producing the required single chain antibody by cultivation in presence of ampicillin conjugated to the antigen of interest. The method utilizes the neutralization of the conjugate by the produced single chain antibody which is secreted to the periplasm. Therefore, a new expression system based on the pET26b vector was designed and a library was constructed. The method was successfully established first for the selection of E. coli BL21 Star (DE3) cells expressing a model single chain antibody (anti-fluorescein) by a simple selection assay on LB-agar plates. Using this selection assay, we could identify a new single chain antibody binding biotin by growing E. coli BL21 Star (DE3) containing the library in presence of a biotin-ampicillin conjugate. In contrast to methods as molecular or cell surface display our selection system applies the soluble single chain antibody molecule and thereby avoids undesired effects, e.g. by the phage particle or the yeast fusion protein. By selecting directly in an expression strain, production and characterization of the selected single chain antibody is possible without any further cloning or transformation steps.

  2. Priming Immunization with DNA Augments Immunogenicity of Recombinant Adenoviral Vectors for Both HIV-1 Specific Antibody and T-Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Koup, Richard A.; Roederer, Mario; Lamoreaux, Laurie; Fischer, Jennifer; Novik, Laura; Nason, Martha C.; Larkin, Brenda D.; Enama, Mary E.; Ledgerwood, Julie E.; Bailer, Robert T.; Mascola, John R.; Nabel, Gary J.; Graham, Barney S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Induction of HIV-1-specific T-cell responses relevant to diverse subtypes is a major goal of HIV vaccine development. Prime-boost regimens using heterologous gene-based vaccine vectors have induced potent, polyfunctional T cell responses in preclinical studies. Methods The first opportunity to evaluate the immunogenicity of DNA priming followed by recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (rAd5) boosting was as open-label rollover trials in subjects who had been enrolled in prior studies of HIV-1 specific DNA vaccines. All subjects underwent apheresis before and after rAd5 boosting to characterize in depth the T cell and antibody response induced by the heterologous DNA/rAd5 prime-boost combination. Results rAd5 boosting was well-tolerated with no serious adverse events. Compared to DNA or rAd5 vaccine alone, sequential DNA/rAd5 administration induced 7-fold higher magnitude Env-biased HIV-1-specific CD8+ T-cell responses and 100-fold greater antibody titers measured by ELISA. There was no significant neutralizing antibody activity against primary isolates. Vaccine-elicited CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells expressed multiple functions and were predominantly long-term (CD127+) central or effector memory T cells and that persisted in blood for >6 months. Epitopes mapped in Gag and Env demonstrated partial cross-clade recognition. Conclusion Heterologous prime-boost using vector-based gene delivery of vaccine antigens is a potent immunization strategy for inducing both antibody and T-cell responses. Trial Registration ClinicalTrails.gov NCT00102089, NCT00108654 PMID:20126394

  3. The role of DNA repair genes in recombination between repeated sequences in yeast.

    PubMed

    Liefshitz, B; Parket, A; Maya, R; Kupiec, M

    1995-08-01

    The presence of repeated sequences in the genome represents a potential source of karyotypic instability. Genetic control of recombination is thus important to preserve the integrity of the genome. To investigate the genetic control of recombination between repeated sequences, we have created a series of isogenic strains in which we could assess the role of genes involved in DNA repair in two types of recombination: direct repeat recombination and ectopic gene conversion. Naturally occurring (Ty elements) and artificially constructed repeats could be compared in the same cell population. We have found that direct repeat recombination and gene conversion have different genetic requirements. The role of the RAD51, RAD52, RAD54, RAD55, and RAD57 genes, which are involved in recombinational repair, was investigated. Based on the phenotypes of single and double mutants, these genes can be divided into three functional subgroups: one composed of RAD52, a second one composed of RAD51 and RAD54, and a third one that includes the RAD55 and RAD57 genes. Among seven genes involved in excision repair tested, only RAD1 and RAD10 played a role in the types of recombination studied. We did not detect a differential effect of any rad mutation on Ty elements as compared to artificially constructed repeats.

  4. Homologous recombination drives both sequence diversity and gene content variation in Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Kong, Ying; Ma, Jennifer H; Warren, Keisha; Tsang, Raymond S W; Low, Donald E; Jamieson, Frances B; Alexander, David C; Hao, Weilong

    2013-01-01

    The study of genetic and phenotypic variation is fundamental for understanding the dynamics of bacterial genome evolution and untangling the evolution and epidemiology of bacterial pathogens. Neisseria meningitidis (Nm) is among the most intriguing bacterial pathogens in genomic studies due to its dynamic population structure and complex forms of pathogenicity. Extensive genomic variation within identical clonal complexes (CCs) in Nm has been recently reported and suggested to be the result of homologous recombination, but the extent to which recombination contributes to genomic variation within identical CCs has remained unclear. In this study, we sequenced two Nm strains of identical serogroup (C) and multi-locus sequence type (ST60), and conducted a systematic analysis with an additional 34 Nm genomes. Our results revealed that all gene content variation between the two ST60 genomes was introduced by homologous recombination at the conserved flanking genes, and 94.25% or more of sequence divergence was caused by homologous recombination. Recombination was found in genes associated with virulence factors, antigenic outer membrane proteins, and vaccine targets, suggesting an important role of homologous recombination in rapidly altering the pathogenicity and antigenicity of Nm. Recombination was also evident in genes of the restriction and modification systems, which may undermine barriers to DNA exchange. In conclusion, homologous recombination can drive both gene content variation and sequence divergence in Nm. These findings shed new light on the understanding of the rapid pathoadaptive evolution of Nm and other recombinogenic bacterial pathogens.

  5. Multiplexed, targeted gene editing in Nicotiana benthamiana for glyco-engineering and monoclonal antibody production.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin; Stoddard, Thomas J; Demorest, Zachary L; Lavoie, Pierre-Olivier; Luo, Song; Clasen, Benjamin M; Cedrone, Frederic; Ray, Erin E; Coffman, Andrew P; Daulhac, Aurelie; Yabandith, Ann; Retterath, Adam J; Mathis, Luc; Voytas, Daniel F; D'Aoust, Marc-André; Zhang, Feng

    2016-02-01

    Biopharmaceutical glycoproteins produced in plants carry N-glycans with plant-specific residues core α(1,3)-fucose and β(1,2)-xylose, which can significantly impact the activity, stability and immunogenicity of biopharmaceuticals. In this study, we have employed sequence-specific transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) to knock out two α(1,3)-fucosyltransferase (FucT) and the two β(1,2)-xylosyltransferase (XylT) genes within Nicotiana benthamiana to generate plants with improved capacity to produce glycoproteins devoid of plant-specific residues. Among plants regenerated from N. benthamiana protoplasts transformed with TALENs targeting either the FucT or XylT genes, 50% (80 of 160) and 73% (94 of 129) had mutations in at least one FucT or XylT allele, respectively. Among plants regenerated from protoplasts transformed with both TALEN pairs, 17% (18 of 105) had mutations in all four gene targets, and 3% (3 of 105) plants had mutations in all eight alleles comprising both gene families; these mutations were transmitted to the next generation. Endogenous proteins expressed in the complete knockout line had N-glycans that lacked β(1,2)-xylose and had a significant reduction in core α(1,3)-fucose levels (40% of wild type). A similar phenotype was observed in the N-glycans of a recombinant rituximab antibody transiently expressed in the homozygous mutant plants. More importantly, the most desirable glycoform, one lacking both core α(1,3)-fucose and β(1,2)-xylose residues, increased in the antibody from 2% when produced in the wild-type line to 55% in the mutant line. These results demonstrate the power of TALENs for multiplexed gene editing. Furthermore, the mutant N. benthamiana lines provide a valuable platform for producing highly potent biopharmaceutical products.

  6. Evaluating the conformation of recombinant domain I of β(2)-glycoprotein I and its interaction with human monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Pericleous, Charis; Miles, Jennifer; Esposito, Diego; Garza-Garcia, Acely; Driscoll, Paul C; Lambrianides, Anastasia; Latchman, David; Isenberg, David; Rahman, Anisur; Ioannou, Yiannis; Giles, Ian

    2011-10-01

    Pathogenic antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) cause the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) by interacting with domain I (DI) of beta-2-glycoprotein I (β(2)GPI). The aPL/β(2)GPI complex then exerts pathogenic effects on target cells. We previously described periplasmic bacterial expression of native and mutated variants of DI, and reported the presence of immunodominant epitopes at positions 8-9 (D8/D9) and position 39 (R39). Mutations at these positions strongly influenced the ability of recombinant DI to bind patient-derived IgG aPL and to inhibit pathogenic effects of these aPL in a mouse model of APS. We now describe an improved cytoplasmic bacterial expression system allowing higher yield of DI. We demonstrate that the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of a (15)N,(13)C-isotope-labelled sample of the recombinant DI protein exhibit properties consistent with the structure of DI in crystal structure of intact β(2)GPI. Mutations at D8/D9 and R39 had limited impact on the NMR spectrum of DI indicating maintenance of the overall fold of the DI domain. We investigated interactions between five variants of DI and ten monoclonal human IgG antibodies, all derived from the IgG aPL antibody IS4 by sequence manipulation and in vitro expression. Arginine residues at positions 100 and 100g in IS4V(H) CDR3 play a particularly important role in binding to DI, but this is unlikely to be due to electrostatic interactions with negatively charged amino acids on DI. Both the strength of binding to DI and the ability to discriminate different DI variants varies between the different IgG antibodies tested. There was no simple relationship between these binding properties and antibody pathogenicity.

  7. A comparative indirect ELISA for the detection of henipavirus antibodies based on a recombinant nucleocapsid protein expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ji-Ming; Yu, Meng; Morrissy, Chris; Zhao, Yong-Gang; Meehan, Greer; Sun, Ying-Xue; Wang, Qing-Hua; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Lin-Fa; Wang, Zhi-Liang

    2006-09-01

    The indirect ELISA is a simple and useful method for detection of pathogen-specific antibodies in animal sera. However, non-specific or background binding is often a problem, especially when recombinant proteins from Escherichia coli are used. In this study, a comparative indirect ELISA in which the total reactivity and the background binding were determined simultaneously on the same ELISA plate was reported. The background was determined by incubation of the test sera with excess free antigen to block specific binding. The sample was considered positive only when its total reactivity reading was higher than a pre-determined cut-off value and the ratio of the total reactivity to the background reading was more than 2.0. Using this approach, an antibody assay for henipaviruses using a recombinant Nipah virus nucleocapsid protein expressed in E. coli was developed. A total of 919 negative serum samples were tested in this assay and the specificity was 95.8%. In addition, eight positive experimental serum samples all tested positive. The use of recombinant protein as the ELISA antigen, instead of inactivated virus antigens, will be of significant advantage for countries where there is no facility of Biosafety level 4 to handle this group of zoonotic viruses.

  8. Gene Evolutionary Trajectories and GC Patterns Driven by Recombination in Zea mays

    PubMed Central

    Sundararajan, Anitha; Dukowic-Schulze, Stefanie; Kwicklis, Madeline; Engstrom, Kayla; Garcia, Nathan; Oviedo, Oliver J.; Ramaraj, Thiruvarangan; Gonzales, Michael D.; He, Yan; Wang, Minghui; Sun, Qi; Pillardy, Jaroslaw; Kianian, Shahryar F.; Pawlowski, Wojciech P.; Chen, Changbin; Mudge, Joann

    2016-01-01

    Recombination occurring during meiosis is critical for creating genetic variation and plays an essential role in plant evolution. In addition to creating novel gene combinations, recombination can affect genome structure through altering GC patterns. In maize (Zea mays) and other grasses, another intriguing GC pattern exists. Maize genes show a bimodal GC content distribution that has been attributed to nucleotide bias in the third, or wobble, position of the codon. Recombination may be an underlying driving force given that recombination sites are often associated with high GC content. Here we explore the relationship between recombination and genomic GC patterns by comparing GC gene content at each of the three codon positions (GC1, GC2, and GC3, collectively termed GCx) to instances of a variable GC-rich motif that underlies double strand break (DSB) hotspots and to meiocyte-specific gene expression. Surprisingly, GCx bimodality in maize cannot be fully explained by the codon wobble hypothesis. High GCx genes show a strong overlap with the DSB hotspot motif, possibly providing a mechanism for the high evolutionary rates seen in these genes. On the other hand, genes that are turned on in meiosis (early prophase I) are biased against both high GCx genes and genes with the DSB hotspot motif, possibly allowing important meiotic genes to avoid DSBs. Our data suggests a strong link between the GC-rich motif underlying DSB hotspots and high GCx genes. PMID:27713757

  9. Recombinant HT.sub.m4 gene, protein and assays

    DOEpatents

    Lim, Bing; Adra, Chaker N.; Lelias, Jean-Michel

    1996-01-01

    The invention relates to a recombinant DNA molecule which encodes a HT.sub.m4 protein, a transformed host cell which has been stably transfected with a DNA molecule which encodes a HT.sub.m4 protein and a recombinant HT.sub.m4 protein. The invention also relates to a method for detecting the presence of a hereditary atopy.

  10. Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)-derived recombinant vectors for gene transfer and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Marconi, Peggy; Fraefel, Cornel; Epstein, Alberto L

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 ) is a human pathogen whose lifestyle is based on a long-term dual interaction with the infected host, being able to establish both lytic and latent infections. The virus genome is a 153-kilobase pair (kbp) double-stranded DNA molecule encoding more than 80 genes. The interest of HSV-1 as gene transfer vector stems from its ability to infect many different cell types, both quiescent and proliferating cells, the very high packaging capacity of the virus capsid, the outstanding neurotropic adaptations that this virus has evolved, and the fact that it never integrates into the cellular chromosomes, thus avoiding the risk of insertional mutagenesis. Two types of vectors can be derived from HSV-1, recombinant vectors and amplicon vectors, and different methodologies have been developed to prepare large stocks of each type of vector. This chapter summarizes the approach most commonly used to prepare recombinant HSV-1 vectors through homologous recombination, either in eukaryotic cells or in bacteria.

  11. Ectopic mitotic recombination in Drosophila probed with bacterial beta-galactosidase gene-based reporter transgenes.

    PubMed Central

    Bärtsch, S; Dücker, K; Würgler, F E; Sengstag, C

    1997-01-01

    Plasmids were constructed to investigate homologous mitotic recombination in Drosophila cells. Heteroalleles containing truncated but overlapping segments of the bacterial beta-galactosidase gene (lacZ) were positioned either on separate plasmids or as direct repeats on the same chromosome. Recombination reconstituted a functional lacZgene leading to expression of LacZ+activity detectable by histochemical staining. High extrachromosomal recombination (ECR) frequencies between unlinked heteroalleles were observed upon transient co-transfection into Drosophila melanogaster Schneider line 2 (S2) cells. Stably transfected cells containing the lacZ heteroalleles linked on a chromosome exhibited intrachromosomal recombination (ICR) frequencies two orders of magnitude lower than ECR frequencies. Recombination was inducible by exposing the cells to ethyl methanesulphonate or mitomycin C. Recombination products were characterized by multiplex PCR analysis and unequal sister chromatid recombination was found as the predominant mechanism reconstituting the lacZ gene. To investigate recombination in vivo imaginal disc cells from transgenic larvae carrying the reporter gene on the X chromosome were isolated and stained for LacZ+ activity. The presence of a few LacZ+ clones indicated that mitotic recombination events occurred at frequencies two orders of magnitude lower than the corresponding event in cultured cells and late during larval development. PMID:9380517

  12. Expression and Characterization of the Extracellular Domain of Human HER2 from Escherichia Coli, and Production of Polyclonal Antibodies Against the Recombinant Proteins.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yong; Feng, Xue; Qu, Jiao; Han, Wenqi; Liu, Zi; Li, Xu; Zou, Ming; Zhen, Yuhong; Zhu, Jie

    2015-06-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is a member of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family. In this study, the whole extracellular domain gene of HER2 was amplified by RT-PCR from human breast cancer cell line SK-BR-3. The genes of membrane-distal region (A) and membrane proximal region (B) of HER2 extracellular domain were amplified from the cloned template, and then inserted into the expression vector pET-28a and pET-30a, respectively. The recombinant expression vectors were transformed into Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) cells and induced by isopropyl-b-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) for expression of proteins His-A and His-B. The expressed proteins were detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and western blot. The optimization of culture conditions led us to accomplish the recombinant protein induction with 1.0 mM IPTG at 37 °C for 8 h, and both proteins were expressed in the insoluble form. Both proteins were purified under the denaturing condition using Ni-NTA sepharose column. Balb/c mice were immunized with the purified proteins and then effectively produced polyclonal antibodies, which reached to a relatively high titer by ELISA testing and had good specificity by western blot detection. The HER2 ECD proteins His-A and His-B could be expressed in E. coli and were suitable for production of high titer antibodies against HER2 ECD.

  13. Increased expression in vivo and in vitro of foreign genes directed by A-type inclusion body hybrid promoters in recombinant vaccinia viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Funahashi, S; Itamura, S; Iinuma, H; Nerome, K; Sugimoto, M; Shida, H

    1991-01-01

    We constructed A-type inclusion body (ATI) hybrid promoters, that is, late ATI promoters followed by tandemly repeated early regions of the promoter for the 7.5-kDa protein (the 7.5-kDa promoter). The repetition of the whole early promoter sequence of the 7.5-kDa gene, including the upstream consensus sequence and initiation region, efficiently increased the early expression of the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene in recombinant vaccinia virus. Recombinant vaccinia virus could express influenza virus hemagglutinin via the hybrid promoter more efficiently, induced higher levels of neutralizing antibody and cytotoxic T lymphocytes, and consequently protected mice more efficiently against challenge with influenza virus than did recombinant vaccinia virus containing the widely used 7.5-kDa promoter. Images PMID:1654453

  14. Accurate assessment of intragenic recombination frequency within the Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene.

    PubMed

    Abbs, S; Roberts, R G; Mathew, C G; Bentley, D R; Bobrow, M

    1990-08-01

    Polymorphic loci that lie at the two extremities of the Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD/BMD) gene have been used to estimate intragenic recombination rates. Multipoint linkage analysis of the CEPH panel of families suggests a total intragenic recombination frequency of nearly 0.12 (confidence intervals 0.041-0.226) over the genomic length of approximately 2 Mb.

  15. Recombinative events of the T cell antigen receptor delta gene in peripheral T cell lymphomas.

    PubMed Central

    Kanavaros, P; Farcet, J P; Gaulard, P; Haioun, C; Divine, M; Le Couedic, J P; Lefranc, M P; Reyes, F

    1991-01-01

    Recombinative events of the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) delta-chain gene were studied in 37 cases of peripheral T cell lymphoma (PTCL) and related to their clinical presentation and the expression of the alpha beta or gamma delta heterodimers as determined by immunostaining of frozen tissue samples. There were 22 cases of alpha beta, 5 cases of gamma delta, and 10 cases of silent TCR expressing neither the alpha beta nor gamma delta TCR. 5 different probes were used to examine the delta locus. The 22 cases of alpha beta PTCL displayed biallelic and monoallelic deletions; a monoallelic V delta 1 J delta 1 rearrangement was observed in 1 case and a monoallelic germ line configuration in 7 cases. The 5 cases of gamma delta PTCL displayed biallelic rearrangements: the productive rearrangements could be ascribed to V delta 1J delta 1 joining in 3 cases and VJ delta 1 joining in 2 cases according to the combined pattern of DNA hybridization with the appropriate probes and of cell reactivity with the TCR delta-1, delta TCS-1, and anti-V delta 2 monoclonal antibodies. In the VJ delta 1 joining, the rearranged V segments were located between V delta 1 and V delta 2. Interestingly, in the third group of 10 cases of silent PTCL, 5 cases were found to have a TCR gene configuration identical to that in the TCR alpha beta PTCL, as demonstrated by biallelic delta gene deletion. These 5 cases were CD3 positive. The 5 remaining cases showed a monoallelic delta gene rearrangement with a monoallelic germ line configuration in 4 and a monoallelic deletion in 1. Four of these cases were CD3 negative, which was consistent with an immature genotype the TCR commitent of which could not be ascertained. Finally, TCR gamma delta PTCL consisted of a distinct clinical morphological and molecular entity whereas TCR alpha beta and silent PTCL had a similar presentation. Images PMID:1991851

  16. Construction of recombinant industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain with bglS gene insertion into PEP4 locus by homologous recombination*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiang; Chen, Qi-he; Fu, Ming-liang; Wang, Jin-ling; Zhang, Hong-bo; He, Guo-qing

    2008-01-01

    The bglS gene encoding endo-l,3-1,4-β-glucanase from Bacillus subtilis was cloned and sequenced in this study. The bglS expression cassette, including PGK1 promoter, bglS gene fused to the signal sequence of the yeast mating pheromone α-factor (MFα1S), and ADH1 terminator with G418-resistance as the selected marker, was constructed. Then one of the PEP4 allele of Saccharomyces cerevisiae WZ65 strain was replaced by bglS expression cassette using chromosomal integration of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-mediated homologous recombination, and the bglS gene was expressed simultaneously. The recombinant strain S. cerevisiae (SC-βG) was preliminarily screened by the clearing hydrolysis zone formed after the barley β-glucan was hydrolyzed in the plate and no proteinase A (PrA) activity was measured in fermenting liquor. The results of PCR analysis of genome DNA showed that one of the PEP4 allele had been replaced and bglS gene had been inserted into the locus of PEP4 gene in recombinant strains. Different endo-l,3-1,4-β-glucanase assay methods showed that the recombinant strain SC-βG had high endo-l,3-1,4-β-glucanase expression level with the maximum of 69.3 U/(h·ml) after 60 h of incubation. Meanwhile, the Congo Red method was suitable for the determination of endo-l,3-1,4-β-glucanase activity during the actual brewing process. The current research implies that the constructed yeast strain could be utilized to improve the industrial brewing property of beer. PMID:18600782

  17. Generation of Recombinant Capripoxvirus Vectors for Vaccines and Gene Knockout Function Studies.

    PubMed

    Boshra, Hani; Cao, Jingxin; Babiuk, Shawn

    2016-01-01

    The ability to manipulate capripoxvirus through gene knockouts and gene insertions has become an increasingly valuable research tool in elucidating the function of individual genes of capripoxvirus, as well as in the development of capripoxvirus-based recombinant vaccines. The homologous recombination technique is used to generate capripoxvirus knockout viruses (KO), and is based on the targeting a particular viral gene of interest. This technique can also be used to insert a gene of interest. A protocol for the generation of a viral gene knockout is described. This technique involves the use of a plasmid which encodes the flanking sequences of the regions where the homologous recombination will occur, and will result in the insertion of an EGFP reporter gene for visualization of recombinant virus, as well as the E. coli gpt gene as a positive selection marker. If an additional gene is to be incorporated, this can be achieved by inserting a gene of interest for expression under a poxvirus promoter into the plasmid between the flanking regions for insertion. This chapter describes a protocol for generating such recombinant capripoxviruses.

  18. Construction of a gene library from Azospirillum brasilense and characterization of a recombinant containing the nif structural genes.

    PubMed

    Schrank, I S; Zaha, A; de Araújo, E F; Santos, D S

    1987-01-01

    1. We have constructed a gene library, from Azospirillum brasilense using the vector EMBL4. 2. A recombinant containing the nif structural genes from A. brasilense was isolated and characterized. This recombinant contains a DNA insert of about 15 kilobases (kb) which gives rise to five fragments after cleavage with EcoRI. Only one of the DNA fragments (6.5 kb) hybridized to the nifHDK genes of Klebsiella pneumoniae. 3. The organization of the nif genes in this DNA fragment was determined using different DNA segments containing the nifH, nifK or nifD genes of K. pneumoniae as probes.

  19. Eliciting an antibody response against a recombinant TSH containing fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Mard-Soltani, Maysam; Rasaee, Mohamad Javad; Sheikhi, AbdolKarim; Hedayati, Mehdi

    2016-10-27

    Designing novel antigens to rise specific antibodies for Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) detection is of great significance. A novel fusion protein consisting of the C termini sequence of TSH beta subunit and a fusion sequence was designed and produced for rabbit immunization. Thereafter, the produced antibodies were purified and characterized for TSH detection. Our results indicate that the produced antibody is capable of sensitive and specific detection of TSH with low cross reactivity. This study underscores the applicability of designed fusion protein for specific and sensitive polyclonal antibody production and the importance of selecting an amenable region of the TSH for immunization.

  20. Recombination sequences in plant mitochondrial genomes: diversity and homologies to known mitochondrial genes.

    PubMed Central

    Stern, D B; Palmer, J D

    1984-01-01

    Several plant mitochondrial genomes contain repeated sequences that are postulated to be sites of homologous intragenomic recombination (1-3). In this report, we have used filter hybridizations to investigate sequence relationships between the cloned mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) recombination repeats from turnip, spinach and maize and total mtDNA isolated from thirteen species of angiosperms. We find that strong sequence homologies exist between the spinach and turnip recombination repeats and essentially all other mitochondrial genomes tested, whereas a major maize recombination repeat does not hybridize to any other mtDNA. The sequences homologous to the turnip repeat do not appear to function in recombination in any other genome, whereas the spinach repeat hybridizes to reiterated sequences within the mitochondrial genomes of wheat and two species of pokeweed that do appear to be sites of recombination. Thus, although intragenomic recombination is a widespread phenomenon in plant mitochondria, it appears that different sequences either serve as substrates for this function in different species, or else surround a relatively short common recombination site which does not cross-hybridize under our experimental conditions. Identified gene sequences from maize mtDNA were used in heterologous hybridizations to show that the repeated sequences implicated in recombination in turnip and spinach/pokeweed/wheat mitochondria include, or are closely linked to genes for subunit II of cytochrome c oxidase and 26S rRNA, respectively. Together with previous studies indicating that the 18S rRNA gene in wheat mtDNA is contained within a recombination repeat (3), these results imply an unexpectedly frequent association between recombination repeats and plant mitochondrial genes. Images PMID:6473104

  1. Recombination rates of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates with both erm(B) and mef(A) genes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Young; Song, Jae-Hoon; Ko, Kwan Soo

    2010-08-01

    Erythromycin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates containing both erm(B) and mef(A) genes have a higher rate of multidrug resistance (MDR). We investigated the relationships between the presence of erythromycin resistance determinants and the recombination rate. We determined the mutation and recombination frequencies of 46 S. pneumoniae isolates, which included 19 with both erm(B) and mef(A), nine with only erm(B), six with only mef(A), and 11 erythromycin-susceptible isolates. Mutation frequency values were estimated as the number of rifampin-resistant colonies as a proportion of total viable count. Genotypes and serotypes of isolates with the hyper-recombination phenotype were determined. Twelve S. pneumoniae isolates were hypermutable and four isolates were determined to have hyper-recombination frequency. Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates with both erm(B) and mef(A) genes did not show a high mutation frequency. In contrast, all isolates with a hyper-recombination phenotype contained both erm(B) and mef(A) genes. In addition, the recombination rate of isolates with both erm(B) and mef(A) genes was statistically higher than the rate of other isolates. The dual presence of erm(B) and mef(A) genes in some pneumococcal isolates may be associated with high recombination frequency. This may be one of the reasons for the frequent emergence of MDR in certain pneumococcal isolates.

  2. Recombinant outer membrane vesicles carrying Chlamydia muridarum HtrA induce antibodies that neutralize chlamydial infection in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Bartolini, Erika; Ianni, Elvira; Frigimelica, Elisabetta; Petracca, Roberto; Galli, Giuliano; Berlanda Scorza, Francesco; Norais, Nathalie; Laera, Donatello; Giusti, Fabiola; Pierleoni, Andrea; Donati, Manuela; Cevenini, Roberto; Finco, Oretta; Grandi, Guido; Grifantini, Renata

    2013-01-01

    Background Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are spheroid particles released by all Gram-negative bacteria as a result of the budding out of the outer membrane. Since they carry many of the bacterial surface-associated proteins and feature a potent built-in adjuvanticity, OMVs are being utilized as vaccines, some of which commercially available. Recently, methods for manipulating the protein content of OMVs have been proposed, thus making OMVs a promising platform for recombinant, multivalent vaccines development. Methods Chlamydia muridarum DO serine protease HtrA, an antigen which stimulates strong humoral and cellular responses in mice and humans, was expressed in Escherichia coli fused to the OmpA leader sequence to deliver it to the OMV compartment. Purified OMVs carrying HtrA (CM rHtrA-OMV) were analyzed for their capacity to induce antibodies capable of neutralizing Chlamydia infection of LLC-MK2 cells in vitro. Results CM rHtrA-OMV immunization in mice induced antibodies that neutralize Chlamydial invasion as judged by an in vitro infectivity assay. This was remarkably different from what observed with an enzymatically functional recombinant HtrA expressed in, and purified from the E. coli cytoplasm (CM rHtrA). The difference in functionality between anti-CM rHtrA and anti-CM rHtrA-OMV antibodies was associated to a different pattern of protein epitopes recognition. The epitope recognition profile of anti-CM HtrA-OMV antibodies was similar to that induced in mice during Chlamydial infection. Conclusions When expressed in OMVs HtrA appears to assume a conformation similar to the native one and this results in the elicitation of functional immune responses. These data further support the potentiality of OMVs as vaccine platform. PMID:24009891

  3. Immunization with recombinantly expressed glycan antigens from Schistosoma mansoni induces glycan-specific antibodies against the parasite

    PubMed Central

    Prasanphanich, Nina Salinger; Luyai, Anthony E; Song, Xuezheng; Heimburg-Molinaro, Jamie; Mandalasi, Msano; Mickum, Megan; Smith, David F; Nyame, A Kwame; Cummings, Richard D

    2014-01-01

    Schistosomiasis caused by infection with parasitic helminths of Schistosoma spp. is a major global health problem due to inadequate treatment and lack of a vaccine. The immune response to schistosomes includes glycan antigens, which could be valuable diagnostic markers and vaccine targets. However, no precedent exists for how to design vaccines targeting eukaryotic glycoconjugates. The di- and tri-saccharide motifs LacdiNAc (GalNAcβ1,4GlcNAc; LDN) and fucosylated LacdiNAc (GalNAcβ1,4(Fucα1-3)GlcNAc; LDNF) are the basis for several important schistosome glycan antigens. They occur in monomeric form or as repeating units (poly-LDNF) and as part of a variety of different glycoconjugates. Because chemical synthesis and conjugation of such antigens is exceedingly difficult, we sought to develop a recombinant expression system for parasite glycans. We hypothesized that presentation of parasite glycans on the cell surface would induce glycan-specific antibodies. We generated Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) Lec8 cell lines expressing poly-LDN (L8-GT) and poly-LDNF (L8-GTFT) abundantly on their membrane glycoproteins. Sera from Schistosoma mansoni-infected mice were highly cross-reactive with the cells and with cell-surface N-glycans. Immunizing mice with L8-GT and L8-GTFT cells induced glycan-specific antibodies. The L8-GTFT cells induced a sustained booster response, with antibodies that bound to S. mansoni lysates and recapitulated the exquisite specificity of the anti-parasite response for particular presentations of LDNF antigen. In summary, this recombinant expression system promotes successful generation of antibodies to the glycans of S. mansoni, and it can be adapted to study the role of glycan antigens and anti-glycan immune responses in many other infections and pathologies. PMID:24727440

  4. Generation and Characterization of Human Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Anthrax Protective Antigen following Vaccination with a Recombinant Protective Antigen Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Chi, Xiangyang; Li, Jianmin; Liu, Weicen; Wang, Xiaolin; Yin, Kexin; Liu, Ju; Zai, Xiaodong; Li, Liangliang; Song, Xiaohong; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Yin, Ying; Fu, Ling; Xu, Junjie; Yu, Changming; Chen, Wei

    2015-05-01

    The anthrax protective antigen (PA) is the central component of the three-part anthrax toxin, and it is the primary immunogenic component in the approved AVA anthrax vaccine and the "next-generation" recombinant PA (rPA) anthrax vaccines. Animal models have indicated that PA-specific antibodies (AB) are sufficient to protect against infection with Bacillus anthracis. In this study, we investigated the PA domain specificity, affinity, mechanisms of neutralization, and synergistic effects of PA-specific antibodies from a single donor following vaccination with the rPA vaccine. Antibody-secreting cells were isolated 7 days after the donor received a boost vaccination, and 34 fully human monoclonal antibodies (hMAb) were identified. Clones 8H6, 4A3, and 22F1 were able to neutralize lethal toxin (LeTx) both in vitro and in vivo. Clone 8H6 neutralized LeTx by preventing furin cleavage of PA in a dose-dependent manner. Clone 4A3 enhanced degradation of nicked PA, thereby interfering with PA oligomerization. The mechanism of 22F1 is still unclear. A fourth clone, 2A6, that was protective only in vitro was found to be neutralizing in vivo in combination with a toxin-enhancing antibody, 8A7, which binds to domain 3 of PA and PA oligomers. These results provide novel insights into the antibody response elicited by the rPA vaccine and may be useful for PA-based vaccine and immunotherapeutic cocktail design.

  5. Promise and problems associated with the use of recombinant AAV for the delivery of anti-HIV antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Sebastian P; Desrosiers, Ronald C

    2016-01-01

    Attempts to elicit antibodies with potent neutralizing activity against a broad range of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) isolates have so far proven unsuccessful. Long-term delivery of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with such activity is a creative alternative that circumvents the need for an immune response and has the potential for creating a long-lasting sterilizing barrier against HIV. This approach is made possible by an incredible array of potent broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) that have been identified over the last several years. Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors are ideally suited for long-term delivery for a variety of reasons. The only products made from rAAV are derived from the transgenes that are put into it; as long as those products are not viewed as foreign, expression from muscle tissue may continue for decades. Thus, use of rAAV to achieve long-term delivery of anti-HIV mAbs with potent neutralizing activity against a broad range of HIV-1 isolates is emerging as a promising concept for the prevention or treatment of HIV-1 infection in humans. Experiments in mice and monkeys that have demonstrated protective efficacy against AIDS virus infection have raised hopes for the promise of this approach. However, all published experiments in monkeys have encountered unwanted immune responses to the AAV-delivered antibody, and these immune responses appear to limit the levels of delivered antibody that can be achieved. In this review, we highlight the promise of rAAV-mediated antibody delivery for the prevention or treatment of HIV infection in humans, but we also discuss the obstacles that will need to be understood and solved in order for the promise of this approach to be realized. PMID:28197421

  6. Recombinant N-Domain of Pregnancy-Specific Glycoprotein from E. coli Cells: Analysis of the Spectrum of Polyclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Prokopenko, P G; Shkoporov, A N; Petrenko, O Yu; Efimov, B A; Negrebetskii, V V; Terent'ev, A A

    2015-11-01

    We studied antibody spectrum in antisera to IgG-like recombinant N-domain of pregnancyspecific glycoprotein-1 (rPSG-N) from E. coli cells. In three experimental series, the fraction of IgG antibodies from anti-rPSG-N sera was immobilized on 3 immunoadsorbents: by polymerization with glutaraldehyde, on glutaraldehyde activated biogel P-300, and on commercial CNBr-activated 4B sepharose. Retroplacental serum was incubated with immobilized antibodies to rPSG1-N, protein was eluted and tested in the precipitation test in standard test systems with PSG1, IgG, and human serum albumin. Three proteins were eluted from all 3 immunoadsorbents: PSG1, IgG, and human serum albumin, which demonstrated the spectrum of antibodies to 3 proteins present also in natural serum PSG1 complex. The proportions of PSG1 and IgG obtained in these experiments were similar to those in natural serum PSG1 complex, while the level of human serum albumin was significantly higher in natural PSG1 complex. Thus, we failed to obtain PSG1 monoprotein free from IgG and human serum albumin. Antigenic mosaicism of the polypeptide chain of IgG-like rPSG1-N relative to the antigenic polyvalence of the complex of three proteins present in bioactive preparation of natural serum PSG1 was discussed.

  7. [The phenomenon of gene linkage and recombination in the paternity test].

    PubMed

    Cheng, D L; Yan, P H; Liu, Y; Chen, J

    1999-02-01

    The phenomenon of gene linkage and recombination may nearly be overlooked in paternity test of one single child, but it is likely encountered in paternity test of twin or more. In a case of paternity test, the results of 17 items including eight DNA loci were analyzed and the phenomenon of gene linkage and recombination was discussed in detail. This phenomenon should be brought into necessary attention in the paternity test.

  8. Antibody study in canine distemper virus nucleocapsid protein gene-immunized mice.

    PubMed

    Yuan, B; Li, X Y; Zhu, T; Yuan, L; Hu, J P; Chen, J; Gao, W; Ren, W Z

    2015-04-10

    The gene for the nucleocapsid (N) protein of canine distemper virus was cloned into the pMD-18T vector, and positive recombinant plasmids were obtained by enzyme digestion and sequencing. After digestion by both EcoRI and KpnI, the plasmid was directionally cloned into the eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA; the positive clone pcDNA-N was screened by electrophoresis and then transfected into COS-7 cells. Immunofluorescence analysis results showed that the canine distemper virus N protein was expressed in the cytoplasm of transfected COS-7 cells. After emulsification in Freund's adjuvant, the recombinant plasmid pcDNA-N was injected into the abdominal cavity of 8-week-old BABL/c mice, with the pcDNA original vector used as a negative control. Mice were immunized 3 times every 2 weeks. The blood of immunized mice was drawn 2 weeks after completing the immunizations to measure titer levels. The antibody titer in the pcDNA-N test was 10(1.62 ± 0.164), while in the control group this value was 10(0.52 ± 0.56), indicating that specific humoral immunity was induced in canine distemper virus nucleocapsid protein-immunized mice.

  9. Recombinant HT{sub m4} gene, protein and assays

    DOEpatents

    Lim, B.; Adra, C.N.; Lelias, J.M.

    1996-09-03

    The invention relates to a recombinant DNA molecule which encodes a HT{sub m4} protein, a transformed host cell which has been stably transfected with a DNA molecule which encodes a HT{sub m4} protein and a recombinant HT{sub m4} protein. The invention also relates to a method for detecting the presence of a hereditary atopy. 2 figs.

  10. Spatially addressed combinatorial protein libraries for recombinant antibody discovery and optimization.

    PubMed

    Mao, Hongyuan; Graziano, James J; Chase, Tyson M A; Bentley, Cornelia A; Bazirgan, Omar A; Reddy, Neil P; Song, Byeong Doo; Smider, Vaughn V

    2010-11-01

    Antibody discovery typically uses hybridoma- or display-based selection approaches, which lack the advantages of directly screening spatially addressed compound libraries as in small-molecule discovery. Here we apply the latter strategy to antibody discovery, using a library of ∼10,000 human germline antibody Fabs created by de novo DNA synthesis and automated protein expression and purification. In multiplexed screening assays, we obtained specific hits against seven of nine antigens. Using sequence-activity relationships and iterative mutagenesis, we optimized the binding affinities of two hits to the low nanomolar range. The matured Fabs showed full and partial antagonism activities in cell-based assays. Thus, protein drug leads can be discovered using surprisingly small libraries of proteins with known sequences, questioning the requirement for billions of members in an antibody discovery library. This methodology also provides sequence, expression and specificity information at the first step of the discovery process, and could enable novel antibody discovery in functional screens.

  11. Fusion of the Dhfr/Mtx and IR/MAR gene amplification methods produces a rapid and efficient method for stable recombinant protein production.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Chiemi; Araki, Yoshio; Miki, Daisuke; Shimizu, Noriaki

    2012-01-01

    Amplification of the dihydrofolate reductase gene (Dhfr) by methotrexate (Mtx) exposure is commonly used for recombinant protein expression in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. However, this method is both time- and labor-intensive, and the high-producing cells that are generated are frequently unstable in culture. Another gene amplification method is based on using a plasmid bearing a mammalian replication initiation region (IR) and a matrix attachment region (MAR), which result in the spontaneous initiation of gene amplification in transfected cells. The IR/MAR and Dhfr/Mtx methods of gene amplification are based on entirely different principles. In this study, we combine these two methods to yield a novel method, termed the IR/MAR-Dhfr fusion method, which was used to express three proteins, the Fc receptor, GFP, and recombinant antibody. The fusion method resulted in a dramatic increase in expression of all three proteins in two CHO sub-lines, DXB-11, and DG44. The IR/MAR-Dhfr fusion amplified the genes rapidly and efficiently, and produced larger amounts of antibody than the Dhfr/Mtx or IR/MAR methods alone. While the amplified structure produced by the Dhfr/Mtx method was highly unstable, and the antibody production rate rapidly decreased with the culture time of the cells, the IR/MAR-Dhfr fusion method resulted in stable amplification and generated clonal cells that produced large amounts of antibody protein over a long period of time. In summary, the novel IR/MAR-Dhfr fusion method enables isolation of stable cells that produce larger amounts of a target recombinant protein more rapidly and easily than either the Dhfr/Mtx or IR/MAR methods alone.

  12. Chimpanzees Immunized with Recombinant Soluble CD4 Develop Anti-Self CD4 Antibody Responses with Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Mamoru; Boyson, Jonathan E.; Lord, Carol I.; Letvin, Norman L.

    1992-06-01

    In view of the efficiency with which human immunodeficiency virus replication can be blocked in vitro with anti-CD4 antibodies, the elicitation of an anti-CD4 antibody response through active immunization might represent a useful therapeutic strategy for AIDS. Here we demonstrate that immunization of chimpanzees with recombinant soluble human CD4 elicited an anti-CD4 antibody response. The elicited antibody bound self CD4 on digitonin-treated but not freshly isolated lymphocytes. Nevertheless, this antibody blocked human immunodeficiency virus replication in chimpanzee and human lymphocytes. These observations suggest that immunization with recombinant soluble CD4 from human immunodeficiency virus-infected humans may be feasible and therapeutically beneficial.

  13. Immunogenic response to a recombinant pseudorabies virus carrying bp26 gene of Brucella melitensis in mice.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lan; Wu, Chang-Xian; Zheng, Ke; Xu, Xian-Jin; Zhang, Hui; Chen, Chuang-Fu; Liu, Zheng-Fei

    2015-06-01

    Brucellae are facultative intracellular bacterial pathogens of a zoonotic disease called brucellosis. Live attenuated vaccines are utilized for prophylaxis of brucellosis; however, they retain residual virulence to human and/or animals, as well as interfere with diagnosis. In this study, recombinant virus PRV ΔTK/ΔgE/bp26 was screened and purified. One-step growth curve assay showed that the titer of recombinant virus was comparable to the parent strain. Mice experiments showed the recombinant virus elicited high titer of humoral antibodies against Brucella detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and against PRV by serum neutralization test. The recombinant virus induced high level of Brucella-specific lymphocyte proliferation response and production of interferon gamma. Collectively, these data suggest that the bivalent virus was capable of inducing both humoral and cellular immunity, and had the potential to be a vaccine candidate to prevent Brucella and/or pseudorabies virus infections.

  14. Phenotypic differentiation of Streptococcus pyogenes populations is induced by recombination-driven gene-specific sweeps

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Yun-Juan; Shapiro, B. Jesse; Lee, Shaun W.; Ploplis, Victoria A.; Castellino, Francis J.

    2016-01-01

    Genomic recombination plays an important role in driving adaptive evolution and population differentiation in bacteria. However, controversy exists as to the effects of recombination on population diversity and differentiation, i.e., recombination is frequent enough to sweep through the population at selected gene loci (gene-specific sweeps), or the recombination rate is low without interfering genome-wide selective sweeps. Observations supporting either view are sparse. Pathogenic bacteria causing infectious diseases are promising candidates to provide observations of recombination. However, phenotype-associated differentiations are usually vague among them due to diverse disease manifestations. Here we report a population genomic study of the group A Streptococcus pyogenes (GAS), a human pathogen with highly recombining genomes. By employing a genome-wide association study on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), we demonstrate a phenotypic differentiation of GAS, represented by separate clustering of two sublineages associated with niche-specific infections, i.e., skin infection and pharyngitis-induced acute rheumatic fever. By quantifying SNPs associated with the differentiation in a statistical and phylogenetic context, we propose that the phenotype-associated differentiation arose through recombination-driven gene-specific sweeps, rather than genome-wide sweeps. Our work provides a novel paradigm of phenotype-associated differentiation induced by gene-specific sweeps in a human pathogen and has implications for understanding of driving forces of bacterial evolution. PMID:27821851

  15. Identification of codon-specific serine to asparagine mistranslation in recombinant monoclonal antibodies by high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yu, X Christopher; Borisov, Oleg V; Alvarez, Melissa; Michels, David A; Wang, Yajun Jennifer; Ling, Victor

    2009-11-15

    Translation errors in protein biosynthesis may result in low level amino acid misincorporation and contribute to product heterogeneity of recombinant protein therapeutics. We report the use of peptide map analysis by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography and high-resolution mass spectrometry to detect and identify mistranslation events in recombinant monoclonal antibodies expressed in mammalian cell lines including Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Misincorporation of an asparagine residue at multiple serine positions was detected as earlier-eluting peptides with masses 27.01 Da higher than expected. The exact positions at which misincorporation occurred were identified by tandem mass spectrometry of the asparagine-containing variant peptides. The identified asparagine misincorporation sites correlated with the use of codon AGC but with none of the other five serine codons. The relative levels of misincorporation ranged from 0.01%-0.2% among multiple serine positions detected across three different antibodies by targeted analysis of expected and variant peptides. The low levels of misincorporation are consistent with published predictions for in vivo translation error rates. Our results demonstrate that state-of-the-art mass spectrometry with a combination of high sensitivity, accuracy, and dynamic range provides a new ability to discover and characterize low level protein variants that arise from mistranslation events.

  16. Conformational changes of recombinant monoclonal antibodies by limited proteolytic digestion, stable isotope labeling, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ponniah, Gomathinayagam; Nowak, Christine; Kita, Adriana; Cheng, Guilong; Kori, Yekaterina; Liu, Hongcheng

    2016-03-15

    Limited proteolytic digestion is a method with a long history that has been used to study protein domain structures and conformational changes. A method of combining limited proteolytic digestion, stable isotope labeling, and mass spectrometry was established in the current study to investigate protein conformational changes. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies with or without the conserved oligosaccharides, and with or without oxidation of the conserved methionine residues, were used to test the newly proposed method. All of the samples were digested in ammonium bicarbonate buffer prepared in normal water. The oxidized deglycosylated sample was also digested in ammonium bicarbonate buffer prepared in (18)O-labeled water. The sample from the digestion in (18)O-water was spiked into each sample digested in normal water. Each mixed sample was subsequently analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The molecular weight differences between the peptides digested in normal water versus (18)O-water were used to differentiate peaks from the samples. The relative peak intensities of peptides with or without the C-terminal incorporation of (18)O atoms were used to determine susceptibility of different samples to trypsin and chymotrypsin. The results demonstrated that the method was capable of detecting local conformational changes of the recombinant monoclonal antibodies caused by deglycosylation and oxidation.

  17. Identification of an unstable 4-hydroxynoneal modification on the 20S proteasome subunit α7 by recombinant antibody technology.

    PubMed

    Just, Jesper; Jung, Tobias; Friis, Niels Anton; Lykkemark, Simon; Drasbek, Kim; Siboska, Gunhild; Grune, Tilman; Kristensen, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Numerous cellular functions rely on an active proteasome allowing degradation of damaged or misfolded proteins. Therefore changes in the proteasomal activity have important physiological consequences. During oxidative stress the production of free radicals can result in the formation of 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) following lipid peroxidiation. The HNE moiety is highly reactive and via a nucleophilic attack readily forms covalent links to cysteine, histidine and lysine side chains. However, as the chemical properties of these amino acids differ, so does the kinetics of the reactions. While covalent linkage through Michael addition is well established, reversible and unstable associations have only been indicated in a few cases. In the present study we have identified an unstable HNE adduct on the α7 subunit of the 20S proteasome using phage display of recombinant antibodies. This recombinant antibody fragment recognized HNE modified proteasomes in vitro and showed that this epitope was easily HNE modified, yet unstable, and influenced by experimental procedures. Hence unstable HNE-adducts could be overlooked as a regulatory mechanism of proteasomal activity and a participating factor in the decreased proteasomal activity associated with oxidative stress.

  18. Rozrolimupab, a mixture of 25 recombinant human monoclonal RhD antibodies, in the treatment of primary immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Robak, Tadeusz; Windyga, Jerzy; Trelinski, Jacek; von Depka Prondzinski, Mario; Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Doyen, Chantal; Janssens, Ann; Alvarez-Román, María Teresa; Jarque, Isidro; Loscertales, Javier; Rus, Gloria Pérez; Hellmann, Andrzej; Jêdrzejczak, Wieslaw Wiktor; Kuliczkowski, Kazimierz; Golubovic, Lana M; Celeketic, Dusica; Cucuianu, Andrei; Gheorghita, Emanuil; Lazaroiu, Mihaela; Shpilberg, Ofer; Attias, Dina; Karyagina, Elena; Svetlana, Kalinina; Vilchevska, Kateryna; Cooper, Nichola; Talks, Kate; Prabhu, Mukhyaprana; Sripada, Prasad; Bharadwaj, T P R; Næsted, Henrik; Skartved, Niels J Ø; Frandsen, Torben P; Flensburg, Mimi F; Andersen, Peter S; Petersen, Jørgen

    2012-11-01

    Rozrolimupab, a recombinant mixture of 25 fully human RhD-specific monoclonal antibodies, represents a new class of recombinant human antibody mixtures. In a phase 1 or 2 dose escalation study, RhD(+) patients (61 subjects) with primary immune thrombocytopenia received a single intravenous dose of rozrolimupab ranging from 75 to 300 μg/kg. The primary outcome was the occurrence of adverse events. The principal secondary outcome was the effect on platelet levels 7 days after the treatment. The most common adverse events were headache and pyrexia, mostly mild, and reported in 20% and 13% of the patients, respectively, without dose relationship. Rozrolimupab caused an expected transient reduction of hemoglobin concentration in the majority of the patients. At the dose of 300 μg/kg platelet responses, defined as platelet count ≥ 30 × 10(9)/L and an increase in platelet count by > 20 × 10(9)/L from baseline were observed after 72 hours and persisted for at least 7 days in 8 of 13 patients (62%). Platelet responses were observed within 24 hours in 23% of patients and lasted for a median of 14 days. Rozrolimupab was well tolerated and elicited rapid platelet responses in patients with immune thrombocytopenia and may be a useful alternative to plasma-derived products. This trial is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00718692.

  19. Probing the human antibody repertoire to exogenous antigens: Characterization of the H and L chain V region gene segments from anti-hepatitis B virus antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Andris, J.S.; Capra, J.D. ); Ehrlich, P.H.; Oestberg, L. )

    1992-12-15

    Structural studies of human antibody V regions have been largely limited to those involving the fetal repertoire, autoantibodies, and malignant cell rearrangements, leaving the normal' repertoire relatively unexplored. In this study the authors describe the nucleotide sequences of the H and L chain V regions of four antibodies specific for the surface Ag of the hepatitis B virus. Monoclonal cell lines were derived from healthy individuals who received standard immunizations with the serum-derived or recombinant hepatitis B virus vaccines by fusion of PBL to a heterohybridoma cell line, SPAZ-4. They utilized the polymerase chain reaction to aimplify the H and L chain V regions for cloning and sequencing. The four antibodies express the following V region combinations: V[sub H]III/V[lambda]V, V[sub H]III/V[kappa]II, V[sub H]IV/V[kappa]I, V[sub H]V/V[lambda]III. When compared to germline genes with the closest sequence homology, all of the V regions appear to have undergone somatic mutation, ranging from 3.4 to 11.3% for the H chain, and 5.1 to 9.2% for the L chain. Analysis of the mutations shows them to be typical for an Ag-driven immune response. 50 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Global gene expression in recombinant and non-recombinant yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in three different metabolic states.

    PubMed

    Díaz, H; Andrews, B A; Hayes, A; Castrillo, J; Oliver, S G; Asenjo, J A

    2009-01-01

    Global gene expression of two strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, one recombinant (P+), accumulating large amounts of an intracellular protein Superoxide Dismutase (SOD) and one non-recombinant (P-) which does not contain the recombinant plasmid, were compared in batch culture during diauxic growth when cells were growing exponentially on glucose, when they were growing exponentially on ethanol, and in the early stationary phase when glycerol was being utilized. When comparing the gene expression for P- (and P+) during growth on ethanol to that on glucose (Eth/Gluc), overexpression is related to an increase in consumption of glycerol, activation of the TCA cycle, degradation of glycogen and metabolism of ethanol. Furthermore, 97.6% of genes (80 genes) involved in the central metabolic pathway are overexpressed. This is similar to that observed by DeRisi et al. [DeRisi, J.L., Iyer, V.R. & Brown, P.O. 1997. Exploring the metabolic and genetic control of gene expression on a genomic scale. Science 278:680-686.] but very different from was observed for Metabolic Flux Analysis (MFA), where the specific growth rate is lowered to ca. 40%, the fluxes in the TCA cycle are reduced to ca. 40% (to 30% in P+), glycolysis is reduced to virtually 0 and protein synthesis to ca. 50% (to 40% in P+). Clearly it is not possible to correlate in a simple or direct way, quantitative mRNA expression levels with cell function which is shown by the Metabolic Flux Analysis (MFA). When comparing the two strains in the 3 growth stages, 4 genes were found to be under or overexpressed in all cases. The products of all of these genes are expressed at the plasma membrane or cell wall of the yeast. While comparing the strains (P+/P-) when growing on glucose, ethanol and in the early stationary phase, many of the genes of the central metabolic pathways are underexpressed in P+, which is similar to the behaviour of the metabolic fluxes of both strains (MFA). Comparing the gene expression for P- (and

  1. Construction and Characterization of an Infectious Vaccinia Virus Recombinant That Expresses the Influenza Hemagglutinin Gene and Induces Resistance to Influenza Virus Infection in Hamsters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Geoffrey L.; Murphy, Brian R.; Moss, Bernard

    1983-12-01

    A DNA copy of the influenza virus hemagglutinin gene, derived from influenza virus A/Jap/305/57 (H2N2) was inserted into the genome of vaccinia virus under the control of an early vaccinia virus promoter. Tissue culture cells infected with the purified recombinant virus synthesized influenza hemagglutinin, which was glycosylated and transported to the cell surface where it could be cleaved with trypsin into HA1 and HA2 subunits. Rabbits and hamsters inoculated intradermally with recombinant virus produced circulating antibodies that inhibited hemagglutination by influenza virus. Furthermore, vaccinated hamsters achieved levels of antibody similar to those obtained upon primary infection with influenza virus and were protected against respiratory infection with the A/Jap/305/57 influenza virus.

  2. Ubiquitination Events That Regulate Recombination of Immunoglobulin Loci Gene Segments

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Jaime; Rothschild, Gerson; Basu, Uttiya

    2014-01-01

    Programed DNA mutagenesis events in the immunoglobulin (Ig) loci of developing B cells utilize the common and conserved mechanism of protein ubiquitination for subsequent proteasomal degradation to generate the required antigen-receptor diversity. Recombinase proteins RAG1 and RAG2, necessary for V(D)J recombination, and activation-induced cytidine deaminase, an essential mutator protein for catalyzing class switch recombination and somatic hypermutation, are regulated by various ubiquitination events that affect protein stability and activity. Programed DNA breaks in the Ig loci can be identified by various components of DNA repair pathways, also regulated by protein ubiquitination. Errors in the ubiquitination pathways for any of the DNA double-strand break repair proteins can lead to inefficient recombination and repair events, resulting in a compromised adaptive immune system or development of cancer. PMID:24653725

  3. Development of an Assay to Detect Antibodies to HIV-2 Using Recombinant DNA Derived Antigens

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-11

    CBre3 EIA is sensitive enough to detect envelope antibodies in seropositive patients before the antibodies are detected in a viral lysate Western blot ...induced E. coli were electrophoresed in polyacrylamide gels and analyzed by Coomassie blue staining and Western blotting (10). Blots were blocked in 1 X... Western blot analysis was used to show that the induced protein is coded for by the HIV-2 DNA. A duplicate gel, as shown in Figure 3, was blotted and

  4. Maternofetal transplacental transport of recombinant IgG antibodies lacking effector functions.

    PubMed

    Mathiesen, Line; Nielsen, Leif K; Andersen, Jan Terje; Grevys, Algirdas; Sandlie, Inger; Michaelsen, Terje E; Hedegaard, Morten; Knudsen, Lisbeth E; Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld

    2013-08-15

    The neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) directs the transfer of maternal immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies across the placenta and thus provides the fetus and newborn with passive protective humoral immunity. Pathogenic maternal IgG antibodies will also be delivered via the placenta and can cause alloimmunity, which may be lethal. A novel strategy to control pathogenic antibodies would be administration of a nondestructive IgG antibody blocking antigen binding while retaining binding to FcRn. We report on 2 human IgG3 antibodies with a hinge deletion and a C131S point mutation (IgG3ΔHinge) that eliminate complement activation and binding to all classical Fcγ receptors (FcγRs) and to C1q while binding to FcRn is retained. Additionally, 1 of the antibodies has a single point mutation in the Fc (R435H) at the binding site for FcRn (IgG3ΔHinge:R435H). We compared transplacental transport with wild-type IgG1 and IgG3, and found transport across trophoblast-derived BeWo cells and ex vivo placenta perfusions with hierarchies as follows: IgG3ΔHinge:R435H>wild-type IgG1≥IgG3ΔHinge and IgG3ΔHinge:R435H=wild-type IgG1=wild-type IgG3>IgG3ΔHinge, respectively. Collectively, IgG3ΔHinge:R435H was transported efficiently from the maternal to the fetal placental compartment. Thus, IgG3ΔHinge:R435H may be a good candidate for transplacental delivery of a nondestructive antibody to the fetus to combat pathogenic antibodies.

  5. Specific recognition of a tetrahedral phosphonamidate transition state analogue group by a recombinant antibody Fab fragment.

    PubMed

    Hua, T D; Lamaty, F; Souriau, C; Rolland-Fulcrand, V; Lazaro, R; Viallefont, P; Lefranc, M P; Weill, M

    1996-06-01

    In order to obtain antibodies able to catalyse a peptide synthesis, a naive combinatorial library of human Fab antibody fragments was screened with the phosphonamidate transition state analogue of the reaction. Several Fab fragments were able to bind the analogue. Competitive binding studies performed with molecules containing representative parts of the hapten showed that two Fabs were able to recognize specifically the tetrahedral phosphorus present in the hapten.

  6. Recombinant IgE antibodies for passive immunotherapy of solid tumours: from concept towards clinical application.

    PubMed

    Karagiannis, Sophia N; Josephs, Debra H; Karagiannis, Panagiotis; Gilbert, Amy E; Saul, Louise; Rudman, Sarah M; Dodev, Tihomir; Koers, Alexander; Blower, Philip J; Corrigan, Christopher; Beavil, Andrew J; Spicer, James F; Nestle, Frank O; Gould, Hannah J

    2012-09-01

    Therapeutic antibodies have revolutionised treatment of some cancers and improved prognosis for many patients. Over half of those available are approved for haematological malignancies, but efficacious antibodies for solid tumours are still urgently needed. Clinically available antibodies belong to the IgG class, the most prevalent antibody class in human blood, while other classes have not been extensively considered. We hypothesised that the unique properties of IgE, a class of tissue-resident antibodies commonly associated with allergies, which can trigger powerful immune responses through strong affinity for their particular receptors on effector cells, could be employed for passive immunotherapy of solid tumours such as ovarian and breast carcinomas. Our laboratory has examined this concept by evaluating two chimaeric antibodies of the same specificity (MOv18) but different isotype, an IgG1 and an IgE against the tumour antigen folate receptor α (FRα). The latter demonstrates the potency of IgE to mount superior immune responses against tumours in disease-relevant models. We identified Fcε receptor-expressing cells, monocytes/macrophages and eosinophils, activated by MOv18 IgE to kill tumour cells by mechanisms such as ADCC and ADCP. We also applied this notion to a marketed therapeutic, the humanised IgG1 antibody trastuzumab and engineered an IgE counterpart, which retained the functions of trastuzumab in restricting proliferation of HER2/neu-expressing tumour cells but also activated effector cells to kill tumour cells by different mechanisms. On-going efficacy, safety evaluations and future first-in-man clinical studies of IgE therapeutics constitute key metrics for this concept, providing new scope for antibody immunotherapies for solid tumours.

  7. Human recombinant domain antibodies against multiple sclerosis antigenic peptide CSF114(Glc).

    PubMed

    Niccheri, Francesca; Real-Fernàndez, Feliciana; Ramazzotti, Matteo; Lolli, Francesco; Rossi, Giada; Rovero, Paolo; Degl'Innocenti, Donatella

    2014-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic auto-immune disease characterized by a damage to the myelin component of the central nervous system. Self-antigens created by aberrant glycosylation have been described to be a key component in the formation of auto-antibodies. CSF114(Glc) is a synthetic glucopeptide detecting in vitro MS-specific auto-antibodies, and it is actively used in diagnostics and research to monitor and quantify MS-associated Ig levels. We reasoned that antibodies raised against this probe could have been relevant for MS. We therefore screened a human Domain Antibody library against CSF114(Glc) using magnetic separation as a panning method. We obtained and described several clones, and the one with the highest signals was produced as a 6×His-tagged protein to properly study the binding properties as a soluble antibody. By surface plasmon resonance measurements, we evidenced that our clone recognized CSF114(Glc) with high affinity and specific for the glucosylated peptide. Kinetic parameters of peptide-clone interaction were calculated obtaining a value of KD in the nanomolar range. Harboring a human framework, this antibody should be very well tolerated by human immune system and may represent a valuable tool for MS diagnosis and therapy, paving the way to new research strategies.

  8. Protection and synergism by recombinant fowl pox vaccines expressing multiple genes from Marek's disease virus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lucy E; Witter, R L; Reddy, S M; Wu, P; Yanagida, N; Yoshida, S

    2003-01-01

    Recombinant fowl poxviruses (rFPVs) were constructed to express genes from serotype 1 Marek's disease virus (MDV) coding for glycoproteins B, E, I, H, and UL32 (gB1, gE, gI, gH, and UL32). An additional rFPV was constructed to contain four MDV genes (gB1, gE, gI, and UL32). These rFPVs were evaluated for their ability to protect maternal antibody-positive chickens against challenge with highly virulent MDV isolates. The protection induced by a single rFPV/gB1 (42%) confirmed our previous finding. The protection induced by rFPV/gI (43%), rFPV/gB1UL32 (46%), rFPV/gB1gEgI (72%), and rFPV/gB1gEgIUL32 (70%) contributed to additional knowledge on MDV genes involved in protective immunity. In contrast, the rFPV containing gE, gH, or UL32 did not induce significant protection compared with turkey herpesvirus (HVT). Levels of protection by rFPV/gB1 and rFPV/gl were comparable with that of HVT. Only gB1 and gI conferred synergism in rFPV containing these two genes. Protection by both rFPV/gB1gEgI (72%) and rFPV/gB1gEgIUL32(70%) against Marek's disease was significantly enhanced compared with a single gB1 or gI gene (40%). This protective synergism between gB1 and gI in rFPVs may be the basis for better protection when bivalent vaccines between serotypes 2 and 3 were used. When rFPV/gB1gIgEUL32 + HVT were used as vaccine against Md5 challenge, the protection was significantly enhanced (94%). This synergism between rFPV/gB1gIgEUL32 and HVT indicates additional genes yet to be discovered in HVT may be responsible for the enhancement.

  9. The effects of mismatch repair and RAD1 genes on interchromosomal crossover recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Ainsley; Fabbri, Rebecca M; Reeves, Jason W; Crouse, Gray F

    2006-06-01

    We have previously shown that recombination between 400-bp substrates containing only 4-bp differences, when present in an inverted repeat orientation, is suppressed by >20-fold in wild-type strains of S. cerevisiae. Among the genes involved in this suppression were three genes involved in mismatch repair--MSH2, MSH3, and MSH6--and one in nucleotide excision repair, RAD1. We now report the involvement of these genes in interchromosomal recombination occurring via crossovers using these same short substrates. In these experiments, recombination was stimulated by a double-strand break generated by the HO endonuclease and can occur between completely identical (homologous) substrates or between nonidentical (homeologous) substrates. In addition, a unique feature of this system is that recombining DNA strands can be given a choice of either type of substrate. We find that interchromosomal crossover recombination with these short substrates is severely inhibited in the absence of MSH2, MSH3, or RAD1 and is relatively insensitive to the presence of mismatches. We propose that crossover recombination with these short substrates requires the products of MSH2, MSH3, and RAD1 and that these proteins have functions in recombination in addition to the removal of terminal nonhomology. We further propose that the observed insensitivity to homeology is a result of the difference in recombinational mechanism and/or the timing of the observed recombination events. These results are in contrast with those obtained using longer substrates and may be particularly relevant to recombination events between the abundant short repeated sequences that characterize the genomes of higher eukaryotes.

  10. DNA secondary structures are associated with recombination in major Plasmodium falciparum variable surface antigen gene families

    PubMed Central

    Sander, Adam F.; Lavstsen, Thomas; Rask, Thomas S.; Lisby, Michael; Salanti, Ali; Fordyce, Sarah L.; Jespersen, Jakob S.; Carter, Richard; Deitsch, Kirk W.; Theander, Thor G.; Pedersen, Anders Gorm; Arnot, David E.

    2014-01-01

    Many bacterial, viral and parasitic pathogens undergo antigenic variation to counter host immune defense mechanisms. In Plasmodium falciparum, the most lethal of human malaria parasites, switching of var gene expression results in alternating expression of the adhesion proteins of the Plasmodium falciparum-erythrocyte membrane protein 1 class on the infected erythrocyte surface. Recombination clearly generates var diversity, but the nature and control of the genetic exchanges involved remain unclear. By experimental and bioinformatic identification of recombination events and genome-wide recombination hotspots in var genes, we show that during the parasite’s sexual stages, ectopic recombination between isogenous var paralogs occurs near low folding free energy DNA 50-mers and that these sequences are heavily concentrated at the boundaries of regions encoding individual Plasmodium falciparum-erythrocyte membrane protein 1 structural domains. The recombinogenic potential of these 50-mers is not parasite-specific because these sequences also induce recombination when transferred to the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Genetic cross data suggest that DNA secondary structures (DSS) act as inducers of recombination during DNA replication in P. falciparum sexual stages, and that these DSS-regulated genetic exchanges generate functional and diverse P. falciparum adhesion antigens. DSS-induced recombination may represent a common mechanism for optimizing the evolvability of virulence gene families in pathogens. PMID:24253306

  11. The Arabidopsis DNA mismatch repair gene PMS1 restricts somatic recombination between homeologous sequences.

    PubMed

    Li, Liangliang; Dion, Eric; Richard, Gabriel; Domingue, Olivier; Jean, Martine; Belzile, François J

    2009-04-01

    The eukaryotic DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system contributes to maintaining the fidelity of genetic information by correcting replication errors and preventing illegitimate recombination events. This study aimed to examine the function(s) of the Arabidopsis thaliana PMS1 gene (AtPMS1), one of three homologs of the bacterial MutL gene in plants. Two independent mutant alleles (Atpms1-1 and Atpms1-2) were obtained and one of these (Atpms1-1) was studied in detail. The mutant exhibited a reduction in seed set and a bias against the transmission of the mutant allele. Somatic recombination, both homologous and homeologous, was examined using a set of reporter constructs. Homologous recombination remained unchanged in the mutant while homeologous recombination was between 1.7- and 4.8-fold higher than in the wild type. This increase in homeologous recombination frequency was not correlated with the degree of sequence divergence. In RNAi lines, a range of increases in homeologous recombination were observed with two lines showing a 3.3-fold and a 3.6-fold increase. These results indicate that the AtPMS1 gene contributes to an antirecombination activity aimed at restricting recombination between diverged sequences.

  12. Towards the molecular characterization of the stable producer phenotype of recombinant antibody-producing NS0 myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Y; Rojas, L; Hinojosa, L; González, I; Aguiar, D; de la Luz, K; Castillo, A; Pérez, R

    2011-08-01

    The loss of heterologous protein expression is one of the major problems faced by industrial cell line developers and has been reported by several authors. Therefore, the understanding of the mechanisms involved in the generation of stable and high producer cell lines is a critical issue, especially for those processes based on long term continuous cultures. We characterized two recombinant NS0 myeloma cell lines expressing Nimotuzumab, a humanized anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibody. The hR3/H7 clone is a stable producer obtained from the unstable hR3/t16 clone. The unstable clone was characterized by a bimodal distribution of intracellular immunoglobulin staining using flow cytometry. Loss of antibody production was due to the emergence of a non-producer cell subpopulation that increased with cell generation number. Immunoglobulin heavy chain (HC) and light chain (LC) ratio (HC/LC) was lower for the unstable phenotype. Proteomic maps using two dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) were obtained for both clones, at initial cell culture time and after 40 generations. Fifteen proteins potentially associated with the phenomenon of production stability were identified. The hR3/H7 stable clone showed an up-regulated expression pattern for most of these proteins. The regulation of recombinant antibody production by the host NS0 myeloma cell line most likely involves simultaneously cellular processes such as DNA transcription, mRNA processing, protein synthesis and folding, vesicular transport, glycolysis and energy production, according to the proteins identified in the present proteomic study.

  13. [Preparation of recombinant serpins B3 and B4 and investigation of their specific interactions with antibodies using hydrogel-based microarrays].

    PubMed

    Butvilovskaya, V I; Tsybulskaya, M V; Tikhonov, A A; Talibov, V O; Belousov, P V; Sazykin, A Yu; Schwartz, A M; Putlyaeva, L V; Surzhikov, S A; Stomakhin, A A; Solopova, O N; Rubina, A Yu

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work was to obtain preparations of recombinant squamous-cell carcinoma antigens (serpins B3 and B4) and to investigate their interactions with different monoclonal antibodies using hydrogel-based microarrays (biochips). Two genetic constructs encoding full-length serpin B3 and serpin B4 molecules were created to produce recombinant SPB3 and SPB4 proteins carrying a N-terminal His6-tag. Monoclonal antibodies against serpin B3 (H3, C5, H5, H81, and G9) were also obtained. An experimental gel-based biological microchip was designed to contain gel elements that carry immobilized antibodies against SPB3, immobilized commercial monoclonal SCC107 and SCC140 antibodies against squamous-cell carcinoma antigen (SCCA), and gel elements with immobilized SPB3 or SPB4. Judging by the specificity of recombinant SPB3 and SPB4, which bind to monoclonal antibodies against SCCA and, according to the manufacturer's data, can recognize conformational epitopes of both SPB3 and SPB4, it was concluded that the obtained recombinant serpins had the correct tertiary structure. A biochip-based direct immunoassay showed that SPB4 could bind effectively only to SCC107 and SCC140 antibodies, while SPB3 interacted specifically not only with these antibodies, but also with H3 and C5 monoclonal antibodies. Using biochip-based sandwich immunoassay, a pair of monoclonal antibodies SCC107/C5 that interacted specifically with serpin B3 but did not interact with serpin B4 was identified. Thus, it has been demonstrated that serpin B3 can be selectively determined in the presence of highly homologous serpin B4 using a biochip-based assay.

  14. Segregation of yeast polymorphic STA genes in meiotic recombinants and analysis of glucoamylase production.

    PubMed

    Balogh, I; Maráz, A

    1996-12-01

    Hybrid yeast strains were constructed using haploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. diastaticus strains to get haploid meiotic recombinants having more than one copy of STA1, STA2, and STA3 genes. STA genes were localized on the chromosomes by pulsed field gel electrophoresis. Working gene dosage effects were found among STA genes in liquid starch medium, indicating low levels of glucose repression. Growth of strains, however, was not influenced by their STA copy number.

  15. Antibody

    MedlinePlus

    An antibody is a protein produced by the body's immune system when it detects harmful substances, called antigens. Examples ... microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses) and chemicals. Antibodies may be produced when the immune system mistakenly ...

  16. Quantitative analysis of recombination between YFP and CFP genes of FRET biosensors introduced by lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Komatsubara, Akira T.; Matsuda, Michiyuki; Aoki, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Biosensors based on the principle of Förster (or fluorescence) resonance energy transfer (FRET) have been developed to visualize spatio-temporal dynamics of signalling molecules in living cells. Many of them adopt a backbone of intramolecular FRET biosensor with a cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) as donor and acceptor, respectively. However, there remains the difficulty of establishing cells stably expressing FRET biosensors with a YFP and CFP pair by lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer, due to the high incidence of recombination between YFP and CFP genes. To address this, we examined the effects of codon-diversification of YFP on the recombination of FRET biosensors introduced by lentivirus or retrovirus. The YFP gene that was fully codon-optimized to E.coli evaded the recombination in lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer, but the partially codon-diversified YFP did not. Further, the length of spacer between YFP and CFP genes clearly affected recombination efficiency, suggesting that the intramolecular template switching occurred in the reverse-transcription process. The simple mathematical model reproduced the experimental data sufficiently, yielding a recombination rate of 0.002–0.005 per base. Together, these results show that the codon-diversified YFP is a useful tool for expressing FRET biosensors by lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer. PMID:26290434

  17. Quantitative analysis of recombination between YFP and CFP genes of FRET biosensors introduced by lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Komatsubara, Akira T; Matsuda, Michiyuki; Aoki, Kazuhiro

    2015-08-20

    Biosensors based on the principle of Förster (or fluorescence) resonance energy transfer (FRET) have been developed to visualize spatio-temporal dynamics of signalling molecules in living cells. Many of them adopt a backbone of intramolecular FRET biosensor with a cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) as donor and acceptor, respectively. However, there remains the difficulty of establishing cells stably expressing FRET biosensors with a YFP and CFP pair by lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer, due to the high incidence of recombination between YFP and CFP genes. To address this, we examined the effects of codon-diversification of YFP on the recombination of FRET biosensors introduced by lentivirus or retrovirus. The YFP gene that was fully codon-optimized to E.coli evaded the recombination in lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer, but the partially codon-diversified YFP did not. Further, the length of spacer between YFP and CFP genes clearly affected recombination efficiency, suggesting that the intramolecular template switching occurred in the reverse-transcription process. The simple mathematical model reproduced the experimental data sufficiently, yielding a recombination rate of 0.002-0.005 per base. Together, these results show that the codon-diversified YFP is a useful tool for expressing FRET biosensors by lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer.

  18. Selection of recombinant IgE antibodies binding the beta-lactoglobulin allergen in a conformation-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Jylhä, Sirpa; Mäkinen-Kiljunen, Soili; Haahtela, Tari; Söderlund, Hans; Takkinen, Kristiina; Laukkanen, Marja-Leena

    2009-10-31

    Cow's milk allergy (CMA) is a common food allergy, especially among infants and young children. Approximately 85% of milk-allergic children outgrow their allergy by the age of three but the remaining 15% remain allergic. Bovine beta-lactoglobulin (BLG) is one of the major allergens in cow's milk. There is a definite need for the specific and sensitive detection of allergenic substances. Validated methods are obligatory to demonstrate allergen contamination and even fatal hidden allergens and, thus, to prevent life-threatening conditions of allergic persons. In this study, we constructed human IgE scFv libraries from an adult milk-allergic patient and isolated the first recombinant IgE antibodies specific to a food allergen, BLG. The selection of the IgE antibody libraries with two distinct panning procedures resulted in the enrichment of four clones having different BLG-binding profiles; two of the clones recognize the native BLG whereas the other two recognize only the heat-denatured form of BLG. For further characterization, the scFv fragments were converted to Fab fragments with human IgG1 isotype. The D1 Fab fragment, binding native BLG with nanomolar affinity, also partially inhibited serum IgE binding to BLG. These BLG-specific IgE antibodies can be applied for the detection of both native and denatured BLG in cow's milk products and furthermore, for the optimization of manufacturing processes to develop safe hypoallergenic milk products.

  19. In Vitro Neutralisation of Rotavirus Infection by Two Broadly Specific Recombinant Monovalent Llama-Derived Antibody Fragments

    PubMed Central

    Aladin, Farah; Einerhand, Alexandra W. C.; Bouma, Janneke; Bezemer, Sandra; Hermans, Pim; Wolvers, Danielle; Bellamy, Kate; Frenken, Leon G. J.; Gray, Jim; Iturriza-Gómara, Miren

    2012-01-01

    Rotavirus is the main cause of viral gastroenteritis in young children. Therefore, the development of inexpensive antiviral products for the prevention and/or treatment of rotavirus disease remains a priority. Previously we have shown that a recombinant monovalent antibody fragment (referred to as Anti-Rotavirus Proteins or ARP1) derived from a heavy chain antibody of a llama immunised with rotavirus was able to neutralise rotavirus infection in a mouse model system. In the present work we investigated the specificity and neutralising activity of two llama antibody fragments, ARP1 and ARP3, against 13 cell culture adapted rotavirus strains of diverse genotypes. In addition, immunocapture electron microscopy (IEM) was performed to determine binding of ARP1 to clinical isolates and cell culture adapted strains. ARP1 and ARP3 were able to neutralise a broad variety of rotavirus serotypes/genotypes in vitro, and in addition, IEM showed specific binding to a variety of cell adapted strains as well as strains from clinical specimens. These results indicated that these molecules could potentially be used as immunoprophylactic and/or immunotherapeutic products for the prevention and/or treatment of infection of a broad range of clinically relevant rotavirus strains. PMID:22403728

  20. Impact of karyotype organization on interlocus recombination between T cell receptor genes in Equidae.

    PubMed

    Drbalova, Jitka; Musilova, Petra; Kubickova, Svatava; Sebestova, Hana; Vahala, Jiri; Rubes, Jiri

    2014-01-01

    The T cell receptor (TCR) genes (TRA, TRB, TRD and TRG) reside in 3 different chromosomal regions. During the maturation of T lymphocytes, the TCR genes are rearranged by site-specific recombination, a process that also predisposes T cells to aberrant rearrangements. Illegitimate recombination between the TCR genes occurs at a low level in healthy individuals, but this frequency may correlate with the risk of lymphoma. The aim of this work was to investigate interlocus recombination in equids. Illegitimate rearrangements were studied in peripheral blood lymphocytes by FISH with painting and BAC probes and by sequencing of PCR products, and the frequencies of recombination were assessed in horses and 4 other equids. The presence of several trans-rearrangement products between the TRA and TRG genes was verified by PCR in all investigated equids. Frequencies of trans-rearrangements in horses are higher than in humans, and colocalization of the TCR genes on the same chromosome increases the incidence of trans-rearrangements between them. The orientation of the TCR genes does not impact interlocus recombination itself but does affect the viability of cells carrying its products and consequently the number of trans-rearrangements observed in lymphocytes.

  1. Recombinant AAV-mediated gene transfer to the retina: gene therapy perspectives.

    PubMed

    Rolling, F

    2004-10-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases such as retinal macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa constitute a broad group of diseases that all share one critical feature, the progressive apoptotic loss of cells in the retina. There is currently no effective treatment available by which the course of these disorders can be modified, and visual dysfunction often progresses to total blindness. Gene therapy represents an attractive approach to treating retinal degeneration because the eye is easily accessible and allows local application of therapeutic vectors with reduced risk of systemic effects. Furthermore, transgene expression within the retina and effects of treatments may be monitored by a variety of noninvasive examinations. An increasing number of strategies for molecular treatment of retinal disease rely on recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) as a therapeutic gene delivery vector. Before rAAV-mediated gene therapy for retinal degeneration becomes a reality, there are a number of important requirements that include: (1) evaluation of different rAAV serotypes, (2) screening of vectors in large animals in order to ensure that they mediate safe and long-term gene expression, (3) appropriate regulation of therapeutic gene expression, (4) evaluation of vectors carrying a therapeutic gene in relevant animal models, (5) identification of suitable patients, and finally (6) manufacture of clinical grade vector. All these steps towards gene therapy are still being explored. Outcomes of these studies will be discussed in the order in which they occur, from vector studies to preclinical assessment of the therapeutic potential of rAAV in animal models of retinal degeneration.

  2. Recombination and Population Mosaic of a Multifunctional Viral Gene, Adeno-Associated Virus cap

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Yasuhiro; Myers, Richard; Danos, Olivier

    2008-01-01

    Homologous recombination is a dominant force in evolution and results in genetic mosaics. To detect evidence of recombination events and assess the biological significance of genetic mosaics, genome sequences for various viral populations of reasonably large size are now available in the GenBank. We studied a multi-functional viral gene, the adeno-associated virus (AAV) cap gene, which codes for three capsid proteins, VP1, VP2 and VP3. VP1-3 share a common C-terminal domain corresponding to VP3, which forms the viral core structure, while the VP1 unique N-terminal part contains an enzymatic domain with phospholipase A2 activity. Our recombinant detection program (RecI) revealed five novel recombination events, four of which have their cross-over points in the N-terminal, VP1 and VP2 unique region. Comparison of phylogenetic trees for different cap gene regions confirmed discordant phylogenies for the recombinant sequences. Furthermore, differences in the phylogenetic tree structures for the VP1 unique (VP1u) region and the rest of cap highlighted the mosaic nature of cap gene in the AAV population: two dominant forms of VP1u sequences were identified and these forms are linked to diverse sequences in the rest of cap gene. This observation together with the finding of frequent recombination in the VP1 and 2 unique regions suggests that this region is a recombination hot spot. Recombination events in this region preserve protein blocks of distinctive functions and contribute to convergence in VP1u and divergence of the rest of cap. Additionally the possible biological significance of two dominant VP1u forms is inferred. PMID:18286191

  3. Recombinant antibodies for specific detection of clostridial [Fe-Fe] hydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Mangayil, Rahul; Karp, Matti; Lamminmäki, Urpo; Santala, Ville

    2016-10-27

    Biological hydrogen production is based on activity of specific enzymes called hydrogenases. Hydrogenases are oxygen sensitive metalloenzymes containing Ni and/or Fe atoms at the active site, catalyzing reversible reduction of protons. Generally, [Fe-Fe] hydrogenases prefer proton reduction to molecular hydrogen, a potential energy carrier molecule that can be produced by bioprocesses in sustainable manner. Thus, monitoring tools have been developed to study the relationship between [Fe-Fe] hydrogenases and biohydrogen production in bioreactors at DNA and RNA levels. In the present study, novel molecular tools are introduced for quantitative monitoring of clostridial [Fe-Fe] hydrogenases at the protein level. Aerobic and anaerobic biopanning (for inactive and active [Fe-Fe] hydrogenase, respectively) of phage displayed single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody libraries aided in isolating nine potential scFvs. The enriched antibodies demonstrated high specificity towards Clostridium spp. [Fe-Fe] hydrogenases allowing detection from pure and mixed cultures. Additionally, the antibodies showed different binding characteristics towards hydrogenase catalytic states, providing a possible means for functional detection of clostridial [Fe-Fe] hydrogenases. From hydrogenase-antibody interaction studies we observed that though antibody binding reduced the enzyme catalytic activity, it facilitated to retain hydrogen evolution from oxygen exposed hydrogenases.

  4. Recombinant antibodies for specific detection of clostridial [Fe-Fe] hydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Mangayil, Rahul; Karp, Matti; Lamminmäki, Urpo; Santala, Ville

    2016-01-01

    Biological hydrogen production is based on activity of specific enzymes called hydrogenases. Hydrogenases are oxygen sensitive metalloenzymes containing Ni and/or Fe atoms at the active site, catalyzing reversible reduction of protons. Generally, [Fe-Fe] hydrogenases prefer proton reduction to molecular hydrogen, a potential energy carrier molecule that can be produced by bioprocesses in sustainable manner. Thus, monitoring tools have been developed to study the relationship between [Fe-Fe] hydrogenases and biohydrogen production in bioreactors at DNA and RNA levels. In the present study, novel molecular tools are introduced for quantitative monitoring of clostridial [Fe-Fe] hydrogenases at the protein level. Aerobic and anaerobic biopanning (for inactive and active [Fe-Fe] hydrogenase, respectively) of phage displayed single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody libraries aided in isolating nine potential scFvs. The enriched antibodies demonstrated high specificity towards Clostridium spp. [Fe-Fe] hydrogenases allowing detection from pure and mixed cultures. Additionally, the antibodies showed different binding characteristics towards hydrogenase catalytic states, providing a possible means for functional detection of clostridial [Fe-Fe] hydrogenases. From hydrogenase-antibody interaction studies we observed that though antibody binding reduced the enzyme catalytic activity, it facilitated to retain hydrogen evolution from oxygen exposed hydrogenases. PMID:27786270

  5. Chromosomal integration of recombinant alpha-amylase and glucoamylase genes in saccharomyces cerevisiae for starch conversion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recombinant constructs of barley '-amylase and Lentinula edodes glucoamylase genes were integrated into the chromosomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The insertion was confirmed by PCR amplification of the gene sequence in the chromosomes. The expression was analyzed by SDS-PAGE of the enzymes puri...

  6. Adsorption and recovery issues of recombinant monoclonal antibodies in reversed-phase liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Fekete, Szabolcs; Beck, Alain; Wagner, Elsa; Vuignier, Karine; Guillarme, Davy

    2015-01-01

    The poor recovery of large biomolecules is a well-known issue in reversed-phase liquid chromatography. Several papers have reported this problem, but the reasons behind this behavior are not yet fully understood. In the present study, state-of-the-art reversed-phase wide-pore stationary phases were used to evaluate the adsorption of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. These biomolecules possess molar mass of approximately 150,000 g/mol and isoelectric points between 6.6 and 9.3. Two types of stationary phases were tested, the Phenomenex Aeris Widepore (silica based), with 3.6 μm superficially porous particles, and the Waters Acquity BEH300 (ethylene-bridged hybrid), with 1.7 μm fully porous particles. A systematic investigation was carried out using 11 immunoglobulin G1, G2, and G4 antibodies, namely, panitumumab, natalizumab, cetuximab, bevacizumab, trastuzumab, rituximab, palivizumab, belimumab, adalimumab, denosumab, and ofatumumab. All are approved by the Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency in various therapeutic indications and are considered as reference antibodies. Several test proteins, such as human serum albumin, transferrin, apoferritin, ovalbumin, and others, possessing a molar mass between 42,000 and 443,000 g/mol were also evaluated to draw reliable conclusions. The purpose of this study was to find a correlation between the adsorption of monoclonal antibodies and their physicochemical properties. Therefore, the impact of isoelectric point, molar mass, protein glycosylation, and hydrophobicity was investigated. The adsorption of intact antibodies on the stationary phase was significantly higher than that of proteins of similar size, isoelectric point, or hydrophobicity. The present study also demonstrates the unique behavior of monoclonal antibodies, contributing some unwanted and unpredictable strong secondary interactions.

  7. Cooperative effects of immune enhancer TPPPS and different adjuvants on antibody responses induced by recombinant ALV-J gp85 subunit vaccines in SPF chickens.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Meng, Fanfeng; Cui, Shuai; Fu, Jiayuan; Wang, Yixin; Cui, Zhizhong; Chang, Shuang; Zhao, Peng

    2017-03-14

    To explore the antibody responses and protective effects induced by subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J) gp85 protein vaccine plus different adjuvants (CpG and white oil adjuvant YF01) combined with the immune enhancer Taishan Pinus massoniana pollen polysaccharide (TPPPS), we immunized SPF chickens with the recombinant ALV-J gp85 protein, along with different adjuvants and immune enhancer, which protected the chickens by inducing different levels of protective antibodies. Results showed that a single injection of gp85 recombinant protein could only produce low-titre antibodies that were maintained over a short time in few chickens. When combined with YF01 or CpG adjuvants, the recombinant protein could induce high-titre antibodies in most of the immunized chickens. Moreover, when the immune enhancer TPPPS was used with the two adjuvants, it further elevated the antibody levels for a longer duration. The eggs from four groups with the highest levels of ALV-J antibodies were collected, hatched, and examined for maternal antibodies. The protection by the maternal antibodies against ALV-J infection in the TPPPS-immunized group was higher than that in the group without TPPPS, which was consistent with the observations in the parents. This study shows that the immune enhancer TPPPS, combined with YF01 or CpG adjuvants, can enhance the immunogenicity of gp85 recombinant proteins, and provide a better immuno-protection. It provides a powerful experimental basis for the development of ALV-J subunit vaccine. Efficient subunit vaccine development will also accelerate the process of purification of ALV-J.

  8. Recombinant HPA-1a antibody therapy for treatment of fetomaternal alloimmune thrombocytopenia: proof of principle in human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Ghevaert, Cedric; Herbert, Nina; Hawkins, Louise; Grehan, Nicola; Cookson, Philip; Garner, Steve F; Crisp-Hihn, Abigail; Lloyd-Evans, Paul; Evans, Amanda; Balan, Kottekkattu; Ouwehand, Willem H; Armour, Kathryn L; Clark, Mike R; Williamson, Lorna M

    2013-07-18

    Fetomaternal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, caused by the maternal generation of antibodies against fetal human platelet antigen-1a (HPA-1a), can result in intracranial hemorrhage and intrauterine death. We have developed a therapeutic human recombinant high-affinity HPA-1a antibody (B2G1Δnab) that competes for binding to the HPA-1a epitope but carries a modified constant region that does not bind to Fcγ receptors. In vitro studies with a range of clinical anti-HPA-1a sera have shown that B2G1Δnab blocks monocyte chemiluminescence by >75%. In this first-in-man study, we demonstrate that HPA-1a1b autologous platelets (matching fetal phenotype) sensitized with B2G1Δnab have the same intravascular survival as unsensitized platelets (190 hours), while platelets sensitized with a destructive immunoglobulin G1 version of the antibody (B2G1) are cleared from the circulation in 2 hours. Mimicking the situation in fetuses receiving B2G1Δnab as therapy, we show that platelets sensitized with a combination of B2G1 (representing destructive HPA-1a antibody) and B2G1Δnab survive 3 times as long in circulation compared with platelets sensitized with B2G1 alone. This confirms the therapeutic potential of B2G1Δnab. The efficient clearance of platelets sensitized with B2G1 also opens up the opportunity to carry out studies of prophylaxis to prevent alloimmunization in HPA-1a-negative mothers.

  9. Construction of adenovirus vectors encoding the lumican gene by gateway recombinant cloning technology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gui-Fang; Qi, Bing; Tu, Lei-Lei; Liu, Lian; Yu, Guo-Cheng; Zhong, Jing-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    AIM To construct adenovirus vectors of lumican gene by gateway recombinant cloning technology to further understand the role of lumican gene in myopia. METHODS Gateway recombinant cloning technology was used to construct adenovirus vectors. The wild-type (wt) and mutant (mut) forms of the lumican gene were synthesized and amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The lumican cDNA fragments were purified and ligated into the adenovirus shuttle vector pDown-multiple cloning site (MCS)-/internal ribozyme entry site (IRES)/enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Then the desired DNA fragments were integrated into the destination vector pAV.Des1d yielding the final expression constructs pAV.Ex1d-cytomegalovirus (CMV)>wt-lumican/IRES/EGFP and pAV.Ex1d-CMV>mut-lumican/IRES /EGFP, respectively. RESULTS The adenovirus plasmids pAV.Ex1d-CMV>wt-lumican/IRES/EGFP and pAV.Ex1d-CMV>mut-lumican/IRES/EGFP were successfully constructed by gateway recombinant cloning technology. Positive clones identified by PCR and sequencing were selected and packaged into recombinant adenovirus in HEK293 cells. CONCLUSION We construct adenovirus vectors containing the lumican gene by gateway recombinant cloning technology, which provides a basis for investigating the role of lumican gene in the pathogenesis of high myopia. PMID:27672590

  10. Improved recombinant antibody production by CHO cells using a production enhancer DNA element with repeated transgene integration at a predetermined chromosomal site.

    PubMed

    Kawabe, Yoshinori; Inao, Takanori; Komatsu, Shodai; Huang, Guan; Ito, Akira; Omasa, Takeshi; Kamihira, Masamichi

    2017-03-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are one of the most useful host cell lines for the production of biopharmaceutical proteins. Although a series of production processes have been refined to improve protein productivity and cost performance, establishing producer cells is still time-consuming and labor-intensive. Recombinase-mediated site-specific gene integration into a predetermined chromosomal locus may enable predictable protein expression, reducing the laborious process of cell screening. We previously developed an accumulative site-specific gene integration system (AGIS) using Cre recombinase and mutated loxP sites for transgene integration and amplification in the CHO cell genome. Epigenetic modifier elements such as insulators are effective DNA cis-regulatory elements for stabilizing transgene expression. Here, we attempted to enhance transgene expression in recombinant CHO cells generated by AGIS using a production enhancer DNA element (PE) derived from the CHO genome. The PE was introduced into an expression unit for a recombinant scFv-Fc antibody. The effect on scFv-Fc productivity of PE position and orientation within the transgene was evaluated, while keeping the background chromosomal structure constant. For the optimal PE arrangement, scFv-Fc productivity was enhanced 2.6-fold compared with an expression unit without a PE. The enhancing effect of the PE on transgene expression was also observed when two or three PE-flanked expression units were inserted as tandem repeats. These results indicate that AGIS using the PE-flanked expression unit is a promising approach for establishing producer cell lines for biopharmaceutical protein production.

  11. Selection of recombinant anti-SH3 domain antibodies by high-throughput phage display.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haiming; Economopoulos, Nicolas O; Liu, Bernard A; Uetrecht, Andrea; Gu, Jun; Jarvik, Nick; Nadeem, Vincent; Pawson, Tony; Moffat, Jason; Miersch, Shane; Sidhu, Sachdev S

    2015-11-01

    Antibodies are indispensable tools in biochemical research and play an expanding role as therapeutics. While hybridoma technology is the dominant method for antibody production, phage display is an emerging technology. Here, we developed and employed a high-throughput pipeline that enables selection of antibodies against hundreds of antigens in parallel. Binding selections using a phage-displayed synthetic antigen-binding fragment (Fab) library against 110 human SH3 domains yielded hundreds of Fabs targeting 58 antigens. Affinity assays demonstrated that representative Fabs bind tightly and specifically to their targets. Furthermore, we developed an efficient affinity maturation strategy adaptable to high-throughput, which increased affinity dramatically but did not compromise specificity. Finally, we tested Fabs in common cell biology applications and confirmed recognition of the full-length antigen in immunoprecipitation, immunoblotting and immunofluorescence assays. In summary, we have established a rapid and robust high-throughput methodology that can be applied to generate highly functional and renewable antibodies targeting protein domains on a proteome-wide scale.

  12. Protection against anthrax toxin by recombinant antibody fragments correlates with antigen affinity.

    PubMed

    Maynard, Jennifer A; Maassen, Catharina B M; Leppla, Stephen H; Brasky, Kathleen; Patterson, Jean L; Iverson, Brent L; Georgiou, George

    2002-06-01

    The tripartite toxin produced by Bacillus anthracis is the key determinant in the etiology of anthrax. We have engineered a panel of toxin-neutralizing antibodies, including single-chain variable fragments (scFvs) and scFvs fused to a human constant kappa domain (scAbs), that bind to the protective antigen subunit of the toxin with equilibrium dissociation constants (K(d)) between 63 nM and 0.25 nM. The entire antibody panel showed high serum, thermal, and denaturant stability. In vitro, post-challenge protection of macrophages from the action of the holotoxin correlated with the K(d) of the scFv variants. Strong correlations among antibody construct affinity, serum half-life, and protection were also observed in a rat model of toxin challenge. High-affinity toxin-neutralizing antibodies may be of therapeutic value for alleviating the symptoms of anthrax toxin in infected individuals and for medium-term prophylaxis to infection.

  13. Selection of recombinant anti-SH3 domain antibodies by high-throughput phage display

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Haiming; Economopoulos, Nicolas O; Liu, Bernard A; Uetrecht, Andrea; Gu, Jun; Jarvik, Nick; Nadeem, Vincent; Pawson, Tony; Moffat, Jason; Miersch, Shane; Sidhu, Sachdev S

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies are indispensable tools in biochemical research and play an expanding role as therapeutics. While hybridoma technology is the dominant method for antibody production, phage display is an emerging technology. Here, we developed and employed a high-throughput pipeline that enables selection of antibodies against hundreds of antigens in parallel. Binding selections using a phage-displayed synthetic antigen-binding fragment (Fab) library against 110 human SH3 domains yielded hundreds of Fabs targeting 58 antigens. Affinity assays demonstrated that representative Fabs bind tightly and specifically to their targets. Furthermore, we developed an efficient affinity maturation strategy adaptable to high-throughput, which increased affinity dramatically but did not compromise specificity. Finally, we tested Fabs in common cell biology applications and confirmed recognition of the full-length antigen in immunoprecipitation, immunoblotting and immunofluorescence assays. In summary, we have established a rapid and robust high-throughput methodology that can be applied to generate highly functional and renewable antibodies targeting protein domains on a proteome-wide scale. PMID:26332758

  14. Recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated alpha-1 antitrypsin gene therapy prevents type I diabetes in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Song, S; Goudy, K; Campbell-Thompson, M; Wasserfall, C; Scott-Jorgensen, M; Wang, J; Tang, Q; Crawford, J M; Ellis, T M; Atkinson, M A; Flotte, T R

    2004-01-01

    Type I diabetes results from an autoimmune destruction of the insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells. Although the exact immunologic processes underlying this disease are unclear, increasing evidence suggests that immunosuppressive, immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory agents can interrupt the progression of the disease. Alpha 1 antitrypsin (AAT) is a multifunctional serine proteinase inhibitor (serpin) that also displays a wide range of anti-inflammatory properties. To test the ability of AAT to modulate the development of type I diabetes, we performed a series of investigations involving recombinant adeno-associated virus vector (rAAV)-mediated gene delivery of human alpha-1 antitrypsin (hAAT) to nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice. Recombinant AAV-expressing hAAT (rAAV2-CB-AT) was administered intramuscularly to 4-week-old female NOD mice (1 x 10(10) i.u./mouse). A single injection of this vector reduced the intensity of insulitis, the levels of insulin autoantibodies, and the frequency of overt type I diabetes (30% (3/10) at 32 weeks of age versus 70% (7/10) in controls). Transgene expression at the injection sites was confirmed by immunostaining. Interestingly, antibodies against hAAT were present in a majority of the vector-injected mice and circulating hAAT was undetectable when assessed 10 weeks postinjection. This study suggests a potential therapeutic role for AAT in preventing type I diabetes as well as the ability of AAV gene therapy-based approaches to ameliorate disease effectively.

  15. Glutathione and thioredoxin systems contribute to recombinant monoclonal antibody interchain disulfide bond reduction during bioprocessing.

    PubMed

    Handlogten, Michael W; Zhu, Min; Ahuja, Sanjeev

    2017-03-06

    Antibody interchain disulfide bond reduction during biopharmaceutical manufacturing has received increased attention since it was first reported in 2010. Antibody reduction leads to loss of product and reduced product stability. It is therefore critical to understand the underlying mechanisms of reduction. To date, the thioredoxin system has been reported as the sole contributor to antibody reduction during bioprocessing. In this work, we show that the glutathione system, in addition to the thioredoxin system, is involved in reducing antibody molecules and the contributions of the two systems can vary depending upon the cell culture process. The roles of the glutathione and thioredoxin systems were evaluated for three molecules with different IgG subclass where reduction was observed during manufacturing: mAb A, mAb B, and mAb C representing an IgG1 , IgG2 , and IgG4, respectively. The expression of enzymes for both the thioredoxin and glutathione systems were confirmed in all three cell lines. Inhibitors were evaluated using purified mammalian reductases to evaluate their specificity. The optimized experimental conditions enabled both the determination of reductase activity contributed from as well as the amount of antibody reduced by each enzymatic system. Our results demonstrate that the underlying enzymatic mechanisms are different depending upon the cell culture process; one of the two systems may be the dominant mechanism, or both enzymatic systems may be involved. Specifically, the glutathione system was found to be the major contributor to mAb A reduction while the thioredoxin system was the major contributor to mAb C reduction. Intriguingly, mAb B experienced significant reduction from both enzymatic systems. In summary, we have demonstrated that in addition to the thioredoxin pathway, the glutathione system is a second major pathway contributing to antibody reduction and this knowledge can be leveraged to develop more specific antibody reduction

  16. Generation of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene knockout rabbits by homologous recombination and gene trapping through somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Yin, Mingru; Jiang, Weihua; Fang, Zhenfu; Kong, Pengcheng; Xing, Fengying; Li, Yao; Chen, Xuejin; Li, Shangang

    2015-11-02

    The rabbit is a common animal model that has been employed in studies on various human disorders, and the generation of genetically modified rabbit lines is highly desirable. Female rabbits have been successfully cloned from cumulus cells, and the somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology is well established. The present study generated hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene knockout rabbits using recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated homologous recombination and SCNT. Gene trap strategies were employed to enhance the gene targeting rates. The male and female gene knockout fibroblast cell lines were derived by different strategies. When male HPRT knockout cells were used for SCNT, no live rabbits were obtained. However, when female HPRT(+/-) cells were used for SCNT, live, healthy rabbits were generated. The cloned HPRT(+/-) rabbits were fertile at maturity. We demonstrate a new technique to produce gene-targeted rabbits. This approach may also be used in the genetic manipulation of different genes or in other species.

  17. RECOMBINANT SINGLE CHAIN VARIABLE FRAGMENT ANTIBODIES (scFv) AGAINST Pro144-Leu155 FRAGMENT OF HUMAN PROTEIN C.

    PubMed

    Oliinyk, O S; Palyvoda, K O; Lugovskaya, N E; Kolibo, D V; Lugovskoy, E V; Komisarenko, S V

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to obtain the recombinant single chain variable fragments of antibodies (scFv) against human protein C, the key component of blood anticoagulation system. For this purpose a peptide that mimics a Pro144-Leu155 sequence of protein C was synthesized and the murine immune scFv library against this peptide was constructed. The protein C specific scFv 9E were selected from the constructed library by the phage-display method. The scFv 9E dissociation constant was found to be 2∙10(-9) M. It was shown that scFv 9E were suitable for protein C detection by ELISA and Western blotting. Selected scFv could be further used for protein C investigation and for the development of quantitative methods for protein C detection in human blood.

  18. Homologous recombination between single-stranded DNA and chromosomal genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, J R; Moore, P D

    1987-01-01

    Transformation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains was examined by using the URA3 and TRP1 genes cloned into M13 vectors in the absence of sequences capable of promoting autonomous replication. These constructs transform S. cerevisiae cells to prototrophy by homologous recombination with the resident mutant gene. Single-stranded DNA was found to transform S. cerevisiae cells at efficiencies greater than that of double-stranded DNA. No conversion of single-stranded transforming DNA into duplex forms could be detected during the transformation process, and we conclude that single-stranded DNA may participate directly in recombination with chromosomal sequences. Transformation with single-stranded DNA gave rise to both gene conversion and reciprocal exchange events. Cotransformation with competing heterologous single-stranded DNA specifically inhibited transformation by single-stranded DNA, suggesting that one of the components in the transformation-recombination process has a preferential affinity for single-stranded DNA. Images PMID:3302673

  19. Embryonic stem cell gene targeting using bacteriophage lambda vectors generated by phage-plasmid recombination.

    PubMed Central

    Tsuzuki, T; Rancourt, D E

    1998-01-01

    Targeted mutagenesis is an extremely useful experimental approach in molecular medicine, allowing the generation of specialized animals that are mutant for any gene of interest. Currently the rate determining step in any gene targeting experiment is construction of the targeting vector (TV). In order to streamline gene targeting methods and avoid problems encountered with plasmid TVs, we describe the direct application of lambda phage in targeted mutagenesis. The recombination-proficient phage vector lambda2TK permits generation of TVs by conventional restriction-ligation or recombination-mediated methods. The resulting lambdaTV DNA can then be cleaved with restriction endonucleases to release the bacteriophage arms and can subsequently be electroporated directly into ES cells to yield gene targets. We demonstrate that in vivo phage-plasmid recombination can be used to introduce neo and lacZ - neo mutations into precise positions within a lambda2TK subclone via double crossover recombination. We describe two methods for eliminating single crossover recombinants, spi selection and size restriction, both of which result in phage TVs bearing double crossover insertions. Thus TVs can be easily and quickly generated in bacteriophage without plasmid subcloning and with little genomic sequence or restriction site information. PMID:9461458

  20. Molluscan mobile elements similar to the vertebrate recombination-activating genes

    PubMed Central

    Panchin, Yuri; Moroz, Leonid L.

    2009-01-01

    Animal genomes contain ~20,000 genes. Additionally millions of genes for antigen receptors are generated in cells of the immune system from the sets of separate gene segments by a mechanism known as the V(D)J somatic recombination. The components of the V(D)J recombination system, Recombination-Activating Gene proteins (RAG1 and RAG2) and recombination signal sequence (RSS), are thought to have “entered” the vertebrate genome as a hypothetical “RAG transposon”. Recently discovered mobile elements have terminal inverted repeats (TIRs) similar to RSS and may encode proteins with a different degree of similarity to RAG1. We describe a novel N-RAG-TP transposon identified from the sea slug Aplysia californica that encodes a protein similar to the N-terminal part of RAG1 in vertebrates. This refines the “RAG transposon” hypothesis and allows us to propose a scenario for V(D)J recombination machinery evolution from a relic transposon related to the existing mobile elements N-RAG-TP, Chapaev and Transib. PMID:18313399

  1. Recombination activating activity of XRCC1 analogous genes in X-ray sensitive and resistant CHO cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubnitchaya-Labudová, O.; Portele, A.; Vaçata, V.; Lubec, G.; Rink, H.; Höfer, M.

    1997-10-01

    The XRCC1 gene (X-ray repair cross complementing) complements the DNA repair deficiency of the radiation sensitive Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) mutant cell line EM9 but the mechanism of the correction is not elucidated yet. XRCC1 shows substantial homology to the RAG2 gene (recombination activating gene) and we therefore tried to answer question, whether structural similarities (sequence of a putative recombination activating domain, aa 332-362 for XRCC1 and aa 286-316 in RAG2) would reflect similar functions of the homologous, putative recombination activating domain. PCR experiments revealed that no sequence homologous to the structural part of human XRCC1 was present in cDNA of CHO. Differential display demonstrated two putative recombination activating domains in the parental CHO line AA8 and one in the radiosensitive mutant EM9. Southern blot experiments showed the presence of several genes with partial homology to human XRCC1. Recombination studies consisted of expressing amplified target domains within chimeric proteins in recA - bacteria and subsequent detection of recombination events by sequencing the recombinant plasmids. Recombination experiments demonstrated recombination activating activity of all putative recombination activating domains amplified from AA8 and EM9 genomes as reflected by deletions within the insert of the recombinant plasmids. The recombination activating activity of XRCC1 analogues could explain a mechanism responsible for the correction of the DNA repair defect in EM9.

  2. Construction of heterologous gene expression cassettes for the development of recombinant Clostridium beijerinckii.

    PubMed

    Oh, Young Hoon; Eom, Gyeong Tae; Kang, Kyoung Hee; Joo, Jeong Chan; Jang, Young-Ah; Choi, Jae Woo; Song, Bong Keun; Lee, Seung Hwan; Park, Si Jae

    2016-04-01

    Gene-expression cassettes for the construction of recombinant Clostridium beijerinckii were developed as potential tools for metabolic engineering of C. beijerinckii. Gene expression cassettes containing ColE1 origin and pAMB origin along with the erythromycin resistance gene were constructed, in which promoters from Escherichia coli, Lactococcus lactis, Ralstonia eutropha, C. acetobutylicum, and C. beijerinckii are examined as potential promoters in C. beijerinckii. Zymogram analysis of the cell extracts and comparison of lipase activities of the recombinant C. beijerinckii strains expressing Pseudomonas fluorescens tliA gene suggested that the tliA gene was functionally expressed by all the examined promoters with different expression level. Also, recombinant C. beijerinckii expressing C. beijerinckii secondary alcohol dehydrogenase by the constructed expression cassettes successfully produced 2-propanol from glucose. The best promoter for TliA expression was the R. eutropha phaP promoter while that for 2-propanol production was the putative C. beijerinckii pta promoter. Gene expression cassettes developed in this study may be useful tools for the construction of recombinant C. beijerinckii strains as host strains for the valuable chemicals and fuels from renewable resources.

  3. An inhibition enzyme immuno assay exploring recombinant invariant surface glycoprotein and monoclonal antibodies for surveillance of surra in animals.

    PubMed

    Rudramurthy, G R; Sengupta, P P; Ligi, M; Rahman, H

    2017-02-20

    The present study is aimed at the development of inhibition ELISA (I-ELISA) exploring monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) and recombinant invariant surface glycoprotein. The extracellular domain (ED) of invariant surface glycoprotein (ISG-75) from Trypanosoma evasni has been heterologously expressed in Pichia pastoris (X-33). The recombinant ISG-75 (rISG-75ED) was characterized by immunoblot and ELISA, followed by the production of MAbs against rISG-75ED. The MAbs were characterized by immunoblot and then explored in the development of I-ELISA for the detection of surra. The diagnostic potential of the developed test has been evaluated using 1192 field sera sample including cattle, buffalo, donkey, horse and camel. The statistical analysis of the data showed optimum combination of diagnostic sensitivity and specificity at 98.8% and 99.2% respectively, with cut-off percentage inhibition (PI) value of >45. The Cohen's kappa coefficient of agreement was found to be 0.98. Hence, the diagnostic test developed in the present study can be exploited as a potential and reliable tool in the serodiagnosis and surveillance of surra in animals.

  4. A Recombinant Human Anti-Platelet scFv Antibody Produced in Pichia pastoris for Atheroma Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Vallet-Courbin, Amelie; Larivière, Mélusine; Hocquellet, Agnès; Hemadou, Audrey; Parimala, Sarjapura-Nagaraja; Laroche-Traineau, Jeanny; Santarelli, Xavier; Clofent-Sanchez, Gisèle; Jacobin-Valat, Marie-Josée; Noubhani, Abdelmajid

    2017-01-01

    Cells of the innate and adaptive immune system are key factors in the progression of atherosclerotic plaque, leading to plaque instability and rupture, potentially resulting in acute atherothrombotic events such as coronary artery disease, cerebrovascular disease and peripheral arterial disease. Here, we describe the cloning, expression, purification, and immunoreactivity assessment of a recombinant single-chain variable fragment (scFv) derived from a human anti-αIIbβ3 antibody (HuAb) selected to target atheromatous lesions for the presence of platelets. Indeed, platelets within atheroma plaques have been shown to play a role in inflammation, in platelet-leucocyte aggregates and in thrombi formation and might thus be considered relevant biomarkers of atherosclerotic progression. The DNA sequence that encodes the anti-αIIbβ3 TEG4 scFv previously obtained from a phage-display selection on activated platelets, was inserted into the eukaryote vector (pPICZαA) in fusion with a tag sequence encoding 2 cysteines useable for specific probes grafting experiments. The recombinant protein was expressed at high yields in Pichia pastoris (30 mg/L culture). The advantage of P. pastoris as an expression system is the production and secretion of recombinant proteins in the supernatant, ruling out the difficulties encountered when scFv are produced in the cytoplasm of bacteria (low yield, low solubility and reduced affinity). The improved conditions allowed for the recovery of highly purified and biologically active scFv fragments ready to be grafted in a site-directed way to nanoparticles for the imaging of atherosclerotic plaques involving inflammatory processes and thus at high risk of instability. PMID:28125612

  5. Suppression of human cytochrome P450 aromatase activity by monoclonal and recombinant antibody fragments and identification of a stable antigenic complex.

    PubMed

    Lala, Puloma; Higashiyama, Tadayoshi; Erman, Mary; Griswold, Jennifer; Wagner, Traci; Osawa, Yoshio; Ghosh, Debashis

    2004-03-01

    Human cytochrome P450 aromatase (P450arom) is responsible for biosynthesis of estrogens from androgens. Monoclonal antibody MAb3-2C2 to P450arom specifically binds to a conformational epitope and suppresses the enzyme activity in a dose-dependent manner. The crystal structure of the Fab fragment of MAb3-2C2 has been used to engineer a recombinant single chain antibody fragment (scFv) and a homodimeric variable domain of the light chain (VL(2)). These recombinant antibody fragments have been expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Here, we show that the recombinant scFv suppresses P450arom activity with an IC(50) value similar to that of natural MAb3-2C2 F(ab')(2). The recombinant VL(2) also exhibits dose-dependent suppression of the P450arom activity, but at a reduced level, demonstrating that the homodimer is unable to fully mimic the complementarity determining region (CDR) of a variable heavy chain (VH)-VL heterodimer. We prepare and purify a stable complex of P450arom with MAb3-2C2 F(ab')(2) and show that the complex migrates and precipitates as a single molecular assembly. Efforts to crystallize P450arom for structure-function studies have yielded small single crystals. Our results suggest that formation of stable complexes with fragments of the monoclonal antibody could provide an alternative method for crystallization of P450arom.

  6. [Serodiagnosis of chlamydiosis: "Chlamy-IgG-DS-Tr"-- the first domestic immunoenzyme recombinant test-system for determination of anti-Chlamydia trachomatis class G antibodies].

    PubMed

    Manzeniuk, I N; Vorob'eva, M S; Nikitiuk, N M; Fedosov, S A; Gorbunov, M A; Gnedoĭ, S N; Losev, V I; Krivenchuk, N A

    2000-01-01

    The first Native test-system for determination of class G antibodies to Chlamydia trachomatis with chlamydia recombinant antigen was elaborated Test-system efficacy was demonstrated in clinical trials. The sensibility, specific activity and suitability of the "Chlamy-IgG-DS-Tr" were the same as for import analogous.

  7. Comparison of growth inhibition of a human ovarian adenocarcinoma cell line by free monoclonal antibodies and their corresponding antibody-recombinant ricin A chain immunotoxins.

    PubMed

    Ettenson, D; Sheldon, K; Marks, A; Houston, L L; Baumal, R

    1988-01-01

    Four mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAb) (8C, IgG2a; M2A, IgG2a; M2D, IgG2b; 10B, IgG1) directed against the human ovarian adenocarcinoma cell line HEY were compared for their ability in the free form and as immunotoxins made with recombinant ricin A chain (rRA) to inhibit the growth of HEY cells. For in vitro studies cultured HEY cells were assayed for protein synthesis and plated in agarose to form colonies, and for in vivo studies they were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) into BALB/c nu/nu (nude) mice at a challenge dose (3 X 10(5) cells) which produced carcinomatosis with ascites, leading to death 30 days following injection. In the free form, mAB 8C was the most potent in inhibiting colony formation in the complement (C)-mediated and ADCC (antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytoxicity) assays in vitro. This mAb was also the only one capable of prolonging survival of mice, both in tumor cell neutralization, and tumor growth inhibition experiments. The four mAb-rRA immunotoxins were effective in inhibiting protein synthesis in vitro in the presence of 10(-7) M monensin. However, in vivo, only 8C-rRA and M2A-rRA were capable of prolonging survival of mice in tumor growth inhibition experiments. Our results suggest that mAb 8C might be useful in the free form and as an 8C-rRA immunotoxin for i.p. immunotherapy of ovarian cancer.

  8. An indirect ELISA for detection of Theileria spp. antibodies using a recombinant protein (rTlSP) from Theileria luwenshuni.

    PubMed

    He, Haining; Li, Youquan; Liu, Junlong; Liu, Zhijie; Yang, Jifei; Liu, Aihong; Chen, Ze; Ren, Qiaoyun; Guan, Guiquan; Liu, Guangyuan; Luo, Jianxun; Yin, Hong

    2016-07-01

    Theileria is a tick-borne, intracellular protozoan parasite of worldwide economic and veterinary importance in small ruminants. Here, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed based on Theileria luwenshuni recombinant surface protein (rTlSP) and was used in the standardization and validation of an ELISA for the detection of circulating antibodies against ovine and caprine theileriosis. A total of 233 sera samples were used for the calculation of the cut-off value which served as a threshold between the positive and the negative sera. When the positive threshold was chosen as 19% of the specific mean antibody rate, the specificity was 97.9%, and the sensitivity was 97.1%. There was a cross-reaction with sera against Theileria uilenbergi and Theileria ovis, and no cross-reaction with sera against Babesia spp. in the ELISA and Western blotting. Two hundred forty samples collected from sheep in Gansu province were detected with blood smears and ELISA, respectively. The results showed that the positive rate of Theileria infection in Gansu province were 63.75% with rTlSP-ELISA, and 46.67% with blood smears, respectively. Our test proved that the rTlSP ELISA is suitable to diagnose Theileria infection and could be used in serological surveys to map out the prevalence of ovine and caprine theileriosis.

  9. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the detection of canine Leptospira antibodies using recombinant OmpL1 protein.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Masaru; Sakai, Yoshiko; Matsuuchi, Megumi; Oikawa, Tatsuo; Watanabe, Malaika; Itamoto, Kazuhito; Iwata, Hiroyuki; Kano, Rui; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko; Onishi, Takafumi; Inokuma, Hisashi

    2005-03-01

    OmpL1 is a 31-kDa outer membrane protein characterized in 1993 and known to be expressed only in pathogenic Leptospira spp. Recombinant OmpL1 (GST-rOmpL1) was expressed for use as an ELISA antigen for the detection of anti-Leptospira antibodies. In immunoblot analysis, the protein reacted with sera of dogs infected with three different serotypes of Leptospira interrogans, while did not react with sera of dogs both uninfected negative controls and infected with Borrelia burgdorferi, which is closely related to Leptospira spp. Moreover, in ELISA using GST-rOmpL1, the optical density (O.D.) values from the positive controls were very high (1.125 +/- 0.549). In contrast, the O.D. values from clinically healthy dogs and dogs with diseases other than leptospirosis were very low (0.109 +/- 0.046 and 0.089 +/- 0.046, respectively). These data suggest that the detection of anti-Leptospira antibodies by ELISA using the GST-rOmpL1 protein can be applied for diagnosis of canine leptospirosis.

  10. Neutralizing Antibody Response and Efficacy of Novel Recombinant Tetravalent Dengue DNA Vaccine Comprising Envelope Domain III in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Ajit; Bhat, Rushil; Malik, Mansi; Sane, Suvarna; Kothari, Sweta; Vaidya, Shashikant; Chowdhary, Abhay; Deshmukh, Ranjana A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Dengue is a global arboviral threat to humans; causing 390 million infections per year. The availability of safe and effective tetravalent dengue vaccine is a global requirement to prevent epidemics, morbidity, and mortality associated with it. Methods: Five experimental groups (6 mice per group) each of 5-week-old BALB/c mice were immunized with vaccine and placebo (empty plasmid) (100 µg, i.m.) on days 0, 14 and 28. Among these, four groups (one group per serotype) of each were subsequently challenged 3 weeks after the last boost with dengue virus (DENV) serotypes 1-4 (100 LD50, 20 µl intracerebrally) to determine vaccine efficacy. The fifth group of each was used as a control. The PBS immunized group was used as mock control. Serum samples were collected before and after subsequent immunizations. EDIII fusion protein expression was determined by Western blot. Total protein concentration was measured by Bradford assay. Neutralizing antibodies were assessed by TCID50-CPE inhibition assay. Statistical analysis was performed using Stata/IC 10.1 software for Windows. One-way repeated measures ANOVA and Mann-Whitney test were used for neutralizing antibody analysis and vaccine efficacy, respectively. Results: The recombinant EDIII fusion protein was expressed adequately in transfected 293T cells. Total protein concentration was almost 3 times more than the control. Vaccine candidate induced neutralizing antibodies against all four DENV serotypes with a notable increase after subsequent boosters. Vaccine efficacy was 83.3% (DENV-1, -3, -4) and 50% (DENV-2). Conclusion: Our results suggest that vaccine is immunogenic and protective; however, further studies are required to improve the immunogenicity particularly against DENV-2. PMID:28360441

  11. Detection of the cyanobacterial toxin, microcystin-LR, using a novel recombinant antibody-based optical-planar waveguide platform.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Caroline; Stack, Edwina; Krivelo, Svetlana; McPartlin, Daniel A; Byrne, Barry; Greef, Charles; Lochhead, Michael J; Husar, Greg; Devlin, Shauna; Elliott, Christopher T; O'Kennedy, Richard J

    2015-05-15

    Microcystins are a major group of cyanobacterial heptapeptide toxins found in freshwater and brackish environments. There is currently an urgent requirement for highly-sensitive, rapid and in-expensive detection methodologies for these toxins. A novel single chain fragment variable (scFv) fragment was generated and is the first known report of a recombinant anti-microcystin avian antibody. In a surface plasmon resonance-based immunoassay, the antibody fragment displayed cross-reactivity with seven microcystin congeners (microcystin-leucine-arginine (MC-LR) 100%, microcystin-tyrosine-arginine (MC-YR) 79.7%, microcystin-leucine-alanine (MC-LA) 74.8%, microcystin-leucine-phenylalanine (MC-LF) 67.5%, microcystin-leucine-tryptophan (MC-LW) 63.7%, microcystin-arginine-arginine (MC-RR) 60.1% and nodularin (Nod) 69.3%, % cross reactivity). Following directed molecular evolution of the parental clone the resultant affinity-enhanced antibody fragment was applied in an optimized fluorescence immunoassay on a planar waveguide detection system. This novel immuno-sensing format can detect free microcystin-LR with a functional limit of detection of 0.19 ng mL(-1)and a detection range of 0.21-5.9 ng mL(-1). The assay is highly reproducible (displaying percentage coefficients of variance below 8% for intra-day assays and below 11% for inter-day assays), utilizes an inexpensive cartridge system with low reagent volumes and can be completed in less than twenty minutes.

  12. Scaled-up manufacturing of recombinant antibodies produced by plant cells in a 200-L orbitally-shaken disposable bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Raven, Nicole; Rasche, Stefan; Kuehn, Christoph; Anderlei, Tibor; Klöckner, Wolf; Schuster, Flora; Henquet, Maurice; Bosch, Dirk; Büchs, Jochen; Fischer, Rainer; Schillberg, Stefan

    2015-02-01

    Tobacco BY-2 cells have emerged as a promising platform for the manufacture of biopharmaceutical proteins, offering efficient protein secretion, favourable growth characteristics and cultivation in containment under a controlled environment. The cultivation of BY-2 cells in disposable bioreactors is a useful alternative to conventional stainless steel stirred-tank reactors, and orbitally-shaken bioreactors could provide further advantages such as simple bag geometry, scalability and predictable process settings. We carried out a scale-up study, using a 200-L orbitally-shaken bioreactor holding disposable bags, and BY-2 cells producing the human monoclonal antibody M12. We found that cell growth and recombinant protein accumulation were comparable to standard shake flask cultivation, despite a 200-fold difference in cultivation volume. Final cell fresh weights of 300-387 g/L and M12 yields of ∼20 mg/L were achieved with both cultivation methods. Furthermore, we established an efficient downstream process for the recovery of M12 from the culture broth. The viscous spent medium prevented clarification using filtration devices, but we used expanded bed adsorption (EBA) chromatography with SP Sepharose as an alternative for the efficient capture of the M12 antibody. EBA was introduced as an initial purification step prior to protein A affinity chromatography, resulting in an overall M12 recovery of 75-85% and a purity of >95%. Our results demonstrate the suitability of orbitally-shaken bioreactors for the scaled-up cultivation of plant cell suspension cultures and provide a strategy for the efficient purification of antibodies from the BY-2 culture medium.

  13. Experimental immunization of cats with a recombinant rabies-canine adenovirus vaccine elicits a long-lasting neutralizing antibody response against rabies.

    PubMed

    Hu, R L; Liu, Y; Zhang, S F; Zhang, F; Fooks, A R

    2007-07-20

    During the past decade, human rabies caused by cats has ranked the second highest in China. Several recombinant rabies vaccines have been developed for dogs. However, seldom have these vaccines been assessed or used in cats. In this trial, we report the experimental immunization of a recombinant canine adenovirus-rabies vaccine, CAV-2-E3Delta-RGP, in cats. Thirty cats were inoculated with the recombinant vaccine intramuscularly, orally and intranasally, respectively. Safety and efficacy studies were undertaken using the fluorescent antibody virus neutralization (FAVN) test and evaluated. Results showed that this recombinant vaccine is safe for cats as demonstrated by the three different routes of administration. The vaccine stimulated an efficient humoral response in the vaccinated cats when 10(8.5)PFU/ml of the recombinant vaccine was injected intramuscularly in a single dose. The neutralizing antibody level increased above 0.5IU/ml at 4 weeks after the vaccination. The mean antibody level ranged from 0.96+/-0.26 to 4.47+/-1.57IU/ml among individuals, and the antibody levels were elicited for at least 12 months. After this period, the immunized cats survived the challenge of CVS-24 and an obvious anemnestic and protective immune response was stimulated after the challenge. The immune response occurred later than the inactivated vaccine and the overall antibody level in the vaccinated cats was lower, but it was sufficient to confer protection of cats against infection. This demonstrated that a single, intramuscular dose of CAV-2-E3Delta-RGP stimulated a long-lasting protective immune response in cats and suggested that CAV-2-E3Delta-RGP could be considered as a potential rabies vaccine candidate for cats.

  14. PCR-mediated recombination of the amplification products of the Hibiscus tiliaceus cytosolic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene.

    PubMed

    Wu, Linghui; Tang, Tian; Zhou, Renchao; Shi, Suhua

    2007-03-31

    PCR-mediated recombination describes the process of in vitro chimera formation from related template sequences present in a single PCR amplification. The high levels of genetic redundancy in eukaryotic genomes should make recombination artifacts occur readily. However, few evolutionary biologists adequately consider this phenomenon when studying gene lineages. The cytosolic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (GapC), which encodes a NADP-dependent nonphosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in the cytosol, is a classical low-copy nuclear gene marker and is commonly used in molecular evolutionary studies. Here, we report on the occurrence of PCR-mediated recombination in the GapC gene family of Hibiscus tiliaceus. The study suggests that recombinant areas appear to be correlated with DNA template secondary structures. Our observations highlight that recombination artifacts should be considered when studying specific and allelic phylogenies. The authors suggest that nested PCR be used to suppress PCR-mediated recombination.

  15. Production of pseudorabies virus recombinant glycoprotein B and its use in an agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) test for detection of antibodies with sensitivity and specificity equal to the virus neutralization assay.

    PubMed

    Serena, María Soledad; Geisler, Christoph; Metz, Germán Ernesto; Mórtola, Eduardo Carlos; Echeverría, María Gabriela

    2016-04-01

    Pseudorabies virus (PrV) causes Aujeszky's disease (AD), which affects mainly swine, but also cattle, sheep, and wild animals, resulting in substantial economic losses due to animal mortality and lost productivity worldwide. To combat PrV, eradication programs using PrV strains lacking the gene encoding glycoprotein E (gE) are ongoing in several countries. These eradication programs have generated a currently unmet demand for affordable, easy-to-use, and sensitive tests that can detect PrV infection in pigs infected with either wild-type virus or vaccine strain (gE-deleted) virus. To meet this demand, we used the baculovirus-insect cell system to produce recombinant glycoprotein B (gB) as antigen for an immune assay. The high GC-content (70% average) of the gB gene from the Argentinian PrV CL15 strain necessitated the use of betaine as a PCR enhancer to amplify the extracellular domain. Recombinant gB was expressed at high levels and reacted strongly with sera from PrV infected pigs. We used the recombinant gB to develop an agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) test for detection of PrV antibodies. Compared to the gold standard virus neutralization (VN) assay, the AGID sensitivity and specificity were 95% and 96.6% respectively. Thus, recombinant gB produced in the baculovirus-insect cell system is a viable source of antigen for the detection of PrV antibodies in AGID tests. Considering its relatively lower cost, simplicity of use and result interpretation, our AGID is a valuable alternative tool to the VN assay.

  16. A fully defined, fed-batch, recombinant NS0 culture process for monoclonal antibody production.

    PubMed

    Hermes, Paul A; Castro, Chris D

    2010-01-01

    To manufacture a glycoprotein, mammalian cells expressing the desired protein are often grown in fed-batch mode. Feeding an undefined, nonanimal hydrolysate helps the cells receive sufficient nutrition, but makes systems difficult to optimize. Even different lots of the same hydrolysate may have significant variability; furthermore, individual components may actually be detrimental to the cells. Switching to fully defined feeds could eliminate these issues. For monoclonal antibody (mAb) production by fed-batch NS0 cells, this article describes the replacement of a hydrolysate-based feed with a fully defined, animal-component-free feed system. The defined feed initially had 67 components, but additional experiments allowed a reduction to 25 components. The mAb titer is approximately 20% higher than in the undefined system, and the feed volume is circa 20% lower. The two systems generated antibodies with similar glycosylation profiles. Other benefits of the defined feed system include lower raw material costs, the ability to optimize key nutrient concentrations, greater confidence in raw material quality, and the elimination of potential, hydrolysate-associated endotoxin issues.

  17. Single cell cloning and recombinant monoclonal antibodies generation from RA synovial B cells reveal frequent targeting of citrullinated histones of NETs

    PubMed Central

    Corsiero, Elisa; Bombardieri, Michele; Carlotti, Emanuela; Pratesi, Federico; Robinson, William; Migliorini, Paola; Pitzalis, Costantino

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterised by breach of self-tolerance towards citrullinated antigens with generation of anti-citrullinated peptide/proteins antibodies (ACPA). Currently, the nature and source of citrullinated antigens driving the humoral autoimmune response within synovial ectopic lymphoid structures (ELS) is a crucial unknown aspect of RA pathogenesis. Here we characterised the autoreactive B-cell response of lesional B cells isolated from ELS+RA synovium. Methods Single synovial tissue CD19+cells were Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS)-sorted and VH/VL Ig genes cloned to generate recombinant monoclonal antibodies (rmAbs) from patients with ELS+/ACPA+RA. Results RA-rmAbs immunoreactivity analysis provided the following key findings: (1) in a chIP-based array containing 300 autoantigens and in a ‘citrullinome’ multiplex assay, a strong reactivity against citrullinated histones H2A/H2B (citH2A/H2B) was observed in ∼40% of RA-rmAbs, followed by cit-fibrinogen and cit-vimentin; (2) anti-citH2A/H2B-reactive RA-rmAbs (but not anti-citH2A/H2B negative) selectively recognised neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) from peripheral blood and/or RA joint neutrophils; (3) anti-citH2A/citH2B and anti-NET immunobinding was dependent on affinity maturation and was completely abrogated following reversion of hypermutated IgVH/VL genes to germline sequences; (4) ELS+ (not ELS−) RA synovial tissues engrafted into Severe Combined ImmunoDeficiency (SCID) mice released human anti-citH2A/citH2B and anti-NET antibodies in association with the intra-graft expression of CXCL13 and lymphotoxin (LT)-β, two master regulators of ELS. Conclusion We provided novel evidence that B cells differentiated within synovial ELS in the RA joints frequent target deiminated proteins which could be generated during NETosis of RA synovial neutrophils including histones. Thus, NETs could represent a source of citrullinated antigens fuelling the ACPA autoimmune

  18. [Heterologous genes expression on Escherichia coli chromosome lac operon using Red recombination].

    PubMed

    Li, Shanhu; Shi, Qingguo; Huang, Cuifen; Zhou, Jianguang

    2008-04-01

    To achieve efficient and stable expression of heterologous exogenetic protein or antigen in E. coli chromosome, the luciferase report gene was knocked in lacZ site of chromosome lac operon by using Red recombination system and selection-counterselection kan/sacB technology. The quantitative analysis of exogenous gene expression indicated that the target gene could be efficiently expressed at lacZ site of lac operon. The results confirmed the efficient screening and stable expression of heterologous protein or antigen on chromosome by using the recombinant engineering technique. This study demonstrated that the chromosome could be used as a vector for heterologous protein or antigen and the stable expression of exogenous gene on E. coli chromosome had no side effect on the bacterial growth and propagation.

  19. Homologous recombination within the capsid gene of porcine circovirus type 2 subgroup viruses via natural co-infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several studies had reported homologous recombination between porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2)-group 1 (Gp1) and -group 2 (Gp2) viruses. Interestingly, the recombination events described thus far mapped either within the Rep gene sequences or the sequences flanking the Rep gene region. Previously, ...

  20. Evolution and homologous recombination of the hemagglutinin-esterase gene sequences from porcine torovirus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of the present study was to gain new insights into the evolution, homologous recombination and selection pressures imposed on the porcine torovirus (PToV), by examining changes in the hemagglutinin-esterase (HE) gene. The most recent common ancestor of PToV was estimated to have emerge...

  1. Problem-Solving Test: Conditional Gene Targeting Using the Cre/loxP Recombination System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberényi, József

    2013-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: gene targeting, knock-out mutation, bacteriophage, complementary base-pairing, homologous recombination, deletion, transgenic organisms, promoter, polyadenylation element, transgene, DNA replication, RNA polymerase, Shine-Dalgarno sequence, restriction endonuclease, polymerase chain…

  2. Pre-existing anti-adeno-associated virus antibodies as a challenge in AAV gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Louis Jeune, Vedell; Joergensen, Jakob A; Hajjar, Roger J; Weber, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based vectors are promising tools for gene therapeutic applications, in part because AAVs are nonpathogenic viruses, and vectors derived from them can drive long-term transgene expression without integration of the vector DNA into the host genome. AAVs are not strongly immunogenic, but they can, nonetheless, give rise to both a cellular and humoral immune response. As a result, a significant fraction of potential patients for AAV-based gene therapy harbors pre-existing antibodies against AAV. Because even very low levels of antibodies can prevent successful transduction, antecedent anti-AAV antibodies pose a serious obstacle to the universal application of AAV gene therapy. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge of the role of anti-AAV antibodies in AAV-based gene therapy with a particular emphasis on approaches to overcome the hurdle that they pose.

  3. Capillary isoelectric focusing method development and validation for investigation of recombinant therapeutic monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Suba, Dávid; Urbányi, Zoltán; Salgó, András

    2015-10-10

    Capillary isoelectric focusing (cIEF) is a basic and highly accurate routine analytical tool to prove identity of protein drugs in quality control (QC) and release tests in biopharmaceutical industries. However there are some "out-of-the-box" applications commercially available which provide easy and rapid isoelectric focusing solutions for investigating monoclonal antibody drug proteins. However use of these kits in routine testings requires high costs. A capillary isoelectric focusing method was developed and validated for identification testing of monoclonal antibody drug products with isoelectric point between 7.0 and 9.0. A method was developed providing good pH gradient for internal calibration (R(2)>0.99) and good resolution between all of the isoform peaks (R=2), minimizing the time and complexity of sample preparation (no urea or salt used). The method is highly reproducible and it is suitable for validation and method transfer to any QC laboratories. Another advantage of the method is that it operates with commercially available chemicals which can be purchased from any suppliers. The interaction with capillary walls (avoid precipitation and adsorption as far as possible) was minimized and synthetic isoelectric small molecular markers were used instead of peptide or protein based markers. The developed method was validated according to the recent ICH guideline (Q2(R1)). Relative standard deviation results were below 0.2% for isoelectric points and below 4% according to the normalized migration times. The method is robust to buffer components with different lot numbers and neutral capillaries with different type of inner coatings. The fluoro-carbon coated column was chosen because of costs-effectivity aspects.

  4. Serodiagnosis of listeriosis based upon detection of antibodies against recombinant truncated forms of listeriolysin O.

    PubMed Central

    Gholizadeh, Y; Poyart, C; Juvin, M; Beretti, J L; Croizé, J; Berche, P; Gaillard, J L

    1996-01-01

    Amino-terminal fragments of listeriolysin O (LLO) of 240 and 411 residues (fragments LLO240 and LLO411, respectively) were expressed in Escherichia coli as fusion polypeptides with maltose-binding protein (MBP) with the aim of producing specific antigens for use in serological tests. In Western blots (immunoblots) with crude bacterial extracts of the fusion polypeptides, the reactivities of MBP-LLO240 and MBP-LLO411 with anti-LLO antibody (ALLO)- and anti-streptolysin O antibody (ASLO)-positive human sera were first compared with that of the entire LLO (LLO530) also fused to MBP (MBP-LLO530). Sixteen of 17 (94.1%) ALLO-positive samples reacting with MBP-LLO530 also reacted with MBP-LLO411, whereas this proportion dropped to 11 of 17 (64.7%) with MBP-LLO240. Alternatively, 18 of 19 (94.7%) ASLO-positive samples giving an interpretable result reacted with MBP-LLO530, whereas 1 of 19 (5.3%) of these samples reacted with MBP-LLO240 or MBP-LLO411. The fusion polypeptide MBP-LLO411 was purified by maltose affinity chromatography and was further evaluated as a diagnostic antigen in a Western blot assay. Twenty-one of 21 (100%) serum samples obtained from patients with listeriosis and found to be positive for ALLO by a reference dot blot test reacted with MBP-LLO411, whereas 1 of 20 (5%) ASLO-positive serum samples and 1 of 100 (1%) serum samples from healthy adults were reactive. Thus, a polypeptide limited to the 411 amino-terminal residues of LLO is a specific and sensitive antigen for the detection of ALLO. PMID:8735086

  5. D-ribulose-5-phosphate 3-epimerase: Cloning and heterologous expression of the spinach gene, and purification and characterization of the recombinant enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.R.; Hartman, F.C.; Lu, T.Y.S.; Larimer, F.W.

    1998-09-01

    The authors have achieved, to their knowledge, the first high-level heterologous expression of the gene encoding D-ribulose-5-phosphate 3-epimerase from any source, thereby permitting isolation and characterization of the epimerase as found in photosynthetic organisms. The extremely labile recombinant spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) enzyme was stabilized by DL-{alpha}-glycerophosphate or ethanol and destabilized by D-ribulose-5-phosphate or 2-mercaptoethanol. Despite this lability, the unprecedentedly high specific activity of the purified material indicates that the structural integrity of the enzyme is maintained throughout isolation. Ethylenediaminetetraacetate and divalent metal cations did not affect epimerase activity, thereby excluding a requirement for the latter in catalysis. As deduced from the sequence of the cloned spinach gene and the electrophoretic mobility under denaturing conditions of the purified recombinant enzyme, its 25-kD subunit size was about the same as that of the corresponding epimerases of yeast and mammals. However, in contrast to these other species, the recombinant spinach enzyme was octameric rather than dimeric, as assessed by gel filtration and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under nondenaturing conditions. Western-blot analyses with antibodies to the purified recombinant enzyme confirmed that the epimerase extracted from spinach leaves is also octameric.

  6. Antitherapeutic antibody-mediated hepatotoxicity of recombinant human Apo2L/TRAIL in the cynomolgus monkey

    PubMed Central

    Zuch de Zafra, Christina L; Ashkenazi, Avi; Darbonne, Walter C; Cheu, Melissa; Totpal, Klara; Ortega, Shirley; Flores, Heather; Walker, Mark D; Kabakoff, Bruce; Lum, Bert L; Mounho-Zamora, Barbara J; Marsters, Scot A; Dybdal, Noël O

    2016-01-01

    Apo2L/TRAIL is a member of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily and an important inducer of apoptosis. Recombinant human (rhu) Apo2L/TRAIL has been attractive as a potential cancer therapeutic because many types of tumor cells are sensitive to its apoptosis-inducing effects. Nonclinical toxicology studies were conducted to evaluate the safety of rhuApo2L/TRAIL for possible use in humans. The cynomolgus monkey was chosen for this safety assessment based on high protein sequence homology between human and cynomolgus Apo2L/TRAIL and comparable expression of their receptors. Although hepatotoxicity was observed in repeat-dose monkey studies with rhuApo2L/TRAIL, all animals that displayed hepatotoxicity had developed antitherapeutic antibodies (ATAs). The cynomolgus ATAs augmented the cytotoxicity of rhuApo2L/TRAIL but not of its cynomolgus counterpart. Of note, human and cynomolgus Apo2L/TRAIL differ by four amino acids, three of which are surface-exposed. In vivo studies comparing human and cynomolgus Apo2L/TRAIL supported the conclusion that these distinct amino acids served as epitopes for cross-species ATAs, capable of crosslinking rhuApo2L/TRAIL and thus triggering hepatocyte apoptosis. We describe a hapten-independent mechanism of immune-mediated, drug-related hepatotoxicity – in this case – associated with the administration of a human recombinant protein in monkeys. The elucidation of this mechanism enabled successful transition of rhuApo2L/TRAIL into human clinical trials. PMID:27512959

  7. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against recombinant tethered follicle-stimulating hormone from Japanese eel Anguilla japonica.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae-Jung; Park, Chae-Won; Kim, Dong-Wan; Park, Hong-Kyu; Byambaragchaa, Munkhzaya; Lee, Nam-Sil; Hong, Sun-Mee; Seo, Mi-Young; Kang, Myung-Hwa; Min, Kwan-Sik

    2016-07-01

    We prepared monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against a recombinant tethered follicle-stimulating hormone (rec-FSH) from Japanese eel Anguilla japonica that was produced in Escherichia coli. Positive hybridomas (clones eFA-C5, eFA-C10, eFA-C11, eFA-C12, eFA-C13, and eFB-C14) were selected by using the eel FSH antigen in ELISA, and anti-eel FSH mAbs were purified from culture supernatants by performing affinity chromatography. Three of the 6mAbs were characterized and their isotypes were identified as IgG2b (eFA-C5 and eFA-C11) and IgG1 (eFB-C14). In western blotting assays, the mAbs recognized the antigen as a 24.3-kDa band, and further detected bands of 34 and 32kDa in the supernatants of CHO cells transfected with cDNA encoding tethered eel FSHβ/α and LHβ/α, respectively. PNase F-mediated deglycosylation of the recombinant proteins resulted in a drastic reduction in their molecular weight, to 7-9kDa. The mAbs eFA-C5 and eFA-C11 recognized the eel FSHα-subunit that is commonly encoded among glycoprotein hormones, whereas eFB-C14 recognized the eel FSHβ-subunit, and immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the staining by these mAbs was specifically localized in the eel pituitary. We also established an ELISA system for detecting rec-tethered FSHβ/α and LHβ/α produced from CHO cell lines. Measurement of biological activities in vitro revealed that only weak activity of rec-FSHβ/α was detected. The activity of rec-LHβ/α was found to be increased in a dose-dependent manner for eel oocyte maturation.

  8. Characterization of anti-MERS-CoV antibodies against various recombinant structural antigens of MERS-CoV in an imported case in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenling; Wang, Huijuan; Deng, Yao; Song, Tie; Lan, Jiaming; Wu, Guizhen; Ke, Changwen; Tan, Wenjie

    2016-11-09

    The first imported case of Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) in China recently occurred, allowing for the characterization of antibody titers in a series of the patient's sera using the following methods based on recombinant viral structural antigens: inactivated MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), recombinant MERS-CoV spike (S, or fragments of S) ELISA, nucleoprotein (NP) ELISA and MERS S pseudovirus particle-based neutralization test (ppNT). A longitudinal profile of the infection showed that seroconversion detected by ELISAs based on the recombinant extracellular domain, S, S1 and receptor-binding domain (RBD) antigens occurred as early as neutralizing antibodies were detected by the ppNT and earlier than antibodies were detected by the inactivated MERS-CoV and N-terminal domain (NTD) ELISAs. Antibodies detected by the NP ELISA occurred last. Strong correlations were found between the S1, RBD and NP ELISAs and the inactivated MERS-CoV ELISA. The S and RBD ELISAs were highly correlated with the commercial S1 ELISA. The S ELISA strongly correlated with the ppNT, although the MERS-CoV, S1, NTD and RBD ELISAs were also significantly correlated with the ppNT (P<0.001).

  9. Characterization of anti-MERS-CoV antibodies against various recombinant structural antigens of MERS-CoV in an imported case in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenling; Wang, Huijuan; Deng, Yao; Song, Tie; Lan, Jiaming; Wu, Guizhen; Ke, Changwen; Tan, Wenjie

    2016-01-01

    The first imported case of Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) in China recently occurred, allowing for the characterization of antibody titers in a series of the patient's sera using the following methods based on recombinant viral structural antigens: inactivated MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), recombinant MERS-CoV spike (S, or fragments of S) ELISA, nucleoprotein (NP) ELISA and MERS S pseudovirus particle-based neutralization test (ppNT). A longitudinal profile of the infection showed that seroconversion detected by ELISAs based on the recombinant extracellular domain, S, S1 and receptor-binding domain (RBD) antigens occurred as early as neutralizing antibodies were detected by the ppNT and earlier than antibodies were detected by the inactivated MERS-CoV and N-terminal domain (NTD) ELISAs. Antibodies detected by the NP ELISA occurred last. Strong correlations were found between the S1, RBD and NP ELISAs and the inactivated MERS-CoV ELISA. The S and RBD ELISAs were highly correlated with the commercial S1 ELISA. The S ELISA strongly correlated with the ppNT, although the MERS-CoV, S1, NTD and RBD ELISAs were also significantly correlated with the ppNT (P<0.001). PMID:27826140

  10. Antibody-directed double suicide gene therapy targeting of MUC1- positive leukemia cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiao-Ya; Wang, Wen-Qian; Zhao, Yu; Li, Xu-Dong; Fang, Zhi-Gang; Lin, Dong-Jun; Xiao, Ruo-Zhi; Huang, Ren-Wei; Pan, Guang-Jin; Liu, Jia-Jun

    2013-10-01

    Our aim was to specifically transfer the cytosine deaminase (CD) and thymidine kinase (TK) genes into mucin 1 (MUC1)-positive leukemia cells by anti-MUC1 antibody directed infection of replication-defective lentivirus and to evaluate the targeted cytotoxicity of double suicide genes to leukemia. The target gene vector (containing CD and TK) and envelope (containing GFP and anti-MUC1) and packaging plasmids were cotransfected into 293T cells to produce the recombinant lentivirus. Suicide genes in virus-infected leukemia cells (U937, Jurkat, and K562) were detected by western blot. The cytotoxicity and bystander effect in vitro and the therapeutic effect in vivo were detected after treatment with the prodrugs. The results revealed that combined treatment with prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) and ganciclovir (GCV) inhibited leukemia cell growth and caused significant bystander effect than treatment with either prodrug alone. TK/GCV treatment alone induced degeneration and cell death while the effect of CD/5-FC alone mainly caused vacuolar degeneration and necrosis. The addictive effects of combinatorial use of GCV and 5-FC mainly induced swelling of the mitochondria followed by necrosis of the leukemia cells. In vivo experiments revealed that both single and combinatorial prodrug treatments could prolong the survival time of leukemic mice. In summary, anti-MUC1 antibody directed lentiviral vector successfully transduced dual suicide genes and exerted targeted cytotoxicity against MUC1 positive leukemia cells. This targeted lentiviral dual suicide gene delivering system provides a promising approach for clinical treatment of leukemia in future.

  11. A modified recombineering protocol for the genetic manipulation of gene clusters in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Alcazar-Fuoli, Laura; Cairns, Timothy; Lopez, Jordi F; Zonja, Bozo; Pérez, Sandra; Barceló, Damià; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Bowyer, Paul; Bignell, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    Genomic analyses of fungal genome structure have revealed the presence of physically-linked groups of genes, termed gene clusters, where collective functionality of encoded gene products serves a common biosynthetic purpose. In multiple fungal pathogens of humans and plants gene clusters have been shown to encode pathways for biosynthesis of secondary metabolites including metabolites required for pathogenicity. In the major mould pathogen of humans Aspergillus fumigatus, multiple clusters of co-ordinately upregulated genes were identified as having heightened transcript abundances, relative to laboratory cultured equivalents, during the early stages of murine infection. The aim of this study was to develop and optimise a methodology for manipulation of gene cluster architecture, thereby providing the means to assess their relevance to fungal pathogenicity. To this end we adapted a recombineering methodology which exploits lambda phage-mediated recombination of DNA in bacteria, for the generation of gene cluster deletion cassettes. By exploiting a pre-existing bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library of A. fumigatus genomic clones we were able to implement single or multiple intra-cluster gene replacement events at both subtelomeric and telomere distal chromosomal locations, in both wild type and highly recombinogenic A. fumigatus isolates. We then applied the methodology to address the boundaries of a gene cluster producing a nematocidal secondary metabolite, pseurotin A, and to address the role of this secondary metabolite in insect and mammalian responses to A. fumigatus challenge.

  12. A Modified Recombineering Protocol for the Genetic Manipulation of Gene Clusters in Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Alcazar-Fuoli, Laura; Cairns, Timothy; Lopez, Jordi F.; Zonja, Bozo; Pérez, Sandra; Barceló, Damià; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Bowyer, Paul; Bignell, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    Genomic analyses of fungal genome structure have revealed the presence of physically-linked groups of genes, termed gene clusters, where collective functionality of encoded gene products serves a common biosynthetic purpose. In multiple fungal pathogens of humans and plants gene clusters have been shown to encode pathways for biosynthesis of secondary metabolites including metabolites required for pathogenicity. In the major mould pathogen of humans Aspergillus fumigatus, multiple clusters of co-ordinately upregulated genes were identified as having heightened transcript abundances, relative to laboratory cultured equivalents, during the early stages of murine infection. The aim of this study was to develop and optimise a methodology for manipulation of gene cluster architecture, thereby providing the means to assess their relevance to fungal pathogenicity. To this end we adapted a recombineering methodology which exploits lambda phage-mediated recombination of DNA in bacteria, for the generation of gene cluster deletion cassettes. By exploiting a pre-existing bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library of A. fumigatus genomic clones we were able to implement single or multiple intra-cluster gene replacement events at both subtelomeric and telomere distal chromosomal locations, in both wild type and highly recombinogenic A. fumigatus isolates. We then applied the methodology to address the boundaries of a gene cluster producing a nematocidal secondary metabolite, pseurotin A, and to address the role of this secondary metabolite in insect and mammalian responses to A. fumigatus challenge. PMID:25372385

  13. Gene expression analysis in MCF-7 breast cancer cells treated with recombinant bromelain.

    PubMed

    Fouz, Nour; Amid, Azura; Hashim, Yumi Zuhanis Has-Yun

    2014-08-01

    The contributing molecular pathways underlying the pathogenesis of breast cancer need to be better characterized. The principle of our study was to better understand the genetic mechanism of oncogenesis for human breast cancer and to discover new possible tumor markers for use in clinical practice. We used complimentary DNA (cDNA) microarrays to compare gene expression profiles of treated Michigan Cancer Foundation-7 (MCF-7) with recombinant bromelain and untreated MCF-7. SpringGene analysis was carried out of differential expression followed by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA), to understand the underlying consequence in developing disease and disorders. We identified 1,102 known genes differentially expressed to a significant degree (p<0.001) changed between the treatment. Within this gene set, 20 genes were significantly changed between treated cells and the control cells with cutoff fold change of more than 1.5. These genes are RNA-binding motif, single-stranded interacting protein 1 (RBMS1), ribosomal protein L29 (RPL29), glutathione S-transferase mu 2 (GSTM2), C15orf32, Akt3, B cell translocation gene 1 (BTG1), C6orf62, C7orf60, kinesin-associated protein 3 (KIFAP3), FBXO11, AT-rich interactive domain 4A (ARID4A), COPS2, TBPL1|SLC2A12, TMEM59, SNORD46, glioma tumor suppressor candidate region gene 2 (GLTSCR2), and LRRFIP. Our observation on gene expression indicated that recombinant bromelain produces a unique signature affecting different pathways, specific for each congener. The microarray results give a molecular mechanistic insight and functional effects, following recombinant bromelain treatment. The extent of changes in genes is related to and involved significantly in gap junction signaling, amyloid processing, cell cycle regulation by BTG family proteins, and breast cancer regulation by stathmin1 that play major roles.

  14. Novel camelid antibody fragments targeting recombinant nucleoprotein of Araucaria hantavirus: a prototype for an early diagnosis of Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Soraya S; Moreira-Dill, Leandro S; Morais, Michelle S S; Prado, Nidiane D R; Barros, Marcos L; Koishi, Andrea C; Mazarrotto, Giovanny A C A; Gonçalves, Giselle M; Zuliani, Juliana P; Calderon, Leonardo A; Soares, Andreimar M; Pereira da Silva, Luiz H; Duarte dos Santos, Claudia N; Fernandes, Carla F C; Stabeli, Rodrigo G

    2014-01-01

    In addition to conventional antibodies, camelids produce immunoglobulins G composed exclusively of heavy chains in which the antigen binding site is formed only by single domains called VHH. Their particular characteristics make VHHs interesting tools for drug-delivery, passive immunotherapy and high-throughput diagnosis. Hantaviruses are rodent-borne viruses of the Bunyaviridae family. Two clinical forms of the infection are known. Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome (HFRS) is present in the Old World, while Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) is found on the American continent. There is no specific treatment for HPS and its diagnosis is carried out by molecular or serological techniques, using mainly monoclonal antibodies or hantavirus nucleoprotein (N) to detect IgM and IgG in patient serum. This study proposes the use of camelid VHHs to develop alternative methods for diagnosing and confirming HPS. Phage display technology was employed to obtain VHHs. After immunizing one Lama glama against the recombinant N protein (prNΔ₈₅) of a Brazilian hantavirus strain, VHH regions were isolated to construct an immune library. VHHs were displayed fused to the M13KO7 phage coat protein III and the selection steps were performed on immobilized prNΔ₈₅. After selection, eighty clones recognized specifically the N protein. These were sequenced, grouped based mainly on the CDRs, and five clones were analyzed by western blot (WB), surface plasmon resonance (SPR) device, and ELISA. Besides the ability to recognize prNΔ85 by WB, all selected clones showed affinity constants in the nanomolar range. Additionaly, the clone KC329705 is able to detect prNΔ₈₅ in solution, as well as the native viral antigen. Findings support the hypothesis that selected VHHs could be a powerful tool in the development of rapid and accurate HPS diagnostic assays, which are essential to provide supportive care to patients and reduce the high mortality rate associated with hantavirus

  15. Evaluation on the efficacy and immunogenicity of recombinant DNA plasmids expressing spike genes from porcine transmissible gastroenteritis virus and porcine epidemic diarrhea virus.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fandan; Ren, Yudong; Suo, Siqingaowa; Sun, Xuejiao; Li, Xunliang; Li, Pengchong; Yang, Wei; Li, Guangxing; Li, Lu; Schwegmann-Wessels, Christel; Herrler, Georg; Ren, Xiaofeng

    2013-01-01

    Porcine transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) and porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PDEV) can cause severe diarrhea in pigs. Development of effective vaccines against TGEV and PEDV is one of important prevention measures. The spike (S) protein is the surface glycoprotein of TGEV and PEDV, which can induce specific neutralization antibodies and is a candidate antigen for vaccination attempts. In this study, the open reading frames of the TGEV S1 protein and in addition of the S or S1 proteins of PEDV were inserted into the eukaryotic expression vector, pIRES, resulting in recombinant plasmids, pIRES-(TGEV-S1-PEDV-S1) and pIRES-(TGEV-S1-PEDV-S). Subsequently, 6-8 weeks old Kunming mice were inoculated with both DNA plasmids. Lymphocyte proliferation assay, virus neutralization assay, IFN-γ assay and CTL activity assay were performed. TGEV/PEDV specific antibody responses as well as kinetic changes of T lymphocyte subgroups of the immunized mice were analyzed. The results showed that the recombinant DNA plasmids increased the proliferation of T lymphocytes and the number of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocyte subgroups. In addition, the DNA vaccines induced a high level of IFN-γ in the immunized mice. The specific CTL activity in the pIRES-(TGEV-S1-PEDV-S) group became significant at 42 days post-immunization. At 35 days post-immunization, the recombinant DNA plasmids bearing full-length S genes of TGEV and PEDV stimulated higher levels of specific antibodies and neutralizing antibodies in immunized mice.

  16. Comparing CDRH3 diversity captured from secondary lymphoid organs for the generation of recombinant human antibodies.

    PubMed

    Venet, Sophie; Kosco-Vilbois, Marie; Fischer, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    The plasticity of natural immunoglobulin repertoires can be exploited for the generation of phage display libraries. Secondary lymphoid organs, such as the spleen and the lymph nodes, constitute interesting sources of diversity because they are rich in B cells, part of which can be affinity matured. These organs, however, differ in their anatomical structure, reflecting the different fluids they drain, which affects the B cell repertoires. The CDRH3 repertoires from these organs, extracted from naïve or immunized mice, were compared in the context of phage display libraries using human antibody framework families. Deep sequencing analysis revealed that all libraries displayed different CDRH3 repertoires, but the one derived from lymph nodes of naïve mice was the most diverse. Library performance was assessed by in vitro selection. For both organs, immunization increased substantially the frequency of molecules able to bind to the immunogen. The library derived from lymph nodes from naïve mice, however, was the most effective in generating diverse and high affinity candidates. These results illustrate that the use of a biased CDRH3 repertoire increases the performance of libraries, but reduces the clonal diversity, which may be detrimental for certain strategies.

  17. Applications of monoclonal antibodies and recombinant cytokines for the treatment of human colorectal and other carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Greiner, J.W.; Smalley, R.V.; Borden, E.C.; Martin, E.W.; Guadagni, F.; Roselli, M.; Schlom, J. )

    1991-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) which recognize a human tumor antigen, termed tumor-associated glycoprotein-72 (TAG-72), have successfully been used to localize primary as well as metastatic colorectal tumor lesions in patients. The localization of the anti-TAG-72 MAbs has also been exploited intraoperatively using a hand-held gamma probe. That procedure, termed radioimmunoguided surgery (RIGS), has identified occult tumors which were not detected using standard external imaging techniques. In another clinical trial, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) was administered intraperitoneally to patients diagnosed with either gastrointestinal or ovarian carcinoma with secondary ascites. Analysis of the tumor cells isolated from the malignant ascites revealed a substantial increase in TAG-72 expression on the surface of tumor cells isolated from seven of eight patients. The results provide evidence that the combination of an anti-carcinoma MAb with the administration of a cytokine, such as IFN-gamma, may be an effective approach for the detection and subsequent treatment, of colorectal carcinoma. 15 references.

  18. Recombination-activating gene 1 and 2 (RAG1 and RAG2) in flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus).

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianlei; Tan, Xungang; Zhang, Pei-Jun; Zhang, Yuqing; Xu, Peng

    2014-12-01

    During the development of B and T lymphocytes, Ig and TCR variable region genes are assembled from germline V, D, and J gene segments by a site-specific recombination reaction known as V(D)J recombination. The process of somatic V(D)J recombination, mediated by the recombination-activating gene (RAG) products, is the most significant characteristic of adaptive immunity in jawed vertebrates. Flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) RAG1 and RAG2 were isolated by Genome Walker and RT-PCR, and their expression patterns were analysed by RT-PCR and in situ hybridization on sections. RAG1 spans over 7.0 kb, containing 4 exons and 3 introns, and the full-length ORF is 3207 bp, encoding a peptide of 1068 amino acids. The first exon lies in the 5'-UTR, which is an alternative exon. RAG2 full-length ORF is 1062 bp, encodes a peptide of 533 amino acids, and lacks introns in the coding region. In 6-month old flounders, the expression of RAG1 and RAG2 was essentially restricted to the pronephros (head kidney) and mesonephros (truck kidney). Additionally, both of them were mainly expressed in the thymus. These results revealed that the thymus and kidney most likely serve as the primary lymphoid tissues in the flounder.

  19. Recombination analysis and structure prediction show correlation between breakpoint clusters and RNA hairpins in the pol gene of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 unique recombinant forms.

    PubMed

    Galli, Andrea; Lai, Alessia; Corvasce, Stefano; Saladini, Francesco; Riva, Chiara; Dehò, Lorenzo; Caramma, Ilaria; Franzetti, Marco; Romano, Laura; Galli, Massimo; Zazzi, Maurizio; Balotta, Claudia

    2008-12-01

    Recombination is recognized as a primary force in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) evolution, increasing viral diversity through reshuffling of genomic portions. The strand-switching activity of reverse transcriptase is required to complete HIV-1 replication and can occur randomly throughout the genome, leading to viral recombination. Some recombination hotspots have been identified and found to correlate with RNA structure or sequence features. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of recombination hotspots in the pol gene of HIV-1 and to assess their correlation with the underlying RNA structure. Analysis of the recombination pattern and breakpoint distribution in a group of unique recombinant forms (URFs) detected two recombination hotspots in the pol region. Two stable and conserved hairpins were consistently predicted corresponding to the identified hotspots using six different RNA-folding algorithms on the URF parental strains. These findings suggest that such hairpins may play a role in the higher recombination rates detected at these positions.

  20. Isolation of novel human and mouse genes of the recA/RAD51 recombination-repair gene family.

    PubMed Central

    Cartwright, R; Dunn, A M; Simpson, P J; Tambini, C E; Thacker, J

    1998-01-01

    Genes from the recA/RAD51 family play essential roles in homologous recombination in all organisms. Using sequence homologies from eukaryotic members of this family we have identified fragments of two additional mammalian genes with homology to RAD51. Cloning the full-length cDNAs for both human and mouse genes showed that the sequences are highly conserved, and that the predicted proteins have characteristic features of this gene family. One of the novel genes (R51H2) occurs in two forms in human cDNA, differing extensively at the 3' end, probably due to an unusual form of alternative splicing. The new genes (R51H2 and R51H3) were mapped to human chromosomes 14q23-24 and 17q1.2, respectively. Expression studies showed that R51H2 is expressed at lower levels than R51H3 , but that expression of both genes occurs at elevated levels in the testis compared with other tissues. The combination of gene structure conservation and the transcript expression patterns suggests that these new members of the recA/RAD51 family may also function in homologous recombination-repair pathways. PMID:9512535

  1. Dynamics and modeling of temperature-regulated gene product expression in recombinant yeast fermentation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, C; Yang, S T

    1996-06-20

    The dynamic response of temperature-regulated gene expression in the recombinant yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, strain XK1-C2 carrying plasmid pSXR125, to temperature changes during fed-batch and continuous (chemostat) cultures was studied. The production of the gene product, beta-galactosidase, in the yeast cell is sensitive to the growth temperature. Gene expression of this product was fully turned on or off by temperature shifts between 24 and 30 degrees C. However, the response for gene turn-on and turn-off in this recombinant yeast was slow, requiring from several hours to over 10 h to fully appear. The continuous reactor took 30-60 h after the temperature shift to reach a new steady state. A dynamic process model was developed to simulate the reactor and cell responses to temperature shift. A first-order model was used to account for the effect of dilution rate on the change of protein concentration in the chemostat. It was found that cell response in gene expression to temperature shift followed first-order plus dead-time dynamics. Also, the response time for gene expression to temperature shift varied with specific growth rate or dilution rate of the continuous reactor. In general, the response was slower at a higher dilution rate and for gene turn-on than for gene turn-off.

  2. A monoclonal antibody against the human SUMO-1 protein obtained by immunization with recombinant protein and CpG-DNA-liposome complex.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dongbum; Lee, Joo Young; Song, Dae-Geun; Kwon, Sanghoon; Lee, Younghee; Pan, Cheol-Ho; Kwon, Hyung-Joo

    2013-10-01

    Post-translational modification regulated by conjugation of a small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) is involved in various cellular processes. In this study, we expressed and purified recombinant human SUMO-1 (hSUMO-1). BALB/c mice were immunized with a complex of hSUMO-1 protein and Lipoplex(O) to produce hSUMO-1-specific antibodies. Using conventional hybridoma technology, we obtained four hybridoma clones derived from the mouse with the highest antibody titer against hSUMO-1. Based on Western blot analysis, our hSUMO-1 monoclonal antibody specifically recognizes hSUMO-1, but not other SUMO proteins. These results support that the anti-hSUMO-1 monoclonal antibody produced with the aid of Lipoplex(O) adjuvant is specific and that Lipoplex(O) is useful for development of monoclonal antibodies against recombinant protein. In addition, we analyzed human tissues to examine the distribution of hSUMO-1. Higher expression of hSUMO-1 was detected in normal adrenal gland, esophagus, pancreas, liver, stomach, kidney, and uterus than in corresponding cancer tissues, suggesting a tumor suppressive function of hSUMO-1.

  3. Absolute quantitation of host cell proteins in recombinant human monoclonal antibodies with an automated CZE-ESI-MS/MS system.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guijie; Sun, Liangliang; Linkous, Travis; Kernaghan, Dawn; McGivney, James B; Dovichi, Norman J

    2014-05-01

    We report the first use of CZE for absolute characterization of host cell proteins (HCPs) in recombinant human monoclonal antibodies. An electrokinetically pumped nanoelectrospray interface was used to couple CZE with a tandem mass spectrometer. Three isotopic-labeled peptides (LSFDKDAMVAR, VDIVENQAMDTR, and LVSDEMVVELIEK) were synthesized by direct incorporation of an isotope-labeled lysine or arginine. The heavy-labeled peptides were spiked in the HCP digests at known concentrations. After CZE-ESI-MS/MS analysis, the peaks of native and isotopic-labeled peptides were extracted with mass tolerance ≤ 5 ppm from the electropherograms, and the ratios of peak area between native and isotopic-labeled peptides pairs were calculated. Calibration curves (the ratios of peak area versus spiked peptide amount) with R(2) values of 0.999, 0.997, and 0.999 were obtained for the three HCP peptides, and the absolute amounts of the three proteins present were determined to be at the picomole level in a 20 μg sample of digested HCPs. The target proteins were present at the 7-30 ppt level in the purified HCP samples.

  4. Generation and characterization of murine monoclonal antibodies to genus-specific 31-kilodalton recombinant cell surface protein of Brucella abortus.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sanjay; Tuteja, Urmil; Batra, Harsh Vardhan

    2007-08-01

    In the present study hybridomas were produced from fusion with splenocytes of BALB/c mice immunized with the recombinant 31-kDa cell surface protein (r31CSP) specific for Brucella species. A set of eight stabilized hybridoma cell lines was generated against r31CSP. Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) produced by all these clones exhibited reactivity for r31CSP as well as with the protein of 31-kDa, derived from whole-cell lysate of 31-kDa Brucella abortus 544. Four of eight MAbs were IgG1, two IgG2b, and two IgM in nature. These MAbs did not show any cross-reaction with whole-cell lysate of Yersinia enterocolitica O: 9, Vibrio cholerae, Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli 0157 by Western blotting. Reactivity of these MAbs was further assessed with other organisms of Brucella species namely, B. abortus S99, B. canis, B. melitensis 16M, B. suis, and a clinical isolate of B. melitensis. Collectively, these data suggest that these MAbs may have the potential for use in the detection of Brucella species with high specificity.

  5. Production of monoclonal antibody against recombinant NS3 protein of bovine viral diarrhea virus (NADL strain)

    PubMed Central

    Seyfi Abad Shapouri, Masood Reza; Ekhtelat, Maryam; Ghorbanpoor Najaf Abadi, Masood; Lotfi, Mohsen; Rashno, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the prevalence of subclinical mastitis caused by Staphylococcus spp. in ewes in West-Azerbaijan province of Iran. Molecular characterization of isolated Staphylococcus spp. from diseased ewes were performed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and DNA sequencing of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gap) gene. Also, antibiotic resistance of staphylococcal isolates against different antibiotics was investigated. A total number of 900 milk samples from 450 native ewes in their mid-lactation period were examined by the California mastitis test (CMT). The CMT positive samples were cultured and bacteria were isolated from 86 (9.50%) glands and 74 (16.40%) ewes. The prevalence of subclinical mastitis in the examined ewes was 16.40%. Microbiological analysis of milk samples revealed that 27 out of 74 sheep with subclinical mastitis were infected with Staphylococcus spp. Amplification of gap gene of 27 Staphylococcus isolates generated a single amplicon of 933 bp in size confirming that isolates were belonged to Staphylococcus genus. Digestion of PCR products by AluI endonuclease generated different RFLP patterns for each species. Nucleotide sequencing of gap gene followed by phylogenetic analysis showed that the most dominant Staphylococcus species were S. epidermidis, S. xylosus and S. chromogenes. Staphylococcal isolates showed the highest resistance to penicillin and ampicillin. In conclusion, Staphylococcus species, except for the southern parts of the province, play an important role in the development of subclinical mastitis in sheep in West-Azerbaijan province of Iran. Also, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin and neomycin are the most effective antibiotics for treatment of this disease. PMID:27872722

  6. The Cloning and Characterization of the Enolase2 Gene of Gekko japonicus and Its Polyclonal Antibody Preparation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Wu, Ronghua; Chen, Haijiao; Zhou, Youlang; Li, Yan; Wang, Yongjun; Liu, Yan; Liu, Mei

    2013-01-01

    The enolase2 gene is usually expressed in mature neurons and also named neuron specific enolase (NSE). In the present study, we first obtained the NSE gene cDNA sequence by using the RACE method based on the expressed sequence tag (EST) fragment from the cDNA library of Gekko japonicus and identified one transcript of about 2.2 kb in central nervous system of Gekko japonicus by Northern blotting. The open reading frame of NSE is 1305 bp, which encodes a 435 amino-acid protein. We further investigated the multi-tissue expression pattern of NSE by RT-PCR and found that the expression of NSE mRNA was very high in brain, spinal cord and low in heart, while it was not detectable in other tissues. The real-time quantitative PCR was used to investigate the time-dependent change in the expression of the NSE mRNA level after gecko spinal cord transection and found it significantly increased at one day, reaching its highest level three days post-injury and then decreasing at the seventh day of the experiment. The recombinant plasmid of pET-32a-NSE was constructed and induced to express His fused NSE protein. The purified NSE protein was used to immunize rabbits to generate polyclonal antisera. The titer of the antiserum was more than 1:65536 determined by ELISA. Western blotting showed that the prepared antibody could specifically recognize the recombinant and endogenous NSE protein. The result of immunohistochemistry revealed that positive signals were present in neurons of the brain and the spinal cord. This study provided the tools of cDNA and polyclonal antibody for studying NSE function in Gekko japonicus. PMID:23615470

  7. Neutralizing Antibodies Induced by Recombinant Virus-Like Particles of Enterovirus 71 Genotype C4 Inhibit Infection at Pre- and Post-attachment Steps

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Zhiqiang; Ye, Xiaohua; Huang, Xulin; Cai, Yicun; Liu, Qingwei; Li, Yan; Su, Zhiguo; Huang, Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Background Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a major causative agent of hand, foot and mouth disease, which has been prevalent in Asia–Pacific regions, causing significant morbidity and mortality in young children. Antibodies elicited by experimental EV71 vaccines could neutralize infection in vitro and passively protect animal models from lethal challenge, indicating that neutralizing antibodies play an essential role in protection. However, how neutralizing antibodies inhibit infection in vitro remains unclear. Methods/Findings In the present study, we explored the mechanisms of neutralization by antibodies against EV71 virus-like particles (VLPs). Recombinant VLPs of EV71 genotype C4 were produced in insect cells using baculovirus vectors. Immunization with the VLPs elicited a high-titer, EV71-specific antibody response in mice. Anti-VLP mouse sera potently neutralized EV71 infection in vitro. The neutralizing antibodies in the anti-VLP mouse sera were found to target mainly an extremely conserved epitope (FGEHKQEKDLEYGAC) located at the GH loop of the VP1 protein. The neutralizing anti-VLP antisera were able to inhibit virus binding to target cells efficiently. In addition, post-attachment treatment of virus-bound cells with the anti-VLP antisera also neutralized virus infection, although the antibody concentration required was higher than that of the pre-attachment treatment. Conclusions Collectively, our findings represent a valuable addition to the understanding of mechanisms of EV71 neutralization and have strong implications for EV71 vaccine development. PMID:23451250

  8. Effector properties and glycosylation patterns of recombinant human anti-D-IgG1 antibodies produced by human PER.C6(®) cells.

    PubMed

    Olovnikova, N I; Grigorieva, O V; Petrov, A V

    2012-12-01

    Creation of effective monoclonal anti-D immunoglobulin for prevention of hemolytic disease of the newborn remains an unsolved problem because there is still no producer cell strain providing stable production and adequate glycosylation of antibodies. Recombinant anti-D have been obtained on the basis of human PER.C6(®) cells and characterized. Anti-D antibodies expressed in PER.C6(®) exhibited lower hemolytic activity in antibody-dependent cytotoxicity (ADCC) reaction mediated by low-affinity Fcγ receptors in comparison with identical antibodies of lymphoblastoid origin. Monoclonal antibodies produced by PER.C6(®) are completely fucosylated and desialylated, i.e. are characterized by abnormal glycosylation. Addition of kifunensine (α-mannosidase I inhibitor) to the medium led to production of antibodies with high hemolytic activity. Reduced activity of monoclonal antibodies in PER.C6(®) cells and the effect of kifunensine (causing synthesis of defucosylated glycans) suggest that the absence of fucose is the key factor responsible for Fc affinity for low-affinity receptors.

  9. The restricted IgG1 antibody response to maedi visna virus is seen following infection but not following immunization with recombinant gag protein.

    PubMed

    Bird, P; Reyburn, H T; Blacklaws, B A; Allen, D; Nettleton, P; Yirrell, D L; Watt, N; Sargan, D; McConnell, I

    1995-11-01

    Maedi-visna (MVV) is a retrovirus of the subfamily lentivirinae which includes HIV, simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV). Infection of its natural host, the sheep, does not cause overt immunodeficiency, but rather a chronic inflammatory disease. However, subtle immunological changes following infection have been reported including a sheep IgG1 subclass-restricted MVV-neutralizing antibody. Here we demonstrate by Western blotting that there is no IgG2 serum antibody response to any MVV antigen after MVV infection, in contrast to infection with the parapox virus Orf, when serum IgG2 anti-Orf antibody is readily detected. By ELISA, the IgG1 antibody titres to Orf are higher than to MVV, but the minimum MVV serum antibody IgG1/IgG2 ratio is significantly raised compared with that for Orf virus antibody in the same sheep, indicating that the IgG2 defect in MVV infection cannot be accounted for by differences in the sensitivity of the Orf and MVV ELISA. Serum IgG2 anti-MVV gag p. 25 can be detected in both normal and MVV-infected sheep following immunization with purified recombinant MVV gag p 25 protein in Freund's complete adjuvant. The failure to make an IgG2 MVV-specific antibody indicates that immunological dysfunction can arise with macrophage tropic lentiviruses, and it may aid viral persistence.

  10. The restricted IgG1 antibody response to maedi visna virus is seen following infection but not following immunization with recombinant gag protein.

    PubMed Central

    Bird, P; Reyburn, H T; Blacklaws, B A; Allen, D; Nettleton, P; Yirrell, D L; Watt, N; Sargan, D; McConnell, I

    1995-01-01

    Maedi-visna (MVV) is a retrovirus of the subfamily lentivirinae which includes HIV, simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV). Infection of its natural host, the sheep, does not cause overt immunodeficiency, but rather a chronic inflammatory disease. However, subtle immunological changes following infection have been reported including a sheep IgG1 subclass-restricted MVV-neutralizing antibody. Here we demonstrate by Western blotting that there is no IgG2 serum antibody response to any MVV antigen after MVV infection, in contrast to infection with the parapox virus Orf, when serum IgG2 anti-Orf antibody is readily detected. By ELISA, the IgG1 antibody titres to Orf are higher than to MVV, but the minimum MVV serum antibody IgG1/IgG2 ratio is significantly raised compared with that for Orf virus antibody in the same sheep, indicating that the IgG2 defect in MVV infection cannot be accounted for by differences in the sensitivity of the Orf and MVV ELISA. Serum IgG2 anti-MVV gag p. 25 can be detected in both normal and MVV-infected sheep following immunization with purified recombinant MVV gag p 25 protein in Freund's complete adjuvant. The failure to make an IgG2 MVV-specific antibody indicates that immunological dysfunction can arise with macrophage tropic lentiviruses, and it may aid viral persistence. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 PMID:7586678

  11. Protective antibodies against Taenia taeniaeformis in rats infected with eggs or injected with non-viable oncospheres or recombinant antigens of oncospheres.

    PubMed

    Ito, A; Asano, K; Okamoto, K

    1994-09-01

    Antibody responses against Taenia taeniaeformis in rats infected with eggs or injected with non-viable oncospheres or recombinant antigens of oncospheres were analysed by passive transfer of serum and Western blotting. When recipient rats were injected with 1 ml serum from donors infected with eggs (infected serum), they all showed complete resistance to oral egg challenge, whereas those injected with 1 ml serum from donors injected with either oncospheres or recombinant antigens (vaccinated serum) showed no resistance. IgG and IgG subclass responses detected by Western blotting revealed that antibody responses to oncosphere antigens in infected serum thoroughly differed from those in vaccinated serum. It is suggested that IgG2 alpha responses in infected serum should be used for screening of epitopes for candidate vaccine.

  12. Enzyme-amplified protein micorarray and a fluidic renewable surface fluorescence immunoassay for botulinum neurotoxin detection using high-affinity recombinant antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Varnum, Susan M.; Warner, Marvin G.; Dockendorff, Brian P.; Anheier, Norman C.; Lou, Jianlong; Marks, James D.; Smith, Leonard A.; Feldhaus, Michael J.; Grate, Jay W.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.

    2006-06-16

    With the use of high-affinity recombinant monoclonal antibodies against the receptor binding domain of botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A), two separate immunoassay platforms were developed for either the sensitive or the rapid detection of BoNT/A. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) microarray was developed for the specific and sensitive detection of BoNT in buffer and clinical fluids. This assay has the sensitivity to detect BoNT in diverse samples down to 14 fM (1.4 pg/mL). Using the recombinant monoclonal antibodies, a renewable surface microcolumn sensor was developed for the rapid detection of BoNT/A in an automated fluidic system. While the ELISA microarray assay, because of its sensitivity, offers an alternative to the mouse bioassay, the renewable surface assay has potential as a rapid screening assay for the analysis of complex environmental samples.

  13. Expression of a Bacillus phytase C gene in Pichia pastoris and properties of the recombinant enzyme.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Olazarán, Martha; Rodríguez-Blanco, Lilí; Carreon-Treviño, J Gerardo; Gallegos-López, Juan A; Viader-Salvadó, José M

    2010-08-01

    The cloning and expression of a native gene encoding a Bacillus subtilis phytase using Pichia pastoris as the host is described. In addition, the influence of N-glycosylation on the biochemical properties of the B. subtilis phytase, the influence of pH on the thermostability of the recombinant and native B. subtilis phytases, and the resistance of both phytases to shrimp digestive enzymes and porcine trypsin are also described. After 48 h of methanol induction in shake flasks, a selected recombinant strain produced and secreted 0.82 U/ml (71 mg/liter) recombinant phytase. This phytase was N-glycosylated, had a molecular mass of 39 kDa after N-deglycosylation, exhibited activity within a pH range of 2.5 to 9 and at temperatures of 25 to 70 degrees C, had high residual activity (85% +/- 2%) after 10 min of heat treatment at 80 degrees C and pH 5.5 in the presence of 5 mM CaCl(2), and was resistant to shrimp digestive enzymes and porcine trypsin. Although the recombinant Bacillus phytase had pH and temperature activity profiles that were similar to those of the corresponding nonglycosylated native phytase, the thermal stabilities of the recombinant and native phytases were different, although both were calcium concentration and pH dependent.

  14. Waste recombinant DNA: effectiveness of thermo-treatment to manage potential gene pollution.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaohua; Li, Mengnan; Zheng, Guanghong; Le, Yiquan; Wang, Lei

    2009-01-01

    Heating at 100 degrees C for 5-10 min is a common method for treating wastewater containing recombinant DNA in many bio-laboratories in China. In this experiment, plasmid pET-28b was used to investigate decay efficiency of waste recombinant DNA during thermo-treatment. The results showed that the decay half-life of the plasmid was 2.7-4.0 min during the thermo-treatment, and even heating for 30 min the plasmids still retained some transforming activity. Low pH promoted the decay of recombinant DNA, but NaCl, bovine serum albumin and EDTA, which existed in the most wastewater from bio-laboratories, protected DNA from degradation. Thus, the decay half-life of plasmid DNA may be longer than 2.7-4.0 min practically. These results suggest that the effectiveness of heating at 100 degrees C for treating waste recombinant DNA is low and a gene pollution risk remains when those thermo-treated recombinant DNAs are discharged into the environment. Therefore other simple and effective methods should be developed.

  15. Gene Targeting Using Homologous Recombination in Embryonic Stem Cells: The Future for Behavior Genetics?

    PubMed

    Gerlai, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Gene targeting with homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells created a revolution in the analysis of the function of genes in behavioral brain research. The technology allowed unprecedented precision with which one could manipulate genes and study the effect of this manipulation on the central nervous system. With gene targeting, the uncertainty inherent in psychopharmacology regarding whether a particular compound would act only through a specific target was removed. Thus, gene targeting became highly popular. However, with this popularity came the realization that like other methods, gene targeting also suffered from some technical and principal problems. For example, two decades ago, issues about compensatory changes and about genetic linkage were raised. Since then, the technology developed, and its utility has been better delineated. This review will discuss the pros and cons of the technique along with these advancements from the perspective of the neuroscientist user. It will also compare and contrast methods that may represent novel alternatives to the homologous recombination based gene targeting approach, including the TALEN and the CRISPR/Cas9 systems. The goal of the review is not to provide detailed recipes, but to attempt to present a short summary of these approaches a behavioral geneticist or neuroscientist may consider for the analysis of brain function and behavior.

  16. Gene Targeting Using Homologous Recombination in Embryonic Stem Cells: The Future for Behavior Genetics?

    PubMed Central

    Gerlai, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Gene targeting with homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells created a revolution in the analysis of the function of genes in behavioral brain research. The technology allowed unprecedented precision with which one could manipulate genes and study the effect of this manipulation on the central nervous system. With gene targeting, the uncertainty inherent in psychopharmacology regarding whether a particular compound would act only through a specific target was removed. Thus, gene targeting became highly popular. However, with this popularity came the realization that like other methods, gene targeting also suffered from some technical and principal problems. For example, two decades ago, issues about compensatory changes and about genetic linkage were raised. Since then, the technology developed, and its utility has been better delineated. This review will discuss the pros and cons of the technique along with these advancements from the perspective of the neuroscientist user. It will also compare and contrast methods that may represent novel alternatives to the homologous recombination based gene targeting approach, including the TALEN and the CRISPR/Cas9 systems. The goal of the review is not to provide detailed recipes, but to attempt to present a short summary of these approaches a behavioral geneticist or neuroscientist may consider for the analysis of brain function and behavior. PMID:27148349

  17. A system for assaying homologous recombination at the endogenous human thymidine kinase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, M.B.; Little, J.B. ); Potter, H. ); Yandell, D.W. Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA )

    1991-08-01

    A system for assaying human interchromosomal recombination in vitro was developed, using a cell line containing two different mutant thymidine kinase genes (TK) on chromosomes 17. Heteroalleles were generated in the TK{sup +/+} parent B-lymphoblast cell line WIL-2 by repeated exposure to the alkylating nitrogen mustard ICR-191, which preferentially causes +1 or {minus}1 frameshifts. Resulting TK{sup {minus}/{minus}} mutants were selected in medium containing the toxic thymidine analog trifluorothymidine. In two lines, heterozygous frameshifts were located in exons 4 and 7 of the TK gene separated by {approx}8 kilobases. These lines undergo spontaneous reversion to TK{sup +} at a frequency of < 10{sup {minus}7}, and revertants can be selected in cytidine/hypoxanthine/aminopterin/thymidine medium. The nature and location of these heteroallelic mutations make large deletions, rearrangements, nondisjunction, and reduplication unlikely mechanisms for reversion to TK{sup +}. The mode of reversion to TK{sup +} was specifically assessed by DNA sequencing, use of single-strand conformation polymorphisms, and analysis of various restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) linked to the TK gene on chromosome 17. The data suggest that a proportion of revertants has undergone recombination and gene conversion at the TK locus, with concomitant loss of frameshifts and allele loss at linked RFLPs. Models are presented for the origin of two recombinants.

  18. Genetic diversity and recombination analysis in the coat protein gene of Banana bract mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, V; Selvarajan, R

    2014-06-01

    Banana bract mosaic virus (BBrMV), a member of the genus Potyvirus, family Potyviridae, is the causal agent of the bract mosaic disease (BBrMD) that causes serious yield losses in banana and plantain in India and the Philippines. In this study, global genetic diversity and molecular evolution of BBrMV based on the capsid protein (CP) gene were investigated. Multiple alignments of CP gene of 49 BBrMV isolates showed nucleotide (nt) and amino acid (aa) identity of 79-100 and 80-100 %, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that except two Indians isolates (TN14 and TN16), all isolates clustered together. Eleven recombination events were detected using Recombination Detection Program. Codon-based maximum-likelihood methods revealed that most of the codons in the CP gene were under negative or neutral selection except for codons 28, 43, and 92 which were under positive selection. Gene flow between BBrMV populations of banana and cardamom was relatively frequent but not between two different populations of banana infecting isolates identified in this study. This is the first report on genetic diversity, and evolution of BBrMV isolates based on recombination and phylogenetic analysis in India.

  19. Transient and stable gene expression in mammalian cells transduced with a recombinant baculovirus vector

    PubMed Central

    Condreay, J. Patrick; Witherspoon, Sam M.; Clay, William C.; Kost, Thomas A.

    1999-01-01

    Recombinant baculoviruses can serve as gene-transfer vehicles for transient expression of recombinant proteins in a wide range of mammalian cell types. Furthermore, by inclusion of a dominant selectable marker in the viral vector, cell lines can be derived that stably express recombinant genes. A virus was constructed containing two expression cassettes controlled by constitutive mammalian promoters: the cytomegalovirus immediate early promoter/enhancer directing expression of green fluorescent protein and the simian virus 40 (SV40) early promoter controlling neomycin phosphotransferase II. Using this virus, efficient gene delivery and expression was observed and measured in numerous cell types of human, primate, and rodent origin. In addition to commonly used transformed cell lines such as HeLa, CHO, Cos-7, and 293, this list includes primary human keratinocytes and bone marrow fibroblasts. In all cases, addition of butyrate or trichostatin A (a selective histone deacetylase inhibitor) to transduced cells markedly enhanced the levels of reporter protein expression observed. When transduced cells are put under selection with the antibiotic G418, cell lines can be obtained at high frequency that stably maintain the expression cassettes of the vector DNA and exhibit stable, high-level expression of the reporter gene. Stably transduced derivatives have been selected from a substantial number of different cell types, suggesting that stable lines can be derived from any cell type that exhibits transient expression. PMID:9874783

  20. Impact of deletion of envelope-related genes of recombinant Sendai viruses on immune responses following pulmonary gene transfer of neonatal mice.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, S; Yonemitsu, Y; Yoshida, K; Okano, S; Kondo, H; Inoue, M; Hasegawa, M; Masumoto, K; Suita, S; Taguchi, T; Sueishi, K

    2007-07-01

    We demonstrated previously that the additive-type recombinant Sendai virus (rSeV) is highly efficient for use in pulmonary gene transfer; however, rSeV exhibits inflammatory responses. To overcome this problem, we tested newly developed non-transmissible constructs, namely, temperature-sensitive F-deleted vector, rSeV/dF (ts-rSeV/dF) and a rSeV with all the envelope-related genes deleted (rSeV/dFdMdHN), for pulmonary gene transfer in neonatal mice, by assessing their toxicity and immune responses. The gene expression in the lungs of neonatal ICR mice peaked on day 2, then gradually decreased until almost disappearing at 14 days after infection in all constructs. Loss of body weight and mortality rate, however, were dramatically improved in mice treated with SeV/dFdMdHN (mortality=0%, n=41) and ts-rSeV/dF (24.2%, n=33) compared with additive rSeV (70.7%, n=58). Although the deletion of envelope-related genes of SeV had a small impact on the production of antibody and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity in both adults and neonates, a dramatic reduction was found in the events related to innate responses, including the production of proinflammatory cytokines, particularly in the case of neonates. These results indicate that pulmonary gene transfer using SeV/dFdMdHN warrants further investigation for its possible use in developing safer therapeutics for neonatal lung diseases, including cystic fibrosis.

  1. Gene transfer to the CNS is efficacious in immune-primed mice harboring physiologically relevant titers of anti-AAV antibodies.

    PubMed

    Treleaven, Christopher M; Tamsett, Thomas J; Bu, Jie; Fidler, Jonathan A; Sardi, S Pablo; Hurlbut, Gregory D; Woodworth, Lisa A; Cheng, Seng H; Passini, Marco A; Shihabuddin, Lamya S; Dodge, James C

    2012-09-01

    Central nervous system (CNS)-directed gene therapy with recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors has been used effectively to slow disease course in mouse models of several neurodegenerative diseases. However, these vectors were typically tested in mice without prior exposure to the virus, an immunological scenario unlikely to be duplicated in human patients. Here, we examined the impact of pre-existing immunity on AAV-mediated gene delivery to the CNS of normal and diseased mice. Antibody levels in brain tissue were determined to be 0.6% of the levels found in systemic circulation. As expected, transgene expression in brains of mice with relatively high serum antibody titers was reduced by 59-95%. However, transduction activity was unaffected in mice that harbored more clinically relevant antibody levels. Moreover, we also showed that markers of neuroinflammation (GFAP, Iba1, and CD3) and histopathology (hematoxylin and eosin (H&E)) were not enhanced in immune-primed mice (regardless of pre-existing antibody levels). Importantly, we also demonstrated in a mouse model of Niemann Pick Type A (NPA) disease that pre-existing immunity did not preclude either gene transfer to the CNS or alleviation of disease-associated neuropathology. These findings support the continued development of AAV-based therapies for the treatment of neurological disorders.

  2. Evaluation of recombinant monoclonal antibody SVmab1 binding to Na V1.7 target sequences and block of human Na V1.7 currents.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong; Tseng, Mandy; Epstein, Linda F; Green, Lydia; Chan, Brian; Soriano, Brian; Lim, Desiree; Pan, Oscar; Murawsky, Christopher M; King, Chadwick T; Moyer, Bryan D

    2016-01-01

    Identification of small and large molecule pain therapeutics that target the genetically validated voltage-gated sodium channel Na V1.7 is a challenging endeavor under vigorous pursuit. The monoclonal antibody SVmab1 was recently published to bind the Na V1.7 DII voltage sensor domain and block human Na V1.7 sodium currents in heterologous cells. We produced purified SVmab1 protein based on publically available sequence information, and evaluated its activity in a battery of binding and functional assays. Herein, we report that our recombinant SVmAb1 does not bind peptide immunogen or purified Na V1.7 DII voltage sensor domain via ELISA, and does not bind Na V1.7 in live HEK293, U-2 OS, and CHO-K1 cells via FACS. Whole cell manual patch clamp electrophysiology protocols interrogating diverse Na V1.7 gating states in HEK293 cells, revealed that recombinant SVmab1 does not block Na V1.7 currents to an extent greater than observed with an isotype matched control antibody. Collectively, our results show that recombinant SVmab1 monoclonal antibody does not bind Na V1.7 target sequences or specifically inhibit Na V1.7 current.

  3. Evaluation of recombinant monoclonal antibody SVmab1 binding to Na V1.7 target sequences and block of human Na V1.7 currents

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dong; Tseng, Mandy; Epstein, Linda F.; Green, Lydia; Chan, Brian; Soriano, Brian; Lim, Desiree; Pan, Oscar; Murawsky, Christopher M.; King, Chadwick T.; Moyer, Bryan D.

    2016-01-01

    Identification of small and large molecule pain therapeutics that target the genetically validated voltage-gated sodium channel Na V1.7 is a challenging endeavor under vigorous pursuit. The monoclonal antibody SVmab1 was recently published to bind the Na V1.7 DII voltage sensor domain and block human Na V1.7 sodium currents in heterologous cells. We produced purified SVmab1 protein based on publically available sequence information, and evaluated its activity in a battery of binding and functional assays. Herein, we report that our recombinant SVmAb1 does not bind peptide immunogen or purified Na V1.7 DII voltage sensor domain via ELISA, and does not bind Na V1.7 in live HEK293, U-2 OS, and CHO-K1 cells via FACS. Whole cell manual patch clamp electrophysiology protocols interrogating diverse Na V1.7 gating states in HEK293 cells, revealed that recombinant SVmab1 does not block Na V1.7 currents to an extent greater than observed with an isotype matched control antibody. Collectively, our results show that recombinant SVmab1 monoclonal antibody does not bind Na V1.7 target sequences or specifically inhibit Na V1.7 current. PMID:27990272

  4. Adjuvant poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) generates more efficient monoclonal antibodies against truncated recombinant histidine-rich protein2 of Plasmodium falciparum for malaria diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Verma, Reena; Ravichandran, Ramakrishnan; Jayaprakash, Naatamai S; Kumar, Ashok; Vijayalakshmi, Mookambeswaran A; Venkataraman, Krishnan

    2015-05-01

    Adjuvants play an important role in eliciting immune responses and subsequent generation of antibodies with high specificity. Recently, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNiPAAm), also known as a "smart" polymer, has been proposed as a potential adjuvant for making antibodies and vaccines. This material exhibits efficient delivery, protection against degradation, and preservation of antigen epitopes. In this work, we used both CFA and smart polymer to develop a highly specific murine monoclonal antibody (mAb) against recombinant truncated histidine rich protein2 (HRP2) of Plasmodium falciparum. Our results indicate that the mAbs developed using these adjuvants were able to recognize recombinant HRP2 and native PfHRP2 protein from spent medium. The mAbs generated against recombinant truncated HRP2 showed better sensitivity to the antigen and importantly mAbs generated using PNiPAAm adjuvant were in the range of 10(8)-10(9) M(-1). The mAbs generated using PNiPAAm are very efficient and sensitive in detecting HRP2. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of such comparison having been made between these two adjuvants and we propose that the smart polymer has huge potential as an alternative to CFA. Additionally, we discuss the utility of the mAbs generated through PNiPAAm for specific diagnosis of malaria caused by P. falciparum.

  5. Parallel antibody germline gene and haplotype analyses support the validity of immunoglobulin germline gene inference and discovery.

    PubMed

    Kirik, Ufuk; Greiff, Lennart; Levander, Fredrik; Ohlin, Mats

    2017-04-04

    Analysis of antibody repertoire development and specific antibody responses important for e.g. autoimmune conditions, allergy, and protection against disease is supported by high throughput sequencing and associated bioinformatics pipelines that describe the diversity of the encoded antibody variable domains. Proper assignment of sequences to germline genes are important for many such processes, for instance in the analysis of somatic hypermutation. Germline gene inference from antibody-encoding transcriptomes, by using tools such as TIgGER or IgDiscover, has a potential to enhance the quality of such analyses. These tools may also be used to identify germline genes not previously known. In this study, we exploited such software for germline gene inference and define aspects of analysis settings and pre-existing knowledge of germline genes that affect the outcome of gene inference. Furthermore, we demonstrate the capacity of IGHJ and IGHD haplotype inference, whenever subjects are heterozygous with respect to such genes, to lend support to IGHV gene inference in general, and to the identification of novel alleles presently not recognized by germline gene reference directories. We propose that such haplotype analysis shall, whenever possible, be used in future best practice to support the outcome of germline gene inference. IGHJ-directed haplotype inference was also used to identify haplotypes not expressing some IGHV germline genes. In particular, we identified a haplotype that did not express several major germline genes such as IGHV1-8, IGHV3-9, IGHV3-15, IGHV1-18, IGHV3-21, and IGHV3-23. We envisage that haplotype analysis will provide an efficient approach to identify subjects for further studies of the link between the available immunoglobulin repertoire and outcomes of immune responses.

  6. Fabrication of DNA-antibody-apatite composite layers for cell-targeted gene transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazaki, Yushin; Oyane, Ayako; Araki, Hiroko; Sogo, Yu; Ito, Atsuo; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Tsurushima, Hideo

    2012-12-01

    Surface-mediated gene transfer systems using apatite (Ap)-based composite layers have received increased attention in tissue engineering applications owing to their safety, biocompatibility and relatively high efficiency. In this study, DNA-antibody-apatite composite layers (DA-Ap layers), in which DNA and antibody molecules are immobilized within a matrix of apatite nanocrystals, were fabricated using a biomimetic coating process. They were then assayed for their gene transfer capability for application in a specific cell-targeted gene transfer. A DA-Ap layer that was fabricated with an anti-CD49f antibody showed a higher gene transfer capability to the CD49f-positive CHO-K1 cells than a DNA-apatite composite layer (D-Ap layer). The antibody facilitated the gene transfer capability of the DA-Ap layer only to the specific cells that were expressing corresponding antigens. When the DA-Ap layer was fabricated with an anti-N-cadherin antibody, a higher gene transfer capability compared with the D-Ap layer was found in the N-cadherin-positive P19CL6 cells, but not in the N-cadherin-negative UV♀2 cells or in the P19CL6 cells that were pre-blocked with anti-N-cadherin. Therefore, the antigen-antibody binding that takes place at the cell-layer interface should be responsible for the higher gene transfer capability of the DA-Ap than D-Ap layer. These results suggest that the DA-Ap layer works as a mediator in a specific cell-targeted gene transfer system.

  7. Fabrication of DNA-antibody-apatite composite layers for cell-targeted gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Yazaki, Yushin; Oyane, Ayako; Araki, Hiroko; Sogo, Yu; Ito, Atsuo; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Tsurushima, Hideo

    2012-12-01

    Surface-mediated gene transfer systems using apatite (Ap)-based composite layers have received increased attention in tissue engineering applications owing to their safety, biocompatibility and relatively high efficiency. In this study, DNA-antibody-apatite composite layers (DA-Ap layers), in which DNA and antibody molecules are immobilized within a matrix of apatite nanocrystals, were fabricated using a biomimetic coating process. They were then assayed for their gene transfer capability for application in a specific cell-targeted gene transfer. A DA-Ap layer that was fabricated with an anti-CD49f antibody showed a higher gene transfer capability to the CD49f-positive CHO-K1 cells than a DNA-apatite composite layer (D-Ap layer). The antibody facilitated the gene transfer capability of the DA-Ap layer only to the specific cells that were expressing corresponding antigens. When the DA-Ap layer was fabricated with an anti-N-cadherin antibody, a higher gene transfer capability compared with the D-Ap layer was found in the N-cadherin-positive P19CL6 cells, but not in the N-cadherin-negative UV♀2 cells or in the P19CL6 cells that were pre-blocked with anti-N-cadherin. Therefore, the antigen-antibody binding that takes place at the cell-layer interface should be responsible for the higher gene transfer capability of the DA-Ap than D-Ap layer. These results suggest that the DA-Ap layer works as a mediator in a specific cell-targeted gene transfer system.

  8. Generation of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene knockout rabbits by homologous recombination and gene trapping through somatic cell nuclear transfer

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Mingru; Jiang, Weihua; Fang, Zhenfu; Kong, Pengcheng; Xing, Fengying; Li, Yao; Chen, Xuejin; Li, Shangang

    2015-01-01

    The rabbit is a common animal model that has been employed in studies on various human disorders, and the generation of genetically modified rabbit lines is highly desirable. Female rabbits have been successfully cloned from cumulus cells, and the somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology is well established. The present study generated hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene knockout rabbits using recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated homologous recombination and SCNT. Gene trap strategies were employed to enhance the gene targeting rates. The male and female gene knockout fibroblast cell lines were derived by different strategies. When male HPRT knockout cells were used for SCNT, no live rabbits were obtained. However, when female HPRT+/− cells were used for SCNT, live, healthy rabbits were generated. The cloned HPRT+/− rabbits were fertile at maturity. We demonstrate a new technique to produce gene-targeted rabbits. This approach may also be used in the genetic manipulation of different genes or in other species. PMID:26522387

  9. Structure of REC2, a recombinational repair gene of Ustilago maydis, and its function in homologous recombination between plasmid and chromosomal sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, B P; Ferguson, D O; Holloman, W K

    1994-01-01

    Mutation in the REC2 gene of Ustilago maydis leads to defects in DNA repair, recombination, and meiosis. Analysis of the primary sequence of the Rec2 protein reveals a region with significant homology to bacterial RecA protein and to the yeast recombination proteins Dmc1, Rad51, and Rad57. This homologous region in the U. maydis Rec2 protein was found to be functionally sensitive to mutation, lending support to the hypothesis that Rec2 has a functional RecA-like domain essential for activity in recombination and repair. Homologous recombination between plasmid and chromosomal DNA sequences is reduced substantially in the rec2 mutant following transformation. The frequency can be restored to a level approaching, but not exceeding, that observed in the wild-type strain if transformation is performed with cells containing multiple copies of REC2. Images PMID:8065360

  10. Extended gene expression by medium exchange and repeated transient transfection for recombinant protein production enhancement.

    PubMed

    Cervera, Laura; Gutiérrez-Granados, Sonia; Berrow, Nicholas Simon; Segura, Maria Mercedes; Gòdia, Francesc

    2015-05-01

    Production of recombinant products in mammalian cell cultures can be achieved by stable gene expression (SGE) or transient gene expression (TGE). The former is based on the integration of a plasmid DNA into the host cell genome allowing continuous gene expression. The latter is based on episomal plasmid DNA expression. Conventional TGE is limited to a short production period of usually about 96 h, therefore limiting productivity. A novel gene expression approach termed extended gene expression (EGE) is explored in this study. The aim of EGE is to prolong the production period by the combination of medium exchange and repeated transfection of cell cultures with plasmid DNA to improve overall protein production. The benefit of this methodology was evaluated for the production of three model recombinant products: intracellular GFP, secreted GFP, and a Gag-GFP virus-like particles (VLPs). Productions were carried out in HEK 293 cell suspension cultures grown in animal-derived component free media using polyethylenimine (PEI) as transfection reagent. Transfections were repeated throughout the production process using different plasmid DNA concentrations, intervals of time, and culture feeding conditions in order to identify the best approach to achieve sustained high-level gene expression. Using this novel EGE strategy, the production period was prolonged between 192 and 240 h with a 4-12-fold increase in production levels, depending on the product type considered.

  11. The persistence of anti-HBs antibody and anamnestic response 20 years after primary vaccination with recombinant hepatitis B vaccine at infancy.

    PubMed

    Bagheri-Jamebozorgi, Masoomeh; Keshavarz, Jila; Nemati, Maryam; Mohammadi-Hossainabad, Saeed; Rezayati, Mohammad-Taghi; Nejad-Ghaderi, Mohsen; Jamalizadeh, Ahmad; Shokri, Fazel; Jafarzadeh, Abdollah

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B (HB) vaccine induces protective levels of antibody response (anti-HBs≥10 mIU/mL) in 90-99% of vaccinees. The levels of anti-HBs antibody decline after vaccination. The aim of this study was to evaluate the persistence of anti-HBs antibodies and immunologic memory in healthy adults at 20 years after primary vaccination with recombinant HB vaccine. Blood samples were collected from 300 adults at 20 years after primary HB vaccination and their sera were tested for anti-HBs antibody by ELISA technique. A single booster dose of HB vaccine was administered to a total of 138 subjects, whose anti-HBs antibody titer was <10 mIU/mL. The sera of subjects were re-tested for the anti-HBs antibody levels at 4 weeks after booster vaccination. At 20 years after primary vaccination 37.0% of participants had protective levels of antibody with geometric mean titer (GMT) of 55.44±77.01 mIU/mL. After booster vaccination, 97.1% of vaccinees developed protective levels of antibody and the GMT rose from 2.35±6.49 mIU/mL to 176.28±161.78 mIU/mL. 125/138 (90.6%) of re-vaccinated subjects also showed an anamnestic response to booster vaccination. At 20 years after primary vaccination with HB vaccine, low proportion of the subjects had protective levels of antibody. However, the majority of the re-vaccinated subjects developed protective levels of anti-HBs and showed an anamnestic response after booster vaccination. Additional follow-up studies are necessary to determine the duration of immunological memory.

  12. Oral administration of recombinant Neisseria meningitidis PorA genetically fused to H. pylori HpaA antigen increases antibody levels in mouse serum, suggesting that PorA behaves as a putative adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Vasquez, Abel E; Manzo, Ricardo A; Soto, Daniel A; Barrientos, Magaly J; Maldonado, Aurora E; Mosqueira, Macarena; Avila, Anastasia; Touma, Jorge; Bruce, Elsa; Harris, Paul R; Venegas, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    The Neisseria meningitidis outer membrane protein PorA from a Chilean strain was purified as a recombinant protein. PorA mixed with AbISCO induced bactericidal antibodies against N. meningitidis in mice. When PorA was fused to the Helicobacter pylori HpaA antigen gene, the specific response against H. pylori protein increased. Splenocytes from PorA-immunized mice were stimulated with PorA, and an increase in the secretion of IL-4 was observed compared with that of IFN-γ. Moreover, in an immunoglobulin sub-typing analysis, a substantially higher IgG1 level was found compared with IgG2a levels, suggesting a Th2-type immune response. This study revealed a peculiar behavior of the purified recombinant PorA protein per se in the absence of AbISCO as an adjuvant. Therefore, the resistance of PorA to proteolytic enzymes, such as those in the gastrointestinal tract, was analyzed, because this is an important feature for an oral protein adjuvant. Finally, we found that PorA fused to the H. pylori HpaA antigen, when expressed in Lactococcus lactis and administered orally, could enhance the antibody response against the HpaA antigen approximately 3 fold. These observations strongly suggest that PorA behaves as an effective oral adjuvant. PMID:25750999

  13. Meiotic recombination generates rich diversity in NK cell receptor genes, alleles, and haplotypes

    PubMed Central

    Norman, Paul J.; Abi-Rached, Laurent; Gendzekhadze, Ketevan; Hammond, John A.; Moesta, Achim K.; Sharma, Deepti; Graef, Thorsten; McQueen, Karina L.; Guethlein, Lisbeth A.; Carrington, Christine V.F.; Chandanayingyong, Dasdayanee; Chang, Yih-Hsin; Crespí, Catalina; Saruhan-Direskeneli, Güher; Hameed, Kamran; Kamkamidze, Giorgi; Koram, Kwadwo A.; Layrisse, Zulay; Matamoros, Nuria; Milà, Joan; Park, Myoung Hee; Pitchappan, Ramasamy M.; Ramdath, D. Dan; Shiau, Ming-Yuh; Stephens, Henry A.F.; Struik, Siske; Tyan, Dolly; Verity, David H.; Vaughan, Robert W.; Davis, Ronald W.; Fraser, Patricia A.; Riley, Eleanor M.; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Parham, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells contribute to the essential functions of innate immunity and reproduction. Various genes encode NK cell receptors that recognize the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) Class I molecules expressed by other cells. For primate NK cells, the killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) are a variable and rapidly evolving family of MHC Class I receptors. Studied here is KIR3DL1/S1, which encodes receptors for highly polymorphic human HLA-A and -B and comprises three ancient allelic lineages that have been preserved by balancing selection throughout human evolution. While the 3DS1 lineage of activating receptors has been conserved, the two 3DL1 lineages of inhibitory receptors were diversified through inter-lineage recombination with each other and with 3DS1. Prominent targets for recombination were D0-domain polymorphisms, which modulate enhancer function, and dimorphism at position 283 in the D2 domain, which influences inhibitory function. In African populations, unequal crossing over between the 3DL1 and 3DL2 genes produced a deleted KIR haplotype in which the telomeric “half” was reduced to a single fusion gene with functional properties distinct from its 3DL1 and 3DL2 parents. Conversely, in Eurasian populations, duplication of the KIR3DL1/S1 locus by unequal crossing over has enabled individuals to carry and express alleles of all three KIR3DL1/S1 lineages. These results demonstrate how meiotic recombination combines with an ancient, preserved diversity to create new KIR phenotypes upon which natural selection acts. A consequence of such recombination is to blur the distinction between alleles and loci in the rapidly evolving human KIR gene family. PMID:19411600

  14. Plasmid transfer by conjugation as a possible route of horizontal gene transfer and recombination in Xylella fastidiosa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Horizontal gene transfer is an important component of evolution and adaptation of bacterial species. Xylella fastidiosa has the ability to incorporate exogenous DNA into its genome by homologous recombination at relatively high rates. This genetic recombination is believed to play a role in adaptati...

  15. Probing the physicochemical interactions of 3-hydroxy-benzo[a]pyrene with different monoclonal and recombinant antibodies by use of fluorescence line-narrowing spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Eisold, Ursula; Kupstat, Annette; Klier, Dennis; Primus, Philipp-A; Pschenitza, Michael; Niessner, Reinhard; Knopp, Dietmar; Kumke, Michael U

    2014-05-01

    Characterization of interactions between antigens and antibodies is of utmost importance both for fundamental understanding of the binding and for development of advanced clinical diagnostics. Here, fluorescence line-narrowing (FLN) spectroscopy was used to study physicochemical interactions between 3-hydroxybenzo[a]pyrene (3OH-BaP, as antigen) and a variety of solvent matrices (as model systems) or anti-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon antibodies (anti-PAH). We focused the studies on the specific physicochemical interactions between 3OH-BaP and different, previously obtained, monoclonal and recombinant anti-PAH antibodies. Control experiments performed with non-binding monoclonal antibodies and bovine serum albumin (BSA) indicated that nonspecific interactions did not affect the FLN spectrum of 3OH-BaP. The spectral positions and relative intensities of the bands in the FLN spectra are highly dependent on the molecular environment of the 3OH-BaP. The FLN bands correlate with different vibrational modes of 3OH-BaP which are affected by interactions with the molecular environment (π-π interactions, H-bonding, or van-der-Waals forces). Although the analyte (3OH-BaP) was the same for all the antibodies investigated, different binding interactions could be identified from the FLN spectra on the basis of structural flexibility and conformational multiplicity of the antibodies' paratopes.

  16. Antibody VH and VL recombination using phage and ribosome display technologies reveals distinct structural routes to affinity improvements with VH-VL interface residues providing important structural diversity.

    PubMed

    Groves, Maria A T; Amanuel, Lily; Campbell, Jamie I; Rees, D Gareth; Sridharan, Sudharsan; Finch, Donna K; Lowe, David C; Vaughan, Tristan J

    2014-01-01

    In vitro selection technologies are an important means of affinity maturing antibodies to generate the optimal therapeutic profile for a particular disease target. Here, we describe the isolation of a parent antibody, KENB061 using phage display and solution phase selections with soluble biotinylated human IL-1R1. KENB061 was affinity matured using phage display and targeted mutagenesis of VH and VL CDR3 using NNS randomization. Affinity matured VHCDR3 and VLCDR3 library blocks were recombined and selected using phage and ribosome display protocol. A direct comparison of the phage and ribosome display antibodies generated was made to determine their functional characteristics.In our analyses, we observed distinct differences in the pattern of beneficial mutations in antibodies derived from phage and ribosome display selections, and discovered the lead antibody Jedi067 had a ~3700-fold improvement in KD over the parent KENB061. We constructed a homology model of the Fv region of Jedi067 to map the specific positions where mutations occurred in the CDR3 loops. For VL CDR3, positions 94 to 97 carry greater diversity in the ribosome display variants compared with the phage display. The positions 95a, 95b and 96 of VLCDR3 form part of the interface with VH in this model. The model shows that positions 96, 98, 100e, 100f, 100 g, 100h, 100i and 101 of the VHCDR3 include residues at the VH and VL interface. Importantly, Leu96 and Tyr98 are conserved at the interface positions in both phage and ribosome display indicating their importance in maintaining the VH-VL interface. For antibodies derived from ribosome display, there is significant diversity at residues 100a to 100f of the VH CDR3 compared with phage display. A unique deletion of isoleucine at position 102 of the lead candidate, Jedi067, also occurs in the VHCDR3.As anticipated, recombining the mutations via ribosome display led to a greater structural diversity, particularly in the heavy chain CDR3, which in turn

  17. The expression of a recombinant cry1Ac gene with subtilisin-like protease CDEP2 gene in acrystalliferous Bacillus thuringiensis by Red/ET homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Xia, Liqiu; Zeng, Zhi; Ding, Xuezhi; Huang, Fan

    2009-10-01

    A novel cDNA encoding the subtilisin-like serine protease gene CDEP2 was isolated from Beauveria bassiana by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). It contained an 1137 bp ORF that predicted a protein of 379 amino acids with M = 38863 Da and pI = 8.21. In an attempt to improve insecticidal activity, the CDEP2 gene and the cry1Ac gene from Bacillus thuringiensis were co-fused into the vector pHT315 as pHAc-CDEP2 plasmid by Red/ET homologous recombination. The co-fusion gene was attempted under the control of the native cry1Ac promoter. Plasmid pHAc-CDEP2 was electro-transformed into the B. thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki Cry(-)B. Analyzed by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting, the transformant Cry(-)B-pHAc-CDEP2 strain produced a 130 kDa Cry1Ac protein and 39 kDa CDEP2 protein. The 50% lethal concentration values (LC(50)) of Cry(-)B-pHAc-CDEP2 strain (8.5 microl/ml) to Helicoverpa armigera third instars larvae was clearly higher than the Cry(-)B-pHAc strain (16.7 microl/ml) at 72 h.

  18. Inactivation of aprE Gene in Bacillus subtilis 168 by Homologus Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Rabbani, Mohammed; Soleymani, Safoura; Sadeghi, Hamid Mir Mohammad; Soleimani, Narjes; Moazen, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Background One of the most important producers of high quality industrial enzymes is the Gram-positive bacterium, Bacillus subtilis (B. Subtilis). One major limitation that hinders the wide application of B. subtilis is the secretion of high levels of extracellular proteases which degrade the secreted foreign proteins. In this study, homologus recombination technique was used to knock out its protease gene, aprE. Methods The internal segment of the pro-sequence of aprE gene of B. subtilis 168 with a length of 80 bps and its complementary sequence were synthesized and ligated into pUB110 at EcoR1 and XbaI restriction sites. Competent cells of B. subtilis 168 were prepared and transformed by electroporation using Bio Rad gene pulser as explained in the methods section. Transformants carrying the recombinant plasmid were selected for resistance to neomycin. The success of homologous recombination was checked by PCR amplification of the neomycin gene which was part of the vector and did not exist in the genome of B. subtilis 168. The protease activity was measured using the Protease Fluorescent Detection Kit based on the proteolytic hydrolysis of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)–labeled casein-substrate. Results The results demonstrated that aprE gene would not be able to produce further active subtilisin E. The reduction of protease activity also confirmed the efficacy of the induced mutation in this gene. Conclusion It will therefore be a major challenge for future research to identify and modulate quality control systems of B. subtilis which limit the production of high quality protease- sensitive products such as lipase. PMID:25215183

  19. Principles and application of antibody libraries for infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Lim, Bee Nar; Tye, Gee Jun; Choong, Yee Siew; Ong, Eugene Boon Beng; Ismail, Asma; Lim, Theam Soon

    2014-12-01

    Antibodies have been used efficiently for the treatment and diagnosis of many diseases. Recombinant antibody technology allows the generation of fully human antibodies. Phage display is the gold standard for the production of human antibodies in vitro. To generate monoclonal antibodies by phage display, the generation of antibody libraries is crucial. Antibody libraries are classified according to the source where the antibody gene sequences were obtained. The most useful library for infectious diseases is the immunized library. Immunized libraries would allow better and selective enrichment of antibodies against disease antigens. The antibodies generated from these libraries can be translated for both diagnostic and therapeutic applications. This review focuses on the generation of immunized antibody libraries and the potential applications of the antibodies derived from these libraries.

  20. Rainbow trout surviving infections of viral haemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) show lasting antibodies to recombinant G protein fragments.

    PubMed

    Encinas, P; Gomez-Casado, E; Fregeneda-Grandes; Olesen, N J; Lorenzen, N; Estepa, A; Coll, J M

    2011-03-01

    Rainbow trout antibodies (Abs) binding to recombinant fragments (frgs) derived from the protein G of the viral haemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV)-07.71 strain, could be detected by ELISA (frg-ELISA) in sera from trout surviving laboratory-controlled infections. Abs were detected not only by using sera from trout infected with the homologous VHSV isolate but also with the VHSV-DK-201433 heterologous isolate, which had 13 amino acid changes. Sera from healthy trout and/or from trout surviving infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) infection, were used to calculate cut-off absorbances to differentiate negative from positive sera. Specific anti-VHSV Abs could then be detected by using any of the following frgs: frg11 (56-110), frg15 (65-250), frg16 (252-450) or G21-465. While high correlations were found among the ELISA values obtained with the different frgs, no correlations between any frg-ELISA and complement-dependent 50% plaque neutralization test (PNT) titres could be demonstrated. Between 4 and 10 weeks after VHSV infection, more trout sera were detected as positives by using heterologous frg-ELISA rather than homologous PNT. Furthermore, the percentage of positive sera detected by frg11-ELISA increased with time after infection to reach 100%, while those detected by complement-dependent PNT decreased to 29.4%, thus confirming that the lack of neutralizing Abs does not mean the lack of any anti-VHSV Abs in survivor trout sera. Preliminary results with sera from field samples suggest that further refinements of the frg-ELISA could allow detection of anti-VHSV trout Abs in natural outbreaks caused by different heterologous VHSV isolates. The homologous frg-ELISA method could be useful to follow G immunization attempts during vaccine development and/or to best understand the fish Ab response during VHSV infections. The viral frgs approach might also be used with other fish species and/or viruses.

  1. The Drosophila Meiotic Recombination Gene Mei-9 Encodes a Homologue of the Yeast Excision Repair Protein Rad1

    PubMed Central

    Sekelsky, J. J.; McKim, K. S.; Chin, G. M.; Hawley, R. S.

    1995-01-01

    Meiotic recombination and DNA repair are mediated by overlapping sets of genes. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, many genes required to repair DNA double-strand breaks are also required for meiotic recombination. In contrast, mutations in genes required for nucleotide excision repair (NER) have no detectable effects on meiotic recombination in S. cerevisiae. The Drosophila melanogaster mei-9 gene is unique among known recombination genes in that it is required for both meiotic recombination and NER. We have analyzed the mei-9 gene at the molecular level and found that it encodes a homologue of the S. cerevisiae excision repair protein Rad1, the probable homologue of mammalian XPF/ERCC4. Hence, the predominant process of meiotic recombination in Drosophila proceeds through a pathway that is at least partially distinct from that of S. cerevisiae, in that it requires an NER protein. The biochemical properties of the Rad1 protein allow us to explain the observation that mei-9 mutants suppress reciprocal exchange without suppressing the frequency of gene conversion. PMID:8647398

  2. The prevalence of neutralizing antibodies against AAV serotype 1 in healthy subjects in China: implications for gene therapy and vaccines using AAV1 vector.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiang; Huang, Weijin; Zhao, Chenyan; Zhang, Li; Meng, Shufang; Gao, Dongying; Wang, Youchun

    2013-09-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 1 (AAV1) has attracted tremendous interest as a promising vector for gene therapy and vaccine applications. However, the presence of AAV1 neutralizing antibodies as a consequence of exposure to wild type AAV1 can limit significantly effective gene transfer for biologics based AAV1 vector. Prior studies have reported that a prevalence of AAV1 neutralizing antibodies ranged from 10% to 50% in different countries around the world, and up to 79% in Dutch subjects. However, few studies have reported on the AAV1 neutralizing antibody prevalence in Chinese subjects. In this study, a high-throughput luciferase-based virus neutralization assay was established and standardized for critical parameters, including the appropriate cell line, and the optimal viral infection dose, and the infection time with homologous AAV1 vaccinated mice and guinea pig sera. Then, a total of 500 healthy individual serum samples from two separate regions of China were screened for the AAV1 neutralizing antibodies by conducting a non-randomized, cross-sectional analysis. Interestingly, a high prevalence of AAV1 neutralizing antibody (69.8%) was found in all individuals. There was significant difference observed for prevalence by gender (P = 0.042), age range (P = 0.011) and geographic origin (P < 0.001). The percentage of positive AAV1 neutralizing antibodies (NT50  > 10) in teenagers (year <18, as of 2012) was significant lower than that of adults (19-56, as of 2012) (P = 0.011), indicating the optimal vaccination period of childhood. The current study provides a useful insight for the future development of AAV1-based vaccination and gene therapy strategies in Beijing and Anhui provinces of China.

  3. Gene cloning, recombinant expression, purification and characterization of l-methionine decarboxylase from Streptomyces sp. 590.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Masaya; Okada, Akane; Yamamoto, Kumiko; Okugochi, Tomomi; Kusaka, Chika; Kudou, Daizou; Nemoto, Michiko; Inagaki, Junko; Hirose, Yuu; Okajima, Toshihide; Tamura, Takashi; Soda, Kenji; Inagaki, Kenji

    2016-12-21

    l-Methionine decarboxylase (MetDC) from Streptomyces sp. 590 depends on pyridoxal 5'-phosphate and catalyzes the non-oxidative decarboxylation of l-methionine to produce 3-methylthiopropylamine and carbon dioxide. MetDC gene (mdc) was determined to consist of 1,674 bp encoding 557 amino acids, and the amino acid sequence is similar to that of l-histidine decarboxylases and l-valine decarboxylases from Streptomyces sp. strains. The mdc gene was cloned and recombinant MetDC was heterologously expressed by Escherichia coli The purification of recombinant MetDC was carried out by DEAE-Toyopearl and Ni-NTA agarose column chromatography. The recombinant enzyme was homodimeric with a molecular mass of 61,000 Da and showed optimal activity between 45 to 55 °C and at pH 6.6, and the stability below 30 °C and between pH 4.6 to 7.0. l-Methionine and l-norleucine were good substrates for MetDC. The Michaelis constants for l-methionine and l-norleucine were 30 and 73 mM, respectively. The recombinant MetDC (0.50 U/ml) severely inhibited growth of human tumour cells A431 (epidermoid ovarian carcinoma cell line) and MDA-MB-231 (breast cancer cell line), however showed relatively low cytotoxicity for human normal cell NHDF-Neo (dermal fibroblast cell line from neonatal foreskin). This study revealed the properties of the gene and the protein sequence of MetDC for the first time.

  4. Bacterial production and structure-functional validation of a recombinant antigen-binding fragment (Fab) of an anti-cancer therapeutic antibody targeting epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Hun; Sim, Dae-Won; Park, Dongsun; Jung, Tai-Geun; Lee, Seonghwan; Oh, Taeheun; Ha, Jong-Ryul; Seok, Seung-Hyeon; Seo, Min-Duk; Kang, Ho Chul; Kim, Young Pil; Won, Hyung-Sik

    2016-12-01

    Fragment engineering of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has emerged as an excellent paradigm to develop highly efficient therapeutic and/or diagnostic agents. Engineered mAb fragments can be economically produced in bacterial systems using recombinant DNA technologies. In this work, we established recombinant production in Escherichia coli for monovalent antigen-binding fragment (Fab) adopted from a clinically used anticancer mAB drug cetuximab targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Recombinant DNA constructs were designed to express both polypeptide chains comprising Fab in a single vector and to secrete them to bacterial periplasmic space for efficient folding. Particularly, a C-terminal engineering to confer an interchain disulfide bond appeared to be able to enhance its heterodimeric integrity and EGFR-binding activity. Conformational relevance of the purified final product was validated by mass spectrometry and crystal structure at 1.9 Å resolution. Finally, our recombinant cetuximab-Fab was found to have strong binding affinity to EGFR overexpressed in human squamous carcinoma model (A431) cells. Its binding ability was comparable to that of cetuximab. Its EGFR-binding affinity was estimated at approximately 0.7 nM of Kd in vitro, which was quite stronger than the binding affinity of natural ligand EGF. Hence, the results validate that our construction could serve as an efficient platform to produce a recombinant cetuximab-Fab with a retained antigen-binding functionality.

  5. Rad52 competes with Ku70/Ku86 for binding to S-region DSB ends to modulate antibody class-switch DNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Zan, Hong; Tat, Connie; Qiu, Zhifang; Taylor, Julia R; Guerrero, Justin A; Shen, Tian; Casali, Paolo

    2017-02-08

    Antibody class-switch DNA recombination (CSR) is initiated by AID-introduced DSBs in the switch (S) regions targeted for recombination, as effected by Ku70/Ku86-mediated NHEJ. Ku-deficient B cells, however, undergo (reduced) CSR through an alternative(A)-NHEJ pathway, which introduces microhomologies in S-S junctions. As microhomology-mediated end-joining requires annealing of single-strand DNA ends, we addressed the contribution of single-strand annealing factors HR Rad52 and translesion DNA polymerase θ to CSR. Compared with their Rad52(+/+) counterparts, which display normal CSR, Rad52(-/-) B cells show increased CSR, fewer intra-Sμ region recombinations, no/minimal microhomologies in S-S junctions, decreased c-Myc/IgH translocations and increased Ku70/Ku86 recruitment to S-region DSB ends. Rad52 competes with Ku70/Ku86 for binding to S-region DSB ends. It also facilitates a Ku-independent DSB repair, which favours intra-S region recombination and mediates, particularly in Ku absence, inter-S-S recombination, as emphasized by the significantly greater CSR reduction in Rad52(-/-) versus Rad52(+/+) B cells on Ku86 knockdown.

  6. Rad52 competes with Ku70/Ku86 for binding to S-region DSB ends to modulate antibody class-switch DNA recombination

    PubMed Central

    Zan, Hong; Tat, Connie; Qiu, Zhifang; Taylor, Julia R.; Guerrero, Justin A.; Shen, Tian; Casali, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Antibody class-switch DNA recombination (CSR) is initiated by AID-introduced DSBs in the switch (S) regions targeted for recombination, as effected by Ku70/Ku86-mediated NHEJ. Ku-deficient B cells, however, undergo (reduced) CSR through an alternative(A)-NHEJ pathway, which introduces microhomologies in S–S junctions. As microhomology-mediated end-joining requires annealing of single-strand DNA ends, we addressed the contribution of single-strand annealing factors HR Rad52 and translesion DNA polymerase θ to CSR. Compared with their Rad52+/+ counterparts, which display normal CSR, Rad52−/− B cells show increased CSR, fewer intra-Sμ region recombinations, no/minimal microhomologies in S–S junctions, decreased c-Myc/IgH translocations and increased Ku70/Ku86 recruitment to S-region DSB ends. Rad52 competes with Ku70/Ku86 for binding to S-region DSB ends. It also facilitates a Ku-independent DSB repair, which favours intra-S region recombination and mediates, particularly in Ku absence, inter-S–S recombination, as emphasized by the significantly greater CSR reduction in Rad52−/− versus Rad52+/+ B cells on Ku86 knockdown. PMID:28176781

  7. Replicative age induces mitotic recombination in the ribosomal RNA gene cluster of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lindstrom, Derek L; Leverich, Christina K; Henderson, Kiersten A; Gottschling, Daniel E

    2011-03-01

    Somatic mutations contribute to the development of age-associated disease. In earlier work, we found that, at high frequency, aging Saccharomyces cerevisiae diploid cells produce daughters without mitochondrial DNA, leading to loss of respiration competence and increased loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in the nuclear genome. Here we used the recently developed Mother Enrichment Program to ask whether aging cells that maintain the ability to produce respiration-competent daughters also experience increased genomic instability. We discovered that this population exhibits a distinct genomic instability phenotype that primarily affects the repeated ribosomal RNA gene array (rDNA array). As diploid cells passed their median replicative life span, recombination rates between rDNA arrays on homologous chromosomes progressively increased, resulting in mutational events that generated LOH at >300 contiguous open reading frames on the right arm of chromosome XII. We show that, while these recombination events were dependent on the replication fork block protein Fob1, the aging process that underlies this phenotype is Fob1-independent. Furthermore, we provide evidence that this aging process is not driven by mechanisms that modulate rDNA recombination in young cells, including loss of cohesion within the rDNA array or loss of Sir2 function. Instead, we suggest that the age-associated increase in rDNA recombination is a response to increasing DNA replication stress generated in aging cells.

  8. Cellulosic Ethanol Production by Recombinant Cellulolytic Bacteria Harbouring pdc and adh II Genes of Zymomonas mobilis

    PubMed Central

    Piriya, P. Sobana; Vasan, P. Thirumalai; Padma, V. S.; Vidhyadevi, U.; Archana, K.; Vennison, S. John

    2012-01-01

    The ethanol fermenting genes such as pyruvate decarboxylase (pdc) and alcohol dehydrogenase II (adh II) were cloned from Zymomonas mobilis and transformed into three different cellulolytic bacteria, namely Enterobacter cloacae JV, Proteus mirabilis JV and Erwinia chrysanthemi and their cellulosic ethanol production capability was studied. Recombinant E. cloacae JV was found to produce 4.5% and 3.5% (v/v) ethanol, respectively, when CMC and 4% NaOH pretreated bagasse were used as substrates, whereas recombinant P. mirabilis and E. chrysanthemi with the same substrates could only produce 4%, 3.5%, 1%, and 1.5 % of ethanol, respectively. The recombinant E. cloacae strain produced twofold higher percentage of ethanol than the wild type. The recombinant E. cloacae strain could be improved further by increasing its ethanol tolerance capability through media optimization and also by combining multigene cellulase expression for enhancing ethanol production from various types of lignocellulosic biomass so that it can be used for industrial level ethanol production. PMID:22919503

  9. Establishing targeted carp TLR22 gene disruption via homologous recombination using CRISPR/Cas9.

    PubMed

    Chakrapani, Vemulawada; Patra, Swagat Kumar; Panda, Rudra Prasanna; Rasal, Kiran Dashrath; Jayasankar, Pallipuram; Barman, Hirak Kumar

    2016-08-01

    Recent advances in gene editing techniques have not been exploited in farmed fishes. We established a gene targeting technique, using the CRISPR/Cas9 system in Labeo rohita, a farmed carp (known as rohu). We demonstrated that donor DNA was integrated via homologous recombination (HR) at the site of targeted double-stranded nicks created by CRISPR/Cas9 nuclease. This resulted in the successful disruption of rohu Toll-like receptor 22 (TLR22) gene, involved in innate immunity and exclusively present in teleost fishes and amphibians. The null mutant, thus, generated lacked TLR22 mRNA expression. Altogether, this is the first evidence that the CRISPR/Cas9 system is a highly efficient tool for targeted gene disruption via HR in teleosts for generating model large-bodied farmed fishes.

  10. Relic of ancient recombinations in gibbon ABO blood group genes deciphered through phylogenetic network analysis.

    PubMed

    Kitano, Takashi; Noda, Reiko; Takenaka, Osamu; Saitou, Naruya

    2009-06-01

    The primate ABO blood group gene encodes a glycosyl transferase (either A or B type), and is known to have large coalescence times among the allelic lineages in human. We determined nucleotide sequences of ca. 2.2kb of this gene for 23 individuals of three gibbon species (agile gibbon, white-handed gibbon, and siamang), and observed a total of 24 haplotypes. We found relics of five ancient intragenic recombinations, occurred during ca. 2-7 million years ago, through a phylogenetic network analysis. The coalescence time between A and B alleles estimate precede the divergence (ca. 8MYA) of siamang and common gibbon lineages. This establishes the coexistence of divergent allelic lineages of the ABO blood group gene for a long period in the ancestral gibbon species, and strengthens the non-neutral evolution for this gene.

  11. Assessing drivers of the IgG4 antibody reactivity to recombinant antigen Bm14 in Wuchereria bancrofti endemic populations in East Africa.

    PubMed

    Damgaard, Johanne; Meyrowitsch, Dan W; Rwegoshora, Rwehumbiza T; Magesa, Stephen M; Mukoko, Dunstan A; Simonsen, Paul E

    2016-09-01

    A high proportion of the human population in lymphatic filariasis (LF) endemic areas is positive for filarial specific IgG4 antibodies, including many individuals without microfilariae (mf; circulating larvae in the human blood) or circulating filarial antigens (CFA; marker of adult worm infection). The antibodies are commonly regarded as markers of infection and/or exposure to filarial larvae, but a direct association between the antibodies and these indices has not been well documented. The present study assessed the role and relative effect of potential drivers of the human IgG4 antibody reactivity to the recombinant filarial antigen Bm14 in Wuchereria bancrofti endemic populations in East Africa. Sera collected during previous studies from 395 well characterized individuals with regard to age, sex, mf, CFA, household vector biting and household exposure to infective filarial larvae were tested for IgG4 antibodies to Bm14, and associations between antibody reactivity and the different variables were statistically analyzed. IgG4 reactivity to Bm14 was highly positively associated with CFA, and to a lesser extent with age. However, an expected association with household exposure to infective filarial larvae was not found. Bm14 antibody reactivity thus appeared mainly to reflect actual infection of individuals with adult filarial worms rather than ongoing exposure to transmission. The analyses moreover suggested that many of the CFA negative but Bm14 positive individuals had early or low level infections where antibodies had been induced but where CFA was not (yet?) measurable. Although the study indicated that IgG4 reactivity to Bm14 is a marker of filarial infection, assessment of this reactivity, especially in children, will still be useful for indirect monitoring of changes in transmission intensity, including break of transmission and post-elimination surveillance, in LF control.

  12. Construction and characterization of recombinant adenovirus carrying a mouse TIGIT-GFP gene.

    PubMed

    Zheng, J M; Cui, J L; He, W T; Yu, D W; Gao, Y; Wang, L; Chen, Z K; Zhou, H M

    2015-12-29

    Recombinant adenovirus vector systems have been used extensively in protein research and gene therapy. However, the construction and characterization of recombinant adenovirus is a tedious and time-consuming process. TIGIT is a recently discovered immunosuppressive molecule that plays an important role in maintaining immunological balance. The construction of recombinant adenovirus mediating TIGIT expression must be simplified to facilitate its use in the study of TIGIT. In this study, the TIGIT gene was combined with green fluorescent protein (GFP); the TIGIT-GFP gene was inserted into a gateway plasmid to construct a TIGIT-GFP adenovirus. HEK 293A cells were infected with the adenovirus, which was then purified and subjected to virus titering. TIGIT-GFP adenovirus was characterized by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence, and its expression in mouse liver was detected by infection through caudal vein injection. The results showed the successful construction of the TIGIT-GFP adenovirus (5 x 10(10) PFU/mL). Co-expression of TIGIT and GFP was identified in 293A and liver cells; synthesis and positioning of TIGIT-GFP was viewed under a fluorescence microscope. TIGIT-GFP was highly expressed on liver cells 1 day (25.53%) after infection and faded 3 days (11.36%) after injection. In conclusion, the fusion of TIGIT with GFP allows easy, rapid, and uncomplicated detection of TIGIT translation. The construction of a TIGIT-GFP adenovirus, mediating TIGIT expression in vitro and in vivo, lays the foundation for further research into TIGIT function and gene therapy. Moreover, the TIGIT-GFP adenovirus is a helpful tool for studying other proteins (which could replace the TIGIT gene).

  13. A recombinant mimetics of the HIV-1 gp41 prehairpin fusion intermediate fused with human IgG Fc fragment elicits neutralizing antibody response in the vaccinated mice

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Zhi; Pan, Chungen; Lu, Hong; Shui, Yuan; Li, Lin; Li, Xiaojuan; Xu, Xueqing; Liu, Shuwen; Jiang, Shibo

    2010-07-30

    Research highlights: {yields} One recombinant mimetics of gp41 prehairpin fusion intermediate (PFI) consisting of gp41 N46 sequence, foldon and IgG Fc, designated N46FdFc, was expressed. {yields} N46FdFc-induced antibodies in mice that neutralized HIV-1 infection, inhibited PIE7 binding to PFI, blocked gp41 six-helix bundle formation, and suppressed HIV-1 mediated cell-cell fusion. {yields} These findings provide an important clue for developing recombinant gp41 PFI mimetics-based HIV vaccines. -- Abstract: HIV-1 gp41 prehairpin fusion intermediate (PFI) composed of three N-terminal heptad repeats (NHR) plays a crucial role in viral fusion and entry and represents an attractive target for anti-HIV therapeutics (e.g., enfuvirtide) and vaccines. In present study, we constructed and expressed two recombinant gp41 PFI mimetics, designated N46Fd and N46FdFc. N46Fd consists of N46 (residues 536-581) in gp41 NHR and foldon (Fd), a trimerization motif. N46FdFc is composed of N46Fd fused with human IgG Fc fragment as an immunoenhancer. We immunized mice with N46 peptide, N46Fd and N46FdFc, respectively, and found that only N46FdFc elicited neutralizing antibody response in mice against infection by HIV-1 strains IIIB (clade B, X4), 92US657 (clade B, R5), and 94UG103 (clade A, X4R5). Anti-N46FdFc antibodies inhibited PIE7 binding to PFI, blocked gp41 six-helix bundle formation, and suppressed HIV-1 mediated cell-cell fusion. These findings provide an important clue for developing recombinant gp41 PFI mimetics-based HIV vaccines.

  14. The role of VL gene structural determinants in the fine specificity of anti-DNA antibodies.

    PubMed

    Singh, A K; Gangemi, R M; Barrett, K J

    1994-01-01

    To investigate the structural contribution of the light chain of anti-DNA antibodies to fine specificity, the VKappa genes of two monoclonal anti-DNA antibodies, termed H241 and H102, were cloned and sequenced. H102 and H241 are independently derived from MRL-lpr/lpr mice and differ in their fine specificity: H241 binds dsDNA and normal glomeruli in vitro and deposits in the kidney in vivo, whereas H102 binds only ssDNA and does not deposit in the kidney. Both are encoded by nearly identical VH genes but different N and D regions. Our previous results have demonstrated that the VH gene for H102 and H241 encodes eight other anti-DNA antibodies that also differed in fine specificity. This suggested that the gene product encoded by the VH 102/241 gene, may have intrinsic affinity for DNA, but is unlikely to determine fine specificity or nephritogenicity. In the present study we examined whether the VKappa gene might account for the difference in nephritogenicity. The complete nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence of VK 102 and VK241 revealed that they are very dissimilar to each other (< 60% homology). VK 241 defined a new member of the VKappa gene family and was moderately homologous to two other VK genes encoding anti-DNA antibodies and to one VK gene encoding an anti-histone antibody all from lupus strains of mice. In addition, sequence diversity in the VK CDR1 region and position 96 of the CDR3 region was observed that may be of significance in determining fine specificity. VK 102 was highly homologous to two other VKappa genes, VKs17.2 and VK C8.5, both encoding anti-DNA antibodies and members of the VK20 gene family. It was striking that all three members of the VK 20 gene family code for DNA reactivity. This suggests that certain VKappa genes may also be used to repeatedly code for anti-DNA reactivity.

  15. Vaccination of koalas with a recombinant Chlamydia pecorum major outer membrane protein induces antibodies of different specificity compared to those following a natural live infection.

    PubMed

    Kollipara, Avinash; Polkinghorne, Adam; Beagley, Kenneth W; Timms, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Chlamydial infection in koalas is common across the east coast of Australia and causes significant morbidity, infertility and mortality. An effective vaccine to prevent the adverse consequences of chlamydial infections in koalas (particularly blindness and infertility in females) would provide an important management tool to prevent further population decline of this species. An important step towards developing a vaccine in koalas is to understand the host immune response to chlamydial infection. In this study, we used the Pepscan methodology to identify B cell epitopes across the Major Outer Membrane Protein (MOMP) of four C. pecorum strains/genotypes that are recognized, either following (a) natural live infection or (b) administration of a recombinant MOMP vaccine. Plasma antibodies from the koalas naturally infected with a C. pecorum G genotype strain recognised the epitopes located in the variable domain (VD) four of MOMP G and also VD4 of MOMP H. By comparison, plasma antibodies from an animal infected with a C. pecorum F genotype strain recognised epitopes in VD1, 2 and 4 of MOMP F, but not from other genotype MOMPs. When Chlamydia-free koalas were immunised with recombinant MOMP protein they produced antibodies not only against epitopes in the VDs but also in conserved domains of MOMP. Naturally infected koalas immunised with recombinant MOMP protein also produced antibodies against epitopes in the conserved domains. This work paves the way for further refinement of a MOMP-based Chlamydia vaccine that will offer wide cross-protection against the variety of chlamydial infections circulating in wild koala populations.

  16. High prevalence of antibodies against canine adenovirus (CAV) type 2 in domestic dog populations in South Africa precludes the use of CAV-based recombinant rabies vaccines.

    PubMed

    Wright, N; Jackson, F R; Niezgoda, M; Ellison, J A; Rupprecht, C E; Nel, L H

    2013-08-28

    Rabies in dogs can be controlled through mass vaccination. Oral vaccination of domestic dogs would be useful in the developing world, where greater vaccination coverage is needed especially in inaccessible areas or places with large numbers of free-roaming dogs. From this perspective, recent research has focused on development of new recombinant vaccines that can be administered orally in a bait to be used as adjunct for parenteral vaccination. One such candidate, a recombinant canine adenovirus type 2 vaccine expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein (CAV2-RG), is considered a promising option for dogs, given host specificity and safety. To assess the potential use of this vaccine in domestic dog populations, we investigated the prevalence of antibodies against canine adenovirus type 2 in South African dogs. Blood was collected from 241 dogs from the Gauteng and KwaZulu-Natal provinces. Sampled dogs had not previously been vaccinated against canine adenovirus type 1 (CAV1) or canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV2). Animals from both provinces had a high percentage of seropositivity (45% and 62%), suggesting that CAV2 circulates extensively among domestic dog populations in South Africa. Given this finding, we evaluated the effect of pre-existing CAV-specific antibodies on the efficacy of the CAV2-RG vaccine delivered via the oral route in dogs. Purpose-bred Beagle dogs, which received prior vaccination against canine parvovirus, canine distemper virus and CAV, were immunized by oral administration of CAV2-RG. After rabies virus (RABV) infection all animals, except one vaccinated dog, developed rabies. This study demonstrated that pre-existing antibodies against CAV, such as naturally occurs in South African dogs, inhibits the development of neutralizing antibodies against RABV when immunized with a CAV-based rabies recombinant vaccine.

  17. Identification of New Genes Required for Meiotic Recombination in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Ajimura, M.; Leem, S. H.; Ogawa, H.

    1993-01-01

    Mutants defective in meiotic recombination were isolated from a disomic haploid strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by examining recombination within the leu2 and his4 heteroalleles located on chromosome III. The mutants were classified into two new complementation groups (MRE2 and MRE11) and eight previously identified groups, which include SPO11, HOP1, REC114, MRE4/MEK1 and genes in the RAD52 epistasis group. All of the mutants, in which the mutations in the new complementation groups are homozygous and diploid, can undergo premeiotic DNA synthesis and produce spores. The spores are, however, not viable. The mre2 and mre11 mutants produce viable spores in a spo13 background, in which meiosis I is bypassed, suggesting that these mutants are blocked at an early step in meiotic recombination. The mre2 mutant does not exhibit any unusual phenotype during mitosis and it is, thus, considered to have a mutation in a meiosis-specific gene. By contrast, the mre11 mutant is sensitive to damage to DNA by methyl methanesulfonate and exhibits a hyperrecombination phenotype in mitosis. Among six alleles of HOP1 that were isolated, an unusual pattern of intragenic complementation was observed. PMID:8417989

  18. A gene responsible for prolyl-hydroxylation of moss-produced recombinant human erythropoietin

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Juliana; Altmann, Friedrich; Graf, Manuela; Stadlmann, Johannes; Reski, Ralf; Decker, Eva L.

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant production of pharmaceutical proteins is crucial, not only for personalized medicine. While most biopharmaceuticals are currently produced in mammalian cell culture, plant-made pharmaceuticals gain momentum. Post-translational modifications in plants are similar to those in humans, however, existing differences may affect quality, safety and efficacy of the products. A frequent modification in higher eukaryotes is prolyl-4-hydroxylase (P4H)-catalysed prolyl-hydroxylation. P4H sequence recognition sites on target proteins differ between humans and plants leading to non-human posttranslational modifications of recombinant human proteins produced in plants. The resulting hydroxyprolines display the anchor for plant-specific O-glycosylation, which bears immunogenic potential for patients. Here we describe the identification of a plant gene responsible for non-human prolyl-hydroxylation of human erythropoietin (hEPO) recombinantly produced in plant (moss) bioreactors. Targeted ablation of this gene abolished undesired prolyl-hydroxylation of hEPO and thus paves the way for plant-made pharmaceuticals humanized via glyco-engineering in moss bioreactors. PMID:24145658

  19. Two recombination-dependent DNA replication pathways of bacteriophage T4, and their roles in mutagenesis and horizontal gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Mosig, Gisela; Gewin, John; Luder, Andreas; Colowick, Nancy; Vo, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    Two major pathways of recombination-dependent DNA replication, “join-copy” and “join-cut-copy,” can be distinguished in phage T4: join-copy requires only early and middle genes, but two late proteins, endonuclease VII and terminase, are uniquely important in the join-cut-copy pathway. In wild-type T4, timing of these pathways is integrated with the developmental program and related to transcription and packaging of DNA. In primase mutants, which are defective in origin-dependent lagging-strand DNA synthesis, the late pathway can bypass the lack of primers for lagging-strand DNA synthesis. The exquisitely regulated synthesis of endo VII, and of two proteins from its gene, explains the delay of recombination-dependent DNA replication in pr