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Sample records for genetic diagnosis pgd

  1. Attitudes Toward Pre-implantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) for Genetic Disorders Among Potential Users in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Olesen, Angelina Patrick; Nor, Siti Nurani Mohd; Amin, Latifah

    2016-02-01

    While pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is available and legal in Malaysia, there is an ongoing controversy debate about its use. There are few studies available on individuals' attitudes toward PGD, particularly among those who have a genetic disease, or whose children have a genetic disease. To the best of our knowledge, this is, in fact, the first study of its kind in Malaysia. We conducted in-depth interviews, using semi-structured questionnaires, with seven selected potential PGD users regarding their knowledge, attitudes and decisions relating to the use PGD. The criteria for selecting potential PGD users were that they or their children had a genetic disease, and they desired to have another child who would be free of genetic disease. All participants had heard of PGD and five of them were considering its use. The participants' attitudes toward PGD were based on several different considerations that were influenced by various factors. These included: the benefit-risk balance of PGD, personal experiences of having a genetic disease, religious beliefs, personal values and cost. The study's findings suggest that the selected Malaysian participants, as potential PGD users, were supportive but cautious regarding the use of PGD for medical purposes, particularly in relation to others whose experiences were similar. More broadly, the paper highlights the link between the participants' personal experiences and their beliefs regarding the appropriateness, for others, of individual decision-making on PGD, which has not been revealed by previous studies.

  2. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for Huntington's disease: the experience of three European centres.

    PubMed

    Van Rij, Maartje C; De Rademaeker, Marjan; Moutou, Céline; Dreesen, Jos C F M; De Rycke, Martine; Liebaers, Inge; Geraedts, Joep P M; De Die-Smulders, Christine E M; Viville, Stéphane

    2012-04-01

    This study provides an overview of 13 years of experience of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for Huntington's disease (HD) at three European PGD centres in Brussels, Maastricht and Strasbourg. Information on all 331 PGD intakes for HD, couples' reproductive history, PGD approach, treatment cycles and outcomes between 1995 and 2008 were collected prospectively. Of 331 couples for intake, 68% requested direct testing and 32% exclusion testing (with a preponderance of French couples). At the time of PGD intake, 39% of women had experienced one or more pregnancies. A history of pregnancy termination after prenatal diagnosis was observed more frequently in the direct testing group (25%) than in the exclusion group (10%; P=0.0027). PGD workup was based on two approaches: (1) direct testing of the CAG-triplet repeat and (2) linkage analysis using intragenic or flanking microsatellite markers of the HTT gene. In total, 257 couples had started workup and 174 couples (70% direct testing, 30% exclusion testing) completed at least one PGD cycle. In total, 389 cycles continued to oocyte retrieval (OR). The delivery rates per OR were 19.8%, and per embryo transfer 24.8%, resulting in 77 deliveries and the birth of 90 children. We conclude that PGD is a valuable and safe reproductive option for HD carriers and couples at risk of transmitting HD.

  3. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for Huntington's disease: the experience of three European centres

    PubMed Central

    Van Rij, Maartje C; De Rademaeker, Marjan; Moutou, Céline; Dreesen, Jos CFM; De Rycke, Martine; Liebaers, Inge; Geraedts, Joep PM; De Die-Smulders, Christine EM; Viville, Stéphane

    2012-01-01

    This study provides an overview of 13 years of experience of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for Huntington's disease (HD) at three European PGD centres in Brussels, Maastricht and Strasbourg. Information on all 331 PGD intakes for HD, couples' reproductive history, PGD approach, treatment cycles and outcomes between 1995 and 2008 were collected prospectively. Of 331 couples for intake, 68% requested direct testing and 32% exclusion testing (with a preponderance of French couples). At the time of PGD intake, 39% of women had experienced one or more pregnancies. A history of pregnancy termination after prenatal diagnosis was observed more frequently in the direct testing group (25%) than in the exclusion group (10% P=0.0027). PGD workup was based on two approaches: (1) direct testing of the CAG-triplet repeat and (2) linkage analysis using intragenic or flanking microsatellite markers of the HTT gene. In total, 257 couples had started workup and 174 couples (70% direct testing, 30% exclusion testing) completed at least one PGD cycle. In total, 389 cycles continued to oocyte retrieval (OR). The delivery rates per OR were 19.8%, and per embryo transfer 24.8%, resulting in 77 deliveries and the birth of 90 children. We conclude that PGD is a valuable and safe reproductive option for HD carriers and couples at risk of transmitting HD. PMID:22071896

  4. ESHRE Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) Consortium: preliminary assessment of data from January 1997 to September 1998. ESHRE PGD Consortium Steering Committee.

    PubMed

    Geraedts, J; Handyside, A; Harper, J; Liebaers, I; Sermon, K; Staessen, C; Thornhill, A; Vanderfaeillie, A; Viville, S

    1999-12-01

    The first clinical application of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) was reported almost a decade ago. Since then, the range of genetic defects that can be detected at single cell level has increased dramatically. At the 13th Annual Meeting of ESHRE in Edinburgh in 1997, a PGD Consortium was formed to undertake the first systematic and long-term study of the efficacy and clinical outcome of PGD. We report here the first data collection covering the period of January 1997 to September 1998. Referral data on 323 couples have been collected for a variety of monogenic and chromosomal disorders, providing information about which patients, at risk for which genetic diseases, are interested in PGD. Data were collected on 392 PGD cycles, resulting in 302 embryo transfers and 66 clinical pregnancies. Because of the importance of follow-up of the children born after PGD, participating centres were asked to contribute data on the pregnancies achieved and the children born after PGD since the start of their PGD programme. Data on 82 pregnancies and 110 fetal sacs were collected, and information was available on 79 children. Finally, biopsy, fluorescence in-situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction protocols were collected, clearly showing that no consensus exists on technical aspects such as which culture medium to use, and emphasizing the role the PGD Consortium could play in setting up guidelines for good laboratory practice. In conclusion, it is clear that the effort of gathering data on PGD cycles is worthwhile and will be continued in the future, preferably using electronic data collection.

  5. Accuracy of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) of single gene and chromosomal disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Verlinsky, Y.; Strom, C.; Rechitsky, S.

    1994-09-01

    We have developed a polar body inferred approach for preconception diagnosis of single gene and chromosomal disorders. Preconception PCR or FISH analysis was performed in a total of 310 first polar bodies for the following genetic conditions: cystic fibrosis, hemophilia A, alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency, Tay Sachs disease, retinitis pigmentosa and common chromosomal trisomies. An important advantage of this approach is the avoidance of sperm (DNA) contamination, which is the major problem of PGD. We are currently applying FISH analysis of biopsied blastomeres, in combination with PCR or separately, and have demonstrated a significant improvement of the accuracy of PGD of X-linked disorders at this stage. Our data have also demonstrated feasibility of the application of FISH technique for PGD of chromosomal disorders. It was possible to detect chromosomal non-disjunctions and chromatid malsegregations in the first meiotic division, as well as to evaluate chromosomal mutations originating from the second meiotic nondisjunction.

  6. Evaluation of PCR-based preimplantation genetic diagnosis applied to monogenic diseases: a collaborative ESHRE PGD consortium study.

    PubMed

    Dreesen, Jos; Destouni, Aspasia; Kourlaba, Georgia; Degn, Birte; Mette, Wulf Christensen; Carvalho, Filipa; Moutou, Celine; Sengupta, Sioban; Dhanjal, Seema; Renwick, Pamela; Davies, Steven; Kanavakis, Emmanouel; Harton, Gary; Traeger-Synodinos, Joanne

    2014-08-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for monogenic disorders currently involves polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods, which must be robust, sensitive and highly accurate, precluding misdiagnosis. Twelve adverse misdiagnoses reported to the ESHRE PGD-Consortium are likely an underestimate. This retrospective study, involving six PGD centres, assessed the validity of PCR-based PGD through reanalysis of untransferred embryos from monogenic-PGD cycles. Data were collected on the genotype concordance at PGD and follow-up from 940 untransferred embryos, including details on the parameters of PGD cycles: category of monogenic disease, embryo morphology, embryo biopsy and genotype assay strategy. To determine the validity of PCR-based PGD, the sensitivity (Se), specificity (Sp) and diagnostic accuracy were calculated. Stratified analyses were also conducted to assess the influence of the parameters above on the validity of PCR-based PGD. The analysis of overall data showed that 93.7% of embryos had been correctly classified at the time of PGD, with Se of 99.2% and Sp of 80.9%. The stratified analyses found that diagnostic accuracy is statistically significantly higher when PGD is performed on two cells versus one cell (P=0.001). Se was significantly higher when multiplex protocols versus singleplex protocols were applied (P=0.005), as well as for PGD applied on cells from good compared with poor morphology embryos (P=0.032). Morphology, however, did not affect diagnostic accuracy. Multiplex PCR-based methods on one cell, are as robust as those on two cells regarding false negative rate, which is the most important criteria for clinical PGD applications. Overall, this study demonstrates the validity, robustness and high diagnostic value of PCR-based PGD.

  7. Public Perceptions of Ethical, Legal and Social Implications of Pre-implantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Olesen, Angelina P; Mohd Nor, Siti Nurani; Amin, Latifah; Che Ngah, Anisah

    2016-12-19

    Pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) became well known in Malaysia after the birth of the first Malaysian 'designer baby', Yau Tak in 2004. Two years later, the Malaysian Medical Council implemented the first and only regulation on the use of Pre-implantation Genetic Diagnosis in this country. The birth of Yau Tak triggered a public outcry because PGD was used for non-medical sex selection thus, raising concerns about PGD and its implications for the society. This study aims to explore participants' perceptions of the future implications of PGD for the Malaysian society. We conducted in-depth interviews with 21 participants over a period of one year, using a semi-structured questionnaire. Findings reveal that responses varied substantially among the participants; there was a broad acceptance as well as rejection of PGD. Contentious ethical, legal and social issues of PGD were raised during the discussions, including intolerance to and discrimination against people with genetic disabilities; societal pressure and the 'slippery slope' of PGD were raised during the discussions. This study also highlights participants' legal standpoint, and major issues regarding PGD in relation to the accuracy of diagnosis. At the social policy level, considerations are given to access as well as the impact of this technology on families, women and physicians. Given these different perceptions of the use of PGD, and its implications and conflicts, policies and regulations of the use of PGD have to be dealt with on a case-by-case basis while taking into consideration of the risk-benefit balance, since its application will impact the lives of so many people in the society.

  8. Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) for Monogenic Disorders: the Value of Concurrent Aneuploidy Screening.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Kara N; Nazem, Taraneh; Berkeley, Alan; Palter, Steven; Grifo, Jamie A

    2016-12-01

    Pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) has changed the landscape of clinical genetics by helping families reduce the transmission of monogenic disorders. However, given the high prevalence of embryonic aneuploidy, particularly in patients of advanced reproductive age, unaffected embryos remain at high risk of implantation failure or pregnancy loss due to aneuploidy. 24-chromosome aneuploidy screening has become widely utilized in routine in vitro fertilization (IVF) to pre-select embryos with greater pregnancy potential, but concurrent 24-chromosome aneuploidy screening has not become standard practice in embryos biopsied for PGD. We performed a retrospective cohort study of patients who underwent PGD with or without 24-chromosome aneuploidy screening to explore the value of concurrent screening. Among the PGD + aneuploidy-screened group (n = 355 blastocysts), only 25.6 % of embryos were both Single Gene Disorder (SGD)-negative (or carriers) and euploid; thus the majority of embryos were ineligible for transfer due to the high prevalence of aneuploidy. Despite a young mean age (32.4 ± 5.9y), 49.9 % of Blastocysts were aneuploid. The majority of patients (53.2 %) had ≥1 blastocyst that was Single Gene Disorder (SGD)-unaffected but aneuploid; without screening, these unaffected but aneuploid embryos would likely have been transferred resulting in implantation failure, pregnancy loss, or a pregnancy affected by chromosomal aneuploidy. Despite the transfer of nearly half the number of embryos in the aneuploidy-screened group (1.1 ± 0.3 vs. 1.9 ± 0.6, p < 0.0001), the implantation rate was higher (75 % vs. 53.3 %) and miscarriage rate lower (20 % vs. 40 %) (although not statistically significant). 24-chromosome aneuploidy screening when performed concurrently with PGD provides valuable information for embryo selection, and notably improves single embryo transfer rates.

  9. Religious Scholars' Attitudes and Views on Ethical Issues Pertaining to Pre-Implantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Olesen, A; Nor, S N; Amin, L

    2016-09-01

    Pre-Implantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) represents the first fusion of genomics and assisted reproduction and the first reproductive technology that allows prospective parents to screen and select the genetic characteristics of their potential offspring. However, for some, the idea that we can intervene in the mechanisms of human existence at such a fundamental level can be, at a minimum, worrying and, at most, repugnant. Religious doctrines particularly are likely to collide with the rapidly advancing capability for science to make such interventions. This paper focuses on opinions and arguments of selected religious scholars regarding ethical issues pertaining to PGD. In-depth interviews were conducted with religious scholars from three different religious organizations in the Klang Valley, Malaysia. Findings showed that Christian scholars are very sceptical of the long-term use of PGD because of its possible effect on the value of humanity and the parent-children relationship. This differs from Islamic scholars, who view PGD as God-given knowledge in medical science to further help humans understand medical genetics. For Buddhist scholars, PGD is considered to be new medical technology that can be used to save lives, avoid suffering, and bring happiness to those who need it. Our results suggest that it is important to include the opinions and views of religious scholars when it comes to new medical technologies such as PGD, as their opinions will have a significant impact on people from various faiths, particularly in a multi-religious country like Malaysia where society places high value on marital relationships and on the traditional concepts of family.

  10. Prenatal diagnosis and preimplantation genetic diagnosis: novel technologies and state of the art of PGD in different regions of the world.

    PubMed

    Peyvandi, F; Garagiola, I; Mortarino, M

    2011-07-01

    Prenatal diagnosis (PND) aims to provide accurate, rapid results as early in pregnancy as possible. Conventional PND involves sampling cells of foetal origin by chorionic villus sampling at 11-14th weeks of pregnancy or amniocentesis after 15th week. These are invasive procedures and have a small but significant rate of 0.5% to 1% for loss of pregnancy. An alternative to existing methods for conventional PND for couples at risk of transmitting a genetic disease to their child is preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). PGD is a newly emerging form of a very early prenatal diagnosis. The technique combines assisted reproductive technology with molecular genetics and cytogenetics to allow the identification of abnormality in embryos prior to implantation. The diagnosis of genetic disease in human preimplantation embryos was pioneered in the late 1980s for testing of aneuploidy, single gene and X-linked disease, such as cystic fibrosis, haemophilia and chromosomal abnormalities. The PGD-related legal and ethical issues have been debated at many levels both nationally and internationally. The attitude towards PGD varies substantially not only in different parts of the world but also within the Europe, owing to scientific, cultural and religious differences. PGD has become widely practised throughout the world for various indications and can substantially decrease the eventual risks of passing a genetic undesired condition of the offspring. Nevertheless, its extension to some new and non-medical indications has raised ethical concerns, in particular its potential eugenic dimension.

  11. Media debates and 'ethical publicity' on social sex selection through preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) technology in Australia.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    This paper offers a critical discourse analysis of media debate over social sex selection in the Australian media from 2008 to 2014. This period coincides with a review of the National Health and Medical Research Council's Ethical Guidelines on the Use of Assisted Reproductive Technology in Clinical Practice and Research (2007), which underlie the regulation of assisted reproductive clinics and practice in Australia. I examine the discussion of the ethics of pre-implatation genetic diagnosis (PGD) within the media as 'ethical publicity' to the lay public. Sex selection through PGD is both exemplary of and interconnected with a range of debates in Australia about the legitimacy of certain reproductive choices and the extent to which procreative liberties should be restricted. Major themes emerging from media reports on PGD sex selection in Australia are described. These include: the spectre of science out of control; ramifications for the contestation over the public funding of abortion in Australia; private choices versus public authorities regulating reproduction; and the ethics of travelling overseas for the technology. It is concluded that within Australia, the issue of PGD sex selection is framed in terms of questions of individual freedom against the principle of sex discrimination - a principle enshrined in legislation - and a commitment to publically-funded medical care.

  12. Developmental neuropsychological assessment of 4- to 5-year-old children born following Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD): A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sacks, Gilat Chaya; Altarescu, Gheona; Guedalia, Judith; Varshaver, Irit; Gilboa, Tal; Levy-Lahad, Ephrat; Eldar-Geva, Talia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate developmental neuropsychological profiles of 4- to 5-year-old children born after Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD). Twenty-seven participants received a neurological examination and a battery of neuropsychological assessments including Wechsler Preschool & Primary Scale of Intelligence - Third Edition (WPPSI-III; cognitive development), Preschool Language Scale, Fourth Edition (PLS-4; language development), Wide Range Assessment of Visual Motor Abilities (visual motor abilities), Childhood Autism Rating Scales II (a screening test for autistic spectrum disorders), and the Miles ABC Test (ocular dominance). Parental questionnaires included the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function Preschool Version (BRIEF-P; executive function), Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) and the Carey Temperament Scales Behavioral Style Questionnaire (socioemotional development and temperament), and the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, Interview Edition, Second Edition (general adaptive behavior). Subjects' tests results were compared to each test's norms. Children born after PGD demonstrated scores within the normal or above-normal ranges for all developmental outcomes (mean ± SD): WPPSI-III-VIQ 107.4 ± 14.4 (p = .013), PLS-4-Total 113.2 ± 12.4, p < .001), CBCL-Total 41.1 ± 8.6 (p < .001), BRIEF-P-Global Executive Composite 44.8 ± 9.5 (p = .009). Twelve (44%) of the PGD children had a significant difference between their VIQ and PIQ scores (compared to 27% in the general population). One subject was found to show possible signs of autistic spectrum disorder, although a family history of autism was noted. In conclusion, in this pilot study, children assessed at age 4-5 years and conceived after PGD displayed developmental neuropsychological outcomes within normal limits as compared to their chronologic peers. A larger study is needed to evaluate and follow the neuropsychological development of children born after PGD.

  13. Experiences of Pre-Implantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) in Sweden: a Three-Year Follow-Up of Men and Women.

    PubMed

    Järvholm, Stina; Thurin-Kjellberg, Ann; Broberg, Malin

    2017-02-12

    Men and women with a hereditary genetic disease are faced with different options when they wish to become parents. One is pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) which is a combination of in vitro fertilization (IVF) and genetic analysis of the embryo before implantation. The present study focused on men and women's psychological experiences of PGD three years after applying for PGD. Nineteen women and seventeen men (i.e. seventeen couples and two women) participated. The interviews were analysed by thematic method. It is better to have tried was identified as a master theme, under which came three underlying sub-themes, which had the following headings: Practical experience of PGD, Psychological experience of PGD and Goals of PGD. The results show that men and women three years after PGD are still psychologically affected by their experience. The men and women raised concerns that their relationship had been affected, both positively and negatively, and feelings of anxiety and depression still remained. Healthcare services should recognize the heterogeneous nature of the group being studied and therefore the need for counselling can arise at different times and in relation to different areas, regardless of the outcome of the PGD.

  14. Is intracytoplasmic sperm injection itself an indication to perform preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD)? About PGD, invasive prenatal diagnosis and genetic sonography.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, M; Geipel, A; Berg, C; Gembruch, U; Schwinger, E; Diedrich, K

    2001-01-01

    Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) provides the only sufficient treatment to overcome severe forms of male infertility. However, male infertility is linked to several genetic problems as an increased number of chromosomal aberrations, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene mutations, Y-chromosome microdeletions, and androgen receptor mutations. Therefore, these couples are at a higher risk of transmitting genetic problems to their offspring compared to the general population. A proposed increased number of gonosomal aberrations in the offspring possibly results from the ICSI technique itself. This led in general to a worldwide agreement to counsel those couples to undergo invasive prenatal diagnosis in order to exclude chromosome abnormalities, especially gonosomal aberrations. In this paper the genetic risks of these couples and the possible implications of ICSI itself are discussed. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis may be considered a procedure of choice in these cases, but substantial ethical problems arise when such a screening is sought. An alternative procedure of prenatal diagnosis in these couples seems to be 'genetic sonography', i.e. high-resolution ultrasound with measurement of nuchal translucency at the end of the first trimester, and detailed fetal evaluation at 18-22 weeks of gestation.

  15. Derivation of HVR1, HVR2 and HVR3 human embryonic stem cell lines from IVF embryos after preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for monogenic disorder.

    PubMed

    Hmadcha, Abdelkrim; Aguilera, Yolanda; Lozano-Arana, Maria Dolores; Mellado, Nuria; Sánchez, Javier; Moya, Cristina; Sánchez-Palazón, Luis; Palacios, Jose; Antiñolo, Guillermo; Soria, Bernat

    2016-05-01

    From 106 human blastocyts donate for research after in vitro fertilization (IVF) and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for monogenetic disorder, 3 human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) HVR1, HVR2 and HVR3 were successfully derived. HVR1 was assumed to be genetically normal, HVR2 carrying Becker muscular dystrophy and HVR3 Hemophilia B. Despite the translocation t(9;15)(q34.3;q14) detected in HVR2, all the 3 cell lines were characterised in vitro and in vivo as normal hESCs lines and were registered in the Spanish Stem Cell Bank.

  16. ESHRE PGD consortium best practice guidelines for organization of a PGD centre for PGD/preimplantation genetic screening.

    PubMed

    Harton, G; Braude, P; Lashwood, A; Schmutzler, A; Traeger-Synodinos, J; Wilton, L; Harper, J C

    2011-01-01

    In 2005, the European Society for Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE) PGD Consortium published a set of Guidelines for Best Practice PGD to give information, support and guidance to potential, existing and fledgling PGD programmes. Subsequent years have seen the introduction of new technologies as well as the evolution of current techniques. Additionally, in light of recent advice from ESHRE on how practice guidelines should be written/formulated, the Consortium believed it was timely to update the PGD guidelines. Rather than one document that covers all of PGD, the new guidelines are separated into four documents, including one relating to organization of the PGD centre and three relating to the methods used: DNA amplification, fluorescence in situ hybridization and biopsy/embryology. Here, we have updated the sections on organization of the PGD centre. One area that has continued to expand is Transport PGD, in which patients are treated at one IVF centre, whereas their gametes/embryos are tested elsewhere, at an independent PGD centre. Transport PGD/preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) has a unique set of challenges with respect to the nature of the sample and the rapid turn-around time required. PGS is currently controversial. Opinions of laboratory specialists and clinicians interested in PGD and PGS have been taken into account here. Current evidence suggests that PGS at cleavage stages is ineffective, but whether PGS at the blastocyst stage or on polar bodies might show improved delivery rates is still unclear. Thus, in this revision, PGS has been included. This document should assist everyone interested in PGD/PGS in developing the best laboratory and clinical practice possible.

  17. Reprogenetics: Preimplantational genetics diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Coco, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Preimplantational Genetics Diagnosis (PGD) is requested by geneticists and reproductive specialists. Usually geneticists ask for PGD because one or both members of the couple have an increased genetic risk for having an affected offspring. On the other hand, reproductive specialists ask for embryo aneuploidy screening (PGS) to assures an euploid embryo transfer, with the purpose to achieve an ongoing pregnancy, although the couple have normal karyotypes. As embryonic aneuploidies are responsible for pre and post implantation abortions, it is logical to considerer that the screening of the embryonic aneuploidies prior to embryo transfer could improve the efficiency of the in vitro fertilization procedures. Nevertheless, it is still premature to affirm this until well-designed clinical trials were done, especially in women of advanced age where the rate of embryos with aneuploidies is much greater. Although the indications of PGD are similar to conventional prenatal diagnosis (PND), PGD has less ethical objections than the PND. As with the PGD/PGS results only unaffected embryos are transferred, both methods can avoid the decision to interrupt the pregnancy due to a genetic problem; this makes an important difference when compared to conventional prenatal diagnosis. PMID:24764761

  18. Reprogenetics: Preimplantational genetics diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Coco, Roberto

    2014-03-01

    Preimplantational Genetics Diagnosis (PGD) is requested by geneticists and reproductive specialists. Usually geneticists ask for PGD because one or both members of the couple have an increased genetic risk for having an affected offspring. On the other hand, reproductive specialists ask for embryo aneuploidy screening (PGS) to assures an euploid embryo transfer, with the purpose to achieve an ongoing pregnancy, although the couple have normal karyotypes. As embryonic aneuploidies are responsible for pre and post implantation abortions, it is logical to considerer that the screening of the embryonic aneuploidies prior to embryo transfer could improve the efficiency of the in vitro fertilization procedures. Nevertheless, it is still premature to affirm this until well-designed clinical trials were done, especially in women of advanced age where the rate of embryos with aneuploidies is much greater. Although the indications of PGD are similar to conventional prenatal diagnosis (PND), PGD has less ethical objections than the PND. As with the PGD/PGS results only unaffected embryos are transferred, both methods can avoid the decision to interrupt the pregnancy due to a genetic problem; this makes an important difference when compared to conventional prenatal diagnosis.

  19. PGD for inherited cardiac diseases.

    PubMed

    Kuliev, Anver; Pomerantseva, Ekaterina; Polling, Dana; Verlinsky, Oleg; Rechitsky, Svetlana

    2012-04-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) has been applied for more than 200 different inherited conditions, with expanding application to common disorders with genetic predisposition. One of the recent indications for PGD has been inherited cardiac disease, for which no preclinical diagnosis and preventive management may exist and which may lead to premature or sudden death. This paper presents the first, as far as is known, cumulative experience of PGD for inherited cardiac diseases, including familial hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy, cardioencephalomyopathy and Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy. A total of 18 PGD cycles were performed, resulting in transfer in 15 of them, which yielded nine unaffected pregnancies and the births of seven disease- or disease predisposition-free children. The data open the prospect of PGD for inherited cardiac diseases, allowing couples carrying cardiac disease predisposing genes to reproduce without much fear of having offspring with these genes, which are at risk for premature or sudden death. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is currently an established clinical procedure in assisted reproduction and genetic practices. Its application has been expanding beyond traditional indications of prenatal diagnosis and currently includes common disorders with genetic predisposition, such as inherited forms of cancer. This applies also to the diseases with no current prospect of treatment, which may manifest despite presymptomatic diagnosis and follow up, when PGD may provide the only relief for the at-risk couples to reproduce. One of the recent indications for PGD has been inherited cardiac disease, for which no preclinical diagnosis and preventive management may exist and which may lead to premature or sudden death. We present here our first cumulative experience of PGD for inherited cardiac diseases, including familial hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy, cardioencephalomyopathy and Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy. A

  20. Social welfare, genetic welfare? Boundary-work in the IVF/PGD clinic.

    PubMed

    Ehrich, Kathryn; Williams, Clare; Scott, Rosamund; Sandall, Jane; Farsides, Bobbie

    2006-09-01

    Through the lens of the 'welfare of the child' assessment, this paper explores how staff working in the area of in vitro fertilisation and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (IVF/PGD) balance reflexive relations of legitimacy and accountability between the public and private spheres, and between medicine, the citizen and the state. The wider research of which this analysis is a part uses multiple methods to study two National Health Service Assisted Conception Units in England. Research methods used included observation clinics and interviews with staff from a range of disciplines. We illustrate how the staff reveal tensions between their views that the welfare of the child assessment can be seen as intrusive and discriminatory, and on the other hand that medical intervention in reproduction should be socially and professionally accountable. These tensions can be understood sociologically in terms of a gradual movement from socially based solutions to fertility problems and disabilities, towards a biomedical, and arguably genetically oriented worldview of such problems. Rather than being viewed as discrete, these two orientations should be seen as indicating an emergent direction of travel along a continuum, with elements of both being present in the accounts. We argue that consideration of the welfare of the child involves staff in ethical boundary-work across the two orientations and between the accountabilities and responsibilities of healthcare professionals, individuals and the state.

  1. Reproductive management through integration of PGD and MPS-based noninvasive prenatal screening/diagnosis for a family with GJB2-associated hearing impairment.

    PubMed

    Xiong, WenPing; Wang, DaYong; Gao, Yuan; Gao, Ya; Wang, HongYang; Guan, Jing; Lan, Lan; Yan, JunHao; Zong, Liang; Yuan, Yuan; Dong, Wei; Huang, SeXin; Wu, KeLiang; Wang, YaoShen; Wang, ZhiLi; Peng, HongMei; Lu, YanPing; Xie, LinYi; Zhao, Cui; Wang, Li; Zhang, QiuJing; Gao, Yun; Li, Na; Yang, Ju; Yin, ZiFang; Han, Bing; Wang, Wei; Chen, Zi-Jiang; Wang, QiuJu

    2015-09-01

    A couple with a proband child of GJB2 (encoding the gap junction protein connexin 26)-associated hearing impairment and a previous pregnancy miscarriage sought for a reproductive solution to bear a healthy child. Our study aimed to develop a customized preconception-to-neonate care trajectory to fulfill this clinical demand by integrating preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT), and noninvasive prenatal diagnosis (NIPD) into the strategy. Auditory and genetic diagnosis of the proband child was carried out to identify the disease causative mutations. The couple then received in-vitro-fertilization treatment, and eight embryos were obtained for day 5 biopsy. PGD was performed by short-tandem-repeat linkage analysis and Sanger sequencing of GJB2 gene. Transfer of a GJB2c.235delC heterozygous embryo resulted in a singleton pregnancy. At the 13th week of gestation, genomic DNA (gDNA) from the trio family and cell-free DNA (cfDNA) from maternal plasma were obtained for assessment of fetal chromosomal aneuploidy and GJB2 mutations. NIPT and NIPD showed the absence of chromosomal aneuploidy and GJB2-associated disease in the fetus, which was later confirmed by invasive procedures and postnatal genetic/auditory diagnosis. This strategy successfully prevented the transmission of hearing impairment in the newborn, thus providing a valuable experience in reproductive management of similar cases and potentially other monogenic disorders.

  2. Ethical issues in new uses of preimplantation genetic diagnosis: should parents be allowed to use preimplantation genetic diagnosis to choose the sexual orientation of their children?

    PubMed

    Dahl, Edgar

    2003-07-01

    Extending the application of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) to screen embryos for non-medical traits such as gender, height and intelligence, raises serious moral, legal, and social issues. In this paper I consider the possibility of using PGD to select the sexual orientation of offspring. After considering five potential objections, I conclude that parents should be permitted to use PGD to choose the sexual orientation of their children.

  3. [Extending preimplantation genetic diagnosis to HLA typing: the Paris experience].

    PubMed

    Steffann, J; Frydman, N; Burlet, P; Gigarel, N; Feyereisen, E; Kerbrat, V; Tachdjian, G; Munnich, A; Frydman, R

    2005-10-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) consists in the genetic analysis of one or two cells. These cells (blastomeres) are sampled from embryos, obtained by in vitro fertilization, at the third day of development. Since 1998, the bioethical laws (1994) and their decrees restricted PGD practices in France, strictly to the avoidance of the birth of a child affected with a genetic defect. In parallel, works on blood cord transplantation, taken at the birth of a compatible HLA sibling, showed very encouraging results, particularly for the treatment of Fanconi anemia. In 2001, Verlinsky et al., have reported the first PGD for Fanconi anaemia combined with HLA typing, allowing the birth of a healthy child, HLA-identical with his affected sister. The "designer baby" concept was born. The French law, which allowed PGD under specific conditions, i.e. when the genetic defect has been characterized in one parent at least, recently extended PGD to HLA typing when embryos are at risk of a genetic disorder. Article L.2131-4-1 (August 2004) allows the practice of HLA typing for PGD embryos when an elder sibling is affected with a genetic disorder and need stem cell transplantation. The HLA-matched offspring resulting from PGD can give cord blood at birth to supply the necessary therapy. This double selection give rise to serious ethical problems, but technical difficulties and legal restrictions will probably limit the development of such a procedure.

  4. Implementing PGD/PGD-A in IVF clinics: considerations for the best laboratory approach and management.

    PubMed

    Capalbo, Antonio; Romanelli, Valeria; Cimadomo, Danilo; Girardi, Laura; Stoppa, Marta; Dovere, Lisa; Dell'Edera, Domenico; Ubaldi, Filippo Maria; Rienzi, Laura

    2016-10-01

    For an IVF clinic that wishes to implement preimplantation genetic diagnosis for monogenic diseases (PGD) and for aneuploidy testing (PGD-A), a global improvement is required through all the steps of an IVF treatment and patient care. At present, CCS (Comprehensive Chromosome Screening)-based trophectoderm (TE) biopsy has been demonstrated as a safe, accurate and reproducible approach to conduct PGD-A and possibly also PGD from the same biopsy. Key challenges in PGD/PGD-A implementation cover genetic and reproductive counselling, selection of the most efficient approach for blastocyst biopsy as well as of the best performing molecular technique to conduct CCS and monogenic disease analysis. Three different approaches for TE biopsy can be compared. However, among them, the application of TE biopsy approaches, entailing the zona opening when the expanded blastocyst stage is reached, represent the only biopsy methods suited with a totally undisturbed embryo culture strategy (time lapse-based incubation in a single media). Moreover, contemporary CCS technologies show a different spectrum of capabilities and limits that potentially impact the clinical outcomes, the management and the applicability of the PGD-A itself. In general, CCS approaches that avoid the use of whole genome amplification (WGA) can provide higher reliability of results with lower costs and turnaround time of analysis. The future perspectives are focused on the scrupulous and rigorous clinical validations of novel CCS methods based on targeted approaches that avoid the use of WGA, such as targeted next-generation sequencing technology, to further improve the throughput of analysis and the overall cost-effectiveness of PGD/PGD-A.

  5. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Basille, Claire; Frydman, René; El Aly, Abdelwahab; Hesters, Laetitia; Fanchin, Renato; Tachdjian, Gérard; Steffann, Julie; LeLorc'h, Marc; Achour-Frydman, Nelly

    2009-07-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is used to analyze embryos genetically before their transfer into the uterus. It was developed first in England in 1990, as part of progress in reproductive medicine, genetic and molecular biology. PGD offers couples at risk the chance to have an unaffected child, without facing termination of pregnancy. Embryos are obtained by in vitro fertilization with intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), and are biopsied mostly on day 3; blastocyst biopsy is mentioned as a possible alternative. The genetic analysis is performed on one or two blastomeres, by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) for cytogenetic diagnosis, or polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for molecular diagnosis. Genetic analysis of the first or second polar body can be used to study maternal genetic contribution. Only unaffected embryos are transferred into the uterus. To improve the accuracy of the diagnosis, new technologies are emerging, with comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and microarrays. In Europe, depending on national regulations, PGD is either prohibited, or allowed, or practiced in the absence of recommendations. The indications are chromosomal abnormalities, X-linked diseases or single gene disorders. The number of disorders being tested increases. In Europe, data collection from the year 2004 reports that globally 69.6% of cycles lead to embryo transfer and implantation rate is 17%. European results from the year 2004 show a clinical pregnancy rate of 18% per oocyte retrieval and 25% per embryo transfer, leading to 528 babies born. The cohort studies concerning the paediatric follow-up of PGD babies show developmental outcomes similar to children conceived after IVF-ICSI. Recent advances include human leucocyte antigen (HLA) typing for PGD embryos, when an elder sibling is affected with a genetic disorder and needs stem cell transplantation. The HLA-matched offspring resulting can give cord blood at birth. Preimplantation genetic screening (PGS

  6. First systematic experience of preimplantation genetic diagnosis for de-novo mutations.

    PubMed

    Rechitsky, Svetlana; Pomerantseva, Ekaterina; Pakhalchuk, Tatiana; Pauling, Dana; Verlinsky, Oleg; Kuliev, Anver

    2011-04-01

    Standard preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) cannot be applied for de-novo mutations (DNM), because neither origin nor relevant haplotypes are available for testing in single cells. PGD strategies were developed for 80 families with 38 genetic disorders, determined by 33 dominant, three recessive and two X-linked DNM. All three recessive mutations were of paternal origin, while of 93 dominant mutations, 40 were paternal, 46 maternal and seven detected in affected children. The development of specific PGD strategy for each couple involved DNA analysis of the parents and affected children prior to PGD, including a mutation verification, polymorphic marker evaluation, whole and single sperm testing to establish the normal and mutant haplotypes and PGD by polar body analysis and/or embryo biopsy. Overall, 151 PGD cycles were performed for 80 families, for which a specific PGD design has been established. The application of these protocols resulted in pre-selection and transfer of 219 (1.72 per cycle) DNM-free embryos in 127 (84.1%) PGD cycles, yielding 63 (49.6%) unaffected pregnancies and birth of 59 (46.5%) healthy children, confirmed to be free of DNM. The data show feasibility of PGD for DNM, which may routinely be performed with accuracy of over 99%, using the established PGD strategy.

  7. A qualitative inquiry of the financial concerns of couples opting to use preimplantation genetic diagnosis to prevent the transmission of known genetic disorders.

    PubMed

    Drazba, Kathryn T; Kelley, Michele A; Hershberger, Patricia E

    2014-04-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is an innovative prenatal testing option because the determination of whether a genetic disorder or chromosomal abnormality is evident occurs prior to pregnancy. However, PGD is not covered financially under the majority of private and public health insurance institutions in the United States, leaving couples to decide whether PGD is financially feasible. The aim of this qualitative study was to understand the role of finances in the decision-making process among couples who were actively considering PGD. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were completed with 18 genetic high-risk couples (36 individual partners). Grounded theory guided the analysis, whereby three themes emerged: 1) Cost is salient, 2) Emotions surrounding affordability, and 3) Financial burden and sacrifice. Ultimately, couples determined that the opportunity to avoid passing on a genetic disorder to a future child was paramount to the cost of PGD, but expressed financial concerns and recognized financial access as a major barrier to PGD utilization.

  8. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis: current and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Cram, David; Pope, Adrianne

    2007-08-01

    Over the last 30 years prenatal diagnosis has been available to couples at genetic risk to determine the genetic health of a naturally conceived pregnancy. Prenatal diagnosis involves fetal cell sampling either by chorionic villous sampling at 10-12 weeks or by amniocentesis at 12-15 weeks gestation and testing for genetic disease. If the fetus is affected, termination of pregnancy is a difficult and emotional issue for the couple. The advent of assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) and more recently preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) now provides an alternative reproductive option that allows couples to commence a pregnancy knowing that their baby will not be affected with the indicated genetic condition. This article explores the option of PGD, its clinical application now and into the future and the current status of regulation and legislation. With recent changes to national legislation, scientists now have the opportunity to access affected PGD embryos donated by patients to establish disease-specific stem cells that may be useful models of human disease and a means to develop more effective therapies for treatment.

  9. Gender eugenics? The ethics of PGD for intersex conditions.

    PubMed

    Sparrow, Robert

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the ethics of the use of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) to prevent the birth of children with intersex conditions/disorders of sex development (DSDs), such as congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) and androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS). While pediatric surgeries performed on children with ambiguous genitalia have been the topic of intense bioethical controversy, there has been almost no discussion to date of the ethics of the use of PGD to reduce the prevalence of these conditions. I suggest that PGD for those conditions that involve serious medical risks for those born with them is morally permissible and that PGD for other "cosmetic" variations in sexual anatomy is more defensible than might first appear. However, importantly, the arguments that establish the latter claim have radical and disturbing implications for our attitude toward diversity more generally.

  10. Clinical guidelines for IVF with PGD for HLA matching.

    PubMed

    Tur-Kaspa, Ilan; Jeelani, Roohi

    2015-02-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing is an established procedure for conceiving a child who may donate cord blood or haematopoietic stem cells for transplantation to save an ill sibling. Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) from related matched donors improves overall survival compared with unrelated or non-matched donors. Since HSCT from related matched-donors is unavailable for 70% of patients, IVF for PGD-HLA is a relevant clinical option. Recent success of HSCT after PGD-HLA, and excellent health and family support of the children born, suggests that debate over this kind of 'designer baby' and 'gift of life' should subside. Discussions about IVF for PGD-HLA should be held with families when a related matched-donor is unavailable, when HSCT can wait at least 9-12 months, within weeks of diagnosis irrespective of prognosis, and when the mother is of reproductive age. Related half-matched egg donors may also be considered. National and international collaborations should be established, and couples choosing this modality should be referred to experienced IVF and PGD centres. Clinical guidelines will improve physician and patient awareness of IVF for PGD-HLA and its role in advancing the clinical care of children in need of HSCT.

  11. Anticipating issues related to increasing preimplantation genetic diagnosis use: a research agenda.

    PubMed

    Klitzman, Robert; Appelbaum, Paul S; Chung, Wendy; Sauer, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Increasing use of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) poses numerous clinical, social, psychological, ethical, legal and policy dilemmas, many of which have received little attention. Patients and providers are now considering and using PGD for a widening array of genetic disorders, and patients may increasingly seek 'designer babies.' In the USA, although governmental oversight policies have been discussed, few specific guidelines exist. Hence, increasingly, patients and providers will face challenging ethical and policy questions of when and for whom to use PGD, and how it should be financed. These issues should be better clarified and addressed through collection of data concerning the current use of PGD in the USA, including factors involved in decision making about PGD use, as well as the education of the various communities that are, and should be, involved in its implementation. Improved understanding of these issues will ultimately enhance the development and implementation of future clinical guidelines and policies.

  12. Practices and ethical concerns regarding preimplantation diagnosis. Who regulates preimplantation genetic diagnosis in Brazil?

    PubMed Central

    Damian, B.B.; Bonetti, T.C.S.; Horovitz, D.D.G.

    2014-01-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) was originally developed to diagnose embryo-related genetic abnormalities for couples who present a high risk of a specific inherited disorder. Because this technology involves embryo selection, the medical, bioethical, and legal implications of the technique have been debated, particularly when it is used to select features that are not related to serious diseases. Although several initiatives have attempted to achieve regulatory harmonization, the diversity of healthcare services available and the presence of cultural differences have hampered attempts to achieve this goal. Thus, in different countries, the provision of PGD and regulatory frameworks reflect the perceptions of scientific groups, legislators, and society regarding this technology. In Brazil, several texts have been analyzed by the National Congress to regulate the use of assisted reproduction technologies. Legislative debates, however, are not conclusive, and limited information has been published on how PGD is specifically regulated. The country requires the development of new regulatory standards to ensure adequate access to this technology and to guarantee its safe practice. This study examined official documents published on PGD regulation in Brazil and demonstrated how little direct oversight of PGD currently exists. It provides relevant information to encourage reflection on a particular regulation model in a Brazilian context, and should serve as part of the basis to enable further reform of the clinical practice of PGD in the country. PMID:25493379

  13. The uptake and outcome of prenatal and pre-implantation genetic diagnosis for Huntington's disease in the Netherlands (1998-2008).

    PubMed

    van Rij, M C; de Koning Gans, P A M; van Belzen, M J; Roos, R A C; Geraedts, J P M; De Rademaeker, M; Bijlsma, E K; de Die-Smulders, C E M

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to study reproductive behaviour of couples opting for prenatal diagnosis (PND) and pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for Huntington's disease (HD). In the Netherlands, exclusion PND is available for persons at 50% risk, whereas exclusion PGD is not allowed. All 162 couples who underwent PND or PGD for HD between 1998 and 2008 and referrals for exclusion PGD to Belgium were included. Couples' reproductive information was collected until December 2010; 132 couples (81.5%) underwent PND in 262 pregnancies, 54 (33.3%) started PGD, and 25 used both. Sixteen percent of PND couples used exclusion PND and 6% used exclusion PGD. The outcomes were 76.5% of PND couples delivered ≥1 unaffected child(ren) after PND, and 44.4% of PGD couples delivered ≥1 PGD child(ren) (mean 2.5 cycles/couple). Couples opting for PGD secondarily (after a previous pregnancy) had more frequently terminated a pregnancy for HD (87.0%) compared with couples secondarily opting for PND (55.2%; p = 0.015). At-risk or HD expansion carrier males were underrepresented in the group of couples primarily opting for PGD (25%) and overrepresented in the secondary PGD group (64%). We conclude that couples reconsider their choices in every subsequent pregnancy based on their previous experience, personal beliefs and the gender of the at-risk partner.

  14. A 'healthy baby': The double imperative of preimplantation genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ehrich, Kathryn; Williams, Clare

    2010-01-01

    This article reports from a study exploring the social processes, meanings and institutions that frame and produce 'ethical problems' and clinical dilemmas for practitioners, scientists and others working in the specialty of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). A major topic in the data was that, in contrast to IVF, the aim of PGD is to transfer to the woman's womb only those embryos likely to be unaffected by serious genetic disorders; that is, to produce 'healthy babies'. Staff described the complex processes through which embryos in each treatment cycle must meet a double imperative: they must be judged viable by embryologists and 'unaffected' by geneticists. In this article, we focus on some of the ethical, social and occupational issues for staff ensuing from PGD's double imperative.

  15. Regulating preimplantation genetic diagnosis in Australia: Disability and parental choice.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Michelle

    2015-06-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is the process by which an early in vitro embryo is screened for a genetic condition. As the name suggests, the procedure is undertaken prior to the embryo being implanted into a woman and therefore affected embryos can be discarded. This article argues that the objections previously put forward opposing the use of PGD to select against disability are flawed. It also argues that permitting parents to act in a procreatively beneficent manner and to preserve their child's right to an open future are good reasons for parents to have the freedom to select against disability. In light of this, are there any sound reasons to limit the use of PGD to selection against serious disabilities?

  16. Choosing between possible lives: legal and ethical issues in preimplantation genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Scott, Rosamund

    2006-01-01

    This article critically appraises the current legal scope of the principal applications of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). This relatively new technique, which is available to some parents undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment, aims to ensure that a child is not born with a seemingly undesirable genetic condition. The question addressed here is whether there should be serious reasons to test for genetic conditions in embryos in order to be able to select between them. The Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority and the Human Genetics Commission have decided that there should be such reasons by broadly aligning the criteria for PGD with those for selective abortion. This stance is critically explored, as are its implications for the possible use of PGD to select either against or for marginal features or for significant traits. The government is currently reviewing the legal scope and regulation of PGD.

  17. FISH for pre-implantation genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Scriven, Paul N; Kirby, Toby L; Ogilvie, Caroline Mackie

    2011-02-23

    Pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is an established alternative to pre-natal diagnosis, and involves selecting pre-implantation embryos from a cohort generated by assisted reproduction technology (ART). This selection may be required because of familial monogenic disease (e.g. cystic fibrosis), or because one partner carries a chromosome rearrangement (e.g. a two-way reciprocal translocation). PGD is available for couples who have had previous affected children, and/or in the case of chromosome rearrangements, recurrent miscarriages, or infertility. Oocytes aspirated following ovarian stimulation are fertilized by in vitro immersion in semen (IVF) or by intracytoplasmic injection of an individual spermatozoon (ICSI). Pre-implantation cleavage-stage embryos are biopsied, usually by the removal of a single cell on day 3 post-fertilization, and the biopsied cell is tested to establish the genetic status of the embryo. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on the fixed nuclei of biopsied cells with target-specific DNA probes is the technique of choice to detect chromosome imbalance associated with chromosome rearrangements, and to select female embryos in families with X-linked disease for which there is no mutation-specific test. FISH has also been used to screen embryos for spontaneous chromosome aneuploidy (also known as PGS or PGD-AS) in order to try and improve the efficiency of assisted reproduction; however, the predictive value of this test using the spreading and FISH technique described here is likely to be unacceptably low in most people's hands and it is not recommended for routine clinical use. We describe the selection of suitable probes for single-cell FISH, spreading techniques for blastomere nuclei, and in situ hybridization and signal scoring, applied to PGD in a clinical setting.

  18. Clinical application of multiple displacement amplification in preimplantation genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Hellani, Ali; Coskun, Serdar; Tbakhi, Abdelghhani; Al-Hassan, Saad

    2005-03-01

    Multiple displacement amplification (MDA) is a technique used in the amplification of very small amounts of DNA. MDA is reported to yield large quantities of high-quality DNA. The applicability of MDA to single cells was recently demonstrated as a potential technique for preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). This paper shows the first clinical application of MDA in PGD. Two cycles of PGD were performed in two diseases, resulting in two pregnancies. All the diagnoses given on blastomeres were confirmed on the non-transferred whole embryos. The blastomere diagnosis was coupled with short tandem repeat (STR) analysis (16 loci) in all cycles. Allelic drop-out (ADO) assessment and amplification efficiency were evaluated on 40 single lymphocytes derived from parents of each disease. ADO and amplification failure were 10.3 and 2.2% for beta-thalassaemia and 17.9 and 2.2% for cystic fibrosis respectively. HLA matching for A, B and DR was performed successfully on single cell for the beta-thalassaemia family using similar methods to genomic DNA. The PGD protocol used in all diseases consists of MDA amplification, followed by a standard polymerase chain reaction protocol. Although HLA matching was not applied to embryos, its feasibility was shown on single cell DNA amplified by MDA. Altogether, these data show the simplicity and reliability of performing PGD in combination with HLA matching and STR analysis using MDA.

  19. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis for monogenic diseases: overview and emerging issues.

    PubMed

    Renwick, Pamela; Ogilvie, Caroline Mackie

    2007-01-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is an established reproductive option for couples at risk of conceiving a pregnancy affected with a known genetic disease, who wish to avoid an (additional) affected child, termination of pregnancy or recurrent miscarriages. Early technologies concentrated on different approaches to direct mutation testing for monogenic diseases using single cell PCR protocols, or sex selection by fluorescent in situ hybridization for X-linked monogenic disease. Development of multiplex fluorescent PCR allowed simultaneously testing of linked markers alongside the mutation test, increasing the accuracy by controlling for contamination and identifying allele drop-out. The advent of highly effective whole genome amplification methods has opened the way for new technologies such as preimplantation genetic haplotyping and microarrays, thus increasing the number of genetic defects that can be detected in preimplantation embryos; the number of cases carried out and the new indications tested increases each year. Different countries have taken very different approaches to legislating and regulating PGD, giving rise to the phenomenon of reproductive tourism. PGD is now being performed for scenarios previously not undertaken using prenatal diagnosis, some of which raise significant ethical concerns. While PGD has benefited many couples aiming to have healthy children, ethical concerns remain over inappropriate use of this technology.

  20. Reiterative changes in the Italian regulation on IVF: the effect on PGD patients' reproductive decisions.

    PubMed

    Gianaroli, Luca; Crivello, Anna Maria; Stanghellini, Ilaria; Ferraretti, Anna Pia; Tabanelli, Carla; Magli, Maria Cristina

    2014-01-01

    National legislations represent one of the main factors influencing access to assisted reproduction treatment. The Italian situation in the last decade is an example of how the treatment of patients for preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) was more dependent on regulators than on medical choices. This report analysed how the changes in Italian regulation affected the number of PGD referrals to this study centre, as well as their decision to opt for cross-border reproductive care (CBRC). The analysis showed that during the period in which PGD was actually not performed because of the restriction imposed by the Italian law on IVF (from 24 February 2004 to 7 May 2009) there was a significant decrease in the number of referrals asking for PGD (2.5% of total referrals) compared with the previous years (3.3%; P < 0.025) and following years when PGD was legalized (5.1%; P < 0.001). The number of couples opting for CBRC had an opposite trend, reaching a maximum when PGD was banned from Italian centres (55 couples), whereas after the readmission of PGD, only eight couples went abroad for treatment. Concomitantly, since May 2009, the proportion of couples performing a PGD cycle in this centre has constantly increased.

  1. The politics of human embryo research and the motivation to achieve PGD

    PubMed Central

    Theodosiou, Anastasia A.; Johnson, Martin H.

    2011-01-01

    This article reports a historical study of factors influencing the achievement of clinical preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) in 1990, 22 years after its first demonstration in animals. During the 1970s, research on PGD continued in large farm animals, but serious interest in human PGD was not evident until 1986. First, interest in PGD during the 1970s waned with the advent of prenatal testing, which for gynaecologists was clinically more familiar, technically simpler and ethically less challenging than IVF. Indeed, IVF was viewed with widespread suspicion until the first IVF births in 1978. Second, interest in clinical PGD was stimulated by the UK Parliamentary reaction against human embryo research that greeted the Warnock Report in 1984. This hostility led scientists to initiate a pro-research campaign, further galvanized in 1985 by MP Enoch Powell’s bid to ban such research. However, while Powell abhorred embryo research, he approved of PGD, a stance that divided the anti-research lobby. Accordingly, the campaigners for research emphasized that it was needed to achieve PGD. Powell demanded evidence of such projects and PGD research increased from 1986. It is concluded that UK political debates on embryo research played a critical role in stimulating the achievement of clinical PGD. Human pregnancies following preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for embryo sex were announced in 1990, 22 years after the technique was pioneered in animals. PGD in humans required not only technological advances, such as IVF and sensitive diagnostic tests, but also the motivation to develop and apply them. Our historical analysis shows that, although research on PGD continued in large farm animals during the 1970s, and techniques of the required sensitivity were developed on mouse embryo models, interest in clinical PGD was not evident until 1986. Two factors stimulated this sudden change in motivation. First, interest in PGD was depressed during the 1970s by the advent

  2. [BETWEEN USAGE AND POLEMIC, AN ARGUMENT IN FAVOUR OF CLARIFYING THE TERMINOLOGY FOR PREIMPLANTATION GENETIC DIAGNOSIS].

    PubMed

    Côté, Stéphanie; Ravitsky, Vardit; Hamet, Pavel; Bouffard, Chantal

    2015-12-01

    Over 30 years ago, preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) was developed to help couples at risk of transmitting a serious genetic disease to their offspring. Today, the range of medical and non-medical uses of PGD has expanded considerably and some raise much controversy. This is the case, for example, with In-Vitro Fertilization to select embryos as 'saviour siblings' or to screen for susceptibility and predisposition to late onset diseases or conditions of variable penetrance. The situation is even more problematic in the case of sex selection or selection of traits that are culturally valued or discredited (such as deafness, behavioral traits, or height). The debate surrounding PGD has been employing terms to describe these particular uses that have contributed to a focus on the negative effects, thus preventing a distinction between the abuses and the benefits of this reproductive technology. In this context, this paper proposes a terminological clarification that would allow distinguishing medical and non-medical use and, therefore, the issues relevant to each. A more accurate and less generic nomenclature could prevent a conflation of different levels of ethical, clinical and social issues under the single term 'PGD'. For the vast majority of medical uses, we propose to keep: 'preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD)', which emphasizes that it is a genetic diagnosis. For non-medical uses, we suggest: 'preimplantation genetic trait selection (PGTS)'.

  3. ESHRE PGD consortium best practice guidelines for fluorescence in situ hybridization-based PGD.

    PubMed

    Harton, G L; Harper, J C; Coonen, E; Pehlivan, T; Vesela, K; Wilton, L

    2011-01-01

    In 2005, the European Society for Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE) PGD Consortium published a set of Guidelines for Best Practice PGD to give information, support and guidance to potential, existing and fledgling PGD programmes. The subsequent years have seen the introduction of new technologies as well as evolution of current techniques. Additionally, in light of recent advice from ESHRE on how practice guidelines should be written and formulated, the Consortium believed it was timely to revise and update the PGD guidelines. Rather than one document that covers all of PGD, the new guidelines are separated into four new documents that apply to different aspects of a PGD programme, i.e. organization of a PGD centre, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)-based testing, amplification-based testing and polar body and embryo biopsy for PGD/preimplantation genetic screening (PGS). Here, we have updated the sections that pertain to FISH-based PGD. PGS has become a highly controversial technique. Opinions of laboratory specialists and clinicians interested in PGD and PGS have been taken into account here. Whereas some believe that PGS does not have a place in clinical medicine, others disagree; therefore, PGS has been included. This document should assist everyone interested in PGD/PGS in developing the best laboratory and clinical practice possible. Topics covered in this guideline include inclusion/exclusion criteria for FISH-based PGD testing, referrals and genetic counselling, preclinical validation of tests, FISH-based testing methods, spreading of cells for analysis, set-up of local IVF centre and transport PGD centres, quality control/ quality assurance and diagnostic confirmation of untransferred embryos.

  4. [Extending preimplantation genetic diagnosis to HLA typing: the French exception].

    PubMed

    Steffann, Julie; Frydman, Nelly; Burlet, Philippe; Gigarel, Nadine; Hesters, Laetitia; Kerbrat, Violaine; Lamazou, Frédéric; Munnich, Arnold; Frydman, René

    2011-01-01

    Umut-Talha, a "sibling savior", was born on 26 January 2011 at Beclère Hospital after embryo selection at the Paris preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) center. His birth revived the controversy over "double PGD". This procedure, authorized in France since 2006, allows couples who already have a child with a serious, incurable genetic disease, to opt for PGD in order to select a healthy embryo that is HLA-matched to the affected sibling and who may thus serve as an ombilical cord blood donor. The procedure is particularly complex and the baby take-home rate is still very low. Double PGD is strictly regulated in France, and candidate couples must first receive individual authorization from the Biomedicine Agency. In our experience, these couples have a strong desire to have children, as reflected by the large number of prior spontaneous pregnancies (25% of couples). Likewise, most of these couples request embryo transfer even when there is no HLA-matched embryo, which accounts for more than half of embryo transfers. The controversy surrounding this practice has flared up again in recent weeks, over the concepts of "designer babies" and "double savior siblings" (the baby is selected to be free of the hereditary disease, and may also serve as a stem cell donor for the affected sibling).

  5. Evaluation of exclusion prenatal and exclusion preimplantation genetic diagnosis for Huntington's disease in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    van Rij, M C; de Die-Smulders, C E M; Bijlsma, E K; de Wert, G M W R; Geraedts, J P; Roos, R A C; Tibben, A

    2013-02-01

    Individuals at 50% risk of Huntington's disease (HD) who prefer not to know their carrier status, might opt for exclusion prenatal diagnosis (ePND) or exclusion preimplantation genetic diagnosis (ePGD). This study aims to provide a better understanding of couples' motives for choosing ePND or ePND, and surveys couples' experiences in order to make recommendations for the improvement of counselling for exclusion testing. This qualitative retrospective interview study focussed on couples who underwent ePND or ePGD for HD in the period 1996-2010. Seventeen couples were included of which 13 had experienced ePND and 6 ePGD. Mean time-interval since exclusion-testing was 3.9 years. Couples' moral reservations regarding termination of pregnancy (TOP) or discarding healthy embryos were counterbalanced by the wish to protect their future child against HD. Seven couples had terminated a total of 11 pregnancies with a 50% HD risk, none showed regret. ePGD was used by couples who wanted to avoid (another) TOP. ePND and ePGD are acceptable reproductive options for a specific group of counsellees. To guarantee sound standards of care, it is imperative that candidate couples be given in-depth non-directive counselling about all possible scenarios, and adequate professional and psychological support prior to, during and after ePND/ePGD.

  6. PGD for all cystic fibrosis carrier couples: novel strategy for preventive medicine and cost analysis.

    PubMed

    Tur-Kaspa, I; Aljadeff, G; Rechitsky, S; Grotjan, H E; Verlinsky, Y

    2010-08-01

    Over 1000 children affected with cystic fibrosis (CF) are born annually in the USA. Since IVF with preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is an alternative to raising a sick child or to aborting an affected fetus, a cost-benefit analysis was performed for a national IVF-PGD program for preventing CF. The amount spent to deliver healthy children for all CF carrier-couples by IVF-PGD was compared with the average annual and lifetime direct medical costs per CF patient avoided. Treating annually about 4000 CF carrier-couples with IVF-PGD would result in 3715 deliveries of non-affected children at a cost of $57,467 per baby. Because the average annual direct medical cost per CF patient was $63,127 and life expectancy is 37 years, savings would be $2.3 million per patient and $2.2 billion for all new CF patients annually in lifetime treatment costs. Cumulated net saving of an IVF-PGD program for all carrier-couples for 37 years would be $33.3 billion. A total of 618,714 cumulative years of patients suffering because of CF and thousands of abortions could be prevented. A national IVF-PGD program is a highly cost-effective novel modality of preventive medicine and would avoid most births of individuals affected with debilitating genetic disease.

  7. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis in patients with male meiotic abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Aran, B; Veiga, A; Vidal, F; Parriego, M; Vendrell, J M; Santaló, J; Egozcue, J; Barri, P N

    2004-04-01

    Indications and candidates for preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) have increased in recent years. This study evaluates whether IVF-intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) results could be improved by selecting embryos through PGD-AS (aneuploidy screening) in couples in whom the male partner presents meiotic abnormalities. Two hundred and fifty-six embryos were biopsied and 183 were suitable for analysis (73.2%). Ninety-two embryos showed normal chromosomal analysis (50.3% of the analysed embryos and 57.5% of the diagnosed embryos). Pregnancy, abortion and implantation rates were compared with 66 IVF-ICSI cycles performed in 44 patients with meiotic abnormalities without PGD (control group). No statistically significant differences in the pregnancy rate (52 versus 43.9%), implantation rate (32.1 versus 23.5%) and miscarriage rate (15.4 versus 10.3%) were observed between the groups. Although the embryos obtained from men with meiotic abnormalities showed a high frequency of chromosome abnormalities, no improvements in pregnancy and implantation rates were obtained after PGD-AS in the series analysed.

  8. Factors Influencing the Decision-Making Process and Long-Term Interpersonal Outcomes for Parents Who Undergo Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for Fanconi Anemia: a Qualitative Investigation.

    PubMed

    Haude, K; McCarthy Veach, P; LeRoy, B; Zierhut, H

    2016-11-17

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by congenital malformations, progressive bone marrow failure, and predisposition to malignancy. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is used to treat FA, and best results are attained with sibling donors who are human leukocyte antigen (HLA) identical matches. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) offers parents of an affected child the opportunity to have an unaffected child who is an HLA match. While some research has investigated parents' experiences during the PGD process, no published studies specifically address factors influencing their decision-making process and long-term interpersonal outcomes. The aims of this study are to: (1) examine parents' expectations and the influence of media, bioethics, and religion on their decision to undergo PGD; (2) examine parents' social support and emotional experiences during their PGD process; and (3) characterize long-term effects of PGD on relationship dynamics (partner, family, friends), others' attitudes, and parental regret. Nine parents participated in semi-structured interviews. Thematic analysis revealed their decision to use PGD was variously influenced by media, bioethics, and religion, in particular, affecting parents' initial confidence levels. Moreover, the PGD process was emotionally complex, with parents desiring varying amounts and types of support from different sources at different times. Parents reported others' attitudes towards them were similar or no different than before PGD. Parental regret regarding PGD was negligible. Results of this study will promote optimization of long-term care for FA families.

  9. ESHRE task force on ethics and Law22: preimplantation genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    De Wert, G; Dondorp, W; Shenfield, F; Devroey, P; Tarlatzis, B; Barri, P; Diedrich, K; Provoost, V; Pennings, G

    2014-08-01

    This Task Force document discusses some relatively unexplored ethical issues involved in preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). The document starts from the wide consensus that PGD is ethically acceptable if aimed at helping at-risk couples to avoid having a child with a serious disorder. However, if understood as a limit to acceptable indications for PGD, this 'medical model' may turn out too restrictive. The document discusses a range of possible requests for PGD that for different reasons fall outwith the accepted model and argues that instead of rejecting those requests out of hand, they need to be independently assessed in the light of ethical criteria. Whereas, for instance, there is no good reason for rejecting PGD in order to avoid health problems in a third generation (where the second generation would be healthy but faced with burdensome reproductive choices if wanting to have children), using PGD to make sure that one's child will have the same disorder or handicap as its parents, is ethically unacceptable.

  10. Conceptualizing Couples’ Decision Making in PGD: Emerging Cognitive, Emotional, and Moral Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Hershberger, Patricia E.; Pierce, Penny F.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To illuminate and synthesize what is known about the underlying decision making processes surrounding couples’ preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) use or disuse and to formulate an initial conceptual framework that can guide future research and practice. Methods This systematic review targeted empirical studies published in English from 1990 to 2008 that examined the decision making process of couples or individual partners that had used, were eligible for, or had contemplated PGD. Sixteen studies met the eligibility requirements. To provide a more comprehensive review, empirical studies that examined healthcare professionals’ perceptions of couples’ decision making surrounding PGD use and key publications from a variety of disciplines supplemented the analysis. Results The conceptual framework formulated from the review demonstrates that couples’ PGD decision making is composed of three iterative and dynamic dimensions: cognitive appraisals, emotional responses, and moral judgments. Conclusion Couples think critically about uncertain and probabilistic information, grapple with conflicting emotions and incorporate moral perspectives into their decision making about whether or not to use PGD. Practice Implications The quality of care and decisional support for couples who are contemplating PGD use can be improved by incorporating focused questions and discussion from each of the dimensions into counseling sessions. PMID:20060677

  11. More than 10 years after the first 'savior siblings': parental experiences surrounding preimplantation genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Zierhut, Heather; MacMillan, Margaret L; Wagner, John E; Bartels, Dianne M

    2013-10-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) to create a healthy donor for a sibling's hematopoetic stem cell transplantation for a child with Fanconi Anemia (FA) was first reported in 2001. Yet we know little about the experiences of parents who have encountered decision making surrounding PGD and human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-typing. The first aim of this study was to understand parents' awareness, perceptions and beliefs about reproductive decision-making including emotional, cognitive, moral dimensions as well as regret surrounding the use of this technology. The second aim was to describe the experiences and rationale of parents of children with a single gene disorder regarding the factors that influenced their decision making surrounding the use of natural pregnancy and/or PGD and HLA-typing. Parents from two national FA support networks in the US and Canada responded to an emailed survey about reproductive decision making and outcomes surrounding natural pregnancy and PGD and HLA-typing. Descriptive statistics and Pearson's Chi-Square tests were used to describe and compare data. Our results indicate that the most important factors in the PGD decision making process were the health of the child and cognitive appraisals followed by emotional responses and then moral judgments. A significant difference was noted in parents considering natural pregnancy before and after 2001 (p = 0.01). Unexpected findings were that less than 35 % of parents were offered PGD by any health care professional and only 70 % were aware PGD with HLA-typing was a reproductive option. Our research suggests that the option of PGD and HLA-typing may influence parents' reproductive decision making choices.

  12. Pandora's box: ethics of PGD for inherited risk of late-onset disorders.

    PubMed

    Noble, Ray; Bahadur, Gulam; Iqbal, Mohammad; Sanyal, Arnab

    2008-01-01

    Until recently, the primary use of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) has been the selection of embryos to avoid lethal or debilitating gene mutations or abnormal chromosome complement. PGD can be used to reduce the risk of transferring to the uterus an embryo with Down syndrome, and parents who are carriers of severe genetic diseases may choose to avoid having children with these debilitating genetic conditions. The use of PGD is now being extended to include gene mutations that increase the risk of late-onset disorders such as breast and ovarian cancer. This paper argues for caution in advocating reproductive methods that are costly, have a limited chance of success, and for which the long-term outcome is unknown. Counselling should allow women a true choice of declining the option of PGD without recrimination, feelings of guilt or social pressure. There is concern that the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority has approved extension of PGD to late-onset multifactorial diseases without clear guidelines for its use. Guidelines for embryo selection should be revised to deal with potential conflict between reproductive success and genetic screening for disorders that do not profoundly affect the embryo or the children.

  13. Breast Cancer, BRCA Mutations, and Attitudes Regarding Pregnancy and Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Woodson, Ashley H.; Muse, Kimberly I.; Lin, Heather; Jackson, Michelle; Mattair, Danielle N.; Schover, Leslie; Woodard, Terri; McKenzie, Laurie; Theriault, Richard L.; Hortobágyi, Gabriel N.; Arun, Banu; Peterson, Susan K.; Profato, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    Background. Women with premenopausal breast cancer may face treatment-related infertility and have a higher likelihood of a BRCA mutation, which may affect their attitudes toward future childbearing. Methods. Premenopausal women were invited to participate in a questionnaire study administered before and after BRCA genetic testing. We used the Impact of Event Scale (IES) to evaluate the pre- and post-testing impact of cancer or carrying a BRCA mutation on attitudes toward future childbearing. The likelihood of pursuing prenatal diagnosis (PND) or preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) was also assessed in this setting. Univariate analyses determined factors contributing to attitudes toward future childbearing and likelihood of PND or PGD. Results. One hundred forty-eight pretesting and 114 post-testing questionnaires were completed. Women with a personal history of breast cancer had less change in IES than those with no history of breast cancer (p = .003). The 18 BRCA-positive women had a greater change in IES than the BRCA-negative women (p = .005). After testing, 31% and 24% of women would use PND and PGD, respectively. BRCA results did not significantly affect attitudes toward PND/PGD. Conclusion. BRCA results and history of breast cancer affect the psychological impact on future childbearing. Intentions to undergo PND or PGD do not appear to change after disclosure of BRCA results. Additional counseling for patients who have undergone BRCA testing may be warranted to educate patients about available fertility preservation options. PMID:24951607

  14. Single-cell sequencing and mini-sequencing for preimplantation genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Bermudez, Mercedes G; Piyamongkol, Wirawit; Tomaz, Susana; Dudman, Evelyn; Sherlock, Jon K; Wells, Dagan

    2003-08-01

    There is increasing interest in the use of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) as an alternative to routine prenatal diagnosis. However, the costs associated with development and testing of new PGD protocols have forced some PGD centres to limit the number of diseases for which PGD is offered. One of the main factors in the design of new protocols, which affects cost and accuracy, is the choice of the mutation-detection technique. We have assessed the reliability of DNA sequencing and mini-sequencing for clinical diagnosis at the single-cell level and have found them to be rapid and accurate. Extensive optimisation for individual mutations is not usually necessary when employing these versatile techniques and consequently a smaller investment of time and resources should be required during development of new protocols. Additionally, we report single-cell protocols for the diagnoses of cystic fibrosis, sickle cell anaemia and beta-thalassaemia, which utilise mini-sequencing. Unlike most mutation-detection techniques, mini-sequencing permits analysis of very small DNA fragments. Small amplicons experience low allele dropout (ADO) rates, and consequently this approach could potentially improve the reliability of PGD.

  15. [The Cagliari (Italy) Court authorizes the preimplantation genetic diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Jorqui Azofra, María

    2007-01-01

    Today, preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) has been greatly accepted within the framework of positive law of many European countries. Nevertheless, in other countries, such as Italy, it is forbidden by law. The ruling of the Civil Court of Cagliari which has authorized its use to a Sardinian couple, has opened, in this way, a small crack to be able to asses possible modifications to the Italian regulation on this matter. This article analyses the ruling of the Civil Court of Cagliari (Italy) from an ethical and legal perspective. The criteria which is used to analyse the legitimacy or illegitimacy of the practice of PGD is analysed. That is, on reasons which could justify or not the transfer of embryos in vitro to the woman. With this objective in mind, the Italian and Spanish normative models which regulates this controversial subject are looked at. As a conclusion, a critical evaluation of the arguments presented is made.

  16. Simultaneous preimplantation genetic diagnosis for Tay-Sachs and Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Altarescu, Gheona; Brooks, Barry; Margalioth, Ehud; Eldar Geva, Talia; Levy-Lahad, Ephrat; Renbaum, Paul

    2007-07-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for single gene defects is described for a family in which each parent is a carrier of both Tay-Sachs (TS) and Gaucher disease (GD). A multiplex fluorescent polymerase chain reaction protocol was developed that simultaneously amplified all four familial mutations and 10 informative microsatellite markers. In one PGD cycle, seven blastomeres were analysed, reaching a conclusive diagnosis in six out of seven embryos for TS and in five out of seven embryos for GD. Of the six diagnosed embryos, one was wild type for both TS and GD, and three were wild type for GD and carriers of TS. Two remaining embryos were compound heterozygotes for TS. Two transferable embryos developed into blastocysts (wt/wt and wt GD/carrier TS) and both were transferred on day 5. This single cycle of PGD resulted in a healthy live child. Allele drop-out (ADO) was observed in three of 34 reactions, yielding an 8% ADO rate. The occurrence of ADO in single cell analysis and undetected recombination events are primary causes of misdiagnosis in PGD and emphasize the need to use multiple polymorphic markers. So far as is known, this is the first report of concomitant PGD for two frequent Ashkenazi Jewish recessive disorders.

  17. Queerin' the PGD clinic : human enhancement and the future of bodily diversity.

    PubMed

    Sparrow, Robert

    2013-06-01

    Disability activists influenced by queer theory and advocates of "human enhancement" have each disputed the idea that what is "normal" is normatively significant, which currently plays a key role in the regulation of pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). Previously, I have argued that the only way to avoid the implication that parents have strong reasons to select children of one sex (most plausibly, female) over the other is to affirm the moral significance of sexually dimorphic human biological norms. After outlining the logic that generates this conclusion, I investigate the extent to which it might also facilitate an alternative, progressive, opening up of the notion of the normal and of the criteria against which we should evaluate the relative merits of different forms of embodiment. This paper therefore investigates the implications of ideas derived from queer theory for the future of PGD and of PGD for the future of queerness.

  18. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis for Huntington's disease with exclusion testing.

    PubMed

    Sermon, Karen; De Rijcke, Martine; Lissens, Willy; De Vos, Anick; Platteau, Peter; Bonduelle, Maryse; Devroey, Paul; Van Steirteghem, André; Liebaers, Inge

    2002-10-01

    Huntington's disease is an autosomal dominant, late-onset disorder, for which the gene and the causative mutation have been known since 1993. Some at-risk patients choose for presymptomatic testing and can make reproductive choices accordingly. Others however, prefer not to know their carrier status, but may still wish to prevent the birth of a carrier child. For these patients, exclusion testing after prenatal sampling has been an option for many years. A disadvantage of this test is that unaffected pregnancies may be terminated if the parent at risk (50%) has not inherited the grandparental Huntington gene, leading to serious moral and ethical objections. As an alternative, preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) on embryos obtained in vitro may be proposed, after which only embryos free of risk are replaced. Embryos can then be selected, either by the amplification of the CAG repeat in the embryos without communicating results to the patients (ie non-disclosure testing), which brings its own practical and moral problems, or exclusion testing. We describe here the first PGD cycles for exclusion testing for Huntington's disease in five couples. Three couples have had at least one PGD cycle so far. One pregnancy ensued and a healthy female baby was delivered.

  19. Is embryo research and preimplantation genetic diagnosis ethical?

    PubMed

    Beyleveld, D

    2000-09-11

    The legal position in the UK on embryo research and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is outlined and contrasted with the position in other EU countries. The "gradualist" position of the UK on the moral status of the embryo is defended on the basis of an argument that precaution must be applied in proportion to the degree to which the embryo has developed to display components of agency, on the assumption that mortality is categorically binding and requires agents to be granted rights and that it cannot be known with certainty that the embryo is not an agent. The extent to which this argument, when combined with vicarious protections that the embryo should receive in order to protect the rights of other agents, limits embryo research and PGD, is discussed. It is concluded that the complexities that attend deliberation about the moral problems attending embryo research and PGD are such that the proper response to these problems is via the procedures of political democracy to achieve accountable answers rather than "correct" answers. This allows for a variety of judgements.

  20. The improvement of the best practice guidelines for preimplantation genetic diagnosis of cystic fibrosis: toward an international consensus

    PubMed Central

    Girardet, Anne; Viart, Victoria; Plaza, Stéphanie; Daina, Gemma; De Rycke, Martine; Des Georges, Marie; Fiorentino, Francesco; Harton, Gary; Ishmukhametova, Aliya; Navarro, Joaquima; Raynal, Caroline; Renwick, Pamela; Saguet, Florielle; Schwarz, Martin; SenGupta, Sioban; Tzetis, Maria; Roux, Anne-Françoise; Claustres, Mireille

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is one of the most common indications for preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for single gene disorders, giving couples the opportunity to conceive unaffected children without having to consider termination of pregnancy. However, there are no available standardized protocols, so that each center has to develop its own diagnostic strategies and procedures. Furthermore, reproductive decisions are complicated by the diversity of disease-causing variants in the CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) gene and the complexity of correlations between genotypes and associated phenotypes, so that attitudes and practices toward the risks for future offspring can vary greatly between countries. On behalf of the EuroGentest Network, eighteen experts in PGD and/or molecular diagnosis of CF from seven countries attended a workshop held in Montpellier, France, on 14 December 2011. Building on the best practice guidelines for amplification-based PGD established by ESHRE (European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology), the goal of this meeting was to formulate specific guidelines for CF-PGD in order to contribute to a better harmonization of practices across Europe. Different topics were covered including variant nomenclature, inclusion criteria, genetic counseling, PGD strategy and reporting of results. The recommendations are summarized here, and updated information on the clinical significance of CFTR variants and associated phenotypes is presented. PMID:26014425

  1. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis, reproductive freedom, and deliberative democracy.

    PubMed

    Farrelly, Colin

    2009-04-01

    In this paper I argue that the account of deliberative democracy advanced by Amy Gutmann and Dennis Thompson (1996, 2004) is a useful normative theory that can help enhance our deliberations about public policy in morally pluralistic societies. More specifically, I illustrate how the prescriptions of deliberative democracy can be applied to the issue of regulating non-medical uses of pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), such as gender selection. Deliberative democracy does not aim to win a philosophical debate among rival first-order theories, such as libertarianism, egalitarianism or feminism. Rather, it advances a second-order analysis that strives to help us determine what would constitute a reasonable balance between the conflicting fundamental values that arise in the context of regulating PGD. I outline a theoretical model (called the Reasonable Genetic Intervention Model) that brings these issues to the fore. Such a model incorporates the concern for both procedural and substantive principles; and it does so in way that takes provisionality seriously.

  2. Live birth after PGD with confirmation by a comprehensive approach (karyomapping) for simultaneous detection of monogenic and chromosomal disorders.

    PubMed

    Natesan, Senthilkumar A; Handyside, Alan H; Thornhill, Alan R; Ottolini, Christian S; Sage, Karen; Summers, Michael C; Konstantinidis, Michalis; Wells, Dagan; Griffin, Darren K

    2014-11-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for monogenic disorders has the drawback of time and cost associated with tailoring a specific test for each couple, disorder, or both. The inability of any single assay to detect the monogenic disorder in question and simultaneously the chromosomal complement of the embryo also limits its application as separate tests may need to be carried out on the amplified material. The first clinical use of a novel approach ('karyomapping') was designed to circumvent this problem. In this example, karyomapping was used to confirm the results of an existing PGD case detecting both chromosomal abnormalities and a monogenic disorder (Smith-Lemli-Opitz [SLO] syndrome) simultaneously. The family underwent IVF, ICSI and PGD, and both polar body and cleavage stage biopsy were carried out. Following whole genome amplification, array comparative genomic hybridisation of the polar bodies and minisequencing and STR analysis of single blastomeres were used to diagnose maternal aneuploidies and SLO status, respectively. This was confirmed, by karyomapping. Unlike standard PGD, karyomapping required no a-priori test development. A singleton pregnancy and live birth, unaffected with SLO syndrome and with no chromosome abnormality, ensued. Karyomapping is potentially capable of detecting a wide spectrum of monogenic and chromosome disorders and, in this context, can be considered a comprehensive approach to PGD.

  3. A birth in non-mosaic Klinefelter's syndrome after testicular fine needle aspiration, intracytoplasmic sperm injection and preimplantation genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Reubinoff, B E; Abeliovich, D; Werner, M; Schenker, J G; Safran, A; Lewin, A

    1998-07-01

    Non-mosaic Klinefelter patients are generally azoospermic due to primary testicular failure. Nevertheless, in some cases, testicular spermatozoa may be recovered and utilized to fertilize oocytes via intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). As the risk for an increased number of gonosomes in these spermatozoa is unclear, preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) may be attempted in the resulting embryos. In the present study, we report our experience with the combined approach of sperm retrieval by testicular fine needle aspiration (FNA), ICSI and PGD in seven consecutive non-mosaic Klinefelter individuals. In four patients, between one and five spermatozoa were retrieved in five out of nine consecutive attempts. In a fifth patient, only 10 round spermatids could be isolated. Mature spermatozoa were injected into a total of 16 metaphase-II oocytes, of which 11 (69%) remained intact. Two distinct pronuclei (2PN) were observed in four oocytes (36%) while a single pronucleus (1PN) was documented in two oocytes. Five cleavage stage embryos developed from the oocytes of two couples. Upon the request of one couple, their three embryos (two derived from 1PN oocytes) were transferred without PGD but pregnancy was not achieved. PGD by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) was performed in the two embryos of the other couple which were derived from normal fertilization. PGD results of one embryo were 18,18,X,X,Y, the embryo was not transferred and FISH analysis of the remaining blastomeres identified variable chromosome numbers in the nuclei. The second embryo was diagnosed as normal and was transferred, resulting in a successful pregnancy and birth. In conclusion, the results of this report indicate that a pregnancy and birth may be attained in azoospermic non-mosaic Klinefelter individuals by testicular FNA combined with ICSI. Due to the unknown risk of gonosomes aneuploidy in embryos from Klinefelter patients, PGD or prenatal diagnosis should be recommended.

  4. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis for gender selection in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Colls, P.; Silver, L.; Olivera, G.; Weier, J.; Escudero, T.; Goodall, N.; Tomkin, G.; Munne, S.

    2009-08-20

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) of gender selection for non medical reasons has been considered an unethical procedure by several authors and agencies in the Western society on the basis of disrupting the sex ratio, being discriminatory againsts women and disposal of normal embryos of the non desired gender. In this study, the analysis of a large series of PGD procedures for gender selection from a wide geographical area in the United States, shows that in general there is no deviation in preference towards any specific gender except for a preference of males in some ethnic populations of Chinese, Indian and Middle Eastern origin that represent a small percentage of the US population. In cases where only normal embryos of the non-desired gender are available, 45.5% of the couples elect to cancel the transfer, while 54.5% of them are open to have transferred embryos of the non-desired gender, this fact being strongly linked to cultural and ethnical background of the parents. In addition this study adds some evidence to the proposition that in couples with previous children of a given gender there is no biological predisposition towards producing embryos of that same gender. Based on these facts, it seems that objections to gender selection formulated by ethics committees and scientific societies are not well-founded.

  5. Perinatal genetics: Diagnosis and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, I.H.; Hatcher, N.H.; Willey, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    This book consists of six sections, each containing several chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Prenatal Diagnosis of the Fragile X Syndrome; Prenatal Genetic Diagnosis by Chorionic Villus Sampling; Prenatal Treatment of Biochemical Disorders; H-Y Antigen, Sex Determination and Gender Control; and Environmental Factors and Human Birth Defects: Interpretation of Relative Risks in Clinical Genetics.

  6. Re-analysis by fluorescence in situ hybridisation of spare embryos cultured until Day 5 after preimplantation genetic diagnosis for a 47, XYY infertile patient demonstrates a high incidence of diploid mosaic embryos: a case report.

    PubMed

    Emiliani, S; Merino, E G; Van den Bergh, M; Abramowicz, M; Vassart, G; Englert, Y; Delneste, D

    2000-12-01

    Mosaicism in 4-8-cell human embryos analysed by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) has been widely reported, but few studies have addressed the incidence of mosaicism in more advanced embryonic stages. In the present study we analysed spare human embryos in a case of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for increased risk of aneuploidy because of an infertile 47,XYY man. After replacement of two embryos typed as 1818XX at PGD, six spare embryos (not frozen because of their low quality) were re-analysed on Day 5 for PGD confirmation. Out of five embryos typed as 1818XY at PGD, four were diploid mosaic (DM) and one was normal in all cells. The sixth embryo, typed as 18XYY/1818181818X at PGD, was a DM. In spite of the bias of our small series of morphologically low-quality embryos, the surprisingly high proportion of mosaics (which confirms previous findings) questions the validity of PGD, but supports the strategy of transferring only the embryos where two blastomeres gave normal and concordant results at PGD. More data are required to understand the clinical significance of early diploid mosaicism (and its impact on implantation rate) and to determine whether some diploid mosaic embryos might be considered safe for transfer.

  7. Choosing embryos: ethical complexity and relational autonomy in staff accounts of PGD

    PubMed Central

    Ehrich, Kathryn; Williams, Clare; Farsides, Bobbie; Sandall, Jane; Scott, Rosamund

    2007-01-01

    The technique of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is commonly explained as a way of checking the genes of embryos produced by IVF for serious genetic diseases. However, complex accounts of this technique emerged during ethics discussion groups held for PGD staff. These form part of a study exploring the social processes, meanings and institutions that frame and produce ‘ethical problems’ for practitioners, scientists and others working in the specialty of PGD in the UK. Two ‘grey areas’ raised by staff are discussed in terms of how far staff are, or in the future may be, able to support autonomous choices of women/couples: accepting ‘carrier’ embryos within the goal of creating a ‘healthy’ child; and sex selection of embryos for social reasons. These grey areas challenged the staff's resolve to offer individual informed choice, in the face of their awareness of possible collective social effects that might ensue from individual choices. We therefore argue that these new forms of choice pose a challenge to conventional models of individual autonomy used in UK genetic and reproductive counselling, and that ‘relational autonomy’ may be a more suitable ethical model to describe the ethical principles being drawn on by staff working in this area. PMID:18092985

  8. AB137. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis for rare monogenic disorder: a lesson from pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Trachoo, Objoon; Satirapod, Chonthicha; Panthan, Bhakbhoom; Sukprasert, Matchuporn; Charoenyingwattana, Angkana; Chantratita, Wasun; Choktanasiri, Wiharn; Hongeng, Suradej

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is a technique to identify the genetic defects in the embryos created through in vitro fertilization (IVF). The purpose of this technology is to assist reproduction in one or both biological parents carrying known genetic abnormalities. Herein, we report on a Thai couple having an experience on the loss of the first child affected by neurodegeneration and died at the age of 2. Brain MRI revealed the tiger-eye-sign, which was suspected for pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN). DNA sequencing of PANK2 gene was performed in the whole family members and novel g.21738G>C at the splice site was identified as likely pathogenic variant, relying on autosomal recessive inheritance model. This article aims to develop PGD strategy for PANK2 variant inherited in this family. Methods Genetic counseling for PGD was performed to the couples and the ethical clearance was done. IVF and intra cytoplamic sperm injection (ICSI) with PGD was performed. All of embryos were biopsied in the cleavage stage and subsequently performed for whole-genome amplification. Genetic status was diagnosed with the linkage analysis using family-specific short-tandem repeat markers and direct mutation testing using SNaPshot Mini-sequencing. The aneuploidy screening was performed by low-pass whole genome next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based strategy. Results Only single cycle of IVF-ICSI was processed. There were seven embryos from these couples: two likely affected, three likely being carriers, one likely unaffected and one failed in the target genome amplification. Aneuploidy screening was done before making decision of embryo transfer and only one unaffected embryo passed the screening. Thereafter, this embryo was transferred in frozen thawed cycle and the pregnancy was successful. The confirmation was done by amniocentesis, which showed the consistent result to PGD. At 38 weeks of gestational age, a healthy male baby

  9. The European Court legitimates access of Italian couples to assisted reproductive techniques and to pre-implantation genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Turillazzi, Emanuela; Frati, Paola; Busardò, Francesco Paolo; Gulino, Matteo; Fineschi, Vittorio

    2015-07-01

    On 28 August 2012, the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) issued a judgment regarding the requirements for the legitimate access of couples to assisted reproductive techniques (ART) and to pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). This judgment concerns the case of an Italian couple who found out after their first child was born with cystic fibrosis that they were healthy carriers of the disease. When the woman became pregnant again in 2010 and underwent fetal screening, it was found that the unborn child also had cystic fibrosis, whereupon she had the pregnancy terminated on medical grounds. In order to have the embryo genetically screened prior to implantation under the procedure of PGD, the couple sought to use in vitro fertilisation to have another child. Since article 1 of the Italian law strictly limits access to ART to sterile/infertile couples or those in which the man has a sexually transmissible disease, the couple appealed to the European court, raising the question of the violation of articles 8 and 14 of the European Convention on Human Rights. The applicants lodged a complaint that they were not allowed legitimate access to ART and to PGD to select an embryo not affected by the disease. The European Court affirmed that the prohibition imposed by Italian law violated article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights. Focusing on important regulatory and legal differences among EU Nations in providing ART treatments and PGD, we derived some important similarities and differences.

  10. Complex preimplantation genetic diagnosis for beta-thalassaemia, sideroblastic anaemia, and human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-typing.

    PubMed

    Kakourou, Georgia; Vrettou, Christina; Kattamis, Antonis; Destouni, Aspasia; Poulou, Myrto; Moutafi, Maria; Kokkali, Georgia; Pantos, Konstantinos; Davies, Stephen; Kitsiou-Tzeli, Sophia; Kanavakis, Emmanuel; Traeger-Synodinos, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) to select histocompatible siblings to facilitate curative haematopoeitic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) is now an acceptable option in the absence of an available human leukocyte antigen (HLA) compatible donor. We describe a case where the couple who requested HLA-PGD, were both carriers of two serious haematological diseases, beta-thalassaemia and sideroblastic anaemia. Their daughter, affected with sideroblastic anaemia, was programmed to have HSCT. A multiplex-fluorescent-touchdown-PCR protocol was optimized for the simultaneous amplification of: the two HBB-gene mutated regions (c.118C> T, c.25-26delAA), four short tandem repeats (STRs) in chr11p15.5 linked to the HBB gene, the SLC25A38 gene mutation (c.726C > T), two STRs in chr3p22.1 linked to the SLC25A38 gene, plus eleven informative STRs for HLA-haplotyping (chr6p22.1-21.3). This was followed by real-time nested PCR and high-resolution melting analysis (HRMA) for the detection of HBB and SLC25A38 gene mutations, as well as the analysis of all STRs on an automatic genetic analyzer (sequencer). The couple completed four clinical in vitro fertilization (IVF)/PGD cycles. At least one matched unaffected embryo was identified and transferred in each cycle. A twin pregnancy was established in the fourth PGD cycle and genotyping results at all loci were confirmed by prenatal diagnosis. Two healthy baby girls were delivered at week 38 of pregnancy. The need to exclude two familial disorders for HLA-PGD is rarely encountered. The methodological approach described here is fast, accurate, clinically-validated, and of relatively low cost.

  11. Failure mode and effects analysis of witnessing protocols for ensuring traceability during PGD/PGS cycles.

    PubMed

    Cimadomo, Danilo; Ubaldi, Filippo Maria; Capalbo, Antonio; Maggiulli, Roberta; Scarica, Catello; Romano, Stefania; Poggiana, Cristina; Zuccarello, Daniela; Giancani, Adriano; Vaiarelli, Alberto; Rienzi, Laura

    2016-09-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis and aneuploidy testing (PGD/PGS) use is constantly growing in IVF, and embryo/biopsy traceability during the additional laboratory procedures needed is pivotal. An electronic witnessing system (EWS), which showed a significant value in decreasing mismatch occurrence and increasing detection possibilities during standard care IVF, still does not guarantee the same level of efficiency during PGD/PGS cycles. Specifically, EWS cannot follow single embryos throughout the procedure. This is however critical when an unambiguous diagnosis corresponds to each embryo. Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) is a proactive method generally adopted to define tools ensuring safety along a procedure. Due to the implementation of a large quantitative PCR (qPCR)-based blastocyst stage PGD/PGS programme in our centre, and to evaluate the potential procedural risks, a FMEA was performed in September 2014. Forty-four failure modes were identified, among which six were given a moderate risk priority number (>15) (RPN; product of estimated occurrence, severity and detection). Specific corrective measures were then introduced and implemented, and a second evaluation performed six months later. The meticulous and careful application of such measures allowed the risks to be decreased along the whole protocol, by reducing their estimated occurrence and/or increasing detection possibilities.

  12. Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis: Prenatal Testing for Embryos Finally Achieving Its Potential

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Harvey J.

    2014-01-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis was developed nearly a quarter-century ago as an alternative form of prenatal diagnosis that is carried out on embryos. Initially offered for diagnosis in couples at-risk for single gene genetic disorders, such as cystic fibrosis, spinal muscular atrophy and Huntington disease, preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) has most frequently been employed in assisted reproduction for detection of chromosome aneuploidy from advancing maternal age or structural chromosome rearrangements. Major improvements have been seen in PGD analysis with movement away from older, less effective technologies, such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), to newer molecular tools, such as DNA microarrays and next generation sequencing. Improved results have also started to be seen with decreasing use of Day 3 blastomere biopsy in favor of polar body or Day 5 trophectoderm biopsy. Discussions regarding the scientific, ethical, legal and social issues surrounding the use of sequence data from embryo biopsy have begun and must continue to avoid concern regarding eugenic or inappropriate use of this technology. PMID:26237262

  13. Ethics of PGD: thoughts on the consequences of typing HLA in embryos.

    PubMed

    Edwards, R G

    2004-08-01

    As with so many fields of study associated with assisted human reproduction, many ethical issues are raised by the practice of preimplantation diagnosis of inherited disease (PGD). Some are part and parcel of assisted conception, e.g.the rights of human embryos in vitro and of embryologists to establish them, carry out research and discard them. Others unique to clinical PGD were discussed at an earlier meeting on PGD (Edwards et al., 2003). Recent developments in PGD are discussed briefly in this Commentary, especially the ethics of designer babies.

  14. Ovarian reserve and PGD treatment outcome in women with myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Srebnik, N; Margalioth, E J; Rabinowitz, R; Varshaver, I; Altarescu, G; Renbaum, P; Levi-Lahad, E; Weintraub, A; Eldar-Geva, T

    2014-07-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is the most common form of muscular dystrophy in adults. There are conflicting reports about its effect on female fertility. This study investigated ovarian reserve and IVF-preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) outcome in women with DM1. A total of 21 women undergoing PGD for DM1 were compared with 21 age- and body mass index-matched women undergoing PGD for other diseases. Ovarian reserve markers, response to stimulation, embryo quality and clinical pregnancy and live birth rates were compared. Day-3 FSH concentration was higher, while anti-Müllerian hormone concentration and antral follicle count were lower in the DM1 group (median, range: 6.9 (1.8-11.3) versus 5.7 (1.5-10.7)IU/l; 0.9 (0.17-5.96) versus 2.68 (0.5-9.1)ng/ml; and 13 (0-63) versus 23 (8-40) follicles, respectively, all P < 0.05). Total FSH dose was higher (5200 versus 2250 IU, P = 0.004), while the numbers of oocytes retrieved (10 versus 16, P < 0.04) and metaphase-II oocytes (9 versus 12, P < 0.03) were lower in the DM1 group. The number of cycles with top-quality embryos and the clinical pregnancy rate were lower in the DM1 group. In conclusion, there is evidence of diminished ovarian reserve and less favourable IVF-PGD outcome in women with DM1. Myotonic Dystrophy (DM) is the most common form of muscular dystrophy in adults. There is evidence of subfertility in males affected with the disease but conflicting reports about the effect of the disease on female fertility. The aim of our study was to investigate ovarian reserve and IVF-PGD results in women with DM. Twenty-one women undergoing preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) treatment for DM were compared to 21 age- and BMI matched women undergoing PGD treatment for other diseases. The two groups were compared for antral follicle count (AFC) and serum anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH) levels (the best known markers of ovarian reserve and fertility potential), ovarian response, embryo quality and pregnancy and live birth

  15. Polar body biopsy: a viable alternative to preimplantation genetic diagnosis and screening.

    PubMed

    Montag, M; van der Ven, K; Rösing, B; van der Ven, H

    2009-01-01

    Polar body diagnosis (PBD) is a diagnostic method for the indirect genetic analysis of oocytes. Polar bodies are by-products of the meiotic cell cycle, which have no influence on further embryo development. The biopsy of polar bodies can be accomplished either by zona drilling or laser drilling within a very short time period. However, the paternal contribution to the genetic constitution of the developing embryo cannot be diagnosed by PBD. The major application of PBD is the detection of maternally derived chromosomal aneuploidies and translocations in oocytes. For these indications, PBD may offer a viable alternative to blastomere biopsy as the embryo's integrity remains unaffected, in contrast to preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) by blastomere biopsy. The rapid pace of developments in the field of molecular diagnostics will also influence the advantages of PBD, and probably allow more general diagnostic applications in the future.

  16. [Genetic diagnosis and prenatal genetic diagnosis of fragile X syndrome].

    PubMed

    Wu, Ling-Qian; Pan, Qian; Long, Zhi-Gao; Zhu, Jun-Zhen; Dai, He-Ping; Zheng, Duo; Xia, Kun; Huang, Xing-Qing; Xia, Jia-Hui

    2003-03-01

    In order to obtain a simple,fast,accurate and low-cost diagnosis method of fragile X syndrome, cytogenetic tests and molecular genetic tests were carried out with direct amplification of (CGG)(n) repeat sequence in 5' terminal of FMR1 gene by PCR and the cDNA sequence of FMR1 by RT-PCR from six mental retardation pedigrees. The proband of pedigree A with high expression of fragile X chromosome(35/273) was detected to be a full mutation patient of fragile X syndrome by the molecular genetic test. There is no expression of fragile X chromosome in the proband and his mother of pedigree B, which was further confirmed as a non-fragile X pedigree by the molecular genetic test. A male foetus of the pedigree C has fragile X chromosome(5/93), but the proband and his mother has no fragile X chromosome. By further detection using molecular genetic test, the male foetus is a full mutation patient of fragile X syndrome, his mother is a permutated carrier, and his brother is a mosaic patient. The proband of pedigree D has high expression of fragile X chromosome (17%), his sister also has expression of fragile X chromosome (5%). By further detection with molecular genetic test, the proband is a full mutation patient of fragile X syndrome,and his sister is a mosaic patient. The probands of pedigrees E and F of the mother were found with suspicions fragile X chromosome, being confirmed as the non-fragile X pedigrees by the molecular genetic test. The conclusion is that the analysis test with direct amplification of 5'j(CGG)n repeat sequence and cDNA sequence in FMR1 gene is simple,fast,low-cost and can be applied in screening, diagnosis and prenatal diagnosis of fragile X syndrome.

  17. [Prenatal genetic diagnosis and related nursing care].

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Ya-Ling; Chiu, Tsan-Hung

    2009-12-01

    Prenatal genetic diagnosis plays an important role in eugenics. Early detection of embryo and fetus abnormalities allows preventive precautions to be taken and treatment to begin early in order to reduce the severity and extent of congenital deformities. Advancements in genetic diagnostic techniques infer that nurses are increasingly likely to deal with prenatal genetic diagnosis cases. This essay introduces a few prevalent prenatal genetic diagnosis methods used at different stages of pregnancy; describes in a comprehensive manner the potential physical and psychological responses of the client; and introduces principles of administering prenatal genetic diagnosis to healthcare clients. Ethical issues related to prenatal genetic diagnosis are also discussed.

  18. Improving preimplantation genetic diagnosis for Fragile X syndrome: two new powerful single-round multiplex indirect and direct tests.

    PubMed

    Kieffer, Emmanuelle; Nicod, Jean-Christophe; Gardes, Nathalie; Kastner, Claire; Becker, Nicolas; Celebi, Catherine; Pirrello, Olivier; Rongières, Catherine; Koscinski, Isabelle; Gosset, Philippe; Moutou, Céline

    2016-02-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FraX) is caused by the expansion of an unstable CGG repeat located in the Fragile X mental retardation 1 gene (FMR1) gene. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) can be proposed to couples at risk of transmitting the disease, that is, when the female carries a premutation or a full mutation. We describe two new single-cell, single-round multiplex PCR for indirect and direct diagnosis of FraX on biopsied embryos. These tests include five unpublished, highly heterozygous simple sequence repeats, and the co-amplification of non-expanded CGG repeats for the direct test. Heterozygosity of the new markers ranged from 69 to 81%. The mean rate of non-informative marker included in the tests was low (26% and 23% for the new indirect and direct tests, respectively). This strategy allows offering a PGD for FraX to 96% of couples requesting it in our centre. A conclusive genotype was obtained in all cells with a rate of cells presenting an allele dropout ranging from 17% for the indirect test to 26% for the direct test. The new indirect test was applied for eight PGD cycles: 32 embryos were analysed, 9 were transferred and 3 healthy babies were born. By multiplexing these highly informative markers, robustness of the diagnosis is improved and the loss of potentially healthy embryos (because they are non-diagnosed or misdiagnosed) is limited. This may increase the chances of success of couples requesting a PGD for FraX, in particular, when premature ovarian insufficiency in premutated women leads to a reduced number of embryos available for analysis.

  19. [Genetic diagnosis against fungal cerebromeningitis].

    PubMed

    Ohno, Hideaki; Miyazaki, Yoshitsugu

    2013-01-01

    Fungal cerebromeningitis is one of deep seated mycoses and also a fatal fungal infectious disease. Regarding to causative pathogen of fungal cerebromeningitis in Japan, Cryptococcus spp., Candida spp., Aspergillus spp., are popular fungi. In general, the diagnosis of deep seated mycosis is sometime difficult. The genetic diagnosis method such as PCR against deep seated mycosis has been developing and it has been also reported as one of useful diagnostic tests. However, PCR for fungal detection is still a research test that has not been cleared or approved officially, therefore it should not be used for diagnosis, or patient management routinely. The PCR which detect broad range of fungi or specific fungus is applied for clinical situation, a careful attention should be paid for avoiding contamination because many fungal species are available in living environment.

  20. Simple and Easy to Perform Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for β-thalassemia Major Using Combination of Conventional and Fluorescent Polymerase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Salehi, Rasoul; Khosravi, Sharifeh; Salehi, Mansour; Kheirollahi, Majid; Khanahmad, Hossein

    2017-01-01

    Background: Thalassemias are the most common monogenic disorders in many countries throughout the world. The best practice to control the prevalence of the disease is prenatal diagnosis (PND) services. Extensive practicing of PND proved effective in reducing new cases but on the other side of this success high abortion rate is hided, which ethically unfair and for many couples, especially with a previous experience of a therapeutic abortion, or moral concerns, is not a suitable choice. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is a strong alternative to conventional PND. At present PGD is the only abortion free fetal diagnostic process. Considering the fact that there are more than 6000 single gene disorders affecting approximately 1 in 300 live-births, the medical need for PGD services is significant. Materials and Methods: In the present study development of a PGD protocol for a thalassemia trait couple using nested multiplex fluorescent polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the combination of polymorphic linked short tandem repeat (STR) markers and thalassemia mutations is described. Restriction fragment length polymorphism used to discriminate between wild and mutated alleles. Results: In PGD clinical cycle, paternal and maternal alleles for D11S988 and D11S1338 STR markers were segregated as it was expected. PCR product for IVSII-1 mutation was subsequently digested with BtscI restriction enzyme to differentiate normal allele from the mutant allele. The mother's mutation, being a comparatively large deletion, was detectable through size differences on agarose gel. Conclusion: The optimized single cell protocol developed and evaluated in this study is a feasible approach for preimplantation diagnosis of β-thalassemia in our patients.

  1. Prenatal screening and prenatal diagnosis: contemporary practices in light of the past.

    PubMed

    Iltis, Ana S

    2016-06-01

    The 20th century eugenics movement in the USA and contemporary practices involving prenatal screening (PNS), prenatal diagnosis (PND), abortion and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) share important morally relevant similarities. I summarise some features of the 20th century eugenics movement; describe the contemporary standard of care in the USA regarding PNS, PND, abortion and PGD; and demonstrate that the 'old eugenics' the contemporary standard of care share the underlying view that social resources should be invested to prevent the birth of people with certain characteristics. This comparison makes evident the difficulty of crafting moral arguments that treat some uses of PNS, PND, abortion and PGD as licit and others as illicit.

  2. Genotyping of β-globin gene mutations in single lymphocytes: a preliminary study for preimplantation genetic diagnosis of monogenic disorders.

    PubMed

    Durmaz, Burak; Ozkinay, Ferda; Onay, Huseyin; Karaca, Emin; Aydinok, Yesim; Tavmergen, Erol; Vrettou, Christina; Traeger-Synodinos, Jan; Kanavakis, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    Hemoglobinopathies, especially β-thalassemia (β-thal), represent an important health burden in Mediterranean countries like Turkey. Some couples prefer the option of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). However, clinical application of PGD, especially for the monogenic disorders is technically demanding. To ensure reliable results, protocols need to be robust and well standardized. Ideally PGD-PCR (polymerase chain reaction) protocols should be based on multiplex and fluorescent PCR for analysis of the disease-causing mutation(s) along with linked markers across the disease-associated locus. In this study, we aimed to constitute a protocol in single cells involving first round multiplex PCR with primers to amplify the region of the β-globin gene containing the most common mutations. Two microsatellites linked to the β-globin gene cluster (D11S4891, D11S2362) and two unlinked (D13S314, GABRB3) microsatellite markers, were used to rule out allele dropout (ADO) and contamination; followed by nested real-time PCR for genotyping the β-globin mutations. We also investigated the allele frequencies and heterozygote rates of these microsatellites in the Turkish population that have not been reported to date. This protocol was tested in 100 single lymphocytes from heterozygotes with known β-globin mutations. Amplification failure was detected in one lymphocyte (1%) and ADO was observed in two lymphocytes (2%). No contamination was detected. All results were concordant with the genotypes of the patients. Overall, this protocol was demonstrated to be sensitive, accurate, reliable and rapid for the detection of β-globin mutations in single cells and shows potential for the clinical application of PGD for hemoglobinopathies in the Turkish population.

  3. Intracytoplasmic sperm injection combined with preimplantation genetic diagnosis for the prevention of recurrent gestational trophoblastic disease.

    PubMed

    Reubinoff, B E; Lewin, A; Verner, M; Safran, A; Schenker, J G; Abeliovich, D

    1997-04-01

    A strategy for the prevention of repeated molar pregnancies by using intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) coupled with preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) with fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) was developed. In this approach, complete moles which arise from dispermic fertilization are avoided by the use of ICSI. ICSI is followed by preimplantation selection against the transfer of 46,XX embryos, thus preventing complete moles resulting from a fertilization of an inactive oocyte, by a haploid X-bearing spermatozoon which subsequently duplicates. Triploid partial moles which arise mainly from dispermic fertilization may also be prevented by ICSI. The preimplantation confirmation of diploidy by FISH guards against triploid partial moles which may result from mechanisms other than dispermic fertilization. The employment of this strategy in an attempt to prevent a repeated event of molar pregnancy in a patient with a history of two previous episodes of gestational trophoblastic disease is reported.

  4. [Genetic kidney diseases: new perspectives on diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Bouatou, Yassine; Paoloni-Giacobino, Ariane; Parvex, Paloma; De Seigneux, Sophie

    2016-02-24

    Suspected renal inherited disorders are regularly evaluated in nephrology consultations both in adults and children. A positive family history and/or a typical phenotype should lead to genetic investigations. A confirmatory diagnosis integrated in a multidisciplinary genetic counseling approach gives patient guidance for further pregnancy. It also allows physician to better stratify disease risk and indicates treatment in some cases. The time to diagnosis and costs have been dramatically reduced thanks to next generation sequencing in several cases of complex inherited nephrologic syndromes.

  5. Noninvasive screening for prenatal genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, J. L.

    1995-01-01

    During the last two decades a number of methods of prenatal diagnosis have become available and have been used either in laboratory research or in routine genetic counselling. Despite the effectiveness of invasive sampling procedures in diagnosing genetic disorders, their use involves some risk. The advantage of noninvasive methods is that they provide an opportunity to make a genetic diagnosis without risk, and therefore are applicable for use in mass screening programmes. This article reviews three different approaches to noninvasive prenatal genetic diagnosis and offers conclusions and recommendations for their use. Maternal serum screening is a well-understood technique that should be universally offered to pregnant women, regardless of their risk status. Invasive tests can be used, as indicated, once serum testing results have been obtained. Although ultrasonography cannot be recommended for routine use, it can provide a useful adjunct to serum screening and deserves further investigation. Elaboration of fetal cells from maternal blood is a promising technique but can only be considered investigational on the basis of current research, and should not serve as the sole basis of clinical decision-making. PMID:8907774

  6. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis and the 'new' eugenics.

    PubMed Central

    King, D S

    1999-01-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PID) is often seen as an improvement upon prenatal testing. I argue that PID may exacerbate the eugenic features of prenatal testing and make possible an expanded form of free-market eugenics. The current practice of prenatal testing is eugenic in that its aim is to reduce the numbers of people with genetic disorders. Due to social pressures and eugenic attitudes held by clinical geneticists in most countries, it results in eugenic outcomes even though no state coercion is involved. I argue that technological advances may soon make PID widely accessible. Because abortion is not involved, and multiple embryos are available, PID is radically more effective as a tool of genetic selection. It will also make possible selection on the basis of non-pathological characteristics, leading, potentially, to a full-blown free-market eugenics. For these reasons, I argue that PID should be strictly regulated. PMID:10226925

  7. [Update on preimplantation genetic diagnosis and screening].

    PubMed

    Kőrösi, Tamás; Török, Olga; Vajta, Gábor

    2014-08-31

    Recent advancement in both human embryology and genomics has created a completely new situation for practical and widespread application of preimplantation genetic diagnosis and screening with a dramatic effect on assisted reproduction. The mapping of the first human genome and the advancement in sequencing technology and bioinformatics has led to the discovery of the exact genetic background of exponentially increasing number of diseases. In parallel, methods for culturing human embryos have also radically improved, enabling the late transfer, and the procedure of vitrification the safe cryopreservation. In consequence, refined genetic analyses have become available from blastocyst biopsy followed by the application of novel genomic methods. Furthermore, some studies suggest that by the selection of aneuploid embryos the pregnancy- and birth-rates can be increased. The amount and the depth of information obtainable from the embryos raise several technical and ethical questions that can be answered by further prospective randomized trials.

  8. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis of inherited disease.

    PubMed

    Ao, A

    1996-12-01

    Research on diagnosis of inherited disease in human embryo before implantation was initiated to help those couples who would prefer to select embryos at this stage rather than during pregnancy. Following in vitro fertilization (IVF), one to two cells were removed from 3 day cleavage stage embryo and cells were analysed for genetic defects. Embryos diagnosed as unaffected were returned to the uterus and thus the resulting pregnancies were assured to be normal. First babies born after the preimplantation diagnosis were using DNA amplification of Y-linked sequences by PCR to avoid X-linked disease. Several pregnancies were obtained by identifying sex of embryos using dual fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with fluorochrome labelled DNA sequences specific for X- and Y-chromosomes to interphase nuclei. Development of single cell PCR for single gene defects led to diagnose several genetic disorders. Preimplantation diagnosis was successfully achieved for predominant delta 508 deletion causing cystic fibrosis, and pregnancies were also diagnosed for Lesch-Nyhan syndrome, Tay-Sachs and Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  9. Pheochromocytoma and Paraganglioma: Genetics, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Fishbein, Lauren

    2016-02-01

    Pheochromocytomas (PCCs) and paragangliomas (PGLs) are rare but unique neuroendocrine tumors. The hypersecretion of catecholamines from the tumors can be associated with high morbidity and mortality, even when tumors are benign. Up to 40% of PCCs/PGLs are associated with germline mutations in susceptibility genes. About one-quarter are malignant, defined by the presence of distant metastases. Treatment options for unresectable metastatic disease, including chemotherapy, (131)I-MIBG, and radiation, can offer limited tumor and hormone control, although none are curative. This article reviews the inherited genetics, diagnosis, and treatment of PCCs and PGLs.

  10. The Impact of Biopsy on Human Embryo Developmental Potential during Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Cimadomo, Danilo; Capalbo, Antonio; Ubaldi, Filippo Maria; Scarica, Catello; Palagiano, Antonio; Canipari, Rita; Rienzi, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis and Screening (PGD/PGS) for monogenic diseases and/or numerical/structural chromosomal abnormalities is a tool for embryo testing aimed at identifying nonaffected and/or euploid embryos in a cohort produced during an IVF cycle. A critical aspect of this technology is the potential detrimental effect that the biopsy itself can have upon the embryo. Different embryo biopsy strategies have been proposed. Cleavage stage blastomere biopsy still represents the most commonly used method in Europe nowadays, although this approach has been shown to have a negative impact on embryo viability and implantation potential. Polar body biopsy has been proposed as an alternative to embryo biopsy especially for aneuploidy testing. However, to date no sufficiently powered study has clarified the impact of this procedure on embryo reproductive competence. Blastocyst stage biopsy represents nowadays the safest approach not to impact embryo implantation potential. For this reason, as well as for the evidences of a higher consistency of the molecular analysis when performed on trophectoderm cells, blastocyst biopsy implementation is gradually increasing worldwide. The aim of this review is to present the evidences published to date on the impact of the biopsy at different stages of preimplantation development upon human embryos reproductive potential. PMID:26942198

  11. Pheochromocytoma-paraganglioma: Biochemical and genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Cano Megías, Marta; Rodriguez Puyol, Diego; Fernández Rodríguez, Loreto; Sención Martinez, Gloria Lisette; Martínez Miguel, Patricia

    Pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas are tumours derived from neural crest cells, which can be diagnosed by biochemical measurement of metanephrine and methoxytyramine. Advances in genetic research have identified many genes involved in the pathogenesis of these tumours, suggesting that up to 35-45% may have an underlying germline mutation. These genes have a singular transcriptional signature and can be grouped into 2 clusters (or groups): cluster 1 (VHL and SHDx), involved in angiogenesis and hypoxia pathways; and cluster 2 (MEN2 and NF1), linked to the kinase signalling pathway. In turn, these genes are associated with a characteristic biochemical phenotype (noradrenergic and adrenergic), and clinical features (location, biological behaviour, age of presentation, etc.) in a large number of cases. Early diagnosis of these tumours, accompanied by a correct genetic diagnosis, should eventually become a priority to enable better treatment, early detection of complications, proper screening of family members and related tumours, as well as an improvement in the overall prognosis of these patients.

  12. Genetic diagnosis for congenital hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Ohga, Shouichi

    Congenital hemolytic anemia is a group of monogenic diseases presenting with anemia due to increased destruction of circulating erythrocytes. The etiology of inherited anemia accounts for germline mutations of the responsible genes coding for the structural components of erythrocytes and extra-erythrocytes. The erythrocyte abnormalities are classified into three major disorders of red cell membrane defects, hemoglobinopathies, and red cell enzymopathies. The extra-erythrocyte abnormalities, typified by consumption coagulopathy and intravascular hemolysis, include Upshaw-Schulman syndrome and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. The clinical manifestations of congenital hemolytic anemia are anemia, jaundice, cholelithiasis and splenomegaly, while the onset mode and severity are both variable. Genetic overlapping of red cell membrane protein disorders, and distinct frequency and mutation spectra differing among races make it difficult to understand this disease entity. On the other hand, genetic modifiers for the phenotype of β-globin diseases provide useful information for selecting the optimal treatment and for long-term management. Recently, next generation sequencing techniques have enabled us to determine the novel causative genes in patients with undiagnosed hemolytic anemias. We herein review the concept and strategy for genetic diagnosis of inherited hemolytic anemias.

  13. Prenatal and pre-implantation genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Vermeesch, Joris Robert; Voet, Thierry; Devriendt, Koenraad

    2016-09-15

    The past decade has seen the development of technologies that have revolutionized prenatal genetic testing; that is, genetic testing from conception until birth. Genome-wide single-cell arrays and high-throughput sequencing analyses are dramatically increasing our ability to detect embryonic and fetal genetic lesions, and have substantially improved embryo selection for in vitro fertilization (IVF). Moreover, both invasive and non-invasive mutation scanning of the genome are helping to identify the genetic causes of prenatal developmental disorders. These advances are changing clinical practice and pose novel challenges for genetic counselling and prenatal care.

  14. Diagnosis support using Fuzzy Cognitive Maps combined with Genetic Algorithms.

    PubMed

    Georgopoulos, Voula C; Stylios, Chrysotomos D

    2009-01-01

    A new hybrid modeling methodology to support medical diagnosis decisions is developed here. It extends previous work on Competitive Fuzzy Cognitive Maps for Medical Diagnosis Support Systems by complementing them with Genetic Algorithms Methods for concept interaction. The synergy of these methodologies is accomplished by a new proposed algorithm that leads to more dependable Advanced Medical Diagnosis Support Systems that are suitable to handle situations where the decisions are not clearly distinct. The technique developed here is applied successfully to model and test a differential diagnosis problem from the speech pathology area for the diagnosis of language impairments.

  15. The importance of genetic diagnosis for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Ginjaar, Ieke B; Bushby, Kate

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy are caused by mutations in the dystrophin-encoding DMD gene. Large deletions and duplications are most common, but small mutations have been found as well. Having a correct diagnosis is important for family planning and providing proper care to patients according to published guidelines. With mutation-specific therapies under development for DMD, a correct diagnosis is now also important for assessing whether patients are eligible for treatments. This review discusses different mutations causing DMD, diagnostic techniques available for making a genetic diagnosis for children suspected of DMD and the importance of having a specific genetic diagnosis in the context of emerging genetic therapies for DMD. PMID:26754139

  16. Translational genetics for diagnosis of human disorders of sex development.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Ruth M; Vilain, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Disorders of sex development (DSDs) are congenital conditions with discrepancies between the chromosomal, gonadal, and phenotypic sex of the individual. Such disorders have historically been difficult to diagnose and cause great stress to patients and their families. Genetic analysis of human samples has been instrumental in elucidating the molecules and pathways involved in the development of the bipotential gonad into a functioning testis or ovary. However, many DSD patients still do not receive a genetic diagnosis. New genetic and genomic technologies are expanding our knowledge of the underlying mechanism of DSDs and opening new avenues for clinical diagnosis. We review the genetic technologies that have elucidated the genes that are well established in sex determination in humans, discuss findings from more recent genomic technologies, and propose a new paradigm for clinical diagnosis of DSDs.

  17. Translational Genetics for Diagnosis of Human Disorders of Sex Development

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Ruth M.; Vilain, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Disorders of sex development (DSDs) are congenital conditions with discrepancies between the chromosomal, gonadal, and phenotypic sex of the individual. Such disorders have historically been difficult to diagnose and cause great stress to patients and their families. Genetic analysis of human samples has been instrumental in elucidating the molecules and pathways involved in the development of the bipotential gonad into a functioning testis or ovary. However, many DSD patients still do not receive a genetic diagnosis. New genetic and genomic technologies are expanding our knowledge of the underlying mechanism of DSDs and opening new avenues for clinical diagnosis. We review the genetic technologies that have elucidated the genes that are well established in sex determination in humans, discuss findings from more recent genomic technologies, and propose a new paradigm for clinical diagnosis of DSDs. PMID:23875799

  18. Technical Update: Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis and Screening.

    PubMed

    Dahdouh, Elias M; Balayla, Jacques; Audibert, François; Wilson, R Douglas; Audibert, François; Brock, Jo-Ann; Campagnolo, Carla; Carroll, June; Chong, Karen; Gagnon, Alain; Johnson, Jo-Ann; MacDonald, William; Okun, Nanette; Pastuck, Melanie; Vallée-Pouliot, Karine

    2015-05-01

    Objectif : Mettre à jour et passer en revue les techniques et les indications du diagnostic génétique préimplantatoire et du dépistage génétique préimplantatoire. Options : Discussion au sujet des aspects techniques et génétiques des techniques génésiques préimplantatoires, particulièrement en ce qui concerne celles qui font appel aux nouvelles technologies cytogénétiques et à la biopsie au stade de l’embryon. Issues : Les issues cliniques obtenues par les techniques génésiques à la suite du recours au diagnostic génétique préimplantatoire et au dépistage génétique préimplantatoire sont incluses. La présente mise à jour ne traite pas en détail des issues indésirables qui ont été signalées en association avec les technologies de procréation assistée. Résultats : La littérature publiée a été récupérée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans Medline et The Cochrane Library en avril 2014 au moyen d’un vocabulaire contrôlé (« aneuploidy », « blastocyst/physiology », « genetic diseases », « preimplantation diagnosis/methods », « fertilization in vitro ») et de mots clés (p. ex. « preimplantation genetic diagnosis », « preimplantation genetic screening », « comprehensive chromosome screening », « aCGH », « SNP microarray », « qPCR » et « embryo selection ») appropriés. Les résultats ont été restreints aux analyses systématiques, aux études observationnelles et aux essais comparatifs randomisés / essais cliniques comparatifs publiés en anglais entre 1990 et avril 2014. Aucune restriction n’a été imposée en matière de langue. Les recherches ont été mises à jour de façon régulière et intégrées à la directive clinique jusqu’en janvier 2015. Des publications additionnelles ont été identifiées à partir des bibliographies des articles récupérés. La littérature grise (non publiée) a été identifiée par l’intermédiaire de

  19. Critical Issues for Dentistry: PGD Program Directors Respond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atchison, Kathryn A.; Cheffetz, Susan E.

    2002-01-01

    Surveyed directors of programs in postgraduate education in general dentistry (PGD) about critical issues facing their programs. Identified 12 themes: lack of postdoctoral applicants; student quality; professionalism and attitudes; number of postdoctoral positions; lack of funding; quality of facilities; special patient care; program curriculum;…

  20. [Diagnosis and treatment of genetic haemochromatosis].

    PubMed

    Milman, Nils Thorm

    2013-04-15

    Genetic haemochromatosis is a complex disorder/disease, which can be caused by a multiplicity of mutations in genes involved in iron metabolism being located on different chromosomes. In Caucasians, mutations in the HFE-gene account for the most common form of haemochromatosis (type 1). Non-HFE-haemochromatoses are less frequent and consist of juvenile haemochromatosis (type 2A and 2B) and TRF2-related haemochromatosis (type 3), which all respond to phlebotomies. The others comprise ferroportin disease (type 4A) atypical ferroportin disease (type 4B), acoeruloplasminaemia, atransferrinaemia and DMT1-associated haemochromatosis.

  1. Improving diagnosis for congenital cataract by introducing NGS genetic testing

    PubMed Central

    Musleh, Mohammud; Ashworth, Jane; Black, Graeme; Hall, Georgina

    2016-01-01

    Childhood cataract (CC) has an incidence of 3.5 per 10,000 by age 15 years. Diagnosis of any underlying cause is important to ensure effective and prompt management of multisystem complications, to facilitate accurate genetic counselling and to streamline multidisciplinary care. Next generation sequencing (NGS) has been shown to be effective in providing an underlying diagnosis in 70% of patients with CC in a research setting. This project aimed to integrate NGS testing in CC within six months of presentation and increase the rate of diagnosis. A retrospective case note review was undertaken to define the baseline efficacy of current care in providing a precise diagnosis. Quality improvement methods were used to integrate and optimize NGS testing in clinical care and measure the improvements made. The percentage of children receiving an NGS result within six months increased from 26% to 71% during the project period. The mean time to NGS testing and receiving a report decreased and there was a reduction in variation over the study period. Several patients and families had a change in management or genetic counselling as a direct result of the diagnosis given by the NGS test. The current recommended investigation of patients with bilateral CC is ineffective in identifying a diagnosis. Quality Improvement methods have facilitated successful integration of NGS testing into clinical care, improving time to diagnosis and leading to development of a new care pathway. PMID:27933154

  2. Genetics and diagnosis of central diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Bichet, Daniel G

    2012-04-01

    Most of the central diabetes insipidus cases seen in general practice are acquired but the rare cases of hereditary autosomal dominant or recessive neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus have provided further cellular understanding of the mechanisms responsible for pre-hormone folding, maturation and release. Autosomal dominant central diabetes insipidus is secondary to the toxic accumulation of vasopressin mutants as fibrillar aggregates in the endoplasmic reticulum of hypothalamic magnocellular neurons producing vasopressin. As well, Trpv1(-/-) and Trpv4(-/-) mice have shed new light on the perception of tonicity through the stretch receptors TRPVs expressed both in central and peripheral neurons. The genomic information provided by sequencing the AVP gene is key to the routine care of these patients and, as in other genetic diseases, reduces health costs and provides psychological benefits to patients and families. In addition, simple, inexpensive blood and urine measurements together with clinical characteristics and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could distinguish between central, nephrogenic and polydipsic cases.

  3. Genetic testing and early diagnosis and intervention: boon or burden?

    PubMed

    Hepburn, E R

    1996-04-01

    The possibility of early diagnosis and intervention is radically changed by the advent of genetic testing. The recent report of the Nuffield Council on Bioethics is timely and helpful. I have suggested, that not only the severity of the disability indicated by genetic information, and the accuracy of the data, ought to govern the approach to the implementation of screening for genetic disorders. In addition, assessment of the value of the information to those involved should be considered. The efficacy of the available therapeutic measures, combined with the prognostic data are important indices of the value of the information. These measures fall into three categories and thus indicate that three different courses of intervention may be appropriate. Three approaches to diagnosis and intervention are then outlined, drawing on the experience of various clinical initiatives.

  4. Genetic testing and early diagnosis and intervention: boon or burden?

    PubMed Central

    Hepburn, E R

    1996-01-01

    The possibility of early diagnosis and intervention is radically changed by the advent of genetic testing. The recent report of the Nuffield Council on Bioethics is timely and helpful. I have suggested, that not only the severity of the disability indicated by genetic information, and the accuracy of the data, ought to govern the approach to the implementation of screening for genetic disorders. In addition, assessment of the value of the information to those involved should be considered. The efficacy of the available therapeutic measures, combined with the prognostic data are important indices of the value of the information. These measures fall into three categories and thus indicate that three different courses of intervention may be appropriate. Three approaches to diagnosis and intervention are then outlined, drawing on the experience of various clinical initiatives. PMID:8731537

  5. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis for cystic fibrosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Biazotti, Maria Cristina Santoro; Pinto, Walter; de Albuquerque, Maria Cecília Romano Maciel; Fujihara, Litsuko Shimabukuro; Suganuma, Cláudia Haru; Reigota, Renata Bednar; Bertuzzo, Carmen Sílvia

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene. This disorder produces a variable phenotype including lung disease, pancreatic insufficiency, and meconium ileus plus bilateral agenesis of the vas deferens causing obstructive azoospermia and male infertility. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis is an alternative that allows identification of embryos affected by this or other genetic diseases. We report a case of couple with cystic fibrosis; the woman had the I148 T mutation and the man had the Delta F508 gene mutation. The couple underwent in vitro fertilization, associated with preimplantation genetic diagnosis, and with subsequent selection of healthy embryos for uterine transfer. The result was an uneventful pregnancy and delivery of a healthy male baby. PMID:25993078

  6. Workshop on molecular methods for genetic diagnosis. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Rinchik, E.M.

    1997-07-01

    The Sarah Lawrence College Human Genetics Program received Department of Energy funding to offer a continuing medical education workshop for genetic counselors in the New York metropolitan area. According to statistics from the National Society of Genetic Counselors, there are approximately 160 genetic counselors working in the tri-state area (New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut), and many of them had been working in the field for more than 10 years. Thus, there was a real need to offer these counselors an in-depth opportunity to learn the specifics of the major advances in molecular genetics, and, in particular, the new approaches to diagnostic testing for genetic disease. As a result of the DOE Award DE-FG02-95ER62048 ($20,583), in July 1995 we offered the {open_quotes}Workshop on Molecular Methods for Genetic Diagnosis{close_quotes} for 24 genetic counselors in the New York metropolitan area. The workshop included an initial review session on the basics of molecular biology, lectures and discussions on past and current topics in molecular genetics and diagnostic procedures, and, importantly, daily laboratory exercises. Each counselor gained not only background, but also firsthand experience, in the major techniques of biochemical and molecular methods for diagnosing genetic diseases as well as in mathematical and computational techniques involved in human genetics analyses. Our goal in offering this workshop was not to make genetic counselors experts in these laboratory diagnostic techniques, but to acquaint them, by hands-on experience, about some of the techniques currently in use. We also wanted to provide them a technical foundation upon which they can understand and appreciate new technical developments arising in the near future.

  7. PGD: a pangolin genome hub for the research community.

    PubMed

    Tan, Tze King; Tan, Ka Yun; Hari, Ranjeev; Mohamed Yusoff, Aini; Wong, Guat Jah; Siow, Cheuk Chuen; Mutha, Naresh V R; Rayko, Mike; Komissarov, Aleksey; Dobrynin, Pavel; Krasheninnikova, Ksenia; Tamazian, Gaik; Paterson, Ian C; Warren, Wesley C; Johnson, Warren E; O'Brien, Stephen J; Choo, Siew Woh

    2016-01-01

    Pangolins (order Pholidota) are the only mammals covered by scales. We have recently sequenced and analyzed the genomes of two critically endangered Asian pangolin species, namely the Malayan pangolin (Manis javanica) and the Chinese pangolin (Manis pentadactyla). These complete genome sequences will serve as reference sequences for future research to address issues of species conservation and to advance knowledge in mammalian biology and evolution. To further facilitate the global research effort in pangolin biology, we developed the Pangolin Genome Database (PGD), as a future hub for hosting pangolin genomic and transcriptomic data and annotations, and with useful analysis tools for the research community. Currently, the PGD provides the reference pangolin genome and transcriptome data, gene sequences and functional information, expressed transcripts, pseudogenes, genomic variations, organ-specific expression data and other useful annotations. We anticipate that the PGD will be an invaluable platform for researchers who are interested in pangolin and mammalian research. We will continue updating this hub by including more data, annotation and analysis tools particularly from our research consortium.Database URL: http://pangolin-genome.um.edu.my.

  8. PGD: a pangolin genome hub for the research community

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Tze King; Tan, Ka Yun; Hari, Ranjeev; Mohamed Yusoff, Aini; Wong, Guat Jah; Siow, Cheuk Chuen; Mutha, Naresh V.R.; Rayko, Mike; Komissarov, Aleksey; Dobrynin, Pavel; Krasheninnikova, Ksenia; Tamazian, Gaik; Paterson, Ian C.; Warren, Wesley C.; Johnson, Warren E.; O'Brien, Stephen J.; Choo, Siew Woh

    2016-01-01

    Pangolins (order Pholidota) are the only mammals covered by scales. We have recently sequenced and analyzed the genomes of two critically endangered Asian pangolin species, namely the Malayan pangolin (Manis javanica) and the Chinese pangolin (Manis pentadactyla). These complete genome sequences will serve as reference sequences for future research to address issues of species conservation and to advance knowledge in mammalian biology and evolution. To further facilitate the global research effort in pangolin biology, we developed the Pangolin Genome Database (PGD), as a future hub for hosting pangolin genomic and transcriptomic data and annotations, and with useful analysis tools for the research community. Currently, the PGD provides the reference pangolin genome and transcriptome data, gene sequences and functional information, expressed transcripts, pseudogenes, genomic variations, organ-specific expression data and other useful annotations. We anticipate that the PGD will be an invaluable platform for researchers who are interested in pangolin and mammalian research. We will continue updating this hub by including more data, annotation and analysis tools particularly from our research consortium. Database URL: http://pangolin-genome.um.edu.my PMID:27616775

  9. The first family with Tay-Sachs disease in Cyprus: Genetic analysis reveals a nonsense (c.78G>A) and a silent (c.1305C>T) mutation and allows preimplantation genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Theodoros; Christopoulos, George; Anastasiadou, Violetta; Hadjiloizou, Stavros; Cregeen, David; Jackson, Marie; Mavrikiou, Gavriella; Kleanthous, Marina; Drousiotou, Anthi

    2014-12-01

    Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) is a recessively inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in the HEXA gene resulting in β-hexosaminidase A (HEX A) deficiency and neuronal accumulation of GM2 ganglioside. We describe the first patient with Tay-Sachs disease in the Cypriot population, a juvenile case which presented with developmental regression at the age of five. The diagnosis was confirmed by measurement of HEXA activity in plasma, peripheral leucocytes and fibroblasts. Sequencing the HEXA gene resulted in the identification of two previously described mutations: the nonsense mutation c.78G>A (p.Trp26X) and the silent mutation c.1305C>T (p.=). The silent mutation was reported once before in a juvenile TSD patient of West Indian origin with an unusually mild phenotype. The presence of this mutation in another juvenile TSD patient provides further evidence that it is a disease-causing mutation. Successful preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) and prenatal follow-up were provided to the couple.

  10. Defects in Peroxisomal 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenase Isoform PGD2 Prevent Gametophytic Interaction in Arabidopsis thaliana1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hölscher, Christian; Meyer, Tanja; Fischer, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    We studied the localization of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (PGD) isoforms of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Similar polypeptide lengths of PGD1, PGD2, and PGD3 obscured which isoform may represent the cytosolic and/or plastidic enzyme plus whether PGD2 with a peroxisomal targeting motif also might target plastids. Reporter-fusion analyses in protoplasts revealed that, with a free N terminus, PGD1 and PGD3 accumulate in the cytosol and chloroplasts, whereas PGD2 remains in the cytosol. Mutagenesis of a conserved second ATG enhanced the plastidic localization of PGD1 and PGD3 but not PGD2. Amino-terminal deletions of PGD2 fusions with a free C terminus resulted in peroxisomal import after dimerization, and PGD2 could be immunodetected in purified peroxisomes. Repeated selfing of pgd2 transfer (T-)DNA alleles yielded no homozygous mutants, although siliques and seeds of heterozygous plants developed normally. Detailed analyses of the C-terminally truncated PGD2-1 protein showed that peroxisomal import and catalytic activity are abolished. Reciprocal backcrosses of pgd2-1 suggested that missing PGD activity in peroxisomes primarily affects the male gametophyte. Tetrad analyses in the quartet1-2 background revealed that pgd2-1 pollen is vital and in vitro germination normal, but pollen tube growth inside stylar tissues appeared less directed. Mutual gametophytic sterility was overcome by complementation with a genomic construct but not with a version lacking the first ATG. These analyses showed that peroxisomal PGD2 activity is required for guided growth of the male gametophytes and pollen tube-ovule interaction. Our report finally demonstrates an essential role of oxidative pentose-phosphate pathway reactions in peroxisomes, likely needed to sustain critical levels of nitric oxide and/or jasmonic acid, whose biosynthesis both depend on NADPH provision. PMID:26941195

  11. Genetic imprecision: Diagnosis of possible defects often cannot predict prognosis

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, R.

    1991-05-01

    The author discusses the difficulties in using current genetic information for the detection of hereditary diseases. Although there have been many advances in cytogenetic and molecular testing, the diagnosis of defects does not necessarily predict prognosis. Detection of mutant alleles, mosaicism, familial chromosomal rearrangements and de novo chromosomal rearrangements lends uncertainties to genetic counselling. The problems have been compounded by a lack of follow-up to determine if a defect actually exists in a fetus aborted as a result of counselling; nor has there been long-term follow-up of fetuses carried to term that appear healthy at birth. Disappointments after the discovery of the cystic fibrosis gene were due to discovery of many mutations of the gene, making screening for the disease difficult. Some genetic counselors question the benefits of screening for this disease since with advances in treatment, life span has been lengthened and quality of life has been improved.

  12. High volume molecular genetic identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms using Genetic Bit Analysis Application to human genetic diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Boyce-Jacino, M.T.; Reynolds, J.; Nikiforov, T.

    1994-09-01

    The most common type of genetic disease-associated mutation is the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). Because most genetic diseases can be caused by multiple SNPs in the same gene, effective routine diagnosis of complex genetic diseases is dependent on a simple and reliable method of interrogating SNP sites. Molecular Tool`s solid phase assay capable of direct genotyping (single base sequencing) of SNP sites, Genetic Bit Analysis (GBA), involves hybridization-capture of a single-stranded PCR product to a sequence-specific, microtiter plate-bound oligonucleotide primer. The captured PCR product then acts as template for single-base extension of the capture primer across the polymorphic site, enabling direct determination of the base composition of the polymorphism through a simple colormetric assay. Genotyping in a high volume, semi-automated, processing system with a current capacity of 100 SNP interrogations per technician per day enables the screening of candidate mutations rapidly and cost-effectively, critically important to comprehensive genetic diagnosis. Using this gel-free technology, we have developed prototype diagnostic tests for CFTR and ApoE polymorphisms which enable direct sequencing of the polymorphic base at each site of interest. Routine clinical diagnosis of genetically complex diseases such as cystic fibrosis is dependent on this combination of robust biochemistry and simple format. Additionally, the ability to transfer the format and biochemistry to any disease gene of interest enables the broad application of this technology to clinical diagnostics, especially for genetically complex diseases.

  13. Genetic Considerations in the Prenatal Diagnosis of Overgrowth Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Vora, Neeta; Bianchi, Diana W.

    2015-01-01

    Large (>90%) for gestational age (LGA) fetuses are usually identified incidentally. Detection of the LGA fetus should first prompt the provider to rule out incorrect dates and maternal diabetes. Once this is done, consideration should be given to certain overgrowth syndromes, especially if anomalies are present. The overgrowth syndromes have significant clinical and molecular overlap, and are associated with developmental delay, tumors, and other anomalies. Although genetic causes of overgrowth are considered postnatally, they are infrequently diagnosed prenatally. Here, we review prenatal sonographic findings in fetal overgrowth syndromes, including Pallister-Killian, Beckwith-Wiedemann, Sotos, Perlman, and Simpson-Golabi-Behmel. We also discuss prenatal diagnosis options and recurrence risks. PMID:19609940

  14. The Ups and Downs of Genetic Diagnosis of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Juan; Reguero, Julián R; Coto, Eliecer

    2016-01-01

    Massive DNA sequencing, also known as next-generation sequencing, has revolutionized genetic diagnosis. This technology has reduced the effort and cost needed to analyze several genes simultaneously and has made genetic evaluation available to a larger number of patients. In hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, genetic analysis has increased from the 3 main genes implicated in the disease (MYH7, MYBPC3, TNNT2) to sequencing of more than 20 related genes. Despite the advantages of acquiring this additional information, many patients show variants of uncertain significance (mainly amino acid changes), which may also be present in at least 1 healthy control undergoing genome sequencing. This will be a dead-end situation unless the variant can be demonstrated to be associated with the disease in the patient's family. In the absence of clear evidence that these variants are truly pathogenic, they cannot be used for reliable genetic counselling in family members. Massive sequencing also enables identification of new candidate genes, but again, the problem of variants of uncertain significance limits the success of these assessments.

  15. Genetics, diagnosis and management of colorectal cancer (Review)

    PubMed Central

    DE ROSA, MARINA; PACE, UGO; REGA, DANIELA; COSTABILE, VALERIA; DURATURO, FRANCESCA; IZZO, PAOLA; DELRIO, PAOLO

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common type of cancer worldwide and a leading cause of cancer death. Surgery represents the mainstay of treatment in early cases but often patients are primarily diagnosed in an advanced stage of disease and sometimes also distant metastases are present. Neoadjuvant therapy is therefore needed but drug resistance may influence response and concur to recurrent disease. At molecular level, it is a very heterogeneous group of diseases with about 30% of hereditary or familial cases. During colorectal adenocarcinomas development, epithelial cells from gastrointestinal trait acquire sequential genetic and epigenetic mutations in specific oncogenes and/or tumour suppressor genes, causing CRC onset, progression and metastasis. Molecular characterization of cancer associated mutations gives valuable information about disease prognosis and response to the therapy. Very early diagnosis and personalized care, as well as a better knowledge of molecular basis of its onset and progression, are therefore crucial to obtain a cure of CRC. In this review, we describe updated genetics, current diagnosis and management of CRC pointing out the extreme need for a multidisciplinary approach to achieve the best results in patient outcomes. PMID:26151224

  16. [Diagnosis of the peripheral hereditary neuropathies and its molecular genetics].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Zamora, Edgar; Arenas-Sordo, María de la Luz

    2008-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies include a wide range of pathological disorders characterized by damage of peripheral nerves. Among them, peripheral hereditary neuropathies are a group of frequent illnesses and early evolution. They have been named hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN) or peripheral hereditary neuropathies type Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT). The most frequent types are CMT1, CMT2 and CMTX. Approximately 70% of the cases correspond to subtype CMT1A, associated with tandem duplication of a 1.5 Mb DNA fragment on chromosome 17p11.2-p12 that codifies the peripheral myelin protein PMP22. So far, there five different types of CMT (1,2,3,4,X) with approximately 32 subtypes, associated with more than 30 genes. Have been reported genetic heterogeneity and expression variability of the illness makes it necessary to carry on diagnostic strategies that integrate clinical study for determining genetic clinical history, family history, complete physical exploration, muscular strength, physical deformities, reflexes and sensitivity, and molecular studies allow detection of different types of mutations and help establish a correct diagnosis and an adequate genetic counseling.

  17. [Genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis in mitochondrial diseases].

    PubMed

    Klopstock, T; Gasser, T

    1999-06-01

    Since mitochondrial diseases lead frequently to severe phenotypes and are often hereditary, there is a need for genetic counselling of the affected families. The specific features of mitochondrial genetics, however, hamper straightforward definition of recurrence risks as in Mendelian diseases. Empirical risks were recently provided for MELAS and MERRF syndromes and for Leber hereditary optic neuropathy. In MELAS and MERFF, higher levels of mutant mtDNA in the mothers' blood were associated with an increased frequency of affected offspring. Chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia and Kearns-Sayre syndrome are in general sporadic disorders without increased recurrence risks in the offspring. As Leigh syndrome is found with maternal, autosomal recessive or X chromosomal transmission, the definition of the molecular defect is crucial for genetic counselling. Prenatal diagnosis was reported only in one case of mitochondrial disease so far, and in our opinion it remains questionable because of the uncertain correlation of the proportion of mutant DNA in chorionic villi and in clinically relevant tissues such as brain.

  18. Genetic diagnosis and prognosis of Alzheimer's disease: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Reitz, Christiane

    2015-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common form of dementia in western societies, is a pathologically and clinically heterogeneous disease with a strong genetic component. The recent advances in high-throughput genome technologies allowing for the rapid analysis of millions of polymorphisms in thousands of subjects has significantly advanced our understanding of the genomic underpinnings of AD susceptibility. During the last 5 years, genome-wide association and whole-exome- and whole-genome sequencing studies have mapped more than 20 disease-associated loci, providing insights into the molecular pathways involved in AD pathogenesis and hinting at potential novel therapeutic targets. This review article summarizes the challenges and opportunities of when using genomic information for the diagnosis and prognosis of AD.

  19. Discussing options between patients and health care professionals in genetic diagnosis: ethical and legal criteria

    PubMed Central

    Nicolás, Pilar

    2007-01-01

    The specific characteristics of genetic data lead to ethical-legal conflicts in the framework of genetic diagnosis. Several international organisations, including UNESCO and the Council of Europe, have enacted rules referring to the use of genetic information. This paper discusses possible legal and ethical criteria that could be used in genetic testing. PMID:19725990

  20. Perspective on the Genetics and Diagnosis of Congenital Hyperinsulinism Disorders

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Context: Congenital hyperinsulinism (HI) is the most common cause of hypoglycemia in children. The risk of permanent brain injury in infants with HI continues to be as high as 25–50% due to delays in diagnosis and inadequate treatment. Congenital HI has been described since the birth of the JCEM under various terms, including “idiopathic hypoglycemia of infancy,” “leucine-sensitive hypoglycemia,” or “nesidioblastosis.” Evidence Acquisition: In the past 20 years, it has become apparent that HI is caused by genetic defects in the pathways that regulate pancreatic β-cell insulin secretion. Evidence Synthesis: There are now 11 genes associated with monogenic forms of HI (ABCC8, KCNJ11, GLUD1, GCK, HADH1, UCP2, MCT1, HNF4A, HNF1A, HK1, PGM1), as well as several syndromic genetic forms of HI (eg, Beckwith-Wiedemann, Kabuki, and Turner syndromes). HI is also the cause of hypoglycemia in transitional neonatal hypoglycemia and in persistent hypoglycemia in various groups of high-risk neonates (such as birth asphyxia, small for gestational age birthweight, infant of diabetic mother). Management of HI is one of the most difficult problems faced by pediatric endocrinologists and frequently requires difficult choices, such as near-total pancreatectomy and/or highly intensive care with continuous tube feedings. For 50 years, diazoxide, a KATP channel agonist, has been the primary drug for infants with HI; however, it is ineffective in most cases with mutations of ABCC8 or KCNJ11, which constitute the majority of infants with monogenic HI. Conclusions: Genetic mutation testing has become standard of care for infants with HI and has proven to be useful not only in projecting prognosis and family counseling, but also in diagnosing infants with surgically curable focal HI lesions. 18F-fluoro-L-dihydroxyphenylalanine (18F-DOPA) PET scans have been found to be highly accurate for localizing such focal lesions preoperatively. New drugs under investigation provide hope

  1. Genetics, diagnosis, and future treatment strategies for primary ciliary dyskinesia

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, M. Leigh Anne; Noone, Peadar G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a genetically heterogeneous recessive disorder resulting in chronic oto-sino-pulmonary disease. While PCD is estimated to occur in 1 in 20,000 individuals, fewer than 1,000 patients in the US have a well-established diagnosis. Areas Covered We provide an overview of the clinical manifestations of PCD, describe the evolution of diagnostic methods, and critique the literature on management of PCD. Expert Opinion Although interest in clinical studies in non-CF bronchiectasis has increased in recent years, some of whom enroll patients with PCD, the literature regarding therapy for PCD as a distinct entity is lacking, as the numbers are small, and there have been no sub-analyses published. However, with improved screening and diagnostic methods, the development of clinical and research consortiums, and actively enrolling registries of PCD patients, the environment is conducive to perform longitudinal studies of disease course and therapeutic studies to alter that course. PMID:26998415

  2. ‘My funky genetics’: BRCA1/2 mutation carriers’ understanding of genetic inheritance and reproductive merger in the context of new repro-genetic technologies

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Lisa R.; Doyle, Maya; Stern, Rikki; Savin, Katie; Hurley, Karen; Sagi, Michal

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Deleterious mutations in the BRCA1/BRCA2 genes elevate lifetime risk of breast and ovarian cancer. Each child of a mutation-positive parent has a 50% chance of inheriting it. Pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) permits prospective parents to avoid transmitting a BRCA1/2 mutation to a child, introducing predictability into a process historically defined by chance. This investigation explored how BRCA1/2 mutation carriers understand genetic inheritance and consider a child’s inheritance of a BRCA1/2 mutation, given the opportunities that exist to pursue PGD. METHOD 39 female and male BRCA1/2 mutation carriers of reproductive age were recruited from urban cancer and reproductive medical centers. Participants completed a standardized educational presentation on PGD and prenatal diagnosis, with pre- and post-test assessments. An interdisciplinary team of qualitative researchers analyzed data using grounded theory techniques. FINDINGS Participants expressed the belief that reproduction yields children with unique genetic strengths and challenges, including the BRCA1/2 mutation, family traits for which predictive tests do not exist, and hypothetical genetic risks. Participants expressed preference for biologically-related children, yet stated their genetically ‘well’ partner’s lineage would be marred through reproductive merger, requiring the well partner to assume the burden of the BRCA1/2 mutation via their children. Participants expressed diverse views of genetically ‘well’ partners’ participation in family planning and risk management decisions. DISCUSSION Pressure to use reprogenetic technology may grow as genetic susceptibility testing becomes more widely available. Work with individuals and couples across the disease spectrum must be attuned to they ways beliefs about genetic inheritance play into reproductive decision making. PMID:22709328

  3. Parents’ experiences of receiving their child’s genetic diagnosis: A qualitative study to inform clinical genetics practice

    PubMed Central

    Ashtiani, Setareh; Makela, Nancy; Carrion, Prescilla; Austin, Jehannine

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Little is currently known about how parents experience the medical genetics appointment at which their child receives a genetic diagnosis. Methods We conducted semi-structured in-person interviews with 13 parents of 10 index children to explore their experience in the medical genetics appointment in which they received their child’s genetic diagnosis. Guided by grounded theory, we used a constant comparative approach to data analysis, and the transcribed interviews were coded and sorted, and thematic categories identified. Results 61.5% of parents experienced the diagnosis session as negative, 23% felt the experience was positive, and 15.5% were ambivalent. Receiving emotional support, an outline of the follow-up plans, and messages of hope and perspective during the session seemed to positively influence parents’ experience, while feeling that their role was as a passive receiver of information and using difficult medical terminology negatively influenced parents’ overall experience. Parental preparedness for the information, and the parents’ emotional reaction to the diagnosis were also factors that influenced the parental experience. Few participants understood the role of the genetic counselor. Conclusion Our results provide in-depth insight into the parental experience of the pediatric medical genetics diagnosis session. We propose a mechanism through which parental experience shapes their perception of the medical genetics session. PMID:24706543

  4. Pre-implantation genetic testing in ART: who will benefit and what is the evidence?

    PubMed

    Vaiarelli, Alberto; Cimadomo, Danilo; Capalbo, Antonio; Orlando, Giovanna; Sapienza, Fabio; Colamaria, Silvia; Palagiano, Antonio; Bulletti, Carlo; Rienzi, Laura; Ubaldi, Filippo Maria

    2016-10-01

    Pre-implantation genetic diagnosis for aneuploidy testing (PGD-A) is a tool to identify euploid embryos during IVF. The suggested populations of patients that can benefit from it are infertile women of advanced maternal age, with a history of recurrent miscarriages and/or IVF failures. However, a general consensus has not yet been reached.After the clinical failure of its first version based on cleavage stage biopsy and 9 chromosome-FISH analysis, PGD-A is currently performed by 24 chromosome screening techniques on trophectoderm (TE) biopsies. This approach has been clearly demonstrated to involve a higher clinical efficiency with respect to the standard care, in terms of sustained pregnancy rate per transfer and lower miscarriage rate. However, data about PGD-A efficacy calculated on a per intention-to-treat basis, as well as an analysis of its cost-effectiveness, are still missing.TE biopsy is a safe and extensively validated approach with low biological and technical margin of error. Firstly, the prevalence of mosaic diploid/aneuploid blastocysts is estimated to be between 0 and 16 %, thus largely tolerable. Secondly, all the comprehensive chromosome screening (CCS) technologies adapted to, or designed to conduct PGD-A are highly concordant, and qPCR in particular has been proven to show the lowest false positive error rate (0.5 %) and a clinically recognizable error rate per blastocyst of just 0.21 %.In conclusion, there is a sufficient body of evidence to support the clinical application of CCS-based PGD-A on TE biopsies. The main limiting factor is the need for a high-standard laboratory to conduct blastocyst culture, biopsy and vitrification without impacting embryo viability.

  5. Modeling the genetic and environmental association between peer group deviance and cannabis use in male twins

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, Nathan A; Neale, Michael C; Jacobson, Kristen; Kendler, Kenneth S

    2009-01-01

    Background Peer group deviance (PGD) is strongly linked to liability to drug use including cannabis. Our aim was to model the genetic and environmental association, including direction of causation, between PGD and cannabis use (CU). Method Results were based on 1753 adult males from the Mid-Atlantic Twin Registry with complete CU and PGD data measured retrospectively at three time intervals between 15 and 25 years using a life-history calendar. Results At all ages, multivariate modeling showed that familial aggregation in PGD was explained by a combination of additive genetic and shared environmental effects, Moreover the significant PGD-CU association was best explained by a CU to PGD causal model in which large portions of the additive genetic (50% to 78%) and shared environmental variance (25% to 73%) in PGD were explained by CU. Conclusions Until recently PGD was assumed to be an environmental, upstream risk factor for CU. Our data are not consistent with this hypothesis. Rather, they suggest that the liability to affiliate with deviant peers is better explained by a combination of genetic and environmental factors that are indexed by CU which sits as a “risk indicator” in the causal pathway between genetic and environmental risks and the expression of PGD. This is consistent with a process of social selection by which the genetic and environmental risks in CU largely drive the propensity to affiliate with deviant peers. PMID:19207350

  6. Diagnosis of Wilson disease in young children: molecular genetic testing and a paradigm shift from the laboratory diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jeong Kee

    2012-12-01

    Wilson disease (WD) is an autosomal recessive disorder of copper metabolism that results in accumulation of copper primarily in the liver, brain and cornea. Mutations in the WD gene, ATP7B, cause failure of copper excretion from hepatocyte into bile and a defective synthesis of ceruloplasmin. More than 500 mutations are now recognized, scattered throughout the ATP7B gene. Since WD has protean clinical presentations, awareness of WD in clinical practice is important for the early diagnosis and prevention of accumulated copper toxicity. Molecular genetic testing is playing an increasingly important role in the diagnosis of WD in uncertain cases and family screening. Siblings should be screened for WD once an index case has been diagnosed. Discrimination of heterozygotes from asymptomatic patients is essential to avoid inappropriate lifelong therapy for heterozygotes. Genetic testing, either by haplotype analysis or by mutation analysis, is the only definite solution for differentiating heterozygote carriers from affected asymptomatic patients. Routine genetic testing, because of the multitude of documented mutations, has been thought to be impractical until recently. However, genetic testing is now being more actively applied to the diagnosis of WD, particularly in young children in whom conventional biochemical diagnosis has much limitation and only genetic testing is able to confirm WD. Because advancement of modern biochemical technology now allows more rapid, easier, and less expensive mutation detection, direct DNA sequencing could be actively considered as the primary mode of diagnostic investigation rather than a supplementary test to the conventional biochemical tests. This review will focus on the recent advancement of molecular genetics and genetic diagnosis of WD in very young children on the basis of research data of the Seoul National University Children's Hospital and recent literature.

  7. Genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis: a multicultural perspective.

    PubMed

    Puñales-Morejon, D

    1997-01-01

    More and more women are using prenatal tests to obtain specific information on the health of the developing fetus. The objective of genetic counseling is not to decrease the occurrence of genetic disease, it is to help individuals and families adjust to their genetic risks and make their own decisions in line with their reproductive goals and world views. Choices made by parent(s) will reflect their own intrapsychic processes as well as their own cultural and social understanding of genetic risk and disease. As prenatal testing continues to diagnose an ever growing number of genetic disorders, genetic counseling faces greater and greater challenges. Now more than ever before, genetic counseling must incorporate both psychological counseling and multiculturalism in order to serve diverse individuals and families at risk for genetic disease.

  8. Niacin and biosynthesis of PGD2 by platelet COX-1 in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Song, Wen-Liang; Stubbe, Jane; Ricciotti, Emanuela; Alamuddin, Naji; Ibrahim, Salam; Crichton, Irene; Prempeh, Maxwell; Lawson, John A.; Wilensky, Robert L.; Rasmussen, Lars Melholt; Puré, Ellen; FitzGerald, Garret A.

    2012-01-01

    The clinical use of niacin to treat dyslipidemic conditions is limited by noxious side effects, most commonly facial flushing. In mice, niacin-induced flushing results from COX-1–dependent formation of PGD2 and PGE2 followed by COX-2–dependent production of PGE2. Consistent with this, niacin-induced flushing in humans is attenuated when niacin is combined with an antagonist of the PGD2 receptor DP1. NSAID-mediated suppression of COX-2–derived PGI2 has negative cardiovascular consequences, yet little is known about the cardiovascular biology of PGD2. Here, we show that PGD2 biosynthesis is augmented during platelet activation in humans and, although vascular expression of DP1 is conserved between humans and mice, platelet DP1 is not present in mice. Despite this, DP1 deletion in mice augmented aneurysm formation and the hypertensive response to Ang II and accelerated atherogenesis and thrombogenesis. Furthermore, COX inhibitors in humans, as well as platelet depletion, COX-1 knockdown, and COX-2 deletion in mice, revealed that niacin evoked platelet COX-1–derived PGD2 biosynthesis. Finally, ADP-induced spreading on fibrinogen was augmented by niacin in washed human platelets, coincident with increased thromboxane (Tx) formation. However, in platelet-rich plasma, where formation of both Tx and PGD2 was increased, spreading was not as pronounced and was inhibited by DP1 activation. Thus, PGD2, like PGI2, may function as a homeostatic response to thrombogenic and hypertensive stimuli and may have particular relevance as a constraint on platelets during niacin therapy. PMID:22406532

  9. Genetics on stage: public engagement in health policy development on preimplantation genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Cox, Susan M; Kazubowski-Houston, Magdalena; Nisker, Jeff

    2009-04-01

    Arts-based approaches to public engagement offer unique advantages over traditional methods of consultation. Here we describe and assess our use of theatre as a method of public engagement in the development of health policy on preimplantation genetic diagnosis, a controversial method for selecting the genetic characteristics of embryos created through in vitro fertilization. Funding from the Canadian Institutes for Health Research and Health Canada supported 16 performances of the play Orchids in Vancouver, Toronto, and Montréal and post-performance discussion in English and French (with Hubert Doucet) in 2005. A total of 741 individuals attended. The methods used to assess audience engagement and elicit policy-relevant dialogue included in-theatre observation of audience responses, moderated post-performance large audience discussion and focus groups, audience feedback forms and researcher fieldnotes. Emphasizing process and context over emerging outcomes, we reflect on the distinctive contributions of theatre in stimulating public engagement and the need to utilize multiple methods to adequately assess these contributions. We suggest continued dialogue about the possible uses of theatre in health policy development and conclude that greater clarity is needed with regard to citizens' (as well as specific stakeholders, policy makers' and sponsors') desired outcomes if there is to be a suitably nuanced and reflexive basis for assessing the effectiveness of various strategies for public engagement.

  10. Competitive technology approaches for electronic hybridization detection in a microsystem with microfluidics for diagnosis genetic tests.

    PubMed

    Bellis, S; Blionas, S; Carrera, J; Chatzandroulis, S; Getin, S; Misiakos, K; Planat-Chretien, A; Tsoukalas, D

    2006-01-01

    This paper is presenting competitive technology alternatives for the electronic hybridization detection in a microsystem with microfluidics for diagnosis genetic tests that are carried out by two competitive research projects. The technologies developed are a photosensor, a capacitive sensor and an optical real-time affinity biosensor. The performance of those biosensors will be evaluated but also their manufacturability and cost will define the appropriateness of each one for industrialization and their integration on a microsystem for diagnosis genetic testing.

  11. Reciprocal Relationships: the Genetic Counselor-Patient Relationship Following a Life-Limiting Prenatal Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Williams, S R; Berrier, K L; Redlinger-Grosse, K; Edwards, J G

    2016-10-22

    Utilizing the tenet, "Relationship is integral to the genetic counseling process" from the Reciprocal Engagement Model (REM) of genetic counseling practice, this study sought to explore the relationship between the genetic counselor and patient following a "life-limiting" prenatal diagnosis that resulted in a major loss (termination, stillbirth/miscarriage, or neonatal death). The specific aims of this study were to: 1) Understand and describe aspects of the genetic counselor-patient relationship in the context of the life-limiting prenatal diagnosis, and identify characteristics and actions of the 2) genetic counselor and 3) patient that influence the relationship. Genetic counselor (GC) participants were recruited via a web-based survey distributed by NSGC and the NSGC Prenatal SIG. Eligible GCs maintained a relationship with a patient beyond the prenatal diagnosis and had a willing patient participant. Individual 60-min audio-recorded telephone interviews were conducted with eight GC and 8 respective patients (n = 16) using parallel interview guides (n = 16). Transcriptions underwent thematic content analysis for systematic coding and identification of emergent themes. The GC-patient relationship was characterized by the evolution of communication and promoted by the supportive needs of the patient, the nature of the diagnosis, and characteristics and supportive actions of the participants. This exploratory study highlights the unique service of support offered by genetic counselors in the context of a life-limiting prenatal diagnosis.

  12. Molecular approaches in the prenatal diagnosis and therapy of genetic disorders.

    PubMed

    Myrianthopoulos, N C

    1987-01-01

    During the last decade a new class of DNA markers, the restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs), has been developed by molecular genetic techniques. Genetic linkage studies using RFLPs have resulted in a large number of chromosome assignments of genes, making possible prenatal diagnosis and presymptomatic testing in many genetic disorders. Even so, of the estimated 100,000 genes that comprise the human genome fewer than 2,000, or 2%, have been mapped. Studies of the molecular basis of some of these mutant genes have brought to light a remarkable multiplicity and diversity of mutations that produce relatively few clinical phenotypes. Many genetic disorders including the thalassemias, familial hypercholesterolemia, Tay-Sachs disease, cystic fibrosis, and congenital adrenal hyperplasia, have been shown to be genetically heterogeneous. It is necessary, therefore, to know the precise mutation in order to make accurate diagnosis and restore proper enzyme or gene function.

  13. Usher syndrome: an effective sequencing approach to establish a genetic and clinical diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Lenarduzzi, S; Vozzi, D; Morgan, A; Rubinato, E; D'Eustacchio, A; Osland, T M; Rossi, C; Graziano, C; Castorina, P; Ambrosetti, U; Morgutti, M; Girotto, G

    2015-02-01

    Usher syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by retinitis pigmentosa, sensorineural hearing loss and, in some cases, vestibular dysfunction. The disorder is clinically and genetically heterogeneous and, to date, mutations in 11 genes have been described. This finding makes difficult to get a precise molecular diagnosis and offer patients accurate genetic counselling. To overcome this problem and to increase our knowledge of the molecular basis of Usher syndrome, we designed a targeted resequencing custom panel. In a first validation step a series of 16 Italian patients with known molecular diagnosis were analysed and 31 out of 32 alleles were detected (97% of accuracy). After this step, 31 patients without a molecular diagnosis were enrolled in the study. Three out of them with an uncertain Usher diagnosis were excluded. One causative allele was detected in 24 out 28 patients (86%) while the presence of both causative alleles characterized 19 patients out 28 (68%). Sixteen novel and 27 known alleles were found in the following genes: USH2A (50%), MYO7A (7%), CDH23 (11%), PCDH15 (7%) and USH1G (2%). Overall, on the 44 patients the protocol was able to characterize 74 alleles out of 88 (84%). These results suggest that our panel is an effective approach for the genetic diagnosis of Usher syndrome leading to: 1) an accurate molecular diagnosis, 2) better genetic counselling, 3) more precise molecular epidemiology data fundamental for future interventional plans.

  14. Targeted massively parallel sequencing provides comprehensive genetic diagnosis for patients with disorders of sex development.

    PubMed

    Arboleda, V A; Lee, H; Sánchez, F J; Délot, E C; Sandberg, D E; Grody, W W; Nelson, S F; Vilain, E

    2013-01-01

    Disorders of sex development (DSD) are rare disorders in which there is discordance between chromosomal, gonadal, and phenotypic sex. Only a minority of patients clinically diagnosed with DSD obtains a molecular diagnosis, leaving a large gap in our understanding of the prevalence, management, and outcomes in affected patients. We created a novel DSD-genetic diagnostic tool, in which sex development genes are captured using RNA probes and undergo massively parallel sequencing. In the pilot group of 14 patients, we determined sex chromosome dosage, copy number variation, and gene mutations. In the patients with a known genetic diagnosis (obtained either on a clinical or research basis), this test identified the molecular cause in 100% (7/7) of patients. In patients in whom no molecular diagnosis had been made, this tool identified a genetic diagnosis in two of seven patients. Targeted sequencing of genes representing a specific spectrum of disorders can result in a higher rate of genetic diagnoses than current diagnostic approaches. Our DSD diagnostic tool provides for first time, in a single blood test, a comprehensive genetic diagnosis in patients presenting with a wide range of urogenital anomalies.

  15. Targeted exome sequencing resolves allelic and the genetic heterogeneity in the genetic diagnosis of nephronophthisis-related ciliopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hee Gyung; Lee, Hyun Kyung; Ahn, Yo Han; Joung, Je-Gun; Nam, Jaeyong; Kim, Nayoung K D; Ko, Jung Min; Cho, Min Hyun; Shin, Jae Il; Kim, Joon; Park, Hye Won; Park, Young Seo; Ha, Il-Soo; Chung, Woo Yeong; Lee, Dae-Yeol; Kim, Su Young; Park, Woong Yang; Cheong, Hae Il

    2016-01-01

    Nephronophthisis-related ciliopathy (NPHP-RC) is a common genetic cause of end-stage renal failure during childhood and adolescence and exhibits an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance. Genetic diagnosis is quite limited owing to genetic heterogeneity in NPHP-RC. We designed a novel approach involving the step-wise screening of Sanger sequencing and targeted exome sequencing for the genetic diagnosis of 55 patients with NPHP-RC. First, five NPHP-RC genes were analyzed by Sanger sequencing in phenotypically classified patients. Known pathogenic mutations were identified in 12 patients (21.8%); homozygous deletions of NPHP1 in 4 juvenile nephronophthisis patients, IQCB1/NPHP5 mutations in 3 Senior–Løken syndrome patients, a CEP290/NPHP6 mutation in 1 Joubert syndrome patient, and TMEM67/MKS3 mutations in 4 Joubert syndrome patients with liver involvement. In the remaining undiagnosed patients, we applied targeted exome sequencing of 34 ciliopathy-related genes to detect known pathogenic mutations in 7 (16.3%) of 43 patients. Another 18 likely damaging heterozygous variants were identified in 13 NPHP-RC genes in 18 patients. In this study, we report a variety of pathogenic and candidate mutations identified in 55 patients with NPHP-RC in Korea using a step-wise application of two genetic tests. These results support the clinical utility of targeted exome sequencing to resolve the issue of allelic and genetic heterogeneity in NPHP-RC. PMID:27491411

  16. An automated diagnosis system of liver disease using artificial immune and genetic algorithms.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chunlin; Peng, Lingxi

    2013-04-01

    The rise of health care cost is one of the world's most important problems. Disease prediction is also a vibrant research area. Researchers have approached this problem using various techniques such as support vector machine, artificial neural network, etc. This study typically exploits the immune system's characteristics of learning and memory to solve the problem of liver disease diagnosis. The proposed system applies a combination of two methods of artificial immune and genetic algorithm to diagnose the liver disease. The system architecture is based on artificial immune system. The learning procedure of system adopts genetic algorithm to interfere the evolution of antibody population. The experiments use two benchmark datasets in our study, which are acquired from the famous UCI machine learning repository. The obtained diagnosis accuracies are very promising with regard to the other diagnosis system in the literatures. These results suggest that this system may be a useful automatic diagnosis tool for liver disease.

  17. Current issues in medically assisted reproduction and genetics in Europe: research, clinical practice, ethics, legal issues and policy. European Society of Human Genetics and European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology.

    PubMed

    Harper, Joyce C; Geraedts, Joep; Borry, Pascal; Cornel, Martina C; Dondorp, Wybo; Gianaroli, Luca; Harton, Gary; Milachich, Tanya; Kääriäinen, Helena; Liebaers, Inge; Morris, Michael; Sequeiros, Jorge; Sermon, Karen; Shenfield, Françoise; Skirton, Heather; Soini, Sirpa; Spits, Claudia; Veiga, Anna; Vermeesch, Joris Robert; Viville, Stéphane; de Wert, Guido; Macek, Milan

    2013-11-01

    In March 2005, a group of experts from the European Society of Human Genetics and European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology met to discuss the interface between genetics and assisted reproductive technology (ART), and published an extended background paper, recommendations and two Editorials. Seven years later, in March 2012, a follow-up interdisciplinary workshop was held, involving representatives of both professional societies, including experts from the European Union Eurogentest2 Coordination Action Project. The main goal of this meeting was to discuss developments at the interface between clinical genetics and ARTs. As more genetic causes of reproductive failure are now recognised and an increasing number of patients undergo testing of their genome before conception, either in regular health care or in the context of direct-to-consumer testing, the need for genetic counselling and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) may increase. Preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) thus far does not have evidence from randomised clinical trials to substantiate that the technique is both effective and efficient. Whole-genome sequencing may create greater challenges both in the technological and interpretational domains, and requires further reflection about the ethics of genetic testing in ART and PGD/PGS. Diagnostic laboratories should be reporting their results according to internationally accepted accreditation standards (International Standards Organisation - ISO 15189). Further studies are needed in order to address issues related to the impact of ART on epigenetic reprogramming of the early embryo. The legal landscape regarding assisted reproduction is evolving but still remains very heterogeneous and often contradictory. The lack of legal harmonisation and uneven access to infertility treatment and PGD/PGS fosters considerable cross-border reproductive care in Europe and beyond. The aim of this paper is to complement previous publications and provide

  18. Current issues in medically assisted reproduction and genetics in Europe: research, clinical practice, ethics, legal issues and policy

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Joyce C; Geraedts, Joep; Borry, Pascal; Cornel, Martina C; Dondorp, Wybo; Gianaroli, Luca; Harton, Gary; Milachich, Tanya; Kääriäinen, Helena; Liebaers, Inge; Morris, Michael; Sequeiros, Jorge; Sermon, Karen; Shenfield, Françoise; Skirton, Heather; Soini, Sirpa; Spits, Claudia; Veiga, Anna; Vermeesch, Joris Robert; Viville, Stéphane; de Wert, Guido; Macek, Milan

    2013-01-01

    In March 2005, a group of experts from the European Society of Human Genetics and European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology met to discuss the interface between genetics and assisted reproductive technology (ART), and published an extended background paper, recommendations and two Editorials. Seven years later, in March 2012, a follow-up interdisciplinary workshop was held, involving representatives of both professional societies, including experts from the European Union Eurogentest2 Coordination Action Project. The main goal of this meeting was to discuss developments at the interface between clinical genetics and ARTs. As more genetic causes of reproductive failure are now recognised and an increasing number of patients undergo testing of their genome before conception, either in regular health care or in the context of direct-to-consumer testing, the need for genetic counselling and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) may increase. Preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) thus far does not have evidence from randomised clinical trials to substantiate that the technique is both effective and efficient. Whole-genome sequencing may create greater challenges both in the technological and interpretational domains, and requires further reflection about the ethics of genetic testing in ART and PGD/PGS. Diagnostic laboratories should be reporting their results according to internationally accepted accreditation standards (International Standards Organisation – ISO 15189). Further studies are needed in order to address issues related to the impact of ART on epigenetic reprogramming of the early embryo. The legal landscape regarding assisted reproduction is evolving but still remains very heterogeneous and often contradictory. The lack of legal harmonisation and uneven access to infertility treatment and PGD/PGS fosters considerable cross-border reproductive care in Europe and beyond. The aim of this paper is to complement previous publications and

  19. Hereditary palmoplantar keratoderma "clinical and genetic differential diagnosis".

    PubMed

    Sakiyama, Tomo; Kubo, Akiharu

    2016-03-01

    Hereditary palmoplantar keratoderma (PPK) is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by hyperkeratosis of the palm and the sole skin. Hereditary PPK are divided into four groups--diffuse, focal, striate and punctate PPK--according to the clinical patterns of the hyperkeratotic lesions. Each group includes simple PPK, without associated features, and PPK with associated features, such as involvement of nails, teeth and other organs. PPK have been classified by a clinically based descriptive system. In recent years, many causative genes of PPK have been identified, which has confirmed and/or rearranged the traditional classifications. It is now important to diagnose PPK by a combination of the traditional morphological classification and genetic testing. In this review, we focus on PPK without associated features and introduce their morphological features, genetic backgrounds and new findings from the last decade.

  20. Genetic Diagnosis Using Whole Exome Sequencing in Common Variable Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Maffucci, Patrick; Filion, Charles A.; Boisson, Bertrand; Itan, Yuval; Shang, Lei; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Whole exome sequencing (WES) has proven an effective tool for the discovery of genetic defects in patients with primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs). However, success in dissecting the genetic etiology of common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) has been limited. We outline a practical framework for using WES to identify causative genetic defects in these subjects. WES was performed on 50 subjects diagnosed with CVID who had at least one of the following criteria: early onset, autoimmune/inflammatory manifestations, low B lymphocytes, and/or familial history of hypogammaglobulinemia. Following alignment and variant calling, exomes were screened for mutations in 269 PID-causing genes. Variants were filtered based on the mode of inheritance and reported frequency in the general population. Each variant was assessed by study of familial segregation and computational predictions of deleteriousness. Out of 433 variations in PID-associated genes, we identified 17 probable disease-causing mutations in 15 patients (30%). These variations were rare or private and included monoallelic mutations in NFKB1, STAT3, CTLA4, PIK3CD, and IKZF1, and biallelic mutations in LRBA and STXBP2. Forty-two other damaging variants were found but were not considered likely disease-causing based on the mode of inheritance and/or patient phenotype. WES combined with analysis of PID-associated genes is a cost-effective approach to identify disease-causing mutations in CVID patients with severe phenotypes and was successful in 30% of our cohort. As targeted therapeutics are becoming the mainstay of treatment for non-infectious manifestations in CVID, this approach will improve management of patients with more severe phenotypes. PMID:27379089

  1. Small Ruminant Lentiviruses: Genetic Variability, Tropism and Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, Hugo; Reina, Ramsés; Amorena, Beatriz; de Andrés, Damián; Martínez, Humberto A.

    2013-01-01

    Small ruminant lentiviruses (SRLV) cause a multisystemic chronic disease affecting animal production and welfare. SRLV infections are spread across the world with the exception of Iceland. Success in controlling SRLV spread depends largely on the use of appropriate diagnostic tools, but the existence of a high genetic/antigenic variability among these viruses, the fluctuant levels of antibody against them and the low viral loads found in infected individuals hamper the diagnostic efficacy. SRLV have a marked in vivo tropism towards the monocyte/macrophage lineage and attempts have been made to identify the genome regions involved in tropism, with two main candidates, the LTR and env gene, since LTR contains primer binding sites for viral replication and the env-encoded protein (SU ENV), which mediates the binding of the virus to the host’s cell and has hypervariable regions to escape the humoral immune response. Once inside the host cell, innate immunity may interfere with SRLV replication, but the virus develops counteraction mechanisms to escape, multiply and survive, creating a quasi-species and undergoing compartmentalization events. So far, the mechanisms of organ tropism involved in the development of different disease forms (neurological, arthritic, pulmonary and mammary) are unknown, but different alternatives are proposed. This is an overview of the current state of knowledge on SRLV genetic variability and its implications in tropism as well as in the development of alternative diagnostic assays. PMID:23611847

  2. New advances of preimplantation and prenatal genetic screening and noninvasive testing as a potential predictor of health status of babies.

    PubMed

    Milachich, Tanya

    2014-01-01

    The current morphologically based selection of human embryos for transfer cannot detect chromosome aneuploidies. So far, only biopsy techniques have been able to screen for chromosomal aneuploidies in the in vitro fertilization (IVF) embryos. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) or screening (PGS) involves the biopsy of oocyte polar bodies or embryonic cells and has become a routine clinical procedure in many IVF clinics worldwide, including recent development of comprehensive chromosome screening of all 23 pairs of chromosomes by microarrays for aneuploidy screening. The routine preimplantation and prenatal genetic diagnosis (PND) require testing in an aggressive manner. These procedures may be invasive to the growing embryo and fetus and potentially could compromise the clinical outcome. Therefore the aim of this review is to summarize not only the new knowledge on preimplantation and prenatal genetic diagnosis in humans, but also on the development of potential noninvasive embryo and fetal testing that might play an important role in the future.

  3. Automated Test Assembly for Cognitive Diagnosis Models Using a Genetic Algorithm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkelman, Matthew; Kim, Wonsuk; Roussos, Louis A.

    2009-01-01

    Much recent psychometric literature has focused on cognitive diagnosis models (CDMs), a promising class of instruments used to measure the strengths and weaknesses of examinees. This article introduces a genetic algorithm to perform automated test assembly alongside CDMs. The algorithm is flexible in that it can be applied whether the goal is to…

  4. Ethical challenges in assisted reproduction: the place of preimplantation genetic diagnosis in a just society.

    PubMed

    Whetstine, Leslie M

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of preimplantation genetic diagnosis and identify the relevant moral questions it raises. In the course of this discussion, the scope of parental rights and the inherent difficulty in defining disease/disability will be considered.

  5. Narrative review: harnessing molecular genetics for the diagnosis and management of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Libin; Seidman, Jonathan G; Seidman, Christine E

    2010-04-20

    Unexplained cardiac hypertrophy, the diagnostic criterion for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), occurs in 1 in 500 adults. Insights into the genetic cause and molecular pathophysiology of HCM are reshaping clinical paradigms for diagnosis and treatment of this common myocardial disorder. Human genetic studies have established that dominant mutations in the proteins that make up the contractile apparatus (the sarcomere) cause HCM. With the current availability of clinical gene-based diagnostics, pathogenic mutations in affected patients can be defined, which can suggest a clinical course and allow definitive preclinical identification of family members at risk for HCM. Genetic discoveries have also fostered mechanistic investigations in model organisms that are engineered to carry human HCM mutations. Novel therapeutic targets have emerged from these fundamental studies and are currently under clinical assessment in humans. The combination of contemporary gene-based diagnosis with new strategies to attenuate disease development and progression is changing the natural history of lifelong cardiac symptoms, arrhythmias, and heart failure from HCM.

  6. Role of molecular genetics in transforming diagnosis of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Molven, Anders; Njølstad, Pål R

    2011-04-01

    Most common diseases also run in families as rare, monogenic forms. Diabetes is no exception. Mutations in approximately 20 different genes are now known to cause monogenic diabetes, a disease group that can be subclassified into maturity-onset diabetes of the young, neonatal diabetes and mitochondrial diabetes. In some families, additional features, such as urogenital malformations, exocrine pancreatic dysfunction and neurological abnormalities, are present and may aid the diagnostic classification. The finding of a mutation in monogenic diabetes may have implications for the prediction of prognosis and choice of treatment. Mutations in the GCK gene cause a mild form of diabetes, which seldom needs insulin and has a low risk for complications. By contrast, HNF1A mutations lead to a diabetes form that in severity, treatment and complication risk resembles Type 1 diabetes, although these patients may experience a good effect of sulfonylurea treatment. The majority of neonatal diabetes cases are caused by mutations in the K(ATP) channel genes ABCC8 and KCNJ11, and sulfonylurea therapy is then usually superior to insulin. Diseases with a considerable genetic component may now be explored by genome-wide approaches using next-generation DNA sequencing technology. We expect that within a few years important breakthroughs will be made in mapping cases of diabetes with a suspected, but still unsolved monogenic basis.

  7. [Diagnosis of MDS: morphology, chromosome abnormalities and genetic mutations].

    PubMed

    Hata, Tomoko

    2015-10-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a group of hematological neoplasms associated with ineffective hematopoiesis and that can transform into acute leukemia. The clinical classification of MDS which is defined by cytopenia, the rate of blasts in peripheral blood and bone marrow, dysplasia, and chromosomal abnormalities, has undergone continuous revision. To increase the accuracy of dysplastic evaluation, IWGM-MDS and the Research Committee for Idiopathic Hematopoietic Disorders, Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, Japan have proposed a quantitative and qualitative definition of dysplasia. Recently, refining the definition of dysgranulopoiesis was proposed by IWGM-MDS. Neutrophils with abnormal clumping of chromatin, and harboring more than 4 nuclear projections, were recognized as dysplastic features. At present, karyotypic abnormalities are detected in approximately 50% of de novo MDS and these remain the most critical prognostic factor. In the new cytogenetic scoring system, cytogenetic abnormalities were classified into five prognostic subgroups. This new classification was adopted by the revised IPSS. Approximately 80% to 90% of MDS patients have detectable mutations by whole-exon sequencing or whole genome sequencing. Many genetic mutations had biological and prognostic significance. It is important to further understand the utility of this factor in determining prognosis and in selecting among therapeutic options.

  8. Genetic diagnosis of patients with esophageal cancer using FISH.

    PubMed

    Awut, Idiris; Niyaz, Madiniyet; Huizhong, Xie; Biekemitoufu, Hadeti; Yan, Zhang Hong; Zhu, Zhang; Sheyhedin, Ilyar; Changmin, Zhang; Wei, Zhangli; Hao, Wen

    2010-09-01

    This study aimed to the clarify the diagnostic efficacy of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in Kazakh patients with esophageal cancer (EC). FISH was compared with the pathological examination of biopsy specimens with DNA probes. We enrolled 20 patients, of which 15 were males and 5 females, with an average age of 58.3 years, who had abnormal esophaguses on barium radiological digital imaging. Touch preparations were performed on biopsy specimens from all of the patients and were examined using FISH for chromosomal abnormalities. We compared the FISH results with the pathology slides stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Classification, according to pathology, identified 2 cases of class II, 3 cases of IIIa, 1 case of IIIb, 2 cases of IV, 12 cases of class V and no cases of class I. The cases classified as class IIIb or higher were considered to be positive for cancer. Using histopathology, 10 cases were diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma and 5 were diagnosed as adenocarcinoma, with one case being false-negative. Thus, the sensitivity of the pathological examination was 93% and the specificity was 100%. Using FISH, 16 cases showed aberrant copy numbers in either chromosome 3 or 17. By comparison, pathology did not reveal any false-positive or false-negative cases with a sensitivity and specificity of 100%. The centromeres of chromosome 3 copy numbers was significantly higher (p=0.035) than the centromeres of chromosome 17. Our study compared FISH to diagnose aneusomic esophageal cancer cells with the pathology of biopsied tissue. Our findings suggest that FISH is a useful and objective assay for the detection of malignant cells of esophageal cancer. In our study, the centromeres of chromosome 3 was the more sensitive probe for the diagnosis of esophageal cancer in Kazakh patients.

  9. Clinical findings and diagnosis in genetic prion diseases in Germany.

    PubMed

    Krasnianski, Anna; Heinemann, Uta; Ponto, Claudia; Kortt, Jasmine; Kallenberg, Kai; Varges, Daniela; Schulz-Schaeffer, Walter J; Kretzschmar, Hans A; Zerr, Inga

    2016-02-01

    To describe the clinical syndrome and diagnostic tests in patients with genetic prion diseases (gPD) in Germany. Clinical features, MRI, EEG, and CSF markers were studied in 91 patients (28 D178N, 20 E200K, 17 inserts, 13 V210I, 8 P102L, 5 E196K). Dementia (35 %) and ataxia (29 %) were the most common initial symptoms and signs. A wide variety and high frequency of neurological/psychiatric symptoms and signs was found during disease course in all patients independently of the type of the mutation. Psychiatric manifestations were frequent (87 %). Neuropsychological abnormalities were observed in 67 %, and aphasia was the most common disturbance (45 %). In E200K, V210I and D178N patients, visual/oculomotor deficits were followed by ataxia early in the disease. Dementia followed by ataxia at onset was common in patients with insert and E196K mutation. P102L patients had isolated ataxia over a longer time period followed by pyramidal signs. Dementia was present only late in the disease course. All clinical routine tests such as MRI, EEG and CSF tests were less sensitive than in sporadic CJD. We provide the first detailed analysis of clinical signs and symptoms in a large group of patients with gPD. Frequency of clinical symptoms and signs was similar in different mutations in a later disease course, but the sequence of occurrence may be of great diagnostic importance. CSF markers were shown to be more sensitive than MRI and EEG.

  10. Integration of PGD-virtual charts into an engineering design process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courard, Amaury; Néron, David; Ladevèze, Pierre; Ballere, Ludovic

    2016-04-01

    This article deals with the efficient construction of approximations of fields and quantities of interest used in geometric optimisation of complex shapes that can be encountered in engineering structures. The strategy, which is developed herein, is based on the construction of virtual charts that allow, once computed offline, to optimise the structure for a negligible online CPU cost. These virtual charts can be used as a powerful numerical decision support tool during the design of industrial structures. They are built using the proper generalized decomposition (PGD) that offers a very convenient framework to solve parametrised problems. In this paper, particular attention has been paid to the integration of the procedure into a genuine engineering design process. In particular, a dedicated methodology is proposed to interface the PGD approach with commercial software.

  11. [Prenatal diagnosis. I: Prenatal diagnosis program at the Medical Genetics Unit of the Universidad de Zulia, Maracaibo, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Prieto-Carrasquero, M; Molero, A; Carrasquero, N; Paz, V; González, S; Pineda-Del Villar, L; Del Villar, A; Rojas-Atencio, A; Quintero, M; Fulcado, W; Mena, R; Morales-Machin, A

    1998-06-01

    The Prenatal Diagnosis Program of the Medical Genetic Unit of University of Zulia has the following objectives: Identification of Genetic Risk Factors (GRF) in those couples who attend to the Prenatal Genetic Clinic, application of different prenatal diagnostic procedures (PDP), and providing adequate genetic counseling. The goal of this paper is to show preliminary results obtained between January 1993 and December 1996. Three hundred and twenty one pregnant women were analyzed by determining the GRF and taking into account the genetic clinical history. The GRF analyzed were: Advanced maternal age (AMA), congenital malformation history (CMH), previous child with chromosomic anomalies (PCCA), defects of neural tube history (DNTH), congenital heart disease history (CHDH), any parent carrier of chromosomic anomaly (PCA), habitual abortion (HA), abnormal fetal echography (AFE), altered maternal serum levels of alpha-feto-protein (AMSAFP) and OTHERS: exposure to teratogenic agents, history of Mendelian diseases, maternal systemic diseases and anxiety in the mother or in her partner. The PDP was designed according to the GRF, which included fetal echography (FE), fetal echocardiography (FEc), amniocentesis (AMN), chordocentesis (CCT) and AMSAFP. Results showed that 58.4% of the expectant mothers asked for counseling during the 2nd trimester, 70% of the total showed only one GRF, and AMA was the most frequent GRF found (40.3%), followed by PCCA, AFE, CHDH, HA, DNTH, PCA, and OTHERS in that order. The specific PDP applied to the identified GRF allowed a health evaluation of the fetus. The GRF identification gave the opportunity of establishing a Prenatal Diagnostic Program producing a response to the couple's needs and showed the utility of an integral and multidisciplinary management directed to any expecting mother in order to identify any high GRF.

  12. A clinical approach to the diagnosis of patients with leukodystrophies and genetic leukoencephelopathies

    PubMed Central

    Leventer, Richard J.; van der Knaap, Marjo S.; van Hove, Johan; Pizzino, Amy; McNeill, Nathan H.; Helman, Guy; Simons, Cas; Schmidt, Johanna L.; Rizzo, William B.

    2015-01-01

    Leukodystrophies (LD) and genetic leukoencephalopathies (gLE) are disorders that result in white matter abnormalities in the central nervous system (CNS). Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (MRI) has dramatically improved and systematized the diagnosis of LDs and gLEs, and in combination with specific clinical features, such as Addison's disease in Adrenoleukodystrophy or hypodontia in Pol-III related or 4H leukodystrophy, can often resolve a case with a minimum of testing. The diagnostic odyssey for the majority LD and gLE patients, however, remains extensive – many patients will wait nearly a decade for a definitive diagnosis and at least half will remain unresolved. The combination of MRI, careful clinical evaluation and next generation genetic sequencing holds promise for both expediting the diagnostic process and dramatically reducing the number of unresolved cases. Here we present a workflow detailing the Global Leukodystrophy Initiative (GLIA) consensus recommendations for an approach to clinical diagnosis, including salient clinical features suggesting a specific diagnosis, neuroim-aging features and molecular genetic testing. We also discuss recommendations on the use of broad-spectrum next-generation sequencing in instances of ambiguous MRI or clinical findings. We conclude with a proposal for systematic trials of genome-wide agnostic testing as a first line diagnostic in LDs and gLEs given the increasing number of genes associated with these disorders. PMID:25655951

  13. Rapid Whole-Genome Sequencing for Genetic Disease Diagnosis in Neonatal Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Carol Jean; Miller, Neil Andrew; Soden, Sarah Elizabeth; Dinwiddie, Darrell Lee; Noll, Aaron; Alnadi, Noor Abu; Andraws, Nevene; Patterson, Melanie LeAnn; Krivohlavek, Lisa Ann; Fellis, Joel; Humphray, Sean; Saffrey, Peter; Kingsbury, Zoya; Weir, Jacqueline Claire; Betley, Jason; Grocock, Russell James; Margulies, Elliott Harrison; Farrow, Emily Gwendolyn; Artman, Michael; Safina, Nicole Pauline; Petrikin, Joshua Erin; Hall, Kevin Peter; Kingsmore, Stephen Francis

    2014-01-01

    Monogenic diseases are frequent causes of neonatal morbidity and mortality, and disease presentations are often undifferentiated at birth. More than 3500 monogenic diseases have been characterized, but clinical testing is available for only some of them and many feature clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Hence, an immense unmet need exists for improved molecular diagnosis in infants. Because disease progression is extremely rapid, albeit heterogeneous, in newborns, molecular diagnoses must occur quickly to be relevant for clinical decision-making. We describe 50-hour differential diagnosis of genetic disorders by whole-genome sequencing (WGS) that features automated bioinformatic analysis and is intended to be a prototype for use in neonatal intensive care units. Retrospective 50-hour WGS identified known molecular diagnoses in two children. Prospective WGS disclosed potential molecular diagnosis of a severe GJB2-related skin disease in one neonate; BRAT1-related lethal neonatal rigidity and multifocal seizure syndrome in another infant; identified BCL9L as a novel, recessive visceral heterotaxy gene (HTX6) in a pedigree; and ruled out known candidate genes in one infant. Sequencing of parents or affected siblings expedited the identification of disease genes in prospective cases. Thus, rapid WGS can potentially broaden and foreshorten differential diagnosis, resulting in fewer empirical treatments and faster progression to genetic and prognostic counseling. PMID:23035047

  14. Genetic testing and counseling in the case of an autism diagnosis: A caregivers perspective.

    PubMed

    Hens, Kristien; Peeters, Hilde; Dierickx, Kris

    2016-09-01

    The search for genes that can explain the development of autism is ongoing. At the same time, genetic counselling and genetic testing can be offered to families with a child diagnosed with autism. However, given the complexity of autism, both with respect to its aetiology as well as with respect to its heterogeneity, such genetic counselling and testing raises specific ethical questions regarding the aim and scope. In order to map these questions and opinions we interviewed 15 Belgian autism professionals. We found that they believed that genetic counselling and genetic testing have certain benefits for families confronted with an autism diagnosis, but also that direct benefit to the child is limited to those cases where a genetic finding offers a certain prognosis and intervention plan. In cases where autism is the result of a syndrome or a known genetic variant that is associated with other health problems, detection can also enable prevention of these health issues. Benefits of genetic testing, such as relief of guilt and reproductive choice, are primarily benefits to the parents, although indirectly they may affect the wellbeing of the person diagnosed. These benefits are associated with ethical questions.

  15. Effect of the PGD2-DP signaling pathway on primary cultured rat hippocampal neuron injury caused by aluminum overload

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jie; Yang, Qunfang; Wei, Yuling; Yang, Yang; Ji, Chaonan; Hu, Xinyue; Mai, Shaoshan; Kuang, Shengnan; Tian, Xiaoyan; Luo, Ying; Liang, Guojuan; Yang, Junqing

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the agonists and antagonists of DP receptor were used to examine whether the PGD2-DP signaling pathway affects neuronal function. Primary cultured hippocampal neuron was prepared and treated with aluminum maltolate (100 μM) to establish the neuronal damage model. PGD2 and cAMP content was detected by ELISA. L-PGDS and DPs mRNA and protein expression were measured by RT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. The aluminium-load neuron was treated with the DP1 agonist BW245C, the DP1 antagonist BWA868C, the DP2 agonist DK-PGD2, and the DP2 antagonist CAY10471, respectively. Neuronal pathomorphology was observed using H-E staining. The cell viability and the lactate dehydrogenase leakage rates of neurons were measured with MTT and LDH kit, respectively. Ca2+ level was detected by Fluo-3/AM. In the model group, the MTT values obviously decreased; LDH leakage rates and PGD2 content increased significantly; L-PGDS, DP1 mRNA and protein expressions increased, and DP2 level decreased. BW245C reduced the Ca2+ fluorescence intensity and protected the neurons. DK-PGD2 increased the intensity of Ca2+ fluorescence, while CAY10471 had the opposite effect. In conclusion, contrary to the effect of DP2, the PGD2-DP1 signaling pathway protects against the primary cultured rat hippocampal neuronal injury caused by aluminum overload. PMID:27089935

  16. Effect of the PGD2-DP signaling pathway on primary cultured rat hippocampal neuron injury caused by aluminum overload.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jie; Yang, Qunfang; Wei, Yuling; Yang, Yang; Ji, Chaonan; Hu, Xinyue; Mai, Shaoshan; Kuang, Shengnan; Tian, Xiaoyan; Luo, Ying; Liang, Guojuan; Yang, Junqing

    2016-04-19

    In the present study, the agonists and antagonists of DP receptor were used to examine whether the PGD2-DP signaling pathway affects neuronal function. Primary cultured hippocampal neuron was prepared and treated with aluminum maltolate (100 μM) to establish the neuronal damage model. PGD2 and cAMP content was detected by ELISA. L-PGDS and DPs mRNA and protein expression were measured by RT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. The aluminium-load neuron was treated with the DP1 agonist BW245C, the DP1 antagonist BWA868C, the DP2 agonist DK-PGD2, and the DP2 antagonist CAY10471, respectively. Neuronal pathomorphology was observed using H-E staining. The cell viability and the lactate dehydrogenase leakage rates of neurons were measured with MTT and LDH kit, respectively. Ca(2+) level was detected by Fluo-3/AM. In the model group, the MTT values obviously decreased; LDH leakage rates and PGD2 content increased significantly; L-PGDS, DP1 mRNA and protein expressions increased, and DP2 level decreased. BW245C reduced the Ca(2+) fluorescence intensity and protected the neurons. DK-PGD2 increased the intensity of Ca(2+) fluorescence, while CAY10471 had the opposite effect. In conclusion, contrary to the effect of DP2, the PGD2-DP1 signaling pathway protects against the primary cultured rat hippocampal neuronal injury caused by aluminum overload.

  17. EMQN best practice guidelines for the molecular genetic diagnosis of hereditary hemochromatosis (HH).

    PubMed

    Porto, Graça; Brissot, Pierre; Swinkels, Dorine W; Zoller, Heinz; Kamarainen, Outi; Patton, Simon; Alonso, Isabel; Morris, Michael; Keeney, Steve

    2016-04-01

    Molecular genetic testing for hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is recognized as a reference test to confirm the diagnosis of suspected HH or to predict its risk. The vast majority (typically >90%) of patients with clinically characterized HH are homozygous for the p.C282Y variant in the HFE gene, referred to as HFE-related HH. Since 1996, HFE genotyping was implemented in diagnostic algorithms for suspected HH, allowing its early diagnosis and prevention. However, the penetrance of disease in p.C282Y homozygotes is incomplete. Hence, homozygosity for p.C282Y is not sufficient to diagnose HH. Neither is p.C282Y homozygosity required for diagnosis as other rare forms of HH exist, generally referred to as non-HFE-related HH. These pose significant challenges when defining criteria for referral, testing protocols, interpretation of test results and reporting practices. We present best practice guidelines for the molecular genetic diagnosis of HH where recommendations are classified, as far as possible, according to the level and strength of evidence. For clarification, the guidelines' recommendations are preceded by a detailed description of the methodology and results obtained with a series of actions taken in order to achieve a wide expert consensus, namely: (i) a survey on the current practices followed by laboratories offering molecular diagnosis of HH; (ii) a systematic literature search focused on some identified controversial topics; (iii) an expert Best Practice Workshop convened to achieve consensus on the practical recommendations included in the guidelines.

  18. EMQN best practice guidelines for the molecular genetic diagnosis of hereditary hemochromatosis (HH)

    PubMed Central

    Porto, Graça; Brissot, Pierre; Swinkels, Dorine W; Zoller, Heinz; Kamarainen, Outi; Patton, Simon; Alonso, Isabel; Morris, Michael; Keeney, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Molecular genetic testing for hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is recognized as a reference test to confirm the diagnosis of suspected HH or to predict its risk. The vast majority (typically >90%) of patients with clinically characterized HH are homozygous for the p.C282Y variant in the HFE gene, referred to as HFE-related HH. Since 1996, HFE genotyping was implemented in diagnostic algorithms for suspected HH, allowing its early diagnosis and prevention. However, the penetrance of disease in p.C282Y homozygotes is incomplete. Hence, homozygosity for p.C282Y is not sufficient to diagnose HH. Neither is p.C282Y homozygosity required for diagnosis as other rare forms of HH exist, generally referred to as non-HFE-related HH. These pose significant challenges when defining criteria for referral, testing protocols, interpretation of test results and reporting practices. We present best practice guidelines for the molecular genetic diagnosis of HH where recommendations are classified, as far as possible, according to the level and strength of evidence. For clarification, the guidelines' recommendations are preceded by a detailed description of the methodology and results obtained with a series of actions taken in order to achieve a wide expert consensus, namely: (i) a survey on the current practices followed by laboratories offering molecular diagnosis of HH; (ii) a systematic literature search focused on some identified controversial topics; (iii) an expert Best Practice Workshop convened to achieve consensus on the practical recommendations included in the guidelines. PMID:26153218

  19. Genetic Heterogeneity of Beta Globin Mutations among Asian-Indians and Importance in Genetic Counselling and Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ravindra; Singh, Kritanjali; Panigrahi, Inusha; Agarwal, Sarita

    2013-01-01

    There are an estimated 45 million carriers of β-thalassemia trait and about 12,000-15,000 infants with β-thalassemia major are born every year in India. Thalassemia major constitutes a significant burden on the health care system. The burden of thalassemia major can be decreased by premarital screening and prenatal diagnosis. The success of prenatal diagnosis requires proper knowledge of spectrum of β-thalassemia mutations. In present study, β-thalassemia mutations were characterized in 300 thalassemia cases from 2007 to 2010 using ARMS-PCR and DNA sequencing. The five most common mutations accounted 78.9% of the studied chromosomes that includes IVS1-5(G>C), Cod 41-42(-TCTT), Cod8-9(+G), Cod16(-C) and 619bp del. Though IVS1-5(G>C) is most common mutation in all the communities, the percentage prevalence were calculated on sub caste basis and found that IVS1-5(G>C) percentage prevalence varied from 25 to 60 in Aroras & Khatris and Thakur respectively. Interestingly Cod41-42(-TCTT) mutation which is the second commonest among the mutations reported was totally absent in Kayasthas and Muslim community. These findings have implications for providing molecular diagnosis, genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis to high risk couples of β-thalassemia.

  20. [Diagnosis, sudden death risk stratification, and treatment of main long QT syndrome molecular-genetic variants].

    PubMed

    Shkol'nikova, M A; Kharlap, M S; Il'darova, R A; Bereznitskaia, V V; Kalinin, L A

    2011-01-01

    Inherited long QT syndrome (LQTS) refers to the primary electrical diseases of the heart. It is characterized by QT prolongation on resting ECG and syncope due to life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. This review focuses on diagnosis, differential diagnosis, risk stratification of sudden cardiac death, and treatment strategy of patients with most prevalent genetic fOrms of LQTS - LQT1, LQT2 and LQT3, which accounted for about 90% of all genetically confirmed cases. Recent advances in understanding of relationship between clinical, electrocardiographic features (on ECG, body surface mapping, stress test) and genetic variants of LQT presented. Characteristics of syncopal events and ECG features of LQTl, LQT2 and LQT3 in the majority of cases are helpful to make an appropriate choice for therapy, even before positive result of molecular genetic testing. Management has focused on the use of beta blockers as first-line treatment and exclusion of triggers of life-threatening arrhythmia which are specific for each molecular-genetic variant. Implantation of cardioverter defibrillator for secondary prevention of sudden death in the high-risk patients or patients with insufficient effect of antiarrhythmic therapy is required.

  1. Gene scene: Earlier, eventually more specific, prenatal genetic diagnosis in realm of possibility

    SciTech Connect

    Randall, T.

    1990-12-26

    A new genetic technique that can amplify the DNA of a single cell has flung open the window of opportunity for prenatal genetic diagnosis to just 3 days after conception, and even to the unfertilized egg. In vitro fertilization (IVF) specialists at the Institute of Obstetrics and Gynecology at London's Postgraduate medical School, Hammersmith Hospital have determined the sex of human embryos at the eight-cell stage of development from five couples at risk for X chromosome-linked diseases. The female embryos, which do not risk inheriting the disease, were then successfully implanted in the uterus and carried to full term.

  2. Diagnosis and management of familial Mediterranean fever: integrating medical genetics in a dedicated interdisciplinary clinic.

    PubMed

    Zadeh, Neda; Getzug, Terri; Grody, Wayne W

    2011-03-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder characterized by recurrent febrile polyserositis, especially prevalent in individuals of Mediterranean descent. Familial Mediterranean fever can have nonspecific manifestations that mimic many common acquired disorders such as infections, acute appendicitis, cholecystitis, and arthritis, which can delay diagnosis for many years and subject patients to extensive evaluations and even unnecessary surgery. Untreated familial Mediterranean fever can result in serious complications such as end-stage renal disease and malabsorption secondary to amyloid deposition in the kidneys and digestive tract, male and female infertility, and growth retardation in children. These significant sequelae, along with the episodic acute attacks, are readily preventable by treatment with oral colchicine and underscore the necessity of early detection and treatment from a medical, psychosocial, and economic standpoint. We describe our comprehensive approach to the accurate diagnosis and effective management of this disorder by means of a dedicated familial Mediterranean fever clinic that incorporates medical genetics on equal footing with general medicine. In addition to providing the clinician with the presenting features of familial Mediterranean fever, methods of diagnosis including molecular testing, and current management based on our extensive experience with hundreds of affected individuals, we also advance this approach as a model for the incorporation of medical genetics practice into the more traditional domains of general medicine.

  3. Advances in molecular identification, taxonomy, genetic variation and diagnosis of Toxocara spp.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Nisbet, Alasdair J; Xu, Min-Jun; Huang, Si-Yang; Li, Ming-Wei; Wang, Chun-Ren; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2012-10-01

    The genus Toxocara contains parasitic nematodes of human and animal health significance, such as Toxocara canis, Toxocara cati and Toxocara vitulorum. T. canis and T. cati are among the most prevalent parasites of dogs and cats with a worldwide distribution. Human infection with T. canis and T. cati, which can cause a number of clinical manifestations such as visceral larva migrans (VLMs), ocular larva migrans (OLMs), eosinophilic meningoencephalitis (EME), covert toxocariasis (CT) and neurotoxocariasis, is considered the most prevalent neglected helminthiasis in industrialized countries. The accurate identification Toxocara spp. and their unequivocal differentiation from each other and from other ascaridoid nematodes causing VLMs and OLMs has important implications for studying their taxonomy, epidemiology, population genetics, diagnosis and control. Due to the limitations of traditional (morphological) approaches for identification and diagnosis of Toxocara spp., PCR-based techniques utilizing a range of genetic markers in the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes have been developed as useful alternative approaches because of their high sensitivity, specificity, rapidity and utility. In this article, we summarize the current state of knowledge and advances in molecular identification, taxonomy, genetic variation and diagnosis of Toxocara spp. with prospects for further studies.

  4. High resolution melting: improvements in the genetic diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a Portuguese cohort

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a complex myocardial disorder with a recognized genetic heterogeneity. The elevated number of genes and mutations involved in HCM limits a gene-based diagnosis that should be considered of most importance for basic research and clinical medicine. Methodology In this report, we evaluated High Resolution Melting (HRM) robustness, regarding HCM genetic testing, by means of analyzing 28 HCM-associated genes, including the most frequent 4 HCM-associated sarcomere genes, as well as 24 genes with lower reported HCM-phenotype association. We analyzed 80 Portuguese individuals with clinical phenotype of HCM allowing simultaneously a better characterization of this disease in the Portuguese population. Results HRM technology allowed us to identify 60 mutated alleles in 72 HCM patients: 49 missense mutations, 3 nonsense mutations, one 1-bp deletion, one 5-bp deletion, one in frame 3-bp deletion, one insertion/deletion, 3 splice mutations, one 5'UTR mutation in MYH7, MYBPC3, TNNT2, TNNI3, CSRP3, MYH6 and MYL2 genes. Significantly 22 are novel gene mutations. Conclusions HRM was proven to be a technique with high sensitivity and a low false positive ratio allowing a rapid, innovative and low cost genotyping of HCM. In a short return, HRM as a gene scanning technique could be a cost-effective gene-based diagnosis for an accurate HCM genetic diagnosis and hopefully providing new insights into genotype/phenotype correlations. PMID:22429680

  5. Genetic Diagnosis of Two Dopa-Responsive Dystonia Families by Exome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhan-fang; Zhang, Yu-han; Guo, Ji-feng; Sun, Qi-ying; Mei, Jun-pu; Zhou, Han-lin; Guan, Li-ping; Tian, Jin-yong; Hu, Zheng-mao; Li, Jia-da; Xia, Kun; Yan, Xin-xiang; Tang, Bei-sha

    2014-01-01

    Dopa-responsive dystonia, a rare disorder typically presenting in early childhood with lower limb dystonia and gait abnormality, responds well to levodopa. However, it is often misdiagnosed with the wide spectrum of phenotypes. By exome sequencing, we make a rapid genetic diagnosis for two atypical dopa-responsive dystonia pedigrees. One pedigree, presented with prominent parkinsonism, was misdiagnosed as Parkinson's disease until a known mutation in GCH1 (GTP cyclohydrolase 1) gene (NM_000161.2: c.631_632delAT, p.Met211ValfsX38) was found. The other pedigree was detected with a new compound heterozygous mutation in TH (tyrosine hydroxylase) gene [(NM_000360.3: c.911C>T, p.Ala304Val) and (NM_000360.3: c.1358G>A, p.Arg453His)], whose proband, a pregnant woman, required a rapid and less-biased genetic diagnosis. In conclusion, we demonstrated that exome sequencing could provide a precise and rapid genetic testing in the diagnosis of Mendelian diseases, especially for diseases with wide phenotypes. PMID:25181484

  6. Genetic Testing as a New Standard for Clinical Diagnosis of Color Vision Deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Davidoff, Candice; Neitz, Maureen; Neitz, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The genetics underlying inherited color vision deficiencies is well understood: causative mutations change the copy number or sequence of the long (L), middle (M), or short (S) wavelength sensitive cone opsin genes. This study evaluated the potential of opsin gene analyses for use in clinical diagnosis of color vision defects. Methods We tested 1872 human subjects using direct sequencing of opsin genes and a novel genetic assay that characterizes single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using the MassArray system. Of the subjects, 1074 also were given standard psychophysical color vision tests for a direct comparison with current clinical methods. Results Protan and deutan deficiencies were classified correctly in all subjects identified by MassArray as having red–green defects. Estimates of defect severity based on SNPs that control photopigment spectral tuning correlated with estimates derived from Nagel anomaloscopy. Conclusions The MassArray assay provides genetic information that can be useful in the diagnosis of inherited color vision deficiency including presence versus absence, type, and severity, and it provides information to patients about the underlying pathobiology of their disease. Translational Relevance The MassArray assay provides a method that directly analyzes the molecular substrates of color vision that could be used in combination with, or as an alternative to current clinical diagnosis of color defects. PMID:27622081

  7. Fusion of qualitative bond graph and genetic algorithms: a fault diagnosis application.

    PubMed

    Lo, C H; Wong, Y K; Rad, A B; Chow, K M

    2002-10-01

    In this paper, the problem of fault diagnosis via integration of genetic algorithms (GA's) and qualitative bond graphs (QBG's) is addressed. We suggest that GA's can be used to search for possible fault components among a system of qualitative equations. The QBG is adopted as the modeling scheme to generate a set of qualitative equations. The qualitative bond graph provides a unified approach for modeling engineering systems, in particular, mechatronic systems. In order to demonstrate the performance of the proposed algorithm, we have tested the proposed algorithm on an in-house designed and built floating disc experimental setup. Results from fault diagnosis in the floating disc system are presented and discussed. Additional measurements will be required to localize the fault when more than one fault candidate is inferred. Fault diagnosis is activated by a fault detection mechanism when a discrepancy between measured abnormal behavior and predicted system behavior is observed. The fault detection mechanism is not presented here.

  8. Marked overlap of four genetic syndromes with dyskeratosis congenita confounds clinical diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Walne, Amanda J.; Collopy, Laura; Cardoso, Shirleny; Ellison, Alicia; Plagnol, Vincent; Albayrak, Canan; Albayrak, Davut; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; Patıroglu, Turkan; Akar, Haluk; Godfrey, Keith; Carter, Tina; Marafie, Makia; Vora, Ajay; Sundin, Mikael; Vulliamy, Thomas; Tummala, Hemanth; Dokal, Inderjeet

    2016-01-01

    Dyskeratosis congenita is a highly pleotropic genetic disorder. This heterogeneity can lead to difficulties in making an accurate diagnosis and delays in appropriate management. The aim of this study was to determine the underlying genetic basis in patients presenting with features of dyskeratosis congenita and who were negative for mutations in the classical dyskeratosis congenita genes. By whole exome and targeted sequencing, we identified biallelic variants in genes that are not associated with dyskeratosis congenita in 17 individuals from 12 families. Specifically, these were homozygous variants in USB1 (8 families), homozygous missense variants in GRHL2 (2 families) and identical compound heterozygous variants in LIG4 (2 families). All patients had multiple somatic features of dyskeratosis congenita but not the characteristic short telomeres. Our case series shows that biallelic variants in USB1, LIG4 and GRHL2, the genes mutated in poikiloderma with neutropenia, LIG4/Dubowitz syndrome and the recently recognized ectodermal dysplasia/short stature syndrome, respectively, cause features that overlap with dyskeratosis congenita. Strikingly, these genes also overlap in their biological function with the known dyskeratosis congenita genes that are implicated in telomere maintenance and DNA repair pathways. Collectively, these observations demonstrate the marked overlap of dyskeratosis congenita with four other genetic syndromes, confounding accurate diagnosis and subsequent management. This has important implications for establishing a genetic diagnosis when a new patient presents in the clinic. Patients with clinical features of dyskeratosis congenita need to have genetic analysis of USB1, LIG4 and GRHL2 in addition to the classical dyskeratosis congenita genes and telomere length measurements. PMID:27612988

  9. Reproductive decisions after prenatal diagnosis in neurofibromatosis type 1: importance of genetic counseling.

    PubMed

    Terzi, Y K; Oguzkan-Balci, S; Anlar, B; Aysun, S; Guran, S; Ayter, S

    2009-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is one of the most common autosomal dominant disorders affecting approximately 1/3500 individuals in all ethnic groups. It is characterized by cutaneous and plexiform neurofibromas, café-au-lait spots, Lisch nodules, freckling in axillary and inguinal regions, optic gliomas and an increased risk of malignancy. The mutation rate of NF1 is one of the highest known for human disorders: approximately 50% of all affected individuals carry de novo mutations. Detection of disease causing mutations in the NF1 gene allows presymptomatic and prenatal diagnosis, but is complex and time-consuming due to the large size of the gene, the existence of pseudogenes, the lack of clustering of the mutations in a particular region of the gene, and the variability of clinical findings. Because the time for investigations in prenatal diagnosis is restricted, detection of disease-associated NF1 alleles is more rapid and useful especially for familial cases. Therefore, genetic diagnosis of NF1 is frequently performed by linkage analysis. In our laboratory, 37 families were characterized with this method, of which two requested prenatal diagnosis. One fetus was found to be under NF1 risk. However, parents elected to continue pregnancy: the child is now 2.5 years old and has NF1 features. The phenotypic variability and the absence of genotype-phenotype correlation create difficulties in reproductive decisions for NF1 families, underlining the importance of appropriate counseling and detailed discussion of possible outcomes before genetic testing of the fetus.

  10. Pitfalls in the molecular genetic diagnosis of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON)

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, D.R. ); Neufeld, M.J. )

    1993-10-01

    Pathogenetic mutations in mtDNA are found in the majority of patients with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), and molecular genetic techniques to detect them are important for diagnosis. A false-positive molecular genetic error has adverse consequences for the diagnosis of this maternally inherited disease. The authors found a number of mtDNA polymorphisms that occur adjacent to known LHON-associated mutations and that confound their molecular genetic detection. These transition mutations occur at mtDNA nt 11779 (SfaNI site loss, 11778 mutation), nt 3459 (BsaHI site loss, 3460 mutation), nt 15258 (AccI site loss, 15257 mutation), nt 14485 (mismatch primer Sau3AI site loss, 14484 mutation), and nt 13707 (BstNI site loss, 13708 mutation). Molecular genetic detection of the most common pathogenetic mtDNA mutations in LHON, using a single restriction enzyme, may be confounded by adjacent polymorphisms that occur with a false-positive rate of 2%-7%. 19 refs.

  11. Improved inherited peripheral neuropathy genetic diagnosis by whole-exome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Drew, Alexander P; Zhu, Danqing; Kidambi, Aditi; Ly, Carolyn; Tey, Shelisa; Brewer, Megan H; Ahmad-Annuar, Azlina; Nicholson, Garth A; Kennerson, Marina L

    2015-01-01

    Inherited peripheral neuropathies (IPNs) are a group of related diseases primarily affecting the peripheral motor and sensory neurons. They include the hereditary sensory neuropathies (HSN), hereditary motor neuropathies (HMN), and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT). Using whole-exome sequencing (WES) to achieve a genetic diagnosis is particularly suited to IPNs, where over 80 genes are involved with weak genotype–phenotype correlations beyond the most common genes. We performed WES for 110 index patients with IPN where the genetic cause was undetermined after previous screening for mutations in common genes selected by phenotype and mode of inheritance. We identified 41 missense sequence variants in the known IPN genes in our cohort of 110 index patients. Nine variants (8%), identified in the genes MFN2, GJB1, BSCL2, and SETX, are previously reported mutations and considered to be pathogenic in these families. Twelve novel variants (11%) in the genes NEFL, TRPV4, KIF1B, BICD2, and SETX are implicated in the disease but require further evidence of pathogenicity. The remaining 20 variants were confirmed as polymorphisms (not causing the disease) and are detailed here to help interpret sequence variants identified in other family studies. Validation using segregation, normal controls, and bioinformatics tools was valuable as supporting evidence for sequence variants implicated in disease. In addition, we identified one SETX sequence variant (c.7640T>C), previously reported as a putative mutation, which we have confirmed as a nonpathogenic rare polymorphism. This study highlights the advantage of using WES for genetic diagnosis in highly heterogeneous diseases such as IPNs and has been particularly powerful in this cohort where genetic diagnosis could not be achieved due to phenotype and mode of inheritance not being previously obvious. However, first tier testing for common genes in clinically well-defined cases remains important and will account for most positive

  12. Prenatal diagnosis in haemophilia A: experience of the genetic diagnostic laboratory.

    PubMed

    Kessler, L; Adams, R; Mighion, L; Walther, S; Ganguly, A

    2014-11-01

    The paper describes the experience of the Genetic Diagnostic Laboratory in prenatal testing for haemophilia A, an X-linked recessive disease caused by mutations in the F8 gene. Knowledge of a familial mutation prior to pregnancy can benefit prenatal diagnosis and decrease wait time for molecular testing during pregnancy. This is a retrospective review of a series of pregnant women who pursued F8 gene testing from December 1997 through May 2012, highlighting three cases, which demonstrate the technical complexities of analysis and the implications of not knowing carrier status prior to pregnancy. Mutations of the F8 gene were detected in affected males, obligate female carriers and suspected female carriers by DNA sequencing, inverse-PCR, qRT-PCR, Southern blot and exonic dosage analysis. The same methods were used to analyse prenatal samples from obligate or suspected female carriers upon request. Maternal cell contamination studies were performed for all prenatal samples analysed. Ninety-nine women pursued F8 testing during pregnancy, either for carrier status alone or carrier status and prenatal diagnosis. Ninety-one women (91%) requested carrier testing because they did not know their F8 mutation carrier status prior to pregnancy. Eight women requested prenatal diagnosis only, and only 4 of these were aware of their mutation status. Thirty-seven individuals were found to be mutation carriers. Forty-two prenatal samples were received for prenatal diagnosis. In total 21 foetuses were identified as mutation carriers. Mutation detection was complex and increased the turnaround time in some cases. Only four of 99 women who submitted samples for F8 testing were aware of their F8 mutation status prior to pregnancy. Knowledge of F8 mutation status prior to pregnancy allows for efficient prenatal diagnosis, when desired. Thus, preconception genetic counselling is required to inform patients of the available options and the complex and time-consuming nature of F8 testing.

  13. Effective diagnosis of genetic disease by computational phenotype analysis of the disease-associated genome

    PubMed Central

    Zemojtel, Tomasz; Köhler, Sebastian; Mackenroth, Luisa; Jäger, Marten; Hecht, Jochen; Krawitz, Peter; Graul-Neumann, Luitgard; Doelken, Sandra; Ehmke, Nadja; Spielmann, Malte; Øien, Nancy Christine; Schweiger, Michal R.; Krüger, Ulrike; Frommer, Götz; Fischer, Björn; Kornak, Uwe; Flöttmann, Ricarda; Ardeshirdavani, Amin; Moreau, Yves; Lewis, Suzanna E.; Haendel, Melissa; Smedley, Damian; Horn, Denise; Mundlos, Stefan; Robinson, Peter N.

    2015-01-01

    Less than half of patients with suspected genetic disease receive a molecular diagnosis. We have therefore integrated next-generation sequencing (NGS), bioinformatics, and clinical data into an effective diagnostic workflow. We used variants in the 2741 established Mendelian disease genes [the disease-associated genome (DAG)] to develop a targeted enrichment DAG panel (7.1 Mb), which achieves a coverage of 20-fold or better for 98% of bases. Furthermore, we established a computational method [Phenotypic Interpretation of eXomes (PhenIX)] that evaluated and ranked variants based on pathogenicity and semantic similarity of patients’ phenotype described by Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) terms to those of 3991 Mendelian diseases. In computer simulations, ranking genes based on the variant score put the true gene in first place less than 5% of the time; PhenIX placed the correct gene in first place more than 86% of the time. In a retrospective test of PhenIX on 52 patients with previously identified mutations and known diagnoses, the correct gene achieved a mean rank of 2.1. In a prospective study on 40 individuals without a diagnosis, PhenIX analysis enabled a diagnosis in 11 cases (28%, at a mean rank of 2.4). Thus, the NGS of the DAG followed by phenotype-driven bioinformatic analysis allows quick and effective differential diagnostics in medical genetics. PMID:25186178

  14. An intelligent system for lung cancer diagnosis using a new genetic algorithm based feature selection method.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chunhong; Zhu, Zhaomin; Gu, Xiaofeng

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we develop a novel feature selection algorithm based on the genetic algorithm (GA) using a specifically devised trace-based separability criterion. According to the scores of class separability and variable separability, this criterion measures the significance of feature subset, independent of any specific classification. In addition, a mutual information matrix between variables is used as features for classification, and no prior knowledge about the cardinality of feature subset is required. Experiments are performed by using a standard lung cancer dataset. The obtained solutions are verified with three different classifiers, including the support vector machine (SVM), the back-propagation neural network (BPNN), and the K-nearest neighbor (KNN), and compared with those obtained by the whole feature set, the F-score and the correlation-based feature selection methods. The comparison results show that the proposed intelligent system has a good diagnosis performance and can be used as a promising tool for lung cancer diagnosis.

  15. Differential Diagnosis of Genetic Disorders Associated with Moderate to Severe Refractory Eczema and Elevated Immunoglobulin E.

    PubMed

    Arjona Aguilera, C; Albarrán Planelles, C; Tercedor Sánchez, J

    2016-03-01

    The association of moderate to severe eczema and elevated plasma levels of immunoglobulin E is a characteristic not only of atopic dermatitis but also of various genodermatoses: hyperimmunoglobulin E syndromes, Omenn syndrome, Netherton syndrome, peeling skin syndrome type B, severe dermatitis, multiple allergies, and metabolic wasting syndrome, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, prolidase deficiency, Loeys-Dietz syndrome, IPEX syndrome, STAT5B deficiency, and pentasomy X. The clinical presentation of these genodermatoses -typically in children- is consistent with severe atopic dermatitis. Immunoglobulin E is elevated from birth and response to conventional treatments is poor. Diagnosis is further complicated by the fact that these genodermatoses often share other clinical manifestations and laboratory findings. We present practical guidelines for differentiating among these various entities, with the aim of helping physicians decide what type of genetic test should be carried out -and when- in order to establish a definitive diagnosis.

  16. Harlequin Ichthyosis: Prenatal Diagnosis of a Rare Yet Severe Genetic Dermatosis

    PubMed Central

    David, Liji Sarah; Beck, Manisha Madhai; Bindra, Mandeep Singh; Arunachal, Gautham

    2015-01-01

    Harlequin Ichthyosis (HI) is an extremely rare genetic skin disorder. It is the most severe type of ichthyosis. It is characterized by thickened, dry, rough and armor like plates of skin with deep cracks in between. Alternative names for HI include- keratosis diffusafetalis, ichthyosis congenital, icthyosis fetalis, harlequin fetus and icthyosis congenital gravior. It is an autosomal recessive disorder with the majority of affected individuals being homozygous for mutation in the ABCA 12 gene. This condition presents with a wide range of severity and symptoms. Affected neonates usually do not survive beyond first few days of life. We are presenting prenatal diagnosis of a case of this rare condition. PMID:26675324

  17. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification: a novel approach for genetic diagnosis of Porphyria.

    PubMed

    Di Pierro, Elena; Brancaleoni, Valentina; Besana, Valeria; Cappellini, Maria Domenica

    2009-08-01

    Porphyrias are disorders caused by the genetic defects of enzymes of the heme pathway and are characterized by such a wide genetic heterogeneity that even the molecular analysis is not always decisive for a correct diagnosis. In the past few years, deletion with a size range of few kilobase pairs have been reported. These peculiar mutations, missed by both sequencing and cytogenetic techniques, have been identified by time consuming and technically demanding methods. To provide a rapid and sensitive method for the detection of deletions responsible for porphyria, we successfully designed and tested seven chemically synthesized probe sets specific for each heme gene and their flanking regions, to be used in multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification technique.

  18. Clinical, genetic, and neuroimaging features of Early Onset Alzheimer Disease: the challenges of diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Alberici, Antonella; Benussi, Alberto; Premi, Enrico; Borroni, Barbara; Padovani, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Early Onset Alzheimer Disease (EOAD) is a rare condition, frequently associated with genetic causes. The dissemination of genetic testing along with biomarker determinations have prompted a wider recognition of EOAD in experienced clinical settings. However, despite the great efforts in establishing the contribution of causative genes to EOAD, atypical disease presentation and clinical features still makes its diagnosis and treatment a challenge for the clinicians. This review aims to provide an extensive evaluation of literature data on EOAD, in order to improve understanding and knowledge of EOAD, underscore its significant impact on patients and their caregivers and influence public policies. This would be crucial to define the urgency of evidence-based treatment approaches.

  19. Access to medical-assisted reproduction and pgd in Italian law: a deadly blow to an illiberal statute? commentary to the European Court on Human Rights's decision Costa and Pavan v Italy (ECtHR, 28 August 2012, App. 54270/2010).

    PubMed

    Biondi, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    This article provides an account of the European Court on Human Rights' Second Section decision in the case Costa and Pavan v Italy. The judgment found that the Italian Statute on Assisted Reproduction (Law 40/2004), and particularly its prohibition to use in vitro fertilisation and pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) to prevent the birth of children affected by genetically transmissible conditions, breached Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR). In fact, the statute in question permits only infertile people to access medically assisted reproduction techniques and forbids PGD and embryo selection. The Court regarded that the rationale of these prohibitions-identified by the Italian Government with the need to prevent eugenic practices as well as to protect the health of the unborn and of the woman-was at odds with the fact that Italian law allows pre-natal screening and therapeutic abortions in case foetal abnormalities are diagnosed. In order to clarify the decision's significance, the paper goes on to analyse the rationale of Law 40/2004 in the Italian legal and political context. Emphasis is placed on the fact that this statute is extremely controversial at domestic level, because many of its provisions-including those considered by the Strasbourg Court-are inherently contradictory and contrast with the settled constitutional principles on abortion, as many domestic authorities highlighted. In this context, should the commented decision be confirmed by the Grand Chamber, it may provide a basis to bring consistency back to the Italian regulation of assisted reproduction. Finally, the paper considers the appeal lodged by the Italian Government to the Grand Chamber, and in particular the contention that the European Court had failed to respect Italy's margin of appreciation. In this regard, it is argued that, under Law 40/2004, individuals face illogical and discriminatory restrictions to their right to private and family life and that

  20. Using a genetic-fuzzy algorithm as a computer aided diagnosis tool on Saudi Arabian breast cancer database.

    PubMed

    Alharbi, Abir; Tchier, F

    2017-04-01

    The computer-aided diagnosis has become one of the major research topics in medical diagnostics. In this research paper, we focus on designing an automated computer diagnosis by combining two major methodologies, namely the fuzzy base systems and the evolutionary genetic algorithms and applying them to the Saudi Arabian breast cancer diagnosis database, to be employed for assisting physicians in the early detection of breast cancers, and hence obtaining an early-computerized diagnosis complementary to that by physicians. Our hybrid algorithm, the genetic-fuzzy algorithm, has produced optimized diagnosis systems that attain high classification performance, in fact, our best three rule system obtained a 97% accuracy, with simple and well interpretive rules, and with a good degree of confidence of 91%.

  1. Whole exome sequencing using Ion Proton system enables reliable genetic diagnosis of inherited retinal dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Riera, Marina; Navarro, Rafael; Ruiz-Nogales, Sheila; Méndez, Pilar; Burés-Jelstrup, Anniken; Corcóstegui, Borja; Pomares, Esther

    2017-01-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies (IRD) comprise a wide group of clinically and genetically complex diseases that progressively affect the retina. Over recent years, the development of next-generation sequencing (NGS) methods has transformed our ability to diagnose heterogeneous diseases. In this work, we have evaluated the implementation of whole exome sequencing (WES) for the molecular diagnosis of IRD. Using Ion ProtonTM system, we simultaneously analyzed 212 genes that are responsible for more than 25 syndromic and non-syndromic IRD. This approach was used to evaluate 59 unrelated families, with the pathogenic variant(s) successfully identified in 71.18% of cases. Interestingly, the mutation detection rate varied substantially depending on the IRD subtype. Overall, we found 63 different mutations (21 novel) in 29 distinct genes, and performed in vivo functional studies to determine the deleterious impact of variants identified in MERTK, CDH23, and RPGRIP1. In addition, we provide evidences that support CDHR1 as a gene responsible for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa with early macular affectation, and present data regarding the disease mechanism of this gene. Altogether, these results demonstrate that targeted WES of all IRD genes is a reliable, hypothesis-free approach, and a cost- and time-effective strategy for the routine genetic diagnosis of retinal dystrophies. PMID:28181551

  2. Collaborative Crowdsourcing for the Diagnosis of Rare Genetic Syndromes: The DYSCERNE Experience.

    PubMed

    Douzgou, Sofia; Pollalis, Yiannis A; Vozikis, Athanassios; Patrinos, George P; Clayton-Smith, Jill

    2016-01-01

    The big-data revolution is creating a challenge for the provision of services in the health sector to keep pace with the expectations of the general population. Utilization of crowdsourcing can impact positively on the quality, cost and speed of healthcare by involving large sections of professionals and the public and creating novel science within an ethical framework. In 2007, the DYSCERNE project was funded by the European Commission Public Health Executive Agency (EU DG Sanco) aimed at setting up a network of expertise for rare dysmorphic disorders. As part of DYSCERNE, a Dysmorphology Diagnostic System was set up to enable clinicians throughout the EU to submit cases electronically for diagnosis using a secure, web-based interface, hosted at specified access points (submitting nodes), in 26 different European countries. DYSCERNE utilized the process of crowdsourcing international expertise for the clinical diagnosis of very rare genetic syndromes of multiple congenital anomalies. This is the first reported account of collaborative crowd sourcing in dysmorphology, as part of a clinical genetics service.

  3. Prenatal diagnosis and genetic analysis of double trisomy 48,XXX,+18.

    PubMed

    Chen, C P; Chern, S R; Yeh, L F; Chen, W L; Chen, L F; Wang, W

    2000-09-01

    Prenatal diagnosis of simultaneous occurrence of double trisomy involving chromosomes 18 and X is extremely rare. We report on the prenatal diagnosis, genetic analysis and clinical manifestations of a fetus with both trisomy 18 and trisomy X. A 26-year-old, para 1 woman was referred for genetic counselling at 36 weeks' gestation with the sonographic findings of intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR), polyhydramnios, ventricular septal defect, and an enlarged cisterna magna. Both cordocentesis and amniocentesis revealed a consistent karyotype of 48,XXX,+18. Quantitative fluorescent polymerase chain reaction using polymorphic small tandem repeat markers specific for chromosomes 18 and X rapidly determined that both aneuploidies arose as a result of non-disjunction in maternal meiosis II. Our case shows that two non-disjunction events can occur not only in the same parent, but also in the same cell division. Our case also shows that double trisomy, 48,XXX,+18, can demonstrate an enlarged cisterna magna, IUGR and polyhydramnios in prenatal ultrasound.

  4. Fault diagnosis in spur gears based on genetic algorithm and random forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerrada, Mariela; Zurita, Grover; Cabrera, Diego; Sánchez, René-Vinicio; Artés, Mariano; Li, Chuan

    2016-03-01

    There are growing demands for condition-based monitoring of gearboxes, and therefore new methods to improve the reliability, effectiveness, accuracy of the gear fault detection ought to be evaluated. Feature selection is still an important aspect in machine learning-based diagnosis in order to reach good performance of the diagnostic models. On the other hand, random forest classifiers are suitable models in industrial environments where large data-samples are not usually available for training such diagnostic models. The main aim of this research is to build up a robust system for the multi-class fault diagnosis in spur gears, by selecting the best set of condition parameters on time, frequency and time-frequency domains, which are extracted from vibration signals. The diagnostic system is performed by using genetic algorithms and a classifier based on random forest, in a supervised environment. The original set of condition parameters is reduced around 66% regarding the initial size by using genetic algorithms, and still get an acceptable classification precision over 97%. The approach is tested on real vibration signals by considering several fault classes, one of them being an incipient fault, under different running conditions of load and velocity.

  5. Whole exome sequencing using Ion Proton system enables reliable genetic diagnosis of inherited retinal dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Riera, Marina; Navarro, Rafael; Ruiz-Nogales, Sheila; Méndez, Pilar; Burés-Jelstrup, Anniken; Corcóstegui, Borja; Pomares, Esther

    2017-02-09

    Inherited retinal dystrophies (IRD) comprise a wide group of clinically and genetically complex diseases that progressively affect the retina. Over recent years, the development of next-generation sequencing (NGS) methods has transformed our ability to diagnose heterogeneous diseases. In this work, we have evaluated the implementation of whole exome sequencing (WES) for the molecular diagnosis of IRD. Using Ion Proton(TM) system, we simultaneously analyzed 212 genes that are responsible for more than 25 syndromic and non-syndromic IRD. This approach was used to evaluate 59 unrelated families, with the pathogenic variant(s) successfully identified in 71.18% of cases. Interestingly, the mutation detection rate varied substantially depending on the IRD subtype. Overall, we found 63 different mutations (21 novel) in 29 distinct genes, and performed in vivo functional studies to determine the deleterious impact of variants identified in MERTK, CDH23, and RPGRIP1. In addition, we provide evidences that support CDHR1 as a gene responsible for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa with early macular affectation, and present data regarding the disease mechanism of this gene. Altogether, these results demonstrate that targeted WES of all IRD genes is a reliable, hypothesis-free approach, and a cost- and time-effective strategy for the routine genetic diagnosis of retinal dystrophies.

  6. Immunohistochemical Markers of Soft Tissue Tumors: Pathologic Diagnosis, Genetic Contributions, and Therapeutic Options

    PubMed Central

    Parham, David M

    2015-01-01

    After ~30 years of widespread usage, immunohistochemistry (IHC) has become a standard method of diagnosis for surgical pathology. Because of the plethora of diagnoses and often subtle nature of diagnostic criteria, IHC finds particular utility in soft tissue tumors. The use of progressively small amounts of tissue for diagnosis highlights the importance of this method. The sensitivity and crispness of IHC stains have progressively improved with the advent of new techniques. Traditionally, IHC detects cell-typic markers that characterize cell phenotypes, such as chromogranin for neuroectodermal tissue, myogenin for skeletal muscle, and cytokeratin for epithelium. However, the advent of genetic discoveries have led to IHC testing for detection of fusion gene products or overexpressed oncogenes associated with deletions and mutations. Proliferation-based markers such as Ki-67 can also be used for prognosis and grading, but more standardization is needed. Development of monoclonal antibody-based pharmaceuticals, such as imatinib or crizotinib, holds the promise of tailored anticancer therapy. IHC thus has assumed importance not only for diagnosis but also for guidance of personalized medicine. PMID:26549970

  7. Genetic analysis of Tunisian families with Usher syndrome type 1: toward improving early molecular diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Rebeh, Imen; Bonnet, Crystel; Bouassida, Walid; Hadjamor, Imen; Ayadi, Hammadi; Ghorbel, Abdelmonem; Petit, Christine; Masmoudi, Saber

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Usher syndrome accounts for about 50% of all hereditary deaf-blindness cases. The most severe form of this syndrome, Usher syndrome type I (USH1), is characterized by profound congenital sensorineural deafness, vestibular dysfunction, and retinitis pigmentosa. Six USH1 genes have been identified, MYO7A, CDH23, PCDH15, USH1C, SANS, and CIB2, encoding myosin VIIA, cadherin-23, protocadherin-15, harmonin, scaffold protein containing ankyrin repeats and a sterile alpha motif (SAM) domain, and calcium- and integrin-binding member 2, respectively. Methods In the present study, we recruited four Tunisian families with a diagnosis of USH1, together with healthy unrelated controls. Affected members underwent detailed audiologic and ocular examinations. We used the North African Deafness (NADf) chip to search for known North African mutations associated with USH. Then, we selected microsatellite markers covering USH1 known loci to genotype the DNA samples. Finally, we performed DNA sequencing of three known USH1 genes: MYO7A, PCDH15, and USH1C. Results Four biallelic mutations, all single base changes, were found in the MYO7A, USH1C, and PCDH15 genes. These mutations consist of a previously reported splicing defect c.470+1G>A in MYO7A, three novel variants, including two nonsense (p.Arg3X and p.Arg134X) in USH1C and PCDH15, respectively, and one frameshift (p.Lys615Asnfs*6) in MYO7A. Conclusions We found a remarkable genetic heterogeneity in the studied families with USH1 with a variety of mutations, among which three were novel. These novel mutations will be included in the NADf mutation screening chip that will allow a higher diagnosis efficiency of this extremely genetically heterogeneous disease. Ultimately, efficient molecular diagnosis of USH in a patient’s early childhood is of utmost importance, allowing better educational and therapeutic management. PMID:27440999

  8. Do parental perceptions and motivations towards genetic testing and prenatal diagnosis for deafness vary in different cultures?

    PubMed

    Nahar, Risha; Puri, Ratna D; Saxena, Renu; Verma, Ishwar C

    2013-01-01

    Surveys of attitudes of individuals with deafness and their families towards genetic testing or prenatal diagnosis have mostly been carried out in the West. It is expected that the perceptions and attitudes would vary amongst persons of different cultures and economic background. There is little information on the prevailing attitudes for genetic testing and prenatal diagnosis for deafness in developing countries. Therefore, this study evaluates the motivations of Indian people with inherited hearing loss towards such testing. Twenty-eight families with history of congenital hearing loss (23 hearing parents with child/family member with deafness, 4 couples with both partners having deafness and 1 parent and child with deafness) participated in a semi-structured survey investigating their interest, attitudes, and intentions for using genetic and prenatal testing for deafness. Participants opinioned that proper management and care of individuals with deafness were handicapped by limited rehabilitation facilities with significant financial and social burden. Nineteen (68%) opted for genetic testing. Twenty-six (93%) expressed high interest in prenatal diagnosis, while 19 (73%) would consider termination of an affected fetus. Three hearing couples, in whom the causative mutations were identified, opted for prenatal diagnosis. On testing, all the three fetuses were affected and the hearing parents elected to terminate the pregnancies. This study provides an insight into the contrasting perceptions towards hearing disability in India and its influence on the desirability of genetic testing and prenatal diagnosis.

  9. Molecular genetic study of novel biomarkers for early diagnosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yong-Deok, Kim; Eun-Hyoung, Jeon; Yeon-Sun, Kim; Kang-Mi, Pang; Jin-Yong, Lee; Sung-Hwan, Cho; Tae-Yun, Kim; Tae-Sung, Park; Soung-Min, Kim; Myung-Jin, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Early detection and treatment of an oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is critical because of its rapid growth, frequent lymph-node metastasis, and poor prognosis. However, no clinically-valuable methods of early diagnosis exist, and genetic analysis of OSCCs has yielded no biomarkers. Study Design: We investigated the expression of genes associated with inflammation in OSCCs via a quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis of microarray data. Tumor and normal tissues from five patients with an OSCC were used for microarray analysis. Differentially-expressed genes, identified using permutation, local pooled error (LPE), t-tests, and significance analysis of microarrays (SAM), were selected as candidate genetic markers. Results: Two groups corresponding to tissue identity were evident, implying that their differentially-expressed genes represented biological differences between tissues. Fifteen genes were identified using the Student’s paired t-test (p<0.05) and the SAM, with a false discovery rate of less than 0.02. Based on gene expression, these 15 genes can be used to classify an OSCC. A genetic analysis of functional networks and ontologies, validated by using a qRT-PCR analysis of the tissue samples, identified four genes, ADAM15, CDC7, IL12RB2 and TNFRSF8, that demonstrated excellent concordance with the microarray data. Conclusions: Our study demonstrated that four genes (ADAM15, CDC7, IL12RB2 and TNFRSF8) had potential as novel biomarkers for the diagnosis and the treatment of an OSCC. Key words:Biomarker, microarray, quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, oral squamous cell carcinoma, gene expression profiling. PMID:25475780

  10. Comparing targeted exome and whole exome approaches for genetic diagnosis of neuromuscular disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gorokhova, Svetlana; Cerino, Mathieu; Mathieu, Yves; Courrier, Sébastien; Desvignes, Jean-Pierre; Salgado, David; Béroud, Christophe; Krahn, Martin; Bartoli, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Massively parallel sequencing is rapidly becoming a widely used method in genetic diagnostics. However, there is still no clear consensus as to which approach can most efficiently identify the pathogenic mutations carried by a given patient, while avoiding false negative and false positive results. We developed a targeted exome approach (MyoPanel2) in order to optimize genetic diagnosis of neuromuscular disorders. Using this approach, we were able to analyse 306 genes known to be mutated in myopathies as well as in related disorders, obtaining 98.8% target sequence coverage at 20 ×. Moreover, MyoPanel2 was able to detect 99.7% of 11,467 known mutations responsible for neuromuscular disorders. We have then used several quality control parameters to compare performance of the targeted exome approach with that of whole exome sequencing. The results of this pilot study of 140 DNA samples suggest that targeted exome sequencing approach is an efficient genetic diagnostic test for most neuromuscular diseases. PMID:27054082

  11. The Effect of Ddt on the Polymorphism at the G6pd and Pgd Loci in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    PubMed Central

    Bijlsma, R.; Kerver, J. W. M.

    1983-01-01

    For the degradation of DDT and other chlorohydrocarbon insecticides energy in the form of NADPH is needed which for the greater part is supplied by the pentose phosphate shunt. Therefore the influence of DDT on the polymorphism at the G6pd and Pgd loci in Drosophila melanogaster was investigated by studying its effect on egg to adult survival and adult survival. The results show the existence of significant differences in fitness between the different genotypes of the two loci for both components. It is found that the effect of DDT supplementation differs significantly from the effect of sodium octanoate addition. DDT treatment also increases the activity of the pentose phosphate shunt as measured by the activity of G6PD and 6PGD. In larvae a 50% increase in activity is found and in adults a 100% increase. As there is little doubt that the activities of G6PD and 6PGD are somehow correlated with the fitness of flies, the data are discussed in relation to the in vitro and in vivo differences in activity between the different allozymes of both G6PD and 6PGD. PMID:6404694

  12. Invited commentary: the politics of human embryo research and the motivation to achieve PGD.

    PubMed

    Yovich, John L

    2011-05-01

    The idea that biomedical research can be influenced by political events implies a teleological basis indicating that scientific achievements occur because there is a political need. Such a concept appears to have been the reason PGD was fast-tracked to emerge as a biomedical achievement well before its due date, occurring at a time when human embryology was still struggling to reach a reasonable level of efficiency and become adopted as a clinically relevant advance around the world. One story underlying the historical achievement of the HFE Act 1990, enabling regulated embryo research, steps outside the firm ground of biomedical science and encourages the idea that Reproductive BioMedicine Online should embrace a further section enabling articles dealing with 'History, politics and personalities' where these influence biomedical research.

  13. Congenital 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) deficiency associated with chronic hemolytic anemia in a Spanish family.

    PubMed

    Vives Corrons, J L; Colomer, D; Pujades, A; Rovira, A; Aymerich, M; Merino, A; Aguilar i Bascompte, J L

    1996-12-01

    Clinical and metabolic studies were performed in four members of a Spanish family with partial (50%) 6 phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) deficiency. In all cases the activities of 6 phosphogluconolactone (6PGL) and glutathione reductase (GR) were normal, and the molecular characterization performed in the partially purified 6PGD from the propositus showed normal kinetic and electrophoretic patterns. Two females (the propositus and her sister) suffered from a well-compensated chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia (CNSHA) and exhibited decreased RBC glutathione (GSH) stability with increased oxidative susceptibility, defined by enhanced malonyldialdehyde (MDA) generation "in vitro." The other two members of the family (the propositus's mother and brother) were clinically asymptomatic. In the propositus and her sister, RBC metabolism exhibited a markedly abnormal concentration of glycolytic intermediates, mainly characterized by striking increases in fructose 1,6 bisphosphate (50-fold), dihydroxiacetone-phosphate (20-fold) and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (tenfold). Although the precise mechanism of the hemolysis in the two patients is unknown, the enhanced oxidative threat observed in their RBCs may interfere in some way with the glycolytic pathway function, leading to a marked increase in certain metabolic intermediates located before the glyceraldehyde 3 phosphate dehydrogenase (GA3PD) step. Since it seems that GA3PD half-life is modulated by fluctuations of the cytosolic redox status, an "in situ" approach was simulated by using permeabilized RBCs. In these conditions, GA3PD activity was significantly lower in the propositus and her sister than in the asymptomatic members of the family and the simultaneous normal control.

  14. A model of genetic guidance for hemoglobinopathy patients and laboratory diagnosis of family members as educational and preventive measures

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Tatiana Dela-Sávia; Freire, Adriana Sousa; Silveira-Lacerda, Elisângela de Paula; García-Zapata, Marco Túlio Antônio

    2012-01-01

    Background: The high frequency of hemoglobinopathies in Brazil constitutes a public health problem and thus educational and preventive measures are necessary to reduce the incidence. Genetic guidance, a modality of genetic counseling, and family screening are measures that can assist in reproductive decisions and mitigate clinical, psychological and social problems of families with these disorders. Objetive: The objective of the current study was to evaluate the effectiveness of educational and preventive measures for hemoglobinopathies using genetic guidance and laboratory screening of families. Methods: The diagnoses of patients with hemoglobinopathies were confirmed and then the level of knowledge about their disease was evaluated and genetic guidance was provided. Three months later, the level of assimilated information of these patients was evaluated. In addition, laboratory diagnosis of family members was carried out. Results: Diagnosis of sickle cell anemia was confirmed for most patients. Moreover, the majority of the patients who had a low level of knowledge before genetic guidance (68.8%) demonstrated a higher level of assimilated information after the process (81.8%). Almost 70% of the family members had hemoglobin changes and some had hemoglobinopathies(2.6%). They were duly informed about the results of the examinations, which made it possible to investigate further. Conclusion: Genetic guidance and family screening were effective preventive and educational measures that improved the quality of life of patients, preventing complications and sequels and allowed the referral of those who may transmit altered genes for clinical diagnosis and to genetic counseling services. PMID:23125541

  15. Next-Generation Sequencing in Oncology: Genetic Diagnosis, Risk Prediction and Cancer Classification.

    PubMed

    Kamps, Rick; Brandão, Rita D; Bosch, Bianca J van den; Paulussen, Aimee D C; Xanthoulea, Sofia; Blok, Marinus J; Romano, Andrea

    2017-01-31

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology has expanded in the last decades with significant improvements in the reliability, sequencing chemistry, pipeline analyses, data interpretation and costs. Such advances make the use of NGS feasible in clinical practice today. This review describes the recent technological developments in NGS applied to the field of oncology. A number of clinical applications are reviewed, i.e., mutation detection in inherited cancer syndromes based on DNA-sequencing, detection of spliceogenic variants based on RNA-sequencing, DNA-sequencing to identify risk modifiers and application for pre-implantation genetic diagnosis, cancer somatic mutation analysis, pharmacogenetics and liquid biopsy. Conclusive remarks, clinical limitations, implications and ethical considerations that relate to the different applications are provided.

  16. Peyronie’s disease: a literature review on epidemiology, genetics, pathophysiology, diagnosis and work-up

    PubMed Central

    Al-Thakafi, Sultan

    2016-01-01

    Peyronie’s disease (PD), a fibromatous disorder of the tunica albuginea of the penile corpus cavernosum, named after the French physician Francois de la Peyronie, is characterized by pain, plaque formation, penile curvature, and plaque calcification. The epidemiological data on PD is inconsistent, with recent reports stating a prevalence of up to 9%, and the condition affecting men of all ages, from teenagers to septuagenarians. We are just beginning to elucidate the role of genetics as a causative factor for PD. Chromosomal abnormalities and single-nucleotide polymorphisms have been shown to be associated with fibrotic diatheses. Tunical mechanical stress and microvascular trauma are major contributory factors to the pathophysiology of PD. The diagnosis of PD can be made using a combination of clinical history, physical examination and, sometimes, imaging modalities. A better understanding of the molecular pathophysiology of this condition remains paramount for the development of newer and more effective disease-targeted interventions. PMID:27298774

  17. Peyronie's disease: a literature review on epidemiology, genetics, pathophysiology, diagnosis and work-up.

    PubMed

    Al-Thakafi, Sultan; Al-Hathal, Naif

    2016-06-01

    Peyronie's disease (PD), a fibromatous disorder of the tunica albuginea of the penile corpus cavernosum, named after the French physician Francois de la Peyronie, is characterized by pain, plaque formation, penile curvature, and plaque calcification. The epidemiological data on PD is inconsistent, with recent reports stating a prevalence of up to 9%, and the condition affecting men of all ages, from teenagers to septuagenarians. We are just beginning to elucidate the role of genetics as a causative factor for PD. Chromosomal abnormalities and single-nucleotide polymorphisms have been shown to be associated with fibrotic diatheses. Tunical mechanical stress and microvascular trauma are major contributory factors to the pathophysiology of PD. The diagnosis of PD can be made using a combination of clinical history, physical examination and, sometimes, imaging modalities. A better understanding of the molecular pathophysiology of this condition remains paramount for the development of newer and more effective disease-targeted interventions.

  18. Angelman-Like Syndrome: A Genetic Approach to Diagnosis with Illustrative Cases.

    PubMed

    Luk, Ho-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic abnormalities in 15q11-13 imprinted region and UBE3A mutation are the two major mechanisms for molecularly confirmed Angelman Syndrome. However, there is 10% of clinically diagnosed Angelman Syndrome remaining test negative. With the advancement of genomic technology like array comparative genomic hybridization and next generation sequencing methods, it is found that some patients of these test negative Angelman-like Syndromes actually have alternative diagnoses. Accurate molecular diagnosis is paramount for genetic counseling and subsequent management. Despite overlapping phenotypes between Angelman and Angelman-like Syndrome, there are some subtle but distinct features which could differentiate them clinically. It would provide important clue during the diagnostic process for clinicians.

  19. Next-Generation Sequencing in Oncology: Genetic Diagnosis, Risk Prediction and Cancer Classification

    PubMed Central

    Kamps, Rick; Brandão, Rita D.; van den Bosch, Bianca J.; Paulussen, Aimee D. C.; Xanthoulea, Sofia; Blok, Marinus J.; Romano, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology has expanded in the last decades with significant improvements in the reliability, sequencing chemistry, pipeline analyses, data interpretation and costs. Such advances make the use of NGS feasible in clinical practice today. This review describes the recent technological developments in NGS applied to the field of oncology. A number of clinical applications are reviewed, i.e., mutation detection in inherited cancer syndromes based on DNA-sequencing, detection of spliceogenic variants based on RNA-sequencing, DNA-sequencing to identify risk modifiers and application for pre-implantation genetic diagnosis, cancer somatic mutation analysis, pharmacogenetics and liquid biopsy. Conclusive remarks, clinical limitations, implications and ethical considerations that relate to the different applications are provided. PMID:28146134

  20. Angelman-Like Syndrome: A Genetic Approach to Diagnosis with Illustrative Cases

    PubMed Central

    Luk, Ho-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic abnormalities in 15q11-13 imprinted region and UBE3A mutation are the two major mechanisms for molecularly confirmed Angelman Syndrome. However, there is 10% of clinically diagnosed Angelman Syndrome remaining test negative. With the advancement of genomic technology like array comparative genomic hybridization and next generation sequencing methods, it is found that some patients of these test negative Angelman-like Syndromes actually have alternative diagnoses. Accurate molecular diagnosis is paramount for genetic counseling and subsequent management. Despite overlapping phenotypes between Angelman and Angelman-like Syndrome, there are some subtle but distinct features which could differentiate them clinically. It would provide important clue during the diagnostic process for clinicians. PMID:26942024

  1. Assisted procreation and its relationship to genetics and eugenics.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Mariella Lombardi

    2009-01-01

    The article below is intended to reflect on whether or not a eugenic tendency constitutes an intrinsic element of human fertilization in vitro. The author outlines ideas and circumstances which characterized the foundation and propagation of eugenics between the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. A brief discussion follows on some of the standard procedures of in vitro fertilization, and in particular, those which manifest a trace or hint of eugenics--heterologous fertilization and sperm banking, preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) and embryo selection--practices which, nonetheless, are used on a large scale and shed light on both the essence of procreative medicine and on the current cultural environment. The objective of the article is to explore whether it is possible to eliminate the eugenic connotations without foregoing the benefits of technical and scientific progress.

  2. Common genetic variation and survival after colorectal cancer diagnosis: a genome-wide analysis

    PubMed Central

    Phipps, Amanda I.; Passarelli, Michael N.; Chan, Andrew T.; Harrison, Tabitha A.; Jeon, Jihyoun; Hutter, Carolyn M.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Brenner, Hermann; Caan, Bette J.; Campbell, Peter T.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J.; Cheadle, Jeremy P.; Curtis, Keith R.; Duggan, David; Fisher, David; Fuchs, Charles S.; Gala, Manish; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Hayes, Richard B.; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hsu, Li; Jacobs, Eric J.; Jansen, Lina; Kaplan, Richard; Kap, Elisabeth J.; Maughan, Timothy S.; Potter, John D.; Schoen, Robert E.; Seminara, Daniela; Slattery, Martha L.; West, Hannah; White, Emily; Peters, Ulrike; Newcomb, Polly A.

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified several germline single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) significantly associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence. Common germline genetic variation may also be related to CRC survival. We used a discovery-based approach to identify SNPs related to survival outcomes after CRC diagnosis. Genome-wide genotyping arrays were conducted for 3494 individuals with invasive CRC enrolled in six prospective cohort studies (median study-specific follow-up = 4.2–8.1 years). In pooled analyses, we used Cox regression to assess SNP-specific associations with CRC-specific and overall survival, with additional analyses stratified by stage at diagnosis. Top findings were followed-up in independent studies. A P value threshold of P < 5×10−8 in analyses combining discovery and follow-up studies was required for genome-wide significance. Among individuals with distant-metastatic CRC, several SNPs at 6p12.1, nearest the ELOVL5 gene, were statistically significantly associated with poorer survival, with the strongest associations noted for rs209489 [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.8, P = 7.6×10−10 and HR = 1.8, P = 3.7×10−9 for CRC-specific and overall survival, respectively). No SNPs were statistically significantly associated with survival among all cases combined or in cases without distant-metastases. SNPs in 6p12.1/ELOVL5 were associated with survival outcomes in individuals with distant-metastatic CRC, and merit further follow-up for functional significance. Findings from this genome-wide association study highlight the potential importance of genetic variation in CRC prognosis and provide clues to genomic regions of potential interest. PMID:26586795

  3. Applications of single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) to taxonomy, diagnosis, population genetics and molecular evolution of parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Gasser, R B; Chilton, N B

    2001-11-22

    The analysis of genetic variation in parasitic nematodes has important implications for studying aspects of taxonomy, diagnosis, population genetics, drug resistance and molecular evolution. This article highlights some applications of PCR-based single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) for the analysis of sequence variation in individual parasites (and their populations) to address some of these areas. It also describes the principles and advantages of SSCP, and provides some examples for future applications in parasitology.

  4. Utility of Whole Exome Sequencing for Genetic Diagnosis of Previously Undiagnosed Pediatric Neurology Patients.

    PubMed

    Kuperberg, Maya; Lev, Dorit; Blumkin, Lubov; Zerem, Ayelet; Ginsberg, Mira; Linder, Ilan; Carmi, Nirit; Kivity, Sarah; Lerman-Sagie, Tally; Leshinsky-Silver, Esther

    2016-12-01

    Whole exome sequencing enables scanning a large number of genes for relatively low costs. The authors investigate its use for previously undiagnosed pediatric neurological patients. This retrospective cohort study performed whole exome sequencing on 57 patients of "Magen" neurogenetic clinics, with unknown diagnoses despite previous workup. The authors report on clinical features, causative genes, and treatment modifications and provide an analysis of whole exome sequencing utility per primary clinical feature. A causative gene was identified in 49.1% of patients, of which 17 had an autosomal dominant mutation, 9 autosomal recessive, and 2 X-linked. The highest rate of positive diagnosis was found for patients with developmental delay, ataxia, or suspected neuromuscular disease. Whole exome sequencing warranted a definitive change of treatment for 5 patients. Genetic databases were updated accordingly. In conclusion, whole exome sequencing is useful in obtaining a high detection rate for previously undiagnosed disorders. Use of this technique could affect diagnosis, treatment, and prognostics for both patients and relatives.

  5. Parental decisions following prenatal diagnosis of chromosomal abnormalities: implications for genetic counseling practice in Japan.

    PubMed

    Suzumori, Nobuhiro; Kumagai, Kyoko; Goto, Shinobu; Nakamura, Akira; Sugiura-Ogasawara, Mayumi

    2015-02-01

    Parental decision-making to terminate or continue a pregnancy was studied after prenatal diagnosis of a chromosome aneuploidy among a sample of patients around the city of Nagoya, Japan. A total of 1,051 amniocentesis cases at 15-18 weeks of gestation were analyzed. Of these, 60 cases of chromosomal anomalies with aneuploidies were diagnosed by conventional cytogenetic analysis. Of the 45 diagnoses of autosomal chromosome aneuploidies, pregnancy was terminated in 93.3 % of the cases. Of the 15 cases diagnosed with sex chromosome aneuploidy, pregnancy was terminated in 46.7 %. Differences in parental decisions with respect to maternal age, gestational week at diagnosis, number of pregnancies per individual and existing number of children were not significant in patients diagnosed either with autosomal or sex chromosome aneuploidy. The findings indicate that when diagnosed with a chromosome aneuploidy in which a severe prognosis was expected, most couples decided to terminate the pregnancy in Japan. Implications of these findings for expanding the profession of genetic counseling are discussed and research recommendations are provided.

  6. Angelman syndrome in Denmark. birth incidence, genetic findings, and age at diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Mertz, Line Granild Bie; Christensen, Rikke; Vogel, Ida; Hertz, Jens Michael; Nielsen, Karen Brøndum; Grønskov, Karen; Østergaard, John R

    2013-09-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurogenetic disorder caused by loss of expression of the maternal imprinted gene UBE3A on chromosome 15q11.2-q13. Clinical features of AS include severe intellectual disability, a happy disposition, ataxia, mandibular prognatism, and epilepsy. Our objectives were to examine the birth incidence of AS in Denmark and to characterize the size of the 15q11.2-q13 deletions with 1,000K array CGH. In addition, we analyzed genotype differences in regard to age at diagnosis and investigated the occurrence of deletions/duplications outside the 15q11.2-q13 regions. We identified 51 patients with genetically verified AS, which corresponded to a birth incidence of 1:24,580 (95%CI: 1:23,727-1:25,433). Thirty-six patients showed a deletion; 13 had a Class I deletion and 20 had a Class II deletion. There was bimodal distribution of the BP3 breakpoint. Three patients had larger and atypical deletions, with distal breakpoints telomeric to BP3. Five patients had paternal uniparental disomy (pUPD) of chromosome 15, and four had a verified UBE3A mutation. Additional deletions/duplications outside the 15q11.2-q13 areas were demonstrated in half the participants. Six harbored more than one CNV. Mean age at diagnosis was 21 months (95%CI: 17-23 months) for children with a deletion and 46 months (95%CI: 36-55 months) for children with pUPD or a UBE3A mutation (P < 0.01). The presence of a CNV outside 15q11.2-q13 did not have an impact on age at diagnosis.

  7. Genetics of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: advances and pitfalls in molecular diagnosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Roma-Rodrigues, Catarina; Fernandes, Alexandra R

    2014-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a primary disease of the cardiac muscle that occurs mainly due to mutations (>1,400 variants) in genes encoding for the cardiac sarcomere. HCM, the most common familial form of cardiomyopathy, affecting one in every 500 people in the general population, is typically inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern, and presents variable expressivity and age-related penetrance. Due to the morphological and pathological heterogeneity of the disease, the appearance and progression of symptoms is not straightforward. Most HCM patients are asymptomatic, but up to 25% develop significant symptoms, including chest pain and sudden cardiac death. Sudden cardiac death is a dramatic event, since it occurs without warning and mainly in younger people, including trained athletes. Molecular diagnosis of HCM is of the outmost importance, since it may allow detection of subjects carrying mutations on HCM-associated genes before development of clinical symptoms of HCM. However, due to the genetic heterogeneity of HCM, molecular diagnosis is difficult. Currently, there are mainly four techniques used for molecular diagnosis of HCM, including Sanger sequencing, high resolution melting, mutation detection using DNA arrays, and next-generation sequencing techniques. Application of these methods has proven successful for identification of mutations on HCM-related genes. This review summarizes the features of these technologies, highlighting their strengths and weaknesses. Furthermore, current therapeutics for HCM patients are correlated with clinically observed phenotypes and are based on the alleviation of symptoms. This is mainly due to insufficient knowledge on the mechanisms involved in the onset of HCM. Tissue engineering alongside regenerative medicine coupled with nanotherapeutics may allow fulfillment of those gaps, together with screening of novel therapeutic drugs and target delivery systems.

  8. The use of targeted exome sequencing in genetic diagnosis of young patients with severe hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Long; Wu, Wen-Feng; Sun, Li-Yuan; Chen, Pan-Pan; Wang, Wei; Benito-Vicente, Asier; Zhang, Fan; Pan, Xiao-Dong; Cui, Wei; Yang, Shi-Wei; Zhou, Yu-Jie; Martin, Cesar; Wang, Lu-Ya

    2016-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is an autosomal dominant disorder. Although genetic testing is an important tool for detecting FH-causing mutations in patients, diagnostic methods for young patients with severe hypercholesterolemia are understudied. This study compares the target exome sequencing (TES) technique with the DNA resequencing array technique on young patients with severe hypercholesterolemia. A total of 20 unrelated patients (mean age 14.8 years) with total cholesterol > 10 mmol/L were included. 12 patient samples were processed by DNA resequencing array, 14 patient samples were processed by TES, and 6 patient samples were processed by both methods. Functional characterization of novel mutations was performed by flow cytometry. The mutation detection rate (MDR) of DNA resequencing array was 75%, while the MDR of TES was 100%. A total of 27 different mutations in the LDLR were identified, including 3 novel mutations and 8 mutations with previously unknown pathogenicity. Functional characterization of c.673delA, c.1363delC, p.Leu575Phe and p.Leu582Phe variants found that all of them are pathogenic. Additionally, 7 patients were diagnosed with Heterozygous FH (HeFH) in which lipid levels were significantly higher than common HeFH patients. This data indicates that TES is a very efficient tool for genetic diagnosis in young patients with severe hypercholesterolemia. PMID:27830735

  9. Diabetes mellitus in neonates and infants: genetic heterogeneity, clinical approach to diagnosis, and therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Cabezas, Oscar; Ellard, Sian

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, we have witnessed major advances in the understanding of the molecular basis of neonatal and infancy-onset diabetes. It is now widely accepted that diabetes presenting before 6 months of age is unlikely to be autoimmune type 1 diabetes. The vast majority of such patients will have a monogenic disorder responsible for the disease and, in some of them, also for a number of other associated extrapancreatic clinical features. Reaching a molecular diagnosis will have immediate clinical consequences for about half of affected patients, as identification of a mutation in either of the two genes encoding the ATP-sensitive potassium channel allows switching from insulin injections to oral sulphonylureas. It also facilitates genetic counselling within the affected families and predicts clinical prognosis. Importantly, monogenic diabetes seems not to be limited to the first 6 months but extends to some extent into the second half of the first year of life, when type 1 diabetes is the more common cause of diabetes. From a scientific perspective, the identification of novel genetic aetiologies has provided important new knowledge regarding the development and function of the human pancreas.

  10. Beware! Preimplantation genetic diagnosis may solve some old problems but it also raises new ones.

    PubMed Central

    Draper, H; Chadwick, R

    1999-01-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PIGD) goes some way to meeting the clinical, psychological and ethical problems of antenatal testing. We should guard, however, against the assumption that PIGD is the answer to all our problems. It also presents some new problems and leaves some old problems untouched. This paper will provide an overview of how PIGD meets some of the old problems but will concentrate on two new challenges for ethics (and, indeed, law). First we look at whether we should always suppose that it is wrong for a clinician to implant a genetically abnormal zygote. The second concern is particularly important in the UK. The Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act (1990) gives clinicians a statutory obligation to consider the interests of the future children they help to create using in vitro fertilisation (IVF) techniques. Does this mean that because PIGD is based on IVF techniques the balance of power for determining the best interests of the future child shifts from the mother to the clinician? PMID:10226915

  11. Prenatal diagnosis as a tool and support for eugenics: myth or reality in contemporary French society?

    PubMed

    Gaille, Marie; Viot, Géraldine

    2013-02-01

    Today, French public debate and bioethics research reflect an ongoing controversy about eugenics. The field of reproductive medicine is often targeted as pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), prenatal diagnosis, and prenatal detection are accused of drifting towards eugenics or being driven by eugenics considerations. This article aims at understanding why the charge against eugenics came at the forefront of the ethical debate. Above all, it aims at showing that the charge against prenatal diagnosis is groundless. The point of view presented in this article has been elaborated jointly by a geneticist and a philosopher. Besides a survey of the medical, bioethical, philosophical and social sciences literature on the topic, the methodology is founded on a joint analysis of geneticist's various consults. Evidence from office visits demonstrated that prenatal diagnosis leads to case-by-case decisions. As we have suggested, this conclusion does not mean that prenatal diagnosis is devoid of ethical issues, and we have identified at least two. The first is related to the evaluation of a decision to abort. The second line of ethical questions arises from the fact that the claim for "normality" hardly hides normative and ambiguous views about disability. As a conclusion, ethical dilemmas keep being noticeable in the field of reproductive medicine and genetic counselling, but an enquiry about eugenic tendencies probably does not allow us to understand them in the proper way.

  12. Use of the MLPA assay in the molecular diagnosis of gene copy number alterations in human genetic diseases.

    PubMed

    Stuppia, Liborio; Antonucci, Ivana; Palka, Giandomenico; Gatta, Valentina

    2012-01-01

    Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) assay is a recently developed technique able to evidence variations in the copy number of several human genes. Due to this ability, MLPA can be used in the molecular diagnosis of several genetic diseases whose pathogenesis is related to the presence of deletions or duplications of specific genes. Moreover, MLPA assay can also be used in the molecular diagnosis of genetic diseases characterized by the presence of abnormal DNA methylation. Due to the large number of genes that can be analyzed by a single technique, MLPA assay represents the gold standard for molecular analysis of all pathologies derived from the presence of gene copy number variation. In this review, the main applications of the MLPA technique for the molecular diagnosis of human diseases are described.

  13. Clinical and molecular studies in two families with Fraser syndrome: a new FRAS1 gene mutation, prenatal ultrasound findings and implications for genetic counselling.

    PubMed

    Ogur, G; Zenker, M; Tosun, M; Ekici, F; Schanze, D; Ozyilmaz, B; Malatyalioglu, E

    2011-01-01

    Fraser syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disorder characterized by cryptophthalmus, variable expression of cutaneous syndactyly of fingers and toes, genital ambiguity and renal agenesis/dysgenesis. We present here molecular and clinical findings of four fetuses with FS from two families. Molecular genetic studies in the two families revealed mutations in FRAS1 gene allowing better genetic counselling and subsequent prenatal diagnosis in one of the two families. In family one, a nonsense mutation (c.3730C>T, p.R1244X) previously described in a Polish patient was found. In family two a novel nonsense mutation previously not known was detected (c.370C>T, p.R124X). PGD is planned for family 1.

  14. Low utilization of prenatal and pre-implantation genetic diagnosis in Huntington disease - risk discounting in preventive genetics.

    PubMed

    Schulman, J D; Stern, H J

    2015-09-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a late-onset, fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by a (CAG) triplet repeat expansion in the Huntingtin gene that enlarges during male meiosis. In 1996 in this journal, one of us (J. D. S.) presented a methodology to perform pre-implantation genetic diagnosis in families at-risk for HD without revealing the genetic status of the at-risk parent. Despite the introduction of accurate prenatal and pre-implantation genetic testing which can prevent transmission of the abnormal HD gene in the family permanently, utilization of these options is extremely low. In this article, we examine the decision-making process regarding genetic testing in families with HD and discuss the possible reasons for the low uptake among this group.

  15. Karyotype analysis with amniotic fluid in 12365 pregnant women with indications for genetic amniocentesis and strategies of prenatal diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Xiao, H; Yang, Y L; Zhang, C Y; Liao, E J; Zhao, H R; Liao, S X

    2016-01-01

    We explored the strategies of prenatal diagnosis by foetal karyotype analysis in pregnant women with indications for genetic amniocentesis. Karyotype analysis of amniotic fluid was performed on 12365 pregnant women with indications for genetic amniocentesis. The detection rates and distributions of abnormal karyotypes were observed in a variety of indications for genetic amniocentesis. The detection rates of abnormal karyotype were 57.4% in either a mother or father with chromosomal abnormality, 8.5% in the pregnant women with pathological ultrasound finding (PUF), 2.79% in the pregnant women with advanced age (35 years and over) and 2.23% in the women with abnormal maternal serum screening (MSS) tests. Foetal abnormal karyotype was found in 86 pregnant women with PUF; of the 86 pregnant women, 42 had trisomy 13, 18 or 21. Of the 12365 pregnant women, foetal abnormal karyotype was found in 428 (3.46%); of the 428 foetuses, only 154 had trisomy 13, 18 or 21. In the pregnant women with abnormal MSS, 111 foetuses had abnormal karyotype, but only 36 foetuses had trisomy 13, 18 or 21. We conclude that (1) ultrasound is an important approach to prevent the birth of foetuses with chromosomal disease. (2) Non-invasive prenatal DNA detection cannot completely replace invasive prenatal diagnosis and MSS. (3) The strategies of prenatal diagnosis: Genetic amniocentesis is strongly recommended for the pregnant women with indications for genetic amniocentesis. For pregnant women who refuse invasive prenatal diagnosis, non-invasive prenatal DNA detection is first performed. If the results of non-invasive prenatal DNA detection are negative, the pregnant women are followed up by ultrasound; if the results of non-invasive prenatal DNA detection are positive, the pregnant women should undergo invasive prenatal diagnosis.

  16. X-linked glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and autosomal 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) polymorphisms in baboons

    SciTech Connect

    VandeBerg, J.L.; Aivaliotis, M.J.; Samollow, P.B. )

    1992-12-01

    Electrophoretic polymorphisms of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) were examined in captive colonies of five subspecies of baboons (Papio hamadryas). Phenotype frequencies and family data verified the X-linked inheritance of the G6PD polymorphism. Insufficient family data were available to confirm autosomal inheritance of the 6PGD polymorphism, but the electrophoretic patterns of variant types (putative heterozygotes) suggested the codominant expression of alleles at an autosomal locus. Implications of the G6PD polymorphism are discussed with regard to its utility as a marker system for research on X-chromosome inactivation during baboon development and for studies of clonal cell proliferation and/or cell selection during the development of atherosclerotic lesions in the baboon model. 61 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  17. Diagnosis of eight groups of xeroderma pigmentosum by genetic complementation using recombinant adenovirus vectors.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Toshiharu; Okura, Masae; Ishii-Osai, Yasue; Hida, Tokimasa

    2016-10-01

    Because patients with xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) must avoid ultraviolet (UV) light from an early age, an early diagnosis of this disorder is essential. XP is composed of seven genetic complementation groups, XP-A to -G, and a variant type (XP-V). To establish an easy and accurate diagnosis of the eight disease groups, we constructed recombinant adenoviruses that expressed one of the XP cDNA. When fibroblasts derived from patients with XP-A, -B, -C, -D, -F or -G were infected with the adenovirus expressing XPA, XPB, XPC, XPD, XPF or XPG, respectively, and UV-C at 5-20 J/m(2) was irradiated, cell viability was clearly recovered by the corresponding recombinant adenoviruses. In contrast, XP-E and XP-V cells were not significantly sensitive to UV irradiation and were barely complemented by the matched recombinant adenoviruses. However, co-infection of Ad-XPA with Ad-XPE increased survival rate of XP-E cells after UV-C exposure. When XP-V cell strains, including one derived from a Japanese patient, were infected with Ad-XPV, exposed to UV-B and cultured with 1 mmol/L of caffeine, flow cytometry detected a characteristic decrease in the S phase in all the XP-V cell strains. From these results, the eight groups of XP could be differentiated by utilizing a set of recombinant adenoviruses, indicating that our procedure provides a convenient and correct diagnostic method for all the XP groups including XP-E and XP-V.

  18. PKA regulatory IIα subunit is essential for PGD2-mediated resolution of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kong, Deping; Shen, Yujun; Liu, Guizhu; Zuo, Shengkai; Ji, Yong; Lu, Ankang; Nakamura, Masataka; Lazarus, Michael; Stratakis, Constantine A; Breyer, Richard M; Yu, Ying

    2016-09-19

    The kinetic participation of macrophages is critical for inflammatory resolution and recovery from myocardial infarction (MI), particularly with respect to the transition from the M1 to the M2 phenotype; however, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. In this study, we found that the deletion of prostaglandin (PG) D2 receptor subtype 1 (DP1) in macrophages retarded M2 polarization, antiinflammatory cytokine production, and resolution in different inflammatory models, including the MI model. DP1 deletion up-regulated proinflammatory genes expression via JAK2/STAT1 signaling in macrophages, whereas its activation facilitated binding of the separated PKA regulatory IIα subunit (PRKAR2A) to the transmembrane domain of IFN-γ receptor, suppressed JAK2-STAT1 axis-mediated M1 polarization, and promoted resolution. PRKAR2A deficiency attenuated DP1 activation-mediated M2 polarization and resolution of inflammation. Collectively, PGD2-DP1 axis-induced M2 polarization facilitates resolution of inflammation through the PRKAR2A-mediated suppression of JAK2/STAT1 signaling. These observations indicate that macrophage DP1 activation represents a promising strategy in the management of inflammation-associated diseases, including post-MI healing.

  19. PKA regulatory IIα subunit is essential for PGD2-mediated resolution of inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yujun; Zuo, Shengkai; Ji, Yong; Nakamura, Masataka; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2016-01-01

    The kinetic participation of macrophages is critical for inflammatory resolution and recovery from myocardial infarction (MI), particularly with respect to the transition from the M1 to the M2 phenotype; however, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. In this study, we found that the deletion of prostaglandin (PG) D2 receptor subtype 1 (DP1) in macrophages retarded M2 polarization, antiinflammatory cytokine production, and resolution in different inflammatory models, including the MI model. DP1 deletion up-regulated proinflammatory genes expression via JAK2/STAT1 signaling in macrophages, whereas its activation facilitated binding of the separated PKA regulatory IIα subunit (PRKAR2A) to the transmembrane domain of IFN-γ receptor, suppressed JAK2–STAT1 axis–mediated M1 polarization, and promoted resolution. PRKAR2A deficiency attenuated DP1 activation–mediated M2 polarization and resolution of inflammation. Collectively, PGD2–DP1 axis–induced M2 polarization facilitates resolution of inflammation through the PRKAR2A-mediated suppression of JAK2/STAT1 signaling. These observations indicate that macrophage DP1 activation represents a promising strategy in the management of inflammation-associated diseases, including post-MI healing. PMID:27621415

  20. [Discovery of Genetic Markers of Resistance to β-Lactams in Gramnegative Microorganisms by PCR Diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Lisitsina, E S; Chernenkaya, T V; Ilyina, E N; Lazareva, I V; Ageevets, V A; Sidorenko, S V

    2015-01-01

    Fifteen specimens of the hemoculture and 89 specimens of the broncho-alveolar lavage were used in the study. Monocultures of gramnegative bacteria resistant to cefotaxime, cefepime, imipenem and meropenem were isolated from the specimens. The PCR method with detection of the results in the real time regimen (PCR test-system Litekh) provided detection of the beta-lactamase genes: bla(CTX-M-like) (72/104, 69.2%), bla(NDM) (6/104, 5.8%), bla(VIM) (49/104, 47.1%) and bla(OXA48-like) (59/104, 56.7%). There was identified correlation between the phenotype of resistance of Acinetobacter spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli to cefotaxime and carbopenems and detection of the bla(CTX-M-like) and bla(NDM) genes. At the same time, up to 70% of the K. pneumoniae isolates from the biological specimes positive with respect to the presence of the carbapenase bla(VIM) and bla(OXA48-like) genes demonstrated their phenotypic susceptibility to carbopenems. The results of the study confirmed the prognostic value of the genetic diagnosis for improvement of the routine bacteriological investigations.

  1. Multi-Stage Feature Selection by Using Genetic Algorithms for Fault Diagnosis in Gearboxes Based on Vibration Signal

    PubMed Central

    Cerrada, Mariela; Sánchez, René Vinicio; Cabrera, Diego; Zurita, Grover; Li, Chuan

    2015-01-01

    There are growing demands for condition-based monitoring of gearboxes, and techniques to improve the reliability, effectiveness and accuracy for fault diagnosis are considered valuable contributions. Feature selection is still an important aspect in machine learning-based diagnosis in order to reach good performance in the diagnosis system. The main aim of this research is to propose a multi-stage feature selection mechanism for selecting the best set of condition parameters on the time, frequency and time-frequency domains, which are extracted from vibration signals for fault diagnosis purposes in gearboxes. The selection is based on genetic algorithms, proposing in each stage a new subset of the best features regarding the classifier performance in a supervised environment. The selected features are augmented at each stage and used as input for a neural network classifier in the next step, while a new subset of feature candidates is treated by the selection process. As a result, the inherent exploration and exploitation of the genetic algorithms for finding the best solutions of the selection problem are locally focused. The approach is tested on a dataset from a real test bed with several fault classes under different running conditions of load and velocity. The model performance for diagnosis is over 98%. PMID:26393603

  2. Multi-Stage Feature Selection by Using Genetic Algorithms for Fault Diagnosis in Gearboxes Based on Vibration Signal.

    PubMed

    Cerrada, Mariela; Vinicio Sánchez, René; Cabrera, Diego; Zurita, Grover; Li, Chuan

    2015-09-18

    There are growing demands for condition-based monitoring of gearboxes, and techniques to improve the reliability, effectiveness and accuracy for fault diagnosis are considered valuable contributions. Feature selection is still an important aspect in machine learning-based diagnosis in order to reach good performance in the diagnosis system. The main aim of this research is to propose a multi-stage feature selection mechanism for selecting the best set of condition parameters on the time, frequency and time-frequency domains, which are extracted from vibration signals for fault diagnosis purposes in gearboxes. The selection is based on genetic algorithms, proposing in each stage a new subset of the best features regarding the classifier performance in a supervised environment. The selected features are augmented at each stage and used as input for a neural network classifier in the next step, while a new subset of feature candidates is treated by the selection process. As a result, the inherent exploration and exploitation of the genetic algorithms for finding the best solutions of the selection problem are locally focused. The Sensors 2015, 15 23904 approach is tested on a dataset from a real test bed with several fault classes under different running conditions of load and velocity. The model performance for diagnosis is over 98%.

  3. "I do not want my baby to suffer as I did"; prenatal and preimplantation genetic diagnosis for BRCA1/2 mutations: a case report and genetic counseling considerations.

    PubMed

    Dagan, Efrat; Gershoni-Baruch, Ruth; Kurolap, Alina; Goldberg, Yael; Fried, Georgeta

    2014-07-01

    This article presents the complexity of prenatal genetic diagnosis and preimplantation genetic diagnosis for hereditary breast-ovarian cancer syndrome. These issues are discussed using a case report to highlight the genetic counseling process, together with decision-making considerations, in light of the clinical, psychological, and ethical perspectives, of both the mutation carriers and health professionals; and the health policy regarding these procedures in Israel compared to several European countries.

  4. KRT9 gene mutation as a reliable indicator in the prenatal molecular diagnosis of epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma.

    PubMed

    Ke, Hai-Ping; Jiang, Hu-Ling; Lv, Ya-Su; Huang, Yi-Zhou; Liu, Rong-Rong; Chen, Xiao-Ling; Du, Zhen-Fang; Luo, Yu-Qin; Xu, Chen-Ming; Fan, Qi-Hui; Zhang, Xian-Ning

    2014-08-01

    Epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma (EPPK) is the most frequent form of such keratodermas. It is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern and is clinically characterized by diffuse yellowish thickening of the skin on the palms and soles with erythematous borders during the first weeks or months after birth. EPPK is generally caused by mutations of the KRT9 gene. More than 26 KRT9 gene mutations responsible for EPPK have been described (Human Intermediate Filament Database, www.interfil.org), and many of these variants are located within the highly-conserved coil 1A region of the α-helical rod domain of keratin 9. Unfortunately, there is no satisfactory treatment for EPPK. Thus, prenatal molecular diagnosis or pre-pregnancy diagnosis is crucial and benefits those affected who seek healthy descendants. In the present study, we performed amniotic fluid-DNA-based prenatal testing for three at-risk pregnant EPPK women from three unrelated southern Chinese families who carried the KRT9 missense mutations p.Arg163Trp and p.Arg163Gln, and successfully helped two families to bear normal daughters. We suggest that before the successful application of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), and noninvasive prenatal diagnosis of EPPK that analyzes fetal cells or cell-free DNA in maternal blood, prenatal genetic diagnosis by amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling (CVS) offers a quite acceptable option for EPPK couples-at-risk to avoid the birth of affected offspring, especially in low- and middle-income countries.

  5. Isolated fetal choroid plexus cysts: not an indication for genetic diagnosis?

    PubMed

    Sohn, C; Gast, A S; Krapfl, E

    1997-01-01

    Offering invasive prenatal cytogenetic testing in cases of isolated choroid plexus cysts is controversial. To give a contribution to this discussion we recorded prospectively the course of 41 fetuses with cysts of the choroid plexus diagnosed in 4,326 pregnancies sonographically scanned in our center between January 1994 and August 1995. The fetuses were all in the 13th to 24th week of gestation, with an average of 19.3 weeks. Only 1 of these fetuses (with large bilateral choroid plexus cysts) had further sonographically visible malformations (renal and cardiac anomalies, malposition of the hands). 34 fetuses had bilateral and 7 one-sided plexus cysts. 38 of the 41 patients decided on invasive diagnosis; karyotyping was successful in all these cases. The complete follow-up until 5 days after birth is known in 38 fetuses, including 3 without genetic diagnosis. A chromosomal aberration was detectable only in 1 fetus (trisomy 18, this fetus had the additional malformations described above), the other fetuses all displaying neither chromosomal nor morphological abnormalities. All fetuses, excluding 1 (the pregnancy was terminated due to trisomy 18) were re-examined before the 25th week of gestation, plexus cysts only still being visible in 3 fetuses. By the 30th week of gestation in these 3 fetuses the cysts had also disappeared. Furthermore, 20 pregnancies with confirmed trisomy 18 diagnosed between 1990 and 1996 were analyzed retrospectively. In 19 cases heart defects had been detected by prenatal ultrasound, cervical hygroma being less common (6 cases) and other malformations still rarer. Choroid plexus cysts had, however, been seen only in the 1 case described above. There was no case of isolated choroid plexus cysts in this group. From our data and current literature we conclude that isolated choroid plexus cysts are not an absolute indication for fetal karyotyping. In our opinion a detailed ultrasound assessment to seek for further malformations in a specialized

  6. An Efficient Trio-Based Mini-Haplotyping Method for Genetic Diagnosis of Phenylketonuria

    PubMed Central

    Talebi, Saeed; Entezam, Mona; Mohajer, Neda; Kazemi-sefat, Golnaz-Ensieh; Razipour, Masoumeh; Ahmadloo, Somayeh; Setoodeh, Aria; Keramatipour, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Objective The phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) locus has high linkage disequilibrium. Haplotypes related to this locus may thus be considered sufficiently informative for genetic diagnosis and carrier screening using multi-allelic markers. In this study, we present an efficient method for haplotype analysis of PAH locus using multiplexing dyes. In addition, we explain how to resolve the dye shift challenge in multiplex short tandem repeat (STR) genotyping. Materials and Methods One hundred family trios were included in this descriptive study. The forward primer of a tetra-nucleotide STR and the reverse primer of a variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) were labeled with three different non-overlapping dyes 5-carboxyfluorescein (FAM), 6-carboxy-N,N,N’,N’-tetramethylrhodamine (HEX) and 6-carboxy-N,N,N’,N’-tetramethylrhodamine (TAMRA). The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products from each family trio were multiplexed for capillary electrophoresis and results were analyzed using Peak Scanner software. Results Multiplexing trio products decreased the cost significantly. The TAMRA labeled products had a significant predictable shift (migrated at a slower electrophoretic rate) relative to the HEX and FAM labeled products. Through our methodology we achieve, the less inter-dye shift than intra-dye shift variance. Correcting the dye shift in the labeled products, according to the reference allele size, significantly decreased the inter-dye variability (P<0.001). Conclusion Multiplexing trio products helps to detect and resolve the dye shift accurately in each family, which otherwise would result in diagnostic error. The dye system of FAM, HEX and TAMRA is more feasible and cheaper than other dye systems. PMID:27540528

  7. Applicability of genetic polymorphism analysis for the diagnosis of Angelman syndrome and the correlation between language difficulties and disease phenotype.

    PubMed

    Wang, K; Li, Y T; Hou, M

    2016-06-17

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurogenetic disorder caused by a defect in the expression of the maternally inherited ubiquitin protein ligase E3A (UBE3A) gene in chromosome 15. The most common genetic defects include maternal deletions in chromosome 15q11-13; however, paternal uniparental disomy and imprinting defects allow for the identification of mutations in UBE3A in 10% of patients with AS. The aim of this study was to validate the clinical features and genetic polymorphisms of AS, and to discuss the relationship between functional language lateralization and the arcuate fasciculus in the Broca's and Wernicke's areas. Six children with AS (mean age = 32.57 months) presenting characteristic behavioral patterns of AS (frequent laughter and happy demeanor, hand flapping, and hypermotor behavior) were recruited to this study. The patients underwent a clinical evaluation (clinical history, dysmorphological and neurological examinations, and psychological evaluations) and paraclinical investigations [genetic tests (fluorescence in situ hybridization and methylation polymerase chain reaction), electroencephalogram, and magnetic resonance imaging]. We conclude that AS diagnosis cannot rely solely on genetic testing for polymorphisms in UBE3A and must consider its clinical characteristics. Moreover, functional language lateralization and the arcuate fasciculus in the Broca's and Wernicke's areas were found to be closely correlated. Therefore, UBE3A gene mutation analysis combined with comprehensive clinical evaluations may be suitable for the diagnosis of AS.

  8. Update on autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis: mRNA analysis using hair samples is a powerful tool for genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Kazumitsu; Akiyama, Masashi

    2015-07-01

    Research on the molecular genetics and pathomechanisms of autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI) has advanced considerably and several causative genes and molecules underlying the disease have been identified. Three major ARCI phenotypes are harlequin ichthyosis (HI), lamellar ichthyosis (LI), and congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma (CIE). Skin barrier defects are involved in the pathogenesis of ARCI. In this review, the causative genes of ARCI and its phenotypes as well as recent advances in the field are summarized. The known causative molecules underlying ARCI include ABCA12, TGM1, ALOXE3, ALOX12B, NIPAL4, CYP4F22, PNPLA1, CERS3, and LIPN. It is important to examine genetic associations and to elucidate the pathomechanisms of ARCI to establish effective therapies and beneficial genetic counseling. Next-generation sequencing is a promising method that enables the detection of causative disease mutations, even in cases of unexpected concomitant genetic diseases. For genetic diagnosis, obtaining mRNA from hair follicle epithelial cells, which are analogous to keratinocytes in the interfollicular epidermis, is convenient and minimally invasive in patients with ARCI. We confirmed that our mRNA analysis method using hair follicle samples can be applied not only to keratinization disorders, but also to other genetic diseases in the dermatology field. Studies that suggest potential next-generation therapies using ARCI model mice are also reviewed.

  9. Protein and genetic diagnosis of limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A: The yield and the pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Fanin, Marina; Angelini, Corrado

    2015-08-01

    Limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A (LGMD2A) is the most frequent form of LGMD worldwide. Comprehensive clinical assessment and laboratory testing is essential for diagnosis of LGMD2A. Muscle immunoblot analysis of calpain-3 is the most useful tool to direct genetic testing, as detection of calpain-3 deficiency has high diagnostic value. However, calpain-3 immunoblot testing lacks sensitivity in about 30% of cases due to gene mutations that inactivate the enzyme. The best diagnostic strategy should be determined on a case-by-case basis, depending on which tissues are available, and which molecular and/or genetic methods are adopted. In this work we survey the current knowledge, advantages, limitations, and pitfalls of protein testing and mutation detection in LGMD2A and provide an update of genetic epidemiology.

  10. Pre-implantation diagnosis of aneuploidy by polar body and blastomere FISH analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Munne, S.; Cohen, J.; Grifo, J.

    1994-09-01

    For preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) of aneuploidy in human in-vitro fertilization (IVF), two blastomeres per embryo should be analyzed to minimize errors caused by FISH and mosaicism. But the biopsy of two cells from an 8-cell embryo can be detrimental. This can be substituted by initial FISH analysis of the first polar body (PB) and subsequent single blastomere analysis. Simultaneous FISH analysis of chromosomes X, Y, 18, 13/21 was used for first polar body aneuploidy analysis. Normal divalents appeared as single-dotted signals corresponding to their two chromatids. We found that pre-division of chromatids increased dramatically with time in culture. All but three pre-division events involved separation of chromatids within the PB or the egg, with a total of two chromatids in each. We concluded that PB aneuploidy analysis is safe when performed within 6 hours after egg retrieval. For our first clinical case we chose a 39 year-old female carrier of an X-linked disease already selected for FISH pre-implantation diagnosis. Eight polar bodies from 12 eggs were analyzed: six showed a normal X181321 complement of divalents; one had an extra chromatid for 13/21 (egg {number_sign}8); and one had a missing chromatid for 13/21 (egg {number_sign}10). After insemination, six fertilized eggs developed into embryos, including egg {number_sign}10 but not egg {number_sign}8. At day 3 of development, a single blastomere per embryo was analyzed by FISH. According to the blastomere analysis, one embryo was haploid, one tetraploid. The two normal female embryos were replaced and pregnancy and CFS results are pending. These results suggest that this technique can be successfully applied for PGD of major aneuploidies in IVF patients over 35. In addition, it indicates that studies on pre-division should be performed on eggs within six hours of retrieval.

  11. Making sense of risk diagnosis in case of prenatal and reproductive genetic counselling for neuromuscular diseases.

    PubMed

    Zaccaro, Antonella; Freda, Maria Francesca

    2014-03-01

    This study explored the processes of significance about the risk communication in prenatal/preconception setting within 1 month to the end of genetic counselling intervention. Participants were all attending a programme of Cardiomyology and Medical Genetics in Naples, Italy, for the first time. Transcripts of 18 semi-structured interviews were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Themes arising included the following: the familiar outcomes of genetic counselling, the risk representation and the impacts on decision-making. The findings suggest the significance of the experience of genetic risk and the implications for the support of individuals and their family after the conclusion of the genetic counselling intervention.

  12. Genetic Testing in the Diagnosis of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia: State-of-the-Art and Future Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Collins, Samuel A; Walker, Woolf T; Lucas, Jane S

    2014-05-09

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a heterogeneous autosomal recessive condition affecting around 1:15,000. In people with PCD, microscopic motile cilia do not move normally resulting in impaired clearance of mucus and debris leading to repeated sinopulmonary infection. If diagnosis is delayed, permanent bronchiectasis and deterioration of lung function occurs. Other complications associated with PCD include congenital heart disease, hearing impairment and infertility. A small number of longitudinal studies suggest that lung function deteriorates before diagnosis of PCD but may stabilise following diagnosis with subsequent specialist management. Early diagnosis is therefore essential, but for a number of reasons referral for diagnostic testing is often delayed until older childhood or even adulthood. Functional diagnostic tests for PCD are expensive, time consuming and require specialist equipment and scientists. In the last few years, there have been considerable developments to identify genes associated with PCD, currently enabling 65% of patients to be identified by bi-allelic mutations. The rapid identification of new genes continues. This review will consider the evidence that early diagnosis of PCD is beneficial. It will review the recent advances in identification of PCD-associated genes and will discuss the role of genetic testing in PCD. It will then consider whether screening for PCD antenatally or in the new born is likely to become a feasible and acceptable for this rare disease.

  13. Genetic Testing Confirmed the Early Diagnosis of X-Linked Hypophosphatemic Rickets in a 7-Month-Old Infant

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Kok Siong; Sng, Andrew Anjian; Ho, Cindy Weili; Koay, Evelyn Siew-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the phosphate regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases on the X-chromosome (PHEX) have been causally associated with X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (XLHR). The early diagnosis of XLHR in infants is challenging when it is based solely on clinical features and biochemical findings. We report a 7-month-old boy with a family history of hypophosphatemic rickets., who demonstrated early clinical evidence of rickets, although serial biochemical findings could not definitively confirm rickets. A sequencing assay targeting the PHEX gene was first performed on the mother’s DNA to screen for mutations in the 5′UTR, 22 coding exons, and the exon-intron junctions. Targeted mutation analysis and mRNA studies were subsequently performed on the boys’ DNA to investigate the pathogenicity of the identified mutation. Genetic screening of the PHEX gene revealed a novel mutation, c.1080-2A>C, at the splice acceptor site in intron 9. The detection of an aberrant mRNA transcript with skipped (loss of) exon 10 establishes its pathogenicity and confirms the diagnosis of XLHR in this infant. Genetic testing of the PHEX gene resulted in early diagnosis of XLHR, thus enabling initiation of therapy and prevention of progressive rachitic changes in the infant. PMID:26904698

  14. Genetic Testing Confirmed the Early Diagnosis of X-Linked Hypophosphatemic Rickets in a 7-Month-Old Infant.

    PubMed

    Poon, Kok Siong; Sng, Andrew Anjian; Ho, Cindy Weili; Koay, Evelyn Siew-Chuan; Loke, Kah Yin

    2015-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the phosphate regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases on the X-chromosome (PHEX) have been causally associated with X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (XLHR). The early diagnosis of XLHR in infants is challenging when it is based solely on clinical features and biochemical findings. We report a 7-month-old boy with a family history of hypophosphatemic rickets., who demonstrated early clinical evidence of rickets, although serial biochemical findings could not definitively confirm rickets. A sequencing assay targeting the PHEX gene was first performed on the mother's DNA to screen for mutations in the 5'UTR, 22 coding exons, and the exon-intron junctions. Targeted mutation analysis and mRNA studies were subsequently performed on the boys' DNA to investigate the pathogenicity of the identified mutation. Genetic screening of the PHEX gene revealed a novel mutation, c.1080-2A>C, at the splice acceptor site in intron 9. The detection of an aberrant mRNA transcript with skipped (loss of) exon 10 establishes its pathogenicity and confirms the diagnosis of XLHR in this infant. Genetic testing of the PHEX gene resulted in early diagnosis of XLHR, thus enabling initiation of therapy and prevention of progressive rachitic changes in the infant.

  15. American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics guideline for the clinical evaluation and etiologic diagnosis of hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Alford, Raye L; Arnos, Kathleen S; Fox, Michelle; Lin, Jerry W; Palmer, Christina G; Pandya, Arti; Rehm, Heidi L; Robin, Nathaniel H; Scott, Daryl A; Yoshinaga-Itano, Christine

    2014-04-01

    Hearing loss is a common and complex condition that can occur at any age, can be inherited or acquired, and is associated with a remarkably wide array of etiologies. The diverse causes of hearing loss, combined with the highly variable and often overlapping presentations of different forms of hearing loss, challenge the ability of traditional clinical evaluations to arrive at an etiologic diagnosis for many deaf and hard-of-hearing individuals. However, identifying the etiology of a hearing loss may affect clinical management, improve prognostic accuracy, and refine genetic counseling and assessment of the likelihood of recurrence for relatives of deaf and hard-of-hearing individuals. Linguistic and cultural identities associated with being deaf or hard of hearing can complicate access to and the effectiveness of clinical care. These concerns can be minimized when genetic and other health-care services are provided in a linguistically and culturally sensitive manner. This guideline offers information about the frequency, causes, and presentations of hearing loss and suggests approaches to the clinical evaluation of deaf and hard-of-hearing individuals aimed at identifying an etiologic diagnosis and providing informative and effective patient education and genetic counseling.

  16. PGD2 and PGE2 regulate gene expression of Prx 6 in primary macrophages via Nrf2.

    PubMed

    Erttmann, Saskia F; Bast, Antje; Seidel, Julia; Breitbach, Katrin; Walther, Reinhard; Steinmetz, Ivo

    2011-08-01

    Peroxiredoxin 6 (Prx 6) is a bifunctional enzyme with both glutathione peroxidase and acidic Ca(2+)-independent phospholipase A(2) activities. We have recently shown that exposure of murine bone marrow-derived macrophages to LPS and IFN-γ leads to induction of COX-2 expression and secretion of PGE(2), up-regulating Prx 6 mRNA levels. This study was designed to investigate various prostaglandins (PGs) for their ability to induce gene expression of Prxs, in particular Prx 6, and to determine the underlying regulatory mechanisms. We provide evidence that both conventional and cyclopentenone PGs enhance Prx 6 mRNA expression. Treatment with either activators or inhibitors of adenylate cyclase as well as cAMP analogs indicated that Prx 6 gene expression is regulated by adenylate cyclase in response to PGD(2) or PGE(2). Furthermore, our study revealed that JAK2, PI3K, PKC, and p38 MAPK contribute to the PGD(2)- or PGE(2)-dependent Prx 6 induction. Using stimulated macrophages from Nrf2-deficient mice or activators of Nrf2 and PPARγ, we found that Nrf2, but not PPARγ, is involved in the PG-dependent increase in Prx 6 mRNA expression. In summary, our data suggest multiple signaling pathways of Prx 6 regulation by PGs and identified Nrf2 as a critical player mediating transcriptional induction.

  17. Distal hereditary motor neuropathy with vocal cord paresis: from difficulty in choral singing to a molecular genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ingram, Gillian; Barwick, Katy E S; Hartley, Louise; McEntagart, Meriel; Crosby, Andrew H; Llewelyn, Gareth; Morris, Huw R

    2016-06-01

    Patients presenting with distal weakness can be a diagnostic challenge; the eventual diagnosis often depends upon accurate clinical phenotyping. We present a mother and daughter with a rare form of distal hereditary motor neuropathy type 7 in whom the diagnosis became apparent by initial difficulty in singing, from early vocal cord dysfunction. This rare neuropathy has now been identified in two apparently unrelated families in Wales. This family's clinical presentation is typical of distal hereditary motor neuropathy type 7, and they have the common truncating mutation in the SLC5A7 gene. Advances in genetic analysis of these rare conditions broaden our understanding of their potential molecular mechanisms and may allow more directed therapy.

  18. [Genetic diagnosis in medicine. An overview of basic concepts and applications].

    PubMed

    Schmidtke, J

    2006-10-01

    Currently, more than half of all known monogenic diseases are characterized at the molecular (DNA) level. This opens the possibility to verify clinically suspected disease at the molecular level, to predict future (late-onset) disorders, to diagnose many diseases prenatally, and to screen the population for genetic traits. Genetic tests that can be performed in Germany, Austria and Switzerland are listed in a database maintained by the German Board of Human Genetics. As of May 2006, 678 different diseases were amenable to DNA-based testing, and 147 institutions offered such tests. The actual genetic test utilisation cannot be determined accurately, but can be deduced from the database of the "Zentralinstitut der Kassenärztlichen Bundesvereinigung". Data have been calculated for the years 1996- 2002. In this time interval, the number of individuals undergoing genetic testing doubled approximately every three years. The total number in 2002 can be estimated at 220,000.

  19. Prenatal genetic diagnosis of retinoblastoma – clinical correlates on follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Neriyanuri, Srividya; Raman, Rajiv; Rishi, Pukhraj; Govindasamy, Kumaramanickavel; Ramprasad, V L; Sharma, Tarun

    2015-01-01

    Retinoblastoma is the most common malignant intraocular tumor in pediatric age group if undetected leads to ocular mortality. Prenatal diagnosis is an emerging technology to detect fatal diseases in utero such that subsequent management is planned to reduce the ocular morbidity. We describe a case demonstrating the importance of prenatal diagnosis in a child with a strong family history of retinoblastoma and importance of a long-term clinical follow-up in these cases. PMID:26632134

  20. A targeted next-generation sequencing assay for the molecular diagnosis of genetic disorders with orodental involvement

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Megana K; Geoffroy, Véronique; Vicaire, Serge; Jost, Bernard; Dumas, Michael; Le Gras, Stéphanie; Switala, Marzena; Gasse, Barbara; Laugel-Haushalter, Virginie; Paschaki, Marie; Leheup, Bruno; Droz, Dominique; Dalstein, Amelie; Loing, Adeline; Grollemund, Bruno; Muller-Bolla, Michèle; Lopez-Cazaux, Séréna; Minoux, Maryline; Jung, Sophie; Obry, Frédéric; Vogt, Vincent; Davideau, Jean-Luc; Davit-Beal, Tiphaine; Kaiser, Anne-Sophie; Moog, Ute; Richard, Béatrice; Morrier, Jean-Jacques; Duprez, Jean-Pierre; Odent, Sylvie; Bailleul-Forestier, Isabelle; Rousset, Monique Marie; Merametdijan, Laure; Toutain, Annick; Joseph, Clara; Giuliano, Fabienne; Dahlet, Jean-Christophe; Courval, Aymeric; El Alloussi, Mustapha; Laouina, Samir; Soskin, Sylvie; Guffon, Nathalie; Dieux, Anne; Doray, Bérénice; Feierabend, Stephanie; Ginglinger, Emmanuelle; Fournier, Benjamin; de la Dure Molla, Muriel; Alembik, Yves; Tardieu, Corinne; Clauss, François; Berdal, Ariane; Stoetzel, Corinne; Manière, Marie Cécile; Dollfus, Hélène; Bloch-Zupan, Agnès

    2016-01-01

    Background Orodental diseases include several clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders that can present in isolation or as part of a genetic syndrome. Due to the vast number of genes implicated in these disorders, establishing a molecular diagnosis can be challenging. We aimed to develop a targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) assay to diagnose mutations and potentially identify novel genes mutated in this group of disorders. Methods We designed an NGS gene panel that targets 585 known and candidate genes in orodental disease. We screened a cohort of 101 unrelated patients without a molecular diagnosis referred to the Reference Centre for Oro-Dental Manifestations of Rare Diseases, Strasbourg, France, for a variety of orodental disorders including isolated and syndromic amelogenesis imperfecta (AI), isolated and syndromic selective tooth agenesis (STHAG), isolated and syndromic dentinogenesis imperfecta, isolated dentin dysplasia, otodental dysplasia and primary failure of tooth eruption. Results We discovered 21 novel pathogenic variants and identified the causative mutation in 39 unrelated patients in known genes (overall diagnostic rate: 39%). Among the largest subcohorts of patients with isolated AI (50 unrelated patients) and isolated STHAG (21 unrelated patients), we had a definitive diagnosis in 14 (27%) and 15 cases (71%), respectively. Surprisingly, COL17A1 mutations accounted for the majority of autosomal-dominant AI cases. Conclusions We have developed a novel targeted NGS assay for the efficient molecular diagnosis of a wide variety of orodental diseases. Furthermore, our panel will contribute to better understanding the contribution of these genes to orodental disease. Trial registration numbers NCT01746121 and NCT02397824. PMID:26502894

  1. How can genetics and epigenetics help the nephrologist improve the diagnosis and treatment of chronic kidney disease patients?

    PubMed

    Witasp, Anna; Ekström, Tomas J; Schalling, Martin; Lindholm, Bengt; Stenvinkel, Peter; Nordfors, Louise

    2014-05-01

    Discovery of novel improved tools for diagnosis, prevention and therapy of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an important task for the nephrology community and it is likely that scientific breakthroughs, to a large extent, will be based on genomics. The rapid growth of the number of genome-wide association studies, major advances in DNA sequencing and omics profiling, and accelerating biomedical research efforts in this area have greatly expanded the knowledge base needed for applied genomics. However, translating and implementing genotype-phenotype data into gene-based medicine in CKD populations is still in an early phase and will require continuous research efforts with integrated approaches and intensified investigations that focus on the biological pathways, which causatively link a genetic variant with the disease phenotype. In this article, we review some current strategies to unravel these translational gaps as well as prospects for the implementation of genetic and epigenetic methods into novel clinical practice.

  2. Genetics of Tinnitus: An Emerging Area for Molecular Diagnosis and Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Escamez, Jose A.; Bibas, Thanos; Cima, Rilana F. F.; Van de Heyning, Paul; Knipper, Marlies; Mazurek, Birgit; Szczepek, Agnieszka J.; Cederroth, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    Subjective tinnitus is the perception of sound in the absence of external or bodily-generated sounds. Chronic tinnitus is a highly prevalent condition affecting over 70 million people in Europe. A wide variety of comorbidities, including hearing loss, psychiatric disorders, neurodegenerative disorders, and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction, have been suggested to contribute to the onset or progression of tinnitus; however, the precise molecular mechanisms of tinnitus are not well understood and the contribution of genetic and epigenetic factors remains unknown. Human genetic studies could enable the identification of novel molecular therapeutic targets, possibly leading to the development of novel pharmaceutical therapeutics. In this article, we briefly discuss the available evidence for a role of genetics in tinnitus and consider potential hurdles in designing genetic studies for tinnitus. Since multiple diseases have tinnitus as a symptom and the supporting genetic evidence is sparse, we propose various strategies to investigate the genetic underpinnings of tinnitus, first by showing evidence of heritability using concordance studies in twins, and second by improving patient selection according to phenotype and/or etiology in order to control potential biases and optimize genetic data output. The increased knowledge resulting from this endeavor could ultimately improve the drug development process and lead to the preventive or curative treatment of tinnitus. PMID:27594824

  3. The rapid molecular genetic diagnosis of cystic fibrosis by polymerase chain reaction: an experience report.

    PubMed

    Macek, M; Boehm, I; Arnold, L; Smrt, J; Macek, M; Duspivová, R; Vávrová, V; Sedlácek, Z; Sperling, K; Schmidtke, J

    1990-01-01

    The authors report their experience with about two thousand DNA amplifications by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in prenatal diagnosis of cystic fibrosis. The method is demonstrated on examples of diagnostic informativity and prenatal diagnosis examination in a family at 1 in 4 risk of the disease using closely CF-linked diagnostic polymorphisms: J3.11/MspI, MetH/MspI, CS7/HhaI, KM19/PstI, Mp6-d9/MspI and XV2c/TaqI, PCR methodology and safety precautions are discussed.

  4. Practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of microcytic anemias due to genetic disorders of iron metabolism or heme synthesis.

    PubMed

    Donker, Albertine E; Raymakers, Reinier A P; Vlasveld, L Thom; van Barneveld, Teus; Terink, Rieneke; Dors, Natasja; Brons, Paul P T; Knoers, Nine V A M; Swinkels, Dorine W

    2014-06-19

    During recent years, our understanding of the pathogenesis of inherited microcytic anemias has gained from the identification of several genes and proteins involved in systemic and cellular iron metabolism and heme syntheses. Numerous case reports illustrate that the implementation of these novel molecular discoveries in clinical practice has increased our understanding of the presentation, diagnosis, and management of these diseases. Integration of these insights into daily clinical practice will reduce delays in establishing a proper diagnosis, invasive and/or costly diagnostic tests, and unnecessary or even detrimental treatments. To assist the clinician, we developed evidence-based multidisciplinary guidelines on the management of rare microcytic anemias due to genetic disorders of iron metabolism and heme synthesis. These genetic disorders may present at all ages, and therefore these guidelines are relevant for pediatricians as well as clinicians who treat adults. This article summarizes these clinical practice guidelines and includes background on pathogenesis, conclusions, and recommendations and a diagnostic flowchart to facilitate using these guidelines in the clinical setting.

  5. Advanced Genetic Testing Comes to the Pain Clinic to Make a Diagnosis of Paroxysmal Extreme Pain Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Ashley; Guthrie, Kimberly J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To describe the use of an advanced genetic testing technique, whole exome sequencing, to diagnose a patient and their family with a SCN9A channelopathy. Setting. Academic tertiary care center. Design. Case report. Case Report. A 61-year-old female with a history of acute facial pain, chronic pain, fibromyalgia, and constipation was found to have a gain of function SCN9A mutation by whole exome sequencing. This mutation resulted in an SCN9A channelopathy that is most consistent with a diagnosis of paroxysmal extreme pain disorder. In addition to the patient being diagnosed, four siblings have a clinical diagnosis of SCN9A channelopathy as they have consistent symptoms and a sister with a known mutation. For treatment, gabapentin was ineffective and carbamazepine was not tolerated. Nontraditional therapies improved symptoms and constipation resolved with pelvic floor retraining with biofeedback. Conclusion. Patients with a personal and family history of chronic pain may benefit from a referral to Medical Genetics. Pelvic floor retraining with biofeedback should be considered for patients with a SCN9A channelopathy and constipation. PMID:27525141

  6. Microsatellite size homoplasies and null alleles do not affect species diagnosis and population genetic analysis in a fungal species complex.

    PubMed

    Queloz, V; Duò, A; Sieber, T N; Grünig, C R

    2010-03-01

    The suitability of 13 microsatellite loci for species diagnosis and population genetics in 11 species of the Phialocephala fortinii s.l.-Acephala applanata species complex (PAC) was assessed. Two data sets were compared to test possible biases in species typing and clone detection resulting from null alleles and size homoplasies. The first data set was based on fragment lengths derived from a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay and the second data set was received from singleplex PCR at lower stringency and sequencing. Most null alleles observed in the multiplex PCR assay could be amplified during singleplex PCR under less stringent conditions. Size homoplasies resulting from mutations in flanking regions and differences in microsatellite structures were observed. For example, Phialocephala uotolensis possessed a (CT)(13) in addition to the (GT)(x) motif at locus mPF_0644. Despite the occurrence of null alleles and size homoplasies, species diagnosis and population genetic analysis studies were not affected. These markers will facilitate studies on population biology, ecology and biogeography of PAC species.

  7. Discriminatory power of common genetic variants in personalized breast cancer diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yirong; Abbey, Craig K.; Liu, Jie; Ong, Irene; Peissig, Peggy; Onitilo, Adedayo A.; Fan, Jun; Yuan, Ming; Burnside, Elizabeth S.

    2016-01-01

    Technology advances in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has engendered optimism that we have entered a new age of precision medicine, in which the risk of breast cancer can be predicted on the basis of a person’s genetic variants. The goal of this study is to evaluate the discriminatory power of common genetic variants in breast cancer risk estimation. We conducted a retrospective case-control study drawing from an existing personalized medicine data repository. We collected variables that predict breast cancer risk: 153 high-frequency/low-penetrance genetic variants, reflecting the state-of-the-art GWAS on breast cancer, mammography descriptors and BI-RADS assessment categories in the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) lexicon. We trained and tested naïve Bayes models by using these predictive variables. We generated ROC curves and used the area under the ROC curve (AUC) to quantify predictive performance. We found that genetic variants achieved comparable predictive performance to BI-RADS assessment categories in terms of AUC (0.650 vs. 0.659, p-value = 0.742), but significantly lower predictive performance than the combination of BI-RADS assessment categories and mammography descriptors (0.650 vs. 0.751, p-value < 0.001). A better understanding of relative predictive capability of genetic variants and mammography data may benefit clinicians and patients to make appropriate decisions about breast cancer screening, prevention, and treatment in the era of precision medicine. PMID:27279675

  8. Discriminatory power of common genetic variants in personalized breast cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yirong; Abbey, Craig K.; Liu, Jie; Ong, Irene; Peissig, Peggy; Onitilo, Adedayo A.; Fan, Jun; Yuan, Ming; Burnside, Elizabeth S.

    2016-03-01

    Technology advances in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has engendered optimism that we have entered a new age of precision medicine, in which the risk of breast cancer can be predicted on the basis of a person's genetic variants. The goal of this study is to evaluate the discriminatory power of common genetic variants in breast cancer risk estimation. We conducted a retrospective case-control study drawing from an existing personalized medicine data repository. We collected variables that predict breast cancer risk: 153 high-frequency/low-penetrance genetic variants, reflecting the state-of-the-art GWAS on breast cancer, mammography descriptors and BI-RADS assessment categories in the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) lexicon. We trained and tested naïve Bayes models by using these predictive variables. We generated ROC curves and used the area under the ROC curve (AUC) to quantify predictive performance. We found that genetic variants achieved comparable predictive performance to BI-RADS assessment categories in terms of AUC (0.650 vs. 0.659, p-value = 0.742), but significantly lower predictive performance than the combination of BI-RADS assessment categories and mammography descriptors (0.650 vs. 0.751, p-value < 0.001). A better understanding of relative predictive capability of genetic variants and mammography data may benefit clinicians and patients to make appropriate decisions about breast cancer screening, prevention, and treatment in the era of precision medicine.

  9. The genetics of Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease: current trends and future implications for diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Hoyle, J Chad; Isfort, Michael C; Roggenbuck, Jennifer; Arnold, W David

    2015-01-01

    Charcot–Marie–Tooth (CMT) disease is the most common hereditary polyneuropathy and is classically associated with an insidious onset of distal predominant motor and sensory loss, muscle wasting, and pes cavus. Other forms of hereditary neuropathy, including sensory predominant or motor predominant forms, are sometimes included in the general classification of CMT, but for the purpose of this review, we will focus primarily on the forms associated with both sensory and motor deficits. CMT has a great deal of genetic heterogeneity, leading to diagnostic considerations that are still rapidly evolving for this disorder. Clinical features, inheritance pattern, gene mutation frequencies, and electrodiagnostic features all are helpful in formulating targeted testing algorithms in practical clinical settings, but these still have shortcomings. Next-generation sequencing (NGS), combined with multigene testing panels, is increasing the sensitivity and efficiency of genetic testing and is quickly overtaking targeted testing strategies. Currently, multigene panel testing and NGS can be considered first-line in many circumstances, although obtaining initial targeted testing for the PMP22 duplication in CMT patients with demyelinating conduction velocities is still a reasonable strategy. As technology improves and cost continues to fall, targeted testing will be completely replaced by multigene NGS panels that can detect the full spectrum of CMT mutations. Nevertheless, clinical acumen is still necessary given the variants of uncertain significance encountered with NGS. Despite the current limitations, the genetic diagnosis of CMT is critical for accurate prognostication, genetic counseling, and in the future, specific targeted therapies. Although whole exome and whole genome sequencing strategies have the power to further elucidate the genetics of CMT, continued technological advances are needed. PMID:26527893

  10. Genetic Identification Is Critical for the Diagnosis of Parkinsonism: A Chinese Pedigree with Early Onset of Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Tang, Bei-sha; Weng, Ling; Li, Nan; Shen, Lu; Wang, Jian; Zuo, Chuan-tao; Yan, Xin-xiang; Xia, Kun; Guo, Ji-feng

    2015-01-01

    Background A number of hereditary neurological diseases display indistinguishable features at the early disease stage. Parkinsonian symptoms can be found in numerous diseases, making it difficult to get a definitive early diagnosis of primary causes for patients with onset of parkinsonism. The accurate and early diagnosis of the causes of parkinsonian patients is important for effective treatments of these patients. Methods We have identified a Chinese family (82 family members over four generations with 21 affected individuals) that manifested the characterized symptoms of parkinsonism and was initially diagnosed as Parkinson’s disease. We followed up with the family for two years, during which we carried out clinical observations, Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography neuroimaging analysis, and exome sequencing to correctly diagnose the case. Results During the two-year follow-up period, we performed comprehensive medical history collection, physical examination, and structural and functional neuroimaging studies of this Chinese family. We found that the patient exhibited progressive deteriorated parkinsonism with Parkinson disease-like neuropathology and also had a good response to the initial levodopa treatment. However, exome sequencing identified a missense mutation, N279K, in exon 10 of MAPT gene, verifying that the early parkinsonian symptoms in this family are caused by the genetic mutation for hereditary frontotemporal lobar dementia. Conclusions For the inherited parkinsonian patients who even show the neuropathology similar to that in Parkinson’s disease and have initial response to levodopa treatment, genetic identification of the molecular basis for the disease is still required for defining the early diagnosis and correct treatment. PMID:26295349

  11. [Psychological aspects of predictive genetic diagnosis in breast and ovarian carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Tiefensee, I; Klusmann, D

    1998-01-01

    Mutations on the genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, that predispose women to breast and ovarian cancer were localised in 1990 (Hall et al. 1990, Narod et al. 1991). With the improvement of the test procedures questions concerning the pros and cons of genetic diagnostic are growing in importance, especially because there are only few scientific studies on the social and psychological consequences of this development. In this article the demands to be made on genetic counselling, the present practice of tests employed in Germany and some "typical" problems of the decision and the consequences of the tests are described.

  12. Are There Cultural Differences in Parental Interest in Early Diagnosis and Genetic Risk Assessment for Autism Spectrum Disorder?

    PubMed Central

    Amiet, Claire; Couchon, Elizabeth; Carr, Kelly; Carayol, Jerôme; Cohen, David

    2014-01-01

    Background: There are many societal and cultural differences between healthcare systems and the use of genetic testing in the US and France. These differences may affect the diagnostic process for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in each country and influence parental opinions regarding the use of genetic screening tools for ASD. Methods: Using an internet-based tool, a survey of parents with at least one child with ASD was conducted. A total of 162 participants from the US completed an English version of the survey and 469 participants from France completed a French version of the survey. Respondents were mainly females (90%) and biological parents (94.3% in the US and 97.2% in France). Results: The mean age of ASD diagnosis reported was not significantly different between France (57.5 ± 38.4 months) and the US (56.5 ± 52.7 months) (p = 0.82) despite significant difference in the average age at which a difference in development was first suspected [29.7 months (±28.4) vs. 21.4 months (±18.1), respectively, p = 7 × 10−4]. Only 27.8% of US participants indicated that their child diagnosed with ASD had undergone diagnostic genetic testing, whereas 61.7% of the French participants indicated this was the case (p = 2.7 × 10−12). In both countries, the majority of respondents (69.3% and 80% from France and the US, respectively) indicated high interest in the use of a genetic screening test for autism. Conclusion: Parents from France and the US report a persistent delay between the initial suspicion of a difference in development and the diagnosis of ASD. Significantly fewer US participants underwent genetic testing although this result should be regarded as exploratory given the limitations. The significance of these between country differences will be discussed. PMID:24795872

  13. mRNA-based detection of rare CFTR mutations improves genetic diagnosis of cystic fibrosis in populations with high genetic heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Felício, V; Ramalho, A S; Igreja, S; Amaral, M D

    2017-03-01

    Even with advent of next generation sequencing complete sequencing of large disease-associated genes and intronic regions is economically not feasible. This is the case of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), the gene responsible for cystic fibrosis (CF). Yet, to confirm a CF diagnosis, proof of CFTR dysfunction needs to be obtained, namely by the identification of two disease-causing mutations. Moreover, with the advent of mutation-based therapies, genotyping is an essential tool for CF disease management. There is, however, still an unmet need to genotype CF patients by fast, comprehensive and cost-effective approaches, especially in populations with high genetic heterogeneity (and low p.F508del incidence), where CF is now emerging with new diagnosis dilemmas (Brazil, Asia, etc). Herein, we report an innovative mRNA-based approach to identify CFTR mutations in the complete coding and intronic regions. We applied this protocol to genotype individuals with a suspicion of CF and only one or no CFTR mutations identified by routine methods. It successfully detected multiple intronic mutations unlikely to be detected by CFTR exon sequencing. We conclude that this is a rapid, robust and inexpensive method to detect any CFTR coding/intronic mutation (including rare ones) that can be easily used either as primary approach or after routine DNA analysis.

  14. Abdomen disease diagnosis in CT images using flexiscale curvelet transform and improved genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Gaurav; Saini, B S

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents an abdomen disease diagnostic system based on the flexi-scale curvelet transform, which uses different optimal scales for extracting features from computed tomography (CT) images. To optimize the scale of the flexi-scale curvelet transform, we propose an improved genetic algorithm. The conventional genetic algorithm assumes that fit parents will likely produce the healthiest offspring that leads to the least fit parents accumulating at the bottom of the population, reducing the fitness of subsequent populations and delaying the optimal solution search. In our improved genetic algorithm, combining the chromosomes of a low-fitness and a high-fitness individual increases the probability of producing high-fitness offspring. Thereby, all of the least fit parent chromosomes are combined with high fit parent to produce offspring for the next population. In this way, the leftover weak chromosomes cannot damage the fitness of subsequent populations. To further facilitate the search for the optimal solution, our improved genetic algorithm adopts modified elitism. The proposed method was applied to 120 CT abdominal images; 30 images each of normal subjects, cysts, tumors and stones. The features extracted by the flexi-scale curvelet transform were more discriminative than conventional methods, demonstrating the potential of our method as a diagnostic tool for abdomen diseases.

  15. Aceruloplasminemia in an asymptomatic patient with a new mutation. Diagnosis and family genetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Aguilar, Fernando; Burguera, Juan A; Benlloch, Salvador; Berenguer, Marina; Rayón, Jose M

    2005-06-01

    A 39-year-old asymptomatic man showed elevated serum ferritin levels, mild hypertransaminasemia and serum ceruloplasmin almost undetectable. There was histological iron accumulation within the hepatocytes and also in the central nervous system (MRI). A genetic analysis revealed a new missense mutation in the ceruloplasmin gene. Two of the other four siblings were also affected by this mutation.

  16. Mosaic small supernumerary marker chromosome 1 at amniocentesis: prenatal diagnosis, molecular genetic analysis and literature review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Ping; Chen, Ming; Su, Yi-Ning; Huang, Jian-Pei; Chern, Schu-Rern; Wu, Peih-Shan; Su, Jun-Wei; Chang, Shun-Ping; Chen, Yu-Ting; Lee, Chen-Chi; Chen, Li-Feng; Pan, Chen-Wen; Wang, Wayseen

    2013-10-15

    We present prenatal diagnosis and molecular cytogenetic analysis of mosaic small supernumerary marker chromosome 1 [sSMC(1)]. We review the literature of sSMC(1) at amniocentesis and chromosome 1p21.1-p12 duplication syndrome. We discuss the genotype-phenotype correlation of the involved genes of ALX3, RBM15, NTNG1, SLC25A24, GPSM2, TBX15 and NOTCH2 in this case.

  17. Tentative clinical diagnosis of Lujan-Fryns syndrome--A conglomeration of different genetic entities?

    PubMed

    Hackmann, Karl; Rump, Andreas; Haas, Stefan A; Lemke, Johannes R; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Tzschach, Andreas; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Albrecht, Beate; Kuechler, Alma; Ripperger, Tim; Kobelt, Albrecht; Oexle, Konrad; Tinschert, Sigrid; Schrock, Evelin; Kalscheuer, Vera M; Di Donato, Nataliya

    2016-01-01

    The clinical diagnosis of Lujan-Fryns syndrome (LFS) comprises X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) with marfanoid habitus, distinct combination of minor facial anomalies and nasal speech. However the definition of syndrome was significantly broadened since the original report and implies ID with marfanoid habitus. Mutations of three genes (MED12, UPF3B, and ZDHHC9) have been reported in "broadly defined" LFS. We examined these genes in 28 individuals with a tentative clinical diagnosis of LFS but we did not identify any causative mutation. By molecular karyotyping we detected other disorders, i.e., Phelan-McDermid syndrome and 16p11.2 microduplication, each in one patient. One affected individual was carrier of a different recurrent duplication on 16p11.2 that has been reported several times to the DECIPHER and ISCA databases in individuals with autism, intellectual disability (ID), and developmental delay. It may represent a new duplication syndrome. We also identified previously unreported de novo duplication on chromosome 12p13.31 which we considered to be disease-causing. X-exome sequencing of four individuals revealed private or non-recurrent mutations in NKAP and LAS1L in one patient each. While LFS is defined as a form of XLID, there seem to be various conditions that have rather similar phenotypes. Therefore, the combination of ID and marfanoid habitus in a male patient is not sufficient for the diagnosis of LFS. We suggest that the diagnosis of LFS in patients with ID and marfanoid habitus should be made only in presence of specific facial features, nasal speech and obvious X-linked segregation of the disorder or an unambiguously pathogenic mutation in the MED12.

  18. Screening Out Controversy: Human Genetics, Emerging Techniques of Diagnosis, and the Origins of the Social Issues Committee of the American Society of Human Genetics, 1964-1973.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, M X

    2016-02-18

    In the years following World War II, and increasingly during the 1960s and 1970s, professional scientific societies developed internal sub-committees to address the social implications of their scientific expertise (Moore, Disrupting Science: Social Movements, American Scientists, and the Politics of the Military, 1945-1975. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2008). This article explores the early years of one such committee, the American Society of Human Genetics' "Social Issues Committee," founded in 1967. Although the committee's name might suggest it was founded to increase the ASHG's public and policy engagement, exploration of the committee's early years reveals a more complicated reality. Affronted by legislators' recent unwillingness to seek the expert advice of human geneticists before adopting widespread neonatal screening programs for phenylketonuria (PKU), and feeling pressed to establish their relevance in an increasingly resource-scarce funding environment, committee members sought to increase the discipline's expert authority. Painfully aware of controversy over abortion rights and haunted by the taint of the discipline's eugenic past, however, the committee proceeded with great caution. Seeking to harness interest in and assert professional control over emerging techniques of genetic diagnosis, the committee strove to protect the society's image by relegating ethical and policy questions about their use to the individual consciences of member scientists. It was not until 1973, after the committee's modest success in organizing support for a retrospective public health study of PKU screening and following the legalization of abortion on demand, that the committee decided to take a more publicly engaged stance.

  19. Genetics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Inheritance; Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... The chromosomes are made up of strands of genetic information called DNA. Each chromosome contains sections of ...

  20. Counseling Challenges with Variants of Uncertain Significance and Incidental Findings in Prenatal Genetic Screening and Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Westerfield, Lauren; Darilek, Sandra; van den Veyver, Ignatia B.

    2014-01-01

    Prenatal genetic screening and testing provides prospective parents information about the health of their fetus. It is offered to find or address an increased risk for chromosomal abnormalities or other genetic conditions in the fetus or to identify the cause of fetal structural abnormalities detected by prenatal imaging. Genome-wide tests, such as the already widely-used chromosomal microarray analysis and emerging diagnostic whole exome and whole genome sequencing, have improved the ability to detect clinically significant findings, but have also increased the chance of detecting incidental findings and variants of uncertain significance. There is an extensive ongoing discussion about optimal strategies for diagnostic laboratories to report such findings and for providers to communicate them with patients. While consensus opinions and guidelines are beginning to appear, they often exclude the prenatal setting, due to its unique set of challenging considerations. These include more limited knowledge of the impact of genetic variants when prospectively detected in an ongoing pregnancy, the absence or limitations of detecting clinically recognizable phenotypes at the time of testing and the different decision-making processes that will ensue from testing. In this review, we examine these challenges within the medical ethical framework unique to prenatal care. PMID:26237491

  1. Molecular approaches to the treatment, prophylaxis, and diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease: clinical molecular and genetic studies on Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Shoji, Mikio

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in clinical molecular and genetic studies on Alzheimer's disease (AD) are summarized here. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Aβ42 and tau are the most sensitive biomarkers for the diagnosis of AD and prediction of its onset following mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Based on this progress, new diagnostic criteria for AD dementia, MCI due to AD, and preclinical AD were proposed by the National Institute of Aging (NIA) and Alzheimer's Association (AA) in April 2011. In these new criteria, progress in CSF biomarker and amyloid imaging studies over the past 10 years has added to critical information. The marked contributions of basic and clinical studies have established clinical evidence supporting these markers. Based on this progress, essential curative therapy for AD is urgently expected.

  2. Using Population Genetics to Interrogate the Monogenic Nephrotic Syndrome Diagnosis in a Case Cohort.

    PubMed

    Sampson, Matthew G; Gillies, Christopher E; Robertson, Catherine C; Crawford, Brendan; Vega-Warner, Virginia; Otto, Edgar A; Kretzler, Matthias; Kang, Hyun Min

    2016-07-01

    To maximize clinical benefits of genetic screening of patients with nephrotic syndrome (NS) to diagnose monogenic causes, reliably distinguishing NS-causing variants from the background of rare, noncausal variants prevalent in all genomes is vital. To determine the prevalence of monogenic NS in a North American case cohort while accounting for background prevalence of genetic variation, we sequenced 21 implicated monogenic NS genes in 312 participants from the Nephrotic Syndrome Study Network and 61 putative controls from the 1000 Genomes Project (1000G). These analyses were extended to available sequence data from approximately 2500 subjects from the 1000G. A typical pathogenicity filter identified causal variants for NS in 4.2% of patients and 5.8% of subjects from the 1000G. We devised a more stringent pathogenicity filtering strategy, reducing background prevalence of causal variants to 1.5%. When applying this stringent filter to patients, prevalence of monogenic NS was 2.9%; of these patients, 67% were pediatric, and 44% had FSGS on biopsy. The rate of complete remission did not associate with monogenic classification. Thus, we identified factors contributing to inaccurate monogenic classification of NS and developed a more accurate variant filtering strategy. The prevalence and clinical correlates of monogenic NS in this sporadically affected cohort differ substantially from those reported for patients referred for genetic analysis. Particularly in unselected, population-based cases, considering putative causal variants in known NS genes from a probabilistic rather than a deterministic perspective may be more precise. We also introduce GeneVetter, a web tool for monogenic assessment of rare disease.

  3. Computer-aided diagnosis system for lung nodules based on computed tomography using shape analysis, a genetic algorithm, and SVM.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho Filho, Antonio Oseas; Silva, Aristófanes Corrêa; de Paiva, Anselmo Cardoso; Nunes, Rodolfo Acatauassú; Gattass, Marcelo

    2016-10-03

    Lung cancer is the major cause of death among patients with cancer worldwide. This work is intended to develop a methodology for the diagnosis of lung nodules using images from the Image Database Consortium and Image Database Resource Initiative (LIDC-IDRI). The proposed methodology uses image processing and pattern recognition techniques. To differentiate the patterns of malignant and benign forms, we used a Minkowski functional, distance measures, representation of the vector of points measures, triangulation measures, and Feret diameters. Finally, we applied a genetic algorithm to select the best model and a support vector machine for classification. In the test stage, we applied the proposed methodology to 1405 (394 malignant and 1011 benign) nodules from the LIDC-IDRI database. The proposed methodology shows promising results for diagnosis of malignant and benign forms, achieving accuracy of 93.19 %, sensitivity of 92.75 %, and specificity of 93.33 %. The results are promising and demonstrate a good rate of correct detections using the shape features. Because early detection allows faster therapeutic intervention, and thus a more favorable prognosis for the patient, herein we propose a methodology that contributes to the area.

  4. Insights for hepatitis C virus related hepatocellular carcinoma genetic biomarkers: Early diagnosis and therapeutic intervention

    PubMed Central

    Ezzat, Wafaa M; Amr, Khalda Sayed

    2016-01-01

    The current review explores the role of emerging molecular contributing factors in liver carcinogenesis on top of hepatitis C virus (HCV). Here we will try to discuss the role genetic and epigenetic factors in pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma. Understanding the role of these factors will help in discovering the mystery of liver carcinogenesis on top of chronic HCV infection. Moreover, use of the studied molecular factors will provide the hepatologists with tailored diagnostic promising biomarkers and flatten the way for establishment of emerging molecular treatment based on exploring the molecular subscription of this aggressive liver cancer. PMID:27843535

  5. An Expert Diagnosis System for Parkinson Disease Based on Genetic Algorithm-Wavelet Kernel-Extreme Learning Machine.

    PubMed

    Avci, Derya; Dogantekin, Akif

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson disease is a major public health problem all around the world. This paper proposes an expert disease diagnosis system for Parkinson disease based on genetic algorithm- (GA-) wavelet kernel- (WK-) Extreme Learning Machines (ELM). The classifier used in this paper is single layer neural network (SLNN) and it is trained by the ELM learning method. The Parkinson disease datasets are obtained from the UCI machine learning database. In wavelet kernel-Extreme Learning Machine (WK-ELM) structure, there are three adjustable parameters of wavelet kernel. These parameters and the numbers of hidden neurons play a major role in the performance of ELM. In this study, the optimum values of these parameters and the numbers of hidden neurons of ELM were obtained by using a genetic algorithm (GA). The performance of the proposed GA-WK-ELM method is evaluated using statical methods such as classification accuracy, sensitivity and specificity analysis, and ROC curves. The calculated highest classification accuracy of the proposed GA-WK-ELM method is found as 96.81%.

  6. Diagnosis of genetic predisposition for lactose intolerance by high resolution melting analysis.

    PubMed

    Delacour, Hervé; Leduc, Amandine; Louçano-Perdriat, Andréa; Plantamura, Julie; Ceppa, Franck

    2017-02-01

    Lactose, the principle sugar in milk, is a disaccharide hydrolyzed by intestinal lactase into glucose and galactose, which are absorbed directly by diffusion in the intestine. The decline of lactase expression (or hypolactasia) in intestinal microvilli after weaning is a normal phenomenon in mammals known as lactase deficiency. It is observed in nearly 75% of the world population and is an inherited autosomal recessive trait with incomplete penetrance. It is caused by SNPs in a regulatory element for lactase gene. In Indo-European, lactase deficiency is associated with rs4982235 SNP (or -13910C>T). The aim of this study is to describe a method based on high resolution melting for rapidly detecting genetic predisposition to lactose intolerance. Analytical performance of the assay was assessed by evaluating within and betwwen-run precision and by comparing the results (n = 50 patients) obtained with the HRM assay to those obtained with the gold standard (Sanger sequencing of the region of interest). In silico prediction of HRM curves was performed to evaluate the potential impact of the other SNPs described within the PCR product on the HRM analytical performances. The assay has good performance (CV <0.2% during the between-run study). A perfect agreement with the gold standard method was observed. The presence of other polymorphisms within the amplified sequence is detected, the misclassification risk is low. This assay can be used for rapidly diagnosing genetic predisposition to lactose intolerance.

  7. Novel Heterozygous Genetic Variants in Patients with 46,XY Gonadal Dysgenesis.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Vasundhera; Jyotsna, Viveka P; Jain, Vandana; Khadgawat, Rajesh; Dada, Rima

    2017-01-01

    46,XY gonadal dysgenesis (GD) constitutes a rare group of disorders characterized by the presence of dysfunctional testes in genotypic males. The molecular etiology is not known in about 2 thirds of instances. The aim of this study was to identify the genetic cause in patients with 46,XY gonadal dysgenesis. Based on clinical, cytogenetic, and biochemical screening, 10 patients with 46,XY GD were recruited. Direct sequencing of SRY, NR5A1, SOX9, DAX1, DHH, DMRT1 genes was carried out for molecular analysis. Among 10 patients, 5 were diagnosed with complete gonadal dysgenesis (CGD), 3 with partial gonadal dysgenesis (PGD), and 3 with testicular agenesis. Molecular analysis revealed 12 heterozygous genetic changes, 4 of which were novel. One (c.416T>A) was observed in evolutionary conserved region of DMRT1 gene in a patient with CGD and was found to be probably damaging on in silico analysis. Other 3 were identified in NR5A1 gene (c.990+22 C>A, c.1387+1403T>A and p.131P), but their association with gonadal dysgenesis is not evident from our study. These genetic changes were absent in parents and 50 healthy control samples, which were also studied. With targeted sequencing approach, a molecular diagnosis was made in only one patient with 46,XY GD. The application of new genomic technologies is required for the precise evaluation of these rare genetic defects.

  8. Antenatal diagnosis of an XXX female. A dilemma for genetic counseling.

    PubMed

    Krone, L R; Prichard, L L; Bradshaw, C L; Jones, O W; Peterson, R M; Dixson, B K

    1975-07-01

    This report describes the first antenatal diagnosis of an XXX female. Over 150 postnatal cases of XXX females have been described. There is no specific phenotype associated with the sex chromosome abnormality and most such persons are fertile. The frequency of XXX females in mental institutions is 3.9 per 1,000 female subjects whereas the frequency in consecutive newborn infants is 1.1 per 1,000 newborns. Chi-square analysis shows this difference cannot be due to chance. On the other hand, data from consecutive newborn studies suggest that intellectual development in XXX newborns is within normal range. Available evidence favors normal development in XXX female infants although the risk for developmental disabilities may be higher for the XXX than for the XX infant.

  9. Prenatal diagnosis of female monozygotic twins discordant for Turner syndrome: implications for prenatal genetic counselling.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, B; Yardin, C; Briault, S; Belin, V; Lienhardt, A; Aubard, Y; Battin, J; Servaud, M; Philippe, H J; Lacombe, D

    2002-08-01

    We describe a set of monozygotic (MZ) female twins, one of whom presented with a typical Turner syndrome (TS) phenotype and the other a normal female phenotype. Prenatal fetal ultrasonographic examination showed a monochorial diamniotic pregnancy with a hygroma colli and growth delay in Twin A and no anomalies in Twin B. Karyotypic analysis performed on fetal blood samples demonstrated a 46,XX/45,X (23/2) mosaicism in Twin A and a normal 46,XX chromosome constitution in Twin B. At birth, Twin A presented with a typical TS and Twin B had a normal female phenotype. Postnatal cytogenetic investigation of blood lymphocytes showed the same 46,XX/45,X mosaicism in both twins: 46,XX/45,X (40/7) in Twin A and 46,XX/45,X (40/5) in Twin B. Further investigations at the age of 10 months showed in Twin A a 46,XX/45,X (98/2) mosaicism in lymphocytes and 100% of 45,X (50 analysed cells) in fibroblasts, and in Twin B a normal 46,XX (100 analysed cells) chromosome constitution in lymphocytes but a mild 46,XX/45,X (78/2) mosaicism in fibroblasts. Monozygosity was confirmed by molecular analysis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of prenatal diagnosis of MZ female twins discordant for TS. Review of reported sets of MZ female twins (eight cases) or triplets (one case) discordant for TS shows, as in the present case, that the phenotype correlates better with the chromosomal distribution of mosaicism in fibroblasts than in lymphocytes. In the blood of MZ twins chimerism may modify the initial allocation of the mosaicism. These results suggest that, in cases of prenatal diagnosis of MZ female twins discordant for TS, the phenotype of each twin would be better predicted from karyotype analysis of cells from amniotic fluid than from fetal blood.

  10. Telethon Network of Genetic Biobanks: a key service for diagnosis and research on rare diseases.

    PubMed

    Filocamo, Mirella; Baldo, Chiara; Goldwurm, Stefano; Renieri, Alessandra; Angelini, Corrado; Moggio, Maurizio; Mora, Marina; Merla, Giuseppe; Politano, Luisa; Garavaglia, Barbara; Casareto, Lorena; Bricarelli, Francesca Dagna

    2013-08-30

    Several examples have always illustrated how access to large numbers of biospecimens and associated data plays a pivotal role in the identification of disease genes and the development of pharmaceuticals. Hence, allowing researchers to access to significant numbers of quality samples and data, genetic biobanks are a powerful tool in basic, translational and clinical research into rare diseases. Recently demand for well-annotated and properly-preserved specimens is growing at a high rate, and is expected to grow for years to come. The best effective solution to this issue is to enhance the potentialities of well-managed biobanks by building a network.Here we report a 5-year experience of the Telethon Network of Genetic Biobanks (TNGB), a non-profit association of Italian repositories created in 2008 to form a virtually unique catalogue of biospecimens and associated data, which presently lists more than 750 rare genetic defects. The process of TNGB harmonisation has been mainly achieved through the adoption of a unique, centrally coordinated, IT infrastructure, which has enabled (i) standardisation of all the TNGB procedures and activities; (ii) creation of an updated TNGB online catalogue, based on minimal data set and controlled terminologies; (iii) sample access policy managed via a shared request control panel at web portal. TNGB has been engaged in disseminating information on its services into both scientific/biomedical - national and international - contexts, as well as associations of patients and families. Indeed, during the last 5-years national and international scientists extensively used the TNGB with different purposes resulting in more than 250 scientific publications. In addition, since its inception the TNGB is an associated member of the Biobanking and Biomolecular Resources Research Infrastructure and recently joined the EuroBioBank network. Moreover, the involvement of patients and families, leading to the formalization of various agreements

  11. Molecular detection of altered X-inactivation patterns in the diagnosis of genetic disease.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, S

    1992-01-01

    It is widely assumed that when a female carrier of a genetic disorder exhibits clinical signs of the disorder it is due to chance non-random X-inactivation in particular tissues. Recently molecular methods have become available for the analysis of X-chromosome inactivation status. These are based either on the methylation patterns of DNA from the active and inactive chromosomes or on the rescue of active X chromosomes in somatic cell hybrids. As a consequence of the molecular studies, it has become obvious that there are some special cases of non-random X-inactivation patterns. These include females carrying X-linked immunodeficiencies and, sometimes, one of a pair of identical female twins.

  12. Direct detection of common and rare inversion mutations in the genetic diagnosis of severe hemophilia A

    SciTech Connect

    Windsor, A.S.; Lillicrap, D.P.; Taylor, S.A.M.

    1994-09-01

    Approximately 50% of the cases of severe hemophilia A (factor VIII:C < 0.01 units/ml) may be due to gross rearrangements of the factor VIII gene. The mutation involves homologous sequences upstream of the factor VIII locus and within intron 22 in an intrachromosomal recombination, inversion, event. The rearrangements can readily be detected on a Southern blot using a probe that is complementary to sequences from within intron 22. We describe here the analysis of this mutation in 71 severe hemophilia A patients. Thirty two of the patients (45%) showed evidence of a rearrangement. Five different patterns of rearrangements were seen, two of which have previously been described and account for the majority of cases (pattern 1, 70% and pattern 2, 16%). Three other abnormal patterns were observed. The inversion mechanism does not usually result in the loss or gain of any genetic material, but in one patient, in whom a unique rearrangement pattern was observed (pattern 3), we have previously documented a gross deletion which removes exons 1-22 of the factor VII gene as well as sequences 5{prime} to the gene. In another individual a fourth pattern in which an extra 19.0 kb band is present was detected. In this case it is unclear as to whether the rearrangement is responsible for the disease or is simply coincident normal variation. A fifth pattern, in which an extra 16.0 kb band was detected, was observed in a family with a new mutation causing hemophilia A. The affected individual and his mother inherited a de novo rearrangement of the factor VIII gene from his unaffected grandfather, implicating it as the cause of the disease. In conclusion, testing for the factor VIII inversion mutation was positive in approximately 45% of severe hemophiliacs, 72% of whom were isolated cases, and as such should constitute the initial stage in the genetic testing protocol for these patients` families.

  13. Exome sequencing improves genetic diagnosis of structural fetal abnormalities revealed by ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Carss, Keren J.; Hillman, Sarah C.; Parthiban, Vijaya; McMullan, Dominic J.; Maher, Eamonn R.; Kilby, Mark D.; Hurles, Matthew E.

    2014-01-01

    The genetic etiology of non-aneuploid fetal structural abnormalities is typically investigated by karyotyping and array-based detection of microscopically detectable rearrangements, and submicroscopic copy-number variants (CNVs), which collectively yield a pathogenic finding in up to 10% of cases. We propose that exome sequencing may substantially increase the identification of underlying etiologies. We performed exome sequencing on a cohort of 30 non-aneuploid fetuses and neonates (along with their parents) with diverse structural abnormalities first identified by prenatal ultrasound. We identified candidate pathogenic variants with a range of inheritance models, and evaluated these in the context of detailed phenotypic information. We identified 35 de novo single-nucleotide variants (SNVs), small indels, deletions or duplications, of which three (accounting for 10% of the cohort) are highly likely to be causative. These are de novo missense variants in FGFR3 and COL2A1, and a de novo 16.8 kb deletion that includes most of OFD1. In five further cases (17%) we identified de novo or inherited recessive or X-linked variants in plausible candidate genes, which require additional validation to determine pathogenicity. Our diagnostic yield of 10% is comparable to, and supplementary to, the diagnostic yield of existing microarray testing for large chromosomal rearrangements and targeted CNV detection. The de novo nature of these events could enable couples to be counseled as to their low recurrence risk. This study outlines the way for a substantial improvement in the diagnostic yield of prenatal genetic abnormalities through the application of next-generation sequencing. PMID:24476948

  14. At the intersection of toxicology, psychiatry, and genetics: a diagnosis of ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sloas, Harold Andrew; Ence, Thomas C; Mendez, Donna R; Cruz, Andrea T

    2013-09-01

    Ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency is a genetic disorder involving a mutation of the ornithine transcarbamylase gene, located on the short arm of the X chromosome (Xp21.1). This makes the expression of the gene most common in homozygous males, but heterozygous females can also be affected and may be more likely to suffer from serious morbidity. Most males present early in the neonatal period with more devastating outcomes than their female counterparts. Up to 34% will present in the first 30 days of life (J Pediatr 2001;138:S30). Females often have partially functioning mitochondria due to uneven distribution of the mutant gene secondary to lyonization (“X-chromosome Inactivation”. Genetics Home Reference, 2012). Occasionally, symptomatic females may not even present until they are placed under metabolic stress such as a severe illness, fasting, pregnancy, or new medication (Roth KS, Steiner RD. “Ornithine Transcarbamylase Deficiency”. EMedicine, 2012). The urea cycle is the body's primary tool for the disposal of excess nitrogen, which is generated by the routine metabolism of proteins and amino acids. Mitochondrial dysfunction impairs urea production and result in hyperammonemia (Semin Neonatol 2002;7:27). The sine qua non among all degrees of OTC deficiency at presentation is hyperammonemia. As in adults, children will have similar symptoms of encephalopathy, but this may be expressed differently depending on the child's developmental level. We present an unusual case of OTC deficiency in an older child with undifferentiated symptoms of an anticholinergic toxidrome, liver failure, iron overdose, and mushroom poisoning.

  15. Prenatal diagnosis and genetic analysis of fetal akinesia deformation sequence and multiple pterygium syndrome associated with neuromuscular junction disorders: a review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Ping

    2012-03-01

    Fetal akinesia deformation sequence is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by a variable combination of arthrogryposis, fetal akinesia, intrauterine growth restriction, developmental abnormalities such as cystic hygroma, pulmonary hypoplasia, cleft palate, cryptorchidism, cardiac defects and intestinal malrotation, and occasional pterygia of the limbs. Multiple pterygium syndrome is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by pterygia of the neck, elbows and/or knees, arthrogryposis, and other phenotypic features such as short stature, genital abnormalities, craniofacial abnormalities, clubfoot, kyphoscoliosis, and cardiac abnormalities. Fetal akinesia deformation sequence may phenotypically overlap with the lethal type of multiple pterygium syndrome. This article provides a comprehensive review of prenatal diagnosis and genetic analysis of fetal akinesia deformation sequence and multiple pterygium syndrome associated with neuromuscular junction disorders. Prenatal diagnosis of fetal akinesia along with cystic hygroma, increased nuchal translucency, nuchal edema, hydrops fetalis, arthrogryposis, pterygia, and other structural abnormalities should include a differential diagnosis of neuromuscular junction disorders. Genetic analysis of mutations in the neuromuscular junction genes such as CHRNA1, CHRND, CHRNG, CNTN1, DOK7, RAPSN, and SYNE1 may unveil the pathogenetic cause of fetal akinesia deformation sequence and multiple pterygium syndrome, and the information acquired is helpful for genetic counseling and clinical management.

  16. Characterization and noninvasive diagnosis of bladder cancer with serum surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy and genetic algorithms.

    PubMed

    Li, Shaoxin; Li, Linfang; Zeng, Qiuyao; Zhang, Yanjiao; Guo, Zhouyi; Liu, Zhiming; Jin, Mei; Su, Chengkang; Lin, Lin; Xu, Junfa; Liu, Songhao

    2015-05-07

    This study aims to characterize and classify serum surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) spectra between bladder cancer patients and normal volunteers by genetic algorithms (GAs) combined with linear discriminate analysis (LDA). Two group serum SERS spectra excited with nanoparticles are collected from healthy volunteers (n = 36) and bladder cancer patients (n = 55). Six diagnostic Raman bands in the regions of 481-486, 682-687, 1018-1034, 1313-1323, 1450-1459 and 1582-1587 cm(-1) related to proteins, nucleic acids and lipids are picked out with the GAs and LDA. By the diagnostic models built with the identified six Raman bands, the improved diagnostic sensitivity of 90.9% and specificity of 100% were acquired for classifying bladder cancer patients from normal serum SERS spectra. The results are superior to the sensitivity of 74.6% and specificity of 97.2% obtained with principal component analysis by the same serum SERS spectra dataset. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves further confirmed the efficiency of diagnostic algorithm based on GA-LDA technique. This exploratory work demonstrates that the serum SERS associated with GA-LDA technique has enormous potential to characterize and non-invasively detect bladder cancer through peripheral blood.

  17. Molecular outcomes, clinical consequences, and genetic diagnosis of Oculocutaneous Albinism in Pakistani population

    PubMed Central

    Shahzad, Mohsin; Yousaf, Sairah; Waryah, Yar M.; Gul, Hadia; Kausar, Tasleem; Tariq, Nabeela; Mahmood, Umair; Ali, Muhammad; Khan, Muzammil A.; Waryah, Ali M.; Shaikh, Rehan S.; Riazuddin, Saima; Ahmed, Zubair M.; Bamshad, Michael J.; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Anderson, Peter; Marchani Blue, Elizabeth; Annable, Marcus; Browning, Brian L.; Buckingham, Kati J.; Chen, Christina; Chin, Jennifer; Chong, Jessica X.; Cooper, Gregory M.; Davis, Colleen P.; Frazar, Christopher; Harrell, Tanya M.; He, Zongxiao; Jain, Preti; Jarvik, Gail P.; Jimenez, Guillaume; Johanson, Eric; Jun, Goo; Kircher, Martin; Kolar, Tom; Krauter, Stephanie A.; Krumm, Niklas; Leal, Suzanne M.; Luksic, Daniel; Marvin, Colby T.; McGee, Sean; Patterson, Karynne; Perez, Marcos; Phillips, Sam W.; Pijoan, Jessica; Poel, Christa; Ragan, Seamus; Reinier, Frederic; Robertson, Peggy D.; Santos-Cortez, Regie; Shankar, Aditi; Slattery, Krystal; Shephard, Cindy; Shively, Kathryn M.; Siegel, Deborah L.; Smith, Joshua D.; Tabor, Holly K.; Tackett, Monica; Wegener, Marc; Wang, Gao; Wheeler, Marsha M.; Wright, Amber; Yi, Qian

    2017-01-01

    Nonsyndromic oculocutaneous Albinism (nsOCA) is clinically characterized by the loss of pigmentation in the skin, hair, and iris. OCA is amongst the most common causes of vision impairment in children. To date, pathogenic variants in six genes have been identified in individuals with nsOCA. Here, we determined the identities, frequencies, and clinical consequences of OCA alleles in 94 previously unreported Pakistani families. Combination of Sanger and Exome sequencing revealed 38 alleles, including 22 novel variants, segregating with nsOCA phenotype in 80 families. Variants of TYR and OCA2 genes were the most common cause of nsOCA, occurring in 43 and 30 families, respectively. Twenty-two novel variants include nine missense, four splice site, two non-sense, one insertion and six gross deletions. In vitro studies revealed retention of OCA proteins harboring novel missense alleles in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of transfected cells. Exon-trapping assays with constructs containing splice site alleles revealed errors in splicing. As eight alleles account for approximately 56% (95% CI: 46.52–65.24%) of nsOCA cases, primarily enrolled from Punjab province of Pakistan, hierarchical strategies for variant detection would be feasible and cost-efficient genetic tests for OCA in families with similar origin. Thus, we developed Tetra-primer ARMS assays for rapid, reliable, reproducible and economical screening of most of these common alleles. PMID:28266639

  18. Primary orbital synovial sarcoma: A clinicopathologic review with a differential diagnosis and discussion of molecular genetics.

    PubMed

    Stagner, Anna M; Jakobiec, Frederick A; Fay, Aaron

    Synovial sarcoma is a soft-tissue sarcoma of the extremities developing in young adults that has rarely been reported in the orbit. Synovial sarcoma is associated with a unique translocation, resulting in an SYT-SSX fusion gene. We analyze 7 published periocular cases, together with the current one, to gain a better appreciation of the features of the tumor in this location and to compare the findings with those derived from nonophthalmic studies. An inferior orbital mass developed in a 31-year-old woman after experiencing periorbital and hemifacial pain for more than a decade. Radiographically, the mass was circumscribed and displayed coarse internal calcifications. A large but subtotal excision with histopathologic examination disclosed a primitive tumor composed of spindled and ovoid cells. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated positivity for nuclear transducin-like enhancer of split 1 and membranous CD99, typical for synovial sarcoma. Fluorescence in situ hybridization identified a (X,18) translocation in the tumor cells. The patient underwent postoperative adjuvant proton beam radiotherapy with a good response that has been maintained during 1 year of follow-up. Orbital soft-tissue tumors of all types are increasingly identified by their distinctive genetic signatures that offer more specificity than standard immunohistochemical tests.

  19. Characterization and noninvasive diagnosis of bladder cancer with serum surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy and genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shaoxin; Li, Linfang; Zeng, Qiuyao; Zhang, Yanjiao; Guo, Zhouyi; Liu, Zhiming; Jin, Mei; Su, Chengkang; Lin, Lin; Xu, Junfa; Liu, Songhao

    2015-05-01

    This study aims to characterize and classify serum surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) spectra between bladder cancer patients and normal volunteers by genetic algorithms (GAs) combined with linear discriminate analysis (LDA). Two group serum SERS spectra excited with nanoparticles are collected from healthy volunteers (n = 36) and bladder cancer patients (n = 55). Six diagnostic Raman bands in the regions of 481-486, 682-687, 1018-1034, 1313-1323, 1450-1459 and 1582-1587 cm-1 related to proteins, nucleic acids and lipids are picked out with the GAs and LDA. By the diagnostic models built with the identified six Raman bands, the improved diagnostic sensitivity of 90.9% and specificity of 100% were acquired for classifying bladder cancer patients from normal serum SERS spectra. The results are superior to the sensitivity of 74.6% and specificity of 97.2% obtained with principal component analysis by the same serum SERS spectra dataset. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves further confirmed the efficiency of diagnostic algorithm based on GA-LDA technique. This exploratory work demonstrates that the serum SERS associated with GA-LDA technique has enormous potential to characterize and non-invasively detect bladder cancer through peripheral blood.

  20. Clinical, genetic, and cellular analysis of 49 osteopetrotic patients: implications for diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Del Fattore, A; Peruzzi, B; Rucci, N; Recchia, I; Cappariello, A; Longo, M; Fortunati, D; Ballanti, P; Iacobini, M; Luciani, M; Devito, R; Pinto, R; Caniglia, M; Lanino, E; Messina, C; Cesaro, S; Letizia, C; Bianchini, G; Fryssira, H; Grabowski, P; Shaw, N; Bishop, N; Hughes, D; Kapur, R P; Datta, H K; Taranta, A; Fornari, R; Migliaccio, S; Teti, A

    2006-01-01

    Background Osteopetrosis, a genetic disease characterised by osteoclast failure, is classified into three forms: infantile malignant autosomal recessive osteopetrosis (ARO), intermediate autosomal recessive osteopetrosis (IRO), and autosomal dominant osteopetrosis (ADO). Methods We studied 49 patients, 21 with ARO, one with IRO, and 27 with type II ADO (ADO II). Results Most ARO patients bore known or novel (one case) ATP6i (TCIRG1) gene mutations. Six ADO II patients had no mutations in ClCN7, the only so far recognised gene implicated, suggesting involvement of yet unknown genes. Identical ClCN7 mutations produced differing phenotypes with variable degrees of severity. In ADO II, serum tartrate resistant acid phosphatase was always elevated. Bone alkaline phosphatase (BALP) was generally low, but osteocalcin was high, suggesting perturbed osteoblast differentiation or function. In contrast, BALP was high in ARO patients. Elevated osteoclast surface/bone surface was noted in biopsies from most ARO patients. Cases with high osteoclasts also showed increased osteoblast surface/bone surface. ARO osteoclasts were morphologically normal, with unaltered formation rates, intracellular pH handling, and response to acidification. Their resorption activity was greatly reduced, but not abolished. In control osteoclasts, all resorption activity was abolished by combined inhibition of proton pumping and sodium/proton antiport. Conclusions These findings provide a rationale for novel therapies targeting pH handling mechanisms in osteoclasts and their microenvironment. PMID:16118345

  1. Analysis of the APX, PGD1 and R1G1B constitutive gene promoters in various organs over three homozygous generations of transgenic rice plants.

    PubMed

    Park, Su-Hyun; Bang, Seung Woon; Jeong, Jin Seo; Jung, Harin; Redillas, Mark Christian Felipe Reveche; Kim, Hyung Il; Lee, Kang Hyun; Kim, Youn Shic; Kim, Ju-Kon

    2012-06-01

    We have previously characterized the constitutively active promoters of the APX, PGD1 and R1G1B genes in rice (Park et al. 2010 in J Exp Bot 61:2459-2467). To have potential crop biotechnology applications, gene promoters must be stably active over many generations. In our current study, we report our further detailed analysis of the APX, PGD1 and R1G1B gene promoters in various organs and tissues of transgenic rice plants for three (T₃₋₅) homozygous generations. The copy numbers in 37 transgenic lines that harbor promoter:gfp constructs were determined and promoter activities were measured by real-time qPCR. Analysis of the 37 lines revealed that 15 contained a single copy of one of the three promoter:gfp chimeric constructs. The promoter activity levels were generally higher in multi-copy lines, whereas variations in these levels over the T₃₋₅ generations studied were observed to be smaller in single-copy than in multi-copy lines. The three promoters were further found to be highly active in the whole plant body at both the vegetative and reproductive stages of plant growth, with the exception of the APX in the ovary and R1G1B in the pistil and filaments where zero or very low levels of activity were detected. Of note, the spatial activities of the PGD1 promoter were found to be strikingly similar to those of the ZmUbi1, a widely used constitutive promoter. Our comparison of promoter activities between T₃, T₄ and T₅ plants revealed that the APX, PGD1 and R1G1B promoters maintained their activities at comparable levels in leaves and roots over three homozygous generations and are therefore potentially viable alternative promoters for crop biotechnology applications.

  2. CEP3 and CEP17 DNA probe potential in the genetic diagnosis and prognostic prediction of esophageal squamous cell cancer

    PubMed Central

    NIYAZ, MADINIYAT; ABDURAHMAN, ABLAJAN; TURGHUN, ABDUGHENI; AWUT, IDIRIS

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the clinical application of molecular pathological diagnosis for the prognosis of Kazakh patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) using centromere enumeration probes (CEPs) for chromosomes 3 and 17. A total of 40 patients with ESCC that had received radical surgical treatment and 10 healthy control participants were enrolled in the present study. Touch preparations of fresh cancerous and normal tissues were completed and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed to count the copy numbers of CEP 3 and 17, and abnormalities were analyzed, in comparison with routine pathological diagnoses. FISH analysis demonstrated that abnormal copy numbers of CEP 3 and 17 (aneuploidy) were detected in all 40 patients with ESCC. CEP 3 and 17 polyploidy rates differed significantly between poorly differentiated, moderately differentiated and well-differentiated ESCC groups (P<0.05): Well-differentiated, 35.38 and 30.92%; moderately differentiated, 55.81 and 44.43%; and poorly differentiated, 76.26 and 71.90%, respectively. Furthermore, polyploidy rates were significantly increased in the group with lymph node metastasis, as compared with the group without (CEP 3, P=0.0001; CEP 17, P=0.012). Variations in the copy numbers of CEP 3 and 17 were demonstrated to be correlated with the level of differentiation and lymph node metastasis in patients with ESCC. Therefore, the present results indicate that DNA probes may be used to predict prognostic factors in patients with ESCC. Furthermore, FISH technology is an objective and qualitative method that is capable of detecting variations in CEP 3 and 17; therefore, FISH may be used in the genetic diagnosis of ESCC in Kazakh patients. PMID:27073452

  3. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) gene mutations in North Egyptian population: implications for the genetic diagnosis in Egypt.

    PubMed

    El-Seedy, A; Pasquet, M C; Shafiek, H; Morsi, T; Kitzis, A; Ladevèze, V

    2016-11-30

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) occurrence in Arab populations is not common and still remains underidentified. Furthermore, the lack of disease awareness and diagnosis facilities have mislead the identification of cystic fibrosis for decades. The knowledge about cystic fibrosis (CF) in Egypt is very limited, and a few reports have drawn attention to the existence of CF or CFTR-related disorders (CFTR-RDs) in the Egyptian population. Therefore a comprehensive genetic analysis of the CFTR gene was realized in patients of North Egypt. DNA samples of 56 Egyptian patients were screened for the CFTR gene mutations. The 27 exons and their flanking regions of the CFTR gene were amplified by PCR, using the published primer pairs, and were studied by automated direct DNA sequencing to detect disease-causing mutations. Moreover, large duplication/deletion was analysed by MLPA technique. CFTR screening revealed the identification of thirteen mutations including four novel ones: c.92G>A (p.Arg31His), c.2782G>C (p.Ala928Pro), c.3718-24G>A, c.4207A>G (p.Arg1403Gly) and nine previously reported mutations: c.454A>T (p.Met152Leu), c.902A>G (p.Tyr301Cys), c.1418delG, c.2620-15C>G, c.2997_3000delAATT, c.3154T>G (p.Phe1052Val), c.3872A>G (p.Gln1291Arg), c.3877G>A (p.Val1293Ile), c.4242+10T>C. Furthermore, eight polymorphisms were found: c.743+40A>G, c.869+11C>T, c.1408A>G, c.1584G>A, c.2562T>G, c.3870A>G, c.4272C>T, c.4389G>A. These mutations and polymorphisms were not previously described in the Egyptian population except for the c.1408A>G polymorphism. Here we demonstrate the importance of the newly discovered mutations in Egyptian patients and the presence of CF, whereas the p.Phe508del mutation is not detected. The identification of CFTR mutations will become increasingly important in undocumented populations. The current findings will help us expand the mutational spectrum of CF and establish the first panel of the CFTR gene mutations in the Egyptian population and design an appropriate

  4. Genetic diagnosis of familial hypercholesterolaemia: the importance of functional analysis of potential splice-site mutations.

    PubMed

    Bourbon, M; Duarte, M A; Alves, A C; Medeiros, A M; Marques, L; Soutar, A K

    2009-05-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) results from defective low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) activity, mainly due to LDLR gene defects. Of the many different LDLR mutations found in patients with FH, about 6% of single base substitutions are located near or within introns, and are predicted to result in exon skipping, retention of an intron, or activation of cryptic sites during mRNA splicing. This paper reports on the Portuguese FH Study, which found 10 such mutations, 6 of them novel. For the mutations that have not been described before or those whose effect on function have not been analysed, their effect on splicing was investigated, using reverse transcriptase PCR analysis of LDLR mRNA from freshly isolated blood mononuclear cells. Two of these variants (c.313+6 T-->C, c.2389G-->T (p.V776L)) caused exon skipping, and one caused retention of an intron (c.1359-5C-->G), whereas two others (c.2140+5 G-->A and c.1061-8T-->C) had no apparent effect. Any effect of c.1185G-->C (p.V374V) on splicing could not be determined because it was on an allele with a promoter mutation (-42C-->G) that was probably not transcribed. Variants in four patients lost to follow-up could not be tested experimentally, but they almost certainly affect splicing because they disrupt the invariant AG or GT in acceptor (c.818-2A-->G) or donor (c.1060+1G-->A, c.1845+1delG and c.2547+1G-->A) spice sites. These findings emphasise that care must be taken before reporting the presence or absence of a splice-site mutation in the LDLR gene for diagnostic purposes. The study also shows that relatively simple, quick and inexpensive RNA assays can evaluate putative splicing mutations that are not always predictable by available software, thereby reducing genetic misdiagnosis of patients with FH.

  5. Functional testing strategy for coding genetic variants of unclear significance in MLH1 in Lynch syndrome diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Hinrichsen, Inga; Schäfer, Dieter; Langer, Deborah; Köger, Nicole; Wittmann, Margarethe; Aretz, Stefan; Steinke, Verena; Holzapfel, Stefanie; Trojan, Jörg; König, Rainer; Zeuzem, Stefan; Brieger, Angela; Plotz, Guido

    2015-02-01

    Lynch syndrome is caused by inactivating mutations in the MLH1 gene, but genetic variants of unclear significance frequently preclude diagnosis. Functional testing can reveal variant-conferred defects in gene or protein function. Based on functional defect frequencies and clinical applicability of test systems, we developed a functional testing strategy aimed at efficiently detecting pathogenic defects in coding MLH1 variants. In this strategy, tests of repair activity and expression are prioritized over analyses of subcellular protein localization and messenger RNA (mRNA) formation. This strategy was used for four unclear coding MLH1 variants (p.Asp41His, p.Leu507Phe, p.Gln689Arg, p.Glu605del + p.Val716Met). Expression was analyzed using a transfection system, mismatch repair (MMR) activity by complementation in vitro, mRNA formation by reverse transcriptase-PCR in carrier lymphocyte mRNA, and subcellular localization with dye-labeled fusion constructs. All tests included clinically meaningful controls. The strategy enabled efficient identification of defects in two unclear variants: the p.Asp41His variant showed loss of MMR activity, whereas the compound variant p.Glu605del + p.Val716Met had a defect of expression. This expression defect was significantly stronger than the pathogenic expression reference variant analyzed in parallel, therefore the defect of the compound variant is also pathogenic. Interestingly, the expression defect was caused additively by both of the compound variants, at least one of which is non-pathogenic when occurring by itself. Tests were neutral for p.Leu507Phe and p.Gln689Arg, and the results were consistent with available clinical data. We finally discuss the improved sensitivity and efficiency of the applied strategy and its limitations in analyzing unclear coding MLH1 variants.

  6. Implementation of next-generation sequencing for molecular diagnosis of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer highlights its genetic heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Pedro; Paulo, Paula; Santos, Catarina; Rocha, Patrícia; Pinto, Carla; Veiga, Isabel; Pinheiro, Manuela; Peixoto, Ana; Teixeira, Manuel R

    2016-09-01

    Molecular diagnosis of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) by standard methodologies has been limited to the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. With the recent development of new sequencing methodologies, the speed and efficiency of DNA testing have dramatically improved. The aim of this work was to validate the use of next-generation sequencing (NGS) for the detection of BRCA1/BRCA2 point mutations in a diagnostic setting and to study the role of other genes associated with HBOC in Portuguese families. A cohort of 94 high-risk families was included in the study, and they were initially screened for the two common founder mutations with variant-specific methods. Fourteen index patients were shown to carry the Portuguese founder mutation BRCA2 c.156_157insAlu, and the remaining 80 were analyzed in parallel by Sanger sequencing for the BRCA1/BRCA2 genes and by NGS for a panel of 17 genes that have been described as involved in predisposition to breast and/or ovarian cancer. A total of 506 variants in the BRCA1/BRCA2 genes were detected by both methodologies, with a 100 % concordance between them. This strategy allowed the detection of a total of 39 deleterious mutations in the 94 index patients, namely 10 in BRCA1 (25.6 %), 21 in BRCA2 (53.8 %), four in PALB2 (10.3 %), two in ATM (5.1 %), one in CHEK2 (2.6 %), and one in TP53 (2.6 %), with 20.5 % of the deleterious mutations being found in genes other than BRCA1/BRCA2. These results demonstrate the efficiency of NGS for the detection of BRCA1/BRCA2 point mutations and highlight the genetic heterogeneity of HBOC.

  7. Medical genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Jorde, L.B.; Carey, J.C.; White, R.L.

    1995-10-01

    This book on the subject of medical genetics is a textbook aimed at a very broad audience: principally, medical students, nursing students, graduate, and undergraduate students. The book is actually a primer of general genetics as applied to humans and provides a well-balanced introduction to the scientific and clinical basis of human genetics. The twelve chapters include: Introduction, Basic Cell Biology, Genetic Variation, Autosomal Dominant and Recessive Inheritance, Sex-linked and Mitochondrial Inheritance, Clinical Cytogenetics, Gene Mapping, Immunogenetics, Cancer Genetics, Multifactorial Inheritance and Common Disease, Genetic Screening, Genetic Diagnosis and Gene Therapy, and Clinical Genetics and Genetic Counseling.

  8. Effects of Common Pesticides on Prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) Inhibition in SC5 Mouse Sertoli Cells, Evidence of Binding at the COX-2 Active Site, and Implications for Endocrine Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Kugathas, Subramaniam; Audouze, Karine; Ermler, Sibylle; Orton, Frances; Rosivatz, Erika; Scholze, Martin; Kortenkamp, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Background: There are concerns that diminished prostaglandin action in fetal life could increase the risk of congenital malformations. Many endocrine-disrupting chemicals have been found to suppress prostaglandin synthesis, but to our knowledge, pesticides have never been tested for these effects. Objectives: We assessed the ability of pesticides that are commonly used in the European Union to suppress prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) synthesis. Methods: Changes in PGD2 secretion in juvenile mouse Sertoli cells (SC5 cells) were measured using an ELISA. Coincubation with arachidonic acid (AA) was conducted to determine the site of action in the PGD2 synthetic pathway. Molecular modeling studies were performed to assess whether pesticides identified as PGD2-active could serve as ligands of the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) binding pocket. Results: The pesticides boscalid, chlorpropham, cypermethrin, cyprodinil, fenhexamid, fludioxonil, imazalil (enilconazole), imidacloprid, iprodione, linuron, methiocarb, o-phenylphenol, pirimiphos-methyl, pyrimethanil, and tebuconazole suppressed PGD2 production. Strikingly, some of these substances—o-phenylphenol, cypermethrin, cyprodinil, linuron, and imazalil (enilconazole)—showed potencies (IC50) in the range between 175 and 1,500 nM, similar to those of analgesics intended to block COX enzymes. Supplementation with AA failed to reverse this effect, suggesting that the sites of action of these pesticides are COX enzymes. The molecular modeling studies revealed that the COX-2 binding pocket can accommodate most of the pesticides shown to suppress PGD2 synthesis. Some of these pesticides are also capable of antagonizing the androgen receptor. Conclusions: Chemicals with structural features more varied than previously thought can suppress PGD2 synthesis. Our findings signal a need for in vivo studies to establish the extent of endocrine-disrupting effects that might arise from simultaneous interference with PGD2 signaling and androgen action

  9. Genetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Capsicum represents one of several well characterized Solanaceous genera. A wealth of classical and molecular genetics research is available for the genus. Information gleaned from its cultivated relatives, tomato and potato, provide further insight for basic and applied studies. Early ...

  10. Genetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maintaining genetic variation in wild populations of Arctic organisms is fundamental to the long-term persistence of high latitude biodiversity. Variability is important because it provides options for species to respond to changing environmental conditions and novel challenges such as emerging path...

  11. How Are Genetic Conditions Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Consultation How are genetic conditions diagnosed? How are genetic conditions diagnosed? A doctor may suspect a diagnosis ... and advocacy resources. For more information about diagnosing genetic conditions: Genetics Home Reference provides information about genetic ...

  12. Single strand conformation polymorphism analysis of androgen receptor gene mutations in patients with androgen insensitivity syndromes: Application for diagnosis, genetic counseling, and therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hiort, O. Tufts-New England Medical Center, Boston, MA ); Huang, Q. ); Sinnecker, G.H.G.; Kruse, K. ); Sadeghi-Nejad, A.; Wolfe, H.J. ); Yandell, D.W. ) Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA )

    1993-07-01

    Recent studies indicate that mutations in the androgen receptor gene are associated with androgen insensitivity syndromes, a heterogeneous group of related disorders involving defective sexual differentiation in karyotypic males. In this report, the authors address the possibility of rapid mutational analysis of the androgen receptor gene for initial diagnosis, genetic counseling, and molecular subclassification of affected patients and their families. DNA from peripheral blood leukocytes of six patients from five families with various degrees of androgen insensitivity was studied. Exons 2 to 8 of the androgen receptor gene were analyzed using a combination of single strand conformation polymorphism analysis and direct DNA sequencing. Female family members were also studied to identify heterozygote carriers. Point mutations in the AR gene were identified in all six patients, and all mutations caused amino acid substitutions. One patient with incomplete androgen insensitivity was a mosaic for the mutation. Four of the five mothers, as well as a young sister of one patient, were carriers of the mutation present in the affected child. The data show that new mutations may occur in the androgen receptor gene leading to sporadic androgen insensitivity syndrome. Molecular genetic characterization of the variant allele can serve as a primary tool for diagnosis and subsequent therapy, and can provide a basis for distinguishing heterozygous carriers in familial androgen resistance. The identification of carriers is of substantial clinical importance for genetic counseling. 29 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Oligonucleotide Arrays vs. Metaphase-Comparative Genomic Hybridisation and BAC Arrays for Single-Cell Analysis: First Applications to Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for Robertsonian Translocation Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Laia; del Rey, Javier; Daina, Gemma; García-Aragonés, Manel; Armengol, Lluís; Fernandez-Encinas, Alba; Parriego, Mònica; Boada, Montserrat; Martinez-Passarell, Olga; Martorell, Maria Rosa; Casagran, Oriol; Benet, Jordi; Navarro, Joaquima

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive chromosome analysis techniques such as metaphase-Comparative Genomic Hybridisation (CGH) and array-CGH are available for single-cell analysis. However, while metaphase-CGH and BAC array-CGH have been widely used for Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis, oligonucleotide array-CGH has not been used in an extensive way. A comparison between oligonucleotide array-CGH and metaphase-CGH has been performed analysing 15 single fibroblasts from aneuploid cell-lines and 18 single blastomeres from human cleavage-stage embryos. Afterwards, oligonucleotide array-CGH and BAC array-CGH were also compared analysing 16 single blastomeres from human cleavage-stage embryos. All three comprehensive analysis techniques provided broadly similar cytogenetic profiles; however, non-identical profiles appeared when extensive aneuploidies were present in a cell. Both array techniques provided an optimised analysis procedure and a higher resolution than metaphase-CGH. Moreover, oligonucleotide array-CGH was able to define extra segmental imbalances in 14.7% of the blastomeres and it better determined the specific unbalanced chromosome regions due to a higher resolution of the technique (≈20 kb). Applicability of oligonucleotide array-CGH for Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis has been demonstrated in two cases of Robertsonian translocation carriers 45,XY,der(13;14)(q10;q10). Transfer of euploid embryos was performed in both cases and pregnancy was achieved by one of the couples. This is the first time that an oligonucleotide array-CGH approach has been successfully applied to Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for balanced chromosome rearrangement carriers. PMID:25415307

  14. Oligonucleotide arrays vs. metaphase-comparative genomic hybridisation and BAC arrays for single-cell analysis: first applications to preimplantation genetic diagnosis for Robertsonian translocation carriers.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Laia; del Rey, Javier; Daina, Gemma; García-Aragonés, Manel; Armengol, Lluís; Fernandez-Encinas, Alba; Parriego, Mònica; Boada, Montserrat; Martinez-Passarell, Olga; Martorell, Maria Rosa; Casagran, Oriol; Benet, Jordi; Navarro, Joaquima

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive chromosome analysis techniques such as metaphase-Comparative Genomic Hybridisation (CGH) and array-CGH are available for single-cell analysis. However, while metaphase-CGH and BAC array-CGH have been widely used for Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis, oligonucleotide array-CGH has not been used in an extensive way. A comparison between oligonucleotide array-CGH and metaphase-CGH has been performed analysing 15 single fibroblasts from aneuploid cell-lines and 18 single blastomeres from human cleavage-stage embryos. Afterwards, oligonucleotide array-CGH and BAC array-CGH were also compared analysing 16 single blastomeres from human cleavage-stage embryos. All three comprehensive analysis techniques provided broadly similar cytogenetic profiles; however, non-identical profiles appeared when extensive aneuploidies were present in a cell. Both array techniques provided an optimised analysis procedure and a higher resolution than metaphase-CGH. Moreover, oligonucleotide array-CGH was able to define extra segmental imbalances in 14.7% of the blastomeres and it better determined the specific unbalanced chromosome regions due to a higher resolution of the technique (≈ 20 kb). Applicability of oligonucleotide array-CGH for Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis has been demonstrated in two cases of Robertsonian translocation carriers 45,XY,der(13;14)(q10;q10). Transfer of euploid embryos was performed in both cases and pregnancy was achieved by one of the couples. This is the first time that an oligonucleotide array-CGH approach has been successfully applied to Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for balanced chromosome rearrangement carriers.

  15. Presentation of Progressive Familial Intrahepatic Cholestasis Type 3 Mimicking Wilson Disease: Molecular Genetic Diagnosis and Response to Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Dhanpat; Schilsky, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 3 (PFIC3) is an autosomal recessive disorder of cholestasis of hepatocellular origin, typically seen in infancy or childhood caused by a defect in the ABCB4 located on chromosome 7. Here we report on an older patient, aged 15, who presented with biochemical testing that led to an initial consideration of a diagnosis of Wilson disease (WD) resulting in a delayed diagnosis of PFIC3. Diagnosis of PFIC3 was later confirmed by molecular studies that identified novel mutations in the ABCB4 gene. Cholestasis due to PFIC3 can cause elevated hepatic copper and increased urine copper excretion that overlap with current diagnostic criteria for WD. Molecular diagnostics are very useful for establishing the diagnosis of PFIC3. Ursodeoxycholic acid ameliorates cholestasis in PFIC3, and may help mediate a reduction in hepatic copper content in response to treatment. PMID:26473142

  16. Induced pluripotent stem cells offer new approach to therapy in thalassemia and sickle cell anemia and option in prenatal diagnosis in genetic diseases.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lin; Chang, Judy C; Lin, Chin; Sun, Xiaofang; Yu, Jingwei; Kan, Yuet Wai

    2009-06-16

    The innovation of reprogramming somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells provides a possible new approach to treat beta-thalassemia and other genetic diseases such as sickle cell anemia. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells can be made from these patients' somatic cells and the mutation in the beta-globin gene corrected by gene targeting, and the cells differentiated into hematopoietic cells to be returned to the patient. In this study, we reprogrammed the skin fibroblasts of a patient with homozygous beta(0) thalassemia into iPS cells, and showed that the iPS cells could be differentiated into hematopoietic cells that synthesized hemoglobin. Prenatal diagnosis and selective abortion have been effective in decreasing the number of beta-thalassemia births in some countries that have instituted carrier screening and genetic counseling. To make use of the cells from the amniotic fluid or chorionic villus sampling that are used for prenatal diagnosis, we also showed that these cells could be reprogrammed into iPS cells. This raises the possibility of providing a new option following prenatal diagnosis of a fetus affected by a severe illness. Currently, the parents would choose either to terminate the pregnancy or continue it and take care of the sick child after birth. The cells for prenatal diagnosis can be converted into iPS cells for treatment in the perinatal periods. Early treatment has the advantage of requiring much fewer cells than adult treatment, and can also prevent organ damage in those diseases in which damage can begin in utero or at an early age.

  17. Diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease on the basis of clinical–genetic classification: a population-based modelling study

    PubMed Central

    Nalls, Mike A.; McLean, Cory Y.; Rick, Jacqueline; Eberly, Shirley; Hutten, Samantha J.; Gwinn, Katrina; Sutherland, Margaret; Martinez, Maria; Heutink, Peter; Williams, Nigel; Hardy, John; Gasser, Thomas; Brice, Alexis; Price, T. Ryan; Nicolas, Aude; Keller, Margaux F.; Molony, Cliona; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Chen-Plotkin, Alice; Suh, Eunran; Letson, Christopher; Fiandaca, Massimo S.; Mapstone, Mark; Federoff, Howard J.; Noyce, Alastair J; Morris, Huw; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M.; Weintraub, Daniel; Zabetian, Cyrus; Hernandez, Dena G.; Lesage, Suzanne; Mullins, Meghan; Conley, Emily Drabant; Northover, Carrie; Frasier, Mark; Marek, Ken; Day-Williams, Aaron G.; Stone, David J.; Ioannidis, John P. A.; Singleton, Andrew B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Accurate diagnosis and early detection of complex disease has the potential to be of enormous benefit to clinical trialists, patients, and researchers alike. We sought to create a non-invasive, low-cost, and accurate classification model for diagnosing Parkinson’s disease risk to serve as a basis for future disease prediction studies in prospective longitudinal cohorts. Methods We developed a simple disease classifying model within 367 patients with Parkinson’s disease and phenotypically typical imaging data and 165 controls without neurological disease of the Parkinson’s Progression Marker Initiative (PPMI) study. Olfactory function, genetic risk, family history of PD, age and gender were algorithmically selected as significant contributors to our classifying model. This model was developed using the PPMI study then tested in 825 patients with Parkinson’s disease and 261 controls from five independent studies with varying recruitment strategies and designs including the Parkinson’s Disease Biomarkers Program (PDBP), Parkinson’s Associated Risk Study (PARS), 23andMe, Longitudinal and Biomarker Study in PD (LABS-PD), and Morris K. Udall Parkinson’s Disease Research Center of Excellence (Penn-Udall). Findings Our initial model correctly distinguished patients with Parkinson’s disease from controls at an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.923 (95% CI = 0.900 – 0.946) with high sensitivity (0.834, 95% CI = 0.711 – 0.883) and specificity (0.903, 95% CI = 0.824 – 0.946) in PPMI at its optimal AUC threshold (0.655). The model is also well-calibrated with all Hosmer-Lemeshow simulations suggesting that when parsed into random subgroups, the actual data mirrors that of the larger expected data, demonstrating that our model is robust and fits well. Likewise external validation shows excellent classification of PD with AUCs of 0.894 in PDBP, 0.998 in PARS, 0.955 in 23andMe, 0.929 in LABS-PD, and 0.939 in Penn-Udall. Additionally, when our model

  18. Clinical and genetic challenges in a family with history of childhood polyp, aortopathy, and clinical diagnosis of hereditary hemorrhagic teleangiectasia (HHT)

    PubMed Central

    Kadiyska, Tanya; Nossikoff, Alexander; Kratunkov, Pencho; Hachmerian, Mary; Angelova, Ludmila

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic teleangiectasia (HHT) is a genetic disorder, characterized by abnormal vessel formation and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). The so-called “Curaçao criteria” are most commonly employed for the purposes of clinical diagnosis. However, children may not exhibit the full magnitude of symptoms and the Curaçao criteria appear to be less sensitive in this setting. We describe a family, in which two members were clinically diagnosed with HHT and referred for genetic testing. As there were phenotypic features suggesting the high likelihood of combined syndrome of juvenile polyposis with hereditary hemorrhagic teleangiectasia (JPHT), we proceeded with genetic testing of SMAD4 gene as initial step, which revealed a novel frameshift mutation. This case shows the variety of challenges that clinicians and genetic laboratories may face in complex cases such as combined JPHT syndrome. Knowledge of the syndrome features is of paramount importance as they could frequently point at the most appropriate gene to be tested. PMID:27212857

  19. A genetic study of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) in south-western Ontario. II. A PCR based approach to molecular and prenatal diagnosis using linkage.

    PubMed Central

    Rodenhiser, D I; Ainsworth, P J; Coulter-Mackie, M B; Singh, S M; Jung, J H

    1993-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a common, autosomal dominant genetic disorder with a variety of highly variable symptoms including cutaneous manifestations (such as café au lait spots), Lisch nodules, plexiform neurofibromas, skeletal abnormalities, an increased risk for malignancy, and the development of learning disabilities. The wide clinical variability of expression of the disease phenotype and high (spontaneous) mutation rate of the NF1 gene indicate that careful clinical examination of patients and family members is necessary to provide an accurate diagnosis of the disease. Since very few NF1 mutations have been identified, and with the apparent lack of a predominant mutation in this large, highly mutable gene, molecular diagnosis of NF1 will continue to be based on haplotypes using linkage analysis. Here we report our experiences while providing a molecular diagnostic service for NF1 in the ethnically diverse region of south-western Ontario. Molecular diagnoses with at least one informative probe/enzyme combination are reported for 19 families including two families requesting prenatal diagnosis for NF1. We have augmented the classical Southern based approach to linkage analysis with the use of PCR based assays for molecular linkage. Furthermore, criteria have been established in our laboratory for executing molecular linkage based on heterozygosity values, recombination fractions, and the use of intragenic probes/markers. Images PMID:8320697

  20. Genetics Home Reference: monilethrix

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Diagnosis & Management Genetic Testing (1 link) Genetic Testing Registry: Beaded hair General Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy Genetic Counseling Palliative Care Surgery and Rehabilitation ...

  1. Possible involvement of aiPLA2 in the phosphatidylserine-containing liposomes induced production of PGE2 and PGD2 in microglia.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Fumiko; Wu, Zhou; Ma, Hong Mei; Okada, Ryo; Hayashi, Yoshinori; Nakanishi, Hiroshi

    2013-09-15

    Liposomes containing phosphatidylserine (PSL) produce PGE2 after being phagocytosed by microglia, but the precise underlying mechanism behind it still remains unclear. Here, we showed that liposomes consisting of phosphatidylserine and lysophosphatidylcholine, a lipolysis product of phosphatidylcholine by PLA2, were phagocytosed by microglia, but failed to induce secretion of PGE2. Furthermore, PSL-induced PGE2 secretion was significantly inhibited by MJ33, an aiPLA2 inhibitor, but not by AACOCF3, a cPLA2 inhibitor. PSL also produced PGD2 and 15d-PGJ2 in microglia. We thus hypothesize that free arachidonic acid is supplied through aiPLA2-mediated lipolysis of phagocytosed phosphatidylcholine, leading to the production of PGH2 and its downstream metabolites.

  2. Autism Spectrum Disorders in Genetic Syndromes: Implications for Diagnosis, Intervention and Understanding the Wider Autism Spectrum Disorder Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, J.; Howlin, P.

    2009-01-01

    Background: An emerging literature on behavioural phenotypes has highlighted apparent associations between autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) or ASD-related phenomenology and a number of different genetically determined syndromes. Method: A systematic review of the current literature regarding the association with ASD and ASD characteristics was…

  3. European guidance for the molecular diagnosis of pseudohypoparathyroidism not caused by point genetic variants at GNAS: an EQA study

    PubMed Central

    Garin, Intza; Mantovani, Giovanna; Aguirre, Urko; Barlier, Anne; Brix, Bettina; Elli, Francesca M; Freson, Kathleen; Grybek, Virginie; Izzi, Benedetta; Linglart, Agnès; Perez de Nanclares, Guiomar; Silve, Caroline; Thiele, Susanne; Werner, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Pseudohypoparathyroidism is a rare endocrine disorder that can be caused by genetic (mainly maternally inherited inactivating point mutations, although intragenic and gross deletions have rarely been reported) or epigenetic alterations at GNAS locus. Clinical and molecular characterization of this disease is not that easy because of phenotypic, biochemical and molecular overlapping features between both subtypes of the disease. The European Consortium for the study of PHP (EuroPHP) designed the present work with the intention of generating the standards of diagnostic clinical molecular (epi)genetic testing in PHP patients. With this aim, DNA samples of eight independent PHP patients carrying GNAS genetic and/or epigenetic defects (three patients with GNAS deletions, two with 20q uniparental disomy and three with a methylation defect of unknown origin) without GNAS point mutations were anonymized and sent to the five participant laboratories for their routine genetic analysis (methylation-specific (MS)-MLPA, pyrosequencing and EpiTYPER) and interpretations. All laboratories were able to detect methylation defects and, after the data analysis, the Consortium compared the results to define technical advantages and disadvantages of different techniques. To conclude, we propose as first-level investigation in PHP patients copy number and methylation analysis by MS-MLPA. Then, in patients with partial methylation defect, the result should be confirmed by single CpG bisulphite-based methods (ie pyrosequencing), whereas in case of a complete methylation defect without detectable deletion, microsatellites or SNP genotyping should be performed to exclude uniparental disomy 20. PMID:25005735

  4. European guidance for the molecular diagnosis of pseudohypoparathyroidism not caused by point genetic variants at GNAS: an EQA study.

    PubMed

    Garin, Intza; Mantovani, Giovanna; Aguirre, Urko; Barlier, Anne; Brix, Bettina; Elli, Francesca M; Freson, Kathleen; Grybek, Virginie; Izzi, Benedetta; Linglart, Agnès; Perez de Nanclares, Guiomar; Silve, Caroline; Thiele, Susanne; Werner, Ralf

    2015-04-01

    Pseudohypoparathyroidism is a rare endocrine disorder that can be caused by genetic (mainly maternally inherited inactivating point mutations, although intragenic and gross deletions have rarely been reported) or epigenetic alterations at GNAS locus. Clinical and molecular characterization of this disease is not that easy because of phenotypic, biochemical and molecular overlapping features between both subtypes of the disease. The European Consortium for the study of PHP (EuroPHP) designed the present work with the intention of generating the standards of diagnostic clinical molecular (epi)genetic testing in PHP patients. With this aim, DNA samples of eight independent PHP patients carrying GNAS genetic and/or epigenetic defects (three patients with GNAS deletions, two with 20q uniparental disomy and three with a methylation defect of unknown origin) without GNAS point mutations were anonymized and sent to the five participant laboratories for their routine genetic analysis (methylation-specific (MS)-MLPA, pyrosequencing and EpiTYPER) and interpretations. All laboratories were able to detect methylation defects and, after the data analysis, the Consortium compared the results to define technical advantages and disadvantages of different techniques. To conclude, we propose as first-level investigation in PHP patients copy number and methylation analysis by MS-MLPA. Then, in patients with partial methylation defect, the result should be confirmed by single CpG bisulphite-based methods (ie pyrosequencing), whereas in case of a complete methylation defect without detectable deletion, microsatellites or SNP genotyping should be performed to exclude uniparental disomy 20.

  5. A Family Perspective of the Value of a Diagnosis for Intellectual Disability: Experiences from a Genetic Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Statham, Helen; Ponder, Maggie; Richards, Martin; Hallowell, Nina; Raymond, Frances Lucy

    2011-01-01

    Many professionals working with individuals with intellectual disability are unconcerned with why someone has the impairment. Genetic aspects may be viewed as, at best irrelevant, but more often, potentially negative. However, where the intellectual disability may be inherited, there are implications for family members and the individual. The data…

  6. Mediterranean Founder Mutation Database (MFMD): Taking Advantage from Founder Mutations in Genetics Diagnosis, Genetic Diversity and Migration History of the Mediterranean Population.

    PubMed

    Charoute, Hicham; Bakhchane, Amina; Benrahma, Houda; Romdhane, Lilia; Gabi, Khalid; Rouba, Hassan; Fakiri, Malika; Abdelhak, Sonia; Lenaers, Guy; Barakat, Abdelhamid

    2015-11-01

    The Mediterranean basin has been the theater of migration crossroads followed by settlement of several societies and cultures in prehistoric and historical times, with important consequences on genetic and genomic determinisms. Here, we present the Mediterranean Founder Mutation Database (MFMD), established to offer web-based access to founder mutation information in the Mediterranean population. Mutation data were collected from the literature and other online resources and systematically reviewed and assembled into this database. The information provided for each founder mutation includes DNA change, amino-acid change, mutation type and mutation effect, as well as mutation frequency and coalescence time when available. Currently, the database contains 383 founder mutations found in 210 genes related to 219 diseases. We believe that MFMD will help scientists and physicians to design more rapid and less expensive genetic diagnostic tests. Moreover, the coalescence time of founder mutations gives an overview about the migration history of the Mediterranean population. MFMD can be publicly accessed from http://mfmd.pasteur.ma.

  7. Molecular diagnosis of genodermatoses.

    PubMed

    Wessagowit, Vesarat

    2013-01-01

    The progress of molecular genetics helps clinicians to prove or exclude a suspected diagnosis for a vast and yet increasing number of genodermatoses. This leads to precise genetic counselling, prenatal diagnosis and preimplantation genetic haplotyping for many inherited skin conditions. It is also helpful in such occasions as phenocopy, late onset and incomplete penetrance, uniparental disomy, mitochondrial inheritance and pigmentary mosaicism. Molecular methods of two genodermatoses are explained in detail, i.e. genodermatoses with skin fragility and neurofibromatosis type 1.

  8. Genetic technology: Promises and problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankel, M. S.

    1975-01-01

    Issues concerning the use of genetic technology are discussed. Some areas discussed include treating genetic disease, prenatal diagnosis and selective abortion, screening for genetic disease, and genetic counseling. Policy issues stemming from these capabilities are considered.

  9. Best practice guidelines for molecular genetic diagnosis of cystic fibrosis and CFTR-related disorders – updated European recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Dequeker, Els; Stuhrmann, Manfred; Morris, Michael A; Casals, Teresa; Castellani, Carlo; Claustres, Mireille; Cuppens, Harry; des Georges, Marie; Ferec, Claude; Macek, Milan; Pignatti, Pier-Franco; Scheffer, Hans; Schwartz, Marianne; Witt, Michal; Schwarz, Martin; Girodon, Emmanuelle

    2009-01-01

    The increasing number of laboratories offering molecular genetic analysis of the CFTR gene and the growing use of commercial kits strengthen the need for an update of previous best practice guidelines (published in 2000). The importance of organizing regional or national laboratory networks, to provide both primary and comprehensive CFTR mutation screening, is stressed. Current guidelines focus on strategies for dealing with increasingly complex situations of CFTR testing. Diagnostic flow charts now include testing in CFTR-related disorders and in fetal bowel anomalies. Emphasis is also placed on the need to consider ethnic or geographic origins of patients and individuals, on basic principles of risk calculation and on the importance of providing accurate laboratory reports. Finally, classification of CFTR mutations is reviewed, with regard to their relevance to pathogenicity and to genetic counselling. PMID:18685558

  10. Cost-effective one-step PCR amplification of cystic fibrosis delta F508 fragment in a single cell for preimplantation genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Y H

    1999-11-01

    The combination of in vitro fertilization (IVF) with PCR technologies enables diagnosis of single gene defects for preimplantation genetic diagnosis. This has been accomplished by two-step nested PCR, or PEP-PCR followed by nested PCR processes. To improve the detection of single cell genetic defects, the lysate of a single lymphocyte, with or without cystic fibrosis DeltaF508 mutation (CFDeltaF508), was incubated in a higher ionic strength solution containing mercaptoethanol prior to the addition of primers to the denatured cellular DNA. A single cell in 5 microl lysis buffer was incubated at 65 degrees C for 15 min, cooled, and neutralized with an equal volume of neutralizing buffer. A 5 microl aliquot of a solution X containing 50 mM MgCl(2), 1 M NaCl, and 10 mM mercaptoethanol was added to the neutralized cell lysate, followed by incubation at 93 degrees C for 15 min. The step was crucial to the successful amplification of CFDeltaF508 DNA fragment. The incubation of cell lysate in solution with the high level of sulphydryl reducing agent and a high ionic strength of about 0.45, at 93 degrees C for 15 min, might denature many chromatin-binding proteins and also ensure the complete dissociation of dsDNA. After the addition of PCR mix, the resulting reaction mixture still contained a sufficient level of sulphydryl reducing agent and 0.135 total ionic strength. This might reduce significantly the interference of various protein factors with DNA, and favour the primer-template annealing. The efficient initial annealing of the primers to target DNA sequences would facilitate PCR amplification efficacy. In conclusion, in more than 80 single cells tested (apart from one) the CFDeltaF508 defect was successfully demonstrated with the present protocol (>99 per cent), without using fluorescent primers and expensive automatic instrumentation.

  11. Quantitative analysis of methylation status at 11p15 and 7q21 for the genetic diagnosis of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and Silver-Russell syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Beom Hee; Kim, Gu-Hwan; Oh, Tae Jeong; Kim, Joo Hyun; Lee, Jin-Joo; Choi, Seung Hoon; Lee, Joo Yeon; Kim, Jae-Min; Choi, In Hee; Kim, Yoo-Mi; Choi, Jin-Ho; Yoo, Han-Wook

    2013-09-01

    Methylation-specific (MS) multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) at two differentially methylated regions (DMRs) at chromosome 11p15, H19-DMR and LIT1-DMR, and microsatellite analysis for uniparental disomy (UPD) at chromosome 7 or 11, have been recommended for the genetic diagnosis of the Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) and the Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS). In this study, the efficacy of the MS pyrosequencing method at H19-DMR and LIT1-DMR at 11p15 and SGCE-DMR at 7q21 was evaluated for the genetic diagnosis of BWS (n=18) and SRS (n=20) patients. Epigenetic alterations or UPD were detected in 83% of BWS and 50% of SRS individuals by MS-MLPA, but the detection rate increased to 95% of BWS and 70% of SRS by MS pyrosequencing. Thirteen BWS patients (72%) harbored loss-of-methylation (LOM) at LIT1-DMR and two patients (11%) harbored gain-of-methylation (GOM) at H19-DMR, whereas two patients (11%) had both LOM at LIT1-DMR and GOM at H19-DMR, reflecting paternal UPD 11. Thirteen SRS patients (65%) harbored LOM at H19-DMR, whereas one patient (5%) had GOM at SGCE-DMR, reflecting maternal UPD 7. Birth anthropometric profiles were significantly correlated to methylation scores at either H19-DMR or LIT1-DMR. In conclusion, MS pyrosequencing enhanced the detection rate of molecular defects in BWS and SRS. Moreover, it indicates that methylation status at 11p15.5 might have an important role in fetal growth.

  12. Challenges in virological diagnosis of HIV -1 transmission from sexual abuse--HIV-1 genetic links are mandatory.

    PubMed

    Ehrnst, Anneka

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to set forth possible strategies and techniques of analysis to diagnose or identify the source of HIV transmission in victims of sexual abuse. Diagnosis of HIV-1 transmission from sexual abuse is complicated. Timely blood samples are important. The right to confidentiality of the HIV diagnosis may prevent sampling from the offender. Hideous rapes occur during war, which victimize many women. Women delivering a child, seeking an abortion, or having a miscarriage may include victims of sexual abuse. HIV-infected children, where vertical transmission has been excluded, are important for investigation. Men who have sex with men may abuse young men. HIV-infected teenagers with signs of early infection should also be considered. Hundreds of single HIV-1 sequences can be created from one or more blood samples from the case and the alleged abuser. The more HIV-1 genes and sequences that are included, the better the outcomes of the phylogenetic relation. Evidence in support of transmission may be obtained from phylogenetic tree analysis and may also free someone from suspicion.

  13. Combined examination of sequence and copy number variations in human deafness genes improves diagnosis for cases of genetic deafness

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Copy number variations (CNVs) are the major type of structural variation in the human genome, and are more common than DNA sequence variations in populations. CNVs are important factors for human genetic and phenotypic diversity. Many CNVs have been associated with either resistance to diseases or identified as the cause of diseases. Currently little is known about the role of CNVs in causing deafness. CNVs are currently not analyzed by conventional genetic analysis methods to study deafness. Here we detected both DNA sequence variations and CNVs affecting 80 genes known to be required for normal hearing. Methods Coding regions of the deafness genes were captured by a hybridization-based method and processed through the standard next-generation sequencing (NGS) protocol using the Illumina platform. Samples hybridized together in the same reaction were analyzed to obtain CNVs. A read depth based method was used to measure CNVs at the resolution of a single exon. Results were validated by the quantitative PCR (qPCR) based method. Results Among 79 sporadic cases clinically diagnosed with sensorineural hearing loss, we identified previously-reported disease-causing sequence mutations in 16 cases. In addition, we identified a total of 97 CNVs (72 CNV gains and 25 CNV losses) in 27 deafness genes. The CNVs included homozygous deletions which may directly give rise to deleterious effects on protein functions known to be essential for hearing, as well as heterozygous deletions and CNV gains compounded with sequence mutations in deafness genes that could potentially harm gene functions. Conclusions We studied how CNVs in known deafness genes may result in deafness. Data provided here served as a basis to explain how CNVs disrupt normal functions of deafness genes. These results may significantly expand our understanding about how various types of genetic mutations cause deafness in humans. PMID:25342930

  14. Do recent US Supreme Court rulings on patenting of genes and genetic diagnostics affect the practice of genetic screening and diagnosis in prenatal and reproductive care?

    PubMed

    Chandrasekharan, Subhashini; McGuire, Amy L; Van den Veyver, Ignatia B

    2014-10-01

    Thousands of patents have been awarded that claim human gene sequences and their uses, and some have been challenged in court. In a recent high-profile case, Association for Molecular Pathology, et al. v. Myriad Genetics, Inc., et al., the US Supreme Court ruled that genes are natural occurring substances and therefore not patentable through 'composition of matter' claims. The consequences of this ruling will extend well beyond ending Myriad's monopoly over BRCA testing and may affect similar monopolies of other commercial laboratories for tests involving other genes. It could also simplify intellectual property issues surrounding genome-wide clinical sequencing, which can generate results for genes covered by intellectual property. Non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) for common aneuploidies using cell-free fetal (cff) DNA in maternal blood is currently offered through commercial laboratories and is also the subject of ongoing patent litigation. The recent Supreme Court decision in the Myriad case has already been invoked by a lower district court in NIPT litigation and resulted in invalidation of primary claims in a patent on currently marketed cffDNA-based testing for chromosomal aneuploidies.

  15. Do recent US Supreme Court rulings on patenting of genes and genetic diagnostics affect the practice of genetic screening and diagnosis in prenatal and reproductive care?

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekharan, Subhashini; McGuire, Amy L.; Van den Veyver, Ignatia B.

    2015-01-01

    Thousands of patents have been awarded that claim human gene sequences and their uses, and some have been challenged in court. In a recent high-profile case, Association for Molecular Pathology, et al. vs. Myriad Genetics, Inc., et al., the United States Supreme Court ruled that genes are natural occurring substances and therefore not patentable through “composition of matter” claims. The consequences of this ruling will extend well beyond ending Myriad's monopoly over BRCA testing, and may affect similar monopolies of other commercial laboratories for tests involving other genes. It could also simplify intellectual property issues surrounding genome-wide clinical sequencing, which can generate results for genes covered by intellectual property. Non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) for common aneuploidies using cell-free fetal (cff) DNA in maternal blood is currently offered through commercial laboratories and is also the subject of ongoing patent litigation. The recent Supreme Court decision in the Myriad case has already been invoked by a lower district court in NIPT litigation and resulted in invalidation of primary claims in a patent on currently marketed cffDNA-based testing for chromosomal aneuploidies. PMID:24989832

  16. A rare genetic disorder in the differential diagnosis of the entrapment neuropathies: hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies.

    PubMed

    Koc, Filiz; Güzel, Rengin; Benlidayi, Ilke Coskun; Yerdelen, Deniz; Güzel, Irfan; Sarica, Yakup

    2006-04-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal-dominant, slowly progressive neuromuscular disorder, which is characterized by recurrent acute peripheral nerve palsies. Electrophysiological studies show decreased motor and sensory conduction velocities in both clinically affected and unaffected nerves. Focal thickening of myelin sheath with sausage-like formation, also called tomacula, is seen in nerve biopsies. In genetic studies, 1.5-Mb deletion on chromosome 17p11.2 is detected in approximately 85% of HNPP cases and point mutations are determined in some cases. We describe a 26-year-old man who had a 6-month history of paresthesia in the little fingers of his hands. He was diagnosed with HNPP by neurologic examination, and electrophysiological and histopathologic studies. Studies in his mother and one brother also showed entrapment neuropathy. However, no deletions or point mutations were determined in this family. Other genetic defects apart from the known ones might be present in this disease. The most frequent entrapment syndrome, carpal tunnel syndrome, is also seen in this disease, so physicians dealing with musculoskeletal problems should be alert about this subject. Awareness of HNPP may help avoid unnecessary operative interventions.

  17. [Andersen-Tawil syndrome: a review of its clinical and genetic diagnosis with emphasis on cardiac manifestations].

    PubMed

    Márquez, Manlio F; Totomoch-Serra, Armando; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Cruz-Robles, David; Pellizzon, Oscar A; Cárdenas, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    The Andersen-Tawil syndrome is a cardiac ion channel disease that is inherited in an autosomal dominant way and is classified as type 7 of the congenital long QT syndromes. Affected gene is KCNJ2, which forms the inward rectifier potassium channel designated Kir2.1. This protein is involved in stabilizing the resting membrane potential and controls the duration of the action potential in skeletal muscle and heart. It also participates in the terminal repolarization phase of the action potential in ventricular myocytes and is a major component responsible for the correction in the potassium current during phase 3 of the action potential repolarization. Kir 2.1 channel has a predominant role in skeletal muscle, heart and brain. Alterations in this channel produce flaccid paralysis, arrhythmias, impaired skeletal development primarily in extremities and facial area. In this review we address the disease from the point of view of clinical and molecular diagnosis with emphasis on cardiac manifestations.

  18. [Current Status of Genetic Diagnosis of Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease: Variety of the Disease-causing Genes].

    PubMed

    Hashiguchi, Akihiro; Higuchi, Yujiro; Takashima, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    At least 40 genes have been associated with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) and the related inherited neuropathies. Genetic studies have revealed the following factors as causes of inherited neuropathies: myelin components, transcription factors for myelination, myelin maintenance systems, differentiation factors of the peripheral nerve, neurofilaments, protein transfer systems, mitochondrial proteins, DNA repair, RNA/protein synthesis, ion channels, and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. Since 2007, we have tried to screen for mutations in CMT patients using microarrays or next generation sequencers. As a result, the detection rate of gene mutations has improved to about 25%. In this study, we applied target resequencing to 72 genes. From the negative examples, we identified the cases based on clinical course, family history, and electrophysiological findings, and then performed exome analysis. We then tried to identify novel causative genes by analyzing the enormous data obtained from our exome analysis.

  19. Genetic variation in SIPA1 in relation to breast cancer risk and survival after breast cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Gaudet, Mia M; Hunter, Kent; Pharoah, Paul; Dunning, Alison M; Driver, Kristy; Lissowska, Jolanta; Sherman, Mark; Peplonska, Beata; Brinton, Louise A; Chanock, Stephen; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat

    2009-04-01

    Genetic variation in SIPA1, signal-induced proliferation-associated gene 1, has been proposed to be associated with aggressive breast tumor characteristics related to metastasis and worse prognosis in humans and rodents. To test this hypothesis, we genotyped 3 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) located at -3092 (AT, rs3741378), and exon 14 + 14 (C>T, rs746429), and examined them in relation to breast cancer risk and overall survival, stratified by tumor characteristics in 2 independent case-control studies conducted in Poland (1,995 cases, 2,296 controls) and in Britain (2,142 cases, 2,257 controls). Vital status (n = 396 deaths) was available for 911 Polish and 1,919 British breast cancer cases with an average follow-up time of 5.5 years. Overall, we found no significant associations between genetic variants of SIPA1 SNPs and breast cancer risk (per allele odds ratios, 95% confidence intervals (CI): rs931127-0.99, 0.93-1.06; rs3741378-1.03, 0.94-1.13; and, rs74642-0.98, 0.92-1.04). In both studies, SIPA1 polymorphisms were not related to overall mortality (per allele hazard ratios, 95% CI: 1.02, 0.88-1.17; 0.90, 0.72-1.11; 1.04, 0.90-1.21, respectively). Our results do not support a relationship between SIPA1 polymorphisms and breast cancer risk or subsequent survival.

  20. Prevalence of 22q11 microdeletions in DiGeorge and velocardiofacial syndromes: implications for genetic counselling and prenatal diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, D A; Salvin, J; Sellinger, B; Budarf, M L; McDonald-McGinn, D M; Zackai, E H; Emanuel, B S

    1993-01-01

    Deletions of chromosome 22q11 have been seen in association with DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) and velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS). In the present study, we analysed samples from 76 patients referred with a diagnosis of either DGS or VCFS to determine the prevalence of 22q11 deletions in these disorders. Using probes and cosmids from the DiGeorge critical region (DGCR), deletions of 22q11 were detected in 83% of DGS and 68% of VCFS patients by DNA dosage analysis, fluorescence in situ hybridisation, or by both methods. Combined with our previously reported patients, deletions have been detected in 88% of DGS and 76% of VCFS patients. The results of prenatal testing for 22q11 deletions by FISH in two pregnancies are presented. We conclude that FISH is an efficient and direct method for the detection of 22q11 deletions in subjects with features of DGS and VCFS as well as in pregnancies at high risk for a deletion. Images PMID:8230155

  1. Predictive testing and existential absurdity: resonances between experiences around genetic diagnosis and the philosophy of Albert Camus.

    PubMed

    Porz, Rouven; Widdershoven, Guy

    2011-07-01

    Predictive genetic testing may confront those affected with difficult life situations that they have not experienced before. These life situations may be interpreted as 'absurd'. In this paper we present a case study of a predictive test situation, showing the perspective of a woman going through the process of deciding for or against taking the test, and struggling with feelings of alienation. To interpret her experiences, we refer to the concept of absurdity, developed by the French Philosopher Albert Camus. Camus' writings on absurdity appear to resonate with patients' stories when they talk about their body and experiences of illness. In this paper we draw on Camus' philosophical essay 'The Myth of Sisyphus' (1942), and compare the absurd experiences of Sisyphus with the interviewee's story. This comparison opens up a field of ethical reflection. We demonstrate that Camus' concept of absurdity offers a new and promising approach to understanding the fragility of patients' situations, especially in the field of predictive testing. We show that people affected might find new meaning through narratives that help them to reconstruct the absurd without totally overcoming it. In conclusion, we will draw out some normative consequences of our narrative approach.

  2. Visna/Maedi virus genetic characterization and serological diagnosis of infection in sheep from a neurological outbreak.

    PubMed

    Glaria, I; Reina, R; Ramírez, H; de Andrés, X; Crespo, H; Jauregui, P; Salazar, E; Luján, L; Pérez, M M; Benavides, J; Pérez, V; Polledo, L; García-Marín, J F; Riezu, J I; Borrás, F; Amorena, B; de Andrés, D

    2012-03-23

    An extensive outbreak characterized by the appearance of neurological symptoms in small ruminant lentivirus (SRLV) infected sheep has been identified in Spain, but the genetic characteristics of the strain involved and differential diagnostic tools for this outbreak remain unexplored. In this work, 23 Visna-affected naturally infected animals from the outbreak, 11 arthritic animals (both groups presenting anti-Visna/Maedi virus serum antibodies), and 100 seronegative animals were used. Eight of the Visna-affected animals were further studied post-mortem by immunohistochemistry. All had lesions in spinal cord, being the most affected part of the central nervous system in six of them. A representative strain of the outbreak was isolated. Together with other proviral sequences from the outbreak the virus was assigned to genotype A2/A3. In vitro culture of the isolate revealed that viral production was slow/low in fibroblast-like cells but it was high in blood monocyte-derived macrophages. The long terminal repeat (LTR) of the viral genome of this isolate lacked an U3-duplication, but its promoter activity in fibroblast-like cells was normal compared to other strains. Thus, viral production could not be inferred from the LTR promoter activity in this isolate. Analysis of the viral immunodominant epitopes among SRLV sequences of the outbreak and other known sequences allowed the design of a synthetic SU peptide ELISA that detected the Visna affected animals, representing a tool of epidemiological interest to control viral spread of this highly pathogenic strain.

  3. Attitudes of women of advanced maternal age undergoing invasive prenatal diagnosis and the impact of genetic counselling

    PubMed Central

    Godino, Lea; Pompilii, Eva; D'Anna, Federica; Morselli-Labate, Antonio M; Nardi, Elena; Seri, Marco; Rizzo, Nicola; Pilu, Gianluigi; Turchetti, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Despite the increasing availability and effectiveness of non-invasive screening for foetal aneuploidies, most women of advanced maternal age (AMA) still opt for invasive tests. A retrospective cross-sectional survey was performed on women of AMA undergoing prenatal invasive procedures, in order to explore their motivations and the outcome of preliminary genetic counselling according to the approach (individual or group) adopted. Of 687 eligible women, 221 (32.2%) participated: 117 had received individual counselling, while 104 had attended group sessions. The two groups did not differ by socio-demographic features. The commonest reported reason to undergo invasive tests was AMA itself (67.4%), while only 10.4% of women mentioned the opportunity of making informed choices. The majority perceived as clear and helpful the information received at counselling, and only 12.7% had doubts left that, however, often concerned non-pertinent issues. The impact of counselling on risk perception and decisions was limited: a minority stated their perceived risk of foetal abnormalities had either increased (6.8%) or reduced (3.6%), and only one eventually declined invasive test. The 52.6% of women expressed a preference toward individual counselling, which also had a stronger impact on perceived risk reduction (P=0.003). Nevertheless, group counselling had a more favourable impact on both clarity of understanding and helpfulness (P=0.0497 and P=0.035, respectively). The idea that AMA represents an absolute indication for invasive tests appears deeply rooted; promotion of non-invasive techniques may require extensive educational efforts targeted to both the general population and health professionals. PMID:26014424

  4. Attitudes of women of advanced maternal age undergoing invasive prenatal diagnosis and the impact of genetic counselling.

    PubMed

    Godino, Lea; Pompilii, Eva; D'Anna, Federica; Morselli-Labate, Antonio M; Nardi, Elena; Seri, Marco; Rizzo, Nicola; Pilu, Gianluigi; Turchetti, Daniela

    2016-03-01

    Despite the increasing availability and effectiveness of non-invasive screening for foetal aneuploidies, most women of advanced maternal age (AMA) still opt for invasive tests. A retrospective cross-sectional survey was performed on women of AMA undergoing prenatal invasive procedures, in order to explore their motivations and the outcome of preliminary genetic counselling according to the approach (individual or group) adopted. Of 687 eligible women, 221 (32.2%) participated: 117 had received individual counselling, while 104 had attended group sessions. The two groups did not differ by socio-demographic features. The commonest reported reason to undergo invasive tests was AMA itself (67.4%), while only 10.4% of women mentioned the opportunity of making informed choices. The majority perceived as clear and helpful the information received at counselling, and only 12.7% had doubts left that, however, often concerned non-pertinent issues. The impact of counselling on risk perception and decisions was limited: a minority stated their perceived risk of foetal abnormalities had either increased (6.8%) or reduced (3.6%), and only one eventually declined invasive test. The 52.6% of women expressed a preference toward individual counselling, which also had a stronger impact on perceived risk reduction (P=0.003). Nevertheless, group counselling had a more favourable impact on both clarity of understanding and helpfulness (P=0.0497 and P=0.035, respectively). The idea that AMA represents an absolute indication for invasive tests appears deeply rooted; promotion of non-invasive techniques may require extensive educational efforts targeted to both the general population and health professionals.

  5. Importance of Genetic Diversity Assessment in Crop Plants and Its Recent Advances: An Overview of Its Analytical Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Govindaraj, M.; Vetriventhan, M.; Srinivasan, M.

    2015-01-01

    The importance of plant genetic diversity (PGD) is now being recognized as a specific area since exploding population with urbanization and decreasing cultivable lands are the critical factors contributing to food insecurity in developing world. Agricultural scientists realized that PGD can be captured and stored in the form of plant genetic resources (PGR) such as gene bank, DNA library, and so forth, in the biorepository which preserve genetic material for long period. However, conserved PGR must be utilized for crop improvement in order to meet future global challenges in relation to food and nutritional security. This paper comprehensively reviews four important areas; (i) the significance of plant genetic diversity (PGD) and PGR especially on agriculturally important crops (mostly field crops); (ii) risk associated with narrowing the genetic base of current commercial cultivars and climate change; (iii) analysis of existing PGD analytical methods in pregenomic and genomic era; and (iv) modern tools available for PGD analysis in postgenomic era. This discussion benefits the plant scientist community in order to use the new methods and technology for better and rapid assessment, for utilization of germplasm from gene banks to their applied breeding programs. With the advent of new biotechnological techniques, this process of genetic manipulation is now being accelerated and carried out with more precision (neglecting environmental effects) and fast-track manner than the classical breeding techniques. It is also to note that gene banks look into several issues in order to improve levels of germplasm distribution and its utilization, duplication of plant identity, and access to database, for prebreeding activities. Since plant breeding research and cultivar development are integral components of improving food production, therefore, availability of and access to diverse genetic sources will ensure that the global food production network becomes more sustainable

  6. Importance of genetic diversity assessment in crop plants and its recent advances: an overview of its analytical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Govindaraj, M; Vetriventhan, M; Srinivasan, M

    2015-01-01

    The importance of plant genetic diversity (PGD) is now being recognized as a specific area since exploding population with urbanization and decreasing cultivable lands are the critical factors contributing to food insecurity in developing world. Agricultural scientists realized that PGD can be captured and stored in the form of plant genetic resources (PGR) such as gene bank, DNA library, and so forth, in the biorepository which preserve genetic material for long period. However, conserved PGR must be utilized for crop improvement in order to meet future global challenges in relation to food and nutritional security. This paper comprehensively reviews four important areas; (i) the significance of plant genetic diversity (PGD) and PGR especially on agriculturally important crops (mostly field crops); (ii) risk associated with narrowing the genetic base of current commercial cultivars and climate change; (iii) analysis of existing PGD analytical methods in pregenomic and genomic era; and (iv) modern tools available for PGD analysis in postgenomic era. This discussion benefits the plant scientist community in order to use the new methods and technology for better and rapid assessment, for utilization of germplasm from gene banks to their applied breeding programs. With the advent of new biotechnological techniques, this process of genetic manipulation is now being accelerated and carried out with more precision (neglecting environmental effects) and fast-track manner than the classical breeding techniques. It is also to note that gene banks look into several issues in order to improve levels of germplasm distribution and its utilization, duplication of plant identity, and access to database, for prebreeding activities. Since plant breeding research and cultivar development are integral components of improving food production, therefore, availability of and access to diverse genetic sources will ensure that the global food production network becomes more sustainable

  7. WHAT ROLE SHOULD PUBLIC OPINION PLAY IN ETHICO-LEGAL DECISION MAKING? THE EXAMPLE OF SELECTING SEX FOR NON-MEDICAL REASONS USING PREIMPLANTATION GENETIC DIAGNOSIS.

    PubMed

    Fovargue, Sara; Bennett, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we consider the prohibition on the use of preimplantation genetic diagnosis to select an embryo on the basis of its sex for non -: medical reasons. We use this as a case study to explore the role that public consultations have and should play in ethico-legal decision-making. Until the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 1990 was amended by the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 2008, non-medical sex selection of an embryo was not statutorily regulated, but it was the policy of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority that such selection should not occur. However, since 2009, it has been a criminal offence to select an embryo on the basis of its sex for non-medical reasons. We consider the reasons given for this change and explore the role that 'public opinion' had in the decision-making process. On the face of it, asking the public what they think seems reasonable, fair and democratic, and those who are not in favour of public consultations being accorded great weight in matters of policy may appear out of touch and as wanting to impose their moral views on the public at large. But there are problems with doing so, especially when seeking to regulate ethically controversial issues. We discuss whether regulation should be influenced by public opinion obtained via 'public consultations', and utilise sex selection for non-medical reasons as an example of how (apparently) public opinion was used to support the criminalisation of this practice.

  8. Genetics Home Reference: aniridia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetic Testing Registry: Congenital aniridia Other Diagnosis and Management Resources (1 link) GeneReview: Aniridia General Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy ...

  9. Genetics and genomic medicine.

    PubMed

    Bogaard, Kali; Johnson, Marlene

    2009-01-01

    Genetics is playing an increasingly important role in the diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of diseases, and the expansion of genetics into health care has generated the field of genomic medicine. Health care delivery is shifting away from general diagnostic evaluation toward a generation of therapeutics based on a patient's genetic makeup. Meanwhile, the scientific community debates how best to incorporate genetics and genomic medicine into practice. While obstacles remain, the ultimate goal is to use information generated from the study of human genetics to improve disease treatment, cure and prevention. As the use of genetics in medical diagnosis and treatment increases, health care workers will require an understanding of genetics and genomic medicine.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: SADDAN

    MedlinePlus

    ... PDF Open All Close All Description SADDAN (severe achondroplasia with developmental delay and acanthosis nigricans) is a ... Genetic Testing (1 link) Genetic Testing Registry: Severe achondroplasia with developmental delay and acanthosis nigricans Other Diagnosis ...

  11. Frontotemporal Dementia: Genetics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Calendar of Events Fundraising Events Conferences Press Releases Genetics of FTD After receiving a diagnosis of FTD ... that recent advances in science have brought the genetics of FTD into much better focus. In 2012, ...

  12. Macrophages programmed by apoptotic cells inhibit epithelial-mesenchymal transition in lung alveolar epithelial cells via PGE2, PGD2, and HGF

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Young-So; Lee, Ye-Ji; Choi, Youn-Hee; Park, Young Mi; Kang, Jihee Lee

    2016-01-01

    Apoptotic cell clearance results in the release of growth factors and the action of signaling molecules involved in tissue homeostasis maintenance. Here, we investigated whether and how macrophages programmed by apoptotic cells inhibit the TGF-β1-induced Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process in lung alveolar epithelial cells. Treatment with conditioned medium derived from macrophages exposed to apoptotic cells, but not viable or necrotic cells, inhibited TGF-β1-induced EMT, including loss of E-cadherin, synthesis of N-cadherin and α-smooth muscle actin, and induction of EMT-activating transcription factors, such as Snail1/2, Zeb1/2, and Twist1. Exposure of macrophages to cyclooxygenase (COX-2) inhibitors (NS-398 and COX-2 siRNA) or RhoA/Rho kinase inhibitors (Y-27632 and RhoA siRNA) and LA-4 cells to antagonists of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) receptor (EP4 [AH-23848]), PGD2 receptors (DP1 [BW-A868C] and DP2 [BAY-u3405]), or the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) receptor c-Met (PHA-665752), reversed EMT inhibition by the conditioned medium. Additionally, we found that apoptotic cell instillation inhibited bleomycin-mediated EMT in primary mouse alveolar type II epithelial cells in vivo. Our data suggest a new model for epithelial cell homeostasis, by which the anti-EMT programming of macrophages by apoptotic cells may control the progressive fibrotic reaction via the production of potent paracrine EMT inhibitors. PMID:26875548

  13. Regulation of Enzyme Activities in Drosophila: Genetic Variation Affecting Induction of Glucose 6-Phosphate and 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenases in Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Cochrane, Bruce J.; Lucchesi, John C.; Laurie-Ahlberg, C. C.

    1983-01-01

    The genetic basis of modulation by dietary sucrose of the enzyme activities glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) activities in third instar larvae of Drosophila melanogaster was investigated, using isogenic lines derived from wild populations. Considerable genetically determined variation in response was detected among lines that differed only in their third chromosome constitution. Comparison of crossreacting material between a responding and a nonresponding line showed that the G6PD activity variation is due to changes in G6PD protein level. These differences in responses are localized in the fat body, with 300 m m sucrose in the diet resulting in a sixfold stimulation of G6PD activity and a fourfold one of 6PGD in the line showing the strongest response. In this tissue, the responses of the two enzymes are closely correlated with one another. Using recombinant lines, we obtained data that suggested the existence of more than one gene on chromosome III involved in the regulation of G6PD in the fat body, and at least one of these genes affects the level of 6PGD as well. PMID:6416921

  14. Quality guidelines and standards for genetic laboratories/clinics in prenatal diagnosis on fetal samples obtained by invasive procedures. An attempt to establish a common European framework for quality assessment. EUCROMIC Quality Assessment Group.

    PubMed

    1997-01-01

    At a workshop in Leuven, November 8-10, 1996, 24 clinical and laboratory geneticists from 15 countries in Europe met and discussed minimum standards for prenatal diagnosis. These guidelines are intended for use as a reference manual by genetic centres all over Europe, especially in countries without national guidelines, in their efforts to achieve and maintain high standards. The workshop was restricted to discuss quality assessment on established invasive procedures for cytogenetic and molecular studies. The committee brought together from their own countries substantial experience of genetic counselling, cytogenetics, molecular biology and quality assessment. It is hoped that future discussions, embracing all aspects of clinical and laboratory genetic services will lead to the establishment of common guidelines for all European countries.

  15. Increasing live birth rate by preimplantation genetic screening of pooled polar bodies using array comparative genomic hybridization.

    PubMed

    Feichtinger, Michael; Stopp, Tina; Göbl, Christian; Feichtinger, Elisabeth; Vaccari, Enrico; Mädel, Ulrike; Laccone, Franco; Stroh-Weigert, Monika; Hengstschläger, Markus; Feichtinger, Wilfried; Neesen, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Meiotic errors during oocyte maturation are considered the major contributors to embryonic aneuploidy and failures in human IVF treatment. Various technologies have been developed to screen polar bodies, blastomeres and trophectoderm cells for chromosomal aberrations. Array-CGH analysis using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) arrays is widely applied for preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) using single cells. Recently, an increase in the pregnancy rate has been demonstrated using array-CGH to evaluate trophectoderm cells. However, in some countries, the analysis of embryonic cells is restricted by law. Therefore, we used BAC array-CGH to assess the impact of polar body analysis on the live birth rate. A disadvantage of polar body aneuploidy screening is the necessity of the analysis of both the first and second polar bodies, resulting in increases in costs for the patient and complex data interpretation. Aneuploidy screening results may sometimes be ambiguous if the first and second polar bodies show reciprocal chromosomal aberrations. To overcome this disadvantage, we tested a strategy involving the pooling of DNA from both polar bodies before DNA amplification. We retrospectively studied 351 patients, of whom 111 underwent polar body array-CGH before embryo transfer. In the group receiving pooled polar body array-CGH (aCGH) analysis, 110 embryos were transferred, and 29 babies were born, corresponding to live birth rates of 26.4% per embryo and 35.7% per patient. In contrast, in the control group, the IVF treatment was performed without preimplantation genetic screening (PGS). For this group, 403 embryos were transferred, and 60 babies were born, resulting in live birth rates of 14.9% per embryo and 22.7% per patient. In conclusion, our data show that in the aCGH group, the use of aneuploidy screening resulted in a significantly higher live birth rate compared with the control group, supporting the benefit of PGS for IVF couples in addition to the

  16. Genetic testing in Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Child, Anne H; Aragon-Martin, Jose A; Sage, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Genetic testing is aiding rapid diagnosis of Marfan syndrome as a basis for management of eye, heart and skeletal disease. The affected patient's mutation can be used as a basis for prenatal or postnatal diagnosis of offspring. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis, the technique of choice, can ensure an unaffected pregnancy.

  17. [Polar body diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Montag, M; van der Ven, K; van der Ven, H

    2009-01-01

    Polar body diagnosis (PBD) is a diagnostic method for the indirect genetic analysis of oocytes. Polar bodies are by-products of the meiotic cell cycle which have no influence on further embryo development. The biopsy of polar bodies can be accomplished either by zona drilling or laser drilling within a very short time period. The paternal contribution to the genetic constitution of the developing embryo cannot be diagnosed by PBD. The major application of PBD is the detection of maternally derived chromosomal aneuploidies and translocations in oocytes. For these indications, PBD may offer a viable alternative to blastomere biopsy as the embryo's integrity remains unaffected in contrast to preimplantation genetic diagnosis by blastomere biopsy. The fast development in the field of molecular diagnostics will also influence PBD and probably allow a more general diagnosis in the future.

  18. [Genetic and ecological study of aboriginal inhabitants of the Siberian northeast. IV. Genotype and genetic structure of three modern populations of Yakutia].

    PubMed

    Posukh, O L; Vibe, V P; Sukernik, R I; Osipova, L P; Karafet, T M

    1990-09-01

    Three separate and reproductively isolated populations living at present in boreal forest and tundra area in Eastern Siberia were studied. Blood groups (AB0, MNSs, Rhesus, Duffy, P. Diego), immunoglobulin allotypes--G1m (z, a, x, f), G3m (b, b0, b1, b3, s, t), Hp, Tf, PGM1, AcP, 6-PGD were tested in blood samples obtained from total 570 individuals. Analysis of covariance and variance matrices containing gene frequencies of the Nganasans, Reindeer Chukchi, the Yugaghir and the Evens has revealed major aspects of regional genetic structure which is in good accordance with regional history and geography.

  19. Prenatal diagnosis of the carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein syndrome type 1A (CDG1A) by a combination of enzymology and genetic linkage analysis after amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling.

    PubMed

    Charlwood, J; Clayton, P; Keir, G; Mian, N; Young, E; Winchester, B

    1998-07-01

    Two pregnancies at risk for the carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein syndrome Type 1A (CDG1A, phosphomannomutase deficient) were monitored by enzyme and genetic linkage analyses. The index case in both families had a proven deficiency of phosphomannomutase (PMM). An unaffected fetus was predicted in family 1 following amniocentesis. Normal PMM activity was found in cultured amniotic fluid cells and there was no elevation of lysosomal enzymes in the amniotic fluid. Genetic linkage analysis using microsatellite markers closely linked to the CDG1A gene confirmed this prediction. A healthy child was born. In the second family direct assay of chorionic villi showed a profound deficiency of PMM and genetic linkage analysis showed the fetus to have the same haplotype as the proband. The pregnancy was terminated and a deficiency of PMM was confirmed in cultured fibroblasts from the fetus. Reliable prenatal diagnosis of CDG Type 1A (PMM-deficient) can be achieved by a combination of biochemical and molecular genetic tests.

  20. Genetics Home Reference: Langer-Giedion syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... People with this condition have multiple noncancerous (benign) bone tumors called osteochondromas. Multiple osteochondromas may result in pain, ... disorders inherited? More about Inheriting Genetic Conditions Diagnosis & Management Genetic Testing (1 link) Genetic Testing Registry: Langer- ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: Muckle-Wells syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... can be inherited? More about Inheriting Genetic Conditions Diagnosis & Management Genetic Testing (1 link) Genetic Testing Registry: Familial amyloid nephropathy with urticaria AND deafness General Information from MedlinePlus ( ...

  2. Neurofibromatoses: part 1 - diagnosis and differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Luiz Oswaldo Carneiro; Batista, Pollyanna Barros; Goloni-Bertollo, Eny Maria; de Souza-Costa, Danielle; Eliam, Lucas; Eliam, Miguel; Cunha, Karin Soares Gonçalves; Darrigo-Junior, Luiz Guilherme; Ferraz-Filho, José Roberto Lopes; Geller, Mauro; Gianordoli-Nascimento, Ingrid F; Madeira, Luciana Gonçalves; Malloy-Diniz, Leandro Fernandes; Mendes, Hérika Martins; de Miranda, Débora Marques; Pavarino, Erika Cristina; Baptista-Pereira, Luciana; Rezende, Nilton A; Rodrigues, Luíza de Oliveira; da Silva, Carla Menezes; de Souza, Juliana Ferreira; de Souza, Márcio Leandro Ribeiro; Stangherlin, Aline; Valadares, Eugênia Ribeiro; Vidigal, Paula Vieira Teixeira

    2014-03-01

    Neurofibromatoses (NF) are a group of genetic multiple tumor growing predisposition diseases: neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) and schwannomatosis (SCH), which have in common the neural origin of tumors and cutaneous signs. They affect nearly 80 thousand of Brazilians. In recent years, the increased scientific knowledge on NF has allowed better clinical management and reduced complication morbidity, resulting in higher quality of life for NF patients. In most cases, neurology, psychiatry, dermatology, clinical geneticists, oncology and internal medicine specialists are able to make the differential diagnosis between NF and other diseases and to identify major NF complications. Nevertheless, due to its great variability in phenotype expression, progressive course, multiple organs involvement and unpredictable natural evolution, NF often requires the support of neurofibromatoses specialists for proper treatment and genetic counseling. This Part 1 offers step-by-step guidelines for NF differential diagnosis. Part 2 will present the NF clinical management.

  3. Novel multiplex real-time PCR system using the SNP technology for the simultaneous diagnosis of Chlamydia trachomatis, Ureaplasma parvum and Ureaplasma urealyticum and genetic typing of serovars of C. trachomatis and U. parvum in NGU.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jingfeng; Zhou, Li; Liu, Xiaoying; Zhang, Changming; Zhao, Youyun; Wang, Yefu

    2011-02-01

    To explore the possibilities of a novel multiplex real-time PCR system for rapid diagnosis, genetic typing of serovars and clinical application in NGU, we developed a multiplex real-time PCR system for the simultaneous diagnosis of Chlamydia trachomatis, Ureaplasma parvum and Ureaplasma urealyticum and molecular detection of serovars of C. trachomatis and U. parvum in NGU using the SNP technology and TaqMan-LNA probe. In 57 pathogen-positive clinical specimens, we identified the following C. trachomatis serovars: D (20.05%, 12/57), E (36.84%, 21/57), F (19.30%, 11/57), G (8.77%, 5/57), H (5.26%, 3/57), J (3.51%, 2/57), and K (5.26%, 3/57). In 115 pathogen-positive clinical specimens, we identified the following U. parvum serovars: 1 (0.87%, 2/115), 3 (55.65%, 64/115), 6 (20.87%, 24/115) and 14 (21.74%, 25/115). Our fast pathogen diagnosis and serotyping assay using real-time TaqMan-LNA PCR may improve our ability to study the pathogenesis and epidemiology of NGU.

  4. Referring patients for a medical genetics consultation and genetic counseling.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Reid

    2011-01-01

    Clinical geneticists and genetic counselors provide diagnosis and counseling for genetic disorders affecting every organ system and every age group. Genetic counselors are more focused on informing patients and families about the inheritance of a genetic disorder and providing recurrence risk counseling, support and information about a diagnosis and reproductive options. Medical geneticists may also share some of these roles in addition to establishing a diagnosis and providing medical management. Medical Geneticists receive training in ACGME-accredited residency programs and are certified by the American Board of Medical Genetics. Genetic counseling is a masters degree program and certification is granted by the American Board of Genetic Counseling. When a patient/family is referred to a Clinical Geneticist, they may expect a thorough evaluation in an effort to establish a diagnosis that may provide information about etiology, prognosis, therapy and recurrence risk.

  5. Prenatal Genetic Counselling

    PubMed Central

    McGillivray, Barbara C.

    1986-01-01

    Genetic concerns and indications for prenatal diagnosis are first recognized by the family physician. Review of personal, pregnancy and family history may indicate concerns beyond that of advanced maternal age. Amniocentesis is still the most frequently used modality for prenatal diagnosis, but detailed ultrasound is valuable for structural abnormalities, and chorionic villus sampling is now being tested as an alternative to amniocentesis. PMID:21267316

  6. Carrier Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Women with Hemophilia Inheritance of Hemophilia Definitions & Terminology Bleeding Symptoms Carrier Diagnosis When to Test for ... and Women with Hemophilia Inheritance of Hemophilia Definitions & Terminology Bleeding Symptoms Carrier Diagnosis When to Test for ...

  7. The Human Gene Mutation Database: towards a comprehensive repository of inherited mutation data for medical research, genetic diagnosis and next-generation sequencing studies.

    PubMed

    Stenson, Peter D; Mort, Matthew; Ball, Edward V; Evans, Katy; Hayden, Matthew; Heywood, Sally; Hussain, Michelle; Phillips, Andrew D; Cooper, David N

    2017-03-27

    The Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD(®)) constitutes a comprehensive collection of published germline mutations in nuclear genes that underlie, or are closely associated with human inherited disease. At the time of writing (March 2017), the database contained in excess of 203,000 different gene lesions identified in over 8000 genes manually curated from over 2600 journals. With new mutation entries currently accumulating at a rate exceeding 17,000 per annum, HGMD represents de facto the central unified gene/disease-oriented repository of heritable mutations causing human genetic disease used worldwide by researchers, clinicians, diagnostic laboratories and genetic counsellors, and is an essential tool for the annotation of next-generation sequencing data. The public version of HGMD ( http://www.hgmd.org ) is freely available to registered users from academic institutions and non-profit organisations whilst the subscription version (HGMD Professional) is available to academic, clinical and commercial users under license via QIAGEN Inc.

  8. Outcomes of trophectoderm biopsy on cryopreserved blastocysts: a case series.

    PubMed

    Lathi, Ruth B; Massie, Jamie A M; Gilani, Morgan; Milki, Amin A; Westphal, Lynn M; Baker, Valerie L; Behr, Barry

    2012-11-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is an increasingly common adjunct to IVF. The information gained from PGD may be used to reduce the incidence of chromosomally abnormal pregnancies and augment the current selection process of embryos. As such, patients may choose to utilize PGD in either fresh or cryopreserved IVF cycles. It is a common practice to cryopreserve excess embryos at the blastocyst stage. In these cases, trophectoderm biopsy is the only technique available for PGD. This articles reports this study centre's experience with trophectoderm biopsies of cryopreserved blastocysts in 12 patients who underwent 13 cycles of PGD. The implantation rate per embryo transferred was 46% and the ongoing pregnancy rate per embryo transfer was 63%. The results from this case series demonstrate that trophectoderm biopsy on cryopreserved blastocysts to perform PGD is logistically feasible. In addition, the rate of implantation and ongoing pregnancy were maintained within a reasonable range to justify the procedure. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is an increasingly common adjunct to IVF and is used to evaluate the genetic makeup of the embryo prior to transfer of the embryo into the uterus. The information gained from PGD may be used to identify single-gene disorders that result in genetic disease, reduce the incidence of chromosomally abnormal pregnancies and/or augment the selection process of embryos to be transferred. In order to perform PGD, a biopsy of the embryo is the performed and cells are removed for testing. PGD may be performed in either fresh or frozen (cryopreserved) IVF cycles. Patients who have cryopreserved embryos remaining in storage from a previous fresh cycle may wish to have these embryos tested with PGD. Many embryos are frozen on day 5 of development, referred to as the blastocyst stage. At this stage of development, embryo biopsy is performed via a technique known as 'trophectoderm biopsy', in which 1-3 of the cells destined to

  9. Population genetic study among the Orange Asli (Semai Senoi) of Malaysia: Malayan aborigines.

    PubMed

    Saha, N; Mak, J W; Tay, J S; Liu, Y; Tan, J A; Low, P S; Singh, M

    1995-02-01

    A population genetic study was undertaken to provide gene frequency data on the additional blood genetic markers in the Semai and to estimate the genetic relations between the Semai and their neighboring and linguistically related populations by genetic distance and principal components analyses. Altogether 10 polymorphic and 7 monomorphic blood genetic markers (plasma proteins and red cell enzymes) were studied in a group of 349 Senoi Semai from 11 aboriginal settlements (villages) in the Pahang State of western Malaysia. Both the red cell glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (PGD) loci reveal the presence of polymorphic frequencies of a nondeficient slow allele at the G6PD locus and a fast allele at the PGD locus. The Semai are characterized by high prevalences of ahaptoglobinemia and G6PD deficiency, high frequencies of HP*1, HB*E, RH*R1, ACP*C, GLO1*1, PGM1*2+, and GC*1F and corresponding low frequencies of ABO*A, HbCoSp, HB*B0, TF*D, CHI, and GC*2. Genetic distance analyses by both cluster and principal components models were performed between the Semai and 14 other populations (Malay; Javanese; Khmer; Veddah; Tamils of Malaysia, Sri Lanka, and India; Sinhalese; Oraon; Toda and Irula of India; Chinese; Japanese; Koreans) on the basis of 30 alleles at 7 polymorphic loci. A more detailed analysis using 53 alleles at 13 polymorphic loci with 10 populations was carried out. Both analyses give genetic evidence of a close relationship between the Semai and the Khmer of Cambodia. Furthermore, the Semai are more closely related to the Javanese than to their close neighbors--the Malay, Chinese, and Tamil Indians. There is no evidence for close genetic relationship between the Semai and the Veddah or other Indian tribes. The evidence fits well with the linguistic relationship of the Semai with the Mon-Khmer branch of the Austro-Asiatic language family.

  10. High Frequency of Copy Number Variations and Sequence Variants at CYP21A2 Locus: Implication for the Genetic Diagnosis of 21-Hydroxylase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Parajes, Silvia; Quinteiro, Celsa; Domínguez, Fernando; Loidi, Lourdes

    2008-01-01

    Background The systematic study of the human genome indicates that the inter-individual variability is greater than expected and it is not only related to sequence polymorphisms but also to gene copy number variants (CNVs). Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency (21OHD) is the most common autosomal recessive disorder with a carrier frequency of 1∶25 to 1∶10. The gene that encodes 21-hydroxylase enzyme, CYP21A2, is considered to be one of the most polymorphic human genes. Copy number variations, such as deletions, which are severe mutations common in 21OHD patients, or gene duplications, which have been reported as rare events, have also been described. The correct characterization of 21OHD alleles is important for disease carrier detection and genetic counselling Methodology and Findings CYP21A2 genotyping by sequencing has been performed in a random sample of the Spanish population, where 144 individuals recruited from university students and employees of the hospital were studied. The frequency of CYP21A2 mutated alleles in our sample was 15.3% (77.3% were mild mutations, 9% were severe mutations and 13.6% were novel variants). Gene dosage assessment was also performed when CYP21A2 gene duplication was suspected. This analysis showed that 7% of individuals bore a chromosome with a duplicated CYP21A2 gene, where one of the copies was mutated. Conclusions As far as we know, the present study has shown the highest frequency of 21OHD carriers reported by a genotyping analysis. In addition, a high frequency of alleles with CYP21A2 duplications, which could be misinterpreted as 21OHD alleles, was found. Moreover, a high frequency of novel genetic variations with an unknown effect on 21-hydroxylase activity was also found. The high frequency of gene duplications, as well as novel variations, should be considered since they have an important involvement in carrier testing and genetic counseling. PMID:18478071

  11. Towards multilocus sequence typing of the Leishmania donovani complex: resolving genotypes and haplotypes for five polymorphic metabolic enzymes (ASAT, GPI, NH1, NH2, PGD).

    PubMed

    Mauricio, Isabel L; Yeo, Matthew; Baghaei, Mehdi; Doto, Daniela; Pratlong, Francine; Zemanova, Eva; Dedet, Jean-Pierre; Lukes, Julius; Miles, Michael A

    2006-06-01

    Multilocus enzyme electrophoresis is the gold standard for identification of Leishmania species and strains. Drawbacks include: only amino acid polymorphisms affecting electrophoretic mobility are detected; distinct allozymes can have coincident mobilities; few characters are available; and parasites must be cultured in bulk. So far, thousands of Leishmania strains have been phenotyped by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis. Here, we sequence enzyme-coding genes to provide a PCR-based higher resolution equivalent of multilocus enzyme electrophoresis, particularly for Leishmania infantum. Of 15 enzymes used for multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MON typing) we have sequenced aspartate aminotransferase, glucose-6-phosphate isomerase, nucleoside hydrolase 1, nucleoside hydrolase 2 and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase. Heterozygous alleles were common, with multiple heterozygous sites within a single locus for several of the genes. Haplotypes were resolved by allele-specific PCR and allele-specific sequencing. Heterozygous haplotypes conformed to the haplotypes of putative parents. One strain appeared to be hybrid across two genetic groups of the Leishmania donovani complex. In most cases, a single amino acid polymorphism was responsible for change in enzyme mobility. Some indistinguishable phenotypes were produced by distinct genotypes. Silent genetic polymorphisms provided enhanced discrimination over multilocus enzyme electrophoresis, for example, by subdividing the zymodeme MON-1. The PCR-based genotyping that we describe could be applied directly to clinical samples or to small volume cultures and in a multilocus sequence typing format. Furthermore, it can be used to detect recombination indirectly and for population genetics studies.

  12. Clinical Genetic Testing in Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    New technologies for mutation detection in the human genome have greatly increased our understanding of epilepsy genetics. Application of genomic technologies in the clinical setting allows for more efficient genetic diagnosis in some patients; therefore, it is important to understand the types of tests available and the types of mutations that can be detected. Making a genetic diagnosis improves overall patient care by enhancing prognosis and recurrence risk counseling and informing treatment decisions. PMID:26316867

  13. Genetic Characterisation of Plasmodium falciparum Isolates with Deletion of the pfhrp2 and/or pfhrp3 Genes in Colombia: The Amazon Region, a Challenge for Malaria Diagnosis and Control.

    PubMed

    Dorado, Erika Jimena; Okoth, Sheila Akinyi; Montenegro, Lidia Madeline; Diaz, Gustavo; Barnwell, John W; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam; Murillo Solano, Claribel

    2016-01-01

    Most Plasmodium falciparum-detecting rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) target histidine-rich protein 2 (PfHRP2). However, P. falciparum isolates with deletion of the pfhrp2 gene and its homolog gene, pfhrp3, have been detected. We carried out an extensive investigation on 365 P. falciparum dried blood samples collected from seven P. falciparum endemic sites in Colombia between 2003 and 2012 to genetically characterise and geographically map pfhrp2- and/or pfhrp3-negative P. falciparum parasites in the country. We found a high proportion of pfhrp2-negative parasites only in Amazonas (15/39; 38.5%), and these parasites were also pfhrp3-negative. These parasites were collected between 2008 and 2009 in Amazonas, while pfhrp3-negative parasites (157/365, 43%) were found in all the sites and from each of the sample collection years evaluated (2003 to 2012). We also found that all pfhrp2- and/or pfhrp3-negative parasites were also negative for one or both flanking genes. Six sub-population clusters were established with 93.3% (14/15) of the pfhrp2-negative parasites grouped in the same cluster and sharing the same haplotype. This haplotype corresponded with the genetic lineage BV1, a multidrug resistant strain that caused two outbreaks reported in Peru between 2010 and 2013. We found this BV1 lineage in the Colombian Amazon as early as 2006. Two new clonal lineages were identified in these parasites from Colombia: the genetic lineages EV1 and F. PfHRP2 sequence analysis revealed high genetic diversity at the amino acid level, with 17 unique sequences identified among 53 PfHRP2 sequences analysed. The use of PfHRP2-based RDTs is not recommended in Amazonas because of the high proportion of parasites with pfhrp2 deletion (38.5%), and implementation of new strategies for malaria diagnosis and control in Amazonas must be prioritised. Moreover, studies to monitor and genetically characterise pfhrp2-negative P. falciparum parasites in the Americas are warranted, given the extensive

  14. Genetic Characterisation of Plasmodium falciparum Isolates with Deletion of the pfhrp2 and/or pfhrp3 Genes in Colombia: The Amazon Region, a Challenge for Malaria Diagnosis and Control

    PubMed Central

    Dorado, Erika Jimena; Okoth, Sheila Akinyi; Montenegro, Lidia Madeline; Diaz, Gustavo; Barnwell, John W.; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam; Murillo Solano, Claribel

    2016-01-01

    Most Plasmodium falciparum-detecting rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) target histidine-rich protein 2 (PfHRP2). However, P. falciparum isolates with deletion of the pfhrp2 gene and its homolog gene, pfhrp3, have been detected. We carried out an extensive investigation on 365 P. falciparum dried blood samples collected from seven P. falciparum endemic sites in Colombia between 2003 and 2012 to genetically characterise and geographically map pfhrp2- and/or pfhrp3-negative P. falciparum parasites in the country. We found a high proportion of pfhrp2-negative parasites only in Amazonas (15/39; 38.5%), and these parasites were also pfhrp3-negative. These parasites were collected between 2008 and 2009 in Amazonas, while pfhrp3-negative parasites (157/365, 43%) were found in all the sites and from each of the sample collection years evaluated (2003 to 2012). We also found that all pfhrp2- and/or pfhrp3-negative parasites were also negative for one or both flanking genes. Six sub-population clusters were established with 93.3% (14/15) of the pfhrp2-negative parasites grouped in the same cluster and sharing the same haplotype. This haplotype corresponded with the genetic lineage BV1, a multidrug resistant strain that caused two outbreaks reported in Peru between 2010 and 2013. We found this BV1 lineage in the Colombian Amazon as early as 2006. Two new clonal lineages were identified in these parasites from Colombia: the genetic lineages EV1 and F. PfHRP2 sequence analysis revealed high genetic diversity at the amino acid level, with 17 unique sequences identified among 53 PfHRP2 sequences analysed. The use of PfHRP2-based RDTs is not recommended in Amazonas because of the high proportion of parasites with pfhrp2 deletion (38.5%), and implementation of new strategies for malaria diagnosis and control in Amazonas must be prioritised. Moreover, studies to monitor and genetically characterise pfhrp2-negative P. falciparum parasites in the Americas are warranted, given the extensive

  15. Genetic diagnosis of X-linked dominant hypophosphatemic rickets in a cohort study: Tubular reabsorption of phosphate and 1,25(OH)2D serum levels are associated with PHEX mutation type

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Genetic Hypophosphatemic Rickets (HR) is a group of diseases characterized by renal phosphate wasting with inappropriately low or normal 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D) serum levels. The most common form of HR is X-linked dominant HR (XLHR) which is caused by inactivating mutations in the PHEX gene. The purpose of this study was to perform genetic diagnosis in a cohort of patients with clinical diagnosis of HR, to perform genotype-phenotype correlations of those patients and to compare our data with other HR cohort studies. Methods Forty three affected individuals from 36 non related families were analyzed. For the genetic analysis, the PHEX gene was sequenced in all of the patients and in 13 cases the study was complemented by mRNA sequencing and Multiple Ligation Probe Assay. For the genotype-phenotype correlation study, the clinical and biochemical phenotype of the patients was compared with the type of mutation, which was grouped into clearly deleterious or likely causative, using the Mann-Whitney and Fisher's exact test. Results Mutations in the PHEX gene were identified in all the patients thus confirming an XLHR. Thirty four different mutations were found distributed throughout the gene with higher density at the 3' end. The majority of the mutations were novel (69.4%), most of them resulted in a truncated PHEX protein (83.3%) and were family specific (88.9%). Tubular reabsorption of phosphate (TRP) and 1,25(OH)2D serum levels were significantly lower in patients carrying clearly deleterious mutations than in patients carrying likely causative ones (61.39 ± 19.76 vs. 80.14 ± 8.80%, p = 0.028 and 40.93 ± 30.73 vs. 78.46 ± 36.27 pg/ml, p = 0.013). Conclusions PHEX gene mutations were found in all the HR cases analyzed, which was in contrast with other cohort studies. Patients with clearly deleterious PHEX mutations had lower TRP and 1,25(OH)2D levels suggesting that the PHEX type of mutation might predict the XLHR phenotype severity. PMID

  16. ISSR markers for gender identification and genetic diagnosis of Hippophae rhamnoides ssp. turkestanica growing at high altitudes in Ladakh region (Jammu and Kashmir).

    PubMed

    Das, Kamal; Ganie, Showkat Hussain; Mangla, Yash; Dar, Tanvir-Ul-Hassan; Chaudhary, Manju; Thakur, Rakesh Kumar; Tandon, Rajesh; Raina, S N; Goel, Shailendra

    2017-03-01

    Hippophae rhamnoides L. ssp. turkestanica (Elaeagnaceae) is a predominantly dioecious and wind-pollinated medicinal plant species. The mature fruits of the species possess antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, anticancerous, and antistimulatory properties that are believed to improve the immune system. The identification of male and female plants in H. rhamnoides ssp. turkestanica is quite difficult until flowering which usually takes 3-4 years or more. A sex-linked marker can be helpful in establishing the orchards through identification of genders at an early stage of development. Therefore, we studied the genetic diversity of populations in Ladakh with the aim to identify a gender-specific marker using ISSR markers. Fifty-eight ISSR primers were used to characterize the genome of H. rhamnoides ssp. turkestanica, of which eight primers generated 12 sex-specific fragments specific to one or more populations. The ISSR primer (P-45) produced a fragment which faithfully segregates all the males from the female plants across all the three valleys surveyed. This male-specific locus was converted into a SCAR. Forward and reverse primers designed from this fragment amplified a 750-bp sequence in males only, thus specifying it as an informative male-specific sex-linked marker. This SCAR marker was further validated for its capability to differentiate gender on an additional collection of plants, representing three geographically isolated valleys (Nubra, Suru, and Indus) from Ladakh region of India. The results confirmed sex-linked specificity of the marker suggesting that this conserved sequence at the Y chromosome is well preserved through the populations in Ladakh region. At present, there are no reliable markers which can differentiate male from female plants across all the three valleys of Ladakh region at an early stage of plant development. It is therefore envisaged that the developed SCAR marker shall provide a reliable molecular tool for early

  17. PABPN1 (GCN)11 as a Dominant Allele in Oculopharyngeal Muscular Dystrophy –Consequences in Clinical Diagnosis and Genetic Counselling

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Pascale; Trollet, Capucine; Gidaro, Teresa; Demay, Laurence; Brochier, Guy; Malfatti, Edoardo; Tom, Fernando MS; Fardeau, Michel; Lafor, Pascal; Romero, Norma; Martin-N, Marie-Laure; Sol, Guilhem; Ferrer-Monasterio, Xavier; Saint-Guily, Jean Lacau; Eymard, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is mainly characterized by ptosis and dysphagia. The genetic cause is a short expansion of a (GCN)10 repeat encoding for polyalanine in the poly(A) binding protein nuclear 1 (PABPN1) gene to (GCN)12–17 repeats. The (GCN)11/Ala11 allele has so far been described to be either a polymorphism or a recessive allele with no effect on the phenotype in the heterozygous state. Here we report the clinical and histopathological phenotype of a patient carrying a single (GCN)11/Ala11 heterozygous allele and presenting an atypical form of OPMD with dysphagia and late and mild oculomotor symptoms. Intranuclear inclusions were observed in his muscle biopsy. This suggests a dominant mode of expression of the (GCN)11/Ala11 allele associated with a partial penetrance of OPMD. PMID:27858728

  18. Genetic alteration and mutation profiling of circulating cell-free tumor DNA (cfDNA) for diagnosis and targeted therapy of gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Yan, Weixin; Zhang, Aiguo; Powell, Michael J

    2016-07-21

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) have been recognized as a biologically distinctive type of tumor, different from smooth muscle and neural tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. The identification of genetic aberrations in proto-oncogenes that drive the growth of GISTs is critical for improving the efficacy of cancer therapy by matching targeted drugs to specific mutations. Research into the oncogenic mechanisms of GISTs has found that these tumors frequently contain activating gene mutations in either platelet-derived growth factor receptor A (PDGFRA) or a receptor tyrosine protein associated with a mast cell growth factor receptor encoded by the KIT gene. Mutant cancer subpopulations have the potential to disrupt durable patient responses to molecularly targeted therapy for GISTs, yet the prevalence and size of subpopulations remain largely unexplored. Detection of the cancer subpopulations that harbor low-frequency mutant alleles of target proto-oncogenes through the use of molecular genetic methods, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) target amplification technology, is hampered by the high abundance of wild-type alleles, which limit the sensitivity of detection of these minor mutant alleles. This is especially true in the case of mutant tumor DNA derived "driver" and "drug-resistant" alleles that are present in the circulating cell-free tumor DNA (cfDNA) in the peripheral blood circulation of GIST patients. So-called "liquid biopsy" allows for the dynamic monitoring of the patients' tumor status during treatment using minimally invasive sampling. New methodologies, such as a technology that employs a xenonucleic acid (XNA) clamping probe to block the PCR amplification of wild-type templates, have allowed improved molecular detection of these low-frequency alleles both in tissue biopsy samples and in cfDNA. These new methodologies could be widely applied for minimally invasive molecular testing in the therapeutic management of GISTs.

  19. Moral issues arising from genetics.

    PubMed

    Zucker, A; Patriquin, D

    1987-01-01

    Gene therapy, pre-natal diagnosis, genetically altered bacteria, patenting new life forms: these are all outgrowths from the development of genetics. Our focus will be on the moral issues engendered by some of the genetic techniques which are now so well integrated into clinical medicine. The section on genetic counseling is meant to show the most frequent moral problems encountered as they might really occur. Genetic screening is presented as a mix of preventive medicine and aid for genetic counseling. Genetic engineering is discussed in the context of evolution and human needs and desires.

  20. Association between Genetic Variation in the Oxytocin Receptor Gene and Emotional Withdrawal, but not between Oxytocin Pathway Genes and Diagnosis in Psychotic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Haram, Marit; Tesli, Martin; Bettella, Francesco; Djurovic, Srdjan; Andreassen, Ole Andreas; Melle, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Social dysfunction is common in patients with psychotic disorders. Oxytocin is a neuropeptide with a central role in social behavior. This study aims to explore the relationship between oxytocin pathway genes and symptoms related to social dysfunction in patients with psychotic disorders. We performed association analyses between four oxytocin pathway genes (OXT, OXTR, AVP, and CD38) and four areas of social behavior-related psychopathology as measured by Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. For this purpose, we used both a polygenic risk score (PGRS) and single OXTR candidate single nucleotide polymorphism previously reported in the literature (rs53576, rs237902, and rs2254298). A total of 734 subjects with DSM-IV psychotic spectrum disorders and 420 healthy controls were included. Oxytocin pathway PGRSs were calculated based on the independent Psychiatric Genomics Consortium study sample. There was a significant association between symptom of Emotional Withdrawal and the previously reported OXTR risk allele A in rs53576. No significant associations between oxytocin pathway gene variants and a diagnosis of psychotic disorder were found. Our findings indicate that while oxytocin pathway genes do not appear to contribute to the susceptibility to psychotic disorders, variations in the OXTR gene might play a role in the development of impaired social behavior. PMID:25667571

  1. Genetic risk, risk perception, and decision making

    SciTech Connect

    Evers-Kiebooms, G.; Cassiman, J.J.; VanDenBerghe, H.; D'Ydewalle, G. )

    1987-01-01

    This book covers the proceedings of a conference held by March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation. Topics presented include: Diagnosis of Genetic disease by linkage analysis and DNA diagnosis of autosomal dominant and recessive diseases.

  2. [Molecular diagnosis of ADPKD].

    PubMed

    Scolari, Francesco; Savoldi, Gianfranco; Mazza, Cinzia; Izzi, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Most patients with ADPKD do not need molecular genetic testing. When indicated, Sanger sequencing is the most commonly used technique. When a pathogenic mutation is not identified by Sanger, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification analysis (MLPA) should be performed to detect gene rearrangement (insertion or deletion). The next generation sequencing (NGS) techniques can provide high-throughput and comprehensive diagnostic screening at lower cost. Finally, in the future, targeted (TS) or whole exome sequencing (WES) will likely play a role in the molecular diagnostics of ADPKD. Molecular genetic testing is indicated in several conditions: no family history; equivocal/atypical renal imaging; marked discordant disease within family; early and severe PKD; reproductive counseling and pre-implantation genetic diagnosis; related living donor transplantation.

  3. Cytogenetic analysis in prenatal diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Schonberg, S A

    1993-01-01

    Chromosome analysis is the single most frequent test used in laboratory prenatal diagnostic studies. I summarize the current status of the field, including diagnostic problems in the laboratory and the clinical problems associated with communicating unexpected laboratory findings. I explore the effect of molecular genetics on these issues and its possible future effects on the entire practice of prenatal diagnosis as it relates to the risk for chromosome nondisjunction (trisomy). I also discuss the use of cytogenetic analysis in the prenatal diagnosis of certain inherited genetic diseases. Images PMID:8236978

  4. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Testing Registry: Dementia, familial Danish Genetic Testing Registry: Hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy, Icelandic type Other Diagnosis and Management Resources (2 links) Johns Hopkins Medicine: ...

  5. Application value of different transformation zone types and its genetic relationship with high-risk HPV type in diagnosis and therapy of cervical disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Zhou, Jia-De

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to discuss the influence of different types of transformation zone (TZ) on positive surgical margin of loop electrosurgical excision procedure (LEEP) and the significance of infection of different genetic high-risk HPV for cervical intraepithelial neoplasm. The clinical data of patients who had CIN2+ and received LEEP during January to December 2013 was investigated. The conditions of positive surgical margin of patients of different transformation zone (type I, II, III) were analyzed. The clinical high-risk types of HPV were divided into three groups, including A5/6, A7 and A9, compared with the pathological conditions of pre-operation and post-operation of the patients in respective group. The results indicated that type III transformation zone is more likely to cause positive cutting margin. For CIN2+ patients, sensitivity and specificity are 0.89% and 79.56% in group A5/6, and negative and positive predicted value (NPV, PPV) are 40% and 5%. The sensitivity, specificity, NPV, PPV in group A7 is 12.5%, 44.08%, 29.49% and 21.21%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, NPV, PPV in group A9 is 88.99%, 87.09%, 85.26%, 81.51%, respectively. Transformation zone type was correlated positively with positive cutting margin percentage (r = 0.8732, P < 0.05). Compared with type I, type II and III transformation zone is more likely to cause pathological upgrades. In conclusion, different types of transformation zone and high-risk HPV have clinical significance in causing positive cutting margin of surgery and disease extent.

  6. Embryo genome profiling by single-cell sequencing for successful preimplantation genetic diagnosis in a family harboring COL4A1 c.1537G>A; p.G513S mutation

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nayana H.; Bhadarka, Harsha K.; Patel, Kruti B.; Vaniawala, Salil N.; Acharya, Arpan; Mukhopadhyaya, Pratap N.; Sodagar, Nilofar R.

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXT: Genetic profiling of embryos (also known as preimplantation genetic diagnosis) before implantation has dramatically enhanced the success quotient of in vitro fertilization (IVF) in recent times. The technology helps in avoiding selective pregnancy termination since the baby is likely to be free of the disease under consideration. AIM: Screening of embryos free from c.1537G>A; p.G513S mutation within the COL4A1 gene for which the father was known in before be in heterozygous condition. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Processing of trophectoderm biopsies was done from twelve embryos for c.1537G>A; p.G513S mutation within the COL4A1 gene. DNA extracted from isolated cells were subjected to whole genome amplification using an isothermal amplification and strand displacement technology. Oligonucleotide primers bracketing the mutation were synthesized and used to amplify 162 base pairs (bp) polymerase chain reaction amplicons originating from each embryo which were subsequently sequenced to detect the presence or absence of the single base polymorphism. RESULTS: Three out of 12 embryos interrogated in this study were found to be normal while 9 were found to harbor the mutation in heterozygous condition. Implantation of one of the normal embryos following by chorionic villus sampling at 11th week of pregnancy indicated that the baby was free from c.1537G>A; p.G513S mutation within the COL4A1 gene. CONCLUSIONS: Single-cell sequencing is a helpful tool for preimplantation embryo profiling. This is the first report from India describing the birth of a normal child through IVF procedure where a potential pathogenic COL4A1 allele was avoided using this technology. PMID:27803589

  7. Dual Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... diagnosis has both a mental disorder and an alcohol or drug problem. These conditions occur together frequently. In particular, alcohol and drug problems tend to occur with Depression Anxiety disorders ...

  8. Genetic Mapping

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fact Sheets Fact Sheets En Español: Mapeo Genético Genetic Mapping What is genetic mapping? How do researchers ... genetic map? What are genetic markers? What is genetic mapping? Among the main goals of the Human ...

  9. Genetic Counseling

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Pregnancy > Before or between pregnancies > Genetic counseling Genetic counseling E-mail to a friend Please fill ... a genetic counselor in your area. What is genetic counseling? Genetic counseling helps you understand how genes , ...

  10. Genetic screening for deafness.

    PubMed

    Smith, Richard J H; Hone, Stephen

    2003-04-01

    Genetic testing for deafness has become a reality. It has changed the paradigm for evaluating deaf and hard-of-hearing persons and will be used by physicians for diagnostic purposes and as a basis for treatment and management options. Although mutation screening is currently available for only a limited number of genes, in these specific instances, diagnosis, carrier detection, and reproductive risk counseling can be provided. In the coming years there will be an expansion of the role of genetic testing and counseling will not be limited to reproductive issues. Treatment and management decisions will be made based on specific genetic diagnoses. Although genetic testing may be a confusing service for the practicing otolaryngologist, it is an important part of medical care. New discoveries and technologies will expand and increase the complexity of genetic testing options and it will become the responsibility of otolaryngologists to familiarize themselves with current discoveries and accepted protocols for genetic testing.

  11. Genetics Home Reference: CLPB deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... have clouding of the lenses of the eyes ( cataracts ) from birth (congenital) or beginning in infancy. CLPB ... link) Genetic Testing Registry: 3-methylglutaconic aciduria with cataracts, neurologic involvement, and neutropenia Other Diagnosis and Management ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: ADNP syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1 link) Genetic Testing Registry: Helsmoortel-van der aa syndrome Other Diagnosis and Management Resources (1 link) ... intellectual disability-autism spectrum disorder Helsmoortel-van der Aa syndrome HVDAS mental retardation, autosomal dominant 28 MRD28 ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: Ochoa syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1 link) Genetic Testing Registry: Ochoa syndrome Other Diagnosis and Management Resources (4 links) GeneReview: Urofacial Syndrome National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: Urodynamic Testing Scripps Health: Self-Catheterization -- Female Scripps ...

  14. Red cell enzyme polymorphisms in Moroccans and southern Spaniards: new data for the genetic history of the western Mediterranean.

    PubMed

    Kandil, M; Moral, P; Esteban, E; Autori, L; Mameli, G E; Zaoui, D; Calo, C; Luna, F; Vacca, L; Vona, G

    1999-10-01

    Population samples from Morocco (El Jadida, south Atlantic coast) and La Alpujarra (Granada mountains, Spain), located on both shores of the western Mediterranean, were typed for 8 erythrocyte genetic markers: ACP1, ESD, PGD, AK1, GLO1, PGM1, SODA, and DIA. Genetic heterogeneity within western Mediterranean groups was investigated on the basis of allele frequencies of these 8 polymorphisms plus ABO and Rh (CDE). Only slight peculiarities for the ACP1, GLO1, and AK1 systems were observed in the 2 samples compared with other Mediterranean data. The new data are consistent with a main north to south genetic differentiation in the Mediterranean region. However, with regard to other European groups, the La Alpujarra population shows a particular affinity with North Africans that may be compatible with both an ancient common substratum and/or a special historical influence during the Muslim domination of the Iberian Peninsula.

  15. Genetics: advances in genetic testing for deafness

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, A. Eliot; Smith, Richard J.H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review To provide an update on recently discovered human deafness genes and to describe advances in comprehensive genetic testing platforms for deafness, both of which have been enabled by new massively parallel sequencing technologies. Recent findings Over the review period, three syndromic and six nonsyndromic deafness genes have been discovered, bringing the total number of nonsyndromic deafness genes to 64. Four studies have shown the utility of massively parallel sequencing for comprehensive genetic testing for deafness. Three of these platforms have been released on a clinical or commercial basis. Summary Deafness is the most common sensory deficit in humans. Genetic diagnosis has traditionally been difficult due to extreme genetic heterogeneity and a lack of phenotypic variability. For these reasons, comprehensive genetic screening platforms have been developed with the use of massively parallel sequencing. These technologies are also accelerating the pace of gene discovery for deafness. Because genetic diagnosis is the basis for molecular therapies, these advances lay the foundation for the clinical care of deaf and hard-of-hearing persons in the future. PMID:23042251

  16. Genetic diseases in adults.

    PubMed

    Kolettis, Peter N

    2003-02-01

    Genetic diseases that do not primarily affect the genitourinary tract may have urologic manifestations. These urologic manifestations range from benign and malignant renal disease to infertility. Thus, the practicing urologist may be involved in the care of these patients and should have knowledge of these diseases. Continued improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of these genetic diseases will likely result in improved survival and will increase the number of patients who may develop urologic manifestations of these diseases.

  17. Genetic Testing in Hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Bilen, Ozlem; Pokharel, Yashashwi; Ballantyne, Christie M

    2016-03-01

    Hereditary dyslipidemias are often underdiagnosed and undertreated, yet with significant health implications, most importantly causing preventable premature cardiovascular diseases. The commonly used clinical criteria to diagnose hereditary lipid disorders are specific but are not very sensitive. Genetic testing may be of value in making accurate diagnosis and improving cascade screening of family members, and potentially, in risk assessment and choice of therapy. This review focuses on using genetic testing in the clinical setting for lipid disorders, particularly familial hypercholesterolemia.

  18. Genetic testing in hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Bilen, Ozlem; Pokharel, Yashashwi; Ballantyne, Christie M

    2015-05-01

    Hereditary dyslipidemias are often underdiagnosed and undertreated, yet with significant health implications, most importantly causing preventable premature cardiovascular diseases. The commonly used clinical criteria to diagnose hereditary lipid disorders are specific but are not very sensitive. Genetic testing may be of value in making accurate diagnosis and improving cascade screening of family members, and potentially, in risk assessment and choice of therapy. This review focuses on using genetic testing in the clinical setting for lipid disorders, particularly familial hypercholesterolemia.

  19. Human prenatal diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Filkins, K.; Russo, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    Advances in the field of prenatal diagnosis have been rapid during the past decade. Moreover, liberal use of birth control methods and restriction of family size have placed greater emphasis on optimum outcome of each pregnancy. There are many prenatal diagnostic techniques of proven value; the risks, including false negatives and false positives, are known. With the rapid proliferation of new and experimental techniques, many disorders are potential diagnosable or even treatable; however, risk factors are unknown and issues relating to quality control have not been resolved. These problems are readily appreciated in the dramatic new techniques involving recombinant DNA, chorion villus sampling, and fetal surgery. Unfortunately, clinicians may not appreciate the difficulties that may also be encountered in the more mundane prenatal diagnostic tests such as ultrasonography or enzymatic testing. The aim of this volume is to clarify and rationalize certain aspects of diagnosis, genetic counseling, and intervention. New and experimental techniques are presented in the light of current knowledge.

  20. Fault diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, Kathy

    1990-01-01

    The objective of the research in this area of fault management is to develop and implement a decision aiding concept for diagnosing faults, especially faults which are difficult for pilots to identify, and to develop methods for presenting the diagnosis information to the flight crew in a timely and comprehensible manner. The requirements for the diagnosis concept were identified by interviewing pilots, analyzing actual incident and accident cases, and examining psychology literature on how humans perform diagnosis. The diagnosis decision aiding concept developed based on those requirements takes abnormal sensor readings as input, as identified by a fault monitor. Based on these abnormal sensor readings, the diagnosis concept identifies the cause or source of the fault and all components affected by the fault. This concept was implemented for diagnosis of aircraft propulsion and hydraulic subsystems in a computer program called Draphys (Diagnostic Reasoning About Physical Systems). Draphys is unique in two important ways. First, it uses models of both functional and physical relationships in the subsystems. Using both models enables the diagnostic reasoning to identify the fault propagation as the faulted system continues to operate, and to diagnose physical damage. Draphys also reasons about behavior of the faulted system over time, to eliminate possibilities as more information becomes available, and to update the system status as more components are affected by the fault. The crew interface research is examining display issues associated with presenting diagnosis information to the flight crew. One study examined issues for presenting system status information. One lesson learned from that study was that pilots found fault situations to be more complex if they involved multiple subsystems. Another was pilots could identify the faulted systems more quickly if the system status was presented in pictorial or text format. Another study is currently under way to

  1. An interesting prenatal diagnosis: double aneuploidy.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Cetin; Eris, Serenat; Yalcin, Yakup; Sen Selim, Halime

    2013-01-01

    Double aneuploidy, the existence of two chromosomal abnormalities in the same individual, is a rare condition. Early diagnosis of this condition is important to offer termination of pregnancy in genetic counselling. Cytogenetic analysis with amniocentesis and ultrasound examination is valuable for diagnosis of double aneuploidy. In this report we present a case with the karyotype of 48XXY+21 diagnosed prenatally.

  2. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for molecular diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. H. Winston; Taranenko, N. I.; Zhu, Y. F.; Allman, S. L.; Tang, K.; Matteson, K. J.; Chang, L. Y.; Chung, C. N.; Martin, Steve; Haff, Lawrence

    1996-04-01

    Laser desorption mass spectrometry has been used for molecular diagnosis of cystic fibrosis. Both 3-base deletion and single-base point mutation have been successfully detected by clinical samples. This new detection method can possibly speed up the diagnosis by one order of magnitude in the future. It may become a new biotechnology technique for population screening of genetic disease.

  3. [Genetics and genetic counseling].

    PubMed

    Izzi, Claudia; Liut, Francesca; Dallera, Nadia; Mazza, Cinzia; Magistroni, Riccardo; Savoldi, Gianfranco; Scolari, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD) is the most frequent genetic disease, characterized by progressive development of bilateral renal cysts. Two causative genes have been identified: PKD1 and PKD2. ADPKD phenotype is highly variable. Typically, ADPKD is an adult onset disease. However, occasionally, ADPKD manifests as very early onset disease. The phenotypic variability of ADPKD can be explained at three genetic levels: genic, allelic and gene modifier effects. Recent advances in molecular screening for PKD gene mutations and the introduction of the new next generation sequencing (NGS)- based genotyping approach have generated considerable improvement regarding the knowledge of genetic basis of ADPKD. The purpose of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of the genetics of ADPKD, focusing on new insights in genotype-phenotype correlation and exploring novel clinical approach to genetic testing. Evaluation of these new genetic information requires a multidisciplinary approach involving a nephrologist and a clinical geneticist.

  4. Polymyositis: Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... themselves being invaded by cells of the immune system. Looking for more information, support or ways to get involved? Contact Us Get Our Emails About Polymyositis (PM) Signs and Symptoms Diagnosis Causes/Inheritance Medical Management Research Find your MDA Care Center Meet Warner ...

  5. Morphological and molecular description of Tenuisentis niloticus (Meyer, 1932) (Acanthocephala: Tenuisentidae) from Heterotis niloticus (Cuvier) (Actinopterygii: Arapaimidae), in Burkina Faso, with emendation of the family diagnosis and notes on new features, cryptic genetic diversity and histopathology.

    PubMed

    Amin, Omar M; Evans, R Paul; Boungou, Magloire; Heckmann, Richard

    2016-02-01

    Specimens described as Rhadinorhynchus niloticus Meyer, 1932 (Rhadinorhynchidae) from two male specimens collected from Heterotis niloticus (Cuvier) in the Egyptian Nile were later redescribed in the genus Tenuisentis Van Cleave, 1936 (Tenuisentidae) based on 12 specimens collected from the same host species in the White Nile. That redescription basically distinguished the two genera based on five traits but did not actually provide a formal description. His account left out information about cerebral ganglion, lemnisci, some reproductive structures, eggs, proboscis hook dissymmetry and roots, size of trunk and a few other structures. We provide (i) the first complete description of this species enhanced by SEM, molecular, and histo-pathological studies; (ii) expand the existing descriptions; (iii) correct questionable accounts advanced by Van Cleave on the cement gland and the hypodermal giant nuclei; and (iv) add descriptions of new features such as the para-receptacle structure which we also report from Paratenuisentis Bullock & Samuel, 1975, the only other genus in Tenuisentidae Van Cleave, 1936. The subsequent description of a few more specimens from the same host collected in Mali was more informative yet incomplete and at variance with our specimens from Burkina Faso. Genetic divergence and phylogenetic analyses of mitochondrial (cytochrome oxidase c subunit I; COI) and nuclear (18S ribosomal RNA) gene relationships uncovered a cryptic species complex containing two lineages. Based on our studies, the family diagnosis is emended. The acanthocephalan causes damage to the host intestine as depicted in histopathological sections. The invading worm can extend from the mucosal layer to the muscularis externa of the host with subsequent tissue necrosis, villi compression, haemorrhaging and blood loss.

  6. Obtaining genetic testing in pediatric epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Ream, Margie A; Patel, Anup D

    2015-10-01

    The steps from patient evaluation to genetic diagnosis remain complicated. We discuss some of the genetic testing methods available along with their general advantages and disadvantages. We briefly review common pediatric epilepsy syndromes with strong genetic association and provide a potentially useful algorithm for genetic testing in drug-resistant epilepsy. We performed an extensive literature review of available information as it pertains to genetic testing and genetics in pediatric epilepsy. If a genetic disorder is suspected as the cause of epilepsy, based on drug resistance, family history, or clinical phenotype, timely diagnosis may reduce overall cost, limit the diagnostic odyssey that can bring much anxiety to families, improve prognostic accuracy, and lead to targeted therapy. Interpretation of complicated results should be performed only in collaboration with geneticists and genetic counselors, unless the ordering neurologist has a strong background in and understanding of genetics. Genetic testing can play an important role in the care provided to patients with epilepsy.

  7. Modern diagnosis and management of the porphyrias.

    PubMed

    Sassa, Shigeru

    2006-11-01

    Recent advances in the molecular understanding of the porphyrias now offer specific diagnosis and precise definition of the types of genetic mutations involved in the disease. Molecular diagnostic testing is powerful and very useful in kindred evaluation and genetic counselling when a disease-responsible mutation has been identified in the family. It is also the only way to properly screen asymptomatic gene carriers, facilitating correct treatment and appropriate genetic counselling of family members at risk. However, it should be noted that DNA-based testing is for the diagnosis of the gene carrier status, but not for the diagnosis of clinical syndrome or severity of the disease, e.g. an acute attack. For the diagnosis of clinically expressed porphyrias, a logical stepwise approach including the analysis of porphyrins and their precursors should not be underestimated, as it is still very useful, and is often the best from the cost-effective point of view.

  8. New Genetics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Science Education > The New Genetics The New Genetics Living Laboratories Classroom Poster Order a Free Copy ... Piece to a Century-Old Evolutionary Puzzle Computing Genetics Model Organisms RNA Interference The New Genetics is ...

  9. Genetic Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Genetic Disorders Home For Patients Search FAQs Genetic Disorders ... Spanish Genetic Disorders FAQ094, April 2014 PDF Format Genetic Disorders Pregnancy What are genes? What are chromosomes? ...

  10. Melanoma Diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsch, Alexander

    The chapter deals with the diagnosis of the malignant melanoma of the skin. This aggressive type of cancer with steadily growing incidence in white populations can hundred percent be cured if it is detected in an early stage. Imaging techniques, in particular dermoscopy, have contributed significantly to improvement of diagnostic accuracy in clinical settings, achieving sensitivities for melanoma experts of beyond 95% at specificities of 90% and more. Automatic computer analysis of dermoscopy images has, in preliminary studies, achieved classification rates comparable to those of experts. However, the diagnosis of melanoma requires a lot of training and experience, and at the time being, average numbers of lesions excised per histology-proven melanoma are around 30, a number which clearly is too high. Further improvements in computer dermoscopy systems and their competent use in clinical settings certainly have the potential to support efforts of improving this situation. In the chapter, medical basics, current state of melanoma diagnosis, image analysis methods, commercial dermoscopy systems, evaluation of systems, and methods and future directions are presented.

  11. Medical genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Nora, J.J.; Fraser, F.C.

    1989-01-01

    This book presents a discussion of medical genetics for the practitioner treating or counseling patients with genetic disease. It includes a discussion of the relationship of heredity and diseases, the chromosomal basis for heredity, gene frequencies, and genetics of development and maldevelopment. The authors also focus on teratology, somatic cell genetics, genetics and cancer, genetics of behavior.

  12. [Genetic information and future medicine].

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Akihiro

    2012-11-01

    Rapid technological advances in genetic analysis have revealed the genetic background of various diseases. Elucidation of the genes responsible for a disease enables better clinical management of the disease and helps to develop targeted drugs. Also, early diagnosis and management of at-risk family members can be made by identification of a genetic disease in the proband. On the other hand, genetic issues often cause psychological distress to the family. To perform genetic testing appropriately and to protect patients and family members from any harm, guidelines for genetic testing were released from the alliance of Japanese genetics-related academic societies in 2003. As genetic testing is becoming incorporated into clinical practice more broadly, the guideline was revised and released by the Japanese Society of Medical Sciences in 2011. All medical professionals in Japan are expected to follow this guideline.

  13. Ethics in reproductive genetics.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, J C; Evans, M I

    1992-12-01

    Ethics in reproductive genetics comprise descriptive ethics and normative ethics. Ethical problems before prenatal diagnosis involve genetic counseling and informed consent for the choice patients must make. Prenatal diagnosis using amniocentesis is controversial. An international survey of geneticists showed that 25% would do prenatal diagnosis for sex selection, and 17% would refer the couple elsewhere. Hungary (60%), India (37%), the US (34%), Canada (30%), Greece (29%), and Sweden (28%) would do prenatal diagnosis. The statistical incidence of positive findings after prenatal diagnosis does not exceed 4% of all cases when most couples choose abortion. Respect for parental choice and for nondirective counseling was supported in responses to 3 cases in the international survey that also had disclosure dilemmas included with abortion choices. 84% of respondents would be nondirective for XYY and 88% for XO. In India, Hungary, Turkey, and Norway, 46%, 40%, 40%, and 33%, respectively, would advise aborting an XO (Turner) fetus. A survey of 737 genetics and obstetricians and ethicists and clergy showed acceptability of abortion in singleton pregnancies and in twins associated strongly with the trimester of pregnancy, indication for selective termination, and fetal number. Prior group review of risks and benefits of experimental fetal therapy, case selection for experimental fetal therapy, the optimal informed-consent process for fetal therapy, twin pregnancies, refusal of proven fetal therapy, the lack of federal support for research in fetal diagnosis (preimplantation embryo diagnosis) and therapy, and sources of a moral obligation are also addressed. The Belmont Report on the ethics of biomedical research in the US proposed ethical principles to guide research with human subjects including the fetus: respect for parsons, beneficence, and justice.

  14. [Prenatal diagnosis using chorionic villi].

    PubMed

    Vega Hernández, M E; Hicks, J J; González-Angulo, J

    1991-07-01

    Chorionic villus sampling (CVS) has a promising future about early detection of fetal abnormalities. It has the potential to become a major tool in the prenatal diagnosis and therapy of genetic disorders. Villus samples can be analyzed by means of cytogenetic, biochemical or molecular technics. Information available at present indicates fetal loss rate should be in the same proportion than amniocentesis. CVS appears to be a reasonably safe and reliable method of prenatal diagnosis in the first trimester of pregnancy. This procedure is setting as fast as it is possible like an excellent alternative to amniocentesis.

  15. Diagnostic recognition of genetic disease

    SciTech Connect

    Nyhan, W.L.; Sakati, N.A.

    1987-01-01

    This book discusses the diagnosis and management of genetically determined diseases. Genetics are also discussed, but the major focus is on diagnosis. Patients with genetically determined disorders have clinical pictures that cross most of the boundaries of subspecialty practice, and are frequently seen by a variety of physicians. The pediatrician will often be the first to come in contact with these patients, but internists are increasingly concerned with these patients, especially those with inborn errors of metabolism. The hematologist may be the first to see a patient with Fanconi anemia, and the gynecologist, the patient with Turner's syndrome. In brief this book emphasizes the diagnosis of various genetic diseases in relation to different medical specialties.

  16. The value of cardiac genetic testing.

    PubMed

    Ingles, Jodie; Semsarian, Christopher

    2014-08-01

    Genetic testing is an important and necessary aspect of the management of families with cardiac genetic conditions. Commercial genetic tests are available for most cardiac genetic diseases, and increasing uptake amongst patients has contributed to a vastly improved knowledge of the genetic basis of these diseases. The incredible advances in genetic technologies have translated to faster, more comprehensive, and inexpensive commercial genetic tests and has completely changed the landscape of commercial genetic testing in recent years. While there are enormous challenges, mostly relating to interpretation of variants, the value of a genetic diagnosis should not be underestimated. In almost all cases, the single greatest utility is for the predictive genetic testing of family members. This review will describe the value of cardiac genetic testing in the current climate of rapid genetic advancements.

  17. Genetic structure of the human population in the Po delta

    PubMed Central

    Beretta, M.; Mazzetti, P.; Mamolini, E.; Gavina, R.; Barale, R.; Vullo, C.; Ravani, A.; Franze, A.; Sapigni, T.; Soracco, E.; Davi, D.; Ricci, N.; Cappello, N.; Rendine, S.; Piazza, A.; Barrai, I.

    1989-01-01

    The genetic structure of the population of Ferrara Province in the Po delta in Italy was investigated using χ2 analysis, kinship analysis, analysis of correspondences, and geographical mapping of principal components of gene frequencies, χ2 Analysis tests for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and for heterogeneity of gene and phenotype frequencies; kinship analysis tests for association between indicators of genetic and geographic proximity; analysis of correspondences relates localities and genetic systems in an eigenvectorial space; and geographic mapping displays the principal components of gene frequencies in the real space. In 1,364 adults in 26 residential units, seven presumably neutral isoenzyme systems were typed; ACP1 ESD, GLO I, GPT, PGD, PGM1 and PGP. It was found that average kinship for these neutral systems is correlated with geographic distance in this small area, but not as strongly as kinship for beta-thalassemia. A north-south gradient was observed for ESD. Analysis of correspondences indicated GPT, PGM1, and GLO I as the systems contributing most to differentiation within the province. The maps obtained from principal components of gene frequencies were consistent with the migrational history of the area. ImagesFigure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8 PMID:2741951

  18. Genetic testing in ALS

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Russell L.; Heverin, Mark; Thorpe, Owen; Abrahams, Sharon; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Hardiman, Orla

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine the degree of consensus among clinicians on the clinical use of genetic testing in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and the factors that determine decision-making. Methods: ALS researchers worldwide were invited to participate in a detailed online survey to determine their attitudes and practices relating to genetic testing. Results: Responses from 167 clinicians from 21 different countries were analyzed. The majority of respondents (73.3%) do not consider that there is a consensus definition of familial ALS (FALS). Fifty-seven percent consider a family history of frontotemporal dementia and 48.5% the presence of a known ALS genetic mutation as sufficient for a diagnosis of FALS. Most respondents (90.2%) offer genetic testing to patients they define as having FALS and 49.4% to patients with sporadic ALS. Four main genes (SOD1, C9orf72, TARDBP, and FUS) are commonly tested. A total of 55.2% of respondents would seek genetic testing if they had personally received a diagnosis of ALS. Forty-two percent never offer presymptomatic testing to family members of patients with FALS. Responses varied between ALS specialists and nonspecialists and based on the number of new patients seen per year. Conclusions: There is a lack of consensus among clinicians as to the definition of FALS. Substantial variation exists in attitude and practices related to genetic testing of patients and presymptomatic testing of their relatives across geographic regions and between experienced specialists in ALS and nonspecialists. PMID:28159885

  19. Molecular Diagnosis of Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Deignan, Joshua L; Grody, Wayne W

    2016-01-01

    This unit describes a recommended approach to identifying causal genetic variants in an individual suspected of having cystic fibrosis. An introduction to the genetics and clinical presentation of cystic fibrosis is initially presented, followed by a description of the two main strategies used in the molecular diagnosis of cystic fibrosis: (1) an initial targeted variant panel used to detect only the most common cystic fibrosis-causing variants in the CFTR gene, and (2) sequencing of the entire coding region of the CFTR gene to detect additional rare causal CFTR variants. Finally, the unit concludes with a discussion regarding the analytic and clinical validity of these approaches.

  20. Genetics in the art and art in genetics.

    PubMed

    Bukvic, Nenad; Elling, John W

    2015-01-15

    "Healing is best accomplished when art and science are conjoined, when body and spirit are probed together", says Bernard Lown, in his book "The Lost Art of Healing". Art has long been a witness to disease either through diseases which affected artists or diseases afflicting objects of their art. In particular, artists have often portrayed genetic disorders and malformations in their work. Sometimes genetic disorders have mystical significance; other times simply have intrinsic interest. Recognizing genetic disorders is also an art form. From the very beginning of my work as a Medical Geneticist I have composed personal "algorithms" to piece together evidence of genetics syndromes and diseases from the observable signs and symptoms. In this paper we apply some 'gestalt' Genetic Syndrome Diagnostic algorithms to virtual patients found in some art masterpieces. In some the diagnosis is clear and in others the artists' depiction only supports a speculative differential diagnosis.

  1. Genetic polymorphism of blood groups and erythrocytes enzymes in population groups of the Republic of Macedonia.

    PubMed

    Efremovska, Lj; Schmidt, H D; Scheil, H G; Gjorgjevic, D; Nikoloska Dadic, E

    2007-12-01

    This study presents the results of an examination of 3 blood-group systems (ABO, Rhesus, and P1) and erythrocyte enzymes (ADA, AK, ALADH, PGD, SAHH, PGM1, PGM3, GPT, GOT, ACP, UMPK, ESD and GLO) in populations that reside in R. Macedonia. Four population samples from the Republic of Macedonia (129 Macedonians from Skopje, 98 Albanians from Skopje, 95 Aromanians from Krusevo, 102 Aromanians from Stip) were included in the study. A comparison of the obtained results with data from literature on other Balkan populations has been made. The results of the comparison of the studied alleles indicate relatively small genetic distances among the studied populations. The obtained dendrograms indicate a larger homogeneity in the large Balkan populations, and a manifest trend of separating the Aromanian population of the Stip region. A larger separation is characteristic in the Greek population of Thrace.

  2. Genetics of pancreatitis: an update for clinicians and genetic counselors.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Sheila; Whitcomb, David C

    2012-04-01

    With novel genetic technologies available, there is a paradigm shift in the way that risk assessments, diagnoses,and therapies for genetic susceptibility syndromes are addressed. Hereditary pancreatitis is among these conditions, for which genetic counseling and next generation sequencing, help families better understand, cope with and live healthier lives. Identifying a genetic etiology to a condition formally believed to be solely environmentally induced can alter the path for treatment for many patients. This finding introduces the concept of gene-environment interactions in human disease and the relationship between genetic predisposition and exposure risk in disease development. The genetic counseling process is complex with medical explanations, psychosocial issues relating to coping with diagnosis, potential future health problems, recurrence risks and family planning. These sometimes difficult conversations can be facilitated by a genetic counselor as a member of the multidisciplinary team. This chapter addresses the intricate medical and psychosocial issues that can arise in the setting of treating patients with hereditary pancreatitis.

  3. Molecular diagnosis: Implications for ophthalmology.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, James T; Sibley, Cailin H; Choi, Dongseok; Harrington, Christina A; Planck, Stephen R

    2016-01-01

    The effort to subdivide diseases and to individualize therapies based on characteristics of the patient has been labeled precision medicine. Jameson and Longo define precision medicine as "treatments targeted to the needs of individual patients on the basis of genetic, biomarker, phenotypic or psychosocial characteristics that distinguish a given patient from other patients with similar clinical presentations" (Jameson and Longo, 2015). We illustrate how molecular diagnosis can be applied to orbital inflammatory disease to achieve the goals of precision medicine.

  4. Autoinflammatory syndromes: diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    During the last decades the description of autoinflammatory syndromes induced great interest among the scientific community. Mainly rheumatologists, immunologists and pediatricians are involved in the discovery of etiopathogenesis of these syndromes and in the recognition of affected patients. In this paper we will discuss the most important clues of monogenic and non-genetic inflammatory syndromes to help pediatricians in the diagnosis and treatment of these diseases. PMID:20813071

  5. Genetic algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Lui; Bayer, Steven E.

    1991-01-01

    Genetic algorithms are mathematical, highly parallel, adaptive search procedures (i.e., problem solving methods) based loosely on the processes of natural genetics and Darwinian survival of the fittest. Basic genetic algorithms concepts are introduced, genetic algorithm applications are introduced, and results are presented from a project to develop a software tool that will enable the widespread use of genetic algorithm technology.

  6. Genetics for the ophthalmologist.

    PubMed

    Sadagopan, Karthikeyan A; Capasso, Jenina; Levin, Alex V

    2012-09-01

    The eye has played a major role in human genomics including gene therapy. It is the fourth most common organ system after integument (skin, hair and nails), nervous system, and musculoskeletal system to be involved in genetic disorders. The eye is involved in single gene disorders and those caused by multifactorial etiology. Retinoblastoma was the first human cancer gene to be cloned. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy was the first mitochondrial disorder described. X-Linked red-green color deficiency was the first X-linked disorder described. The eye, unlike any other body organ, allows directly visualization of genetic phenomena such as skewed X-inactivation in the fundus of a female carrier of ocular albinism. Basic concepts of genetics and their application to clinical ophthalmological practice are important not only in making a precise diagnosis and appropriate referral, but also in management and genetic counseling.

  7. Genetics and epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Steinlein, Ortrud K.

    2008-01-01

    The term “epilepsy” describes a heterogeneous group of disorders, most of them caused by interactions between several or even many genes and environmental factors. Much rarer are the genetic epilepsies that are due to single-gene mutations or defined structural chromosomal aberrations, such as microdeletions. The discovery of several of the genes underlying these rare genetic epilepsies has already considerably contributed to our understanding of the basic mechanisms epileptogenesis. The progress made in the last 15 years in the genetics of epilepsy is providing new possibilities for diagnosis and therapy. Here, different genetic epilepsies are reviewed as examples, to demonstrate the various pathways that can lead from genes to seizures. PMID:18472482

  8. Genetic counseling services and development of training programs in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Juliana Mei-Har; Thong, Meow-Keong

    2013-12-01

    Genetic counseling service is urgently required in developing countries. In Malaysia, the first medical genetic service was introduced in 1994 at one of the main teaching hospitals in Kuala Lumpur. Two decades later, the medical genetic services have improved with the availability of genetic counseling, genetic testing and diagnosis, for both paediatric conditions and adult-onset inherited conditions, at four main centers of medical genetic services in Malaysia. Prenatal diagnosis services and assisted reproductive technologies are available at tertiary centres and private medical facilities. Positive developments include governmental recognition of Clinical Genetics as a subspecialty, increased funding for genetics services, development of medical ethics guidelines, and establishment of support groups. However, the country lacked qualified genetic counselors. Proposals were presented to policy-makers to develop genetic counseling courses. Challenges encountered included limited resources and public awareness, ethical dilemmas such as religious and social issues and inadequate genetic health professionals especially genetic counselors.

  9. The genetics of dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dellefave, Lisa; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review More than forty different individual genes have been implicated in the inheritance of dilated cardiomyopathy. For a subset of these genes, mutations can lead to a spectrum of cardiomyopathy that extends to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and left ventricular noncompaction. In nearly all cases, there is an increased risk of arrhythmias. With some genetic mutations, extracardiac manifestations are likely to be present. The precise genetic etiology can usually not be discerned from the cardiac and/or extracardiac manifestations and requires molecular genetic diagnosis for prognostic determination and cardiac care. Recent findings Newer technologies are influencing genetic testing, especially cardiomyopathy genetic testing, where an increased number of genes are now routinely being tested simultaneously. While this approach to testing multiple genes is increasing the diagnostic yield, the analysis of multiple genes in one test is also resulting in a large amount of genetic information of unclear significance. Summary Genetic testing is highly useful in the care of patients and families, since it guides diagnosis, influences care and aids in prognosis. However, the large amount of benign human genetic variation may complicate genetic results, and often requires a skilled team to accurately interpret the findings. PMID:20186049

  10. Experimental studies on some genetic effects of marine pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, B.; Bisol, P. M.; Rodinò, E.

    1980-03-01

    Following the results of a series of investigations carried out to estimate the degree of marine pollution by utilizing certain marine filter feeders, such as the blue mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis, research has been planned to detect possible genetic effects of pollutants, with special attention to those acting at the population level. The possible selective role of pollutants has been studied both in natural ( Mytilus) and in experimental ( Tisbe holothuriae) populations by utilizing some electrophoretically-detected gene-enzyme systems as genetic markers. For some of the seven polymorphic loci studied in Mytilus (AP, LAP, 6-PGD, IDHs, IDHm, PGI, PGM) significant changes in gene frequencies have been detected which can be related to the degree of pollution in the sampling areas. In the more polluted areas these changes were accompanied by a decrease in the frequency of heterozygotes. Similar changes in gene frequencies also occurred in laboratory populations of the copepod Tisbe, reared under various experimental conditions. In particular, certain alleles of two loci, PGI-1 and AP-1, exhibited an increase in frequency, especially in populations cultured at various levels of oil pollution. This trend appeared more significant for the locus PGI. The fact that equilibria are reached and that the less favoured alleles are nevertheless maintained in the populations, even at extremely low frequencies, suggests the balanced nature of these enzyme polymorphisms. The significance of the above findings is briefly discussed.

  11. Reproductive decisions after fetal genetic counselling.

    PubMed

    Pergament, Eugene; Pergament, Deborah

    2012-10-01

    A broad range of testing modalities for fetal genetic disease has been established. These include carrier screening for single-gene mutations, first-trimester and second-trimester screening for chromosome abnormalities and open neural-tube defects, prenatal diagnosis by means of chorionic villus sampling and amniocentesis, and preimplantation genetic diagnosis. Reproductive decisions before and after fetal genetic counselling represent the culmination of a dynamic interaction between prospective parents, obstetrician and genetic counsellor. The decision to undergo genetic testing before and after genetic counselling is influenced by a host of interrelated factors, including patient-partner and family relationships, patient-physician communication, societal mores, religious beliefs, and the media. Because of the complexity of personal and societal factors involved, it is not surprising that genetic counselling concerning reproductive decision-making must be individualised. A limited number of principles, guidelines and standards apply when counselling about testing for fetal genetic disease. These principles are that genetic counselling should be non-directive and unbiased and that parental decisions should be supported regardless of the reproductive choice. A critical responsibility of the obstetrician and genetic counsellor is to provide accurate and objective information about the implications, advantages, disadvantages and consequences of any genetic testing applied to prospective parents and their fetuses. These principles and responsibilities will be tested as newer technologies, such as array comparative genome hybridisation, non-invasive prenatal diagnosis and sequencing of the entire genome are introduced into the field of reproductive genetics and become routine practice.

  12. Symbiotic relationships: saviour siblings, family rights and biomedicine.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Belinda

    2005-12-01

    It is now possible to combine the use of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) and tissue matching to select an IVF embryo that will, after birth, be a compatible tissue donor for an existing individual. This article analyses the ethical issues and the regulatory frameworks that intersect around the creation of tissue compatible children.

  13. Parental Choices and Ethical Dilemmas Involving Disabilities: Special Education and the Problem of Deliberately Chosen Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauffman, James M.; Hallahan, Daniel P.

    2009-01-01

    Ethical issues regarding children with disabilities have long involved their treatment after they are born. These issues remain important, but children may be deliberately created with or without characteristics that are usually thought of as disabilities. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) and related technologies that involve human…

  14. Prevention is the Best Therapy: The Geneticist's Approach.

    PubMed

    Altarescu, Gheona

    2016-06-01

    Abstract During the last two decades prenatal genetic screening and diagnosis has become the cornerstone of medical care for family planning to prevent genetic disease. Carrier screening programs for genetic disorders that are prevalent in various populations identify couples and pregnancies at risk of having an affected child. These couples can proceed with a choice of invasive prenatal diagnosis tests of the fetus (chorionic villous sampling and amniocentesis), or non-invasive prenatal testing of free fetal DNA circulation in the maternal blood which has emerged within the last few years and is currently available for fetal sexing for X Linked disorders. Despite the advances in prenatal diagnosis, couples found to have a fetus affected with a genetic disorder may need to face the dilemma of pregnancy termination. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is an alternative to preempt risk of having a child affected with a life-altering genetic disorder. This technique allows biopsy and genetic diagnosis of embryos obtained from in vitro fertilization by analysis of the genetic material from one or a few embryonic cells. Only unaffected embryos are returned to the mother to establish the pregnancy. We present our experience using PGD for four Lysosomal storage disorders: Tay Sachs, Gaucher type 1, Hunter and Fabry disease with some of the couples being carriers of more than one genetic disorder. PGD is applicable to most disorders for which the gene and the familial mutation are known and should be presented to couples as an alternative to invasive prenatal testing.

  15. [Chromosome analysis and genetic testing].

    PubMed

    Isobe, Yasushi; Miura, Ikuo

    2014-03-01

    Chromosomal and genetic tests are essential to establish correct diagnoses of the lymphoma. When the tissue examination is planned, these should be done simultaneously with the morphological and immunophenotypic evaluations. Chromosome analyses can identify the genomic alterations of tumor cells. Some chromosome abnormalities define disease subtypes. For example, recurrent 14q32 translocations involving the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus support the diagnosis of B-cell lymphoma, and their translocation partners identify the types. In contrast, genetic testings are performed to confirm the presence of certain abnormalities including gene rearrangements, mutations, amplifications and deletions in each case. These results provide us detailed information for diagnosis, prognosis, and choice of therapy.

  16. [Genetics of sudden unexplained death].

    PubMed

    Campuzano, Oscar; Allegue, Catarina; Brugada, Ramon

    2014-03-20

    Sudden unexplained death is defined by death without a conclusive diagnosis after autopsy and it is responsible for a large percentage of sudden deaths. The progressive interaction between genetics and forensics in post-mortem studies has identified inheritable alterations responsible for pathologies associated with arrhythmic sudden death. The genetic diagnosis of the deceased enables the undertaking of preventive measures in family members, many of them asymptomatic but at risk. The implications of this multidisciplinary translational medical approach are complex, requiring the dedication of a specialized team.

  17. Challenges in the diagnosis of Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Summers, Kim M; West, Jennifer A; Peterson, Madelyn M; Stark, Denis; McGill, James J; West, Malcolm J

    2006-06-19

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a multisystem disorder of connective tissue that is inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion, and results from mutations in the FBN1 gene on chromosome 15. Diagnosis is challenging as it requires definition of diverse clinical features and input from a variety of specialists. Genetic testing of FBN1 is time consuming, expensive and complex, and may not solve the diagnostic dilemma. Failure to make a diagnosis or making an inappropriate diagnosis of MFS has social, lifestyle and medical consequences for the individual as well as the family.

  18. Genetics Home Reference: Dowling-Degos disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... with no history of acne. Cysts within the hair follicle (pilar cysts) may develop, most commonly on the ... Conditions Diagnosis & Management Genetic Testing (1 ... Counseling Palliative Care Surgery and Rehabilitation ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: mucopolysaccharidosis type III

    MedlinePlus

    ... diagnosis of mucopolysaccharidosis III (Sanfilippo syndrome): A changing landscape. Mol Genet Metab. 2014 Sep-Oct;113(1- ... j.1651-2227.2010.01800.x. Epub 2010 Mar 14. Citation on PubMed Meyer A, Kossow K, ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: GM3 synthase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... GM3 synthase deficiency is characterized by recurrent seizures (epilepsy) and problems with brain development. Within the first ... Testing (1 link) Genetic Testing Registry: Amish infantile epilepsy syndrome Other Diagnosis and Management Resources (2 links) ...

  1. Putting medical genetics into practice.

    PubMed

    Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a fragment of history on the growing impact of genetics on the practice of medicine over 50 years, as experienced by a medical geneticist who helped to provide services to patients at risk of genetic disorders. It is a personal account influenced by a fascination with chromosomes that has drawn him into many studies, including sex determination, gene discovery, fetal diagnosis, phylogenomics, and karyotype evolution.

  2. [Is preimplantation diagnosis legal?--on the need for harmonizing legislation].

    PubMed

    Ratzel, Rudolf

    2002-07-01

    Whether PGD is already legally permitted in Germany today is a moot point. A guidelines draft of the Germany's Federal General Medical Council, the Bundesärztekammer, on pre-implantation genetic diagnostics that--like the earlier findings of the ethics commission of the German federal state of the Rhineland-Palatinate--assumed that the method is admissible, if certain clearly-defined indications are present and a rigorous testing procedure has been established, has given the discussion a new impetus. The discussion is in full swing, with calls by politicians for the legislator to pass a regulation mounting. Of late, though, constitutional objections have been raised against a positive-law regulation. Such a simple legal move to regulate PGD, it is claimed, would violate the constitutionally-guaranteed right to inviolable human dignity. Critics, however, point out that such an absolute inviolability does not exist. According to them, not only the verdicts by the German Federal Constitutional Court, the Bundesverfassungsgericht, on the reform of section 218 of the German Federal Penal Code (StGB)--the paragraph that specifies the conditions under which an abortion is not punished--that relativize (in terms of the indication model) one claim to existence with respect to another, but also the approval in terms of pharmaceutical and medicine-products law of nidation-blocking agents, serve to show this. If the condition of being a human being were made to coincide with the completion of the genetic code upon the completion of the process of fertilisation, then one tended to forget, the critics noted, that this attendant dignity was not properly "infused with life" unless nidation had been successful. Without nidation everything were fragmentary, the total protection of human dignity according to Article 1 Section 1 of the Federal Republic's Basic Law, Germany's constitution, notwithstanding. During every in vitro fertilisation embryo transfer is conditional upon a

  3. Genetics in Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Moreno, Mercedes; Rego, Ignacio; Carreira-Garcia, Vanessa; Blanco, Francisco J

    2008-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a degenerative articular disease with complex pathogeny because diverse factors interact causing a process of deterioration of the cartilage. Despite the multifactorial nature of this pathology, from the 50’s it´s known that certain forms of osteoarthritis are related to a strong genetic component. The genetic bases of this disease do not follow the typical patterns of mendelian inheritance and probably they are related to alterations in multiple genes. The identification of a high number of candidate genes to confer susceptibility to the development of the osteoarthritis shows the complex nature of this disease. At the moment, the genetic mechanisms of this disease are not known, however, which seems clear is that expression levels of several genes are altered, and that the inheritance will become a substantial factor in future considerations of diagnosis and treatment of the osteoarthritis. PMID:19516961

  4. Prenatal diagnosis of a fetus with anencephaly and thumb agenesis.

    PubMed

    Barone, Chiara; Bartoloni, Giovanni; Cataliotti, Antonella; Indaco, Lara; Pappalardo, Elisa; Barrano, Barbara; Ettore, Giuseppe; Bianca, Sebastiano

    2012-03-01

    Severe anomalies of the forebrain together with reduction limb anomalies are a rare congenital anomalies association. We report a prenatal diagnosis of acalvaria, anencephaly and thumb agenesis in a voluntary terminated fetus and discuss the role of genetic counseling.

  5. Bacteriophage: laboratorial diagnosis and phage therapy

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Joas L. Da; Hirata, Rosario D.C.; Hirata, Mario H.

    2009-01-01

    Bacteriophages have been researched as a new alternative to antibiotics. These viruses inject their genetic material into bacteria and use their host machinery to multiply themselves. The research of bacteriophages in Brazil will certainly provide low-cost treatment of multidrug resistant bacteria, new microbiological diagnosis and advantages for the Brazilian food industry. PMID:24031398

  6. Human herpesvirus infections: Pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, C.; Roizman, B.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 24 selections. Some of the titles are: Molecular Biology of Latent HSV-1; Molecular Genetics of Antiviral Chemotherapy of Herpes Viruses; Molecular Basis of Foscarnet Action; Use of Vaccinia Virus as a Vector for Expression of Herpesvirus Genes; and Diagnosis of Herpesvirus with Monoclonal Antibodies.

  7. Prenatal diagnosis of Sanfilippo syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hopwood, John J

    2005-02-01

    The focus of this communication is to comment on the relative importance of enzymatic and molecular genetics, potential false results and future options for prenatal diagnosis of Sanfilippo syndrome (mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) types IIIA, IIIB, IIIC and IIID). During the provision of an international service over the past 25 years, our department has identified 7 affected out of 49 MPS III prenatal assessments. During this period, the technology used by us and others (Thompson et al., 1993; Kleijer et al., 1996) in these diagnoses has undergone considerable development in evolution. Our policy to maintain a close relationship between the provision of a diagnostic service and research to achieve an overall goal of early diagnosis and effective therapy have progressed both activities.

  8. Genetic counseling

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000510.htm Genetic counseling To use the sharing features on this ... cystic fibrosis or Down syndrome. Who May Want Genetic Counseling? It is up to you whether or ...

  9. Genetic Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... This can cause a medical condition called a genetic disorder. You can inherit a gene mutation from ... during your lifetime. There are three types of genetic disorders: Single-gene disorders, where a mutation affects ...

  10. Genetic modification and genetic determinism.

    PubMed

    Resnik, David B; Vorhaus, Daniel B

    2006-06-26

    In this article we examine four objections to the genetic modification of human beings: the freedom argument, the giftedness argument, the authenticity argument, and the uniqueness argument. We then demonstrate that each of these arguments against genetic modification assumes a strong version of genetic determinism. Since these strong deterministic assumptions are false, the arguments against genetic modification, which assume and depend upon these assumptions, are therefore unsound. Serious discussion of the morality of genetic modification, and the development of sound science policy, should be driven by arguments that address the actual consequences of genetic modification for individuals and society, not by ones propped up by false or misleading biological assumptions.

  11. Genetic modification and genetic determinism

    PubMed Central

    Resnik, David B; Vorhaus, Daniel B

    2006-01-01

    In this article we examine four objections to the genetic modification of human beings: the freedom argument, the giftedness argument, the authenticity argument, and the uniqueness argument. We then demonstrate that each of these arguments against genetic modification assumes a strong version of genetic determinism. Since these strong deterministic assumptions are false, the arguments against genetic modification, which assume and depend upon these assumptions, are therefore unsound. Serious discussion of the morality of genetic modification, and the development of sound science policy, should be driven by arguments that address the actual consequences of genetic modification for individuals and society, not by ones propped up by false or misleading biological assumptions. PMID:16800884

  12. [The Human Genome Project, genetic viability and genetic epidemiology].

    PubMed

    Hagymási, Krisztina; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2005-12-18

    The goal of the Human Genome Project to elucidate the complete sequence of the human genome has been achieved. The aims of the "post-genome" era are explaining the genetic information, characterisation of functional elements encoded in the human genome and mapping the human genetic variability as well. Two unrelated human beings also share 99.9% of their genomic sequence. The difference of 0.1% is the result of genetic polymorphisms: single nucleotide polymorphisms, repetitive sequences and insertion/deletion. The genetic differences, coupled with environmental exposures will determine the phenotypic variation we observe in health or disease. The disease-causing genetic variants can be identified by linkage analysis or association studies. The knowledge of human genome and application of multiple biomarkers will improve our ability to identify individuals at risk, so that preventive interventions can be applied, earlier diagnosis can be made and treatment can be optimized.

  13. Imaging Genetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munoz, Karen E.; Hyde, Luke W.; Hariri, Ahmad R.

    2009-01-01

    Imaging genetics is an experimental strategy that integrates molecular genetics and neuroimaging technology to examine biological mechanisms that mediate differences in behavior and the risks for psychiatric disorder. The basic principles in imaging genetics and the development of the field are discussed.

  14. Family Assessment and Genetic Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Pat; And Others

    Presented are two papers from a panel discussion on prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling with families. D. Blackston (director of the Developmental Evaluation Clinic, Decatur, Georgia) points out that a concise family history, pregnancy and birth data, developmental history, careful physical examination, and appropriate laboratory studies are…

  15. Genetics Home Reference: Dent disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1 Genetic Testing Registry: Dent disease 2 Other Diagnosis and Management Resources (4 links) GeneReview: Dent Disease MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Protein - Urine National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: Kidney Failure: Choosing a Treatment That's Right for ...

  16. The Psychosocial Impact of Genetic Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costello, Audrey

    1988-01-01

    Genetic diseases in children present difficulties to the children themselves and to their families. This article reviews the features of genetic disease, stresses surrounding diagnosis, difficulties associated with each developmental stage, other sources of psychosocial stress on the family (e.g., finances, hospitalization, placement decisions),…

  17. Molecular Diagnosis: Implications for Ophthalmology

    PubMed Central

    Sibley, Cailin H.; Choi, Dongseok; Harrington, Christina A.; Planck, Stephen R.

    2016-01-01

    The effort to subdivide diseases and to individualize therapies based on characteristics of the patient has been labelled precision medicine. Jameson and Longo define precision medicine as “treatments targeted to the needs of individual patients on the basis of genetic, biomarker, phenotypic or psychosocial characteristics that distinguish a given patient from other patients with similar clinical presentations” (Jameson and Longo, 2015). We illustrate how molecular diagnosis can be applied to orbital inflammatory disease to achieve the goals of precision medicine. PMID:26608807

  18. Clinical Cancer Genetics Disparities among Latinos.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Correa, Marcia; Pérez-Mayoral, Julyann; Dutil, Julie; Echenique, Miguel; Mosquera, Rafael; Rivera-Román, Keila; Umpierre, Sharee; Rodriguez-Quilichini, Segundo; Gonzalez-Pons, Maria; Olivera, Myrta I; Pardo, Sherly

    2016-12-12

    The three major hereditary cancer syndromes in Latinos (Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis and Lynch Syndrome) have been shown to exhibit geographic disparities by country of origin suggesting admixture-based disparities. A solid infrastructure of clinical genetics geared towards diagnosis and prevention could aid in reducing the mortality of these cancer syndromes in Latinos. Currently, clinical cancer genetic services in Latin America are scarce. Moreover, limited studies have investigated the mutational spectrum of these cancer syndromes in Latinos resulting in gaps in personalized medicine affecting diagnosis, treatment and prevention. The following commentary discusses available genotype and clinical information on hereditary cancer in Latinos and highlights the limited access for cancer genetic services in Latin America including barriers to genetic testing and alternatives for providing better access to genetic services. In this review, we discuss the status of clinical genetic cancer services for both US Latinos and those Latinos living in Latin America.

  19. Risks of reproducing with a genetic disorder.

    PubMed

    Byler, Melissa Ciano; Lebel, Robert Roger

    2013-07-01

    Male-factor infertility is the cause of reproductive issues in many couples. For approximately 15% of these men, the origin of the infertility is genetic. These causes include both chromosomal and single-gene disorders frequently impacting spermatogenesis. By identifying the genetic mechanism behind the infertility, we determine the ability of the couple to use assisted reproduction technologies. Use of these methods has ignited a new spectrum of concerns for the genetic competence of the offspring. By knowing what specific genetic risks exist for the offspring of men with these particular disorders, we are able to use preimplantation genetic diagnosis to detect these problems.

  20. Celiac disease: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Pelkowski, Timothy D; Viera, Anthony J

    2014-01-15

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder of the gastrointestinal tract. It is triggered by exposure to dietary gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. Gluten is a storage protein in wheat, rye, and barley, which are staples in many American diets. Celiac disease is characterized by chronic inflammation of the small intestinal mucosa, which leads to atrophy of the small intestinal villi and subsequent malabsorption. The condition may develop at any age. Intestinal manifestations include diarrhea and weight loss. Common extraintestinal manifestations include iron deficiency anemia, decreased bone mineral density, and neuropathy. Most cases of celiac disease are diagnosed in persons with extraintestinal manifestations. The presence of dermatitis herpetiformis is pathognomonic for celiac disease. Diagnosis is supported by a positive tissue transglutaminase serologic test but, in general, should be confirmed by a small bowel biopsy showing the characteristic histology associated with celiac disease. The presence of human leukocyte antigen alleles DQ2, DQ8, or both is essential for the development of celiac disease, and can be a useful genetic test in select instances. Treatment of celiac disease is a gluten-free diet. Dietary education should focus on identifying hidden sources of gluten, planning balanced meals, reading labels, food shopping, dining out, and dining during travel. About 5% of patients with celiac disease are refractory to a gluten-free diet. These patients should be referred to a gastroenterologist for reconsideration of the diagnosis or for aggressive treatment of refractory celiac disease, which may involve corticosteroids and immunomodulators.

  1. Access, quality and costs of prenatal diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Luis A; Berkshire, Steven

    2010-01-01

    The background risk of birth defects ranges from 2 to 5%. These birth defects are responsible for 30% of all admissions to pediatric hospitals and are responsible for a large proportion of neonatal and infant deaths. Medicine and Genetics have taken giant steps in their ability to detect and treat genetic disorders in utero. Screening tests for prenatal diagnosis should be offered to all pregnant women to assess their risk of having a baby with a birth defect or genetic disorder. Psychosocial and financial factors, inadequate insurance coverage, and the inability to pay for health care services are some of the known barriers to healthcare. These barriers are particularly magnified when there is a language barrier. From an economical standpoint it has been demonstrated that prenatal diagnosis has the potential of saving millions of dollars to our healthcare system. But when patients do not have the resources to access prenatal care and prenatal diagnosis cost shifting occurs, escalating healthcare costs. Our current healthcare system promotes inequalities in its delivery. With the existing barriers to access, quality, and costs of prenatal diagnosis we are confronted with an inefficient and flawed system.

  2. Genetic barcodes

    DOEpatents

    Weier, Heinz -Ulrich G

    2015-08-04

    Herein are described multicolor FISH probe sets termed "genetic barcodes" targeting several cancer or disease-related loci to assess gene rearrangements and copy number changes in tumor cells. Two, three or more different fluorophores are used to detect the genetic barcode sections thus permitting unique labeling and multilocus analysis in individual cell nuclei. Gene specific barcodes can be generated and combined to provide both numerical and structural genetic information for these and other pertinent disease associated genes.

  3. Genetic screening: marvel or menace?

    PubMed

    Rowley, P T

    1984-07-13

    Genetic screening is a systematic search in the population for persons of certain genotypes. The usual purpose is to detect persons who themselves or whose offspring are at risk for genetic diseases or genetically determined susceptibilities to environmental agents. Is genetic screening a marvel about to free us from the scourge of genetic disease or a menace about to invade our privacy and determine who may reproduce? There are three different types of genetic screening. Newborn screening identifies serious genetic disease at birth, permitting prompt treatment to prevent mental and physical retardation. Fetal screening and prenatal diagnosis identify genetic disease in the fetus permitting selective termination of pregnancy and the opportunity to have children free of defects detectable in utero. Carrier screening identifies individuals heterozygous for a gene for a serious recessive disease who may be at risk for affected offspring. The challenge to society is to provide (by way of cost-effective programs) expert services, including genetic counseling and follow-up, to all who may benefit, to ensure confidentiality and freedom of choice, and to avoid misunderstanding and stigmatization. It is recommended that the objective of screening programs should be to maximize the options available to families at risk rather than to reduce the incidence of genetic diseases. Whenever possible, the providers of these services should be the providers of primary health care. Urgently needed are a greater awareness of avoidable genetic diseases on the part of primary care providers and efforts to familiarize the public with the basic concepts of human genetics through the public school system.

  4. Head Lice: Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment FAQs Malathion FAQs Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ... Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ...

  5. [Endoscopic diagnosis of enterobiasis].

    PubMed

    Johansen, N; Petersen, H D

    2000-02-28

    This article describes two cases of worm-infestation with symptomatology, diagnosis and treatment. The cases are discussed in respect to the other cases in the literature emphasizing symptomatology and diagnosis by endoscopy.

  6. Body Lice Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment FAQs Malathion FAQs Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ... Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ...

  7. Prenatal diagnosis of achondrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Golbus, M S; Hall, B D; Filly, R A; Poskanzer, L B

    1977-09-01

    Severe rhizomelic and mesomelic dwarfism was demonstrated in a 20-week gestation fetus by amniography. A systematic progressive approach to prenatal diagnosis in the absence of a definitive diagnosis and the use of contrast radiography is discussed.

  8. [The diagnosis artifice].

    PubMed

    Lifshitz, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    The clinical diagnosis is considered the cornerstone in the decisions making process, since it has various functions, including the executive. However, the diagnosis is not only a goal by itself, but a mean to help patients. It is not enough to identify how the disease which ails the patient is called; the diagnosis must be individualized as much as possible in each case, for the mere mention of the diagnosis can mean a wide variety of problems.

  9. Invasive prenatal diagnosis of fetal thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong-Zhi; Yang, Yan-Dong

    2017-02-01

    Thalassemia is the most common monogenic inherited disease worldwide, affecting individuals originating from many countries to various extents. As the disease requires long-term care, prevention of the homozygous state presents a substantial global disease burden. The comprehensively preventive programs involve carrier detections, molecular diagnostics, genetic counseling, and prenatal diagnosis. Invasive prenatal diagnosis refers to obtaining fetal material by chorionic villus sampling (CVS) at the first trimester, and by amniocentesis or cordocentesis at the second trimester. Molecular diagnosis, which includes multiple techniques that are aimed at the detection of mutations in the α- or β-globin genes, facilitates prenatal diagnosis and definitive diagnosis of the fetus. These are valuable procedures for couples at risk, so that they can be offered options to have healthy offspring. According to local practices and legislation, genetic counseling should accompany the invasive diagnostic procedures, DNA testing, and disclosure of the results. The most critical issue in any type of prenatal molecular testing is maternal cell contamination (MCC), especially when a fetus is found to inherit a particular mutation from the mother. The best practice is to perform MCC studies on all prenatal samples. The recent successful studies of fetal DNA in maternal plasma may allow future prenatal testing that is non-invasive for the fetus and result in significant reduction of invasive diagnostic procedures.

  10. Erythropoietic differentiation of a human embryonic stem cell line harbouring the sickle cell anaemia mutation.

    PubMed

    Pryzhkova, Marina V; Peters, Ann; Zambidis, Elias T

    2010-08-01

    Herein is reported efficient erythropoietic differentiation of a human embryonic stem cell (ESC) line derived from a preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD)-screened embryo that harbours the homozygous sickle cell disease (SCD) haemoglobinopathy mutation. This human ESC line possesses typical pluripotency characteristics and forms multilineage teratomas in vivo. SCD-human ESC efficiently differentiated to the haematopoietic lineage under serum-free and stromal co-culture conditions and gave rise to robust primitive and definitive erythrocytes. Expression of embryonic, fetal and adult sickle globin genes in SCD PGD-derived human ESC-derived erythrocytes was confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR, intracytoplasmic fluorescence-activated cell sorting and in-situ immunostaining of PGD-derived human ESC teratoma sections. These data introduce important methodologies and paradigms for using patient-specific human ESC to generate normal and haemoglobinopathic erythroid progenitors for biomedical research.

  11. Genetics of alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Edenberg, Howard J; Foroud, Tatiana

    2014-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence strongly indicate that genetic factors contribute to the risk for alcohol use disorders (AUD). There is substantial heterogeneity in AUD, which complicates studies seeking to identify specific genetic factors. To identify these genetic effects, several different alcohol-related phenotypes have been analyzed, including diagnosis and quantitative measures related to AUDs. Study designs have used candidate gene analyses, genetic linkage studies, genomewide association studies (GWAS), and analyses of rare variants. Two genes that encode enzymes of alcohol metabolism have the strongest effect on AUD: aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 and alcohol dehydrogenase 1B each has strongly protective variants that reduce risk, with odds ratios approximately 0.2-0.4. A number of other genes important in AUD have been identified and replicated, including GABRA2 and alcohol dehydrogenases 1B and 4. GWAS have identified additional candidates. Rare variants are likely also to play a role; studies of these are just beginning. A multifaceted approach to gene identification, targeting both rare and common variations and assembling much larger datasets for meta-analyses, is critical for identifying the key genes and pathways important in AUD.

  12. Genetic Evaluation of Short Stature

    PubMed Central

    Rosenfeld, Ron G.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Genetics plays a major role in determining an individual's height. Although there are many monogenic disorders that lead to perturbations in growth and result in short stature, there is still no consensus as to the role that genetic diagnostics should play in the evaluation of a child with short stature. Evidence Acquisition: A search of PubMed was performed, focusing on the genetic diagnosis of short stature as well as on specific diagnostic subgroups included in this article. Consensus guidelines were reviewed. Evidence Synthesis: There are a multitude of rare genetic causes of severe short stature. There is no high-quality evidence to define the optimal approach to the genetic evaluation of short stature. We review genetic etiologies of a number of diagnostic subgroups and propose an algorithm for genetic testing based on these subgroups. Conclusion: Advances in genomic technologies are revolutionizing the diagnostic approach to short stature. Endocrinologists must become facile with the use of genetic testing in order to identify the various monogenic disorders that present with short stature. PMID:24915122

  13. [Genetic diagnostic testing in inherited retinal dystrophies].

    PubMed

    Kohl, S; Biskup, S

    2013-03-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies are clinically and genetically highly heterogeneous. They can be divided according to the clinical phenotype and course of the disease, as well as the underlying mode of inheritance. Isolated retinal dystrophies (i.e., retinitis pigmentosa, Leber's congenital amaurosis, cone and cone-rod dystrophy, macular dystrophy, achromatopsia, congenital stationary nightblindness) and syndromal forms (i.e., Usher syndrome, Bardet-Biedl syndrome) can be differentiated. To date almost 180 genes and thousands of distinct mutations have been identified that are responsible for the different forms of these blinding illnesses. Until recently, there was no adequate diagnostic genetic testing available. With the development of the next generation sequencing technologies, a comprehensive genetic screening analysis for all known genes for inherited retinal dystrophies has been established at reasonable costs and in appropriate turn-around times. Depending on the primary clinical diagnosis and the presumed mode of inheritance, different diagnostic panels can be chosen for genetic testing. Statistics show that in 55-80 % of the cases the genetic defect of the inherited retinal dystrophy can be identified with this approach, depending on the initial clinical diagnosis. The aim of any genetic diagnostics is to define the genetic cause of a given illness within the affected patient and family and thereby i) confirm the clinical diagnosis, ii) provide targeted genetic testing in family members, iii) enable therapeutic intervention, iv) give a prognosis on disease course and progression and v) in the long run provide the basis for novel therapeutic approaches and personalised medicine.

  14. [Insights about uncertainty in genetic counseling].

    PubMed

    Huicochea-Montiel, Juan Carlos; Cárdenas-Conejo, Alan; Cervantes-Díaz, María Teresa; Araujo-Solís, María Antonieta de Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Genetic counseling is an information process to help people in the understanding and adaptation to the medical, psychological and family implications of the genetic contribution in diseases. This counseling encompasses all sorts of patients. This represents a challenge in the daily work of the medical geneticist, because giving information in a meaningful way to the patient and his family implies an emotional and psychological burden. Generally we can see two outcomes in the medical practice of genetics, which converge after a diagnosis process: 1) we can face the inability to reach a diagnostic conclusion or 2) we can establish or confirm a diagnosis with certainty, which is the main piece in the genetic counseling. However, in all the situations the uncertainty is a fact, since in the case of those individuals who come in for genetic counseling before symptoms appear or those in prenatal cases, the absence of clinical manifestations and the impossibility to change the course of events lead to the appearance of helplessness and despair. In those cases without diagnostic conclusion, this situation represents a reason for uncertainty, and even in those patients with a diagnosis, certain factors can modify the circumstances in which genetic counseling occurs, such as unpredictability or lack of control. Therefore, it is important to consider the management of uncertainty as an inherent part throughout the process of care in medical genetics. The teaching of medical genetics should also consider the inclusion of topics related to this circumstance.

  15. Genetic Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, John

    1973-01-01

    Presents a review of genetic engineering, in which the genotypes of plants and animals (including human genotypes) may be manipulated for the benefit of the human species. Discusses associated problems and solutions and provides an extensive bibliography of literature relating to genetic engineering. (JR)

  16. Primary care and genetics and genomics.

    PubMed

    Scott, Joan; Trotter, Tracy

    2013-12-01

    With the recent expansion of genetic science, its evolving translation to clinical medicine, and the growing number of available resources for genomics in primary care, the primary care provider must increasingly integrate genetics and genomics into daily practice. Because primary care medicine combines the treatment of acute illness with disease prevention and anticipatory guidance, the primary care provider is in an ideal position to evaluate and treat patients for genetic disease. The notion that genetic knowledge is only rarely needed will have to be replaced with a comprehensive approach that integrates "genetic thinking" into every patient encounter. Genomic competencies will need to be added to the primary care provider's repertoire; such competencies include prevention, assessment, evaluation, and diagnosis of genetic conditions; the ordering and interpreting of genetic tests; communication with families; appropriate referrals; and the management or comanagement of care. The process of deciding when to order genetic tests, what tests to order, and how to interpret the results is complex, and the tests and their results have specific risks and benefits, especially for pediatric patients. The longitudinal nature of primary pediatric care provides the opportunity to obtain and continually update the family history, which is the most powerful initial genetic "test." The ongoing provider-family relationship, coupled with the astounding number of advances in genetic and genomic testing, also necessitates a constant re-evaluation of past diagnosis or nondiagnosis.

  17. [Is systemic diagnosis possible?].

    PubMed

    Siewierska, Anna; Sliwczyńska, Jadwiga; Namysłowska, Irena

    2008-01-01

    The authors discuss the concept of systemic diagnosis and its logical and scientific validity. A diagnosis is the result of the "diagnostic process", with the presence of the acting object (the person making the diagnosis) and the subject (the individual or group patient, such as family), between whom there is a skew relation. They also wonder, to which part of this diagnostic process is the term "systemic" applied--to the clinician or to the subject of the diagnosis, their relation or the effect of the process. The authors also stress the crucial effect of the constructivism and social constructionism on the process of the systemic diagnosis.

  18. The SHOX gene and the short stature. Roundtable on diagnosis and treatment of short stature due to SHOX haploinsufficiency: how genetics, radiology and anthropometry can help the pediatrician in the diagnostic process Padova (April 20th, 2011).

    PubMed

    De Sanctis, Vincenzo; Tosetto, Ilaria; Iughetti, Lorenzo; Antoniazzi, Franco; Clementi, Maurizio; Toffolutti, Tiziana; Facchin, Paola; Monti, Elena; Pisanello, Lorena; Tonini, Giorgio; Greggio, Nella A

    2012-08-01

    The growth of the human body depends from a complex interaction between nutritional, environmental and hormonal factors and by a large number of different genes. One of these genes, short stature homeobox (SHOX), is believed to play a major role in growth. SHOX haploinsufficiency is associated with a wide spectrum of conditions, all characterized growth failure such as Leri-Weill dyschondrosteosis, Turner syndrome, short stature with subtle auxological and radiological findings and the so called "idiopathic short stature" (short stature with no specific findings other than growth failure). The document was prepared by a multidisciplinary team (paediatric endocrinologists, paediatrician, radiologist, geneticist and epidemiologist) to focus on the investigation of children with suspected SHOX- deficiency (SHOX-D) for an early identification and a correct diagnostic work - up of this genetic disorder. On the basis of a number of screening studies, SHOX-D appears to be a relatively frequent cause of short stature. The following recommendations were suggested by our multidisciplinary team: (i) a careful family history, measurements of body proportions and detection of any dysmorphic features are important for the suspect of a genetic disorder ,(ii)the presence of any combination of the following physical findings, such as reduced arm span/height ratio, increased sitting height/height ratio, above average BMI, Madelung deformity, cubitus valgus, short or bowed forearm, dislocation of the ulna at the elbow, or the appearance of muscular hypertrophy, should prompt the clinician to obtain a molecular analysis of the SHOX region, (iii) it is of practical importance to recognise early or mild signs of Madelung deformity on hand and wrist radiographs, (iv) growth hormone ,after stimulation test, is usually normal. However, treatment with rhGH may improve final adult height; the efficacy of treatment is similar to that observed in those treated for Turner syndrome.

  19. Molecular diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Watt, Christopher D; Bagg, Adam

    2010-11-01

    The diagnosis and classification of acute myeloid leukemia is multifaceted, requiring the integration of a variety of laboratory findings, with genetic approaches now firmly established as a central component. Molecular genetic technologies continue to evolve and provide additional tiers of both clarity and complexity. Many have rapidly moved into clinical laboratories; others remain as relevant discovery tools, while some are poised to take their place in diagnostic testing menus. Here, we attempt to synthesize the role of various testing modalities and exciting nascent fundamental discoveries, with a view as to how these might be integrated into the contemporary and future evaluation of this group of aggressive hematologic malignancies.

  20. Diagnosis and management of hereditary hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Salgia, Reena J; Brown, Kimberly

    2015-02-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis is a rare genetic disorder that can have significant clinical consequences. Hemochromatosis is associated with iron overload, and can initially be recognized through laboratory testing for serum ferritin and transferrin saturation. Genetic testing for the HFE mutation can be performed in patients with elevated iron indices and a suspicion for hemochromatosis or liver disease. The main pathway resulting in iron overload is through altered hepcidin levels. Treatment of patients with the clinical phenotype of hereditary hemochromatosis is commonly through phlebotomy for removal of excess iron stores. This article highlights the current information and data regarding the diagnosis and management of hemochromatosis.

  1. Genetic testing for paediatric neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Valente, Enza Maria; Ferraris, Alessandro; Dallapiccola, Bruno

    2008-12-01

    Paediatric neurological disorders encompass a large group of clinically heterogeneous diseases, of which some are known to have a genetic cause. Over the past few years, advances in nosological classifications and in strategies for molecular testing have substantially improved the diagnosis, genetic counselling, and clinical management of many patients, and have facilitated the possibility of prenatal diagnoses for future pregnancies. However, the increasing availability of genetic tests for paediatric neurological disorders is raising important questions with regard to the appropriateness, choice of protocols, interpretation of results, and ethical and social concerns of these services. In this Review, we discuss these topics and how these concerns affect genetic counselling.

  2. Recommendations for reporting results of diagnostic genetic testing (biochemical, cytogenetic and molecular genetic).

    PubMed

    Claustres, Mireille; Kožich, Viktor; Dequeker, Els; Fowler, Brain; Hehir-Kwa, Jayne Y; Miller, Konstantin; Oosterwijk, Cor; Peterlin, Borut; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny; Zimmermann, Uwe; Zuffardi, Orsetta; Hastings, Ros J; Barton, David E

    2014-02-01

    Genetic test results can have considerable importance for patients, their parents and more remote family members. Clinical therapy and surveillance, reproductive decisions and genetic diagnostics in family members, including prenatal diagnosis, are based on these results. The genetic test report should therefore provide a clear, concise, accurate, fully interpretative and authoritative answer to the clinical question. The need for harmonizing reporting practice of genetic tests has been recognised by the External Quality Assessment (EQA), providers and laboratories. The ESHG Genetic Services Quality Committee has produced reporting guidelines for the genetic disciplines (biochemical, cytogenetic and molecular genetic). These guidelines give assistance on report content, including the interpretation of results. Selected examples of genetic test reports for all three disciplines are provided in an annexe.

  3. An Overview of Mutation Detection Methods in Genetic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Mahdieh, Nejat; Rabbani, Bahareh

    2013-01-01

    Genetic disorders are traditionally categorized into three main groups: single-gene, chromosomal, and multifactorial disorders. Single gene or Mendelian disorders result from errors in DNA sequence of a gene and include autosomal dominant (AD), autosomal recessive (AR), X-linked recessive (XR), X-linked dominant and Y-linked (holandric) disorders. Chromosomal disorders are due to chromosomal aberrations including numerical and structural damages. Molecular and cytogenetic techniques have been applied to identify genetic mutations leading to diseases. Accurate diagnosis of diseases is essential for appropriate treatment of patients, genetic counseling and prevention strategies. Characteristic features of patterns of inheritance are briefly reviewed and a short description of chromosomal disorders is also presented. In addition, applications of cytogenetic and molecular techniques and different types of mutations are discussed for genetic diagnosis of the pediatric genetic diseases. The purpose is to make pediatricians familiar with the applications of cytogenetic and molecular techniques and tools used for genetic diagnosis. PMID:24427490

  4. Mitochondrial disorders: Challenges in diagnosis & treatment

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Nahid Akhtar; Govindaraj, Periyasamy; Meena, Angamuthu Kannan; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunctions are known to be responsible for a number of heterogenous clinical presentations with multi-systemic involvement. Impaired oxidative phosphorylation leading to a decrease in cellular energy (ATP) production is the most important cause underlying these disorders. Despite significant progress made in the field of mitochondrial medicine during the last two decades, the molecular mechanisms underlying these disorders are not fully understood. Since the identification of first mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutation in 1988, there has been an exponential rise in the identification of mtDNA and nuclear DNA mutations that are responsible for mitochondrial dysfunction and disease. Genetic complexity together with ever widening clinical spectrum associated with mitochondrial dysfunction poses a major challenge in diagnosis and treatment. Effective therapy has remained elusive till date and is mostly efficient in relieving symptoms. In this review, we discuss the important clinical and genetic features of mitochondrials disorders with special emphasis on diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25857492

  5. Molecular diagnosis of coenzyme Q10 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Yubero, Delia; Montero, Raquel; Armstrong, Judith; Espinós, Carmen; Palau, Francesc; Santos-Ocaña, Carlos; Salviati, Leonardo; Navas, Placido; Artuch, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ) deficiency syndromes comprise a growing number of neurological and extraneurological disorders. Primary-genetic but also secondary CoQ deficiencies have been reported. The biochemical determination of CoQ is a good tool for the rapid identification of CoQ deficiencies but does not allow the selection of candidate genes for molecular diagnosis. Moreover, the metabolic pathway for CoQ synthesis is an intricate and not well-understood process, where a large number of genes are implicated. Thus, only next-generation sequencing techniques (either genetic panels of whole-exome and -genome sequencing) are at present appropriate for a rapid and realistic molecular diagnosis of these syndromes. The potential treatability of CoQ deficiency strongly supports the necessity of a rapid molecular characterization of patients, since primary CoQ deficiencies may respond well to CoQ treatment.

  6. The genetics of deafness.

    PubMed

    Nance, Walter E

    2003-01-01

    Deafness is an etiologically heterogeneous trait with many known genetic and environmental causes. Genetic factors account for at least half of all cases of profound congenital deafness, and can be classified by the mode of inheritance and the presence or absence of characteristic clinical features that may permit the diagnosis of a specific form of syndromic deafness. The identification of more than 120 independent genes for deafness has provided profound new insights into the pathophysiology of hearing, as well as many unexpected surprises. Although a large number of genes can clearly cause deafness, recessive mutations at a single locus, GJB2 or Connexin 26, account for more than half of all genetic cases in some, but not all populations. The high frequency may well be related to the greatly improved social, educational, and economic circumstances of the deaf that began with the introduction of sign language 300-400 years ago, along with a high frequency of marriages among the deaf in many countries. Similar mechanisms may account for the rapid fixation of genes for speech after the first mutations appeared 50,000-100,000 years ago. Molecular studies have shown that mutations involving several different loci may be the cause for the same form of syndromic deafness. Even within a single locus, different mutations can have profoundly different effects, leading to a different pattern of inheritance in some cases, or isolated hearing loss without the characteristic syndromic features in others. Most cases of genetic deafness result from mutations at a single locus, but an increasing number of examples are being recognized in which recessive mutations at two loci are involved. For example, digenic interactions are now known to be an important cause of deafness in individuals who carry a single mutation at the Connexin 26 locus along with a deletion involving the functionally related Connexin 30 locus. This mechanism complicates genetic evaluation and counseling, but

  7. [Genetics and present therapy options in Parkinson's disease: a review].

    PubMed

    Bereznai, Benjamin; Molnar, Mária Judit

    2009-05-30

    In the past years, six monogenic forms of Parkinson disease have clearly been associated with this movement disorder. The most frequent forms are LRRK2- and Parkin-associated Parkinson disease. Currently, a genetic diagnosis does not change the therapy, the genes involved in genetic Parkinson disease help to understand the underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms of Parkinson disease. Beside the overview of the molecular-genetic basis, we give a review about genetic testing, pharmacological and other multidisciplinary treatment options.

  8. Genetic Alliance

    MedlinePlus

    ... all things Genetic Alliance, Expecting Health and more... Co-Creating A Healthy Future See all the photos, videos, slideshows and more that we co-created at our 30th Anniversary conference. BioTrust BioTrust ...

  9. Genetics (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... chromosomes to their child, 22 autosomal and 1 sex chromosome. The inheritance of genetic diseases, abnormalities, or traits ... chromosome the abnormal gene resides on (autosomal or sex chromosome), and by whether the gene itself is dominant ...

  10. Genetic Counseling

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Kathryn J.; Sakati, Nadia; Prichard, Lorraine L.; Schneiderman, Lawrence J.; Jones, Oliver W.; Dixson, Barbara K.

    1976-01-01

    The geographic distribution of County Health Department clinic facilities in the state of California has made it readily possible to establish a regionalized program for genetic counseling services, using public health nurses as a major source of case-finding. From both consumer and health professional standpoints, regionalized satellite genetic counseling clinics have been successful, and in particular, the effectiveness of public health nurses in identifying clinical genetic problems is readily apparent. Long-term follow-up reinforcement of genetic counseling appears to be an important conclusion from these studies. It is our suggestion that reinforcement of counseling would best be accomplished through the health team member (physician, nurse and so forth) following the patient or family rather than through the consulting geneticist. PMID:946335

  11. Confirmation of prenatal diagnosis of sex chromosome mosaicism.

    PubMed

    McFadden, D E; Kalousek, D K

    1989-04-01

    Prenatal diagnosis of mosaicism causes problems in interpretation and in genetic counselling. Part of the difficulty with any prenatal diagnosis of mosaicism is interpretation of results without knowing the exact origin, embryonic or extraembryonic, of the abnormal cell line. To confuse the issue in cases of prenatal diagnosis of 45,X/46,XY mosaicism is the recent demonstration that a diagnosis of 45,X/46,XY made prenatally is not necessarily associated with the same phenotype as when diagnosed postnatally. We present two cases of prenatal diagnosis of sex chromosome mosaicism (45,X/46,XY and 45,X/47,XYY). Posttermination examination of the phenotypically normal male fetuses and their placentas established that the placenta was the most likely source of the 45,X cell line. An approach to confirming the prenatal diagnosis of sex chromosome mosaicism and establishing its origin utilizing detailed cytogenetic examination of both fetus and placenta is suggested.

  12. Structuring the genetic heterogeneity of the Basque population: a view from classical polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Manzano, C; de, la Rúa C; Iriondo, M; Mazón, L I; Vicario, A; Aguirre, A

    2002-02-01

    In this study we analyze 18 classical polymorphisms (ABO, Rh, MNSs, Lewis, P, Duffy, Kell, ADA, ESD, PGM1, PGD, AK1, ACP1, GLO1, HP, GC, TF, and PI) in over 2000 autochthonous individuals from 14 natural districts in three provinces of the Basque Country (Alava, Guipuzcoa, and Biscay). Heterogeneity analysis via the chi2 test and a calculation of F(ST) indicate that there is significant genetic heterogeneity between the Basque districts. The R matrix informs us that this heterogeneity is not significantly concentrated in a single district or in the districts of a single province, but is rather distributed among several districts belonging to the three provinces analyzed. We undertake to assess the influence of various historical, geographical, and cultural factors on the genetic structure of the Basque population. Analysis suggests that allele distribution is geographically patterned in the Basque Country. The gradient distributions observed in the case of some alleles (ABO*O, RH*cDE, RH*cde, MNS*MS, and ACP1*C) on the basis of Moran's autocorrelation coefficient I, along with the influence of the two main travel routes through the Basque Country (western route through Bilbao and eastern route through Vitoria), suggest that the gene flow tends toward the coast. As regards other factors considered (administrative division, repopulation processes, linguistic heterogeneity, and north vs. south cultural heterogeneity), we detected only a certain influence exerted by an old tribal differentiation (2000 B.P.), which would diminish with the passage of time.

  13. Refinement of variant selection for the LDL-C genetic risk score in the diagnosis of the polygenic form of clinical Familial Hypercholesterolemia and replication in samples from six countries

    PubMed Central

    Futema, Marta; Shah, Sonia; Cooper, Jackie A; Li, KaWah; Whittall, Ros A; Sharifi, Mahtab; Goldberg, Olivia; Drogari, Euridiki; Mollaki, Vasiliki; Wiegman, Albert; Defesche, Joep; D’Agostino, Maria N; D’Angelo, Antonietta; Rubba, Paolo; Fortunato, Giuliana; Walus-Miarka, Małgorzata; Hegele, Robert A; Bamimore, Mary Aderayo; Durst, Ronen; Leitersdorf, Eran; Mulder, Monique T; Roeters van Lennep, Janine E; Sijbrands, Eric J G; Whittaker, John C; Talmud, Philippa J; Humphries, Steve E

    2016-01-01

    Background Familial Hypercholesterolemia (FH) is an autosomal-dominant disorder caused by mutations in one of three genes. In the 60% of patients who are mutation-negative we have recently shown that the clinical phenotype can be associated with an accumulation of common small-effect LDL-C-raising alleles using a 12-SNP score. The aims of the study were to improve the selection of SNPs, and to replicate the results in additional samples. Methods Receiver-operating characteristic curves were used to determine the optimum number of LDL-C SNPs. For replication analysis, we genotyped patients with a clinical diagnosis of FH from six countries for six LDL-C-associated alleles. We compared the weighted SNP score among patients with no confirmed mutation (FH/M-), those with a mutation (FH/M+), and controls from an UK population sample (WHII). Results Increasing the number of SNPs to 33 did not improve the ability of the score to discriminate between FH/M- and controls, while sequential removal of SNPs with smaller effects/lower frequency showed a weighted score of six SNPs performed as well as the 12-SNP score. Meta-analysis of the weighted 6-SNP score, based on polymorphisms in CELSR2, APOB, ABCG5/8, LDLR and APOE loci, in the independent FH/M- cohorts showed a consistently higher score in comparison to the WHII population (P<2.2×10-16). Modeling in individuals with a 6-SNP score in the top three quarters of the score distribution, indicated a >95% likelihood of a polygenic explanation of their increased LDL-C. Conclusion A 6-SNP LDL-C score consistently distinguishes FH/M- patients from healthy subjects. The hypercholesterolemia in 88% of mutation-negative patients is likely to have a polygenic basis. PMID:25414277

  14. Performance Testing of PCR Assay in Blood Samples for the Diagnosis of Toxoplasmic Encephalitis in AIDS Patients from the French Departments of America and Genetic Diversity of Toxoplasma gondii: A Prospective and Multicentric Study

    PubMed Central

    Ajzenberg, Daniel; Lamaury, Isabelle; Demar, Magalie; Vautrin, Cyrille; Cabié, André; Simon, Stéphane; Nicolas, Muriel; Desbois-Nogard, Nicole; Boukhari, Rachida; Riahi, Homayoun; Dardé, Marie-Laure; Massip, Patrice; Dupon, Michel; Preux, Pierre-Marie; Labrunie, Anaïs; Boncoeur, Marie-Paule

    2016-01-01

    Background Toxoplasmic encephalitis in patients with AIDS is a life-threatening disease mostly due to reactivation of Toxoplasma gondii cysts in the brain. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of real-time PCR assay in peripheral blood samples for the diagnosis of toxoplasmic encephalitis in AIDS patients in the French West Indies and Guiana. Methodology/Principal Findings Adult patients with HIV and suspicion of toxoplasmic encephalitis with start of specific antitoxoplasmic therapy were included in this study during 40 months. The real-time PCR assay targeting the 529 bp repeat region of T. gondii was performed in two different centers for all blood samples. A Neighbor-Joining tree was reconstructed from microsatellite data to examine the relationships between strains from human cases of toxoplasmosis in South America and the Caribbean. A total of 44 cases were validated by a committee of experts, including 36 cases with toxoplasmic encephalitis. The specificity of the PCR assay in blood samples was 100% but the sensitivity was only 25% with moderate agreement between the two centers. Altered level of consciousness and being born in the French West Indies and Guiana were the only two variables that were associated with significantly decreased risk of false negative results with the PCR assay. Conclusion/Significance Our results showed that PCR sensitivity in blood samples increased with severity of toxoplasmic encephalitis in AIDS patients. Geographic origin of patients was likely to influence PCR sensitivity but there was little evidence that it was caused by differences in T. gondii strains. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00803621 PMID:27355620

  15. [Improvements in the diagnosis of dystrophinopathies: what have we learnt in these last 20 years?].

    PubMed

    López-Hernández, Luz B; Ayala-Madrigal, M Luz; van Heusden, Dave; Estrada-Mena, Francisco J; Canto, Patricia; Sandoval-Ramírez, Lucila; Gómez-Díaz, Benjamín; Coral-Vázquez, Ramón M

    2011-02-16

    INTRODUCTION. Dystrophinopathies are X-linked genetic disorders caused by mutations in the DMD gene. Genetic tests are of utmost importance for management and genetic counseling of these diseases. However, the complexity of the DMD gene is a challenge for diagnosis. AIM. To describe recent advances in the diagnosis of dystrophinopathies, after 20 years since the firsts molecular assays for genetic screening for these diseases. DEVELOPMENT. Currently, a variety of strategies such as automated mutation detection, cell-based methods and high throughput haplotyping have been developed to facilitate diagnosis of dystrophinopathies, carrier detection, prenatal and preimplantation diagnosis. CONCLUSION. New technologies have improved early detection and optimal management of dystrophinopathies and have established the basis for future molecular medicine. The most significant advances in dystrophinopathy diagnosis are reviewed herein.

  16. Enterobiasis (Pinworm Infection): Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... About CDC.gov . Pinworm Infection General Information Pinworm Infection FAQs Epidemiology & Risk Factors Biology Disease Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals Publications Get Email Updates ...

  17. Advances in gene technology: Human genetic disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, W.A.; Ahmad, F.; Black, S.; Schultz, J.; Whelan, W.J.

    1984-01-01

    This book discusses the papers presented at the conference on the subject of ''advances in Gene technology: Human genetic disorders''. Molecular biology of various carcinomas and inheritance of metabolic diseases is discussed and technology advancement in diagnosis of hereditary diseases is described. Some of the titles discussed are-Immunoglobulin genes translocation and diagnosis; hemophilia; oncogenes; oncogenic transformations; experimental data on mice, hamsters, birds carcinomas and sarcomas.

  18. Genetic mutations in Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Daneswari, Muthumula; Reddy, Mutjumula Swamy Ranga

    2013-07-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is a rare multisystemic disease inherited in a dominant autosomal at a high level of penetrance and variable expressiveness. It is mainly characterized by basal cell carcinoma, odontogenic keratocyst and skeletal anomalies. Diagnosis is based upon established major and minor clinical and radiographic criteria and gene mutation analysis. This article presents a case of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, its genetic predisposition, diagnosis and management.

  19. Clinical genetic testing of periodic fever syndromes.

    PubMed

    Marcuzzi, Annalisa; Piscianz, Elisa; Kleiner, Giulio; Tommasini, Alberto; Severini, Giovanni Maria; Monasta, Lorenzo; Crovella, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Periodic fever syndromes (PFSs) are a wide group of autoinflammatory diseases. Due to some clinical overlap between different PFSs, differential diagnosis can be a difficult challenge. Nowadays, there are no universally agreed recommendations for most PFSs, and near half of patients may remain without a genetic diagnosis even after performing multiple-gene analyses. Molecular analysis of periodic fevers' causative genes can improve patient quality of life by providing early and accurate diagnosis and allowing the administration of appropriate treatment. In this paper we focus our discussion on effective usefulness of genetic diagnosis of PFSs. The aim of this paper is to establish how much can the diagnostic system improve, in order to increase the success of PFS diagnosis. The mayor expectation in the near future will be addressed to the so-called next generation sequencing approach. Although the application of bioinformatics to high-throughput genetic analysis could allow the identification of complex genotypes, the complexity of this definition will hardly result in a clear contribution for the physician. In our opinion, however, to obtain the best from this new development a rule should always be kept well in mind: use genetics only to answer specific clinical questions.

  20. Clinical Genetic Testing of Periodic Fever Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Marcuzzi, Annalisa; Piscianz, Elisa; Kleiner, Giulio; Tommasini, Alberto; Severini, Giovanni Maria; Monasta, Lorenzo; Crovella, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Periodic fever syndromes (PFSs) are a wide group of autoinflammatory diseases. Due to some clinical overlap between different PFSs, differential diagnosis can be a difficult challenge. Nowadays, there are no universally agreed recommendations for most PFSs, and near half of patients may remain without a genetic diagnosis even after performing multiple-gene analyses. Molecular analysis of periodic fevers' causative genes can improve patient quality of life by providing early and accurate diagnosis and allowing the administration of appropriate treatment. In this paper we focus our discussion on effective usefulness of genetic diagnosis of PFSs. The aim of this paper is to establish how much can the diagnostic system improve, in order to increase the success of PFS diagnosis. The mayor expectation in the near future will be addressed to the so-called next generation sequencing approach. Although the application of bioinformatics to high-throughput genetic analysis could allow the identification of complex genotypes, the complexity of this definition will hardly result in a clear contribution for the physician. In our opinion, however, to obtain the best from this new development a rule should always be kept well in mind: use genetics only to answer specific clinical questions. PMID:23484126

  1. Genetic screening

    PubMed Central

    Andermann, Anne; Blancquaert, Ingeborg

    2010-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE To provide a primer for primary care professionals who are increasingly called upon to discuss the growing number of genetic screening services available and to help patients make informed decisions about whether to participate in genetic screening, how to interpret results, and which interventions are most appropriate. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE As part of a larger research program, a wide literature relating to genetic screening was reviewed. PubMed and Internet searches were conducted using broad search terms. Effort was also made to identify the gray literature. MAIN MESSAGE Genetic screening is a type of public health program that is systematically offered to a specified population of asymptomatic individuals with the aim of providing those identified as high risk with prevention, early treatment, or reproductive options. Ensuring an added benefit from screening, as compared with standard clinical care, and preventing unintended harms, such as undue anxiety or stigmatization, depends on the design and implementation of screening programs, including the recruitment methods, education and counseling provided, timing of screening, predictive value of tests, interventions available, and presence of oversight mechanisms and safeguards. There is therefore growing apprehension that economic interests might lead to a market-driven approach to introducing and expanding screening before program effectiveness, acceptability, and feasibility have been demonstrated. As with any medical intervention, there is a moral imperative for genetic screening to do more good than harm, not only from the perspective of individuals and families, but also for the target population and society as a whole. CONCLUSION Primary care professionals have an important role to play in helping their patients navigate the rapidly changing terrain of genetic screening services by informing them about the benefits and risks of new genetic and genomic technologies and empowering them to

  2. Lessons from European population genetic databases: comparing the law in Estonia, Iceland, Sweden and the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Susan M C; Helgason, Hördur Helgi; Kaye, Jane; Nõmper, Ants; Wendel, Lotta

    2005-06-01

    The advent of large-scale, population genetic databases (PGDs) in several countries around the world marks a significant development in human DNA banking and genetic research. The European countries that have led the way in the development of PGDs are Iceland, Sweden, Estonia and the U.K. In legal terms, the emergence of PGDs has been far from straightforward as such projects pose a range of difficult and complex issues for the law to address. This article canvasses the current law in Iceland, Estonia, Sweden and the U.K. on four fundamental issues of principle pertaining to PGDs, in order to illustrate the difficulties that have emerged around PGDs, highlight key areas of legal concern, and shed light on possible ways forward. It compares and contrasts the differing legal positions and lawmakers' responses to date in these four European countries that have established PGDs or are seeking to do so. The four fundamental issues examined are: (1) consent, especially for secondary research purposes; (2) ownership of biological samples, data and databases; (3) the rights of certain third parties to gain access to, and to use, PGD biological samples and data; and (4) benefit sharing, including the provision of feedback and genetic counselling to participants. This analysis may offer some guidance for policymakers in other jurisdictions where PGDs have been proposed or are being established.

  3. About Genetic Counselors

    MedlinePlus

    ... seeing a genetic counselor? Q. What is a genetic counselor? A. Genetic counselors are healthcare professionals with ... and serve as patient advocates. Q. What is genetic counseling? A. Genetic counseling is the process of ...

  4. Specific Genetic Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Genetic Terms Definitions for genetic terms Specific Genetic Disorders Many human diseases have a genetic component. ... Condition in an Adult The Undiagnosed Diseases Program Genetic Disorders Achondroplasia Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Antiphospholipid Syndrome ...

  5. New Genetic Insights into Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ware, Stephanie M.; Jefferies, John Lynn

    2012-01-01

    There has been remarkable progress in understanding the genetic basis of cardiovascular malformations. Chromosome microarray analysis has provided a new tool to understand the genetic basis of syndromic cardiovascular malformations resulting from microdeletion or microduplication of genetic material, allowing the delineation of new syndromes. Improvements in sequencing technology have led to increasingly comprehensive testing for aortopathy, cardiomyopathy, single gene syndromic disorders, and Mendelian-inherited congenital heart disease. Understanding the genetic etiology for these disorders has improved their clinical recognition and management and led to new guidelines for treatment and family-based diagnosis and surveillance. These new discoveries have also expanded our understanding of the contribution of genetic variation, susceptibility alleles, and epigenetics to isolated congenital heart disease. This review summarizes the current understanding of the genetic basis of syndromic and non-syndromic congenital heart disease and highlights new diagnostic and management recommendations. PMID:22822471

  6. Prenatal diagnosis in multiple pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Taylor, M J; Fisk, N M

    2000-08-01

    Fetal abnormality is more common in multiple than in singleton pregnancies. This, together with the requirement to consider the risks with at least two babies to sample correctly each fetus and to undertake accurately-targeted selective termination, amounts to a major challenge for obstetricians involved in prenatal diagnosis. Early determination of chorionicity should be routine, since this influences not only the genetic risks but also the invasive procedure chosen for karyotyping or genotyping. Assessment of nuchal translucency identifies individual fetuses at risk of trisomy. Contrary to expectation, invasive procedures in twins appear to have procedure-related miscarriage rates that are similar to those in singletons. Instead, contamination remains a concern at chorionic villus sampling. Elective late karyotyping of fetuses may have a role in some countries. Whereas management options for discordant fetal abnormality are relatively straightforward in dichorionic pregnancies, monochorionic pregnancies are at risk of co-twin sequelae after any single intrauterine death. Techniques have now been developed to occlude completely the cord vasculature by laser and/or ultrasound guided bipolar diathermy. Given the complexities associated with prenatal diagnosis, all invasive procedures in multiple pregnancies should be performed in tertiary referral centres.

  7. Diagnosis of congenital fibrinogen disorders.

    PubMed

    Lebreton, Aurélien; Casini, Alessandro

    2016-08-01

    Congenital fibrinogen disorders comprise quantitative disorders defined by a complete absence (afibrinogenemia) or by a decreased level (hypofibrinogenemia) of circulating fibrinogen and qualitative disorders characterized by a discrepancy between the activity and the antigenic levels of fibrinogen (dysfibrinogenemia and hypodysfibrinogenemia). The biological diagnosis is based on a standard haemostasis assessment. All the coagulation tests that depend on the formation of fibrin as the end point are affected; although in dysfibrinogenemia the specificity and sensitivity of routine test depend on reagent and techniques. A genetic exploration permits to confirm the diagnosis and may enhance the prediction of the patient's phenotype. Homozygous or composite heterozygous null mutations are most often responsible for afibrinogenemia while hypofibrinogenemic patients are mainly heterozygous carrier of an afibrinogenemic allele. Heterozygous missense mutations are prevalent in dysfibrinogenemia, with two hot spot localized in exon 2 of the FGA and in the exon 8 of the FGG. The correlation between phenotype and genotype has been identified in some fibrinogen variants, including six mutations clustered in exons 8 and 9 of the FGG leading to hypofibrinogenemia with hepatic inclusions of abnormal fibrinogen aggregates as well as a few mutations associated with an increase risk of thrombotic events. A familial screening and additional functional assays should be carried out when possible.

  8. Progress in molecular diagnosis of Charcot-Marie-Tooth-disease type 1 (CMT 1, HMSN I) and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)-detection of a potential genetic mosaicism

    SciTech Connect

    Bathke, K.; Liehr. T.; Ekici, A.

    1994-09-01

    We tested 20 CMT 1 patients characterized according to the criteria of the European CMT consortium by Southern hybridization of MspI restricted genomic DNA with probes pVAW409R1, pVAW412Hec and pEW401HE. In 11 of the 20 CMT 1 cases (55%), we observed a duplication in 17q11.2; one patient had a dinucleotide insertion in exon 6 of the PO-gene (5%). One HNPP case had a typical 17p11.2 deletion. Analysis of CA-repeats was performed with primers RM11GT and Mfd41; SSCP-analysis of the PO, PMP22 and Cx32-genes is in progress. FISH was carried out with probe pVAW409R1. 125 interphase nuclei were analyzed for each proband by counting the signals per nucleus. Normal cells show a characteristic distribution of signals: 1 signal in 5.9% of nuclei, 2 in 86.3% and 3 in 7.8%. A duplication is indicated by a shift to 3 signals in more than approximately 60% and 2 in less than 25% of the nuclei. In contrast, the 17p11.2 deletion of the HNPP patient shifts to 82.4% of nuclei with a single hybridization signal versus 14.4% with 2 signals. We detected one case with significantly abnormal distribution of interphase nuclei hybridization signals compared to cultures of normal cells and to those with 17p11.2 duplication or deletion: 3.2% nuclei revealed 1 signal, 48.0% two signals and 48.8% 3 signals, indicating a pathogenic but moderate dosis increase compared to the throughout duplicated cases. FISH with probe pVAW409R1 is a versatile tool to detect the HNPP deletion both in interphase nuclei and in metaphase chromosomes. In CMT 1 disease interphase nuclei are required for FISH analysis due to the small duplication of 1.5 Mbp. In contrast to Southern techniques, FISH is able to detect genetic mosaicism.

  9. Population structure of the Chenchu and other south Indian tribal groups: relationships between genetic, anthropometric, dermatoglyphic, geographic, and linguistic distances.

    PubMed

    Sirajuddin, S M; Duggirala, R; Crawford, M H

    1994-10-01

    We describe the genetic structure and interrelationships of nine south Indian tribal groups (seven from Andhra Pradesh and two from the adjoining states of Tamil Nadu and Kerala) using seven polymorphic loci (ABO, MN, RH, PGM, ACP, PGD, and LDH). R matrix analysis indicates that the Andhra Pradesh tribes are clustered and that the Kadar and Irula are genetically isolated from them. This dispersion of populations has been explained by the combination of relatively high frequencies of the alleles RH D and MN M in the Kadar and the relatively high proportions of the allele PGM*2 in the Irula. The Mahaboobnagar Chenchu subgroup is isolated from other Telugu-speaking groups because of high frequencies of the PGM*1 and ACP*A alleles. The regression of mean per locus heterozygosity (H) on distance from the gene frequency centroid (rii) reveals considerable levels of external gene flow among the Lambadi, the Yerukula, and the two Chenchu subgroups and more homogeneity in the Kolam, Koya, Yanadi, Irula, and Kadar. Mantel statistics were used to assess the relative effects of nonbiological processes (i.e., language and geography) on the morphological and genetic patterns of these subdivided populations. The significance of correlations was determined between different data sets (genetic, dermatoglyphic, anthropometric, geographic, and linguistic) at three levels involving nine, six, and five populations. Although multiple correlation analysis reveals significant combined effects of geography and language on genetics, anthropometrics, and dermatoglyphics, highly significant partial correlations suggest strong effects of geography on both anthropometry and genetics. Our analysis indicates that geographic factors have an overwhelming effect on the genetic differentiation of the south Indian tribal groups.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: 16p11.2 deletion syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Most also have at least some features of autism spectrum disorders. These disorders are characterized by impaired ... Registry: 16p11.2 deletion syndrome Genetic Testing Registry: Autism, susceptibility to, 14a Other Diagnosis and Management Resources ( ...

  11. Genetic neurological channelopathies: molecular genetics and clinical phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Spillane, J; Kullmann, D M; Hanna, M G

    2016-01-01

    Evidence accumulated over recent years has shown that genetic neurological channelopathies can cause many different neurological diseases. Presentations relating to the brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerve or muscle mean that channelopathies can impact on almost any area of neurological practice. Typically, neurological channelopathies are inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion and cause paroxysmal disturbances of neurological function, although the impairment of function can become fixed with time. These disorders are individually rare, but an accurate diagnosis is important as it has genetic counselling and often treatment implications. Furthermore, the study of less common ion channel mutation-related diseases has increased our understanding of pathomechanisms that is relevant to common neurological diseases such as migraine and epilepsy. Here, we review the molecular genetic and clinical features of inherited neurological channelopathies.

  12. Genetic neurological channelopathies: molecular genetics and clinical phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Spillane, J; Kullmann, D M; Hanna, M G

    2016-01-01

    Evidence accumulated over recent years has shown that genetic neurological channelopathies can cause many different neurological diseases. Presentations relating to the brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerve or muscle mean that channelopathies can impact on almost any area of neurological practice. Typically, neurological channelopathies are inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion and cause paroxysmal disturbances of neurological function, although the impairment of function can become fixed with time. These disorders are individually rare, but an accurate diagnosis is important as it has genetic counselling and often treatment implications. Furthermore, the study of less common ion channel mutation-related diseases has increased our understanding of pathomechanisms that is relevant to common neurological diseases such as migraine and epilepsy. Here, we review the molecular genetic and clinical features of inherited neurological channelopathies. PMID:26558925

  13. [Cluster headache differential diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Guégan-Massardier, Evelyne; Laubier, Cécile

    2015-11-01

    Cluster headache is characterized by disabling stereotyped headache. Early diagnosis allows appropriate treatment, unfortunately diagnostic errors are frequent. The main differential diagnoses are other primary or essential headaches. Migraine, more frequent and whose diagnosis is carried by excess, trigeminal neuralgia or other trigemino-autonomic cephalgia. Vascular or tumoral underlying condition can mimic cluster headache, neck and brain imaging is recommended, ideally MRI.

  14. Genetics of Epilepsy in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Genetics should now be part of everyday clinical epilepsy practice. Good data exist to provide empiric risks based on epilepsy syndrome diagnosis. Investigation of the molecular basis of some epilepsies is now a practical clinical task and is of clear value to the patient and family. In some cases, specific therapeutic decisions can now be made based on genetic findings, and this scenario of precision therapy is likely to increase in the coming years. PMID:26316866

  15. Molecular diagnosis of onychomycosis.

    PubMed

    Petinataud, D; Berger, S; Contet-Audonneau, N; Machouart, M

    2014-12-01

    Onychomycosis is a frequent cause of nail infections due to dermatophytes. Molds and yeast may also be responsible of these pathologies. Antifungal treatments are frequently given without a mycological diagnosis, partly because of the requisite time for obtaining the biological results. The mycological diagnosis requires a direct microscopic examination and a culture in order to accurately identify the fungal genus and species. Nevertheless, this conventional diagnosis is often time consuming due to the delay of fungal cultures and presents disadvantages that make it not sufficient enough to give a precise and confident response to the clinicians. Therefore additional tests have been developed to help distinguish onychomycosis from other nail disorders. Among them, molecular biology techniques offer modern and rapid tools to improve traditional microbiological diagnosis. In this review, we first present the conventional diagnosis methods for onychomycosis and then we describe the main molecular biology tools and the currently available commercial kits that allow a rapid detection of the pathology.

  16. Tunisia: communities and community genetics.

    PubMed

    Chaabouni-Bouhamed, Habiba

    2008-01-01

    The population of Tunisia rose from 2.7 millions before the Second World War to 10,074,951 in 2005. Modern Tunisians are the descendents of indigenous Berbers and of people from various civilizations that were assimilated into the population over the centuries. Since its independence in 1956, Tunisia has enjoyed a stable political regime. The social landscape has also changed, based on the declaration of the Code of Personal Status, and on the nationwide education and economic progress. Consanguineous marriages are prevalent, with the same distribution between maternal and paternal relatives' offspring. Large and consanguineous families contributed to the description of a number of new autosomal recessive conditions and to identify new loci and genes. Genetic disorders are common in Tunisia, where most people are receptive to health guidelines. Selective abortion of an affected fetus is legal in Tunisia. Contraception is encouraged. This paper reviews common genetic disorders in the country. In spite of the high quality of health care services provided in Tunisia and the progress made in genetic research in the country, genetic services still remain insufficient and do not cover all parts of the country. At present, genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis seems to be the method of choice to prevent genetic diseases in Tunisia, and such services should be developed as a priority despite the financial costs of such a program.

  17. Neurocutaneous Manifestations of Genetic Mosaicism

    PubMed Central

    van Steensel, Maurice A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic mosaicism is defined as the presence of two or more genetically distinct cell populations in a single individual. Ever more disorders are found to be manifestations of mosaicism and together constitute a significant proportion of the morbidity confronting pediatric specialists. An emerging category is that of overgrowth syndromes with skin manifestations and neurological or developmental abnormalities, such as the well-known Proteus syndrome. In recent years, we have seen dramatic advances in our understanding of these disorders and we now know the genetic basis of many of them. This has profound consequences for diagnosis, counselling, and even treatment, with therapies targeted to specific pathways becoming available for clinical use. Recognizing such overgrowth syndromes, therefore, is more important than ever. Fortunately, their skin manifestations can provide important diagnostic clues when evaluated in the entire phenotypic context. In this review, I provide an overview of the most frequently seen mosaic neurocutaneous phenotypes and discuss their molecular basis. PMID:27617125

  18. Preimplantation diagnosis or chorionic villus biopsy? Women's attitudes and preferences.

    PubMed

    Miedzybrodzka, Z; Templeton, A; Dean, J; Haites, N; Mollison, J; Smith, N

    1993-12-01

    The objective of this work was to assess women's attitudes and preferences to two methods of prenatal diagnosis for genetic disease: embryo and chorionic villus biopsy (CVS). The design involved a structured postal questionnaire sent to women in the Grampian region with different reproductive experiences. The population sample included 46 women who had had genetic counselling because of a family history of a single gene disorder, 18 women who had had CVS for a single gene disorder, 158 women who had had CVS for other reasons, 200 women who had recently delivered a normal baby and 50 women who had experience of in-vitro fertilization (IVF). The main outcome measures were attitudes to family limitation, prenatal diagnosis, termination for fetal abnormality, embryo biopsy and CVS. Of the women surveyed, 38% preferred embryo diagnosis, whereas 42% favoured CVS and termination. Women with previous experience of CVS preferred this option whereas those with experience of IVF as infertility treatment were more likely to favour embryo diagnosis, as were women who had had genetic counselling for a single gene disorder. It was concluded that a substantial number of women find embryo diagnosis more acceptable than CVS when the pregnancy is at high risk. This is especially true amongst those with experience of IVF or who are at risk themselves. A demand for embryo diagnosis has been demonstrated.