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Sample records for genetic networks involved

  1. The genetic regulatory network centered on Pto-Wuschela and its targets involved in wood formation revealed by association studies

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaohui; Wei, Zunzheng; Du, Qingzhang; Chen, Jinhui; Wang, Qingshi; Quan, Mingyang; Song, Yuepeng; Xie, Jianbo; Zhang, Deqiang

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) regulate gene expression and can strongly affect phenotypes. However, few studies have examined TF variants and TF interactions with their targets in plants. Here, we used genetic association in 435 unrelated individuals of Populus tomentosa to explore the variants in Pto-Wuschela and its targets to decipher the genetic regulatory network of Pto-Wuschela. Our bioinformatics and co-expression analysis identified 53 genes with the motif TCACGTGA as putative targets of Pto-Wuschela. Single-marker association analysis showed that Pto-Wuschela was associated with wood properties, which is in agreement with the observation that it has higher expression in stem vascular tissues in Populus. Also, SNPs in the 53 targets were associated with growth or wood properties under additive or dominance effects, suggesting these genes and Pto-Wuschela may act in the same genetic pathways that affect variation in these quantitative traits. Epistasis analysis indicated that 75.5% of these genes directly or indirectly interacted Pto-Wuschela, revealing the coordinated genetic regulatory network formed by Pto-Wuschela and its targets. Thus, our study provides an alternative method for dissection of the interactions between a TF and its targets, which will strength our understanding of the regulatory roles of TFs in complex traits in plants. PMID:26549216

  2. [China genetic counseling network (CGCN): a website on genetic counseling and genetic education].

    PubMed

    He, Min; Li, Wei

    2007-03-01

    In April 2005, with the voluntary involvement of more than 50 worldwide genetic counselors or medical geneticists, we developed a website for online genetic counseling and genetic education on common genetic disease throughout China (URL: http://www.gcnet.org.cn). This website is offering professional online genetic counseling, as well as providing information about common genetic diseases which is a resource for genetic counselors and online genetic counselees. Online genetic counseling is an alternative method to the widely accepted face-to-face counseling. The data warehouse of China Genetic Counseling Network (CGCN) will be a unique supplement to current status of Clinical Genetics and healthcare system in China.

  3. Understanding genetic regulatory networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauffman, Stuart

    2003-04-01

    Random Boolean networks (RBM) were introduced about 35 years ago as first crude models of genetic regulatory networks. RBNs are comprised of N on-off genes, connected by a randomly assigned regulatory wiring diagram where each gene has K inputs, and each gene is controlled by a randomly assigned Boolean function. This procedure samples at random from the ensemble of all possible NK Boolean networks. The central ideas are to study the typical, or generic properties of this ensemble, and see 1) whether characteristic differences appear as K and biases in Boolean functions are introducted, and 2) whether a subclass of this ensemble has properties matching real cells. Such networks behave in an ordered or a chaotic regime, with a phase transition, "the edge of chaos" between the two regimes. Networks with continuous variables exhibit the same two regimes. Substantial evidence suggests that real cells are in the ordered regime. A key concept is that of an attractor. This is a reentrant trajectory of states of the network, called a state cycle. The central biological interpretation is that cell types are attractors. A number of properties differentiate the ordered and chaotic regimes. These include the size and number of attractors, the existence in the ordered regime of a percolating "sea" of genes frozen in the on or off state, with a remainder of isolated twinkling islands of genes, a power law distribution of avalanches of gene activity changes following perturbation to a single gene in the ordered regime versus a similar power law distribution plus a spike of enormous avalanches of gene changes in the chaotic regime, and the existence of branching pathway of "differentiation" between attractors induced by perturbations in the ordered regime. Noise is serious issue, since noise disrupts attractors. But numerical evidence suggests that attractors can be made very stable to noise, and meanwhile, metaplasias may be a biological manifestation of noise. As we learn more

  4. Network growth models and genetic regulatory networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, D. V.; Kauffman, S. A.; Socolar, J. E. S.

    2006-03-01

    We study a class of growth algorithms for directed graphs that are candidate models for the evolution of genetic regulatory networks. The algorithms involve partial duplication of nodes and their links, together with the innovation of new links, allowing for the possibility that input and output links from a newly created node may have different probabilities of survival. We find some counterintuitive trends as the parameters are varied, including the broadening of the in-degree distribution when the probability for retaining input links is decreased. We also find that both the scaling of transcription factors with genome size and the measured degree distributions for genes in yeast can be reproduced by the growth algorithm if and only if a special seed is used to initiate the process.

  5. Network growth models and genetic regulatory networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socolar, Joshua; Foster, David; Kauffman, Stuart

    2006-03-01

    We study a class of growth algorithms for directed graphs that are candidate models for the evolution of genetic regulatory networks. The algorithms involve partial duplication of nodes and their links, together with innovation of new links, allowing for the possibility that input and output links from a newly created node may have different probabilities of survival. We find some counterintuitive trends as parameters are varied, including the broadening of indegree distribution when the probability for retaining input links is decreased. We also find that both the scaling of transcription factors with genome size and the measured degree distributions for genes in yeast can be reproduced by the growth algorithm if and only if a special seed is used to initiate the process.

  6. Investigating the specific core genetic-and-epigenetic networks of cellular mechanisms involved in human aging in peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng-Wei; Wang, Wen-Hsin; Chen, Bor-Sen

    2016-02-23

    Aging is an inevitable part of life for humans, and slowing down the aging process has become a main focus of human endeavor. Here, we applied a systems biology approach to construct protein-protein interaction networks, gene regulatory networks, and epigenetic networks, i.e. genetic and epigenetic networks (GENs), of elderly individuals and young controls. We then compared these GENs to extract aging mechanisms using microarray data in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, microRNA (miRNA) data, and database mining. The core GENs of elderly individuals and young controls were obtained by applying principal network projection to GENs based on Principal Component Analysis. By comparing the core networks, we identified that to overcome the accumulated mutation of genes in the aging process the transcription factor JUN can be activated by stress signals, including the MAPK signaling, T-cell receptor signaling, and neurotrophin signaling pathways through DNA methylation of BTG3, G0S2, and AP2B1 and the regulations of mir-223 let-7d, and mir-130a. We also address the aging mechanisms in old men and women. Furthermore, we proposed that drugs designed to target these DNA methylated genes or miRNAs may delay aging. A multiple drug combination comprising phenylalanine, cholesterol, and palbociclib was finally designed for delaying the aging process.

  7. Construction and analysis of regulatory genetic networks in cervical cancer based on involved microRNAs, target genes, transcription factors and host genes

    PubMed Central

    WANG, NING; XU, ZHIWEN; WANG, KUNHAO; ZHU, MINGHUI; LI, YANG

    2014-01-01

    Over recent years, genes and microRNA (miRNA/miR) have been considered as key biological factors in human carcinogenesis. During cancer development, genes may act as multiple identities, including target genes of miRNA, transcription factors and host genes. The present study concentrated on the regulatory networks consisting of the biological factors involved in cervical cancer in order to investigate their features and affect on this specific pathology. Numerous raw data was collected and organized into purposeful structures, and adaptive procedures were defined for application to the prepared data. The networks were therefore built with the factors as basic components according to their interacting associations. The networks were constructed at three levels of interdependency, including a differentially-expressed network, a related network and a global network. Comparisons and analyses were made at a systematic level rather than from an isolated gene or miRNA. Critical hubs were extracted in the core networks and notable features were discussed, including self-adaption feedback regulation. The present study expounds the pathogenesis from a novel point of view and is proposed to provide inspiration for further investigation and therapy. PMID:24944708

  8. Genetic Variations Involved in Vitamin E Status

    PubMed Central

    Borel, Patrick; Desmarchelier, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin E (VE) is the generic term for four tocopherols and four tocotrienols that exhibit the biological activity of α-tocopherol. VE status, which is usually estimated by measuring fasting blood VE concentration, is affected by numerous factors, such as dietary VE intake, VE absorption efficiency, and VE catabolism. Several of these factors are in turn modulated by genetic variations in genes encoding proteins involved in these factors. To identify these genetic variations, two strategies have been used: genome-wide association studies and candidate gene association studies. Each of these strategies has its advantages and its drawbacks, nevertheless they have allowed us to identify a list of single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with fasting blood VE concentration and α-tocopherol bioavailability. However, much work remains to be done to identify, and to replicate in different populations, all the single nucleotide polymorphisms involved, to assess the possible involvement of other kind of genetic variations, e.g., copy number variants and epigenetic modifications, in order to establish a reliable list of genetic variations that will allow us to predict the VE status of an individual by knowing their genotype in these genetic variations. Yet, the potential usefulness of this area of research is exciting with regard to personalized nutrition and for future clinical trials dedicated to assessing the biological effects of the various isoforms of VE. PMID:27983595

  9. Functional brain networks involved in reality monitoring.

    PubMed

    Metzak, Paul D; Lavigne, Katie M; Woodward, Todd S

    2015-08-01

    Source monitoring refers to the recollection of variables that specify the context and conditions in which a memory episode was encoded. This process involves using the qualitative and quantitative features of a memory trace to distinguish its source. One specific class of source monitoring is reality monitoring, which involves distinguishing internally generated from externally generated information, that is, memories of imagined events from real events. The purpose of the present study was to identify functional brain networks that underlie reality monitoring, using an alternative type of source monitoring as a control condition. On the basis of previous studies on self-referential thinking, it was expected that a medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) based network would be more active during reality monitoring than the control condition, due to the requirement to focus on a comparison of internal (self) and external (other) source information. Two functional brain networks emerged from this analysis, one reflecting increasing task-related activity, and one reflecting decreasing task-related activity. The second network was mPFC based, and was characterized by task-related deactivations in areas resembling the default-mode network; namely, the mPFC, middle temporal gyri, lateral parietal regions, and the precuneus, and these deactivations were diminished during reality monitoring relative to source monitoring, resulting in higher activity during reality monitoring. This result supports previous research suggesting that self-referential thinking involves the mPFC, but extends this to a network-level interpretation of reality monitoring.

  10. Synchronization of electronic genetic networks.

    PubMed

    Wagemakers, Alexandre; Buldú, Javier M; García-Ojalvo, Jordi; Sanjuán, Miguel A F

    2006-03-01

    We describe a simple analog electronic circuit that mimics the behavior of a well-known synthetic gene oscillator, the repressilator, which represents a set of three genes repressing one another. Synchronization of a population of such units is thoroughly studied, with the aim to compare the role of global coupling with that of global forcing on the population. Our results show that coupling is much more efficient than forcing in leading the gene population to synchronized oscillations. Furthermore, a modification of the proposed analog circuit leads to a simple electronic version of a genetic toggle switch, which is a simple network of two mutual repressor genes, where control by external forcing is also analyzed.

  11. Involvement of support networks in treatment.

    PubMed

    Longabaugh, Richard

    2003-01-01

    Alcohol dependence and abuse are biopsychosocially determined and ameliorated. However, social factors involved in effecting treatment outcomes continue to be understudied as a context in which psychological and biological factors are researched and also as a treatment focus in their own right. Yet the client's social setting and relationships during and after treatment are more important forces in the recovery process than formally defined alcohol treatment interventions. Though this has been so historically, it is even more likely now in managed care environments where treatments are highly circumscribed. This suggests that treatment interventions refocus toward targeting changes in the patient's social environment. Treatments involving spouses and families of the patient's social networks it has been shown, are incrementally effective. A high priority for research is to identify the set of conditions under which the wider social network can also be effective. Early results are promising though not well understood. The next generation of network therapies will focus on testing the conditions under which various components of the patient's social network are important in affecting patient outcomes. As with other therapies, an important focus for research is on identifying the active ingredients in these treatments that bring about favorable change in patients generally or that enhance the outcomes of the subset of patients particularly amenable to network interventions (patient-treatment "matching"). Recommended priorities for future research in network interventions are identified.

  12. Genetic Network Inference Using Hierarchical Structure

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Shuhei; Tokuhisa, Masato; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko

    2016-01-01

    Many methods for inferring genetic networks have been proposed, but the regulations they infer often include false-positives. Several researchers have attempted to reduce these erroneous regulations by proposing the use of a priori knowledge about the properties of genetic networks such as their sparseness, scale-free structure, and so on. This study focuses on another piece of a priori knowledge, namely, that biochemical networks exhibit hierarchical structures. Based on this idea, we propose an inference approach that uses the hierarchical structure in a target genetic network. To obtain a reasonable hierarchical structure, the first step of the proposed approach is to infer multiple genetic networks from the observed gene expression data. We take this step using an existing method that combines a genetic network inference method with a bootstrap method. The next step is to extract a hierarchical structure from the inferred networks that is consistent with most of the networks. Third, we use the hierarchical structure obtained to assign confidence values to all candidate regulations. Numerical experiments are also performed to demonstrate the effectiveness of using the hierarchical structure in the genetic network inference. The improvement accomplished by the use of the hierarchical structure is small. However, the hierarchical structure could be used to improve the performances of many existing inference methods. PMID:26941653

  13. Inferring genetic networks from microarray data.

    SciTech Connect

    May, Elebeoba Eni; Davidson, George S.; Martin, Shawn Bryan; Werner-Washburne, Margaret C.; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel

    2004-06-01

    In theory, it should be possible to infer realistic genetic networks from time series microarray data. In practice, however, network discovery has proved problematic. The three major challenges are: (1) inferring the network; (2) estimating the stability of the inferred network; and (3) making the network visually accessible to the user. Here we describe a method, tested on publicly available time series microarray data, which addresses these concerns. The inference of genetic networks from genome-wide experimental data is an important biological problem which has received much attention. Approaches to this problem have typically included application of clustering algorithms [6]; the use of Boolean networks [12, 1, 10]; the use of Bayesian networks [8, 11]; and the use of continuous models [21, 14, 19]. Overviews of the problem and general approaches to network inference can be found in [4, 3]. Our approach to network inference is similar to earlier methods in that we use both clustering and Boolean network inference. However, we have attempted to extend the process to better serve the end-user, the biologist. In particular, we have incorporated a system to assess the reliability of our network, and we have developed tools which allow interactive visualization of the proposed network.

  14. Genetic algorithm for neural networks optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setyawati, Bina R.; Creese, Robert C.; Sahirman, Sidharta

    2004-11-01

    This paper examines the forecasting performance of multi-layer feed forward neural networks in modeling a particular foreign exchange rates, i.e. Japanese Yen/US Dollar. The effects of two learning methods, Back Propagation and Genetic Algorithm, in which the neural network topology and other parameters fixed, were investigated. The early results indicate that the application of this hybrid system seems to be well suited for the forecasting of foreign exchange rates. The Neural Networks and Genetic Algorithm were programmed using MATLAB«.

  15. Boolean Modelingof Genetic Regulatory Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Réka

    Biological systems form complex networks of interaction on several scales, ranging from the molecular to the ecosystem level. On the subcellular scale, interaction between genes and gene products (mRNAs, proteins) forms the basis of essential processes like signal transduction, cell metabolism or embryonic development. Recent experimental advances helped uncover the qualitative structure of many gene control networks, creating a surge of interest in the quantitative description of gene regulation. We give a brief description of the main frameworks and methods used in modeling gene regulatory networks, then focus on a recent model of the segment polarity genes of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. The basis of this model is the known interactions between the products of the segment polarity genes, and the network topology these interactions form. The interactions between mRNAs and proteins are described as logical (Boolean) functions. The success in reproducing both wild type and mutant gene expression patterns suggests that the kinetic details of the interactions are not essential as long as the network of interactions is unperturbed. The model predicts the gene patterns for cases that were not yet studied experimentally, and implies a remarkable robustness toward changes in internal parameters, initial conditions and even some mutations.

  16. Genetic origins of social networks in rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Brent, Lauren J. N.; Heilbronner, Sarah R.; Horvath, Julie E.; Gonzalez-Martinez, Janis; Ruiz-Lambides, Angelina; Robinson, Athy G.; Skene, J. H. Pate; Platt, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    Sociality is believed to have evolved as a strategy for animals to cope with their environments. Yet the genetic basis of sociality remains unclear. Here we provide evidence that social network tendencies are heritable in a gregarious primate. The tendency for rhesus macaques, Macaca mulatta, to be tied affiliatively to others via connections mediated by their social partners - analogous to friends of friends in people - demonstrated additive genetic variance. Affiliative tendencies were predicted by genetic variation at two loci involved in serotonergic signalling, although this result did not withstand correction for multiple tests. Aggressive tendencies were also heritable and were related to reproductive output, a fitness proxy. Our findings suggest that, like humans, the skills and temperaments that shape the formation of multi-agent relationships have a genetic basis in nonhuman primates, and, as such, begin to fill the gaps in our understanding of the genetic basis of sociality. PMID:23304433

  17. The causes of epistasis in genetic networks.

    PubMed

    Macía, Javier; Solé, Ricard V; Elena, Santiago F

    2012-02-01

    Epistasis refers to the nonadditive interactions between genes in determining phenotypes. Considerable efforts have shown that, even for a given organism, epistasis may vary both in intensity and sign. Recent comparative studies supported that the overall sign of epistasis switches from positive to negative as the complexity of an organism increases, and it has been hypothesized that this change shall be a consequence of the underlying gene network properties. Why should this be the case? What characteristics of genetic networks determine the sign of epistasis? Here we show, by evolving genetic networks that differ in their complexity and robustness against perturbations but that perform the same tasks, that robustness increased with complexity and that epistasis was positive for small nonrobust networks but negative for large robust ones. Our results indicate that robustness and negative epistasis emerge as a consequence of the existence of redundant elements in regulatory structures of genetic networks and that the correlation between complexity and epistasis is a byproduct of such redundancy, allowing for the decoupling of epistasis from the underlying network complexity.

  18. New neuronal networks involved in ethanol reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Kiianmaa, Kalervo; Hyytiä, Petri; Samson, Herman H; Engel, Jörgen A; Svensson, Lennart; Söderpalm, Bo; Larsson, Anna; Colombo, Giancarlo; Vacca, Giovanni; Finn, Deborah A; Bachtell, Ryan K; Ryabinin, Andrey E

    2003-02-01

    This article represents the proceedings of a symposium at the 2002 ISBRA/RSA meeting in San Francisco. The organizers were Kalervo Kiianmaa and Andrey E. Ryabinin. The chairs were Kalervo Kiianmaa and Jörgen A. Engel. The presentations were (1) The role of opioidergic and dopaminergic networks in ethanol-seeking behavior, by Kalervo Kiianmaa and Petri Hyytiä; (2) Interaction between the dopamine systems in the prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens during ethanol self-administration, by Herman H. Samson; (3) Neurochemical and behavioral studies on ethanol and nicotine interactions, by Jörgen A. Engel, Lennart Svensson, Bo Söderpalm, and Anna Larsson; (4) Involvement of the GABA receptor in alcohol reinforcement in sP rats, by Giancarlo Colombo and Giovanni Vacca; (5) Neuroactive steroids and ethanol reinforcement, by Deborah A. Finn, and (6) Potential contribution of the urocortin system to regulation of alcohol self-administration, by Andrey E. Ryabinin and Ryan K. Bachtell.(B)

  19. Bridging genetic networks and queueing theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arazi, Arnon; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Yechiali, Uri

    2004-02-01

    One of the main challenges facing biology today is the understanding of the joint action of genes, proteins and RNA molecules, interwoven in intricate interdependencies commonly known as genetic networks. To this end, several mathematical approaches have been introduced to date. In addition to developing the analytical tools required for this task anew, one can utilize knowledge found in existing disciplines, specializing in the representation and analysis of systems featuring similar aspects. We suggest queueing theory as a possible source of such knowledge. This discipline, which focuses on the study of workloads forming in a variety of scenarios, offers an assortment of tools allowing for the derivation of the statistical properties of the inspected systems. We argue that a proper adaptation of modeling techniques and analytical methods used in queueing theory can contribute to the study of genetic regulatory networks. This is demonstrated by presenting a queueing-inspired model of a genetic network of arbitrary size and structure, for which the probability distribution function is derived. This model is further applied to the description of the lac operon regulation mechanism. In addition, we discuss the possible benefits stemming for queueing theory from the interdisciplinary dialogue with molecular biology-in particular, the incorporation of various dynamical behaviours into queueing networks.

  20. Adaptation by Plasticity of Genetic Regulatory Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, Naama

    2007-03-01

    Genetic regulatory networks have an essential role in adaptation and evolution of cell populations. This role is strongly related to their dynamic properties over intermediate-to-long time scales. We have used the budding yeast as a model Eukaryote to study the long-term dynamics of the genetic regulatory system and its significance in evolution. A continuous cell growth technique (chemostat) allows us to monitor these systems over long times under controlled condition, enabling a quantitative characterization of dynamics: steady states and their stability, transients and relaxation. First, we have demonstrated adaptive dynamics in the GAL system, a classic model for a Eukaryotic genetic switch, induced and repressed by different carbon sources in the environment. We found that both induction and repression are only transient responses; over several generations, the system converges to a single robust steady state, independent of external conditions. Second, we explored the functional significance of such plasticity of the genetic regulatory network in evolution. We used genetic engineering to mimic the natural process of gene recruitment, placing the gene HIS3 under the regulation of the GAL system. Such genetic rewiring events are important in the evolution of gene regulation, but little is known about the physiological processes supporting them and the dynamics of their assimilation in a cell population. We have shown that cells carrying the rewired genome adapted to a demanding change of environment and stabilized a population, maintaining the adaptive state for hundreds of generations. Using genome-wide expression arrays we showed that underlying the observed adaptation is a global transcriptional programming that allowed tuning expression of the recruited gene to demands. Our results suggest that non-specific properties reflecting the natural plasticity of the regulatory network support adaptation of cells to novel challenges and enhance their evolvability.

  1. Determinants of Communication Network Involvement: Connectedness and Integration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monge, Peter R.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Developed structural equation models of involvement in communication networks in organizations for communication network connectedness and for network integration. A questionnaire was administered to members of a naval training facility (N=125). Models showed acceptable goodness-of-fit for the connectedness model and excellent goodness-of-fit for…

  2. Genetic Network Programming with Reconstructed Individuals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Fengming; Mabu, Shingo; Wang, Lutao; Eto, Shinji; Hirasawa, Kotaro

    A lot of research on evolutionary computation has been done and some significant classical methods such as Genetic Algorithm (GA), Genetic Programming (GP), Evolutionary Programming (EP), and Evolution Strategies (ES) have been studied. Recently, a new approach named Genetic Network Programming (GNP) has been proposed. GNP can evolve itself and find the optimal solution. It is based on the idea of Genetic Algorithm and uses the data structure of directed graphs. Many papers have demonstrated that GNP can deal with complex problems in the dynamic environments very efficiently and effectively. As a result, recently, GNP is getting more and more attentions and is used in many different areas such as data mining, extracting trading rules of stock markets, elevator supervised control systems, etc., and GNP has obtained some outstanding results. Focusing on the GNP's distinguished expression ability of the graph structure, this paper proposes a method named Genetic Network Programming with Reconstructed Individuals (GNP-RI). The aim of GNP-RI is to balance the exploitation and exploration of GNP, that is, to strengthen the exploitation ability by using the exploited information extensively during the evolution process of GNP and finally obtain better performances than that of GNP. In the proposed method, the worse individuals are reconstructed and enhanced by the elite information before undergoing genetic operations (mutation and crossover). The enhancement of worse individuals mimics the maturing phenomenon in nature, where bad individuals can become smarter after receiving a good education. In this paper, GNP-RI is applied to the tile-world problem which is an excellent bench mark for evaluating the proposed architecture. The performance of GNP-RI is compared with that of the conventional GNP. The simulation results show some advantages of GNP-RI demonstrating its superiority over the conventional GNPs.

  3. Effects of macromolecular crowding on genetic networks.

    PubMed

    Morelli, Marco J; Allen, Rosalind J; Wolde, Pieter Rein ten

    2011-12-21

    The intracellular environment is crowded with proteins, DNA, and other macromolecules. Under physiological conditions, macromolecular crowding can alter both molecular diffusion and the equilibria of bimolecular reactions and therefore is likely to have a significant effect on the function of biochemical networks. We propose a simple way to model the effects of macromolecular crowding on biochemical networks via an appropriate scaling of bimolecular association and dissociation rates. We use this approach, in combination with kinetic Monte Carlo simulations, to analyze the effects of crowding on a constitutively expressed gene, a repressed gene, and a model for the bacteriophage λ genetic switch, in the presence and absence of nonspecific binding of transcription factors to genomic DNA. Our results show that the effects of crowding are mainly caused by the shift of association-dissociation equilibria rather than the slowing down of protein diffusion, and that macromolecular crowding can have relevant and counterintuitive effects on biochemical network performance.

  4. Time-course of cortical networks involved in working memory

    PubMed Central

    Luu, Phan; Caggiano, Daniel M.; Geyer, Alexandra; Lewis, Jenn; Cohn, Joseph; Tucker, Don M.

    2014-01-01

    Working memory (WM) is one of the most studied cognitive constructs. Although many neuroimaging studies have identified brain networks involved in WM, the time course of these networks remains unclear. In this paper we use dense-array electroencephalography (dEEG) to capture neural signals during performance of a standard WM task, the n-back task, and a blend of principal components analysis and independent components analysis (PCA/ICA) to statistically identify networks of WM and their time courses. Results reveal a visual cortex centric network, that also includes the posterior cingulate cortex, that is active prior to stimulus onset and that appears to reflect anticipatory, attention-related processes. After stimulus onset, the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, lateral prefrontal prefrontal cortex, and temporal poles become associated with the prestimulus network. This second network appears to reflect executive control processes. Following activation of the second network, the cortices of the temporo-parietal junction with the temporal lobe structures seen in the first and second networks re-engage. This third network appears to reflect activity of the ventral attention network involved in control of attentional reorientation. The results point to important temporal features of network dynamics that integrate multiple subsystems of the ventral attention network with the default mode network in the performance of working memory tasks. PMID:24523686

  5. Character Recognition Using Genetically Trained Neural Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Diniz, C.; Stantz, K.M.; Trahan, M.W.; Wagner, J.S.

    1998-10-01

    Computationally intelligent recognition of characters and symbols addresses a wide range of applications including foreign language translation and chemical formula identification. The combination of intelligent learning and optimization algorithms with layered neural structures offers powerful techniques for character recognition. These techniques were originally developed by Sandia National Laboratories for pattern and spectral analysis; however, their ability to optimize vast amounts of data make them ideal for character recognition. An adaptation of the Neural Network Designer soflsvare allows the user to create a neural network (NN_) trained by a genetic algorithm (GA) that correctly identifies multiple distinct characters. The initial successfid recognition of standard capital letters can be expanded to include chemical and mathematical symbols and alphabets of foreign languages, especially Arabic and Chinese. The FIN model constructed for this project uses a three layer feed-forward architecture. To facilitate the input of characters and symbols, a graphic user interface (GUI) has been developed to convert the traditional representation of each character or symbol to a bitmap. The 8 x 8 bitmap representations used for these tests are mapped onto the input nodes of the feed-forward neural network (FFNN) in a one-to-one correspondence. The input nodes feed forward into a hidden layer, and the hidden layer feeds into five output nodes correlated to possible character outcomes. During the training period the GA optimizes the weights of the NN until it can successfully recognize distinct characters. Systematic deviations from the base design test the network's range of applicability. Increasing capacity, the number of letters to be recognized, requires a nonlinear increase in the number of hidden layer neurodes. Optimal character recognition performance necessitates a minimum threshold for the number of cases when genetically training the net. And, the amount of

  6. Genetic Regulatory Networks in Embryogenesis and Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The article introduces a series of papers that were originally presented at a workshop titled Genetic Regulatory Network in Embryogenesis and Evaluation. Contents include the following: evolution of cleavage programs in relationship to axial specification and body plan evolution, changes in cell lineage specification elucidate evolutionary relations in spiralia, axial patterning in the leech: developmental mechanisms and evolutionary implications, hox genes in arthropod development and evolution, heterochronic genes in development and evolution, a common theme for LIM homeobox gene function across phylogeny, and mechanisms of specification in ascidian embryos.

  7. Functional Localization of Genetic Network Programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eto, Shinji; Hirasawa, Kotaro; Hu, Jinglu

    According to the knowledge of brain science, it is suggested that there exists cerebral functional localization, which means that a specific part of the cerebrum is activated depending on various kinds of information human receives. The aim of this paper is to build an artificial model to realize functional localization based on Genetic Network Programming (GNP), a new evolutionary computation method recently developed. GNP has a directed graph structure suitable for realizing functional localization. We studied the basic characteristics of the proposed system by making GNP work in a functionally localized way.

  8. Demonstrations of Neural Network Computations Involving Students

    PubMed Central

    May, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    David Marr famously proposed three levels of analysis (implementational, algorithmic, and computational) for understanding information processing systems such as the brain. While two of these levels are commonly taught in neuroscience courses (the implementational level through neurophysiology and the computational level through systems/cognitive neuroscience), the algorithmic level is typically neglected. This leaves an explanatory gap in students’ understanding of how, for example, the flow of sodium ions enables cognition. Neural networks bridge these two levels by demonstrating how collections of interacting neuron-like units can give rise to more overtly cognitive phenomena. The demonstrations in this paper are intended to facilitate instructors’ introduction and exploration of how neurons “process information.” PMID:23493501

  9. Genetic networks: between theory and experimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottani, Samuel; Mazurie, Aurélien

    Thanks to an increasing availability of data on cell components and progress in computers and computer science, a long awaited paradigm shift is running in biology from reductionism to holistic approaches. One of the consequences is the huge development of network-related representations of cell activity and an increasing involvement of researchers from computer science, physics and mathematics in their analysis. But what are the promises of these approaches for the biologist? What is the available biological data sustaining them and is it sufficient? After a presentation of the interaction network view of the cell, we shall focus on studies on gene network structure and dynamics. Then we shall discuss the difficulties of these approaches and their theoretical and practical usefulness for the biologist.

  10. Security and Privacy Preservation in Human-Involved Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asher, Craig; Aumasson, Jean-Philippe; Phan, Raphael C.-W.

    This paper discusses security within human-involved networks, with a focus on social networking services (SNS). We argue that more secure networks could be designed using semi-formal security models inspired from cryptography, as well as notions like that of ceremony, which exploits human-specific abilities and psychology to assist creating more secure protocols. We illustrate some of our ideas with the example of the SNS Facebook.

  11. Training product unit neural networks with genetic algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janson, D. J.; Frenzel, J. F.; Thelen, D. C.

    1991-01-01

    The training of product neural networks using genetic algorithms is discussed. Two unusual neural network techniques are combined; product units are employed instead of the traditional summing units and genetic algorithms train the network rather than backpropagation. As an example, a neural netork is trained to calculate the optimum width of transistors in a CMOS switch. It is shown how local minima affect the performance of a genetic algorithm, and one method of overcoming this is presented.

  12. Genetic Networks Activated by Blast Injury to the Eye

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0255 TITLE: Genetic Networks Activated by Blast...DATES COVERED 15 July 2012 – 14 July 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Genetic Networks Activated by Blast Injury to the Eye 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...following a blast injury to the eye. In this process the genetic networks activated by injury will be defined along with biological markers of

  13. Genetically determined phenotype covariation networks control bone strength.

    PubMed

    Jepsen, Karl J; Courtland, Hayden-William; Nadeau, Joseph H

    2010-07-01

    To identify genes affecting bone strength, we studied how genetic variants regulate components of a phenotypic covariation network that was previously shown to accurately characterize the compensatory trait interactions involved in functional adaptation during growth. Quantitative trait loci (QTLs) regulating femoral robustness, morphologic compensation, and mineralization (tissue quality) were mapped at three ages during growth using AXB/BXA Recombinant Inbred (RI) mouse strains and adult B6-i(A) Chromosome Substitution Strains (CSS). QTLs for robustness were identified on chromosomes 8, 12, 18, and 19 and confirmed at all three ages, indicating that genetic variants established robustness postnatally without further modification. A QTL for morphologic compensation, which was measured as the relationship between cortical area and body weight, was identified on chromosome 8. This QTL limited the amount of bone formed during growth and thus acted as a setpoint for diaphyseal bone mass. Additional QTLs were identified from the CSS analysis. QTLs for robustness and morphologic compensation regulated bone structure independently (ie, in a nonpleiotropic manner), indicating that each trait may be targeted separately to individualize treatments aiming to improve strength. Multiple regression analyses showed that variation in morphologic compensation and tissue quality, not bone size, determined femoral strength relative to body weight. Thus an individual inheriting slender bones will not necessarily inherit weak bones unless the individual also inherits a gene that impairs compensation. This systems genetic analysis showed that genetically determined phenotype covariation networks control bone strength, suggesting that incorporating functional adaptation into genetic analyses will advance our understanding of the genetic basis of bone strength.

  14. Genetic demographic networks: Mathematical model and applications.

    PubMed

    Kimmel, Marek; Wojdyła, Tomasz

    2016-10-01

    Recent improvement in the quality of genetic data obtained from extinct human populations and their ancestors encourages searching for answers to basic questions regarding human population history. The most common and successful are model-based approaches, in which genetic data are compared to the data obtained from the assumed demography model. Using such approach, it is possible to either validate or adjust assumed demography. Model fit to data can be obtained based on reverse-time coalescent simulations or forward-time simulations. In this paper we introduce a computational method based on mathematical equation that allows obtaining joint distributions of pairs of individuals under a specified demography model, each of them characterized by a genetic variant at a chosen locus. The two individuals are randomly sampled from either the same or two different populations. The model assumes three types of demographic events (split, merge and migration). Populations evolve according to the time-continuous Moran model with drift and Markov-process mutation. This latter process is described by the Lyapunov-type equation introduced by O'Brien and generalized in our previous works. Application of this equation constitutes an original contribution. In the result section of the paper we present sample applications of our model to both simulated and literature-based demographies. Among other we include a study of the Slavs-Balts-Finns genetic relationship, in which we model split and migrations between the Balts and Slavs. We also include another example that involves the migration rates between farmers and hunters-gatherers, based on modern and ancient DNA samples. This latter process was previously studied using coalescent simulations. Our results are in general agreement with the previous method, which provides validation of our approach. Although our model is not an alternative to simulation methods in the practical sense, it provides an algorithm to compute pairwise

  15. Artificial neural networks reveal efficiency in genetic value prediction.

    PubMed

    Peixoto, L A; Bhering, L L; Cruz, C D

    2015-06-18

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of artificial neural networks (ANNs) for predicting genetic value in experiments carried out in randomized blocks. Sixteen scenarios were simulated with different values of heritability (10, 20, 30, and 40%), coefficient of variation (5 and 10%), and the number of genotypes per block (150 and 200 for validation, and 5000 for neural network training). One hundred validation populations were used in each scenario. Accuracy of ANNs was evaluated by comparing the correlation of network value with genetic value, and of phenotypic value with genetic value. Neural networks were efficient in predicting genetic value with a 0.64 to 10.3% gain compared to the phenotypic value, regardless the simulated population size, heritability, or coefficient of variation. Thus, the artificial neural network is a promising technique for predicting genetic value in balanced experiments.

  16. Information transmission in genetic regulatory networks: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkačik, Gašper; Walczak, Aleksandra M.

    2011-04-01

    Genetic regulatory networks enable cells to respond to changes in internal and external conditions by dynamically coordinating their gene expression profiles. Our ability to make quantitative measurements in these biochemical circuits has deepened our understanding of what kinds of computations genetic regulatory networks can perform, and with what reliability. These advances have motivated researchers to look for connections between the architecture and function of genetic regulatory networks. Transmitting information between a network's inputs and outputs has been proposed as one such possible measure of function, relevant in certain biological contexts. Here we summarize recent developments in the application of information theory to gene regulatory networks. We first review basic concepts in information theory necessary for understanding recent work. We then discuss the functional complexity of gene regulation, which arises from the molecular nature of the regulatory interactions. We end by reviewing some experiments that support the view that genetic networks responsible for early development of multicellular organisms might be maximizing transmitted 'positional information'.

  17. Social Network Influence on Father Involvement in Childrearing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Dave

    Predictors of fathers' involvement in childrearing activities were investigated as part of a study of the ecology of urban childrearing in five western societies. Selected on the basis of a stratified random sample technique, participants were 96 white fathers from intact families having a 3-year-old child. Network theory provided three hypotheses…

  18. Genetic control of root growth: from genes to networks

    PubMed Central

    Slovak, Radka; Ogura, Takehiko; Satbhai, Santosh B.; Ristova, Daniela; Busch, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Background Roots are essential organs for higher plants. They provide the plant with nutrients and water, anchor the plant in the soil, and can serve as energy storage organs. One remarkable feature of roots is that they are able to adjust their growth to changing environments. This adjustment is possible through mechanisms that modulate a diverse set of root traits such as growth rate, diameter, growth direction and lateral root formation. The basis of these traits and their modulation are at the cellular level, where a multitude of genes and gene networks precisely regulate development in time and space and tune it to environmental conditions. Scope This review first describes the root system and then presents fundamental work that has shed light on the basic regulatory principles of root growth and development. It then considers emerging complexities and how they have been addressed using systems-biology approaches, and then describes and argues for a systems-genetics approach. For reasons of simplicity and conciseness, this review is mostly limited to work from the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, in which much of the research in root growth regulation at the molecular level has been conducted. Conclusions While forward genetic approaches have identified key regulators and genetic pathways, systems-biology approaches have been successful in shedding light on complex biological processes, for instance molecular mechanisms involving the quantitative interaction of several molecular components, or the interaction of large numbers of genes. However, there are significant limitations in many of these methods for capturing dynamic processes, as well as relating these processes to genotypic and phenotypic variation. The emerging field of systems genetics promises to overcome some of these limitations by linking genotypes to complex phenotypic and molecular data using approaches from different fields, such as genetics, genomics, systems biology and phenomics. PMID

  19. Introduction to Focus Issue: Quantitative Approaches to Genetic Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Réka; Collins, James J.; Glass, Leon

    2013-06-01

    All cells of living organisms contain similar genetic instructions encoded in the organism's DNA. In any particular cell, the control of the expression of each different gene is regulated, in part, by binding of molecular complexes to specific regions of the DNA. The molecular complexes are composed of protein molecules, called transcription factors, combined with various other molecules such as hormones and drugs. Since transcription factors are coded by genes, cellular function is partially determined by genetic networks. Recent research is making large strides to understand both the structure and the function of these networks. Further, the emerging discipline of synthetic biology is engineering novel gene circuits with specific dynamic properties to advance both basic science and potential practical applications. Although there is not yet a universally accepted mathematical framework for studying the properties of genetic networks, the strong analogies between the activation and inhibition of gene expression and electric circuits suggest frameworks based on logical switching circuits. This focus issue provides a selection of papers reflecting current research directions in the quantitative analysis of genetic networks. The work extends from molecular models for the binding of proteins, to realistic detailed models of cellular metabolism. Between these extremes are simplified models in which genetic dynamics are modeled using classical methods of systems engineering, Boolean switching networks, differential equations that are continuous analogues of Boolean switching networks, and differential equations in which control is based on power law functions. The mathematical techniques are applied to study: (i) naturally occurring gene networks in living organisms including: cyanobacteria, Mycoplasma genitalium, fruit flies, immune cells in mammals; (ii) synthetic gene circuits in Escherichia coli and yeast; and (iii) electronic circuits modeling genetic networks

  20. Introduction to focus issue: quantitative approaches to genetic networks.

    PubMed

    Albert, Réka; Collins, James J; Glass, Leon

    2013-06-01

    All cells of living organisms contain similar genetic instructions encoded in the organism's DNA. In any particular cell, the control of the expression of each different gene is regulated, in part, by binding of molecular complexes to specific regions of the DNA. The molecular complexes are composed of protein molecules, called transcription factors, combined with various other molecules such as hormones and drugs. Since transcription factors are coded by genes, cellular function is partially determined by genetic networks. Recent research is making large strides to understand both the structure and the function of these networks. Further, the emerging discipline of synthetic biology is engineering novel gene circuits with specific dynamic properties to advance both basic science and potential practical applications. Although there is not yet a universally accepted mathematical framework for studying the properties of genetic networks, the strong analogies between the activation and inhibition of gene expression and electric circuits suggest frameworks based on logical switching circuits. This focus issue provides a selection of papers reflecting current research directions in the quantitative analysis of genetic networks. The work extends from molecular models for the binding of proteins, to realistic detailed models of cellular metabolism. Between these extremes are simplified models in which genetic dynamics are modeled using classical methods of systems engineering, Boolean switching networks, differential equations that are continuous analogues of Boolean switching networks, and differential equations in which control is based on power law functions. The mathematical techniques are applied to study: (i) naturally occurring gene networks in living organisms including: cyanobacteria, Mycoplasma genitalium, fruit flies, immune cells in mammals; (ii) synthetic gene circuits in Escherichia coli and yeast; and (iii) electronic circuits modeling genetic networks

  1. Human Genetic Evidence for Involvement of CD137 in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Söderström, Leif Å; Gertow, Karl; Folkersen, Lasse; Sabater-Lleal, Maria; Sundman, Eva; Sheikine, Yuri; Goel, Anuj; Baldassarre, Damiano; Humphries, Steve E; de Faire, Ulf; Watkins, Hugh; Tremoli, Elena; Veglia, Fabrizio; Hamsten, Anders; Hansson, Göran K; Olofsson, Peder S

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease and the main cause of cardiovascular disease. Inflammation promotes plaque instability and clinical disease, such as myocardial infarction, stroke and peripheral vascular disease. Subclinical atherosclerosis begins with thickening of the arterial intimal layer, and increased intima-media thickness (IMT) in the carotid artery is a widely used measurement of subclinical atherosclerosis. Activation of CD137 (tumor necrosis factor receptor super family 9) promotes inflammation and disease development in murine atherosclerosis. CD137 is expressed in human atherosclerosis, but its role is largely unknown. This study uses a genetic approach to investigate CD137 in human atherosclerotic disease. In publicly available data on genotype and gene expression from the HapMap project, the minor T allele of rs2453021, a single nucleotide polymorphism in CD137, was significantly associated with CD137 gene expression. In the PROCARDIS and Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC) cohorts of 13,029 cases and controls, no significant association was detected between the minor T allele of rs2453021 and risk for coronary artery disease or myocardial infarction. However, in the IMPROVE multicenter study of 3,418 individuals, the minor T allele of rs2453021 was associated with increased IMT of the common carotid artery (CCA), as measured by ultrasonography, with presence of plaque in CCA and with increased incidence of adverse noncardiac vascular events. Taken together, this study shows that the minor T allele of rs2453021 is associated with increased IMT in the CCA and increased risk of incident noncardiac vascular events, thus providing the first human genetic evidence for involvement of CD137 in atherosclerosis. PMID:25032953

  2. Optimization of multicast optical networks with genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Bo; Mao, Xiangqiao; Zhang, Feng; Qin, Xi; Lu, Dan; Chen, Ming; Chen, Yong; Cao, Jihong; Jian, Shuisheng

    2007-11-01

    In this letter, aiming to obtain the best multicast performance of optical network in which the video conference information is carried by specified wavelength, we extend the solutions of matrix games with the network coding theory and devise a new method to solve the complex problems of multicast network switching. In addition, an experimental optical network has been testified with best switching strategies by employing the novel numerical solution designed with an effective way of genetic algorithm. The result shows that optimal solutions with genetic algorithm are accordance with the ones with the traditional fictitious play method.

  3. Quantifying and analyzing the network basis of genetic complexity.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Ethan G; Galitski, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    Genotype-to-phenotype maps exhibit complexity. This genetic complexity is mentioned frequently in the literature, but a consistent and quantitative definition is lacking. Here, we derive such a definition and investigate its consequences for model genetic systems. The definition equates genetic complexity with a surplus of genotypic diversity over phenotypic diversity. Applying this definition to ensembles of Boolean network models, we found that the in-degree distribution and the number of periodic attractors produced determine the relative complexity of different topology classes. We found evidence that networks that are difficult to control, or that exhibit a hierarchical structure, are genetically complex. We analyzed the complexity of the cell cycle network of Sacchoromyces cerevisiae and pinpointed genes and interactions that are most important for its high genetic complexity. The rigorous definition of genetic complexity is a tool for unraveling the structure and properties of genotype-to-phenotype maps by enabling the quantitative comparison of the relative complexities of different genetic systems. The definition also allows the identification of specific network elements and subnetworks that have the greatest effects on genetic complexity. Moreover, it suggests ways to engineer biological systems with desired genetic properties.

  4. Genetic and epigenetic networks controlling T helper 1 cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Placek, Katarzyna; Coffre, Maryaline; Maiella, Sylvie; Bianchi, Elisabetta; Rogge, Lars

    2009-06-01

    Significant progress has been made during the past years in our understanding of the mechanisms that control the differentiation of naïve CD4(+) T cells into effector T-cell subsets with distinct functional properties. Previous work allowed the identification of key molecules involved in regulating this highly complex process, such as cytokines and their receptors, signal transducers and transcription factors. More recently, the emphasis of research in this field has been to elucidate how the multiplicity of signals is integrated to shape a T helper subset-specific gene-expression program controlling differentiation and effector functions. In this review we will highlight advances that have been made in unravelling the genetic and epigenetic networks controlling differentiation of naïve CD4(+) T cells into interferon-gamma(IFN-gamma)-secreting T helper type 1 (Th1) cells.

  5. Genetic and epigenetic networks controlling T helper 1 cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Placek, Katarzyna; Coffre, Maryaline; Maiella, Sylvie; Bianchi, Elisabetta; Rogge, Lars

    2009-01-01

    Significant progress has been made during the past years in our understanding of the mechanisms that control the differentiation of naïve CD4+ T cells into effector T-cell subsets with distinct functional properties. Previous work allowed the identification of key molecules involved in regulating this highly complex process, such as cytokines and their receptors, signal transducers and transcription factors. More recently, the emphasis of research in this field has been to elucidate how the multiplicity of signals is integrated to shape a T helper subset-specific gene-expression program controlling differentiation and effector functions. In this review we will highlight advances that have been made in unravelling the genetic and epigenetic networks controlling differentiation of naïve CD4+ T cells into interferon-γ(IFN-γ)-secreting T helper type 1 (Th1) cells. PMID:19476511

  6. Special considerations in prognostic research in cancer involving genetic polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of genetic polymorphisms may help identify putative prognostic markers and determine the biological basis of variable prognosis in patients. However, in contrast to other variables commonly used in the prognostic studies, there are special considerations when studying genetic polymorphisms. For example, variable inheritance patterns (recessive, dominant, codominant, and additive genetic models) need to be explored to identify the specific genotypes associated with the outcome. In addition, several characteristics of genetic polymorphisms, such as their minor allele frequency and linkage disequilibrium among multiple polymorphisms, and the population substructure of the cohort investigated need to be accounted for in the analyses. In addition, in cancer research due to the genomic differences between the tumor and non-tumor DNA, differences in the genetic information obtained using these tissues need to be carefully assessed in prognostic studies. In this article, we review these and other considerations specific to genetic polymorphism by focusing on genetic prognostic studies in cancer. PMID:23773794

  7. Evolving complex dynamics in electronic models of genetic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Jonathan; Linsay, Paul S.; Collins, J. J.; Glass, Leon

    2004-09-01

    Ordinary differential equations are often used to model the dynamics and interactions in genetic networks. In one particularly simple class of models, the model genes control the production rates of products of other genes by a logical function, resulting in piecewise linear differential equations. In this article, we construct and analyze an electronic circuit that models this class of piecewise linear equations. This circuit combines CMOS logic and RC circuits to model the logical control of the increase and decay of protein concentrations in genetic networks. We use these electronic networks to study the evolution of limit cycle dynamics. By mutating the truth tables giving the logical functions for these networks, we evolve the networks to obtain limit cycle oscillations of desired period. We also investigate the fitness landscapes of our networks to determine the optimal mutation rate for evolution.

  8. A genetic algorithm for solving supply chain network design model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firoozi, Z.; Ismail, N.; Ariafar, S. H.; Tang, S. H.; Ariffin, M. K. M. A.

    2013-09-01

    Network design is by nature costly and optimization models play significant role in reducing the unnecessary cost components of a distribution network. This study proposes a genetic algorithm to solve a distribution network design model. The structure of the chromosome in the proposed algorithm is defined in a novel way that in addition to producing feasible solutions, it also reduces the computational complexity of the algorithm. Computational results are presented to show the algorithm performance.

  9. Solving deterministic non-linear programming problem using Hopfield artificial neural network and genetic programming techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasant, P.; Ganesan, T.; Elamvazuthi, I.

    2012-11-01

    A fairly reasonable result was obtained for non-linear engineering problems using the optimization techniques such as neural network, genetic algorithms, and fuzzy logic independently in the past. Increasingly, hybrid techniques are being used to solve the non-linear problems to obtain better output. This paper discusses the use of neuro-genetic hybrid technique to optimize the geological structure mapping which is known as seismic survey. It involves the minimization of objective function subject to the requirement of geophysical and operational constraints. In this work, the optimization was initially performed using genetic programming, and followed by hybrid neuro-genetic programming approaches. Comparative studies and analysis were then carried out on the optimized results. The results indicate that the hybrid neuro-genetic hybrid technique produced better results compared to the stand-alone genetic programming method.

  10. Genetic regulatory network models of biological clocks: evolutionary history matters.

    PubMed

    Knabe, Johannes F; Nehaniv, Chrystopher L; Schilstra, Maria J

    2008-01-01

    We study the evolvability and dynamics of artificial genetic regulatory networks (GRNs), as active control systems, realizing simple models of biological clocks that have evolved to respond to periodic environmental stimuli of various kinds with appropriate periodic behaviors. GRN models may differ in the evolvability of expressive regulatory dynamics. A new class of artificial GRNs with an evolvable number of complex cis-regulatory control sites--each involving a finite number of inhibitory and activatory binding factors--is introduced, allowing realization of complex regulatory logic. Previous work on biological clocks in nature has noted the capacity of clocks to oscillate in the absence of environmental stimuli, putting forth several candidate explanations for their observed behavior, related to anticipation of environmental conditions, compartmentation of activities in time, and robustness to perturbations of various kinds or to unselected accidents of neutral selection. Several of these hypotheses are explored by evolving GRNs with and without (Gaussian) noise and blackout periods for environmental stimulation. Robustness to certain types of perturbation appears to account for some, but not all, dynamical properties of the evolved networks. Unselected abilities, also observed for biological clocks, include the capacity to adapt to change in wavelength of environmental stimulus and to clock resetting.

  11. Shared genetic data and the rights of involved people.

    PubMed

    Sellaroli, Valentina; Cucca, Francesco; Santosuosso, Amedeo

    2007-01-01

    The authors examine the two main attitudes toward genetics: Exceptionalism and Undervaluation. They firstly pose the basis of the matter from the scientific point of view and then verify how these two attitudes really work in the different fields where human genetics finds relevant applications, dealing with the questions arising from the unique characteristics of genetic data that is shared among the whole bio-group. Then some judicial cases related to the conflicts arising when genetic data are stored in repositories, whatever the aims and reasons, are presented and discussed. The matter is then considered from the criminal law perspective, in the light of the new possible implications of DNA fingerprinting in criminal investigations. Finally, some general considerations on opposing Exceptionalism/Undervaluation viewpoints and the real reason for making up new rules are presented.

  12. Reconstruction and analysis of the genetic and metabolic regulatory networks of the central metabolism of Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Goelzer, Anne; Bekkal Brikci, Fadia; Martin-Verstraete, Isabelle; Noirot, Philippe; Bessières, Philippe; Aymerich, Stéphane; Fromion, Vincent

    2008-01-01

    Background Few genome-scale models of organisms focus on the regulatory networks and none of them integrates all known levels of regulation. In particular, the regulations involving metabolite pools are often neglected. However, metabolite pools link the metabolic to the genetic network through genetic regulations, including those involving effectors of transcription factors or riboswitches. Consequently, they play pivotal roles in the global organization of the genetic and metabolic regulatory networks. Results We report the manually curated reconstruction of the genetic and metabolic regulatory networks of the central metabolism of Bacillus subtilis (transcriptional, translational and post-translational regulations and modulation of enzymatic activities). We provide a systematic graphic representation of regulations of each metabolic pathway based on the central role of metabolites in regulation. We show that the complex regulatory network of B. subtilis can be decomposed as sets of locally regulated modules, which are coordinated by global regulators. Conclusion This work reveals the strong involvement of metabolite pools in the general regulation of the metabolic network. Breaking the metabolic network down into modules based on the control of metabolite pools reveals the functional organization of the genetic and metabolic regulatory networks of B. subtilis. PMID:18302748

  13. Genetic variants in Alzheimer disease - molecular and brain network approaches.

    PubMed

    Gaiteri, Chris; Mostafavi, Sara; Honey, Christopher J; De Jager, Philip L; Bennett, David A

    2016-07-01

    Genetic studies in late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD) are aimed at identifying core disease mechanisms and providing potential biomarkers and drug candidates to improve clinical care of AD. However, owing to the complexity of LOAD, including pathological heterogeneity and disease polygenicity, extraction of actionable guidance from LOAD genetics has been challenging. Past attempts to summarize the effects of LOAD-associated genetic variants have used pathway analysis and collections of small-scale experiments to hypothesize functional convergence across several variants. In this Review, we discuss how the study of molecular, cellular and brain networks provides additional information on the effects of LOAD-associated genetic variants. We then discuss emerging combinations of these omic data sets into multiscale models, which provide a more comprehensive representation of the effects of LOAD-associated genetic variants at multiple biophysical scales. Furthermore, we highlight the clinical potential of mechanistically coupling genetic variants and disease phenotypes with multiscale brain models.

  14. Genetic Mechanisms Involved in the Phenotype of Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, David

    2007-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most common genetic cause of significant intellectual disability in the human population, occurring in roughly 1 in 700 live births. The ultimate cause of DS is trisomy of all or part of the set of genes located on chromosome 21. How this trisomy leads to the phenotype of DS is unclear. The completion of the DNA…

  15. Are genetically robust regulatory networks dynamically different from random ones?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevim, Volkan; Rikvold, Per Arne

    We study a genetic regulatory network model developed to demonstrate that genetic robustness can evolve through stabilizing selection for optimal phenotypes. We report preliminary results on whether such selection could result in a reorganization of the state space of the system. For the chosen parameters, the evolution moves the system slightly toward the more ordered part of the phase diagram. We also find that strong memory effects cause the Derrida annealed approximation to give erroneous predictions about the model's phase diagram.

  16. MicroRNA-dependent genetic networks during neural development.

    PubMed

    Abernathy, Daniel G; Yoo, Andrew S

    2015-01-01

    The development of the structurally and functionally diverse mammalian nervous system requires the integration of numerous levels of gene regulation. Accumulating evidence suggests that microRNAs are key mediators of genetic networks during neural development. Importantly, microRNAs are found to regulate both feedback and feedforward loops during neural development leading to large changes in gene expression. These repressive interactions provide an additional mechanism that facilitates the establishment of complexity within the nervous system. Here, we review studies that have enabled the identification of microRNAs enriched in the brain and discuss the way that genetic networks in neural development depend on microRNAs.

  17. A Full Bayesian Approach for Boolean Genetic Network Inference

    PubMed Central

    Han, Shengtong; Wong, Raymond K. W.; Lee, Thomas C. M.; Shen, Linghao; Li, Shuo-Yen R.; Fan, Xiaodan

    2014-01-01

    Boolean networks are a simple but efficient model for describing gene regulatory systems. A number of algorithms have been proposed to infer Boolean networks. However, these methods do not take full consideration of the effects of noise and model uncertainty. In this paper, we propose a full Bayesian approach to infer Boolean genetic networks. Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms are used to obtain the posterior samples of both the network structure and the related parameters. In addition to regular link addition and removal moves, which can guarantee the irreducibility of the Markov chain for traversing the whole network space, carefully constructed mixture proposals are used to improve the Markov chain Monte Carlo convergence. Both simulations and a real application on cell-cycle data show that our method is more powerful than existing methods for the inference of both the topology and logic relations of the Boolean network from observed data. PMID:25551820

  18. Node-based measures of connectivity in genetic networks.

    PubMed

    Koen, Erin L; Bowman, Jeff; Wilson, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    At-site environmental conditions can have strong influences on genetic connectivity, and in particular on the immigration and settlement phases of dispersal. However, at-site processes are rarely explored in landscape genetic analyses. Networks can facilitate the study of at-site processes, where network nodes are used to model site-level effects. We used simulated genetic networks to compare and contrast the performance of 7 node-based (as opposed to edge-based) genetic connectivity metrics. We simulated increasing node connectivity by varying migration in two ways: we increased the number of migrants moving between a focal node and a set number of recipient nodes, and we increased the number of recipient nodes receiving a set number of migrants. We found that two metrics in particular, the average edge weight and the average inverse edge weight, varied linearly with simulated connectivity. Conversely, node degree was not a good measure of connectivity. We demonstrated the use of average inverse edge weight to describe the influence of at-site habitat characteristics on genetic connectivity of 653 American martens (Martes americana) in Ontario, Canada. We found that highly connected nodes had high habitat quality for marten (deep snow and high proportions of coniferous and mature forest) and were farther from the range edge. We recommend the use of node-based genetic connectivity metrics, in particular, average edge weight or average inverse edge weight, to model the influences of at-site habitat conditions on the immigration and settlement phases of dispersal.

  19. Genetic Networks in Mouse Retinal Ganglion Cells

    PubMed Central

    Struebing, Felix L.; Lee, Richard K.; Williams, Robert W.; Geisert, Eldon E.

    2016-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) are the output neuron of the eye, transmitting visual information from the retina through the optic nerve to the brain. The importance of RGCs for vision is demonstrated in blinding diseases where RGCs are lost, such as in glaucoma or after optic nerve injury. In the present study, we hypothesize that normal RGC function is transcriptionally regulated. To test our hypothesis, we examine large retinal expression microarray datasets from recombinant inbred mouse strains in GeneNetwork and define transcriptional networks of RGCs and their subtypes. Two major and functionally distinct transcriptional networks centering around Thy1 and Tubb3 (Class III beta-tubulin) were identified. Each network is independently regulated and modulated by unique genomic loci. Meta-analysis of publically available data confirms that RGC subtypes are differentially susceptible to death, with alpha-RGCs and intrinsically photosensitive RGCs (ipRGCs) being less sensitive to cell death than other RGC subtypes in a mouse model of glaucoma. PMID:27733864

  20. Genetic Network Programming with Intron-Like Nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabu, Shingo; Chen, Yan; Eto, Shinji; Shimada, Kaoru; Hirasawa, Kotaro

    Recently, Genetic Network Programming (GNP) has been proposed, which is an extension of Genetic Algorithm(GA) and Genetic Programming(GP). GNP can make compact programs and can memorize the past history in it implicitly, because it expresses the solution by directed graphs and therefore, it can reuse the nodes. In this research, intron-like nodes are introduced for improving the performance of GNP. The aim of introducing intron-like nodes is to use every node as much as possible. It is found from simulations that the intron-like nodes are useful for improving the training speed and generalization ability.

  1. Characterizing and prototyping genetic networks with cell-free transcription-translation reactions.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Melissa K; Hayes, Clarmyra A; Chappell, James; Sun, Zachary Z; Murray, Richard M; Noireaux, Vincent; Lucks, Julius B

    2015-09-15

    A central goal of synthetic biology is to engineer cellular behavior by engineering synthetic gene networks for a variety of biotechnology and medical applications. The process of engineering gene networks often involves an iterative 'design-build-test' cycle, whereby the parts and connections that make up the network are built, characterized and varied until the desired network function is reached. Many advances have been made in the design and build portions of this cycle. However, the slow process of in vivo characterization of network function often limits the timescale of the testing step. Cell-free transcription-translation (TX-TL) systems offer a simple and fast alternative to performing these characterizations in cells. Here we provide an overview of a cell-free TX-TL system that utilizes the native Escherichia coli TX-TL machinery, thereby allowing a large repertoire of parts and networks to be characterized. As a way to demonstrate the utility of cell-free TX-TL, we illustrate the characterization of two genetic networks: an RNA transcriptional cascade and a protein regulated incoherent feed-forward loop. We also provide guidelines for designing TX-TL experiments to characterize new genetic networks. We end with a discussion of current and emerging applications of cell free systems.

  2. Methods for Mapping of Interaction Networks Involving Membrane Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Hooker, Brian S.; Bigelow, Diana J.; Lin, Chiann Tso

    2007-11-23

    Numerous approaches have been taken to study protein interactions, such as tagged protein complex isolation followed by mass spectrometry, yeast two-hybrid methods, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, surface plasmon resonance, site-directed mutagenesis, and crystallography. Membrane protein interactions pose significant challenges due to the need to solubilize membranes without disrupting protein-protein interactions. Traditionally, analysis of isolated protein complexes by high-resolution 2D gel electrophoresis has been the main method used to obtain an overall picture of proteome constituents and interactions. However, this method is time consuming, labor intensive, detects only abundant proteins and is not suitable for the coverage required to elucidate large interaction networks. In this review, we discuss the application of various methods to elucidate interactions involving membrane proteins. These techniques include methods for the direct isolation of single complexes or interactors as well as methods for characterization of entire subcellular and cellular interactomes.

  3. Integration of biological networks and pathways with genetic association studies.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yan V

    2012-10-01

    Millions of genetic variants have been assessed for their effects on the trait of interest in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). The complex traits are affected by a set of inter-related genes. However, the typical GWAS only examine the association of a single genetic variant at a time. The individual effects of a complex trait are usually small, and the simple sum of these individual effects may not reflect the holistic effect of the genetic system. High-throughput methods enable genomic studies to produce a large amount of data to expand the knowledge base of the biological systems. Biological networks and pathways are built to represent the functional or physical connectivity among genes. Integrated with GWAS data, the network- and pathway-based methods complement the approach of single genetic variant analysis, and may improve the power to identify trait-associated genes. Taking advantage of the biological knowledge, these approaches are valuable to interpret the functional role of the genetic variants, and to further understand the molecular mechanism influencing the traits. The network- and pathway-based methods have demonstrated their utilities, and will be increasingly important to address a number of challenges facing the mainstream GWAS.

  4. Complex and unexpected dynamics in simple genetic regulatory networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borg, Yanika; Ullner, Ekkehard; Alagha, Afnan; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Nesbeth, Darren; Zaikin, Alexey

    2014-03-01

    One aim of synthetic biology is to construct increasingly complex genetic networks from interconnected simpler ones to address challenges in medicine and biotechnology. However, as systems increase in size and complexity, emergent properties lead to unexpected and complex dynamics due to nonlinear and nonequilibrium properties from component interactions. We focus on four different studies of biological systems which exhibit complex and unexpected dynamics. Using simple synthetic genetic networks, small and large populations of phase-coupled quorum sensing repressilators, Goodwin oscillators, and bistable switches, we review how coupled and stochastic components can result in clustering, chaos, noise-induced coherence and speed-dependent decision making. A system of repressilators exhibits oscillations, limit cycles, steady states or chaos depending on the nature and strength of the coupling mechanism. In large repressilator networks, rich dynamics can also be exhibited, such as clustering and chaos. In populations of Goodwin oscillators, noise can induce coherent oscillations. In bistable systems, the speed with which incoming external signals reach steady state can bias the network towards particular attractors. These studies showcase the range of dynamical behavior that simple synthetic genetic networks can exhibit. In addition, they demonstrate the ability of mathematical modeling to analyze nonlinearity and inhomogeneity within these systems.

  5. Genetic Algorithm Application in Optimization of Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Norouzi, Ali; Zaim, A. Halim

    2014-01-01

    There are several applications known for wireless sensor networks (WSN), and such variety demands improvement of the currently available protocols and the specific parameters. Some notable parameters are lifetime of network and energy consumption for routing which play key role in every application. Genetic algorithm is one of the nonlinear optimization methods and relatively better option thanks to its efficiency for large scale applications and that the final formula can be modified by operators. The present survey tries to exert a comprehensive improvement in all operational stages of a WSN including node placement, network coverage, clustering, and data aggregation and achieve an ideal set of parameters of routing and application based WSN. Using genetic algorithm and based on the results of simulations in NS, a specific fitness function was achieved, optimized, and customized for all the operational stages of WSNs. PMID:24693235

  6. New probabilistic graphical models for genetic regulatory networks studies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junbai; Cheung, Leo Wang-Kit; Delabie, Jan

    2005-12-01

    This paper introduces two new probabilistic graphical models for reconstruction of genetic regulatory networks using DNA microarray data. One is an independence graph (IG) model with either a forward or a backward search algorithm and the other one is a Gaussian network (GN) model with a novel greedy search method. The performances of both models were evaluated on four MAPK pathways in yeast and three simulated data sets. Generally, an IG model provides a sparse graph but a GN model produces a dense graph where more information about gene-gene interactions may be preserved. The results of our proposed models were compared with several other commonly used models, and our models have shown to give superior performance. Additionally, we found the same common limitations in the prediction of genetic regulatory networks when using only DNA microarray data.

  7. Information theory and the ethylene genetic network

    PubMed Central

    González-García, José S

    2011-01-01

    The original aim of the Information Theory (IT) was to solve a purely technical problem: to increase the performance of communication systems, which are constantly affected by interferences that diminish the quality of the transmitted information. That is, the theory deals only with the problem of transmitting with the maximal precision the symbols constituting a message. In Shannon's theory messages are characterized only by their probabilities, regardless of their value or meaning. As for its present day status, it is generally acknowledged that Information Theory has solid mathematical foundations and has fruitful strong links with Physics in both theoretical and experimental areas. However, many applications of Information Theory to Biology are limited to using it as a technical tool to analyze biopolymers, such as DNA, RNA or protein sequences. The main point of discussion about the applicability of IT to explain the information flow in biological systems is that in a classic communication channel, the symbols that conform the coded message are transmitted one by one in an independent form through a noisy communication channel, and noise can alter each of the symbols, distorting the message; in contrast, in a genetic communication channel the coded messages are not transmitted in the form of symbols but signaling cascades transmit them. Consequently, the information flow from the emitter to the effector is due to a series of coupled physicochemical processes that must ensure the accurate transmission of the message. In this review we discussed a novel proposal to overcome this difficulty, which consists of the modeling of gene expression with a stochastic approach that allows Shannon entropy (H) to be directly used to measure the amount of uncertainty that the genetic machinery has in relation to the correct decoding of a message transmitted into the nucleus by a signaling pathway. From the value of H we can define a function I that measures the amount of

  8. Information theory and the ethylene genetic network.

    PubMed

    González-García, José S; Díaz, José

    2011-10-01

    The original aim of the Information Theory (IT) was to solve a purely technical problem: to increase the performance of communication systems, which are constantly affected by interferences that diminish the quality of the transmitted information. That is, the theory deals only with the problem of transmitting with the maximal precision the symbols constituting a message. In Shannon's theory messages are characterized only by their probabilities, regardless of their value or meaning. As for its present day status, it is generally acknowledged that Information Theory has solid mathematical foundations and has fruitful strong links with Physics in both theoretical and experimental areas. However, many applications of Information Theory to Biology are limited to using it as a technical tool to analyze biopolymers, such as DNA, RNA or protein sequences. The main point of discussion about the applicability of IT to explain the information flow in biological systems is that in a classic communication channel, the symbols that conform the coded message are transmitted one by one in an independent form through a noisy communication channel, and noise can alter each of the symbols, distorting the message; in contrast, in a genetic communication channel the coded messages are not transmitted in the form of symbols but signaling cascades transmit them. Consequently, the information flow from the emitter to the effector is due to a series of coupled physicochemical processes that must ensure the accurate transmission of the message. In this review we discussed a novel proposal to overcome this difficulty, which consists of the modeling of gene expression with a stochastic approach that allows Shannon entropy (H) to be directly used to measure the amount of uncertainty that the genetic machinery has in relation to the correct decoding of a message transmitted into the nucleus by a signaling pathway. From the value of H we can define a function I that measures the amount of

  9. Genetic interaction network of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae type 1 phosphatase Glc7

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Michael R; Nguyen, Thao; Szapiel, Nicolas; Knockleby, James; Por, Hanting; Zadworny, Megan; Neszt, Michael; Harrison, Paul; Bussey, Howard; Mandato, Craig A; Vogel, Jackie; Lesage, Guillaume

    2008-01-01

    Background Protein kinases and phosphatases regulate protein phosphorylation, a critical means of modulating protein function, stability and localization. The identification of functional networks for protein phosphatases has been slow due to their redundant nature and the lack of large-scale analyses. We hypothesized that a genome-scale analysis of genetic interactions using the Synthetic Genetic Array could reveal protein phosphatase functional networks. We apply this approach to the conserved type 1 protein phosphatase Glc7, which regulates numerous cellular processes in budding yeast. Results We created a novel glc7 catalytic mutant (glc7-E101Q). Phenotypic analysis indicates that this novel allele exhibits slow growth and defects in glucose metabolism but normal cell cycle progression and chromosome segregation. This suggests that glc7-E101Q is a hypomorphic glc7 mutant. Synthetic Genetic Array analysis of glc7-E101Q revealed a broad network of 245 synthetic sick/lethal interactions reflecting that many processes are required when Glc7 function is compromised such as histone modification, chromosome segregation and cytokinesis, nutrient sensing and DNA damage. In addition, mitochondrial activity and inheritance and lipid metabolism were identified as new processes involved in buffering Glc7 function. An interaction network among 95 genes genetically interacting with GLC7 was constructed by integration of genetic and physical interaction data. The obtained network has a modular architecture, and the interconnection among the modules reflects the cooperation of the processes buffering Glc7 function. Conclusion We found 245 genes required for the normal growth of the glc7-E101Q mutant. Functional grouping of these genes and analysis of their physical and genetic interaction patterns bring new information on Glc7-regulated processes. PMID:18627629

  10. A Unifying Mathematical Framework for Genetic Robustness, Environmental Robustness, Network Robustness and their Trade-offs on Phenotype Robustness in Biological Networks. Part III: Synthetic Gene Networks in Synthetic Biology

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bor-Sen; Lin, Ying-Po

    2013-01-01

    Robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation are ubiquitous systematic properties that are observed in biological systems at many different levels. The underlying principles for robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation are universal to both complex biological systems and sophisticated engineering systems. In many biological networks, network robustness should be large enough to confer: intrinsic robustness for tolerating intrinsic parameter fluctuations; genetic robustness for buffering genetic variations; and environmental robustness for resisting environmental disturbances. Network robustness is needed so phenotype stability of biological network can be maintained, guaranteeing phenotype robustness. Synthetic biology is foreseen to have important applications in biotechnology and medicine; it is expected to contribute significantly to a better understanding of functioning of complex biological systems. This paper presents a unifying mathematical framework for investigating the principles of both robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation for synthetic gene networks in synthetic biology. Further, from the unifying mathematical framework, we found that the phenotype robustness criterion for synthetic gene networks is the following: if intrinsic robustness + genetic robustness + environmental robustness ≦ network robustness, then the phenotype robustness can be maintained in spite of intrinsic parameter fluctuations, genetic variations, and environmental disturbances. Therefore, the trade-offs between intrinsic robustness, genetic robustness, environmental robustness, and network robustness in synthetic biology can also be investigated through corresponding phenotype robustness criteria from the systematic point of view. Finally, a robust synthetic design that involves network evolution algorithms with desired behavior under intrinsic parameter fluctuations, genetic variations, and environmental

  11. Involvement of mesolimbic dopaminergic network in neuropathic pain relief by treadmill exercise

    PubMed Central

    Wakaizumi, Kenta; Kondo, Takashige; Hamada, Yusuke; Narita, Michiko; Kawabe, Rui; Narita, Hiroki; Watanabe, Moe; Kato, Shigeki; Senba, Emiko; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Yamanaka, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    Background Exercise alleviates pain and it is a central component of treatment strategy for chronic pain in clinical setting. However, little is known about mechanism of this exercise-induced hypoalgesia. The mesolimbic dopaminergic network plays a role in positive emotions to rewards including motivation and pleasure. Pain negatively modulates these emotions, but appropriate exercise is considered to activate the dopaminergic network. We investigated possible involvement of this network as a mechanism of exercise-induced hypoalgesia. Methods In the present study, we developed a protocol of treadmill exercise, which was able to recover pain threshold under partial sciatic nerve ligation in mice, and investigated involvement of the dopaminergic reward network in exercise-induced hypoalgesia. To temporally suppress a neural activation during exercise, a genetically modified inhibitory G-protein-coupled receptor, hM4Di, was specifically expressed on dopaminergic pathway from the ventral tegmental area to the nucleus accumbens. Results The chemogenetic-specific neural suppression by Gi-DREADD system dramatically offset the effect of exercise-induced hypoalgesia in transgenic mice with hM4Di expressed on the ventral tegmental area dopamine neurons. Additionally, anti-exercise-induced hypoalgesia effect was significantly observed under the suppression of neurons projecting out of the ventral tegmental area to the nucleus accumbens as well. Conclusion Our findings suggest that the dopaminergic pathway from the ventral tegmental area to the nucleus accumbens is involved in the anti-nociception under low-intensity exercise under a neuropathic pain-like state. PMID:27909152

  12. In silico Transcriptional Regulatory Networks Involved in Tomato Fruit Ripening

    PubMed Central

    Arhondakis, Stilianos; Bita, Craita E.; Perrakis, Andreas; Manioudaki, Maria E.; Krokida, Afroditi; Kaloudas, Dimitrios; Kalaitzis, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Tomato fruit ripening is a complex developmental programme partly mediated by transcriptional regulatory networks. Several transcription factors (TFs) which are members of gene families such as MADS-box and ERF were shown to play a significant role in ripening through interconnections into an intricate network. The accumulation of large datasets of expression profiles corresponding to different stages of tomato fruit ripening and the availability of bioinformatics tools for their analysis provide an opportunity to identify TFs which might regulate gene clusters with similar co-expression patterns. We identified two TFs, a SlWRKY22-like and a SlER24 transcriptional activator which were shown to regulate modules by using the LeMoNe algorithm for the analysis of our microarray datasets representing four stages of fruit ripening, breaker, turning, pink and red ripe. The WRKY22-like module comprised a subgroup of six various calcium sensing transcripts with similar to the TF expression patterns according to real time PCR validation. A promoter motif search identified a cis acting element, the W-box, recognized by WRKY TFs that was present in the promoter region of all six calcium sensing genes. Moreover, publicly available microarray datasets of similar ripening stages were also analyzed with LeMoNe resulting in TFs such as SlERF.E1, SlERF.C1, SlERF.B2, SLERF.A2, SlWRKY24, SLWRKY37, and MADS-box/TM29 which might also play an important role in regulation of ripening. These results suggest that the SlWRKY22-like might be involved in the coordinated regulation of expression of the six calcium sensing genes. Conclusively the LeMoNe tool might lead to the identification of putative TF targets for further physiological analysis as regulators of tomato fruit ripening. PMID:27625653

  13. Predicting genetic interactions from Boolean models of biological networks.

    PubMed

    Calzone, Laurence; Barillot, Emmanuel; Zinovyev, Andrei

    2015-08-01

    Genetic interaction can be defined as a deviation of the phenotypic quantitative effect of a double gene mutation from the effect predicted from single mutations using a simple (e.g., multiplicative or linear additive) statistical model. Experimentally characterized genetic interaction networks in model organisms provide important insights into relationships between different biological functions. We describe a computational methodology allowing us to systematically and quantitatively characterize a Boolean mathematical model of a biological network in terms of genetic interactions between all loss of function and gain of function mutations with respect to all model phenotypes or outputs. We use the probabilistic framework defined in MaBoSS software, based on continuous time Markov chains and stochastic simulations. In addition, we suggest several computational tools for studying the distribution of double mutants in the space of model phenotype probabilities. We demonstrate this methodology on three published models for each of which we derive the genetic interaction networks and analyze their properties. We classify the obtained interactions according to their class of epistasis, dependence on the chosen initial conditions and the phenotype. The use of this methodology for validating mathematical models from experimental data and designing new experiments is discussed.

  14. Fusion techniques of fuzzy systems and neural networks, and fuzzy systems and genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Hideyuki

    1993-12-01

    This paper overviews four combinations of fuzzy logic, neural networks and genetic algorithms: (1) neural networks to auto-design fuzzy systems, (2) employing fuzzy rule structure to construct structured neural networks, (3) genetic algorithms to auto-design fuzzy systems, and (4) a fuzzy knowledge-based system to control genetic parameter dynamically.

  15. Enhanced energy transport in genetically engineered excitonic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Heechul; Heldman, Nimrod; Rebentrost, Patrick; Abbondanza, Luigi; Iagatti, Alessandro; Alessi, Andrea; Patrizi, Barbara; Salvalaggio, Mario; Bussotti, Laura; Mohseni, Masoud; Caruso, Filippo; Johnsen, Hannah C.; Fusco, Roberto; Foggi, Paolo; Scudo, Petra F.; Lloyd, Seth; Belcher, Angela M.

    2016-02-01

    One of the challenges for achieving efficient exciton transport in solar energy conversion systems is precise structural control of the light-harvesting building blocks. Here, we create a tunable material consisting of a connected chromophore network on an ordered biological virus template. Using genetic engineering, we establish a link between the inter-chromophoric distances and emerging transport properties. The combination of spectroscopy measurements and dynamic modelling enables us to elucidate quantum coherent and classical incoherent energy transport at room temperature. Through genetic modifications, we obtain a significant enhancement of exciton diffusion length of about 68% in an intermediate quantum-classical regime.

  16. Identification of Resting State Networks Involved in Executive Function.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Joanna; McNulty, Jonathan P; Boran, Lorraine; Roche, Richard A P; Delany, David; Bokde, Arun L W

    2016-06-01

    The structural networks in the human brain are consistent across subjects, and this is reflected also in that functional networks across subjects are relatively consistent. These findings are not only present during performance of a goal oriented task but there are also consistent functional networks during resting state. It suggests that goal oriented activation patterns may be a function of component networks identified using resting state. The current study examines the relationship between resting state networks measured and patterns of neural activation elicited during a Stroop task. The association between the Stroop-activated networks and the resting state networks was quantified using spatial linear regression. In addition, we investigated if the degree of spatial association of resting state networks with the Stroop task may predict performance on the Stroop task. The results of this investigation demonstrated that the Stroop activated network can be decomposed into a number of resting state networks, which were primarily associated with attention, executive function, visual perception, and the default mode network. The close spatial correspondence between the functional organization of the resting brain and task-evoked patterns supports the relevance of resting state networks in cognitive function.

  17. Simulating and Synthesizing Substructures Using Neural Network and Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Youhua; Kapania, Rakesh K.; VanLandingham, Hugh F.

    1997-01-01

    The feasibility of simulating and synthesizing substructures by computational neural network models is illustrated by investigating a statically indeterminate beam, using both a 1-D and a 2-D plane stress modelling. The beam can be decomposed into two cantilevers with free-end loads. By training neural networks to simulate the cantilever responses to different loads, the original beam problem can be solved as a match-up between two subsystems under compatible interface conditions. The genetic algorithms are successfully used to solve the match-up problem. Simulated results are found in good agreement with the analytical or FEM solutions.

  18. Precise Network Modeling of Systems Genetics Data Using the Bayesian Network Webserver.

    PubMed

    Ziebarth, Jesse D; Cui, Yan

    2017-01-01

    The Bayesian Network Webserver (BNW, http://compbio.uthsc.edu/BNW ) is an integrated platform for Bayesian network modeling of biological datasets. It provides a web-based network modeling environment that seamlessly integrates advanced algorithms for probabilistic causal modeling and reasoning with Bayesian networks. BNW is designed for precise modeling of relatively small networks that contain less than 20 nodes. The structure learning algorithms used by BNW guarantee the discovery of the best (most probable) network structure given the data. To facilitate network modeling across multiple biological levels, BNW provides a very flexible interface that allows users to assign network nodes into different tiers and define the relationships between and within the tiers. This function is particularly useful for modeling systems genetics datasets that often consist of multiscalar heterogeneous genotype-to-phenotype data. BNW enables users to, within seconds or minutes, go from having a simply formatted input file containing a dataset to using a network model to make predictions about the interactions between variables and the potential effects of experimental interventions. In this chapter, we will introduce the functions of BNW and show how to model systems genetics datasets with BNW.

  19. Gene network inference via structural equation modeling in genetical genomics experiments.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bing; de la Fuente, Alberto; Hoeschele, Ina

    2008-03-01

    Our goal is gene network inference in genetical genomics or systems genetics experiments. For species where sequence information is available, we first perform expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) mapping by jointly utilizing cis-, cis-trans-, and trans-regulation. After using local structural models to identify regulator-target pairs for each eQTL, we construct an encompassing directed network (EDN) by assembling all retained regulator-target relationships. The EDN has nodes corresponding to expressed genes and eQTL and directed edges from eQTL to cis-regulated target genes, from cis-regulated genes to cis-trans-regulated target genes, from trans-regulator genes to target genes, and from trans-eQTL to target genes. For network inference within the strongly constrained search space defined by the EDN, we propose structural equation modeling (SEM), because it can model cyclic networks and the EDN indeed contains feedback relationships. On the basis of a factorization of the likelihood and the constrained search space, our SEM algorithm infers networks involving several hundred genes and eQTL. Structure inference is based on a penalized likelihood ratio and an adaptation of Occam's window model selection. The SEM algorithm was evaluated using data simulated with nonlinear ordinary differential equations and known cyclic network topologies and was applied to a real yeast data set.

  20. Rewiring of genetic networks in response to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Sourav; Mehta, Monika; Kuo, Dwight; Sung, Min-Kyung; Chuang, Ryan; Jaehnig, Eric J; Bodenmiller, Bernd; Licon, Katherine; Copeland, Wilbert; Shales, Michael; Fiedler, Dorothea; Dutkowski, Janusz; Guénolé, Aude; van Attikum, Haico; Shokat, Kevan M; Kolodner, Richard D; Huh, Won-Ki; Aebersold, Ruedi; Keogh, Michael-Christopher; Krogan, Nevan J; Ideker, Trey

    2010-12-03

    Although cellular behaviors are dynamic, the networks that govern these behaviors have been mapped primarily as static snapshots. Using an approach called differential epistasis mapping, we have discovered widespread changes in genetic interaction among yeast kinases, phosphatases, and transcription factors as the cell responds to DNA damage. Differential interactions uncover many gene functions that go undetected in static conditions. They are very effective at identifying DNA repair pathways, highlighting new damage-dependent roles for the Slt2 kinase, Pph3 phosphatase, and histone variant Htz1. The data also reveal that protein complexes are generally stable in response to perturbation, but the functional relations between these complexes are substantially reorganized. Differential networks chart a new type of genetic landscape that is invaluable for mapping cellular responses to stimuli.

  1. MAC Protocol for Ad Hoc Networks Using a Genetic Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Elizarraras, Omar; Panduro, Marco; Méndez, Aldo L.

    2014-01-01

    The problem of obtaining the transmission rate in an ad hoc network consists in adjusting the power of each node to ensure the signal to interference ratio (SIR) and the energy required to transmit from one node to another is obtained at the same time. Therefore, an optimal transmission rate for each node in a medium access control (MAC) protocol based on CSMA-CDMA (carrier sense multiple access-code division multiple access) for ad hoc networks can be obtained using evolutionary optimization. This work proposes a genetic algorithm for the transmission rate election considering a perfect power control, and our proposition achieves improvement of 10% compared with the scheme that handles the handshaking phase to adjust the transmission rate. Furthermore, this paper proposes a genetic algorithm that solves the problem of power combining, interference, data rate, and energy ensuring the signal to interference ratio in an ad hoc network. The result of the proposed genetic algorithm has a better performance (15%) compared to the CSMA-CDMA protocol without optimizing. Therefore, we show by simulation the effectiveness of the proposed protocol in terms of the throughput. PMID:25140339

  2. Disentangling genetic and environmental risk factors for individual diseases from multiplex comorbidity networks

    PubMed Central

    Klimek, Peter; Aichberger, Silke; Thurner, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Most disorders are caused by a combination of multiple genetic and/or environmental factors. If two diseases are caused by the same molecular mechanism, they tend to co-occur in patients. Here we provide a quantitative method to disentangle how much genetic or environmental risk factors contribute to the pathogenesis of 358 individual diseases, respectively. We pool data on genetic, pathway-based, and toxicogenomic disease-causing mechanisms with disease co-occurrence data obtained from almost two million patients. From this data we construct a multiplex network where nodes represent disorders that are connected by links that either represent phenotypic comorbidity of the patients or the involvement of a certain molecular mechanism. From the similarity of phenotypic and mechanism-based networks for each disorder we derive measure that allows us to quantify the relative importance of various molecular mechanisms for a given disease. We find that most diseases are dominated by genetic risk factors, while environmental influences prevail for disorders such as depressions, cancers, or dermatitis. Almost never we find that more than one type of mechanisms is involved in the pathogenesis of diseases. PMID:28008973

  3. Disentangling genetic and environmental risk factors for individual diseases from multiplex comorbidity networks.

    PubMed

    Klimek, Peter; Aichberger, Silke; Thurner, Stefan

    2016-12-23

    Most disorders are caused by a combination of multiple genetic and/or environmental factors. If two diseases are caused by the same molecular mechanism, they tend to co-occur in patients. Here we provide a quantitative method to disentangle how much genetic or environmental risk factors contribute to the pathogenesis of 358 individual diseases, respectively. We pool data on genetic, pathway-based, and toxicogenomic disease-causing mechanisms with disease co-occurrence data obtained from almost two million patients. From this data we construct a multiplex network where nodes represent disorders that are connected by links that either represent phenotypic comorbidity of the patients or the involvement of a certain molecular mechanism. From the similarity of phenotypic and mechanism-based networks for each disorder we derive measure that allows us to quantify the relative importance of various molecular mechanisms for a given disease. We find that most diseases are dominated by genetic risk factors, while environmental influences prevail for disorders such as depressions, cancers, or dermatitis. Almost never we find that more than one type of mechanisms is involved in the pathogenesis of diseases.

  4. Towards a predictive theory for genetic regulatory networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkacik, Gasper

    When cells respond to changes in the environment by regulating the expression levels of their genes, we often draw parallels between these biological processes and engineered information processing systems. One can go beyond this qualitative analogy, however, by analyzing information transmission in biochemical ``hardware'' using Shannon's information theory. Here, gene regulation is viewed as a transmission channel operating under restrictive constraints set by the resource costs and intracellular noise. We present a series of results demonstrating that a theory of information transmission in genetic regulatory circuits feasibly yields non-trivial, testable predictions. These predictions concern strategies by which individual gene regulatory elements, e.g., promoters or enhancers, read out their signals; as well as strategies by which small networks of genes, independently or in spatially coupled settings, respond to their inputs. These predictions can be quantitatively compared to the known regulatory networks and their function, and can elucidate how reproducible biological processes, such as embryonic development, can be orchestrated by networks built out of noisy components. Preliminary successes in the gap gene network of the fruit fly Drosophila indicate that a full ab initio theoretical prediction of a regulatory network is possible, a feat that has not yet been achieved for any real regulatory network. We end by describing open challenges on the path towards such a prediction.

  5. Molecular genetic analysis of activation-tagged transcription factors thought to be involved in photomorphogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Neff, Michael M.

    2011-06-23

    This is a final report for Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-08ER15927 entitled “Molecular Genetic Analysis of Activation-Tagged Transcription Factors Thought to be Involved in Photomorphogenesis”. Based on our preliminary photobiological and genetic analysis of the sob1-D mutant, we hypothesized that OBP3 is a transcription factor involved in both phytochrome and cryptochrome-mediated signal transduction. In addition, we hypothesized that OBP3 is involved in auxin signaling and root development. Based on our preliminary photobiological and genetic analysis of the sob2-D mutant, we also hypothesized that a related gene, LEP, is involved in hormone signaling and seedling development.

  6. Issues impacting genetic network reverse engineering algorithm validation using small networks.

    PubMed

    Vinh, Nguyen Xuan; Chetty, Madhu; Coppel, Ross; Wangikar, Pramod P

    2012-12-01

    Genetic network reverse engineering has been an area of intensive research within the systems biology community during the last decade. With many techniques currently available, the task of validating them and choosing the best one for a certain problem is a complex issue. Current practice has been to validate an approach on in-silico synthetic data sets, and, wherever possible, on real data sets with known ground-truth. In this study, we highlight a major issue that the validation of reverse engineering algorithms on small benchmark networks very often results in networks which are not statistically better than a randomly picked network. Another important issue highlighted is that with short time series, a small variation in the pre-processing procedure might yield large differences in the inferred networks. To demonstrate these issues, we have selected as our case study the IRMA in-vivo synthetic yeast network recently published in Cell. Using Fisher's exact test, we show that many results reported in the literature on reverse-engineering this network are not significantly better than random. The discussion is further extended to some other networks commonly used for validation purposes in the literature. The results presented in this study emphasize that studies carried out using small genetic networks are likely to be trivial, making it imperative that larger real networks be used for validating and benchmarking purposes. If smaller networks are considered, then the results should be interpreted carefully to avoid over confidence. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Computational Methods for Protein Interaction and Structural Prediction.

  7. Quantitative Genetics Identifies Cryptic Genetic Variation Involved in the Paternal Regulation of Seed Development.

    PubMed

    Pires, Nuno D; Bemer, Marian; Müller, Lena M; Baroux, Célia; Spillane, Charles; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic development requires a correct balancing of maternal and paternal genetic information. This balance is mediated by genomic imprinting, an epigenetic mechanism that leads to parent-of-origin-dependent gene expression. The parental conflict (or kinship) theory proposes that imprinting can evolve due to a conflict between maternal and paternal alleles over resource allocation during seed development. One assumption of this theory is that paternal alleles can regulate seed growth; however, paternal effects on seed size are often very low or non-existent. We demonstrate that there is a pool of cryptic genetic variation in the paternal control of Arabidopsis thaliana seed development. Such cryptic variation can be exposed in seeds that maternally inherit a medea mutation, suggesting that MEA acts as a maternal buffer of paternal effects. Genetic mapping using recombinant inbred lines, and a novel method for the mapping of parent-of-origin effects using whole-genome sequencing of segregant bulks, indicate that there are at least six loci with small, paternal effects on seed development. Together, our analyses reveal the existence of a pool of hidden genetic variation on the paternal control of seed development that is likely shaped by parental conflict.

  8. Quantitative Genetics Identifies Cryptic Genetic Variation Involved in the Paternal Regulation of Seed Development

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Nuno D.; Bemer, Marian; Müller, Lena M.; Baroux, Célia; Spillane, Charles; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic development requires a correct balancing of maternal and paternal genetic information. This balance is mediated by genomic imprinting, an epigenetic mechanism that leads to parent-of-origin-dependent gene expression. The parental conflict (or kinship) theory proposes that imprinting can evolve due to a conflict between maternal and paternal alleles over resource allocation during seed development. One assumption of this theory is that paternal alleles can regulate seed growth; however, paternal effects on seed size are often very low or non-existent. We demonstrate that there is a pool of cryptic genetic variation in the paternal control of Arabidopsis thaliana seed development. Such cryptic variation can be exposed in seeds that maternally inherit a medea mutation, suggesting that MEA acts as a maternal buffer of paternal effects. Genetic mapping using recombinant inbred lines, and a novel method for the mapping of parent-of-origin effects using whole-genome sequencing of segregant bulks, indicate that there are at least six loci with small, paternal effects on seed development. Together, our analyses reveal the existence of a pool of hidden genetic variation on the paternal control of seed development that is likely shaped by parental conflict. PMID:26811909

  9. Comparison and evaluation of network clustering algorithms applied to genetic interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Hou, Lin; Wang, Lin; Berg, Arthur; Qian, Minping; Zhu, Yunping; Li, Fangting; Deng, Minghua

    2012-01-01

    The goal of network clustering algorithms detect dense clusters in a network, and provide a first step towards the understanding of large scale biological networks. With numerous recent advances in biotechnologies, large-scale genetic interactions are widely available, but there is a limited understanding of which clustering algorithms may be most effective. In order to address this problem, we conducted a systematic study to compare and evaluate six clustering algorithms in analyzing genetic interaction networks, and investigated influencing factors in choosing algorithms. The algorithms considered in this comparison include hierarchical clustering, topological overlap matrix, bi-clustering, Markov clustering, Bayesian discriminant analysis based community detection, and variational Bayes approach to modularity. Both experimentally identified and synthetically constructed networks were used in this comparison. The accuracy of the algorithms is measured by the Jaccard index in comparing predicted gene modules with benchmark gene sets. The results suggest that the choice differs according to the network topology and evaluation criteria. Hierarchical clustering showed to be best at predicting protein complexes; Bayesian discriminant analysis based community detection proved best under epistatic miniarray profile (EMAP) datasets; the variational Bayes approach to modularity was noticeably better than the other algorithms in the genome-scale networks.

  10. Engineering microbial phenotypes through rewiring of genetic networks.

    PubMed

    Windram, Oliver P F; Rodrigues, Rui T L; Lee, Sangjin; Haines, Matthew; Bayer, Travis S

    2017-03-21

    The ability to program cellular behaviour is a major goal of synthetic biology, with applications in health, agriculture and chemicals production. Despite efforts to build 'orthogonal' systems, interactions between engineered genetic circuits and the endogenous regulatory network of a host cell can have a significant impact on desired functionality. We have developed a strategy to rewire the endogenous cellular regulatory network of yeast to enhance compatibility with synthetic protein and metabolite production. We found that introducing novel connections in the cellular regulatory network enabled us to increase the production of heterologous proteins and metabolites. This strategy is demonstrated in yeast strains that show significantly enhanced heterologous protein expression and higher titers of terpenoid production. Specifically, we found that the addition of transcriptional regulation between free radical induced signalling and nitrogen regulation provided robust improvement of protein production. Assessment of rewired networks revealed the importance of key topological features such as high betweenness centrality. The generation of rewired transcriptional networks, selection for specific phenotypes, and analysis of resulting library members is a powerful tool for engineering cellular behavior and may enable improved integration of heterologous protein and metabolite pathways.

  11. A candidate multimodal functional genetic network for thermal adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Rachana; Prajapati, Indira; Bankston, Shannon; Thompson, Aprylle; Usher, Jaytriece; Isokpehi, Raphael D.

    2014-01-01

    Vertebrate ectotherms such as reptiles provide ideal organisms for the study of adaptation to environmental thermal change. Comparative genomic and exomic studies can recover markers that diverge between warm and cold adapted lineages, but the genes that are functionally related to thermal adaptation may be difficult to identify. We here used a bioinformatics genome-mining approach to predict and identify functions for suitable candidate markers for thermal adaptation in the chicken. We first established a framework of candidate functions for such markers, and then compiled the literature on genes known to adapt to the thermal environment in different lineages of vertebrates. We then identified them in the genomes of human, chicken, and the lizard Anolis carolinensis, and established a functional genetic interaction network in the chicken. Surprisingly, markers initially identified from diverse lineages of vertebrates such as human and fish were all in close functional relationship with each other and more associated than expected by chance. This indicates that the general genetic functional network for thermoregulation and/or thermal adaptation to the environment might be regulated via similar evolutionarily conserved pathways in different vertebrate lineages. We were able to identify seven functions that were statistically overrepresented in this network, corresponding to four of our originally predicted functions plus three unpredicted functions. We describe this network as multimodal: central regulator genes with the function of relaying thermal signal (1), affect genes with different cellular functions, namely (2) lipoprotein metabolism, (3) membrane channels, (4) stress response, (5) response to oxidative stress, (6) muscle contraction and relaxation, and (7) vasodilation, vasoconstriction and regulation of blood pressure. This network constitutes a novel resource for the study of thermal adaptation in the closely related nonavian reptiles and other

  12. Networks of genetic loci and the scientific literature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semeiks, J. R.; Grate, L. R.; Mian, I. S.

    This work considers biological information graphs, networks in which nodes corre-spond to genetic loci (or "genes") and an (undirected) edge signifies that two genes are discussed in the same article(s) in the scientific literature ("documents"). Operations that utilize the topology of these graphs can assist researchers in the scientific discovery process. For example, a shortest path between two nodes defines an ordered series of genes and documents that can be used to explore the relationship(s) between genes of interest. This work (i) describes how topologies in which edges are likely to reflect genuine relationship(s) can be constructed from human-curated corpora of genes an-notated with documents (or vice versa), and (ii) illustrates the potential of biological information graphs in synthesizing knowledge in order to formulate new hypotheses and generate novel predictions for subsequent experimental study. In particular, the well-known LocusLink corpus is used to construct a biological information graph consisting of 10,297 nodes and 21,910 edges. The large-scale statistical properties of this gene-document network suggest that it is a new example of a power-law network. The segregation of genes on the basis of species and encoded protein molecular function indicate the presence of assortativity, the preference for nodes with similar attributes to be neighbors in a network. The practical utility of a gene-document network is illustrated by using measures such as shortest paths and centrality to analyze a subset of nodes corresponding to genes implicated in aging. Each release of a curated biomedical corpus defines a particular static graph. The topology of a gene-document network changes over time as curators add and/or remove nodes and/or edges. Such a dynamic, evolving corpus provides both the foundation for analyzing the growth and behavior of large complex networks and a substrate for examining trends in biological research.

  13. Superiority of artificial neural networks for a genetic classification procedure.

    PubMed

    Sant'Anna, I C; Tomaz, R S; Silva, G N; Nascimento, M; Bhering, L L; Cruz, C D

    2015-08-19

    The correct classification of individuals is extremely important for the preservation of genetic variability and for maximization of yield in breeding programs using phenotypic traits and genetic markers. The Fisher and Anderson discriminant functions are commonly used multivariate statistical techniques for these situations, which allow for the allocation of an initially unknown individual to predefined groups. However, for higher levels of similarity, such as those found in backcrossed populations, these methods have proven to be inefficient. Recently, much research has been devoted to developing a new paradigm of computing known as artificial neural networks (ANNs), which can be used to solve many statistical problems, including classification problems. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of ANNs as an evaluation technique of genetic diversity by comparing their performance with that of traditional methods. The discriminant functions were equally ineffective in discriminating the populations, with error rates of 23-82%, thereby preventing the correct discrimination of individuals between populations. The ANN was effective in classifying populations with low and high differentiation, such as those derived from a genetic design established from backcrosses, even in cases of low differentiation of the data sets. The ANN appears to be a promising technique to solve classification problems, since the number of individuals classified incorrectly by the ANN was always lower than that of the discriminant functions. We envisage the potential relevant application of this improved procedure in the genomic classification of markers to distinguish between breeds and accessions.

  14. The role of social networking sites in medical genetics research.

    PubMed

    Reaves, Allison Cook; Bianchi, Diana W

    2013-05-01

    Social networking sites (SNS) have potential value in the field of medical genetics as a means of research subject recruitment and source of data. This article examines the current role of SNS in medical genetics research and potential applications for these sites in future studies. Facebook is the primary SNS considered, given the prevalence of its use in the United States and role in a small but growing number of studies. To date, utilization of SNS in medical genetics research has been primarily limited to three studies that recruited subjects from populations of Facebook users [McGuire et al. (2009); Am J Bioeth 9: 3-10; Janvier et al. (2012); Pediatrics 130: 293-298; Leighton et al. (2012); Public Health Genomics 15: 11-21]. These studies and a number of other medical and public health studies that have used Facebook as a context for recruiting research subjects are discussed. Approaches for Facebook-based subject recruitment are identified, including paid Facebook advertising, snowball sampling, targeted searching and posting. The use of these methods in medical genetics research has the potential to facilitate cost-effective research on both large, heterogeneous populations and small, hard-to-access sub-populations.

  15. Differential Network Analysis Reveals Genetic Effects on Catalepsy Modules

    PubMed Central

    Iancu, Ovidiu D.; Oberbeck, Denesa; Darakjian, Priscila; Kawane, Sunita; Erk, Jason; McWeeney, Shannon; Hitzemann, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We performed short-term bi-directional selective breeding for haloperidol-induced catalepsy, starting from three mouse populations of increasingly complex genetic structure: an F2 intercross, a heterogeneous stock (HS) formed by crossing four inbred strains (HS4) and a heterogeneous stock (HS-CC) formed from the inbred strain founders of the Collaborative Cross (CC). All three selections were successful, with large differences in haloperidol response emerging within three generations. Using a custom differential network analysis procedure, we found that gene coexpression patterns changed significantly; importantly, a number of these changes were concordant across genetic backgrounds. In contrast, absolute gene-expression changes were modest and not concordant across genetic backgrounds, in spite of the large and similar phenotypic differences. By inferring strain contributions from the parental lines, we are able to identify significant differences in allelic content between the selected lines concurrent with large changes in transcript connectivity. Importantly, this observation implies that genetic polymorphisms can affect transcript and module connectivity without large changes in absolute expression levels. We conclude that, in this case, selective breeding acts at the subnetwork level, with the same modules but not the same transcripts affected across the three selections. PMID:23555609

  16. NACE: A web-based tool for prediction of intercompartmental efficiency of human molecular genetic networks.

    PubMed

    Popik, Olga V; Ivanisenko, Timofey V; Saik, Olga V; Petrovskiy, Evgeny D; Lavrik, Inna N; Ivanisenko, Vladimir A

    2016-06-15

    Molecular genetic processes generally involve proteins from distinct intracellular localisations. Reactions that follow the same process are distributed among various compartments within the cell. In this regard, the reaction rate and the efficiency of biological processes can depend on the subcellular localisation of proteins. Previously, the authors proposed a method of evaluating the efficiency of biological processes based on the analysis of the distribution of protein subcellular localisation (Popik et al., 2014). Here, NACE is presented, which is an open access web-oriented program that implements this method and allows the user to evaluate the intercompartmental efficiency of human molecular genetic networks. The method has been extended by a new feature that provides the evaluation of the tissue-specific efficiency of networks for more than 2800 anatomical structures. Such assessments are important in cases when molecular genetic pathways in different tissues proceed with the participation of various proteins with a number of intracellular localisations. For example, an analysis of KEGG pathways, conducted using the developed program, showed that the efficiencies of many KEGG pathways are tissue-specific. Analysis of efficiencies of regulatory pathways in the liver, linking proteins of the hepatitis C virus with human proteins involved in the KEGG apoptosis pathway, showed that intercompartmental efficiency might play an important role in host-pathogen interactions. Thus, the developed tool can be useful in the study of the effectiveness of functioning of various molecular genetic networks, including metabolic, regulatory, host-pathogen interactions and others taking into account tissue-specific gene expression. The tool is available via the following link: http://www-bionet.sscc.ru/nace/.

  17. Multilevel modeling for inference of genetic regulatory networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Shu-Kay; Wang, Kui; McLachlan, Geoffrey J.

    2005-12-01

    Time-course experiments with microarrays are often used to study dynamic biological systems and genetic regulatory networks (GRNs) that model how genes influence each other in cell-level development of organisms. The inference for GRNs provides important insights into the fundamental biological processes such as growth and is useful in disease diagnosis and genomic drug design. Due to the experimental design, multilevel data hierarchies are often present in time-course gene expression data. Most existing methods, however, ignore the dependency of the expression measurements over time and the correlation among gene expression profiles. Such independence assumptions violate regulatory interactions and can result in overlooking certain important subject effects and lead to spurious inference for regulatory networks or mechanisms. In this paper, a multilevel mixed-effects model is adopted to incorporate data hierarchies in the analysis of time-course data, where temporal and subject effects are both assumed to be random. The method starts with the clustering of genes by fitting the mixture model within the multilevel random-effects model framework using the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm. The network of regulatory interactions is then determined by searching for regulatory control elements (activators and inhibitors) shared by the clusters of co-expressed genes, based on a time-lagged correlation coefficients measurement. The method is applied to two real time-course datasets from the budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) genome. It is shown that the proposed method provides clusters of cell-cycle regulated genes that are supported by existing gene function annotations, and hence enables inference on regulatory interactions for the genetic network.

  18. Genetic effect on blood pressure is modulated by age: the Hypertension Genetic Epidemiology Network Study.

    PubMed

    Shi, Gang; Gu, Chi C; Kraja, Aldi T; Arnett, Donna K; Myers, Richard H; Pankow, James S; Hunt, Steven C; Rao, Dabeeru C

    2009-01-01

    Genome-wide linkage analysis was performed for systolic and diastolic blood pressures in the Hypertension Genetic Epidemiology Network. We investigated the role of gene-age interactions using a recently developed variance components method that incorporates age variation in genetic effects. Substantially improved linkage evidence, in terms of both the number of linkage peaks and their significance levels, was observed. Twenty-six linkage peaks were identified with maximum logarithm of odds scores ranging between 3.0 and 4.6, 15 of which were cross-validated by the literature. The chromosomal region 1p36 that showed the highest logarithm of odds score in our study was found to be supported by evidence from 3 studies. The new method also led to vastly improved validation across ethnic groups. Ten of the 15 supported linkage peaks were cross-validated between 2 different ethnic groups, and 2 peaks on chromosomal region 1q31 and 16p11 were validated in 3 ethnic groups. In conclusion, this investigation demonstrates that genetic effects on blood pressure vary by age. The improved genetic linkage results presented here should help to identify the specific genetic variants that explain the observed results.

  19. Between "design" and "bricolage": genetic networks, levels of selection, and adaptive evolution.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Adam S

    2007-05-15

    The extent to which "developmental constraints" in complex organisms restrict evolutionary directions remains contentious. Yet, other forms of internal constraint, which have received less attention, may also exist. It will be argued here that a set of partial constraints below the level of phenotypes, those involving genes and molecules, influences and channels the set of possible evolutionary trajectories. At the top-most organizational level there are the genetic network modules, whose operations directly underlie complex morphological traits. The properties of these network modules, however, have themselves been set by the evolutionary history of the component genes and their interactions. Characterization of the components, structures, and operational dynamics of specific genetic networks should lead to a better understanding not only of the morphological traits they underlie but of the biases that influence the directions of evolutionary change. Furthermore, such knowledge may permit assessment of the relative degrees of probability of short evolutionary trajectories, those on the microevolutionary scale. In effect, a "network perspective" may help transform evolutionary biology into a scientific enterprise with greater predictive capability than it has hitherto possessed.

  20. Design of artificial genetic regulatory networks with multiple delayed adaptive responses*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaluza, Pablo; Inoue, Masayo

    2016-06-01

    Genetic regulatory networks with adaptive responses are widely studied in biology. Usually, models consisting only of a few nodes have been considered. They present one input receptor for activation and one output node where the adaptive response is computed. In this work, we design genetic regulatory networks with many receptors and many output nodes able to produce delayed adaptive responses. This design is performed by using an evolutionary algorithm of mutations and selections that minimizes an error function defined by the adaptive response in signal shapes. We present several examples of network constructions with a predefined required set of adaptive delayed responses. We show that an output node can have different kinds of responses as a function of the activated receptor. Additionally, complex network structures are presented since processing nodes can be involved in several input-output pathways. Supplementary material in the form of one nets file available from the Journal web page at http://dx.doi.org/10.1140/epjb/e2016-70172-9

  1. Integrated systems approach identifies genetic nodes and networks in late-onset Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bin; Gaiteri, Chris; Bodea, Liviu-Gabriel; Wang, Zhi; McElwee, Joshua; Podtelezhnikov, Alexei A.; Zhang, Chunsheng; Xie, Tao; Tran, Linh; Dobrin, Radu; Fluder, Eugene; Clurman, Bruce; Melquist, Stacey; Narayanan, Manikandan; Suver, Christine; Shah, Hardik; Mahajan, Milind; Gillis, Tammy; Mysore, Jayalakshmi; MacDonald, Marcy E.; Lamb, John R.; Bennett, David A; Molony, Cliona; Stone, David J.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Myers, Amanda J.; Schadt, Eric E.; Neumann, Harald; Zhu, Jun; Emilsson, Valur

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The genetics of complex disease produce alterations in the molecular interactions of cellular pathways whose collective effect may become clear through the organized structure of molecular networks. To characterize molecular systems associated with late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD), we constructed gene regulatory networks in 1647 post-mortem brain tissues from LOAD patients and non-demented subjects, and demonstrate that LOAD reconfigures specific portions of the molecular interaction structure. Through an integrative network-based approach, we rank-ordered these network structures for relevance to LOAD pathology, highlighting an immune and microglia-specific module dominated by genes involved in pathogen phagocytosis, containing TYROBP as a key regulator and up-regulated in LOAD. Mouse microglia cells over-expressing intact or truncated TYROBP revealed expression changes that significantly overlapped the human brain TYROBP network. Thus the causal network structure is a useful predictor of response to gene perturbations and presents a novel framework to test models of disease mechanisms underlying LOAD. PMID:23622250

  2. Gene network and familial analyses uncover a gene network involving Tbx5/Osr1/Pcsk6 interaction in the second heart field for atrial septation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ke K.; Xiang, Menglan; Zhou, Lun; Liu, Jielin; Curry, Nathan; Heine Suñer, Damian; Garcia-Pavia, Pablo; Zhang, Xiaohua; Wang, Qin; Xie, Linglin

    2016-01-01

    Atrial septal defects (ASDs) are a common human congenital heart disease (CHD) that can be induced by genetic abnormalities. Our previous studies have demonstrated a genetic interaction between Tbx5 and Osr1 in the second heart field (SHF) for atrial septation. We hypothesized that Osr1 and Tbx5 share a common signaling networking and downstream targets for atrial septation. To identify this molecular networks, we acquired the RNA-Seq transcriptome data from the posterior SHF of wild-type, Tbx5+/−, Osr1+/−, Osr1−/− and Tbx5+/−/Osr1+/− mutant embryos. Gene set analysis was used to identify the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways that were affected by the doses of Tbx5 and Osr1. A gene network module involving Tbx5 and Osr1 was identified using a non-parametric distance metric, distance correlation. A subset of 10 core genes and gene–gene interactions in the network module were validated by gene expression alterations in posterior second heart field (pSHF) of Tbx5 and Osr1 transgenic mouse embryos, a time-course gene expression change during P19CL6 cell differentiation. Pcsk6 was one of the network module genes that were linked to Tbx5. We validated the direct regulation of Tbx5 on Pcsk6 using immunohistochemical staining of pSHF, ChIP-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and luciferase reporter assay. Importantly, we identified Pcsk6 as a novel gene associated with ASD via a human genotyping study of an ASD family. In summary, our study implicated a gene network involving Tbx5, Osr1 and Pcsk6 interaction in SHF for atrial septation, providing a molecular framework for understanding the role of Tbx5 in CHD ontogeny. PMID:26744331

  3. Gene network and familial analyses uncover a gene network involving Tbx5/Osr1/Pcsk6 interaction in the second heart field for atrial septation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ke K; Xiang, Menglan; Zhou, Lun; Liu, Jielin; Curry, Nathan; Heine Suñer, Damian; Garcia-Pavia, Pablo; Zhang, Xiaohua; Wang, Qin; Xie, Linglin

    2016-03-15

    Atrial septal defects (ASDs) are a common human congenital heart disease (CHD) that can be induced by genetic abnormalities. Our previous studies have demonstrated a genetic interaction between Tbx5 and Osr1 in the second heart field (SHF) for atrial septation. We hypothesized that Osr1 and Tbx5 share a common signaling networking and downstream targets for atrial septation. To identify this molecular networks, we acquired the RNA-Seq transcriptome data from the posterior SHF of wild-type, Tbx5(+/) (-), Osr1(+/-), Osr1(-/-) and Tbx5(+/-)/Osr1(+/-) mutant embryos. Gene set analysis was used to identify the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways that were affected by the doses of Tbx5 and Osr1. A gene network module involving Tbx5 and Osr1 was identified using a non-parametric distance metric, distance correlation. A subset of 10 core genes and gene-gene interactions in the network module were validated by gene expression alterations in posterior second heart field (pSHF) of Tbx5 and Osr1 transgenic mouse embryos, a time-course gene expression change during P19CL6 cell differentiation. Pcsk6 was one of the network module genes that were linked to Tbx5. We validated the direct regulation of Tbx5 on Pcsk6 using immunohistochemical staining of pSHF, ChIP-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and luciferase reporter assay. Importantly, we identified Pcsk6 as a novel gene associated with ASD via a human genotyping study of an ASD family. In summary, our study implicated a gene network involving Tbx5, Osr1 and Pcsk6 interaction in SHF for atrial septation, providing a molecular framework for understanding the role of Tbx5 in CHD ontogeny.

  4. Does Religious Involvement Protect against Early Drinking? A Behavior Genetic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harden, K. Paige

    2010-01-01

    Background: Adolescent involvement in religious organizations has been hypothesized to protect against early age at first drink. However, the correlation between adolescent religiosity and later age at first drink may be confounded by environmental or genetic differences between families. This study tests whether, after controlling for shared…

  5. Scaling up: human genetics as a Cold War network.

    PubMed

    Lindee, Susan

    2014-09-01

    In this commentary I explore how the papers here illuminate the processes of collection that have been so central to the history of human genetics since 1945. The development of human population genetics in the Cold War period produced databases and biobanks that have endured into the present, and that continue to be used and debated. In the decades after the bomb, scientists collected and transferred human biological materials and information from populations of interest, and as they moved these biological resources or biosocial resources acquired new meanings and uses. The papers here collate these practices and map their desires and ironies. They explore how a large international network of geneticists, biological anthropologists, virologists and other physicians and scientists interacted with local informants, research subjects and public officials. They also track the networks and standards that mobilized the transfer of information, genealogies, tissue and blood samples. As Joanna Radin suggests here, the massive collections of human biological materials and data were often understood to be resources for an "as-yet-unknown" future. The stories told here contain elements of surveillance, extraction, salvage and eschatology.

  6. Genetic network driven control of PHBV copolymer composition.

    PubMed

    Iadevaia, Sergio; Mantzaris, Nikos V

    2006-03-09

    We developed a detailed mathematical model describing the coupling between the molecular weight distribution dynamics of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) copolymer chains with those of hydroxybutyrate (HB) and hydroxyvalerate (HV) monomer formation. Sensitivity analysis of the model revealed that both the monomer composition and the molecular weight distribution of the copolymer chains are strongly affected by the ratio between the rates at which the two-monomer units are incorporated into the chains. This ratio depends on the relative HB and HV availability, which in turn is a function of the expression levels of genes encoding enzymes that catalyze monomer formation. Regulation of gene expression was accomplished through the aid of an artificial genetic network, the patterns of expression of which can be controlled by appropriately tuning the concentration of an extracellular inducer. Extensive simulations were used to study the effects of operating conditions and parameter uncertainties on the range of achievable copolymer compositions. Since the predicted conditions fell in the range of feasible bioprocessing manipulations, it is expected that such strategy could be successfully employed. Thus, the presented model constitutes a powerful tool for designing genetic networks that can drive the formation of PHBV copolymer structures with desirable characteristics.

  7. Global asymptotic stability of Hopfield neural network involving distributed delays.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongyong

    2004-01-01

    In the paper, we study dynamical behaviors of Hopfield neural networks system with distributed delays. Some new criteria ensuring the existence and uniqueness, and the global asymptotic stability (GAS) of equilibrium point are derived. In the results, we do not assume that the signal propagation functions satisfy the Lipschitz condition and do not require them to be bounded, differentiable or strictly increasing. Moreover, the symmetry of the connection matrix is not also necessary. Thus, we improve some previous works of other researchers. These conditions are presented in terms of system parameters and have importance leading significance in designs and applications of the GAS for Hopfield neural networks system with distributed delays. Two examples are also worked out to demonstrate the advantages of our results.

  8. Genetic specificity of a plant–insect food web: Implications for linking genetic variation to network complexity

    PubMed Central

    Barbour, Matthew A.; Fortuna, Miguel A.; Bascompte, Jordi; Nicholson, Joshua R.; Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta; Jules, Erik S.; Crutsinger, Gregory M.

    2016-01-01

    Theory predicts that intraspecific genetic variation can increase the complexity of an ecological network. To date, however, we are lacking empirical knowledge of the extent to which genetic variation determines the assembly of ecological networks, as well as how the gain or loss of genetic variation will affect network structure. To address this knowledge gap, we used a common garden experiment to quantify the extent to which heritable trait variation in a host plant determines the assembly of its associated insect food web (network of trophic interactions). We then used a resampling procedure to simulate the additive effects of genetic variation on overall food-web complexity. We found that trait variation among host-plant genotypes was associated with resistance to insect herbivores, which indirectly affected interactions between herbivores and their insect parasitoids. Direct and indirect genetic effects resulted in distinct compositions of trophic interactions associated with each host-plant genotype. Moreover, our simulations suggest that food-web complexity would increase by 20% over the range of genetic variation in the experimental population of host plants. Taken together, our results indicate that intraspecific genetic variation can play a key role in structuring ecological networks, which may in turn affect network persistence. PMID:26858398

  9. Safety assessment, detection and traceability, and societal aspects of genetically modified foods. European Network on Safety Assessment of Genetically Modified Food Crops (ENTRANSFOOD). Concluding remarks.

    PubMed

    Kuiper, H A; König, A; Kleter, G A; Hammes, W P; Knudsen, I

    2004-07-01

    The most important results from the EU-sponsored ENTRANSFOOD Thematic Network project are reviewed, including the design of a detailed step-wise procedure for the risk assessment of foods derived from genetically modified crops based on the latest scientific developments, evaluation of topical risk assessment issues, and the formulation of proposals for improved risk management and public involvement in the risk analysis process.

  10. General asymmetric neutral networks and structure design by genetic algorithms: A learning rule for temporal patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Bornholdt, S.; Graudenz, D.

    1993-07-01

    A learning algorithm based on genetic algorithms for asymmetric neural networks with an arbitrary structure is presented. It is suited for the learning of temporal patterns and leads to stable neural networks with feedback.

  11. Genetic Background Specific Hypoxia Resistance in Rat is Correlated with Balanced Activation of a Cross-Chromosomal Genetic Network Centering on Physiological Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Mao, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Genetic background of an individual can drastically influence an organism's response upon environmental stress and pathological stimulus. Previous studies in inbred rats showed that compared to Brown Norway (BN), Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rat exerts strong hypoxia susceptibility. However, despite extensive narrow-down approaches via the chromosome substitution methodology, this genome-based physiological predisposition could not be traced back to distinct quantitative trait loci. Upon the completion and public data availability of PhysGen SS-BN consomic (CS) rat platform, I employed systems biology approach attempting to further our understanding of the molecular basis of genetic background effect in light of hypoxia response. I analyzed the physiological screening data of 22 CS rat strains under normoxia and 2-weeks of hypoxia, and cross-compared them to the parental strains. The analyses showed that SS-9(BN) and SS-18(BN) represent the most hypoxia-resistant CS strains with phenotype similar to BN, whereas SS-6(BN) and SS-Y(BN) segregated to the direction of SS. A meta-analysis on the transcriptomic profiles of these CS rat strains under hypoxia treatment showed that although polymorphisms on the substituted BN chromosomes could be directly involved in hypoxia resistance, this seems to be embedded in a more complex trans-chromosomal genetic regulatory network. Via information theory based modeling approach, this hypoxia relevant core genetic network was reverse engineered. Network analyses showed that the protective effects of BN chromosome 9 and 18 were reflected by a balanced activation of this core network centering on physiological homeostasis. Presumably, it is the system robustness constituted on such differential network activation that acts as hypoxia response modifier. Understanding of the intrinsic link between the individual genetic background and the network robustness will set a basis in the current scientific efforts toward personalized medicine.

  12. Information theoretical methods to deconvolute genetic regulatory networks applied to thyroid neoplasms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Lemus, Enrique; Velázquez-Fernández, David; Estrada-Gil, Jesús K.; Silva-Zolezzi, Irma; Herrera-Hernández, Miguel F.; Jiménez-Sánchez, Gerardo

    2009-12-01

    Most common pathologies in humans are not caused by the mutation of a single gene, rather they are complex diseases that arise due to the dynamic interaction of many genes and environmental factors. This plethora of interacting genes generates a complexity landscape that masks the real effects associated with the disease. To construct dynamic maps of gene interactions (also called genetic regulatory networks) we need to understand the interplay between thousands of genes. Several issues arise in the analysis of experimental data related to gene function: on the one hand, the nature of measurement processes generates highly noisy signals; on the other hand, there are far more variables involved (number of genes and interactions among them) than experimental samples. Another source of complexity is the highly nonlinear character of the underlying biochemical dynamics. To overcome some of these limitations, we generated an optimized method based on the implementation of a Maximum Entropy Formalism (MaxEnt) to deconvolute a genetic regulatory network based on the most probable meta-distribution of gene-gene interactions. We tested the methodology using experimental data for Papillary Thyroid Cancer (PTC) and Thyroid Goiter tissue samples. The optimal MaxEnt regulatory network was obtained from a pool of 25,593,993 different probability distributions. The group of observed interactions was validated by several (mostly in silico) means and sources. For the associated Papillary Thyroid Cancer Gene Regulatory Network (PTC-GRN) the majority of the nodes (genes) have very few links (interactions) whereas a small number of nodes are highly connected. PTC-GRN is also characterized by high clustering coefficients and network heterogeneity. These properties have been recognized as characteristic of topological robustness, and they have been largely described in relation to biological networks. A number of biological validity outcomes are discussed with regard to both the

  13. [Parkinson's disease: Role of genetic and environment factors. Involvement in everyday clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Defebvre, L

    2010-10-01

    Genetics and exposure to toxins constitute the main determinants in the onset of Parkinson's disease (PD). At least, 13 loci and nine genes involved in familial and sporadic forms have been described. A significant association between occupational exposure to pesticides (especially insecticides) and PD has been confirmed recently with rare cases even being recognized as occupational disease. We develop in this paper a practical approach for such situations where a common genetic or toxic origin is suggested. Such an approach can be applied very broadly using case by case study then further analysis in a specialized center of reference in the field of genetics or occupational diseases and the environment. A pedigree needs to be drawn to evaluate a potential genetic factor with, if possible, the examination of various family members. Depending on the mode of inheritance, age of disease onset and phenotypic expression, genetic analysis will be carried out (mainly the study of parkin gene for recessive transmission and LRRK2 gene for dominant transmission). The evaluation of a toxic factor is more difficult because its direct involvement may not always be defined with certainty, the collection of information is more complex (product list, causal relationship, protection system used...). The course of action will identify the existence of a potential risk factor particularly in patients at risk (farmers, workers in a factory using heavy metals) by considering secondary specialized consultation with the occupational physician or pathology consultation work for possible development of a procedure for recognition of occupational disease.

  14. Unpacking Parent Involvement: Korean American Parents' Collective Networking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Minjung

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the ways in which a group of Korean American parents perceived and responded to institutional inequalities in a family-school partnership. In their school, which had a growing Asian population, the dominant group's middle-class perspective on parent involvement became normal and operated as an overarching structure. Drawing…

  15. Building Leadership Capacity in the Involving Network State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedersen, Dorthe; Tangkjaer, Christian

    2013-01-01

    New partnerships, cross-organisational collaborations and co-creation, digitalisation, involvement of citizens, public design and innovation stand out as new and emerging solutions in welfare delivery. However, New Public Management (NPM) seems to represent a historical repertoire of perspectives and tools that falls short of dealing with public…

  16. Parent Involvement, Sibling Companionship, and Adolescent Substance Use: A Longitudinal, Genetically-Informed Design

    PubMed Central

    Samek, Diana R.; Rueter, Martha A.; Keyes, Margaret A.; McGue, Matt; Iacono, William G.

    2015-01-01

    A large literature shows that parent and sibling relationship factors are associated with an increased likelihood of adolescent substance use. Less is known about the etiology of these associations. Using a genetically-informed sibling design, we examined the prospective associations between parent involvement, sibling companionship, and adolescent substance use at two points in mid- and late-adolescence. Adolescents were adopted (n = 568) or the biological offspring of both parents (n = 412). Cross-lagged panel results showed that higher levels of parent involvement in early adolescence were associated with lower levels of substance use later in adolescence. Results did not significantly differ across adoption status, suggesting this association cannot be due to passive gene-environment correlation. Adolescent substance use at Time 1 was not significantly associated with parent involvement at Time 2, suggesting this association does not appear to be solely due to evocative (i.e. “child-driven”) effects either. Together, results support a protective influence of parent involvement on subsequent adolescent substance use that is environmental in nature. The cross-paths between sibling companionship and adolescent substance use were significant and negative in direction (i.e., protective) for sisters, but positive for brothers (in line with a social contagion hypothesis). These effects were consistent across genetically related and unrelated pairs, and thus appear to be environmentally mediated. For mixed gender siblings, results were consistent with environmentally-driven, protective influence hypothesis for genetically unrelated pairs, but in line with a genetically influenced, social contagion hypothesis for genetically related pairs. Implications are discussed. PMID:26030026

  17. Caco-2 cell permeability modelling: a neural network coupled genetic algorithm approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Fenza, Armida; Alagona, Giuliano; Ghio, Caterina; Leonardi, Riccardo; Giolitti, Alessandro; Madami, Andrea

    2007-04-01

    The ability to cross the intestinal cell membrane is a fundamental prerequisite of a drug compound. However, the experimental measurement of such an important property is a costly and highly time consuming step of the drug development process because it is necessary to synthesize the compound first. Therefore, in silico modelling of intestinal absorption, which can be carried out at very early stages of drug design, is an appealing alternative procedure which is based mainly on multivariate statistical analysis such as partial least squares (PLS) and neural networks (NN). Our implementation of neural network models for the prediction of intestinal absorption is based on the correlation of Caco-2 cell apparent permeability ( P app) values, as a measure of intestinal absorption, to the structures of two different data sets of drug candidates. Several molecular descriptors of the compounds were calculated and the optimal subsets were selected using a genetic algorithm; therefore, the method was indicated as Genetic Algorithm-Neural Network (GA-NN). A methodology combining a genetic algorithm search with neural network analysis applied to the modelling of Caco-2 P app has never been presented before, although the two procedures have been already employed separately. Moreover, we provide new Caco-2 cell permeability measurements for more than two hundred compounds. Interestingly, the selected descriptors show to possess physico-chemical connotations which are in excellent accordance with the well known relevant molecular properties involved in the cellular membrane permeation phenomenon: hydrophilicity, hydrogen bonding propensity, hydrophobicity and molecular size. The predictive ability of the models, although rather good for a preliminary study, is somewhat affected by the poor precision of the experimental Caco-2 measurements. Finally, the generalization ability of one model was checked on an external test set not derived from the data sets used to build the models

  18. Application of a hybrid model of neural networks and genetic algorithms to evaluate landslide susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. B.; Li, J. W.; Zhou, B.; Yuan, Z. Q.; Chen, Y. P.

    2013-03-01

    In the last few decades, the development of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) technology has provided a method for the evaluation of landslide susceptibility and hazard. Slope units were found to be appropriate for the fundamental morphological elements in landslide susceptibility evaluation. Following the DEM construction in a loess area susceptible to landslides, the direct-reverse DEM technology was employed to generate 216 slope units in the studied area. After a detailed investigation, the landslide inventory was mapped in which 39 landslides, including paleo-landslides, old landslides and recent landslides, were present. Of the 216 slope units, 123 involved landslides. To analyze the mechanism of these landslides, six environmental factors were selected to evaluate landslide occurrence: slope angle, aspect, the height and shape of the slope, distance to river and human activities. These factors were extracted in terms of the slope unit within the ArcGIS software. The spatial analysis demonstrates that most of the landslides are located on convex slopes at an elevation of 100-150 m with slope angles from 135°-225° and 40°-60°. Landslide occurrence was then checked according to these environmental factors using an artificial neural network with back propagation, optimized by genetic algorithms. A dataset of 120 slope units was chosen for training the neural network model, i.e., 80 units with landslide presence and 40 units without landslide presence. The parameters of genetic algorithms and neural networks were then set: population size of 100, crossover probability of 0.65, mutation probability of 0.01, momentum factor of 0.60, learning rate of 0.7, max learning number of 10 000, and target error of 0.000001. After training on the datasets, the susceptibility of landslides was mapped for the land-use plan and hazard mitigation. Comparing the susceptibility map with landslide inventory, it was noted that the prediction accuracy of landslide occurrence

  19. A Parallel Attractor Finding Algorithm Based on Boolean Satisfiability for Genetic Regulatory Networks

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wensheng; Yang, Guowu; Wu, Wei; He, Lei; Sun, Mingyu

    2014-01-01

    In biological systems, the dynamic analysis method has gained increasing attention in the past decade. The Boolean network is the most common model of a genetic regulatory network. The interactions of activation and inhibition in the genetic regulatory network are modeled as a set of functions of the Boolean network, while the state transitions in the Boolean network reflect the dynamic property of a genetic regulatory network. A difficult problem for state transition analysis is the finding of attractors. In this paper, we modeled the genetic regulatory network as a Boolean network and proposed a solving algorithm to tackle the attractor finding problem. In the proposed algorithm, we partitioned the Boolean network into several blocks consisting of the strongly connected components according to their gradients, and defined the connection between blocks as decision node. Based on the solutions calculated on the decision nodes and using a satisfiability solving algorithm, we identified the attractors in the state transition graph of each block. The proposed algorithm is benchmarked on a variety of genetic regulatory networks. Compared with existing algorithms, it achieved similar performance on small test cases, and outperformed it on larger and more complex ones, which happens to be the trend of the modern genetic regulatory network. Furthermore, while the existing satisfiability-based algorithms cannot be parallelized due to their inherent algorithm design, the proposed algorithm exhibits a good scalability on parallel computing architectures. PMID:24718686

  20. A parallel attractor-finding algorithm based on Boolean satisfiability for genetic regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wensheng; Yang, Guowu; Wu, Wei; He, Lei; Sun, Mingyu

    2014-01-01

    In biological systems, the dynamic analysis method has gained increasing attention in the past decade. The Boolean network is the most common model of a genetic regulatory network. The interactions of activation and inhibition in the genetic regulatory network are modeled as a set of functions of the Boolean network, while the state transitions in the Boolean network reflect the dynamic property of a genetic regulatory network. A difficult problem for state transition analysis is the finding of attractors. In this paper, we modeled the genetic regulatory network as a Boolean network and proposed a solving algorithm to tackle the attractor finding problem. In the proposed algorithm, we partitioned the Boolean network into several blocks consisting of the strongly connected components according to their gradients, and defined the connection between blocks as decision node. Based on the solutions calculated on the decision nodes and using a satisfiability solving algorithm, we identified the attractors in the state transition graph of each block. The proposed algorithm is benchmarked on a variety of genetic regulatory networks. Compared with existing algorithms, it achieved similar performance on small test cases, and outperformed it on larger and more complex ones, which happens to be the trend of the modern genetic regulatory network. Furthermore, while the existing satisfiability-based algorithms cannot be parallelized due to their inherent algorithm design, the proposed algorithm exhibits a good scalability on parallel computing architectures.

  1. Strawberry Maturity Neural Network Detectng System Based on Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Liming

    The quick and non-detective detection of agriculture product is one of the measures to increase the precision and productivity of harvesting and grading. Having analyzed H frequency of different maturities in different light intensities, the results show that H frequency for the same maturity has little influence in different light intensities; Under the same light intensity, three strawberry maturities are changing in order. After having confirmed the H frequency section to distinguish the different strawberry maturity, the triplelayer feed-forward neural network system to detect strawberry maturity was designed by using genetic algorithm. The test results show that the detecting precision ratio is 91.7%, it takes 160ms to distinguish one strawberry. Therefore, the online non-detective detecting the strawberry maturity could be realized.

  2. Genetic analysis of absB, a Streptomyces coelicolor locus involved in global antibiotic regulation.

    PubMed

    Adamidis, T; Champness, W

    1992-07-01

    The filamentous soil bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor is known to produce four antibiotics which are genetically and structurally distinct. An extensive search for antibiotic regulatory mutants led to the discovery of absB mutants, which are antibiotic deficient but sporulation proficient. Genetic analysis of the absB mutants has resulted in definition of the absB locus at 5 o'clock on the genetic map. Multiple cloned copies of the actII-ORF4 gene, an activator of synthesis of the antibiotic actinorhodin, restore actinorhodin biosynthetic capability to the absB mutants. These results are interpreted to mean that the failure of absB mutants to produce antibiotics results from decreased expression of the antibiotic genes. The absB gene is proposed to be involved in global regulation of antibiotic synthesis.

  3. Non-resident Fathers’ Social Networks: The Relationship between Social Support and Father Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Jason T.; Sarver, Christian M.

    2011-01-01

    Literature and research examining non-resident fathers’ involvement with their chidren has focused primarily on the fathers’ relationship with their child’s mother. Receiving limited attention in the literature has been the inclusion of examining non-resident fathers’ social support networks, the function of these social networks—perceived and received social support, and how these social support networks affect non-resident fathers’ involvement with their children. Using data from Wave One of the Fragile Families and Child Well-being Study, this study examined the social support networks non-resident fathers (n = 895) utilized in their involvement with their children. Results of the regression analyses indicate that non-resident fathers’ relationship with their child’s mother and perceived social support from their social networks contributed positively to their involvement with their children. Policy and practice implications are discussed. PMID:23288998

  4. Linking social and pathogen transmission networks using microbial genetics in giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis).

    PubMed

    VanderWaal, Kimberly L; Atwill, Edward R; Isbell, Lynne A; McCowan, Brenda

    2014-03-01

    Although network analysis has drawn considerable attention as a promising tool for disease ecology, empirical research has been hindered by limitations in detecting the occurrence of pathogen transmission (who transmitted to whom) within social networks. Using a novel approach, we utilize the genetics of a diverse microbe, Escherichia coli, to infer where direct or indirect transmission has occurred and use these data to construct transmission networks for a wild giraffe population (Giraffe camelopardalis). Individuals were considered to be a part of the same transmission chain and were interlinked in the transmission network if they shared genetic subtypes of E. coli. By using microbial genetics to quantify who transmits to whom independently from the behavioural data on who is in contact with whom, we were able to directly investigate how the structure of contact networks influences the structure of the transmission network. To distinguish between the effects of social and environmental contact on transmission dynamics, the transmission network was compared with two separate contact networks defined from the behavioural data: a social network based on association patterns, and a spatial network based on patterns of home-range overlap among individuals. We found that links in the transmission network were more likely to occur between individuals that were strongly linked in the social network. Furthermore, individuals that had more numerous connections or that occupied 'bottleneck' positions in the social network tended to occupy similar positions in the transmission network. No similar correlations were observed between the spatial and transmission networks. This indicates that an individual's social network position is predictive of transmission network position, which has implications for identifying individuals that function as super-spreaders or transmission bottlenecks in the population. These results emphasize the importance of association patterns in

  5. Ochratoxin A carcinogenicity involves a complex network of epigenetic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Marin-Kuan, Maricel; Cavin, Christophe; Delatour, Thierry; Schilter, Benoît

    2008-08-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a mycotoxin occurring in a wide range of food products. Because of the limitation of human epidemiological data, the safety significance of OTA in food has to rely on animal data, with renal toxicity and carcinogenicity being considered the pivotal effects. The elucidation of the mechanism of action would improve the use of experimental animal data for risk assessment. Direct genotoxicity versus epigenetic mechanisms appears to be a key question. In the present review, the increasingly documented epigenetic cellular effects of OTA and their potential toxicological relevance are discussed. The information available suggests that OTA is unlikely to act through a single, well-defined mechanism of action. Instead, it is proposed that a network of interacting epigenetic mechanisms, including protein synthesis inhibition, oxidative stress and the activation of specific cell signalling pathways, is responsible for OTA carcinogenicity. From a risk assessment perspective, it has to be noted that the mechanisms proposed above depend mainly upon gene expression and enzyme activation, and are, therefore, likely to be thresholded.

  6. Genetic and epigenetic determinants mediate proneness of oncogene breakpoint sites for involvement in TCR translocations.

    PubMed

    Larmonie, N S D; van der Spek, A; Bogers, A J J C; van Dongen, J J M; Langerak, A W

    2014-03-01

    T-cell receptor (TCR) translocations are a genetic hallmark of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and lead to juxtaposition of oncogene and TCR loci. Oncogene loci become involved in translocations because they are accessible to the V(D)J recombination machinery. Such accessibility is predicted at cryptic recombination signal sequence (cRSS) sites ('Type 1') as well as other sites that are subject to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) ('Type 2') during early stages of thymocyte development. As chromatin accessibility markers have not been analyzed in the context of TCR-associated translocations, various genetic and epigenetic determinants of LMO2, TAL1 and TLX1 translocation breakpoint (BP) sites and BP cluster regions (BCRs) were examined in human thymocytes to establish DSB proneness and heterogeneity of BP site involvement in TCR translocations. Our data show that DSBs in BCRs are primarily induced in the presence of a genetic element of sequence vulnerability (cRSSs, transposable elements), whereas breaks at single BP sites lacking such elements are more likely induced by chance or perhaps because of patient-specific genetic vulnerability. Vulnerability to obtain DSBs is increased by features that determine chromatin organization, such as methylation status and nucleosome occupancy, although at different levels at different BP sites.

  7. Structural and Functional Characterization of a Caenorhabditis elegans Genetic Interaction Network within Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, Benjamin; Lee, Anna Y.; Hallett, Michael; Jenna, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    A genetic interaction (GI) is defined when the mutation of one gene modifies the phenotypic expression associated with the mutation of a second gene. Genome-wide efforts to map GIs in yeast revealed structural and functional properties of a GI network. This provided insights into the mechanisms underlying the robustness of yeast to genetic and environmental insults, and also into the link existing between genotype and phenotype. While a significant conservation of GIs and GI network structure has been reported between distant yeast species, such a conservation is not clear between unicellular and multicellular organisms. Structural and functional characterization of a GI network in these latter organisms is consequently of high interest. In this study, we present an in-depth characterization of ~1.5K GIs in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We identify and characterize six distinct classes of GIs by examining a wide-range of structural and functional properties of genes and network, including co-expression, phenotypical manifestations, relationship with protein-protein interaction dense subnetworks (PDS) and pathways, molecular and biological functions, gene essentiality and pleiotropy. Our study shows that GI classes link genes within pathways and display distinctive properties, specifically towards PDS. It suggests a model in which pathways are composed of PDS-centric and PDS-independent GIs coordinating molecular machines through two specific classes of GIs involving pleiotropic and non-pleiotropic connectors. Our study provides the first in-depth characterization of a GI network within pathways of a multicellular organism. It also suggests a model to understand better how GIs control system robustness and evolution. PMID:26871911

  8. Cortical Networks Involved in Memory for Temporal Order.

    PubMed

    Manelis, Anna; Popov, Vencislav; Paynter, Christopher; Walsh, Matthew; Wheeler, Mark E; Vogt, Keith M; Reder, Lynne M

    2017-03-15

    We examined the neurobiological basis of temporal resetting, an aspect of temporal order memory, using a version of the delayed-match-to-multiple-sample task. While in an fMRI scanner, participants evaluated whether an item was novel or whether it had appeared before or after a reset event that signified the start of a new block of trials. Participants responded "old" to items that were repeated within the current block and "new" to both novel items and items that had last appeared before the reset event (pseudonew items). Medial-temporal, prefrontal, and occipital regions responded to absolute novelty of the stimulus-they differentiated between novel items and previously seen items, but not between old and pseudonew items. Activation for pseudonew items in the frontopolar and parietal regions, in contrast, was intermediate between old and new items. The posterior cingulate cortex extending to precuneus was the only region that showed complete temporal resetting, and its activation reflected whether an item was new or old according to the task instructions regardless of its familiarity. There was also a significant Condition (old/pseudonew) × Familiarity (second/third presentations) interaction effect on behavioral and neural measures. For pseudonew items, greater familiarity decreased response accuracy, increased RTs, increased ACC activation, and increased functional connectivity between ACC and the left frontal pole. The reverse was observed for old items. On the basis of these results, we propose a theoretical framework in which temporal resetting relies on an episodic retrieval network that is modulated by cognitive control and conflict resolution.

  9. Network-centric Analysis of Genetic Predisposition in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Ntemka, A; Iliadis, F; Papanikolaou, NA; Grekas, D

    2011-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a serious, long-term complication of diabetes and the leading cause of end-stage renal disease throughout the world. Although this disease is progressively imposing a heavier burden on the health care system, in many aspects it remains poorly understood. In addition to environmental influences, there is abundant evidence in support of genetic susceptibility to microvascular complications of nephropathy in diabetic patients. Familial clustering of phenotypes such as end-stage renal disease, albuminuria and kidney disease have been reported in large scale population studies throughout the world demonstrating strong contribution of inherited factors. Recent genome-wide linkage scans identified several chromosomal regions that are likely to contain diabetic nephropathy susceptibility genes, and association analyses have evaluated positional candidate genes under linkage peaks. In this review we have extracted from the literature the most promising candidate genes thought to confer susceptibility to diabetic nephropathy and mapped them to affected pathways by using network-centric analysis. Several of the top susceptibility genes have been identified as network hubs and bottlenecks suggesting that they might be important agents in the onset of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:22435020

  10. Calibration of neural networks using genetic algorithms, with application to optimal path planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Terence R.; Pitney, Gilbert A.; Greenwood, Daniel

    1987-01-01

    Genetic algorithms (GA) are used to search the synaptic weight space of artificial neural systems (ANS) for weight vectors that optimize some network performance function. GAs do not suffer from some of the architectural constraints involved with other techniques and it is straightforward to incorporate terms into the performance function concerning the metastructure of the ANS. Hence GAs offer a remarkably general approach to calibrating ANS. GAs are applied to the problem of calibrating an ANS that finds optimal paths over a given surface. This problem involves training an ANS on a relatively small set of paths and then examining whether the calibrated ANS is able to find good paths between arbitrary start and end points on the surface.

  11. Transcriptional master regulator analysis in breast cancer genetic networks.

    PubMed

    Tovar, Hugo; García-Herrera, Rodrigo; Espinal-Enríquez, Jesús; Hernández-Lemus, Enrique

    2015-12-01

    Gene regulatory networks account for the delicate mechanisms that control gene expression. Under certain circumstances, gene regulatory programs may give rise to amplification cascades. Such transcriptional cascades are events in which activation of key-responsive transcription factors called master regulators trigger a series of gene expression events. The action of transcriptional master regulators is then important for the establishment of certain programs like cell development and differentiation. However, such cascades have also been related with the onset and maintenance of cancer phenotypes. Here we present a systematic implementation of a series of algorithms aimed at the inference of a gene regulatory network and analysis of transcriptional master regulators in the context of primary breast cancer cells. Such studies were performed in a highly curated database of 880 microarray gene expression experiments on biopsy-captured tissue corresponding to primary breast cancer and healthy controls. Biological function and biochemical pathway enrichment analyses were also performed to study the role that the processes controlled - at the transcriptional level - by such master regulators may have in relation to primary breast cancer. We found that transcription factors such as AGTR2, ZNF132, TFDP3 and others are master regulators in this gene regulatory network. Sets of genes controlled by these regulators are involved in processes that are well-known hallmarks of cancer. This kind of analyses may help to understand the most upstream events in the development of phenotypes, in particular, those regarding cancer biology.

  12. Molecular Genetic Analysis of Activation-tagged Transcription Factors Thought to be Involved in Photomorphogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Neff, Michael

    2011-06-23

    Plants utilize light as a source of information via families of photoreceptors such as the red/far-red absorbing phytochromes (PHY) and the blue/UVA absorbing cryptochromes (CRY). The main goal of the Neff lab is to use molecular-genetic mutant screens to elucidate signaling components downstream of these photoreceptors. Activation-tagging mutagenesis led to the identification of two putative transcription factors that may be involved in both photomorphogenesis and hormone signaling pathways. sob1-D (suppressor of phyB-dominant) mutant phenotypes are caused by the over-expression of a Dof transcription factor previously named OBP3. Our previous studies indicate that OBP3 is a negative regulator of light-mediated cotyledon expansion and may be involved in modulating responsiveness to the growth-regulating hormone auxin. The sob2-D mutant uncovers a role for LEP, a putative AP2/EREBP-like transcription factor, in seed germination, hypocotyl elongation and responsiveness to the hormone abscisic acid. Based on photobiological and genetic analysis of OBP3-knockdown and LEP-null mutations, we hypothesize that these transcription factors are involved in both light-mediated seedling development and hormone signaling. To examine the role that these genes play in photomorphogenesis we will: 1) Further explore the genetic role of OBP3 in cotyledon/leaf expansion and other photomorphogenic processes as well as examine potential physical interactions between OBP3 and CRY1 or other signaling components that genetically interact with this transcription factor 2) Test the hypothesis that OBP3 is genetically involved in auxin signaling and root development as well as examine the affects of this hormone and light on OBP3 protein accumulation. 3) Test the hypothesis that LEP is involved in seed germination, seedling photomorphogenesis and hormone signaling. Together these experiments will lead to a greater understanding of the complexity of interactions between photoreceptors and DNA

  13. Characterizing individual differences in reward sensitivity from the brain networks involved in response inhibition.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Claramonte, Paola; Ávila, César; Rodríguez-Pujadas, Aina; Costumero, Víctor; Ventura-Campos, Noelia; Bustamante, Juan Carlos; Rosell-Negre, Patricia; Barrós-Loscertales, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    A "disinhibited" cognitive profile has been proposed for individuals with high reward sensitivity, characterized by increased engagement in goal-directed responses and reduced processing of negative or unexpected cues, which impairs adequate behavioral regulation after feedback in these individuals. This pattern is manifested through deficits in inhibitory control and/or increases in RT variability. In the present work, we aimed to test whether this profile is associated with the activity of functional networks during a stop-signal task using independent component analysis (ICA). Sixty-one participants underwent fMRI while performing a stop-signal task, during which a manual response had to be inhibited. ICA was used to mainly replicate the functional networks involved in the task (Zhang and Li, 2012): two motor networks involved in the go response, the left and right fronto-parietal networks for stopping, a midline error-processing network, and the default-mode network (DMN), which was further subdivided into its anterior and posterior parts. Reward sensitivity was mainly associated with greater activity of motor networks, reduced activity in the midline network during correct stop trials and, behaviorally, increased RT variability. All these variables explained 36% of variance of the SR scores. This pattern of associations suggests that reward sensitivity involves greater motor engagement in the dominant response, more distractibility and reduced processing of salient or unexpected events, which may lead to disinhibited behavior.

  14. Increasing public involvement in enriching our fish stocks through genetic enhancement.

    PubMed

    Halvorson, H O; Quezada, F

    1999-11-01

    A total of 70%, of the world's conventional commercial fish species are now fully exploited, overexploited, depleted or recovering from depletion. This dramatic crash in the capture world fisheries production has led to problems in foods distribution, balance of payments, employment, and ecological depletion. Public support for breeding programs with terrestrial farm animals and plants in agriculture have revolutionized this industry over the past few hundred years. However, new genetic rearing technologies to improve marine animal production through aquaculture that utilize modern biology to obtain sustainable aquaculture and preserve biodiversity provide a promise to address these problems. However aquaculture has not been subject to public discussion and approval. Public involvement, not necessarily acquiescence, provide value added in the decision making process. Public understanding and involvement involves three stages. (i) Public concern over the pool of genetic information; (ii) if aquaculture is to respond to the fisheries crises with innovation, the knowledge gap between public understanding and scientific information must be bridged; and (iii) strategies must be developed for achieving this. Release of recombinant DNA to the environment, and handling exotic species, are useful case studies. Illustrations will be given of communication bridges to the public and ways to involve the public in making policy decisions.

  15. On the underlying assumptions of threshold Boolean networks as a model for genetic regulatory network behavior

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Van; McCall, Matthew N.; McMurray, Helene R.; Almudevar, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Boolean networks (BoN) are relatively simple and interpretable models of gene regulatory networks. Specifying these models with fewer parameters while retaining their ability to describe complex regulatory relationships is an ongoing methodological challenge. Additionally, extending these models to incorporate variable gene decay rates, asynchronous gene response, and synergistic regulation while maintaining their Markovian nature increases the applicability of these models to genetic regulatory networks (GRN). We explore a previously-proposed class of BoNs characterized by linear threshold functions, which we refer to as threshold Boolean networks (TBN). Compared to traditional BoNs with unconstrained transition functions, these models require far fewer parameters and offer a more direct interpretation. However, the functional form of a TBN does result in a reduction in the regulatory relationships which can be modeled. We show that TBNs can be readily extended to permit self-degradation, with explicitly modeled degradation rates. We note that the introduction of variable degradation compromises the Markovian property fundamental to BoN models but show that a simple state augmentation procedure restores their Markovian nature. Next, we study the effect of assumptions regarding self-degradation on the set of possible steady states. Our findings are captured in two theorems relating self-degradation and regulatory feedback to the steady state behavior of a TBN. Finally, we explore assumptions of synchronous gene response and asynergistic regulation and show that TBNs can be easily extended to relax these assumptions. Applying our methods to the budding yeast cell-cycle network revealed that although the network is complex, its steady state is simplified by the presence of self-degradation and lack of purely positive regulatory cycles. PMID:24376454

  16. Steady-State Analysis of Genetic Regulatory Networks Modelled by Probabilistic Boolean Networks

    PubMed Central

    Gluhovsky, Ilya; Hashimoto, Ronaldo F.; Dougherty, Edward R.; Zhang, Wei

    2003-01-01

    Probabilistic Boolean networks (PBNs) have recently been introduced as a promising class of models of genetic regulatory networks. The dynamic behaviour of PBNs can be analysed in the context of Markov chains. A key goal is the determination of the steady-state (long-run) behaviour of a PBN by analysing the corresponding Markov chain. This allows one to compute the long-term influence of a gene on another gene or determine the long-term joint probabilistic behaviour of a few selected genes. Because matrix-based methods quickly become prohibitive for large sizes of networks, we propose the use of Monte Carlo methods. However, the rate of convergence to the stationary distribution becomes a central issue. We discuss several approaches for determining the number of iterations necessary to achieve convergence of the Markov chain corresponding to a PBN. Using a recently introduced method based on the theory of two-state Markov chains, we illustrate the approach on a sub-network designed from human glioma gene expression data and determine the joint steadystate probabilities for several groups of genes. PMID:18629023

  17. Systematic review of genetic association studies involving histologically confirmed non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Kayleigh L; Miller, Michael H; Dillon, John F

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease has an increasing prevalence in Western countries, affecting up to 20% of the population. Objective The aim of this project was to systematically review and summarise the genetic association studies that investigate possible genetic influences that confer susceptibility to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Design The MEDLINE and SCOPUS databases were searched to identify candidate gene studies on histologically diagnosed non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Results A total of 85 articles have been summarised and categorised on the basis of the general pathway each candidate gene is involved in, including lipid metabolism, lipoprotein processing, cholesterol synthesis, glucose homoeostasis, inflammatory response, protection against oxidative stress and whole body metabolism. Conclusions The main findings demonstrate a small but consistent association of PNPLA3 with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Genetic association studies have investigated general disease susceptibility, histological characteristics, severity and progression. However, further study is required to better elucidate the genetic factors influencing fatty liver disease. PMID:26462272

  18. Genetic Control of Chromatin States in Humans Involves Local and Distal Chromosomal Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Grubert, Fabian; Zaugg, Judith B.; Kasowski, Maya; Ursu, Oana; Spacek, Damek V.; Martin, Alicia R.; Greenside, Peyton; Srivas, Rohith; Phanstiel, Doug H.; Pekowska, Aleksandra; Heidari, Nastaran; Euskirchen, Ghia; Huber, Wolfgang; Pritchard, Jonathan K.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Steinmetz, Lars M.; Kundaje, Anshul; Snyder, Michael

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Deciphering the impact of genetic variants on gene regulation is fundamental to understanding human disease. Although gene regulation often involves long-range interactions, it is unknown to what extent non-coding genetic variants influence distal molecular phenotypes. Here, we integrate chromatin profiling for three histone marks in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) from 75 sequenced individuals with LCL-specific Hi-C and ChIA-PET-based chromatin contact maps to uncover one of the largest collections of local and distal histone quantitative trait loci (hQTLs). Distal QTLs are enriched within topologically associated domains and exhibit largely concordant variation of chromatin state coordinated by proximal and distal non-coding genetic variants. Histone QTLs are enriched for common variants associated with autoimmune diseases and enable identification of putative target genes of disease-associated variants from genome-wide association studies. These analyses provide insights into how genetic variation can affect human disease phenotypes by coordinated changes in chromatin at interacting regulatory elements. PMID:26300125

  19. Genes and quantitative genetic variation involved with senescence in cells, organs, and the whole plant

    PubMed Central

    Pujol, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    Senescence, the deterioration of morphological, physiological, and reproductive functions with age that ends with the death of the organism, was widely studied in plants. Genes were identified that are linked to the deterioration of cells, organs and the whole plant. It is, however, unclear whether those genes are the source of age dependent deterioration or get activated to regulate such deterioration. Furthermore, it is also unclear whether such genes are active as a direct consequence of age or because they are specifically involved in some developmental stages. At the individual level, it is the relationship between quantitative genetic variation, and age that can be used to detect the genetic signature of senescence. Surprisingly, the latter approach was only scarcely applied to plants. This may be the consequence of the demanding requirements for such approaches and/or the fact that most research interest was directed toward plants that avoid senescence. Here, I review those aspects in turn and call for an integrative genetic theory of senescence in plants. Such conceptual development would have implications for the management of plant genetic resources and generate progress on fundamental questions raised by aging research. PMID:25755664

  20. Evaluation of the efficiency of artificial neural networks for genetic value prediction.

    PubMed

    Silva, G N; Tomaz, R S; Sant'Anna, I C; Carneiro, V Q; Cruz, C D; Nascimento, M

    2016-03-28

    Artificial neural networks have shown great potential when applied to breeding programs. In this study, we propose the use of artificial neural networks as a viable alternative to conventional prediction methods. We conduct a thorough evaluation of the efficiency of these networks with respect to the prediction of breeding values. Therefore, we considered eight simulated scenarios, and for the purpose of genetic value prediction, seven statistical parameters in addition to the phenotypic mean in a network designed as a multilayer perceptron. After an evaluation of different network configurations, the results demonstrated the superiority of neural networks compared to estimation procedures based on linear models, and indicated high predictive accuracy and network efficiency.

  1. A Co-Association Network Analysis of the Genetic Determination of Pig Conformation, Growth and Fatness

    PubMed Central

    Puig-Oliveras, Anna; Ballester, Maria; Corominas, Jordi; Revilla, Manuel; Estellé, Jordi; Fernández, Ana I.; Ramayo-Caldas, Yuliaxis; Folch, Josep M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Several QTLs have been identified for major economically relevant traits in livestock, such as growth and meat quality, revealing the complex genetic architecture of these traits. The use of network approaches considering the interactions of multiple molecules and traits provides useful insights into the molecular underpinnings of complex traits. Here, a network based methodology, named Association Weight Matrix, was applied to study gene interactions and pathways affecting pig conformation, growth and fatness traits. Results The co-association network analysis underpinned three transcription factors, PPARγ, ELF1, and PRDM16 involved in mesoderm tissue differentiation. Fifty-four genes in the network belonged to growth-related ontologies and 46 of them were common with a similar study for growth in cattle supporting our results. The functional analysis uncovered the lipid metabolism and the corticotrophin and gonadotrophin release hormone pathways among the most important pathways influencing these traits. Our results suggest that the genes and pathways here identified are important determining either the total body weight of the animal and the fat content. For instance, a switch in the mesoderm tissue differentiation may determinate the age-related preferred pathways being in the puberty stage those related with the miogenic and osteogenic lineages; on the contrary, in the maturity stage cells may be more prone to the adipocyte fate. Hence, our results demonstrate that an integrative genomic co-association analysis is a powerful approach for identifying new connections and interactions among genes. Conclusions This work provides insights about pathways and key regulators which may be important determining the animal growth, conformation and body proportions and fatness traits. Molecular information concerning genes and pathways here described may be crucial for the improvement of genetic breeding programs applied to pork meat production. PMID:25503799

  2. A service-oriented architecture for integrating the modeling and formal verification of genetic regulatory networks

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The study of biological networks has led to the development of increasingly large and detailed models. Computer tools are essential for the simulation of the dynamical behavior of the networks from the model. However, as the size of the models grows, it becomes infeasible to manually verify the predictions against experimental data or identify interesting features in a large number of simulation traces. Formal verification based on temporal logic and model checking provides promising methods to automate and scale the analysis of the models. However, a framework that tightly integrates modeling and simulation tools with model checkers is currently missing, on both the conceptual and the implementational level. Results We have developed a generic and modular web service, based on a service-oriented architecture, for integrating the modeling and formal verification of genetic regulatory networks. The architecture has been implemented in the context of the qualitative modeling and simulation tool GNA and the model checkers NUSMV and CADP. GNA has been extended with a verification module for the specification and checking of biological properties. The verification module also allows the display and visual inspection of the verification results. Conclusions The practical use of the proposed web service is illustrated by means of a scenario involving the analysis of a qualitative model of the carbon starvation response in E. coli. The service-oriented architecture allows modelers to define the model and proceed with the specification and formal verification of the biological properties by means of a unified graphical user interface. This guarantees a transparent access to formal verification technology for modelers of genetic regulatory networks. PMID:20042075

  3. Etiologic Ischemic Stroke Phenotypes in the NINDS Stroke Genetics Network

    PubMed Central

    Ay, Hakan; Arsava, Ethem Murat; Andsberg, Gunnar; Benner, Thomas; Brown, Robert D.; Chapman, Sherita N.; Cole, John W.; Delavaran, Hossein; Dichgans, Martin; Engström, Gunnar; Giralt-Steinhauer, Eva; Grewal, Raji P.; Gwinn, Katrina; Jern, Christina; Jimenez-Conde, Jordi; Jood, Katarina; Katsnelson, Michael; Kissela, Brett; Kittner, Steven J.; Kleindorfer, Dawn O.; Labovitz, Daniel L.; Lanfranconi, Silvia; Lee, Jin-Moo; Lehm, Manuel; Lemmens, Robin; Levi, Chris; Li, Linxin; Lindgren, Arne; Markus, Hugh S.; McArdle, Patrick F.; Melander, Olle; Norrving, Bo; Peddareddygari, Leema Reddy; Pedersén, Annie; Pera, Joanna; Rannikmäe, Kristiina; Rexrode, Kathryn M.; Rhodes, David; Rich, Stephen S.; Roquer, Jaume; Rosand, Jonathan; Rothwell, Peter M.; Rundek, Tatjana; Sacco, Ralph L.; Schmidt, Reinhold; Schürks, Markus; Seiler, Stephan; Sharma, Pankaj; Slowik, Agnieszka; Sudlow, Cathie; Thijs, Vincent; Woodfield, Rebecca; Worrall, Bradford B.; Meschia, James F.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose NINDS Stroke Genetics Network (SiGN) is an international consortium of ischemic stroke studies that aims to generate high quality phenotype data to identify the genetic basis of etiologic stroke subtypes. This analysis characterizes the etiopathogenetic basis of ischemic stroke and reliability of stroke classification in the consortium. Methods Fifty-two trained and certified adjudicators determined both phenotypic (abnormal test findings categorized in major etiologic groups without weighting towards the most likely cause) and causative ischemic stroke subtypes in 16,954 subjects with imaging-confirmed ischemic stroke from 12 US studies and 11 studies from 8 European countries using the web-based Causative Classification of Stroke System. Classification reliability was assessed with blinded re-adjudication of 1509 randomly selected cases. Results The distribution of etiologic categories varied by study, age, sex, and race (p<0.001 for each). Overall, only 40% to 54% of cases with a given major ischemic stroke etiology (phenotypic subtype) were classified into the same final causative category with high confidence. There was good agreement for both causative (kappa 0.72, 95%CI:0.69-0.75) and phenotypic classifications (kappa 0.73, 95%CI:0.70-0.75). Conclusions This study demonstrates that etiologic subtypes can be determined with good reliability in studies that include investigators with different expertise and background, institutions with different stroke evaluation protocols and geographic location, and patient populations with different epidemiological characteristics. The discordance between phenotypic and causative stroke subtypes highlights the fact that the presence of an abnormality in a stroke patient does not necessarily mean that it is the cause of stroke. PMID:25378430

  4. Transcriptome comparison reveals a genetic network regulating the lower temperature limit in fish

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Peng; Liu, Mingli; Liu, Yimeng; Wang, Jinfeng; Zhang, Dong; Niu, Hongbo; Jiang, Shouwen; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Dongsheng; Han, Bingshe; Xu, Qianghua; Chen, Liangbiao

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional plasticity is a major driver of phenotypic differences between species. The lower temperature limit (LTL), namely the lower end of survival temperature, is an important trait delimiting the geographical distribution of a species, however, the genetic mechanisms are poorly understood. We investigated the inter-species transcriptional diversification in cold responses between zebrafish Danio rerio and tilapia Oreochromis niloticus, which were reared at a common temperature (28 °C) but have distinct LTLs. We identified significant expressional divergence between the two species in the orthologous genes from gills when the temperature cooled to the LTL of tilapia (8 °C). Five KEGG pathways were found sequentially over-represented in the zebrafish/tilapia divergently expressed genes in the duration (12 hour) of 8 °C exposure, forming a signaling cascade from metabolic regulation to apoptosis via FoxO signaling. Consistently, we found differential progression of apoptosis in the gills of the two species in which zebrafish manifested a delayed and milder apoptotic phenotype than tilapia, corresponding with a lower LTL of zebrafish. We identified diverged expression in 25 apoptosis-related transcription factors between the two species which forms an interacting network with diverged factors involving the FoxO signaling and metabolic regulation. We propose a genetic network which regulates LTL in fishes. PMID:27356472

  5. Genetic, metabolic and environmental factors involved in the development of liver cirrhosis in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Lopez, Omar; Martinez-Lopez, Erika; Roman, Sonia; Fierro, Nora A; Panduro, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis (LC) is a chronic illness caused by inflammatory responses and progressive fibrosis. Globally, the most common causes of chronic liver disease include persistent alcohol abuse, followed by viral hepatitis infections and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. However, regardless of the etiological factors, the susceptibility and degree of liver damage may be influenced by genetic polymorphisms that are associated with distinct ethnic and cultural backgrounds. Consequently, metabolic genes are influenced by variable environmental lifestyle factors, such as diet, physical inactivity, and emotional stress, which are associated with regional differences among populations. This Topic Highlight will focus on the genetic and environmental factors that may influence the metabolism of alcohol and nutrients in the setting of distinct etiologies of liver disease. The interaction between genes and environment in the current-day admixed population, Mestizo and Native Mexican, will be described. Additionally, genes involved in immune regulation, insulin sensitivity, oxidative stress and extracellular matrix deposition may modulate the degree of severity. In conclusion, LC is a complex disease. The onset, progression, and clinical outcome of LC among the Mexican population are influenced by specific genetic and environmental factors. Among these are an admixed genome with a heterogenic distribution of European, Amerindian and African ancestry; a high score of alcohol consumption; viral infections; a hepatopathogenic diet; and a high prevalence of obesity. The variance in risk factors among populations suggests that intervention strategies directed towards the prevention and management of LC should be tailored according to such population-based features. PMID:26556986

  6. Functional dissection of protein complexes involved in yeast chromosome biology using a genetic interaction map.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sean R; Miller, Kyle M; Maas, Nancy L; Roguev, Assen; Fillingham, Jeffrey; Chu, Clement S; Schuldiner, Maya; Gebbia, Marinella; Recht, Judith; Shales, Michael; Ding, Huiming; Xu, Hong; Han, Junhong; Ingvarsdottir, Kristin; Cheng, Benjamin; Andrews, Brenda; Boone, Charles; Berger, Shelley L; Hieter, Phil; Zhang, Zhiguo; Brown, Grant W; Ingles, C James; Emili, Andrew; Allis, C David; Toczyski, David P; Weissman, Jonathan S; Greenblatt, Jack F; Krogan, Nevan J

    2007-04-12

    Defining the functional relationships between proteins is critical for understanding virtually all aspects of cell biology. Large-scale identification of protein complexes has provided one important step towards this goal; however, even knowledge of the stoichiometry, affinity and lifetime of every protein-protein interaction would not reveal the functional relationships between and within such complexes. Genetic interactions can provide functional information that is largely invisible to protein-protein interaction data sets. Here we present an epistatic miniarray profile (E-MAP) consisting of quantitative pairwise measurements of the genetic interactions between 743 Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes involved in various aspects of chromosome biology (including DNA replication/repair, chromatid segregation and transcriptional regulation). This E-MAP reveals that physical interactions fall into two well-represented classes distinguished by whether or not the individual proteins act coherently to carry out a common function. Thus, genetic interaction data make it possible to dissect functionally multi-protein complexes, including Mediator, and to organize distinct protein complexes into pathways. In one pathway defined here, we show that Rtt109 is the founding member of a novel class of histone acetyltransferases responsible for Asf1-dependent acetylation of histone H3 on lysine 56. This modification, in turn, enables a ubiquitin ligase complex containing the cullin Rtt101 to ensure genomic integrity during DNA replication.

  7. Effects of genetic and environmental factors on trait network predictions from quantitative trait locus data.

    PubMed

    Remington, David L

    2009-03-01

    The use of high-throughput genomic techniques to map gene expression quantitative trait loci has spurred the development of path analysis approaches for predicting functional networks linking genes and natural trait variation. The goal of this study was to test whether potentially confounding factors, including effects of common environment and genes not included in path models, affect predictions of cause-effect relationships among traits generated by QTL path analyses. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to test simple QTL-trait networks under different regulatory scenarios involving direct and indirect effects. SEM identified the correct models under simple scenarios, but when common-environment effects were simulated in conjunction with direct QTL effects on traits, they were poorly distinguished from indirect effects, leading to false support for indirect models. Application of SEM to loblolly pine QTL data provided support for biologically plausible a priori hypotheses of QTL mechanisms affecting height and diameter growth. However, some biologically implausible models were also well supported. The results emphasize the need to include any available functional information, including predictions for genetic and environmental correlations, to develop plausible models if biologically useful trait network predictions are to be made.

  8. Optimization of a fermentation medium using neural networks and genetic algorithms.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Yuko; Chu, Khim Hoong

    2003-11-01

    Artificial neural networks and genetic algorithms are used to model and optimize a fermentation medium for the production of the enzyme hydantoinase by Agrobacterium radiobacter. Experimental data reported in the literature were used to build two neural network models. The concentrations of four medium components served as inputs to the neural network models, and hydantoinase or cell concentration served as a single output of each model. Genetic algorithms were used to optimize the input space of the neural network models to find the optimum settings for maximum enzyme and cell production. Using this procedure, two artificial intelligence techniques have been effectively integrated to create a powerful tool for process modeling and optimization.

  9. Digit and command interpretation for electronic book using neural network and genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Lam, H K; Leung, Frank H F

    2004-12-01

    This paper presents the interpretation of digits and commands using a modified neural network and the genetic algorithm. The modified neural network exhibits a node-to-node relationship which enhances its learning and generalization abilities. A digit-and-command interpreter constructed by the modified neural networks is proposed to recognize handwritten digits and commands. A genetic algorithm is employed to train the parameters of the modified neural networks of the digit-and-command interpreter. The proposed digit-and-command interpreter is successfully realized in an electronic book. Simulation and experimental results will be presented to show the applicability and merits of the proposed approach.

  10. Genetic Networking of the Bemisia tabaci Cryptic Species Complex Reveals Pattern of Biological Invasions

    PubMed Central

    De Barro, Paul; Ahmed, Muhammad Z.

    2011-01-01

    Background A challenge within the context of cryptic species is the delimitation of individual species within the complex. Statistical parsimony network analytics offers the opportunity to explore limits in situations where there are insufficient species-specific morphological characters to separate taxa. The results also enable us to explore the spread in taxa that have invaded globally. Methodology/Principal Findings Using a 657 bp portion of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase 1 from 352 unique haplotypes belonging to the Bemisia tabaci cryptic species complex, the analysis revealed 28 networks plus 7 unconnected individual haplotypes. Of the networks, 24 corresponded to the putative species identified using the rule set devised by Dinsdale et al. (2010). Only two species proposed in Dinsdale et al. (2010) departed substantially from the structure suggested by the analysis. The analysis of the two invasive members of the complex, Mediterranean (MED) and Middle East – Asia Minor 1 (MEAM1), showed that in both cases only a small number of haplotypes represent the majority that have spread beyond the home range; one MEAM1 and three MED haplotypes account for >80% of the GenBank records. Israel is a possible source of the globally invasive MEAM1 whereas MED has two possible sources. The first is the eastern Mediterranean which has invaded only the USA, primarily Florida and to a lesser extent California. The second are western Mediterranean haplotypes that have spread to the USA, Asia and South America. The structure for MED supports two home range distributions, a Sub-Saharan range and a Mediterranean range. The MEAM1 network supports the Middle East - Asia Minor region. Conclusion/Significance The network analyses show a high level of congruence with the species identified in a previous phylogenetic analysis. The analysis of the two globally invasive members of the complex support the view that global invasion often involve very small portions of the available

  11. Learning genetic epistasis using Bayesian network scoring criteria

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Gene-gene epistatic interactions likely play an important role in the genetic basis of many common diseases. Recently, machine-learning and data mining methods have been developed for learning epistatic relationships from data. A well-known combinatorial method that has been successfully applied for detecting epistasis is Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction (MDR). Jiang et al. created a combinatorial epistasis learning method called BNMBL to learn Bayesian network (BN) epistatic models. They compared BNMBL to MDR using simulated data sets. Each of these data sets was generated from a model that associates two SNPs with a disease and includes 18 unrelated SNPs. For each data set, BNMBL and MDR were used to score all 2-SNP models, and BNMBL learned significantly more correct models. In real data sets, we ordinarily do not know the number of SNPs that influence phenotype. BNMBL may not perform as well if we also scored models containing more than two SNPs. Furthermore, a number of other BN scoring criteria have been developed. They may detect epistatic interactions even better than BNMBL. Although BNs are a promising tool for learning epistatic relationships from data, we cannot confidently use them in this domain until we determine which scoring criteria work best or even well when we try learning the correct model without knowledge of the number of SNPs in that model. Results We evaluated the performance of 22 BN scoring criteria using 28,000 simulated data sets and a real Alzheimer's GWAS data set. Our results were surprising in that the Bayesian scoring criterion with large values of a hyperparameter called α performed best. This score performed better than other BN scoring criteria and MDR at recall using simulated data sets, at detecting the hardest-to-detect models using simulated data sets, and at substantiating previous results using the real Alzheimer's data set. Conclusions We conclude that representing epistatic interactions using BN models

  12. Identification of Host Genes Involved in Geminivirus Infection Using a Reverse Genetics Approach

    PubMed Central

    Luna, Ana P.; Bejarano, Eduardo R.

    2011-01-01

    Geminiviruses, like all viruses, rely on the host cell machinery to establish a successful infection, but the identity and function of these required host proteins remain largely unknown. Tomato yellow leaf curl Sardinia virus (TYLCSV), a monopartite geminivirus, is one of the causal agents of the devastating Tomato yellow leaf curl disease (TYLCD). The transgenic 2IRGFP N. benthamiana plants, used in combination with Virus Induced Gene Silencing (VIGS), entail an important potential as a tool in reverse genetics studies to identify host factors involved in TYLCSV infection. Using these transgenic plants, we have made an accurate description of the evolution of TYLCSV replication in the host in both space and time. Moreover, we have determined that TYLCSV and Tobacco rattle virus (TRV) do not dramatically influence each other when co-infected in N. benthamiana, what makes the use of TRV-induced gene silencing in combination with TYLCSV for reverse genetic studies feasible. Finally, we have tested the effect of silencing candidate host genes on TYLCSV infection, identifying eighteen genes potentially involved in this process, fifteen of which had never been implicated in geminiviral infections before. Seven of the analyzed genes have a potential anti-viral effect, whereas the expression of the other eleven is required for a full infection. Interestingly, almost half of the genes altering TYLCSV infection play a role in postranslational modifications. Therefore, our results provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying geminivirus infections, and at the same time reveal the 2IRGFP/VIGS system as a powerful tool for functional reverse genetics studies. PMID:21818318

  13. Genetically Modified Networks: A Genetic Algorithm contribution to Space Geodesy. Application to the transformation of SLR and DORIS EOP time series into ITRF2005.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulot, D.; Collilieux, X.; Pollet, A.; Berio, P.; Gobinddass, M. L.; Soudarin, L.; Willis, P.

    2009-04-01

    In this study, we apply Genetic Algorithms (GAs) in order to optimize the referencing (and consequently the precision - stability - and the accuracy) of the EOPs with respect to ITRF2005. These EOPs are derived from SLR or DORIS data at a daily sampling, simultaneously with weekly station positions. GAs are evolutionary algorithms, i.e. stochastic algorithms based on the evolution theory and using some genetic operators such as chromosome crossover and gene mutations. They are currently used for a broad spectrum of activities, from medicine to defence to finance. They have also been used in Earth and Space sciences (remote sensing, geophysics, meteorology, astrophysics, astronomy, etc.) since the early nineties. But, as far as we know, the present work is the first application of GAs in the framework of Space Geodesy. In this work, we use an algorithm based on GAs to find weekly optimal sub-networks over which applying minimum constraints in order to reference EOPs. Each week, the three rotations of the involved terrestrial frames are forced to be zero with respect to ITRF2005 through minimum constraints applied over these sub-networks, which are called Genetically Modified Networks (GMNs). The reference system effects are used as objectives to optimize with GAs. Regarding SLR, our approach provides an improvement of 10 % in accuracy for polar motion in comparison to the results obtained with the network specially designed for EOP referencing by the Analysis Working Group of the International Laser Ranging Service. This improvement of nearly 25 as represents 50 % of the current precision of the IERS 05 C04 reference series. We also show preliminary results regarding such GMNs for the DORIS technique using two different solutions (IGN and CNES/CLS solutions). Finally, for practical applications, we also test, for the SLR and the DORIS techniques, the possible emergence of global core networks to be used for EOP referencing on the basis of GAs.

  14. A global genetic interaction network maps a wiring diagram of cellular function.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, Michael; VanderSluis, Benjamin; Koch, Elizabeth N; Baryshnikova, Anastasia; Pons, Carles; Tan, Guihong; Wang, Wen; Usaj, Matej; Hanchard, Julia; Lee, Susan D; Pelechano, Vicent; Styles, Erin B; Billmann, Maximilian; van Leeuwen, Jolanda; van Dyk, Nydia; Lin, Zhen-Yuan; Kuzmin, Elena; Nelson, Justin; Piotrowski, Jeff S; Srikumar, Tharan; Bahr, Sondra; Chen, Yiqun; Deshpande, Raamesh; Kurat, Christoph F; Li, Sheena C; Li, Zhijian; Usaj, Mojca Mattiazzi; Okada, Hiroki; Pascoe, Natasha; San Luis, Bryan-Joseph; Sharifpoor, Sara; Shuteriqi, Emira; Simpkins, Scott W; Snider, Jamie; Suresh, Harsha Garadi; Tan, Yizhao; Zhu, Hongwei; Malod-Dognin, Noel; Janjic, Vuk; Przulj, Natasa; Troyanskaya, Olga G; Stagljar, Igor; Xia, Tian; Ohya, Yoshikazu; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Raught, Brian; Boutros, Michael; Steinmetz, Lars M; Moore, Claire L; Rosebrock, Adam P; Caudy, Amy A; Myers, Chad L; Andrews, Brenda; Boone, Charles

    2016-09-23

    We generated a global genetic interaction network for Saccharomyces cerevisiae, constructing more than 23 million double mutants, identifying about 550,000 negative and about 350,000 positive genetic interactions. This comprehensive network maps genetic interactions for essential gene pairs, highlighting essential genes as densely connected hubs. Genetic interaction profiles enabled assembly of a hierarchical model of cell function, including modules corresponding to protein complexes and pathways, biological processes, and cellular compartments. Negative interactions connected functionally related genes, mapped core bioprocesses, and identified pleiotropic genes, whereas positive interactions often mapped general regulatory connections among gene pairs, rather than shared functionality. The global network illustrates how coherent sets of genetic interactions connect protein complex and pathway modules to map a functional wiring diagram of the cell.

  15. Analysis of the enzyme network involved in cattle milk production using graph theory.

    PubMed

    Ghorbani, Sholeh; Tahmoorespur, Mojtaba; Masoudi Nejad, Ali; Nasiri, Mohammad; Asgari, Yazdan

    2015-06-01

    Understanding cattle metabolism and its relationship with milk products is important in bovine breeding. A systemic view could lead to consequences that will result in a better understanding of existing concepts. Topological indices and quantitative characterizations mostly result from the application of graph theory on biological data. In the present work, the enzyme network involved in cattle milk production was reconstructed and analyzed based on available bovine genome information using several public datasets (NCBI, Uniprot, KEGG, and Brenda). The reconstructed network consisted of 3605 reactions named by KEGG compound numbers and 646 enzymes that catalyzed the corresponding reactions. The characteristics of the directed and undirected network were analyzed using Graph Theory. The mean path length was calculated to be4.39 and 5.41 for directed and undirected networks, respectively. The top 11 hub enzymes whose abnormality could harm bovine health and reduce milk production were determined. Therefore, the aim of constructing the enzyme centric network was twofold; first to find out whether such network followed the same properties of other biological networks, and second, to find the key enzymes. The results of the present study can improve our understanding of milk production in cattle. Also, analysis of the enzyme network can help improve the modeling and simulation of biological systems and help design desired phenotypes to increase milk production quality or quantity.

  16. Telethon Network of Genetic Biobanks: a key service for diagnosis and research on rare diseases.

    PubMed

    Filocamo, Mirella; Baldo, Chiara; Goldwurm, Stefano; Renieri, Alessandra; Angelini, Corrado; Moggio, Maurizio; Mora, Marina; Merla, Giuseppe; Politano, Luisa; Garavaglia, Barbara; Casareto, Lorena; Bricarelli, Francesca Dagna

    2013-08-30

    Several examples have always illustrated how access to large numbers of biospecimens and associated data plays a pivotal role in the identification of disease genes and the development of pharmaceuticals. Hence, allowing researchers to access to significant numbers of quality samples and data, genetic biobanks are a powerful tool in basic, translational and clinical research into rare diseases. Recently demand for well-annotated and properly-preserved specimens is growing at a high rate, and is expected to grow for years to come. The best effective solution to this issue is to enhance the potentialities of well-managed biobanks by building a network.Here we report a 5-year experience of the Telethon Network of Genetic Biobanks (TNGB), a non-profit association of Italian repositories created in 2008 to form a virtually unique catalogue of biospecimens and associated data, which presently lists more than 750 rare genetic defects. The process of TNGB harmonisation has been mainly achieved through the adoption of a unique, centrally coordinated, IT infrastructure, which has enabled (i) standardisation of all the TNGB procedures and activities; (ii) creation of an updated TNGB online catalogue, based on minimal data set and controlled terminologies; (iii) sample access policy managed via a shared request control panel at web portal. TNGB has been engaged in disseminating information on its services into both scientific/biomedical - national and international - contexts, as well as associations of patients and families. Indeed, during the last 5-years national and international scientists extensively used the TNGB with different purposes resulting in more than 250 scientific publications. In addition, since its inception the TNGB is an associated member of the Biobanking and Biomolecular Resources Research Infrastructure and recently joined the EuroBioBank network. Moreover, the involvement of patients and families, leading to the formalization of various agreements

  17. Prediction of Genetic Interactions Using Machine Learning and Network Properties

    PubMed Central

    Madhukar, Neel S.; Elemento, Olivier; Pandey, Gaurav

    2015-01-01

    A genetic interaction (GI) is a type of interaction where the effect of one gene is modified by the effect of one or several other genes. These interactions are important for delineating functional relationships among genes and their corresponding proteins, as well as elucidating complex biological processes and diseases. An important type of GI – synthetic sickness or synthetic lethality – involves two or more genes, where the loss of either gene alone has little impact on cell viability, but the combined loss of all genes leads to a severe decrease in fitness (sickness) or cell death (lethality). The identification of GIs is an important problem for it can help delineate pathways, protein complexes, and regulatory dependencies. Synthetic lethal interactions have important clinical and biological significance, such as providing therapeutically exploitable weaknesses in tumors. While near systematic high-content screening for GIs is possible in single cell organisms such as yeast, the systematic discovery of GIs is extremely difficult in mammalian cells. Therefore, there is a great need for computational approaches to reliably predict GIs, including synthetic lethal interactions, in these organisms. Here, we review the state-of-the-art approaches, strategies, and rigorous evaluation methods for learning and predicting GIs, both under general (healthy/standard laboratory) conditions and under specific contexts, such as diseases. PMID:26579514

  18. GENNET-Toolbox: An Evolving Genetic Algorithm for Neural Network Training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Garay, Vicente; Irigoyen, Eloy; Artaza, Fernando

    Genetic Algorithms have been used from 1989 for both Neural Network training and design. Nevertheless, the use of a Genetic Algorithm for adjusting the Neural Network parameters can still be engaging. This work presents the study and validation of a different approach to this matter by introducing a Genetic Algorithm designed for Neural Network training. This algorithm features a mutation operator capable of working on three levels (network, neuron and layer) and with the mutation parameters encoded and evolving within each individual. We also explore the use of three types of hybridization: post-training, Lamarckian and Baldwinian. These proposes in combination with the algorithm, show for a fast and powerful tool for Neural Network training.

  19. Synthesis of PHBV block copolymers driven by an oscillatory genetic network.

    PubMed

    Iadevaia, Sergio; Mantzaris, Nikos V

    2007-02-20

    Artificial genetic networks constitute a powerful tool to achieve various biotechnological objectives. In this work, we propose the modification of an oscillatory genetic network, known as the repressilator, to drive synthesis of poly(3hydroxybutyrate-co-3hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) block copolymer chains in recombinant Escherichia coli cells. To study the feasibility of this idea, we developed a detailed mathematical model describing the dynamics of the genetic network, which drive the formation of monomer units that are subsequently incorporated into actively growing block copolymer chains. Extensive simulation studies have shown that appropriate choice of the molecular characteristics of the network and manipulation of extracelllular conditions lead to tight control of both the micro- and macro-structures of the resulting block copolymer chains. Thus, the model can guide network design aiming at producing block copolymer structures with desirable characteristics.

  20. Online Social Networks for Crowdsourced Multimedia-Involved Behavioral Testing: An Empirical Study.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Lee, Jong-Seok

    2015-01-01

    Online social networks have emerged as effective crowdsourcing media to recruit participants in recent days. However, issues regarding how to effectively exploit them have not been adequately addressed yet. In this paper, we investigate the reliability and effectiveness of multimedia-involved behavioral testing via social network-based crowdsourcing, especially focused on Facebook as a medium to recruit participants. We conduct a crowdsourcing-based experiment for a music recommendation problem. It is shown that different advertisement methods yield different degrees of efficiency and there exist significant differences in behavioral patterns across different genders and different age groups. In addition, we perform a comparison of our experiment with other multimedia-involved crowdsourcing experiments built on Amazon Mechanical Turk (MTurk), which suggests that crowdsourcing-based experiments using social networks for recruitment can achieve comparable efficiency. Based on the analysis results, advantages and disadvantages of social network-based crowdsourcing and suggestions for successful experiments are also discussed. We conclude that social networks have the potential to support multimedia-involved behavioral tests to gather in-depth data even for long-term periods.

  1. Online Social Networks for Crowdsourced Multimedia-Involved Behavioral Testing: An Empirical Study

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Lee, Jong-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Online social networks have emerged as effective crowdsourcing media to recruit participants in recent days. However, issues regarding how to effectively exploit them have not been adequately addressed yet. In this paper, we investigate the reliability and effectiveness of multimedia-involved behavioral testing via social network-based crowdsourcing, especially focused on Facebook as a medium to recruit participants. We conduct a crowdsourcing-based experiment for a music recommendation problem. It is shown that different advertisement methods yield different degrees of efficiency and there exist significant differences in behavioral patterns across different genders and different age groups. In addition, we perform a comparison of our experiment with other multimedia-involved crowdsourcing experiments built on Amazon Mechanical Turk (MTurk), which suggests that crowdsourcing-based experiments using social networks for recruitment can achieve comparable efficiency. Based on the analysis results, advantages and disadvantages of social network-based crowdsourcing and suggestions for successful experiments are also discussed. We conclude that social networks have the potential to support multimedia-involved behavioral tests to gather in-depth data even for long-term periods. PMID:26793137

  2. Power graph compression reveals dominant relationships in genetic transcription networks.

    PubMed

    Ahnert, Sebastian E

    2013-11-01

    We introduce a framework for the discovery of dominant relationship patterns in transcription networks, by compressing the network into a power graph with overlapping power nodes. Our application of this approach to the transcription networks of S. cerevisiae and E. coli, paired with GO term enrichment analysis, provides a highly informative overview of the most prominent relationships in the gene regulatory networks of these two organisms.

  3. Decreasing Risky Behavior on Social Network Sites: The Impact of Parental Involvement in Secondary Education Interventions.

    PubMed

    Vanderhoven, Ellen; Schellens, Tammy; Valcke, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Teenagers face significant risks when using increasingly popular social network sites. Prevention and intervention efforts to raise awareness about these risks and to change risky behavior (so-called "e-safety" interventions) are essential for the wellbeing of these minors. However, several studies have revealed that while school interventions often affect awareness, they have only a limited impact on pupils' unsafe behavior. Utilizing the Theory of Planned Behavior and theories about parental involvement, we hypothesized that involving parents in an e-safety intervention would positively influence pupils' intentions and behavior. In a quasi-experimental study with pre- and post-test measures involving 207 pupils in secondary education, we compared the impact of an intervention without parental involvement with one that included active parental involvement by means of a homework task. We found that whereas parental involvement was not necessary to improve the intervention's impact on risk awareness, it did change intentions to engage in certain unsafe behavior, such as posting personal and sexual information on the profile page of a social network site, and in reducing existing problematic behavior. This beneficial impact was particularly evident for boys. These findings suggest that developing prevention campaigns with active parental involvement is well worth the effort. Researchers and developers should therefore focus on other efficient strategies to involve parents.

  4. The reverse cholesterol transport pathway improves understanding of genetic networks for fat deposition and muscle growth in beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Tyler F; Wu, Xiao-Lin; Pan, Zengxiang; Michal, Jennifer J; Wright, Raymond W; Killinger, Karen M; MacNeil, Michael D; Jiang, Zhihua

    2010-12-03

    In the present study, thirteen genes involved in the reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) pathway were investigated for their associations with three fat depositions, eight fatty acid compositions and two growth-related phenotypes in a Wagyu x Limousin reference population, including 6 F(1) bulls, 113 F(1) dams, and 246 F(2) progeny. A total of 37 amplicons were used to screen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on 6 F(1) bulls. Among 36 SNPs detected in 11 of these 13 genes, 19 were selected for genotyping by the Sequenom assay design on all F(2) progeny. Single-marker analysis revealed seven SNPs in ATP binding cassette A1, apolipoproteins A1, B and E, phospholipid transfer protein and paraoxinase 1 genes significantly associated with nine phenotypes (P<0.05). Previously, we reported genetic networks associated with 19 complex phenotypes based on a total of 138 genetic polymorphisms derived from 71 known functional genes. Therefore, after Bonferroni correction, these significant (adjusted P<0.05) and suggestive (adjusted P<0.10) associations were then used to identify genetic networks related to the RCT pathway. Multiple-marker analysis suggested possible genetic networks involving the RCT pathway for kidney-pelvic-heart fat percentage, rib-eye area, and subcutaneous fat depth phenotypes with markers derived from paraoxinase 1, apolipoproteins A1 and E, respectively. The present study confirmed that genes involved in cholesterol homeostasis are useful targets for investigating obesity in humans as well as for improving meat quality phenotypes in a livestock production.

  5. Involvement or Isolation? The Social Networks of Children with Autism in Regular Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamberlain, Brandt; Kasari, Connie; Rotheram-Fuller, Erin

    2007-01-01

    Including children with autism in regular classrooms has become prevalent; yet some evidence suggests such placements could increase the risk of isolation and rejection. In this study, we used social network methods to explore the involvement of children with autism in typical classrooms. Participants were 398 children (196 boys) in regular 2nd…

  6. Students' Involvement in Social Networking and Attitudes towards Its Integration into Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umoh, Ukeme Ekpedeme; Etuk, Etuk Nssien

    2016-01-01

    The study examined Students' Involvement in Social Networking and attitudes towards its Integration into Teaching. The study was carried out in the University of Uyo, Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria. The population of the study consisted of 17,618 undergraduate students enrolled into full time degree programmes in the University of Uyo for 2014/2015…

  7. Community (in) Colleges: The Relationship Between Online Network Involvement and Academic Outcomes at a Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Eliza D.; McFarland, Daniel A.; Rios-Aguilar, Cecilia; Deil-Amen, Regina

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study explores the relationship between online social network involvement and academic outcomes among community college students. Prior theory hypothesizes that socio-academic moments are especially important for the integration of students into community colleges and that integration is related to academic outcomes. Online social…

  8. Cambodian Parental Involvement: The Role of Parental Beliefs, Social Networks, and Trust

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eng, Sothy; Szmodis, Whitney; Mulsow, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    The role of social capital (parental beliefs, social networks, and trust) as a predictor of parental involvement in Cambodian children's education was examined, controlling for human capital (family socioeconomic status). Parents of elementary students (n = 273) were interviewed face to face in Cambodia. Teacher contact scored highest, followed by…

  9. Genetic Network and Breeding Patterns of a Sicklefin Lemon Shark (Negaprion acutidens) Population in the Society Islands, French Polynesia

    PubMed Central

    Mourier, Johann; Buray, Nicolas; Schultz, Jennifer K.; Clua, Eric; Planes, Serge

    2013-01-01

    Human pressures have put many top predator populations at risk of extinction. Recent years have seen alarming declines in sharks worldwide, while their resilience remains poorly understood. Studying the ecology of small populations of marine predators is a priority to better understand their ability to withstand anthropogenic and environmental stressors. In the present study, we monitored a naturally small island population of 40 adult sicklefin lemon sharks in Moorea, French Polynesia over 5 years. We reconstructed the genetic relationships among individuals and determined the population’s mating system. The genetic network illustrates that all individuals, except one, are interconnected at least through one first order genetic relationship. While this species developed a clear inbreeding avoidance strategy involving dispersal and migration, the small population size, low number of breeders, and the fragmented environment characterizing these tropical islands, limits its complete effectiveness. PMID:23967354

  10. Theta Oscillation Reveals the Temporal Involvement of Different Attentional Networks in Contingent Reorienting

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chi-Fu; Liang, Wei-Kuang; Lai, Chiou-Lian; Hung, Daisy L.; Juan, Chi-Hung

    2016-01-01

    In the visual world, rapidly reorienting to relevant objects outside the focus of attention is vital for survival. This ability from the interaction between goal-directed and stimulus-driven attentional control is termed contingent reorienting. Neuroimaging studies have demonstrated activations of the ventral and dorsal attentional networks (DANs) which exhibit right hemisphere dominance, but the temporal dynamics of the attentional networks still remain unclear. The present study used event-related potential (ERP) to index the locus of spatial attention and Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) to acquire the time-frequency information during contingent reorienting. The ERP results showed contingent reorienting induced significant N2pc on both hemispheres. In contrast, our time-frequency analysis found further that, unlike the N2pc, theta oscillation during contingent reorienting differed between hemispheres and experimental sessions. The inter-trial coherence (ITC) of the theta oscillation demonstrated that the two sides of the attentional networks became phase-locked to contingent reorienting at different stages. The left attentional networks were associated with contingent reorienting in the first experimental session whereas the bilateral attentional networks play a more important role in this process in the subsequent session. This phase-locked information suggests a dynamic temporal evolution of the involvement of different attentional networks in contingent reorienting and a potential role of the left ventral network in the first session. PMID:27375459

  11. Analysis of genetic interaction networks shows that alternatively spliced genes are highly versatile.

    PubMed

    Talavera, David; Sheoran, Ritika; Lovell, Simon C

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing has the potential to increase the diversity of the transcriptome and proteome. Where more than one transcript arises from a gene they are often so different that they are quite unlikely to have the same function. However, it remains unclear if alternative splicing generally leads to a gene being involved in multiple biological processes or whether it alters the function within a single process. Knowing that genetic interactions occur between functionally related genes, we have used them as a proxy for functional versatility, and have analysed the sets of genes of two well-characterised model organisms: Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster. Using network analyses we find that few genes are functionally homogenous (only involved in a few functionally-related biological processes). Moreover, there are differences between alternatively spliced genes and genes with a single transcript; specifically, genes with alternatively splicing are, on average, involved in more biological processes. Finally, we suggest that factors other than specific functional classes determine whether a gene is alternatively spliced.

  12. Achromobacter xylosoxidans: an emerging pathogen carrying different elements involved in horizontal genetic transfer.

    PubMed

    Traglia, German Matías; Almuzara, Marisa; Merkier, Andrea Karina; Adams, Christina; Galanternik, Laura; Vay, Carlos; Centrón, Daniela; Ramírez, María Soledad

    2012-12-01

    In the last few years, numerous cases of multidrug-resistant Achromobacter xylosoxidans infections have been documented in immunocompromised and cystic fibrosis patients. To gain insights into the molecular mechanisms and mobile elements related to multidrug resistance in this bacterium, we studied 24 non-epidemiological A. xylosoxidans clinical isolates from Argentina. Specific primers for plasmids, transposons, insertion sequences, bla(ampC), intI1, and intI2 genes were used in PCR reactions. The obtained results showed the presence of wide host range IncP plasmids in ten isolates and a high dispersion of class 1 integrons (n = 10) and class 2 integrons (n = 3). Four arrays in the variable region (vr) of class 1 integrons were identified carrying different gene cassettes as the aminoglycoside resistance aac(6')-Ib and aadA1, the trimethoprim resistance dfrA1 and dfrA16, and the β-lactamase bla(OXA-2). In only one of the class 2 integrons, a vr was amplified that includes sat2-aadA1. The bla(ampC) gene was found in all isolates, confirming its ubiquitous nature. Our results show that A. xylosoxidans clinical isolates contain a rich variety of genetic elements commonly associated with resistance genes and their dissemination. This supports the hypothesis that A. xylosoxidans is becoming a reservoir of horizontal genetic transfer elements commonly involved in spreading antibiotic resistance.

  13. Systematic Analysis of the Genetic Variability That Impacts SUMO Conjugation and Their Involvement in Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hao-Dong; Shi, Shao-Ping; Chen, Xiang; Qiu, Jian-Ding

    2015-01-01

    Protein function has been observed to rely on select essential sites instead of requiring all sites to be indispensable. Small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) conjugation or sumoylation, which is a highly dynamic reversible process and its outcomes are extremely diverse, ranging from changes in localization to altered activity and, in some cases, stability of the modified, has shown to be especially valuable in cellular biology. Motivated by the significance of SUMO conjugation in biological processes, we report here on the first exploratory assessment whether sumoylation related genetic variability impacts protein functions as well as the occurrence of diseases related to SUMO. Here, we defined the SUMOAMVR as sumoylation related amino acid variations that affect sumoylation sites or enzymes involved in the process of connectivity, and categorized four types of potential SUMOAMVRs. We detected that 17.13% of amino acid variations are potential SUMOAMVRs and 4.83% of disease mutations could lead to SUMOAMVR with our system. More interestingly, the statistical analysis demonstrates that the amino acid variations that directly create new potential lysine sumoylation sites are more likely to cause diseases. It can be anticipated that our method can provide more instructive guidance to identify the mechanisms of genetic diseases. PMID:26154679

  14. Curve-based multivariate distance matrix regression analysis: application to genetic association analyses involving repeated measures

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Rany M.; O'Connor, Daniel T.

    2010-01-01

    Most, if not all, human phenotypes exhibit a temporal, dosage-dependent, or age effect. Despite this fact, it is rare that data are collected over time or in sequence in relevant studies of the determinants of these phenotypes. The costs and organizational sophistication necessary to collect repeated measurements or longitudinal data for a given phenotype are clearly impediments to this, but greater efforts in this area are needed if insights into human phenotypic expression are to be obtained. Appropriate data analysis methods for genetic association studies involving repeated or longitudinal measures are also needed. We consider the use of longitudinal profiles obtained from fitted functions on repeated data collections from a set of individuals whose similarities are contrasted between sets of individuals with different genotypes to test hypotheses about genetic influences on time-dependent phenotype expression. The proposed approach can accommodate uncertainty of the fitted functions, as well as weighting factors across the time points, and is easily extended to a wide variety of complex analysis settings. We showcase the proposed approach with data from a clinical study investigating human blood vessel response to tyramine. We also compare the proposed approach with standard analytic procedures and investigate its robustness and power via simulation studies. The proposed approach is found to be quite flexible and performs either as well or better than traditional statistical methods. PMID:20423962

  15. Systematic Analysis of the Genetic Variability That Impacts SUMO Conjugation and Their Involvement in Human Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hao-Dong; Shi, Shao-Ping; Chen, Xiang; Qiu, Jian-Ding

    2015-07-01

    Protein function has been observed to rely on select essential sites instead of requiring all sites to be indispensable. Small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) conjugation or sumoylation, which is a highly dynamic reversible process and its outcomes are extremely diverse, ranging from changes in localization to altered activity and, in some cases, stability of the modified, has shown to be especially valuable in cellular biology. Motivated by the significance of SUMO conjugation in biological processes, we report here on the first exploratory assessment whether sumoylation related genetic variability impacts protein functions as well as the occurrence of diseases related to SUMO. Here, we defined the SUMOAMVR as sumoylation related amino acid variations that affect sumoylation sites or enzymes involved in the process of connectivity, and categorized four types of potential SUMOAMVRs. We detected that 17.13% of amino acid variations are potential SUMOAMVRs and 4.83% of disease mutations could lead to SUMOAMVR with our system. More interestingly, the statistical analysis demonstrates that the amino acid variations that directly create new potential lysine sumoylation sites are more likely to cause diseases. It can be anticipated that our method can provide more instructive guidance to identify the mechanisms of genetic diseases.

  16. Untangling genetic networks of panic, phobia, fear and anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Villafuerte, Sandra; Burmeister, Margit

    2003-01-01

    As is the case for normal individual variation in anxiety levels, the conditions panic disorder, agoraphobia and other phobias have a significant genetic basis. Recent reports have started to untangle the genetic relationships between predispositions to anxiety and anxiety disorders. PMID:12914652

  17. Finding friends and enemies in an enemies-only network: A graph diffusion kernel for predicting novel genetic interactions and co-complex membership from yeast genetic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yan; Suhail, Yasir; Lin, Yu-yi; Boeke, Jef D.; Bader, Joel S.

    2008-01-01

    The yeast synthetic lethal genetic interaction network contains rich information about underlying pathways and protein complexes as well as new genetic interactions yet to be discovered. We have developed a graph diffusion kernel as a unified framework for inferring complex/pathway membership analogous to “friends” and genetic interactions analogous to “enemies” from the genetic interaction network. When applied to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae synthetic lethal genetic interaction network, we can achieve a precision around 50% with 20% to 50% recall in the genome-wide prediction of new genetic interactions, supported by experimental validation. The kernels show significant improvement over previous best methods for predicting genetic interactions and protein co-complex membership from genetic interaction data. PMID:18832443

  18. Speech recognition method based on genetic vector quantization and BP neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Li'ai; Li, Lihua; Zhou, Jian; Zhao, Qiuxia

    2009-07-01

    Vector Quantization is one of popular codebook design methods for speech recognition at present. In the process of codebook design, traditional LBG algorithm owns the advantage of fast convergence, but it is easy to get the local optimal result and be influenced by initial codebook. According to the understanding that Genetic Algorithm has the capability of getting the global optimal result, this paper proposes a hybrid clustering method GA-L based on Genetic Algorithm and LBG algorithm to improve the codebook.. Then using genetic neural networks for speech recognition. consequently search a global optimization codebook of the training vector space. The experiments show that neural network identification method based on genetic algorithm can extricate from its local maximum value and the initial restrictions, it can show superior to the standard genetic algorithm and BP neural network algorithm from various sources, and the genetic BP neural networks has a higher recognition rate and the unique application advantages than the general BP neural network in the same GA-VQ codebook, it can achieve a win-win situation in the time and efficiency.

  19. Using attribute grammars for the genetic selection of back-propagation networks for character recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browse, Roger A.; Hussain, Talib S.; Smillie, Matthew B.

    1999-03-01

    Determining exactly which neural network architecture, with which parameters, will provide the best solution to a classification task is often based upon the intuitions and experience of the implementers of neural network solutions. The research presented in this paper is centered on the development of automated methods for the selection of appropriate networks, as applied to character recognition. The Network Generating Attribute Grammar Encoding system is a compact and general method for the specification of commonly accepted network architectures that can be easily expanded to include novel architectures, or that can be easily restricted to a small subset of some known architecture. Within this system, the context-free component of the attribute grammar specifies a class of basic architectures by using the non-terminals to represent network, layers and component structures. The inherited and synthesized attributes indicate the connections necessary to develop a functioning network from any parse tree that is generated from the grammar. The attribute grammar encoding is particularly conducive to the use of genetic algorithms as a strategy for searching the space of possible networks. The resultant parse trees are used as the genetic code, permitting a variety of different genetic manipulations. We apply this approach in the generation of backpropagation networks for recognition of characters from a set consisting of 20,000 examples of 26 letters.

  20. Selection Shapes Transcriptional Logic and Regulatory Specialization in Genetic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Fogelmark, Karl; Peterson, Carsten; Troein, Carl

    2016-01-01

    Background Living organisms need to regulate their gene expression in response to environmental signals and internal cues. This is a computational task where genes act as logic gates that connect to form transcriptional networks, which are shaped at all scales by evolution. Large-scale mutations such as gene duplications and deletions add and remove network components, whereas smaller mutations alter the connections between them. Selection determines what mutations are accepted, but its importance for shaping the resulting networks has been debated. Methodology To investigate the effects of selection in the shaping of transcriptional networks, we derive transcriptional logic from a combinatorially powerful yet tractable model of the binding between DNA and transcription factors. By evolving the resulting networks based on their ability to function as either a simple decision system or a circadian clock, we obtain information on the regulation and logic rules encoded in functional transcriptional networks. Comparisons are made between networks evolved for different functions, as well as with structurally equivalent but non-functional (neutrally evolved) networks, and predictions are validated against the transcriptional network of E. coli. Principal Findings We find that the logic rules governing gene expression depend on the function performed by the network. Unlike the decision systems, the circadian clocks show strong cooperative binding and negative regulation, which achieves tight temporal control of gene expression. Furthermore, we find that transcription factors act preferentially as either activators or repressors, both when binding multiple sites for a single target gene and globally in the transcriptional networks. This separation into positive and negative regulators requires gene duplications, which highlights the interplay between mutation and selection in shaping the transcriptional networks. PMID:26927540

  1. Genetic Dissection of a Regionally Differentiated Network for Exploratory Behavior in Drosophila Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Berni, Jimena

    2015-01-01

    Summary An efficient strategy to explore the environment for available resources involves the execution of random walks where straight line locomotion alternates with changes of direction. This strategy is highly conserved in the animal kingdom, from zooplankton to human hunter-gatherers [1–8]. Drosophila larvae execute a routine of this kind, performing straight line crawling interrupted at intervals by pause turns that halt crawling and redirect the trajectory of movement [9–11]. The execution of this routine depends solely on the activity of networks located in the thoracic and abdominal segments of the nervous system, while descending input from the brain serves to modify it in a context-dependent fashion [9]. I used a genetic method to investigate the location and function of the circuitry required for the different elements of exploratory crawling. By using the Slit-Robo axon guidance pathway to target neuronal midline crossing defects selectively to particular regions of the thoracic and abdominal networks, it has been possible to define at least three functions required for the performance of the exploratory routine: (1) symmetrical outputs in thoracic and abdominal segments that generate the crawls; (2) asymmetrical output that is uniquely initiated in the thoracic segments and generates the turns; and (3) an intermittent interruption to crawling that determines the time-dependent transition between crawls and turns. PMID:25959962

  2. A Multi-Stage Reverse Logistics Network Problem by Using Hybrid Priority-Based Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeong-Eun; Gen, Mitsuo; Rhee, Kyong-Gu

    Today remanufacturing problem is one of the most important problems regarding to the environmental aspects of the recovery of used products and materials. Therefore, the reverse logistics is gaining become power and great potential for winning consumers in a more competitive context in the future. This paper considers the multi-stage reverse Logistics Network Problem (m-rLNP) while minimizing the total cost, which involves reverse logistics shipping cost and fixed cost of opening the disassembly centers and processing centers. In this study, we first formulate the m-rLNP model as a three-stage logistics network model. Following for solving this problem, we propose a Genetic Algorithm pri (GA) with priority-based encoding method consisting of two stages, and introduce a new crossover operator called Weight Mapping Crossover (WMX). Additionally also a heuristic approach is applied in the 3rd stage to ship of materials from processing center to manufacturer. Finally numerical experiments with various scales of the m-rLNP models demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of our approach by comparing with the recent researches.

  3. Genetic dissection of a regionally differentiated network for exploratory behavior in Drosophila larvae.

    PubMed

    Berni, Jimena

    2015-05-18

    An efficient strategy to explore the environment for available resources involves the execution of random walks where straight line locomotion alternates with changes of direction. This strategy is highly conserved in the animal kingdom, from zooplankton to human hunter-gatherers. Drosophila larvae execute a routine of this kind, performing straight line crawling interrupted at intervals by pause turns that halt crawling and redirect the trajectory of movement. The execution of this routine depends solely on the activity of networks located in the thoracic and abdominal segments of the nervous system, while descending input from the brain serves to modify it in a context-dependent fashion. I used a genetic method to investigate the location and function of the circuitry required for the different elements of exploratory crawling. By using the Slit-Robo axon guidance pathway to target neuronal midline crossing defects selectively to particular regions of the thoracic and abdominal networks, it has been possible to define at least three functions required for the performance of the exploratory routine: (1) symmetrical outputs in thoracic and abdominal segments that generate the crawls; (2) asymmetrical output that is uniquely initiated in the thoracic segments and generates the turns; and (3) an intermittent interruption to crawling that determines the time-dependent transition between crawls and turns.

  4. Genetic algorithms for the design of looped irrigation water distribution networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reca, Juan; MartíNez, Juan

    2006-05-01

    A new computer model called Genetic Algorithm Pipe Network Optimization Model (GENOME) has been developed with the aim of optimizing the design of new looped irrigation water distribution networks. The model is based on a genetic algorithm method, although relevant modifications and improvements have been implemented to adapt the model to this specific problem. It makes use of the robust network solver EPANET. The model has been tested and validated by applying it to the least cost optimization of several benchmark networks reported in the literature. The results obtained with GENOME have been compared with those found in previous works, obtaining the same results as the best published in the literature to date. Once the model was validated, the optimization of a real complex irrigation network has been carried out to evaluate the potential of the genetic algorithm for the optimal design of large-scale networks. Although satisfactory results have been obtained, some adjustments would be desirable to improve the performance of genetic algorithms when the complexity of the network requires it.

  5. Social and Genetic Networks of HIV-1 Transmission in New York City

    PubMed Central

    Wertheim, Joel O.; Kosakovsky Pond, Sergei L.; Forgione, Lisa A.; Mehta, Sanjay R.; Murrell, Ben; Shah, Sharmila; Smith, Davey M.; Scheffler, Konrad; Torian, Lucia V.

    2017-01-01

    Background Sexually transmitted infections spread across contact networks. Partner elicitation and notification are commonly used public health tools to identify, notify, and offer testing to persons linked in these contact networks. For HIV-1, a rapidly evolving pathogen with low per-contact transmission rates, viral genetic sequences are an additional source of data that can be used to infer or refine transmission networks. Methods and Findings The New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene interviews individuals newly diagnosed with HIV and elicits names of sexual and injection drug using partners. By law, the Department of Health also receives HIV sequences when these individuals enter healthcare and their physicians order resistance testing. Our study used both HIV sequence and partner naming data from 1342 HIV-infected persons in New York City between 2006 and 2012 to infer and compare sexual/drug-use named partner and genetic transmission networks. Using these networks, we determined a range of genetic distance thresholds suitable for identifying potential transmission partners. In 48% of cases, named partners were infected with genetically closely related viruses, compatible with but not necessarily representing or implying, direct transmission. Partner pairs linked through the genetic similarity of their HIV sequences were also linked by naming in 53% of cases. Persons who reported high-risk heterosexual contact were more likely to name at least one partner with a genetically similar virus than those reporting their risk as injection drug use or men who have sex with men. Conclusions We analyzed an unprecedentedly large and detailed partner tracing and HIV sequence dataset and determined an empirically justified range of genetic distance thresholds for identifying potential transmission partners. We conclude that genetic linkage provides more reliable evidence for identifying potential transmission partners than partner naming, highlighting the

  6. Multi-objective optimization of long-term groundwater monitoring network design using a probabilistic Pareto genetic algorithm under uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Qiankun; Wu, Jianfeng; Yang, Yun; Qian, Jiazhong; Wu, Jichun

    2016-03-01

    Optimal design of long term groundwater monitoring (LTGM) network often involves conflicting objectives and substantial uncertainty arising from insufficient hydraulic conductivity (K) data. This study develops a new multi-objective simulation-optimization model involving four objectives: minimizations of (i) the total sampling costs for monitoring contaminant plume, (ii) mass estimation error, (iii) the first moment estimation error, and (iv) the second moment estimation error of the contaminant plume, for LTGM network design problems. Then a new probabilistic Pareto genetic algorithm (PPGA) coupled with the commonly used flow and transport codes, MODFLOW and MT3DMS, is developed to search for the Pareto-optimal solutions to the multi-objective LTGM problems under uncertainty of the K-fields. The PPGA integrates the niched Pareto genetic algorithm with probabilistic Pareto sorting scheme to deal with the uncertainty of objectives caused by the uncertain K-field. Also, the elitist selection strategy, the operation library and the Pareto solution set filter are conducted to improve the diversity and reliability of Pareto-optimal solutions by the PPGA. Furthermore, the sampling strategy of noisy genetic algorithm is adopted to cope with the uncertainty of the K-fields and improve the computational efficiency of the PPGA. In particular, Monte Carlo (MC) analysis is employed to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed methodology in finding Pareto-optimal sampling network designs of LTGM systems through a two-dimensional hypothetical example and a three-dimensional field application in Indiana (USA). Comprehensive analysis demonstrates that the proposed PPGA can find Pareto optimal solutions with low variability and high reliability and is a promising tool for optimizing multi-objective LTGM network designs under uncertainty.

  7. De novo deleterious genetic variations target a biological network centered on Aβ peptide in early-onset Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Rovelet-Lecrux, A; Charbonnier, C; Wallon, D; Nicolas, G; Seaman, M N J; Pottier, C; Breusegem, S Y; Mathur, P P; Jenardhanan, P; Le Guennec, K; Mukadam, A S; Quenez, O; Coutant, S; Rousseau, S; Richard, A-C; Boland, A; Deleuze, J-F; Frebourg, T; Hannequin, D; Campion, D

    2015-09-01

    We hypothesized that de novo variants (DNV) might participate in the genetic determinism of sporadic early-onset Alzheimer disease (EOAD, onset before 65 years). We investigated 14 sporadic EOAD trios first by array-comparative genomic hybridization. Two patients carried a de novo copy number variation (CNV). We then performed whole-exome sequencing in the 12 remaining trios and identified 12 non-synonymous DNVs in six patients. The two de novo CNVs (an amyloid precursor protein (APP) duplication and a BACE2 intronic deletion) and 3/12 non-synonymous DNVs (in PSEN1, VPS35 and MARK4) targeted genes from a biological network centered on the Amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide. We showed that this a priori-defined genetic network was significantly enriched in amino acid-altering DNV, compared with the rest of the exome. The causality of the APP de novo duplication (which is the first reported one) was obvious. In addition, we provided evidence of the functional impact of the following three non-synonymous DNVs targeting this network: the novel PSEN1 variant resulted in exon 9 skipping in patient's RNA, leading to a pathogenic missense at exons 8-10 junction; the VPS35 missense variant led to partial loss of retromer function, which may impact neuronal APP trafficking and Aβ secretion; and the MARK4 multiple nucleotide variant resulted into increased Tau phosphorylation, which may trigger enhanced Aβ-induced toxicity. Despite the difficulty to recruit Alzheimer disease (AD) trios owing to age structures of the pedigrees and the genetic heterogeneity of the disease, this strategy allowed us to highlight the role of de novo pathogenic events, the putative involvement of new genes in AD genetics and the key role of Aβ network alteration in AD.

  8. Systems genetics of obesity in an F2 pig model by genome-wide association, genetic network, and pathway analyses

    PubMed Central

    Kogelman, Lisette J. A.; Pant, Sameer D.; Fredholm, Merete; Kadarmideen, Haja N.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a complex condition with world-wide exponentially rising prevalence rates, linked with severe diseases like Type 2 Diabetes. Economic and welfare consequences have led to a raised interest in a better understanding of the biological and genetic background. To date, whole genome investigations focusing on single genetic variants have achieved limited success, and the importance of including genetic interactions is becoming evident. Here, the aim was to perform an integrative genomic analysis in an F2 pig resource population that was constructed with an aim to maximize genetic variation of obesity-related phenotypes and genotyped using the 60K SNP chip. Firstly, Genome Wide Association (GWA) analysis was performed on the Obesity Index to locate candidate genomic regions that were further validated using combined Linkage Disequilibrium Linkage Analysis and investigated by evaluation of haplotype blocks. We built Weighted Interaction SNP Hub (WISH) and differentially wired (DW) networks using genotypic correlations amongst obesity-associated SNPs resulting from GWA analysis. GWA results and SNP modules detected by WISH and DW analyses were further investigated by functional enrichment analyses. The functional annotation of SNPs revealed several genes associated with obesity, e.g., NPC2 and OR4D10. Moreover, gene enrichment analyses identified several significantly associated pathways, over and above the GWA study results, that may influence obesity and obesity related diseases, e.g., metabolic processes. WISH networks based on genotypic correlations allowed further identification of various gene ontology terms and pathways related to obesity and related traits, which were not identified by the GWA study. In conclusion, this is the first study to develop a (genetic) obesity index and employ systems genetics in a porcine model to provide important insights into the complex genetic architecture associated with obesity and many biological pathways that underlie

  9. Combining epidemiological and genetic networks signifies the importance of early treatment in HIV-1 transmission.

    PubMed

    Zarrabi, Narges; Prosperi, Mattia; Belleman, Robert G; Colafigli, Manuela; De Luca, Andrea; Sloot, Peter M A

    2012-01-01

    Inferring disease transmission networks is important in epidemiology in order to understand and prevent the spread of infectious diseases. Reconstruction of the infection transmission networks requires insight into viral genome data as well as social interactions. For the HIV-1 epidemic, current research either uses genetic information of patients' virus to infer the past infection events or uses statistics of sexual interactions to model the network structure of viral spreading. Methods for a reliable reconstruction of HIV-1 transmission dynamics, taking into account both molecular and societal data are still lacking. The aim of this study is to combine information from both genetic and epidemiological scales to characterize and analyse a transmission network of the HIV-1 epidemic in central Italy.We introduce a novel filter-reduction method to build a network of HIV infected patients based on their social and treatment information. The network is then combined with a genetic network, to infer a hypothetical infection transmission network. We apply this method to a cohort study of HIV-1 infected patients in central Italy and find that patients who are highly connected in the network have longer untreated infection periods. We also find that the network structures for homosexual males and heterosexual populations are heterogeneous, consisting of a majority of 'peripheral nodes' that have only a few sexual interactions and a minority of 'hub nodes' that have many sexual interactions. Inferring HIV-1 transmission networks using this novel combined approach reveals remarkable correlations between high out-degree individuals and longer untreated infection periods. These findings signify the importance of early treatment and support the potential benefit of wide population screening, management of early diagnoses and anticipated antiretroviral treatment to prevent viral transmission and spread. The approach presented here for reconstructing HIV-1 transmission networks

  10. Dynamic brain network reconfiguration as a potential schizophrenia genetic risk mechanism modulated by NMDA receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Urs; Schäfer, Axel; Rausch, Franziska; Schweiger, Janina I.; Bilek, Edda; Erk, Susanne; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Grimm, Oliver; Geiger, Lena S.; Haddad, Leila; Otto, Kristina; Mohnke, Sebastian; Heinz, Andreas; Zink, Mathias; Walter, Henrik; Schwarz, Emanuel; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Tost, Heike

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is increasingly recognized as a disorder of distributed neural dynamics, but the molecular and genetic contributions are poorly understood. Recent work highlights a role for altered N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor signaling and related impairments in the excitation–inhibitory balance and synchrony of large-scale neural networks. Here, we combined a pharmacological intervention with novel techniques from dynamic network neuroscience applied to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to identify alterations in the dynamic reconfiguration of brain networks related to schizophrenia genetic risk and NMDA receptor hypofunction. We quantified “network flexibility,” a measure of the dynamic reconfiguration of the community structure of time-variant brain networks during working memory performance. Comparing 28 patients with schizophrenia, 37 unaffected first-degree relatives, and 139 healthy controls, we detected significant differences in network flexibility [F(2,196) = 6.541, P = 0.002] in a pattern consistent with the assumed genetic risk load of the groups (highest for patients, intermediate for relatives, and lowest for controls). In an observer-blinded, placebo-controlled, randomized, cross-over pharmacological challenge study in 37 healthy controls, we further detected a significant increase in network flexibility as a result of NMDA receptor antagonism with 120 mg dextromethorphan [F(1,34) = 5.291, P = 0.028]. Our results identify a potential dynamic network intermediate phenotype related to the genetic liability for schizophrenia that manifests as altered reconfiguration of brain networks during working memory. The phenotype appears to be influenced by NMDA receptor antagonism, consistent with a critical role for glutamate in the temporal coordination of neural networks and the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. PMID:27791105

  11. Dynamic brain network reconfiguration as a potential schizophrenia genetic risk mechanism modulated by NMDA receptor function.

    PubMed

    Braun, Urs; Schäfer, Axel; Bassett, Danielle S; Rausch, Franziska; Schweiger, Janina I; Bilek, Edda; Erk, Susanne; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Grimm, Oliver; Geiger, Lena S; Haddad, Leila; Otto, Kristina; Mohnke, Sebastian; Heinz, Andreas; Zink, Mathias; Walter, Henrik; Schwarz, Emanuel; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Tost, Heike

    2016-11-01

    Schizophrenia is increasingly recognized as a disorder of distributed neural dynamics, but the molecular and genetic contributions are poorly understood. Recent work highlights a role for altered N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor signaling and related impairments in the excitation-inhibitory balance and synchrony of large-scale neural networks. Here, we combined a pharmacological intervention with novel techniques from dynamic network neuroscience applied to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to identify alterations in the dynamic reconfiguration of brain networks related to schizophrenia genetic risk and NMDA receptor hypofunction. We quantified "network flexibility," a measure of the dynamic reconfiguration of the community structure of time-variant brain networks during working memory performance. Comparing 28 patients with schizophrenia, 37 unaffected first-degree relatives, and 139 healthy controls, we detected significant differences in network flexibility [F(2,196) = 6.541, P = 0.002] in a pattern consistent with the assumed genetic risk load of the groups (highest for patients, intermediate for relatives, and lowest for controls). In an observer-blinded, placebo-controlled, randomized, cross-over pharmacological challenge study in 37 healthy controls, we further detected a significant increase in network flexibility as a result of NMDA receptor antagonism with 120 mg dextromethorphan [F(1,34) = 5.291, P = 0.028]. Our results identify a potential dynamic network intermediate phenotype related to the genetic liability for schizophrenia that manifests as altered reconfiguration of brain networks during working memory. The phenotype appears to be influenced by NMDA receptor antagonism, consistent with a critical role for glutamate in the temporal coordination of neural networks and the pathophysiology of schizophrenia.

  12. Recurrent neural network for non-smooth convex optimization problems with application to the identification of genetic regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Long; Hou, Zeng-Guang; Lin, Yingzi; Tan, Min; Zhang, Wenjun Chris; Wu, Fang-Xiang

    2011-05-01

    A recurrent neural network is proposed for solving the non-smooth convex optimization problem with the convex inequality and linear equality constraints. Since the objective function and inequality constraints may not be smooth, the Clarke's generalized gradients of the objective function and inequality constraints are employed to describe the dynamics of the proposed neural network. It is proved that the equilibrium point set of the proposed neural network is equivalent to the optimal solution of the original optimization problem by using the Lagrangian saddle-point theorem. Under weak conditions, the proposed neural network is proved to be stable, and the state of the neural network is convergent to one of its equilibrium points. Compared with the existing neural network models for non-smooth optimization problems, the proposed neural network can deal with a larger class of constraints and is not based on the penalty method. Finally, the proposed neural network is used to solve the identification problem of genetic regulatory networks, which can be transformed into a non-smooth convex optimization problem. The simulation results show the satisfactory identification accuracy, which demonstrates the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed approach.

  13. Kin in space: social viscosity in a spatially and genetically substructured network

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Jochen B.W; Trillmich, Fritz

    2008-01-01

    Population substructuring is a fundamental aspect of animal societies. A growing number of theoretical studies recognize that who-meets-whom is not random, but rather determined by spatial relationships or illustrated by social networks. Structural properties of large highly dynamic social systems are notoriously difficult to unravel. Network approaches provide powerful ways to analyse the intricate relationships between social behaviour, dispersal strategies and genetic structure. Applying network analytical tools to a colony of the highly gregarious Galápagos sea lion (Zalophus wollebaeki), we find several genetic clusters that correspond to spatially determined ‘network communities’. Overall relatedness was low, and genetic structure in the network can be interpreted as an emergent property of philopatry and seems not to be primarily driven by targeted interactions among highly related individuals in family groups. Nevertheless, social relationships between directly adjacent individuals in the network were stronger among genetically more similar individuals. Taken together, these results suggest that even small differences in the degree of relatedness can influence behavioural decisions. This raises the fascinating prospect that kin selection may also apply to low levels of relatedness within densely packed animal groups where less obvious co-operative interactions such as increased tolerance and stress reduction are important. PMID:18522913

  14. Kin in space: social viscosity in a spatially and genetically substructured network.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Jochen B W; Trillmich, Fritz

    2008-09-22

    Population substructuring is a fundamental aspect of animal societies. A growing number of theoretical studies recognize that who-meets-whom is not random, but rather determined by spatial relationships or illustrated by social networks. Structural properties of large highly dynamic social systems are notoriously difficult to unravel. Network approaches provide powerful ways to analyse the intricate relationships between social behaviour, dispersal strategies and genetic structure. Applying network analytical tools to a colony of the highly gregarious Galápagos sea lion (Zalophus wollebaeki), we find several genetic clusters that correspond to spatially determined 'network communities'. Overall relatedness was low, and genetic structure in the network can be interpreted as an emergent property of philopatry and seems not to be primarily driven by targeted interactions among highly related individuals in family groups. Nevertheless, social relationships between directly adjacent individuals in the network were stronger among genetically more similar individuals. Taken together, these results suggest that even small differences in the degree of relatedness can influence behavioural decisions. This raises the fascinating prospect that kin selection may also apply to low levels of relatedness within densely packed animal groups where less obvious co-operative interactions such as increased tolerance and stress reduction are important.

  15. Specialized Genetic Recombination Systems in Bacteria: Their Involvement in Gene Expression and Evolution,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    Classical genetics’and recent studies in molecular ga,- enetics have revealed a variet: of’ genetic exchange s, stems in bacteria. These recobination s- stems ...not drawn to scale?) .The borer geneous terminal sequences, turcne by i .’u . consist of random bacterial sequenco s that va’ y in conmpostlon and3 1’ n...eonts, originally used to define mobile genetic elements in maize (McClintock 1952), has been used colloquially to refer to all transposable genetic

  16. Bayesian network reconstruction using systems genetics data: comparison of MCMC methods.

    PubMed

    Tasaki, Shinya; Sauerwine, Ben; Hoff, Bruce; Toyoshiba, Hiroyoshi; Gaiteri, Chris; Chaibub Neto, Elias

    2015-04-01

    Reconstructing biological networks using high-throughput technologies has the potential to produce condition-specific interactomes. But are these reconstructed networks a reliable source of biological interactions? Do some network inference methods offer dramatically improved performance on certain types of networks? To facilitate the use of network inference methods in systems biology, we report a large-scale simulation study comparing the ability of Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) samplers to reverse engineer Bayesian networks. The MCMC samplers we investigated included foundational and state-of-the-art Metropolis-Hastings and Gibbs sampling approaches, as well as novel samplers we have designed. To enable a comprehensive comparison, we simulated gene expression and genetics data from known network structures under a range of biologically plausible scenarios. We examine the overall quality of network inference via different methods, as well as how their performance is affected by network characteristics. Our simulations reveal that network size, edge density, and strength of gene-to-gene signaling are major parameters that differentiate the performance of various samplers. Specifically, more recent samplers including our novel methods outperform traditional samplers for highly interconnected large networks with strong gene-to-gene signaling. Our newly developed samplers show comparable or superior performance to the top existing methods. Moreover, this performance gain is strongest in networks with biologically oriented topology, which indicates that our novel samplers are suitable for inferring biological networks. The performance of MCMC samplers in this simulation framework can guide the choice of methods for network reconstruction using systems genetics data.

  17. An Examination of Two Policy Networks Involved in Advancing Smokefree Policy Initiatives.

    PubMed

    Moreland-Russell, Sarah; Carothers, Bobbi J

    2015-09-08

    This study examines smokefree policy networks in two cities—Kansas City and St. Louis, Missouri—one that was successful in achieving widespread policy success, and one that was not. Descriptive social network analyses and visual network mapping were used to compare importance and contact relationships among actors involved in the smokefree policy initiatives. In Kansas City, where policy adoption was achieved, there was a higher level of connectivity among members, with network members being in contact with an average of more than five people, compared to just over two people for the St. Louis network. For both cities, despite being recognized as important, politicians were in contact with the fewest number of people. Results highlight the critical need to actively engage a variety of stakeholders when attempting city wide public health policy change. As evident by the success in smokefree policy adoption throughout Kansas City compared to St. Louis, closer linkages and continued communication among stakeholders including the media, coalitions, public health agencies, policymakers, and other partners are essential if we are to advance and broaden the impact of public health policy. Results indicate that the presence of champions, or those that play leadership roles in actively promoting policy by linking individuals and organizations, play an important role in advancing public health policy. Those working in public health should examine their level of engagement with the policy process and implement strategies for improving that engagement through relationship building and ongoing interactions with a variety of stakeholders, including policymakers.

  18. An Examination of Two Policy Networks Involved in Advancing Smokefree Policy Initiatives

    PubMed Central

    Moreland-Russell, Sarah; Carothers, Bobbi J.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines smokefree policy networks in two cities—Kansas City and St. Louis, Missouri—one that was successful in achieving widespread policy success, and one that was not. Descriptive social network analyses and visual network mapping were used to compare importance and contact relationships among actors involved in the smokefree policy initiatives. In Kansas City, where policy adoption was achieved, there was a higher level of connectivity among members, with network members being in contact with an average of more than five people, compared to just over two people for the St. Louis network. For both cities, despite being recognized as important, politicians were in contact with the fewest number of people. Results highlight the critical need to actively engage a variety of stakeholders when attempting city wide public health policy change. As evident by the success in smokefree policy adoption throughout Kansas City compared to St. Louis, closer linkages and continued communication among stakeholders including the media, coalitions, public health agencies, policymakers, and other partners are essential if we are to advance and broaden the impact of public health policy. Results indicate that the presence of champions, or those that play leadership roles in actively promoting policy by linking individuals and organizations, play an important role in advancing public health policy. Those working in public health should examine their level of engagement with the policy process and implement strategies for improving that engagement through relationship building and ongoing interactions with a variety of stakeholders, including policymakers. PMID:26371022

  19. Genetic variants in Alzheimer disease – molecular and brain network approaches

    PubMed Central

    Gaiteri, Chris; Mostafavi, Sara; Honey, Christopher; De Jager, Philip L.; Bennett, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic studies in late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD) are aimed at identifying core disease mechanisms and providing potential biomarkers and drug candidates to improve clinical care for AD. However, due to the complexity of LOAD, including pathological heterogeneity and disease polygenicity, extracting actionable guidance from LOAD genetics has been challenging. Past attempts to summarize the effects of LOAD-associated genetic variants have used pathway analysis and collections of small-scale experiments to hypothesize functional convergence across several variants. In this review, we discuss how the study of molecular, cellular and brain networks provides additional information on the effect of LOAD-associated genetic variants. We then discuss emerging combinations of omic data types in multiscale models, which provide a more comprehensive representation of the effect of LOAD-associated genetic variants at multiple biophysical scales. Further, we highlight the clinical potential of mechanistically coupling genetic variants and disease phenotypes with multiscale brain models. PMID:27282653

  20. A Hybrid Neural Network-Genetic Algorithm Technique for Aircraft Engine Performance Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobayashi, Takahisa; Simon, Donald L.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, a model-based diagnostic method, which utilizes Neural Networks and Genetic Algorithms, is investigated. Neural networks are applied to estimate the engine internal health, and Genetic Algorithms are applied for sensor bias detection and estimation. This hybrid approach takes advantage of the nonlinear estimation capability provided by neural networks while improving the robustness to measurement uncertainty through the application of Genetic Algorithms. The hybrid diagnostic technique also has the ability to rank multiple potential solutions for a given set of anomalous sensor measurements in order to reduce false alarms and missed detections. The performance of the hybrid diagnostic technique is evaluated through some case studies derived from a turbofan engine simulation. The results show this approach is promising for reliable diagnostics of aircraft engines.

  1. A Forward Genetic Screen for Molecules Involved in Pheromone-Induced Dauer Formation in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Neal, Scott J; Park, JiSoo; DiTirro, Danielle; Yoon, Jason; Shibuya, Mayumi; Choi, Woochan; Schroeder, Frank C; Butcher, Rebecca A; Kim, Kyuhyung; Sengupta, Piali

    2016-05-03

    Animals must constantly assess their surroundings and integrate sensory cues to make appropriate behavioral and developmental decisions. Pheromones produced by conspecific individuals provide critical information regarding environmental conditions. Ascaroside pheromone concentration and composition are instructive in the decision of Caenorhabditis elegans to either develop into a reproductive adult or enter into the stress-resistant alternate dauer developmental stage. Pheromones are sensed by a small set of sensory neurons, and integrated with additional environmental cues, to regulate neuroendocrine signaling and dauer formation. To identify molecules required for pheromone-induced dauer formation, we performed an unbiased forward genetic screen and identified phd (pheromone response-defective dauer) mutants. Here, we describe new roles in dauer formation for previously identified neuronal molecules such as the WD40 domain protein QUI-1 and MACO-1 Macoilin, report new roles for nociceptive neurons in modulating pheromone-induced dauer formation, and identify tau tubulin kinases as new genes involved in dauer formation. Thus, phd mutants define loci required for the detection, transmission, or integration of pheromone signals in the regulation of dauer formation.

  2. A Forward Genetic Screen for Molecules Involved in Pheromone-Induced Dauer Formation in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Neal, Scott J.; Park, JiSoo; DiTirro, Danielle; Yoon, Jason; Shibuya, Mayumi; Choi, Woochan; Schroeder, Frank C.; Butcher, Rebecca A.; Kim, Kyuhyung; Sengupta, Piali

    2016-01-01

    Animals must constantly assess their surroundings and integrate sensory cues to make appropriate behavioral and developmental decisions. Pheromones produced by conspecific individuals provide critical information regarding environmental conditions. Ascaroside pheromone concentration and composition are instructive in the decision of Caenorhabditis elegans to either develop into a reproductive adult or enter into the stress-resistant alternate dauer developmental stage. Pheromones are sensed by a small set of sensory neurons, and integrated with additional environmental cues, to regulate neuroendocrine signaling and dauer formation. To identify molecules required for pheromone-induced dauer formation, we performed an unbiased forward genetic screen and identified phd (pheromone response-defective dauer) mutants. Here, we describe new roles in dauer formation for previously identified neuronal molecules such as the WD40 domain protein QUI-1 and MACO-1 Macoilin, report new roles for nociceptive neurons in modulating pheromone-induced dauer formation, and identify tau tubulin kinases as new genes involved in dauer formation. Thus, phd mutants define loci required for the detection, transmission, or integration of pheromone signals in the regulation of dauer formation. PMID:26976437

  3. Genetic Polymorphisms Involved in Folate Metabolism and Maternal Risk for Down Syndrome: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Balduino Victorino, Daniella; de Godoy, Moacir Fernandes; Goloni-Bertollo, Eny Maria; Pavarino, Érika Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Inconclusive results of the association between genetic polymorphisms involved in folate metabolism and maternal risk for Down syndrome (DS) have been reported. Therefore, this meta-analysis was conducted. We searched electronic databases through May, 2014, for eligible studies. Pooled odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were used to assess the strength of the association, which was estimated by fixed or random effects models. Heterogeneity among studies was evaluated using Q-test and I2 statistic. Subgroup and sensitivity analyses were also conducted. Publication bias was estimated using Begg's and Egger's tests. A total of 17 case-controls studies were included. There was evidence for an association between the MTRR c.66A>G (rs1801394) polymorphism and maternal risk for DS. In the subgroup analysis, increased maternal risk for DS was found in Caucasians. Additionally, the polymorphic heterozygote MTHFD1 1958GA genotype was associated significantly with maternal risk for DS, when we limit the analysis by studies conformed to Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Finally, considering MTR c.2756A>G (rs1805087), TC2 c.776C>G (rs1801198), and CBS c.844ins68, no significant associations have been found, neither in the overall analyses nor in the stratified analyses by ethnicity. In conclusion, our meta-analysis suggested that the MTRR c.66A>G (rs1801394) polymorphism and MTHFD1 c.1958G>A (rs2236225) were associated with increased maternal risk for DS. PMID:25544792

  4. Genetic Analysis of Transvection Effects Involving Cis-Regulatory Elements of the Drosophila Ultrabithorax Gene

    PubMed Central

    Micol, J. L.; Castelli-Gair, J. E.; Garcia-Bellido, A.

    1990-01-01

    The Ultrabithorax (Ubx) gene of Drosophila melanogaster contains two functionally distinguishable regions: the protein-coding Ubx transcription unit and, upstream of it, the transcribed but non-protein-coding bxd region. Numerous recessive, partial loss-of-function mutations which appear to be regulatory mutations map within the bxd region and within the introns of the Ubx transcription unit. In addition, mutations within the Ubx unit exons are known and most of these behave as null alleles. Ubx(1) is one such allele. We have confirmed that, although the Ubx(1) allele does not produce detectable Ubx proteins (UBX), it does retain other genetic functions detectable by their effects on the expression of a paired, homologous Ubx allele, i.e., by transvection. We have extended previous analyses made by E. B. Lewis by mapping the critical elements of the Ubx gene which participate in transvection effects. Our results show that the Ubx(1) allele retains wild-type functions whose effectiveness can be reduced (1) by additional cis mutations in the bxd region or in introns of the Ubx transcription unit, as well as (2) by rearrangements disturbing pairing between homologous Ubx genes. Our results suggest that those remnant functions in Ubx(1) are able to modulate the activity of the allele located in the homologous chromosome. We discuss the normal cis regulatory role of these functions involved in trans interactions between homologous Ubx genes, as well as the implications of our results for the current models on transvection. PMID:2123161

  5. Informatic parcellation of the network involved in the computation of subjective value

    PubMed Central

    Rangel, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how the brain computes value is a basic question in neuroscience. Although individual studies have driven this progress, meta-analyses provide an opportunity to test hypotheses that require large collections of data. We carry out a meta-analysis of a large set of functional magnetic resonance imaging studies of value computation to address several key questions. First, what is the full set of brain areas that reliably correlate with stimulus values when they need to be computed? Second, is this set of areas organized into dissociable functional networks? Third, is a distinct network of regions involved in the computation of stimulus values at decision and outcome? Finally, are different brain areas involved in the computation of stimulus values for different reward modalities? Our results demonstrate the centrality of ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC), ventral striatum and posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) in the computation of value across tasks, reward modalities and stages of the decision-making process. We also find evidence of distinct subnetworks of co-activation within VMPFC, one involving central VMPFC and dorsal PCC and another involving more anterior VMPFC, left angular gyrus and ventral PCC. Finally, we identify a posterior-to-anterior gradient of value representations corresponding to concrete-to-abstract rewards. PMID:23887811

  6. Diversification in the genetic architecture of gene expression and transcriptional networks in organ differentiation of Populus.

    PubMed

    Drost, Derek R; Benedict, Catherine I; Berg, Arthur; Novaes, Evandro; Novaes, Carolina R D B; Yu, Qibin; Dervinis, Christopher; Maia, Jessica M; Yap, John; Miles, Brianna; Kirst, Matias

    2010-05-04

    A fundamental goal of systems biology is to identify genetic elements that contribute to complex phenotypes and to understand how they interact in networks predictive of system response to genetic variation. Few studies in plants have developed such networks, and none have examined their conservation among functionally specialized organs. Here we used genetical genomics in an interspecific hybrid population of the model hardwood plant Populus to uncover transcriptional networks in xylem, leaves, and roots. Pleiotropic eQTL hotspots were detected and used to construct coexpression networks a posteriori, for which regulators were predicted based on cis-acting expression regulation. Networks were shown to be enriched for groups of genes that function in biologically coherent processes and for cis-acting promoter motifs with known roles in regulating common groups of genes. When contrasted among xylem, leaves, and roots, transcriptional networks were frequently conserved in composition, but almost invariably regulated by different loci. Similarly, the genetic architecture of gene expression regulation is highly diversified among plant organs, with less than one-third of genes with eQTL detected in two organs being regulated by the same locus. However, colocalization in eQTL position increases to 50% when they are detected in all three organs, suggesting conservation in the genetic regulation is a function of ubiquitous expression. Genes conserved in their genetic regulation among all organs are primarily cis regulated (approximately 92%), whereas genes with eQTL in only one organ are largely trans regulated. Trans-acting regulation may therefore be the primary driver of differentiation in function between plant organs.

  7. Separate cortical networks involved in music perception: preliminary functional MRI evidence for modularity of music processing.

    PubMed

    Schmithorst, Vincent J

    2005-04-01

    Music perception is a quite complex cognitive task, involving the perception and integration of various elements including melody, harmony, pitch, rhythm, and timbre. A preliminary functional MRI investigation of music perception was performed, using a simplified passive listening task. Group independent component analysis (ICA) was used to separate out various components involved in music processing, as the hemodynamic responses are not known a priori. Various components consistent with auditory processing, expressive language, syntactic processing, and visual association were found. The results are discussed in light of various hypotheses regarding modularity of music processing and its overlap with language processing. The results suggest that, while some networks overlap with ones used for language processing, music processing may involve its own domain-specific processing subsystems.

  8. Searching for causal networks involving latent variables in complex traits: Application to growth, carcass, and meat quality traits in pigs.

    PubMed

    Peñagaricano, F; Valente, B D; Steibel, J P; Bates, R O; Ernst, C W; Khatib, H; Rosa, G J M

    2015-10-01

    Structural equation models (SEQM) can be used to model causal relationships between multiple variables in multivariate systems. Among the strengths of SEQM is its ability to consider causal links between latent variables. The use of latent variables allows modeling complex phenomena while reducing at the same time the dimensionality of the data. One relevant aspect in the quantitative genetics context is the possibility of correlated genetic effects influencing sets of variables under study. Under this scenario, if one aims at inferring causality among latent variables, genetic covariances act as confounders if ignored. Here we describe a methodology for assessing causal networks involving latent variables underlying complex phenotypic traits. The first step of the method consists of the construction of latent variables defined on the basis of prior knowledge and biological interest. These latent variables are jointly evaluated using confirmatory factor analysis. The estimated factor scores are then used as phenotypes for fitting a multivariate mixed model to obtain the covariance matrix of latent variables conditional on the genetic effects. Finally, causal relationships between the adjusted latent variables are evaluated using different SEQM with alternative causal specifications. We have applied this method to a data set with pigs for which several phenotypes were recorded over time. Five different latent variables were evaluated to explore causal links between growth, carcass, and meat quality traits. The measurement model, which included 5 latent variables capturing the information conveyed by 19 different phenotypic traits, showed an acceptable fit to data (e.g., χ/df = 1.3, root-mean-square error of approximation = 0.028, standardized root-mean-square residual = 0.041). Causal links between latent variables were explored after removing genetic confounders. Interestingly, we found that both growth (-0.160) and carcass traits (-0.500) have a significant

  9. Functional and genetic analysis of the colon cancer network.

    PubMed

    Emmert-Streib, Frank; de Matos Simoes, Ricardo; Glazko, Galina; McDade, Simon; Haibe-Kains, Benjamin; Holzinger, Andreas; Dehmer, Matthias; Campbell, Frederick

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a complex disease that has proven to be difficult to understand on the single-gene level. For this reason a functional elucidation needs to take interactions among genes on a systems-level into account. In this study, we infer a colon cancer network from a large-scale gene expression data set by using the method BC3Net. We provide a structural and a functional analysis of this network and also connect its molecular interaction structure with the chromosomal locations of the genes enabling the definition of cis- and trans-interactions. Furthermore, we investigate the interaction of genes that can be found in close neighborhoods on the chromosomes to gain insight into regulatory mechanisms. To our knowledge this is the first study analyzing the genome-scale colon cancer network.

  10. Multistability and bifurcation Analysis of Inhibitory Coupled Cyclic Genetic Regulatory Networks with Delays.

    PubMed

    Ling, Guang; Guan, Zhi-Hong; Hu, Bin; Lai, Qiang; Wu, Yonghong

    2017-02-14

    Many biological systems have the conspicuous property to present more than one stable state and diverse rhythmic behaviors. A closed relationship between these complex dynamic behaviors and cyclic genetic structures has been witnessed by pioneering works. In this paper, a typical structure of inhibitory coupled cyclic genetic networks is introduced to further enlighten this mechanism of stability and biological rhythms of living cells. The coupled networks consist two identical cyclic genetic subnetworks, which inhibit each other directly. Each subnetwork can be regarded as a genetic unit at the cellular level. Multiple time delays, including both internal delays and coupling delays, are considered. The existence of positive equilibriums for this kind of coupled systems is proved, and the stability for each equilibrium are analyzed without or with delays. It is shown that the coupled networks with positive cyclic genetic units have a ability to show multistability, while the coupled networks with negative units may present a series of Hopf bifurcations with the variation of time delays. Several numerical simulations are made to prove our results.

  11. Informed consent, participation in, and withdrawal from a population based cohort study involving genetic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, K; Kita, Y; Ueshima, H

    2005-01-01

    Design: Descriptive analyses. Setting and participants: The study evaluated two non-genetic subcohorts comprising 3166 people attending for a health checkup during 2002, and two genetic subcohorts comprising 2195 people who underwent a checkup during 2003. Main outcome measurements: Analysis endpoints were differences in participation rates between the non-genetic and genetic subcohorts, differences between providing non-extensive and extensive preliminary information, and changes in participation status between baseline and at 6 months. Results: Participation rates in the genetic subcohorts were 4·7–9·3% lower than those in the non-genetic subcohorts. The odds ratios (OR) of participation in genetic research were between 0·60 and 0·77, and the OR for withdrawal from the research was over 7·70; providing preliminary extensive information about genetic research reduced the withdrawal risks (OR 0·15 for all dependent variables) but worsened participation rates (OR 0·63–0·74). Conclusions: The general population responded sceptically towards genetic research. It is crucial that genetic researchers utilise an informative and educational consent process worthy of public trust. PMID:15994356

  12. Hybrid Neural-Network: Genetic Algorithm Technique for Aircraft Engine Performance Diagnostics Developed and Demonstrated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobayashi, Takahisa; Simon, Donald L.

    2002-01-01

    As part of the NASA Aviation Safety Program, a unique model-based diagnostics method that employs neural networks and genetic algorithms for aircraft engine performance diagnostics has been developed and demonstrated at the NASA Glenn Research Center against a nonlinear gas turbine engine model. Neural networks are applied to estimate the internal health condition of the engine, and genetic algorithms are used for sensor fault detection, isolation, and quantification. This hybrid architecture combines the excellent nonlinear estimation capabilities of neural networks with the capability to rank the likelihood of various faults given a specific sensor suite signature. The method requires a significantly smaller data training set than a neural network approach alone does, and it performs the combined engine health monitoring objectives of performance diagnostics and sensor fault detection and isolation in the presence of nominal and degraded engine health conditions.

  13. Prediction of Aerodynamic Coefficients for Wind Tunnel Data using a Genetic Algorithm Optimized Neural Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajkumar, T.; Aragon, Cecilia; Bardina, Jorge; Britten, Roy

    2002-01-01

    A fast, reliable way of predicting aerodynamic coefficients is produced using a neural network optimized by a genetic algorithm. Basic aerodynamic coefficients (e.g. lift, drag, pitching moment) are modelled as functions of angle of attack and Mach number. The neural network is first trained on a relatively rich set of data from wind tunnel tests of numerical simulations to learn an overall model. Most of the aerodynamic parameters can be well-fitted using polynomial functions. A new set of data, which can be relatively sparse, is then supplied to the network to produce a new model consistent with the previous model and the new data. Because the new model interpolates realistically between the sparse test data points, it is suitable for use in piloted simulations. The genetic algorithm is used to choose a neural network architecture to give best results, avoiding over-and under-fitting of the test data.

  14. Stochasticity, Bistability and the Wisdom of Crowds: A Model for Associative Learning in Genetic Regulatory Networks

    PubMed Central

    Sorek, Matan; Balaban, Nathalie Q.; Loewenstein, Yonatan

    2013-01-01

    It is generally believed that associative memory in the brain depends on multistable synaptic dynamics, which enable the synapses to maintain their value for extended periods of time. However, multistable dynamics are not restricted to synapses. In particular, the dynamics of some genetic regulatory networks are multistable, raising the possibility that even single cells, in the absence of a nervous system, are capable of learning associations. Here we study a standard genetic regulatory network model with bistable elements and stochastic dynamics. We demonstrate that such a genetic regulatory network model is capable of learning multiple, general, overlapping associations. The capacity of the network, defined as the number of associations that can be simultaneously stored and retrieved, is proportional to the square root of the number of bistable elements in the genetic regulatory network. Moreover, we compute the capacity of a clonal population of cells, such as in a colony of bacteria or a tissue, to store associations. We show that even if the cells do not interact, the capacity of the population to store associations substantially exceeds that of a single cell and is proportional to the number of bistable elements. Thus, we show that even single cells are endowed with the computational power to learn associations, a power that is substantially enhanced when these cells form a population. PMID:23990765

  15. Design and Implementation of the International Genetics and Translational Research in Transplantation Network

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Genetic association studies of transplantation outcomes have been hampered by small samples and highly complex multifactorial phenotypes, hindering investigations of the genetic architecture of a range of comorbidities which significantly impact graft and recipient life expectancy. We describe here the rationale and design of the International Genetics & Translational Research in Transplantation Network. The network comprises 22 studies to date, including 16494 transplant recipients and 11669 donors, of whom more than 5000 are of non-European ancestry, all of whom have existing genomewide genotype data sets. Methods We describe the rich genetic and phenotypic information available in this consortium comprising heart, kidney, liver, and lung transplant cohorts. Results We demonstrate significant power in International Genetics & Translational Research in Transplantation Network to detect main effect association signals across regions such as the MHC region as well as genomewide for transplant outcomes that span all solid organs, such as graft survival, acute rejection, new onset of diabetes after transplantation, and for delayed graft function in kidney only. Conclusions This consortium is designed and statistically powered to deliver pioneering insights into the genetic architecture of transplant-related outcomes across a range of different solid-organ transplant studies. The study design allows a spectrum of analyses to be performed including recipient-only analyses, donor-recipient HLA mismatches with focus on loss-of-function variants and nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms. PMID:26479416

  16. Criticality Is an Emergent Property of Genetic Networks that Exhibit Evolvability

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Sosa, Christian; Huang, Sui; Aldana, Maximino

    2012-01-01

    Accumulating experimental evidence suggests that the gene regulatory networks of living organisms operate in the critical phase, namely, at the transition between ordered and chaotic dynamics. Such critical dynamics of the network permits the coexistence of robustness and flexibility which are necessary to ensure homeostatic stability (of a given phenotype) while allowing for switching between multiple phenotypes (network states) as occurs in development and in response to environmental change. However, the mechanisms through which genetic networks evolve such critical behavior have remained elusive. Here we present an evolutionary model in which criticality naturally emerges from the need to balance between the two essential components of evolvability: phenotype conservation and phenotype innovation under mutations. We simulated the Darwinian evolution of random Boolean networks that mutate gene regulatory interactions and grow by gene duplication. The mutating networks were subjected to selection for networks that both (i) preserve all the already acquired phenotypes (dynamical attractor states) and (ii) generate new ones. Our results show that this interplay between extending the phenotypic landscape (innovation) while conserving the existing phenotypes (conservation) suffices to cause the evolution of all the networks in a population towards criticality. Furthermore, the networks produced by this evolutionary process exhibit structures with hubs (global regulators) similar to the observed topology of real gene regulatory networks. Thus, dynamical criticality and certain elementary topological properties of gene regulatory networks can emerge as a byproduct of the evolvability of the phenotypic landscape. PMID:22969419

  17. Simulating Visual Learning and Optical Illusions via a Network-Based Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siu, Theodore; Vivar, Miguel; Shinbrot, Troy

    We present a neural network model that uses a genetic algorithm to identify spatial patterns. We show that the model both learns and reproduces common visual patterns and optical illusions. Surprisingly, we find that the illusions generated are a direct consequence of the network architecture used. We discuss the implications of our results and the insights that we gain on how humans fall for optical illusions

  18. Yeast Augmented Network Analysis (YANA): a new systems approach to identify therapeutic targets for human genetic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wiley, David J.; Juan, Ilona; Le, Hao; Cai, Xiaodong; Baumbach, Lisa; Beattie, Christine; D'Urso, Gennaro

    2014-01-01

    Genetic interaction networks that underlie most human diseases are highly complex and poorly defined. Better-defined networks will allow identification of a greater number of therapeutic targets. Here we introduce our Yeast Augmented Network Analysis (YANA) approach and test it with the X-linked spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) disease gene UBA1. First, we express UBA1 and a mutant variant in fission yeast and use high-throughput methods to identify fission yeast genetic modifiers of UBA1. Second, we analyze available protein-protein interaction network databases in both fission yeast and human to construct UBA1 genetic networks. Third, from these networks we identified potential therapeutic targets for SMA. Finally, we validate one of these targets in a vertebrate (zebrafish) SMA model. This study demonstrates the power of combining synthetic and chemical genetics with a simple model system to identify human disease gene networks that can be exploited for treating human diseases. PMID:25075304

  19. Epidemiological and genetic clues for molecular mechanisms involved in uterine leiomyoma development and growth

    PubMed Central

    Commandeur, Arno E.; Styer, Aaron K.; Teixeira, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Uterine leiomyomas (fibroids) are highly prevalent benign smooth muscle tumors of the uterus. In the USA, the lifetime risk for women developing uterine leiomyomas is estimated as up to 75%. Except for hysterectomy, most therapies or treatments often provide only partial or temporary relief and are not successful in every patient. There is a clear racial disparity in the disease; African-American women are estimated to be three times more likely to develop uterine leiomyomas and generally develop more severe symptoms. There is also familial clustering between first-degree relatives and twins, and multiple inherited syndromes in which fibroid development occurs. Leiomyomas have been described as clonal and hormonally regulated, but despite the healthcare burden imposed by the disease, the etiology of uterine leiomyomas remains largely unknown. The mechanisms involved in their growth are also essentially unknown, which has contributed to the slow progress in development of effective treatment options. METHODS A comprehensive PubMed search for and critical assessment of articles related to the epidemiological, biological and genetic clues for uterine leiomyoma development was performed. The individual functions of some of the best candidate genes are explained to provide more insight into their biological function and to interconnect and organize genes and pathways in one overarching figure that represents the current state of knowledge about uterine leiomyoma development and growth. RESULTS In this review, the widely recognized roles of estrogen and progesterone in uterine leiomyoma pathobiology on the basis of clinical and experimental data are presented. This is followed by fundamental aspects and concepts including the possible cellular origin of uterine fibroids. The central themes in the subsequent parts are cytogenetic aberrations in leiomyomas and the racial/ethnic disparities in uterine fibroid biology. Then, the attributes of various in vitro and

  20. Connectivity rescues genetic diversity after a demographic bottleneck in a butterfly population network.

    PubMed

    Jangjoo, Maryam; Matter, Stephen F; Roland, Jens; Keyghobadi, Nusha

    2016-09-27

    Demographic bottlenecks that occur when populations fluctuate in size erode genetic diversity, but that diversity can be recovered through immigration. Connectivity among populations and habitat patches in the landscape enhances immigration and should in turn facilitate recovery of genetic diversity after a sudden reduction in population size. For the conservation of genetic diversity, it may therefore be particularly important to maintain connectivity in the face of factors that increase demographic instability, such as climate change. However, a direct link between connectivity and recovery of genetic diversity after a demographic bottleneck has not been clearly demonstrated in an empirical system. Here, we show that connectivity of habitat patches in the landscape contributes to the maintenance of genetic diversity after a demographic bottleneck. We were able to monitor genetic diversity in a network of populations of the alpine butterfly, Parnassius smintheus, before, during, and after a severe reduction in population size that lasted two generations. We found that allelic diversity in the network declined after the demographic bottleneck but that less allelic diversity was lost from populations occupying habitat patches with higher connectivity. Furthermore, the effect of connectivity on allelic diversity was important during the demographic recovery phase. Our results demonstrate directly the ability of connectivity to mediate the rescue of genetic diversity in a natural system.

  1. Landscape attributes and life history variability shape genetic structure of trout populations in a stream network

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neville, H.M.; Dunham, J.B.; Peacock, M.M.

    2006-01-01

    Spatial and temporal landscape patterns have long been recognized to influence biological processes, but these processes often operate at scales that are difficult to study by conventional means. Inferences from genetic markers can overcome some of these limitations. We used a landscape genetics approach to test hypotheses concerning landscape processes influencing the demography of Lahontan cutthroat trout in a complex stream network in the Great Basin desert of the western US. Predictions were tested with population- and individual-based analyses of microsatellite DNA variation, reflecting patterns of dispersal, population stability, and local effective population sizes. Complementary genetic inferences suggested samples from migratory corridors housed a mixture of fish from tributaries, as predicted based on assumed migratory life histories in those habitats. Also as predicted, populations presumed to have greater proportions of migratory fish or from physically connected, large, or high quality habitats had higher genetic variability and reduced genetic differentiation from other populations. Populations thought to contain largely non-migratory individuals generally showed the opposite pattern, suggesting behavioral isolation. Estimated effective sizes were small, and we identified significant and severe genetic bottlenecks in several populations that were isolated, recently founded, or that inhabit streams that desiccate frequently. Overall, this work suggested that Lahontan cutthroat trout populations in stream networks are affected by a combination of landscape and metapopulation processes. Results also demonstrated that genetic patterns can reveal unexpected processes, even within a system that is well studied from a conventional ecological perspective. ?? Springer 2006.

  2. Connectivity rescues genetic diversity after a demographic bottleneck in a butterfly population network

    PubMed Central

    Jangjoo, Maryam; Matter, Stephen F.; Roland, Jens; Keyghobadi, Nusha

    2016-01-01

    Demographic bottlenecks that occur when populations fluctuate in size erode genetic diversity, but that diversity can be recovered through immigration. Connectivity among populations and habitat patches in the landscape enhances immigration and should in turn facilitate recovery of genetic diversity after a sudden reduction in population size. For the conservation of genetic diversity, it may therefore be particularly important to maintain connectivity in the face of factors that increase demographic instability, such as climate change. However, a direct link between connectivity and recovery of genetic diversity after a demographic bottleneck has not been clearly demonstrated in an empirical system. Here, we show that connectivity of habitat patches in the landscape contributes to the maintenance of genetic diversity after a demographic bottleneck. We were able to monitor genetic diversity in a network of populations of the alpine butterfly, Parnassius smintheus, before, during, and after a severe reduction in population size that lasted two generations. We found that allelic diversity in the network declined after the demographic bottleneck but that less allelic diversity was lost from populations occupying habitat patches with higher connectivity. Furthermore, the effect of connectivity on allelic diversity was important during the demographic recovery phase. Our results demonstrate directly the ability of connectivity to mediate the rescue of genetic diversity in a natural system. PMID:27621433

  3. Inference and Analysis of Population Structure Using Genetic Data and Network Theory.

    PubMed

    Greenbaum, Gili; Templeton, Alan R; Bar-David, Shirli

    2016-04-01

    Clustering individuals to subpopulations based on genetic data has become commonplace in many genetic studies. Inference about population structure is most often done by applying model-based approaches, aided by visualization using distance-based approaches such as multidimensional scaling. While existing distance-based approaches suffer from a lack of statistical rigor, model-based approaches entail assumptions of prior conditions such as that the subpopulations are at Hardy-Weinberg equilibria. Here we present a distance-based approach for inference about population structure using genetic data by defining population structure using network theory terminology and methods. A network is constructed from a pairwise genetic-similarity matrix of all sampled individuals. The community partition, a partition of a network to dense subgraphs, is equated with population structure, a partition of the population to genetically related groups. Community-detection algorithms are used to partition the network into communities, interpreted as a partition of the population to subpopulations. The statistical significance of the structure can be estimated by using permutation tests to evaluate the significance of the partition's modularity, a network theory measure indicating the quality of community partitions. To further characterize population structure, a new measure of the strength of association (SA) for an individual to its assigned community is presented. The strength of association distribution (SAD) of the communities is analyzed to provide additional population structure characteristics, such as the relative amount of gene flow experienced by the different subpopulations and identification of hybrid individuals. Human genetic data and simulations are used to demonstrate the applicability of the analyses. The approach presented here provides a novel, computationally efficient model-free method for inference about population structure that does not entail assumption of

  4. Reactivation of L1 retrotransposon by benzo(a)pyrene involves complex genetic and epigenetic regulation.

    PubMed

    Teneng, Ivo; Montoya-Durango, Diego E; Quertermous, James L; Lacy, Mary E; Ramos, Kenneth S

    2011-03-01

    Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), is an environmental pollutant present in tobacco smoke and a byproduct of fossil fuel combustion which likely contributes to the tumorigenic processes in human cancers including lung and esophageal. Long Interspersed Nuclear Element-1 (LINE-1) or L1 is a mobile element within the mammalian genome that propagates via a "copy-and-paste" mechanism using reverse transcriptase and RNA intermediates. L1 is strongly expressed during early embryogenesis and then silenced as cells initiate differentiation programming. Although the complex transcriptional control mechanisms of L1 are not well understood, L1 reactivation has been described in several human cancers and following exposure of mouse or human cells to BaP. In this study we investigated the molecular mechanisms and epigenetic events that regulate L1 reactivation following BaP exposure. We show that challenge of HeLa cells with BaP induces early enrichment of the transcriptionally-active chromatin markers histone H3 trimethylated at lysine 4 (H3K4Me3) and histone H3 acetylated at lysine 9 (H3K9Ac), and reduces association of DNA methyltransferase-1 (DNMT1) with the L1 promoter. These changes are followed by proteasome-dependent decreases in cellular DNMT1 expression and sustained reduction of cytosine methylation within the L1 promoter CpG island. Pharmacological inhibition of the proteasome signaling pathway with the inhibitor MG132 blocks degradation of DNMT1 and alters BaP-mediated histone epigenetic modifications. We conclude that genetic reactivation of L1 by BaP involves an ordered cascade of epigenetic events that begin with nucleosomal histone modifications and is completed with alterations in DNMT1 recruitment to the L1 promoter and reduced DNA methylation of CpG islands.

  5. Sensory-motor networks involved in speech production and motor control: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Behroozmand, Roozbeh; Shebek, Rachel; Hansen, Daniel R; Oya, Hiroyuki; Robin, Donald A; Howard, Matthew A; Greenlee, Jeremy D W

    2015-04-01

    Speaking is one of the most complex motor behaviors developed to facilitate human communication. The underlying neural mechanisms of speech involve sensory-motor interactions that incorporate feedback information for online monitoring and control of produced speech sounds. In the present study, we adopted an auditory feedback pitch perturbation paradigm and combined it with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) recordings in order to identify brain areas involved in speech production and motor control. Subjects underwent fMRI scanning while they produced a steady vowel sound /a/ (speaking) or listened to the playback of their own vowel production (playback). During each condition, the auditory feedback from vowel production was either normal (no perturbation) or perturbed by an upward (+600 cents) pitch-shift stimulus randomly. Analysis of BOLD responses during speaking (with and without shift) vs. rest revealed activation of a complex network including bilateral superior temporal gyrus (STG), Heschl's gyrus, precentral gyrus, supplementary motor area (SMA), Rolandic operculum, postcentral gyrus and right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG). Performance correlation analysis showed that the subjects produced compensatory vocal responses that significantly correlated with BOLD response increases in bilateral STG and left precentral gyrus. However, during playback, the activation network was limited to cortical auditory areas including bilateral STG and Heschl's gyrus. Moreover, the contrast between speaking vs. playback highlighted a distinct functional network that included bilateral precentral gyrus, SMA, IFG, postcentral gyrus and insula. These findings suggest that speech motor control involves feedback error detection in sensory (e.g. auditory) cortices that subsequently activate motor-related areas for the adjustment of speech parameters during speaking.

  6. Environmental Moderators of Genetic Influences on Adolescent Delinquent Involvement and Victimization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaver, Kevin M.

    2011-01-01

    A growing body of empirical research reveals that genetic factors account for a substantial amount of variance in measures of antisocial behaviors. At the same time, evidence is also emerging indicating that certain environmental factors moderate the effects that genetic factors have on antisocial outcomes. Despite this line of research, much…

  7. Transcriptome analysis of genes and gene networks involved in aggressive behavior in mouse and zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Malki, Karim; Du Rietz, Ebba; Crusio, Wim E; Pain, Oliver; Paya-Cano, Jose; Karadaghi, Rezhaw L; Sluyter, Frans; de Boer, Sietse F; Sandnabba, Kenneth; Schalkwyk, Leonard C; Asherson, Philip; Tosto, Maria Grazia

    2016-09-01

    Despite moderate heritability estimates, the molecular architecture of aggressive behavior remains poorly characterized. This study compared gene expression profiles from a genetic mouse model of aggression with zebrafish, an animal model traditionally used to study aggression. A meta-analytic, cross-species approach was used to identify genomic variants associated with aggressive behavior. The Rankprod algorithm was used to evaluated mRNA differences from prefrontal cortex tissues of three sets of mouse lines (N = 18) selectively bred for low and high aggressive behavior (SAL/LAL, TA/TNA, and NC900/NC100). The same approach was used to evaluate mRNA differences in zebrafish (N = 12) exposed to aggressive or non-aggressive social encounters. Results were compared to uncover genes consistently implicated in aggression across both studies. Seventy-six genes were differentially expressed (PFP < 0.05) in aggressive compared to non-aggressive mice. Seventy genes were differentially expressed in zebrafish exposed to a fight encounter compared to isolated zebrafish. Seven genes (Fos, Dusp1, Hdac4, Ier2, Bdnf, Btg2, and Nr4a1) were differentially expressed across both species 5 of which belonging to a gene-network centred on the c-Fos gene hub. Network analysis revealed an association with the MAPK signaling cascade. In human studies HDAC4 haploinsufficiency is a key genetic mechanism associated with brachydactyly mental retardation syndrome (BDMR), which is associated with aggressive behaviors. Moreover, the HDAC4 receptor is a drug target for valproic acid, which is being employed as an effective pharmacological treatment for aggressive behavior in geriatric, psychiatric, and brain-injury patients. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Genetic algorithm based adaptive neural network ensemble and its application in predicting carbon flux

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xue, Y.; Liu, S.; Hu, Y.; Yang, J.; Chen, Q.

    2007-01-01

    To improve the accuracy in prediction, Genetic Algorithm based Adaptive Neural Network Ensemble (GA-ANNE) is presented. Intersections are allowed between different training sets based on the fuzzy clustering analysis, which ensures the diversity as well as the accuracy of individual Neural Networks (NNs). Moreover, to improve the accuracy of the adaptive weights of individual NNs, GA is used to optimize the cluster centers. Empirical results in predicting carbon flux of Duke Forest reveal that GA-ANNE can predict the carbon flux more accurately than Radial Basis Function Neural Network (RBFNN), Bagging NN ensemble, and ANNE. ?? 2007 IEEE.

  9. Investigating the mechanism of hepatocellular carcinoma progression by constructing genetic and epigenetic networks using NGS data identification and big database mining method.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng-Wei; Chang, Ping-Yao; Chen, Bor-Sen

    2016-11-29

    The mechanisms leading to the development and progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are complicated and regulated genetically and epigenetically. The recent advancement in high-throughput sequencing has facilitated investigations into the role of genetic and epigenetic regulations in hepatocarcinogenesis. Therefore, we used systems biology and big database mining to construct genetic and epigenetic networks (GENs) using the information about mRNA, miRNA, and methylation profiles of HCC patients. Our approach involves analyzing gene regulatory networks (GRNs), protein-protein networks (PPINs), and epigenetic networks at different stages of hepatocarcinogenesis. The core GENs, influencing each stage of HCC, were extracted via principal network projection (PNP). The pathways during different stages of HCC were compared. We observed that extracellular signals were further transduced to transcription factors (TFs), resulting in the aberrant regulation of their target genes, in turn inducing mechanisms that are responsible for HCC progression, including cell proliferation, anti-apoptosis, aberrant cell cycle, cell survival, and metastasis. We also selected potential multiple drugs specific to prominent epigenetic network markers of each stage of HCC: lestaurtinib, dinaciclib, and perifosine against the NTRK2, MYC, and AKT1 markers influencing HCC progression from stage I to stage II; celecoxib, axitinib, and vinblastine against the DDIT3, PDGFB, and JUN markers influencing HCC progression from stage II to stage III; and atiprimod, celastrol, and bortezomib against STAT3, IL1B, and NFKB1 markers influencing HCC progression from stage III to stage IV.

  10. Investigating the mechanism of hepatocellular carcinoma progression by constructing genetic and epigenetic networks using NGS data identification and big database mining method

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cheng-Wei; Chang, Ping-Yao; Chen, Bor-Sen

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms leading to the development and progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are complicated and regulated genetically and epigenetically. The recent advancement in high-throughput sequencing has facilitated investigations into the role of genetic and epigenetic regulations in hepatocarcinogenesis. Therefore, we used systems biology and big database mining to construct genetic and epigenetic networks (GENs) using the information about mRNA, miRNA, and methylation profiles of HCC patients. Our approach involves analyzing gene regulatory networks (GRNs), protein-protein networks (PPINs), and epigenetic networks at different stages of hepatocarcinogenesis. The core GENs, influencing each stage of HCC, were extracted via principal network projection (PNP). The pathways during different stages of HCC were compared. We observed that extracellular signals were further transduced to transcription factors (TFs), resulting in the aberrant regulation of their target genes, in turn inducing mechanisms that are responsible for HCC progression, including cell proliferation, anti-apoptosis, aberrant cell cycle, cell survival, and metastasis. We also selected potential multiple drugs specific to prominent epigenetic network markers of each stage of HCC: lestaurtinib, dinaciclib, and perifosine against the NTRK2, MYC, and AKT1 markers influencing HCC progression from stage I to stage II; celecoxib, axitinib, and vinblastine against the DDIT3, PDGFB, and JUN markers influencing HCC progression from stage II to stage III; and atiprimod, celastrol, and bortezomib against STAT3, IL1B, and NFKB1 markers influencing HCC progression from stage III to stage IV. PMID:27821810

  11. Identification of a complex genetic network underlying Saccharomyces cerevisiae colony morphology

    PubMed Central

    Voordeckers, Karin; De Maeyer, Dries; Zande, Elisa; Vinces, Marcelo D; Meert, Wim; Cloots, Lore; Ryan, Owen; Marchal, Kathleen; Verstrepen, Kevin J

    2012-01-01

    When grown on solid substrates, different microorganisms often form colonies with very specific morphologies. Whereas the pioneers of microbiology often used colony morphology to discriminate between species and strains, the phenomenon has not received much attention recently. In this study, we use a genome-wide assay in the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to identify all genes that affect colony morphology. We show that several major signalling cascades, including the MAPK, TORC, SNF1 and RIM101 pathways play a role, indicating that morphological changes are a reaction to changing environments. Other genes that affect colony morphology are involved in protein sorting and epigenetic regulation. Interestingly, the screen reveals only few genes that are likely to play a direct role in establishing colony morphology, with one notable example being FLO11, a gene encoding a cell-surface adhesin that has already been implicated in colony morphology, biofilm formation, and invasive and pseudohyphal growth. Using a series of modified promoters for fine-tuning FLO11 expression, we confirm the central role of Flo11 and show that differences in FLO11 expression result in distinct colony morphologies. Together, our results provide a first comprehensive look at the complex genetic network that underlies the diversity in the morphologies of yeast colonies. PMID:22882838

  12. Pattern recognition in lithology classification: modeling using neural networks, self-organizing maps and genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Sasmita; Jha, Madan K.

    2017-03-01

    Effective characterization of lithology is vital for the conceptualization of complex aquifer systems, which is a prerequisite for the development of reliable groundwater-flow and contaminant-transport models. However, such information is often limited for most groundwater basins. This study explores the usefulness and potential of a hybrid soft-computing framework; a traditional artificial neural network with gradient descent-momentum training (ANN-GDM) and a traditional genetic algorithm (GA) based ANN (ANN-GA) approach were developed and compared with a novel hybrid self-organizing map (SOM) based ANN (SOM-ANN-GA) method for the prediction of lithology at a basin scale. This framework is demonstrated through a case study involving a complex multi-layered aquifer system in India, where well-log sites were clustered on the basis of sand-layer frequencies; within each cluster, subsurface layers were reclassified into four depth classes based on the maximum drilling depth. ANN models for each depth class were developed using each of the three approaches. Of the three, the hybrid SOM-ANN-GA models were able to recognize incomplete geologic pattern more reasonably, followed by ANN-GA and ANN-GDM models. It is concluded that the hybrid soft-computing framework can serve as a promising tool for characterizing lithology in groundwater basins with missing lithologic patterns.

  13. A genetic algorithm for the arrival probability in the stochastic networks.

    PubMed

    Shirdel, Gholam H; Abdolhosseinzadeh, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    A genetic algorithm is presented to find the arrival probability in a directed acyclic network with stochastic parameters, that gives more reliability of transmission flow in delay sensitive networks. Some sub-networks are extracted from the original network, and a connection is established between the original source node and the original destination node by randomly selecting some local source and the local destination nodes. The connections are sorted according to their arrival probabilities and the best established connection is determined with the maximum arrival probability. There is an established discrete time Markov chain in the network. The arrival probability to a given destination node from a given source node in the network is defined as the multi-step transition probability of the absorbtion in the final state of the established Markov chain. The proposed method is applicable on large stochastic networks, where the previous methods were not. The effectiveness of the proposed method is illustrated by some numerical results with perfect fitness values of the proposed genetic algorithm.

  14. Machine Learning for Information Retrieval: Neural Networks, Symbolic Learning, and Genetic Algorithms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Hsinchun

    1995-01-01

    Presents an overview of artificial-intelligence-based inductive learning techniques and their use in information science research. Three methods are discussed: the connectionist Hopfield network; the symbolic ID3/ID5R; evolution-based genetic algorithms. The knowledge representations and algorithms of these methods are examined in the context of…

  15. Discovery of novel genetic networks associated with 19 economically important traits in beef cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantitative or complex traits are determined by the combined effects of many loci, and are affected by gene-gene interactions, genetic networks or molecular pathways. In the present study, we genotyped a total of 138 mutations, mainly single nucleotide polymorphisms derived from 71 functional gene...

  16. Molecular evolution and population genetics of two Drosophila mettleri cytochrome P450 genes involved in host plant utilization

    PubMed Central

    Bono, Jeremy M.; Matzkin, Luciano M.; Castrezana, Sergio; Markow, Therese A.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the genetic basis of adaptation is one of the primary goals of evolutionary biology. The evolution of xenobiotic resistance in insects has proven to be an especially suitable arena for studying the genetics of adaptation, and resistant phenotypes are known to result from both coding and regulatory changes. In this study, we examine the evolutionary history and population genetics of two Drosophila mettleri cytochrome P450 genes that are putatively involved in the detoxification of alkaloids present in two of its cactus hosts: saguaro (Carnegiea gigantea) and senita (Lophocereus schottii). Previous studies demonstrated that Cyp28A1 was highly upregulated following exposure to rotting senita tissue while Cyp4D10 was highly upregulated following exposure to rotting saguaro tissue. Here, we show that a subset of sites in Cyp28A1 experienced adaptive evolution specifically in the D. mettleri lineage. Moreover, neutrality tests in several populations were also consistent with a history of selection on Cyp28A1. In contrast, we did not find evidence for positive selection on Cyp4D10, though this certainly does not preclude its involvement in host plant use. A surprising result that emerged from our population genetic analyses was the presence of significant genetic differentiation between flies collected from different host plant species (saguaro and senita) at Organ Pipe National Monument, Arizona, USA. This preliminary evidence suggests that D. mettleri may have evolved into distinctive host races that specialize on different hosts, a possibility that warrants further investigation. PMID:18510584

  17. Searching Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) for information on genetic loci involved in human disease.

    PubMed

    Borate, Bhavesh; Baxevanis, Andreas D

    2009-09-01

    Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) is a comprehensive compendium of information on human genes and genetic disorders, with a particular emphasis on the interplay between observed phenotypes and underlying genotypes. This unit focuses on the basic methodology for formulating OMIM searches and illustrates the types of information that can be retrieved from OMIM, including descriptions of clinical manifestations resulting from genetic abnormalities. This unit also provides information on additional relevant medical and molecular biology databases. A basic knowledge of OMIM should be part of the armamentarium of physicians and scientists with an interest in research on and clinical aspects of genetic disorders.

  18. Searching Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) for information on genetic loci involved in human disease.

    PubMed

    Baxevanis, Andreas D

    2012-04-01

    Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) is a comprehensive compendium of information on human genes and genetic disorders, with a particular emphasis on the interplay between observed phenotypes and underlying genotypes. This unit focuses on the basic methodology for formulating OMIM searches and illustrates the types of information that can be retrieved from OMIM, including descriptions of clinical manifestations resulting from genetic abnormalities. This unit also provides information on additional relevant medical and molecular biology databases. A basic knowledge of OMIM should be part of the armamentarium of physicians and scientists with an interest in research on the clinical aspects of genetic disorders.

  19. Improved Cost-Base Design of Water Distribution Networks using Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradzadeh Azar, Foad; Abghari, Hirad; Taghi Alami, Mohammad; Weijs, Steven

    2010-05-01

    Population growth and progressive extension of urbanization in different places of Iran cause an increasing demand for primary needs. The water, this vital liquid is the most important natural need for human life. Providing this natural need is requires the design and construction of water distribution networks, that incur enormous costs on the country's budget. Any reduction in these costs enable more people from society to access extreme profit least cost. Therefore, investment of Municipal councils need to maximize benefits or minimize expenditures. To achieve this purpose, the engineering design depends on the cost optimization techniques. This paper, presents optimization models based on genetic algorithm(GA) to find out the minimum design cost Mahabad City's (North West, Iran) water distribution network. By designing two models and comparing the resulting costs, the abilities of GA were determined. the GA based model could find optimum pipe diameters to reduce the design costs of network. Results show that the water distribution network design using Genetic Algorithm could lead to reduction of at least 7% in project costs in comparison to the classic model. Keywords: Genetic Algorithm, Optimum Design of Water Distribution Network, Mahabad City, Iran.

  20. A lateralized functional auditory network is involved in anuran sexual selection.

    PubMed

    Xue, Fei; Fang, Guangzhan; Yue, Xizi; Zhao, Ermi; Brauth, Steven E; Tang, Yezhong

    2016-12-01

    Right ear advantage (REA) exists in many land vertebrates in which the right ear and left hemisphere preferentially process conspecific acoustic stimuli such as those related to sexual selection. Although ecological and neural mechanisms for sexual selection have been widely studied, the brain networks involved are still poorly understood. In this study we used multi-channel electroencephalographic data in combination with Granger causal connectivity analysis to demonstrate, for the first time, that auditory neural network interconnecting the left and right midbrain and forebrain function asymmetrically in the Emei music frog (Babina daunchina), an anuran species which exhibits REA. The results showed the network was lateralized. Ascending connections between the mesencephalon and telencephalon were stronger in the left side while descending ones were stronger in the right, which matched with the REA in this species and implied that inhibition from the forebrainmay induce REA partly. Connections from the telencephalon to ipsilateral mesencephalon in response to white noise were the highest in the non-reproductive stage while those to advertisement calls were the highest in reproductive stage, implying the attention resources and living strategy shift when entered the reproductive season. Finally, these connection changes were sexually dimorphic, revealing sex differences in reproductive roles.

  1. Metabolic mapping reveals sex-dependent involvement of default mode and salience network in alexithymia

    PubMed Central

    Colic, L.; Demenescu, L. R.; Li, M.; Kaufmann, J.; Krause, A. L.; Metzger, C.

    2016-01-01

    Alexithymia, a personality construct marked by difficulties in processing one’s emotions, has been linked to the altered activity in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Although longitudinal studies reported sex differences in alexithymia, what mediates them is not known. To investigate sex-specific associations of alexithymia and neuronal markers, we mapped metabolites in four brain regions involved differentially in emotion processing using a point-resolved spectroscopy MRS sequence in 3 Tesla. Both sexes showed negative correlations between alexithymia and N-acetylaspartate (NAA) in pregenual ACC (pgACC). Women showed a robust negative correlation of the joint measure of glutamate and glutamine (Glx) to NAA in posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), whereas men showed a weak positive association of Glx to NAA in dorsal ACC (dACC). Our results suggest that lowered neuronal integrity in pgACC, a region of the default mode network (DMN), might primarily account for the general difficulties in emotional processing in alexithymia. Association of alexithymia in women extends to another region in the DMN-PCC, while in men a region in the salience network (SN) was involved. These observations could be representative of sex specific regulation strategies that include diminished internal evaluation of feelings in women and cognitive emotion suppression in men. PMID:26341904

  2. Mechanisms and neuronal networks involved in reactive and proactive cognitive control of interference in working memory.

    PubMed

    Irlbacher, Kerstin; Kraft, Antje; Kehrer, Stefanie; Brandt, Stephan A

    2014-10-01

    Cognitive control can be reactive or proactive in nature. Reactive control mechanisms, which support the resolution of interference, start after its onset. Conversely, proactive control involves the anticipation and prevention of interference prior to its occurrence. The interrelation of both types of cognitive control is currently under debate: Are they mediated by different neuronal networks? Or are there neuronal structures that have the potential to act in a proactive as well as in a reactive manner? This review illustrates the way in which integrating knowledge gathered from behavioral studies, functional imaging, and human electroencephalography proves useful in answering these questions. We focus on studies that investigate interference resolution at the level of working memory representations. In summary, different mechanisms are instrumental in supporting reactive and proactive control. Distinct neuronal networks are involved, though some brain regions, especially pre-SMA, possess functions that are relevant to both control modes. Therefore, activation of these brain areas could be observed in reactive, as well as proactive control, but at different times during information processing.

  3. Magnetoencephalography Reveals a Widespread Increase in Network Connectivity in Idiopathic/Genetic Generalized Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Elshahabi, Adham; Klamer, Silke; Sahib, Ashish Kaul; Lerche, Holger; Braun, Christoph; Focke, Niels K.

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic/genetic generalized epilepsy (IGE/GGE) is characterized by seizures, which start and rapidly engage widely distributed networks, and result in symptoms such as absences, generalized myoclonic and primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Although routine magnetic resonance imaging is apparently normal, many studies have reported structural alterations in IGE/GGE patients using diffusion tensor imaging and voxel-based morphometry. Changes have also been reported in functional networks during generalized spike wave discharges. However, network function in the resting-state without epileptiforme discharges has been less well studied. We hypothesize that resting-state networks are more representative of the underlying pathophysiology and abnormal network synchrony. We studied functional network connectivity derived from whole-brain magnetoencephalography recordings in thirteen IGE/GGE and nineteen healthy controls. Using graph theoretical network analysis, we found a widespread increase in connectivity in patients compared to controls. These changes were most pronounced in the motor network, the mesio-frontal and temporal cortex. We did not, however, find any significant difference between the normalized clustering coefficients, indicating preserved gross network architecture. Our findings suggest that increased resting state connectivity could be an important factor for seizure spread and/or generation in IGE/GGE, and could serve as a biomarker for the disease. PMID:26368933

  4. Genetic, molecular and physiological mechanisms involved in human obesity: Society for Endocrinology Medal Lecture 2012.

    PubMed

    Farooqi, Sadaf I

    2015-01-01

    The health consequences of obesity represent one of the major public health challenges of our time. Whilst the role of environmental drivers such as reduced physical activity and increased food intake is widely acknowledged, the importance of biological factors which influence individual variation in weight is less readily recognised. Considerable evidence suggests that genetic factors influence a person's weight in a given environment and that these genetic influences are more potent at the extremes of the body mass index (BMI) distribution. The discovery that genetic disruption of certain pathways can lead to severe obesity has informed our current understanding of how body weight is regulated by brain circuits that regulate appetite and energy expenditure. These studies provide a framework for investigating patients and ultimately may guide the development of more rational-targeted therapies for genetically susceptible individuals with severe obesity.

  5. Obesity is marked by distinct functional connectivity in brain networks involved in food reward and salience.

    PubMed

    Wijngaarden, M A; Veer, I M; Rombouts, S A R B; van Buchem, M A; Willems van Dijk, K; Pijl, H; van der Grond, J

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that brain circuits involved in reward and salience respond differently to fasting in obese versus lean individuals. We compared functional connectivity networks related to food reward and saliency after an overnight fast (baseline) and after a prolonged fast of 48 h in lean versus obese subjects. We included 13 obese (2 males, 11 females, BMI 35.4 ± 1.2 kg/m(2), age 31 ± 3 years) and 11 lean subjects (2 males, 9 females, BMI 23.2 ± 0.5 kg/m(2), age 28 ± 3 years). Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans were made after an overnight fast (baseline) and after a prolonged 48 h fast. Functional connectivity of the amygdala, hypothalamus and posterior cingulate cortex (default-mode) networks was assessed using seed-based correlations. At baseline, we found a stronger connectivity between hypothalamus and left insula in the obese subjects. This effect diminished upon the prolonged fast. After prolonged fasting, connectivity of the hypothalamus with the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) increased in lean subjects and decreased in obese subjects. Amygdala connectivity with the ventromedial prefrontal cortex was stronger in lean subjects at baseline, which did not change upon the prolonged fast. No differences in posterior cingulate cortex connectivity were observed. In conclusion, obesity is marked by alterations in functional connectivity networks involved in food reward and salience. Prolonged fasting differentially affected hypothalamic connections with the dACC and the insula between obese and lean subjects. Our data support the idea that food reward and nutrient deprivation are differently perceived and/or processed in obesity.

  6. Mining functional modules in genetic networks with decomposable graphical models.

    PubMed

    Dejori, Mathäus; Schwaighofer, Anton; Tresp, Volker; Stetter, Martin

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, graphical models have become an increasingly important tool for the structural analysis of genome-wide expression profiles at the systems level. Here we present a new graphical modelling technique, which is based on decomposable graphical models, and apply it to a set of gene expression profiles from acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The new method explains probabilistic dependencies of expression levels in terms of the concerted action of underlying genetic functional modules, which are represented as so-called "cliques" in the graph. In addition, the method uses continuous-valued (instead of discretized) expression levels, and makes no particular assumption about their probability distribution. We show that the method successfully groups members of known functional modules to cliques. Our method allows the evaluation of the importance of genes for global cellular functions based on both link count and the clique membership count.

  7. An approach for in vitro genetic networks assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noireaux, Vincent; Bar-Ziv, Roy; Libchaber, Albert

    2004-03-01

    A cell-free expression extract has been used to assemble genetic circuits in vitro. The extract, which does not contained endogenous DNA and RNA, is used as a battery to carry out transcription and translation of genes inserted into plasmids. We engineered transcriptional activation and repression cascades, in which the protein product of each stage is the input required to drive or block the following stage. Although we can find regions of linear response for single stages, cascading to subsequent stages requires working in non-linear regimes. Substantial time delays and dramatic decreases in output production are incurred with each additional stage, due to a bottleneck at the translation machinery. Faster turnover of RNA message can relieve competition between genes and stabilize output against variations in input and parameters.

  8. On Path Attractors, Stochastic Bifurcation and Dephasing In Genetic Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potoyan, Davit

    2015-03-01

    Gene regulatory networks are driven stochastic systems with the noise having two distinct components due to the to birth and death of metabolite molecules and dichotomous nature of gene state switching. Presence of dichotomous gene noise alone has the capacity to significantly perturb the optimal transition paths and steady state probability distributions compared to the macroscopic models and their weak noise approximations. Most importantly dichotomous gene noise can also lead to multimodal distributions due to stochastic bifurcation of the underlying nonlinear dynamical system, which underlies the mechanism of formation of population heterogeneity. In this note we derive approximate path based expression of the time dependent probability of gene circuits which enables deeper exploration of the role of gene noise in formation of epigenetic states and dephasing-like phenomena.

  9. Tuning the structure and parameters of a neural network by using hybrid Taguchi-genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jinn-Tsong; Chou, Jyh-Horng; Liu, Tung-Kuan

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, a hybrid Taguchi-genetic algorithm (HTGA) is applied to solve the problem of tuning both network structure and parameters of a feedforward neural network. The HTGA approach is a method of combining the traditional genetic algorithm (TGA), which has a powerful global exploration capability, with the Taguchi method, which can exploit the optimum offspring. The Taguchi method is inserted between crossover and mutation operations of a TGA. Then, the systematic reasoning ability of the Taguchi method is incorporated in the crossover operations to select the better genes to achieve crossover, and consequently enhance the genetic algorithms. Therefore, the HTGA approach can be more robust, statistically sound, and quickly convergent. First, the authors evaluate the performance of the presented HTGA approach by studying some global numerical optimization problems. Then, the presented HTGA approach is effectively applied to solve three examples on forecasting the sunspot numbers, tuning the associative memory, and solving the XOR problem. The numbers of hidden nodes and the links of the feedforward neural network are chosen by increasing them from small numbers until the learning performance is good enough. As a result, a partially connected feedforward neural network can be obtained after tuning. This implies that the cost of implementation of the neural network can be reduced. In these studied problems of tuning both network structure and parameters of a feedforward neural network, there are many parameters and numerous local optima so that these studied problems are challenging enough for evaluating the performances of any proposed GA-based approaches. The computational experiments show that the presented HTGA approach can obtain better results than the existing method reported recently in the literature.

  10. Genetic Adaptation to Climate in White Spruce Involves Small to Moderate Allele Frequency Shifts in Functionally Diverse Genes.

    PubMed

    Hornoy, Benjamin; Pavy, Nathalie; Gérardi, Sébastien; Beaulieu, Jean; Bousquet, Jean

    2015-11-11

    Understanding the genetic basis of adaptation to climate is of paramount importance for preserving and managing genetic diversity in plants in a context of climate change. Yet, this objective has been addressed mainly in short-lived model species. Thus, expanding knowledge to nonmodel species with contrasting life histories, such as forest trees, appears necessary. To uncover the genetic basis of adaptation to climate in the widely distributed boreal conifer white spruce (Picea glauca), an environmental association study was conducted using 11,085 single nucleotide polymorphisms representing 7,819 genes, that is, approximately a quarter of the transcriptome.Linear and quadratic regressions controlling for isolation-by-distance, and the Random Forest algorithm, identified several dozen genes putatively under selection, among which 43 showed strongest signals along temperature and precipitation gradients. Most of them were related to temperature. Small to moderate shifts in allele frequencies were observed. Genes involved encompassed a wide variety of functions and processes, some of them being likely important for plant survival under biotic and abiotic environmental stresses according to expression data. Literature mining and sequence comparison also highlighted conserved sequences and functions with angiosperm homologs.Our results are consistent with theoretical predictions that local adaptation involves genes with small frequency shifts when selection is recent and gene flow among populations is high. Accordingly, genetic adaptation to climate in P. glauca appears to be complex, involving many independent and interacting gene functions, biochemical pathways, and processes. From an applied perspective, these results shall lead to specific functional/association studies in conifers and to the development of markers useful for the conservation of genetic resources.

  11. Genetic Adaptation to Climate in White Spruce Involves Small to Moderate Allele Frequency Shifts in Functionally Diverse Genes

    PubMed Central

    Hornoy, Benjamin; Pavy, Nathalie; Gérardi, Sébastien; Beaulieu, Jean; Bousquet, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the genetic basis of adaptation to climate is of paramount importance for preserving and managing genetic diversity in plants in a context of climate change. Yet, this objective has been addressed mainly in short-lived model species. Thus, expanding knowledge to nonmodel species with contrasting life histories, such as forest trees, appears necessary. To uncover the genetic basis of adaptation to climate in the widely distributed boreal conifer white spruce (Picea glauca), an environmental association study was conducted using 11,085 single nucleotide polymorphisms representing 7,819 genes, that is, approximately a quarter of the transcriptome. Linear and quadratic regressions controlling for isolation-by-distance, and the Random Forest algorithm, identified several dozen genes putatively under selection, among which 43 showed strongest signals along temperature and precipitation gradients. Most of them were related to temperature. Small to moderate shifts in allele frequencies were observed. Genes involved encompassed a wide variety of functions and processes, some of them being likely important for plant survival under biotic and abiotic environmental stresses according to expression data. Literature mining and sequence comparison also highlighted conserved sequences and functions with angiosperm homologs. Our results are consistent with theoretical predictions that local adaptation involves genes with small frequency shifts when selection is recent and gene flow among populations is high. Accordingly, genetic adaptation to climate in P. glauca appears to be complex, involving many independent and interacting gene functions, biochemical pathways, and processes. From an applied perspective, these results shall lead to specific functional/association studies in conifers and to the development of markers useful for the conservation of genetic resources. PMID:26560341

  12. Network-Informed Gene Ranking Tackles Genetic Heterogeneity in Exome-Sequencing Studies of Monogenic Disease.

    PubMed

    Dand, Nick; Schulz, Reiner; Weale, Michael E; Southgate, Laura; Oakey, Rebecca J; Simpson, Michael A; Schlitt, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Genetic heterogeneity presents a significant challenge for the identification of monogenic disease genes. Whole-exome sequencing generates a large number of candidate disease-causing variants and typical analyses rely on deleterious variants being observed in the same gene across several unrelated affected individuals. This is less likely to occur for genetically heterogeneous diseases, making more advanced analysis methods necessary. To address this need, we present HetRank, a flexible gene-ranking method that incorporates interaction network data. We first show that different genes underlying the same monogenic disease are frequently connected in protein interaction networks. This motivates the central premise of HetRank: those genes carrying potentially pathogenic variants and whose network neighbors do so in other affected individuals are strong candidates for follow-up study. By simulating 1,000 exome sequencing studies (20,000 exomes in total), we model varying degrees of genetic heterogeneity and show that HetRank consistently prioritizes more disease-causing genes than existing analysis methods. We also demonstrate a proof-of-principle application of the method to prioritize genes causing Adams-Oliver syndrome, a genetically heterogeneous rare disease. An implementation of HetRank in R is available via the Website http://sourceforge.net/p/hetrank/.

  13. An efficient genetic algorithm for maximum coverage deployment in wireless sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Yourim; Kim, Yong-Hyuk

    2013-10-01

    Sensor networks have a lot of applications such as battlefield surveillance, environmental monitoring, and industrial diagnostics. Coverage is one of the most important performance metrics for sensor networks since it reflects how well a sensor field is monitored. In this paper, we introduce the maximum coverage deployment problem in wireless sensor networks and analyze the properties of the problem and its solution space. Random deployment is the simplest way to deploy sensor nodes but may cause unbalanced deployment and therefore, we need a more intelligent way for sensor deployment. We found that the phenotype space of the problem is a quotient space of the genotype space in a mathematical view. Based on this property, we propose an efficient genetic algorithm using a novel normalization method. A Monte Carlo method is adopted to design an efficient evaluation function, and its computation time is decreased without loss of solution quality using a method that starts from a small number of random samples and gradually increases the number for subsequent generations. The proposed genetic algorithms could be further improved by combining with a well-designed local search. The performance of the proposed genetic algorithm is shown by a comparative experimental study. When compared with random deployment and existing methods, our genetic algorithm was not only about twice faster, but also showed significant performance improvement in quality.

  14. The effect of network topology on the stability of discrete state models of genetic control

    PubMed Central

    Pomerance, Andrew; Ott, Edward; Girvan, Michelle; Losert, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Boolean networks have been proposed as potentially useful models for genetic control. An important aspect of these networks is the stability of their dynamics in response to small perturbations. Previous approaches to stability have assumed uncorrelated random network structure. Real gene networks typically have nontrivial topology significantly different from the random network paradigm. To address such situations, we present a general method for determining the stability of large Boolean networks of any specified network topology and predicting their steady-state behavior in response to small perturbations. Additionally, we generalize to the case where individual genes have a distribution of “expression biases,” and we consider a nonsynchronous update, as well as extension of our method to non-Boolean models in which there are more than two possible gene states. We find that stability is governed by the maximum eigenvalue of a modified adjacency matrix, and we test this result by comparison with numerical simulations. We also discuss the possible application of our work to experimentally inferred gene networks. PMID:19416903

  15. A hybrid of genetic algorithm and particle swarm optimization for recurrent network design.

    PubMed

    Juang, Chia-Feng

    2004-04-01

    An evolutionary recurrent network which automates the design of recurrent neural/fuzzy networks using a new evolutionary learning algorithm is proposed in this paper. This new evolutionary learning algorithm is based on a hybrid of genetic algorithm (GA) and particle swarm optimization (PSO), and is thus called HGAPSO. In HGAPSO, individuals in a new generation are created, not only by crossover and mutation operation as in GA, but also by PSO. The concept of elite strategy is adopted in HGAPSO, where the upper-half of the best-performing individuals in a population are regarded as elites. However, instead of being reproduced directly to the next generation, these elites are first enhanced. The group constituted by the elites is regarded as a swarm, and each elite corresponds to a particle within it. In this regard, the elites are enhanced by PSO, an operation which mimics the maturing phenomenon in nature. These enhanced elites constitute half of the population in the new generation, whereas the other half is generated by performing crossover and mutation operation on these enhanced elites. HGAPSO is applied to recurrent neural/fuzzy network design as follows. For recurrent neural network, a fully connected recurrent neural network is designed and applied to a temporal sequence production problem. For recurrent fuzzy network design, a Takagi-Sugeno-Kang-type recurrent fuzzy network is designed and applied to dynamic plant control. The performance of HGAPSO is compared to both GA and PSO in these recurrent networks design problems, demonstrating its superiority.

  16. Optimization of cocoa butter analog synthesis variables using neural networks and genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Shekarchizadeh, Hajar; Tikani, Reza; Kadivar, Mahdi

    2014-09-01

    Cocoa butter analog was prepared from camel hump fat and tristearin by enzymatic interesterification in supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) using immobilized Thermomyces lanuginosus lipase (Lipozyme TL IM) as a biocatalyst. Optimal process conditions were determined using neural networks and genetic algorithm optimization. Response surfaces methodology was used to design the experiments to collect data for the neural network modelling. A general regression neural network model was developed to predict the response of triacylglycerol (TAG) distribution of cocoa butter analog from the process pressure, temperature, tristearin/camel hump fat ratio, water content, and incubation time. A genetic algorithm was used to search for a combination of the process variables for production of most similar cocoa butter analog to the corresponding cocoa butter. The combinations of the process variables during genetic algorithm optimization were evaluated using the neural network model. The pressure of 10 MPa; temperature of 40 °C; SSS/CHF ratio of 0.6:1; water content of 13 % (w/w); and incubation time of 4.5 h were found to be the optimum conditions to achieve the most similar cocoa butter analog to the corresponding cocoa butter.

  17. A Genetic Algorithm for the Bi-Level Topological Design of Local Area Networks.

    PubMed

    Camacho-Vallejo, José-Fernando; Mar-Ortiz, Julio; López-Ramos, Francisco; Rodríguez, Ricardo Pedraza

    2015-01-01

    Local access networks (LAN) are commonly used as communication infrastructures which meet the demand of a set of users in the local environment. Usually these networks consist of several LAN segments connected by bridges. The topological LAN design bi-level problem consists on assigning users to clusters and the union of clusters by bridges in order to obtain a minimum response time network with minimum connection cost. Therefore, the decision of optimally assigning users to clusters will be made by the leader and the follower will make the decision of connecting all the clusters while forming a spanning tree. In this paper, we propose a genetic algorithm for solving the bi-level topological design of a Local Access Network. Our solution method considers the Stackelberg equilibrium to solve the bi-level problem. The Stackelberg-Genetic algorithm procedure deals with the fact that the follower's problem cannot be optimally solved in a straightforward manner. The computational results obtained from two different sets of instances show that the performance of the developed algorithm is efficient and that it is more suitable for solving the bi-level problem than a previous Nash-Genetic approach.

  18. A Genetic Algorithm for the Bi-Level Topological Design of Local Area Networks

    PubMed Central

    Camacho-Vallejo, José-Fernando; Mar-Ortiz, Julio; López-Ramos, Francisco; Rodríguez, Ricardo Pedraza

    2015-01-01

    Local access networks (LAN) are commonly used as communication infrastructures which meet the demand of a set of users in the local environment. Usually these networks consist of several LAN segments connected by bridges. The topological LAN design bi-level problem consists on assigning users to clusters and the union of clusters by bridges in order to obtain a minimum response time network with minimum connection cost. Therefore, the decision of optimally assigning users to clusters will be made by the leader and the follower will make the decision of connecting all the clusters while forming a spanning tree. In this paper, we propose a genetic algorithm for solving the bi-level topological design of a Local Access Network. Our solution method considers the Stackelberg equilibrium to solve the bi-level problem. The Stackelberg-Genetic algorithm procedure deals with the fact that the follower’s problem cannot be optimally solved in a straightforward manner. The computational results obtained from two different sets of instances show that the performance of the developed algorithm is efficient and that it is more suitable for solving the bi-level problem than a previous Nash-Genetic approach. PMID:26102502

  19. Exploitation of genetic interaction network topology for the prediction of epistatic behavior.

    PubMed

    Alanis-Lobato, Gregorio; Cannistraci, Carlo Vittorio; Ravasi, Timothy

    2013-10-01

    Genetic interaction (GI) detection impacts the understanding of human disease and the ability to design personalized treatment. The mapping of every GI in most organisms is far from complete due to the combinatorial amount of gene deletions and knockdowns required. Computational techniques to predict new interactions based only on network topology have been developed in network science but never applied to GI networks. We show that topological prediction of GIs is possible with high precision and propose a graph dissimilarity index that is able to provide robust prediction in both dense and sparse networks. Computational prediction of GIs is a strong tool to aid high-throughput GI determination. The dissimilarity index we propose in this article is able to attain precise predictions that reduce the universe of candidate GIs to test in the lab.

  20. A methodology for pseudo-genetic stochastic modeling of discrete fracture networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonneau, François; Henrion, Vincent; Caumon, Guillaume; Renard, Philippe; Sausse, Judith

    2013-07-01

    Stochastic simulation of fracture systems is an interesting approach to build a set of dense and complex networks. However, discrete fracture models made of planar fractures generally fail to reproduce the complexity of natural networks, both in terms of geometry and connectivity. In this study a pseudo-genetic method is developed to generate stochastic fracture models that are consistent with patterns observed on outcrops and fracture growth principles. The main idea is to simulate evolving fracture networks through geometric proxies by iteratively growing 3D fractures. The algorithm defines heuristic rules in order to mimic the mechanics of fracture initiation, propagation, interaction and termination. The growth process enhances the production of linking structure and impacts the connectivity of fracture networks. A sensitivity study is performed on synthetic examples. The method produces unbiased fracture dip and strike statistics and qualitatively reproduces the fracture density map. The fracture length distribution law is underestimated because of the early stop in fracture growth after intersection.

  1. Shared Genetic Factors Involved in Celiac Disease, Type 2 Diabetes and Anorexia Nervosa Suggest Common Molecular Pathways for Chronic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mostowy, Joanna; Montén, Caroline; Gudjonsdottir, Audur H.; Arnell, Henrik; Browaldh, Lars; Nilsson, Staffan; Agardh, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified several genetic regions involved in immune-regulatory mechanisms to be associated with celiac disease. Previous GWAS also revealed an over-representation of genes involved in type 2 diabetes and anorexia nervosa associated with celiac disease, suggesting involvement of common metabolic pathways for development of these chronic diseases. The aim of this study was to extend these previous analyses to study the gene expression in the gut from children with active celiac disease. Material and Methods Thirty six target genes involved in type 2 diabetes and four genes associated with anorexia nervosa were investigated for gene expression in small intestinal biopsies from 144 children with celiac disease at median (range) age of 7.4 years (1.6–17.8) and from 154 disease controls at a median (range) age 11.4.years (1.4–18.3). Results A total of eleven of genes were differently expressed in celiac patients compared with disease controls of which CD36, CD38, FOXP1, SELL, PPARA, PPARG, AGT previously associated with type 2 diabetes and AKAP6, NTNG1 with anorexia nervosa remained significant after correction for multiple testing. Conclusion Shared genetic factors involved in celiac disease, type 2 diabetes and anorexia nervosa suggest common underlying molecular pathways for these diseases. PMID:27483138

  2. An Improved Integral Inequality to Stability Analysis of Genetic Regulatory Networks With Interval Time-Varying Delays.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xian; Wu, Ligang; Cui, Shaochun

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on stability analysis for a class of genetic regulatory networks with interval time-varying delays. An improved integral inequality concerning on double-integral items is first established. Then, we use the improved integral inequality to deal with the resultant double-integral items in the derivative of the involved Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional. As a result, a delay-range-dependent and delay-rate-dependent asymptotical stability criterion is established for genetic regulatory networks with differential time-varying delays. Furthermore, it is theoretically proven that the stability criterion proposed here is less conservative than the corresponding one in [Neurocomputing, 2012, 93: 19-26]. Based on the obtained result, another stability criterion is given under the case that the information of the derivatives of delays is unknown. Finally, the effectiveness of the approach proposed in this paper is illustrated by a pair of numerical examples which give the comparisons of stability criteria proposed in this paper and some literature.

  3. A Systems Approach Implicates a Brain Mitochondrial Oxidative Homeostasis Co-expression Network in Genetic Vulnerability to Alcohol Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Nicole A. R.; Denmark, DeAunne L.; Kozell, Laura B.; Buck, Kari J.

    2017-01-01

    Genetic factors significantly affect vulnerability to alcohol dependence (alcoholism). We previously identified quantitative trait loci on distal mouse chromosome 1 with large effects on predisposition to alcohol physiological dependence and associated withdrawal following both chronic and acute alcohol exposure in mice (Alcdp1 and Alcw1, respectively). We fine-mapped these loci to a 1.1–1.7 Mb interval syntenic with human 1q23.2-23.3. Alcw1/Alcdp1 interval genes show remarkable genetic variation among mice derived from the C57BL/6J and DBA/2J strains, the two most widely studied genetic animal models for alcohol-related traits. Here, we report the creation of a novel recombinant Alcw1/Alcdp1 congenic model (R2) in which the Alcw1/Alcdp1 interval from a donor C57BL/6J strain is introgressed onto a uniform, inbred DBA/2J genetic background. As expected, R2 mice demonstrate significantly less severe alcohol withdrawal compared to wild-type littermates. Additionally, comparing R2 and background strain animals, as well as reciprocal congenic (R8) and appropriate background strain animals, we assessed Alcw1/Alcdp1 dependent brain gene expression using microarray and quantitative PCR analyses. To our knowledge this includes the first Weighted Gene Co-expression Network Analysis using reciprocal congenic models. Importantly, this allows detection of co-expression patterns limited to one or common to both genetic backgrounds with high or low predisposition to alcohol withdrawal severity. The gene expression patterns (modules) in common contain genes related to oxidative phosphorylation, building upon human and animal model studies that implicate involvement of oxidative phosphorylation in alcohol use disorders (AUDs). Finally, we demonstrate that administration of N-acetylcysteine, an FDA-approved antioxidant, significantly reduces symptoms of alcohol withdrawal (convulsions) in mice, thus validating a phenotypic role for this network. Taken together, these studies

  4. High acceptance of an early dyslexia screening test involving genetic analyses in Germany.

    PubMed

    Wilcke, Arndt; Müller, Bent; Schaadt, Gesa; Kirsten, Holger; Boltze, Johannes

    2016-02-01

    Dyslexia is a developmental disorder characterized by severe problems in the acquisition of reading and writing skills. It has a strong neurobiological basis. Genetic influence is estimated at 50-70%. One of the central problems with dyslexia is its late diagnosis, normally not before the end of the 2nd grade, resulting in the loss of several years for early therapy. Currently, research is focusing on the development of early tests for dyslexia, which may be based on EEG and genetics. Our aim was to determine the acceptance of such a future test among parents. We conducted a representative survey in Germany with 1000 parents of children aged 3-7 years, with and without experience of dyslexia. 88.7% of the parents supported the introduction of an early test for dyslexia based on EEG and genetics; 82.8% would have their own children tested, and 57.9% were willing to pay for the test if health insurance did not cover the costs. Test acceptance was significantly higher if parents had prior experience with dyslexia. The perceived benefits of such a test were early recognition and remediation and, preventing deficits. Concerns regarded the precision of the test, its potentially stigmatizing effect and its costs. The high overall support for the test leads to the conclusion that parents would accept a test for dyslexia based on EEG and genetics.

  5. Genetic variation in genes involved in folate and drug metabolism in a south Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Padmalatha S; Murali, T. S; Vasudevan, T. G; Prasada, Shama K.; Bhagavath, Ashok Kumar; Pai, Pranita; Gopinath, P. M.; Satyamoorthy, K.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genetic variations represented as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) vary across the world population. This genetic polymorphism (such as SNPs) plays an important role in pharmacogenomics. SNPs that affects cellular metabolism, by altering the enzyme activity, have an important role in therapeutic outcome. Allele frequencies in number of clinically relevant SNPs within south Indian populations are not yet known. Hence, we genotyped randomly selected unrelated south Indian subjects from different locations of south India representing the heterogeneous ethnic background of the population. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Common variants of MTHFD1, TYMS, SHMT1, MTR, MTRR, CBS and SULT1A1 gene polymorphisms were screened from healthy unrelated south Indian volunteers. Genotypes were determined using RFLP analysis of polymerase chain reaction-amplified products and confirmed by DNA sequencing. Chi-square test was performed to test for deviation from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium for each locus. RESULTS: Gene allele frequency for several polymorphisms in our study differed significantly between the populations of other nations reported for several of the SNPs. These results demonstrate that the populations in different geographic regions may have widely varying genetic allele frequencies for clinically relevant SNPs. CONCLUSION: The present study reports, for the first time, the frequency distribution of MTHFD1, TYMS, SHMT1, MTR, MTRR, CBS and SULTIA1 gene polymorphisms in a south Indian population. Population-specific genetic polymorphism studies will help in practicing pharmacogenomic principles in the clinics. PMID:21747588

  6. Prediction of microRNAs involved in immune system diseases through network based features.

    PubMed

    Prabahar, Archana; Natarajan, Jeyakumar

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs are a class of small non-coding regulatory RNA molecules that modulate the expression of several genes at post-transcriptional level and play a vital role in disease pathogenesis. Recent research shows that a range of miRNAs are involved in the regulation of immunity and its deregulation results in immune mediated diseases such as cancer, inflammation and autoimmune diseases. Computational discovery of these immune miRNAs using a set of specific features is highly desirable. In the current investigation, we present a SVM based classification system which uses a set of novel network based topological and motif features in addition to the baseline sequential and structural features to predict immune specific miRNAs from other non-immune miRNAs. The classifier was trained and tested on a balanced set of equal number of positive and negative examples to show the discriminative power of our network features. Experimental results show that our approach achieves an accuracy of 90.2% and outperforms the classification accuracy of 63.2% reported using the traditional miRNA sequential and structural features. The proposed classifier was further validated with two immune disease sub-class datasets related to multiple sclerosis microarray data and psoriasis RNA-seq data with higher accuracy. These results indicate that our classifier which uses network and motif features along with sequential and structural features will lead to significant improvement in classifying immune miRNAs and hence can be applied to identify other specific classes of miRNAs as an extensible miRNA classification system.

  7. Differentially expressed genes and gene networks involved in pig ovarian follicular atresia.

    PubMed

    Terenina, Elena; Fabre, Stephane; Bonnet, Agnès; Monniaux, Danielle; Robert-Granié, Christèle; SanCristobal, Magali; Sarry, Julien; Vignoles, Florence; Gondret, Florence; Monget, Philippe; Tosser-Klopp, Gwenola

    2017-02-01

    Ovarian folliculogenesis corresponds to the development of follicles leading to either ovulation or degeneration, this latter process being called atresia. Even if atresia involves apoptosis, its mechanism is not well understood. The objective of this study was to analyze global gene expression in pig granulosa cells of ovarian follicles during atresia. The transcriptome analysis was performed on a 9,216 cDNA microarray to identify gene networks and candidate genes involved in pig ovarian follicular atresia. We found 1,684 significantly regulated genes to be differentially regulated between small healthy follicles and small atretic follicles. Among them, 287 genes had a fold-change higher than two between the two follicle groups. Eleven genes (DKK3, GADD45A, CAMTA2, CCDC80, DAPK2, ECSIT, MSMB, NUPR1, RUNX2, SAMD4A, and ZNF628) having a fold-change higher than five between groups could likely serve as markers of follicular atresia. Moreover, automatic confrontation of deregulated genes with literature data highlighted 93 genes as regulatory candidates of pig granulosa cell atresia. Among these genes known to be inhibitors of apoptosis, stimulators of apoptosis, or tumor suppressors INHBB, HNF4, CLU, different interleukins (IL5, IL24), TNF-associated receptor (TNFR1), and cytochrome-c oxidase (COX) were suggested as playing an important role in porcine atresia. The present study also enlists key upstream regulators in follicle atresia based on our results and on a literature review. The novel gene candidates and gene networks identified in the current study lead to a better understanding of the molecular regulation of ovarian follicular atresia.

  8. A target coverage scheduling scheme based on genetic algorithms in directional sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Gil, Joon-Min; Han, Youn-Hee

    2011-01-01

    As a promising tool for monitoring the physical world, directional sensor networks (DSNs) consisting of a large number of directional sensors are attracting increasing attention. As directional sensors in DSNs have limited battery power and restricted angles of sensing range, maximizing the network lifetime while monitoring all the targets in a given area remains a challenge. A major technique to conserve the energy of directional sensors is to use a node wake-up scheduling protocol by which some sensors remain active to provide sensing services, while the others are inactive to conserve their energy. In this paper, we first address a Maximum Set Covers for DSNs (MSCD) problem, which is known to be NP-complete, and present a greedy algorithm-based target coverage scheduling scheme that can solve this problem by heuristics. This scheme is used as a baseline for comparison. We then propose a target coverage scheduling scheme based on a genetic algorithm that can find the optimal cover sets to extend the network lifetime while monitoring all targets by the evolutionary global search technique. To verify and evaluate these schemes, we conducted simulations and showed that the schemes can contribute to extending the network lifetime. Simulation results indicated that the genetic algorithm-based scheduling scheme had better performance than the greedy algorithm-based scheme in terms of maximizing network lifetime.

  9. Stochastic gene expression in single cells: exploring the importance of noise in genetic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2003-03-01

    Cells are intrinsically noisy biochemical reactors. This leads to random cell to cell variation (noise) in gene expression levels. First, I will address the source of this noise at the level of transcription and translation of a single gene. Our experimental results demonstrate that the intrinsic noise of a single gene is predominantly controlled at the translational level, and that increased translational efficiency leads to increased noise strength. This observation is consistent with a theoretical model in which proteins are randomly produced in sharp bursts followed by periods of slow decay. Second, I will explore the importance of genetic noise for a naturally occuring network: the lac operon. The classic lactose utilization network of E. coli has been under investigation for several decades and, in its simplest form the network may be modeled as a single positive feedback module. However, this simplicity is deceptive, as even this basic network is capable of complex metabolic behavior, including adaptation, amplification, and graded-to-binary response conversion. I will present single cell measurements on the expression of key genes in lactose uptake network and explore the importance of genetic noise on the regulation of these genes.

  10. Inferring Genetic Networks and Identifying Compound Mode of Action via Expression Profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Timothy S.; di Bernardo, Diego; Lorenz, David; Collins, James J.

    2003-07-01

    The complexity of cellular gene, protein, and metabolite networks can hinder attempts to elucidate their structure and function. To address this problem, we used systematic transcriptional perturbations to construct a first-order model of regulatory interactions in a nine-gene subnetwork of the SOS pathway in Escherichia coli. The model correctly identified the major regulatory genes and the transcriptional targets of mitomycin C activity in the subnetwork. This approach, which is experimentally and computationally scalable, provides a framework for elucidating the functional properties of genetic networks and identifying molecular targets of pharmacological compounds.

  11. Systematic genetic analysis of transcription factors to map the fission yeast transcription-regulatory network.

    PubMed

    Chua, Gordon

    2013-12-01

    Mapping transcriptional-regulatory networks requires the identification of target genes, binding specificities and signalling pathways of transcription factors. However, the characterization of each transcription factor sufficiently for deciphering such networks remains laborious. The recent availability of overexpression and deletion strains for almost all of the transcription factor genes in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe provides a valuable resource to better investigate transcription factors using systematic genetics. In the present paper, I review and discuss the utility of these strain collections combined with transcriptome profiling and genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation to identify the target genes of transcription factors.

  12. Buying and Selling Stocks of Multi Brands Using Genetic Network Programming with Control Nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkawa, Etsushi; Chen, Yan; Bao, Zhiguo; Mabu, Shingo; Shimada, Kaoru; Hirasawa, Kotaro

    A new evolutionary method named “Genetic Network Programming with control nodes, GNPcn” has been applied to determine the timing of buying or selling stocks. GNPcn represents its solutions as directed graph structures which has some useful features inherently. For example, GNPcn has an implicit memory function which memorizes the past action sequences of agents and GNPcn can re-use nodes repeatedly in the network flow, so very compact graph structures can be made. GNPcn can determine the strategy of buying and selling stocks of multi issues. The effectiveness of the proposed method is confirmed by simulations.

  13. Systematic proteomic analysis of human hepotacellular carcinoma cells reveals molecular pathways and networks involved in metastasis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yanyan; Shen, Huali; Yu, Hongxiu; Zhong, Fan; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Chen; Zhao, Jian; Li, Hong; Chen, Jie; Liu, Yinkun; Yang, Pengyuan

    2011-06-01

    Systematic proteomic studying of the mechanism of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) metastasis remains challenging. We performed comparative proteomic and pathway analysis of four human metastatic HCC cell lines to identify metastasis-associated proteins. These HCC cell lines had a similar genetic background but with an increasing potential of metastasis. Using a combination of two dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, a total of 125 proteins and their post-translational modification forms or isoforms were found to be differentially expressed in the cell lines. Among them, 29 were gradually up-regulated whereas 17 were down-regulated with increasing metastatic potential. Instead of a traditional single-gene readout, global bioinformatics analysis was carried out, which revealed that the glycolysis pathway was the most significantly enriched pathway. The heat shock proteins (HSPs) centered and NF-kappaB centered networks were also enriched in the result, which may imply the key function of inflaming on metastasis. Meanwhile, knockdown of HDGF, an up-regulated protein and a target of NF-kappaB, induced cell apoptosis in the metastatic HCC cells. This work provides a demonstration that a combination of bioinformatics and comparative proteomics can help in finding out potential biomarkers associated with HCC metastasis on the level of pathways.

  14. Discovering link communities in complex networks by an integer programming model and a genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenping; Zhang, Xiang-Sun; Wang, Rui-Sheng; Liu, Hongwei; Zhang, Shihua

    2013-01-01

    Identification of communities in complex networks is an important topic and issue in many fields such as sociology, biology, and computer science. Communities are often defined as groups of related nodes or links that correspond to functional subunits in the corresponding complex systems. While most conventional approaches have focused on discovering communities of nodes, some recent studies start partitioning links to find overlapping communities straightforwardly. In this paper, we propose a new quantity function for link community identification in complex networks. Based on this quantity function we formulate the link community partition problem into an integer programming model which allows us to partition a complex network into overlapping communities. We further propose a genetic algorithm for link community detection which can partition a network into overlapping communities without knowing the number of communities. We test our model and algorithm on both artificial networks and real-world networks. The results demonstrate that the model and algorithm are efficient in detecting overlapping community structure in complex networks.

  15. A multi-agent genetic algorithm for community detection in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhangtao; Liu, Jing

    2016-05-01

    Complex networks are popularly used to represent a lot of practical systems in the domains of biology and sociology, and the structure of community is one of the most important network attributes which has received an enormous amount of attention. Community detection is the process of discovering the community structure hidden in complex networks, and modularity Q is one of the best known quality functions measuring the quality of communities of networks. In this paper, a multi-agent genetic algorithm, named as MAGA-Net, is proposed to optimize modularity value for the community detection. An agent, coded by a division of a network, represents a candidate solution. All agents live in a lattice-like environment, with each agent fixed on a lattice point. A series of operators are designed, namely split and merging based neighborhood competition operator, hybrid neighborhood crossover, adaptive mutation and self-learning operator, to increase modularity value. In the experiments, the performance of MAGA-Net is validated on both well-known real-world benchmark networks and large-scale synthetic LFR networks with 5000 nodes. The systematic comparisons with GA-Net and Meme-Net show that MAGA-Net outperforms these two algorithms, and can detect communities with high speed, accuracy and stability.

  16. Computational, Integrative, and Comparative Methods for the Elucidation of Genetic Coexpression Networks

    DOE PAGES

    Baldwin, Nicole E.; Chesler, Elissa J.; Kirov, Stefan; ...

    2005-01-01

    Gene expression microarray data can be used for the assembly of genetic coexpression network graphs. Using mRNA samples obtained from recombinant inbred Mus musculus strains, it is possible to integrate allelic variation with molecular and higher-order phenotypes. The depth of quantitative genetic analysis of microarray data can be vastly enhanced utilizing this mouse resource in combination with powerful computational algorithms, platforms, and data repositories. The resulting network graphs transect many levels of biological scale. This approach is illustrated with the extraction of cliques of putatively co-regulated genes and their annotation using gene ontology analysis and cis -regulatory element discovery.more » The causal basis for co-regulation is detected through the use of quantitative trait locus mapping.« less

  17. Exploring the Link between Genetic Relatedness r and Social Contact Structure k in Animal Social Networks.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Jochen B W; Traulsen, Arne; James, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Our understanding of how cooperation can arise in a population of selfish individuals has been greatly advanced by theory. More than one approach has been used to explore the effect of population structure. Inclusive fitness theory uses genetic relatedness r to express the role of population structure. Evolutionary graph theory models the evolution of cooperation on network structures and focuses on the number of interacting partners k as a quantity of interest. Here we use empirical data from a hierarchically structured animal contact network to examine the interplay between independent, measurable proxies for these key parameters. We find strong inverse correlations between estimates of r and k over three levels of social organization, suggesting that genetic relatedness and social contact structure capture similar structural information in a real population.

  18. Automatic reconstruction of molecular and genetic networks from discrete time series data.

    PubMed

    Durzinsky, Markus; Wagler, Annegret; Weismantel, Robert; Marwan, Wolfgang

    2008-09-01

    We apply a mathematical algorithm which processes discrete time series data to generate a complete list of Petri net structures containing the minimal number of nodes required to reproduce the data set. The completeness of the list as guaranteed by a mathematical proof allows to define a minimal set of experiments required to discriminate between alternative network structures. This in principle allows to prove all possible minimal network structures by disproving all alternative candidate structures. The dynamic behaviour of the networks in terms of a switching rule for the transitions of the Petri net is part of the result. In addition to network reconstruction, the algorithm can be used to determine how many yet undetected components at least must be involved in a certain process. The algorithm also reveals all alternative structural modifications of a network that are required to generate a predefined behaviour.

  19. Optimal Parameter for the Training of Multilayer Perceptron Neural Networks by Using Hierarchical Genetic Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Orozco-Monteagudo, Maykel; Taboada-Crispi, Alberto; Gutierrez-Hernandez, Liliana

    2008-11-06

    This paper deals with the controversial topic of the selection of the parameters of a genetic algorithm, in this case hierarchical, used for training of multilayer perceptron neural networks for the binary classification. The parameters to select are the crossover and mutation probabilities of the control and parametric genes and the permanency percent. The results can be considered as a guide for using this kind of algorithm.

  20. Neural-Network-Biased Genetic Algorithms for Materials Design: Evolutionary Algorithms That Learn.

    PubMed

    Patra, Tarak K; Meenakshisundaram, Venkatesh; Hung, Jui-Hsiang; Simmons, David S

    2017-02-13

    Machine learning has the potential to dramatically accelerate high-throughput approaches to materials design, as demonstrated by successes in biomolecular design and hard materials design. However, in the search for new soft materials exhibiting properties and performance beyond those previously achieved, machine learning approaches are frequently limited by two shortcomings. First, because they are intrinsically interpolative, they are better suited to the optimization of properties within the known range of accessible behavior than to the discovery of new materials with extremal behavior. Second, they require large pre-existing data sets, which are frequently unavailable and prohibitively expensive to produce. Here we describe a new strategy, the neural-network-biased genetic algorithm (NBGA), for combining genetic algorithms, machine learning, and high-throughput computation or experiment to discover materials with extremal properties in the absence of pre-existing data. Within this strategy, predictions from a progressively constructed artificial neural network are employed to bias the evolution of a genetic algorithm, with fitness evaluations performed via direct simulation or experiment. In effect, this strategy gives the evolutionary algorithm the ability to "learn" and draw inferences from its experience to accelerate the evolutionary process. We test this algorithm against several standard optimization problems and polymer design problems and demonstrate that it matches and typically exceeds the efficiency and reproducibility of standard approaches including a direct-evaluation genetic algorithm and a neural-network-evaluated genetic algorithm. The success of this algorithm in a range of test problems indicates that the NBGA provides a robust strategy for employing informatics-accelerated high-throughput methods to accelerate materials design in the absence of pre-existing data.

  1. Prediction of Aerodynamic Coefficient using Genetic Algorithm Optimized Neural Network for Sparse Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajkumar, T.; Bardina, Jorge; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Wind tunnels use scale models to characterize aerodynamic coefficients, Wind tunnel testing can be slow and costly due to high personnel overhead and intensive power utilization. Although manual curve fitting can be done, it is highly efficient to use a neural network to define the complex relationship between variables. Numerical simulation of complex vehicles on the wide range of conditions required for flight simulation requires static and dynamic data. Static data at low Mach numbers and angles of attack may be obtained with simpler Euler codes. Static data of stalled vehicles where zones of flow separation are usually present at higher angles of attack require Navier-Stokes simulations which are costly due to the large processing time required to attain convergence. Preliminary dynamic data may be obtained with simpler methods based on correlations and vortex methods; however, accurate prediction of the dynamic coefficients requires complex and costly numerical simulations. A reliable and fast method of predicting complex aerodynamic coefficients for flight simulation I'S presented using a neural network. The training data for the neural network are derived from numerical simulations and wind-tunnel experiments. The aerodynamic coefficients are modeled as functions of the flow characteristics and the control surfaces of the vehicle. The basic coefficients of lift, drag and pitching moment are expressed as functions of angles of attack and Mach number. The modeled and training aerodynamic coefficients show good agreement. This method shows excellent potential for rapid development of aerodynamic models for flight simulation. Genetic Algorithms (GA) are used to optimize a previously built Artificial Neural Network (ANN) that reliably predicts aerodynamic coefficients. Results indicate that the GA provided an efficient method of optimizing the ANN model to predict aerodynamic coefficients. The reliability of the ANN using the GA includes prediction of aerodynamic

  2. Systematic interactome mapping and genetic perturbation analysis of a C. elegans TGF-beta signaling network.

    PubMed

    Tewari, Muneesh; Hu, Patrick J; Ahn, Jin Sook; Ayivi-Guedehoussou, Nono; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Li, Siming; Milstein, Stuart; Armstrong, Chris M; Boxem, Mike; Butler, Maurice D; Busiguina, Svetlana; Rual, Jean-François; Ibarrola, Nieves; Chaklos, Sabrina T; Bertin, Nicolas; Vaglio, Philippe; Edgley, Mark L; King, Kevin V; Albert, Patrice S; Vandenhaute, Jean; Pandey, Akhilesh; Riddle, Donald L; Ruvkun, Gary; Vidal, Marc

    2004-02-27

    To initiate a system-level analysis of C. elegans DAF-7/TGF-beta signaling, we combined interactome mapping with single and double genetic perturbations. Yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) screens starting with known DAF-7/TGF-beta pathway components defined a network of 71 interactions among 59 proteins. Coaffinity purification (co-AP) assays in mammalian cells confirmed the overall quality of this network. Systematic perturbations of the network using RNAi, both in wild-type and daf-7/TGF-beta pathway mutant animals, identified nine DAF-7/TGF-beta signaling modifiers, seven of which are conserved in humans. We show that one of these has functional homology to human SNO/SKI oncoproteins and that mutations at the corresponding genetic locus daf-5 confer defects in DAF-7/TGF-beta signaling. Our results reveal substantial molecular complexity in DAF-7/TGF-beta signal transduction. Integrating interactome maps with systematic genetic perturbations may be useful for developing a systems biology approach to this and other signaling modules.

  3. Statistical epistasis networks reduce the computational complexity of searching three-locus genetic models.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ting; Andrew, Angeline S; Karagas, Margaret R; Moore, Jason H

    2013-01-01

    The rapid development of sequencing technologies makes thousands to millions of genetic attributes available for testing associations with various biological traits. Searching this enormous high-dimensional data space imposes a great computational challenge in genome-wide association studies. We introduce a network-based approach to supervise the search for three-locus models of disease susceptibility. Such statistical epistasis networks (SEN) are built using strong pairwise epistatic interactions and provide a global interaction map to search for higher-order interactions by prioritizing genetic attributes clustered together in the networks. Applying this approach to a population-based bladder cancer dataset, we found a high susceptibility three-way model of genetic variations in DNA repair and immune regulation pathways, which holds great potential for studying the etiology of bladder cancer with further biological validations. We demonstrate that our SEN-supervised search is able to find a small subset of three-locus models with significantly high associations at a substantially reduced computational cost.

  4. A Bayesian network coding scheme for annotating biomedical information presented to genetic counseling clients.

    PubMed

    Green, Nancy

    2005-04-01

    We developed a Bayesian network coding scheme for annotating biomedical content in layperson-oriented clinical genetics documents. The coding scheme supports the representation of probabilistic and causal relationships among concepts in this domain, at a high enough level of abstraction to capture commonalities among genetic processes and their relationship to health. We are using the coding scheme to annotate a corpus of genetic counseling patient letters as part of the requirements analysis and knowledge acquisition phase of a natural language generation project. This paper describes the coding scheme and presents an evaluation of intercoder reliability for its tag set. In addition to giving examples of use of the coding scheme for analysis of discourse and linguistic features in this genre, we suggest other uses for it in analysis of layperson-oriented text and dialogue in medical communication.

  5. Large-scale genetic perturbations reveal regulatory networks and an abundance of gene-specific repressors.

    PubMed

    Kemmeren, Patrick; Sameith, Katrin; van de Pasch, Loes A L; Benschop, Joris J; Lenstra, Tineke L; Margaritis, Thanasis; O'Duibhir, Eoghan; Apweiler, Eva; van Wageningen, Sake; Ko, Cheuk W; van Heesch, Sebastiaan; Kashani, Mehdi M; Ampatziadis-Michailidis, Giannis; Brok, Mariel O; Brabers, Nathalie A C H; Miles, Anthony J; Bouwmeester, Diane; van Hooff, Sander R; van Bakel, Harm; Sluiters, Erik; Bakker, Linda V; Snel, Berend; Lijnzaad, Philip; van Leenen, Dik; Groot Koerkamp, Marian J A; Holstege, Frank C P

    2014-04-24

    To understand regulatory systems, it would be useful to uniformly determine how different components contribute to the expression of all other genes. We therefore monitored mRNA expression genome-wide, for individual deletions of one-quarter of yeast genes, focusing on (putative) regulators. The resulting genetic perturbation signatures reflect many different properties. These include the architecture of protein complexes and pathways, identification of expression changes compatible with viability, and the varying responsiveness to genetic perturbation. The data are assembled into a genetic perturbation network that shows different connectivities for different classes of regulators. Four feed-forward loop (FFL) types are overrepresented, including incoherent type 2 FFLs that likely represent feedback. Systematic transcription factor classification shows a surprisingly high abundance of gene-specific repressors, suggesting that yeast chromatin is not as generally restrictive to transcription as is often assumed. The data set is useful for studying individual genes and for discovering properties of an entire regulatory system.

  6. Strain Dependent Genetic Networks for Antibiotic-Sensitivity in a Bacterial Pathogen with a Large Pan-Genome

    PubMed Central

    van Opijnen, Tim; Bento, José

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between an antibiotic and bacterium is not merely restricted to the drug and its direct target, rather antibiotic induced stress seems to resonate through the bacterium, creating selective pressures that drive the emergence of adaptive mutations not only in the direct target, but in genes involved in many different fundamental processes as well. Surprisingly, it has been shown that adaptive mutations do not necessarily have the same effect in all species, indicating that the genetic background influences how phenotypes are manifested. However, to what extent the genetic background affects the manner in which a bacterium experiences antibiotic stress, and how this stress is processed is unclear. Here we employ the genome-wide tool Tn-Seq to construct daptomycin-sensitivity profiles for two strains of the bacterial pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae. Remarkably, over half of the genes that are important for dealing with antibiotic-induced stress in one strain are dispensable in another. By confirming over 100 genotype-phenotype relationships, probing potassium-loss, employing genetic interaction mapping as well as temporal gene-expression experiments we reveal genome-wide conditionally important/essential genes, we discover roles for genes with unknown function, and uncover parts of the antibiotic’s mode-of-action. Moreover, by mapping the underlying genomic network for two query genes we encounter little conservation in network connectivity between strains as well as profound differences in regulatory relationships. Our approach uniquely enables genome-wide fitness comparisons across strains, facilitating the discovery that antibiotic responses are complex events that can vary widely between strains, which suggests that in some cases the emergence of resistance could be strain specific and at least for species with a large pan-genome less predictable. PMID:27607357

  7. Strain Dependent Genetic Networks for Antibiotic-Sensitivity in a Bacterial Pathogen with a Large Pan-Genome.

    PubMed

    van Opijnen, Tim; Dedrick, Sandra; Bento, José

    2016-09-01

    The interaction between an antibiotic and bacterium is not merely restricted to the drug and its direct target, rather antibiotic induced stress seems to resonate through the bacterium, creating selective pressures that drive the emergence of adaptive mutations not only in the direct target, but in genes involved in many different fundamental processes as well. Surprisingly, it has been shown that adaptive mutations do not necessarily have the same effect in all species, indicating that the genetic background influences how phenotypes are manifested. However, to what extent the genetic background affects the manner in which a bacterium experiences antibiotic stress, and how this stress is processed is unclear. Here we employ the genome-wide tool Tn-Seq to construct daptomycin-sensitivity profiles for two strains of the bacterial pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae. Remarkably, over half of the genes that are important for dealing with antibiotic-induced stress in one strain are dispensable in another. By confirming over 100 genotype-phenotype relationships, probing potassium-loss, employing genetic interaction mapping as well as temporal gene-expression experiments we reveal genome-wide conditionally important/essential genes, we discover roles for genes with unknown function, and uncover parts of the antibiotic's mode-of-action. Moreover, by mapping the underlying genomic network for two query genes we encounter little conservation in network connectivity between strains as well as profound differences in regulatory relationships. Our approach uniquely enables genome-wide fitness comparisons across strains, facilitating the discovery that antibiotic responses are complex events that can vary widely between strains, which suggests that in some cases the emergence of resistance could be strain specific and at least for species with a large pan-genome less predictable.

  8. Environmentally induced changes in correlated responses to selection reveal variable pleiotropy across a complex genetic network.

    PubMed

    Sikkink, Kristin L; Reynolds, Rose M; Cresko, William A; Phillips, Patrick C

    2015-05-01

    Selection in novel environments can lead to a coordinated evolutionary response across a suite of characters. Environmental conditions can also potentially induce changes in the genetic architecture of complex traits, which in turn could alter the pattern of the multivariate response to selection. We describe a factorial selection experiment using the nematode Caenorhabditis remanei in which two different stress-related phenotypes (heat and oxidative stress resistance) were selected under three different environmental conditions. The pattern of covariation in the evolutionary response between phenotypes or across environments differed depending on the environment in which selection occurred, including asymmetrical responses to selection in some cases. These results indicate that variation in pleiotropy across the stress response network is highly sensitive to the external environment. Our findings highlight the complexity of the interaction between genes and environment that influences the ability of organisms to acclimate to novel environments. They also make clear the need to identify the underlying genetic basis of genetic correlations in order understand how patterns of pleiotropy are distributed across complex genetic networks.

  9. Genetic variation among 82 pharmacogenes: The PGRNseq data from the eMERGE network

    PubMed Central

    Bush, WS; Crosslin, DR; Owusu‐Obeng, A; Wallace, J; Almoguera, B; Basford, MA; Bielinski, SJ; Carrell, DS; Connolly, JJ; Crawford, D; Doheny, KF; Gallego, CJ; Gordon, AS; Keating, B; Kirby, J; Kitchner, T; Manzi, S; Mejia, AR; Pan, V; Perry, CL; Peterson, JF; Prows, CA; Ralston, J; Scott, SA; Scrol, A; Smith, M; Stallings, SC; Veldhuizen, T; Wolf, W; Volpi, S; Wiley, K; Li, R; Manolio, T; Bottinger, E; Brilliant, MH; Carey, D; Chisholm, RL; Chute, CG; Haines, JL; Hakonarson, H; Harley, JB; Holm, IA; Kullo, IJ; Jarvik, GP; Larson, EB; McCarty, CA; Williams, MS; Denny, JC; Rasmussen‐Torvik, LJ; Roden, DM

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variation can affect drug response in multiple ways, although it remains unclear how rare genetic variants affect drug response. The electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) Network, collaborating with the Pharmacogenomics Research Network, began eMERGE‐PGx, a targeted sequencing study to assess genetic variation in 82 pharmacogenes critical for implementation of “precision medicine.” The February 2015 eMERGE‐PGx data release includes sequence‐derived data from ∼5,000 clinical subjects. We present the variant frequency spectrum categorized by variant type, ancestry, and predicted function. We found 95.12% of genes have variants with a scaled Combined Annotation‐Dependent Depletion score above 20, and 96.19% of all samples had one or more Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium Level A actionable variants. These data highlight the distribution and scope of genetic variation in relevant pharmacogenes, identifying challenges associated with implementing clinical sequencing for drug treatment at a broader level, underscoring the importance for multifaceted research in the execution of precision medicine. PMID:26857349

  10. Preparation of agar nanospheres: comparison of response surface and artificial neural network modeling by a genetic algorithm approach.

    PubMed

    Zaki, Mohammad Reza; Varshosaz, Jaleh; Fathi, Milad

    2015-05-20

    Multivariate nature of drug loaded nanospheres manufacturing in term of multiplicity of involved factors makes it a time consuming and expensive process. In this study genetic algorithm (GA) and artificial neural network (ANN), two tools inspired by natural process, were employed to optimize and simulate the manufacturing process of agar nanospheres. The efficiency of GA was evaluated against the response surface methodology (RSM). The studied responses included particle size, poly dispersity index, zeta potential, drug loading and release efficiency. GA predicted greater extremum values for response factors compared to RSM. However, real values showed some deviations from predicted data. Appropriate agreement was found between ANN model predicted and real values for all five response factors with high correlation coefficients. GA was more successful than RSM in optimization and along with ANN were efficient tools in optimizing and modeling the fabrication process of drug loaded in agar nanospheres.

  11. Brain network reorganization differs in response to stress in rats genetically predisposed to depression and stress-resilient rats

    PubMed Central

    Gass, N; Becker, R; Schwarz, A J; Weber-Fahr, W; Clemm von Hohenberg, C; Vollmayr, B; Sartorius, A

    2016-01-01

    Treatment-resistant depression (TRD) remains a pressing clinical problem. Optimizing treatment requires better definition of the specificity of the involved brain circuits. The rat strain bred for negative cognitive state (NC) represents a genetic animal model of TRD with high face, construct and predictive validity. Vice versa, the positive cognitive state (PC) strain represents a stress-resilient phenotype. Although NC rats show depressive-like behavior, some symptoms such as anhedonia require an external trigger, i.e. a stressful event, which is similar to humans when stressful event induces a depressive episode in genetically predisposed individuals (gene–environment interaction). We aimed to distinguish neurobiological predisposition from the depressogenic pathology at the level of brain-network reorganization. For this purpose, resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging time series were acquired at 9.4 Tesla scanner in NC (N=11) and PC (N=7) rats before and after stressful event. We used a graph theory analytical approach to calculate the brain-network global and local properties. There was no difference in the global characteristics between the strains. At the local level, the response in the risk strain was characterized with an increased internodal role and reduced local clustering and efficiency of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and prelimbic cortex compared to the stress-resilient strain. We suggest that the increased internodal role of these prefrontal regions could be due to the enhancement of some of their long-range connections, given their connectivity with the amygdala and other default-mode-like network hubs, which could create a bias to attend to negative information characteristic for depression. PMID:27922640

  12. Brain network reorganization differs in response to stress in rats genetically predisposed to depression and stress-resilient rats.

    PubMed

    Gass, N; Becker, R; Schwarz, A J; Weber-Fahr, W; Clemm von Hohenberg, C; Vollmayr, B; Sartorius, A

    2016-12-06

    Treatment-resistant depression (TRD) remains a pressing clinical problem. Optimizing treatment requires better definition of the specificity of the involved brain circuits. The rat strain bred for negative cognitive state (NC) represents a genetic animal model of TRD with high face, construct and predictive validity. Vice versa, the positive cognitive state (PC) strain represents a stress-resilient phenotype. Although NC rats show depressive-like behavior, some symptoms such as anhedonia require an external trigger, i.e. a stressful event, which is similar to humans when stressful event induces a depressive episode in genetically predisposed individuals (gene-environment interaction). We aimed to distinguish neurobiological predisposition from the depressogenic pathology at the level of brain-network reorganization. For this purpose, resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging time series were acquired at 9.4 Tesla scanner in NC (N=11) and PC (N=7) rats before and after stressful event. We used a graph theory analytical approach to calculate the brain-network global and local properties. There was no difference in the global characteristics between the strains. At the local level, the response in the risk strain was characterized with an increased internodal role and reduced local clustering and efficiency of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and prelimbic cortex compared to the stress-resilient strain. We suggest that the increased internodal role of these prefrontal regions could be due to the enhancement of some of their long-range connections, given their connectivity with the amygdala and other default-mode-like network hubs, which could create a bias to attend to negative information characteristic for depression.

  13. IN-STREAM AND WATERSHED PREDICTORS OF GENETIC DIVERSITY, EFFECTIVE POPULATION SIZE AND IMMIGRATION ACROSS RIVER-STREAM NETWORKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The influence of spatial processes on population dynamics within river-stream networks is poorly understood. Utilizing spatially explicit analyses of temporal genetic variance, we examined whether persistence of Central Stonerollers (Campostoma anomalum) reflects differences in h...

  14. Identification and reconstitution of genetic regulatory networks for improved microbial tolerance to isooctane.

    PubMed

    Kang, Aram; Chang, Matthew Wook

    2012-04-01

    Microbial tolerance to hydrocarbons has been studied in an effort to improve the productivity of biochemical processes and to enhance the efficiency of hydrocarbon bioremediation. Despite these studies, few attempts have been made to design rational strategies to improve microbial tolerance to hydrocarbons. Herein, we present an engineering framework that enables us to harness our understanding of genetic regulatory networks to improve hydrocarbon tolerance. In this study, isooctane was used as a representative hydrocarbon due to its use in petroleum refining and in biochemical processes. To increase isooctane tolerance, we first identified essential transcriptional determinants and genetic regulatory networks underlying cellular responses to isooctane in Escherichia coli using genome-wide microarray analysis. Based on functional transcriptome and bioinformatics analysis, a range of combinations of transcription factors whose activity was predictably perturbed by isooctane were knocked out and overexpressed to reconstitute the regulatory networks. We demonstrated that the reconstitution of the regulatory networks led to a significant improvement in isooctane tolerance, and especially, engineered E. coli strains lacking and overexpressing some of the perturbed transcription factors showed 3- to 5-fold improvement. This microbe with high tolerance to isooctane can be harnessed for biochemical processes, fuel oil bioremediation and metabolic engineering for biofuel production. Furthermore, we envision that the engineering framework employed to improve the tolerance in this study can be exploited for developing other microbes with desired phenotypes.

  15. Elucidation of Genetic Interactions in the Yeast GATA-Factor Network Using Bayesian Model Selection

    PubMed Central

    Milias-Argeitis, Andreas; Oliveira, Ana Paula; Gerosa, Luca; Falter, Laura; Sauer, Uwe; Lygeros, John

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the structure and function of complex gene regulatory networks using classical genetic assays is an error-prone procedure that frequently generates ambiguous outcomes. Even some of the best-characterized gene networks contain interactions whose validity is not conclusively proven. Founded on dynamic experimental data, mechanistic mathematical models are able to offer detailed insights that would otherwise require prohibitively large numbers of genetic experiments. Here we attempt mechanistic modeling of the transcriptional network formed by the four GATA-factor proteins, a well-studied system of central importance for nitrogen-source regulation of transcription in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To resolve ambiguities in the network organization, we encoded a set of five interactions hypothesized in the literature into a set of 32 mathematical models, and employed Bayesian model selection to identify the most plausible set of interactions based on dynamic gene expression data. The top-ranking model was validated on newly generated GFP reporter dynamic data and was subsequently used to gain a better understanding of how yeast cells organize their transcriptional response to dynamic changes of nitrogen sources. Our work constitutes a necessary and important step towards obtaining a holistic view of the yeast nitrogen regulation mechanisms; on the computational side, it provides a demonstration of how powerful Monte Carlo techniques can be creatively combined and used to address the great challenges of large-scale dynamical system inference. PMID:26967983

  16. Stimulatory Influences of Far Infrared Therapy on the Transcriptome and Genetic Networks of Endothelial Progenitor Cells Receiving High Glucose Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tzu-Chiao; Lin, Chin-Sheng; Tsai, Tsung-Neng; Cheng, Shu-Meng; Lin, Wei-Shiang; Cheng, Cheng-Chung; Wu, Chun-Hsien; Hsu, Chih-Hsueng

    2015-01-01

    Background Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) play a fundamental role in vascular repair and angiogenesis- related diseases. It is well-known that the process of angiogenesis is faulty in patients with diabetes. Long-term exposure of peripheral blood EPCs to high glucose (HG-EPCs) has been shown to impair cell proliferation and other functional competencies. Far infrared (FIR) therapy can promote ischemia-induced angiogenesis in diabetic mice and restore high glucose-suppressed endothelial progenitor cell functions both in vitro and in vivo. However, the detail mechanisms and global transcriptome alternations are still unclear. Methods In this study, we investigated the influences of FIR upon HG-EPC gene expressions. EPCs were obtained from the peripheral blood and treated with high glucose. These cells were then subjected to FIR irradiation and functional assays. Results Those genes responsible for fibroblast growth factors, Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription and prostaglandin signaling pathways were significantly induced in HG-EPCs after FIR treatment. On the other hand, mouse double minute 2 homolog, genes involved in glycogen metabolic process, and genes involved in cardiac fibrosis were down-regulated. We also observed complex genetic networks functioning in FIR-treated HG-EPCs, in which several genes, such as GATA binding protein 3, hairy and enhancer of split-1, Sprouty Homolog 2, MAPK and Sirtuin 1, acted as hubs to maintain the stability and connectivity of the whole genetic network. Conclusions Deciphering FIR-affected genes will not only provide us with new knowledge regarding angiogenesis, but also help to develop new biomarkers for evaluating the effects of FIR therapy. Our findings may also be adapted to develop new methods to increase EPC activities for treating diabetes-related ischemia and metabolic syndrome-associated cardiovascular disorders. PMID:27122901

  17. VAN3 ARF-GAP-mediated vesicle transport is involved in leaf vascular network formation.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Koji; Naramoto, Satoshi; Sawa, Shinichiro; Yahara, Natsuko; Ueda, Takashi; Nakano, Akihiko; Sugiyama, Munetaka; Fukuda, Hiroo

    2005-04-01

    Within the leaf of an angiosperm, the vascular system is constructed in a complex network pattern called venation. The formation of this vein pattern has been widely studied as a paradigm of tissue pattern formation in plants. To elucidate the molecular mechanism controlling the vein patterning process, we previously isolated Arabidopsis mutants van1 to van7, which show a discontinuous vein pattern. Here we report the phenotypic analysis of the van3 mutant in relation to auxin signaling and polar transport, and the molecular characterization of the VAN3 gene and protein. Double mutant analyses with pin1, emb30-7/gn and mp, and physiological analyses using the auxin-inducible marker DR5::GUS and an auxin transport inhibitor indicated that VAN3 may be involved in auxin signal transduction, but not in polar auxin transport. Positional cloning identified VAN3 as a gene that encodes an adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribosylation factor-guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) activating protein (ARF-GAP). It resembles animal ACAPs and contains four domains: a BAR (BIN/amphiphysin/RVS) domain, a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain, an ARF-GAP domain and an ankyrin (ANK)-repeat domain. Recombinant VAN3 protein showed GTPase-activating activity and a specific affinity for phosphatidylinositols. This protein can self-associate through the N-terminal BAR domain in the yeast two-hybrid system. Subcellular localization analysis by double staining for Venus-tagged VAN3 and several green-fluorescent-protein-tagged intracellular markers indicated that VAN3 is located in a subpopulation of the trans-Golgi network (TGN). Our results indicate that the expression of this gene is induced by auxin and positively regulated by VAN3 itself, and that a specific ACAP type of ARF-GAP functions in vein pattern formation by regulating auxin signaling via a TGN-mediated vesicle transport system.

  18. Target mimics: an embedded layer of microRNA-involved gene regulatory networks in plants

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play an essential role in gene regulation in plants. At the same time, the expression of miRNA genes is also tightly controlled. Recently, a novel mechanism called “target mimicry” was discovered, providing another layer for modulating miRNA activities. However, except for the artificial target mimics manipulated for functional studies on certain miRNA genes, only one example, IPS1 (Induced by Phosphate Starvation 1)—miR399 was experimentally confirmed in planta. To date, few analyses for comprehensive identification of natural target mimics have been performed in plants. Thus, limited evidences are available to provide detailed information for interrogating the questionable issue whether target mimicry was widespread in planta, and implicated in certain biological processes. Results In this study, genome-wide computational prediction of endogenous miRNA mimics was performed in Arabidopsis and rice, and dozens of target mimics were identified. In contrast to a recent report, the densities of target mimic sites were found to be much higher within the untranslated regions (UTRs) when compared to those within the coding sequences (CDSs) in both plants. Some novel sequence characteristics were observed for the miRNAs that were potentially regulated by the target mimics. GO (Gene Ontology) term enrichment analysis revealed some functional insights into the predicted mimics. After degradome sequencing data-based identification of miRNA targets, the regulatory networks constituted by target mimics, miRNAs and their downstream targets were constructed, and some intriguing subnetworks were further exploited. Conclusions These results together suggest that target mimicry may be widely implicated in regulating miRNA activities in planta, and we hope this study could expand the current understanding of miRNA-involved regulatory networks. PMID:22613869

  19. Genetic Factors Involved in Fumonisin Accumulation in Maize Kernels and Their Implications in Maize Agronomic Management and Breeding

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Rogelio; Cao, Ana; Butrón, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Contamination of maize with fumonisins depends on the environmental conditions; the maize resistance to contamination and the interaction between both factors. Although the effect of environmental factors is a determinant for establishing the risk of kernel contamination in a region, there is sufficient genetic variability among maize to develop resistance to fumonisin contamination and to breed varieties with contamination at safe levels. In addition, ascertaining which environmental factors are the most important in a region will allow the implementation of risk monitoring programs and suitable cultural practices to reduce the impact of such environmental variables. The current paper reviews all works done to address the influence of environmental variables on fumonisin accumulation, the genetics of maize resistance to fumonisin accumulation, and the search for the biochemical and/or structural mechanisms of the maize plant that could be involved in resistance to fumonisin contamination. We also explore the outcomes of breeding programs and risk monitoring of undertaken projects. PMID:26308050

  20. Genetic Factors Involved in Fumonisin Accumulation in Maize Kernels and Their Implications in Maize Agronomic Management and Breeding.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Rogelio; Cao, Ana; Butrón, Ana

    2015-08-20

    Contamination of maize with fumonisins depends on the environmental conditions; the maize resistance to contamination and the interaction between both factors. Although the effect of environmental factors is a determinant for establishing the risk of kernel contamination in a region, there is sufficient genetic variability among maize to develop resistance to fumonisin contamination and to breed varieties with contamination at safe levels. In addition, ascertaining which environmental factors are the most important in a region will allow the implementation of risk monitoring programs and suitable cultural practices to reduce the impact of such environmental variables. The current paper reviews all works done to address the influence of environmental variables on fumonisin accumulation, the genetics of maize resistance to fumonisin accumulation, and the search for the biochemical and/or structural mechanisms of the maize plant that could be involved in resistance to fumonisin contamination. We also explore the outcomes of breeding programs and risk monitoring of undertaken projects.

  1. International cooperation and networking in genetic health care provision: issues arising from the genetic services plan for the Emilia-Romagna region, Italy.

    PubMed

    Calzolari, E; Baroncini, A

    2005-01-01

    The aims of this report are to describe the genetic plan for Emilia-Romagna, a region in Italy, and to contribute to the international exchange of information on developing and applying policy frameworks to provide high-quality and comprehensive genetic health care in the publicly funded health systems. At the present time there is no national policy for genetic medicine in Italy, and only two regions, Emilia-Romagna and Liguria, have formally agreed to a strategic plan for health care in genetics. The current provision of genetic services in Emilia-Romagna is described focusing on the intra- and inter-organizational linkages to ensure a comprehensive system of coordinated activities. Strengths and implementation areas are highlighted. Points that must be solved within the regional or national context are the definition of the level of assistance required in genetic medicine, the formal professional recognition of the genetic counselor and the adjustment of the billing mechanisms to the complexities of clinical genetic services. Issues that need to be addressed at a wider level include full assessment of genetic tests before their introduction into clinical practice, networking to provide tests for the rarest genetic diseases, consensus on fundamental terminology and clinical and administrative data sets to promote a cohesive framework for the flow of information throughout the health care systems with respect to genetics.

  2. Chromatin remodeling gene EZH2 involved in the genetic etiology of autism in Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; You, Yang; Yue, Weihua; Yu, Hao; Lu, Tianlan; Wu, Zhiliu; Jia, Meixiang; Ruan, Yanyan; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Dai; Wang, Lifang

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a group of severe neurodevelopmental disorders. Epigenetic factors play a critical role in the etiology of ASD. Enhancer of zest homolog 2 (EZH2), which encodes a histone methyltransferase, plays an important role in the process of chromatin remodeling during neurodevelopment. Further, EZH2 is located in chromosome 7q35-36, which is one of the linkage regions for autism. However, the genetic relationship between autism and EZH2 remains unclear. To investigate the association between EZH2 and autism in Chinese Han population, we performed a family-based association study between autism and three tagged single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that covered 95.4% of the whole region of EZH2. In the discovery cohort of 239 trios, two SNPs (rs740949 and rs6464926) showed a significant association with autism. To decrease false positive results, we expanded the sample size to 427 trios. A SNP (rs6464926) was significantly associated with autism even after Bonferroni correction (p=0.008). Haplotype G-T (rs740949 and rs6464926) was a risk factor for autism (Z=2.655, p=0.008, Global p=0.024). In silico function prediction for SNPs indicated that these two SNPs might be regulatory SNPs. Expression pattern of EZH2 showed that it is highly expressed in human embryonic brains. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that EZH2 might contribute to the genetic etiology of autism in Chinese Han population.

  3. A mosaic genetic screen for genes involved in the early steps of Drosophila oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jagut, Marlène; Mihaila-Bodart, Ludivine; Molla-Herman, Anahi; Alin, Marie-Françoise; Lepesant, Jean-Antoine; Huynh, Jean-René

    2013-03-01

    The first hours of Drosophila embryogenesis rely exclusively on maternal information stored within the egg during oogenesis. The formation of the egg chamber is thus a crucial step for the development of the future adult. It has emerged that many key developmental decisions are made during the very first stages of oogenesis. We performed a clonal genetic screen on the left arm of chromosome 2 for mutations affecting early oogenesis. During the first round of screening, we scored for defects in egg chambers morphology as an easy read-out of early abnormalities. In a second round of screening, we analyzed the localization of centrosomes and Orb protein within the oocyte, the position of the oocyte within the egg chamber, and the progression through meiosis. We have generated a collection of 71 EMS-induced mutants that affect oocyte determination, polarization, or localization. We also recovered mutants affecting the number of germline cyst divisions or the differentiation of follicle cells. Here, we describe the analysis of nine complementation groups and eight single alleles. We mapped several mutations and identified alleles of Bicaudal-D, lethal(2) giant larvae, kuzbanian, GDP-mannose 4,6-dehydratase, tho2, and eiF4A. We further report the molecular identification of two alleles of the Drosophila homolog of Che-1/AATF and demonstrate its antiapoptotic activity in vivo. This collection of mutants will be useful to investigate further the early steps of Drosophila oogenesis at a genetic level.

  4. Human amniotic fluid stem cells as a model for functional studies of genes involved in human genetic diseases or oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rosner, Margit; Dolznig, Helmut; Schipany, Katharina; Mikula, Mario; Brandau, Oliver; Hengstschläger, Markus

    2011-09-01

    Besides their putative usage for therapies, stem cells are a promising tool for functional studies of genes involved in human genetic diseases or oncogenesis. For this purpose induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells can be derived from patients harbouring specific mutations. In contrast to adult stem cells, iPS cells are pluripotent and can efficiently be grown in culture. However, iPS cells are modulated due to the ectopic induction of pluripotency, harbour other somatic mutations accumulated during the life span of the source cells, exhibit only imperfectly cleared epigenetic memory of the source cell, and are often genomically instable. In addition, iPS cells from patients only allow the investigation of mutations, which are not prenatally lethal. Embryonic stem (ES) cells have a high proliferation and differentiation potential, but raise ethical issues. Human embryos, which are not transferred in the course of in vitro fertilization, because of preimplantation genetic diagnosis of a genetic defect, are still rarely donated for the establishment of ES cell lines. In addition, their usage for studies on gene functions for oncogenesis is hampered by the fact the ES cells are already tumorigenic per se. In 2003 amniotic fluid stem (AFS) cells have been discovered, which meanwhile have been demonstrated to harbour the potential to differentiate into cells of all three germ layers. Monoclonal human AFS cell lines derived from amniocenteses have a high proliferative potential, are genomically stable and are not associated with ethical controversies. Worldwide amniocenteses are performed for routine human genetic diagnosis. We here discuss how generation and banking of monoclonal human AFS cell lines with specific chromosomal aberrations or monogenic disease mutations would allow to study the functional consequences of disease causing mutations. In addition, recently a protocol for efficient and highly reproducible siRNA-mediated long-term knockdown of endogenous gene

  5. The Congenital Heart Disease Genetic Network Study: rationale, design, and early results.

    PubMed

    Gelb, Bruce; Brueckner, Martina; Chung, Wendy; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Kaltman, Jonathan; Kaski, Juan Pablo; Kim, Richard; Kline, Jennie; Mercer-Rosa, Laura; Porter, George; Roberts, Amy; Rosenberg, Ellen; Seiden, Howard; Seidman, Christine; Sleeper, Lynn; Tennstedt, Sharon; Kaltman, Jonathan; Schramm, Charlene; Burns, Kristin; Pearson, Gail; Rosenberg, Ellen

    2013-02-15

    Congenital heart defects (CHD) are the leading cause of infant mortality among birth defects, and later morbidities and premature mortality remain problematic. Although genetic factors contribute significantly to cause CHD, specific genetic lesions are unknown for most patients. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-funded Pediatric Cardiac Genomics Consortium established the Congenital Heart Disease Genetic Network Study to investigate relationships between genetic factors, clinical features, and outcomes in CHD. The Pediatric Cardiac Genomics Consortium comprises 6 main and 4 satellite sites at which subjects are recruited, and medical data and biospecimens (blood, saliva, cardiovascular tissue) are collected. Core infrastructure includes an administrative/data-coordinating center, biorepository, data hub, and core laboratories (genotyping, whole-exome sequencing, candidate gene evaluation, and variant confirmation). Eligibility includes all forms of CHD. Annual follow-up is obtained for probands <1-year-old. Parents are enrolled whenever available. Enrollment from December 2010 to June 2012 comprised 3772 probands. One or both parents were enrolled for 72% of probands. Proband median age is 5.5 years. The one third enrolled at age <1 year are contacted annually for follow-up information. The distribution of CHD favors more complex lesions. Approximately, 11% of probands have a genetic diagnosis. Adequate DNA is available from 97% and 91% of blood and saliva samples, respectively. Genomic analyses of probands with heterotaxy, atrial septal defects, conotruncal, and left ventricular outflow tract obstructive lesions are underway. The scientific community's use of Pediatric Cardiac Genomics Consortium resources is welcome.

  6. Phage Genetic Sites Involved in λ Growth Inhibition by the Escherichia Coli Rap Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Guzman, P.; Guarneros, G.

    1989-01-01

    The rap mutation of Escherichia coli prevents the growth of bacteriophage λ. We have isolated phage mutants that compensate for the host deficiency. The mutations, named bar, were genetically located to three different loci of the λ genome: barI in the attP site, barII in the cIII ea10 region, and barIII within or very near the imm434 region. The level of λ leftward transcription correlates with rap exclusion. Phage λ mutants partially defective in the pL promoter or in pL-transcript antitermination showed a Bar(-) phenotype. Conversely, mutants constitutive for transcription from the pI or pL promoters were excluded more stringently by rap bacteria. We conclude that rap exclusion depends on the magnitude of transcription through the wild type bar loci in the phage genome. PMID:2523838

  7. Applying the Good Laboratory Practice regulations to studies involving genetically modified plants.

    PubMed

    Holden, D E

    1995-12-01

    How can the Environmental Protection Agency's Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) regulations, originally written primarily for mammalian toxicology studies, be applied to regulatory studies conducted for genetically modified plants? Do they fit? Can they be applied and still make sense? How is a Quality Assurance Unit (QAU) to interpret the requirements in this new area of biotechnology? The answers to these questions are discussed in this brief presentation of how one team within the Monsanto QAU, along with the researchers, developed am effective and comprehensive compliance program by applying the "traditional approach" to the GLP regulations to a new and important scientific field in regulatory compliance. Topics discussed will address the differences in the approach between traditional toxicity testing and the newer technology and how the differences were resolved, new and innovative definitions of particular phases and other aspects of regulatory studies, and how the draft regulations for pesticidal plants will help this area of technology in the future.

  8. A genetic study of a Staphylococus aureus plasmid involving cure and transference.

    PubMed

    Darini, A L

    1996-01-01

    High frequency transfer and elimination of drug resistance may indicate an extrachromosomal inheritance of genetic determinants. This study shows the cure and transfer of a small plasmid and tetracycline resistance in Staphylococcus aureus 1030 (55)Tet strains. Several methods are available for plasmid elimination. We used ethidium bromide, an agent that binds to DNA, and thus inhibits DNA polymerase. This caused a high frequency of loss of the small plasmid and resistance to tetracycline. Transfer of tetracycline resistance was done in a mixed culture at a frequency of 10(-6). This type of study is very important to physicians and epidemiology investigators and provides better knowledge on antibiotic-resistance mechanisms that may occur in vivo in a hospital environment.

  9. Integument pattern formation involves genetic and epigenetic controls: feather arrays simulated by digital hormone models.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ting-Xin; Widelitz, Randall B; Shen, Wei-Min; Will, Peter; Wu, Da-Yu; Lin, Chih-Min; Jung, Han-Sung; Chuong, Cheng-Ming

    2004-01-01

    Pattern formation is a fundamental morphogenetic process. Models based on genetic and epigenetic control have been proposed but remain controversial. Here we use feather morphogenesis for further evaluation. Adhesion molecules and/or signaling molecules were first expressed homogenously in feather tracts (restrictive mode, appear earlier) or directly in bud or inter-bud regions ( de novo mode, appear later). They either activate or inhibit bud formation, but paradoxically colocalize in the bud. Using feather bud reconstitution, we showed that completely dissociated cells can reform periodic patterns without reference to previous positional codes. The patterning process has the characteristics of being self-organizing, dynamic and plastic. The final pattern is an equilibrium state reached by competition, and the number and size of buds can be altered based on cell number and activator/inhibitor ratio, respectively. We developed a Digital Hormone Model which consists of (1) competent cells without identity that move randomly in a space, (2) extracellular signaling hormones which diffuse by a reaction-diffusion mechanism and activate or inhibit cell adhesion, and (3) cells which respond with topological stochastic actions manifested as changes in cell adhesion. Based on probability, the results are cell clusters arranged in dots or stripes. Thus genetic control provides combinational molecular information which defines the properties of the cells but not the final pattern. Epigenetic control governs interactions among cells and their environment based on physical-chemical rules (such as those described in the Digital Hormone Model). Complex integument patterning is the sum of these two components of control and that is why integument patterns are usually similar but non-identical. These principles may be shared by other pattern formation processes such as barb ridge formation, fingerprints, pigmentation patterning, etc. The Digital Hormone Model can also be applied to

  10. Integument pattern formation involves genetic and epigenetic controls: feather arrays simulated by digital hormone models

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ting-Xin; Widelitz, Randall B.; Shen, Wei-Min; Will, Peter; Wu, Da-Yu; Lin, Chih-Min; Jung, Han-Sung; Chuong, Cheng-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Pattern formation is a fundamental morphogenetic process. Models based on genetic and epigenetic control have been proposed but remain controversial. Here we use feather morphogenesis for further evaluation. Adhesion molecules and/or signaling molecules were first expressed homogenously in feather tracts (restrictive mode, appear earlier) or directly in bud or inter-bud regions (de novo mode, appear later). They either activate or inhibit bud formation, but paradoxically co-localize in the bud. Using feather bud reconstitution, we showed that completely dissociated cells can reform periodic patterns without reference to previous positional codes. The patterning process has the characteristics of being self-organizing, dynamic and plastic. The final pattern is an equilibrium state reached by competition, and the number and size of buds can be altered based on cell number and activator/inhibitor ratio, respectively. We developed a Digital Hormone Model which consists of (1) competent cells without identity that move randomly in a space, (2) extracellular signaling hormones which diffuse by a reaction-diffusion mechanism and activate or inhibit cell adhesion, and (3) cells which respond with topological stochastic actions manifested as changes in cell adhesion. Based on probability, the results are cell clusters arranged in dots or stripes. Thus genetic control provides combinational molecular information which defines the properties of the cells but not the final pattern. Epigenetic control governs interactions among cells and their environment based on physical-chemical rules (such as those described in the Digital Hormone Model). Complex integument patterning is the sum of these two components of control and that is why integument patterns are usually similar but non-identical. These principles may be shared by other pattern formation processes such as barb ridge formation, fingerprints, pigmentation patterning, etc. The Digital Hormone Model can also be applied to

  11. Alcohol-Induced Histone Acetylation Reveals a Gene Network Involved in Alcohol Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Ghezzi, Alfredo; Krishnan, Harish R.; Lew, Linda; Prado, Francisco J.; Ong, Darryl S.; Atkinson, Nigel S.

    2013-01-01

    Sustained or repeated exposure to sedating drugs, such as alcohol, triggers homeostatic adaptations in the brain that lead to the development of drug tolerance and dependence. These adaptations involve long-term changes in the transcription of drug-responsive genes as well as an epigenetic restructuring of chromosomal regions that is thought to signal and maintain the altered transcriptional state. Alcohol-induced epigenetic changes have been shown to be important in the long-term adaptation that leads to alcohol tolerance and dependence endophenotypes. A major constraint impeding progress is that alcohol produces a surfeit of changes in gene expression, most of which may not make any meaningful contribution to the ethanol response under study. Here we used a novel genomic epigenetic approach to find genes relevant for functional alcohol tolerance by exploiting the commonalities of two chemically distinct alcohols. In Drosophila melanogaster, ethanol and benzyl alcohol induce mutual cross-tolerance, indicating that they share a common mechanism for producing tolerance. We surveyed the genome-wide changes in histone acetylation that occur in response to these drugs. Each drug induces modifications in a large number of genes. The genes that respond similarly to either treatment, however, represent a subgroup enriched for genes important for the common tolerance response. Genes were functionally tested for behavioral tolerance to the sedative effects of ethanol and benzyl alcohol using mutant and inducible RNAi stocks. We identified a network of genes that are essential for the development of tolerance to sedation by alcohol. PMID:24348266

  12. Genetics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Inheritance; Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... The chromosomes are made up of strands of genetic information called DNA. Each chromosome contains sections of ...

  13. Combining social and genetic networks to study HIV transmission in mixing risk groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarrabi, Narges; Prosperi, Mattia C. F.; Belleman, Robbert G.; Di Giambenedetto, Simona; Fabbiani, Massimiliano; De Luca, Andrea; Sloot, Peter M. A.

    2013-09-01

    Reconstruction of HIV transmission networks is important for understanding and preventing the spread of the virus and drug resistant variants. Mixing risk groups is important in network analysis of HIV in order to assess the role of transmission between risk groups in the HIV epidemic. Most of the research focuses on the transmission within HIV risk groups, while transmission between different risk groups has been less studied. We use a proposed filter-reduction method to infer hypothetical transmission networks of HIV by combining data from social and genetic scales. We modified the filtering process in order to include mixing risk groups in the model. For this, we use the information on phylogenetic clusters obtained through phylogenetic analysis. A probability matrix is also defined to specify contact rates between individuals form the same and different risk groups. The method converts the data form each scale into network forms and combines them by overlaying and computing their intersection. We apply this method to reconstruct networks of HIV infected patients in central Italy, including mixing between risk groups. Our results suggests that bisexual behavior among Italian MSM and IDU partnership are relatively important in heterosexual transmission of HIV in central Italy.

  14. Neural networks with multiple general neuron models: a hybrid computational intelligence approach using Genetic Programming.

    PubMed

    Barton, Alan J; Valdés, Julio J; Orchard, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Classical neural networks are composed of neurons whose nature is determined by a certain function (the neuron model), usually pre-specified. In this paper, a type of neural network (NN-GP) is presented in which: (i) each neuron may have its own neuron model in the form of a general function, (ii) any layout (i.e network interconnection) is possible, and (iii) no bias nodes or weights are associated to the connections, neurons or layers. The general functions associated to a neuron are learned by searching a function space. They are not provided a priori, but are rather built as part of an Evolutionary Computation process based on Genetic Programming. The resulting network solutions are evaluated based on a fitness measure, which may, for example, be based on classification or regression errors. Two real-world examples are presented to illustrate the promising behaviour on classification problems via construction of a low-dimensional representation of a high-dimensional parameter space associated to the set of all network solutions.

  15. Application of wavelet neural network model based on genetic algorithm in the prediction of high-speed railway settlement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Shihua; Li, Feida; Liu, Yintao; Lan, Lan; Zhou, Conglin; Huang, Qing

    2015-12-01

    With the advantage of high speed, big transport capacity, low energy consumption, good economic benefits and so on, high-speed railway is becoming more and more popular all over the world. It can reach 350 kilometers per hour, which requires high security performances. So research on the prediction of high-speed railway settlement that as one of the important factors affecting the safety of high-speed railway becomes particularly important. This paper takes advantage of genetic algorithms to seek all the data in order to calculate the best result and combines the advantage of strong learning ability and high accuracy of wavelet neural network, then build the model of genetic wavelet neural network for the prediction of high-speed railway settlement. By the experiment of back propagation neural network, wavelet neural network and genetic wavelet neural network, it shows that the absolute value of residual errors in the prediction of high-speed railway settlement based on genetic algorithm is the smallest, which proves that genetic wavelet neural network is better than the other two methods. The correlation coefficient of predicted and observed value is 99.9%. Furthermore, the maximum absolute value of residual error, minimum absolute value of residual error-mean value of relative error and value of root mean squared error(RMSE) that predicted by genetic wavelet neural network are all smaller than the other two methods'. The genetic wavelet neural network in the prediction of high-speed railway settlement is more stable in terms of stability and more accurate in the perspective of accuracy.

  16. Molecular stripping, targets and decoys as modulators of oscillations in the NF-κB/IκBα/DNA genetic network

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhipeng; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic transcription factors in the NF-κB family are central components of an extensive genetic network that activates cellular responses to inflammation and to a host of other external stressors. This network consists of feedback loops that involve the inhibitor IκBα, numerous downstream functional targets, and still more numerous binding sites that do not appear to be directly functional. Under steady stimulation, the regulatory network of NF-κB becomes oscillatory, and temporal patterns of NF-κB pulses appear to govern the patterns of downstream gene expression needed for immune response. Understanding how the information from external stress passes to oscillatory signals and is then ultimately relayed to gene expression is a general issue in systems biology. Recently, in vitro kinetic experiments as well as molecular simulations suggest that active stripping of NF-κB by IκBα from its binding sites can modify the traditional systems biology view of NF-κB/IκBα gene circuits. In this work, we revise the commonly adopted minimal model of the NF-κB regulatory network to account for the presence of the large number of binding sites for NF-κB along with dissociation from these sites that may proceed either by passive unbinding or by active molecular stripping. We identify regimes where the kinetics of target and decoy unbinding and molecular stripping enter a dynamic tug of war that may either compensate each other or amplify nuclear NF-κB activity, leading to distinct oscillatory patterns. Our finding that decoys and stripping play a key role in shaping the NF-κB oscillations suggests strategies to control NF-κB responses by introducing artificial decoys therapeutically. PMID:27683001

  17. Engineering modular and tunable genetic amplifiers for scaling transcriptional signals in cascaded gene networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baojun; Barahona, Mauricio; Buck, Martin

    2014-08-01

    Synthetic biology aims to control and reprogram signal processing pathways within living cells so as to realize repurposed, beneficial applications. Here we report the design and construction of a set of modular and gain-tunable genetic amplifiers in Escherichia coli capable of amplifying a transcriptional signal with wide tunable-gain control in cascaded gene networks. The devices are engineered using orthogonal genetic components (hrpRS, hrpV and PhrpL) from the hrp (hypersensitive response and pathogenicity) gene regulatory network in Pseudomonas syringae. The amplifiers can linearly scale up to 21-fold the transcriptional input with a large output dynamic range, yet not introducing significant time delay or significant noise during signal amplification. The set of genetic amplifiers achieves different gains and input dynamic ranges by varying the expression levels of the underlying ligand-free activator proteins in the device. As their electronic counterparts, these engineered transcriptional amplifiers can act as fundamental building blocks in the design of biological systems by predictably and dynamically modulating transcriptional signal flows to implement advanced intra- and extra-cellular control functions.

  18. Temperature drift modeling of MEMS gyroscope based on genetic-Elman neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Shen; Rui, Song; Jie, Li; Xiaoming, Zhang; Jun, Tang; Yunbo, Shi; Jun, Liu; Huiliang, Cao

    2016-05-01

    In order to improve the temperature drift modeling precision of a tuning fork micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) gyroscope, a novel multiple inputs/single output model based on genetic algorithm (GA) and Elman neural network (Elman NN) is proposed. First, the temperature experiment of MEMS gyroscope is carried out and the outputs of MEMS gyroscope and temperature sensors are collected; then the temperature drift model based on temperature, temperature variation rate and the coupling term is proposed, and the Elman NN is employed to guarantee the generalization ability of the model; at last the genetic algorithm is used to tune the parameters of Elman NN in order to improve the modeling precision. The Allan analysis results validate that, compared to traditional single input/single output model, the novel multiple inputs/single output model can guarantee high accurate fitting ability because the proposed model can provide more plentiful controllable information. By the way, the generalization ability of the Elman neural network can be improved significantly due to the parameters are optimized by genetic algorithm.

  19. Prediction of road traffic death rate using neural networks optimised by genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Seyed Ali; Jahandideh, Sepideh; Jahandideh, Mina; Asadabadi, Ebrahim Barzegari

    2015-01-01

    Road traffic injuries (RTIs) are realised as a main cause of public health problems at global, regional and national levels. Therefore, prediction of road traffic death rate will be helpful in its management. Based on this fact, we used an artificial neural network model optimised through Genetic algorithm to predict mortality. In this study, a five-fold cross-validation procedure on a data set containing total of 178 countries was used to verify the performance of models. The best-fit model was selected according to the root mean square errors (RMSE). Genetic algorithm, as a powerful model which has not been introduced in prediction of mortality to this extent in previous studies, showed high performance. The lowest RMSE obtained was 0.0808. Such satisfactory results could be attributed to the use of Genetic algorithm as a powerful optimiser which selects the best input feature set to be fed into the neural networks. Seven factors have been known as the most effective factors on the road traffic mortality rate by high accuracy. The gained results displayed that our model is very promising and may play a useful role in developing a better method for assessing the influence of road traffic mortality risk factors.

  20. Lung Cancer Classification Employing Proposed Real Coded Genetic Algorithm Based Radial Basis Function Neural Network Classifier

    PubMed Central

    Deepa, S. N.

    2016-01-01

    A proposed real coded genetic algorithm based radial basis function neural network classifier is employed to perform effective classification of healthy and cancer affected lung images. Real Coded Genetic Algorithm (RCGA) is proposed to overcome the Hamming Cliff problem encountered with the Binary Coded Genetic Algorithm (BCGA). Radial Basis Function Neural Network (RBFNN) classifier is chosen as a classifier model because of its Gaussian Kernel function and its effective learning process to avoid local and global minima problem and enable faster convergence. This paper specifically focused on tuning the weights and bias of RBFNN classifier employing the proposed RCGA. The operators used in RCGA enable the algorithm flow to compute weights and bias value so that minimum Mean Square Error (MSE) is obtained. With both the lung healthy and cancer images from Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) database and Real time database, it is noted that the proposed RCGA based RBFNN classifier has performed effective classification of the healthy lung tissues and that of the cancer affected lung nodules. The classification accuracy computed using the proposed approach is noted to be higher in comparison with that of the classifiers proposed earlier in the literatures. PMID:28050198

  1. Lung Cancer Classification Employing Proposed Real Coded Genetic Algorithm Based Radial Basis Function Neural Network Classifier.

    PubMed

    Selvakumari Jeya, I Jasmine; Deepa, S N

    2016-01-01

    A proposed real coded genetic algorithm based radial basis function neural network classifier is employed to perform effective classification of healthy and cancer affected lung images. Real Coded Genetic Algorithm (RCGA) is proposed to overcome the Hamming Cliff problem encountered with the Binary Coded Genetic Algorithm (BCGA). Radial Basis Function Neural Network (RBFNN) classifier is chosen as a classifier model because of its Gaussian Kernel function and its effective learning process to avoid local and global minima problem and enable faster convergence. This paper specifically focused on tuning the weights and bias of RBFNN classifier employing the proposed RCGA. The operators used in RCGA enable the algorithm flow to compute weights and bias value so that minimum Mean Square Error (MSE) is obtained. With both the lung healthy and cancer images from Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) database and Real time database, it is noted that the proposed RCGA based RBFNN classifier has performed effective classification of the healthy lung tissues and that of the cancer affected lung nodules. The classification accuracy computed using the proposed approach is noted to be higher in comparison with that of the classifiers proposed earlier in the literatures.

  2. Genomic and network patterns of schizophrenia genetic variation in human evolutionary accelerated regions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ke; Schadt, Eric E; Pollard, Katherine S; Roussos, Panos; Dudley, Joel T

    2015-05-01

    The population persistence of schizophrenia despite associated reductions in fitness and fecundity suggests that the genetic basis of schizophrenia has a complex evolutionary history. A recent meta-analysis of schizophrenia genome-wide association studies offers novel opportunities for assessment of the evolutionary trajectories of schizophrenia-associated loci. In this study, we hypothesize that components of the genetic architecture of schizophrenia are attributable to human lineage-specific evolution. Our results suggest that schizophrenia-associated loci enrich in genes near previously identified human accelerated regions (HARs). Specifically, we find that genes near HARs conserved in nonhuman primates (pHARs) are enriched for schizophrenia-associated loci, and that pHAR-associated schizophrenia genes are under stronger selective pressure than other schizophrenia genes and other pHAR-associated genes. We further evaluate pHAR-associated schizophrenia genes in regulatory network contexts to investigate associated molecular functions and mechanisms. We find that pHAR-associated schizophrenia genes significantly enrich in a GABA-related coexpression module that was previously found to be differentially regulated in schizophrenia affected individuals versus healthy controls. In another two independent networks constructed from gene expression profiles from prefrontal cortex samples, we find that pHAR-associated schizophrenia genes are located in more central positions and their average path lengths to the other nodes are significantly shorter than those of other schizophrenia genes. Together, our results suggest that HARs are associated with potentially important functional roles in the genetic architecture of schizophrenia.

  3. a Modified Genetic Algorithm for Finding Fuzzy Shortest Paths in Uncertain Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidari, A. A.; Delavar, M. R.

    2016-06-01

    In realistic network analysis, there are several uncertainties in the measurements and computation of the arcs and vertices. These uncertainties should also be considered in realizing the shortest path problem (SPP) due to the inherent fuzziness in the body of expert's knowledge. In this paper, we investigated the SPP under uncertainty to evaluate our modified genetic strategy. We improved the performance of genetic algorithm (GA) to investigate a class of shortest path problems on networks with vague arc weights. The solutions of the uncertain SPP with considering fuzzy path lengths are examined and compared in detail. As a robust metaheuristic, GA algorithm is modified and evaluated to tackle the fuzzy SPP (FSPP) with uncertain arcs. For this purpose, first, a dynamic operation is implemented to enrich the exploration/exploitation patterns of the conventional procedure and mitigate the premature convergence of GA technique. Then, the modified GA (MGA) strategy is used to resolve the FSPP. The attained results of the proposed strategy are compared to those of GA with regard to the cost, quality of paths and CPU times. Numerical instances are provided to demonstrate the success of the proposed MGA-FSPP strategy in comparison with GA. The simulations affirm that not only the proposed technique can outperform GA, but also the qualities of the paths are effectively improved. The results clarify that the competence of the proposed GA is preferred in view of quality quantities. The results also demonstrate that the proposed method can efficiently be utilized to handle FSPP in uncertain networks.

  4. Modeling delay in genetic networks: From delay birth-death processes to delay stochastic differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Chinmaya; López, José Manuel; Azencott, Robert; Ott, William; Bennett, Matthew R.; Josić, Krešimir

    2014-05-28

    Delay is an important and ubiquitous aspect of many biochemical processes. For example, delay plays a central role in the dynamics of genetic regulatory networks as it stems from the sequential assembly of first mRNA and then protein. Genetic regulatory networks are therefore frequently modeled as stochastic birth-death processes with delay. Here, we examine the relationship between delay birth-death processes and their appropriate approximating delay chemical Langevin equations. We prove a quantitative bound on the error between the pathwise realizations of these two processes. Our results hold for both fixed delay and distributed delay. Simulations demonstrate that the delay chemical Langevin approximation is accurate even at moderate system sizes. It captures dynamical features such as the oscillatory behavior in negative feedback circuits, cross-correlations between nodes in a network, and spatial and temporal information in two commonly studied motifs of metastability in biochemical systems. Overall, these results provide a foundation for using delay stochastic differential equations to approximate the dynamics of birth-death processes with delay.

  5. A Simple Genetic Algorithm for Calibration of Stochastic Rock Discontinuity Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, R.; Jurado-Piña, R.

    2012-07-01

    We present a novel approach for calibration of stochastic discontinuity network parameters based on genetic algorithms (GAs). To validate the approach, examples of application of the method to cases with known parameters of the original Poisson discontinuity network are presented. Parameters of the model are encoded as chromosomes using a binary representation, and such chromosomes evolve as successive generations of a randomly generated initial population, subjected to GA operations of selection, crossover and mutation. Such back-calculated parameters are employed to make assessments about the inference capabilities of the model using different objective functions with different probabilities of crossover and mutation. Results show that the predictive capabilities of GAs significantly depend on the type of objective function considered; and they also show that the calibration capabilities of the genetic algorithm can be acceptable for practical engineering applications, since in most cases they can be expected to provide parameter estimates with relatively small errors for those parameters of the network (such as intensity and mean size of discontinuities) that have the strongest influence on many engineering applications.

  6. TheCellMap.org: A Web-Accessible Database for Visualizing and Mining the Global Yeast Genetic Interaction Network.

    PubMed

    Usaj, Matej; Tan, Yizhao; Wang, Wen; VanderSluis, Benjamin; Zou, Albert; Myers, Chad L; Costanzo, Michael; Andrews, Brenda; Boone, Charles

    2017-03-21

    Providing access to quantitative genomic data is key to ensure large-scale data validation and promote new discoveries. TheCellMap.org serves as a central repository for storing and analyzing quantitative genetic interaction data produced by genome-scale Synthetic Genetic Array (SGA) experiments with the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae In particular, TheCellMap.org allows users to easily access, visualize, explore and functionally annotate genetic interactions, or to extract and reorganize sub-networks, using data-driven network layouts in an intuitive and interactive manner.

  7. Weighted Interaction SNP Hub (WISH) network method for building genetic networks for complex diseases and traits using whole genome genotype data

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background High-throughput genotype (HTG) data has been used primarily in genome-wide association (GWA) studies; however, GWA results explain only a limited part of the complete genetic variation of traits. In systems genetics, network approaches have been shown to be able to identify pathways and their underlying causal genes to unravel the biological and genetic background of complex diseases and traits, e.g., the Weighted Gene Co-expression Network Analysis (WGCNA) method based on microarray gene expression data. The main objective of this study was to develop a scale-free weighted genetic interaction network method using whole genome HTG data in order to detect biologically relevant pathways and potential genetic biomarkers for complex diseases and traits. Results We developed the Weighted Interaction SNP Hub (WISH) network method that uses HTG data to detect genome-wide interactions between single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) and its relationship with complex traits. Data dimensionality reduction was achieved by selecting SNPs based on its: 1) degree of genome-wide significance and 2) degree of genetic variation in a population. Network construction was based on pairwise Pearson's correlation between SNP genotypes or the epistatic interaction effect between SNP pairs. To identify modules the Topological Overlap Measure (TOM) was calculated, reflecting the degree of overlap in shared neighbours between SNP pairs. Modules, clusters of highly interconnected SNPs, were defined using a tree-cutting algorithm on the SNP dendrogram created from the dissimilarity TOM (1-TOM). Modules were selected for functional annotation based on their association with the trait of interest, defined by the Genome-wide Module Association Test (GMAT). We successfully tested the established WISH network method using simulated and real SNP interaction data and GWA study results for carcass weight in a pig resource population; this resulted in detecting modules and key functional and

  8. Functional Validation of Rare Human Genetic Variants Involved in Homologous Recombination Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min-Soo; Yu, Mi; Kim, Kyoung-Yeon; Park, Geun-Hee; Kwack, KyuBum; Kim, Keun P.

    2015-01-01

    Systems for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are necessary to maintain genome integrity and normal functionality of cells in all organisms. Homologous recombination (HR) plays an important role in repairing accidental and programmed DSBs in mitotic and meiotic cells, respectively. Failure to repair these DSBs causes genome instability and can induce tumorigenesis. Rad51 and Rad52 are two key proteins in homologous pairing and strand exchange during DSB-induced HR; both are highly conserved in eukaryotes. In this study, we analyzed pathogenic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in human RAD51 and RAD52 using the Polymorphism Phenotyping (PolyPhen) and Sorting Intolerant from Tolerant (SIFT) algorithms and observed the effect of mutations in highly conserved domains of RAD51 and RAD52 on DNA damage repair in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae-based system. We identified a number of rad51 and rad52 alleles that exhibited severe DNA repair defects. The functionally inactive SNPs were located near ATPase active site of Rad51 and the DNA binding domain of Rad52. The rad51-F317I, rad52-R52W, and rad52-G107C mutations conferred hypersensitivity to methyl methane sulfonate (MMS)-induced DNA damage and were defective in HR-mediated DSB repair. Our study provides a new approach for detecting functional and loss-of-function genetic polymorphisms and for identifying causal variants in human DNA repair genes that contribute to the initiation or progression of cancer. PMID:25938495

  9. Functional Validation of Rare Human Genetic Variants Involved in Homologous Recombination Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min-Soo; Yu, Mi; Kim, Kyoung-Yeon; Park, Geun-Hee; Kwack, KyuBum; Kim, Keun P

    2015-01-01

    Systems for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are necessary to maintain genome integrity and normal functionality of cells in all organisms. Homologous recombination (HR) plays an important role in repairing accidental and programmed DSBs in mitotic and meiotic cells, respectively. Failure to repair these DSBs causes genome instability and can induce tumorigenesis. Rad51 and Rad52 are two key proteins in homologous pairing and strand exchange during DSB-induced HR; both are highly conserved in eukaryotes. In this study, we analyzed pathogenic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in human RAD51 and RAD52 using the Polymorphism Phenotyping (PolyPhen) and Sorting Intolerant from Tolerant (SIFT) algorithms and observed the effect of mutations in highly conserved domains of RAD51 and RAD52 on DNA damage repair in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae-based system. We identified a number of rad51 and rad52 alleles that exhibited severe DNA repair defects. The functionally inactive SNPs were located near ATPase active site of Rad51 and the DNA binding domain of Rad52. The rad51-F317I, rad52-R52W, and rad52-G107C mutations conferred hypersensitivity to methyl methane sulfonate (MMS)-induced DNA damage and were defective in HR-mediated DSB repair. Our study provides a new approach for detecting functional and loss-of-function genetic polymorphisms and for identifying causal variants in human DNA repair genes that contribute to the initiation or progression of cancer.

  10. Genetic diversity of variants involved in drug response and metabolism in Sri Lankan populations: implications for clinical implementation of pharmacogenomics

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Sze Ling; Samaranayake, Nilakshi; Ross, Colin J.D.; Toh, Meng Tiak; Carleton, Bruce; Hayden, Michael R.; Teo, Yik Ying; Dissanayake, Vajira H.W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Interpopulation differences in drug responses are well documented, and in some cases they correspond to differences in the frequency of associated genetic markers. Understanding the diversity of genetic markers associated with drug response across different global populations is essential to infer population rates of drug response or risk for adverse drug reactions, and to guide implementation of pharmacogenomic testing. Sri Lanka is a culturally and linguistically diverse nation, but little is known about the population genetics of the major Sri Lankan ethnic groups. The objective of this study was to investigate the diversity of pharmacogenomic variants in the major Sri Lankan ethnic groups. Methods We examined the allelic diversity of more than 7000 variants in genes involved in drug biotransformation and response in the three major ethnic populations of Sri Lanka (Sinhalese, Sri Lankan Tamils, and Moors), and compared them with other South Asian, South East Asian, and European populations using Wright’s Fixation Index, principal component analysis, and STRUCTURE analysis. Results We observed overall high levels of similarity within the Sri Lankan populations (median FST=0.0034), and between Sri Lankan and other South Asian populations (median FST=0.0064). Notably, we observed substantial differentiation between Sri Lankan and European populations for important pharmacogenomic variants related to warfarin (VKORC1 rs9923231) and clopidogrel (CYP2C19 rs4986893) response. Conclusion These data expand our understanding of the population structure of Sri Lanka, provide a resource for pharmacogenomic research, and have implications for the clinical use of genetic testing of pharmacogenomic variants in these populations. PMID:26444257

  11. Beyond the MHC: A canine model of dermatomyositis shows a complex pattern of genetic risk involving novel loci

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Jacquelyn M.; Hill, Cody M.; Anderson, Kendall J.

    2017-01-01

    Juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) is a chronic inflammatory myopathy and vasculopathy driven by genetic and environmental influences. Here, we investigated the genetic underpinnings of an analogous, spontaneous disease of dogs also termed dermatomyositis (DMS). As in JDM, we observed a significant association with a haplotype of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) (DLA-DRB1*002:01/-DQA1*009:01/-DQB1*001:01), particularly in homozygosity (P-val = 0.0001). However, the high incidence of the haplotype among healthy dogs indicated that additional genetic risk factors are likely involved in disease progression. We conducted genome-wide association studies in two modern breeds having common ancestry and detected strong associations with novel loci on canine chromosomes 10 (P-val = 2.3X10-12) and 31 (P-val = 3.95X10-8). Through whole genome resequencing, we identified primary candidate polymorphisms in conserved regions of PAN2 (encoding p.Arg492Cys) and MAP3K7CL (c.383_392ACTCCACAAA>GACT) on chromosomes 10 and 31, respectively. Analyses of these polymorphisms and the MHC haplotypes revealed that nine of 27 genotypic combinations confer high or moderate probability of disease and explain 93% of cases studied. The pattern of disease risk across PAN2 and MAP3K7CL genotypes provided clear evidence for a significant epistatic foundation for this disease, a risk further impacted by MHC haplotypes. We also observed a genotype-phenotype correlation wherein an earlier age of onset is correlated with an increased number of risk alleles at PAN2 and MAP3K7CL. High frequencies of multiple genetic risk factors are unique to affected breeds and likely arose coincident with artificial selection for desirable phenotypes. Described herein is the first three-locus association with a complex canine disease and two novel loci that provide targets for exploration in JDM and related immunological dysfunction. PMID:28158183

  12. Beyond the MHC: A canine model of dermatomyositis shows a complex pattern of genetic risk involving novel loci.

    PubMed

    Evans, Jacquelyn M; Noorai, Rooksana E; Tsai, Kate L; Starr-Moss, Alison N; Hill, Cody M; Anderson, Kendall J; Famula, Thomas R; Clark, Leigh Anne

    2017-02-01

    Juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) is a chronic inflammatory myopathy and vasculopathy driven by genetic and environmental influences. Here, we investigated the genetic underpinnings of an analogous, spontaneous disease of dogs also termed dermatomyositis (DMS). As in JDM, we observed a significant association with a haplotype of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) (DLA-DRB1*002:01/-DQA1*009:01/-DQB1*001:01), particularly in homozygosity (P-val = 0.0001). However, the high incidence of the haplotype among healthy dogs indicated that additional genetic risk factors are likely involved in disease progression. We conducted genome-wide association studies in two modern breeds having common ancestry and detected strong associations with novel loci on canine chromosomes 10 (P-val = 2.3X10-12) and 31 (P-val = 3.95X10-8). Through whole genome resequencing, we identified primary candidate polymorphisms in conserved regions of PAN2 (encoding p.Arg492Cys) and MAP3K7CL (c.383_392ACTCCACAAA>GACT) on chromosomes 10 and 31, respectively. Analyses of these polymorphisms and the MHC haplotypes revealed that nine of 27 genotypic combinations confer high or moderate probability of disease and explain 93% of cases studied. The pattern of disease risk across PAN2 and MAP3K7CL genotypes provided clear evidence for a significant epistatic foundation for this disease, a risk further impacted by MHC haplotypes. We also observed a genotype-phenotype correlation wherein an earlier age of onset is correlated with an increased number of risk alleles at PAN2 and MAP3K7CL. High frequencies of multiple genetic risk factors are unique to affected breeds and likely arose coincident with artificial selection for desirable phenotypes. Described herein is the first three-locus association with a complex canine disease and two novel loci that provide targets for exploration in JDM and related immunological dysfunction.

  13. Detecting instability in animal social networks: genetic fragmentation is associated with social instability in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Beisner, Brianne A; Jackson, Megan E; Cameron, Ashley N; McCowan, Brenda

    2011-01-26

    The persistence of biological systems requires evolved mechanisms which promote stability. Cohesive primate social groups are one example of stable biological systems, which persist in spite of regular conflict. We suggest that genetic relatedness and its associated kinship structure are a potential source of stability in primate social groups as kinship structure is an important organizing principle in many animal societies. We investigated the effect of average genetic relatedness per matrilineal family on the stability of matrilineal grooming and agonistic interactions in 48 matrilines from seven captive groups of rhesus macaques. Matrilines with low average genetic relatedness show increased family-level instability such as: more sub-grouping in their matrilineal groom network, more frequent fighting with kin, and higher rates of wounding. Family-level instability in multiple matrilines within a group is further associated with group-level instability such as increased wounding. Stability appears to arise from the presence of clear matrilineal structure in the rhesus macaque group hierarchy, which is derived from cohesion among kin in their affiliative and agonistic interactions with each other. We conclude that genetic relatedness and kinship structure are an important source of group stability in animal societies, particularly when dominance and/or affilative interactions are typically governed by kinship.

  14. Yeast genetic analysis reveals the involvement of chromatin reassembly factors in repressing HIV-1 basal transcription.

    PubMed

    Vanti, Manuela; Gallastegui, Edurne; Respaldiza, Iñaki; Rodríguez-Gil, Alfonso; Gómez-Herreros, Fernando; Jimeno-González, Silvia; Jordan, Albert; Chávez, Sebastián

    2009-01-01

    Rebound of HIV viremia after interruption of anti-retroviral therapy is due to the small population of CD4+ T cells that remain latently infected. HIV-1 transcription is the main process controlling post-integration latency. Regulation of HIV-1 transcription takes place at both initiation and elongation levels. Pausing of RNA polymerase II at the 5' end of HIV-1 transcribed region (5'HIV-TR), which is immediately downstream of the transcription start site, plays an important role in the regulation of viral expression. The activation of HIV-1 transcription correlates with the rearrangement of a positioned nucleosome located at this region. These two facts suggest that the 5'HIV-TR contributes to inhibit basal transcription of those HIV-1 proviruses that remain latently inactive. However, little is known about the cell elements mediating the repressive role of the 5'HIV-TR. We performed a genetic analysis of this phenomenon in Saccharomyces cerevisiae after reconstructing a minimal HIV-1 transcriptional system in this yeast. Unexpectedly, we found that the critical role played by the 5'HIV-TR in maintaining low levels of basal transcription in yeast is mediated by FACT, Spt6, and Chd1, proteins so far associated with chromatin assembly and disassembly during ongoing transcription. We confirmed that this group of factors plays a role in HIV-1 postintegration latency in human cells by depleting the corresponding human orthologs with shRNAs, both in HIV latently infected cell populations and in particular single-integration clones, including a latent clone with a provirus integrated in a highly transcribed gene. Our results indicate that chromatin reassembly factors participate in the establishment of the equilibrium between activation and repression of HIV-1 when it integrates into the human genome, and they open the possibility of considering these factors as therapeutic targets of HIV-1 latency.

  15. Multitrophic interactions involving genetically modified potatoes, nontarget aphids, natural enemies and hyperparasitoids.

    PubMed

    Cowgill, S E; Danks, C; Atkinson, H J

    2004-03-01

    Genetically modified (GM) potatoes expressing a cysteine proteinase inhibitor (cystatin) have been developed as an option for the management of plant parasitic nematodes. The relative impact of such plants on predators and parasitoids (natural enemies) of nontarget insects was determined in a field trial. The trial consisted of GM plants, control plants grown in soil treated with a nematicide and untreated control plants. The quantity of nontarget aphids and their quality as hosts for natural enemies were studied. Aphid density was significantly reduced by nematicide treatment and few natural enemies were recorded from treated potatoes during the study. In contrast, similar numbers of aphids and their more abundant predators were recorded from the untreated control and the GM potatoes. The size of aphids on GM and control plants was recorded twice during the study. During the first sampling period (2-9 July) aphids clip-caged on GM plants were smaller than those on control plants. During the second sampling period (23-30 July) there was no difference in aphid size between those from the GM and control plants. Host size is an important component of host quality. It can affect the size and fecundity of parasitoid females and the sex ratio of their offspring. However, neither the fitness of females of Aphidius ervi, the most prevalent primary parasitoid, nor the sex ratio of their progeny, were affected when the parasitoids developed on aphids feeding on GM plants. Two guilds of secondary parasitoid were also recorded during the study. The fitness of the most abundant species, Aspahes vulgaris, was not affected when it developed on hosts from GM plants. The transgene product, OC I Delta D86, was not detected in aphids that had fed on GM plants in the field, suggesting that there is minimal secondary exposure of natural enemies to the inhibitor. The results indicate that transgenic nematode resistance is potentially more compatible with aphid biological control than is

  16. Identification of a Genetic Locus in Pseudomonas aureofaciens Involved in Fungal Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Carruthers, F. L.; Conner, A. J.; Mahanty, H. K.

    1994-01-01

    In iron-rich conditions, Pseudomonas aureofaciens PA147-2 produces an antibiotic-like compound that inhibits the growth of a plant fungal pathogen, Aphanomyces euteiches. To contribute to the potential use of PA147-2 as a biocontrol organism, we report the identification of a genetic locus important for antibiotic biosynthesis. Mutants defective for fungal inhibition (Af-) were generated by Tn5 mutagenesis. Southern hybridization of total DNAs from three Af- mutants indicated that loss of fungal inhibition was due to a single Tn5 insertion in each mutant. Restriction mapping of the mutation points showed that in two mutants the Tn5 insertions were in the same 16.0-kb EcoRI fragment and were separated by 2.1 kb. A genomic library of PA147-2 was constructed and screened by using a region of DNA flanking the Tn5 insertion in one mutant (PA109) as a probe to recover complementing cosmids. Three cosmids containing a 16.0-kb EcoRI fragment complementary to the two mutants were recovered. Allele replacement by homologous recombination with putative complementing cosmids restored one mutant to antifungal activity against A. euteiches. Southern analysis of the complemented mutants confirmed that allele replacement had occurred between cosmid DNA and Tn5. The wild-type 16.0-kb EcoRI fragment was cloned from the cosmid and complemented the two mutants to antifungal activity. An antifungal compound was isolated from PA147-2 grown on solid medium. Antifungal activity correlated to a peak on high-pressure liquid chromatography analysis. Under the same growth and extraction conditions, the antifungal activity seen in PA147-2 was absent in two Af- mutants. Furthermore, absence of an antifungal compound in each mutant correlated to the absence of the wild-type “antifungal” peak on high-pressure liquid chromatography analysis. Images PMID:16349166

  17. Modeling of trophospheric ozone concentrations using genetically trained multi-level cellular neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozcan, H. Kurtulus; Bilgili, Erdem; Sahin, Ulku; Ucan, O. Nuri; Bayat, Cuma

    2007-09-01

    Tropospheric ozone concentrations, which are an important air pollutant, are modeled by the use of an artificial intelligence structure. Data obtained from air pollution measurement stations in the city of Istanbul are utilized in constituting the model. A supervised algorithm for the evaluation of ozone concentration using a genetically trained multi-level cellular neural network (ML-CNN) is introduced, developed, and applied to real data. A genetic algorithm is used in the optimization of CNN templates. The model results and the actual measurement results are compared and statistically evaluated. It is observed that seasonal changes in ozone concentrations are reflected effectively by the concentrations estimated by the multilevel-CNN model structure, with a correlation value of 0.57 ascertained between actual and model results. It is shown that the multilevel-CNN modeling technique is as satisfactory as other modeling techniques in associating the data in a complex medium in air pollution applications.

  18. Using Long-Distance Scientist Involvement to Enhance NASA Volunteer Network Educational Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, K.

    2012-12-01

    Since 1999, the NASA/JPL Solar System Ambassadors (SSA) and Solar System Educators (SSEP) programs have used specially-trained volunteers to expand education and public outreach beyond the immediate NASA center regions. Integrating nationwide volunteers in these highly effective programs has helped optimize agency funding set aside for education. Since these volunteers were trained by NASA scientists and engineers, they acted as "stand-ins" for the mission team members in communities across the country. Through the efforts of these enthusiastic volunteers, students gained an increased awareness of NASA's space exploration missions through Solar System Ambassador classroom visits, and teachers across the country became familiarized with NASA's STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) educational materials through Solar System Educator workshops; however the scientist was still distant. In 2003, NASA started the Digital Learning Network (DLN) to bring scientists into the classroom via videoconferencing. The first equipment was expensive and only schools that could afford the expenditure were able to benefit; however, recent advancements in software allow classrooms to connect to the DLN via personal computers and an internet connection. Through collaboration with the DLN at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the Goddard Spaceflight Center, Solar System Ambassadors and Solar System Educators in remote parts of the country are able to bring scientists into their classroom visits or workshops as guest speakers. The goals of this collaboration are to provide special elements to the volunteers' event, allow scientists opportunities for education involvement with minimal effort, acquaint teachers with DLN services and enrich student's classroom learning experience.;

  19. A mouse forward genetics screen identifies LISTERIN as an E3 ubiquitin ligase involved in neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Chu, Jessie; Hong, Nancy A; Masuda, Claudio A; Jenkins, Brian V; Nelms, Keats A; Goodnow, Christopher C; Glynne, Richard J; Wu, Hua; Masliah, Eliezer; Joazeiro, Claudio A P; Kay, Steve A

    2009-02-17

    A mouse neurological mutant, lister, was identified through a genome-wide N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis screen. Homozygous lister mice exhibit profound early-onset and progressive neurological and motor dysfunction. lister encodes a RING finger protein, LISTERIN, which functions as an E3 ubiquitin ligase in vitro. Although lister is widely expressed in all tissues, motor and sensory neurons and neuronal processes in the brainstem and spinal cord are primarily affected in the mutant. Pathological signs include gliosis, dystrophic neurites, vacuolated mitochondria, and accumulation of soluble hyperphosphorylated tau. Analysis with a different lister allele generated through targeted gene trap insertion reveals LISTERIN is required for embryonic development and confirms that direct perturbation of a LISTERIN-regulated process causes neurodegeneration. The lister mouse uncovers a pathway involved in neurodegeneration and may serves as a model for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying human neurodegenerative disorders.

  20. A mouse forward genetics screen identifies LISTERIN as an E3 ubiquitin ligase involved in neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Jessie; Hong, Nancy A.; Masuda, Claudio A.; Jenkins, Brian V.; Nelms, Keats A.; Goodnow, Christopher C.; Glynne, Richard J.; Wu, Hua; Masliah, Eliezer; Joazeiro, Claudio A. P.; Kay, Steve A.

    2009-01-01

    A mouse neurological mutant, lister, was identified through a genome-wide N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis screen. Homozygous lister mice exhibit profound early-onset and progressive neurological and motor dysfunction. lister encodes a RING finger protein, LISTERIN, which functions as an E3 ubiquitin ligase in vitro. Although lister is widely expressed in all tissues, motor and sensory neurons and neuronal processes in the brainstem and spinal cord are primarily affected in the mutant. Pathological signs include gliosis, dystrophic neurites, vacuolated mitochondria, and accumulation of soluble hyperphosphorylated tau. Analysis with a different lister allele generated through targeted gene trap insertion reveals LISTERIN is required for embryonic development and confirms that direct perturbation of a LISTERIN-regulated process causes neurodegeneration. The lister mouse uncovers a pathway involved in neurodegeneration and may serves as a model for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying human neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:19196968

  1. The case for an ancestral genetic system involving simple analogues of the nucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, Gerald F.; Orgel, Leslie E.; Schwartz, Alan W.; Miller, Stanley L.

    1987-01-01

    The idea that the first living systems on earth were based on self-replicating RNA molecules has recently become popular as a result of the discovery of ribozymes. However, there are several major problems associated with the prebiotic synthesis of ribonucleotides. In addition, there is the newly recognized problem of enantiomeric cross-inhibition, whereby template-directed polymerization involving one enantiomer of RNA is inhibited strongly by the presence of the other enantiomer. Here, it is proposed that RNA was preceded in the evolution of life by a polymer constructed from flexible, acyclic, probably prochiral nucleotide analogues that were synthesized readily on the primitive earth. Several potentially prebiotic nucleotide analogues are considered in this context, and some of the consequences of this proposal are discussed.

  2. Noise-Aided Logic in an Electronic Analog of Synthetic Genetic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Hellen, Edward H.; Dana, Syamal K.; Kurths, Jürgen; Kehler, Elizabeth; Sinha, Sudeshna

    2013-01-01

    We report the experimental verification of noise-enhanced logic behaviour in an electronic analog of a synthetic genetic network, composed of two repressors and two constitutive promoters. We observe good agreement between circuit measurements and numerical prediction, with the circuit allowing for robust logic operations in an optimal window of noise. Namely, the input-output characteristics of a logic gate is reproduced faithfully under moderate noise, which is a manifestation of the phenomenon known as Logical Stochastic Resonance. The two dynamical variables in the system yield complementary logic behaviour simultaneously. The system is easily morphed from AND/NAND to OR/NOR logic. PMID:24124531

  3. Satellite image processing for precision agriculture and agroindustry using convolutional neural network and genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firdaus; Arkeman, Y.; Buono, A.; Hermadi, I.

    2017-01-01

    Translating satellite imagery to a useful data for decision making during this time are usually done manually by human. In this research, we are going to translate satellite imagery by using artificial intelligence method specifically using convolutional neural network and genetic algorithm to become a useful data for decision making, especially for precision agriculture and agroindustry. In this research, we are focused on how to made a sustainable land use planning with 3 objectives. The first is maximizing economic factor. Second is minimizing CO2 emission and the last is minimizing land degradation. Results show that by using artificial intelligence method, can produced a good pareto optimum solutions in a short time.

  4. Supplier selection based on a neural network model using genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Golmohammadi, Davood; Creese, Robert C; Valian, Haleh; Kolassa, John

    2009-09-01

    In this paper, a decision-making model was developed to select suppliers using neural networks (NNs). This model used historical supplier performance data for selection of vendor suppliers. Input and output were designed in a unique manner for training purposes. The managers' judgments about suppliers were simulated by using a pairwise comparisons matrix for output estimation in the NN. To obtain the benefit of a search technique for model structure and training, genetic algorithm (GA) was applied for the initial weights and architecture of the network. The suppliers' database information (input) can be updated over time to change the suppliers' score estimation based on their performance. The case study illustrated shows how the model can be applied for suppliers' selection.

  5. Optimal groundwater remediation using artificial neural networks and the genetic algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Leah L.

    1992-08-01

    An innovative computational approach for the optimization of groundwater remediation is presented which uses artificial neural networks (ANNs) and the genetic algorithm (GA). In this approach, the ANN is trained to predict an aspect of the outcome of a flow and transport simulation. Then the GA searches through realizations or patterns of pumping and uses the trained network to predict the outcome of the realizations. This approach has advantages of parallel processing of the groundwater simulations and the ability to ``recycle`` or reuse the base of knowledge formed by these simulations. These advantages offer reduction of computational burden of the groundwater simulations relative to a more conventional approach which uses nonlinear programming (NLP) with a quasi-newtonian search. Also the modular nature of this approach facilitates substitution of different groundwater simulation models.

  6. AN ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK EVALUATION OF TUBERCULOSIS USING GENETIC AND PHYSIOLOGICAL PATIENT DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, William O.; Darsey, Jerry A.; Hanna, Josh; Razorilova, Svetlana; Kitaev, Mikhael; Alisherov, Avtandiil; Tarasenko, Olga

    2010-04-12

    When doctors see more cases of patients with tell-tale symptoms of a disease, it is hoped that they will be able to recognize an infection administer treatment appropriately, thereby speeding up recovery for sick patients. We hope that our studies can aid in the detection of tuberculosis by using a computer model called an artificial neural network. Our model looks at patients with and without tuberculosis (TB). The data that the neural network examined came from the following: patient' age, gender, place, of birth, blood type, Rhesus (Rh) factor, and genes of the human Leukocyte Antigens (HLA) system (9q34.1) present in the Major Histocompatibility Complex. With availability in genetic data and good research, we hope to give them an advantage in the detection of tuberculosis. We try to mimic the doctor's experience with a computer test, which will learn from patient data the factors that contribute to TB.

  7. An Artificial Neural Network Evaluation of Tuberculosis Using Genetic and Physiological Patient Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, William O.; Hanna, Josh; Razorilova, Svetlana; Kitaev, Mikhael; Alisherov, Avtandiil; Darsey, Jerry A.; Tarasenko, Olga

    2010-04-01

    When doctors see more cases of patients with tell-tale symptoms of a disease, it is hoped that they will be able to recognize an infection administer treatment appropriately, thereby speeding up recovery for sick patients. We hope that our studies can aid in the detection of tuberculosis by using a computer model called an artificial neural network. Our model looks at patients with and without tuberculosis (TB). The data that the neural network examined came from the following: patient' age, gender, place, of birth, blood type, Rhesus (Rh) factor, and genes of the human Leukocyte Antigens (HLA) system (9q34.1) present in the Major Histocompatibility Complex. With availability in genetic data and good research, we hope to give them an advantage in the detection of tuberculosis. We try to mimic the doctor's experience with a computer test, which will learn from patient data the factors that contribute to TB.

  8. Genetic Networks of Liver Metabolism Revealed by Integration of Metabolic and Transcriptional Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Ferrara, Christine T.; Wang, Ping; Neto, Elias Chaibub; Stevens, Robert D.; Bain, James R.; Wenner, Brett R.; Ilkayeva, Olga R.; Keller, Mark P.; Blasiole, Daniel A.; Kendziorski, Christina; Yandell, Brian S.; Newgard, Christopher B.; Attie, Alan D.

    2008-01-01

    Although numerous quantitative trait loci (QTL) influencing disease-related phenotypes have been detected through gene mapping and positional cloning, identification of the individual gene(s) and molecular pathways leading to those phenotypes is often elusive. One way to improve understanding of genetic architecture is to classify phenotypes in greater depth by including transcriptional and metabolic profiling. In the current study, we have generated and analyzed mRNA expression and metabolic profiles in liver samples obtained in an F2 intercross between the diabetes-resistant C57BL/6 leptinob/ob and the diabetes-susceptible BTBR leptinob/ob mouse strains. This cross, which segregates for genotype and physiological traits, was previously used to identify several diabetes-related QTL. Our current investigation includes microarray analysis of over 40,000 probe sets, plus quantitative mass spectrometry-based measurements of sixty-seven intermediary metabolites in three different classes (amino acids, organic acids, and acyl-carnitines). We show that liver metabolites map to distinct genetic regions, thereby indicating that tissue metabolites are heritable. We also demonstrate that genomic analysis can be integrated with liver mRNA expression and metabolite profiling data to construct causal networks for control of specific metabolic processes in liver. As a proof of principle of the practical significance of this integrative approach, we illustrate the construction of a specific causal network that links gene expression and metabolic changes in the context of glutamate metabolism, and demonstrate its validity by showing that genes in the network respond to changes in glutamine and glutamate availability. Thus, the methods described here have the potential to reveal regulatory networks that contribute to chronic, complex, and highly prevalent diseases and conditions such as obesity and diabetes. PMID:18369453

  9. Network dysfunction of emotional and cognitive processes in those at genetic risk of bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Breakspear, Michael; Roberts, Gloria; Green, Melissa J; Nguyen, Vinh T; Frankland, Andrew; Levy, Florence; Lenroot, Rhoshel; Mitchell, Philip B

    2015-11-01

    The emotional and cognitive vulnerabilities that precede the development of bipolar disorder are poorly understood. The inferior frontal gyrus-a key cortical hub for the integration of cognitive and emotional processes-exhibits both structural and functional changes in bipolar disorder, and is also functionally impaired in unaffected first-degree relatives, showing diminished engagement during inhibition of threat-related emotional stimuli. We hypothesized that this functional impairment of the inferior frontal gyrus in those at genetic risk of bipolar disorder reflects the dysfunction of broader network dynamics underlying the coordination of emotion perception and cognitive control. To test this, we studied effective connectivity in functional magnetic resonance imaging data acquired from 41 first-degree relatives of patients with bipolar disorder, 45 matched healthy controls and 55 participants with established bipolar disorder. Dynamic causal modelling was used to model the neuronal interaction between key regions associated with fear perception (the anterior cingulate), inhibition (the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex) and the region upon which these influences converge, namely the inferior frontal gyrus. Network models that embodied non-linear, hierarchical relationships were the most strongly supported by data from our healthy control and bipolar participants. We observed a marked difference in the hierarchical influence of the anterior cingulate on the effective connectivity from the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex to the inferior frontal gyrus that is unique to the at-risk cohort. Non-specific, non-hierarchical mechanisms appear to compensate for this network disturbance. We thus establish a specific network disturbance suggesting dysfunction in the processes that support hierarchical relationships between emotion and cognitive control in those at high genetic risk for bipolar disorder.

  10. On a vector space representation in genetic algorithms for sensor scheduling in wireless sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Martins, F V C; Carrano, E G; Wanner, E F; Takahashi, R H C; Mateus, G R; Nakamura, F G

    2014-01-01

    Recent works raised the hypothesis that the assignment of a geometry to the decision variable space of a combinatorial problem could be useful both for providing meaningful descriptions of the fitness landscape and for supporting the systematic construction of evolutionary operators (the geometric operators) that make a consistent usage of the space geometric properties in the search for problem optima. This paper introduces some new geometric operators that constitute the realization of searches along the combinatorial space versions of the geometric entities descent directions and subspaces. The new geometric operators are stated in the specific context of the wireless sensor network dynamic coverage and connectivity problem (WSN-DCCP). A genetic algorithm (GA) is developed for the WSN-DCCP using the proposed operators, being compared with a formulation based on integer linear programming (ILP) which is solved with exact methods. That ILP formulation adopts a proxy objective function based on the minimization of energy consumption in the network, in order to approximate the objective of network lifetime maximization, and a greedy approach for dealing with the system's dynamics. To the authors' knowledge, the proposed GA is the first algorithm to outperform the lifetime of networks as synthesized by the ILP formulation, also running in much smaller computational times for large instances.

  11. Reveal, A General Reverse Engineering Algorithm for Inference of Genetic Network Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Shoudan; Fuhrman, Stefanie; Somogyi, Roland

    1998-01-01

    Given the immanent gene expression mapping covering whole genomes during development, health and disease, we seek computational methods to maximize functional inference from such large data sets. Is it possible, in principle, to completely infer a complex regulatory network architecture from input/output patterns of its variables? We investigated this possibility using binary models of genetic networks. Trajectories, or state transition tables of Boolean nets, resemble time series of gene expression. By systematically analyzing the mutual information between input states and output states, one is able to infer the sets of input elements controlling each element or gene in the network. This process is unequivocal and exact for complete state transition tables. We implemented this REVerse Engineering ALgorithm (REVEAL) in a C program, and found the problem to be tractable within the conditions tested so far. For n = 50 (elements) and k = 3 (inputs per element), the analysis of incomplete state transition tables (100 state transition pairs out of a possible 10(exp 15)) reliably produced the original rule and wiring sets. While this study is limited to synchronous Boolean networks, the algorithm is generalizable to include multi-state models, essentially allowing direct application to realistic biological data sets. The ability to adequately solve the inverse problem may enable in-depth analysis of complex dynamic systems in biology and other fields.

  12. The Transmission of Gun and Other Weapon-Involved Violence Within Social Networks

    PubMed Central

    Tracy, Melissa; Braga, Anthony A.; Papachristos, Andrew V.

    2016-01-01

    Fatal and nonfatal injuries resulting from gun violence remain a persistent problem in the United States. The available research suggests that gun violence diffuses among people and across places through social relationships. Understanding the relationship between gun violence within social networks and individual gun violence risk is critical in preventing the spread of gun violence within populations. This systematic review examines the existing scientific evidence on the transmission of gun and other weapon-related violence in household, intimate partner, peer, and co-offending networks. Our review identified 16 studies published between 1996 and 2015 that suggest that exposure to a victim or perpetrator of violence in one's interpersonal relationships and social networks increases the risk of individual victimization and perpetration. Formal network analyses find high concentrations of gun violence in small networks and that exposure to gun violence in one's networks is highly correlated with one's own probability of being a gunshot victim. Physical violence by parents and weapon use by intimate partners also increase risk for victimization and perpetration. Additional work is needed to better characterize the mechanisms through which network exposures increase individual risk for violence and to evaluate interventions aimed at disrupting the spread of gun and other weapon violence in high-risk social networks. PMID:26733492

  13. The Transmission of Gun and Other Weapon-Involved Violence Within Social Networks.

    PubMed

    Tracy, Melissa; Braga, Anthony A; Papachristos, Andrew V

    2016-01-01

    Fatal and nonfatal injuries resulting from gun violence remain a persistent problem in the United States. The available research suggests that gun violence diffuses among people and across places through social relationships. Understanding the relationship between gun violence within social networks and individual gun violence risk is critical in preventing the spread of gun violence within populations. This systematic review examines the existing scientific evidence on the transmission of gun and other weapon-related violence in household, intimate partner, peer, and co-offending networks. Our review identified 16 studies published between 1996 and 2015 that suggest that exposure to a victim or perpetrator of violence in one's interpersonal relationships and social networks increases the risk of individual victimization and perpetration. Formal network analyses find high concentrations of gun violence in small networks and that exposure to gun violence in one's networks is highly correlated with one's own probability of being a gunshot victim. Physical violence by parents and weapon use by intimate partners also increase risk for victimization and perpetration. Additional work is needed to better characterize the mechanisms through which network exposures increase individual risk for violence and to evaluate interventions aimed at disrupting the spread of gun and other weapon violence in high-risk social networks.

  14. Genetic loci of Mycoplasma agalactiae involved in systemic spreading during experimental intramammary infection of sheep.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Shivanand; Zimmermann, Martina; Flöck, Martina; Brunthaler, Rene; Spergser, Joachim; Rosengarten, Renate; Chopra-Dewasthaly, Rohini

    2016-10-20

    Mycoplasmas are amongst the most successful pathogens of both humans and animals yet the molecular basis of mycoplasma pathogenesis is poorly understood. This is partly due to the lack of classical virulence factors and little similarity to common bacterial pathogenic determinants. Using Mycoplasma agalactiae as a model we initiated research in this direction by screening a transposon mutant library in the natural sheep host using a negative selection method. Having successfully identified putative factors involved in the colonization of local infection and lymphogenic sites, the current study assessed mutants unable to spread systemically in sheep after experimental intramammary infection. Analysis of distant body sites for complete absence of mutants via SSM PCR revealed that additional set of genes, such as pdhB, oppC, oppB, gtsB, MAG1890, MAG5520 and MAG3650 are required for systemic spreading apart from those that were necessary for initial colonization. Additional in vitro studies with the mutants absent at these systemic sites confirmed the potential role of some of the respective gene products concerning their interaction with host cells. Mutants of pdhB, oppC and MAG4460 exhibited significantly slower growth in the presence of HeLa cells in MEM medium. This first attempt to identify genes exclusively required for systemic spreading provides a basis for further in-depth research to understand the exact mechanism of chronicity and persistence of M. agalactiae.

  15. NMR Parameters Determination through ACE Committee Machine with Genetic Implanted Fuzzy Logic and Genetic Implanted Neural Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asoodeh, Mojtaba; Bagheripour, Parisa; Gholami, Amin

    2015-06-01

    Free fluid porosity and rock permeability, undoubtedly the most critical parameters of hydrocarbon reservoir, could be obtained by processing of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) log. Despite conventional well logs (CWLs), NMR logging is very expensive and time-consuming. Therefore, idea of synthesizing NMR log from CWLs would be of a great appeal among reservoir engineers. For this purpose, three optimization strategies are followed. Firstly, artificial neural network (ANN) is optimized by virtue of hybrid genetic algorithm-pattern search (GA-PS) technique, then fuzzy logic (FL) is optimized by means of GA-PS, and eventually an alternative condition expectation (ACE) model is constructed using the concept of committee machine to combine outputs of optimized and non-optimized FL and ANN models. Results indicated that optimization of traditional ANN and FL model using GA-PS technique significantly enhances their performances. Furthermore, the ACE committee of aforementioned models produces more accurate and reliable results compared with a singular model performing alone.

  16. Dynamical properties of gene regulatory networks involved in long-term potentiation

    PubMed Central

    Nido, Gonzalo S.; Ryan, Margaret M.; Benuskova, Lubica; Williams, Joanna M.

    2015-01-01

    The long-lasting enhancement of synaptic effectiveness known as long-term potentiation (LTP) is considered to be the cellular basis of long-term memory. LTP elicits changes at the cellular and molecular level, including temporally specific alterations in gene networks. LTP can be seen as a biological process in which a transient signal sets a new homeostatic state that is “remembered” by cellular regulatory systems. Previously, we have shown that early growth response (Egr) transcription factors are of fundamental importance to gene networks recruited early after LTP induction. From a systems perspective, we hypothesized that these networks will show less stable architecture, while networks recruited later will exhibit increased stability, being more directly related to LTP consolidation. Using random Boolean network (RBN) simulations we found that the network derived at 24 h was markedly more stable than those derived at 20 min or 5 h post-LTP. This temporal effect on the vulnerability of the networks is mirrored by what is known about the vulnerability of LTP and memory itself. Differential gene co-expression analysis further highlighted the importance of the Egr family and found a rapid enrichment in connectivity at 20 min, followed by a systematic decrease, providing a potential explanation for the down-regulation of gene expression at 24 h documented in our preceding studies. We also found that the architecture exhibited by a control and the 24 h LTP co-expression networks fit well to a scale-free distribution, known to be robust against perturbations. By contrast the 20 min and 5 h networks showed more truncated distributions. These results suggest that a new homeostatic state is achieved 24 h post-LTP. Together, these data present an integrated view of the genomic response following LTP induction by which the stability of the networks regulated at different times parallel the properties observed at the synapse. PMID:26300724

  17. Construction of protein interaction network involved in lung adenocarcinomas using a novel algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Juan; Yang, Hai-Tao; Li, Zhu; Xu, Ning; Yu, Bo; Xu, Jun-Ping; Zhao, Pei-Ge; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Xiu-Juan; Lin, Dian-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Studies that only assess differentially-expressed (DE) genes do not contain the information required to investigate the mechanisms of diseases. A complete knowledge of all the direct and indirect interactions between proteins may act as a significant benchmark in the process of forming a comprehensive description of cellular mechanisms and functions. The results of protein interaction network studies are often inconsistent and are based on various methods. In the present study, a combined network was constructed using selected gene pairs, following the conversion and combination of the scores of gene pairs that were obtained across multiple approaches by a novel algorithm. Samples from patients with and without lung adenocarcinoma were compared, and the RankProd package was used to identify DE genes. The empirical Bayesian (EB) meta-analysis approach, the search tool for the retrieval of interacting genes/proteins database (STRING), the weighted gene coexpression network analysis (WGCNA) package and the differentially-coexpressed genes and links package (DCGL) were used for network construction. A combined network was also constructed with a novel rank-based algorithm using a combined score. The topological features of the 5 networks were analyzed and compared. A total of 941 DE genes were screened. The topological analysis indicated that the gene interaction network constructed using the WGCNA method was more likely to produce a small-world property, which has a small average shortest path length and a large clustering coefficient, whereas the combined network was confirmed to be a scale-free network. Gene pairs that were identified using the novel combined method were mostly enriched in the cell cycle and p53 signaling pathway. The present study provided a novel perspective to the network-based analysis. Each method has advantages and disadvantages. Compared with single methods, the combined algorithm used in the present study may provide a novel method to

  18. Identification of transcriptional networks involved in peroxisome proliferator chemical-induced hepatocyte proliferation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Peroxisome proliferator chemical (PPC) exposure leads to increases in rodent liver tumors through a non-genotoxic mode of action (MOA). The PPC MOA includes increased oxidative stress, hepatocyte proliferation and decreased apoptosis. We investigated the putative genetic regulato...

  19. Genetic Manipulation of Leishmania donovani to Explore the Involvement of Argininosuccinate Synthase in Oxidative Stress Management

    PubMed Central

    Sardar, Abul Hasan; Jardim, Armando; Ghosh, Ayan Kumar; Mandal, Abhishek; Das, Sushmita; Saini, Savita; Abhishek, Kumar; Singh, Ruby; Verma, Sudha; Kumar, Ajay; Das, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS) produced by the phagocytic cells are the most common arsenals used to kill the intracellular pathogens. However, Leishmania, an intracellular pathogen, has evolved mechanisms to survive by counterbalancing the toxic oxygen metabolites produced during infection. Polyamines, the major contributor in this anti-oxidant machinery, are largely dependent on the availability of L-arginine in the intracellular milieu. Argininosuccinate synthase (ASS) plays an important role as the rate-limiting step required for converting L-citrulline to argininosuccinate to provide arginine for an assortment of metabolic processes. Leishmania produce an active ASS enzyme, yet it has an incomplete urea cycle as it lacks an argininosuccinate lyase (ASL). There is no evidence for endogenous synthesis of L-arginine in Leishmania, which suggests that these parasites salvage L-arginine from extracellular milieu and makes the biological function of ASS and the production of argininosuccinate in Leishmania unclear. Our previous quantitative proteomic analysis of Leishmania promastigotes treated with sub-lethal doses of ROS, RNS, or a combination of both, led to the identification of several differentially expressed proteins which included ASS. To assess the involvement of ASS in stress management, a mutant cell line with greatly reduced ASS activity was created by a double-targeted gene replacement strategy in L. donovani promastigote. Interestingly, LdASS is encoded by three copies of allele, but Western blot analysis showed the third allele did not appear to express ASS. The free thiol levels in the mutant LdASS-/-/+ cell line were decreased. Furthermore, the cell viability in L-arginine depleted medium was greatly attenuated on exposure to different stress environments and was adversely impacted in its ability to infect mice. These findings suggest that ASS is important for Leishmania donovani to counterbalance the stressed environments

  20. Cerebellar Neural Circuits Involving Executive Control Network Predict Response to Group Cognitive Behavior Therapy in Social Anxiety Disorder.

    PubMed

    MinlanYuan; Meng, Yajing; Zhang, Yan; Nie, Xiaojing; Ren, Zhengjia; Zhu, Hongru; Li, Yuchen; Lui, Su; Gong, Qiyong; Qiu, Changjian; Zhang, Wei

    2017-02-02

    Some intrinsic connectivity networks including the default mode network (DMN) and executive control network (ECN) may underlie social anxiety disorder (SAD). Although the cerebellum has been implicated in the pathophysiology of SAD and several networks relevant to higher-order cognition, it remains unknown whether cerebellar areas involved in DMN and ECN exhibit altered resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) with cortical networks in SAD. Forty-six patients with SAD and 64 healthy controls (HC) were included and submitted to the baseline resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Seventeen SAD patients who completed post-treatment clinical assessments were included after group cognitive behavior therapy (CBT). RsFC of three cerebellar subregions in both groups was assessed respectively in a voxel-wise way, and these rsFC maps were compared by two-sample t tests between groups. Whole-brain voxel-wise regression was performed to examine whether cerebellar connectivity networks can predict response to CBT. Lower rsFC circuits of cerebellar subregions compared with HC at baseline (p < 0.05, corrected by false discovery rate) were revealed. The left Crus I rsFC with dorsal medial prefrontal cortex was negatively correlated with symptom severity. The clinical assessments in SAD patients were significantly decreased after CBT. Higher pretreatment cerebellar rsFC with angular gyrus and dorsal lateral frontal cortex corresponded with greater symptom improvement following CBT. Cerebellar rsFC circuits involving DMN and ECN are possible neuropathologic mechanisms of SAD. Stronger pretreatment cerebellar rsFC circuits involving ECN suggest potential neural markers to predict CBT response.

  1. Identification of muscarinic receptor subtypes involved in catecholamine secretion in adrenal medullary chromaffin cells by genetic deletion

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Keita; Matsuoka, Hidetada; Miyata, Hironori; Matsui, Minoru; Inoue, Masumi

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Activation of muscarinic receptors results in catecholamine secretion in adrenal chromaffin cells in many mammals, and muscarinic receptors partly mediate synaptic transmission from the splanchnic nerve, at least in guinea pigs. To elucidate the physiological functions of muscarinic receptors in chromaffin cells, it is necessary to identify the muscarinic receptor subtypes involved in excitation. Experimental Approach To identify muscarinic receptors, pharmacological tools and strains of mice where one or several muscarinic receptor subtypes were genetically deleted were used. Cellular responses to muscarinic stimulation in isolated chromaffin cells were studied with the patch clamp technique and amperometry. Key Results Muscarinic M1, M4 and M5 receptors were immunologically detected in mouse chromaffin cells, and these receptors disappeared after the appropriate gene deletion. Mouse cells secreted catecholamines in response to muscarinic agonists, angiotensin II and a decrease in external pH. Genetic deletion of M1, but not M3, M4 or M5, receptors in mice abolished secretion in response to muscarine, but not to other stimuli. The muscarine-induced secretion was suppressed by MT7, a snake peptide toxin specific for M1 receptors. Similarly, muscarine failed to induce an inward current in the presence of MT7 in mouse and rat chromaffin cells. The binding affinity of VU0255035 for the inhibition of muscarine-induced currents agreed with that for the M1 receptor. Conclusions and Implications Based upon the effects of genetic deletion of muscarinic receptors and MT7, it is concluded that the M1 receptor alone is responsible for muscarine-induced catecholamine secretion. PMID:25393049

  2. Real Time Updating Genetic Network Programming for Adapting to the Change of Stock Prices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yan; Mabu, Shingo; Shimada, Kaoru; Hirasawa, Kotaro

    The key in stock trading model is to take the right actions for trading at the right time, primarily based on the accurate forecast of future stock trends. Since an effective trading with given information of stock prices needs an intelligent strategy for the decision making, we applied Genetic Network Programming (GNP) to creating a stock trading model. In this paper, we propose a new method called Real Time Updating Genetic Network Programming (RTU-GNP) for adapting to the change of stock prices. There are three important points in this paper: First, the RTU-GNP method makes a stock trading decision considering both the recommendable information of technical indices and the candlestick charts according to the real time stock prices. Second, we combine RTU-GNP with a Sarsa learning algorithm to create the programs efficiently. Also, sub-nodes are introduced in each judgment and processing node to determine appropriate actions (buying/selling) and to select appropriate stock price information depending on the situation. Third, a Real Time Updating system has been firstly introduced in our paper considering the change of the trend of stock prices. The experimental results on the Japanese stock market show that the trading model with the proposed RTU-GNP method outperforms other models without real time updating. We also compared the experimental results using the proposed method with Buy&Hold method to confirm its effectiveness, and it is clarified that the proposed trading model can obtain much higher profits than Buy&Hold method.

  3. Comparison of deterministic and stochastic models of the lac operon genetic network.

    PubMed

    Stamatakis, Michail; Mantzaris, Nikos V

    2009-02-01

    The lac operon has been a paradigm for genetic regulation with positive feedback, and several modeling studies have described its dynamics at various levels of detail. However, it has not yet been analyzed how stochasticity can enrich the system's behavior, creating effects that are not observed in the deterministic case. To address this problem we use a comparative approach. We develop a reaction network for the dynamics of the lac operon genetic switch and derive corresponding deterministic and stochastic models that incorporate biological details. We then analyze the effects of key biomolecular mechanisms, such as promoter strength and binding affinities, on the behavior of the models. No assumptions or approximations are made when building the models other than those utilized in the reaction network. Thus, we are able to carry out a meaningful comparison between the predictions of the two models to demonstrate genuine effects of stochasticity. Such a comparison reveals that in the presence of stochasticity, certain biomolecular mechanisms can profoundly influence the region where the system exhibits bistability, a key characteristic of the lac operon dynamics. For these cases, the temporal asymptotic behavior of the deterministic model remains unchanged, indicating a role of stochasticity in modulating the behavior of the system.

  4. Genetic characterization of ovine herpesvirus 2 strains involved in water buffaloes malignant catarrhal fever outbreaks in Southern Italy.

    PubMed

    Amoroso, Maria Grazia; Galiero, Giorgio; Fusco, Giovanna

    2017-02-01

    Ovine herpesvirus 2 (OvHV-2) was responsible for two outbreaks of malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) on two water buffalo farms in Southern Italy. In this study, the presence of this virus in the nasal swabs from sick animals as well as in the organs of dead buffaloes was ascertained by a Real-time PCR assay. Positive samples also underwent a relative quantitative analysis of the viral DNA in them. All the dead animals had the highest relative viral quantities, while buffaloes recovering from the virus had intermediate quantities, and asymptomatic OvHV-2-positive sheep had the lowest relative quantities (as compared with the calibrator). The strains involved in the MCF outbreaks underwent genetic characterization by sequencing segments of their ORF50, ORF75 and Ov9.5 genes. The results showed that the outbreaks were caused by two specific genetic variants of OvHV-2, and that these variants exhibit nucleotide differences at the loci analysed. Sheep living in the surrounding farms, as well as sheep kept with buffaloes, were also investigated as possible transmitters of the virus. In this regard, local strategies for the control of MCF should consider separating reservoir species from susceptible animals.

  5. Mitochondrial 12S rRNA A827G mutation is involved in the genetic susceptibility to aminoglycoside ototoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Xing Guangqian; Chen Zhibin; Wei Qinjun; Tian Huiqin; Li Xiaolu; Zhou Aidong; Bu Xingkuan; Cao Xin . E-mail: caoxin@njmu.edu.cn

    2006-08-11

    We have analyzed the clinical and molecular characterization of a Chinese family with aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing impairment. Clinical evaluations revealed that only those family members who had a history of exposure to aminoglycoside antibiotics subsequently developed hearing loss, suggesting mitochondrial genome involvement. Sequence analysis of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA and tRNA{sup Ser(UCN)} genes led to the identification of a homoplasmic A827G mutation in all maternal relatives, a mutation that was identified previously in a few sporadic patients and in another Chinese family with non-syndromic deafness. The pathogenicity of the A827G mutation is strongly supported by the occurrence of the same mutation in two independent families and several genetically unrelated subjects. The A827G mutation is located at the A-site of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene which is highly conserved in mammals. It is possible that the alteration of the tertiary or quaternary structure of this rRNA by the A827G mutation may lead to mitochondrial dysfunction, thereby playing a role in the pathogenesis of hearing loss and aminoglycoside hypersensitivity. However, incomplete penetrance of hearing impairment indicates that the A827G mutation itself is not sufficient to produce clinical phenotype but requires the involvement of modifier factors for the phenotypic expression. Indeed, aminoglycosides may contribute to the phenotypic manifestation of the A827G mutation in this family. In contrast with the congenital or early-onset hearing impairment in another Chinese family carrying the A827G mutation, three patients in this pedigree developed hearing loss only after use of aminoglycosides. This discrepancy likely reflects the difference of genetic backgrounds, either mitochondrial haplotypes or nuclear modifier genes, between two families.

  6. Modeling the Normal and Neoplastic Cell Cycle with 'Realistic Boolean Genetic Networks': Their Application for Understanding Carcinogenesis and Assessing Therapeutic Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szallasi, Zoltan; Liang, Shoudan

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we show how Boolean genetic networks could be used to address complex problems in cancer biology. First, we describe a general strategy to generate Boolean genetic networks that incorporate all relevant biochemical and physiological parameters and cover all of their regulatory interactions in a deterministic manner. Second, we introduce 'realistic Boolean genetic networks' that produce time series measurements very similar to those detected in actual biological systems. Third, we outline a series of essential questions related to cancer biology and cancer therapy that could be addressed by the use of 'realistic Boolean genetic network' modeling.

  7. Inference of a Transcriptional Network Involved in Chemical Inhibition of Estrogen Synthesis in Fathead Minnow

    EPA Science Inventory

    A variety of chemicals in the environment have the potential to inhibit aromatase, an enzyme critical to estrogen synthesis. We examined the responses of female fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) to a model aromatase inhibitor, fadrozole, using transcriptional network inferen...

  8. Offline Memory Reprocessing: Involvement of the Brain's Default Network in Spontaneous Thought Processes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kun; Yu, Chunshui; Xu, Lijuan; Qin, Wen; Li, Kuncheng; Xu, Lin; Jiang, Tianzi

    2009-01-01

    Background Spontaneous thought processes (STPs), also called daydreaming or mind-wandering, occur ubiquitously in daily life. However, the functional significance of STPs remains largely unknown. Methodology/Principal Finding Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we first identified an STPs-network whose activity was positively correlated with the subjects' tendency of having STPs during a task-free state. The STPs-network was then found to be strongly associated with the default network, which has previously been established as being active during the task-free state. Interestingly, we found that offline reprocessing of previously memorized information further increased the activity of the STPs-network regions, although during a state with less STPs. In addition, we found that the STPs-network kept a dynamic balance between functional integration and functional separation among its component regions to execute offline memory reprocessing in STPs. Conclusion/Significance These findings strengthen a view that offline memory reprocessing and STPs share the brain's default network, and thus implicate that offline memory reprocessing may be a predetermined function of STPs. This supports the perspective that memory can be consolidated and modified during STPs, and thus gives rise to a dynamic behavior dependent on both previous external and internal experiences. PMID:19290044

  9. Adding learning to cellular genetic algorithms for training recurrent neural networks.

    PubMed

    Ku, K W; Mak, M W; Siu, W C

    1999-01-01

    This paper proposes a hybrid optimization algorithm which combines the efforts of local search (individual learning) and cellular genetic algorithms (GA's) for training recurrent neural networks (RNN's). Each weight of an RNN is encoded as a floating point number, and a concatenation of the numbers forms a chromosome. Reproduction takes place locally in a square grid with each grid point representing a chromosome. Two approaches, Lamarckian and Baldwinian mechanisms, for combining cellular GA's and learning have been compared. Different hill-climbing algorithms are incorporated into the cellular GA's as learning methods. These include the real-time recurrent learning (RTRL) and its simplified versions, and the delta rule. The RTRL algorithm has been successively simplified by freezing some of the weights to form simplified versions. The delta rule, which is the simplest form of learning, has been implemented by considering the RNN's as feedforward networks during learning. The hybrid algorithms are used to train the RNN's to solve a long-term dependency problem. The results show that Baldwinian learning is inefficient in assisting the cellular GA. It is conjectured that the more difficult it is for genetic operations to produce the genotypic changes that match the phenotypic changes due to learning, the poorer is the convergence of Baldwinian learning. Most of the combinations using the Lamarckian mechanism show an improvement in reducing the number of generations required for an optimum network; however, only a few can reduce the actual time taken. Embedding the delta rule in the cellular GA's has been found to be the fastest method. It is also concluded that learning should not be too extensive if the hybrid algorithm is to be benefit from learning.

  10. A Web-based database of genetic association studies in cutaneous melanoma enhanced with network-driven data exploration tools.

    PubMed

    Athanasiadis, Emmanouil I; Antonopoulou, Kyriaki; Chatzinasiou, Foteini; Lill, Christina M; Bourdakou, Marilena M; Sakellariou, Argiris; Kypreou, Katerina; Stefanaki, Irene; Evangelou, Evangelos; Ioannidis, John P A; Bertram, Lars; Stratigos, Alexander J; Spyrou, George M

    2014-01-01

    The publicly available online database MelGene provides a comprehensive, regularly updated, collection of data from genetic association studies in cutaneous melanoma (CM), including random-effects meta-analysis results of all eligible polymorphisms. The updated database version includes data from 192 publications with information on 1114 significantly associated polymorphisms across 280 genes, along with new front-end and back-end capabilities. Various types of relationships between data are calculated and visualized as networks. We constructed 13 different networks containing the polymorphisms and the genes included in MelGene. We explored the derived network representations under the following questions: (i) are there nodes that deserve consideration regarding their network connectivity characteristics? (ii) What is the relation of either the genome-wide or nominally significant CM polymorphisms/genes with the ones highlighted by the network representation? We show that our network approach using the MelGene data reveals connections between statistically significant genes/ polymorphisms and other genes/polymorphisms acting as 'hubs' in the reconstructed networks. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first database containing data from a comprehensive field synopsis and systematic meta-analyses of genetic polymorphisms in CM that provides user-friendly tools for in-depth molecular network visualization and exploration. The proposed network connections highlight potentially new loci requiring further investigation of their relation to melanoma risk. Database URL: http://www.melgene.org.

  11. Network-based gene prediction for Plasmodium falciparum malaria towards genetics-based drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Malaria is the most deadly parasitic infectious disease. Existing drug treatments have limited efficacy in malaria elimination, and the complex pathogenesis of the disease is not fully understood. Detecting novel malaria-associated genes not only contributes in revealing the disease pathogenesis, but also facilitates discovering new targets for anti-malaria drugs. Methods In this study, we developed a network-based approach to predict malaria-associated genes. We constructed a cross-species network to integrate human-human, parasite-parasite and human-parasite protein interactions. Then we extended the random walk algorithm on this network, and used known malaria genes as the seeds to find novel candidate genes for malaria. Results We validated our algorithms using 77 known malaria genes: 14 human genes and 63 parasite genes were ranked averagely within top 2% and top 4%, respectively among human and parasite genomes. We also evaluated our method for predicting novel malaria genes using a set of 27 genes with literature supporting evidence. Our approach ranked 12 genes within top 1% and 24 genes within top 5%. In addition, we demonstrated that top-ranked candied genes were enriched for drug targets, and identified commonalities underlying top-ranked malaria genes through pathway analysis. In summary, the candidate malaria-associated genes predicted by our data-driven approach have the potential to guide genetics-based anti-malaria drug discovery. PMID:26099491

  12. Genetic networks and the flow of positional information in embryonic development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialek, William

    When we study a biological system, we make inferences about the underlying mechanisms and dynamics. But biological systems themselves must also solve inference problems, as when our brains draw conclusions about the world given (often quite limited) data from our eyes and ears. My colleagues and I have been exploring both of these inference problems as they play out in the first hours of development in the fruit fly embryo. In this system, the concentrations of particular molecules encode the position of each cell in the embryo, and these concentrations are the outputs of a genetic network. Putting ourselves in the place of the cells, we have been able to read the code, building a dictionary that maps gene expression levels back into estimates of position. If our dictionary really is the one used by the embryo, then mutants should build predictably distorted body plans, and preliminary results show quantitative agreement with these predictions. Independent of their role as carriers of information, we can also analyze the patterns of gene expression to draw inferences about the underlying network. Finally, it is possible that the network architecture and parameters have been chosen to optimize the flow of information, and we see signatures of this optimization. Joint work with CG Callan, JO Dubuis, T Gregor, D Krotov, M Petkova, TR Sokolowski, G Tkacik, AM Walczak, and EF Wieschaus.

  13. Genetic Network Inference: From Co-Expression Clustering to Reverse Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhaeseleer, Patrik; Liang, Shoudan; Somogyi, Roland

    2000-01-01

    Advances in molecular biological, analytical, and computational technologies are enabling us to systematically investigate the complex molecular processes underlying biological systems. In particular, using high-throughput gene expression assays, we are able to measure the output of the gene regulatory network. We aim here to review datamining and modeling approaches for conceptualizing and unraveling the functional relationships implicit in these datasets. Clustering of co-expression profiles allows us to infer shared regulatory inputs and functional pathways. We discuss various aspects of clustering, ranging from distance measures to clustering algorithms and multiple-duster memberships. More advanced analysis aims to infer causal connections between genes directly, i.e., who is regulating whom and how. We discuss several approaches to the problem of reverse engineering of genetic networks, from discrete Boolean networks, to continuous linear and non-linear models. We conclude that the combination of predictive modeling with systematic experimental verification will be required to gain a deeper insight into living organisms, therapeutic targeting, and bioengineering.

  14. Thermomechanical processing optimization for 304 austenitic stainless steel using artificial neural network and genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Wen; Yang, Sen

    2016-12-01

    Thermomechanical processing has an important effect on the grain boundary character distribution. To obtain the optimal thermomechanical processing parameters is the key of grain boundary engineering. In this study, genetic algorithm (GA) based on artificial neural network model was proposed to optimize the thermomechanical processing parameters. In this model, a back-propagation neural network (BPNN) was established to map the relationship between thermomechanical processing parameters and the fraction of low-Σ CSL boundaries, and GA integrated with BPNN (BPNN/GA) was applied to optimize the thermomechanical processing parameters. The validation of the optimal thermomechanical processing parameters was verified by an experiment. Moreover, the microstructures and the intergranular corrosion resistance of the base material (BM) and the materials produced by the optimal thermomechanical processing parameters (termed as the GBEM) were studied. Compared to the BM specimen, the fraction of low-Σ CSL boundaries was increased from 56.8 to 77.9% and the random boundary network was interrupted by the low-Σ CSL boundaries, and the intergranular corrosion resistance was improved in the GBEM specimen. The results indicated that the BPNN/GA model was an effective and reliable means for the thermomechanical processing parameters optimization, which resulted in improving the intergranular corrosion resistance in 304 austenitic stainless steel.

  15. Generalized spike-wave discharges involve a default mode network in patients with juvenile absence epilepsy: a MEG study.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Kotaro; Takeda, Youji; Tanaka, Naoaki; Kurita, Tsugiko; Shiraishi, Hideaki; Takeuchi, Fumiya; Nakane, Shingo; Sueda, Keitaro; Koyama, Tsukasa

    2010-05-01

    This study uses magnetoencephalography (MEG) to examine whether cortical regions that constitute a default mode network are involved during generalized spike-wave discharges (GSWs) in patients with juvenile absence epilepsy (JAE). We studied five JAE patients for whom MEG was recorded using a 204-channel, whole-head gradiometer system. Dynamic statistical parametric mapping (dSPM) was done to estimate the cortical source distribution of GSW. The dSPM results showed strong medial prefrontal activation in all patients, with activation in the posterior cingulate and precuneus in three of five patients simultaneously or slightly after medial prefrontal activation. Furthermore, dSPM showed that the initial activation of a GSW appears in the focal cortical regions. Cortical regions that constitute a default mode network are strongly involved in the GSW process in some patients with JAE. Results also show that focal cortical activation appears at the onset of a GSW.

  16. Landscape modelling of gene flow: improved power using conditional genetic distance derived from the topology of population networks.

    PubMed

    Dyer, Rodney J; Nason, John D; Garrick, Ryan C

    2010-09-01

    Landscape genetics is a burgeoning field of interest that focuses on how site-specific factors influence the distribution of genetic variation and the genetic connectivity of individuals and populations. In this manuscript, we focus on two methodological extensions for landscape genetic analyses: the use of conditional genetic distance (cGD) derived from population networks and the utility of extracting potentially confounding effects caused by correlations between phylogeographic history and contemporary ecological factors. Individual-based simulations show that when describing the spatial distribution of genetic variation, cGD consistently outperforms the traditional genetic distance measure of linearized F(ST) under both 1- and 2-dimensional stepping stone models and Cavalli-Sforza and Edward's chord distance D(c) in 1-dimensional landscapes. To show how to identify and extract the effects of phylogeographic history prior to embarking on landscape genetic analyses, we use nuclear genotypic data from the Sonoran desert succulent Euphorbia lomelii (Euphrobiaceae), for which a detailed phylogeographic history has previously been determined. For E. lomelii, removing the effect of phylogeographic history significantly influences our ability to infer both the identity and the relative importance of spatial and bio-climatic variables in subsequent landscape genetic analyses. We close by discussing the utility of cGD in landscape genetic analyses.

  17. Genetic Associations of Brain Structural Networks in Schizophrenia: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Jagannathan, Kanchana; Calhoun, Vince D.; Gelernter, Joel; Stevens, Michael C.; Liu, Jingyu; Bolognani, Federico; Windemuth, Andreas; Ruaño, Gualberto; Assaf, Michal; Pearlson, Godfrey D.

    2010-01-01

    Background Schizophrenia is a complex genetic disorder, with multiple putative risk genes and many reports of reduced cortical gray matter. Identifying the genetic loci contributing to these structural alterations in schizophrenia (and likely also to normal structural gray matter patterns) could aid understanding of schizophrenia’s pathophysiology. We used structural parameters as potential intermediate illness markers to investigate genomic factors derived from single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays. Method We used research quality structural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI) scans from European American subjects including 33 healthy control subjects and 18 schizophrenia patients. All subjects were genotyped for 367 SNPs. Linked sMRI and genetic (SNP) components were extracted to reveal relationships between brain structure and SNPs, using parallel independent component analysis, a novel multivariate approach that operates effectively in small sample sizes. Results We identified an sMRI component that significantly correlated with a genetic component (r = −.536, p < .00005); components also distinguished groups. In the sMRI component, schizophrenia gray matter deficits were in brain regions consistently implicated in previous reports, including frontal and temporal lobes and thalamus (p < .01). These deficits were related to SNPs from 16 genes, several previously associated with schizophrenia risk and/or involved in normal central nervous system development, including AKT, PI3K, SLC6A4, DRD2, CHRM2, and ADORA2A. Conclusions Despite the small sample size, this novel analysis method identified an sMRI component including brain areas previously reported to be abnormal in schizophrenia and an associated genetic component containing several putative schizophrenia risk genes. Thus, we identified multiple genes potentially underlying specific structural brain abnormalities in schizophrenia. PMID:20691427

  18. Network-assisted genetic dissection of pathogenicity and drug resistance in the opportunistic human pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hanhae; Jung, Kwang-Woo; Maeng, Shinae; Chen, Ying-Lien; Shin, Junha; Shim, Jung Eun; Hwang, Sohyun; Janbon, Guilhem; Kim, Taeyup; Heitman, Joseph; Bahn, Yong-Sun; Lee, Insuk

    2015-03-05

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic human pathogenic fungus that causes meningoencephalitis. Due to the increasing global risk of cryptococcosis and the emergence of drug-resistant strains, the development of predictive genetics platforms for the rapid identification of novel genes governing pathogenicity and drug resistance of C. neoformans is imperative. The analysis of functional genomics data and genome-scale mutant libraries may facilitate the genetic dissection of such complex phenotypes but with limited efficiency. Here, we present a genome-scale co-functional network for C. neoformans, CryptoNet, which covers ~81% of the coding genome and provides an efficient intermediary between functional genomics data and reverse-genetics resources for the genetic dissection of C. neoformans phenotypes. CryptoNet is the first genome-scale co-functional network for any fungal pathogen. CryptoNet effectively identified novel genes for pathogenicity and drug resistance using guilt-by-association and context-associated hub algorithms. CryptoNet is also the first genome-scale co-functional network for fungi in the basidiomycota phylum, as Saccharomyces cerevisiae belongs to the ascomycota phylum. CryptoNet may therefore provide insights into pathway evolution between two distinct phyla of the fungal kingdom. The CryptoNet web server (www.inetbio.org/cryptonet) is a public resource that provides an interactive environment of network-assisted predictive genetics for C. neoformans.

  19. A neural network controller for the path tracking control of a hopping robot involving time delays.

    PubMed

    Chaitanya, V Sree Krishna; Reddy, M Srinivas

    2006-02-01

    In this paper a hopping robot motion with offset mass is discussed. A mathematical model has been considered and an efficient single layered neural network has been developed to suit to the dynamics of the hopping robot, which ensures guaranteed tracking performance leading to the stability of the otherwise unstable system. The neural network takes advantage of the robot regressor dynamics that expresses the highly nonlinear robot dynamics in a linear form in terms of the known and unknown robot parameters. Time delays in the control mechanism play a vital role in the motion of hopping robots. The present work also enables us to estimate the maximum time delay admissible with out losing the guaranteed tracking performance. Further this neural network does not require offline training procedures. The salient features are highlighted by appropriate simulations.

  20. Comparison of approaches for machine-learning optimization of neural networks for detecting gene-gene interactions in genetic epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Motsinger-Reif, Alison A; Dudek, Scott M; Hahn, Lance W; Ritchie, Marylyn D

    2008-05-01

    The detection of genotypes that predict common, complex disease is a challenge for human geneticists. The phenomenon of epistasis, or gene-gene interactions, is particularly problematic for traditional statistical techniques. Additionally, the explosion of genetic information makes exhaustive searches of multilocus combinations computationally infeasible. To address these challenges, neural networks (NN), a pattern recognition method, have been used. One limitation of the NN approach is that its success is dependent on the architecture of the network. To solve this, machine-learning approaches have been suggested to evolve the best NN architecture for a particular data set. In this study we provide a detailed technical description of the use of grammatical evolution to optimize neural networks (GENN) for use in genetic association studies. We compare the performance of GENN to that of a previous machine-learning NN application--genetic programming neural networks in both simulated and real data. We show that GENN greatly outperforms genetic programming neural networks in data sets with a large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms. Additionally, we demonstrate that GENN has high power to detect disease-risk loci in a range of high-order epistatic models. Finally, we demonstrate the scalability of the GENN method with increasing numbers of variables--as many as 500,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms.

  1. Genetic identification of intracellular trafficking regulators involved in Notch-dependent binary cell fate acquisition following asymmetric cell division.

    PubMed

    Le Bras, Stéphanie; Rondanino, Christine; Kriegel-Taki, Géraldine; Dussert, Aurore; Le Borgne, Roland

    2012-10-15

    Notch signalling is involved in numerous cellular processes during development and throughout adult life. Although ligands and receptors are largely expressed in the whole organism, activation of Notch receptors only takes place in a subset of cells and/or tissues and is accurately regulated in time and space. Previous studies have demonstrated that endocytosis and recycling of both ligands and/or receptors are essential for this regulation. However, the precise endocytic routes, compartments and regulators involved in the spatiotemporal regulation are largely unknown. In order to identify intracellular trafficking regulators of Notch signalling, we have undertaken a tissue-specific dsRNA genetic screen of candidates potentially involved in endocytosis and recycling within the endolysosomal pathway. dsRNA against 418 genes was induced in the Drosophila melanogaster sensory organ lineage in which Notch signalling regulates binary cell fate acquisition. Gain or loss of Notch signalling phenotypes were observed in adult sensory organs for 113 of them. Furthermore, 26 genes were found to regulate the steady state localisation of Notch, Sanpodo, a Notch co-factor, and/or Delta in the pupal lineage. In particular, we identified 20 genes with previously unknown function in D. melanogaster intracellular trafficking. Among them, we identified CG2747 and we show that it regulates the localisation of clathrin adaptor AP-1 complex, a negative regulator of Notch signalling. Together, our results further demonstrate the essential function of intracellular trafficking in regulating Notch-signalling-dependent binary cell fate acquisition and constitute an additional step toward the elucidation of the routes followed by Notch receptor and ligands during signalling.

  2. Genetic algorithm optimization in drug design QSAR: Bayesian-regularized genetic neural networks (BRGNN) and genetic algorithm-optimized support vectors machines (GA-SVM).

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Michael; Caballero, Julio; Fernandez, Leyden; Sarai, Akinori

    2011-02-01

    Many articles in "in silico" drug design implemented genetic algorithm (GA) for feature selection, model optimization, conformational search, or docking studies. Some of these articles described GA applications to quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) modeling in combination with regression and/or classification techniques. We reviewed the implementation of GA in drug design QSAR and specifically its performance in the optimization of robust mathematical models such as Bayesian-regularized artificial neural networks (BRANNs) and support vector machines (SVMs) on different drug design problems. Modeled data sets encompassed ADMET and solubility properties, cancer target inhibitors, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, HIV-1 protease inhibitors, ion-channel and calcium entry blockers, and antiprotozoan compounds as well as protein classes, functional, and conformational stability data. The GA-optimized predictors were often more accurate and robust than previous published models on the same data sets and explained more than 65% of data variances in validation experiments. In addition, feature selection over large pools of molecular descriptors provided insights into the structural and atomic properties ruling ligand-target interactions.

  3. Dentate gyrus network dysfunctions precede the symptomatic phase in a genetic mouse model of seizures

    PubMed Central

    Toader, Oana; Forte, Nicola; Orlando, Marta; Ferrea, Enrico; Raimondi, Andrea; Baldelli, Pietro; Benfenati, Fabio; Medrihan, Lucian

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal circuit disturbances that lead to hyperexcitability in the cortico-hippocampal network are one of the landmarks of temporal lobe epilepsy. The dentate gyrus (DG) network plays an important role in regulating the excitability of the entire hippocampus by filtering and integrating information received via the perforant path. Here, we investigated possible epileptogenic abnormalities in the function of the DG neuronal network in the Synapsin II (Syn II) knockout mouse (Syn II−/−), a genetic mouse model of epilepsy. Syn II is a presynaptic protein whose deletion in mice reproducibly leads to generalized seizures starting at the age of 2 months. We made use of a high-resolution microelectrode array (4096 electrodes) and patch-clamp recordings, and found that in acute hippocampal slices of young pre-symptomatic (3–6 week-old) Syn II−/− mice excitatory synaptic output of the mossy fibers is reduced. Moreover, we showed that the main excitatory neurons present in the polymorphic layer of the DG, hilar mossy cells, display a reduced excitability. We also provide evidence of a predominantly inhibitory regulatory output from mossy cells to granule cells, through feed-forward inhibition, and show that the excitatory-inhibitory ratio is increased in both pre-symptomatic and symptomatic Syn II−/− mice. These results support the key role of the hilar mossy neurons in maintaining the normal excitability of the hippocampal network and show that the late epileptic phenotype of the Syn II−/− mice is preceded by neuronal circuitry dysfunctions. Our data provide new insights into the mechanisms of epileptogenesis in the Syn II−/− mice and open the possibility for early diagnosis and therapeutic interventions. PMID:24009558

  4. A Unifying Mathematical Framework for Genetic Robustness, Environmental Robustness, Network Robustness and their Trade-off on Phenotype Robustness in Biological Networks Part I: Gene Regulatory Networks in Systems and Evolutionary Biology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bor-Sen; Lin, Ying-Po

    2013-01-01

    Robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation are ubiquitous systematic properties observed in biological systems at different levels. The underlying principles for robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation are universal to both complex biological systems and sophisticated engineering systems. In many biological networks, network robustness should be enough to confer intrinsic robustness in order to tolerate intrinsic parameter fluctuations, genetic robustness for buffering genetic variations, and environmental robustness for resisting environmental disturbances. With this, the phenotypic stability of biological network can be maintained, thus guaranteeing phenotype robustness. This paper presents a survey on biological systems and then develops a unifying mathematical framework for investigating the principles of both robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation in systems and evolutionary biology. Further, from the unifying mathematical framework, it was discovered that the phenotype robustness criterion for biological networks at different levels relies upon intrinsic robustness + genetic robustness + environmental robustness ≦ network robustness. When this is true, the phenotype robustness can be maintained in spite of intrinsic parameter fluctuations, genetic variations, and environmental disturbances. Therefore, the trade-offs between intrinsic robustness, genetic robustness, environmental robustness, and network robustness in systems and evolutionary biology can also be investigated through their corresponding phenotype robustness criterion from the systematic point of view.

  5. Involvement of 5-HT1A receptors in animal tests of anxiety and depression: evidence from genetic models.

    PubMed

    Overstreet, David H; Commissaris, Randall C; De La Garza, Richard; File, Sandra E; Knapp, Darin J; Seiden, Lewis S

    2003-06-01

    Clinical studies have suggested the involvement of 5-HT1A receptors in anxiety and depressive disorders because partial 5-HT1A receptor agonists such as buspirone are therapeutic. The present review considers evidence from genetic animal models that support a role for 5-HT1A receptors in anxiety-like and depressed-like behavior in animals. Selective breeding for differential hypothermic responses to a selective 5-HT1A receptor agonist led to the development of the high DPAT sensitive (HDS) and low DPAT sensitive (LDS) lines of rats. The HDS rats differ from the LDS rats on several behavioral measures reflective of anxiety or depression, including reduced social interaction, reduced responding in a conflict task and exaggerated immobility in the forced swim test. However, they do not differ from the LDS rats in the elevated plus maze task, which is a commonly used test of anxiety. Nor do the HDS rats exhibit a typical anxiogenic response to the hippocampal administration of the 5-HT1A agonist. Although the HDS rats do exhibit elevations in 5-HT1A receptors in regions of the limbic cortex, it is not clear whether these increases account for the behavioral differences. Paradoxically, 5-HT1A receptor knockout mice also exhibit anxiety-like behavior in the plus maze, open field and conflict tests compared to wild type mice. However, the knockouts exhibited less immobility in the forced swim test than wild type control mice. Recent studies using selective regional reinstatement of the receptor have implicated the postsynaptic 5-HT1A receptors in these changes in anxiety-like behavior. Thus, preliminary evidence from two different types of genetic animal models suggests that anxiety-like behavior can arise if the 5-HT1A receptor function is eliminated or overexpressed. Further study with additional tests of anxiety are needed to confirm this intriguing relationship.

  6. A Combined Computational and Genetic Approach Uncovers Network Interactions of the Cyanobacterial Circadian Clock

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Joseph S.; Cheng, Ryan R.; Paddock, Mark L.; Sancar, Cigdem

    2016-01-01

    DCA, independently confirmed known interactions and revealed a core set of subnetworks within the larger HK-RR set. We validated high-scoring candidate proteins via combinatorial genetics, demonstrating that DCA can be utilized to reduce the search space of complex protein networks and to infer undiscovered specific interactions for signaling proteins in vivo. Significantly, new interactions that link circadian response to cell division and fitness in a light/dark cycle were uncovered. The combined analysis also uncovered a more basic core clock, illustrating the synergy and applicability of a combined computational and genetic approach for investigating prokaryotic signaling networks. PMID:27381914

  7. Hybrid artificial neural network genetic algorithm technique for modeling chemical oxygen demand removal in anoxic/oxic process.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yongwen; Huang, Mingzhi; Wan, Jinquan; Hu, Kang; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Huiping

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a hybrid artificial neural network (ANN) - genetic algorithm (GA) numerical technique was successfully developed to deal with complicated problems that cannot be solved by conventional solutions. ANNs and Gas were used to model and simulate the process of removing chemical oxygen demand (COD) in an anoxic/oxic system. The minimization of the error function with respect to the network parameters (weights and biases) has been considered as training of the network. Real-coded genetic algorithm was used to train the network in an unsupervised manner. Meanwhile the important process parameters, such as the influent COD (COD(in)), reflux ratio (R(r)), carbon-nitrogen ratio (C/N) and the effluent COD (COD(out)) were considered. The result shows that compared with the performance of ANN model, the performance of the GA-ANN (genetic algorithm - artificial neural network) network was found to be more impressive. Using ANN, the mean absolute percentage error (MAPE), mean squared error (MSE) and correlation coefficient (R) were 9.33×10(-4), 2.82 and 0.98596, respectively; while for the GA-ANN, they were converged to be 4.18×10(-4), 1.12 and 0.99476, respectively.

  8. Tinnitus and hyperacusis involve hyperactivity and enhanced connectivity in auditory-limbic-arousal-cerebellar network

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Chen; Li, Xiaowei; Liu, Lijie; Wang, Jian; Lu, Chun-Qiang; Yang, Ming; Jiao, Yun; Zang, Feng-Chao; Radziwon, Kelly; Chen, Guang-Di; Sun, Wei; Krishnan Muthaiah, Vijaya Prakash; Salvi, Richard; Teng, Gao-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Hearing loss often triggers an inescapable buzz (tinnitus) and causes everyday sounds to become intolerably loud (hyperacusis), but exactly where and how this occurs in the brain is unknown. To identify the neural substrate for these debilitating disorders, we induced both tinnitus and hyperacusis with an ototoxic drug (salicylate) and used behavioral, electrophysiological, and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) techniques to identify the tinnitus–hyperacusis network. Salicylate depressed the neural output of the cochlea, but vigorously amplified sound-evoked neural responses in the amygdala, medial geniculate, and auditory cortex. Resting-state fMRI revealed hyperactivity in an auditory network composed of inferior colliculus, medial geniculate, and auditory cortex with side branches to cerebellum, amygdala, and reticular formation. Functional connectivity revealed enhanced coupling within the auditory network and segments of the auditory network and cerebellum, reticular formation, amygdala, and hippocampus. A testable model accounting for distress, arousal, and gating of tinnitus and hyperacusis is proposed. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06576.001 PMID:25962854

  9. Parents, Friends, and Romantic Partners: Enmeshment in Deviant Networks and Adolescent Delinquency Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lonardo, Robert A.; Giordano, Peggy C.; Longmore, Monica A.; Manning, Wendy D.

    2009-01-01

    Adolescent networks include parents, friends, and romantic partners, but research on the social learning mechanisms related to delinquency has not typically examined the characteristics of all three domains simultaneously. Analyses draw on data from the Toledo Adolescent Relationships Study (n = 957), and our analytic sample contains 51% male and…

  10. Optimal field-scale groundwater remediation using neural networks and the genetic algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, L.L.; Dowla, F.U.; Johnson, V.M.

    1993-05-01

    We present a new approach for field-scale nonlinear management of groundwater remediation. First, an artificial neural network (ANN) is trained to predict the outcome of a groundwater transport simulation. Then a genetic algorithm (GA) searches through possible pumping realizations, evaluating the fitness of each with a prediction from the trained ANN. Traditional approaches rely on optimization algorithms requiring sequential calls of the groundwater transport simulation. Our approach processes the transport simulations in parallel and ``recycles`` the knowledge base of these simulations, greatly reducing the computational and real-time burden, often the primary impediment to developing field-scale management models. We present results from a Superfund site suggesting that such management techniques can reduce cleanup costs by over a hundred million dollars.

  11. Prediction of CHF in concentric-tube open thermosiphon using artificial neural network and genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, R. H.; Su, G. H.; Qiu, S. Z.; Fukuda, Kenji

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, an artificial neural network (ANN) for predicting critical heat flux (CHF) of concentric-tube open thermosiphon has been trained successfully based on the experimental data from the literature. The dimensionless input parameters of the ANN are density ratio, ρ l/ ρ v; the ratio of the heated tube length to the inner diameter of the outer tube, L/ D i; the ratio of frictional area, d i/( D i + d o); and the ratio of equivalent heated diameter to characteristic bubble size, D he/[ σ/ g( ρ l- ρ v)]0.5, the output is Kutateladze number, Ku. The predicted values of ANN are found to be in reasonable agreement with the actual values from the experiments with a mean relative error (MRE) of 8.46%. New correlations for predicting CHF were also proposed by using genetic algorithm (GA) and succeeded to correlate the existing CHF data with better accuracy than the existing empirical correlations.

  12. State estimation for Markovian jumping genetic regulatory networks with random delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinliang; Tian, Engang; Gu, Zhou; Zhang, Yuanyuan

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, the state estimation problem is investigated for stochastic genetic regulatory networks (GRNs) with random delays and Markovian jumping parameters. The delay considered is assumed to be satisfying a certain stochastic characteristic. Meantime, the delays of GRNs are described by a binary switching sequence satisfying a conditional probability distribution. The aim of this paper is to design a state estimator to estimate the true states of the considered GRNs through the available output measurements. By using Lyapunov functional and some stochastic analysis techniques, the stability criteria of the estimation error systems are obtained in the form of linear matrix inequalities under which the estimation error dynamics is globally asymptotically stable. Then, the explicit expression of the desired estimator is shown. Finally, a numerical example is presented to show the effectiveness of the proposed results.

  13. A bioinformatics analysis of Lamin-A regulatory network: a perspective on epigenetic involvement in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Arancio, Walter

    2012-04-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare human genetic disease that leads to premature aging. HGPS is caused by mutation in the Lamin-A (LMNA) gene that leads, in affected young individuals, to the accumulation of the progerin protein, usually present only in aging differentiated cells. Bioinformatics analyses of the network of interactions of the LMNA gene and transcripts are presented. The LMNA gene network has been analyzed using the BioGRID database (http://thebiogrid.org/) and related analysis tools such as Osprey (http://biodata.mshri.on.ca/osprey/servlet/Index) and GeneMANIA ( http://genemania.org/). The network of interaction of LMNA transcripts has been further analyzed following the competing endogenous (ceRNA) hypotheses (RNA cross-talk via microRNAs [miRNAs]) and using the miRWalk database and tools (www.ma.uni-heidelberg.de/apps/zmf/mirwalk/). These analyses suggest particular relevance of epigenetic modifiers (via acetylase complexes and specifically HTATIP histone acetylase) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent chromatin remodelers (via pBAF, BAF, and SWI/SNF complexes).

  14. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder with Reading Disabilities: Preliminary Genetic Findings on the Involvement of the ADRA2A Gene

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, J.; Langley, K.; Pay, H.; Payton, A.; Worthington, J.; Ollier, W.; Thapar, A.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and reading disability (RD) tend to co-occur and quantitative genetic studies have shown this to arise primarily through shared genetic influences. However, molecular genetic studies have shown different genes to be associated with each of these conditions. Neurobiological studies have…

  15. Multi-input CRISPR/Cas genetic circuits that interface host regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Alec A K; Voigt, Christopher A

    2014-11-24

    Genetic circuits require many regulatory parts in order to implement signal processing or execute algorithms in cells. A potentially scalable approach is to use dCas9, which employs small guide RNAs (sgRNAs) to repress genetic loci via the programmability of RNA:DNA base pairing. To this end, we use dCas9 and designed sgRNAs to build transcriptional logic gates and connect them to perform computation in living cells. We constructed a set of NOT gates by designing five synthetic Escherichia coli σ70 promoters that are repressed by corresponding sgRNAs, and these interactions do not exhibit crosstalk between each other. These sgRNAs exhibit high on-target repression (56- to 440-fold) and negligible off-target interactions (< 1.3-fold). These gates were connected to build larger circuits, including the Boolean-complete NOR gate and a 3-gate circuit consisting of four layered sgRNAs. The synthetic circuits were connected to the native E. coli regulatory network by designing output sgRNAs to target an E. coli transcription factor (malT). This converts the output of a synthetic circuit to a switch in cellular phenotype (sugar utilization, chemotaxis, phage resistance).

  16. The Stock Price Prediction and Sell-buy Strategy Model by Genetic Network Programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Shigeo; Hirasawa, Kotaro; Hu, Jinglu

    Various stock prices predicting and sell-buy strategy models have been so far proposed. They are classified as the fundamental analysis using the achievements of the companies and the trend of business, etc., and the technical analysis which carries out the numerical analysis of the movement of stock prices. On the other hand, as one of the methods for data mining which finds out the regularity from a vast quantity of stock price data, Genetic Algorithm (GA) has been so far applied widely. As a concrete example, the optimal values of parameters of stock indices like various moving averages and rates of deviation, etc. is computed by GA, and there have been developed various methods for predicting stock prices and determinig sell-buy strategy based on it. However, it is hard to determine which is the most effective index by the conventional GA. Moreover, the most effective one depends on the brands. So in this paper, a stock price prediction and sell-buy strategy model which searches for the optimal combination of various indices in the technical analysis has been proposed using Genetic Network programming and its effectiveness is confirmed by simulations.

  17. Enhanced antibiotic production by Streptomyces sindenensis using artificial neural networks coupled with genetic algorithm and Nelder-Mead downhill simplex.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, C K M; Khan, Mahvish; Praveen, Vandana; Khan, Saif; Srivastava, Akanksha

    2012-07-01

    Antibiotic production with Streptomyces sindenensis MTCC 8122 was optimized under submerged fermentation conditions by artificial neural network (ANN) coupled with genetic algorithm (GA) and Nelder-Mead downhill simplex (NMDS). Feed forward back-propagation ANN was trained to establish the mathematical relationship among the medium components and length of incubation period for achieving maximum antibiotic yield. The optimization strategy involved growing the culture with varying concentrations of various medium components for different incubation periods. Under non-optimized condition, antibiotic production was found to be 95 microgram/ml, which nearly doubled (176 microgram/ml) with the ANN-GA optimization. ANN-NMDS optimization was found to be more efficacious, and maximum antibiotic production (197 microgram/ml) was obtained by cultivating the cells with (g/l) fructose 2.7602, MgSO4 1.2369, (NH4)2PO4 0.2742, DL-threonine 3.069%, and soyabean meal 1.952%, for 9.8531 days of incubation, which was roughly 12% higher than the yield obtained by ANN coupled with GA under the same conditions.

  18. Identification and characterization of a NaCl-responsive genetic locus involved in survival during desiccation in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Vriezen, Jan A C; de Bruijn, Frans J; Nüsslein, Klaus

    2013-09-01

    The Rhizobiaceae are a bacterial family of enormous agricultural importance due to the ability of its members to fix atmospheric nitrogen in an intimate relationship with plants. Their survival as naturally occurring soil bacteria in agricultural soils as well as popular seed inocula is affected directly by drought and salinity. Survival after desiccation in the presence of NaCl is enabled by underlying genetic mechanisms in the model organism Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021. Since salt stress parallels a loss in water activity, the identification of NaCl-responsive loci may identify loci involved in survival during desiccation. This approach enabled identification of the loci asnO and ngg by their reduced ability to grow on increased NaCl concentrations, likely due to their inability to produce the osmoprotectant N-acetylglutaminylglutamine (NAGGN). In addition, the mutant harboring ngg::Tn5luxAB was affected in its ability to survive desiccation and responded to osmotic stress. The desiccation sensitivity may have been due to secondary functions of Ngg (N-acetylglutaminylglutamine synthetase)-like cell wall metabolism as suggested by the presence of a d-alanine-d-alanine ligase (dAla-dAla) domain and by sensitivity of the mutant to β-lactam antibiotics. asnO::Tn5luxAB is expressed during the stationary phase under normal growth conditions. Amino acid sequence similarity to enzymes producing β-lactam inhibitors and increased resistance to β-lactam antibiotics may indicate that asnO is involved in the production of a β-lactam inhibitor.

  19. Identifying a Network of Brain Regions Involved in Aversion-Related Processing: A Cross-Species Translational Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Dave J.; Northoff, Georg

    2011-01-01

    The ability to detect and respond appropriately to aversive stimuli is essential for all organisms, from fruit flies to humans. This suggests the existence of a core neural network which mediates aversion-related processing. Human imaging studies on aversion have highlighted the involvement of various cortical regions, such as the prefrontal cortex, while animal studies have focused largely on subcortical regions like the periaqueductal gray and hypothalamus. However, whether and how these regions form a core neural network of aversion remains unclear. To help determine this, a translational cross-species investigation in humans (i.e., meta-analysis) and other animals (i.e., systematic review of functional neuroanatomy) was performed. Our results highlighted the recruitment of the anterior cingulate cortex, the anterior insula, and the amygdala as well as other subcortical (e.g., thalamus, midbrain) and cortical (e.g., orbitofrontal) regions in both animals and humans. Importantly, involvement of these regions remained independent of sensory modality. This study provides evidence for a core neural network mediating aversion in both animals and humans. This not only contributes to our understanding of the trans-species neural correlates of aversion but may also carry important implications for psychiatric disorders where abnormal aversive behavior can often be observed. PMID:22102836

  20. Robust control of uncertain nonlinear switched genetic regulatory networks with time delays: A redesign approach.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Hojjatullah; Majd, Vahid Johari

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the problem of robust stability of nonlinear genetic regulatory networks (GRNs) is investigated. The developed method is an integral sliding mode control based redesign for a class of perturbed dissipative switched GRNs with time delays. The control law is redesigned by modifying the dissipativity-based control law that was designed for the unperturbed GRNs with time delays. The switched GRNs are switched from one mode to another based on time, state, etc. Although, the active subsystem is known in any instance, but the switching law and the transition probabilities are not known. The model for each mode is considered affine with matched and unmatched perturbations. The redesigned control law forces the GRN to always remain on the sliding surface and the dissipativity is maintained from the initial time in the presence of the norm-bounded perturbations. The global stability of the perturbed GRNs is maintained if the unperturbed model is globally dissipative. The designed control law for the perturbed GRNs guarantees robust exponential or asymptotic stability of the closed-loop network depending on the type of stability of the unperturbed model. The results are applied to a nonlinear switched GRN, and its convergence to the origin is verified by simulation.

  1. The fatigue life prediction of aluminium alloy using genetic algorithm and neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susmikanti, Mike

    2013-09-01

    The behavior of the fatigue life of the industrial materials is very important. In many cases, the material with experiencing fatigue life cannot be avoided, however, there are many ways to control their behavior. Many investigations of the fatigue life phenomena of alloys have been done, but it is high cost and times consuming computation. This paper report the modeling and simulation approaches to predict the fatigue life behavior of Aluminum Alloys and resolves some problems of computation. First, the simulation using genetic algorithm was utilized to optimize the load to obtain the stress values. These results can be used to provide N-cycle fatigue life of the material. Furthermore, the experimental data was applied as input data in the neural network learning, while the samples data were applied for testing of the training data. Finally, the multilayer perceptron algorithm is applied to predict whether the given data sets in accordance with the fatigue life of the alloy. To achieve rapid convergence, the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm was also employed. The simulations results shows that the fatigue behaviors of aluminum under pressure can be predicted. In addition, implementation of neural networks successfully identified a model for material fatigue life.

  2. Computer aided decision making for heart disease detection using hybrid neural network-Genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Arabasadi, Zeinab; Alizadehsani, Roohallah; Roshanzamir, Mohamad; Moosaei, Hossein; Yarifard, Ali Asghar

    2017-04-01

    Cardiovascular disease is one of the most rampant causes of death around the world and was deemed as a major illness in Middle and Old ages. Coronary artery disease, in particular, is a widespread cardiovascular malady entailing high mortality rates. Angiography is, more often than not, regarded as the best method for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease; on the other hand, it is associated with high costs and major side effects. Much research has, therefore, been conducted using machine learning and data mining so as to seek alternative modalities. Accordingly, we herein propose a highly accurate hybrid method for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease. As a matter of fact, the proposed method is able to increase the performance of neural network by approximately 10% through enhancing its initial weights using genetic algorithm which suggests better weights for neural network. Making use of such methodology, we achieved accuracy, sensitivity and specificity rates of 93.85%, 97% and 92% respectively, on Z-Alizadeh Sani dataset.

  3. Simulation and optimization of a pulsating heat pipe using artificial neural network and genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jokar, Ali; Godarzi, Ali Abbasi; Saber, Mohammad; Shafii, Mohammad Behshad

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, a novel approach has been presented to simulate and optimize the pulsating heat pipes (PHPs). The used pulsating heat pipe setup was designed and constructed for this study. Due to the lack of a general mathematical model for exact analysis of the PHPs, a method has been applied for simulation and optimization using the natural algorithms. In this way, the simulator consists of a kind of multilayer perceptron neural network, which is trained by experimental results obtained from our PHP setup. The results show that the complex behavior of PHPs can be successfully described by the non-linear structure of this simulator. The input variables of the neural network are input heat flux to evaporator (q″), filling ratio (FR) and inclined angle (IA) and its output is thermal resistance of PHP. Finally, based upon the simulation results and considering the heat pipe's operating constraints, the optimum operating point of the system is obtained by using genetic algorithm (GA). The experimental results show that the optimum FR (38.25 %), input heat flux to evaporator (39.93 W) and IA (55°) that obtained from GA are acceptable.

  4. A graph-based evolutionary algorithm: Genetic Network Programming (GNP) and its extension using reinforcement learning.

    PubMed

    Mabu, Shingo; Hirasawa, Kotaro; Hu, Jinglu

    2007-01-01

    This paper proposes a graph-based evolutionary algorithm called Genetic Network Programming (GNP). Our goal is to develop GNP, which can deal with dynamic environments efficiently and effectively, based on the distinguished expression ability of the graph (network) structure. The characteristics of GNP are as follows. 1) GNP programs are composed of a number of nodes which execute simple judgment/processing, and these nodes are connected by directed links to each other. 2) The graph structure enables GNP to re-use nodes, thus the structure can be very compact. 3) The node transition of GNP is executed according to its node connections without any terminal nodes, thus the past history of the node transition affects the current node to be used and this characteristic works as an implicit memory function. These structural characteristics are useful for dealing with dynamic environments. Furthermore, we propose an extended algorithm, "GNP with Reinforcement Learning (GNPRL)" which combines evolution and reinforcement learning in order to create effective graph structures and obtain better results in dynamic environments. In this paper, we applied GNP to the problem of determining agents' behavior to evaluate its effectiveness. Tileworld was used as the simulation environment. The results show some advantages for GNP over conventional methods.

  5. Genetic algorithm for the optimization of features and neural networks in ECG signals classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongqiang; Yuan, Danyang; Ma, Xiangdong; Cui, Dianyin; Cao, Lu

    2017-01-01

    Feature extraction and classification of electrocardiogram (ECG) signals are necessary for the automatic diagnosis of cardiac diseases. In this study, a novel method based on genetic algorithm-back propagation neural network (GA-BPNN) for classifying ECG signals with feature extraction using wavelet packet decomposition (WPD) is proposed. WPD combined with the statistical method is utilized to extract the effective features of ECG signals. The statistical features of the wavelet packet coefficients are calculated as the feature sets. GA is employed to decrease the dimensions of the feature sets and to optimize the weights and biases of the back propagation neural network (BPNN). Thereafter, the optimized BPNN classifier is applied to classify six types of ECG signals. In addition, an experimental platform is constructed for ECG signal acquisition to supply the ECG data for verifying the effectiveness of the proposed method. The GA-BPNN method with the MIT-BIH arrhythmia database achieved a dimension reduction of nearly 50% and produced good classification results with an accuracy of 97.78%. The experimental results based on the established acquisition platform indicated that the GA-BPNN method achieved a high classification accuracy of 99.33% and could be efficiently applied in the automatic identification of cardiac arrhythmias.

  6. Optimal Sensor Placement for Leak Location in Water Distribution Networks Using Genetic Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Casillas, Myrna V.; Puig, Vicenç; Garza-Castañón, Luis E.; Rosich, Albert

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a new sensor placement approach for leak location in water distribution networks (WDNs). The sensor placement problem is formulated as an integer optimization problem. The optimization criterion consists in minimizing the number of non-isolable leaks according to the isolability criteria introduced. Because of the large size and non-linear integer nature of the resulting optimization problem, genetic algorithms (GAs) are used as the solution approach. The obtained results are compared with a semi-exhaustive search method with higher computational effort, proving that GA allows one to find near-optimal solutions with less computational load. Moreover, three ways of increasing the robustness of the GA-based sensor placement method have been proposed using a time horizon analysis, a distance-based scoring and considering different leaks sizes. A great advantage of the proposed methodology is that it does not depend on the isolation method chosen by the user, as long as it is based on leak sensitivity analysis. Experiments in two networks allow us to evaluate the performance of the proposed approach. PMID:24193099

  7. Genetic algorithm for the optimization of features and neural networks in ECG signals classification

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongqiang; Yuan, Danyang; Ma, Xiangdong; Cui, Dianyin; Cao, Lu

    2017-01-01

    Feature extraction and classification of electrocardiogram (ECG) signals are necessary for the automatic diagnosis of cardiac diseases. In this study, a novel method based on genetic algorithm-back propagation neural network (GA-BPNN) for classifying ECG signals with feature extraction using wavelet packet decomposition (WPD) is proposed. WPD combined with the statistical method is utilized to extract the effective features of ECG signals. The statistical features of the wavelet packet coefficients are calculated as the feature sets. GA is employed to decrease the dimensions of the feature sets and to optimize the weights and biases of the back propagation neural network (BPNN). Thereafter, the optimized BPNN classifier is applied to classify six types of ECG signals. In addition, an experimental platform is constructed for ECG signal acquisition to supply the ECG data for verifying the effectiveness of the proposed method. The GA-BPNN method with the MIT-BIH arrhythmia database achieved a dimension reduction of nearly 50% and produced good classification results with an accuracy of 97.78%. The experimental results based on the established acquisition platform indicated that the GA-BPNN method achieved a high classification accuracy of 99.33% and could be efficiently applied in the automatic identification of cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:28139677

  8. Golden ratio genetic algorithm based approach for modelling and analysis of the capacity expansion of urban road traffic network.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lun; Zhang, Meng; Yang, Wenchen; Dong, Decun

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the modelling and analysis of the capacity expansion of urban road traffic network (ICURTN). Thebilevel programming model is first employed to model the ICURTN, in which the utility of the entire network is maximized with the optimal utility of travelers' route choice. Then, an improved hybrid genetic algorithm integrated with golden ratio (HGAGR) is developed to enhance the local search of simple genetic algorithms, and the proposed capacity expansion model is solved by the combination of the HGAGR and the Frank-Wolfe algorithm. Taking the traditional one-way network and bidirectional network as the study case, three numerical calculations are conducted to validate the presented model and algorithm, and the primary influencing factors on extended capacity model are analyzed. The calculation results indicate that capacity expansion of road network is an effective measure to enlarge the capacity of urban road network, especially on the condition of limited construction budget; the average computation time of the HGAGR is 122 seconds, which meets the real-time demand in the evaluation of the road network capacity.

  9. Fuzzy Logic, Neural Networks, Genetic Algorithms: Views of Three Artificial Intelligence Concepts Used in Modeling Scientific Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sunal, Cynthia Szymanski; Karr, Charles L.; Sunal, Dennis W.

    2003-01-01

    Students' conceptions of three major artificial intelligence concepts used in the modeling of systems in science, fuzzy logic, neural networks, and genetic algorithms were investigated before and after a higher education science course. Students initially explored their prior ideas related to the three concepts through active tasks. Then,…

  10. Genetics and Gene Expression Involving Stress and Distress Pathways in Fibromyalgia with and without Comorbid Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Light, Kathleen C.; White, Andrea T.; Tadler, Scott; Iacob, Eli; Light, Alan R.

    2012-01-01

    In complex multisymptom disorders like fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) that are defined primarily by subjective symptoms, genetic and gene expression profiles can provide very useful objective information. This paper summarizes research on genes that may be linked to increased susceptibility in developing and maintaining these disorders, and research on resting and stressor-evoked changes in leukocyte gene expression, highlighting physiological pathways linked to stress and distress. These include the adrenergic nervous system, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and serotonergic pathways, and exercise responsive metabolite-detecting ion channels. The findings to date provide some support for both inherited susceptibility and/or physiological dysregulation in all three systems, particularly for catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) genes, the glucocorticoid and the related mineralocorticoid receptors (NR3C1, NR3C2), and the purinergic 2X4 (P2X4) ion channel involved as a sensory receptor for muscle pain and fatigue and also in upregulation of spinal microglia in chronic pain models. Methodological concerns for future research, including potential influences of comorbid clinical depression and antidepressants and other medications, on gene expression are also addressed. PMID:22110941

  11. Bayesian state space models for dynamic genetic network construction across multiple tissues.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yulan; Kelemen, Arpad

    2016-08-01

    Construction of gene-gene interaction networks and potential pathways is a challenging and important problem in genomic research for complex diseases while estimating the dynamic changes of the temporal correlations and non-stationarity are the keys in this process. In this paper, we develop dynamic state space models with hierarchical Bayesian settings to tackle this challenge for inferring the dynamic profiles and genetic networks associated with disease treatments. We treat both the stochastic transition matrix and the observation matrix time-variant and include temporal correlation structures in the covariance matrix estimations in the multivariate Bayesian state space models. The unevenly spaced short time courses with unseen time points are treated as hidden state variables. Hierarchical Bayesian approaches with various prior and hyper-prior models with Monte Carlo Markov Chain and Gibbs sampling algorithms are used to estimate the model parameters and the hidden state variables. We apply the proposed Hierarchical Bayesian state space models to multiple tissues (liver, skeletal muscle, and kidney) Affymetrix time course data sets following corticosteroid (CS) drug administration. Both simulation and real data analysis results show that the genomic changes over time and gene-gene interaction in response to CS treatment can be well captured by the proposed models. The proposed dynamic Hierarchical Bayesian state space modeling approaches could be expanded and applied to other large scale genomic data, such as next generation sequence (NGS) combined with real time and time varying electronic health record (EHR) for more comprehensive and robust systematic and network based analysis in order to transform big biomedical data into predictions and diagnostics for precision medicine and personalized healthcare with better decision making and patient outcomes.

  12. A hybrid neural networks-fuzzy logic-genetic algorithm for grade estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahmasebi, Pejman; Hezarkhani, Ardeshir

    2012-05-01

    The grade estimation is a quite important and money/time-consuming stage in a mine project, which is considered as a challenge for the geologists and mining engineers due to the structural complexities in mineral ore deposits. To overcome this problem, several artificial intelligence techniques such as Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) and Fuzzy Logic (FL) have recently been employed with various architectures and properties. However, due to the constraints of both methods, they yield the desired results only under the specific circumstances. As an example, one major problem in FL is the difficulty of constructing the membership functions (MFs).Other problems such as architecture and local minima could also be located in ANN designing. Therefore, a new methodology is presented in this paper for grade estimation. This method which is based on ANN and FL is called "Coactive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System" (CANFIS) which combines two approaches, ANN and FL. The combination of these two artificial intelligence approaches is achieved via the verbal and numerical power of intelligent systems. To improve the performance of this system, a Genetic Algorithm (GA) - as a well-known technique to solve the complex optimization problems - is also employed to optimize the network parameters including learning rate, momentum of the network and the number of MFs for each input. A comparison of these techniques (ANN, Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System or ANFIS) with this new method (CANFIS-GA) is also carried out through a case study in Sungun copper deposit, located in East-Azerbaijan, Iran. The results show that CANFIS-GA could be a faster and more accurate alternative to the existing time-consuming methodologies for ore grade estimation and that is, therefore, suggested to be applied for grade estimation in similar problems.

  13. A hybrid neural networks-fuzzy logic-genetic algorithm for grade estimation

    PubMed Central

    Tahmasebi, Pejman; Hezarkhani, Ardeshir

    2012-01-01

    The grade estimation is a quite important and money/time-consuming stage in a mine project, which is considered as a challenge for the geologists and mining engineers due to the structural complexities in mineral ore deposits. To overcome this problem, several artificial intelligence techniques such as Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) and Fuzzy Logic (FL) have recently been employed with various architectures and properties. However, due to the constraints of both methods, they yield the desired results only under the specific circumstances. As an example, one major problem in FL is the difficulty of constructing the membership functions (MFs).Other problems such as architecture and local minima could also be located in ANN designing. Therefore, a new methodology is presented in this paper for grade estimation. This method which is based on ANN and FL is called “Coactive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System” (CANFIS) which combines two approaches, ANN and FL. The combination of these two artificial intelligence approaches is achieved via the verbal and numerical power of intelligent systems. To improve the performance of this system, a Genetic Algorithm (GA) – as a well-known technique to solve the complex optimization problems – is also employed to optimize the network parameters including learning rate, momentum of the network and the number of MFs for each input. A comparison of these techniques (ANN, Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System or ANFIS) with this new method (CANFIS–GA) is also carried out through a case study in Sungun copper deposit, located in East-Azerbaijan, Iran. The results show that CANFIS–GA could be a faster and more accurate alternative to the existing time-consuming methodologies for ore grade estimation and that is, therefore, suggested to be applied for grade estimation in similar problems. PMID:25540468

  14. Topology of genetic associations between regional gray matter volume and intellectual ability: Evidence for a high capacity network.

    PubMed

    Bohlken, Marc M; Brouwer, Rachel M; Mandl, René C W; Hedman, Anna M; van den Heuvel, Martijn P; van Haren, Neeltje E M; Kahn, René S; Pol, Hilleke E Hulshoff

    2016-01-01

    Intelligence is associated with a network of distributed gray matter areas including the frontal and parietal higher association cortices and primary processing areas of the temporal and occipital lobes. Efficient information transfer between gray matter regions implicated in intelligence is thought to be critical for this trait to emerge. Genetic factors implicated in intelligence and gray matter may promote a high capacity for information transfer. Whether these genetic factors act globally or on local gray matter areas separately is not known. Brain maps of phenotypic and genetic associations between gray matter volume and intelligence were made using structural equation modeling of 3T MRI T1-weighted scans acquired in 167 adult twins of the newly acquired U-TWIN cohort. Subsequently, structural connectivity analyses (DTI) were performed to test the hypothesis that gray matter regions associated with intellectual ability form a densely connected core. Gray matter regions associated with intellectual ability were situated in the right prefrontal, bilateral temporal, bilateral parietal, right occipital and subcortical regions. Regions implicated in intelligence had high structural connectivity density compared to 10,000 reference networks (p=0.031). The genetic association with intelligence was for 39% explained by a genetic source unique to these regions (independent of total brain volume), this source specifically implicated the right supramarginal gyrus. Using a twin design, we show that intelligence is genetically represented in a spatially distributed and densely connected network of gray matter regions providing a high capacity infrastructure. Although genes for intelligence have overlap with those for total brain volume, we present evidence that there are genes for intelligence that act specifically on the subset of brain areas that form an efficient brain network.

  15. Neonatal Odor-Shock Conditioning Alters the Neural Network Involved in Odor Fear Learning at Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sevelinges, Yannick; Sullivan, Regina M.; Messaoudi, Belkacem; Mouly, Anne-Marie

    2008-01-01

    Adult learning and memory functions are strongly dependent on neonatal experiences. We recently showed that neonatal odor-shock learning attenuates later life odor fear conditioning and amygdala activity. In the present work we investigated whether changes observed in adults can also be observed in other structures normally involved, namely…

  16. Neural networks involved in learning lexical-semantic and syntactic information in a second language.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Jutta L; Rueschemeyer, Shirley-Ann; Ono, Kentaro; Sugiura, Motoaki; Sadato, Norihiro; Nakamura, Akinori

    2014-01-01

    The present study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate the neural correlates of language acquisition in a realistic learning environment. Japanese native speakers were trained in a miniature version of German prior to fMRI scanning. During scanning they listened to (1) familiar sentences, (2) sentences including a novel sentence structure, and (3) sentences containing a novel word while visual context provided referential information. Learning-related decreases of brain activation over time were found in a mainly left-hemispheric network comprising classical frontal and temporal language areas as well as parietal and subcortical regions and were largely overlapping for novel words and the novel sentence structure in initial stages of learning. Differences occurred at later stages of learning during which content-specific activation patterns in prefrontal, parietal and temporal cortices emerged. The results are taken as evidence for a domain-general network supporting the initial stages of language learning which dynamically adapts as learners become proficient.

  17. Neural networks involved in learning lexical-semantic and syntactic information in a second language

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Jutta L.; Rueschemeyer, Shirley-Ann; Ono, Kentaro; Sugiura, Motoaki; Sadato, Norihiro; Nakamura, Akinori

    2014-01-01

    The present study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate the neural correlates of language acquisition in a realistic learning environment. Japanese native speakers were trained in a miniature version of German prior to fMRI scanning. During scanning they listened to (1) familiar sentences, (2) sentences including a novel sentence structure, and (3) sentences containing a novel word while visual context provided referential information. Learning-related decreases of brain activation over time were found in a mainly left-hemispheric network comprising classical frontal and temporal language areas as well as parietal and subcortical regions and were largely overlapping for novel words and the novel sentence structure in initial stages of learning. Differences occurred at later stages of learning during which content-specific activation patterns in prefrontal, parietal and temporal cortices emerged. The results are taken as evidence for a domain-general network supporting the initial stages of language learning which dynamically adapts as learners become proficient. PMID:25400602

  18. Protective Autoimmunity: A Unifying Model for the Immune Network Involved in CNS Repair.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Michal; Raposo, Catarina

    2014-08-01

    Immune activity in the CNS parenchyma under various acute and chronic neurodegenerative conditions has been often interpreted as a sign of pathological inflammation. The apparent resemblance of the local neuroinflammatory processes to autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis (MS), generated the view that, despite differences in etiology and pathology, neurodegenerative disorders with a local inflammatory component can benefit from systemic anti-inflammatory therapy. In addition, as CNS self-reactive T cells are associated with the etiology of MS, autoimmunity was assumed to solely reflect pathology, and therefore, was universally linked to autoimmune disease. Yet, it is becoming increasingly clear that CNS-specific T cells, along with circulating and local innate immune cells, can enhance CNS healing processes following non-infectious injuries, or any deviation from homeostasis, including chronic pathological conditions. Here, we discuss the theory of "protective autoimmunity," which describes the activity of an immune cell network encompassing effector and regulatory T cells with specificity for CNS antigens, in CNS maintenance and repair. Such an immune network, evoked in response to external and internal threats, functions in a tightly regulated way, ensuring restoration of the brain's equilibrium and return to homeostasis.

  19. Fine-scale population structure and riverscape genetics of brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) distributed continuously along headwater channel networks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kanno, Yoichiro; Vokoun, Jason C.; Letcher, Benjamin H.

    2011-01-01

    Linear and heterogeneous habitat makes headwater stream networks an ideal ecosystem in which to test the influence of environmental factors on spatial genetic patterns of obligatory aquatic species. We investigated fine-scale population structure and influence of stream habitat on individual-level genetic differentiation in brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) by genotyping eight microsatellite loci in 740 individuals in two headwater channel networks (7.7 and 4.4 km) in Connecticut, USA. A weak but statistically significant isolation-by-distance pattern was common in both sites. In the field, many tagged individuals were recaptured in the same 50-m reaches within a single field season (summer to fall). One study site was characterized with a hierarchical population structure, where seasonal barriers (natural falls of 1.5–2.5 m in height during summer base-flow condition) greatly reduced gene flow and perceptible spatial patterns emerged because of the presence of tributaries, each with a group of genetically distinguishable individuals. Genetic differentiation increased when pairs of individuals were separated by high stream gradient (steep channel slope) or warm stream temperature in this site, although the evidence of their influence was equivocal. In a second site, evidence for genetic clusters was weak at best, but genetic differentiation between individuals was positively correlated with number of tributary confluences. We concluded that the population-level movement of brook trout was limited in the study headwater stream networks, resulting in the fine-scale population structure (genetic clusters and clines) even at distances of a few kilometres, and gene flow was mitigated by ‘riverscape’ variables, particularly by physical barriers, waterway distance (i.e. isolation-by-distance) and the presence of tributaries.

  20. Genetic architecture of wood properties based on association analysis and co-expression networks in white spruce.

    PubMed

    Lamara, Mebarek; Raherison, Elie; Lenz, Patrick; Beaulieu, Jean; Bousquet, Jean; MacKay, John

    2016-04-01

    Association studies are widely utilized to analyze complex traits but their ability to disclose genetic architectures is often limited by statistical constraints, and functional insights are usually minimal in nonmodel organisms like forest trees. We developed an approach to integrate association mapping results with co-expression networks. We tested single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 2652 candidate genes for statistical associations with wood density, stiffness, microfibril angle and ring width in a population of 1694 white spruce trees (Picea glauca). Associations mapping identified 229-292 genes per wood trait using a statistical significance level of P < 0.05 to maximize discovery. Over-representation of genes associated for nearly all traits was found in a xylem preferential co-expression group developed in independent experiments. A xylem co-expression network was reconstructed with 180 wood associated genes and several known MYB and NAC regulators were identified as network hubs. The network revealed a link between the gene PgNAC8, wood stiffness and microfibril angle, as well as considerable within-season variation for both genetic control of wood traits and gene expression. Trait associations were distributed throughout the network suggesting complex interactions and pleiotropic effects. Our findings indicate that integration of association mapping and co-expression networks enhances our understanding of complex wood traits.

  1. The rural-urban effect on spatial genetic structure of type II Toxoplasma gondii strains involved in human congenital toxoplasmosis, France, 2002-2009.

    PubMed

    Ajzenberg, Daniel; Collinet, Frédéric; Aubert, Dominique; Villena, Isabelle; Dardé, Marie-Laure; Devillard, Sébastien

    2015-12-01

    Congenital toxoplasmosis involves Toxoplasma gondii type II strains in 95% of cases in France. We used spatial principal component analysis (sPCA) and 15 microsatellite markers to investigate the spatial genetic structure of type II strains involved in 240 cases of congenital toxoplasmosis in France from 2002 through 2009. Mailing addresses of patients were geo-referenced a posteriori in decimal degrees and categorized into urban or rural areas of residence. No spatial genetic structure was found for type II strains that infected mothers who were living in urban areas, but a global spatial genetic structure was found for those that infected mothers who were living in a rural environment. Our results suggest that sources of infection by T. gondii are different in rural and urban areas in France, and advocate for targeted messages in the prevention of toxoplasmosis according to the type of residence of susceptible people.

  2. Network Biomarkers of Bladder Cancer Based on a Genome-Wide Genetic and Epigenetic Network Derived from Next-Generation Sequencing Data

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cheng-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic and microRNA (miRNA) regulation are associated with carcinogenesis and the development of cancer. By using the available omics data, including those from next-generation sequencing (NGS), genome-wide methylation profiling, candidate integrated genetic and epigenetic network (IGEN) analysis, and drug response genome-wide microarray analysis, we constructed an IGEN system based on three coupling regression models that characterize protein-protein interaction networks (PPINs), gene regulatory networks (GRNs), miRNA regulatory networks (MRNs), and epigenetic regulatory networks (ERNs). By applying system identification method and principal genome-wide network projection (PGNP) to IGEN analysis, we identified the core network biomarkers to investigate bladder carcinogenic mechanisms and design multiple drug combinations for treating bladder cancer with minimal side-effects. The progression of DNA repair and cell proliferation in stage 1 bladder cancer ultimately results not only in the derepression of miR-200a and miR-200b but also in the regulation of the TNF pathway to metastasis-related genes or proteins, cell proliferation, and DNA repair in stage 4 bladder cancer. We designed a multiple drug combination comprising gefitinib, estradiol, yohimbine, and fulvestrant for treating stage 1 bladder cancer with minimal side-effects, and another multiple drug combination comprising gefitinib, estradiol, chlorpromazine, and LY294002 for treating stage 4 bladder cancer with minimal side-effects. PMID:27034531

  3. Importance of input perturbations and stochastic gene expression in the reverse engineering of genetic regulatory networks: insights from an identifiability analysis of an in silico network.

    PubMed

    Zak, Daniel E; Gonye, Gregory E; Schwaber, James S; Doyle, Francis J

    2003-11-01

    Gene expression profiles are an increasingly common data source that can yield insights into the functions of cells at a system-wide level. The present work considers the limitations in information content of gene expression data for reverse engineering regulatory networks. An in silico genetic regulatory network was constructed for this purpose. Using the in silico network, a formal identifiability analysis was performed that considered the accuracy with which the parameters in the network could be estimated using gene expression data and prior structural knowledge (which transcription factors regulate which genes) as a function of the input perturbation and stochastic gene expression. The analysis yielded experimentally relevant results. It was observed that, in addition to prior structural knowledge, prior knowledge of kinetic parameters, particularly mRNA degradation rate constants, was necessary for the network to be identifiable. Also, with the exception of cases where the noise due to stochastic gene expression was high, complex perturbations were more favorable for identifying the network than simple ones. Although the results may be specific to the network considered, the present study provides a framework for posing similar questions in other systems.

  4. The integration of citizens into a science/policy network in genetics: governance arrangements and asymmetry in expertise.

    PubMed

    Daudelin, Geneviève; Lehoux, Pascale; Abelson, Julia; Denis, Jean L

    2011-09-01

    OBJECTIVE While there are increasing calls for public input into health research and policy, the actual obtaining of such input faces many challenges in practice. This article examines how a Canadian science/policy network in the field of genetics integrated citizens into its structure and then managed their participation. METHODS Our ethnographic case study covers a 5-year period (2003-08) and combines four data sources: observations of the network's meetings and informal activities, debriefing sessions with the network's leaders, semi-structured interviews with network members (n = 20) and document analysis. RESULTS When setting up the network, the leaders wanted to include a range of perspectives (research, clinical and policy) to increase the relevance of their research production and knowledge-transfer activities. After 2 years of operation, the network's members agreed to also include citizens who were not knowledgeable in genetics and policy issues. As neither the structure nor the dynamics of the network were modified, the citizens very soon started to feel uncomfortable with their role. They doubted the relevance of their contribution, pointing to an asymmetry in knowledge between them and the expert members. There were significant tensions in the network's governance and the citizens' concerns during the process were not fully addressed. CONCLUSION The integration of citizens into transdisciplinary networks requires recognizing and addressing the asymmetry of expertise that underpins such a collaborative endeavour. It also requires understanding that citizens may feel uncomfortable adopting the pre-defined role ascribed to them, may need a space of their own or may even withdraw if they feel being used.

  5. Research network involvement and addiction treatment center staff: counselor attitudes toward buprenorphine.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Hannah K; Ducharme, Lori J; Roman, Paul M

    2007-01-01

    The National Institute on Drug Abuse's Clinical Trials Network (CTN) aims to improve addiction treatment in the United States in part through technology transfer. Given the importance of clinicians in the technology transfer process, this research compares 561 CTN-affiliated and 1,745 non-CTN counselors' ratings of buprenorphine acceptability. CTN-affiliated counselors reported significantly greater acceptability than non-CTN counselors. This difference was not explained by controlling for counselor characteristics, but was completely attenuated by measures of buprenorphine-specific training and buprenorphine implementation. These data suggest that the CTN's impact on counselor attitudes may be attributed to the greater exposure to buprenorphine received by CTN-affiliated counselors.

  6. Serotonin modulates the cytokine network in the lung: involvement of prostaglandin E2

    PubMed Central

    Ménard, G; Turmel, V; Bissonnette, E Y

    2007-01-01

    Serotonin, well known for its role in depression, has been shown to modulate immune responses. Interestingly, the plasma level of serotonin is increased in symptomatic asthmatic patients and the use of anti-depressants, known to reduce serotonin levels, provokes a decrease in asthma symptoms and an increase in pulmonary function. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that serotonin affects alveolar macrophage (AM) cytokine production, altering the cytokine network in the lung and contributing to asthma pathogenesis. AMs were treated with different concentrations of serotonin (10-11−10-9 M) or 5-HT1 and 5-HT2 receptor agonists for 2 h prior stimulation. T helper 1 (Th1) and Th2 cytokines, prostaglandin-E2 (PGE2) and nitric oxide (NO) were measured in cell-free supernatants. Serotonin significantly inhibited the production of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin (IL)-12, whereas IL-10, NO and PGE2 production were increased. These immunomodulatory effects of serotonin were mimicked by 5-HT2 receptor agonist but were not abrogated by 5-HT2 receptor antagonist, suggesting the implication of other 5-HT receptors. Inhibitors of cyclooxygenase and antibody to PGE2 abrogated the inhibitory and stimulatory effect of serotonin on TNF and IL-10 production, respectively, whereas NO synthase inhibitor eliminated serotonin-stimulated IL-10 increase. Furthermore, PGE2 significantly increased AM IL-10 and NO production. These results suggest that serotonin alters the cytokine network in the lung through the production of PGE2. The reduction of Th1-type cytokine by serotonin may contribute to asthma pathogenesis. PMID:17822443

  7. Increased functional connectivity with puberty in the mentalising network involved in social emotion processing

    PubMed Central

    Klapwijk, Eduard T.; Goddings, Anne-Lise; Heyes, Stephanie Burnett; Bird, Geoffrey; Viner, Russell M.; Blakemore, Sarah-Jayne

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that puberty plays an important role in the structural and functional brain development seen in adolescence, but little is known of the pubertal influence on changes in functional connectivity. We explored how pubertal indicators (salivary concentrations of testosterone, oestradiol and DHEA; pubertal stage; menarcheal status) relate to functional connectivity between components of a mentalising network identified to be engaged in social emotion processing by our prior work, using psychophysiological interaction (PPI) analysis. Female adolescents aged 11 to 13 years were scanned whilst silently reading scenarios designed to evoke either social emotions (guilt and embarrassment) or basic emotions (disgust and fear), of which only social compared to basic emotions require the representation of another person’s mental states. Pubertal stage and menarcheal status were used to assign participants to pre/early or mid/late puberty groups. We found increased functional connectivity between the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (DMPFC) and the right posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) and right temporo-parietal junction (TPJ) during social relative to basic emotion processing. Moreover, increasing oestradiol concentrations were associated with increased functional connectivity between the DMPFC and the right TPJ during social relative to basic emotion processing, independent of age. Our analysis of the PPI data by phenotypic pubertal status showed that more advanced puberty stage was associated with enhanced functional connectivity between the DMPFC and the left anterior temporal cortex (ATC) during social relative to basic emotion processing, also independent of age. Our results suggest increased functional maturation of the social brain network with the advancement of puberty in girls. PMID:23998674

  8. Increased functional connectivity with puberty in the mentalising network involved in social emotion processing.

    PubMed

    Klapwijk, Eduard T; Goddings, Anne-Lise; Burnett Heyes, Stephanie; Bird, Geoffrey; Viner, Russell M; Blakemore, Sarah-Jayne

    2013-07-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Puberty and Adolescence". There is increasing evidence that puberty plays an important role in the structural and functional brain development seen in adolescence, but little is known of the pubertal influence on changes in functional connectivity. We explored how pubertal indicators (salivary concentrations of testosterone, oestradiol and DHEA; pubertal stage; menarcheal status) relate to functional connectivity between components of a mentalising network identified to be engaged in social emotion processing by our prior work, using psychophysiological interaction (PPI) analysis. Female adolescents aged 11 to 13years were scanned whilst silently reading scenarios designed to evoke either social emotions (guilt and embarrassment) or basic emotions (disgust and fear), of which only social compared to basic emotions require the representation of another person's mental states. Pubertal stage and menarcheal status were used to assign participants to pre/early or mid/late puberty groups. We found increased functional connectivity between the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (DMPFC) and the right posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) and right temporo-parietal junction (TPJ) during social relative to basic emotion processing. Moreover, increasing oestradiol concentrations were associated with increased functional connectivity between the DMPFC and the right TPJ during social relative to basic emotion processing, independent of age. Our analysis of the PPI data by phenotypic pubertal status showed that more advanced puberty stage was associated with enhanced functional connectivity between the DMPFC and the left anterior temporal cortex (ATC) during social relative to basic emotion processing, also independent of age. Our results suggest increased functional maturation of the social brain network with the advancement of puberty in girls.

  9. MP-GeneticSynth: inferring biological network regulations from time series.

    PubMed

    Castellini, Alberto; Paltrinieri, Daniele; Manca, Vincenzo

    2015-03-01

    MP-GeneticSynth is a Java tool for discovering the logic and regulation mechanisms responsible for observed biological dynamics in terms of finite difference recurrent equations. The software makes use of: (i) metabolic P systems as a modeling framework, (ii) an evolutionary approach to discover flux regulation functions as linear combinations of given primitive functions, (iii) a suitable reformulation of the least squares method to estimate function parameters considering simultaneously all the reactions involved in complex dynamics. The tool is available as a plugin for the virtual laboratory MetaPlab. It has graphical and interactive interfaces for data preparation, a priori knowledge integration, and flux regulator analysis. Availability and implementation: Source code, binaries, documentation (including quick start guide and videos) and case studies are freely available at http://mplab.sci.univr.it/plugins/mpgs/index.html.

  10. Modulation of monoamine oxidase (MAO) expression in neuropsychiatric disorders: genetic and environmental factors involved in type A MAO expression.

    PubMed

    Naoi, Makoto; Riederer, Peter; Maruyama, Wakako

    2016-02-01

    -A activity may increase the levels of serotonin and norepinephrine, resulting in disturbed neurotransmitter system development and behavior. This review discusses genetic and environmental factors involved in the regulation of MAO-A expression, in the contexts of neuropsychiatric function and of the regulation of neuronal survival and death.

  11. Transcriptional coexpression network reveals the involvement of varying stem cell features with different dysregulations in different gastric cancer subtypes.

    PubMed

    Kalamohan, Kalaivani; Periasamy, Jayaprakash; Bhaskar Rao, Divya; Barnabas, Georgina D; Ponnaiyan, Srigayatri; Ganesan, Kumaresan

    2014-10-01

    Despite the advancements in the cancer therapeutics, gastric cancer ranks as the second most common cancers with high global mortality rate. Integrative functional genomic investigation is a powerful approach to understand the major dysregulations and to identify the potential targets toward the development of targeted therapeutics for various cancers. Intestinal and diffuse type gastric tumors remain the major subtypes and the molecular determinants and drivers of these distinct subtypes remain unidentified. In this investigation, by exploring the network of gene coexpression association in gastric tumors, mRNA expressions of 20,318 genes across 200 gastric tumors were categorized into 21 modules. The genes and the hub genes of the modules show gastric cancer subtype specific expression. The expression patterns of the modules were correlated with intestinal and diffuse subtypes as well as with the differentiation status of gastric tumors. Among these, G1 module has been identified as a major driving force of diffuse type gastric tumors with the features of (i) enriched mesenchymal, mesenchymal stem cell like, and mesenchymal derived multiple lineages, (ii) elevated OCT1 mediated transcription, (iii) involvement of Notch activation, and (iv) reduced polycomb mediated epigenetic repression. G13 module has been identified as key factor in intestinal type gastric tumors and found to have the characteristic features of (i) involvement of embryonic stem cell like properties, (ii) Wnt, MYC and E2F mediated transcription programs, and (iii) involvement of polycomb mediated repression. Thus the differential transcription programs, differential epigenetic regulation and varying stem cell features involved in two major subtypes of gastric cancer were delineated by exploring the gene coexpression network. The identified subtype specific dysregulations could be optimally employed in developing subtype specific therapeutic targeting strategies for gastric cancer.

  12. Optimisation of groundwater level monitoring networks using geostatistical modelling based on the Spartan family variogram and a genetic algorithm method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parasyris, Antonios E.; Spanoudaki, Katerina; Kampanis, Nikolaos A.

    2016-04-01

    Groundwater level monitoring networks provide essential information for water resources management, especially in areas with significant groundwater exploitation for agricultural and domestic use. Given the high maintenance costs of these networks, development of tools, which can be used by regulators for efficient network design is essential. In this work, a monitoring network optimisation tool is presented. The network optimisation tool couples geostatistical modelling based on the Spartan family variogram with a genetic algorithm method and is applied to Mires basin in Crete, Greece, an area of high socioeconomic and agricultural interest, which suffers from groundwater overexploitation leading to a dramatic decrease of groundwater levels. The purpose of the optimisation tool is to determine which wells to exclude from the monitoring network because they add little or no beneficial information to groundwater level mapping of the area. Unlike previous relevant investigations, the network optimisation tool presented here uses Ordinary Kriging with the recently-established non-differentiable Spartan variogram for groundwater level mapping, which, based on a previous geostatistical study in the area leads to optimal groundwater level mapping. Seventy boreholes operate in the area for groundwater abstraction and water level monitoring. The Spartan variogram gives overall the most accurate groundwater level estimates followed closely by the power-law model. The geostatistical model is coupled to an integer genetic algorithm method programmed in MATLAB 2015a. The algorithm is used to find the set of wells whose removal leads to the minimum error between the original water level mapping using all the available wells in the network and the groundwater level mapping using the reduced well network (error is defined as the 2-norm of the difference between the original mapping matrix with 70 wells and the mapping matrix of the reduced well network). The solution to the

  13. Genetic variation associated with circulating monocyte count in the eMERGE Network.

    PubMed

    Crosslin, David R; McDavid, Andrew; Weston, Noah; Zheng, Xiuwen; Hart, Eugene; de Andrade, Mariza; Kullo, Iftikhar J; McCarty, Catherine A; Doheny, Kimberly F; Pugh, Elizabeth; Kho, Abel; Hayes, M Geoffrey; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Saip, Alexander; Crawford, Dana C; Crane, Paul K; Newton, Katherine; Carrell, David S; Gallego, Carlos J; Nalls, Michael A; Li, Rongling; Mirel, Daniel B; Crenshaw, Andrew; Couper, David J; Tanaka, Toshiko; van Rooij, Frank J A; Chen, Ming-Huei; Smith, Albert V; Zakai, Neil A; Yango, Qiong; Garcia, Melissa; Liu, Yongmei; Lumley, Thomas; Folsom, Aaron R; Reiner, Alex P; Felix, Janine F; Dehghan, Abbas; Wilson, James G; Bis, Joshua C; Fox, Caroline S; Glazer, Nicole L; Cupples, L Adrienne; Coresh, Josef; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Bandinelli, Stefania; Frayling, Timothy M; Chakravarti, Aravinda; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Melzer, David; Levy, Daniel; Boerwinkle, Eric; Singleton, Andrew B; Hernandez, Dena G; Longo, Dan L; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Psaty, Bruce M; Ferrucci, Luigi; Harris, Tamara B; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Ganesh, Santhi K; Larson, Eric B; Carlson, Chris S; Jarvik, Gail P

    2013-05-15

    With white blood cell count emerging as an important risk factor for chronic inflammatory diseases, genetic associations of differential leukocyte types, specifically monocyte count, are providing novel candidate genes and pathways to further investigate. Circulating monocytes play a critical role in vascular diseases such as in the formation of atherosclerotic plaque. We performed a joint and ancestry-stratified genome-wide association analyses to identify variants specifically associated with monocyte count in 11 014 subjects in the electronic Medical Records and Genomics Network. In the joint and European ancestry samples, we identified novel associations in the chromosome 16 interferon regulatory factor 8 (IRF8) gene (P-value = 2.78×10(-16), β = -0.22). Other monocyte associations include novel missense variants in the chemokine-binding protein 2 (CCBP2) gene (P-value = 1.88×10(-7), β = 0.30) and a region of replication found in ribophorin I (RPN1) (P-value = 2.63×10(-16), β = -0.23) on chromosome 3. The CCBP2 and RPN1 region is located near GATA binding protein2 gene that has been previously shown to be associated with coronary heart disease. On chromosome 9, we found a novel association in the prostaglandin reductase 1 gene (P-value = 2.29×10(-7), β = 0.16), which is downstream from lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1. This region has previously been shown to be associated with monocyte count. We also replicated monocyte associations of genome-wide significance (P-value = 5.68×10(-17), β = -0.23) at the integrin, alpha 4 gene on chromosome 2. The novel IRF8 results and further replications provide supporting evidence of genetic regions associated with monocyte count.

  14. Brain networks involved in tactile speed classification of moving dot patterns: the effects of speed and dot periodicity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jiajia; Kitada, Ryo; Kochiyama, Takanori; Yu, Yinghua; Makita, Kai; Araki, Yuta; Wu, Jinglong; Sadato, Norihiro

    2017-01-01

    Humans are able to judge the speed of an object’s motion by touch. Research has suggested that tactile judgment of speed is influenced by physical properties of the moving object, though the neural mechanisms underlying this process remain poorly understood. In the present study, functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to investigate brain networks that may be involved in tactile speed classification and how such networks may be affected by an object’s texture. Participants were asked to classify the speed of 2-D raised dot patterns passing under their right middle finger. Activity in the parietal operculum, insula, and inferior and superior frontal gyri was positively related to the motion speed of dot patterns. Activity in the postcentral gyrus and superior parietal lobule was sensitive to dot periodicity. Psycho-physiological interaction (PPI) analysis revealed that dot periodicity modulated functional connectivity between the parietal operculum (related to speed) and postcentral gyrus (related to dot periodicity). These results suggest that texture-sensitive activity in the primary somatosensory cortex and superior parietal lobule influences brain networks associated with tactually-extracted motion speed. Such effects may be related to the influence of surface texture on tactile speed judgment. PMID:28145505

  15. EDENetworks: a user-friendly software to build and analyse networks in biogeography, ecology and population genetics.

    PubMed

    Kivelä, Mikko; Arnaud-Haond, Sophie; Saramäki, Jari

    2015-01-01

    The recent application of graph-based network theory analysis to biogeography, community ecology and population genetics has created a need for user-friendly software, which would allow a wider accessibility to and adaptation of these methods. EDENetworks aims to fill this void by providing an easy-to-use interface for the whole analysis pipeline of ecological and evolutionary networks starting from matrices of species distributions, genotypes, bacterial OTUs or populations characterized genetically. The user can choose between several different ecological distance metrics, such as Bray-Curtis or Sorensen distance, or population genetic metrics such as FST or Goldstein distances, to turn the raw data into a distance/dissimilarity matrix. This matrix is then transformed into a network by manual or automatic thresholding based on percolation theory or by building the minimum spanning tree. The networks can be visualized along with auxiliary data and analysed with various metrics such as degree, clustering coefficient, assortativity and betweenness centrality. The statistical significance of the results can be estimated either by resampling the original biological data or by null models based on permutations of the data.

  16. Integrative microRNA-gene expression network analysis in genetic hypercalciuric stone-forming rat kidney

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yuchao; Qin, Baolong; Hu, Henglong; Zhang, Jiaqiao; Wang, Yufeng; Wang, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Background. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) influence a variety of biological functions by regulating gene expression post-transcriptionally. Aberrant miRNA expression has been associated with many human diseases. Urolithiasis is a common disease, and idiopathic hypercalciuria (IH) is an important risk factor for calcium urolithiasis. However, miRNA expression patterns and their biological functions in urolithiasis remain unknown. Methods and Results. A multi-step approach combining microarray miRNA and mRNA expression profile and bioinformatics analysis was adopted to analyze dysregulated miRNAs and genes in genetic hypercalciuric stone-forming (GHS) rat kidneys, using normal Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats as controls. We identified 2418 mRNAs and 19 miRNAs as significantly differentially expressed, over 700 gene ontology (GO) terms and 83 KEGG pathways that were significantly enriched in GHS rats. In addition, we constructed an miRNA-gene network that suggested that rno-miR-674-5p, rno-miR-672-5p, rno-miR-138-5p and rno-miR-21-3p may play important roles in the regulatory network. Furthermore, signal-net analysis suggested that NF-kappa B likely plays a crucial role in hypercalciuria urolithiasis. Conclusions. This study presents a global view of mRNA and miRNA expression in GHS rat kidneys, and suggests that miRNAs may be important in the regulation of hypercalciuria. The data provide valuable insights for future research, which should aim at validating the role of the genes featured here in the pathophysiology of hypercalciuria. PMID:27069814

  17. A network centred on the inferior frontal cortex is critically involved in levodopa-induced dyskinesias.

    PubMed

    Cerasa, Antonio; Koch, Giacomo; Donzuso, Giulia; Mangone, Graziella; Morelli, Maurizio; Brusa, Livia; Stampanoni Bassi, Mario; Ponzo, Viviana; Picazio, Silvia; Passamonti, Luca; Salsone, Maria; Augimeri, Antonio; Caltagirone, Carlo; Quattrone, Aldo

    2015-02-01

    Levodopa-induced dyskinesias are disabling motor complications of long-term dopamine replacement in patients with Parkinson's disease. In recent years, several alternative models have been proposed to explain the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this hyperkinetic motor disorder. In particular, our group has shed new light on the role of the prefrontal cortex as a key site of interest, demonstrating that, among other areas, the inferior frontal cortex is particularly characterized by altered patterns of anatomical and functional changes. However, how neural activity varies depending on levodopa treatment in patients with dyskinesias and whether the reported prefrontal abnormalities may have a critical role in dyskinesias is debated. To answer these questions we performed independent functional magnetic resonance imaging and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation studies. In the first experiment we applied resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging on 12 patients with Parkinson's disease with levodopa-induced dyskinesias and 12 clinically matched patients without dyskinesias, before and after administration of levodopa. Functional connectivity of brain networks in the resting state was assessed in both groups. We chose the right inferior frontal cortex as the seed region given the evidence highlighting the role of this region in motor control. In a second experiment, we applied different forms of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over the right inferior frontal cortex in a new group of dyskinetic patients who were taking a supramaximal dose of levodopa, to verify the clinical relevance of this area in controlling the development of hyperkinetic movements. The resting state functional imaging analysis revealed that in patients with levodopa-induced dyskinesias connectivity of the right inferior frontal cortex was decreased with the left motor cortex and increased with the right putamen when compared to patients without levodopa

  18. Design of a broadband electrical impedance matching network for piezoelectric ultrasound transducers based on a genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    An, Jianfei; Song, Kezhu; Zhang, Shuangxi; Yang, Junfeng; Cao, Ping

    2014-04-16

    An improved method based on a genetic algorithm (GA) is developed to design a broadband electrical impedance matching network for piezoelectric ultrasound transducer. A key feature of the new method is that it can optimize both the topology of the matching network and perform optimization on the components. The main idea of this method is to find the optimal matching network in a set of candidate topologies. Some successful experiences of classical algorithms are absorbed to limit the size of the set of candidate topologies and greatly simplify the calculation process. Both binary-coded GA and real-coded GA are used for topology optimization and components optimization, respectively. Some calculation strategies, such as elitist strategy and clearing niche method, are adopted to make sure that the algorithm can converge to the global optimal result. Simulation and experimental results prove that matching networks with better performance might be achieved by this improved method.

  19. Genome-wide RNAi screen identifies networks involved in intestinal stem cell regulation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiankun; Han, Lili; Singh, Shree Ram; Liu, Hanhan; Neumüller, Ralph A; Yan, Dong; Hu, Yanhui; Liu, Ying; Liu, Wei; Lin, Xinhua; Hou, Steven X

    2015-02-24

    The intestinal epithelium is the most rapidly self-renewing tissue in adult animals and maintained by intestinal stem cells (ISCs) in both Drosophila and mammals. To comprehensively identify genes and pathways that regulate ISC fates, we performed a genome-wide transgenic RNAi screen in adult Drosophila intestine and identified 405 genes that regulate ISC maintenance and lineage-specific differentiation. By integrating these genes into publicly available interaction databases, we further developed functional networks that regulate ISC self-renewal, ISC proliferation, ISC maintenance of diploid status, ISC survival, ISC-to-enterocyte (EC) lineage differentiation, and ISC-to-enteroendocrine (EE) lineage differentiation. By comparing regulators among ISCs, female germline stem cells, and neural stem cells, we found that factors related to basic stem cell cellular processes are commonly required in all stem cells, and stem-cell-specific, niche-related signals are required only in the unique stem cell type. Our findings provide valuable insights into stem cell maintenance and lineage-specific differentiation.

  20. Hormonal networks involved in apical hook development in darkness and their response to light

    PubMed Central

    Mazzella, Maria A.; Casal, Jorge J.; Muschietti, Jorge P.; Fox, Ana R.

    2013-01-01

    In darkness, the dicot seedlings produce an apical hook as result of differential cell division and extension at opposite sides of the hypocotyl. This hook protects the apical meristem from mechanical damage during seedling emergence from the soil. In darkness, gibberellins act via the DELLA-PIF (PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTORs) pathway, and ethylene acts via the EIN3/EIL1 (ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE 3/EIN3 like 1)-HLS1 (HOOKLESS 1) pathway to control the asymmetric accumulation of auxin required for apical hook formation and maintenance. These core pathways form a network with multiple points of connection. Light perception by phytochromes and cryptochromes reduces the activity of PIFs and (COP1) CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 1—both required for hook formation in darkness—, lowers the levels of gibberellins, and triggers hook opening as a component of the switch between heterotrophic and photoautotrophic development. Apical hook opening is thus a suitable model to study the convergence of endogenous and exogenous signals on the control of cell division and cell growth. PMID:24616725

  1. Structure, function and networks of transcription factors involved in abiotic stress responses.

    PubMed

    Lindemose, Søren; O'Shea, Charlotte; Jensen, Michael Krogh; Skriver, Karen

    2013-03-13

    Transcription factors (TFs) are master regulators of abiotic stress responses in plants. This review focuses on TFs from seven major TF families, known to play functional roles in response to abiotic stresses, including drought, high salinity, high osmolarity, temperature extremes and the phytohormone ABA. Although ectopic expression of several TFs has improved abiotic stress tolerance in plants, fine-tuning of TF expression and protein levels remains a challenge to avoid crop yield loss. To further our understanding of TFs in abiotic stress responses, emerging gene regulatory networks based on TFs and their direct targets genes are presented. These revealed components shared between ABA-dependent and independent signaling as well as abiotic and biotic stress signaling. Protein structure analysis suggested that TFs hubs of large interactomes have extended regions with protein intrinsic disorder (ID), referring to their lack of fixed tertiary structures. ID is now an emerging topic in plant science. Furthermore, the importance of the ubiquitin-proteasome protein degradation systems and modification by sumoylation is also apparent from the interactomes. Therefore; TF interaction partners such as E3 ubiquitin ligases and TF regions with ID represent future targets for engineering improved abiotic stress tolerance in crops.

  2. Model-based action planning involves cortico-cerebellar and basal ganglia networks

    PubMed Central

    Fermin, Alan S. R.; Yoshida, Takehiko; Yoshimoto, Junichiro; Ito, Makoto; Tanaka, Saori C.; Doya, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Humans can select actions by learning, planning, or retrieving motor memories. Reinforcement Learning (RL) associates these processes with three major classes of strategies for action selection: exploratory RL learns state-action values by exploration, model-based RL uses internal models to simulate future states reached by hypothetical actions, and motor-memory RL selects past successful state-action mapping. In order to investigate the neural substrates that implement these strategies, we conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment while humans performed a sequential action selection task under conditions that promoted the use of a specific RL strategy. The ventromedial prefrontal cortex and ventral striatum increased activity in the exploratory condition; the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, dorsomedial striatum, and lateral cerebellum in the model-based condition; and the supplementary motor area, putamen, and anterior cerebellum in the motor-memory condition. These findings suggest that a distinct prefrontal-basal ganglia and cerebellar network implements the model-based RL action selection strategy. PMID:27539554

  3. Wiring a plant: genetic networks for phloem formation in Arabidopsis thaliana roots.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Villalon, Antia

    2016-04-01

    In plants, phloem conduits form a specialized vascular network mediating the exchange of nutrients and signaling molecules between distantly separated organs. To become effective transport elements, protophloem cells undergo a rather unique, differentiation program that involves nucleus degradation, organelle rearrangement and cell wall thickening. Yet, protophloem sieve elements remain alive because their essential metabolic functions are supported by their neighboring companion cells. In spite of the importance of the phloem, the molecular mechanisms orchestrating protophloem specification and differentiation remain still poorly understood. In this review, I provide a summary of recent discoveries regarding morphogenetic events that determine phloem formation, and also a discussion of the systemic effects on root architecture derived from impaired protophloem differentiation programs.

  4. Genetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Capsicum represents one of several well characterized Solanaceous genera. A wealth of classical and molecular genetics research is available for the genus. Information gleaned from its cultivated relatives, tomato and potato, provide further insight for basic and applied studies. Early ...

  5. Genetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maintaining genetic variation in wild populations of Arctic organisms is fundamental to the long-term persistence of high latitude biodiversity. Variability is important because it provides options for species to respond to changing environmental conditions and novel challenges such as emerging path...

  6. A neural-network-based exponential H∞ synchronisation for chaotic secure communication via improved genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Feng-Hsiag

    2016-10-01

    In this study, a novel approach via improved genetic algorithm (IGA)-based fuzzy observer is proposed to realise exponential optimal H∞ synchronisation and secure communication in multiple time-delay chaotic (MTDC) systems. First, an original message is inserted into the MTDC system. Then, a neural-network (NN) model is employed to approximate the MTDC system. Next, a linear differential inclusion (LDI) state-space representation is established for the dynamics of the NN model. Based on this LDI state-space representation, this study proposes a delay-dependent exponential stability criterion derived in terms of Lyapunov's direct method, thus ensuring that the trajectories of the slave system approach those of the master system. Subsequently, the stability condition of this criterion is reformulated into a linear matrix inequality (LMI). Due to GA's random global optimisation search capabilities, the lower and upper bounds of the search space can be set so that the GA will seek better fuzzy observer feedback gains, accelerating feedback gain-based synchronisation via the LMI-based approach. IGA, which exhibits better performance than traditional GA, is used to synthesise a fuzzy observer to not only realise the exponential synchronisation, but also achieve optimal H∞ performance by minimizing the disturbance attenuation level and recovering the transmitted message. Finally, a numerical example with simulations is given in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach.

  7. Feature Selection and Classification of Electroencephalographic Signals: An Artificial Neural Network and Genetic Algorithm Based Approach.

    PubMed

    Erguzel, Turker Tekin; Ozekes, Serhat; Tan, Oguz; Gultekin, Selahattin

    2015-10-01

    Feature selection is an important step in many pattern recognition systems aiming to overcome the so-called curse of dimensionality. In this study, an optimized classification method was tested in 147 patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) treated with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). The performance of the combination of a genetic algorithm (GA) and a back-propagation (BP) neural network (BPNN) was evaluated using 6-channel pre-rTMS electroencephalographic (EEG) patterns of theta and delta frequency bands. The GA was first used to eliminate the redundant and less discriminant features to maximize classification performance. The BPNN was then applied to test the performance of the feature subset. Finally, classification performance using the subset was evaluated using 6-fold cross-validation. Although the slow bands of the frontal electrodes are widely used to collect EEG data for patients with MDD and provide quite satisfactory classification results, the outcomes of the proposed approach indicate noticeably increased overall accuracy of 89.12% and an area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) of 0.904 using the reduced feature set.

  8. Functional Genomic Annotation of Genetic Risk Loci Highlights Inflammation and Epithelial Biology Networks in CKD

    PubMed Central

    Ledo, Nora; Ko, Yi-An; Park, Ae-Seo Deok; Kang, Hyun-Mi; Han, Sang-Youb; Choi, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified multiple loci associated with the risk of CKD. Almost all risk variants are localized to the noncoding region of the genome; therefore, the role of these variants in CKD development is largely unknown. We hypothesized that polymorphisms alter transcription factor binding, thereby influencing the expression of nearby genes. Here, we examined the regulation of transcripts in the vicinity of CKD-associated polymorphisms in control and diseased human kidney samples and used systems biology approaches to identify potentially causal genes for prioritization. We interrogated the expression and regulation of 226 transcripts in the vicinity of 44 single nucleotide polymorphisms using RNA sequencing and gene expression arrays from 95 microdissected control and diseased tubule samples and 51 glomerular samples. Gene expression analysis from 41 tubule samples served for external validation. 92 transcripts in the tubule compartment and 34 transcripts in glomeruli showed statistically significant correlation with eGFR. Many novel genes, including ACSM2A/2B, FAM47E, and PLXDC1, were identified. We observed that the expression of multiple genes in the vicinity of any single CKD risk allele correlated with renal function, potentially indicating that genetic variants influence multiple transcripts. Network analysis of GFR-correlating transcripts highlighted two major clusters; a positive correlation with epithelial and vascular functions and an inverse correlation with inflammatory gene cluster. In summary, our functional genomics analysis highlighted novel genes and critical pathways associated with kidney function for future analysis. PMID:25231882

  9. Soil temperature modeling at different depths using neuro-fuzzy, neural network, and genetic programming techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisi, Ozgur; Sanikhani, Hadi; Cobaner, Murat

    2016-05-01

    The applicability of artificial neural networks (ANN), adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS), and genetic programming (GP) techniques in estimating soil temperatures (ST) at different depths is investigated in this study. Weather data from two stations, Mersin and Adana, Turkey, were used as inputs to the applied models in order to model monthly STs. The first part of the study focused on comparison of ANN, ANFIS, and GP models in modeling ST of two stations at the depths of 10, 50, and 100 cm. GP was found to perform better than the ANN and ANFIS-SC in estimating monthly ST. The effect of periodicity (month of the year) on models' accuracy was also investigated. Including periodicity component in models' inputs considerably increased their accuracies. The root mean square error (RMSE) of ANN models was respectively decreased by 34 and 27 % for the depths of 10 and 100 cm adding the periodicity input. In the second part of the study, the accuracies of the ANN, ANFIS, and GP models were compared in estimating ST of Mersin Station using the climatic data of Adana Station. The ANN models generally performed better than the ANFIS-SC and GP in modeling ST of Mersin Station without local climatic inputs.

  10. Production of Engineered Fabrics Using Artificial Neural Network-Genetic Algorithm Hybrid Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Ashis; Majumdar, Prabal Kumar; Banerjee, Debamalya

    2015-10-01

    The process of fabric engineering which is generally practised in most of the textile mills is very complicated, repetitive, tedious and time consuming. To eliminate this trial and error approach, a new approach of fabric engineering has been attempted in this work. Data sets of construction parameters [comprising of ends per inch, picks per inch, warp count and weft count] and three fabric properties (namely drape coefficient, air permeability and thermal resistance) of 25 handloom cotton fabrics have been used. The weights and biases of three artificial neural network (ANN) models developed for the prediction of drape coefficient, air permeability and thermal resistance were used to formulate the fitness or objective function and constraints of the optimization problem. The optimization problem was solved using genetic algorithm (GA). In both the fabrics which were attempted for engineering, the target and simulated fabric properties were very close. The GA was able to search the optimum set of fabric construction parameters with reasonably good accuracy except in case of EPI. However, the overall result is encouraging and can be improved further by using larger data sets of handloom fabrics by hybrid ANN-GA model.

  11. Artificial Neural Network and Genetic Algorithm Hybrid Intelligence for Predicting Thai Stock Price Index Trend

    PubMed Central

    Boonjing, Veera; Intakosum, Sarun

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the use of Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and Genetic Algorithm (GA) for prediction of Thailand's SET50 index trend. ANN is a widely accepted machine learning method that uses past data to predict future trend, while GA is an algorithm that can find better subsets of input variables for importing into ANN, hence enabling more accurate prediction by its efficient feature selection. The imported data were chosen technical indicators highly regarded by stock analysts, each represented by 4 input variables that were based on past time spans of 4 different lengths: 3-, 5-, 10-, and 15-day spans before the day of prediction. This import undertaking generated a big set of diverse input variables with an exponentially higher number of possible subsets that GA culled down to a manageable number of more effective ones. SET50 index data of the past 6 years, from 2009 to 2014, were used to evaluate this hybrid intelligence prediction accuracy, and the hybrid's prediction results were found to be more accurate than those made by a method using only one input variable for one fixed length of past time span. PMID:27974883

  12. [Medium optimization for mycelia production of Antrodia camphorata based on artificial neural network-genetic algorithm].

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhenming; He, Zhe; Xu, Hongyu; Shi, Jinsong; Xu, Zhenghong

    2011-12-01

    To illustrate the complex fermentation process of submerged culture of Antrodia camphorata ATCC 200183, we observed the morphology change of this filamentous fungus. Then we used two optimization models namely response surface methodology (RSM) and artificial neural network (ANN) to model the fermentation process of Antrodia camphorata. By genetic algorithm (GA), we optimized the inoculum size and medium components for Antrodia camphorata production. The results show that fitness and prediction accuracy of ANN model was higher when compared to those of RSM model. Using GA, we optimized the input space of ANN model, and obtained maximum biomass of 6.2 g/L at the GA-optimized concentrations of spore (1.76x 10(5) /mL) and medium components (glucose, 29.1 g/L; peptone, 9.3 g/L; and soybean flour, 2.8 g/L). The biomass obtained using the ANN-GA designed medium was (6.1+/-0.2) g/L which was in good agreement with the predicted value. The same optimization process may be used to improve the production of mycelia and bioactive metabolites from potent medicinal fungi by changing the fermentation parameters.

  13. Trading Rules on Stock Markets Using Genetic Network Programming with Reinforcement Learning and Importance Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabu, Shingo; Hirasawa, Kotaro; Furuzuki, Takayuki

    Genetic Network Programming (GNP) is an evolutionary computation which represents its solutions using graph structures. Since GNP can create quite compact programs and has an implicit memory function, it has been clarified that GNP works well especially in dynamic environments. In addition, a study on creating trading rules on stock markets using GNP with Importance Index (GNP-IMX) has been done. IMX is a new element which is a criterion for decision making. In this paper, we combined GNP-IMX with Actor-Critic (GNP-IMX&AC) and create trading rules on stock markets. Evolution-based methods evolve their programs after enough period of time because they must calculate fitness values, however reinforcement learning can change programs during the period, therefore the trading rules can be created efficiently. In the simulation, the proposed method is trained using the stock prices of 10 brands in 2002 and 2003. Then the generalization ability is tested using the stock prices in 2004. The simulation results show that the proposed method can obtain larger profits than GNP-IMX without AC and Buy&Hold.

  14. Surface Roughness Optimization of Polyamide-6/Nanoclay Nanocomposites Using Artificial Neural Network: Genetic Algorithm Approach

    PubMed Central

    Moghri, Mehdi; Omidi, Mostafa; Farahnakian, Masoud

    2014-01-01

    During the past decade, polymer nanocomposites attracted considerable investment in research and development worldwide. One of the key factors that affect the quality of polymer nanocomposite products in machining is surface roughness. To obtain high quality products and reduce machining costs it is very important to determine the optimal machining conditions so as to achieve enhanced machining performance. The objective of this paper is to develop a predictive model using a combined design of experiments and artificial intelligence approach for optimization of surface roughness in milling of polyamide-6 (PA-6) nanocomposites. A surface roughness predictive model was developed in terms of milling parameters (spindle speed and feed rate) and nanoclay (NC) content using artificial neural network (ANN). As the present study deals with relatively small number of data obtained from full factorial design, application of genetic algorithm (GA) for ANN training is thought to be an appropriate approach for the purpose of developing accurate and robust ANN model. In the optimization phase, a GA is considered in conjunction with the explicit nonlinear function derived from the ANN to determine the optimal milling parameters for minimization of surface roughness for each PA-6 nanocomposite. PMID:24578636

  15. Artificial Neural Network and Genetic Algorithm Hybrid Intelligence for Predicting Thai Stock Price Index Trend.

    PubMed

    Inthachot, Montri; Boonjing, Veera; Intakosum, Sarun

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the use of Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and Genetic Algorithm (GA) for prediction of Thailand's SET50 index trend. ANN is a widely accepted machine learning method that uses past data to predict future trend, while GA is an algorithm that can find better subsets of input variables for importing into ANN, hence enabling more accurate prediction by its efficient feature selection. The imported data were chosen technical indicators highly regarded by stock analysts, each represented by 4 input variables that were based on past time spans of 4 different lengths: 3-, 5-, 10-, and 15-day spans before the day of prediction. This import undertaking generated a big set of diverse input variables with an exponentially higher number of possible subsets that GA culled down to a manageable number of more effective ones. SET50 index data of the past 6 years, from 2009 to 2014, were used to evaluate this hybrid intelligence prediction accuracy, and the hybrid's prediction results were found to be more accurate than those made by a method using only one input variable for one fixed length of past time span.

  16. Pile-up correction by Genetic Algorithm and Artificial Neural Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafaee, M.; Saramad, S.

    2009-08-01

    Pile-up distortion is a common problem for high counting rates radiation spectroscopy in many fields such as industrial, nuclear and medical applications. It is possible to reduce pulse pile-up using hardware-based pile-up rejections. However, this phenomenon may not be eliminated completely by this approach and the spectrum distortion caused by pile-up rejection can be increased as well. In addition, inaccurate correction or rejection of pile-up artifacts in applications such as energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectrometers can lead to losses of counts, will give poor quantitative results and even false element identification. Therefore, it is highly desirable to use software-based models to predict and correct any recognized pile-up signals in data acquisition systems. The present paper describes two new intelligent approaches for pile-up correction; the Genetic Algorithm (GA) and Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs). The validation and testing results of these new methods have been compared, which shows excellent agreement with the measured data with 60Co source and NaI detector. The Monte Carlo simulation of these new intelligent algorithms also shows their advantages over hardware-based pulse pile-up rejection methods.

  17. Interpreting Microarray Data to Build Models of Microbial Genetic Regulation Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Sokhansanj, B; Garnham, J B; Fitch, J P

    2002-01-23

    Microarrays and DNA chips are an efficient, high-throughput technology for measuring temporal changes in the expression of message RNA (mRNA) from thousands of genes (often the entire genome of an organism) in a single experiment. A crucial drawback of microarray experiments is that results are inherently qualitative: data are generally neither quantitatively repeatable, nor may microarray spot intensities be calibrated to in vivo mRNA concentrations. Nevertheless, microarrays represent by the far the cheapest and fastest way to obtain information about a cells global genetic regulatory networks. Besides poor signal characteristics, the massive number of data produced by microarray experiments poses challenges for visualization, interpretation and model building. Towards initial model development, we have developed a Java tool for visualizing the spatial organization of gene expression in bacteria. We are also developing an approach to inferring and testing qualitative fuzzy logic models of gene regulation using microarray data. Because we are developing and testing qualitative hypotheses that do not require quantitative precision, our statistical evaluation of experimental data is limited to checking for validity and consistency. Our goals are to maximize the impact of inexpensive microarray technology, bearing in mind that biological models and hypotheses are typically qualitative.

  18. The Mosaic Ancestry of the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel and the D. melanogaster Reference Genome Reveals a Network of Epistatic Fitness Interactions.

    PubMed

    Pool, John E

    2015-12-01

    North American populations of Drosophila melanogaster derive from both European and African source populations, but despite their importance for genetic research, patterns of ancestry along their genomes are largely undocumented. Here, I infer geographic ancestry along genomes of the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP) and the D. melanogaster reference genome, which may have implications for reference alignment, association mapping, and population genomic studies in Drosophila. Overall, the proportion of African ancestry was estimated to be 20% for the DGRP and 9% for the reference genome. Combining my estimate of admixture timing with historical records, I provide the first estimate of natural generation time for this species (approximately 15 generations per year). Ancestry levels were found to vary strikingly across the genome, with less African introgression on the X chromosome, in regions of high recombination, and at genes involved in specific processes (e.g., circadian rhythm). An important role for natural selection during the admixture process was further supported by evidence that many unlinked pairs of loci showed a deficiency of Africa-Europe allele combinations between them. Numerous epistatic fitness interactions may therefore exist between African and European genotypes, leading to ongoing selection against incompatible variants. By focusing on hubs in this network of fitness interactions, I identified a set of interacting loci that include genes with roles in sensation and neuropeptide/hormone reception. These findings suggest that admixed D. melanogaster samples could become an important study system for the genetics of early-stage isolation between populations.

  19. A Unifying Mathematical Framework for Genetic Robustness, Environmental Robustness, Network Robustness and their Tradeoff on Phenotype Robustness in Biological Networks Part II: Ecological Networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bor-Sen; Lin, Ying-Po

    2013-01-01

    In ecological networks, network robustness should be large enough to confer intrinsic robustness for tolerating intrinsic parameter fluctuations, as well as environmental robustness for resisting environmental disturbances, so that the phenotype stability of ecological networks can be maintained, thus guaranteeing phenotype robustness. However, it is difficult to analyze the network robustness of ecological systems because they are complex nonlinear partial differential stochastic systems. This paper develops a unifying mathematical framework for investigating the principles of both robust stabilization and environmental disturbance sensitivity in ecological networks. We found that the phenotype robustness criterion for ecological networks is that if intrinsic robustness + environmental robustness ≦ network robustness, then the phenotype robustness can be maintained in spite of intrinsic parameter fluctuations and environmental disturbances. These results in robust ecological networks are similar to that in robust gene regulatory networks and evolutionary networks even they have different spatial-time scales.

  20. Inference of S-system models of genetic networks by solving one-dimensional function optimization problems.

    PubMed

    Kimura, S; Araki, D; Matsumura, K; Okada-Hatakeyama, M

    2012-02-01

    Voit and Almeida have proposed the decoupling approach as a method for inferring the S-system models of genetic networks. The decoupling approach defines the inference of a genetic network as a problem requiring the solutions of sets of algebraic equations. The computation can be accomplished in a very short time, as the approach estimates S-system parameters without solving any of the differential equations. Yet the defined algebraic equations are non-linear, which sometimes prevents us from finding reasonable S-system parameters. In this study, we propose a new technique to overcome this drawback of the decoupling approach. This technique transforms the problem of solving each set of algebraic equations into a one-dimensional function optimization problem. The computation can still be accomplished in a relatively short time, as the problem is transformed by solving a linear programming problem. We confirm the effectiveness of the proposed approach through numerical experiments.

  1. A new optimization framework using genetic algorithm and artificial neural network to reduce uncertainties in petroleum reservoir models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maschio, Célio; José Schiozer, Denis

    2015-01-01

    In this article, a new optimization framework to reduce uncertainties in petroleum reservoir attributes using artificial intelligence techniques (neural network and genetic algorithm) is proposed. Instead of using the deterministic values of the reservoir properties, as in a conventional process, the parameters of the probability density function of each uncertain attribute are set as design variables in an optimization process using a genetic algorithm. The objective function (OF) is based on the misfit of a set of models, sampled from the probability density function, and a symmetry factor (which represents the distribution of curves around the history) is used as weight in the OF. Artificial neural networks are trained to represent the production curves of each well and the proxy models generated are used to evaluate the OF in the optimization process. The proposed method was applied to a reservoir with 16 uncertain attributes and promising results were obtained.

  2. Genetic Basis for Developmental Homeostasis of Germline Stem Cell Niche Number: A Network of Tramtrack-Group Nuclear BTB Factors

    PubMed Central

    Chalvet, Fabienne; Netter, Sophie; Dos Santos, Nicolas; Poisot, Emilie; Paces-Fessy, Mélanie; Cumenal, Delphine; Peronnet, Frédérique; Pret, Anne-Marie; Théodore, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    The potential to produce new cells during adult life depends on the number of stem cell niches and the capacity of stem cells to divide, and is therefore under the control of programs ensuring developmental homeostasis. However, it remains generally unknown how the number of stem cell niches is controlled. In the insect ovary, each germline stem cell (GSC) niche is embedded in a functional unit called an ovariole. The number of ovarioles, and thus the number of GSC niches, varies widely among species. In Drosophila, morphogenesis of ovarioles starts in larvae with the formation of terminal filaments (TFs), each made of 8–10 cells that pile up and sort in stacks. TFs constitute organizers of individual germline stem cell niches during larval and early pupal development. In the Drosophila melanogaster subgroup, the number of ovarioles varies interspecifically from 8 to 20. Here we show that pipsqueak, Trithorax-like, batman and the bric-à-brac (bab) locus, all encoding nuclear BTB/POZ factors of the Tramtrack Group, are involved in limiting the number of ovarioles in D. melanogaster. At least two different processes are differentially perturbed by reducing the function of these genes. We found that when the bab dose is reduced, sorting of TF cells into TFs was affected such that each TF contains fewer cells and more TFs are formed. In contrast, psq mutants exhibited a greater number of TF cells per ovary, with a normal number of cells per TF, thereby leading to formation of more TFs per ovary than in the wild type. Our results indicate that two parallel genetic pathways under the control of a network of nuclear BTB factors are combined in order to negatively control the number of germline stem cell niches. PMID:23185495

  3. Genetic basis for developmental homeostasis of germline stem cell niche number: a network of Tramtrack-Group nuclear BTB factors.

    PubMed

    Bartoletti, Mathieu; Rubin, Thomas; Chalvet, Fabienne; Netter, Sophie; Dos Santos, Nicolas; Poisot, Emilie; Paces-Fessy, Mélanie; Cumenal, Delphine; Peronnet, Frédérique; Pret, Anne-Marie; Théodore, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    The potential to produce new cells during adult life depends on the number of stem cell niches and the capacity of stem cells to divide, and is therefore under the control of programs ensuring developmental homeostasis. However, it remains generally unknown how the number of stem cell niches is controlled. In the insect ovary, each germline stem cell (GSC) niche is embedded in a functional unit called an ovariole. The number of ovarioles, and thus the number of GSC niches, varies widely among species. In Drosophila, morphogenesis of ovarioles starts in larvae with the formation of terminal filaments (TFs), each made of 8-10 cells that pile up and sort in stacks. TFs constitute organizers of individual germline stem cell niches during larval and early pupal development. In the Drosophila melanogaster subgroup, the number of ovarioles varies interspecifically from 8 to 20. Here we show that pipsqueak, Trithorax-like, batman and the bric-à-brac (bab) locus, all encoding nuclear BTB/POZ factors of the Tramtrack Group, are involved in limiting the number of ovarioles in D. melanogaster. At least two different processes are differentially perturbed by reducing the function of these genes. We found that when the bab dose is reduced, sorting of TF cells into TFs was affected such that each TF contains fewer cells and more TFs are formed. In contrast, psq mutants exhibited a greater number of TF cells per ovary, with a normal number of cells per TF, thereby leading to formation of more TFs per ovary than in the wild type. Our results indicate that two parallel genetic pathways under the control of a network of nuclear BTB factors are combined in order to negatively control the number of germline stem cell niches.

  4. A Systems Genetics Approach Identifies Gene Regulatory Networks Associated with Fatty Acid Composition in Brassica rapa Seed1

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Dong; Bucher, Johan; Jin, Mina; Boyle, Kerry; Fobert, Pierre; Maliepaard, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acids in seeds affect seed germination and seedling vigor, and fatty acid composition determines the quality of seed oil. In this study, quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping of fatty acid and transcript abundance was integrated with gene network analysis to unravel the genetic regulation of seed fatty acid composition in a Brassica rapa doubled haploid population from a cross between a yellow sarson oil type and a black-seeded pak choi. The distribution of major QTLs for fatty acids showed a relationship with the fatty acid types: linkage group A03 for monounsaturated fatty acids, A04 for saturated fatty acids, and A05 for polyunsaturated fatty acids. Using a genetical genomics approach, expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) hotspots were found at major fatty acid QTLs on linkage groups A03, A04, A05, and A09. An eQTL-guided gene coexpression network of lipid metabolism-related genes showed major hubs at the genes BrPLA2-ALPHA, BrWD-40, a number of seed storage protein genes, and the transcription factor BrMD-2, suggesting essential roles for these genes in lipid metabolism. Three subnetworks were extracted for the economically important and most abundant fatty acids erucic, oleic, linoleic, and linolenic acids. Network analysis, combined with comparison of the genome positions of cis- or trans-eQTLs with fatty acid QTLs, allowed the identification of candidate genes for genetic regulation of these fatty acids. The generated insights in the genetic architecture of fatty acid composition and the underlying complex gene regulatory networks in B. rapa seeds are discussed. PMID:26518343

  5. Mechanosensitive Molecular Networks Involved in Transducing Resistance Exercise-Signals into Muscle Protein Accretion

    PubMed Central

    Rindom, Emil; Vissing, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Loss of skeletal muscle myofibrillar protein with disease and/or inactivity can severely deteriorate muscle strength and function. Strategies to counteract wasting of muscle myofibrillar protein are therefore desirable and invite for considerations on the potential superiority of specific modes of resistance exercise and/or the adequacy of low load resistance exercise regimens as well as underlying mechanisms. In this regard, delineation of the potentially mechanosensitive molecular mechanisms underlying muscle protein synthesis (MPS), may contribute to an understanding on how differentiated resistance exercise can transduce a mechanical signal into stimulation of muscle accretion. Recent findings suggest specific upstream exercise-induced mechano-sensitive myocellular signaling pathways to converge on mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), to influence MPS. This may e.g. implicate mechanical activation of signaling through a diacylglycerol kinase (DGKζ)-phosphatidic acid (PA) axis or implicate integrin deformation to signal through a Focal adhesion kinase (FAK)-Tuberous Sclerosis Complex 2 (TSC2)-Ras homolog enriched in brain (Rheb) axis. Moreover, since initiation of translation is reliant on mRNA, it is also relevant to consider potentially mechanosensitive signaling pathways involved in muscle myofibrillar gene transcription and whether some of these pathways converge with those affecting mTORC1 activation for MPS. In this regard, recent findings suggest how mechanical stress may implicate integrin deformation and/or actin dynamics to signal through a Ras homolog gene family member A protein (RhoA)-striated muscle activator of Rho signaling (STARS) axis or implicate deformation of Notch to affect Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) signaling through a small mother of decapentaplegic (Smad) axis. PMID:27909410

  6. Mechanosensitive Molecular Networks Involved in Transducing Resistance Exercise-Signals into Muscle Protein Accretion.

    PubMed

    Rindom, Emil; Vissing, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Loss of skeletal muscle myofibrillar protein with disease and/or inactivity can severely deteriorate muscle strength and function. Strategies to counteract wasting of muscle myofibrillar protein are therefore desirable and invite for considerations on the potential superiority of specific modes of resistance exercise and/or the adequacy of low load resistance exercise regimens as well as underlying mechanisms. In this regard, delineation of the potentially mechanosensitive molecular mechanisms underlying muscle protein synthesis (MPS), may contribute to an understanding on how differentiated resistance exercise can transduce a mechanical signal into stimulation of muscle accretion. Recent findings suggest specific upstream exercise-induced mechano-sensitive myocellular signaling pathways to converge on mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), to influence MPS. This may e.g. implicate mechanical activation of signaling through a diacylglycerol kinase (DGKζ)-phosphatidic acid (PA) axis or implicate integrin deformation to signal through a Focal adhesion kinase (FAK)-Tuberous Sclerosis Complex 2 (TSC2)-Ras homolog enriched in brain (Rheb) axis. Moreover, since initiation of translation is reliant on mRNA, it is also relevant to consider potentially mechanosensitive signaling pathways involved in muscle myofibrillar gene transcription and whether some of these pathways converge with those affecting mTORC1 activation for MPS. In this regard, recent findings suggest how mechanical stress may implicate integrin deformation and/or actin dynamics to signal through a Ras homolog gene family member A protein (RhoA)-striated muscle activator of Rho signaling (STARS) axis or implicate deformation of Notch to affect Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) signaling through a small mother of decapentaplegic (Smad) axis.

  7. Systems Genetic Analyses Highlight a TGFβ-FOXO3 Dependent Striatal Astrocyte Network Conserved across Species and Associated with Stress, Sleep, and Huntington’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Scarpa, Joseph R.; Jiang, Peng; Losic, Bojan; Readhead, Ben; Dudley, Joel T.; Vitaterna, Martha H.; Turek, Fred W.

    2016-01-01

    Recent systems-based analyses have demonstrated that sleep and stress traits emerge from shared genetic and transcriptional networks, and clinical work has elucidated the emergence of sleep dysfunction and stress susceptibility as early symptoms of Huntington's disease. Understanding the biological bases of these early non-motor symptoms may reveal therapeutic targets that prevent disease onset or slow disease progression, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this complex clinical presentation remain largely unknown. In the present work, we specifically examine the relationship between these psychiatric traits and Huntington's disease (HD) by identifying striatal transcriptional networks shared by HD, stress, and sleep phenotypes. First, we utilize a systems-based approach to examine a large publicly available human transcriptomic dataset for HD (GSE3790 from GEO) in a novel way. We use weighted gene coexpression network analysis and differential connectivity analyses to identify transcriptional networks dysregulated in HD, and we use an unbiased ranking scheme that leverages both gene- and network-level information to identify a novel astrocyte-specific network as most relevant to HD caudate. We validate this result in an independent HD cohort. Next, we computationally predict FOXO3 as a regulator of this network, and use multiple publicly available in vitro and in vivo experimental datasets to validate that this astrocyte HD network is downstream of a signaling pathway important in adult neurogenesis (TGFβ-FOXO3). We also map this HD-relevant caudate subnetwork to striatal transcriptional networks in a large (n = 100) chronically stressed (B6xA/J)F2 mouse population that has been extensively phenotyped (328 stress- and sleep-related measurements), and we show that this striatal astrocyte network is correlated to sleep and stress traits, many of which are known to be altered in HD cohorts. We identify causal regulators of this network through Bayesian network

  8. Functional MRI to assess alterations of functional networks in response to pharmacological or genetic manipulations of the serotonergic system in mice.

    PubMed

    Razoux, Florence; Baltes, Christof; Mueggler, Thomas; Seuwen, Aline; Russig, Holger; Mansuy, Isabelle; Rudin, Markus

    2013-07-01

    Imaging methods that enable the investigation of functional networks both in human and animal brain provide important insights into mechanisms underlying pathologies including psychiatric disorders. Since the serotonergic receptor 1A (5-HT(1A)-R) has been strongly implicated in the pathophysiology of depressive and anxiety disorders, as well as in the action of antidepressant drugs, we investigated brain connectivity related to the 5-HT(1A)-R system by use of pharmacological functional magnetic resonance imaging in mice. We characterized functional connectivity elicited by activation of 5-HT(1A)-R and investigated how pharmacological and genetic manipulations of its function may modulate the evoked connectivity. Functional connectivity elicited by administration of the 5-HT(1A)-R agonist 8-OH-DPAT can be described by networks characterized by small-world attributes with nodes displaying highly concerted response patterns. Circuits identified comprised the brain structures known to be involved in stress-related disorders (e.g. prefrontal cortex, amygdala and hippocampus). The results also highlight the dorsomedial thalamus, a structure associated with fear processing, as a hub of the 5-HT(1A)-R functional network. Administration of a specific 5-HT(1A)-R antagonist or use of heterozygous 5-HT(1A)-R knockout mice significantly reduced functional connectivity elicited by 8-OH-DPAT. Whole brain functional connectivity analysis constitutes an attractive tool to characterize impairments in neurotransmission and the efficacy of pharmacological treatment in a comprehensive manner.

  9. Alternate wiring of a KNOXI genetic network underlies differences in leaf development of A. thaliana and C. hirsuta

    PubMed Central

    Rast-Somssich, Madlen I.; Broholm, Suvi; Jenkins, Huw; Canales, Claudia; Vlad, Daniela; Kwantes, Michiel; Bilsborough, Gemma; Dello Ioio, Raffaele; Ewing, Rob M.; Laufs, Patrick; Huijser, Peter; Ohno, Carolyn; Heisler, Marcus G.; Hay, Angela; Tsiantis, Miltos

    2015-01-01

    Two interrelated problems in biology are understanding the regulatory logic and predictability of morphological evolution. Here, we studied these problems by comparing Arabidopsis thaliana, which has simple leaves, and its relative, Cardamine hirsuta, which has dissected leaves comprising leaflets. By transferring genes between the two species, we provide evidence for an inverse relationship between the pleiotropy of SHOOTMERISTEMLESS (STM) and BREVIPEDICELLUS (BP) homeobox genes and their ability to modify leaf form. We further show that cis-regulatory divergence of BP results in two alternative configurations of the genetic networks controlling leaf development. In C. hirsuta, ChBP is repressed by the microRNA164A (MIR164A)/ChCUP-SHAPED COTYLEDON (ChCUC) module and ChASYMMETRIC LEAVES1 (ChAS1), thus creating cross-talk between MIR164A/CUC and AS1 that does not occur in A. thaliana. These different genetic architectures lead to divergent interactions of network components and growth regulation in each species. We suggest that certain regulatory genes with low pleiotropy are predisposed to readily integrate into or disengage from conserved genetic networks influencing organ geometry, thus rapidly altering their properties and contributing to morphological divergence. PMID:26588991

  10. The genetic basis of alcoholism: multiple phenotypes, many genes, complex networks.

    PubMed

    Morozova, Tatiana V; Goldman, David; Mackay, Trudy F C; Anholt, Robert R H

    2012-02-20

    Alcoholism is a significant public health problem. A picture of the genetic architecture underlying alcohol-related phenotypes is emerging from genome-wide association studies and work on genetically tractable model organisms.

  11. Genetic algorithm based input selection for a neural network function approximator with applications to SSME health monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peck, Charles C.; Dhawan, Atam P.; Meyer, Claudia M.

    1991-01-01

    A genetic algorithm is used to select the inputs to a neural network function approximator. In the application considered, modeling critical parameters of the space shuttle main engine (SSME), the functional relationship between measured parameters is unknown and complex. Furthermore, the number of possible input parameters is quite large. Many approaches have been used for input selection, but they are either subjective or do not consider the complex multivariate relationships between parameters. Due to the optimization and space searching capabilities of genetic algorithms they were employed to systematize the input selection process. The results suggest that the genetic algorithm can generate parameter lists of high quality without the explicit use of problem domain knowledge. Suggestions for improving the performance of the input selection process are also provided.

  12. Genetic-linkage mapping of complex hereditary disorders to a whole-genome molecular-interaction network.

    PubMed

    Iossifov, Ivan; Zheng, Tian; Baron, Miron; Gilliam, T Conrad; Rzhetsky, Andrey

    2008-07-01

    Common hereditary neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia are most likely both genetically multifactorial and heterogeneous. Because of these characteristics traditional methods for genetic analysis fail when applied to such diseases. To address the problem we propose a novel probabilistic framework that combines the standard genetic linkage formalism with whole-genome molecular-interaction data to predict pathways or networks of interacting genes that contribute to common heritable disorders. We apply the model to three large genotype-phenotype data sets, identify a small number of significant candidate genes for autism (24), bipolar disorder (21), and schizophrenia (25), and predict a number of gene targets likely to be shared among the disorders.

  13. Parallel genetic algorithm for the design of neural networks: an application to the classification of remotely sensed data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stramaglia, Sebastiano; Satalino, Giuseppe; Sternieri, A.; Anelli, P.; Blonda, Palma N.; Pasquariello, Guido

    1998-10-01

    We consider the problem of classification of remote sensed data from LANDSAT Thematic Mapper images. The data have been acquired in July 1986 on an area locate din South Italy. We compare the performance obtained by feed-forward neural networks designed by a parallel genetic algorithm to determine their topology with the ones obtained by means of a multi-layer perceptron trained with Back Propagation learning rule. The parallel genetic algorithm, implemented on the APE100/Quadrics platform, is based on the coding scheme recently proposed by Sternieri and Anelli and exploits a recently proposed environment for genetic algorithms on Quadrics, called AGAPE. The SASIMD architecture of Quadrics forces the chromosome representation. The coding scheme provides that the connections weights of the neural network are organized as a floating point string. The parallelization scheme adopted is the elitistic coarse grained stepping stone model, with migration occurring only towards neighboring processors. The fitness function depends on the mean square error.After fixing the total number of individuals and running the algorithm on Quadrics architectures with different number of processors, the proposed parallel genetic algorithm displayed a superlinear speedup. We report results obtained on a data set made of 1400 patterns.

  14. Emergency Department Visits Involving Misuse and Abuse of the Antipsychotic Quetiapine: Results from the Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN)

    PubMed Central

    Mattson, Margaret E; Albright, Victoria A; Yoon, Joanna; Council, Carol L

    2015-01-01

    Case reports in medical literature suggest that the atypical antipsychotic quetiapine, a medication not previously considered to