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Sample records for genetic pathways leading

  1. Under the Influence of Genetics: How Transdisciplinarity Leads Us to Rethink Social Pathways to Illness

    PubMed Central

    Pescosolido, Bernice A.; Perry, Brea L.; Long, J. Scott; Martin, Jack K.; Nurnberger, John I.; Hesselbrock, Victor

    2015-01-01

    To extend our understanding of how social structures and social processes impact behavior, sociologists have been challenged to incorporate the potential explanatory role of genetics in their models. Here, we draw propositions from three major understandings of illness causation offered by social theory – fundamental causes, social stress processes, and social safety net theories. We tailor hypotheses to the case of alcohol dependence, long considered a multifaceted problem, defying simple explanation and having both biological and social roots. After briefly reviewing current appeals for transdisciplinary research, we describe both sociological and genetic theories, and derive propositions expected under each and under a transdisciplinary theoretical frame. Analyses of a later wave of the preeminent medical science study, the Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA), reveals a complex interplay of how the GABRA2 gene works with and against social structural factors to produce cases meeting DSM/ICD diagnoses. When both genetic and social factors are controlled, virtually equivalent effects of each remain; and, only modest evidence suggests that genetic influence works through social structural conditions and experiences. Further exploratory analyses using multiplicative terms reveal enhanced gene-environment interactions: 1) women are largely unaffected in their risk for alcohol dependence by allele status at this candidate gene; 2) family support attenuates genetic influence; 3) childhood deprivation exacerbates genetic predispositions. We discuss how these findings lead us to consider the essential intradisciplinary tension in sociological theories (i.e., the role of proximal and distal influences in social processes). Overall, our findings point to the promise of theories blending social and genetic influences by focusing directly on dynamic, networked sequences that produce different pathways to health and illness. PMID:19569404

  2. Shared Selective Pressures on Fungal and Human Metabolic Pathways Lead to Divergent yet Analogous Genetic Responses.

    PubMed

    Eidem, Haley R; McGary, Kriston L; Rokas, Antonis

    2015-06-01

    Reduced metabolic efficiency, toxic intermediate accumulation, and deficits of molecular building blocks, which all stem from disruptions of flux through metabolic pathways, reduce organismal fitness. Although these represent shared selection pressures across organisms, the genetic signatures of the responses to them may differ. In fungi, a frequently observed signature is the physical linkage of genes from the same metabolic pathway. In contrast, human metabolic genes are rarely tightly linked; rather, they tend to show tissue-specific coexpression. We hypothesized that the physical linkage of fungal metabolic genes and the tissue-specific coexpression of human metabolic genes are divergent yet analogous responses to the range of selective pressures imposed by disruptions of flux. To test this, we examined the degree to which the human homologs of physically linked metabolic genes in fungi (fungal linked homologs or FLOs) are coexpressed across six human tissues. We found that FLOs are significantly more correlated in their expression profiles across human tissues than other metabolic genes. We obtained similar results in analyses of the same six tissues from chimps, gorillas, orangutans, and macaques. We suggest that when selective pressures remain stable across large evolutionary distances, evidence of selection in a given evolutionary lineage can become a highly reliable predictor of the signature of selection in another, even though the specific adaptive response in each lineage is markedly different.

  3. The root hair assay facilitates the use of genetic and pharmacological tools in order to dissect multiple signalling pathways that lead to programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Kacprzyk, Joanna; Devine, Aoife; McCabe, Paul F

    2014-01-01

    The activation of programmed cell death (PCD) is often a result of complex signalling pathways whose relationship and intersection are not well understood. We recently described a PCD root hair assay and proposed that it could be used to rapidly screen genetic or pharmacological modulators of PCD. To further assess the applicability of the root hair assay for studying multiple signalling pathways leading to PCD activation we have investigated the crosstalk between salicylic acid, autophagy and apoptosis-like PCD (AL-PCD) in Arabidopsis thaliana. The root hair assay was used to determine rates of AL-PCD induced by a panel of cell death inducing treatments in wild type plants treated with chemical modulators of salicylic acid synthesis or autophagy, and in genetic lines defective in autophagy or salicylic acid signalling. The assay demonstrated that PCD induced by exogenous salicylic acid or fumonisin B1 displayed a requirement for salicylic acid signalling and was partially dependent on the salicylic acid signal transducer NPR1. Autophagy deficiency resulted in an increase in the rates of AL-PCD induced by salicylic acid and fumonisin B1, but not by gibberellic acid or abiotic stress. The phenylalanine ammonia lyase-dependent salicylic acid synthesis pathway contributed only to death induced by salicylic acid and fumonisin B1. 3-Methyladenine, which is commonly used as an inhibitor of autophagy, appeared to influence PCD induction in all treatments suggesting a possible secondary, non-autophagic, effect on a core component of the plant PCD pathway. The results suggest that salicylic acid signalling is negatively regulated by autophagy during salicylic acid and mycotoxin-induced AL-PCD. However, this crosstalk does not appear to be directly involved in PCD induced by gibberellic acid or abiotic stress. This study demonstrates that the root hair assay is an effective tool for relatively rapid investigation of complex signalling pathways leading to the activation of

  4. The Root Hair Assay Facilitates the Use of Genetic and Pharmacological Tools in Order to Dissect Multiple Signalling Pathways That Lead to Programmed Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Kacprzyk, Joanna; Devine, Aoife; McCabe, Paul F.

    2014-01-01

    The activation of programmed cell death (PCD) is often a result of complex signalling pathways whose relationship and intersection are not well understood. We recently described a PCD root hair assay and proposed that it could be used to rapidly screen genetic or pharmacological modulators of PCD. To further assess the applicability of the root hair assay for studying multiple signalling pathways leading to PCD activation we have investigated the crosstalk between salicylic acid, autophagy and apoptosis-like PCD (AL-PCD) in Arabidopsis thaliana. The root hair assay was used to determine rates of AL-PCD induced by a panel of cell death inducing treatments in wild type plants treated with chemical modulators of salicylic acid synthesis or autophagy, and in genetic lines defective in autophagy or salicylic acid signalling. The assay demonstrated that PCD induced by exogenous salicylic acid or fumonisin B1 displayed a requirement for salicylic acid signalling and was partially dependent on the salicylic acid signal transducer NPR1. Autophagy deficiency resulted in an increase in the rates of AL-PCD induced by salicylic acid and fumonisin B1, but not by gibberellic acid or abiotic stress. The phenylalanine ammonia lyase-dependent salicylic acid synthesis pathway contributed only to death induced by salicylic acid and fumonisin B1. 3-Methyladenine, which is commonly used as an inhibitor of autophagy, appeared to influence PCD induction in all treatments suggesting a possible secondary, non-autophagic, effect on a core component of the plant PCD pathway. The results suggest that salicylic acid signalling is negatively regulated by autophagy during salicylic acid and mycotoxin-induced AL-PCD. However, this crosstalk does not appear to be directly involved in PCD induced by gibberellic acid or abiotic stress. This study demonstrates that the root hair assay is an effective tool for relatively rapid investigation of complex signalling pathways leading to the activation of

  5. Genetic pathways in colorectal and other cancers.

    PubMed

    Ilyas, M; Straub, J; Tomlinson, I P; Bodmer, W F

    1999-12-01

    Cells from cancers show aberrant behaviour such as unrestrained growth, invasion into adjacent tissue and metastasis. All these features of cancer cell behaviour can be explained in terms of genetic changes and the functional impact of these changes. In this review, colorectal cancer (CRC) is examined as a classical example of multistep carcinogenesis. First there is an overview which shows that cancers develop by a process of somatic evolution. This gives rise to preferred genetic pathways of tumorigenesis. The factors which may influence the development and ultimate choice of genetic pathways are then examined. Next, CRC is studied as a specific disease and the putative genetic pathways are described. The mutations that comprise these pathways and the possible functional sequelae of these are explored. The review concludes with a look at those avenues which may further elucidate the natural history of CRC and lead to improved therapy.

  6. Genetic pathways in colorectal and other cancers.

    PubMed

    Ilyas, M; Straub, J; Tomlinson, I P; Bodmer, W F

    1999-03-01

    Cells from cancers show aberrant behaviour such as unrestrained growth, invasion into adjacent tissue and metastasis. All these features of cancer cell behaviour can be explained in terms of genetic changes and the functional impact of these changes. In this review, colorectal cancer (CRC) is examined as a classical example of multistep carcinogenesis. First there is an overview which shows that cancers develop by a process of somatic evolution. This gives rise to preferred genetic pathways of tumorigenesis. The factors which may influence the development and ultimate choice of genetic pathways are then examined. Next, CRC is studied as a specific disease and the putative genetic pathways are described. The mutations that comprise these pathways and the possible functional sequelae of these are explored. The review concludes with a look at those avenues which may further elucidate the natural history of CRC and lead to improved therapy.

  7. Unraveling tissue regeneration pathways using chemical genetics.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Lijoy K; Sengupta, Sumitra; Kawakami, Atsushi; Andreasen, Eric A; Löhr, Christiane V; Loynes, Catherine A; Renshaw, Stephen A; Peterson, Randall T; Tanguay, Robert L

    2007-11-30

    Identifying the molecular pathways that are required for regeneration remains one of the great challenges of regenerative medicine. Although genetic mutations have been useful for identifying some molecular pathways, small molecule probes of regenerative pathways might offer some advantages, including the ability to disrupt pathway function with precise temporal control. However, a vertebrate regeneration model amenable to rapid throughput small molecule screening is not currently available. We report here the development of a zebrafish early life stage fin regeneration model and its use in screening for small molecules that modulate tissue regeneration. By screening 2000 biologically active small molecules, we identified 17 that specifically inhibited regeneration. These compounds include a cluster of glucocorticoids, and we demonstrate that transient activation of the glucocorticoid receptor is sufficient to block regeneration, but only if activation occurs during wound healing/blastema formation. In addition, knockdown of the glucocorticoid receptor restores regenerative capability to nonregenerative, glucocorticoid-exposed zebrafish. To test whether the classical anti-inflammatory action of glucocorticoids is responsible for blocking regeneration, we prevented acute inflammation following amputation by antisense repression of the Pu.1 gene. Although loss of Pu.1 prevents the inflammatory response, regeneration is not affected. Collectively, these results indicate that signaling from exogenous glucocorticoids impairs blastema formation and limits regenerative capacity through an acute inflammation-independent mechanism. These studies also demonstrate the feasibility of exploiting chemical genetics to define the pathways that govern vertebrate regeneration. PMID:17848559

  8. Soil is an important pathway of human lead exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Mielke, H W; Reagan, P L

    1998-01-01

    This review shows the equal or greater importance of leaded gasoline-contaminated dust compared to lead-based paint to the child lead problem, and that soil lead, resulting from leaded gasoline and pulverized lead-based paint, is at least or more important than lead-based paint (intact and not pulverized) as a pathway of human lead exposure. Because lead-based paint is a high-dose source, the biologically relevant dosage is similar to lead in soil. Both lead-based paint and soil lead are associated with severe lead poisoning. Leaded gasoline and lead in food, but not lead-based paint, are strongly associated with population blood lead levels in both young children and adults. Soil lead and house dust, but not lead-based paint, are associated with population blood lead levels in children. Most soil lead and house dust are associated with leaded gasoline. Lead-based paint dust is associated with cases of renovation of either exterior or interior environments in which the paint was pulverized. Based upon the limited data to date, abatement of soil lead is more effective than abatement of lead-based paint in reducing blood lead levels of young children. About equal numbers of children under 7 years of age are exposed to soil lead and lead-based paint. Seasonality studies point to soil lead as the main source of population blood lead levels. Soil lead is a greater risk factor than lead-based paint to children engaged in hand-to-mouth and pica behavior. In summary, soil lead is important for addressing the population of children at risk of lead poisoning. When soil lead is acknowledged by regulators and the public health community as an important pathway of human lead exposure, then more effective opportunities for improving primary lead prevention can become a reality. Images Figure 1 PMID:9539015

  9. AMD and the alternative complement pathway: genetics and functional implications.

    PubMed

    Tan, Perciliz L; Bowes Rickman, Catherine; Katsanis, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is an ocular neurodegenerative disorder and is the leading cause of legal blindness in Western societies, with a prevalence of up to 8 % over the age of 60, which continues to increase with age. AMD is characterized by the progressive breakdown of the macula (the central region of the retina), resulting in the loss of central vision including visual acuity. While its molecular etiology remains unclear, advances in genetics and genomics have illuminated the genetic architecture of the disease and have generated attractive pathomechanistic hypotheses. Here, we review the genetic architecture of AMD, considering the contribution of both common and rare alleles to susceptibility, and we explore the possible mechanistic links between photoreceptor degeneration and the alternative complement pathway, a cascade that has emerged as the most potent genetic driver of this disorder. PMID:27329102

  10. Conserved genetic pathways associated with microphthalmia, anophthalmia, and coloboma.

    PubMed

    Reis, Linda M; Semina, Elena V

    2015-06-01

    The human eye is a complex organ whose development requires extraordinary coordination of developmental processes. The conservation of ocular developmental steps in vertebrates suggests possible common genetic mechanisms. Genetic diseases involving the eye represent a leading cause of blindness in children and adults. During the last decades, there has been an exponential increase in genetic studies of ocular disorders. In this review, we summarize current success in identification of genes responsible for microphthalmia, anophthalmia, and coloboma (MAC) phenotypes, which are associated with early defects in embryonic eye development. Studies in animal models for the orthologous genes identified overlapping phenotypes for most factors, confirming the conservation of their function in vertebrate development. These animal models allow for further investigation of the mechanisms of MAC, integration of various identified genes into common developmental pathways and finally, provide an avenue for the development and testing of therapeutic interventions.

  11. Programmable genetic circuits for pathway engineering.

    PubMed

    Hoynes-O'Connor, Allison; Moon, Tae Seok

    2015-12-01

    Synthetic biology has the potential to provide decisive advances in genetic control of metabolic pathways. However, there are several challenges that synthetic biologists must overcome before this vision becomes a reality. First, a library of diverse and well-characterized sensors, such as metabolite-sensing or condition-sensing promoters, must be constructed. Second, robust programmable circuits that link input conditions with a specific gene regulation response must be developed. Finally, multi-gene targeting strategies must be integrated with metabolically relevant sensors and complex, robust logic. Achievements in each of these areas, which employ the CRISPR/Cas system, in silico modeling, and dynamic sensor-regulators, among other tools, provide a strong basis for future research. Overall, the future for synthetic biology approaches in metabolic engineering holds immense promise.

  12. An empirical comparison of lead exposure pathway models.

    PubMed Central

    Succop, P; Bornschein, R; Brown, K; Tseng, C Y

    1998-01-01

    Structural equation modeling is a statistical method for partitioning the variance in a set of interrelated multivariate outcomes into that which is due to direct, indirect, and covariate (exogenous) effects. Despite this model's flexibility to handle different experimental designs, postulation of a causal chain among the endogenous variables and the points of influence of the covariates is required. This has motivated the researchers at the University of Cincinnati Department of Environmental Health to be guided by a theoretical model for movement of lead from distal sources (exterior soil or dust and paint lead) to proximal sources (interior dust lead) and then finally to biologic outcomes (handwipe and blood lead). The question of whether a single structural equation model built from proximity arguments can be applied to diverse populations observed in different communities with varying lead amounts, sources, and bioavailabilities is addressed in this article. This reanalysis involved data from 1855 children less than 72 months of age enrolled in 11 studies performed over approximately 15 years. Data from children residing near former ore-processing sites were included in this reanalysis. A single model adequately fit the data from these 11 studies; however, the model needs to be flexible to include pathways that are not frequently observed. As expected, the more proximal sources of interior dust lead and handwipe lead were the most important predictors of blood lead; soil lead often had a number of indirect influences. A limited number of covariates were also isolated as usually affecting the endogenous lead variables. The blood lead levels surveyed at the ore-processing sites were comparable to and actually somewhat lower than those reported in the the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Lessened bioavailability of the lead at certain of these sites is a probable reason for this finding. PMID:9860917

  13. Genetic dissection of cardiac growth control pathways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacLellan, W. R.; Schneider, M. D.

    2000-01-01

    Cardiac muscle cells exhibit two related but distinct modes of growth that are highly regulated during development and disease. Cardiac myocytes rapidly proliferate during fetal life but exit the cell cycle irreversibly soon after birth, following which the predominant form of growth shifts from hyperplastic to hypertrophic. Much research has focused on identifying the candidate mitogens, hypertrophic agonists, and signaling pathways that mediate these processes in isolated cells. What drives the proliferative growth of embryonic myocardium in vivo and the mechanisms by which adult cardiac myocytes hypertrophy in vivo are less clear. Efforts to answer these questions have benefited from rapid progress made in techniques to manipulate the murine genome. Complementary technologies for gain- and loss-of-function now permit a mutational analysis of these growth control pathways in vivo in the intact heart. These studies have confirmed the importance of suspected pathways, have implicated unexpected pathways as well, and have led to new paradigms for the control of cardiac growth.

  14. An Interactive, Integrated, Instructional Pathway to the LEAD Science Gateway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalda, S.; Clark, R.; Davis, L.; Wiziecki, E. N.

    2008-12-01

    Linked Environments for Atmospheric Discovery (LEAD) is a bold and revolutionary paradigm that through a Web-based Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) exposes the user to a rich environment of data, models, data mining and visualization and analysis tools, enabling the user to ask science questions of applications while the complexity of the software and middleware managing these applications is hidden from the user. From its inception in 2003, LEAD has championed goals that have context for the future of weather and related research and education. LEAD espouses to lowering the barrier for using complex end-to-end weather technologies by a) democratizing the availability of advanced weather technologies, b) empowering the user of these technologies to tackle a variety of problems, and c) facilitating learning and understanding. LEAD, as it exists today, is poised to enable a diverse community of scientists, educators, students, and operational practitioners. The project has been informed by atmospheric and computer scientists, educators, and educational consultants who, in search of new knowledge, understanding, ideas, and learning methodologies, seek easy access to new capabilities that allow for user-directed and interactive query and acquisition, simulation, assimilation, data mining, computational modeling, and visualization. As one component of the total LEAD effort, the LEAD education team has designed interactive, integrated, instructional pathways within a set of learning modules (LEAD-to-Learn) to facilitate, enhance, and enable the use of the LEAD gateway in the classroom. The LEAD education initiative focuses on the means to integrate data, tools, and services used by researchers into undergraduate meteorology education in order to provide an authentic and contextualized environment for teaching and learning. Educators, educational specialists, and students from meteorology and computer science backgrounds have collaborated on the design and development

  15. A Newton Cooperative Genetic Algorithm Method for In Silico Optimization of Metabolic Pathway Production

    PubMed Central

    Mohamad, Mohd Saberi; Abdullah, Afnizanfaizal

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an in silico optimization method of metabolic pathway production. The metabolic pathway can be represented by a mathematical model known as the generalized mass action model, which leads to a complex nonlinear equations system. The optimization process becomes difficult when steady state and the constraints of the components in the metabolic pathway are involved. To deal with this situation, this paper presents an in silico optimization method, namely the Newton Cooperative Genetic Algorithm (NCGA). The NCGA used Newton method in dealing with the metabolic pathway, and then integrated genetic algorithm and cooperative co-evolutionary algorithm. The proposed method was experimentally applied on the benchmark metabolic pathways, and the results showed that the NCGA achieved better results compared to the existing methods. PMID:25961295

  16. Genome-Wide Pathway Analysis Identifies Genetic Pathways Associated with Psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Aterido, Adrià; Julià, Antonio; Ferrándiz, Carlos; Puig, Lluís; Fonseca, Eduardo; Fernández-López, Emilia; Dauden, Esteban; Sánchez-Carazo, José Luís; López-Estebaranz, José Luís; Moreno-Ramírez, David; Vanaclocha, Francisco; Herrera, Enrique; de la Cueva, Pablo; Dand, Nick; Palau, Núria; Alonso, Arnald; López-Lasanta, María; Tortosa, Raül; García-Montero, Andrés; Codó, Laia; Gelpí, Josep Lluís; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Absher, Devin; Capon, Francesca; Myers, Richard M; Barker, Jonathan N; Marsal, Sara

    2016-03-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease with a complex genetic architecture. To date, the psoriasis heritability is only partially explained. However, there is increasing evidence that the missing heritability in psoriasis could be explained by multiple genetic variants of low effect size from common genetic pathways. The objective of this study was to identify new genetic variation associated with psoriasis risk at the pathway level. We genotyped 598,258 single nucleotide polymorphisms in a discovery cohort of 2,281 case-control individuals from Spain. We performed a genome-wide pathway analysis using 1,053 reference biological pathways. A total of 14 genetic pathways (PFDR ≤ 2.55 × 10(-2)) were found to be significantly associated with psoriasis risk. Using an independent validation cohort of 7,353 individuals from the UK, a total of 6 genetic pathways were significantly replicated (PFDR ≤ 3.46 × 10(-2)). We found genetic pathways that had not been previously associated with psoriasis risk such as retinol metabolism (Pcombined = 1.84 × 10(-4)), the transport of inorganic ions and amino acids (Pcombined = 1.57 × 10(-7)), and post-translational protein modification (Pcombined = 1.57 × 10(-7)). In the latter pathway, MGAT5 showed a strong network centrality, and its association with psoriasis risk was further validated in an additional case-control cohort of 3,429 individuals (P < 0.05). These findings provide insights into the biological mechanisms associated with psoriasis susceptibility.

  17. Genome-Wide Pathway Analysis Identifies Genetic Pathways Associated with Psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Aterido, Adrià; Julià, Antonio; Ferrándiz, Carlos; Puig, Lluís; Fonseca, Eduardo; Fernández-López, Emilia; Dauden, Esteban; Sánchez-Carazo, José Luís; López-Estebaranz, José Luís; Moreno-Ramírez, David; Vanaclocha, Francisco; Herrera, Enrique; de la Cueva, Pablo; Dand, Nick; Palau, Núria; Alonso, Arnald; López-Lasanta, María; Tortosa, Raül; García-Montero, Andrés; Codó, Laia; Gelpí, Josep Lluís; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Absher, Devin; Capon, Francesca; Myers, Richard M; Barker, Jonathan N; Marsal, Sara

    2016-03-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease with a complex genetic architecture. To date, the psoriasis heritability is only partially explained. However, there is increasing evidence that the missing heritability in psoriasis could be explained by multiple genetic variants of low effect size from common genetic pathways. The objective of this study was to identify new genetic variation associated with psoriasis risk at the pathway level. We genotyped 598,258 single nucleotide polymorphisms in a discovery cohort of 2,281 case-control individuals from Spain. We performed a genome-wide pathway analysis using 1,053 reference biological pathways. A total of 14 genetic pathways (PFDR ≤ 2.55 × 10(-2)) were found to be significantly associated with psoriasis risk. Using an independent validation cohort of 7,353 individuals from the UK, a total of 6 genetic pathways were significantly replicated (PFDR ≤ 3.46 × 10(-2)). We found genetic pathways that had not been previously associated with psoriasis risk such as retinol metabolism (Pcombined = 1.84 × 10(-4)), the transport of inorganic ions and amino acids (Pcombined = 1.57 × 10(-7)), and post-translational protein modification (Pcombined = 1.57 × 10(-7)). In the latter pathway, MGAT5 showed a strong network centrality, and its association with psoriasis risk was further validated in an additional case-control cohort of 3,429 individuals (P < 0.05). These findings provide insights into the biological mechanisms associated with psoriasis susceptibility. PMID:26743605

  18. Genetics of the deflagellation pathway in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed Central

    Finst, R J; Kim, P J; Quarmby, L M

    1998-01-01

    Signal-induced deflagellation in Chlamydomonas involves Ca2+-activated breakage of the nine outer-doublet axonemal microtubules at a specific site in the flagellar transition zone. In this study, we isolated 13 new deflagellation mutants that can be divided into two phenotypic classes, the Adf class and the Fa class. Cells with the Adf deflagellation phenotype are defective in acid-stimulated Ca2+ influx, but can be induced to deflagellate by treatment with nonionic detergent and Ca2+. Genetic analyses show that the five new Adf mutations, as well as the previously identified adf1 mutation, are alleles of the ADF1 gene. Mutants in the second phenotypic class, the Fa mutants, fail to deflagellate in response to any known chemical stimulus and are defective in Ca2+-activated microtubule severing. Genetic analysis of these eight new Fa strains demonstrated that they define two complementation groups, and one of these contains the previously identified fa1 mutation. Diploid analysis showed that five alleles map to the FA1 gene, whereas four alleles define a novel gene that we have named FA2. The isolation of multiple mutant alleles of each gene, generated by either ultraviolet irradiation or insertional mutagenesis, indicates that ADF1, FA1, and FA2 may be the only genes that can be identified in a loss-of-function screen. These alleles should provide a better understanding of the regulation of microtubule severing by Ca2+. PMID:9611203

  19. Genetic relations of oceanic basalts as indicated by lead isotopes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tatsumoto, M.

    1966-01-01

    The isotopic compositions of lead and the concentrations of lead, uranium, and thorium in samples of oceanic tholeiite and alkali suites are determined, and the genetic relations of the oceanic basalts are discussed. Lead of the oceanic tholeiites has a varying lead-206 : lead-204 ratio between 17.8 and 18.8, while leads of the alkali basalt suites from Easter Island and Guadalupe Island are very radiogenic with lead-206 : lead-204 ratios between 19.3 and 20.4. It is concluded that (i) the isotopic composition of lead in oceanic tholeiite suggests that the upper mantle source region of the tholeiite was differentiated from an original mantle material more than 1 billion years ago and that the upper mantle is not homogeneous at the present time, (ii) less than 20 million years was required for the crystal differentiation within the alkali suite from Easter Island, (iii) no crustal contamination was involved in the course of differentiation of rocks from Easter Island; however, some crustal contamination may have affected Guadalupe Island rocks, and (iv) alkali basalt may be produced from the tholeiite in the oceanic region by crystal differentiation. Alternatively the difference in the isotopic composition of lead in oceanic basalts may be produced by partial melting at different depths of a differentiated upper mantle.

  20. Genetic contribution of the leukotriene pathway to coronary artery disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated the genetic contribution of the leukotriene (LT) pathway to risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) in 4,512 Caucasian and African American subjects ascertained through elective cardiac evaluation. Of the three previously associated variants, the shorter "3" and "4" alleles of a promoter ...

  1. Analytical approaches relating genetic evolutionary pathways to prognostic factors

    SciTech Connect

    Rohloff, A.C.; Sakach, J.M.; Shackney, S.E.

    1995-09-01

    Human solid tumors accumulate multiple genetic abnormalities as they progress to advanced stages. Multiparameter flow cytometry measurements of individual cells within each tumor may be useful in describing the genetic pathways taken by individual tumors during the course of their genetic evolution. In this paper, we analyzed correlated cell-by-cell measurements of cell DNA content, HER-2/neu protein content, and ras protein content obtained by multiparameter flow cytometry studies of primary breast cancers from 92 patients. These laboratory findings were correlated with established clinical prognostic factors for each patient at the time of diagnosis, using a stepwise multiple analysis of variance (MANOVA). The stepwise MANOVA successively splits a group of patients into two mutually exclusive dissimilar groups, selecting the clinical prognostic factor that is most effective in doing so. Using this criterion, formation of the first three groups that were judged most dissimilar on the cytometry parameters was based on the number of positive nodes at the time of diagnosis. We show that ploidy, HER-2/neu protein content, and ras protein content, as measured by multiple parameter flow cytometry, are correlated with nodal status and other known clinical prognostic factors. The cell-by-cell multiparameter data suggest that for some individual tumors there are multiple genetic evolutionary pathways. Multiple genetic evolutionary pathways are also suggested by the MANOVA analysis. Focusing on the identification and analysis of genetic evolutionary pathways within individual tumors and across patients appears to offer a promising approach for defining the prognosis of early cancers. 9 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  2. Molecular population genetics and selection in the glycolytic pathway.

    PubMed

    Eanes, Walter F

    2011-01-15

    In this review, I discuss the evidence for differential natural selection acting across enzymes in the glycolytic pathway in Drosophila. Across the genome, genes evolve at very different rates and possess markedly varying levels of molecular polymorphism, codon bias and expression variation. Discovering the underlying causes of this variation has been a challenge in evolutionary biology. It has been proposed that both the intrinsic properties of enzymes and their pathway position have direct effects on their molecular evolution, and with the genomic era the study of adaptation has been taken to the level of pathways and networks of genes and their products. Of special interest have been the energy-producing pathways. Using both population genetic and experimental approaches, our laboratory has been engaged in a study of molecular variation across the glycolytic pathway in Drosophila melanogaster and its close relatives. We have observed a pervasive pattern in which genes at the top of the pathway, especially around the intersection at glucose 6-phosphate, show evidence for both contemporary selection, in the form of latitudinal allele clines, and inter-specific selection, in the form of elevated levels of amino acid substitutions between species. To further explore this question, future work will require corroboration in other species, expansion into tangential pathways, and experimental work to better characterize metabolic control through the pathway and to examine the pleiotropic effects of these genes on other traits and fitness components.

  3. Investigating the phytohormone ethylene response pathway by chemical genetics.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lee-Chung; Chueh, Chiao-Mei; Wang, Long-Chi

    2014-01-01

    Conventional mutant screening in forward genetics research is indispensible to understand the biological operation behind any given phenotype. However, several issues, such as functional redundancy and lethality or sterility resulting from null mutations, frequently impede the functional characterization of genetic mutants. As an alternative approach, chemical screening with natural products or synthetic small molecules that act as conditional mutagens allows for identifying bioactive compounds as bioprobes to overcome the above-mentioned issues. Ethylene is the simplest olefin and is one of the major phytohormones playing crucial roles in plant physiology. Most of the current information on how ethylene works in plants came primarily from genetic studies of ethylene mutants identified by conventional genetic screening two decades ago. However, we lack a complete picture of functional interaction among components in the ethylene pathway and cross talk of ethylene with other phytohormones. Here, we describe our methodology for using chemical genetics to identify small molecules that interfere with the ethylene response. We set up a phenotype-based screening platform and a reporter gene-based system for verification of the hit compounds identified by chemical screening. We have successfully identified small molecules affecting the ethylene phenotype in etiolated seedlings and showed that a group of structurally similar compounds are novel inhibitors of ACC synthase, a rate-limiting enzyme in the ethylene biosynthesis pathway.

  4. Differential genetic interactions of yeast stress response MAPK pathways

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Humberto; Shales, Michael; Fernandez-Piñar, Pablo; Wei, Ping; Molina, Maria; Fiedler, Dorothea; Shokat, Kevan M; Beltrao, Pedro; Lim, Wendell; Krogan, Nevan J

    2015-01-01

    Genetic interaction screens have been applied with great success in several organisms to study gene function and the genetic architecture of the cell. However, most studies have been performed under optimal growth conditions even though many functional interactions are known to occur under specific cellular conditions. In this study, we have performed a large-scale genetic interaction analysis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae involving approximately 49 × 1,200 double mutants in the presence of five different stress conditions, including osmotic, oxidative and cell wall-altering stresses. This resulted in the generation of a differential E-MAP (or dE-MAP) comprising over 250,000 measurements of conditional interactions. We found an extensive number of conditional genetic interactions that recapitulate known stress-specific functional associations. Furthermore, we have also uncovered previously unrecognized roles involving the phosphatase regulator Bud14, the histone methylation complex COMPASS and membrane trafficking complexes in modulating the cell wall integrity pathway. Finally, the osmotic stress differential genetic interactions showed enrichment for genes coding for proteins with conditional changes in phosphorylation but not for genes with conditional changes in gene expression. This suggests that conditional genetic interactions are a powerful tool to dissect the functional importance of the different response mechanisms of the cell. PMID:25888283

  5. Biochemical Genetic Pathways that Modulate Aging in Multiple Species

    PubMed Central

    Bitto, Alessandro; Wang, Adrienne M.; Bennett, Christopher F.; Kaeberlein, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying biological aging have been extensively studied in the past 20 years with the avail of mainly four model organisms: the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster, and the domestic mouse Mus musculus. Extensive research in these four model organisms has identified a few conserved genetic pathways that affect longevity as well as metabolism and development. Here, we review how the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), sirtuins, adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), and mitochondrial stress-signaling pathways influence aging and life span in the aforementioned models and their possible implications for delaying aging in humans. We also draw some connections between these biochemical pathways and comment on what new developments aging research will likely bring in the near future. PMID:26525455

  6. Evolution of tryptophan biosynthetic pathway in microbial genomes: a comparative genetic study.

    PubMed

    Priya, V K; Sarkar, Susmita; Sinha, Somdatta

    2014-03-01

    Biosynthetic pathway evolution needs to consider the evolution of a group of genes that code for enzymes catalysing the multiple chemical reaction steps leading to the final end product. Tryptophan biosynthetic pathway has five chemical reaction steps that are highly conserved in diverse microbial genomes, though the genes of the pathway enzymes show considerable variations in arrangements, operon structure (gene fusion and splitting) and regulation. We use a combined bioinformatic and statistical analyses approach to address the question if the pathway genes from different microbial genomes, belonging to a wide range of groups, show similar evolutionary relationships within and between them. Our analyses involved detailed study of gene organization (fusion/splitting events), base composition, relative synonymous codon usage pattern of the genes, gene expressivity, amino acid usage, etc. to assess inter- and intra-genic variations, between and within the pathway genes, in diverse group of microorganisms. We describe these genetic and genomic variations in the tryptophan pathway genes in different microorganisms to show the similarities across organisms, and compare the same genes across different organisms to find the possible variability arising possibly due to horizontal gene transfers. Such studies form the basis for moving from single gene evolution to pathway evolutionary studies that are important steps towards understanding the systems biology of intracellular pathways. PMID:24592292

  7. Genetic perspective on the role of the autophagy-lysosome pathway in Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Gan-Or, Ziv; Dion, Patrick A; Rouleau, Guy A

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD), once considered as a prototype of a sporadic disease, is now known to be considerably affected by various genetic factors, which interact with environmental factors and the normal process of aging, leading to PD. Large studies determined that the hereditary component of PD is at least 27%, and in some populations, single genetic factors are responsible for more than 33% of PD patients. Interestingly, many of these genetic factors, such as LRRK2, GBA, SMPD1, SNCA, PARK2, PINK1, PARK7, SCARB2, and others, are involved in the autophagy-lysosome pathway (ALP). Some of these genes encode lysosomal enzymes, whereas others correspond to proteins that are involved in transport to the lysosome, mitophagy, or other autophagic-related functions. Is it possible that all these factors converge into a single pathway that causes PD? In this review, we will discuss these genetic findings and the role of the ALP in the pathogenesis of PD and will try to answer this question. We will suggest a novel hypothesis for the pathogenic mechanism of PD that involves the lysosome and the different autophagy pathways. PMID:26207393

  8. [Lead compound optimization strategy (1)--changing metabolic pathways and optimizing metabolism stability].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiang; Liu, Hong

    2013-10-01

    Lead compound optimization plays an important role in new drug discovery and development. The strategies for changing metabolic pathways can modulate pharmacokinetic properties, prolong the half life, improve metabolism stability and bioavailability of lead compounds. The strategies for changing metabolic pathways and improving metabolism stability are reviewed. These methods include blocking metabolic site, reduing lipophilicity, changing ring size, bioisosterism, and prodrug.

  9. Genetic and epigenetic pathways in myelodysplastic syndromes: A brief overview.

    PubMed

    Jhanwar, Suresh C

    2015-05-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a highly heterogenous group of hematopoietic tumors, mainly due to variable clinical features and diverse set of cytogenetic, molecular genetic and epigenetic lesions. The major clinical features of MDS are ineffective hematopoiesis, peripheral cytopenias, and an increased risk of transformation to acute myeloid leukemias, which in turn is most likely determined by specific genetic abnormalities and other presenting hematologic features. The risk of developing MDS is relatively higher in some genetic syndromes such as Fanconi anemia and receipt of chemotherapy and radiation treatment. In recent years a significant progress has occurred and a vast literatures has become available including the spectrum of cytogenetic abnormalities, gene mutations relating to RNA splicing machinery, epigenetic regulation of gene expression and signaling pathways associated with MDS pathogenesis, which have provided opportunities to understand the molecular mechanisms as well as employ targeted therapeutic approaches to treat MDS. The cytogenetic abnormalities detected in MDS varies from a single abnormality to complex karyotype not easily amenable to conventional cytogenetic analysis. In such cases, array based high resolution genomic analysis detected abnormalities, which are diagnostic as well as prognostic. The most common driver gene mutations detected in patients with MDS include RNA splicing (SF3B1,SRSF2,U2F1,ZRSR2), DNA methylation (TET2,DNMT3A,IDH1/IDH2), chromatin modification (ASXL1,EZH2), transcription regulation (RUNX1,BCOR) and DNA repair control p53. A small subset of MDS arise due to deregulation of RAS pathway, mainly due to NRAS/KRAS/NF1 mutations. Identification of these mutations and pathways have provided opportunities for oncologists to target these patients with specific therapies. Several drugs which either target the spliceosome, oncogenic RAS signaling, or hypomethylating agents have been employed to successfully treat MDS

  10. The adverse outcome pathway (AOP) for chemical binding to tubulin in oocytes leading to aneuploid offspring.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, Francesco; Massarotti, Alberto; Yauk, Carole L; Pacchierotti, Francesca; Russo, Antonella

    2016-03-01

    The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) has launched the Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) Programme to advance knowledge of pathways of toxicity and improve the use of mechanistic information in risk assessment. An AOP links a molecular initiating event (MIE) to an adverse outcome (AO) through intermediate key events (KE). Here, we present the scientific evidence in support of an AOP whereby chemicals that bind to tubulin cause microtubule depolymerization resulting in spindle disorganization followed by altered chromosome alignment and segregation and the generation of aneuploidy in female germ cells, ultimately leading to aneuploidy in the offspring. Aneuploidy, an abnormal number of chromosomes that is not an exact multiple of the haploid number, is a well-known cause of human disease and represents a major cause of infertility, pregnancy failure, and serious genetic disorders in the offspring. Among chemicals that induce aneuploidy in female germ cells, a large majority impairs microtubule dynamics and spindle function. Colchicine, a prototypical chemical that binds to tubulin and causes microtubule depolymerization, is used here to illustrate the AOP. This AOP is specific to female germ cells exposed during the periovulation period. Although the majority of the data come from rodent studies, the available evidence suggests that the MIE and KEs are conserved across species and would occur in human oocytes. The development of AOPs related to mutagenicity in germ cells is expected to aid the identification of potential hazards to germ cell genomic integrity and support regulatory efforts to protect population health.

  11. MAPK pathway activation by chronic lead-exposure increases vascular reactivity through oxidative stress/cyclooxygenase-2-dependent pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Simões, Maylla Ronacher; Aguado, Andrea; Fiorim, Jonaína; Silveira, Edna Aparecida; Azevedo, Bruna Fernandes; Toscano, Cindy Medice; Zhenyukh, Olha; Briones, Ana María; Alonso, María Jesús; Vassallo, Dalton Valentim; Salaices, Mercedes

    2015-03-01

    Chronic exposure to low lead concentration produces hypertension; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We analyzed the role of oxidative stress, cyclooxygenase-2-dependent pathways and MAPK in the vascular alterations induced by chronic lead exposure. Aortas from lead-treated Wistar rats (1st dose: 10 μg/100 g; subsequent doses: 0.125 μg/100 g, intramuscular, 30 days) and cultured aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from Sprague Dawley rats stimulated with lead (20 μg/dL) were used. Lead blood levels of treated rats attained 21.7 ± 2.38 μg/dL. Lead exposure increased systolic blood pressure and aortic ring contractile response to phenylephrine, reduced acetylcholine-induced relaxation and did not affect sodium nitroprusside relaxation. Endothelium removal and L-NAME left-shifted the response to phenylephrine more in untreated than in lead-treated rats. Apocynin and indomethacin decreased more the response to phenylephrine in treated than in untreated rats. Aortic protein expression of gp91(phox), Cu/Zn-SOD, Mn-SOD and COX-2 increased after lead exposure. In cultured VSMCs lead 1) increased superoxide anion production, NADPH oxidase activity and gene and/or protein levels of NOX-1, NOX-4, Mn-SOD, EC-SOD and COX-2 and 2) activated ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK. Both antioxidants and COX-2 inhibitors normalized superoxide anion production, NADPH oxidase activity and mRNA levels of NOX-1, NOX-4 and COX-2. Blockade of the ERK1/2 and p38 signaling pathways abolished lead-induced NOX-1, NOX-4 and COX-2 expression. Results show that lead activation of the MAPK signaling pathways activates inflammatory proteins such as NADPH oxidase and COX-2, suggesting a reciprocal interplay and contribution to vascular dysfunction as an underlying mechanisms for lead-induced hypertension. - Highlights: • Lead-exposure increases oxidative stress, COX-2 expression and vascular reactivity. • Lead exposure activates MAPK signaling pathway. • ROS and COX-2 activation by

  12. Genetic and molecular mechanisms leading to eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Holvoet, S; Blanchard, C

    2014-04-01

    From the epidemiologic studies, to the first genome wide association study in 2010, the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of EoE has been both inspiring and puzzling. Epidemiologic studies have highlighted the contribution of the genetic in the EoE disease by emphasizing the presence of familial type of EoE, but has also revealed the complexity of its transmission that does not follow a Mendelian inheritance. The molecular pathogenesis advances have helped in the understanding of the mechanisms underlying this esophageal inflammation but has also allow the identification of candidate genes for which single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) are associated with the disease. Recently, the genome wide analysis of more than half a million single nucleotide polymorphism has allowed the identification of gene variations associated with the EoE disease and has led to substantial advance in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to EoE. Undeniably, EoE is a complex polygenic disease and we certainly are only at the ground level of its detailed comprehension. PMID:25075658

  13. Importance of monitoring family members in establishing sources and pathways of lead in blood.

    PubMed

    Gulson, B L; Mizon, K J; Korsch, M J; Howarth, D

    1996-10-11

    High precision lead isotope measurements were undertaken to establish the sources and pathways in blood and environmental samples of five families from the Broken Hill lead mining community, New South Wales, Australia. The five families were selected from 27 families investigated to illustrate the different sources and pathways of lead into blood and the importance of monitoring the whole family. The results illustrate that although the major source of lead is from the orebody, paint and petrol can be significant contributors to both house dust and blood leads. The results also show that the sources and pathways can be from the father's occupation and hence monitoring of families is important, especially in high risk locations. In two cases, the elevated blood leads in the children did not derive from their current residence but from other residences in the community.

  14. Genetic analysis of photoreceptor action pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The specific strategies and long-term goals of this proposal remain intact relative to the original proposal. We continue to isolate and characterize photomorphogenic mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. The molecular and biochemical characterization of one of these mutants, det1, has led to one publication of original data and to one Society for Experimental Biology Symposium paper (see below). The phenotype of a second mutant, det2, has also been studied during this funding period. In addition, we have continued work on a general strategy to isolate mutations in trans-acting regulatory factors that mediate light-regulated gene expression, and have identified several potentially interesting regulatory mutants. In the third funding period, we will concentrate on the genetical, biochemical, and molecular characterization of these new mutants. Construction of double mutants between the new mutants and the previously characterized morphological mutants should allow us to construct a pathway for light-regulated seedling development in Arabidopsis.

  15. Genetic Analysis of the Colicin V Secretion Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, L. H.; Fath, M. J.; Mahanty, H. K.; Tai, P. C.; Kolter, R.

    1995-01-01

    Colicin V (ColV) is peptide antibiotic secreted by Escherichia coli through a dedicated exporter composed of three proteins, CvaA, CvaB, and TolC. ColV secretion is independent of the E. coli general secretory pathway (Sec) but requires an N-terminal export signal specific for the CvaAB/TolC exporter. ColV secretion was characterized using genetic and biochemical methods. When the ColV N-terminal extension is replaced with the OmpA signal sequence, the Sec system can localize ColV to the periplasm. Periplasmic ColV is lethal to cells lacking the ColV immunity protein, Cvi. Based on this result, a genetic assay was designed to monitor for the presence of periplasmic ColV during normal CvaAB/TolC mediated secretion. Results indicate that low levels of ColV may be present in the periplasm during secretion. Precursor and mature ColV were also characterized from the wild-type system and in various exporter mutant backgrounds using immunoprecipitation. ColV processing is rapid in wild-type cells, and CvaA and CvaB are critical for processing to occur. In contrast, processing occurs normally, albeit more slowly, in a TolC mutant. PMID:8536973

  16. Genetically encoded optical probes for imaging cellular signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Umezawa, Yoshio

    2005-06-15

    The intracellular signaling can be monitored in vivo in living cells by genetically encoded intracellular fluorescent and bioluminescent probes or indicators, which include second messengers, protein phosphorylation, protein conformational changes, protein-protein interactions, and protein localizations. These probes are of general use not only for fundamental biological studies, but also for assay and screening of possible pharmaceutical or toxic chemicals that inhibit or facilitate cellular signaling pathways. In this review, two examples of such indicators were briefly introduced. First, a genetically encoded fluorescent indicator was described for the detection and characterization of estrogen agonists and antagonists. The indicator was named SCCoR (single cell-coactivator recruitment). The high sensitivity of the present indicator made it possible to distinguish between estrogen strong and weak agonists in a dose-dependent fashion, immediately after adding a ligand to live cells. Discrimination of agonists from antagonists was efficiently achieved using the indicator. The approach described here can be applied to develop biosensors for other hormone receptors as well. Another example herein is a genetically encoded bioluminescent indicator for monitoring the nuclear trafficking of target proteins in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrated quantitative cell-based in vitro sensing of ligand-induced translocation of androgen receptor, which allowed high-throughput screening of exo- and endogenous agonists and antagonists. Furthermore, the indicator enabled noninvasive in vivo imaging of the androgen receptor translocation in the brains of living mice with a charge-coupled device imaging system. These rapid and quantitative analyses in vitro and in vivo provide a wide variety of applications for screening pharmacological or toxicological compounds and testing them in living animals.

  17. Synergy and interactions among biological pathways leading to preterm premature rupture of membranes.

    PubMed

    Lannon, Sophia M R; Vanderhoeven, Jeroen P; Eschenbach, David A; Gravett, Michael G; Adams Waldorf, Kristina M

    2014-10-01

    Preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM) occurs in 1% to 2% of births. Impact of PPROM is greatest in low- and middle-income countries where prematurity-related deaths are most common. Recent investigations identify cytokine and matrix metalloproteinase activation, oxidative stress, and apoptosis as primary pathways to PPROM. These biological processes are initiated by heterogeneous etiologies including infection/inflammation, placental bleeding, uterine overdistention, and genetic polymorphisms. We hypothesize that pathways to PPROM overlap and act synergistically to weaken membranes. We focus our discussion on membrane composition and strength, pathways linking risk factors to membrane weakening, and future research directions to reduce the global burden of PPROM.

  18. Genetics of Hypertension and Cardiovascular Disease and Their Interconnected Pathways: Lessons from Large Studies

    PubMed Central

    Kraja, Aldi T.; Hunt, Steven C.; Rao, D. C.; Dávila-Román, Victor G.; Arnett, Donna K.; Province, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    Blood pressure (BP), hypertension (HT) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) are common complex phenotypes, which are affected by multiple genetic and environmental factors. This article describes recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) that have reported causative variants for BP/HT and CVD/heart traits and analyzes the overlapping associated gene polymorphisms. It also examines potential replication of findings from the HyperGEN data on African Americans and whites. Several genes involved in BP/HT regulation also appear to be involved in CVD. A better picture is emerging, with overlapping hot-spot regions and with interconnected pathways between BP/HT and CVD. A systemic approach to full understanding of BP/HT and CVD development and their progression to disease may lead to the identification of gene targets and pathways for the development of novel therapeutic interventions. PMID:21128019

  19. Genetics of hypertension and cardiovascular disease and their interconnected pathways: lessons from large studies.

    PubMed

    Kraja, Aldi T; Hunt, Steven C; Rao, D C; Dávila-Román, Victor G; Arnett, Donna K; Province, Michael A

    2011-02-01

    Blood pressure (BP), hypertension (HT) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) are common complex phenotypes, which are affected by multiple genetic and environmental factors. This article describes recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) that have reported causative variants for BP/HT and CVD/heart traits and analyzes the overlapping associated gene polymorphisms. It also examines potential replication of findings from the HyperGEN data on African Americans and whites. Several genes involved in BP/HT regulation also appear to be involved in CVD. A better picture is emerging, with overlapping hot-spot regions and with interconnected pathways between BP/HT and CVD. A systemic approach to full understanding of BP/HT and CVD development and their progression to disease may lead to the identification of gene targets and pathways for the development of novel therapeutic interventions.

  20. Th17 Cell Pathway in Human Immunity: Lessons from Genetics and Therapeutic Interventions.

    PubMed

    Patel, Dhavalkumar D; Kuchroo, Vijay K

    2015-12-15

    The T helper 17 (Th17) cell pathway has been linked by genome-wide association studies to multiple autoimmune diseases. Identification of the genetic causes of primary immunodeficiency diseases revealed that Th17 cells are also critical in host immunity to mucocutaneous candida infections and Staphylococcus aureus. Therapeutic interventions with inhibitors of the different components of the pathway such as interleukin-12 (IL-12), IL-23, IL-17A, and IL-17RA have variably beneficial effects in psoriasis, Crohn's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, non-infectious uveitis, and multiple sclerosis. Thus, whereas Th17 cells are protective against Candida albicans and to a lesser degree Staphylococcus aureus, they are pathogenic in many autoimmune diseases. Here, we compare and contrast the effects of human genetic mutations of and therapeutic interventions targeted at Th17 cell molecules. We discuss that although there are similarities when Th17 cell pathway molecules are modulated, each molecule has unique non-Th17 cell features that lead to different functional outcomes.

  1. Th17 Cell Pathway in Human Immunity: Lessons from Genetics and Therapeutic Interventions.

    PubMed

    Patel, Dhavalkumar D; Kuchroo, Vijay K

    2015-12-15

    The T helper 17 (Th17) cell pathway has been linked by genome-wide association studies to multiple autoimmune diseases. Identification of the genetic causes of primary immunodeficiency diseases revealed that Th17 cells are also critical in host immunity to mucocutaneous candida infections and Staphylococcus aureus. Therapeutic interventions with inhibitors of the different components of the pathway such as interleukin-12 (IL-12), IL-23, IL-17A, and IL-17RA have variably beneficial effects in psoriasis, Crohn's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, non-infectious uveitis, and multiple sclerosis. Thus, whereas Th17 cells are protective against Candida albicans and to a lesser degree Staphylococcus aureus, they are pathogenic in many autoimmune diseases. Here, we compare and contrast the effects of human genetic mutations of and therapeutic interventions targeted at Th17 cell molecules. We discuss that although there are similarities when Th17 cell pathway molecules are modulated, each molecule has unique non-Th17 cell features that lead to different functional outcomes. PMID:26682981

  2. Lead-Related Genetic Loci, Cumulative Lead Exposure and Incident Coronary Heart Disease: The Normative Aging Study

    PubMed Central

    Weisskopf, Marc G.; Sparrow, David; Schwartz, Joel; Hu, Howard; Park, Sung Kyun

    2016-01-01

    Background Cumulative exposure to lead is associated with cardiovascular outcomes. Polymorphisms in the δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD), hemochromatosis (HFE), heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1), vitamin D receptor (VDR), glutathione S-transferase (GST) supergene family (GSTP1, GSTT1, GSTM1), apolipoprotein E (APOE),angiotensin II receptor-1 (AGTR1) and angiotensinogen (AGT) genes, are believed to alter toxicokinetics and/or toxicodynamics of lead. Objectives We assessed possible effect modification by genetic polymorphisms in ALAD, HFE, HMOX1, VDR, GSTP1, GSTT1, GSTM1, APOE, AGTR1 and AGT individually and as the genetic risk score (GRS) on the association between cumulative lead exposure and incident coronary heart disease (CHD) events. Methods We used K-shell-X-ray fluorescence to measure bone lead levels. GRS was calculated on the basis of 22 lead-related loci. We constructed Cox proportional hazard models to compute adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for incident CHD. We applied inverse probability weighting to account for potential selection bias due to recruitment into the bone lead sub-study. Results Significant effect modification was found by VDR, HMOX1, GSTP1, APOE, and AGT genetic polymorphisms when evaluated individually. Further, the bone lead-CHD associations became larger as GRS increases. After adjusting for potential confounders, a HR of CHD was 2.27 (95%CI: 1.50–3.42) with 2-fold increase in patella lead levels, among participants in the top tertile of GRS. We also detected an increasing trend in HRs across tertiles of GRS (p-trend = 0.0063). Conclusions Our findings suggest that lead-related loci as a whole may play an important role in susceptibility to lead-related CHD risk. These findings need to be validated in a separate cohort containing bone lead, lead-related genetic loci and incident CHD data. PMID:27584680

  3. Dynamic regulation of genetic pathways and targets during aging in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Tao; Shao, Jiaofang; Ren, Xiaoliang; Zhao, Zhongying

    2014-01-01

    Numerous genetic targets and some individual pathways associated with aging have been identified using the worm model. However, less is known about the genetic mechanisms of aging in genome wide, particularly at the level of multiple pathways as well as the regulatory networks during aging. Here, we employed the gene expression datasets of three time points during aging in Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) and performed the approach of gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) on each dataset between adjacent stages. As a result, multiple genetic pathways and targets were identified as significantly down- or up-regulated. Among them, 5 truly aging-dependent signaling pathways including MAPK signaling pathway, mTOR signaling pathway, Wnt signaling pathway, TGF-beta signaling pathway and ErbB signaling pathway as well as 12 significantly associated genes were identified with dynamic expression pattern during aging. On the other hand, the continued declines in the regulation of several metabolic pathways have been demonstrated to display age-related changes. Furthermore, the reconstructed regulatory networks based on three of aging related Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments followed by sequencing (ChIP–seq) datasets and the expression matrices of 154 involved genes in above signaling pathways provide new insights into aging at the multiple pathways level. The combination of multiple genetic pathways and targets needs to be taken into consideration in future studies of aging, in which the dynamic regulation would be uncovered. PMID:24739375

  4. Dynamic regulation of genetic pathways and targets during aging in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    He, Kan; Zhou, Tao; Shao, Jiaofang; Ren, Xiaoliang; Zhao, Zhongying; Liu, Dahai

    2014-03-01

    Numerous genetic targets and some individual pathways associated with aging have been identified using the worm model. However, less is known about the genetic mechanisms of aging in genome wide, particularly at the level of multiple pathways as well as the regulatory networks during aging. Here, we employed the gene expression datasets of three time points during aging in Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) and performed the approach of gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) on each dataset between adjacent stages. As a result, multiple genetic pathways and targets were identified as significantly down- or up-regulated. Among them, 5 truly aging-dependent signaling pathways including MAPK signaling pathway, mTOR signaling pathway, Wnt signaling pathway, TGF-beta signaling pathway and ErbB signaling pathway as well as 12 significantly associated genes were identified with dynamic expression pattern during aging. On the other hand, the continued declines in the regulation of several metabolic pathways have been demonstrated to display age-related changes. Furthermore, the reconstructed regulatory networks based on three of aging related Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments followed by sequencing (ChIP-seq) datasets and the expression matrices of 154 involved genes in above signaling pathways provide new insights into aging at the multiple pathways level. The combination of multiple genetic pathways and targets needs to be taken into consideration in future studies of aging, in which the dynamic regulation would be uncovered.

  5. Evolution of branched regulatory genetic pathways: directional selection on pleiotropic loci accelerates developmental system drift.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Norman A; Porter, Adam H

    2007-01-01

    Developmental systems are regulated by a web of interacting loci. One common and useful approach in studying the evolution of development is to focus on classes of interacting elements within these systems. Here, we use individual-based simulations to study the evolution of traits controlled by branched developmental pathways involving three loci, where one locus regulates two different traits. We examined the system under a variety of selective regimes. In the case where one branch was under stabilizing selection and the other under directional selection, we observed "developmental system drift": the trait under stabilizing selection showed little phenotypic change even though the loci underlying that trait showed considerable evolutionary divergence. This occurs because the pleiotropic locus responds to directional selection and compensatory mutants are then favored in the pathway under stabilizing selection. Though developmental system drift may be caused by other mechanisms, it seems likely that it is accelerated by the same underlying genetic mechanism as that producing the Dobzhansky-Muller incompatibilities that lead to speciation in both linear and branched pathways. We also discuss predictions of our model for developmental system drift and how different selective regimes affect probabilities of speciation in the branched pathway system.

  6. Detecting genetic interactions in pathway-based genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Huang, Anhui; Martin, Eden R; Vance, Jeffery M; Cai, Xiaodong

    2014-05-01

    Pathway-based genome-wide association studies (GWAS) can exploit collective effects of causal variants in a pathway to increase power of detection. However, current methods for pathway-based GWAS do not consider epistatic effects of genetic variants, although interactions between genetic variants may play an important role in influencing complex traits. In this paper, we employed a Bayesian Lasso logistic regression model for pathway-based GWAS to include all possible main effects and a large number of pairwise interactions of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a pathway, and then inferred the model with an efficient group empirical Bayesian Lasso (EBLasso) method. Using the inferred model, the statistical significance of a pathway was tested with the Wald statistics. Reliable effects in a significant pathway were selected using the stability selection technique. Extensive computer simulations demonstrated that our group EBlasso method significantly outperformed two competitive methods in most simulation setups and offered similar performance in other simulation setups. When applying to a GWAS dataset for Parkinson disease, EBLasso identified three significant pathways including the primary bile acid biosynthesis pathway, the neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction, and the MAPK signaling pathway. All effects identified in the primary bile acid biosynthesis pathway and many of effects in the other two pathways were epistatic effects. The group EBLasso method provides a valuable tool for pathway-based GWAS to identify main and epistatic effects of genetic variants.

  7. A novel genetic score approach using instruments to investigate interactions between pathways and environment: application to air pollution.

    PubMed

    Bind, Marie-Abele; Coull, Brent; Suh, Helen; Wright, Robert; Baccarelli, Andrea; Vokonas, Pantel; Schwartz, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Air pollution has been associated with increased systemic inflammation markers. We developed a new pathway analysis approach to investigate whether gene variants within relevant pathways (oxidative stress, endothelial function, and metal processing) modified the association between particulate air pollution and fibrinogen, C-reactive protein (CRP), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). Our study population consisted of 822 elderly participants of the Normative Aging Study (1999-2011). To investigate the role of biological mechanisms and to reduce the number of comparisons in the analysis, we created pathway-specific scores using gene variants related to each pathway. To select the most appropriate gene variants, we used the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (Lasso) to relate independent outcomes representative of each pathway (8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine for oxidative stress, augmentation index for endothelial function, and patella lead for metal processing) to gene variants. A high genetic score corresponds to a higher allelic risk profile. We fit mixed-effects models to examine modification by the genetic score of the weekly air pollution association with the outcome. Among participants with higher genetic scores within the oxidative stress pathway, we observed significant associations between particle number and fibrinogen, while we did not find any association among participants with lower scores (p(interaction) = 0.04). Compared to individuals with low genetic scores of metal processing gene variants, participants with higher scores had greater effects of particle number on fibrinogen (p(interaction) = 0.12), CRP (p(interaction) = 0.02), and ICAM-1 (pinteraction = 0.08). This two-stage penalization method is easy to implement and can be used for large-scale genetic applications.

  8. Cancer predisposition in mutant mice defective in multiple genetic pathways: uncovering important genetic interactions.

    PubMed

    Meira, L B; Reis, A M; Cheo, D L; Nahari, D; Burns, D K; Friedberg, E C

    2001-06-01

    Mouse models that mimic the human skin cancer-prone disease xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) provide an useful experimental system with which to study the relationship between the DNA repair process of nucleotide excision repair (NER) and ultraviolet- (UV) induced skin carcinogenesis. We have generated Xpc mutant mice and documented their deficiency in the process of NER of UV-induced DNA damage. Xpc mutant mice are highly predisposed to UV-B radiation-induced skin cancer, both in the homozygous and the heterozygous state. The combination of Xpc and Trp53 mutations enhances this predisposition and alters the tumor spectrum observed in single mutant mice. These results suggest a synergism between NER and the function of Trp53 in suppression of cancer. We have examined the mutational spectrum in the Trp53 gene from skin cancers in Trp53+/+ and Trp53+/- mice of all three Xpc genotypes and have found evidence for signature mutations associated with defective NER. In addition, we have demonstrated that Xpc mutant mice are highly predisposed to the induction of lung and liver cancers by treatment with 2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF) and N-OH-2-AAF. By combining the Xpc mutation with other mutations in genes involved in repair of DNA damage we have identified additional genetic interactions important in carcinogenesis. The mouse Apex gene is a critical component of the base excision repair (BER) pathway as well as the redox regulation of transcription factors important in growth control and the cellular response to DNA damage. By combining mutations in Xpc, Trp53 and Apex we have obtained genetic evidence for a functional interaction between Apex and Trp53 which probably involves the activation of the Trp53 protein by Apex. Mutations in the mismatch repair (MMR) gene Msh2 also influence the carcinogenesis observed in Xpc Trp53 mutant mice. Our results demonstrate that multiple repair pathways operate in prevention of tumor formation. PMID:11376686

  9. Pathways of Behavior Problems from Childhood to Late Adolescence Leading to Delinquency and Academic Underachievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timmermans, Maartje; van Lier, Pol A. C.; Koot, Hans M.

    2009-01-01

    Adolescent delinquency and academic underachievement are both linked with child and adolescent behavior problems. However, little is known about behavioral pathways leading to these adverse outcomes. Children's aggression, opposition, status violations, and property violations scores were collected at ages 5, 10, and 18. Delinquency and academic…

  10. Alpha1a-adrenoceptor genetic variant induces cardiomyoblast-to-fibroblast-like cell transition via distinct signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Kleine-Brueggeney, Maren; Gradinaru, Irina; Babaeva, Ekaterina; Schwinn, Debra A; Oganesian, Anush

    2014-09-01

    The role of naturally occurring human α1a-Adrenergic Receptor (α1aAR) genetic variants associated with cardiovascular disorders is poorly understood. Here, we present the novel findings that expression of human α1aAR-247R (247R) genetic variant in cardiomyoblasts leads to transition of cardiomyoblasts into a fibroblast-like phenotype, evidenced by morphology and distinct de novo expression of characteristic genes. These fibroblast-like cells exhibit constitutive, high proliferative capacity and agonist-induced hypertrophy compared with cells prior to transition. We demonstrate that constitutive, synergistic activation of EGFR, Src and ERK kinases is the potential molecular mechanism of this transition. We also demonstrate that 247R triggers two distinct EGFR transactivation-dependent signaling pathways: 1) constitutive Gq-independent β-arrestin-1/Src/MMP/EGFR/ERK-dependent hyperproliferation and 2) agonist-induced Gq- and EGFR/STAT-dependent hypertrophy. Interestingly, in cardiomyoblasts agonist-independent hyperproliferation is MMP-dependent, but in fibroblast-like cells it is MMP-independent, suggesting that expression of α1aAR genetic variant in cardiomyocytes may trigger extracellular matrix remodeling. Thus, these novel findings demonstrate that EGFR transactivation by α1aAR-247R leads to hyperproliferation, hypertrophy and alterations in cardiomyoblasts, suggesting that these unique genetically-mediated alterations in signaling pathways and cellular function may lead to myocardial fibrosis. Such extracellular matrix remodeling may contribute to the genesis of arrhythmias in certain types of heart failure.

  11. Genetic Variants in Isolated Ebstein Anomaly Implicated in Myocardial Development Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Druschel, Charlotte M.; Fan, Ruzong; Caggana, Michele; Brody, Lawrence C.; Mills, James L.

    2016-01-01

    Ebstein anomaly (EA) is a rare heart defect in which the tricuspid valve is malformed and displaced. The tricuspid valve abnormalities can lead to backflow of blood from the right ventricle to the right atrium, preventing proper circulation of blood to the lungs. Although the etiology of EA is largely unresolved, increased prevalence of EA in those with a family history of congenital heart disease suggests EA has a genetic component. Copy number variants (CNVs) are a major source of genetic variation and have been implicated in a range of congenital heart defect phenotypes. We performed a systematic, genome-wide search for CNVs in 47 isolated EA cases using genotyping microarrays. In addition, we used a custom HaloPlex panel to sequence three known EA genes and 47 candidate EA genes. We identified 35 candidate CNVs in 24 (51%) EA cases. Rare sequence variants in genes associated with cardiomyopathy were identified in 11 (23%) EA cases. Two CNVs near the transcriptional repressor HEY1, a member of the NOTCH signaling pathway, were identified in three unrelated cases. All other candidate CNVs were each identified in a single case. At least 11 of 35 candidate CNVs include genes involved in myocardial development or function, including multiple genes in the BMP signaling pathway. We identified enrichment of gene sets involved in histone modification and cardiomyocyte differentiation, supporting the involvement of the developing myocardium in the etiology of EA. Gene set enrichment analysis also identified ribosomal RNA processing, a potentially novel pathway of altered cardiac development in EA. Our results suggest an altered myocardial program may contribute to abnormal tricuspid valve development in EA. Future studies should investigate abnormal differentiation of cardiomyocytes as a potential etiological factor in EA. PMID:27788187

  12. Pathways to genetic screening: Patient knowledges, patient practices. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    This study is design to assess the impacts of the integration of genetic knowledge in to the life of high-risk family members. The social and cultural barriers and bridges that incorporation of genetic information will have on these families as well as how they use this genetic information to increase reproductive options and improve the quality of family life are a major focus of this work.

  13. Multiple signaling pathways leading to the activation of interferon regulatory factor 3.

    PubMed

    Servant, Marc J; Grandvaux, Nathalie; Hiscott, John

    2002-09-01

    Virus infection of susceptible cells activates multiple signaling pathways that orchestrate the activation of genes, such as cytokines, involved in the antiviral and innate immune response. Among the kinases induced are the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases, Jun-amino terminal kinases (JNK) and p38, the IkappaB kinase (IKK) and DNA-PK. In addition, virus infection also activates an uncharacterized VAK responsible for the C-terminal phosphorylation and subsequent activation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3). Virus-mediated activation of IRF-3 through VAK is dependent on viral entry and transcription, since replication deficient virus failed to induce IRF-3 activity. The pathways leading to VAK activation are not well characterized, but IRF-3 appears to represent a novel cellular detection pathway that recognizes viral nucleocapsid (N) structure. Recently, the range of inducers responsible for IRF-3 activation has increased. In addition to virus infection, recognition of bacterial infection mediated through lipopolysaccharide by Toll-like receptor 4 has also been reported. Furthermore, MAP kinase kinase kinase (MAP KKK)-related pathways and DNA-PK induce N-terminal phosphorylation of IRF-3. This review summarizes recent observations in the identification of novel signaling pathways leading to IRF-3 activation.

  14. Genetic Variation in Dopamine Pathways Differentially Associated with Smoking Progression in Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laucht, Manfred; Becker, Katja; Frank, Josef; Schmidt, Martin H.; Esser, Gunter; Treutlein, Jens; Skowronek, Markus H.; Schumann, Gunter

    2008-01-01

    A study examines whether genetic variation in dopamine pathways differentially associate with smoking progression in adolescence. Results indicate the influence of specific dopamine genes in different stages of smoking progression in adolescents.

  15. Evolution of a pathway for chlorobenzene metabolism leads to natural attenuation in contaminated groundwater

    PubMed

    van der Meer JR; Werlen; Nishino; Spain

    1998-11-01

    Complete metabolism of chlorinated benzenes is not a feature that is generally found in aerobic bacteria but is thought to be due to a novel recombination of two separate gene clusters. Such a recombination could be responsible for adaptation of a natural microbial community in response to contamination with synthetic chemicals. This hypothesis was tested in a chlorobenzene (CB)-contaminated aquifer. CB-degrading bacteria from a contaminated site were characterized for a number of years by examining a combination of growth characteristics and DNA-DNA hybridization, PCR, and DNA sequence data. The genetic information obtained for the CB pathway of the predominant microorganism, Ralstonia sp. strain JS705, revealed a unique combination of (partially duplicated) genes for chlorocatechol degradation and genes for a benzene-toluene type of aromatic ring dioxygenase. The organism was detected in CB-polluted groundwater by hybridizing colonies cultivated on low-strength heterotrophic media with probes for the CB pathway. Southern hybridizations performed to determine the organization of the CB pathway genes and the 16S ribosomal DNA indicated that CB-degrading organisms isolated from different wells at the site were identical to JS705. Physiological characterization by the Biolog test system revealed some differences. The genes for the aromatic ring dioxygenase and dihydrodiol dehydrogenase of JS705 were detected in toluene and benzene degraders from the same site. Our results suggest that recent horizontal gene transfer and genetic recombination of existing genes between indigenous microorganisms were the mechanisms for evolution of the catabolic pathway. Evolution of the CB pathway seems to have created the capacity for natural attenuation of CB at the contaminated site.

  16. Lead concentration in the blood of the general population living near a lead-zinc mine site, Nigeria: Exposure pathways.

    PubMed

    Bello, Olanrewaju; Naidu, Ravi; Rahman, Mohammad Mahmudur; Liu, Yanju; Dong, Zhaomin

    2016-01-15

    Lead (Pb) poisoning in children is a major public health catastrophe worldwide. This report summarises both exposure pathways and blood Pb levels in children below 7 years of age and adults (above 18 years) from the Adudu community living near a lead-zinc mine in Nasawara, Nigeria. The average and median blood Pb levels in children and adults were 2.1 and 1.3 μg/dL, 3.1 and 1.8 μg/dL, respectively. However, Pb in 14% of adults' blood exceeded 5 μg/dL, which is the recommended threshold blood Pb concentration in adults as established by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Furthermore 68% of adults' blood exceeded blood Pb action level of 2 μg/dL. For children, 11.4% and 31% of the blood samples exceeded 5 μg/dL and 2 μg/dL, respectively, while no safe blood Pb level in children has been recommended. In Nasawara, a significant difference (p<0.05) was observed between the various age groups in children with 2-4 years old having the highest levels and 6 year old children having the lowest Pb levels. Although this study did not detect elevated levels of Pb in children's blood in regions such as Zamfara, Nigeria and Kabwe, Zambia, a high percentage of samples exceeded 2 μg/dL. Soils, floor dusts, water and crops also reveal that Pb contamination in the study area could potentially be the major cause of blood Pb in the community exposed to mining. This study also observed a significant correlation between water Pb levels of adults and blood Pb levels, suggesting that water is the major exposure pathway. This analysis highlights the need to properly manage mining activities so that the health of communities living in the vicinity of a Pb-Zn mine is not compromised. PMID:26556755

  17. Lead concentration in the blood of the general population living near a lead-zinc mine site, Nigeria: Exposure pathways.

    PubMed

    Bello, Olanrewaju; Naidu, Ravi; Rahman, Mohammad Mahmudur; Liu, Yanju; Dong, Zhaomin

    2016-01-15

    Lead (Pb) poisoning in children is a major public health catastrophe worldwide. This report summarises both exposure pathways and blood Pb levels in children below 7 years of age and adults (above 18 years) from the Adudu community living near a lead-zinc mine in Nasawara, Nigeria. The average and median blood Pb levels in children and adults were 2.1 and 1.3 μg/dL, 3.1 and 1.8 μg/dL, respectively. However, Pb in 14% of adults' blood exceeded 5 μg/dL, which is the recommended threshold blood Pb concentration in adults as established by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Furthermore 68% of adults' blood exceeded blood Pb action level of 2 μg/dL. For children, 11.4% and 31% of the blood samples exceeded 5 μg/dL and 2 μg/dL, respectively, while no safe blood Pb level in children has been recommended. In Nasawara, a significant difference (p<0.05) was observed between the various age groups in children with 2-4 years old having the highest levels and 6 year old children having the lowest Pb levels. Although this study did not detect elevated levels of Pb in children's blood in regions such as Zamfara, Nigeria and Kabwe, Zambia, a high percentage of samples exceeded 2 μg/dL. Soils, floor dusts, water and crops also reveal that Pb contamination in the study area could potentially be the major cause of blood Pb in the community exposed to mining. This study also observed a significant correlation between water Pb levels of adults and blood Pb levels, suggesting that water is the major exposure pathway. This analysis highlights the need to properly manage mining activities so that the health of communities living in the vicinity of a Pb-Zn mine is not compromised.

  18. Genetic and biochemical analysis of the SLN1 pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Fassler, Jan S; West, Ann H

    2010-01-01

    The histidine kinase-based signal transduction pathway was first uncovered in bacteria and is a prominent form of regulation in prokaryotes. However, this type of signal transduction is not unique to prokaryotes; over the last decade two-component signal transduction pathways have been identified and characterized in diverse eukaryotes, from unicellular yeasts to multicellular land plants. A number of small but important differences have been noted in the architecture and function of eukaryotic pathways. Because of the powerful genetic approaches and facile molecular analysis associated with the yeast system, the SLN1 osmotic response pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is particularly useful as a eukaryotic pathway model. This chapter provides an overview of genetic and biochemical methods that have been important in elucidating the stimulus-response events that underlie this pathway and in understanding the details of a eukaryotic His-Asp phosphorelay. PMID:20946854

  19. Molecular Genetic Characterization of Terreic Acid Pathway in Aspergillus terreus

    DOE PAGES

    Guo, Chun-Jun; Sun, Wei-wen; Bruno, Kenneth S.; Wang, Clay C.

    2014-09-29

    Terreic acid is a natural product derived from 6-methylsalicylic acid (6-MSA). A compact gene cluster for its biosynthesis was characterized. Isolation of the intermediates and shunt products from the mutant strains, in combined with bioinformatic analyses, allowed us to propose a biosynthetic pathway for terreic acid. Lastly, defining the pathway and the genes involved will facilitate the engineering of this molecule with interesting antimicrobial and antitumor bioactivities.

  20. Chemical form of selenium differentially influences DNA repair pathways following exposure to lead nitrate.

    PubMed

    McKelvey, Shauna M; Horgan, Karina A; Murphy, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Lead, an environmental toxin is known to induce a broad range of physiological and biochemical dysfunctions in humans through a number of mechanisms including the deactivation of antioxidants thus leading to generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subsequent DNA damage. Selenium on the other hand has been proven to play an important role in the protection of cells from free radical damage and oxidative stress, though its effects are thought to be form and dose dependent. As the liver is the primary organ required for metabolite detoxification, HepG2 cells were chosen to assess the protective effects of various selenium compounds following exposure to the genotoxic agent lead nitrate. Initially DNA damage was quantified using a comet assay, gene expression patterns associated with DNA damage and signalling were also examined using PCR arrays and the biological pathways which were most significantly affected by selenium were identified. Interestingly, the organic type selenium compounds (selenium yeast and selenomethionine) conferred protection against lead induced DNA damage in HepG2 cells; this is evident by reduction in the quantity of DNA present in the comet tail of cells cultured in their presence with lead. This trend also followed through the gene expression changes noted in DNA damage pathways analysed. These results were in contrast with those of inorganic sodium selenite which promoted lead induced DNA damage evident in both the comet assay results and the gene expression analysis. Over all this study provided valuable insights into the effects which various selenium compounds had on the DNA damage and signalling pathway indicating the potential for using organic forms of selenium such as selenium enriched yeast to protect against DNA damaging agents.

  1. Chemical form of selenium differentially influences DNA repair pathways following exposure to lead nitrate.

    PubMed

    McKelvey, Shauna M; Horgan, Karina A; Murphy, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Lead, an environmental toxin is known to induce a broad range of physiological and biochemical dysfunctions in humans through a number of mechanisms including the deactivation of antioxidants thus leading to generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subsequent DNA damage. Selenium on the other hand has been proven to play an important role in the protection of cells from free radical damage and oxidative stress, though its effects are thought to be form and dose dependent. As the liver is the primary organ required for metabolite detoxification, HepG2 cells were chosen to assess the protective effects of various selenium compounds following exposure to the genotoxic agent lead nitrate. Initially DNA damage was quantified using a comet assay, gene expression patterns associated with DNA damage and signalling were also examined using PCR arrays and the biological pathways which were most significantly affected by selenium were identified. Interestingly, the organic type selenium compounds (selenium yeast and selenomethionine) conferred protection against lead induced DNA damage in HepG2 cells; this is evident by reduction in the quantity of DNA present in the comet tail of cells cultured in their presence with lead. This trend also followed through the gene expression changes noted in DNA damage pathways analysed. These results were in contrast with those of inorganic sodium selenite which promoted lead induced DNA damage evident in both the comet assay results and the gene expression analysis. Over all this study provided valuable insights into the effects which various selenium compounds had on the DNA damage and signalling pathway indicating the potential for using organic forms of selenium such as selenium enriched yeast to protect against DNA damaging agents. PMID:25023848

  2. The genetic makeup of the Drosophila piRNA pathway.

    PubMed

    Handler, Dominik; Meixner, Katharina; Pizka, Manfred; Lauss, Kathrin; Schmied, Christopher; Gruber, Franz Sebastian; Brennecke, Julius

    2013-06-01

    The piRNA (PIWI-interacting RNA) pathway is a small RNA silencing system that acts in animal gonads and protects the genome against the deleterious influence of transposons. A major bottleneck in the field is the lack of comprehensive knowledge of the factors and molecular processes that constitute this pathway. We conducted an RNAi screen in Drosophila and identified ~50 genes that strongly impact the ovarian somatic piRNA pathway. Many identified genes fall into functional categories that indicate essential roles for mitochondrial metabolism, RNA export, the nuclear pore, transcription elongation, and chromatin regulation in the pathway. Follow-up studies on two factors demonstrate that components acting at distinct hierarchical levels of the pathway were identified. Finally, we define CG2183/Gasz as an essential primary piRNA biogenesis factor in somatic and germline cells. Based on the similarities between insect and vertebrate piRNA pathways, our results have far-reaching implications for the understanding of this conserved genome defense system. PMID:23665231

  3. The genetic makeup of the Drosophila piRNA pathway.

    PubMed

    Handler, Dominik; Meixner, Katharina; Pizka, Manfred; Lauss, Kathrin; Schmied, Christopher; Gruber, Franz Sebastian; Brennecke, Julius

    2013-06-01

    The piRNA (PIWI-interacting RNA) pathway is a small RNA silencing system that acts in animal gonads and protects the genome against the deleterious influence of transposons. A major bottleneck in the field is the lack of comprehensive knowledge of the factors and molecular processes that constitute this pathway. We conducted an RNAi screen in Drosophila and identified ~50 genes that strongly impact the ovarian somatic piRNA pathway. Many identified genes fall into functional categories that indicate essential roles for mitochondrial metabolism, RNA export, the nuclear pore, transcription elongation, and chromatin regulation in the pathway. Follow-up studies on two factors demonstrate that components acting at distinct hierarchical levels of the pathway were identified. Finally, we define CG2183/Gasz as an essential primary piRNA biogenesis factor in somatic and germline cells. Based on the similarities between insect and vertebrate piRNA pathways, our results have far-reaching implications for the understanding of this conserved genome defense system.

  4. Academic provenance: Investigation of pathways that lead students into the geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houlton, Heather R.

    Pathways that lead students into the geosciences as a college major have not been fully explored in the current literature, despite the recent studies on the "geoscience pipeline model." Anecdotal evidence suggests low quality geoscience curriculum in K-12 education, lack of visibility of the discipline and lack of knowledge about geoscience careers contribute to low geoscience enrollments at universities. This study investigated the reasons why college students decided to major in the geosciences. Students' interests, experiences, motivations and desired future careers were examined to develop a pathway model. In addition, self-efficacy was used to inform pathway analyses, as it is an influential factor in academic major and career choice. These results and interpretations have strong implications for recruitment and retention in academia and industry. A semi-structured interview protocol was developed, which was informed by John Flanagan's critical incident theory. The responses to this interview were used to identify common experiences that diverse students shared for reasons they became geoscience majors. Researchers used self-efficacy theory by Alfred Bandura to assess students' pathways. Seventeen undergraduate geoscience majors from two U.S. Midwest research universities were sampled for cross-comparison and analysis. Qualitative analyses led to the development of six categorical steps for the geoscience pathway. The six pathway steps are: innate attributes/interest sources, pre-college critical incidents, college critical incidents, current/near future goals, expected career attributes and desired future careers. Although, how students traversed through each step was unique for individuals, similar patterns were identified between different populations in our participants: Natives, Immigrants and Refugees. In addition, critical incidents were found to act on behavior in two different ways: to support and confirm decision-making behavior (supportive critical

  5. Overlapping Group Logistic Regression with Applications to Genetic Pathway Selection

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Yaohui; Breheny, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Discovering important genes that account for the phenotype of interest has long been a challenge in genome-wide expression analysis. Analyses such as gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) that incorporate pathway information have become widespread in hypothesis testing, but pathway-based approaches have been largely absent from regression methods due to the challenges of dealing with overlapping pathways and the resulting lack of available software. The R package grpreg is widely used to fit group lasso and other group-penalized regression models; in this study, we develop an extension, grpregOverlap, to allow for overlapping group structure using a latent variable approach. We compare this approach to the ordinary lasso and to GSEA using both simulated and real data. We find that incorporation of prior pathway information can substantially improve the accuracy of gene expression classifiers, and we shed light on several ways in which hypothesis-testing approaches such as GSEA differ from regression approaches with respect to the analysis of pathway data. PMID:27679461

  6. Overlapping Group Logistic Regression with Applications to Genetic Pathway Selection.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yaohui; Breheny, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Discovering important genes that account for the phenotype of interest has long been a challenge in genome-wide expression analysis. Analyses such as gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) that incorporate pathway information have become widespread in hypothesis testing, but pathway-based approaches have been largely absent from regression methods due to the challenges of dealing with overlapping pathways and the resulting lack of available software. The R package grpreg is widely used to fit group lasso and other group-penalized regression models; in this study, we develop an extension, grpregOverlap, to allow for overlapping group structure using a latent variable approach. We compare this approach to the ordinary lasso and to GSEA using both simulated and real data. We find that incorporation of prior pathway information can substantially improve the accuracy of gene expression classifiers, and we shed light on several ways in which hypothesis-testing approaches such as GSEA differ from regression approaches with respect to the analysis of pathway data. PMID:27679461

  7. Overlapping Group Logistic Regression with Applications to Genetic Pathway Selection

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Yaohui; Breheny, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Discovering important genes that account for the phenotype of interest has long been a challenge in genome-wide expression analysis. Analyses such as gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) that incorporate pathway information have become widespread in hypothesis testing, but pathway-based approaches have been largely absent from regression methods due to the challenges of dealing with overlapping pathways and the resulting lack of available software. The R package grpreg is widely used to fit group lasso and other group-penalized regression models; in this study, we develop an extension, grpregOverlap, to allow for overlapping group structure using a latent variable approach. We compare this approach to the ordinary lasso and to GSEA using both simulated and real data. We find that incorporation of prior pathway information can substantially improve the accuracy of gene expression classifiers, and we shed light on several ways in which hypothesis-testing approaches such as GSEA differ from regression approaches with respect to the analysis of pathway data.

  8. Genetic Heterogeneity in Severe Congenital Neutropenia: How Many Aberrant Pathways Can Kill a Neutrophil?

    PubMed Central

    Schäffer, Alejandro A.; Klein, Christoph

    2008-01-01

    Purpose of review Severe congenital neutropenia (SCN) is a primary immunodeficiency in which lack of neutrophils causes inadequate innate immune host response to bacterial infections. SCN occurs with sporadic, autosomal dominant (AD), autosomal recessive (AR), and X-linked recessive (XLR) inheritance, as well as in a variety of multi-system syndromes. A principal stimulus for this review is the identification of novel genetic defects and pathophysiological insights into the role of neutrophil apoptosis. Recent findings Identification of mutations in HAX1 in autosomal recessive SCN (Kostmann disease), large epidemiological study estimating the risk of progression from SCN to leukemia, better understanding of how heterozygous mutations in neutrophil elastase (ELA2) cause SCN, molecular characterization of a novel syndromic form of SCN called p14 deficiency, and new animal models for several syndromic forms of SCN. Summary We consider the numerous genes mutated in SCN, many attempts to make animal models of SCN, and results from both human and mouse studies investigating the molecular mechanisms of neutrophil apoptosis. Investigations of how SCN genes and apoptosis pathways are connected should lead to better understanding of the pathogenesis of neutropenia and apoptosis pathways relevant to many cell types. PMID:17989524

  9. Whole Genome Sequencing and Complete Genetic Analysis Reveals Novel Pathways to Glycopeptide Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Renzoni, Adriana; Andrey, Diego O.; Jousselin, Ambre; Barras, Christine; Monod, Antoinette; Vaudaux, Pierre; Lew, Daniel; Kelley, William L.

    2011-01-01

    The precise mechanisms leading to the emergence of low-level glycopeptide resistance in Staphylococcus aureus are poorly understood. In this study, we used whole genome deep sequencing to detect differences between two isogenic strains: a parental strain and a stable derivative selected stepwise for survival on 4 µg/ml teicoplanin, but which grows at higher drug concentrations (MIC 8 µg/ml). We uncovered only three single nucleotide changes in the selected strain. Nonsense mutations occurred in stp1, encoding a serine/threonine phosphatase, and in yjbH, encoding a post-transcriptional negative regulator of the redox/thiol stress sensor and global transcriptional regulator, Spx. A missense mutation (G45R) occurred in the histidine kinase sensor of cell wall stress, VraS. Using genetic methods, all single, pairwise combinations, and a fully reconstructed triple mutant were evaluated for their contribution to low-level glycopeptide resistance. We found a synergistic cooperation between dual phospho-signalling systems and a subtle contribution from YjbH, suggesting the activation of oxidative stress defences via Spx. To our knowledge, this is the first genetic demonstration of multiple sensor and stress pathways contributing simultaneously to glycopeptide resistance development. The multifactorial nature of glycopeptide resistance in this strain suggests a complex reprogramming of cell physiology to survive in the face of drug challenge. PMID:21738716

  10. Pathway engineering for healthy phytochemicals leading to the production of novel flavonoids in tomato fruit.

    PubMed

    Schijlen, Elio; Ric de Vos, C H; Jonker, Harry; van den Broeck, Hetty; Molthoff, Jos; van Tunen, Arjen; Martens, Stefan; Bovy, Arnaud

    2006-07-01

    Flavonoids are a large family of plant polyphenolic secondary metabolites. Although they are widespread throughout the plant kingdom, some flavonoid classes are specific for only a few plant species. Due to their presumed health benefits there is growing interest in the development of food crops with tailor-made levels and composition of flavonoids, designed to exert an optimal biological effect. In order to explore the possibilities of flavonoid engineering in tomato fruits, we have targeted this pathway towards classes of potentially healthy flavonoids which are novel for tomato. Using structural flavonoid genes (encoding stilbene synthase, chalcone synthase, chalcone reductase, chalcone isomerase and flavone synthase) from different plant sources, we were able to produce transgenic tomatoes accumulating new phytochemicals. Biochemical analysis showed that the fruit peel contained high levels of stilbenes (resveratrol and piceid), deoxychalcones (butein and isoliquiritigenin), flavones (luteolin-7-glucoside and luteolin aglycon) and flavonols (quercetin glycosides and kaempferol glycosides). Using an online high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) antioxidant detection system, we demonstrated that, due to the presence of the novel flavonoids, the transgenic tomato fruits displayed altered antioxidant profiles. In addition, total antioxidant capacity of tomato fruit peel with high levels of flavones and flavonols increased more than threefold. These results on genetic engineering of flavonoids in tomato fruit demonstrate the possibilities to change the levels and composition of health-related polyphenols in a crop plant and provide more insight in the genetic and biochemical regulation of the flavonoid pathway within this worldwide important vegetable. PMID:17177808

  11. Genetic Architectures of Quantitative Variation in RNA Editing Pathways.

    PubMed

    Gu, Tongjun; Gatti, Daniel M; Srivastava, Anuj; Snyder, Elizabeth M; Raghupathy, Narayanan; Simecek, Petr; Svenson, Karen L; Dotu, Ivan; Chuang, Jeffrey H; Keller, Mark P; Attie, Alan D; Braun, Robert E; Churchill, Gary A

    2016-02-01

    RNA editing refers to post-transcriptional processes that alter the base sequence of RNA. Recently, hundreds of new RNA editing targets have been reported. However, the mechanisms that determine the specificity and degree of editing are not well understood. We examined quantitative variation of site-specific editing in a genetically diverse multiparent population, Diversity Outbred mice, and mapped polymorphic loci that alter editing ratios globally for C-to-U editing and at specific sites for A-to-I editing. An allelic series in the C-to-U editing enzyme Apobec1 influences the editing efficiency of Apob and 58 additional C-to-U editing targets. We identified 49 A-to-I editing sites with polymorphisms in the edited transcript that alter editing efficiency. In contrast to the shared genetic control of C-to-U editing, most of the variable A-to-I editing sites were determined by local nucleotide polymorphisms in proximity to the editing site in the RNA secondary structure. Our results indicate that RNA editing is a quantitative trait subject to genetic variation and that evolutionary constraints have given rise to distinct genetic architectures in the two canonical types of RNA editing.

  12. New IBD genetics: common pathways with other diseases.

    PubMed

    Lees, C W; Barrett, J C; Parkes, M; Satsangi, J

    2011-12-01

    Complex disease genetics has been revolutionised in recent years by the advent of genome-wide association (GWA) studies. The chronic inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis have seen notable successes culminating in the discovery of 99 published susceptibility loci/genes (71 Crohn's disease; 47 ulcerative colitis) to date. Approximately one-third of loci described confer susceptibility to both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Amongst these are multiple genes involved in IL23/Th17 signalling (IL23R, IL12B, JAK2, TYK2 and STAT3), IL10, IL1R2, REL, CARD9, NKX2.3, ICOSLG, PRDM1, SMAD3 and ORMDL3. The evolving genetic architecture of IBD has furthered our understanding of disease pathogenesis. For Crohn's disease, defective processing of intracellular bacteria has become a central theme, following gene discoveries in autophagy and innate immunity (associations with NOD2, IRGM, ATG16L1 are specific to Crohn's disease). Genetic evidence has also demonstrated the importance of barrier function to the development of ulcerative colitis (HNF4A, LAMB1, CDH1 and GNA12). However, when the data are analysed in more detail, deeper themes emerge including the shared susceptibility seen with other diseases. Many immune-mediated diseases overlap in this respect, paralleling the reported epidemiological evidence. However, in several cases the reported shared susceptibility appears at odds with the clinical picture. Examples include both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. In this review we will detail the presently available data on the genetic overlap between IBD and other diseases. The discussion will be informed by the epidemiological data in the published literature and the implications for pathogenesis and therapy will be outlined. This arena will move forwards very quickly in the next few years. Ultimately, we anticipate that these genetic insights will transform the landscape of common complex diseases such as IBD. PMID:21300624

  13. t-BHQ Provides Protection against Lead Neurotoxicity via Nrf2/HO-1 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Ye, Fang; Li, Xiaoyi; Li, Lili; Yuan, Jing; Chen, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The neurotoxicity of lead has been well established, and oxidative stress is strongly associated with lead-induced neurotoxicity. Nrf2 is important for protection against oxidative stress in many disease models. We applied t-BHQ, which is an Nrf2 activator, to investigate the possible role of Nrf2 in the protection against lead neurotoxicity. t-BHQ significantly attenuated the oxidative stress in developmental rats by decreasing MDA level, as well as by increasing SOD activity and GSH content, in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. Furthermore, neuronal apoptosis was detected by Nissl staining, and Bax expression was inhibited in the t-BHQ-treated group. Results showed that t-BHQ suppressed ROS production and caspase 3/7 activity but increased intracellular GSH content, in SH-SY5Y cells under lead exposure. Moreover, in vivo and in vitro, t-BHQ enhanced the nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and binding to ARE areas but did not induce Nrf2 transcription. These phenomena were confirmed using RT-PCR, EMSA, Western blot, and immunofluorescence analyses. Subsequent upregulation of the expression of HO-1, NQO1, and GCLC was observed. However, knockdown of Nrf2 or HO-1 adversely affected the protective effects of t-BHQ against lead toxicity in SH-SY5Y cells. Thus, t-BHQ can protect against lead neurotoxicity, depending on the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway.

  14. t-BHQ Provides Protection against Lead Neurotoxicity via Nrf2/HO-1 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Fang; Li, Xiaoyi; Li, Lili; Yuan, Jing; Chen, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The neurotoxicity of lead has been well established, and oxidative stress is strongly associated with lead-induced neurotoxicity. Nrf2 is important for protection against oxidative stress in many disease models. We applied t-BHQ, which is an Nrf2 activator, to investigate the possible role of Nrf2 in the protection against lead neurotoxicity. t-BHQ significantly attenuated the oxidative stress in developmental rats by decreasing MDA level, as well as by increasing SOD activity and GSH content, in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. Furthermore, neuronal apoptosis was detected by Nissl staining, and Bax expression was inhibited in the t-BHQ-treated group. Results showed that t-BHQ suppressed ROS production and caspase 3/7 activity but increased intracellular GSH content, in SH-SY5Y cells under lead exposure. Moreover, in vivo and in vitro, t-BHQ enhanced the nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and binding to ARE areas but did not induce Nrf2 transcription. These phenomena were confirmed using RT-PCR, EMSA, Western blot, and immunofluorescence analyses. Subsequent upregulation of the expression of HO-1, NQO1, and GCLC was observed. However, knockdown of Nrf2 or HO-1 adversely affected the protective effects of t-BHQ against lead toxicity in SH-SY5Y cells. Thus, t-BHQ can protect against lead neurotoxicity, depending on the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway. PMID:26798413

  15. Rph1 mediates the nutrient-limitation signaling pathway leading to transcriptional activation of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Amélie; Klionsky, Daniel J

    2015-04-01

    To maintain proper cellular homeostasis, the magnitude of autophagy activity has to be finely tuned in response to environmental changes. Many aspects of autophagy regulation have been extensively studied: pathways integrating signals through the master regulators TORC1 and PKA lead to multiple post-translational modifications affecting the functions, protein-protein interactions, and localization of Atg proteins. The expression of several ATG genes increases sharply upon autophagy induction conditions, and defects in ATG gene expression are associated with various diseases, pointing to the importance of transcriptional regulation of autophagy. Yet, how changes in ATG gene expression affect the rate of autophagy is not well characterized, and transcriptional regulators of the autophagy pathway remain largely unknown. To identify such regulators, we analyzed the expression of several ATG genes in a library of DNA-binding protein mutants. This led to the identification of Rph1 as a master transcriptional regulator of autophagy.

  16. Alpha1a-adrenoceptor genetic variant induces cardiomyoblast-to-fibroblast-like cell transition via distinct signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Kleine-Brueggeney, Maren; Gradinaru, Irina; Babaeva, Ekaterina; Schwinn, Debra A; Oganesian, Anush

    2014-09-01

    The role of naturally occurring human α1a-Adrenergic Receptor (α1aAR) genetic variants associated with cardiovascular disorders is poorly understood. Here, we present the novel findings that expression of human α1aAR-247R (247R) genetic variant in cardiomyoblasts leads to transition of cardiomyoblasts into a fibroblast-like phenotype, evidenced by morphology and distinct de novo expression of characteristic genes. These fibroblast-like cells exhibit constitutive, high proliferative capacity and agonist-induced hypertrophy compared with cells prior to transition. We demonstrate that constitutive, synergistic activation of EGFR, Src and ERK kinases is the potential molecular mechanism of this transition. We also demonstrate that 247R triggers two distinct EGFR transactivation-dependent signaling pathways: 1) constitutive Gq-independent β-arrestin-1/Src/MMP/EGFR/ERK-dependent hyperproliferation and 2) agonist-induced Gq- and EGFR/STAT-dependent hypertrophy. Interestingly, in cardiomyoblasts agonist-independent hyperproliferation is MMP-dependent, but in fibroblast-like cells it is MMP-independent, suggesting that expression of α1aAR genetic variant in cardiomyocytes may trigger extracellular matrix remodeling. Thus, these novel findings demonstrate that EGFR transactivation by α1aAR-247R leads to hyperproliferation, hypertrophy and alterations in cardiomyoblasts, suggesting that these unique genetically-mediated alterations in signaling pathways and cellular function may lead to myocardial fibrosis. Such extracellular matrix remodeling may contribute to the genesis of arrhythmias in certain types of heart failure. PMID:24835978

  17. The Fourth International Symposium on Genetic Disorders of the Ras/MAPK Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, David A.; Schill, Lisa; Schoyer, Lisa; Andresen, Brage S.; Bakker, Annette; Bayrak-Toydemir, Pinar; Burkitt-Wright, Emma; Chatfield, Kathryn; Elefteriou, Florent; Elgersma, Ype; Fisher, Michael J.; Franz, David; Gelb, Bruce D.; Goriely, Anne; Gripp, Karen W.; Hardan, Antonio Y.; Keppler-Noreuil, Kim M.; Kerr, Bronwyn; Korf, Bruce; Leoni, Chiara; McCormick, Frank; Plotkin, Scott R.; Rauen, Katherine A.; Reilly, Karlyne; Roberts, Amy; Sandler, Abby; Siegel, Dawn; Walsh, Karin; Widemann, Brigitte C.

    2016-01-01

    The RASopathies are a group of disorders due to variations of genes associated with the Ras/MAPK pathway. Some of the RASopathies include neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), Noonan syndrome, Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines, cardiofaciocutaneous (CFC) syndrome, Costello syndrome, Legius syndrome, and capillary malformation–arteriovenous malformation (CM-AVM) syndrome. In combination, the RASopathies are a frequent group of genetic disorders. This report summarizes the proceedings of the 4th International Symposium on Genetic Disorders of the Ras/MAPK pathway and highlights gaps in the field. PMID:27155140

  18. The Fourth International Symposium on Genetic Disorders of the Ras/MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, David A; Schill, Lisa; Schoyer, Lisa; Andresen, Brage S; Bakker, Annette; Bayrak-Toydemir, Pinar; Burkitt-Wright, Emma; Chatfield, Kathryn; Elefteriou, Florent; Elgersma, Ype; Fisher, Michael J; Franz, David; Gelb, Bruce D; Goriely, Anne; Gripp, Karen W; Hardan, Antonio Y; Keppler-Noreuil, Kim M; Kerr, Bronwyn; Korf, Bruce; Leoni, Chiara; McCormick, Frank; Plotkin, Scott R; Rauen, Katherine A; Reilly, Karlyne; Roberts, Amy; Sandler, Abby; Siegel, Dawn; Walsh, Karin; Widemann, Brigitte C

    2016-08-01

    The RASopathies are a group of disorders due to variations of genes associated with the Ras/MAPK pathway. Some of the RASopathies include neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), Noonan syndrome, Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines, cardiofaciocutaneous (CFC) syndrome, Costello syndrome, Legius syndrome, and capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation (CM-AVM) syndrome. In combination, the RASopathies are a frequent group of genetic disorders. This report summarizes the proceedings of the 4th International Symposium on Genetic Disorders of the Ras/MAPK pathway and highlights gaps in the field. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27155140

  19. Genetic defects in folate and cobalamin pathways affecting the brain.

    PubMed

    Kirsch, Susanne H; Herrmann, Wolfgang; Obeid, Rima

    2013-01-01

    Folate and cobalamin are necessary for early brain development and function. Deficiency of folate or cobalamin during pregnancy can cause severe malformation in the central nervous system such as neural tube defects. After birth, folate and cobalamin deficiency can cause anemia, failure to thrive, recurrent infections, psychiatric and neurological symptoms. The folate and the homocysteine metabolic pathways interact at a central step where 5-methyltetrahydrofolate donates its methyl group to homocysteine to produce methionine and tetrahydrofolate. Methyl cobalamin and folate interact at this critical step. Both nutrients have a crucial role in DNA synthesis and in delivering S-adenosylmethionine, the universal methyl donor. Severe and mild inherited disorders in folate and cobalamin pathways have been described. The two groups of disorders share some similarities, but differ in the molecular mechanism, metabolic dysregulation, and disease management. This review summarizes selected disorders, including rare and common mutations that affect folate and cobalamin absorption, transport, or dependent enzymes. When the mutations are discovered early enough, many of the described disorders are easily treatable by B vitamin supplementation, which often prevents or reverses the manifestation of the disease. Therefore, the screening for mutations is recommended and should be carried out as early as possible: after occurrence of the first symptoms or when a certain constellations of the folate and cobalamin related markers are measured, such as elevated homocysteine and/or methylmalonic acid. PMID:23183749

  20. Close genetic linkage of the determinants of the ribitol and D-arabitol catabolic pathways in Klebsiella aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Charnetzky, W T; Mortlock, R P

    1974-07-01

    Klebsiella aerogenes strain W70 has separate inducible pathways for the degradation of the pentitols ribitol and d-arabitol. These pathways are closely linked genetically as determined by transduction with phage PW52. There are two regulatory sites for the ribitol catabolic pathway as defined by loci for mutations to constitutive synthesis of ribitol dehydrogenase and d-ribulokinase, rbtB and rbtC. The two control sites are separated by a site represented by the dalB22 mutation. This mutation deprives the cell of the ability to induce synthesis of d-arabitol dehydrogenase and d-xylulokinase activities. Two additional regulatory mutations for the d-arabitol pathway, dalC31 and dalC37, map to the opposite side of rbtB13 relative to dalB22. The order of the genetic sites thus far determined for this region is dalK-dalD-dalC31, dalC37-rbtB13-dalB22-rbtC14-rbtD-rbtK, where dalK and dalD represent structural genes for the kinase and dehydrogenase of the d-arabitol pathway, respectively, and rbtK and rbtD represent the corresponding genes for the ribitol pathway. The two mutations that lead to constitutive synthesis of the d-arabitol-induced enzymes, dalC31 and dalC37, have different phenotypes with regard to their response to xylitol. The growth of dalC31 is inhibited by xylitol, but the toxicity can be reduced by increasing the levels of ribitol dehydrogenase either by induction with ribitol or by selection of a ribitol dehydrogenase-constitutive mutation.

  1. Molecular classification and genetic pathways in hyperplastic polyposis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Carvajal-Carmona, L G; Howarth, K M; Lockett, M; Polanco-Echeverry, G M; Volikos, E; Gorman, M; Barclay, E; Martin, L; Jones, A M; Saunders, B; Guenther, T; Donaldson, A; Paterson, J; Frayling, I; Novelli, M R; Phillips, R; Thomas, H J W; Silver, A; Atkin, W; Tomlinson, I P M

    2007-08-01

    Hyperplastic Polyposis (HPPS) is a poorly characterized syndrome that increases colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. We aimed to provide a molecular classification of HPPS. We obtained 282 tumours from 32 putative HPPS patients with >or= 10 hyperplastic polyps (HPs); some patients also had adenomas and CRCs. We found no good evidence of microsatellite instability (MSI) in our samples. The epithelium of HPs was monoclonal. Somatic BRAF mutations occurred in two-thirds of our patients' HPs, and KRAS2 mutations in 10%; both mutations were more common in younger cases. The respective mutation frequencies in a set of 'sporadic' HPs were 18% and 10%. Importantly, the putative HPPS patients generally fell into two readily defined groups, one set whose polyps had BRAF mutations, and another set whose polyps had KRAS2 mutations. The most plausible explanation for this observation is that there exist different forms of inherited predisposition to HPPS, and that these determine whether polyps follow a BRAF or KRAS2 pathway. Most adenomas and CRCs from our putative HPPS patients had 'classical' morphology and few of these lesions had BRAF or KRAS2 mutations. These findings suggest that tumourigenesis in HPPS does not necessarily follow the 'serrated' pathway. Although current definitions of HPPS are sub-optimal, we suggest that diagnosis could benefit from molecular analysis. Specifically, testing BRAF and KRAS2 mutations, and perhaps MSI, in multiple polyps could help to distinguish HPPS from sporadic HPs. We propose a specific model which would have diagnosed five more of our cases as HPPS compared with the WHO clinical criteria.

  2. Genetic Amplification of the VEGF Pathway Genes Including VEGFA in Human Osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jilong; Yang, Da; Sun, Yan; Sun, Baocun; Wang, Guowen; Trent, Jonathan; Araujo, Dejka; Chen, Kexin; Zhang, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Background Osteosarcoma is the most common primary tumor of bone. It is a highly vascular and extremely destructive malignancy mainly affecting children and young adults. We performed microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and carried out pathway analysis to gain a systemic view on the pathway alterations of the genetically altered genes. Methods Recurrent amplified and deleted genes detected by aCGH were subjected to the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEEG) pathway analysis to identify the altered pathways. Among enriched pathways, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway genes were collectively amplified and the alterations of this pathway were validated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and immunohistochemistry in 58 formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded osteosarcoma archival tissues with clinical follow-up information. Results the pathway enrichment analyses of the aCGH data revealed that VEGF pathway genes, including vascular endothelial growth factor A(VEGFA) gene itself, were significantly amplified in osteosarcoma. Genetic amplification of the VEGFA gene, both focally and in larger fragment, was validated by FISH. Notably, amplification of VEGFA gene and elevated expression of the VEGFA protein were significantly associated with microvascular density (MVD) and adverse tumor-free survival in osteosarcoma. Conclusions We reported for the first time that VEGF pathway genes including VEGFA gene are amplified in osteosarcoma. Amplification of the VEGFA gene is not only an important mechanism for elevated VEGFA protein expression, but also a poor prognostic factor for tumor-free survival. Combined classification of VEGFA gene amplification and positive VEGFA protein expression might provide more accurate patient stratification method for selection of anti-VEGF therapy for osteosarcoma. PMID:21495021

  3. Pigmentation, pleiotropy, and genetic pathways in humans and mice

    SciTech Connect

    Barsh, G.S.

    1995-10-01

    Some of the most striking polymorphisms in human populations affect the color of our eyes, hair, or skin. Despite some simple lessons from high school biology (blue eyes are recessive; brown are dominant), the genetic basis of such phenotypic variability has, for the most part, eluded Mendelian description. A logical place to search for the keys to understanding common variation in human pigmentation are genes in which defects cause uncommon conditions such as albinism or piebaldism. The area under this lamppost has recently gotten larger, with two articles, one in this issue of the Journal, that describe the map position for Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) and with the recent cloning of a gene that causes X-linked ocular albinism (OA1). In addition, a series of three recent articles in Cell demonstrate (1) that defects in the gene encoding the endothelin B (ET{sub B}) receptor cause hypopigmentation and Hirschsprung disease in a Mennonite population and the mouse mutation piebald(s) and (2) that a defect in the edn3 gene, which encodes one of the ligands for the ET{sub B} receptor, causes the lethal spotting (ls) mouse mutation. 47 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Pathways to Childhood Depressive Symptoms: The Role of Social, Cognitive, and Genetic Risk Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lau, Jennifer Y. F.; Rijsdijk, Fruhling; Gregory, Alice M.; McGuffin, Peter; Eley, Thalia C.

    2007-01-01

    Childhood depressive conditions have been explored from multiple theoretical approaches but with few empirical attempts to address the interrelationships among these different domains and their combined effects. In the present study, the authors examined different pathways through which social, cognitive, and genetic risk factors may be expressed…

  5. Lead

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lead Share Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us Lead Poisoning is Preventable If your home was built before ... of the RRP rule. Read more . Learn about Lead Poisoning Prevention Week . Report Uncertified Contractors and Environmental Violations ...

  6. Genetic Identification of an Enzymatic Se(VI) Reduction Pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, N.; Kobayashi, D. Y.

    2006-12-01

    Enterobacter cloacae is a biofilm-forming organism that colonizes the subterranean portions of plants. Because of its ability to catalyze the reduction of selenium oxyanions, this bacterium plays an important role in Se(0) biomineralization and Se cycling in soils. Identification of the genes that regulate selenate reductase activity is needed to elucidate the mechanisms employed by this organism to reduce Se(VI). However, the genes in E. cloacae involved in selenium reduction are currently unknown. In this study, transposon mutagenesis and direct cloning techniques were used to identify genetic regions in E. cloacae SLD1a-1 associated with selenate reductase activity. The mini-Tn5 transposon system was used to produce mutants that have lost the ability to reduce selenate. E. cloacae mutants and genomic library clones heterologously expressed in E. coli S17-1 were screened for activity on LB agar supplemented with sodium selenate. The rate of selenate reduction by the clones was measured in liquid minimal media, and the Se(0) minerals formed by the clones were examined using EXAFS, TEM, and XRD. The transposon mutagenesis experiments revealed that mutation of menaquinone biosynthesis genes inhibits selenate reduction. The direct cloning experiments showed that heterologous expression of the global anaerobic regulatory gene fnr from Enterobacter cloacae in the non Se-reducing strain E. coli S17-1 activated selenate reductase activity and the ability to precipitate Se(0) particles. Se(VI) reduction by E. coli S17-1 containing the fnr gene occurred at similar rates as E. cloacae and produced elemental selenium particles with identical morphologies and short range atomic order. These findings indicate that Se(VI) reduction by facultative anaerobes is regulated by anaerobic electron carriers and oxygen sensing transcription factors.

  7. Genetic/molecular alterations of meningiomas and the signaling pathways targeted

    PubMed Central

    Domingues, Patrícia; González-Tablas, María; Otero, Álvaro; Pascual, Daniel; Ruiz, Laura; Miranda, David; Sousa, Pablo; Gonçalves, Jesús María; Lopes, María Celeste; Orfao, Alberto; Tabernero, María Dolores

    2015-01-01

    Meningiomas are usually considered to be benign central nervous system tumors; however, they show heterogenous clinical, histolopathological and cytogenetic features associated with a variable outcome. In recent years important advances have been achieved in the identification of the genetic/molecular alterations of meningiomas and the signaling pathways involved. Thus, monosomy 22, which is often associated with mutations of the NF2 gene, has emerged as the most frequent alteration of meningiomas; in addition, several other genes (e.g. AKT1, KLF4, TRAF7, SMO) and chromosomes have been found to be recurrently altered often in association with more complex karyotypes and involvement of multiple signaling pathways. Here we review the current knowledge about the most relevant genes involved and the signaling pathways targeted by such alterations. In addition, we summarize those proposals that have been made so far for classification and prognostic stratification of meningiomas based on their genetic/genomic features. PMID:25965831

  8. Human Exposure Pathways of Heavy Metals in a Lead-Zinc Mining Area, Jiangsu Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Chang-Sheng; Ma, Zong-Wei; Yang, Jin; Liu, Yang; Bi, Jun; Huang, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Heavy metal pollution is becoming a serious issue in developing countries such as China, and the public is increasingly aware of its adverse health impacts in recent years. We assessed the potential health risks in a lead-zinc mining area and attempted to identify the key exposure pathways. We evaluated the spatial distributions of personal exposure using indigenous exposure factors and field monitoring results of water, soil, food, and indoor and outdoor air samples. The risks posed by 10 metals and the contribution of inhalation, ingestion and dermal contact pathways to these risks were estimated. Human hair samples were also analyzed to indicate the exposure level in the human body. Our results show that heavy metal pollution may pose high potential health risks to local residents, especially in the village closest to the mine (V1), mainly due to Pb, Cd and Hg. Correspondingly, the residents in V1 had higher Pb (8.14 mg/kg) levels in hair than those in the other two villages. Most of the estimated risks came from soil, the intake of self-produced vegetables and indoor air inhalation. This study highlights the importance of site-specific multipathway health risk assessments in studying heavy-metal exposures in China. PMID:23152752

  9. HCV upregulates Bim through the ROS/JNK signalling pathway, leading to Bax-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Lin; Chen, Ming; Tanaka, Motofumi; Ku, Yonson; Itoh, Tomoo; Shoji, Ikuo; Hotta, Hak

    2015-09-01

    We previously reported that hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection induces Bax-triggered, mitochondrion-mediated apoptosis by using the HCV J6/JFH1 strain and Huh-7.5 cells. However, it was still unclear how HCV-induced Bax activation. In this study, we showed that the HCV-induced activation and mitochondrial accumulation of Bax were significantly attenuated by treatment with a general antioxidant, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), or a specific c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor, SP600125, with the result suggesting that the reactive oxygen species (ROS)/JNK signalling pathway is upstream of Bax activation in HCV-induced apoptosis. We also demonstrated that HCV infection transcriptionally activated the gene for the pro-apoptotic protein Bim and the protein expression of three major splice variants of Bim (BimEL, BimL and BimS). The HCV-induced increase in the Bim mRNA and protein levels was significantly counteracted by treatment with NAC or SP600125, suggesting that the ROS/JNK signalling pathway is involved in Bim upregulation. Moreover, HCV infection led to a marked accumulation of Bim on the mitochondria to facilitate its interaction with Bax. On the other hand, downregulation of Bim by siRNA (small interfering RNA) significantly prevented HCV-mediated activation of Bax and caspase 3. Taken together, these observations suggest that HCV-induced ROS/JNK signalling transcriptionally activates Bim expression, which leads to Bax activation and apoptosis induction.

  10. Genetic evidence for common pathways in human age-related diseases.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Simon C; Dong, Xiao; Vijg, Jan; Suh, Yousin

    2015-10-01

    Aging is the single largest risk factor for chronic disease. Studies in model organisms have identified conserved pathways that modulate aging rate and the onset and progression of multiple age-related diseases, suggesting that common pathways of aging may influence age-related diseases in humans as well. To determine whether there is genetic evidence supporting the notion of common pathways underlying age-related diseases, we analyzed the genes and pathways found to be associated with five major categories of age-related disease using a total of 410 genomewide association studies (GWAS). While only a small number of genes are shared among all five disease categories, those found in at least three of the five major age-related disease categories are highly enriched for apoliprotein metabolism genes. We found that a more substantial number of gene ontology (GO) terms are shared among the 5 age-related disease categories and shared GO terms include canonical aging pathways identified in model organisms, such as nutrient-sensing signaling, translation, proteostasis, stress responses, and genome maintenance. Taking advantage of the vast amount of genetic data from the GWAS, our findings provide the first direct evidence that conserved pathways of aging simultaneously influence multiple age-related diseases in humans as has been demonstrated in model organisms.

  11. Lead

    MedlinePlus

    ... obvious symptoms, it frequently goes unrecognized. CDC’s Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program is committed to the Healthy People ... Lead Levels Information for Parents Tips for preventing lead poisoning About Us Overview of CDC’s Childhood Lead Poisoning ...

  12. Plant defense pathways subverted by Agrobacterium for genetic transformation

    PubMed Central

    Krichevsky, Alexander; Kozlovsky, Stanislav V; Yasmin, Farzana; Citovsky, Vitaly

    2010-01-01

    The soil phytopathogen Agrobacterium has the unique ability to introduce single-stranded transferred DNA (T-DNA) from its tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid into the host cell in a process known as horizontal gene transfer. Following its entry into the host cell cytoplasm, the T-DNA associates with the bacterial virulence (Vir) E2 protein, also exported from Agrobacterium, creating the T-DNA nucleoprotein complex (T-complex), which is then translocated into the nucleus where the DNA is integrated into the host chromatin. VirE2 protects the T-DNA from the host DNase activities, packages it into a helical filament and interacts with the host proteins, one of which, VIP1, facilitates nuclear import of the T-complex and its subsequent targeting to the host chromatin. Although the VirE2 and VIP1 protein components of the T-complex are vital for its intracellular transport, they must be removed to expose the T-DNA for integration. Our recent work demonstrated that this task is aided by an host defense-related F-box protein VBF that is induced by Agrobacterium infection and that recognizes and binds VIP1. VBF destabilizes VirE2 and VIP1 in yeast and plant cells, presumably via SCF-mediated proteasomal degradation. VBF expression in and export from the Agrobacterium cell lead to increased tumorigenesis. Here, we discuss these findings in the context of the “arms race” between Agrobacterium infectivity and plant defense. PMID:20890133

  13. A Hypothesis for Using Pathway Genetic Load Analysis for Understanding Complex Outcomes in Bilirubin Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Riordan, Sean M; Bittel, Douglas C; Le Pichon, Jean-Baptiste; Gazzin, Silvia; Tiribelli, Claudio; Watchko, Jon F; Wennberg, Richard P; Shapiro, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Genetic-based susceptibility to bilirubin neurotoxicity and chronic bilirubin encephalopathy (kernicterus) is still poorly understood. Neonatal jaundice affects 60-80% of newborns, and considerable effort goes into preventing this relatively benign condition from escalating into the development of kernicterus making the incidence of this potentially devastating condition very rare in more developed countries. The current understanding of the genetic background of kernicterus is largely comprised of mutations related to alterations of bilirubin production, elimination, or both. Less is known about mutations that may predispose or protect against CNS bilirubin neurotoxicity. The lack of a monogenetic source for this risk of bilirubin neurotoxicity suggests that disease progression is dependent upon an overall decrease in the functionality of one or more essential genetically controlled metabolic pathways. In other words, a "load" is placed on key pathways in the form of multiple genetic variants that combine to create a vulnerable phenotype. The idea of epistatic interactions creating a pathway genetic load (PGL) that affects the response to a specific insult has been previously reported as a PGL score. We hypothesize that the PGL score can be used to investigate whether increased susceptibility to bilirubin-induced CNS damage in neonates is due to a mutational load being placed on key genetic pathways important to the central nervous system's response to bilirubin neurotoxicity. We propose a modification of the PGL score method that replaces the use of a canonical pathway with custom gene lists organized into three tiers with descending levels of evidence combined with the utilization of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) causality prediction methods. The PGL score has the potential to explain the genetic background of complex bilirubin induced neurological disorders (BIND) such as kernicterus and could be the key to understanding ranges of outcome severity in

  14. A Hypothesis for Using Pathway Genetic Load Analysis for Understanding Complex Outcomes in Bilirubin Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Riordan, Sean M.; Bittel, Douglas C.; Le Pichon, Jean-Baptiste; Gazzin, Silvia; Tiribelli, Claudio; Watchko, Jon F.; Wennberg, Richard P.; Shapiro, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic-based susceptibility to bilirubin neurotoxicity and chronic bilirubin encephalopathy (kernicterus) is still poorly understood. Neonatal jaundice affects 60–80% of newborns, and considerable effort goes into preventing this relatively benign condition from escalating into the development of kernicterus making the incidence of this potentially devastating condition very rare in more developed countries. The current understanding of the genetic background of kernicterus is largely comprised of mutations related to alterations of bilirubin production, elimination, or both. Less is known about mutations that may predispose or protect against CNS bilirubin neurotoxicity. The lack of a monogenetic source for this risk of bilirubin neurotoxicity suggests that disease progression is dependent upon an overall decrease in the functionality of one or more essential genetically controlled metabolic pathways. In other words, a “load” is placed on key pathways in the form of multiple genetic variants that combine to create a vulnerable phenotype. The idea of epistatic interactions creating a pathway genetic load (PGL) that affects the response to a specific insult has been previously reported as a PGL score. We hypothesize that the PGL score can be used to investigate whether increased susceptibility to bilirubin-induced CNS damage in neonates is due to a mutational load being placed on key genetic pathways important to the central nervous system's response to bilirubin neurotoxicity. We propose a modification of the PGL score method that replaces the use of a canonical pathway with custom gene lists organized into three tiers with descending levels of evidence combined with the utilization of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) causality prediction methods. The PGL score has the potential to explain the genetic background of complex bilirubin induced neurological disorders (BIND) such as kernicterus and could be the key to understanding ranges of outcome severity

  15. Association genetics and transcriptome analysis reveal a gibberellin-responsive pathway involved in regulating photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jianbo; Tian, Jiaxing; Du, Qingzhang; Chen, Jinhui; Li, Ying; Yang, Xiaohui; Li, Bailian; Zhang, Deqiang

    2016-05-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) regulate a wide range of important processes in plant growth and development, including photosynthesis. However, the mechanism by which GAs regulate photosynthesis remains to be understood. Here, we used multi-gene association to investigate the effect of genes in the GA-responsive pathway, as constructed by RNA sequencing, on photosynthesis, growth, and wood property traits, in a population of 435 Populus tomentosa By analyzing changes in the transcriptome following GA treatment, we identified many key photosynthetic genes, in agreement with the observed increase in measurements of photosynthesis. Regulatory motif enrichment analysis revealed that 37 differentially expressed genes related to photosynthesis shared two essential GA-related cis-regulatory elements, the GA response element and the pyrimidine box. Thus, we constructed a GA-responsive pathway consisting of 47 genes involved in regulating photosynthesis, including GID1, RGA, GID2, MYBGa, and 37 photosynthetic differentially expressed genes. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based association analysis showed that 142 SNPs, representing 40 candidate genes in this pathway, were significantly associated with photosynthesis, growth, and wood property traits. Epistasis analysis uncovered interactions between 310 SNP-SNP pairs from 37 genes in this pathway, revealing possible genetic interactions. Moreover, a structural gene-gene matrix based on a time-course of transcript abundances provided a better understanding of the multi-gene pathway affecting photosynthesis. The results imply a functional role for these genes in mediating photosynthesis, growth, and wood properties, demonstrating the potential of combining transcriptome-based regulatory pathway construction and genetic association approaches to detect the complex genetic networks underlying quantitative traits.

  16. Association genetics and transcriptome analysis reveal a gibberellin-responsive pathway involved in regulating photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jianbo; Tian, Jiaxing; Du, Qingzhang; Chen, Jinhui; Li, Ying; Yang, Xiaohui; Li, Bailian; Zhang, Deqiang

    2016-05-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) regulate a wide range of important processes in plant growth and development, including photosynthesis. However, the mechanism by which GAs regulate photosynthesis remains to be understood. Here, we used multi-gene association to investigate the effect of genes in the GA-responsive pathway, as constructed by RNA sequencing, on photosynthesis, growth, and wood property traits, in a population of 435 Populus tomentosa By analyzing changes in the transcriptome following GA treatment, we identified many key photosynthetic genes, in agreement with the observed increase in measurements of photosynthesis. Regulatory motif enrichment analysis revealed that 37 differentially expressed genes related to photosynthesis shared two essential GA-related cis-regulatory elements, the GA response element and the pyrimidine box. Thus, we constructed a GA-responsive pathway consisting of 47 genes involved in regulating photosynthesis, including GID1, RGA, GID2, MYBGa, and 37 photosynthetic differentially expressed genes. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based association analysis showed that 142 SNPs, representing 40 candidate genes in this pathway, were significantly associated with photosynthesis, growth, and wood property traits. Epistasis analysis uncovered interactions between 310 SNP-SNP pairs from 37 genes in this pathway, revealing possible genetic interactions. Moreover, a structural gene-gene matrix based on a time-course of transcript abundances provided a better understanding of the multi-gene pathway affecting photosynthesis. The results imply a functional role for these genes in mediating photosynthesis, growth, and wood properties, demonstrating the potential of combining transcriptome-based regulatory pathway construction and genetic association approaches to detect the complex genetic networks underlying quantitative traits. PMID:27091876

  17. The genetic basis for inactivation of Wnt pathway in human osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Osteosarcoma is a highly genetically unstable tumor with poor prognosis. We performed microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq), and pathway analysis to gain a systemic view of the pathway alterations of osteosarcoma. Methods aCGH experiments were carried out on 10 fresh osteosarcoma samples. The output data (Gene Expression Omnibus Series accession number GSE19180) were pooled with published aCGH raw data (GSE9654) to determine recurrent copy number changes. These were analyzed using Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis to identify altered pathways in osteosarcoma. Transcriptome sequencing of six osteosarcomas was performed to detect the expression profile of Wnt signaling pathway genes. Protein expression of WNT1, β-catenin, c-myc, and cyclin D1 in the Wnt pathway was detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in an independent group of 46 osteosarcoma samples. Results KEGG pathway analysis identified frequent deletions of Wnt and other Wnt signaling pathway genes. At the mRNA level, transcriptome sequencing found reduced levels of mRNA expression of Wnt signaling pathway transcripts. While WNT1 protein expression was detected by IHC in 69.6% (32/46) of the osteosarcomas, no β-catenin protein was detected in the nucleus. β-catenin protein expression was, however, detected in the membrane and cytoplasm of 69.6% (32/46) of the osteosarcomas. c-myc protein expression was detected in only 47.8% (22/46) and cyclin D1 protein expression in 52.2% (24/46) of osteosarcoma samples. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that WNT1-negative patients had a trend towards longer disease free survival than WNT1-positive patients. Interestingly, in WNT1-negative patients, those who were also cyclin D1-negative had significantly longer disease free survival than cyclin D1-positive patients. However, there was no significant association between any of the investigated proteins and overall

  18. Pleiotropy and pathway analyses of genetic variants associated with both type 2 diabetes and prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Raynor, LA; Pankow, James S; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Tang, Weihong; Prizment, Anna; Couper, David J

    2013-01-01

    Aims: Epidemiological evidence shows that diabetes is associated with a reduced risk of prostate cancer. The objective of this study was to identify genes that may contribute to both type 2 diabetes and prostate cancer outcomes and the biological pathways these diseases may share. Methods: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study is a population-based prospective cohort study in four U.S. communities that included a baseline examination in 1987-89 and three follow-up exams at three year intervals. Participants were 45-64 years old at baseline. We conducted a genomewide association (GWA) study of incident type 2 diabetes in males, summarized variation across genetic loci into a polygenic risk score, and determined if that diabetes risk score was also associated with incident prostate cancer in the same study population. Secondarily we conducted a separate GWA study of prostate cancer, performed a pathway analysis of both type 2 diabetes and prostate cancer, and qualitatively determined if any of the biochemical pathways identified were shared between the two outcomes. Results: We found that the polygenic risk score for type 2 diabetes was not statistically significantly associated with prostate cancer. The pathway analysis also found no overlap between pathways associated with type 2 diabetes and prostate cancer. However, it did find that the growth hormone signaling pathway was statistically significantly associated with type 2 diabetes (p=0.0001). Conclusion: The inability of this study to find an association between type 2 diabetes polygenic risk scores with prostate cancer or biological pathways in common suggests that shared genetic variants may not contribute significantly to explaining shared etiology. PMID:23565322

  19. Genetics and pharmacogenetics of aminergic transmitter pathways in functional gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Martinucci, Irene; Blandizzi, Corrado; de Bortoli, Nicola; Bellini, Massimo; Antonioli, Luca; Tuccori, Marco; Fornai, Matteo; Marchi, Santino; Colucci, Rocchina

    2015-01-01

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) are highly prevalent syndromes, without evident underlying organic causes. Their pathogenesis is multifactorial in nature, with a combination of environmental and genetic factors contributing to their clinical manifestations, for which most of current treatments are not satisfactory. It is acknowledged that amine mediators (noradrenaline, dopamine and serotonin) play pivotal regulatory actions on gut functions and visceral sensation. In addition, drugs of therapeutic interest for FGIDs act on these transmitter pathways. The present article reviews current knowledge on the impact of genetics and pharmacogenetics of aminergic pathways on FGID pathophysiology, clinical presentations, symptom severity and medical management, in an attempt of highlighting the most relevant evidence and point out issues that should be addressed in future investigations.

  20. Physician scientist research pathway leading to certification by the American Board of Pathology.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Sharon W; Johnson, Rebecca L

    2016-06-01

    In 2014, the American Board of Pathology, in response to the pathology community, approved a physician scientist research pathway (PSRP). This brief report summarizes the history of and objectives for creating the physician scientist research pathway and the requirements of the American Board of Pathology for the certification of physician scientist research pathway trainees. PMID:26980045

  1. Matricellular protein Cyr61 bridges lysophosphatidic acid and integrin pathways leading to cell migration.

    PubMed

    Wu, Daniel Dongwei; Zhang, Fuqiang; Hao, Feng; Chun, Jerold; Xu, Xuemin; Cui, Mei-Zhen

    2014-02-28

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a potent bioactive lipid found in atherosclerotic lesions, markedly induces smooth muscle cell (SMC) migration, which is an important process in atherogenesis. Therefore, understanding the mechanism of LPA-induced SMC migration is important. Several microarray databases suggest that the matricellular protein Cyr61 is highly induced by LPA. We hypothesized that Cyr61 mediates LPA-induced cell migration. Our data show that LPA induced temporal and spatial expression of Cyr61, which promptly accumulated in the cellular Golgi apparatus and then translocated to the extracellular matrix. Cyr61 antibody blockade and siRNA inhibition both diminished LPA-induced SMC migration, indicating a novel regulatory role of Cyr61. SMCs derived from LPA receptor 1 (LPA1) knock-out mice lack the ability of Cyr61 induction and cell migration, supporting the concept that LPA1 is required for Cyr61 expression and migration. By contrast, PPARγ was not found to be involved in LPA-mediated effects. Furthermore, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase important for regulating cell migration, was activated by LPA at a late time frame coinciding with Cyr61 accumulation. Interestingly, knockdown of Cyr61 blocked LPA-induced FAK activation, indicating that an LPA-Cyr61-FAK axis leads to SMC migration. Our results further demonstrate that plasma membrane integrins α6β1 and ανβ3 transduced the LPA-Cyr61 signal toward FAK activation and migration. Taken together, these data reveal that de novo Cyr61 in the extracellular matrix bridges LPA and integrin pathways, which in turn, activate FAK, leading to cell migration. The current study provides new insights into mechanisms underlying cell migration-related disorders, including atherosclerosis, restenosis, and cancers.

  2. Natural Genetic Variation Influences Protein Abundances in C. elegans Developmental Signalling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kapil Dev; Roschitzki, Bernd; Snoek, L Basten; Grossmann, Jonas; Zheng, Xue; Elvin, Mark; Kamkina, Polina; Schrimpf, Sabine P; Poulin, Gino B; Kammenga, Jan E; Hengartner, Michael O

    2016-01-01

    Complex traits, including common disease-related traits, are affected by many different genes that function in multiple pathways and networks. The apoptosis, MAPK, Notch, and Wnt signalling pathways play important roles in development and disease progression. At the moment we have a poor understanding of how allelic variation affects gene expression in these pathways at the level of translation. Here we report the effect of natural genetic variation on transcript and protein abundance involved in developmental signalling pathways in Caenorhabditis elegans. We used selected reaction monitoring to analyse proteins from the abovementioned four pathways in a set of recombinant inbred lines (RILs) generated from the wild-type strains N2 (Bristol) and CB4856 (Hawaii) to enable quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping. About half of the cases from the 44 genes tested showed a statistically significant change in protein abundance between various strains, most of these were however very weak (below 1.3-fold change). We detected a distant QTL on the left arm of chromosome II that affected protein abundance of the phosphatidylserine receptor protein PSR-1, and two separate QTLs that influenced embryonic and ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis on chromosome IV. Our results demonstrate that natural variation in C. elegans is sufficient to cause significant changes in signalling pathways both at the gene expression (transcript and protein abundance) and phenotypic levels. PMID:26985669

  3. PDK1 is required for the hormonal signaling pathway leading to meiotic resumption in starfish oocytes.

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, Daisaku; Hori-Oshima, Sawako; Fukuhara, Takeshi; Tachibana, Kazunori; Okumura, Eiichi; Kishimoto, Takeo

    2004-12-15

    Meiotic resumption is generally under the control of an extracellular maturation-inducing hormone. It is equivalent to the G2-M phase transition in somatic cell mitosis and is regulated by cyclin B-Cdc2 kinase. However, the complete signaling pathway from the hormone to cyclin B-Cdc2 is yet unclear in any organism. A model system to analyze meiotic resumption is the starfish oocyte, in which Akt/protein kinase B (PKB) plays a key mediator in hormonal signaling that leads to cyclin B-Cdc2 activation. Here we show in starfish oocytes that when PDK1 activity is inhibited by a neutralizing antibody, maturation-inducing hormone fails to induce cyclin B-Cdc2 activation at the meiotic G2-M phase transition, even though PDK2 activity becomes detectable. These observations assign a novel role to PDK1 for a hormonal signaling intermediate toward meiotic resumption. They further support that PDK2 is a molecule distinct from PDK1 and Akt, and that PDK2 activity is not sufficient for the full activation of Akt in the absence of PDK1 activity. PMID:15581868

  4. A clathrin-dependent pathway leads to KRas signaling on late endosomes en route to lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Albert; Tebar, Francesc; Alvarez-Moya, Blanca; López-Alcalá, Cristina; Calvo, Maria; Enrich, Carlos; Agell, Neus; Nakamura, Takeshi; Matsuda, Michiyuki; Bachs, Oriol

    2009-03-23

    Ras proteins are small guanosine triphosphatases involved in the regulation of important cellular functions such as proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Understanding the intracellular trafficking of Ras proteins is crucial to identify novel Ras signaling platforms. In this study, we report that epidermal growth factor triggers Kirsten Ras (KRas) translocation onto endosomal membranes (independently of calmodulin and protein kinase C phosphorylation) through a clathrin-dependent pathway. From early endosomes, KRas but not Harvey Ras or neuroblastoma Ras is sorted and transported to late endosomes (LEs) and lysosomes. Using yellow fluorescent protein-Raf1 and the Raichu-KRas probe, we identified for the first time in vivo-active KRas on Rab7 LEs, eliciting a signal output through Raf1. On these LEs, we also identified the p14-MP1 scaffolding complex and activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2. Abrogation of lysosomal function leads to a sustained late endosomal mitogen-activated protein kinase signal output. Altogether, this study reveals novel aspects about KRas intracellular trafficking and signaling, shedding new light on the mechanisms controlling Ras regulation in the cell.

  5. Genetic polymorphisms in the vitamin D pathway in relation to lung cancer risk and survival

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Jinyu; Xu, Fangxiu; Qu, Jinli; Wang, Yu; Gao, Ming; Yu, Herbert; Qian, Biyun

    2015-01-01

    Studies have suggested that vitamin D may have protective effects against cancer development or tumor progression. To search for additional evidence, we investigated the role of genetic polymorphisms involved in the vitamin D pathway in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We evaluated common genetic polymorphisms associated with the vitamin D pathway in relation to NSCLC in a case-control study of 603 newly diagnosed NSCLC patients and 661 matched healthy controls. Seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped, the expression of CYP27B1 and CYP24A1 were measured in 153 tumor samples and their associations with genotypes and patient survival were also analyzed. In the case-control comparison, we found SNP rs3782130 (CYP27B1), rs7041 (GC), rs6068816 and rs4809957 (CYP24A1) associated with NSCLC risk. The risk of NSCLC was increased with the number of risk alleles. CYP27B1 and CYP24A1 expression were significantly different between tumor and normal tissues in NSCLC. High CYP27B1 expression was associated with better overall survival, and the expression was different by the rs3782130 genotype. The study suggests that some genetic polymorphisms involved in the vitamin D pathway may associate with NSCLC risk, and one of the polymorphisms (rs3782130) may affect gene expression and patient survival. PMID:25544771

  6. A portable expression resource for engineering cross-species genetic circuits and pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kushwaha, Manish; Salis, Howard M.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic circuits and metabolic pathways can be reengineered to allow organisms to process signals and manufacture useful chemicals. However, their functions currently rely on organism-specific regulatory parts, fragmenting synthetic biology and metabolic engineering into host-specific domains. To unify efforts, here we have engineered a cross-species expression resource that enables circuits and pathways to reuse the same genetic parts, while functioning similarly across diverse organisms. Our engineered system combines mixed feedback control loops and cross-species translation signals to autonomously self-regulate expression of an orthogonal polymerase without host-specific promoters, achieving nontoxic and tuneable gene expression in diverse Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Combining 50 characterized system variants with mechanistic modelling, we show how the cross-species expression resource's dynamics, capacity and toxicity are controlled by the control loops' architecture and feedback strengths. We also demonstrate one application of the resource by reusing the same genetic parts to express a biosynthesis pathway in both model and non-model hosts. PMID:26184393

  7. Common genetic variants in Wnt signaling pathway genes as potential prognostic biomarkers for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ting, Wen-Chien; Chen, Lu-Min; Pao, Jiunn-Bey; Yang, Ying-Pi; You, Bang-Jau; Chang, Ta-Yuan; Lan, Yu-Hsuan; Lee, Hong-Zin; Bao, Bo-Ying

    2013-01-01

    Compelling evidence has implicated the Wnt signaling pathway in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. We assessed the use of tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (tSNPs) in adenomatous polyposis coli (APC)/β-catenin (CTNNB1) genes to predict outcomes in patients with colorectal cancer. We selected and genotyped 10 tSNP to predict common variants across entire APC and CTNNB1 genes in 282 colorectal cancer patients. The associations of these tSNPs with distant metastasis-free survival and overall survival were evaluated by Kaplan-Meier analysis, Cox regression model, and survival tree analysis. The 5-year overall survival rate was 68.3%. Survival tree analysis identified a higher-order genetic interaction profile consisting of the APC rs565453, CTNNB1 2293303, and APC rs1816769 that was significantly associated with overall survival. The 5-year survival overall rates were 89.2%, 66.1%, and 58.8% for the low-, medium-, and high-risk genetic profiles, respectively (log-rank P = 0.001). After adjusting for possible confounders, including age, gender, carcinoembryonic antigen levels, tumor differentiation, stage, lymphovascular invasion, perineural invasion, and lymph node involvement, the genetic interaction profile remained significant. None of the studied SNPs were individually associated with distant metastasis-free survival and overall survival. Our results suggest that the genetic interaction profile among Wnt pathway SNPs might potentially increase the prognostic value in outcome prediction for colorectal cancer. PMID:23405266

  8. Genetic Interaction Maps in Escherichia coli Reveal Functional Crosstalk among Cell Envelope Biogenesis Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Vlasblom, James; Gagarinova, Alla; Phanse, Sadhna; Graham, Chris; Yousif, Fouad; Ding, Huiming; Xiong, Xuejian; Nazarians-Armavil, Anaies; Alamgir, Md; Ali, Mehrab; Pogoutse, Oxana; Pe'er, Asaf; Arnold, Roland; Michaut, Magali; Parkinson, John; Golshani, Ashkan; Whitfield, Chris; Wodak, Shoshana J.; Moreno-Hagelsieb, Gabriel; Greenblatt, Jack F.; Emili, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    As the interface between a microbe and its environment, the bacterial cell envelope has broad biological and clinical significance. While numerous biosynthesis genes and pathways have been identified and studied in isolation, how these intersect functionally to ensure envelope integrity during adaptive responses to environmental challenge remains unclear. To this end, we performed high-density synthetic genetic screens to generate quantitative functional association maps encompassing virtually the entire cell envelope biosynthetic machinery of Escherichia coli under both auxotrophic (rich medium) and prototrophic (minimal medium) culture conditions. The differential patterns of genetic interactions detected among >235,000 digenic mutant combinations tested reveal unexpected condition-specific functional crosstalk and genetic backup mechanisms that ensure stress-resistant envelope assembly and maintenance. These networks also provide insights into the global systems connectivity and dynamic functional reorganization of a universal bacterial structure that is both broadly conserved among eubacteria (including pathogens) and an important target. PMID:22125496

  9. Population Genetic Analysis Infers Migration Pathways of Phytophthora ramorum in US Nurseries

    PubMed Central

    Goss, Erica M.; Larsen, Meg; Chastagner, Gary A.; Givens, Donald R.; Grünwald, Niklaus J.

    2009-01-01

    Recently introduced, exotic plant pathogens may exhibit low genetic diversity and be limited to clonal reproduction. However, rapidly mutating molecular markers such as microsatellites can reveal genetic variation within these populations and be used to model putative migration patterns. Phytophthora ramorum is the exotic pathogen, discovered in the late 1990s, that is responsible for sudden oak death in California forests and ramorum blight of common ornamentals. The nursery trade has moved this pathogen from source populations on the West Coast to locations across the United States, thus risking introduction to other native forests. We examined the genetic diversity of P. ramorum in United States nurseries by microsatellite genotyping 279 isolates collected from 19 states between 2004 and 2007. Of the three known P. ramorum clonal lineages, the most common and genetically diverse lineage in the sample was NA1. Two eastward migration pathways were revealed in the clustering of NA1 isolates into two groups, one containing isolates from Connecticut, Oregon, and Washington and the other isolates from California and the remaining states. This finding is consistent with trace forward analyses conducted by the US Department of Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. At the same time, genetic diversities in several states equaled those observed in California, Oregon, and Washington and two-thirds of multilocus genotypes exhibited limited geographic distributions, indicating that mutation was common during or subsequent to migration. Together, these data suggest that migration, rapid mutation, and genetic drift all play a role in structuring the genetic diversity of P. ramorum in US nurseries. This work demonstrates that fast-evolving genetic markers can be used to examine the evolutionary processes acting on recently introduced pathogens and to infer their putative migration patterns, thus showing promise for the application of forensics to plant

  10. An assessment of molecular pathways of obesity susceptible to nutrient, toxicant and genetically induced epigenetic perturbation.

    PubMed

    Xue, Jing; Ideraabdullah, Folami Y

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, the etiology of human disease has greatly improved with the inclusion of epigenetic mechanisms, in particular as a common link between environment and disease. However, for most diseases we lack a detailed interpretation of the epigenetic regulatory pathways perturbed by environment and causal mechanisms. Here, we focus on recent findings elucidating nutrient-related epigenetic changes linked to obesity. We highlight studies demonstrating that obesity is a complex disease linked to disruption of epigenetically regulated metabolic pathways in the brain, adipose tissue and liver. These pathways regulate (1) homeostatic and hedonic eating behaviors, (2) adipocyte differentiation and fat accumulation, and (3) energy expenditure. By compiling these data, we illustrate that obesity-related phenotypes are repeatedly linked to disruption of critical epigenetic mechanisms that regulate key metabolic genes. These data are supported by genetic mutation of key epigenetic regulators, and many of the diet-induced epigenetic mechanisms of obesity are also perturbed by exposure to environmental toxicants. Identifying similarly perturbed epigenetic mechanisms in multiple experimental models of obesity strengthens the translational applications of these findings. We also discuss many of the ongoing challenges to understanding the role of environmentally induced epigenetic pathways in obesity and suggest future studies to elucidate these roles. This assessment illustrates our current understanding of molecular pathways of obesity that are susceptible to environmental perturbation via epigenetic mechanisms. Thus, it lays the groundwork for dissecting the complex interactions between diet, genes and toxicants that contribute to obesity and obesity-related phenotypes. PMID:27012616

  11. Development of an adverse outcome pathway for acetylcholinesterase inhibition leading to acute mortality

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) are designed to describe linkages of key events (KEs) within a biological pathway that result in an adverse outcome associated with chemical perturbation of a well-defined molecular initiating event (MIE). Risk assessors have traditionally relied ...

  12. Going and Passing through Community Colleges: Examining the Effectiveness of Project Lead The Way in STEM Pathways

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starobin, Soko S.; Schenk, Tom, Jr.; Laanan, Frankie Santos; Rethwisch, David G.; Moeller, Darin

    2013-01-01

    Project Lead The Way (PLTW), which aims to create a seamless pathway from secondary education to college and career success in STEM fields, was first implemented in the state of Iowa in 2005. As a part of a statewide, longitudinal research in PLTW, this study explores the effectiveness of PLTW in college persistence by analyzing multiple data…

  13. Genetic variations in the transforming growth factor beta pathway as predictors of bladder cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hua; Kamat, Ashish M; Aldousari, Saad; Ye, Yuanqing; Huang, Maosheng; Dinney, Colin P; Wu, Xifeng

    2012-01-01

    Bladder cancer is the fifth most common cancer in the United States, and identifying genetic markers that may predict susceptibility in high-risk population is always needed. The purpose of our study is to determine whether genetic variations in the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) pathway are associated with bladder cancer risk. We identified 356 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 37 key genes from this pathway and evaluated their association with cancer risk in 801 cases and 801 controls. Forty-one SNPs were significantly associated with cancer risk, and after adjusting for multiple comparisons, 9 remained significant (Q-value ≤0.1). Haplotype analysis further revealed three haplotypes within VEGFC and two haplotypes in EGFR were significantly associated with increased bladder cancer risk compared to the most common haplotype. Classification and regression tree analysis further revealed potential high-order gene-gene interactions, with VEGFC: rs3775194 being the initial split, which suggests that this variant is responsible for the most variation in risk. Individuals carrying the common genotype for VEGFC: rs3775194 and EGFR: rs7799627 and the variant genotype for VEGFR: rs4557213 had a 4.22-fold increase in risk, a much larger effect magnitude than that conferred by common genotype for VEGFR: rs4557213. Our study provides the first epidemiological evidence supporting a connection between TGF-β pathway variants and bladder cancer risk.

  14. Conserved genetic pathways controlling the development of the diffuse endocrine system in vertebrates and Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Hartenstein, Volker; Takashima, Shigeo; Adams, Katrina L

    2010-05-01

    The midgut epithelium is formed by absorptive enterocytes, secretory cells and endocrine cells. Each of these lineages is derived from the pluripotent progenitors that constitute the embryonic endoderm; the mature midgut retains pools of self-renewing stem cells that continue to produce all lineages. Recent findings in vertebrates and Drosophila shed light on the genetic mechanism that specifies the fate of the different lineages. A pivotal role is played by the Notch signaling pathway that, in a manner that appears to be very similar to the way in which Notch signaling selects neural progenitors within the neurectoderm, distinguishes the fate of secretory/endocrine cells and enterocytes. Proneural genes encoding bHLH transcription factors are expressed and required in prospective endocrine cells; activation of the Notch pathways restricts the number of these cells and promotes enterocyte development. In this review we compare the development of the intestinal endocrine cells in vertebrates and insects and summarize recent findings dealing with genetic pathways controlling this cell type.

  15. Designing RNA-based genetic control systems for efficient production from engineered metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Jason T; Carothers, James M

    2015-02-20

    Engineered metabolic pathways can be augmented with dynamic regulatory controllers to increase production titers by minimizing toxicity and helping cells maintain homeostasis. We investigated the potential for dynamic RNA-based genetic control systems to increase production through simulation analysis of an engineered p-aminostyrene (p-AS) pathway in E. coli. To map the entire design space, we formulated 729 unique mechanistic models corresponding to all of the possible control topologies and mechanistic implementations in the system under study. Two thousand sampled simulations were performed for each of the 729 system designs to relate the potential effects of dynamic control to increases in p-AS production (total of 3 × 10(6) simulations). Our analysis indicates that dynamic control strategies employing aptazyme-regulated expression devices (aREDs) can yield >10-fold improvements over static control. We uncovered generalizable trends in successful control architectures and found that highly performing RNA-based control systems are experimentally tractable. Analyzing the metabolic control state space to predict optimal genetic control strategies promises to enhance the design of metabolic pathways. PMID:25314371

  16. A conserved genetic pathway determines inflorescence architecture in Arabidopsis and rice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Teo, Zhi Wei Norman; Bi, Yang; Song, Shiyong; Xi, Wanyan; Yang, Xiaobei; Yin, Zhongchao; Yu, Hao

    2013-03-25

    The spatiotemporal architecture of inflorescences that bear flowers determines plant reproductive success by affecting fruit set and plant interaction with pollinators. The inflorescence architecture that displays great diversity across flowering plants depends on developmental decisions at inflorescence meristems. Here we report a key conserved genetic pathway determining inflorescence architecture in Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa (rice). In Arabidopsis, four MADS-box genes, SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS 1, SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE, AGAMOUS-LIKE 24, and SEPALLATA 4 act redundantly and directly to suppress TERMINAL FLOWER1 (TFL1) in emerging floral meristems. This is indispensable for the well-known function of APETALA1 in specifying floral meristems and is coupled with a conformational change in chromosome looping at the TFL1 locus. Similarly, we demonstrate that the orthologs of these MADS-box genes in rice determine panicle branching by regulating TFL1-like genes. Our findings reveal a conserved regulatory pathway that determines inflorescence architecture in flowering plants.

  17. New discoveries in schizophrenia genetics reveal neurobiological pathways: A review of recent findings.

    PubMed

    Kotlar, Alex V; Mercer, Kristina B; Zwick, Michael E; Mulle, Jennifer G

    2015-12-01

    Schizophrenia research has undergone a recent transformation. By leveraging large sample sizes, genome-wide association studies of common genetic variants have approximately tripled the number of candidate genetic loci. Rare variant studies have identified copy number variants that are schizophrenia risk loci. Among these, the 3q29 microdeletion is now known to be the single largest schizophrenia risk factor. Next-generation sequencing studies are increasingly used for rare variant association testing, and have already facilitated identification of large effect alleles. Collectively, recent findings implicate voltage-gated calcium channel and cytoskeletal pathways in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Taken together, these results suggest the possibility of imminent breakthroughs in the molecular understanding of schizophrenia.

  18. Glycogen pathways in disease: new developments in a classical field of medical genetics.

    PubMed

    Kilimann, Manfred W; Oldfors, Anders

    2015-05-01

    Glycogen is the storage form of glucose in animal cells. Its degradation can rapidly provide fuel for energy production (particularly important in muscle), or replenish blood glucose during fasting by the liver. Genetic defects of glycogen metabolism give rise to glycogen storage diseases (GSDs), manifesting histologically in abnormal quantity or quality of glycogen in the cells. GSDs can be caused by defects of proteins participating in the synthesis or degradation of glycogen itself, in the glycolytic degradation of glucose phosphates in muscle and erythrocytes, in the release of glucose from liver and kidney into the bloodstream, in the clearance of glycogen from lysosomes (all, "primary GSDs"), or in the control of these pathways ("secondary GSDs"). Most genes responsible for classical, primary GSDs have probably been identified, and future progress in understanding the biochemical and genetic defects underlying unsolved disorders presenting with glycogen storage abnormalities will perhaps be predominantly in the field of secondary GSDs.

  19. Human high-altitude adaptation: forward genetics meets the HIF pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bigham, Abigail W.

    2014-01-01

    Humans have adapted to the chronic hypoxia of high altitude in several locations, and recent genome-wide studies have indicated a genetic basis. In some populations, genetic signatures have been identified in the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway, which orchestrates the transcriptional response to hypoxia. In Tibetans, they have been found in the HIF2A (EPAS1) gene, which encodes for HIF-2α, and the prolyl hydroxylase domain protein 2 (PHD2, also known as EGLN1) gene, which encodes for one of its key regulators, PHD2. High-altitude adaptation may be due to multiple genes that act in concert with one another. Unraveling their mechanism of action can offer new therapeutic approaches toward treating common human diseases characterized by chronic hypoxia. PMID:25319824

  20. Structural and Functional Characterization of a Caenorhabditis elegans Genetic Interaction Network within Pathways.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Benjamin; Lee, Anna Y; Hallett, Michael; Jenna, Sarah

    2016-02-01

    A genetic interaction (GI) is defined when the mutation of one gene modifies the phenotypic expression associated with the mutation of a second gene. Genome-wide efforts to map GIs in yeast revealed structural and functional properties of a GI network. This provided insights into the mechanisms underlying the robustness of yeast to genetic and environmental insults, and also into the link existing between genotype and phenotype. While a significant conservation of GIs and GI network structure has been reported between distant yeast species, such a conservation is not clear between unicellular and multicellular organisms. Structural and functional characterization of a GI network in these latter organisms is consequently of high interest. In this study, we present an in-depth characterization of ~1.5K GIs in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We identify and characterize six distinct classes of GIs by examining a wide-range of structural and functional properties of genes and network, including co-expression, phenotypical manifestations, relationship with protein-protein interaction dense subnetworks (PDS) and pathways, molecular and biological functions, gene essentiality and pleiotropy. Our study shows that GI classes link genes within pathways and display distinctive properties, specifically towards PDS. It suggests a model in which pathways are composed of PDS-centric and PDS-independent GIs coordinating molecular machines through two specific classes of GIs involving pleiotropic and non-pleiotropic connectors. Our study provides the first in-depth characterization of a GI network within pathways of a multicellular organism. It also suggests a model to understand better how GIs control system robustness and evolution. PMID:26871911

  1. Structural and Functional Characterization of a Caenorhabditis elegans Genetic Interaction Network within Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, Benjamin; Lee, Anna Y.; Hallett, Michael; Jenna, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    A genetic interaction (GI) is defined when the mutation of one gene modifies the phenotypic expression associated with the mutation of a second gene. Genome-wide efforts to map GIs in yeast revealed structural and functional properties of a GI network. This provided insights into the mechanisms underlying the robustness of yeast to genetic and environmental insults, and also into the link existing between genotype and phenotype. While a significant conservation of GIs and GI network structure has been reported between distant yeast species, such a conservation is not clear between unicellular and multicellular organisms. Structural and functional characterization of a GI network in these latter organisms is consequently of high interest. In this study, we present an in-depth characterization of ~1.5K GIs in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We identify and characterize six distinct classes of GIs by examining a wide-range of structural and functional properties of genes and network, including co-expression, phenotypical manifestations, relationship with protein-protein interaction dense subnetworks (PDS) and pathways, molecular and biological functions, gene essentiality and pleiotropy. Our study shows that GI classes link genes within pathways and display distinctive properties, specifically towards PDS. It suggests a model in which pathways are composed of PDS-centric and PDS-independent GIs coordinating molecular machines through two specific classes of GIs involving pleiotropic and non-pleiotropic connectors. Our study provides the first in-depth characterization of a GI network within pathways of a multicellular organism. It also suggests a model to understand better how GIs control system robustness and evolution. PMID:26871911

  2. Genetic Variation along the Histamine Pathway in Children with Allergic versus Nonallergic Asthma.

    PubMed

    Anvari, Sara; Vyhlidal, Carrie A; Dai, Hongying; Jones, Bridgette L

    2015-12-01

    Histamine is an important mediator in the pathogenesis of asthma. Variation in genes along the histamine production, response, and degradation pathway may be important in predicting response to antihistamines. We hypothesize that differences exist among single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes of the histamine pathway between children with allergic versus nonallergic asthma. Children (7-18 yr of age; n = 202) with asthma were classified as allergic or nonallergic based on allergy skin testing. Genotyping was performed to detect known SNPs (n = 10) among genes (HDC, HNMT, ABP1, HRH1, and HRH4) within the histamine pathway. Chi square tests and Cochran-Armitage Trend were used to identify associations between genetic variants and allergic or nonallergic asthma. Significance was determined by P < 0.05 and false-positive report probability. After correction for race differences in genotype were observed, HRH1-17 TT (6% allergic versus 0% nonallergic; P = 0.04), HNMT-464 TT (41% allergic versus 29% nonallergic; P = 0.04), and HNMT-1639 TT (30% allergic versus 20% nonallergic; P = 0.04) were overrepresented among children with allergic asthma. Genotype differences specifically among the African-American children were also observed: HRH1-17 TT (13% allergic versus 0% nonallergic; P = 0.04) and HNMT-1639 TT (23% allergic versus 3% nonallergic; P = 0.03) genotypes were overrepresented among African-American children with allergic asthma. Our study suggests that genetic variation within the histamine pathway may be associated with an allergic versus nonallergic asthma phenotype. Further studies are needed to determine the functional significance of identified SNPs and their impact on antihistamine response in patients with asthma and allergic disease.

  3. Unraveling the Genetic Basis of Aspirin Hypersensitivity in Asthma Beyond Arachidonate Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Park, Se-Min; Park, Jong Sook; Park, Hae-Sim

    2013-01-01

    Although aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) has attracted a great deal of attention because of its association with severe asthma, it remains widely under-diagnosed in the asthmatic population. Oral aspirin challenge is the best method of diagnosing AERD, but this is a time-consuming procedure with serious complications in some cases. Thus, development of non-invasive methods for easy diagnosis is necessary to prevent unexpected complications of aspirin use in susceptible patients. For the past decade, many studies have attempted to elucidate the genetic variants responsible for risk of AERD. Several approaches have been applied in these genetic studies. To date, a limited number of biologically plausible candidate genes in the arachidonate and immune and inflammatory pathways have been studied. Recently, a genome-wide association study was performed. In this review, the results of these studies are summarized, and their limitations discussed. In addition to the genetic variants, changes in methylation patterns on CpG sites have recently been identified in a target tissue of aspirin hypersensitivity. Finally, perspectives on application of new genomic technologies are introduced; these will aid our understanding of the genetic pathogenesis of aspirin hypersensitivity in asthma. PMID:24003382

  4. The role of MAPK and FAS death receptor pathways in testicular germ cell apoptosis induced by lead.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shuying; Liang, Duoping; An, Na; Jia, Li; Shan, Yujuan; Chen, Chao; Sun, Kuo; Niu, Fei; Li, Huiyan; Fu, Songbin

    2009-09-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate gene expression involved in the signal pathway of MAPK and death signal receptor pathway of FAS in lead-induced apoptosis of testicular germ cells. First, cell viabilities were determined by MTT assay. Second, using single cell gel-electrophoresis test (comet assay) and TUNEL staining technique, apoptotic rate and cell apoptosis localization of testicular germ cells were measured in mice treated with 0.15%, 0.3%, and 0.6% lead, respectively. Third, the immunolocalization of K-ras, c-fos, Fas, and active caspase-3 proteins was determined by immunohistochemistry. Finally, changes in the translational levels of K-ras, c-fos, Fas, and active caspase-3 were further detected by western blot analysis. Our results showed that lead could significantly induce testicular germ cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner (P<0.01). The mechanisms were closely related to the increased expressions of K-ras, c-fos, Fas, and active caspase-3 in apoptotic germ cells. In conclusion, K-ras/c-fos and Fas/caspase-3 death signaling receptor pathways were involved in the lead-induced apoptosis of the testicular germ cells in mice. PMID:19727529

  5. Hodgkin Lymphoma Risk: Role of Genetic Polymorphisms and Gene-Gene Interactions in DNA repair pathways

    PubMed Central

    Monroy, Claudia M.; Cortes, Andrea C.; Lopez, Mirtha; Rourke, Elizabeth; Etzel, Carol J.; Younes, Anas; Strom, Sara S.; El-Zein, Randa

    2011-01-01

    DNA repair variants may play a potentially important role in an individual’s susceptibility to developing cancer. Numerous studies have reported the association between genetic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in DNA repair genes and different types of hematologic cancers. However, to date, the effects of such SNPs on modulating Hodgkin Lymphoma (HL) risk have not yet been investigated. We hypothesized that gene-gene interaction between candidate genes in Direct Reversal, Nucleotide excision repair (NER), Base excision repair (BER) and Double strand break (DSB) pathways may contribute to susceptibility to HL. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a study on 200 HL cases and 220 controls to assess associations between HL risk and 21 functional SNPs in DNA repair genes. We evaluated potential gene-gene interactions and the association of multiple polymorphisms in a chromosome region using a multi-analytic strategy combining logistic regression, multi-factor dimensionality reduction and classification and regression tree approaches. We observed that, in combination, allelic variants in the XPC Ala499Val, NBN Glu185Gln, XRCC3 Thr241Me, XRCC1 Arg194Trp and XRCC1 399Gln polymorphisms modify the risk for developing HL. Moreover, the cumulative genetic risk score revealed a significant trend where the risk for developing HL increases as the number of adverse alleles in BER and DSB genes increase. These findings suggest that DNA repair variants in BER and DSB pathways may play an important role in the development of HL. PMID:21374732

  6. The Genetic Link between Parkinson's Disease and the Kynurenine Pathway Is Still Missing.

    PubMed

    Török, Nóra; Török, Rita; Szolnoki, Zoltán; Somogyvári, Ferenc; Klivényi, Péter; Vécsei, László

    2015-01-01

    Background. There is substantial evidence that the kynurenine pathway (KP) plays a role in the normal physiology of the brain and is involved in the pathology of neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease and Parkinson's disease (PD). Objective. We set out to investigate the potential roles in PD of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from one of the key enzymes of the KP, kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO). Methods. 105 unrelated, clinically definitive PD patients and 131 healthy controls were enrolled to investigate the possible effects of the different alleles of KMO. Fluorescently labeled TaqMan probes were used for allele discrimination. Results. None of the four investigated SNPs proved to be associated with PD or influenced the age at onset of the disease. Conclusions. The genetic link between the KP and PD is still missing. The investigated SNPs presumably do not appear to influence the function of KMO and probably do not contain binding sites for regulatory proteins of relevance in PD. This is the first study to assess the genetic background behind the biochemical alterations of the kynurenine pathway in PD, directing the attention to this previously unexamined field.

  7. Genetic variants in novel pathways influence blood pressure and cardiovascular disease risk.

    PubMed

    Ehret, Georg B; Munroe, Patricia B; Rice, Kenneth M; Bochud, Murielle; Johnson, Andrew D; Chasman, Daniel I; Smith, Albert V; Tobin, Martin D; Verwoert, Germaine C; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Pihur, Vasyl; Vollenweider, Peter; O'Reilly, Paul F; Amin, Najaf; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Teumer, Alexander; Glazer, Nicole L; Launer, Lenore; Zhao, Jing Hua; Aulchenko, Yurii; Heath, Simon; Sõber, Siim; Parsa, Afshin; Luan, Jian'an; Arora, Pankaj; Dehghan, Abbas; Zhang, Feng; Lucas, Gavin; Hicks, Andrew A; Jackson, Anne U; Peden, John F; Tanaka, Toshiko; Wild, Sarah H; Rudan, Igor; Igl, Wilmar; Milaneschi, Yuri; Parker, Alex N; Fava, Cristiano; Chambers, John C; Fox, Ervin R; Kumari, Meena; Go, Min Jin; van der Harst, Pim; Kao, Wen Hong Linda; Sjögren, Marketa; Vinay, D G; Alexander, Myriam; Tabara, Yasuharu; Shaw-Hawkins, Sue; Whincup, Peter H; Liu, Yongmei; Shi, Gang; Kuusisto, Johanna; Tayo, Bamidele; Seielstad, Mark; Sim, Xueling; Nguyen, Khanh-Dung Hoang; Lehtimäki, Terho; Matullo, Giuseppe; Wu, Ying; Gaunt, Tom R; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Cooper, Matthew N; Platou, Carl G P; Org, Elin; Hardy, Rebecca; Dahgam, Santosh; Palmen, Jutta; Vitart, Veronique; Braund, Peter S; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Uiterwaal, Cuno S P M; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Palmas, Walter; Campbell, Harry; Ludwig, Barbara; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Palmer, Nicholette D; Aspelund, Thor; Garcia, Melissa; Chang, Yen-Pei C; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Steinle, Nanette I; Grobbee, Diederick E; Arking, Dan E; Kardia, Sharon L; Morrison, Alanna C; Hernandez, Dena; Najjar, Samer; McArdle, Wendy L; Hadley, David; Brown, Morris J; Connell, John M; Hingorani, Aroon D; Day, Ian N M; Lawlor, Debbie A; Beilby, John P; Lawrence, Robert W; Clarke, Robert; Hopewell, Jemma C; Ongen, Halit; Dreisbach, Albert W; Li, Yali; Young, J Hunter; Bis, Joshua C; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Adair, Linda S; Lee, Nanette R; Chen, Ming-Huei; Olden, Matthias; Pattaro, Cristian; Bolton, Judith A Hoffman; Köttgen, Anna; Bergmann, Sven; Mooser, Vincent; Chaturvedi, Nish; Frayling, Timothy M; Islam, Muhammad; Jafar, Tazeen H; Erdmann, Jeanette; Kulkarni, Smita R; Bornstein, Stefan R; Grässler, Jürgen; Groop, Leif; Voight, Benjamin F; Kettunen, Johannes; Howard, Philip; Taylor, Andrew; Guarrera, Simonetta; Ricceri, Fulvio; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew; Barroso, Inês; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Weder, Alan B; Hunt, Steven C; Sun, Yan V; Bergman, Richard N; Collins, Francis S; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Scott, Laura J; Stringham, Heather M; Peltonen, Leena; Perola, Markus; Vartiainen, Erkki; Brand, Stefan-Martin; Staessen, Jan A; Wang, Thomas J; Burton, Paul R; Soler Artigas, Maria; Dong, Yanbin; Snieder, Harold; Wang, Xiaoling; Zhu, Haidong; Lohman, Kurt K; Rudock, Megan E; Heckbert, Susan R; Smith, Nicholas L; Wiggins, Kerri L; Doumatey, Ayo; Shriner, Daniel; Veldre, Gudrun; Viigimaa, Margus; Kinra, Sanjay; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Tripathy, Vikal; Langefeld, Carl D; Rosengren, Annika; Thelle, Dag S; Corsi, Anna Maria; Singleton, Andrew; Forrester, Terrence; Hilton, Gina; McKenzie, Colin A; Salako, Tunde; Iwai, Naoharu; Kita, Yoshikuni; Ogihara, Toshio; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Okamura, Tomonori; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Umemura, Satoshi; Eyheramendy, Susana; Meitinger, Thomas; Wichmann, H-Erich; Cho, Yoon Shin; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Lee, Jong-Young; Scott, James; Sehmi, Joban S; Zhang, Weihua; Hedblad, Bo; Nilsson, Peter; Smith, George Davey; Wong, Andrew; Narisu, Narisu; Stančáková, Alena; Raffel, Leslie J; Yao, Jie; Kathiresan, Sekar; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Schwartz, Stephen M; Ikram, M Arfan; Longstreth, W T; Mosley, Thomas H; Seshadri, Sudha; Shrine, Nick R G; Wain, Louise V; Morken, Mario A; Swift, Amy J; Laitinen, Jaana; Prokopenko, Inga; Zitting, Paavo; Cooper, Jackie A; Humphries, Steve E; Danesh, John; Rasheed, Asif; Goel, Anuj; Hamsten, Anders; Watkins, Hugh; Bakker, Stephan J L; van Gilst, Wiek H; Janipalli, Charles S; Mani, K Radha; Yajnik, Chittaranjan S; Hofman, Albert; Mattace-Raso, Francesco U S; Oostra, Ben A; Demirkan, Ayse; Isaacs, Aaron; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Lakatta, Edward G; Orru, Marco; Scuteri, Angelo; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Kangas, Antti J; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Soininen, Pasi; Tukiainen, Taru; Würtz, Peter; Ong, Rick Twee-Hee; Dörr, Marcus; Kroemer, Heyo K; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Galan, Pilar; Hercberg, Serge; Lathrop, Mark; Zelenika, Diana; Deloukas, Panos; Mangino, Massimo; Spector, Tim D; Zhai, Guangju; Meschia, James F; Nalls, Michael A; Sharma, Pankaj; Terzic, Janos; Kumar, M V Kranthi; Denniff, Matthew; Zukowska-Szczechowska, Ewa; Wagenknecht, Lynne E; Fowkes, F Gerald R; Charchar, Fadi J; Schwarz, Peter E H; Hayward, Caroline; Guo, Xiuqing; Rotimi, Charles; Bots, Michiel L; Brand, Eva; Samani, Nilesh J; Polasek, Ozren; Talmud, Philippa J; Nyberg, Fredrik; Kuh, Diana; Laan, Maris; Hveem, Kristian; Palmer, Lyle J; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Casas, Juan P; Mohlke, Karen L; Vineis, Paolo; Raitakari, Olli; Ganesh, Santhi K; Wong, Tien Y; Tai, E Shyong; Cooper, Richard S; Laakso, Markku; Rao, Dabeeru C; Harris, Tamara B; Morris, Richard W; Dominiczak, Anna F; Kivimaki, Mika; Marmot, Michael G; Miki, Tetsuro; Saleheen, Danish; Chandak, Giriraj R; Coresh, Josef; Navis, Gerjan; Salomaa, Veikko; Han, Bok-Ghee; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Kooner, Jaspal S; Melander, Olle; Ridker, Paul M; Bandinelli, Stefania; Gyllensten, Ulf B; Wright, Alan F; Wilson, James F; Ferrucci, Luigi; Farrall, Martin; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Pramstaller, Peter P; Elosua, Roberto; Soranzo, Nicole; Sijbrands, Eric J G; Altshuler, David; Loos, Ruth J F; Shuldiner, Alan R; Gieger, Christian; Meneton, Pierre; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Wareham, Nicholas J; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Rotter, Jerome I; Rettig, Rainer; Uda, Manuela; Strachan, David P; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Beckmann, Jacques S; Boerwinkle, Eric; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Boehnke, Michael; Larson, Martin G; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Psaty, Bruce M; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Elliott, Paul; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Levy, Daniel; Caulfield, Mark J; Johnson, Toby

    2011-09-11

    Blood pressure is a heritable trait influenced by several biological pathways and responsive to environmental stimuli. Over one billion people worldwide have hypertension (≥140 mm Hg systolic blood pressure or  ≥90 mm Hg diastolic blood pressure). Even small increments in blood pressure are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. This genome-wide association study of systolic and diastolic blood pressure, which used a multi-stage design in 200,000 individuals of European descent, identified sixteen novel loci: six of these loci contain genes previously known or suspected to regulate blood pressure (GUCY1A3-GUCY1B3, NPR3-C5orf23, ADM, FURIN-FES, GOSR2, GNAS-EDN3); the other ten provide new clues to blood pressure physiology. A genetic risk score based on 29 genome-wide significant variants was associated with hypertension, left ventricular wall thickness, stroke and coronary artery disease, but not kidney disease or kidney function. We also observed associations with blood pressure in East Asian, South Asian and African ancestry individuals. Our findings provide new insights into the genetics and biology of blood pressure, and suggest potential novel therapeutic pathways for cardiovascular disease prevention.

  8. Genetic Variants in Novel Pathways Influence Blood Pressure and Cardiovascular Disease Risk

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Blood pressure (BP) is a heritable trait1 influenced by multiple biological pathways and is responsive to environmental stimuli. Over one billion people worldwide have hypertension (BP ≥140 mm Hg systolic [SBP] or ≥90 mm Hg diastolic [DBP])2. Even small increments in BP are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events3. This genome-wide association study of SBP and DBP, which used a multi-stage design in 200,000 individuals of European descent, identified 16 novel loci: six of these loci contain genes previously known or suspected to regulate BP (GUCY1A3-GUCY1B3; NPR3-C5orf23; ADM; FURIN-FES; GOSR2; GNAS-EDN3); the other 10 provide new clues to BP physiology. A genetic risk score based on 29 genome-wide significant variants was associated with hypertension, left ventricular wall thickness, stroke, and coronary artery disease, but not kidney disease or kidney function. We also observed associations with BP in East Asian, South Asian, and African ancestry individuals. Our findings provide new insights into the genetics and biology of BP, and suggest novel potential therapeutic pathways for cardiovascular disease prevention. PMID:21909115

  9. Metabolic Pathways Leading to Mercury Methylation in Desulfovibrio desulfuricans LS †

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sung-Chan; Chase, Theodore; Bartha, Richard

    1994-01-01

    The synthesis of methylmercury by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans LS was investigated on the basis of 14C incorporation from precursors and the measurement of relevant enzyme activities in cell extracts. The previously observed incorporation of C-3 from serine into methylmercury was confirmed by measurement of relatively high activities of serine hydroxymethyltransferase and other enzymes of this pathway. High rates of label incorporation into methylmercury from H14COO- and H14CO3- prompted the assay of enzymes of the acetyl coenzyme A (CoA) synthase pathway. These enzymes were found to be present but at activity levels much lower than those reported for acetogens. Propyl iodide inhibited methylmercury and acetyl-CoA syntheses to similar extents, and methylmercury synthesis was found to compete with acetyl-CoA synthesis for methyl groups. On the basis of these findings, we propose that in methylmercury synthesis by D. desulfuricans LS the methyl group is transferred from CH3-tetrahydrofolate via methylcobalamin. The methyl group may originate from C-3 of serine or from formate via the acetyl-CoA synthase pathway. These pathways are not unique to D. desulfuricans LS, and thus the ability of this bacterium to methylate mercury is most likely associated with the substrate specificity of its enzymes. PMID:16349435

  10. Dysregulation of Npas2 leads to altered metabolic pathways in a murine knockout model.

    PubMed

    O'Neil, Derek; Mendez-Figueroa, Hector; Mistretta, Toni-Ann; Su, Chunliu; Lane, Robert H; Aagaard, Kjersti M

    2013-11-01

    In our primate model of maternal high fat diet exposure, we have described that fetal epigenomic modifications to the peripheral circadian Npas2 are associated with persistent alterations in fetal hepatic metabolism and non-alcoholic fatty liver. As the interaction of circadian response with metabolism is not well understood, we employed a murine knockout model to characterize the molecular mechanisms with which Npas2 reprograms the fetal hepatic metabolic response. cDNA was generated from Npas2-/- and +/+ (wild type) livers at day 2 (newborn) and at 25 weeks (adult) of life. Newborn samples were analyzed by exon array (n = 3/cohort). Independent pathway analysis software determined that the primary dysregulated pathway(s) in the Npas2-/- animals uniformly converged on lipid metabolism. Of particular interest, Ppargc1a, which integrates circadian and metabolism pathways, was significantly (p < .01) over expressed in newborn (1.7 fold) and adult (1.8 fold) Npas2-/- animals. These findings are consistent with an essential role for Npas2 in programming the peripheral circadian response and hepatic metabolism, which has not been previously described.

  11. FINDbase: a relational database recording frequencies of genetic defects leading to inherited disorders worldwide.

    PubMed

    van Baal, Sjozef; Kaimakis, Polynikis; Phommarinh, Manyphong; Koumbi, Daphne; Cuppens, Harry; Riccardino, Francesca; Macek, Milan; Scriver, Charles R; Patrinos, George P

    2007-01-01

    Frequency of INherited Disorders database (FINDbase) (http://www.findbase.org) is a relational database, derived from the ETHNOS software, recording frequencies of causative mutations leading to inherited disorders worldwide. Database records include the population and ethnic group, the disorder name and the related gene, accompanied by links to any corresponding locus-specific mutation database, to the respective Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man entries and the mutation together with its frequency in that population. The initial information is derived from the published literature, locus-specific databases and genetic disease consortia. FINDbase offers a user-friendly query interface, providing instant access to the list and frequencies of the different mutations. Query outputs can be either in a table or graphical format, accompanied by reference(s) on the data source. Registered users from three different groups, namely administrator, national coordinator and curator, are responsible for database curation and/or data entry/correction online via a password-protected interface. Databaseaccess is free of charge and there are no registration requirements for data querying. FINDbase provides a simple, web-based system for population-based mutation data collection and retrieval and can serve not only as a valuable online tool for molecular genetic testing of inherited disorders but also as a non-profit model for sustainable database funding, in the form of a 'database-journal'.

  12. Genetic variants in mammary development, prolactin signalling and involution pathways explain considerable variation in bovine milk production and milk composition

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The maintenance of lactation in mammals is the result of a balance between competing signals from mammary development, prolactin signalling and involution pathways. Dairy cattle are an interesting case study to investigate the effect of polymorphisms that affect the function of genes in these pathways. In dairy cattle, lactation yields and milk composition (for example protein percentage and fat percentage) are routinely recorded, and these vary greatly between individuals. In this study, we test 8058 single nucleotide polymorphisms in or close to genes in these pathways for association with milk production traits and determine the proportion of variance explained by each pathway, using data on 16 812 dairy cattle, including Holstein-Friesian and Jersey bulls and cows. Results Single nucleotide polymorphisms close to genes in the mammary development, prolactin signalling and involution pathways were significantly associated with milk production traits. The involution pathway explained the largest proportion of genetic variation for production traits. The mammary development pathway also explained additional genetic variation for milk volume, fat percentage and protein percentage. Conclusions Genetic variants in the involution pathway explained considerably more genetic variation in milk production traits than expected by chance. Many of the associations for single nucleotide polymorphisms in genes in this pathway have not been detected in conventional genome-wide association studies. The pathway approach used here allowed us to identify some novel candidates for further studies that will be aimed at refining the location of associated genomic regions and identifying polymorphisms contributing to variation in lactation volume and milk composition. PMID:24779965

  13. Biotechnology of polyketides: New breath of life for the novel antibiotic genetic pathways discovery through metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Elisângela Soares; Schuch, Viviane; de Macedo Lemos, Eliana Gertrudes

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of secondary metabolites produced by microorganisms (e.g., penicillin in 1928) and the beginning of their industrial application (1940) opened new doors to what has been the main medication source for the treatment of infectious diseases and tumors. In fact, approximately 80 years after the discovery of the first antibiotic compound, and despite all of the warnings about the failure of the “goose that laid the golden egg,” the potential of this wealth is still inexorable: simply adjust the focus from “micro” to “nano”, that means changing the look from microorganisms to nanograms of DNA. Then, the search for new drugs, driven by genetic engineering combined with metagenomic strategies, shows us a way to bypass the barriers imposed by methodologies limited to isolation and culturing. However, we are far from solving the problem of supplying new molecules that are effective against the plasticity of multi- or pan-drug-resistant pathogens. Although the first advances in genetic engineering date back to 1990, there is still a lack of high-throughput methods to speed up the screening of new genes and design new molecules by recombination of pathways. In addition, it is necessary an increase in the variety of heterologous hosts and improvements throughout the full drug discovery pipeline. Among numerous studies focused on this subject, those on polyketide antibiotics stand out for the large technical-scientific efforts that established novel solutions for the transfer/engineering of major metabolic pathways using transposons and other episomes, overcoming one of the main methodological constraints for the heterologous expression of major pathways. In silico prediction analysis of three-dimensional enzymatic structures and advances in sequencing technologies have expanded access to the metabolic potential of microorganisms. PMID:24688489

  14. Biotechnology of polyketides: new breath of life for the novel antibiotic genetic pathways discovery through metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Elisângela Soares; Schuch, Viviane; de Macedo Lemos, Eliana Gertrudes

    2013-12-01

    The discovery of secondary metabolites produced by microorganisms (e.g., penicillin in 1928) and the beginning of their industrial application (1940) opened new doors to what has been the main medication source for the treatment of infectious diseases and tumors. In fact, approximately 80 years after the discovery of the first antibiotic compound, and despite all of the warnings about the failure of the "goose that laid the golden egg," the potential of this wealth is still inexorable: simply adjust the focus from "micro" to "nano", that means changing the look from microorganisms to nanograms of DNA. Then, the search for new drugs, driven by genetic engineering combined with metagenomic strategies, shows us a way to bypass the barriers imposed by methodologies limited to isolation and culturing. However, we are far from solving the problem of supplying new molecules that are effective against the plasticity of multi- or pan-drug-resistant pathogens. Although the first advances in genetic engineering date back to 1990, there is still a lack of high-throughput methods to speed up the screening of new genes and design new molecules by recombination of pathways. In addition, it is necessary an increase in the variety of heterologous hosts and improvements throughout the full drug discovery pipeline. Among numerous studies focused on this subject, those on polyketide antibiotics stand out for the large technical-scientific efforts that established novel solutions for the transfer/engineering of major metabolic pathways using transposons and other episomes, overcoming one of the main methodological constraints for the heterologous expression of major pathways. In silico prediction analysis of three-dimensional enzymatic structures and advances in sequencing technologies have expanded access to the metabolic potential of microorganisms.

  15. The Role of Inflammatory Pathway Genetic Variation on Maternal Metabolic Phenotypes during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Urbanek, Margrit; Hayes, M. Geoffrey; Lee, Hoon; Freathy, Rachel M.; Lowe, Lynn P.; Ackerman, Christine; Jafari, Nadereh; Dyer, Alan R.; Cox, Nancy J.; Dunger, David B.; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Metzger, Boyd E.; Lowe, William L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Since mediators of inflammation are associated with insulin resistance, and the risk of developing diabetes mellitus and gestational diabetes, we hypothesized that genetic variation in members of the inflammatory gene pathway impact glucose levels and related phenotypes in pregnancy. We evaluated this hypothesis by testing for association between genetic variants in 31 inflammatory pathway genes in the Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome (HAPO) cohort, a large multiethnic multicenter study designed to address the impact of glycemia less than overt diabetes on pregnancy outcome. Results Fasting, 1-hour, and 2-hour glucose, fasting and 1-hour C-peptide, and HbA1c levels were measured in blood samples obtained from HAPO participants during an oral glucose tolerance test at 24-32 weeks gestation. We tested for association between 458 SNPs mapping to 31 genes in the inflammatory pathway and metabolic phenotypes in 3836 European ancestry and 1713 Thai pregnant women. The strongest evidence for association was observed with TNF alpha and HbA1c (rs1052248; 0.04% increase per allele C; p-value = 4.4×10−5), RETN and fasting plasma glucose (rs1423096; 0.7 mg/dl decrease per allele A; p-value = 1.1×10−4), IL8 and 1 hr plasma glucose (rs2886920; 2.6 mg/dl decrease per allele T; p-value = 1.3×10−4), ADIPOR2 and fasting C-peptide (rs2041139; 0.55 ug/L decrease per allele A; p-value = 1.4×10−4), LEPR and 1-hour C-peptide (rs1171278; 0.62 ug/L decrease per allele T; p-value = 2.4×10−4), and IL6 and 1-hour plasma glucose (rs6954897; −2.29 mg/dl decrease per allele G, p-value = 4.3×10−4). Conclusions Based on the genes surveyed in this study the inflammatory pathway is unlikely to have a strong impact on maternal metabolic phenotypes in pregnancy although variation in individual members of the pathway (e.g. RETN, IL8, ADIPOR2, LEPR, IL6, and TNF alpha,) may contribute to metabolic phenotypes in pregnant women. PMID

  16. Genetic immunization based on the ubiquitin-fusion degradation pathway against Trypanosoma cruzi

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Bin; Hiromatsu, Kenji; Hisaeda, Hajime; Duan, Xuefeng; Imai, Takashi; Murata, Shigeo; Tanaka, Keiji; Himeno, Kunisuke

    2010-02-12

    Cytotoxic CD8{sup +} T cells are particularly important to the development of protective immunity against the intracellular protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease. We have developed a new effective strategy of genetic immunization by activating CD8{sup +} T cells through the ubiquitin-fusion degradation (UFD) pathway. We constructed expression plasmids encoding the amastigote surface protein-2 (ASP-2) of T. cruzi. To induce the UFD pathway, a chimeric gene encoding ubiquitin fused to ASP-2 (pUB-ASP-2) was constructed. Mice immunized with pUB-ASP-2 presented lower parasitemia and longer survival period, compared with mice immunized with pASP-2 alone. Depletion of CD8{sup +} T cells abolished protection against T. cruzi in mice immunized with pUB-ASP-2 while depletion of CD4{sup +} T cells did not influence the effective immunity. Mice deficient in LMP2 or LMP7, subunits of immunoproteasomes, were not able to develop protective immunity induced. These results suggest that ubiquitin-fused antigens expressed in antigen-presenting cells were effectively degraded via the UFD pathway, and subsequently activated CD8{sup +} T cells. Consequently, immunization with pUB-ASP-2 was able to induce potent protective immunity against infection of T. cruzi.

  17. Crumbs and stardust act in a genetic pathway that controls the organization of epithelia in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Tepass, U; Knust, E

    1993-09-01

    We provide evidence that the genes crumbs (crb) and stardust (sdt) encode critical components of a pathway that acts at the apical pole of epithelial cells to control the cytoarchitecture of ectodermally derived epithelia of the Drosophila embryo. We describe the developmental defects caused by sdt mutations, which are very similar to those associated with mutations in crb. In both mutants the epithelial structure of ectodermal cells breaks down during early organogenesis, leading to the formation of irregular clusters of cells and cell death in some epithelia. Certain cells can, however, compensate for the loss of crb or sdt function in a tissue-specific manner, later reassuming an epithelial cell shape and forming small epithelial vesicles, suggesting that, besides crb and sdt, other tissue-specific components are involved in this process. The crb protein (CRB) is continuously expressed in wild-type embryos in cells of the ectoderm and ectodermally derived epithelia. In sdt mutant embryos CRB is present only during gastrulation, but becomes undetectable during germ band extension; the protein is again visible during early organogenesis, at the time when the sdt mutant phenotype becomes apparent. In sdt mutant embryos, CRB is associated with the apical membrane only in well-differentiated epithelial cells, but it is expressed diffusely in the cytoplasm of cells which have lost epithelial morphology. Our results suggest that time- and tissue-specific control mechanisms exist to establish and maintain epithelial cell structure. Mosaic experiments suggest that sdt is required cell autonomously, in contrast to crb, the requirement of which appears to be non-cell-autonomous. Double mutant combinations of crb and sdt suggest that these genes are part of a common genetic pathway (crb/sdt pathway), in which sdt acts downstream of crb and is activated by the latter.

  18. The independent acquisition of plant root nitrogen-fixing symbiosis in Fabids recruited the same genetic pathway for nodule organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Svistoonoff, Sergio; Benabdoun, Faiza Meriem; Nambiar-Veetil, Mathish; Imanishi, Leandro; Vaissayre, Virginie; Cesari, Stella; Diagne, Nathalie; Hocher, Valérie; de Billy, Françoise; Bonneau, Jocelyne; Wall, Luis; Ykhlef, Nadia; Rosenberg, Charles; Bogusz, Didier; Franche, Claudine; Gherbi, Hassen

    2013-01-01

    Only species belonging to the Fabid clade, limited to four classes and ten families of Angiosperms, are able to form nitrogen-fixing root nodule symbioses (RNS) with soil bacteria. This concerns plants of the legume family (Fabaceae) and Parasponia (Cannabaceae) associated with the Gram-negative proteobacteria collectively called rhizobia and actinorhizal plants associated with the Gram-positive actinomycetes of the genus Frankia. Calcium and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) is a key component of the common signaling pathway leading to both rhizobial and arbuscular mycorrhizal symbioses (AM) and plays a central role in cross-signaling between root nodule organogenesis and infection processes. Here, we show that CCaMK is also needed for successful actinorhiza formation and interaction with AM fungi in the actinorhizal tree Casuarina glauca and is also able to restore both nodulation and AM symbioses in a Medicago truncatula ccamk mutant. Besides, we expressed auto-active CgCCaMK lacking the auto-inhibitory/CaM domain in two actinorhizal species: C. glauca (Casuarinaceae), which develops an intracellular infection pathway, and Discaria trinervis (Rhamnaceae) which is characterized by an ancestral intercellular infection mechanism. In both species, we found induction of nodulation independent of Frankia similar to response to the activation of CCaMK in the rhizobia-legume symbiosis and conclude that the regulation of actinorhiza organogenesis is conserved regardless of the infection mode. It has been suggested that rhizobial and actinorhizal symbioses originated from a common ancestor with several independent evolutionary origins. Our findings are consistent with the recruitment of a similar genetic pathway governing rhizobial and Frankia nodule organogenesis. PMID:23741336

  19. The Independent Acquisition of Plant Root Nitrogen-Fixing Symbiosis in Fabids Recruited the Same Genetic Pathway for Nodule Organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Svistoonoff, Sergio; Benabdoun, Faiza Meriem; Nambiar-Veetil, Mathish; Imanishi, Leandro; Vaissayre, Virginie; Cesari, Stella; Diagne, Nathalie; Hocher, Valérie; de Billy, Françoise; Bonneau, Jocelyne; Wall, Luis; Ykhlef, Nadia; Rosenberg, Charles; Bogusz, Didier; Franche, Claudine; Gherbi, Hassen

    2013-01-01

    Only species belonging to the Fabid clade, limited to four classes and ten families of Angiosperms, are able to form nitrogen-fixing root nodule symbioses (RNS) with soil bacteria. This concerns plants of the legume family (Fabaceae) and Parasponia (Cannabaceae) associated with the Gram-negative proteobacteria collectively called rhizobia and actinorhizal plants associated with the Gram-positive actinomycetes of the genus Frankia. Calcium and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) is a key component of the common signaling pathway leading to both rhizobial and arbuscular mycorrhizal symbioses (AM) and plays a central role in cross-signaling between root nodule organogenesis and infection processes. Here, we show that CCaMK is also needed for successful actinorhiza formation and interaction with AM fungi in the actinorhizal tree Casuarina glauca and is also able to restore both nodulation and AM symbioses in a Medicago truncatula ccamk mutant. Besides, we expressed auto-active CgCCaMK lacking the auto-inhibitory/CaM domain in two actinorhizal species: C. glauca (Casuarinaceae), which develops an intracellular infection pathway, and Discaria trinervis (Rhamnaceae) which is characterized by an ancestral intercellular infection mechanism. In both species, we found induction of nodulation independent of Frankia similar to response to the activation of CCaMK in the rhizobia-legume symbiosis and conclude that the regulation of actinorhiza organogenesis is conserved regardless of the infection mode. It has been suggested that rhizobial and actinorhizal symbioses originated from a common ancestor with several independent evolutionary origins. Our findings are consistent with the recruitment of a similar genetic pathway governing rhizobial and Frankia nodule organogenesis. PMID:23741336

  20. fDWI Evaluation of Hypothalamic Appetite Regulation Pathways in Mice Genetically Deficient in Leptin or Neuropeptide Y.

    PubMed

    Lizarbe, Blanca; López-Larrubia, Pilar; Cerdán, Sebastián

    2015-12-01

    We evaluate the contribution of leptin-dependent anorexigenic pathways and neuropeptide Y (NPY)-dependent orexigenic pathways to the changes in hypothalamic water diffusion parameters observed in vivo by functional diffusion weighted MRI (fDWI). Mice genetically deficient in leptin (B6.V-Lep (ob) /J) or NPY (129S-Npy (tm1Rpa) /J) and the corresponding wild-type controls, were subjected to sequential isocaloric feeding, fasting and recovery regimes. Non-invasive fDWI measurements were performed under these conditions, and complemented with parallel determinations of food and water consumption, respiratory exchange ratio (RER), locomotor activity and endocrine profiles. Control mice showed significant increases in hypothalamic water diffusion parameters upon fasting, returning to normal values in the recovery period. Leptin deficient mice depicted permanently increased water diffusion parameters under all feeding conditions as compared to wild type controls, without important changes upon fasting or recovery. These results paralleled sustained increases in food and water intake, significantly augmented body weight, and decreased RER values or locomotor activity, thus configuring an obese phenotype. NPY-deficient mice showed significantly reduced increases (or even slight decreases) in the water diffusion parameters upon fasting as compared to wild type controls, paralleled by decreased food and water intake during the recovery period. In conclusion, leptin deficiency results in sustained orexigenic stimulation, leading to increased water diffusion parameters, while NPY deficiency lead to reduced orexigenic stimulation and water diffusion parameters. Diffusion changes are proposed to reflect net astrocytic volume changes induced by the balance between the orexigenic and anorexigenic firings of AgRP/NPY and POMC/CART neurons, respectively. Together, our results suggest that fDWI provides an adequate tool to investigate hypothalamic appetite disorders.

  1. Overview of the Cancer Genetics and Pathway Curation tasks of BioNLP Shared Task 2013

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Since their introduction in 2009, the BioNLP Shared Task events have been instrumental in advancing the development of methods and resources for the automatic extraction of information from the biomedical literature. In this paper, we present the Cancer Genetics (CG) and Pathway Curation (PC) tasks, two event extraction tasks introduced in the BioNLP Shared Task 2013. The CG task focuses on cancer, emphasizing the extraction of physiological and pathological processes at various levels of biological organization, and the PC task targets reactions relevant to the development of biomolecular pathway models, defining its extraction targets on the basis of established pathway representations and ontologies. Results Six groups participated in the CG task and two groups in the PC task, together applying a wide range of extraction approaches including both established state-of-the-art systems and newly introduced extraction methods. The best-performing systems achieved F-scores of 55% on the CG task and 53% on the PC task, demonstrating a level of performance comparable to the best results achieved in similar previously proposed tasks. Conclusions The results indicate that existing event extraction technology can generalize to meet the novel challenges represented by the CG and PC task settings, suggesting that extraction methods are capable of supporting the construction of knowledge bases on the molecular mechanisms of cancer and the curation of biomolecular pathway models. The CG and PC tasks continue as open challenges for all interested parties, with data, tools and resources available from the shared task homepage. PMID:26202570

  2. Genetic effects in the leukotriene biosynthesis pathway and association with atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Crosslin, David R.; Shah, Svati H.; Nelson, Sarah C.; Haynes, Carol S.; Connelly, Jessica J.; Gadson, Shera; Goldschmidt-Clermont, Pascal J.; Vance, Jeffery M.; Rose, Jason; Granger, Chris B.; Seo, David; Gregory, Simon G.; Kraus, William E.

    2009-01-01

    Leukotrienes are arachidonic acid derivatives long known for their inflammatory properties and their involvement with a number of human diseases, most particularly asthma. Recently, leukotriene-based inflammation has also been shown to play an important role in atherosclerosis: ALOX5AP and LTA4H, both genes in the leukotriene biosynthesis pathway, have individually been shown to be associated with various cardiovascular disease (CVD) phenotypes. To assess the role of the leukotriene pathway in CVD pathogenesis, we performed genetic association studies of ALOX5AP and LTA4H in a family based study of early onset coronary artery disease (EOCAD) (GENECARD, 1,101 families) and in a non-familial dataset of EOCAD (CATHGEN, 656 cases and 405 controls). We found weak to moderate association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ALOX5AP and LTA4H with EOCAD. The previously reported four-SNP haplotype (HapA) in ALOX5AP showed association with EOCAD in CATHGEN (P = 0.02), while controlling for age, race and CVD risk factors. HapK, the previously reported ten-SNP haplotype in LTA4H was associated with EOCAD in CATHGEN (P = 0.04). Another previously reported four-SNP haplotype in ALOX5AP (HapB) was not significant in our sample (P = 0.39). The overall lack of (or weak) association of single SNPs as compared with the haplotype results demonstrates the need for analyzing multiple SNPs within each gene in such studies. Interestingly, we detected an association of SNPs in ALOX5 (P < 0.05), the target of ALOX5AP, with CVD. Using a pathway-based approach, we also detected statistical evidence for interactions among ALOX5, ALOX5AP and LTA4H using RNA expression data from a collection of freshly harvested human aortas with varying degrees of atherosclerosis. The GENECARD families did not demonstrate evidence for linkage or association with ALOX5, ALOX5AP or LTA4H. Our results support a modest role for the leukotriene pathway in atherosclerosis pathogenesis, reveal important

  3. Forward genetic screen for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor formation identifies new genes and genetic pathways driving tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rahrmann, Eric P; Watson, Adrienne L; Keng, Vincent W; Choi, Kwangmin; Moriarity, Branden S; Beckmann, Dominic A; Wolf, Natalie; Sarver, Aaron; Collins, Margaret H; Moertel, Christopher L; Wallace, Margaret R; Gel, Bernat; Serra, Eduard; Ratner, Nancy; Largaespada, David A

    2013-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are sarcomas of Schwann cell-lineage origin that occur sporadically or in association with the inherited syndrome, Neurofibromatosis Type 1. To identify genetic drivers of MPNST development, we utilized the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon-based somatic mutagenesis system in mice with somatic loss of tumor protein p53 (Trp53) function and/or overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Common insertion site (CIS) analysis of 269 neurofibromas and 106 MPNSTs identified 695 and 87 sites with a statistically significant number of recurrent transposon insertions, respectively. Comparison to human data sets revealed novel and known driver genes for MPNST formation at these sites. Pairwise co-occurrence analysis of CIS-associated genes identified many cooperating mutations that are enriched for in Wnt/CTNNB1, PI3K/Akt/mTor, and growth factor receptor signaling pathways. Lastly, we identified several novel proto-oncogenes including forkhead box R2 (Foxr2), which we functionally validated as a proto-oncogene involved in MPNST maintenance. PMID:23685747

  4. Emerging pathways in genetic Parkinson's disease: Potential role of ceramide metabolism in Lewy body disease.

    PubMed

    Bras, Jose; Singleton, Andrew; Cookson, Mark R; Hardy, John

    2008-12-01

    Heterozygous loss-of-function mutations at the glucosecerebrosidase locus have recently been shown to be a potent risk factor for Lewy body disease. Based on this observation, we have re-evaluated the likelihood that the different PARK loci (defined using clinical criteria for disease) may be misleading attempts to find common pathways to pathogenesis. Rather, we suggest, grouping the different loci which lead to different Lewy body disease may be more revealing. Doing this, we suggest that several of the genes involved in disparate Lewy body diseases impinge on ceramide metabolism and we suggest that this may be a common theme for pathogenesis. PMID:19021754

  5. Proanthocyanidins Attenuation of Chronic Lead-Induced Liver Oxidative Damage in Kunming Mice via the Nrf2/ARE Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Long, Miao; Liu, Yi; Cao, Yu; Wang, Nan; Dang, Meng; He, Jianbin

    2016-01-01

    Lead is harmful for human health and animals. Proanthocyanidins (PCs), a natural antioxidant, possess a broad spectrum of pharmacological and medicinal properties. However, its protective effects against lead-induced liver damage have not been clarified. This study was aimed to evaluate the protective effect of PCs on the hepatotoxicity of male Kunming mice induced by chronic lead exposure. A total of 70 healthy male Kunming mice were averagely divided into four groups: control group, i.e., the group exposed to lead, the group treated with PCs, and the group co-treated with lead and PCs. The mice exposed to lead were given water containing 0.2% lead acetate. Mice treated in the PCs and PCs lead co-treated groups were given PC (100 mg/kg) in 0.9% saline by oral gavage. Lead exposure caused a significant elevation in the liver function parameters, lead level, lipid peroxidation, and inhibition of antioxidant enzyme activities. The induction of oxidative stress and histological alterations in the liver were minimized by co-treatment with PCs. Meanwhile, the number of Transferase-Mediated Deoxyuridine Triphosphate-Biotin Nick End Labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells was significantly reduced in the PCs/lead co-treated group compared to the lead group. In addition, the lead group showed an increase in the expression level of Bax, while the expression of Bcl-2 was decreased. Furthermore, the lead group showed an increase in the expression level of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-related genes and protein (GRP78 and CHOP). Co-treated with PCs significantly reversed these expressions in the liver. PCs were, therefore, demonstrated to have protective, antioxidant, and anti-ER stress and anti-apoptotic activities in liver damage caused by chronic lead exposure in the Kunming mouse. This may be due to the ability of PCs to enhance the ability of liver tissue to protect against oxidative stress via the Nrf2/ARE signaling pathway, resulting in decreasing ER stress and apoptosis of

  6. Arsenic alters vascular smooth muscle cell focal adhesion complexes leading to activation of FAK-src mediated pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Pysher, Michele D. Chen, Qin M.; Vaillancourt, Richard R.

    2008-09-01

    Chronic exposure to arsenic has been linked to tumorigenesis, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, atherosclerosis, and peripheral vascular disease; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying its pathological effects remain elusive. In this study, we investigated arsenic-induced alteration of focal adhesion protein complexes in normal, primary vascular smooth muscle cells. We demonstrate that exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of arsenic (50 ppb As{sup 3+}) can alter focal adhesion protein co-association leading to activation of downstream pathways. Co-associated proteins were identified and quantitated via co-immunoprecipitation, SDS-PAGE, and Western blot analysis followed by scanning densitometry. Activation of MAPK pathways in total cell lysates was evaluated using phosphor-specific antibodies. In our model, arsenic treatment caused a sustained increase in FAK-src association and activation, and induced the formation of unique signaling complexes (beginning after 3-hour As{sup 3+} exposure and continuing throughout the 12-hour time course studied). The effects of these alterations were manifested as chronic stimulation of downstream PAK, ERK and JNK pathways. Past studies have demonstrated that these pathways are involved in cellular survival, growth, proliferation, and migration in VSMCs.

  7. Genetic analysis of photoreceptor action pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    The specific strategies and long-term goals of this proposal remain intact relative to the original proposal. We continue to isolate and characterize photomorphogenic mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. The molecular and biochemical characterization of one of these mutants, det1, has led to one publication of original data and to one Society for Experimental Biology Symposium paper (see below). The phenotype of a second mutant, det2, has also been studied during this funding period. In addition, we have continued work on a general strategy to isolate mutations in trans-acting regulatory factors that mediate light-regulated gene expression, and have identified several potentially interesting regulatory mutants. In the third funding period, we will concentrate on the genetical, biochemical, and molecular characterization of these new mutants. Construction of double mutants between the new mutants and the previously characterized morphological mutants should allow us to construct a pathway for light-regulated seedling development in Arabidopsis.

  8. A distinct small RNA pathway silences selfish genetic elements in the germline.

    PubMed

    Vagin, Vasily V; Sigova, Alla; Li, Chengjian; Seitz, Hervé; Gvozdev, Vladimir; Zamore, Phillip D

    2006-07-21

    In the Drosophila germline, repeat-associated small interfering RNAs (rasiRNAs) ensure genomic stability by silencing endogenous selfish genetic elements such as retrotransposons and repetitive sequences. Whereas small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) derive from both the sense and antisense strands of their double-stranded RNA precursors, rasiRNAs arise mainly from the antisense strand. rasiRNA production appears not to require Dicer-1, which makes microRNAs (miRNAs), or Dicer-2, which makes siRNAs, and rasiRNAs lack the 2',3' hydroxy termini characteristic of animal siRNA and miRNA. Unlike siRNAs and miRNAs, rasiRNAs function through the Piwi, rather than the Ago, Argonaute protein subfamily. Our data suggest that rasiRNAs protect the fly germline through a silencing mechanism distinct from both the miRNA and RNA interference pathways.

  9. Identification of the phytosphingosine metabolic pathway leading to odd-numbered fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Natsuki; Ohno, Yusuke; Yamagata, Maki; Obara, Takashi; Seki, Naoya; Kitamura, Takuya; Naganuma, Tatsuro; Kihara, Akio

    2014-01-01

    The long-chain base phytosphingosine is a component of sphingolipids and exists in yeast, plants and some mammalian tissues. Phytosphingosine is unique in that it possesses an additional hydroxyl group compared with other long-chain bases. However, its metabolism is unknown. Here we show that phytosphingosine is metabolized to odd-numbered fatty acids and is incorporated into glycerophospholipids both in yeast and mammalian cells. Disruption of the yeast gene encoding long-chain base 1-phosphate lyase, which catalyzes the committed step in the metabolism of phytosphingosine to glycerophospholipids, causes an ~40% reduction in the level of phosphatidylcholines that contain a C15 fatty acid. We also find that 2-hydroxypalmitic acid is an intermediate of the phytosphingosine metabolic pathway. Furthermore, we show that the yeast MPO1 gene, whose product belongs to a large, conserved protein family of unknown function, is involved in phytosphingosine metabolism. Our findings provide insights into fatty acid diversity and identify a pathway by which hydroxyl group-containing lipids are metabolized. PMID:25345524

  10. Identification of the phytosphingosine metabolic pathway leading to odd-numbered fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Natsuki; Ohno, Yusuke; Yamagata, Maki; Obara, Takashi; Seki, Naoya; Kitamura, Takuya; Naganuma, Tatsuro; Kihara, Akio

    2014-10-27

    The long-chain base phytosphingosine is a component of sphingolipids and exists in yeast, plants and some mammalian tissues. Phytosphingosine is unique in that it possesses an additional hydroxyl group compared with other long-chain bases. However, its metabolism is unknown. Here we show that phytosphingosine is metabolized to odd-numbered fatty acids and is incorporated into glycerophospholipids both in yeast and mammalian cells. Disruption of the yeast gene encoding long-chain base 1-phosphate lyase, which catalyzes the committed step in the metabolism of phytosphingosine to glycerophospholipids, causes an ~40% reduction in the level of phosphatidylcholines that contain a C15 fatty acid. We also find that 2-hydroxypalmitic acid is an intermediate of the phytosphingosine metabolic pathway. Furthermore, we show that the yeast MPO1 gene, whose product belongs to a large, conserved protein family of unknown function, is involved in phytosphingosine metabolism. Our findings provide insights into fatty acid diversity and identify a pathway by which hydroxyl group-containing lipids are metabolized.

  11. Overlapping Dopaminergic Pathway Genetic Susceptibility for Heroin and Cocaine Addictions in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Levran, Orna; Randesi, Matthew; da Rosa, Joel Correa; Ott, Jurg; Rotrosen, John; Adelson, Miriam; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2015-01-01

    Summary Drugs of abuse activate the mesolimbic dopaminergic pathway. Genetic variations in the dopaminergic system may contribute to vulnerability to drug addiction. Several processes are shared between cocaine and heroin addictions but some neurobiological mechanisms and environmental influence may be specific. This study examined the association of 98 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 13 dopamine pathway-related genes with heroin and/or cocaine addiction in a sample of 801 African Americans (315 subjects with heroin addiction (OD), with or without cocaine (CD) or alcohol addiction (AD), 279 subjects with CD, with or without AD, and 207 controls). Single-marker analyses provided nominally significant evidence for associations of 24 SNPs in DRD1, ANKK1/DRD2, DRD3, DRD5, DBH, DDC, COMT and CSNK1E with OD and/or CD. A DRD2 7-SNPs haplotype block that includes SNPs rs1075650 and rs2283265, which were shown to alter D2S/D2L splicing, was indicated in both addictions. The Met allele of the COMT Val158Met functional variant was associated with protection from OD. None of the signals remained significant after correction for multiple testing. The study results are in accordance with the results of several previous studies, including our report of association of DRD1 SNP rs5326 with OD in a smaller sample from this cohort. The findings suggest the presence of an overlap in the genetic liability for heroin and cocaine addictions, as well as shared and distinct liability for OD in subjects of African and European descent. PMID:25875614

  12. Mesenchymal chemotaxis requires selective inactivation of myosin II at the leading edge via a noncanonical PLCγ/PKCα pathway.

    PubMed

    Asokan, Sreeja B; Johnson, Heath E; Rahman, Anisur; King, Samantha J; Rotty, Jeremy D; Lebedeva, Irina P; Haugh, Jason M; Bear, James E

    2014-12-22

    Chemotaxis, migration toward soluble chemical cues, is critical for processes such as wound healing and immune surveillance and is exhibited by various cell types, from rapidly migrating leukocytes to slow-moving mesenchymal cells. To study mesenchymal chemotaxis, we observed cell migration in microfluidic chambers that generate stable gradients of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). Surprisingly, we found that pathways implicated in amoeboid chemotaxis, such as PI3K and mammalian target of rapamycin signaling, are dispensable for PDGF chemotaxis. Instead, we find that local inactivation of Myosin IIA, through a noncanonical Ser1/2 phosphorylation of the regulatory light chain, is essential. This site is phosphorylated by PKCα, which is activated by an intracellular gradient of diacylglycerol generated by PLCγ. Using a combination of live imaging and gradients of activators/inhibitors in the microfluidic chambers, we demonstrate that this signaling pathway and subsequent inhibition of Myosin II activity at the leading edge are required for mesenchymal chemotaxis.

  13. Evidence of Multi-step Nucleation Leading to Various Crystallization Pathways from an Fe-O-Al Melt

    PubMed Central

    Wang, G. C.; Wang, Q.; Li, S. L.; Ai, X. G.; Fan, C. G.

    2014-01-01

    The crystallization process from a solution begins with nucleation, which determines the structure and size of the resulting crystals. Further understanding of multi-pathway crystallizations from solution through two-step nucleation mechanisms is needed. This study uses density functional theory to probe the thermodynamic properties of alumina clusters at high temperature and reveals the thermodynamic relationship between these clusters and the saturation levels of dissolved oxygen and aluminum in an Fe–O–Al melt. Based on the thermodynamics of cluster formation and the experimental evidence for both excess oxygen in the Fe-O-Al melt and for alumina with a polycrystalline structure in solidified iron, we demonstrate that the appearance of various types of clusters that depends on the saturation ratio determines the nucleation steps that lead to the various crystallization pathways. Such mechanisms may also be important in nucleation and crystallization from solution. PMID:24866413

  14. Polyploid formation pathways have an impact on genetic rearrangements in resynthesized Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Szadkowski, E; Eber, F; Huteau, V; Lodé, M; Coriton, O; Jenczewski, E; Chèvre, A M

    2011-08-01

    • Polyploids can be produced by the union of unreduced gametes or through somatic doubling of F(1) interspecific hybrids. The first route is suspected to produce allopolyploid species under natural conditions, whereas experimental data have only been thoroughly gathered for the latter. • We analyzed the meiotic behavior of an F(1) interspecific hybrid (by crossing Brassica oleracea and B.rapa, progenitors of B.napus) and the extent to which recombined homoeologous chromosomes were transmitted to its progeny. These results were then compared with results obtained for a plant generated by somatic doubling of this F₁ hybrid (CD.S₀) and an amphidiploid (UG.S₀) formed via a pathway involving unreduced gametes; we studied the impact of this method of polyploid formation on subsequent generations. • This study revealed that meiosis of the F₁ interspecific hybrid generated more gametes with recombined chromosomes than did meiosis of the plant produced by somatic doubling, although the size of these translocations was smaller. In the progeny of the UG.S₀ plant, there was an unexpected increase in the frequency at which the C1 chromosome was replaced by the A1 chromosome. • We conclude that polyploid formation pathways differ in their genetic outcome. Our study opens up perspectives for the understanding of polyploid origins.

  15. Combinatorial genetic transformation of cereals and the creation of metabolic libraries for the carotenoid pathway.

    PubMed

    Farre, Gemma; Naqvi, Shaista; Sanahuja, Georgina; Bai, Chao; Zorrilla-López, Uxue; Rivera, Sol M; Canela, Ramon; Sandman, Gerhard; Twyman, Richard M; Capell, Teresa; Zhu, Changfu; Christou, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Combinatorial nuclear transformation is used to generate populations of transgenic plants containing random selections from a collection of input transgenes. This is a useful approach because it provides the means to test different combinations of genes without the need for separate transformation experiments, allowing the comprehensive analysis of metabolic pathways and other genetic systems requiring the coordinated expression of multiple genes. The principle of combinatorial nuclear transformation is demonstrated in this chapter through protocols developed in our laboratory that allow combinations of genes encoding enzymes in the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway to be introduced into rice and a white-endosperm variety of corn. These allow the accumulation of carotenoids to be screened initially by the colour of the endosperm, which ranges from white through various shades of yellow and orange depending on the types and quantities of carotenoids present. The protocols cover the preparation of DNA-coated metal particles, the transformation of corn and rice plants by particle bombardment, the regeneration of transgenic plants, the extraction of carotenoids from plant tissues, and their analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography.

  16. Genetic associations at 53 loci highlight cell types and biological pathways relevant for kidney function.

    PubMed

    Pattaro, Cristian; Teumer, Alexander; Gorski, Mathias; Chu, Audrey Y; Li, Man; Mijatovic, Vladan; Garnaas, Maija; Tin, Adrienne; Sorice, Rossella; Li, Yong; Taliun, Daniel; Olden, Matthias; Foster, Meredith; Yang, Qiong; Chen, Ming-Huei; Pers, Tune H; Johnson, Andrew D; Ko, Yi-An; Fuchsberger, Christian; Tayo, Bamidele; Nalls, Michael; Feitosa, Mary F; Isaacs, Aaron; Dehghan, Abbas; d'Adamo, Pio; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Zonderman, Alan B; Nolte, Ilja M; van der Most, Peter J; Wright, Alan F; Shuldiner, Alan R; Morrison, Alanna C; Hofman, Albert; Smith, Albert V; Dreisbach, Albert W; Franke, Andre; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Metspalu, Andres; Tonjes, Anke; Lupo, Antonio; Robino, Antonietta; Johansson, Åsa; Demirkan, Ayse; Kollerits, Barbara; Freedman, Barry I; Ponte, Belen; Oostra, Ben A; Paulweber, Bernhard; Krämer, Bernhard K; Mitchell, Braxton D; Buckley, Brendan M; Peralta, Carmen A; Hayward, Caroline; Helmer, Catherine; Rotimi, Charles N; Shaffer, Christian M; Müller, Christian; Sala, Cinzia; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Saint-Pierre, Aude; Ackermann, Daniel; Shriner, Daniel; Ruggiero, Daniela; Toniolo, Daniela; Lu, Yingchang; Cusi, Daniele; Czamara, Darina; Ellinghaus, David; Siscovick, David S; Ruderfer, Douglas; Gieger, Christian; Grallert, Harald; Rochtchina, Elena; Atkinson, Elizabeth J; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Boerwinkle, Eric; Salvi, Erika; Bottinger, Erwin P; Murgia, Federico; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Ernst, Florian; Kronenberg, Florian; Hu, Frank B; Navis, Gerjan J; Curhan, Gary C; Ehret, George B; Homuth, Georg; Coassin, Stefan; Thun, Gian-Andri; Pistis, Giorgio; Gambaro, Giovanni; Malerba, Giovanni; Montgomery, Grant W; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Jacobs, Gunnar; Li, Guo; Wichmann, H-Erich; Campbell, Harry; Schmidt, Helena; Wallaschofski, Henri; Völzke, Henry; Brenner, Hermann; Kroemer, Heyo K; Kramer, Holly; Lin, Honghuang; Leach, I Mateo; Ford, Ian; Guessous, Idris; Rudan, Igor; Prokopenko, Inga; Borecki, Ingrid; Heid, Iris M; Kolcic, Ivana; Persico, Ivana; Jukema, J Wouter; Wilson, James F; Felix, Janine F; Divers, Jasmin; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Stafford, Jeanette M; Gaspoz, Jean-Michel; Smith, Jennifer A; Faul, Jessica D; Wang, Jie Jin; Ding, Jingzhong; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Attia, John; Whitfield, John B; Chalmers, John; Viikari, Jorma; Coresh, Josef; Denny, Joshua C; Karjalainen, Juha; Fernandes, Jyotika K; Endlich, Karlhans; Butterbach, Katja; Keene, Keith L; Lohman, Kurt; Portas, Laura; Launer, Lenore J; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Yengo, Loic; Franke, Lude; Ferrucci, Luigi; Rose, Lynda M; Kedenko, Lyudmyla; Rao, Madhumathi; Struchalin, Maksim; Kleber, Marcus E; Cavalieri, Margherita; Haun, Margot; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Ciullo, Marina; Pirastu, Mario; de Andrade, Mariza; McEvoy, Mark A; Woodward, Mark; Adam, Martin; Cocca, Massimiliano; Nauck, Matthias; Imboden, Medea; Waldenberger, Melanie; Pruijm, Menno; Metzger, Marie; Stumvoll, Michael; Evans, Michele K; Sale, Michele M; Kähönen, Mika; Boban, Mladen; Bochud, Murielle; Rheinberger, Myriam; Verweij, Niek; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Martin, Nicholas G; Hastie, Nick; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Soranzo, Nicole; Devuyst, Olivier; Raitakari, Olli; Gottesman, Omri; Franco, Oscar H; Polasek, Ozren; Gasparini, Paolo; Munroe, Patricia B; Ridker, Paul M; Mitchell, Paul; Muntner, Paul; Meisinger, Christa; Smit, Johannes H; Kovacs, Peter; Wild, Philipp S; Froguel, Philippe; Rettig, Rainer; Mägi, Reedik; Biffar, Reiner; Schmidt, Reinhold; Middelberg, Rita P S; Carroll, Robert J; Penninx, Brenda W; Scott, Rodney J; Katz, Ronit; Sedaghat, Sanaz; Wild, Sarah H; Kardia, Sharon L R; Ulivi, Sheila; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Enroth, Stefan; Kloiber, Stefan; Trompet, Stella; Stengel, Benedicte; Hancock, Stephen J; Turner, Stephen T; Rosas, Sylvia E; Stracke, Sylvia; Harris, Tamara B; Zeller, Tanja; Zemunik, Tatijana; Lehtimäki, Terho; Illig, Thomas; Aspelund, Thor; Nikopensius, Tiit; Esko, Tonu; Tanaka, Toshiko; Gyllensten, Ulf; Völker, Uwe; Emilsson, Valur; Vitart, Veronique; Aalto, Ville; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Chouraki, Vincent; Chen, Wei-Min; Igl, Wilmar; März, Winfried; Koenig, Wolfgang; Lieb, Wolfgang; Loos, Ruth J F; Liu, Yongmei; Snieder, Harold; Pramstaller, Peter P; Parsa, Afshin; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Susztak, Katalin; Hamet, Pavel; Tremblay, Johanne; de Boer, Ian H; Böger, Carsten A; Goessling, Wolfram; Chasman, Daniel I; Köttgen, Anna; Kao, W H Linda; Fox, Caroline S

    2016-01-01

    Reduced glomerular filtration rate defines chronic kidney disease and is associated with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), combining data across 133,413 individuals with replication in up to 42,166 individuals. We identify 24 new and confirm 29 previously identified loci. Of these 53 loci, 19 associate with eGFR among individuals with diabetes. Using bioinformatics, we show that identified genes at eGFR loci are enriched for expression in kidney tissues and in pathways relevant for kidney development and transmembrane transporter activity, kidney structure, and regulation of glucose metabolism. Chromatin state mapping and DNase I hypersensitivity analyses across adult tissues demonstrate preferential mapping of associated variants to regulatory regions in kidney but not extra-renal tissues. These findings suggest that genetic determinants of eGFR are mediated largely through direct effects within the kidney and highlight important cell types and biological pathways. PMID:26831199

  17. Genetic polymorphisms of the RAS-cytokine pathway and chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Kanetsky, Peter; Raj, Dominic

    2008-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in children is irreversible. It is associated with renal failure progression and atherosclerotic cardiovascular (CV) abnormalities. Nearly 60% of children with CKD are affected since birth with congenital or inherited kidney disorders. Preliminary evidence primarily from adult CKD studies indicates common genetic risk factors for CKD and atherosclerotic CV disease. Although multiple physiologic pathways share common genes for CKD and CV disease, substantial evidence supports our attention to the renin angiotensin system (RAS) and the interlinked inflammatory cascade because they modulate the progressions of renal and CV disease. Gene polymorphisms in the RAS-cytokine pathway, through altered gene expression of inflammatory cytokines, are potential factors that modulate the rate of CKD progression and CV abnormalities in patients with CKD. For studying such hypotheses, the cooperative efforts among scientific groups and the availability of robust and affordable technologies to genotype thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across the genome make genome-wide association studies an attractive paradigm for studying polygenic diseases such as CKD. Although attractive, such studies should be interpreted carefully, with a fundamental understanding of their potential weaknesses. Nevertheless, whole-genome association studies for diabetic nephropathy and future studies pertaining to other types of CKD will offer further insight for the development of targeted interventions to treat CKD and associated atherosclerotic CV abnormalities in the pediatric CKD population. PMID:18481112

  18. Genetic Analysis of Benzothiophene Biodesulfurization Pathway of Gordonia terrae Strain C-6

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Kehui; Zhang, Yue; Tian, Huimei; Ji, Kaihua; Li, Guoqiang

    2013-01-01

    Sulfur can be removed from benzothiophene (BT) by some bacteria without breaking carbon-carbon bonds. However, a clear mechanism for BT desulfurization and its genetic components have not been reported in literatures so far. In this study, we used comparative transcriptomics to study differential expression of genes in Gordonia terrae C-6 cultured with BT or sodium sulfate as the sole source of sulfur. We found that 135 genes were up-regulated with BT relative to sodium sulfate as the sole sulfur source. Many of these genes encode flavin-dependent monooxygenases, alkane sulfonate monooxygenases and desulfinase, which perform similar functions to those involved in the 4S pathway of dibenzothiophene (DBT) biodesulfurization. Three of the genes were found to be located in the same operon, designated bdsABC. Cell extracts of pET28a-bdsABC transfected E. coli Rosetta (DE3) converted BT to a phenolic compound, identified as o-hydroxystyrene. These results advance our understanding of enzymes involved in the BT biodesulfurization pathway. PMID:24367657

  19. Genetic Investigation of Complement Pathway Genes in Type 2 Diabetic Retinopathy: An Inflammatory Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ming Ming; Wang, Jun; Ren, Hong; Sun, Yun Duan; Fan, Jiao Jie; Teng, Yan; Li, Yan Bo

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) has complex multifactorial pathogenesis. This study aimed to investigate the association of complement pathway genes with susceptibility to DR. Eight haplotype-tagging SNPs of SERPING1 and C5 were genotyped in 570 subjects with type 2 diabetes: 295 DR patients (138 nonproliferative DR [NPDR] and 157 proliferative DR [PDR]) and 275 diabetic controls. Among the six C5 SNPs, a marginal association was first detected between rs17611 and total DR patients (P = 0.009, OR = 0.53 for recessive model). In stratification analysis, a significant decrease in the frequencies of G allele and GG homozygosity for rs17611 was observed in PDR patients compared with diabetic controls (Pcorr = 0.032, OR = 0.65 and Pcorr = 0.016, OR = 0.37, resp.); it was linked with a disease progression. A haplotype AA defined by the major alleles of rs17611 and rs1548782 was significantly predisposed to PDR with increased risk of 1.54 (Pcorr = 0.023). Regarding other variants in C5 and SERPING1, none of the tagging SNPs had a significant association with DR and its subgroups (all P > 0.05). Our study revealed an association between DR and C5 polymorphisms with clinical significance, whereas SERPING1 is not a major genetic component of DR. Our data suggest a link of complement pathway with DR pathogenesis. PMID:26989329

  20. Genetic associations at 53 loci highlight cell types and biological pathways relevant for kidney function

    PubMed Central

    Pattaro, Cristian; Teumer, Alexander; Gorski, Mathias; Chu, Audrey Y.; Li, Man; Mijatovic, Vladan; Garnaas, Maija; Tin, Adrienne; Sorice, Rossella; Li, Yong; Taliun, Daniel; Olden, Matthias; Foster, Meredith; Yang, Qiong; Chen, Ming-Huei; Pers, Tune H.; Johnson, Andrew D.; Ko, Yi-An; Fuchsberger, Christian; Tayo, Bamidele; Nalls, Michael; Feitosa, Mary F.; Isaacs, Aaron; Dehghan, Abbas; d'Adamo, Pio; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Zonderman, Alan B.; Nolte, Ilja M.; van der Most, Peter J.; Wright, Alan F.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Morrison, Alanna C.; Hofman, Albert; Smith, Albert V.; Dreisbach, Albert W.; Franke, Andre; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Metspalu, Andres; Tonjes, Anke; Lupo, Antonio; Robino, Antonietta; Johansson, Åsa; Demirkan, Ayse; Kollerits, Barbara; Freedman, Barry I.; Ponte, Belen; Oostra, Ben A.; Paulweber, Bernhard; Krämer, Bernhard K.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Buckley, Brendan M.; Peralta, Carmen A.; Hayward, Caroline; Helmer, Catherine; Rotimi, Charles N.; Shaffer, Christian M.; Müller, Christian; Sala, Cinzia; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Saint-Pierre, Aude; Ackermann, Daniel; Shriner, Daniel; Ruggiero, Daniela; Toniolo, Daniela; Lu, Yingchang; Cusi, Daniele; Czamara, Darina; Ellinghaus, David; Siscovick, David S.; Ruderfer, Douglas; Gieger, Christian; Grallert, Harald; Rochtchina, Elena; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Salvi, Erika; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Murgia, Federico; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Ernst, Florian; Kronenberg, Florian; Hu, Frank B.; Navis, Gerjan J.; Curhan, Gary C.; Ehret, George B.; Homuth, Georg; Coassin, Stefan; Thun, Gian-Andri; Pistis, Giorgio; Gambaro, Giovanni; Malerba, Giovanni; Montgomery, Grant W.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Jacobs, Gunnar; Li, Guo; Wichmann, H-Erich; Campbell, Harry; Schmidt, Helena; Wallaschofski, Henri; Völzke, Henry; Brenner, Hermann; Kroemer, Heyo K.; Kramer, Holly; Lin, Honghuang; Leach, I. Mateo; Ford, Ian; Guessous, Idris; Rudan, Igor; Prokopenko, Inga; Borecki, Ingrid; Heid, Iris M.; Kolcic, Ivana; Persico, Ivana; Jukema, J. Wouter; Wilson, James F.; Felix, Janine F.; Divers, Jasmin; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Gaspoz, Jean-Michel; Smith, Jennifer A.; Faul, Jessica D.; Wang, Jie Jin; Ding, Jingzhong; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Attia, John; Whitfield, John B.; Chalmers, John; Viikari, Jorma; Coresh, Josef; Denny, Joshua C.; Karjalainen, Juha; Fernandes, Jyotika K.; Endlich, Karlhans; Butterbach, Katja; Keene, Keith L.; Lohman, Kurt; Portas, Laura; Launer, Lenore J.; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Yengo, Loic; Franke, Lude; Ferrucci, Luigi; Rose, Lynda M.; Kedenko, Lyudmyla; Rao, Madhumathi; Struchalin, Maksim; Kleber, Marcus E.; Cavalieri, Margherita; Haun, Margot; Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Ciullo, Marina; Pirastu, Mario; de Andrade, Mariza; McEvoy, Mark A.; Woodward, Mark; Adam, Martin; Cocca, Massimiliano; Nauck, Matthias; Imboden, Medea; Waldenberger, Melanie; Pruijm, Menno; Metzger, Marie; Stumvoll, Michael; Evans, Michele K.; Sale, Michele M.; Kähönen, Mika; Boban, Mladen; Bochud, Murielle; Rheinberger, Myriam; Verweij, Niek; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Martin, Nicholas G.; Hastie, Nick; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Soranzo, Nicole; Devuyst, Olivier; Raitakari, Olli; Gottesman, Omri; Franco, Oscar H.; Polasek, Ozren; Gasparini, Paolo; Munroe, Patricia B.; Ridker, Paul M.; Mitchell, Paul; Muntner, Paul; Meisinger, Christa; Smit, Johannes H.; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Adair, Linda S.; Alexander, Myriam; Altshuler, David; Amin, Najaf; Arking, Dan E.; Arora, Pankaj; Aulchenko, Yurii; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barroso, Ines; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Beilby, John P.; Bergman, Richard N.; Bergmann, Sven; Bis, Joshua C.; Boehnke, Michael; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Bots, Michiel L.; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; Brand, Stefan-Martin; Brand, Eva; Braund, Peter S.; Brown, Morris J.; Burton, Paul R.; Casas, Juan P.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chambers, John C.; Chandak, Giriraj R.; Chang, Yen-Pei C.; Charchar, Fadi J.; Chaturvedi, Nish; Shin Cho, Yoon; Clarke, Robert; Collins, Francis S.; Collins, Rory; Connell, John M.; Cooper, Jackie A.; Cooper, Matthew N.; Cooper, Richard S.; Corsi, Anna Maria; Dörr, Marcus; Dahgam, Santosh; Danesh, John; Smith, George Davey; Day, Ian N. M.; Deloukas, Panos; Denniff, Matthew; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Dong, Yanbin; Doumatey, Ayo; Elliott, Paul; Elosua, Roberto; Erdmann, Jeanette; Eyheramendy, Susana; Farrall, Martin; Fava, Cristiano; Forrester, Terrence; Fowkes, F. Gerald R.; Fox, Ervin R.; Frayling, Timothy M.; Galan, Pilar; Ganesh, Santhi K.; Garcia, Melissa; Gaunt, Tom R.; Glazer, Nicole L.; Go, Min Jin; Goel, Anuj; Grässler, Jürgen; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Groop, Leif; Guarrera, Simonetta; Guo, Xiuqing; Hadley, David; Hamsten, Anders; Han, Bok-Ghee; Hardy, Rebecca; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Heath, Simon; Heckbert, Susan R.; Hedblad, Bo; Hercberg, Serge; Hernandez, Dena; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hilton, Gina; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Bolton, Judith A Hoffman; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Howard, Philip; Humphries, Steve E.; Hunt, Steven C.; Hveem, Kristian; Ikram, M. Arfan; Islam, Muhammad; Iwai, Naoharu; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jackson, Anne U.; Jafar, Tazeen H.; Janipalli, Charles S.; Johnson, Toby; Kathiresan, Sekar; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Kinra, Sanjay; Kita, Yoshikuni; Kivimaki, Mika; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Kumar, M. J. Kranthi; Kuh, Diana; Kulkarni, Smita R.; Kumari, Meena; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Laakso, Markku; Laan, Maris; Laitinen, Jaana; Lakatta, Edward G.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Larson, Martin G.; Lathrop, Mark; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Lawrence, Robert W.; Lee, Jong-Young; Lee, Nanette R.; Levy, Daniel; Li, Yali; Longstreth, Will T.; Luan, Jian'an; Lucas, Gavin; Ludwig, Barbara; Mangino, Massimo; Mani, K. Radha; Marmot, Michael G.; Mattace-Raso, Francesco U. S.; Matullo, Giuseppe; McArdle, Wendy L.; McKenzie, Colin A.; Meitinger, Thomas; Melander, Olle; Meneton, Pierre; Meschia, James F.; Miki, Tetsuro; Milaneschi, Yuri; Mohlke, Karen L.; Mooser, Vincent; Morken, Mario A.; Morris, Richard W.; Mosley, Thomas H.; Najjar, Samer; Narisu, Narisu; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Nguyen, Khanh-Dung Hoang; Nilsson, Peter; Nyberg, Fredrik; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Ogihara, Toshio; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Okamura, Tomonori; Ong, RickTwee-Hee; Ongen, Halit; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; O'Reilly, Paul F.; Org, Elin; Orru, Marco; Palmas, Walter; Palmen, Jutta; Palmer, Lyle J.; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Parker, Alex N.; Peden, John F.; Peltonen, Leena; Perola, Markus; Pihur, Vasyl; Platou, Carl G. P.; Plump, Andrew; Prabhakaran, Dorairajan; Psaty, Bruce M.; Raffel, Leslie J.; Rao, Dabeeru C.; Rasheed, Asif; Ricceri, Fulvio; Rice, Kenneth M.; Rosengren, Annika; Rotter, Jerome I.; Rudock, Megan E.; Sõber, Siim; Salako, Tunde; Saleheen, Danish; Salomaa, Veikko; Samani, Nilesh J.; Schwartz, Steven M.; Schwarz, Peter E. H.; Scott, Laura J.; Scott, James; Scuteri, Angelo; Sehmi, Joban S.; Seielstad, Mark; Seshadri, Sudha; Sharma, Pankaj; Shaw-Hawkins, Sue; Shi, Gang; Shrine, Nick R. G.; Sijbrands, Eric J. G.; Sim, Xueling; Singleton, Andrew; Sjögren, Marketa; Smith, Nicholas L.; Artigas, Maria Soler; Spector, Tim D.; Staessen, Jan A.; Stancakova, Alena; Steinle, Nanette I.; Strachan, David P.; Stringham, Heather M.; Sun, Yan V.; Swift, Amy J.; Tabara, Yasuharu; Tai, E-Shyong; Talmud, Philippa J.; Taylor, Andrew; Terzic, Janos; Thelle, Dag S.; Tobin, Martin D.; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Tripathy, Vikal; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Uda, Manuela; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Uiterwaal, Cuno S. P. M.; Umemura, Satoshi; van der Harst, Pim; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Vartiainen, Erkki; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Veldre, Gudrun; Verwoert, Germaine C.; Viigimaa, Margus; Vinay, D. G.; Vineis, Paolo; Voight, Benjamin F.; Vollenweider, Peter; Wagenknecht, Lynne E.; Wain, Louise V.; Wang, Xiaoling; Wang, Thomas J.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Watkins, Hugh; Weder, Alan B.; Whincup, Peter H.; Wiggins, Kerri L.; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Wong, Andrew; Wu, Ying; Yajnik, Chittaranjan S.; Yao, Jie; Young, J. H.; Zelenika, Diana; Zhai, Guangju; Zhang, Weihua; Zhang, Feng; Zhao, Jing Hua; Zhu, Haidong; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Zitting, Paavo; Zukowska-Szczechowska, Ewa; Okada, Yukinori; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Gu, Dongfeng; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Takahashi, Atsushi; Maeda, Shiro; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Chen, Peng; Lim, Su-Chi; Wong, Tien-Yin; Liu, Jianjun; Young, Terri L.; Aung, Tin; Teo, Yik-Ying; Kim, Young Jin; Kang, Daehee; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Chang, Li-Ching; Fann, S. -J. Cathy; Mei, Hao; Hixson, James E.; Chen, Shufeng; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Isono, Masato; Albrecht, Eva; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Kubo, Michiaki; Nakamura, Yusuke; Kamatani, Naoyuki; Kato, Norihiro; He, Jiang; Chen, Yuan-Tsong; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Reilly, Muredach P; Schunkert, Heribert; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Hall, Alistair; Hengstenberg, Christian; König, Inke R.; Laaksonen, Reijo; McPherson, Ruth; Thompson, John R.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Ziegler, Andreas; Absher, Devin; Chen, Li; Cupples13, L. Adrienne; Halperin, Eran; Li, Mingyao; Musunuru, Kiran; Preuss, Michael; Schillert, Arne; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Wells, George A.; Holm, Hilma; Roberts, Robert; Stewart, Alexandre F. R.; Fortmann, Stephen; Go, Alan; Hlatky, Mark; Iribarren, Carlos; Knowles, Joshua; Myers, Richard; Quertermous, Thomas; Sidney, Steven; Risch, Neil; Tang, Hua; Blankenberg, Stefan; Schnabel, Renate; Sinning, Christoph; Lackner, Karl J.; Tiret, Laurence; Nicaud, Viviane; Cambien, Francois; Bickel, Christoph; Rupprecht, Hans J.; Perret, Claire; Proust, Carole; Münzel, Thomas F.; Barbalic, Maja; Chen, Ida Yii-Der; Demissie-Banjaw, Serkalem; Folsom, Aaron; Lumley, Thomas; Marciante, Kristin; Taylor, Kent D.; Volcik, Kelly; Gretarsdottir, Solveig; Gulcher, Jeffrey R.; Kong, Augustine; Stefansson, Kari; Thorgeirsson, Gudmundur; Andersen, Karl; Fischer, Marcus; Grosshennig, Anika; Linsel-Nitschke, Patrick; Stark, Klaus; Schreiber, Stefan; Aherrahrou, Zouhair; Bruse, Petra; Doering, Angela; Klopp, Norman; Diemert, Patrick; Loley, Christina; Medack, Anja; Nahrstedt, Janja; Peters, Annette; Wagner, Arnika K.; Willenborg, Christina; Böhm, Bernhard O.; Dobnig, Harald; Grammer, Tanja B.; Hoffmann, Michael M.; Meinitzer, Andreas; Winkelmann, Bernhard R.; Pilz, Stefan; Renner, Wilfried; Scharnagl, Hubert; Stojakovic, Tatjana; Tomaschitz, Andreas; Winkler, Karl; Guiducci, Candace; Burtt, Noel; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Dandona, Sonny; Jarinova, Olga; Qu, Liming; Wilensky, Robert; Matthai, William; Hakonarson, Hakon H.; Devaney, Joe; Burnett, Mary Susan; Pichard, Augusto D.; Kent, Kenneth M.; Satler, Lowell; Lindsay, Joseph M.; Waksman, Ron; Knouff, Christopher W.; Waterworth, Dawn M.; Walker, Max C.; Epstein, Stephen E.; Rader, Daniel J.; Nelson, Christopher P.; Wright, Benjamin J.; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Ball, Stephen G.; Loehr, Laura R.; Rosamond, Wayne D.; Benjamin, Emelia; Haritunians, Talin; Couper, David; Murabito, Joanne; Wang, Ying A.; Stricker, Bruno H.; Chang, Patricia P.; Willerson, James T.; Felix, Stephan B.; Watzinger, Norbert; Aragam, Jayashri; Zweiker, Robert; Lind, Lars; Rodeheffer, Richard J.; Greiser, Karin Halina; Deckers, Jaap W.; Stritzke, Jan; Ingelsson, Erik; Kullo, Iftikhar; Haerting, Johannes; Reffelmann, Thorsten; Redfield, Margaret M.; Werdan, Karl; Mitchell, Gary F.; Arnett, Donna K.; Gottdiener, John S.; Blettner, Maria; Friedrich, Nele; Kovacs, Peter; Wild, Philipp S.; Froguel, Philippe; Rettig, Rainer; Mägi, Reedik; Biffar, Reiner; Schmidt, Reinhold; Middelberg, Rita P. S.; Carroll, Robert J.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Scott, Rodney J.; Katz, Ronit; Sedaghat, Sanaz; Wild, Sarah H.; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Ulivi, Sheila; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Enroth, Stefan; Kloiber, Stefan; Trompet, Stella; Stengel, Benedicte; Hancock, Stephen J.; Turner, Stephen T.; Rosas, Sylvia E.; Stracke, Sylvia; Harris, Tamara B.; Zeller, Tanja; Zemunik, Tatijana; Lehtimäki, Terho; Illig, Thomas; Aspelund, Thor; Nikopensius, Tiit; Esko, Tonu; Tanaka, Toshiko; Gyllensten, Ulf; Völker, Uwe; Emilsson, Valur; Vitart, Veronique; Aalto, Ville; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Chouraki, Vincent; Chen, Wei-Min; Igl, Wilmar; März, Winfried; Koenig, Wolfgang; Lieb, Wolfgang; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Liu, Yongmei; Snieder, Harold; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Parsa, Afshin; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Susztak, Katalin; Hamet, Pavel; Tremblay, Johanne; de Boer, Ian H.; Böger, Carsten A.; Goessling, Wolfram; Chasman, Daniel I.; Köttgen, Anna; Kao, W. H. Linda; Fox, Caroline S.

    2016-01-01

    Reduced glomerular filtration rate defines chronic kidney disease and is associated with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), combining data across 133,413 individuals with replication in up to 42,166 individuals. We identify 24 new and confirm 29 previously identified loci. Of these 53 loci, 19 associate with eGFR among individuals with diabetes. Using bioinformatics, we show that identified genes at eGFR loci are enriched for expression in kidney tissues and in pathways relevant for kidney development and transmembrane transporter activity, kidney structure, and regulation of glucose metabolism. Chromatin state mapping and DNase I hypersensitivity analyses across adult tissues demonstrate preferential mapping of associated variants to regulatory regions in kidney but not extra-renal tissues. These findings suggest that genetic determinants of eGFR are mediated largely through direct effects within the kidney and highlight important cell types and biological pathways. PMID:26831199

  1. Genetic associations at 53 loci highlight cell types and biological pathways relevant for kidney function.

    PubMed

    Pattaro, Cristian; Teumer, Alexander; Gorski, Mathias; Chu, Audrey Y; Li, Man; Mijatovic, Vladan; Garnaas, Maija; Tin, Adrienne; Sorice, Rossella; Li, Yong; Taliun, Daniel; Olden, Matthias; Foster, Meredith; Yang, Qiong; Chen, Ming-Huei; Pers, Tune H; Johnson, Andrew D; Ko, Yi-An; Fuchsberger, Christian; Tayo, Bamidele; Nalls, Michael; Feitosa, Mary F; Isaacs, Aaron; Dehghan, Abbas; d'Adamo, Pio; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Zonderman, Alan B; Nolte, Ilja M; van der Most, Peter J; Wright, Alan F; Shuldiner, Alan R; Morrison, Alanna C; Hofman, Albert; Smith, Albert V; Dreisbach, Albert W; Franke, Andre; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Metspalu, Andres; Tonjes, Anke; Lupo, Antonio; Robino, Antonietta; Johansson, Åsa; Demirkan, Ayse; Kollerits, Barbara; Freedman, Barry I; Ponte, Belen; Oostra, Ben A; Paulweber, Bernhard; Krämer, Bernhard K; Mitchell, Braxton D; Buckley, Brendan M; Peralta, Carmen A; Hayward, Caroline; Helmer, Catherine; Rotimi, Charles N; Shaffer, Christian M; Müller, Christian; Sala, Cinzia; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Saint-Pierre, Aude; Ackermann, Daniel; Shriner, Daniel; Ruggiero, Daniela; Toniolo, Daniela; Lu, Yingchang; Cusi, Daniele; Czamara, Darina; Ellinghaus, David; Siscovick, David S; Ruderfer, Douglas; Gieger, Christian; Grallert, Harald; Rochtchina, Elena; Atkinson, Elizabeth J; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Boerwinkle, Eric; Salvi, Erika; Bottinger, Erwin P; Murgia, Federico; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Ernst, Florian; Kronenberg, Florian; Hu, Frank B; Navis, Gerjan J; Curhan, Gary C; Ehret, George B; Homuth, Georg; Coassin, Stefan; Thun, Gian-Andri; Pistis, Giorgio; Gambaro, Giovanni; Malerba, Giovanni; Montgomery, Grant W; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Jacobs, Gunnar; Li, Guo; Wichmann, H-Erich; Campbell, Harry; Schmidt, Helena; Wallaschofski, Henri; Völzke, Henry; Brenner, Hermann; Kroemer, Heyo K; Kramer, Holly; Lin, Honghuang; Leach, I Mateo; Ford, Ian; Guessous, Idris; Rudan, Igor; Prokopenko, Inga; Borecki, Ingrid; Heid, Iris M; Kolcic, Ivana; Persico, Ivana; Jukema, J Wouter; Wilson, James F; Felix, Janine F; Divers, Jasmin; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Stafford, Jeanette M; Gaspoz, Jean-Michel; Smith, Jennifer A; Faul, Jessica D; Wang, Jie Jin; Ding, Jingzhong; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Attia, John; Whitfield, John B; Chalmers, John; Viikari, Jorma; Coresh, Josef; Denny, Joshua C; Karjalainen, Juha; Fernandes, Jyotika K; Endlich, Karlhans; Butterbach, Katja; Keene, Keith L; Lohman, Kurt; Portas, Laura; Launer, Lenore J; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Yengo, Loic; Franke, Lude; Ferrucci, Luigi; Rose, Lynda M; Kedenko, Lyudmyla; Rao, Madhumathi; Struchalin, Maksim; Kleber, Marcus E; Cavalieri, Margherita; Haun, Margot; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Ciullo, Marina; Pirastu, Mario; de Andrade, Mariza; McEvoy, Mark A; Woodward, Mark; Adam, Martin; Cocca, Massimiliano; Nauck, Matthias; Imboden, Medea; Waldenberger, Melanie; Pruijm, Menno; Metzger, Marie; Stumvoll, Michael; Evans, Michele K; Sale, Michele M; Kähönen, Mika; Boban, Mladen; Bochud, Murielle; Rheinberger, Myriam; Verweij, Niek; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Martin, Nicholas G; Hastie, Nick; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Soranzo, Nicole; Devuyst, Olivier; Raitakari, Olli; Gottesman, Omri; Franco, Oscar H; Polasek, Ozren; Gasparini, Paolo; Munroe, Patricia B; Ridker, Paul M; Mitchell, Paul; Muntner, Paul; Meisinger, Christa; Smit, Johannes H; Kovacs, Peter; Wild, Philipp S; Froguel, Philippe; Rettig, Rainer; Mägi, Reedik; Biffar, Reiner; Schmidt, Reinhold; Middelberg, Rita P S; Carroll, Robert J; Penninx, Brenda W; Scott, Rodney J; Katz, Ronit; Sedaghat, Sanaz; Wild, Sarah H; Kardia, Sharon L R; Ulivi, Sheila; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Enroth, Stefan; Kloiber, Stefan; Trompet, Stella; Stengel, Benedicte; Hancock, Stephen J; Turner, Stephen T; Rosas, Sylvia E; Stracke, Sylvia; Harris, Tamara B; Zeller, Tanja; Zemunik, Tatijana; Lehtimäki, Terho; Illig, Thomas; Aspelund, Thor; Nikopensius, Tiit; Esko, Tonu; Tanaka, Toshiko; Gyllensten, Ulf; Völker, Uwe; Emilsson, Valur; Vitart, Veronique; Aalto, Ville; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Chouraki, Vincent; Chen, Wei-Min; Igl, Wilmar; März, Winfried; Koenig, Wolfgang; Lieb, Wolfgang; Loos, Ruth J F; Liu, Yongmei; Snieder, Harold; Pramstaller, Peter P; Parsa, Afshin; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Susztak, Katalin; Hamet, Pavel; Tremblay, Johanne; de Boer, Ian H; Böger, Carsten A; Goessling, Wolfram; Chasman, Daniel I; Köttgen, Anna; Kao, W H Linda; Fox, Caroline S

    2016-01-21

    Reduced glomerular filtration rate defines chronic kidney disease and is associated with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), combining data across 133,413 individuals with replication in up to 42,166 individuals. We identify 24 new and confirm 29 previously identified loci. Of these 53 loci, 19 associate with eGFR among individuals with diabetes. Using bioinformatics, we show that identified genes at eGFR loci are enriched for expression in kidney tissues and in pathways relevant for kidney development and transmembrane transporter activity, kidney structure, and regulation of glucose metabolism. Chromatin state mapping and DNase I hypersensitivity analyses across adult tissues demonstrate preferential mapping of associated variants to regulatory regions in kidney but not extra-renal tissues. These findings suggest that genetic determinants of eGFR are mediated largely through direct effects within the kidney and highlight important cell types and biological pathways.

  2. Effects of Lead Exposure and Genetic Polymorphisms on ALAD and GPx Activities in Brazilian Battery Workers.

    PubMed

    da Cunha Martins, Airton; Mazzaron Barcelos, Gustavo Rafael; Jacob Ferreira, Anna Laura Bechara; de Souza, Marilesia Ferreira; de Syllos Cólus, Ilce Mara; Antunes, Lusânia Maria Greggi; Bastos Paoliello, Monica Maria; Adeyemi, Joseph A; Barbosa, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Lead (Pb) is a toxic metal that is widely used by metallurgical industries such as car battery recycling. Exposure to the metal may modify the redox status of the cells and consequently result in changes in activities of important enzymes such as delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). Similarly, genetic polymorphisms may modulate the activities of enzymes related to detoxification processes of the metal and may modify Pb body burden. Therefore, the aims of the present study were (i) to evaluate the correlation between blood lead levels (BLL) and activities of the enzymes ALAD and GPx, and (ii) to determine whether activities of these enzymes may be influenced by polymorphisms in ALAD and GPx genes in Brazilian automotive battery workers chronically exposed to Pb, as well as the effects of these polymorphisms on BLL. Our study included 257 participants; BLL were determined by inductively couple plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), and the activities of the enzymes ALAD and GPx were quantified spectrophotometrically; and genotyping of ALAD (rs1800435) and GPx-1 (rs1800668) polymorphisms was performed by TaqMan assays (real-time polymerase chain reaction, RT-PCR). Significant negative correlations were found between BLL and ALAD activity. Subjects who carried at least one polymorphic allele for ALAD gene displayed markedly lower ALAD activities, while no significant effect was observed regarding GPx-1 polymorphism and activity of the same enzyme. Further, ALAD and GPx-1 polymorphisms exerted no marked influence on BLL. Taken together, our results showed that BLL affected ALAD but not GPx activities, and these were not modulated by polymorphisms in ALAD and GPx gene. Further, the rs1800435 SNP showed a tendency to modulate ALAD activity, while the rs1800668 SNP did not modulate GPx activity in Brazilian automotive battery workers exposed to Pb.

  3. Effects of Lead Exposure and Genetic Polymorphisms on ALAD and GPx Activities in Brazilian Battery Workers.

    PubMed

    da Cunha Martins, Airton; Mazzaron Barcelos, Gustavo Rafael; Jacob Ferreira, Anna Laura Bechara; de Souza, Marilesia Ferreira; de Syllos Cólus, Ilce Mara; Antunes, Lusânia Maria Greggi; Bastos Paoliello, Monica Maria; Adeyemi, Joseph A; Barbosa, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Lead (Pb) is a toxic metal that is widely used by metallurgical industries such as car battery recycling. Exposure to the metal may modify the redox status of the cells and consequently result in changes in activities of important enzymes such as delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). Similarly, genetic polymorphisms may modulate the activities of enzymes related to detoxification processes of the metal and may modify Pb body burden. Therefore, the aims of the present study were (i) to evaluate the correlation between blood lead levels (BLL) and activities of the enzymes ALAD and GPx, and (ii) to determine whether activities of these enzymes may be influenced by polymorphisms in ALAD and GPx genes in Brazilian automotive battery workers chronically exposed to Pb, as well as the effects of these polymorphisms on BLL. Our study included 257 participants; BLL were determined by inductively couple plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), and the activities of the enzymes ALAD and GPx were quantified spectrophotometrically; and genotyping of ALAD (rs1800435) and GPx-1 (rs1800668) polymorphisms was performed by TaqMan assays (real-time polymerase chain reaction, RT-PCR). Significant negative correlations were found between BLL and ALAD activity. Subjects who carried at least one polymorphic allele for ALAD gene displayed markedly lower ALAD activities, while no significant effect was observed regarding GPx-1 polymorphism and activity of the same enzyme. Further, ALAD and GPx-1 polymorphisms exerted no marked influence on BLL. Taken together, our results showed that BLL affected ALAD but not GPx activities, and these were not modulated by polymorphisms in ALAD and GPx gene. Further, the rs1800435 SNP showed a tendency to modulate ALAD activity, while the rs1800668 SNP did not modulate GPx activity in Brazilian automotive battery workers exposed to Pb. PMID:26275098

  4. Overlapping dopaminergic pathway genetic susceptibility to heroin and cocaine addictions in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Levran, Orna; Randesi, Matthew; da Rosa, Joel Correa; Ott, Jurg; Rotrosen, John; Adelson, Miriam; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2015-05-01

    Drugs of abuse activate the mesolimbic dopaminergic pathway. Genetic variations in the dopaminergic system may contribute to drug addiction. Several processes are shared between cocaine and heroin addictions but some neurobiological mechanisms may be specific. This study examined the association of 98 single nucleotide polymorphisms in 13 dopamine-related genes with heroin addiction (OD) and/or cocaine addiction (CD) in a sample of 801 African Americans (315 subjects with OD ± CD, 279 subjects with CD, and 207 controls). Single-marker analyses provided nominally significant evidence for associations of 24 SNPs) in DRD1, ANKK1/DRD2, DRD3, DRD5, DBH, DDC, COMT and CSNK1E. A DRD2 7-SNPs haplotype that includes SNPs rs1075650 and rs2283265, which were shown to alter D2S/D2L splicing, was indicated in both addictions. The Met allele of the functional COMT Val158Met was associated with protection from OD. None of the signals remained significant after correction for multiple testing. The study results are in accordance with the results of previous studies, including our report of association of DRD1 SNP rs5326 with OD. The findings suggest the presence of an overlap in genetic susceptibility for OD and CD, as well as shared and distinct susceptibility for OD in subjects of African and European descent. PMID:25875614

  5. Identification of Biochemical Pathways Associated with Lead Tolerance and Detoxification in Chrysopogon zizanioides L. Nash (Vetiver) by Metabolic Profiling.

    PubMed

    Pidatala, Venkataramana R; Li, Kefeng; Sarkar, Dibyendu; Ramakrishna, Wusirika; Datta, Rupali

    2016-03-01

    Lead (Pb) is a major urban pollutant, due to deteriorating lead-based paint in houses built before 1978. Phytoremediation is an inexpensive and effective technique for remediation of Pb-contaminated homes. Vetiver (Chrysopogon zizanioides), a noninvasive, fast-growing grass with high biomass, can tolerate and accumulate large quantities of Pb in its tissues. Lead is known to induce phytochelatins and antioxidative enzymes in vetiver; however, the overall impact of Pb stress on metabolic pathways of vetiver is unknown. In the current study, vetiver plants were treated with different concentrations of Pb in a hydroponic setup. Metabolites were extracted and analyzed using LC/MS/MS. Multivariate analysis of metabolites in both root and shoot tissue showed tremendous induction in key metabolic pathways including sugar metabolism, amino acid metabolism, and an increase in production of osmoprotectants, such as betaine and polyols, and metal-chelating organic acids. The data obtained provide a comprehensive insight into the overall stress response mechanisms in vetiver. PMID:26843403

  6. Identification of Biochemical Pathways Associated with Lead Tolerance and Detoxification in Chrysopogon zizanioides L. Nash (Vetiver) by Metabolic Profiling.

    PubMed

    Pidatala, Venkataramana R; Li, Kefeng; Sarkar, Dibyendu; Ramakrishna, Wusirika; Datta, Rupali

    2016-03-01

    Lead (Pb) is a major urban pollutant, due to deteriorating lead-based paint in houses built before 1978. Phytoremediation is an inexpensive and effective technique for remediation of Pb-contaminated homes. Vetiver (Chrysopogon zizanioides), a noninvasive, fast-growing grass with high biomass, can tolerate and accumulate large quantities of Pb in its tissues. Lead is known to induce phytochelatins and antioxidative enzymes in vetiver; however, the overall impact of Pb stress on metabolic pathways of vetiver is unknown. In the current study, vetiver plants were treated with different concentrations of Pb in a hydroponic setup. Metabolites were extracted and analyzed using LC/MS/MS. Multivariate analysis of metabolites in both root and shoot tissue showed tremendous induction in key metabolic pathways including sugar metabolism, amino acid metabolism, and an increase in production of osmoprotectants, such as betaine and polyols, and metal-chelating organic acids. The data obtained provide a comprehensive insight into the overall stress response mechanisms in vetiver.

  7. Genetic Analysis of the CDI Pathway from Burkholderia pseudomallei 1026b

    PubMed Central

    Edman, Natasha; Chaudhuri, Swarnava; Poole, Stephen J.; Manoil, Colin; Hayes, Christopher S.; Low, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Contact-dependent growth inhibition (CDI) is a mode of inter-bacterial competition mediated by the CdiB/CdiA family of two-partner secretion systems. CdiA binds to receptors on susceptible target bacteria, then delivers a toxin domain derived from its C-terminus. Studies with Escherichia coli suggest the existence of multiple CDI growth-inhibition pathways, whereby different systems exploit distinct target-cell proteins to deliver and activate toxins. Here, we explore the CDI pathway in Burkholderia using the CDIIIBp1026b system encoded on chromosome II of Burkholderia pseudomallei 1026b as a model. We took a genetic approach and selected Burkholderia thailandensis E264 mutants that are resistant to growth inhibition by CDIIIBp1026b. We identified mutations in three genes, BTH_I0359, BTH_II0599, and BTH_I0986, each of which confers resistance to CDIIIBp1026b. BTH_I0359 encodes a small peptide of unknown function, whereas BTH_II0599 encodes a predicted inner membrane transport protein of the major facilitator superfamily. The inner membrane localization of BTH_II0599 suggests that it may facilitate translocation of CdiA-CTIIBp1026b toxin from the periplasm into the cytoplasm of target cells. BTH_I0986 encodes a putative transglycosylase involved in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) synthesis. ∆BTH_I0986 mutants have altered LPS structure and do not interact with CDI+ inhibitor cells to the same extent as BTH_I0986+ cells, suggesting that LPS could function as a receptor for CdiAIIBp1026b. Although ∆BTH_I0359, ∆BTH_II0599, and ∆BTH_I0986 mutations confer resistance to CDIIIBp1026b, they provide no protection against the CDIE264 system deployed by B. thailandensis E264. Together, these findings demonstrate that CDI growth-inhibition pathways are distinct and can differ significantly even between closely related species. PMID:25786241

  8. Dispersal pathways and genetic differentiation among worldwide populations of the invasive weed Centaurea solstitialis L. (Asteraceae).

    PubMed

    Eriksen, Renée L; Hierro, José L; Eren, Özkan; Andonian, Krikor; Török, Katalin; Becerra, Pablo I; Montesinos, Daniel; Khetsuriani, Liana; Diaconu, Alecu; Kesseli, Rick

    2014-01-01

    The natural history of introduced species is often unclear due to a lack of historical records. Even when historical information is readily available, important factors of the invasions such as genetic bottlenecks, hybridization, historical relationships among populations and adaptive changes are left unknown. In this study, we developed a set of nuclear, simple sequence repeat markers and used these to characterize the genetic diversity and population structure among native (Eurasian) and non-native (North and South American) populations of Centaurea solstitialis L., (yellow starthistle). We used these data to test hypotheses about the invasion pathways of the species that were based on historical and geographical records, and we make inferences about historical relationships among populations and demographic processes following invasion. We confirm that the center of diversity and the native range of the species is likely the eastern Mediterranean region in the vicinity of Turkey. From this region, the species likely proceeded to colonize other parts of Europe and Asia via a slow, stepwise range expansion. Spanish populations were the primary source of seed to invade South America via human-mediated events, as was evident from historical records, but populations from the eastern Mediterranean region were also important. North American populations were largely derived from South America, but had secondary contributors. We suggest that the introduction history of non-native populations from disparate parts of the native range have allowed not just one, but multiple opportunities first in South America then again in North America for the creation of novel genotypes via intraspecific hybridization. We propose that multiple intraspecific hybridization events may have created especially potent conditions for the selection of a noxious invader, and may explain differences in genetic patterns among North and South America populations, inferred differences in demographic

  9. Interrogating causal pathways linking genetic variants, small molecule metabolites, and circulating lipids

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Emerging technologies based on mass spectrometry or nuclear magnetic resonance enable the monitoring of hundreds of small metabolites from tissues or body fluids. Profiling of metabolites can help elucidate causal pathways linking established genetic variants to known disease risk factors such as blood lipid traits. Methods We applied statistical methodology to dissect causal relationships between single nucleotide polymorphisms, metabolite concentrations, and serum lipid traits, focusing on 95 genetic loci reproducibly associated with the four main serum lipids (total-, low-density lipoprotein-, and high-density lipoprotein- cholesterol and triglycerides). The dataset used included 2,973 individuals from two independent population-based cohorts with data for 151 small molecule metabolites and four main serum lipids. Three statistical approaches, namely conditional analysis, Mendelian randomization, and structural equation modeling, were compared to investigate causal relationship at sets of a single nucleotide polymorphism, a metabolite, and a lipid trait associated with one another. Results A subset of three lipid-associated loci (FADS1, GCKR, and LPA) have a statistically significant association with at least one main lipid and one metabolite concentration in our data, defining a total of 38 cross-associated sets of a single nucleotide polymorphism, a metabolite and a lipid trait. Structural equation modeling provided sufficient discrimination to indicate that the association of a single nucleotide polymorphism with a lipid trait was mediated through a metabolite at 15 of the 38 sets, and involving variants at the FADS1 and GCKR loci. Conclusions These data provide a framework for evaluating the causal role of components of the metabolome (or other intermediate factors) in mediating the association between established genetic variants and diseases or traits. PMID:24678845

  10. Dispersal Pathways and Genetic Differentiation among Worldwide Populations of the Invasive Weed Centaurea solstitialis L. (Asteraceae)

    PubMed Central

    Eriksen, Renée L.; Hierro, José L.; Eren, Özkan; Andonian, Krikor; Török, Katalin; Becerra, Pablo I.; Montesinos, Daniel; Khetsuriani, Liana; Diaconu, Alecu; Kesseli, Rick

    2014-01-01

    The natural history of introduced species is often unclear due to a lack of historical records. Even when historical information is readily available, important factors of the invasions such as genetic bottlenecks, hybridization, historical relationships among populations and adaptive changes are left unknown. In this study, we developed a set of nuclear, simple sequence repeat markers and used these to characterize the genetic diversity and population structure among native (Eurasian) and non-native (North and South American) populations of Centaurea solstitialis L., (yellow starthistle). We used these data to test hypotheses about the invasion pathways of the species that were based on historical and geographical records, and we make inferences about historical relationships among populations and demographic processes following invasion. We confirm that the center of diversity and the native range of the species is likely the eastern Mediterranean region in the vicinity of Turkey. From this region, the species likely proceeded to colonize other parts of Europe and Asia via a slow, stepwise range expansion. Spanish populations were the primary source of seed to invade South America via human-mediated events, as was evident from historical records, but populations from the eastern Mediterranean region were also important. North American populations were largely derived from South America, but had secondary contributors. We suggest that the introduction history of non-native populations from disparate parts of the native range have allowed not just one, but multiple opportunities first in South America then again in North America for the creation of novel genotypes via intraspecific hybridization. We propose that multiple intraspecific hybridization events may have created especially potent conditions for the selection of a noxious invader, and may explain differences in genetic patterns among North and South America populations, inferred differences in demographic

  11. DNA repair pathways underlie a common genetic mechanism modulating onset in polyglutamine diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bettencourt, Conceição; Hensman‐Moss, Davina; Flower, Michael; Wiethoff, Sarah; Brice, Alexis; Goizet, Cyril; Stevanin, Giovanni; Koutsis, Georgios; Karadima, Georgia; Panas, Marios; Yescas‐Gómez, Petra; García‐Velázquez, Lizbeth Esmeralda; Alonso‐Vilatela, María Elisa; Lima, Manuela; Raposo, Mafalda; Traynor, Bryan; Sweeney, Mary; Wood, Nicholas; Giunti, Paola; Durr, Alexandra; Holmans, Peter; Houlden, Henry; Tabrizi, Sarah J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The polyglutamine diseases, including Huntington's disease (HD) and multiple spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs), are among the commonest hereditary neurodegenerative diseases. They are caused by expanded CAG tracts, encoding glutamine, in different genes. Longer CAG repeat tracts are associated with earlier ages at onset, but this does not account for all of the difference, and the existence of additional genetic modifying factors has been suggested in these diseases. A recent genome‐wide association study (GWAS) in HD found association between age at onset and genetic variants in DNA repair pathways, and we therefore tested whether the modifying effects of variants in DNA repair genes have wider effects in the polyglutamine diseases. Methods We assembled an independent cohort of 1,462 subjects with HD and polyglutamine SCAs, and genotyped single‐nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) selected from the most significant hits in the HD study. Results In the analysis of DNA repair genes as a group, we found the most significant association with age at onset when grouping all polyglutamine diseases (HD+SCAs; p = 1.43 × 10–5). In individual SNP analysis, we found significant associations for rs3512 in FAN1 with HD+SCAs (p = 1.52 × 10–5) and all SCAs (p = 2.22 × 10–4) and rs1805323 in PMS2 with HD+SCAs (p = 3.14 × 10–5), all in the same direction as in the HD GWAS. Interpretation We show that DNA repair genes significantly modify age at onset in HD and SCAs, suggesting a common pathogenic mechanism, which could operate through the observed somatic expansion of repeats that can be modulated by genetic manipulation of DNA repair in disease models. This offers novel therapeutic opportunities in multiple diseases. Ann Neurol 2016;79:983–990 PMID:27044000

  12. Genetic Variation in DNA Repair Pathways and Risk of Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Rendleman, Justin; Antipin, Yevgeniy; Reva, Boris; Adaniel, Christina; Przybylo, Jennifer A.; Dutra-Clarke, Ana; Hansen, Nichole; Heguy, Adriana; Huberman, Kety; Borsu, Laetitia; Paltiel, Ora; Ben-Yehuda, Dina; Brown, Jennifer R.; Freedman, Arnold S.; Sander, Chris; Zelenetz, Andrew; Klein, Robert J.; Shao, Yongzhao; Lacher, Mortimer; Vijai, Joseph; Offit, Kenneth; Kirchhoff, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Molecular and genetic evidence suggests that DNA repair pathways may contribute to lymphoma susceptibility. Several studies have examined the association of DNA repair genes with lymphoma risk, but the findings from these reports have been inconsistent. Here we provide the results of a focused analysis of genetic variation in DNA repair genes and their association with the risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). With a population of 1,297 NHL cases and 1,946 controls, we have performed a two-stage case/control association analysis of 446 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) tagging the genetic variation in 81 DNA repair genes. We found the most significant association with NHL risk in the ATM locus for rs227060 (OR = 1.27, 95% CI: 1.13–1.43, p = 6.77×10−5), which remained significant after adjustment for multiple testing. In a subtype-specific analysis, associations were also observed for the ATM locus among both diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL) and small lymphocytic lymphomas (SLL), however there was no association observed among follicular lymphomas (FL). In addition, our study provides suggestive evidence of an interaction between SNPs in MRE11A and NBS1 associated with NHL risk (OR = 0.51, 95% CI: 0.34–0.77, p = 0.0002). Finally, an imputation analysis using the 1,000 Genomes Project data combined with a functional prediction analysis revealed the presence of biologically relevant variants that correlate with the observed association signals. While the findings generated here warrant independent validation, the results of our large study suggest that ATM may be a novel locus associated with the risk of multiple subtypes of NHL. PMID:25010664

  13. Oral azathioprine leads to higher incorporation of 6-thioguanine in DNA of skin than liver: the protective role of the Keap1/Nrf2/ARE pathway.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Sukirti; Zhang, Ying; Knatko, Elena V; Finlayson, Stewart; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T

    2011-10-01

    Azathioprine is a widely used anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressive, and anticancer agent. However, chronic treatment with this drug is associated with a profoundly increased risk (in certain cases by more than 100-fold) of developing squamous cell carcinoma of the skin. Incorporation of its ultimate metabolite, thio-dGTP, in DNA results in partial substitution of guanine with 6-thioguanine which, combined with exposure to UVA radiation, creates a source of synergistic mutagenic damage to DNA. We now report that oral treatment with azathioprine leads to a much greater incorporation of 6-thioguanine in DNA of mouse skin than liver. These higher levels of 6-thioguanine, together with the fact that the skin is constantly exposed to UV radiation from the sun, may be responsible, at least in part, for the increased susceptibility of this organ to tumor development. Genetic upregulation of the Keap1/Nrf2/ARE pathway, a major cellular regulator of the expression of a network of cytoprotective genes, reduces the incorporation of 6-thioguanine in DNA of both skin and liver following treatment with azathioprine. Similarly, pharmacologic activation of the pathway by the potent inducer sulforaphane results in lower 6-thioguanine incorporation in DNA and protects 6-thioguanine-treated cells against oxidative stress following exposure to UVA radiation. Protection is accompanied by increased levels of glutathione and induction of multidrug resistance-associated protein 4, an organic anion efflux pump that also exports nucleoside monophosphate analogues. Our findings suggest that activation of the Keap1/Nrf2/ARE pathway could reduce the risk for skin cancer in patients receiving long-term azathioprine therapy. PMID:21803983

  14. [Study of determination method for lead and cadmium in the semen and liquor follicle of genetic fluid].

    PubMed

    Yu, Jian-qiao; Shi, Xiao-yong; Yang, Ming-ming; Pan, Li; Chen, Bo

    2005-10-01

    Lead and Cadium as the key elements influencing human genetic health were selectively determined in the present paper. In the area of metal elements determination in body fluid, most samples used in the study are blood, plasma and saliva. No literature about genetic fluid determination has been found so far. In the present paper the preparation of samples, volume of samples, and determination parameters were investigated. An easy reliable method of determining lead and cadium in semen and liquor follicle is established. The recoveries of lead are 99.0%-118% and the recoveries of cadium are 96.3%-109%. The determination limit of lead is 0.8 microg x L(-1) and the determination limit of cadium is 0.05 microg x L(-1). The relative standard deviations (RSD)(n = 5) are 3.74%-8.54%.

  15. Multiple Pathways of Genome Plasticity Leading to Development of Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Baharoglu, Zeynep; Garriss, Geneviève; Mazel, Didier

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of multi-resistant bacterial strains is a major source of concern and has been correlated with the widespread use of antibiotics. The origins of resistance are intensively studied and many mechanisms involved in resistance have been identified, such as exogenous gene acquisition by horizontal gene transfer (HGT), mutations in the targeted functions, and more recently, antibiotic tolerance through persistence. In this review, we focus on factors leading to integron rearrangements and gene capture facilitating antibiotic resistance acquisition, maintenance and spread. The role of stress responses, such as the SOS response, is discussed. PMID:27029305

  16. Multiple activation pathways of benzene leading to products with varying genotoxic characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Glatt, H.; Ludewig, G.; Platt, K.L.; Klein, J.; Oesch, F. ); Padykula, R.; Berchtold, G.A. )

    1989-07-01

    Benzene and 13 potential metabolites were investigated for genotoxicity in Salmonella typhimurium and V79 Chinese hamster cells. In the presence of NADPH-fortified hepatic postmitochondrial fraction (S9 mix), benzene reverted his S. typhimurium strains. The effect was strongest in strain TA1535. Among the potential metabolites, only the trans-1,2-dihydrodiol, in the presence of S9 mix, and the diol epoxides, in the presence and absence of S9 mix, proved mutagenic in this strain. The anti-diol epoxide was more potent than the syndiastereomer. Both enantiomers of the anti-diastereomer showed similar activities. S9 mix did not appreciably affect the mutagenicity of the anti-diol epoxide. However, detoxification was observed when purified rat liver dihydrodiol dehydrogenase was used at concentrations comparable to that present in the liver. Elevated frequencies of micronucleated cells were observed after treatment with hydroquinone, 1,2,4-trihydroxybenzene, catechol, phenol, 1,2,3-trihydroxybenzene, and quinone. By far the most prominent effect in the whole study was the potent induction of gene mutations by quinone and hydroquinone. This unique and narrow spectrum of genotoxic activities differs from the broad spectrum observed with the antidiol epoxide, suggesting qualitative differences in their interaction with genetic material.

  17. Interleukin-13 Activates Distinct Cellular Pathways Leading to Ductular Reaction, Steatosis, and Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Gieseck, Richard L; Ramalingam, Thirumalai R; Hart, Kevin M; Vannella, Kevin M; Cantu, David A; Lu, Wei-Yu; Ferreira-González, Sofía; Forbes, Stuart J; Vallier, Ludovic; Wynn, Thomas A

    2016-07-19

    Fibroproliferative diseases are driven by dysregulated tissue repair responses and are a major cause of morbidity and mortality because they affect nearly every organ system. Type 2 cytokine responses are critically involved in tissue repair; however, the mechanisms that regulate beneficial regeneration versus pathological fibrosis are not well understood. Here, we have shown that the type 2 effector cytokine interleukin-13 simultaneously, yet independently, directed hepatic fibrosis and the compensatory proliferation of hepatocytes and biliary cells in progressive models of liver disease induced by interleukin-13 overexpression or after infection with Schistosoma mansoni. Using transgenic mice with interleukin-13 signaling genetically disrupted in hepatocytes, cholangiocytes, or resident tissue fibroblasts, we have revealed direct and distinct roles for interleukin-13 in fibrosis, steatosis, cholestasis, and ductular reaction. Together, these studies show that these mechanisms are simultaneously controlled but distinctly regulated by interleukin-13 signaling. Thus, it may be possible to promote interleukin-13-dependent hepatobiliary expansion without generating pathological fibrosis. VIDEO ABSTRACT. PMID:27421703

  18. Genetic variants in the mTOR pathway and breast cancer risk in African American women.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ting-Yuan David; Ambrosone, Christine B; Hong, Chi-Chen; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Liu, Song; Hu, Qiang; Yao, Song; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Bandera, Elisa V; Ruiz-Narváez, Edward A; Haddad, Stephen; Troester, Melissa A; Haiman, Christopher A; Bensen, Jeannette T; Olshan, Andrew F; Palmer, Julie R; Rosenberg, Lynn

    2016-01-01

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-AKT-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway has been implicated in breast carcinogenesis. However, there has been no large-scale investigation of genetic variants in the mTOR pathway and breast cancer risk. We examined 28847 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 61 mTOR pathway genes in the African American Breast Cancer Epidemiology and Risk consortium of 3663 cases [1983 estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) and 1098 ER-negative (ER-)] and 4687 controls. Gene-level analyses were conducted using the adaptive rank truncated product (ARTP) test for 10773 SNPs that were not highly correlated (r (2) < 0.8), and SNP-level analyses were conducted with logistic regression. Among genes that were prioritized (nominal P < 0.05, ARTP tests), associations were observed for intronic SNPs TSC2 rs181088346 [odds ratio (OR) of each copy of variant allele = 0.77, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.65-0.88 for all breast cancer] and BRAF rs114729114 (OR = 1.53, 95% CI = 1.24-1.91 for all breast cancer and OR = 2.03, 95% CI = 1.50-2.76 for ER- tumors). For ER- tumors, intronic SNPs PGF rs11542848 (OR = 1.38, 95% CI = 1.15-1.66) and rs61759375 (OR = 1.34, 95% CI = 1.14-1.57) and MAPK3 rs78564187 (OR = 1.26, 95% CI = 1.11-1.43) were associated with increased risk. These SNPs were significant at a gene-wide level (Bonferroni-corrected P < 0.05). The variant allele of RPS6KB2 rs35363135, a synonymous coding SNP, was more likely to be observed in ER- than ER+ tumors (OR = 1.18, 95% CI = 1.05-1.31, gene-wide Bonferroni-corrected P = 0.06). In conclusion, specific mTOR pathway genes are potentially important to breast cancer risk and to the ER negativity in African American women. PMID:26577839

  19. Loss of Modifier of Cell Adhesion Reveals a Pathway Leading to Axonal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qi; Peto, Charles A.; Shelton, G. Diane; Mizisin, Andrew; Sawchenko, Paul E.; Schubert, David

    2009-01-01

    Axonal dysfunction is the major phenotypic change in many neurodegenerative diseases, but the processes underlying this impairment are not clear. Modifier of cell adhesion (MOCA) is a presenilin binding protein that functions as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rac1. The loss of MOCA in mice leads to axonal degeneration and causes sensorimotor impairments by decreasing cofilin phosphorylation and altering its upstream signaling partners LIM kinase and p21-activated kinase, an enzyme directly downstream of Rac1. The dystrophic axons found in MOCA-deficient mice are associated with abnormal aggregates of neurofilament protein, the disorganization of the axonal cytoskeleton, and the accumulation of autophagic vacuoles and polyubiquitinated proteins. Furthermore, MOCA deficiency causes an alteration in the actin cytoskeleton and the formation of cofilin-containing rod-like structures. The dystrophic axons show functional abnormalities, including impaired axonal transport. These findings demonstrate that MOCA is required for maintaining the functional integrity of axons and define a model for the steps leading to axonal degeneration. PMID:19129390

  20. Inhibitors of intracellular signaling pathways that lead to stimulated epidermal pigmentation: perspective of anti-pigmenting agents.

    PubMed

    Imokawa, Genji; Ishida, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Few anti-pigmenting agents have been designed and developed according to their known hyperpigmentation mechanisms and corresponding intracellular signaling cascades. Most anti-pigmenting agents developed so far are mechanistically involved in the interruption of constitutional melanogenic mechanisms by which skin color is maintained at a normal and unstimulated level. Thus, owing to the difficulty of confining topical application to a specific hyperpigmented skin area, potent anti-pigmenting agents capable of attenuating the natural unstimulated pigmentation process have the risk of leading to hypopigmentation. Since intracellular signaling pathways within melanocytes do not function substantially in maintaining normal skin color and are activated only by environmental stimuli such as UV radiation, specifically down-regulating the activation of melanogenesis to the constitutive level would be an appropriate strategy to develop new potent anti-pigmenting agents with a low risk of hypopigmentation. In this article, we review the hyperpigmentation mechanisms and intracellular signaling pathways that lead to the stimulation of melanogenesis. We also discuss a screening and evaluation system to select candidates for new anti-melanogenic substances by focusing on inhibitors of endothelin-1 or stem cell factor-triggered intracellular signaling cascades. From this viewpoint, we show that extracts of the herbs Withania somnifera and Melia toosendan and the natural chemicals Withaferin A and Astaxanthin are new candidates for potent anti-pigmenting substances that avoid the risk of hypopigmentation. PMID:24823877

  1. Divergence genetics analysis reveals historical population genetic processes leading to contrasting phylogeographic patterns in co-distributed species.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Tamara M; Keever, Carson C; Saski, Christopher A; Hart, Michael W; Marko, Peter B

    2010-11-01

    Coalescent samplers are computational time machines for inferring the historical demographic genetic processes that have given rise to observable patterns of spatial genetic variation among contemporary populations. We have used traditional characterizations of population structure and coalescent-based inferences about demographic processes to reconstruct the population histories of two co-distributed marine species, the frilled dog whelk, Nucella lamellosa, and the bat star, Patiria miniata. Analyses of population structure were consistent with previous work in both species except that additional samples of N. lamellosa showed a larger regional genetic break on Vancouver Island (VI) rather than between the southern Alexander Archipelago as in P. miniata. Our understanding of the causes, rather than just the patterns, of spatial genetic variation was dramatically improved by coalescent analyses that emphasized variation in population divergence times. Overall, gene flow was greater in bat stars (planktonic development) than snails (benthic development) but spatially homogeneous within species. In both species, these large phylogeographic breaks corresponded to relatively ancient divergence times between populations rather than regionally restricted gene flow. Although only N. lamellosa shows a large break on VI, population separation times on VI are congruent between species, suggesting a similar response to late Pleistocene ice sheet expansion. The absence of a phylogeographic break in P. miniata on VI can be attributed to greater gene flow and larger effective population size in this species. Such insights put the relative significance of gene flow into a more comprehensive historical biogeographic context and have important implications for conservation and landscape genetic studies that emphasize the role of contemporary gene flow and connectivity in shaping patterns of population differentiation. PMID:21040048

  2. Pathway analysis supports association of nonsyndromic cryptorchidism with genetic loci linked to cytoskeleton-dependent functions

    PubMed Central

    Barthold, Julia Spencer; Wang, Yanping; Kolon, Thomas F.; Kollin, Claude; Nordenskjöld, Agneta; Olivant Fisher, Alicia; Figueroa, T. Ernesto; BaniHani, Ahmad H.; Hagerty, Jennifer A.; Gonzaléz, Ricardo; Noh, Paul H.; Chiavacci, Rosetta M.; Harden, Kisha R.; Abrams, Debra J.; Kim, Cecilia E.; Li, Jin; Hakonarson, Hakon; Devoto, Marcella

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION What are the genetic loci that increase susceptibility to nonsyndromic cryptorchidism, or undescended testis? SUMMARY ANSWER A genome-wide association study (GWAS) suggests that susceptibility to cryptorchidism is heterogeneous, with a subset of suggestive signals linked to cytoskeleton-dependent functions and syndromic forms of the disease. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Population studies suggest moderate genetic risk of cryptorchidism and possible maternal and environmental contributions to risk. Previous candidate gene analyses have failed to identify a major associated locus, although variants in insulin-like 3 (INSL3), relaxin/insulin-like family peptide receptor 2 (RXFP2) and other hormonal pathway genes may increase risk in a small percentage of patients. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION This is a case–control GWAS of 844 boys with nonsyndromic cryptorchidism and 2718 control subjects without syndromes or genital anomalies, all of European ancestry. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS All boys with cryptorchidism were diagnosed and treated by a pediatric specialist. In the discovery phase, DNA was extracted from tissue or blood samples and genotyping performed using the Illumina HumanHap550 and Human610-Quad (Group 1) or OmniExpress (Group 2) platform. We imputed genotypes genome-wide, and combined single marker association results in meta-analyses for all cases and for secondary subphenotype analyses based on testis position, laterality and age, and defined genome-wide significance as P = 7 × 10−9 to correct for multiple testing. Selected markers were genotyped in an independent replication group of European cases (n = 298) and controls (n = 324). We used several bioinformatics tools to analyze top (P < 10−5) and suggestive (P < 10−3) signals for significant enrichment of signaling pathways, cellular functions and custom gene lists after multiple testing correction. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE In the full analysis, we identified 20

  3. Randomized BioBrick assembly: a novel DNA assembly method for randomizing and optimizing genetic circuits and metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Sleight, Sean C; Sauro, Herbert M

    2013-09-20

    The optimization of genetic circuits and metabolic pathways often involves constructing various iterations of the same construct or using directed evolution to achieve the desired function. Alternatively, a method that randomizes individual parts in the same assembly reaction could be used for optimization by allowing for the ability to screen large numbers of individual clones expressing randomized circuits or pathways for optimal function. Here we describe a new assembly method to randomize genetic circuits and metabolic pathways from modular DNA fragments derived from PCR-amplified BioBricks. As a proof-of-principle for this method, we successfully assembled CMY (Cyan-Magenta-Yellow) three-gene circuits using Gibson Assembly that express CFP, RFP, and YFP with independently randomized promoters, ribosome binding sites, transcriptional terminators, and all parts randomized simultaneously. Sequencing results from 24 CMY circuits with various parts randomized show that 20/24 circuits are distinct and expression varies over a 200-fold range above background levels. We then adapted this method to randomize the same parts with enzyme coding sequences from the lycopene biosynthesis pathway instead of fluorescent proteins, designed to independently express each enzyme in the pathway from a different promoter. Lycopene production is improved using this randomization method by about 30% relative to the highest polycistronic-expressing pathway. These results demonstrate the potential of generating nearly 20,000 unique circuit or pathway combinations when three parts are permutated at each position in a three-gene circuit or pathway, and the methodology can likely be adapted to other circuits and pathways to maximize products of interest.

  4. Genetic variations in the Hippo signaling pathway and breast cancer risk in African American women in the AMBER Consortium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianmin; Yao, Song; Hu, Qiang; Zhu, Qianqian; Liu, Song; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Haddad, Stephen A; Yang, Nuo; Shen, He; Hong, Chi-Chen; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Ruiz-Narvaez, Edward A; Bensen, Jeannette T; Troester, Melissa A; Bandera, Elisa V; Rosenberg, Lynn; Haiman, Christopher A; Olshan, Andrew F; Palmer, Julie R; Ambrosone, Christine B

    2016-10-01

    The Hippo signaling pathway regulates cellular proliferation and survival, thus exerting profound effects on normal cell fate and tumorigenesis. Dysfunction of the Hippo pathway components has been linked with breast cancer stem cell regulation, as well as breast tumor progression and metastasis. TAZ, a key component of the Hippo pathway, is highly expressed in triple negative breast cancer; however, the associations of genetic variations in this important pathway with breast cancer risk remain largely unexplored. Here, we analyzed 8309 germline variants in 15 genes from the Hippo pathway with a total of 3663 cases and 4687 controls from the African American Breast Cancer Epidemiology and Risk Consortium. Odds ratios (ORs) were estimated using logistic regression for overall breast cancer, by estrogen receptor (ER) status (1983 ER positive and 1098 ER negative), and for case-only analyses by ER status. The Hippo signaling pathway was significantly associated with ER-negative breast cancer (pathway level P = 0.02). Gene-based analyses revealed that CDH1 was responsible for the pathway association (P < 0.01), with rs4783673 in CDH1 statistically significant after gene-level adjustment for multiple comparisons (P = 9.2×10(-5), corrected P = 0.02). rs142697907 in PTPN14 was associated with ER-positive breast cancer and rs2456773 in CDK1 with ER-negativity in case-only analysis after gene-level correction for multiple comparisons (corrected P < 0.05). In conclusion, common genetic variations in the Hippo signaling pathway may contribute to both ER-negative and ER+ breast cancer risk in AA women.

  5. Genetic analysis of a transcriptional activation pathway by using hepatoma cell variants.

    PubMed Central

    Bulla, G A; Fournier, R E

    1994-01-01

    A hierarchy of liver-enriched transcription factors plays an important role in activating expression of many hepatic genes. In particular, hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 (HNF-4) is a major activator of the gene encoding HNF-1, and HNF-1 itself activates expression of more than 20 liver genes. To dissect this activation pathway genetically, we prepared somatic cell variants that were deficient in expression of the liver-specific alpha 1-antitrypsin (alpha 1AT) gene, which requires both HNF-1 and HNF-4 for high-level gene activity. This was accomplished in two steps. First, hepatoma transfectants that stably expressed two selectable markers under alpha 1AT promoter control were prepared; second, variant sublines that could no longer express either transgene were isolated by direct selection. In this report, we demonstrate that the variants contain defects in the HNF-4/HNF-1 activation pathway. These defects functioned in trans, as expression of many liver genes was affected, but the variant phenotypes were recessive to wild type in somatic cell hybrids. Three different variant classes could be discriminated by their phenotypic responses to ectopic expression of either HNF-4 or HNF-1. Two variant clones appeared specifically deficient in HNF-4 expression, as transfection with an HNF-4 expression cassette fully restored their hepatic phenotypes. Another line activated HNF-1 in response to forced HNF-4 expression, but activation of downstream genes failed to occur. One clone was unresponsive to either HNF-1 or HNF-4. Using the variants, we demonstrate further that the chromosomal genes encoding alpha 1AT, aldolase B, and alpha-fibrinogen display strict requirements for HNF-1 activation in vivo, while other liver genes were unaffected by the presence or absence of HNF-1 or HNF-4. We also provide evidence for the existence of an autoregulatory loop in which HNF-1 regulates its own expression through activation of HNF-4. Images PMID:7935424

  6. Contribution of genetic and epigenetic mechanisms to Wnt pathway activity in prevalent skeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    García-Ibarbia, Carmen; Delgado-Calle, Jesús; Casafont, Iñigo; Velasco, Javier; Arozamena, Jana; Pérez-Núñez, María I; Alonso, María A; Berciano, María T; Ortiz, Fernando; Pérez-Castrillón, José L; Fernández, Agustín F; Fraga, Mario F; Zarrabeitia, María T; Riancho, José A

    2013-12-15

    We reported previously that the expression of Wnt-related genes is lower in osteoporotic hip fractures than in osteoarthritis. We aimed to confirm those results by analyzing β-catenin levels and explored potential genetic and epigenetic mechanisms involved. β-Catenin gene expression and nuclear levels were analyzed by real time PCR and confocal immunofluorescence. Increased nuclear β-catenin was found in osteoblasts isolated from patients with osteoarthritis (99 ± 4 units vs. 76 ± 12, p=0.01, n=10), without differences in gene transcription, which is consistent with a post-translational down-regulation of β-catenin and decreased Wnt pathway activity. Twenty four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of genes showing differential expression between fractures and osteoarthritis (WNT4, WNT10A, WNT16 and SFRP1) were analyzed in DNA isolated from blood of 853 patients. The genotypic frequencies were similar in both groups of patients, with no significant differences. Methylation of Wnt pathway genes was analyzed in bone tissue samples (15 with fractures and 15 with osteoarthritis) by interrogating a CpG-based methylation array. Six genes showed significant methylation differences between both groups of patients: FZD10, TBL1X, CSNK1E, WNT8A, CSNK1A1L and SFRP4. The DNA demethylating agent 5-deoxycytidine up-regulated 8 genes, including FZD10, in an osteoblast-like cell line, whereas it down-regulated other 16 genes. In conclusion, Wnt activity is reduced in patients with hip fractures, in comparison with those with osteoarthritis. It does not appear to be related to differences in the allele frequencies of the Wnt genes studied. On the other hand, methylation differences between both groups could contribute to explain the differences in Wnt activity.

  7. FGF21 signalling pathway and metabolic traits – genetic association analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kaess, Bernhard M; Barnes, Timothy A; Stark, Klaus; Charchar, Fadi J; Waterworth, Dawn; Song, Kijoung; Wang, William Y S; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Mooser, Vincent; Zukowska-Szczechowska, Ewa; Samani, Nilesh J; Hengstenberg, Christian; Tomaszewski, Maciej

    2010-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is a novel master regulator of metabolic profile. The biological actions of FGF21 are elicited upon its klotho beta (KLB)-facilitated binding to FGF receptor 1 (FGFR1), FGFR2 and FGFR3. We hypothesised that common polymorphisms in the FGF21 signalling pathway may be associated with metabolic risk. At the screening stage, we examined associations between 63 common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in five genes of this pathway (FGF21, KLB, FGFR1, FGFR2, FGFR3) and four metabolic phenotypes (LDL cholesterol – LDL-C, HDL-cholesterol – HDL-C, triglycerides and body mass index) in 629 individuals from Silesian Hypertension Study (SHS). Replication analyses were performed in 5478 unrelated individuals of the Swiss CoLaus cohort (imputed genotypes) and in 3030 directly genotyped individuals of the German Myocardial Infarction Family Study (GerMIFS). Of 54 SNPs that met quality control criteria after genotyping in SHS, 4 (rs4733946 and rs7012413 in FGFR1; rs2071616 in FGFR2 and rs7670903 in KLB) showed suggestive association with LDL-C (P=0.0006, P=0.0013, P=0.0055, P=0.011, respectively) and 1 (rs2608819 in KLB) was associated with body mass index (P=0.011); all with false discovery rate q<0.5. Of these, only one FGFR2 polymorphism (rs2071616) showed replicated association with LDL-C in both CoLaus (P=0.009) and men from GerMIFS (P=0.017). The direction of allelic effect of rs2071616 upon LDL-C was consistent in all examined populations. These data show that common genetic variations in FGFR2 may be associated with LDL-C in subjects of white European ancestry. PMID:20717167

  8. Final Technical Report: Genetic and Molecular Analysis of a new control pathway in assimilate partitioning.

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, Daniel, R.

    2009-03-10

    Assimilate partitioning refers to the systemic distribution of photoassimilate from sites of primary assimilation (source tissue) to import-dependent tissues and organs (sinks). One of the defining questions in this area is how plants balance source productivity with sink demand. We discovered a sucrose-sensing signal transduction pathway that controls the activity of BvSUT1, a proton-sucrose symporter in sugar beet leaf tissue. Sucrose symporters are responsible for sucrose accumulation in the phloem of many plants and, therefore, they mediate the pivotal step in the long-distance transport of photoassimilate to non-photosynthetic tissues, such as roots and seed. We previously showed that sucrose transport activity is directly proportional to the transcription rate of BvSUT1 and that symporter mRNA and protein have high rates of turnover with half-lives on the order of 2 h. We further demonstrated that symporter transcription is regulated by sucrose levels in the leaf and that sucrose-dependent regulation of BvSUT1 transcription is mediated, at least in part, by a protein phosphorylation relay pathway. The goal of the experiments during this current grant were to use genetic and molecular approaches to identify essential components of this vital regulatory system. The initial objectives were to: (1) to characterize Arabidopsis mutants we've isolated that are resistant to growth inhibition by sucrose analogues that are recognized by the sucrose-sensor, (2) to screen for loss of function mutants in BvSUT1-promoter:luciferase transgenic plants that no longer respond to sucrose accumulation in the leaf using non-destructive visualization of luciferase activity, (3) to use gel mobility-shift assays and nuclease protection experiments to identify cis elements in the symporter promoter and DNA-binding proteins that are involved in sucrose regulation of symporter expression.

  9. Comparison of Metabolic Pathways in Escherichia coli by Using Genetic Algorithms.

    PubMed

    Ortegon, Patricia; Poot-Hernández, Augusto C; Perez-Rueda, Ernesto; Rodriguez-Vazquez, Katya

    2015-01-01

    In order to understand how cellular metabolism has taken its modern form, the conservation and variations between metabolic pathways were evaluated by using a genetic algorithm (GA). The GA approach considered information on the complete metabolism of the bacterium Escherichia coli K-12, as deposited in the KEGG database, and the enzymes belonging to a particular pathway were transformed into enzymatic step sequences by using the breadth-first search algorithm. These sequences represent contiguous enzymes linked to each other, based on their catalytic activities as they are encoded in the Enzyme Commission numbers. In a posterior step, these sequences were compared using a GA in an all-against-all (pairwise comparisons) approach. Individual reactions were chosen based on their measure of fitness to act as parents of offspring, which constitute the new generation. The sequences compared were used to construct a similarity matrix (of fitness values) that was then considered to be clustered by using a k-medoids algorithm. A total of 34 clusters of conserved reactions were obtained, and their sequences were finally aligned with a multiple-sequence alignment GA optimized to align all the reaction sequences included in each group or cluster. From these comparisons, maps associated with the metabolism of similar compounds also contained similar enzymatic step sequences, reinforcing the Patchwork Model for the evolution of metabolism in E. coli K-12, an observation that can be expanded to other organisms, for which there is metabolism information. Finally, our mapping of these reactions is discussed, with illustrations from a particular case. PMID:25973143

  10. Genetic and epigenetic aberrations occurring in colorectal tumors associated with serrated pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Eiji; Fukuyo, Masaki; Ohata, Ken; Matsusaka, Keisuke; Doi, Noriteru; Mano, Yasunobu; Takane, Kiyoko; Abe, Hiroyuki; Yagi, Koichi; Matsuhashi, Nobuyuki; Fukushima, Junichi; Fukayama, Masashi; Akagi, Kiwamu; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Nakajima, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    To clarify molecular alterations in serrated pathway of colorectal cancer (CRC), we performed epigenetic and genetic analyses in sessile serrated adenoma/polyps (SSA/P), traditional serrated adenomas (TSAs) and high‐methylation CRC. The methylation levels of six Group‐1 and 14 Group‐2 markers, established in our previous studies, were analyzed quantitatively using pyrosequencing. Subsequently, we performed targeted exon sequencing analyses of 126 candidate driver genes and examined molecular alterations that are associated with cancer development. SSA/P showed high methylation levels of both Group‐1 and Group‐2 markers, frequent BRAF mutation and occurrence in proximal colon, which were features of high‐methylation CRC. But TSA showed low‐methylation levels of Group‐1 markers, less frequent BRAF mutation and occurrence at distal colon. SSA/P, but not TSA, is thus considered to be precursor of high‐methylation CRC. High‐methylation CRC had even higher methylation levels of some genes, e.g., MLH1, than SSA/P, and significant frequency of somatic mutations in nonsynonymous mutations (p < 0.0001) and insertion/deletions (p = 0.002). MLH1‐methylated SSA/P showed lower methylation level of MLH1 compared with high‐methylation CRC, and rarely accompanied silencing of MLH1 expression. The mutation frequencies were not different between MLH1‐methylated and MLH1‐unmethylated SSA/P, suggesting that MLH1 methylation might be insufficient in SSA/P to acquire a hypermutation phenotype. Mutations of mismatch repair genes, e.g., MSH3 and MSH6, and genes in PI3K, WNT, TGF‐β and BMP signaling (but not in TP53 signaling) were significantly involved in high‐methylation CRC compared with adenoma, suggesting importance of abrogation of these genes in serrated pathway. PMID:26510091

  11. Comparison of Metabolic Pathways in Escherichia coli by Using Genetic Algorithms.

    PubMed

    Ortegon, Patricia; Poot-Hernández, Augusto C; Perez-Rueda, Ernesto; Rodriguez-Vazquez, Katya

    2015-01-01

    In order to understand how cellular metabolism has taken its modern form, the conservation and variations between metabolic pathways were evaluated by using a genetic algorithm (GA). The GA approach considered information on the complete metabolism of the bacterium Escherichia coli K-12, as deposited in the KEGG database, and the enzymes belonging to a particular pathway were transformed into enzymatic step sequences by using the breadth-first search algorithm. These sequences represent contiguous enzymes linked to each other, based on their catalytic activities as they are encoded in the Enzyme Commission numbers. In a posterior step, these sequences were compared using a GA in an all-against-all (pairwise comparisons) approach. Individual reactions were chosen based on their measure of fitness to act as parents of offspring, which constitute the new generation. The sequences compared were used to construct a similarity matrix (of fitness values) that was then considered to be clustered by using a k-medoids algorithm. A total of 34 clusters of conserved reactions were obtained, and their sequences were finally aligned with a multiple-sequence alignment GA optimized to align all the reaction sequences included in each group or cluster. From these comparisons, maps associated with the metabolism of similar compounds also contained similar enzymatic step sequences, reinforcing the Patchwork Model for the evolution of metabolism in E. coli K-12, an observation that can be expanded to other organisms, for which there is metabolism information. Finally, our mapping of these reactions is discussed, with illustrations from a particular case.

  12. Comparison of Metabolic Pathways in Escherichia coli by Using Genetic Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Ortegon, Patricia; Poot-Hernández, Augusto C.; Perez-Rueda, Ernesto; Rodriguez-Vazquez, Katya

    2015-01-01

    In order to understand how cellular metabolism has taken its modern form, the conservation and variations between metabolic pathways were evaluated by using a genetic algorithm (GA). The GA approach considered information on the complete metabolism of the bacterium Escherichia coli K-12, as deposited in the KEGG database, and the enzymes belonging to a particular pathway were transformed into enzymatic step sequences by using the breadth-first search algorithm. These sequences represent contiguous enzymes linked to each other, based on their catalytic activities as they are encoded in the Enzyme Commission numbers. In a posterior step, these sequences were compared using a GA in an all-against-all (pairwise comparisons) approach. Individual reactions were chosen based on their measure of fitness to act as parents of offspring, which constitute the new generation. The sequences compared were used to construct a similarity matrix (of fitness values) that was then considered to be clustered by using a k-medoids algorithm. A total of 34 clusters of conserved reactions were obtained, and their sequences were finally aligned with a multiple-sequence alignment GA optimized to align all the reaction sequences included in each group or cluster. From these comparisons, maps associated with the metabolism of similar compounds also contained similar enzymatic step sequences, reinforcing the Patchwork Model for the evolution of metabolism in E. coli K-12, an observation that can be expanded to other organisms, for which there is metabolism information. Finally, our mapping of these reactions is discussed, with illustrations from a particular case. PMID:25973143

  13. Identification of environmental lead sources and pathways in a mining and smelting town: Mount Isa, Australia.

    PubMed

    Mackay, A K; Taylor, M P; Munksgaard, N C; Hudson-Edwards, K A; Burn-Nunes, L

    2013-09-01

    Lead (Pb) concentrations and isotopic compositions from soils, dusts and aerosols from public land and residential lots adjacent to the copper and Pb mine and smelter at Mount Isa, Australia, were examined to understand the sources and risks of environmental Pb exposure. Urban soil samples contain elevated Pb concentrations (mean 1560 mg/kg), of which 45-85% of the Pb is bioaccessible. The Pb isotopic composition of surface soils (0-2 cm), aerosols and dusts ((206)Pb/(207)Pb, (208)Pb/(207)Pb range: 1.049, 2.322-1.069, 2.345) are dominated by Pb derived from the Mount Isa Pb-zinc ore bodies. Underlying soil horizons (10-20 cm) have distinctly different Pb isotopic compositions ((206)Pb/(207)Pb, (208)Pb/(207)Pb range: 1.093, 2.354-1.212, 2.495). Surface soil-, dust- and aerosol-Pb are derived predominantly from smelter emissions and fugitive mining sources and not from in situ weathered bedrock. Remediation strategies should target legacy and ongoing sources of environmental Pb to mitigate the problem of Pb exposure at Mount Isa. PMID:23770073

  14. Identification of environmental lead sources and pathways in a mining and smelting town: Mount Isa, Australia.

    PubMed

    Mackay, A K; Taylor, M P; Munksgaard, N C; Hudson-Edwards, K A; Burn-Nunes, L

    2013-09-01

    Lead (Pb) concentrations and isotopic compositions from soils, dusts and aerosols from public land and residential lots adjacent to the copper and Pb mine and smelter at Mount Isa, Australia, were examined to understand the sources and risks of environmental Pb exposure. Urban soil samples contain elevated Pb concentrations (mean 1560 mg/kg), of which 45-85% of the Pb is bioaccessible. The Pb isotopic composition of surface soils (0-2 cm), aerosols and dusts ((206)Pb/(207)Pb, (208)Pb/(207)Pb range: 1.049, 2.322-1.069, 2.345) are dominated by Pb derived from the Mount Isa Pb-zinc ore bodies. Underlying soil horizons (10-20 cm) have distinctly different Pb isotopic compositions ((206)Pb/(207)Pb, (208)Pb/(207)Pb range: 1.093, 2.354-1.212, 2.495). Surface soil-, dust- and aerosol-Pb are derived predominantly from smelter emissions and fugitive mining sources and not from in situ weathered bedrock. Remediation strategies should target legacy and ongoing sources of environmental Pb to mitigate the problem of Pb exposure at Mount Isa.

  15. Genetically distinct pathways guide effector export through the type VI secretion system

    PubMed Central

    Whitney, John C.; Beck, Christina M.; Goo, Young Ah; Russell, Alistair B.; Harding, Brittany; De Leon, Justin A.; Cunningham, David A.; Tran, Bao Q.; Low, David A.; Goodlett, David R.; Hayes, Christopher S.; Mougous, Joseph D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Bacterial secretion systems often employ molecular chaperones to recognize and facilitate export of their substrates. Recent work demonstrated that a secreted component of the type VI secretion system (T6SS), hemolysin co-regulated protein (Hcp), binds directly to effectors, enhancing their stability in the bacterial cytoplasm. Herein, we describe a quantitative cellular proteomics screen for T6S substrates that exploits this chaperone-like quality of Hcp. Application of this approach to the Hcp secretion island I-encoded T6SS (H1-T6SS) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa led to the identification of a novel effector protein, termed Tse4 (type VI secretion exported 4), subsequently shown to act as a potent intra-specific H1-T6SS-delivered antibacterial toxin. Interestingly, our screen failed to identify two predicted H1-T6SS effectors, Tse5 and Tse6, which differ from Hcp-stabilized substrates by the presence of toxin-associated PAAR-repeat motifs and genetic linkage to members of the valine-glycine repeat protein G (vgrG) genes. Genetic studies further distinguished these two groups of effectors: Hcp-stabilized effectors were found to display redundancy in interbacterial competition with respect to the requirement for the two H1-T6SS-exported VgrG proteins, whereas Tse5 and Tse6 delivery strictly required a cognate VgrG. Together, we propose that interaction with either VgrG or Hcp defines distinct pathways for T6S effector export. PMID:24589350

  16. VAV1 and BAFF, via NFκB pathway, are genetic risk factors for myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Avidan, Nili; Le Panse, Rozen; Harbo, Hanne F; Bernasconi, Pia; Poulas, Konstantinos; Ginzburg, Elizabeta; Cavalcante, Paola; Colleoni, Lara; Baggi, Fulvio; Antozzi, Carlo; Truffault, Frédérique; Horn-Saban, Shirley; Pöschel, Simone; Zagoriti, Zoi; Maniaol, Angelina; Lie, Benedicte A; Bernard, Isabelle; Saoudi, Abdelhadi; Illes, Zsolt; Casasnovas Pons, Carlos; Melms, Arthur; Tzartos, Socrates; Willcox, Nicholas; Kostera-Pruszczyk, Anna; Tallaksen, Chantal; Mantegazza, Renato; Berrih-Aknin, Sonia; Miller, Ariel

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify novel genetic loci that predispose to early-onset myasthenia gravis (EOMG) applying a two-stage association study, exploration, and replication strategy. Methods Thirty-four loci and one confirmation loci, human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DRA, were selected as candidate genes by team members of groups involved in different research aspects of MG. In the exploration step, these candidate genes were genotyped in 384 EOMG and 384 matched controls and significant difference in allele frequency were found in eight genes. In the replication step, eight candidate genes and one confirmation loci were genotyped in 1177 EOMG patients and 814 controls, from nine European centres. Results Allele frequency differences were found in four novel loci: CD86, AKAP12, VAV1, B-cell activating factor (BAFF), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and these differences were consistent in all nine cohorts. Haplotype trend test supported the differences in allele frequencies between cases and controls. In addition, allele frequency difference in female versus male patients at HLA-DRA and TNF-α loci were observed. Interpretation The genetic associations to EOMG outside the HLA complex are novel and of interest as VAV1 is a key signal transducer essential for T- and B-cell activation, and BAFF is a cytokine that plays important roles in the proliferation and differentiation of B-cells. Moreover, we noted striking epistasis between the predisposing VAV1 and BAFF haplotypes; they conferred a greater risk in combination than alone. These, and CD86, share the same signaling pathway, namely nuclear factor-kappaB (NFκB), thus implicating dysregulation of proinflammatory signaling in predisposition to EOMG. PMID:25356403

  17. The microtubule-associated molecular pathways may be genetically disrupted in patients with Bipolar Disorder. Insights from the molecular cascades.

    PubMed

    Drago, Antonio; Crisafulli, Concetta; Sidoti, Antonina; Calabrò, Marco; Serretti, Alessandro

    2016-01-15

    Bipolar Disorder is a severe disease characterized by pathological mood swings from major depressive episodes to manic ones and vice versa. The biological underpinnings of Bipolar Disorder have yet to be defined. As a consequence, pharmacological treatments are suboptimal. In the present paper we test the hypothesis that the molecular pathways involved with the direct targets of lithium, hold significantly more genetic variations associated with BD. A molecular pathway approach finds its rationale in the polygenic nature of the disease. The pathways were tested in a sample of ∼ 7,000 patients and controls. Data are available from the public NIMH database. The definition of the pathways was conducted according to the National Cancer Institute (http://pid.nci.nih.gov/). As a result, 3 out of the 18 tested pathways related to lithium action resisted the permutation analysis and were found to be associated with BD. These pathways were related to Reelin, Integrins and Aurora. A pool of genes selected from the ones linked with the above pathways was further investigated in order to identify the fine molecular mechanics shared by our significant pathways and also their link with lithium mechanism of action. The data obtained point out to a possible involvement of microtubule-related mechanics. PMID:26551401

  18. Genetic Variation in the TP53 Pathway and Bladder Cancer Risk. A Comprehensive Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pineda, Silvia; Milne, Roger L.; Calle, M. Luz; Rothman, Nathaniel; López de Maturana, Evangelina; Herranz, Jesús; Kogevinas, Manolis; Chanock, Stephen J.; Tardón, Adonina; Márquez, Mirari; Guey, Lin T.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Lloreta, Josep; Baum, Erin; González-Neira, Anna; Carrato, Alfredo; Navarro, Arcadi; Silverman, Debra T.; Real, Francisco X.; Malats, Núria

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Germline variants in TP63 have been consistently associated with several tumors, including bladder cancer, indicating the importance of TP53 pathway in cancer genetic susceptibility. However, variants in other related genes, including TP53 rs1042522 (Arg72Pro), still present controversial results. We carried out an in depth assessment of associations between common germline variants in the TP53 pathway and bladder cancer risk. Material and Methods We investigated 184 tagSNPs from 18 genes in 1,058 cases and 1,138 controls from the Spanish Bladder Cancer/EPICURO Study. Cases were newly-diagnosed bladder cancer patients during 1998–2001. Hospital controls were age-gender, and area matched to cases. SNPs were genotyped in blood DNA using Illumina Golden Gate and TaqMan assays. Cases were subphenotyped according to stage/grade and tumor p53 expression. We applied classical tests to assess individual SNP associations and the Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator (LASSO)-penalized logistic regression analysis to assess multiple SNPs simultaneously. Results Based on classical analyses, SNPs in BAK1 (1), IGF1R (5), P53AIP1 (1), PMAIP1 (2), SERINPB5 (3), TP63 (3), and TP73 (1) showed significant associations at p-value≤0.05. However, no evidence of association, either with overall risk or with specific disease subtypes, was observed after correction for multiple testing (p-value≥0.8). LASSO selected the SNP rs6567355 in SERPINB5 with 83% of reproducibility. This SNP provided an OR = 1.21, 95%CI 1.05–1.38, p-value = 0.006, and a corrected p-value = 0.5 when controlling for over-estimation. Discussion We found no strong evidence that common variants in the TP53 pathway are associated with bladder cancer susceptibility. Our study suggests that it is unlikely that TP53 Arg72Pro is implicated in the UCB in white Europeans. SERPINB5 and TP63 variation deserve further exploration in extended studies. PMID:24818791

  19. Puerarin protects rat kidney from lead-induced apoptosis by modulating the PI3K/Akt/eNOS pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chan-Min; Ma, Jie-Qiong; Sun, Yun-Zhi

    2012-02-01

    Puerarin (PU), a natural flavonoid, has been reported to have many benefits and medicinal properties. However, its protective effects against lead (Pb) induced injury in kidney have not been clarified. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of puerarin on renal oxidative stress and apoptosis in rats exposed to Pb. Wistar rats were exposed to lead acetate in the drinking water (500 mg Pb/l) with or without puerarin co-administration (100, 200, 300 and 400 mg PU/kg intragastrically once daily) for 75 days. Our data showed that puerarin significantly prevented Pb-induced nephrotoxicity in a dose-dependent manner, indicated by both diagnostic indicators of kidney damage (serum urea, uric acid and creatinine) and histopathological analysis. Moreover, Pb-induced profound elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and oxidative stress, as evidenced by increasing of lipid peroxidation level and depleting of intracellular reduced glutathione (GSH) level in kidney, were suppressed by treatment with puerarin. Furthermore, TUNEL assay showed that Pb-induced apoptosis in rat kidney was significantly inhibited by puerarin. In exploring the underlying mechanisms of puerarin action, we found that activities of caspase-3 were markedly inhibited by the treatment of puerarin in the kidney of Pb-treated rats. Puerarin increased phosphorylated Akt, phosphorylated eNOS and NO levels in kidney, which in turn inactivated pro-apoptotic signaling events including inhibition of mitochondria cytochrome c release and restoration of the balance between pro- and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins in kidney of Pb-treated rats. In conclusion, these results suggested that the inhibition of Pb-induced apoptosis by puerarin is due at least in part to its antioxidant activity and its ability to modulate the PI3K/Akt/eNOS signaling pathway. Highlights: ► Puerarin prevented lead-induced nephrototoxicity. ► Puerarin reduced lead-induced increase in ROS and TBARS production

  20. Mutations in 2 distinct genetic pathways result in cerebral cavernous malformations in mice

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Aubrey C.; Drakos, Stavros G.; Ruiz, Oscar E.; Smith, Alexandra C.H.; Gibson, Christopher C.; Ling, Jing; Passi, Samuel F.; Stratman, Amber N.; Sacharidou, Anastasia; Revelo, M. Patricia; Grossmann, Allie H.; Diakos, Nikolaos A.; Davis, George E.; Metzstein, Mark M.; Whitehead, Kevin J.; Li, Dean Y.

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are a common type of vascular malformation in the brain that are a major cause of hemorrhagic stroke. This condition has been independently linked to 3 separate genes: Krev1 interaction trapped (KRIT1), Cerebral cavernous malformation 2 (CCM2), and Programmed cell death 10 (PDCD10). Despite the commonality in disease pathology caused by mutations in these 3 genes, we found that the loss of Pdcd10 results in significantly different developmental, cell biological, and signaling phenotypes from those seen in the absence of Ccm2 and Krit1. PDCD10 bound to germinal center kinase III (GCKIII) family members, a subset of serine-threonine kinases, and facilitated lumen formation by endothelial cells both in vivo and in vitro. These findings suggest that CCM may be a common tissue manifestation of distinct mechanistic pathways. Nevertheless, loss of heterozygosity (LOH) for either Pdcd10 or Ccm2 resulted in CCMs in mice. The murine phenotype induced by loss of either protein reproduced all of the key clinical features observed in human patients with CCM, as determined by direct comparison with genotype-specific human surgical specimens. These results suggest that CCM may be more effectively treated by directing therapies based on the underlying genetic mutation rather than treating the condition as a single clinical entity. PMID:21490399

  1. Computational discovery of pathway-level genetic vulnerabilities in non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Young, Jonathan H.; Peyton, Michael; Seok Kim, Hyun; McMillan, Elizabeth; Minna, John D.; White, Michael A.; Marcotte, Edward M.

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Novel approaches are needed for discovery of targeted therapies for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that are specific to certain patients. Whole genome RNAi screening of lung cancer cell lines provides an ideal source for determining candidate drug targets. Results: Unsupervised learning algorithms uncovered patterns of differential vulnerability across lung cancer cell lines to loss of functionally related genes. Such genetic vulnerabilities represent candidate targets for therapy and are found to be involved in splicing, translation and protein folding. In particular, many NSCLC cell lines were especially sensitive to the loss of components of the LSm2-8 protein complex or the CCT/TRiC chaperonin. Different vulnerabilities were also found for different cell line subgroups. Furthermore, the predicted vulnerability of a single adenocarcinoma cell line to loss of the Wnt pathway was experimentally validated with screening of small-molecule Wnt inhibitors against an extensive cell line panel. Availability and implementation: The clustering algorithm is implemented in Python and is freely available at https://bitbucket.org/youngjh/nsclc_paper. Contact: marcotte@icmb.utexas.edu or jon.young@utexas.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26755624

  2. A Sleeping Beauty forward genetic screen identifies new genes and pathways driving osteosarcoma development and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Moriarity, Branden S; Otto, George M; Rahrmann, Eric P; Rathe, Susan K; Wolf, Natalie K; Weg, Madison T; Manlove, Luke A; LaRue, Rebecca S; Temiz, Nuri A; Molyneux, Sam D; Choi, Kwangmin; Holly, Kevin J; Sarver, Aaron L; Scott, Milcah C; Forster, Colleen L; Modiano, Jaime F; Khanna, Chand; Hewitt, Stephen M; Khokha, Rama; Yang, Yi; Gorlick, Richard; Dyer, Michael A; Largaespada, David A

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcomas are sarcomas of the bone, derived from osteoblasts or their precursors, with a high propensity to metastasize. Osteosarcoma is associated with massive genomic instability, making it problematic to identify driver genes using human tumors or prototypical mouse models, many of which involve loss of Trp53 function. To identify the genes driving osteosarcoma development and metastasis, we performed a Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon-based forward genetic screen in mice with and without somatic loss of Trp53. Common insertion site (CIS) analysis of 119 primary tumors and 134 metastatic nodules identified 232 sites associated with osteosarcoma development and 43 sites associated with metastasis, respectively. Analysis of CIS-associated genes identified numerous known and new osteosarcoma-associated genes enriched in the ErbB, PI3K-AKT-mTOR and MAPK signaling pathways. Lastly, we identified several oncogenes involved in axon guidance, including Sema4d and Sema6d, which we functionally validated as oncogenes in human osteosarcoma. PMID:25961939

  3. Genetic Approach Identifies Distinct Asthma Pathways In Overweight vs. Normal Weight Children

    PubMed Central

    Kovacic, Melinda Butsch; Martin, Lisa J.; Myers, Jocelyn M. Biagini; He, Hua; Lindsey, Mark; Mersha, Tesfaye B.; Ji, Hong; Hershey, Gurjit K. Khurana

    2015-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis of asthma in the context of excess body weight may be distinct from asthma that develops in normal weight children. The study’s objective was to explore the biology of asthma in the context of obesity and normal weight status using genetic methodologies. Methods SNP associations with asthma and interactions between SNPs and overweight status in 49 genes were assessed in child-participants of the Greater Cincinnati Pediatric Clinic Repository. Results Asthma was significantly associated with weight (OR=1.38; p=0.037). The number of genes and the magnitude of their associations with asthma were notably greater when considering overweight children alone versus normal weight and overweight children together. When considering weight, distinct sets of asthma-associated genes were observed, many times with opposing effects. Conclusions We demonstrated that the underlying heterogeneity of asthma is likely due in part to distinct pathogenetic pathways that depend on preceding/co-morbid overweight and/or allergy. It is therefore important to consider both obesity and asthma when conducting studies of asthma. PMID:26009928

  4. Genetic risk for schizophrenia: convergence on synaptic pathways involved in plasticity.

    PubMed

    Hall, Jeremy; Trent, Simon; Thomas, Kerrie L; O'Donovan, Michael C; Owen, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Recent large-scale genomic studies have revealed two broad classes of risk alleles for schizophrenia: a polygenic component of risk mediated through multiple common risk variants and rarer more highly penetrant submicroscopic chromosomal deletions and duplications, known as copy number variants. The focus of this review is on the emerging findings from the latter and subsequent exome sequencing data of smaller, deleterious single nucleotide variants and indels. In these studies, schizophrenia patients were found to have enriched de novo mutations in genes belonging to the postsynaptic density at glutamatergic synapses, particularly components of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor signaling complex, including the PSD-95 complex, activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein interactors, the fragile X mental retardation protein complex, voltage-gated calcium channels, and genes implicated in actin cytoskeletal dynamics. The convergence of these implicated genes onto a coherent biological pathway at the synapse, with a specific role in plasticity, provides a significant advance in understanding pathogenesis and points to new targets for biological investigation. We consider the implications of these studies in the context of existing genetic data and the potential need to reassess diagnostic boundaries of neuropsychiatric disorders before discussing ways forward for more directed mechanistic studies to develop stratified, novel therapeutic approaches in the future. PMID:25152434

  5. A Sleeping Beauty forward genetic screen identifies new genes and pathways driving osteosarcoma development and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Moriarity, Branden S; Otto, George M; Rahrmann, Eric P; Rathe, Susan K; Wolf, Natalie K; Weg, Madison T; Manlove, Luke A; LaRue, Rebecca S; Temiz, Nuri A; Molyneux, Sam D; Choi, Kwangmin; Holly, Kevin J; Sarver, Aaron L; Scott, Milcah C; Forster, Colleen L; Modiano, Jaime F; Khanna, Chand; Hewitt, Stephen M; Khokha, Rama; Yang, Yi; Gorlick, Richard; Dyer, Michael A; Largaespada, David A

    2015-06-01

    Osteosarcomas are sarcomas of the bone, derived from osteoblasts or their precursors, with a high propensity to metastasize. Osteosarcoma is associated with massive genomic instability, making it problematic to identify driver genes using human tumors or prototypical mouse models, many of which involve loss of Trp53 function. To identify the genes driving osteosarcoma development and metastasis, we performed a Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon-based forward genetic screen in mice with and without somatic loss of Trp53. Common insertion site (CIS) analysis of 119 primary tumors and 134 metastatic nodules identified 232 sites associated with osteosarcoma development and 43 sites associated with metastasis, respectively. Analysis of CIS-associated genes identified numerous known and new osteosarcoma-associated genes enriched in the ErbB, PI3K-AKT-mTOR and MAPK signaling pathways. Lastly, we identified several oncogenes involved in axon guidance, including Sema4d and Sema6d, which we functionally validated as oncogenes in human osteosarcoma. PMID:25961939

  6. Genetic risk for schizophrenia: convergence on synaptic pathways involved in plasticity.

    PubMed

    Hall, Jeremy; Trent, Simon; Thomas, Kerrie L; O'Donovan, Michael C; Owen, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Recent large-scale genomic studies have revealed two broad classes of risk alleles for schizophrenia: a polygenic component of risk mediated through multiple common risk variants and rarer more highly penetrant submicroscopic chromosomal deletions and duplications, known as copy number variants. The focus of this review is on the emerging findings from the latter and subsequent exome sequencing data of smaller, deleterious single nucleotide variants and indels. In these studies, schizophrenia patients were found to have enriched de novo mutations in genes belonging to the postsynaptic density at glutamatergic synapses, particularly components of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor signaling complex, including the PSD-95 complex, activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein interactors, the fragile X mental retardation protein complex, voltage-gated calcium channels, and genes implicated in actin cytoskeletal dynamics. The convergence of these implicated genes onto a coherent biological pathway at the synapse, with a specific role in plasticity, provides a significant advance in understanding pathogenesis and points to new targets for biological investigation. We consider the implications of these studies in the context of existing genetic data and the potential need to reassess diagnostic boundaries of neuropsychiatric disorders before discussing ways forward for more directed mechanistic studies to develop stratified, novel therapeutic approaches in the future.

  7. Genetic approach identifies distinct asthma pathways in overweight vs normal weight children.

    PubMed

    Butsch Kovacic, M; Martin, L J; Biagini Myers, J M; He, H; Lindsey, M; Mersha, T B; Khurana Hershey, G K

    2015-08-01

    The pathogenesis of asthma in the context of excess body weight may be distinct from asthma that develops in normal weight children. The study's objective was to explore the biology of asthma in the context of obesity and normal weight status using genetic methodologies. Associations between asthma and SNPs in 49 genes were assessed, as well as, interactions between SNPs and overweight status in child participants of the Greater Cincinnati Pediatric Clinic Repository. Asthma was significantly associated with weight (OR = 1.38; P = 0.037). The number of genes and the magnitude of their associations with asthma were notably greater when considering overweight children alone vs normal weight and overweight children together. When considering weight, distinct sets of asthma-associated genes were observed, many times with opposing effects. We demonstrated that the underlying heterogeneity of asthma is likely due in part to distinct pathogenetic pathways that depend on preceding/comorbid overweight and/or allergy. It is therefore important to consider both obesity and asthma when conducting studies of asthma.

  8. Pathways and barriers to genetic testing and screening: Molecular genetics meets the high-risk family. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Duster, T.

    1998-11-01

    The proliferation of genetic screening and testing is requiring increasing numbers of Americans to integrate genetic knowledge and interventions into their family life and personal experience. This study examines the social processes that occur as families at risk for two of the most common autosomal recessive diseases, sickle cell disease (SC) and cystic fibrosis (CF), encounter genetic testing. Each of these diseases is found primarily in a different ethnic/racial group (CF in Americans of North European descent and SC in Americans of West African descent). This has permitted them to have a certain additional lens on the role of culture in integrating genetic testing into family life and reproductive planning. A third type of genetic disorder, the thalassemias was added to the sample in order to extent the comparative frame and to include other ethnic and racial groups.

  9. Cultural transmission of tool use combined with habitat specializations leads to fine-scale genetic structure in bottlenose dolphins.

    PubMed

    Kopps, Anna M; Ackermann, Corinne Y; Sherwin, William B; Allen, Simon J; Bejder, Lars; Krützen, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Socially learned behaviours leading to genetic population structure have rarely been described outside humans. Here, we provide evidence of fine-scale genetic structure that has probably arisen based on socially transmitted behaviours in bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops sp.) in western Shark Bay, Western Australia. We argue that vertical social transmission in different habitats has led to significant geographical genetic structure of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotypes. Dolphins with mtDNA haplotypes E or F are found predominantly in deep (more than 10 m) channel habitat, while dolphins with a third haplotype (H) are found predominantly in shallow habitat (less than 10 m), indicating a strong haplotype-habitat correlation. Some dolphins in the deep habitat engage in a foraging strategy using tools. These 'sponging' dolphins are members of one matriline, carrying haplotype E. This pattern is consistent with what had been demonstrated previously at another research site in Shark Bay, where vertical social transmission of sponging had been shown using multiple lines of evidence. Using an individual-based model, we found support that in western Shark Bay, socially transmitted specializations may have led to the observed genetic structure. The reported genetic structure appears to present an example of cultural hitchhiking of mtDNA haplotypes on socially transmitted foraging strategies, suggesting that, as in humans, genetic structure can be shaped through cultural transmission.

  10. Cultural transmission of tool use combined with habitat specializations leads to fine-scale genetic structure in bottlenose dolphins

    PubMed Central

    Kopps, Anna M.; Ackermann, Corinne Y.; Sherwin, William B.; Allen, Simon J.; Bejder, Lars; Krützen, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Socially learned behaviours leading to genetic population structure have rarely been described outside humans. Here, we provide evidence of fine-scale genetic structure that has probably arisen based on socially transmitted behaviours in bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops sp.) in western Shark Bay, Western Australia. We argue that vertical social transmission in different habitats has led to significant geographical genetic structure of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotypes. Dolphins with mtDNA haplotypes E or F are found predominantly in deep (more than 10 m) channel habitat, while dolphins with a third haplotype (H) are found predominantly in shallow habitat (less than 10 m), indicating a strong haplotype–habitat correlation. Some dolphins in the deep habitat engage in a foraging strategy using tools. These ‘sponging’ dolphins are members of one matriline, carrying haplotype E. This pattern is consistent with what had been demonstrated previously at another research site in Shark Bay, where vertical social transmission of sponging had been shown using multiple lines of evidence. Using an individual-based model, we found support that in western Shark Bay, socially transmitted specializations may have led to the observed genetic structure. The reported genetic structure appears to present an example of cultural hitchhiking of mtDNA haplotypes on socially transmitted foraging strategies, suggesting that, as in humans, genetic structure can be shaped through cultural transmission. PMID:24648223

  11. Deciphering the underlying genetic and epigenetic events leading to gastric carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Vogiatzi, Paraskevi; Vindigni, Carla; Roviello, Franco; Renieri, Alessandra; Giordano, Antonio

    2007-05-01

    Gastric cancer is a common aggressive malignancy. Although its incidence shows considerable variation among different countries, gastric cancer is still a major health problem worldwide. The causes of stomach cancer are not completely understood. What is clear is that gastric cancer is a multi-stage process involving genetic and epigenetic factors. This review is an in-depth study of the known genetic and epigenetic processes in the development of this tumor, and delineates possible approaches in gene and epigenetic therapy.

  12. RNA interference silencing of chalcone synthase, the first step in the flavonoid biosynthesis pathway, leads to parthenocarpic tomato fruits.

    PubMed

    Schijlen, Elio G W M; de Vos, C H Ric; Martens, Stefan; Jonker, Harry H; Rosin, Faye M; Molthoff, Jos W; Tikunov, Yury M; Angenent, Gerco C; van Tunen, Arjen J; Bovy, Arnaud G

    2007-07-01

    Parthenocarpy, the formation of seedless fruits in the absence of functional fertilization, is a desirable trait for several important crop plants, including tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Seedless fruits can be of great value for consumers, the processing industry, and breeding companies. In this article, we propose a novel strategy to obtain parthenocarpic tomatoes by down-regulation of the flavonoid biosynthesis pathway using RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated suppression of chalcone synthase (CHS), the first gene in the flavonoid pathway. In CHS RNAi plants, total flavonoid levels, transcript levels of both Chs1 and Chs2, as well as CHS enzyme activity were reduced by up to a few percent of the corresponding wild-type values. Surprisingly, all strong Chs-silenced tomato lines developed parthenocarpic fruits. Although a relation between flavonoids and parthenocarpic fruit development has never been described, it is well known that flavonoids are essential for pollen development and pollen tube growth and, hence, play an essential role in plant reproduction. The observed parthenocarpic fruit development appeared to be pollination dependent, and Chs RNAi fruits displayed impaired pollen tube growth. Our results lead to novel insight in the mechanisms underlying parthenocarpic fruit development. The potential of this technology for applications in plant breeding and biotechnology will be discussed. PMID:17478633

  13. Genome-scale genetic screen of lead ion-sensitive gene deletion mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Du, J; Cao, C; Jiang, L

    2015-06-01

    Pb (lead) is one of the most widespread and toxic heavy metal contaminants and imposes potential harm to human health. Pb ions cause cellular damage and induce loss of cell viability. However, mechanisms regulating Pb toxicity remain poorly understood. Through a genome-scale screen, we have identified 30 yeast single-gene deletion mutants that are sensitive to lead ions. These genes are involved in the metabolism, transcription, protein synthesis, cell cycle and DNA processing, protein folding, modification, destination, as well as cellular transport process. Comparative analyses to cadmium-sensitive mutations identified from previous studies indicate that overlapping genes of lead- and cadmium-sensitive mutations are involved in both the metabolism and the cellular transport process. Furthermore, eleven lead-sensitive mutants show elevated levels of lead contents in response to lead stress. Our findings provide a basis to understand molecular mechanisms underlying the detoxification of lead ions by yeast cells.

  14. Genetic variation in the parasympathetic signaling pathway in patients with reflex syncope.

    PubMed

    Holmegard, H N; Benn, M; Mehlsen, J; Haunsø, S

    2013-01-01

    Reflex syncope is defined by a self-terminating transient loss of consciousness associated with an exaggerated response of the vagal reflexes upon orthostatic challenges. A hereditary component has previously been suggested. We hypothesized that variations in genes encoding proteins mediating the vagal signaling in the heart may be involved in reflex syncope pathogenesis. We systematically resequenced the entire coding regions and flanking intron sequences in 5 genes in the cardiac post-synaptic parasympathetic signaling pathway [muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 (CHRM2); G-protein beta-1 subunit (GNB1); G-protein gamma-2 subunit (GNG2); potassium inwardly rectifying channel, subfamily J, member 3 (KCNJ3); and potassium inwardly rectifying channel, subfamily J, member 5 (KCNJ5)] in 74 patients with well-characterized reflex syncope of either cardioinhibitory [Vasovagal Syncope International Study (VASIS-IIB), N = 38] or vasodepressor (VASIS-III, N = 36) type. We identified 2 novel genetic variants (CHRM2 c.1114C>G and GNG2 c.87+34G>A) and several known variants (GNB1: c.267+14G>A, c.267+19C>T, and c.738C>T; KCNJ3: c.119A>G, c.591C>T, c.1038T>C, and c.1494T>C; KCNJ5: c. 171T>C, c.810T>G, c.834T>C, c.844C>G, c.938+7C>T, and c.938-10G>A). The minor allele frequency of the KCNJ5 c.938+7C>T variant was significantly lower in patients than in the control group (0.014 versus 0.089, P = 0.001), and the frequency of heterozygosity and homozygosity was lower in cardioinhibitory patients compared to controls. Genetic variations in genes responsible for the vagal signaling in the heart, including CHRM2, GNB1, GNG2, KCNJ3, and KCNJ5, are not major contributors to the pathogenesis of reflex syncope of vasodepressor or cardioinhibitory types. PMID:23408450

  15. Genetic alterations leading to increases in internal potassium concentrations are detrimental for DNA integrity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Merchan, Stephanie; Pedelini, Leda; Hueso, Guillem; Calzada, Arturo; Serrano, Ramón; Yenush, Lynne

    2011-02-01

    We have investigated the effects of alterations in potassium homeostasis on cell cycle progression and genome stability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast strains lacking the PPZ1 and PPZ2 phosphatase genes, which aberrantly accumulate potassium, are sensitive to agents causing replicative stress or DNA damage and present a cell cycle delay in the G(1) /S phase. A synthetic slow growth phenotype was identified in a subset of DNA repair mutants upon inhibition of Ppz activity. Moreover, we observe that this slow growth phenotype observed in cdc7(ts) mutants with reduced Ppz activity is reverted by disrupting the TRK1 potassium transporter gene. As over-expression of a mammalian potassium transporter leads to similar phenotypes, we conclude that these defects can be attributed to potassium accumulation. As we reported previously, internal potassium accumulation activates the Slt2 MAP kinase pathway. We show that the removal of SLT2 in ppz1 ppz2 mutants ameliorates sensitivity to agents causing replication stress and DNA damage, whereas over-activation of the pathway leads to similar cell cycle-related defects. Taken together, these results are consistent with inappropriate potassium accumulation reducing DNA replication efficiency, negatively influencing DNA integrity and leading to the requirement of mismatch repair, the MRX complex, or homologous recombination pathways for normal growth.

  16. Born to Lead? A Twin Design and Genetic Association Study of Leadership Role Occupancy.

    PubMed

    De Neve, Jan-Emmanuel; Mikhaylov, Slava; Dawes, Christopher T; Christakis, Nicholas A; Fowler, James H

    2013-02-01

    We address leadership emergence and the possibility that there is a partially innate predisposition to occupy a leadership role. Employing twin design methods on data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, we estimate the heritability of leadership role occupancy at 24%. Twin studies do not point to specific genes or neurological processes that might be involved. We therefore also conduct association analysis on the available genetic markers. The results show that leadership role occupancy is associated with rs4950, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) residing on a neuronal acetylcholine receptor gene (CHRNB3). We replicate this family-based genetic association result on an independent sample in the Framingham Heart Study. This is the first study to identify a specific genotype associated with the tendency to occupy a leadership position. The results suggest that what determines whether an individual occupies a leadership position is the complex product of genetic and environmental influences; with a particular role for rs4950. PMID:23459689

  17. Born to Lead? A Twin Design and Genetic Association Study of Leadership Role Occupancy*

    PubMed Central

    De Neve, Jan-Emmanuel; Mikhaylov, Slava; Dawes, Christopher T.; Christakis, Nicholas A.; Fowler, James H.

    2013-01-01

    We address leadership emergence and the possibility that there is a partially innate predisposition to occupy a leadership role. Employing twin design methods on data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, we estimate the heritability of leadership role occupancy at 24%. Twin studies do not point to specific genes or neurological processes that might be involved. We therefore also conduct association analysis on the available genetic markers. The results show that leadership role occupancy is associated with rs4950, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) residing on a neuronal acetylcholine receptor gene (CHRNB3). We replicate this family-based genetic association result on an independent sample in the Framingham Heart Study. This is the first study to identify a specific genotype associated with the tendency to occupy a leadership position. The results suggest that what determines whether an individual occupies a leadership position is the complex product of genetic and environmental influences; with a particular role for rs4950. PMID:23459689

  18. Born to Lead? A Twin Design and Genetic Association Study of Leadership Role Occupancy.

    PubMed

    De Neve, Jan-Emmanuel; Mikhaylov, Slava; Dawes, Christopher T; Christakis, Nicholas A; Fowler, James H

    2013-02-01

    We address leadership emergence and the possibility that there is a partially innate predisposition to occupy a leadership role. Employing twin design methods on data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, we estimate the heritability of leadership role occupancy at 24%. Twin studies do not point to specific genes or neurological processes that might be involved. We therefore also conduct association analysis on the available genetic markers. The results show that leadership role occupancy is associated with rs4950, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) residing on a neuronal acetylcholine receptor gene (CHRNB3). We replicate this family-based genetic association result on an independent sample in the Framingham Heart Study. This is the first study to identify a specific genotype associated with the tendency to occupy a leadership position. The results suggest that what determines whether an individual occupies a leadership position is the complex product of genetic and environmental influences; with a particular role for rs4950.

  19. Breeding and Genetics Symposium: networks and pathways to guide genomic selection.

    PubMed

    Snelling, W M; Cushman, R A; Keele, J W; Maltecca, C; Thomas, M G; Fortes, M R S; Reverter, A

    2013-02-01

    Many traits affecting profitability and sustainability of meat, milk, and fiber production are polygenic, with no single gene having an overwhelming influence on observed variation. No knowledge of the specific genes controlling these traits has been needed to make substantial improvement through selection. Significant gains have been made through phenotypic selection enhanced by pedigree relationships and continually improving statistical methodology. Genomic selection, recently enabled by assays for dense SNP located throughout the genome, promises to increase selection accuracy and accelerate genetic improvement by emphasizing the SNP most strongly correlated to phenotype although the genes and sequence variants affecting phenotype remain largely unknown. These genomic predictions theoretically rely on linkage disequilibrium (LD) between genotyped SNP and unknown functional variants, but familial linkage may increase effectiveness when predicting individuals related to those in the training data. Genomic selection with functional SNP genotypes should be less reliant on LD patterns shared by training and target populations, possibly allowing robust prediction across unrelated populations. Although the specific variants causing polygenic variation may never be known with certainty, a number of tools and resources can be used to identify those most likely to affect phenotype. Associations of dense SNP genotypes with phenotype provide a 1-dimensional approach for identifying genes affecting specific traits; in contrast, associations with multiple traits allow defining networks of genes interacting to affect correlated traits. Such networks are especially compelling when corroborated by existing functional annotation and established molecular pathways. The SNP occurring within network genes, obtained from public databases or derived from genome and transcriptome sequences, may be classified according to expected effects on gene products. As illustrated by

  20. Genetic variation in mitotic regulatory pathway genes is associated with breast tumor grade.

    PubMed

    Purrington, Kristen S; Slettedahl, Seth; Bolla, Manjeet K; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Czene, Kamila; Nevanlinna, Heli; Bojesen, Stig E; Andrulis, Irene L; Cox, Angela; Hall, Per; Carpenter, Jane; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Haiman, Christopher A; Fasching, Peter A; Mannermaa, Arto; Winqvist, Robert; Brenner, Hermann; Lindblom, Annika; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Benitez, Javier; Swerdlow, Anthony; Kristensen, Vessela; Guénel, Pascal; Meindl, Alfons; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Fagerholm, Rainer; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; Wang, Xianshu; Olswold, Curtis; Olson, Janet E; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Knight, Julia A; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Reed, Malcolm W R; Cross, Simon S; Liu, Jianjun; Li, Jingmei; Humphreys, Keith; Clarke, Christine; Scott, Rodney; Fostira, Florentia; Fountzilas, George; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Ekici, Arif B; Hartmann, Arndt; Beckmann, Matthias W; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kataja, Vesa; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Pylkäs, Katri; Kauppila, Saila; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Stegmaier, Christa; Arndt, Volker; Margolin, Sara; Balleine, Rosemary; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Pilar Zamora, M; Menéndez, Primitiva; Ashworth, Alan; Jones, Michael; Orr, Nick; Arveux, Patrick; Kerbrat, Pierre; Truong, Thérèse; Bugert, Peter; Toland, Amanda E; Ambrosone, Christine B; Labrèche, France; Goldberg, Mark S; Dumont, Martine; Ziogas, Argyrios; Lee, Eunjung; Dite, Gillian S; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C; Long, Jirong; Shrubsole, Martha; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Barile, Monica; Peterlongo, Paolo; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Van Deurzen, Carolien H M; Martens, John W M; Kriege, Mieke; Figueroa, Jonine D; Chanock, Stephen J; Lissowska, Jolanta; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Tapper, William J; Gerty, Susan M; Durcan, Lorraine; Mclean, Catriona; Milne, Roger L; Baglietto, Laura; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Van'T Veer, Laura J; Cornelissen, Sten; Försti, Asta; Torres, Diana; Rüdiger, Thomas; Rudolph, Anja; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Nickels, Stefan; Weltens, Caroline; Floris, Giuseppe; Moisse, Matthieu; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Qin; Dunning, Alison M; Shah, Mitul; Brown, Judith; Simard, Jacques; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L; Hopper, John L; Bogdanova, Natalia; Dörk, Thilo; Zheng, Wei; Radice, Paolo; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Devillee, Peter; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hooning, Maartje; García-Closas, Montserrat; Sawyer, Elinor; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marmee, Frederick; Eccles, Diana M; Giles, Graham G; Peto, Julian; Schmidt, Marjanka; Broeks, Annegien; Hamann, Ute; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Lambrechts, Diether; Pharoah, Paul D P; Easton, Douglas; Pankratz, V Shane; Slager, Susan; Vachon, Celine M; Couch, Fergus J

    2014-11-15

    Mitotic index is an important component of histologic grade and has an etiologic role in breast tumorigenesis. Several small candidate gene studies have reported associations between variation in mitotic genes and breast cancer risk. We measured associations between 2156 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 194 mitotic genes and breast cancer risk, overall and by histologic grade, in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) iCOGS study (n = 39 067 cases; n = 42 106 controls). SNPs in TACC2 [rs17550038: odds ratio (OR) = 1.24, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.16-1.33, P = 4.2 × 10(-10)) and EIF3H (rs799890: OR = 1.07, 95% CI 1.04-1.11, P = 8.7 × 10(-6)) were significantly associated with risk of low-grade breast cancer. The TACC2 signal was retained (rs17550038: OR = 1.15, 95% CI 1.07-1.23, P = 7.9 × 10(-5)) after adjustment for breast cancer risk SNPs in the nearby FGFR2 gene, suggesting that TACC2 is a novel, independent genome-wide significant genetic risk locus for low-grade breast cancer. While no SNPs were individually associated with high-grade disease, a pathway-level gene set analysis showed that variation across the 194 mitotic genes was associated with high-grade breast cancer risk (P = 2.1 × 10(-3)). These observations will provide insight into the contribution of mitotic defects to histological grade and the etiology of breast cancer. PMID:24927736

  1. Molecular subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma arise by distinct genetic pathways.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Georg; Wright, George W; Emre, N C Tolga; Kohlhammer, Holger; Dave, Sandeep S; Davis, R Eric; Carty, Shannon; Lam, Lloyd T; Shaffer, A L; Xiao, Wenming; Powell, John; Rosenwald, Andreas; Ott, German; Muller-Hermelink, Hans Konrad; Gascoyne, Randy D; Connors, Joseph M; Campo, Elias; Jaffe, Elaine S; Delabie, Jan; Smeland, Erlend B; Rimsza, Lisa M; Fisher, Richard I; Weisenburger, Dennis D; Chan, Wing C; Staudt, Louis M

    2008-09-01

    Gene-expression profiling has been used to define 3 molecular subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), termed germinal center B-cell-like (GCB) DLBCL, activated B-cell-like (ABC) DLBCL, and primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL). To investigate whether these DLBCL subtypes arise by distinct pathogenetic mechanisms, we analyzed 203 DLBCL biopsy samples by high-resolution, genome-wide copy number analysis coupled with gene-expression profiling. Of 272 recurrent chromosomal aberrations that were associated with gene-expression alterations, 30 were used differentially by the DLBCL subtypes (P < 0.006). An amplicon on chromosome 19 was detected in 26% of ABC DLBCLs but in only 3% of GCB DLBCLs and PMBLs. A highly up-regulated gene in this amplicon was SPIB, which encodes an ETS family transcription factor. Knockdown of SPIB by RNA interference was toxic to ABC DLBCL cell lines but not to GCB DLBCL, PMBL, or myeloma cell lines, strongly implicating SPIB as an oncogene involved in the pathogenesis of ABC DLBCL. Deletion of the INK4a/ARF tumor suppressor locus and trisomy 3 also occurred almost exclusively in ABC DLBCLs and was associated with inferior outcome within this subtype. FOXP1 emerged as a potential oncogene in ABC DLBCL that was up-regulated by trisomy 3 and by more focal high-level amplifications. In GCB DLBCL, amplification of the oncogenic mir-17-92 microRNA cluster and deletion of the tumor suppressor PTEN were recurrent, but these events did not occur in ABC DLBCL. Together, these data provide genetic evidence that the DLBCL subtypes are distinct diseases that use different oncogenic pathways. PMID:18765795

  2. Molecular subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma arise by distinct genetic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lenz, Georg; Wright, George W.; Emre, N. C. Tolga; Kohlhammer, Holger; Dave, Sandeep S.; Davis, R. Eric; Carty, Shannon; Lam, Lloyd T.; Shaffer, A. L.; Xiao, Wenming; Powell, John; Rosenwald, Andreas; Ott, German; Muller-Hermelink, Hans Konrad; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Connors, Joseph M.; Campo, Elias; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Delabie, Jan; Smeland, Erlend B.; Rimsza, Lisa M.; Fisher, Richard I.; Weisenburger, Dennis D.; Chan, Wing C.; Staudt, Louis M.

    2008-01-01

    Gene-expression profiling has been used to define 3 molecular subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), termed germinal center B-cell-like (GCB) DLBCL, activated B-cell-like (ABC) DLBCL, and primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL). To investigate whether these DLBCL subtypes arise by distinct pathogenetic mechanisms, we analyzed 203 DLBCL biopsy samples by high-resolution, genome-wide copy number analysis coupled with gene-expression profiling. Of 272 recurrent chromosomal aberrations that were associated with gene-expression alterations, 30 were used differentially by the DLBCL subtypes (P < 0.006). An amplicon on chromosome 19 was detected in 26% of ABC DLBCLs but in only 3% of GCB DLBCLs and PMBLs. A highly up-regulated gene in this amplicon was SPIB, which encodes an ETS family transcription factor. Knockdown of SPIB by RNA interference was toxic to ABC DLBCL cell lines but not to GCB DLBCL, PMBL, or myeloma cell lines, strongly implicating SPIB as an oncogene involved in the pathogenesis of ABC DLBCL. Deletion of the INK4a/ARF tumor suppressor locus and trisomy 3 also occurred almost exclusively in ABC DLBCLs and was associated with inferior outcome within this subtype. FOXP1 emerged as a potential oncogene in ABC DLBCL that was up-regulated by trisomy 3 and by more focal high-level amplifications. In GCB DLBCL, amplification of the oncogenic mir-17–92 microRNA cluster and deletion of the tumor suppressor PTEN were recurrent, but these events did not occur in ABC DLBCL. Together, these data provide genetic evidence that the DLBCL subtypes are distinct diseases that use different oncogenic pathways. PMID:18765795

  3. Genetic variation in mitotic regulatory pathway genes is associated with breast tumor grade

    PubMed Central

    Purrington, Kristen S.; Slettedahl, Seth; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Czene, Kamila; Nevanlinna, Heli; Bojesen, Stig E.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Cox, Angela; Hall, Per; Carpenter, Jane; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Haiman, Christopher A.; Fasching, Peter A.; Mannermaa, Arto; Winqvist, Robert; Brenner, Hermann; Lindblom, Annika; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Benitez, Javier; Swerdlow, Anthony; Kristensen, Vessela; Guénel, Pascal; Meindl, Alfons; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Fagerholm, Rainer; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Wang, Xianshu; Olswold, Curtis; Olson, Janet E.; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Knight, Julia A.; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Reed, Malcolm W.R.; Cross, Simon S.; Liu, Jianjun; Li, Jingmei; Humphreys, Keith; Clarke, Christine; Scott, Rodney; Fostira, Florentia; Fountzilas, George; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Ekici, Arif B.; Hartmann, Arndt; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kataja, Vesa; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Pylkäs, Katri; Kauppila, Saila; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Stegmaier, Christa; Arndt, Volker; Margolin, Sara; Balleine, Rosemary; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Pilar Zamora, M.; Menéndez, Primitiva; Ashworth, Alan; Jones, Michael; Orr, Nick; Arveux, Patrick; Kerbrat, Pierre; Truong, Thérèse; Bugert, Peter; Toland, Amanda E.; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Labrèche, France; Goldberg, Mark S.; Dumont, Martine; Ziogas, Argyrios; Lee, Eunjung; Dite, Gillian S.; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C.; Long, Jirong; Shrubsole, Martha; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Barile, Monica; Peterlongo, Paolo; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Tollenaar, Robert A.E.M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Van Deurzen, Carolien H.M.; Martens, John W.M.; Kriege, Mieke; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Miller, Nicola; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Tapper, William J.; Gerty, Susan M.; Durcan, Lorraine; Mclean, Catriona; Milne, Roger L.; Baglietto, Laura; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Van'T Veer, Laura J.; Cornelissen, Sten; Försti, Asta; Torres, Diana; Rüdiger, Thomas; Rudolph, Anja; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Nickels, Stefan; Weltens, Caroline; Floris, Giuseppe; Moisse, Matthieu; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Qin; Dunning, Alison M.; Shah, Mitul; Brown, Judith; Simard, Jacques; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Hopper, John L.; Bogdanova, Natalia; Dörk, Thilo; Zheng, Wei; Radice, Paolo; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Devillee, Peter; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hooning, Maartje; García-Closas, Montserrat; Sawyer, Elinor; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marmee, Frederick; Eccles, Diana M.; Giles, Graham G.; Peto, Julian; Schmidt, Marjanka; Broeks, Annegien; Hamann, Ute; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Lambrechts, Diether; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Easton, Douglas; Pankratz, V. Shane; Slager, Susan; Vachon, Celine M.; Couch, Fergus J.

    2014-01-01

    Mitotic index is an important component of histologic grade and has an etiologic role in breast tumorigenesis. Several small candidate gene studies have reported associations between variation in mitotic genes and breast cancer risk. We measured associations between 2156 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 194 mitotic genes and breast cancer risk, overall and by histologic grade, in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) iCOGS study (n = 39 067 cases; n = 42 106 controls). SNPs in TACC2 [rs17550038: odds ratio (OR) = 1.24, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.16–1.33, P = 4.2 × 10−10) and EIF3H (rs799890: OR = 1.07, 95% CI 1.04–1.11, P = 8.7 × 10−6) were significantly associated with risk of low-grade breast cancer. The TACC2 signal was retained (rs17550038: OR = 1.15, 95% CI 1.07–1.23, P = 7.9 × 10−5) after adjustment for breast cancer risk SNPs in the nearby FGFR2 gene, suggesting that TACC2 is a novel, independent genome-wide significant genetic risk locus for low-grade breast cancer. While no SNPs were individually associated with high-grade disease, a pathway-level gene set analysis showed that variation across the 194 mitotic genes was associated with high-grade breast cancer risk (P = 2.1 × 10−3). These observations will provide insight into the contribution of mitotic defects to histological grade and the etiology of breast cancer. PMID:24927736

  4. Exome capture sequencing of adenoma reveals genetic alterations in multiple cellular pathways at the early stage of colorectal tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Donger; Yang, Liu; Zheng, Liangtao; Ge, Weiting; Li, Dan; Zhang, Yong; Hu, Xueda; Gao, Zhibo; Xu, Jinghong; Huang, Yanqin; Hu, Hanguang; Zhang, Hang; Zhang, Hao; Liu, Mingming; Yang, Huanming; Zheng, Lei; Zheng, Shu

    2013-01-01

    Most of colorectal adenocarcinomas are believed to arise from adenomas, which are premalignant lesions. Sequencing the whole exome of the adenoma will help identifying molecular biomarkers that can predict the occurrence of adenocarcinoma more precisely and help understanding the molecular pathways underlying the initial stage of colorectal tumorigenesis. We performed the exome capture sequencing of the normal mucosa, adenoma and adenocarcinoma tissues from the same patient and sequenced the identified mutations in additional 73 adenomas and 288 adenocarcinomas. Somatic single nucleotide variations (SNVs) were identified in both the adenoma and adenocarcinoma by comparing with the normal control from the same patient. We identified 12 nonsynonymous somatic SNVs in the adenoma and 42 nonsynonymous somatic SNVs in the adenocarcinoma. Most of these mutations including OR6X1, SLC15A3, KRTHB4, RBFOX1, LAMA3, CDH20, BIRC6, NMBR, GLCCI1, EFR3A, and FTHL17 were newly reported in colorectal adenomas. Functional annotation of these mutated genes showed that multiple cellular pathways including Wnt, cell adhesion and ubiquitin mediated proteolysis pathways were altered genetically in the adenoma and that the genetic alterations in the same pathways persist in the adenocarcinoma. CDH20 and LAMA3 were mutated in the adenoma while NRXN3 and COL4A6 were mutated in the adenocarcinoma from the same patient, suggesting for the first time that genetic alterations in the cell adhesion pathway occur as early as in the adenoma. Thus, the comparison of genomic mutations between adenoma and adenocarcinoma provides us a new insight into the molecular events governing the early step of colorectal tumorigenesis. PMID:23301059

  5. Structured Parenting of Toddlers at High versus Low Genetic Risk: Two Pathways to Child Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leve, Leslie D.; Harold, Gordon T.; Ge, Xiaojia; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.; Shaw, Daniel; Scaramella, Laura V.; Reiss, David

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Little is known about how parenting might offset genetic risk to prevent the onset of child problems during toddlerhood. We used a prospective adoption design to separate genetic and environmental influences and test whether associations between structured parenting and toddler behavior problems were conditioned by genetic risk for…

  6. Genetic variants in DNA repair pathways are not associated with disease progression among multiple myeloma patients.

    PubMed

    Thyagarajan, Bharat; Arora, Mukta; Guan, Weihua; Barcelo, Helene; Jackson, Scott; Kumar, Shaji; Gertz, Morie

    2013-11-01

    DNA damage induced by high dose melphalan and autologous transplantation is repaired by the nucleotide excision repair (NER) and base excision repair (BER) pathways. We evaluated the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (n=311) in the NER and BER pathways and disease progression in 695 multiple myeloma patients who underwent autologous transplantation. None of the SNPs were associated with disease progression. Pathway based analyses showed that the NER pathway had a borderline association with disease progression (p=0.09). These findings suggest that common variation in the NER and BER pathways do not substantially influence disease progression in multiple myeloma patients.

  7. Genetic Factors That Might Lead to Different Responses in Individuals Exposed to Perchlorate

    PubMed Central

    Scinicariello, Franco; Murray, H. Edward; Smith, Lester; Wilbur, Sharon; Fowler, Bruce A.

    2005-01-01

    Perchlorate has been detected in groundwater in many parts of the United States, and recent detection in vegetable and dairy food products indicates that contamination by perchlorate is more widespread than previously thought. Perchlorate is a competitive inhibitor of the sodium iodide symporter, the thyroid cell–surface protein responsible for transporting iodide from the plasma into the thyroid. An estimated 4.3% of the U.S. population is subclinically hypothyroid, and 6.9% of pregnant women may have low iodine intake. Congenital hypothyroidism affects 1 in 3,000 to 1 in 4,000 infants, and 15% of these cases have been attributed to genetic defects. Our objective in this review is to identify genetic biomarkers that would help define subpopulations sensitive to environmental perchlorate exposure. We review the literature to identify genetic defects involved in the iodination process of the thyroid hormone synthesis, particularly defects in iodide transport from circulation into the thyroid cell, defects in iodide transport from the thyroid cell to the follicular lumen (Pendred syndrome), and defects of iodide organification. Furthermore, we summarize relevant studies of perchlorate in humans. Because of perchlorate inhibition of iodide uptake, it is biologically plausible that chronic ingestion of perchlorate through contaminated sources may cause some degree of iodine discharge in populations that are genetically susceptible to defects in the iodination process of the thyroid hormone synthesis, thus deteriorating their conditions. We conclude that future studies linking human disease and environmental perchlorate exposure should consider the genetic makeup of the participants, actual perchlorate exposure levels, and individual iodine intake/excretion levels. PMID:16263499

  8. Genetic factors that might lead to different responses in individuals exposed to perchlorate.

    PubMed

    Scinicariello, Franco; Murray, H Edward; Smith, Lester; Wilbur, Sharon; Fowler, Bruce A

    2005-11-01

    Perchlorate has been detected in groundwater in many parts of the United States, and recent detection in vegetable and dairy food products indicates that contamination by perchlorate is more widespread than previously thought. Perchlorate is a competitive inhibitor of the sodium iodide symporter, the thyroid cell-surface protein responsible for transporting iodide from the plasma into the thyroid. An estimated 4.3% of the U.S. population is subclinically hypothyroid, and 6.9% of pregnant women may have low iodine intake. Congenital hypothyroidism affects 1 in 3,000 to 1 in 4,000 infants, and 15% of these cases have been attributed to genetic defects. Our objective in this review is to identify genetic biomarkers that would help define subpopulations sensitive to environmental perchlorate exposure. We review the literature to identify genetic defects involved in the iodination process of the thyroid hormone synthesis, particularly defects in iodide transport from circulation into the thyroid cell, defects in iodide transport from the thyroid cell to the follicular lumen (Pendred syndrome), and defects of iodide organification. Furthermore, we summarize relevant studies of perchlorate in humans. Because of perchlorate inhibition of iodide uptake, it is biologically plausible that chronic ingestion of perchlorate through contaminated sources may cause some degree of iodine discharge in populations that are genetically susceptible to defects in the iodination process of the thyroid hormone synthesis, thus deteriorating their conditions. We conclude that future studies linking human disease and environmental perchlorate exposure should consider the genetic makeup of the participants, actual perchlorate exposure levels, and individual iodine intake/excretion levels. PMID:16263499

  9. Genetic factors that might lead to different responses in individuals exposed to perchlorate.

    PubMed

    Scinicariello, Franco; Murray, H Edward; Smith, Lester; Wilbur, Sharon; Fowler, Bruce A

    2005-11-01

    Perchlorate has been detected in groundwater in many parts of the United States, and recent detection in vegetable and dairy food products indicates that contamination by perchlorate is more widespread than previously thought. Perchlorate is a competitive inhibitor of the sodium iodide symporter, the thyroid cell-surface protein responsible for transporting iodide from the plasma into the thyroid. An estimated 4.3% of the U.S. population is subclinically hypothyroid, and 6.9% of pregnant women may have low iodine intake. Congenital hypothyroidism affects 1 in 3,000 to 1 in 4,000 infants, and 15% of these cases have been attributed to genetic defects. Our objective in this review is to identify genetic biomarkers that would help define subpopulations sensitive to environmental perchlorate exposure. We review the literature to identify genetic defects involved in the iodination process of the thyroid hormone synthesis, particularly defects in iodide transport from circulation into the thyroid cell, defects in iodide transport from the thyroid cell to the follicular lumen (Pendred syndrome), and defects of iodide organification. Furthermore, we summarize relevant studies of perchlorate in humans. Because of perchlorate inhibition of iodide uptake, it is biologically plausible that chronic ingestion of perchlorate through contaminated sources may cause some degree of iodine discharge in populations that are genetically susceptible to defects in the iodination process of the thyroid hormone synthesis, thus deteriorating their conditions. We conclude that future studies linking human disease and environmental perchlorate exposure should consider the genetic makeup of the participants, actual perchlorate exposure levels, and individual iodine intake/excretion levels.

  10. Molecular Genetics of the PI3K-AKT-mTOR Pathway in Genodermatoses: Diagnostic Implications and Treatment Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Vahidnezhad, Hassan; Yousse An, Leila; Uitto, Jouni

    2016-01-01

    A number of critical signaling pathways are required for homeostatic regulation of cell survival, differentiation, and proliferation during organogenesis. One of them is the PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway consisting of a cascade of inhibitor/activator molecules. Recently, a number of heritable diseases with skin involvement, manifesting particularly with tissue overgrowth, have been shown to result from mutations in the genes in the PI3K-AKT-mTOR and interacting intracellular pathways. Many of these conditions represent an overlapping spectrum of phenotypic manifestations forming a basis for novel, unifying classifications. Identification of the mutant genes and specific mutations in these patients has implications for diagnostics and genetic counseling and provides a rational basis for the development of novel treatment modalities for this currently intractable group of disorders.

  11. The most prevalent genetic cause of ALS-FTD, C9orf72 synergizes the toxicity of ATXN2 intermediate polyglutamine repeats through the autophagy pathway.

    PubMed

    Ciura, Sorana; Sellier, Chantal; Campanari, Maria-Letizia; Charlet-Berguerand, Nicolas; Kabashi, Edor

    2016-08-01

    The most common genetic cause for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia (ALS-FTD) is repeat expansion of a hexanucleotide sequence (GGGGCC) within the C9orf72 genomic sequence. To elucidate the functional role of C9orf72 in disease pathogenesis, we identified certain molecular interactors of this factor. We determined that C9orf72 exists in a complex with SMCR8 and WDR41 and that this complex acts as a GDP/GTP exchange factor for RAB8 and RAB39, 2 RAB GTPases involved in macroautophagy/autophagy. Consequently, C9orf72 depletion in neuronal cultures leads to accumulation of unresolved aggregates of SQSTM1/p62 and phosphorylated TARDBP/TDP-43. However, C9orf72 reduction does not lead to major neuronal toxicity, suggesting that a second stress may be required to induce neuronal cell death. An intermediate size of polyglutamine repeats within ATXN2 is an important genetic modifier of ALS-FTD. We found that coexpression of intermediate polyglutamine repeats (30Q) of ATXN2 combined with C9orf72 depletion increases the aggregation of ATXN2 and neuronal toxicity. These results were confirmed in zebrafish embryos where partial C9orf72 knockdown along with intermediate (but not normal) repeat expansions in ATXN2 causes locomotion deficits and abnormal axonal projections from spinal motor neurons. These results demonstrate that C9orf72 plays an important role in the autophagy pathway while genetically interacting with another major genetic risk factor, ATXN2, to contribute to ALS-FTD pathogenesis.

  12. The most prevalent genetic cause of ALS-FTD, C9orf72 synergizes the toxicity of ATXN2 intermediate polyglutamine repeats through the autophagy pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ciura, Sorana; Sellier, Chantal; Campanari, Maria-Letizia; Charlet-Berguerand, Nicolas; Kabashi, Edor

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The most common genetic cause for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia (ALS-FTD) is repeat expansion of a hexanucleotide sequence (GGGGCC) within the C9orf72 genomic sequence. To elucidate the functional role of C9orf72 in disease pathogenesis, we identified certain molecular interactors of this factor. We determined that C9orf72 exists in a complex with SMCR8 and WDR41 and that this complex acts as a GDP/GTP exchange factor for RAB8 and RAB39, 2 RAB GTPases involved in macroautophagy/autophagy. Consequently, C9orf72 depletion in neuronal cultures leads to accumulation of unresolved aggregates of SQSTM1/p62 and phosphorylated TARDBP/TDP-43. However, C9orf72 reduction does not lead to major neuronal toxicity, suggesting that a second stress may be required to induce neuronal cell death. An intermediate size of polyglutamine repeats within ATXN2 is an important genetic modifier of ALS-FTD. We found that coexpression of intermediate polyglutamine repeats (30Q) of ATXN2 combined with C9orf72 depletion increases the aggregation of ATXN2 and neuronal toxicity. These results were confirmed in zebrafish embryos where partial C9orf72 knockdown along with intermediate (but not normal) repeat expansions in ATXN2 causes locomotion deficits and abnormal axonal projections from spinal motor neurons. These results demonstrate that C9orf72 plays an important role in the autophagy pathway while genetically interacting with another major genetic risk factor, ATXN2, to contribute to ALS-FTD pathogenesis. PMID:27245636

  13. The most prevalent genetic cause of ALS-FTD, C9orf72 synergizes the toxicity of ATXN2 intermediate polyglutamine repeats through the autophagy pathway.

    PubMed

    Ciura, Sorana; Sellier, Chantal; Campanari, Maria-Letizia; Charlet-Berguerand, Nicolas; Kabashi, Edor

    2016-08-01

    The most common genetic cause for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia (ALS-FTD) is repeat expansion of a hexanucleotide sequence (GGGGCC) within the C9orf72 genomic sequence. To elucidate the functional role of C9orf72 in disease pathogenesis, we identified certain molecular interactors of this factor. We determined that C9orf72 exists in a complex with SMCR8 and WDR41 and that this complex acts as a GDP/GTP exchange factor for RAB8 and RAB39, 2 RAB GTPases involved in macroautophagy/autophagy. Consequently, C9orf72 depletion in neuronal cultures leads to accumulation of unresolved aggregates of SQSTM1/p62 and phosphorylated TARDBP/TDP-43. However, C9orf72 reduction does not lead to major neuronal toxicity, suggesting that a second stress may be required to induce neuronal cell death. An intermediate size of polyglutamine repeats within ATXN2 is an important genetic modifier of ALS-FTD. We found that coexpression of intermediate polyglutamine repeats (30Q) of ATXN2 combined with C9orf72 depletion increases the aggregation of ATXN2 and neuronal toxicity. These results were confirmed in zebrafish embryos where partial C9orf72 knockdown along with intermediate (but not normal) repeat expansions in ATXN2 causes locomotion deficits and abnormal axonal projections from spinal motor neurons. These results demonstrate that C9orf72 plays an important role in the autophagy pathway while genetically interacting with another major genetic risk factor, ATXN2, to contribute to ALS-FTD pathogenesis. PMID:27245636

  14. National Human Exposure Assessment Survey: analysis of exposure pathways and routes for arsenic and lead in EPA Region 5.

    PubMed

    Clayton, C A; Pellizzari, E D; Quackenboss, J J

    2002-01-01

    The National Human Exposure Assessment Survey (NHEXAS) Phase I field study conducted in EPA Region 5 (Great Lakes Area) provides extensive exposure data on a representative sample of approximately 250 residents of the region. Associated environmental media and biomarker (blood, urine) concentration data were also obtained for the study participants to aid in understanding of the relationships of exposures to both contaminant pathways and doses. Besides fulfilling the primary NHEXAS objectives, the NHEXAS data provided an opportunity to explore secondary usages, such as examining pathway to route of exposure relationships. A generic type of structural equation model was used to define the anticipated relationships among the various data types for both arsenic (As) and lead (Pb). Since, by design, only a few participants provided data for all sample types, implementing this model required that some media concentrations (outdoor air and soil) be imputed for subjects with missing information by using measurements collected in the same geographic area and time period. The model, and associated pairwise correlations, generally revealed significant but weak associations among the concentrations, exposures, and doses; the strongest associations occurred for the various air measurements (indoor versus outdoor and personal). The generally weak associations were thought to be partly due to the absence of complete coverage of nonresidential environmental media and to nonsynchronization of relevant measurement times and integration periods of collection across the various sample types. In general, relationships between the NHEXAS questionnaire data and the various concentration, exposure, and body-burden measures were also weak. The model results and the modeling exercise suggest several ways for optimizing the design of future exposure assessment studies that are aimed at supporting structural modeling activities. PMID:11859431

  15. Systematic permutation testing in GWAS pathway analyses: identification of genetic networks in dilated cardiomyopathy and ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Genome wide association studies (GWAS) are applied to identify genetic loci, which are associated with complex traits and human diseases. Analogous to the evolution of gene expression analyses, pathway analyses have emerged as important tools to uncover functional networks of genome-wide association data. Usually, pathway analyses combine statistical methods with a priori available biological knowledge. To determine significance thresholds for associated pathways, correction for multiple testing and over-representation permutation testing is applied. Results We systematically investigated the impact of three different permutation test approaches for over-representation analysis to detect false positive pathway candidates and evaluate them on genome-wide association data of Dilated Cardiomyopathy (DCM) and Ulcerative Colitis (UC). Our results provide evidence that the gold standard - permuting the case–control status – effectively improves specificity of GWAS pathway analysis. Although permutation of SNPs does not maintain linkage disequilibrium (LD), these permutations represent an alternative for GWAS data when case–control permutations are not possible. Gene permutations, however, did not add significantly to the specificity. Finally, we provide estimates on the required number of permutations for the investigated approaches. Conclusions To discover potential false positive functional pathway candidates and to support the results from standard statistical tests such as the Hypergeometric test, permutation tests of case control data should be carried out. The most reasonable alternative was case–control permutation, if this is not possible, SNP permutations may be carried out. Our study also demonstrates that significance values converge rapidly with an increasing number of permutations. By applying the described statistical framework we were able to discover axon guidance, focal adhesion and calcium signaling as important DCM-related pathways

  16. The reverse cholesterol transport pathway improves understanding of genetic networks for fat deposition and muscle growth in beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Tyler F; Wu, Xiao-Lin; Pan, Zengxiang; Michal, Jennifer J; Wright, Raymond W; Killinger, Karen M; MacNeil, Michael D; Jiang, Zhihua

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, thirteen genes involved in the reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) pathway were investigated for their associations with three fat depositions, eight fatty acid compositions and two growth-related phenotypes in a Wagyu x Limousin reference population, including 6 F(1) bulls, 113 F(1) dams, and 246 F(2) progeny. A total of 37 amplicons were used to screen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on 6 F(1) bulls. Among 36 SNPs detected in 11 of these 13 genes, 19 were selected for genotyping by the Sequenom assay design on all F(2) progeny. Single-marker analysis revealed seven SNPs in ATP binding cassette A1, apolipoproteins A1, B and E, phospholipid transfer protein and paraoxinase 1 genes significantly associated with nine phenotypes (P<0.05). Previously, we reported genetic networks associated with 19 complex phenotypes based on a total of 138 genetic polymorphisms derived from 71 known functional genes. Therefore, after Bonferroni correction, these significant (adjusted P<0.05) and suggestive (adjusted P<0.10) associations were then used to identify genetic networks related to the RCT pathway. Multiple-marker analysis suggested possible genetic networks involving the RCT pathway for kidney-pelvic-heart fat percentage, rib-eye area, and subcutaneous fat depth phenotypes with markers derived from paraoxinase 1, apolipoproteins A1 and E, respectively. The present study confirmed that genes involved in cholesterol homeostasis are useful targets for investigating obesity in humans as well as for improving meat quality phenotypes in a livestock production. PMID:21151936

  17. Genetic dissection of the polyoxin building block-carbamoylpolyoxamic acid biosynthesis revealing the “pathway redundancy” in metabolic networks

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Polyoxin, a peptidyl nucleoside antibiotic, consists of three building blocks including a nucleoside skeleton, polyoximic acid (POIA), and carbamoylpolyoxamic acid (CPOAA), however, little is known about the “pathway redundancy” of the metabolic networks directing the CPOAA biosynthesis in the cell factories of the polyoxin producer. Results Here we report the genetic characterization of CPOAA biosynthesis with revealing a “pathway redundancy” in metabolic networks. Independent mutation of the four genes (polL-N and polP) directly resulted in the accumulation of polyoxin I, suggesting their positive roles for CPOAA biosynthesis. Moreover, the individual mutant of polN and polP also partially retains polyoxin production, suggesting the existence of the alternative homologs substituting their functional roles. Conclusions It is unveiled that argA and argB in L-arginine biosynthetic pathway contributed to the “pathway redundancy”, more interestingly, argB in S. cacaoi is indispensible for both polyoxin production and L-arginine biosynthesis. These data should provide an example for the research on the “pathway redundancy” in metabolic networks, and lay a solid foundation for targeted enhancement of polyoxin production with synthetic biology strategies. PMID:24314013

  18. Direct observation of kinetic traps associated with structural transformations leading to multiple pathways of S-layer assembly.

    PubMed

    Shin, Seong-Ho; Chung, Sungwook; Sanii, Babak; Comolli, Luis R; Bertozzi, Carolyn R; De Yoreo, James J

    2012-08-01

    The concept of a folding funnel with kinetic traps describes folding of individual proteins. Using in situ Atomic Force Microscopy to investigate S-layer assembly on mica, we show this concept is equally valid during self-assembly of proteins into extended matrices. We find the S-layer-on-mica system possesses a kinetic trap associated with conformational differences between a long-lived transient state and the final stable state. Both ordered tetrameric states emerge from clusters of the monomer phase, however, they then track along two different pathways. One leads directly to the final low-energy state and the other to the kinetic trap. Over time, the trapped state transforms into the stable state. By analyzing the time and temperature dependencies of formation and transformation we find that the energy barriers to formation of the two states differ by only 0.7 kT, but once the high-energy state forms, the barrier to transformation to the low-energy state is 25 kT. Thus the transient state exhibits the characteristics of a kinetic trap in a folding funnel. PMID:22822216

  19. Direct observation of kinetic traps associated with structural transformations leading to multiple pathways of S-layer assembly

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Seong-Ho; Chung, Sungwook; Sanii, Babak; Comolli, Luis R.; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; De Yoreo, James J.

    2012-01-01

    The concept of a folding funnel with kinetic traps describes folding of individual proteins. Using in situ Atomic Force Microscopy to investigate S-layer assembly on mica, we show this concept is equally valid during self-assembly of proteins into extended matrices. We find the S-layer-on-mica system possesses a kinetic trap associated with conformational differences between a long-lived transient state and the final stable state. Both ordered tetrameric states emerge from clusters of the monomer phase, however, they then track along two different pathways. One leads directly to the final low-energy state and the other to the kinetic trap. Over time, the trapped state transforms into the stable state. By analyzing the time and temperature dependencies of formation and transformation we find that the energy barriers to formation of the two states differ by only 0.7 kT, but once the high-energy state forms, the barrier to transformation to the low-energy state is 25 kT. Thus the transient state exhibits the characteristics of a kinetic trap in a folding funnel. PMID:22822216

  20. Signalling pathway leading to an activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase by stimulating M3 muscarinic receptor.

    PubMed

    Kim, J Y; Yang, M S; Oh, C D; Kim, K T; Ha, M J; Kang, S S; Chun, J S

    1999-01-15

    The signalling pathway leading to an activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase subtypes Erk-1 and -2 upon stimulation of muscarinic receptor with carbachol in human neuroblastoma SK-N-BE2(C) cells was investigated. Carbachol activated Erk-1/-2 by stimulating M3 muscarinic receptor, as determined by specific antagonists for individual muscarinic receptors. The activation of Erk-1/-2 by carbachol was blocked by the inhibition or down-regulation of protein kinase C (PKC). Among the multiple PKC isoforms expressed in SK-N-BE2(C) cells, only PKCepsilon was activated by the treatment of carbachol, and selective down-regulation of PKCepsilon was sufficient to block Erk-1/-2 activation. Carbachol treatment induced activation of the serine/threonine protein kinase Raf, and an inhibition of Raf blocked Erk-1/-2 activation. Ectopic expression of inhibitory small GTPase Ras, RasN17, blocked the carbachol-induced Raf activation without affecting the activation of PKCepsilon, while the inhibition of PKC blocked the Raf activation. Thus, these results suggest that carbachol-induced activation of PKCepsilon mediates Erk-1/-2 activation by a sequential activation of Ras, Raf and MAP kinase kinase.

  1. Genetic modulation of apoptotic pathways fails to alter disease course in tripeptidyl-peptidase 1 deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwi-Hye; Sleat, David E; Bernard, Ora; Lobel, Peter

    2009-03-27

    Late-infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (LINCL) is a fatal, incurable neurodegenerative disease of children caused by the loss of the lysosomal protein tripeptidyl-peptidase 1 (TPP1). Previous studies have suggested that Bcl-2-dependent apoptotic pathways are involved in neuronal cell death in LINCL patients and, as a result, anti-apoptotic treatments that increase Bcl-2 activity have been proposed as a potential therapeutic approach. In this study, we have directly investigated whether targeting anti-apoptotic pathways may be of value in LINCL in a mouse model of this disease that lacks TPP1 and which recapitulates many aspect of the human disease, including a greatly shortened life-span. Our approach was to genetically modify apoptotic pathways and determine the effects of these changes on the severe neurodegenerative phenotype of the LINCL mouse. LINCL mice were generated that either lacked the pro-apoptotic p53 or had increased levels of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2, changes that would exacerbate or ameliorate neuronal death, respectively, should pathways involving these proteins be important. Neither modification affected the shortened life-span of the LINCL mouse. These results suggest that either neuronal death in LINCL does not occur via apoptosis or that it occurs via apoptotic pathways not involving p53 or Bcl-2. Alternatively, pathways involving p53 and/or Bcl-2 may be involved in neuronal death under normal circumstances but may not be the only routes to this end. Importantly, our findings suggest that targeting pathways of cell death involving p53 or Bcl-2 do not represent useful directions for developing effective treatment. PMID:19429009

  2. Genetic variants and risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: A GWAS-based pathway analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xi; Zhu, Hongcheng; Qin, Qin; Yang, Yuehua; Yang, Yan; Cheng, Hongyan; Sun, Xinchen

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to identify candidate single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that may affect the susceptibility to esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and elucidate their potential mechanisms to generate SNP-to-gene-to-pathway hypotheses. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) dataset for ESCC, which included 453,852 SNPs from 1898 ESCC patients and 2100 control subjects of Chinese population, was reviewed. The identify candidate causal SNPs and pathways (ICSNPathway) analysis identified seven candidate SNPs, five genes, and seven pathways, which together revealed seven hypothetical biological mechanisms. The three strongest hypothetical biological mechanisms were as follows: rs4135113 → TDG → BASE EXCISION REPAIR; rs1800450 → MBL2 → MONOSACCHARIDE BINDING; and rs3769823 → CASP8 → d4gdiPathway. The GWAS dataset was evaluated using the ICSNPathway, which showed seven candidate SNPs, five genes, and seven pathways that may contribute to the susceptibility of patients to ESCC. PMID:25431829

  3. New genetic findings lead the way to a better understanding of fundamental mechanisms of drug hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Pirmohamed, Munir; Ostrov, David A.; Park, B. Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Drug hypersensitivity reactions are an important clinical problem for both health care and industry. Recent advances in genetics have identified a number of HLA alleles associated with a range of these adverse reactions predominantly affecting the skin but also other organs, such as the liver. The associations between abacavir hypersensitivity and HLA-B*57:01 and carbamazepine-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome and HLA-B*15:02 have been implemented in clinical practice. There are many different mechanisms proposed in the pathogenesis of drug hypersensitivity reactions, including the hapten hypothesis, direct binding to T-cell receptors (the pharmacologic interaction hypothesis), and peptide-binding displacement. A problem with all the hypotheses is that they are largely based on in vitro findings, with little direct in vivo evidence. Although most studies have focused on individual mechanisms, it is perhaps more important to consider them all as being complementary, potentially occurring at the same time with the same drug in the same patient. This might at least partly account for the heterogeneity of the immune response seen in different patients. There is a need to develop novel methodologies to evaluate how the in vitro mechanisms relate to the in vivo situation and how the highly consistent genetic findings with different HLA alleles can be more consistently used for both prediction and prevention of these serious adverse reactions. PMID:26254050

  4. New genetic findings lead the way to a better understanding of fundamental mechanisms of drug hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Pirmohamed, Munir; Ostrov, David A; Park, B Kevin

    2015-08-01

    Drug hypersensitivity reactions are an important clinical problem for both health care and industry. Recent advances in genetics have identified a number of HLA alleles associated with a range of these adverse reactions predominantly affecting the skin but also other organs, such as the liver. The associations between abacavir hypersensitivity and HLA-B*57:01 and carbamazepine-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome and HLA-B*15:02 have been implemented in clinical practice. There are many different mechanisms proposed in the pathogenesis of drug hypersensitivity reactions, including the hapten hypothesis, direct binding to T-cell receptors (the pharmacologic interaction hypothesis), and peptide-binding displacement. A problem with all the hypotheses is that they are largely based on in vitro findings, with little direct in vivo evidence. Although most studies have focused on individual mechanisms, it is perhaps more important to consider them all as being complementary, potentially occurring at the same time with the same drug in the same patient. This might at least partly account for the heterogeneity of the immune response seen in different patients. There is a need to develop novel methodologies to evaluate how the in vitro mechanisms relate to the in vivo situation and how the highly consistent genetic findings with different HLA alleles can be more consistently used for both prediction and prevention of these serious adverse reactions.

  5. Using the Drosophila Melanogaster Genetics Reference Panel to Identify Toxicity Pathways for Toluene

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mechanistic information is needed to link effects of chemicals at molecular targets in high­ throughput screening assays to adverse outcomes in whole organisms. This study was designed to use the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP), a set of genetically well...

  6. Genetic variations in the VEGF pathway as prognostic factors in metastatic colorectal cancer patients treated with oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Paré-Brunet, L; Sebio, A; Salazar, J; Berenguer-Llergo, A; Río, E; Barnadas, A; Baiget, M; Páez, D

    2015-10-01

    Angiogenesis is a significant biological mechanism in the progression and metastasis of solid tumors. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), its receptors and signaling effectors have a central role in tumor-induced angiogenesis. Genetic variation in the VEGF pathway may impact on tumor angiogenesis and, hence, on clinical cancer outcomes. This study evaluates the influence of common genetic variations within the VEGF pathway in the clinical outcomes of 172 metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients treated with first-line oxaliplatin/5-fluorouracil chemotherapy. A total of 27 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 16 genes in the VEGF-dependent angionenesis process were genotyped using a dynamic array on the BioMark™ system. After assessing the KRAS mutational status, we found that four SNPs located in three genes (KISS1, KRAS and VEGFR2) were associated with progression-free survival. Five SNPs in three genes (ITGAV, KRAS and VEGFR2) correlated with overall survival. The gene-gene interactions identified in the survival tree analysis support the importance of VEGFR2 rs2071559 and KISS1 rs71745629 in modulating these outcomes. This study provides evidence that functional germline polymorphisms in the VEGF pathway may help to predict outcome in mCRC patients who undergo oxaliplatin/5-fluorouracil chemotherapy.

  7. The genetics of antipsychotic induced tremors: a genome-wide pathway analysis on the STEP-BD SCP sample.

    PubMed

    Drago, Antonio; Crisafulli, Concetta; Serretti, Alessandro

    2011-12-01

    Extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS) are associated with antipsychotic treatment. The exact definition of the genetic variants that influence the antipsychotic induced EPS would dramatically increase the quality of antipsychotic prescriptions. We investigated this issue in a subsample of the Systematic Treatment Enhancement Program for Bipolar Disorder (STEP-BD). Four hundred nine manic patients were treated with antipsychotics and had complete clinical and genetic data. Outcome was an item of the Clinical Monitoring Form which scored tremors from 0 to 4 at each clinical visit. Visits were scheduled according to clinical issues, based on a naturalistic approach. A genomic inflation factor of 1.017 resulted after genetic quality control. Single SNPs GWAS (Plink) and molecular pathway GWAS were conducted (SNP ratio test, KEGG depository). No single SNP reached GWAS significance level of association. Molecular pathways related to cell survival events and lipid synthesis were significantly associated with antipsychotic induced EPS (P = 0.0009 for Hsa04512, Hsa01031, Hsa00230, Hsa04510, Hsa03320, Hsa04930, and Hsa04115; P = 0.0019 for Hsa04020 and Hsa00561). This finding was consistent with previous GWAS studies. PMID:21990027

  8. Mycobacteria exploit three genetically distinct DNA double-strand break repair pathways

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Richa; Barkan, Daniel; Redelman-Sidi, Gil; Shuman, Stewart; Glickman, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens rely on their DNA repair pathways to resist genomic damage inflicted by the host. DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are especially threatening to bacterial viability. DSB repair by homologous recombination (HR) requires nucleases that resect DSB ends and a strand exchange protein that facilitates homology search. RecBCD and RecA perform these functions in E. coli and constitute the major pathway of error free DSB repair. Mycobacteria, including the human pathogen M. tuberculosis, elaborate an additional error-prone pathway of DSB repair via nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) catalyzed by Ku and DNA ligase D (LigD). Little is known about the relative contributions of HR and NHEJ to mycobacterial chromosome repair, the factors that dictate pathway choice, or the existence of additional DSB repair pathways. Here we demonstrate that Mycobacterium smegmatis has three DSB repair pathway options: HR, NHEJ, and a novel mechanism of single-strand annealing (SSA). Inactivation of NHEJ or SSA is compensated by elevated HR. We find that mycobacterial RecBCD does not participate in HR or confer resistance to ionizing radiation (IR), but is required for the RecA-independent SSA pathway. In contrast, the mycobacterial helicase-nuclease AdnAB participates in the RecA-dependent HR pathway, and is a major determinant of resistance to IR and oxidative DNA damage. These findings reveal distinctive features of mycobacterial DSB repair, most notably the dedication of the RecBCD and AdnAB helicase-nuclease machines to distinct repair pathways. PMID:21219454

  9. Genetic ablation of Rest leads to in vitro-specific derepression of neuronal genes during neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Hitomi; Hara, Akira; Era, Takumi; Kunisada, Takahiro; Yamada, Yasuhiro

    2012-02-01

    Rest (RE1-silencing transcription factor, also called Nrsf) is involved in the maintenance of the undifferentiated state of neuronal stem/progenitor cells in vitro by preventing precocious expression of neuronal genes. However, the function of Rest during neurogenesis in vivo remains to be elucidated because of the early embryonic lethal phenotype of conventional Rest knockout mice. In the present study, we have generated Rest conditional knockout mice, which allow the effect of genetic ablation of Rest during embryonic neurogenesis to be examined in vivo. We show that Rest plays a role in suppressing the expression of neuronal genes in cultured neuronal cells in vitro, as well as in non-neuronal cells outside of the central nervous system, but that it is dispensable for embryonic neurogenesis in vivo. Our findings highlight the significance of extrinsic signals for the proper intrinsic regulation of neuronal gene expression levels in the specification of cell fate during embryonic neurogenesis in vivo. PMID:22241837

  10. Integrative Approach Detected Association between Genetic Variants of microRNA Binding Sites of TLRs Pathway Genes and OSCC Susceptibility in Chinese Han Population

    PubMed Central

    Li, Taiwen; Xu, Hao; Zhou, Yu; Dan, Hongxia; Jiang, Lu; Zeng, Xin; Li, Longjiang; Li, Jing; Liao, Ga; Chen, Qianming

    2014-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a leading malignancy worldwide; the overall 5-year survival rate is approximately 50%. A variety of proteins in Toll-like receptors (TLRs) pathway have been related with the risk of OSCC. However, the influence of genetic variations in TLRs pathway genes on OSCC susceptibility is unclear. Previous studies mainly focused on the coding region of genes, while the UTR region remains unstudied. In the current study, a bioinformatics approach was performed to select candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on microRNA binding sites of TLRs pathway genes related with OSCC. After screening 90 OSCC related TLRs pathway genes, 16 SNPs were selected for genotyping. We found that rs5030486, the polymorphisms on 3′ UTR of TRAF6, was significantly associated with OSCC risk. AG genotype of TRAF6 was strongly associated with a decreased risk of OSCC (OR = 0.252; 95% CI = 0.106, 0.598; p = 0.001). In addition, AG genotype was also related with a reduced risk of OSCC progression both in univariable analysis (HR = 0.303, 95% CI = 0.092, 0.995) and multivariable analysis (HR = 0.272, 95% CI = 0.082, 0.903). Furthermore, after detecting the mRNA expression level of TRAF6 in 24 OSCC patients, we found that TRAF6 expression level was significantly different between patients carrying different genotypes at locus rs5030486 (p = 0.013), indicating that rs5030486 of TRAF6 might contribute to OSCC risk by altering TRAF6 expression level. In general, these data indicated that SNP rs5030486 could be a potential bio-marker for OSCC risk and our results might provide new insights into the association of polymorphisms within the non-coding area of genes with cancers. PMID:24999832

  11. Integrative approach detected association between genetic variants of microRNA binding sites of TLRs pathway genes and OSCC susceptibility in Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun; Sun, Chongkui; Li, Taiwen; Xu, Hao; Zhou, Yu; Dan, Hongxia; Jiang, Lu; Zeng, Xin; Li, Longjiang; Li, Jing; Liao, Ga; Chen, Qianming

    2014-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a leading malignancy worldwide; the overall 5-year survival rate is approximately 50%. A variety of proteins in Toll-like receptors (TLRs) pathway have been related with the risk of OSCC. However, the influence of genetic variations in TLRs pathway genes on OSCC susceptibility is unclear. Previous studies mainly focused on the coding region of genes, while the UTR region remains unstudied. In the current study, a bioinformatics approach was performed to select candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on microRNA binding sites of TLRs pathway genes related with OSCC. After screening 90 OSCC related TLRs pathway genes, 16 SNPs were selected for genotyping. We found that rs5030486, the polymorphisms on 3' UTR of TRAF6, was significantly associated with OSCC risk. AG genotype of TRAF6 was strongly associated with a decreased risk of OSCC (OR = 0.252; 95% CI = 0.106, 0.598; p = 0.001). In addition, AG genotype was also related with a reduced risk of OSCC progression both in univariable analysis (HR = 0.303, 95% CI = 0.092, 0.995) and multivariable analysis (HR = 0.272, 95% CI = 0.082, 0.903). Furthermore, after detecting the mRNA expression level of TRAF6 in 24 OSCC patients, we found that TRAF6 expression level was significantly different between patients carrying different genotypes at locus rs5030486 (p = 0.013), indicating that rs5030486 of TRAF6 might contribute to OSCC risk by altering TRAF6 expression level. In general, these data indicated that SNP rs5030486 could be a potential bio-marker for OSCC risk and our results might provide new insights into the association of polymorphisms within the non-coding area of genes with cancers.

  12. Genetic loci associated with changes in lipid levels leading to constitution-based discrepancy in Koreans

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Abnormal lipid concentrations are risk factors for atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. The pathological susceptibility to cardiovascular disease risks such as metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, insulin resistance, and so on differs between Sasang constitutional types. Methods We used multiple regression analyses to study the association between lipid-related traits and genetic variants from several genome-wide association studies according to Sasang constitutional types, considering that the Tae-Eum (TE) has predominant cardiovascular risk. Results By analyzing 26 variants of 20 loci in two Korean populations (8,597 subjects), we found that 12 and 5 variants, respectively, were replicably associated with lipid levels and dyslipidemia risk. By analyzing TE and non-TE type (each 2,664 subjects) populations classified on the basis of Sasang constitutional medicine, we found that the minor allele effects of three variants enriched in TE type had a harmful influence on lipid risk (near apolipoprotein A-V (APOA5)-APOA4-APOC3-APOA1 on increased triglyceride: p = 8.90 × 10-11, in APOE-APOC1-APOC4 on increased low-density lipoprotein cholesterol: p = 1.63 × 10-5, and near endothelial lipase gene on decreased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol: p = 4.28 × 10-3), whereas those of three variants (near angiopoietin-like 3 gene, APOA5-APOA4-APOC3-APOA1, and near lipoprotein lipase gene on triglyceride and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol) associated in non-TE type had neutral influences because of a compensating effect. Conclusions These results implied that the minor allele effects of lipid-associated variants may predispose TE type subjects to high cardiovascular disease risk because of their genetic susceptibility to lipid-related disorders. PMID:25005712

  13. A role for Drosophila Cyclin J in oogenesis revealed by genetic interactions with the piRNA pathway

    PubMed Central

    Atikukke, Govindaraja; Albosta, Paul; Zhang, Huamei; Finley, Russell L.

    2014-01-01

    Cyclin J (CycJ) is a poorly characterized member of the Cyclin superfamily of cyclin-dependent kinase regulators, many of which regulate the cell cycle or transcription. Although CycJ is conserved in metazoans its cellular function has not been identified and no mutant defects have been described. In Drosophila, CycJ transcript is present primarily in ovaries and very early embryos, suggesting a role in one or both of these tissues. The CycJ gene (CycJ) lies immediately downstream of armitage (armi), a gene involved in the Piwi-associated RNA (piRNA) pathways that are required for silencing transposons in the germline and adjacent somatic cells. Mutations in armi result in oogenesis defects but a role for CycJ in oogenesis has not been defined. Here we assessed oogenesis in CycJ mutants in the presence or absence of mutations in armi or other piRNA pathway genes. CycJ null ovaries appeared normal, indicating that CycJ is not essential for oogenesis under normal conditions. In contrast, armi null ovaries produced only two egg chambers per ovariole and the eggs had severe axis specification defects, as observed previously for armi and other piRNA pathway mutants. Surprisingly, the CycJ armi double mutant failed to produce any mature eggs. The double null ovaries generally had only one egg chamber per ovariole and the egg chambers frequently contained an overabundance of differentiated germline cells. Production of these compound egg chambers could be suppressed with CycJ transgenes but not with mutations in the checkpoint gene mnk, which suppress oogenesis defects in armi mutants. The CycJ null showed similar genetic interactions with the germline and somatic piRNA pathway gene piwi, and to a lesser extent with aubergine (aub), a member of the germline-specific piRNA pathway. The strong genetic interactions between CycJ and piRNA pathway genes reveal a role for CycJ in early oogenesis. Our results suggest that CycJ is required to regulate egg chamber production or

  14. Genetic variations in vitamin D-related pathways and breast cancer risk in African American women in the AMBER consortium.

    PubMed

    Yao, Song; Haddad, Stephen A; Hu, Qiang; Liu, Song; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Ruiz-Narvaez, Edward A; Hong, Chi-Chen; Zhu, Qianqian; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Cheng, Ting-Yuan David; Bensen, Jeannette T; Johnson, Candace S; Trump, Donald L; Haiman, Christopher A; Olshan, Andrew F; Palmer, Julie R; Ambrosone, Christine B

    2016-05-01

    Studies of genetic variations in vitamin D-related pathways and breast cancer risk have been conducted mostly in populations of European ancestry, and only sparsely in African Americans (AA), who are known for a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency. We analyzed 24,445 germline variants in 63 genes from vitamin D-related pathways in the African American Breast Cancer Epidemiology and Risk (AMBER) consortium, including 3,663 breast cancer cases and 4,687 controls. Odds ratios (OR) were derived from logistic regression models for overall breast cancer, by estrogen receptor (ER) status (1,983 ER positive and 1,098 ER negative), and for case-only analyses of ER status. None of the three vitamin D-related pathways were associated with breast cancer risk overall or by ER status. Gene-level analyses identified associations with risk for several genes at a nominal p ≤ 0.05, particularly for ER- breast cancer, including rs4647707 in DDB2. In case-only analyses, vitamin D metabolism and signaling pathways were associated with ER- cancer (pathway-level p = 0.02), driven by a single gene CASR (gene-level p = 0.001). The top SNP in CASR was rs112594756 (p = 7 × 10(-5), gene-wide corrected p = 0.01), followed by a second signal from a nearby SNP rs6799828 (p = 1 × 10(-4), corrected p = 0.03). In summary, several variants in vitamin D pathways were associated with breast cancer risk in AA women. In addition, CASR may be related to tumor ER status, supporting a role of vitamin D or calcium in modifying breast cancer phenotypes. PMID:26650177

  15. Genetic variations in vitamin D-related pathways and breast cancer risk in African American women in the AMBER consortium.

    PubMed

    Yao, Song; Haddad, Stephen A; Hu, Qiang; Liu, Song; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Ruiz-Narvaez, Edward A; Hong, Chi-Chen; Zhu, Qianqian; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Cheng, Ting-Yuan David; Bensen, Jeannette T; Johnson, Candace S; Trump, Donald L; Haiman, Christopher A; Olshan, Andrew F; Palmer, Julie R; Ambrosone, Christine B

    2016-05-01

    Studies of genetic variations in vitamin D-related pathways and breast cancer risk have been conducted mostly in populations of European ancestry, and only sparsely in African Americans (AA), who are known for a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency. We analyzed 24,445 germline variants in 63 genes from vitamin D-related pathways in the African American Breast Cancer Epidemiology and Risk (AMBER) consortium, including 3,663 breast cancer cases and 4,687 controls. Odds ratios (OR) were derived from logistic regression models for overall breast cancer, by estrogen receptor (ER) status (1,983 ER positive and 1,098 ER negative), and for case-only analyses of ER status. None of the three vitamin D-related pathways were associated with breast cancer risk overall or by ER status. Gene-level analyses identified associations with risk for several genes at a nominal p ≤ 0.05, particularly for ER- breast cancer, including rs4647707 in DDB2. In case-only analyses, vitamin D metabolism and signaling pathways were associated with ER- cancer (pathway-level p = 0.02), driven by a single gene CASR (gene-level p = 0.001). The top SNP in CASR was rs112594756 (p = 7 × 10(-5), gene-wide corrected p = 0.01), followed by a second signal from a nearby SNP rs6799828 (p = 1 × 10(-4), corrected p = 0.03). In summary, several variants in vitamin D pathways were associated with breast cancer risk in AA women. In addition, CASR may be related to tumor ER status, supporting a role of vitamin D or calcium in modifying breast cancer phenotypes.

  16. Nomenclature, molecular genetics and clinical significance of the precursor lesions in the serrated polyp pathway of colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liang, John J; Alrawi, Sadir; Tan, Dongfeng

    2008-01-01

    Serrated adenomas (SAs) are part of the distinct serrated polyp pathway of colorectal carcinogenesis characterized by microsatellite instability and deficiency in DNA mismatch repair. Sessile SA is a recently recognized lesion that typically presents as a large sessile polyp, but lacks the conventional dysplasia. It is more frequently found on the right side than on the left side of the colon, and is thought to represent an intermediate form in the hyperplastic polyp to sessile SA, traditional SA, and colon cancer sequence. Many terms have been used and are still in use in the literature to describe this lesion, such as "hyperplastic polyposis", "giant hyperplastic polyposis," "large hyperplastic polyps," "hyperplastic-adenomatous polyposis syndrome," "giant hyperplastic polyp," and "mixed epithelial polyp." The purpose of this paper is to review and clarify the confusing nomenclature, and to provide a framework for understanding the genetic alterations and clinical significance of these precursor lesions in the serrated polyp pathway of colorectal caner.

  17. Genetic Variation in Melatonin Pathway Enzymes in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Comorbid Sleep Onset Delay

    PubMed Central

    Pendergast, Julie S.; Allen, Melissa J.; Leu, Roberta M.; Johnson, Carl Hirschie; Elsea, Sarah H.; Malow, Beth A.

    2014-01-01

    Sleep disruption is common in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Genes whose products regulate endogenous melatonin modify sleep patterns and have been implicated in ASD. Genetic factors likely contribute to comorbid expression of sleep disorders in ASD. We studied a clinically unique ASD subgroup, consisting solely of children with comorbid expression of sleep onset delay. We evaluated variation in two melatonin pathway genes, acetylserotonin O-methyltransferase (ASMT) and cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2). We observed higher frequencies than currently reported (p < 0.04) for variants evidenced to decrease ASMT expression and related to decreased CYP1A2 enzyme activity (p ≤ 0.0007). We detected a relationship between genotypes in ASMT and CYP1A2 (r2 = 0.63). Our results indicate that expression of sleep onset delay relates to melatonin pathway genes. PMID:25059483

  18. The Third International Meeting on Genetic Disorders in the RAS/MAPK Pathway: Toward a Therapeutic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Korf, Bruce; Ahmadian, Reza; Allanson, Judith; Aoki, Yoko; Bakker, Annette; Wright, Emma Burkitt; Denger, Brian; Elgersma, Ype; Gelb, Bruce D.; Gripp, Karen W.; Kerr, Bronwyn; Kontaridis, Maria; Lazaro, Conxi; Linardic, Corinne; Lozano, Reymundo; MacRae, Calum A.; Messiaen, Ludwine; Mulero-Navarro, Sonia; Neel, Benjamin; Plotkin, Scott; Rauen, Katherine A.; Roberts, Amy; Silva, Alcino J.; Sittampalam, Sitta G.; Zhang, Chao; Schoyer, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    “The Third International Meeting on Genetic Disorders in the RAS/MAPK Pathway: Towards a Therapeutic Approach” was held at the Renaissance Orlando at SeaWorld Hotel (August 2–4, 2013). Seventy-one physicians and scientists attended the meeting, and parallel meetings were held by patient advocacy groups (CFC International, Costello Syndrome Family Network, NF Network and Noonan Syndrome Foundation). Parent and patient advocates opened the meeting with a panel discussion to set the stage regarding their hopes and expectations for therapeutic advances. In keeping with the theme on therapeutic development, the sessions followed a progression from description of the phenotype and definition of therapeutic endpoints, to definition of genomic changes, to identification of therapeutic targets in the RAS/MAPK pathway, to preclinical drug development and testing, to clinical trials. These proceedings will review the major points of discussion. PMID:25900621

  19. Coevolution Theory of the Genetic Code at Age Forty: Pathway to Translation and Synthetic Life

    PubMed Central

    Wong, J. Tze-Fei; Ng, Siu-Kin; Mat, Wai-Kin; Hu, Taobo; Xue, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The origins of the components of genetic coding are examined in the present study. Genetic information arose from replicator induction by metabolite in accordance with the metabolic expansion law. Messenger RNA and transfer RNA stemmed from a template for binding the aminoacyl-RNA synthetase ribozymes employed to synthesize peptide prosthetic groups on RNAs in the Peptidated RNA World. Coevolution of the genetic code with amino acid biosynthesis generated tRNA paralogs that identify a last universal common ancestor (LUCA) of extant life close to Methanopyrus, which in turn points to archaeal tRNA introns as the most primitive introns and the anticodon usage of Methanopyrus as an ancient mode of wobble. The prediction of the coevolution theory of the genetic code that the code should be a mutable code has led to the isolation of optional and mandatory synthetic life forms with altered protein alphabets. PMID:26999216

  20. Coevolution Theory of the Genetic Code at Age Forty: Pathway to Translation and Synthetic Life.

    PubMed

    Wong, J Tze-Fei; Ng, Siu-Kin; Mat, Wai-Kin; Hu, Taobo; Xue, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The origins of the components of genetic coding are examined in the present study. Genetic information arose from replicator induction by metabolite in accordance with the metabolic expansion law. Messenger RNA and transfer RNA stemmed from a template for binding the aminoacyl-RNA synthetase ribozymes employed to synthesize peptide prosthetic groups on RNAs in the Peptidated RNA World. Coevolution of the genetic code with amino acid biosynthesis generated tRNA paralogs that identify a last universal common ancestor (LUCA) of extant life close to Methanopyrus, which in turn points to archaeal tRNA introns as the most primitive introns and the anticodon usage of Methanopyrus as an ancient mode of wobble. The prediction of the coevolution theory of the genetic code that the code should be a mutable code has led to the isolation of optional and mandatory synthetic life forms with altered protein alphabets. PMID:26999216

  1. Search and Insights into Novel Genetic Alterations Leading to Classical and Atypical Werner Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Oshima, Junko; Hisama, Fuki M.

    2014-01-01

    Segmental progeroid syndromes are a group of disorders with multiple features resembling accelerated aging. Adult-onset Werner syndrome (WS) and childhood-onset Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) are the best known examples. The discovery of genes responsible for such syndromes has facilitated our understanding of the basic mechanisms of aging as well as the pathogenesis of other common, age-related diseases. Our International Registry of Werner Syndrome accesses progeroid pedigrees from all over the world, including those for whom we have ruled out a mutation at the WRN locus. Cases without WRN mutations are operationally categorized as “atypical WS” (AWS). In 2003, we identified LMNA mutations among a subset of AWS cases using a candidate gene approach. As of 2013, the Registry has 142 WS patients with WRN mutations, 11 AWS patients with LMNA mutations, and 49 AWS patients that have neither WRN nor LMNA mutations. Efforts are underway to identify the responsible genes for AWS with unknown genetic causes. While WS and AWS are rare disorders, the causative genes have been shown to have much wider implications for cancer, cardiovascular disease and the biology of aging. Remarkably, centenarian studies revealed WRN and LMNA polymorphic variants among those who have escaped various geriatric disorders. PMID:24401204

  2. Novel bioassay for the discovery of inhibitors of the 2-C-Methyl-D-Erythritol 4-Phosphate (MEP) and terpenoid pathways leading to carotenoid biosynthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway leads to the synthesis of isopentenyl-phosphate (IPP) in plastids. It is a major branch point providing precursors for the synthesis of carotenoids, tocopherols, plastoquinone and the phytyl chain of chlorophylls, as well as the hormones abscisi...

  3. Molecular and genetic studies of fusarium trichothecene biosynthesis: pathways, genes, and evolution.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Makoto; Tokai, Takeshi; Takahashi-Ando, Naoko; Ohsato, Shuichi; Fujimura, Makoto

    2007-09-01

    Trichothecenes are a large family of sesquiterpenoid secondary metabolites of Fusarium species (e.g., F. graminearum) and other molds. They are major mycotoxins that can cause serious problems when consumed via contaminated cereal grains. In the past 20 years, an outline of the trichothecene biosynthetic pathway has been established based on the results of precursor feeding experiments and blocked mutant analyses. Following the isolation of the pathway gene Tri5 encoding the first committed enzyme trichodiene synthase, 10 biosynthesis genes (Tri genes; two regulatory genes, seven pathway genes, and one transporter gene) were functionally identified in the Tri5 gene cluster. At least three pathway genes, Tri101 (separated alone), and Tri1 and Tri16 (located in the Tri1-Tri16 two-gene cluster), were found outside of the Tri5 gene cluster. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the pathways of biosynthesis, the functions of cloned Tri genes, and the evolution of Tri genes, focusing on Fusarium species. PMID:17827683

  4. Genetic polymorphisms in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling pathway as potential risk factors of menopausal hot flashes

    PubMed Central

    ZIV-GAL, Ayelet; GALLICCHIO, Lisa; MILLER, Susan R.; ZACUR, Howard A.; FLAWS, Jodi A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine if genetic polymorphisms in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling pathway are associated with menopausal hot flashes via hormone levels. Study design Women (n=639) aged 45–54 years completed a study survey and provided blood for genetic and hormone analyses. The associations were analyzed using multivariable logistic regression and generalized linear models. Results Women carrying CYP1B1 (rs1800440) GG genotype had 3-fold greater odds of experiencing hot flashes for ≥1 year compared to the AA genotype [adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 3.05 (1.12–8.25)]. Adding serum estradiol concentrations to the confounder-adjusted model resulted in a non-significant association [aOR: 2.59 (0.91–7.18)]. Carriers of both CYP1B1 (rs1800440) G and CYP1B1 (rs1058636) G alleles had higher odds of experiencing hot flashes for ≥1 year compared to women homozygous for the major alleles [aOR: 1.77 (1.06–2.96)], even after adjustment for serum estradiol. Conclusion CYP1B1 is associated with menopausal hot flashes via pathways that may involve changes in serum estradiol concentration. PMID:22840970

  5. Shared Genetic Factors Involved in Celiac Disease, Type 2 Diabetes and Anorexia Nervosa Suggest Common Molecular Pathways for Chronic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mostowy, Joanna; Montén, Caroline; Gudjonsdottir, Audur H.; Arnell, Henrik; Browaldh, Lars; Nilsson, Staffan; Agardh, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified several genetic regions involved in immune-regulatory mechanisms to be associated with celiac disease. Previous GWAS also revealed an over-representation of genes involved in type 2 diabetes and anorexia nervosa associated with celiac disease, suggesting involvement of common metabolic pathways for development of these chronic diseases. The aim of this study was to extend these previous analyses to study the gene expression in the gut from children with active celiac disease. Material and Methods Thirty six target genes involved in type 2 diabetes and four genes associated with anorexia nervosa were investigated for gene expression in small intestinal biopsies from 144 children with celiac disease at median (range) age of 7.4 years (1.6–17.8) and from 154 disease controls at a median (range) age 11.4.years (1.4–18.3). Results A total of eleven of genes were differently expressed in celiac patients compared with disease controls of which CD36, CD38, FOXP1, SELL, PPARA, PPARG, AGT previously associated with type 2 diabetes and AKAP6, NTNG1 with anorexia nervosa remained significant after correction for multiple testing. Conclusion Shared genetic factors involved in celiac disease, type 2 diabetes and anorexia nervosa suggest common underlying molecular pathways for these diseases. PMID:27483138

  6. Proceedings from the 2009 Genetic Syndromes of the Ras/MAPK Pathway: From Bedside to Bench and Back

    PubMed Central

    Rauen, Katherine A.; Schoyer, Lisa; McCormick, Frank; Lin, Angela E.; Allanson, Judith E.; Stevenson, David A.; Gripp, Karen W.; Neri, Giovanni; Carey, John C.; Legius, Eric; Tartaglia, Marco; Schubbert, Suzanne; Roberts, Amy E.; Gelb, Bruce D.; Shannon, Kevin; Gutmann, David H.; McMahon, Martin; Guerra, Carmen; Fagin, James A.; Yu, Benjamin; Aoki, Yoko; Neel, Ben G.; Balmain, Allan; Drake, Richard R.; Nolan, Garry P.; Zenker, Martin; Bollag, Gideon; Sebolt-Leopold, Judith; Gibbs, Jackson B.; Silva, Alcino J.; Patton, E. Elizabeth; Viskochil, David H.; Kieran, Mark W.; Korf, Bruce R.; Hagerman, Randi J.; Packer, Roger J.; Melese, Teri

    2012-01-01

    The RASopathies are a group of genetic syndromes caused by germline mutations in genes that encode components of the Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. Some of these syndromes are neurofibromatosis type 1, Noonan syndrome, Costello syndrome, cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome, LEOPARD syndrome and Legius syndrome. Their common underlying pathogenetic mechanism brings about significant overlap in phenotypic features and includes craniofacial dysmorphology, cardiac, cutaneous, musculoskeletal, GI and ocular abnormalities, and a predisposition to cancer. The proceedings from the symposium “Genetic Syndromes of the Ras/MAPK Pathway: From Bedside to Bench and Back” chronicle the timely and typical research symposium which brought together clinicians, basic scientists, physician-scientists, advocate leaders, trainees, students and individuals with Ras syndromes and their families. The goals, to discuss basic science and clinical issues, to set forth a solid framework for future research, to direct translational applications towards therapy and to set forth best practices for individuals with RASopathies was successfully meet with a commitment to begin to move towards clinical trials. PMID:20014119

  7. Genetics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Inheritance; Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... The chromosomes are made up of strands of genetic information called DNA. Each chromosome contains sections of ...

  8. Genetic Variations in the Sonic Hedgehog Pathway Affect Clinical Outcomes in Non-muscle–invasive Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Meng; Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Clague, Jessica; Kamat, Ashish M.; Picornell, Antoni; Chang, Joshua; Zhang, Xiaofan; Izzo, Julie; Yang, Hushan; Lin, Jie; Gu, Jian; Chanock, Stephen; Kogevinas, Manolis; Rothman, Nathaniel; Silverman, Debra T.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Grossman, H. Barton; Dinney, Colin P.; Malats, Núria; Wu, Xifeng

    2010-01-01

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway genetic variations may affect bladder cancer risk and clinical outcomes; therefore, we genotyped 177 SNPs in 11 Shh pathway genes in a study including 803 bladder cancer cases and 803 controls. We assessed SNP associations with cancer risk and clinical outcomes in 419 cases of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) and 318 cases of muscle invasive and metastatic bladder cancer (MiMBC). Only 3 SNPs (GLI3 rs3823720, rs3735361, rs10951671) reached nominal significance in association with risk (P≤0.05), which became non-significant after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Nine SNPs reached a nominally significant individual association with recurrence of NMIBC in patients who received transurethral resection (TUR) only (P≤0.05), of which 2 (SHH rs1233560 and GLI2 rs11685068) were replicated independently in 356 TUR-only NMIBC patients with P-values of 1.0×10−3 (SHH rs1233560) and 1.3×10−3 (GLI2 rs11685068). Nine SNPs also reached a nominally significant individual association with clinical outcome of NMIBC patients who received Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG; P≤0.05), of which 2, the independent GLI3 variants rs6463089 and rs3801192, remained significant after adjusting for multiple comparisons (P=2×10−4 and 9×10−4, respectively). The wild-type genotype of either of these SNPs was associated with a lower recurrence rate and longer recurrence-free survival (versus the variants). Although 3 SNPs (GLI2 rs735557, GLI2 rs4848632, and SHH rs208684) showed nominal significance in association with overall survival in MiMBC patients (P≤0.05), none remained significant after multiple-comparison adjustments. Germline genetic variations in the Shh pathway predicted clinical outcomes of TUR and BCG for NMIBC patients. PMID:20858759

  9. Multivariate Analysis of Subjective Responses to d-amphetamine In Healthy Volunteers Finds Novel Genetic Pathway Associations

    PubMed Central

    Yarosh, Haley L.; Meda, Shashwath A.; de Wit, Harriet; Hart, Amy B.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Researchers studying behavioral and physiologic effects of d-amphetamine have explored individual response differences to the drug. Concurrently, genome wide analyses have identified several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with these traits. Univariate methods can identify SNPs associated with behavioral and physiological traits, but multivariate analyses allow identification of clusters of related biologically relevant SNPs and behavioral components. Objectives To identify clusters of related biologically relevant SNPs and behavioral components in the responses of healthy individuals to d-amphetamine using multivariate analysis. Methods Individuals (N=375) without substance abuse histories completed surveys and detailed cardiovascular monitoring during randomized, blinded sessions: d-amphetamine (10mg, 20mg), placebo. We applied parallel-independent component analysis (Para-ICA) to data previously analyzed with univariate approaches, revealing new associations between genes and behavioral responses to d-amphetamine. Results Three significantly associated (p<.001) phenotype-genotype pairs emerged. The first component included physiologic measures of systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) along with SNPs in calcium and glutamatergic signaling pathways. The second associated components included the ‘Anger’ items from the Profile of Mood States (POMS) questionnaire and the Marijuana effects from the Addiction Research Center Inventory (Cuyas, Verdejo-Garcia et al.), with enriched genetic pathways involved in Cardiomyopathy and MAPK signaling. The final pair included ‘Anxious’, ‘Fatigue’, and ‘Confusion’ items from the POMS questionnaire, plus functional pathways related to cardiac muscle contraction and cardiomyopathy. Conclusions Multifactorial genetic networks related to calcium signaling, glutamatergic and dopaminergic synapse function and amphetamine addiction appear to mediate common

  10. Creating new evolutionary pathways through bioinvasion: the population genetics of brushtail possums in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Sarre, Stephen D; Aitken, Nicola; Adamack, Aaron T; MacDonald, Anna J; Gruber, Bernd; Cowan, Phil

    2014-07-01

    Rapid increases in global trade and human movement have created novel mixtures of organisms bringing with them the potential to rapidly accelerate the evolution of new forms. The common brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula), introduced into New Zealand from Australia in the 19th century, is one such species having been sourced from multiple populations in its native range. Here, we combine microsatellite DNA- and GIS-based spatial data to show that T. vulpecula originating from at least two different Australian locations exhibit a population structure that is commensurate with their introduction history and which cannot be explained by landscape features alone. Most importantly, we identify a hybrid zone between the two subspecies which appears to function as a barrier to dispersal. When combined with previous genetic, morphological and captive studies, our data suggest that assortative mating between the two subspecies may operate at a behavioural or species recognition level rather than through fertilization, genetic incompatibility or developmental inhibition. Nevertheless, hybridization between the two subspecies of possum clearly occurs, creating the opportunity for novel genetic combinations that would not occur in their natural ranges and which is especially likely given that multiple contact zones occur in New Zealand. This discovery has implications for wildlife management in New Zealand because multiple contact zones are likely to influence the dispersal patterns of possums and because differential susceptibility to baiting with sodium fluoroacetate between possums of different origins may promote novel genetic forms.

  11. Pathways to genetic screening: Patient knowledges, Patient practices. Technical report of research progress

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-29

    This study is designed to clarify the integration of genetic knowledge into the lived experience of high-risk family members. A major focus is elucidation of the social and cultural barriers and bridges to the use of genetic information to increase reproductive options and improve the quality of family life. They study focuses on families at risk for cystic fibrosis and sickle cell disease. These two disease groups were selected because they are among the most common potentially lethal genetic diseases and because while each has a similar pattern of inheritance and raises similarly serious bio-medical challenges and issues of information management, they primarily affect different racial and ethno-cultural groups permitting a naturally occurring experiment. In the variable penetration and meaning of genetic medicine in two populations. We have conducted intensive interviews with more than 300 individuals in approximately 88 families. We have attempted to balance the effort equally between the two groups, but have found we are able to penetrate the family systems of the cystic fibrosis families more easily than the sickle cell families.

  12. Novel Bioassay for the Discovery of Inhibitors of the 2-C-Methyl-D-erythritol 4-Phosphate (MEP) and Terpenoid Pathways Leading to Carotenoid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Corniani, Natália; Velini, Edivaldo D.; Silva, Ferdinando M. L.; Nanayakkara, N. P. Dhammika; Witschel, Matthias; Dayan, Franck E.

    2014-01-01

    The 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway leads to the synthesis of isopentenyl diphosphate in plastids. It is a major branch point providing precursors for the synthesis of carotenoids, tocopherols, plastoquinone and the phytyl chain of chlorophylls, as well as the hormones abscisic acid and gibberellins. Consequently, disruption of this pathway is harmful to plants. We developed an in vivo bioassay that can measure the carbon flow through the carotenoid pathway. Leaf cuttings are incubated in the presence of a phytoene desaturase inhibitor to induce phytoene accumulation. Any compound reducing the level of phytoene accumulation is likely to interfere with either one of the steps in the MEP pathway or the synthesis of geranylgeranyl diphosphate. This concept was tested with known inhibitors of steps of the MEP pathway. The specificity of this in vivo bioassay was also verified by testing representative herbicides known to target processes outside of the MEP and carotenoid pathways. This assay enables the rapid screen of new inhibitors of enzymes preceding the synthesis of phytoene, though there are some limitations related to the non-specific effect of some inhibitors on this assay. PMID:25077957

  13. Novel bioassay for the discovery of inhibitors of the 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) and terpenoid pathways leading to carotenoid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Corniani, Natália; Velini, Edivaldo D; Silva, Ferdinando M L; Nanayakkara, N P Dhammika; Witschel, Matthias; Dayan, Franck E

    2014-01-01

    The 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway leads to the synthesis of isopentenyl diphosphate in plastids. It is a major branch point providing precursors for the synthesis of carotenoids, tocopherols, plastoquinone and the phytyl chain of chlorophylls, as well as the hormones abscisic acid and gibberellins. Consequently, disruption of this pathway is harmful to plants. We developed an in vivo bioassay that can measure the carbon flow through the carotenoid pathway. Leaf cuttings are incubated in the presence of a phytoene desaturase inhibitor to induce phytoene accumulation. Any compound reducing the level of phytoene accumulation is likely to interfere with either one of the steps in the MEP pathway or the synthesis of geranylgeranyl diphosphate. This concept was tested with known inhibitors of steps of the MEP pathway. The specificity of this in vivo bioassay was also verified by testing representative herbicides known to target processes outside of the MEP and carotenoid pathways. This assay enables the rapid screen of new inhibitors of enzymes preceding the synthesis of phytoene, though there are some limitations related to the non-specific effect of some inhibitors on this assay.

  14. Genetic variation and metabolic pathway intricacy govern the active compound content and quality of the Chinese medicinal plant Lonicera japonica thunb

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Traditional Chinese medicine uses various herbs for the treatment of various diseases for thousands of years and it is now time to assess the characteristics and effectiveness of these medicinal plants based on modern genetic and molecular tools. The herb Flos Lonicerae Japonicae (FLJ or Lonicera japonica Thunb.) is used as an anti-inflammatory agent but the chemical quality of FLJ and its medicinal efficacy has not been consistent. Here, we analyzed the transcriptomes and metabolic pathways to evaluate the active medicinal compounds in FLJ and hope that this approach can be used for a variety of medicinal herbs in the future. Results We assess transcriptomic differences between FLJ and L. japonica Thunb. var. chinensis (Watts) (rFLJ), which may explain the variable medicinal effects. We acquired transcriptomic data (over 100 million reads) from the two herbs, using RNA-seq method and the Illumina GAII platform. The transcriptomic profiles contain over 6,000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) for each of the three flower development stages from FLJ, as well as comparable amount of ESTs from the rFLJ flower bud. To elucidate enzymatic divergence on biosynthetic pathways between the two varieties, we correlated genes and their expression profiles to known metabolic activities involving the relevant active compounds, including phenolic acids, flavonoids, terpenoids, and fatty acids. We also analyzed the diversification of genes that process the active compounds to distinguish orthologs and paralogs together with the pathways concerning biosynthesis of phenolic acid and its connections with other related pathways. Conclusions Our study provides both an initial description of gene expression profiles in flowers of FLJ and its counterfeit rFLJ and the enzyme pool that can be used to evaluate FLJ quality. Detailed molecular-level analyses allow us to decipher the relationship between metabolic pathways involved in processing active medicinal compounds and gene

  15. Genetic variants in the vitamin D pathway and breast cancer disease-free survival

    PubMed Central

    Brewster, Abenaa M.

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have investigated the association between vitamin D pathway genes and breast cancer risk; however, little is known about the association between vitamin D pathway genes and breast cancer prognosis. In a retrospective cohort of 1029 patients with early-stage breast cancer, we analyzed the association between 106 tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in eight vitamin D pathway genes and breast cancer disease-free survival (DFS) using Cox regression analysis adjusted for known prognostic variables. Using a false discovery rate of 10%, six intronic SNPs were significantly associated with poorer DFS: retinoid-X receptor alpha (RXRA) SNPs (rs881658, rs11185659, rs10881583, rs881657 and rs7864987) and plasminogen activator and urokinase receptor (PLAUR) SNP (rs4251864). Treatment received (no systemic therapy, hormone therapy alone or chemotherapy) was an effect modifier of the RXRA SNPs association with DFS (P < 0.05); therefore, we stratified further analysis by treatment group. Among patients who did not receive systemic therapy, RXRA SNP [rs10881583 (P = 0.02)] was associated with poorer DFS, and among patients who received chemotherapy, RXRA SNPs (rs881658, rs11185659, rs10881583, rs881657 and rs7864987) were associated with poorer DFS (P < 0.001 for all SNPs). However, RXRA SNPs: rs10881583 (P < 0.001) and rs881657 (P = 0.02) were associated with improved DFS in patients treated with hormone therapy alone. Our results suggest that SNPs in the RXRA and PLAUR genes in the vitamin D pathway may contribute to breast cancer DFS. In particular, SNPs in RXRA may predict for poorer or improved DFS in patients, according to type of systemic treatment received. If validated, these markers could be used for risk stratification of breast cancer patients. PMID:23180655

  16. Dominant Enhancers of Egfr in Drosophila Melanogaster: Genetic Links between the Notch and Egfr Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Price, J. V.; Savenye, E. D.; Lum, D.; Breitkreutz, A.

    1997-01-01

    The Drosophila epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a key component of a complex signaling pathway that participates in multiple developmental processes. We have performed an F(1) screen for mutations that cause dominant enhancement of wing vein phenotypes associated with mutations in Egfr. With this screen, we have recovered mutations in Hairless (H), vein, groucho (gro), and three apparently novel loci. All of the E(Egfr)s we have identified show dominant interactions in transheterozygous combinations with each other and with alleles of N or Su(H), suggesting that they are involved in cross-talk between the N and EGFR signaling pathways. Further examination of the phenotypic interactions between Egfr, H, and gro revealed that reductions in Egfr activity enhanced both the bristle loss associated with H mutations, and the bristle hyperplasia and ocellar hypertrophy associated with gro mutations. Double mutant combinations of Egfr and gro hypomorphic alleles led to the formation of ectopic compound eyes in a dosage sensitive manner. Our findings suggest that these E(Egfr)s represent links between the Egfr and Notch signaling pathways, and that Egfr activity can either promote or suppress Notch signaling, depending on its developmental context. PMID:9383058

  17. Robust gene signatures from microarray data using genetic algorithms enriched with biological pathway keywords.

    PubMed

    Luque-Baena, R M; Urda, D; Gonzalo Claros, M; Franco, L; Jerez, J M

    2014-06-01

    Genetic algorithms are widely used in the estimation of expression profiles from microarrays data. However, these techniques are unable to produce stable and robust solutions suitable to use in clinical and biomedical studies. This paper presents a novel two-stage evolutionary strategy for gene feature selection combining the genetic algorithm with biological information extracted from the KEGG database. A comparative study is carried out over public data from three different types of cancer (leukemia, lung cancer and prostate cancer). Even though the analyses only use features having KEGG information, the results demonstrate that this two-stage evolutionary strategy increased the consistency, robustness and accuracy of a blind discrimination among relapsed and healthy individuals. Therefore, this approach could facilitate the definition of gene signatures for the clinical prognosis and diagnostic of cancer diseases in a near future. Additionally, it could also be used for biological knowledge discovery about the studied disease.

  18. Long-lived Min Mice Develop Advanced Intestinal Cancers through a Genetically Conservative Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Halberg, Richard B.; Waggoner, Jesse; Rasmussen, Kristen; White, Alanna; Clipson, Linda; Prunuske, Amy J.; Bacher, Jeffery W.; Sullivan, Ruth; Washington, Mary Kay; Pitot, Henry C.; Petrini, John H. J.; Albertson, Donna G.; Dove, William F.

    2009-01-01

    C57BL/6J mice carrying the Min allele of Adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc) develop numerous adenomas along the entire length of the intestine and consequently die at an early age. This short lifespan would prevent the accumulation of somatic genetic mutations or epigenetic alterations necessary for tumor progression. To overcome this limitation, we generated F1 ApcMin/+ hybrids by crossing C57BR/cdcJ and SWR/J females to B6 ApcMin/+ males. These hybrids developed few intestinal tumors and often lived longer than 1 year. Many of the tumors (24–87%) were invasive adenocarcinomas, in which neoplastic tissue penetrated through the muscle wall into the mesentery. In a few cases (3%), lesions metastasized by extension to regional lymph nodes. The development of these familial cancers does not require chromosomal gains or losses, a high level of microsatellite instability, or the presence of Helicobacter. To test whether genetic instability might accelerate tumor progression, we generated ApcMin/+ mice homozygous for the hypomorphic allele of the Nijmegen breakage syndrome gene (Nbs1ΔB) and also treated ApcMin/+ mice with a strong somatic mutagen. These imposed genetic instabilities did not reduce the time required for cancers to form, nor increase the percentage of cancers, nor drive progression to the point of distant metastasis. In summary, we have found that the ApcMin/+ mouse model for familial intestinal cancer can develop frequent invasive cancers in the absence of overt genomic instability. Possible factors that promote invasion include age-dependent epigenetic changes, conservative somatic recombination, or direct effects of alleles in the F1 hybrid genetic background. PMID:19584276

  19. Genetic polymorphisms in folate pathway enzymes, DRD4 and GSTM1 are related to temporomandibular disorder

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) is a multifactorial syndrome related to a critical period of human life. TMD has been associated with psychological dysfunctions, oxidative state and sexual dimorphism with coincidental occurrence along the pubertal development. In this work we study the association between TMD and genetic polymorphisms of folate metabolism, neurotransmission, oxidative and hormonal metabolism. Folate metabolism, which depends on genes variations and diet, is directly involved in genetic and epigenetic variations that can influence the changes of last growing period of development in human and the appearance of the TMD. Methods A case-control study was designed to evaluate the impact of genetic polymorphisms above described on TMD. A total of 229 individuals (69% women) were included at the study; 86 were patients with TMD and 143 were healthy control subjects. Subjects underwent to a clinical examination following the guidelines by the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD). Genotyping of 20 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs), divided in two groups, was performed by multiplex minisequencing preceded by multiplex PCR. Other seven genetic polymorphisms different from SNPs (deletions, insertions, tandem repeat, null genotype) were achieved by a multiplex-PCR. A chi-square test was performed to determine the differences in genotype and allelic frequencies between TMD patients and healthy subjects. To estimate TMD risk, in those polymorphisms that shown significant differences, odds ratio (OR) with a 95% of confidence interval were calculated. Results Six of the polymorphisms showed statistical associations with TMD. Four of them are related to enzymes of folates metabolism: Allele G of Serine Hydoxymethyltransferase 1 (SHMT1) rs1979277 (OR = 3.99; 95%CI 1.72, 9.25; p = 0.002), allele G of SHMT1 rs638416 (OR = 2.80; 95%CI 1.51, 5.21; p = 0.013), allele T of Methylentetrahydrofolate Dehydrogenase (MTHFD) rs

  20. Weight of evidence evaluation of adverse outcome pathways converging at impaired vitellogenin synthesis leading to reproductive impairment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) provide a framework that supports greater use of mechanistic data measured at lower levels of biological organization as a basis for regulatory decision-making. However, it is recognized that different types of regulatory applications and decisions...

  1. Salt stress response triggers activation of the jasmonate signaling pathway leading to inhibition of cell elongation in Arabidopsis primary root.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Camilo E; Acevedo-Acevedo, Orlando; Miranda, Giovanna S; Vergara-Barros, Pablo; Holuigue, Loreto; Figueroa, Carlos R; Figueroa, Pablo M

    2016-07-01

    Salinity is a severe abiotic stress that affects irrigated croplands. Jasmonate (JA) is an essential hormone involved in plant defense against herbivory and in responses to abiotic stress. However, the relationship between the salt stress response and the JA pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana is not well understood at molecular and cellular levels. In this work we investigated the activation of JA signaling by NaCl and its effect on primary root growth. We found that JA-responsive JAZ genes were up-regulated by salt stress in a COI1-dependent manner in the roots. Using a JA-Ile sensor we demonstrated that activation of JA signaling by salt stress occurs in the meristematic zone and stele of the differentiation zone and that this activation was dependent on JAR1 and proteasome functions. Another finding is that the elongation zone (EZ) and its cortical cells were significantly longer in JA-related mutants (AOS, COI1, JAZ3 and MYC2/3/4 genes) compared with wild-type plants under salt stress, revealing the participation of the canonical JA signaling pathway. Noteworthy, osmotic stress - a component of salt stress - inhibited cell elongation in the EZ in a COI1-dependent manner. We propose that salt stress triggers activation of the JA signaling pathway followed by inhibition of cell elongation in the EZ. We have shown that salt-inhibited root growth partially involves the jasmonate signaling pathway in Arabidopsis. PMID:27217545

  2. Genetic variants in microRNA and microRNA biogenesis pathway genes and breast cancer risk among women of African ancestry.

    PubMed

    Qian, Frank; Feng, Ye; Zheng, Yonglan; Ogundiran, Temidayo O; Ojengbede, Oladosu; Zheng, Wei; Blot, William; Ambrosone, Christine B; John, Esther M; Bernstein, Leslie; Hu, Jennifer J; Ziegler, Regina G; Nyante, Sarah; Bandera, Elisa V; Ingles, Sue A; Press, Michael F; Nathanson, Katherine L; Hennis, Anselm; Nemesure, Barbara; Ambs, Stefan; Kolonel, Laurence N; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Haiman, Christopher A; Huo, Dezheng

    2016-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNA) regulate breast biology by binding to specific RNA sequences, leading to RNA degradation and inhibition of translation of their target genes. While germline genetic variations may disrupt some of these interactions between miRNAs and their targets, studies assessing the relationship between genetic variations in the miRNA network and breast cancer risk are still limited, particularly among women of African ancestry. We systematically put together a list of 822 and 10,468 genetic variants among primary miRNA sequences and 38 genes in the miRNA biogenesis pathway, respectively; and examined their association with breast cancer risk in the ROOT consortium which includes women of African ancestry. Findings were replicated in an independent consortium. Logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratio (OR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI). For overall breast cancer risk, three single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in miRNA biogenesis genes DROSHA rs78393591 (OR = 0.69, 95 % CI: 0.55-0.88, P = 0.003), ESR1 rs523736 (OR = 0.88, 95 % CI: 0.82-0.95, P = 3.99 × 10(-4)), and ZCCHC11 rs114101502 (OR = 1.33, 95 % CI: 1.11-1.59, P = 0.002), and one SNP in primary miRNA sequence (rs116159732 in miR-6826, OR = 0.74, 95 % CI: 0.63-0.89, P = 0.001) were found to have significant associations in both discovery and validation phases. In a subgroup analysis, two SNPs were associated with risk of estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer, and three SNPs were associated with risk of ER-positive breast cancer. Several variants in miRNA and miRNA biogenesis pathway genes were associated with breast cancer risk. Risk associations varied by ER status, suggesting potential new mechanisms in etiology.

  3. Genetic variants in microRNA and microRNA biogenesis pathway genes and breast cancer risk among women of African ancestry.

    PubMed

    Qian, Frank; Feng, Ye; Zheng, Yonglan; Ogundiran, Temidayo O; Ojengbede, Oladosu; Zheng, Wei; Blot, William; Ambrosone, Christine B; John, Esther M; Bernstein, Leslie; Hu, Jennifer J; Ziegler, Regina G; Nyante, Sarah; Bandera, Elisa V; Ingles, Sue A; Press, Michael F; Nathanson, Katherine L; Hennis, Anselm; Nemesure, Barbara; Ambs, Stefan; Kolonel, Laurence N; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Haiman, Christopher A; Huo, Dezheng

    2016-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNA) regulate breast biology by binding to specific RNA sequences, leading to RNA degradation and inhibition of translation of their target genes. While germline genetic variations may disrupt some of these interactions between miRNAs and their targets, studies assessing the relationship between genetic variations in the miRNA network and breast cancer risk are still limited, particularly among women of African ancestry. We systematically put together a list of 822 and 10,468 genetic variants among primary miRNA sequences and 38 genes in the miRNA biogenesis pathway, respectively; and examined their association with breast cancer risk in the ROOT consortium which includes women of African ancestry. Findings were replicated in an independent consortium. Logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratio (OR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI). For overall breast cancer risk, three single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in miRNA biogenesis genes DROSHA rs78393591 (OR = 0.69, 95 % CI: 0.55-0.88, P = 0.003), ESR1 rs523736 (OR = 0.88, 95 % CI: 0.82-0.95, P = 3.99 × 10(-4)), and ZCCHC11 rs114101502 (OR = 1.33, 95 % CI: 1.11-1.59, P = 0.002), and one SNP in primary miRNA sequence (rs116159732 in miR-6826, OR = 0.74, 95 % CI: 0.63-0.89, P = 0.001) were found to have significant associations in both discovery and validation phases. In a subgroup analysis, two SNPs were associated with risk of estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer, and three SNPs were associated with risk of ER-positive breast cancer. Several variants in miRNA and miRNA biogenesis pathway genes were associated with breast cancer risk. Risk associations varied by ER status, suggesting potential new mechanisms in etiology. PMID:27380242

  4. Genome-wide survey of yeast mutations leading to activation of the yeast cell integrity MAPK pathway: Novel insights into diverse MAPK outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The yeast cell wall integrity mitogen-activated protein kinase (CWI-MAPK) pathway is the main regulator of adaptation responses to cell wall stress in yeast. Here, we adopt a genomic approach to shed light on two aspects that are only partially understood, namely, the characterization of the gene functional catalog associated with CWI pathway activation and the extent to which MAPK activation correlates with transcriptional outcomes. Results A systematic yeast mutant deletion library was screened for constitutive transcriptional activation of the CWI-related reporter gene MLP1. Monitoring phospho-Slt2/Mpk1 levels in the identified mutants revealed sixty-four deletants with high levels of phosphorylation of this MAPK, including mainly genes related to cell wall construction and morphogenesis, signaling, and those with unknown function. Phenotypic analysis of the last group of mutants suggests their involvement in cell wall homeostasis. A good correlation between levels of Slt2 phosphorylation and the magnitude of the transcriptional response was found in most cases. However, the expression of CWI pathway-related genes was enhanced in some mutants in the absence of significant Slt2 phosphorylation, despite the fact that functional MAPK signaling through the pathway was required. CWI pathway activation was associated to increased deposition of chitin in the cell wall - a known survival compensatory mechanism - in about 30% of the mutants identified. Conclusion We provide new insights into yeast genes related to the CWI pathway and into how the state of activation of the Slt2 MAPK leads to different outcomes, discovering the versatility of this kind of signaling pathways. These findings potentially have broad implications for understanding the functioning of other eukaryotic MAPKs. PMID:21810245

  5. Race/ethnicity, genetic ancestry, and breast cancer-related lymphedema in the Pathways Study.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Marilyn L; Yao, Song; Lee, Valerie S; Roh, Janise M; Zhu, Qianqian; Ergas, Isaac J; Liu, Qian; Zhang, Yali; Kutner, Susan E; Quesenberry, Charles P; Ambrosone, Christine B; Kushi, Lawrence H

    2016-08-01

    Breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL) is a serious chronic condition after breast cancer (BC) surgery and treatment. It is unclear if BCRL risk varies by race/ethnicity. In a multiethnic prospective cohort study of 2953 BC patients, we examined the association of self-reported BCRL status with self-reported race/ethnicity and estimated genetic ancestry. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) were calculated by multivariable Cox proportional hazards models, with follow-up starting 6 months post-BC diagnosis. Estimates were further stratified by body mass index (BMI). By 48 months of follow-up, 342 (11.6 %) women reported having BCRL. Younger age at BC diagnosis, higher BMI at baseline, and lower physical activity were associated with greater BCRL risk. African American (AA) women had a 2-fold increased risk of BCRL compared with White women (HR = 2.04; 95 % CI 1.35-3.08). African genetic ancestry was also associated with an increased risk (HR = 2.50; 95 % CI 1.43, 4.36). Both risks were attenuated but remained elevated after adjusting for known risk factors and became more pronounced when restricted to the nonobese women (adjusted HR = 2.31 for AA and HR = 3.70 for African ancestry, both p < 0.05). There was also evidence of increased BCRL risk with Hispanic ethnicity in the nonobese women. Nonobese AA women had a higher risk of BCRL than White women, which cannot be fully explained by known risk factors. This is the first large-scale, prospective study demonstrating differences in BCRL risk according to race/ethnicity as assessed by both self-report and genetic ancestry data, with a potential ancestry-obesity interaction. PMID:27449493

  6. Identification of genetic bases of vibrio fluvialis species-specific biochemical pathways and potential virulence factors by comparative genomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xin; Liang, Weili; Wang, Yunduan; Xu, Jialiang; Zhu, Jun; Kan, Biao

    2014-03-01

    Vibrio fluvialis is an important food-borne pathogen that causes diarrheal illness and sometimes extraintestinal infections in humans. In this study, we sequenced the genome of a clinical V. fluvialis strain and determined its phylogenetic relationships with other Vibrio species by comparative genomic analysis. We found that the closest relationship was between V. fluvialis and V. furnissii, followed by those with V. cholerae and V. mimicus. Moreover, based on genome comparisons and gene complementation experiments, we revealed genetic mechanisms of the biochemical tests that differentiate V. fluvialis from closely related species. Importantly, we identified a variety of genes encoding potential virulence factors, including multiple hemolysins, transcriptional regulators, and environmental survival and adaptation apparatuses, and the type VI secretion system, which is indicative of complex regulatory pathways modulating pathogenesis in this organism. The availability of V. fluvialis genome sequences may promote our understanding of pathogenic mechanisms for this emerging pathogen.

  7. Combining reverse genetics and nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolomics unravels trypanosome-specific metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Bringaud, Frédéric; Biran, Marc; Millerioux, Yoann; Wargnies, Marion; Allmann, Stefan; Mazet, Muriel

    2015-06-01

    Numerous eukaryotes have developed specific metabolic traits that are not present in extensively studied model organisms. For instance, the procyclic insect form of Trypanosoma brucei, a parasite responsible for sleeping sickness in its mammalian-specific bloodstream form, metabolizes glucose into excreted succinate and acetate through pathways with unique features. Succinate is primarily produced from glucose-derived phosphoenolpyruvate in peroxisome-like organelles, also known as glycosomes, by a soluble NADH-dependent fumarate reductase only described in trypanosomes so far. Acetate is produced in the mitochondrion of the parasite from acetyl-CoA by a CoA-transferase, which forms an ATP-producing cycle with succinyl-CoA synthetase. The role of this cycle in ATP production was recently demonstrated in procyclic trypanosomes and has only been proposed so far for anaerobic organisms, in addition to trypanosomatids. We review how nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry can be used to analyze the metabolic network perturbed by deletion (knockout) or downregulation (RNAi) of the candidate genes involved in these two particular metabolic pathways of procyclic trypanosomes. The role of succinate and acetate production in trypanosomes is discussed, as well as the connections between the succinate and acetate branches, which increase the metabolic flexibility probably required by the parasite to deal with environmental changes such as oxidative stress.

  8. Population Genetic Structure and Potential Incursion Pathways of the Bluetongue Virus Vector Culicoides brevitarsis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in Australia.

    PubMed

    Tay, W T; Kerr, P J; Jermiin, L S

    2016-01-01

    Culicoides brevitarsis is a vector of the bluetongue virus (BTV), which infects sheep and cattle. It is an invasive species in Australia with an assumed Asian/South East Asian origin. Using one mitochondrial marker (i.e., part of the cytochrome oxidase subunit I gene) and six nuclear markers, we inferred population genetic structure and possible incursion pathways for Australian C. brevitarsis. Nine mitochondrial haplotypes, with low nucleotide sequence diversity (0.0-0.7%) among these, were identified in a sample of 70 individuals from seven sites. Both sets of markers revealed a homogeneous population structure, albeit with evidence of isolation by distance and two genetically distinct clusters distributed along a north-to-south cline. No evidence of a cryptic species complex was found. The geographical distribution of the mitochondrial haplotypes is consistent with at least two incursion pathways into Australia since the arrival of suitable livestock hosts. By contrast, 15 mitochondrial haplotypes, with up to four times greater nucleotide sequence diversity (0.0-2.9%) among these, were identified in a sample of 16 individuals of the endemic C. marksi (sampled from a site in South Australia and another in New South Wales). A phylogenetic tree inferred using the mitochondrial marker revealed that the Australian and Japanese samples of C. brevitarsis are as evolutionarily different from one another as some of the other Australian species (e.g., C. marksi, C. henryi, C. pallidothorax) are. The phylogenetic tree placed four of the species endemic to Australia (C. pallidothorax, C. bundyensis, C. marksi, C. henryi) in a clade, with a fifth such species (C. bunrooensis) sharing a common ancestor with that clade and a clade comprising two Japanese species (C. verbosus, C. kibunensis).

  9. Population Genetic Structure and Potential Incursion Pathways of the Bluetongue Virus Vector Culicoides brevitarsis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Tay, W. T.; Kerr, P. J.; Jermiin, L. S.

    2016-01-01

    Culicoides brevitarsis is a vector of the bluetongue virus (BTV), which infects sheep and cattle. It is an invasive species in Australia with an assumed Asian/South East Asian origin. Using one mitochondrial marker (i.e., part of the cytochrome oxidase subunit I gene) and six nuclear markers, we inferred population genetic structure and possible incursion pathways for Australian C. brevitarsis. Nine mitochondrial haplotypes, with low nucleotide sequence diversity (0.0–0.7%) among these, were identified in a sample of 70 individuals from seven sites. Both sets of markers revealed a homogeneous population structure, albeit with evidence of isolation by distance and two genetically distinct clusters distributed along a north-to-south cline. No evidence of a cryptic species complex was found. The geographical distribution of the mitochondrial haplotypes is consistent with at least two incursion pathways into Australia since the arrival of suitable livestock hosts. By contrast, 15 mitochondrial haplotypes, with up to four times greater nucleotide sequence diversity (0.0–2.9%) among these, were identified in a sample of 16 individuals of the endemic C. marksi (sampled from a site in South Australia and another in New South Wales). A phylogenetic tree inferred using the mitochondrial marker revealed that the Australian and Japanese samples of C. brevitarsis are as evolutionarily different from one another as some of the other Australian species (e.g., C. marksi, C. henryi, C. pallidothorax) are. The phylogenetic tree placed four of the species endemic to Australia (C. pallidothorax, C. bundyensis, C. marksi, C. henryi) in a clade, with a fifth such species (C. bunrooensis) sharing a common ancestor with that clade and a clade comprising two Japanese species (C. verbosus, C. kibunensis). PMID:26771743

  10. Genetic polymorphisms in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor–signaling pathway and sleep disturbances in middle-aged women

    PubMed Central

    Ziv-Gal, Ayelet; Flaws, Jodi A.; Mahoney, Megan M.; Miller, Susan R.; Zacur, Howard A.; Gallicchio, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Objective We aimed to determine if selected genetic polymorphisms in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR)–signaling pathway and circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (CLOCK) are associated with insomnia and early awakening in middle-aged women. Methods Women aged 45 to 54 years (n=639) were recruited into a middle-aged health study and agreed to complete questionnaires and donate blood samples. Questionnaires were used to assess sleep outcomes. Blood samples were processed for genotyping the selected polymorphisms: AHR (rs2066853), AHR repressor (AHRR) (rs2292596), aryl hydrocarbon nuclear translocator (ARNT) (rs2228099), and circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (CLOCK) (rs1801260). Data were analyzed using multivariable logistic regression. Results Women heterozygous for the AHRR alleles (GC) had decreased odds of insomnia compared to women homozygous for the AHRR_C allele (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 0.69; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.49–0.96). Women with at least one of the AHRR_G or CLOCK_C alleles had significantly decreased odds of insomnia compared to women homozygous for the AHRR_C and CLOCK_T alleles (aOR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.43–0.96). Additionally, women homozygous for the AHRR_G and CLOCK_C alleles had significantly decreased odds of insomnia compared to women homozygous for the AHRR_C and CLOCK_T alleles (aOR, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.35–0.89). None of the selected single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) or combinations of SNPs were significantly associated with early awakening. Conclusions Selected genetic polymorphisms in the AHR-signaling pathway (i.e., AHRR) and CLOCK may play a role in decreasing the risk for experiencing insomnia during the menopausal transition. PMID:23768840

  11. Population Genetic Structure and Potential Incursion Pathways of the Bluetongue Virus Vector Culicoides brevitarsis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in Australia.

    PubMed

    Tay, W T; Kerr, P J; Jermiin, L S

    2016-01-01

    Culicoides brevitarsis is a vector of the bluetongue virus (BTV), which infects sheep and cattle. It is an invasive species in Australia with an assumed Asian/South East Asian origin. Using one mitochondrial marker (i.e., part of the cytochrome oxidase subunit I gene) and six nuclear markers, we inferred population genetic structure and possible incursion pathways for Australian C. brevitarsis. Nine mitochondrial haplotypes, with low nucleotide sequence diversity (0.0-0.7%) among these, were identified in a sample of 70 individuals from seven sites. Both sets of markers revealed a homogeneous population structure, albeit with evidence of isolation by distance and two genetically distinct clusters distributed along a north-to-south cline. No evidence of a cryptic species complex was found. The geographical distribution of the mitochondrial haplotypes is consistent with at least two incursion pathways into Australia since the arrival of suitable livestock hosts. By contrast, 15 mitochondrial haplotypes, with up to four times greater nucleotide sequence diversity (0.0-2.9%) among these, were identified in a sample of 16 individuals of the endemic C. marksi (sampled from a site in South Australia and another in New South Wales). A phylogenetic tree inferred using the mitochondrial marker revealed that the Australian and Japanese samples of C. brevitarsis are as evolutionarily different from one another as some of the other Australian species (e.g., C. marksi, C. henryi, C. pallidothorax) are. The phylogenetic tree placed four of the species endemic to Australia (C. pallidothorax, C. bundyensis, C. marksi, C. henryi) in a clade, with a fifth such species (C. bunrooensis) sharing a common ancestor with that clade and a clade comprising two Japanese species (C. verbosus, C. kibunensis). PMID:26771743

  12. Enzymological and genetic studies of one-carbon reactions in the pathway of acetate utilization by methanogenic bacteria. Annual report, February 1986-December 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Ferry, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    The project focused on determining the biochemical pathway and mechanisms of acetate conversion to methane in methanogenic bacteria. A corrinoid cofactor was discovered in the carbon monoxide dehydrogenase complex previously shown to be involved in the pathway of acetate conversion to methane. The genetic control mechanism for the regulation of formate dehydrogenase synthesis was determined. Results show that the enzyme is autoregulated at the level of transcription.

  13. Genetic Dissection Reveals Two Separate Pathways for Rod and Cone Regeneration in the Teleost Retina

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Ann C.; Scholz, Tamera L.; Brockerhoff, Susan E.; Fadool, James M.

    2009-01-01

    Development of therapies to treat visual system dystrophies resulting from the degeneration of rod and cone photoreceptors may directly benefit from studies of animal models, such as the zebrafish, that display continuous retinal neurogenesis and the capacity for injury-induced regeneration. Previous studies of retinal regeneration in fish have been conducted on adult animals and have relied on methods that cause acute damage to both rods and cones, as well as other retinal cell types. We report here the use of a genetic approach to study progenitor cell responses to photoreceptor degeneration in the larval and adult zebrafish retina. We have compared the responses to selective rod or cone degeneration using, respectively, the XOPS-mCFP transgenic line and zebrafish with a null mutation in the pde6c gene. Notably, rod degeneration induces increased proliferation of progenitors in the outer nuclear layer (ONL) and is not associated with proliferation or reactive gliosis in the inner nuclear layer (INL). Molecular characterization of the rod progenitor cells demonstrated that they are committed to the rod photoreceptor fate while they are still mitotic. In contrast, cone degeneration induces both Müller cell proliferation and reactive gliosis, with little change in proliferation in the ONL. We found that in both lines, proliferative responses to photoreceptor degeneration can be observed as 7 days post fertilization (dpf). These two genetic models therefore offer new opportunities for investigating the molecular mechanisms of selective degeneration and regeneration of rods and cones. PMID:18265406

  14. The necrophagous fly anthrax transmission pathway: empirical and genetic evidence from wildlife epizootics.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Jason K; Van Ert, Matthew; Mullins, Jocelyn C; Hadfield, Ted L; Hugh-Jones, Martin E

    2014-08-01

    Early studies confirmed Bacillus anthracis in emesis and feces of flies under laboratory conditions, but there is little empirical field evidence supporting the roles of flies in anthrax transmission. We collected samples during outbreaks of anthrax affecting livestock and native and exotic wildlife on two ranches in West Texas (2009-2010). Sampling included animal carcasses, maggots, adult flies feeding on or within several meters of carcasses, and leaves from surrounding vegetation. Microbiology and PCR were used to detect B. anthracis in the samples. Viable B. anthracis and/or PCR-positive results were obtained from all represented sample types. Genetic analysis of B. anthracis samples using multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) confirmed that each ranch represented a distinct genetic lineage. Within each ranch, we detected the same genotype of B. anthracis from carcasses, maggots, and adult flies. The results of this study provide evidence supporting a transmission cycle in which blowflies contaminate vegetation near carcasses that may then infect additional browsing animals during anthrax outbreaks in the shrubland environment of West Texas.

  15. Identification of Links Between Cellular Pathways by Genetic Interaction Mapping (GIM).

    PubMed

    Malabat, Christophe; Saveanu, Cosmin

    2016-01-01

    The yeast systematic deletion collection offered the basis for a number of different strategies that establish functional links between genes by analyzing the phenotype of cells that combine two different deletions or mutations. A distinguishing feature of the collection is the presence of molecular barcodes at each deleted locus, which can be used to quantify the presence and abundance of cells bearing a given allele in a complex mix. As a result, a large number of mutants can be tested in batch cultures, replacing tedious manipulation of thousands of individual strains with a barcode microarray readout. Barcode-based genetic screens like Genetic Interaction Mapping (GIM) thus require little investment in terms of specific equipment, are fast to perform, and allow precise measurements of double mutant growth rates for both aggravating (synthetic sick) and alleviating (epistatic) effects. We describe here protocols for preparing the pools of haploid double mutant S. cerevisiae cells, testing their composition with barcode microarrays, and analyzing the results to extract useful functional information.

  16. The hijacking of a receptor kinase–driven pathway by a wheat fungal pathogen leads to disease

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Gongjun; Zhang, Zengcui; Friesen, Timothy L.; Raats, Dina; Fahima, Tzion; Brueggeman, Robert S.; Lu, Shunwen; Trick, Harold N.; Liu, Zhaohui; Chao, Wun; Frenkel, Zeev; Xu, Steven S.; Rasmussen, Jack B.; Faris, Justin D.

    2016-01-01

    Necrotrophic pathogens live and feed on dying tissue, but their interactions with plants are not well understood compared to biotrophic pathogens. The wheat Snn1 gene confers susceptibility to strains of the necrotrophic pathogen Parastagonospora nodorum that produce the SnTox1 protein. We report the positional cloning of Snn1, a member of the wall-associated kinase class of receptors, which are known to drive pathways for biotrophic pathogen resistance. Recognition of SnTox1 by Snn1 activates programmed cell death, which allows this necrotroph to gain nutrients and sporulate. These results demonstrate that necrotrophic pathogens such as P. nodorum hijack host molecular pathways that are typically involved in resistance to biotrophic pathogens, revealing the complex nature of susceptibility and resistance in necrotrophic and biotrophic pathogen interactions with plants.

  17. Antagonizing pathways leading to differential dynamics in colon carcinogenesis in Shugoshin1 (Sgo1)-haploinsufficient chromosome instability model.

    PubMed

    Rao, Chinthalapally V; Sanghera, Saira; Zhang, Yuting; Biddick, Laura; Reddy, Arun; Lightfoot, Stan; Dai, Wei; Yamada, Hiroshi Y

    2016-05-01

    Colon cancer is the second most lethal cancer. It is predicted to claim 50,310 lives in 2014. Chromosome Instability (CIN) is observed in 80-90% of colon cancers, and is thought to contribute to colon cancer progression and recurrence. However, there are no animal models of CIN that have been validated for studies of colon cancer development or drug testing. In this study, we sought to validate a mitotic error-induced CIN model mouse, the Shugoshin1 (Sgo1) haploinsufficient mouse, as a colon cancer study model. Wild-type and Sgo1(-/+) mice were treated with the colonic carcinogen, azoxymethane (AOM). We tracked colon tumor development 12, 24, and 36 wk after treatment to assess progression of colon tumorigenesis. Initially, more precancerous lesions, Aberrant Crypt Foci (ACF), developed in Sgo1(-/+) mice. However, the ACF did not develop straightforwardly into larger tumors. At the 36-wk endpoint, the number of gross tumors in Sgo1(-/+) mice was no different from that in wild-type controls. However, Copy Number Variation (CNV) analysis indicated that fully developed colon tumor in Sgo1(-/+) mice carried 13.75 times more CNV. Immunohistological analyses indicated that Sgo1(-/+) mice differentially expressed IL-6, Bcl2, and p16(INK4A) . We propose that formation of ACF in Sgo1(-/+) mice is facilitated by the IL6-STAT3-SOCS3 oncogenic pathway and by the Bcl2-anti-apoptotic pathway, yet further development of the ACF to tumors is inhibited by the p16(INK4A) tumor suppressor pathway. Manipulating these pathways would be beneficial for inhibiting development of colon cancer with CIN. PMID:25773652

  18. Maternal Chromium Restriction Leads to Glucose Metabolism Imbalance in Mice Offspring through Insulin Signaling and Wnt Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian; Sun, Xiaofang; Xiao, Xinhua; Zheng, Jia; Li, Ming; Yu, Miao; Ping, Fan; Wang, Zhixin; Qi, Cuijuan; Wang, Tong; Wang, Xiaojing

    2016-01-01

    An adverse intrauterine environment, induced by a chromium-restricted diet, is a potential cause of metabolic disease in adult life. Up to now, the relative mechanism has not been clear. C57BL female mice were time-mated and fed either a control diet (CD), or a chromium-restricted diet (CR) throughout pregnancy and the lactation period. After weaning, some offspring continued the diet diagram (CD-CD or CR-CR), while other offspring were transferred to another diet diagram (CD-CR or CR-CD). At 32 weeks of age, glucose metabolism parameters were measured, and the liver from CR-CD group and CD-CD group was analyzed using a gene array. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and Western blot were used to verify the result of the gene array. A maternal chromium-restricted diet resulted in obesity, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, increased area under the curve (AUC) of glucose in oral glucose tolerance testing and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). There were 463 genes that differed significantly (>1.5-fold change, p < 0.05) between CR-CD offspring (264 up-regulated genes, 199 down-regulated genes) and control offspring. The Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway and STRING (Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes/Proteins) analysis revealed that the insulin signaling pathway and Wnt signaling pathway were in the center of the gene network. Our study provides the first evidence that maternal chromium deficiency influences glucose metabolism in pups through the regulation of insulin signaling and Wnt signaling pathways. PMID:27782077

  19. Restoring KLF5 in esophageal squamous cell cancer cells activates the JNK pathway leading to apoptosis and reduced cell survival.

    PubMed

    Tarapore, Rohinton S; Yang, Yizeng; Katz, Jonathan P

    2013-05-01

    Esophageal cancer is the eighth most common cancer in the world and has an extremely dismal prognosis, with a 5-year survival of less than 20%. Current treatment options are limited, and thus identifying new molecular targets and pathways is critical to derive novel therapies. Worldwide, more than 90% of esophageal cancers are esophageal squamous cell cancer (ESCC). Previously, we identified that Krüppel-like factor 5 (KLF5), a key transcriptional regulator normally expressed in esophageal squamous epithelial cells, is lost in human ESCC. To examine the effects of restoring KLF5 in ESCC, we transduced the human ESCC cell lines TE7 and TE15, both of which lack KLF5 expression, with retrovirus to express KLF5 upon doxycycline induction. When KLF5 was induced, ESCC cells demonstrated increased apoptosis and decreased viability, with up-regulation of the proapoptotic factor BAX. Interestingly, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling, an important upstream mediator of proapoptotic pathways including BAX, was also activated following KLF5 induction. KLF5 activation of JNK signaling was mediated by KLF5 transactivation of two key upstream regulators of the JNK pathway, ASK1 and MKK4, and inhibition of JNK blocked apoptosis and normalized cell survival following KLF5 induction. Thus, restoring KLF5 in ESCC cells promotes apoptosis and decreases cell survival in a JNK-dependent manner, providing a potential therapeutic target for human ESCC.

  20. Precise spatio-temporal regulation of the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway leads to petal spot formation in Clarkia gracilis (Onagraceae)

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Talline R.; Berg, Jeremy J.; Blinka, Steven; Rausher, Mark D.; Baum, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Petal spots are widespread in Angiosperms and are often implicated in pollinator attraction. Clarkia gracilis petals each have a single red-purple spot that contrasts against a pink background. The position and presence of spots in C. gracilis are determined by the epistatic interaction of alleles at two, as-yet-unidentified loci.We used HPLC to identify the different pigments produced in the petals, and qualitative and quantitative RT-PCR to assay for spatio-temporal patterns of expression of different anthocyanin pathway genes.We found that spots contain different pigments from the remainder of the petal, being composed of cyanidin/peonidin-based, instead of malvidin-based anthocyanins. Expression assays of anthocyanin pathway genes show that Dfr2 has a spot-specific expression pattern and acts as a switch for spot production. Co-segregation analyses implicate the gene products of the P and I loci as trans-regulators of this switch. Spot pigments appear earlier in development due to early expression of Dfr2 and F3′h1. Pigments in the background appear later, due to later expression of Dfr1 and F3′5′h1.The evolution of this spot production mechanism appears to have been facilitated by duplication of the Dfr gene and to have required substantial reworking of the anthocyanin pathway regulatory network. PMID:23231386

  1. Genetics and Gene Expression Involving Stress and Distress Pathways in Fibromyalgia with and without Comorbid Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Light, Kathleen C.; White, Andrea T.; Tadler, Scott; Iacob, Eli; Light, Alan R.

    2012-01-01

    In complex multisymptom disorders like fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) that are defined primarily by subjective symptoms, genetic and gene expression profiles can provide very useful objective information. This paper summarizes research on genes that may be linked to increased susceptibility in developing and maintaining these disorders, and research on resting and stressor-evoked changes in leukocyte gene expression, highlighting physiological pathways linked to stress and distress. These include the adrenergic nervous system, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and serotonergic pathways, and exercise responsive metabolite-detecting ion channels. The findings to date provide some support for both inherited susceptibility and/or physiological dysregulation in all three systems, particularly for catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) genes, the glucocorticoid and the related mineralocorticoid receptors (NR3C1, NR3C2), and the purinergic 2X4 (P2X4) ion channel involved as a sensory receptor for muscle pain and fatigue and also in upregulation of spinal microglia in chronic pain models. Methodological concerns for future research, including potential influences of comorbid clinical depression and antidepressants and other medications, on gene expression are also addressed. PMID:22110941

  2. Genetic Diversity of Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae) on the Hawaiian Islands: Implications for an Introduction Pathway Into California.

    PubMed

    Barr, Norman B; Ledezma, Lisa A; Leblanc, Luc; San Jose, Michael; Rubinoff, Daniel; Geib, Scott M; Fujita, Brian; Bartels, David W; Garza, Daniel; Kerr, Peter; Hauser, Martin; Gaimari, Stephen

    2014-10-01

    Population genetic diversity of the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), on the Hawaiian islands of Oahu, Maui, Kauai, and Hawaii (the Big Island) was estimated using DNA sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene. In total, 932 flies representing 36 sampled sites across the four islands were sequenced for a 1,500-bp fragment of the gene named the C1500 marker. Genetic variation was low on the Hawaiian Islands with >96% of flies having just two haplotypes: C1500-Haplotype 1 (63.2%) or C1500-Haplotype 2 (33.3%). The other 33 flies (3.5%) had haplotypes similar to the two dominant haplotypes. No population structure was detected among the islands or within islands. The two haplotypes were present at similar frequencies at each sample site, suggesting that flies on the various islands can be considered one population. Comparison of the Hawaiian data set to DNA sequences of 165 flies from outbreaks in California between 2006 and 2012 indicates that a single-source introduction pathway of Hawaiian origin cannot explain many of the flies in California. Hawaii, however, could not be excluded as a maternal source for 69 flies. There was no clear geographic association for Hawaiian or non-Hawaiian haplotypes in the Bay Area or Los Angeles Basin over time. This suggests that California experienced multiple, independent introductions from different sources. PMID:26309285

  3. Genetic Variants in the Insulin-like Growth Factor Pathway and Colorectal Cancer Risk in the Netherlands Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Colinda C. J. M.; Schouten, Leo J.; Godschalk, Roger W. L.; van Engeland, Manon; van den Brandt, Piet A.; van Schooten, Frederik J.; Weijenberg, Matty P.

    2015-01-01

    Interrelationships between insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), hyperinsulinaemia, diabetes, and colorectal cancer (CRC) indicate involvement of IGFs in colorectal tumorigenesis. We investigated the CRC risk associated with 24 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 9 genes related to the IGF pathway and an IGF1 19-CA repeat polymorphism. Variants were selected from literature and genotyped in toenail DNA from 3,768 subcohort members and 2,580 CRC cases from the Netherlands Cohort Study, which has a case-cohort design (n = 120,852). We used the follow-up period 1986–2002. Eighteen SNPs were unequivocally associated with selected endpoints in the literature and unfavorable alleles were aggregated into a genetic sum score. Cox regression showed that a higher genetic sum score significantly increased CRC risk at all subsites, except the rectum, in men (highest vs. lowest tertile: HR for CRC = 1.36, 95% CI: 1.11, 1.65; P-trend = 0.002). Single SNPs (except the IGF1 SNP rs5742694) were not associated with risk. Models including the total number of IGF1 19-CA repeats showed CRC risk was halved at all subsites in women carrying <38 repeats but not >38 repeats (≤36 versus 38 repeats: HR for CRC = 0.44; 95% CI: 0.33, 0.58; P-trend < 0.001). These findings support a role for variants in IGF-related genes in colorectal tumorigenesis. PMID:26381944

  4. A genetic variant in large tumor suppressor kinase 2 of Hippo signaling pathway contributes to prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Lili; Wen, Juan; Zhao, Tingting; Hu, Zhibin; Song, Ci; Gu, Dongying; He, Mingliang; Lee, Nikki P; Xu, Zhi; Chen, Jinfei

    2016-01-01

    The Hippo pathway plays an important role in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The present study aimed at exploring the genetic variants of Hippo pathway-related genes and their association with HCC prognosis. A total of 331 HCC patients who tested positive for hepatitis B surface antigen were recruited in this study. None of the patients had prior surgical treatment. Twelve potentially functional single-nucleotide polymorphisms (rs7317471 and rs9509492 in LATS2; rs4810446, rs2267853, rs8000, and rs6073627 in MST1; rs10955176 in MST2; and rs16861979, rs2043550, rs16861985, rs1055153, and rs7630434 in TAZ) in the Hippo pathway were genotyped from patients’ peripheral leukocytes using the Sequenom MassARRAY iPLEX platform. Cox proportional hazard models and log-rank test were used for the survival analyses. LATS2 rs7317471 C>T polymorphism was significantly associated with decreased risk of death in HCC using the dominant model (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] =0.63, 95% confidence interval [CI] =0.46–0.87, P=0.004). Furthermore, using stratified analysis, LATS2 rs7317471 CT/TT genotypes were found to be significantly associated with decreased risk of death in patients who were below 53 years of age (adjusted HR =0.50), females (adjusted HR =0.60), smokers (adjusted HR =0.56), drinkers (adjusted HR =0.58), have Barcelona clinic liver cancer stage B (adjusted HR =0.62), and received no prior chemotherapy or transcatheter hepatic arterial chemoembolization (adjusted HR =0.48). Our results suggested that LATS2 rs7317471 could be used as a potential biomarker for the prediction of HCC prognosis. PMID:27110123

  5. Discovering new genetic and psychosocial pathways in Major Depressive Disorder: the NewMood project.

    PubMed

    Freeborough, Annabel; Kimpton, Jessica

    2011-09-01

    The World Health Organisation predicts that Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) will be the second greatest contributor to the global burden of disease by 2020, however, the neurobiological mechanisms behind the disease and the risk factors for it are yet unknown. NewMood (New Molecules for Mood Disorders) was a research project funded by the EU, collaborating work from 10 European countries with the aim of finding new molecular mechanisms behind MDD to develop more effective treatment options. This review explains the aims and objectives of NewMood and how it intends to achieve them with regards to the current literature. It also outlines two of its most recent projects: genome wide association replication study for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) increasing susceptibility to MDD and stress related pathways in depression using the cortisol awakening response (CAR). Both of these studies had significant results and could further contribute to our current understanding of MDD.

  6. miRNA Nomenclature: A View Incorporating Genetic Origins, Biosynthetic Pathways, and Sequence Variants.

    PubMed

    Desvignes, T; Batzel, P; Berezikov, E; Eilbeck, K; Eppig, J T; McAndrews, M S; Singer, A; Postlethwait, J H

    2015-11-01

    High-throughput sequencing of miRNAs has revealed the diversity and variability of mature and functional short noncoding RNAs, including their genomic origins, biogenesis pathways, sequence variability, and newly identified products such as miRNA-offset RNAs (moRs). Here we review known cases of alternative mature miRNA-like RNA fragments and propose a revised definition of miRNAs to encompass this diversity. We then review nomenclature guidelines for miRNAs and propose to extend nomenclature conventions to align with those for protein-coding genes established by international consortia. Finally, we suggest a system to encompass the full complexity of sequence variations (i.e., isomiRs) in the analysis of small RNA sequencing experiments.

  7. Cisplatin Induces Overactivation of the Dormant Primordial Follicle through PTEN/AKT/FOXO3a Pathway which Leads to Loss of Ovarian Reserve in Mice.

    PubMed

    Chang, Eun Mi; Lim, Eunjin; Yoon, Sookyoung; Jeong, Kyungah; Bae, Sijeong; Lee, Dong Ryul; Yoon, Tae Ki; Choi, Youngsok; Lee, Woo Sik

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin is a first-line chemotherapeutic agent for ovarian cancer that acts by promoting DNA cross links and adduct. However drug resistance and considerable side effects including reproductive toxicity remain a significant challenge. PTEN is well known as a tumor suppressor function which plays a fundamental role in the regulation of the cell cycle, apoptosis and development of cancer. At the same time PTEN has been revealed to be critically important for the maintenance of the primordial follicle pool. In this study, we investigated the role of PTEN/Akt/FOXO3 pathway in cisplatin-induced primordial follicle depletion. Cisplatin induced ovarian failure mouse model was used to evaluate how this pathway involves. In vitro maturation was used for oocyte rescue after cisplatin damage. We found that cisplatin treatment decreased PTEN levels, leading to a subsequent increase in the phosphorylation of key molecules in the pathway. The activation of the PTEN/Akt/FOXO3 pathway cascade increased cytoplasmic translocation of FOXO3a in cisplatin-treated follicles, which in turn increased the pool size of growing follicles, and rapidly depleted the number of dormant follicles. Once activated, the follicles were more prone to apoptosis, and their cumulus cells showed a loss of luteinizing hormone (LH) receptor expression, which leads to failure during final maturation and ovulation. In vitro maturation to rescue oocytes in a cisplatin-treated mouse model resulted in successful maturation and fertilization. This study is the first to show the involvement of the PTEN/Akt/FOXO3 pathway in premature ovarian failure after cisplatin treatment and the possibility of rescue through in vitro maturation.

  8. Cisplatin Induces Overactivation of the Dormant Primordial Follicle through PTEN/AKT/FOXO3a Pathway which Leads to Loss of Ovarian Reserve in Mice.

    PubMed

    Chang, Eun Mi; Lim, Eunjin; Yoon, Sookyoung; Jeong, Kyungah; Bae, Sijeong; Lee, Dong Ryul; Yoon, Tae Ki; Choi, Youngsok; Lee, Woo Sik

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin is a first-line chemotherapeutic agent for ovarian cancer that acts by promoting DNA cross links and adduct. However drug resistance and considerable side effects including reproductive toxicity remain a significant challenge. PTEN is well known as a tumor suppressor function which plays a fundamental role in the regulation of the cell cycle, apoptosis and development of cancer. At the same time PTEN has been revealed to be critically important for the maintenance of the primordial follicle pool. In this study, we investigated the role of PTEN/Akt/FOXO3 pathway in cisplatin-induced primordial follicle depletion. Cisplatin induced ovarian failure mouse model was used to evaluate how this pathway involves. In vitro maturation was used for oocyte rescue after cisplatin damage. We found that cisplatin treatment decreased PTEN levels, leading to a subsequent increase in the phosphorylation of key molecules in the pathway. The activation of the PTEN/Akt/FOXO3 pathway cascade increased cytoplasmic translocation of FOXO3a in cisplatin-treated follicles, which in turn increased the pool size of growing follicles, and rapidly depleted the number of dormant follicles. Once activated, the follicles were more prone to apoptosis, and their cumulus cells showed a loss of luteinizing hormone (LH) receptor expression, which leads to failure during final maturation and ovulation. In vitro maturation to rescue oocytes in a cisplatin-treated mouse model resulted in successful maturation and fertilization. This study is the first to show the involvement of the PTEN/Akt/FOXO3 pathway in premature ovarian failure after cisplatin treatment and the possibility of rescue through in vitro maturation. PMID:26656301

  9. Cisplatin Induces Overactivation of the Dormant Primordial Follicle through PTEN/AKT/FOXO3a Pathway which Leads to Loss of Ovarian Reserve in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Eun Mi; Lim, Eunjin; Yoon, Sookyoung; Jeong, Kyungah; Bae, Sijeong; Lee, Dong Ryul; Yoon, Tae Ki

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin is a first-line chemotherapeutic agent for ovarian cancer that acts by promoting DNA cross links and adduct. However drug resistance and considerable side effects including reproductive toxicity remain a significant challenge. PTEN is well known as a tumor suppressor function which plays a fundamental role in the regulation of the cell cycle, apoptosis and development of cancer. At the same time PTEN has been revealed to be critically important for the maintenance of the primordial follicle pool. In this study, we investigated the role of PTEN/Akt/FOXO3 pathway in cisplatin-induced primordial follicle depletion. Cisplatin induced ovarian failure mouse model was used to evaluate how this pathway involves. In vitro maturation was used for oocyte rescue after cisplatin damage. We found that cisplatin treatment decreased PTEN levels, leading to a subsequent increase in the phosphorylation of key molecules in the pathway. The activation of the PTEN/Akt/FOXO3 pathway cascade increased cytoplasmic translocation of FOXO3a in cisplatin-treated follicles, which in turn increased the pool size of growing follicles, and rapidly depleted the number of dormant follicles. Once activated, the follicles were more prone to apoptosis, and their cumulus cells showed a loss of luteinizing hormone (LH) receptor expression, which leads to failure during final maturation and ovulation. In vitro maturation to rescue oocytes in a cisplatin-treated mouse model resulted in successful maturation and fertilization. This study is the first to show the involvement of the PTEN/Akt/FOXO3 pathway in premature ovarian failure after cisplatin treatment and the possibility of rescue through in vitro maturation. PMID:26656301

  10. High-precision Pb isotopic measurements of teeth and environmental samples from Sofia (Bulgaria): insights for regional lead sources and possible pathways to the human body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamenov, George D.

    2008-08-01

    High-precision Pb isotopic measurements on teeth and possible sources in a given area can provide important insights for the lead (Pb) sources and pathways in the human body. Pb isotopic analyses on soils from the area of Sofia, Bulgaria show that Pb is contributed by three end-members represented by two natural sources and leaded gasoline. Sequential leaching experiments reveal that the alumosilicate fraction of the soils is mainly controlled by natural Pb derived from two mountain massifs bordering the city. Around 1/3 to a half of the Pb in the soil leachates, however, can be explained by contamination from leaded gasoline. Contemporary teeth from Sofia residents show very similar Pb isotopic compositions to the soil leachates, also indicating that around 1/3 to a half of the Pb can be explained by derivation from leaded gasoline. The remarkable isotopic similarities between the teeth and the most labile fractions of the local soils suggest that the lead can be derived from the latter. Pb incorporation in the human body via soil-plant-human or soil-plant-animal-human chains is unlikely due to the fact that no significant farming occurs in the city area. The isotopic compositions of the local soil labile fractions can be used as approximation of the bioaccessible lead for humans. Considering all possible scenarios it appears that soil and/or soil-born dust inhalation and/or ingestion is the most probable pathway for incorporation of local soil lead in the local population. The high-precision Pb isotope data presented in this work indicate that apparently the local soil is what plays major role in the human Pb exposure.

  11. The Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase Pathway in Human Cancer: Genetic Alterations and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Arcaro, Alexandre; Guerreiro, Ana S

    2007-01-01

    The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway is frequently activated in human cancer and represents an attractive target for therapies based on small molecule inhibitors. PI3K isoforms play an essential role in the signal transduction events activated by cell surface receptors including receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). There are eight known PI3K isoforms in humans, which have been subdivided into three classes (I-III). Therefore PI3Ks show considerable diversity and it remains unclear which kinases in this family should be targeted in cancer. The class IA of PI3K comprises the p110α, p110β and p110δ isoforms, which associate with activated RTKs. In human cancer, recent reports have described activating mutations in the PIK3CA gene encoding p110α, and inactivating mutations in the phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) gene, a tumour suppressor and antagonist of the PI3K pathway. The PIK3CA mutations described in cancer constitutively activate p110α and, when expressed in cells drive oncogenic transformation. Moreover, these mutations cause the constitutive activation of downstream signaling molecules such as Akt/protein kinase B (PKB), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and ribosomal protein S6 kinase (S6K) that is commonly observed in cancer cells. In addition to p110α, the other isoforms of the PI3K family may also play a role in human cancer, although their individual functions remain to be precisely identified. In this review we will discuss the evidence implicating individual PI3K isoforms in human cancer and their potential as drug targets in this context. PMID:19384426

  12. Comparative Study of Computational Methods for Reconstructing Genetic Networks of Cancer-Related Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Sedaghat, Nafiseh; Saegusa, Takumi; Randolph, Timothy; Shojaie, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Network reconstruction is an important yet challenging task in systems biology. While many methods have been recently proposed for reconstructing biological networks from diverse data types, properties of estimated networks and differences between reconstruction methods are not well understood. In this paper, we conduct a comprehensive empirical evaluation of seven existing network reconstruction methods, by comparing the estimated networks with different sparsity levels for both normal and tumor samples. The results suggest substantial heterogeneity in networks reconstructed using different reconstruction methods. Our findings also provide evidence for significant differences between networks of normal and tumor samples, even after accounting for the considerable variability in structures of networks estimated using different reconstruction methods. These differences can offer new insight into changes in mechanisms of genetic interaction associated with cancer initiation and progression. PMID:25288880

  13. GENETIC AND MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF DNA DAMAGE REPAIR AND TOLERANCE PATHWAYS.

    SciTech Connect

    SUTHERLAND, B.M.

    2001-07-26

    Radiation can damage cellular components, including DNA. Organisms have developed a panoply of means of dealing with DNA damage. Some repair paths have rather narrow substrate specificity (e.g. photolyases), which act on specific pyrimidine photoproducts in a specific type (e.g., DNA) and conformation (double-stranded B conformation) of nucleic acid. Others, for example, nucleotide excision repair, deal with larger classes of damages, in this case bulky adducts in DNA. A detailed discussion of DNA repair mechanisms is beyond the scope of this article, but one can be found in the excellent book of Friedberg et al. [1] for further detail. However, some DNA damages and paths for repair of those damages important for photobiology will be outlined below as a basis for the specific examples of genetic and molecular analysis that will be presented below.

  14. Keap1/Nrf2 pathway activation leads to a repressed hepatic gluconeogenic and lipogenic program in mice on a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Slocum, Stephen L; Skoko, John J; Wakabayashi, Nobunao; Aja, Susan; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Kensler, Thomas W; Chartoumpekis, Dionysios V

    2016-02-01

    The Keap1/Nrf2 pathway, known to regulate the expression of a series of cytoprotective and antioxidant genes, has been studied in the context of obesity and type 2 diabetes; diseases that are characterized by chronic oxidative stress. There is increasing evidence, however, that the transcription factor Nrf2 can crosstalk with pathways not directly related to cytoprotection. Our present work focuses on the effect of Nrf2 on hepatic gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis, two metabolic processes which are dysregulated in the obese/diabetic state. To this end, a genetic mouse model of Nrf2 pathway activation was used (Keap1-hypo; both Keap1 alleles are hypomorphic) and was exposed to a 3-month high-fat diet along with the relevant control wild-type mice. The Keap1-hypo mice were partially protected from obesity, had lower fasting glucose and insulin levels and developed less liver steatosis compared to the wild-type. Key gluconeogenic and lipogenic enzymes were repressed in the Keap1-hypo livers with concomitant activated Ampk signaling. Primary Keap1-hypo hepatocyte cultures also show increased Ampk signaling and repressed glucose production. In conclusion, increased Keap1/Nrf2 signaling in the liver is accompanied by repressed gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis that can, at least partially, explain the ameliorated diabetic phenotype in the Keap1-hypo mice. PMID:26701603

  15. Genetic basis of human complement C4A deficiency. Detection of a point mutation leading to nonexpression.

    PubMed Central

    Barba, G; Rittner, C; Schneider, P M

    1993-01-01

    The fourth component of the human complement system (C4) is coded for by two genes, C4A and C4B, located within the MHC. Null alleles of C4 (C4Q0) are defined by the absence of C4 protein in plasma. These null alleles are due either to large gene deletions or to nonexpression of the respective genes. In a previous study, evidence was obtained for nonexpressed defective genes at the C4A locus, and for gene conversion at the C4B locus. To further characterize the molecular basis of these non-expressed C4A genes, we selected nine pairs of PCR primers from flanking genomic intron sequences to amplify all 41 exons from individuals with a defective C4A gene. The amplified products were subjected to single-stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis to detect possible mutations. PCR products exhibiting a variation in the SSCP pattern were sequenced directly. In 10 of 12 individuals studied, we detected a 2-bp insertion in exon 29 leading to nonexpression due to the creation of a termination codon, which was observed in linkage to the haplotype HLA-B60-DR6 in seven cases. In one of the other two individuals without this mutation, evidence was obtained for gene conversion to the C4B isotype. The genetic basis of C4A nonexpression in the second individual is not yet known and will be subject to further analysis. Images PMID:8473511

  16. Can joined-up data lead to joined-up thinking? The Western Australian developmental pathways project.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Fiona; Glauert, Rebecca; McKenzie, Anne; O'Donnell, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    Modern societies are challenged by "wicked problems" - by definition, those that are difficult to define, multi-causal and hard to treat. Problems such as low birth weight, obesity, mental ill health, teenage pregnancy, educational difficulties and juvenile crime fit this category. Given the complex nature of these problems, they require the best data in order to measure them, guide policy frameworks and evaluate whether the steps taken to address them are actually making a difference. What such problems really require are joined-up approaches to enable effective solutions. In this paper, we describe a unique initiative to encourage a more preventive, whole-of-government approach to these problems - the Developmental Pathways Project, which has enabled the linkage of a large number of de-identified administrative databases in order to explore the pathways into and out of the negative outcomes affecting our children and youth. This project has not only enabled the linkage of agency data, but also of agency personnel, in order to improve and promote cross-agency research, policy and preventive solutions. Through the use of these linkages we are attempting to shift the paradigm to encourage agencies to appreciate that these "wicked problems" demand a preventive approach, as well as the provision of effective services for those already affected.

  17. Prenatal inhibition of the kynurenine pathway leads to structural changes in the hippocampus of adult rat offspring

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Omari S; Pisar, Mazura; Forrest, Caroline M; Vincenten, Maria C J; Darlington, L Gail; Stone, Trevor W

    2014-01-01

    Glutamate receptors for N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) are involved in early brain development. The kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism includes the NMDA receptor agonist quinolinic acid and the antagonist kynurenic acid. We now report that prenatal inhibition of the pathway in rats with 3,4-dimethoxy-N-[4-(3-nitrophenyl)thiazol-2-yl]benzenesulphonamide (Ro61-8048) produces marked changes in hippocampal neuron morphology, spine density and the immunocytochemical localisation of developmental proteins in the offspring at postnatal day 60. Golgi–Cox silver staining revealed decreased overall numbers and lengths of CA1 basal dendrites and secondary basal dendrites, together with fewer basal dendritic spines and less overall dendritic complexity in the basal arbour. Fewer dendrites and less complexity were also noted in the dentate gyrus granule cells. More neurons containing the nuclear marker NeuN and the developmental protein sonic hedgehog were detected in the CA1 region and dentate gyrus. Staining for doublecortin revealed fewer newly generated granule cells bearing extended dendritic processes. The number of neuron terminals staining for vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT)-1 and VGLUT-2 was increased by Ro61-8048, with no change in expression of vesicular GABA transporter or its co-localisation with vesicle-associated membrane protein-1. These data support the view that constitutive kynurenine metabolism normally plays a role in early embryonic brain development, and that interfering with it has profound consequences for neuronal structure and morphology, lasting into adulthood. PMID:24646396

  18. Cadmium exposure activates the ERK signaling pathway leading to altered osteoblast gene expression and apoptotic death in Saos-2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Arbon, Kate S.; Christensen, Cody M.; Harvey, Wendy A.; Heggland, Sara J.

    2012-01-01

    Recent reports of cadmium in electronic waste and jewelry have increased public awareness regarding this toxic metal. Human exposure to cadmium is associated with the development of osteoporosis. We previously reported cadmium induces apoptosis in human tumor-derived Saos-2 osteoblasts. In this study, we examine the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) and protein kinase C (PKC) pathways in cadmium-induced apoptosis and altered osteoblast gene expression. Saos-2 osteoblasts were cultured in the presence or absence of 10 μM CdCl2 for 2–72 hours. We detected significant ERK activation in response to CdCl2 and pretreatment with the ERK inhibitor PD98059 attenuated cadmium-induced apoptosis. However, PKCα activation was not observed after exposure to CdCl2 and pretreatment with the PKC inhibitor, Calphostin C, was unable to rescue cells from cadmium-induced apoptosis. Gene expression studies were conducted using qPCR. Cells exposed to CdCl2 exhibited a significant decrease in the bone-forming genes osteopontin (OPN) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) mRNA. In contrast, SOST, whose protein product inhibits bone formation, significantly increased in response to CdCl2. Pretreatment with PD98059 had a recovery effect on cadmium-induced changes in gene expression. This research demonstrates cadmium can directly inhibit osteoblasts via ERK signaling pathway and identifies SOST as a target for cadmium-induced osteotoxicity. PMID:22019892

  19. Thrombin stimulation of inflammatory breast cancer cells leads to aggressiveness via the EGFR-PAR1-Pak1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Ohshiro, Kazufumi; Bui-Nguyen, Tri M; Divijendra Natha, Reddy S; Schwartz, Arnold M; Levine, Paul; Kumar, Rakesh

    2012-12-27

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) accounts for a small fraction but aggressive form of epithelial breast cancer. Although the role of thrombin in cancer is beginning to be unfolded, its impact on the biology of IBC remains unknown. The purpose of this study was to establish the role of thrombin on the invasiveness of IBC cells. The IBC SUM149 cell line was treated with thrombin in the absence or presence of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor erlotinib and protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) inhibitor. The effects of pharmacological inhibitors on the ability of thrombin to stimulate the growth rate and invasiveness were examined. We found that the inhibition of putative cellular targets of thrombin action suppresses both the growth and invasiveness of SUM149 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, thrombin-mediated increased invasion of SUM149 cells was routed through EGFR phosphorylation, and in turn, stimulation of the p21-activated kinase (Pak1) activity in a EGFR-sensitive manner. Interestingly, thrombin-mediated activation of the Pak1 pathway stimulation was blocked by erlotinib and PAR1 inhibitor. For proof-of-principle studies, we found immunohistochemical evidence of Pak1 activation as well as expression of PAR1 in IBC. Thrombin utilizes EGFR to relay signals promoting SUM149 cell growth and invasion via the Pak1 pathway. The study provides the rationale for future therapeutic approaches in mitigating the invasive nature of IBC by targeting Pak1 and/or EGFR.

  20. A Genetic Pathway Conferring Life Extension and Resistance to Uv Stress in Caenorhabditis Elegans

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, S.; Johnson, T. E.

    1996-01-01

    A variety of mechanisms have been proposed to explain the extension of adult life span (Age) seen in several mutants in Caenorhabditis elegans (age-1: an altered aging rate; daf-2 and daf-23: activation of a dauer-specific longevity program; spe-26: reduced fertility; clk-1: an altered biological clock). Using an assay for ultraviolet (UV) resistance in young adult hermaphrodites (survival after UV irradiation), we observed that all these Age mutants show increased resistance to UV. Moreover, mutations in daf-16 suppressed the UV resistance as well as the increased longevity of all the Age mutants. In contrast to the multiple mechanisms initially proposed, these results suggest that a single, daf-16-dependent pathway, specifies both extended life span and increased UV resistance. The mutations in daf-16 did not alter the reduced fertility of spe-26 and interestingly a daf-16 mutant is more fertile than wild type. We propose that life span and some aspects of stress resistance are jointly negatively regulated by a set of gerontogenes (genes whose alteration causes life extension) in C. elegans. PMID:8807294

  1. A model for genetic and epigenetic regulatory networks identifies rare pathways for transcription factor induced pluripotency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artyomov, Maxim; Meissner, Alex; Chakraborty, Arup

    2010-03-01

    Most cells in an organism have the same DNA. Yet, different cell types express different proteins and carry out different functions. This is because of epigenetic differences; i.e., DNA in different cell types is packaged distinctly, making it hard to express certain genes while facilitating the expression of others. During development, upon receipt of appropriate cues, pluripotent embryonic stem cells differentiate into diverse cell types that make up the organism (e.g., a human). There has long been an effort to make this process go backward -- i.e., reprogram a differentiated cell (e.g., a skin cell) to pluripotent status. Recently, this has been achieved by transfecting certain transcription factors into differentiated cells. This method does not use embryonic material and promises the development of patient-specific regenerative medicine, but it is inefficient. The mechanisms that make reprogramming rare, or even possible, are poorly understood. We have developed the first computational model of transcription factor-induced reprogramming. Results obtained from the model are consistent with diverse observations, and identify the rare pathways that allow reprogramming to occur. If validated, our model could be further developed to design optimal strategies for reprogramming and shed light on basic questions in biology.

  2. Chemical genetics reveals negative regulation of abscisic acid signaling by a plant immune response pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Houn; Hauser, Felix; Ha, Tracy; Xue, Shaowu; Böhmer, Maik; Nishimura, Noriyuki; Munemasa, Shintaro; Hubbard, Katharine; Peine, Nora; Lee, Byeong-Ha; Lee, Stephen; Robert, Nadia; Parker, Jane E; Schroeder, Julian I

    2011-06-01

    Coordinated regulation of protection mechanisms against environmental abiotic stress and pathogen attack is essential for plant adaptation and survival. Initial abiotic stress can interfere with disease-resistance signaling [1-6]. Conversely, initial plant immune signaling may interrupt subsequent abscisic acid (ABA) signal transduction [7, 8]. However, the processes involved in this crosstalk between these signaling networks have not been determined. By screening a 9600-compound chemical library, we identified a small molecule [5-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)furan-2-yl]-piperidine-1-ylmethanethione (DFPM) that rapidly downregulates ABA-dependent gene expression and also inhibits ABA-induced stomatal closure. Transcriptome analyses show that DFPM also stimulates expression of plant defense-related genes. Major early regulators of pathogen-resistance responses, including EDS1, PAD4, RAR1, and SGT1b, are required for DFPM-and notably also for Pseudomonas-interference with ABA signal transduction, whereas salicylic acid, EDS16, and NPR1 are not necessary. Although DFPM does not interfere with early ABA perception by PYR/RCAR receptors or ABA activation of SnRK2 kinases, it disrupts cytosolic Ca(2+) signaling and downstream anion channel activation in a PAD4-dependent manner. Our findings provide evidence that activation of EDS1/PAD4-dependent plant immune responses rapidly disrupts ABA signal transduction and that this occurs at the level of Ca(2+) signaling, illuminating how the initial biotic stress pathway interferes with ABA signaling.

  3. Complement alternative pathway genetic variation and Dengue infection in the Thai population.

    PubMed

    Kraivong, R; Vasanawathana, S; Limpitikul, W; Malasit, P; Tangthawornchaikul, N; Botto, M; Screaton, G R; Mongkolsapaya, J; Pickering, M C

    2013-11-01

    Dengue disease is a mosquito-borne infection caused by Dengue virus. Infection may be asymptomatic or variably manifest as mild Dengue fever (DF) to the most severe form, Dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF). Mechanisms that influence disease severity are not understood. Complement, an integral component of the immune system, is activated during Dengue infection and the degree of activation increases with disease severity. Activation of the complement alternative pathway is influenced by polymorphisms within activation (factor B rs12614/rs641153, C3 rs2230199) and regulatory [complement factor H (CFH) rs800292] proteins, collectively termed a complotype. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the complotype influences disease severity during secondary Dengue infection. In addition to the complotype, we also assessed two other disease-associated CFH polymorphisms (rs1061170, rs3753394) and a structural polymorphism within the CFH protein family. We did not detect any significant association between the examined polymorphisms and Dengue infection severity in the Thai population. However, the minor allele frequencies of the factor B and C3 polymorphisms were less than 10%, so our study was not sufficiently powered to detect an association at these loci. We were also unable to detect a direct interaction between CFH and Dengue NS1 using both recombinant NS1 and DV2-infected culture supernatants. We conclude that the complotype does not influence secondary Dengue infection severity in the Thai population.

  4. Jatropha curcas, a biofuel crop: Functional genomics for understanding metabolic pathways and genetic improvement

    PubMed Central

    Maghuly, Fatemeh; Laimer, Margit

    2013-01-01

    Jatropha curcas is currently attracting much attention as an oilseed crop for biofuel, as Jatropha can grow under climate and soil conditions that are unsuitable for food production. However, little is known about Jatropha, and there are a number of challenges to be overcome. In fact, Jatropha has not really been domesticated; most of the Jatropha accessions are toxic, which renders the seedcake unsuitable for use as animal feed. The seeds of Jatropha contain high levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids, which negatively impact the biofuel quality. Fruiting of Jatropha is fairly continuous, thus increasing costs of harvesting. Therefore, before starting any improvement program using conventional or molecular breeding techniques, understanding gene function and the genome scale of Jatropha are prerequisites. This review presents currently available and relevant information on the latest technologies (genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics) to decipher important metabolic pathways within Jatropha, such as oil and toxin synthesis. Further, it discusses future directions for biotechnological approaches in Jatropha breeding and improvement. PMID:24092674

  5. A Coupled Chemical Genetic and Bioinformatic Approach to Polo-like Kinase Pathway Exploration

    PubMed Central

    Paulson, Jennifer L.; Sullivan, Matthew; Lowery, Drew M.; Cohen, Michael S.; Zhang, Chao; Randle, David H.; Taunton, Jack; Yaffe, Michael B.; Morgan, David O.; Shokat, Kevan M.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Protein phosphorylation is a ubiquitous mechanism for cellular signal propagation, and signaling network complexity presents a challenge to protein kinase substrate identification. Few targets of Polo-like kinases are known, despite their significant role in coordinating cell cycle progression. Here, we combine chemical genetic, bioinformatic, and proteomic tools for Polo-like kinase substrate identification. Monospecific pharmacological inhibition of budding yeast Polo-like kinase, Cdc5, resulted in a misaligned pre-anaphase spindle and subsequently delayed anaphase nuclear migration, revealing a novel Cdc5 function. A cellular screen for Cdc5 substrates identified Spc72, a spindle pole body (SPB) component and microtubule anchor required for nuclear positioning. Spc72 bound to the Cdc5 PBD in a mitosis-specific manner, was phosphorylated by Cdc5 in vitro, and demonstrated a loss of mitotic phosphorylation in vivo upon Cdc5 inhibition. Finally, an examination of Cdc5 binding by SPB-localized proteins expanded our knowledge of Cdc5 function at the SPB. PMID:18022565

  6. Genetic recombination pathways and their application for genome modification of human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, Mikko; Tuuri, Timo; Savilahti, Harri

    2010-10-01

    Human embryonic stem cells are pluripotent cells derived from early human embryo and retain a potential to differentiate into all adult cell types. They provide vast opportunities in cell replacement therapies and are expected to become significant tools in drug discovery as well as in the studies of cellular and developmental functions of human genes. The progress in applying different types of DNA recombination reactions for genome modification in a variety of eukaryotic cell types has provided means to utilize recombination-based strategies also in human embryonic stem cells. Homologous recombination-based methods, particularly those utilizing extended homologous regions and those employing zinc finger nucleases to boost genomic integration, have shown their usefulness in efficient genome modification. Site-specific recombination systems are potent genome modifiers, and they can be used to integrate DNA into loci that contain an appropriate recombination signal sequence, either naturally occurring or suitably pre-engineered. Non-homologous recombination can be used to generate random integrations in genomes relatively effortlessly, albeit with a moderate efficiency and precision. DNA transposition-based strategies offer substantially more efficient random strategies and provide means to generate single-copy insertions, thus potentiating the generation of genome-wide insertion libraries applicable in genetic screens.

  7. Human genetics in rheumatoid arthritis guides a high-throughput drug screen of the CD40 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Diogo, Dorothée; Wu, Di; Spoonamore, Jim; Dancik, Vlado; Franke, Lude; Kurreeman, Fina; Rossin, Elizabeth J; Duclos, Grant; Hartland, Cathy; Zhou, Xuezhong; Li, Kejie; Liu, Jun; De Jager, Philip L; Siminovitch, Katherine A; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Bowes, John; Eyre, Steve; Padyukov, Leonid; Gregersen, Peter K; Worthington, Jane; Gupta, Namrata; Clemons, Paul A; Stahl, Eli; Tolliday, Nicola; Plenge, Robert M

    2013-05-01

    Although genetic and non-genetic studies in mouse and human implicate the CD40 pathway in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), there are no approved drugs that inhibit CD40 signaling for clinical care in RA or any other disease. Here, we sought to understand the biological consequences of a CD40 risk variant in RA discovered by a previous genome-wide association study (GWAS) and to perform a high-throughput drug screen for modulators of CD40 signaling based on human genetic findings. First, we fine-map the CD40 risk locus in 7,222 seropositive RA patients and 15,870 controls, together with deep sequencing of CD40 coding exons in 500 RA cases and 650 controls, to identify a single SNP that explains the entire signal of association (rs4810485, P = 1.4×10(-9)). Second, we demonstrate that subjects homozygous for the RA risk allele have ∼33% more CD40 on the surface of primary human CD19+ B lymphocytes than subjects homozygous for the non-risk allele (P = 10(-9)), a finding corroborated by expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analysis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 1,469 healthy control individuals. Third, we use retroviral shRNA infection to perturb the amount of CD40 on the surface of a human B lymphocyte cell line (BL2) and observe a direct correlation between amount of CD40 protein and phosphorylation of RelA (p65), a subunit of the NF-κB transcription factor. Finally, we develop a high-throughput NF-κB luciferase reporter assay in BL2 cells activated with trimerized CD40 ligand (tCD40L) and conduct an HTS of 1,982 chemical compounds and FDA-approved drugs. After a series of counter-screens and testing in primary human CD19+ B cells, we identify 2 novel chemical inhibitors not previously implicated in inflammation or CD40-mediated NF-κB signaling. Our study demonstrates proof-of-concept that human genetics can be used to guide the development of phenotype-based, high-throughput small-molecule screens to identify potential novel therapies in

  8. Human Genetics in Rheumatoid Arthritis Guides a High-Throughput Drug Screen of the CD40 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Diogo, Dorothée; Wu, Di; Spoonamore, Jim; Dancik, Vlado; Franke, Lude; Kurreeman, Fina; Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Duclos, Grant; Hartland, Cathy; Zhou, Xuezhong; Li, Kejie; Liu, Jun; De Jager, Philip L.; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Bowes, John; Eyre, Steve; Padyukov, Leonid; Gregersen, Peter K.; Worthington, Jane; Gupta, Namrata; Clemons, Paul A.; Stahl, Eli; Tolliday, Nicola; Plenge, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Although genetic and non-genetic studies in mouse and human implicate the CD40 pathway in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), there are no approved drugs that inhibit CD40 signaling for clinical care in RA or any other disease. Here, we sought to understand the biological consequences of a CD40 risk variant in RA discovered by a previous genome-wide association study (GWAS) and to perform a high-throughput drug screen for modulators of CD40 signaling based on human genetic findings. First, we fine-map the CD40 risk locus in 7,222 seropositive RA patients and 15,870 controls, together with deep sequencing of CD40 coding exons in 500 RA cases and 650 controls, to identify a single SNP that explains the entire signal of association (rs4810485, P = 1.4×10−9). Second, we demonstrate that subjects homozygous for the RA risk allele have ∼33% more CD40 on the surface of primary human CD19+ B lymphocytes than subjects homozygous for the non-risk allele (P = 10−9), a finding corroborated by expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analysis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 1,469 healthy control individuals. Third, we use retroviral shRNA infection to perturb the amount of CD40 on the surface of a human B lymphocyte cell line (BL2) and observe a direct correlation between amount of CD40 protein and phosphorylation of RelA (p65), a subunit of the NF-κB transcription factor. Finally, we develop a high-throughput NF-κB luciferase reporter assay in BL2 cells activated with trimerized CD40 ligand (tCD40L) and conduct an HTS of 1,982 chemical compounds and FDA–approved drugs. After a series of counter-screens and testing in primary human CD19+ B cells, we identify 2 novel chemical inhibitors not previously implicated in inflammation or CD40-mediated NF-κB signaling. Our study demonstrates proof-of-concept that human genetics can be used to guide the development of phenotype-based, high-throughput small-molecule screens to identify potential novel therapies in

  9. Genetic Inactivation of ATRX Leads to a Decrease in the Amount of Telomeric Cohesin and Level of Telomere Transcription in Human Glioma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Eid, Rita; Demattei, Marie-Véronique; Episkopou, Harikleia; Augé-Gouillou, Corinne; Decottignies, Anabelle; Grandin, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in ATRX (alpha thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked), a chromatin-remodeling protein, are associated with the telomerase-independent ALT (alternative lengthening of telomeres) pathway of telomere maintenance in several types of cancer, including human gliomas. In telomerase-positive glioma cells, we found by immunofluorescence that ATRX localized not far from the chromosome ends but not exactly at the telomere termini. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments confirmed a subtelomeric localization for ATRX, yet short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated genetic inactivation of ATRX failed to trigger the ALT pathway. Cohesin has been recently shown to be part of telomeric chromatin. Here, using ChIP, we showed that genetic inactivation of ATRX provoked diminution in the amount of cohesin in subtelomeric regions of telomerase-positive glioma cells. Inactivation of ATRX also led to diminution in the amount of TERRAs, noncoding RNAs resulting from transcription of telomeric DNA, as well as to a decrease in RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) levels at the telomeres. Our data suggest that ATRX might establish functional interactions with cohesin on telomeric chromatin in order to control TERRA levels and that one or the other or both of these events might be relevant to the triggering of the ALT pathway in cancer cells that exhibit genetic inactivation of ATRX. PMID:26055325

  10. Erythritol feeds the pentose phosphate pathway via three new isomerases leading to D-erythrose-4-phosphate in Brucella

    PubMed Central

    Barbier, Thibault; Collard, François; Zúñiga-Ripa, Amaia; Moriyón, Ignacio; Godard, Thibault; Becker, Judith; Wittmann, Christoph; Van Schaftingen, Emile; Letesson, Jean-Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Erythritol is an important nutrient for several α-2 Proteobacteria, including N2-fixing plant endosymbionts and Brucella, a worldwide pathogen that finds this four-carbon polyol in genital tissues. Erythritol metabolism involves phosphorylation to l-erythritol-4-phosphate by the kinase EryA and oxidation of the latter to l-3-tetrulose 4-phosphate by the dehydrogenase EryB. It is accepted that further steps involve oxidation by the putative dehydrogenase EryC and subsequent decarboxylation to yield triose-phosphates. Accordingly, growth on erythritol as the sole C source should require aldolase and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase to produce essential hexose-6-monophosphate. However, we observed that a mutant devoid of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatases grew normally on erythritol and that EryC, which was assumed to be a dehydrogenase, actually belongs to the xylose isomerase superfamily. Moreover, we found that TpiA2 and RpiB, distant homologs of triose phosphate isomerase and ribose 5-phosphate isomerase B, were necessary, as previously shown for Rhizobium. By using purified recombinant enzymes, we demonstrated that l-3-tetrulose-4-phosphate was converted to d-erythrose 4-phosphate through three previously unknown isomerization reactions catalyzed by EryC (tetrulose-4-phosphate racemase), TpiA2 (d-3-tetrulose-4-phosphate isomerase; renamed EryH), and RpiB (d-erythrose-4-phosphate isomerase; renamed EryI), a pathway fully consistent with the isotopomer distribution of the erythrose-4-phosphate-derived amino acids phenylalanine and tyrosine obtained from bacteria grown on 13C-labeled erythritol. d-Erythrose-4-phosphate is then converted by enzymes of the pentose phosphate pathway to glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate and fructose 6-phosphate, thus bypassing fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase. This is the first description to our knowledge of a route feeding carbohydrate metabolism exclusively via d-erythrose 4-phosphate, a pathway that may provide clues to the preferential metabolism of

  11. Erythritol feeds the pentose phosphate pathway via three new isomerases leading to D-erythrose-4-phosphate in Brucella.

    PubMed

    Barbier, Thibault; Collard, François; Zúñiga-Ripa, Amaia; Moriyón, Ignacio; Godard, Thibault; Becker, Judith; Wittmann, Christoph; Van Schaftingen, Emile; Letesson, Jean-Jacques

    2014-12-16

    Erythritol is an important nutrient for several α-2 Proteobacteria, including N2-fixing plant endosymbionts and Brucella, a worldwide pathogen that finds this four-carbon polyol in genital tissues. Erythritol metabolism involves phosphorylation to L-erythritol-4-phosphate by the kinase EryA and oxidation of the latter to L-3-tetrulose 4-phosphate by the dehydrogenase EryB. It is accepted that further steps involve oxidation by the putative dehydrogenase EryC and subsequent decarboxylation to yield triose-phosphates. Accordingly, growth on erythritol as the sole C source should require aldolase and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase to produce essential hexose-6-monophosphate. However, we observed that a mutant devoid of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatases grew normally on erythritol and that EryC, which was assumed to be a dehydrogenase, actually belongs to the xylose isomerase superfamily. Moreover, we found that TpiA2 and RpiB, distant homologs of triose phosphate isomerase and ribose 5-phosphate isomerase B, were necessary, as previously shown for Rhizobium. By using purified recombinant enzymes, we demonstrated that L-3-tetrulose-4-phosphate was converted to D-erythrose 4-phosphate through three previously unknown isomerization reactions catalyzed by EryC (tetrulose-4-phosphate racemase), TpiA2 (D-3-tetrulose-4-phosphate isomerase; renamed EryH), and RpiB (D-erythrose-4-phosphate isomerase; renamed EryI), a pathway fully consistent with the isotopomer distribution of the erythrose-4-phosphate-derived amino acids phenylalanine and tyrosine obtained from bacteria grown on (13)C-labeled erythritol. D-erythrose-4-phosphate is then converted by enzymes of the pentose phosphate pathway to glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate and fructose 6-phosphate, thus bypassing fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase. This is the first description to our knowledge of a route feeding carbohydrate metabolism exclusively via D-erythrose 4-phosphate, a pathway that may provide clues to the preferential metabolism of

  12. Genetic Variation in the Inflammation and Innate Immunity Pathways and Colorectal Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hansong; Taverna, Darin; Stram, Daniel O.; Fortini, Barbara K.; Cheng, Iona; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Burnett, Terrilea; Makar, Karen W.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Hopper, John L.; Gallinger, Steve; Baron, John A.; Haile, Robert; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Henderson, Brian E.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Casey, Graham; Duggan, David; Ulrich, Cornelia M.; Le Marchand, Loïc

    2013-01-01

    Background It is widely accepted that chronic inflammation plays a role in the etiology of colorectal cancer. Using a two-stage design, we examined the associations between colorectal cancer and common variation in 37 key genes in the inflammation and innate immunity pathways. Methods In the discovery stage, 2,322 discordant sibships (2,535 cases, 3,915 sibling controls) from the Colorectal Cancer Family Registry were genotyped for over 600 tagSNPs and 99 SNPs were selected for further examination based on strength of association. In the second stage, 351 SNPs tagging gene regions covered by the 99 SNPs were tested in 4,783 Multiethnic Cohort subjects (2,153 cases, 2,630 controls). Results The association between rs9858822 in the PPARG gene and colorectal cancer was statistically significant at the end of the second stage (odds ratio per allele = 1.36, Bonferroni-adjusted P = 0.045), based on the “effective” number of markers in Stage 2 (n = 306). The risk allele C was common (frequency 0.3) in African Americans but rare (frequency < 0.03) in whites, Japanese Americans, Latinos and Native Hawaiians. No statistically significant heterogeneity of effects across race/ethnicity, BMI levels, regular aspirin use or pack-years of smoking was detected for this SNP. Suggestive associations were also observed for several SNPs in close vicinity to rs9858822. Conclusions Our results provide new evidence of association between PPARG variants and colorectal cancer risk. Impact Further replication in independent samples is warranted. PMID:24045924

  13. A Cbfa1-dependent genetic pathway controls bone formation beyond embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Ducy, P; Starbuck, M; Priemel, M; Shen, J; Pinero, G; Geoffroy, V; Amling, M; Karsenty, G

    1999-04-15

    The molecular mechanisms controlling bone extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition by differentiated osteoblasts in postnatal life, called hereafter bone formation, are unknown. This contrasts with the growing knowledge about the genetic control of osteoblast differentiation during embryonic development. Cbfa1, a transcriptional activator of osteoblast differentiation during embryonic development, is also expressed in differentiated osteoblasts postnatally. The perinatal lethality occurring in Cbfa1-deficient mice has prevented so far the study of its function after birth. To determine if Cbfa1 plays a role during bone formation we generated transgenic mice overexpressing Cbfa1 DNA-binding domain (DeltaCbfa1) in differentiated osteoblasts only postnatally. DeltaCbfa1 has a higher affinity for DNA than Cbfa1 itself, has no transcriptional activity on its own, and can act in a dominant-negative manner in DNA cotransfection assays. DeltaCbfa1-expressing mice have a normal skeleton at birth but develop an osteopenic phenotype thereafter. Dynamic histomorphometric studies show that this phenotype is caused by a major decrease in the bone formation rate in the face of a normal number of osteoblasts thus indicating that once osteoblasts are differentiated Cbfa1 regulates their function. Molecular analyses reveal that the expression of the genes expressed in osteoblasts and encoding bone ECM proteins is nearly abolished in transgenic mice, and ex vivo assays demonstrated that DeltaCbfa1-expressing osteoblasts were less active than wild-type osteoblasts. We also show that Cbfa1 regulates positively the activity of its own promoter, which has the highest affinity Cbfa1-binding sites characterized. This study demonstrates that beyond its differentiation function Cbfa1 is the first transcriptional activator of bone formation identified to date and illustrates that developmentally important genes control physiological processes postnatally. PMID:10215629

  14. Molecular, genetic and epigenetic pathways of peroxynitrite-induced cellular toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Korkmaz, Ahmet; Oter, Sukru; Seyrek, Melik; Topal, Turgut

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a key role in the pathogenesis of cancer and many metabolic diseases; therefore, an effective antioxidant therapy would be of great importance in these circumstances. Nevertheless, convincing randomized clinical trials revealed that antioxidant supplementations were not associated with significant reduction in incidence of cancer, chronic diseases and all-cause mortality. As oxidation of essential molecules continues, it turns to nitro-oxidative stress because of the involvement of nitric oxide in pathogenesis processes. Peroxynitrite damages via several distinctive mechanisms; first, it has direct toxic effects on all biomolecules and causes lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and DNA damage. The second mechanism involves the induction of several transcription factors leading to cytokine-induced chronic inflammation. Finally, it causes epigenetic perturbations that exaggerate nuclear factor kappa-B mediated inflammatory gene expression. Lessons-learned from the treatment of several chronic disorders including pulmonary diseases suggest that, chronic inflammation and glucocorticoid resistance are regulated by prolonged peroxynitrite production. PMID:21217858

  15. A New Signaling Pathway for HCV Inhibition by Estrogen: GPR30 Activation Leads to Cleavage of Occludin by MMP-9.

    PubMed

    Ulitzky, Laura; Lafer, Manuel M; KuKuruga, Mark A; Silberstein, Erica; Cehan, Nicoleta; Taylor, Deborah R

    2016-01-01

    Poor outcome in response to hepatitis C virus, including higher viral load, hepatocellular carcinoma and cirrhosis, is more associated with men and postmenopausal women than with premenopausal women and women receiving hormone replacement therapy, suggesting that β-estradiol plays an innate role in preventing viral infection and liver disease. Consequently, most research in the field has concluded that estrogen affects HCV replication through viral interactions with estrogen receptor-α. Previously, estrogen-like antagonists, including Tamoxifen, were shown to reduce HCV RNA production and prevent viral entry, although the authors did not identify host factors involved. Estrogen can act alternatively through the membrane-bound G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor, GPR30. Here, human hepatoma Huh7.5 cells were infected with HCV J6/JFH-1 and treated with estrogen or Tamoxifen, resulting in a marked decrease in detectable virus. The effect was mimicked by G1, a GPR30-specific agonist, and was reversed by the GPR30-specific antagonist, G15. While previous studies have demonstrated that estrogen down-regulated occludin in cervical cancer cells, its action on liver cells was unknown. Occludin is a tight junction protein and HCV receptor and here we report that activation and cellular export of MMP-9 led to the cleavage of occludin upon estrogen treatment of liver cells. This is the first report of the cleavage of an HCV receptor in response to estrogen. We also identify the occludin cleavage site in extracellular Domain D; the motif required for HCV entry and spread. This pathway gives new insight into a novel innate antiviral pathway and the suboptimal environment that estrogen provides for the proliferation of the virus. It may also explain the disparate host-virus responses to HCV demonstrated by the two sexes. Moreover, these data suggest that hormone replacement therapy may have beneficial antiviral enhancement properties for HCV-infected postmenopausal women and

  16. A New Signaling Pathway for HCV Inhibition by Estrogen: GPR30 Activation Leads to Cleavage of Occludin by MMP-9

    PubMed Central

    Ulitzky, Laura; Lafer, Manuel M.; KuKuruga, Mark A.; Silberstein, Erica; Cehan, Nicoleta; Taylor, Deborah R.

    2016-01-01

    Poor outcome in response to hepatitis C virus, including higher viral load, hepatocellular carcinoma and cirrhosis, is more associated with men and postmenopausal women than with premenopausal women and women receiving hormone replacement therapy, suggesting that β-estradiol plays an innate role in preventing viral infection and liver disease. Consequently, most research in the field has concluded that estrogen affects HCV replication through viral interactions with estrogen receptor-α. Previously, estrogen-like antagonists, including Tamoxifen, were shown to reduce HCV RNA production and prevent viral entry, although the authors did not identify host factors involved. Estrogen can act alternatively through the membrane-bound G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor, GPR30. Here, human hepatoma Huh7.5 cells were infected with HCV J6/JFH-1 and treated with estrogen or Tamoxifen, resulting in a marked decrease in detectable virus. The effect was mimicked by G1, a GPR30-specific agonist, and was reversed by the GPR30-specific antagonist, G15. While previous studies have demonstrated that estrogen down-regulated occludin in cervical cancer cells, its action on liver cells was unknown. Occludin is a tight junction protein and HCV receptor and here we report that activation and cellular export of MMP-9 led to the cleavage of occludin upon estrogen treatment of liver cells. This is the first report of the cleavage of an HCV receptor in response to estrogen. We also identify the occludin cleavage site in extracellular Domain D; the motif required for HCV entry and spread. This pathway gives new insight into a novel innate antiviral pathway and the suboptimal environment that estrogen provides for the proliferation of the virus. It may also explain the disparate host-virus responses to HCV demonstrated by the two sexes. Moreover, these data suggest that hormone replacement therapy may have beneficial antiviral enhancement properties for HCV-infected postmenopausal women and

  17. Development of the adverse outcome pathway "alkylation of DNA in male premeiotic germ cells leading to heritable mutations" using the OECD's users' handbook supplement.

    PubMed

    Yauk, Carole L; Lambert, Iain B; Meek, M E Bette; Douglas, George R; Marchetti, Francesco

    2015-12-01

    The Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development's (OECD) Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) programme aims to develop a knowledgebase of all known pathways of toxicity that lead to adverse effects in humans and ecosystems. A Users' Handbook was recently released to provide supplementary guidance on AOP development. This article describes one AOP-alkylation of DNA in male premeiotic germ cells leading to heritable mutations. This outcome is an important regulatory endpoint. The AOP describes the biological plausibility and empirical evidence supporting that compounds capable of alkylating DNA cause germ cell mutations and subsequent mutations in the offspring of exposed males. Alkyl adducts are subject to DNA repair; however, at high doses the repair machinery becomes saturated. Lack of repair leads to replication of alkylated DNA and ensuing mutations in male premeiotic germ cells. Mutations that do not impair spermatogenesis persist and eventually are present in mature sperm. Thus, the mutations are transmitted to the offspring. Although there are some gaps in empirical support and evidence for essentiality of the key events for certain aspects of this AOP, the overall AOP is generally accepted as dogma and applies broadly to any species that produces sperm. The AOP was developed and used in an iterative process to test and refine the Users' Handbook, and is one of the first publicly available AOPs. It is our hope that this AOP will be leveraged to develop other AOPs in this field to advance method development, computational models to predict germ cell effects, and integrated testing strategies. PMID:26010389

  18. The circumvention of the natural biopurification of calcium along nutrient pathways by atmospheric inputs of industrial lead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, Robert W.; Hirao, Yoshimitsu; Patterson, Clair C.

    1982-12-01

    Biopurification factors for Ca with respect to Sr, Ba, and natural, uncontaminated Pb were measured for different nutrient-consumer pairs in a remote subalpine ecosystem. The factor for Sr is expressed as: (nutrient Sr/Ca) ÷ (consumer Sr/Ca). Similar expressions were used for Ba/Ca and Pb/Ca. It was found that Ca was biopurified of Sr 3-fold, of Ba 16-fold, and of Pb 100-fold in going from rock to sedge leaves. In going from sedge leaf to vole, Ca was biopurified of Sr 4-fold, of Ba 8-fold, and of Pb 16-fold. In going from meadow vole to pine marten, Ca was biopurified of Sr 6-fold, of Ba 7-fold, and of Pb 1.1-fold. Similar ranges of values for these factors were obtained for detrital and amphibian food chains. Fluxes of industrial lead entering the ecosystem as precipitation and dry deposition were measured and it was found that 40% of the lead in soil humus and soil moisture, 82% of the lead in sedge leaves, 92% of the lead in vole, and 97% of the lead in marten was industrial. The natural skeletal Pb/Ca ratio in carnivores (4 × 10 -8) was determined by means of corrections for inputs of industrial lead, food chain relationships, and measured biopurification factors for the ecosystem studied. This represents a 1700-fold reduction of the average Pb/Ca ratio in igneous rocks at the earth's surface (6.4 × 10 -5) by the compounding of successive Pb biopurification factors in transferring Ca from rock to carnivore. The natural ratio is similar to the value of 6 × 10 -8 observed for Pb/Ca in the bones of Peruvians who lived 2000 years ago but is 1/900th of the value of about 3.5 × 10 -5 for the skeletal Pb/Ca ratio found in present day Americans. This study shows experimentally how the Ba/Ca ratio in average surface igneous rock (3 × 10 -3) has been reduced 800-fold through compounding of successive biopurification steps to provide the skeletal Ba/Ca ratio of about 4 × 10 -6 observed in humans. It also provides biopurification factors for Sr and Ba among a

  19. Photoirradiation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons with UVA Light – A Pathway Leading to the Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species, Lipid Peroxidation, and DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hongtao; Xia, Qingsu; Yan, Jian; Herreno-Saenz, Diogenes; Wu, Yuh-Shen; Tang, I-Wah; Fu, Peter P.

    2009-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a class of genotoxic environmental contaminants. We have long been interested in determining the mechanisms by which PAHs induce genotoxicity. Although the metabolic activation of PAHs leading to biological activities has been well studied, the photo-induced activation pathway has seldom reported. In this paper, we review the study of photoirradiation of PAHs with UVA irradiation results in (i) cytotoxicity and DNA damage (ii) DNA single strand cleavage; (iii) formation of 8-hydroxy -2′-deoxyguanosine adduct (8-OHdG), and (iv) formation of lipid peroxidation. Evidence has been shown that these photobiological activities are mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). PMID:17159277

  20. H-Ras Increases Urokinase Expression and Cell Invasion in Genetically Modified Human Astrocytes Through Ras/Raf/MEK Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, YUNGE; XIAO, AIZHEN; DIPIERRO, CHARLES G.; ABDEL-FATTAH, RANA; AMOS, SAMSON; REDPATH, GERARD T.; CARPENTER, JOAN E.; PIEPER, RUSSELL O.; HUSSAINI, ISA M.

    2008-01-01

    Previous study reported that the activation of Ras pathway cooperated with E6/E7-mediated inactivation of p53/pRb to transform immortalized normal human astrocytes (NHA/hTERT) into intracranial tumors strongly resembling human astrocytomas. The mechanism of how H-Ras contributes to astrocytoma formation is unclear. Using genetically modified NHA cells (E6/E7/hTERT and E6/E7/hTERT/Ras cells) as models, we investigated the mechanism of Ras-induced tumorigenesis. The overexpression of constitutively active H-RasV12 in E6/E7/hTERT cells robustly increased the levels of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) mRNA, protein, activity and invasive capacity of the E6/E7/hTERT/Ras cells. However, the expressions of MMP-9 and MMP-2 did not significantly change in the E6/E7/hTERT and E6/E7/hTERT/Ras cells. Furthermore, E6/E7/hTERT/Ras cells also displayed higher level of uPA activity and were more invasive than E6/E7/hTERT cells in 3D culture, and formed an intracranial tumor mass in a NOD-SCID mouse model. uPA specific inhibitor (B428) and uPA neutralizing antibody decreased uPA activity and invasion in E6/E7/hTERT/Ras cells. uPA-deficient U-1242 glioblastoma cells were less invasive in vitro and exhibited reduced tumor growth and infiltration into normal brain in xenograft mouse model. Inhibitors of Ras (FTA), Raf (Bay 54−9085) and MEK (UO126), but not of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) (LY294002) and of protein kinase C (BIM) pathways, inhibited uPA activity and cell invasion. Our results suggest that H-Ras increased uPA expression and activity via the Ras/Raf/MEK signaling pathway leading to enhanced cell invasion and this may contribute to increased invasive growth properties of astrocytomas. PMID:18383343

  1. Filaggrin deficiency leads to impaired lipid profile and altered acidification pathways in a 3D skin construct.

    PubMed

    Vávrová, Kateřina; Henkes, Dominika; Strüver, Kay; Sochorová, Michaela; Skolová, Barbora; Witting, Madeleine Y; Friess, Wolfgang; Schreml, Stephan; Meier, Robert J; Schäfer-Korting, Monika; Fluhr, Joachim W; Küchler, Sarah

    2014-03-01

    Mutations in the filaggrin (FLG) gene are strongly associated with common dermatological disorders such as atopic dermatitis. However, the exact underlying pathomechanism is still ambiguous. Here, we investigated the impact of FLG on skin lipid composition, organization, and skin acidification using a FLG knockdown (FLG-) skin construct. Initially, sodium/hydrogen antiporter (NHE-1) activity was sufficient to maintain the acidic pH (5.5) of the reconstructed skin. At day 7, the FLG degradation products urocanic (UCA) and pyrrolidone-5-carboxylic acid (PCA) were significantly decreased in FLG- constructs, but the skin surface pH was still physiological owing to an upregulation of NHE-1. At day 14, secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) IIA, which converts phospholipids to fatty acids, was significantly more activated in FLG- than in FLG+. Although NHE-1 and sPLA2 were able to compensate the FLG deficiency, maintain the skin surface pH, and ensured ceramide processing (no differences detected), an accumulation of free fatty acids (2-fold increase) led to less ordered intercellular lipid lamellae and higher permeability of the FLG- constructs. The interplay of the UCA/PCA and the sPLA2/NHE-1 acidification pathways of the skin and the impact of FLG insufficiency on skin lipid composition and organization in reconstructed skin are described.

  2. Xanthohumol inhibits STAT3 activation pathway leading to growth suppression and apoptosis induction in human cholangiocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Dokduang, Hasaya; Yongvanit, Puangrat; Namwat, Nisana; Pairojkul, Chawalit; Sangkhamanon, Sakkarn; Yageta, Mika Sakurai; Murakami, Yoshinori; Loilome, Watcharin

    2016-04-01

    STAT3 plays a significant role in the development of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) associated with the liver fluke (Opisthorchis viverrini; Ov). Xanthohumol (XN), a prenylated flavonoid extracted from hops, has known anticancer activity and could potentially target STAT3. The present study determined the effect of XN on STAT3, as well as ascertained its usefulness against CCA. The CCA cell proliferation at 20 µM and 50 µM of XN was shown to inhibited, while 20 µM partially inhibited IL-6-induced STAT3 activation. At 50 µM, the inhibition was complete. The reduction in STAT3 activity at 20 and 50 µM was associated with a significant reduction of CCA cell growth and apoptosis. We also found that the administration of 50 µM XN orally in drinking water to nude mice inoculated with CCA led to a reduction in tumor growth in comparison with controls. In addition, apoptosis of cancer cells increased although there was no visible toxicity. The present study shows that XN can inhibit STAT3 activation both in vivo and in vitro due to suppression of the Akt-NFκB signaling pathway. XN should be considered as a possible therapeutic agent against CCA. PMID:26794001

  3. Pathways by which the interplay of organismic and environmental factors lead to phenotypic variation within and across generations.

    PubMed

    Harper, Lawrence V

    2013-01-01

    The range of responses made to environmental exigencies by animals, including humans, may be impacted by the experiences of their progenitors. In mammals, pathways have been documented ranging from transactions between a mother and her developing fetus in the womb through continuity of parenting practices and cultural inheritance. In addition, phenotypic plasticity may be constrained by factors transmitted by the gametes that are involved in the regulation of gene expression rather than modifications to the genome itself. Possible mediators for this kind of inheritance are examined, and the conditions that might have led to the evolution of such transmission are considered. Anticipatory adjustments to possible environmental exigencies are likely to occur when such conditions recur regularly, but intermittently across generations and endure for substantial periods of time, and when adjusting to them after the fact is likely to be biologically costly, even life-threatening. It appears that physical growth and responses to nutrient availability are domains in which anticipatory, epigenetically inherited adjustments occur. In addition, given the fact that humans have oppressed one another repeatedly and for relatively long periods of time, such behavioral tendencies as boldness or innovativeness may be behavioral traits subject to such effects. The implications of these factors for research and policy are discussed.

  4. MAPK pathway activation leads to Bim loss and histone deacetylase inhibitor resistance: rationale to combine romidepsin with an MEK inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Arup R; Robey, Robert W; Luchenko, Victoria L; Zhan, Zhirong; Piekarz, Richard L; Gillet, Jean-Pierre; Kossenkov, Andrew V; Wilkerson, Julia; Showe, Louise C; Gottesman, Michael M; Collie, Nathan L; Bates, Susan E

    2013-05-16

    To identify molecular determinants of histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDI) resistance, we selected HuT78 cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) cells with romidepsin in the presence of P-glycoprotein inhibitors to prevent transporter upregulation. Resistant sublines were 250- to 385-fold resistant to romidepsin and were resistant to apoptosis induced by apicidin, entinostat, panobinostat, belinostat, and vorinostat. A custom TaqMan array identified increased insulin receptor (INSR) gene expression; immunoblot analysis confirmed increased protein expression and a four- to eightfold increase in mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinase (MEK) phosphorylation in resistant cells compared with parental cells. Resistant cells were exquisitely sensitive to MEK inhibitors, and apoptosis correlated with restoration of proapoptotic Bim. Romidepsin combined with MEK inhibitors yielded greater apoptosis in cells expressing mutant KRAS compared with romidepsin treatment alone. Gene expression analysis of samples obtained from patients with CTCL enrolled on the NCI1312 phase 2 study of romidepsin in T-cell lymphoma suggested perturbation of the MAPK pathway by romidepsin. Immunohistochemical analysis of Bim expression demonstrated decreased expression in some skin biopsies at disease progression. These findings implicate increased activation of MEK and decreased Bim expression as a resistance mechanism to HDIs, supporting combination of romidepsin with MEK inhibitors in clinical trials.

  5. Patterns of genetic variability and habitat occupancy in Crepis triasii (Asteraceae) at different spatial scales: insights on evolutionary processes leading to diversification in continental islands

    PubMed Central

    Mayol, Maria; Palau, Carles; Rosselló, Josep A.; González-Martínez, Santiago C.; Molins, Arántzazu; Riba, Miquel

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Archipelagos are unique systems for studying evolutionary processes promoting diversification and speciation. The islands of the Mediterranean basin are major areas of plant richness, including a high proportion of narrow endemics. Many endemic plants are currently found in rocky habitats, showing varying patterns of habitat occupancy at different spatial scales throughout their range. The aim of the present study was to understand the impact of varying patterns of population distribution on genetic diversity and structure to shed light on demographic and evolutionary processes leading to population diversification in Crepis triasii, an endemic plant from the eastern Balearic Islands. Methods Using allozyme and chloroplast markers, we related patterns of genetic structure and diversity to those of habitat occupancy at a regional (between islands and among populations within islands) and landscape (population size and connectivity) scale. Key Results Genetic diversity was highly structured both at the regional and at the landscape level, and was positively correlated with population connectivity in the landscape. Populations located in small isolated mountains and coastal areas, with restricted patterns of regional occupancy, were genetically less diverse and much more differentiated. In addition, more isolated populations had stronger fine-scale genetic structure than well-connected ones. Changes in habitat availability and quality arising from marine transgressions during the Quaternary, as well as progressive fragmentation associated with the aridification of the climate since the last glaciation, are the most plausible factors leading to the observed patterns of genetic diversity and structure. Conclusions Our results emphasize the importance of gene flow in preventing genetic erosion and maintaining the evolutionary potential of populations. They also agree with recent studies highlighting the importance of restricted gene flow and genetic

  6. Integrated Genomics Identifies Five Medulloblastoma Subtypes with Distinct Genetic Profiles, Pathway Signatures and Clinicopathological Features

    PubMed Central

    Kool, Marcel; Koster, Jan; Bunt, Jens; Hasselt, Nancy E.; Lakeman, Arjan; van Sluis, Peter; Troost, Dirk; Meeteren, Netteke Schouten-van; Caron, Huib N.; Cloos, Jacqueline; Mršić, Alan; Ylstra, Bauke; Grajkowska, Wieslawa; Hartmann, Wolfgang; Pietsch, Torsten; Ellison, David; Clifford, Steven C.; Versteeg, Rogier

    2008-01-01

    age had type B, D, or E tumors. Type B included most desmoplastic cases. We validated and confirmed the molecular subtypes and their associated clinicopathological features with expression data from a second independent series of 46 medulloblastomas. Conclusions The new medulloblastoma classification presented in this study will greatly enhance the understanding of this heterogeneous disease. It will enable a better selection and evaluation of patients in clinical trials, and it will support the development of new molecular targeted therapies. Ultimately, our results may lead to more individualized therapies with improved cure rates and a better quality of life. PMID:18769486

  7. Identification of combined genetic determinants of liver stiffness within the SREBP1c-PNPLA3 pathway.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, Marcin; Grünhage, Frank; Lammert, Frank

    2013-01-01

    The common PNPLA3 (adiponutrin) variant, p.I148M, was identified as a genetic determinant of liver fibrosis. Since the expression of PNPLA3 is induced by sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c (SREBP1c), we investigate two common SREBP1c variants (rs2297508 and rs11868035) for their association with liver stiffness. In 899 individuals (aged 17-83 years, 547 males) with chronic liver diseases, hepatic fibrosis was non-invasively phenotyped by transient elastography (TE). The SREBP1c single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped using PCR-based assays with 5'-nuclease and fluorescence detection. The SREBP1c rs11868035 variant affected liver fibrosis significantly (p = 0.029): median TE levels were 7.2, 6.6 and 6.0 kPa in carriers of (TT) (n = 421), (CT) (n = 384) and (CC) (n = 87) genotypes, respectively. Overall, the SREBP1c SNP was associated with low TE levels (5.0-8.0 kPa). Carriers of both PNPLA3 and SREBP1c risk genotypes displayed significantly (p = 0.005) higher median liver stiffness, as compared to patients carrying none of these variants. The common SREBP1c variant may affect early stages of liver fibrosis. Our study supports a role of the SREBP1c-PNPLA3 pathway as a "disease module" that promotes hepatic fibrogenesis.

  8. Mouse Models as Tools to Identify Genetic Pathways for Retinal Degeneration, as Exemplified by Leber's Congenital Amaurosis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA) is an inherited retinal degenerative disease characterized by severe loss of vision in the first year of life. In addition to early vision loss, a variety of other eye-related abnormalities including roving eye movements, deep-set eyes, and sensitivity to bright light also occur with this disease. Many animal models of LCA are available and the study them has led to a better understanding of the pathology of the disease, and has led to the development of therapeutic strategies aimed at curing or slowing down LCA. Mouse models, with their well-developed genetics and similarity to human physiology and anatomy, serve as powerful tools with which to investigate the etiology of human LCA. Such mice provide reproducible, experimental systems for elucidating pathways of normal development, function, designing strategies and testing compounds for translational research and gene-based therapies aimed at delaying the diseases progression. In this chapter, I describe tools used in the discovery and evaluation of mouse models of LCA including a Phoenix Image-Guided Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and a Diagnosys Espion Visual Electrophysiology System. Three mouse models are described, the rd3 mouse model for LCA12 and LCA1, the rd12 mouse model for LCA2, and the rd16 mouse model for LCA10.

  9. Common Genetic Pathways Regulate Organ-Specific Infection-Related Development in the Rice Blast Fungus[W

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Sara L.; Besi, Maria I.; Galhano, Rita; Franceschetti, Marina; Goetz, Stephan; Lenhert, Steven; Osbourn, Anne; Sesma, Ane

    2010-01-01

    Magnaporthe oryzae is the most important fungal pathogen of rice (Oryza sativa). Under laboratory conditions, it is able to colonize both aerial and underground plant organs using different mechanisms. Here, we characterize an infection-related development in M. oryzae produced on hydrophilic polystyrene (PHIL-PS) and on roots. We show that fungal spores develop preinvasive hyphae (pre-IH) from hyphopodia (root penetration structures) or germ tubes and that pre-IH also enter root cells. Changes in fungal cell wall structure accompanying pre-IH are seen on both artificial and root surfaces. Using characterized mutants, we show that the PMK1 (for pathogenicity mitogen-activated protein kinase 1) pathway is required for pre-IH development. Twenty mutants with altered pre-IH differentiation on PHIL-PS identified from an insertional library of 2885 M. oryzae T-DNA transformants were found to be defective in pathogenicity. The phenotypic analysis of these mutants revealed that appressorium, hyphopodium, and pre-IH formation are genetically linked fungal developmental processes. We further characterized one of these mutants, M1373, which lacked the M. oryzae ortholog of exportin-5/Msn5p (EXP5). Mutants lacking EXP5 were much less virulent on roots, suggesting an important involvement of proteins and/or RNAs transported by EXP5 during M. oryzae root infection. PMID:20348434

  10. Safety assessment considerations for food and feed derived from plants with genetic modifications that modulate endogenous gene expression and pathways.

    PubMed

    Kier, Larry D; Petrick, Jay S

    2008-08-01

    The current globally recognized comparative food and feed safety assessment paradigm for biotechnology-derived crops is a robust and comprehensive approach for evaluating the safety of both the inserted gene product and the resulting crop. Incorporating many basic concepts from food safety, toxicology, nutrition, molecular biology, and plant breeding, this approach has been used effectively by scientists and regulatory agencies for 10-15 years. Current and future challenges in agriculture include the need for improved yields, tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses, and improved nutrition. The next generation of biotechnology-derived crops may utilize regulatory proteins, such as transcription factors that modulate gene expression and/or endogenous plant pathways. In this review, we discuss the applicability of the current safety assessment paradigm to biotechnology-derived crops developed using modifications involving regulatory proteins. The growing literature describing the molecular biology underlying plant domestication and conventional breeding demonstrates the naturally occurring genetic variation found in plants, including significant variation in the classes, expression, and activity of regulatory proteins. Specific examples of plant modifications involving insertion or altered expression of regulatory proteins are discussed as illustrative case studies supporting the conclusion that the current comparative safety assessment process is appropriate for these types of biotechnology-developed crops.

  11. Expression of oncogenic K-ras from its endogenous promoter leads to a partial block of erythroid differentiation and hyperactivation of cytokine-dependent signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Liu, Yangang; Beard, Caroline; Tuveson, David A; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Jacks, Tyler E; Lodish, Harvey F

    2007-06-15

    When overexpressed in primary erythroid progenitors, oncogenic Ras leads to the constitutive activation of its downstream signaling pathways, severe block of terminal erythroid differentiation, and cytokine-independent growth of primary erythroid progenitors. However, whether high-level expression of oncogenic Ras is required for these phenotypes is unknown. To address this issue, we expressed oncogenic K-ras (K-ras(G12D)) from its endogenous promoter using a tetracycline-inducible system. We show that endogenous K-ras(G12D) leads to a partial block of terminal erythroid differentiation in vivo. In contrast to results obtained when oncogenic Ras was overexpressed from retroviral vectors, endogenous levels of K-ras(G12D) fail to constitutively activate but rather hyperactivate cytokine-dependent signaling pathways, including Stat5, Akt, and p44/42 MAPK, in primary erythroid progenitors. This explains previous observations that hematopoietic progenitors expressing endogenous K-ras(G12D) display hypersensitivity to cytokine stimulation in various colony assays. Our results support efforts to modulate Ras signaling for treating hematopoietic malignancies.

  12. Murine gammaherpesvirus M2 protein induction of IRF4 via the NFAT pathway leads to IL-10 expression in B cells.

    PubMed

    Rangaswamy, Udaya S; Speck, Samuel H

    2014-01-01

    Reactivation of the gammaherpesviruses Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) and murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68) from latently infected B cells has been linked to plasma cell differentiation. We have previously shown that the MHV68 M2 protein is important for virus reactivation from B cells and, when expressed alone in primary murine B cells, can drive B cell differentiation towards a pre-plasma cell phenotype. In addition, expression of M2 in primary murine B cells leads to secretion of high levels of IL-10 along with enhanced proliferation and survival. Furthermore, the absence of M2 in vivo leads to a defect in the appearance of MHV68 infected plasma cells in the spleen at the peak of MHV68 latency. Here, employing an inducible B cell expression system, we have determined that M2 activates the NFAT pathway in a Src kinase-dependent manner--leading to induction of the plasma cell-associated transcription factor, Interferon Regulatory Factor-4 (IRF4). Furthermore, we show that expression of IRF4 alone in a B cell line up-regulates IL-10 expression in culture supernatants, revealing a novel role for IRF4 in B cell induced IL-10. Consistent with the latter observation, we show that IRF4 can regulate the IL-10 promoter in B cells. In primary murine B cells, addition of cyclosporine (CsA) resulted in a significant decrease in M2-induced IL-10 levels as well as IRF4 expression, emphasizing the importance of the NFAT pathway in M2- -mediated induction of IL-10. Together, these studies argue in favor of a model wherein M2 activation of the NFAT pathway initiates events leading to increased levels of IRF4--a key player in plasma cell differentiation--which in turn triggers IL-10 expression. In the context of previous findings, the data presented here provides insights into how M2 facilitates plasma cell differentiation and subsequent virus reactivation.

  13. Murine Gammaherpesvirus M2 Protein Induction of IRF4 via the NFAT Pathway Leads to IL-10 Expression in B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rangaswamy, Udaya S.; Speck, Samuel H.

    2014-01-01

    Reactivation of the gammaherpesviruses Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) and murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68) from latently infected B cells has been linked to plasma cell differentiation. We have previously shown that the MHV68 M2 protein is important for virus reactivation from B cells and, when expressed alone in primary murine B cells, can drive B cell differentiation towards a pre-plasma cell phenotype. In addition, expression of M2 in primary murine B cells leads to secretion of high levels of IL-10 along with enhanced proliferation and survival. Furthermore, the absence of M2 in vivo leads to a defect in the appearance of MHV68 infected plasma cells in the spleen at the peak of MHV68 latency. Here, employing an inducible B cell expression system, we have determined that M2 activates the NFAT pathway in a Src kinase-dependent manner – leading to induction of the plasma cell-associated transcription factor, Interferon Regulatory Factor-4 (IRF4). Furthermore, we show that expression of IRF4 alone in a B cell line up-regulates IL-10 expression in culture supernatants, revealing a novel role for IRF4 in B cell induced IL-10. Consistent with the latter observation, we show that IRF4 can regulate the IL-10 promoter in B cells. In primary murine B cells, addition of cyclosporine (CsA) resulted in a significant decrease in M2-induced IL-10 levels as well as IRF4 expression, emphasizing the importance of the NFAT pathway in M2- mediated induction of IL-10. Together, these studies argue in favor of a model wherein M2 activation of the NFAT pathway initiates events leading to increased levels of IRF4 – a key player in plasma cell differentiation – which in turn triggers IL-10 expression. In the context of previous findings, the data presented here provides insights into how M2 facilitates plasma cell differentiation and subsequent virus reactivation. PMID:24391506

  14. Genetic deletion of monoacylglycerol lipase leads to impaired cannabinoid receptor CB₁R signaling and anxiety-like behavior.

    PubMed

    Imperatore, Roberta; Morello, Giovanna; Luongo, Livio; Taschler, Ulrike; Romano, Rosaria; De Gregorio, Danilo; Belardo, Carmela; Maione, Sabatino; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Cristino, Luigia

    2015-11-01

    Endocannabinoids (eCB) are key regulators of excitatory/inhibitory neurotransmission at cannabinoid-1-receptor (CB1 R)-expressing axon terminals. The most abundant eCB in the brain, that is 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), is hydrolyzed by the enzyme monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), whose chronic inhibition in the brain was reported to cause CB1 R desensitization. We employed the MAGL knock-out mouse (MAGL-/-), a genetic model of congenital and sustained elevation of 2-AG levels in the brain, to provide morphological and biochemical evidence for β-arrestin2-mediated CB1 R desensitization in brain regions involved in the control of emotional states, that is, the prefrontal cortex (PFC), amygdala, hippocampus and cerebellar cortex. We found a widespread CB1 R/β-arrestin2 co-expression in the mPFC, amygdala and hippocampus accompanied by impairment of extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling and elevation of vesicular glutamate transporter (VGluT1) at CB1 R-positive excitatory terminals in the mPFC, or vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT) at CB1 R-positive inhibitory terminals in the amygdala and hippocampus. The impairment of CB1 R signaling in MAGL-/- mice was also accompanied by enhanced excitatory drive in the basolateral amygdala (BLA)-mPFC circuit, with subsequent elevation of glutamate release to the mPFC and anxiety-like and obsessive-compulsive behaviors, as assessed by the light/dark box and marble burying tests, respectively. Collectively, these data provide evidence for a β-arrestin2-mediated desensitization of CB1 R in MAGL-/- mice, with impact on the synaptic plasticity of brain circuits involved in emotional functions. In this study, the authors provide evidence that congenitally enhanced endocannabinoid levels in the neuronal circuits underlying anxiety-like behavioral states (mainly medial prefrontal cortex, amygdala and hippocampus) lead to CB1R desenistization and anxiety and depression. MAGL-/- mice, a model of congenital overactivity of the e

  15. Genetic deletion of monoacylglycerol lipase leads to impaired cannabinoid receptor CB₁R signaling and anxiety-like behavior.

    PubMed

    Imperatore, Roberta; Morello, Giovanna; Luongo, Livio; Taschler, Ulrike; Romano, Rosaria; De Gregorio, Danilo; Belardo, Carmela; Maione, Sabatino; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Cristino, Luigia

    2015-11-01

    Endocannabinoids (eCB) are key regulators of excitatory/inhibitory neurotransmission at cannabinoid-1-receptor (CB1 R)-expressing axon terminals. The most abundant eCB in the brain, that is 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), is hydrolyzed by the enzyme monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), whose chronic inhibition in the brain was reported to cause CB1 R desensitization. We employed the MAGL knock-out mouse (MAGL-/-), a genetic model of congenital and sustained elevation of 2-AG levels in the brain, to provide morphological and biochemical evidence for β-arrestin2-mediated CB1 R desensitization in brain regions involved in the control of emotional states, that is, the prefrontal cortex (PFC), amygdala, hippocampus and cerebellar cortex. We found a widespread CB1 R/β-arrestin2 co-expression in the mPFC, amygdala and hippocampus accompanied by impairment of extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling and elevation of vesicular glutamate transporter (VGluT1) at CB1 R-positive excitatory terminals in the mPFC, or vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT) at CB1 R-positive inhibitory terminals in the amygdala and hippocampus. The impairment of CB1 R signaling in MAGL-/- mice was also accompanied by enhanced excitatory drive in the basolateral amygdala (BLA)-mPFC circuit, with subsequent elevation of glutamate release to the mPFC and anxiety-like and obsessive-compulsive behaviors, as assessed by the light/dark box and marble burying tests, respectively. Collectively, these data provide evidence for a β-arrestin2-mediated desensitization of CB1 R in MAGL-/- mice, with impact on the synaptic plasticity of brain circuits involved in emotional functions. In this study, the authors provide evidence that congenitally enhanced endocannabinoid levels in the neuronal circuits underlying anxiety-like behavioral states (mainly medial prefrontal cortex, amygdala and hippocampus) lead to CB1R desenistization and anxiety and depression. MAGL-/- mice, a model of congenital overactivity of the e

  16. The medical examination in United States immigration applications: the potential use of genetic testing leads to heightened privacy concerns.

    PubMed

    Burroughs, A Maxwell

    2005-01-01

    The medical examination has been an integral part of the immigration application process since the passing of the Immigration Act of 1891. Failing the medical examination can result in denial of the application. Over the years the medical examination has been expanded to include questioning about diseases that are scientifically shown to be rooted in an individual's genetic makeup. Recent advances in the fields of genomics and bioinformatics are making accurate and precise screening for these conditions a reality. Government policymakers will soon be faced with decisions regarding whether or not to sanction the use of these newly-developed genetic tests in the immigration application procedure. The terror threat currently facing the United States may ultimately bolster the argument in favor of genetic testing and/or DNA collection of applicants. However, the possibility of a government mandate requiring genetic testing raises a host of ethical issues; including the threat of eugenics and privacy concerns. Genetic testing has the ability to uncover a wealth of sensitive medical information about an individual and currently there are no medical information privacy protections afforded to immigration applicants. This article examines the potential for genetic testing in the immigration application process and the ethical issues surrounding this testing. In particular, this article explores the existing framework of privacy protections afforded to individuals living in the United States and how this and newly-erected standards like those released by the Health and Human Services (HHS) might apply to individuals seeking to immigrate to the United States. PMID:16619448

  17. Risk of ovarian cancer and the NF-κB pathway: genetic association with IL1A and TNFSF10.

    PubMed

    Charbonneau, Bridget; Block, Matthew S; Bamlet, William R; Vierkant, Robert A; Kalli, Kimberly R; Fogarty, Zachary; Rider, David N; Sellers, Thomas A; Tworoger, Shelley S; Poole, Elizabeth; Risch, Harvey A; Salvesen, Helga B; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Baglietto, Laura; Giles, Graham G; Severi, Gianluca; Trabert, Britton; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Whittemore, Alice S; Sieh, Weiva; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Bandera, Elisa V; Orlow, Irene; Terry, Kathryn; Goodman, Marc T; Thompson, Pamela J; Cook, Linda S; Rossing, Mary Anne; Ness, Roberta B; Narod, Steven A; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Lu, Karen; Butzow, Ralf; Dörk, Thilo; Pejovic, Tanja; Campbell, Ian; Le, Nhu D; Bunker, Clareann H; Bogdanova, Natalia; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Eccles, Diana; Paul, James; Wu, Anna H; Gayther, Simon A; Hogdall, Estrid; Heitz, Florian; Kaye, Stanley B; Karlan, Beth Y; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Gronwald, Jacek; Hogdall, Claus K; Lambrechts, Diether; Fasching, Peter A; Menon, Usha; Schildkraut, Joellen; Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Levine, Douglas A; Kjaer, Susanne Kruger; Cramer, Daniel; Flanagan, James M; Phelan, Catherine M; Brown, Robert; Massuger, Leon F A G; Song, Honglin; Doherty, Jennifer A; Krakstad, Camilla; Liang, Dong; Odunsi, Kunle; Berchuck, Andrew; Jensen, Allan; Lubinski, Jan; Nevanlinna, Heli; Bean, Yukie T; Lurie, Galina; Ziogas, Argyrios; Walsh, Christine; Despierre, Evelyn; Brinton, Louise; Hein, Alexander; Rudolph, Anja; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Olson, Sara H; Harter, Philipp; Tyrer, Jonathan; Vitonis, Allison F; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Aben, Katja K; Pike, Malcolm C; Ramus, Susan J; Wik, Elisabeth; Cybulski, Cezary; Lin, Jie; Sucheston, Lara; Edwards, Robert; McGuire, Valerie; Lester, Jenny; du Bois, Andreas; Lundvall, Lene; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Szafron, Lukasz M; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Yang, Hannah; Beckmann, Matthias W; Pelttari, Liisa M; Van Altena, Anne M; van den Berg, David; Halle, Mari K; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Schwaab, Ira; Chandran, Urmila; Menkiszak, Janusz; Ekici, Arif B; Wilkens, Lynne R; Leminen, Arto; Modugno, Francesmary; Friel, Grace; Rothstein, Joseph H; Vergote, Ignace; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Sobiczewski, Piotr; Kelemen, Linda E; Pharoah, Paul D P; Moysich, Kirsten; Knutson, Keith L; Cunningham, Julie M; Fridley, Brooke L; Goode, Ellen L

    2014-02-01

    A missense single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the immune modulatory gene IL1A has been associated with ovarian cancer risk (rs17561). Although the exact mechanism through which this SNP alters risk of ovarian cancer is not clearly understood, rs17561 has also been associated with risk of endometriosis, an epidemiologic risk factor for ovarian cancer. Interleukin-1α (IL1A) is both regulated by and able to activate NF-κB, a transcription factor family that induces transcription of many proinflammatory genes and may be an important mediator in carcinogenesis. We therefore tagged SNPs in more than 200 genes in the NF-κB pathway for a total of 2,282 SNPs (including rs17561) for genotype analysis of 15,604 cases of ovarian cancer in patients of European descent, including 6,179 of high-grade serous (HGS), 2,100 endometrioid, 1,591 mucinous, 1,034 clear cell, and 1,016 low-grade serous, including 23,235 control cases spanning 40 studies in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium. In this large population, we confirmed the association between rs17561 and clear cell ovarian cancer [OR, 0.84; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.76-0.93; P = 0.00075], which remained intact even after excluding participants in the prior study (OR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.75-0.95; P = 0.006). Considering a multiple-testing-corrected significance threshold of P < 2.5 × 10(-5), only one other variant, the TNFSF10 SNP rs6785617, was associated significantly with a risk of ovarian cancer (low malignant potential tumors OR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.79-0.91; P = 0.00002). Our results extend the evidence that borderline tumors may have a distinct genetic etiology. Further investigation of how these SNPs might modify ovarian cancer associations with other inflammation-related risk factors is warranted. PMID:24272484

  18. Genetic variants in a lipid regulatory pathway as potential tools for improving the nutritional quality of grass-fed beef.

    PubMed

    Baeza, M C; Corva, P M; Soria, L A; Pavan, E; Rincon, G; Medrano, J F

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of genetic variants on candidate genes corresponding to the sterol recognition element-binding protein-1 (SREBP-1) signaling pathway and stearoyl-CoA desaturases (SCD1 and SCD5) on muscle fatty acid (FA) composition of Brangus steers fattened on grass. FA profiles were measured on Longissimus lumborum muscle samples using a gas chromatography-flame ionization detection technique. A total of 43 tag single-nucleotide polymorphisms on the SCD1, SCD5, SREBP-1, SCAP, INSIG1, INSIG2, MBTPS1, MBTPS2, and SRPR genes were genotyped on 246 steers to perform a marker-trait association study. To evaluate the influence of the Indicine breed in the composite breed, additional groups of 48 Angus, 18 Hereford, 75 Hereford x Angus, and 36 Limousin x Hereford-Angus steers were also genotyped. To perform the association analysis, FA data were grouped according to the number of carbon atoms and/or number of double bonds (i.e. SFA, MUFA, PUFA, etc.). In addition, different indexes that reflect the activity of FA desaturase and elongase enzymes were calculated. SCD1 markers significantly affected C14:1/(C14:0 + C14:1) and C18:1/(C18:0 + C18:1) indexes, whereas one SNP in SCD5 was correlated with the C16:1/(C16:0 + C16:1) index. Polymorphisms in the signal recognition particle receptor (SRPR) gene were associated with all the estimated desaturase indexes. Because the evaluated markers showed no effect on total lipid content of beef, this work supports the potential utilization of these markers for the improvement of grass-fed beef without undesirable side effects.

  19. A pathway-based analysis provides additional support for an immune-related genetic susceptibility to Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Holmans, Peter; Moskvina, Valentina; Jones, Lesley; Sharma, Manu; Vedernikov, Alexey; Buchel, Finja; Saad, Mohamad; Sadd, Mohamad; Bras, Jose M; Bettella, Francesco; Nicolaou, Nayia; Simón-Sánchez, Javier; Mittag, Florian; Gibbs, J Raphael; Schulte, Claudia; Durr, Alexandra; Guerreiro, Rita; Hernandez, Dena; Brice, Alexis; Stefánsson, Hreinn; Majamaa, Kari; Gasser, Thomas; Heutink, Peter; Wood, Nicholas W; Martinez, Maria; Singleton, Andrew B; Nalls, Michael A; Hardy, John; Morris, Huw R; Williams, Nigel M

    2013-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease affecting 1-2% in people >60 and 3-4% in people >80. Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have now implicated significant evidence for association in at least 18 genomic regions. We have studied a large PD-meta analysis and identified a significant excess of SNPs (P < 1 × 10(-16)) that are associated with PD but fall short of the genome-wide significance threshold. This result was independent of variants at the 18 previously implicated regions and implies the presence of additional polygenic risk alleles. To understand how these loci increase risk of PD, we applied a pathway-based analysis, testing for biological functions that were significantly enriched for genes containing variants associated with PD. Analysing two independent GWA studies, we identified that both had a significant excess in the number of functional categories enriched for PD-associated genes (minimum P = 0.014 and P = 0.006, respectively). Moreover, 58 categories were significantly enriched for associated genes in both GWA studies (P < 0.001), implicating genes involved in the 'regulation of leucocyte/lymphocyte activity' and also 'cytokine-mediated signalling' as conferring an increased susceptibility to PD. These results were unaltered by the exclusion of all 178 genes that were present at the 18 genomic regions previously reported to be strongly associated with PD (including the HLA locus). Our findings, therefore, provide independent support to the strong association signal at the HLA locus and imply that the immune-related genetic susceptibility to PD is likely to be more widespread in the genome than previously appreciated.

  20. Genetic variants in a lipid regulatory pathway as potential tools for improving the nutritional quality of grass-fed beef.

    PubMed

    Baeza, M C; Corva, P M; Soria, L A; Pavan, E; Rincon, G; Medrano, J F

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of genetic variants on candidate genes corresponding to the sterol recognition element-binding protein-1 (SREBP-1) signaling pathway and stearoyl-CoA desaturases (SCD1 and SCD5) on muscle fatty acid (FA) composition of Brangus steers fattened on grass. FA profiles were measured on Longissimus lumborum muscle samples using a gas chromatography-flame ionization detection technique. A total of 43 tag single-nucleotide polymorphisms on the SCD1, SCD5, SREBP-1, SCAP, INSIG1, INSIG2, MBTPS1, MBTPS2, and SRPR genes were genotyped on 246 steers to perform a marker-trait association study. To evaluate the influence of the Indicine breed in the composite breed, additional groups of 48 Angus, 18 Hereford, 75 Hereford x Angus, and 36 Limousin x Hereford-Angus steers were also genotyped. To perform the association analysis, FA data were grouped according to the number of carbon atoms and/or number of double bonds (i.e. SFA, MUFA, PUFA, etc.). In addition, different indexes that reflect the activity of FA desaturase and elongase enzymes were calculated. SCD1 markers significantly affected C14:1/(C14:0 + C14:1) and C18:1/(C18:0 + C18:1) indexes, whereas one SNP in SCD5 was correlated with the C16:1/(C16:0 + C16:1) index. Polymorphisms in the signal recognition particle receptor (SRPR) gene were associated with all the estimated desaturase indexes. Because the evaluated markers showed no effect on total lipid content of beef, this work supports the potential utilization of these markers for the improvement of grass-fed beef without undesirable side effects. PMID:22690737

  1. Assessing Basal and Acute Autophagic Responses in the Adult Drosophila Nervous System: The Impact of Gender, Genetics and Diet on Endogenous Pathway Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Brandon; Mauntz, Ruth E.; Gonzalez, Arysa; Barekat, Ayeh; El-Mecharrafie, Nadja; Garza, Shannon; Gurney, Michael A.; Achal, Madhulika; Linton, Phyllis-Jean; Harris, Greg L.; Finley, Kim D.

    2016-01-01

    The autophagy pathway is critical for the long-term homeostasis of cells and adult organisms and is often activated during periods of stress. Reduced pathway efficacy plays a central role in several progressive neurological disorders that are associated with the accumulation of cytotoxic peptides and protein aggregates. Previous studies have shown that genetic and transgenic alterations to the autophagy pathway impacts longevity and neural aggregate profiles of adult Drosophila. In this study, we have identified methods to measure the acute in vivo induction of the autophagy pathway in the adult fly CNS. Our findings indicate that the genotype, age, and gender of adult flies can influence pathway responses. Further, we demonstrate that middle-aged male flies exposed to intermittent fasting (IF) had improved neuronal autophagic profiles. IF-treated flies also had lower neural aggregate profiles, maintained more youthful behaviors and longer lifespans, when compared to ad libitum controls. In summary, we present methodology to detect dynamic in vivo changes that occur to the autophagic profiles in the adult Drosophila CNS and that a novel IF-treatment protocol improves pathway response in the aging nervous system. PMID:27711219

  2. H-ficolin binds Aspergillus fumigatus leading to activation of the lectin complement pathway and modulation of lung epithelial immune responses.

    PubMed

    Bidula, Stefan; Sexton, Darren W; Yates, Matthew; Abdolrasouli, Alireza; Shah, Anand; Wallis, Russell; Reed, Anna; Armstrong-James, Darius; Schelenz, Silke

    2015-10-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that typically infects the lungs of immunocompromised patients leading to a high mortality. H-Ficolin, an innate immune opsonin, is produced by type II alveolar epithelial cells and could participate in lung defences against infections. Here, we used the human type II alveolar epithelial cell line, A549, to determine the involvement of H-ficolin in fungal defence. Additionally, we investigated the presence of H-ficolin in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from transplant patients during pneumonia. H-Ficolin exhibited demonstrable binding to A. fumigatus conidia via l-fucose, d-mannose and N-acetylglucosamine residues in a calcium- and pH-dependent manner. Moreover, recognition led to lectin complement pathway activation and enhanced fungal association with A549 cells. Following recognition, H-ficolin opsonization manifested an increase in interleukin-8 production from A549 cells, which involved activation of the intracellular signalling pathways mitogen-activated protein kinase MAPK kinase 1/2, p38 MAPK and c-Jun N-terminal kinase. Finally, H-ficolin concentrations were significantly higher in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of patients with lung infections compared with control subjects (n = 16; P = 0·00726). Receiver operating characteristics curve analysis further highlighted the potential of H-ficolin as a diagnostic marker for lung infection (area under the curve = 0·77; P < 0·0001). Hence, H-ficolin participates in A. fumigatus defence through the activation of the lectin complement pathway, enhanced fungus-host interactions and modulated immune responses.

  3. Crosstalk between Ca2+ signaling and mitochondrial H2O2 is required for rotenone inhibition of mTOR signaling pathway leading to neuronal apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qian; Zhang, Ruijie; Zhang, Hai; Liu, Wen; Xu, Chong; Liu, Lei; Huang, Shile; Chen, Long

    2016-01-01

    Rotenone, a neurotoxic pesticide, induces loss of dopaminergic neurons related to Parkinson's disease. Previous studies have shown that rotenone induces neuronal apoptosis partly by triggering hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-dependent suppression of mTOR pathway. However, the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. Here, we show that rotenone elevates intracellular free calcium ion ([Ca2+]i) level, and activates CaMKII, resulting in inhibition of mTOR signaling and induction of neuronal apoptosis. Chelating [Ca2+]i with BAPTA/AM, preventing extracellular Ca2+ influx using EGTA, inhibiting CaMKII with KN93, or silencing CaMKII significantly attenuated rotenone-induced H2O2 production, mTOR inhibition, and cell death. Interestingly, using TTFA, antimycin A, catalase or Mito-TEMPO, we found that rotenone-induced mitochondrial H2O2 also in turn elevated [Ca2+]i level, thereby stimulating CaMKII, leading to inhibition of mTOR pathway and induction of neuronal apoptosis. Expression of wild type mTOR or constitutively active S6K1, or silencing 4E-BP1 strengthened the inhibitory effects of catalase, Mito-TEMPO, BAPTA/AM or EGTA on rotenone-induced [Ca2+]i elevation, CaMKII phosphorylation and neuronal apoptosis. Together, the results indicate that the crosstalk between Ca2+ signaling and mitochondrial H2O2 is required for rotenone inhibition of mTOR-mediated S6K1 and 4E-BP1 pathways. Our findings suggest that how to control over-elevation of intracellular Ca2+ and overproduction of mitochondrial H2O2 may be a new approach to deal with the neurotoxicity of rotenone. PMID:26859572

  4. How could differences in 'control over destiny' lead to socio-economic inequalities in health? A synthesis of theories and pathways in the living environment.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Margaret; Pennington, Andy; Orton, Lois; Nayak, Shilpa; Petticrew, Mark; Sowden, Amanda; White, Martin

    2016-05-01

    We conducted the first synthesis of theories on causal associations and pathways connecting degree of control in the living environment to socio-economic inequalities in health-related outcomes. We identified the main theories about how differences in 'control over destiny' could lead to socio-economic inequalities in health, and conceptualised these at three distinct explanatory levels: micro/personal; meso/community; and macro/societal. These levels are interrelated but have rarely been considered together in the disparate literatures in which they are located. This synthesis of theories provides new conceptual frameworks to contribute to the design and conduct of theory-led evaluations of actions to tackle inequalities in health.

  5. Mesenchymal chemotaxis requires selective inactivation of Myosin II at the leading edge via a non-canonical PLCγ/PKCα pathway

    PubMed Central

    Asokan, Sreeja B.; Johnson, Heath E.; Rahman, Anisur; King, Samantha J.; Rotty, Jeremy D.; Lebedeva, Irina P.; Haugh, Jason M.; Bear, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Chemotaxis, migration towards soluble chemical cues, is critical for processes such as wound healing and immune surveillance, and is exhibited by various cell types from rapidly-migrating leukocytes to slow-moving mesenchymal cells. To interrogate the mechanisms involved in mesenchymal chemotaxis, we observed cell migration in microfluidic chambers that generate stable gradients of the chemoattractant PDGF. Surprisingly, we found that pathways implicated in amoeboid chemotaxis, such as PI3K and mTOR signaling, are dispensable for chemotaxis to PDGF. Instead, we find that local inactivation of Myosin IIA, through a non-canonical Ser1/2 phosphorylation of the regulatory light chain, is essential. This site is phosphorylated by PKCα, which is activated by an intracellular gradient of diacylglycerol generated by PLCγ. Using a combination of TIRF imaging and gradients of activators/inhibitors in the microfluidic chambers, we demonstrate that this signaling pathway and subsequent inhibition of Myosin II activity at the leading edge is required for mesenchymal chemotaxis. PMID:25482883

  6. A SPRY2 mutation leading to MAPK/ERK pathway inhibition is associated with an autosomal dominant form of IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Milillo, Annamaria; La Carpia, Francesca; Costanzi, Stefano; D'Urbano, Vanessa; Martini, Maurizio; Lanuti, Paola; Vischini, Gisella; Larocca, Luigi M; Marchisio, Marco; Miscia, Sebastiano; Amoroso, Antonio; Gurrieri, Fiorella; Sangiorgi, Eugenio

    2015-12-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) represents the most common primary glomerulonephritis worldwide with a prevalence of 25-50% among patients with primary glomerulopathies. In ~5-10% of the patients the disease segregates with an autosomal dominant (AD) pattern. Association studies identified loci on chromosomes 1q32, 6p21, 8p23, 17p13, 22q12, whereas classical linkage studies on AD families identified loci on chromosomes 2q36, 4q26-31, 6q22, 17q12-22. We have studied a large Sicilian family where IgAN segregates with an AD transmission. To identify the causal gene, the exomes of two affected and one unaffected individual have been sequenced. From the bioinformatics analysis a p.(Arg119Trp) variant in the SPRY2 gene was identified as the probable disease-causing mutation. Moreover, functional characterization of this variant showed that it is responsible for the inhibition of the MAPK/ERK1/2 pathway. The same effect was observed in two sporadic IgAN patients carriers of wild-type SPRY2, suggesting that downregulation of the MAPK/ERK1/2 pathway represents a common mechanism leading to IgAN.

  7. Genetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Capsicum represents one of several well characterized Solanaceous genera. A wealth of classical and molecular genetics research is available for the genus. Information gleaned from its cultivated relatives, tomato and potato, provide further insight for basic and applied studies. Early ...

  8. Genetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maintaining genetic variation in wild populations of Arctic organisms is fundamental to the long-term persistence of high latitude biodiversity. Variability is important because it provides options for species to respond to changing environmental conditions and novel challenges such as emerging path...

  9. A novel miR-371a-5p-mediated pathway, leading to BAG3 upregulation in cardiomyocytes in response to epinephrine, is lost in Takotsubo cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    d'Avenia, M; Citro, R; De Marco, M; Veronese, A; Rosati, A; Visone, R; Leptidis, S; Philippen, L; Vitale, G; Cavallo, A; Silverio, A; Prota, C; Gravina, P; De Cola, A; Carletti, E; Coppola, G; Gallo, S; Provenza, G; Bossone, E; Piscione, F; Hahne, M; De Windt, L J; Turco, M C; De Laurenzi, V

    2015-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms protecting cardiomyocytes from stress-induced death, including tension stress, are essential for cardiac physiology and defects in these protective mechanisms can result in pathological alterations. Bcl2-associated athanogene 3 (BAG3) is expressed in cardiomyocytes and is a component of the chaperone-assisted autophagy pathway, essential for homeostasis of mechanically altered cells. BAG3 ablation in mice results in a lethal cardiomyopathy soon after birth and mutations of this gene have been associated with different cardiomyopathies including stress-induced Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC). The pathogenic mechanism leading to TTC has not been defined, but it has been suggested that the heart can be damaged by excessive epinephrine (epi) spillover in the absence of a protective mechanism. The aim of this study was to provide more evidence for a role of BAG3 in the pathogenesis of TTC. Therefore, we sequenced BAG3 gene in 70 TTC patients and in 81 healthy donors with the absence of evaluable cardiovascular disease. Mutations and polymorphisms detected in the BAG3 gene included a frequent nucleotide change g2252c in the BAG3 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR) of Takotsubo patients (P<0.05), resulting in loss of binding of microRNA-371a-5p (miR-371a-5p) as evidenced by dual-luciferase reporter assays and argonaute RNA-induced silencing complex catalytic component 2/pull-down assays. Moreover, we describe a novel signaling pathway in cardiomyocytes that leads to BAG3 upregulation on exposure to epi through an ERK-dependent upregulation of miR-371a-5p. In conclusion, the presence of a g2252c polymorphism in the BAG3 3′-UTR determines loss of miR-371a-5p binding and results in an altered response to epi, potentially representing a new molecular mechanism that contributes to TTC pathogenesis. PMID:26512958

  10. Meta-Analysis of Global Transcriptomics Suggests that Conserved Genetic Pathways are Responsible for Quercetin and Tannic Acid Mediated Longevity in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Pietsch, Kerstin; Saul, Nadine; Swain, Suresh C.; Menzel, Ralph; Steinberg, Christian E. W.; Stürzenbaum, Stephen R.

    2012-01-01

    Recent research has highlighted that the polyphenols Quercetin and Tannic acid are capable of extending the lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans. To gain a deep understanding of the underlying molecular genetics, we analyzed the global transcriptional patterns of nematodes exposed to three concentrations of Quercetin or Tannic acid, respectively. By means of an intricate meta-analysis it was possible to compare the transcriptomes of polyphenol exposure to recently published datasets derived from (i) longevity mutants or (ii) infection. This detailed comparative in silico analysis facilitated the identification of compound specific and overlapping transcriptional profiles and allowed the prediction of putative mechanistic models of Quercetin and Tannic acid mediated longevity. Lifespan extension due to Quercetin was predominantly driven by the metabolome, TGF-beta signaling, Insulin-like signaling, and the p38 MAPK pathway and Tannic acid’s impact involved, in part, the amino acid metabolism and was modulated by the TGF-beta and the p38 MAPK pathways. DAF-12, which integrates TGF-beta and Insulin-like downstream signaling, and genetic players of the p38 MAPK pathway therefore seem to be crucial regulators for both polyphenols. Taken together, this study underlines how meta-analyses can provide an insight of molecular events that go beyond the traditional categorization into gene ontology-terms and Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes-pathways. It also supports the call to expand the generation of comparative and integrative databases, an effort that is currently still in its infancy. PMID:22493606

  11. Recent habitat fragmentation caused by major roads leads to reduction of gene flow and loss of genetic variability in ground beetles.

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Irene; Largiadèr, Carlo R

    2003-01-01

    Although habitat fragmentation is suspected to jeopardize the long-term survival of many species, few data are available on its impact on the genetic variability of invertebrates. We assess the genetic population structure of the flightless ground beetle Carabus violaceus L., 1758 in a Swiss forest, which is divided into several fragments by a highway and two main roads. Eight samples were collected from different forest fragments and analysed at six microsatellite loci. The largest genetic differentiation was observed between samples separated by roads and in particular by the highway. The number of roads between sites explained 44% of the variance in pairwise F(ST) estimates, whereas the age of the road and the geographical distance between locations were not significant factors. Furthermore, a comparison of allelic richness showed that the genetic variability in a small forest fragment isolated by the highway was significantly lower than in the rest of the study area. These findings strongly support the hypothesis that large roads are absolute barriers to gene flow in C. violaceus, which may lead to a loss of genetic variability in fragmented populations. PMID:12639322

  12. Health risk assessment of various metal(loid)s via multiple exposure pathways on children living near a typical lead-acid battery plant, China.

    PubMed

    Cao, Suzhen; Duan, Xiaoli; Zhao, Xiuge; Wang, Beibei; Ma, Jin; Fan, Delong; Sun, Chengye; He, Bin; Wei, Fusheng; Jiang, Guibin

    2015-05-01

    Manufacture of lead-acid batteries is of widespread interest because of its emissions of heavy metals and metalloids into environment, harming environmental quality and consequently causing detrimental effects on human health. In this study, exposure pathways and health risks of children to heavy metal(loid)s (Pb, Cd, As, etc) were investigated based on field sampling and questionnaire. Pb was one of the most abundant elements in children's blood, with an elevated blood lead level of 12.45 μg dL(-1). Soil/dust and food were heavily polluted by targeted metal(loid)s. Food ingestion accounted for more than 80% of the total exposure for most metal(loid)s. The non-cancer risks to children were 3-10 times higher than the acceptable level of 1, while the cancer risks were 5-200 times higher than the maximum acceptable level of 1.0 × 10(-4). The study emphasized the significance of effective environmental management, particularly to ensure food security near battery facilities.

  13. Genetic and genomic insights into the role of benzoate-catabolic pathway redundancy in Burkholderia xenovorans LB400.

    PubMed

    Denef, V J; Klappenbach, J A; Patrauchan, M A; Florizone, C; Rodrigues, J L M; Tsoi, T V; Verstraete, W; Eltis, L D; Tiedje, J M

    2006-01-01

    Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of Burkholderia xenovorans LB400, a potent polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) degrader, have implicated growth substrate- and phase-dependent expression of three benzoate-catabolizing pathways: a catechol ortho cleavage (ben-cat) pathway and two benzoyl-coenzyme A pathways, encoded by gene clusters on the large chromosome (boxC) and the megaplasmid (boxM). To elucidate the significance of this apparent redundancy, we constructed mutants with deletions of the ben-cat pathway (the DeltabenABCD::kan mutant), the boxC pathway (the DeltaboxABC::kan mutant), and both pathways (the DeltabenABCDDelta boxABC::kan mutant). All three mutants oxidized benzoate in resting-cell assays. However, the DeltabenABCD::kan and DeltabenABCD DeltaboxABC::kan mutants grew at reduced rates on benzoate and displayed increased lag phases. By contrast, growth on succinate, on 4-hydroxybenzoate, and on biphenyl was unaffected. Microarray and proteomic analyses revealed that cells of the DeltabenABCD::kan mutant growing on benzoate expressed both box pathways. Overall, these results indicate that all three pathways catabolize benzoate. Deletion of benABCD abolished the ability of LB400 to grow using 3-chlorobenzoate. None of the benzoate pathways could degrade 2- or 4-chlorobenzoate, indicating that the pathway redundancy does not directly contribute to LB400's PCB-degrading capacities. Finally, an extensive sigmaE-regulated oxidative stress response not present in wild-type LB400 grown on benzoate was detected in these deletion mutants, supporting our earlier suggestion that the box pathways are preferentially active under reduced oxygen tension. Our data further substantiate the expansive network of tightly interconnected and complexly regulated aromatic degradation pathways in LB400. PMID:16391095

  14. Alpha1a-Adrenoceptor Genetic Variant Triggers Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Hyperproliferation and Agonist Induced Hypertrophy via EGFR Transactivation Pathway.

    PubMed

    Gradinaru, Irina; Babaeva, Ekaterina; Schwinn, Debra A; Oganesian, Anush

    2015-01-01

    α1a Adrenergic receptors (α1aARs) are the predominant AR subtype in human vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs). α1aARs in resistance vessels are crucial in the control of blood pressure, yet the impact of naturally occurring human α1aAR genetic variants in cardiovascular disorders remains poorly understood. To this end, we present novel findings demonstrating that 3D cultures of vascular SMCs expressing human α1aAR-247R (247R) genetic variant demonstrate significantly increased SMC contractility compared with cells expressing the α1aAR-WT (WT) receptor. Stable expression of 247R genetic variant also triggers MMP/EGFR-transactivation dependent serum- and agonist-independent (constitutive) hyperproliferation and agonist-dependent hypertrophy of SMCs. Agonist stimulation reduces contractility Using pathway-specific inhibitors we determined that the observed hyperproliferation of 247R-expressing cells is triggered via β-arrestin1/Src/MMP-2/EGFR/ERK-dependent mechanism. MMP-2-specific siRNA inhibited 247R-triggered hyperproliferation indicating MMP-2 involvement in 247R-triggered hyperproliferation in SMCs. β-arrestin1-specific shRNA also inhibited 247R-triggered hyperproliferation but did not affect hypertrophy in 247R-expressing SMCs, indicating that agonist-dependent hypertrophy is independent of β-arrestin1. Our data reveal that in different cardiovascular cells the same human receptor genetic variant can activate alternative modulators of the same signaling pathway. Thus, our findings in SMCs demonstrate that depending on the type of cells expressing the same receptor (or receptor variant), different target-specific inhibitors could be used to modulate aberrant hyperproliferative or hypertrophic pathways in order to restore normal phenotype.

  15. Role of Genetic Polymorphisms in NFKB-Mediated Inflammatory Pathways in Response to Primary Chemoradiation Therapy for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dzhugashvili, Maia; Luengo-Gil, Ginés; García, Teresa; González-Conejero, Rocío; Conesa-Zamora, Pablo; Escolar, Pedro Pablo; Calvo, Felipe; Vicente, Vicente; Ayala de la Peña, Francisco

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether polymorphisms of genes related to inflammation are associated with pathologic response (primary endpoint) in patients with rectal cancer treated with primary chemoradiation therapy (PCRT). Methods and Materials: Genomic DNA of 159 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer treated with PCRT was genotyped for polymorphisms rs28362491 (NFKB1), rs1213266/rs5789 (PTGS1), rs5275 (PTGS2), and rs16944/rs1143627 (IL1B) using TaqMan single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping assays. The association between each genotype and pathologic response (poor response vs complete or partial response) was analyzed using logistic regression models. Results: The NFKB1 DEL/DEL genotype was associated with pathologic response (odds ratio [OR], 6.39; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.78-52.65; P=.03) after PCRT. No statistically significant associations between other polymorphisms and response to PCRT were observed. Patients with the NFKB1 DEL/DEL genotype showed a trend for longer disease-free survival (log-rank test, P=.096) and overall survival (P=.049), which was not significant in a multivariate analysis that included pathologic response. Analysis for 6 polymorphisms showed that patients carrying the haplotype rs28362491-DEL/rs1143627-A/rs1213266-G/rs5789-C/rs5275-A/rs16944-G (13.7% of cases) had a higher response rate to PCRT (OR, 8.86; 95% CI, 1.21-64.98; P=.034) than the reference group (rs28362491-INS/rs1143627-A/rs1213266-G/rs5789-C/rs5275-A/rs16944-G). Clinically significant (grade ≥2) acute organ toxicity was also more frequent in patients with that same haplotype (OR, 4.12; 95% CI, 1.11-15.36; P=.037). Conclusions: Our results suggest that genetic variation in NFKB-related inflammatory pathways might influence sensitivity to primary chemoradiation for rectal cancer. If confirmed, an inflammation-related radiogenetic profile might be used to select patients with rectal cancer for preoperative combined-modality treatment.

  16. Risk of Ovarian Cancer and the NF-κB Pathway: Genetic association with IL1A and TNFSF10

    PubMed Central

    Charbonneau, Bridget; Block, Matthew S.; Bamlet, William R.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Kalli, Kimberly R.; Fogarty, Zachary; Rider, David N.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Poole, Elizabeth; Risch, Harvey A.; Salvesen, Helga B.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Baglietto, Laura; Giles, Graham G.; Severi, Gianluca; Trabert, Britton; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Whittemore, Alice S.; Sieh, Weiva; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Bandera, Elisa V.; Orlow, Irene; Terry, Kathryn; Goodman, Marc T.; Thompson, Pamela J; Cook, Linda S.; Rossing, Mary Anne; Ness, Roberta B.; Narod, Steven A.; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Lu, Karen; Butzow, Ralf; Dörk, Thilo; Pejovic, Tanja; Campbell, Ian; Le, Nhu D.; Bunker, Clareann H.; Bogdanova, Natalia; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Eccles, Diana; Paul, James; Wu, Anna H.; Gayther, Simon A.; Hogdall, Estrid; Heitz, Florian; Kaye, Stanley B.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Culver, Hoda Anton; Gronwald, Jacek; Hogdall, Claus K.; Lambrechts, Diether; Fasching, Peter A.; Menon, Usha; Schildkraut, Joellen; Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Levine, Douglas A.; Kjaer, Susanne Kruger; Cramer, Daniel; Flanagan, James M.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Brown, Robert; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Song, Honglin; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Krakstad, Camilla; Liang, Dong; Odunsi, Kunle; Berchuck, Andrew; Jensen, Allan; Lubiński, Jan; Nevanlinna, Heli; Bean, Yukie T.; Lurie, Galina; Ziogas, Argyrios; Walsh, Christine; Despierre, Evelyn; Brinton, Louise; Hein, Alexander; Rudolph, Anja; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Olson, Sara H.; Harter, Philipp; Tyrer, Jonathan; Vitonis, Allison F.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Aben, Katja K.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Ramus, Susan J.; Wik, Elisabeth; Cybulski, Cezary; Lin, Jie; Sucheston, Lara; Edwards, Robert; McGuire, Valerie; Lester, Jenny; du Bois, Andreas; Lundvall, Lene; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Szafron, Lukasz M; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Yang, Hannah; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Van Altena, Anne M.; van den Berg, David; Halle, Mari K; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Schwaab, Ira; Chandran, Urmila; Menkiszak, Janusz; Ekici, Arif B.; Wilkens, Lynne R; Leminen, Arto; Modugno, Francesmary; Friel, Grace; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Vergote, Ignace; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Sobiczewski, Piotr; Kelemen, Linda E.; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Moysich, Kirsten; Knutson, Keith L.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Goode, Ellen L.

    2014-01-01

    A missense single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the immune modulatory gene IL1A has been associated with ovarian cancer risk (rs17561). While the exact mechanism through which this SNP alters risk of ovarian cancer is not clearly understood, rs17561 has also been associated with risk of endometriosis, an epidemiologic risk factor for ovarian cancer. IL-1α is both regulated by and able to activate NF-κB, a transcription factor family that induces transcription of many pro-inflammatory genes and may be an important mediator in carcinogenesis. We therefore tagged SNPs in over 200 genes in the NF-κB pathway for a total of 2,282 SNPs (including rs17561) for genotype analysis of 15,604 cases of ovarian cancer in patients of European descent, including 6,179 of high grade serous (HGS), 2,100 endometrioid, 1,591 mucinous, 1,034 clear cell and 1,016 low grade serous (LGS), including 23,235 control cases spanning 40 studies in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC). In this large population, we confirmed the association between rs17561 and clear cell ovarian cancer (OR=0.84, 95% CI: 0.76–0.93; p=0.00075), which remained intact even after excluding participants in the prior study (OR=0.85, 95% CI: 0.75–0.95; p=0.006). Considering a multiple-testing-corrected significance threshold of p< 2.5×10−5, only one other variant, the TNFSF10 SNP rs6785617, was associated significantly with a risk of ovarian cancer (low malignant potential (LMP) tumors OR=0.85, 95% CI: 0.79–0.91; p=0.00002). Our results extend the evidence that borderline tumors may have a distinct genetic etiology. Further investigation of how these SNPs might modify ovarian cancer associations with other inflammation related risk factors is warranted. PMID:24272484

  17. Genetic Drift during Systemic Arbovirus Infection of Mosquito Vectors Leads to Decreased Relative Fitness during Host Switching.

    PubMed

    Grubaugh, Nathan D; Weger-Lucarelli, James; Murrieta, Reyes A; Fauver, Joseph R; Garcia-Luna, Selene M; Prasad, Abhishek N; Black, William C; Ebel, Gregory D

    2016-04-13

    The emergence of mosquito-borne RNA viruses, such as West Nile virus (WNV), is facilitated by genetically complex virus populations within hosts. Here, we determine whether WNV enzootic (Culex tarsalis, Cx. quinquefasciatus, and Cx. pipiens) and bridge vectors (Aedes aegypti) have differential impacts on viral mutational diversity and fitness. During systemic mosquito infection, WNV faced stochastic reductions in genetic diversity that rapidly was recovered during intra-tissue population expansions. Interestingly, this intrahost selection and diversification was mosquito species dependent with Cx. tarsalis and Cx. quinquefasciatus exhibiting greater WNV divergence. However, recovered viral populations contained a preponderance of potentially deleterious mutations (i.e., high mutational load) and had lower relative fitness in avian cells compared to input virus. These findings demonstrate that the adaptive potential associated with mosquito transmission varies depending on the mosquito species and carries a significant fitness cost in vertebrates.

  18. Genetic Drift during Systemic Arbovirus Infection of Mosquito Vectors Leads to Decreased Relative Fitness during Host Switching.

    PubMed

    Grubaugh, Nathan D; Weger-Lucarelli, James; Murrieta, Reyes A; Fauver, Joseph R; Garcia-Luna, Selene M; Prasad, Abhishek N; Black, William C; Ebel, Gregory D

    2016-04-13

    The emergence of mosquito-borne RNA viruses, such as West Nile virus (WNV), is facilitated by genetically complex virus populations within hosts. Here, we determine whether WNV enzootic (Culex tarsalis, Cx. quinquefasciatus, and Cx. pipiens) and bridge vectors (Aedes aegypti) have differential impacts on viral mutational diversity and fitness. During systemic mosquito infection, WNV faced stochastic reductions in genetic diversity that rapidly was recovered during intra-tissue population expansions. Interestingly, this intrahost selection and diversification was mosquito species dependent with Cx. tarsalis and Cx. quinquefasciatus exhibiting greater WNV divergence. However, recovered viral populations contained a preponderance of potentially deleterious mutations (i.e., high mutational load) and had lower relative fitness in avian cells compared to input virus. These findings demonstrate that the adaptive potential associated with mosquito transmission varies depending on the mosquito species and carries a significant fitness cost in vertebrates. PMID:27049584

  19. Genetic control of courtship behavior in the housefly: evidence for a conserved bifurcation of the sex-determining pathway.

    PubMed

    Meier, Nicole; Käppeli, Simone Catherine; Hediger Niessen, Monika; Billeter, Jean-Christophe; Goodwin, Stephen F; Bopp, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster, genes of the sex-determination hierarchy orchestrate the development and differentiation of sex-specific tissues, establishing sex-specific physiology and neural circuitry. One of these sex-determination genes, fruitless (fru), plays a key role in the formation of neural circuits underlying Drosophila male courtship behavior. Conservation of fru gene structure and sex-specific expression has been found in several insect orders, though it is still to be determined whether a male courtship role for the gene is employed in these species due to the lack of mutants and homologous experimental evidence. We have isolated the fru ortholog (Md-fru) from the common housefly, Musca domestica, and show the gene's conserved genomic structure. We demonstrate that male-specific Md-fru transcripts arise by conserved mechanisms of sex-specific splicing. Here we show that Md-fru, is similarly involved in controlling male courtship behavior. A male courtship behavioral function for Md-fru was revealed by the behavioral and neuroanatomical analyses of a hypomorphic allele, Md-tra(man) , which specifically disrupted the expression of Md-fru in males, leading to severely impaired male courtship behavior. In line with a role in nervous system development, we found that expression of Md-fru was confined to neural tissues in the brain, most prominently in optic neuropil and in peripheral sensory organs. We propose that, like in Drosophila, overt sexual differentiation of the housefly depends on a sex-determining pathway that bifurcates downstream of the Md-tra gene to coordinate dimorphic development of non-neuronal tissues mediated by Md-dsx with that of neuronal tissues largely mediated by Md-fru.

  20. Genetic drift in antagonistic genes leads to divergence in sex-specific fitness between experimental populations of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Hesketh, Jack; Fowler, Kevin; Reuter, Max

    2013-05-01

    Males and females differ in their reproductive roles and as a consequence are often under diverging selection pressures on shared phenotypic traits. Theory predicts that divergent selection can favor the invasion of sexually antagonistic alleles, which increase the fitness of one sex at the detriment of the other. Sexual antagonism can be subsequently resolved through the evolution of sex-specific gene expression, allowing the sexes to diverge phenotypically. Although sexual dimorphism is very common, recent evidence also shows that antagonistic genetic variation continues to segregate in populations of many organisms. Here we present empirical data on the interaction between sexual antagonism and genetic drift in populations that have independently evolved under standardized conditions. We demonstrate that small experimental populations of Drosophila melanogaster have diverged in male and female fitness, with some populations showing high male, but low female fitness while other populations show the reverse pattern. The between-population patterns are consistent with the differentiation in reproductive fitness being driven by genetic drift in sexually antagonistic alleles. We discuss the implications of our results with respect to the maintenance of antagonistic variation in subdivided populations and consider the wider implications of drift in fitness-related genes.

  1. Selection in a fluctuating environment leads to decreased genetic variation and facilitates the evolution of phenotypic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Hallsson, L R; Björklund, M

    2012-07-01

    Changes in the environment are expected to induce changes in the quantitative genetic variation, which influences the ability of a population to adapt to environmental change. Furthermore, environmental changes are not constant in time, but fluctuate. Here, we investigate the effect of rapid, continuous and/or fluctuating temperature changes in the seed beetle Callosobruchus maculatus, using an evolution experiment followed by a split-brood experiment. In line with expectations, individuals responded in a plastic way and had an overall higher potential to respond to selection after a rapid change in the environment. After selection in an environment with increasing temperature, plasticity remained unchanged (or decreased) and environmental variation decreased, especially when fluctuations were added; these results were unexpected. As expected, the genetic variation decreased after fluctuating selection. Our results suggest that fluctuations in the environment have major impact on the response of a population to environmental change; in a highly variable environment with low predictability, a plastic response might not be beneficial and the response is genetically and environmentally canalized resulting in a low potential to respond to selection and low environmental sensitivity. Interestingly, we found greater variation for phenotypic plasticity after selection, suggesting that the potential for plasticity to evolve is facilitated after exposure to environmental fluctuations. Our study highlights that environmental fluctuations should be considered when investigating the response of a population to environmental change.

  2. Genetic evidence for differences in the pathways of druse and prismatic calcium oxalate crystal formation in Medicago truncatula

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current evidence supports a single pathway of oxalate biosynthesis utilising ascorbic acid as the precursor. In this study, we begin to address the possibility that more than one pathway of oxalate biosynthesis and calcium oxalate formation occurs in Medicago truncatula Gaertn. (cv. Jemalong genotyp...

  3. The procyanidin trimer C1 induces macrophage activation via NF-κB and MAPK pathways, leading to Th1 polarization in murine splenocytes.

    PubMed

    Sung, Nak-Yun; Yang, Mi-So; Song, Du-Sup; Byun, Eui-Baek; Kim, Jae-Kyung; Park, Jong-Heum; Song, Beom-Seok; Lee, Ju-Woon; Park, Sang-Hyun; Park, Hyun-Jin; Byun, Myung-Woo; Byun, Eui-Hong; Kim, Jae-Hun

    2013-08-15

    Numerous studies have shown various relationships between foods with a high nutritional value and a robust immune response, particularly studies that have focused on host protection and cytokine networks. This study aimed to clarify the role played by the procyanidin trimer C1 in innate and adaptive immunity. Procyanidin C1 did not exert cytotoxicity at concentrations ranging from 7.8 to 62.5 μg/ml in macrophage cells; therefore, concentration of 62.5 μg/ml was used as the maximum dose of procyanidin C1 throughout subsequent experiments. Procyanidin C1 enhanced inducible nitric oxide synthase-mediated nitric oxide production in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, procyanidin C1 functionally induced macrophage activation by augmenting the expression of cell surface molecules (CD80, CD86, and MHC II) and proinflammatory cytokine production (tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6) via activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), e.g., p38, ERK, and JNK and nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling pathways. Interestingly, procyanidin C1 effectively polarized T helper type 1 (Th1) by secreting Th1-mediated cytokines (interferon-γ, IL-12p70, and IL-2) and inducing splenocyte proliferation, indicating that procyanidin C1 contributes to Th1 polarization of the immune response. Accordingly, these findings confirms that the procyanidin C1 induces macrophage activation via NF-κB and MAPK pathways, leading to Th1 polarization in murine splenocytes, which suggests that procyanidin C1 regulates innate and adaptive immunity by macrophage activation and Th1 polarization.

  4. The Genetics of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Tourette Syndrome: An Epidemiological and Pathway-Based Approach for Gene Discovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grados, Marco A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To provide a contemporary perspective on genetic discovery methods applied to obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and Tourette syndrome (TS). Method: A review of research trends in genetics research in OCD and TS is conducted, with emphasis on novel approaches. Results: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are now in progress in OCD…

  5. Genetic variants in PI3K/AKT pathway are associated with severe radiation pneumonitis in lung cancer patients treated with radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yang; Liu, Bo; Li, Jing; Wu, Huanlei; Yang, Ju; Zhou, Xiao; Yi, Mingxiao; Li, Qianxia; Yu, Shiying; Yuan, Xianglin

    2016-01-01

    PI3K/AKT pathway plays important roles in inflammatory and fibrotic diseases while its connection to radiation pneumonitis (RP) is unclear. In this study, we explored the associations of genetic variants in PI3K/AKT pathway with RP in lung cancer patients with radiotherapy. Two hundred and sixty one lung cancer patients with radiotherapy were included in this prospective study (NCT02490319) and genotyped by MassArray and Sanger Sequence methods. By multivariate Cox hazard analysis and multiple testing, GA/GG genotype of AKT2: rs33933140 (HR = 0.272, 95% CI: 0.140-0.530, P = 1.3E-4, Pc = 9.1E-4), and the GT/GG genotype of PI3CA: rs9838117 (HR = 0.132, 95% CI: 0.042-0.416, P = 0.001, Pc = 0.006) were found to be strongly associated with a decreased occurrence of RP ≥ grade 3. And patients with the CT/TT genotype of AKT2: rs11880261 had a notably higher incidence of RP ≥ grade 3 (HR = 2.950, 95% CI: 1.380-6.305, P = 0.005, Pc = 0.025). We concluded that the genetic variants of PI3K/AKT pathway were significantly related to RP of grade ≥ 3 and may thus be predictors of severe RP before radiotherapy, if further validated in larger population.

  6. Genetic profile of GNAQ-mutated blue melanocytic neoplasms reveals mutations in genes linked to genomic instability and the PI3K pathway

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Alea, Mileidys; Vivancos, Ana; Caratú, Ginevra; Matito, Judit; Ferrer, Berta; Hernandez-Losa, Javier; Cortés, Javier; Muñoz, Eva; Garcia-Patos, Vicente; Recio, Juan A.

    2016-01-01

    Melanomas arising in association with a common or cellular blue nevus (MABN) comprise a relatively rare and heterogeneous group of lethal melanomas. Although GNAQ is known to be frequently mutated in common blue nevus, cellular blue nevus (CBN) and MABN and these malignant lesions present gross chromosome alterations harboring BAP1 mutations, little is known about other mutations that contribute to the development and progression of these neoplasms. Thus, the genetic profile of these tumors is important to increase the number of intervention and treatment modalities. Here, we characterized and genetically profiled two different sections of a rare MABN and two CBNs from three different patients. All of the samples harbored a GNAQ mutation, exhibited RAS pathway activation, and harbored additional mutations in genes associated with genomic instability and epigenetic regulation (KMT2C, FANCD2, ATR, ATRX, NBN, ERCC2, SETD2, and WHSC1). In addition, all neoplasms harbored mutations that directly or indirectly affected either the regulation or activation of the PI3K pathway (PIK3CA, NF1, INPP5B and GSK3B). Our results not only help understand the genetic complexity of these blue melanocytic lesions but provide a rationale to use the combination of PI3K/MTOR and MEK1/2 inhibitors against these types of tumors. PMID:27057633

  7. Can Genetic Analysis of Putative Blood Alzheimer’s Disease Biomarkers Lead to Identification of Susceptibility Loci?

    PubMed Central

    Huebinger, Ryan M.; Shewale, Shantanu J.; Koenig, Jessica L.; Mitchel, Jeffrey S.; O’Bryant, Sid E.; Waring, Stephen C.; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Chasse, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Although 24 Alzheimer’s disease (AD) risk loci have been reliably identified, a large portion of the predicted heritability for AD remains unexplained. It is expected that additional loci of small effect will be identified with an increased sample size. However, the cost of a significant increase in Case-Control sample size is prohibitive. The current study tests whether exploring the genetic basis of endophenotypes, in this case based on putative blood biomarkers for AD, can accelerate the identification of susceptibility loci using modest sample sizes. Each endophenotype was used as the outcome variable in an independent GWAS. Endophenotypes were based on circulating concentrations of proteins that contributed significantly to a published blood-based predictive algorithm for AD. Endophenotypes included Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein 1 (MCP1), Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule 1 (VCAM1), Pancreatic Polypeptide (PP), Beta2 Microglobulin (B2M), Factor VII (F7), Adiponectin (ADN) and Tenascin C (TN-C). Across the seven endophenotypes, 47 SNPs were associated with outcome with a p-value ≤1x10-7. Each signal was further characterized with respect to known genetic loci associated with AD. Signals for several endophenotypes were observed in the vicinity of CR1, MS4A6A/MS4A4E, PICALM, CLU, and PTK2B. The strongest signal was observed in association with Factor VII levels and was located within the F7 gene. Additional signals were observed in MAP3K13, ZNF320, ATP9B and TREM1. Conditional regression analyses suggested that the SNPs contributed to variation in protein concentration independent of AD status. The identification of two putatively novel AD loci (in the Factor VII and ATP9B genes), which have not been located in previous studies despite massive sample sizes, highlights the benefits of an endophenotypic approach for resolving the genetic basis for complex diseases. The coincidence of several of the endophenotypic signals with known AD loci may point to novel

  8. SpA, ClfA, and FnbA Genetic Variations Lead to Staphaurex Test-Negative Phenotypes in Bovine Mastitis Staphylococcus aureus Isolates▿

    PubMed Central

    Stutz, Katrin; Stephan, Roger; Tasara, Taurai

    2011-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus encodes many proteins that act as virulence factors, leading to a variety of diseases, including mastitis in cows. Among these virulence factors, SpA, ClfA, ClfB, FnbA, and FnbB are important for the ability of S. aureus to adhere to and invade host cells as well as to evade host immune responses. The interaction between these S. aureus surface proteins and human immunoglobulin G and fibrinogen that are coupled to latex particles is utilized to induce latex agglutination reactions, which are used widely in diagnostic kits for confirmation of presumptive S. aureus isolates. In this study, the Staphaurex latex agglutination test was performed on a collection of confirmed bovine mastitis S. aureus isolates. Notably, 54% (43/79 isolates) of these isolates exhibited latex agglutination-negative phenotypes (Staphaurex-negative result). To gain insights into the reasons for the high frequency of Staphaurex-negative bovine mastitis S. aureus isolates, the spa, clfA, clfB, fnbA, and fnbB genes were examined. Specific genetic changes in spa, clfA, and fnbA, as well as a loss of fnbB, which may impair SpA, ClfA, FnbA, and FnbB functions in latex agglutination reactions, were detected in Staphaurex-negative S. aureus isolates. The genetic changes included a premature stop codon in the spa gene, leading to a truncated SpA protein that is unable to participate in S. aureus cell-mediated agglutination of latex particles. In addition, clfA and fnbA genetic polymorphisms were detected that were linked to ClfA and FnbA amino acid changes that may significantly reduce fibrinogen-binding activity. The genetic variations in these S. aureus isolates might also have implications for their bovine mastitis virulence capacity. PMID:21147952

  9. The ARG1-LIKE2 gene of Arabidopsis functions in a gravity signal transduction pathway that is genetically distinct from the PGM pathway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guan, Changhui; Rosen, Elizabeth S.; Boonsirichai, Kanokporn; Poff, Kenneth L.; Masson, Patrick H.

    2003-01-01

    The arl2 mutants of Arabidopsis display altered root and hypocotyl gravitropism, whereas their inflorescence stems are fully gravitropic. Interestingly, mutant roots respond like the wild type to phytohormones and an inhibitor of polar auxin transport. Also, their cap columella cells accumulate starch similarly to wild-type cells, and mutant hypocotyls display strong phototropic responses to lateral light stimulation. The ARL2 gene encodes a DnaJ-like protein similar to ARG1, another protein previously implicated in gravity signal transduction in Arabidopsis seedlings. ARL2 is expressed at low levels in all organs of seedlings and plants. arl2-1 arg1-2 double mutant roots display kinetics of gravitropism similar to those of single mutants. However, double mutants carrying both arl2-1 and pgm-1 (a mutation in the starch-biosynthetic gene PHOSPHOGLUCOMUTASE) at the homozygous state display a more pronounced root gravitropic defect than the single mutants. On the other hand, seedlings with a null mutation in ARL1, a paralog of ARG1 and ARL2, behave similarly to the wild type in gravitropism and other related assays. Taken together, the results suggest that ARG1 and ARL2 function in the same gravity signal transduction pathway in the hypocotyl and root of Arabidopsis seedlings, distinct from the pathway involving PGM.

  10. The ARG1-LIKE2 Gene of Arabidopsis Functions in a Gravity Signal Transduction Pathway That Is Genetically Distinct from the PGM Pathway1

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Changhui; Rosen, Elizabeth S.; Boonsirichai, Kanokporn; Poff, Kenneth L.; Masson, Patrick H.

    2003-01-01

    The arl2 mutants of Arabidopsis display altered root and hypocotyl gravitropism, whereas their inflorescence stems are fully gravitropic. Interestingly, mutant roots respond like the wild type to phytohormones and an inhibitor of polar auxin transport. Also, their cap columella cells accumulate starch similarly to wild-type cells, and mutant hypocotyls display strong phototropic responses to lateral light stimulation. The ARL2 gene encodes a DnaJ-like protein similar to ARG1, another protein previously implicated in gravity signal transduction in Arabidopsis seedlings. ARL2 is expressed at low levels in all organs of seedlings and plants. arl2-1 arg1-2 double mutant roots display kinetics of gravitropism similar to those of single mutants. However, double mutants carrying both arl2-1 and pgm-1 (a mutation in the starch-biosynthetic gene PHOSPHOGLUCOMUTASE) at the homozygous state display a more pronounced root gravitropic defect than the single mutants. On the other hand, seedlings with a null mutation in ARL1, a paralog of ARG1 and ARL2, behave similarly to the wild type in gravitropism and other related assays. Taken together, the results suggest that ARG1 and ARL2 function in the same gravity signal transduction pathway in the hypocotyl and root of Arabidopsis seedlings, distinct from the pathway involving PGM. PMID:12970478

  11. Signal transduction pathways leading to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction in cancer cells by Allium vegetable-derived organosulfur compounds: a review.

    PubMed

    Herman-Antosiewicz, Anna; Singh, Shivendra V

    2004-11-01

    Epidemiological studies continue to support the premise that dietary intake of Allium vegetables (e.g., garlic, onions and so forth) may lower the risk of various types of cancer. Anticarcinogenic effect of Allium vegetables is attributed to organosulfur compounds (OSCs) that are generated upon processing of these vegetables. Preclinical studies have provided convincing evidence to indicate that Allium vegetable-derived OSCs including diallyl sulfide, diallyl disulfide and diallyl trisulfide are highly effective in affording protection against cancer in laboratory animals induced by a variety of chemical carcinogens. Inhibition of carcinogen activation through modulation of cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenases and/or acceleration of carcinogen detoxification via induction of phase II enzymes (glutathione transferases, quinone reductase, etc.) are believed to be responsible for protective effects of OSCs against chemically induced cancers. More recent studies have indicated that some naturally occurring OSC analogues can suppress proliferation of cancer cells in culture and inhibit growth of transplanted tumor xenografts in vivo by inducing apoptosis and/or by perturbing cell cycle progression. This review summarizes current knowledge on signal transduction pathways leading to perturbations in cell cycle progression and apoptosis induction by OSCs.

  12. Fine particulate matter leads to reproductive impairment in male rats by overexpressing phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt) signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xi-Ning; Yan, Chao; Liu, Dong-Yao; Peng, Jin-Pu; Chen, Jin-Jun; Zhou, Yue; Long, Chun-Lan; He, Da-Wei; Lin, Tao; Shen, Lian-Ju; Wei, Guang-Hui

    2015-09-17

    Maintenance of male reproductive function depends on normal sperm generation during which process Sertoli cells play a vital role. Studies found that fine particulate matter (PM) causes decreased male sperm quality, mechanism of which unestablished. We aim to investigate the definite mechanism of PM impairment on male reproduction. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were daily exposed to normal saline (NS) or PM2.5 with the doses of 9 mg/kg.b.w and 24 mg/kg.b.w. via intratracheal instillation for seven weeks. Reproductive function was tested by mating test and semen analysis after last exposure. Testes were collected to assess changes in histomorphology, and biomarkers including connexin 43 (Cx43), superoxide dismutase (SOD), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and phosphorylated protein kinase B (p-Akt). Male rats exposed to PM2.5 showed noticeable decreased fertility, significantly reduced sperm count, increased sperm abnormality rate and severe testicular damage in histomorphology. After PM2.5 exposure, the levels of Cx43 was significantly downregulated, and SOD was upregulated and downregulated significantly with different dose, respectively. Protein expression of PI3K and p-Akt dramatically enhanced, and the later one being located in Sertoli cells, the upward or declining trend was in dose dependent. PM2.5 exposure leads to oxidative stress impairment via PI3K/Akt signaling pathway on male reproduction in rats.

  13. Diet- and Genetically-induced Obesity Produces Alterations in the Microbiome, Inflammation and Wnt Pathway in the Intestine of Apc+/1638N Mice: Comparisons and Contrasts

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Crott, Jimmy W.; Lyu, Lin; Pfalzer, Anna C.; Li, Jinchao; Choi, Sang-Woon; Yang, Yingke; Mason, Joel B.; Liu, Zhenhua

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is an established risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC). Our previous study indicated that obesity increases activity of the pro-tumorigenic Wnt-signaling. Presently, we sought to further advance our understanding of the mechanisms by which obesity promotes CRC by examining associations between microbiome, inflammation and Wnt-signaling in Apc+/1638N mice whose obesity was induced by one of two modalities, diet- or genetically-induced obesity. Three groups were employed: Apc+/1638NLepr+/+ fed a low fat diet (10% fat), Apc+/1638NLepr+/+ fed a high fat diet (60% fat, diet-induced obesity), and Apc+/1638NLeprdb/db fed a low fat diet (genetically-induced obesity). All animals received diets for 16 weeks from 8 to 24 weeks of age. The abundance of 19 bowel cancer-associated bacterial taxa were examined by real-time PCR. The abundance of Turicibacter and Desulfovibrio decreased, but F. prausnitizii increased, in diet-induced obese mice (p < 0.05). In contrast, in genetically-induced obese mice, Bifidobacterium, A. muciniphila and E. rectale decreased, but Peptostrptococcus, and E. coli increased (p < 0.05). Both diet- and genetically-induced obesity altered the expression of genes involved in bacterial recognition (MyD88) and increased inflammation as indicated by elevated levels of cytokines (IFNγ and TNF-α for genetically-induced obesity, and IL-6 for diet-induced obesity). The elevated inflammation was associated with altered expression of genes that are integral components of the Wnt-signaling cascade in a fashion indicating its activation. These findings demonstrate that the composition of the small intestinal microbiome is affected differently in diet- and genetically-induced obesity, but both are associated with elevated intestinal inflammation and alterations of the Wnt pathway towards enhancing tumorigenesis.

  14. Diet- and Genetically-induced Obesity Produces Alterations in the Microbiome, Inflammation and Wnt Pathway in the Intestine of Apc+/1638N Mice: Comparisons and Contrasts

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Crott, Jimmy W.; Lyu, Lin; Pfalzer, Anna C.; Li, Jinchao; Choi, Sang-Woon; Yang, Yingke; Mason, Joel B.; Liu, Zhenhua

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is an established risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC). Our previous study indicated that obesity increases activity of the pro-tumorigenic Wnt-signaling. Presently, we sought to further advance our understanding of the mechanisms by which obesity promotes CRC by examining associations between microbiome, inflammation and Wnt-signaling in Apc+/1638N mice whose obesity was induced by one of two modalities, diet- or genetically-induced obesity. Three groups were employed: Apc+/1638NLepr+/+ fed a low fat diet (10% fat), Apc+/1638NLepr+/+ fed a high fat diet (60% fat, diet-induced obesity), and Apc+/1638NLeprdb/db fed a low fat diet (genetically-induced obesity). All animals received diets for 16 weeks from 8 to 24 weeks of age. The abundance of 19 bowel cancer-associated bacterial taxa were examined by real-time PCR. The abundance of Turicibacter and Desulfovibrio decreased, but F. prausnitizii increased, in diet-induced obese mice (p < 0.05). In contrast, in genetically-induced obese mice, Bifidobacterium, A. muciniphila and E. rectale decreased, but Peptostrptococcus, and E. coli increased (p < 0.05). Both diet- and genetically-induced obesity altered the expression of genes involved in bacterial recognition (MyD88) and increased inflammation as indicated by elevated levels of cytokines (IFNγ and TNF-α for genetically-induced obesity, and IL-6 for diet-induced obesity). The elevated inflammation was associated with altered expression of genes that are integral components of the Wnt-signaling cascade in a fashion indicating its activation. These findings demonstrate that the composition of the small intestinal microbiome is affected differently in diet- and genetically-induced obesity, but both are associated with elevated intestinal inflammation and alterations of the Wnt pathway towards enhancing tumorigenesis. PMID:27698916

  15. Antipodean white sharks on a Mediterranean walkabout? Historical dispersal leads to genetic discontinuity and an endangered anomalous population.

    PubMed

    Gubili, Chrysoula; Bilgin, Rasit; Kalkan, Evrim; Karhan, S Ünsal; Jones, Catherine S; Sims, David W; Kabasakal, Hakan; Martin, Andrew P; Noble, Leslie R

    2011-06-01

    The provenance of white sharks (Carcharodon carcharias) in the Mediterranean is both a conundrum and an important conservation issue. Considering this species's propensity for natal philopatry, any evidence that the Mediterranean stock has little or no contemporary immigration from the Atlantic would suggest that it is extraordinarily vulnerable. To address this issue we sequenced the mitochondrial control region of four rare Mediterranean white sharks. Unexpectedly, the juvenile sequences were identical although collected at different locations and times, showing little genetic differentiation from Indo-Pacific lineages, but strong separation from geographically closer Atlantic/western Indian Ocean haplotypes. Historical long-distance dispersal (probably a consequence of navigational error during past climatic oscillations) and potential founder effects are invoked to explain the anomalous relationships of this isolated 'sink' population, highlighting the present vulnerability of its nursery grounds. PMID:21084352

  16. Antipodean white sharks on a Mediterranean walkabout? Historical dispersal leads to genetic discontinuity and an endangered anomalous population

    PubMed Central

    Gubili, Chrysoula; Bilgin, Raşit; Kalkan, Evrim; Karhan, S. Ünsal; Jones, Catherine S.; Sims, David W.; Kabasakal, Hakan; Martin, Andrew P.; Noble, Leslie R.

    2011-01-01

    The provenance of white sharks (Carcharodon carcharias) in the Mediterranean is both a conundrum and an important conservation issue. Considering this species's propensity for natal philopatry, any evidence that the Mediterranean stock has little or no contemporary immigration from the Atlantic would suggest that it is extraordinarily vulnerable. To address this issue we sequenced the mitochondrial control region of four rare Mediterranean white sharks. Unexpectedly, the juvenile sequences were identical although collected at different locations and times, showing little genetic differentiation from Indo-Pacific lineages, but strong separation from geographically closer Atlantic/western Indian Ocean haplotypes. Historical long-distance dispersal (probably a consequence of navigational error during past climatic oscillations) and potential founder effects are invoked to explain the anomalous relationships of this isolated ‘sink’ population, highlighting the present vulnerability of its nursery grounds. PMID:21084352

  17. A Cross-Cancer Genetic Association Analysis of the DNA repair and DNA Damage Signaling Pathways for Lung, Ovary, Prostate, Breast and Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Scarbrough, Peter M.; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Iversen, Edwin S.; Brhane, Yonathan; Amos, Christopher I.; Kraft, Peter; Hung, Rayjean J.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Witte, John S.; Pharoah, Paul; Henderson, Brian E.; Gruber, Stephen B.; Hunter, David J.; Garber, Judy E.; Joshi, Amit D.; McDonnell, Kevin; Easton, Doug F.; Eeles, Ros; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Muir, Kenneth; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.

    2015-01-01

    Background DNA damage is an established mediator of carcinogenesis, though GWAS have identified few significant loci. This cross-cancer site, pooled analysis was performed to increase the power to detect common variants of DNA repair genes associated with cancer susceptibility. Methods We conducted a cross-cancer analysis of 60,297 SNPs, at 229 DNA repair gene regions, using data from the NCI Genetic Associations and Mechanisms in Oncology (GAME-ON) Network. Our analysis included data from 32 GWAS and 48,734 controls and 51,537 cases across five cancer sites (breast, colon, lung, ovary, and prostate). Because of the unavailability of individual data, data were analyzed at the aggregate level. Meta-analysis was performed using the Association analysis for SubSETs (ASSET) software. To test for genetic associations that might escape individual variant testing due to small effect sizes, pathway analysis of eight DNA repair pathways was performed using hierarchical modeling. Results We identified three susceptibility DNA repair genes, RAD51B (p < 5.09 × 10−6), MSH5 (p < 5.09 × 10−6) and BRCA2 (p = 5.70 × 10−6). Hierarchical modeling identified several pleiotropic associations with cancer risk in the base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair, mismatch repair, and homologous recombination pathways. Conclusions Only three susceptibility loci were identified which had all been previously reported. In contrast, hierarchical modeling identified several pleiotropic cancer risk associations in key DNA repair pathways. Impact Results suggest that many common variants in DNA repair genes are likely associated with cancer susceptibility through small effect sizes that do not meet stringent significance testing criteria. PMID:26637267

  18. Genetic variations in base excision repair pathway and risk of bladder cancer: a case-control study in the United States.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hui; Gong, Yilei; Dai, Jingyao; Wu, Xifeng; Gu, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Base excision repair (BER) is one of the major cellular DNA repair pathways that repairs small isolated foci of DNA damage including reduced or oxidized single bases or fragments and small, non-bulky adducts. Genetic variations in BER genes may affect DNA repair capacity and increase susceptibility to bladder cancer. In a case-control study of 801 bladder cancer patients and 801 matched controls, we evaluated the associations of 167 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 19 genes of the BER pathway with the risk of bladder cancer. In individual SNP analysis, 13 SNPs in 10 BER pathway genes were significantly associated with bladder cancer risk. The most significant SNP was rs2029167 in the SMUG1 gene. The homozygous variant GG genotype was associated with a 1.42-fold increased risk of bladder cancer (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.11-1.82, P=0.005). Cumulative effect analysis showed joint effects of increased risk of bladder cancer with increasing number of unfavorable genotypes in patients. Classification and regression tree analysis further revealed high-order gene-gene interactions and categorized the study subjects into low-, medium-low-, medium-high-, and high-risk groups. Compared with the low-risk group, the odds ratio for medium-low-, medium-high-, and high-risk group was 1.83 (95% CI: 1.23-2.72), 2.61 (95% CI: 1.79-3.80), and 3.05 (95% CI: 2.08-4.46), respectively (P for trend<0.001). Our results suggest that genetic variations in BER pathway genes modulate the risk of bladder cancer individually and jointly.

  19. Association Study of Mannose-Binding Lectin Levels and Genetic Variants in Lectin Pathway Proteins with Susceptibility to Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Osthoff, Michael; Dean, Melinda M.; Baird, Paul N.; Richardson, Andrea J.; Daniell, Mark; Guymer, Robyn H.; Eisen, Damon P.

    2015-01-01

    Background In age-related macular degeneration (AMD) the complement system is thought to be activated by chronic oxidative damage with genetic variants identified in the alternative pathway as susceptibility factors. However, the involvement of the lectin pathway of complement, a key mediator of oxidative damage, is controversial. This study investigated whether mannose-binding lectin (MBL) levels and genetic variants in lectin pathway proteins, are associated with the predisposition to and severity of AMD. Methods MBL levels and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the MBL2 and the ficolin-2 (FCN2) gene were determined in 109 patients with AMD and 109 age- and sex-matched controls. Results MBL expression levels were equally distributed in both cases (early and late AMD) and controls (p>0.05). However, there was a trend towards higher median MBL levels in cases with late AMD compared to cases with early AMD (1.0 vs. 0.4 μg/ml, p = 0.09) and MBL deficiency (<0.5 μg/ml) was encountered less frequently in the late AMD group (35% vs 56%, p = 0.03). FCN2 and MBL2 allele frequencies were similarly distributed in early and late AMD cases compared with controls (p>0.05 for all analyses) as were MBL2 genotypes. Similarly, there was no significant difference in allele frequencies in any SNPs in either the MBL2 or FCN2 gene in cases with early vs. late AMD. Conclusions SNPs of lectin pathway proteins investigated in this study were not associated with AMD or AMD severity. However, MBL levels deserve further study in a larger cohort of early vs. late AMD patients to elucidate any real effect on AMD severity. PMID:26207622

  20. Genetic engineering of the biosynthesis of glycinebetaine leads to increased tolerance of photosynthesis to salt stress in transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinghong; Liang, Zheng; Wen, Xiaogang; Lu, Congming

    2008-01-01

    Genetically engineered tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) with the ability to synthesis glycinebetaine (GB) in chloroplasts was established by introducing the BADH gene for betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase from spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.). The genetic engineering resulted in enhanced tolerance of growth of young seedlings to salt stress. This increased tolerance was not due to improved water status, since there were no significant differences in accumulation of sodium and chloride, leaf water potential, and relative water content between wild type and transgenic plants under salt stress. Salt stress resulted in a decrease in CO2 assimilation and such a decrease was much greater in wild type plants than in transgenic plants. Though salt stress showed no damage to PSII, there were a decrease in the maximal PSII electron transport rate in vivo and an increase in non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) and these changes were greater in wild type plants than in transgenic plants. In addition, salt stress inhibited the activities of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, chloroplastic fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase, and phosphoribulokinase and such a decrease was also greater in wild type plants than in transgenic plants, suggesting that GB protects these enzymes against salt stress. However, there were no significant changes in the activities of phosphoglycerate kinase, triose phosphate isomerase, ribulose-5-phosphate isomerase, transketolase, and sedoheptulose-1,7-bisphosphatase in both wild type and transgenic plants. The results in this study suggest that enhanced tolerance of CO2 assimilation to salt stress may be one of physiological bases for increased tolerance of growth of transgenic plants to salt stress.

  1. Genetic damage induced by lead chloride in different tissues of fresh water climbing perch Anabas testudineus (Bloch).

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Md Kawser; Parvin, Elora; Arif, Mohammad; Islam, Md Monirul; Akter, Mosammat Salma; Khan, Mohammad Shahneawz

    2011-11-01

    The present investigation was undertaken to study the induction of DNA damage by lead chloride (PbCl(2)) in freshwater climbing perch Anabas testudineus using alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay). Based on the LC(50) values of lead chloride of A. testudineus three different concentrations viz., 0.1, 1.0 and 2.0 mg/L were selected to expose fish. The DNA damage was observed in the gill, kidney and liver tissue as the percentage of DNA in comet tails and comet heads in the tissue of the exposed fish. DNA damage at different concentrations showed sensitivity to particular tissue. The liver tissue exhibited significantly (p < 0.01) higher DNA damage, followed by kidney and gill. However, the DNA damage was found to be dose dependent; at 2 mg/L of PbCl(2) the tail and head DNA of liver tissue were 57.84% and 39.49%, in kidney tissue the values were 52.36% and 44.97% whereas in gill tissue the values were 48.86% and 48.96% respectively. The current study explored the utility of the comet assay for in vivo laboratory studies using A. testudineus species for screening the genotoxic potential of lead chloride.

  2. OsbHLH148, a basic helix-loop-helix protein, interacts with OsJAZ proteins in a jasmonate signaling pathway leading to drought tolerance in rice.

    PubMed

    Seo, Ju-Seok; Joo, Joungsu; Kim, Min-Jeong; Kim, Yeon-Ki; Nahm, Baek Hie; Song, Sang Ik; Cheong, Jong-Joo; Lee, Jong Seob; Kim, Ju-Kon; Choi, Yang Do

    2011-03-01

    Jasmonates play important roles in development, stress responses and defense in plants. Here, we report the results of a study using a functional genomics approach that identified a rice basic helix-loop-helix domain gene, OsbHLH148, that conferred drought tolerance as a component of the jasmonate signaling module in rice. OsbHLH148 transcript levels were rapidly increased by treatment with methyl jasmonate (MeJA) or abscisic acid, and abiotic stresses including dehydration, high salinity, low temperature and wounding. Transgenic over-expression of OsbHLH148 in rice confers plant tolerance to drought stress. Expression profiling followed by DNA microarray and RNA gel-blot analyses of transgenic versus wild-type rice identified genes that are up-regulated by OsbHLH148 over-expression. These include OsDREB and OsJAZ genes that are involved in stress responses and the jasmonate signaling pathway, respectively. OsJAZ1, a rice ZIM domain protein, interacted with OsbHLH148 in yeast two-hybrid and pull-down assays, but it interacted with the putative OsCOI1 only in the presence of coronatine. Furthermore, the OsJAZ1 protein was degraded by rice and Arabidopsis extracts in the presence of coronatine, and its degradation was inhibited by MG132, a 26S proteasome inhibitor, suggesting 26S proteasome-mediated degradation of OsJAZ1 via the SCF(OsCOI1) complex. The transcription level of OsJAZ1 increased upon exposure of rice to MeJA. These results show that OsJAZ1 could act as a transcriptional regulator of the OsbHLH148-related jasmonate signaling pathway leading to drought tolerance. Thus, our study suggests that OsbHLH148 acts on an initial response of jasmonate-regulated gene expression toward drought tolerance, constituting the OsbHLH148-OsJAZ-OsCOI1 signaling module in rice.

  3. Genetic Deletion of Uncoupling Protein 3 Exaggerates Apoptotic Cell Death in the Ischemic Heart Leading to Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Perrino, Cinzia; Schiattarella, Gabriele G.; Sannino, Anna; Pironti, Gianluigi; Petretta, Maria Piera; Cannavo, Alessandro; Gargiulo, Giuseppe; Ilardi, Federica; Magliulo, Fabio; Franzone, Anna; Carotenuto, Giuseppe; Serino, Federica; Altobelli, Giovanna G.; Cimini, Vincenzo; Cuocolo, Alberto; Lombardi, Assunta; Goglia, Fernando; Indolfi, Ciro; Trimarco, Bruno; Esposito, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Background Uncoupling protein 3 (ucp3) is a member of the mitochondrial anion carrier superfamily of proteins uncoupling mitochondrial respiration. In this study, we investigated the effects of ucp3 genetic deletion on mitochondrial function and cell survival under low oxygen conditions in vitro and in vivo. Methods and Results To test the effects of ucp3 deletion in vitro, murine embryonic fibroblasts and adult cardiomyocytes were isolated from wild‐type (WT, n=67) and ucp3 knockout mice (ucp3−/−, n=70). To test the effects of ucp3 genetic deletion in vivo, myocardial infarction (MI) was induced by permanent coronary artery ligation in WT and ucp3−/− mice. Compared with WT, ucp3−/− murine embryonic fibroblasts and cardiomyocytes exhibited mitochondrial dysfunction and increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation and apoptotic cell death under hypoxic conditions in vitro (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase‐dUTP nick end labeling–positive nuclei: WT hypoxia, 70.3±1.2%; ucp3−/− hypoxia, 85.3±0.9%; P<0.05). After MI, despite similar areas at risk in the 2 groups, ucp3−/− hearts demonstrated a significantly larger infarct size compared with WT (infarct area/area at risk: WT, 48.2±3.7%; ucp3−/−, 65.0±2.9%; P<0.05). Eight weeks after MI, cardiac function was significantly decreased in ucp3−/− mice compared with WT (fractional shortening: WT MI, 42.7±3.1%; ucp3−/− MI, 24.4±2.9; P<0.05), and this was associated with heightened apoptotic cell death (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase‐dUTP nick end labeling–positive nuclei: WT MI, 0.7±0.04%; ucp3−/− MI, 1.1±0.09%, P<0.05). Conclusions Our data indicate that ucp3 levels regulate reactive oxygen species levels and cell survival during hypoxia, modulating infarct size in the ischemic heart. PMID:23688674

  4. Germline or somatic GPR101 duplication leads to X-linked acrogigantism: a clinico-pathological and genetic study.

    PubMed

    Iacovazzo, Donato; Caswell, Richard; Bunce, Benjamin; Jose, Sian; Yuan, Bo; Hernández-Ramírez, Laura C; Kapur, Sonal; Caimari, Francisca; Evanson, Jane; Ferraù, Francesco; Dang, Mary N; Gabrovska, Plamena; Larkin, Sarah J; Ansorge, Olaf; Rodd, Celia; Vance, Mary L; Ramírez-Renteria, Claudia; Mercado, Moisés; Goldstone, Anthony P; Buchfelder, Michael; Burren, Christine P; Gurlek, Alper; Dutta, Pinaki; Choong, Catherine S; Cheetham, Timothy; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Stratakis, Constantine A; Lopes, Maria-Beatriz; Grossman, Ashley B; Trouillas, Jacqueline; Lupski, James R; Ellard, Sian; Sampson, Julian R; Roncaroli, Federico; Korbonits, Márta

    2016-01-01

    Non-syndromic pituitary gigantism can result from AIP mutations or the recently identified Xq26.3 microduplication causing X-linked acrogigantism (XLAG). Within Xq26.3, GPR101 is believed to be the causative gene, and the c.924G > C (p.E308D) variant in this orphan G protein-coupled receptor has been suggested to play a role in the pathogenesis of acromegaly.We studied 153 patients (58 females and 95 males) with pituitary gigantism. AIP mutation-negative cases were screened for GPR101 duplication through copy number variation droplet digital PCR and high-density aCGH. The genetic, clinical and histopathological features of XLAG patients were studied in detail. 395 peripheral blood and 193 pituitary tumor DNA samples from acromegaly patients were tested for GPR101 variants.We identified 12 patients (10 females and 2 males; 7.8 %) with XLAG. In one subject, the duplicated region only contained GPR101, but not the other three genes in found to be duplicated in the previously reported patients, defining a new smallest region of overlap of duplications. While females presented with germline mutations, the two male patients harbored the mutation in a mosaic state. Nine patients had pituitary adenomas, while three had hyperplasia. The comparison of the features of XLAG, AIP-positive and GPR101&AIP-negative patients revealed significant differences in sex distribution, age at onset, height, prolactin co-secretion and histological features. The pathological features of XLAG-related adenomas were remarkably similar. These tumors had a sinusoidal and lobular architecture. Sparsely and densely granulated somatotrophs were admixed with lactotrophs; follicle-like structures and calcifications were commonly observed. Patients with sporadic of familial acromegaly did not have an increased prevalence of the c.924G > C (p.E308D) GPR101 variant compared to public databases.In conclusion, XLAG can result from germline or somatic duplication of GPR101. Duplication of GPR101

  5. Does eczema lead to asthma?

    PubMed

    Burgess, John A; Lowe, Adrian J; Matheson, Melanie C; Varigos, George; Abramson, Michael J; Dharmage, Shyamali C

    2009-06-01

    The nature of the relationship between eczema, asthma, and allergic rhinitis has been controversial. It has been commonly held that these disorders, while sharing genetic and environmental risk factors, are unrelated disorders that may develop sequentially along an atopic pathway. Conversely, the link between eczema and these later-onset respiratory disorders may be causal. This review examines the relationship between eczema, asthma, and allergic rhinitis in the context of the atopic march, the skin barrier, and recent developments in eczema genetics; and we propose that the relationship is causal. We describe a plausible biological pathway with eczema as the first step in a progressive atopic march that over time leads to asthma and/or allergic rhinitis. Such a pathway has implications for our understanding of these disorders and steps that might be made to prevent the development of asthma in particular. We propose that intervention studies in eczema should be conducted to confirm or refute this causal relationship. Such studies may materially improve the quality of life of eczema patients and will have important public health benefits if the interventions lead to a reduction in the burden of asthma.

  6. Carrying-over effects of GVBD blocking on post-blocking meiotic progression of oocytes: species difference and the signaling pathway leading to MPF activation.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Guang-Zhong; Lian, Hua-Yu; Gao, Yan; Sun, Ming-Ju; Gong, Shuai; Zheng, Liang-Liang; Zhang, Chuan-Xin; Tan, Jing-He

    2014-01-01

    Efforts to improve the quality of in vitro matured oocytes by blocking germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) and allowing more time for ooplasmic maturation have achieved little due to a lack of knowledge on the molecular events during GVBD blocking. Such knowledge is also important for studies aimed at regulating gene expression in maturing oocytes prior to GVBD. We studied species difference and signaling pathways leading to the carrying-over effect of GVBD blocking on post-blocking meiotic progression (PBMP). Overall, GVBD-blocking with roscovitine decelerated PBMP of mouse oocytes but accelerated that of pig oocytes. During blocking culture, whereas cyclin B of pig oocytes increased continuously, that of mouse oocytes declined first and then increased slowly. In both species, (a) whereas active CDC2A showed a dynamics similar to cyclin B, inactive CDC2A decreased continuously; (b) when oocytes were blocked in blocking medium containing cycloheximide, PBMP was decelerated significantly while cyclin B and active CDC2A decreasing to the lowest level; (c) whereas sodium vanadate in blocking medium reduced PBMP, epidermal growth factor (EGF) in blocking medium accelerated PBMP significantly with no effect on cyclin B levels. In conclusion, the EGF signaling cascade accelerated PBMP by promoting the pre-MPF (M-phase-promoting factor) to MPF conversion during GVBD blocking with roscovitine. The significant difference in PBMP observed between mouse and pig oocytes was caused by species difference in cyclin B dynamics during blocking culture as no species difference was observed in either pre-MPF to MPF conversion or the EGF signaling activity. PMID:25078078

  7. Modulation of the phosphate-starvation response in Escherichia coli by genetic manipulation of the polyphosphate pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Sharfstein, S.T.; Van Dien, S.J.; Keasling, J.D.

    1996-08-20

    The effect of intracellular polyphosphate on the phosphate-starvation response in Escherichia coli was studied by genetically manipulating the intracellular polyphosphate levels and by performing phosphate shifts on the genetically engineered strains. Strains that produced large quantities of polyphosphate and were able to degrade it induced the phosphate-starvation response to a lesser extent than wild-type strains, whereas strains that were unable to degrade a large intracellular polyphosphate pool induce the phosphate-starvation response to a greater extent than wild-type strains. These results have important implications for expression of heterologous genes under control of the phoA promoter.

  8. Genetic variation in the TLR and NF-κB genetic pathways and cervical and vulvar cancer risk: a population-based case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Bodelon, Clara; Madeleine, Margaret M.; Johnson, Lisa G.; Du, Qin; Galloway, Denise A.; Malkki, Mari; Petersdorf, Effie W.; Schwartz, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    Genital infection with the oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) is the necessary cause of cervical cancer and of a large fraction of vulvar cancers. The toll-like receptor (TLR) and the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signaling pathways have been implicated in inflammation, autoimmune disease and cancer, but whether common nucleotide variation in these pathways is associated with the risk of cervical and vulvar cancers has received little study. Using data from a population-based case-control study of cervical and vulvar cancers, we genotyped 205 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in and around 32 candidate gene regions within these pathways. Gene-based analyses were employed to estimate the associations between individual gene regions and the risk of cervical and vulvar cancers. Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated to assess the risk of cervical and vulvar cancers for each SNP. P-values were adjusted for multiple testing. A total of 876 cervical cancer cases, 517 vulvar cancer cases and 1,100 controls were included in the analysis. The TNF region was significantly associated with the risks of cervical cancer (gene-based P-value: 2.0×10−4) and vulvar cancer (gene-based P-value: 1.0×10−4). The rare allele (A) of SNP rs2239704 in the 5′ UTR of the LTA gene was significantly associated with increased risks of cervical cancer (OR=1.31, 95% CI: 1.15–1.50; adjusted P-value: 0.013) and vulvar cancer (OR=1.51, 95% CI: 1.30–1.75; adjusted P-value: 1.9×10−5). These findings add to the evidence of the importance of the immune system in the etiology of cervical and vulvar cancers. PMID:23824834

  9. Alcohol Interacts with Genetic Alteration of the Hippo Tumor Suppressor Pathway to Modulate Tissue Growth in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Ilanges, Anoj; Jahanshahi, Maryam; Balobin, Denis M.; Pfleger, Cathie M.

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol-mediated cancers represent more than 3.5% of cancer-related deaths, yet how alcohol promotes cancer is a major open question. Using Drosophila, we identified novel interactions between dietary ethanol and loss of tumor suppressor components of the Hippo Pathway. The Hippo Pathway suppresses tumors in flies and mammals by inactivating transcriptional co-activator Yorkie, and the spectrum of cancers associated with impaired Hippo signaling overlaps strikingly with those associated with alcohol. Therefore, our findings may implicate loss of Hippo Pathway tumor suppression in alcohol-mediated cancers. Ethanol enhanced overgrowth from loss of the expanded, hippo, or warts tumor suppressors but, surprisingly, not from over-expressing the yorkie oncogene. We propose that in parallel to Yorkie-dependent overgrowth, impairing Hippo signaling in the presence of alcohol may promote overgrowth via additional alcohol-relevant targets. We also identified interactions between alcohol and Hippo Pathway over-activation. We propose that exceeding certain thresholds of alcohol exposure activates Hippo signaling to maintain proper growth control and prevent alcohol-mediated mis-patterning and tissue overgrowth. PMID:24205337

  10. A Global Genomic and Genetic Strategy to Predict Pathway Activation of Xenobiotic Responsive Transcription Factors in the Mouse Liver

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many drugs and environmentally-relevant chemicals activate xenobiotic-responsive transcription factors(TF). Identification of target genes of these factors would be useful in predicting pathway activation in in vitro chemical screening. Starting with a large compendium of Affymet...

  11. Genetic diversity of Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae) on the Hawaiian Islands: Implications for an introduction pathway into California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Population genetic diversity of the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, on the Hawaiian islands of Oahu, Maui, Kauai, and Hawaii (the Big Island) was estimated using DNA sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene. A total of 932 flies representing 36 sampled sites across...

  12. Genetic Variation in Melatonin Pathway Enzymes in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Comorbid Sleep Onset Delay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veatch, Olivia J.; Pendergast, Julie S.; Allen, Melissa J.; Leu, Roberta M.; Johnson, Carl Hirschie; Elsea, Sarah H.; Malow, Beth A.

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disruption is common in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Genes whose products regulate endogenous melatonin modify sleep patterns and have been implicated in ASD. Genetic factors likely contribute to comorbid expression of sleep disorders in ASD. We studied a clinically unique ASD subgroup, consisting solely of children with…

  13. Two forward genetic screens for vein density mutants in sorghum converge on a cytochrome P450 gene in the brassinosteroid pathway.

    PubMed

    Rizal, Govinda; Thakur, Vivek; Dionora, Jacqueline; Karki, Shanta; Wanchana, Samart; Acebron, Kelvin; Larazo, Nikki; Garcia, Richard; Mabilangan, Abigail; Montecillo, Florencia; Danila, Florence; Mogul, Reychelle; Pablico, Paquito; Leung, Hei; Langdale, Jane A; Sheehy, John; Kelly, Steven; Quick, William Paul

    2015-10-01

    The specification of vascular patterning in plants has interested plant biologists for many years. In the last decade a new context has emerged for this interest. Specifically, recent proposals to engineer C(4) traits into C(3) plants such as rice require an understanding of how the distinctive venation pattern in the leaves of C(4) plants is determined. High vein density with Kranz anatomy, whereby photosynthetic cells are arranged in encircling layers around vascular bundles, is one of the major traits that differentiate C(4) species from C(3) species. To identify genetic factors that specify C(4) leaf anatomy, we generated ethyl methanesulfonate- and γ-ray-mutagenized populations of the C(4) species sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), and screened for lines with reduced vein density. Two mutations were identified that conferred low vein density. Both mutations segregated in backcrossed F(2) populations as homozygous recessive alleles. Bulk segregant analysis using next-generation sequencing revealed that, in both cases, the mutant phenotype was associated with mutations in the CYP90D2 gene, which encodes an enzyme in the brassinosteroid biosynthesis pathway. Lack of complementation in allelism tests confirmed this result. These data indicate that the brassinosteroid pathway promotes high vein density in the sorghum leaf, and suggest that differences between C(4) and C(3) leaf anatomy may arise in part through differential activity of this pathway in the two leaf types. PMID:26333774

  14. The Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor DRhoGEF2 Is a Genetic Modifier of the PI3K Pathway in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ying-Ju; Zhou, Lily; Binari, Richard; Manoukian, Armen; Mak, Tak; McNeill, Helen; Stambolic, Vuk

    2016-01-01

    The insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway mediates various physiological processes associated with human health. Components of this pathway are highly conserved throughout eukaryotic evolution. In Drosophila, the PTEN ortholog and its mammalian counterpart downregulate insulin/IGF signaling by antagonizing the PI3-kinase function. From a dominant loss-of-function genetic screen, we discovered that mutations of a Dbl-family member, the guanine nucleotide exchange factor DRhoGEF2 (DRhoGEF22(l)04291), suppressed the PTEN-overexpression eye phenotype. dAkt/dPKB phosphorylation, a measure of PI3K signaling pathway activation, increased in the eye discs from the heterozygous DRhoGEF2 wandering third instar larvae. Overexpression of DRhoGEF2, and it's functional mammalian ortholog PDZ-RhoGEF (ArhGEF11), at various stages of eye development, resulted in both dPKB/Akt-dependent and -independent phenotypes, reflecting the complexity in the crosstalk between PI3K and Rho signaling in Drosophila.

  15. The Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor DRhoGEF2 Is a Genetic Modifier of the PI3K Pathway in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ying-Ju; Zhou, Lily; Binari, Richard; Manoukian, Armen; Mak, Tak; McNeill, Helen; Stambolic, Vuk

    2016-01-01

    The insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway mediates various physiological processes associated with human health. Components of this pathway are highly conserved throughout eukaryotic evolution. In Drosophila, the PTEN ortholog and its mammalian counterpart downregulate insulin/IGF signaling by antagonizing the PI3-kinase function. From a dominant loss-of-function genetic screen, we discovered that mutations of a Dbl-family member, the guanine nucleotide exchange factor DRhoGEF2 (DRhoGEF22(l)04291), suppressed the PTEN-overexpression eye phenotype. dAkt/dPKB phosphorylation, a measure of PI3K signaling pathway activation, increased in the eye discs from the heterozygous DRhoGEF2 wandering third instar larvae. Overexpression of DRhoGEF2, and it’s functional mammalian ortholog PDZ-RhoGEF (ArhGEF11), at various stages of eye development, resulted in both dPKB/Akt-dependent and -independent phenotypes, reflecting the complexity in the crosstalk between PI3K and Rho signaling in Drosophila. PMID:27015411

  16. Two forward genetic screens for vein density mutants in sorghum converge on a cytochrome P450 gene in the brassinosteroid pathway.

    PubMed

    Rizal, Govinda; Thakur, Vivek; Dionora, Jacqueline; Karki, Shanta; Wanchana, Samart; Acebron, Kelvin; Larazo, Nikki; Garcia, Richard; Mabilangan, Abigail; Montecillo, Florencia; Danila, Florence; Mogul, Reychelle; Pablico, Paquito; Leung, Hei; Langdale, Jane A; Sheehy, John; Kelly, Steven; Quick, William Paul

    2015-10-01

    The specification of vascular patterning in plants has interested plant biologists for many years. In the last decade a new context has emerged for this interest. Specifically, recent proposals to engineer C(4) traits into C(3) plants such as rice require an understanding of how the distinctive venation pattern in the leaves of C(4) plants is determined. High vein density with Kranz anatomy, whereby photosynthetic cells are arranged in encircling layers around vascular bundles, is one of the major traits that differentiate C(4) species from C(3) species. To identify genetic factors that specify C(4) leaf anatomy, we generated ethyl methanesulfonate- and γ-ray-mutagenized populations of the C(4) species sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), and screened for lines with reduced vein density. Two mutations were identified that conferred low vein density. Both mutations segregated in backcrossed F(2) populations as homozygous recessive alleles. Bulk segregant analysis using next-generation sequencing revealed that, in both cases, the mutant phenotype was associated with mutations in the CYP90D2 gene, which encodes an enzyme in the brassinosteroid biosynthesis pathway. Lack of complementation in allelism tests confirmed this result. These data indicate that the brassinosteroid pathway promotes high vein density in the sorghum leaf, and suggest that differences between C(4) and C(3) leaf anatomy may arise in part through differential activity of this pathway in the two leaf types.

  17. The Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor DRhoGEF2 Is a Genetic Modifier of the PI3K Pathway in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ying-Ju; Zhou, Lily; Binari, Richard; Manoukian, Armen; Mak, Tak; McNeill, Helen; Stambolic, Vuk

    2016-01-01

    The insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway mediates various physiological processes associated with human health. Components of this pathway are highly conserved throughout eukaryotic evolution. In Drosophila, the PTEN ortholog and its mammalian counterpart downregulate insulin/IGF signaling by antagonizing the PI3-kinase function. From a dominant loss-of-function genetic screen, we discovered that mutations of a Dbl-family member, the guanine nucleotide exchange factor DRhoGEF2 (DRhoGEF22(l)04291), suppressed the PTEN-overexpression eye phenotype. dAkt/dPKB phosphorylation, a measure of PI3K signaling pathway activation, increased in the eye discs from the heterozygous DRhoGEF2 wandering third instar larvae. Overexpression of DRhoGEF2, and it's functional mammalian ortholog PDZ-RhoGEF (ArhGEF11), at various stages of eye development, resulted in both dPKB/Akt-dependent and -independent phenotypes, reflecting the complexity in the crosstalk between PI3K and Rho signaling in Drosophila. PMID:27015411

  18. Genetic and diet effects on Ppar-α and Ppar-γ signaling pathways in the Berlin Fat Mouse Inbred line with genetic predisposition for obesity

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Berlin Fat Mouse Inbred (BFMI) line is a new mouse model for obesity, which was long-term selected for high fatness. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are involved in the control of energy homeostasis, nutrient metabolism and cell proliferation. Here, we studied the expression patterns of the different Ppar genes and the genes in the PPAR pathway in the BFMI line in comparison to physiological changes. Results At the age of 10 weeks, the BFMI mice exhibited marked obesity with enlarged adipocytes and high serum triglycerides concentrations in comparison to the often used mouse line C57BL/6 (B6). Between these two lines, gene expression analyses revealed differentially expressed genes belonging to the PPAR pathway, in particular genes of the lipogenesis and the fatty acid transport. Conclusion Surprisingly, the Ppar-α gene expression was up-regulated in liver and Ppar-γ gene expression was down-regulated in the white adipose tissue, indicating the activation of a mechanism that counteracts the rise of obesity. PMID:20831792

  19. Genetic susceptibility to Chagas disease cardiomyopathy: involvement of several genes of the innate immunity and chemokine-dependent migration pathways

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is endemic in Latin America. Thirty percent of infected individuals develop chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC), an inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy that is, by far, the most important clinical consequence of T. cruzi infection. The others remain asymptomatic (ASY). A possible genetic component to disease progression was suggested by familial aggregation of cases and the association of markers of innate and adaptive immunity genes with CCC development. Migration of Th1-type T cells play a major role in myocardial damage. Methods Our genetic analysis focused on CCR5, CCL2 and MAL/TIRAP genes. We used the Tag SNPs based approach, defined to catch all the genetic information from each gene. The study was conducted on a large Brazilian population including 315 CCC cases and 118 ASY subjects. Results The CCL2rs2530797A/A and TIRAPrs8177376A/A were associated to an increase susceptibility whereas the CCR5rs3176763C/C genotype is associated to protection to CCC. These associations were confirmed when we restricted the analysis to severe CCC, characterized by a left ventricular ejection fraction under 40%. Conclusions Our data show that polymorphisms affecting key molecules involved in several immune parameters (innate immunity signal transduction and T cell/monocyte migration) play a role in genetic susceptibility to CCC development. This also points out to the multigenic character of CCC, each polymorphism imparting a small contribution. The identification of genetic markers for CCC will provide information for pathogenesis as well as therapeutic targets. PMID:24330528

  20. Genetic interpretation of lead-isotopic data from the Columbia River basalt group, Oregon, Washington, and Idaho.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Church, S.E.

    1985-01-01

    Lead-isotopic data for the high-alumina olivine plateau basalts and most of the Colombia River basalt group plot within the Cascade Range mixing array. The data for several of the formations form small, tight clusters and the Nd and Sr isotopic data show discrete variation between these basalt groups. The observed isotopic and trace-element data from most of the Columbia River basalt group can be accounted for by a model which calls for partial melting of the convecting oceanic-type mantle and contamination by fluids derived from continental sediments which were subducted along the trench. These sediments were transported in the low-velocity zone at least 400 km behind the active arc into a back-arc environment represented by the Columbia Plateau province. With time, the zone of melting moved up, resulting in the formation of the Saddle Mt basalt by partial melting of a 2600 m.y.-old sub-continental lithosphere characterized by high Th/U, Th/Pb, Rb/Sr and Nd/Sm ratios and LREE enrichment. Partial melting of old sub-continental lithosphere beneath the continental crust may be an important process in the formation of continental tholeiite flood basalt sequences world-wide. -L.di H.

  1. Assessing the Molecular Genetics of the Development of Executive Attention in Children: Focus on Genetic Pathways Related to the Anterior Cingulate Cortex and Dopamine

    PubMed Central

    Brocki, Karin; Clerkin, Suzanne M.; Guise, Kevin G.; Fan, Jin; Fossella, John A.

    2009-01-01

    It is well-known that children show gradual and protracted improvement in an array of behaviors involved in the conscious control of thought and emotion. Non-invasive neuroimaging in developing populations has revealed many neural correlates of behavior, particularly in the developing cingulate cortex and fronto-striatal circuits. These brain regions, themselves, undergo protracted molecular and cellular change in the first two decades of human development and, as such, are ideal regions of interest for cognitive- and imaging-genetic studies that seek to link processes at the biochemical and synaptic levels to brain activity and behavior. We review our research to-date that employs both adult and child-friendly versions of the Attention Network Task (ANT) in an effort to begin to describe the role of specific genes in the assembly of a functional attention system. Presently, we constrain our predictions for genetic association studies by focusing on the role of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and of dopamine in the development of executive attention. PMID:19344637

  2. Genetic link between Cabeza, a Drosophila homologue of Fused in Sarcoma (FUS), and the EGFR signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Shimamura, Mai; Kyotani, Akane; Azuma, Yumiko; Yoshida, Hideki; Binh Nguyen, Thanh; Mizuta, Ikuko; Yoshida, Tomokatsu; Mizuno, Toshiki; Nakagawa, Masanori; Tokuda, Takahiko; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu

    2014-08-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that causes progressive muscular weakness. Fused in Sarcoma (FUS) that has been identified in familial ALS is an RNA binding protein that is normally localized in the nucleus. However, its function in vivo is not fully understood. Drosophila has Cabeza (Caz) as a FUS homologue and specific knockdown of Caz in the eye imaginal disc and pupal retina using a GMR-GAL4 driver was here found to induce an abnormal morphology of the adult compound eyes, a rough eye phenotype. This was partially suppressed by expression of the apoptosis inhibitor P35. Knockdown of Caz exerted no apparent effect on differentiation of photoreceptor cells. However, immunostaining with an antibody to Cut that marks cone cells revealed fusion of these and ommatidia of pupal retinae. These results indicate that Caz knockdown induces apoptosis and also inhibits differentiation of cone cells, resulting in abnormal eye morphology in adults. Mutation in EGFR pathway-related genes, such as rhomboid-1, rhomboid-3 and mirror suppressed the rough eye phenotype induced by Caz knockdown. Moreover, the rhomboid-1 mutation rescued the fusion of cone cells and ommatidia observed in Caz knockdown flies. The results suggest that Caz negatively regulates the EGFR signaling pathway required for determination of cone cell fate in Drosophila. - Highlights: • Knockdown of Cabeza induced rough eye phenotype. • Knockdown of Cabeza induced fusion of cone cells in pupal retinae. • Knockdown of Cabeza induced apoptosis in pupal retinae. • Mutation in EGFR pathway-related genes suppressed the rough eye phenotype. • Cabeza may negatively regulate the EGFR pathway.

  3. Pathways Regulating Spheroid Formation of Human Follicular Thyroid Cancer Cells under Simulated Microgravity Conditions: A Genetic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Riwaldt, Stefan; Bauer, Johann; Wehland, Markus; Slumstrup, Lasse; Kopp, Sascha; Warnke, Elisabeth; Dittrich, Anita; Magnusson, Nils E.; Pietsch, Jessica; Corydon, Thomas J.; Infanger, Manfred; Grimm, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Microgravity induces three-dimensional (3D) growth in numerous cell types. Despite substantial efforts to clarify the underlying mechanisms for spheroid formation, the precise molecular pathways are still not known. The principal aim of this paper is to compare static 1g-control cells with spheroid forming (MCS) and spheroid non-forming (AD) thyroid cancer cells cultured in the same flask under simulated microgravity conditions. We investigated the morphology and gene expression patterns in human follicular thyroid cancer cells (UCLA RO82-W-1 cell line) after a 24 h-exposure on the Random Positioning Machine (RPM) and focused on 3D growth signaling processes. After 24 h, spheroid formation was observed in RPM-cultures together with alterations in the F-actin cytoskeleton. qPCR indicated more changes in gene expression in MCS than in AD cells. Of the 24 genes analyzed VEGFA, VEGFD, MSN, and MMP3 were upregulated in MCS compared to 1g-controls, whereas ACTB, ACTA2, KRT8, TUBB, EZR, RDX, PRKCA, CAV1, MMP9, PAI1, CTGF, MCP1 were downregulated. A pathway analysis revealed that the upregulated genes code for proteins, which promote 3D growth (angiogenesis) and prevent excessive accumulation of extracellular proteins, while genes coding for structural proteins are downregulated. Pathways regulating the strength/rigidity of cytoskeletal proteins, the amount of extracellular proteins, and 3D growth may be involved in MCS formation. PMID:27070589

  4. JAK kinase targeting in hematologic malignancies: a sinuous pathway from identification of genetic alterations towards clinical indications

    PubMed Central

    Springuel, Lorraine; Renauld, Jean-Christophe; Knoops, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Constitutive JAK-STAT pathway activation occurs in most myeloproliferative neoplasms as well as in a significant proportion of other hematologic malignancies, and is frequently a marker of poor prognosis. The underlying molecular alterations are heterogeneous as they include activating mutations in distinct components (cytokine receptor, JAK, STAT), overexpression (cytokine receptor, JAK) or rare JAK2 fusion proteins. In some cases, concomitant loss of negative regulators contributes to pathogenesis by further boosting the activation of the cascade. Exploiting the signaling bottleneck provided by the limited number of JAK kinases is an attractive therapeutic strategy for hematologic neoplasms driven by constitutive JAK-STAT pathway activation. However, given the conserved nature of the kinase domain among family members and the interrelated roles of JAK kinases in many physiological processes, including hematopoiesis and immunity, broad usage of JAK inhibitors in hematology is challenged by their narrow therapeutic window. Novel therapies are, therefore, needed. The development of more selective inhibitors is a questionable strategy as such inhibitors might abrogate the beneficial contribution of alleviating the cancer-related pro-inflammatory microenvironment and raise selective pressure to a threshold that allows the emergence of malignant subclones harboring drug-resistant mutations. In contrast, synergistic combinations of JAK inhibitors with drugs targeting cascades that work in concert with JAK-STAT pathway appear to be promising therapeutic alternatives to JAK inhibitors as monotherapies. PMID:26432382

  5. Molecular genetics of human growth hormone, insulin-like growth factors and their pathways in common disease.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Santiago; Gaunt, Tom R; Day, Ian N M

    2007-08-01

    The human growth hormone gene (GH1) and the insulin-like growth factor 1 and 2 genes (IGF1 and IGF2) encode the central elements of a key pathway influencing growth in humans. This "growth pathway" also includes transcription factors, agonists, antagonists, receptors, binding proteins, and endocrine factors that constitute an intrincate network of feedback loops. GH1 is evolutionarily coupled with other genes in linkage disequilibrium in 17q24.2, and the same applies to IGF2 in 11p15.5. In contrast, IGF1 in 12q22-24.1 is not in strong linkage disequilibrium with neighbouring genes. Knowledge of the functional architecture of these regions is important for the understanding of the combined evolution and function of GH1, IGF2 and IGF1 in relation to complex diseases. A number of mutations accounting for rare Mendelian disorders have been described in GH-IGF elements. The constellation of genes in this key pathway contains potential candidates in a number of complex diseases, including growth disorders, metabolic syndrome, diabetes (notably IGF2BP2) cardiovascular disease, and central nervous system diseases, and in longevity, aging and cancer. We review these genes and their associations with disease phenotypes, with special attention to metabolic risk traits. PMID:17534663

  6. Genetic mapping of QTLs controlling fatty acids provided insights into the genetic control of fatty acid synthesis pathway in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming Li; Khera, Pawan; Pandey, Manish K; Wang, Hui; Qiao, Lixian; Feng, Suping; Tonnis, Brandon; Barkley, Noelle A; Pinnow, David; Holbrook, Corley C; Culbreath, Albert K; Varshney, Rajeev K; Guo, Baozhu

    2015-01-01

    Peanut, a high-oil crop with about 50% oil content, is either crushed for oil or used as edible products. Fatty acid composition determines the oil quality which has high relevance to consumer health, flavor, and shelf life of commercial products. In addition to the major fatty acids, oleic acid (C18:1) and linoleic acid (C18:2) accounting for about 80% of peanut oil, the six other fatty acids namely palmitic acid (C16:0), stearic acid (C18:0), arachidic acid (C20:0), gadoleic acid (C20:1), behenic acid (C22:0), and lignoceric acid (C24:0) are accounted for the rest 20%. To determine the genetic basis and to improve further understanding on effect of FAD2 genes on these fatty acids, two recombinant inbred line (RIL) populations namely S-population (high oleic line 'SunOleic 97R' × low oleic line 'NC94022') and T-population (normal oleic line 'Tifrunner' × low oleic line 'GT-C20') were developed. Genetic maps with 206 and 378 marker loci for the S- and the T-population, respectively were used for quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis. As a result, a total of 164 main-effect (M-QTLs) and 27 epistatic (E-QTLs) QTLs associated with the minor fatty acids were identified with 0.16% to 40.56% phenotypic variation explained (PVE). Thirty four major QTLs (>10% of PVE) mapped on five linkage groups and 28 clusters containing more than three QTLs were also identified. These results suggest that the major QTLs with large additive effects would play an important role in controlling composition of these minor fatty acids in addition to the oleic and linoleic acids in peanut oil. The interrelationship among these fatty acids should be considered while breeding for improved peanut genotypes with good oil quality and desired fatty acid composition.

  7. Computational discovery of pathway-level genetic vulnerabilities in non-small-cell lung cancer | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Novel approaches are needed for discovery of targeted therapies for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that are specific to certain patients. Whole genome RNAi screening of lung cancer cell lines provides an ideal source for determining candidate drug targets. Unsupervised learning algorithms uncovered patterns of differential vulnerability across lung cancer cell lines to loss of functionally related genes. Such genetic vulnerabilities represent candidate targets for therapy and are found to be involved in splicing, translation and protein folding.

  8. Genetic Variants in the p14ARF/MDM2/TP53 Pathway Are Associated with the Prognosis of Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Patients Treated with Radical Resection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Tang, Yang; Huang, Liu; Yu, Qianqian; Hu, Guangyuan; Yuan, Xianglin

    2016-01-01

    The p14ARF/MDM2/ TP53 pathway is known to play an important role in tumor progression by cell cycle control, although the association between this pathway and the prognosis of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is unclear. In this study, we explored the association between genetic variants in the p14ARF/MDM2/TP53 pathway and prognosis in ESCC patients with radical resection. 124 ESCC patients with radical resection were included in this retrospective study and genotyped using the MassArray method. According to multivariate Cox hazard analysis and multiple testing, the TC/CC genotype of p14ARF rs3814960 was shown to be strongly related to a decreased overall survival (OS) (HR = 2.77, 95% CI: 1.33–5.75, P = 0.006, Pc = 0.030) and disease-free survival (DFS) (HR = 2.45, 95% CI: 1.30–4.61, P = 0.005, Pc = 0.025). Moreover, patients with the DEL/A +AA genotype of MDM2 rs34886328 had a notably increased OS (HR = 0.27, 95% CI: 0.13–0.56, P = 4.7×10−4, Pc = 0.003) and DFS (HR = 0.22, 95% CI: 0.11–0.43, P = 1.1×10−5, Pc = 6.6×10−5). We also found that these two SNPs had a cumulative effect on the prognosis of ESCC, with the OS (P < 0.001) and DFS (P < 0.001) being shortest for patients carrying both of these unfavorable genotypes. In conclusion, genetic variants of the p14ARF/MDM2/TP53 pathway are significantly related to OS and DFS, and may be predictors of the prognosis of ESCC after surgery. We speculate the individuals with the TC/CC genotype of p14ARF rs3814960 and/or the DEL/DEL genotype of MDMD2 rs34886328 should have more aggressive treatment and may greatly benefit from early prediction and prevention of an unfavorable prognosis by genotyping before the initiation of therapy. These findings should be further validated in a larger population. PMID:27414035

  9. Genetic Variants in the p14ARF/MDM2/TP53 Pathway Are Associated with the Prognosis of Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Patients Treated with Radical Resection.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Tang, Yang; Huang, Liu; Yu, Qianqian; Hu, Guangyuan; Yuan, Xianglin

    2016-01-01

    The p14ARF/MDM2/ TP53 pathway is known to play an important role in tumor progression by cell cycle control, although the association between this pathway and the prognosis of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is unclear. In this study, we explored the association between genetic variants in the p14ARF/MDM2/TP53 pathway and prognosis in ESCC patients with radical resection. 124 ESCC patients with radical resection were included in this retrospective study and genotyped using the MassArray method. According to multivariate Cox hazard analysis and multiple testing, the TC/CC genotype of p14ARF rs3814960 was shown to be strongly related to a decreased overall survival (OS) (HR = 2.77, 95% CI: 1.33-5.75, P = 0.006, Pc = 0.030) and disease-free survival (DFS) (HR = 2.45, 95% CI: 1.30-4.61, P = 0.005, Pc = 0.025). Moreover, patients with the DEL/A +AA genotype of MDM2 rs34886328 had a notably increased OS (HR = 0.27, 95% CI: 0.13-0.56, P = 4.7×10-4, Pc = 0.003) and DFS (HR = 0.22, 95% CI: 0.11-0.43, P = 1.1×10-5, Pc = 6.6×10-5). We also found that these two SNPs had a cumulative effect on the prognosis of ESCC, with the OS (P < 0.001) and DFS (P < 0.001) being shortest for patients carrying both of these unfavorable genotypes. In conclusion, genetic variants of the p14ARF/MDM2/TP53 pathway are significantly related to OS and DFS, and may be predictors of the prognosis of ESCC after surgery. We speculate the individuals with the TC/CC genotype of p14ARF rs3814960 and/or the DEL/DEL genotype of MDMD2 rs34886328 should have more aggressive treatment and may greatly benefit from early prediction and prevention of an unfavorable prognosis by genotyping before the initiation of therapy. These findings should be further validated in a larger population.

  10. Identification of potential genetic components involved in the deviant quorum-sensing signaling pathways of Burkholderia glumae through a functional genomics approach.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ruoxi; Barphagha, Inderjit K; Ham, Jong Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia glumae is the chief causal agent for bacterial panicle blight of rice. The acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL)-mediated quorum-sensing (QS) system dependent on a pair of luxI and luxR homologs, tofI and tofR, is the primary cell-to-cell signaling mechanism determining the virulence of this bacterium. Production of toxoflavin, a major virulence factor of B. glumae, is known to be dependent on the tofI/tofR QS system. In our previous study, however, it was observed that B. glumae mutants defective in tofI or tofR produced toxoflavin if they grew on the surface of a solid medium, suggesting that alternative signaling pathways independent of tofI or tofR are activated in that growth condition for the production of toxoflavin. In this study, potential genetic components involved in the tofI- and tofR-independent signaling pathways for toxoflavin production were sought through screening random mini-Tn5 mutants of B. glumae to better understand the intercellular signaling pathways of this pathogen. Fifteen and three genes were initially identified as the potential genetic elements of the tofI- and tofR-independent pathways, respectively. Especially, the ORF (bglu_2g06320) divergently transcribed from toxJ, which encodes an orphan LuxR protein and controls toxoflavin biosynthesis, was newly identified in this study as a gene required for the tofR-independent toxoflavin production and named as toxK. Among those genes, flhD, dgcB, and wzyB were further studied to validate their functions in the tofI-independent toxoflavin production, and similar studies were also conducted with qsmR and toxK for their functions in the tofR-independent toxoflavin production. This work provides a foundation for future comprehensive studies of the intercellular signaling systems of B. glumae and other related pathogenic bacteria.

  11. Genetic Mapping of QTLs Controlling Fatty Acids Provided Insights into the Genetic Control of Fatty Acid Synthesis Pathway in Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Qiao, Lixian; Feng, Suping; Tonnis, Brandon; Barkley, Noelle A.; Pinnow, David; Holbrook, Corley C.; Culbreath, Albert K.; Varshney, Rajeev K.; Guo, Baozhu

    2015-01-01

    Peanut, a high-oil crop with about 50% oil content, is either crushed for oil or used as edible products. Fatty acid composition determines the oil quality which has high relevance to consumer health, flavor, and shelf life of commercial products. In addition to the major fatty acids, oleic acid (C18:1) and linoleic acid (C18:2) accounting for about 80% of peanut oil, the six other fatty acids namely palmitic acid (C16:0), stearic acid (C18:0), arachidic acid (C20:0), gadoleic acid (C20:1), behenic acid (C22:0), and lignoceric acid (C24:0) are accounted for the rest 20%. To determine the genetic basis and to improve further understanding on effect of FAD2 genes on these fatty acids, two recombinant inbred line (RIL) populations namely S-population (high oleic line ‘SunOleic 97R’ × low oleic line ‘NC94022’) and T-population (normal oleic line ‘Tifrunner’ × low oleic line ‘GT-C20’) were developed. Genetic maps with 206 and 378 marker loci for the S- and the T-population, respectively were used for quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis. As a result, a total of 164 main-effect (M-QTLs) and 27 epistatic (E-QTLs) QTLs associated with the minor fatty acids were identified with 0.16% to 40.56% phenotypic variation explained (PVE). Thirty four major QTLs (>10% of PVE) mapped on five linkage groups and 28 clusters containing more than three QTLs were also identified. These results suggest that the major QTLs with large additive effects would play an important role in controlling composition of these minor fatty acids in addition to the oleic and linoleic acids in peanut oil. The interrelationship among these fatty acids should be considered while breeding for improved peanut genotypes with good oil quality and desired fatty acid composition. PMID:25849082

  12. Using Ambystoma mexicanum (Mexican axolotl) embryos, chemical genetics, and microarray analysis to identify signaling pathways associated with tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ponomareva, Larissa V; Athippozhy, Antony; Thorson, Jon S; Voss, S Randal

    2015-12-01

    Amphibian vertebrates are important models in regenerative biology because they present exceptional regenerative capabilities throughout life. However, it takes considerable effort to rear amphibians to juvenile and adult stages for regeneration studies, and the relatively large sizes that frogs and salamanders achieve during development make them difficult to use in chemical screens. Here, we introduce a new tail regeneration model using late stage Mexican axolotl embryos. We show that axolotl embryos completely regenerate amputated tails in 7days before they exhaust their yolk supply and begin to feed. Further, we show that axolotl embryos can be efficiently reared in microtiter plates to achieve moderate throughput screening of soluble chemicals to investigate toxicity and identify molecules that alter regenerative outcome. As proof of principle, we identified integration 1 / wingless (Wnt), transforming growth factor beta (Tgf-β), and fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) pathway antagonists that completely block tail regeneration and additional chemicals that significantly affected tail outgrowth. Furthermore, we used microarray analysis to show that inhibition of Wnt signaling broadly affects transcription of genes associated with Wnt, Fgf, Tgf-β, epidermal growth factor (Egf), Notch, nerve growth factor (Ngf), homeotic gene (Hox), rat sarcoma/mitogen-activated protein kinase (Ras/Mapk), myelocytomatosis viral oncogene (Myc), tumor protein 53 (p53), and retinoic acid (RA) pathways. Punctuated changes in the expression of genes known to regulate vertebrate development were observed; this suggests the tail regeneration transcriptional program is hierarchically structured and temporally ordered. Our study establishes the axolotl as a chemical screening model to investigate signaling pathways associated with tissue regeneration.

  13. Using Ambystoma mexicanum (Mexican axolotl) embryos, chemical genetics, and microarray analysis to identify signaling pathways associated with tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ponomareva, Larissa V; Athippozhy, Antony; Thorson, Jon S; Voss, S Randal

    2015-12-01

    Amphibian vertebrates are important models in regenerative biology because they present exceptional regenerative capabilities throughout life. However, it takes considerable effort to rear amphibians to juvenile and adult stages for regeneration studies, and the relatively large sizes that frogs and salamanders achieve during development make them difficult to use in chemical screens. Here, we introduce a new tail regeneration model using late stage Mexican axolotl embryos. We show that axolotl embryos completely regenerate amputated tails in 7days before they exhaust their yolk supply and begin to feed. Further, we show that axolotl embryos can be efficiently reared in microtiter plates to achieve moderate throughput screening of soluble chemicals to investigate toxicity and identify molecules that alter regenerative outcome. As proof of principle, we identified integration 1 / wingless (Wnt), transforming growth factor beta (Tgf-β), and fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) pathway antagonists that completely block tail regeneration and additional chemicals that significantly affected tail outgrowth. Furthermore, we used microarray analysis to show that inhibition of Wnt signaling broadly affects transcription of genes associated with Wnt, Fgf, Tgf-β, epidermal growth factor (Egf), Notch, nerve growth factor (Ngf), homeotic gene (Hox), rat sarcoma/mitogen-activated protein kinase (Ras/Mapk), myelocytomatosis viral oncogene (Myc), tumor protein 53 (p53), and retinoic acid (RA) pathways. Punctuated changes in the expression of genes known to regulate vertebrate development were observed; this suggests the tail regeneration transcriptional program is hierarchically structured and temporally ordered. Our study establishes the axolotl as a chemical screening model to investigate signaling pathways associated with tissue regeneration. PMID:26092703

  14. Genetic determinants of folate and vitamin B12 metabolism: a common pathway in neural tube defect and Down syndrome?

    PubMed

    Guéant, Jean-Louis; Guéant-Rodriguez, Rosa-Maria; Anello, Guido; Bosco, Paolo; Brunaud, Laurent; Romano, Corrado; Ferri, Rafaele; Romano, Antonino; Candito, Mirande; Namour, Bernard

    2003-11-01

    One-carbon metabolism is under the influence of folate, vitamin B12 and genetic polymorphisms of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR 677 C --> T and 1298 A --> C), of methionine synthase (MTR 2756 C --> G), methionine synthase reductase (MTRR 66 A --> G) and transcobalamin (TCN 776 C --> G). The pathogenesis of neural tube defect (NTD) may be related to this metabolism. The influence of the MTHFR 677 C --> T polymorphism reported in The Netherlands and Ireland can be questioned in southern Italy, France and Great Britain. MTRR, combined with a low level of vitamin B12, increases the risk of NTD and of having a child with NTD in Canada, while TCN 776 GG and MTRR 66 GG mutated genotypes associated with the MTHFR 677 CC wild-type are predictors of NTD cases in Sicily. Down syndrome (DS) is due to a failure of normal chromosomal segregation during meiosis, possibly related to one-carbon metabolism. MTHFR 677 C --> T and MTRR 66 A --> G polymorphisms are associated with a greater risk of having a child with DS in North America, Ireland and The Netherlands. In contrast, MTHFR 677 C --> T has no influence on DS risk in France and Sicily, while homocysteine and MTR 2756 AG/GG genotypes are predictors of DS risk in Sicily. In conclusion, NTD