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Sample records for genetic programming conference

  1. EDITORIAL: Conference program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-04-01

    Some of the papers and talks given at the conference have not been published in this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series. The attached PDF file lists the full conference program and indicates (with an asterisk) those papers or talks which are not present in this volume.

  2. Constellation Program Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    NASA Administrator Michael Griffin, left, Scott Horowitz, NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems and Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager, right, are seen during a press conference outlining specific center responsibilities associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration, Monday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  3. Constellation Program Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    Scott Horowitz, NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems, center, speaks as Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager, right, looks on during a press conference outlining specific center responsibilities associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration, Monday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  4. Constellation Program Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager, speaks during a press conference outlining specific center responsibilities associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration, Monday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  5. Constellation Program Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    Dean Acosta, NASA Deputy Assistant Administrator and Press Secretary, moderates a press conference with NASA Administrator Michael Griffin Scott Horowitz, NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems and Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager, outlining specific center responsibilities associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration, Monday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  6. Constellation Program Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    Scott Horowitz, NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems, left, looks on as Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager, speaks during a press conference outlining specific center responsibilities associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration, Monday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  7. Constellation Program Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    Members of the media listen during a press conference with NASA Administrator Michael Griffin, Scott Horowitz, NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems and Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager, outlining specific center responsibilities associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration, Monday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  8. Constellation Program Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    Scott Horowitz, NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems, left, and Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager, are seen during a press conference outlining specific center responsibilities associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration, Monday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  9. Constellation Program Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    NASA Administrator Michael Griffin, seated left, Scott Horowitz, NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems and Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager, right, are seen during a press conference outlining specific center responsibilities associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human moon and Mars exploration, Monday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Dean Acosta, NASA Deputy Assistant Administrator and Press Secretary, far left, moderates the program. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  10. Constellation Program Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    NASA Administrator Michael Griffin, left, looks on as Scott Horowitz, NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems speaks during a press conference outlining specific center responsibilities associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration, Monday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  11. Constellation Program Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    NASA Administrator Michael Griffin, speaks during a press conference outlining specific center responsibilities associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration, Monday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  12. CIEE 1993 annual conference: Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The California Institute for Energy efficiency`s third annual conference highlights the results of CIEE-sponsored multiyear research in three programs: Building Energy Efficiency, Air Quality Impacts of Energy Efficiency, and End-Use Resource Planning. Results from scoping studies, Director`s discretionary research, and exploratory research are also featured.

  13. The 50th Annual Maize Genetics Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Cone, Karen

    2014-03-26

    The 50th Annual Maize Genetics Conference was held February 27 - March 2, 2008 at the Marriott Wardman Park Hotel in Washington, D.C. As the golden anniversary of the Conference and coinciding with the release of a draft of the maize genome sequence, this was a special meeting. To publicize this unique occasion, meeting organizers hosted a press conference, which was attended by members of the press representing science and non-science publications, and an evening reception at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, where the draft sequence was announced and awards were presented to Dr. Mary Clutter and Senator Kit Bond to thank them for their outstanding contributions to maize genetics and genomics research. As usual, the Conference provided an invigorating forum for exchange of recent research results in many areas of maize genetics, e.g., cytogenetics, development, molecular genetics, transposable element biology, biochemical genetics, and genomics. Results were shared via both oral and poster presentations. Invited talks were given by four distinguished geneticists: Vicki Chandler, University of Arizona; John Doebley, University of Wisconsin; Susan Wessler, University of Georgia; and Richard Wilson, Washington University. There were 46 short talks and 241 poster presentations. The Conference was attended by over 500 participants. This included a large number of first-time participants in the meeting and an increasingly visible presence by individuals from underrepresented groups. Although we do not have concrete counts, there seem to be more African American, African and Hispanic/Latino attendees coming to the meeting than in years past. In addition, this meeting attracted many participants from outside the U.S. Student participation continues to be hallmark of the spirit of free exchange and cooperation characteristic of the maize genetics community. With the generous support provided by DOE, USDA NSF, and corporate/private donors, organizers were

  14. Genetic factors conferring metastasis in osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Maximov, Vadim V; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2016-07-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is a deadly bone malignancy affecting mostly children and adolescents. OS has outstandingly complex genetic alterations likely due to p53-independent genomic instability. Based on analysis of recent published research we claim existence of various genetic mechanisms of osteosarcomagenesis conferring great variability to different OS properties including metastatic potential. We also propose a model explaining how diverse genetic mechanisms occur and providing a framework for future research. P53-independent preexisting genomic instability, which precedes and frequently causes TP53 genetic alterations, is central in our model. In addition, our analyses reveal a possible cooperation between aberrantly activated HIF-1α and AP-1 genetic pathways in OS metastasis. We also review the involvement of noncoding RNA genes in OS metastasis.

  15. Gordon Research Conference on Genetic Toxicology

    SciTech Connect

    Project Director Penelope Jeggo

    2003-02-15

    Genetic toxicology represents a study of the genetic damage that a cell can incur, the agents that induce such damage, the damage response mechanisms available to cells and organisms, and the potential consequences of such damage. Genotoxic agents are abundant in the environment and are also induced endogenously. The consequences of such damage can include carcinogenesis and teratogenesis. An understanding of genetic toxicology is essential to carry out risk evaluations of the impact of genotoxic agents and to assess how individual genetic differences influence the response to genotoxic damage. In recent years, the importance of maintaining genomic stability has become increasingly recognized, in part by the realization that failure of the damage response mechanisms underlies many, if not all, cancer incidence. The importance of these mechanisms is also underscored by their remarkable conservation between species, allowing the study of simple organisms to provide significant input into our understanding of the underlying mechanisms. It has also become clear that the damage response mechanisms interface closely with other aspects of cellular metabolism including replication, transcription and cell cycle regulation. Moreover, defects in many of these mechanisms, as observed for example in ataxia telangiectasia patients, confer disorders with associated developmental abnormalities demonstrating their essential roles during growth and development. In short, while a decade ago, a study of the impact of DNA damage was seen as a compartmentalized area of cellular research, it is now appreciated to lie at the centre of an array of cellular responses of crucial importance to human health. Consequently, this has become a dynamic and rapidly advancing area of research. The Genetic Toxicology Gordon Research Conference is biannual with an evolving change in the emphasis of the meetings. From evaluating the nature of genotoxic chemicals, which lay at the centre of the early

  16. Aviation Safety/Automation Program Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morello, Samuel A. (Compiler)

    1990-01-01

    The Aviation Safety/Automation Program Conference - 1989 was sponsored by the NASA Langley Research Center on 11 to 12 October 1989. The conference, held at the Sheraton Beach Inn and Conference Center, Virginia Beach, Virginia, was chaired by Samuel A. Morello. The primary objective of the conference was to ensure effective communication and technology transfer by providing a forum for technical interchange of current operational problems and program results to date. The Aviation Safety/Automation Program has as its primary goal to improve the safety of the national airspace system through the development and integration of human-centered automation technologies for aircraft crews and air traffic controllers.

  17. Constraints in Genetic Programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janikow, Cezary Z.

    1996-01-01

    Genetic programming refers to a class of genetic algorithms utilizing generic representation in the form of program trees. For a particular application, one needs to provide the set of functions, whose compositions determine the space of program structures being evolved, and the set of terminals, which determine the space of specific instances of those programs. The algorithm searches the space for the best program for a given problem, applying evolutionary mechanisms borrowed from nature. Genetic algorithms have shown great capabilities in approximately solving optimization problems which could not be approximated or solved with other methods. Genetic programming extends their capabilities to deal with a broader variety of problems. However, it also extends the size of the search space, which often becomes too large to be effectively searched even by evolutionary methods. Therefore, our objective is to utilize problem constraints, if such can be identified, to restrict this space. In this publication, we propose a generic constraint specification language, powerful enough for a broad class of problem constraints. This language has two elements -- one reduces only the number of program instances, the other reduces both the space of program structures as well as their instances. With this language, we define the minimal set of complete constraints, and a set of operators guaranteeing offspring validity from valid parents. We also show that these operators are not less efficient than the standard genetic programming operators if one preprocesses the constraints - the necessary mechanisms are identified.

  18. APS Conference on Understanding the Biological Clock: From Genetics to Physiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, Martin

    1996-01-01

    The Conference was designed to take advantage of the fusion of two intellectually dominant but heretofore separate lines of clock research, vertebrate physiology and invertebrate and microbial genetics. The APS Conference attracted 251 scientists, 68 of whom were students. In addition to the excellent speaker program organized by Dunlap and Loros, the attendees also submitted 93 volunteer abstracts that were programmed in poster sessions. Thirty-four percent of the submitted abstracts were first authorized by a female student or scientist.

  19. 15. international conference on plant growth substances: Program -- Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    Since the 14th Conference in Amsterdam in 1991, progress in plant hormone research and developmental plant biology has been truly astonishing. The five ``classical`` plant hormones, auxin, gibberellin, cytokinin, ethylene, and abscisic acid, have been joined by a number of new signal molecules, e.g., systemin, jasmonic acid, salicylic acid, whose biosynthesis and functions are being understood in ever greater detail. Molecular genetics has opened new vistas in an understanding of transduction pathways that regulate developmental processes in response to hormonal and environmental signals. The program of the 15th Conference includes accounts of this progress and brings together scientists whose work focuses on physiological, biochemical, and chemical aspects of plant growth regulation. This volume contains the abstracts of papers presented at this conference.

  20. Research and Development Conference CIEE Program 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    CIEE`s second annual Research and Development Conference will introduce you to some of the results achieved to date through CIEE-sponsored multiyear research performed in three programs: Building Energy Efficiency, Air Quality Impacts of Energy Efficiency, and End-Use Resource Planning. Results from scoping studies, Director`s discretionary research, and exploratory research will also be featured in this report.

  1. Research and Development Conference CIEE Program 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    CIEE's second annual Research and Development Conference will introduce you to some of the results achieved to date through CIEE-sponsored multiyear research performed in three programs: Building Energy Efficiency, Air Quality Impacts of Energy Efficiency, and End-Use Resource Planning. Results from scoping studies, Director's discretionary research, and exploratory research will also be featured in this report.

  2. Fossil Energy Materials Program conference proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Judkins, R.R.

    1987-08-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy has recognized the need for materials research and development to assure the adequacy of materials of construction for advanced fossil energy systems. The principal responsibility for identifying needed materials research and for establishing a program to address these needs resides within the Office of Technical Coordination. That office has established the Advanced Research and Technology Development (AR and TD) Fossil Energy Materials Program to fulfill that responsibility. In addition to the AR and TD Materials Program, which is designed to address in a generic way the materials needs of fossil energy systems, specific materials support activities are also sponsored by the various line organizations such as the Office of Coal Gasification. A conference was held at Oak Ridge, Tennessee on May 19-21, 1987, to present and discuss the results of program activities during the past year. The conference program was organized in accordance with the research thrust areas we have established. These research thrust areas include structural ceramics (particularly fiber-reinforced ceramic composites), corrosion and erosion, and alloy development and mechanical properties. Eighty-six people attended the conference. Papers have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  3. National conference for bicycle program specialists. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, K.

    1981-07-01

    The National Conference for Bicycle Program Specialists was conducted in order to provide a forum for the exchange of information and ideas on bicycle program activities and to enhance the skills of bicycle program specialists. The planning and results of the conference, as well as post conference activities, are described. (LEW)

  4. Measuring the Effectiveness of a Genetic Counseling Supervision Training Conference.

    PubMed

    Atzinger, Carrie L; He, Hua; Wusik, Katie

    2016-08-01

    Genetic counselors who receive formal training report increased confidence and competence in their supervisory roles. The effectiveness of specific formal supervision training has not been assessed previously. A day-long GC supervision conference was designed based on published supervision competencies and was attended by 37 genetic counselors. Linear Mixed Model and post-hoc paired t-test was used to compare Psychotherapy Supervisor Development Scale (PSDS) scores among/between individuals pre and post conference. Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE) model and post-hoc McNemar's test was used to determine if the conference had an effect on GC supervision competencies. PSDS scores were significantly increased 1 week (p < 0.001) and 6 months (p < 0.001) following the conference. For three supervision competencies, attendees were more likely to agree they were able to perform them after the conference than before. These effects remained significant 6 months later. For the three remaining competencies, the majority of supervisors agreed they could perform these before the conference; therefore, no change was found. This exploratory study showed this conference increased the perceived confidence and competence of the supervisors who attended and increased their self-reported ability to perform certain supervision competencies. While still preliminary, this supports the idea that a one day conference on supervision has the potential to impact supervisor development.

  5. Proceedings: first Lake States forest genetics conference

    Treesearch

    Lake States Forest Experiment Station

    1953-01-01

    Over the years there has been a small but impportant amount of research in forest genetics in the Lake States, and recently there has beeen a growing awareness of the importance of tree improvement in this region. For these reasons it appeared that a meeting of people active or interested in forest genetics might be worth while. So after consultation with a number of...

  6. Programming Practices of Atlantic Coast Conference Wind Ensembles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiltshire, Eric S.; Paul, Timothy A.; Paul, Phyllis M.; Rudnicki, Erika

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the programming trends of the elite wind bands/ensembles of the Atlantic Coast Conference universities. Using survey techniques previously employed by Powell (2009) and Paul (2010; in press), we contacted the directors of the Atlantic Coast Conference band programs and requested concert programs from their top groups for the…

  7. Programming Practices of Atlantic Coast Conference Wind Ensembles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiltshire, Eric S.; Paul, Timothy A.; Paul, Phyllis M.; Rudnicki, Erika

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the programming trends of the elite wind bands/ensembles of the Atlantic Coast Conference universities. Using survey techniques previously employed by Powell (2009) and Paul (2010; in press), we contacted the directors of the Atlantic Coast Conference band programs and requested concert programs from their top groups for the…

  8. Nineteenth annual actinide separations conference: Conference program and abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Bronson, M.

    1995-12-31

    This report contains the abstracts from the conference presentations. Sessions were divided into the following topics: Waste treatment; Spent fuel treatment; Issues and responses to Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board 94-1; Pyrochemical technologies; Disposition technologies; and Aqueous separation technologies.

  9. National Dairy Genetic Evaluation Program

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The National Dairy Genetic Evaluation Program is a continuation of ongoing USDA collaboration with the U.S. dairy industry on genetic evaluation of dairy cattle since 1908. Data are provided by dairy records processing centers (yield, health, pedigree, and reproduction traits), breed registry societ...

  10. Genetics of multifactorial disorders: proceedings of the 6th Pan Arab Human Genetics Conference.

    PubMed

    Nair, Pratibha; Bizzari, Sami; Rajah, Nirmal; Assaf, Nada; Al-Ali, Mahmoud Taleb; Hamzeh, Abdul Rezzak

    2016-04-20

    The 6th Pan Arab Human Genetics Conference (PAHGC), "Genetics of Multifactorial Disorders" was organized by the Center for Arab Genomic Studies (http://www.cags.org.ae) in Dubai, United Arab Emirates from 21 to 23 January, 2016. The PAHGCs are held biennially to provide a common platform to bring together regional and international geneticists to share their knowledge and to discuss common issues. Over 800 delegates attended the first 2 days of the conference and these came from various medical and scientific backgrounds. They consisted of geneticists, molecular biologists, medical practitioners, postdoctoral researchers, technical staff (e.g., nurses and lab technicians) and medical students from 35 countries around the world. On the 3rd day, a one-day workshop on "Genetic Counseling" was delivered to 26 participants. The conference focused on four major topics, namely, diabetes, genetics of neurodevelopmental disorders, congenital anomalies and cancer genetics. Personalized medicine was a recurrent theme in most of the research presented at the conference, as was the application of novel molecular findings in clinical settings. This report discusses a summary of the presentations from the meeting.

  11. Genetically programmed superparamagnetic behavior of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taeuk; Moore, David; Fussenegger, Martin

    2012-12-31

    Although magnetic fields and paramagnetic inorganic materials were abundant on planet earth during the entire evolution of living species the interaction of organisms with these physical forces remains a little-understood phenomenon. Interestingly, rather than being genetically encoded, organisms seem to accumulate and take advantage of inorganic nanoparticles to sense or react to magnetic fields. Using a synthetic biology-inspired approach we have genetically programmed mammalian cells to show superparamagnetic behavior. The combination of ectopic production of the human ferritin heavy chain 1 (hFTH1), engineering the cells for expression of an iron importer, the divalent metal ion transferase 1 (DMT1) and the design of an iron-loading culture medium to maximize cellular iron uptake enabled efficient iron mineralization in intracellular ferritin particles and conferred superparamagnetic behavior to the entire cell. When captured by a magnetic field the superparamagnetic cells reached attraction velocities of up to 30 μm/s and could be efficiently separated from complex cell mixtures using standard magnetic cell separation equipment. Technology that enables magnetic separation of genetically programmed superparamagnetic cells in the absence of inorganic particles could foster novel opportunities in diagnostics and cell-based therapies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Additional mechanisms conferring genetic susceptibility to Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Calero, Miguel; Gómez-Ramos, Alberto; Calero, Olga; Soriano, Eduardo; Avila, Jesús; Medina, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Familial Alzheimer’s disease (AD), mostly associated with early onset, is caused by mutations in three genes (APP, PSEN1, and PSEN2) involved in the production of the amyloid β peptide. In contrast, the molecular mechanisms that trigger the most common late onset sporadic AD remain largely unknown. With the implementation of an increasing number of case-control studies and the upcoming of large-scale genome-wide association studies there is a mounting list of genetic risk factors associated with common genetic variants that have been associated with sporadic AD. Besides apolipoprotein E, that presents a strong association with the disease (OR∼4), the rest of these genes have moderate or low degrees of association, with OR ranging from 0.88 to 1.23. Taking together, these genes may account only for a fraction of the attributable AD risk and therefore, rare variants and epistastic gene interactions should be taken into account in order to get the full picture of the genetic risks associated with AD. Here, we review recent whole-exome studies looking for rare variants, somatic brain mutations with a strong association to the disease, and several studies dealing with epistasis as additional mechanisms conferring genetic susceptibility to AD. Altogether, recent evidence underlines the importance of defining molecular and genetic pathways, and networks rather than the contribution of specific genes. PMID:25914626

  13. Evolution of a computer program for classifying protein segments as transmembrane domains using genetic programming

    SciTech Connect

    Koza, J.R.

    1994-12-31

    The recently-developed genetic programming paradigm is used to evolve a computer program to classify a given protein segment as being a transmembrane domain or non-transmembrane area of the protein. Genetic programming starts with a primordial ooze of randomly generated computer programs composed of available programmatic ingredients and then genetically breeds the population of programs using the Darwinian principle of survival of the fittest and an analog of the naturally occurring genetic operation of crossover (sexual recombination). Automatic function definition enables genetic programming to dynamically create subroutines dynamically during the run. Genetic programming is given a training set of differently-sized protein segments and their correct classification (but no biochemical knowledge, such as hydrophobicity values). Correlation is used as the fitness measure to drive the evolutionary process. The best genetically-evolved program achieves an out-of-sample correlation of 0.968 and an out-of-sample error rate of 1.6%. This error rate is better than that reported for four other algorithms reported at the First International Conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology. Our genetically evolved program is an instance of an algorithm discovered by an automated learning paradigm that is superior to that written by human investigators.

  14. Dynamical genetic programming in XCSF.

    PubMed

    Preen, Richard J; Bull, Larry

    2013-01-01

    A number of representation schemes have been presented for use within learning classifier systems, ranging from binary encodings to artificial neural networks. This paper presents results from an investigation into using a temporally dynamic symbolic representation within the XCSF learning classifier system. In particular, dynamical arithmetic networks are used to represent the traditional condition-action production system rules to solve continuous-valued reinforcement learning problems and to perform symbolic regression, finding competitive performance with traditional genetic programming on a number of composite polynomial tasks. In addition, the network outputs are later repeatedly sampled at varying temporal intervals to perform multistep-ahead predictions of a financial time series.

  15. Fault detection using genetic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liang; B. Jack, Lindsay; Nandi, Asoke K.

    2005-03-01

    Genetic programming (GP) is a stochastic process for automatically generating computer programs. GP has been applied to a variety of problems which are too wide to reasonably enumerate. As far as the authors are aware, it has rarely been used in condition monitoring (CM). In this paper, GP is used to detect faults in rotating machinery. Featuresets from two different machines are used to examine the performance of two-class normal/fault recognition. The results are compared with a few other methods for fault detection: Artificial neural networks (ANNs) have been used in this field for many years, while support vector machines (SVMs) also offer successful solutions. For ANNs and SVMs, genetic algorithms have been used to do feature selection, which is an inherent function of GP. In all cases, the GP demonstrates performance which equals or betters that of the previous best performing approaches on these data sets. The training times are also found to be considerably shorter than the other approaches, whilst the generated classification rules are easy to understand and independently validate.

  16. Third conference on radiation protection and dosimetry. Program and abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    1991-01-01

    This conference has been designed with the objectives of promoting communication among applied, research, regulatory, and standards personnel involved in radiation protection and providing them with sufficient information to evaluate their programs. To partly fulfill these objectives, a technical program consisting of more than 75 invited and contributed oral presentations encompassing all aspects of radiation protection has been prepared. General topics include external dosimetry, internal dosimetry, instruments, regulations and standards, accreditation and test programs, research advances, and applied program experience. This publication provides a summary of the technical program and a collection of abstracts of the oral presentations.

  17. Twenty-second Fungal Genetics Conference - Asilomar, 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Jonathan D. Walton

    2003-06-30

    The purpose of the Twenty Second Fungal Genetics Conference is to bring together scientists and students who are interested in genetic approaches to studying the biology of filamentous fungi. It is intended to stimulate thinking and discussion in an atmosphere that supports interactions between scientists at different levels and in different disciplines. Topics range from the basic to the applied. Filamentous fungi impact human affairs in many ways. In the environment they are the most important agents of decay and nutrient turnover. They are used extensively in the food industry for the production of food enzymes such as pectinase and food additives such as citric acid. They are used in the production of fermented foods such as alcoholic drinks, bread, cheese, and soy sauce. More than a dozen species of mushrooms are used as foods directly. Many of our most important antibiotics, such as penicillin, cyclosporin, and lovastatin, come from fungi. Fungi also have many negative impacts on human health and economics. Fungi are serious pathogens in immuno-compromised patients. Fungi are the single largest group of plant pathogens and thus a serious limit on crop productivity throughout the world. Many fungi are allergenic, and mold contamination of residences and commercial buildings is now recognized as a serious public health threat. As decomposers, fungi cause extensive damage to just about all natural and synthetic materials.

  18. University Programs. Symposium 20. [AHRD Conference, 2001].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    This symposium on university programs consists of three presentations. "Institutional and Curricular Characteristics of Leading Graduate Human Resource Development (HRD) Programs in the United States" (K. Peter Kuchinke) reports a study on institutional arrangements, student enrollments, and core curriculum content and found a large…

  19. The Genetic Programming of Industrial Microorganisms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopwood, David A.

    1981-01-01

    Traces the development of the field of industrial microbial genetics, describing a range of techniques for genetic programing. Includes a discussion of site-directed mutagenesis, protoplast fusion, and recombinant DNA manipulations. (CS)

  20. The Genetic Programming of Industrial Microorganisms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopwood, David A.

    1981-01-01

    Traces the development of the field of industrial microbial genetics, describing a range of techniques for genetic programing. Includes a discussion of site-directed mutagenesis, protoplast fusion, and recombinant DNA manipulations. (CS)

  1. Exceptional Children Conference Papers: Involvement of Parents in School Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Exceptional Children, Arlington, VA.

    A selection of four papers from those presented at the CEC Northwest Regional Conference (Vancouver, British Columbia, October 21-24, 1970) deals with the involvement of parents in school programs. Beryl Gridley briefly skims the area of work with parents of exceptional children while Vera Brinson details work with parents of preschoolers. Ila…

  2. Atmospheric Downscaling using Genetic Programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerenner, Tanja; Venema, Victor; Simmer, Clemens

    2013-04-01

    Coupling models for the different components of the Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere-System requires up-and downscaling procedures. Subject of our work is the downscaling scheme used to derive high resolution forcing data for land-surface and subsurface models from coarser atmospheric model output. The current downscaling scheme [Schomburg et. al. 2010, 2012] combines a bi-quadratic spline interpolation, deterministic rules and autoregressive noise. For the development of the scheme, training and validation data sets have been created by carrying out high-resolution runs of the atmospheric model. The deterministic rules in this scheme are partly based on known physical relations and partly determined by an automated search for linear relationships between the high resolution fields of the atmospheric model output and high resolution data on surface characteristics. Up to now deterministic rules are available for downscaling surface pressure and partially, depending on the prevailing weather conditions, for near surface temperature and radiation. Aim of our work is to improve those rules and to find deterministic rules for the remaining variables, which require downscaling, e.g. precipitation or near surface specifc humidity. To accomplish that, we broaden the search by allowing for interdependencies between different atmospheric parameters, non-linear relations, non-local and time-lagged relations. To cope with the vast number of possible solutions, we use genetic programming, a method from machine learning, which is based on the principles of natural evolution. We are currently working with GPLAB, a Genetic Programming toolbox for Matlab. At first we have tested the GP system to retrieve the known physical rule for downscaling surface pressure, i.e. the hydrostatic equation, from our training data. We have found this to be a simple task to the GP system. Furthermore we have improved accuracy and efficiency of the GP solution by implementing constant variation and

  3. Texture segmentation by genetic programming.

    PubMed

    Song, Andy; Ciesielski, Vic

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a texture segmentation method using genetic programming (GP), which is one of the most powerful evolutionary computation algorithms. By choosing an appropriate representation texture, classifiers can be evolved without computing texture features. Due to the absence of time-consuming feature extraction, the evolved classifiers enable the development of the proposed texture segmentation algorithm. This GP based method can achieve a segmentation speed that is significantly higher than that of conventional methods. This method does not require a human expert to manually construct models for texture feature extraction. In an analysis of the evolved classifiers, it can be seen that these GP classifiers are not arbitrary. Certain textural regularities are captured by these classifiers to discriminate different textures. GP has been shown in this study as a feasible and a powerful approach for texture classification and segmentation, which are generally considered as complex vision tasks.

  4. Genetic programming and serial processing for time series classification.

    PubMed

    Alfaro-Cid, Eva; Sharman, Ken; Esparcia-Alcázar, Anna I

    2014-01-01

    This work describes an approach devised by the authors for time series classification. In our approach genetic programming is used in combination with a serial processing of data, where the last output is the result of the classification. The use of genetic programming for classification, although still a field where more research in needed, is not new. However, the application of genetic programming to classification tasks is normally done by considering the input data as a feature vector. That is, to the best of our knowledge, there are not examples in the genetic programming literature of approaches where the time series data are processed serially and the last output is considered as the classification result. The serial processing approach presented here fills a gap in the existing literature. This approach was tested in three different problems. Two of them are real world problems whose data were gathered for online or conference competitions. As there are published results of these two problems this gives us the chance to compare the performance of our approach against top performing methods. The serial processing of data in combination with genetic programming obtained competitive results in both competitions, showing its potential for solving time series classification problems. The main advantage of our serial processing approach is that it can easily handle very large datasets.

  5. MU-SPIN Conference Explorers Program Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrowman, Jim

    2000-01-01

    The mission of the Explorer Program is to provide frequent flight opportunities for world-class scientific investigations from space within the following space science themes: (1) Astronomical Search for Origins and Planetary Systems; (2) Structure and Evolution of the Universe (3) The Sun-Earth Connection. America's space exploration started with Explorer 1: (1) Launched February 1, 1958; (2) Discovered the Van Allen Radiation Belts; (3) Over 75 Explorer missions have flown.

  6. Genetic algorithms using SISAL parallel programming language

    SciTech Connect

    Tejada, S.

    1994-05-06

    Genetic algorithms are a mathematical optimization technique developed by John Holland at the University of Michigan [1]. The SISAL programming language possesses many of the characteristics desired to implement genetic algorithms. SISAL is a deterministic, functional programming language which is inherently parallel. Because SISAL is functional and based on mathematical concepts, genetic algorithms can be efficiently translated into the language. Several of the steps involved in genetic algorithms, such as mutation, crossover, and fitness evaluation, can be parallelized using SISAL. In this paper I will l discuss the implementation and performance of parallel genetic algorithms in SISAL.

  7. Genetics and the unity of biology. Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-31

    International Congresses of Genetics, convened just once every five years, provide a rare opportunity for overview in the field of genetic engineering. The Congress, held August 20-27, 1988 in Toronto, Canada focused on the theme Genetics and the Unity of Biology, which was chosen because the concepts of modern genetics have provided biology with a unifying theoretical structure. This program guide contains a schedule of all Congress activities and a listing of all Symposia, Workshops and Poster Sessions held.

  8. Design of Autonomous Navigation Controllers for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Using Multi-Objective Genetic Programming

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-03-01

    In Genetic Programming 1997: Proceedings of the Second Annual Conference, pages 398–406, 1997. [23] Emilio Frazzoli. Maneuver-based motion planning...Evolutionary approaches to neural control of rolling, walking, swimming and flying animats or robots. In Richard J. Duro, Jose Santos, and Manuel Grana...objective genetic programming. In Proceedings of the Congress on Evolutionary Computation, Portland, OR, June 2004. [66] Peter Pacheco . Parallel

  9. 2012 Gordon Research Conference on Bioinspired Materials - Formal Schedule and Speaker/Poster Program

    SciTech Connect

    Chilkoti, Ashutosk

    2012-06-29

    The emerging, interdisciplinary field of Bioinspired Materials focuses on developing a fundamental understanding of the synthesis, directed self-assembly and hierarchical organization of natural occurring materials, and uses this understanding to engineer new bioinspired artificial materials for diverse applications. The inaugural 2012 Gordon Conference on Bioinspired Materials seeks to capture the excitement of this burgeoning field by a cutting-edge scientific program and roster of distinguished invited speakers and discussion leaders who will address the key issues in the field. The Conference will feature a wide range of topics, such as materials and devices from DNA, reprogramming the genetic code for design of new materials, peptide, protein and carbohydrate based materials, biomimetic systems, complexity in self-assembly, and biomedical applications of bioinspired materials.

  10. Atmospheric Downscaling using Genetic Programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerenner, T.; Venema, V.; Simmer, C.

    2013-12-01

    The coupling of models for the different components of the soil-vegetation-atmosphere system is required to understand component interactions and feedback processes. The Transregional Collaborative Research Center 32 (TR 32) has developed a coupled modeling platform, TerrSysMP, consisting of the atmospheric model COSMO, the land-surface model CLM, and the hydrological model ParFlow. These component models are usually operated at different resolutions in space and time owing to the dominant processes. These different scales should also be considered in the coupling mode, because it is for instance unfeasible to run the computationally quite expensive atmospheric models at the usually much higher spatial resolution required by hydrological models. Thus up- and downscaling procedures are required at the interface between atmospheric model and land-surface/subsurface models. Here we present an advanced atmospheric downscaling scheme, that creates realistic fine-scale fields (e.g. 400 m resolution) of the atmospheric state variables from the coarse atmospheric model output (e.g. 2.8 km resolution). The mixed physical/statistical scheme is developed from a training data set of high-resolution atmospheric model runs covering a range different weather conditions using Genetic Programming (GP). GP originates from machine learning: From a set of functions (arithmetic expressions, IF-statements, etc.) and terminals (constants or variables) GP generates potential solutions to a given problem while minimizing a fitness or cost function. We use a multi-objective approach that aims at fitting spatial structures, spatially distributed variance and spatio-temporal correlation of the fields. We account for the spatio-temporal nature of the data in two ways. On the one hand we offer GP potential predictors, which are based on our physical understanding of the atmospheric processes involved (spatial and temporal gradients, etc.). On the other hand we include functions operating on

  11. Genetic algorithms as discovery programs

    SciTech Connect

    Hilliard, M.R.; Liepins, G.

    1986-01-01

    Genetic algorithms are mathematical counterparts to natural selection and gene recombination. As such, they have provided one of the few significant breakthroughs in machine learning. Used with appropriate reward functions and apportionment of credit, they have been successfully applied to gas pipeline operation, x-ray registration and mathematical optimization problems. This paper discusses the basics of genetic algorithms, describes a few successes, and reports on current progress at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in applications to set covering and simulated robots.

  12. Genetic Parallel Programming: design and implementation.

    PubMed

    Cheang, Sin Man; Leung, Kwong Sak; Lee, Kin Hong

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a novel Genetic Parallel Programming (GPP) paradigm for evolving parallel programs running on a Multi-Arithmetic-Logic-Unit (Multi-ALU) Processor (MAP). The MAP is a Multiple Instruction-streams, Multiple Data-streams (MIMD), general-purpose register machine that can be implemented on modern Very Large-Scale Integrated Circuits (VLSIs) in order to evaluate genetic programs at high speed. For human programmers, writing parallel programs is more difficult than writing sequential programs. However, experimental results show that GPP evolves parallel programs with less computational effort than that of their sequential counterparts. It creates a new approach to evolving a feasible problem solution in parallel program form and then serializes it into a sequential program if required. The effectiveness and efficiency of GPP are investigated using a suite of 14 well-studied benchmark problems. Experimental results show that GPP speeds up evolution substantially.

  13. Programming cells: towards an automated 'Genetic Compiler'.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Kevin; Voigt, Christopher A

    2010-08-01

    One of the visions of synthetic biology is to be able to program cells using a language that is similar to that used to program computers or robotics. For large genetic programs, keeping track of the DNA on the level of nucleotides becomes tedious and error prone, requiring a new generation of computer-aided design (CAD) software. To push the size of projects, it is important to abstract the designer from the process of part selection and optimization. The vision is to specify genetic programs in a higher-level language, which a genetic compiler could automatically convert into a DNA sequence. Steps towards this goal include: defining the semantics of the higher-level language, algorithms to select and assemble parts, and biophysical methods to link DNA sequence to function. These will be coupled to graphic design interfaces and simulation packages to aid in the prediction of program dynamics, optimize genes, and scan projects for errors.

  14. Chapman Conference accents success of space weather program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siscoe, George; Song, Paul

    Over 160 scientists and students from more than a dozen countries attended the Chapman Conference on Space Weather: Progress and Challenges in Research and Applications to hear 70 talks and peruse 150 posters documenting achievements made during the first 5 years of the National Space Weather Program (NSWP).Since the advent of the NSWR, space weather research has expanded from a semi-private activity, pursued mostly to address operational concerns of industries and military branches affected by space weather, to a broad subject pursued in part for its capacity to integrate research across the divisions of the SPA community.

  15. Genetic code ambiguity confers a selective advantage on Acinetobacter baylyi.

    PubMed

    Bacher, Jamie M; Waas, William F; Metzgar, David; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie; Schimmel, Paul

    2007-09-01

    A primitive genetic code, composed of a smaller set of amino acids, may have expanded via recursive periods of genetic code ambiguity that were followed by specificity. Here we model a step in this process by showing how genetic code ambiguity could result in an enhanced growth rate in Acinetobacter baylyi.

  16. Genetic Code Ambiguity Confers a Selective Advantage on Acinetobacter baylyi▿

    PubMed Central

    Bacher, Jamie M.; Waas, William F.; Metzgar, David; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie; Schimmel, Paul

    2007-01-01

    A primitive genetic code, composed of a smaller set of amino acids, may have expanded via recursive periods of genetic code ambiguity that were followed by specificity. Here we model a step in this process by showing how genetic code ambiguity could result in an enhanced growth rate in Acinetobacter baylyi. PMID:17616603

  17. A Synthetic Genetic Edge Detection Program

    PubMed Central

    Tabor, Jeffrey J.; Salis, Howard; Simpson, Zachary B.; Chevalier, Aaron A.; Levskaya, Anselm; Marcotte, Edward M.; Voigt, Christopher A.; Ellington, Andrew D.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Edge detection is a signal processing algorithm common in artificial intelligence and image recognition programs. We have constructed a genetically encoded edge detection algorithm that programs an isogenic community of E.coli to sense an image of light, communicate to identify the light-dark edges, and visually present the result of the computation. The algorithm is implemented using multiple genetic circuits. An engineered light sensor enables cells to distinguish between light and dark regions. In the dark, cells produce a diffusible chemical signal that diffuses into light regions. Genetic logic gates are used so that only cells that sense light and the diffusible signal produce a positive output. A mathematical model constructed from first principles and parameterized with experimental measurements of the component circuits predicts the performance of the complete program. Quantitatively accurate models will facilitate the engineering of more complex biological behaviors and inform bottom-up studies of natural genetic regulatory networks. PMID:19563759

  18. A synthetic genetic edge detection program.

    PubMed

    Tabor, Jeffrey J; Salis, Howard M; Simpson, Zachary Booth; Chevalier, Aaron A; Levskaya, Anselm; Marcotte, Edward M; Voigt, Christopher A; Ellington, Andrew D

    2009-06-26

    Edge detection is a signal processing algorithm common in artificial intelligence and image recognition programs. We have constructed a genetically encoded edge detection algorithm that programs an isogenic community of E. coli to sense an image of light, communicate to identify the light-dark edges, and visually present the result of the computation. The algorithm is implemented using multiple genetic circuits. An engineered light sensor enables cells to distinguish between light and dark regions. In the dark, cells produce a diffusible chemical signal that diffuses into light regions. Genetic logic gates are used so that only cells that sense light and the diffusible signal produce a positive output. A mathematical model constructed from first principles and parameterized with experimental measurements of the component circuits predicts the performance of the complete program. Quantitatively accurate models will facilitate the engineering of more complex biological behaviors and inform bottom-up studies of natural genetic regulatory networks.

  19. Committee on the Undergraduate Program in Mathematics Geometry Conference, Part I: Convexity and Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durst, Lincoln K., Ed.

    This is the first volume of the proceedings of the Committee on the Undergraduate Program in Mathematics (CUPM) Geometry Conference, held at Santa Barbara in June, 1967. The purpose of the conference was to consider the status of geometry in colleges at the undergraduate level. The conference, attended by undergraduate mathematics teachers,…

  20. Making a Difference: Education at the 10th International Conference on Zebrafish Development and Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jennifer O.; Pickart, Michael A.; Pierret, Chris; Tomasciewicz, Henry G.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Scientists, educators, and students met at the 10th International Conference on Zebrafish Development and Genetics during the 2-day Education Workshop, chaired by Dr. Jennifer Liang and supported in part by the Genetics Society of America. The goal of the workshop was to share expertise, to discuss the challenges faced when using zebrafish in the classroom, and to articulate goals for expanding the impact of zebrafish in education. PMID:23244686

  1. State of Wisconsin Evaluation Conference Summary: ESEA Title I Migrant Education Programs, Summer of 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Dept. of Public Instruction, Madison. Div. for Management and Planning Services.

    The Elementary Secondary Education Act Title I Wisconsin Migrant Education Conference was held on August 6, 1979 to evaluate programs and to gather program planning data. Data for this evaluation were collected by means of both structured interaction of the 53 conference participants and questionnaires completed by participants. The teachers felt…

  2. 6th international conference on biophysics and synchrotron radiation. Program/Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Pittroff, Connie; Strasser, Susan Barr

    1999-08-03

    This STI product consists of the Program/Abstracts book that was prepared for the participants in the Sixth International Conference on Biophysics and Synchrotron Radiation that was held August 4-8, 1998, at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. This book contains the full conference program and abstracts of the scientific presentations.

  3. Conference on Career Development and Program Articulation in Health. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milliken, Mary Elizabeth

    This document is a summary report of a 3-day conference held in November 1972 by the Health Occupations Teacher Education Program within the Division of Vocational Education of the University of Georgia. The conference focused on an emerging issue in health occupations education, articulation of programs. Basic problems in the health field are job…

  4. Genetic Network Programming with Reconstructed Individuals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Fengming; Mabu, Shingo; Wang, Lutao; Eto, Shinji; Hirasawa, Kotaro

    A lot of research on evolutionary computation has been done and some significant classical methods such as Genetic Algorithm (GA), Genetic Programming (GP), Evolutionary Programming (EP), and Evolution Strategies (ES) have been studied. Recently, a new approach named Genetic Network Programming (GNP) has been proposed. GNP can evolve itself and find the optimal solution. It is based on the idea of Genetic Algorithm and uses the data structure of directed graphs. Many papers have demonstrated that GNP can deal with complex problems in the dynamic environments very efficiently and effectively. As a result, recently, GNP is getting more and more attentions and is used in many different areas such as data mining, extracting trading rules of stock markets, elevator supervised control systems, etc., and GNP has obtained some outstanding results. Focusing on the GNP's distinguished expression ability of the graph structure, this paper proposes a method named Genetic Network Programming with Reconstructed Individuals (GNP-RI). The aim of GNP-RI is to balance the exploitation and exploration of GNP, that is, to strengthen the exploitation ability by using the exploited information extensively during the evolution process of GNP and finally obtain better performances than that of GNP. In the proposed method, the worse individuals are reconstructed and enhanced by the elite information before undergoing genetic operations (mutation and crossover). The enhancement of worse individuals mimics the maturing phenomenon in nature, where bad individuals can become smarter after receiving a good education. In this paper, GNP-RI is applied to the tile-world problem which is an excellent bench mark for evaluating the proposed architecture. The performance of GNP-RI is compared with that of the conventional GNP. The simulation results show some advantages of GNP-RI demonstrating its superiority over the conventional GNPs.

  5. FASEB Summer Research Conference. Genetic Recombination and Chromosome Rearrangements

    SciTech Connect

    Jinks-Robertson, Sue

    2002-02-01

    The 2001 meeting entitled ''Genetic Recombination and Genome Rearrangements'' was held July 21-26 in Snowmass, Colorado. The goal of the meeting was to bring together scientists using diverse approaches to study all aspects of genetic recombination. This goal was achieved by integrating talks covering the genetics, biochemistry and structural biology of homologous recombination, site-specific recombination, and nonhomologous recombination. The format of the meeting consisted of a keynote address on the opening evening, two formal plenary sessions on each of the four full meeting days, a single afternoon workshop consisting of short talks chosen from among submitted abstracts, and afternoon poster sessions on each of the four full meeting days. The eight plenary session were entitled: (1) Recombination Mechanisms, (2) Prokaryotic Recombination, (3) Repair and Recombination, (4) Site-specific Recombination and Transposition, (5) Eukaryotic Recombination I, (6) Genome Rearrangements, (7) Meiosis, and (8) Eukaryotic Recombination II. Each session included a mix of genetic, biochemical and structural talks; talks were limited to 20 minutes, followed by 10 minutes of very lively, general discussion. Much of the data presented in the plenary sessions was unpublished, thus providing attendees with the most up-to-date knowledge of this rapidly-moving field.

  6. Race, Genetics and Medicine: New Information, Enduring Questions: Final Report on Conference held on April 9, 2005 and its Sequelae

    SciTech Connect

    Beckwith, Jonathan R.

    2008-08-20

    The Conference, “Race, Genetics and Medicine: New Information, Enduring Questions,” was held on Saturday, April 9, 2005 in the Science Center, Lecture Hall D at Harvard University, Cambridge, MA. Approximately 150 people attended. The audience was composed mainly of college and graduate school science students and postdoctoral fellows, some science and medical school faculty, science teachers at various levels, journalists and interested members of the public. The keynote speaker and the panelists reflected different academic disciplines (genetics, medicine, anthropology, sociology) and a CEO of a biotechnology company with background in medicine and law. They also presented different perspectives on the utility of race concepts in medicine and even on the use of the word “race.” While the talks often involved descriptions of genetic approaches that were not simple to explain, the speakers did an effective job of getting across the gist of studies that have been carried out on these issues. Although no consensus was reached, the conference gave the audience the opportunity to understand the issues and to have the tools to follow the debates in the future. Our strongest feedback was from attendees who had heard of the race and genetics issues through various media, but did not have a sense of what they were really about. They reported to us that they now felt they understood the basis of these discussions. Our post-conference activities have been successfully completed. While we had proposed to make available transcripts of the talks to the public through a Website, some of the speakers would not agree to have their presentations available in this way. Therefore, we asked permission from the DOE to use the funds to prepare classroom lesson plans for high school students to discuss the issues. These were prepared over a year-long period by the Genetic Screening Study Group Members with an educator, Ms. Ronnee Yashon, who teaches at Tufts University and who

  7. Identification of Immune-Relevant Factors Conferring Sarcoidosis Genetic Risk

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Annegret; Ellinghaus, David; Nutsua, Marcel; Hofmann, Sylvia; Montgomery, Courtney G.; Iannuzzi, Michael C.; Rybicki, Benjamin A.; Petrek, Martin; Mrazek, Frantisek; Pabst, Stefan; Grohé, Christian; Grunewald, Johan; Ronninger, Marcus; Eklund, Anders; Padyukov, Leonid; Mihailovic-Vucinic, Violeta; Jovanovic, Dragana; Sterclova, Martina; Homolka, Jiri; Nöthen, Markus M.; Herms, Stefan; Gieger, Christian; Strauch, Konstantin; Winkelmann, Juliane; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Brand, Stephan; Büning, Carsten; Schürmann, Manfred; Ellinghaus, Eva; Baurecht, Hansjörg; Lieb, Wolfgang; Nebel, Almut; Müller-Quernheim, Joachim; Franke, Andre

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Genetic variation plays a significant role in the etiology of sarcoidosis. However, only a small fraction of its heritability has been explained so far. Objectives: To define further genetic risk loci for sarcoidosis, we used the Immunochip for a candidate gene association study of immune-associated loci. Methods: Altogether the study population comprised over 19,000 individuals. In a two-stage design, 1,726 German sarcoidosis cases and 5,482 control subjects were genotyped for 128,705 single-nucleotide polymorphisms using the Illumina Immunochip for the screening step. The remaining 3,955 cases, 7,514 control subjects, and 684 parents of affected offspring were used for validation and replication of 44 candidate and two established risk single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Measurements and Main Results: Four novel susceptibility loci were identified with genome-wide significance in the European case-control populations, located on chromosomes 12q24.12 (rs653178; ATXN2/SH2B3), 5q33.3 (rs4921492; IL12B), 4q24 (rs223498; MANBA/NFKB1), and 2q33.2 (rs6748088; FAM117B). We further defined three independent association signals in the HLA region with genome-wide significance, peaking in the BTNL2 promoter region (rs5007259), at HLA-B (rs4143332/HLA-B*0801) and at HLA-DPB1 (rs9277542), and found another novel independent signal near IL23R (rs12069782) on chromosome 1p31.3. Conclusions: Functional predictions and protein network analyses suggest a prominent role of the drug-targetable IL23/Th17 signaling pathway in the genetic etiology of sarcoidosis. Our findings reveal a substantial genetic overlap of sarcoidosis with diverse immune-mediated inflammatory disorders, which could be of relevance for the clinical application of modern therapeutics PMID:26051272

  8. Artificially ambiguous genetic code confers growth yield advantage

    PubMed Central

    Pezo, V.; Metzgar, D.; Hendrickson, T. L.; Waas, W. F.; Hazebrouck, S.; Döring, V.; Marlière, P.; Schimmel, P.; de Crécy-Lagard, V.

    2004-01-01

    A primitive genetic code is thought to have encoded statistical, ambiguous proteins in which more than one amino acid was inserted at a given codon. The relative vitality of organisms bearing ambiguous proteins and the kinds of pressures that forced development of the highly specific modern genetic code are unknown. Previous work demonstrated that, in the absence of selective pressure, enforced ambiguity in cells leads to death or to sequence reversion to eliminate the ambiguous phenotype. Here, we report the creation of a nonreverting strain of bacteria that produced statistical proteins. Ablating the editing activity of isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase resulted in an ambiguous code in which, through supplementation of a limited supply of isoleucine with an alternative amino acid that was noncoding, the mutant generating statistical proteins was favored over the wild-type isogenic strain. Such organisms harboring statistical proteins could have had an enhanced adaptive capacity and could have played an important role in the early development of living systems. PMID:15163798

  9. Applications of genetic programming in cancer research.

    PubMed

    Worzel, William P; Yu, Jianjun; Almal, Arpit A; Chinnaiyan, Arul M

    2009-02-01

    The theory of Darwinian evolution is the fundamental keystones of modern biology. Late in the last century, computer scientists began adapting its principles, in particular natural selection, to complex computational challenges, leading to the emergence of evolutionary algorithms. The conceptual model of selective pressure and recombination in evolutionary algorithms allow scientists to efficiently search high dimensional space for solutions to complex problems. In the last decade, genetic programming has been developed and extensively applied for analysis of molecular data to classify cancer subtypes and characterize the mechanisms of cancer pathogenesis and development. This article reviews current successes using genetic programming and discusses its potential impact in cancer research and treatment in the near future.

  10. Applications of Genetic Programming in Cancer Research

    PubMed Central

    Worzel, William P.; Yu, Jianjun; Almal, Arpit A.; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.

    2012-01-01

    The theory of Darwinian evolution is the fundamental keystones of modern biology. Late in the last century, computer scientists began adapting its principles, in particular natural selection, to complex computational challenges, leading to the emergence of evolutionary algorithms. The conceptual model of selective pressure and recombination in evolutionary algorithms allows scientists to efficiently search high dimensional space for solutions to complex problems. In the last decade, genetic programming has been developed and extensively applied for analysis of molecular data to classify cancer subtypes and characterize the mechanisms of cancer pathogenesis and development. This article reviews current successes using genetic programming and discusses its potential impact in cancer research and treatment in the near future. PMID:18929677

  11. Evaluating the 2008 consensus conference on genetically modified foods in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Fan, Mei-Fang

    2015-07-01

    Genetically modified foods have become one of the most popular topics for deliberative exercises involving ordinary citizens worldwide. This paper examines the Taiwanese consensus conference on GM foods held in June 2008, and the implications and limitations of the public deliberations. The consensus conference facilitated multiparty dialogues and enhanced citizens' knowledge, and affected their attitudes. This study demonstrates the ways contextual factors have influenced the outcome of the citizens' deliberative practices, including the government's conventional technocratic decision-making style, the strong influence of the U.S. government, the political and technological culture, the government's framing of economic development concerns, and a lack of pressure from civil society to compel the government to formally respond to their concerns. The consensus conference had a limited effect on policy decision-making, and seemed to serve as a socio-political experiment.

  12. Negative feedback in genetic circuits confers evolutionary resilience and capacitance.

    PubMed

    Marciano, David C; Lua, Rhonald C; Katsonis, Panagiotis; Amin, Shivas R; Herman, Christophe; Lichtarge, Olivier

    2014-06-26

    Natural selection for specific functions places limits upon the amino acid substitutions a protein can accept. Mechanisms that expand the range of tolerable amino acid substitutions include chaperones that can rescue destabilized proteins and additional stability-enhancing substitutions. Here, we present an alternative mechanism that is simple and uses a frequently encountered network motif. Computational and experimental evidence shows that the self-correcting, negative-feedback gene regulation motif increases repressor expression in response to deleterious mutations and thereby precisely restores repression of a target gene. Furthermore, this ability to rescue repressor function is observable across the Eubacteria kingdom through the greater accumulation of amino acid substitutions in negative-feedback transcription factors compared to genes they control. We propose that negative feedback represents a self-contained genetic canalization mechanism that preserves phenotype while permitting access to a wider range of functional genotypes.

  13. Evolving evolutionary algorithms using linear genetic programming.

    PubMed

    Oltean, Mihai

    2005-01-01

    A new model for evolving Evolutionary Algorithms is proposed in this paper. The model is based on the Linear Genetic Programming (LGP) technique. Every LGP chromosome encodes an EA which is used for solving a particular problem. Several Evolutionary Algorithms for function optimization, the Traveling Salesman Problem and the Quadratic Assignment Problem are evolved by using the considered model. Numerical experiments show that the evolved Evolutionary Algorithms perform similarly and sometimes even better than standard approaches for several well-known benchmarking problems.

  14. An Innovative Marketing Model: Promoting Technical Programs by Conducting One-Day Conferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrosian, Anahid

    This document examines an innovative marketing strategy developed by South Texas Community College (STCC) to promote its technical programs. In 2000, STCC organized the "Business Conference Institute" to develop 1-day conferences with the Division of Business, Math & Sciences (DBMS). The creation of this Institute linked the College with the local…

  15. Telecommunications Policy Research Conference 1987. Program [and] Keynote Address by Morris Tanenbaum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Telecommunications Policy Research Conference, Inc., Washington, DC.

    Panelists, discussants, and speakers at the 20 sessions of this three-day conference on telecommunications policy research are listed under the appropriate sessions in this conference program, as well luncheon and dinner speakers. Topics addressed by the various sessions include: federal regulatory policies and technical change in…

  16. Design Conference for the Evaluation of the Talent Search Program: Synthesis of Major Themes and Commissioned Papers Prepared for the Conference (Washington, D.C., September 30, 1992).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westat, Inc., Rockville, MD.

    This report gathers papers prepared for a design conference for the evaluation of the Federal Talent Search Program, an early intervention program to identify gifted and talented financially needy students and connect them with discretionary grants for higher education. An introductory paper synthesizes major conference themes. These include: (1)…

  17. Duplication of coding segments in genetic programming

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, T.

    1996-12-31

    Research into the utility of non-coding segments, or introns, in genetic-based encodings has shown that they expedite the evolution of solutions in domains by protecting building blocks against destructive crossover. We consider a genetic programming system where non-coding segments can be removed, and the resultant chromosomes returned into the population. This parsimonious repair leads to premature convergence, since as we remove the naturally occurring non-coding segments, we strip away their protective backup feature. We then duplicate the coding segments in the repaired chromosomes, and place the modified chromosomes into the population. The duplication method significantly improves the learning rate in the domain we have considered. We also show that this method can be applied to other domains.

  18. 76 FR 9399 - ITS Joint Program Office; Pre-Proposal Safety Pilot Joint Bidders Conference; Notice of Public...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-17

    ... ITS Joint Program Office; Pre-Proposal Safety Pilot Joint Bidders Conference; Notice of Public Meeting...: Notice. The U.S. Department of Transportation ITS Joint Program Office (ITS JPO) is conducting a Pre-proposal Conference (``Safety Pilot Joint Bidders Conference'') on February 22, 2011 from 8:30 a.m. to...

  19. 2012 Gordon Research Conference on Microbial Stress Response, Schedule and Speaker/Poster Program

    SciTech Connect

    Donohue, Timothy J.

    2012-07-20

    The Gordon Research Conference on Microbial Stress Response was held at Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, Massachusetts, July 15-20, 2012. The Conference was well-attended with 180 participants. The 2012 Microbial Stress Responses Gordon Research Conference will provide a forum for the open reporting of recent discoveries on the diverse mechanisms employed by microbes to respond to stress. Approaches range from analysis at the molecular level (how are signals perceived and transmitted to change gene expression or function) to cellular and microbial community responses. Attached is a copy of the formal schedule and speaker program and the poster program.

  20. Restoration of degraded images using genetic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Beltrán, José Enrique; Díaz-Ramírez, Víctor H.; Trujillo, Leonardo; Legrand, Pierrick

    2016-09-01

    In image restoration problems it is commonly assumed that image degradations are linear. In real-life this assumption is not always satisfied causing linear restoration methods fail. In this work, we present the design of an image restoration filtering based on genetic programming. The proposed filtering is given by a secuence of basic mathematical operators that allows to retrieve an undegraded image from an image degraded with noise. Computer simulations results obtained with the proposed algorithm in terms of objective metrics are analyzed and discussed by processing images degraded with noise. The obtained results are compared with those obtained with existing linear filters.

  1. Functional Localization of Genetic Network Programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eto, Shinji; Hirasawa, Kotaro; Hu, Jinglu

    According to the knowledge of brain science, it is suggested that there exists cerebral functional localization, which means that a specific part of the cerebrum is activated depending on various kinds of information human receives. The aim of this paper is to build an artificial model to realize functional localization based on Genetic Network Programming (GNP), a new evolutionary computation method recently developed. GNP has a directed graph structure suitable for realizing functional localization. We studied the basic characteristics of the proposed system by making GNP work in a functionally localized way.

  2. Augmented Evolutionary Computation Using Genetic Programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ae, Tadashi; Kamitani, Motoki

    2006-06-01

    Evolutionary computation is an anticipatory computation for generation of creative sets including the set of sequences. The Interactive Evolutionary Computation (IEC, in short) is known as one of evolutionary computations, but it is not necessarily efficient because it may make the user tired. Therefore, we propose an improved method, that is, Augmented Interactive Evolutionary Computation (AIEC, in short), where the hypothesis/verification is applied for the generative agent instead of the objective element. We will state this type of evolutionary computation which is realized by a Genetic Programming.

  3. LIGO detector characterization with genetic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaglia, Marco; Staats, Kai; Errico, Luciano; Mogushi, Kentaro; Gabbard, Hunter

    2017-01-01

    Genetic Programming (GP) is a supervised approach to Machine Learning. GP has for two decades been applied to a diversity of problems, from predictive and financial modelling to data mining, from code repair to optical character recognition and product design. GP uses a stochastic search, tournament, and fitness function to explore a solution space. GP evolves a population of individual programs, through multiple generations, following the principals of biological evolution (mutation and reproduction) to discover a model that best fits or categorizes features in a given data set. We apply GP to categorization of LIGO noise and show that it can effectively be used to characterize the detector non-astrophysical noise both in low latency and offline searches. National Science Foundation award PHY-1404139.

  4. Improving Search Properties in Genetic Programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janikow, Cezary Z.; DeWeese, Scott

    1997-01-01

    With the advancing computer processing capabilities, practical computer applications are mostly limited by the amount of human programming required to accomplish a specific task. This necessary human participation creates many problems, such as dramatically increased cost. To alleviate the problem, computers must become more autonomous. In other words, computers must be capable to program/reprogram themselves to adapt to changing environments/tasks/demands/domains. Evolutionary computation offers potential means, but it must be advanced beyond its current practical limitations. Evolutionary algorithms model nature. They maintain a population of structures representing potential solutions to the problem at hand. These structures undergo a simulated evolution by means of mutation, crossover, and a Darwinian selective pressure. Genetic programming (GP) is the most promising example of an evolutionary algorithm. In GP, the structures that evolve are trees, which is a dramatic departure from previously used representations such as strings in genetic algorithms. The space of potential trees is defined by means of their elements: functions, which label internal nodes, and terminals, which label leaves. By attaching semantic interpretation to those elements, trees can be interpreted as computer programs (given an interpreter), evolved architectures, etc. JSC has begun exploring GP as a potential tool for its long-term project on evolving dextrous robotic capabilities. Last year we identified representation redundancies as the primary source of inefficiency in GP. Subsequently, we proposed a method to use problem constraints to reduce those redundancies, effectively reducing GP complexity. This method was implemented afterwards at the University of Missouri. This summer, we have evaluated the payoff from using problem constraints to reduce search complexity on two classes of problems: learning boolean functions and solving the forward kinematics problem. We have also

  5. Improving Search Properties in Genetic Programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janikow, Cezary Z.; DeWeese, Scott

    1997-01-01

    With the advancing computer processing capabilities, practical computer applications are mostly limited by the amount of human programming required to accomplish a specific task. This necessary human participation creates many problems, such as dramatically increased cost. To alleviate the problem, computers must become more autonomous. In other words, computers must be capable to program/reprogram themselves to adapt to changing environments/tasks/demands/domains. Evolutionary computation offers potential means, but it must be advanced beyond its current practical limitations. Evolutionary algorithms model nature. They maintain a population of structures representing potential solutions to the problem at hand. These structures undergo a simulated evolution by means of mutation, crossover, and a Darwinian selective pressure. Genetic programming (GP) is the most promising example of an evolutionary algorithm. In GP, the structures that evolve are trees, which is a dramatic departure from previously used representations such as strings in genetic algorithms. The space of potential trees is defined by means of their elements: functions, which label internal nodes, and terminals, which label leaves. By attaching semantic interpretation to those elements, trees can be interpreted as computer programs (given an interpreter), evolved architectures, etc. JSC has begun exploring GP as a potential tool for its long-term project on evolving dextrous robotic capabilities. Last year we identified representation redundancies as the primary source of inefficiency in GP. Subsequently, we proposed a method to use problem constraints to reduce those redundancies, effectively reducing GP complexity. This method was implemented afterwards at the University of Missouri. This summer, we have evaluated the payoff from using problem constraints to reduce search complexity on two classes of problems: learning boolean functions and solving the forward kinematics problem. We have also

  6. Genetically engineered livestock for agriculture: a generation after the first transgenic animal research conference.

    PubMed

    Murray, James D; Maga, Elizabeth A

    2016-06-01

    At the time of the first Transgenic Animal Research Conference, the lack of knowledge about promoter, enhancer and coding regions of genes of interest greatly hampered our efforts to create transgenes that would express appropriately in livestock. Additionally, we were limited to gene insertion by pronuclear microinjection. As predicted then, widespread genome sequencing efforts and technological advancements have profoundly altered what we can do. There have been many developments in technology to create transgenic animals since we first met at Granlibakken in 1997, including the advent of somatic cell nuclear transfer-based cloning and gene editing. We can now create new transgenes that will express when and where we want and can target precisely in the genome where we want to make a change or insert a transgene. With the large number of sequenced genomes, we have unprecedented access to sequence information including, control regions, coding regions, and known allelic variants. These technological developments have ushered in new and renewed enthusiasm for the production of transgenic animals among scientists and animal agriculturalists around the world, both for the production of more relevant biomedical research models as well as for agricultural applications. However, even though great advancements have been made in our ability to control gene expression and target genetic changes in our animals, there still are no genetically engineered animal products on the market for food. World-wide there has been a failure of the regulatory processes to effectively move forward. Estimates suggest the world will need to increase our current food production 70 % by 2050; that is we will have to produce the total amount of food each year that has been consumed by mankind over the past 500 years. The combination of transgenic animal technology and gene editing will become increasingly more important tools to help feed the world. However, to date the practical benefits of

  7. Successful technical trading agents using genetic programming.

    SciTech Connect

    Othling, Andrew S.; Kelly, John A.; Pryor, Richard J.; Farnsworth, Grant V.

    2004-10-01

    Genetic programming (GP) has proved to be a highly versatile and useful tool for identifying relationships in data for which a more precise theoretical construct is unavailable. In this project, we use a GP search to develop trading strategies for agent based economic models. These strategies use stock prices and technical indicators, such as the moving average convergence/divergence and various exponentially weighted moving averages, to generate buy and sell signals. We analyze the effect of complexity constraints on the strategies as well as the relative performance of various indicators. We also present innovations in the classical genetic programming algorithm that appear to improve convergence for this problem. Technical strategies developed by our GP algorithm can be used to control the behavior of agents in economic simulation packages, such as ASPEN-D, adding variety to the current market fundamentals approach. The exploitation of arbitrage opportunities by technical analysts may help increase the efficiency of the simulated stock market, as it does in the real world. By improving the behavior of simulated stock markets, we can better estimate the effects of shocks to the economy due to terrorism or natural disasters.

  8. Genetic programming for detecting target motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Andy; Zhang, Mengjie

    2012-09-01

    This study presents a selective motion detection methodology which is based on genetic programming (GP), an evolutionary search strategy. By this approach, motion detection programs can be automatically evolved instead of manually coded. This study investigates the suitable GP representation for motion detection as well as explores the advantages of this method. Unlike conventional methods, this evolutionary approach can generate programs which are able to mark target motions. The stationary background and the uninteresting or irrelevant motions such as swaying trees, noises are all ignored. Furthermore, programs can be trained to detect target motions from a moving background. They are capable of distinguishing different kinds of motions. Such differentiation can be based on the type of motions as well, for example, fast moving targets are captured, while slow moving targets are ignored. One of the characteristics of this method is that no modification or additional process is required when different types of motions are introduced. Moreover, real-time performance can be achieved by this GP motion detection method.

  9. National Institutes of Health Presentation at IPE Conference Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, Caroline

    1992-01-01

    The conference objective was to set up a working dialogue among representatives from industry and various Federal agencies. Discussed here are present National Institutes of Health (NIH) support in the area of intelligent processing equipment (IPE) and how researchers can work together on future research objectives. Information is given in viewgraph form with accompanying comments.

  10. National Institutes of Health Presentation at IPE Conference Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, Caroline

    1992-01-01

    The conference objective was to set up a working dialogue among representatives from industry and various Federal agencies. Discussed here are present National Institutes of Health (NIH) support in the area of intelligent processing equipment (IPE) and how researchers can work together on future research objectives. Information is given in viewgraph form with accompanying comments.

  11. "Get Smart in 99." NSWCEG Annual Conference Program and Proceedings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nanlohy, Phil, Ed.; van Vliet, Ron, Ed.

    The following papers are included in these proceedings from the New South Wales Computer Education Group (NSWCEG) conference: "The Origins of a Global Learning" (Al Rogers); "Moving Beyond 'Know How' to 'Know Why': CLICK! Computers and Learning in Classrooms: K-6" (Dianne P. Chambers); "Technology Planning: A Strategic…

  12. Discovering Knowledge from Noisy Databases Using Genetic Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Man Leung; Leung, Kwong Sak; Cheng, Jack C. Y.

    2000-01-01

    Presents a framework that combines Genetic Programming and Inductive Logic Programming, two approaches in data mining, to induce knowledge from noisy databases. The framework is based on a formalism of logic grammars and is implemented as a data mining system called LOGENPRO (Logic Grammar-based Genetic Programming System). (Contains 34…

  13. Mitochondrial DNA Haplogroup A may confer a genetic susceptibility to AIDS group from Southwest China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua-Wei; Xu, Yu; Miao, Ying-Lei; Luo, Hua-You; Wang, Kun-Hua

    2016-05-01

    The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in humans was one of the chronic infections caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and the interactions between viral infection and mitochondrial energetic implicated that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation(s) may effect genetic susceptibility to AIDS. Thus, to illustrate the maternal genetic structure and further identify whether mtDNA variation(s) can effect HIV infection among southwest Chinese AIDS group, the whole mtDNA control region sequences of 70 AIDS patients and 480 health individuals from southwest China were analyzed here. Our results indicated the plausible recent genetic admixture results of AIDS group; comparison of matrilineal components between AIDS and matched Han groups showed that mtDNA haplogroup A (p = 0.048, OR = 3.006, 95% CI = 1.109-8.145) has a significant higher difference between the two groups; further comparison illustrated that mtDNA mutations 16,209 (p = 0.046, OR = 2.607, 95% CI = 0.988-6.876) and 16,319 (p = 0.009, OR = 2.965, 95% CI = 1.278-6.876) have significant differences between AIDS and matched control groups, and both of which were the defining variations of mtDNA haplogroup A, they further confirmed that mtDNA haplogroup A may confer genetic susceptibility to AIDS. Our results suggested that haplogroup A may confer a genetic susceptibility to AIDS group from Southwest China.

  14. On Using Surrogates with Genetic Programming.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, Torsten; Branke, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    One way to accelerate evolutionary algorithms with expensive fitness evaluations is to combine them with surrogate models. Surrogate models are efficiently computable approximations of the fitness function, derived by means of statistical or machine learning techniques from samples of fully evaluated solutions. But these models usually require a numerical representation, and therefore cannot be used with the tree representation of genetic programming (GP). In this paper, we present a new way to use surrogate models with GP. Rather than using the genotype directly as input to the surrogate model, we propose using a phenotypic characterization. This phenotypic characterization can be computed efficiently and allows us to define approximate measures of equivalence and similarity. Using a stochastic, dynamic job shop scenario as an example of simulation-based GP with an expensive fitness evaluation, we show how these ideas can be used to construct surrogate models and improve the convergence speed and solution quality of GP.

  15. Post-Bakke Policy Conferences of Administrators of High-Demand Academic Programs. Reports of Eleven Conferences Held September 1978-February 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Council on Education, Washington, DC.

    Information on eleven conferences focusing on post-Bakke policy and sponsored by the American Council on Education for administrators of high-demand programs is presented. An introductory report by Todd Furniss ("Professional Education After Bakke") discusses the rationale for the conferences and examines some of the implications for…

  16. Post-Bakke Policy Conferences of Administrators of High-Demand Academic Programs. Reports of Eleven Conferences Held September 1978-February 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Council on Education, Washington, DC.

    Information on eleven conferences focusing on post-Bakke policy and sponsored by the American Council on Education for administrators of high-demand programs is presented. An introductory report by Todd Furniss ("Professional Education After Bakke") discusses the rationale for the conferences and examines some of the implications for…

  17. National Conference on Manpower Programs for Indians (Kansas City, Missouri, February 15-16, 1967).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Employment Security (DOL), Washington, DC.

    The purposes of the National Conference on Manpower Programs for Indians were: (1) to inform tribal leaders of the total resources and programs available to American Indians; (2) to learn from tribal leaders more about their problems and needs as American citizens; and (3) to create among the participating agencies a keener awareness of the need…

  18. Cablevision for Continuing Education and Community Programs, Conference Presentations (Regina, November 28-29, 1972).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saskatchewan Association for Lifelong Learning.

    The Conference on Cablevision for Continuing Education and Community Programs was held to present the present situation of the development of cablevision in Canada and to indicate some of the future possibilities for its use in continuing education and community programming in Saskatchewan. Following the keynote address, three panels presented…

  19. The Callaway Gardens Conference on Building a Multiyear, Multidisciplinary, High School Science Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee.

    In addition to a summary of the proceedings of the Callaway Gardens Conference attended by selected science educators, scientists, and psychologists, invited papers by Robert Gagne ("The High School Science Program--A Psychologist's Assessment") and Clifford Swartz ("The High School Science Program--A Scientist's Assessment")…

  20. Overseas Programs for Secondary School Students. Report on Regional Conferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, William A., Ed.

    An increase in secondary school overseas study programs is central to the development of program examination and apprisal procedures suggested in this report. Summaries of workshop discussions include: (1) program criteria; (2) participant recruitment, selection, and orientation; (3) short-term versus year-long study abroad programs; (4) role of…

  1. Committee of the Undergraduate Program in Mathematics Geometry Conference, Part III: Geometric Transformation Groups and Other Topics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durst, Lincoln K., Ed.

    This is Part III of the first volume of the proceedings of the Committee on the Undergraduate Program in Mathematics (CUPM) Geometry Conference, held at Santa Barbara in June, 1967. The purpose of the conference was to consider the status of geometry in colleges at the undergraduate level. The conference, attended by undergraduate mathematics…

  2. The Imaging and Cognition Genetics Conference 2011, ICG 2011: A Meeting of Minds

    PubMed Central

    Le Hellard, Stéphanie; Hanson, Isabel

    2012-01-01

    In June 2011, 70 researchers from the disciplines of cognitive science, genetics, psychology, psychiatry, neurobiology, and computer science gathered in Os, Norway, for the first Imaging and Cognition Genetics meeting. The aim of the conference was to discuss progress, enhance collaboration, and maximize the sharing of resources within this new field. In this Perspective, we summarize the major themes that emerged from ICG 2011. The first is the importance of defining cognitive and imaging phenotypes and endophenotypes suitable for genetic analysis. These can come from differential psychology, cognitive science, structural MRI, tractography, and functional imaging. The second theme is the emergence of new methods for the analysis of complex traits. These include advanced computational and statistical techniques for analyzing complex datasets, and new ways of interpreting data from genome-wide association studies, such as jointly evaluating the contribution of SNPs in specific genes and pathways rather than considering single SNPs in isolation. The final theme is the importance of establishing functional correlates of newly identified genetic variants. PMID:22654732

  3. Disability rights in dialogue with clinical genetics conference, May 31 to June 2, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    The issue of prenatal diagnosis and selective abortion has been hotly debated in the medical, genetic counselling, feminist, parents, disability rights and bio-ethics literature, each of the various positions critiquing each other. People from the disability rights community in particular have began to articulate a critical view of the practice of widespread prenatal diagnosis with intent to abort because the pregnancy might result in a child with a disability. Unfortunately, people from the various disciplines and perspectives, such as bioethics, disability rights, feminism and so forth, by and large, have tended only to write for themselves and their colleagues. Few people have crossed disciplines to try to talk to people with other views. The rapid advances of genome research have continued to produce new prenatal tests, raising many complex ethical questions regarding the applications of prenatal testing. But the widely disparate positions of the various factions has made it difficult to move toward formulation of public policy change necessary to encompass these new genetic technologies. Genetic counselling is in the front lines of the controversial social and ethical issues arising from prenatal diagnosis, in its interface between medical science and the consumer of services. The primary intent of the conference was to invite and facilitate productive dialogue between individuals and groups of people who have traditionally not interacted as a result of their disparate views on these issues and to learn from this process, emphasizing the involvement of people with disabilities and people who work in clinical genetics.

  4. The Imaging and Cognition Genetics Conference 2011, ICG 2011: A Meeting of Minds.

    PubMed

    Le Hellard, Stéphanie; Hanson, Isabel

    2012-01-01

    In June 2011, 70 researchers from the disciplines of cognitive science, genetics, psychology, psychiatry, neurobiology, and computer science gathered in Os, Norway, for the first Imaging and Cognition Genetics meeting. The aim of the conference was to discuss progress, enhance collaboration, and maximize the sharing of resources within this new field. In this Perspective, we summarize the major themes that emerged from ICG 2011. The first is the importance of defining cognitive and imaging phenotypes and endophenotypes suitable for genetic analysis. These can come from differential psychology, cognitive science, structural MRI, tractography, and functional imaging. The second theme is the emergence of new methods for the analysis of complex traits. These include advanced computational and statistical techniques for analyzing complex datasets, and new ways of interpreting data from genome-wide association studies, such as jointly evaluating the contribution of SNPs in specific genes and pathways rather than considering single SNPs in isolation. The final theme is the importance of establishing functional correlates of newly identified genetic variants.

  5. Genetic Associations With White Matter Hyperintensities Confer Risk of Lacunar Stroke.

    PubMed

    Traylor, Matthew; Rutten-Jacobs, Loes C A; Thijs, Vincent; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Levi, Chris; Bevan, Steve; Malik, Rainer; Boncoraglio, Giorgio; Sudlow, Cathie; Rothwell, Peter M; Dichgans, Martin; Markus, Hugh S

    2016-05-01

    White matter hyperintensities (WMH) are increased in patients with lacunar stroke. Whether this is because of shared pathogenesis remains unknown. Using genetic data, we evaluated whether WMH-associated genetic susceptibility factors confer risk of lacunar stroke, and therefore whether they share pathogenesis. We used a genetic risk score approach to test whether single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with WMH in community populations were associated with magnetic resonance imaging-confirmed lacunar stroke (n=1,373), as well as cardioembolic (n=1,331) and large vessel (n=1,472) Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment subtypes, against 9,053 controls. Second, we separated lacunar strokes into those with WMH (n=568) and those without (n=787) and tested for association with the risk score in these 2 groups. In addition, we evaluated whether WMH-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms are associated with lacunar stroke, or in the 2 groups. The WMH genetic risk score was associated with lacunar stroke (odds ratio [OR; 95% confidence interval [CI

  6. Genetic Associations With White Matter Hyperintensities Confer Risk of Lacunar Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Rutten-Jacobs, Loes C.A.; Thijs, Vincent; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Levi, Chris; Bevan, Steve; Malik, Rainer; Boncoraglio, Giorgio; Sudlow, Cathie; Rothwell, Peter M.; Dichgans, Martin; Markus, Hugh S.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose— White matter hyperintensities (WMH) are increased in patients with lacunar stroke. Whether this is because of shared pathogenesis remains unknown. Using genetic data, we evaluated whether WMH-associated genetic susceptibility factors confer risk of lacunar stroke, and therefore whether they share pathogenesis. Methods— We used a genetic risk score approach to test whether single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with WMH in community populations were associated with magnetic resonance imaging–confirmed lacunar stroke (n=1,373), as well as cardioembolic (n=1,331) and large vessel (n=1,472) Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment subtypes, against 9,053 controls. Second, we separated lacunar strokes into those with WMH (n=568) and those without (n=787) and tested for association with the risk score in these 2 groups. In addition, we evaluated whether WMH-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms are associated with lacunar stroke, or in the 2 groups. Results— The WMH genetic risk score was associated with lacunar stroke (odds ratio [OR; 95% confidence interval [CI

  7. Guidelines on the use of molecular genetics in reintroduction programs

    Treesearch

    Michael K. Schwartz

    2005-01-01

    The use of molecular genetics can play a key role in reintroduction efforts. Prior to the introduction of any individuals, molecular genetics can be used to identify the most appropriate source population for the reintroduction, ensure that no relic populations exist in the reintroduction area, and guide captive breeding programs. The use of molecular genetics post-...

  8. Solving Classification Problems Using Genetic Programming Algorithms on GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cano, Alberto; Zafra, Amelia; Ventura, Sebastián

    Genetic Programming is very efficient in problem solving compared to other proposals but its performance is very slow when the size of the data increases. This paper proposes a model for multi-threaded Genetic Programming classification evaluation using a NVIDIA CUDA GPUs programming model to parallelize the evaluation phase and reduce computational time. Three different well-known Genetic Programming classification algorithms are evaluated using the parallel evaluation model proposed. Experimental results using UCI Machine Learning data sets compare the performance of the three classification algorithms in single and multithreaded Java, C and CUDA GPU code. Results show that our proposal is much more efficient.

  9. qnrA6 genetic environment and quinolone resistance conferred on Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Jayol, Aurélie; Janvier, Frédéric; Guillard, Thomas; Chau, Françoise; Mérens, Audrey; Robert, Jérôme; Fantin, Bruno; Berçot, Béatrice; Cambau, Emmanuelle

    2016-04-01

    To determine the genetic location and environment of the qnrA6 gene in Proteus mirabilis PS16 where it was first described and to characterize the quinolone resistance qnrA6 confers. Transformation experiments and Southern blotting were performed for plasmid and genomic DNA of P. mirabilis PS16 to determine the qnrA6 location. Combinatorial PCRs with primers in qnrA6 and genes usually surrounding qnrA genes were used to determine the genetic environment. The qnrA6 coding region, including or not the promoter region, was cloned into vectors pTOPO and pBR322 and the MICs of six quinolones were measured for transformants of Escherichia coli TOP10 and P. mirabilis ATCC 29906 Rif(R). qnrA6 was shown to be chromosomally encoded in P. mirabilis PS16 and its genetic environment was 81%-87% similar to that of qnrA2 in the Shewanella algae chromosome. The 5138 bp region up- and downstream of qnrA6 contained an IS10 sequence surrounded by two ISCR1. This resulted in qnrA6 being displaced 1.9 kb from its native promoter but supplied a promoter present in ISCR1. qnrA6 cloned into pTOPO and pBR322 conferred a 4-32-fold increase in fluoroquinolone MICs when expressed in E. coli but only 2-3-fold in P. mirabilis. When including the promoter region, a further increase in resistance was observed in both species, reaching MIC values above clinical breakpoints for only P. mirabilis. qnrA6 is the first chromosomally located qnrA gene described in Enterobacteriaceae. The quinolone resistance conferred by qnrA6 depends on the proximity of an efficient promoter and the host strain where it is expressed. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Conference on Singlet Molecular Oxygen (COSMO 84), program and abstracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, B.

    1984-09-01

    The Conference objective was to promote interdisciplinary awareness and communication by assembling research workers in such diverse fields as photochemistry, photophysics, synthetic chemistry, photobiology, photomedicine, laser and atmospheric physics; and to present their recent findings with singlet molecular oxygen as the common theme. This was prompted by several recent developments: notably the direct observation of 02 superscript 1 micron g in emission at 1.27 microns which now provides solvent-dependent life-times, reaction or quenching rate constants, and sensitized yields directly; the trapping of zwitterionic intermediates and the role of catalysts in electron transfer peroxidation; the feasibility of a singlet oxygen-iodine chemical laser; direct observation of 02 microns g in enzymic processes; the use of endoperoxides as actinometers; the phototherapy of malignant tumors; prospects for 02 superscript 1 delta g as a solar energy storage intermediate.

  11. Mitochondrial DNA haplogroup confers genetic susceptibility to nasopharyngeal carcinoma in Chaoshanese from Guangdong, China.

    PubMed

    Hu, Sheng-Ping; Du, Ju-Ping; Li, De-Rui; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have shown association of mtDNA background with cancer development. We analyzed mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region variation of 201 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and of 201 normal controls from Chaoshan Han Chinese to discern mtDNA haplogroup effect on the disease onset. Binary logistic regression analysis with adjustment for gender and age revealed that the haplogroup R9 (P = 0.011, OR = 1.91, 95% CI = 1.16-3.16), particularly its sub-haplogroup F1 (P = 0.015, OR = 2.43, 95% CI = 1.18-5.00), were associated significantly with increased NPC risk. These haplogroups were further confirmed to confer high NPC risk in males and/or individuals ≥ 40 years of age, but not in females or in subjects <40 years old. Our results indicated that mtDNA background confers genetic susceptibility to NPC in Chaoshan Han Chinese, and R9, particularly its sub-haplogroup F1, is a risk factor for NPC.

  12. Mitochondrial DNA Haplogroup Confers Genetic Susceptibility to Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma in Chaoshanese from Guangdong, China

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Sheng-Ping; Du, Ju-Ping; Li, De-Rui; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have shown association of mtDNA background with cancer development. We analyzed mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region variation of 201 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and of 201 normal controls from Chaoshan Han Chinese to discern mtDNA haplogroup effect on the disease onset. Binary logistic regression analysis with adjustment for gender and age revealed that the haplogroup R9 (P = 0.011, OR = 1.91, 95% CI = 1.16–3.16), particularly its sub-haplogroup F1 (P = 0.015, OR = 2.43, 95% CI = 1.18–5.00), were associated significantly with increased NPC risk. These haplogroups were further confirmed to confer high NPC risk in males and/or individuals ≥40 years of age, but not in females or in subjects <40 years old. Our results indicated that mtDNA background confers genetic susceptibility to NPC in Chaoshan Han Chinese, and R9, particularly its sub-haplogroup F1, is a risk factor for NPC. PMID:24498198

  13. 75 FR 80790 - Multi-Family Housing Program 2011 Industry Forums-Open Teleconference and/or Web Conference Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-23

    ... Rural Housing Service Multi-Family Housing Program 2011 Industry Forums--Open Teleconference and/or Web... series of teleconference and/or Web conference meetings regarding the USDA Multi-Family Housing Program. The teleconference and/or Web conference meetings will be scheduled on a quarterly basis, but may be...

  14. Genomics into Healthcare: the 5th Pan Arab Human Genetics Conference and 2013 Golden Helix Symposium.

    PubMed

    Fortina, Paolo; Al Khaja, Najib; Al Ali, Mahmoud Taleb; Hamzeh, Abdul Rezzak; Nair, Pratibha; Innocenti, Federico; Patrinos, George P; Kricka, Larry J

    2014-05-01

    The joint 5th Pan Arab Human Genetics conference and 2013 Golden Helix Symposium, "Genomics into Healthcare" was coorganized by the Center for Arab Genomic Studies (http://www.cags.org.ae) in collaboration with the Golden Helix Foundation (http://www.goldenhelix.org) in Dubai, United Arab Emirates from 17 to 19 November, 2013. The meeting was attended by over 900 participants, doctors and biomedical students from over 50 countries and was organized into a series of nine themed sessions that covered cancer genomics and epigenetics, genomic and epigenetic studies, genomics of blood and metabolic disorders, cytogenetic diagnosis and molecular profiling, next-generation sequencing, consanguinity and hereditary diseases, clinical genomics, clinical applications of pharmacogenomics, and genomics in public health. © 2014 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  15. Genomics into Healthcare: The 5th Pan Arab Human Genetics Conference and 2013 Golden Helix Symposium

    PubMed Central

    Fortina, Paolo; AlKhaja, Najib; Al Ali, Mahmoud Taleb; Hamzeh, Abdul Rezzak; Nair, Pratibha; Innocenti, Federico; Patrinos, George P.; Kricka, Larry J.

    2014-01-01

    The joint 5th Pan Arab Human Genetics conference and 2013 Golden Helix Symposium, “Genomics into Healthcare” was coorganized by the Center for Arab Genomic Studies (http://www.cags.org.ae) in collaboration with the Golden Helix Foundation (http://www.goldenhelix.org) in Dubai, United Arab Emirates from 17 to 19 November, 2013. The meeting was attended by over 900 participants, doctors and biomedical students from over 50 countries and was organized into a series of nine themed sessions that covered cancer genomics and epigenetics, genomic and epigenetic studies, genomics of blood and metabolic disorders, cytogenetic diagnosis and molecular profiling, next-generation sequencing, consanguinity and hereditary diseases, clinical genomics, clinical applications of pharmacogenomics, and genomics in public health. PMID:24526565

  16. Annotated Bibliography on Program Evaluation in Residential Adult Education (Conferences and Institutes).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulich, Jindra, Ed.; And Others

    Designed especially for relative novices in residential adult education conference and institute work, this annotated bibliography covers 29 books, periodical articles, and book chapters. These items have been chosen for practical application or theoretical significance to the evaluation of program design and content and of learning within…

  17. Early Childhood Programs in the States: Report of a December 1972 Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO.

    A report of the first conference on implementing State early childhood programs, sponsored by the ECS Early Childhood Project, is presented. Speeches provided are: (1) "The States Are Moving in Child Development" by Robert E. McNair; (2) "Our Evolving Social Policy for Children: Fact or Fiction" by Edward Zigler; (3) "State Responsibility and…

  18. School Experience in Queensland Pre-Service Teacher Education Programs. 2. Conference Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duck, Greg, Ed.; Cunningham, Debra, Ed.

    This report discusses the third major stage of the Queensland Board of Teacher Education's investigation into the nature of school experiences in preservice teacher education programs in Queensland, Australia. An account is presented of the proceedings of a statewide conference held in September 1984 to discuss results of the survey research…

  19. The Impact of the Seaside Health Education Conference on Middle School Health Programs in Oregon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Girvan, James T.

    This paper presents an evaluation of the Seaside Health Education Conference (SHEC) that, for ten years, has been held yearly for the purpose of promoting health education in Oregon schools by providing in-service programs for teachers. Each school district attending the SHEC comes as a team composed of health educators, other teachers,…

  20. Designing Effective HRD Programs. Symposium 23. [Concurrent Symposium Session at AHRD Annual Conference, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on designing effective human resource development (HRD) programs that was conducted as part of a conference on HRD. "Leveraging System Factors for Increased Training Effectiveness" (David Ripley) is a conceptual paper that critiques current training design models and the lack of…

  1. Seniors' Demographic Correlates for Motivations to Enroll in Degree-Conferring Programs in Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Li-Kuang; Wang, Shan Tair

    2016-01-01

    Policies, practices, and studies have long been focused on nonformal learning for older adults as if this were the only learning context for grey populations. In fact, today more elderly adults participate in degree-conferring programs. It is important to explore why formal learning environments attract the elderly. Therefore, the purpose of this…

  2. Seniors' Demographic Correlates for Motivations to Enroll in Degree-Conferring Programs in Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Li-Kuang; Wang, Shan Tair

    2016-01-01

    Policies, practices, and studies have long been focused on nonformal learning for older adults as if this were the only learning context for grey populations. In fact, today more elderly adults participate in degree-conferring programs. It is important to explore why formal learning environments attract the elderly. Therefore, the purpose of this…

  3. Three-Way Conferences Facilitated by Program Supervisors: Student Teachers' Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Hsiu-Lien

    2011-01-01

    This is a phenomenological study exploring student teachers' perceptions of three-way conferences during student teaching. Two preservice student teachers in the stage of pre-practicum and four in practicum (5 females and 1 male; Caucasians; undergraduates) in an early childhood teacher education program were purposefully selected, interviewed,…

  4. Research and development conference: California Institute for Energy Efficiency (CIEE) program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    CIEE's first Research and Development Conference will introduce you to some of the results achieved to date through CIEE-sponsored multiyear research performed in three programs: building energy efficiency, air quality impacts of energy efficiency, and end-use resource planning. Results from scoping studies, Director's discretionary research, and exploratory research will also be featured.

  5. The Alvey Conference in Edinburgh: A Review of the United Kingdom’s Research Program in Computer Science.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    A conference to review the UK’s Alvey Program of research in computer science was held in Edinburgh from 24 through 27 June 1985. This report summarizes the speakers’ comments about the progress of the Alvey Program.

  6. Adaptable Constrained Genetic Programming: Extensions and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janikow, Cezary Z.

    2005-01-01

    An evolutionary algorithm applies evolution-based principles to problem solving. To solve a problem, the user defines the space of potential solutions, the representation space. Sample solutions are encoded in a chromosome-like structure. The algorithm maintains a population of such samples, which undergo simulated evolution by means of mutation, crossover, and survival of the fittest principles. Genetic Programming (GP) uses tree-like chromosomes, providing very rich representation suitable for many problems of interest. GP has been successfully applied to a number of practical problems such as learning Boolean functions and designing hardware circuits. To apply GP to a problem, the user needs to define the actual representation space, by defining the atomic functions and terminals labeling the actual trees. The sufficiency principle requires that the label set be sufficient to build the desired solution trees. The closure principle allows the labels to mix in any arity-consistent manner. To satisfy both principles, the user is often forced to provide a large label set, with ad hoc interpretations or penalties to deal with undesired local contexts. This unfortunately enlarges the actual representation space, and thus usually slows down the search. In the past few years, three different methodologies have been proposed to allow the user to alleviate the closure principle by providing means to define, and to process, constraints on mixing the labels in the trees. Last summer we proposed a new methodology to further alleviate the problem by discovering local heuristics for building quality solution trees. A pilot system was implemented last summer and tested throughout the year. This summer we have implemented a new revision, and produced a User's Manual so that the pilot system can be made available to other practitioners and researchers. We have also designed, and partly implemented, a larger system capable of dealing with much more powerful heuristics.

  7. Genetic Programming for Automatic Hydrological Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadalawada, Jayashree; Babovic, Vladan

    2017-04-01

    One of the recent challenges for the hydrologic research community is the need for the development of coupled systems that involves the integration of hydrologic, atmospheric and socio-economic relationships. This poses a requirement for novel modelling frameworks that can accurately represent complex systems, given, the limited understanding of underlying processes, increasing volume of data and high levels of uncertainity. Each of the existing hydrological models vary in terms of conceptualization and process representation and is the best suited to capture the environmental dynamics of a particular hydrological system. Data driven approaches can be used in the integration of alternative process hypotheses in order to achieve a unified theory at catchment scale. The key steps in the implementation of integrated modelling framework that is influenced by prior understanding and data, include, choice of the technique for the induction of knowledge from data, identification of alternative structural hypotheses, definition of rules, constraints for meaningful, intelligent combination of model component hypotheses and definition of evaluation metrics. This study aims at defining a Genetic Programming based modelling framework that test different conceptual model constructs based on wide range of objective functions and evolves accurate and parsimonious models that capture dominant hydrological processes at catchment scale. In this paper, GP initializes the evolutionary process using the modelling decisions inspired from the Superflex framework [Fenicia et al., 2011] and automatically combines them into model structures that are scrutinized against observed data using statistical, hydrological and flow duration curve based performance metrics. The collaboration between data driven and physical, conceptual modelling paradigms improves the ability to model and manage hydrologic systems. Fenicia, F., D. Kavetski, and H. H. Savenije (2011), Elements of a flexible approach

  8. USF-1 genetic polymorphisms confer a high risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Wang, Bai-Fang; Tong, Jing; Chang, Bing; Wang, Bing-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms in upstream transcription factor 1 (USF1) were investigated for their links to increased risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in Chinese population. Between January 2013 and April 2014, 174 patients with NAFLD in the First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University were selected for this study. A group of 100 healthy subjects were identified as the control group. The MALDI-TOF-MS, a mass spectrometry based technique, was used to detect USF-1 genetic polymorphisms using PCR amplified DNA products. Furthermore, Automatic Chemistry Analyzer (ACA) was used to determine the clinical indicators. Genotypes, allele frequencies and clinical indicators were measured to assess NAFLD risk in relation to the SNPs. USF-1 rs6427573 genetic polymorphisms were associated with an increased risk of NAFLD (AA vs. GG: OR = 3.16, 95% CI = 1.56-6.43, P = 0.001; GA + AA vs. GG: OR = 1.87, 95% CI = 1.13-3.09, P = 0.015; GG + AA vs. AA: OR = 2.96, 95% CI = 1.49-5.88, P = 0.001; G vs. A: OR = 2.10, 95% CI = 1.43-3.09, P < 0.001). Similarly, rs2516839 polymorphisms also conferred a risk for NAFLD (AA vs. GG: OR = 2.49, 95% CI = 1.43-4.34, P = 0.001; GA + AA vs. GG: OR = 1.69, 95% CI = 1.02-2.78, P = 0.041). On the other hand, rs3737787 and rs2774279 showed no statistical significances in the NAFLD group and control group (P > 0.05). Two USF-1 genetic polymorphisms, rs6427573 and rs2516839, may present an increased risk of NAFLD.

  9. Alternative Living Kidney Donation Programs Boost Genetically Unrelated Donation

    PubMed Central

    Poldervaart, Rosalie A.; Laging, Mirjam; Royaards, Tessa; Kal-van Gestel, Judith A.; van Agteren, Madelon; de Klerk, Marry; Zuidema, Willij; Betjes, Michiel G. H.; Roodnat, Joke I.

    2015-01-01

    Donor-recipient ABO and/or HLA incompatibility used to lead to donor decline. Development of alternative transplantation programs enabled transplantation of incompatible couples. How did that influence couple characteristics? Between 2000 and 2014, 1232 living donor transplantations have been performed. In conventional and ABO-incompatible transplantation the willing donor becomes an actual donor for the intended recipient. In kidney-exchange and domino-donation the donor donates indirectly to the intended recipient. The relationship between the donor and intended recipient was studied. There were 935 conventional and 297 alternative program transplantations. There were 66 ABO-incompatible, 68 domino-paired, 62 kidney-exchange, and 104 altruistic donor transplantations. Waiting list recipients (n = 101) were excluded as they did not bring a living donor. 1131 couples remained of whom 196 participated in alternative programs. Genetically unrelated donors (486) were primarily partners. Genetically related donors (645) were siblings, parents, children, and others. Compared to genetically related couples, almost three times as many genetically unrelated couples were incompatible and participated in alternative programs (P < 0.001). 62% of couples were genetically related in the conventional donation program versus 32% in alternative programs (P < 0.001). Patient and graft survival were not significantly different between recipient programs. Alternative donation programs increase the number of transplantations by enabling genetically unrelated donors to donate. PMID:26421181

  10. Genetic Network Programming with Intron-Like Nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabu, Shingo; Chen, Yan; Eto, Shinji; Shimada, Kaoru; Hirasawa, Kotaro

    Recently, Genetic Network Programming (GNP) has been proposed, which is an extension of Genetic Algorithm(GA) and Genetic Programming(GP). GNP can make compact programs and can memorize the past history in it implicitly, because it expresses the solution by directed graphs and therefore, it can reuse the nodes. In this research, intron-like nodes are introduced for improving the performance of GNP. The aim of introducing intron-like nodes is to use every node as much as possible. It is found from simulations that the intron-like nodes are useful for improving the training speed and generalization ability.

  11. Using genetic programming to discover nonlinear variable interactions.

    PubMed

    Westbury, Chris; Buchanan, Lori; Sanderson, Michael; Rhemtulla, Mijke; Phillips, Leah

    2003-05-01

    Psychology has to deal with many interacting variables. The analyses usually used to uncover such relationships have many constraints that limit their utility. We briefly discuss these and describe recent work that uses genetic programming to evolve equations to combine variables in nonlinear ways in a number of different domains. We focus on four studies of interactions from lexical access experiments and psychometric problems. In all cases, genetic programming described nonlinear combinations of items in a manner that was subsequently independently verified. We discuss the general implications of genetic programming and related computational methods for multivariate problems in psychology.

  12. FKBP52 deficiency–conferred uterine progesterone resistance is genetic background and pregnancy stage specific

    PubMed Central

    Tranguch, Susanne; Wang, Haibin; Daikoku, Takiko; Xie, Huirong; Smith, David F.; Dey, Sudhansu K.

    2007-01-01

    Immunophilin FKBP52 serves as a cochaperone to govern normal progesterone (P4) receptor (PR) function. Using Fkbp52–/– mice, we show intriguing aspects of uterine P4/PR signaling during pregnancy. Implantation failure is the major phenotype found in these null females, which is conserved on both C57BL6/129 and CD1 backgrounds. However, P4 supplementation rescued implantation and subsequent decidualization in CD1, but not C57BL6/129, null females. Surprisingly, experimentally induced decidualization in the absence of blastocysts failed in Fkbp52–/– mice on either background even with P4 supplementation, suggesting that embryonic signals complement uterine signaling for this event. Another interesting finding was that while P4 at higher than normal pregnancy levels conferred PR signaling sufficient for implantation in CD1 null females, these levels were inefficient in maintaining pregnancy to full term. However, elevating P4 levels further restored PR signaling to a level optimal for successful term pregnancy with normal litter size. Collectively, the results show that the indispensability of FKBP52 in uterine P4/PR signaling is a function of genetic disparity and is pregnancy stage specific. Since there is evidence for a correlation between P4 supplementation and reduced risks of P4-resistant recurrent miscarriages and remission of endometriosis, these findings have clinical implications for genetically diverse populations of women. PMID:17571166

  13. Immunochip SNP array identifies novel genetic variants conferring susceptibility to candidaemia.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinod; Cheng, Shih-Chin; Johnson, Melissa D; Smeekens, Sanne P; Wojtowicz, Agnieszka; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos; Karjalainen, Juha; Franke, Lude; Withoff, Sebo; Plantinga, Theo S; van de Veerdonk, Frank L; van der Meer, Jos W M; Joosten, Leo A B; Sokol, Harry; Bauer, Hermann; Herrmann, Bernhard G; Bochud, Pierre-Yves; Marchetti, Oscar; Perfect, John R; Xavier, Ramnik J; Kullberg, Bart Jan; Wijmenga, Cisca; Netea, Mihai G

    2014-09-08

    Candidaemia is the fourth most common cause of bloodstream infection, with a high mortality rate of up to 40%. Identification of host genetic factors that confer susceptibility to candidaemia may aid in designing adjunctive immunotherapeutic strategies. Here we hypothesize that variation in immune genes may predispose to candidaemia. We analyse 118,989 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across 186 loci known to be associated with immune-mediated diseases in the largest candidaemia cohort to date of 217 patients of European ancestry and a group of 11,920 controls. We validate the significant associations by comparison with a disease-matched control group. We observe significant association between candidaemia and SNPs in the CD58 (P = 1.97 × 10(-11); odds ratio (OR) = 4.68), LCE4A-C1orf68 (P = 1.98 × 10(-10); OR = 4.25) and TAGAP (P = 1.84 × 10(-8); OR = 2.96) loci. Individuals carrying two or more risk alleles have an increased risk for candidaemia of 19.4-fold compared with individuals carrying no risk allele. We identify three novel genetic risk factors for candidaemia, which we subsequently validate for their role in antifungal host defence.

  14. Women in Engineering Program Advocates Network (WEPAN): Evaluation of the seventh annual conference

    SciTech Connect

    Brainard, S.G.

    1996-08-01

    The primary goals of the 1996 WEPAN Conference were to: (1) Conduct technical and programmatic seminars for institutions desiring to initiate, replicate, or expand women in engineering programs; (2) Provide assistance in fundraising and grant writing; (3) Profile women in engineering programs of excellence; (4) Sponsor inspiring, knowledgeable and motivational keynote speakers; and, (5) Offer a series of workshops focused on topics such as: establishing partnerships with industry, current research findings, retention strategies, issues affecting special populations, and early intervention techniques. In an effort to provide greater access for women to engineering careers, women in engineering program directors at Purdue University, Stevens Institute of Technology and the University of Washington joined together in 1990 to establish WEPAN, a national network of individuals interested in the recruitment, admission, retention, and graduation of women engineering students. This is the seventh year of operation. Success of this effort has been reflected in numerous ways: increased membership in the organization; increased number of women in engineering programs; increased number of women graduating in engineering; and grants from the U.S. Department of Energy, the National Science Foundation, the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the AT&T Foundation, and many other corporations to carry out the goals of WEPAN. The Seventh Annual Women in Engineering Conference entitled, Capitalizing on Today`s Challenges, was held in Denver, Colorado on June 1-4, 1996 at the Hyatt Regency. The conference brought together representatives from academia, government, and industry and examined current issues and initiatives for women in technology, science, and education. Building on the successes of the previous conferences, the seventh conference offered a new variety of speakers and topics.

  15. 21st International Conference on DNA Computing and Molecular Programming

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-24

    assembly, and that non-local control enhances our ability to perform computation and algorithmically self-assemble structures from small input...NUMBER Peng Yin, Will iam Shih, Sungwook Woo 1000000566 Se. TASK NUMBER Sf. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8... PERFORMING ORGANIZATION President and Fellows of Harvard College REPORT NUMBER Sponsored Programs Administration 25 Shattuck St 167915 Boston, MA

  16. Guiding Genetic Program Based Data Mining Using Fuzzy Rules

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    A data mining procedure for automatic determination of fuzzy decision tree structure using a genetic program is discussed. A genetic program (GP) is...an algorithm that evolves other algorithms or mathematical expressions. Methods for accelerating convergence of the data mining procedure are examined...Connections to past GP based data mining procedures for evolving fuzzy decision trees are established. Finally, experimental methods that have been used to validate the data mining algorithm are discussed.

  17. Biotech 101: an educational outreach program in genetics and biotechnology.

    PubMed

    East, Kelly M; Hott, Adam M; Callanan, Nancy P; Lamb, Neil E

    2012-10-01

    Recent advances in research and biotechnology are making genetics and genomics increasingly relevant to the lives and health of the general public. For the public to make informed healthcare and public policy decisions relating to genetic information, there is a need for increased genetic literacy. Biotech 101 is a free, short-course for the local community introducing participants to topics in genetics, genomics, and biotechnology, created at the HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology. This study evaluated the effectiveness of Biotech 101 in increasing the genetic literacy of program participants through pre-and-post surveys. Genetic literacy was measured through increases in self-perceived knowledge for each content area covered through the course and the self-reported impact the course had on various aspects of participants' lives. Three hundred ninety-two individuals attended Biotech 101 during the first three course offerings. Participants reported a significant increase in self-perceived knowledge for each content area (p < 0.01). Participants also reported the program had high levels of impact on their lives and decision-making, a high likelihood for continued self-learning, and overwhelming satisfaction with course content and logistics. Biotech 101 is an effective mechanism for impacting participants' lives and genetic literacy and serves as a model for other similar programs, adding to the currently limited evidence base regarding public educational strategies in genetics and biotechnology.

  18. National Conference on Pre-Release. A Symposium on Adult Offender Programs, Halfway House, Pre-Release, and Work Release.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killinger, George G., Ed.; And Others

    Seventy-four participants attended the 4-day National Conference on Pre-Release Programs for a symposium on adult offender programs. Presentations heard included: (1) "Halfway House Programs--A National Overview" by O.J. Keller, Jr., (2) "The Evolving Program of a Privately Operated Halfway House" by Robert P. Taylor, (3) "The Employment Program…

  19. Genetic conservation in applied tree breeding programs.

    Treesearch

    R. Johnson; B. St. Clair; S. Lipow

    2001-01-01

    This paper reviews how population size and structure impacts the maintenance of genetic variation in breeding and gene resource populations. We discuss appropriate population sizes for low frequency alleles and point out some examples of low frequency alleles in the literature. Development of appropriate breeding populations and gene resource populations are discussed...

  20. Fourth conference on radiation protection and dosimetry: Proceedings, program, and abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Casson, W.H.; Thein, C.M.; Bogard, J.S.

    1994-10-01

    This Conference is the fourth in a series of conferences organized by staff members of Oak Ridge National Laboratory in an effort to improve communication in the field of radiation protection and dosimetry. Scientists, regulators, managers, professionals, technologists, and vendors from the United States and countries around the world have taken advantage of this opportunity to meet with their contemporaries and peers in order to exchange information and ideas. The program includes over 100 papers in 9 sessions, plus an additional session for works in progress. Papers are presented in external dosimetry, internal dosimetry, radiation protection programs and assessments, developments in instrumentation and materials, environmental and medical applications, and on topics related to standards, accreditation, and calibration. Individual papers are indexed separately on EDB.

  1. Aging is not programmed: genetic pseudo-program is a shadow of developmental growth.

    PubMed

    Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2013-12-15

    Aging is not and cannot be programmed. Instead, aging is a continuation of developmental growth, driven by genetic pathways such as mTOR. Ironically, this is often misunderstood as a sort of programmed aging. In contrast, aging is a purposeless quasi-program or, figuratively, a shadow of actual programs.

  2. Discovering Hidden Resources: Partners and Volunteers--Assistive Technology Reuse Programs. Conference Proceedings (Decatur, Georgia, May 1-2, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RESNA: Association for the Advancement of Rehabilitation Technology, Arlington, VA.

    This brief paper summarizes proceedings of a May 2000 conference, Discovering Hidden Resources: Partners and Volunteers--Assistive Technology Reuse Programs, hosted by the Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology Society of North America. The conference focused on different approaches for involving corporate and private partners in…

  3. Report on Student Work Programs Leadership Conference at Berry College (Mount Berry, Georgia, October 4-5, 1982).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rock, Maxine

    A conference was held for college presidents, student work supervisors, and students who are involved in student-work programs. Attending the conference were representatives of the following colleges: Alice Lloyd College, Pippa Passes, Kentucky; Berea College, Berea, Kentucky; Berry College, Mount Berry, Georgia; Bethune-Cookman College, Daytona…

  4. Annual Pennsylvania Conference on Postsecondary Occupational Education: Programming Postsecondary Occupational Education. (Ninth, Pennsylvania State University, September 28-29, 1977).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martorana, S. V., Ed.; And Others

    This publication contains the text of the main presentations and the highlights of discussion groups from the Ninth Annual Pennsylvania Conference on Postsecondary Occupational Education. The conference theme was "Programming Postsecondary Occupational Education." Ewald Nyquist, the first speaker, delineated the problems faced by…

  5. Issues in NASA program and project management. Special Report: 1993 conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, ED (Editor); Kishiyama, Jenny S. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    This volume is the seventh in an ongoing series on aerospace project management at NASA. Articles in this volume cover the 1993 Conference: perspectives in NASA program/project management; the best job in aerospace; improvements in project management at NASA; strategic planning...mapping the way to NASA's future; new NASA procurement initiatives; international cooperation; and industry, government and university partnership. A section on resources for NASA managers rounds out the publication.

  6. Immunochip SNP array identifies novel genetic variants conferring susceptibility to candidemia

    PubMed Central

    Smeekens, Sanne P.; Wojtowicz, Agnieszka; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos; Karjalainen, Juha; Franke, Lude; Withoff, Sebo; Plantinga, Theo S.; van de Veerdonk, Frank L.; van der Meer, Jos W.M.; Joosten, Leo A.B.; Bochud, Pierre-Yves; Marchetti, Oscar; Perfect, John R.; Xavier, Ramnik; Kullberg, Bart Jan; Wijmenga, Cisca; Netea, Mihai G.

    2016-01-01

    Candidemia is the fourth most common cause of bloodstream infection, with a high mortality rate of up to 40%. Identification of host genetic factors that confer susceptibility to candidemia may aid in designing adjunctive immunotherapeutic strategies. We hypothesized that variation in immune genes may predispose to candidemia. We analyzed 118,989 SNPs across 186 loci known to be associated with immune-mediated diseases in the largest candidemia cohort to date of 217 patients of European ancestry and a group of 11,920 controls. The significant associations were validated by comparison with a disease-matched control group. We observed significant association between candidemia and SNPs in the CD58 (P = 1.97×10−11; OR = 4.68), LCE4A-C1orf68 (P = 1.98×10−10; OR = 4.25) and TAGAP (P = 1.84×10−8; OR = 2.96) loci. Individuals carrying two or more risk alleles had an increased risk for candidemia of 19.4-fold compared to individuals carrying no risk allele. While latent cornified envelope (LCE) genes contribute to mucosal integrity, the role of CD58 and TAGAP in host defense is unknown. Studies using transcriptomics, pathway analysis, and immunological validation showed that CD58 plays a role in the recognition and phagocytosis of Candida by macrophages, while TAGAP was involved in Candida-induced cytokine production. TAGAP-deficient mice were more susceptible to systemic Candida infection. We identified three novel genetic risk factors for candidemia, which we subsequently validated for their role in antifungal host defense. PMID:25197941

  7. Combined Genetic Biomarkers Confer Susceptibility to Risk of Urothelial Bladder Carcinoma in a Saudi Population

    PubMed Central

    Nassir, Anmar; Saada, Hesham; Dannoun, Anas; Qoqandi, Omar; Alsharif, Ammar; Tayeb, Mohammed Taher

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated the associations between seven single nucleotide polymorphisms and susceptibility to urothelial bladder carcinoma (UBC) in a Saudi population. Genomic DNA was taken from buccal cells of 52 patients with UBC and 104 controls for genotyping of GSTT1, GSTM1, rs4646903, rs1048943, TP53 rs1042522, rs1801133, and rs1801394 using PCR and TaqMan® assays. The rs1801133 and rs1801394 variants showed strong associations with UBC (OR = 2.3, P = 0.0002; OR = 2.6, P = 0.0001, resp.). Homozygosity of Pro72 conferred a significant double risk in cases compared with controls (30.8% versus 15.4%), but the homozygote Arg/Arg had no effect on risk. Genotypic combinations of GSTM1/GSTT1, rs4646903/rs1048943, and rs1801133/rs1801394 exhibited significant linkage with the disease (χ2 = 10.3, P = 0.006; χ2 = 13.9, P = 0.003; and χ2 = 20.4, P = 0.0004, resp.). The GSTM1 and rs1042522Arg and rs1801394G variant alleles were more frequent in current smokers with UBC (52.4%, 52.5%, and 64.3%, resp.) than were the corresponding wild-types. Despite some variants having only a slight effect on UBC risk, the interaction effect of combined genetic biomarkers—or even the presence of one copy of a variant allele—is potentially much greater. Perhaps more studies regarding next-generation genetic sequencing and its utility can add to the risk of UBC. PMID:28348449

  8. Common variants of OPA1 conferring genetic susceptibility to leprosy in Han Chinese from Southwest China.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yang-Lin; Zhang, Deng-Feng; Wang, Dong; Li, Yu-Ye; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2015-11-01

    Leprosy is an ancient chronic infection caused by Mycobacterium leprae. Onset of leprosy was highly affected by host nutritional condition and energy production, (partially) due to genomic loss and parasitic life style of M. leprae. The optic atrophy 1 (OPA1) gene plays an essential role in mitochondria, which function in cellular energy supply and innate immunity. To investigate the potential involvement of OPA1 in leprosy. We analyzed 7 common genetic variants of OPA1 in 1110 Han Chinese subjects with and without leprosy, followed by mRNA expression profiling and protein-protein interaction (PPI) network analysis. We observed positive associations between OPA1 variants rs9838374 (Pgenotypic=0.003) and rs414237 (Pgenotypic=0.002) with lepromatous leprosy. expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analysis showed that the leprosy-related risk allele C of rs414237 is correlated with lower OPA1 mRNA expression level. Indeed, we identified a decrease of OPA1 mRNA expression in both with patients and cellular model of leprosy. In addition, the PPI analysis showed that OPA1 protein was actively involved in the interaction network of M. leprae induced differentially expressed genes. Our results indicated that OPA1 variants confer risk of leprosy and may affect OPA1 expression, mitochondrial function and antimicrobial pathways. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A Conference on Planning for Documentation and the National Conference Follow-up Program (Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, February 1979).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dansker, Judith

    This document reports on the activities of the Southeastern Teacher Corps Network's 1979 conference on planning for the documentation and follow-up survey of educational conferences. Topics discussed at the meeting include developing the skills and operational procedures for documentation processes in Network organizations, and developing the…

  10. Report of a National Conference on Home Start and Other Programs for Parents and Children (National Conference on Home-Based Child Development Programs, St. Louis, Missouri, March 18-21, 1975).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Child Development (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    This report of the National Conference on Home-Based Child Development Programs is intended to serve as a resource document to people interested in developmental programs for parents and children. The report includes (1) a summary of Home Start evaluation findings; (2) brief descriptions of programs such as Dr. Ira Gordon's Florida Parent…

  11. Solving deterministic non-linear programming problem using Hopfield artificial neural network and genetic programming techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasant, P.; Ganesan, T.; Elamvazuthi, I.

    2012-11-01

    A fairly reasonable result was obtained for non-linear engineering problems using the optimization techniques such as neural network, genetic algorithms, and fuzzy logic independently in the past. Increasingly, hybrid techniques are being used to solve the non-linear problems to obtain better output. This paper discusses the use of neuro-genetic hybrid technique to optimize the geological structure mapping which is known as seismic survey. It involves the minimization of objective function subject to the requirement of geophysical and operational constraints. In this work, the optimization was initially performed using genetic programming, and followed by hybrid neuro-genetic programming approaches. Comparative studies and analysis were then carried out on the optimized results. The results indicate that the hybrid neuro-genetic hybrid technique produced better results compared to the stand-alone genetic programming method.

  12. Mendelian genetics: Paradigm, conjecture, or research program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, V.; Brouwer, W.

    Kuhn's model of the structure of scientific revolutions, Popper's hypothetic-deductive model of science, and Lakatos's methodology of competing research programs are applied to a historical episode in biology. Each of these three models offers a different explanatory system for the development, neglect, and eventual acceptance of Mendel's paradigm of inheritance. The authors conclude that both rational and nonrational criteria play an important role during times of crisis in science, when different research programs compete for acceptance. It is suggested that Kuhn's model, emphasizing the nonrational basis of science, and Popper's model, emphasizing the rational basis of science, can be used fruitfully in high school science courses.

  13. Mendelian Genetics: Paradigm, Conjecture, or Research Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oldham, V.; Brouwer, W.

    1984-01-01

    Applies Kuhn's model of the structure of scientific revolutions, Popper's hypothetic-deductive model of science, and Lakatos' methodology of competing research programs to a historical biological episode. Suggests using Kuhn's model (emphasizing the nonrational basis of science) and Popper's model (emphasizing the rational basis of science) in…

  14. Mendelian Genetics: Paradigm, Conjecture, or Research Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oldham, V.; Brouwer, W.

    1984-01-01

    Applies Kuhn's model of the structure of scientific revolutions, Popper's hypothetic-deductive model of science, and Lakatos' methodology of competing research programs to a historical biological episode. Suggests using Kuhn's model (emphasizing the nonrational basis of science) and Popper's model (emphasizing the rational basis of science) in…

  15. Primer on Molecular Genetics; DOE Human Genome Program

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    1992-04-01

    This report is taken from the April 1992 draft of the DOE Human Genome 1991--1992 Program Report, which is expected to be published in May 1992. The primer is intended to be an introduction to basic principles of molecular genetics pertaining to the genome project. The material contained herein is not final and may be incomplete. Techniques of genetic mapping and DNA sequencing are described.

  16. Primer on molecular genetics. DOE Human Genome Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    This report is taken from the April 1992 draft of the DOE Human Genome 1991--1992 Program Report, which is expected to be published in May 1992. The primer is intended to be an introduction to basic principles of molecular genetics pertaining to the genome project. The material contained herein is not final and may be incomplete. Techniques of genetic mapping and DNA sequencing are described.

  17. SPAGHETTI: simulation software to test genetic mapping programs.

    PubMed

    Tinker, Nicholas A

    2010-01-01

    SPAGHETTI is a computer program to simulate genetic populations with segregating molecular markers that are influenced by "real-life" complications such as duplicated loci and segregation distortion. It produces output that is readable by popular mapping software, and it can be used to demonstrate or test methods for constructing genetic linkage maps. The source code, sample files, instructions for use, and an executable version compatible with MS Windows are available for free from http://gnomad.agr.ca/software/spaghetti.

  18. Catchcopy Creation Support System Using Electronic Dictionary and Genetic Programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsudaira, Tomomi; Hagiwara, Masafumi

    In this paper, we propose a catchcopy creation support system. In respect of a vocabulary and getting an idea, it is difficult for inexperienced people to make a catch copy. This system will support users from these points. In the system, EDR electronic dictionary and Genetic Programming are employed. EDR electronic dictionary which has large-scale knowledge is used as a knowledge base. Genetic programing is used to make catchcopy using some words chosen by user. Proposed system requires arbitrary number of words as an input, and shows words relevant to the input. User chooses words from displayed words. Candidates of catchcopy are made by genetic programing algorithm using chosen words. We implemented a catchcopy creation support system from a viewpoint of a way-of-thinking support tool.

  19. A Model Program for Translational Medicine in Epilepsy Genetics.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lacey A; Ullmann, Jeremy F P; Olson, Heather E; Achkar, Christelle M El; Truglio, Gessica; Kelly, McKenna; Rosen-Sheidley, Beth; Poduri, Annapurna

    2017-03-01

    Recent technological advances in gene sequencing have led to a rapid increase in gene discovery in epilepsy. However, the ability to assess pathogenicity of variants, provide functional analysis, and develop targeted therapies has not kept pace with rapid advances in sequencing technology. Thus, although clinical genetic testing may lead to a specific molecular diagnosis for some patients, test results often lead to more questions than answers. As the field begins to focus on therapeutic applications of genetic diagnoses using precision medicine, developing processes that offer more than equivocal test results is essential. The success of precision medicine in epilepsy relies on establishing a correct genetic diagnosis, analyzing functional consequences of genetic variants, screening potential therapeutics in the preclinical laboratory setting, and initiating targeted therapy trials for patients. The authors describe the structure of a comprehensive, pediatric Epilepsy Genetics Program that can serve as a model for translational medicine in epilepsy.

  20. Proceedings of the Seventh Annual Summer Conference. NASA/USRA: University Advanced Design Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Advanced Design Program (ADP) is a unique program that brings together students and faculty from U.S. engineering schools with engineers from the NASA centers through integration of current and future NASA space and aeronautics projects into university engineering design curriculum. The Advanced Space Design Program study topics cover a broad range of projects that could be undertaken during a 20-30 year period beginning with the deployment of the Space Station Freedom. The Advanced Aeronautics Design Program study topics typically focus on nearer-term projects of interest to NASA, covering from small, slow-speed vehicles through large, supersonic passenger transports and on through hypersonic research vehicles. Student work accomplished during the 1990-91 academic year and reported at the 7th Annual Summer Conference is presented.

  1. Polyglot programming in applications used for genetic data analysis.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Robert M

    2014-01-01

    Applications used for the analysis of genetic data process large volumes of data with complex algorithms. High performance, flexibility, and a user interface with a web browser are required by these solutions, which can be achieved by using multiple programming languages. In this study, I developed a freely available framework for building software to analyze genetic data, which uses C++, Python, JavaScript, and several libraries. This system was used to build a number of genetic data processing applications and it reduced the time and costs of development.

  2. Polyglot Programming in Applications Used for Genetic Data Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Applications used for the analysis of genetic data process large volumes of data with complex algorithms. High performance, flexibility, and a user interface with a web browser are required by these solutions, which can be achieved by using multiple programming languages. In this study, I developed a freely available framework for building software to analyze genetic data, which uses C++, Python, JavaScript, and several libraries. This system was used to build a number of genetic data processing applications and it reduced the time and costs of development. PMID:25197633

  3. Summary of the planning, management, and evaluation process for the Geothermal Program Review VI conference

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-10-01

    The purpose of this document is to present an overview of the planning, facilitation, and evaluation process used to conduct the Geothermal Program Review VI (PR VI) conference. This document was also prepared to highlight lessons learned from PR VI and, by utilizing the evaluation summaries and recommendations, be used as a planning tool for PR VII. The conference, entitled Beyond Goals and Objectives,'' was sponsored by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Geothermal Technology Division (GTD), PR VI was held in San Francisco, California on April 19--21, 1988 and was attended by 127 participants. PR VI was held in conjunction with the National Geothermal Association's (NGA) Industry Round Table. This document presents a brief summary of the activities, responsibilities, and resources for implementing the PR VI meeting and provides recommendations, checklists, and a proposed schedule for assisting in planning PR VII.

  4. Genetic Evolution of Shape-Altering Programs for Supersonic Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennelly, Robert A., Jr.; Bencze, Daniel P. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Two constrained shape optimization problems relevant to aerodynamics are solved by genetic programming, in which a population of computer programs evolves automatically under pressure of fitness-driven reproduction and genetic crossover. Known optimal solutions are recovered using a small, naive set of elementary operations. Effectiveness is improved through use of automatically defined functions, especially when one of them is capable of a variable number of iterations, even though the test problems lack obvious exploitable regularities. An attempt at evolving new elementary operations was only partially successful.

  5. Algorithmic Trading with Developmental and Linear Genetic Programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Garnett; Banzhaf, Wolfgang

    A developmental co-evolutionary genetic programming approach (PAM DGP) and a standard linear genetic programming (LGP) stock trading systemare applied to a number of stocks across market sectors. Both GP techniques were found to be robust to market fluctuations and reactive to opportunities associated with stock price rise and fall, with PAMDGP generating notably greater profit in some stock trend scenarios. Both algorithms were very accurate at buying to achieve profit and selling to protect assets, while exhibiting bothmoderate trading activity and the ability to maximize or minimize investment as appropriate. The content of the trading rules produced by both algorithms are also examined in relation to stock price trend scenarios.

  6. Proceedings of the Ninth Annual Summer Conference: NASA/USRA University Advanced Aeronautics Design Program and Advanced Space Design Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The NASA/USRA University Advanced Design Program was established in 1984 as an attempt to add more and better design education to primarily undergraduate engineering programs. The original focus of the pilot program encompassing nine universities and five NASA centers was on space design. Two years later, the program was expanded to include aeronautics design with six universities and three NASA centers participating. This year marks the last of a three-year cycle of participation by forty-one universities, eight NASA centers, and one industry participant. The Advanced Space Design Program offers universities an opportunity to plan and design missions and hardware that would be of usc in the future as NASA enters a new era of exploration and discovery, while the Advanced Aeronautics Design Program generally offers opportunities for study of design problems closer to the present time, ranging from small, slow-speed vehicles to large, supersonic and hypersonic passenger transports. The systems approach to the design problem is emphasized in both the space and aeronautics projects. The student teams pursue the chosen problem during their senior year in a one- or two-semester capstone design course and submit a comprehensive written report at the conclusion of the project. Finally, student representatives from each of the universities summarize their work in oral presentations at the Annual Summer Conference, sponsored by one of the NASA centers and attended by the university faculty, NASA and USRA personnel and aerospace industry representatives. As the Advanced Design Program has grown in size, it has also matured in terms of the quality of the student projects. The present volume represents the student work accomplished during the 1992-1993 academic year reported at the Ninth Annual Summer Conference hosted by NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, June 14-18, 1993.

  7. Mitochondrial DNA haplogroup B5 confers genetic susceptibility to Alzheimer's disease in Han Chinese.

    PubMed

    Bi, Rui; Zhang, Wen; Yu, Dandan; Li, Xiao; Wang, Hui-Zhen; Hu, Qiu-Xiang; Zhang, Chen; Lu, Weihong; Ni, Jianliang; Fang, Yiru; Li, Tao; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2015-03-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been widely reported in psychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases. We aimed to investigate the association between matrilineal structures of Han Chinese populations and Alzheimer's disease (AD) by a 2-stage case-control study: A total of 341 AD patients and 435 normal individuals from Southwest China were analyzed for mitochondrial DNA sequence variations and were classified into respective haplogroups. A total of 371 AD patients and 470 normal individuals from East China, as validation samples, were genotyped for the variants defining the risk haplogroup. Haplogroup B5 had a significantly higher frequency in AD patients (7.33%) than in control subjects (3.68%) from Southwest China, and we found a similar pattern of higher frequency of B5 in patients in the case-control sample from East China. In the combined population, association of haplogroup B5 with AD risk was strengthened (p = 0.02; odds ratio = 1.74; 95% confidence interval = 1.10-2.76). In lymphoblastoid cell lines belonging to haplogroup B5a, we observed significantly increased reactive oxygen species and decreased mitochondrial mass. Hela cells with stable expression of the MT-ATP6 gene with B5-defining variant m.8584G>A also showed a significantly decreased mitochondrial function. Taken together, our results indicated that haplogroup B5 conferred genetic susceptibility to AD in Han Chinese, and this effect was most likely mediated by ancient variant m.8584G>A. The predisposing effect of B5 to AD is consistent with the ancestral-susceptibility model of complex diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A discrete genetic locus confers xyloglucan metabolism in select human gut Bacteroidetes

    PubMed Central

    Larsbrink, Johan; Rogers, Theresa E.; Hemsworth, Glyn R.; McKee, Lauren S.; Tauzin, Alexandra S.; Spadiut, Oliver; Klinter, Stefan; Pudlo, Nicholas A.; Urs, Karthik; Koropatkin, Nicole M.; Creagh, A. Louise; Haynes, Charles A.; Kelly, Amelia G.; Cederholm, Stefan Nilsson; Davies, Gideon J.; Martens, Eric C.; Brumer, Harry

    2014-01-01

    A well-balanced human diet includes a significant intake of non-starch polysaccharides, collectively termed “dietary fibre,” from the cell walls of diverse fruits and vegetables.1 Due to a paucity of alimentary enzymes encoded by the human genome,2 our ability to derive energy from dietary fibre depends on saccharification and fermentation of complex carbohydrates by the massive microbial community residing in our distal gut.3,4 The xyloglucans (XyGs), in particular, are a ubiquitous family of highly branched plant cell wall polysaccharides5,6 whose mechanism(s) of degradation in the human gut and consequent importance in nutrition was heretofore unknown.1,7,8 Here, we demonstrate that a single, complex gene locus in Bacteroides ovatus confers xyloglucan catabolism in this common colonic symbiont. Through targeted gene disruption, biochemical analysis of all predicted glycoside hydrolases and carbohydrate-binding proteins, and three-dimensional structural determination of the vanguard endo-xyloglucanase, we reveal the molecular mechanisms through which XyGs are hydrolysed to component monosaccharides for further metabolism. We also observe that orthologous xyloglucan utilization loci (XyGULs) serve as genetic markers of xyloglucan catabolism in Bacteroidetes, that XyGULs are restricted to a limited number of phylogenetically diverse strains, and that XyGULs are ubiquitous in surveyed human metagenomes. Our findings reveal that the metabolism of even highly abundant components of dietary fibre may be mediated by niche species, which has immediate fundamental and practical implications for gut symbiont population ecology in the context of human diet, nutrition and health.9–12 PMID:24463512

  9. A discrete genetic locus confers xyloglucan metabolism in select human gut Bacteroidetes.

    PubMed

    Larsbrink, Johan; Rogers, Theresa E; Hemsworth, Glyn R; McKee, Lauren S; Tauzin, Alexandra S; Spadiut, Oliver; Klinter, Stefan; Pudlo, Nicholas A; Urs, Karthik; Koropatkin, Nicole M; Creagh, A Louise; Haynes, Charles A; Kelly, Amelia G; Cederholm, Stefan Nilsson; Davies, Gideon J; Martens, Eric C; Brumer, Harry

    2014-02-27

    A well-balanced human diet includes a significant intake of non-starch polysaccharides, collectively termed 'dietary fibre', from the cell walls of diverse fruits and vegetables. Owing to the paucity of alimentary enzymes encoded by the human genome, our ability to derive energy from dietary fibre depends on the saccharification and fermentation of complex carbohydrates by the massive microbial community residing in our distal gut. The xyloglucans (XyGs) are a ubiquitous family of highly branched plant cell wall polysaccharides whose mechanism(s) of degradation in the human gut and consequent importance in nutrition have been unclear. Here we demonstrate that a single, complex gene locus in Bacteroides ovatus confers XyG catabolism in this common colonic symbiont. Through targeted gene disruption, biochemical analysis of all predicted glycoside hydrolases and carbohydrate-binding proteins, and three-dimensional structural determination of the vanguard endo-xyloglucanase, we reveal the molecular mechanisms through which XyGs are hydrolysed to component monosaccharides for further metabolism. We also observe that orthologous XyG utilization loci (XyGULs) serve as genetic markers of XyG catabolism in Bacteroidetes, that XyGULs are restricted to a limited number of phylogenetically diverse strains, and that XyGULs are ubiquitous in surveyed human metagenomes. Our findings reveal that the metabolism of even highly abundant components of dietary fibre may be mediated by niche species, which has immediate fundamental and practical implications for gut symbiont population ecology in the context of human diet, nutrition and health.

  10. Genetic program based data mining to reverse engineer digital logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, James F., III; Nguyen, Thanh Vu H.

    2006-04-01

    A data mining based procedure for automated reverse engineering and defect discovery has been developed. The data mining algorithm for reverse engineering uses a genetic program (GP) as a data mining function. A genetic program is an algorithm based on the theory of evolution that automatically evolves populations of computer programs or mathematical expressions, eventually selecting one that is optimal in the sense it maximizes a measure of effectiveness, referred to as a fitness function. The system to be reverse engineered is typically a sensor. Design documents for the sensor are not available and conditions prevent the sensor from being taken apart. The sensor is used to create a database of input signals and output measurements. Rules about the likely design properties of the sensor are collected from experts. The rules are used to create a fitness function for the genetic program. Genetic program based data mining is then conducted. This procedure incorporates not only the experts' rules into the fitness function, but also the information in the database. The information extracted through this process is the internal design specifications of the sensor. Uncertainty related to the input-output database and the expert based rule set can significantly alter the reverse engineering results. Significant experimental and theoretical results related to GP based data mining for reverse engineering will be provided. Methods of quantifying uncertainty and its effects will be presented. Finally methods for reducing the uncertainty will be examined.

  11. Expanding the genetic counseling workforce: program directors' views on increasing the size of genetic counseling graduate programs.

    PubMed

    Pan, Vivian; Yashar, Beverly M; Pothast, Rachel; Wicklund, Catherine

    2016-08-01

    Although there is an anticipated need for more genetic counselors, little is known about limitations at the graduate training level. We evaluated opportunities for growth of the genetic counseling (GC) workforce by exploring program directors' perspectives on increasing number of graduate trainees. Thirty US-based GC program directors (PDs) were recruited through the Association of Genetic Counseling Program Directors' listserv. Online surveys and semistructured phone interviews were used to explore factors impacting the expansion of the GC workforce. Twenty-five PDs completed the survey; 18 interviews were conducted. Seventy-three percent said they believe that the workforce is growing too slowly and the number of graduates should increase. Attitudes were mixed regarding whether the job market should be the main factor driving workforce expansion. Thematic analysis of transcripts identified barriers to program expansion in six categories: funding, accreditation requirements, clinical sites, faculty availability, applicant pool, and physical space. General consensus among participants indicates the importance of increasing the capacity of the GC workforce pipeline. Addressing funding issues, examining current accreditation requirements, and reevaluating current education models may be effective strategies to expanding GC program size. Future research on increasing the number of GC programs and a needs assessment for GC services are suggested.Genet Med 18 8, 842-849.

  12. Common variants of the PINK1 and PARL genes do not confer genetic susceptibility to schizophrenia in Han Chinese.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao; Zhang, Wen; Zhang, Chen; Yi, Zhenghui; Zhang, Deng-Feng; Gong, Wei; Tang, Jinsong; Wang, Dong; Lu, Weihong; Chen, Xiaogang; Fang, Yiru; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2015-04-01

    Schizophrenia is a prevalent psychiatric disorder with a complex etiology. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been frequently reported in schizophrenia. Phosphatase and tension homologue-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) and presenilin-associated rhomboid-like protease (PARL) are mitochondrial proteins, and genetic variants of these two genes may confer genetic susceptibility to schizophrenia by influencing mitochondrial function. In this study, we conducted a two-stage genetic association study to test this hypothesis. We genotyped 4 PINK1 and 5 PARL genetic variants and evaluated the potential association of the 9 SNPs with schizophrenia in two independent case-control cohorts of 2510 Han Chinese individuals. No positive association of common genetic variants of the PINK1 and PARL genes with schizophrenia was identified in our samples after Bonferroni correction. Re-analysis of the newly updated Psychiatric Genetics Consortium (PGC) data sets confirmed our negative result. Intriguingly, one PINK1 SNP (rs10916832), which showed a marginally significant association in only Hunan samples (P = 0.032), is associated with the expression of a schizophrenia susceptible gene KIF17 according to the expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) analysis. Our study indicated that common genetic variants of the PINK1 and PARL genes are unlikely to be involved in schizophrenia. Further studies are essential to characterize the role of the PINK1 and PARL genes in schizophrenia.

  13. Genetic programming applied to RFI mitigation in radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staats, K.

    2016-12-01

    Genetic Programming is a type of machine learning that employs a stochastic search of a solutions space, genetic operators, a fitness function, and multiple generations of evolved programs to resolve a user-defined task, such as the classification of data. At the time of this research, the application of machine learning to radio astronomy was relatively new, with a limited number of publications on the subject. Genetic Programming had never been applied, and as such, was a novel approach to this challenging arena. Foundational to this body of research, the application Karoo GP was developed in the programming language Python following the fundamentals of tree-based Genetic Programming described in "A Field Guide to Genetic Programming" by Poli, et al. Karoo GP was tasked with the classification of data points as signal or radio frequency interference (RFI) generated by instruments and machinery which makes challenging astronomers' ability to discern the desired targets. The training data was derived from the output of an observation run of the KAT-7 radio telescope array built by the South African Square Kilometre Array (SKA-SA). Karoo GP, kNN, and SVM were comparatively employed, the outcome of which provided noteworthy correlations between input parameters, the complexity of the evolved hypotheses, and performance of raw data versus engineered features. This dissertation includes description of novel approaches to GP, such as upper and lower limits to the size of syntax trees, an auto-scaling multiclass classifier, and a Numpy array element manager. In addition to the research conducted at the SKA-SA, it is described how Karoo GP was applied to fine-tuning parameters of a weather prediction model at the South African Astronomical Observatory (SAAO), to glitch classification at the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO), and to astro-particle physics at The Ohio State University.

  14. Designating Winners: Using Evaluation in School Recognition Programs. Papers from the National Conference on School Recognition Programs (1st, Miami, Florida, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wynne, Edward A., Ed.

    This monograph is composed of papers from the first National Conference on School Recognition Programs. School recognition programs vary considerably, but they do acknowledge schools that perform well (winners) and have recognizable public relations value. Consequently, school recognition programs have substantial potential for educational…

  15. Non-Traditional and Interdisciplinary Programs. Selected Papers from the Annual Conference on Non-Traditional and Interdisciplinary Programs (4th, Arlington, Virginia, June 30-July 2, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuinness, Kathleen, Comp.

    A total of 50 papers are presented from the George Mason University (Virginia) fourth annual conference on nontraditional and interdisciplinary programs. They are grouped in the following major categories: adjunct faculty, corporate/university linkages, experiential learning, graduate nontraditional programs, interdisciplinary program issues,…

  16. Non-Traditional and Interdisciplinary Programs. Selected Papers from the Annual Conference on Non-Traditional and Interdisciplinary Programs (4th, Arlington, Virginia, June 30-July 2, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuinness, Kathleen, Comp.

    A total of 50 papers are presented from the George Mason University (Virginia) fourth annual conference on nontraditional and interdisciplinary programs. They are grouped in the following major categories: adjunct faculty, corporate/university linkages, experiential learning, graduate nontraditional programs, interdisciplinary program issues,…

  17. Developmental hematopoiesis: ontogeny, genetic programming and conservation.

    PubMed

    Ciau-Uitz, Aldo; Monteiro, Rui; Kirmizitas, Arif; Patient, Roger

    2014-08-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) sustain blood production throughout life and are of pivotal importance in regenerative medicine. Although HSC generation from pluripotent stem cells would resolve their shortage for clinical applications, this has not yet been achieved mainly because of the poor mechanistic understanding of their programming. Bone marrow HSCs are first created during embryogenesis in the dorsal aorta (DA) of the midgestation conceptus, from where they migrate to the fetal liver and, eventually, the bone marrow. It is currently accepted that HSCs emerge from specialized endothelium, the hemogenic endothelium, localized in the ventral wall of the DA through an evolutionarily conserved process called the endothelial-to-hematopoietic transition. However, the endothelial-to-hematopoietic transition represents one of the last steps in HSC creation, and an understanding of earlier events in the specification of their progenitors is required if we are to create them from naïve pluripotent cells. Because of their ready availability and external development, zebrafish and Xenopus embryos have enormously facilitated our understanding of the early developmental processes leading to the programming of HSCs from nascent lateral plate mesoderm to hemogenic endothelium in the DA. The amenity of the Xenopus model to lineage tracing experiments has also contributed to the establishment of the distinct origins of embryonic (yolk sac) and adult (HSC) hematopoiesis, whereas the transparency of the zebrafish has allowed in vivo imaging of developing blood cells, particularly during and after the emergence of HSCs in the DA. Here, we discuss the key contributions of these model organisms to our understanding of developmental hematopoiesis. Copyright © 2014 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Carbon Dioxide Effects Research and Assessment Program: Proceedings of the carbon dioxide and climate research program conference

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, L E

    1980-12-01

    Papers presented at the Carbon Dioxide and Climate Research Program Conference are included in this volume. Topics discussed are: the carbon cycle; modeling the carbon system; climatic response due to increased CO2; climate modeling; the use of paleoclimatic data in understanding climate change; attitudes and implications of CO2; social responses to the CO2 problem; a scenario for atmospheric CO2 to 2025; marine photosynthesis and the global carbon cycle; and the role of tropical forests in the carbon balance of the world. Separate abstracts of nine papers have been prepared for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (RJC)

  19. Feature extraction from multiple data sources using genetic programming.

    SciTech Connect

    Szymanski, J. J.; Brumby, Steven P.; Pope, P. A.; Eads, D. R.; Galassi, M. C.; Harvey, N. R.; Perkins, S. J.; Porter, R. B.; Theiler, J. P.; Young, A. C.; Bloch, J. J.; David, N. A.; Esch-Mosher, D. M.

    2002-01-01

    Feature extration from imagery is an important and long-standing problem in remote sensing. In this paper, we report on work using genetic programming to perform feature extraction simultaneously from multispectral and digital elevation model (DEM) data. The tool used is the GENetic Imagery Exploitation (GENIE) software, which produces image-processing software that inherently combines spatial and spectral processing. GENIE is particularly useful in exploratory studies of imagery, such as one often does in combining data from multiple sources. The user trains the software by painting the feature of interest with a simple graphical user interface. GENIE then uses genetic programming techniques to produce an image-processing pipeline. Here, we demonstrate evolution of image processing algorithms that extract a range of land-cover features including towns, grasslands, wild fire burn scars, and several types of forest. We use imagery from the DOE/NNSA Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI) spacecraft, fused with USGS 1:24000 scale DEM data.

  20. 10. international mouse genome conference

    SciTech Connect

    Meisler, M.H.

    1996-12-31

    Ten years after hosting the First International Mammalian Genome Conference in Paris in 1986, Dr. Jean-Louis Guenet presided over the Tenth Conference at the Pasteur Institute, October 7--10, 1996. The 1986 conference was a satellite to the Human Gene Mapping Workshop and had approximately 50 attendees. The 1996 meeting was attended by 300 scientists from around the world. In the interim, the number of mapped loci in the mouse increased from 1,000 to over 20,000. This report contains a listing of the program and its participants, and two articles that review the meeting and the role of the laboratory mouse in the Human Genome project. More than 200 papers were presented at the conference covering the following topics: International mouse chromosome committee meetings; Mutant generation and identification; Physical and genetic maps; New technology and resources; Chromatin structure and gene regulation; Rate and hamster genetic maps; Informatics and databases; and Quantitative trait analysis.

  1. Considering genetic characteristics in German Holstein breeding programs.

    PubMed

    Segelke, D; Täubert, H; Reinhardt, F; Thaller, G

    2016-01-01

    Recently, several research groups have demonstrated that several haplotypes may cause embryonic loss in the homozygous state. Up to now, carriers of genetic disorders were often excluded from mating, resulting in a decrease of genetic gain and a reduced number of sires available for the breeding program. Ongoing research is very likely to identify additional genetic defects causing embryonic loss and calf mortality by genotyping a large proportion of the female cattle population and sequencing key ancestors. Hence, a clear demand is present to develop a method combining selection against recessive defects (e.g., Holstein haplotypes HH1-HH5) with selection for economically beneficial traits (e.g., polled) for mating decisions. Our proposed method is a genetic index that accounts for the allele frequencies in the population and the economic value of the genetic characteristic without excluding carriers from breeding schemes. Fertility phenotypes from routine genetic evaluations were used to determine the economic value per embryo lost. Previous research has shown that embryo loss caused by HH1 and HH2 occurs later than the loss for HH3, HH4, and HH5. Therefore, an economic value of € 97 was used against HH1 and HH2 and € 70 against HH3, HH4, and HH5. For polled, € 7 per polled calf was considered. Minor allele frequencies of the defects ranged between 0.8 and 3.3%. The polled allele has a frequency of 4.1% in the German Holstein population. A genomic breeding program was simulated to study the effect of changing the selection criteria from assortative mating based on breeding values to selecting the females using the genetic index. Selection for a genetic index on the female path is a useful method to control the allele frequencies by reducing undesirable alleles and simultaneously increasing economical beneficial characteristics maintaining most of the genetic gain in production and functional traits. Additionally, we applied the genetic index to real data and

  2. Genetic mapping of two genes conferring resistance to powdery mildew in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Pérez-Vega, Elena; Trabanco, Noemí; Campa, Ana; Ferreira, Juan José

    2013-06-01

    Powdery mildew (PM) is a serious disease in many legume species, including the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). This study investigated the genetic control behind resistance reaction to PM in the bean genotype, Cornell 49242. The results revealed evidence supporting a qualitative mode of inheritance for resistance and the involvement of two independent genes in the resistance reaction. The location of these resistance genes was investigated in a linkage genetic map developed for the XC RIL population. Contingency tests revealed significant associations for 28 loci out of a total of 329 mapped loci. Fifteen were isolated or formed groups with less than two loci. The thirteen remaining loci were located at three regions in linkage groups Pv04, Pv09, and Pv11. The involvement of Pv09 was discarded due to the observed segregation in the subpopulation obtained from the Xana genotype for the loci located in this region. In contrast, the two subpopulations obtained from the Xana genotype for the BM161 locus, linked to the Co-3/9 anthracnose resistance gene (Pv04), and from the Xana genotype for the SCAReoli locus, linked to the Co-2 anthracnose resistance gene (Pv11), exhibited monogenic segregations, suggesting that both regions were involved in the genetic control of resistance. A genetic dissection was carried out to verify the involvement of both regions in the reaction to PM. Two resistant recombinant lines were selected, according to their genotypes, for the block of loci included in the Co-2 and Co-3/9 regions, and they were crossed with the susceptible parent, Xana. Linkage analysis in the respective F2 populations supported the hypothesis that a dominant gene (Pm1) was located in the linkage group Pv11 and another gene (Pm2) was located in the linkage group Pv04. This is the first report showing the localization of resistance genes against powdery mildew in Phaseolus vulgaris and the results offer the opportunity to increase the efficiency of breeding

  3. A Working Conference on Cooperative Programs Among Universities and Predominantly Negro Colleges (Atlanta, Ga., August 20-21, 1965).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brisbane, Robert H., Jr., Ed.

    The proceedings reported are of a working conference designed to provide (1) an opportunity for the universities and predominantly Negro colleges engaged in cooperative programs for the remediation of inequalities in educational opportunities to share their experiences with a view toward increasing the effectiveness of such programs, and (2) a…

  4. Teacher Education Programs for Native People. Proceedings of a Conference on Native Teacher Education (Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, November 1973).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aldous, Myrtle, Ed.; And Others

    In an effort to pool information on the working operations of Indian teacher education programs in Canada and parts of the United States, a conference on Native teacher education was held in mid-October 1973 at Saskatoon. Nine programs sent delegates, including the University of Alaska, University of Alberta, Brandon University (Manitoba),…

  5. CONFERENCE SUMMARY--FROM THEORY TO PRACTICE. THE DESCRIPTION AND DEMONSTRATION OF A GUIDANCE PROGRAM IN ONE DISTRICT K-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palo Alto Unified School District, CA.

    VARIOUS ASPECTS OF THE PALO ALTO GUIDANCE PROGRAM WERE PRESENTED AT THE CONFERENCE. THE OBJECTIVES OF THE PROGRAM WERE BASED ON THE BELIEF THAT GUIDANCE SHOULD FOSTER INDIVIDUALIZATION IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF ALL CHILDREN BY PROVIDING CONDITIONS WHICH WOULD ENSURE THIS INDIVIDUALIZATION. THESE TWO THEORETICAL CONSTRUCTS, REINFORCEMENT THEORY AND…

  6. 2012 Gordon Research Conference on Mutagenesis - Formal Schedule and Speaker/Poster Program

    SciTech Connect

    Demple, Bruce

    2012-08-24

    The delicate balance among cellular pathways that control mutagenic changes in DNA will be the focus of the 2012 Mutagenesis Gordon Research Conference. Mutagenesis is essential for evolution, while genetic stability maintains cellular functions in all organisms from microbes to metazoans. Different systems handle DNA lesions at various times of the cell cycle and in different places within the nucleus, and inappropriate actions can lead to mutations. While mutation in humans is closely linked to disease, notably cancers, mutational systems can also be beneficial. The conference will highlight topics of beneficial mutagenesis, including full establishment of the immune system, cell survival mechanisms, and evolution and adaptation in microbial systems. Equal prominence will be given to detrimental mutation processes, especially those involved in driving cancer, neurological diseases, premature aging, and other threats to human health. Provisional session titles include Branching Pathways in Mutagenesis; Oxidative Stress and Endogenous DNA Damage; DNA Maintenance Pathways; Recombination, Good and Bad; Problematic DNA Structures; Localized Mutagenesis; Hypermutation in the Microbial World; and Mutation and Disease.

  7. Genetic evaluation of a Great Lakes lake trout hatchery program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Page, K.S.; Scribner, K.T.; Bast, D.; Holey, M.E.; Burnham-Curtis, M. K.

    2005-01-01

    Efforts over several decades to restore lake trout Salvelinus namaycush in U.S. waters of the upper Great Lakes have emphasized the stocking of juveniles from each of six hatchery broodstocks. Retention of genetic diversity across all offspring life history stages throughout the hatchery system has been an important component of the restoration hatchery and stocking program. Different stages of the lake trout hatchery program were examined to determine how effective hatchery practices have been in minimizing the loss of genetic diversity in broodstock adults and in progeny stocked. Microsatellite loci were used to estimate allele frequencies, measures of genetic diversity, and relatedness for wild source populations, hatchery broodstocks, and juveniles. We also estimated the effective number of breeders for each broodstock. Hatchery records were used to track destinations of fertilized eggs from all spawning dates to determine whether adult contributions to stocking programs were proportional to reproductive effort. Overall, management goals of maintaining genetic diversity were met across all stages of the hatchery program; however, we identified key areas where changes in mating regimes and in the distribution of fertilized gametes and juveniles could be improved. Estimates of effective breeding population size (Nb) were 9-41% of the total number of adults spawned. Low estimates of Nb were primarily attributed to spawning practices, including the pooling of gametes from multiple males and females and the reuse of males. Nonrandom selection and distribution of fertilized eggs before stocking accentuated declines in effective breeding population size and increased levels of relatedness of juveniles distributed to different rearing facilities and stocking locales. Adoption of guidelines that decrease adult reproductive variance and promote more equitable reproductive contributions of broodstock adults to juveniles would further enhance management goals of

  8. Parliamentarians from CIS and the Far East reaffirm commitment to population program. Parliamentarians conference in Ulaanbaatar.

    PubMed

    1999-01-01

    This article summarizes the proceedings of the Parliamentarian Conference held in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia. Parliamentarian representatives from Japan, South Korea, China, Russia, and Commonwealth of Independent States countries agreed to work together in providing better lives to their people through rational population planning. Problems faced by the region, as mentioned in the conference, include persistently high maternal and infant mortality, internal migration from rural to urban areas, high unemployment rate, lower enrollment of boys and men as compared to girls and women in educational institutions, and environmental problems such as soil erosion resulting from over grazing. In addition, member representatives presented the status of the region's reproductive health/rights, gender and population policy, food security and environment, and adolescents and elderly. It was noted that there has been significant progress in reproductive health, gender equality, agricultural sector, and legislation for the youth and the elderly. However, these issues still need to be improved and developed. The UN Population Fund has reinforced its commitment towards population and development programs in the region, and the parliamentarians have reaffirmed its commitment to creating the legal framework favorable to the implementation of the Program of Action in the Ulaanbaatar Declaration.

  9. Initiatives for the '90s. National SOICC Conference (13th, Snowbird, Utah, August 20-22, 1990). Conference Program Highlights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Occupational Information Coordinating Committee (DOL/ETA), Washington, DC.

    This publication provides highlights from a conference of the National Occupational Information Coordinating Committee (NOICC) and the State Occupational Information Coordinating Committees (SOICCs). Highlights of presentations include the following: (1) NOICC initiatives reflect an integrated, long-range planning approach; (2) business,…

  10. Human Genetics Education: A Look to the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biological Sciences Curriculum Study Journal, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Examines the status of human genetics education. Provides an updated report of the work being done at the BSCS Center for Education in Human and Medical Genetics. Includes reports of regional conferences and of West German educational programs. (MA)

  11. Non-Traditional and Interdisciplinary Programs. Selected Papers from the Annual Conference on Non-Traditional and Interdisciplinary Programs (3rd, Arlington, Virginia, July 1-3, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fonseca, James W., Comp.

    Sixty-one papers are presented from the George Mason University (Virginia) annual conference on nontraditional interdisciplinary programs. They are grouped in the following categories, with three to ten papers per category: adjunct faculty; corporate/university linkages; experiential learning; graduate non-traditional programs; interdisciplinary…

  12. Early Intervention Programs for Developmentally Disabled Children. Central Conference of University Training Programs in Developmental Disabilities Proceedings (Indianapolis, Indiana, August 25-26, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shuster, Susan K., Ed.; Groman, Cynthia L., Ed.

    The document summarizes proceedings of an August 1980 conference on early intervention programs for developmentally disabled children attended by representatives of public instruction, federal and state model programs, early childhood staff from university affiliated facilities, instructors from colleges and universities and graduate students.…

  13. Non-Traditional and Interdisciplinary Programs. Selected Papers from the Annual Conference on Non-Traditional & Interdisciplinary Programs (2nd, Arlington, Virginia, June 27-29, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fonseca, James W., Comp.

    A total of 47 papers are presented from the George Mason University (Virginia) second annual conference on nontraditional, interdisciplinary, and external degree programs. Among the papers are authors are: "A Learning Theory Account of Walden University's Doctoral Instructional Program" (B. M. Austin); "Hospital Based Interdisciplinary Education…

  14. Initialization Method for Grammar-Guided Genetic Programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Arnau, M.; Manrique, D.; Ríos, J.; Rodríguez-Patón, A.

    This paper proposes a new tree-generation algorithm for grammarguided genetic programming that includes a parameter to control the maximum size of the trees to be generated. An important feature of this algorithm is that the initial populations generated are adequately distributed in terms of tree size and distribution within the search space. Consequently, genetic programming systems starting from the initial populations generated by the proposed method have a higher convergence speed. Two different problems have been chosen to carry out the experiments: a laboratory test involving searching for arithmetical equalities and the real-world task of breast cancer prognosis. In both problems, comparisons have been made to another five important initialization methods.

  15. ONMCGP: Orthogonal Neighbourhood Mutation Cartesian Genetic Programming for Evolvable Hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    I, Fuchuan N.; I, Yuanxiang L.; E, Peng K.

    2014-03-01

    Evolvable Hardware is facing the problems of scalability and stalling effect. This paper proposed a novel Orthogonal Neighbourhood Mutation (ONM) operator in Cartesian genetic programming (CGP), to reduce the stalling effect in CGP and improve the efficiency of the algorithms.The method incorporates with Differential Evolution strategy. Demonstrated by experiments on benchmark, the proposed Orthogonal Neighbourhood Search can jump out of Local optima, reduce the stalling effect in CGP and the algorithm convergence faster.

  16. Genetic Programming of Conventional Features to Detect Seizure Precursors

    PubMed Central

    Smart, Otis; Firpi, Hiram; Vachtsevanos, George

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an application of genetic programming (GP) to optimally select and fuse conventional features (C-features) for the detection of epileptic waveforms within intracranial electroencephalogram (IEEG) recordings that precede seizures, known as seizure-precursors. Evidence suggests that seizure-precursors may localize regions important to seizure generation on the IEEG and epilepsy treatment. However, current methods to detect epileptic precursors lack a sound approach to automatically select and combine C-features that best distinguish epileptic events from background, relying on visual review predominantly. This work suggests GP as an optimal alternative to create a single feature after evaluating the performance of a binary detector that uses: 1) genetically programmed features; 2) features selected via GP; 3) forward sequentially selected features; and 4) visually selected features. Results demonstrate that a detector with a genetically programmed feature outperforms the other three approaches, achieving over 78.5% positive predictive value, 83.5% sensitivity, and 93% specificity at the 95% level of confidence. PMID:19050744

  17. Genetic Programming of Conventional Features to Detect Seizure Precursors.

    PubMed

    Smart, Otis; Firpi, Hiram; Vachtsevanos, George

    2007-12-01

    This paper presents an application of genetic programming (GP) to optimally select and fuse conventional features (C-features) for the detection of epileptic waveforms within intracranial electroencephalogram (IEEG) recordings that precede seizures, known as seizure-precursors. Evidence suggests that seizure-precursors may localize regions important to seizure generation on the IEEG and epilepsy treatment. However, current methods to detect epileptic precursors lack a sound approach to automatically select and combine C-features that best distinguish epileptic events from background, relying on visual review predominantly. This work suggests GP as an optimal alternative to create a single feature after evaluating the performance of a binary detector that uses: 1) genetically programmed features; 2) features selected via GP; 3) forward sequentially selected features; and 4) visually selected features. Results demonstrate that a detector with a genetically programmed feature outperforms the other three approaches, achieving over 78.5% positive predictive value, 83.5% sensitivity, and 93% specificity at the 95% level of confidence.

  18. The National Energy Strategy: A balanced program?. Proceedings of the nineteenth annual Illinois energy conference

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    The Nineteenth Annual Illinois Energy Conference was held in Chicago, Illinois November 1991. It was organized by the Energy Resources Center, University of Illinois at Chicago with major support provided by the US Environmental Protection Agency, the US Department of Energy, the Illinois Commerce Commission, the Illinois Department of Energy and Natural Resources, and the Citizens Council on Energy Resources. The conference program was developed by a planning committee who drew upon Illinois energy and environmental specialists from the major sectors including energy industries, environmental organizations, research universities, utility companies, federal, state and local government agencies, and public interest groups. The members of the planning committee were brought together for a full-day session where they were asked to assess the political, economic, and social impacts of the proposed National Energy Strategy as it relates to Illinois and the Midwest region. Within this context, the planning committee identified several major issues including: (1) Is the proposed plan a balanced strategy; (2) What are the NES impacts on the transportation sector; (3) What are the opportunities for improved efficiency in the Electric Utility Sector; and (4) What is the role of advanced research and development.

  19. Proceedings of the 1972 Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center Endocrine Program Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Subjects covered during the Endocrine Program Conference include the following: (1) endocrine/metabolic studies on the Apollo 16 crewmen; (2) changes in glucose, insulin, and growth hormone levels associated with bed rest; (3) circadian rhythms of heart rate and body temperature during 56 days of bed rest; (4) stress-induced changes in corticosteroid metabolism in man; (5) present status of physiological studies on parathyroid hormone and vitamin D; (6) antagonistic effect of lithium on antidiuretic hormone action; (7) proposed Skylab body-fluid volumes study; (8) daily rhythmic changes in serotonin content in areas of the mouse brain and norepinephrine content in areas of the hamster brain; (9) studies of sodium homeostasis during simulated weightlessness; and (10) application of the water immersion model to man.

  20. Proceedings of the 1973 Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center Endocrine Program Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Papers given at the conference are presented. Subjects covered include the following: biochemical changes during 28 days of space flight, modulating the pituitary-adrenal response to stress, the significance of biorhythms in space flight, the importance of the rein-angiotensin system in normal cardiovascular homeostasis, a progress report of stress-induced changes in corticosteroid metabolism, recent studies of physiological factors involved in the regulation of serotonin content and turnover in the brain, the role of brain biogenic amines in the control of pituitary-adrenocortical activity, application of the water immersion model to man by studies of acid-base homeostasis during simulated weightlessness, the present status of physiological studies and analysis of calcium homeostasis in the Apollo and Skylab programs, and endocrine considerations in the red-cell-mass and plasma-volume changes of Skylab 2 and 3 crews.

  1. Agenda of the Fourth Annual Summer Conference, NASA/USRA University Advanced Design Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Presentations given by the participants at the fourth annual summer conference of the NASA/USRA University Advanced Design Program are summarized. The study topics include potential space and aeronautics projects which could be undertaken during a 20 to 30 year period beginning with the Space Station Initial Operating Configuration (IOC) scheduled for the early to mid-1990's. This includes system design studies for both manned and unmanned endeavors; e.g., lunar launch and landing facilities and operations, variable artificial gravity facility for the Space Station, manned Mars aircraft and delivery system, long term space habitat, construction equipment for lunar bases, Mars oxygen production system, trans-Pacific high speed civil transport, V/STOL aircraft concepts, etc.

  2. ICENES `91:Sixth international conference on emerging nuclear energy systems. Program and abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    This document contains the program and abstracts of the sessions at the Sixth International Conference on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems held June 16--21, 1991 at Monterey, California. These sessions included: The plenary session, fission session, fission and nonelectric session, poster session 1P; (space propulsion, space nuclear power, electrostatic confined fusion, fusion miscellaneous, inertial confinement fusion, {mu}-catalyzed fusion, and cold fusion); Advanced fusion session, space nuclear session, poster session 2P, (nuclear reactions/data, isotope separation, direct energy conversion and exotic concepts, fusion-fission hybrids, nuclear desalting, accelerator waste-transmutation, and fusion-based chemical recycling); energy policy session, poster session 3P (energy policy, magnetic fusion reactors, fission reactors, magnetically insulated inertial fusion, and nuclear explosives for power generation); exotic energy storage and conversion session; and exotic energy storage and conversion; review and closing session.

  3. Nasa university program review conference. summary report, mar. 1 - 3, 1965

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, D. J.

    1965-01-01

    The purpose of the NASA University Program Review Conference was to describe the nature of the Program, the manner in which it is being conducted, the results that it is producing, and the impact it may be having. The presentations, except for some expository papers by NASA offi- cials, were made by members of the university and nonprofit community. ference message as it has come to me, a university professor spending a year in making a study of NASA-University relations under a NASA contract with my institution. In preparing the report, my guiding principle has been to try to maximize its usefulness by making it accurate, brief, and prompt. These qualities are largely incompatible, and I am sure that the result of my search for an optimum compromise will please no one. Open editorializing is mainly confined to a brief section constituting my Evaluation of Program. The complete transcript will shortly be available, to stand as the authoritative source for statements that anyone may wish to attribute to the speakers.

  4. Older Americans ARE A Resource for Community Colleges, Business, Themselves and Society. Older Americans Program, National Conference Report (2nd, Washington, DC, March 13-14, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Community and Junior Colleges, Washington, DC.

    Highlights are presented of a national conference conducted to share specific models for community college programs for older adults and to devise financial and political strategies to ensure the continuation of these programs. After discussing the conference design, the report presents a summary of Bentley Lipscomb's keynote address on the…

  5. Minority Students & Special Education: The Issues of Placement and Proportion. Model Programs and Practical Approaches. Spring Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Idola J., Ed.; Goodale, Ronda, Ed.

    The second of two documents on issues concerned with limited English speaking students in Massachusetts special education programs, this report presents proceedings from a 1982 conference. Sixteen presentations are summarized and results of participants' evaluations on six-item questionnaires are included. Topics covered in the workshop sessions…

  6. School-Age Child Care: Programs and Issues. Papers from a June 1979 Conference at Wheelock College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Genser, Andrea, Ed.; Baden, Clifford

    This publication is a collection of representative presentations from a conference on school-age child care which took place in 1979 at Wheelock College, Boston, Massachusetts. The book is divided into four sections. Part I, the Introduction, explores the differing needs of children in school-age child care programs, and discusses the way…

  7. EVOLVING RETRIEVAL ALGORITHMS WITH A GENETIC PROGRAMMING SCHEME

    SciTech Connect

    J. THEILER; ET AL

    1999-06-01

    The retrieval of scene properties (surface temperature, material type, vegetation health, etc.) from remotely sensed data is the ultimate goal of many earth observing satellites. The algorithms that have been developed for these retrievals are informed by physical models of how the raw data were generated. This includes models of radiation as emitted and/or rejected by the scene, propagated through the atmosphere, collected by the optics, detected by the sensor, and digitized by the electronics. To some extent, the retrieval is the inverse of this ''forward'' modeling problem. But in contrast to this forward modeling, the practical task of making inferences about the original scene usually requires some ad hoc assumptions, good physical intuition, and a healthy dose of trial and error. The standard MTI data processing pipeline will employ algorithms developed with this traditional approach. But we will discuss some preliminary research on the use of a genetic programming scheme to ''evolve'' retrieval algorithms. Such a scheme cannot compete with the physical intuition of a remote sensing scientist, but it may be able to automate some of the trial and error. In this scenario, a training set is used, which consists of multispectral image data and the associated ''ground truth;'' that is, a registered map of the desired retrieval quantity. The genetic programming scheme attempts to combine a core set of image processing primitives to produce an IDL (Interactive Data Language) program which estimates this retrieval quantity from the raw data.

  8. Genetic programs constructed from layered logic gates in single cells.

    PubMed

    Moon, Tae Seok; Lou, Chunbo; Tamsir, Alvin; Stanton, Brynne C; Voigt, Christopher A

    2012-11-08

    Genetic programs function to integrate environmental sensors, implement signal processing algorithms and control expression dynamics. These programs consist of integrated genetic circuits that individually implement operations ranging from digital logic to dynamic circuits, and they have been used in various cellular engineering applications, including the implementation of process control in metabolic networks and the coordination of spatial differentiation in artificial tissues. A key limitation is that the circuits are based on biochemical interactions occurring in the confined volume of the cell, so the size of programs has been limited to a few circuits. Here we apply part mining and directed evolution to build a set of transcriptional AND gates in Escherichia coli. Each AND gate integrates two promoter inputs and controls one promoter output. This allows the gates to be layered by having the output promoter of an upstream circuit serve as the input promoter for a downstream circuit. Each gate consists of a transcription factor that requires a second chaperone protein to activate the output promoter. Multiple activator-chaperone pairs are identified from type III secretion pathways in different strains of bacteria. Directed evolution is applied to increase the dynamic range and orthogonality of the circuits. These gates are connected in different permutations to form programs, the largest of which is a 4-input AND gate that consists of 3 circuits that integrate 4 inducible systems, thus requiring 11 regulatory proteins. Measuring the performance of individual gates is sufficient to capture the behaviour of the complete program. Errors in the output due to delays (faults), a common problem for layered circuits, are not observed. This work demonstrates the successful layering of orthogonal logic gates, a design strategy that could enable the construction of large, integrated circuits in single cells.

  9. Do nuclear-encoded core subunits of mitochondrial complex I confer genetic susceptibility to schizophrenia in Han Chinese populations?

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao; Zhang, Wen; Tang, Jinsong; Tan, Liwen; Luo, Xiong-jian; Chen, Xiaogang; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2015-06-08

    Schizophrenia is one of the most prevalent psychiatric disorders with complex genetic etiology. Accumulating evidence suggests that energy metabolism and oxidative stress play important roles in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Dysfunction of mitochondrial respiratory chain and altered expression of complex I subunits were frequently reported in schizophrenia. To investigate whether nuclear-encoded core subunit genes of mitochondrial complex I are associated with schizophrenia, we performed a genetic association study in Han Chinese. In total, 46 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 7 nuclear-encoded core genes of mitochondrial complex I were genotyped in 918 schizophrenia patients and 1042 healthy controls. We also analyzed these SNPs in a large sample mainly composed of Europeans through using the available GWAS datasets from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC). No significant associations were detected between these SNPs and schizophrenia in Han Chinese and the PGC data set. However, we observed nominal significant associations of 2 SNPs in the NDUFS1 gene and 4 SNPs in the NDUFS2 gene with early onset schizophrenia (EOS), but none of these associations survived the Bonferroni correction. Taken together, our results suggested that common SNPs in the nuclear-encoded core subunit genes of mitochondrial complex I may not confer genetic susceptibility to schizophrenia.

  10. Genetic Architecture of Resistance to Alternaria brassicae in Arabidopsis thaliana: QTL Mapping Reveals Two Major Resistance-Conferring Loci

    PubMed Central

    Rajarammohan, Sivasubramanian; Kumar, Amarendra; Gupta, Vibha; Pental, Deepak; Pradhan, Akshay K.; Kaur, Jagreet

    2017-01-01

    Alternaria brassicae, a necrotrophic fungal pathogen, causes Alternaria blight, one of the most important diseases of oleiferous Brassica crops. The current study utilized Arabidopsis as a model to decipher the genetic architecture of defense against A. brassicae. Significant phenotypic variation that was largely genetically determined was observed among Arabidopsis accessions in response to pathogen challenge. Three biparental mapping populations were developed from three resistant accessions viz. CIBC-5, Ei-2, and Cvi-0 and two susceptible accessions – Gre-0 and Zdr-1 (commonly crossed to CIBC-5 and Ei-2). A total of six quantitative trait locus (QTLs) governing resistance to A. brassicae were identified, five of which were population-specific while one QTL was common between all the three mapping populations. Interestingly, the common QTL had varying phenotypic contributions in different populations, which can be attributed to the genetic background of the parental accessions. The presence of both common and population-specific QTLs indicate that resistance to A. brassicae is quantitative, and that different genes may mediate resistance to the pathogen in different accessions. Two of the QTLs had moderate-to-large effects, one of which explained nearly 50% of the variation. The large effect QTLs may therefore contain genes that could play a significant role in conferring resistance even in heterologous hosts. PMID:28286515

  11. Stream Flow Prediction by Remote Sensing and Genetic Programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Ni-Bin

    2009-01-01

    A genetic programming (GP)-based, nonlinear modeling structure relates soil moisture with synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) images to present representative soil moisture estimates at the watershed scale. Surface soil moisture measurement is difficult to obtain over a large area due to a variety of soil permeability values and soil textures. Point measurements can be used on a small-scale area, but it is impossible to acquire such information effectively in large-scale watersheds. This model exhibits the capacity to assimilate SAR images and relevant geoenvironmental parameters to measure soil moisture.

  12. Student Behaviour Problems: Context, Initiatives and Programs. Selected Papers from the National Conference on Student Behaviour Problems: Context, Initiatives and Programs (3rd, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, October 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkins, John, Ed.; Izard, John, Ed.

    The conference papers in this collection are grouped under the following topics: behavior problems in context; interpersonal relationships; initiatives by systems and schools; and programs in special settings. Papers included are: (1) National Trends in Discipline Policy Development (Roger Slee); (2) Balancing: The Protocols of Discipline (William…

  13. Student Behaviour Problems: Context, Initiatives and Programs. Selected Papers from the National Conference on Student Behaviour Problems: Context, Initiatives and Programs (3rd, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, October 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkins, John, Ed.; Izard, John, Ed.

    The conference papers in this collection are grouped under the following topics: behavior problems in context; interpersonal relationships; initiatives by systems and schools; and programs in special settings. Papers included are: (1) National Trends in Discipline Policy Development (Roger Slee); (2) Balancing: The Protocols of Discipline (William…

  14. Controlling Individuals Growth in Semantic Genetic Programming through Elitist Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Vanneschi, Leonardo; Popovič, Aleš

    2016-01-01

    In 2012, Moraglio and coauthors introduced new genetic operators for Genetic Programming, called geometric semantic genetic operators. They have the very interesting advantage of inducing a unimodal error surface for any supervised learning problem. At the same time, they have the important drawback of generating very large data models that are usually very hard to understand and interpret. The objective of this work is to alleviate this drawback, still maintaining the advantage. More in particular, we propose an elitist version of geometric semantic operators, in which offspring are accepted in the new population only if they have better fitness than their parents. We present experimental evidence, on five complex real-life test problems, that this simple idea allows us to obtain results of a comparable quality (in terms of fitness), but with much smaller data models, compared to the standard geometric semantic operators. In the final part of the paper, we also explain the reason why we consider this a significant improvement, showing that the proposed elitist operators generate manageable models, while the models generated by the standard operators are so large in size that they can be considered unmanageable. PMID:27057158

  15. Controlling Individuals Growth in Semantic Genetic Programming through Elitist Replacement.

    PubMed

    Castelli, Mauro; Vanneschi, Leonardo; Popovič, Aleš

    2016-01-01

    In 2012, Moraglio and coauthors introduced new genetic operators for Genetic Programming, called geometric semantic genetic operators. They have the very interesting advantage of inducing a unimodal error surface for any supervised learning problem. At the same time, they have the important drawback of generating very large data models that are usually very hard to understand and interpret. The objective of this work is to alleviate this drawback, still maintaining the advantage. More in particular, we propose an elitist version of geometric semantic operators, in which offspring are accepted in the new population only if they have better fitness than their parents. We present experimental evidence, on five complex real-life test problems, that this simple idea allows us to obtain results of a comparable quality (in terms of fitness), but with much smaller data models, compared to the standard geometric semantic operators. In the final part of the paper, we also explain the reason why we consider this a significant improvement, showing that the proposed elitist operators generate manageable models, while the models generated by the standard operators are so large in size that they can be considered unmanageable.

  16. Invited commentary: Evaluating vaccination programs using genetic sequence data.

    PubMed

    Halloran, M Elizabeth; Holmes, Edward C

    2009-12-15

    Genomic data will become an increasingly important component of epidemiologic studies in coming years. The authors of the accompanying Journal article, van Ballegooijen et al. (Am J Epidemiol. 2009;170(12):1455-1463), are to be commended for attempting to use the coalescent analysis of viral sequence data to evaluate a hepatitis B vaccination program. Coalescent theory attempts to link the phylogenetic history of populations with rates of population growth and decline. In particular, under certain assumptions, a reduction in genetic diversity can be interpreted as a reduction in disease incidence. However, the authors of this commentary contend that van Ballegooijen et al.'s interpretation of changes in viral genetic diversity as a measure of hepatitis B vaccine effectiveness has major limitations. Because of the potential use of these methods in future vaccination studies, the authors discuss the utility of these methods and the data requirements needed for them to be convincing. First, data sets should be large enough to provide sufficient epidemiologic-scale resolution. Second, data need to reflect sufficiently fine-grained temporal sampling. Third, other processes that can potentially influence genetic diversity and confuse demographic inferences should be considered.

  17. Combining classifiers generated by multi-gene genetic programming for protein fold recognition using genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Bardsiri, Mahshid Khatibi; Eftekhari, Mahdi; Mousavi, Reza

    2015-01-01

    In this study the problem of protein fold recognition, that is a classification task, is solved via a hybrid of evolutionary algorithms namely multi-gene Genetic Programming (GP) and Genetic Algorithm (GA). Our proposed method consists of two main stages and is performed on three datasets taken from the literature. Each dataset contains different feature groups and classes. In the first step, multi-gene GP is used for producing binary classifiers based on various feature groups for each class. Then, different classifiers obtained for each class are combined via weighted voting so that the weights are determined through GA. At the end of the first step, there is a separate binary classifier for each class. In the second stage, the obtained binary classifiers are combined via GA weighting in order to generate the overall classifier. The final obtained classifier is superior to the previous works found in the literature in terms of classification accuracy.

  18. Suspended sediment modeling using genetic programming and soft computing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisi, Ozgur; Dailr, Ali Hosseinzadeh; Cimen, Mesut; Shiri, Jalal

    2012-07-01

    SummaryModeling suspended sediment load is an important factor in water resources engineering as it crucially affects the design and management of water resources structures. In this study the genetic programming (GP) technique was applied for estimating the daily suspended sediment load in two stations in Cumberland River in U.S. Daily flow and sediment data from 1972 to 1989 were used to train and test the applied genetic programming models. The effect of various GP operators on sediment load estimation was investigated. The optimal fitness function, operator functions, linking function and learning algorithm were obtained for modeling daily suspended sediment. The GP estimates were compared with those of the Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS), Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) and Support Vector Machine (SVM) results, in term of coefficient of determination, mean absolute error, coefficient of residual mass and variance accounted for. The comparison results indicated that the GP is superior to the ANFIS, ANN and SVM models in estimating daily suspended sediment load.

  19. Resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Toxin Cry2Ab in Trichoplusia ni Is Conferred by a Novel Genetic Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xiaozhao; Kain, Wendy; Cassidy, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    The resistance to the Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxin Cry2Ab in a greenhouse-originated Trichoplusia ni strain resistant to both Bt toxins Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab was characterized. Biological assays determined that the Cry2Ab resistance in the T. ni strain was a monogenic recessive trait independent of Cry1Ac resistance, and there existed no significant cross-resistance between Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab in T. ni. From the dual-toxin-resistant T. ni strain, a strain resistant to Cry2Ab only was isolated, and the Cry2Ab resistance trait was introgressed into a susceptible laboratory strain to facilitate comparative analysis of the Cry2Ab resistance with the susceptible T. ni strain. Results from biochemical analysis showed no significant difference between the Cry2Ab-resistant and -susceptible T. ni larvae in midgut proteases, including caseinolytic proteolytic activity and zymogram profile and serine protease activities, in midgut aminopeptidase and alkaline phosphatase activity, and in midgut esterases and hemolymph plasma melanization activity. For analysis of genetic linkage of Cry2Ab resistance with potential Cry toxin receptor genes, molecular markers for the midgut cadherin, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and aminopeptidase N (APN) genes were identified between the original greenhouse-derived dual-toxin-resistant and the susceptible laboratory T. ni strains. Genetic linkage analysis showed that the Cry2Ab resistance in T. ni was not genetically associated with the midgut genes coding for the cadherin, ALP, and 6 APNs (APN1 to APN6) nor associated with the ABC transporter gene ABCC2. Therefore, the Cry2Ab resistance in T. ni is conferred by a novel but unknown genetic mechanism. PMID:26025894

  20. Resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Toxin Cry2Ab in Trichoplusia ni Is Conferred by a Novel Genetic Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaozhao; Kain, Wendy; Cassidy, Douglas; Wang, Ping

    2015-08-01

    The resistance to the Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxin Cry2Ab in a greenhouse-originated Trichoplusia ni strain resistant to both Bt toxins Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab was characterized. Biological assays determined that the Cry2Ab resistance in the T. ni strain was a monogenic recessive trait independent of Cry1Ac resistance, and there existed no significant cross-resistance between Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab in T. ni. From the dual-toxin-resistant T. ni strain, a strain resistant to Cry2Ab only was isolated, and the Cry2Ab resistance trait was introgressed into a susceptible laboratory strain to facilitate comparative analysis of the Cry2Ab resistance with the susceptible T. ni strain. Results from biochemical analysis showed no significant difference between the Cry2Ab-resistant and -susceptible T. ni larvae in midgut proteases, including caseinolytic proteolytic activity and zymogram profile and serine protease activities, in midgut aminopeptidase and alkaline phosphatase activity, and in midgut esterases and hemolymph plasma melanization activity. For analysis of genetic linkage of Cry2Ab resistance with potential Cry toxin receptor genes, molecular markers for the midgut cadherin, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and aminopeptidase N (APN) genes were identified between the original greenhouse-derived dual-toxin-resistant and the susceptible laboratory T. ni strains. Genetic linkage analysis showed that the Cry2Ab resistance in T. ni was not genetically associated with the midgut genes coding for the cadherin, ALP, and 6 APNs (APN1 to APN6) nor associated with the ABC transporter gene ABCC2. Therefore, the Cry2Ab resistance in T. ni is conferred by a novel but unknown genetic mechanism.

  1. Accessible Genetics Research Ethics Education (AGREE): A Web-Based Program for IRBs and Investigators

    SciTech Connect

    Sugarman, Jeremy; Lee, Linda

    2006-03-31

    The primary objective of this project was to design and evaluate a series of web-based educational modules on genetics research ethics for members of Institutional Review Boards and investigators to facilitate the development and oversight of important research that is sensitive to the relevant ethical, legal and social issues. After a needs assessment was completed in March of 2003, five online educational modules on the ethics of research in genetics were developed, tested, and made available through a host website for AGREE: http://agree.mc.duke.edu/index.html. The 5 modules are: (1) Ethics and Genetics Research in Populations; (2) Ethics in Behavioral Genetics Research; (3) Ethical Issues in Research on Gene-Environment Interactions; (4) Ethical Issues in Reproductive Genetics Research; and (5) Ethical Issues in Diagnostic and Therapeutic Research. The development process adopted a tested approach used at Duke University School of Medicine in providing education for researchers and IRB members, supplementing it with expert input and a rigorous evaluation. The host website also included a description of the AGREE; short bios on the AGREE Investigators and Expert Advisory Panel; streaming media of selected presentations from a conference, Working at the Frontiers of Law and Science: Applications of the Human Genome held October 2-3, 2003, at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; and links to online resources in genomics, research ethics, ethics in genomics research, and related organizations. The web site was active beginning with the posting of the first module and was maintained throughout the project period. We have also secured agreement to keep the site active an additional year beyond the project period. AGREE met its primary objective of creating web-based educational modules related to the ethical issues in genetics research. The modules have been disseminated widely. While it is clearly easier to judge the quality of the educational experience

  2. Twenty-Seventh Fungal Genetics Conference, Asilomar, CA, March 12-17, 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, Jonathan

    2013-03-17

    This meeting brings together ~900 international scientists to discuss the latest research on fungal genetics. Sessions of particular relevance to DOE include lignocellulose degradation, cellulose conversion to fermentable sugars, fermentation of sugars to fuel molecules. Other sessions cover fungal diseases of biomass crops (miscanthus, corn, switchgrass, etc.).

  3. Genetic diversity confers colony-level benefits due to individual immunity.

    PubMed

    Simone-Finstrom, Michael; Walz, Megan; Tarpy, David R

    2016-03-01

    Several costs and benefits arise as a consequence of eusociality and group-living. With increasing group size, spread of disease among nest-mates poses selective pressure on both individual immunity and group-level mechanisms of disease resistance (social immunity). Another factor known to influence colony-level expression of disease is intracolony genetic diversity, which in honeybees (Apis mellifera) is a direct function of the number of mates of the queen. Colonies headed by queens with higher mating numbers have less variable infections of decreased intensity, though the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. By pathogen-challenging larvae in vitro, we decoupled larval immune response from mechanisms of social immunity. Our results show that baseline immunity and degree of immune response do not vary with genetic diversity. However, intracolony variance in antimicrobial peptide production after pathogen challenge decreases with increasing genetic diversity. This reduction in variability of the larval immune response could drive the mitigation of disease observed in genetically diverse colonies. © 2016 The Author(s).

  4. Genetic diversity confers colony-level benefits due to individual immunity

    PubMed Central

    Walz, Megan; Tarpy, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Several costs and benefits arise as a consequence of eusociality and group-living. With increasing group size, spread of disease among nest-mates poses selective pressure on both individual immunity and group-level mechanisms of disease resistance (social immunity). Another factor known to influence colony-level expression of disease is intracolony genetic diversity, which in honeybees (Apis mellifera) is a direct function of the number of mates of the queen. Colonies headed by queens with higher mating numbers have less variable infections of decreased intensity, though the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. By pathogen-challenging larvae in vitro, we decoupled larval immune response from mechanisms of social immunity. Our results show that baseline immunity and degree of immune response do not vary with genetic diversity. However, intracolony variance in antimicrobial peptide production after pathogen challenge decreases with increasing genetic diversity. This reduction in variability of the larval immune response could drive the mitigation of disease observed in genetically diverse colonies. PMID:26961896

  5. Environmentally co‐occurring mercury resistance plasmids are genetically and phenotypically diverse and confer variable context‐dependent fitness effects

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Ellie; Lilley, Andrew K.; Paterson, Steve; Spiers, Andrew J.; Brockhurst, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Plasmids are important mobile elements that can facilitate genetic exchange and local adaptation within microbial communities. We compared the sequences of four co‐occurring pQBR family environmental mercury resistance plasmids and measured their effects on competitive fitness of a P seudomonas fluorescens  SBW25 host, which was isolated at the same field site. Fitness effects of carriage differed between plasmids and were strongly context dependent, varying with medium, plasmid status of competitor and levels of environmental mercury. The plasmids also varied widely in their rates of conjugation and segregational loss. We found that few of the plasmid‐borne accessory genes could be ascribed functions, although we identified a putative chemotaxis operon, a type IV pilus‐encoding cluster and a region encoding putative arylsulfatase enzymes, which were conserved across geographically distant isolates. One plasmid, pQBR55, conferred the ability to catabolize sucrose. Transposons, including the mercury resistance Tn5042, appeared to have been acquired by different pQBR plasmids by recombination, indicating an important role for horizontal gene transfer in the recent evolution of pQBR plasmids. Our findings demonstrate extensive genetic and phenotypic diversity among co‐occurring members of a plasmid community and suggest a role for environmental heterogeneity in the maintenance of plasmid diversity. PMID:25969927

  6. Environmentally co-occurring mercury resistance plasmids are genetically and phenotypically diverse and confer variable context-dependent fitness effects.

    PubMed

    Hall, James P J; Harrison, Ellie; Lilley, Andrew K; Paterson, Steve; Spiers, Andrew J; Brockhurst, Michael A

    2015-12-01

    Plasmids are important mobile elements that can facilitate genetic exchange and local adaptation within microbial communities. We compared the sequences of four co-occurring pQBR family environmental mercury resistance plasmids and measured their effects on competitive fitness of a Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 host, which was isolated at the same field site. Fitness effects of carriage differed between plasmids and were strongly context dependent, varying with medium, plasmid status of competitor and levels of environmental mercury. The plasmids also varied widely in their rates of conjugation and segregational loss. We found that few of the plasmid-borne accessory genes could be ascribed functions, although we identified a putative chemotaxis operon, a type IV pilus-encoding cluster and a region encoding putative arylsulfatase enzymes, which were conserved across geographically distant isolates. One plasmid, pQBR55, conferred the ability to catabolize sucrose. Transposons, including the mercury resistance Tn5042, appeared to have been acquired by different pQBR plasmids by recombination, indicating an important role for horizontal gene transfer in the recent evolution of pQBR plasmids. Our findings demonstrate extensive genetic and phenotypic diversity among co-occurring members of a plasmid community and suggest a role for environmental heterogeneity in the maintenance of plasmid diversity.

  7. Proceedings of the sixth annual conference on fossil energy materials. Fossil Energy AR and TD Mateials Program

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, N.C.; Judkins, R.R.

    1992-07-01

    The Sixth Annual Conference on Fossil Energy Materials was held in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, on May 12--14, 1992. The meeting was sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Fossil Energy through the Advanced Research and Technology Development (AR&TD) Materials Program, and ASM International. The objective of the AR&TD Materials Program is to conduct research and development on materials for longer-term fossil energy applications as well as for generic needs of various fossil fuel technologies. The management of the Program has been decentralized to the DOE Field Office, Oak Ridge with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as the technical support contractor. The research is performed by staff members at ORNL and by a substantial number of researchers at other national laboratories, universities, and in private industry. The work is divided into the following categories: (1) ceramics, (2) development and corrosion resistance of iron aluminide, advanced austenitic and chromium-niobium alloys, and (3) technology assessment and technology transfer. This conference is held each year to review the work on all of the projects of the Program. The agenda for the meeting is given in Appendix A, and a list of attendees is presented in Appendix B. ASM International cosponsored the conference, for which we are especially grateful.

  8. A new crossover operator in genetic programming for object classification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mengjie; Gao, Xiaoying; Lou, Weijun

    2007-10-01

    The crossover operator has been considered "the centre of the storm" in genetic programming (GP). However, many existing GP approaches to object recognition suggest that the standard GP crossover is not sufficiently powerful in producing good child programs due to the totally random choice of the crossover points. To deal with this problem, this paper introduces an approach with a new crossover operator in GP for object recognition, particularly object classification. In this approach, a local hill-climbing search is used in constructing good building blocks, a weight called looseness is introduced to identify the good building blocks in individual programs, and the looseness values are used as heuristics in choosing appropriate crossover points to preserve good building blocks. This approach is examined and compared with the standard crossover operator and the headless chicken crossover (HCC) method on a sequence of object classification problems. The results suggest that this approach outperforms the HCC, the standard crossover, and the standard crossover operator with hill climbing on all of these problems in terms of the classification accuracy. Although this approach spends a bit longer time than the standard crossover operator, it significantly improves the system efficiency over the HCC method.

  9. Follow Through: Program and Policy Issues. Proceedings from the Conference on the Feasibility of Follow-Up Studies to the Follow Through Program (Washington, D.C., February 21, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramp, Eugene A., Ed.; Pederson, Colleen Smalter, Ed.

    Participants in this conference urged that arrangements be made for collecting and preserving information about participants, personnel, and organizations involved in the Follow Through Program, and for conducting long-term review studies of the program. Papers presented at the conference were: (1) "A Brief History" (Robert L. Egbert and…

  10. Texas Rural Health Care Program and Research Priorities for the 1980's. Report of a Conference Sponsored by the Texas Rural Health Field Services Program (Austin, Texas, April 18, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson-Caire, Donnie; And Others

    An invitational conference brought experts and concerned, active individuals together to review and identify research and program needs for rural Texas health care. The goals of the conference were to prioritize the top five program and research activities for rural health care in the 1980's, to develop a network of communication and cooperation…

  11. 18th U.S. Department of Energy Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Conference. Program

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-20

    This conference explored the latest developments in low-level radioactive waste management through presentations from professionals in both the public and the private sectors and special guests. The conference included two continuing education seminars, a workshop, exhibits, and a tour of Envirocare of Utah, Inc., one of America's three commercial low-level radioactive waste depositories.

  12. Women in engineering program advocates network (WEPAN): Evaluation of the fourth annual conference

    SciTech Connect

    Brainard, S.G.

    1994-08-01

    The 1994 WEPAN conference highlighted the establishment of the three Regional Centers for Women in Engineering, which are located at the University of Washington, Purdue University, and Stevens Insitute of Technology. An overall evaluation was conducted on the effectiveness of the conference, including the quality of plenary sessions, workshops, registration, accommodations and reception.

  13. A Report on the Peace Education Commission Program, International Peace Research Association Conference 2010, Sydney, Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toh, Swee-Hin

    2010-01-01

    From July 6th to 10th, 2010, International Peace Research Association (IPRA) held its biennial conference at the University of Sydney in Australia. Hosted by the University's Centre for Peace & Conflict Studies and coordinated by Jake Lynch and a team of dedicated staff and volunteers, the conference featured seven plenary panels and many…

  14. Genetic counseling services and development of training programs in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Juliana Mei-Har; Thong, Meow-Keong

    2013-12-01

    Genetic counseling service is urgently required in developing countries. In Malaysia, the first medical genetic service was introduced in 1994 at one of the main teaching hospitals in Kuala Lumpur. Two decades later, the medical genetic services have improved with the availability of genetic counseling, genetic testing and diagnosis, for both paediatric conditions and adult-onset inherited conditions, at four main centers of medical genetic services in Malaysia. Prenatal diagnosis services and assisted reproductive technologies are available at tertiary centres and private medical facilities. Positive developments include governmental recognition of Clinical Genetics as a subspecialty, increased funding for genetics services, development of medical ethics guidelines, and establishment of support groups. However, the country lacked qualified genetic counselors. Proposals were presented to policy-makers to develop genetic counseling courses. Challenges encountered included limited resources and public awareness, ethical dilemmas such as religious and social issues and inadequate genetic health professionals especially genetic counselors.

  15. SOME FEEDBACK FROM DISCUSSION GROUPS-NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON THE SELECTION AND USE OF PROGRAMED INSTRUCTION, JUNE 26, 27, 28, 1963.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1963

    CONFERENCE GROUPS MET TO CLARIFY POSITIONS AND UNDERSCORE PROBLEMS ON PROGRAMED INSTRUCTION. PROGRAMED INSTRUCTION SHOULD DEVELOP AN IMAGE THAT CONNOTES A PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION WITH ATTENTION TO THE SPECIFICS OF CONTENT, SHAPING, AND PROGRAM SELECTION AND USE. THE POPULAR APPEAL OF PROGRAMED INSTRUCTION MAY GO BEYOND PRESENT PRACTICE AND FOCUS…

  16. Genetic Risk Conferred from Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Towards Type II Diabetes Mellitus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-14

    1, 2 . Based on estimates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), this trend will result in the prevalence of 1 in 3...potential to translate into an evidence-based personalized medical approach through early detection, intervention, lifestyle modifications, and disease ...pre-identified SNPs among Tricare beneficiaries being treated for T2D and non- diseased “controls”; Specific aim 2: Identify genetic disparities in

  17. An empirical review: Characteristics of plant microsatellite markers that confer higher levels of genetic variation1

    PubMed Central

    Merritt, Benjamin J.; Culley, Theresa M.; Avanesyan, Alina; Stokes, Richard; Brzyski, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    During microsatellite marker development, researchers must choose from a pool of possible primer pairs to further test in their species of interest. In many cases, the goal is maximizing detectable levels of genetic variation. To guide researchers and determine which markers are associated with higher levels of genetic variation, we conducted a literature review based on 6782 genomic microsatellite markers published from 1997–2012. We examined relationships between heterozygosity (He or Ho) or allele number (A) with the following marker characteristics: repeat type, motif length, motif region, repeat frequency, and microsatellite size. Variation across taxonomic groups was also analyzed. There were significant differences between imperfect and perfect repeat types in A and He. Dinucleotide motifs exhibited significantly higher A, He, and Ho than most other motifs. Repeat frequency and motif region were positively correlated with A, He, and Ho, but correlations with microsatellite size were minimal. Higher taxonomic groups were disproportionately represented in the literature and showed little consistency. In conclusion, researchers should carefully consider marker characteristics so they can be tailored to the desired application. If researchers aim to target high genetic variation, dinucleotide motif lengths with large repeat frequencies may be best. PMID:26312192

  18. Practice-based competencies for accreditation of and training in graduate programs in genetic counseling.

    PubMed

    Fine, B A; Baker, D L; Fiddler, M B

    1996-09-01

    In January 1996, the American Board of Genetic Counseling (ABGC) adopted 27 practice-based competencies as a standard for assessing the training of graduate students in genetic counseling. These competencies were identified and refined through a collective, narrative process that took place from January through November 1994, and included directors of graduate programs in genetic counseling, ABGC board members and expert consultants. These competencies now form the basis of the document "Requirements for Graduate Programs in Genetic Counseling Seeking Accreditation by the American Board of Genetic Counseling" (American Board of Genetic Counseling, 1996). The competencies are organized into four domains and are presented and discussed in this article.

  19. Reversible circuit synthesis by genetic programming using dynamic gate libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abubakar, Mustapha Y.; Jung, Low Tang; Zakaria, Nordin; Younes, Ahmed; Abdel-Aty, Abdel-Haleem

    2017-06-01

    We have defined a new method for automatic construction of reversible logic circuits by using the genetic programming approach. The choice of the gate library is 100% dynamic. The algorithm is capable of accepting all possible combinations of the following gate types: NOT TOFFOLI, NOT PERES, NOT CNOT TOFFOLI, NOT CNOT SWAP FREDKIN, NOT CNOT TOFFOLI SWAP FREDKIN, NOT CNOT PERES, NOT CNOT SWAP FREDKIN PERES, NOT CNOT TOFFOLI PERES and NOT CNOT TOFFOLI SWAP FREDKIN PERES. Our method produced near optimum circuits in some cases when a particular subset of gate types was used in the library. Meanwhile, in some cases, optimal circuits were produced due to the heuristic nature of the algorithm. We compared the outcomes of our method with several existing synthesis methods, and it was shown that our algorithm performed relatively well compared to the previous synthesis methods in terms of the output efficiency of the algorithm and execution time as well.

  20. A Comparison of Genetic Programming Variants for Hyper-Heuristics

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Sean

    2015-03-01

    Modern society is faced with ever more complex problems, many of which can be formulated as generate-and-test optimization problems. General-purpose optimization algorithms are not well suited for real-world scenarios where many instances of the same problem class need to be repeatedly and efficiently solved, such as routing vehicles over highways with constantly changing traffic flows, because they are not targeted to a particular scenario. Hyper-heuristics automate the design of algorithms to create a custom algorithm for a particular scenario. Hyper-heuristics typically employ Genetic Programming (GP) and this project has investigated the relationship between the choice of GP and performance in Hyper-heuristics. Results are presented demonstrating the existence of problems for which there is a statistically significant performance differential between the use of different types of GP.

  1. Integer programming model for optimizing bus timetable using genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wihartiko, F. D.; Buono, A.; Silalahi, B. P.

    2017-01-01

    Bus timetable gave an information for passengers to ensure the availability of bus services. Timetable optimal condition happened when bus trips frequency could adapt and suit with passenger demand. In the peak time, the number of bus trips would be larger than the off-peak time. If the number of bus trips were more frequent than the optimal condition, it would make a high operating cost for bus operator. Conversely, if the number of trip was less than optimal condition, it would make a bad quality service for passengers. In this paper, the bus timetabling problem would be solved by integer programming model with modified genetic algorithm. Modification was placed in the chromosomes design, initial population recovery technique, chromosomes reconstruction and chromosomes extermination on specific generation. The result of this model gave the optimal solution with accuracy 99.1%.

  2. Genetic programming approach to extracting features from remotely sensed imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Theiler, J. P.; Perkins, S. J.; Harvey, N. R.; Szymanski, J. J.; Brumby, Steven P.

    2001-01-01

    Multi-instrument data sets present an interesting challenge to feature extraction algorithm developers. Beyond the immediate problems of spatial co-registration, the remote sensing scientist must explore a complex algorithm space in which both spatial and spectral signatures may be required to identify a feature of interest. We describe a genetic programming/supervised classifier software system, called Genie, which evolves and combines spatio-spectral image processing tools for remotely sensed imagery. We describe our representation of candidate image processing pipelines, and discuss our set of primitive image operators. Our primary application has been in the field of geospatial feature extraction, including wildfire scars and general land-cover classes, using publicly available multi-spectral imagery (MSI) and hyper-spectral imagery (HSI). Here, we demonstrate our system on Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM+) MSI. We exhibit an evolved pipeline, and discuss its operation and performance.

  3. Linking Programs and Resources for Rural Special Education. Proceedings of the Annual National Conference of the American Council on Rural Special Education (7th, Asheville, North Carolina, March 17-20, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Council on Rural Special Education.

    This conference focused on the theme of linking programs and resources for rural special education. This conference proceeding contains an overview and conference agenda booklet, abstracts and some full texts of conference presentations, including the following sampling of papers: "A Data Based Model for the Rural Model Aide in Special Education,"…

  4. Accurate construction of consensus genetic maps via integer linear programming.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yonghui; Close, Timothy J; Lonardi, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    We study the problem of merging genetic maps, when the individual genetic maps are given as directed acyclic graphs. The computational problem is to build a consensus map, which is a directed graph that includes and is consistent with all (or, the vast majority of) the markers in the input maps. However, when markers in the individual maps have ordering conflicts, the resulting consensus map will contain cycles. Here, we formulate the problem of resolving cycles in the context of a parsimonious paradigm that takes into account two types of errors that may be present in the input maps, namely, local reshuffles and global displacements. The resulting combinatorial optimization problem is, in turn, expressed as an integer linear program. A fast approximation algorithm is proposed, and an additional speedup heuristic is developed. Our algorithms were implemented in a software tool named MERGEMAP which is freely available for academic use. An extensive set of experiments shows that MERGEMAP consistently outperforms JOINMAP, which is the most popular tool currently available for this task, both in terms of accuracy and running time. MERGEMAP is available for download at http://www.cs.ucr.edu/~yonghui/mgmap.html.

  5. Equality Postponed: Continuing Barriers to Higher Education in the 1980s. Report from the Policy Conference on Postsecondary Programs for the Disadvantaged (Racine, Wisconsin, June 1982).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adolphus, Stephen H., Ed.

    Major barriers to equal access of minority and disadvantaged students to higher education are considered in eight papers and five responses from the 1982 Wingspread Conference on Postsecondary Programs for the Disadvantaged. Included is a policy statement from the conference that covers: quality education for all, the interrelatedness of education…

  6. Office of Special Education Programs' Annual Technical Assistance and Dissemination Conference Proceedings (4th, Washington, D.C., January 27-29, 1994).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academy for Educational Development, Washington, DC.

    This document presents the proceedings of a conference attended by Project Directors (or their designees) of projects funded by the Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) and having a significant component of technical assistance (TA) and/or dissemination activities. The conference was designed to provide new information to projects, to…

  7. A novel genetic programming approach for epileptic seizure detection.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Arpit; Tiwari, Aruna; Krishna, Ramesh; Varma, Vishaal

    2016-02-01

    The human brain is a delicate mix of neurons (brain cells), electrical impulses and chemicals, known as neurotransmitters. Any damage has the potential to disrupt the workings of the brain and cause seizures. These epileptic seizures are the manifestations of epilepsy. The electroencephalograph (EEG) signals register average neuronal activity from the cerebral cortex and label changes in activity over large areas. A detailed analysis of these electroencephalograph (EEG) signals provides valuable insights into the mechanisms instigating epileptic disorders. Moreover, the detection of interictal spikes and epileptic seizures in an EEG signal plays an important role in the diagnosis of epilepsy. Automatic seizure detection methods are required, as these epileptic seizures are volatile and unpredictable. This paper deals with an automated detection of epileptic seizures in EEG signals using empirical mode decomposition (EMD) for feature extraction and proposes a novel genetic programming (GP) approach for classifying the EEG signals. Improvements in the standard GP approach are made using a Constructive Genetic Programming (CGP) in which constructive crossover and constructive subtree mutation operators are introduced. A hill climbing search is integrated in crossover and mutation operators to remove the destructive nature of these operators. A new concept of selecting the Globally Prime offspring is also presented to select the best fitness offspring generated during crossover. To decrease the time complexity of GP, a new dynamic fitness value computation (DFVC) is employed to increase the computational speed. We conducted five different sets of experiments to evaluate the performance of the proposed model in the classification of different mixtures of normal, interictal and ictal signals, and the accuracies achieved are outstandingly high. The experimental results are compared with the existing methods on same datasets, and these results affirm the potential use of

  8. Regionalization of runoff models derived by genetic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heřmanovský, M.; Havlíček, V.; Hanel, M.; Pech, P.

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the potential of hydrological models derived by genetic programming (GP) to estimate runoff at ungauged catchments by regionalization. A set of 176 catchments from the MOPEX (Model Parameter Estimation Experiment) project was used for our analysis. Runoff models for each catchment were derived by genetic programming (hereafter GP models). A comparison of efficiency was made between GP models and three conceptual models (SAC-SMA, BTOPMC, GR4J). The efficiency of the GP models was in general comparable with that of the SAC-SMA and BTOPMC models but slightly lower (up to 10% for calibration and 15% in validation) than for the GR4J model. The relationship between the efficiency of the GP models and catchment descriptors (CDs) was investigated. From 13 available CDs the aridity index and mean catchment elevation explained most of the variation in the efficiency of the GP models. The runoff for each catchment was then estimated considering GP models from single or multiple physically similar catchments (donors). Better results were obtained with multiple donor catchments. Increasing the number of CDs used for quantification of physical similarity improves the efficiency of the GP models in runoff simulation. The best regionalization results were obtained with 6 CDs together with 6 donors. Our results show that transfer of the GP models is possible and leads to satisfactory results when applied at physically similar catchments. The GP models can be therefore used as an alternative for runoff modelling at ungauged catchments if similar gauged catchments can be identified and successfully simulated.

  9. 2012 Gordon Research Conference on Rock Deformation - Formal Schedule and Speaker/Poster Program

    SciTech Connect

    Kelemen, Peter

    2012-08-24

    The Gordon Research Conference on ROCK DEFORMATION was held at Proctor Academy Andover, New Hampshire, August 19-24, 2012. The Conference was well-attended with 124 participants (attendees list attached). The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both U.S. and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. Of the 124 attendees, 66 voluntarily responded to a general inquiry regarding ethnicity which appears on our registration forms. Of the 66 respondents, 8% were Minorities – 2% Hispanic, 6% Asian and 0% African American. Approximately 27% of the participants at the 2012 meeting were women. In designing the formal speakers program, emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field. There was a conscious effort to stimulate lively discussion about the key issues in the field today. Time for formal presentations was limited in the interest of group discussions. In order that more scientists could communicate their most recent results, poster presentation time was scheduled. Attached is a copy of the formal schedule and speaker program and the poster program. In addition to these formal interactions, "free time" was scheduled to allow informal discussions. Such discussions are fostering new collaborations and joint efforts in the field. Feedback processes are vitally important in controlling the rates and mechanisms of rock deformation. Positive feedbacks lead to accelerating rates, and commonly to spatial focusing. Localization and acceleration of creep is often associated with stress and/or strain rate dependent grain size reduction, frictional heating, or viscous shear heating. The presence of melt may help to localize and accelerate deformation, and in turn deformation may help to localize melt transport. Volume changes during retrograde metamorphic reactions may, under some circumstances, lead

  10. 17th international free electron laser conference and 2nd international FEL users` workshop. Program and abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    This workshop and conference were held together to enhance the interaction between FEL builders and users. Current topics of interest in FEL research form the basis for the oral presentations. The program for the User`s workshop was developed in a similar manner. Storage rings, linear accelerators, materials research and applications are all considered topics. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  11. Outcomes of a Genetics Education Program for Nursing Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prows, Cynthia A.; Hetteberg, Carol; Johnson, Nancy; Latta, Kathy; Lovell, Anne; Saal, Howard M.; Warren, Nancy Steinberg

    2003-01-01

    Summer institutes with follow-up continuing education sought to increase nursing faculty's knowledge and teaching of genetics. Outcome measures following four summer institutes (n=126) revealed significant improvements in genetics knowledge, increased genetics content in curricula, and development of new elective genetics courses. (Contains 22…

  12. Common variation in ISL1 confers genetic susceptibility for human congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Kristen N; Hakonarson, Hakon; Kim, Cecilia E; Doevendans, Pieter A; Koeleman, Bobby P C; Mital, Seema; Raue, Jennifer; Glessner, Joseph T; Coles, John G; Moreno, Victor; Granger, Anne; Gruber, Stephen B; Gruber, Peter J

    2010-05-26

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common birth abnormality and the etiology is unknown in the overwhelming majority of cases. ISLET1 (ISL1) is a transcription factor that marks cardiac progenitor cells and generates diverse multipotent cardiovascular cell lineages. The fundamental role of ISL1 in cardiac morphogenesis makes this an exceptional candidate gene to consider as a cause of complex congenital heart disease. We evaluated whether genetic variation in ISL1 fits the common variant-common disease hypothesis. A 2-stage case-control study examined 27 polymorphisms mapping to the ISL1 locus in 300 patients with complex congenital heart disease and 2,201 healthy pediatric controls. Eight genic and flanking ISL1 SNPs were significantly associated with complex congenital heart disease. A replication study analyzed these candidate SNPs in 1,044 new cases and 3,934 independent controls and confirmed that genetic variation in ISL1 is associated with risk of non-syndromic congenital heart disease. Our results demonstrate that two different ISL1 haplotypes contribute to risk of CHD in white and black/African American populations.

  13. Mitochondrial DNA Haplogroup R Confers a Genetic Risk Factor for Intrauterine Adhesion in Han Women Population.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Zhu, Libo; Huang, Xiufeng; Xu, Ping; Chen, Zhengyun; Huang, Qiongshi; Zhang, Xinmei

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether a specific mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroup is implicated in the pathogenesis of intrauterine adhesion (IUA). Peripheral blood samples were collected from 486 women with (case group, n = 154) and without IUA (control group, n = 332) at the Women's Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine. Genomic DNA was extracted from the blood, and the mtDNA haplogroups of Han women M, N and R were determined by sequencing hypervariable mtDNA segments and testing diagnostic polymorphisms in the mtDNA coding region. Women with mtDNA haplogroup R had an independently increased genetic risk factor for IUA with an OR 1.77 (95% CI 1.16-2.70, p = 0.009) compared with women without. Moreover, repeated intrauterine surgery within 1 month and number of intrauterine operations were both significantly associated with IUA (p < 0.001). These results suggest that mtDNA haplogroup R, one of the main mtDNA haplogroups in Han population, is a strong independent genetic risk factor for women with IUA. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Tree genetics defines fungal partner communities that may confer drought tolerance.

    PubMed

    Gehring, Catherine A; Sthultz, Christopher M; Flores-Rentería, Lluvia; Whipple, Amy V; Whitham, Thomas G

    2017-09-25

    Plant genetic variation and soil microorganisms are individually known to influence plant responses to climate change, but the interactive effects of these two factors are largely unknown. Using long-term observational studies in the field and common garden and greenhouse experiments of a foundation tree species (Pinus edulis) and its mutualistic ectomycorrhizal fungal (EMF) associates, we show that EMF community composition is under strong plant genetic control. Seedlings acquire the EMF community of their seed source trees (drought tolerant vs. drought intolerant), even when exposed to inoculum from the alternate tree type. Drought-tolerant trees had 25% higher growth and a third the mortality of drought-intolerant trees over the course of 10 y of drought in the wild, traits that were also observed in their seedlings in a common garden. Inoculation experiments show that EMF communities are critical to drought tolerance. Drought-tolerant and drought-intolerant seedlings grew similarly when provided sterile EMF inoculum, but drought-tolerant seedlings grew 25% larger than drought-intolerant seedlings under dry conditions when each seedling type developed its distinct EMF community. This demonstration that particular combinations of plant genotype and mutualistic EMF communities improve the survival and growth of trees with drought is especially important, given the vulnerability of forests around the world to the warming and drying conditions predicted for the future.

  15. Structural health monitoring feature design by genetic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Dustin Y.; Todd, Michael D.

    2014-09-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) systems provide real-time damage and performance information for civil, aerospace, and other high-capital or life-safety critical structures. Conventional data processing involves pre-processing and extraction of low-dimensional features from in situ time series measurements. The features are then input to a statistical pattern recognition algorithm to perform the relevant classification or regression task necessary to facilitate decisions by the SHM system. Traditional design of signal processing and feature extraction algorithms can be an expensive and time-consuming process requiring extensive system knowledge and domain expertise. Genetic programming, a heuristic program search method from evolutionary computation, was recently adapted by the authors to perform automated, data-driven design of signal processing and feature extraction algorithms for statistical pattern recognition applications. The proposed method, called Autofead, is particularly suitable to handle the challenges inherent in algorithm design for SHM problems where the manifestation of damage in structural response measurements is often unclear or unknown. Autofead mines a training database of response measurements to discover information-rich features specific to the problem at hand. This study provides experimental validation on three SHM applications including ultrasonic damage detection, bearing damage classification for rotating machinery, and vibration-based structural health monitoring. Performance comparisons with common feature choices for each problem area are provided demonstrating the versatility of Autofead to produce significant algorithm improvements on a wide range of problems.

  16. Empirical valence bond models for reactive potential energy surfaces: A parallel multilevel genetic program approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellucci, Michael A.; Coker, David F.

    2011-07-01

    We describe a new method for constructing empirical valence bond potential energy surfaces using a parallel multilevel genetic program (PMLGP). Genetic programs can be used to perform an efficient search through function space and parameter space to find the best functions and sets of parameters that fit energies obtained by ab initio electronic structure calculations. Building on the traditional genetic program approach, the PMLGP utilizes a hierarchy of genetic programming on two different levels. The lower level genetic programs are used to optimize coevolving populations in parallel while the higher level genetic program (HLGP) is used to optimize the genetic operator probabilities of the lower level genetic programs. The HLGP allows the algorithm to dynamically learn the mutation or combination of mutations that most effectively increase the fitness of the populations, causing a significant increase in the algorithm's accuracy and efficiency. The algorithm's accuracy and efficiency is tested against a standard parallel genetic program with a variety of one-dimensional test cases. Subsequently, the PMLGP is utilized to obtain an accurate empirical valence bond model for proton transfer in 3-hydroxy-gamma-pyrone in gas phase and protic solvent.

  17. Empirical valence bond models for reactive potential energy surfaces: a parallel multilevel genetic program approach.

    PubMed

    Bellucci, Michael A; Coker, David F

    2011-07-28

    We describe a new method for constructing empirical valence bond potential energy surfaces using a parallel multilevel genetic program (PMLGP). Genetic programs can be used to perform an efficient search through function space and parameter space to find the best functions and sets of parameters that fit energies obtained by ab initio electronic structure calculations. Building on the traditional genetic program approach, the PMLGP utilizes a hierarchy of genetic programming on two different levels. The lower level genetic programs are used to optimize coevolving populations in parallel while the higher level genetic program (HLGP) is used to optimize the genetic operator probabilities of the lower level genetic programs. The HLGP allows the algorithm to dynamically learn the mutation or combination of mutations that most effectively increase the fitness of the populations, causing a significant increase in the algorithm's accuracy and efficiency. The algorithm's accuracy and efficiency is tested against a standard parallel genetic program with a variety of one-dimensional test cases. Subsequently, the PMLGP is utilized to obtain an accurate empirical valence bond model for proton transfer in 3-hydroxy-gamma-pyrone in gas phase and protic solvent.

  18. A Comparative Study of "The International Educational Technology Conference" (IETC) and "The International Conference on Computers in Education" (ICCE): The Program, Essay Distribution, the Themes, and Research Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Gwo-Dong; Chen, Chun-Hsiang; Wang, Chin-Yeh; Li, Liang-Yi

    2012-01-01

    The article aims to compare international conferences, "The International Educational Technology Conference" (IETC, 2011) and "The International Conference on Computers in Education" (ICCE, 2010), from various dimensions. The comparison is expected to conclude a better approach for every IETC and ICCE to be held. (Contains 4…

  19. Classifying nucleic acid sub-sequences as introns or exons using genetic programming

    SciTech Connect

    Handley, S.

    1995-12-31

    An evolutionary computation technique, genetic programming, created programs that classify messenger RNA sequences into one of two classes: (1) the sequence is expressed as (part of) a protein (an exon), or (2) not expressed as protein (an intron).

  20. 2009 Gordon Research Conference on Photochemistry: Formal Schedule and Speaker/Poster Program

    SciTech Connect

    Wasielewski, Michael

    2009-07-05

    The impact of photochemistry on diverse fields ranging from materials and environmental science to biology and medicine has never been greater. The 2009 Gordon Conference on Photochemistry will highlight recent advances in these key areas while also presenting the latest research on new photochemical reactions and mechanistic studies. Session topics will include: development of new chromophores, light harvesting materials, solar energy conversion, photocontrolled biomolecules, light-triggered amplification reactions, and advanced bioimaging techniques. The Conference will continue its 45 year history of promoting interactions between fundamental and applied scientists, a hallmark of the Gordon Conferences. In addition, oral presentations, poster sessions and informal discussions will provide opportunities for junior scientists and students to present their own work and discuss their results with leaders in the field. Applicants to the Conference are encouraged to submit abstracts for poster presentations in order to gain visibility and feedback on their research. In addition, a number of poster abstracts will be selected for presentation as short talks.

  1. Eighth SIAM conference on parallel processing for scientific computing: Final program and abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    This SIAM conference is the premier forum for developments in parallel numerical algorithms, a field that has seen very lively and fruitful developments over the past decade, and whose health is still robust. Themes for this conference were: combinatorial optimization; data-parallel languages; large-scale parallel applications; message-passing; molecular modeling; parallel I/O; parallel libraries; parallel software tools; parallel compilers; particle simulations; problem-solving environments; and sparse matrix computations.

  2. Heterozygosity for the alpha1-antitrypsin Z allele may confer genetic risk of cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mihalache, F; Höblinger, A; Grünhage, F; Krawczyk, M; Gärtner, B C; Acalovschi, M; Sauerbruch, T; Lammert, F; Zimmer, V

    2011-02-01

    Alpha1-antitrypsin (α1AT) deficiency caused by Z allele homozygosity represents a well-established risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma. Previous studies have also implicated α1AT Z heterozygosity in cholangiocarcinogenesis. To assess the 'common' Z and S alleles as well as the promoter variant rs8004738 for association with cholangiocarcinoma. We genotyped 182 Caucasian patients and 350 controls for rs28929474 (Z), rs17580 (S) and the variant rs8004738. Exploratory analyses were performed in relation to gender and cholangiocarcinoma localisation. rs28929474 was significantly enriched in the cholangiocarcinoma group (4.1 vs. 1.7%; OR 2.46, 95% CI 1.14-5.32; Bonferroni corrected p(c) = 0.036), reinforced by Armitage trend testing (OR 2.53; p(c) = 0.032). The rs8004738 (promoter) minor allele tended to be overrepresented in Z heterozygotes (30.0 vs. 16.7%: P = 0.13). Exploratory data analyses suggested a high genetic risk for extrahepatic tumour localisation (OR 3.0; p(c) = 0.016) and potentially female Z allele carriers (OR 3.37; unadjusted P = 0.022, p(c) = 0.088). These data point to a novel role of α1AT Z heterozygosity as a potential genetic susceptibility factor for cholangiocarcinoma formation and suggest a contribution of aberrant α1AT function in biliary carcinogenesis. However, given the overall low rs28929474 minor allele frequency, larger studies are warranted to confirm and extend our findings. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Yeast functional screen to identify genetic determinants capable of conferring abiotic stress tolerance in Jatropha curcas

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Environmentally inflicted stresses such as salinity and drought limit the plant productivity both in natural and agricultural system. Increasing emphasis has been directed to molecular breeding strategies to enhance the intrinsic ability of plant to survive stress conditions. Functional screens in microorganisms with heterologous genes are a rapid, effective and powerful tool to identify stress tolerant genes in plants. Jatropha curcas (Physic nut) has been identified as a potential source of biodiesel plant. In order to improve its productivity under stress conditions to benefit commercial plantations, we initiated prospecting of novel genes expressed during stress in J. curcas that can be utilized to enhance stress tolerance ability of plant. Results To identify genes expressed during salt tolerance, cDNA expression libraries were constructed from salt-stressed roots of J. curcas, regulated under the control of the yeast GAL1 system. Using a replica based screening, twenty thousand yeast transformants were screened to identify transformants expressing heterologous gene sequences from J. curcas with enhanced ability to tolerate stress. From the screen we obtained 32 full length genes from J. curcas [GenBank accession numbers FJ489601-FJ489611, FJ619041-FJ619057 and FJ623457-FJ623460] that can confer abiotic stress tolerance. As a part of this screen, we optimized conditions for salt stress in J. curcas, defined parameters for salt stress in yeast, as well as isolated three salt hypersensitive yeast strains shs-2, shs-6 and shs-8 generated through a process of random mutagenesis, and exhibited growth retardation beyond 750 mM NaCl. Further, we demonstrated complementation of the salt sensitive phenotypes in the shs mutants, and analyzed the expression patterns for selected J. curcas genes obtained from the screen in both leaf and root tissues after salt stress treatments. Conclusions The approach described in this report provides a rapid and universal

  4. 76 FR 72424 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request Information Program on the Genetic Testing Registry

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-23

    ... Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request Information Program on the Genetic Testing Registry AGENCY... Genetic Testing Registry; Type of Information Collection Request: New collection; Need and Use of Information Collection: Laboratory tests for more than 2,000 genetic conditions are available; however,...

  5. Genetic modulation of lipid profiles following lifestyle modification or metformin treatment: the Diabetes Prevention Program.

    PubMed

    Pollin, Toni I; Isakova, Tamara; Jablonski, Kathleen A; de Bakker, Paul I W; Taylor, Andrew; McAteer, Jarred; Pan, Qing; Horton, Edward S; Delahanty, Linda M; Altshuler, David; Shuldiner, Alan R; Goldberg, Ronald B; Florez, Jose C; Franks, Paul W

    2012-01-01

    Weight-loss interventions generally improve lipid profiles and reduce cardiovascular disease risk, but effects are variable and may depend on genetic factors. We performed a genetic association analysis of data from 2,993 participants in the Diabetes Prevention Program to test the hypotheses that a genetic risk score (GRS) based on deleterious alleles at 32 lipid-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms modifies the effects of lifestyle and/or metformin interventions on lipid levels and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) lipoprotein subfraction size and number. Twenty-three loci previously associated with fasting LDL-C, HDL-C, or triglycerides replicated (P = 0.04-1 × 10(-17)). Except for total HDL particles (r = -0.03, P = 0.26), all components of the lipid profile correlated with the GRS (partial |r| = 0.07-0.17, P = 5 × 10(-5)-1 10(-19)). The GRS was associated with higher baseline-adjusted 1-year LDL cholesterol levels (β = +0.87, SEE ± 0.22 mg/dl/allele, P = 8 × 10(-5), P(interaction) = 0.02) in the lifestyle intervention group, but not in the placebo (β = +0.20, SEE ± 0.22 mg/dl/allele, P = 0.35) or metformin (β = -0.03, SEE ± 0.22 mg/dl/allele, P = 0.90; P(interaction) = 0.64) groups. Similarly, a higher GRS predicted a greater number of baseline-adjusted small LDL particles at 1 year in the lifestyle intervention arm (β = +0.30, SEE ± 0.012 ln nmol/L/allele, P = 0.01, P(interaction) = 0.01) but not in the placebo (β = -0.002, SEE ± 0.008 ln nmol/L/allele, P = 0.74) or metformin (β = +0.013, SEE ± 0.008 nmol/L/allele, P = 0.12; P(interaction) = 0.24) groups. Our findings suggest that a high genetic burden confers an adverse lipid profile and predicts attenuated response in LDL-C levels and small LDL particle number to dietary and physical activity interventions aimed at weight loss.

  6. Genetic Modulation of Lipid Profiles following Lifestyle Modification or Metformin Treatment: The Diabetes Prevention Program

    PubMed Central

    Jablonski, Kathleen A.; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Taylor, Andrew; McAteer, Jarred; Pan, Qing; Horton, Edward S.; Delahanty, Linda M.; Altshuler, David; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Goldberg, Ronald B.; Florez, Jose C.; Bray, George A.; Culbert, Iris W.; Champagne, Catherine M.; Eberhardt, Barbara; Greenway, Frank; Guillory, Fonda G.; Herbert, April A.; Jeffirs, Michael L.; Kennedy, Betty M.; Lovejoy, Jennifer C.; Morris, Laura H.; Melancon, Lee E.; Ryan, Donna; Sanford, Deborah A.; Smith, Kenneth G.; Smith, Lisa L.; Amant, Julia A. St.; Tulley, Richard T.; Vicknair, Paula C.; Williamson, Donald; Zachwieja, Jeffery J.; Polonsky, Kenneth S.; Tobian, Janet; Ehrmann, David; Matulik, Margaret J.; Clark, Bart; Czech, Kirsten; DeSandre, Catherine; Hilbrich, Ruthanne; McNabb, Wylie; Semenske, Ann R.; Caro, Jose F.; Watson, Pamela G.; Goldstein, Barry J.; Smith, Kellie A.; Mendoza, Jewel; Liberoni, Renee; Pepe, Constance; Spandorfer, John; Donahue, Richard P.; Goldberg, Ronald B.; Prineas, Ronald; Rowe, Patricia; Calles, Jeanette; Cassanova-Romero, Paul; Florez, Hermes J.; Giannella, Anna; Kirby, Lascelles; Larreal, Carmen; McLymont, Valerie; Mendez, Jadell; Ojito, Juliet; Perry, Arlette; Saab, Patrice; Haffner, Steven M.; Montez, Maria G.; Lorenzo, Carlos; Martinez, Arlene; Hamman, Richard F.; Nash, Patricia V.; Testaverde, Lisa; Anderson, Denise R.; Ballonoff, Larry B.; Bouffard, Alexis; Calonge, B. Ned; Delve, Lynne; Farago, Martha; Hill, James O.; Hoyer, Shelley R.; Jortberg, Bonnie T.; Lenz, Dione; Miller, Marsha; Price, David W.; Regensteiner, Judith G.; Seagle, Helen; Smith, Carissa M.; Steinke, Sheila C.; VanDorsten, Brent; Horton, Edward S.; Lawton, Kathleen E.; Arky, Ronald A.; Bryant, Marybeth; Burke, Jacqueline P.; Caballero, Enrique; Callaphan, Karen M.; Ganda, Om P.; Franklin, Therese; Jackson, Sharon D.; Jacobsen, Alan M.; Jacobsen, Alan M.; Kula, Lyn M.; Kocal, Margaret; Malloy, Maureen A.; Nicosia, Maryanne; Oldmixon, Cathryn F.; Pan, Jocelyn; Quitingon, Marizel; Rubtchinsky, Stacy; Seely, Ellen W.; Schweizer, Dana; Simonson, Donald; Smith, Fannie; Solomon, Caren G.; Warram, James; Kahn, Steven E.; Montgomery, Brenda K.; Fujimoto, Wilfred; Knopp, Robert H.; Lipkin, Edward W.; Marr, Michelle; Trence, Dace; Kitabchi, Abbas E.; Murphy, Mary E.; Applegate, William B.; Bryer-Ash, Michael; Frieson, Sandra L.; Imseis, Raed; Lambeth, Helen; Lichtermann, Lynne C.; Oktaei, Hooman; Rutledge, Lily M.K.; Sherman, Amy R.; Smith, Clara M.; Soberman, Judith E.; Williams-Cleaves, Beverly; Metzger, Boyd E.; Johnson, Mariana K.; Behrends, Catherine; Cook, Michelle; Fitzgibbon, Marian; Giles, Mimi M.; Heard, Deloris; Johnson, Cheryl K.H.; Larsen, Diane; Lowe, Anne; Lyman, Megan; McPherson, David; Molitch, Mark E.; Pitts, Thomas; Reinhart, Renee; Roston, Susan; Schinleber, Pamela A.; Nathan, David M.; McKitrick, Charles; Turgeon, Heather; Abbott, Kathy; Anderson, Ellen; Bissett, Laurie; Cagliero, Enrico; Florez, Jose C.; Delahanty, Linda; Goldman, Valerie; Poulos, Alexandra; Olefsky, Jerrold M.; Carrion-Petersen, Mary Lou; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Edelman, Steven V.; Henry, Robert R.; Horne, Javiva; Janesch, Simona Szerdi; Leos, Diana; Mudaliar, Sundar; Polonsky, William; Smith, Jean; Vejvoda, Karen; Pi-Sunyer, F. Xavier; Lee, Jane E.; Allison, David B.; Aronoff, Nancy J.; Crandall, Jill P.; Foo, Sandra T.; Pal, Carmen; Parkes, Kathy; Pena, Mary Beth; Rooney, Ellen S.; Wye, Gretchen E.H. Van; Viscovich, Kristine A.; Marrero, David G.; Prince, Melvin J.; Kelly, Susie M.; Dotson, Yolanda F.; Fineberg, Edwin S.; Guare, John C; Hadden, Angela M.; Ignaut, James M.; Jackson, Marcia L.; Kirkman, Marion S.; Mather, Kieren J.; Porter, Beverly D.; Roach, Paris J.; Rowland, Nancy D.; Wheeler, Madelyn L.; Ratner, Robert E.; Youssef, Gretchen; Shapiro, Sue; Bavido-Arrage, Catherine; Boggs, Geraldine; Bronsord, Marjorie; Brown, Ernestine; Cheatham, Wayman W.; Cola, Susan; Evans, Cindy; Gibbs, Peggy; Kellum, Tracy; Levatan, Claresa; Nair, Asha K.; Passaro, Maureen; Uwaifo, Gabriel; Saad, Mohammed F.; Budget, Maria; Jinagouda, Sujata; Akbar, Khan; Conzues, Claudia; Magpuri, Perpetua; Ngo, Kathy; Rassam, Amer; Waters, Debra; Xapthalamous, Kathy; Santiago, Julio V.; Dagogo-Jack, Samuel; White, Neil H.; Das, Samia; Santiago, Ana; Brown, Angela; Fisher, Edwin; Hurt, Emma; Jones, Tracy; Kerr, Michelle; Ryder, Lucy; Wernimont, Cormarie; Saudek, Christopher D.; Bradley, Vanessa; Sullivan, Emily; Whittington, Tracy; Abbas, Caroline; Brancati, Frederick L.; Clark, Jeanne M.; Charleston, Jeanne B.; Freel, Janice; Horak, Katherine; Jiggetts, Dawn; Johnson, Deloris; Joseph, Hope; Loman, Kimberly; Mosley, Henry; Rubin, Richard R.; Samuels, Alafia; Stewart, Kerry J.; Williamson, Paula; Schade, David S.; Adams, Karwyn S.; Johannes, Carolyn; Atler, Leslie F.; Boyle, Patrick J.; Burge, Mark R.; Canady, Janene L.; Chai, Lisa; Gonzales, Ysela; Hernandez-McGinnis, Doris A.; Katz, Patricia; King, Carolyn; Rassam, Amer; Rubinchik, Sofya; Senter, Willette; Waters, Debra; Shamoon, Harry; Brown, Janet O.; Adorno, Elsie; Cox, Liane; Crandall, Jill; Duffy, Helena; Engel, Samuel; Friedler, Allison; Howard-Century, Crystal J.; Kloiber, Stacey; Longchamp, Nadege; Martinez, Helen; Pompi, Dorothy; Scheindlin, Jonathan; Violino, Elissa; Walker, Elizabeth; Wylie-Rosett, Judith; Zimmerman, Elise; Zonszein, Joel; Orchard, Trevor; Wing, Rena R.; Koenning, Gaye; Kramer, M. Kaye; Barr, Susan; Boraz, Miriam; Clifford, Lisa; Culyba, Rebecca; Frazier, Marlene; Gilligan, Ryan; Harrier, Susan; Harris, Louann; Jeffries, Susan; Kriska, Andrea; Manjoo, Qurashia; Mullen, Monica; Noel, Alicia; Otto, Amy; Semler, Linda; Smith, Cheryl F.; Smith, Marie; Venditti, Elizabeth; Weinzierl, Valarie; Williams, Katherine V.; Wilson, Tara; Arakaki, Richard F.; Latimer, Renee W.; Baker-Ladao, Narleen K.; Beddow, Ralph; Dias, Lorna; Inouye, Jillian; Mau, Marjorie K.; Mikami, Kathy; Mohideen, Pharis; Odom, Sharon K.; Perry, Raynette U.; Knowler, William C.; Cooeyate, Norman; Hoskin, Mary A.; Percy, Carol A.; Acton, Kelly J.; Andre, Vickie L.; Barber, Rosalyn; Begay, Shandiin; Bennett, Peter H.; Benson, Mary Beth; Bird, Evelyn C.; Broussard, Brenda A.; Chavez, Marcella; Dacawyma, Tara; Doughty, Matthew S.; Duncan, Roberta; Edgerton, Cyndy; Ghahate, Jacqueline M.; Glass, Justin; Glass, Martia; Gohdes, Dorothy; Grant, Wendy; Hanson, Robert L.; Horse, Ellie; Ingraham, Louise E.; Jackson, Merry; Jay, Priscilla; Kaskalla, Roylen S.; Kessler, David; Kobus, Kathleen M.; Krakoff, Jonathan; Manus, Catherine; Michaels, Sara; Morgan, Tina; Nashboo, Yolanda; Nelson, Julie A.; Poirier, Steven; Polczynski, Evette; Reidy, Mike; Roumain, Jeanine; Rowse, Debra; Sangster, Sandra; Sewenemewa, Janet; Tonemah, Darryl; Wilson, Charlton; Yazzie, Michelle; Bain, Raymond; Fowler, Sarah; Brenneman, Tina; Abebe, Solome; Bamdad, Julie; Callaghan, Jackie; Edelstein, Sharon L.; Gao, Yuping; Grimes, Kristina L.; Grover, Nisha; Haffner, Lori; Jones, Steve; Jones, Tara L.; Katz, Richard; Lachin, John M.; Mucik, Pamela; Orlosky, Robert; Rochon, James; Sapozhnikova, Alla; Sherif, Hanna; Stimpson, Charlotte; Temprosa, Marinella; Walker-Murray, Fredricka; Marcovina, Santica; Strylewicz, Greg; Aldrich, F. Alan; O'Leary, Dan; Stamm, Elizabeth; Rautaharju, Pentti; Prineas, Ronald J.; Alexander, Teresa; Campbell, Charles; Hall, Sharon; Li, Yabing; Mills, Margaret; Pemberton, Nancy; Rautaharju, Farida; Zhang, Zhuming; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth; Moran, Robert R.; Ganiats, Ted; David, Kristin; Sarkin, Andrew J.; Eastman, R.; Fradkin, Judith; Garfield, Sanford; Gregg, Edward; Zhang, Ping; Herman, William; Florez, Jose C.; Altshuler, David; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Franks, Paul W.; Hanson, Robert L.; Jablonski, Kathleen; Knowler, William C.; McAteer, Jarred B.; Pollin, Toni I.; Shuldiner, Alan R.

    2012-01-01

    Weight-loss interventions generally improve lipid profiles and reduce cardiovascular disease risk, but effects are variable and may depend on genetic factors. We performed a genetic association analysis of data from 2,993 participants in the Diabetes Prevention Program to test the hypotheses that a genetic risk score (GRS) based on deleterious alleles at 32 lipid-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms modifies the effects of lifestyle and/or metformin interventions on lipid levels and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) lipoprotein subfraction size and number. Twenty-three loci previously associated with fasting LDL-C, HDL-C, or triglycerides replicated (P = 0.04–1×10−17). Except for total HDL particles (r = −0.03, P = 0.26), all components of the lipid profile correlated with the GRS (partial |r| = 0.07–0.17, P = 5×10−5–1×10−19). The GRS was associated with higher baseline-adjusted 1-year LDL cholesterol levels (β = +0.87, SEE±0.22 mg/dl/allele, P = 8×10−5, P interaction = 0.02) in the lifestyle intervention group, but not in the placebo (β = +0.20, SEE±0.22 mg/dl/allele, P = 0.35) or metformin (β = −0.03, SEE±0.22 mg/dl/allele, P = 0.90; P interaction = 0.64) groups. Similarly, a higher GRS predicted a greater number of baseline-adjusted small LDL particles at 1 year in the lifestyle intervention arm (β = +0.30, SEE±0.012 ln nmol/L/allele, P = 0.01, P interaction = 0.01) but not in the placebo (β = −0.002, SEE±0.008 ln nmol/L/allele, P = 0.74) or metformin (β = +0.013, SEE±0.008 nmol/L/allele, P = 0.12; P interaction = 0.24) groups. Our findings suggest that a high genetic burden confers an adverse lipid profile and predicts attenuated response in LDL-C levels and small LDL particle number to dietary and physical activity interventions aimed at weight loss. PMID:22951888

  7. Genetic programming over context-free languages with linear constraints for the knapsack problem: first results.

    PubMed

    Bruhn, Peter; Geyer-Schulz, Andreas

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce genetic programming over context-free languages with linear constraints for combinatorial optimization, apply this method to several variants of the multidimensional knapsack problem, and discuss its performance relative to Michalewicz's genetic algorithm with penalty functions. With respect to Michalewicz's approach, we demonstrate that genetic programming over context-free languages with linear constraints improves convergence. A final result is that genetic programming over context-free languages with linear constraints is ideally suited to modeling complementarities between items in a knapsack problem: The more complementarities in the problem, the stronger the performance in comparison to its competitors.

  8. Shift Schedules and Intern Work Hours, Patient Numbers, Conference Attendance, and Sleep at a Single Pediatric Residency Program.

    PubMed

    Kocolas, Irene; Day, Kristen; King, Marta; Stevenson, Adam; Sheng, Xiaoming; Hobson, Wendy; Bruse, Jaime; Bale, James

    2017-03-01

    The effects of 2011 Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) duty hour standards on intern work hours, patient load, conference attendance, and sleep have not been fully determined. We prospectively compared intern work hours, patient numbers, conference attendance, sleep duration, pattern, and quality in a 2011 ACGME duty hour-compliant shift schedule with a 2003 ACGME duty hour-compliant call schedule at a single pediatric residency program. Interns were assigned to shift or call schedules during 4 alternate months in the winter of 2010-2011. Work hours, patient numbers, conference attendance, sleep duration, pattern, and quality were tracked. Interns worked significantly fewer hours per week on day (73.2 hours) or night (71.6 hours) shifts than during q4 call (79.6 hours; P < .01). During high census months, shift schedule interns cared for significantly more patients/day (8.1/day shift vs 6.2/call; P < .001) and attended significantly fewer conferences than call schedule interns. Night shift interns slept more hours per 24-hour period than call schedule interns (7.2 ± 0.5 vs 6.3 ± 0.9 hours; P < .05) and had more consistent sleep patterns. A shift schedule resulted in reduced intern work hours and improved sleep duration and pattern. Although intern didactic conference attendance declined significantly during high census months, opportunities for experiential learning remained robust with unchanged or increased intern patient numbers. Copyright © 2016 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Study Abroad in the Eighties. Papers Presented at a Conference on American Academic Programs Abroad (3rd, Pamplona, Spain, July 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Deborah J., Ed.

    Issues concerning study abroad in the 1980s are addressed in 10 selected conference papers. Topics include program design, low-cost financing, curriculum design, academic standards, summer study programs, an exchange program between the University of South Florida and University of Paris VII, internationalizing the community college, curriculum…

  10. Advancement in genetic variants conferring obesity susceptibility from genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Jia, Weiping; Hu, Cheng

    2015-06-01

    Obesity prevalence has increased in recent years. Lifestyle change fuels obesity, but genetic factors cause more than 50% of average variations in obesity. The advent of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has hastened the progress of polygenic obesity research. As of this writing, more than 73 obesity susceptibility loci have been identified in ethnic groups through GWAS. The identified loci explain only 2% to 4% of obesity heritability, thereby indicating that a large proportion of loci remain undiscovered. Thus, the next step is to identify and confirm novel loci, which may exhibit smaller effects and lower allele frequencies than established loci. However, achieving these tasks has been difficult for researchers. GWAS help researchers discover the causal loci. Moreover, numerous biological studies have been performed on the polygenic effects on obesity, such as studies on fat mass- and obesity-associated gene (FTO), but the role of these polygenic effects in the mechanism of obesity remains unclear. Thus, obesity-causing variations should be identified, and insights into the biology of polygenic effects on obesity are needed.

  11. Multimodality molecular imaging and extracellular vesicle release based genetic profiling with porphyrin nanodroplets (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemp, Roger J.; Paproski, Robert J.

    2017-03-01

    For emerging tissue-engineering applications, transplants, and cell-based therapies it is important to assess cell viability and function in vivo in deep tissues. Bioluminescence and fluorescence methods are poorly suited to deep monitoring applications with high resolution and require genetically-engineered reporters which are not always feasible. We report on a method for imaging cell viability using deep, high-resolution photoacoustic imaging. We use an exogenous dye, Resazurin, itself weakly fluorescent until it is reduced from blue to a pink color with bright red fluorescence. Upon cell death fluorescence is lost and an absorption shift is observed. The irreversible reaction of resazurin to resorufin is proportional to aerobic respiration. We detect colorimetric absorption shifts using multispectral photoacoustic imaging and quantify the fraction of viable cells. SKOV-3 cells with and without ±80oC heat treatment were imaged after Resazurin treatment. High 575nm:620nm ratiometric absorption and photoacoustic signals in viable cells were observed with a much lower ratio in low-viability populations.

  12. Genetic Variants at 10p11 Confer Risk of Tetralogy of Fallot in Chinese of Nanjing

    PubMed Central

    Si, Linjie; Jin, Guangfu; Dai, Juncheng; Wang, Cheng; Chen, Jiaping; Da, Min; Hu, Yuanli; Yi, Chenlong; Hu, Zhibin; Shen, Hongbing; Mo, Xuming; Chen, Yijiang; Wang, Xiaowei

    2014-01-01

    A recent genome-wide association study (GWAS) has identified a new subset of susceptibility loci of Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF), one form of cyanotic congenital heart disease (CHD), on chromosomes 10p11, 10p14, 12q24, 13q31, 15q13 and 16q12 in Europeans. In the current study, we conducted a case-control study in a Chinese population including 1,010 CHD cases [atrial septal defect (ASD), ventricular septal defect (VSD) and TOF] and 1,962 controls to evaluate the associations of these loci with risk of CHD. We found that rs2228638 in NRP1 on 10p11 was significantly increased the risk of TOF (OR = 1.52, 95% CI = 1.13–2.04, P = 0.006), but not in other subgroups including ASD and VSD. In addition, no significant associations were observed between the other loci and the risk of ASD, VSD or TOF. Our results suggested that the genetic variants on 10p11 may serve as candidate markers for TOF susceptibility in Chinese population. PMID:24594544

  13. EPA'S GENETIC DIVERSITY RESEARCH PROGRAM: ECOLOGICAL INDICATOR DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Genetic diversity is a fundamental component of biodiversity that is affected by environmental stressors in predictable ways and limits potential responses of a population to future stressors. Understanding patterns of genetic diversity enhances the value and interpretation of o...

  14. EPA'S GENETIC DIVERSITY RESEARCH PROGRAM: ECOLOGICAL INDICATOR DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Genetic diversity is a fundamental component of biodiversity that is affected by environmental stressors in predictable ways and limits potential responses of a population to future stressors. Understanding patterns of genetic diversity enhances the value and interpretation of o...

  15. Human Genetics Education in the High School: A Pilot Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haddow, Paula K.

    1982-01-01

    Describes and evaluates a two-day workshop on human genetics for high school biology teachers which involved: (1) a series of lectures by professionals in medical genetics, ethics, and genetic counseling; (2) demonstrations; (3) question-and-answer sessions; (4) a curriculum packet; and (5) a follow-up bimonthly newsletter. (DC)

  16. Genetic variants in cell cycle control pathway confer susceptibility to aggressive prostate carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kibel, Adam S; Ahn, Jiyoung; Isikbay, Masis; Klim, Aleksandra; Wu, William S; Hayes, Richard B; Isaacs, William B; Daw, E Warwick

    2016-04-01

    Because a significant number of patients with prostate cancer (PCa) are diagnosed with disease unlikely to cause harm, genetic markers associated with clinically aggressive PCa have potential clinical utility. Since cell cycle checkpoint dysregulation is crucial for the development and progression of cancer, we tested the hypothesis that common germ-line variants within cell cycle genes were associated with aggressive PCa. Via a two-stage design, 364 common sequence variants in 88 genes were tested. The initial stage consisted of 258 aggressive PCa patients and 442 controls, and the second stage added 384 aggressive PCa Patients and 463 controls. European-American and African-American samples were analyzed separately. In the first stage, SNPs were typed by Illumina Goldengate assay while in the second stage SNPs were typed by Pyrosequencing assays. Genotype frequencies between cases and controls were compared using logistical regression analysis with additive, dominant and recessive models. Eleven variants within 10 genes (CCNC, CCND3, CCNG1, CCNT2, CDK6, MDM2, SKP2, WEE1, YWHAB, YWHAH) in the European-American population and nine variants in 7 genes (CCNG1, CDK2, CDK5, MDM2, RB1, SMAD3, TERF2) in the African-American population were found to be associated with aggressive PCa using at least one model. Of particular interest, CCNC (rs3380812) was associated with risk in European-American cohorts from both institutions. CDK2 (rs1045435) and CDK5 (rs2069459) were associated with risk in the African-American cohorts from both institutions. Lastly, variants within MDM2 and CCNG1 were protective for aggressive PCa in both ethnic groups. This study confirms that polymorphisms within cell cycle genes are associated with clinically aggressive PCa. Validation of these markers in additional populations is necessary, but these markers may help identify patients at risk for potentially lethal carcinoma. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Genetic Interactions among Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii Mutations That Confer Resistance to anti-Microtubule Herbicides

    PubMed Central

    James, S. W.; Lefebvre, P. A.

    1992-01-01

    We previously described two types of genetic interactions among recessive mutations in the APM1 and APM2 loci of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that may reflect a physical association of the gene products or their involvement in a common structure/process: (1) allele-specific synthetic lethality, and (2) unlinked noncomplementation, or dominant enhancement. To further investigate these interactions, we isolated revertants in which the heat sensitivity caused by the apm2-1 mutation is lost. The heat-insensitive revertants were either fully or partially suppressed for the drug-resistance caused by the apm2-1 allele. In recombination tests the revertants behaved as if the suppressing mutation mapped within the APM2 locus; the partial suppressors of apm2-1 herbicide resistance failed to complement apm2-1, leading to the conclusion that they were likely to be intragenic pseudorevertants. The apm2-1 partial suppressor mutations reversed apm1(-)apm2-1 synthetic lethality in an allele-specific manner with respect both to apm1(-) alleles and apm2-1 suppressor mutations. Those apm1(-) apm2-1(rev) strains that regained viability also regained heat sensitivity characteristic of the original apm2-1 mutation, even though the apm2-1 suppressor strains were fully heat-insensitive. The Hs(+) phenotypes of apm2-1 partial suppressors were also reversed by treatment with the microtubule-stabilizing agent deuterium oxide (D(2)O). In addition to the above interactions, we observed interallelic complementation and phenotypic enhancement of temperature conditionality among apm1(-) alleles. Evidence of a role for the products of the two genes in microtubule-based processes was obtained from studying flagellar assembly in apm1(-) and apm2(-) mutants. PMID:1311696

  18. Common genetic variants associated with telomere length confer risk for neuroblastoma and other childhood cancers.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Kyle M; Whitehead, Todd P; de Smith, Adam J; Smirnov, Ivan V; Park, Minsun; Endicott, Alyson A; Francis, Stephen S; Codd, Veryan; Samani, Nilesh J; Metayer, Catherine; Wiemels, Joseph L

    2016-06-01

    Aberrant telomere lengthening is an important feature of cancer cells in adults and children. In addition to somatic mutations, germline polymorphisms in telomere maintenance genes impact telomere length. Whether these telomere-associated polymorphisms affect risk of childhood malignancies remains largely unexplored. We collected genome-wide data from three groups with pediatric malignancies [neuroblastoma (N = 1516), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) (N = 958) and osteosarcoma (N = 660)] and three control populations (N = 6892). Using case-control comparisons, we analyzed eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes definitively associated with interindividual variation in leukocyte telomere length (LTL) in prior genome-wide association studies: ACYP2, TERC, NAF1, TERT, OBFC1, CTC1, ZNF208 and RTEL1 Six of these SNPs were associated (P < 0.05) with neuroblastoma risk, one with leukemia risk and one with osteosarcoma risk. The allele associated with longer LTL increased cancer risk for all these significantly associated SNPs. Using a weighted linear combination of the eight LTL-associated SNPs, we observed that neuroblastoma patients were predisposed to longer LTL than controls, with each standard deviation increase in genotypically estimated LTL associated with a 1.15-fold increased odds of neuroblastoma (95%CI = 1.09-1.22; P = 7.9×10(-7)). This effect was more pronounced in adolescent-onset neuroblastoma patients (OR = 1.46; 95%CI = 1.03-2.08). A one standard deviation increase in genotypically estimated LTL was more weakly associated with osteosarcoma risk (OR = 1.10; 95%CI = 1.01-1.19; P = 0.017) and leukemia risk (OR = 1.07; 95%CI = 1.00-1.14; P = 0.044), specifically for leukemia patients who relapsed (OR = 1.19; 95%CI = 1.01-1.40; P = 0.043). These results indicate that genetic predisposition to longer LTL is a newly identified risk factor for neuroblastoma and potentially for other cancers of childhood.

  19. Evaluation of the 1997 Joint National Conference, Women in Engineering Program Advocates Network (WEPAN) and National Association of Minority Engineering Program Administrators (NAMEPA)

    SciTech Connect

    Brainard, Suzanne G.

    1997-07-01

    The primary goal of the 1997 Joint National Conference was to unite NAMEPA and WEPAN in a unique collaborative effort to further the cause of increasing the participation of women and minorities in science and engineering. The specific objectives were to: (1) conduct technical and programmatic seminars for institutions desiring to initiate, replicate, or expand women and minorities in engineering program; (2) provide assistance in fundraising and grant writing; (3) profile women in engineering programs of excellence; (4) sponsor inspiring knowledgeable and motivational keynote speakers; and (5) offer a series of workshops focused on a multitude of topics.

  20. Obesity-programmed mice are rescued by early genetic intervention.

    PubMed

    Bumaschny, Viviana F; Yamashita, Miho; Casas-Cordero, Rodrigo; Otero-Corchón, Verónica; de Souza, Flávio S J; Rubinstein, Marcelo; Low, Malcolm J

    2012-11-01

    Obesity is a chronic metabolic disorder affecting half a billion people worldwide. Major difficulties in managing obesity are the cessation of continued weight loss in patients after an initial period of responsiveness and rebound to pretreatment weight. It is conceivable that chronic weight gain unrelated to physiological needs induces an allostatic regulatory state that defends a supranormal adipose mass despite its maladaptive consequences. To challenge this hypothesis, we generated a reversible genetic mouse model of early-onset hyperphagia and severe obesity by selectively blocking the expression of the proopiomelanocortin gene (Pomc) in hypothalamic neurons. Eutopic reactivation of central POMC transmission at different stages of overweight progression normalized or greatly reduced food intake in these obesity-programmed mice. Hypothalamic Pomc rescue also attenuated comorbidities such as hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and hepatic steatosis and normalized locomotor activity. However, effectiveness of treatment to normalize body weight and adiposity declined progressively as the level of obesity at the time of Pomc induction increased. Thus, our study using a novel reversible monogenic obesity model reveals the critical importance of early intervention for the prevention of subsequent allostatic overload that auto-perpetuates obesity.

  1. Obesity-programmed mice are rescued by early genetic intervention

    PubMed Central

    Bumaschny, Viviana F.; Yamashita, Miho; Casas-Cordero, Rodrigo; Otero-Corchón, Verónica; de Souza, Flávio S.J.; Rubinstein, Marcelo; Low, Malcolm J.

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic metabolic disorder affecting half a billion people worldwide. Major difficulties in managing obesity are the cessation of continued weight loss in patients after an initial period of responsiveness and rebound to pretreatment weight. It is conceivable that chronic weight gain unrelated to physiological needs induces an allostatic regulatory state that defends a supranormal adipose mass despite its maladaptive consequences. To challenge this hypothesis, we generated a reversible genetic mouse model of early-onset hyperphagia and severe obesity by selectively blocking the expression of the proopiomelanocortin gene (Pomc) in hypothalamic neurons. Eutopic reactivation of central POMC transmission at different stages of overweight progression normalized or greatly reduced food intake in these obesity-programmed mice. Hypothalamic Pomc rescue also attenuated comorbidities such as hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and hepatic steatosis and normalized locomotor activity. However, effectiveness of treatment to normalize body weight and adiposity declined progressively as the level of obesity at the time of Pomc induction increased. Thus, our study using a novel reversible monogenic obesity model reveals the critical importance of early intervention for the prevention of subsequent allostatic overload that auto-perpetuates obesity. PMID:23093774

  2. Genetic programming approach to evaluate complexity of texture images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciocca, Gianluigi; Corchs, Silvia; Gasparini, Francesca

    2016-11-01

    We adopt genetic programming (GP) to define a measure that can predict complexity perception of texture images. We perform psychophysical experiments on three different datasets to collect data on the perceived complexity. The subjective data are used for training, validation, and test of the proposed measure. These data are also used to evaluate several possible candidate measures of texture complexity related to both low level and high level image features. We select four of them (namely roughness, number of regions, chroma variance, and memorability) to be combined in a GP framework. This approach allows a nonlinear combination of the measures and could give hints on how the related image features interact in complexity perception. The proposed complexity measure M exhibits Pearson correlation coefficients of 0.890 on the training set, 0.728 on the validation set, and 0.724 on the test set. M outperforms each of all the single measures considered. From the statistical analysis of different GP candidate solutions, we found that the roughness measure evaluated on the gray level image is the most dominant one, followed by the memorability, the number of regions, and finally the chroma variance.

  3. Automating the packing heuristic design process with genetic programming.

    PubMed

    Burke, Edmund K; Hyde, Matthew R; Kendall, Graham; Woodward, John

    2012-01-01

    The literature shows that one-, two-, and three-dimensional bin packing and knapsack packing are difficult problems in operational research. Many techniques, including exact, heuristic, and metaheuristic approaches, have been investigated to solve these problems and it is often not clear which method to use when presented with a new instance. This paper presents an approach which is motivated by the goal of building computer systems which can design heuristic methods. The overall aim is to explore the possibilities for automating the heuristic design process. We present a genetic programming system to automatically generate a good quality heuristic for each instance. It is not necessary to change the methodology depending on the problem type (one-, two-, or three-dimensional knapsack and bin packing problems), and it therefore has a level of generality unmatched by other systems in the literature. We carry out an extensive suite of experiments and compare with the best human designed heuristics in the literature. Note that our heuristic design methodology uses the same parameters for all the experiments. The contribution of this paper is to present a more general packing methodology than those currently available, and to show that, by using this methodology, it is possible for a computer system to design heuristics which are competitive with the human designed heuristics from the literature. This represents the first packing algorithm in the literature able to claim human competitive results in such a wide variety of packing domains.

  4. Genetic programming model for forecast of short and noisy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivapragasam, C.; Vincent, P.; Vasudevan, G.

    2007-01-01

    Though forecasting of river flow has received a great deal of attention from engineers and researchers throughout the world, this still continues to be a challenging task owing to the complexity of the process. In the last decade or so, artificial neural networks (ANNs) have been widely applied, and their ability to model complex phenomena has been clearly demonstrated. However, the success of ANNs depends very crucially on having representative records of sufficient length. Further, the forecast accuracy decreases rapidly with an increase in the forecast horizon. In this study, the use of the Darwinian theory-based recent evolutionary technique of genetic programming (GP) is suggested to forecast fortnightly flow up to 4-lead. It is demonstrated that short lead predictions can be significantly improved from a short and noisy time series if the stochastic (noise) component is appropriately filtered out. The deterministic component can then be easily modelled. Further, only the immediate antecedent exogenous and/or non-exogenous inputs can be assumed to control the process. With an increase in the forecast horizon, the stochastic components also play an important role in the forecast, besides the inherent difficulty in ascertaining the appropriate input variables which can be assumed to govern the underlying process. GP is found to be an efficient tool to identify the most appropriate input variables to achieve reasonable prediction accuracy for higher lead-period forecasts. A comparison with ANNs suggests that though there is no significant difference in the prediction accuracy, GP does offer some unique advantages. Copyright

  5. Genetic adaptation to captivity in species conservation programs.

    PubMed

    Frankham, Richard

    2008-01-01

    As wild environments are often inhospitable, many species have to be captive-bred to save them from extinction. In captivity, species adapt genetically to the captive environment and these genetic adaptations are overwhelmingly deleterious when populations are returned to wild environments. I review empirical evidence on (i) the genetic basis of adaptive changes in captivity, (ii) factors affecting the extent of genetic adaptation to captivity, and (iii) means for minimizing its deleterious impacts. Genetic adaptation to captivity is primarily due to rare alleles that in the wild were deleterious and partially recessive. The extent of adaptation to captivity depends upon selection intensity, genetic diversity, effective population size and number of generation in captivity, as predicted by quantitative genetic theory. Minimizing generations in captivity provides a highly effective means for minimizing genetic adaptation to captivity, but is not a practical option for most animal species. Population fragmentation and crossing replicate captive populations provide practical means for minimizing the deleterious effects of genetic adaptation to captivity upon populations reintroduced into the wild. Surprisingly, equalization of family sizes reduces the rate of genetic adaptation, but not the deleterious impacts upon reintroduced populations. Genetic adaptation to captivity is expected to have major effects on reintroduction success for species that have spent many generations in captivity. This issue deserves a much higher priority than it is currently receiving.

  6. [International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD). Follow-up to the Cairo and Ouagadougou programs of action].

    PubMed

    Dabo, K

    1999-12-01

    Following the adoption of the program of action of the September 1994 International Conference on Population and Development held in Cairo, the population policy-related texts and goals of the member states of the Permanent Interstate Committee Against Drought in the Sahel (CILSS) were reviewed and revised in the context of new program priorities with the technical assistance of FNUAP, CERPOD, and Futures Group International¿s Policy Project. The Ouagadougou program of action, which replaces the N¿Djamena program of action, is a global framework for cooperation and action in the areas of population and sustainable development in the Sahel. It integrates all major concerns of the Cairo, Beijing, and Copenhagen programs of action. Follow-up, evaluation, and coordination of the Ouagadougou program of action¿s implementation at the regional level were made CERPOD¿s responsibility by the appropriate CILSS ministerial committee, while its implementation at the national level will fall upon the shoulders of individual member countries benefiting from CERPOD and Policy Project technical support. CERPOD¿s experience with follow-up activities is described. The organization is also leading research studies relevant to priority concerns outlined in the Cairo and Ouagadougou programs of action. A midterm evaluation of all Cairo and Ouagadougou action programs will be conducted in the year 2002.

  7. A case-based approach to the development of practice-based competencies for accreditation of and training in graduate programs in genetic counseling.

    PubMed

    Fiddler, M B; Fine, B A; Baker, D L

    1996-09-01

    The American Board of Genetic Counseling (ABGC) sponsored a consensus development conference with participation from directors of graduate programs in genetic counseling, board members, and expert consultants. Using a collective, narrative, and case-based approach, 27 competencies were identified as embedded in the practice of genetic counseling. These competencies were organized into four domains of skills: Communication; Critical Thinking; Interpersonal, Counseling, and Psychosocial Assessment; and Professional Ethics and Values. The adoption of a competency framework for accreditation has a variety of implications for curriculum design and implementation. We report here the process by which a set of practice-based genetic counseling competencies have been derived; and in an accompanying article, the competencies themselves are provided. We also discuss the application of the competencies to graduate program accreditation as well as some of the implications competency-based standards may have for education and the genetic counseling profession. These guidelines may also serve as a basis for the continuing education of practicing genetic counselors and a performance evaluation tool in the workplace.

  8. 2012 Gordon Research Conference and Seminar on Atomic and Molecular Interactions - Formal Schedule and Speaker/Poster Program

    SciTech Connect

    Zwier, Timothy S.

    2012-07-20

    The Gordon Research Conference on ATOMIC & MOLECULAR INTERACTIONS was held at Stonehill College Easton, Massachusetts, July 15-20, 2012. The Conference was well-attended with 121 participants (attendees list attached). The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both U.S. and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. Of the 121 attendees, 64 voluntarily responded to a general inquiry regarding ethnicity which appears on our registration forms. Of the 64 respondents, 11% were Minorities – 2% Hispanic, 9% Asian and 0% African American. Approximately 20% of the participants at the 2012 meeting were women. The Gordon Research SEMINAR on ATOMIC & MOLECULAR INTERACTIONS was held at Stonehill College Easton, Massachusetts, July 14 - 15, 2012. The Conference was well-attended with 42 participants (attendees list attached). The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both U.S. and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. Of the 42 attendees, 20 voluntarily responded to a general inquiry regarding ethnicity which appears on our registration forms. Of the 20 respondents, 10% were Minorities – 0% Hispanic, 10% Asian and 0% African American. Approximately 29% of the participants at the 2012 meeting were women. In designing the formal speakers program, emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field. There was a conscious effort to stimulate lively discussion about the key issues in the field today. Time for formal presentations was limited in the interest of group discussions. In order that more scientists could communicate their most recent results, poster presentation time was scheduled. Attached is a copy of the formal schedule and speaker program and the poster program. In addition to

  9. 2012 Gordon Research Conference on Vibrational Spectroscopy - Formal Schedule and Speaker/Poster Program

    SciTech Connect

    Geiger, Franz

    2012-08-10

    The Vibrational Spectroscopy conference brings together experimentalists and theoreticians working at the frontiers of modern vibrational spectroscopy, with a special emphasis on spectroscopies that probe the structure and dynamics of molecules in gases, liquids, and at interfaces. The conference explores the wide range of state-of-the-art techniques based on vibrational motion. These techniques span the fields of time-domain, high-resolution frequency-domain, spatially-resolved, nonlinear, and multidimensional spectroscopies. The conference highlights both the application of these techniques in chemistry, materials, biology, the environment, and medicine as well as the development of theoretical models that enable one to connect spectroscopic signatures to underlying molecular motions including chemical reaction dynamics. The conference goal is to advance the field of vibrational spectroscopy by bringing together a collection of researchers who share common interests and who will gain from discussing work at the forefront of several connected areas. The intent is to emphasize the insights and understanding that studies of vibrations provide about a variety of molecular systems ranging from small polyatomic molecules to large biomolecules, nanomaterials, and environmental systems.

  10. Issues in NASA program and project management. Special report: 1995 conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Edward J. (Editor); Lawbaugh, William M. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This volume is the tenth in an ongoing series on aerospace project management at NASA. Articles in this volume cover the 1996 Conference as follows: international partnerships; industry/interagency collaboration; technology transfer; and project management development process. A section on resources for NASA managers rounds out the publication.

  11. Fifth SIAM conference on geometric design 97: Final program and abstracts. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    The meeting was divided into the following sessions: (1) CAD/CAM; (2) Curve/Surface Design; (3) Geometric Algorithms; (4) Multiresolution Methods; (5) Robotics; (6) Solid Modeling; and (7) Visualization. This report contains the abstracts of papers presented at the meeting. Proceding the conference there was a short course entitled ``Wavelets for Geometric Modeling and Computer Graphics``.

  12. Getting on the Conference Program and Writing a Practical Article: Templates for Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jalongo, Mary Renck

    2013-01-01

    For many early childhood professionals, their initial foray into writing for publication consists of preparing a conference proposal for a workshop/training type of session and producing a manuscript suitable for publication as a practical article in a professional journal. The primary purpose of the article is to provide authors with templates,…

  13. Genetic ablation of the fpr1 gene confers protection from smoking-induced lung emphysema in mice.

    PubMed

    Cardini, Silvia; Dalli, Jesmond; Fineschi, Silvia; Perretti, Mauro; Lungarella, Giuseppe; Lucattelli, Monica

    2012-09-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) is the main causative factor of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Current research supports the concept that airway inflammation is central to the development and progression of the disease. Studies have demonstrated that neutrophils are increased in COPD lungs and that neutrophil-associated products correlate with the development and severity of COPD. The peptide FMLP is an active component of CS. FMLP interacts on the neutrophil and macrophage membranes with a high-affinity receptor subtype (FPR1) and with a low-affinity subtype FPRL1, promoting a chemotactic response, superoxide anion production, and degranulation. Bacterial colonization of the lower respiratory tract and lung cell damage may represent further sources of formyl peptides in patients with COPD. We investigated the role of FPR in a mouse model on lung inflammation and emphysema induced by CS. Here, we report the novel observation that genetic ablation of the FPR1 gene (Fpr1) confers protection from smoking-induced lung emphysema in mice. Compared with wild-type mice, Fpr1 knockout mice displayed marked decreases in the lung migration of neutrophils and macrophages after CS exposure. Upon transgenic approach, the changes in cell numbers were accompanied by marked modulation of the expression of genes implicated in the inflammatory response. Administration of the FPR1 antagonist cyclosporine H to wild-type mice attenuated the acute inflammatory response evoked by CS. These findings may have clinical significance because current smokers and subjects with emphysema showed increased FPR expression in bronchoalveolar fluids and on peripheral neutrophils. Modulating the FPR1 signal should be explored as a potential new therapy.

  14. Genetic Deletion of the Nociceptin/Orphanin FQ Receptor in the Rat Confers Resilience to the Development of Drug Addiction.

    PubMed

    Kallupi, Marsida; Scuppa, Giulia; de Guglielmo, Giordano; Calò, Girolamo; Weiss, Friedbert; Statnick, Michael A; Rorick-Kehn, Linda M; Ciccocioppo, Roberto

    2017-02-01

    The nociceptin (NOP) receptor is a G-protein-coupled receptor whose natural ligand is the NOP/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) peptide. Evidence from pharmacological studies suggests that the N/OFQ system is implicated in the regulation of several addiction-related phenomena, such as drug intake, withdrawal, and relapse. Here, to further explore the role of NOP system in addiction, we used NOP (-/-) rats to study the motivation for cocaine, heroin, and alcohol self-administration in the absence of N/OFQ function. Conditioned place preference (CPP) and saccharin (0.2% w/v) self-administration were also investigated. Results showed that NOP (-/-) rats self-administer less cocaine (0.25, 0.125, or 0.5 mg/infusion) both under a fixed ratio 1 and a progressive ratio schedule of reinforcement compared with wild-type (Wt) controls. Consistently, cocaine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) was able to induce CPP in Wt but not in NOP (-/-). When NOP (-/-) rats were tested for heroin (20 μg/infusion) and ethanol (10% v/v) self-administration, they showed significantly lower drug intake compared with Wt. Conversely, saccharin self-administration was not affected by NOP deletion, excluding the possibility of nonspecific learning deficits or generalized disruption of reward mechanisms in NOP (-/-) rats. These findings were confirmed with pharmacological experiments using two selective NOP antagonists, SB-612111 and LY2817412. Both drugs attenuated alcohol self-administration in Wt rats but not in NOP (-/-) rats. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that genetic deletion of NOP receptors confers resilience to drug abuse and support a role for NOP receptor antagonism as a potential treatment option for drug addiction.

  15. Standard outcome metrics and evaluation methodology for disease management programs. American Healthways and Johns Hopkins Consensus Conference.

    PubMed

    2003-01-01

    Disease management is conceptually recognized as being a significant approach for closing the gaps in care identified by the Institute of Medicine as contributing to poor outcomes from our health care system. That conceptual credibility has been bolstered by the disease management industry through the adoption of an industry-standard definition of disease management and through the development and implementation of disease management accreditation programs by the National Committee for Quality Assurance, Utilization Review Accreditation Commission, and Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations. The clinical and financial outcomes of disease management programs continue to be suspect, however, due to the lack of an industry standard set of outcomes metrics and a uniform methodology for evaluating those metrics. As a result, the ability to evaluate the effectiveness of any individual program is compromised, and the ability to effectively compare results across programs of different delivery designs is non-existent. To address this issue, American Healthways and Johns Hopkins convened a consensus conference of nearly 150 health care professionals representing health plans, hospitals, practicing physicians (both primary care and specialty), and other health care professionals. The conference purpose was to develop a "first-step" set of metrics and a uniform methodology that could be applied industry-wide to enable meaningful comparisons between programs and to allow evaluation of individual programs whether "homegrown" or "outsourced." The consensus conferees recognized that there were many paths to this objective, but that they had to land on a set of metrics and a methodology that was "doable" in light of today's technology and data availability. The results of their consensus effort follow.

  16. QTL mapping of wheat plant architectural characteristics and their genetic relationship with seven QTLs conferring resistance to sheath blight

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yan; Du, Ziyi; Chen, Jiang; Zhang, Zhongjun

    2017-01-01

    Sheath blight is one of the most devastating wheat diseases worldwide. Breeding resistant cultivars is the most powerful strategy to defeat the disease. Plant resistance on “disease escape” works through modulation of morphological traits and shows sustainable resistance to disease. Plant architectural traits have been reported to play a significant role in disease response. Therefore, exploring the genetic relationship between plant architecture and disease resistance is of importance to the understanding of plant resistance via “disease escape”. Using an F9 population of 266 RILs (Recombinant Inbred Lines) derived from the cross of Luke × AQ24788-83, we have generated a linkage map of 631 markers on 21 chromosomes. In this study, we present the QTL identification of fourteen plant architectural characteristics and heading time from two years and analyze their genetic relationships with seven previously published QTLs to sheath blight (QSBs, QSe.cau), including plant height (PH), the space between the flag leaf and penultimate leaf (fdR), heading date (Hd), and other traits. Twelve stable QTLs of the morphological traits were identified with good consistency across five replicates. For the seven previously published QSBs, we found no significant association with plant height. However, some of the QSBs displayed strong associations with plant architectural traits and heading date. Especially, QfdR.cau-1AS, QHd.cau-2BS, QfdR.cau-5DL, and QfdR.cau-6BL were respectively mapped to the same regions as QSe.cau-1AS, QSe.cau-2BS, QSe.cau-5DL, and QSe.cau-6BL. Taken together, we have demonstrated that plant height did not exert a direct influence on the resistance to sheath blight conferred by the seven QSBs and that the plant architecture and heading date did exhibit a tight relationship with the resistance. Therefore, this study provides a novel evidence to help understand sheath blight resistance in wheat. In addition, the linked morphological characteristics

  17. 24th IUPAP Conference on Computational Physics (2012): Introduction, acknowledgements, program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baiotti, Luca; Takabe, Hideaki

    2013-08-01

    Welcome to CCP2012, held next to the K computer site in Kobe and in Japan's best season. The Conference on Computational Physics (CCP) is organized annually under the auspices of Commission 20 of the IUPAP (International Union of Pure and Applied Physics). This is the first time it has been held in Japan. I was asked to be the chairman about two and half years ago and when I accepted the request I decided to make the conference very unique and different from the traditional style of CCP. I was not satisfied when I attended big conferences where the parallel sessions are classified with the name of the research field. These days we have many opportunities to attend domestic and international conferences, where it is possible to listen to many talks on the same topics. If the topics are very new, then the conference is very useful for my research. However, I wanted to have a conference where I could listen to a variety of topics carried out with the same method. Computational science is very unique and it is easy to organize a new type of conference with the classification in the horizontal direction of the matrix made of the names of research fields and the name of numerical methods. You may be able to list the names of methods easily; finite difference, Monte Carlo, particle, molecular dynamics and so on. I was dissatisfied to find that most conferences focus solely on research fields and the method that brings to the scientific research is not highlighted as much. I wanted to listen to topics from fundamental physics to industrial science in a systematic way. In order to create such a conference, a small number of experts is not enough, so I asked for the help of more than 100 Japanese computer scientists, in a variety of fields. We called this group the Japan Advisory Board (JAB). I asked them to recommend a member of the International Advisory Board (IAB). Then, we could start making the list of plenary and invited speakers. This was almost the end of March last

  18. Experimental evolution, genetic analysis and genome re-sequencing reveal the mutation conferring artemisinin resistance in an isogenic lineage of malaria parasites

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Classical and quantitative linkage analyses of genetic crosses have traditionally been used to map genes of interest, such as those conferring chloroquine or quinine resistance in malaria parasites. Next-generation sequencing technologies now present the possibility of determining genome-wide genetic variation at single base-pair resolution. Here, we combine in vivo experimental evolution, a rapid genetic strategy and whole genome re-sequencing to identify the precise genetic basis of artemisinin resistance in a lineage of the rodent malaria parasite, Plasmodium chabaudi. Such genetic markers will further the investigation of resistance and its control in natural infections of the human malaria, P. falciparum. Results A lineage of isogenic in vivo drug-selected mutant P. chabaudi parasites was investigated. By measuring the artemisinin responses of these clones, the appearance of an in vivo artemisinin resistance phenotype within the lineage was defined. The underlying genetic locus was mapped to a region of chromosome 2 by Linkage Group Selection in two different genetic crosses. Whole-genome deep coverage short-read re-sequencing (Illumina® Solexa) defined the point mutations, insertions, deletions and copy-number variations arising in the lineage. Eight point mutations arise within the mutant lineage, only one of which appears on chromosome 2. This missense mutation arises contemporaneously with artemisinin resistance and maps to a gene encoding a de-ubiquitinating enzyme. Conclusions This integrated approach facilitates the rapid identification of mutations conferring selectable phenotypes, without prior knowledge of biological and molecular mechanisms. For malaria, this model can identify candidate genes before resistant parasites are commonly observed in natural human malaria populations. PMID:20846421

  19. Experimental evolution, genetic analysis and genome re-sequencing reveal the mutation conferring artemisinin resistance in an isogenic lineage of malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Paul; Martinelli, Axel; Modrzynska, Katarzyna; Borges, Sofia; Creasey, Alison; Rodrigues, Louise; Beraldi, Dario; Loewe, Laurence; Fawcett, Richard; Kumar, Sujai; Thomson, Marian; Trivedi, Urmi; Otto, Thomas D; Pain, Arnab; Blaxter, Mark; Cravo, Pedro

    2010-09-16

    Classical and quantitative linkage analyses of genetic crosses have traditionally been used to map genes of interest, such as those conferring chloroquine or quinine resistance in malaria parasites. Next-generation sequencing technologies now present the possibility of determining genome-wide genetic variation at single base-pair resolution. Here, we combine in vivo experimental evolution, a rapid genetic strategy and whole genome re-sequencing to identify the precise genetic basis of artemisinin resistance in a lineage of the rodent malaria parasite, Plasmodium chabaudi. Such genetic markers will further the investigation of resistance and its control in natural infections of the human malaria, P. falciparum. A lineage of isogenic in vivo drug-selected mutant P. chabaudi parasites was investigated. By measuring the artemisinin responses of these clones, the appearance of an in vivo artemisinin resistance phenotype within the lineage was defined. The underlying genetic locus was mapped to a region of chromosome 2 by Linkage Group Selection in two different genetic crosses. Whole-genome deep coverage short-read re-sequencing (Illumina Solexa) defined the point mutations, insertions, deletions and copy-number variations arising in the lineage. Eight point mutations arise within the mutant lineage, only one of which appears on chromosome 2. This missense mutation arises contemporaneously with artemisinin resistance and maps to a gene encoding a de-ubiquitinating enzyme. This integrated approach facilitates the rapid identification of mutations conferring selectable phenotypes, without prior knowledge of biological and molecular mechanisms. For malaria, this model can identify candidate genes before resistant parasites are commonly observed in natural human malaria populations.

  20. Mathematical Modeling of Intestinal Iron Absorption Using Genetic Programming

    PubMed Central

    Colins, Andrea; Gerdtzen, Ziomara P.; Nuñez, Marco T.; Salgado, J. Cristian

    2017-01-01

    Iron is a trace metal, key for the development of living organisms. Its absorption process is complex and highly regulated at the transcriptional, translational and systemic levels. Recently, the internalization of the DMT1 transporter has been proposed as an additional regulatory mechanism at the intestinal level, associated to the mucosal block phenomenon. The short-term effect of iron exposure in apical uptake and initial absorption rates was studied in Caco-2 cells at different apical iron concentrations, using both an experimental approach and a mathematical modeling framework. This is the first report of short-term studies for this system. A non-linear behavior in the apical uptake dynamics was observed, which does not follow the classic saturation dynamics of traditional biochemical models. We propose a method for developing mathematical models for complex systems, based on a genetic programming algorithm. The algorithm is aimed at obtaining models with a high predictive capacity, and considers an additional parameter fitting stage and an additional Jackknife stage for estimating the generalization error. We developed a model for the iron uptake system with a higher predictive capacity than classic biochemical models. This was observed both with the apical uptake dataset used for generating the model and with an independent initial rates dataset used to test the predictive capacity of the model. The model obtained is a function of time and the initial apical iron concentration, with a linear component that captures the global tendency of the system, and a non-linear component that can be associated to the movement of DMT1 transporters. The model presented in this paper allows the detailed analysis, interpretation of experimental data, and identification of key relevant components for this complex biological process. This general method holds great potential for application to the elucidation of biological mechanisms and their key components in other complex

  1. A genetic programming approach to oral cancer prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Mei Sze; Tan, Jing Wei; Yap, Hwa Jen; Abdul Kareem, Sameem; Zain, Rosnah Binti

    2016-01-01

    Background The potential of genetic programming (GP) on various fields has been attained in recent years. In bio-medical field, many researches in GP are focused on the recognition of cancerous cells and also on gene expression profiling data. In this research, the aim is to study the performance of GP on the survival prediction of a small sample size of oral cancer prognosis dataset, which is the first study in the field of oral cancer prognosis. Method GP is applied on an oral cancer dataset that contains 31 cases collected from the Malaysia Oral Cancer Database and Tissue Bank System (MOCDTBS). The feature subsets that is automatically selected through GP were noted and the influences of this subset on the results of GP were recorded. In addition, a comparison between the GP performance and that of the Support Vector Machine (SVM) and logistic regression (LR) are also done in order to verify the predictive capabilities of the GP. Result The result shows that GP performed the best (average accuracy of 83.87% and average AUROC of 0.8341) when the features selected are smoking, drinking, chewing, histological differentiation of SCC, and oncogene p63. In addition, based on the comparison results, we found that the GP outperformed the SVM and LR in oral cancer prognosis. Discussion Some of the features in the dataset are found to be statistically co-related. This is because the accuracy of the GP prediction drops when one of the feature in the best feature subset is excluded. Thus, GP provides an automatic feature selection function, which chooses features that are highly correlated to the prognosis of oral cancer. This makes GP an ideal prediction model for cancer clinical and genomic data that can be used to aid physicians in their decision making stage of diagnosis or prognosis. PMID:27688975

  2. Genetic Programming as Alternative for Predicting Development Effort of Individual Software Projects

    PubMed Central

    Chavoya, Arturo; Lopez-Martin, Cuauhtemoc; Andalon-Garcia, Irma R.; Meda-Campaña, M. E.

    2012-01-01

    Statistical and genetic programming techniques have been used to predict the software development effort of large software projects. In this paper, a genetic programming model was used for predicting the effort required in individually developed projects. Accuracy obtained from a genetic programming model was compared against one generated from the application of a statistical regression model. A sample of 219 projects developed by 71 practitioners was used for generating the two models, whereas another sample of 130 projects developed by 38 practitioners was used for validating them. The models used two kinds of lines of code as well as programming language experience as independent variables. Accuracy results from the model obtained with genetic programming suggest that it could be used to predict the software development effort of individual projects when these projects have been developed in a disciplined manner within a development-controlled environment. PMID:23226305

  3. Genetic programming as alternative for predicting development effort of individual software projects.

    PubMed

    Chavoya, Arturo; Lopez-Martin, Cuauhtemoc; Andalon-Garcia, Irma R; Meda-Campaña, M E

    2012-01-01

    Statistical and genetic programming techniques have been used to predict the software development effort of large software projects. In this paper, a genetic programming model was used for predicting the effort required in individually developed projects. Accuracy obtained from a genetic programming model was compared against one generated from the application of a statistical regression model. A sample of 219 projects developed by 71 practitioners was used for generating the two models, whereas another sample of 130 projects developed by 38 practitioners was used for validating them. The models used two kinds of lines of code as well as programming language experience as independent variables. Accuracy results from the model obtained with genetic programming suggest that it could be used to predict the software development effort of individual projects when these projects have been developed in a disciplined manner within a development-controlled environment.

  4. CDPOP: A spatially explicit cost distance population genetics program

    Treesearch

    Erin L. Landguth; S. A. Cushman

    2010-01-01

    Spatially explicit simulation of gene flow in complex landscapes is essential to explain observed population responses and provide a foundation for landscape genetics. To address this need, we wrote a spatially explicit, individual-based population genetics model (CDPOP). The model implements individual-based population modelling with Mendelian inheritance and k-allele...

  5. SAM: The "Search and Match" Computer Program of the Escherichia coli Genetic Stock Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bachmann, B. J.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Describes a computer program used at a genetic stock center to locate particular strains of bacteria. The program can match up to 30 strain descriptions requested by a researcher with the records on file. Uses of this particular program can be made in many fields. (PS)

  6. SAM: The "Search and Match" Computer Program of the Escherichia coli Genetic Stock Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bachmann, B. J.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Describes a computer program used at a genetic stock center to locate particular strains of bacteria. The program can match up to 30 strain descriptions requested by a researcher with the records on file. Uses of this particular program can be made in many fields. (PS)

  7. Genetic programming of polynomial harmonic networks using the discrete Fourier transform.

    PubMed

    Nikolaev, Nikolay Y; Iba, Hitoshi

    2002-10-01

    This paper presents a genetic programming system that evolves polynomial harmonic networks. These are multilayer feed-forward neural networks with polynomial activation functions. The novel hybrids assume that harmonics with non-multiple frequencies may enter as inputs the activation polynomials. The harmonics with non-multiple, irregular frequencies are derived analytically using the discrete Fourier transform. The polynomial harmonic networks have tree-structured topology which makes them especially suitable for evolutionary structural search. Empirical results show that this hybrid genetic programming system outperforms an evolutionary system manipulating polynomials, the traditional Koza-style genetic programming, and the harmonic GMDH network algorithm on processing time series.

  8. Resources for Teaching: Programed Instruction Community Problems Nursing Rounds. Report of a Conference for Nursing Instructors (Louisville, Kentucky, October 16-17, 1967).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National League for Nursing, New York, NY. Nursing Advisory Service.

    Representatives of 15 nursing programs participated in the conference conducted by the Nursing Advisory Service of the National League for Nursing and the National Tuberculosis and Respiratory Disease Association, with the Assistance of the Department of Baccalaureate and Higher Degree Programs of the National League for Nursing and cosponsored by…

  9. LEADERSHIP FOR VOCATIONAL EDUCATION IN CALIFORNIA--THEORY AND PRACTICE OF PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT, SUMMARY REPORT OF THE COASTAL, NORTHERN, AND SOUTHERN REGIONAL CONFERENCES (NOVEMBER, 1965).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Vocational Education Services.

    APPROXIMATELY 105 SUPERVISORS AND COORDINATORS OF PUBLIC SCHOOL VOCATIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS IN CALIFORNIA PARTICIPATED IN CONFERENCES TO STUDY CURRENT LEADERSHIP PRACTICES AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS AS RELATED TO NATIONAL, STATE, AND LOCAL REQUIREMENTS. PRESENTATIONS WERE--(1) "A THEORETICAL MODEL FOR VOCATIONAL EDUCATION IN A…

  10. Quality Programs for Children and Families: Multiple Perspectives. Proceedings of the Annual Conference on Early Childhood Education (6th, Duluth, Minnesota, October 3-4, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sword, Jeane, Ed.

    Presented are the keynote address and sectional presentations made at a conference on early childhood education. Speakers offered various perspectives on high quality programs for children and families. The keynote address, given by Bettye Caldwell, concerned marketing quality programs for children, exploring internal and external deterrents,…

  11. Proceedings of the 1983 EMU Conference on Foreign Languages for Business (Ypsilanti, Michigan, April 7-9, 1983). Part III: Program Overviews and Components.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voght, Geoffrey M., Ed.

    A collection of 11 papers from the third part of the conference on the applications of foreign language and international studies to business concentrates on international exchange and study abroad programs. The papers include the following: "The University of South Carolina's Master's in International Business Studies Program" (Margit…

  12. School Reading Programs: Criteria for Excellence; Proceedings of the Language Communications Conference (28th, Univ. of Pittsburgh, November 7-8, 1975).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Allen, Ed.; Bean, Rita, Ed.

    The proceedings of this conference reflect the theme of criteria for excellence in school reading programs. Contents of the volume include an introduction concerning excellence in education by Harry W. Sartain and a concluding statement presenting guidelines for development and assessment of an effective reading program by Rita M. Bean. Major…

  13. Removing Barriers to the Adult Learner: Through Marketing, Management, and Programming. NUCEA Region VI Conference (Las Vegas, Nevada, October 10-13, 1982).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conter, Robert V., Ed.; Porcelli, Winifred A., Ed.

    These proceedings contain the texts of nine presentations delivered at a conference on removing barriers to the adult learner through marketing, management, and programing. Included in the volume are the following papers: "Faculty Perceptions of Adult Learners, Off-Campus Credit Programs, and Teaching Strategies," by Diane…

  14. Architectural Contributions to Effective Programming for the Mentally Retarded. Conference Report of the Architectural Institute (Denver, Colorado, May 15-16, 1967).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association on Mental Deficiency, Washington, DC.

    Conference participants consider the role of the architect and the programer in planning and constructing facilities for the mentally handicapped. David Rosen discusses the design problems of state institutions with particular reference to the Woodbridge State School in New Jersey; Gunnar Dybwad describes the need of the programer for the…

  15. Increasing Rural Adults' Participation in Collegial Programs: Exemplary Programs. Proceedings of the Rural Action Conference "Programs and Activities to Overcome Barriers to Rural Adult Participation in Postsecondary Education" (Blacksburg, Virginia, June 1-3, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullins, W. Robert, Ed.; And Others

    Approximately 85 educators from six states participated in a regional conference designed to showcase exemplary and collaborative programs to overcome many of the barriers faced by rural adults in pursuing higher education. After the keynote address, "The Role of Adult Learning in Revitalizing Rural Communities," by Cornelia Butler Flora, the…

  16. Fourth SIAM conference on mathematical and computational issues in the geosciences: Final program and abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    The conference focused on computational and modeling issues in the geosciences. Of the geosciences, problems associated with phenomena occurring in the earth`s subsurface were best represented. Topics in this area included petroleum recovery, ground water contamination and remediation, seismic imaging, parameter estimation, upscaling, geostatistical heterogeneity, reservoir and aquifer characterization, optimal well placement and pumping strategies, and geochemistry. Additional sessions were devoted to the atmosphere, surface water and oceans. The central mathematical themes included computational algorithms and numerical analysis, parallel computing, mathematical analysis of partial differential equations, statistical and stochastic methods, optimization, inversion, homogenization and renormalization. The problem areas discussed at this conference are of considerable national importance, with the increasing importance of environmental issues, global change, remediation of waste sites, declining domestic energy sources and an increasing reliance on producing the most out of established oil reservoirs.

  17. Mendel: the Swiss army knife of genetic analysis programs.

    PubMed

    Lange, Kenneth; Papp, Jeanette C; Sinsheimer, Janet S; Sripracha, Ram; Zhou, Hua; Sobel, Eric M

    2013-06-15

    Mendel is one of the few statistical genetics packages that provide a full spectrum of gene mapping methods, ranging from parametric linkage in large pedigrees to genome-wide association with rare variants. Our latest additions to Mendel anticipate and respond to the needs of the genetics community. Compared with earlier versions, Mendel is faster and easier to use and has a wider range of applications. Supported platforms include Linux, MacOS and Windows. Free from www.genetics.ucla.edu/software/mendel.

  18. Mendel: the Swiss army knife of genetic analysis programs

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Kenneth; Papp, Jeanette C.; Sinsheimer, Janet S.; Sripracha, Ram; Zhou, Hua; Sobel, Eric M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary: Mendel is one of the few statistical genetics packages that provide a full spectrum of gene mapping methods, ranging from parametric linkage in large pedigrees to genome-wide association with rare variants. Our latest additions to Mendel anticipate and respond to the needs of the genetics community. Compared with earlier versions, Mendel is faster and easier to use and has a wider range of applications. Supported platforms include Linux, MacOS and Windows. Availability: Free from www.genetics.ucla.edu/software/mendel Contact: klange@ucla.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:23610370

  19. Overview: Bellagio Conference on Program and Policy Options for Preventing Obesity in the Low- and Middle-Income Countries.

    PubMed

    Popkin, B; Monteiro, C; Swinburn, B

    2013-11-01

    The Bellagio 'Conference on Program and Policy Options for Preventing Obesity in the Low- and Middle-Income Countries' (LMICs) was organized to pull together the current. We need not reiterate the importance of this topic or the speed of change in eating, drinking and moving facing us across the globe. The conference emerges from need to significantly step up the policies and programs to reduce obesity by learning from some current examples of best practice and strengthening the role of the academic and civil society players in translating global evidence and experience into action at the national level. There is also a need to empower the younger generation of scholars and activists in these countries to carry on this effort. The meeting was also timely because a number of funding agencies in the United States, Canada and the UK, at least, are beginning to focus attention on this topic. This set of papers provides not only examples of existing best practice but also a road map ahead for LMICs in the various areas of action needed to reduce obesity across LMICs. The meeting highlighted critical barriers to implementation that have blocked many initiatives.

  20. Developing close combat behaviors for simulated soldiers using genetic programming techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, Richard J.; Schaller, Mark J.

    2003-10-01

    Genetic programming is a powerful methodology for automatically producing solutions to problems in a variety of domains. It has been used successfully to develop behaviors for RoboCup soccer players and simple combat agents. We will attempt to use genetic programming to solve a problem in the domain of strategic combat, keeping in mind the end goal of developing sophisticated behaviors for compound defense and infiltration. The simplified problem at hand is that of two armed agents in a small room, containing obstacles, fighting against each other for survival. The base case and three changes are considered: a memory of positions using stacks, context-dependent genetic programming, and strongly typed genetic programming. Our work demonstrates slight improvements from the first two techniques, and no significant improvement from the last.

  1. Identification of Student Misconceptions in Genetics Problem Solving via Computer Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browning, Mark E.; Lehman, James D.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a computer program presenting four genetics problems to monitor the problem solving process of college students. Identifies three main areas of difficulty: computational skills; determination of gametes; and application of previous learning to new situations. (Author/YP)

  2. National Survey of Genetics Content in Basic Nursing Preparatory Programs in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hetteberg, Carol G.; Prows, Cynthia A.; Deets, Carol; Monsen, Rita B.; Kenner, Carole A.

    1999-01-01

    A sample of 879 basic nursing programs was used to identify the type and amount of genetics content in curricula. Recommendations were made for increasing genetics content as a result of the synthesis of the survey data with previously collected data. (25 references) (Author/JOW)

  3. Genetic Variations of PIP4K2A Confer Vulnerability to Poor Antipsychotic Response in Severely Ill Schizophrenia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Harpreet; Jajodia, Ajay; Grover, Sandeep; Baghel, Ruchi; Gupta, Meenal; Jain, Sanjeev; Kukreti, Ritushree

    2014-01-01

    incomplete responders with low severity (OR = 4.09, 95%-CI = 2.09–8.02). Our findings provide strong evidence that diplotype ATTGCT/ATTGCT of PIP4K2A gene conferred approximately three-times higher incomplete responsiveness towards antipsychotics in severely ill patients. These results are consistent with the known role of phosphatidyl-inositol-signaling elements in antipsychotic action and outcome. Findings have implication for future molecular genetic studies as well as personalized medicine. However more work is warranted to elucidate underlying causal biological pathway. PMID:25025909

  4. Predicting the Structure of Covert Networks using Genetic Programming, Cognitive Work Analysis and Social Network Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    RTO-MP-MSG-069 15 - 1 Predicting the Structure of Covert Networks using Genetic Programming, Cognitive Work Analysis and Social Network...collation of intelligence covering types of mission, in terms of actors and goals; phase two involves the building of task models, based on Cognitive ...REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Predicting the Structure of Covert Networks using Genetic Programming, Cognitive Work

  5. Proceedings of the First ERDA Semiannual Solar Photovoltaic Conversion Program Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Organization, basic research and applied technology for the Solar Photovoltaic Conversion Program are outlined. The program aims to provide a technology base for low cost thin film solar cells and solar arrays.

  6. Proceedings of the 8th Annual Summer Conference: NASA/USRA Advanced Design Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Papers presented at the 8th Annual Summer Conference are categorized as Space Projects and Aeronautics projects. Topics covered include: Systematic Propulsion Optimization Tools (SPOT), Assured Crew Return Vehicle Post Landing Configuration Design and Test, Autonomous Support for Microorganism Research in Space, Bioregenerative System Components for Microgravity, The Extended Mission Rover (EMR), Planetary Surface Exploration MESUR/Autonomous Lunar Rover, Automation of Closed Environments in Space for Human Comfort and Safety, Walking Robot Design, Extraterrestrial Surface Propulsion Systems, The Design of Four Hypersonic Reconnaissance Aircraft, Design of a Refueling Tanker Delivering Liquid Hydrogen, The Design of a Long-Range Megatransport Aircraft, and Solar Powered Multipurpose Remotely Powered Aircraft.

  7. Program and abstracts of the 28th conference on Great Lakes research

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Abstracts of papers presented at the 28th Conference on Great Lakes Research and the annual meeting of the International Association for Great Lakes Research covered two symposia. The first was a comparison of Great Lakes and Baltic ecosystems, which provided an opportunity for international exchanges of information and insights. The second featured pollution problems in the Green Bay estuary environment that is of particular value to Wisconsin and Michigan. There are 41 separate abstracts selected for the Energy Data Base (EDB). Four of those were also selected for Energy Research Abstracts (ERA), six for Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA), and two for INS.

  8. Exceptional Children Conference Papers: Training and Personnel in Early Childhood Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Exceptional Children, Arlington, VA.

    Four papers discuss training and personnel in early childhood education. The concepts developed by the Division of Training Programs in seeking to award a grant for planning inservice training programs are described by J. Gerald Minskoff as is the role of a training coordinator. An evaluation of a pilot program to train teacher aides is presented…

  9. Assessing the integration of genomic medicine in genetic counseling training programs.

    PubMed

    Profato, Jessica; Gordon, Erynn S; Dixon, Shannan; Kwan, Andrea

    2014-08-01

    Medical genetics has entered a period of transition from genetics to genomics. Genetic counselors (GCs) may take on roles in the clinical implementation of genomics. This study explores the perspectives of program directors (PDs) on including genomic medicine in GC training programs, as well as the status of this integration. Study methods included an online survey, an optional one-on-one telephone interview, and an optional curricula content analysis. The majority of respondents (15/16) reported that it is important to include genomic medicine in program curricula. Most topics of genomic medicine are either "currently taught" or "under development" in all participating programs. Interview data from five PDs and one faculty member supported the survey data. Integrating genomics in training programs is challenging, and it is essential to develop genomics resources for curricula.

  10. DNA sequencing conference, 2

    SciTech Connect

    Cook-Deegan, R.M.; Venter, J.C.; Gilbert, W.; Mulligan, J.; Mansfield, B.K.

    1991-06-19

    This conference focused on DNA sequencing, genetic linkage mapping, physical mapping, informatics and bioethics. Several were used to study this sequencing and mapping. This article also discusses computer hardware and software aiding in the mapping of genes.

  11. 2012 Gordon Research Conference on Graphitic Carbon Materials, Chemistry and Physics of - Formal Schedule and Speaker/Poster Program

    SciTech Connect

    Fertig, Herbert A.

    2012-06-22

    The Gordon Research Conference on GRAPHITIC CARBON MATERIALS, CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS OF was held at the Davidson College, Davidson, North Carolina, June 17 – 22, 2012. The Conference was well-attended with 95 participants (attendees list attached). The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both U.S. and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. Of the 95 attendees, 41 voluntarily responded to a general inquiry regarding ethnicity which appears on our registration forms. Of the 41 respondents, 49% were Minorities – 5% Hispanic, 44% Asian and 0% African American. Approximately 2% of the participants at the 2012 meeting were women. In designing the formal speakers program, emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field. There was a conscious effort to stimulate lively discussion about the key issues in the field today. Time for formal presentations was limited in the interest of group discussions. In order that more scientists could communicate their most recent results, poster presentation time was scheduled. Attached is a copy of the formal schedule and speaker program and the poster program. In addition to these formal interactions, "free time" was scheduled to allow informal discussions. Such discussions are fostering new collaborations and joint efforts in the field. Carbon materials play an extremely important role in our society. They not only constitute the largest supply of energy we use today (i.e., coal) but also are the bases of many important technologies ranging from pencils, adsorbents, and metal strengtheners, to batteries and many others. Recent studies on graphitic carbon, including fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, and graphene, have further revealed novel optical and electrical properties, making it possible to use them for new applications in renewable energy as well as

  12. The potential use of genetics to increase the effectiveness of treatment programs for criminal offenders.

    PubMed

    Beaver, Kevin M; Jackson, Dylan B; Flesher, Dillon

    2014-01-01

    During the past couple of decades, the amount of research examining the genetic underpinnings to antisocial behaviors, including crime, has exploded. Findings from this body of work have generated a great deal of information linking genetics to criminal involvement. As a partial result, there is now a considerable amount of interest in how these findings should be integrated into the criminal justice system. In the current paper, we outline the potential ways that genetic information can be used to increase the effectiveness of treatment programs designed to reduce recidivism among offenders. We conclude by drawing attention to how genetic information can be used by rehabilitation programs to increase program effectiveness, reduce offender recidivism rates, and enhance public safety.

  13. Pro-Bike 80. First national conference for bicycle program specialists

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Thirty-five workshops are summarized, including copies of handout materials. These covered the topics of: bicycling facilities, legal issues and police services, education concerns, encouragement programs, and program development and related issues. Also summarized are informal sessions covering such topics as bike lanes, safety, an ethnographic case study approach to bicycling, bicycling and the press, and programs such as the Nationwide Trails Plan. Speeches are also presented covering the industry role, the second bicycle boom, and the metaphysics of energy. (LEW)

  14. NASA/USRA University Advanced Design Program Fourth Annual Summer Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alred, John

    1988-01-01

    The study topics cover a broad range of potential space and aeronautics projects which could be undertaken during a 20-30 year period beginning with the Space Station Initial Operating Configuration scheduled for the mid 1990's. Both manned and unmanned endeavors are embraced, and the systems approach to the design problem is emphasized. The student teams pursue the chosen problem during their senior year in a one or two semester capstone design course and submit a comprehensive written report at the conclusion of the project. Finally, student representatives from each of the universities summarize their work in oral presentations at the annual Summer Conference, held at one of the NASA centers and attended by the university faculty, NASA and USRA personnel, and aerospace industry representatives.

  15. Sixth SIAM conference on applied linear algebra: Final program and abstracts. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    Linear algebra plays a central role in mathematics and applications. The analysis and solution of problems from an amazingly wide variety of disciplines depend on the theory and computational techniques of linear algebra. In turn, the diversity of disciplines depending on linear algebra also serves to focus and shape its development. Some problems have special properties (numerical, structural) that can be exploited. Some are simply so large that conventional approaches are impractical. New computer architectures motivate new algorithms, and fresh ways to look at old ones. The pervasive nature of linear algebra in analyzing and solving problems means that people from a wide spectrum--universities, industrial and government laboratories, financial institutions, and many others--share an interest in current developments in linear algebra. This conference aims to bring them together for their mutual benefit. Abstracts of papers presented are included.

  16. Artificial intelligence programming with LabVIEW: genetic algorithms for instrumentation control and optimization.

    PubMed

    Moore, J H

    1995-06-01

    A genetic algorithm for instrumentation control and optimization was developed using the LabVIEW graphical programming environment. The usefulness of this methodology for the optimization of a closed loop control instrument is demonstrated with minimal complexity and the programming is presented in detail to facilitate its adaptation to other LabVIEW applications. Closed loop control instruments have variety of applications in the biomedical sciences including the regulation of physiological processes such as blood pressure. The program presented here should provide a useful starting point for those wishing to incorporate genetic algorithm approaches to LabVIEW mediated optimization of closed loop control instruments.

  17. Assessing University Programs. Symposium 9. [Concurrent Symposium Session at AHRD Annual Conference, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    This packet contains three papers from a symposium on evaluating university human resource development (HRD) programs. The first paper, "Where Have All the Young Ones Gone? An Analysis of the Graduates of an Human Resource Development Program" (Douglas H. Smith, Jo D. Gallagher), reports the results of a survey of graduates between 1998…

  18. Geriatric Education across 94 Million Acres: Adapting Conference Programming in a Rural State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy-Southwick, Colleen; McBride, Melen

    2006-01-01

    Montana, a predominantly rural state, with a unique blend of geography and history, low population density, and cultural diversity represents the challenges for program development and implementation across remote areas. The paper discusses two statewide multidisciplinary geriatric education programs for health professionals offered by the…

  19. Geriatric Education across 94 Million Acres: Adapting Conference Programming in a Rural State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy-Southwick, Colleen; McBride, Melen

    2006-01-01

    Montana, a predominantly rural state, with a unique blend of geography and history, low population density, and cultural diversity represents the challenges for program development and implementation across remote areas. The paper discusses two statewide multidisciplinary geriatric education programs for health professionals offered by the…

  20. Future Directions for Open Learning. A Report Based on an Invitational Conference on Open Learning Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Ronald

    The expansion of higher education in the United States has resulted in a variety of outreach programs to bring postsecondary education off the campus and into the community. New systems and programs of nontraditional study have emerged. Issues of current concern in open learning include: quality and effectiveness, outreach and access, research and…

  1. On the path to genetic novelties: insights from programmed DNA elimination and RNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Catania, Francesco; Schmitz, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how genetic novelties arise is a central goal of evolutionary biology. To this end, programmed DNA elimination and RNA splicing deserve special consideration. While programmed DNA elimination reshapes genomes by eliminating chromatin during organismal development, RNA splicing rearranges genetic messages by removing intronic regions during transcription. Small RNAs help to mediate this class of sequence reorganization, which is not error-free. It is this imperfection that makes programmed DNA elimination and RNA splicing excellent candidates for generating evolutionary novelties. Leveraging a number of these two processes' mechanistic and evolutionary properties, which have been uncovered over the past years, we present recently proposed models and empirical evidence for how splicing can shape the structure of protein-coding genes in eukaryotes. We also chronicle a number of intriguing similarities between the processes of programmed DNA elimination and RNA splicing, and highlight the role that the variation in the population-genetic environment may play in shaping their target sequences.

  2. The prediction of the degree of exposure to solvent of amino acid residues via genetic programming

    SciTech Connect

    Handley, S.

    1994-12-31

    In this paper I evolve programs that predict the degree of exposure to solvent (the buriedness) of amino acid residues given only the primary structure. I use genetic programming to evolve programs that take as input the primary structure and that output the buriedness of each residue. I trained these programs on a set of 82 proteins from the Brookhaven Protein Data Bank (PDB) and cross-validated them on a separate testing set of 40 proteins, also from the PDB. The best program evolved had a correlation of 0.434 between the predicted and observed buriednesses on the testing set.

  3. Abstracts: Eighth Annual Conference on Fossil Energy Materials. Fossil Energy Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    Abstracts are presented for about 40 papers. The Fossil Energy Advanced Research and Technology Development Materials program is an integrated materials research activity of the fossil energy coal program, whose objective is to conduct R and D for all advanced coal conversion and utilization technologies. The program is aimed at understanding materials behavior in coal system environments and the development of new materials for improving plant operations and reliability. A generic approach is used for addressing multiple coal technologies; for example, the hot-gas particulate filter development is applicable to pressurized fluidized bed combustion, integrated coal gasification combined-cycle, coal combustion, and indirectly fired combined-cycle systems.

  4. A novel holistic framework for genetic-based captive-breeding and reintroduction programs.

    PubMed

    Attard, C R M; Möller, L M; Sasaki, M; Hammer, M P; Bice, C M; Brauer, C J; Carvalho, D C; Harris, J O; Beheregaray, L B

    2016-10-01

    Research in reintroduction biology has provided a greater understanding of the often limited success of species reintroductions and highlighted the need for scientifically rigorous approaches in reintroduction programs. We examined the recent genetic-based captive-breeding and reintroduction literature to showcase the underuse of the genetic data gathered. We devised a framework that takes full advantage of the genetic data through assessment of the genetic makeup of populations before (past component of the framework), during (present component), and after (future component) captive-breeding and reintroduction events to understand their conservation potential and maximize their success. We empirically applied our framework to two small fishes: Yarra pygmy perch (Nannoperca obscura) and southern pygmy perch (Nannoperca australis). Each of these species has a locally adapted and geographically isolated lineage that is endemic to the highly threatened lower Murray-Darling Basin in Australia. These two populations were rescued during Australia's recent decade-long Millennium Drought, when their persistence became entirely dependent on captive-breeding and subsequent reintroduction efforts. Using historical demographic analyses, we found differences and similarities between the species in the genetic impacts of past natural and anthropogenic events that occurred in situ, such as European settlement (past component). Subsequently, successful maintenance of genetic diversity in captivity-despite skewed brooder contribution to offspring-was achieved through carefully managed genetic-based breeding (present component). Finally, genetic monitoring revealed the survival and recruitment of released captive-bred offspring in the wild (future component). Our holistic framework often requires no additional data collection to that typically gathered in genetic-based breeding programs, is applicable to a wide range of species, advances the genetic considerations of reintroduction

  5. Programs for the Educationally Disadvantaged: A Report of a Conference on Teaching Children and Youth Who Are Educationally Disadvantaged, May 21-23, 1962, Washington, D.C. Bulletin, 1963, No. 17. OE-35044

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Education, US Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, 1963

    1963-01-01

    Under the auspices of the Instructional Programs Branch of the U.S. Office of Education, a 3-day conference was held May 21-23, 1962, on "Teaching Children and Youth Who Are Educationally Disadvantaged." The conference brought together from all over the Nation acknowledged leaders of public school programs expressly designed to realize…

  6. NASA/USRA University Advanced Design Program Fifth Annual Summer Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The NASA/USRA University Advanced Design Program is a unique program that brings together NASA engineers, students, and faculty from United States engineering schools by integrating current and future NASA space/aeronautics engineering design projects into the university curriculum. The Program was conceived in the fall of 1984 as a pilot project to foster engineering design education in the universities and to supplement NASA's in-house efforts in advanced planning for space and aeronautics design. Nine universities and five NASA centers participated in the first year of the pilot project. Close cooperation between the NASA centers and the universities, the careful selection of design topics, and the enthusiasm of the students has resulted in a very successful program than now includes forty universities and eight NASA centers. The study topics cover a broad range of potential space and aeronautics projects.

  7. Evolving rule-based systems in two medical domains using genetic programming.

    PubMed

    Tsakonas, Athanasios; Dounias, Georgios; Jantzen, Jan; Axer, Hubertus; Bjerregaard, Beth; von Keyserlingk, Diedrich Graf

    2004-11-01

    To demonstrate and compare the application of different genetic programming (GP) based intelligent methodologies for the construction of rule-based systems in two medical domains: the diagnosis of aphasia's subtypes and the classification of pap-smear examinations. Past data representing (a) successful diagnosis of aphasia's subtypes from collaborating medical experts through a free interview per patient, and (b) correctly classified smears (images of cells) by cyto-technologists, previously stained using the Papanicolaou method. Initially a hybrid approach is proposed, which combines standard genetic programming and heuristic hierarchical crisp rule-base construction. Then, genetic programming for the production of crisp rule based systems is attempted. Finally, another hybrid intelligent model is composed by a grammar driven genetic programming system for the generation of fuzzy rule-based systems. Results denote the effectiveness of the proposed systems, while they are also compared for their efficiency, accuracy and comprehensibility, to those of an inductive machine learning approach as well as to those of a standard genetic programming symbolic expression approach. The proposed GP-based intelligent methodologies are able to produce accurate and comprehensible results for medical experts performing competitive to other intelligent approaches. The aim of the authors was the production of accurate but also sensible decision rules that could potentially help medical doctors to extract conclusions, even at the expense of a higher classification score achievement.

  8. Towards programming languages for genetic engineering of living cells

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Michael; Phillips, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Synthetic biology aims at producing novel biological systems to carry out some desired and well-defined functions. An ultimate dream is to design these systems at a high level of abstraction using engineering-based tools and programming languages, press a button, and have the design translated to DNA sequences that can be synthesized and put to work in living cells. We introduce such a programming language, which allows logical interactions between potentially undetermined proteins and genes to be expressed in a modular manner. Programs can be translated by a compiler into sequences of standard biological parts, a process that relies on logic programming and prototype databases that contain known biological parts and protein interactions. Programs can also be translated to reactions, allowing simulations to be carried out. While current limitations on available data prevent full use of the language in practical applications, the language can be used to develop formal models of synthetic systems, which are otherwise often presented by informal notations. The language can also serve as a concrete proposal on which future language designs can be discussed, and can help to guide the emerging standard of biological parts which so far has focused on biological, rather than logical, properties of parts. PMID:19369220

  9. Towards programming languages for genetic engineering of living cells.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Michael; Phillips, Andrew

    2009-08-06

    Synthetic biology aims at producing novel biological systems to carry out some desired and well-defined functions. An ultimate dream is to design these systems at a high level of abstraction using engineering-based tools and programming languages, press a button, and have the design translated to DNA sequences that can be synthesized and put to work in living cells. We introduce such a programming language, which allows logical interactions between potentially undetermined proteins and genes to be expressed in a modular manner. Programs can be translated by a compiler into sequences of standard biological parts, a process that relies on logic programming and prototype databases that contain known biological parts and protein interactions. Programs can also be translated to reactions, allowing simulations to be carried out. While current limitations on available data prevent full use of the language in practical applications, the language can be used to develop formal models of synthetic systems, which are otherwise often presented by informal notations. The language can also serve as a concrete proposal on which future language designs can be discussed, and can help to guide the emerging standard of biological parts which so far has focused on biological, rather than logical, properties of parts.

  10. Shaping a Cohesive Agenda: Next Steps. National Conference on Adult and External Degree Programs. (7th, Memphis, Tennessee, October 7-10, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance, an Association for Alternative Degree Programs.

    Proceedings of an international conference on adult and external degree programs are presented. Selected papers are drawn from the areas of distance learning, support services, intra-institutional, curriculum, and teaching. They include: "Uses of Distance Education for Graduate Professional Degrees" (Ruth J. Person and Raymond Vondran); "Library…

  11. College Faculty: Adjunct and Non-Traditional Roles. Selected Papers from the Conference on Non-Traditional Interdisciplinary Programs (Arlington, Virginia, June 22-24, 1983).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fonseca, James W., Ed.

    Six papers on adjunct and nontraditional college faculty are presented from the George Mason University (Virginia) annual conference on nontraditional interdisciplinary programs. The papers and authors are as follows: "Educational Orientation and Role Perceptions of Adjunct Faculty" (William McAfee, Lewis Smith); "Quality Teaching…

  12. Issues and Actions: Dialogues from Wingspread. Proceedings of the Conference on Adolescent Pregnancy: State Policies and Programs (Racine, Wisconsin, August 19-21, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mott (C.S.) Foundation, Flint, MI.

    Proceedings of a conference on adolescent pregnancy are presented in this document. Eunice Kennedy Shriver's opening address, in which she urged the building of "communities of caring" is summarized, as is the address by Gina C. Adams who discussed recent findings on the topic of adolescent pregnancy. Several programs developed to address the…

  13. Advancing Our National Agenda. Proceedings of the National Conference on Adult and External Degree Programs (8th, Washington, D.C., October 12-14, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Council on Education, Washington, DC.

    A comprehensive, interactive conference was designed to help improve the quality of external degree programs and adult education. Sixteen papers are presented as follows: (1) "Designing Self-Instructional Print Material for the Adult Learner" (Diane J. Davis); (2) "Degrees by Alternative Delivery for U.S. Soldiers and Sailors"…

  14. LEADERSHIP FOR VOCATIONAL EDUCATION IN CALIFORNIA--THEORY AND PRACTICE OF PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT, SUMMARY REPORT OF THE COASTAL, CENTRAL, AND SOUTHERN REGIONAL CONFERENCES (JANUARY-FEBRUARY, 1966).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Vocational Education Services.

    APPROXIMATELY 100 SUPERVISORS AND COORDINATORS OF PUBLIC SCHOOL VOCATIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS IN CALIFORNIA PARTICIPATED IN TWO CONFERENCES TO CONSIDER THE METHODS OF LABOR FORCE ENUMERATION, THE ASPECTS OF THE LABOR SITUATION MOST PERTINENT TO CHANGES IN VOCATIONAL EDUCATION, THE PROBLEMS OF WORKING WITH MANPOWER DATA, AND THE SALIENT FEATURES OF…

  15. What's Ahead for Voc. Ed. Selected Presentations from the National Conference on Program Planning and Evaluation (Washington, D.C., March 12-14, 1969).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1969

    Selected presentations from the National Conference on Program Planning and Evaluation held in Washington, D.C., March 12-14, 1969 are reported in this mimeographed publication: (1) "Vocational Education: From a World of Stability to a World of Change," by G. Venn, (2) "Staffing the State Department to Meet the Needs of Vocational…

  16. Current Directions in Family Nurse Practitioner Curricula. Proceedings of a National Conference of Representatives from Family Nurse Practitioner Programs (Chapel Hill, North Carolina, January 29-31, 1976)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickard, C. Glenn, Jr., Ed.; Watkins, Julia D., Ed.

    The conference reported here was held for nurse faculty and physicians from twenty-five family nurse practitioner (FNP) programs based in twenty-one states to provide the participants with an opportunity to consider their common curriculum problems and successes in FNP education. The first half of this booklet contains five paper presentations…

  17. Proceedings of the 1983 EMU Conference on Foreign Languages for Business (Ypsilanti, Michigan, April 7-9, 1983). Part II: Program Development and Retraining Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voght, Geoffrey M., Ed.

    A collection of 10 papers from the second part of the conference on the applications of foreign languages and international studies to business focuses on the development of programs in foreign languages for business purposes. The papers include: "Foreign Languages for Global Vocations: From Theory to Practice" (Rochelle K. Kelz), "A Grim(m) Fairy…

  18. National Research Conference on Day Programs for Hearing Impaired Children (Lake Mohonk, New York, May 10-13, 1967). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulholland, Ann M.; Fellendorf, George W.

    State needs in public school education for the hearing impaired and steps in the development of comprehensive state planning are presented along with recommendations of conference participants, a summary report, and models for regional planning, day programs, and the team approach. The interest of the Alexander Graham Bell Association and the U.S.…

  19. Advancing Our National Agenda. Proceedings of the National Conference on Adult and External Degree Programs (8th, Washington, D.C., October 12-14, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Council on Education, Washington, DC.

    A comprehensive, interactive conference was designed to help improve the quality of external degree programs and adult education. Sixteen papers are presented as follows: (1) "Designing Self-Instructional Print Material for the Adult Learner" (Diane J. Davis); (2) "Degrees by Alternative Delivery for U.S. Soldiers and Sailors"…

  20. Shaping a Cohesive Agenda: Next Steps. National Conference on Adult and External Degree Programs. (7th, Memphis, Tennessee, October 7-10, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance, an Association for Alternative Degree Programs.

    Proceedings of an international conference on adult and external degree programs are presented. Selected papers are drawn from the areas of distance learning, support services, intra-institutional, curriculum, and teaching. They include: "Uses of Distance Education for Graduate Professional Degrees" (Ruth J. Person and Raymond Vondran); "Library…

  1. Community Health, Community Care, Community Support: Proceedings of the Invitational Conference on Innovative Childhood Care and Development Support Programs (Amsterdam, Netherlands, September 1996).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanrahan, Marian, Ed.; Prinsen, Bert, Ed.

    The development of community-based programs to support inexperienced parents through home visits by experienced mothers, who are in turned facilitated by child health and development professionals, has become an increasingly common approach in Europe and the United States. This edited volume presents proceedings from an invitational conference on…

  2. Selected Proceedings from the International Conference on the Career Development of Handicapped Individuals: Program Implementation. Volume 2 (3rd, Dallas, TX, November 19-21, 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kokaska, Charles J., Ed.

    The document contains 16 papers on program implementation in the career development of the handicapped, and is one of three volumes of selected papers presented at a November, 1981, international conference on the career development of handicapped individuals. Papers have the following titles and authors: "A Career Education Materials Development…

  3. Tracking the genetic stability of a honeybee breeding program with genetic markers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A genetic stock identification (GSI) assay was developed in 2008 to distinguish Russian honey bees from other honey bee stocks that are commercially produced in the United States. Probability of assignment (POA) values have been collected and maintained since the stock release in 2008 to the Russian...

  4. Perinatal vs Genetic Programming of Serotonin States Associated with Anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Altieri, Stefanie C; Yang, Hongyan; O'Brien, Hannah J; Redwine, Hannah M; Senturk, Damla; Hensler, Julie G; Andrews, Anne M

    2015-01-01

    Large numbers of women undergo antidepressant treatment during pregnancy; however, long-term consequences for their offspring remain largely unknown. Rodents exposed to serotonin transporter (SERT)-inhibiting antidepressants during development show changes in adult emotion-like behavior. These changes have been equated with behavioral alterations arising from genetic reductions in SERT. Both models are highly relevant to humans yet they vary in their time frames of SERT disruption. We find that anxiety-related behavior and, importantly, underlying serotonin neurotransmission diverge between the two models. In mice, constitutive loss of SERT causes life-long increases in anxiety-related behavior and hyperserotonemia. Conversely, early exposure to the antidepressant escitalopram (ESC; Lexapro) results in decreased anxiety-related behavior beginning in adolescence, which is associated with adult serotonin system hypofunction in the ventral hippocampus. Adult behavioral changes resulting from early fluoxetine (Prozac) exposure were different from those of ESC and, although somewhat similar to SERT deficiency, were not associated with changes in hippocampal serotonin transmission in late adulthood. These findings reveal dissimilarities in adult behavior and neurotransmission arising from developmental exposure to different widely prescribed antidepressants that are not recapitulated by genetic SERT insufficiency. Moreover, they support a pivotal role for serotonergic modulation of anxiety-related behavior. PMID:25523893

  5. Genetics of bovine respiratory disease in cattle: can breeding programs reduce the problem?

    PubMed

    Berry, Donagh P

    2014-12-01

    Genetics is responsible for approximately half the observed change in performance internationally in well-structured cattle breeding programs. Almost all, if not all, individual characteristics, including animal health, have a genetic basis. Once genetic variation exists then breeding for improvement is possible. Although the heritability of most health traits is low to moderate, considerable exploitable genetic variation does exist. From the limited studies undertaken, and mostly from limited datasets, the direct heritability of susceptibility to BRD varied from 0.07 to 0.22 and the maternal heritability (where estimated) varied from 0.05 to 0.07. Nonetheless, considerable genetic variation clearly exists; the genetic standard deviation for the direct component (binary trait), although differing across populations, varied from 0.08 to 0.20 while the genetic standard deviation for the maternal component varied from 0.04 to 0.07. Little is known about the genetic correlation between genetic predisposition to BRD and animal performance; the estimation of these correlations should be prioritized. (Long-term) Breeding strategies to reduce the incidence of BRD in cattle should be incorporated into national BRD eradication or control strategies.

  6. Geothermal direct heat program: roundup technical conference proceedings. Volume II. Bibliography of publications. State-coupled geothermal resource assessment program

    SciTech Connect

    Ruscetta, C.A.

    1982-07-01

    Lists of publications are presented for the Geothermal Resource Assessment Program for the Utah Earth Science Laboratory and the following states: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Kansas, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, New York, North Dakota, Oregon, Texas, Utah, and Washington.

  7. Proceedings of the 6th Annual Summer Conference: NASA/USRA University Advanced Design Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The NASA/USRA University Advanced Design Program is a unique program that brings together NASA engineers, students, and faculty from United States engineering schools by integrating current and future NASA space/aeronautics engineering design projects into the university curriculum. The Program was conceived in the fall of 1984 as a pilot project to foster engineering design education in the universities and to supplement NASA's in-house efforts in advanced planning for space and aeronautics design. Nine universities and five NASA centers participated in the first year of the pilot project. The study topics cover a broad range of potential space and aeronautics projects that could be undertaken during a 20 to 30 year period beginning with the deployment of the Space Station Freedom scheduled for the mid-1990s. Both manned and unmanned endeavors are embraced, and the systems approach to the design problem is emphasized.

  8. Developmentally Programmed 3′ CpG Island Methylation Confers Tissue- and Cell-Type-Specific Transcriptional Activation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Da-Hai; Ware, Carol; Waterland, Robert A.; Zhang, Jiexin; Chen, Miao-Hsueh; Gadkari, Manasi; Kunde-Ramamoorthy, Govindarajan; Nosavanh, Lagina M.

    2013-01-01

    During development, a small but significant number of CpG islands (CGIs) become methylated. The timing of developmentally programmed CGI methylation and associated mechanisms of transcriptional regulation during cellular differentiation, however, remain poorly characterized. Here, we used genome-wide DNA methylation microarrays to identify epigenetic changes during human embryonic stem cell (hESC) differentiation. We discovered a group of CGIs associated with developmental genes that gain methylation after hESCs differentiate. Conversely, erasure of methylation was observed at the identified CGIs during subsequent reprogramming to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), further supporting a functional role for the CGI methylation. Both global gene expression profiling and quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) validation indicated opposing effects of CGI methylation in transcriptional regulation during differentiation, with promoter CGI methylation repressing and 3′ CGI methylation activating transcription. By studying diverse human tissues and mouse models, we further confirmed that developmentally programmed 3′ CGI methylation confers tissue- and cell-type-specific gene activation in vivo. Importantly, luciferase reporter assays provided evidence that 3′ CGI methylation regulates transcriptional activation via a CTCF-dependent enhancer-blocking mechanism. These findings expand the classic view of mammalian CGI methylation as a mechanism for transcriptional silencing and indicate a functional role for 3′ CGI methylation in developmental gene regulation. PMID:23459939

  9. Mating System and Genetic Composition of the Macaw Palm (Acrocomia aculeata): Implications for Breeding and Genetic Conservation Programs.

    PubMed

    Lanes, Éder C M; Motoike, Sérgio Y; Kuki, Kacilda N; Resende, Marcos D V; Caixeta, Eveline T

    2016-11-01

    Acrocomia aculeata (Arecaceae), a palm endemic to South and Central America, is a potential oil crop. Knowledge of the mating system of this species is limited to its reproductive biology and to studies using molecular markers. The present study analyzed genetic diversity between its developmental stages and determined its prevailing mating system in order to support genetic conservation and breeding programs. We tested 9 microsatellite markers in 27 mother trees (adult plants) and 157 offspring (juvenile plants) from the southeastern region of Brazil. Heterozygosity levels differed between the 2 studied life stages, as indicated by the fixation index of adult and juvenile trees, suggesting that selection against homozygotes occurs during the plant life cycle. The mating system parameters analyzed indicate that A. aculeata is predominantly outcrossing (allogamous). However, its low levels of selfing suggest that there is individual variation with regard to self-incompatibility, which can be a survival strategy in isolated or fragmented habitats. Deviations in variance effective size were detected because of high mating rates among relatives and correlated matings. These findings indicate that the main source of inbreeding results from biparental inbreeding in the population and that the progenies are predominantly composed of full-sibs. The information provided by this study on the ecology and reproduction dynamics of A. aculeata should be useful to both breeding and genetic conservation programs, allowing the development of more precise mathematical models and the estimation of the appropriate number of mother trees for seed collection.

  10. Energy Consumption Forecasting Using Semantic-Based Genetic Programming with Local Search Optimizer

    PubMed Central

    Vanneschi, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Energy consumption forecasting (ECF) is an important policy issue in today's economies. An accurate ECF has great benefits for electric utilities and both negative and positive errors lead to increased operating costs. The paper proposes a semantic based genetic programming framework to address the ECF problem. In particular, we propose a system that finds (quasi-)perfect solutions with high probability and that generates models able to produce near optimal predictions also on unseen data. The framework blends a recently developed version of genetic programming that integrates semantic genetic operators with a local search method. The main idea in combining semantic genetic programming and a local searcher is to couple the exploration ability of the former with the exploitation ability of the latter. Experimental results confirm the suitability of the proposed method in predicting the energy consumption. In particular, the system produces a lower error with respect to the existing state-of-the art techniques used on the same dataset. More importantly, this case study has shown that including a local searcher in the geometric semantic genetic programming system can speed up the search process and can result in fitter models that are able to produce an accurate forecasting also on unseen data. PMID:26106410

  11. Energy Consumption Forecasting Using Semantic-Based Genetic Programming with Local Search Optimizer.

    PubMed

    Castelli, Mauro; Trujillo, Leonardo; Vanneschi, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Energy consumption forecasting (ECF) is an important policy issue in today's economies. An accurate ECF has great benefits for electric utilities and both negative and positive errors lead to increased operating costs. The paper proposes a semantic based genetic programming framework to address the ECF problem. In particular, we propose a system that finds (quasi-)perfect solutions with high probability and that generates models able to produce near optimal predictions also on unseen data. The framework blends a recently developed version of genetic programming that integrates semantic genetic operators with a local search method. The main idea in combining semantic genetic programming and a local searcher is to couple the exploration ability of the former with the exploitation ability of the latter. Experimental results confirm the suitability of the proposed method in predicting the energy consumption. In particular, the system produces a lower error with respect to the existing state-of-the art techniques used on the same dataset. More importantly, this case study has shown that including a local searcher in the geometric semantic genetic programming system can speed up the search process and can result in fitter models that are able to produce an accurate forecasting also on unseen data.

  12. University HRD Programs. [Concurrent Symposium Session at AHRD Annual Conference, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1997

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on university HRD (human resource development) programs. A survey of 20 multinational corporations reported in "Determining the Labor Demand and Development Needs of HR/HRD Professionals in China" (William J. Rothwell) finds the demand for HR generalists and specialists in China is…

  13. EVALUATION CONFERENCE ON LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT SEMINARS, PROGRAM PLANNING, BUDGETING AND EVALUATION. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HIMMELE, IRVIN H.; SMITH, CLODUS R.

    THIRTY-FOUR PARTICIPANTS REPRESENTING THE LEADERSHIP-ACTION LEVEL OF PERSONNEL THROUGHOUT THE NATION AND FROM THE U.S. OFFICE OF EDUCATION EVALUATED THE LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT AND PROGRAM PLANNING, AND BUDGETING SEMINARS HELD DURING 1967. GUIDELINES FOR SEMINAR EVALUATION WERE PRESENTED--(1) "RATIONALE AND RETROSPECT" BY N. EDWIN CRAWFORD, (2)…

  14. Community Concerns and Extension Youth Programs. Proceedings Regional Conference (February 18-20, 1981). Publication 28.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Leigh Cree, Ed.

    The 4-H/Community Resource Development workshop was designed to help people conducting Extension 4-H programs on sensitive and complex community issues improve their ability to create a better climate for discussion of alternatives and development of community projects. Topics of the presentations included the role of the 4-H administrator,…

  15. Exceptional Children Conference Papers: Specific Subject Programs for EMRs and TMRs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Exceptional Children, Arlington, VA.

    Eight papers focus upon specific subject programs for educable and trainable mentally retarded (EMR and TMR) students. Three of the papers, concerning driver education and traffic safety education for EMR students, cover driver education guidelines and materials developed in a Michigan state institute involving teachers of EMR and teachers of…

  16. Evaluation of the 2012 18th Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Epidemiology and 22nd CityMatCH MCH Urban Leadership Conference: six month impact on science, program, and policy.

    PubMed

    Arellano, Danielle E; Goodman, David A; Howlette, Travis; Kroelinger, Charlan D; Law, Mark; Phillips, Donna; Jones, Jessica; Brantley, Mary D; Fitzgerald, Maureen

    2014-09-01

    The 18th Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Epidemiology and 22nd CityMatCH MCH Urban Leadership Conference took place in December 2012, covering MCH science, program, and policy issues. Assessing the impact of the Conference on attendees' work 6 months post-Conference provides information critical to understanding the impact and the use of new partnerships, knowledge, and skills gained during the Conference. Evaluation assessments, which included collection of quantitative and qualitative data, were administered at two time points: at Conference registration and 6 months post-Conference. The evaluation files were merged using computer IP address, linking responses from each assessment. Percentages of attendees reporting Conference impacts were calculated from quantitative data, and common themes and supporting examples were identified from qualitative data. Online registration was completed by 650 individuals. Of registrants, 30 % responded to the 6 month post-Conference assessment. Between registration and 6 month post-Conference evaluation, the distribution of respondents did not significantly differ by organizational affiliation. In the 6 months following the Conference, 65 % of respondents reported pursuing a networking interaction; 96 % shared knowledge from the Conference with co-workers and others in their agency; and 74 % utilized knowledge from the Conference to translate data into public health action. The Conference produced far-reaching impacts among Conference attendees. The Conference served as a platform for networking, knowledge sharing, and attaining skills that advance the work of attendees, with the potential of impacting organizational and workforce capacity. Increasing capacity could improve MCH programs, policies, and services, ultimately impacting the health of women, infants, and children.

  17. Evaluation of the 2012 18th Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Epidemiology and 22nd CityMatCH MCH Urban Leadership Conference: Six Month Impact on Science, Program, and Policy

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, David A.; Howlette, Travis; Kroelinger, Charlan D.; Law, Mark; Phillips, Donna; Jones, Jessica; Brantley, Mary D.; Fitzgerald, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    The 18th Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Epidemiology and 22nd CityMatCH MCH Urban Leadership Conference took place in December 2012, covering MCH science, program, and policy issues. Assessing the impact of the Conference on attendees’ work 6 months post-Conference provides information critical to understanding the impact and the use of new partnerships, knowledge, and skills gained during the Conference. Evaluation assessments, which included collection of quantitative and qualitative data, were administered at two time points: at Conference registration and 6 months post-Conference. The evaluation files were merged using computer IP address, linking responses from each assessment. Percentages of attendees reporting Conference impacts were calculated from quantitative data, and common themes and supporting examples were identified from qualitative data. Online registration was completed by 650 individuals. Of registrants, 30 % responded to the 6 month post-Conference assessment. Between registration and 6 month post-Conference evaluation, the distribution of respondents did not significantly differ by organizational affiliation. In the 6 months following the Conference, 65 % of respondents reported pursuing a networking interaction; 96 % shared knowledge from the Conference with coworkers and others in their agency; and 74 % utilized knowledge from the Conference to translate data into public health action. The Conference produced far-reaching impacts among Conference attendees. The Conference served as a platform for networking, knowledge sharing, and attaining skills that advance the work of attendees, with the potential of impacting organizational and workforce capacity. Increasing capacity could improve MCH programs, policies, and services, ultimately impacting the health of women, infants, and children. PMID:25107597

  18. Avionics equipment failure prediction based on genetic programming and grey model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xiujian; Luo, Qiang; Zhao, Yiyang; Feng, Qi

    2017-01-01

    Avionics equipment failure prediction by conventional GM (Grey Model) may yield large forecasting errors. Combining GM (1, 1) model with genetic programming algorithm, a kind of GP-GM (1, 1) forecast model was established to minimize such errors. Forecasting sequence was calculated by means of GM (1, 1) model, then genetic programming algorithm was used to modify them further, and the degradation trend prediction of characteristic parameters of avionics equipment was realized. The validity of GP-GM (1, 1) prediction model was testified by tracking and forecasting the experiment data of avionics equipment in real environment.

  19. A survey of application: genomics and genetic programming, a new frontier.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammad Wahab; Alam, Mansaf

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide an introduction to the rapidly developing field of genetic programming (GP). Particular emphasis is placed on the application of GP to genomics. First, the basic methodology of GP is introduced. This is followed by a review of applications in the areas of gene network inference, gene expression data analysis, SNP analysis, epistasis analysis and gene annotation. Finally this paper concluded by suggesting potential avenues of possible future research on genetic programming, opportunities to extend the technique, and areas for possible practical applications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Geriatric education across 94 million acres: adapting conference programming in a rural state.

    PubMed

    Murphy-Southwick, Colleen; McBride, Melen

    2006-01-01

    Montana, a predominantly rural state, with a unique blend of geography and history, low population density, and cultural diversity represents the challenges for program development and implementation across remote areas. The paper discusses two statewide multidisciplinary geriatric education programs for health professionals offered by the recently established Montana Geriatric Education Center (MTGEC); use of telecommunications technology; collaborations with Geriatric Education Centers (GECs) and the Montana Healthcare Telemedicine Alliance (MHTA); and training outcomes, insights, and implications for continuing education of health professionals who practice in hard-to-reach regions. In addition, data from a statewide needs assessment are presented specific to preferred format. The MTGEC training model that combined traditional classroom and videoconference increased attendance by twofold and may be adapted in other regions to train providers in remote areas of the U.S.

  1. Genetic testing and Alzheimer disease: recommendations of the Stanford Program in Genomics, Ethics, and Society.

    PubMed

    McConnell, L M; Koenig, B A; Greely, H T; Raffin, T A

    1999-01-01

    Several genes associated with Alzheimer disease (AD) have been localized and cloned; two genetic tests are already commercially available, and new tests are being developed. Genetic testing for AD--either for disease prediction or for diagnosis--raises critical ethical concerns. The multidisciplinary Alzheimer Disease Working Group of the Stanford Program in Genomics, Ethics, and Society (PGES) presents comprehensive recommendations on genetic testing for AD. The Group concludes that under current conditions, genetic testing for AD prediction or diagnosis is only rarely appropriate. Criteria for judging the readiness of a test for introduction into routine clinical practice typically rely heavily on evaluation of technical efficacy. PGES recommends a broader and more comprehensive approach, considering: 1) the unique social and historical meanings of AD; 2) the availability of procedures to promote good surrogate decision making for incompetent patients and to safeguard confidentiality; 3) access to sophisticated genetic counselors able to communicate complex risk information and effectively convey the social costs and psychological burdens of testing, such as unintentional disclosure of predictive genetic information to family members; 4) protection from inappropriate advertising and marketing of genetic tests; and 5) recognition of the need for public education about the meaning and usefulness of predictive and diagnostic tests for AD. In this special issue of Genetic Testing, the PGES recommendations are published along with comprehensive background papers authored by Working Group members.

  2. Lyndon Johnson's Press Conferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Stephen

    Because President Lyndon Johnson understood well the publicity value of the American news media, he sought to exploit them. He saw reporters as "torch bearers" for his programs and policies and used the presidential press conference chiefly for promotional purposes. Although he met with reporters often, his press conferences were usually…

  3. Genetics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Inheritance; Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... The chromosomes are made up of strands of genetic information called DNA. Each chromosome contains sections of ...

  4. A CAL Program to Teach the Basic Principles of Genetic Engineering--A Change from the Traditional Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewhurst, D. G.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    An interactive computer-assisted learning program written for the BBC microcomputer to teach the basic principles of genetic engineering is described. Discussed are the hardware requirements software, use of the program, and assessment. (Author/CW)

  5. A CAL Program to Teach the Basic Principles of Genetic Engineering--A Change from the Traditional Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewhurst, D. G.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    An interactive computer-assisted learning program written for the BBC microcomputer to teach the basic principles of genetic engineering is described. Discussed are the hardware requirements software, use of the program, and assessment. (Author/CW)

  6. The Alpha-1 Association Genetic Counseling Program: an innovative approach to service.

    PubMed

    McGee, Dawn; Strange, Charlie; McClure, Rebecca; Schwarz, Laura; Erven, Marlene

    2011-08-01

    In an era of specialty medicine, genetic counselors are becoming increasingly focused in their service provision. The Alpha-1 Association Genetic Counseling Program, established in September 2007, specializes in confidential toll-free genetic counseling provided by a certified genetic counselor for Alpha-1 Antitrypsin deficiency, a co-dominant condition associated with lung and/or liver disease. The program received more than 600 callers in its first 2 years. Sixty-seven percent of new callers were family members, carriers, or health professionals. The number of callers increased between the first 2 years, with the greatest increases being family members and health professionals. Testing options and explanation of results encompassed 60% of initial reasons for calls. Seventy-two percent of referrals came from family and friends, test result letters, and the Alpha-1 Association. Between year 1 and 2 family member referrals showed the largest increase. This disease-specific genetic counseling program provides a model that may be useful for other rare disease communities.

  7. Educational outcomes of a workplace screening program for genetic susceptibility to hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Nisselle, A E; Collins, V R; Gason, A A; Flouris, A; Delatycki, M B; Allen, K J; Aitken, M A; Metcalfe, S A

    2006-02-01

    Education is an essential component of a genetic screening program. Knowledge outcomes were measured after large-scale workplace education and screening for genetic susceptibility to hereditary hemochromatosis. The aim was to assess knowledge of concepts presented, impact of mode of delivery, and knowledge retention. Education in a group setting was delivered via oral or video presentation and knowledge assessed using self-administered questionnaires at baseline, 1 month, and 12 months. Over 60% of 11 679 participants correctly answered all questions at baseline, scoring higher with clinical concepts (disease etiology and treatment) than genetic concepts (penetrance and genetic heterogeneity). Revising the education program significantly increased correct responses for etiology (p < 0.002), whilst modifying the knowledge assessment tool significantly increased correct responses for etiology (p < 0.001) and gene penetrance (p < 0.001). For three of the four concepts assessed, use of video was as effective as oral presentation for knowledge outcomes. A significantly higher proportion of those at increased risk of disease (n = 44) responded correctly at 12 months than did controls (n = 82; p = 0.011 for etiology, p = 0.002 for treatment and p = 0.003 for penetrance). Hence, genetic screening can be successfully offered in a group workplace setting, with participants remembering clinical concepts better than genetic concepts up to 1 year later.

  8. Genetic algorithms and genetic programming for multiscale modeling: Applications in materials science and chemistry and advances in scalability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sastry, Kumara Narasimha

    2007-03-01

    Effective and efficient rnultiscale modeling is essential to advance both the science and synthesis in a, wide array of fields such as physics, chemistry, materials science; biology, biotechnology and pharmacology. This study investigates the efficacy and potential of rising genetic algorithms for rnultiscale materials modeling and addresses some of the challenges involved in designing competent algorithms that solve hard problems quickly, reliably and accurately. In particular, this thesis demonstrates the use of genetic algorithms (GAs) and genetic programming (GP) in multiscale modeling with the help of two non-trivial case studies in materials science and chemistry. The first case study explores the utility of genetic programming (GP) in multi-timescaling alloy kinetics simulations. In essence, GP is used to bridge molecular dynamics and kinetic Monte Carlo methods to span orders-of-magnitude in simulation time. Specifically, GP is used to regress symbolically an inline barrier function from a limited set of molecular dynamics simulations to enable kinetic Monte Carlo that simulate seconds of real time. Results on a non-trivial example of vacancy-assisted migration on a surface of a face-centered cubic (fcc) Copper-Cobalt (CuxCo 1-x) alloy show that GP predicts all barriers with 0.1% error from calculations for less than 3% of active configurations, independent of type of potentials used to obtain the learning set of barriers via molecular dynamics. The resulting method enables 2--9 orders-of-magnitude increase in real-time dynamics simulations taking 4--7 orders-of-magnitude less CPU time. The second case study presents the application of multiobjective genetic algorithms (MOGAs) in multiscaling quantum chemistry simulations. Specifically, MOGAs are used to bridge high-level quantum chemistry and semiempirical methods to provide accurate representation of complex molecular excited-state and ground-state behavior. Results on ethylene and benzene---two common

  9. Innate and adaptive immunity in bacteria: mechanisms of programmed genetic variation to fight bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Bikard, David; Marraffini, Luciano A

    2012-02-01

    Bacteria are constantly challenged by bacteriophages (viruses that infect bacteria), the most abundant microorganism on earth. Bacteria have evolved a variety of immunity mechanisms to resist bacteriophage infection. In response, bacteriophages can evolve counter-resistance mechanisms and launch a 'virus versus host' evolutionary arms race. In this context, rapid evolution is fundamental for the survival of the bacterial cell. Programmed genetic variation mechanisms at loci involved in immunity against bacteriophages generate diversity at a much faster rate than random point mutation and enable bacteria to quickly adapt and repel infection. Diversity-generating retroelements (DGRs) and phase variation mechanisms enhance the generic (innate) immune response against bacteriophages. On the other hand, the integration of small bacteriophage sequences in CRISPR loci provide bacteria with a virus-specific and sequence-specific adaptive immune response. Therefore, although using different molecular mechanisms, both prokaryotes and higher organisms rely on programmed genetic variation to increase genetic diversity and fight rapidly evolving infectious agents.

  10. New directions and changing faces for the USDA sunflower genetics programs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This document is a summary of a slideshow presented at the National Sunflower Association’s annual Research Forum in Fargo, ND, in January 2008. Background information was provided about new staff in the Sunflower Genetics programs as well as progress during this, the transitional year. Studies to b...

  11. Predicting Student Grades in Learning Management Systems with Multiple Instance Genetic Programming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zafra, Amelia; Ventura, Sebastian

    2009-01-01

    The ability to predict a student's performance could be useful in a great number of different ways associated with university-level learning. In this paper, a grammar guided genetic programming algorithm, G3P-MI, has been applied to predict if the student will fail or pass a certain course and identifies activities to promote learning in a…

  12. Including nonadditive genetic effects in mating programs to maximize dairy farm profitability.

    PubMed

    Aliloo, H; Pryce, J E; González-Recio, O; Cocks, B G; Goddard, M E; Hayes, B J

    2017-02-01

    We compared the outcome of mating programs based on different evaluation models that included nonadditive genetic effects (dominance and heterozygosity) in addition to additive effects. The additive and dominance marker effects and the values of regression on average heterozygosity were estimated using 632,003 single nucleotide polymorphisms from 7,902 and 7,510 Holstein cows with calving interval and production (milk, fat, and protein yields) records, respectively. Expected progeny values were computed based on the estimated genetic effects and genotype probabilities of hypothetical progeny from matings between the available genotyped cows and the top 50 young genomic bulls. An index combining the traits based on their economic values was developed and used to evaluate the performance of different mating scenarios in terms of dollar profit. We observed that mating programs with nonadditive genetic effects performed better than a model with only additive effects. Mating programs with dominance and heterozygosity effects increased milk, fat, and protein yields by up to 38, 1.57, and 1.21 kg, respectively. The inclusion of dominance and heterozygosity effects decreased calving interval by up to 0.70 d compared with random mating. The average reduction in progeny inbreeding by the inclusion of nonadditive genetic effects in matings compared with random mating was between 0.25 to 1.57 and 0.64 to 1.57 percentage points for calving interval and production traits, respectively. The reduction in inbreeding was accompanied by an average of A$8.42 (Australian dollars) more profit per mating for a model with additive, dominance, and heterozygosity effects compared with random mating. Mate allocations that benefit from nonadditive genetic effects can improve progeny performance only in the generation where it is being implemented, and the gain from specific combining abilities cannot be accumulated over generations. Continuous updating of genomic predictions and mate

  13. Beyond a curricular design of convenience: replacing the noon conference with an academic half day in three internal medicine residency programs.

    PubMed

    Batalden, Maren K; Warm, Eric J; Logio, Lia S

    2013-05-01

    Several residency programs have created an academic half day (AHD) for the delivery of core curriculum, and some program Web sites provide narrative descriptions of individual AHD curricula; nonetheless, little published literature on the AHD format exists. This article details three distinctive internal medicine residency programs (Cambridge Health Alliance, University of Cincinnati, and New York Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical College) whose leaders replaced the traditional noon conference curriculum with an AHD. Although each program's AHD developed independently of the other two, retrospective comparative review reveals instructive similarities and differences that may be useful to other residency directors. In this article, the authors describe the distinct approaches to the AHD at the three institutions through a framework of six core principles: (1) protect time and space to facilitate learning, (2) nurture active learning in residents, (3) choose and sequence curricular content deliberately, (4) develop faculty, (5) encourage resident preparation and accountability for learning, and (6) employ a continuous improvement approach to curriculum development and evaluation. The authors chronicle curricular adaptations at each institution over the first three years of experience. Preliminary outcome data, presented in the article, suggests that the transition from the traditional noon conference to an AHD may increase conference attendance, improve resident and faculty satisfaction with the curriculum, and improve resident performance on the In Training Examination.

  14. Authorized Course of Instruction for the Quinmester Program. Science: Genetics; Continuity of Life; and Perpetuating the Species.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    Each of the three secondary school science units, prepared for the Dade County Florida Quinmester Program, concerns some aspects of genetics. "Genetics" requires previous study of biology and concentrates on in-depth study of the nature, transmission, and function of the genetic material. There are no formal prerequisites for the units…

  15. ALA Conference 2009: Chicago Hope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, John N., III

    2009-01-01

    There is joy among those who have the funds to go to Chicago for the American Library Association (ALA) annual conference, July 9-15. Every librarian knows there is nothing better than a Chicago gathering, with the city's wonderful haunts, museums, restaurants, and fine memories of past conferences. The conference program covers nearly every…

  16. ALA Conference 2009: Chicago Hope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, John N., III

    2009-01-01

    There is joy among those who have the funds to go to Chicago for the American Library Association (ALA) annual conference, July 9-15. Every librarian knows there is nothing better than a Chicago gathering, with the city's wonderful haunts, museums, restaurants, and fine memories of past conferences. The conference program covers nearly every…

  17. Report on an Investigation into an Entry Level Clinical Doctorate for the Genetic Counseling Profession and a Survey of the Association of Genetic Counseling Program Directors.

    PubMed

    Reiser, Catherine; LeRoy, Bonnie; Grubs, Robin; Walton, Carol

    2015-10-01

    The master's degree is the required entry-level degree for the genetic counseling profession in the US and Canada. In 2012 the Association of Genetic Counseling Program Directors (AGCPD) passed resolutions supporting retention of the master's as the entry-level and terminal degree and opposing introduction of an entry-level clinical doctorate (CD) degree. An AGCPD workgroup surveyed directors of all 34 accredited training programs with the objective of providing the Genetic Counseling Advanced Degrees Task Force (GCADTF) with information regarding potential challenges if master's programs were required to transition to an entry-level CD. Program demographics, projected ability to transition to an entry-level CD, factors influencing ability to transition, and potential effects of transition on programs, students and the genetic counseling workforce were characterized. Two programs would definitely be able to transition, four programs would close, thirteen programs would be at risk to close and fourteen programs would probably be able to transition with varying degrees of difficulty. The most frequently cited limiting factors were economic, stress on clinical sites, and administrative approval of a new degree/program. Student enrollment under an entry-level CD model was projected to decrease by 26.2 %, negatively impacting the workforce pipeline. The results further illuminate and justify AGCPD's position to maintain the master's as the entry-level degree.

  18. Influence of Genetic Counseling Graduate Program Websites on Student Application Decisions.

    PubMed

    Ivan, Kristina M; Hassed, Susan; Darden, Alix G; Aston, Christopher E; Guy, Carrie

    2017-04-19

    This study investigated how genetic counseling educational program websites affect application decisions via an online survey sent to current students and recent graduates. Program leadership: directors, assistant directors, associate directors, were also surveyed to determine where their opinions coincided or differed from those reported by students and recent graduates. Chi square analysis and t-tests were used to determine significance of results. A two-sample t-test was used to compare factors students identified as important on a 5-point Likert scale with those identified by directors. Thematic analysis revealed three major themes students consider important for program websites: easy navigation, website content, and website impression. Directors were interested in how prospective students use their program website and what information they found most useful. Students indicated there were specific programs they chose not to apply to due to the difficulty of using the website for that program. Directors significantly underestimated how important information about application requirements was to students in making application decisions. The information reported herein will help individual genetic counseling graduate programs improve website functionality and retain interested applicants.

  19. Potential of gene drives with genome editing to increase genetic gain in livestock breeding programs.

    PubMed

    Gonen, Serap; Jenko, Janez; Gorjanc, Gregor; Mileham, Alan J; Whitelaw, C Bruce A; Hickey, John M

    2017-01-04

    This paper uses simulation to explore how gene drives can increase genetic gain in livestock breeding programs. Gene drives are naturally occurring phenomena that cause a mutation on one chromosome to copy itself onto its homologous chromosome. We simulated nine different breeding and editing scenarios with a common overall structure. Each scenario began with 21 generations of selection, followed by 20 generations of selection based on true breeding values where the breeder used selection alone, selection in combination with genome editing, or selection with genome editing and gene drives. In the scenarios that used gene drives, we varied the probability of successfully incorporating the gene drive. For each scenario, we evaluated genetic gain, genetic variance [Formula: see text], rate of change in inbreeding ([Formula: see text]), number of distinct quantitative trait nucleotides (QTN) edited, rate of increase in favourable allele frequencies of edited QTN and the time to fix favourable alleles. Gene drives enhanced the benefits of genome editing in seven ways: (1) they amplified the increase in genetic gain brought about by genome editing; (2) they amplified the rate of increase in the frequency of favourable alleles and reduced the time it took to fix them; (3) they enabled more rapid targeting of QTN with lesser effect for genome editing; (4) they distributed fixed editing resources across a larger number of distinct QTN across generations; (5) they focussed editing on a smaller number of QTN within a given generation; (6) they reduced the level of inbreeding when editing a subset of the sires; and (7) they increased the efficiency of converting genetic variation into genetic gain. Genome editing in livestock breeding results in short-, medium- and long-term increases in genetic gain. The increase in genetic gain occurs because editing increases the frequency of favourable alleles in the population. Gene drives accelerate the increase in allele frequency

  20. Multi-gene genetic programming based predictive models for municipal solid waste gasification in a fluidized bed gasifier.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Daya Shankar; Pan, Indranil; Das, Saptarshi; Leahy, James J; Kwapinski, Witold

    2015-03-01

    A multi-gene genetic programming technique is proposed as a new method to predict syngas yield production and the lower heating value for municipal solid waste gasification in a fluidized bed gasifier. The study shows that the predicted outputs of the municipal solid waste gasification process are in good agreement with the experimental dataset and also generalise well to validation (untrained) data. Published experimental datasets are used for model training and validation purposes. The results show the effectiveness of the genetic programming technique for solving complex nonlinear regression problems. The multi-gene genetic programming are also compared with a single-gene genetic programming model to show the relative merits and demerits of the technique. This study demonstrates that the genetic programming based data-driven modelling strategy can be a good candidate for developing models for other types of fuels as well. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Antagonistic pleiotropy at the human IL6 promoter confers genetic resilience to the pro-inflammatory effects of adverse social conditions in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Cole, Steven W; Arevalo, Jesusa M G; Manu, Kavya; Telzer, Eva H; Kiang, Lisa; Bower, Julienne E; Irwin, Michael R; Fuligni, Andrew J

    2011-07-01

    The authors tested the evolutionary genetic hypothesis that the functional form of an asymmetrically risky Gene × Environment interaction will differ as a function of age-related antagonistic pleiotropy (i.e., show opposite effects in young vs. old individuals). Previous studies have identified a polymorphism in the human IL6 promoter (rs1800795; IL6-74 G/C) that interacts with adverse socioenvironmental conditions to promote chronic inflammation in older adults (elevated C-reactive protein). This study identifies a protective effect of the same polymorphism in 17- to 19-year-old adolescents confronting socioeconomic adversity. Over 60% of the environmental risk contribution to the IL6 × Socioeconomic Status interaction could be accounted for by interpersonal stress and adult role burden. Thus, the IL6-174G allele does not represent an undifferentiated risk factor but instead sensitizes inflammatory biology to socioenvironmental conditions, conferring either genetic vulnerability or resilience depending on the developmental "somatic environment" that interacts with social conditions to influence gene expression.

  2. Molecular and Genetic Characterization of a Non-Climacteric Phenotype in Melon Reveals Two Loci Conferring Altered Ethylene Response in Fruit1

    PubMed Central

    Périn, Christophe; Gomez-Jimenez, MariCarmen; Hagen, Lynda; Dogimont, Catherine; Pech, Jean-Claude; Latché, Alain; Pitrat, Michel; Lelièvre, Jean-Marc

    2002-01-01

    Fruit ripening and abscission are associated with an ethylene burst in several melon (Cucumis melo) genotypes. In cantaloupe as in other climacteric fruit, exogenous ethylene can prematurely induce abscission, ethylene production, and ripening. Melon genotypes without fruit abscission or without ethylene burst also exist and are, therefore, non-climacteric. In the nonabscising melon fruit PI 161375, exogenous ethylene failed to stimulate abscission, loss of firmness, ethylene production, and expression of all target genes tested. However, the PI 161375 etiolated seedlings displayed the usual ethylene-induced triple response. Genetic analysis on a population of recombinant cantaloupe Charentais × PI 161375 inbred lines in segregation for fruit abscission and ethylene production indicated that both characters are controlled by two independent loci, abscission layer (Al)-3 and Al-4. The non-climacteric phenotype in fruit tissues is attributable to ethylene insensitivity conferred by the recessive allelic forms from PI 161375. Five candidate genes (two ACO, two ACS, and ERS) that were localized on the melon genetic map did not exhibit colocalization with Al-3 or Al-4. PMID:12011360

  3. Potential benefits of genomic selection on genetic gain of small ruminant breeding programs.

    PubMed

    Shumbusho, F; Raoul, J; Astruc, J M; Palhiere, I; Elsen, J M

    2013-08-01

    In conventional small ruminant breeding programs, only pedigree and phenotype records are used to make selection decisions but prospects of including genomic information are now under consideration. The objective of this study was to assess the potential benefits of genomic selection on the genetic gain in French sheep and goat breeding designs of today. Traditional and genomic scenarios were modeled with deterministic methods for 3 breeding programs. The models included decisional variables related to male selection candidates, progeny testing capacity, and economic weights that were optimized to maximize annual genetic gain (AGG) of i) a meat sheep breeding program that improved a meat trait of heritability (h(2)) = 0.30 and a maternal trait of h(2) = 0.09 and ii) dairy sheep and goat breeding programs that improved a milk trait of h(2) = 0.30. Values of ±0.20 of genetic correlation between meat and maternal traits were considered to study their effects on AGG. The Bulmer effect was accounted for and the results presented here are the averages of AGG after 10 generations of selection. Results showed that current traditional breeding programs provide an AGG of 0.095 genetic standard deviation (σa) for meat and 0.061 σa for maternal trait in meat breed and 0.147 σa and 0.120 σa in sheep and goat dairy breeds, respectively. By optimizing decisional variables, the AGG with traditional selection methods increased to 0.139 σa for meat and 0.096 σa for maternal traits in meat breeding programs and to 0.174 σa and 0.183 σa in dairy sheep and goat breeding programs, respectively. With a medium-sized reference population (nref) of 2,000 individuals, the best genomic scenarios gave an AGG that was 17.9% greater than with traditional selection methods with optimized values of decisional variables for combined meat and maternal traits in meat sheep, 51.7% in dairy sheep, and 26.2% in dairy goats. The superiority of genomic schemes increased with the size of the

  4. Evaluation of two-year Jewish genetic disease screening program in Atlanta: insight into community genetic screening approaches.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yunru; Liu, Shuling; Grinzaid, Karen

    2015-04-01

    Improvements in genetic testing technologies have led to the development of expanded carrier screening panels for the Ashkenazi Jewish population; however, there are major inconsistencies in current screening practices. A 2-year pilot program was launched in Atlanta in 2010 to promote and facilitate screening for 19 Jewish genetic diseases. We analyzed data from this program, including participant demographics and outreach efforts. This retrospective analysis is based on a de-identified dataset of 724 screenees. Data were obtained through medical chart review and questionnaires and included demographic information, screening results, response to outreach efforts, and follow-up behavior and preferences. We applied descriptive analysis, chi-square tests, and logistic regression to analyze the data and compare findings with published literature. The majority of participants indicated that they were not pregnant or did not have a partner who was pregnant were affiliated with Jewish organizations and reported 100 % AJ ancestry. Overall, carrier frequency was 1 in 3.9. Friends, rabbis, and family members were the most common influencers of the decision to receive screening. People who were older, had a history of pregnancy, and had been previously screened were more likely to educate others (all p < 0.05). Analysis of this 2-year program indicated that people who are ready to have children or expand their families are more likely to get screened and encourage others to be screened. The most effective outreach efforts targeted influencers who then encouraged screening in the target population. Educating influencers and increasing overall awareness were the most effective outreach strategies.

  5. Genetic Counseling Graduate Student Debt: Impact on Program, Career and Life Choices

    PubMed Central

    Kuhl, Ashley; Reiser, Catherine; Eickhoff, Jens; Petty, Elizabeth M

    2015-01-01

    The cost of education is rising, increasing student financial aid and debt for students pursuing higher education. A few studies have assessed the impact of student debt in medicine, physical therapy and social work, but little is known about the impact of student debt on genetic counseling students and graduates. To address this gap in knowledge, a web-based study of 408 recent alumni of genetic counseling programs in North America was conducted to assess the impact of student debt on program, career and life choices. Over half (63%; n=256/408) of the participants reported that loans were extremely important in their ability to attend their training program, with most using subsidized loans no longer available to current graduate students. While participants were generally satisfied with their genetic counseling education, 83% (n=282/342) of participants with student debt reported feeling burdened by their debt, which had a median of $40,000-$50,000. This debt is relatively close to the median starting salary reported by survey participants ($45,000-$50,000), breaching the “20-10 rule” that states student debt should not exceed 20% of annual net income. In response to this critical issue, we propose recommendations for the genetic counseling field that may help alleviate student debt impact and burden. PMID:24578121

  6. Genetic counseling graduate student debt: impact on program, career and life choices.

    PubMed

    Kuhl, Ashley; Reiser, Catherine; Eickhoff, Jens; Petty, Elizabeth M

    2014-10-01

    The cost of education is rising, increasing student financial aid and debt for students pursuing higher education. A few studies have assessed the impact of student debt in medicine, physical therapy and social work, but little is known about the impact of student debt on genetic counseling students and graduates. To address this gap in knowledge, a web-based study of 408 recent alumni of genetic counseling programs in North America was conducted to assess the impact of student debt on program, career and life choices. Over half (63 %; n = 256/408) of the participants reported that loans were extremely important in their ability to attend their training program, with most using subsidized loans no longer available to current graduate students. While participants were generally satisfied with their genetic counseling education, 83 % (n = 282/342) of participants with student debt reported feeling burdened by their debt, which had a median of $40,000-$50,000. This debt is relatively close to the median starting salary reported by survey participants ($45,000-$50,000), breaching the "20-10 rule" that states student debt should not exceed 20 % of annual net income. In response to this critical issue, we propose recommendations for the genetic counseling field that may help alleviate student debt impact and burden.

  7. Implementation of genetic conservation practices in a muskellunge propagation and stocking program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jennings, Martin J.; Sloss, Brian L.; Hatzenbeler, Gene R.; Kampa, Jeffrey M.; Simonson, Timothy D.; Avelallemant, Steven P.; Lindenberger, Gary A.; Underwood, Bruce D.

    2010-01-01

    Conservation of genetic resources is a challenging issue for agencies managing popular sport fishes. To address the ongoing potential for genetic risks, we developed a comprehensive set of recommendations to conserve genetic diversity of muskellunge (Esox masquinongy) in Wisconsin, and evaluated the extent to which the recommendations can be implemented. Although some details are specific to Wisconsin's muskellunge propagation program, many of the practical issues affecting implementation are applicable to other species and production systems. We developed guidelines to restrict future brood stock collection operations to lakes with natural reproduction and to develop a set of brood lakes to use on a rotational basis within regional stock boundaries, but implementation will require considering lakes with variable stocking histories. Maintaining an effective population size sufficient to minimize the risk of losing alleles requires limiting brood stock collection to large lakes. Recommendations to better approximate the temporal distribution of spawning in hatchery operations and randomize selection of brood fish are feasible. Guidelines to modify rearing and distribution procedures face some logistic constraints. An evaluation of genetic diversity of hatchery-produced fish during 2008 demonstrated variable success representing genetic variation of the source population. Continued evaluation of hatchery operations will optimize operational efficiency while moving toward genetic conservation goals.

  8. Implementation of genetic conservation practices in a muskellunge propagation and stocking program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jennings, Martin J.; Sloss, Brian L.; Hatzenbeler, Gene R.; Kampa, Jeffrey M.; Simonson, Timothy D.; Avelallemant, Steven P.; Lindenberger, Gary A.; Underwood, Bruce D.

    2010-01-01

    Conservation of genetic resources is a challenging issue for agencies managing popular sport fishes. To address the ongoing potential for genetic risks, we developed a comprehensive set of recommendations to conserve genetic diversity of muskellunge (Esox masquinongy) in Wisconsin, and evaluated the extent to which the recommendations can be implemented. Although some details are specific to Wisconsin's muskellunge propagation program, many of the practical issues affecting implementation are applicable to other species and production systems. We developed guidelines to restrict future broodstock collection operations to lakes with natural reproduction and to develop a set of brood lakes to use on a rotational basis within regional stock boundaries, but implementation will require considering lakes with variable stocking histories. Maintaining an effective population size sufficient to minimize the risk of losing alleles requires limiting broodstock collection to large lakes. Recommendations to better approximate the temporal distribution of spawning in hatchery operations and randomize selection of brood fish are feasible. Guidelines to modify rearing and distribution procedures face some logistic constraints. An evaluation of genetic diversity of hatchery-produced fish during 2008 demonstrated variable success representing genetic variation of the source population. Continued evaluation of hatchery operations will optimize operational efficiency while moving toward genetic conservation goals.

  9. CTLA-4 gene polymorphism confers susceptibility to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) independently from age and from other genetic or immune disease markers. The Belgian Diabetes Registry.

    PubMed

    Van der Auwera, B J; Vandewalle, C L; Schuit, F C; Winnock, F; De Leeuw, I H; Van Imschoot, S; Lamberigts, G; Gorus, F K

    1997-10-01

    Apart from genes in the HLA complex (IDDM1) and the variable number of tandem repeats in the 5' region of the insulin gene (INS VNTR, IDDM2), several other loci have been proposed to contribute to IDDM susceptibility. Recently, linkage and association have been shown between the cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4) gene on chromosome 2q and IDDM. In a registry-based group of 525 recent-onset IDDM patients <40 years old we investigated the possible interactions of a CTLA-4 gene A-to-G transition polymorphism with age at clinical disease onset and with the presence or absence of established genetic (HLA-DQ, INS VNTR) and immune disease markers (autoantibodies against islet cell cytoplasm (ICA); insulin (IAA); glutamate decarboxylase (GAD65-Ab); IA-2 protein tyrosine phosphatase (IA-2-Ab)) determined within the first week of insulin treatment. In new-onset IDDM patients. G-allele-containing CTLA-4 genotypes (relative risk (RR)= 1.5; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.2-2.0; P < 0.005) were not preferentially associated with age at clinical presentation or with the presence of other genetic (HLA-DR3 or DR4 alleles; HLA-DQA1*0301-DQB1*0302 and/or DQA1*0501-DQB1*0201 risk haplotypes; INS VNTR I/I risk genotype) or immune (ICA, IAA, IA-2-Ab, GAD65-Ab) markers of diabetes. For 151 patients, thyrogastric autoantibodies (anti-thyroid peroxidase, anti-thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor, anti-parietal cell, anti-intrinsic factor) were determined, but association between CTLA-4 risk genotypes and markers of polyendocrine autoimmunity could not be demonstrated before or after stratification for HLA- or INS-linked risk. In conclusion, the presence of a G-containing CTLA-4 genotype confers a moderate but significant RR for IDDM that is independent of age and genetic or immune disease markers.

  10. The mecA homolog mecC confers resistance against β-lactams in Staphylococcus aureus irrespective of the genetic strain background.

    PubMed

    Ballhausen, Britta; Kriegeskorte, André; Schleimer, Nina; Peters, Georg; Becker, Karsten

    2014-07-01

    In staphylococci, methicillin resistance is mediated by mecA-encoded penicillin-binding protein 2a (PBP2a), which has a low affinity for beta-lactams. Recently, a novel PBP2a homolog was described as being encoded by mecC, which shares only 70% similarity to mecA. To prove that mecC is the genetic determinant that confers methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus, a mecC knockout strain was generated. The S. aureus ΔmecC strain showed considerably reduced oxacillin and cefoxitin MICs (0.25 and 4 μg/ml, respectively) compared to those of the corresponding wild-type methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strain (8 and 16 μg/ml, respectively). Complementing the mutant in trans with wild-type mecC restored the resistance to oxacillin and cefoxitin. By expressing mecC and mecA in different S. aureus clonal lineages, we found that mecC mediates resistance irrespective of the genetic strain background, yielding oxacillin and cefoxitin MIC values comparable to those with mecA. In addition, we showed that mecC expression is inducible by oxacillin, which supports the assumption that a functional beta-lactam-dependent regulatory system is active in MRSA strains possessing staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) type XI. In summary, we showed that mecC is inducible by oxacillin and mediates beta-lactam resistance in SCCmec type XI-carrying strains as well as in different S. aureus genetic backgrounds. Furthermore, our results could explain the comparatively low MICs for clinical mecC-harboring S. aureus isolates. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. wisepair: a computer program for individual matching in genetic tracking studies.

    PubMed

    Rothstein, Andrew P; McLaughlin, Ryan; Acevedo-Gutiérrez, Alejandro; Schwarz, Dietmar

    2017-03-01

    Individual-based data sets tracking organisms over space and time are fundamental to answering broad questions in ecology and evolution. A 'permanent' genetic tag circumvents a need to invasively mark or tag animals, especially if there are little phenotypic differences among individuals. However, genetic tracking of individuals does not come without its limits; correctly matching genotypes and error rates associated with laboratory work can make it difficult to parse out matched individuals. In addition, defining a sampling design that effectively matches individuals in the wild can be a challenge for researchers. Here, we combine the two objectives of defining sampling design and reducing genotyping error through an efficient Python-based computer-modelling program, wisepair. We describe the methods used to develop the computer program and assess its effectiveness through three empirical data sets, with and without reference genotypes. Our results show that wisepair outperformed similar genotype matching programs using previously published from reference genotype data of diurnal poison frogs (Allobates femoralis) and without-reference (faecal) genotype sample data sets of harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) and Eurasian otters (Lutra lutra). In addition, due to limited sampling effort in the harbour seal data, we present optimal sampling designs for future projects. wisepair allows for minimal sacrifice in the available methods as it incorporates sample rerun error data, allelic pairwise comparisons and probabilistic simulations to determine matching thresholds. Our program is the lone tool available to researchers to define parameters a priori for genetic tracking studies.

  12. Cost-effectiveness of a school-based Tay-Sachs and cystic fibrosis genetic carrier screening program.

    PubMed

    Warren, Emma; Anderson, Rob; Proos, Anné L; Burnett, Leslie B; Barlow-Stewart, Kris; Hall, Jane

    2005-09-01

    To explore the cost-effectiveness of school-based multi-disease genetic carrier screening. Decision analysis of the cost-effectiveness of a school-based Tay-Sachs disease and cystic fibrosis genetic carrier screening program, relative to no screening. Data relating to ethnicity profile, test-accepting behavior, and screening program cost were sourced from an existing program in Sydney, Australia. Compared to no screening, the incremental cost-effectiveness of the screening program is A dollar 5,834 per additional carrier detected. This cost-effectiveness ratio is most sensitive to changes in genetic test accuracy, and the cost of laboratory assays. The results imply a cost per affected birth avoided of approximately A dollar 530,000 (approximately US dollar 371,000). This preconceptional genetic carrier screening program offers comparable cost-effectiveness to prenatal screening programs for cystic fibrosis.

  13. Natural diversity in the model legume Medicago truncatula allows identifying distinct genetic mechanisms conferring partial resistance to Verticillium wilt.

    PubMed

    Ben, Cécile; Toueni, Maoulida; Montanari, Sara; Tardin, Marie-Claire; Fervel, Magalie; Negahi, Azam; Saint-Pierre, Laure; Mathieu, Guillaume; Gras, Marie-Christine; Noël, Dominique; Prospéri, Jean-Marie; Pilet-Nayel, Marie-Laure; Baranger, Alain; Huguet, Thierry; Julier, Bernadette; Rickauer, Martina; Gentzbittel, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Verticillium wilt is a major threat to alfalfa (Medicago sativa) and many other crops. The model legume Medicago truncatula was used as a host for studying resistance and susceptibility to Verticillium albo-atrum. In addition to presenting well-established genetic resources, this wild plant species enables to investigate biodiversity of the response to the pathogen and putative crosstalk between disease and symbiosis. Symptom scoring after root inoculation and modelling of disease curves allowed assessing susceptibility levels in recombinant lines of three crosses between susceptible and resistant lines, in a core collection of 32 lines, and in mutants affected in symbiosis with rhizobia. A GFP-expressing V. albo-atrum strain was used to study colonization of susceptible plants. Symptoms and colonization pattern in infected M. truncatula plants were typical of Verticillium wilt. Three distinct major quantitative trait loci were identified using a multicross, multisite design, suggesting that simple genetic mechanisms appear to control Verticillium wilt resistance in M. truncatula lines A17 and DZA45.5. The disease functional parameters varied largely in lines of the core collection. This biodiversity with regard to disease response encourages the development of association genetics and ecological approaches. Several mutants of the resistant line, impaired in different steps of rhizobial symbiosis, were affected in their response to V. albo-atrum, which suggests that mechanisms involved in the establishment of symbiosis or disease might have some common regulatory control points.

  14. Natural diversity in the model legume Medicago truncatula allows identifying distinct genetic mechanisms conferring partial resistance to Verticillium wilt

    PubMed Central

    Gentzbittel, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Verticillium wilt is a major threat to alfalfa (Medicago sativa) and many other crops. The model legume Medicago truncatula was used as a host for studying resistance and susceptibility to Verticillium albo-atrum. In addition to presenting well-established genetic resources, this wild plant species enables to investigate biodiversity of the response to the pathogen and putative crosstalk between disease and symbiosis. Symptom scoring after root inoculation and modelling of disease curves allowed assessing susceptibility levels in recombinant lines of three crosses between susceptible and resistant lines, in a core collection of 32 lines, and in mutants affected in symbiosis with rhizobia. A GFP-expressing V. albo-atrum strain was used to study colonization of susceptible plants. Symptoms and colonization pattern in infected M. truncatula plants were typical of Verticillium wilt. Three distinct major quantitative trait loci were identified using a multicross, multisite design, suggesting that simple genetic mechanisms appear to control Verticillium wilt resistance in M. truncatula lines A17 and DZA45.5. The disease functional parameters varied largely in lines of the core collection. This biodiversity with regard to disease response encourages the development of association genetics and ecological approaches. Several mutants of the resistant line, impaired in different steps of rhizobial symbiosis, were affected in their response to V. albo-atrum, which suggests that mechanisms involved in the establishment of symbiosis or disease might have some common regulatory control points. PMID:23213135

  15. Evolutionary conservation and modulation of a juvenile growth-regulating genetic program

    PubMed Central

    Delaney, Angela; Padmanabhan, Vasantha; Rezvani, Geoffrey; Chen, Weiping; Forcinito, Patricia; Cheung, Crystal S.F.; Baron, Jeffrey; Lui, Julian C.K.

    2014-01-01

    Body size varies enormously among mammalian species. In small mammals, body growth is typically suppressed rapidly, within weeks, whereas in large mammals, growth is suppressed slowly, over years, allowing for a greater adult size. We recently reported evidence that body growth suppression in rodents is caused in part by a juvenile genetic program that occurs in multiple tissues simultaneously and involves the downregulation of a large set of growth-promoting genes. We hypothesized that this genetic program is conserved in large mammals but that its time course is evolutionarily modulated such that it plays out more slowly, allowing for more prolonged growth. Consistent with this hypothesis, using expression microarray analysis, we identified a set of genes that are downregulated with age in both juvenile sheep kidney and lung. This overlapping gene set was enriched for genes involved in cell proliferation and growth and showed striking similarity to a set of genes downregulated with age in multiple organs of the juvenile mouse and rat, indicating that the multiorgan juvenile genetic program previously described in rodents has been conserved in the 80 million years since sheep and rodents diverged in evolution. Using microarray and real-time PCR, we found that the pace of this program was most rapid in mice, more gradual in rats, and most gradual in sheep. The findings support the hypothesis that a growth-regulating genetic program is conserved among mammalian species but that its pace is modulated to allow more prolonged growth and therefore greater adult body size in larger mammals. PMID:24776848

  16. Genetically engineered red cells expressing single domain camelid antibodies confer long-term protection against botulinum neurotoxin.

    PubMed

    Huang, Nai-Jia; Pishesha, Novalia; Mukherjee, Jean; Zhang, Sicai; Deshycka, Rhogerry; Sudaryo, Valentino; Dong, Min; Shoemaker, Charles B; Lodish, Harvey F

    2017-09-04

    A short half-life in the circulation limits the application of therapeutics such as single-domain antibodies (VHHs). We utilize red blood cells to prolong the circulatory half-life of VHHs. Here we present VHHs against botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) on the surface of red blood cells by expressing chimeric proteins of VHHs with Glycophorin A or Kell. Mice whose red blood cells carry the chimeric proteins exhibit resistance to 10,000 times the lethal dose (LD50) of BoNT/A, and transfusion of these red blood cells into naive mice affords protection for up to 28 days. We further utilize an improved CD34+ culture system to engineer human red blood cells that express these chimeric proteins. Mice transfused with these red blood cells are resistant to highly lethal doses of BoNT/A. We demonstrate that engineered red blood cells expressing VHHs can provide prolonged prophylactic protection against bacterial toxins without inducing inhibitory immune responses and illustrates the potentially broad translatability of our strategy for therapeutic applications.The therapeutic use of single-chain antibodies (VHHs) is limited by their short half-life in the circulation. Here the authors engineer mouse and human red blood cells to express VHHs against botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) on their surface and show that an infusion of these cells into mice confers long lasting protection against a high dose of BoNT/A.

  17. Genetic variation in plant CYP51s confers resistance against voriconazole, a novel inhibitor of brassinosteroid-dependent sterol biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Rozhon, Wilfried; Husar, Sigrid; Kalaivanan, Florian; Khan, Mamoona; Idlhammer, Markus; Shumilina, Daria; Lange, Theo; Hoffmann, Thomas; Schwab, Wilfried; Fujioka, Shozo; Poppenberger, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are plant steroid hormones with structural similarity to mammalian sex steroids and ecdysteroids from insects. The BRs are synthesized from sterols and are essential regulators of cell division, cell elongation and cell differentiation. In this work we show that voriconazole, an antifungal therapeutic drug used in human and veterinary medicine, severely impairs plant growth by inhibiting sterol-14α-demethylation and thereby interfering with BR production. The plant growth regulatory properties of voriconazole and related triazoles were identified in a screen for compounds with the ability to alter BR homeostasis. Voriconazole suppressed growth of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and of a wide range of both monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plants. We uncover that voriconazole toxicity in plants is a result of a deficiency in BRs that stems from an inhibition of the cytochrome P450 CYP51, which catalyzes a step of BR-dependent sterol biosynthesis. Interestingly, we found that the woodland strawberry Fragaria vesca, a member of the Rosaceae, is naturally voriconazole resistant and that this resistance is conferred by the specific CYP51 variant of F. vesca. The potential of voriconazole as a novel tool for plant research is discussed.

  18. Genetic Variation in Plant CYP51s Confers Resistance against Voriconazole, a Novel Inhibitor of Brassinosteroid-Dependent Sterol Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Rozhon, Wilfried; Husar, Sigrid; Kalaivanan, Florian; Khan, Mamoona; Idlhammer, Markus; Shumilina, Daria; Lange, Theo; Hoffmann, Thomas; Schwab, Wilfried; Fujioka, Shozo; Poppenberger, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are plant steroid hormones with structural similarity to mammalian sex steroids and ecdysteroids from insects. The BRs are synthesized from sterols and are essential regulators of cell division, cell elongation and cell differentiation. In this work we show that voriconazole, an antifungal therapeutic drug used in human and veterinary medicine, severely impairs plant growth by inhibiting sterol-14α-demethylation and thereby interfering with BR production. The plant growth regulatory properties of voriconazole and related triazoles were identified in a screen for compounds with the ability to alter BR homeostasis. Voriconazole suppressed growth of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and of a wide range of both monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plants. We uncover that voriconazole toxicity in plants is a result of a deficiency in BRs that stems from an inhibition of the cytochrome P450 CYP51, which catalyzes a step of BR-dependent sterol biosynthesis. Interestingly, we found that the woodland strawberry Fragaria vesca, a member of the Rosaceae, is naturally voriconazole resistant and that this resistance is conferred by the specific CYP51 variant of F. vesca. The potential of voriconazole as a novel tool for plant research is discussed. PMID:23335967

  19. Genetic analysis and molecular mapping of a wheat gene conferring tolerance to the greenbug (Schizaphis graminum Rondani).

    PubMed

    Zhu, L C; Smith, C M; Fritz, A; Boyko, E V; Flinn, M B

    2004-07-01

    The greenbug, Schizaphis graminum (Rondani), is one of the major pests of wheat worldwide. The efficient utilization of wheat genes expressing resistance to greenbug infestation is highly dependent on a clear understanding of their relationships. The use of such genes will be further facilitated through the use of molecular markers linked to resistance genes. The present study involved several F(2) wheat populations derived from crosses between susceptible cultivars and resistant germplasm carrying different greenbug resistance genes. These populations were used to characterize the inheritance of a wheat gene ( Gbz) conferring tolerance to greenbug biotype I, to identify molecular markers linked to Gbz, and to investigate the relationship between Gbz and Gb3, a previously identified greenbug resistance gene. Our results indicated that Gbz is inherited as a single dominant gene. Microsatellite marker Xwmc157 is completely linked to Gbz, and Xbarc53 and Xgdm46 flank Gbz at distances of 5.1 and 9.5 cM, respectively. Selection of Gbz using marker Xwmc157 alone gives breeders 100% selection accuracy. Gbz may be placed in the distal region of the long arm of the wheat chromosome 7D. The results of allelism tests indicated that Gbz is either allelic or tightly linked to Gb3.

  20. Evolving a Nelder-Mead Algorithm for Optimization with Genetic Programming.

    PubMed

    Fajfar, Iztok; Puhan, Janez; Bűrmen, Árpád

    2016-01-25

    We used genetic programming to evolve a direct search optimization algorithm, similar to that of the standard downhill simplex optimization method proposed by Nelder and Mead (1965). In the training process, we used several ten-dimensional quadratic functions with randomly displaced parameters and different randomly generated starting simplices. The genetically obtained optimization algorithm showed overall better performance than the original Nelder-Mead method on a standard set of test functions. We observed that many parts of the genetically produced algorithm were seldom or never executed, which allowed us to greatly simplify the algorithm by removing the redundant parts. The resulting algorithm turns out to be considerably simpler than the original Nelder-Mead method while still performing better than the original method.

  1. Interactive computer program for learning genetic principles of segregation and independent assortment through meiosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoli; Ge, Rong; Yang, Yufei; Shen, Hao; Li, Yingjie; Tseng, Charles C

    2009-01-01

    Teaching fundamental principles of genetics such as segregation and independent assortment of genes could be challenging for high school and college biology instructors. Students without thorough knowledge in meiosis often end up of frustration and failure in genetics courses. Although all textbooks and laboratory manuals have excellent graphic demonstrations and photographs of meiotic process, students may not always master the concept due to the lack of hands-on exercise. In response to the need for an effective lab exercise to understand the segregation of allelic genes and the independent assortment of the unlinked genes, we developed an interactive program for students to manually manipulate chromosome models and visualize each major step of meiosis so that these two genetic principles can be thoroughly understood.

  2. Next conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hexemer, Alexander; Toney, Michael F.

    2010-11-01

    After the successful conference on Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science (SRPS) in Rolduc Abbey (the Netherlands), we are now looking forward to the next meeting in this topical series started in 1995 by H G Zachmann, one of the pioneers of the use of synchrotron radiation techniques in polymer science. Earlier meetings were held in Hamburg (1995), Sheffield (2002), Kyoto (2006), and Rolduc (2009). In September of 2012 the Synchrotron Radiation and Polymer Science V conferences will be organized in a joint effort by the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory Advanced Light Source at LBL Advanced Light Source at LBL The conference will be organised in the heart of beautiful San Francisco. The program will consist of invited and contributed lectures divided in sessions on the use of synchrotron SAXS/WAXD, imaging and tomography, soft x-rays, x-ray spectroscopy, GISAXS and reflectivity, micro-beams and hyphenated techniques in polymer science. Poster contributions are more than welcome and will be highlighted during the poster sessions. Visits to both SLAC as well as LBL will be organised. San Francisco can easily be reached. It is served by two major international airports San Francisco International Airport and Oakland International Airport. Both are being served by most major airlines with easy connections to Europe and Asia as well as national destinations. Both also boast excellent connections to San Francisco city centre. We are looking forward to seeing you in the vibrant city by the Bay in September 2012. Golden gate bridge Alexander Hexemer Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Advanced Light Source, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA Michael F Toney Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, Menlo Pk, CA 94025, USA E-mail: ahexemer@lbl.gov, mftoney@slac.stanford.edu

  3. [Genetic programming used for the measurement of CO concentration based on nondispersive infrared absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin; Duan, Fa-jie; Tong, Ying; Gao, Qiang

    2011-07-01

    Nondispersive infrared absorption spectroscopy(NDIR) is an important method to measure CO concentration in the air. In the present study, an open-path measurement system and continuous measuring device was developed, and genetic programming was used to establish the calibration model of subjects' light intensity sampling values. Continuous measurements were carried out in 10 different concentration of CO, and 40 sampled data were acquired and analyzed. For validation set, the correlation coefficient was 0.9997. The biggest relative error of validation was 4.00%, and the average relative error was 1.11%. Results show that genetic programming can be a good method for the modeling of gas concentration measurements equipped with NDIR systems.

  4. 42 CFR 3.512 - Prehearing conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Prehearing conferences. 3.512 Section 3.512 Public... ORGANIZATIONS AND PATIENT SAFETY WORK PRODUCT Enforcement Program § 3.512 Prehearing conferences. (a) The ALJ must schedule at least one prehearing conference, and may schedule additional prehearing conferences...

  5. An integrated biochemistry and genetics outreach program designed for elementary school students.

    PubMed

    Ross, Eric D; Lee, Sarah K; Radebaugh, Catherine A; Stargell, Laurie A

    2012-02-01

    Exposure to genetic and biochemical experiments typically occurs late in one's academic career. By the time students have the opportunity to select specialized courses in these areas, many have already developed negative attitudes toward the sciences. Given little or no direct experience with the fields of genetics and biochemistry, it is likely that many young people rule these out as potential areas of study or career path. To address this problem, we developed a 7-week (~1 hr/week) hands-on course to introduce fifth grade students to basic concepts in genetics and biochemistry. These young students performed a series of investigations (ranging from examining phenotypic variation, in vitro enzymatic assays, and yeast genetic experiments) to explore scientific reasoning through direct experimentation. Despite the challenging material, the vast majority of students successfully completed each experiment, and most students reported that the experience increased their interest in science. Additionally, the experiments within the 7-week program are easily performed by instructors with basic skills in biological sciences. As such, this program can be implemented by others motivated to achieve a broader impact by increasing the accessibility of their university and communicating to a young audience a positive impression of the sciences and the potential for science as a career.

  6. An Integrated Biochemistry and Genetics Outreach Program Designed for Elementary School Students

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Eric D.; Lee, Sarah K.; Radebaugh, Catherine A.; Stargell, Laurie A.

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to genetic and biochemical experiments typically occurs late in one’s academic career. By the time students have the opportunity to select specialized courses in these areas, many have already developed negative attitudes toward the sciences. Given little or no direct experience with the fields of genetics and biochemistry, it is likely that many young people rule these out as potential areas of study or career path. To address this problem, we developed a 7-week (∼1 hr/week) hands-on course to introduce fifth grade students to basic concepts in genetics and biochemistry. These young students performed a series of investigations (ranging from examining phenotypic variation, in vitro enzymatic assays, and yeast genetic experiments) to explore scientific reasoning through direct experimentation. Despite the challenging material, the vast majority of students successfully completed each experiment, and most students reported that the experience increased their interest in science. Additionally, the experiments within the 7-week program are easily performed by instructors with basic skills in biological sciences. As such, this program can be implemented by others motivated to achieve a broader impact by increasing the accessibility of their university and communicating to a young audience a positive impression of the sciences and the potential for science as a career. PMID:22135354

  7. The influence of genetic background versus commercial breeding programs on chicken immunocompetence.

    PubMed

    Emam, Mehdi; Mehrabani-Yeganeh, Hassan; Barjesteh, Neda; Nikbakht, Gholamreza; Thompson-Crispi, Kathleen; Charkhkar, Saeid; Mallard, Bonnie

    2014-01-01

    Immunocompetence of livestock plays an important role in farm profitability because it directly affects health maintenance. Genetics significantly influences the immune system, and the genotypic structure of modern fast-growing chickens has been changed, particularly after decades of breeding for higher production. Therefore, this study was designed to help determine if intensive breeding programs have adversely affected immunocompetence or whether the immune response profiles are controlled to greater extent by genetic background. Thus, 3 indigenous chicken populations from different genetic backgrounds and 2 globally available modern broiler strains, Ross 308 and Cobb 500, were evaluated for various aspects of immune response. These included antibody responses against sheep red blood cells and Brucella abortus antigen, as well as some aspects of cell-mediated immunocompetence by toe web swelling test and in vitro blood mononuclear cell proliferation. Significant differences (P < 0.05) in antibody responses to both antigens and cellular proliferation were observed among populations but not consistently between modern commercial strains versus the indigenous populations. In fact, the immune response profiles of Cobb 500 were similar to the indigenous populations, but varied compared with the other commercial strain. In addition, considerable variation was recorded between indigenous populations for all responses measured in this study. The results of this study suggest that the variation observed in immune responses between these strains of chickens is most likely due to differences in the genetic background between each strain of chicken rather than by commercial selection programs for high production.

  8. Lasing from Escherichia coli bacteria genetically programmed to express green fluorescent protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gather, Malte C.; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2011-08-01

    We report on lasing action from colonies of Escherichia coli bacteria that are genetically programmed to synthesize the green fluorescent protein (GFP). When embedded in a Fabry--Perot type cavity and excited by ns-pulses of blue light (465nm), the bacteria generate green laser emission (˜520nm). Broad illumination of pump light yields simultaneous lasing over a large area in bacterial colonies.

  9. Lasing from Escherichia coli bacteria genetically programmed to express green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Gather, Malte C; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2011-08-15

    We report on lasing action from colonies of Escherichia coli bacteria that are genetically programmed to synthesize the green fluorescent protein (GFP). When embedded in a Fabry-Perot type cavity and excited by ns-pulses of blue light (465 nm), the bacteria generate green laser emission (∼520 nm). Broad illumination of pump light yields simultaneous lasing over a large area in bacterial colonies.

  10. Visions for a sustainable world: A conference on science, technology and social responsibility. Conference report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    This report summarizes the organization, activities, and outcomes of Student Pugwash USA`s 1992 International Conference, Visions for a Sustainable World: A Conference on Science, Technology and Social Responsibility. The conference was held June 14--20, 1992 at Emory University, and brought together 94 students and over 65 experts from industry, academe, and government. The conference addressed issues ranging from global environmental cooperation to the social impacts of the Human Genome Project to minority concerns in the sciences. It provided a valuable forum for talented students and professionals to engage in critical dialogue on many interdisciplinary issues at the juncture of science, technology and society. The conference challenged students -- the world`s future scientists, engineers, and political leaders -- to think broadly about global problems and to devise policy options that are viable and innovative. The success of the conference in stimulating interest, understanding, and enthusiasm about interdisciplinary global issues is clearly evident from both the participants` feedback and their continued involvement in Student Pugwash USA programs. Six working groups met each morning. The working group themes included: environmental challenges for developing countries; energy options: their social and environmental impact; health care in developing countries; changing dynamics of peace and global security; educating for the socially responsible use of technology; ethics and the use of genetic information. The conference was specifically designed to include mechanisms for ensuring its long-term impact. Participants were encouraged to focus on their individual role in helping resolve global issues. This was achieved through each participant`s development of a Personal Plan of Action, a plan which mapped out activities the student could undertake after the conference to continue the dialogue and work towards the resolution of global and local problems.

  11. The risk for major depression conferred by childhood maltreatment is multiplied by BDNF and SERT genetic vulnerability: a replication study

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Blanca; Bellón, Juan Ángel; Rivera, Margarita; Molina, Esther; King, Michael; Marston, Louise; Torres-González, Francisco; Moreno-Küstner, Berta; Moreno-Peral, Patricia; Motrico, Emma; Montón-Franco, Carmen; GildeGómez-Barragán, María Josefa; Sánchez-Celaya, Marta; Díaz-Barreiros, Miguel Ángel; Vicens, Catalina; de Dios Luna, Juan; Nazareth, Irwin; Cervilla, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Background There is limited evidence for a moderating role of both serotonin transporter (SERT) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) genes on the risk for major depression (MD) developing after childhood maltreatment. However, research on this topic remains inconclusive, and there is a lack of data from longitudinal studies with large and representative population samples. Our study aimed to clarify whether, in the presence of previous childhood maltreatment, individuals carrying low functional alleles for both SERT 5-HTTLPR and BDNF Val66Met polymorphisms had a higher risk for MD. Methods We explored 2- and 3-way gene (SERT and BDNF) × environment (childhood maltreatment) interactions in a large sample of Spanish adults who were followed up over a 3-year period and assessed in person for both DSM-IV MD and exposure to childhood maltreatment. Results Our study included 2679 participants. Those with both the 5-HTTLPR s allele and the BDNF Met allele showed the highest risk of MD if they had previously experienced emotional (z = 2.08, p = 0.037), sexual (z = 2.19, p = 0.029) or any kind of childhood abuse (z = 2.37, p = 0.018). These 3-way interactions remained significant regardless of whether the 5-HTTLPR triallelic or the 5-HTTLPR biallelic polymorphisms were included in the analyses. Limitations Retrospective assessment of childhood maltreatment may have resulted in a moderate degree of recall bias. Conclusion Our results confirm that the risk of depression conferred by childhood maltreatment is modified by variation at both SERT and BDNF genes. PMID:25510949

  12. The risk for major depression conferred by childhood maltreatment is multiplied by BDNF and SERT genetic vulnerability: a replication study.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Blanca; Bellón, Juan Á; Rivera, Margarita; Molina, Esther; King, Michael; Marston, Louise; Torres-González, Francisco; Moreno-Küstner, Berta; Moreno-Peral, Patricia; Motrico, Emma; Montón-Franco, Carmen; GildeGómez-Barragán, María J; Sánchez-Celaya, Marta; Díaz-Barreiros, Miguel Á; Vicens, Catalina; de Dios Luna, Juan; Nazareth, Irwin; Cervilla, Jorge

    2015-05-01

    There is limited evidence for a moderating role of both serotonin transporter (SERT) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) genes on the risk for major depression (MD) developing after childhood maltreatment. However, research on this topic remains inconclusive, and there is a lack of data from longitudinal studies with large and representative population samples. Our study aimed to clarify whether, in the presence of previous childhood maltreatment, individuals carrying low functional alleles for both SERT 5-HTTLPR and BDNF Val66Met polymorphisms had a higher risk for MD. We explored 2- and 3-way gene (SERT and BDNF) × environment (childhood maltreatment) interactions in a large sample of Spanish adults who were followed up over a 3-year period and assessed in person for both DSM-IV MD and exposure to childhood maltreatment. Our study included 2679 participants. Those with both the 5-HTTLPR s allele and the BDNF Met allele showed the highest risk of MD if they had previously experienced emotional (z = 2.08, p = 0.037), sexual (z = 2.19, p = 0.029) or any kind of childhood abuse (z = 2.37, p = 0.018). These 3-way interactions remained significant regardless of whether the 5-HTTLPR triallelic or the 5-HTTLPR biallelic polymorphisms were included in the analyses. Retrospective assessment of childhood maltreatment may have resulted in a moderate degree of recall bias. Our results confirm that the risk of depression conferred by childhood maltreatment is modified by variation at both SERT and BDNF genes.

  13. The GLO1 C332 (Ala111) allele confers autism vulnerability: family-based genetic association and functional correlates.

    PubMed

    Gabriele, Stefano; Lombardi, Federica; Sacco, Roberto; Napolioni, Valerio; Altieri, Laura; Tirindelli, Maria Cristina; Gregorj, Chiara; Bravaccio, Carmela; Rousseau, Francis; Persico, Antonio M

    2014-12-01

    Glyoxalase I (GLO1) is a homodimeric Zn(2+)-dependent isomerase involved in the detoxification of methylglyoxal and in limiting the formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGE). We previously found the rs4746 A332 (Glu111) allele of the GLO1 gene, which encodes for glyoxalase I, associated with "unaffected sibling" status in families with one or more children affected by Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). To identify and characterize this protective allele, we sequenced GLO1 exons and exon-intron junctions, detecting two additional SNPs (rs1049346, rs1130534) in linkage disequilibrium with rs4746. A family-based association study involving 385 simplex and 20 multiplex Italian families yielded a significant association with autism driven only by the rs4746 C332 (Ala111) allele itself (P < 0.05 and P < 0.001 under additive and dominant/recessive models, respectively). Glyoxalase enzymatic activity was significantly reduced both in leukocytes and in post-mortem temporocortical tissue (N = 38 and 13, respectively) of typically developing C332 allele carriers (P < 0.05 and <0.01), with no difference in Glo1 protein levels. Conversely, AGE amounts were significantly higher in the same C332 post-mortem brains (P = 0.001), with a strong negative correlation between glyoxalase activity and AGE levels (τ = -0.588, P < 0.01). Instead, 19 autistic brains show a dysregulation of the glyoxalase-AGE axis (τ = -0.209, P = 0.260), with significant blunting of glyoxalase activity and AGE amounts compared to controls (P < 0.05), and loss of rs4746 genotype effects. In summary, the GLO1 C332 (Ala111) allele confers autism vulnerability by reducing brain glyoxalase activity and enhancing AGE formation, but years after an autism diagnosis the glyoxalase-AGE axis appears profoundly disrupted, with loss of C332 allelic effects.

  14. Evolution of cartesian genetic programs for development of learning neural architecture.

    PubMed

    Khan, Gul Muhammad; Miller, Julian F; Halliday, David M

    2011-01-01

    Although artificial neural networks have taken their inspiration from natural neurological systems, they have largely ignored the genetic basis of neural functions. Indeed, evolutionary approaches have mainly assumed that neural learning is associated with the adjustment of synaptic weights. The goal of this paper is to use evolutionary approaches to find suitable computational functions that are analogous to natural sub-components of biological neurons and demonstrate that intelligent behavior can be produced as a result of this additional biological plausibility. Our model allows neurons, dendrites, and axon branches to grow or die so that synaptic morphology can change and affect information processing while solving a computational problem. The compartmental model of a neuron consists of a collection of seven chromosomes encoding distinct computational functions inside the neuron. Since the equivalent computational functions of neural components are very complex and in some cases unknown, we have used a form of genetic programming known as Cartesian genetic programming (CGP) to obtain these functions. We start with a small random network of soma, dendrites, and neurites that develops during problem solving by repeatedly executing the seven chromosomal programs that have been found by evolution. We have evaluated the learning potential of this system in the context of a well-known single agent learning problem, known as Wumpus World. We also examined the harder problem of learning in a competitive environment for two antagonistic agents, in which both agents are controlled by independent CGP computational networks (CGPCN). Our results show that the agents exhibit interesting learning capabilities.

  15. Genetic variability and population structure of Salvia lachnostachys: implications for breeding and conservation programs.

    PubMed

    Erbano, Marianna; Schühli, Guilherme Schnell E; Santos, Élide Pereira Dos

    2015-04-08

    The genetic diversity and population structure of Salvia lachnostachys Benth were assessed. Inter Simple Sequence Repeat (ISSR) molecular markers were used to investigate the restricted distribution of S. lachnostachys in Parana State, Brazil. Leaves of 73 individuals representing three populations were collected. DNA was extracted and submitted to PCR-ISSR amplification with nine tested primers. Genetic diversity parameters were evaluated. Our analysis indicated 95.6% polymorphic loci (stress value 0.02) with a 0.79 average Simpson's index. The Nei-Li distance dendrogram and principal component analysis largely recovered the geographical origin of each sample. Four major clusters were recognized representing each collected population. Nei's gene diversity and Shannon's information index were 0.25 and 0.40 respectively. As is typical for outcrossing herbs, the majority of genetic variation occurred at the population level (81.76%). A high gene flow (Nm = 2.48) was observed with a correspondingly low fixation index. These values were generally similar to previous studies on congeneric species. The results of principal coordinate analysis (PCA) and of arithmetic average (UPGMA) were consistent and all three populations appear distinct as in STRUCTURE analysis. In addition, this analysis indicated a majority intrapopulation genetic variation. Despite the human pressure on natural populations our study found high levels of genetic diversity for S. lachnostachys. This was the first molecular assessment for this endemic species with medicinal proprieties and the results can guide for subsequent bioprospection, breeding programs or conservation actions.

  16. Recent Developments in Graduate Programs. New Opportunities through Versatility: Broadening the Mold. Proceedings of Conference/Workshop of the Council of Graduate Schools in the United States and the Graduate Record Examinations Board (Minneapolis, Minnesota, October 13, 1982).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Graduate Schools in the U.S., Washington, DC.

    Recent developments in graduate programs are discussed in 15 papers from a 1982 conference cosponsored by the Council of Graduate Schools and the Graduate Record Examinations Board. Attention is directed to issues associated with program presentations, program innovations in various disciplines, and industry/university cooperative graduate…

  17. Violence Prevention for Young Adolescents: The State of the Art of Program Evaluation. Working Papers. Proceedings of the Carnegie Corporation Conference on Violence Prevention for Young Adolescents (Washington, D.C., July 12-13, 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Stu; Wilson-Brewer, Renee

    This report contains a summary of a survey of violence prevention programs and a conference on the state of the art in evaluating such programs, as well as conclusions and recommendations. The survey of 51 violence prevention programs focused on evaluation activities. Analysis of the data indicated: frequently the goals have not been used to…

  18. Techniques and Procedures in College and Adult Reading Programs; Yearbook of the Annual Meeting of the Southwest Reading Conference for Colleges and Universities (6th, Texas Christian University, December 7-8, 1956).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Causey, Oscar S., Ed.

    The title of this volume was the theme of the sixth annual meeting of the Southwest Reading Conference for Colleges and Universities, held in December 1956. Authors of the eleven reports on successful college and adult reading programs focused on various aspects of the programs, including academic performance, program evaluation, faculty, public…

  19. High temperature effects on Pi54 conferred resistance to Magnaporthe oryzae in two genetic backgrounds of Oryza sativa.

    PubMed

    Onaga, Geoffrey; Wydra, Kerstin; Koopmann, Birger; Chebotarov, Dmytro; Séré, Yakouba; Von Tiedemann, Andreas

    2017-02-21

    The global temperatures are predicted to rise due to climate change. However, knowledge on the mechanisms underlying the effect of high temperature (HT) on plant pathogen interaction is limited. We investigated the effect of elevated temperature on host phenotypic, biochemical and gene expression patterns in the rice-Magnaporthe oryzae (Mo) pathosystem using two genetic backgrounds, Co39 (Oryzae sativa-indica) and LTH (O. sativa-japonica) with (CO and LT) and without (Co39 and LTH) R gene (Pi54). After exposure to 28°C and 35°C the two genetic backgrounds showed contrasting responses to Mo. At 28°C, CO, Co39 and LTH displayed a more severe disease phenotype than LT. Surprisingly, CO became resistant to Mo after exposure to 35°C. CO and LT were used for further analysis to determine the defence related biochemical and transcriptome changes associated with HT induced resistance. Pre-exposure to 35°C triggered intense callose deposits and cell wall fluorescence of the attacked epidermal cells, as well as, increased hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and salicylic acid (SA) levels. Transcriptional changes due to combined stress (35°C+Mo) were largely overridden by pathogen infection in both backgrounds, suggesting that the plants tended to shift their response to the pathogen. However, significant differences in global gene expression patterns occurred between CO and LT in response to both single (35°C and Mo) and double stress (35°C+Mo). Collectively, our results suggest that rice lines carrying Pi54 respond to Mo by rapid induction of callose and H2O2, and that these resistance mechanisms are amplified at HT. The relative difference in disease severity between CO and LT at 28°C suggests that the genetic background of japonica rice facilitates the function of Pi54 more than the background of indica rice. The phenotypic plasticity and gene expression differences between CO and LT reveal the presence of intricate background specific molecular signatures that may

  20. Genetic Effects Conferring Heat Tolerance in a Cross of Tolerant × Susceptible Maize (Zea mays L.) Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Naveed, Muhammad; Ahsan, Muhammad; Akram, Hafiz M.; Aslam, Muhammad; Ahmed, Nisar

    2016-01-01

    Incessant rise in ambient temperature is threatening sustainability of maize productions, worldwide. Breeding heat resilient synthetics/hybrids is the most economical tool while lack of knowledge of gene action controlling heat and yield relevant traits in maize is hampering progress in this regard. The current study, therefore, was conducted using analyses of generation mean and variance, and narrow sense heritability (hn2) and genetic advance as percent of mean (GAM%). Initially, one hundred inbred lines were evaluated for cell membrane thermo-stability and grain yield per plant on mean day/night temperatures of 36.6°C/22.1°C in non-stressed (NS) and 42.7°C/25.7°C in heat-stressed (HS) conditions. From these, one tolerant (ZL-11271) and one susceptible (R-2304-2) genotypes were crossed to develop six basic generations, being evaluated on mean day/night temperatures of 36.1°C/22.8°C (NS) and 42.3°C/25.9°C (HS) in factorial randomized complete block design with three replications. Non-allelic additive-dominance genetic effects were recorded for most traits in both conditions except transpiration rate, being controlled by additive epistatic effects in NS regime. Dissection of genetic variance into additive (D), dominance (H), environment (E) and interaction (F) components revealed significance of only DE variances in HS condition than DE, DFE and DHE variances in NS regime which hinted at the potential role of environments in breeding maize for high temperature tolerance. Additive variance was high for majority of traits in both environments except ear length in NS condition where dominance was at large. Higher magnitudes of σD,2 hn2 and GAM% for cell membrane thermo-stability, transpiration rate, leaf firing, ear length, kernels per ear and grain yield per plant in both regimes implied that simple selections might be sufficient for further improvement of these traits. Low-to-moderate GAM% for leaf temperature and 100-grain weight in both conditions

  1. The genetic immunization with paraflagellar rod protein-2 fused to the HSP70 confers protection against late Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    PubMed

    Morell, María; Thomas, M Carmen; Caballero, Trinidad; Alonso, Carlos; López, Manuel C

    2006-11-30

    The immunological properties of the Trypanosoma cruzi paraflagellar rod proteins (PFR2 and PFR3) administered alone as well as fused to HSP70 have been analyzed in mice in the context of genetic immunization. The immunization of mice with the DNA vectors containing the PFRs gene or PFRs-HSP70 fused genes induced high level of IgG(2a) anti-PFRs. However, only the immunization with the PFR2-HSP70 fused genes triggers in spleen cells a statistically significant enhancement of expression of IL-12 and IFN-gamma and a decrease in the percentage of cells expressing IL-4. Likewise, the PFR2-HSP70 molecule elicits a statistically significant activation of PFR2 antigen specific CTLs. Immunization with the PFR2-HSP70 chimeric gene provided a protective response against a T. cruzi experimental infection.

  2. Vital to future generations. The Bali Conference has recommended that 4% of all official development assistance be earmarked for population programs.

    PubMed

    Ward, R

    1993-03-01

    The Fourth Asian and Pacific Population Conference organized by the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) and the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) was held in Bali, Indonesia, in August 1992. The highlights included: sustainable population and economic growth in a region with three-fifths of the world's population; the threat to the environment from the consumption of natural resources; high fertility; high dependency ratios and aging; land degradation; and migration. The Director of UNFPA revealed that the average rate of population growth had fallen to 1.7% annually since 1963, but an estimated 17.7 million persons were still being added to the region each year. The Conference urged improvement in reproductive health care to reduce maternal illness and death and the spread of sexually transmitted diseases, especially AIDS, and women-centered programs. Both long- and short-term rural-to-urban and international migration affects the development dynamic. The Conference viewed urbanization as inevitable, but cautioned against neglect of rural development. Improving the status of women through education will help reduce discrimination. The success of family planning efforts in the region is attributable to the changing behavior of women, age at marriage, and the number and spacing of children. 86% of the developing world's elderly will reside in Asia by the year 2000. The Conference recommended economic incentives and tax exemptions to assist families caring for older relatives, but stopped short of pension plans and social security systems. Mortality, however, may be reduced by increasing HIV infection and AIDS prevention. Poverty alleviation figured among agenda items. Robert McNamara noted in a 1991 address that over 1 million people suffer from hunger and over 900 million remain illiterate worldwide. To counter this, education, nutrition, and health services for the poor are needed; also needed are human resources

  3. Identification, genetic characterization, GA response and molecular mapping of Sdt97: a dominant mutant gene conferring semi-dwarfism in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Tong, Ji-Ping; Liu, Xue-Jun; Zhang, Shi-Yong; Li, Shao-Qing; Peng, Xiao-Jue; Yang, Jing; Zhu, Ying-Guo

    2007-08-01

    Semi-dwarfism is an important agronomic trait in rice breeding programmes. sd-1, termed the 'Green Revolution gene', confers semi-dwarf stature, increases harvest index, improves lodging resistance, and is associated with increased responsiveness to nitrogen fertilizer. It has contributed substantially to the significant increase in rice production. In this paper, a novel semi-dwarf mutant in rice is reported. Genetic analysis revealed that only a single dominant gene locus non-allelic to sd-1, temporarily designated Sdt97, is involved in the control of semi-dwarfism of the mutant. The semi-dwarfism of the mutant could be partly restored to the tall wild-type by application of exogenous GA3, suggesting that the mutant gene Sdt97 may be involved in the gibberellin (GA) synthesis pathway and not the GA response pathway in rice. A residual heterozygous line (RHL) population derived from a recombinant inbred line (RIL) was developed. Simple sequence repeat (SSR) and bulked segregation analysis (BSA) combined with recessive class analysis (RCA) techniques were used to map Sdt97 to the long arm of chromosome 6 at the interval between two STS markers, N6 and TX5, with a genetic distance of 0.2 cM and 0.8 cM, respectively. A contig map was constructed based on the reference sequence aligned by the Sdt97 linked markers. The physical map of the Sdt97 locus was defined to a 118 kb interval, and 19 candidate genes were detected in the target region. This is the first time that a dominant semi-dwarf gene has been reported in rice. Cloning and functional analysis of gene Sdt97 will help us to learn more about molecular mechanism of rice semi-dwarfism.

  4. 9. international mouse genome conference

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    This conference was held November 12--16, 1995 in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The purpose of this conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on genetic mapping in mice. This report contains abstracts of presentations, focusing on the following areas: mutation identification; comparative mapping; informatics and complex traits; mutagenesis; gene identification and new technology; and genetic and physical mapping.

  5. Genetic Diversity of Brazilian Aedes aegypti: Patterns following an Eradication Program

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Fernando A.; Shama, Renata; Martins, Ademir J.; Gloria-Soria, Andrea; Brown, Julia E.; Powell, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Aedes aegypti is the most important vector of dengue fever in Brazil, where severe epidemics have recently taken place. Ae. aegypti in Brazil was the subject of an intense eradication program in the 1940s and 50s to control yellow fever. Brazil was the largest country declared free of this mosquito by the Pan-American Health Organization in 1958. Soon after relaxation of this program, Ae. aegypti reappeared in this country, and by the early 1980s dengue fever had been reported. The aim of this study is to analyze the present-day genetic patterns of Ae. aegypti populations in Brazil. Methodology/Principal Findings We studied the genetic variation in samples of 11 widely spread populations of Ae. aegypti in Brazil based on 12 well-established microsatellite loci. Our principal finding is that present-day Brazilian Ae. aegypti populations form two distinct groups, one in the northwest and one in the southeast of the country. These two groups have genetic affinities to northern South American countries and the Caribbean, respectively. This is consistent with what has been reported for other genetic markers such as mitochondrial DNA and allele frequencies at the insecticide resistance gene, kdr. Conclusions/Significance We conclude that the genetic patterns in present day populations of Ae. aegypti in Brazil are more consistent with a complete eradication of the species in the recent past followed by re-colonization, rather than the alternative possibility of expansion from residual pockets of refugia. At least two colonizations are likely to have taken place, one from northern South American countries (e.g., Venezuela) that founded the northwestern group, and one from the Caribbean that founded the southeastern group. The proposed source areas were never declared free of Ae. aegypti. PMID:25233218

  6. Miniaturizing 3D assay for high-throughput drug and genetic screens for small patient-derived tumor samples (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotem, Asaf; Garraway, Levi; Su, Mei-Ju; Basu, Anindita; Regev, Aviv; Struhl, Kevin

    2017-02-01

    Three-dimensional growth conditions reflect the natural environment of cancer cells and are crucial to be performed at drug screens. We developed a 3D assay for cellular transformation that involves growth in low attachment (GILA) conditions and is strongly correlated with the 50-year old benchmark assay-soft agar. Using GILA, we performed high-throughput screens for drugs and genes that selectively inhibit or increase transformation, but not proliferation. This phenotypic approach is complementary to our genetic approach that utilizes single-cell RNA-sequencing of a patient sample to identify putative oncogenes that confer sensitivity to drugs designed to specifically inhibit the identified oncoprotein. Currently, we are dealing with a big challenge in our field- the limited number of cells that might be extracted from a biopsy. Small patient-derived samples are hard to test in the traditional multiwell plate and it will be helpful to minimize the culture area and the experimental system. We managed to design a suitable microfluidic device for limited number of cells and perform the assay using image analysis. We aim to test drugs on tumor cells, outside of the patient body- and recommend on the ideal treatment that is tailored to the individual. This device will help to minimize biopsy-sampling volumes and minimize interventions in the patient's tumor.

  7. National Conference on the Development of Statewide Preservation Programs. Report of a Conference on the Current Status and Future Directions of Statewide Programs for the Preservation of Our Intellectual Heritage (Washington, D.C., March 1-3, 1989).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, Carolyn Clark, Ed.

    This report presents some of the prominent features of a national invitational conference whose goal was to provide a national forum to discuss ongoing preservation efforts in individual states; describe the preservation challenge faced by all states in common; review the kinds of materials at risk; and alert administrators to the opportunities…

  8. 4th Annual Conference for African-American Researchers in the Mathematical Sciences (CAARMS4). Preliminary Program

    SciTech Connect

    Tapia, Richard

    1998-06-01

    In June, The Center for Research on Parallel Computation (CRPC), an NSF-funded Science and Technology Center, hosted the 4th Annual Conference for African-American Reserachers in the Mathematical Sciences (CAARMS4) at Rice University. The main goal of this conference was to highlight current work by African-American researchers and graduate students in mathematics. This conference strengthened the mathematical sciences by encouraging the increased participation of African-American and underrepresented groups into the field, facilitating working relationships between them and helping to cultivate their careers. In addition to the talks there was a graduate student poster session and tutorials on topics in mathematics and computer science. These talks, presentations, and discussions brought a broader perspective to the critical issues involving minority participation in mathematics.

  9. Telegenetics: application of a tele-education program in genetic syndromes for Brazilian students

    PubMed Central

    MAXIMINO, Luciana Paula; PICOLINI-PEREIRA, Mirela Machado; CARVALHO, José Luiz Brito

    2014-01-01

    With the high occurrence of genetic anomalies in Brazil and the manifestations of communication disorders associated with these conditions, the development of educative actions that comprise these illnesses can bring unique benefits in the identification and appropriate treatment of these clinical pictures. Objective The aim of this study was to develop and analyze an educational program in genetic syndromes for elementary students applied in two Brazilian states, using an Interactive Tele-education model. Material and Methods The study was carried out in 4 schools: two in the state of São Paulo, Southeast Region, Brazil, and two in the state of Amazonas, North Region, Brazil. Forty-five students, both genders, aged between 13 and 14 years, of the 9th grade of the basic education of both public and private system, were divided into two groups: 21 of São Paulo Group (SPG) and 24 of Amazonas Group (AMG). The educational program lasted about 3 months and was divided into two stages including both classroom and distance activities on genetic syndromes. The classroom activity was carried out separately in each school, with expository lessons, graphs and audiovisual contents. In the activity at a distance the educational content was presented to students by means of the Interactive Tele-education model. In this stage, the students had access a Cybertutor, using the Young Doctor Project methodology. In order to measure the effectiveness of the educational program, the Problem Situation Questionnaire (PSQ) and the Web Site Motivational Analysis Checklist adapted (FPM) were used. Results The program developed was effective for knowledge acquisition in 80% of the groups. FPM showed a high satisfaction index from the participants in relation to the Interactive Tele-education, evaluating the program as "awesome course". No statistically significant differences between the groups regarding type of school or state were observed. Conclusion Thus, the Tele-Education Program can

  10. Conference Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, W. Warner, Ed.; Beckhard, Richard, Ed.

    This book, written to instruct in the use of a conference as a medium of social intercourse, is divided into four sections. Section I, which contains five articles, deals with factors to be considered in planning a conference. Specific techniques one can employ to improve a conference and several different techniques for evaluating the…

  11. DEVELOP students attend conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Last month, Madeline Brozen and Jason Jones of the DEVELOP Program at John C. Stennis Space Center joined members from the program's national office at Langley Research Center to attend the Southern Growth Policies Board annual conference in Biloxi. Pictured are (l to r): Karen Allsbrook, Jonathan Gleason, Gov. Haley Barbour, Madeline Brozen, Lindsay Rogers and Tracey Silcox.

  12. DEVELOP students attend conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-06-08

    Last month, Madeline Brozen and Jason Jones of the DEVELOP Program at John C. Stennis Space Center joined members from the program's national office at Langley Research Center to attend the Southern Growth Policies Board annual conference in Biloxi. Pictured are (l to r): Karen Allsbrook, Jonathan Gleason, Gov. Haley Barbour, Madeline Brozen, Lindsay Rogers and Tracey Silcox.

  13. The National Animal Germplasm Program: challenges and opportunities for poultry genetic resources.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, H D

    2006-02-01

    In the United States, poultry genetic resources have consolidated because of economic pressures. Such consolidations can potentially jeopardize the poultry industry and the ability of research communities to respond to future challenges. To address the loss of genetic resources for all livestock and aquatic species, USDA established the National Animal Germplasm Program (NAGP) in 1999. Since the initiation of NAGP, population surveys have been conducted on nonindustrial chicken and turkey breeds. These surveys not only provide insight into breed status, but also serve as a benchmark for future comparisons. The survey results revealed that 20 chicken breeds and 9 turkey breeds were in various stages of being lost. The NAGP has initiated an ex situ repository for cryopreserved germplasm and tissue that already contains 59 chicken lines and 2,915 tissue samples. As the NAGP, along with its industry and university partners, continues developing the ex situ collection, there are research opportunities in cryopreserved tissue utilization and studies of genetic diversity. For cryopreserved tissues, several key research areas include improving the cryopreservation protocols for rooster and tom semen by using cryoprotectants other than glycerol and utilizing embryonic cells. Although surveys have been conducted on public research lines and rare breeds, there is a void in understanding the level of genetic diversity present in U.S. poultry populations. Therefore, an opportunity exists to perform a series of genetic diversity studies using molecular- based approaches. Such an evaluation can help clarify population differences between research lines and rare breeds and, thereby, facilitate conservation strategies. There appears to be growing consumer interest in poultry products derived from heritage breeds and/or poultry raised in nonindustrial production systems. Although the depth of such market trends is unknown, such an interest may provide an important niche for rare

  14. The Mouse House: A brief history of the ORNL mouse-genetics program, 1947–2009

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Liane B.

    2013-10-01

    The large mouse genetics program at the Oak Ridge National Lab is often re-membered chiefly for the germ-cell mutation-rate data it generated and their uses in estimating the risk of heritable radiation damage. In fact, it soon became a multi-faceted research effort that, over a period of almost 60 years, generated a wealth of information in the areas of mammalian mutagenesis, basic genetics (later enriched by molecular techniques), cytogenetics, reproductive biology, biochemistry of germ cells, and teratology. Research in the area of germ-cell mutagenesis explored the important physical and biological factors that affect the frequency and nature of induced mutations and made several unexpected discoveries, such as the major importance of the perigametic interval (the zygote stage) for the origin of spontaneous mutations and for the sensitivity to induced genetic change. Of practical value was the discovery that ethylnitrosourea was a supermutagen for point mutations, making high-efficiency mutagenesis in the mouse feasible worldwide. Teratogenesis findings resulted in recommendations still generally accepted in radiological practice. Studies supporting the mutagenesis research added whole bodies of information about mammalian germ-cell development and about molecular targets in germ cells. The early decision to not merely count but propagate genetic variants of all sorts made possible further discoveries, such as the Y-Chromosome s importance in mammalian sex determination and the identification of rare X-autosome translocations, which, in turn, led to the formulation of the single-active-X hypothesis and provided tools for studies of functional mosaicism for autosomal genes, male sterility, and chromosome-pairing mechanism. Extensive genetic and then molecular analyses of large numbers of induced specific-locus mutants resulted in fine-structure physical and correlated functional mapping of significant portions of the mouse genome and constituted a valuable

  15. The Mouse House: a brief history of the ORNL mouse-genetics program, 1947-2009.

    PubMed

    Russell, Liane B

    2013-01-01

    The large mouse genetics program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is often remembered chiefly for the germ-cell mutation-rate data it generated and their uses in estimating the risk of heritable radiation damage. In fact, it soon became a multi-faceted research effort that, over a period of almost 60 years, generated a wealth of information in the areas of mammalian mutagenesis, basic genetics (later enriched by molecular techniques), cytogenetics, reproductive biology, biochemistry of germ cells, and teratology. Research in the area of germ-cell mutagenesis explored the important physical and biological factors that affect the frequency and nature of induced mutations and made several unexpected discoveries, such as the major importance of the perigametic interval (the zygote stage) for the origin of spontaneous mutations and for the sensitivity to induced genetic change. Of practical value was the discovery that ethylnitrosourea was a supermutagen for point mutations, making high-efficiency mutagenesis in the mouse feasible worldwide. Teratogenesis findings resulted in recommendations still generally accepted in radiological practice. Studies supporting the mutagenesis research added whole bodies of information about mammalian germ-cell development and about molecular targets in germ cells. The early decision to not merely count but propagate genetic variants of all sorts made possible further discoveries, such as the Y-chromosome's importance in mammalian sex determination and the identification of rare X-autosome translocations, which, in turn, led to the formulation of the single-active-X hypothesis and provided tools for studies of functional mosaicism for autosomal genes, male sterility, and chromosome-pairing mechanism. Extensive genetic and then molecular analyses of large numbers of induced specific-locus mutants resulted in fine-structure physical and correlated functional mapping of significant portions of the mouse genome and constituted a

  16. Founder effects, inbreeding, and loss of genetic diversity in four avian reintroduction programs.

    PubMed

    Jamieson, Ian G

    2011-02-01

    The number of individuals translocated and released as part of a reintroduction is often small, as is the final established population, because the reintroduction site is typically small. Small founder and small resulting populations can result in population bottlenecks, which are associated with increased rates of inbreeding and loss of genetic diversity, both of which can affect the long-term viability of reintroduced populations. I used information derived from pedigrees of four monogamous bird species reintroduced onto two different islands (220 and 259 ha) in New Zealand to compare the pattern of inbreeding and loss of genetic diversity among the reintroduced populations. Although reintroduced populations founded with few individuals had higher levels of inbreeding, as predicted, other factors, including biased sex ratio and skewed breeding success, contributed to high levels of inbreeding and loss of genetic diversity. Of the 10-58 individuals released, 4-25 genetic founders contributed at least one living descendent and yielded approximately 3-11 founder-genome equivalents (number of genetic founders assuming an equal contribution of offspring and no random loss of alleles across generations) after seven breeding seasons. This range is much lower than the 20 founder-genome equivalents recommended for captive-bred populations. Although the level of inbreeding in one reintroduced population initially reached three times that of a closely related species, the long-term estimated rate of inbreeding of this one population was approximately one-third that of the other species due to differences in carrying capacities of the respective reintroduction sites. The increasing number of reintroductions to suitable areas that are smaller than those I examined here suggests that it might be useful to develop long-term strategies and guidelines for reintroduction programs, which would minimize inbreeding and maintain genetic diversity. ©2010 Society for Conservation

  17. Expression of Rice Chitinase Gene in Genetically Engineered Tomato Confers Enhanced Resistance to Fusarium Wilt and Early Blight

    PubMed Central

    Jabeen, Nyla; Chaudhary, Zubeda; Gulfraz, Muhammad; Rashid, Hamid; Mirza, Bushra

    2015-01-01

    This is the first study reporting the evaluation of transgenic lines of tomato harboring rice chitinase (RCG3) gene for resistance to two important fungal pathogens Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol) causing fusarium wilt and Alternaria solani causing early blight (EB). In this study, three transgenic lines TL1, TL2 and TL3 of tomato Solanum lycopersicum Mill. cv. Riogrande genetically engineered with rice chitinase (RCG 3) gene and their R1 progeny was tested for resistance to Fol by root dip method and A. solani by detached leaf assay. All the R0 transgenic lines were highly resistant to these fungal pathogens compared to non-transgenic control plants. The pattern of segregation of three independent transformant for Fol and A. solani was also studied. Mendelian segregation was observed in transgenic lines 2 and 3 while it was not observed in transgenic line 1. It was concluded that introduction of chitinase gene in susceptible cultivar of tomato not only enhanced the resistance but was stably inherited in transgenic lines 2 and 3. PMID:26361473

  18. Genetic variants in STAT4 and HLA-DQ genes confer risk of hepatitis B virus–related hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, De-Ke; Sun, Jielin; Cao, Guangwen; Liu, Yao; Lin, Dongxin; Gao, Yu-Zhen; Ren, Wei-Hua; Long, Xi-Dai; Zhang, Hongxing; Ma, Xiao-Pin; Wang, Zhong; Jiang, Wei; Chen, Tao-Yang; Gao, Yong; Sun, Liang-Dan; Long, Ji-Rong; Huang, Hui-Xing; Wang, Dan; Yu, Hongjie; Zhang, Pengyin; Tang, Li-Sha; Peng, Bo; Cai, Hao; Liu, Ting-Ting; Zhou, Ping; Liu, Fang; Lin, Xiaoling; Tao, Sha; Wan, Bo; Sai-Yin, He-Xi Ge; Qin, Lun-Xiu; Yin, Jianhua; Liu, Li; Wu, Chen; Pei, Yan; Zhou, Yuan-Feng; Zhai, Yun; Lu, Pei-Xin; Tan, Aihua; Zuo, Xian-Bo; Fan, Jia; Chang, Jiang; Gu, Xiaoli; Wang, Neng-Jin; Li, Yang; Liu, Yin-Kun; Zhai, Kan; Zhang, Hongwei; Hu, Zhibin; Liu, Jun; Yi, Qing; Xiang, Yongbing; Shi, Rong; Ding, Qiang; Zheng, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Mo, Zengnan; Shugart, Yin Yao; Zhang, Xue-Jun; Zhou, Gangqiao; Shen, Hongbing; Zheng, S Lilly; Xu, Jianfeng; Yu, Long

    2013-01-01

    To identify genetic susceptibility loci for hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in the Chinese population, we carried out a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in 2,514 chronic HBV carriers (1,161 HCC cases and 1,353 controls) followed by a 2-stage validation among 6 independent populations of chronic HBV carriers (4,319 cases and 4,966 controls). The joint analyses showed that HCC risk was significantly associated with two independent loci: rs7574865 at STAT4, Pmeta = 2.48 × 10−10, odds ratio (OR) = 1.21; and rs9275319 at HLA-DQ, Pmeta = 2.72 × 10−17, OR = 1.49. The risk allele G at rs7574865 was significantly associated with lower mRNA levels of STAT4 in both the HCC tissues and nontumor tissues of 155 individuals with HBV-related HCC (Ptrend = 0.0008 and 0.0002, respectively). We also found significantly lower mRNA expression of STAT4 in HCC tumor tissues compared with paired adjacent nontumor tissues (P = 2.33 × 10−14). PMID:23242368

  19. Cost-effectiveness analysis of the genetic screening program for familial hypercholesterolemia in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Wonderling, David; Umans-Eckenhausen, Marina A W; Marks, Dalya; Defesche, Joep C; Kastelein, John J P; Thorogood, Margaret

    2004-02-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is associated with pronounced atherosclerosis leading to premature cardiovascular disease and untimely death. Despite the availability of effective preventative drug treatments, many affected individuals remain undiagnosed and untreated until they become symptomatic with cardiovascular disease. To assess the cost-effectiveness of systematic genetic screening of family members of persons diagnosed with FH, an analysis was conducted using data from a nationwide screening program for the identification of individuals with FH, instituted in The Netherlands in 1994, and from other sources. There was DNA testing of families with a known genetic defect to identify new cases of FH in the presymptomatic stage of the disease. After identification, most newly identified patients were started on cholesterol-lowering statin treatment. On average, new cases diagnosed by the screening program gained 3.3 years of life each. Twenty-six myocardial infarctions would be avoided for every 100 persons treated with statins between the ages of 18 and 60 years. The average total lifetime incremental costs, over all age ranges and both sexes, including costs for screening and testing, lifetime drug treatment, and treatment of cardiovascular events, was US dollars 7500 per new case identified. Cost per life-year gained was US dollars 8700. Therefore, systematic genetic screening of family members of persons diagnosed with FH is cost-effective in The Netherlands and should be considered for other settings.

  20. Random amplified polymorphic markers as indicator for genetic conservation program in Iranian pheasant (Phasianus colchicus).

    PubMed

    Elyasi Zarringhabaie, Ghorban; Javanmard, Arash; Pirahary, Ommolbanin

    2012-01-01

    The objective of present study was identification of genetic similarity between wild Iran and captive Azerbaijan Pheasant using PCR-RAPD markers. For this purpose, in overall, 28 birds were taken for DNA extraction and subsequently 15 arbitrary primers were applied for PCR-RAPD technique. After electrophoresis, five primers exhibited sufficient variability which yielded overall 65 distinct bands, 59 polymorphic bands, for detalis, range of number of bands per primer was 10 to 14, and produced size varied between 200 to 1500 bp. Highest and lowest polymorphic primers were OPC5, OPC16 (100%) and OPC15 (81%), respectively. Result of genetic variation between two groups was accounted as nonsignificant (8.12%) of the overall variation. According to our expectation the wild Iranian birds showed higher genetic diversity value than the Azerbaijan captive birds. As general conclusion, two pheasant populations have almost same genetic origin and probably are subpopulations of one population. The data reported herein could open the opportunity to search for suitable conservation strategy to improve richness of Iran biodiversity and present study here was the first report that might have significant impact on the breeding and conservation program of Iranian pheasant gene pool. Analyses using more regions, more birds, and more DNA markers will be useful to confirm or to reject these findings.

  1. NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON URBAN STORM WATER: ENHANCING PROGRAMS AT THE LOCAL LEVEL - PROCEEDINGS CHICAGO, IL FEBRUARY 17-20, 2003

    EPA Science Inventory

    A wide array of effective storm water management and resource protection tools have been developed for urban environments, but their implementation continues to be hampered by a lack of technology transfer opportunities. At the national conference Urban Storm Water: Enhancing Pro...

  2. Developments in the EPA Computational Toxicology Program to Identify Environmental Endocrine Disruptors ( Environmental Endocrine Disruptors Gordon Conference)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation at the Environmental Endocrine Disruptors Gordon Conference in Newry, ME June 22, 2016 to give an overview of the use of high throughput screening and high throughput toxicokinetics to build models for endocrine disruption by environmental chemicals for estrogen rece...

  3. Conference Attendance Patterns of Outdoor Orientation Program Staff at Four-Year Colleges in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Brent J.

    2009-01-01

    One purpose of professional conference attendance is to enhance social support. Intentionally fostering this support is an important political aim that should be developed. Although many multifactor definitions of social support exist (Cobb, 1979; Cohen & Syme, 1985; Kahn, 1979; Shaefer et al., 1981; Weiss, 1974), all distinguish between an…

  4. Identifying Liaison Opportunities through Content Analysis: Academic Library Trends in the Ecological Society of America's Conference Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conklin, Jamie L.

    2013-01-01

    Science and technology librarians need to continually invest time into professional development activities to gain new skills relevant to the faculty and students they serve. Many academic libraries face diminishing budgets and have few travel dollars available for attendance at library and subject-specific conferences. This study determined that…

  5. The Thirteen College Program: Teacher Evaluation of the 4th Annual Summer Curriculum Development Conference and Attitudes Toward Undergraduate Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parmeter, Tom; Faxio, John

    During the summer of 1970, the Institute for Services to Education (ISE) held its fourth annual summer writing conference for faculty members of predominantly black institutions of higher education. The purpose was to continue the process of teacher development of undergraduate curriculum materials and concomitant instructional practices.…

  6. Identifying Liaison Opportunities through Content Analysis: Academic Library Trends in the Ecological Society of America's Conference Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conklin, Jamie L.

    2013-01-01

    Science and technology librarians need to continually invest time into professional development activities to gain new skills relevant to the faculty and students they serve. Many academic libraries face diminishing budgets and have few travel dollars available for attendance at library and subject-specific conferences. This study determined that…

  7. NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON URBAN STORM WATER: ENHANCING PROGRAMS AT THE LOCAL LEVEL - PROCEEDINGS CHICAGO, IL FEBRUARY 17-20, 2003

    EPA Science Inventory

    A wide array of effective storm water management and resource protection tools have been developed for urban environments, but their implementation continues to be hampered by a lack of technology transfer opportunities. At the national conference Urban Storm Water: Enhancing Pro...

  8. Developments in the EPA Computational Toxicology Program to Identify Environmental Endocrine Disruptors ( Environmental Endocrine Disruptors Gordon Conference)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation at the Environmental Endocrine Disruptors Gordon Conference in Newry, ME June 22, 2016 to give an overview of the use of high throughput screening and high throughput toxicokinetics to build models for endocrine disruption by environmental chemicals for estrogen rece...

  9. Conference Attendance Patterns of Outdoor Orientation Program Staff at Four-Year Colleges in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Brent J.

    2009-01-01

    One purpose of professional conference attendance is to enhance social support. Intentionally fostering this support is an important political aim that should be developed. Although many multifactor definitions of social support exist (Cobb, 1979; Cohen & Syme, 1985; Kahn, 1979; Shaefer et al., 1981; Weiss, 1974), all distinguish between an…

  10. Highlights from the 2016 HIV diagnostics conference: The new landscape of HIV testing in laboratories, public health programs and clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Wesolowski, Laura G; Parker, Monica M; Delaney, Kevin P; Owen, S Michele

    2017-02-07

    The 2016 HIV Diagnostics Conference, held in Atlanta, Georgia, was attended by public health officials, laboratorians, HIV testing program managers, surveillance coordinators and industry representatives. The conference addressed test performance data, the implementation of new testing algorithms, quality assurance, and the application of new tests in a variety of settings. With regard to the recommended Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Association of Public Health Laboratories HIV laboratory testing algorithm, the conference featured performance data, implementation challenges such as a lack of test options for the second and third steps, as well as data needs for new tests that may be used as part of the algorithm. There are delays when nucleic acid testing is needed with the algorithm. Novel tests such as point of care nucleic acid tests are needed on the U.S. market to readily identify acute infection. Multiplex tests are being developed which allow for the simultaneous detection of multiple pathogens. CDC staff highlighted new guidance for testing in non-clinical settings. Innovative approaches to linking testing and care in some settings have led to identification of early infections, improved receipt of test results and expedited initiation of therapy. Work continues to optimize testing so that infections are accurately identified as early as possible and time to treatment is minimized to improve health outcomes and prevent transmission.

  11. EPIVAC International Conference on Financial Sustainability of Immunization Programs in sub-Saharan Africa, February 16-18, 2012, Ouidah, Benin.

    PubMed

    Drach, Marcel; Le Gargasson, Jean-Bernard; Mathonnat, Jacky; Da Silva, Alfred; Kaddar, Miloud; Colombini, Anaïs

    2013-09-23

    The introduction of new vaccines with much higher prices than traditional vaccines results in increasing budgetary pressure on immunization programs in GAVI-eligible countries, increasing the need to ensure their financial sustainability. In this context, the third EPIVAC (Epidemiology and Vaccinology) technical conference was held from February 16 to 18, 2012 at the Regional Institute of Public Health in Ouidah, Benin. Managers of ministries of health and finance from 11 West African countries (GAVI eligible countries), as well as former EPIVAC students and European experts, shared their knowledge and best practices on immunization financing at district and country level. The conference concluded by stressing five major priorities for the financial sustainability of national immunization programs (NIPs) in GAVI-eligible countries. - Strengthen public financing by increasing resources and fiscal space, improving budget processes, increasing contribution of local governments and strengthen efficiency of budget spending. - Promote equitable community financing which was recognized as a significant and essential contribution to the continuity of EPI operations. - Widen private funding by exploring prospects offered by sponsorship through foundations dedicated to immunization and by corporate social responsibility programs. - Contain the potential crowding-out effect of GAVI co-financing and ensure that decisions on new vaccine introductions are evidence-based. - Seek out innovative financing mechanisms such as taxes on food products or a national solidarity fund.

  12. Conference Scene

    PubMed Central

    Leeder, J Steven; Lantos, John; Spielberg, Stephen P

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge for clinicians, pharmaceutical companies and regulatory agencies is to better understand the relative contributions of ontogeny and genetic variation to observed variability in drug disposition and response across the pediatric age spectrum from preterm and term newborns, to infants, children and adolescents. Extrapolation of adult experience with pharmacogenomics and personalized medicine to pediatric patients of different ages and developmental stages, is fraught with many challenges. Compared with adults, pediatric pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics involves an added measure of complexity as variability owing to developmental processes, or ontogeny, is superimposed upon genetic variation. Furthermore, some pediatric diseases have no adult correlate or are more prevalent in children compared with adults, and several adverse drug reactions are unique to children, or occur at a higher frequency in children. The primary objective of this conference was to initiate an ongoing series of annual meetings on ‘Pediatric Pharmacogenomics and Personalized Medicine’ organized by the Center for Personalized Medicine and Therapeutic Innovation and Division of Clinical Pharmacology and Medical Therapeutics at Children’s Mercy Hospitals and Clinics in Kansas City, MO, USA. The primary goals of the inaugural meeting were: to bring together clinicians, basic and translational scientists and allied healthcare practitioners, and engage in a multi- and cross-disciplinary dialog aimed at implementing personalized medicine in pediatric settings; to provide a forum for the presentation and the dissemination of research related to the application of pharmacogenomic strategies to investigations of variability of drug disposition and response in children; to explore the ethical, legal and societal implications of pharmacogenomics and personalized medicine that are unique to children; and finally, to create networking opportunities for stimulating discussion

  13. Mechanics of Textile Composites Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Poe, C.C. Jr.; Harris, C.E.

    1995-10-01

    This document is a compilation of papers presented at the Mechanics of Textile Composites Conference in Hampton, Virginia, December 6-8, 1994. This conference was the culmination of a 3-year program that was initiated by NASA late in 1990 to develop mechanics of textile composites in support of the NASA Advanced Composites Technology Program (ACT). The goal of the program was to develop mathematical models of textile preform materials and test methods to facilitate structural analysis and design. Participants in the program were from NASA, academia, and industry. Separate abstracts have been submitted to the database for articles from this conference.

  14. Real Time Updating Genetic Network Programming for Adapting to the Change of Stock Prices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yan; Mabu, Shingo; Shimada, Kaoru; Hirasawa, Kotaro

    The key in stock trading model is to take the right actions for trading at the right time, primarily based on the accurate forecast of future stock trends. Since an effective trading with given information of stock prices needs an intelligent strategy for the decision making, we applied Genetic Network Programming (GNP) to creating a stock trading model. In this paper, we propose a new method called Real Time Updating Genetic Network Programming (RTU-GNP) for adapting to the change of stock prices. There are three important points in this paper: First, the RTU-GNP method makes a stock trading decision considering both the recommendable information of technical indices and the candlestick charts according to the real time stock prices. Second, we combine RTU-GNP with a Sarsa learning algorithm to create the programs efficiently. Also, sub-nodes are introduced in each judgment and processing node to determine appropriate actions (buying/selling) and to select appropriate stock price information depending on the situation. Third, a Real Time Updating system has been firstly introduced in our paper considering the change of the trend of stock prices. The experimental results on the Japanese stock market show that the trading model with the proposed RTU-GNP method outperforms other models without real time updating. We also compared the experimental results using the proposed method with Buy&Hold method to confirm its effectiveness, and it is clarified that the proposed trading model can obtain much higher profits than Buy&Hold method.

  15. Conference Committees: Conference Committees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-09-01

    International Programm Committee (IPC) Harald Ade NCSU Sadao Aoki University Tsukuba David Attwood Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory/CXRO Christian David Paul Scherrer Institut Peter Fischer Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Adam Hitchcock McMaster University Chris Jacobsen SUNY, Stony Brook Denis Joyeux Lab Charles Fabry de l'Institut d'Optique Yasushi Kagoshima University of Hyogo Hiroshi Kihara Kansai Medical University Janos Kirz SUNY Stony Brook Maya Kiskinova ELETTRA Ian McNulty Argonne National Lab/APS Alan Michette Kings College London Graeme Morrison Kings College London Keith Nugent University of Melbourne Zhu Peiping BSRF Institute of High Energy Physics Francois Polack Soleil Christoph Quitmann Paul Scherrer Institut Günther Schmahl University Göttingen Gerd Schneider Bessy Hyun-Joon Shin Pohang Accelerator Lab Jean Susini ESRF Mau-Tsu Tang NSRRC Tony Warwick Lawrence Berkeley Lab/ALS Local Organizing Committee Christoph Quitmann Chair, Scientific Program Charlotte Heer Secretary Christian David Scientific Program Frithjof Nolting Scientific Program Franz Pfeiffer Scientific Program Marco Stampanoni Scientific Program Robert Rudolph Sponsoring, Financials Alfred Waser Industry Exhibition Robert Keller Public Relation Markus Knecht Computing and WWW Annick Cavedon Proceedings and Excursions and Accompanying Persons Program Margrit Eichler Excursions and Accompanying Persons Program Kathy Eikenberry Excursions and Accompanying Persons Program Marlies Locher Excursions and Accompanying Persons Program

  16. Genetic Gain and Inbreeding from Genomic Selection in a Simulated Commercial Breeding Program for Perennial Ryegrass.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zibei; Cogan, Noel O I; Pembleton, Luke W; Spangenberg, German C; Forster, John W; Hayes, Ben J; Daetwyler, Hans D

    2016-03-01

    Genomic selection (GS) provides an attractive option for accelerating genetic gain in perennial ryegrass () improvement given the long cycle times of most current breeding programs. The present study used simulation to investigate the level of genetic gain and inbreeding obtained from GS breeding strategies compared with traditional breeding strategies for key traits (persistency, yield, and flowering time). Base population genomes were simulated through random mating for 60,000 generations at an effective population size of 10,000. The degree of linkage disequilibrium (LD) in the resulting population was compared with that obtained from empirical studies. Initial parental varieties were simulated to match diversity of current commercial cultivars. Genomic selection was designed to fit into a company breeding program at two selection points in the breeding cycle (spaced plants and miniplot). Genomic estimated breeding values (GEBVs) for productivity traits were trained with phenotypes and genotypes from plots. Accuracy of GEBVs was 0.24 for persistency and 0.36 for yield for single plants, while for plots it was lower (0.17 and 0.19, respectively). Higher accuracy of GEBVs was obtained for flowering time (up to 0.7), partially as a result of the larger reference population size that was available from the clonal row stage. The availability of GEBVs permit a 4-yr reduction in cycle time, which led to at least a doubling and trebling genetic gain for persistency and yield, respectively, than the traditional program. However, a higher rate of inbreeding per cycle among varieties was also observed for the GS strategy. Copyright © 2016 Crop Science Society of America.

  17. Optimal In Silico Target Gene Deletion through Nonlinear Programming for Genetic Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Chung-Chien; Song, Mingzhou

    2010-01-01

    Background Optimal selection of multiple regulatory genes, known as targets, for deletion to enhance or suppress the activities of downstream genes or metabolites is an important problem in genetic engineering. Such problems become more feasible to address in silico due to the availability of more realistic dynamical system models of gene regulatory and metabolic networks. The goal of the computational problem is to search for a subset of genes to knock out so that the activity of a downstream gene or a metabolite is optimized. Methodology/Principal Findings Based on discrete dynamical system modeling of gene regulatory networks, an integer programming problem is formulated for the optimal in silico target gene deletion problem. In the first result, the integer programming problem is proved to be NP-hard and equivalent to a nonlinear programming problem. In the second result, a heuristic algorithm, called GKONP, is designed to approximate the optimal solution, involving an approach to prune insignificant terms in the objective function, and the parallel differential evolution algorithm. In the third result, the effectiveness of the GKONP algorithm is demonstrated by applying it to a discrete dynamical system model of the yeast pheromone pathways. The empirical accuracy and time efficiency are assessed in comparison to an optimal, but exhaustive search strategy. Significance Although the in silico target gene deletion problem has enormous potential applications in genetic engineering, one must overcome the computational challenge due to its NP-hardness. The presented solution, which has been demonstrated to approximate the optimal solution in a practical amount of time, is among the few that address the computational challenge. In the experiment on the yeast pheromone pathways, the identified best subset of genes for deletion showed advantage over genes that were selected empirically. Once validated in vivo, the optimal target genes are expected to achieve higher

  18. Optimal in silico target gene deletion through nonlinear programming for genetic engineering.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chung-Chien; Song, Mingzhou

    2010-02-24

    Optimal selection of multiple regulatory genes, known as targets, for deletion to enhance or suppress the activities of downstream genes or metabolites is an important problem in genetic engineering. Such problems become more feasible to address in silico due to the availability of more realistic dynamical system models of gene regulatory and metabolic networks. The goal of the computational problem is to search for a subset of genes to knock out so that the activity of a downstream gene or a metabolite is optimized. Based on discrete dynamical system modeling of gene regulatory networks, an integer programming problem is formulated for the optimal in silico target gene deletion problem. In the first result, the integer programming problem is proved to be NP-hard and equivalent to a nonlinear programming problem. In the second result, a heuristic algorithm, called GKONP, is designed to approximate the optimal solution, involving an approach to prune insignificant terms in the objective function, and the parallel differential evolution algorithm. In the third result, the effectiveness of the GKONP algorithm is demonstrated by applying it to a discrete dynamical system model of the yeast pheromone pathways. The empirical accuracy and time efficiency are assessed in comparison to an optimal, but exhaustive search strategy. Although the in silico target gene deletion problem has enormous potential applications in genetic engineering, one must overcome the computational challenge due to its NP-hardness. The presented solution, which has been demonstrated to approximate the optimal solution in a practical amount of time, is among the few that address the computational challenge. In the experiment on the yeast pheromone pathways, the identified best subset of genes for deletion showed advantage over genes that were selected empirically. Once validated in vivo, the optimal target genes are expected to achieve higher genetic engineering effectiveness than a trial

  19. Genetic Programming Based Approach for Modeling Time Series Data of Real Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahalpara, Dilip P.; Parikh, Jitendra C.

    Analytic models of a computer generated time series (logistic map) and three real time series (ion saturation current in Aditya Tokamak plasma, NASDAQ composite index and Nifty index) are constructed using Genetic Programming (GP) framework. In each case, the optimal map that results from fitting part of the data set also provides a very good description of the rest of the data. Predictions made using the map iteratively are very good for computer generated time series but not for the data of real systems. For such cases, an extended GP model is proposed and illustrated. A comparison of these results with those obtained using Artificial Neural Network (ANN) is also carried out.

  20. Genetic programming for evolving due-date assignment models in job shop environments.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Su; Zhang, Mengjie; Johnston, Mark; Tan, Kay Chen

    2014-01-01

    Due-date assignment plays an important role in scheduling systems and strongly influences the delivery performance of job shops. Because of the stochastic and dynamic nature of job shops, the development of general due-date assignment models (DDAMs) is complicated. In this study, two genetic programming (GP) methods are proposed to evolve DDAMs for job shop environments. The experimental results show that the evolved DDAMs can make more accurate estimates than other existing dynamic DDAMs with promising reusability. In addition, the evolved operation-based DDAMs show better performance than the evolved DDAMs employing aggregate information of jobs and machines.

  1. Buying and Selling Stocks of Multi Brands Using Genetic Network Programming with Control Nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkawa, Etsushi; Chen, Yan; Bao, Zhiguo; Mabu, Shingo; Shimada, Kaoru; Hirasawa, Kotaro

    A new evolutionary method named “Genetic Network Programming with control nodes, GNPcn” has been applied to determine the timing of buying or selling stocks. GNPcn represents its solutions as directed graph structures which has some useful features inherently. For example, GNPcn has an implicit memory function which memorizes the past action sequences of agents and GNPcn can re-use nodes repeatedly in the network flow, so very compact graph structures can be made. GNPcn can determine the strategy of buying and selling stocks of multi issues. The effectiveness of the proposed method is confirmed by simulations.

  2. High-Significance Averages of Event-Related Potential Via Genetic Programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Citi, Luca; Poli, Riccardo; Cinel, Caterina

    In this paper we use register-based genetic programming with memory-with memory to discover probabilistic membership functions that are used to divide up data-sets of event-related potentials recorded via EEG in psycho-physiological experiments based on the corresponding response times. The objective is to evolve membership functions which lead to maximising the statistical significance with which true brain waves can be reconstructed when averaging the trials in each bin. Results show that GP can significantly improve the fidelity with which ERP components can be recovered.

  3. Robust layered image transmission based on genetic programming for noisy channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Wen-Jyi; Lin, Ray-Shine; Wu, Chung-Kun

    2001-02-01

    We present a novel robust layered image transmission design algorithm for noisy channels. In the algorithm, the layered embedded zerotree wavelet coding technique is used to encode the images for the transmission of each layer. A new error protection allocation scheme based on genetic programming is then employed to determine the degree of protection for each layer so that the average distortion of the reconstructed images after transmission can be minimized. Simulation results show that, subject to the same amount of redundancy bits for error protection, the new algorithm outperforms other existing algorithms where equal- protection schemes are adopted.

  4. 1985 oil spill conference

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-02-01

    This 1985 Oil Spill Conference, our ninth biennial meeting, presents another unique opportunity fo industry, government, and academic representatives to meet and exchange ideas to enhance our knowledge and understanding of the prevention, behavior, control, and cleanup of oil spills. Growing international and domestic participation, and the continued worldwide use of the Proceedings of past oil spill conferences as valuable reference sources affirms the importance and quality of these conferences. It is my firm belief, furthermore, that the conferences have contributed substantially to the reduction in the number of marine oil spills, and to our increased cleanup capabilities. The sponsoring organizations--the United States Coast Guard, the American Petroleum Institute, and the United States Environmental Protection Agency--have combined their efforts to provide a program of timely technical content which affords the opportunity to review the state-of-the-art accomplishments since our last conference in 1983. Finally, I hope that the knowledge and associations developed at this conference will influence your decision to participate in the 1987 Oil Spill Conference, to be held in Baltimore, Maryland.

  5. Relieving the Bottleneck: An Investigation of Barriers to Expansion of Supervision Networks at Genetic Counseling Training Programs.

    PubMed

    Berg, Jordan; Hoskovec, Jennifer; Hashmi, S Shahrukh; McCarthy Veach, Patricia; Ownby, Allison; Singletary, Claire N

    2017-09-06

    Rapid growth in the demand for genetic counselors has led to a workforce shortage. There is a prevailing assumption that the number of training slots for genetic counseling students is linked to the availability of clinical supervisors. This study aimed to determine and compare barriers to expansion of supervision networks at genetic counseling training programs as perceived by supervisors, non-supervisors, and Program Directors. Genetic counselors were recruited via National Society of Genetic Counselors e-blast; Program Directors received personal emails. Online surveys were completed by 216 supervisors, 98 non-supervisors, and 23 Program Directors. Respondents rated impact of 35 barriers; comparisons were made using Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon ranked sum tests. Half of supervisors (51%) indicated willingness to increase supervision. All non-supervisors were willing to supervise. However, all agreed that being too busy impacted ability to supervise, highlighted by supervisors' most impactful barriers: lack of time, other responsibilities, intensive nature of supervision, desire for breaks, and unfilled positions. Non-supervisors noted unique barriers: distance, institutional barriers, and non-clinical roles. Program Directors' perceptions were congruent with those of genetic counselors with three exceptions they rated as impactful: lack of money, prefer not to supervise, and never been asked. In order to expand supervision networks and provide comprehensive student experiences, the profession must examine service delivery models to increase workplace efficiency, reconsider the supervision paradigm, and redefine what constitutes a countable case or place value on non-direct patient care experiences.

  6. Genetic and pharmacological evidence that G2019S LRRK2 confers a hyperkinetic phenotype, resistant to motor decline associated with aging

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Francesco; Russo, Isabella; Shimshek, Derya R.; Greggio, Elisa; Morari, Michele

    2014-01-01

    The leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 mutation G2019S in the kinase-domain is the most common genetic cause of Parkinson's disease. To investigate the impact of the G2019S mutation on motor activity in vivo, a longitudinal phenotyping approach was developed in knock-in (KI) mice bearing this kinase-enhancing mutation. Two cohorts of G2019S KI mice and wild-type littermates (WT) were subjected to behavioral tests, specific for akinesia, bradykinesia and overall gait ability, at different ages (3, 6, 10, 15 and 19 months). The motor performance of G2019S KI mice remained stable up to the age of 19 months and did not show the typical age-related decline in immobility time and stepping activity of WT. Several lines of evidence suggest that enhanced LRRK2 kinase activity is the main contributor to the observed hyperkinetic phenotype of G2019S KI mice: i) KI mice carrying a LRRK2 kinase-dead mutation (D1994S KD) showed a similar progressive motor decline as WT; ii) two LRRK2 kinase inhibitors, H-1152 and Nov-LRRK2-11, acutely reversed the hyperkinetic phenotype of G2019S KI mice, while being ineffective in WT or D1994S KD animals. LRRK2 target engagement in vivo was further substantiated by reduction of LRRK2 phosphorylation at Ser935 in the striatum and cortex at efficacious doses of Nov-LRRK2-11, and in the striatum at efficacious doses of H-1152. In summary, expression of the G2019S mutation in the mouse LRRK2 gene confers a hyperkinetic phenotype that is resistant to age-related motor decline, likely via enhancement of LRRK2 kinase activity. This study provides an in vivo model to investigate the effects of LRRK2 inhibitors on motor function. PMID:25107341

  7. Non-Traditional Graduate Education: A Frontier for the 1980's. Selected Papers from the Conference on Non-Traditional Interdisciplinary Programs (2nd, Arlington, Virginia, June 22-24, 1983).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fonseca, James W., Ed.

    Six papers on graduate education are presented from the George Mason University (Virginia) annual conference on nontraditional interdisciplinary programs. The papers and authors include: "Management Education: A Non-Traditional Graduate Program for the Non-for-Profit Manager" (Susan Calkin); "'Pracademics': the Role of the Adjunct…

  8. Entering the 90's: Reflections on the Past, Directions for the Future. National Conference on Adult and External Degree Programs (9th, Tampa, Florida, October 11-13, 1989).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance, an Association for Alternative Degree Programs.

    This report of a conference on distance learning/adult education programs contains the following papers: "Adult Learners, Distance Education, and Technology: It's the Future, but Can We Get There from Here?" (Gulliver, Wright); "Minority Student Response to External Adult Degree Program Education" (Gillett, Sutphin); "Methods in Project…

  9. Entering the 90's: Reflections on the Past, Directions for the Future. National Conference on Adult and External Degree Programs (9th, Tampa, Florida, October 11-13, 1989).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance, an Association for Alternative Degree Programs.

    This report of a conference on distance learning/adult education programs contains the following papers: "Adult Learners, Distance Education, and Technology: It's the Future, but Can We Get There from Here?" (Gulliver, Wright); "Minority Student Response to External Adult Degree Program Education" (Gillett, Sutphin); "Methods in Project…

  10. Demystifying Data: Data Use in State and Local Public Health Nutrition Programs--Measuring Achievement of the 1990 Health Promotion/Disease Prevention Objectives for the Nation. Proceedings of the Continuing Education Conference for the Association of State and Territorial Public Health Nutrition Directors and Association of Faculties of Graduate Programs in Public Health Nutrition (Chapel Hill, North Carolina, May 21-24, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Mildred, Comp.

    This document contains the proceedings from the Conference of State and Territorial Public Health Nutrition Directors and Faculties of Graduate Programs in Public Health Nutrition designed to improve participants' proficiency in data management. It includes an introduction by Mildred Kaufman, a conference agenda, and the following presentations:…

  11. Order from the order: how a spatiotemporal genetic program is encoded in a 2-D genetic map of the bacterial chromosome.

    PubMed

    Muskhelishvili, Georgi; Travers, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we sketch out a holistic methodology used for exploring how the genetic program is encoded in a 2-D genetic map of a bacterial chromosome. We argue that the major problem resides in the conceptual integration of the two logically distinct types of information encoded in the chiral double-helical DNA polymer. This integration is accomplished by mapping the genetic function on the genomic sequence organisation and therefore is potentially applicable to any chromosome. The vast generalisation achieved by this approach necessarily ignores exquisite details, yet it is fundamental in providing comprehensive methodology for exploring the role of the DNA sequence organisation in harnessing genetic information and sustaining biological order. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Internal combustion engine control for series hybrid electric vehicles by parallel and distributed genetic programming/multiobjective genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladwin, D.; Stewart, P.; Stewart, J.

    2011-02-01

    This article addresses the problem of maintaining a stable rectified DC output from the three-phase AC generator in a series-hybrid vehicle powertrain. The series-hybrid prime power source generally comprises an internal combustion (IC) engine driving a three-phase permanent magnet generator whose output is rectified to DC. A recent development has been to control the engine/generator combination by an electronically actuated throttle. This system can be represented as a nonlinear system with significant time delay. Previously, voltage control of the generator output has been achieved by model predictive methods such as the Smith Predictor. These methods rely on the incorporation of an accurate system model and time delay into the control algorithm, with a consequent increase in computational complexity in the real-time controller, and as a necessity relies to some extent on the accuracy of the models. Two complementary performance objectives exist for the control system. Firstly, to maintain the IC engine at its optimal operating point, and secondly, to supply a stable DC supply to the traction drive inverters. Achievement of these goals minimises the transient energy storage requirements at the DC link, with a consequent reduction in both weight and cost. These objectives imply constant velocity operation of the IC engine under external load disturbances and changes in both operating conditions and vehicle speed set-points. In order to achieve these objectives, and reduce the complexity of implementation, in this article a controller is designed by the use of Genetic Programming methods in the Simulink modelling environment, with the aim of obtaining a relatively simple controller for the time-delay system which does not rely on the implementation of real time system models or time delay approximations in the controller. A methodology is presented to utilise the miriad of existing control blocks in the Simulink libraries to automatically evolve optimal control

  13. Drag reduction of a car model by linear genetic programming control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruiying; Noack, Bernd R.; Cordier, Laurent; Borée, Jacques; Harambat, Fabien

    2017-08-01

    We investigate open- and closed-loop active control for aerodynamic drag reduction of a car model. Turbulent flow around a blunt-edged Ahmed body is examined at ReH≈ 3× 105 based on body height. The actuation is performed with pulsed jets at all trailing edges (multiple inputs) combined with a Coanda deflection surface. The flow is monitored with 16 pressure sensors distributed at the rear side (multiple outputs). We apply a recently developed model-free control strategy building on genetic programming in Dracopoulos and Kent (Neural Comput Appl 6:214-228, 1997) and Gautier et al. (J Fluid Mech 770:424-441, 2015). The optimized control laws comprise periodic forcing, multi-frequency forcing and sensor-based feedback including also time-history information feedback and combinations thereof. Key enabler is linear genetic programming (LGP) as powerful regression technique for optimizing the multiple-input multiple-output control laws. The proposed LGP control can select the best open- or closed-loop control in an unsupervised manner. Approximately 33% base pressure recovery associated with 22% drag reduction is achieved in all considered classes of control laws. Intriguingly, the feedback actuation emulates periodic high-frequency forcing. In addition, the control identified automatically the only sensor which listens to high-frequency flow components with good signal to noise ratio. Our control strategy is, in principle, applicable to all multiple actuators and sensors experiments.

  14. Exploration of Genetic Programming Optimal Parameters for Feature Extraction from Remote Sensed Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, P.; Shetty, S.; Momm, H. G.

    2014-11-01

    Evolutionary computation is used for improved information extraction from high-resolution satellite imagery. The utilization of evolutionary computation is based on stochastic selection of input parameters often defined in a trial-and-error approach. However, exploration of optimal input parameters can yield improved candidate solutions while requiring reduced computation resources. In this study, the design and implementation of a system that investigates the optimal input parameters was researched in the problem of feature extraction from remotely sensed imagery. The two primary assessment criteria were the highest fitness value and the overall computational time. The parameters explored include the population size and the percentage and order of mutation and crossover. The proposed system has two major subsystems; (i) data preparation: the generation of random candidate solutions; and (ii) data processing: evolutionary process based on genetic programming, which is used to spectrally distinguish the features of interest from the remaining image background of remote sensed imagery. The results demonstrate that the optimal generation number is around 1500, the optimal percentage of mutation and crossover ranges from 35% to 40% and 5% to 0%, respectively. Based on our findings the sequence that yielded better results was mutation over crossover. These findings are conducive to improving the efficacy of utilizing genetic programming for feature extraction from remotely sensed imagery.

  15. A wavelet-linear genetic programming model for sodium (Na+) concentration forecasting in rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravansalar, Masoud; Rajaee, Taher; Zounemat-Kermani, Mohammad

    2016-06-01

    The prediction of water quality parameters in water resources such as rivers is of importance issue that needs to be considered in better management of irrigation systems and water supplies. In this respect, this study proposes a new hybrid wavelet-linear genetic programming (WLGP) model for prediction of monthly sodium (Na+) concentration. The 23-year monthly data used in this study, were measured from the Asi River at the Demirköprü gauging station located in Antakya, Turkey. At first, the measured discharge (Q) and Na+ datasets are initially decomposed into several sub-series using discrete wavelet transform (DWT). Then, these new sub-series are imposed to the ad hoc linear genetic programming (LGP) model as input patterns to predict monthly Na+ one month ahead. The results of the new proposed WLGP model are compared with LGP, WANN and ANN models. Comparison of the models represents the superiority of the WLGP model over the LGP, WANN and ANN models such that the Nash-Sutcliffe efficiencies (NSE) for WLGP, WANN, LGP and ANN models were 0.984, 0.904, 0.484 and 0.351, respectively. The achieved results even points to the superiority of the single LGP model than the ANN model. Continuously, the capability of the proposed WLGP model in terms of prediction of the Na+ peak values is also presented in this study.

  16. Coregulation of Genetic Programs by the Transcription Factors NFIB and STAT5

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Gertraud W.; Kang, Keunsoo; Yoo, Kyung Hyun; Tang, Yong; Zhu, Bing-Mei; Yamaji, Daisuke; Colditz, Vera; Jang, Seung Jian; Gronostajski, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    Mammary-specific genetic programs are activated during pregnancy by the common transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 5. More than one third of these genes carry nuclear factor I/B (NFIB) binding motifs that coincide with STAT5 in vivo binding, suggesting functional synergy between these two transcription factors. The role of NFIB in this governance was investigated in mice from which Nfib had been inactivated in mammary stem cells or in differentiating alveolar epithelium. Although NFIB was not required for alveolar expansion, the combined absence of NFIB and STAT5 prevented the formation of functional alveoli. NFIB controlled the expression of mammary-specific and STAT5-regulated genes and chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing established STAT5 and NFIB binding at composite regulatory elements containing histone H3 lysine dimethylation enhancer marks and progesterone receptor binding. By integrating previously published chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing data sets, the presence of NFIB-STAT5 modules in other cell types was investigated. Notably, genomic sites bound by NFIB in hair follicle stem cells were also occupied by STAT5 in mammary epithelium and coincided with enhancer marks. Many of these genes were under NFIB control in both hair follicle stem cells and mammary alveolar epithelium. We propose that NFIB-STAT5 modules, possibly in conjunction with other transcription factors, control cell-specific genetic programs. PMID:24678731

  17. Wavelet-linear genetic programming: A new approach for modeling monthly streamflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravansalar, Masoud; Rajaee, Taher; Kisi, Ozgur

    2017-06-01

    The streamflows are important and effective factors in stream ecosystems and its accurate prediction is an essential and important issue in water resources and environmental engineering systems. A hybrid wavelet-linear genetic programming (WLGP) model, which includes a discrete wavelet transform (DWT) and a linear genetic programming (LGP) to predict the monthly streamflow (Q) in two gauging stations, Pataveh and Shahmokhtar, on the Beshar River at the Yasuj, Iran were used in this study. In the proposed WLGP model, the wavelet analysis was linked to the LGP model where the original time series of streamflow were decomposed into the sub-time series comprising wavelet coefficients. The results were compared with the single LGP, artificial neural network (ANN), a hybrid wavelet-ANN (WANN) and Multi Linear Regression (MLR) models. The comparisons were done by some of the commonly utilized relevant physical statistics. The Nash coefficients (E) were found as 0.877 and 0.817 for the WLGP model, for the Pataveh and Shahmokhtar stations, respectively. The comparison of the results showed that the WLGP model could significantly increase the streamflow prediction accuracy in both stations. Since, the results demonstrate a closer approximation of the peak streamflow values by the WLGP model, this model could be utilized for the simulation of cumulative streamflow data prediction in one month ahead.

  18. A genetic programming approach to explore the crash severity on multi-lane roads.

    PubMed

    Das, Abhishek; Abdel-Aty, Mohamed

    2010-03-01

    The study aims at understanding the relationship of geometric and environmental factors with injury related crashes as well as with severe crashes through the development of classification models. The Linear Genetic Programming (LGP) method is used to achieve these objectives. LGP is based on the traditional genetic algorithm, except that it evolves computer programs. The methodology is different from traditional non-parametric methods like classification and regression trees which develop only one model, with fixed criteria, for any given dataset. The LGP on the other hand not only evolves numerous models through the concept of biological evolution, and using the evolutionary operators of crossover and mutation, but also allows the investigator to choose the best models, developed over various runs, based on classification rates. Discipulus software was used to evolve the models. The results included vision obstruction which was found to be a leading factor for severe crashes. Percentage of trucks, even if small, is more likely to make the crashes injury prone. The 'lawn and curb' median are found to be safe for angle/turning movement crashes. Dry surface conditions as well as good pavement conditions decrease the severity of crashes and so also wider shoulder and sidewalk widths. Interaction terms among variables like on-street parking with higher posted speed limit have been found to make injuries more probable. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Coregulation of genetic programs by the transcription factors NFIB and STAT5.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Gertraud W; Kang, Keunsoo; Yoo, Kyung Hyun; Tang, Yong; Zhu, Bing-Mei; Yamaji, Daisuke; Colditz, Vera; Jang, Seung Jian; Gronostajski, Richard M; Hennighausen, Lothar

    2014-05-01

    Mammary-specific genetic programs are activated during pregnancy by the common transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 5. More than one third of these genes carry nuclear factor I/B (NFIB) binding motifs that coincide with STAT5 in vivo binding, suggesting functional synergy between these two transcription factors. The role of NFIB in this governance was investigated in mice from which Nfib had been inactivated in mammary stem cells or in differentiating alveolar epithelium. Although NFIB was not required for alveolar expansion, the combined absence of NFIB and STAT5 prevented the formation of functional alveoli. NFIB controlled the expression of mammary-specific and STAT5-regulated genes and chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing established STAT5 and NFIB binding at composite regulatory elements containing histone H3 lysine dimethylation enhancer marks and progesterone receptor binding. By integrating previously published chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing data sets, the presence of NFIB-STAT5 modules in other cell types was investigated. Notably, genomic sites bound by NFIB in hair follicle stem cells were also occupied by STAT5 in mammary epithelium and coincided with enhancer marks. Many of these genes were under NFIB control in both hair follicle stem cells and mammary alveolar epithelium. We propose that NFIB-STAT5 modules, possibly in conjunction with other transcription factors, control cell-specific genetic programs.

  20. Trading Rules on Stock Markets Using Genetic Network Programming with Reinforcement Learning and Importance Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabu, Shingo; Hirasawa, Kotaro; Furuzuki, Takayuki

    Genetic Network Programming (GNP) is an evolutionary computation which represents its solutions using graph structures. Since GNP can create quite compact programs and has an implicit memory function, it has been clarified that GNP works well especially in dynamic environments. In addition, a study on creating trading rules on stock markets using GNP with Importance Index (GNP-IMX) has been done. IMX is a new element which is a criterion for decision making. In this paper, we combined GNP-IMX with Actor-Critic (GNP-IMX&AC) and create trading rules on stock markets. Evolution-based methods evolve their programs after enough period of time because they must calculate fitness values, however reinforcement learning can change programs during the period, therefore the trading rules can be created efficiently. In the simulation, the proposed method is trained using the stock prices of 10 brands in 2002 and 2003. Then the generalization ability is tested using the stock prices in 2004. The simulation results show that the proposed method can obtain larger profits than GNP-IMX without AC and Buy&Hold.