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Sample records for genome based cell

  1. Obtaining genomes from uncultivated environmental microorganisms using FACS-based single-cell genomics.

    PubMed

    Rinke, Christian; Lee, Janey; Nath, Nandita; Goudeau, Danielle; Thompson, Brian; Poulton, Nicole; Dmitrieff, Elizabeth; Malmstrom, Rex; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Woyke, Tanja

    2014-05-01

    Single-cell genomics is a powerful tool for exploring the genetic makeup of environmental microorganisms, the vast majority of which are difficult, if not impossible, to cultivate with current approaches. Here we present a comprehensive protocol for obtaining genomes from uncultivated environmental microbes via high-throughput single-cell isolation by FACS. The protocol encompasses the preservation and pretreatment of differing environmental samples, followed by the physical separation, lysis, whole-genome amplification and 16S rRNA-based identification of individual bacterial and archaeal cells. The described procedure can be performed with standard molecular biology equipment and a FACS machine. It takes <12 h of bench time over a 4-d time period, and it generates up to 1 μg of genomic DNA from an individual microbial cell, which is suitable for downstream applications such as PCR amplification and shotgun sequencing. The completeness of the recovered genomes varies, with an average of ∼50%.

  2. Manifold Based Optimization for Single-Cell 3D Genome Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Collas, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) structure of the genome is important for orchestration of gene expression and cell differentiation. While mapping genomes in 3D has for a long time been elusive, recent adaptations of high-throughput sequencing to chromosome conformation capture (3C) techniques, allows for genome-wide structural characterization for the first time. However, reconstruction of "consensus" 3D genomes from 3C-based data is a challenging problem, since the data are aggregated over millions of cells. Recent single-cell adaptations to the 3C-technique, however, allow for non-aggregated structural assessment of genome structure, but data suffer from sparse and noisy interaction sampling. We present a manifold based optimization (MBO) approach for the reconstruction of 3D genome structure from chromosomal contact data. We show that MBO is able to reconstruct 3D structures based on the chromosomal contacts, imposing fewer structural violations than comparable methods. Additionally, MBO is suitable for efficient high-throughput reconstruction of large systems, such as entire genomes, allowing for comparative studies of genomic structure across cell-lines and different species. PMID:26262780

  3. Functional cell-based uHTS in chemical genomic drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Croston, Glenn E

    2002-03-01

    The availability of genomic information significantly increases the number of potential targets available for drug discovery, although the function of many targets and their relationship to disease is unknown. In a chemical genomic research approach, ultra-high throughput screening (uHTS) of genomic targets takes place early in the drug discovery process, before target validation. Target-selective modulators then provide drug leads and pharmacological research tools to validate target function. Effective implementation of a chemical genomic strategy requires assays that can perform uHTS for large numbers of genomic targets. Cell-based functional assays are capable of the uHTS throughput required for chemical genomic research, and their functional nature provides distinct advantages over ligand-binding assays in the identification of target-selective modulators.

  4. Single-cell genomics-based analysis of virus–host interactions in marine surface bacterioplankton

    PubMed Central

    Labonté, Jessica M; Swan, Brandon K; Poulos, Bonnie; Luo, Haiwei; Koren, Sergey; Hallam, Steven J; Sullivan, Matthew B; Woyke, Tanja; Eric Wommack, K; Stepanauskas, Ramunas

    2015-01-01

    Viral infections dynamically alter the composition and metabolic potential of marine microbial communities and the evolutionary trajectories of host populations with resulting feedback on biogeochemical cycles. It is quite possible that all microbial populations in the ocean are impacted by viral infections. Our knowledge of virus–host relationships, however, has been limited to a minute fraction of cultivated host groups. Here, we utilized single-cell sequencing to obtain genomic blueprints of viruses inside or attached to individual bacterial and archaeal cells captured in their native environment, circumventing the need for host and virus cultivation. A combination of comparative genomics, metagenomic fragment recruitment, sequence anomalies and irregularities in sequence coverage depth and genome recovery were utilized to detect viruses and to decipher modes of virus–host interactions. Members of all three tailed phage families were identified in 20 out of 58 phylogenetically and geographically diverse single amplified genomes (SAGs) of marine bacteria and archaea. At least four phage–host interactions had the characteristics of late lytic infections, all of which were found in metabolically active cells. One virus had genetic potential for lysogeny. Our findings include first known viruses of Thaumarchaeota, Marinimicrobia, Verrucomicrobia and Gammaproteobacteria clusters SAR86 and SAR92. Viruses were also found in SAGs of Alphaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. A high fragment recruitment of viral metagenomic reads confirmed that most of the SAG-associated viruses are abundant in the ocean. Our study demonstrates that single-cell genomics, in conjunction with sequence-based computational tools, enable in situ, cultivation-independent insights into host–virus interactions in complex microbial communities. PMID:25848873

  5. Single-cell genomics-based analysis of virus–host interactions in marine surface bacterioplankton

    DOE PAGES

    Labonté, Jessica M.; Swan, Brandon K.; Poulos, Bonnie; ...

    2015-04-07

    Viral infections dynamically alter the composition and metabolic potential of marine microbial communities and the evolutionary trajectories of host populations with resulting feedback on biogeochemical cycles. It is quite possible that all microbial populations in the ocean are impacted by viral infections. Our knowledge of virus–host relationships, however, has been limited to a minute fraction of cultivated host groups. Here, we utilized single-cell sequencing to obtain genomic blueprints of viruses inside or attached to individual bacterial and archaeal cells captured in their native environment, circumventing the need for host and virus cultivation. Furthermore, a combination of comparative genomics, metagenomic fragmentmore » recruitment, sequence anomalies and irregularities in sequence coverage depth and genome recovery were utilized to detect viruses and to decipher modes of virus–host interactions. Members of all three tailed phage families were identified in 20 out of 58 phylogenetically and geographically diverse single amplified genomes (SAGs) of marine bacteria and archaea. At least four phage–host interactions had the characteristics of late lytic infections, all of which were found in metabolically active cells. One virus had genetic potential for lysogeny. Our findings include first known viruses of Thaumarchaeota, Marinimicrobia, Verrucomicrobia and Gammaproteobacteria clusters SAR86 and SAR92. Viruses were also found in SAGs of Alphaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. A high fragment recruitment of viral metagenomic reads confirmed that most of the SAG-associated viruses are abundant in the ocean. This study demonstrates that single-cell genomics, in conjunction with sequence-based computational tools, enable in situ, cultivation-independent insights into host–virus interactions in complex microbial communities.« less

  6. Single-cell genomics-based analysis of virus–host interactions in marine surface bacterioplankton

    SciTech Connect

    Labonté, Jessica M.; Swan, Brandon K.; Poulos, Bonnie; Luo, Haiwei; Koren, Sergey; Hallam, Steven J.; Sullivan, Matthew B.; Woyke, Tanja; Eric Wommack, K.; Stepanauskas, Ramunas

    2015-04-07

    Viral infections dynamically alter the composition and metabolic potential of marine microbial communities and the evolutionary trajectories of host populations with resulting feedback on biogeochemical cycles. It is quite possible that all microbial populations in the ocean are impacted by viral infections. Our knowledge of virus–host relationships, however, has been limited to a minute fraction of cultivated host groups. Here, we utilized single-cell sequencing to obtain genomic blueprints of viruses inside or attached to individual bacterial and archaeal cells captured in their native environment, circumventing the need for host and virus cultivation. Furthermore, a combination of comparative genomics, metagenomic fragment recruitment, sequence anomalies and irregularities in sequence coverage depth and genome recovery were utilized to detect viruses and to decipher modes of virus–host interactions. Members of all three tailed phage families were identified in 20 out of 58 phylogenetically and geographically diverse single amplified genomes (SAGs) of marine bacteria and archaea. At least four phage–host interactions had the characteristics of late lytic infections, all of which were found in metabolically active cells. One virus had genetic potential for lysogeny. Our findings include first known viruses of Thaumarchaeota, Marinimicrobia, Verrucomicrobia and Gammaproteobacteria clusters SAR86 and SAR92. Viruses were also found in SAGs of Alphaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. A high fragment recruitment of viral metagenomic reads confirmed that most of the SAG-associated viruses are abundant in the ocean. This study demonstrates that single-cell genomics, in conjunction with sequence-based computational tools, enable in situ, cultivation-independent insights into host–virus interactions in complex microbial communities.

  7. Human cancer classification: a systems biology- based model integrating morphology, cancer stem cells, proteomics, and genomics.

    PubMed

    Idikio, Halliday A

    2011-02-22

    Human cancer classification is currently based on the idea of cell of origin, light and electron microscopic attributes of the cancer. What is not yet integrated into cancer classification are the functional attributes of these cancer cells. Recent innovative techniques in biology have provided a wealth of information on the genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic changes in cancer cells. The emergence of the concept of cancer stem cells needs to be included in a classification model to capture the known attributes of cancer stem cells and their potential contribution to treatment response, and metastases. The integrated model of cancer classification presented here incorporates all morphology, cancer stem cell contributions, genetic, and functional attributes of cancer. Integrated cancer classification models could eliminate the unclassifiable cancers as used in current classifications. Future cancer treatment may be advanced by using an integrated model of cancer classification.

  8. Efficient CRISPR/Cas9-Based Genome Engineering in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Kime, Cody; Mandegar, Mohammad A; Srivastava, Deepak; Yamanaka, Shinya; Conklin, Bruce R; Rand, Tim A

    2016-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPS cells) are rapidly emerging as a powerful tool for biomedical discovery. The advent of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPS cells) with human embryonic stem (hES)-cell-like properties has led to hPS cells with disease-specific genetic backgrounds for in vitro disease modeling and drug discovery as well as mechanistic and developmental studies. To fully realize this potential, it will be necessary to modify the genome of hPS cells with precision and flexibility. Pioneering experiments utilizing site-specific double-strand break (DSB)-mediated genome engineering tools, including zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), have paved the way to genome engineering in previously recalcitrant systems such as hPS cells. However, these methods are technically cumbersome and require significant expertise, which has limited adoption. A major recent advance involving the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) endonuclease has dramatically simplified the effort required for genome engineering and will likely be adopted widely as the most rapid and flexible system for genome editing in hPS cells. In this unit, we describe commonly practiced methods for CRISPR endonuclease genomic editing of hPS cells into cell lines containing genomes altered by insertion/deletion (indel) mutagenesis or insertion of recombinant genomic DNA.

  9. Genome engineering in human cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Minjung; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Jin-Soo; Kim, Hyongbum

    2014-01-01

    Genome editing in human cells is of great value in research, medicine, and biotechnology. Programmable nucleases including zinc-finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and RNA-guided engineered nucleases recognize a specific target sequence and make a double-strand break at that site, which can result in gene disruption, gene insertion, gene correction, or chromosomal rearrangements. The target sequence complexities of these programmable nucleases are higher than 3.2 mega base pairs, the size of the haploid human genome. Here, we briefly introduce the structure of the human genome and the characteristics of each programmable nuclease, and review their applications in human cells including pluripotent stem cells. In addition, we discuss various delivery methods for nucleases, programmable nickases, and enrichment of gene-edited human cells, all of which facilitate efficient and precise genome editing in human cells.

  10. Messenger RNA- versus retrovirus-based induced pluripotent stem cell reprogramming strategies: analysis of genomic integrity.

    PubMed

    Steichen, Clara; Luce, Eléanor; Maluenda, Jérôme; Tosca, Lucie; Moreno-Gimeno, Inmaculada; Desterke, Christophe; Dianat, Noushin; Goulinet-Mainot, Sylvie; Awan-Toor, Sarah; Burks, Deborah; Marie, Joëlle; Weber, Anne; Tachdjian, Gérard; Melki, Judith; Dubart-Kupperschmitt, Anne

    2014-06-01

    The use of synthetic messenger RNAs to generate human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) is particularly appealing for potential regenerative medicine applications, because it overcomes the common drawbacks of DNA-based or virus-based reprogramming strategies, including transgene integration in particular. We compared the genomic integrity of mRNA-derived iPSCs with that of retrovirus-derived iPSCs generated in strictly comparable conditions, by single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and copy number variation (CNV) analyses. We showed that mRNA-derived iPSCs do not differ significantly from the parental fibroblasts in SNP analysis, whereas retrovirus-derived iPSCs do. We found that the number of CNVs seemed independent of the reprogramming method, instead appearing to be clone-dependent. Furthermore, differentiation studies indicated that mRNA-derived iPSCs differentiated efficiently into hepatoblasts and that these cells did not load additional CNVs during differentiation. The integration-free hepatoblasts that were generated constitute a new tool for the study of diseased hepatocytes derived from patients' iPSCs and their use in the context of stem cell-derived hepatocyte transplantation. Our findings also highlight the need to conduct careful studies on genome integrity for the selection of iPSC lines before using them for further applications. ©AlphaMed Press.

  11. Messenger RNA- Versus Retrovirus-Based Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Reprogramming Strategies: Analysis of Genomic Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Steichen, Clara; Luce, Eléanor; Maluenda, Jérôme; Tosca, Lucie; Moreno-Gimeno, Inmaculada; Desterke, Christophe; Dianat, Noushin; Goulinet-Mainot, Sylvie; Awan-Toor, Sarah; Burks, Deborah; Marie, Joëlle; Weber, Anne; Tachdjian, Gérard; Melki, Judith

    2014-01-01

    The use of synthetic messenger RNAs to generate human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) is particularly appealing for potential regenerative medicine applications, because it overcomes the common drawbacks of DNA-based or virus-based reprogramming strategies, including transgene integration in particular. We compared the genomic integrity of mRNA-derived iPSCs with that of retrovirus-derived iPSCs generated in strictly comparable conditions, by single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and copy number variation (CNV) analyses. We showed that mRNA-derived iPSCs do not differ significantly from the parental fibroblasts in SNP analysis, whereas retrovirus-derived iPSCs do. We found that the number of CNVs seemed independent of the reprogramming method, instead appearing to be clone-dependent. Furthermore, differentiation studies indicated that mRNA-derived iPSCs differentiated efficiently into hepatoblasts and that these cells did not load additional CNVs during differentiation. The integration-free hepatoblasts that were generated constitute a new tool for the study of diseased hepatocytes derived from patients’ iPSCs and their use in the context of stem cell-derived hepatocyte transplantation. Our findings also highlight the need to conduct careful studies on genome integrity for the selection of iPSC lines before using them for further applications. PMID:24736403

  12. Efficient CRISPR/Cas9-based Genome Engineering in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kime, Cody; Mandegar, Mohammad A.; Srivastava, Deepak; Yamanaka, Shinya; Conklin, Bruce R.; Rand, Tim A.

    2016-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) are rapidly emerging as a powerful tool for biomedical discovery. The advent of human induced pluripotent stem (hiPS) cells with human embryonic stem (hES) cell-like properties has led to hPSCs with disease-specific genetic backgrounds for in-vitro disease modeling, drug discovery, mechanistic and developmental studies. To fully realize this potential it will be necessary to modify the genome of hPSCs with precision and flexibility. Pioneering experiments utilizing site-specific double strand break (DSB)-mediated genome engineering tools, including Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs) and Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs), have paved the way to genome engineering in previously recalcitrant systems such as hPSCs. However, these methods are technically cumbersome and require significant expertise, which limited adoption. A major recent advance involving the Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR) endonuclease has dramatically simplified the effort required for genome engineering and will likely be adopted widely as the most rapid and flexible system for genome editing in hPSCs. Herein, we describe commonly practiced methods for CRISPR endonuclease genomic editing of hPSCs to cell lines containing genomes altered by Insertion/Deletion (INDEL) mutagenesis or insertion of recombinant genomic DNA. PMID:26724721

  13. Prognostic impact of array-based genomic profiles in esophageal squamous cell cancer.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Ana; Isinger, Anna; Karlsson, Anna; Johansson, Jan; Jönsson, Göran; Bendahl, Pär-Ola; Falkenback, Dan; Halvarsson, Britta; Nilbert, Mef

    2008-04-11

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is a genetically complex tumor type and a major cause of cancer related mortality. Although distinct genetic alterations have been linked to ESCC development and prognosis, the genetic alterations have not gained clinical applicability. We applied array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) to obtain a whole genome copy number profile relevant for identifying deranged pathways and clinically applicable markers. A 32 k aCGH platform was used for high resolution mapping of copy number changes in 30 stage I-IV ESCC. Potential interdependent alterations and deranged pathways were identified and copy number changes were correlated to stage, differentiation and survival. Copy number alterations affected median 19% of the genome and included recurrent gains of chromosome regions 5p, 7p, 7q, 8q, 10q, 11q, 12p, 14q, 16p, 17p, 19p, 19q, and 20q and losses of 3p, 5q, 8p, 9p and 11q. High-level amplifications were observed in 30 regions and recurrently involved 7p11 (EGFR), 11q13 (MYEOV, CCND1, FGF4, FGF3, PPFIA, FAD, TMEM16A, CTTS and SHANK2) and 11q22 (PDFG). Gain of 7p22.3 predicted nodal metastases and gains of 1p36.32 and 19p13.3 independently predicted poor survival in multivariate analysis. aCGH profiling verified genetic complexity in ESCC and herein identified imbalances of multiple central tumorigenic pathways. Distinct gains correlate with clinicopathological variables and independently predict survival, suggesting clinical applicability of genomic profiling in ESCC.

  14. Prognostic Impact of Array-based Genomic Profiles in Esophageal Squamous Cell Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, Ana; Isinger, Anna; Karlsson, Anna; Johansson, Jan; Jönsson, Göran; Bendahl, Pär-Ola; Falkenback, Dan; Halvarsson, Britta; Nilbert, Mef

    2008-01-01

    Background Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is a genetically complex tumor type and a major cause of cancer related mortality. Although distinct genetic alterations have been linked to ESCC development and prognosis, the genetic alterations have not gained clinical applicability. We applied array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) to obtain a whole genome copy number profile relevant for identifying deranged pathways and clinically applicable markers. Methods A 32 k aCGH platform was used for high resolution mapping of copy number changes in 30 stage I-IV ESCC. Potential interdependent alterations and deranged pathways were identified and copy number changes were correlated to stage, differentiation and survival. Results Copy number alterations affected median 19% of the genome and included recurrent gains of chromosome regions 5p, 7p, 7q, 8q, 10q, 11q, 12p, 14q, 16p, 17p, 19p, 19q, and 20q and losses of 3p, 5q, 8p, 9p and 11q. High-level amplifications were observed in 30 regions and recurrently involved 7p11 (EGFR), 11q13 (MYEOV, CCND1, FGF4, FGF3, PPFIA, FAD, TMEM16A, CTTS and SHANK2) and 11q22 (PDFG). Gain of 7p22.3 predicted nodal metastases and gains of 1p36.32 and 19p13.3 independently predicted poor survival in multivariate analysis. Conclusion aCGH profiling verified genetic complexity in ESCC and herein identified imbalances of multiple central tumorigenic pathways. Distinct gains correlate with clinicopathological variables and independently predict survival, suggesting clinical applicability of genomic profiling in ESCC. PMID:18405350

  15. Comparative Analysis of Human B Cell Epitopes Based on BCG Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haican; Zhao, Xiuqin; Wan, Kanglin

    2016-01-01

    Background. Tuberculosis is a huge global health problem. BCG is the only vaccine used for about 100 years against TB, but the reasons for protection variability in populations remain unclear. To improve BCG efficacy and develop a strategy for new vaccines, the underlying genetic differences among BCG subtypes should be understood urgently. Methods and Findings. Human B cell epitope data were collected from the Immune Epitope Database. Epitope sequences were mapped with those of 15 genomes, including 13 BCGs, M. bovis AF2122/97, and M. tuberculosis H37Rv, to identify epitopes distribution. Among 398 experimentally verified B cell epitopes, 321 (80.7%) were conserved, while the remaining 77 (19.3%) were lost to varying degrees in BCGs. The variable protective efficacy of BCGs may result from the degree of B cell epitopes deficiency. Conclusions. Here we firstly analyzed the genetic characteristics of BCGs based on B cell epitopes and found that B cell epitopes distribution may contribute to vaccine efficacy. Restoration of important antigens or effective B cell epitopes in BCG could be a useful strategy for vaccine development. PMID:27382565

  16. Chromosomal Instability Estimation Based on Next Generation Sequencing and Single Cell Genome Wide Copy Number Variation Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dago, Angel E.; Leitz, Laura J.; Wang, Yipeng; Lee, Jerry; Werner, Shannon L.; Gendreau, Steven; Patel, Premal; Jia, Shidong; Zhang, Liangxuan; Tucker, Eric K.; Malchiodi, Michael; Graf, Ryon P.; Dittamore, Ryan; Marrinucci, Dena; Landers, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Genomic instability is a hallmark of cancer often associated with poor patient outcome and resistance to targeted therapy. Assessment of genomic instability in bulk tumor or biopsy can be complicated due to sample availability, surrounding tissue contamination, or tumor heterogeneity. The Epic Sciences circulating tumor cell (CTC) platform utilizes a non-enrichment based approach for the detection and characterization of rare tumor cells in clinical blood samples. Genomic profiling of individual CTCs could provide a portrait of cancer heterogeneity, identify clonal and sub-clonal drivers, and monitor disease progression. To that end, we developed a single cell Copy Number Variation (CNV) Assay to evaluate genomic instability and CNVs in patient CTCs. For proof of concept, prostate cancer cell lines, LNCaP, PC3 and VCaP, were spiked into healthy donor blood to create mock patient-like samples for downstream single cell genomic analysis. In addition, samples from seven metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients were included to evaluate clinical feasibility. CTCs were enumerated and characterized using the Epic Sciences CTC Platform. Identified single CTCs were recovered, whole genome amplified, and sequenced using an Illumina NextSeq 500. CTCs were then analyzed for genome-wide copy number variations, followed by genomic instability analyses. Large-scale state transitions (LSTs) were measured as surrogates of genomic instability. Genomic instability scores were determined reproducibly for LNCaP, PC3, and VCaP, and were higher than white blood cell (WBC) controls from healthy donors. A wide range of LST scores were observed within and among the seven mCRPC patient samples. On the gene level, loss of the PTEN tumor suppressor was observed in PC3 and 5/7 (71%) patients. Amplification of the androgen receptor (AR) gene was observed in VCaP cells and 5/7 (71%) mCRPC patients. Using an in silico down-sampling approach, we determined that DNA copy

  17. Genomics-based identification of self-ligands with T cell receptor-specific biological activity.

    PubMed

    Santori, Fabio R; Brown, Stuart M; Vukmanović, Stanislav

    2002-12-01

    Self-peptide/major histocompatibility complex (MHC) complexes profoundly influence the biology of T lymphocytes. They promote the selection of the T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire in the thymus, maintain the homeostasis of peripheral T cells prior to encounter with antigen, and modify the responsiveness of T cells to foreign antigens. In addition, they can serve as antigens for autoaggressive T cells that induce autoimmune diseases. The complete sequencing of the genomes of human, mouse, and many pathogenic organisms now provides us with a comprehensive list of all possible proteins that may be the source of foreign antigenic and self-peptides. A computational approach using profile-based similarity searches on potential self-MHC-binding peptides can be used to efficiently predict self-peptides with biological activities. The common feature of the identified peptides is similarity to antigen. Thus, self-peptides may form 'hazy' images of the universe of antigens that are used as templates to create and maintain the TCR repertoire.

  18. Geosmin induces genomic instability in the mammalian cell microplate-based comet assay.

    PubMed

    Silva, Aline Flor; Lehmann, Mauricio; Dihl, Rafael Rodrigues

    2015-11-01

    Geosmin (GEO) (trans-1,10-dimethyl-trans-9-decalol) is a metabolite that renders earthy and musty taste and odor to water. Data of GEO genotoxicity on mammalian cells are scarce in the literature. Thus, the present study assessed the genotoxicity of GEO on Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells in the microplate-based comet assay. The percent of tail DNA (tail intensity (TI)), tail moment (TM), and tail length (TL) were used as parameters for DNA damage assessment. The results demonstrated that concentrations of GEO of 30 and 60 μg/mL were genotoxic to CHO cells after 4- and 24-h exposure periods, in all parameters evaluated, such as TI, TM, and TL. Additionally, GEO 15 μg/mL was genotoxic in the three parameters only in the 24-h exposure time. The same was observed for GEO 7.5 μg/mL, which induced significant DNA damage observed as TI in the 24-h treatment. The results present evidence that exposure to GEO may be associated with genomic instability in mammalian cells.

  19. One Bacterial Cell, One Complete Genome

    SciTech Connect

    Woyke, Tanja; Tighe, Damon; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Clum, Alicia; Copeland, Alex; Schackwitz, Wendy; Lapidus, Alla; Wu, Dongying; McCutcheon, John P.; McDonald, Bradon R.; Moran, Nancy A.; Bristow, James; Cheng, Jan-Fang

    2010-04-26

    While the bulk of the finished microbial genomes sequenced to date are derived from cultured bacterial and archaeal representatives, the vast majority of microorganisms elude current culturing attempts, severely limiting the ability to recover complete or even partial genomes from these environmental species. Single cell genomics is a novel culture-independent approach, which enables access to the genetic material of an individual cell. No single cell genome has to our knowledge been closed and finished to date. Here we report the completed genome from an uncultured single cell of Candidatus Sulcia muelleri DMIN. Digital PCR on single symbiont cells isolated from the bacteriome of the green sharpshooter Draeculacephala minerva bacteriome allowed us to assess that this bacteria is polyploid with genome copies ranging from approximately 200?900 per cell, making it a most suitable target for single cell finishing efforts. For single cell shotgun sequencing, an individual Sulcia cell was isolated and whole genome amplified by multiple displacement amplification (MDA). Sanger-based finishing methods allowed us to close the genome. To verify the correctness of our single cell genome and exclude MDA-derived artifacts, we independently shotgun sequenced and assembled the Sulcia genome from pooled bacteriomes using a metagenomic approach, yielding a nearly identical genome. Four variations we detected appear to be genuine biological differences between the two samples. Comparison of the single cell genome with bacteriome metagenomic sequence data detected two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), indicating extremely low genetic diversity within a Sulcia population. This study demonstrates the power of single cell genomics to generate a complete, high quality, non-composite reference genome within an environmental sample, which can be used for population genetic analyzes.

  20. Uniform and accurate single-cell sequencing based on emulsion whole-genome amplification

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yusi; Li, Chunmei; Lu, Sijia; Zhou, Wenxiong; Tang, Fuchou; Xie, X. Sunney; Huang, Yanyi

    2015-01-01

    Whole-genome amplification (WGA) for next-generation sequencing has seen wide applications in biology and medicine when characterization of the genome of a single cell is required. High uniformity and fidelity of WGA is needed to accurately determine genomic variations, such as copy number variations (CNVs) and single-nucleotide variations (SNVs). Prevailing WGA methods have been limited by fluctuation of the amplification yield along the genome, as well as false-positive and -negative errors for SNV identification. Here, we report emulsion WGA (eWGA) to overcome these problems. We divide single-cell genomic DNA into a large number (105) of picoliter aqueous droplets in oil. Containing only a few DNA fragments, each droplet is led to reach saturation of DNA amplification before demulsification such that the differences in amplification gain among the fragments are minimized. We demonstrate the proof-of-principle of eWGA with multiple displacement amplification (MDA), a popular WGA method. This easy-to-operate approach enables simultaneous detection of CNVs and SNVs in an individual human cell, exhibiting significantly improved amplification evenness and accuracy. PMID:26340991

  1. Uniform and accurate single-cell sequencing based on emulsion whole-genome amplification.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yusi; Li, Chunmei; Lu, Sijia; Zhou, Wenxiong; Tang, Fuchou; Xie, X Sunney; Huang, Yanyi

    2015-09-22

    Whole-genome amplification (WGA) for next-generation sequencing has seen wide applications in biology and medicine when characterization of the genome of a single cell is required. High uniformity and fidelity of WGA is needed to accurately determine genomic variations, such as copy number variations (CNVs) and single-nucleotide variations (SNVs). Prevailing WGA methods have been limited by fluctuation of the amplification yield along the genome, as well as false-positive and -negative errors for SNV identification. Here, we report emulsion WGA (eWGA) to overcome these problems. We divide single-cell genomic DNA into a large number (10(5)) of picoliter aqueous droplets in oil. Containing only a few DNA fragments, each droplet is led to reach saturation of DNA amplification before demulsification such that the differences in amplification gain among the fragments are minimized. We demonstrate the proof-of-principle of eWGA with multiple displacement amplification (MDA), a popular WGA method. This easy-to-operate approach enables simultaneous detection of CNVs and SNVs in an individual human cell, exhibiting significantly improved amplification evenness and accuracy.

  2. Detection of genomic imbalances in microdissected Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells of classical Hodgkin's lymphoma by array-based comparative genomic hybridization.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Sylvia; Martin-Subero, José I; Gesk, Stefan; Hüsken, Julia; Giefing, Maciej; Nagel, Inga; Riemke, Jennifer; Chott, Andreas; Klapper, Wolfram; Parrens, Marie; Merlio, Jean-Philippe; Küppers, Ralf; Bräuninger, Andreas; Siebert, Reiner; Hansmann, Martin-Leo

    2008-09-01

    Cytogenetic analysis of classical Hodgkin's lymphoma is limited by the low content of the neoplastic Hodgkin-Reed-Sternberg cells in the affected tissues. However, available cytogenetic data point to an extreme karyotype complexity. To obtain insights into chromosomal imbalances in classical Hodgkin's lymphoma, we applied array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array comparative genomic hybridization) using DNA from microdissected Hodgkin-Reed-Sternberg cells. To avoid biases introduced by DNA amplification for array comparative genomic hybridization, cHL cases rich in Hodgkin-Reed-Sternberg cells were selected. DNA obtained from approximately 100,000 microdissected Hodgkin-Reed-Sternberg cells of each of ten classical Hodgkin's lymphoma cases was hybridized onto commercial 105 K oligonucleotide comparative genomic hybridization microarrays. Selected imbalances were confirmed by interphase cytogenetics and quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis and further studied in an independent series of classical Hodgkin's lymphoma. Gains identified in at least five cHL affected 2p12-16, 5q15-23, 6p22, 8q13, 8q24, 9p21-24, 9q34, 12q13-14, 17q12, 19p13, 19q13 and 20q11 whereas losses recurrent in at least five cases involved Xp21, 6q23-24 and 13q22. Copy number changes of selected genes and a small deletion (156 kb) of the CDKN2B (p15) gene were confirmed by interphase cytogenetics and polymerase chain reaction analysis, respectively. Several gained regions included genes constitutively expressed in cHL. Among these, gains of STAT6 (12q13), NOTCH1 (9q34) and JUNB (19p13) were present in additional cHL with the usual low Hodgkin-Reed-Sternberg cell content. The present study demonstrates that array comparative genomic hybridization of microdissected Hodgkin-Reed-Sternberg cells is suitable for identifying and characterizing chromosomal imbalances. Regions affected by genomic changes in Hodgkin-Reed-Sternberg cells recurrently include genes constitutively

  3. Accelerating Genome Editing in CHO Cells Using CRISPR Cas9 and CRISPy, a Web-Based Target Finding Tool

    PubMed Central

    Ronda, Carlotta; Pedersen, Lasse Ebdrup; Hansen, Henning Gram; Kallehauge, Thomas Beuchert; Betenbaugh, Michael J; Nielsen, Alex Toftgaard; Kildegaard, Helene Faustrup

    2014-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are widely used in the biopharmaceutical industry as a host for the production of complex pharmaceutical proteins. Thus genome engineering of CHO cells for improved product quality and yield is of great interest. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the efficacy of the CRISPR Cas9 technology in CHO cells by generating site-specific gene disruptions in COSMC and FUT8, both of which encode proteins involved in glycosylation. The tested single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) created an indel frequency up to 47.3% in COSMC, while an indel frequency up to 99.7% in FUT8 was achieved by applying lectin selection. All eight sgRNAs examined in this study resulted in relatively high indel frequencies, demonstrating that the Cas9 system is a robust and efficient genome-editing methodology in CHO cells. Deep sequencing revealed that 85% of the indels created by Cas9 resulted in frameshift mutations at the target sites, with a strong preference for single base indels. Finally, we have developed a user-friendly bioinformatics tool, named “CRISPy” for rapid identification of sgRNA target sequences in the CHO-K1 genome. The CRISPy tool identified 1,970,449 CRISPR targets divided into 27,553 genes and lists the number of off-target sites in the genome. In conclusion, the proven functionality of Cas9 to edit CHO genomes combined with our CRISPy database have the potential to accelerate genome editing and synthetic biology efforts in CHO cells. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2014; 111: 1604–1616. © 2014 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24827782

  4. Accelerating genome editing in CHO cells using CRISPR Cas9 and CRISPy, a web-based target finding tool.

    PubMed

    Ronda, Carlotta; Pedersen, Lasse Ebdrup; Hansen, Henning Gram; Kallehauge, Thomas Beuchert; Betenbaugh, Michael J; Nielsen, Alex Toftgaard; Kildegaard, Helene Faustrup

    2014-08-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are widely used in the biopharmaceutical industry as a host for the production of complex pharmaceutical proteins. Thus genome engineering of CHO cells for improved product quality and yield is of great interest. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the efficacy of the CRISPR Cas9 technology in CHO cells by generating site-specific gene disruptions in COSMC and FUT8, both of which encode proteins involved in glycosylation. The tested single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) created an indel frequency up to 47.3% in COSMC, while an indel frequency up to 99.7% in FUT8 was achieved by applying lectin selection. All eight sgRNAs examined in this study resulted in relatively high indel frequencies, demonstrating that the Cas9 system is a robust and efficient genome-editing methodology in CHO cells. Deep sequencing revealed that 85% of the indels created by Cas9 resulted in frameshift mutations at the target sites, with a strong preference for single base indels. Finally, we have developed a user-friendly bioinformatics tool, named "CRISPy" for rapid identification of sgRNA target sequences in the CHO-K1 genome. The CRISPy tool identified 1,970,449 CRISPR targets divided into 27,553 genes and lists the number of off-target sites in the genome. In conclusion, the proven functionality of Cas9 to edit CHO genomes combined with our CRISPy database have the potential to accelerate genome editing and synthetic biology efforts in CHO cells.

  5. Cancer Cell Line Panels Empower Genomics-Based Discovery of Precision Cancer Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Seok; Sung, Yeo-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Since the first human cancer cell line, HeLa, was established in the early 1950s, there has been a steady increase in the number and tumor type of available cancer cell line models. Cancer cell lines have made significant contributions to the development of various chemotherapeutic agents. Recent advances in multi-omics technologies have facilitated detailed characterizations of the genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, and epigenomic profiles of these cancer cell lines. An increasing number of studies employ the power of a cancer cell line panel to provide predictive biomarkers for targeted and cytotoxic agents, including those that are already used in clinical practice. Different types of statistical and machine learning algorithms have been developed to analyze the large-scale data sets that have been produced. However, much work remains to address the discrepancies in drug assay results from different platforms and the frequent failures to translate discoveries from cell line models to the clinic. Nevertheless, continuous expansion of cancer cell line panels should provide unprecedented opportunities to identify new candidate targeted therapies, particularly for the so-called "dark matter" group of cancers, for which pharmacologically tractable driver mutations have not been identified. PMID:26256959

  6. Cancer Cell Line Panels Empower Genomics-Based Discovery of Precision Cancer Medicine.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Seok; Sung, Yeo-Jin; Paik, Soonmyung

    2015-09-01

    Since the first human cancer cell line, HeLa, was established in the early 1950s, there has been a steady increase in the number and tumor type of available cancer cell line models. Cancer cell lines have made significant contributions to the development of various chemotherapeutic agents. Recent advances in multi-omics technologies have facilitated detailed characterizations of the genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, and epigenomic profiles of these cancer cell lines. An increasing number of studies employ the power of a cancer cell line panel to provide predictive biomarkers for targeted and cytotoxic agents, including those that are already used in clinical practice. Different types of statistical and machine learning algorithms have been developed to analyze the large-scale data sets that have been produced. However, much work remains to address the discrepancies in drug assay results from different platforms and the frequent failures to translate discoveries from cell line models to the clinic. Nevertheless, continuous expansion of cancer cell line panels should provide unprecedented opportunities to identify new candidate targeted therapies, particularly for the so-called "dark matter" group of cancers, for which pharmacologically tractable driver mutations have not been identified.

  7. Ultrahigh-throughput approach for analyzing single-cell genomic damage with an agarose-based microfluidic comet array.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiwei; Feng, Xiaojun; Du, Wei; Li, Ying; Liu, Bi-Feng

    2013-04-16

    Genomic DNA damage was generally identified with a "comet assay" but limited by low throughput and poor reproducibility. Here we demonstrated an ultrahigh-throughput approach with a microfluidic chip to simultaneously interrogate DNA damage conditions of up to 10,000 individual cells (approximately 100-fold in throughput over the conventional method) with better reproducibility. For experiment, agarose was chosen as the chip fabrication material, which would further act as an electrophoretic sieving matrix for DNA fragments separation. Cancer cells (HeLa or HepG2) were lined up in parallel microchannels by capillary effect to form a dense array of single cells. After treatment with different doses of hydrogen peroxide, individual cells were then lysed for subsequent single-cell gel electrophoresis in the direction vertical to microchannel and fluorescence detection. Through morphological analysis and fluorescent measurement of comet-shaped DNA, the damage conditions of individual cells could be quantified. DNA repair capacity was further evaluated to validate the reliability of this method. It indicated that the agarose-based microfluidic comet array electrophoresis was simple, highly reproducible, and of high throughput, providing a new method for highly efficient single-cell genomic analysis.

  8. Virus Integration and Genome Influence in Approaches to Stem Cell Based Therapy for Andro-Urology

    PubMed Central

    Li, Longkun; Zhang, Deying; Li, Peng; Damaser, Margot; Zhang, Yuanyuan

    2014-01-01

    Despite the potential of stem cells in cell-based therapy, major limitations such as cell retention, ingrowth, and trans-differentiation after implantation remain. One technique for genetic modification of cells for tissue repair is the introduction of specific genes using molecular biology techniques, such as virus integration, to provide a gene that adds new functions to enhance cellular function, and to secrete trophic factors for recruiting resident cells to participate in tissue repair. Stem cells can be labelled to track cell survival, migration, and lineage. Increasing evidence demonstrates that cell therapy and gene therapy in combination remarkably improve myogenic differentiation of implanted mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), revascularization, and innervation in genitourinary tissues, especially to treat urinary incontinence, erectile dysfunction, lower urinary tract reconstruction, and renal failure. This review discusses the benefits, safety, side effects, and alternatives for using genetically modified MSCs in tissue regeneration in andro-urology. PMID:25453258

  9. Virus integration and genome influence in approaches to stem cell based therapy for andro-urology.

    PubMed

    Li, Longkun; Zhang, Deying; Li, Peng; Damaser, Margot; Zhang, Yuanyuan

    2015-03-01

    Despite the potential of stem cells in cell-based therapy, major limitations such as cell retention, ingrowth, and trans-differentiation after implantation remain. One technique for genetic modification of cells for tissue repair is the introduction of specific genes using molecular biology techniques, such as virus integration, to provide a gene that adds new functions to enhance cellular function, and to secrete trophic factors for recruiting resident cells to participate in tissue repair. Stem cells can be labeled to track cell survival, migration, and lineage. Increasing evidence demonstrates that cell therapy and gene therapy in combination remarkably improve differentiation of implanted mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), revascularization, and innervation in genitourinary tissues, especially to treat urinary incontinence, erectile dysfunction, lower urinary tract reconstruction, and renal failure. This review discusses the benefits, safety, side effects, and alternatives for using genetically modified MSCs in tissue regeneration in andro-urology.

  10. Genome-Wide Mutation Avalanches Induced in Diploid Yeast Cells by a Base Analog or an APOBEC Deaminase

    PubMed Central

    Lada, Artem G.; Stepchenkova, Elena I.; Waisertreiger, Irina S. R.; Noskov, Vladimir N.; Dhar, Alok; Eudy, James D.; Boissy, Robert J.; Hirano, Masayuki; Rogozin, Igor B.; Pavlov, Youri I.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic information should be accurately transmitted from cell to cell; conversely, the adaptation in evolution and disease is fueled by mutations. In the case of cancer development, multiple genetic changes happen in somatic diploid cells. Most classic studies of the molecular mechanisms of mutagenesis have been performed in haploids. We demonstrate that the parameters of the mutation process are different in diploid cell populations. The genomes of drug-resistant mutants induced in yeast diploids by base analog 6-hydroxylaminopurine (HAP) or AID/APOBEC cytosine deaminase PmCDA1 from lamprey carried a stunning load of thousands of unselected mutations. Haploid mutants contained almost an order of magnitude fewer mutations. To explain this, we propose that the distribution of induced mutation rates in the cell population is uneven. The mutants in diploids with coincidental mutations in the two copies of the reporter gene arise from a fraction of cells that are transiently hypersensitive to the mutagenic action of a given mutagen. The progeny of such cells were never recovered in haploids due to the lethality caused by the inactivation of single-copy essential genes in cells with too many induced mutations. In diploid cells, the progeny of hypersensitive cells survived, but their genomes were saturated by heterozygous mutations. The reason for the hypermutability of cells could be transient faults of the mutation prevention pathways, like sanitization of nucleotide pools for HAP or an elevated expression of the PmCDA1 gene or the temporary inability of the destruction of the deaminase. The hypothesis on spikes of mutability may explain the sudden acquisition of multiple mutational changes during evolution and carcinogenesis. PMID:24039593

  11. A new avian leukosis virus-based packaging cell line that uses two separate transcomplementing helper genomes.

    PubMed

    Cosset, F L; Legras, C; Chebloune, Y; Savatier, P; Thoraval, P; Thomas, J L; Samarut, J; Nigon, V M; Verdier, G

    1990-03-01

    An avian leukosis virus-based packaging cell line was constructed from the genome of the Rous-associated virus type 1. The gag, pol, and env genes were separated on two different plasmids; the packaging signal and the 3' long terminal repeat were removed. On a plasmid expressing the gag and pol genes, the env gene was replaced by the hygromycin resistance gene. The phleomycin resistance gene was inserted in the place of the gag-pol genes on a plasmid expressing the env gene. The plasmid containing the gag, pol, and Hygror genes was transfected into QT6 cells. Clones that produced high levels of p27gag were transfected with the plasmid containing the Phleor and env genes. Clones that produced high levels of env protein (as measured by an interference assay) were tested for their ability to package NeoR-expressing replication-defective vectors (TXN3'). One of the clones (Isolde) was able to transfer the Neo+ phenotype to recipient cells at a titer of 10(5) resistance focus-forming units per ml. Titers of supernatants of cells infected with Rous-associated virus type 1 prior to transfection by Neor vectors were similar. Tests for recombination events that might result in intact helper virus showed no evidence for the generation of replication-competent virus. The use of selectable genes inserted next to the viral genes to generate high-producer packaging cell lines is discussed.

  12. Genome-wide base-resolution mapping of DNA methylation in single cells using single-cell bisulfite sequencing (scBS-seq).

    PubMed

    Clark, Stephen J; Smallwood, Sébastien A; Lee, Heather J; Krueger, Felix; Reik, Wolf; Kelsey, Gavin

    2017-03-01

    DNA methylation (DNAme) is an important epigenetic mark in diverse species. Our current understanding of DNAme is based on measurements from bulk cell samples, which obscures intercellular differences and prevents analyses of rare cell types. Thus, the ability to measure DNAme in single cells has the potential to make important contributions to the understanding of several key biological processes, such as embryonic development, disease progression and aging. We have recently reported a method for generating genome-wide DNAme maps from single cells, using single-cell bisulfite sequencing (scBS-seq), allowing the quantitative measurement of DNAme at up to 50% of CpG dinucleotides throughout the mouse genome. Here we present a detailed protocol for scBS-seq that includes our most recent developments to optimize recovery of CpGs, mapping efficiency and success rate; reduce hands-on time; and increase sample throughput with the option of using an automated liquid handler. We provide step-by-step instructions for each stage of the method, comprising cell lysis and bisulfite (BS) conversion, preamplification and adaptor tagging, library amplification, sequencing and, lastly, alignment and methylation calling. An individual with relevant molecular biology expertise can complete library preparation within 3 d. Subsequent computational steps require 1-3 d for someone with bioinformatics expertise.

  13. Genomic expression differences between cutaneous cells from red hair color individuals and black hair color individuals based on bioinformatic analysis.

    PubMed

    Puig-Butille, Joan Anton; Gimenez-Xavier, Pol; Visconti, Alessia; Nsengimana, Jérémie; Garcia-García, Francisco; Tell-Marti, Gemma; Escamez, Maria José; Newton-Bishop, Julia; Bataille, Veronique; Del Río, Marcela; Dopazo, Joaquín; Falchi, Mario; Puig, Susana

    2016-12-24

    The MC1R gene plays a crucial role in pigmentation synthesis. Loss-of-function MC1R variants, which impair protein function, are associated with red hair color (RHC) phenotype and increased skin cancer risk. Cultured cutaneous cells bearing loss-of-function MC1R variants show a distinct gene expression profile compared to wild-type MC1R cultured cutaneous cells. We analysed the gene signature associated with RHC co-cultured melanocytes and keratinocytes by Protein-Protein interaction (PPI) network analysis to identify genes related with non-functional MC1R variants. From two detected networks, we selected 23 nodes as hub genes based on topological parameters. Differential expression of hub genes was then evaluated in healthy skin biopsies from RHC and black hair color (BHC) individuals. We also compared gene expression in melanoma tumors from individuals with RHC versus BHC. Gene expression in normal skin from RHC cutaneous cells showed dysregulation in 8 out of 23 hub genes (CLN3, ATG10, WIPI2, SNX2, GABARAPL2, YWHA, PCNA and GBAS). Hub genes did not differ between melanoma tumors in RHC versus BHC individuals. The study suggests that healthy skin cells from RHC individuals present a constitutive genomic deregulation associated with the red hair phenotype and identify novel genes involved in melanocyte biology.

  14. A Digital PCR-Based Method for Efficient and Highly Specific Screening of Genome Edited Cells

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Jennifer R.; Postovit, Lynne-Marie

    2016-01-01

    The rapid adoption of gene editing tools such as CRISPRs and TALENs for research and eventually therapeutics necessitates assays that can rapidly detect and quantitate the desired alterations. Currently, the most commonly used assay employs “mismatch nucleases” T7E1 or “Surveyor” that recognize and cleave heteroduplexed DNA amplicons containing mismatched base-pairs. However, this assay is prone to false positives due to cancer-associated mutations and/or SNPs and requires large amounts of starting material. Here we describe a powerful alternative wherein droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) can be used to decipher homozygous from heterozygous mutations with superior levels of both precision and sensitivity. We use this assay to detect knockout inducing alterations to stem cell associated proteins, NODAL and SFRP1, generated using either TALENs or an “all-in-one” CRISPR/Cas plasmid that we have modified for one-step cloning and blue/white screening of transformants. Moreover, we highlight how ddPCR can be used to assess the efficiency of varying TALEN-based strategies. Collectively, this work highlights how ddPCR-based screening can be paired with CRISPR and TALEN technologies to enable sensitive, specific, and streamlined approaches to gene editing and validation. PMID:27089539

  15. TruePrime is a novel method for whole-genome amplification from single cells based on TthPrimPol

    PubMed Central

    Picher, Ángel J.; Budeus, Bettina; Wafzig, Oliver; Krüger, Carola; García-Gómez, Sara; Martínez-Jiménez, María I.; Díaz-Talavera, Alberto; Weber, Daniela; Blanco, Luis; Schneider, Armin

    2016-01-01

    Sequencing of a single-cell genome requires DNA amplification, a process prone to introducing bias and errors into the amplified genome. Here we introduce a novel multiple displacement amplification (MDA) method based on the unique DNA primase features of Thermus thermophilus (Tth) PrimPol. TthPrimPol displays a potent primase activity preferring dNTPs as substrates unlike conventional primases. A combination of TthPrimPol's unique ability to synthesize DNA primers with the highly processive Phi29 DNA polymerase (Φ29DNApol) enables near-complete whole genome amplification from single cells. This novel method demonstrates superior breadth and evenness of genome coverage, high reproducibility, excellent single-nucleotide variant (SNV) detection rates with low allelic dropout (ADO) and low chimera formation as exemplified by sequencing HEK293 cells. Moreover, copy number variant (CNV) calling yields superior results compared with random primer-based MDA methods. The advantages of this method, which we named TruePrime, promise to facilitate and improve single-cell genomic analysis. PMID:27897270

  16. TruePrime is a novel method for whole-genome amplification from single cells based on TthPrimPol.

    PubMed

    Picher, Ángel J; Budeus, Bettina; Wafzig, Oliver; Krüger, Carola; García-Gómez, Sara; Martínez-Jiménez, María I; Díaz-Talavera, Alberto; Weber, Daniela; Blanco, Luis; Schneider, Armin

    2016-11-29

    Sequencing of a single-cell genome requires DNA amplification, a process prone to introducing bias and errors into the amplified genome. Here we introduce a novel multiple displacement amplification (MDA) method based on the unique DNA primase features of Thermus thermophilus (Tth) PrimPol. TthPrimPol displays a potent primase activity preferring dNTPs as substrates unlike conventional primases. A combination of TthPrimPol's unique ability to synthesize DNA primers with the highly processive Phi29 DNA polymerase (Φ29DNApol) enables near-complete whole genome amplification from single cells. This novel method demonstrates superior breadth and evenness of genome coverage, high reproducibility, excellent single-nucleotide variant (SNV) detection rates with low allelic dropout (ADO) and low chimera formation as exemplified by sequencing HEK293 cells. Moreover, copy number variant (CNV) calling yields superior results compared with random primer-based MDA methods. The advantages of this method, which we named TruePrime, promise to facilitate and improve single-cell genomic analysis.

  17. Efficient Synergistic Single-Cell Genome Assembly.

    PubMed

    Movahedi, Narjes S; Embree, Mallory; Nagarajan, Harish; Zengler, Karsten; Chitsaz, Hamidreza

    2016-01-01

    As the vast majority of all microbes are unculturable, single-cell sequencing has become a significant method to gain insight into microbial physiology. Single-cell sequencing methods, currently powered by multiple displacement genome amplification (MDA), have passed important milestones such as finishing and closing the genome of a prokaryote. However, the quality and reliability of genome assemblies from single cells are still unsatisfactory due to uneven coverage depth and the absence of scattered chunks of the genome in the final collection of reads caused by MDA bias. In this work, our new algorithm Hybrid De novo Assembler (HyDA) demonstrates the power of coassembly of multiple single-cell genomic data sets through significant improvement of the assembly quality in terms of predicted functional elements and length statistics. Coassemblies contain significantly more base pairs and protein coding genes, cover more subsystems, and consist of longer contigs compared to individual assemblies by the same algorithm as well as state-of-the-art single-cell assemblers SPAdes and IDBA-UD. Hybrid De novo Assembler (HyDA) is also able to avoid chimeric assemblies by detecting and separating shared and exclusive pieces of sequence for input data sets. By replacing one deep single-cell sequencing experiment with a few single-cell sequencing experiments of lower depth, the coassembly method can hedge against the risk of failure and loss of the sample, without significantly increasing sequencing cost. Application of the single-cell coassembler HyDA to the study of three uncultured members of an alkane-degrading methanogenic community validated the usefulness of the coassembly concept. HyDA is open source and publicly available at http://chitsazlab.org/software.html, and the raw reads are available at http://chitsazlab.org/research.html.

  18. Pathway-based analysis using genome-wide association data from a Korean non-small cell lung cancer study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Donghoon; Lee, Geon Kook; Yoon, Kyong-Ah; Lee, Jin Soo

    2013-01-01

    Pathway-based analysis, used in conjunction with genome-wide association study (GWAS) techniques, is a powerful tool to detect subtle but systematic patterns in genome that can help elucidate complex diseases, like cancers. Here, we stepped back from genetic polymorphisms at a single locus and examined how multiple association signals can be orchestrated to find pathways related to lung cancer susceptibility. We used single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array data from 869 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cases from a previous GWAS at the National Cancer Center and 1,533 controls from the Korean Association Resource project for the pathway-based analysis. After mapping single-nucleotide polymorphisms to genes, considering their coding region and regulatory elements (±20 kbp), multivariate logistic regression of additive and dominant genetic models were fitted against disease status, with adjustments for age, gender, and smoking status. Pathway statistics were evaluated using Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) and Adaptive Rank Truncated Product (ARTP) methods. Among 880 pathways, 11 showed relatively significant statistics compared to our positive controls (PGSEA≤0.025, false discovery rate≤0.25). Candidate pathways were validated using the ARTP method and similarities between pathways were computed against each other. The top-ranked pathways were ABC Transporters (PGSEA<0.001, PARTP = 0.001), VEGF Signaling Pathway (PGSEA<0.001, PARTP = 0.008), G1/S Check Point (PGSEA = 0.004, PARTP = 0.013), and NRAGE Signals Death through JNK (PGSEA = 0.006, PARTP = 0.001). Our results demonstrate that pathway analysis can shed light on post-GWAS research and help identify potential targets for cancer susceptibility.

  19. Development of a facile droplet-based single-cell isolation platform for cultivation and genomic analysis in microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Tingting; Zhou, Qian; Zhang, Peng; Gong, Yanhai; Gou, Honglei; Xu, Jian; Ma, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Wider application of single-cell analysis has been limited by the lack of an easy-to-use and low-cost strategy for single-cell isolation that can be directly coupled to single-cell sequencing and single-cell cultivation, especially for small-size microbes. Herein, a facile droplet microfluidic platform was developed to dispense individual microbial cells into conventional standard containers for downstream analysis. Functional parts for cell encapsulation, droplet inspection and sorting, as well as a chip-to-tube capillary interface were integrated on one single chip with simple architecture, and control of the droplet sorting was achieved by a low-cost solenoid microvalve. Using microalgal and yeast cells as models, single-cell isolation success rate of over 90% and single-cell cultivation success rate of 80% were demonstrated. We further showed that the individual cells isolated can be used in high-quality DNA and RNA analyses at both gene-specific and whole-genome levels (i.e. real-time quantitative PCR and genome sequencing). The simplicity and reliability of the method should improve accessibility of single-cell analysis and facilitate its wider application in microbiology researches. PMID:28112223

  20. Phylogeography, Salinity Adaptations and Metabolic Potential of the Candidate Division KB1 Bacteria Based on a Partial Single Cell Genome

    PubMed Central

    Nigro, Lisa M.; Hyde, Andrew S.; MacGregor, Barbara J.; Teske, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Deep-sea hypersaline anoxic basins and other hypersaline environments contain abundant and diverse microbial life that has adapted to these extreme conditions. The bacterial Candidate Division KB1 represents one of several uncultured groups that have been consistently observed in hypersaline microbial diversity studies. Here we report the phylogeography of KB1, its phylogenetic relationships to Candidate Division OP1 Bacteria, and its potential metabolic and osmotic stress adaptations based on a partial single cell amplified genome of KB1 from Orca Basin, the largest hypersaline seafloor brine basin in the Gulf of Mexico. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis – previously developed based on 14C incorporation experiments with mixed-species enrichments from Mediterranean seafloor brines – that KB1 has adapted its proteins to elevated intracellular salinity, but at the same time KB1 apparently imports glycine betaine; this compatible solute is potentially not limited to osmoregulation but could also serve as a carbon and energy source. PMID:27597842

  1. Comparative genomic hybridization with single cells after whole genome amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Haddad, B.R.; Baldini, A.; Hughes, M.R.

    1994-09-01

    Conventional karyotype analysis is the ideal way to diagnose chromosomal imbalances. However it requires cell culture and chromosome preparation. There are instances where a very small number of cells are available for cytogenetic evaluation and chromosomes cannot be obtained. Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) is a novel molecular cytogenetic technique that provides information about genetic imbalances affecting the genome. The power of this technique lies in its ability to detect genetic imbalances using total genomic DNA. We have previously demonstrated the feasibility of whole genome amplification from single cells for subsequent analysis of multiple genetic loci by PCR. In this present work, we combine whole genome amplification with CGH to detect chromosomal imbalances from small numbers of cells. Both cytogenetically normal and abnormal cells were individually picked by micromanipulation and subjected to whole genome amplification using random oligonucleotide primers. Amplified test and control DNA were differentially labeled by incorporation of digoxigenin or biotin, mixed together and hybridized to normal male metaphase spreads. Hybridization was detected with two fluorochromes, rhodamine-anti-digoxigenin and FITC -Avidin. Ratio of intensities of the two fluorochromes along the target chromosomes was analyzed using locally developed computer imaging software. Using the combination of whole genome amplification and CGH, we were able to detect different chromosomal aneuploidies from 30, 20, and 10 cells. It can also be applied to the analysis of fetal cells sorted from maternal circulation, or to tumor cells obtained from needle biopsies or from different body fluids and effusions. Finally, its successful application to single cells will have a great impact on preimplantation diagnosis.

  2. Single cell genomics of subsurface microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanauskas, R.; Onstott, T. C.; Lau, C.; Kieft, T. L.; Woyke, T.; Rinke, C.; Sczyrba, A.; van Heerden, E.

    2012-12-01

    Recent studies have revealed unexpected abundance and diversity of microorganisms in terrestrial and marine subsurface, providing new perspectives over their biogeochemical significance, evolution, and the limits of life. The now commonly used research tools, such as metagenomics and PCR-based gene surveys enabled cultivation-unbiased analysis of genes encoded by natural microbial communities. However, these methods seldom provide direct evidence for how the discovered genes are organized inside genomes and from which organisms do they come from. Here we evaluated the feasibility of an alternative, single cell genomics approach, in the analysis of subsurface microbial community composition, metabolic potential and microevolution at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF), South Dakota, and the Witwaterstrand Basin, South Africa. We successfully recovered genomic DNA from individual microbial cells from multiple locations, including ultra-deep (down to 3,500 m) and low-biomass (down to 10^3 cells mL^-1) fracture water. The obtained single amplified genomes (SAGs) from SURF contained multiple representatives of the candidate divisions OP3, OP11, OD1 and uncharacterized archaea. By sequencing eight of these SAGs, we obtained the first genome content information for these phylum-level lineages that do not contain a single cultured representative. The Witwaterstrand samples were collected from deep fractures, biogeochemical dating of which suggests isolation from tens of thousands to tens of millions of years. Thus, these fractures may be viewed as "underground Galapagos", a natural, long-term experiment of microbial evolution within well-defined temporal and spatial boundaries. We are analyzing multiple SAGs from these environments, which will provide detailed information about adaptations to life in deep subsurface, mutation rates, selective pressures and gene flux within and across microbial populations.

  3. Genomic DNA of MCF-7 breast cancer cells not an ideal choice as positive control for PCR amplification based detection of Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus-Like Sequences.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Bhushan B; Hiremath, Shivaprakash V; Kulkarni, Suyamindra S; Hallikeri, Umesh R; Patil, Basavaraj R; Gai, Pramod B

    2013-11-01

    The identification of the etiology of breast cancer is a crucial research issue for the development of an effective preventive and treatment strategies. Researchers are exploring the possible involvement of Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV) in causing human breast cancer. Hence, it becomes very important to use a consistent positive control agent in PCR amplification based detection of MMTV-Like Sequence (MMTV-LS) in human breast cancer for accurate and reproducible results. This study was done to investigate the feasibility of using genomic DNA of MCF-7 breast cancer cells to detect MMTV-LS using PCR amplification based detection. MMTV env and SAG gene located at the 3' long terminal repeat (LTR) sequences were targeted for the PCR based detection. No amplification was observed in case of the genomic DNA of MCF-7 breast cancer cells. However, the 2.7 kb DNA fragment comprising MMTV env and SAG LTR sequences yielded the products of desired size. From these results it can be concluded that Genomic DNA of MCF-7 cell is not a suitable choice as positive control for PCR or RT-PCR based detection of MMTV-LS. It is also suggested that plasmids containing the cloned genes or sequences of MMTV be used as positive control for detection of MMTV-LS.

  4. Identifying anti-cancer drug response related genes using an integrative analysis of transcriptomic and genomic variations with cell line-based drug perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yunqin; Ma, Qin; Wei, Jia; Liu, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinical responses to anti-cancer therapies often only benefit a defined subset of patients. Predicting the best treatment strategy hinges on our ability to effectively translate genomic data into actionable information on drug responses. Results To achieve this goal, we compiled a comprehensive collection of baseline cancer genome data and drug response information derived from a large panel of cancer cell lines. This data set was applied to identify the signature genes relevant to drug sensitivity and their resistance by integrating CNVs and the gene expression of cell lines with in vitro drug responses. We presented an efficient in-silico pipeline for integrating heterogeneous cell line data sources with the simultaneous modeling of drug response values across all the drugs and cell lines. Potential signature genes correlated with drug response (sensitive or resistant) in different cancer types were identified. Using signature genes, our collaborative filtering-based drug response prediction model outperformed the 44 algorithms submitted to the DREAM competition on breast cancer cells. The functions of the identified drug response related signature genes were carefully analyzed at the pathway level and the synthetic lethality level. Furthermore, we validated these signature genes by applying them to the classification of the different subtypes of the TCGA tumor samples, and further uncovered their in vivo implications using clinical patient data. Conclusions Our work may have promise in translating genomic data into customized marker genes relevant to the response of specific drugs for a specific cancer type of individual patients. PMID:26824188

  5. Comparative genome-based identification of a cell wall-anchored protein from Lactobacillus plantarum increases adhesion of Lactococcus lactis to human epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Zuo, Fanglei; Yu, Rui; Zeng, Zhu; Ma, Huiqin; Chen, Shangwu

    2015-09-15

    Adhesion to host cells is considered important for Lactobacillus plantarum as well as other lactic acid bacteria (LAB) to persist in human gut and thus exert probiotic effects. Here, we sequenced the genome of Lt. plantarum strain NL42 originating from a traditional Chinese dairy product, performed comparative genomic analysis and characterized a novel adhesion factor. The genome of NL42 was highly divergent from its closest neighbors, especially in six large genomic regions. NL42 harbors a total of 42 genes encoding adhesion-associated proteins; among them, cwaA encodes a protein containing multiple domains, including five cell wall surface anchor repeat domains and an LPxTG-like cell wall anchor motif. Expression of cwaA in Lactococcus lactis significantly increased its autoaggregation and hydrophobicity, and conferred the new ability to adhere to human colonic epithelial HT-29 cells by targeting cellular surface proteins, and not carbohydrate moieties, for CwaA adhesion. In addition, the recombinant Lc. lactis inhibited adhesion of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli to HT-29 cells, mainly by exclusion. We conclude that CwaA is a novel adhesion factor in Lt. plantarum and a potential candidate for improving the adhesion ability of probiotics or other bacteria of interest.

  6. Genome regulation in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Puck, T T; Krystosek, A; Chan, D C

    1990-05-01

    A theory is presented proposing that genetic regulation in mammalian cells is at least a two-tiered effect; that one level of regulation involves the transition between gene exposure and sequestration; that normal differentiation requires a different spectrum of genes to be exposed in each separate state of differentiation; that the fiber systems of the cell cytoskeleton and the nuclear matrix together control the degree of gene exposure; that specific phosphorylation of these elements causes them to assume a different organizational network and to impose a different pattern of sequestration and exposure on the elements of the genome; that the varied gene phosphorylation mechanisms in the cell are integrated in this function; that attachment of this network system to specific parts of the chromosomes brings about sequestration or exposure of the genes in their neighborhood in a fashion similar to that observed when microtubule elements attach through the kinetochore to the centromeric DNA; that one function of repetitive sequences is to serve as elements for the final attachment of this fibrous network to the specific chromosomal loci; and that at least an important part of the calcium manifestation as a metabolic trigger of different differentiation states involves its acting as a binding agent to centers of electronegativity, in particular proteins and especially phosphorylated groups, so as to change the conformation of the fiber network that ultimately controls gene exposure in the mammalian cell. It would appear essential to determine what abnormal gene exposures and sequestrations are characteristic of each type of cancer; which agonists, if any, will bring about reverse transformation; and whether these considerations can be used in therapy.

  7. Inferring Cell Differentiation Processes Based on Phylogenetic Analysis of Genome-Wide Epigenetic Information: Hematopoiesis as a Model Case

    PubMed Central

    Koyanagi, Kanako O.

    2015-01-01

    How cells divide and differentiate is a fundamental question in organismal development; however, the discovery of differentiation processes in various cell types is laborious and sometimes impossible. Phylogenetic analysis is typically used to reconstruct evolutionary processes based on inherent characters. It could also be used to reconstruct developmental processes based on the developmental changes that occur during cell proliferation and differentiation. In this study, DNA methylation information from differentiated hematopoietic cells was used to perform phylogenetic analyses. The results were assessed for their validity in inferring hierarchical differentiation processes of hematopoietic cells and DNA methylation processes of differentiating progenitor cells. Overall, phylogenetic analyses based on DNA methylation information facilitated inferences regarding hematopoiesis. PMID:25638259

  8. Genome-Wide Association Study of Survival in Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Receiving Platinum-Based Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Yuanqing; Rosell, Rafael; Amos, Christopher I.; Stewart, David J.; Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Roth, Jack A.; Minna, John D.; Gu, Jian; Lin, Jie; Buch, Shama C.; Nukui, Tomoko; Ramirez Serrano, Jose Luis; Taron, Miquel; Cassidy, Adrian; Lu, Charles; Chang, Joe Y.; Lippman, Scott M.; Hong, Waun Ki; Spitz, Margaret R.; Romkes, Marjorie; Yang, Ping

    2011-01-01

    Background Interindividual variation in genetic background may influence the response to chemotherapy and overall survival for patients with advanced-stage non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods To identify genetic variants associated with poor overall survival in these patients, we conducted a genome-wide scan of 307 260 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 327 advanced-stage NSCLC patients who received platinum-based chemotherapy with or without radiation at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (the discovery population). A fast-track replication was performed for 315 patients from the Mayo Clinic followed by a second validation at the University of Pittsburgh in 420 patients enrolled in the Spanish Lung Cancer Group PLATAX clinical trial. A pooled analysis combining the Mayo Clinic and PLATAX populations or all three populations was also used to validate the results. We assessed the association of each SNP with overall survival by multivariable Cox proportional hazard regression analysis. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results SNP rs1878022 in the chemokine-like receptor 1 (CMKLR1) was statistically significantly associated with poor overall survival in the MD Anderson discovery population (hazard ratio [HR] of death = 1.59, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.32 to 1.92, P = 1.42 × 10−6), in the PLATAX clinical trial (HR of death = 1.23, 95% CI = 1.00 to 1.51, P = .05), in the pooled Mayo Clinic and PLATAX validation (HR of death = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.06 to 1.40, P = .005), and in pooled analysis of all three populations (HR of death = 1.33, 95% CI = 1.19 to 1.48, P = 5.13 × 10−7). Carrying a variant genotype of rs10937823 was associated with decreased overall survival (HR of death = 1.82, 95% CI = 1.42 to 2.33, P = 1.73 × 10−6) in the pooled MD Anderson and Mayo Clinic populations but not in the PLATAX trial patient population (HR of death = 0.96, 95% CI = 0.69 to 1.35). Conclusion These results have the potential to

  9. Development and Validation of a Gene-Based Model for Outcome Prediction in Germ Cell Tumors Using a Combined Genomic and Expression Profiling Approach.

    PubMed

    Korkola, James E; Heck, Sandy; Olshen, Adam B; Feldman, Darren R; Reuter, Victor E; Houldsworth, Jane; Bosl, George J; Chaganti, R S K

    2015-01-01

    Germ Cell Tumors (GCT) have a high cure rate, but we currently lack the ability to accurately identify the small subset of patients who will die from their disease. We used a combined genomic and expression profiling approach to identify genomic regions and underlying genes that are predictive of outcome in GCT patients. We performed array-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) on 53 non-seminomatous GCTs (NSGCTs) treated with cisplatin based chemotherapy and defined altered genomic regions using Circular Binary Segmentation. We identified 14 regions associated with two year disease-free survival (2yDFS) and 16 regions associated with five year disease-specific survival (5yDSS). From corresponding expression data, we identified 101 probe sets that showed significant changes in expression. We built several models based on these differentially expressed genes, then tested them in an independent validation set of 54 NSGCTs. These predictive models correctly classified outcome in 64-79.6% of patients in the validation set, depending on the endpoint utilized. Survival analysis demonstrated a significant separation of patients with good versus poor predicted outcome when using a combined gene set model. Multivariate analysis using clinical risk classification with the combined gene model indicated that they were independent prognostic markers. This novel set of predictive genes from altered genomic regions is almost entirely independent of our previously identified set of predictive genes for patients with NSGCTs. These genes may aid in the identification of the small subset of patients who are at high risk of poor outcome.

  10. A dictionary based informational genome analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In the post-genomic era several methods of computational genomics are emerging to understand how the whole information is structured within genomes. Literature of last five years accounts for several alignment-free methods, arisen as alternative metrics for dissimilarity of biological sequences. Among the others, recent approaches are based on empirical frequencies of DNA k-mers in whole genomes. Results Any set of words (factors) occurring in a genome provides a genomic dictionary. About sixty genomes were analyzed by means of informational indexes based on genomic dictionaries, where a systemic view replaces a local sequence analysis. A software prototype applying a methodology here outlined carried out some computations on genomic data. We computed informational indexes, built the genomic dictionaries with different sizes, along with frequency distributions. The software performed three main tasks: computation of informational indexes, storage of these in a database, index analysis and visualization. The validation was done by investigating genomes of various organisms. A systematic analysis of genomic repeats of several lengths, which is of vivid interest in biology (for example to compute excessively represented functional sequences, such as promoters), was discussed, and suggested a method to define synthetic genetic networks. Conclusions We introduced a methodology based on dictionaries, and an efficient motif-finding software application for comparative genomics. This approach could be extended along many investigation lines, namely exported in other contexts of computational genomics, as a basis for discrimination of genomic pathologies. PMID:22985068

  11. Genome Editing Using Mammalian Haploid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Horii, Takuro; Hatada, Izuho

    2015-01-01

    Haploid cells are useful for studying gene functions because disruption of a single allele can cause loss-of-function phenotypes. Recent success in generating haploid embryonic stem cells (ESCs) in mice, rats, and monkeys provides a new platform for simple genetic manipulation of the mammalian genome. Use of haploid ESCs enhances the genome-editing potential of the CRISPR/Cas system. For example, CRISPR/Cas was used in haploid ESCs to generate multiple knockouts and large deletions at high efficiency. In addition, genome-wide screening is facilitated by haploid cell lines containing gene knockout libraries. PMID:26437403

  12. Role of the mitochondrial genome in assisted reproductive technologies and embryonic stem cell-based therapeutic cloning.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Carol A; Kubisch, H Michael; Pierce, Kenneth E

    2004-01-01

    Mitochondria play a pivotal role in cellular metabolism and are important determinants of embryonic development. Mitochondrial function and biogenesis rely on an intricate coordination of regulation and expression of nuclear and mitochondrial genes. For example, several nucleus-derived transcription factors, such as mitochondrial transcription factor A, are required for mitochondrial DNA replication. Mitochondrial inheritance is strictly maternal while paternally-derived mitochondria are selectively eliminated during early embryonic cell divisions. However, there are reports from animals as well as human patients that paternal mitochondria can occasionally escape elimination, which in some cases has led to severe pathologies. The resulting existence of different mitochondrial genomes within the same cell has been termed mitochondrial heteroplasmy. The increasing use of invasive techniques in assisted reproduction in humans has raised concerns that one of the outcomes of such techniques is an increase in the incidence of mitochondrial heteroplasmy. Indeed, there is evidence that heteroplasmy is a direct consequence of ooplasm transfer, a technique that was used to 'rescue' oocytes from older women by injecting ooplasm from young oocytes. Mitochondria from donor and recipient were found in varying proportions in resulting children. Heteroplasmy is also a byproduct of nuclear transfer, as has been shown in studies on cloned sheep, cattle and monkeys. As therapeutic cloning will depend on nuclear transfer into oocytes and the subsequent generation of embryonic stem cells from resulting blastocysts, the prospect of mitochondrial heteroplasmy and its potential problems necessitate further studies in this area.

  13. Single Cell Genomics: Advances and Future Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Macaulay, Iain C.; Voet, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    Advances in whole-genome and whole-transcriptome amplification have permitted the sequencing of the minute amounts of DNA and RNA present in a single cell, offering a window into the extent and nature of genomic and transcriptomic heterogeneity which occurs in both normal development and disease. Single-cell approaches stand poised to revolutionise our capacity to understand the scale of genomic, epigenomic, and transcriptomic diversity that occurs during the lifetime of an individual organism. Here, we review the major technological and biological breakthroughs achieved, describe the remaining challenges to overcome, and provide a glimpse into the promise of recent and future developments. PMID:24497842

  14. Human genome project and sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Norman, Brenda J; Miller, Sheila D

    2011-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is one of the most common genetic blood disorders in the United States that affects 1 in every 375 African Americans. Sickle cell disease is an inherited condition caused by abnormal hemoglobin in the red blood cells. The Human Genome Project has provided valuable insight and extensive research advances in the understanding of the human genome and sickle cell disease. Significant progress in genetic knowledge has led to an increase in the ability for researchers to map and sequence genes for diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of sickle cell disease and other chronic illnesses. This article explores some of the recent knowledge and advances about sickle cell disease and the Human Genome Project.

  15. A genomic biomarker signature can predict skin sensitizers using a cell-based in vitro alternative to animal tests.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Henrik; Lindstedt, Malin; Albrekt, Ann-Sofie; Borrebaeck, Carl A K

    2011-08-08

    Allergic contact dermatitis is an inflammatory skin disease that affects a significant proportion of the population. This disease is caused by an adverse immune response towards chemical haptens, and leads to a substantial economic burden for society. Current test of sensitizing chemicals rely on animal experimentation. New legislations on the registration and use of chemicals within pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries have stimulated significant research efforts to develop alternative, human cell-based assays for the prediction of sensitization. The aim is to replace animal experiments with in vitro tests displaying a higher predictive power. We have developed a novel cell-based assay for the prediction of sensitizing chemicals. By analyzing the transcriptome of the human cell line MUTZ-3 after 24 h stimulation, using 20 different sensitizing chemicals, 20 non-sensitizing chemicals and vehicle controls, we have identified a biomarker signature of 200 genes with potent discriminatory ability. Using a Support Vector Machine for supervised classification, the prediction performance of the assay revealed an area under the ROC curve of 0.98. In addition, categorizing the chemicals according to the LLNA assay, this gene signature could also predict sensitizing potency. The identified markers are involved in biological pathways with immunological relevant functions, which can shed light on the process of human sensitization. A gene signature predicting sensitization, using a human cell line in vitro, has been identified. This simple and robust cell-based assay has the potential to completely replace or drastically reduce the utilization of test systems based on experimental animals. Being based on human biology, the assay is proposed to be more accurate for predicting sensitization in humans, than the traditional animal-based tests.

  16. A genomic biomarker signature can predict skin sensitizers using a cell-based in vitro alternative to animal tests

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Allergic contact dermatitis is an inflammatory skin disease that affects a significant proportion of the population. This disease is caused by an adverse immune response towards chemical haptens, and leads to a substantial economic burden for society. Current test of sensitizing chemicals rely on animal experimentation. New legislations on the registration and use of chemicals within pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries have stimulated significant research efforts to develop alternative, human cell-based assays for the prediction of sensitization. The aim is to replace animal experiments with in vitro tests displaying a higher predictive power. Results We have developed a novel cell-based assay for the prediction of sensitizing chemicals. By analyzing the transcriptome of the human cell line MUTZ-3 after 24 h stimulation, using 20 different sensitizing chemicals, 20 non-sensitizing chemicals and vehicle controls, we have identified a biomarker signature of 200 genes with potent discriminatory ability. Using a Support Vector Machine for supervised classification, the prediction performance of the assay revealed an area under the ROC curve of 0.98. In addition, categorizing the chemicals according to the LLNA assay, this gene signature could also predict sensitizing potency. The identified markers are involved in biological pathways with immunological relevant functions, which can shed light on the process of human sensitization. Conclusions A gene signature predicting sensitization, using a human cell line in vitro, has been identified. This simple and robust cell-based assay has the potential to completely replace or drastically reduce the utilization of test systems based on experimental animals. Being based on human biology, the assay is proposed to be more accurate for predicting sensitization in humans, than the traditional animal-based tests. PMID:21824406

  17. Automated cell analysis tool for a genome-wide RNAi screen with support vector machine based supervised learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remmele, Steffen; Ritzerfeld, Julia; Nickel, Walter; Hesser, Jürgen

    2011-03-01

    RNAi-based high-throughput microscopy screens have become an important tool in biological sciences in order to decrypt mostly unknown biological functions of human genes. However, manual analysis is impossible for such screens since the amount of image data sets can often be in the hundred thousands. Reliable automated tools are thus required to analyse the fluorescence microscopy image data sets usually containing two or more reaction channels. The herein presented image analysis tool is designed to analyse an RNAi screen investigating the intracellular trafficking and targeting of acylated Src kinases. In this specific screen, a data set consists of three reaction channels and the investigated cells can appear in different phenotypes. The main issue of the image processing task is an automatic cell segmentation which has to be robust and accurate for all different phenotypes and a successive phenotype classification. The cell segmentation is done in two steps by segmenting the cell nuclei first and then using a classifier-enhanced region growing on basis of the cell nuclei to segment the cells. The classification of the cells is realized by a support vector machine which has to be trained manually using supervised learning. Furthermore, the tool is brightness invariant allowing different staining quality and it provides a quality control that copes with typical defects during preparation and acquisition. A first version of the tool has already been successfully applied for an RNAi-screen containing three hundred thousand image data sets and the SVM extended version is designed for additional screens.

  18. Genome wide copy number analysis of single cells

    PubMed Central

    Baslan, Timour; Kendall, Jude; Rodgers, Linda; Cox, Hilary; Riggs, Mike; Stepansky, Asya; Troge, Jennifer; Ravi, Kandasamy; Esposito, Diane; Lakshmi, B.; Wigler, Michael; Navin, Nicholas; Hicks, James

    2016-01-01

    Summary Copy number variation (CNV) is increasingly recognized as an important contributor to phenotypic variation in health and disease. Most methods for determining CNV rely on admixtures of cells, where information regarding genetic heterogeneity is lost. Here, we present a protocol that allows for the genome wide copy number analysis of single nuclei isolated from mixed populations of cells. Single nucleus sequencing (SNS), combines flow sorting of single nuclei based on DNA content, whole genome amplification (WGA), followed by next generation sequencing to quantize genomic intervals in a genome wide manner. Multiplexing of single cells is discussed. Additionally, we outline informatic approaches that correct for biases inherent in the WGA procedure and allow for accurate determination of copy number profiles. All together, the protocol takes ~3 days from flow cytometry to sequence-ready DNA libraries. PMID:22555242

  19. High-throughput, genome-scale protein production method based on the wheat germ cell-free expression system.

    PubMed

    Endo, Yaeta; Sawasaki, Tatsuya

    2004-01-01

    Current cell-free protein expression systems are capable of synthesizing proteins with high speed and accuracy; however, the yields are low due to their instability over time. Escherichia coli based systems are not always sufficient for expression of eukaryotic proteins. This report reviews a high-throughput protein production method based on the cell-free system prepared from eukaryote, wheat embryos. We first demonstrate a method for preparation of this extract that exhibited a high degree of stability and activity. To maximize translation yield and throughput, we address and resolve the following issues: (1) optimization of the ORF flanking regions; (2) PCR-based generation of DNA for mRNA production; (3) expression vectors for large-scale protein production; and (4) a translation reaction that does not require a membrane. The combination of these elemental processes with robotic automation resulted in high-throughput protein synthesis.

  20. BrucellaBase: Genome information resource.

    PubMed

    Sankarasubramanian, Jagadesan; Vishnu, Udayakumar S; Khader, L K M Abdul; Sridhar, Jayavel; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy; Rajendhran, Jeyaprakash

    2016-09-01

    Brucella sp. causes a major zoonotic disease, brucellosis. Brucella belongs to the family Brucellaceae under the order Rhizobiales of Alphaproteobacteria. We present BrucellaBase, a web-based platform, providing features of a genome database together with unique analysis tools. We have developed a web version of the multilocus sequence typing (MLST) (Whatmore et al., 2007) and phylogenetic analysis of Brucella spp. BrucellaBase currently contains genome data of 510 Brucella strains along with the user interfaces for BLAST, VFDB, CARD, pairwise genome alignment and MLST typing. Availability of these tools will enable the researchers interested in Brucella to get meaningful information from Brucella genome sequences. BrucellaBase will regularly be updated with new genome sequences, new features along with improvements in genome annotations. BrucellaBase is available online at http://www.dbtbrucellosis.in/brucellabase.html or http://59.99.226.203/brucellabase/homepage.html. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Imaging Specific Genomic DNA in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Baohui; Guan, Juan; Huang, Bo

    2016-07-05

    The three-dimensional organization of the genome plays important roles in regulating the functional output of the genome and even in the maintenance of epigenetic inheritance and genome stability. Here, we review and compare a number of newly developed methods-especially those that utilize the CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat)-Cas9 (CRISPR-associated protein 9) system-that enable the direct visualization of specific, endogenous DNA sequences in living cells. We also discuss the practical considerations in implementing the CRISPR imaging technique to achieve sufficient signal-to-background levels, high specificity, and high labeling efficiency. These DNA labeling methods enable tracking of the copy number, localization, and movement of genomic elements, and we discuss the potential applications of these methods in understanding the searching and targeting mechanism of the Cas9-sgRNA complex, investigating chromosome organization, and visualizing genome instability and rearrangement.

  2. Fish T cells: recent advances through genomics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laing, Kerry J.; Hansen, John D.

    2011-01-01

    This brief review is intended to provide a concise overview of the current literature concerning T cells, advances in identifying distinct T cell functional subsets, and in distinguishing effector cells from memory cells. We compare and contrast a wealth of recent progress made in T cell immunology of teleost, elasmobranch, and agnathan fish, to knowledge derived from mammalian T cell studies. From genome studies, fish clearly have most components associated with T cell function and we can speculate on the presence of putative T cell subsets, and the ability to detect their differentiation to form memory cells. Some recombinant proteins for T cell associated cytokines and antibodies for T cell surface receptors have been generated that will facilitate studying the functional roles of teleost T cells during immune responses. Although there is still a long way to go, major advances have occurred in recent years for investigating T cell responses, thus phenotypic and functional characterization is on the near horizon.

  3. Isolation of genomic DNA from mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Koh, Cheryl M

    2013-01-01

    The isolation of genomic DNA from mammalian cells is a routine molecular biology laboratory technique with numerous downstream applications. The isolated DNA can be used as a template for PCR, cloning, and genotyping and to generate genomic DNA libraries. It can also be used for sequencing to detect mutations and other alterations, and for DNA methylation analyses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Genome-editing Technologies for Gene and Cell Therapy.

    PubMed

    Maeder, Morgan L; Gersbach, Charles A

    2016-03-01

    Gene therapy has historically been defined as the addition of new genes to human cells. However, the recent advent of genome-editing technologies has enabled a new paradigm in which the sequence of the human genome can be precisely manipulated to achieve a therapeutic effect. This includes the correction of mutations that cause disease, the addition of therapeutic genes to specific sites in the genome, and the removal of deleterious genes or genome sequences. This review presents the mechanisms of different genome-editing strategies and describes each of the common nuclease-based platforms, including zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), meganucleases, and the CRISPR/Cas9 system. We then summarize the progress made in applying genome editing to various areas of gene and cell therapy, including antiviral strategies, immunotherapies, and the treatment of monogenic hereditary disorders. The current challenges and future prospects for genome editing as a transformative technology for gene and cell therapy are also discussed.

  5. Genome-editing Technologies for Gene and Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Maeder, Morgan L; Gersbach, Charles A

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy has historically been defined as the addition of new genes to human cells. However, the recent advent of genome-editing technologies has enabled a new paradigm in which the sequence of the human genome can be precisely manipulated to achieve a therapeutic effect. This includes the correction of mutations that cause disease, the addition of therapeutic genes to specific sites in the genome, and the removal of deleterious genes or genome sequences. This review presents the mechanisms of different genome-editing strategies and describes each of the common nuclease-based platforms, including zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), meganucleases, and the CRISPR/Cas9 system. We then summarize the progress made in applying genome editing to various areas of gene and cell therapy, including antiviral strategies, immunotherapies, and the treatment of monogenic hereditary disorders. The current challenges and future prospects for genome editing as a transformative technology for gene and cell therapy are also discussed. PMID:26755333

  6. Covering Your Bases: Inheritance of DNA Methylation in Plant Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Cytosine methylation is an important base modification that is inherited across mitotic and meiotic cell divisions in plant genomes. Heritable methylation variants can contribute to within-species phenotypic variation. Few methylation variants were known until recently, making it possible to begin to address major unanswered questions: the extent of natural methylation variation within plant genomes, its effects on phenotypic variation, its degree of dependence on genotype, and how it fits into an evolutionary context. Techniques like whole-genome bisulfite sequencing (WGBS) make it possible to determine cytosine methylation states at single-base resolution across entire genomes and populations. Application of this method to natural and novel experimental populations is revealing answers to these long-standing questions about the role of DNA methylation in plant genomes. PMID:24270503

  7. Copy Number Variation Analysis by Array Analysis of Single Cells Following Whole Genome Amplification.

    PubMed

    Dimitriadou, Eftychia; Zamani Esteki, Masoud; Vermeesch, Joris Robert

    2015-01-01

    Whole genome amplification is required to ensure the availability of sufficient material for copy number variation analysis of a genome deriving from an individual cell. Here, we describe the protocols we use for copy number variation analysis of non-fixed single cells by array-based approaches following single-cell isolation and whole genome amplification. We are focusing on two alternative protocols, an isothermal and a PCR-based whole genome amplification method, followed by either comparative genome hybridization (aCGH) or SNP array analysis, respectively.

  8. Genomic Landscape of Developing Male Germ Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tin-Lap; Pang, Alan Lap-Yin; Rennert, Owen M.; Chan, Wai-Yee

    2010-01-01

    Spermatogenesis is a highly orchestrated developmental process by which spermatogonia develop into mature spermatozoa. This process involves many testis- or male germ cell-specific gene products whose expressions are strictly regulated. In the past decade the advent of high-throughput gene expression analytical techniques has made functional genomic studies of this process, particularly in model animals such as mice and rats, feasible and practical. These studies have just begun to reveal the complexity of the genomic landscape of the developing male germ cells. Over 50% of the mouse and rat genome are expressed during testicular development. Among transcripts present in germ cells, 40% – 60% are uncharacterized. A number of genes, and consequently their associated biological pathways, are differentially expressed at different stages of spermatogenesis. Developing male germ cells present a rich repertoire of genetic processes. Tissue-specific as well as spermatogenesis stage-specific alternative splicing of genes exemplifies the complexity of genome expression. In addition to this layer of control, discoveries of abundant presence of antisense transcripts, expressed psuedogenes, non-coding RNAs (ncRNA) including long ncRNAs, microRNAs (miRNAs) and Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs), and retrogenes all point to the presence of multiple layers of expression and functional regulation in male germ cells. It is anticipated that application of systems biology approaches will further our understanding of the regulatory mechanism of spermatogenesis.† PMID:19306351

  9. Radiation induced genomic instability in bystander cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, H.; Gu, S.; Randers-Pehrson, G.; Hei, T.

    There is considerable evidence that exposure to ionizing radiation may induce a heritable genomic instability that leads to a persisting increased frequency of genetic and functional changes in the non-irradiated progeny of a wide variety of irradiated cells Genomic instability is measured as delayed expressions in chromosomal alterations micronucleus formation gene mutations and decreased plating efficiency During the last decade numerous studies have shown that radiation could induce bystander effect in non-irradiated neighboring cells similar endpoints have also been used in genomic instability studies Both genomic instability and the bystander effect are phenomena that result in a paradigm shift in our understanding of radiation biology In the past it seemed reasonable to assume that the production of single- and double-strand DNA breaks are due to direct energy deposition of energy by a charged particle to the nucleus It turns out that biology is not quite that simple Using the Columbia University charged particle microbeam and the highly sensitive human hamster hybrid AL cell mutagenic assay we irradiated 10 of the cells with a lethal dose of 30 alpha particles through the nucleus After overnight incubation the remaining viable bystander cells were replated in dishes for colony formation Clonal isolates were expanded and cultured for 6 consecutive weeks to assess plating efficiency and mutation frequency Preliminary results indicated that there was no significant decrease in plating efficiency among the bystander colonies when compared with

  10. Whole Genome Amplification of Labeled Viable Single Cells Suited for Array-Comparative Genomic Hybridization.

    PubMed

    Kroneis, Thomas; El-Heliebi, Amin

    2015-01-01

    Understanding details of a complex biological system makes it necessary to dismantle it down to its components. Immunostaining techniques allow identification of several distinct cell types thereby giving an inside view of intercellular heterogeneity. Often staining reveals that the most remarkable cells are the rarest. To further characterize the target cells on a molecular level, single cell techniques are necessary. Here, we describe the immunostaining, micromanipulation, and whole genome amplification of single cells for the purpose of genomic characterization. First, we exemplify the preparation of cell suspensions from cultured cells as well as the isolation of peripheral mononucleated cells from blood. The target cell population is then subjected to immunostaining. After cytocentrifugation target cells are isolated by micromanipulation and forwarded to whole genome amplification. For whole genome amplification, we use GenomePlex(®) technology allowing downstream genomic analysis such as array-comparative genomic hybridization.

  11. DNA damage in cells exhibiting radiation-induced genomic instability

    SciTech Connect

    Keszenman, Deborah J.; Kolodiuk, Lucia; Baulch, Janet E.

    2015-02-22

    Cells exhibiting radiation induced genomic instability exhibit varied spectra of genetic and chromosomal aberrations. Even so, oxidative stress remains a common theme in the initiation and/or perpetuation of this phenomenon. Isolated oxidatively modified bases, abasic sites, DNA single strand breaks and clustered DNA damage are induced in normal mammalian cultured cells and tissues due to endogenous reactive oxygen species generated during normal cellular metabolism in an aerobic environment. While sparse DNA damage may be easily repaired, clustered DNA damage may lead to persistent cytotoxic or mutagenic events that can lead to genomic instability. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that DNA damage signatures characterised by altered levels of endogenous, potentially mutagenic, types of DNA damage and chromosomal breakage are related to radiation-induced genomic instability and persistent oxidative stress phenotypes observed in the chromosomally unstable progeny of irradiated cells. The measurement of oxypurine, oxypyrimidine and abasic site endogenous DNA damage showed differences in non-double-strand breaks (DSB) clusters among the three of the four unstable clones evaluated as compared to genomically stable clones and the parental cell line. These three unstable clones also had increased levels of DSB clusters. The results of this study demonstrate that each unstable cell line has a unique spectrum of persistent damage and lead us to speculate that alterations in DNA damage signaling and repair may be related to the perpetuation of genomic instability.

  12. DNA damage in cells exhibiting radiation-induced genomic instability

    DOE PAGES

    Keszenman, Deborah J.; Kolodiuk, Lucia; Baulch, Janet E.

    2015-02-22

    Cells exhibiting radiation induced genomic instability exhibit varied spectra of genetic and chromosomal aberrations. Even so, oxidative stress remains a common theme in the initiation and/or perpetuation of this phenomenon. Isolated oxidatively modified bases, abasic sites, DNA single strand breaks and clustered DNA damage are induced in normal mammalian cultured cells and tissues due to endogenous reactive oxygen species generated during normal cellular metabolism in an aerobic environment. While sparse DNA damage may be easily repaired, clustered DNA damage may lead to persistent cytotoxic or mutagenic events that can lead to genomic instability. In this study, we tested the hypothesismore » that DNA damage signatures characterised by altered levels of endogenous, potentially mutagenic, types of DNA damage and chromosomal breakage are related to radiation-induced genomic instability and persistent oxidative stress phenotypes observed in the chromosomally unstable progeny of irradiated cells. The measurement of oxypurine, oxypyrimidine and abasic site endogenous DNA damage showed differences in non-double-strand breaks (DSB) clusters among the three of the four unstable clones evaluated as compared to genomically stable clones and the parental cell line. These three unstable clones also had increased levels of DSB clusters. The results of this study demonstrate that each unstable cell line has a unique spectrum of persistent damage and lead us to speculate that alterations in DNA damage signaling and repair may be related to the perpetuation of genomic instability.« less

  13. Novel approaches in function-driven single-cell genomics

    DOE PAGES

    Doud, Devin F. R.; Woyke, Tanja

    2017-06-07

    Deeper sequencing and improved bioinformatics in conjunction with single-cell and metagenomic approaches continue to illuminate undercharacterized environmental microbial communities. This has propelled the 'who is there, and what might they be doing' paradigm to the uncultivated and has already radically changed the topology of the tree of life and provided key insights into the microbial contribution to biogeochemistry. While characterization of 'who' based on marker genes can describe a large fraction of the community, answering 'what are they doing' remains the elusive pinnacle for microbiology. Function-driven single-cell genomics provides a solution by using a function-based screen to subsample complex microbialmore » communities in a targeted manner for the isolation and genome sequencing of single cells. This enables single-cell sequencing to be focused on cells with specific phenotypic or metabolic characteristics of interest. Recovered genomes are conclusively implicated for both encoding and exhibiting the feature of interest, improving downstream annotation and revealing activity levels within that environment. This emerging approach has already improved our understanding of microbial community functioning and facilitated the experimental analysis of uncharacterized gene product space. Here we provide a comprehensive review of strategies that have been applied for function-driven single-cell genomics and the future directions we envision.« less

  14. Genome-editing tools for stem cell biology

    PubMed Central

    Vasileva, E A; Shuvalov, O U; Garabadgiu, A V; Melino, G; Barlev, N A

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells provide a versatile platform for regenerative studies, drug testing and disease modeling. That the expression of only four transcription factors, Oct4, Klf4, Sox2 and c-Myc (OKSM), is sufficient for generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from differentiated somatic cells has revolutionized the field and also highlighted the importance of OKSM as targets for genome editing. A number of novel genome-editing systems have been developed recently. In this review, we focus on successful applications of several such systems for generation of iPSCs. In particular, we discuss genome-editing systems based on zinc-finger fusion proteins (ZFs), transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) and an RNA-guided DNA-specific nuclease, Cas9, derived from the bacterial defense system against viruses that utilizes clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR). PMID:26203860

  15. Recent Advances in Microbial Single Cell Genomics Technology and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanauskas, R.

    2016-02-01

    Single cell genomics is increasingly utilized as a powerful tool to decipher the metabolic potential, evolutionary histories and in situ interactions of environmental microorganisms. This transformative technology recovers extensive information from cultivation-unbiased samples of individual, unicellular organisms. Thus, it does not require data binning into arbitrary phylogenetic or functional groups and therefore is highly compatible with agent-based modeling approaches. I will present several technological advances in this field, which significantly improve genomic data recovery from individual cells and provide direct linkages between cell's genomic and phenotypic properties. I will also demonstrate how these new technical capabilities help understanding the metabolic potential and viral infections of the "microbial dark matter" inhabiting aquatic and subsurface environments.

  16. Genome-editing tools for stem cell biology.

    PubMed

    Vasileva, E A; Shuvalov, O U; Garabadgiu, A V; Melino, G; Barlev, N A

    2015-07-23

    Human pluripotent stem cells provide a versatile platform for regenerative studies, drug testing and disease modeling. That the expression of only four transcription factors, Oct4, Klf4, Sox2 and c-Myc (OKSM), is sufficient for generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from differentiated somatic cells has revolutionized the field and also highlighted the importance of OKSM as targets for genome editing. A number of novel genome-editing systems have been developed recently. In this review, we focus on successful applications of several such systems for generation of iPSCs. In particular, we discuss genome-editing systems based on zinc-finger fusion proteins (ZFs), transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) and an RNA-guided DNA-specific nuclease, Cas9, derived from the bacterial defense system against viruses that utilizes clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR).

  17. Genome Annotation in a Community College Cell Biology Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beagley, C. Timothy

    2013-01-01

    The Biology Department at Salt Lake Community College has used the IMG-ACT toolbox to introduce a genome mapping and annotation exercise into the laboratory portion of its Cell Biology course. This project provides students with an authentic inquiry-based learning experience while introducing them to computational biology and contemporary learning…

  18. Genome Annotation in a Community College Cell Biology Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beagley, C. Timothy

    2013-01-01

    The Biology Department at Salt Lake Community College has used the IMG-ACT toolbox to introduce a genome mapping and annotation exercise into the laboratory portion of its Cell Biology course. This project provides students with an authentic inquiry-based learning experience while introducing them to computational biology and contemporary learning…

  19. Predicting distinct organization of transcription factor binding sites on the promoter regions: a new genome-based approach to expand human embryonic stem cell regulatory network.

    PubMed

    Hosseinpour, Batool; Bakhtiarizadeh, Mohammad Reza; Khosravi, Pegah; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil

    2013-12-01

    Self-proliferation and differentiation into distinct cell types have been made stem cell as a promising target for regenerative medicine. Several key genes can regulate self-renewal and pluripotency of embryonic stem cells (hESCs). They work together and build a transcriptional hierarchy. Coexpression and coregulation of genes control by common regulatory elements on the promoter regions. Consequently, distinct organization and combination of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs modules) on promoter regions, in view of order and distance, lead to a common specific expression pattern within a set of genes. To gain insights into transcriptional regulation of hESCs, we selected promoter regions of eleven common expressed hESC genes including SOX2, LIN28, STAT3, NANOG, LEFTB, TDGF1, POU5F1, FOXD3, TERF1, REX1 and GDF3 to predict activating regulatory modules on promoters and discover key corresponding transcription factors. Then, promoter regions in human genome were explored for modules and 328 genes containing the same modules were detected. Using microarray data, we verified that 102 of 328 genes commonly upregulate in hESCs. Also, using output data of DNA-protein interaction assays, we found that 42 of all predicted genes are targets of SOX2, NANOG and POU5F1. Additionally, a protein interaction network of hESC genes was constructed based on biological processes, and interestingly, 126 downregulated genes along with upregulated ones identified by promoter analysis were predicted in the network. Based on the results, we suggest that the identified genes, coregulating with common hESC genes, represent a novel approach for gene discovery based on whole genome promoter analysis irrespective of gene expression. Altogether, promoter profiling can be used to expand hESC transcriptional regulatory circuitry by analysis of shared functional sequences between genes. This approach provides a clear image on underlying regulatory mechanism of gene expression profile and

  20. WormBase: Annotating many nematode genomes.

    PubMed

    Howe, Kevin; Davis, Paul; Paulini, Michael; Tuli, Mary Ann; Williams, Gary; Yook, Karen; Durbin, Richard; Kersey, Paul; Sternberg, Paul W

    2012-01-01

    WormBase (www.wormbase.org) has been serving the scientific community for over 11 years as the central repository for genomic and genetic information for the soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The resource has evolved from its beginnings as a database housing the genomic sequence and genetic and physical maps of a single species, and now represents the breadth and diversity of nematode research, currently serving genome sequence and annotation for around 20 nematodes. In this article, we focus on WormBase's role of genome sequence annotation, describing how we annotate and integrate data from a growing collection of nematode species and strains. We also review our approaches to sequence curation, and discuss the impact on annotation quality of large functional genomics projects such as modENCODE.

  1. Synthetic genomics and the construction of a synthetic bacterial cell.

    PubMed

    Glass, John I

    2012-01-01

    The first synthetic cellular organism was created in 2010 and based on a very small, very simple bacterium called Mycoplasma mycoides. The bacterium was called synthetic because its DNA genome was chemically synthesized rather than replicated from an existing template DNA, as occurs in all other known cellular life on Earth. The experiment was undertaken in order to develop a system that would allow creation of a minimal bacterial cell that could lead to a better understand of the first principles of cellular life. The effort resulted in new synthetic genomics techniques called genome assembly and genome transplantation. The ability of scientists to design and build bacteria opens new possibilities for creating microbes to solve human problems.

  2. Dissecting genomic diversity, one cell at a time

    PubMed Central

    Blainey, Paul C; Quake, Stephen R

    2014-01-01

    Emerging technologies are bringing single-cell genome sequencing into the mainstream; this field has already yielded insights into the genetic architecture and variability between cells that highlight the dynamic nature of the genome. PMID:24524132

  3. Genome integrity, stem cells and hyaluronan

    PubMed Central

    Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew; Balazs, Endre A.

    2012-01-01

    Faithful preservation of genome integrity is the critical mission of stem cells as well as of germ cells. Reviewed are the following mechanisms involved in protecting DNA in these cells: (a) The efflux machinery that can pump out variety of genotoxins in ATP-dependent manner; (b) the mechanisms maintaining minimal metabolic activity which reduces generation of reactive oxidants, by-products of aerobic respiration; (c) the role of hypoxic niche of stem cells providing a gradient of variable oxygen tension; (d) (e) the presence of hyaluronan (HA) and HA receptors on stem cells and in the niche; (f) the role of HA in protecting DNA from oxidative damage; (g) the specific function of HA in protecting DNA in stem cells; (h) the interactions of HA with sperm cells and oocytes that also may shield their DNA from oxidative damage, and (e) mechanisms by which HA exerts the anti-oxidant activity. While HA has multitude of functions its anti-oxidant capabilities are often overlooked but may be of significance in preservation of integrity of stem and germ cells genome. PMID:22383371

  4. Genomics and epigenomics of renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Maher, Eamonn R

    2013-02-01

    Kidney cancer accounts for about 2% of all cancers and worldwide >250,000 new cases of kidney cancer are diagnosed each year. Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common form of adult kidney cancer and this review describes our current knowledge of the genetic and epigenetic basis of sporadic RCC. Though to date major advances in understanding the underlying the molecular basis of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) have often been derived from studies of rare familial forms of renal cell carcinoma, large-scale genomic and epigenomic studies of sporadic tumours are beginning to provide clearer pictures of the genomic and epigenomic landscape of RCC and the key pathways implicated in the initiation and progression of the disease. Although current knowledge of the molecular pathogenesis of RCC is incomplete, and mostly relates to clear cell (conventional) RCC, the next five years will see an unprecedented flood of genomic and epigenomic data and the key future challenges will relate to the utilisation of this data to develop novel genetic and epigenetic markers for diagnosis and prognosis and to develop novel targeted therapies in order to enable an age of personalised medicine.

  5. Comparative Genomics and the Gene Complement of a Minimal Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islas, Sara; Becerra, Arturo; Luisi, P. Luigi; Lazcano, Antonio

    2004-02-01

    The concept of a minimal cell is discussed from the viewpoint of comparative genomics. Analysis of published DNA content values determined for 641 different archaeal and bacterial species by pulsed field gel electrophoresis has lead to a more precise definition of the genome size ranges of free-living and host-associated organisms. DNA content is not an indicator of phylogenetic position. However, the smallest genomes in our sample do not have a random distribution in rRNA-based evolutionary trees, and are found mostly in (a) the basal branches of the tree where thermophiles are located; and (b) in late clades, such as those of Gram positive bacteria. While the smallest-known genome size for an endosymbiont is only 450 kb, no free-living prokaryote has been described to have genomes <1450 kb. Estimates of the size of minimal gene complement can provide important insights in the primary biological functions required for a sustainable, reproducing cell nowadays and throughout evolutionary times, but definitions of the minimum cell is dependent on specific environments.

  6. Genome editing in pluripotent stem cells: research and therapeutic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Deleidi, Michela; Yu, Cong

    2016-05-06

    Recent progress in human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) and genome editing technologies has opened up new avenues for the investigation of human biology in health and disease as well as the development of therapeutic applications. Gene editing approaches with programmable nucleases have been successfully established in hPSCs and applied to study gene function, develop novel animal models and perform genetic and chemical screens. Several studies now show the successful editing of disease-linked alleles in somatic and patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) as well as in animal models. Importantly, initial clinical trials have shown the safety of programmable nucleases for ex vivo somatic gene therapy. In this context, the unlimited proliferation potential and the pluripotent properties of iPSCs may offer advantages for gene targeting approaches. However, many technical and safety issues still need to be addressed before genome-edited iPSCs are translated into the clinical setting. Here, we provide an overview of the available genome editing systems and discuss opportunities and perspectives for their application in basic research and clinical practice, with a particular focus on hPSC based research and gene therapy approaches. Finally, we discuss recent research on human germline genome editing and its social and ethical implications. - Highlights: • Programmable nucleases have proven efficient and specific for genome editing in human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). • Genome edited hPSCs can be employed to study gene function in health and disease as well as drug and chemical screens. • Genome edited hPSCs hold great promise for ex vivo gene therapy approaches. • Technical and safety issues should be first addressed to advance the clinical use of gene-edited hPSCs.

  7. Microfluidic whole genome amplification device for single cell sequencing.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhilong; Lu, Sijia; Huang, Yanyi

    2014-10-07

    We developed a microfluidic device to perform multiplex single-cell whole-genome amplification (WGA) using multiple annealing and looping-based amplification cycles (MALBAC). This device, made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), allows us to monitor the whole process of cell loading and single-cell WGA for sequencing. We show that the genome coverage of MALBAC amplifications is reproducible between chambers on a single chip and between different chips, which enables data normalization using standard samples to accurately identify copy number variations (CNVs). This device provides an easy-to-operate approach to perform single cell sequencing library preparation with minimum hands-on time. It reduces the requirement of manual expertise as well as the risk of contamination, which is essential in future applications especially the medical diagnosis.

  8. Genome-Wide Association Study of Prognosis in Advanced Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Receiving Platinum-Based Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Lingmin; Wu, Chen; Zhao, Xueying; Heist, Rebecca; Su, Li; Zhao, Yang; Han, Baohui; Cao, Songyu; Chu, Minjie; Dai, Juncheng; Dong, Jing; Shu, Yongqian; Xu, Lin; Chen, Yijiang; Wang, Yi; Lu, Feng; Jiang, Yue; Yu, Dianke; Chen, Hongyan; Tan, Wen; Ma, Hongxia; Chen, Jiaping; Jin, Guangfu; Wu, Tangchun; Lu, Daru; Christiani, David C.; Lin, Dongxin; Hu, Zhibin; Shen, Hongbing

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Genetic variation may influence chemotherapy response and overall survival in cancer patients. Experimental design We conducted a genome-wide scan in 535 advanced-stage non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients from two independent cohorts (307 from Nanjing and 228 from Beijing). A replication was carried out on an independent cohort of 340 patients from Southeastern China followed by a second validation on 409 patients from the Massachusetts General Hospital (Boston, MA). Results Consistent associations with NSCLC survival were identified for five single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in Chinese populations with P values ranging from 3.63 × 10−5 to 4.19 × 10−7 in the additive genetic model. The minor allele of three SNPs (rs7629386 at 3p22.1, rs969088 at 5p14.1, and rs3850370 at 14q24.3) were associated with worse NSCLC survival while 2 (rs41997 at 7q31.31 and rs12000445 at 9p21.3) were associated with better NSCLC survival. In addition, rs7629386 at 3p22.1 (CTNNB1) and rs3850370 at 14q24.3 (SNW1-ALKBH1-NRXN3) were further replicated in the Caucasian population. Conclusion In this three-stage genome-wide association studies, we identified five SNPs as markers for survival of advanced-stage NSCLC patients treated with first-line platinum-based chemotherapy in Chinese Han populations. Two of these SNPs, rs7629386 and rs3850370, could also be markers for survival among Caucasian patients. PMID:22872573

  9. Population-based 3D genome structure analysis reveals driving forces in spatial genome organization

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenyuan; Kalhor, Reza; Dai, Chao; Hao, Shengli; Gong, Ke; Zhou, Yonggang; Li, Haochen; Zhou, Xianghong Jasmine; Le Gros, Mark A.; Larabell, Carolyn A.; Chen, Lin; Alber, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Conformation capture technologies (e.g., Hi-C) chart physical interactions between chromatin regions on a genome-wide scale. However, the structural variability of the genome between cells poses a great challenge to interpreting ensemble-averaged Hi-C data, particularly for long-range and interchromosomal interactions. Here, we present a probabilistic approach for deconvoluting Hi-C data into a model population of distinct diploid 3D genome structures, which facilitates the detection of chromatin interactions likely to co-occur in individual cells. Our approach incorporates the stochastic nature of chromosome conformations and allows a detailed analysis of alternative chromatin structure states. For example, we predict and experimentally confirm the presence of large centromere clusters with distinct chromosome compositions varying between individual cells. The stability of these clusters varies greatly with their chromosome identities. We show that these chromosome-specific clusters can play a key role in the overall chromosome positioning in the nucleus and stabilizing specific chromatin interactions. By explicitly considering genome structural variability, our population-based method provides an important tool for revealing novel insights into the key factors shaping the spatial genome organization. PMID:26951677

  10. Population-based 3D genome structure analysis reveals driving forces in spatial genome organization

    DOE PAGES

    Tjong, Harianto; Li, Wenyuan; Kalhor, Reza; ...

    2016-03-07

    Conformation capture technologies (e.g., Hi-C) chart physical interactions between chromatin regions on a genome-wide scale. However, the structural variability of the genome between cells poses a great challenge to interpreting ensemble-averaged Hi-C data, particularly for long-range and interchromosomal interactions. Here, we present a probabilistic approach for deconvoluting Hi-C data into a model population of distinct diploid 3D genome structures, which facilitates the detection of chromatin interactions likely to co-occur in individual cells. Here, our approach incorporates the stochastic nature of chromosome conformations and allows a detailed analysis of alternative chromatin structure states. For example, we predict and experimentally confirm themore » presence of large centromere clusters with distinct chromosome compositions varying between individual cells. The stability of these clusters varies greatly with their chromosome identities. We show that these chromosome-specific clusters can play a key role in the overall chromosome positioning in the nucleus and stabilizing specific chromatin interactions. By explicitly considering genome structural variability, our population-based method provides an important tool for revealing novel insights into the key factors shaping the spatial genome organization.« less

  11. Selective single cell isolation for genomics using microraft arrays

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Joshua D.; Williams, Lindsay A.; DiSalvo, Matthew; Brandt, Alicia T.; Marayati, Raoud; Sims, Christopher E.; Allbritton, Nancy L.; Prins, Jan F.; Yeh, Jen Jen; Jones, Corbin D.

    2016-01-01

    Genomic methods are used increasingly to interrogate the individual cells that compose specific tissues. However, current methods for single cell isolation struggle to phenotypically differentiate specific cells in a heterogeneous population and rely primarily on the use of fluorescent markers. Many cellular phenotypes of interest are too complex to be measured by this approach, making it difficult to connect genotype and phenotype at the level of individual cells. Here we demonstrate that microraft arrays, which are arrays containing thousands of individual cell culture sites, can be used to select single cells based on a variety of phenotypes, such as cell surface markers, cell proliferation and drug response. We then show that a common genomic procedure, RNA-seq, can be readily adapted to the single cells isolated from these rafts. We show that data generated using microrafts and our modified RNA-seq protocol compared favorably with the Fluidigm C1. We then used microraft arrays to select pancreatic cancer cells that proliferate in spite of cytotoxic drug treatment. Our single cell RNA-seq data identified several expected and novel gene expression changes associated with early drug resistance. PMID:27530426

  12. Lupus pathobiology based on genomics.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disorder with complex genetic underpinnings. This review attempts to assemble the myriad of genomic findings to build a clearer picture of the pathobiology of SLE to serve as a guide for therapeutics. Over 100 genes are now known for SLE, and several more penetrant ones have led to the emergence of more defined lupus phenotypes. Also discussed here are the targeted therapies that have come up on the horizon and the specific biologic mechanisms of more traditional therapies which have only recently been explored. The diagnostic toolbox has been enhanced by the addition of new antibodies, gene expression signatures, and mutation panels. This provides an opportunity to piece together the lupus puzzle and even revisit the clinical classification of SLE.

  13. Single-Cell Whole-Genome Amplification and Sequencing: Methodology and Applications.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lei; Ma, Fei; Chapman, Alec; Lu, Sijia; Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney

    2015-01-01

    We present a survey of single-cell whole-genome amplification (WGA) methods, including degenerate oligonucleotide-primed polymerase chain reaction (DOP-PCR), multiple displacement amplification (MDA), and multiple annealing and looping-based amplification cycles (MALBAC). The key parameters to characterize the performance of these methods are defined, including genome coverage, uniformity, reproducibility, unmappable rates, chimera rates, allele dropout rates, false positive rates for calling single-nucleotide variations, and ability to call copy-number variations. Using these parameters, we compare five commercial WGA kits by performing deep sequencing of multiple single cells. We also discuss several major applications of single-cell genomics, including studies of whole-genome de novo mutation rates, the early evolution of cancer genomes, circulating tumor cells (CTCs), meiotic recombination of germ cells, preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), and preimplantation genomic screening (PGS) for in vitro-fertilized embryos.

  14. Frequent somatic transfer of mitochondrial DNA into the nuclear genome of human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ju, Young Seok; Tubio, Jose M C; Mifsud, William; Fu, Beiyuan; Davies, Helen R; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Li, Yilong; Yates, Lucy; Gundem, Gunes; Tarpey, Patrick S; Behjati, Sam; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Martin, Sancha; Fullam, Anthony; Gerstung, Moritz; Nangalia, Jyoti; Green, Anthony R; Caldas, Carlos; Borg, Åke; Tutt, Andrew; Lee, Ming Ta Michael; van't Veer, Laura J; Tan, Benita K T; Aparicio, Samuel; Span, Paul N; Martens, John W M; Knappskog, Stian; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Eyfjörd, Jórunn Erla; Myklebost, Ola; Flanagan, Adrienne M; Foster, Christopher; Neal, David E; Cooper, Colin; Eeles, Rosalind; Bova, Steven G; Lakhani, Sunil R; Desmedt, Christine; Thomas, Gilles; Richardson, Andrea L; Purdie, Colin A; Thompson, Alastair M; McDermott, Ultan; Yang, Fengtang; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Campbell, Peter J; Stratton, Michael R

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondrial genomes are separated from the nuclear genome for most of the cell cycle by the nuclear double membrane, intervening cytoplasm, and the mitochondrial double membrane. Despite these physical barriers, we show that somatically acquired mitochondrial-nuclear genome fusion sequences are present in cancer cells. Most occur in conjunction with intranuclear genomic rearrangements, and the features of the fusion fragments indicate that nonhomologous end joining and/or replication-dependent DNA double-strand break repair are the dominant mechanisms involved. Remarkably, mitochondrial-nuclear genome fusions occur at a similar rate per base pair of DNA as interchromosomal nuclear rearrangements, indicating the presence of a high frequency of contact between mitochondrial and nuclear DNA in some somatic cells. Transmission of mitochondrial DNA to the nuclear genome occurs in neoplastically transformed cells, but we do not exclude the possibility that some mitochondrial-nuclear DNA fusions observed in cancer occurred years earlier in normal somatic cells.

  15. Frequent somatic transfer of mitochondrial DNA into the nuclear genome of human cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Young Seok; Tubio, Jose M.C.; Mifsud, William; Fu, Beiyuan; Davies, Helen R.; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Li, Yilong; Yates, Lucy; Gundem, Gunes; Tarpey, Patrick S.; Behjati, Sam; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Martin, Sancha; Fullam, Anthony; Gerstung, Moritz; Nangalia, Jyoti; Green, Anthony R.; Caldas, Carlos; Borg, Åke; Tutt, Andrew; Lee, Ming Ta Michael; van't Veer, Laura J.; Tan, Benita K.T.; Aparicio, Samuel; Span, Paul N.; Martens, John W.M.; Knappskog, Stian; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Eyfjörd, Jórunn Erla; Flanagan, Adrienne M.; Foster, Christopher; Neal, David E.; Cooper, Colin; Eeles, Rosalind; Lakhani, Sunil R.; Desmedt, Christine; Thomas, Gilles; Richardson, Andrea L.; Purdie, Colin A.; Thompson, Alastair M.; McDermott, Ultan; Yang, Fengtang; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Campbell, Peter J.; Stratton, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial genomes are separated from the nuclear genome for most of the cell cycle by the nuclear double membrane, intervening cytoplasm, and the mitochondrial double membrane. Despite these physical barriers, we show that somatically acquired mitochondrial-nuclear genome fusion sequences are present in cancer cells. Most occur in conjunction with intranuclear genomic rearrangements, and the features of the fusion fragments indicate that nonhomologous end joining and/or replication-dependent DNA double-strand break repair are the dominant mechanisms involved. Remarkably, mitochondrial-nuclear genome fusions occur at a similar rate per base pair of DNA as interchromosomal nuclear rearrangements, indicating the presence of a high frequency of contact between mitochondrial and nuclear DNA in some somatic cells. Transmission of mitochondrial DNA to the nuclear genome occurs in neoplastically transformed cells, but we do not exclude the possibility that some mitochondrial-nuclear DNA fusions observed in cancer occurred years earlier in normal somatic cells. PMID:25963125

  16. From CO2 to cell: energetic expense of creating biomass using the Calvin-Benson-Bassham and reductive citric acid cycles based on genome data.

    PubMed

    Mangiapia, Mary; Scott, Kathleen

    2016-04-01

    The factors driving the dominance of the Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle (CBB) or reductive citric acid cycle (rCAC) in autotrophic microorganisms in different habitats are debated. Based on costs for synthesizing a few metabolic intermediates, it has been suggested that the CBB poses a disadvantage due to higher metabolic cost. The purpose of this study was to extend this estimate of cost from metabolite synthesis to biomass synthesis. For 12 gammaproteobacteria (CBB) and five epsilonproteobacteria (rCAC), the amount of ATP to synthesize a gram of biomass from CO2 was calculated from genome sequences via metabolic maps. The eleven central carbon metabolites needed to synthesize biomass were all less expensive to synthesize via the rCAC (66%-89% of the ATP needed to synthesize them via CBB). Differences in cell compositions did result in differing demands for metabolites among the organisms, but the differences in cost to synthesize biomass were small among organisms that used a particular pathway (e.g. rCAC), compared to the difference between pathways (rCAC versus CBB). The rCAC autotrophs averaged 0.195 moles ATP per g biomass, while their CBB counterparts averaged 0.238. This is the first in silico estimate of the relative expense of both pathways to generate biomass.

  17. The somatic genomic landscape of chromophobe renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Caleb F.; Ricketts, Christopher; Wang, Min; Yang, Lixing; Cherniack, Andrew D.; Shen, Hui; Buhay, Christian; Kang, Hyojin; Kim, Sang Cheol; Fahey, Catherine C.; Hacker, Kathryn E.; Bhanot, Gyan; Gordenin, Dmitry A.; Chu, Andy; Gunaratne, Preethi H.; Biehl, Michael; Seth, Sahil; Kaipparettu, Benny A.; Bristow, Christopher A.; Donehower, Lawrence A.; Wallen, Eric M.; Smith, Angela B.; Tickoo, Satish K.; Tamboli, Pheroze; Reuter, Victor; Schmidt, Laura S.; Hsieh, James J.; Choueiri, Toni K.; Hakimi, A. Ari; Chin, Lynda; Meyerson, Matthew; Kucherlapati, Raju; Park, Woong-Yang; Robertson, A. Gordon; Laird, Peter W.; Henske, Elizabeth P.; Kwiatkowski, David J.; Park, Peter J.; Morgan, Margaret; Shuch, Brian; Muzny, Donna; Wheeler, David A.; Linehan, W. Marston; Gibbs, Richard A.; Rathmell, W. Kimryn; Creighton, Chad J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary We describe the landscape of somatic genomic alterations of 66 chromophobe renal cell carcinomas (ChRCCs) based on multidimensional and comprehensive characterization, including mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and whole genome sequencing. The result is consistent that ChRCC originates from the distal nephron compared to other kidney cancers with more proximal origins. Combined mtDNA and gene expression analysis implicates changes in mitochondrial function as a component of the disease biology, while suggesting alternative roles for mtDNA mutations in cancers relying on oxidative phosphorylation. Genomic rearrangements lead to recurrent structural breakpoints within TERT promoter region, which correlates with highly elevated TERT expression and manifestation of kataegis, representing a mechanism of TERT up-regulation in cancer distinct from previously-observed amplifications and point mutations. PMID:25155756

  18. Stem cell genome-to-systems biology.

    PubMed

    Chia, Na-Yu; Ng, Huck-Hui

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells are capable of extended proliferation and concomitantly differentiating into a plethora of specialized cell types that render them apropos for their usage as a form of regenerative medicine for cell replacement therapies. The molecular processes that underlie the ability for stem cells to self-renew and differentiate have been intriguing, and elucidating the intricacies within the genome is pertinent to enhance our understanding of stem cells. Systems biology is emerging as a crucial field in the study of the sophisticated nature of stem cells, through the adoption of multidisciplinary approaches which couple high-throughput experimental techniques with computational and mathematical analysis. This allows for the determination of the molecular constituents that govern stem cell characteristics and conjointly with functional validations via genetic perturbation and protein location binding analysis necessitate the construction of the complex transcriptional regulatory network. With the elucidation of protein-protein interaction, protein-DNA regulation, microRNA involvement as well as the epigenetic modifications, it is possible to comprehend the defining features of stem cells at the system level.

  19. Whole-genome amplification of single-cell genomes for next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Korfhage, Christian; Fisch, Evelyn; Fricke, Evelyn; Baedker, Silke; Loeffert, Dirk

    2013-10-11

    DNA sequence analysis and genotyping of biological samples using next-generation sequencing (NGS), microarrays, or real-time PCR is often limited by the small amount of sample available. A single cell contains only one to four copies of the genomic DNA, depending on the organism (haploid or diploid organism) and the cell-cycle phase. The DNA content of a single cell ranges from a few femtograms in bacteria to picograms in mammalia. In contrast, a deep analysis of the genome currently requires a few hundred nanograms up to micrograms of genomic DNA for library formation necessary for NGS sequencing or labeling protocols (e.g., microarrays). Consequently, accurate whole-genome amplification (WGA) of single-cell DNA is required for reliable genetic analysis (e.g., NGS) and is particularly important when genomic DNA is limited. The use of single-cell WGA has enabled the analysis of genomic heterogeneity of individual cells (e.g., somatic genomic variation in tumor cells). This unit describes how the genome of single cells can be used for WGA for further genomic studies, such as NGS. Recommendations for isolation of single cells are given and common sources of errors are discussed.

  20. Evaluation of two public genome references for Chinese hamster ovary cells in the context of RNA-seq based gene expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun; Le, Huong; Goudar, Chetan T

    2017-03-15

    RNA-Seq is a powerful transcriptomics tool for mammalian cell culture process development. Successful RNA-Seq data analysis requires a high quality reference for read mapping and gene expression quantification. Currently, there are two public genome references for Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, the predominant mammalian cell line in the biopharmaceutical industry. In this study, we compared these two references by analyzing 60 RNA-Seq samples from a variety of CHO cell culture conditions. Among the 20,891 common genes in both references, we observed that 31.5% have more than 7.1% quantification differences, implying gene definition differences in the two references. We propose a framework to quantify this difference using two metrics, Consistency and Stringency, which account for the average quantification difference between the two references over all samples, and the sample-specific effect on the quantification result, respectively. These two metrics can be used to identify potential genes for future gene model improvement and to understand the reliability of differentially expressed genes identified by RNA-Seq data analysis. Before a more comprehensive genome reference for CHO cells emerges, the strategy proposed in this study can enable a more robust transcriptome analysis for CHO cell RNA-Seq data. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. [Research progress in developing reporter systems for the enrichment of positive cells with targeted genome modification].

    PubMed

    Bai, Yichun; Xu, Kun; Wei, Zehui; Ma, Zheng; Zhang, Zhiying

    2016-01-01

    Targeted genome editing technology plays an important role in studies of gene function, gene therapy and transgenic breeding. Moreover, the efficiency of targeted genome editing is increased dramatically with the application of recently developed artificial nucleases such as ZFNs, TALENs and CRISPR/Cas9. However, obtaining positive cells with targeted genome modification is restricted to some extent by nucleases expression plasmid transfection efficiency, nucleases expression and activity, and repair efficiency after genome editing. Thus, the enrichment and screening of positive cells with targeted genome modification remains a problem that need to be solved. Surrogate reporter systems could be used to reflect the efficiency of nucleases indirectly and enrich genetically modified positive cells effectively, which may increase the efficiency of the enrichment and screening of positive cells with targeted genome modification. In this review, we mainly summarized principles and applications of reporter systems based on NHEJ and SSA repair mechanisms, which may provide references for related studies in future.

  2. Shared clonal cytogenetic abnormalities in aberrant mast cells and leukemic myeloid blasts detected by single nucleotide polymorphism microarray-based whole-genome scanning.

    PubMed

    Frederiksen, John K; Shao, Lina; Bixby, Dale L; Ross, Charles W

    2016-04-01

    Systemic mastocytosis (SM) is characterized by a clonal proliferation of aberrant mast cells within extracutaneous sites. In a subset of SM cases, a second associated hematologic non-mast cell disease (AHNMD) is also present, usually of myeloid origin. Polymerase chain reaction and targeted fluorescence in situ hybridization studies have provided evidence that, in at least some cases, the aberrant mast cells are related clonally to the neoplastic cells of the AHNMD. In this work, a single nucleotide polymorphism microarray (SNP-A) was used to characterize the cytogenetics of the aberrant mast cells from a patient with acute myeloid leukemia and concomitant mast cell leukemia associated with a KIT D816A mutation. The results demonstrate the presence of shared cytogenetic abnormalities between the mast cells and myeloid blasts, as well as additional abnormalities within mast cells (copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity) not detectable by routine karyotypic analysis. To our knowledge, this work represents the first application of SNP-A whole-genome scanning to the detection of shared cytogenetic abnormalities between the two components of a case of SM-AHNMD. The findings provide additional evidence of a frequent clonal link between aberrant mast cells and cells of myeloid AHNMDs, and also highlight the importance of direct sequencing for identifying uncommon activating KIT mutations.

  3. Cell-to-cell variability and robustness in S-phase duration from genome replication kinetics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing; Bassetti, Federico; Gherardi, Marco; Lagomarsino, Marco Cosentino

    2017-08-21

    Genome replication, a key process for a cell, relies on stochastic initiation by replication origins, causing a variability of replication timing from cell to cell. While stochastic models of eukaryotic replication are widely available, the link between the key parameters and overall replication timing has not been addressed systematically. We use a combined analytical and computational approach to calculate how positions and strength of many origins lead to a given cell-to-cell variability of total duration of the replication of a large region, a chromosome or the entire genome. Specifically, the total replication timing can be framed as an extreme-value problem, since it is due to the last region that replicates in each cell. Our calculations identify two regimes based on the spread between characteristic completion times of all inter-origin regions of a genome. For widely different completion times, timing is set by the single specific region that is typically the last to replicate in all cells. Conversely, when the completion time of all regions are comparable, an extreme-value estimate shows that the cell-to-cell variability of genome replication timing has universal properties. Comparison with available data shows that the replication program of three yeast species falls in this extreme-value regime. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. Genome-Based Taxonomic Classification of Bacteroidetes.

    PubMed

    Hahnke, Richard L; Meier-Kolthoff, Jan P; García-López, Marina; Mukherjee, Supratim; Huntemann, Marcel; Ivanova, Natalia N; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Göker, Markus

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial phylum Bacteroidetes, characterized by a distinct gliding motility, occurs in a broad variety of ecosystems, habitats, life styles, and physiologies. Accordingly, taxonomic classification of the phylum, based on a limited number of features, proved difficult and controversial in the past, for example, when decisions were based on unresolved phylogenetic trees of the 16S rRNA gene sequence. Here we use a large collection of type-strain genomes from Bacteroidetes and closely related phyla for assessing their taxonomy based on the principles of phylogenetic classification and trees inferred from genome-scale data. No significant conflict between 16S rRNA gene and whole-genome phylogenetic analysis is found, whereas many but not all of the involved taxa are supported as monophyletic groups, particularly in the genome-scale trees. Phenotypic and phylogenomic features support the separation of Balneolaceae as new phylum Balneolaeota from Rhodothermaeota and of Saprospiraceae as new class Saprospiria from Chitinophagia. Epilithonimonas is nested within the older genus Chryseobacterium and without significant phenotypic differences; thus merging the two genera is proposed. Similarly, Vitellibacter is proposed to be included in Aequorivita. Flexibacter is confirmed as being heterogeneous and dissected, yielding six distinct genera. Hallella seregens is a later heterotypic synonym of Prevotella dentalis. Compared to values directly calculated from genome sequences, the G+C content mentioned in many species descriptions is too imprecise; moreover, corrected G+C content values have a significantly better fit to the phylogeny. Corresponding emendations of species descriptions are provided where necessary. Whereas most observed conflict with the current classification of Bacteroidetes is already visible in 16S rRNA gene trees, as expected whole-genome phylogenies are much better resolved.

  5. Genome-Based Taxonomic Classification of Bacteroidetes

    PubMed Central

    Hahnke, Richard L.; Meier-Kolthoff, Jan P.; García-López, Marina; Mukherjee, Supratim; Huntemann, Marcel; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Göker, Markus

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial phylum Bacteroidetes, characterized by a distinct gliding motility, occurs in a broad variety of ecosystems, habitats, life styles, and physiologies. Accordingly, taxonomic classification of the phylum, based on a limited number of features, proved difficult and controversial in the past, for example, when decisions were based on unresolved phylogenetic trees of the 16S rRNA gene sequence. Here we use a large collection of type-strain genomes from Bacteroidetes and closely related phyla for assessing their taxonomy based on the principles of phylogenetic classification and trees inferred from genome-scale data. No significant conflict between 16S rRNA gene and whole-genome phylogenetic analysis is found, whereas many but not all of the involved taxa are supported as monophyletic groups, particularly in the genome-scale trees. Phenotypic and phylogenomic features support the separation of Balneolaceae as new phylum Balneolaeota from Rhodothermaeota and of Saprospiraceae as new class Saprospiria from Chitinophagia. Epilithonimonas is nested within the older genus Chryseobacterium and without significant phenotypic differences; thus merging the two genera is proposed. Similarly, Vitellibacter is proposed to be included in Aequorivita. Flexibacter is confirmed as being heterogeneous and dissected, yielding six distinct genera. Hallella seregens is a later heterotypic synonym of Prevotella dentalis. Compared to values directly calculated from genome sequences, the G+C content mentioned in many species descriptions is too imprecise; moreover, corrected G+C content values have a significantly better fit to the phylogeny. Corresponding emendations of species descriptions are provided where necessary. Whereas most observed conflict with the current classification of Bacteroidetes is already visible in 16S rRNA gene trees, as expected whole-genome phylogenies are much better resolved. PMID:28066339

  6. Genome-Based Taxonomic Classification of Bacteroidetes

    SciTech Connect

    Hahnke, Richard L.; Meier-Kolthoff, Jan P.; García-López, Marina; Mukherjee, Supratim; Huntemann, Marcel; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Göker, Markus

    2016-12-20

    The bacterial phylum Bacteroidetes, characterized by a distinct gliding motility, occurs in a broad variety of ecosystems, habitats, life styles, and physiologies. Accordingly, taxonomic classification of the phylum, based on a limited number of features, proved difficult and controversial in the past, for example, when decisions were based on unresolved phylogenetic trees of the 16S rRNA gene sequence. Here we use a large collection of type-strain genomes from Bacteroidetes and closely related phyla for assessing their taxonomy based on the principles of phylogenetic classification and trees inferred from genome-scale data. No significant conflict between 16S rRNA gene and whole-genome phylogenetic analysis is found, whereas many but not all of the involved taxa are supported as monophyletic groups, particularly in the genome-scale trees. Phenotypic and phylogenomic features support the separation of Balneolaceae as new phylum Balneolaeota from Rhodothermaeota and of Saprospiraceae as new class Saprospiria from Chitinophagia. Epilithonimonas is nested within the older genus Chryseobacterium and without significant phenotypic differences; thus merging the two genera is proposed. Similarly, Vitellibacter is proposed to be included in Aequorivita. Flexibacter is confirmed as being heterogeneous and dissected, yielding six distinct genera. Hallella seregens is a later heterotypic synonym of Prevotella dentalis. Compared to values directly calculated from genome sequences, the G+C content mentioned in many species descriptions is too imprecise; moreover, corrected G+C content values have a significantly better fit to the phylogeny. Corresponding emendations of species descriptions are provided where necessary. Whereas most observed conflict with the current classification of Bacteroidetes is already visible in 16S rRNA gene trees, as expected whole-genome phylogenies are much better resolved.

  7. Genome-Based Taxonomic Classification of Bacteroidetes

    DOE PAGES

    Hahnke, Richard L.; Meier-Kolthoff, Jan P.; García-López, Marina; ...

    2016-12-20

    The bacterial phylum Bacteroidetes, characterized by a distinct gliding motility, occurs in a broad variety of ecosystems, habitats, life styles, and physiologies. Accordingly, taxonomic classification of the phylum, based on a limited number of features, proved difficult and controversial in the past, for example, when decisions were based on unresolved phylogenetic trees of the 16S rRNA gene sequence. Here we use a large collection of type-strain genomes from Bacteroidetes and closely related phyla for assessing their taxonomy based on the principles of phylogenetic classification and trees inferred from genome-scale data. No significant conflict between 16S rRNA gene and whole-genome phylogeneticmore » analysis is found, whereas many but not all of the involved taxa are supported as monophyletic groups, particularly in the genome-scale trees. Phenotypic and phylogenomic features support the separation of Balneolaceae as new phylum Balneolaeota from Rhodothermaeota and of Saprospiraceae as new class Saprospiria from Chitinophagia. Epilithonimonas is nested within the older genus Chryseobacterium and without significant phenotypic differences; thus merging the two genera is proposed. Similarly, Vitellibacter is proposed to be included in Aequorivita. Flexibacter is confirmed as being heterogeneous and dissected, yielding six distinct genera. Hallella seregens is a later heterotypic synonym of Prevotella dentalis. Compared to values directly calculated from genome sequences, the G+C content mentioned in many species descriptions is too imprecise; moreover, corrected G+C content values have a significantly better fit to the phylogeny. Corresponding emendations of species descriptions are provided where necessary. Whereas most observed conflict with the current classification of Bacteroidetes is already visible in 16S rRNA gene trees, as expected whole-genome phylogenies are much better resolved.« less

  8. Defining cell types and states with single-cell genomics

    PubMed Central

    Trapnell, Cole

    2015-01-01

    A revolution in cellular measurement technology is under way: For the first time, we have the ability to monitor global gene regulation in thousands of individual cells in a single experiment. Such experiments will allow us to discover new cell types and states and trace their developmental origins. They overcome fundamental limitations inherent in measurements of bulk cell population that have frustrated efforts to resolve cellular states. Single-cell genomics and proteomics enable not only precise characterization of cell state, but also provide a stunningly high-resolution view of transitions between states. These measurements may finally make explicit the metaphor that C.H. Waddington posed nearly 60 years ago to explain cellular plasticity: Cells are residents of a vast “landscape” of possible states, over which they travel during development and in disease. Single-cell technology helps not only locate cells on this landscape, but illuminates the molecular mechanisms that shape the landscape itself. However, single-cell genomics is a field in its infancy, with many experimental and computational advances needed to fully realize its full potential. PMID:26430159

  9. Comprehensive Genomic Profiling of Central Giant Cell Lesions Identifies Clinically Relevant Genomic Alterations.

    PubMed

    Bezak, Brett; Lehrke, Heidi; Elvin, Julia; Gay, Laurie; Schembri-Wismayer, David; Viozzi, Christopher

    2017-05-01

    Comprehensive genomic profiling (CGP) can simultaneously detect clinically relevant genomic alterations (CRGAs) in hundreds of cancer-related genes and direct treatment toward patient-specific therapy options for many tumors. This pilot study aimed to use CGP to describe CRGAs present in central giant cell lesions (CGCLs) to characterize any possible underlying genomic drivers of CGCLs. With institutional review board approval, electronic medical records were searched for patients with histologically confirmed CGCLs who underwent biopsy at Mayo Clinic from 2000 through 2014. Clinical characteristics were recorded from the medical records. At least 50 ng of DNA was extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded archival CGCL specimens by use of hybridization-capture, adaptor ligation-based libraries targeting all exons from 315 cancer-related genes plus select introns from 28 genes commonly rearranged in cancer. Samples were sequenced to high, uniform coverage and assessed for all 4 classes of genomic alterations: base substitutions, small insertions and deletions, rearrangements, and copy number alterations. Of 8 CGCL specimens, 3 (37.5%) harbored CRGAs, including base substitutions in BRAF, GNAS, and KRAS that are predicted to be oncogenic. In 1 sample, focal high-level amplification of the MITF gene was detected. Rearrangement in the PDGFRB gene was identified in a fourth sample, although the significance of this alteration is uncertain. This pilot study shows that a relatively high frequency of CRGAs (37.5%) can be identified in CGCLs by use of CGP. Furthermore, 25% of CGCLs analyzed had somatic mutations predicted to activate the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway, suggesting it may be a driver of the aggressive behavior of these lesions. On the basis of this study, genomic profiling of a larger cohort of CGCLs to validate these observations, as well as correlate mutations with aggressive versus nonaggressive biological behavior and

  10. Genome editing in pluripotent stem cells: research and therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Deleidi, Michela; Yu, Cong

    2016-05-06

    Recent progress in human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) and genome editing technologies has opened up new avenues for the investigation of human biology in health and disease as well as the development of therapeutic applications. Gene editing approaches with programmable nucleases have been successfully established in hPSCs and applied to study gene function, develop novel animal models and perform genetic and chemical screens. Several studies now show the successful editing of disease-linked alleles in somatic and patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) as well as in animal models. Importantly, initial clinical trials have shown the safety of programmable nucleases for ex vivo somatic gene therapy. In this context, the unlimited proliferation potential and the pluripotent properties of iPSCs may offer advantages for gene targeting approaches. However, many technical and safety issues still need to be addressed before genome-edited iPSCs are translated into the clinical setting. Here, we provide an overview of the available genome editing systems and discuss opportunities and perspectives for their application in basic research and clinical practice, with a particular focus on hPSC based research and gene therapy approaches. Finally, we discuss recent research on human germline genome editing and its social and ethical implications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of sample treatments on genome recovery via single-cell genomics

    SciTech Connect

    Clingenpeel, Scott; Schwientek, Patrick; Hugenholtz, Philip; Woyke, Tanja

    2014-06-13

    It is known that single-cell genomics is a powerful tool for accessing genetic information from uncultivated microorganisms. Methods of handling samples before single-cell genomic amplification may affect the quality of the genomes obtained. Using three bacterial strains we demonstrate that, compared to cryopreservation, lower-quality single-cell genomes are recovered when the sample is preserved in ethanol or if the sample undergoes fluorescence in situ hybridization, while sample preservation in paraformaldehyde renders it completely unsuitable for sequencing.

  12. Genomic instability of human embryonic stem cell lines using different passaging culture methods.

    PubMed

    Tosca, Lucie; Feraud, Olivier; Magniez, Aurélie; Bas, Cécile; Griscelli, Frank; Bennaceur-Griscelli, Annelise; Tachdjian, Gérard

    2015-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells exhibit genomic instability that can be related to culture duration or to the passaging methods used for cell dissociation. In order to study the impact of cell dissociation techniques on human embryonic stem cells genomic instability, we cultured H1 and H9 human embryonic stem cells lines using mechanical/manual or enzymatic/collagenase-IV dissociation methods. Genomic instability was evaluated at early (p60) passages by using oligonucleotide based array-comparative genomic hybridization 105 K with a mean resolution of 50 Kb. DNA variations were mainly located on subtelomeric and pericentromeric regions with sizes <100 Kb. In this study, 9 recurrent genomic variations were acquired during culture including the well known duplication 20q11.21. When comparing cell dissociation methods, we found no significant differences between DNA variations number and size, DNA gain or DNA loss frequencies, homozygous loss frequencies and no significant difference on the content of genes involved in development, cell cycle tumorigenesis and syndrome disease. In addition, we have never found any malignant tissue in 4 different teratoma representative of the two independent stem cell lines. These results show that the occurrence of genomic instability in human embryonic stem cells is similar using mechanical or collagenase IV-based enzymatic cell culture dissociation methods. All the observed genomic variations have no impact on the development of malignancy.

  13. Are we Genomic Mosaics? Variations of the Genome of Somatic Cells can Contribute to Diversify our Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Astolfi, P A; Salamini, F; Sgaramella, V

    2010-09-01

    Theoretical and experimental evidences support the hypothesis that the genomes and the epigenomes may be different in the somatic cells of complex organisms. In the genome, the differences range from single base substitutions to chromosome number; in the epigenome, they entail multiple postsynthetic modifications of the chromatin. Somatic genome variations (SGV) may accumulate during development in response both to genetic programs, which may differ from tissue to tissue, and to environmental stimuli, which are often undetected and generally irreproducible. SGV may jeopardize physiological cellular functions, but also create novel coding and regulatory sequences, to be exposed to intraorganismal Darwinian selection. Genomes acknowledged as comparatively poor in genes, such as humans', could thus increase their pristine informational endowment. A better understanding of SGV will contribute to basic issues such as the "nature vs nurture" dualism and the inheritance of acquired characters. On the applied side, they may explain the low yield of cloning via somatic cell nuclear transfer, provide clues to some of the problems associated with transdifferentiation, and interfere with individual DNA analysis. SGV may be unique in the different cells types and in the different developmental stages, and thus explain the several hundred gaps persisting in the human genomes "completed" so far. They may compound the variations associated to our epigenomes and make of each of us an "(epi)genomic" mosaic. An ensuing paradigm is the possibility that a single genome (the ephemeral one assembled at fertilization) has the capacity to generate several different brains in response to different environments.

  14. A computational functional genomics based self-limiting self-concentration mechanism of cell specialization as a biological role of jumping genes.

    PubMed

    Lötsch, Jörn; Ultsch, Alfred

    2016-01-01

    Specialization is ubiquitous in biological systems and its manifold mechanisms are active research topics. Although clearly adaptive, the way in which specialization of cells is realized remains incompletely understood as it requires the reshaping of a cell's genome to favor particular biological processes in the competition on a cell's functional capacity. Here, a self-specialization mechanism is identified as a possible biological role of jumping genes, in particular LINE-1 retrotransposition. The mechanism is self-limiting and consistent with its evolutionary preservation despite its likely gene-breaking effects. The scenario we studied was the need for a cell to process a longer exposition to an extraordinary situation, for example continuous exposure to the nociceptive input or the intake of addictive drugs. Both situations may evolve toward chronification. The mechanism involves competition within a gene set in which a subset of genes cooperating in particular biological processes. The subset carries a piece of information, consisting of the LINE-1 sequence, about the destruction of their functional competitor genes which are not involved in that process. During gene transcription, an active copy of LINE-1 is co-transcribed. At a certain low probability, a subsequently transcribed and thus actually exposed gene can be rendered nonfunctional by LINE-1 retrotransposition in a relevant gene part. As retrotransposition needs time it is unlikely that LINE-1 retrotranspose into its own carrier gene. This reshapes the cell genome toward self-specializing of those biological processes that are carried out with a high number of LINE-1 containing genes. Self-termination of the mechanism is achieved by allowing LINE-1 to also occasionally jump into the coding region of itself, thus destroying the information about competitor destruction by successively decreasing the number of LINE-1 until the mechanism ceases. Employing a computational functional genomics approach, we

  15. Accessing the genomic information of unculturable oceanic picoeukaryotes by combining multiple single cells

    PubMed Central

    Mangot, Jean-François; Logares, Ramiro; Sánchez, Pablo; Latorre, Fran; Seeleuthner, Yoann; Mondy, Samuel; Sieracki, Michael E.; Jaillon, Olivier; Wincker, Patrick; Vargas, Colomban de; Massana, Ramon

    2017-01-01

    Pico-sized eukaryotes play key roles in the functioning of marine ecosystems, but we still have a limited knowledge on their ecology and evolution. The MAST-4 lineage is of particular interest, since it is widespread in surface oceans, presents ecotypic differentiation and has defied culturing efforts so far. Single cell genomics (SCG) are promising tools to retrieve genomic information from these uncultured organisms. However, SCG are based on whole genome amplification, which normally introduces amplification biases that limit the amount of genomic data retrieved from a single cell. Here, we increase the recovery of genomic information from two MAST-4 lineages by co-assembling short reads from multiple Single Amplified Genomes (SAGs) belonging to evolutionary closely related cells. We found that complementary genomic information is retrieved from different SAGs, generating co-assembly that features >74% of genome recovery, against about 20% when assembled individually. Even though this approach is not aimed at generating high-quality draft genomes, it allows accessing to the genomic information of microbes that would otherwise remain unreachable. Since most of the picoeukaryotes still remain uncultured, our work serves as a proof-of-concept that can be applied to other taxa in order to extract genomic data and address new ecological and evolutionary questions. PMID:28128359

  16. Accessing the genomic information of unculturable oceanic picoeukaryotes by combining multiple single cells.

    PubMed

    Mangot, Jean-François; Logares, Ramiro; Sánchez, Pablo; Latorre, Fran; Seeleuthner, Yoann; Mondy, Samuel; Sieracki, Michael E; Jaillon, Olivier; Wincker, Patrick; Vargas, Colomban de; Massana, Ramon

    2017-01-27

    Pico-sized eukaryotes play key roles in the functioning of marine ecosystems, but we still have a limited knowledge on their ecology and evolution. The MAST-4 lineage is of particular interest, since it is widespread in surface oceans, presents ecotypic differentiation and has defied culturing efforts so far. Single cell genomics (SCG) are promising tools to retrieve genomic information from these uncultured organisms. However, SCG are based on whole genome amplification, which normally introduces amplification biases that limit the amount of genomic data retrieved from a single cell. Here, we increase the recovery of genomic information from two MAST-4 lineages by co-assembling short reads from multiple Single Amplified Genomes (SAGs) belonging to evolutionary closely related cells. We found that complementary genomic information is retrieved from different SAGs, generating co-assembly that features >74% of genome recovery, against about 20% when assembled individually. Even though this approach is not aimed at generating high-quality draft genomes, it allows accessing to the genomic information of microbes that would otherwise remain unreachable. Since most of the picoeukaryotes still remain uncultured, our work serves as a proof-of-concept that can be applied to other taxa in order to extract genomic data and address new ecological and evolutionary questions.

  17. CRISPR/Cas9 Based Genome Editing of Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Pohl, C; Kiel, J A K W; Driessen, A J M; Bovenberg, R A L; Nygård, Y

    2016-07-15

    CRISPR/Cas9 based systems have emerged as versatile platforms for precision genome editing in a wide range of organisms. Here we have developed powerful CRISPR/Cas9 tools for marker-based and marker-free genome modifications in Penicillium chrysogenum, a model filamentous fungus and industrially relevant cell factory. The developed CRISPR/Cas9 toolbox is highly flexible and allows editing of new targets with minimal cloning efforts. The Cas9 protein and the sgRNA can be either delivered during transformation, as preassembled CRISPR-Cas9 ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) or expressed from an AMA1 based plasmid within the cell. The direct delivery of the Cas9 protein with in vitro synthesized sgRNA to the cells allows for a transient method for genome engineering that may rapidly be applicable for other filamentous fungi. The expression of Cas9 from an AMA1 based vector was shown to be highly efficient for marker-free gene deletions.

  18. Calibrating genomic and allelic coverage bias in single-cell sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Joshua; Cornils, Hauke; Jung, Joonil; Maire, Cecile; Ligon, Keith L.; Meyerson, Matthew; Love, J. Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Artifacts introduced in whole-genome amplification (WGA) make it difficult to derive accurate genomic information from single-cell genomes and require different analytical strategies from bulk genome analysis. Here, we describe statistical methods to quantitatively assess the amplification bias resulting from whole-genome amplification of single-cell genomic DNA. Analysis of single-cell DNA libraries generated by different technologies revealed universal features of the genome coverage bias predominantly generated at the amplicon level (1–10 kb). The magnitude of coverage bias can be accurately calibrated from low-pass sequencing (~0.1 ×) to predict the depth-of-coverage yield of single-cell DNA libraries sequenced at arbitrary depths. We further provide a benchmark comparison of single-cell libraries generated by multi-strand displacement amplification (MDA) and multiple annealing and looping-based amplification cycles (MALBAC). Finally, we develop statistical models to calibrate allelic bias in single-cell whole-genome amplification and demonstrate a census-based strategy for efficient and accurate variant detection from low-input biopsy samples. PMID:25879913

  19. Calibrating genomic and allelic coverage bias in single-cell sequencing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng-Zhong; Adalsteinsson, Viktor A; Francis, Joshua; Cornils, Hauke; Jung, Joonil; Maire, Cecile; Ligon, Keith L; Meyerson, Matthew; Love, J Christopher

    2015-04-16

    Artifacts introduced in whole-genome amplification (WGA) make it difficult to derive accurate genomic information from single-cell genomes and require different analytical strategies from bulk genome analysis. Here, we describe statistical methods to quantitatively assess the amplification bias resulting from whole-genome amplification of single-cell genomic DNA. Analysis of single-cell DNA libraries generated by different technologies revealed universal features of the genome coverage bias predominantly generated at the amplicon level (1-10 kb). The magnitude of coverage bias can be accurately calibrated from low-pass sequencing (∼0.1 × ) to predict the depth-of-coverage yield of single-cell DNA libraries sequenced at arbitrary depths. We further provide a benchmark comparison of single-cell libraries generated by multi-strand displacement amplification (MDA) and multiple annealing and looping-based amplification cycles (MALBAC). Finally, we develop statistical models to calibrate allelic bias in single-cell whole-genome amplification and demonstrate a census-based strategy for efficient and accurate variant detection from low-input biopsy samples.

  20. From Genomics to Gene Therapy: Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Meet Genome Editing.

    PubMed

    Hotta, Akitsu; Yamanaka, Shinya

    2015-01-01

    The advent of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells has opened up numerous avenues of opportunity for cell therapy, including the initiation in September 2014 of the first human clinical trial to treat dry age-related macular degeneration. In parallel, advances in genome-editing technologies by site-specific nucleases have dramatically improved our ability to edit endogenous genomic sequences at targeted sites of interest. In fact, clinical trials have already begun to implement this technology to control HIV infection. Genome editing in iPS cells is a powerful tool and enables researchers to investigate the intricacies of the human genome in a dish. In the near future, the groundwork laid by such an approach may expand the possibilities of gene therapy for treating congenital disorders. In this review, we summarize the exciting progress being made in the utilization of genomic editing technologies in pluripotent stem cells and discuss remaining challenges toward gene therapy applications.

  1. Genome inside genome: NGS based identification and assembly of endophytic Sphingopyxis granuli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa genomes from rice genomic reads.

    PubMed

    Battu, Latha; Reddy, Mettu Madhavi; Goud, Burragoni Sravanthi; Ulaganathan, Kayalvili; Kandasamy, Ulaganathan

    2017-02-10

    The interactions between crop plants and the endophytic bacteria colonizing them are poorly understood and experimental methods were found to be inadequate to meet the complexities associated with the interaction. Moreover, research on endophytic bacteria was focused at host plant species level and not at cultivar level which is essential for understanding the role played by them on the productivity of specific crop genotype. High throughput genomics offers valuable tools for identification, characterization of endophytic bacteria and understand their interaction with host plants. In this paper we report the use of high throughput plant genomic data for identification of endophytic bacteria colonizing rice plants. Using this novel next generation sequencing based computational method Sphingopyxis granuli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were identified as endophytes colonizing the elite indica rice cultivar RP Bio-226 and their draft genome sequences were assembled.

  2. Genome Sequence of Mycoplasma hyorhinis Isolated from Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Cibulski, Samuel Paulo; Siqueira, Franciele Maboni; Teixeira, Thais Fumaco; Mayer, Fabiana Quoos; Almeida, Luiz Gonzaga

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasmas are major contaminants of mammalian cell cultures. Here, the complete genome sequence of Mycoplasma hyorhinis recovered from Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells is reported. PMID:27738034

  3. Aberrant genomic imprinting in rhesus monkey embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Akihisa; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat M; Kuo, Hung-Chih; Wolf, Don P

    2006-03-01

    Genomic imprinting involves modification of a gene or a chromosomal region that results in the differential expression of parental alleles. Disruption or inappropriate expression of imprinted genes is associated with several clinically significant syndromes and tumorigenesis in humans. Additionally, abnormal imprinting occurs in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and in clonally derived animals. Imprinted gene expression patterns in primate ESCs are largely unknown, despite the clinical potential of the latter in the cell-based treatment of human disease. Because of the possible implications of abnormal gene expression to cell or tissue replacement therapies involving ESCs, we examined allele specific expression of four imprinted genes in the rhesus macaque. Genomic and complementary DNA from embryos and ESC lines containing useful single nucleotide polymorphisms were subjected to polymerase chain reaction-based amplification and sequence analysis. In blastocysts, NDN expression was variable indicating abnormal or incomplete imprinting whereas IGF2 and SNRPN were expressed exclusively from the paternal allele and H19 from the maternal allele as expected. In ESCs, both NDN and SNRPN were expressed from the paternal allele while IGF2 and H19 showed loss of imprinting and biallelic expression. In differentiated ESC progeny, these expression patterns were maintained. The implications of aberrant imprinted gene expression to ESC differentiation in vitro and on ESC-derived cell function in vivo after transplantation are unknown.

  4. CD8+ T cell recognition of epitopes within the capsid of adeno-associated virus 8-based gene transfer vectors depends on vectors' genome.

    PubMed

    Wu, Te-Lang; Li, Hua; Faust, Susan M; Chi, Emily; Zhou, Shangzhen; Wright, Fraser; High, Katherine A; Ertl, Hildegund C J

    2014-01-01

    Self-complementary adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors expressing human factor IX (hF.IX) have achieved transient or sustained correction of hemophilia B in human volunteers. High doses of AAV2 or AAV8 vectors delivered to the liver caused in several patients an increase in transaminases accompanied by a rise in AAV capsid-specific T cells and a decrease in circulating hF.IX levels suggesting immune-mediated destruction of vector-transduced cells. Kinetics of these adverse events differed in patients receiving AAV2 or AAV8 vectors causing rise in transaminases at 3 versus 8 weeks after vector injection, respectively. To test if CD8+ T cells to AAV8 vectors, which are similar to AAV2 vectors are fully-gutted vectors and thereby fail to encode structural viral proteins, could cause damage at this late time point, we tested in a series of mouse studies how long major histocompatibility (MHC) class I epitopes within AAV8 capsid can be presented to CD8+ T cells. Our results clearly show that depending on the vectors' genome, CD8+ T cells can detect such epitopes on AAV8's capsid for up to 6 months indicating that the capsid of AAV8 degrades slowly in mice.

  5. UV Decontamination of MDA Reagents for Single Cell Genomics

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Janey; Tighe, Damon; Sczyrba, Alexander; Malmatrom, Rex; Clingenpeel, Scott; Malfatti, Stephanie; Rinke, Christian; Wang, Zhong; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Woyke, Tanja

    2011-03-18

    Single cell genomics, the amplification and sequencing of genomes from single cells, can provide a glimpse into the genetic make-up and thus life style of the vast majority of uncultured microbial cells, making it an immensely powerful and increasingly popular tool. This is accomplished by use of multiple displacement amplification (MDA), which can generate billions of copies of a single bacterial genome producing microgram-range DNA required for shotgun sequencing. Here, we address a key challenge inherent to this approach and propose a solution for the improved recovery of single cell genomes. While DNA-free reagents for the amplification of a single cell genome are a prerequisite for successful single cell sequencing and analysis, DNA contamination has been detected in various reagents, which poses a considerable challenge. Our study demonstrates the effect of UV irradiation in efficient elimination of exogenous contaminant DNA found in MDA reagents, while maintaining Phi29 activity. Consequently, we also find that increased UV exposure to Phi29 does not adversely affect genome coverage of MDA amplified single cells. While additional challenges in single cell genomics remain to be resolved, the proposed methodology is relatively quick and simple and we believe that its application will be of high value for future single cell sequencing projects.

  6. Accuracy of Answers to Cell Lineage Questions Depends on Single-Cell Genomics Data Quality and Quantity.

    PubMed

    Spiro, Adam; Shapiro, Ehud

    2016-06-01

    Advances in single-cell (SC) genomics enable commensurate improvements in methods for uncovering lineage relations among individual cells, as determined by phylogenetic analysis of the somatic mutations harbored by each cell. Theoretically, complete and accurate knowledge of the genome of each cell of an individual can produce an extremely accurate cell lineage tree of that individual. However, the reality of SC genomics is that such complete and accurate knowledge would be wanting, in quality and in quantity, for the foreseeable future. In this paper we offer a framework for systematically exploring the feasibility of answering cell lineage questions based on SC somatic mutational analysis, as a function of SC genomics data quality and quantity. We take into consideration the current limitations of SC genomics in terms of mutation data quality, most notably amplification bias and allele dropouts (ADO), as well as cost, which puts practical limits on mutation data quantity obtained from each cell as well as on cell sample density. We do so by generating in silico cell lineage trees using a dedicated formal language, eSTG, and show how the ability to answer correctly a cell lineage question depends on the quality and quantity of the SC mutation data. The presented framework can serve as a baseline for the potential of current SC genomics to unravel cell lineage dynamics, as well as the potential contributions of future advancement, both biochemical and computational, for the task.

  7. Genome editing: a robust technology for human stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Arun Pandian; Song, Minjung; Ramakrishna, Suresh

    2017-09-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells comprise induced pluripotent and embryonic stem cells, which have tremendous potential for biological and therapeutic applications. The development of efficient technologies for the targeted genome alteration of stem cells in disease models is a prerequisite for utilizing stem cells to their full potential. Genome editing of stem cells is possible with the help of synthetic nucleases that facilitate site-specific modification of a gene of interest. Recent advances in genome editing techniques have improved the efficiency and speed of the development of stem cells for human disease models. Zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated system are powerful tools for editing DNA at specific loci. Here, we discuss recent technological advances in genome editing with site-specific nucleases in human stem cells.

  8. Whole Genome Amplification in Genomic Analysis of Single Circulating Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Gasch, Christin; Pantel, Klaus; Riethdorf, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Investigation of the genome of organisms is one of the major basics in molecular biology to understand the complex organization of cells. While genomic DNA can easily be isolated from tissues or cell cultures of plant, animal or human origin, DNA extraction from single cells is still challenging. Here, we describe three techniques for the amplification of genomic DNA of fixed single circulating tumor cells (CTC) isolated from blood of cancer patients. This amplification is aimed to increase DNA amounts from those of one cell to yields sufficient for different DNA analyses such as mutational analysis including next-generation sequencing, array-comparative genome hybridization (CGH), and quantitative measurement of gene amplifications. Molecular analysis of CTC as liquid biopsy can be used to identify therapeutic targets in personalized medicine directed, e.g. against human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and to stratify the patients to those therapies.

  9. Single cell genome analysis of an uncultured heterotrophic stramenopile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Rajat S.; Price, Dana C.; Schliep, Alexander; Cai, Guohong; Korobeynikov, Anton; Yoon, Hwan Su; Yang, Eun Chan; Bhattacharya, Debashish

    2014-04-01

    A broad swath of eukaryotic microbial biodiversity cannot be cultivated in the lab and is therefore inaccessible to conventional genome-wide comparative methods. One promising approach to study these lineages is single cell genomics (SCG), whereby an individual cell is captured from nature and genome data are produced from the amplified total DNA. Here we tested the efficacy of SCG to generate a draft genome assembly from a single sample, in this case a cell belonging to the broadly distributed MAST-4 uncultured marine stramenopiles. Using de novo gene prediction, we identified 6,996 protein-encoding genes in the MAST-4 genome. This genetic inventory was sufficient to place the cell within the ToL using multigene phylogenetics and provided preliminary insights into the complex evolutionary history of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) in the MAST-4 lineage.

  10. Single cell genome analysis of an uncultured heterotrophic stramenopile

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Rajat S.; Price, Dana C.; Schliep, Alexander; Cai, Guohong; Korobeynikov, Anton; Yoon, Hwan Su; Yang, Eun Chan; Bhattacharya, Debashish

    2014-01-01

    A broad swath of eukaryotic microbial biodiversity cannot be cultivated in the lab and is therefore inaccessible to conventional genome-wide comparative methods. One promising approach to study these lineages is single cell genomics (SCG), whereby an individual cell is captured from nature and genome data are produced from the amplified total DNA. Here we tested the efficacy of SCG to generate a draft genome assembly from a single sample, in this case a cell belonging to the broadly distributed MAST-4 uncultured marine stramenopiles. Using de novo gene prediction, we identified 6,996 protein-encoding genes in the MAST-4 genome. This genetic inventory was sufficient to place the cell within the ToL using multigene phylogenetics and provided preliminary insights into the complex evolutionary history of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) in the MAST-4 lineage. PMID:24759094

  11. Genome annotation in a community college cell biology lab.

    PubMed

    Beagley, C Timothy

    2013-01-01

    The Biology Department at Salt Lake Community College has used the IMG-ACT toolbox to introduce a genome mapping and annotation exercise into the laboratory portion of its Cell Biology course. This project provides students with an authentic inquiry-based learning experience while introducing them to computational biology and contemporary learning skills. Additionally, the project strengthens student understanding of the scientific method and contributes to student learning gains in curricular objectives centered around basic molecular biology, specifically, the Central Dogma. Importantly, inclusion of this project in the laboratory course provides students with a positive learning environment and allows for the use of cooperative learning strategies to increase overall student success.

  12. Integrated Genome-Based Studies of Shewanella Echophysiology

    SciTech Connect

    Margrethe H. Serres

    2012-06-29

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a motile, facultative {gamma}-Proteobacterium with remarkable respiratory versatility; it can utilize a range of organic and inorganic compounds as terminal electronacceptors for anaerobic metabolism. The ability to effectively reduce nitrate, S0, polyvalent metals andradionuclides has established MR-1 as an important model dissimilatory metal-reducing microorganism for genome-based investigations of biogeochemical transformation of metals and radionuclides that are of concern to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites nationwide. Metal-reducing bacteria such as Shewanella also have a highly developed capacity for extracellular transfer of respiratory electrons to solid phase Fe and Mn oxides as well as directly to anode surfaces in microbial fuel cells. More broadly, Shewanellae are recognized free-living microorganisms and members of microbial communities involved in the decomposition of organic matter and the cycling of elements in aquatic and sedimentary systems. To function and compete in environments that are subject to spatial and temporal environmental change, Shewanella must be able to sense and respond to such changes and therefore require relatively robust sensing and regulation systems. The overall goal of this project is to apply the tools of genomics, leveraging the availability of genome sequence for 18 additional strains of Shewanella, to better understand the ecophysiology and speciation of respiratory-versatile members of this important genus. To understand these systems we propose to use genome-based approaches to investigate Shewanella as a system of integrated networks; first describing key cellular subsystems - those involved in signal transduction, regulation, and metabolism - then building towards understanding the function of whole cells and, eventually, cells within populations. As a general approach, this project will employ complimentary "top-down" - bioinformatics-based genome functional predictions, high

  13. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis guided by single-cell genomics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) aims to help couples with heritable genetic disorders to avoid the birth of diseased offspring or the recurrence of loss of conception. Following in vitro fertilization, one or a few cells are biopsied from each human preimplantation embryo for genetic testing, allowing diagnosis and selection of healthy embryos for uterine transfer. Although classical methods, including single-cell PCR and fluorescent in situ hybridization, enable PGD for many genetic disorders, they have limitations. They often require family-specific designs and can be labor intensive, resulting in long waiting lists. Furthermore, certain types of genetic anomalies are not easy to diagnose using these classical approaches, and healthy offspring carrying the parental mutant allele(s) can result. Recently, state-of-the-art methods for single-cell genomics have flourished, which may overcome the limitations associated with classical PGD, and these underpin the development of generic assays for PGD that enable selection of embryos not only for the familial genetic disorder in question, but also for various other genetic aberrations and traits at once. Here, we discuss the latest single-cell genomics methodologies based on DNA microarrays, single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays or next-generation sequence analysis. We focus on their strengths, their validation status, their weaknesses and the challenges for implementing them in PGD. PMID:23998893

  14. Mechanisms of Base Substitution Mutagenesis in Cancer Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Bacolla, Albino; Cooper, David N.; Vasquez, Karen M.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer genome sequence data provide an invaluable resource for inferring the key mechanisms by which mutations arise in cancer cells, favoring their survival, proliferation and invasiveness. Here we examine recent advances in understanding the molecular mechanisms responsible for the predominant type of genetic alteration found in cancer cells, somatic single base substitutions (SBSs). Cytosine methylation, demethylation and deamination, charge transfer reactions in DNA, DNA replication timing, chromatin status and altered DNA proofreading activities are all now known to contribute to the mechanisms leading to base substitution mutagenesis. We review current hypotheses as to the major processes that give rise to SBSs and evaluate their relative relevance in the light of knowledge acquired from cancer genome sequencing projects and the study of base modifications, DNA repair and lesion bypass. Although gene expression data on APOBEC3B enzymes provide support for a role in cancer mutagenesis through U:G mismatch intermediates, the enzyme preference for single-stranded DNA may limit its activity genome-wide. For SBSs at both CG:CG and YC:GR sites, we outline evidence for a prominent role of damage by charge transfer reactions that follow interactions of the DNA with reactive oxygen species (ROS) and other endogenous or exogenous electron-abstracting molecules. PMID:24705290

  15. Distinct p53 genomic binding patterns in normal and cancer-derived human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Botcheva K.; McCorkle S. R.; McCombie W. R.; Dunn J. J.; Anderson C. W.

    2011-12-15

    We report here genome-wide analysis of the tumor suppressor p53 binding sites in normal human cells. 743 high-confidence ChIP-seq peaks representing putative genomic binding sites were identified in normal IMR90 fibroblasts using a reference chromatin sample. More than 40% were located within 2 kb of a transcription start site (TSS), a distribution similar to that documented for individually studied, functional p53 binding sites and, to date, not observed by previous p53 genome-wide studies. Nearly half of the high-confidence binding sites in the IMR90 cells reside in CpG islands, in marked contrast to sites reported in cancer-derived cells. The distinct genomic features of the IMR90 binding sites do not reflect a distinct preference for specific sequences, since the de novo developed p53 motif based on our study is similar to those reported by genome-wide studies of cancer cells. More likely, the different chromatin landscape in normal, compared with cancer-derived cells, influences p53 binding via modulating availability of the sites. We compared the IMR90 ChIPseq peaks to the recently published IMR90 methylome1 and demonstrated that they are enriched at hypomethylated DNA. Our study represents the first genome-wide, de novo mapping of p53 binding sites in normal human cells and reveals that p53 binding sites reside in distinct genomic landscapes in normal and cancer-derived human cells.

  16. Recent advances in microbial single cell genomics technology and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanauskas, R.

    2015-12-01

    Single cell genomics is increasingly utilized as a powerful tool to decipher the metabolic potential, evolutionary histories and in situ interactions of environmental microorganisms. I will present several new developments of this exciting technology, which improve genomic data recovery from individual cells and allow its integration with cell's phenotypic properties. I will also demonstrate how these new technical capabilities help understanding the biology of the "microbial dark matter" inhabiting marine and terrestrial subsurface environments.

  17. New Array Approaches to Explore Single Cells Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Vanneste, Evelyne; Bittman, Lilach; Van der Aa, Niels; Voet, Thierry; Vermeesch, Joris Robert

    2011-01-01

    Microarray analysis enables the genome-wide detection of copy number variations and the investigation of chromosomal instability. Whereas array techniques have been well established for the analysis of unamplified DNA derived from many cells, it has been more challenging to enable the accurate analysis of single cell genomes. In this review, we provide an overview of single cell DNA amplification techniques, the different array approaches, and discuss their potential applications to study human embryos. PMID:22509179

  18. A Single-Cell Genome for Thiovulum sp.

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Ian P. G.; Blainey, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    We determined a significant fraction of the genome sequence of a representative of Thiovulum, the uncultivated genus of colorless sulfur Epsilonproteobacteria, by analyzing the genome sequences of four individual cells collected from phototrophic mats from Elkhorn Slough, California. These cells were isolated utilizing a microfluidic laser-tweezing system, and their genomes were amplified by multiple-displacement amplification prior to sequencing. Thiovulum is a gradient bacterium found at oxic-anoxic marine interfaces and noted for its distinctive morphology and rapid swimming motility. The genomic sequences of the four individual cells were assembled into a composite genome consisting of 221 contigs covering 2.083 Mb including 2,162 genes. This single-cell genome represents a genomic view of the physiological capabilities of isolated Thiovulum cells. Thiovulum is the second-fastest bacterium ever observed, swimming at 615 μm/s, and this genome shows that this rapid swimming motility is a result of a standard flagellar machinery that has been extensively characterized in other bacteria. This suggests that standard flagella are capable of propelling bacterial cells at speeds much faster than typically thought. Analysis of the genome suggests that naturally occurring Thiovulum populations are more diverse than previously recognized and that studies performed in the past probably address a wide range of unrecognized genotypic and phenotypic diversities of Thiovulum. The genome presented in this article provides a basis for future isolation-independent studies of Thiovulum, where single-cell and metagenomic tools can be used to differentiate between different Thiovulum genotypes. PMID:23023751

  19. GenColors-based comparative genome databases for small eukaryotic genomes.

    PubMed

    Felder, Marius; Romualdi, Alessandro; Petzold, Andreas; Platzer, Matthias; Sühnel, Jürgen; Glöckner, Gernot

    2013-01-01

    Many sequence data repositories can give a quick and easily accessible overview on genomes and their annotations. Less widespread is the possibility to compare related genomes with each other in a common database environment. We have previously described the GenColors database system (http://gencolors.fli-leibniz.de) and its applications to a number of bacterial genomes such as Borrelia, Legionella, Leptospira and Treponema. This system has an emphasis on genome comparison. It combines data from related genomes and provides the user with an extensive set of visualization and analysis tools. Eukaryote genomes are normally larger than prokaryote genomes and thus pose additional challenges for such a system. We have, therefore, adapted GenColors to also handle larger datasets of small eukaryotic genomes and to display eukaryotic gene structures. Further recent developments include whole genome views, genome list options and, for bacterial genome browsers, the display of horizontal gene transfer predictions. Two new GenColors-based databases for two fungal species (http://fgb.fli-leibniz.de) and for four social amoebas (http://sacgb.fli-leibniz.de) were set up. Both new resources open up a single entry point for related genomes for the amoebozoa and fungal research communities and other interested users. Comparative genomics approaches are greatly facilitated by these resources.

  20. GenColors-based comparative genome databases for small eukaryotic genomes

    PubMed Central

    Felder, Marius; Romualdi, Alessandro; Petzold, Andreas; Platzer, Matthias; Sühnel, Jürgen; Glöckner, Gernot

    2013-01-01

    Many sequence data repositories can give a quick and easily accessible overview on genomes and their annotations. Less widespread is the possibility to compare related genomes with each other in a common database environment. We have previously described the GenColors database system (http://gencolors.fli-leibniz.de) and its applications to a number of bacterial genomes such as Borrelia, Legionella, Leptospira and Treponema. This system has an emphasis on genome comparison. It combines data from related genomes and provides the user with an extensive set of visualization and analysis tools. Eukaryote genomes are normally larger than prokaryote genomes and thus pose additional challenges for such a system. We have, therefore, adapted GenColors to also handle larger datasets of small eukaryotic genomes and to display eukaryotic gene structures. Further recent developments include whole genome views, genome list options and, for bacterial genome browsers, the display of horizontal gene transfer predictions. Two new GenColors-based databases for two fungal species (http://fgb.fli-leibniz.de) and for four social amoebas (http://sacgb.fli-leibniz.de) were set up. Both new resources open up a single entry point for related genomes for the amoebozoa and fungal research communities and other interested users. Comparative genomics approaches are greatly facilitated by these resources. PMID:23193285

  1. Prognostic value of genomic damage in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    de Juan, C; Iniesta, P; Vega, F J; Peinado, M A; Fernandez, C; Caldés, T; Massa, M J; López, J A; Sánchez, A; Torres, A J; Balibrea, J L; Benito, M

    1998-06-01

    Genomic alterations have been analysed in 65 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tissue samples by using the arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction (AP-PCR), which is a PCR-based genomic fingerprinting. We have shown that AP-PCR may be applied as a useful and feasible practical method for detection of the genomic alterations that accompany malignancy in NSCLC. Genomic changes detected by us consisted of: allelic losses or gains in anonymous DNA sequences, homozygously deleted DNA sequences and polymorphic DNA sequences. According to these genomic changes, lung tumours evaluated in the present study have been scored into three groups: low, moderate and high genomic damage tumours. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of genomic damage on patient survival. Survival analysis was carried out in 51 NSCLC patients. Our results revealed that high genomic damage patients showed a poorer prognosis than those with low or moderate genomic damage (P = 0.038). Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that patients with higher genomic alterations displayed an adjusted-by-stage risk ratio 4.26 times higher than the remaining patients (95% CI = 1.03-17.54). We can conclude that genomic damage has an independent prognostic value of poor clinical evolution in NSCLC.

  2. Ten years of bacterial genome sequencing: comparative-genomics-based discoveries.

    PubMed

    Binnewies, Tim T; Motro, Yair; Hallin, Peter F; Lund, Ole; Dunn, David; La, Tom; Hampson, David J; Bellgard, Matthew; Wassenaar, Trudy M; Ussery, David W

    2006-07-01

    It has been more than 10 years since the first bacterial genome sequence was published. Hundreds of bacterial genome sequences are now available for comparative genomics, and searching a given protein against more than a thousand genomes will soon be possible. The subject of this review will address a relatively straightforward question: "What have we learned from this vast amount of new genomic data?" Perhaps one of the most important lessons has been that genetic diversity, at the level of large-scale variation amongst even genomes of the same species, is far greater than was thought. The classical textbook view of evolution relying on the relatively slow accumulation of mutational events at the level of individual bases scattered throughout the genome has changed. One of the most obvious conclusions from examining the sequences from several hundred bacterial genomes is the enormous amount of diversity--even in different genomes from the same bacterial species. This diversity is generated by a variety of mechanisms, including mobile genetic elements and bacteriophages. An examination of the 20 Escherichia coli genomes sequenced so far dramatically illustrates this, with the genome size ranging from 4.6 to 5.5 Mbp; much of the variation appears to be of phage origin. This review also addresses mobile genetic elements, including pathogenicity islands and the structure of transposable elements. There are at least 20 different methods available to compare bacterial genomes. Metagenomics offers the chance to study genomic sequences found in ecosystems, including genomes of species that are difficult to culture. It has become clear that a genome sequence represents more than just a collection of gene sequences for an organism and that information concerning the environment and growth conditions for the organism are important for interpretation of the genomic data. The newly proposed Minimal Information about a Genome Sequence standard has been developed to obtain this

  3. Genetic recombination pathways and their application for genome modification of human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, Mikko; Tuuri, Timo; Savilahti, Harri

    2010-10-01

    Human embryonic stem cells are pluripotent cells derived from early human embryo and retain a potential to differentiate into all adult cell types. They provide vast opportunities in cell replacement therapies and are expected to become significant tools in drug discovery as well as in the studies of cellular and developmental functions of human genes. The progress in applying different types of DNA recombination reactions for genome modification in a variety of eukaryotic cell types has provided means to utilize recombination-based strategies also in human embryonic stem cells. Homologous recombination-based methods, particularly those utilizing extended homologous regions and those employing zinc finger nucleases to boost genomic integration, have shown their usefulness in efficient genome modification. Site-specific recombination systems are potent genome modifiers, and they can be used to integrate DNA into loci that contain an appropriate recombination signal sequence, either naturally occurring or suitably pre-engineered. Non-homologous recombination can be used to generate random integrations in genomes relatively effortlessly, albeit with a moderate efficiency and precision. DNA transposition-based strategies offer substantially more efficient random strategies and provide means to generate single-copy insertions, thus potentiating the generation of genome-wide insertion libraries applicable in genetic screens. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Extraction and Elongation of Genomic DNA from a Single Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prinz, Christelle; Tegenfeldt, Jonas; Austin, Robert

    2001-03-01

    We are developing ways to use microfabricated electrode arrays to extract genomic DNA from single E. coli cells and then move the genomic material into an dielectrophoretic trap for clean-up and fractionation. We will present some preliminary data and discuss some of basic polymer physics that impact on these experiments.

  5. Dissecting the human microbiome with single-cell genomics.

    PubMed

    Tolonen, Andrew C; Xavier, Ramnik J

    2017-06-14

    Recent advances in genome sequencing of single microbial cells enable the assignment of functional roles to members of the human microbiome that cannot currently be cultured. This approach can reveal the genomic basis of phenotypic variation between closely related strains and can be applied to the targeted study of immunogenic bacteria in disease.

  6. Genome-wide analysis of histone methylation reveals chromatin state-based complex regulation of differential gene transcription and function of CD8 memory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Araki, Yasuto; Wang, Zhibin; Zang, Chongzhi; Wood, William H.; Schones, Dustin; Cui, Kairong; Roh, Tae-Young; Lhotsky, Brad; Wersto, Robert P.; Peng, Weiqun; Becker, Kevin G.; Zhao, Keji; Weng, Nan-ping

    2009-01-01

    Summary Memory lymphocytes are characterized by their ability to exhibit a rapid response to the recall antigen, in which differential transcription plays a significant role, yet the underlying mechanism is not understood. We report here a genome-wide analysis of histone methylation on two histone H3 lysine residues (H3K4me3 and H3K27me3) and gene expression profiles in naïve and memory CD8 T cells. We found that a general correlation exists between the levels of gene expression and the levels of H3K4me3 (positive correlation) and H3K27me3 (negative correlation) across the gene body. These correlations display four distinct modes: repressive, active, poised, and bivalent, reflecting different functions of these genes. Furthermore, a permissive chromatin state of each gene is established by a combination of different histone modifications. Our findings reveal a complex regulation by histone methylation in differential gene expression and suggest that histone methylation may be responsible for memory CD8 T cell function. PMID:19523850

  7. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis in identification of metastasis-related genes of lung squamous cell carcinoma based on the Cancer Genome Atlas database.

    PubMed

    Tian, Feng; Zhao, Jinlong; Fan, Xinlei; Kang, Zhenxing

    2017-01-01

    Lung squamous cell carcinoma (lung SCC) is a common type of malignancy. Its pathogenesis mechanism of tumor development is unclear. The aim of this study was to identify key genes for diagnosis biomarkers in lung SCC metastasis. We searched and downloaded mRNA expression data and clinical data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database to identify differences in mRNA expression of primary tumor tissues from lung SCC with and without metastasis. Gene co-expression network analysis, protein-protein interaction (PPI) network, Gene Ontology (GO), Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reactions (qRT-PCR) were used to explore the biological functions of the identified dysregulated genes. Four hundred and eighty-two differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified between lung SCC with and without metastasis. Nineteen modules were identified in lung SCC through weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA). Twenty-three DEGs and 26 DEGs were significantly enriched in the respective pink and black module. KEGG pathway analysis displayed that 26 DEGs in the black module were significantly enriched in bile secretion pathway. Forty-nine DEGs in the two gene co-expression module were used to construct PPI network. CFTR in the black module was the hub protein, had the connectivity with 182 genes. The results of qRT-PCR displayed that FIGF, SFTPD, DYNLRB2 were significantly down-regulated in the tumor samples of lung SCC with metastasis and CFTR, SCGB3A2, SSTR1, SCTR, ROPN1L had the down-regulation tendency in lung SCC with metastasis compared to lung SCC without metastasis. The dysregulated genes including CFTR, SCTR and FIGF might be involved in the pathology of lung SCC metastasis and could be used as potential diagnosis biomarkers or therapeutic targets for lung SCC.

  8. Array-Based Comparative Genomic Hybridization Analysis Reveals Chromosomal Copy Number Aberrations Associated with Clinical Outcome in Canine Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Bresolin, Silvia; Marconato, Laura; Comazzi, Stefano; Te Kronnie, Geertruy; Aresu, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Canine Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma (cDLBCL) is an aggressive cancer with variable clinical response. Despite recent attempts by gene expression profiling to identify the dog as a potential animal model for human DLBCL, this tumor remains biologically heterogeneous with no prognostic biomarkers to predict prognosis. The aim of this work was to identify copy number aberrations (CNAs) by high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) in 12 dogs with newly diagnosed DLBCL. In a subset of these dogs, the genetic profiles at the end of therapy and at relapse were also assessed. In primary DLBCLs, 90 different genomic imbalances were counted, consisting of 46 gains and 44 losses. Two gains in chr13 were significantly correlated with clinical stage. In addition, specific regions of gains and losses were significantly associated to duration of remission. In primary DLBCLs, individual variability was found, however 14 recurrent CNAs (>30%) were identified. Losses involving IGK, IGL and IGH were always found, and gains along the length of chr13 and chr31 were often observed (>41%). In these segments, MYC, LDHB, HSF1, KIT and PDGFRα are annotated. At the end of therapy, dogs in remission showed four new CNAs, whereas three new CNAs were observed in dogs at relapse compared with the previous profiles. One ex novo CNA, involving TCR, was present in dogs in remission after therapy, possibly induced by the autologous vaccine. Overall, aCGH identified small CNAs associated with outcome, which, along with future expression studies, may reveal target genes relevant to cDLBCL. PMID:25372838

  9. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis in identification of metastasis-related genes of lung squamous cell carcinoma based on the Cancer Genome Atlas database

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Feng; Zhao, Jinlong; Kang, Zhenxing

    2017-01-01

    Background Lung squamous cell carcinoma (lung SCC) is a common type of malignancy. Its pathogenesis mechanism of tumor development is unclear. The aim of this study was to identify key genes for diagnosis biomarkers in lung SCC metastasis. Methods We searched and downloaded mRNA expression data and clinical data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database to identify differences in mRNA expression of primary tumor tissues from lung SCC with and without metastasis. Gene co-expression network analysis, protein-protein interaction (PPI) network, Gene Ontology (GO), Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reactions (qRT-PCR) were used to explore the biological functions of the identified dysregulated genes. Results Four hundred and eighty-two differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified between lung SCC with and without metastasis. Nineteen modules were identified in lung SCC through weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA). Twenty-three DEGs and 26 DEGs were significantly enriched in the respective pink and black module. KEGG pathway analysis displayed that 26 DEGs in the black module were significantly enriched in bile secretion pathway. Forty-nine DEGs in the two gene co-expression module were used to construct PPI network. CFTR in the black module was the hub protein, had the connectivity with 182 genes. The results of qRT-PCR displayed that FIGF, SFTPD, DYNLRB2 were significantly down-regulated in the tumor samples of lung SCC with metastasis and CFTR, SCGB3A2, SSTR1, SCTR, ROPN1L had the down-regulation tendency in lung SCC with metastasis compared to lung SCC without metastasis. Conclusions The dysregulated genes including CFTR, SCTR and FIGF might be involved in the pathology of lung SCC metastasis and could be used as potential diagnosis biomarkers or therapeutic targets for lung SCC. PMID:28203405

  10. Array-comparative genomic hybridization profiling of immunohistochemical subgroups of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma shows distinct genomic alterations

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ying; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Karnan, Sivasundaram; Miyata, Tomoko; Ohshima, Koichi; Seto, Masao

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) displays striking heterogeneity at the clinical, genetic and molecular levels. Subtypes include germinal center B-cell-like (GCB) DLBCL and activated B-cell-like (ABC) DLBCL, according to microarray analysis, and germinal center type or non-germinal center type by immunohistochemistry. Although some reports have described genomic aberrations based upon microarray classification system, genomic aberrations based upon immunohistochemical classifications have rarely been reported. The present study aimed to ascertain the relationship between genomic aberrations and subtypes identified by immunohistochemistry, and to study the pathogenetic character of Chinese DLBCL. We conducted immunohistochemistry using antibodies against CD10, BCL6 and MUM1 in 59 samples of DLBCL from Chinese patients, and then performed microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization for each case. Characteristic genomic differences were found between GCB and non-GCB DLBCL from the array data. The GCB type was characterized by more gains at 7q (7q22.1, P < 0.05) and losses at 16q (P ≤ 0.05), while the non-GCB type was characterized by gains at 11q24.3 and 3q13.2 (P < 0.05). We found completely different mutations in BCL6+ and BCL6− non-GCB type DLBCL, whereby the BCL6− group had a higher number of gains at 1q and a loss at 14q32.13 (P ≤ 0.005), while the BCL6+ group showed a higher number of gains at 14q23.1 (P = 0.15) and losses at 6q (P = 0.07). The BCL6− group had a higher frequency of genomic imbalances compared to the BCL6+ group. In conclusion, the BCL6+ and BCL6− non-GCB type of DLBCL appear to have different mechanisms of pathogenesis. PMID:24843885

  11. Array-comparative genomic hybridization profiling of immunohistochemical subgroups of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma shows distinct genomic alterations.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ying; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Karnan, Sivasundaram; Miyata, Tomoko; Ohshima, Koichi; Seto, Masao

    2014-04-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) displays striking heterogeneity at the clinical, genetic and molecular levels. Subtypes include germinal center B-cell-like (GCB) DLBCL and activated B-cell-like (ABC) DLBCL, according to microarray analysis, and germinal center type or non-germinal center type by immunohistochemistry. Although some reports have described genomic aberrations based upon microarray classification system, genomic aberrations based upon immunohistochemical classifications have rarely been reported. The present study aimed to ascertain the relationship between genomic aberrations and subtypes identified by immunohistochemistry, and to study the pathogenetic character of Chinese DLBCL. We conducted immunohistochemistry using antibodies against CD10, BCL6 and MUM1 in 59 samples of DLBCL from Chinese patients, and then performed microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization for each case. Characteristic genomic differences were found between GCB and non-GCB DLBCL from the array data. The GCB type was characterized by more gains at 7q (7q22.1, P < 0.05) and losses at 16q (P ≤ 0.05), while the non-GCB type was characterized by gains at 11q24.3 and 3q13.2 (P < 0.05). We found completely different mutations in BCL6+ and BCL6- non-GCB type DLBCL, whereby the BCL6- group had a higher number of gains at 1q and a loss at 14q32.13 (P ≤ 0.005), while the BCL6+ group showed a higher number of gains at 14q23.1 (P = 0.15) and losses at 6q (P = 0.07). The BCL6- group had a higher frequency of genomic imbalances compared to the BCL6+ group. In conclusion, the BCL6+ and BCL6- non-GCB type of DLBCL appear to have different mechanisms of pathogenesis.

  12. Recombinant genomes which express chloramphenicol acetyltransferase in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gorman, C.M.; Moffat, L.F.; Howard, B.H.

    1982-09-01

    The authors constructed a series of recombinant genomes which directed expression of the enzyme chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) in mammalian cells. The prototype recombinant in this series, pSV2-cat, consisted of the beta-lactamase gene and origin of replication from pBR322 coupled to a simian virus 40 (SV40) early transcription region into which CAT coding sequences were inserted. Readily measured levels of CAT accumulated within 48 h after the introduction of pSV2-cat DNA into African green monkey kidney CV-1 cells. Because endogenous CAT activity is not present in CV-1 or other mammalian cells, and because rapid, sensitive assays for CAT activity are available, these recombinants provided a uniquely convenient system for monitoring the expression of foreign DNAs in tissue culture cells. To demonstrate the usefulness of this system, we constructed derivatives of pSV2-cat from which part or all of the SV 40 promoter region was removed. Deletion of one copy of the 72-base-pair repeat sequence in the SV40 promoter caused no significant decrease in CAT synthesis in monkey kidney CV-1 cells; however, an additional deletion of 50 base pairs from the second copy of the repeats reduced CAT synthesis to 11% of its level in the wild type. They also constructed a recombinant, pSVO-cat, in which the entire SV40 promoter region was removed and a unique HindIII site was substituted for the insertion of other promoter sequences.

  13. Genomics and public health: development of Web-based training tools for increasing genomic awareness.

    PubMed

    Bodzin, Jennifer; Kardia, Sharon L R; Goldenberg, Aaron; Raup, Sarah F; Bach, Janice V; Citrin, Toby

    2005-04-01

    In 2001, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention funded three Centers for Genomics and Public Health to develop training tools for increasing genomic awareness. Over the past three years, the centers, working together with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Office of Genomics and Disease Prevention, have developed tools to increase awareness of the impact genomics will have on public health practice, to provide a foundation for understanding basic genomic advances, and to translate the relevance of that information to public health practitioners' own work. These training tools serve to communicate genomic advances and their potential for integration into public heath practice. This paper highlights two of these training tools: 1) Genomics for Public Health Practitioners: The Practical Application of Genomics in Public Health Practice, a Web-based introduction to genomics, and 2) Six Weeks to Genomic Awareness, an in-depth training module on public health genomics. This paper focuses on the processes and collaborative efforts by which these live presentations were developed and delivered as Web-based training sessions.

  14. Genome size and DNA base composition of geophytes: the mirror of phenology and ecology?

    PubMed

    Veselý, Pavel; Bures, Petr; Smarda, Petr; Pavlícek, Tomás

    2012-01-01

    Genome size is known to affect various plant traits such as stomatal size, seed mass, and flower or shoot phenology. However, these associations are not well understood for species with very large genomes, which are laregly represented by geophytic plants. No detailed associations are known between DNA base composition and genome size or species ecology. Genome sizes and GC contents were measured in 219 geophytes together with tentative morpho-anatomical and ecological traits. Increased genome size was associated with earliness of flowering and tendency to grow in humid conditions, and there was a positive correlation between an increase in stomatal size in species with extremely large genomes. Seed mass of geophytes was closely related to their ecology, but not to genomic parameters. Genomic DNA GC content showed a unimodal relationship with genome size but no relationship with species ecology. Evolution of genome size in geophytes is closely related to their ecology and phenology and is also associated with remarkable changes in DNA base composition. Although geophytism together with producing larger cells appears to be an advantageous strategy for fast development of an organism in seasonal habitats, the drought sensitivity of large stomata may restrict the occurrence of geophytes with very large genomes to regions not subject to water stress.

  15. Genome size and DNA base composition of geophytes: the mirror of phenology and ecology?

    PubMed Central

    Veselý, Pavel; Bureš, Petr; Šmarda, Petr; Pavlíček, Tomáš

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Genome size is known to affect various plant traits such as stomatal size, seed mass, and flower or shoot phenology. However, these associations are not well understood for species with very large genomes, which are laregly represented by geophytic plants. No detailed associations are known between DNA base composition and genome size or species ecology. Methods Genome sizes and GC contents were measured in 219 geophytes together with tentative morpho-anatomical and ecological traits. Key Results Increased genome size was associated with earliness of flowering and tendency to grow in humid conditions, and there was a positive correlation between an increase in stomatal size in species with extremely large genomes. Seed mass of geophytes was closely related to their ecology, but not to genomic parameters. Genomic DNA GC content showed a unimodal relationship with genome size but no relationship with species ecology. Conclusions Evolution of genome size in geophytes is closely related to their ecology and phenology and is also associated with remarkable changes in DNA base composition. Although geophytism together with producing larger cells appears to be an advantageous strategy for fast development of an organism in seasonal habitats, the drought sensitivity of large stomata may restrict the occurrence of geophytes with very large genomes to regions not subject to water stress. PMID:22021815

  16. CyanoBase: the cyanobacteria genome database update 2010.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Mitsuteru; Okamoto, Shinobu; Kohara, Mitsuyo; Fujishiro, Tsunakazu; Fujisawa, Takatomo; Sato, Shusei; Tabata, Satoshi; Kaneko, Takakazu; Nakamura, Yasukazu

    2010-01-01

    CyanoBase (http://genome.kazusa.or.jp/cyanobase) is the genome database for cyanobacteria, which are model organisms for photosynthesis. The database houses cyanobacteria species information, complete genome sequences, genome-scale experiment data, gene information, gene annotations and mutant information. In this version, we updated these datasets and improved the navigation and the visual display of the data views. In addition, a web service API now enables users to retrieve the data in various formats with other tools, seamlessly.

  17. CRISPR/Cas9-Based Genome Editing in Plants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaling; Ma, Xingliang; Xie, Xianrong; Liu, Yao-Guang

    2017-01-01

    Recently, genome editing technologies have shown great potential in plants. The newly developed clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 system is a new generation of genome editing tool rapidly replacing the earlier zinc finger nucleases and transcription activator-like effector nucleases systems. Indeed, due to its advantages of simplicity and high efficiency, the CRISPR/Cas9-based genome editing system is becoming a powerful tool in plant science research. Here, we introduce the technical features of the plant CRISPR/Cas9-based genome editing system and its applications in plant functional genomics studies and genetic improvement. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Improved genome recovery and integrated cell-size analyses of individual uncultured microbial cells and viral particles.

    PubMed

    Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Fergusson, Elizabeth A; Brown, Joseph; Poulton, Nicole J; Tupper, Ben; Labonté, Jessica M; Becraft, Eric D; Brown, Julia M; Pachiadaki, Maria G; Povilaitis, Tadas; Thompson, Brian P; Mascena, Corianna J; Bellows, Wendy K; Lubys, Arvydas

    2017-07-20

    Microbial single-cell genomics can be used to provide insights into the metabolic potential, interactions, and evolution of uncultured microorganisms. Here we present WGA-X, a method based on multiple displacement amplification of DNA that utilizes a thermostable mutant of the phi29 polymerase. WGA-X enhances genome recovery from individual microbial cells and viral particles while maintaining ease of use and scalability. The greatest improvements are observed when amplifying high G+C content templates, such as those belonging to the predominant bacteria in agricultural soils. By integrating WGA-X with calibrated index-cell sorting and high-throughput genomic sequencing, we are able to analyze genomic sequences and cell sizes of hundreds of individual, uncultured bacteria, archaea, protists, and viral particles, obtained directly from marine and soil samples, in a single experiment. This approach may find diverse applications in microbiology and in biomedical and forensic studies of humans and other multicellular organisms.Single-cell genomics can be used to study uncultured microorganisms. Here, Stepanauskas et al. present a method combining improved multiple displacement amplification and FACS, to obtain genomic sequences and cell size information from uncultivated microbial cells and viral particles in environmental samples.

  19. Differentiation and Genomic Instability in a Human Mammary Cell Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, R.; Kale, R.; Pettengill, O.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Harvest of prophylactic mastectomy specimens from an obligate heterozygote for ataxia-telangiectasia provided autologous fibroblasts as well epithelial cells (HMEC). The routine availability of these autologous cells has provided an opportunity to study cell-cell interactions in coculture and monoculture, and in 3-dimensional cultures grown in the NASA rotating bioreactor. HMEC and stromal fibroblasts grown in 2-dimensional monoculture were both observed to produce extracellular matrix. Similar matrix was encountered in 3-dimensional cultures containing HMEC. Metaphases were analyzed. For stromal fibroblasts, genomic aberrations were found in 18% of metaphase spreads. For HMEC, aberrations were greater such that a majority were found to be abnormal. The level of genomic instability determined for these noncancerous cells in 2-dimensional monoculture should be useful for generating a human cell model that can correlate the effects of differentiation in 3-dimensional coculture on the level of genomic instability.

  20. Differentiation and Genomic Instability in a Human Mammary Cell Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, R.; Kale, R.; Pettengill, O.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Harvest of prophylactic mastectomy specimens from an obligate heterozygote for ataxia-telangiectasia provided autologous fibroblasts as well epithelial cells (HMEC). The routine availability of these autologous cells has provided an opportunity to study cell-cell interactions in coculture and monoculture, and in 3-dimensional cultures grown in the NASA rotating bioreactor. HMEC and stromal fibroblasts grown in 2-dimensional monoculture were both observed to produce extracellular matrix. Similar matrix was encountered in 3-dimensional cultures containing HMEC. Metaphases were analyzed. For stromal fibroblasts, genomic aberrations were found in 18% of metaphase spreads. For HMEC, aberrations were greater such that a majority were found to be abnormal. The level of genomic instability determined for these noncancerous cells in 2-dimensional monoculture should be useful for generating a human cell model that can correlate the effects of differentiation in 3-dimensional coculture on the level of genomic instability.

  1. Creation of a bacterial cell controlled by a chemically synthesized genome.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Daniel G; Glass, John I; Lartigue, Carole; Noskov, Vladimir N; Chuang, Ray-Yuan; Algire, Mikkel A; Benders, Gwynedd A; Montague, Michael G; Ma, Li; Moodie, Monzia M; Merryman, Chuck; Vashee, Sanjay; Krishnakumar, Radha; Assad-Garcia, Nacyra; Andrews-Pfannkoch, Cynthia; Denisova, Evgeniya A; Young, Lei; Qi, Zhi-Qing; Segall-Shapiro, Thomas H; Calvey, Christopher H; Parmar, Prashanth P; Hutchison, Clyde A; Smith, Hamilton O; Venter, J Craig

    2010-07-02

    We report the design, synthesis, and assembly of the 1.08-mega-base pair Mycoplasma mycoides JCVI-syn1.0 genome starting from digitized genome sequence information and its transplantation into a M. capricolum recipient cell to create new M. mycoides cells that are controlled only by the synthetic chromosome. The only DNA in the cells is the designed synthetic DNA sequence, including "watermark" sequences and other designed gene deletions and polymorphisms, and mutations acquired during the building process. The new cells have expected phenotypic properties and are capable of continuous self-replication.

  2. Genome damage in induced pluripotent stem cells: assessing the mechanisms and their consequences.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Samer M I; Elbaz, Judith; Nagy, Andras A

    2013-03-01

    In 2006, Shinya Yamanaka and colleagues discovered how to reprogram terminally differentiated somatic cells to a pluripotent stem cell state. The resulting induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) made a paradigm shift in the field, further nailing down the disproval of the long-held dogma that differentiation is unidirectional. The prospect of using iPSCs for patient-specific cell-based therapies has been enticing. This promise, however, has been questioned in the last two years as several studies demonstrated intrinsic epigenetic and genomic anomalies in these cells. Here, we not only review the recent critical studies addressing the genome integrity during the reprogramming process, but speculate about the underlying mechanisms that could create de novo genome damage in iPSCs. Finally, we discuss how much an elevated mutation load really matters considering the safety of future therapies with cells heavily cultured in vitro.

  3. FISH 'N' Chips : a single cell genomic analyzer for the human microbiome.

    SciTech Connect

    Light, Yooli Kim; Perroud, Thomas D.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Meagher, Robert J.; Singh, Anup K.; Malamud, Daniel; Saxena, Deepak; Liu, Peng

    2010-09-01

    Uncultivable microorganisms likely play significant roles in the ecology within the human body, with subtle but important implications for human health. Focusing on the oral microbiome, we are developing a processor for targeted isolation of individual microbial cells, facilitating whole-genome analysis without the need for isolation of pure cultures. The processor consists of three microfluidic modules: identification based on 16S rRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), fluorescence-based sorting, and encapsulation of individual selected cells into small droplets for whole genome amplification. We present here a technique for performing microscale FISH and flow cytometry, as a prelude to single cell sorting.

  4. Low-dose carbon-based nanoparticle-induced effects in A549 lung cells determined by biospectroscopy are associated with increases in genomic methylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junyi; Tian, Meiping; Cui, Li; Dwyer, John; Fullwood, Nigel J.; Shen, Heqing; Martin, Francis L.

    2016-02-01

    Nanotechnology has introduced many manufactured carbon-based nanoparticles (CNPs) into our environment, generating a debate into their risks and benefits. Numerous nanotoxicology investigations have been carried, and nanoparticle-induced toxic effects have been reported. However, there remain gaps in our knowledge, primarily regarding mechanism. Herein, we assessed the global alterations induced by CNPs in A549 lung cells using biospectroscopy techniques, including attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). A549 cells were treated with fullerene (C60), long or short multi-walled carbon nanotubes, or single-walled carbon nanotubes at concentrations of 0.1 mg/L, 0.01 mg/L and 0.001 mg/L. Exposed cells were then analysed by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and SERS. Spectra were pre-processed via computational analysis, and information on biochemical alterations in exposed cells were identified. Additionally, global DNA methylation levels in cells exposed to CNPs at 0.1 mg/L were determined using HPLC-MS and genetic regulators (for DNA methylation) were checked by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. It was found that CNPs exert marked effects in A549 cells and also contribute to increases in global DNA methylation. For the first time, this study highlights that real-world levels of nanoparticles can alter the methylome of exposed cells; this could have enormous implications for their regulatory assessment.

  5. Low-dose carbon-based nanoparticle-induced effects in A549 lung cells determined by biospectroscopy are associated with increases in genomic methylation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junyi; Tian, Meiping; Cui, Li; Dwyer, John; Fullwood, Nigel J.; Shen, Heqing; Martin, Francis L.

    2016-01-01

    Nanotechnology has introduced many manufactured carbon-based nanoparticles (CNPs) into our environment, generating a debate into their risks and benefits. Numerous nanotoxicology investigations have been carried, and nanoparticle-induced toxic effects have been reported. However, there remain gaps in our knowledge, primarily regarding mechanism. Herein, we assessed the global alterations induced by CNPs in A549 lung cells using biospectroscopy techniques, including attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). A549 cells were treated with fullerene (C60), long or short multi-walled carbon nanotubes, or single-walled carbon nanotubes at concentrations of 0.1 mg/L, 0.01 mg/L and 0.001 mg/L. Exposed cells were then analysed by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and SERS. Spectra were pre-processed via computational analysis, and information on biochemical alterations in exposed cells were identified. Additionally, global DNA methylation levels in cells exposed to CNPs at 0.1 mg/L were determined using HPLC-MS and genetic regulators (for DNA methylation) were checked by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. It was found that CNPs exert marked effects in A549 cells and also contribute to increases in global DNA methylation. For the first time, this study highlights that real-world levels of nanoparticles can alter the methylome of exposed cells; this could have enormous implications for their regulatory assessment. PMID:26831369

  6. Discovery of a novel restriction endonuclease by genome comparison and application of a wheat-germ-based cell-free translation assay: PabI (5'-GTA/C) from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus abyssi.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Ken; Watanabe, Miki; Kuroita, Toshihiro; Uchiyama, Ikuo; Bujnicki, Janusz M; Kawakami, Bunsei; Tanokura, Masaru; Kobayashi, Ichizo

    2005-07-21

    To search for restriction endonucleases, we used a novel plant-based cell-free translation procedure that bypasses the toxicity of these enzymes. To identify candidate genes, the related genomes of the hyperthermophilic archaea Pyrococcus abyssi and Pyrococcus horikoshii were compared. In line with the selfish mobile gene hypothesis for restriction-modification systems, apparent genome rearrangement around putative restriction genes served as a selecting criterion. Several candidate restriction genes were identified and then amplified in such a way that they were removed from their own translation signal. During their cloning into a plasmid, the genes became connected with a plant translation signal. After in vitro transcription by T7 RNA polymerase, the mRNAs were separated from the template DNA and translated in a wheat-germ-based cell-free protein synthesis system. The resulting solution could be directly assayed for restriction activity. We identified two deoxyribonucleases. The novel enzyme was denoted as PabI, purified and found to recognize 5'-GTAC and leave a 3'-TA overhang (5'-GTA/C), a novel restriction enzyme-generated terminus. PabI is active up to 90 degrees C and optimally active at a pH of around 6 and in NaCl concentrations ranging from 100 to 200 mM. We predict that it has a novel 3D structure.

  7. Nontransgenic Genome Modification in Plant Cells1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Marton, Ira; Zuker, Amir; Shklarman, Elena; Zeevi, Vardit; Tovkach, Andrey; Roffe, Suzy; Ovadis, Marianna; Tzfira, Tzvi; Vainstein, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) are a powerful tool for genome editing in eukaryotic cells. ZFNs have been used for targeted mutagenesis in model and crop species. In animal and human cells, transient ZFN expression is often achieved by direct gene transfer into the target cells. Stable transformation, however, is the preferred method for gene expression in plant species, and ZFN-expressing transgenic plants have been used for recovery of mutants that are likely to be classified as transgenic due to the use of direct gene-transfer methods into the target cells. Here we present an alternative, nontransgenic approach for ZFN delivery and production of mutant plants using a novel Tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-based expression system for indirect transient delivery of ZFNs into a variety of tissues and cells of intact plants. TRV systemically infected its hosts and virus ZFN-mediated targeted mutagenesis could be clearly observed in newly developed infected tissues as measured by activation of a mutated reporter transgene in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and petunia (Petunia hybrida) plants. The ability of TRV to move to developing buds and regenerating tissues enabled recovery of mutated tobacco and petunia plants. Sequence analysis and transmission of the mutations to the next generation confirmed the stability of the ZFN-induced genetic changes. Because TRV is an RNA virus that can infect a wide range of plant species, it provides a viable alternative to the production of ZFN-mediated mutants while avoiding the use of direct plant-transformation methods. PMID:20876340

  8. Nuclear envelope and genome interactions in cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Talamas, Jessica A.; Capelson, Maya

    2015-01-01

    The eukaryotic cell nucleus houses an organism’s genome and is the location within the cell where all signaling induced and development-driven gene expression programs are ultimately specified. The genome is enclosed and separated from the cytoplasm by the nuclear envelope (NE), a double-lipid membrane bilayer, which contains a large variety of trans-membrane and associated protein complexes. In recent years, research regarding multiple aspects of the cell nucleus points to a highly dynamic and coordinated concert of efforts between chromatin and the NE in regulation of gene expression. Details of how this concert is orchestrated and how it directs cell differentiation and disease are coming to light at a rapid pace. Here we review existing and emerging concepts of how interactions between the genome and the NE may contribute to tissue specific gene expression programs to determine cell fate. PMID:25852741

  9. Rapid detection of structural variation in a human genome using nanochannel-based genome mapping technology.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hongzhi; Hastie, Alex R; Cao, Dandan; Lam, Ernest T; Sun, Yuhui; Huang, Haodong; Liu, Xiao; Lin, Liya; Andrews, Warren; Chan, Saki; Huang, Shujia; Tong, Xin; Requa, Michael; Anantharaman, Thomas; Krogh, Anders; Yang, Huanming; Cao, Han; Xu, Xun

    2014-01-01

    Structural variants (SVs) are less common than single nucleotide polymorphisms and indels in the population, but collectively account for a significant fraction of genetic polymorphism and diseases. Base pair differences arising from SVs are on a much higher order (>100 fold) than point mutations; however, none of the current detection methods are comprehensive, and currently available methodologies are incapable of providing sufficient resolution and unambiguous information across complex regions in the human genome. To address these challenges, we applied a high-throughput, cost-effective genome mapping technology to comprehensively discover genome-wide SVs and characterize complex regions of the YH genome using long single molecules (>150 kb) in a global fashion. Utilizing nanochannel-based genome mapping technology, we obtained 708 insertions/deletions and 17 inversions larger than 1 kb. Excluding the 59 SVs (54 insertions/deletions, 5 inversions) that overlap with N-base gaps in the reference assembly hg19, 666 non-gap SVs remained, and 396 of them (60%) were verified by paired-end data from whole-genome sequencing-based re-sequencing or de novo assembly sequence from fosmid data. Of the remaining 270 SVs, 260 are insertions and 213 overlap known SVs in the Database of Genomic Variants. Overall, 609 out of 666 (90%) variants were supported by experimental orthogonal methods or historical evidence in public databases. At the same time, genome mapping also provides valuable information for complex regions with haplotypes in a straightforward fashion. In addition, with long single-molecule labeling patterns, exogenous viral sequences were mapped on a whole-genome scale, and sample heterogeneity was analyzed at a new level. Our study highlights genome mapping technology as a comprehensive and cost-effective method for detecting structural variation and studying complex regions in the human genome, as well as deciphering viral integration into the host genome.

  10. Single-cell genomic profiling of acute myeloid leukemia for clinical use: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Yan, Benedict; Hu, Yongli; Ban, Kenneth H K; Tiang, Zenia; Ng, Christopher; Lee, Joanne; Tan, Wilson; Chiu, Lily; Tan, Tin Wee; Seah, Elaine; Ng, Chin Hin; Chng, Wee-Joo; Foo, Roger

    2017-03-01

    Although bulk high-throughput genomic profiling studies have led to a significant increase in the understanding of cancer biology, there is increasing awareness that bulk profiling approaches do not completely elucidate tumor heterogeneity. Single-cell genomic profiling enables the distinction of tumor heterogeneity, and may improve clinical diagnosis through the identification and characterization of putative subclonal populations. In the present study, the challenges associated with a single-cell genomics profiling workflow for clinical diagnostics were investigated. Single-cell RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) was performed on 20 cells from an acute myeloid leukemia bone marrow sample. Putative blasts were identified based on their gene expression profiles and principal component analysis was performed to identify outlier cells. Variant calling was performed on the single-cell RNA-seq data. The present pilot study demonstrates a proof of concept for clinical single-cell genomic profiling. The recognized limitations include significant stochastic RNA loss and the relatively low throughput of the current proposed platform. Although the results of the present study are promising, further technological advances and protocol optimization are necessary for single-cell genomic profiling to be clinically viable.

  11. Re-engineering the mitochondrial genomes in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Koob, Michael D; Yoo, Young Hyun

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondria are subcellular organelles composed of two discrete membranes in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells. They have long been recognized as the generators of energy for the cell and also have been known to associate with several metabolic pathways that are crucial for cellular function. Mitochondria have their own genome, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), that is completely separated and independent from the much larger nuclear genome, and even have their own system for making proteins from the genes in this mtDNA genome. The human mtDNA is a small (~16.5 kb) circular DNA and defects in this genome can cause a wide range of inherited human diseases. Despite of the significant advances in discovering the mtDNA defects, however, there are currently no effective therapies for these clinically devastating diseases due to the lack of technology for introducing specific modifications into the mitochondrial genomes and for generating accurate mtDNA disease models. The ability to engineer the mitochondrial genomes would provide a powerful tool to create mutants with which many crucial experiments can be performed in the basic mammalian mitochondrial genetic studies as well as in the treatment of human mtDNA diseases. In this review we summarize the current approaches associated with the correction of mtDNA mutations in cells and describe our own efforts for introducing engineered mtDNA constructs into the mitochondria of living cells through bacterial conjugation. PMID:21189990

  12. Genomic Sequencing of Single Microbial Cells from Environmental Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Ishoey, Thomas; Woyke, Tanja; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Novotny, Mark; Lasken, Roger S.

    2008-02-01

    Recently developed techniques allow genomic DNA sequencing from single microbial cells [Lasken RS: Single-cell genomic sequencing using multiple displacement amplification, Curr Opin Microbiol 2007, 10:510-516]. Here, we focus on research strategies for putting these methods into practice in the laboratory setting. An immediate consequence of single-cell sequencing is that it provides an alternative to culturing organisms as a prerequisite for genomic sequencing. The microgram amounts of DNA required as template are amplified from a single bacterium by a method called multiple displacement amplification (MDA) avoiding the need to grow cells. The ability to sequence DNA from individual cells will likely have an immense impact on microbiology considering the vast numbers of novel organisms, which have been inaccessible unless culture-independent methods could be used. However, special approaches have been necessary to work with amplified DNA. MDA may not recover the entire genome from the single copy present in most bacteria. Also, some sequence rearrangements can occur during the DNA amplification reaction. Over the past two years many research groups have begun to use MDA, and some practical approaches to single-cell sequencing have been developed. We review the consensus that is emerging on optimum methods, reliability of amplified template, and the proper interpretation of 'composite' genomes which result from the necessity of combining data from several single-cell MDA reactions in order to complete the assembly. Preferred laboratory methods are considered on the basis of experience at several large sequencing centers where >70% of genomes are now often recovered from single cells. Methods are reviewed for preparation of bacterial fractions from environmental samples, single-cell isolation, DNA amplification by MDA, and DNA sequencing.

  13. Whole-genome molecular haplotyping of single cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, H Christina; Wang, Jianbin; Potanina, Anastasia; Quake, Stephen R

    2011-01-01

    Conventional experimental methods of studying the human genome are limited by the inability to independently study the combination of alleles, or haplotype, on each of the homologous copies of the chromosomes. We developed a microfluidic device capable of separating and amplifying homologous copies of each chromosome from a single human metaphase cell. Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array analysis of amplified DNA enabled us to achieve completely deterministic, whole-genome, personal haplotypes of four individuals, including a HapMap trio with European ancestry (CEU) and an unrelated European individual. The phases of alleles were determined at ∼99.8% accuracy for up to ∼96% of all assayed SNPs. We demonstrate several practical applications, including direct observation of recombination events in a family trio, deterministic phasing of deletions in individuals and direct measurement of the human leukocyte antigen haplotypes of an individual. Our approach has potential applications in personal genomics, single-cell genomics and statistical genetics.

  14. Coordinates and intervals in graph-based reference genomes.

    PubMed

    Rand, Knut D; Grytten, Ivar; Nederbragt, Alexander J; Storvik, Geir O; Glad, Ingrid K; Sandve, Geir K

    2017-05-18

    It has been proposed that future reference genomes should be graph structures in order to better represent the sequence diversity present in a species. However, there is currently no standard method to represent genomic intervals, such as the positions of genes or transcription factor binding sites, on graph-based reference genomes. We formalize offset-based coordinate systems on graph-based reference genomes and introduce methods for representing intervals on these reference structures. We show the advantage of our methods by representing genes on a graph-based representation of the newest assembly of the human genome (GRCh38) and its alternative loci for regions that are highly variable. More complex reference genomes, containing alternative loci, require methods to represent genomic data on these structures. Our proposed notation for genomic intervals makes it possible to fully utilize the alternative loci of the GRCh38 assembly and potential future graph-based reference genomes. We have made a Python package for representing such intervals on offset-based coordinate systems, available at https://github.com/uio-cels/offsetbasedgraph . An interactive web-tool using this Python package to visualize genes on a graph created from GRCh38 is available at https://github.com/uio-cels/genomicgraphcoords .

  15. Single cell genomic quantification by non-fluorescence nonlinear microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kota, Divya; Liu, Jing

    2017-02-01

    Human epidermal growth receptor 2 (Her2) is a gene which plays a major role in breast cancer development. The quantification of Her2 expression in single cells is limited by several drawbacks in existing fluorescence-based single molecule techniques, such as low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), strong autofluorescence and background signals from biological components. For rigorous genomic quantification, a robust method of orthogonal detection is highly desirable and we demonstrated it by two non-fluorescent imaging techniques -transient absorption microscopy (TAM) and second harmonic generation (SHG). In TAM, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are chosen as an orthogonal probes for detection of single molecules which gives background-free quantifications of single mRNA transcript. In SHG, emission from barium titanium oxide (BTO) nanoprobes was demonstrated which allows stable signal beyond the autofluorescence window. Her2 mRNA was specifically labeled with nanoprobes which are conjugated with antibodies or oligonucleotides and quantified at single copy sensitivity in the cancer cells and tissues. Furthermore, a non-fluorescent super-resolution concept, named as second harmonic super-resolution microscopy (SHaSM), was proposed to quantify individual Her2 transcripts in cancer cells beyond the diffraction limit. These non-fluorescent imaging modalities will provide new dimensions in biomarker quantification at single molecule sensitivity in turbid biological samples, offering a strong cross-platform strategy for clinical monitoring at single cell resolution.

  16. Cell-of-Origin-Specific 3D Genome Structure Acquired during Somatic Cell Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Krijger, Peter Hugo Lodewijk; Di Stefano, Bruno; de Wit, Elzo; Limone, Francesco; van Oevelen, Chris; de Laat, Wouter; Graf, Thomas

    2016-05-05

    Forced expression of reprogramming factors can convert somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Here we studied genome topology dynamics during reprogramming of different somatic cell types with highly distinct genome conformations. We find large-scale topologically associated domain (TAD) repositioning and alterations of tissue-restricted genomic neighborhoods and chromatin loops, effectively erasing the somatic-cell-specific genome structures while establishing an embryonic stem-cell-like 3D genome. Yet, early passage iPSCs carry topological hallmarks that enable recognition of their cell of origin. These hallmarks are not remnants of somatic chromosome topologies. Instead, the distinguishing topological features are acquired during reprogramming, as we also find for cell-of-origin-dependent gene expression patterns. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cell-of-Origin-Specific 3D Genome Structure Acquired during Somatic Cell Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Krijger, Peter Hugo Lodewijk; Di Stefano, Bruno; de Wit, Elzo; Limone, Francesco; van Oevelen, Chris; de Laat, Wouter; Graf, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Summary Forced expression of reprogramming factors can convert somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Here we studied genome topology dynamics during reprogramming of different somatic cell types with highly distinct genome conformations. We find large-scale topologically associated domain (TAD) repositioning and alterations of tissue-restricted genomic neighborhoods and chromatin loops, effectively erasing the somatic-cell-specific genome structures while establishing an embryonic stem-cell-like 3D genome. Yet, early passage iPSCs carry topological hallmarks that enable recognition of their cell of origin. These hallmarks are not remnants of somatic chromosome topologies. Instead, the distinguishing topological features are acquired during reprogramming, as we also find for cell-of-origin-dependent gene expression patterns. PMID:26971819

  18. HopBase: a unified resource for Humulus genomics.

    PubMed

    Hill, Steven T; Sudarsanam, Ramcharan; Henning, John; Hendrix, David

    2017-01-01

    Hop (Humulus lupulus L. var lupulus) is a dioecious plant of worldwide significance, used primarily for bittering and flavoring in brewing beer. Studies on the medicinal properties of several unique compounds produced by hop have led to additional interest from pharmacy and healthcare industries as well as livestock production as a natural antibiotic. Genomic research in hop has resulted a published draft genome and transcriptome assemblies. As research into the genomics of hop has gained interest, there is a critical need for centralized online genomic resources. To support the growing research community, we report the development of an online resource "HopBase.org." In addition to providing a gene annotation to the existing Shinsuwase draft genome, HopBase makes available genome assemblies and annotations for both the cultivar "Teamaker" and male hop accession number USDA 21422M. These genome assemblies, gene annotations, along with other common data, coupled with a genome browser and BLAST database enable the hop community to enter the genomic age. The HopBase genomic resource is accessible at http://hopbase.org and http://hopbase.cgrb.oregonstate.edu. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  19. Ontology-Based Search of Genomic Metadata.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Javier D; Lenzerini, Maurizio; Masseroli, Marco; Venco, Francesco; Ceri, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) is a huge and still expanding public repository of more than 4,000 experiments and 25,000 data files, assembled by a large international consortium since 2007; unknown biological knowledge can be extracted from these huge and largely unexplored data, leading to data-driven genomic, transcriptomic, and epigenomic discoveries. Yet, search of relevant datasets for knowledge discovery is limitedly supported: metadata describing ENCODE datasets are quite simple and incomplete, and not described by a coherent underlying ontology. Here, we show how to overcome this limitation, by adopting an ENCODE metadata searching approach which uses high-quality ontological knowledge and state-of-the-art indexing technologies. Specifically, we developed S.O.S. GeM (http://www.bioinformatics.deib.polimi.it/SOSGeM/), a system supporting effective semantic search and retrieval of ENCODE datasets. First, we constructed a Semantic Knowledge Base by starting with concepts extracted from ENCODE metadata, matched to and expanded on biomedical ontologies integrated in the well-established Unified Medical Language System. We prove that this inference method is sound and complete. Then, we leveraged the Semantic Knowledge Base to semantically search ENCODE data from arbitrary biologists' queries. This allows correctly finding more datasets than those extracted by a purely syntactic search, as supported by the other available systems. We empirically show the relevance of found datasets to the biologists' queries.

  20. Single-Cell Genomics for Virology.

    PubMed

    Ciuffi, Angela; Rato, Sylvie; Telenti, Amalio

    2016-05-04

    Single-cell sequencing technologies, i.e., single cell analysis followed by deep sequencing investigate cellular heterogeneity in many biological settings. It was only in the past year that single-cell sequencing analyses has been applied in the field of virology, providing new ways to explore viral diversity and cell response to viral infection, which are summarized in the present review.

  1. Analysis of renal cancer cell lines from two major resources enables genomics-guided cell line selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Rileen; Winer, Andrew G.; Chevinsky, Michael; Jakubowski, Christopher; Chen, Ying-Bei; Dong, Yiyu; Tickoo, Satish K.; Reuter, Victor E.; Russo, Paul; Coleman, Jonathan A.; Sander, Chris; Hsieh, James J.; Hakimi, A. Ari

    2017-05-01

    The utility of cancer cell lines is affected by the similarity to endogenous tumour cells. Here we compare genomic data from 65 kidney-derived cell lines from the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia and the COSMIC Cell Lines Project to three renal cancer subtypes from The Cancer Genome Atlas: clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC, also known as kidney renal clear cell carcinoma), papillary (pRCC, also known as kidney papillary) and chromophobe (chRCC, also known as kidney chromophobe) renal cell carcinoma. Clustering copy number alterations shows that most cell lines resemble ccRCC, a few (including some often used as models of ccRCC) resemble pRCC, and none resemble chRCC. Human ccRCC tumours clustering with cell lines display clinical and genomic features of more aggressive disease, suggesting that cell lines best represent aggressive tumours. We stratify mutations and copy number alterations for important kidney cancer genes by the consistency between databases, and classify cell lines into established gene expression-based indolent and aggressive subtypes. Our results could aid investigators in analysing appropriate renal cancer cell lines.

  2. Hellbender genome sequences shed light on genomic expansion at the base of crown salamanders.

    PubMed

    Sun, Cheng; Mueller, Rachel Lockridge

    2014-07-01

    Among animals, genome sizes range from 20 Mb to 130 Gb, with 380-fold variation across vertebrates. Most of the largest vertebrate genomes are found in salamanders, an amphibian clade of 660 species. Thus, salamanders are an important system for studying causes and consequences of genomic gigantism. Previously, we showed that plethodontid salamander genomes accumulate higher levels of long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons than do other vertebrates, although the evolutionary origins of such sequences remained unexplored. We also showed that some salamanders in the family Plethodontidae have relatively slow rates of DNA loss through small insertions and deletions. Here, we present new data from Cryptobranchus alleganiensis, the hellbender. Cryptobranchus and Plethodontidae span the basal phylogenetic split within salamanders; thus, analyses incorporating these taxa can shed light on the genome of the ancestral crown salamander lineage, which underwent expansion. We show that high levels of LTR retrotransposons likely characterize all crown salamanders, suggesting that disproportionate expansion of this transposable element (TE) class contributed to genomic expansion. Phylogenetic and age distribution analyses of salamander LTR retrotransposons indicate that salamanders' high TE levels reflect persistence and diversification of ancestral TEs rather than horizontal transfer events. Finally, we show that relatively slow DNA loss rates through small indels likely characterize all crown salamanders, suggesting that a decreased DNA loss rate contributed to genomic expansion at the clade's base. Our identification of shared genomic features across phylogenetically distant salamanders is a first step toward identifying the evolutionary processes underlying accumulation and persistence of high levels of repetitive sequence in salamander genomes.

  3. Viruses Roll the Dice: The Stochastic Behavior of Viral Genome Molecules Accelerates Viral Adaptation at the Cell and Tissue Levels

    PubMed Central

    Miyashita, Shuhei; Ishibashi, Kazuhiro; Kishino, Hirohisa; Ishikawa, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    evolution, which are based on the stochastic behavior of the viral genome molecules in each cell. PMID:25781391

  4. Viruses roll the dice: the stochastic behavior of viral genome molecules accelerates viral adaptation at the cell and tissue levels.

    PubMed

    Miyashita, Shuhei; Ishibashi, Kazuhiro; Kishino, Hirohisa; Ishikawa, Masayuki

    2015-03-01

    , which are based on the stochastic behavior of the viral genome molecules in each cell.

  5. Genome Informed Trait-Based Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaoz, U.; Cheng, Y.; Bouskill, N.; Tang, J.; Beller, H. R.; Brodie, E.; Riley, W. J.

    2013-12-01

    Trait-based approaches are powerful tools for representing microbial communities across both spatial and temporal scales within ecosystem models. Trait-based models (TBMs) represent the diversity of microbial taxa as stochastic assemblages with a distribution of traits constrained by trade-offs between these traits. Such representation with its built-in stochasticity allows the elucidation of the interactions between the microbes and their environment by reducing the complexity of microbial community diversity into a limited number of functional ';guilds' and letting them emerge across spatio-temporal scales. From the biogeochemical/ecosystem modeling perspective, the emergent properties of the microbial community could be directly translated into predictions of biogeochemical reaction rates and microbial biomass. The accuracy of TBMs depends on the identification of key traits of the microbial community members and on the parameterization of these traits. Current approaches to inform TBM parameterization are empirical (i.e., based on literature surveys). Advances in omic technologies (such as genomics, metagenomics, metatranscriptomics, and metaproteomics) pave the way to better-initialize models that can be constrained in a generic or site-specific fashion. Here we describe the coupling of metagenomic data to the development of a TBM representing the dynamics of metabolic guilds from an organic carbon stimulated groundwater microbial community. Illumina paired-end metagenomic data were collected from the community as it transitioned successively through electron-accepting conditions (nitrate-, sulfate-, and Fe(III)-reducing), and used to inform estimates of growth rates and the distribution of metabolic pathways (i.e., aerobic and anaerobic oxidation, fermentation) across a spatially resolved TBM. We use this model to evaluate the emergence of different metabolisms and predict rates of biogeochemical processes over time. We compare our results to observational

  6. StellaBase: The Nematostella vectensis Genomics Database

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, James C.; Ryan, Joseph F.; Watson, James A.; Webb, Jeramy; Mullikin, James C.; Rokhsar, Daniel; Finnerty, John R.

    2006-01-01

    StellaBase, the Nematostella vectensis Genomics Database, is a web-based resource that will facilitate desktop and bench-top studies of the starlet sea anemone. Nematostella is an emerging model organism that has already proven useful for addressing fundamental questions in developmental evolution and evolutionary genomics. StellaBase allows users to query the assembled Nematostella genome, a confirmed gene library, and a predicted genome using both keyword and homology based search functions. Data provided by these searches will elucidate gene family evolution in early animals. Unique research tools, including a Nematostella genetic stock library, a primer library, a literature repository and a gene expression library will provide support to the burgeoning Nematostella research community. The development of StellaBase accompanies significant upgrades to CnidBase, the Cnidarian Evolutionary Genomics Database. With the completion of the first sequenced cnidarian genome, genome comparison tools have been added to CnidBase. In addition, StellaBase provides a framework for the integration of additional species-specific databases into CnidBase. StellaBase is available at . PMID:16381919

  7. StellaBase: the Nematostella vectensis Genomics Database.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, James C; Ryan, Joseph F; Watson, James A; Webb, Jeramy; Mullikin, James C; Rokhsar, Daniel; Finnerty, John R

    2006-01-01

    StellaBase, the Nematostella vectensis Genomics Database, is a web-based resource that will facilitate desktop and bench-top studies of the starlet sea anemone. Nematostella is an emerging model organism that has already proven useful for addressing fundamental questions in developmental evolution and evolutionary genomics. StellaBase allows users to query the assembled Nematostella genome, a confirmed gene library, and a predicted genome using both keyword and homology based search functions. Data provided by these searches will elucidate gene family evolution in early animals. Unique research tools, including a Nematostella genetic stock library, a primer library, a literature repository and a gene expression library will provide support to the burgeoning Nematostella research community. The development of StellaBase accompanies significant upgrades to CnidBase, the Cnidarian Evolutionary Genomics Database. With the completion of the first sequenced cnidarian genome, genome comparison tools have been added to CnidBase. In addition, StellaBase provides a framework for the integration of additional species-specific databases into CnidBase. StellaBase is available at http://www.stellabase.org.

  8. Comprehensive genomic characterization of squamous cell lung cancers.

    PubMed

    2012-09-27

    Lung squamous cell carcinoma is a common type of lung cancer, causing approximately 400,000 deaths per year worldwide. Genomic alterations in squamous cell lung cancers have not been comprehensively characterized, and no molecularly targeted agents have been specifically developed for its treatment. As part of The Cancer Genome Atlas, here we profile 178 lung squamous cell carcinomas to provide a comprehensive landscape of genomic and epigenomic alterations. We show that the tumour type is characterized by complex genomic alterations, with a mean of 360 exonic mutations, 165 genomic rearrangements, and 323 segments of copy number alteration per tumour. We find statistically recurrent mutations in 11 genes, including mutation of TP53 in nearly all specimens. Previously unreported loss-of-function mutations are seen in the HLA-A class I major histocompatibility gene. Significantly altered pathways included NFE2L2 and KEAP1 in 34%, squamous differentiation genes in 44%, phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase pathway genes in 47%, and CDKN2A and RB1 in 72% of tumours. We identified a potential therapeutic target in most tumours, offering new avenues of investigation for the treatment of squamous cell lung cancers.

  9. Genomic instability and tumorigenic induction in immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells by heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hei, T. K.; Piao, C. Q.; Wu, L. J.; Willey, J. C.; Hall, E. J.

    1998-11-01

    Carcinogenesis is postulated to be a progressive multistage process characterized by an increase in genomic instability and clonal selection with each mutational event endowing a selective growth advantage. Genomic instability as manifested by the amplification of specific gene fragments is common among tumor and transformed cells. In the present study, immortalized human bronchial (BEP2D) cells were irradiated with graded doses of either 1GeV/nucleon 56Fe ions or 150 keV/μm alpha particles. Transformed cells developed through a series of successive steps before becoming tumorigenic in nude mice. Tumorigenic cells showed neither ras mutations nor deletion in the p16 tumor suppressor gene. In contrast, they harbored mutations in the p53 gene and over-expressed cyclin D1. Genomic instability among transformed cells at various stage of the carcinogenic process was examined based on frequencies of PALA resistance. Incidence of genomic instability was highest among established tumor cell lines relative to transformed, non-tumorigenic and control cell lines. Treatment of BEP2D cells with a 4 mM dose of the aminothiol WR-1065 significantly reduced their neoplastic transforming response to 56Fe particles. This model provides an opportunity to study the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in malignant transformation of human epithelial cells by heavy ions.

  10. Genome rearrangement affects RNA virus adaptability on prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Pesko, Kendra; Voigt, Emily A; Swick, Adam; Morley, Valerie J; Timm, Collin; Yin, John; Turner, Paul E

    2015-01-01

    Gene order is often highly conserved within taxonomic groups, such that organisms with rearranged genomes tend to be less fit than wild type gene orders, and suggesting natural selection favors genome architectures that maximize fitness. But it is unclear whether rearranged genomes hinder adaptability: capacity to evolutionarily improve in a new environment. Negative-sense non-segmented RNA viruses (order Mononegavirales) have specific genome architecture: 3' UTR - core protein genes - envelope protein genes - RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase gene - 5' UTR. To test how genome architecture affects RNA virus evolution, we examined vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) variants with the nucleocapsid (N) gene moved sequentially downstream in the genome. Because RNA polymerase stuttering in VSV replication causes greater mRNA production in upstream genes, N gene translocation toward the 5' end leads to stepwise decreases in N transcription, viral replication and progeny production, and also impacts the activation of type 1 interferon mediated antiviral responses. We evolved VSV gene-order variants in two prostate cancer cell lines: LNCap cells deficient in innate immune response to viral infection, and PC-3 cells that mount an IFN stimulated anti-viral response to infection. We observed that gene order affects phenotypic adaptability (reproductive growth; viral suppression of immune function), especially on PC-3 cells that strongly select against virus infection. Overall, populations derived from the least-fit ancestor (most-altered N position architecture) adapted fastest, consistent with theory predicting populations with low initial fitness should improve faster in evolutionary time. Also, we observed correlated responses to selection, where viruses improved across both hosts, rather than suffer fitness trade-offs on unselected hosts. Whole genomics revealed multiple mutations in evolved variants, some of which were conserved across selective environments for a given gene

  11. Single-cell genomics for dissection of complex malaria infections

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Shalini; Nkhoma, Standwell C.; Serre, David; Zimmerman, Peter A.; Gorena, Karla; Daniel, Benjamin J.; Nosten, François; Anderson, Timothy J.C.; Cheeseman, Ian H.

    2014-01-01

    Most malaria infections contain complex mixtures of distinct parasite lineages. These multiple-genotype infections (MGIs) impact virulence evolution, drug resistance, intra-host dynamics, and recombination, but are poorly understood. To address this we have developed a single-cell genomics approach to dissect MGIs. By combining cell sorting and whole-genome amplification (WGA), we are able to generate high-quality material from parasite-infected red blood cells (RBCs) for genotyping and next-generation sequencing. We optimized our approach through analysis of >260 single-cell assays. To quantify accuracy, we decomposed mixtures of known parasite genotypes and obtained highly accurate (>99%) single-cell genotypes. We applied this validated approach directly to infections of two major malaria species, Plasmodium falciparum, for which long term culture is possible, and Plasmodium vivax, for which no long-term culture is feasible. We demonstrate that our single-cell genomics approach can be used to generate parasite genome sequences directly from patient blood in order to unravel the complexity of P. vivax and P. falciparum infections. These methods open the door for large-scale analysis of within-host variation of malaria infections, and reveal information on relatedness and drug resistance haplotypes that is inaccessible through conventional sequencing of infections. PMID:24812326

  12. Post-Fragmentation Whole Genome Amplification-Based Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benardini, James; LaDuc, Myron T.; Langmore, John

    2011-01-01

    This innovation is derived from a proprietary amplification scheme that is based upon random fragmentation of the genome into a series of short, overlapping templates. The resulting shorter DNA strands (<400 bp) constitute a library of DNA fragments with defined 3 and 5 termini. Specific primers to these termini are then used to isothermally amplify this library into potentially unlimited quantities that can be used immediately for multiple downstream applications including gel eletrophoresis, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR), comparative genomic hybridization microarray, SNP analysis, and sequencing. The standard reaction can be performed with minimal hands-on time, and can produce amplified DNA in as little as three hours. Post-fragmentation whole genome amplification-based technology provides a robust and accurate method of amplifying femtogram levels of starting material into microgram yields with no detectable allele bias. The amplified DNA also facilitates the preservation of samples (spacecraft samples) by amplifying scarce amounts of template DNA into microgram concentrations in just a few hours. Based on further optimization of this technology, this could be a feasible technology to use in sample preservation for potential future sample return missions. The research and technology development described here can be pivotal in dealing with backward/forward biological contamination from planetary missions. Such efforts rely heavily on an increasing understanding of the burden and diversity of microorganisms present on spacecraft surfaces throughout assembly and testing. The development and implementation of these technologies could significantly improve the comprehensiveness and resolving power of spacecraft-associated microbial population censuses, and are important to the continued evolution and advancement of planetary protection capabilities. Current molecular procedures for assaying spacecraft-associated microbial burden and diversity have

  13. Enrichment of Root Endophytic Bacteria from Populus deltoides and Single-Cell-Genomics Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Utturkar, Sagar M.; Cude, W. Nathan; Robeson, Michael S.; Yang, Zamin K.; Klingeman, Dawn M.; Land, Miriam L.; Allman, Steve L.; Lu, Tse-Yuan S.; Brown, Steven D.; Schadt, Christopher W.; Podar, Mircea; Doktycz, Mitchel J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial endophytes that colonize Populus trees contribute to nutrient acquisition, prime immunity responses, and directly or indirectly increase both above- and below-ground biomasses. Endophytes are embedded within plant material, so physical separation and isolation are difficult tasks. Application of culture-independent methods, such as metagenome or bacterial transcriptome sequencing, has been limited due to the predominance of DNA from the plant biomass. Here, we describe a modified differential and density gradient centrifugation-based protocol for the separation of endophytic bacteria from Populus roots. This protocol achieved substantial reduction in contaminating plant DNA, allowed enrichment of endophytic bacteria away from the plant material, and enabled single-cell genomics analysis. Four single-cell genomes were selected for whole-genome amplification based on their rarity in the microbiome (potentially uncultured taxa) as well as their inferred abilities to form associations with plants. Bioinformatics analyses, including assembly, contamination removal, and completeness estimation, were performed to obtain single-amplified genomes (SAGs) of organisms from the phyla Armatimonadetes, Verrucomicrobia, and Planctomycetes, which were unrepresented in our previous cultivation efforts. Comparative genomic analysis revealed unique characteristics of each SAG that could facilitate future cultivation efforts for these bacteria. IMPORTANCE Plant roots harbor a diverse collection of microbes that live within host tissues. To gain a comprehensive understanding of microbial adaptations to this endophytic lifestyle from strains that cannot be cultivated, it is necessary to separate bacterial cells from the predominance of plant tissue. This study provides a valuable approach for the separation and isolation of endophytic bacteria from plant root tissue. Isolated live bacteria provide material for microbiome sequencing, single-cell genomics, and analyses

  14. A Platform for Designing Genome-Based Personalized Immunotherapy or Vaccine against Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sudheer; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Dhanda, Sandeep Kumar; Kumar, Rahul; Kumar, Shailesh; Sehgal, Manika; Nagpal, Gandharva

    2016-01-01

    Due to advancement in sequencing technology, genomes of thousands of cancer tissues or cell-lines have been sequenced. Identification of cancer-specific epitopes or neoepitopes from cancer genomes is one of the major challenges in the field of immunotherapy or vaccine development. This paper describes a platform Cancertope, developed for designing genome-based immunotherapy or vaccine against a cancer cell. Broadly, the integrated resources on this platform are apportioned into three precise sections. First section explains a cancer-specific database of neoepitopes generated from genome of 905 cancer cell lines. This database harbors wide range of epitopes (e.g., B-cell, CD8+ T-cell, HLA class I, HLA class II) against 60 cancer-specific vaccine antigens. Second section describes a partially personalized module developed for predicting potential neoepitopes against a user-specific cancer genome. Finally, we describe a fully personalized module developed for identification of neoepitopes from genomes of cancerous and healthy cells of a cancer-patient. In order to assist the scientific community, wide range of tools are incorporated in this platform that includes screening of epitopes against human reference proteome (http://www.imtech.res.in/raghava/cancertope/). PMID:27832200

  15. Genome sequencing of normal cells reveals developmental lineages and mutational processes

    PubMed Central

    Behjati, Sam; Wedge, David C; Tamuri, Asif U; Martincorena, Inigo; Petljak, Mia; Alexandrov, Ludmil B; Gundem, Gunes; Tarpey, Patrick S; Roerink, Sophie; Blokker, Joyce; Maddison, Mark; Mudie, Laura; Robinson, Ben; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Campbell, Peter; Goldman, Nick; van de Wetering, Marc; Cuppen, Edwin; Clevers, Hans; Stratton, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    The somatic mutations present in the genome of a cell have been accumulated over the lifetime of a multicellular organism. These mutations can provide insights into the developmental lineage tree1, the number of divisions each cell has undergone and the mutational processes that have been operative2. Here, we conducted whole genome sequencing of clonal lines3 derived from multiple tissues of healthy mice. Using somatic base substitutions, we reconstructed the early cell divisions of each animal demonstrating the contributions of embryonic cells to adult tissues. Differences were observed between tissues in the numbers and types of mutations accumulated by each cell, which likely reflect differences in the number of cell divisions they have undergone and varying contributions of different mutational processes. If somatic mutation rates are similar to those in mice, the results indicate that precise insights into development and mutagenesis of normal human cells will be possible. PMID:25043003

  16. Recent advances in developing molecular tools for targeted genome engineering of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kwang-il

    2015-01-01

    Various biological molecules naturally existing in diversified species including fungi, bacteria, and bacteriophage have functionalities for DNA binding and processing. The biological molecules have been recently actively engineered for use in customized genome editing of mammalian cells as the molecule-encoding DNA sequence information and the underlying mechanisms how the molecules work are unveiled. Excitingly, multiple novel methods based on the newly constructed artificial molecular tools have enabled modifications of specific endogenous genetic elements in the genome context at efficiencies that are much higher than that of the conventional homologous recombination based methods. This minireview introduces the most recently spotlighted molecular genome engineering tools with their key features and ongoing modifications for better performance. Such ongoing efforts have mainly focused on the removal of the inherent DNA sequence recognition rigidity from the original molecular platforms, the addition of newly tailored targeting functions into the engineered molecules, and the enhancement of their targeting specificity. Effective targeted genome engineering of mammalian cells will enable not only sophisticated genetic studies in the context of the genome, but also widely-applicable universal therapeutics based on the pinpointing and correction of the disease-causing genetic elements within the genome in the near future.

  17. Annotation-based genome-wide SNP discovery in the large and complex Aegilops tauschii genome using next-generation sequencing without a reference genome sequence

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An annotation-based, genome-wide SNP discovery pipeline is reported using NGS data for large and complex genomes without a reference genome sequence. Roche 454 shotgun reads with low genome coverage of one genotype are annotated in order to distinguish single-copy sequences and repeat junctions fr...

  18. TG1 integrase-based system for site-specific gene integration into bacterial genomes.

    PubMed

    Muroi, Tetsurou; Kokuzawa, Takaaki; Kihara, Yoshihiko; Kobayashi, Ryuichi; Hirano, Nobutaka; Takahashi, Hideo; Haruki, Mitsuru

    2013-05-01

    Serine-type phage integrases catalyze unidirectional site-specific recombination between the attachment sites, attP and attB, in the phage and host bacterial genomes, respectively; these integrases and DNA target sites function efficiently when transferred into heterologous cells. We previously developed an in vivo site-specific genomic integration system based on actinophage TG1 integrase that introduces ∼2-kbp DNA into an att site inserted into a heterologous Escherichia coli genome. Here, we analyzed the TG1 integrase-mediated integrations of att site-containing ∼10-kbp DNA into the corresponding att site pre-inserted into various genomic locations; moreover, we developed a system that introduces ∼10-kbp DNA into the genome with an efficiency of ∼10(4) transformants/μg DNA. Integrations of attB-containing DNA into an attP-containing genome were more efficient than integrations of attP-containing DNA into an attB-containing genome, and integrations targeting attP inserted near the replication origin, oriC, and the E. coli "centromere" analogue, migS, were more efficient than those targeting attP within other regions of the genome. Because the genomic region proximal to the oriC and migS sites is located at the extreme poles of the cell during chromosomal segregation, the oriC-migS region may be more exposed to the cytosol than are other regions of the E. coli chromosome. Thus, accessibility of pre-inserted attP to attB-containing incoming DNA may be crucial for the integration efficiency by serine-type integrases in heterologous cells. These results may be beneficial to the development of serine-type integrases-based genomic integration systems for various bacterial species.

  19. Variation block-based genomics method for crop plants

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In contrast with wild species, cultivated crop genomes consist of reshuffled recombination blocks, which occurred by crossing and selection processes. Accordingly, recombination block-based genomics analysis can be an effective approach for the screening of target loci for agricultural traits. Results We propose the variation block method, which is a three-step process for recombination block detection and comparison. The first step is to detect variations by comparing the short-read DNA sequences of the cultivar to the reference genome of the target crop. Next, sequence blocks with variation patterns are examined and defined. The boundaries between the variation-containing sequence blocks are regarded as recombination sites. All the assumed recombination sites in the cultivar set are used to split the genomes, and the resulting sequence regions are termed variation blocks. Finally, the genomes are compared using the variation blocks. The variation block method identified recurring recombination blocks accurately and successfully represented block-level diversities in the publicly available genomes of 31 soybean and 23 rice accessions. The practicality of this approach was demonstrated by the identification of a putative locus determining soybean hilum color. Conclusions We suggest that the variation block method is an efficient genomics method for the recombination block-level comparison of crop genomes. We expect that this method will facilitate the development of crop genomics by bringing genomics technologies to the field of crop breeding. PMID:24929792

  20. Statistical methods for detecting genomic alterations through array-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH).

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuedong; Guo, Sun-Wei

    2004-01-01

    Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (ABCGH) is an emerging high-resolution and high-throughput molecular genetic technique that allows genome-wide screening for chromosome alterations associated with tumorigenesis. Like the cDNA microarrays, ABCGH uses two differentially labeled test and reference DNAs which are cohybridized to cloned genomic fragments immobilized on glass slides. The hybridized DNAs are then detected in two different fluorochromes, and the significant deviation from unity in the ratios of the digitized intensity values is indicative of copy-number differences between the test and reference genomes. Proper statistical analyses need to account for many sources of variation besides genuine differences between the two genomes. In particular, spatial correlations, the variable nature of the ratio variance and non-Normal distribution call for careful statistical modeling. We propose two new statistics, the standard t-statistic and its modification with variances smoothed along the genome, and two tests for each statistic, the standard t-test and a test based on the hybrid adaptive spline (HAS). Simulations indicate that the smoothed t-statistic always improves the performance over the standard t-statistic. The t-tests are more powerful in detecting isolated alterations while those based on HAS are more powerful in detecting a cluster of alterations. We apply the proposed methods to the identification of genomic alterations in endometrium in women with endometriosis.

  1. Single Cell Genomics and Transcriptomics for Unicellular Eukaryotes

    SciTech Connect

    Ciobanu, Doina; Clum, Alicia; Singh, Vasanth; Salamov, Asaf; Han, James; Copeland, Alex; Grigoriev, Igor; James, Timothy; Singer, Steven; Woyke, Tanja; Malmstrom, Rex; Cheng, Jan-Fang

    2014-03-14

    Despite their small size, unicellular eukaryotes have complex genomes with a high degree of plasticity that allow them to adapt quickly to environmental changes. Unicellular eukaryotes live with prokaryotes and higher eukaryotes, frequently in symbiotic or parasitic niches. To this day their contribution to the dynamics of the environmental communities remains to be understood. Unfortunately, the vast majority of eukaryotic microorganisms are either uncultured or unculturable, making genome sequencing impossible using traditional approaches. We have developed an approach to isolate unicellular eukaryotes of interest from environmental samples, and to sequence and analyze their genomes and transcriptomes. We have tested our methods with six species: an uncharacterized protist from cellulose-enriched compost identified as Platyophrya, a close relative of P. vorax; the fungus Metschnikowia bicuspidate, a parasite of water flea Daphnia; the mycoparasitic fungi Piptocephalis cylindrospora, a parasite of Cokeromyces and Mucor; Caulochytrium protosteloides, a parasite of Sordaria; Rozella allomycis, a parasite of the water mold Allomyces; and the microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Here, we present the four components of our approach: pre-sequencing methods, sequence analysis for single cell genome assembly, sequence analysis of single cell transcriptomes, and genome annotation. This technology has the potential to uncover the complexity of single cell eukaryotes and their role in the environmental samples.

  2. Genome-based approaches to develop vaccines against bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Serruto, Davide; Serino, Laura; Masignani, Vega; Pizza, Mariagrazia

    2009-05-26

    Bacterial infectious diseases remain the single most important threat to health worldwide. Although conventional vaccinology approaches were successful in conferring protection against several diseases, they failed to provide efficacious solutions against many others. The advent of whole-genome sequencing changed the way to think about vaccine development, enabling the targeting of possible vaccine candidates starting from the genomic information of a single bacterial isolate, with a process named reverse vaccinology. As the genomic era progressed, reverse vaccinology has evolved with a pan-genome approach and multi-strain genome analysis became fundamental for the design of universal vaccines. This review describes the applications of genome-based approaches in the development of new vaccines against bacterial pathogens.

  3. Cell type–specific genomics of Drosophila neurons

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Gilbert L.; Davis, Fred P.; Picard, Serge; Eddy, Sean R.

    2012-01-01

    Many tools are available to analyse genomes but are often challenging to use in a cell type–specific context. We have developed a method similar to the isolation of nuclei tagged in a specific cell type (INTACT) technique [Deal,R.B. and Henikoff,S. (2010) A simple method for gene expression and chromatin profiling of individual cell types within a tissue. Dev. Cell, 18, 1030–1040; Steiner,F.A., Talbert,P.B., Kasinathan,S., Deal,R.B. and Henikoff,S. (2012) Cell-type-specific nuclei purification from whole animals for genome-wide expression and chromatin profiling. Genome Res., doi:10.1101/gr.131748.111], first developed in plants, for use in Drosophila neurons. We profile gene expression and histone modifications in Kenyon cells and octopaminergic neurons in the adult brain. In addition to recovering known gene expression differences, we also observe significant cell type–specific chromatin modifications. In particular, a small subset of differentially expressed genes exhibits a striking anti-correlation between repressive and activating histone modifications. These genes are enriched for transcription factors, recovering those known to regulate mushroom body identity and predicting analogous regulators of octopaminergic neurons. Our results suggest that applying INTACT to specific neuronal populations can illuminate the transcriptional regulatory networks that underlie neuronal cell identity. PMID:22855560

  4. Cell size, genome size and the dominance of Angiosperms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonin, K. A.; Roddy, A. B.

    2016-12-01

    Angiosperms are capable of maintaining the highest rates of photosynthetic gas exchange of all land plants. High rates of photosynthesis depends mechanistically both on efficiently transporting water to the sites of evaporation in the leaf and on regulating the loss of that water to the atmosphere as CO2 diffuses into the leaf. Angiosperm leaves are unique in their ability to sustain high fluxes of liquid and vapor phase water transport due to high vein densities and numerous, small stomata. Despite the ubiquity of studies characterizing the anatomical and physiological adaptations that enable angiosperms to maintain high rates of photosynthesis, the underlying mechanism explaining why they have been able to develop such high leaf vein densities, and such small and abundant stomata, is still incomplete. Here we ask whether the scaling of genome size and cell size places a fundamental constraint on the photosynthetic metabolism of land plants, and whether genome downsizing among the angiosperms directly contributed to their greater potential and realized primary productivity relative to the other major groups of terrestrial plants. Using previously published data we show that a single relationship can predict guard cell size from genome size across the major groups of terrestrial land plants (e.g. angiosperms, conifers, cycads and ferns). Similarly, a strong positive correlation exists between genome size and both stomatal density and vein density that together ultimately constrains maximum potential (gs, max) and operational stomatal conductance (gs, op). Further the difference in the slopes describing the covariation between genome size and both gs, max and gs, op suggests that genome downsizing brings gs, op closer to gs, max. Taken together the data presented here suggests that the smaller genomes of angiosperms allow their final cell sizes to vary more widely and respond more directly to environmental conditions and in doing so bring operational photosynthetic

  5. Genomic Copy Number Dictates a Gene-Independent Cell Response to CRISPR/Cas9 Targeting | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system enables genome editing and somatic cell genetic screens in mammalian cells. We performed genome-scale loss-of-function screens in 33 cancer cell lines to identify genes essential for proliferation/survival and found a strong correlation between increased gene copy number and decreased cell viability after genome editing. Within regions of copy-number gain, CRISPR/Cas9 targeting of both expressed and unexpressed genes, as well as intergenic loci, led to significantly decreased cell proliferation through induction of a G2 cell-cycle arrest.

  6. Genomic Typing of Red Cell Antigens

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    Antigen‐Matched  Red  Cells   for  Sickle   Cell   Anemia  Patients  Using  Molecular Typing to Augment Testing: Meghan Delaney, Prashant Gaur, Askale...H, Constans J, Quilici JC, Lefevre‐Witier P, Sevin J, Stevens M: Study of red blood  cell  and serum enzymes in  five  Pyrenean communities and in a...Antigen‐Matched Red  Cells  for  Sickle   Cell  Anemia Patients  Using Molecular Typing to Augment Testing: AABB (poster) 2009.  Background: Patients with  sickle

  7. Single-Cell (Meta-)Genomics of a Dimorphic Candidatus Thiomargarita nelsonii Reveals Genomic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Flood, Beverly E.; Fliss, Palmer; Jones, Daniel S.; Dick, Gregory J.; Jain, Sunit; Kaster, Anne-Kristin; Winkel, Matthias; Mußmann, Marc; Bailey, Jake

    2016-01-01

    The genus Thiomargarita includes the world's largest bacteria. But as uncultured organisms, their physiology, metabolism, and basis for their gigantism are not well understood. Thus, a genomics approach, applied to a single Candidatus Thiomargarita nelsonii cell was employed to explore the genetic potential of one of these enigmatic giant bacteria. The Thiomargarita cell was obtained from an assemblage of budding Ca. T. nelsonii attached to a provannid gastropod shell from Hydrate Ridge, a methane seep offshore of Oregon, USA. Here we present a manually curated genome of Bud S10 resulting from a hybrid assembly of long Pacific Biosciences and short Illumina sequencing reads. With respect to inorganic carbon fixation and sulfur oxidation pathways, the Ca. T. nelsonii Hydrate Ridge Bud S10 genome was similar to marine sister taxa within the family Beggiatoaceae. However, the Bud S10 genome contains genes suggestive of the genetic potential for lithotrophic growth on arsenite and perhaps hydrogen. The genome also revealed that Bud S10 likely respires nitrate via two pathways: a complete denitrification pathway and a dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia pathway. Both pathways have been predicted, but not previously fully elucidated, in the genomes of other large, vacuolated, sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. Surprisingly, the genome also had a high number of unusual features for a bacterium to include the largest number of metacaspases and introns ever reported in a bacterium. Also present, are a large number of other mobile genetic elements, such as insertion sequence (IS) transposable elements and miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs). In some cases, mobile genetic elements disrupted key genes in metabolic pathways. For example, a MITE interrupts hupL, which encodes the large subunit of the hydrogenase in hydrogen oxidation. Moreover, we detected a group I intron in one of the most critical genes in the sulfur oxidation pathway, dsrA. The dsrA group

  8. [Transcription activator-like effectors(TALEs)based genome engineering].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mei-Wei; Duan, Cheng-Li; Liu, Jiang

    2013-10-01

    Systematic reverse-engineering of functional genome architecture requires precise modifications of gene sequences and transcription levels. The development and application of transcription activator-like effectors(TALEs) has created a wealth of genome engineering possibilities. TALEs are a class of naturally occurring DNA-binding proteins found in the plant pathogen Xanthomonas species. The DNA-binding domain of each TALE typically consists of tandem 34-amino acid repeat modules rearranged according to a simple cipher to target new DNA sequences. Customized TALEs can be used for a wide variety of genome engineering applications, including transcriptional modulation and genome editing. Such "genome engineering" has now been established in human cells and a number of model organisms, thus opening the door to better understanding gene function in model organisms, improving traits in crop plants and treating human genetic disorders.

  9. Base-Resolution Analysis of Cisplatin–DNA Adducts at the Genome Scale

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Xiaoting; Xiong, Xushen; Song, Jinghui; He, Chuan; Yi, Chengqi

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin, one of the most widely used anticancer drugs, crosslinks DNA and ultimately induces cell death. However, the genomic pattern of cisplatin–DNA adducts has remained unknown owing to the lack of a reliable and sensitive genome-wide method. Herein we present “cisplatin-seq” to identify genome-wide cisplatin crosslinking sites at base resolution. Cisplatin-seq reveals that mitochondrial DNA is a preferred target of cisplatin. For nuclear genomes, cisplatin–DNA adducts are enriched within promoters and regions harboring transcription termination sites. While the density of GG dinucleotides determines the initial crosslinking of cisplatin, binding of proteins to the genome largely contributes to the accumulative pattern of cisplatin–DNA adducts. PMID:27736024

  10. SpBase: the sea urchin genome database and web site.

    PubMed

    Cameron, R Andrew; Samanta, Manoj; Yuan, Autumn; He, Dong; Davidson, Eric

    2009-01-01

    SpBase is a system of databases focused on the genomic information from sea urchins and related echinoderms. It is exposed to the public through a web site served with open source software (http://spbase.org/). The enterprise was undertaken to provide an easily used collection of information to directly support experimental work on these useful research models in cell and developmental biology. The information served from the databases emerges from the draft genomic sequence of the purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and includes sequence data and genomic resource descriptions for other members of the echinoderm clade which in total span 540 million years of evolutionary time. This version of the system contains two assemblies of the purple sea urchin genome, associated expressed sequences, gene annotations and accessory resources. Search mechanisms for the sequences and the gene annotations are provided. Because the system is maintained along with the Sea Urchin Genome resource, a database of sequenced clones is also provided.

  11. Genome-Scale Analysis of Cell-Specific Regulatory Codes Using Nuclear Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Baek, Songjoon; Sung, Myong-Hee

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing technologies have made it possible for biologists to generate genome-wide profiles of chromatin features at the nucleotide resolution. Enzymes such as nucleases or transposes have been instrumental as a chromatin-probing agent due to their ability to target accessible chromatin for cleavage or insertion. On the scale of a few hundred base pairs, preferential action of the nuclear enzymes on accessible chromatin allows mapping of cell state-specific accessibility in vivo. Such accessible regions contain functionally important regulatory sites, including promoters and enhancers, which undergo active remodeling for cells adapting in a dynamic environment. DNase-seq and the more recent ATAC-seq are two assays that are gaining popularity. Deep sequencing of DNA libraries from these assays, termed genomic footprinting, has been proposed to enable the comprehensive construction of protein occupancy profiles over the genome at the nucleotide level. Recent studies have discovered limitations of genomic footprinting which reduce the scope of detectable proteins. In addition, the identification of putative factors that bind to the observed footprints remains challenging. Despite these caveats, the methodology still presents significant advantages over alternative techniques such as ChIP-seq or FAIRE-seq. Here we describe computational approaches and tools for analysis of chromatin accessibility and genomic footprinting. Proper experimental design and assay-specific data analysis ensure the detection sensitivity and maximize retrievable information. The enzyme-based chromatin profiling approaches represent a powerful and evolving methodology which facilitates our understanding of how the genome is regulated.

  12. Programming the genome in embryonic and somatic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Collas, Philippe; Noer, Agate; Timoskainen, Sanna

    2007-01-01

    In opposition to terminally differentiated cells, stem cells can self-renew and give rise to multiple cell types. Embryonic stem cells retain the ability of the inner cell mass of blastocysts to differentiate into all cell types of the body and have acquired in culture unlimited self-renewal capacity. Somatic stem cells are found in many adult tissues, have an extensive but finite lifespan and can differentiate into a more restricted array of cell types. A growing body of evidence indicates that multi-lineage differentiation ability of stem cells can be defined by the potential for expression of lineage-specification genes. Gene expression, or as emphasized here, potential for gene expression, is largely controlled by epigenetic modifications of DNA and chromatin on genomic regulatory and coding regions. These modifications modulate chromatin organization not only on specific genes but also at the level of the whole nucleus; they can also affect timing of DNA replication. This review highlights how mechanisms by which genes are poised for transcription in undifferentiated stem cells are being uncovered through primarily the mapping of DNA methylation, histone modifications and transcription factor binding throughout the genome. The combinatorial association of epigenetic marks on developmentally regulated and lineage-specifying genes in undifferentiated cells seems to define a pluripotent state.

  13. CGCI Investigators Reveal Comprehensive Landscape of Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL) Genomes | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers from British Columbia Cancer Agency used whole genome sequencing to analyze 40 DLBCL cases and 13 cell lines in order to fill in the gaps of the complex landscape of DLBCL genomes. Their analysis, “Mutational and structural analysis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma using whole genome sequencing,” was published online in Blood on May 22. The authors are Ryan Morin, Marco Marra, and colleagues.  

  14. Pluripotency in 3D: Genome organization in pluripotent cells

    PubMed Central

    Denholtz, Matthew; Plath, Kathrin

    2012-01-01

    Cells face the challenge of storing two meters of DNA in the three-dimensional (3D) space of the nucleus that spans only a few microns. The nuclear organization that is required to overcome this challenge must allow for the accessibility of the gene regulatory machinery to the DNA and, in the case of embryonic stem cells (ESCs), for the transcriptional and epigenetic changes that accompany differentiation. Recent technological advances have allowed for the mapping of genome organization at an unprecedented resolution and scale. These breakthroughs have lead to a deluge of new data, and a sophisticated understanding of the relationship between gene regulation and 3D genome organization is beginning to form. In this review we summarize some of the recent findings illuminating the 3D structure of the eukaryotic genome, as well as the relationship between genome topology and function from the level of whole chromosomes to enhancer-promoter loops with a focus on features affecting genome organization in ESCs and changes in nuclear organization during differentiation. PMID:23199754

  15. CRISPR-Cas-mediated targeted genome editing in human cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Luhan; Mali, Prashant; Kim-Kiselak, Caroline; Church, George

    2014-01-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) systems have evolved as an adaptive surveillance and defense mechanism in bacteria and archaea that uses short RNAs to direct degradation of foreign genetic elements. Here, we present our protocol for utilizing the S. pyogenes type II bacterial CRISPR system to achieve sequence-specific genome alterations in human cells. In principle, any genomic sequence of the form N₁₉NGG can be targeted with the generation of custom guide RNA (gRNA) which functions to direct the Cas9 protein to genomic targets and induce DNA cleavage. Here, we describe our methods for designing and generating gRNA expression constructs either singly or in a multiplexed manner, as well as optimized protocols for the delivery of Cas9-gRNA components into human cells. Genomic alterations at the target site are then introduced either through nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) or through homologous recombination (HR) in the presence of an appropriate donor sequence. This RNA-guided editing tool offers greater ease of customization and synthesis in comparison to existing sequence-specific endonucleases and promises to become a highly versatile and multiplexable human genome engineering platform.

  16. Atypical Epstein-Barr viral genomic structure in lymphoma tissue and lymphoid cell lines.

    PubMed

    Tang, Weihua; Fan, Hongxin; Schroeder, Jane; Dunphy, Cherie H; Bryant, Ronald J; Fedoriw, Yuri; Gulley, Margaret L

    2013-06-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA is found within the malignant cells of some subtypes of lymphoma, and viral presence is being exploited for improved diagnosis, monitoring, and management of affected patients. Recent work suggests that viral genomic polymorphism, such as partial deletion of the viral genome, could interfere with virus detection in tumor tissues. To test for atypical forms of the EBV genome, 98 lymphomas and 6 infected cell lines were studied using a battery of 6 quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays targeting disparate sections of EBV DNA. Fifty of the lymphomas (51%) had no amplifiable EBV DNA, and 38 lymphomas (39%) had low-level EBV infection that was deemed incidental based on EBV-encoded RNA (EBER) in situ hybridization results. The remaining 10 lymphomas (10%) had high EBV loads and EBER localization to malignant cells by EBER in situ hybridization. All 10 represented lymphoma subtypes were previously associated with EBV (Burkitt, diffuse large B-cell, or T-cell type), whereas no remnants of EBV were detected in other lymphoma subtypes (follicular, small lymphocytic, mantle cell, or marginal zone type). Interestingly, 4 of the 10 infected lymphomas had evidence of atypical viral genomes, including 3 of 4 infected T-cell lymphomas with aberrant loss of LMP2 amplicons, and a single diffuse large B-cell lymphoma lacking the central part of the viral genome spanning BamH1W, BZLF1, and EBNA1 gene segments. A reasonable screening strategy for infected malignancy involves applying EBER1 and LMP1 quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays and confirming that values exceeding 2000 copies of EBV per 100,000 cells have EBER localization to malignant cells.

  17. Genome of a Low-Salinity Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaeon Determined by Single-Cell and Metagenomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Potanina, Anastasia; Francis, Christopher A.; Quake, Stephen R.

    2011-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) are thought to be among the most abundant microorganisms on Earth and may significantly impact the global nitrogen and carbon cycles. We sequenced the genome of AOA in an enrichment culture from low-salinity sediments in San Francisco Bay using single-cell and metagenomic genome sequence data. Five single cells were isolated inside an integrated microfluidic device using laser tweezers, the cells' genomic DNA was amplified by multiple displacement amplification (MDA) in 50 nL volumes and then sequenced by high-throughput DNA pyrosequencing. This microscopy-based approach to single-cell genomics minimizes contamination and allows correlation of high-resolution cell images with genomic sequences. Statistical properties of coverage across the five single cells, in combination with the contrasting properties of the metagenomic dataset allowed the assembly of a high-quality draft genome. The genome of this AOA, which we designate Candidatus Nitrosoarchaeum limnia SFB1, is ∼1.77 Mb with >2100 genes and a G+C content of 32%. Across the entire genome, the average nucleotide identity to Nitrosopumilus maritimus, the only AOA in pure culture, is ∼70%, suggesting this AOA represents a new genus of Crenarchaeota. Phylogenetically, the 16S rRNA and ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA) genes of this AOA are most closely related to sequences reported from a wide variety of freshwater ecosystems. Like N. maritimus, the low-salinity AOA genome appears to have an ammonia oxidation pathway distinct from ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB). In contrast to other described AOA, these low-salinity AOA appear to be motile, based on the presence of numerous motility- and chemotaxis-associated genes in the genome. This genome data will be used to inform targeted physiological and metabolic studies of this novel group of AOA, which may ultimately advance our understanding of AOA metabolism and their impacts on the global carbon and nitrogen cycles. PMID

  18. Detection of aneuploidy in single cells using comparative genomic hybridization.

    PubMed

    Voullaire, L; Wilton, L; Slater, H; Williamson, R

    1999-09-01

    The ability of comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) to detect aneuploidy following universal amplification of DNA from a single cell, or a small number of cells, was investigated with a view to preimplantation diagnosis following in vitro fertilization, and prenatal diagnosis using fetal erythroblasts obtained from maternal blood. The DNA obtained from lysed single cells was amplified using degenerate oligonucleotide-primed PCR (DOP-PCR). This product was labelled using nick translation and hybridized together with normal reference genomic DNA. The CGH fluorescent ratio profiles obtained could be used to determine aneuploidy with cut-off thresholds of 0.75 and 1.25. Deviation in the profiles in the heterochromatic regions was reduced by using, as a reference sample, normal genomic DNA that had also undergone DOP-PCR. Single cells known to be trisomic for chromosomes 13, 18 or 21 were analysed using this technique. The resolution of CGH with amplified DNA from a single cell is of the order of 40 Mb, sufficient for the diagnosis of trisomy 21, and possibly segmental aneuploidy of equivalent size. These results, and those of others, demonstrate that diagnosis of chromosomal aneuploidy in single cells is possible using CGH with DOP-PCR amplified DNA.

  19. Programming cells by multiplex genome engineering and accelerated evolution

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Peter A.; Sun, Zachary Z.; Xu, George; Forest, Craig R.; Church, George M.

    2015-01-01

    The breadth of genomic diversity found among organisms in nature allows populations to adapt to diverse environments1,2. However, genomic diversity is difficult to generate in the laboratory and new phenotypes do not easily arise on practical timescales3. Although in vitro and directed evolution methods4–9 have created genetic variants with usefully altered phenotypes, these methods are limited to laborious and serial manipulation of single genes and are not used for parallel and continuous directed evolution of gene networks or genomes. Here, we describe multiplex automated genome engineering (MAGE) for large-scale programming and evolution of cells. MAGE simultaneously targets many locations on the chromosome for modification in a single cell or across a population of cells, thus producing combinatorial genomic diversity. Because the process is cyclical and scalable, we constructed prototype devices that automate the MAGE technology to facilitate rapid and continuous generation of a diverse set of genetic changes (mismatches, insertions, deletions). We applied MAGE to optimize the 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate (DXP) biosynthesis pathway in Escherichia coli to overproduce the industrially important isoprenoid lycopene. Twenty-four genetic components in the DXP pathway were modified simultaneously using a complex pool of synthetic DNA, creating over 4.3 billion combinatorial genomic variants per day. We isolated variants with more than fivefold increase in lycopene production within 3 days, a significant improvement over existing metabolic engineering techniques. Our multiplex approach embraces engineering in the context of evolution by expediting the design and evolution of organisms with new and improved properties. PMID:19633652

  20. Two ways to fold the genome during the cell cycle: insights obtained with chromosome conformation capture.

    PubMed

    Dekker, Job

    2014-01-01

    Genetic and epigenetic inheritance through mitosis is critical for dividing cells to maintain their state. This process occurs in the context of large-scale re-organization of chromosome conformation during prophase leading to the formation of mitotic chromosomes, and during the reformation of the interphase nucleus during telophase and early G1. This review highlights how recent studies over the last 5 years employing chromosome conformation capture combined with classical models of chromosome organization based on decades of microscopic observations, are providing new insights into the three-dimensional organization of chromatin inside the interphase nucleus and within mitotic chromosomes. One striking observation is that interphase genome organization displays cell type-specific features that are related to cell type-specific gene expression, whereas mitotic chromosome folding appears universal and tissue invariant. This raises the question of whether or not there is a need for an epigenetic memory for genome folding. Herein, the two different folding states of mammalian genomes are reviewed and then models are discussed wherein instructions for cell type-specific genome folding are locally encoded in the linear genome and transmitted through mitosis, e.g., as open chromatin sites with or without continuous binding of transcription factors. In the next cell cycle these instructions are used to re-assemble protein complexes on regulatory elements which then drive three-dimensional folding of the genome from the bottom up through local action and self-assembly into higher order levels of cell type-specific organization. In this model, no explicit epigenetic memory for cell type-specific chromosome folding is required.

  1. Induced pluripotent stem cells meet genome editing

    PubMed Central

    Hockemeyer, Dirk; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    It is extremely rare for a single experiment to be so impactful and timely that it shapes and forecasts the experiments of the next decade. Here, we review how two such experiments --the generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and the development of CRISPR/Cas9 technology-- have fundamentally reshaped our approach to biomedical research, stem cell biology and human genetics. We will also highlight the previous knowledge that iPSC and CRISPR/Cas9 technologies were built on as this groundwork demonstrated the need for solutions and the benefits that these technologies provided, and have set the stage for their success. PMID:27152442

  2. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Meet Genome Editing.

    PubMed

    Hockemeyer, Dirk; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2016-05-05

    It is extremely rare for a single experiment to be so impactful and timely that it shapes and forecasts the experiments of the next decade. Here, we review how two such experiments-the generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and the development of CRISPR/Cas9 technology-have fundamentally reshaped our approach to biomedical research, stem cell biology, and human genetics. We will also highlight the previous knowledge that iPSC and CRISPR/Cas9 technologies were built on as this groundwork demonstrated the need for solutions and the benefits that these technologies provided and set the stage for their success.

  3. Web-based visual analysis for high-throughput genomics.

    PubMed

    Goecks, Jeremy; Eberhard, Carl; Too, Tomithy; Nekrutenko, Anton; Taylor, James

    2013-06-13

    Visualization plays an essential role in genomics research by making it possible to observe correlations and trends in large datasets as well as communicate findings to others. Visual analysis, which combines visualization with analysis tools to enable seamless use of both approaches for scientific investigation, offers a powerful method for performing complex genomic analyses. However, there are numerous challenges that arise when creating rich, interactive Web-based visualizations/visual analysis applications for high-throughput genomics. These challenges include managing data flow from Web server to Web browser, integrating analysis tools and visualizations, and sharing visualizations with colleagues. We have created a platform simplifies the creation of Web-based visualization/visual analysis applications for high-throughput genomics. This platform provides components that make it simple to efficiently query very large datasets, draw common representations of genomic data, integrate with analysis tools, and share or publish fully interactive visualizations. Using this platform, we have created a Circos-style genome-wide viewer, a generic scatter plot for correlation analysis, an interactive phylogenetic tree, a scalable genome browser for next-generation sequencing data, and an application for systematically exploring tool parameter spaces to find good parameter values. All visualizations are interactive and fully customizable. The platform is integrated with the Galaxy (http://galaxyproject.org) genomics workbench, making it easy to integrate new visual applications into Galaxy. Visualization and visual analysis play an important role in high-throughput genomics experiments, and approaches are needed to make it easier to create applications for these activities. Our framework provides a foundation for creating Web-based visualizations and integrating them into Galaxy. Finally, the visualizations we have created using the framework are useful tools for high

  4. Exploring Arabidopsis thaliana Root Endophytes via Single-Cell Genomics

    SciTech Connect

    Lundberg, Derek; Woyke, Tanja; Tringe, Susannah; Dangl, Jeff

    2014-03-19

    Land plants grow in association with microbial communities both on their surfaces and inside the plant (endophytes). The relationships between microbes and their host can vary from pathogenic to mutualistic. Colonization of the endophyte compartment occurs in the presence of a sophisticated plant immune system, implying finely tuned discrimination of pathogens from mutualists and commensals. Despite the importance of the microbiome to the plant, relatively little is known about the specific interactions between plants and microbes, especially in the case of endophytes. The vast majority of microbes have not been grown in the lab, and thus one of the few ways of studying them is by examining their DNA. Although metagenomics is a powerful tool for examining microbial communities, its application to endophyte samples is technically difficult due to the presence of large amounts of host plant DNA in the sample. One method to address these difficulties is single-cell genomics where a single microbial cell is isolated from a sample, lysed, and its genome amplified by multiple displacement amplification (MDA) to produce enough DNA for genome sequencing. This produces a single-cell amplified genome (SAG). We have applied this technology to study the endophytic microbes in Arabidopsis thaliana roots. Extensive 16S gene profiling of the microbial communities in the roots of multiple inbred A. thaliana strains has identified 164 OTUs as being significantly enriched in all the root endophyte samples compared to their presence in bulk soil.

  5. Effects of whole genome duplication on cell size and gene expression in mouse embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    IMAI, Hiroyuki; FUJII, Wataru; KUSAKABE, Ken Takeshi; KISO, Yasuo; KANO, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in ploidy tend to influence cell physiology, which in the long-term, contribute to species adaptation and evolution. Polyploid cells are observed under physiological conditions in the nerve and liver tissues, and in tumorigenic processes. Although tetraploid cells have been studied in mammalian cells, the basic characteristics and alterations caused by whole genome duplication are still poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to acquire basic knowledge about the effect of whole genome duplication on the cell cycle, cell size, and gene expression. Using flow cytometry, we demonstrate that cell cycle subpopulations in mouse tetraploid embryonic stem cells (TESCs) were similar to those in embryonic stem cells (ESCs). We performed smear preparations and flow cytometric analysis to identify cell size alterations. These indicated that the relative cell volume of TESCs was approximately 2.2–2.5 fold that of ESCs. We also investigated the effect of whole genome duplication on the expression of housekeeping and pluripotency marker genes using quantitative real-time PCR with external RNA. We found that the target transcripts were 2.2 times more abundant in TESCs than those in ESCs. This indicated that gene expression and cell volume increased in parallel. Our findings suggest the existence of a homeostatic mechanism controlling the cytoplasmic transcript levels in accordance with genome volume changes caused by whole genome duplication. PMID:27569766

  6. Enhancing Targeted Genomic DNA Editing in Chicken Cells Using the CRISPR/Cas9 System

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ling; Yang, Likai; Guo, Yijie; Du, Weili; Yin, Yajun; Zhang, Tao; Lu, Hongzhao

    2017-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system has enabled highly efficient genome targeted editing for various organisms. However, few studies have focused on CRISPR/Cas9 nuclease-mediated chicken genome editing compared with mammalian genomes. The current study combined CRISPR with yeast Rad52 (yRad52) to enhance targeted genomic DNA editing in chicken DF-1 cells. The efficiency of CRISPR/Cas9 nuclease-induced targeted mutations in the chicken genome was increased to 41.9% via the enrichment of the dual-reporter surrogate system. In addition, the combined effect of CRISPR nuclease and yRad52 dramatically increased the efficiency of the targeted substitution in the myostatin gene using 50-mer oligodeoxynucleotides (ssODN) as the donor DNA, resulting in a 36.7% editing efficiency after puromycin selection. Furthermore, based on the effect of yRad52, the frequency of exogenous gene integration in the chicken genome was more than 3-fold higher than that without yRad52. Collectively, these results suggest that ssODN is an ideal donor DNA for targeted substitution and that CRISPR/Cas9 combined with yRad52 significantly enhances chicken genome editing. These findings could be extensively applied in other organisms. PMID:28068387

  7. Enhancing Targeted Genomic DNA Editing in Chicken Cells Using the CRISPR/Cas9 System.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Yang, Likai; Guo, Yijie; Du, Weili; Yin, Yajun; Zhang, Tao; Lu, Hongzhao

    2017-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system has enabled highly efficient genome targeted editing for various organisms. However, few studies have focused on CRISPR/Cas9 nuclease-mediated chicken genome editing compared with mammalian genomes. The current study combined CRISPR with yeast Rad52 (yRad52) to enhance targeted genomic DNA editing in chicken DF-1 cells. The efficiency of CRISPR/Cas9 nuclease-induced targeted mutations in the chicken genome was increased to 41.9% via the enrichment of the dual-reporter surrogate system. In addition, the combined effect of CRISPR nuclease and yRad52 dramatically increased the efficiency of the targeted substitution in the myostatin gene using 50-mer oligodeoxynucleotides (ssODN) as the donor DNA, resulting in a 36.7% editing efficiency after puromycin selection. Furthermore, based on the effect of yRad52, the frequency of exogenous gene integration in the chicken genome was more than 3-fold higher than that without yRad52. Collectively, these results suggest that ssODN is an ideal donor DNA for targeted substitution and that CRISPR/Cas9 combined with yRad52 significantly enhances chicken genome editing. These findings could be extensively applied in other organisms.

  8. A Web-Based Comparative Genomics Tutorial for Investigating Microbial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    STRONG, MICHAEL; CASCIO, DUILIO; EISENBERG, DAVID

    2004-01-01

    As the number of completely sequenced microbial genomes continues to rise at an impressive rate, it is important to prepare students with the skills necessary to investigate microorganisms at the genomic level. As a part of the core curriculum for first-year graduate students in the biological sciences, we have implemented a web-based tutorial to introduce students to the fields of comparative and functional genomics. The tutorial focuses on recent computational methods for identifying functionally linked genes and proteins on a genome-wide scale and was used to introduce students to the Rosetta Stone, Phylogenetic Profile, conserved Gene Neighbor, and Operon computational methods. Students learned to use a number of publicly available web servers and databases to identify functionally linked genes in the Escherichia coli genome, with emphasis on genome organization and operon structure. The overall effectiveness of the tutorial was assessed based on student evaluations and homework assignments. The tutorial is available to other educators at http://www.doe-mbi.ucla.edu/~strong/m253.php. PMID:23653555

  9. Genome Editing in Human Cells Using CRISPR/Cas Nucleases.

    PubMed

    Wyvekens, Nicolas; Tsai, Shengdar Q; Joung, J Keith

    2015-10-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) system has been broadly adopted for highly efficient genome editing in a variety of model organisms and human cell types. Unlike previous genome editing technologies such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), CRISPR/Cas technology does not require complex protein engineering and can be utilized by any researcher proficient in basic molecular biology and cell culture techniques. This unit describes protocols for design and cloning of vectors expressing single or multiplex gRNAs, for transient transfection of human cell lines, and for quantitation of mutation frequencies by T7 endonuclease I assay. These protocols also include guidance for using two improvements that increase the specificity of CRISPR/Cas nucleases: truncated gRNAs and dimeric RNA-guided FokI nucleases.

  10. RNA-programmed genome editing in human cells.

    PubMed

    Jinek, Martin; East, Alexandra; Cheng, Aaron; Lin, Steven; Ma, Enbo; Doudna, Jennifer

    2013-01-29

    Type II CRISPR immune systems in bacteria use a dual RNA-guided DNA endonuclease, Cas9, to cleave foreign DNA at specific sites. We show here that Cas9 assembles with hybrid guide RNAs in human cells and can induce the formation of double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs) at a site complementary to the guide RNA sequence in genomic DNA. This cleavage activity requires both Cas9 and the complementary binding of the guide RNA. Experiments using extracts from transfected cells show that RNA expression and/or assembly into Cas9 is the limiting factor for Cas9-mediated DNA cleavage. In addition, we find that extension of the RNA sequence at the 3' end enhances DNA targeting activity in vivo. These results show that RNA-programmed genome editing is a facile strategy for introducing site-specific genetic changes in human cells.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00471.001.

  11. A Method for Checking Genomic Integrity in Cultured Cell Lines from SNP Genotyping Data.

    PubMed

    Danecek, Petr; McCarthy, Shane A; Durbin, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Genomic screening for chromosomal abnormalities is an important part of quality control when establishing and maintaining stem cell lines. We present a new method for sensitive detection of copy number alterations, aneuploidy, and contamination in cell lines using genome-wide SNP genotyping data. In contrast to other methods designed for identifying copy number variations in a single sample or in a sample composed of a mixture of normal and tumor cells, this new method is tailored for determining differences between cell lines and the starting material from which they were derived, which allows us to distinguish between normal and novel copy number variation. We implemented the method in the freely available BCFtools package and present results based on induced pluripotent stem cell lines obtained in the HipSci project.

  12. A Method for Checking Genomic Integrity in Cultured Cell Lines from SNP Genotyping Data

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Shane A.; Durbin, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Genomic screening for chromosomal abnormalities is an important part of quality control when establishing and maintaining stem cell lines. We present a new method for sensitive detection of copy number alterations, aneuploidy, and contamination in cell lines using genome-wide SNP genotyping data. In contrast to other methods designed for identifying copy number variations in a single sample or in a sample composed of a mixture of normal and tumor cells, this new method is tailored for determining differences between cell lines and the starting material from which they were derived, which allows us to distinguish between normal and novel copy number variation. We implemented the method in the freely available BCFtools package and present results based on induced pluripotent stem cell lines obtained in the HipSci project. PMID:27176002

  13. Current Developments in Prokaryotic Single Cell Whole Genome Amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Goudeau, Danielle; Nath, Nandita; Ciobanu, Doina; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Malmstrom, Rex

    2014-03-14

    Our approach to prokaryotic single-cell Whole Genome Amplification at the JGI continues to evolve. To increase both the quality and number of single-cell genomes produced, we explore all aspects of the process from cell sorting to sequencing. For example, we now utilize specialized reagents, acoustic liquid handling, and reduced reaction volumes eliminate non-target DNA contamination in WGA reactions. More specifically, we use a cleaner commercial WGA kit from Qiagen that employs a UV decontamination procedure initially developed at the JGI, and we use the Labcyte Echo for tip-less liquid transfer to set up 2uL reactions. Acoustic liquid handling also dramatically reduces reagent costs. In addition, we are exploring new cell lysis methods including treatment with Proteinase K, lysozyme, and other detergents, in order to complement standard alkaline lysis and allow for more efficient disruption of a wider range of cells. Incomplete lysis represents a major hurdle for WGA on some environmental samples, especially rhizosphere, peatland, and other soils. Finding effective lysis strategies that are also compatible with WGA is challenging, and we are currently assessing the impact of various strategies on genome recovery.

  14. The somatic genomic landscape of chromophobe renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Davis, Caleb F; Ricketts, Christopher J; Wang, Min; Yang, Lixing; Cherniack, Andrew D; Shen, Hui; Buhay, Christian; Kang, Hyojin; Kim, Sang Cheol; Fahey, Catherine C; Hacker, Kathryn E; Bhanot, Gyan; Gordenin, Dmitry A; Chu, Andy; Gunaratne, Preethi H; Biehl, Michael; Seth, Sahil; Kaipparettu, Benny A; Bristow, Christopher A; Donehower, Lawrence A; Wallen, Eric M; Smith, Angela B; Tickoo, Satish K; Tamboli, Pheroze; Reuter, Victor; Schmidt, Laura S; Hsieh, James J; Choueiri, Toni K; Hakimi, A Ari; Chin, Lynda; Meyerson, Matthew; Kucherlapati, Raju; Park, Woong-Yang; Robertson, A Gordon; Laird, Peter W; Henske, Elizabeth P; Kwiatkowski, David J; Park, Peter J; Morgan, Margaret; Shuch, Brian; Muzny, Donna; Wheeler, David A; Linehan, W Marston; Gibbs, Richard A; Rathmell, W Kimryn; Creighton, Chad J

    2014-09-08

    We describe the landscape of somatic genomic alterations of 66 chromophobe renal cell carcinomas (ChRCCs) on the basis of multidimensional and comprehensive characterization, including mtDNA and whole-genome sequencing. The result is consistent that ChRCC originates from the distal nephron compared with other kidney cancers with more proximal origins. Combined mtDNA and gene expression analysis implicates changes in mitochondrial function as a component of the disease biology, while suggesting alternative roles for mtDNA mutations in cancers relying on oxidative phosphorylation. Genomic rearrangements lead to recurrent structural breakpoints within TERT promoter region, which correlates with highly elevated TERT expression and manifestation of kataegis, representing a mechanism of TERT upregulation in cancer distinct from previously observed amplifications and point mutations.

  15. Comprehensive genomic characterization of squamous cell lung cancers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Summary Lung squamous cell carcinoma (lung SqCC) is a common type of lung cancer, causing approximately 400,000 deaths per year worldwide. Genomic alterations in lung SqCC have not been comprehensively characterized and no molecularly targeted agents have been developed specifically for its treatment. As part of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), we profiled 178 lung SqCCs to provide a comprehensive landscape of genomic and epigenomic alterations. Lung SqCC is characterized by complex genomic alterations, with a mean of 360 exonic mutations, 165 genomic rearrangements, and 323 segments of copy number alteration per tumor. We found statistically recurrent mutations in 18 genes in including mutation of TP53 in nearly all specimens. Previously unreported loss-of-function mutations were seen in the HLA-A class I major histocompatibility gene. Significantly altered pathways included NFE2L2/KEAP1 in 34%, squamous differentiation genes in 44%, PI3K/AKT in 47%, and CDKN2A/RB1 in 72% of tumors. We identified a potential therapeutic target in the majority of tumors, offering new avenues of investigation for lung SqCC treatment. PMID:22960745

  16. Genomic Insights into Geothermal Spring Community Members using a 16S Agnostic Single-Cell Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowers, R. M.

    2016-12-01

    INSTUTIONS (ALL): DOE Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, CA USA. Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences, East Boothbay, ME USA. Department of Biological Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. ABSTRACT BODY: With recent advances in DNA sequencing, rapid and affordable screening of single-cell genomes has become a reality. Single-cell sequencing is a multi-step process that takes advantage of any number of single-cell sorting techniques, whole genome amplification (WGA), and 16S rRNA gene based PCR screening to identify the microbes of interest prior to shotgun sequencing. However, the 16S PCR based screening step is costly and may lead to unanticipated losses of microbial diversity, as cells that do not produce a clean 16S amplicon are typically omitted from downstream shotgun sequencing. While many of the sorted cells that fail the 16S PCR step likely originate from poor quality amplified DNA, some of the cells with good WGA kinetics may instead represent bacteria or archaea with 16S genes that fail to amplify due to primer mis-matches or the presence of intervening sequences. Using cell material from Dewar Creek, a hot spring in British Columbia, we sequenced all sorted cells with good WGA kinetics irrespective of their 16S amplification success. We show that this high-throughput approach to single-cell sequencing (i) can reduce the overall cost of single-cell genome production, and (ii). may lead to the discovery of previously unknown branches on the microbial tree of life.

  17. KRAS Genomic Status Predicts the Sensitivity of Ovarian Cancer Cells to Decitabine | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Decitabine, a cancer therapeutic that inhibits DNA methylation, produces variable antitumor response rates in patients with solid tumors that might be leveraged clinically with identification of a predictive biomarker. In this study, we profiled the response of human ovarian, melanoma, and breast cancer cells treated with decitabine, finding that RAS/MEK/ERK pathway activation and DNMT1 expression correlated with cytotoxic activity. Further, we showed that KRAS genomic status predicted decitabine sensitivity in low-grade and high-grade serous ovarian cancer cells.

  18. Chemically modified guide RNAs enhance CRISPR-Cas genome editing in human primary cells.

    PubMed

    Hendel, Ayal; Bak, Rasmus O; Clark, Joseph T; Kennedy, Andrew B; Ryan, Daniel E; Roy, Subhadeep; Steinfeld, Israel; Lunstad, Benjamin D; Kaiser, Robert J; Wilkens, Alec B; Bacchetta, Rosa; Tsalenko, Anya; Dellinger, Douglas; Bruhn, Laurakay; Porteus, Matthew H

    2015-09-01

    CRISPR-Cas-mediated genome editing relies on guide RNAs that direct site-specific DNA cleavage facilitated by the Cas endonuclease. Here we report that chemical alterations to synthesized single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) enhance genome editing efficiency in human primary T cells and CD34(+) hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Co-delivering chemically modified sgRNAs with Cas9 mRNA or protein is an efficient RNA- or ribonucleoprotein (RNP)-based delivery method for the CRISPR-Cas system, without the toxicity associated with DNA delivery. This approach is a simple and effective way to streamline the development of genome editing with the potential to accelerate a wide array of biotechnological and therapeutic applications of the CRISPR-Cas technology.

  19. Architectural proteins: Regulators of 3D genome organization in cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Díaz, Elena; Corces, Victor G.

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between alterations in chromatin structure and changes in gene expression during cell differentiation has served as a paradigm to understand the link between genome organization and function. Yet the factors involved and the mechanisms by which the three-dimensional organization of the nucleus is established remain poorly understood. The use of Chromosome Conformation-Capture (3C) based approaches has resulted in a new appreciation of the role of architectural proteins in the establishment of 3D genome organization. Architectural proteins orchestrate higher-order chromatin organization through the establishment of interactions between regulatory elements across multiple spatial scales. The regulation of these proteins, their interaction with DNA, and their co occurrence in the genome, may be responsible for the plasticity of 3D-chromatin architecture that dictates cell and time-specific blueprints of gene expression. PMID:25218583

  20. Architectural proteins: regulators of 3D genome organization in cell fate.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Díaz, Elena; Corces, Victor G

    2014-11-01

    The relation between alterations in chromatin structure and changes in gene expression during cell differentiation has served as a paradigm to understand the link between genome organization and function. Yet, the factors involved and the mechanisms by which the 3D organization of the nucleus is established remain poorly understood. The use of Chromosome Conformation-Capture (3C)-based approaches has resulted in a new appreciation of the role of architectural proteins in the establishment of 3D genome organization. Architectural proteins orchestrate higher-order chromatin organization through the establishment of interactions between regulatory elements across multiple spatial scales. The regulation of these proteins, their interaction with DNA, and their co-occurrence in the genome, may be responsible for the plasticity of 3D chromatin architecture that dictates cell and time-specific blueprints of gene expression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Chemically modified guide RNAs enhance CRISPR-Cas genome editing in human primary cells

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Joseph T; Kennedy, Andrew B; Ryan, Daniel E; Roy, Subhadeep; Steinfeld, Israel; Lunstad, Benjamin D; Kaiser, Robert J; Wilkens, Alec B; Bacchetta, Rosa; Tsalenko, Anya; Dellinger, Douglas; Bruhn, Laurakay; Porteus, Matthew H

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas-mediated genome editing relies on guide RNAs that direct site-specific DNA cleavage facilitated by the Cas endonuclease. Here we report that chemical alterations to synthesized single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) enhance genome editing efficiency in human primary T cells and CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Co-delivering chemically modified sgRNAs with Cas9 mRNA or protein is an efficient RNA- or ribonucleoprotein (RNP)-based delivery method for the CRISPR-Cas system, without the toxicity associated with DNA delivery. This approach is a simple and effective way to streamline the development of genome editing with the potential to accelerate a wide array of biotechnological and therapeutic applications of the CRISPR-Cas technology. PMID:26121415

  2. Comprehensive genomic profiles of small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    George, Julie; Lim, Jing Shan; Jang, Se Jin; Cun, Yupeng; Ozretić, Luka; Kong, Gu; Leenders, Frauke; Lu, Xin; Fernández-Cuesta, Lynnette; Bosco, Graziella; Müller, Christian; Dahmen, Ilona; Jahchan, Nadine S.; Park, Kwon-Sik; Yang, Dian; Karnezis, Anthony N.; Vaka, Dedeepya; Torres, Angela; Wang, Maia Segura; Korbel, Jan O.; Menon, Roopika; Chun, Sung-Min; Kim, Deokhoon; Wilkerson, Matt; Hayes, Neil; Engelmann, David; Pützer, Brigitte; Bos, Marc; Michels, Sebastian; Vlasic, Ignacija; Seidel, Danila; Pinther, Berit; Schaub, Philipp; Becker, Christian; Altmüller, Janine; Yokota, Jun; Kohno, Takashi; Iwakawa, Reika; Tsuta, Koji; Noguchi, Masayuki; Muley, Thomas; Hoffmann, Hans; Schnabel, Philipp A.; Petersen, Iver; Chen, Yuan; Soltermann, Alex; Tischler, Verena; Choi, Chang-min; Kim, Yong-Hee; Massion, Pierre P.; Zou, Yong; Jovanovic, Dragana; Kontic, Milica; Wright, Gavin M.; Russell, Prudence A.; Solomon, Benjamin; Koch, Ina; Lindner, Michael; Muscarella, Lucia A.; la Torre, Annamaria; Field, John K.; Jakopovic, Marko; Knezevic, Jelena; Castaños-Vélez, Esmeralda; Roz, Luca; Pastorino, Ugo; Brustugun, Odd-Terje; Lund-Iversen, Marius; Thunnissen, Erik; Köhler, Jens; Schuler, Martin; Botling, Johan; Sandelin, Martin; Sanchez-Cespedes, Montserrat; Salvesen, Helga B.; Achter, Viktor; Lang, Ulrich; Bogus, Magdalena; Schneider, Peter M.; Zander, Thomas; Ansén, Sascha; Hallek, Michael; Wolf, Jürgen; Vingron, Martin; Yatabe, Yasushi; Travis, William D.; Nürnberg, Peter; Reinhardt, Christian; Perner, Sven; Heukamp, Lukas; Büttner, Reinhard; Haas, Stefan A.; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Peifer, Martin; Sage, Julien; Thomas, Roman K.

    2016-01-01

    We have sequenced the genomes of 110 small cell lung cancers (SCLC), one of the deadliest human cancers. In nearly all the tumours analysed we found bi-allelic inactivation of TP53 and RB1, sometimes by complex genomic rearrangements. Two tumours with wild-type RB1 had evidence of chromothripsis leading to overexpression of cyclin D1 (encoded by the CCND1 gene), revealing an alternative mechanism of Rb1 deregulation. Thus, loss of the tumour suppressors TP53 and RB1 is obligatory in SCLC. We discovered somatic genomic rearrangements of TP73 that create an oncogenic version of this gene, TP73Δex2/3. In rare cases, SCLC tumours exhibited kinase gene mutations, providing a possible therapeutic opportunity for individual patients. Finally, we observed inactivating mutations in NOTCH family genes in 25% of human SCLC. Accordingly, activation of Notch signalling in a pre-clinical SCLC mouse model strikingly reduced the number of tumours and extended the survival of the mutant mice. Furthermore, neuroendocrine gene expression was abrogated by Notch activity in SCLC cells. This first comprehensive study of somatic genome alterations in SCLC uncovers several key biological processes and identifies candidate therapeutic targets in this highly lethal form of cancer. PMID:26168399

  3. Comprehensive genomic profiles of small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    George, Julie; Lim, Jing Shan; Jang, Se Jin; Cun, Yupeng; Ozretić, Luka; Kong, Gu; Leenders, Frauke; Lu, Xin; Fernández-Cuesta, Lynnette; Bosco, Graziella; Müller, Christian; Dahmen, Ilona; Jahchan, Nadine S; Park, Kwon-Sik; Yang, Dian; Karnezis, Anthony N; Vaka, Dedeepya; Torres, Angela; Wang, Maia Segura; Korbel, Jan O; Menon, Roopika; Chun, Sung-Min; Kim, Deokhoon; Wilkerson, Matt; Hayes, Neil; Engelmann, David; Pützer, Brigitte; Bos, Marc; Michels, Sebastian; Vlasic, Ignacija; Seidel, Danila; Pinther, Berit; Schaub, Philipp; Becker, Christian; Altmüller, Janine; Yokota, Jun; Kohno, Takashi; Iwakawa, Reika; Tsuta, Koji; Noguchi, Masayuki; Muley, Thomas; Hoffmann, Hans; Schnabel, Philipp A; Petersen, Iver; Chen, Yuan; Soltermann, Alex; Tischler, Verena; Choi, Chang-min; Kim, Yong-Hee; Massion, Pierre P; Zou, Yong; Jovanovic, Dragana; Kontic, Milica; Wright, Gavin M; Russell, Prudence A; Solomon, Benjamin; Koch, Ina; Lindner, Michael; Muscarella, Lucia A; la Torre, Annamaria; Field, John K; Jakopovic, Marko; Knezevic, Jelena; Castaños-Vélez, Esmeralda; Roz, Luca; Pastorino, Ugo; Brustugun, Odd-Terje; Lund-Iversen, Marius; Thunnissen, Erik; Köhler, Jens; Schuler, Martin; Botling, Johan; Sandelin, Martin; Sanchez-Cespedes, Montserrat; Salvesen, Helga B; Achter, Viktor; Lang, Ulrich; Bogus, Magdalena; Schneider, Peter M; Zander, Thomas; Ansén, Sascha; Hallek, Michael; Wolf, Jürgen; Vingron, Martin; Yatabe, Yasushi; Travis, William D; Nürnberg, Peter; Reinhardt, Christian; Perner, Sven; Heukamp, Lukas; Büttner, Reinhard; Haas, Stefan A; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Peifer, Martin; Sage, Julien; Thomas, Roman K

    2015-08-06

    We have sequenced the genomes of 110 small cell lung cancers (SCLC), one of the deadliest human cancers. In nearly all the tumours analysed we found bi-allelic inactivation of TP53 and RB1, sometimes by complex genomic rearrangements. Two tumours with wild-type RB1 had evidence of chromothripsis leading to overexpression of cyclin D1 (encoded by the CCND1 gene), revealing an alternative mechanism of Rb1 deregulation. Thus, loss of the tumour suppressors TP53 and RB1 is obligatory in SCLC. We discovered somatic genomic rearrangements of TP73 that create an oncogenic version of this gene, TP73Δex2/3. In rare cases, SCLC tumours exhibited kinase gene mutations, providing a possible therapeutic opportunity for individual patients. Finally, we observed inactivating mutations in NOTCH family genes in 25% of human SCLC. Accordingly, activation of Notch signalling in a pre-clinical SCLC mouse model strikingly reduced the number of tumours and extended the survival of the mutant mice. Furthermore, neuroendocrine gene expression was abrogated by Notch activity in SCLC cells. This first comprehensive study of somatic genome alterations in SCLC uncovers several key biological processes and identifies candidate therapeutic targets in this highly lethal form of cancer.

  4. Identification of prognostic relevant chromosomal abnormalities in chronic lymphocytic leukemia using microarray-based genomic profiling.

    PubMed

    Stevens-Kroef, Marian Jpl; van den Berg, Eva; Olde Weghuis, Daniel; Geurts van Kessel, Ad; Pfundt, Rolph; Linssen-Wiersma, Matty; Benjamins, Marloes; Dijkhuizen, Trijnie; Groenen, Patricia Jta; Simons, Annet

    2014-01-09

    Characteristic genomic abnormalities in patients with B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) have been shown to provide important prognostic information. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA), currently used in clinical diagnostics of CLL, are targeted tests aimed at specific genomic loci. Microarray-based genomic profiling is a new high-resolution tool that enables genome-wide analyses. The aim of this study was to compare two recently launched genomic microarray platforms, i.e., the CytoScan HD Array (Affymetrix) and the HumanOmniExpress Array (Illumina), with FISH and MLPA to ascertain whether these latter tests can be replaced by either one of the microarray platforms in a clinical diagnostic setting. Microarray-based genomic profiling and FISH were performed in all 28 CLL patients. For an unbiased comparison of the performance of both microarray platforms 9 patients were evaluated on both platforms, resulting in the identification of exactly identical genomic aberrations. To evaluate the detection limit of the microarray platforms we included 7 patients in which the genomic abnormalities were present in a relatively low percentage of the cells (range 5-28%) as previously determined by FISH. We found that both microarray platforms allowed the detection of copy number abnormalities present in as few as 16% of the cells. In addition, we found that microarray-based genomic profiling allowed the identification of genomic abnormalities that could not be detected by FISH and/or MLPA, including a focal TP53 loss and copy neutral losses of heterozygosity of chromosome 17p. From our results we conclude that although the microarray platforms exhibit a somewhat lower limit of detection compared to FISH, they still allow the detection of copy number abnormalities present in as few as 16% of the cells. By applying similar interpretation criteria, the results obtained from both platforms were comparable. In

  5. Whole-genome sequencing of nine esophageal adenocarcinoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Contino, Gianmarco; Eldridge, Matthew D.; Secrier, Maria; Bower, Lawrence; Fels Elliott, Rachael; Weaver, Jamie; Lynch, Andy G.; Edwards, Paul A.W.; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C.

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) is highly mutated and molecularly heterogeneous. The number of cell lines available for study is limited and their genome has been only partially characterized. The availability of an accurate annotation of their mutational landscape is crucial for accurate experimental design and correct interpretation of genotype-phenotype findings. We performed high coverage, paired end whole genome sequencing on eight EAC cell lines—ESO26, ESO51, FLO-1, JH-EsoAd1, OACM5.1 C, OACP4 C, OE33, SK-GT-4—all verified against original patient material, and one esophageal high grade dysplasia cell line, CP-D. We have made available the aligned sequence data and report single nucleotide variants (SNVs), small insertions and deletions (indels), and copy number alterations, identified by comparison with the human reference genome and known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We compare these putative mutations to mutations found in primary tissue EAC samples, to inform the use of these cell lines as a model of EAC. PMID:27594985

  6. Modeling genome coverage in single-cell sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Daley, Timothy; Smith, Andrew D.

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Single-cell DNA sequencing is necessary for examining genetic variation at the cellular level, which remains hidden in bulk sequencing experiments. But because they begin with such small amounts of starting material, the amount of information that is obtained from single-cell sequencing experiment is highly sensitive to the choice of protocol employed and variability in library preparation. In particular, the fraction of the genome represented in single-cell sequencing libraries exhibits extreme variability due to quantitative biases in amplification and loss of genetic material. Results: We propose a method to predict the genome coverage of a deep sequencing experiment using information from an initial shallow sequencing experiment mapped to a reference genome. The observed coverage statistics are used in a non-parametric empirical Bayes Poisson model to estimate the gain in coverage from deeper sequencing. This approach allows researchers to know statistical features of deep sequencing experiments without actually sequencing deeply, providing a basis for optimizing and comparing single-cell sequencing protocols or screening libraries. Availability and implementation: The method is available as part of the preseq software package. Source code is available at http://smithlabresearch.org/preseq. Contact: andrewds@usc.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary material is available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25107873

  7. [Compartmentalization of the cell nucleus and spatial organization of the genome].

    PubMed

    Gavrilov, A A; Razin, S V

    2015-01-01

    The eukaryotic cell nucleus is one of the most complex cell organelles. Despite the absence of membranes, the nuclear space is divided into numerous compartments where different processes in- volved in the genome activity take place. The most important nuclear compartments include nucleoli, nuclear speckles, PML bodies, Cajal bodies, histone locus bodies, Polycomb bodies, insulator bodies, transcription and replication factories. The structural basis for the nuclear compartmentalization is provided by genomic DNA that occupies most of the nuclear volume. Nuclear compartments, in turn, guide the chromosome folding by providing a platform for the spatial interaction of individual genomic loci. In this review, we discuss fundamental principles of higher order genome organization with a focus on chromosome territories and chromosome domains, as well as consider the structure and function of the key nuclear compartments. We show that the func- tional compartmentalization of the cell nucleus and genome spatial organization are tightly interconnected, and that this form of organization is highly dynamic and is based on stochastic processes.

  8. Detection of genomic imbalances by array based comparative genomic hybridisation in fetuses with multiple malformations

    PubMed Central

    Le Caignec, C; Boceno, M; Saugier-Veber, P; Jacquemont, S; Joubert, M; David, A; Frebourg, T; Rival, J

    2005-01-01

    Background: Malformations are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in full term infants and genomic imbalances are a significant component of their aetiology. However, the causes of defects in many patients with multiple congenital malformations remain unexplained despite thorough clinical examination and laboratory investigations. Methods: We used a commercially available array based comparative genomic hybridisation method (array CGH), able to screen all subtelomeric regions, main microdeletion syndromes, and 201 other regions covering the genome, to detect submicroscopic chromosomal imbalances in 49 fetuses with three or more significant anomalies and normal karyotype. Results: Array CGH identified eight genomic rearrangements (16.3%), all confirmed by quantitative multiplex PCR of short fluorescent fragments. Subtelomeric and interstitial deletions, submicroscopic duplications, and a complex genomic imbalance were identified. In four de novo cases (15qtel deletion, 16q23.1–q23.3 deletion, 22q11.2 deletion, and mosaicism for a rearranged chromosome 18), the genomic imbalance identified clearly underlay the pathological phenotype. In one case, the relationship between the genotype and phenotype was unclear, since a subtelomeric 6q deletion was detected in a mother and her two fetuses bearing multiple malformations. In three cases, a subtelomeric 10q duplication, probably a genomic polymorphism, was identified. Conclusions: The detection of 5/49 causative chromosomal imbalances (or 4/49 if the 6qtel deletion is not considered as causative) suggests wide genome screening when standard chromosome analysis is normal and confirms that array CGH will have a major impact on pre and postnatal diagnosis as well as providing information for more accurate genetic counselling. PMID:15689449

  9. OMIGA: Optimized Maker-Based Insect Genome Annotation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinding; Xiao, Huamei; Huang, Shuiqing; Li, Fei

    2014-08-01

    Insects are one of the largest classes of animals on Earth and constitute more than half of all living species. The i5k initiative has begun sequencing of more than 5,000 insect genomes, which should greatly help in exploring insect resource and pest control. Insect genome annotation remains challenging because many insects have high levels of heterozygosity. To improve the quality of insect genome annotation, we developed a pipeline, named Optimized Maker-Based Insect Genome Annotation (OMIGA), to predict protein-coding genes from insect genomes. We first mapped RNA-Seq reads to genomic scaffolds to determine transcribed regions using Bowtie, and the putative transcripts were assembled using Cufflink. We then selected highly reliable transcripts with intact coding sequences to train de novo gene prediction software, including Augustus. The re-trained software was used to predict genes from insect genomes. Exonerate was used to refine gene structure and to determine near exact exon/intron boundary in the genome. Finally, we used the software Maker to integrate data from RNA-Seq, de novo gene prediction, and protein alignment to produce an official gene set. The OMIGA pipeline was used to annotate the draft genome of an important insect pest, Chilo suppressalis, yielding 12,548 genes. Different strategies were compared, which demonstrated that OMIGA had the best performance. In summary, we present a comprehensive pipeline for identifying genes in insect genomes that can be widely used to improve the annotation quality in insects. OMIGA is provided at http://ento.njau.edu.cn/omiga.html .

  10. Enrichment of Root Endophytic Bacteria from Populus deltoides and Single-Cell-Genomics Analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Utturkar, Sagar M.; Cude, W. Nathan; Robeson, Jr., Michael S.; ...

    2016-07-15

    Bacterial endophytes that colonize Populus trees contribute to nutrient acquisition, prime immunity responses, and directly or indirectly increase both above- and below-ground biomasses. Endophytes are embedded within plant material, so physical separation and isolation are difficult tasks. Application of culture-independent methods, such as metagenome or bacterial transcriptome sequencing, has been limited due to the predominance of DNA from the plant biomass. In this paper, we present a modified differential and density gradient centrifugation-based protocol for the separation of endophytic bacteria from Populus roots. This protocol achieved substantial reduction in contaminating plant DNA, allowed enrichment of endophytic bacteria away from themore » plant material, and enabled single-cell genomics analysis. Four single-cell genomes were selected for whole-genome amplification based on their rarity in the microbiome (potentially uncultured taxa) as well as their inferred abilities to form associations with plants. Bioinformatics analyses, including assembly, contamination removal, and completeness estimation, were performed to obtain single-amplified genomes (SAGs) of organisms from the phyla Armatimonadetes, Verrucomicrobia, and Planctomycetes, which were unrepresented in our previous cultivation efforts. Finally, comparative genomic analysis revealed unique characteristics of each SAG that could facilitate future cultivation efforts for these bacteria.« less

  11. Enrichment of Root Endophytic Bacteria from Populus deltoides and Single-Cell-Genomics Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Utturkar, Sagar M.; Cude, W. Nathan; Robeson, Jr., Michael S.; Yang, Zamin Koo; Klingeman, Dawn Marie; Land, Miriam L.; Allman, Steve L.; Lu, Tse-Yuan S.; Brown, Steven D.; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Podar, Mircea; Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Pelletier, Dale A.

    2016-07-15

    Bacterial endophytes that colonize Populus trees contribute to nutrient acquisition, prime immunity responses, and directly or indirectly increase both above- and below-ground biomasses. Endophytes are embedded within plant material, so physical separation and isolation are difficult tasks. Application of culture-independent methods, such as metagenome or bacterial transcriptome sequencing, has been limited due to the predominance of DNA from the plant biomass. In this paper, we present a modified differential and density gradient centrifugation-based protocol for the separation of endophytic bacteria from Populus roots. This protocol achieved substantial reduction in contaminating plant DNA, allowed enrichment of endophytic bacteria away from the plant material, and enabled single-cell genomics analysis. Four single-cell genomes were selected for whole-genome amplification based on their rarity in the microbiome (potentially uncultured taxa) as well as their inferred abilities to form associations with plants. Bioinformatics analyses, including assembly, contamination removal, and completeness estimation, were performed to obtain single-amplified genomes (SAGs) of organisms from the phyla Armatimonadetes, Verrucomicrobia, and Planctomycetes, which were unrepresented in our previous cultivation efforts. Finally, comparative genomic analysis revealed unique characteristics of each SAG that could facilitate future cultivation efforts for these bacteria.

  12. Modelling genome-wide topological associating domains in mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Y; Giorgetti, L; Tiana, G

    2017-03-01

    Chromosome conformation capture (3C)-based techniques such as chromosome conformation capture carbon copy (5C) and Hi-C revealed that the folding of mammalian chromosomes is highly hierarchical. A fundamental structural unit in the hierarchy is represented by topologically associating domains (TADs), sub-megabase regions of the genome within which the chromatin fibre preferentially interacts. 3C-based methods provide the mean contact probabilities between chromosomal loci, averaged over a large number of cells, and do not give immediate access to the single-cell conformations of the chromatin fibre. However, coarse-grained polymer models based on 5C data can be used to extract the single-cell conformations of single TADs. Here, we extend this approach to analyse around 2500 TADs in murine embryonic stem cells based on high-resolution Hi-C data. This allowed to predict the cell-to-cell variability in single contacts within genome-wide TADs and correlations between them. Based on these results, we predict that TADs are more similar to ideal chains than to globules in terms of their physical size and three-dimensional shape distribution. Furthermore, we show that their physical size and the degree of structural anisotropy of single TADs are correlated with the level of transcriptional activity of the genes that it harbours. Finally, we show that a large number of multiplets of genomic loci co-localize more often than expected by random, and these loci are particularly enriched in promoters, enhancers and CTCF-bound sites. These results provide the first genome-wide structural reconstruction of TADs using polymeric models obeying the laws of thermodynamics and reveal important universal trends in the correlation between chromosome structure and transcription.

  13. Patient-derived cell models as preclinical tools for genome-directed targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jiryeon; Park, Kyunghee; Yi, Jun Ho; Hong, Mineui; Ahn, Taejin; Rath, Oliver; Schueler, Julia; Kim, Seung Tae; Do, In-Gu; Lee, Sujin; Park, Se Hoon; Ji, Yong Ick; Kim, Dukwhan; Park, Joon Oh; Park, Young Suk; Kang, Won Ki; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Park, Woong-Yang; Lim, Ho Yeong; Lee, Jeeyun

    2015-01-01

    Background In this study, we established patient-derived tumor cell (PDC) models using tissues collected from patients with metastatic cancer and assessed whether these models could be used as a tool for genome-based cancer treatment. Methods PDCs were isolated and cultured from malignant effusions including ascites and pleural fluid. Pathological examination, immunohistochemical analysis, and genomic profiling were performed to compare the histological and genomic features of primary tumors, PDCs. An exploratory gene expression profiling assay was performed to further characterize PDCs. Results From January 2012 to May 2013, 176 samples from patients with metastatic cancer were collected. PDC models were successfully established in 130 (73.6%) samples. The median time from specimen collection to passage 1 (P1) was 3 weeks (range, 0.5–4 weeks), while that from P1 to P2 was 2.5 weeks (range, 0.5–5 weeks). Sixteen paired samples of genomic alterations were highly concordant between each primary tumor and progeny PDCs, with an average variant allele frequency (VAF) correlation of 0.878. We compared genomic profiles of the primary tumor (P0), P1 cells, P2 cells, and patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) derived from P2 cells and found that three samples (P0, P1, and P2 cells) were highly correlated (0.99–1.00). Moreover, PDXs showed more than 100 variants, with correlations of only 0.6–0.8 for the other samples. Drug responses of PDCs were reflective of the clinical response to targeted agents in selected patient PDC lines. Conclusion(s) Our results provided evidence that our PDC model was a promising model for preclinical experiments and closely resembled the patient tumor genome and clinical response. PMID:26296973

  14. Multiplex CRISPR/Cas9-based genome engineering from a single lentiviral vector.

    PubMed

    Kabadi, Ami M; Ousterout, David G; Hilton, Isaac B; Gersbach, Charles A

    2014-10-29

    Engineered DNA-binding proteins that manipulate the human genome and transcriptome have enabled rapid advances in biomedical research. In particular, the RNA-guided CRISPR/Cas9 system has recently been engineered to create site-specific double-strand breaks for genome editing or to direct targeted transcriptional regulation. A unique capability of the CRISPR/Cas9 system is multiplex genome engineering by delivering a single Cas9 enzyme and two or more single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) targeted to distinct genomic sites. This approach can be used to simultaneously create multiple DNA breaks or to target multiple transcriptional activators to a single promoter for synergistic enhancement of gene induction. To address the need for uniform and sustained delivery of multiplex CRISPR/Cas9-based genome engineering tools, we developed a single lentiviral system to express a Cas9 variant, a reporter gene and up to four sgRNAs from independent RNA polymerase III promoters that are incorporated into the vector by a convenient Golden Gate cloning method. Each sgRNA is efficiently expressed and can mediate multiplex gene editing and sustained transcriptional activation in immortalized and primary human cells. This delivery system will be significant to enabling the potential of CRISPR/Cas9-based multiplex genome engineering in diverse cell types.

  15. MarinegenomicsDB: an integrated genome viewer for community-based annotation of genomes.

    PubMed

    Koyanagi, Ryo; Takeuchi, Takeshi; Hisata, Kanako; Gyoja, Fuki; Shoguchi, Eiichi; Satoh, Nori; Kawashima, Takeshi

    2013-10-01

    We constructed a web-based genome annotation platform, MarinegenomicsDB, to integrate genome data from various marine organisms including the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata and the coral Acropora digitifera. This newly developed viewer application provides open access to published data and a user-friendly environment for community-based manual gene annotation. Development on a flexible framework enables easy expansion of the website on demand. To date, more than 2000 genes have been annotated using this system. In the future, the website will be expanded to host a wider variety of data, more species, and different types of genome-wide analyses. The website is available at the following URL: http://marinegenomics.oist.jp.

  16. CnidBase: The Cnidarian Evolutionary Genomics Database

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Joseph F.; Finnerty, John R.

    2003-01-01

    CnidBase, the Cnidarian Evolutionary Genomics Database, is a tool for investigating the evolutionary, developmental and ecological factors that affect gene expression and gene function in cnidarians. In turn, CnidBase will help to illuminate the role of specific genes in shaping cnidarian biodiversity in the present day and in the distant past. CnidBase highlights evolutionary changes between species within the phylum Cnidaria and structures genomic and expression data to facilitate comparisons to non-cnidarian metazoans. CnidBase aims to further the progress that has already been made in the realm of cnidarian evolutionary genomics by creating a central community resource which will help drive future research and facilitate more accurate classification and comparison of new experimental data with existing data. CnidBase is available at http://cnidbase.bu.edu/. PMID:12519972

  17. Comprehensive genome characterization of solitary fibrous tumors using high-resolution array-based comparative genomic hybridization.

    PubMed

    Bertucci, François; Bouvier-Labit, Corinne; Finetti, Pascal; Adélaïde, José; Metellus, Philippe; Mokhtari, Karima; Decouvelaere, Anne-Valérie; Miquel, Catherine; Jouvet, Anne; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Pedeutour, Florence; Chaffanet, Max; Birnbaum, Daniel

    2013-02-01

    Solitary fibrous tumors (SFTs) are rare spindle cell tumors with limited therapeutic options. Their molecular basis is poorly known. No consistent cytogenetic abnormality has been reported. We used high-resolution whole-genome array-based comparative genomic hybridization (Agilent 244K oligonucleotide chips) to profile 47 samples, meningeal in >75% of cases. Few copy number aberrations (CNAs) were observed. Sixty-eight percent of samples did not show any gene CNA after exclusion of probes located in regions with referenced copy number variation (CNV). Only low-level CNAs were observed. The genomic profiles were very homogeneous among samples. No molecular class was revealed by clustering of DNA copy numbers. All cases displayed a "simplex" profile. No recurrent CNA was identified. Imbalances occurring in >20%, such as the gain of 8p11.23-11.22 region, contained known CNVs. The 13q14.11-13q31.1 region (lost in 4% of cases) was the largest altered region and contained the lowest percentage of genes with referenced CNVs. A total of 425 genes without CNV showed copy number transition in at least one sample, but only but only 1 in at least 10% of samples. The genomic profiles of meningeal and extra-meningeal cases did not show any differences.

  18. Single-molecule optical genome mapping of a human HapMap and a colorectal cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Teo, Audrey S M; Verzotto, Davide; Yao, Fei; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Hillmer, Axel M

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have changed our understanding of the variability of the human genome. However, the identification of genome structural variations based on NGS approaches with read lengths of 35-300 bases remains a challenge. Single-molecule optical mapping technologies allow the analysis of DNA molecules of up to 2 Mb and as such are suitable for the identification of large-scale genome structural variations, and for de novo genome assemblies when combined with short-read NGS data. Here we present optical mapping data for two human genomes: the HapMap cell line GM12878 and the colorectal cancer cell line HCT116. High molecular weight DNA was obtained by embedding GM12878 and HCT116 cells, respectively, in agarose plugs, followed by DNA extraction under mild conditions. Genomic DNA was digested with KpnI and 310,000 and 296,000 DNA molecules (≥ 150 kb and 10 restriction fragments), respectively, were analyzed per cell line using the Argus optical mapping system. Maps were aligned to the human reference by OPTIMA, a new glocal alignment method. Genome coverage of 6.8× and 5.7× was obtained, respectively; 2.9× and 1.7× more than the coverage obtained with previously available software. Optical mapping allows the resolution of large-scale structural variations of the genome, and the scaffold extension of NGS-based de novo assemblies. OPTIMA is an efficient new alignment method; our optical mapping data provide a resource for genome structure analyses of the human HapMap reference cell line GM12878, and the colorectal cancer cell line HCT116.

  19. Actomyosin drives cancer cell nuclear dysmorphia and threatens genome stability

    PubMed Central

    Takaki, Tohru; Montagner, Marco; Serres, Murielle P.; Le Berre, Maël; Russell, Matt; Collinson, Lucy; Szuhai, Karoly; Howell, Michael; Boulton, Simon J.; Sahai, Erik; Petronczki, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Altered nuclear shape is a defining feature of cancer cells. The mechanisms underlying nuclear dysmorphia in cancer remain poorly understood. Here we identify PPP1R12A and PPP1CB, two subunits of the myosin phosphatase complex that antagonizes actomyosin contractility, as proteins safeguarding nuclear integrity. Loss of PPP1R12A or PPP1CB causes nuclear fragmentation, nuclear envelope rupture, nuclear compartment breakdown and genome instability. Pharmacological or genetic inhibition of actomyosin contractility restores nuclear architecture and genome integrity in cells lacking PPP1R12A or PPP1CB. We detect actin filaments at nuclear envelope rupture sites and define the Rho-ROCK pathway as the driver of nuclear damage. Lamin A protects nuclei from the impact of actomyosin activity. Blocking contractility increases nuclear circularity in cultured cancer cells and suppresses deformations of xenograft nuclei in vivo. We conclude that actomyosin contractility is a major determinant of nuclear shape and that unrestrained contractility causes nuclear dysmorphia, nuclear envelope rupture and genome instability. PMID:28737169

  20. Elucidating the triplicated ancestral genome structure of radish based on chromosome-level comparison with the Brassica genomes.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Young-Min; Kim, Namshin; Ahn, Byung Ohg; Oh, Mijin; Chung, Won-Hyong; Chung, Hee; Jeong, Seongmun; Lim, Ki-Byung; Hwang, Yoon-Jung; Kim, Goon-Bo; Baek, Seunghoon; Choi, Sang-Bong; Hyung, Dae-Jin; Lee, Seung-Won; Sohn, Seong-Han; Kwon, Soo-Jin; Jin, Mina; Seol, Young-Joo; Chae, Won Byoung; Choi, Keun Jin; Park, Beom-Seok; Yu, Hee-Ju; Mun, Jeong-Hwan

    2016-07-01

    This study presents a chromosome-scale draft genome sequence of radish that is assembled into nine chromosomal pseudomolecules. A comprehensive comparative genome analysis with the Brassica genomes provides genomic evidences on the evolution of the mesohexaploid radish genome. Radish (Raphanus sativus L.) is an agronomically important root vegetable crop and its origin and phylogenetic position in the tribe Brassiceae is controversial. Here we present a comprehensive analysis of the radish genome based on the chromosome sequences of R. sativus cv. WK10039. The radish genome was sequenced and assembled into 426.2 Mb spanning >98 % of the gene space, of which 344.0 Mb were integrated into nine chromosome pseudomolecules. Approximately 36 % of the genome was repetitive sequences and 46,514 protein-coding genes were predicted and annotated. Comparative mapping of the tPCK-like ancestral genome revealed that the radish genome has intermediate characteristics between the Brassica A/C and B genomes in the triplicated segments, suggesting an internal origin from the genus Brassica. The evolutionary characteristics shared between radish and other Brassica species provided genomic evidences that the current form of nine chromosomes in radish was rearranged from the chromosomes of hexaploid progenitor. Overall, this study provides a chromosome-scale draft genome sequence of radish as well as novel insight into evolution of the mesohexaploid genomes in the tribe Brassiceae.

  1. Genomic imprinting in development, growth, behavior and stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Plasschaert, Robert N.; Bartolomei, Marisa S.

    2014-01-01

    Genes that are subject to genomic imprinting in mammals are preferentially expressed from a single parental allele. This imprinted expression of a small number of genes is crucial for normal development, as these genes often directly regulate fetal growth. Recent work has also demonstrated intricate roles for imprinted genes in the brain, with important consequences on behavior and neuronal function. Finally, new studies have revealed the importance of proper expression of specific imprinted genes in induced pluripotent stem cells and in adult stem cells. As we review here, these findings highlight the complex nature and developmental importance of imprinted genes. PMID:24757003

  2. Genomic imprinting in development, growth, behavior and stem cells.

    PubMed

    Plasschaert, Robert N; Bartolomei, Marisa S

    2014-05-01

    Genes that are subject to genomic imprinting in mammals are preferentially expressed from a single parental allele. This imprinted expression of a small number of genes is crucial for normal development, as these genes often directly regulate fetal growth. Recent work has also demonstrated intricate roles for imprinted genes in the brain, with important consequences on behavior and neuronal function. Finally, new studies have revealed the importance of proper expression of specific imprinted genes in induced pluripotent stem cells and in adult stem cells. As we review here, these findings highlight the complex nature and developmental importance of imprinted genes.

  3. Current clinical application of genomic and proteomic profiling in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Tanvetyanon, Tawee; Creelan, Benjamin C; Chiappori, Alberto A

    2014-01-01

    Genomic or proteomic profiling of cancer can be broadly defined as a systematic grouping of cancer based on its genetic or protein makeup. In the management of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), genomic and proteomic profiling applications have become useful in early disease detection, diagnosis, treatment, and prognostication. We reviewed the recent literature on the applications of genomic and proteomic profiling in NSCLC. Important applications were summarized into those already adopted as standard care and those still under investigation. For genomic profiling, testing for EGFR mutation and ALK rearrangement has become routine for adenocarcinoma. Multiplex assay and malignancy-risk gene signature are both important applications in development. A test to predict outcome after treatment with an epidermal growth factor rector/tyrosine kinase inhibitor and a screening blood test for lung cancer are being investigated for use in proteomic profiling. Genomic profiling is routine in patients with NSCLC, and proteomic profiling shows promise. Additional genomic and proteomic profiling applications may also prove to be useful contributions in the care of these patients.

  4. L1-Associated Genomic Regions are Deleted in Somatic Cells of the Healthy Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Erwin, Jennifer A.; Paquola, Apuã C.M.; Singer, Tatjana; Gallina, Iryna; Novotny, Mark; Quayle, Carolina; Bedrosian, Tracy; Ivanio, Francisco; Butcher, Cheyenne R.; Herdy, Joseph R.; Sarkar, Anindita; Lasken, Roger S.; Muotri, Alysson R.; Gage, Fred H.

    2016-01-01

    The healthy human brain is a mosaic of varied genomes. L1 retrotransposition is known to create mosaicism by inserting L1 sequences into new locations of somatic cell genomes. Using a machine learning-based, single-cell sequencing approach, we discovered that Somatic L1-Associated Variants (SLAVs) are actually composed of two classes: L1 retrotransposition insertions and retrotransposition-independent L1-associated variants. We demonstrate that a subset of SLAVs are, in fact, somatic deletions generated by L1 endonuclease cutting activity. Retrotransposition- independent rearrangements within inherited L1s resulted in the deletion of proximal genomic regions. These rearrangements were resolved by microhomology-mediated repair, which suggests that L1-associated genomic regions are hotspots for somatic copy number variants in the brain and therefore a heritable genetic contributor to somatic mosaicism. We demonstrate that SLAVs are present in crucial neural genes, such as DLG2/PSD93, and affect between 44–63% of cells of the cells in the healthy brain. PMID:27618310

  5. Challenges and Triumphs to Genomics-Based Natural Product Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Paul R.; Chavarria, Krystle L.; Fenical, William; Moore, Bradley S.; Ziemert, Nadine

    2013-01-01

    Genome sequencing is rapidly changing the field of natural products research by providing opportunities to assess the biosynthetic potential of strains prior to chemical analysis or biological testing. Ready access to sequence data is driving the development of new bioinformatic tools and methods to identify the products of silent or cryptic pathways. While genome mining has fast become a useful approach to natural product discovery, it has also become clear that identifying pathways of interest is much easier than finding the associated products. This has led to bottlenecks in the discovery process that must be overcome for the potential of genomics-based natural product discovery to be fully realized. In this perspective, we address some of these challenges in the context of our work with the marine actinomycete genus Salinispora, which is proving to be a useful model with which to apply genome mining as an approach to natural product discovery. PMID:24104399

  6. Mechanical Genomics Identifies Diverse Modulators of Bacterial Cell Stiffness.

    PubMed

    Auer, George K; Lee, Timothy K; Rajendram, Manohary; Cesar, Spencer; Miguel, Amanda; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Weibel, Douglas B

    2016-06-22

    Bacteria must maintain mechanical integrity to withstand the large osmotic pressure differential across the cell membrane and wall. Although maintaining mechanical integrity is critical for proper cellular function, a fact exploited by prominent cell-wall-targeting antibiotics, the proteins that contribute to cellular mechanics remain unidentified. Here, we describe a high-throughput optical method for quantifying cell stiffness and apply this technique to a genome-wide collection of ∼4,000 Escherichia coli mutants. We identify genes with roles in diverse functional processes spanning cell-wall synthesis, energy production, and DNA replication and repair that significantly change cell stiffness when deleted. We observe that proteins with biochemically redundant roles in cell-wall synthesis exhibit different stiffness defects when deleted. Correlating our data with chemical screens reveals that reducing membrane potential generally increases cell stiffness. In total, our work demonstrates that bacterial cell stiffness is a property of both the cell wall and broader cell physiology and lays the groundwork for future systematic studies of mechanoregulation.

  7. Small cell ovarian carcinoma: genomic stability and responsiveness to therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The biology of small cell ovarian carcinoma of the hypercalcemic type (SCCOHT), which is a rare and aggressive form of ovarian cancer, is poorly understood. Tumourigenicity, in vitro growth characteristics, genetic and genomic anomalies, and sensitivity to standard and novel chemotherapeutic treatments were investigated in the unique SCCOHT cell line, BIN-67, to provide further insight in the biology of this rare type of ovarian cancer. Method The tumourigenic potential of BIN-67 cells was determined and the tumours formed in a xenograft model was compared to human SCCOHT. DNA sequencing, spectral karyotyping and high density SNP array analysis was performed. The sensitivity of the BIN-67 cells to standard chemotherapeutic agents and to vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and the JX-594 vaccinia virus was tested. Results BIN-67 cells were capable of forming spheroids in hanging drop cultures. When xenografted into immunodeficient mice, BIN-67 cells developed into tumours that reflected the hypercalcemia and histology of human SCCOHT, notably intense expression of WT-1 and vimentin, and lack of expression of inhibin. Somatic mutations in TP53 and the most common activating mutations in KRAS and BRAF were not found in BIN-67 cells by DNA sequencing. Spectral karyotyping revealed a largely normal diploid karyotype (in greater than 95% of cells) with a visibly shorter chromosome 20 contig. High density SNP array analysis also revealed few genomic anomalies in BIN-67 cells, which included loss of heterozygosity of an estimated 16.7 Mb interval on chromosome 20. SNP array analyses of four SCCOHT samples also indicated a low frequency of genomic anomalies in the majority of cases. Although resistant to platinum chemotherapeutic drugs, BIN-67 cell viability in vitro was reduced by >75% after infection with oncolytic viruses. Conclusions These results show that SCCOHT differs from high-grade serous carcinomas by exhibiting few chromosomal anomalies and lacking TP53

  8. Unclassified renal cell carcinoma: a clinicopathological, comparative genomic hybridization, and whole-genome exon sequencing study

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhen-Yan; Pang, Li-Juan; Qi, Yan; Kang, Xue-Ling; Hu, Jian-Ming; Wang, Lianghai; Liu, Kun-Peng; Ren, Yuan; Cui, Mei; Song, Li-Li; Li, Hong-An; Zou, Hong; Li, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Unclassified renal cell carcinoma (URCC) is a rare variant of RCC, accounting for only 3-5% of all cases. Studies on the molecular genetics of URCC are limited, and hence, we report on 2 cases of URCC analyzed using comparative genome hybridization (CGH) and the genome-wide human exon GeneChip technique to identify the genomic alterations of URCC. Both URCC patients (mean age, 72 years) presented at an advanced stage and died within 30 months post-surgery. Histologically, the URCCs were composed of undifferentiated, multinucleated, giant cells with eosinophilic cytoplasm. Immunostaining revealed that both URCC cases had strong p53 protein expression and partial expression of cluster of differentiation-10 and cytokeratin. The CGH profiles showed chromosomal imbalances in both URCC cases: gains were observed in chromosomes 1p11-12, 1q12-13, 2q20-23, 3q22-23, 8p12, and 16q11-15, whereas losses were detected on chromosomes 1q22-23, 3p12-22, 5p30-ter, 6p, 11q, 16q18-22, 17p12-14, and 20p. Compared with 18 normal renal tissues, 40 mutated genes were detected in the URCC tissues, including 32 missense and 8 silent mutations. Functional enrichment analysis revealed that the missense mutation genes were involved in 11 different biological processes and pathways, including cell cycle regulation, lipid localization and transport, neuropeptide signaling, organic ether metabolism, and ATP-binding cassette transporter signaling. Our findings indicate that URCC may be a highly aggressive cancer, and the genetic alterations identified herein may provide clues regarding the tumorigenesis of URCC and serve as a basis for the development of targeted therapies against URCC in the future. PMID:25120763

  9. Metabolic diversity and ecological niches of Achromatium populations revealed with single-cell genomic sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Mansor, Muammar; Hamilton, Trinity L.; Fantle, Matthew S.; Macalady, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Large, sulfur-cycling, calcite-precipitating bacteria in the genus Achromatium represent a significant proportion of bacterial communities near sediment-water interfaces at sites throughout the world. Our understanding of their potentially crucial roles in calcium, carbon, sulfur, nitrogen, and iron cycling is limited because they have not been cultured or sequenced using environmental genomics approaches to date. We utilized single-cell genomic sequencing to obtain one incomplete and two nearly complete draft genomes for Achromatium collected at Warm Mineral Springs (WMS), FL. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, the three cells represent distinct and relatively distant Achromatium populations (91–92% identity). The draft genomes encode key genes involved in sulfur and hydrogen oxidation; oxygen, nitrogen and polysulfide respiration; carbon and nitrogen fixation; organic carbon assimilation and storage; chemotaxis; twitching motility; antibiotic resistance; and membrane transport. Known genes for iron and manganese energy metabolism were not detected. The presence of pyrophosphatase and vacuolar (V)-type ATPases, which are generally rare in bacterial genomes, suggests a role for these enzymes in calcium transport, proton pumping, and/or energy generation in the membranes of calcite-containing inclusions. PMID:26322031

  10. Evidence-based gene predictions in plant genomes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Automated evidence-based gene building is a rapid and cost-effective way to provide reliable gene annotations on newly sequenced genomes. One of the limitations of evidence-based gene builders, however, is their requirement for gene expression evidence—known proteins, full-length cDNAs, or expressed...

  11. MonarchBase: the monarch butterfly genome database

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Shuai; Reppert, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    The monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) is emerging as a model organism to study the mechanisms of circadian clocks and animal navigation, and the genetic underpinnings of long-distance migration. The initial assembly of the monarch genome was released in 2011, and the biological interpretation of the genome focused on the butterfly’s migration biology. To make the extensive data associated with the genome accessible to the general biological and lepidopteran communities, we established MonarchBase (available at http://monarchbase.umassmed.edu). The database is an open-access, web-available portal that integrates all available data associated with the monarch butterfly genome. Moreover, MonarchBase provides access to an updated version of genome assembly (v3) upon which all data integration is based. These include genes with systematic annotation, as well as other molecular resources, such as brain expressed sequence tags, migration expression profiles and microRNAs. MonarchBase utilizes a variety of retrieving methods to access data conveniently and for integrating biological interpretations. PMID:23143105

  12. MonarchBase: the monarch butterfly genome database.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Shuai; Reppert, Steven M

    2013-01-01

    The monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) is emerging as a model organism to study the mechanisms of circadian clocks and animal navigation, and the genetic underpinnings of long-distance migration. The initial assembly of the monarch genome was released in 2011, and the biological interpretation of the genome focused on the butterfly's migration biology. To make the extensive data associated with the genome accessible to the general biological and lepidopteran communities, we established MonarchBase (available at http://monarchbase.umassmed.edu). The database is an open-access, web-available portal that integrates all available data associated with the monarch butterfly genome. Moreover, MonarchBase provides access to an updated version of genome assembly (v3) upon which all data integration is based. These include genes with systematic annotation, as well as other molecular resources, such as brain expressed sequence tags, migration expression profiles and microRNAs. MonarchBase utilizes a variety of retrieving methods to access data conveniently and for integrating biological interpretations.

  13. Genomic Analysis of Immune Cell Infiltrates Across 11 Tumor Types.

    PubMed

    Iglesia, Michael D; Parker, Joel S; Hoadley, Katherine A; Serody, Jonathan S; Perou, Charles M; Vincent, Benjamin G

    2016-11-01

    Immune infiltration of the tumor microenvironment has been associated with improved survival for some patients with solid tumors. The precise makeup and prognostic relevance of immune infiltrates across a broad spectrum of tumors remain unclear. Using mRNA sequencing data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) from 11 tumor types representing 3485 tumors, we evaluated lymphocyte and macrophage gene expression by tissue type and by genomic subtypes defined within and across tumor tissue of origin (Cox proportional hazards, Pearson correlation). We investigated clonal diversity of B-cell infiltrates through calculating B-cell receptor (BCR) repertoire sequence diversity. All statistical tests were two-sided. High expression of T-cell and B-cell signatures predicted improved overall survival across many tumor types including breast, lung, and melanoma (breast CD8_T_Cells hazard ratio [HR] = 0.36, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.16 to 0.81, P = .01; lung adenocarcinoma B_Cell_60gene HR = 0.71, 95% CI = 0.58 to 0.87, P = 7.80E-04; melanoma LCK HR = 0.86, 95% CI = 0.79 to 0.94, P = 6.75E-04). Macrophage signatures predicted worse survival in GBM, as did B-cell signatures in renal tumors (Glioblastoma Multiforme [GBM]: macrophages HR = 1.62, 95% CI = 1.17 to 2.26, P = .004; renal: B_Cell_60gene HR = 1.17, 95% CI = 1.04 to 1.32, P = .009). BCR diversity was associated with survival beyond gene segment expression in melanoma (HR = 2.67, 95% CI = 1.32 to 5.40, P = .02) and renal cell carcinoma (HR = 0.36, 95% CI = 0.15 to 0.87, P = .006). These data support existing studies suggesting that in diverse tissue types, heterogeneous immune infiltrates are present and typically portend an improved prognosis. In some tumor types, BCR diversity was also associated with survival. Quantitative genomic signatures of immune cells warrant further testing as prognostic markers and potential biomarkers of response to cancer immunotherapy.

  14. Evolution of electron transfer out of the cell: comparative genomics of six Geobacter genomes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Geobacter species grow by transferring electrons out of the cell - either to Fe(III)-oxides or to man-made substances like energy-harvesting electrodes. Study of Geobacter sulfurreducens has shown that TCA cycle enzymes, inner-membrane respiratory enzymes, and periplasmic and outer-membrane cytochromes are required. Here we present comparative analysis of six Geobacter genomes, including species from the clade that predominates in the subsurface. Conservation of proteins across the genomes was determined to better understand the evolution of Geobacter species and to create a metabolic model applicable to subsurface environments. Results The results showed that enzymes for acetate transport and oxidation, and for proton transport across the inner membrane were well conserved. An NADH dehydrogenase, the ATP synthase, and several TCA cycle enzymes were among the best conserved in the genomes. However, most of the cytochromes required for Fe(III)-reduction were not, including many of the outer-membrane cytochromes. While conservation of cytochromes was poor, an abundance and diversity of cytochromes were found in every genome, with duplications apparent in several species. Conclusions These results indicate there is a common pathway for acetate oxidation and energy generation across the family and in the last common ancestor. They also suggest that while cytochromes are important for extracellular electron transport, the path of electrons across the periplasm and outer membrane is variable. This combination of abundant cytochromes with weak sequence conservation suggests they may not be specific terminal reductases, but rather may be important in their heme-bearing capacity, as sinks for electrons between the inner-membrane electron transport chain and the extracellular acceptor. PMID:20078895

  15. Sequencing Single Cell Microbial Genomes with Microfluidic Amplifications Tools (MICW - Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    ScienceCinema

    Quake, Steve [University of Stanford

    2016-07-12

    Stanford University's Steve Quake on "Sequencing Single Cell Microbial Genomes with Microfluidic Amplification Tools" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  16. Sequencing Single Cell Microbial Genomes with Microfluidic Amplifications Tools (MICW - Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    SciTech Connect

    Quake, Steve

    2011-10-12

    Stanford University's Steve Quake on "Sequencing Single Cell Microbial Genomes with Microfluidic Amplification Tools" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  17. Identifying anti-growth factors for human cancer cell lines through genome-scale metabolic modeling

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffari, Pouyan; Mardinoglu, Adil; Asplund, Anna; Shoaie, Saeed; Kampf, Caroline; Uhlen, Mathias; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Human cancer cell lines are used as important model systems to study molecular mechanisms associated with tumor growth, hereunder how genomic and biological heterogeneity found in primary tumors affect cellular phenotypes. We reconstructed Genome scale metabolic models (GEMs) for eleven cell lines based on RNA-Seq data and validated the functionality of these models with data from metabolite profiling. We used cell line-specific GEMs to analyze the differences in the metabolism of cancer cell lines, and to explore the heterogeneous expression of the metabolic subsystems. Furthermore, we predicted 85 antimetabolites that can inhibit growth of, or even kill, any of the cell lines, while at the same time not being toxic for 83 different healthy human cell types. 60 of these antimetabolites were found to inhibit growth in all cell lines. Finally, we experimentally validated one of the predicted antimetabolites using two cell lines with different phenotypic origins, and found that it is effective in inhibiting the growth of these cell lines. Using immunohistochemistry, we also showed high or moderate expression levels of proteins targeted by the validated antimetabolite. Identified anti-growth factors for inhibition of cell growth may provide leads for the development of efficient cancer treatment strategies. PMID:25640694

  18. The CHR site: definition and genome-wide identification of a cell cycle transcriptional element.

    PubMed

    Müller, Gerd A; Wintsche, Axel; Stangner, Konstanze; Prohaska, Sonja J; Stadler, Peter F; Engeland, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    The cell cycle genes homology region (CHR) has been identified as a DNA element with an important role in transcriptional regulation of late cell cycle genes. It has been shown that such genes are controlled by DREAM, MMB and FOXM1-MuvB and that these protein complexes can contact DNA via CHR sites. However, it has not been elucidated which sequence variations of the canonical CHR are functional and how frequent CHR-based regulation is utilized in mammalian genomes. Here, we define the spectrum of functional CHR elements. As the basis for a computational meta-analysis, we identify new CHR sequences and compile phylogenetic motif conservation as well as genome-wide protein-DNA binding and gene expression data. We identify CHR elements in most late cell cycle genes binding DREAM, MMB, or FOXM1-MuvB. In contrast, Myb- and forkhead-binding sites are underrepresented in both early and late cell cycle genes. Our findings support a general mechanism: sequential binding of DREAM, MMB and FOXM1-MuvB complexes to late cell cycle genes requires CHR elements. Taken together, we define the group of CHR-regulated genes in mammalian genomes and provide evidence that the CHR is the central promoter element in transcriptional regulation of late cell cycle genes by DREAM, MMB and FOXM1-MuvB. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. The CHR site: definition and genome-wide identification of a cell cycle transcriptional element

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Gerd A.; Wintsche, Axel; Stangner, Konstanze; Prohaska, Sonja J.; Stadler, Peter F.; Engeland, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    The cell cycle genes homology region (CHR) has been identified as a DNA element with an important role in transcriptional regulation of late cell cycle genes. It has been shown that such genes are controlled by DREAM, MMB and FOXM1-MuvB and that these protein complexes can contact DNA via CHR sites. However, it has not been elucidated which sequence variations of the canonical CHR are functional and how frequent CHR-based regulation is utilized in mammalian genomes. Here, we define the spectrum of functional CHR elements. As the basis for a computational meta-analysis, we identify new CHR sequences and compile phylogenetic motif conservation as well as genome-wide protein-DNA binding and gene expression data. We identify CHR elements in most late cell cycle genes binding DREAM, MMB, or FOXM1-MuvB. In contrast, Myb- and forkhead-binding sites are underrepresented in both early and late cell cycle genes. Our findings support a general mechanism: sequential binding of DREAM, MMB and FOXM1-MuvB complexes to late cell cycle genes requires CHR elements. Taken together, we define the group of CHR-regulated genes in mammalian genomes and provide evidence that the CHR is the central promoter element in transcriptional regulation of late cell cycle genes by DREAM, MMB and FOXM1-MuvB. PMID:25106871

  20. Defective DNA repair and increased genomic instability in Cernunnos-XLF-deficient murine ES cells

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Shan; Alt, Frederick W.; Cheng, Hwei-Ling; Brush, James W.; Li, Gang

    2007-01-01

    Nonhomologous DNA end-joining (NHEJ) is a major pathway of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair in mammalian cells, and it functions to join both specifically programmed DSBs that occur in the context of V(D)J recombination during early lymphocyte development as well as general DSBs that occur in all cells. Thus, defects in NHEJ impair V(D)J recombination and lead to general genomic instability. In human patients, mutations of Cernunnos-XLF (also called NHEJ1), a recently identified NHEJ factor, underlie certain severe combined immune deficiencies associated with defective V(D)J recombination and radiosensitivity. To characterize Cernunnos-XLF function in mouse cells, we used gene-targeted mutation to delete exons 4 and 5 from both copies of the Cernunnos-XLF gene in ES cell (referred to as CerΔ/Δ ES cells). Analyses of CerΔ/Δ ES cells showed that they produce no readily detectable Cernunnos-XLF protein. Based on transient V(D)J recombination assays, we find that CerΔ/Δ ES cells have dramatic impairments in ability to form both V(D)J coding joins and joins of their flanking recombination signal sequences (RS joins). CerΔ/Δ ES cells are highly sensitive to ionizing radiation and have intrinsic DNA DSB repair defects as measured by pulse field gel electrophoresis. Finally, the Cernunnos-XLF mutations led to increased spontaneous genomic instability, including translocations. We conclude that, in mice, Cernunnos-XLF is essential for normal NHEJ-mediated repair of DNA DSBs and that Cernunnos-XLF acts as a genomic caretaker to prevent genomic instability. PMID:17360556

  1. Insights from a chimpanzee adipose stromal cell population: opportunities for adult stem cells to expand primate functional genomics.

    PubMed

    Pfefferle, Lisa W; Wray, Gregory A

    2013-01-01

    Comparisons between humans and chimpanzees are essential for understanding traits unique to each species. However, linking important phenotypic differences to underlying molecular changes is often challenging. The ability to generate, differentiate, and profile adult stem cells provides a powerful but underutilized opportunity to investigate the molecular basis for trait differences between species within specific cell types and in a controlled environment. Here, we characterize adipose stromal cells (ASCs) from Clint, the chimpanzee whose genome was first sequenced. Using imaging and RNA-Seq, we compare the chimpanzee ASCs with three comparable human cell lines. Consistent with previous studies on ASCs in humans, the chimpanzee cells have fibroblast-like morphology and express genes encoding components of the extracellular matrix at high levels. Differentially expressed genes are enriched for distinct functional classes between species: immunity and protein processing are higher in chimpanzees, whereas cell cycle and DNA processing are higher in humans. Although hesitant to draw definitive conclusions from these data given the limited sample size, we wish to stress the opportunities that adult stem cells offer for studying primate evolution. In particular, adult stem cells provide a powerful means to investigate the profound disease susceptibilities unique to humans and a promising tool for conservation efforts with nonhuman primates. By allowing for experimental perturbations in relevant cell types, adult stem cells promise to complement classic comparative primate genomics based on in vivo sampling.

  2. Genomic portfolio of Merkel cell carcinoma as determined by comprehensive genomic profiling: implications for targeted therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Philip R; Tomson, Brett N; Elkin, Sheryl K; Marchlik, Erica; Carter, Jennifer L; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2016-04-26

    Merkel cell carcinoma is an ultra-rare cutaneous neuroendocrine cancer for which approved treatment options are lacking. To better understand potential actionability, the genomic landscape of Merkel cell cancers was assessed. The molecular aberrations in 17 patients with Merkel cell carcinoma were, on physician request, tested in a Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) laboratory (Foundation Medicine, Cambridge, MA) using next-generation sequencing (182 or 236 genes) and analyzed by N-of-One, Inc. (Lexington, MA). There were 30 genes harboring aberrations and 60 distinct molecular alterations identified in this patient population. The most common abnormalities involved the TP53 gene (12/17 [71% of patients]) and the cell cycle pathway (CDKN2A/B, CDKN2C or RB1) (12/17 [71%]). Abnormalities also were observed in the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway (AKT2, FBXW7, NF1, PIK3CA, PIK3R1, PTEN or RICTOR) (9/17 [53%]) and DNA repair genes (ATM, BAP1, BRCA1/2, CHEK2, FANCA or MLH1) (5/17 [29%]). Possible cognate targeted therapies, including FDA-approved drugs, could be identified in most of the patients (16/17 [94%]). In summary, Merkel cell carcinomas were characterized by multiple distinct aberrations that were unique in the majority of analyzed cases. Most patients had theoretically actionable alterations. These results provide a framework for investigating tailored combinations of matched therapies in Merkel cell carcinoma patients.

  3. Laser microdissection: A powerful tool for genomics at cell level.

    PubMed

    Bevilacqua, Claudia; Ducos, Bertrand

    2017-09-16

    Laser microdissection (LM) has become considerably democratized over the last fifteen years. Instruments have evolved to offer more powerful and efficient lasers as well as new options for sample collection and preparation. Technological evolutions have also focused on the post-microdissection analysis capabilities, opening up investigations in all disciplines of experimental and clinical biology, thanks to the advent of new high-throughput methods of genome analysis, including RNAseq and proteomics, now globally known as microgenomics, i.e. analysis of biomolecules at the cell level. In spite of the advances these rapidly developing methods have allowed, the workflow for sampling and collection by LM remains a critical step in insuring sample integrity in terms of histology (accurate cell identification) and biochemistry (reliable analyzes of biomolecules). In this review, we describe the sample processing as well as the strengths and limiting factors of LM applied to the specific selection of one or more cells of interest from a heterogeneous tissue. We will see how the latest developments in protocols and methods have made LM a powerful and sometimes essential tool for genomic and proteomic analyzes of tiny amounts of biomolecules extracted from few cells isolated from a complex tissue, in their physiological context, thus offering new opportunities for understanding fundamental physiological and/or patho-physiological processes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Global genomic diversity of human papillomavirus 6 based on 724 isolates and 190 complete genome sequences.

    PubMed

    Jelen, Mateja M; Chen, Zigui; Kocjan, Boštjan J; Burt, Felicity J; Chan, Paul K S; Chouhy, Diego; Combrinck, Catharina E; Coutlée, François; Estrade, Christine; Ferenczy, Alex; Fiander, Alison; Franco, Eduardo L; Garland, Suzanne M; Giri, Adriana A; González, Joaquín Víctor; Gröning, Arndt; Heidrich, Kerstin; Hibbitts, Sam; Hošnjak, Lea; Luk, Tommy N M; Marinic, Karina; Matsukura, Toshihiko; Neumann, Anna; Oštrbenk, Anja; Picconi, Maria Alejandra; Richardson, Harriet; Sagadin, Martin; Sahli, Roland; Seedat, Riaz Y; Seme, Katja; Severini, Alberto; Sinchi, Jessica L; Smahelova, Jana; Tabrizi, Sepehr N; Tachezy, Ruth; Tohme, Sarah; Uloza, Virgilijus; Vitkauskiene, Astra; Wong, Yong Wee; Zidovec Lepej, Snježana; Burk, Robert D; Poljak, Mario

    2014-07-01

    Human papillomavirus type 6 (HPV6) is the major etiological agent of anogenital warts and laryngeal papillomas and has been included in both the quadrivalent and nonavalent prophylactic HPV vaccines. This study investigated the global genomic diversity of HPV6, using 724 isolates and 190 complete genomes from six continents, and the association of HPV6 genomic variants with geographical location, anatomical site of infection/disease, and gender. Initially, a 2,800-bp E5a-E5b-L1-LCR fragment was sequenced from 492/530 (92.8%) HPV6-positive samples collected for this study. Among them, 130 exhibited at least one single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), indel, or amino acid change in the E5a-E5b-L1-LCR fragment and were sequenced in full. A global alignment and maximum likelihood tree of 190 complete HPV6 genomes (130 fully sequenced in this study and 60 obtained from sequence repositories) revealed two variant lineages, A and B, and five B sublineages: B1, B2, B3, B4, and B5. HPV6 (sub)lineage-specific SNPs and a 960-bp representative region for whole-genome-based phylogenetic clustering within the L2 open reading frame were identified. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that lineage B predominated globally. Sublineage B3 was more common in Africa and North and South America, and lineage A was more common in Asia. Sublineages B1 and B3 were associated with anogenital infections, indicating a potential lesion-specific predilection of some HPV6 sublineages. Females had higher odds for infection with sublineage B3 than males. In conclusion, a global HPV6 phylogenetic analysis revealed the existence of two variant lineages and five sublineages, showing some degree of ethnogeographic, gender, and/or disease predilection in their distribution. This study established the largest database of globally circulating HPV6 genomic variants and contributed a total of 130 new, complete HPV6 genome sequences to available sequence repositories. Two HPV6 variant lineages

  5. Global Genomic Diversity of Human Papillomavirus 6 Based on 724 Isolates and 190 Complete Genome Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Jelen, Mateja M.; Chen, Zigui; Kocjan, Boštjan J.; Burt, Felicity J.; Chan, Paul K. S.; Chouhy, Diego; Combrinck, Catharina E.; Coutlée, François; Estrade, Christine; Ferenczy, Alex; Fiander, Alison; Franco, Eduardo L.; Garland, Suzanne M.; Giri, Adriana A.; González, Joaquín Víctor; Gröning, Arndt; Heidrich, Kerstin; Hibbitts, Sam; Hošnjak, Lea; Luk, Tommy N. M.; Marinic, Karina; Matsukura, Toshihiko; Neumann, Anna; Oštrbenk, Anja; Picconi, Maria Alejandra; Richardson, Harriet; Sagadin, Martin; Sahli, Roland; Seedat, Riaz Y.; Seme, Katja; Severini, Alberto; Sinchi, Jessica L.; Smahelova, Jana; Tabrizi, Sepehr N.; Tachezy, Ruth; Tohme, Sarah; Uloza, Virgilijus; Vitkauskiene, Astra; Wong, Yong Wee; Židovec Lepej, Snježana; Burk, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human papillomavirus type 6 (HPV6) is the major etiological agent of anogenital warts and laryngeal papillomas and has been included in both the quadrivalent and nonavalent prophylactic HPV vaccines. This study investigated the global genomic diversity of HPV6, using 724 isolates and 190 complete genomes from six continents, and the association of HPV6 genomic variants with geographical location, anatomical site of infection/disease, and gender. Initially, a 2,800-bp E5a-E5b-L1-LCR fragment was sequenced from 492/530 (92.8%) HPV6-positive samples collected for this study. Among them, 130 exhibited at least one single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), indel, or amino acid change in the E5a-E5b-L1-LCR fragment and were sequenced in full. A global alignment and maximum likelihood tree of 190 complete HPV6 genomes (130 fully sequenced in this study and 60 obtained from sequence repositories) revealed two variant lineages, A and B, and five B sublineages: B1, B2, B3, B4, and B5. HPV6 (sub)lineage-specific SNPs and a 960-bp representative region for whole-genome-based phylogenetic clustering within the L2 open reading frame were identified. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that lineage B predominated globally. Sublineage B3 was more common in Africa and North and South America, and lineage A was more common in Asia. Sublineages B1 and B3 were associated with anogenital infections, indicating a potential lesion-specific predilection of some HPV6 sublineages. Females had higher odds for infection with sublineage B3 than males. In conclusion, a global HPV6 phylogenetic analysis revealed the existence of two variant lineages and five sublineages, showing some degree of ethnogeographic, gender, and/or disease predilection in their distribution. IMPORTANCE This study established the largest database of globally circulating HPV6 genomic variants and contributed a total of 130 new, complete HPV6 genome sequences to available sequence repositories. Two HPV

  6. Stem-like cancer cells are inducible by increasing genomic instability in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yi; Zhong, Zhendong; Huang, Yijun; Deng, Wen; Cao, Junxia; Tsao, George; Liu, Quentin; Pei, Duanqing; Kang, Tiebang; Zeng, Yi-Xin

    2010-02-12

    The existence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) or stem-like cancer cells (SLCCs) is regarded as the cause of tumor formation and recurrence. However, the origin of such cells remains controversial with two competing hypotheses: CSCs are either transformed from tissue adult stem cells or dedifferentiated from transformed progenitor cells. Compelling evidence has determined the chromosomal aneuploidy to be one of the hallmarks of cancer cells, indicating genome instability plays an important role in tumorigenesis, for which CSCs are believed to be the initiator. To gain direct evidence that genomic instability is involved in the induction of SLCCs, we utilized multiple approaches to enhance genomic instability and monitored the percentage of SLCC in cultured cancer cells. Using side population (SP) cells as a marker for SLCC in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and CD133 for human neuroblastoma cells, we found that DNA damage inducers, UV and mitomycin C were capable of increasing SP cells in NPC CNE-2 and neuroblastoma SKN-SH cells. Likewise, either overexpression of a key regulator of cell cycle, Mad2, or knock down of Aurora B, an important kinase in mitosis, or Cdh1, a key E3 ligase in cell cycle, resulted in a significant increase of SP cells in CNE-2. More interestingly, enrichment of SP cells was observed in recurrent tumor tissues as compared with the primary tumor in the same NPC patients. Our study thus suggested that, beside transformation of tissue stem cells leading to CSC generation, genomic instability could be another potential mechanism resulting in SLCC formation, especially at tumor recurrence stage.

  7. Genomic DNA extraction from cells by electroporation on an integrated microfluidic platform.

    PubMed

    Geng, Tao; Bao, Ning; Sriranganathanw, Nammalwar; Li, Liwu; Lu, Chang

    2012-11-06

    The vast majority of genetic analysis of cells involves chemical lysis for release of DNA molecules. However, chemical reagents required in the lysis interfere with downstream molecular biology and often require removal after the step. Electrical lysis based on irreversible electroporation is a promising technique to prepare samples for genetic analysis due to its purely physical nature, fast speed, and simple operation. However, there has been no experimental confirmation on whether electrical lysis extracts genomic DNA from cells in a reproducible and efficient fashion in comparison to chemical lysis, especially for eukaryotic cells that have most of the DNA enclosed in the nucleus. In this work, we construct an integrated microfluidic chip that physically traps a low number of cells, lyses the cells using electrical pulses rapidly, then purifies and concentrates genomic DNA. We demonstrate that electrical lysis offers high efficiency for DNA extraction from both eukaryotic cells (up to ∼36% for Chinese hamster ovary cells) and bacterial cells (up to ∼45% for Salmonella typhimurium) that is comparable to the widely used chemical lysis. The DNA extraction efficiency has dependence on both the electric parameters and relative amount of beads used for DNA adsorption. We envision that electroporation-based DNA extraction will find use in ultrasensitive assays that benefit from minimal dilution and simple procedures.

  8. ATM deficiency generating genomic instability sensitizes pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells to therapy-induced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Perkhofer, Lukas; Schmitt, Anna; Romero Carrasco, Maria Carolina; Ihle, Michaela; Hampp, Stephanie; Ruess, Dietrich Alexander; Hessmann, Elisabeth; Russell, Ronan; Lechel, André; Azoitei, Ninel; Lin, Qiong; Liebau, Stefan; Hohwieler, Meike; Bohnenberger, Hanibal; Lesina, Marina; Algül, Hana; Gieldon, Laura; Schröck, Evelin; Gaedcke, Jochen; Wagner, Martin; Wiesmüller, Lisa; Sipos, Bence; Seufferlein, Thomas; Reinhardt, Hans Christian; Frappart, Pierre-Olivier; Kleger, Alexander

    2017-08-08

    Pancreatic adenocarcinomas (PDAC) harbour recurrent functional mutations of the master DNA damage response kinase ATM which has been shown to accelerate tumorigenesis and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. To study how ATM deficiency affects genome integrity in this setting, we evaluated the molecular and functional effects of conditional Atm deletion in a mouse model of PDAC. ATM deficiency was associated with increased mitotic defects, recurrent genomic rearrangements and deregulated DNA integrity checkpoints, reminiscent of human PDAC. We hypothesized that altered genome integrity might allow synthetic lethality-based options for targeted therapeutic intervention. Supporting this possibility, we found that the PARP inhibitor olaparib or ATR inhibitors reduced the viability of PDAC cells in vitro and in vivo associated with a genotype-selective increase in apoptosis. Overall, our results offered a preclinical mechanistic rationale for the use of PARP and ATR inhibitors to improve treatment of ATM-mutant PDAC. Copyright ©2017, American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. Genome-based prediction of testcross values in maize.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Theresa; Wimmer, Valentin; Auinger, Hans-Jürgen; Erbe, Malena; Knaak, Carsten; Ouzunova, Milena; Simianer, Henner; Schön, Chris-Carolin

    2011-07-01

    This is the first large-scale experimental study on genome-based prediction of testcross values in an advanced cycle breeding population of maize. The study comprised testcross progenies of 1,380 doubled haploid lines of maize derived from 36 crosses and phenotyped for grain yield and grain dry matter content in seven locations. The lines were genotyped with 1,152 single nucleotide polymorphism markers. Pedigree data were available for three generations. We used best linear unbiased prediction and stratified cross-validation to evaluate the performance of prediction models differing in the modeling of relatedness between inbred lines and in the calculation of genome-based coefficients of similarity. The choice of similarity coefficient did not affect prediction accuracies. Models including genomic information yielded significantly higher prediction accuracies than the model based on pedigree information alone. Average prediction accuracies based on genomic data were high even for a complex trait like grain yield (0.72-0.74) when the cross-validation scheme allowed for a high degree of relatedness between the estimation and the test set. When predictions were performed across distantly related families, prediction accuracies decreased significantly (0.47-0.48). Prediction accuracies decreased with decreasing sample size but were still high when the population size was halved (0.67-0.69). The results from this study are encouraging with respect to genome-based prediction of the genetic value of untested lines in advanced cycle breeding populations and the implementation of genomic selection in the breeding process.

  10. Genome-wide examination of myoblast cell cycle withdrawal duringdifferentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Xun; Collier, John Michael; Hlaing, Myint; Zhang, Leanne; Delshad, Elizabeth H.; Bristow, James; Bernstein, Harold S.

    2002-12-02

    Skeletal and cardiac myocytes cease division within weeks of birth. Although skeletal muscle retains limited capacity for regeneration through recruitment of satellite cells, resident populations of adult myocardial stem cells have not been identified. Because cell cycle withdrawal accompanies myocyte differentiation, we hypothesized that C2C12 cells, a mouse myoblast cell line previously used to characterize myocyte differentiation, also would provide a model for studying cell cycle withdrawal during differentiation. C2C12 cells were differentiated in culture medium containing horse serum and harvested at various time points to characterize the expression profiles of known cell cycle and myogenic regulatory factors by immunoblot analysis. BrdU incorporation decreased dramatically in confluent cultures 48 hr after addition of horse serum, as cells started to form myotubes. This finding was preceded by up-regulation of MyoD, followed by myogenin, and activation of Bcl-2. Cyclin D1 was expressed in proliferating cultures and became undetectable in cultures containing 40 percent fused myotubes, as levels of p21(WAF1/Cip1) increased and alpha-actin became detectable. Because C2C12 myoblasts withdraw from the cell cycle during myocyte differentiation following a course that recapitulates this process in vivo, we performed a genome-wide screen to identify other gene products involved in this process. Using microarrays containing approximately 10,000 minimally redundant mouse sequences that map to the UniGene database of the National Center for Biotechnology Information, we compared gene expression profiles between proliferating, differentiating, and differentiated C2C12 cells and verified candidate genes demonstrating differential expression by RT-PCR. Cluster analysis of differentially expressed genes revealed groups of gene products involved in cell cycle withdrawal, muscle differentiation, and apoptosis. In addition, we identified several genes, including DDAH2 and Ly

  11. Limiting replication stress during somatic cell reprogramming reduces genomic instability in induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Sergio; Lopez-Contreras, Andres J.; Gabut, Mathieu; Marion, Rosa M.; Gutierrez-Martinez, Paula; Bua, Sabela; Ramirez, Oscar; Olalde, Iñigo; Rodrigo-Perez, Sara; Li, Han; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Serrano, Manuel; Blasco, Maria A.; Batada, Nizar N.; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    The generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) from adult somatic cells is one of the most remarkable discoveries in recent decades. However, several works have reported evidence of genomic instability in iPSC, raising concerns on their biomedical use. The reasons behind the genomic instability observed in iPSC remain mostly unknown. Here we show that, similar to the phenomenon of oncogene-induced replication stress, the expression of reprogramming factors induces replication stress. Increasing the levels of the checkpoint kinase 1 (CHK1) reduces reprogramming-induced replication stress and increases the efficiency of iPSC generation. Similarly, nucleoside supplementation during reprogramming reduces the load of DNA damage and genomic rearrangements on iPSC. Our data reveal that lowering replication stress during reprogramming, genetically or chemically, provides a simple strategy to reduce genomic instability on mouse and human iPSC. PMID:26292731

  12. Multiplex CRISPR/Cas9-based genome engineering enhanced by Drosha-mediated sgRNA-shRNA structure.

    PubMed

    Yan, Qiang; Xu, Kun; Xing, Jiani; Zhang, Tingting; Wang, Xin; Wei, Zehui; Ren, Chonghua; Liu, Zhongtian; Shao, Simin; Zhang, Zhiying

    2016-12-12

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system has recently been developed into a powerful genome-editing technology, as it requires only two key components (Cas9 protein and sgRNA) to function and further enables multiplex genome targeting and homology-directed repair (HDR) based precise genome editing in a wide variety of organisms. Here, we report a novel and interesting strategy by using the Drosha-mediated sgRNA-shRNA structure to direct Cas9 for multiplex genome targeting and precise genome editing. For multiplex genome targeting assay, we achieved more than 9% simultaneous mutant efficiency for 3 genomic loci among the puromycin-selected cell clones. By introducing the shRNA against DNA ligase IV gene (LIG4) into the sgRNA-shRNA construct, the HDR-based precise genome editing efficiency was improved as more than 2-fold. Our works provide a useful tool for multiplex and precise genome modifying in mammalian cells.

  13. Multiplex CRISPR/Cas9-based genome engineering enhanced by Drosha-mediated sgRNA-shRNA structure

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Qiang; Xu, Kun; Xing, Jiani; Zhang, Tingting; Wang, Xin; Wei, Zehui; Ren, Chonghua; Liu, Zhongtian; Shao, Simin; Zhang, Zhiying

    2016-01-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system has recently been developed into a powerful genome-editing technology, as it requires only two key components (Cas9 protein and sgRNA) to function and further enables multiplex genome targeting and homology-directed repair (HDR) based precise genome editing in a wide variety of organisms. Here, we report a novel and interesting strategy by using the Drosha-mediated sgRNA-shRNA structure to direct Cas9 for multiplex genome targeting and precise genome editing. For multiplex genome targeting assay, we achieved more than 9% simultaneous mutant efficiency for 3 genomic loci among the puromycin-selected cell clones. By introducing the shRNA against DNA ligase IV gene (LIG4) into the sgRNA-shRNA construct, the HDR-based precise genome editing efficiency was improved as more than 2-fold. Our works provide a useful tool for multiplex and precise genome modifying in mammalian cells. PMID:27941919

  14. Duplication of the genome in normal and cancer cell cycles.

    PubMed

    Bandura, Jennifer L; Calvi, Brian R

    2002-01-01

    It is critical to discover the mechanisms of normal cell cycle regulation if we are to fully understand what goes awry in cancer cells. The normal eukaryotic cell tightly regulates the activity of origins of DNA replication so that the genome is duplicated exactly once per cell cycle. Over the last ten years much has been learned concerning the cell cycle regulation of origin activity. It is now clear that the proteins and cell cycle mechanisms that control origin activity are largely conserved from yeast to humans. Despite this conservation, the composition of origins of DNA replication in higher eukaryotes remains ill defined. A DNA consensus for predicting origins has yet to emerge, and it is of some debate whether primary DNA sequence determines where replication initiates. In this review we outline what is known about origin structure and the mechanism of once per cell cycle DNA replication with an emphasis on recent advances in mammalian cells. We discuss the possible relevance of these regulatory pathways for cancer biology and therapy.

  15. Protein and genome evolution in Mammalian cells for biotechnology applications.

    PubMed

    Majors, Brian S; Chiang, Gisela G; Betenbaugh, Michael J

    2009-06-01

    Mutation and selection are the essential steps of evolution. Researchers have long used in vitro mutagenesis, expression, and selection techniques in laboratory bacteria and yeast cultures to evolve proteins with new properties, termed directed evolution. Unfortunately, the nature of mammalian cells makes applying these mutagenesis and whole-organism evolution techniques to mammalian protein expression systems laborious and time consuming. Mammalian evolution systems would be useful to test unique mammalian cell proteins and protein characteristics, such as complex glycosylation. Protein evolution in mammalian cells would allow for generation of novel diagnostic tools and designer polypeptides that can only be tested in a mammalian expression system. Recent advances have shown that mammalian cells of the immune system can be utilized to evolve transgenes during their natural mutagenesis processes, thus creating proteins with unique properties, such as fluorescence. On a more global level, researchers have shown that mutation systems that affect the entire genome of a mammalian cell can give rise to cells with unique phenotypes suitable for commercial processes. This review examines the advances in mammalian cell and protein evolution and the application of this work toward advances in commercial mammalian cell biotechnology.

  16. Comprehensive genome and epigenome characterization of CHO cells in response to evolutionary pressures and over time

    PubMed Central

    Feichtinger, Julia; Hernández, Inmaculada; Fischer, Christoph; Hanscho, Michael; Auer, Norbert; Hackl, Matthias; Jadhav, Vaibhav; Baumann, Martina; Krempl, Peter M.; Schmidl, Christian; Farlik, Matthias; Schuster, Michael; Merkel, Angelika; Sommer, Andreas; Heath, Simon; Rico, Daniel; Bock, Christoph; Thallinger, Gerhard G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The most striking characteristic of CHO cells is their adaptability, which enables efficient production of proteins as well as growth under a variety of culture conditions, but also results in genomic and phenotypic instability. To investigate the relative contribution of genomic and epigenetic modifications towards phenotype evolution, comprehensive genome and epigenome data are presented for six related CHO cell lines, both in response to perturbations (different culture conditions and media as well as selection of a specific phenotype with increased transient productivity) and in steady state (prolonged time in culture under constant conditions). Clear transitions were observed in DNA‐methylation patterns upon each perturbation, while few changes occurred over time under constant conditions. Only minor DNA‐methylation changes were observed between exponential and stationary growth phase; however, throughout a batch culture the histone modification pattern underwent continuous adaptation. Variation in genome sequence between the six cell lines on the level of SNPs, InDels, and structural variants is high, both upon perturbation and under constant conditions over time. The here presented comprehensive resource may open the door to improved control and manipulation of gene expression during industrial bioprocesses based on epigenetic mechanisms. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2241–2253. © 2016 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27072894

  17. Genomics of Drug Sensitivity in Cancer (GDSC): a resource for therapeutic biomarker discovery in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wanjuan; Soares, Jorge; Greninger, Patricia; Edelman, Elena J; Lightfoot, Howard; Forbes, Simon; Bindal, Nidhi; Beare, Dave; Smith, James A; Thompson, I Richard; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Futreal, P Andrew; Haber, Daniel A; Stratton, Michael R; Benes, Cyril; McDermott, Ultan; Garnett, Mathew J

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in cancer genomes strongly influence clinical responses to treatment and in many instances are potent biomarkers for response to drugs. The Genomics of Drug Sensitivity in Cancer (GDSC) database (www.cancerRxgene.org) is the largest public resource for information on drug sensitivity in cancer cells and molecular markers of drug response. Data are freely available without restriction. GDSC currently contains drug sensitivity data for almost 75 000 experiments, describing response to 138 anticancer drugs across almost 700 cancer cell lines. To identify molecular markers of drug response, cell line drug sensitivity data are integrated with large genomic datasets obtained from the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer database, including information on somatic mutations in cancer genes, gene amplification and deletion, tissue type and transcriptional data. Analysis of GDSC data is through a web portal focused on identifying molecular biomarkers of drug sensitivity based on queries of specific anticancer drugs or cancer genes. Graphical representations of the data are used throughout with links to related resources and all datasets are fully downloadable. GDSC provides a unique resource incorporating large drug sensitivity and genomic datasets to facilitate the discovery of new therapeutic biomarkers for cancer therapies.

  18. GARLIC: Genomic Autozygosity Regions Likelihood-based Inference and Classification.

    PubMed

    Szpiech, Zachary A; Blant, Alexandra; Pemberton, Trevor J

    2017-07-01

    Runs of homozygosity (ROH) are important genomic features that manifest when identical-by-descent haplotypes are inherited from parents. Their length distributions and genomic locations are informative about population history and they are useful for mapping recessive loci contributing to both Mendelian and complex disease risk. Here, we present software implementing a model-based method ( Pemberton et al., 2012 ) for inferring ROH in genome-wide SNP datasets that incorporates population-specific parameters and a genotyping error rate as well as provides a length-based classification module to identify biologically interesting classes of ROH. Using simulations, we evaluate the performance of this method. GARLIC is written in C ++. Source code and pre-compiled binaries (Windows, OSX and Linux) are hosted on GitHub ( https://github.com/szpiech/garlic ) under the GNU General Public License version 3. zachary.szpiech@ucsf.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  19. Each cell counts: Hematopoiesis and immunity research in the era of single cell genomics.

    PubMed

    Jaitin, Diego Adhemar; Keren-Shaul, Hadas; Elefant, Naama; Amit, Ido

    2015-02-01

    Hematopoiesis and immunity are mediated through complex interactions between multiple cell types and states. This complexity is currently addressed following a reductionist approach of characterizing cell types by a small number of cell surface molecular features and gross functions. While the introduction of global transcriptional profiling technologies enabled a more comprehensive view, heterogeneity within sampled populations remained unaddressed, obscuring the true picture of hematopoiesis and immune system function. A critical mass of technological advances in molecular biology and genomics has enabled genome-wide measurements of single cells - the fundamental unit of immunity. These new advances are expected to boost detection of less frequent cell types and fuzzy intermediate cell states, greatly expanding the resolution of current available classifications. This new era of single-cell genomics in immunology research holds great promise for further understanding of the mechanisms and circuits regulating hematopoiesis and immunity in both health and disease. In the near future, the accuracy of single-cell genomics will ultimately enable precise diagnostics and treatment of multiple hematopoietic and immune related diseases.

  20. Identification of minor histocompatibility antigens based on the 1000 Genomes Project

    PubMed Central

    Oostvogels, Rimke; Lokhorst, Henk M.; Minnema, Monique C.; van Elk, Maureen; van den Oudenalder, Kelly; Spierings, Eric; Mutis, Tuna; Spaapen, Robbert M.

    2014-01-01

    Minor histocompatibility antigens are highly immunogeneic polymorphic peptides playing crucial roles in the clinical outcome of HLA-identical allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Although the introduction of genome-wide association-based strategies significantly has accelerated the identification of minor histocompatibility antigens over the past years, more efficient, rapid and robust identification techniques are required for a better understanding of the immunobiology of minor histocompatibility antigens and for their optimal clinical application in the treatment of hematologic malignancies. To develop a strategy that can overcome the drawbacks of all earlier strategies, we now integrated our previously developed genetic correlation analysis methodology with the comprehensive genomic databases from the 1000 Genomes Project. We show that the data set of the 1000 Genomes Project is suitable to identify all of the previously known minor histocompatibility antigens. Moreover, we demonstrate the power of this novel approach by the identification of the new HLA-DP4 restricted minor histocompatibility antigen UTDP4-1, which despite extensive efforts could not be identified using any of the previously developed biochemical, molecular biological or genetic strategies. The 1000 Genomes Project-based identification of minor histocompatibility antigens thus represents a very convenient and robust method for the identification of new targets for cancer therapy after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. PMID:25150256

  1. Identification of minor histocompatibility antigens based on the 1000 Genomes Project.

    PubMed

    Oostvogels, Rimke; Lokhorst, Henk M; Minnema, Monique C; van Elk, Maureen; van den Oudenalder, Kelly; Spierings, Eric; Mutis, Tuna; Spaapen, Robbert M

    2014-12-01

    Minor histocompatibility antigens are highly immunogeneic polymorphic peptides playing crucial roles in the clinical outcome of HLA-identical allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Although the introduction of genome-wide association-based strategies significantly has accelerated the identification of minor histocompatibility antigens over the past years, more efficient, rapid and robust identification techniques are required for a better understanding of the immunobiology of minor histocompatibility antigens and for their optimal clinical application in the treatment of hematologic malignancies. To develop a strategy that can overcome the drawbacks of all earlier strategies, we now integrated our previously developed genetic correlation analysis methodology with the comprehensive genomic databases from the 1000 Genomes Project. We show that the data set of the 1000 Genomes Project is suitable to identify all of the previously known minor histocompatibility antigens. Moreover, we demonstrate the power of this novel approach by the identification of the new HLA-DP4 restricted minor histocompatibility antigen UTDP4-1, which despite extensive efforts could not be identified using any of the previously developed biochemical, molecular biological or genetic strategies. The 1000 Genomes Project-based identification of minor histocompatibility antigens thus represents a very convenient and robust method for the identification of new targets for cancer therapy after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  2. Evaluation of somatic genomic imbalances in thyroid carcinomas of follicular origin by CGH-based approaches.

    PubMed

    Baldan, Federica; Mio, Catia; Allegri, Lorenzo; Passon, Nadia; Lepore, Saverio M; Russo, Diego; Damante, Giuseppe

    2017-09-07

    Application of distinct technologies of cancer genome analysis has provided important information for the molecular characterization of several human neoplasia, including follicular cell-derived thyroid carcinoma. Among them, comparative genomic hybridization (CGH)-based procedures have been extensively applied to evaluate genomic imbalances present in these tumours, obtaining data leading to an increase in the understanding of their complexity and diversity. In this review, after a brief overview of the most commonly used CGH-based technichs, we will describe the major results deriving from the most influential studies in the literature which used this approach to investigate the genomic aberrations of thyroid cancer cells. In most studies a small number of patients have been analyzed. Deletions and duplications at different chromosomal regions were detected in all investigated cohorts. A higher number of genomic imbalances has been detected in anaplastic or poorly differentiated thyroid carcinomas compared to well differentiated ones. Limitations in the interpretation of the results, as well the potential impact in the clinical practice are discussed. Though a quite heterogeneous picture arises from results so far available, CGH array, combined with other methodologies as well as an accurate clinical management, may offer novel opportunities for a better stratification of thyroid cancer patients.

  3. Manipulation and extraction of genomic DNA from cell lysate by functionalized magnetic particles for lab on a chip applications.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Siu Wai; Hsing, I-Ming

    2006-01-15

    A novel approach for extracting living cells' genomic DNA materials utilizing functionalized magnetic particles (MPs) is reported in this investigation. This strategy is amenable to handle bio-samples in a miniaturized environment and it offers a possibility to separate and purify DNA from other cell lysate mixtures "on-chip", which is known to be a bottle-neck step in an integrated micro-total-analysis-system (muTAS). "Species-specific" genomic DNA of interest is captured by the MPs based on the hybridization interaction between the biotinylated probes modified MPs and a complementary region of the targeted genome. The genome DNA anchored on the particles can be separated from the rest of cellular mixtures by a simple buffer washing upon the exertion of external magnetic force. Surface modifications of MPs and hybridization conditions affecting the genome capturing efficiency are investigated. Extraction of genomic DNA from E. coli is demonstrated in a silicon/glass-based micro-reactor patterned with a platinum heater and sensors. On-chip extraction and manipulation of genomic DNAs illustrated in this study is a step forward toward a total integrated bioanalytical microsystem for crude cells/sample analysis.

  4. Evidence-based gene predictions in plant genomes.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chengzhi; Mao, Long; Ware, Doreen; Stein, Lincoln

    2009-10-01

    Automated evidence-based gene building is a rapid and cost-effective way to provide reliable gene annotations on newly sequenced genomes. One of the limitations of evidence-based gene builders, however, is their requirement for transcriptional evidence-known proteins, full-length cDNAs, or expressed sequence tags (ESTs)-in the species of interest. This limitation is of particular concern for plant genomes, where the rate of genome sequencing is greatly outpacing the rate of EST- and cDNA-sequencing projects. To overcome this limitation, we have developed an evidence-based gene build system (the Gramene pipeline) that can use transcriptional evidence across related species. The Gramene pipeline uses the Ensembl computing infrastructure with a novel data processing scheme. Using the previously annotated plant genomes, the dicot Arabidopsis thaliana and the monocot Oryza sativa, we show that the cross-species ESTs from within monocot or dicot class are a valuable source of evidence for gene predictions. We also find that, using only EST and cross-species evidence, the Gramene pipeline can generate a plant gene set that is comparable in quality to the human genes based on known proteins and full-length cDNAs. We compare the Gramene pipeline to several widely used ab initio gene prediction programs in rice; this comparison shows the pipeline performs favorably at both the gene and exon levels with cross-species gene products only. We discuss the results of testing the pipeline on a 22-Mb region of the newly sequenced maize genome and discuss potential application of the pipeline to other genomes.

  5. From evidence-based medicine to genomic medicine

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    The concept of ‘evidence-based medicine’ dates back to mid-19th century or even earlier. It remains pivotal in planning, funding and in delivering the health care. Clinicians, public health practitioners, health commissioners/purchasers, health planners, politicians and public seek formal ‘evidence’ in approving any form of health care provision. Essentially ‘evidence-based medicine’ aims at the conscientious, explicit and judicious use of the current best evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients. It is in fact the ‘personalised medicine’ in practice. Since the completion of the human genome project and the rapid accumulation of huge amount of data, scientists and physicians alike are excited on the prospect of ‘personalised health care’ based on individual’s genotype and phenotype. The first decade of the new millennium now witnesses the transition from ‘evidence-based medicine’ to the ‘genomic medicine’. The practice of medicine, including health promotion and prevention of disease, stands now at a wide-open road as the scientific and medical community embraces itself with the rapidly expanding and revolutionising field of genomic medicine. This article reviews the rapid transformation of modern medicine from the ‘evidence-based medicine’ to ‘genomic medicine’. PMID:18923934

  6. Phylogenetic analyses of phylum Actinobacteria based on whole genome sequences.

    PubMed

    Verma, Mansi; Lal, Devi; Kaur, Jaspreet; Saxena, Anjali; Kaur, Jasvinder; Anand, Shailly; Lal, Rup

    2013-09-01

    Actinobacteria constitute one of the largest and ancient taxonomic phylum within the domain bacteria and are well known for their secondary metabolites. Considerable variation in the metabolic properties, genome size and GC content of the members of this phylum has been observed. Therefore, the placement of new or existing species based on 16S rRNA gene sometimes becomes problematic due to the low congruence level. In the present study, phylogeny of ninety actinobacterial genomes was reconstructed using single gene and whole genome based data. Where alignment-free phylogenetic method was found to be more robust, the concatenation of 94 proteins improved the resolution which all single gene based phylogenies failed to resolve. The comprehensive analysis of 94 conserved proteins resulted in a total of 42,447 informative sites, which is so far the largest meta-alignment obtained for this phylum. But the ultimate resolved phylogeny was obtained by generating a consensus tree by combining the information from single gene and genome based phylogenies. The present investigation clearly revealed that the consensus approach is a useful tool for phylogenetic inference and the taxonomic affiliations must be based on this approach. The consensus approach suggested that there is a need for taxonomic amendments of the orders Frankiales and Micrococcales.

  7. WormBase 2016: expanding to enable helminth genomic research.

    PubMed

    Howe, Kevin L; Bolt, Bruce J; Cain, Scott; Chan, Juancarlos; Chen, Wen J; Davis, Paul; Done, James; Down, Thomas; Gao, Sibyl; Grove, Christian; Harris, Todd W; Kishore, Ranjana; Lee, Raymond; Lomax, Jane; Li, Yuling; Muller, Hans-Michael; Nakamura, Cecilia; Nuin, Paulo; Paulini, Michael; Raciti, Daniela; Schindelman, Gary; Stanley, Eleanor; Tuli, Mary Ann; Van Auken, Kimberly; Wang, Daniel; Wang, Xiaodong; Williams, Gary; Wright, Adam; Yook, Karen; Berriman, Matthew; Kersey, Paul; Schedl, Tim; Stein, Lincoln; Sternberg, Paul W

    2016-01-04

    WormBase (www.wormbase.org) is a central repository for research data on the biology, genetics and genomics of Caenorhabditis elegans and other nematodes. The project has evolved from its original remit to collect and integrate all data for a single species, and now extends to numerous nematodes, ranging from evolutionary comparators of C. elegans to parasitic species that threaten plant, animal and human health. Research activity using C. elegans as a model system is as vibrant as ever, and we have created new tools for community curation in response to the ever-increasing volume and complexity of data. To better allow users to navigate their way through these data, we have made a number of improvements to our main website, including new tools for browsing genomic features and ontology annotations. Finally, we have developed a new portal for parasitic worm genomes. WormBase ParaSite (parasite.wormbase.org) contains all publicly available nematode and platyhelminth annotated genome sequences, and is designed specifically to support helminth genomic research. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. Changing Histopathological Diagnostics by Genome-Based Tumor Classification

    PubMed Central

    Kloth, Michael; Buettner, Reinhard

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, tumors are classified by histopathological criteria, i.e., based on their specific morphological appearances. Consequently, current therapeutic decisions in oncology are strongly influenced by histology rather than underlying molecular or genomic aberrations. The increase of information on molecular changes however, enabled by the Human Genome Project and the International Cancer Genome Consortium as well as the manifold advances in molecular biology and high-throughput sequencing techniques, inaugurated the integration of genomic information into disease classification. Furthermore, in some cases it became evident that former classifications needed major revision and adaption. Such adaptations are often required by understanding the pathogenesis of a disease from a specific molecular alteration, using this molecular driver for targeted and highly effective therapies. Altogether, reclassifications should lead to higher information content of the underlying diagnoses, reflecting their molecular pathogenesis and resulting in optimized and individual therapeutic decisions. The objective of this article is to summarize some particularly important examples of genome-based classification approaches and associated therapeutic concepts. In addition to reviewing disease specific markers, we focus on potentially therapeutic or predictive markers and the relevance of molecular diagnostics in disease monitoring. PMID:24879454

  9. WormBase 2016: expanding to enable helminth genomic research

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Kevin L.; Bolt, Bruce J.; Cain, Scott; Chan, Juancarlos; Chen, Wen J.; Davis, Paul; Done, James; Down, Thomas; Gao, Sibyl; Grove, Christian; Harris, Todd W.; Kishore, Ranjana; Lee, Raymond; Lomax, Jane; Li, Yuling; Muller, Hans-Michael; Nakamura, Cecilia; Nuin, Paulo; Paulini, Michael; Raciti, Daniela; Schindelman, Gary; Stanley, Eleanor; Tuli, Mary Ann; Van Auken, Kimberly; Wang, Daniel; Wang, Xiaodong; Williams, Gary; Wright, Adam; Yook, Karen; Berriman, Matthew; Kersey, Paul; Schedl, Tim; Stein, Lincoln; Sternberg, Paul W.

    2016-01-01

    WormBase (www.wormbase.org) is a central repository for research data on the biology, genetics and genomics of Caenorhabditis elegans and other nematodes. The project has evolved from its original remit to collect and integrate all data for a single species, and now extends to numerous nematodes, ranging from evolutionary comparators of C. elegans to parasitic species that threaten plant, animal and human health. Research activity using C. elegans as a model system is as vibrant as ever, and we have created new tools for community curation in response to the ever-increasing volume and complexity of data. To better allow users to navigate their way through these data, we have made a number of improvements to our main website, including new tools for browsing genomic features and ontology annotations. Finally, we have developed a new portal for parasitic worm genomes. WormBase ParaSite (parasite.wormbase.org) contains all publicly available nematode and platyhelminth annotated genome sequences, and is designed specifically to support helminth genomic research. PMID:26578572

  10. Capturing Three-Dimensional Genome Organization in Individual Cells by Single-Cell Hi-C.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Takashi; Wingett, Steven W; Fraser, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Hi-C is a powerful method to investigate genome-wide, higher-order chromatin and chromosome conformations averaged from a population of cells. To expand the potential of Hi-C for single-cell analysis, we developed single-cell Hi-C. Similar to the existing "ensemble" Hi-C method, single-cell Hi-C detects proximity-dependent ligation events between cross-linked and restriction-digested chromatin fragments in cells. A major difference between the single-cell Hi-C and ensemble Hi-C protocol is that the proximity-dependent ligation is carried out in the nucleus. This allows the isolation of individual cells in which nearly the entire Hi-C procedure has been carried out, enabling the production of a Hi-C library and data from individual cells. With this new method, we studied genome conformations and found evidence for conserved topological domain organization from cell to cell, but highly variable interdomain contacts and chromosome folding genome wide. In addition, we found that the single-cell Hi-C protocol provided cleaner results with less technical noise suggesting it could be used to improve the ensemble Hi-C technique.

  11. Carcinogens induce genome-wide loss of heterozygosity in normal stem cells without persistent chromosomal instability.

    PubMed

    Donahue, Sarah L; Lin, Qing; Cao, Shang; Ruley, H Earl

    2006-08-01

    Widespread losses of heterozygosity (LOH) in human cancer have been thought to result from chromosomal instability caused by mutations affecting DNA repair/genome maintenance. However, the origin of LOH in most tumors is unknown. The present study examined the ability of carcinogenic agents to induce LOH at 53 sites throughout the genome of normal diploid mouse ES cells. Brief exposures to nontoxic levels of methylnitrosourea, diepoxybutane, mitomycin C, hydroxyurea, doxorubicin, and UV light stimulated LOH at all loci at frequencies ranging from 1-8 x 10(-3) per cell (10-123 times higher than in untreated cells). This greatly exceeds the frequencies at which these agents have been reported to induce point mutations and is comparable to the rates of LOH observed in ES cells lacking the gene responsible for Bloom syndrome, an inherited DNA repair defect that results in greatly increased risk of cancer. These results suggest that LOH contributes significantly to the carcinogenicity of a variety of mutagens and raises the possibility that genome-wide LOH observed in some human cancers may reflect prior exposure to genotoxic agents rather than a state of chromosomal instability during the carcinogenic process. Finally, as a practical matter, chemically induced LOH is expected to enhance the recovery of homozygous recessive mutants from phenotype-based genetic screens in mammalian cells.

  12. Carcinogens induce genome-wide loss of heterozygosity in normal stem cells without persistent chromosomal instability

    PubMed Central

    Donahue, Sarah L.; Lin, Qing; Cao, Shang; Ruley, H. Earl

    2006-01-01

    Widespread losses of heterozygosity (LOH) in human cancer have been thought to result from chromosomal instability caused by mutations affecting DNA repair/genome maintenance. However, the origin of LOH in most tumors is unknown. The present study examined the ability of carcinogenic agents to induce LOH at 53 sites throughout the genome of normal diploid mouse ES cells. Brief exposures to nontoxic levels of methylnitrosourea, diepoxybutane, mitomycin C, hydroxyurea, doxorubicin, and UV light stimulated LOH at all loci at frequencies ranging from 1–8 × 10−3 per cell (10–123 times higher than in untreated cells). This greatly exceeds the frequencies at which these agents have been reported to induce point mutations and is comparable to the rates of LOH observed in ES cells lacking the gene responsible for Bloom syndrome, an inherited DNA repair defect that results in greatly increased risk of cancer. These results suggest that LOH contributes significantly to the carcinogenicity of a variety of mutagens and raises the possibility that genome-wide LOH observed in some human cancers may reflect prior exposure to genotoxic agents rather than a state of chromosomal instability during the carcinogenic process. Finally, as a practical matter, chemically induced LOH is expected to enhance the recovery of homozygous recessive mutants from phenotype-based genetic screens in mammalian cells. PMID:16868089

  13. Malignant glioma: lessons from genomics, mouse models, and stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; McKay, Renée M; Parada, Luis F

    2012-03-30

    Eighty percent of malignant tumors that develop in the central nervous system are malignant gliomas, which are essentially incurable. Here, we discuss how recent sequencing studies are identifying unexpected drivers of gliomagenesis, including mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and the NF-κB pathway, and how genome-wide analyses are reshaping the classification schemes for tumors and enhancing prognostic value of molecular markers. We discuss the controversies surrounding glioma stem cells and explore how the integration of new molecular data allows for the generation of more informative animal models to advance our knowledge of glioma's origin, progression, and treatment.

  14. Genomic instability, driver genes and cell selection: Projections from cancer to stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ben-David, Uri

    2015-04-01

    Cancer cells and stem cells share many traits, including a tendency towards genomic instability. Human cancers exhibit tumor-specific genomic aberrations, which often affect their malignancy and drug response. During their culture propagation, human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) also acquire characteristic genomic aberrations, which may have significant impact on their molecular and cellular phenotypes. These aberrations vary in size from single nucleotide alterations to copy number alterations to whole chromosome gains. A prominent challenge in both cancer and stem cell research is to identify "driver aberrations" that confer a selection advantage, and "driver genes" that underlie the recurrence of these aberrations. Following principles that are already well-established in cancer research, candidate driver genes have also been suggested in hPSCs. Experimental validation of the functional role of such candidates can uncover whether these are bona fide driver genes. The identification of driver genes may bring us closer to a mechanistic understanding of the genomic instability of stem cells. Guided by terminologies and methodologies commonly applied in cancer research, such understanding may have important ramifications for both stem cell and cancer biology. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Stress as a fundamental theme in cell plasticity.

  15. GI-SVM: A sensitive method for predicting genomic islands based on unannotated sequence of a single genome.

    PubMed

    Lu, Bingxin; Leong, Hon Wai

    2016-02-01

    Genomic islands (GIs) are clusters of functionally related genes acquired by lateral genetic transfer (LGT), and they are present in many bacterial genomes. GIs are extremely important for bacterial research, because they not only promote genome evolution but also contain genes that enhance adaption and enable antibiotic resistance. Many methods have been proposed to predict GI. But most of them rely on either annotations or comparisons with other closely related genomes. Hence these methods cannot be easily applied to new genomes. As the number of newly sequenced bacterial genomes rapidly increases, there is a need for methods to detect GI based solely on sequences of a single genome. In this paper, we propose a novel method, GI-SVM, to predict GIs given only the unannotated genome sequence. GI-SVM is based on one-class support vector machine (SVM), utilizing composition bias in terms of k-mer content. From our evaluations on three real genomes, GI-SVM can achieve higher recall compared with current methods, without much loss of precision. Besides, GI-SVM allows flexible parameter tuning to get optimal results for each genome. In short, GI-SVM provides a more sensitive method for researchers interested in a first-pass detection of GI in newly sequenced genomes.

  16. Accurate genome relative abundance estimation based on shotgun metagenomic reads.

    PubMed

    Xia, Li C; Cram, Jacob A; Chen, Ting; Fuhrman, Jed A; Sun, Fengzhu

    2011-01-01

    Accurate estimation of microbial community composition based on metagenomic sequencing data is fundamental for subsequent metagenomics analysis. Prevalent estimation methods are mainly based on directly summarizing alignment results or its variants; often result in biased and/or unstable estimates. We have developed a unified probabilistic framework (named GRAMMy) by explicitly modeling read assignment ambiguities, genome size biases and read distributions along the genomes. Maximum likelihood method is employed to compute Genome Relative Abundance of microbial communities using the Mixture Model theory (GRAMMy). GRAMMy has been demonstrated to give estimates that are accurate and robust across both simulated and real read benchmark datasets. We applied GRAMMy to a collection of 34 metagenomic read sets from four metagenomics projects and identified 99 frequent species (minimally 0.5% abundant in at least 50% of the data-sets) in the human gut samples. Our results show substantial improvements over previous studies, such as adjusting the over-estimated abundance for Bacteroides species for human gut samples, by providing a new reference-based strategy for metagenomic sample comparisons. GRAMMy can be used flexibly with many read assignment tools (mapping, alignment or composition-based) even with low-sensitivity mapping results from huge short-read datasets. It will be increasingly useful as an accurate and robust tool for abundance estimation with the growing size of read sets and the expanding database of reference genomes.

  17. Integrated genome-based studies of Shewanella Ecophysiology

    SciTech Connect

    Tiedje, James M.; Konstantinidis, Kostas; Worden, Mark

    2014-01-08

    The aim of the work reported is to study Shewanella population genomics, and to understand the evolution, ecophysiology, and speciation of Shewanella. The tasks supporting this aim are: to study genetic and ecophysiological bases defining the core and diversification of Shewanella species; to determine gene content patterns along redox gradients; and to Investigate the evolutionary processes, patterns and mechanisms of Shewanella.

  18. Sleeping Beauty Transposon Mutagenesis of the Rat Genome in Spermatogonial Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ivics, Zoltán; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Chapman, Karen M.; Hamra, F. Kent

    2011-01-01

    Since several aspects of physiology in rats has evolved to be more similar to humans than that of mice, it is highly desirable to link the rat into the process of annotating the human genome with function. However, the lack of technology for generating defined mutants in the rat genome has hindered the identification of causative relationships between genes and disease phenotypes. As an important step towards this goal, an approach of establishing transposon-mediated insertional mutagenesis in rat spermatogonial stem cells was recently developed. Transposons can be viewed as natural DNA transfer vehicles that, similar to integrating viruses, are capable of efficient genomic insertion. The mobility of transposons can be controlled by conditionally providing the transposase component of the transposition reaction. Thus, a DNA of interest such as a mutagenic gene trap cassette cloned between the inverted repeat sequences of a transposon-based vector can be utilized for stable genomic insertion in a regulated and highly efficient manner. Gene trap transposons integrate into the genome in a random fashion, and those mutagenic insertions that occurred in expressed genes can be selected in vitro based on activation of a reporter. Selected monoclonal as well as polyclonal libraries of gene trap clones are transplanted into the testes of recipient/founder male rats allowing passage of the mutation through the germline to F1 progeny after only a single cross with wild-type females. This paradigm enables a powerful methodological pipeline for forward genetic screens for functional gene annotation in the rat, as well as other vertebrate models. This article provides a detailed description on how to culturerat spermatogonial stem cell lines, their transfection with transposon plasmids, selection of gene trap insertions with antibiotics, transplantation of genetically modified stem cells and genotyping of knockout animals. PMID:21193047

  19. Sleeping Beauty transposon mutagenesis of the rat genome in spermatogonial stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ivics, Zoltán; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Chapman, Karen M; Hamra, F Kent

    2011-04-01

    Since several aspects of physiology in rats have evolved to be more similar to humans than that of mice, it is highly desirable to link the rat into the process of annotating the human genome with function. However, the lack of technology for generating defined mutants in the rat genome has hindered the identification of causative relationships between genes and disease phenotypes. As an important step towards this goal, an approach of establishing transposon-mediated insertional mutagenesis in rat spermatogonial stem cells was recently developed. Transposons can be viewed as natural DNA transfer vehicles that, similar to integrating viruses, are capable of efficient genomic insertion. The mobility of transposons can be controlled by conditionally providing the transposase component of the transposition reaction. Thus, a DNA of interest such as a mutagenic gene trap cassette cloned between the inverted repeat sequences of a transposon-based vector can be utilized for stable genomic insertion in a regulated and highly efficient manner. Gene-trap transposons integrate into the genome in a random fashion, and those mutagenic insertions that occurred in expressed genes can be selected in vitro based on activation of a reporter. Selected monoclonal as well as polyclonal libraries of gene trap clones are transplanted into the testes of recipient/founder male rats allowing passage of the mutation through the germline to F1 progeny after only a single cross with wild-type females. This paradigm enables a powerful methodological pipeline for forward genetic screens for functional gene annotation in the rat, as well as other vertebrate models. This article provides a detailed description on how to culture rat spermatogonial stem cell lines, their transfection with transposon plasmids, selection of gene-trap insertions with antibiotics, transplantation of genetically modified stem cells and genotyping of knockout animals. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Advances in genome-wide protein expression using the wheat germ cell-free system.

    PubMed

    Endo, Yaeta; Sawasaki, Tatsuya

    2005-01-01

    In the current post-genomic era, cell-free translation platforms are gaining importance in structural as well as functional genomics. They are based on extracts prepared from Escherichia coli cells, wheat germ, or rabbit reticulocytes, and when programmed with any mRNA in the presence of energy sources and amino acids, can synthesize the respective protein in vitro. Among the cell-free systems, the wheat germ-based translation system is of special interest due to its eukaryotic nature and robustness. This chapter outlines the existing protein production platforms and their limitations, and describes the basic concept of the wheat germ-based cell-free system. It also demonstrates how the conventional wheat germ system can be improved by eliminating endogenous inhibitors, by using an expression vector specially designed for this system and polymerase chain reaction-directed protein synthesis directly from cDNAs in a bi-layer translation system. Finally, a robotic procedure for translation based on the wheat germ extract and bi-layer cell-free translation is described.

  1. Identification of genomic sites for CRISPR/Cas9-based genome editing in the Vitis vinifera genome

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    CRISPR/Cas9 has been recently demonstrated as an effective and popular genome editing tool for modifying genomes of human, animals, microorganisms, and plants. Success of such genome editing is highly dependent on the availability of suitable target sites in the genomes to be edited. Many specific t...

  2. Genomic safe harbors permit high β-globin transgene expression in thalassemia induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Papapetrou, Eirini P; Lee, Gabsang; Malani, Nirav; Setty, Manu; Riviere, Isabelle; Tirunagari, Laxmi M S; Kadota, Kyuichi; Roth, Shoshannah L; Giardina, Patricia; Viale, Agnes; Leslie, Christina; Bushman, Frederic D; Studer, Lorenz; Sadelain, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Realizing the therapeutic potential of human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells will require robust, precise and safe strategies for genetic modification, as cell therapies that rely on randomly integrated transgenes pose oncogenic risks. Here we describe a strategy to genetically modify human iPS cells at ‘safe harbor’ sites in the genome, which fulfill five criteria based on their position relative to contiguous coding genes, microRNAs and ultraconserved regions. We demonstrate that ~10% of integrations of a lentivirally encoded β-globin transgene in β-thalassemia-patient iPS cell clones meet our safe harbor criteria and permit high-level β-globin expression upon erythroid differentiation without perturbation of neighboring gene expression. This approach, combining bioinformatics and functional analyses, should be broadly applicable to introducing therapeutic or suicide genes into patient-specific iPS cells for use in cell therapy. PMID:21151124

  3. Genome-wide functional analysis of human cell-cycle regulators

    PubMed Central

    Mukherji, Mridul; Bell, Russell; Supekova, Lubica; Wang, Yan; Orth, Anthony P.; Batalov, Serge; Miraglia, Loren; Huesken, Dieter; Lange, Joerg; Martin, Christopher; Sahasrabudhe, Sudhir; Reinhardt, Mischa; Natt, Francois; Hall, Jonathan; Mickanin, Craig; Labow, Mark; Chanda, Sumit K.; Cho, Charles Y.; Schultz, Peter G.

    2006-01-01

    Human cells have evolved complex signaling networks to coordinate the cell cycle. A detailed understanding of the global regulation of this fundamental process requires comprehensive identification of the genes and pathways involved in the various stages of cell-cycle progression. To this end, we report a genome-wide analysis of the human cell cycle, cell size, and proliferation by targeting >95% of the protein-coding genes in the human genome using small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Analysis of >2 million images, acquired by quantitative fluorescence microscopy, showed that depletion of 1,152 genes strongly affected cell-cycle progression. These genes clustered into eight distinct phenotypic categories based on phase of arrest, nuclear area, and nuclear morphology. Phase-specific networks were built by interrogating knowledge-based and physical interaction databases with identified genes. Genome-wide analysis of cell-cycle regulators revealed a number of kinase, phosphatase, and proteolytic proteins and also suggests that processes thought to regulate G1-S phase progression like receptor-mediated signaling, nutrient status, and translation also play important roles in the regulation of G2/M phase transition. Moreover, 15 genes that are integral to TNF/NF-κB signaling were found to regulate G2/M, a previously unanticipated role for this pathway. These analyses provide systems-level insight into both known and novel genes as well as pathways that regulate cell-cycle progression, a number of which may provide new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of cancer. PMID:17001007

  4. Single-Cell-Genomics-Facilitated Read Binning of Candidate Phylum EM19 Genomes from Geothermal Spring Metagenomes.

    PubMed

    Becraft, Eric D; Dodsworth, Jeremy A; Murugapiran, Senthil K; Ohlsson, J Ingemar; Briggs, Brandon R; Kanbar, Jad; De Vlaminck, Iwijn; Quake, Stephen R; Dong, Hailiang; Hedlund, Brian P; Swingley, Wesley D

    2015-12-04

    The vast majority of microbial life remains uncatalogued due to the inability to cultivate these organisms in the laboratory. This "microbial dark matter" represents a substantial portion of the tree of life and of the populations that contribute to chemical cycling in many ecosystems. In this work, we leveraged an existing single-cell genomic data set representing the candidate bacterial phylum "Calescamantes" (EM19) to calibrate machine learning algorithms and define metagenomic bins directly from pyrosequencing reads derived from Great Boiling Spring in the U.S. Great Basin. Compared to other assembly-based methods, taxonomic binning with a read-based machine learning approach yielded final assemblies with the highest predicted genome completeness of any method tested. Read-first binning subsequently was used to extract Calescamantes bins from all metagenomes with abundant Calescamantes populations, including metagenomes from Octopus Spring and Bison Pool in Yellowstone National Park and Gongxiaoshe Spring in Yunnan Province, China. Metabolic reconstruction suggests that Calescamantes are heterotrophic, facultative anaerobes, which can utilize oxidized nitrogen sources as terminal electron acceptors for respiration in the absence of oxygen and use proteins as their primary carbon source. Despite their phylogenetic divergence, the geographically separate Calescamantes populations were highly similar in their predicted metabolic capabilities and core gene content, respiring O2, or oxidized nitrogen species for energy conservation in distant but chemically similar hot springs.

  5. Single-Cell-Genomics-Facilitated Read Binning of Candidate Phylum EM19 Genomes from Geothermal Spring Metagenomes

    PubMed Central

    Becraft, Eric D.; Dodsworth, Jeremy A.; Murugapiran, Senthil K.; Ohlsson, J. Ingemar; Briggs, Brandon R.; Kanbar, Jad; De Vlaminck, Iwijn; Quake, Stephen R.; Dong, Hailiang; Hedlund, Brian P.

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of microbial life remains uncatalogued due to the inability to cultivate these organisms in the laboratory. This “microbial dark matter” represents a substantial portion of the tree of life and of the populations that contribute to chemical cycling in many ecosystems. In this work, we leveraged an existing single-cell genomic data set representing the candidate bacterial phylum “Calescamantes” (EM19) to calibrate machine learning algorithms and define metagenomic bins directly from pyrosequencing reads derived from Great Boiling Spring in the U.S. Great Basin. Compared to other assembly-based methods, taxonomic binning with a read-based machine learning approach yielded final assemblies with the highest predicted genome completeness of any method tested. Read-first binning subsequently was used to extract Calescamantes bins from all metagenomes with abundant Calescamantes populations, including metagenomes from Octopus Spring and Bison Pool in Yellowstone National Park and Gongxiaoshe Spring in Yunnan Province, China. Metabolic reconstruction suggests that Calescamantes are heterotrophic, facultative anaerobes, which can utilize oxidized nitrogen sources as terminal electron acceptors for respiration in the absence of oxygen and use proteins as their primary carbon source. Despite their phylogenetic divergence, the geographically separate Calescamantes populations were highly similar in their predicted metabolic capabilities and core gene content, respiring O2, or oxidized nitrogen species for energy conservation in distant but chemically similar hot springs. PMID:26637598

  6. Systematic quantification of HDR and NHEJ reveals effects of locus, nuclease, and cell type on genome-editing

    PubMed Central

    Miyaoka, Yuichiro; Berman, Jennifer R.; Cooper, Samantha B.; Mayerl, Steven J.; Chan, Amanda H.; Zhang, Bin; Karlin-Neumann, George A.; Conklin, Bruce R.

    2016-01-01

    Precise genome-editing relies on the repair of sequence-specific nuclease-induced DNA nicking or double-strand breaks (DSBs) by homology-directed repair (HDR). However, nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ), an error-prone repair, acts concurrently, reducing the rate of high-fidelity edits. The identification of genome-editing conditions that favor HDR over NHEJ has been hindered by the lack of a simple method to measure HDR and NHEJ directly and simultaneously at endogenous loci. To overcome this challenge, we developed a novel, rapid, digital PCR–based assay that can simultaneously detect one HDR or NHEJ event out of 1,000 copies of the genome. Using this assay, we systematically monitored genome-editing outcomes of CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9), Cas9 nickases, catalytically dead Cas9 fused to FokI, and transcription activator–like effector nuclease at three disease-associated endogenous gene loci in HEK293T cells, HeLa cells, and human induced pluripotent stem cells. Although it is widely thought that NHEJ generally occurs more often than HDR, we found that more HDR than NHEJ was induced under multiple conditions. Surprisingly, the HDR/NHEJ ratios were highly dependent on gene locus, nuclease platform, and cell type. The new assay system, and our findings based on it, will enable mechanistic studies of genome-editing and help improve genome-editing technology. PMID:27030102

  7. Systematic quantification of HDR and NHEJ reveals effects of locus, nuclease, and cell type on genome-editing.

    PubMed

    Miyaoka, Yuichiro; Berman, Jennifer R; Cooper, Samantha B; Mayerl, Steven J; Chan, Amanda H; Zhang, Bin; Karlin-Neumann, George A; Conklin, Bruce R

    2016-03-31

    Precise genome-editing relies on the repair of sequence-specific nuclease-induced DNA nicking or double-strand breaks (DSBs) by homology-directed repair (HDR). However, nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ), an error-prone repair, acts concurrently, reducing the rate of high-fidelity edits. The identification of genome-editing conditions that favor HDR over NHEJ has been hindered by the lack of a simple method to measure HDR and NHEJ directly and simultaneously at endogenous loci. To overcome this challenge, we developed a novel, rapid, digital PCR-based assay that can simultaneously detect one HDR or NHEJ event out of 1,000 copies of the genome. Using this assay, we systematically monitored genome-editing outcomes of CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9), Cas9 nickases, catalytically dead Cas9 fused to FokI, and transcription activator-like effector nuclease at three disease-associated endogenous gene loci in HEK293T cells, HeLa cells, and human induced pluripotent stem cells. Although it is widely thought that NHEJ generally occurs more often than HDR, we found that more HDR than NHEJ was induced under multiple conditions. Surprisingly, the HDR/NHEJ ratios were highly dependent on gene locus, nuclease platform, and cell type. The new assay system, and our findings based on it, will enable mechanistic studies of genome-editing and help improve genome-editing technology.

  8. Whole-genome duplication increases tumor cell sensitivity to MPS1 inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Jemaà, Mohamed; Manic, Gwenola; Lledo, Gwendaline; Lissa, Delphine; Reynes, Christelle; Morin, Nathalie; Chibon, Frédéric; Sistigu, Antonella; Castedo, Maria; Vitale, Ilio; Kroemer, Guido; Abrieu, Ariane

    2016-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that whole-genome duplication resulting in tetraploidy facilitates carcinogenesis by providing an intermediate and metastable state more prone to generate oncogenic aneuploidy. Here, we report a novel strategy to preferentially kill tetraploid cells based on the abrogation of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) via the targeting of TTK protein kinase (better known as monopolar spindle 1, MPS1). The pharmacological inhibition as well as the knockdown of MPS1 kills more efficiently tetraploid cells than their diploid counterparts. By using time-lapse videomicroscopy, we show that tetraploid cells do not survive the aborted mitosis due to SAC abrogation upon MPS1 depletion. On the contrary diploid cells are able to survive up to at least two more cell cycles upon the same treatment. This effect might reflect the enhanced difficulty of cells with whole-genome doubling to tolerate a further increase in ploidy and/or an elevated level of chromosome instability in the absence of SAC functions. We further show that MPS1-inhibited tetraploid cells promote mitotic catastrophe executed by the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis, as indicated by the loss of mitochondrial potential, the release of the pro-apoptotic cytochrome c from mitochondria, and the activation of caspases. Altogether, our results suggest that MPS1 inhibition could be used as a therapeutic strategy for targeting tetraploid cancer cells. PMID:26637805

  9. U87MG Decoded: The Genomic Sequence of a Cytogenetically Aberrant Human Cancer Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Eskin, Ascia; Lee, Hane; Merriman, Barry; Nelson, Stanley F.

    2010-01-01

    U87MG is a commonly studied grade IV glioma cell line that has been analyzed in at least 1,700 publications over four decades. In order to comprehensively characterize the genome of this cell line and to serve as a model of broad cancer genome sequencing, we have generated greater than 30× genomic sequence coverage using a novel 50-base mate paired strategy with a 1.4kb mean insert library. A total of 1,014,984,286 mate-end and 120,691,623 single-end two-base encoded reads were generated from five slides. All data were aligned using a custom designed tool called BFAST, allowing optimal color space read alignment and accurate identification of DNA variants. The aligned sequence reads and mate-pair information identified 35 interchromosomal translocation events, 1,315 structural variations (>100 bp), 191,743 small (<21 bp) insertions and deletions (indels), and 2,384,470 single nucleotide variations (SNVs). Among these observations, the known homozygous mutation in PTEN was robustly identified, and genes involved in cell adhesion were overrepresented in the mutated gene list. Data were compared to 219,187 heterozygous single nucleotide polymorphisms assayed by Illumina 1M Duo genotyping array to assess accuracy: 93.83% of all SNPs were reliably detected at filtering thresholds that yield greater than 99.99% sequence accuracy. Protein coding sequences were disrupted predominantly in this cancer cell line due to small indels, large deletions, and translocations. In total, 512 genes were homozygously mutated, including 154 by SNVs, 178 by small indels, 145 by large microdeletions, and 35 by interchromosomal translocations to reveal a highly mutated cell line genome. Of the small homozygously mutated variants, 8 SNVs and 99 indels were novel events not present in dbSNP. These data demonstrate that routine generation of broad cancer genome sequence is possible outside of genome centers. The sequence analysis of U87MG provides an unparalleled level of mutational

  10. Comprehensive red blood cell and platelet antigen prediction from whole genome sequencing: proof of principle

    PubMed Central

    Westhoff, Connie M.; Uy, Jon Michael; Aguad, Maria; Smeland‐Wagman, Robin; Kaufman, Richard M.; Rehm, Heidi L.; Green, Robert C.; Silberstein, Leslie E.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND There are 346 serologically defined red blood cell (RBC) antigens and 33 serologically defined platelet (PLT) antigens, most of which have known genetic changes in 45 RBC or six PLT genes that correlate with antigen expression. Polymorphic sites associated with antigen expression in the primary literature and reference databases are annotated according to nucleotide positions in cDNA. This makes antigen prediction from next‐generation sequencing data challenging, since it uses genomic coordinates. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS The conventional cDNA reference sequences for all known RBC and PLT genes that correlate with antigen expression were aligned to the human reference genome. The alignments allowed conversion of conventional cDNA nucleotide positions to the corresponding genomic coordinates. RBC and PLT antigen prediction was then performed using the human reference genome and whole genome sequencing (WGS) data with serologic confirmation. RESULTS Some major differences and alignment issues were found when attempting to convert the conventional cDNA to human reference genome sequences for the following genes: ABO, A4GALT, RHD, RHCE, FUT3, ACKR1 (previously DARC), ACHE, FUT2, CR1, GCNT2, and RHAG. However, it was possible to create usable alignments, which facilitated the prediction of all RBC and PLT antigens with a known molecular basis from WGS data. Traditional serologic typing for 18 RBC antigens were in agreement with the WGS‐based antigen predictions, providing proof of principle for this approach. CONCLUSION Detailed mapping of conventional cDNA annotated RBC and PLT alleles can enable accurate prediction of RBC and PLT antigens from whole genomic sequencing data. PMID:26634332

  11. InsectBase: a resource for insect genomes and transcriptomes.

    PubMed

    Yin, Chuanlin; Shen, Gengyu; Guo, Dianhao; Wang, Shuping; Ma, Xingzhou; Xiao, Huamei; Liu, Jinding; Zhang, Zan; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Yiqun; Yu, Kaixiang; Huang, Shuiqing; Li, Fei

    2016-01-04

    The genomes and transcriptomes of hundreds of insects have been sequenced. However, insect community lacks an integrated, up-to-date collection of insect gene data. Here, we introduce the first release of InsectBase, available online at http://www.insect-genome.com. The database encompasses 138 insect genomes, 116 insect transcriptomes, 61 insect gene sets, 36 gene families of 60 insects, 7544 miRNAs of 69 insects, 96,925 piRNAs of Drosophila melanogaster and Chilo suppressalis, 2439 lncRNA of Nilaparvata lugens, 22,536 pathways of 78 insects, 678,881 untranslated regions (UTR) of 84 insects and 160,905 coding sequences (CDS) of 70 insects. This release contains over 12 million sequences and provides search functionality, a BLAST server, GBrowse, insect pathway construction, a Facebook-like network for the insect community (iFacebook), and phylogenetic analysis of selected genes.

  12. InsectBase: a resource for insect genomes and transcriptomes

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Chuanlin; Shen, Gengyu; Guo, Dianhao; Wang, Shuping; Ma, Xingzhou; Xiao, Huamei; Liu, Jinding; Zhang, Zan; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Yiqun; Yu, Kaixiang; Huang, Shuiqing; Li, Fei

    2016-01-01

    The genomes and transcriptomes of hundreds of insects have been sequenced. However, insect community lacks an integrated, up-to-date collection of insect gene data. Here, we introduce the first release of InsectBase, available online at http://www.insect-genome.com. The database encompasses 138 insect genomes, 116 insect transcriptomes, 61 insect gene sets, 36 gene families of 60 insects, 7544 miRNAs of 69 insects, 96 925 piRNAs of Drosophila melanogaster and Chilo suppressalis, 2439 lncRNA of Nilaparvata lugens, 22 536 pathways of 78 insects, 678 881 untranslated regions (UTR) of 84 insects and 160 905 coding sequences (CDS) of 70 insects. This release contains over 12 million sequences and provides search functionality, a BLAST server, GBrowse, insect pathway construction, a Facebook-like network for the insect community (iFacebook), and phylogenetic analysis of selected genes. PMID:26578584

  13. CFGP: a web-based, comparative fungal genomics platform.

    PubMed

    Park, Jongsun; Park, Bongsoo; Jung, Kyongyong; Jang, Suwang; Yu, Kwangyul; Choi, Jaeyoung; Kong, Sunghyung; Park, Jaejin; Kim, Seryun; Kim, Hyojeong; Kim, Soonok; Kim, Jihyun F; Blair, Jaime E; Lee, Kwangwon; Kang, Seogchan; Lee, Yong-Hwan

    2008-01-01

    Since the completion of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome sequencing project in 1996, the genomes of over 80 fungal species have been sequenced or are currently being sequenced. Resulting data provide opportunities for studying and comparing fungal biology and evolution at the genome level. To support such studies, the Comparative Fungal Genomics Platform (CFGP; http://cfgp.snu.ac.kr), a web-based multifunctional informatics workbench, was developed. The CFGP comprises three layers, including the basal layer, middleware and the user interface. The data warehouse in the basal layer contains standardized genome sequences of 65 fungal species. The middleware processes queries via six analysis tools, including BLAST, ClustalW, InterProScan, SignalP 3.0, PSORT II and a newly developed tool named BLASTMatrix. The BLASTMatrix permits the identification and visualization of genes homologous to a query across multiple species. The Data-driven User Interface (DUI) of the CFGP was built on a new concept of pre-collecting data and post-executing analysis instead of the 'fill-in-the-form-and-press-SUBMIT' user interfaces utilized by most bioinformatics sites. A tool termed Favorite, which supports the management of encapsulated sequence data and provides a personalized data repository to users, is another novel feature in the DUI.

  14. Global Genomic Diversity of Human Papillomavirus 11 Based on 433 Isolates and 78 Complete Genome Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Jelen, Mateja M.; Chen, Zigui; Kocjan, Boštjan J.; Hošnjak, Lea; Burt, Felicity J.; Chan, Paul K. S.; Chouhy, Diego; Combrinck, Catharina E.; Estrade, Christine; Fiander, Alison; Garland, Suzanne M.; Giri, Adriana A.; González, Joaquín Víctor; Gröning, Arndt; Hibbitts, Sam; Luk, Tommy N. M.; Marinic, Karina; Matsukura, Toshihiko; Neumann, Anna; Oštrbenk, Anja; Picconi, Maria Alejandra; Sagadin, Martin; Sahli, Roland; Seedat, Riaz Y.; Seme, Katja; Severini, Alberto; Sinchi, Jessica L.; Smahelova, Jana; Tabrizi, Sepehr N.; Tachezy, Ruth; Tohme Faybush, Sarah; Uloza, Virgilijus; Uloziene, Ingrida; Wong, Yong Wee; Židovec Lepej, Snježana; Burk, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human papillomavirus 11 (HPV11) is an etiological agent of anogenital warts and laryngeal papillomas and is included in the 4-valent and 9-valent prophylactic HPV vaccines. We established the largest collection of globally circulating HPV11 isolates to date and examined the genomic diversity of 433 isolates and 78 complete genomes (CGs) from six continents. The genomic variation within the 2,800-bp E5a-E5b-L1-upstream regulatory region was initially studied in 181/207 (87.4%) HPV11 isolates collected for this study. Of these, the CGs of 30 HPV11 variants containing unique single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), indels (insertions or deletions), or amino acid changes were fully sequenced. A maximum likelihood tree based on the global alignment of 78 HPV11 CGs (30 CGs from our study and 48 CGs from GenBank) revealed two HPV11 lineages (lineages A and B) and four sublineages (sublineages A1, A2, A3, and A4). HPV11 (sub)lineage-specific SNPs within the CG were identified, as well as the 208-bp representative region for CG-based phylogenetic clustering within the partial E2 open reading frame and noncoding region 2. Globally, sublineage A2 was the most prevalent, followed by sublineages A1, A3, and A4 and lineage B. IMPORTANCE This collaborative international study defined the global heterogeneity of HPV11 and established the largest collection of globally circulating HPV11 genomic variants to date. Thirty novel complete HPV11 genomes were determined and submitted to the available sequence repositories. Global phylogenetic analysis revealed two HPV11 variant lineages and four sublineages. The HPV11 (sub)lineage-specific SNPs and the representative region identified within the partial genomic region E2/noncoding region 2 (NCR2) will enable the simpler identification and comparison of HPV11 variants worldwide. This study provides an important knowledge base for HPV11 for future studies in HPV epidemiology, evolution, pathogenicity, prevention, and molecular assay

  15. Global Genomic Diversity of Human Papillomavirus 11 Based on 433 Isolates and 78 Complete Genome Sequences.

    PubMed

    Jelen, Mateja M; Chen, Zigui; Kocjan, Boštjan J; Hošnjak, Lea; Burt, Felicity J; Chan, Paul K S; Chouhy, Diego; Combrinck, Catharina E; Estrade, Christine; Fiander, Alison; Garland, Suzanne M; Giri, Adriana A; González, Joaquín Víctor; Gröning, Arndt; Hibbitts, Sam; Luk, Tommy N M; Marinic, Karina; Matsukura, Toshihiko; Neumann, Anna; Oštrbenk, Anja; Picconi, Maria Alejandra; Sagadin, Martin; Sahli, Roland; Seedat, Riaz Y; Seme, Katja; Severini, Alberto; Sinchi, Jessica L; Smahelova, Jana; Tabrizi, Sepehr N; Tachezy, Ruth; Tohme Faybush, Sarah; Uloza, Virgilijus; Uloziene, Ingrida; Wong, Yong Wee; Židovec Lepej, Snježana; Burk, Robert D; Poljak, Mario

    2016-06-01

    Human papillomavirus 11 (HPV11) is an etiological agent of anogenital warts and laryngeal papillomas and is included in the 4-valent and 9-valent prophylactic HPV vaccines. We established the largest collection of globally circulating HPV11 isolates to date and examined the genomic diversity of 433 isolates and 78 complete genomes (CGs) from six continents. The genomic variation within the 2,800-bp E5a-E5b-L1-upstream regulatory region was initially studied in 181/207 (87.4%) HPV11 isolates collected for this study. Of these, the CGs of 30 HPV11 variants containing unique single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), indels (insertions or deletions), or amino acid changes were fully sequenced. A maximum likelihood tree based on the global alignment of 78 HPV11 CGs (30 CGs from our study and 48 CGs from GenBank) revealed two HPV11 lineages (lineages A and B) and four sublineages (sublineages A1, A2, A3, and A4). HPV11 (sub)lineage-specific SNPs within the CG were identified, as well as the 208-bp representative region for CG-based phylogenetic clustering within the partial E2 open reading frame and noncoding region 2. Globally, sublineage A2 was the most prevalent, followed by sublineages A1, A3, and A4 and lineage B. This collaborative international study defined the global heterogeneity of HPV11 and established the largest collection of globally circulating HPV11 genomic variants to date. Thirty novel complete HPV11 genomes were determined and submitted to the available sequence repositories. Global phylogenetic analysis revealed two HPV11 variant lineages and four sublineages. The HPV11 (sub)lineage-specific SNPs and the representative region identified within the partial genomic region E2/noncoding region 2 (NCR2) will enable the simpler identification and comparison of HPV11 variants worldwide. This study provides an important knowledge base for HPV11 for future studies in HPV epidemiology, evolution, pathogenicity, prevention, and molecular assay development

  16. Retinoic acid signaling and mouse embryonic stem cell differentiation: Cross talk between genomic and non-genomic effects of RA.

    PubMed

    Rochette-Egly, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), the active derivative of vitamin A, a fat-soluble vitamin, plays key roles in cell growth and differentiation by activating nuclear receptors, RARs (α, β and γ), which are ligand dependent regulators of transcription. The past years highlighted several novelties in the field that increased the complexity of RA effects. Indeed, in addition to its classical genomic effects, RA also has extranuclear and non-transcriptional effects. RA induces the rapid and transient activation of kinase cascades, which are integrated in the nucleus via the phosphorylation of RARs at a conserved serine residue located in the N-terminal domain and their coregulators. In order to investigate the relevance of RARs' phosphorylation in cell differentiation, mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells were used as a model. When treated with RA, these pluripotent cells give rise to neuronal cells. Cells invalidated for each RAR were generated as well as stable rescue lines expressing RARs mutated in phosphor acceptor sites. Such a strategy revealed that RA-induced neuronal differentiation involves the RARγ2 subtype and requires RARγ2 phosphorylation. Moreover, in gene expression profiling experiments, the phosphorylated form of RARγ2 was found to regulate a small subset of genes through binding a novel RA response element consisting of two direct repeats with a 7 base pair spacer. These new findings suggest an important role for RAR phosphorylation during cell differentiation, and pave the way for further investigations with other cell types and during embryonic development. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Linking transcription to physiology in lipodomics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. INTEGRATED GENOME-BASED STUDIES OF SHEWANELLA ECOPHYSIOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    NEALSON, KENNETH H.

    2013-10-15

    laboratories. Applications: 1. Corrosion: Electron flow is often part of the corrosive process, and several studies were done in concert with this proposal with regard to the ability of EET-capable bacteria to enhance, inhibit, or detect corrosion. These included using EET-capable bacteria to detect corrosion in its earliest stages [5], to use corrosion-causing bacteria for the study of the microbe/mineral interface during corrosion [1], and to study the groups of microbes involved with corrosion of natural systems [19]. 2. Bioenergy and microbial fuel cells: The production of electricity by Shewanella was shown early in this program (several years ago) to be dependent on the genes for extracellular electron transport (EET), and applied work involved the testing of various strains and conditions for the optimization of current production by the shewanellae [11,14,16]. 3. Identification of shewanellae strains: Based on similarities seen in genomic comparisons, a rapid method was employed for distinguishing between shewanellae strains [17]. Interactions with other laboratories: This grant was an extension of a grant involving the so-called ?Shewanella Federation?, and as such, a number of our publications were joint with other members of this group. The groups included: 1. Pacific Northwest Laboratories ? 2. Oak Ridge National Labs 3. Michigan State University 4. University of Oklahoma 5. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington DC 6. Burnham Medical Research Institute, San Diego 7. J. Craig Venter Institute, San Diego Education: Graduate Students: Michael Waters, Ph.D. ? at NIST, Washington D.C. Lewis Hsu, Ph.D. ? at NRL, San Diego Howard Harris, Ph.D. ? Postdoc at University, France Everett Salas, Ph.D. ? Scientist at Chevron McLean, Jeffrey, Ph.D. ? Scientist at J. Craig Venter Institute McCrow, John, Ph.D. ? Scientist at J. Craig Venter Institute Postdocs: Mohamed El-Naggar ? Professor of Physics, USC Jinjun Kan ? Senior Researcher at Undergraduatges: During this year, we had

  18. Genome wide profiling of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), their derivatives and embryonal carcinoma cells to develop base profiles of U.S. Federal government approved hESC lines.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Shin, Soojung; Zeng, Xianmin; Zhan, Ming; Gonzalez, Rodolfo; Mueller, Franz-Josef; Schwartz, Catherine M; Xue, Haipeng; Li, Huai; Baker, Shawn C; Chudin, Eugene; Barker, David L; McDaniel, Timothy K; Oeser, Steffen; Loring, Jeanne F; Mattson, Mark P; Rao, Mahendra S

    2006-05-03

    In order to compare the gene expression profiles of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines and their differentiated progeny and to monitor feeder contaminations, we have examined gene expression in seven hESC lines and human fibroblast feeder cells using Illumina bead arrays that contain probes for 24,131 transcript probes. A total of 48 different samples (including duplicates) grown in multiple laboratories under different conditions were analyzed and pairwise comparisons were performed in all groups. Hierarchical clustering showed that blinded duplicates were correctly identified as the closest related samples. hESC lines clustered together irrespective of the laboratory in which they were maintained. hESCs could be readily distinguished from embryoid bodies (EB) differentiated from them and the karyotypically abnormal hESC line BG01V. The embryonal carcinoma (EC) line NTera2 is a useful model for evaluating characteristics of hESCs. Expression of subsets of individual genes was validated by comparing with published databases, MPSS (Massively Parallel Signature Sequencing) libraries, and parallel analysis by microarray and RT-PCR. we show that Illumina's bead array platform is a reliable, reproducible and robust method for developing base global profiles of cells and identifying similarities and differences in large number of samples.

  19. Genome wide profiling of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), their derivatives and embryonal carcinoma cells to develop base profiles of U.S. Federal government approved hESC lines

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Shin, Soojung; Zeng, Xianmin; Zhan, Ming; Gonzalez, Rodolfo; Mueller, Franz-Josef; Schwartz, Catherine M; Xue, Haipeng; Li, Huai; Baker, Shawn C; Chudin, Eugene; Barker, David L; McDaniel, Timothy K; Oeser, Steffen; Loring, Jeanne F; Mattson, Mark P; Rao, Mahendra S

    2006-01-01

    Background In order to compare the gene expression profiles of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines and their differentiated progeny and to monitor feeder contaminations, we have examined gene expression in seven hESC lines and human fibroblast feeder cells using Illumina® bead arrays that contain probes for 24,131 transcript probes. Results A total of 48 different samples (including duplicates) grown in multiple laboratories under different conditions were analyzed and pairwise comparisons were performed in all groups. Hierarchical clustering showed that blinded duplicates were correctly identified as the closest related samples. hESC lines clustered together irrespective of the laboratory in which they were maintained. hESCs could be readily distinguished from embryoid bodies (EB) differentiated from them and the karyotypically abnormal hESC line BG01V. The embryonal carcinoma (EC) line NTera2 is a useful model for evaluating characteristics of hESCs. Expression of subsets of individual genes was validated by comparing with published databases, MPSS (Massively Parallel Signature Sequencing) libraries, and parallel analysis by microarray and RT-PCR. Conclusion we show that Illumina's bead array platform is a reliable, reproducible and robust method for developing base global profiles of cells and identifying similarities and differences in large number of samples. PMID:16672070

  20. Comprehensive genomic characterization of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The Cancer Genome Atlas profiled 279 head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) to provide a comprehensive landscape of somatic genomic alterations. We find that human papillomavirus-associated (HPV) tumors are dominated by helicase domain mutations of the oncogene PIK3CA, novel alterations involving loss of TRAF3, and amplification of the cell cycle gene E2F1. Smoking-related HNSCCs demonstrate near universal loss of TP53 mutations and CDKN2A with frequent copy number alterations including a novel amplification of 11q22. A subgroup of oral cavity tumors with favorable clinical outcomes displayed infrequent CNAs in conjunction with activating mutations of HRAS or PIK3CA, coupled with inactivating mutations of CASP8, NOTCH1 and wild-type TP53. Other distinct subgroups harbored novel loss of function alterations of the chromatin modifier NSD1, Wnt pathway genes AJUBA and FAT1, and activation of oxidative stress factor NFE2L2, mainly in laryngeal tumors. Therapeutic candidate alterations were identified in the majority of HNSCC's. PMID:25631445

  1. Comprehensive genomic characterization of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    2015-01-29

    The Cancer Genome Atlas profiled 279 head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) to provide a comprehensive landscape of somatic genomic alterations. Here we show that human-papillomavirus-associated tumours are dominated by helical domain mutations of the oncogene PIK3CA, novel alterations involving loss of TRAF3, and amplification of the cell cycle gene E2F1. Smoking-related HNSCCs demonstrate near universal loss-of-function TP53 mutations and CDKN2A inactivation with frequent copy number alterations including amplification of 3q26/28 and 11q13/22. A subgroup of oral cavity tumours with favourable clinical outcomes displayed infrequent copy number alterations in conjunction with activating mutations of HRAS or PIK3CA, coupled with inactivating mutations of CASP8, NOTCH1 and TP53. Other distinct subgroups contained loss-of-function alterations of the chromatin modifier NSD1, WNT pathway genes AJUBA and FAT1, and activation of oxidative stress factor NFE2L2, mainly in laryngeal tumours. Therapeutic candidate alterations were identified in most HNSCCs.

  2. Mutational and structural analysis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma using whole-genome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Morin, Ryan D.; Mungall, Karen; Pleasance, Erin; Mungall, Andrew J.; Goya, Rodrigo; Huff, Ryan D.; Scott, David W.; Ding, Jiarui; Roth, Andrew; Chiu, Readman; Corbett, Richard D.; Chan, Fong Chun; Mendez-Lago, Maria; Trinh, Diane L.; Bolger-Munro, Madison; Taylor, Greg; Hadj Khodabakhshi, Alireza; Ben-Neriah, Susana; Pon, Julia; Meissner, Barbara; Woolcock, Bruce; Farnoud, Noushin; Rogic, Sanja; Lim, Emilia L.; Johnson, Nathalie A.; Shah, Sohrab; Jones, Steven; Steidl, Christian; Holt, Robert; Birol, Inanc; Moore, Richard; Connors, Joseph M.; Gascoyne, Randy D.

    2013-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is a genetically heterogeneous cancer composed of at least 2 molecular subtypes that differ in gene expression and distribution of mutations. Recently, application of genome/exome sequencing and RNA-seq to DLBCL has revealed numerous genes that are recurrent targets of somatic point mutation in this disease. Here we provide a whole-genome-sequencing-based perspective of DLBCL mutational complexity by characterizing 40 de novo DLBCL cases and 13 DLBCL cell lines and combining these data with DNA copy number analysis and RNA-seq from an extended cohort of 96 cases. Our analysis identified widespread genomic rearrangements including evidence for chromothripsis as well as the presence of known and novel fusion transcripts. We uncovered new gene targets of recurrent somatic point mutations and genes that are targeted by focal somatic deletions in this disease. We highlight the recurrence of germinal center B-cell-restricted mutations affecting genes that encode the S1P receptor and 2 small GTPases (GNA13 and GNAI2) that together converge on regulation of B-cell homing. We further analyzed our data to approximate the relative temporal order in which some recurrent mutations were acquired and demonstrate that ongoing acquisition of mutations and intratumoral clonal heterogeneity are common features of DLBCL. This study further improves our understanding of the processes and pathways involved in lymphomagenesis, and some of the pathways mutated here may indicate new avenues for therapeutic intervention. PMID:23699601

  3. Modeling Human Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes Using Pluripotent Stem Cells and Genome Engineering.

    PubMed

    Jung, Moonjung; Dunbar, Cynthia E; Winkler, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    The combination of epigenetic reprogramming with advanced genome editing technologies opened a new avenue to study disease mechanisms, particularly of disorders with depleted target tissue. Bone marrow failure syndromes (BMFS) typically present with a marked reduction of peripheral blood cells due to a destroyed or dysfunctional bone marrow compartment. Somatic and germline mutations have been etiologically linked to many cases of BMFS. However, without the ability to study primary patient material, the exact pathogenesis for many entities remained fragmentary. Capturing the pathological genotype in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) allows studying potential developmental defects leading to a particular phenotype. The lack of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in these patients can also be overcome by differentiating patient-derived iPSCs into hematopoietic lineages. With fast growing genome editing techniques, such as CRISPR/Cas9, correction of disease-causing mutations in iPSCs or introduction of mutations in cells from healthy individuals enable comparative studies that may identify other genetic or epigenetic events contributing to a specific disease phenotype. In this review, we present recent progresses in disease modeling of inherited and acquired BMFS using reprogramming and genome editing techniques. We also discuss the challenges and potential shortcomings of iPSC-based models for hematological diseases.

  4. Use of genome-editing tools to treat sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Tasan, Ipek; Jain, Surbhi; Zhao, Huimin

    2016-09-01

    Recent advances in genome-editing techniques have made it possible to modify any desired DNA sequence by employing programmable nucleases. These next-generation genome-modifying tools are the ideal candidates for therapeutic applications, especially for the treatment of genetic disorders like sickle cell disease (SCD). SCD is an inheritable monogenic disorder which is caused by a point mutation in the β-globin gene. Substantial success has been achieved in the development of supportive therapeutic strategies for SCD, but unfortunately there is still a lack of long-term universal cure. The only existing curative treatment is based on allogeneic stem cell transplantation from healthy donors; however, this treatment is applicable to a limited number of patients only. Hence, a universally applicable therapy is highly desirable. In this review, we will discuss the three programmable nucleases that are commonly used for genome-editing purposes: zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (CRISPR/Cas9). We will continue by exemplifying uses of these methods to correct the sickle cell mutation. Additionally, we will present induction of fetal globin expression as an alternative approach to cure sickle cell disease. We will conclude by comparing the three methods and explaining the concerns about their use in therapy.

  5. Site-Specific Genome Engineering in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Merkert, Sylvia; Martin, Ulrich

    2016-06-24

    The possibility to generate patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) offers an unprecedented potential of applications in clinical therapy and medical research. Human iPSCs and their differentiated derivatives are tools for diseases modelling, drug discovery, safety pharmacology, and toxicology. Moreover, they allow for the engineering of bioartificial tissue and are promising candidates for cellular therapies. For many of these applications, the ability to genetically modify pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) is indispensable, but efficient site-specific and safe technologies for genetic engineering of PSCs were developed only recently. By now, customized engineered nucleases provide excellent tools for targeted genome editing, opening new perspectives for biomedical research and cellular therapies.

  6. Site-Specific Genome Engineering in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Merkert, Sylvia; Martin, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The possibility to generate patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) offers an unprecedented potential of applications in clinical therapy and medical research. Human iPSCs and their differentiated derivatives are tools for diseases modelling, drug discovery, safety pharmacology, and toxicology. Moreover, they allow for the engineering of bioartificial tissue and are promising candidates for cellular therapies. For many of these applications, the ability to genetically modify pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) is indispensable, but efficient site-specific and safe technologies for genetic engineering of PSCs were developed only recently. By now, customized engineered nucleases provide excellent tools for targeted genome editing, opening new perspectives for biomedical research and cellular therapies. PMID:27347935

  7. Dissecting diabetes/metabolic disease mechanisms using pluripotent stem cells and genome editing tools

    PubMed Central

    Teo, Adrian Kee Keong; Gupta, Manoj K.; Doria, Alessandro; Kulkarni, Rohit N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetes and metabolic syndromes are chronic, devastating diseases with increasing prevalence. Human pluripotent stem cells are gaining popularity in their usage for human in vitro disease modeling. With recent rapid advances in genome editing tools, these cells can now be genetically manipulated with relative ease to study how genes and gene variants contribute to diabetes and metabolic syndromes. Scope of review We highlight the diabetes and metabolic genes and gene variants, which could potentially be studied, using two powerful technologies – human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) and genome editing tools – to aid the elucidation of yet elusive mechanisms underlying these complex diseases. Major conclusions hPSCs and the advancing genome editing tools appear to be a timely and potent combination for probing molecular mechanism(s) underlying diseases such as diabetes and metabolic syndromes. The knowledge gained from these hiPSC-based disease modeling studies can potentially be translated into the clinics by guiding clinicians on the appropriate type of medication to use for each condition based on the mechanism of action of the disease. PMID:26413465

  8. Effect of amino acid supplementation on titer and glycosylation distribution in hybridoma cell cultures-Systems biology-based interpretation using genome-scale metabolic flux balance model and multivariate data analysis.

    PubMed

    Reimonn, Thomas M; Park, Seo-Young; Agarabi, Cyrus D; Brorson, Kurt A; Yoon, Seongkyu

    2016-09-01

    Genome-scale flux balance analysis (FBA) is a powerful systems biology tool to characterize intracellular reaction fluxes during cell cultures. FBA estimates intracellular reaction rates by optimizing an objective function, subject to the constraints of a metabolic model and media uptake/excretion rates. A dynamic extension to FBA, dynamic flux balance analysis (DFBA), can calculate intracellular reaction fluxes as they change during cell cultures. In a previous study by Read et al. (2013), a series of informed amino acid supplementation experiments were performed on twelve parallel murine hybridoma cell cultures, and this data was leveraged for further analysis (Read et al., Biotechnol Prog. 2013;29:745-753). In order to understand the effects of media changes on the model murine hybridoma cell line, a systems biology approach is applied in the current study. Dynamic flux balance analysis was performed using a genome-scale mouse metabolic model, and multivariate data analysis was used for interpretation. The calculated reaction fluxes were examined using partial least squares and partial least squares discriminant analysis. The results indicate media supplementation increases product yield because it raises nutrient levels extending the growth phase, and the increased cell density allows for greater culture performance. At the same time, the directed supplementation does not change the overall metabolism of the cells. This supports the conclusion that product quality, as measured by glycoform assays, remains unchanged because the metabolism remains in a similar state. Additionally, the DFBA shows that metabolic state varies more at the beginning of the culture but less by the middle of the growth phase, possibly due to stress on the cells during inoculation. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:1163-1173, 2016.

  9. CRISPR-based screening of genomic island excision events in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Selle, Kurt; Klaenhammer, Todd R; Barrangou, Rodolphe

    2015-06-30

    Genomic analysis of Streptococcus thermophilus revealed that mobile genetic elements (MGEs) likely contributed to gene acquisition and loss during evolutionary adaptation to milk. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR-associated genes (CRISPR-Cas), the adaptive immune system in bacteria, limits genetic diversity by targeting MGEs including bacteriophages, transposons, and plasmids. CRISPR-Cas systems are widespread in streptococci, suggesting that the interplay between CRISPR-Cas systems and MGEs is one of the driving forces governing genome homeostasis in this genus. To investigate the genetic outcomes resulting from CRISPR-Cas targeting of integrated MGEs, in silico prediction revealed four genomic islands without essential genes in lengths from 8 to 102 kbp, totaling 7% of the genome. In this study, the endogenous CRISPR3 type II system was programmed to target the four islands independently through plasmid-based expression of engineered CRISPR arrays. Targeting lacZ within the largest 102-kbp genomic island was lethal to wild-type cells and resulted in a reduction of up to 2.5-log in the surviving population. Genotyping of Lac(-) survivors revealed variable deletion events between the flanking insertion-sequence elements, all resulting in elimination of the Lac-encoding island. Chimeric insertion sequence footprints were observed at the deletion junctions after targeting all of the four genomic islands, suggesting a common mechanism of deletion via recombination between flanking insertion sequences. These results established that self-targeting CRISPR-Cas systems may direct significant evolution of bacterial genomes on a population level, influencing genome homeostasis and remodeling.

  10. Maintenance of Genome Integrity: How Mammalian Cells Orchestrate Genome Duplication by Coordinating Replicative and Specialized DNA Polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Ryan; Eckert, Kristin

    2017-01-01

    Precise duplication of the human genome is challenging due to both its size and sequence complexity. DNA polymerase errors made during replication, repair or recombination are central to creating mutations that drive cancer and aging. Here, we address the regulation of human DNA polymerases, specifically how human cells orchestrate DNA polymerases in the face of stress to complete replication and maintain genome stability. DNA polymerases of the B-family are uniquely adept at accurate genome replication, but there are numerous situations in which one or more additional DNA polymerases are required to complete genome replication. Polymerases of the Y-family have been extensively studied in the bypass of DNA lesions; however, recent research has revealed that these polymerases play important roles in normal human physiology. Replication stress is widely cited as contributing to genome instability, and is caused by conditions leading to slowed or stalled DNA replication. Common Fragile Sites epitomize “difficult to replicate” genome regions that are particularly vulnerable to replication stress, and are associated with DNA breakage and structural variation. In this review, we summarize the roles of both the replicative and Y-family polymerases in human cells, and focus on how these activities are regulated during normal and perturbed genome replication. PMID:28067843

  11. Maintenance of Genome Integrity: How Mammalian Cells Orchestrate Genome Duplication by Coordinating Replicative and Specialized DNA Polymerases.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Ryan; Eckert, Kristin

    2017-01-06

    Precise duplication of the human genome is challenging due to both its size and sequence complexity. DNA polymerase errors made during replication, repair or recombination are central to creating mutations that drive cancer and aging. Here, we address the regulation of human DNA polymerases, specifically how human cells orchestrate DNA polymerases in the face of stress to complete replication and maintain genome stability. DNA polymerases of the B-family are uniquely adept at accurate genome replication, but there are numerous situations in which one or more additional DNA polymerases are required to complete genome replication. Polymerases of the Y-family have been extensively studied in the bypass of DNA lesions; however, recent research has revealed that these polymerases play important roles in normal human physiology. Replication stress is widely cited as contributing to genome instability, and is caused by conditions leading to slowed or stalled DNA replication. Common Fragile Sites epitomize "difficult to replicate" genome regions that are particularly vulnerable to replication stress, and are associated with DNA breakage and structural variation. In this review, we summarize the roles of both the replicative and Y-family polymerases in human cells, and focus on how these activities are regulated during normal and perturbed genome replication.

  12. Combining magnetic sorting of mother cells and fluctuation tests to analyze genome instability during mitotic cell aging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Melissa N; Maxwell, Patrick H

    2014-10-16

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been an excellent model system for examining mechanisms and consequences of genome instability. Information gained from this yeast model is relevant to many organisms, including humans, since DNA repair and DNA damage response factors are well conserved across diverse species. However, S. cerevisiae has not yet been used to fully address whether the rate of accumulating mutations changes with increasing replicative (mitotic) age due to technical constraints. For instance, measurements of yeast replicative lifespan through micromanipulation involve very small populations of cells, which prohibit detection of rare mutations. Genetic methods to enrich for mother cells in populations by inducing death of daughter cells have been developed, but population sizes are still limited by the frequency with which random mutations that compromise the selection systems occur. The current protocol takes advantage of magnetic sorting of surface-labeled yeast mother cells to obtain large enough populations of aging mother cells to quantify rare mutations through phenotypic selections. Mutation rates, measured through fluctuation tests, and mutation frequencies are first established for young cells and used to predict the frequency of mutations in mother cells of various replicative ages. Mutation frequencies are then determined for sorted mother cells, and the age of the mother cells is determined using flow cytometry by staining with a fluorescent reagent that detects bud scars formed on their cell surfaces during cell division. Comparison of predicted mutation frequencies based on the number of cell divisions to the frequencies experimentally observed for mother cells of a given replicative age can then identify whether there are age-related changes in the rate of accumulating mutations. Variations of this basic protocol provide the means to investigate the influence of alterations in specific gene functions or specific environmental conditions on

  13. Symposium on single cell analysis and genomic approaches, Experimental Biology 2017 Chicago, Illinois, April 23, 2017.

    PubMed

    Coller, Hilary A

    2017-09-01

    Emerging technologies for the analysis of genome-wide information in single cells have the potential to transform many fields of biology, including our understanding of cell states, the response of cells to external stimuli, mosaicism, and intratumor heterogeneity. At Experimental Biology 2017 in Chicago, Physiological Genomics hosted a symposium in which five leaders in the field of single cell genomics presented their recent research. The speakers discussed emerging methodologies in single cell analysis and critical issues for the analysis of single cell data. Also discussed were applications of single cell genomics to understanding the different types of cells within an organism or tissue and the basis for cell-to-cell variability in response to stimuli. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Cryptosporidium as a testbed for single cell genome characterization of unicellular eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Troell, Karin; Hallström, Björn; Divne, Anna-Maria; Alsmark, Cecilia; Arrighi, Romanico; Huss, Mikael; Beser, Jessica; Bertilsson, Stefan

    2016-06-23

    Infectious disease involving multiple genetically distinct populations of pathogens is frequently concurrent, but difficult to detect or describe with current routine methodology. Cryptosporidium sp. is a widespread gastrointestinal protozoan of global significance in both animals and humans. It cannot be easily maintained in culture and infections of multiple strains have been reported. To explore the potential use of single cell genomics methodology for revealing genome-level variation in clinical samples from Cryptosporidium-infected hosts, we sorted individual oocysts for subsequent genome amplification and full-genome sequencing. Cells were identified with fluorescent antibodies with an 80 % success rate for the entire single cell genomics workflow, demonstrating that the methodology can be applied directly to purified fecal samples. Ten amplified genomes from sorted single cells were selected for genome sequencing and compared both to the original population and a reference genome in order to evaluate the accuracy and performance of the method. Single cell genome coverage was on average 81 % even with a moderate sequencing effort and by combining the 10 single cell genomes, the full genome was accounted for. By a comparison to the original sample, biological variation could be distinguished and separated from noise introduced in the amplification. As a proof of principle, we have demonstrated the power of applying single cell genomics to dissect infectious disease caused by closely related parasite species or subtypes. The workflow can easily be expanded and adapted to target other protozoans, and potential applications include mapping genome-encoded traits, virulence, pathogenicity, host specificity and resistance at the level of cells as truly meaningful biological units.

  15. De novo DNA methylation of the paternal genome in 2-cell mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Ma, X S; Wang, X G; Qin, L; Song, C L; Lin, F; Song, J M; Zhu, C C; Liu, H L

    2014-10-27

    The developmental dynamics of DNA methylation events have been well studied. Active demethylation of the paternal genome occurs in the zygote, passive demethylation occurs during cleavage stages, and de novo methylation occurs by the blastocyst stage. It is believed that the paternal genome has lower levels of methylation during early development than the maternal genome. However, in this study, we provide direct and indirect evidence of genome-wide de novo DNA methylation of the paternal genome after the first cell cycle in mouse embryos. Although very little methylation was detected within the male pronucleus in zygotes, an intense methylation signal was clearly visible within the androgenetic 2-cell embryos. Moreover, the DNA methylation level of the paternal genome in the post-zygotic metaphase embryos was similar to that of the maternal genome. Using indirect immunofluorescence with an antibody to methylated lysine 9 in histone H3, we provided new evidence to support the concept of spatial compartmentalization of parental genomes in 2-cell mouse embryos. Nevertheless, the transient segregation of parental genomes was not observed by determining the DNA methylation distribution in the 2-cell embryos even though DNA methylation asymmetry between the maternal and paternal pronucleus existed in the 1-cell stage. The disappearance of separate immunofluorescence signals of 5-methyl cytosine in the 2-cell embryos might be attributed to the de novo methylation of the paternal genome during the first mitotic cycle.

  16. Preferential retrotransposition in aging yeast mother cells is correlated with increased genome instability.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Melissa N; Scannapieco, Alison E; Au, Pak Ho; Dorsey, Savanna; Royer, Catherine A; Maxwell, Patrick H

    2015-10-01

    Retrotransposon expression or mobility is increased with age in multiple species and could promote genome instability or altered gene expression during aging. However, it is unclear whether activation of retrotransposons during aging is an indirect result of global changes in chromatin and gene regulation or a result of retrotransposon-specific mechanisms. Retromobility of a marked chromosomal Ty1 retrotransposon in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was elevated in mother cells relative to their daughter cells, as determined by magnetic cell sorting of mothers and daughters. Retromobility frequencies in aging mother cells were significantly higher than those predicted by cell age and the rate of mobility in young populations, beginning when mother cells were only several generations old. New Ty1 insertions in aging mothers were more strongly correlated with gross chromosome rearrangements than in young cells and were more often at non-preferred target sites. Mother cells were more likely to have high concentrations and bright foci of Ty1 Gag-GFP than their daughter cells. Levels of extrachromosomal Ty1 cDNA were also significantly higher in aged mother cell populations than their daughter cell populations. These observations are consistent with a retrotransposon-specific mechanism that causes retrotransposition to occur preferentially in yeast mother cells as they begin to age, as opposed to activation by phenotypic changes associated with very old age. These findings will likely be relevant for understanding retrotransposons and aging in many organisms, based on similarities in regulation and consequences of retrotransposition in diverse species.

  17. Preferential retrotransposition in aging yeast mother cells is correlated with increased genome instability

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Melissa N.; Scannapieco, Alison E.; Au, Pak Ho; Dorsey, Savanna; Royer, Catherine A.; Maxwell, Patrick H.

    2015-01-01

    Retrotransposon expression or mobility is increased with age in multiple species and could promote genome instability or altered gene expression during aging. However, it is unclear whether activation of retrotransposons during aging is an indirect result of global changes in chromatin and gene regulation or a result of retrotransposon-specific mechanisms. Retromobility of a marked chromosomal Ty1 retrotransposon in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was elevated in mother cells relative to their daughter cells, as determined by magnetic cell sorting of mothers and daughters. Retromobility frequencies in aging mother cells were significantly higher than those predicted by cell age and the rate of mobility in young populations, beginning when mother cells were only several generations old. New Ty1 insertions in aging mothers were more strongly correlated with gross chromosome rearrangements than in young cells and were more often at non-preferred target sites. Mother cells were more likely to have high concentrations and bright foci of Ty1 Gag-GFP than their daughter cells. Levels of extrachromosomal Ty1 cDNA were also significantly higher in aged mother cell populations than their daughter cell populations. These observations are consistent with a retrotransposon-specific mechanism that causes retrotransposition to occur preferentially in yeast mother cells as they begin to age, as opposed to activation by phenotypic changes associated with very old age. These findings will likely be relevant for understanding retrotransposons and aging in many organisms, based on similarities in regulation and consequences of retrotransposition in diverse species. PMID:26298836

  18. AlgaGEM – a genome-scale metabolic reconstruction of algae based on the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii genome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Microalgae have the potential to deliver biofuels without the associated competition for land resources. In order to realise the rates and titres necessary for commercial production, however, system-level metabolic engineering will be required. Genome scale metabolic reconstructions have revolutionized microbial metabolic engineering and are used routinely for in silico analysis and design. While genome scale metabolic reconstructions have been developed for many prokaryotes and model eukaryotes, the application to less well characterized eukaryotes such as algae is challenging not at least due to a lack of compartmentalization data. Results We have developed a genome-scale metabolic network model (named AlgaGEM) covering the metabolism for a compartmentalized algae cell based on the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii genome. AlgaGEM is a comprehensive literature-based genome scale metabolic reconstruction that accounts for the functions of 866 unique ORFs, 1862 metabolites, 2249 gene-enzyme-reaction-association entries, and 1725 unique reactions. The reconstruction was compartmentalized into the cytoplasm, mitochondrion, plastid and microbody using available data for algae complemented with compartmentalisation data for Arabidopsis thaliana. AlgaGEM describes a functional primary metabolism of Chlamydomonas and significantly predicts distinct algal behaviours such as the catabolism or secretion rather than recycling of phosphoglycolate in photorespiration. AlgaGEM was validated through the simulation of growth and algae metabolic functions inferred from literature. Using efficient resource utilisation as the optimality criterion, AlgaGEM predicted observed metabolic effects under autotrophic, heterotrophic and mixotrophic conditions. AlgaGEM predicts increased hydrogen production when cyclic electron flow is disrupted as seen in a high producing mutant derived from mutational studies. The model also predicted the physiological pathway for H2 production and

  19. Comparative Analysis of Chloroplast Genomes: Functional Annotation, Genome-Based Phylogeny, and Deduced Evolutionary Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Rivas, Javier De Las; Lozano, Juan Jose; Ortiz, Angel R.

    2002-01-01

    All protein sequences from 19 complete chloroplast genomes (cpDNA) have been studied using a new computational method able to analyze functional correlations among series of protein sequences contained in complete proteomes. First, all open reading frames (ORFs) from the cpDNAs, comprising a total of 2266 protein sequences, were compared against the 3168 proteins from Synechocystis PCC6803 complete genome to find functionally related orthologous proteins. Additionally, all cpDNA genomes were pairwise compared to find orthologous groups not present in cyanobacteria. Annotations in the cluster of othologous proteins database and CyanoBase were used as reference for the functional assignments. Following this protocol, new functional assignments were made for ORFs of unknown function and for ycfs (hypothetical chloroplast frames), which still lack a functional assignment. Using this information, a matrix of functional relationships was derived from profiles of the presence and/or absence of orthologous proteins; the matrix included 1837 proteins in 277 orthologous clusters. A factor analysis study of this matrix, followed by cluster analysis, allowed us to obtain accurate phylogenetic reconstructions and the detection of genes probably involved in speciation as phylogenetic correlates. Finally, by grouping common evolutionary patterns, we show that it is possible to determine functionally linked protein networks. This has allowed us to suggest putative associations for some unknown ORFs. PMID:11932241

  20. Cell geometry dictates TNFα-induced genome response.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Aninda; Venkatachalapathy, Saradha; Ratna, Prasuna; Wang, Yejun; Jokhun, Doorgesh Sharma; Shivashankar, G V

    2017-05-16

    Cells in physiology integrate local soluble and mechanical signals to regulate genomic programs. Whereas the individual roles of these signals are well studied, the cellular responses to the combined chemical and physical signals are less explored. Here, we investigated the cross-talk between cellular geometry and TNFα signaling. We stabilized NIH 3T3 fibroblasts into rectangular anisotropic or circular isotropic geometries and stimulated them with TNFα and analyzed nuclear translocation of transcription regulators -NFκB (p65) and MKL and downstream gene-expression patterns. We found that TNFα induces geometry-dependent actin depolymerization, which enhances IκB degradation, p65 nuclear translocation, nuclear exit of MKL, and sequestration of p65 at the RNA-polymerase-II foci. Further, global transcription profile of cells under matrix-TNFα interplay reveals a geometry-dependent gene-expression pattern. At a functional level, we find cell geometry affects TNFα-induced cell proliferation. Our results provide compelling evidence that fibroblasts, depending on their geometries, elicit distinct cellular responses for the same cytokine.

  1. Cell geometry dictates TNFα-induced genome response

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Aninda; Venkatachalapathy, Saradha; Ratna, Prasuna; Wang, Yejun; Jokhun, Doorgesh Sharma; Shivashankar, G. V.

    2017-01-01

    Cells in physiology integrate local soluble and mechanical signals to regulate genomic programs. Whereas the individual roles of these signals are well studied, the cellular responses to the combined chemical and physical signals are less explored. Here, we investigated the cross-talk between cellular geometry and TNFα signaling. We stabilized NIH 3T3 fibroblasts into rectangular anisotropic or circular isotropic geometries and stimulated them with TNFα and analyzed nuclear translocation of transcription regulators –NFκB (p65) and MKL and downstream gene-expression patterns. We found that TNFα induces geometry-dependent actin depolymerization, which enhances IκB degradation, p65 nuclear translocation, nuclear exit of MKL, and sequestration of p65 at the RNA-polymerase-II foci. Further, global transcription profile of cells under matrix-TNFα interplay reveals a geometry-dependent gene-expression pattern. At a functional level, we find cell geometry affects TNFα-induced cell proliferation. Our results provide compelling evidence that fibroblasts, depending on their geometries, elicit distinct cellular responses for the same cytokine. PMID:28461498

  2. Population genetics inside a cell: Mutations and mitochondrial genome maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Sidhartha; Shraiman, Boris; Gottschling, Dan

    2012-02-01

    In realistic ecological and evolutionary systems natural selection acts on multiple levels, i.e. it acts on individuals as well as on collection of individuals. An understanding of evolutionary dynamics of such systems is limited in large part due to the lack of experimental systems that can challenge theoretical models. Mitochondrial genomes (mtDNA) are subjected to selection acting on cellular as well as organelle levels. It is well accepted that mtDNA in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is unstable and can degrade over time scales comparable to yeast cell division time. We utilize a recent technology designed in Gottschling lab to extract DNA from populations of aged yeast cells and deep sequencing to characterize mtDNA variation in a population of young and old cells. In tandem, we developed a stochastic model that includes the essential features of mitochondrial biology that provides a null model for expected mtDNA variation. Overall, we find approximately 2% of the polymorphic loci that show significant increase in frequency as cells age providing direct evidence for organelle level selection. Such quantitative study of mtDNA dynamics is absolutely essential to understand the propagation of mtDNA mutations linked to a spectrum of age-related diseases in humans.

  3. Fluorescence-based resource for semi-automated genomic analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Kiser, M.B.; Dragwa, C.; Jedlicka, A.E.

    1994-09-01

    To facilitate the practical application of highly efficient semi-automated methods for general application in genomic analyses, we have developed a fluorescence-based marker resource. Ninety highly polymorphic simple tandem repeat markers were combined to provide a rapid, accurate, and highly efficient initial genome-wide screening system. These markers are spaced on average every 33 recombination units, with a mean heterozygosity of 81% (range 65-94%), covering 22 autosomes and the X and Y chromosomes. Less than 3% of the genome lies beyond 30 cM of the nearest marker. Markers were placed in a vertical ladder that we have termed a SET according to the size of the PCR fragments they produce during electrophoresis. Each SET was designed to avoid overlap between loci during gel separations to assure accuracy when scoring genotypes. We have constructed 15 SETS of markers. Three SETS, each labelled with one of three fluors, were combined into what we have termed a GROUP, which is co-electrophoresed with internal size standards that are labelled with a fourth flour. Five GROUPS of markers were assembled that contain a total of 15 SETS of markers. Each GROUP cover 18 regions of the genome that can be detected simultaneously, since this genomic analysis system is fully compatible with automated fragment analyzers using simultaneous four-color fluorescence-based detection systems. This allows for multiplex detection and a throughput of 1,944 genotypes daily per instrument. This system will be highly beneficial in a number of clinical and research applications including: linkage, cancer genetics, forensics, and cytogenetics.

  4. Genomic-based-breeding tools for tropical maize improvement.

    PubMed

    Chakradhar, Thammineni; Hindu, Vemuri; Reddy, Palakolanu Sudhakar

    2017-09-05

    Maize has traditionally been the main staple diet in the Southern Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa and widely grown by millions of resource poor small scale farmers. Approximately, 35.4 million hectares are sown to tropical maize, constituting around 59% of the developing worlds. Tropical maize encounters tremendous challenges besides poor agro-climatic situations with average yields recorded <3 tones/hectare that is far less than the average of developed countries. On the contrary to poor yields, the demand for maize as food, feed, and fuel is continuously increasing in these regions. Heterosis breeding introduced in early 90 s improved maize yields significantly, but genetic gains is still a mirage, particularly for crop growing under marginal environments. Application of molecular markers has accelerated the pace of maize breeding to some extent. The availability of array of sequencing and genotyping technologies offers unrivalled service to improve precision in maize-breeding programs through modern approaches such as genomic selection, genome-wide association studies, bulk segregant analysis-based sequencing approaches, etc. Superior alleles underlying complex traits can easily be identified and introgressed efficiently using these sequence-based approaches. Integration of genomic tools and techniques with advanced genetic resources such as nested association mapping and backcross nested association mapping could certainly address the genetic issues in maize improvement programs in developing countries. Huge diversity in tropical maize and its inherent capacity for doubled haploid technology offers advantage to apply the next generation genomic tools for accelerating production in marginal environments of tropical and subtropical world. Precision in phenotyping is the key for success of any molecular-breeding approach. This article reviews genomic technologies and their application to improve agronomic traits in tropical maize breeding has been reviewed in

  5. Cre Fused with RVG Peptide Mediates Targeted Genome Editing in Mouse Brain Cells In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Zhiyuan; Sun, Zhaolin; Li, Pan; Feng, Tao; Wu, Sen

    2016-01-01

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) are short peptides that can pass through cell membranes. CPPs can facilitate the cellular entry of proteins, macromolecules, nanoparticles and drugs. RVG peptide (RVG hereinafter) is a 29-amino-acid CPP derived from a rabies virus glycoprotein that can cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and enter brain cells. However, whether RVG can be used for genome editing in the brain has not been reported. In this work, we combined RVG with Cre recombinase for bacterial expression. The purified RVG-Cre protein cut plasmids in vitro and traversed cell membranes in cultured Neuro2a cells. By tail vein-injecting RVG-Cre into Cre reporter mouse lines mTmG and Rosa26lacZ, we demonstrated that RVG-Cre could target brain cells and achieve targeted somatic genome editing in adult mice. This direct delivery of the gene-editing enzyme protein into mouse brains with RVG is much safer than plasmid- or viral-based methods, holding promise for further applications in the treatment of various brain diseases. PMID:27983648

  6. Amplification of multiple genomic loci from single cells isolated by laser micro-dissection of tissues

    PubMed Central

    Frumkin, Dan; Wasserstrom, Adam; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Harmelin, Alon; Rechavi, Gideon; Shapiro, Ehud

    2008-01-01

    Background Whole genome amplification (WGA) and laser assisted micro-dissection represent two recently developed technologies that can greatly advance biological and medical research. WGA allows the analysis of multiple genomic loci from a single genome and has been performed on single cells from cell suspensions and from enzymatically-digested tissues. Laser micro-dissection makes it possible to isolate specific single cells from heterogeneous tissues. Results Here we applied for the first time WGA on laser micro-dissected single cells from stained tissue sections, and developed a protocol for sequentially performing the two procedures. The combined procedure allows correlating the cell's genome with its natural morphology and precise anatomical position. From each cell we amplified 122 genomic and mitochondrial loci. In cells obtained from fresh tissue sections, 64.5% of alleles successfully amplified to ~700000 copies each, and mitochondrial DNA was amplified successfully in all cells. Multiplex PCR amplification and analysis of cells from pre-stored sections yielded significantly poorer results. Sequencing and capillary electrophoresis of WGA products allowed detection of slippage mutations in microsatellites (MS), and point mutations in P53. Conclusion Comprehensive genomic analysis of single cells from stained tissue sections opens new research opportunities for cell lineage and depth analyses, genome-wide mutation surveys, and other single cell assays. PMID:18284708

  7. A web-based genomic sequence database for the Streptomycetaceae: a tool for systematics and genome mining

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The ARS Microbial Genome Sequence Database (http://199.133.98.43), a web-based database server, was established utilizing the BIGSdb (Bacterial Isolate Genomics Sequence Database) software package, developed at Oxford University, as a tool to manage multi-locus sequence data for the family Streptomy...

  8. Natural Biased Coin Encoded in the Genome Determines Cell Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Dorri, Faezeh; Mahini, Hamid; Sharifi-Zarchi, Ali; Totonchi, Mehdi; Tusserkani, Ruzbeh; Pezeshk, Hamid; Sadeghi, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Decision making at a cellular level determines different fates for isogenic cells. However, it is not yet clear how rational decisions are encoded in the genome, how they are transmitted to their offspring, and whether they evolve and become optimized throughout generations. In this paper, we use a game theoretic approach to explain how rational decisions are made in the presence of cooperators and competitors. Our results suggest the existence of an internal switch that operates as a biased coin. The biased coin is, in fact, a biochemical bistable network of interacting genes that can flip to one of its stable states in response to different environmental stimuli. We present a framework to describe how the positions of attractors in such a gene regulatory network correspond to the behavior of a rational player in a competing environment. We evaluate our model by considering lysis/lysogeny decision making of bacteriophage lambda in E. coli. PMID:25090629

  9. Sonication-based isolation and enrichment of Chlorella protothecoides chloroplasts for illumina genome sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Angelova, Angelina; Park, Sang-Hycuk; Kyndt, John; Fitzsimmons, Kevin; Brown, Judith K

    2013-09-01

    With the increasing world demand for biofuel, a number of oleaginous algal species are being considered as renewable sources of oil. Chlorella protothecoides Krüger synthesizes triacylglycerols (TAGs) as storage compounds that can be converted into renewable fuel utilizing an anabolic pathway that is poorly understood. The paucity of algal chloroplast genome sequences has been an important constraint to chloroplast transformation and for studying gene expression in TAGs pathways. In this study, the intact chloroplasts were released from algal cells using sonication followed by sucrose gradient centrifugation, resulting in a 2.36-fold enrichment of chloroplasts from C. protothecoides, based on qPCR analysis. The C. protothecoides chloroplast genome (cpDNA) was determined using the Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencing platform and found to be 84,576 Kb in size (8.57 Kb) in size, with a GC content of 30.8 %. This is the first report of an optimized protocol that uses a sonication step, followed by sucrose gradient centrifugation, to release and enrich intact chloroplasts from a microalga (C. prototheocoides) of sufficient quality to permit chloroplast genome sequencing with high coverage, while minimizing nuclear genome contamination. The approach is expected to guide chloroplast isolation from other oleaginous algal species for a variety of uses that benefit from enrichment of chloroplasts, ranging from biochemical analysis to genomics studies.

  10. Embryo genome profiling by single-cell sequencing for preimplantation genetic diagnosis in a β-thalassemia family.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanwen; Chen, Shengpei; Yin, Xuyang; Shen, Xiaoting; Pan, Xiaoyu; Chen, Fang; Jiang, Hui; Liang, Yu; Wang, Wei; Xu, Xun; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Xiuqing; Zhou, Canquan; Wang, Jun

    2015-04-01

    The embryonic genome, including genotypes and haplotypes, contains all the information for preimplantation genetic diagnosis, representing great potential for mendelian disorder carriers to conceive healthy babies. We developed a strategy to obtain the full embryonic genome for a β-thalassemia-carrier couple to have a healthy second baby. We carried out sequencing for single blastomere cells and the family trio and further developed the analysis pipeline, including recovery of the missing alleles, removal of the majority of errors, and phasing of the embryonic genome. The final accuracy for homozygous and heterozygous single-nucleotide polymorphisms reached 99.62% and 98.39%, respectively. The aneuploidies of embryos were detected as well. Based on the comprehensive embryonic genome, we effectively performed whole-genome mendelian disorder diagnosis and human leukocyte antigen matching tests. This retrospective study in a β-thalassemia family demonstrates a method for embryo genome recovery through single-cell sequencing, which permits detection of genetic variations in preimplantation genetic diagnosis. It shows the potential of single-cell sequencing technology in preimplantation genetic diagnosis clinical practices. © 2015 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  11. Targeted gene correction minimally impacts whole-genome mutational load in human-disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cell clones.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Keiichiro; Yu, Chang; Qu, Jing; Li, Mo; Yao, Xiaotian; Yuan, Tingting; Goebl, April; Tang, Senwei; Ren, Ruotong; Aizawa, Emi; Zhang, Fan; Xu, Xiuling; Soligalla, Rupa Devi; Chen, Feng; Kim, Jessica; Kim, Na Young; Liao, Hsin-Kai; Benner, Chris; Esteban, Concepcion Rodriguez; Jin, Yabin; Liu, Guang-Hui; Li, Yingrui; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2014-07-03

    The utility of genome editing technologies for disease modeling and developing cellular therapies has been extensively documented, but the impact of these technologies on mutational load at the whole-genome level remains unclear. We performed whole-genome sequencing to evaluate the mutational load at single-base resolution in individual gene-corrected human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) clones in three different disease models. In single-cell clones, gene correction by helper-dependent adenoviral vector (HDAdV) or Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nuclease (TALEN) exhibited few off-target effects and a low level of sequence variation, comparable to that accumulated in routine hiPSC culture. The sequence variants were randomly distributed and unique to individual clones. We also combined both technologies and developed a TALEN-HDAdV hybrid vector, which significantly increased gene-correction efficiency in hiPSCs. Therefore, with careful monitoring via whole-genome sequencing it is possible to apply genome editing to human pluripotent cells with minimal impact on genomic mutational load.

  12. The Karyote physico-chemical genomic, proteomic, metabolic cell modeling system.

    PubMed

    Ortoleva, P; Berry, E; Brun, Y; Fan, J; Fontus, M; Hubbard, K; Jaqaman, K; Jarymowycz, L; Navid, A; Sayyed-Ahmad, A; Shreif, Z; Stanley, F; Tuncay, K; Weitzke, E; Wu, L-C

    2003-01-01

    Modeling approaches to the dynamics of a living cell are presented that are strongly based on its underlying physical and chemical processes and its hierarchical spatio-temporal organization. Through the inclusion of a broad spectrum of processes and a rigorous analysis of the multiple scale nature of cellular dynamics, we are attempting to advance cell modeling and its applications. The presentation focuses on our cell modeling system, which integrates data archiving and quantitative physico-chemical modeling and information theory to provide a seamless approach to the modeling/data analysis endeavor. Thereby the rapidly growing mess of genomic, proteomic, metabolic, and cell physiological data can be automatically used to develop and calibrate a predictive cell model. The discussion focuses on the Karyote cell modeling system and an introduction to the CellX and VirusX models. The Karyote software system integrates three elements: (1) a model-building and data archiving module that allows one to define a cell type to be modeled through its reaction network, structure, and transport processes as well as to choose the surrounding medium and other parameters of the phenomenon to be modeled; (2) a genomic, proteomic, metabolic cell simulator that solves the equations of metabolic reaction, transcription/translation polymerization and the exchange of molecules between parts of the cell and with the surrounding medium; and (3) an information theory module (ITM) that automates model calibration and development, and integrates a variety of data types with the cell dynamic computations. In Karyote, reactions may be fast (equilibrated) or slow (finite rate), and the special effects of enzymes and other minority species yielding steady-state cycles of arbitrary complexities are accounted for. These features of the dynamics are handled via rigorous multiple scale analysis. A user interface allows for an automated generation and solution of the equations of multiple timescale

  13. Micro and nanofluidic structures for cell sorting and genomic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Keith J.

    Microfluidic systems promise rapid analysis of small samples in a compact and inexpensive format. But direct scaling of lab bench protocols on-chip is challenging because laminar flows in typical microfluidic devices are characterized by non-mixing streamlines. Common microfluidic mixers and sorters work by diffusion, limiting application to objects that diffuse slowly such as cells and DNA. Recently Huang et.al. developed a passive microfluidic element to continuously separate bio-particles deterministically. In Deterministic Lateral Displacement (DLD), objects are sorted by size as they transit an asymmetric array of microfabricated posts. This thesis further develops DLD arrays with applications in three broad new areas. First the arrays are used, not simply to sort particles, but to move streams of cells through functional flows for chemical treatment---such as on-chip immunofluorescent labeling of blood cells with washing, and on-chip E.coli cell lysis with simultaneous chromosome extraction. Secondly, modular tiling of the basic DLD element is used to construct complex particle handling modes that include beam steering for jets of cells and beads. Thirdly, nanostructured DLD arrays are built using Nanoimprint Lithography (NIL) and continuous-flow separation of 100 nm and 200 nm size particles is demonstrated. Finally a number of ancillary nanofabrication techniques were developed in support of these overall goals, including methods to interface nanofluidic structures with standard microfluidic components such as inlet channels and reservoirs, precision etching of ultra-high aspect ratio (>50:1) silicon nanostructures, and fabrication of narrow (˜ 35 nm) channels used to stretch genomic length DNA.

  14. The Comprehensive Phytopathogen Genomics Resource: a web-based resource for data-mining plant pathogen genomes.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, John P; Neeno-Eckwall, Eric C; Adhikari, Bishwo N; Perna, Nicole T; Tisserat, Ned; Leach, Jan E; Lévesque, C André; Buell, C Robin

    2011-01-01

    The Comprehensive Phytopathogen Genomics Resource (CPGR) provides a web-based portal for plant pathologists and diagnosticians to view the genome and trancriptome sequence status of 806 bacterial, fungal, oomycete, nematode, viral and viroid plant pathogens. Tools are available to search and analyze annotated genome sequences of 74 bacterial, fungal and oomycete pathogens. Oomycete and fungal genomes are obtained directly from GenBank, whereas bacterial genome sequences are downloaded from the A Systematic Annotation Package (ASAP) database that provides curation of genomes using comparative approaches. Curated lists of bacterial genes relevant to pathogenicity and avirulence are also provided. The Plant Pathogen Transcript Assemblies Database provides annotated assemblies of the transcribed regions of 82 eukaryotic genomes from publicly available single pass Expressed Sequence Tags. Data-mining tools are provided along with tools to create candidate diagnostic markers, an emerging use for genomic sequence data in plant pathology. The Plant Pathogen Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) database is a resource for pathogens that lack genome or transcriptome data sets and contains 131 755 rDNA sequences from GenBank for 17 613 species identified as plant pathogens and related genera. Database URL: http://cpgr.plantbiology.msu.edu.

  15. Whole genome sequences in pulse crops: a global community resource to expedite translational genomics and knowledge-based crop improvement.

    PubMed

    Bohra, Abhishek; Singh, Narendra P

    2015-08-01

    Unprecedented developments in legume genomics over the last decade have resulted in the acquisition of a wide range of modern genomic resources to underpin genetic improvement of grain legumes. The genome enabled insights direct investigators in various ways that primarily include unearthing novel structural variations, retrieving the lost genetic diversity, introducing novel/exotic alleles from wider gene pools, finely resolving the complex quantitative traits and so forth. To this end, ready availability of cost-efficient and high-density genotyping assays allows genome wide prediction to be increasingly recognized as the key selection criterion in crop breeding. Further, the high-dimensional measurements of agronomically significant phenotypes obtained by using new-generation screening techniques will empower reference based resequencing as well as allele mining and trait mapping methods to comprehensively associate genome diversity with the phenome scale variation. Besides stimulating the forward genetic systems, accessibility to precisely delineated genomic segments reveals novel candidates for reverse genetic techniques like targeted genome editing. The shifting paradigm in plant genomics in turn necessitates optimization of crop breeding strategies to enable the most efficient integration of advanced omics knowledge and tools. We anticipate that the crop improvement schemes will be bolstered remarkably with rational deployment of these genome-guided approaches, ultimately resulting in expanded plant breeding capacities and improved crop performance.

  16. Acoustic-transfection for genomic manipulation of single-cells using high frequency ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sangpil; Wang, Pengzhi; Peng, Qin; Wang, Yingxiao; Shung, K Kirk

    2017-07-13

    Efficient intracellular delivery of biologically active macromolecules has been a challenging but important process for manipulating live cells for research and therapeutic purposes. There have been limited transfection techniques that can deliver multiple types of active molecules simultaneously into single-cells as well as different types of molecules into physically connected individual neighboring cells separately with high precision and low cytotoxicity. Here, a high frequency ultrasound-based remote intracellular delivery technique capable of delivery of multiple DNA plasmids, messenger RNAs, and recombinant proteins is developed to allow high spatiotemporal visualization and analysis of gene and protein expressions as well as single-cell gene editing using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated protein-9 nuclease (Cas9), a method called acoustic-transfection. Acoustic-transfection has advantages over typical sonoporation because acoustic-transfection utilizing ultra-high frequency ultrasound over 150 MHz can directly deliver gene and proteins into cytoplasm without microbubbles, which enables controlled and local intracellular delivery to acoustic-transfection technique. Acoustic-transfection was further demonstrated to deliver CRISPR-Cas9 systems to successfully modify and reprogram the genome of single live cells, providing the evidence of the acoustic-transfection technique for precise genome editing using CRISPR-Cas9.

  17. Modular fluorescence complementation sensors for live cell detection of epigenetic signals at endogenous genomic sites.

    PubMed

    Lungu, Cristiana; Pinter, Sabine; Broche, Julian; Rathert, Philipp; Jeltsch, Albert

    2017-09-21

    Investigation of the fundamental role of epigenetic processes requires methods for the locus-specific detection of epigenetic modifications in living cells. Here, we address this urgent demand by developing four modular fluorescence complementation-based epigenetic biosensors for live-cell microscopy applications. These tools combine engineered DNA-binding proteins with domains recognizing defined epigenetic marks, both fused to non-fluorescent fragments of a fluorescent protein. The presence of the epigenetic mark at the target DNA sequence leads to the reconstitution of a functional fluorophore. With this approach, we could for the first time directly detect DNA methylation and histone 3 lysine 9 trimethylation at endogenous genomic sites in live cells and follow dynamic changes in these marks upon drug treatment, induction of epigenetic enzymes and during the cell cycle. We anticipate that this versatile technology will improve our understanding of how specific epigenetic signatures are set, erased and maintained during embryonic development or disease onset.Tools for imaging epigenetic modifications can shed light on the regulation of epigenetic processes. Here, the authors present a fluorescence complementation approach for detection of DNA and histone methylation at endogenous genomic sites allowing following of dynamic changes of these marks by live-cell microscopy.

  18. Genome Sequence Analyses of Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. glycinea and Subtractive Hybridization-Based Comparative Genomics with Nine Pseudomonads

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Mingsheng; Wang, Dongping; Bradley, Carl A.; Zhao, Youfu

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial blight, caused by Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. glycinea (Psg), is a common disease of soybean. In an effort to compare a current field isolate with one isolated in the early 1960s, the genomes of two Psg strains, race 4 and B076, were sequenced using 454 pyrosequencing. The genomes of both Psg strains share more than 4,900 highly conserved genes, indicating very low genetic diversity between Psg genomes. Though conserved, genome rearrangements and recombination events occur commonly within the two Psg genomes. When compared to each other, 437 and 163 specific genes were identified in B076 and race 4, respectively. Most specific genes are plasmid-borne, indicating that acquisition and maintenance of plasmids may represent a major mechanism to change the genetic composition of the genome and even acquire new virulence factors. Type three secretion gene clusters of Psg strains are near identical with that of P. savastanoi pv. phaseolicola (Pph) strain 1448A and they shared 20 common effector genes. Furthermore, the coronatine biosynthetic cluster is present on a large plasmid in strain B076, but not in race 4. In silico subtractive hybridization-based comparative genomic analyses with nine sequenced phytopathogenic pseudomonads identified dozens of specific islands (SIs), and revealed that the genomes of Psg strains are more similar to those belonging to the same genomospecies such as Pph 1448A than to other phytopathogenic pseudomonads. The number of highly conserved genes (core genome) among them decreased dramatically when more genomes were included in the subtraction, suggesting the diversification of pseudomonads, and further indicating the genome heterogeneity among pseudomonads. However, the number of specific genes did not change significantly, suggesting these genes are indeed specific in Psg genomes. These results reinforce the idea of a species complex of P. syringae and support the reclassification of P. syringae into different species. PMID

  19. Marker-Based Estimation of Genetic Parameters in Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhiqiu; Yang, Rong-Cai

    2014-01-01

    Linear mixed model (LMM) analysis has been recently used extensively for estimating additive genetic variances and narrow-sense heritability in many genomic studies. While the LMM analysis is computationally less intensive than the Bayesian algorithms, it remains infeasible for large-scale genomic data sets. In this paper, we advocate the use of a statistical procedure known as symmetric differences squared (SDS) as it may serve as a viable alternative when the LMM methods have difficulty or fail to work with large datasets. The SDS procedure is a general and computationally simple method based only on the least squares regression analysis. We carry out computer simulations and empirical analyses to compare the SDS procedure with two commonly used LMM-based procedures. Our results show that the SDS method is not as good as the LMM methods for small data sets, but it becomes progressively better and can match well with the precision of estimation by the LMM methods for data sets with large sample sizes. Its major advantage is that with larger and larger samples, it continues to work with the increasing precision of estimation while the commonly used LMM methods are no longer able to work under our current typical computing capacity. Thus, these results suggest that the SDS method can serve as a viable alternative particularly when analyzing ‘big’ genomic data sets. PMID:25025305

  20. Whole genome sequence-based serogrouping of Listeria monocytogenes isolates.

    PubMed

    Hyden, Patrick; Pietzka, Ariane; Lennkh, Anna; Murer, Andrea; Springer, Burkhard; Blaschitz, Marion; Indra, Alexander; Huhulescu, Steliana; Allerberger, Franz; Ruppitsch, Werner; Sensen, Christoph W

    2016-10-10

    Whole genome sequencing (WGS) is currently becoming the method of choice for characterization of Listeria monocytogenes isolates in national reference laboratories (NRLs). WGS is superior with regards to accuracy, resolution and analysis speed in comparison to several other methods including serotyping, PCR, pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus sequence typing (MLST), multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA), and multivirulence-locus sequence typing (MVLST), which have been used thus far for the characterization of bacterial isolates (and are still important tools in reference laboratories today) to control and prevent listeriosis, one of the major sources of foodborne diseases for humans. Backward compatibility of WGS to former methods can be maintained by extraction of the respective information from WGS data. Serotyping was the first subtyping method for L. monocytogenes capable of differentiating 12 serovars and national reference laboratories still perform serotyping and PCR-based serogrouping as a first level classification method for Listeria monocytogenes surveillance. Whole genome sequence based core genome MLST analysis of a L. monocytogenes collection comprising 172 isolates spanning all 12 serotypes was performed for serogroup determination. These isolates clustered according to their serotypes and it was possible to group them either into the IIa, IIc, IVb or IIb clusters, respectively, which were generated by minimum spanning tree (MST) and neighbor joining (NJ) tree data analysis, demonstrating the power of the new approach. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Temporal Analysis of Genome Alterations Induced by Single-Cell Passaging in Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Qiang; Ramirez, Jean-Marie; Becker, Fabienne; Pantesco, Véronique; Lavabre-Bertrand, Thierry; Hovatta, Outi; Lemaître, Jean-Marc; Pellestor, Franck

    2015-01-01

    Simplified culture conditions are essential for large-scale drug screening and medical applications of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). However, hPSCs [ie, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), and human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are prone to genomic instability, a phenomenon that is highly influenced by the culture conditions. Enzymatic dissociation, a cornerstone of large-scale hPSC culture systems, has been reported to be deleterious, but the extent and the timeline of the genomic alterations induced by this passaging technique are still unclear. We prospectively monitored three hESC lines that were initially derived and cultured on human feeders and passaged mechanically before switching to enzymatic single-cell passaging. We show that karyotype abnormalities and copy number variations are not restricted to long-term culture, but can occur very rapidly, within five passages after switching hESCs to enzymatic dissociation. Subchromosomal abnormalities preceded or accompanied karyotype abnormalities and were associated with increased occurrence of DNA double-strand breaks. Our results indicate that enzymatic single-cell passaging can be highly deleterious to the hPSC genome, even when used only for a limited period of time. Moreover, hPSC culture techniques should be reappraised by complementing the routine karyotype analysis with more sensitive techniques, such as microarrays, to detect subchromosomal abnormalities. PMID:25254421

  2. Genome-based bioprospecting of microbes for new therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Zotchev, Sergey B; Sekurova, Olga N; Katz, Leonard

    2012-12-01

    Bioprospecting of natural sources for new medicines has a long and successful history, exemplified by the fact that over 50% of all drugs currently on the market are either derived from or inspired by natural products. However, development of new natural product-based therapeutics has been on the decline over the past 20 years, mainly owing to frequent re-discovery of already known compounds coupled with high costs for screening, characterization and development. With the onset of the genomic era allowing rapid sequencing and analysis of bacterial and fungal genomes, it became evident that these organisms possess 'hidden treasures' in the form of gene clusters potentially governing biosynthesis of novel biologically active compounds. This review highlights current progress in mining for and expression of these gene clusters, which may revolutionize the drug discovery pipelines in the near future.

  3. Genomic and epigenetic insights into the molecular bases of heterosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z Jeffrey

    2013-07-01

    Heterosis, also known as hybrid vigour, is widespread in plants and animals, but the molecular bases for this phenomenon remain elusive. Recent studies in hybrids and allopolyploids using transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolomic, epigenomic and systems biology approaches have provided new insights. Emerging genomic and epigenetic perspectives suggest that heterosis arises from allelic interactions between parental genomes, leading to altered programming of genes that promote the growth, stress tolerance and fitness of hybrids. For example, epigenetic modifications of key regulatory genes in hybrids and allopolyploids can alter complex regulatory networks of physiology and metabolism, thus modulating biomass and leading to heterosis. The conceptual advances could help to improve plant and animal productivity through the manipulation of heterosis.

  4. Single-cell genomics reveal low recombination frequencies in freshwater bacteria of the SAR11 clade

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The SAR11 group of Alphaproteobacteria is highly abundant in the oceans. It contains a recently diverged freshwater clade, which offers the opportunity to compare adaptations to salt- and freshwaters in a monophyletic bacterial group. However, there are no cultivated members of the freshwater SAR11 group and no genomes have been sequenced yet. Results We isolated ten single SAR11 cells from three freshwater lakes and sequenced and assembled their genomes. A phylogeny based on 57 proteins indicates that the cells are organized into distinct microclusters. We show that the freshwater genomes have evolved primarily by the accumulation of nucleotide substitutions and that they have among the lowest ratio of recombination to mutation estimated for bacteria. In contrast, members of the marine SAR11 clade have one of the highest ratios. Additional metagenome reads from six lakes confirm low recombination frequencies for the genome overall and reveal lake-specific variations in microcluster abundances. We identify hypervariable regions with gene contents broadly similar to those in the hypervariable regions of the marine isolates, containing genes putatively coding for cell surface molecules. Conclusions We conclude that recombination rates differ dramatically in phylogenetic sister groups of the SAR11 clade adapted to freshwater and marine ecosystems. The results suggest that the transition from marine to freshwater systems has purged diversity and resulted in reduced opportunities for recombination with divergent members of the clade. The low recombination frequencies of the LD12 clade resemble the low genetic divergence of host-restricted pathogens that have recently shifted to a new host. PMID:24286338

  5. The genomic and transcriptomic landscape of a HeLa cell line.

    PubMed

    Landry, Jonathan J M; Pyl, Paul Theodor; Rausch, Tobias; Zichner, Thomas; Tekkedil, Manu M; Stütz, Adrian M; Jauch, Anna; Aiyar, Raeka S; Pau, Gregoire; Delhomme, Nicolas; Gagneur, Julien; Korbel, Jan O; Huber, Wolfgang; Steinmetz, Lars M

    2013-08-07

    HeLa is the most widely used model cell line for studying human cellular and molecular biology. To date, no genomic reference for this cell line has been released, and experiments have relied on the human reference genome. Effective design and interpretation of molecular genetic studies performed using HeLa cells require accurate genomic information. Here we present a detailed genomic and transcriptomic characterization of a HeLa cell line. We performed DNA and RNA sequencing of a HeLa Kyoto cell line and analyzed its mutational portfolio and gene expression profile. Segmentation of the genome according to copy number revealed a remarkably high level of aneuploidy and numerous large structural variants at unprecedented resolution. Some of the extensive genomic rearrangements are indicative of catastrophic chromosome shattering, known as chromothripsis. Our analysis of the HeLa gene expression profile revealed that several pathways, including cell cycle and DNA repair, exhibit significantly different expression patterns from those in normal human tissues. Our results provide the first detailed account of genomic variants in the HeLa genome, yielding insight into their impact on gene expression and cellular function as well as their origins. This study underscores the importance of accounting for the strikingly aberrant characteristics of HeLa cells when designing and interpreting experiments, and has implications for the use of HeLa as a model of human biology.

  6. Genetic variants that confer resistance to malaria are associated with red blood cell traits in African-Americans: an electronic medical record-based genome-wide association study.

    PubMed

    Ding, Keyue; de Andrade, Mariza; Manolio, Teri A; Crawford, Dana C; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Denny, Joshua C; Masys, Daniel R; Jouni, Hayan; Pachecho, Jennifer A; Kho, Abel N; Roden, Dan M; Chisholm, Rex; Kullo, Iftikhar J

    2013-07-08

    To identify novel genetic loci influencing interindividual variation in red blood cell (RBC) traits in African-Americans, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in 2315 individuals, divided into discovery (n = 1904) and replication (n = 411) cohorts. The traits included hemoglobin concentration (HGB), hematocrit (HCT), RBC count, mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC). Patients were participants in the electronic MEdical Records and GEnomics (eMERGE) network and underwent genotyping of ~1.2 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms on the Illumina Human1M-Duo array. Association analyses were performed adjusting for age, sex, site, and population stratification. Three loci previously associated with resistance to malaria-HBB (11p15.4), HBA1/HBA2 (16p13.3), and G6PD (Xq28)-were associated (P ≤ 1 × 10(-6)) with RBC traits in the discovery cohort. The loci replicated in the replication cohort (P ≤ 0.02), and were significant at a genome-wide significance level (P < 5 × 10(-8)) in the combined cohort. The proportions of variance in RBC traits explained by significant variants at these loci were as follows: rs7120391 (near HBB) 1.3% of MCHC, rs9924561 (near HBA1/A2) 5.5% of MCV, 6.9% of MCH and 2.9% of MCHC, and rs1050828 (in G6PD) 2.4% of RBC count, 2.9% of MCV, and 1.4% of MCH, respectively. We were not able to replicate loci identified by a previous GWAS of RBC traits in a European ancestry cohort of similar sample size, suggesting that the genetic architecture of RBC traits differs by race. In conclusion, genetic variants that confer resistance to malaria are associated with RBC traits in African-Americans.

  7. The genomic landscape of histone modifications in human T cells

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Tae-Young; Cuddapah, Suresh; Cui, Kairong; Zhao, Keji

    2006-01-01

    To understand the molecular basis that supports the dynamic gene expression programs unique to T cells, we investigated the genomic landscape of activating histone modifications, including histone H3 K9/K14 diacetylation (H3K9acK14ac), H3 K4 trimethylation (H3K4me3), and the repressive histone modification H3 K27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) in primary human T cells. We show that H3K9acK14ac and H3K4me3 are associated with active genes required for T cell function and development, whereas H3K27me3 is associated with silent genes that are involved in development in other cell types. Unexpectedly, we find that 3,330 gene promoters are associated with all of these histone modifications. The gene expression levels are correlated with both the absolute and relative levels of the activating H3K4me3 and the repressive H3K27me3 modifications. Our data reveal that rapidly inducible genes are associated with the H3 acetylation and H3K4me3 modifications, suggesting they assume a chromatin structure poised for activation. In addition, we identified a subpopulation of chromatin regions that are associated with high levels of H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 but low levels of H3K9acK14ac. Therefore, these regions have a distinctive chromatin modification pattern and thus may represent a distinct class of chromatin domains. PMID:17043231

  8. Disseminated tumour cells with highly aberrant genomes are linked to poor prognosis in operable oesophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Sarah; Bartenhagen, Christoph; Hoffmann, Martin; Will, Daniel; Fischer, Johannes C; Baldus, Stephan E; Vay, Christian; Fluegen, Georg; Dizdar, Levent; Vallböhmer, Daniel; Klein, Christoph A; Knoefel, Wolfram T; Stoecklein, Nikolas H; Möhlendick, Birte

    2017-08-22

    Chromosomal instability (CIN) has repeatedly been identified as a prognostic marker. Here we evaluated the percentage of aberrant genome per cell (PAG) as a measure of CIN in single disseminated tumour cells (DTC) isolated from patients with operable oesophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), to assess the impact of CIN(high) DTCs on prognosis. We isolated CK18(positive) DTCs from bone marrow (BM) or lymph node (LN) preparations of operable EAC patients. After whole-genome amplification, single DTCs were analysed for chromosomal gains and losses using metaphase-based comparative genomic hybridisation (mCGH). We calculated the PAG for each DTC and determined the critical threshold value that identifies high-risk patients by STEPP (Subpopulation Treatment Effect Pattern Plot) analysis in two independent EAC patient cohorts (cohort #1, n=44; cohort #2; n=29). The most common chromosomal alterations observed among the DTCs were typical for EAC, but the DTCs showed a varying PAG between individual patients. Generally, LNDTCs displayed a significantly higher PAG than BMDTCs. STEPP analysis revealed an increasing PAG of DTCs to be correlated with an increased risk for short survival in two independent EAC cohorts as well as in the corresponding pooled analysis. In all three data sets (cohort #1, cohort #2 and pooled cohort), PAG(high) DTCs conferred an independent risk for a significantly decreased survival. The analysis of PAG/CIN in solitary marker-positive DTCs identifies operable EAC patients with poor prognosis, indicating a more aggressive minimal residual disease.

  9. Annotation-based genome-wide SNP discovery in the large and complex Aegilops tauschii genome using next-generation sequencing without a reference genome sequence

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Many plants have large and complex genomes with an abundance of repeated sequences. Many plants are also polyploid. Both of these attributes typify the genome architecture in the tribe Triticeae, whose members include economically important wheat, rye and barley. Large genome sizes, an abundance of repeated sequences, and polyploidy present challenges to genome-wide SNP discovery using next-generation sequencing (NGS) of total genomic DNA by making alignment and clustering of short reads generated by the NGS platforms difficult, particularly in the absence of a reference genome sequence. Results An annotation-based, genome-wide SNP discovery pipeline is reported using NGS data for large and complex genomes without a reference genome sequence. Roche 454 shotgun reads with low genome coverage of one genotype are annotated in order to distinguish single-copy sequences and repeat junctions from repetitive sequences and sequences shared by paralogous genes. Multiple genome equivalents of shotgun reads of another genotype generated with SOLiD or Solexa are then mapped to the annotated Roche 454 reads to identify putative SNPs. A pipeline program package, AGSNP, was developed and used for genome-wide SNP discovery in Aegilops tauschii-the diploid source of the wheat D genome, and with a genome size of 4.02 Gb, of which 90% is repetitive sequences. Genomic DNA of Ae. tauschii accession AL8/78 was sequenced with the Roche 454 NGS platform. Genomic DNA and cDNA of Ae. tauschii accession AS75 was sequenced primarily with SOLiD, although some Solexa and Roche 454 genomic sequences were also generated. A total of 195,631 putative SNPs were discovered in gene sequences, 155,580 putative SNPs were discovered in uncharacterized single-copy regions, and another 145,907 putative SNPs were discovered in repeat junctions. These SNPs were dispersed across the entire Ae. tauschii genome. To assess the false positive SNP discovery rate, DNA containing putative SNPs was

  10. Genome Based Phylogeny and Comparative Genomic Analysis of Intra-Mammary Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Vincent P.; Lefébure, Tristan; Pavinski Bitar, Paulina D.; Dogan, Belgin; Simpson, Kenneth W.; Schukken, Ynte H.; Stanhope, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli is an important cause of bovine mastitis and can cause both severe inflammation with a short-term transient infection, as well as less severe, but more chronic inflammation and infection persistence. E. coli is a highly diverse organism that has been classified into a number of different pathotypes or pathovars, and mammary pathogenic E. coli (MPEC) has been proposed as a new such pathotype. The purpose of this study was to use genome sequence data derived from both transient and persistent MPEC isolates (two isolates of each phenotype) to construct a genome-based phylogeny that places MPEC in its phylogenetic context with other E. coli pathovars. A subsidiary goal was to conduct comparative genomic analyses of these MPEC isolates with other E. coli pathovars to provide a preliminary perspective on loci that might be correlated with the MPEC phenotype. Both concatenated and consensus tree phylogenies did not support MPEC monophyly or the monophyly of either transient or persistent phenotypes. Three of the MPEC isolates (ECA-727, ECC-Z, and ECA-O157) originated from within the predominately commensal clade of E. coli, referred to as phylogroup A. The fourth MPEC isolate, of the persistent phenotype (ECC-1470), was sister group to an isolate of ETEC, falling within the E. coli B1 clade. This suggests that the MPEC phenotype has arisen on numerous independent occasions and that this has often, although not invariably, occurred from commensal ancestry. Examination of the genes present in the MPEC strains relative to the commensal strains identified a consistent presence of the type VI secretion system (T6SS) in the MPEC strains, with only occasional representation in commensal strains, suggesting that T6SS may be associated with MPEC pathogenesis and/or as an inter-bacterial competitive attribute and therefore could represent a useful target to explore for the development of MPEC specific inhibitors. PMID:25807497

  11. Genomic Alteration in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (HNSCC) Cell Lines Inferred from Karyotyping, Molecular Cytogenetics, and Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization.

    PubMed

    Singchat, Worapong; Hitakomate, Ekarat; Rerkarmnuaychoke, Budsaba; Suntronpong, Aorarat; Fu, Beiyuan; Bodhisuwan, Winai; Peyachoknagul, Surin; Yang, Fengtang; Koontongkaew, Sittichai; Srikulnath, Kornsorn

    2016-01-01

    Genomic alteration in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) was studied in two cell line pairs (HN30-HN31 and HN4-HN12) using conventional C-banding, multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization (M-FISH), and array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH). HN30 and HN4 were derived from primary lesions in the pharynx and base of tongue, respectively, and HN31 and HN12 were derived from lymph-node metastatic lesions belonging to the same patients. Gain of chromosome 1, 7, and 11 were shared in almost all cell lines. Hierarchical clustering revealed that HN31 was closely related to HN4, which shared eight chromosome alteration cases. Large C-positive heterochromatins were found in the centromeric region of chromosome 9 in HN31 and HN4, which suggests complex structural amplification of the repetitive sequence. Array CGH revealed amplification of 7p22.3p11.2, 8q11.23q12.1, and 14q32.33 in all cell lines involved with tumorigenesis and inflammation genes. The amplification of 2p21 (SIX3), 11p15.5 (H19), and 11q21q22.3 (MAML2, PGR, TRPC6, and MMP family) regions, and deletion of 9p23 (PTPRD) and 16q23.1 (WWOX) regions were identified in HN31 and HN12. Interestingly, partial loss of PTPRD (9p23) and WWOX (16q23.1) genes was identified in HN31 and HN12, and the level of gene expression tended to be the down-regulation of PTPRD, with no detectable expression of the WWOX gene. This suggests that the scarcity of PTPRD and WWOX genes might have played an important role in progression of HNSCC, and could be considered as a target for cancer therapy or a biomarker in molecular pathology.

  12. Genomic Alteration in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (HNSCC) Cell Lines Inferred from Karyotyping, Molecular Cytogenetics, and Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Rerkarmnuaychoke, Budsaba; Suntronpong, Aorarat; Fu, Beiyuan; Bodhisuwan, Winai; Peyachoknagul, Surin; Yang, Fengtang; Koontongkaew, Sittichai; Srikulnath, Kornsorn

    2016-01-01

    Genomic alteration in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) was studied in two cell line pairs (HN30-HN31 and HN4-HN12) using conventional C-banding, multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization (M-FISH), and array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH). HN30 and HN4 were derived from primary lesions in the pharynx and base of tongue, respectively, and HN31 and HN12 were derived from lymph-node metastatic lesions belonging to the same patients. Gain of chromosome 1, 7, and 11 were shared in almost all cell lines. Hierarchical clustering revealed that HN31 was closely related to HN4, which shared eight chromosome alteration cases. Large C-positive heterochromatins were found in the centromeric region of chromosome 9 in HN31 and HN4, which suggests complex structural amplification of the repetitive sequence. Array CGH revealed amplification of 7p22.3p11.2, 8q11.23q12.1, and 14q32.33 in all cell lines involved with tumorigenesis and inflammation genes. The amplification of 2p21 (SIX3), 11p15.5 (H19), and 11q21q22.3 (MAML2, PGR, TRPC6, and MMP family) regions, and deletion of 9p23 (PTPRD) and 16q23.1 (WWOX) regions were identified in HN31 and HN12. Interestingly, partial loss of PTPRD (9p23) and WWOX (16q23.1) genes was identified in HN31 and HN12, and the level of gene expression tended to be the down-regulation of PTPRD, with no detectable expression of the WWOX gene. This suggests that the scarcity of PTPRD and WWOX genes might have played an important role in progression of HNSCC, and could be considered as a target for cancer therapy or a biomarker in molecular pathology. PMID:27501229

  13. Investigation of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Outbreak on an Adult Stem Cell Transplant Unit by Use of Whole-Genome Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yijun; Zembower, Teresa R; Metzger, Kristen E; Lei, Zhengdeng; Green, Stefan J; Qi, Chao

    2017-10-01

    A viral whole-genome sequencing (WGS) strategy, based on PCR amplification followed by next-generation sequencing, was used to investigate a nosocomial respiratory syncytial virus-B (RSV-B) outbreak in a hematology-oncology and stem cell transplant unit. RSV-B genomes from 16 patients and health care workers (HCWs) suspected to be involved in the outbreak were compared to RSV-B genomes that were acquired from outpatients during the same time period but epidemiologically unrelated to the outbreak. Phylogenetic analysis of the whole genome identified a cluster of 11 patients and HCWs who had an identical RSV-B strain which was clearly distinct from strains recovered from individuals unrelated to the outbreak. Sequence variation of the glycoprotein (G) gene alone was insufficient to distinguish the outbreak strains from the outbreak-unrelated strains, thereby demonstrating that WGS is valuable for local outbreak investigation. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  14. Targeted Genome Editing in Human Repopulating Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Genovese, Pietro; Tomaso, Tiziano Di; Firrito, Claudia; Calabria, Andrea; Moi, Davide; Mazzieri, Roberta; Bonini, Chiara; Holmes, Michael C.; Gregory, Philip D.; van der Burg, Mirjam; Gentner, Bernhard; Montini, Eugenio; Lombardo, Angelo; Naldini, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Targeted genome editing by artificial nucleases has brought the goal of site-specific transgene integration and gene correction within the reach of gene therapy. However, its application to long-term repopulating Hematopoietic Stem Cells (HSCs) has remained elusive. Here we show that poor permissiveness to gene transfer and limited proficiency of the homology directed DNA repair pathway constrain gene targeting in human HSCs. By tailoring delivery platforms and culture conditions we overcame these barriers and provide stringent evidence of targeted integration in human HSCs by long-term multilineage repopulation of transplanted mice. We demonstrate the therapeutic potential of our strategy by targeting a corrective cDNA into the IL2RG gene of HSCs from healthy donors and a subject with X-linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID-X1). Gene edited HSCs sustained normal hematopoiesis and gave rise to functional lymphoid cells that possess a selective growth advantage over those carrying disruptive IL2RG mutations. These results open new avenues for treating SCID-X1 and other diseases. PMID:24870228

  15. Squamous cell lung cancer: from tumor genomics to cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Gandara, David R; Hammerman, Peter S; Sos, Martin L; Lara, Primo N; Hirsch, Fred R

    2015-05-15

    Squamous cell lung cancer (SCC) represents an area of unmet need in lung cancer research. For the past several years, therapeutic progress in SCC has lagged behind the now more common non-small cell lung cancer histologic subtype of adenocarcinoma. However, recent efforts to define the complex biology underlying SCC have begun to bear fruit in a multitude of ways, including characterization of previously unknown genomic and signaling pathways, delineation of new, potentially actionable molecular targets, and subsequent development of a large number of agents directed against unique SCC-associated molecular abnormalities. For the first time, SCC-specific prognostic gene signatures and predictive biomarkers of new therapeutic agents are emerging. In addition, recent and ongoing clinical trials, including the Lung-MAP master protocol, have been designed to facilitate approval of targeted therapy-biomarker combinations. In this comprehensive review, we describe the current status of SCC therapeutics, recent advances in the understanding of SCC biology and prognostic gene signatures, and the development of innovative new clinical trials, all of which offer new hope for patients with advanced SCC.

  16. p53-Dependent suppression of genome instability in germ cells.

    PubMed

    Otozai, Shinji; Ishikawa-Fujiwara, Tomoko; Oda, Shoji; Kamei, Yasuhiro; Ryo, Haruko; Sato, Ayuko; Nomura, Taisei; Mitani, Hiroshi; Tsujimura, Tohru; Inohara, Hidenori; Todo, Takeshi

    2014-02-01

    Radiation increases mutation frequencies at tandem repeat loci. Germline mutations in γ-ray-irradiated medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) were studied, focusing on the microsatellite loci. Mismatch-repair genes suppress microsatellite mutation by directly removing altered sequences at the nucleotide level, whereas the p53 gene suppresses genetic alterations by eliminating damaged cells. The contribution of these two defense mechanisms to radiation-induced microsatellite instability was addressed. The spontaneous mutation frequency was significantly higher in msh2(-/-) males than in wild-type fish, whereas there was no difference in the frequency of radiation-induced mutations between msh2(-/-) and wild-type fish. By contrast, irradiated p53(-/-) fish exhibited markedly increased mutation frequencies, whereas their spontaneous mutation frequency was the same as that of wild-type fish. In the spermatogonia of the testis, radiation induced a high level of apoptosis both in wild-type and msh2(-/-) fish, but negligible levels in p53(-/-) fish. The results demonstrate that the msh2 and p53 genes protect genome integrity against spontaneous and radiation-induced mutation by two different pathways: direct removal of mismatches and elimination of damaged cells.

  17. Mutational and structural analysis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma using whole genome sequencing | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Abstract: Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is a genetically heterogeneous cancer comprising at least two molecular subtypes that differ in gene expression and distribution of mutations. Recently, application of genome/exome sequencing and RNA-seq to DLBCL has revealed numerous genes that are recurrent targets of somatic point mutation in this disease.

  18. Genome-wide profiling of S/MAR-based replicon contact sites

    PubMed Central

    Gogol-Döring, Andreas; Schreiber, Sabrina; Epplen, Jörg T.; Lipps, Hans J.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Autonomously replicating vectors represent a simple and versatile model system for genetic modifications, but their localization in the nucleus and effect on endogenous gene expression is largely unknown. Using circular chromosome conformation capture we mapped genomic contact sites of S/MAR-based replicons in HeLa cells. The influence of cis-active sequences on genomic localization was assessed using replicons containing either an insulator sequence or an intron. While the original and the insulator-containing replicons displayed distinct contact sites, the intron-containing replicon showed a rather broad genomic contact pattern. Our results indicate a preference for certain chromatin structures and a rather non-dynamic behaviour during mitosis. Independent of inserted cis-active elements established vector molecules reside preferentially within actively transcribed regions, especially within promoter sequences and transcription start sites. However, transcriptome analyses revealed that established S/MAR-based replicons do not alter gene expression profiles of host genome. Knowledge of preferred contact sites of exogenous DNA, e.g. viral or non-viral episomes, contribute to our understanding of episome behaviour in the nucleus and can be used for vector improvement and guiding of DNA sequences to specific subnuclear sites. PMID:28609784

  19. Genome-wide profiling of S/MAR-based replicon contact sites.

    PubMed

    Hagedorn, Claudia; Gogol-Döring, Andreas; Schreiber, Sabrina; Epplen, Jörg T; Lipps, Hans J

    2017-07-27

    Autonomously replicating vectors represent a simple and versatile model system for genetic modifications, but their localization in the nucleus and effect on endogenous gene expression is largely unknown. Using circular chromosome conformation capture we mapped genomic contact sites of S/MAR-based replicons in HeLa cells. The influence of cis-active sequences on genomic localization was assessed using replicons containing either an insulator sequence or an intron. While the original and the insulator-containing replicons displayed distinct contact sites, the intron-containing replicon showed a rather broad genomic contact pattern. Our results indicate a preference for certain chromatin structures and a rather non-dynamic behaviour during mitosis. Independent of inserted cis-active elements established vector molecules reside preferentially within actively transcribed regions, especially within promoter sequences and transcription start sites. However, transcriptome analyses revealed that established S/MAR-based replicons do not alter gene expression profiles of host genome. Knowledge of preferred contact sites of exogenous DNA, e.g. viral or non-viral episomes, contribute to our understanding of episome behaviour in the nucleus and can be used for vector improvement and guiding of DNA sequences to specific subnuclear sites. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. [First experiences with preimplantation genetic screening of chromosomal aberrations using oligonucleotide-based array comparative genomic hybridization].

    PubMed

    Kuglík, Petr; Smetana, Jan; Němcová, Darja; Vallová, Vladimíra; Mikulášová, Aneta; Gaillyová, Renata; Hubinka, Vít; Koudelka, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is a complex approach for detecting genetic abnormalities in early-stage embryos using genetic or molecular cytogenetic methods. Recently, single cell genomic methods based on DNA microarrays have been used for PGD. In the presented paper, we discuss and demonstrate the possibility to detect copy number variation (CNVs) in trophectoderm cells biopsied from 5-day embryos using 60-mer oligonucleotide-based array-CGH with CytoSure 8 × 15K Aneuploidy Array. Whereas this microarray platform was originally designed for analysis of unamplified DNA derived from many cells, the new methods, developed for single-cell genomics, allow the application of oligo arrays technology in preimplanation genetic diagnosis. Preclinical validation of single cell array-CGH was made by analysis of 30 positive and negative controls. Validation process included whole genome amplification of DNA from 5-10 cells with normal karyotype and from samples with known aneuploidies and structural aberrations. Subsequently, we analyzed the whole genome profiles in 118 embryos; aneuploidies of chromosomes were observed in 26.7%; segmental imbalances were proved in 6.8% of embryos. Our first experience confirmed that this oligonucleotide-based array technique enables high-resolution preimplantation aneuploidy screening of all the 23 chromosome pairs and sensitive preimplantation diagnosis of segmental imbalances such as deletions, duplications and amplifications.

  1. A method for detecting significant genomic regions associated with oral squamous cell carcinoma using aCGH.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Yeol; Kim, Jin; Kim, Hyung Jun; Nam, Woong; Cha, In-Ho

    2010-05-01

    Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) provides a genome-wide technique for identifying chromosomal aberrations in human diseases, including cancer. Chromosomal aberrations in cancers are defined as regions that contain an increased or decreased DNA copy number, relative to normal samples. The identification of genomic regions associated with systematic aberrations provides insights into initiation and progression of cancer, and improves diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy strategies. The McNemar test can be used to detect differentially expressed genes after discretization of gene expressions in a microarray experiment for the matched dataset. In this study, we propose a method to detect significantly altered DNA regions, shifted McNemar test, which is based on the standard McNemar test and takes into account changes in copy number variations and the region size throughout the whole genome. In addition, this novel method can be used to detect genomic regions associated with the progress of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The performance of the proposed method was evaluated based on the homogeneity within the selected regions and the classification accuracies of the selected regions. This method might be useful for identifying new candidate genes that neighbor known genes based on the whole-genomic variation because it detects significant chromosomal regions, not independent probes.

  2. Chromatin modifications and genomic contexts linked to dynamic DNA methylation patterns across human cell types

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Haidan; Zhang, Dongwei; Liu, Hongbo; Wei, Yanjun; Lv, Jie; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Chunlong; Wu, Qiong; Su, Jianzhong; Zhang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is related closely to sequence contexts and chromatin modifications; however, their potential differences in different genomic regions across cell types remain largely unexplored. We used publicly available genome-scale DNA methylation and histone modification profiles to study their relationships among different genomic regions in human embryonic stem cells (H1), H1-derived neuronal progenitor cultured cells (NPC), and foetal fibroblasts (IMR90) using the Random forests classifier. Histone modifications achieved high accuracy in modelling DNA methylation patterns on a genome scale in the three cell types. The inclusion of sequence features helped improve accuracy only in non-promoter regions of IMR90. Furthermore, the top six feature combinations obtained by mean decrease Gini were important indicators of different DNA methylation patterns, suggesting that H3K4me2 and H3K4me3 are important indicators that are independent of genomic regions and cell types. H3K9me3 was IMR90-specific and exhibited a genomic region-specific correlation with DNA methylation. Variations of essential chromatin modification signals may effectively discriminate changes of DNA methylation between H1 and IMR90. Genes with different co-variations of epigenetic marks exhibited genomic region-specific biological relevance. This study provides an integrated strategy to identify systematically essential epigenetic and genetic elements of genomic region-specific and cell type-specific DNA methylation patterns. PMID:25673498

  3. Integrated Genome-Based Studies of Shewanella Ecophysiology

    SciTech Connect

    Andrei L. Osterman, Ph.D.

    2012-12-17

    Integration of bioinformatics and experimental techniques was applied to mapping and characterization of the key components (pathways, enzymes, transporters, regulators) of the core metabolic machinery in Shewanella oneidensis and related species with main focus was on metabolic and regulatory pathways involved in utilization of various carbon and energy sources. Among the main accomplishments reflected in ten joint publications with other participants of Shewanella Federation are: (i) A systems-level reconstruction of carbohydrate utilization pathways in the genus of Shewanella (19 species). This analysis yielded reconstruction of 18 sugar utilization pathways including 10 novel pathway variants and prediction of > 60 novel protein families of enzymes, transporters and regulators involved in these pathways. Selected functional predictions were verified by focused biochemical and genetic experiments. Observed growth phenotypes were consistent with bioinformatic predictions providing strong validation of the technology and (ii) Global genomic reconstruction of transcriptional regulons in 16 Shewanella genomes. The inferred regulatory network includes 82 transcription factors, 8 riboswitches and 6 translational attenuators. Of those, 45 regulons were inferred directly from the genome context analysis, whereas others were propagated from previously characterized regulons in other species. Selected regulatory predictions were experimentally tested. Integration of this analysis with microarray data revealed overall consistency and provided additional layer of interactions between regulons. All the results were captured in the new database RegPrecise, which is a joint development with the LBNL team. A more detailed analysis of the individual subsystems, pathways and regulons in Shewanella spp included bioinfiormatics-based prediction and experimental characterization of: (i) N-Acetylglucosamine catabolic pathway; (ii)Lactate utilization machinery; (iii) Novel Nrt

  4. Array comparative genomic hybridization-based characterization of genetic alterations in pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Voortman, Johannes; Lee, Jih-Hsiang; Killian, Jonathan Keith; Suuriniemi, Miia; Wang, Yonghong; Lucchi, Marco; Smith, William I; Meltzer, Paul; Wang, Yisong; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2010-07-20

    The goal of this study was to characterize and classify pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors based on array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). Using aCGH, we performed karyotype analysis of 33 small cell lung cancer (SCLC) tumors, 13 SCLC cell lines, 19 bronchial carcinoids, and 9 gastrointestinal carcinoids. In contrast to the relatively conserved karyotypes of carcinoid tumors, the karyotypes of SCLC tumors and cell lines were highly aberrant. High copy number (CN) gains were detected in SCLC tumors and cell lines in cytogenetic bands encoding JAK2, FGFR1, and MYC family members. In some of those samples, the CN of these genes exceeded 100, suggesting that they could represent driver alterations and potential drug targets in subgroups of SCLC patients. In SCLC tumors, as well as bronchial carcinoids and carcinoids of gastrointestinal origin, recurrent CN alterations were observed in 203 genes, including the RB1 gene and 59 microRNAs of which 51 locate in the DLK1-DIO3 domain. These findings suggest the existence of partially shared CN alterations in these tumor types. In contrast, CN alterations of the TP53 gene and the MYC family members were predominantly observed in SCLC. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the aCGH profile of SCLC cell lines highly resembles that of clinical SCLC specimens. Finally, by analyzing potential drug targets, we provide a genomics-based rationale for targeting the AKT-mTOR and apoptosis pathways in SCLC.

  5. Genome-wide analysis of LXRα activation reveals new transcriptional networks in human atherosclerotic foam cells.

    PubMed

    Feldmann, Radmila; Fischer, Cornelius; Kodelja, Vitam; Behrens, Sarah; Haas, Stefan; Vingron, Martin; Timmermann, Bernd; Geikowski, Anne; Sauer, Sascha

    2013-04-01

    Increased physiological levels of oxysterols are major risk factors for developing atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. Lipid-loaded macrophages, termed foam cells, are important during the early development of atherosclerotic plaques. To pursue the hypothesis that ligand-based modulation of the nuclear receptor LXRα is crucial for cell homeostasis during atherosclerotic processes, we analysed genome-wide the action of LXRα in foam cells and macrophages. By integrating chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-seq) and gene expression profile analyses, we generated a highly stringent set of 186 LXRα target genes. Treatment with the nanomolar-binding ligand T0901317 and subsequent auto-regulatory LXRα activation resulted in sequence-dependent sharpening of the genome-binding patterns of LXRα. LXRα-binding loci that correlated with differential gene expression revealed 32 novel target genes with potential beneficial effects, which in part explained the implications of disease-associated genetic variation data. These observations identified highly integrated LXRα ligand-dependent transcriptional networks, including the APOE/C1/C4/C2-gene cluster, which contribute to the reversal of cholesterol efflux and the dampening of inflammation processes in foam cells to prevent atherogenesis.

  6. TALENs facilitate targeted genome editing in human cells with high specificity and low cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Mussolino, Claudio; Alzubi, Jamal; Fine, Eli J; Morbitzer, Robert; Cradick, Thomas J; Lahaye, Thomas; Bao, Gang; Cathomen, Toni

    2014-06-01

    Designer nucleases have been successfully employed to modify the genomes of various model organisms and human cell types. While the specificity of zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) and RNA-guided endonucleases has been assessed to some extent, little data are available for transcription activator-like effector-based nucleases (TALENs). Here, we have engineered TALEN pairs targeting three human loci (CCR5, AAVS1 and IL2RG) and performed a detailed analysis of their activity, toxicity and specificity. The TALENs showed comparable activity to benchmark ZFNs, with allelic gene disruption frequencies of 15-30% in human cells. Notably, TALEN expression was overall marked by a low cytotoxicity and the absence of cell cycle aberrations. Bioinformatics-based analysis of designer nuclease specificity confirmed partly substantial off-target activity of ZFNs targeting CCR5 and AAVS1 at six known and five novel sites, respectively. In contrast, only marginal off-target cleavage activity was detected at four out of 49 predicted off-target sites for CCR5- and AAVS1-specific TALENs. The rational design of a CCR5-specific TALEN pair decreased off-target activity at the closely related CCR2 locus considerably, consistent with fewer genomic rearrangements between the two loci. In conclusion, our results link nuclease-associated toxicity to off-target cleavage activity and corroborate TALENs as a highly specific platform for future clinical translation.

  7. GeneSpeed Beta Cell: An Online Genomics Data Repository and Analysis Resource Tailored for the Islet Cell Biologist

    PubMed Central

    Quayum, Nayeem; Kutchma, Alecksandr; Sarkar, Suparna A.; Juhl, Kirstine; Gradwohl, Gerard; Mellitzer, Georg; Hutton, John C.; Jensen, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Objective. We here describe the development of a freely available online database resource, GeneSpeed Beta Cell, which has been created for the pancreatic islet and pancreatic developmental biology investigator community. Research Design and Methods. We have developed GeneSpeed Beta Cell as a separate component of the GeneSpeed database, providing a genomics-type data repository of pancreas and islet-relevant datasets interlinked with the domain-oriented GeneSpeed database. Results. GeneSpeed Beta Cell allows the query of multiple published and unpublished select genomics datasets in a simultaneous fashion (multiexperiment viewing) and is capable of defining intersection results from precomputed analysis of such datasets (multidimensional querying). Combined with the protein-domain categorization/assembly toolbox provided by the GeneSpeed database, the user is able to define spatial expression constraints of select gene lists in a relatively rigid fashion within the pancreatic expression space. We provide several demonstration case studies of relevance to islet cell biology and development of the pancreas that provide novel insight into islet biology. Conclusions. The combination of an exhaustive domain-based compilation of the transcriptome with gene array data of interest to the islet biologist affords novel methods for multidimensional querying between individual datasets in a rapid fashion, presently not available elsewhere. PMID:18795106

  8. Prioritization of anticancer drugs against a cancer using genomic features of cancer cells: A step towards personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sudheer; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Kumar, Rahul; Gautam, Ankur; Nanda, Jagpreet Singh; Dhanda, Sandeep Kumar; Brahmachari, Samir Kumar; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated drug profile of 24 anticancer drugs tested against a large number of cell lines in order to understand the relation between drug resistance and altered genomic features of a cancer cell line. We detected frequent mutations, high expression and high copy number variations of certain genes in both drug resistant cell lines and sensitive cell lines. It was observed that a few drugs, like Panobinostat, are effective against almost all types of cell lines, whereas certain drugs are effective against only a limited type of cell lines. Tissue-specific preference of drugs was also seen where a drug is more effective against cell lines belonging to a specific tissue. Genomic features based models have been developed for each anticancer drug and achieved average correlation between predicted and actual growth inhibition of cell lines in the range of 0.43 to 0.78. We hope, our study will throw light in the field of personalized medicine, particularly in designing patient-specific anticancer drugs. In order to serve the scientific community, a webserver, CancerDP, has been developed for predicting priority/potency of an anticancer drug against a cancer cell line using its genomic features (http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/cancerdp/). PMID:27030518

  9. Computational modelling of genome-scale metabolic networks and its application to CHO cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Rejc, Živa; Magdevska, Lidija; Tršelič, Tilen; Osolin, Timotej; Vodopivec, Rok; Mraz, Jakob; Pavliha, Eva; Zimic, Nikolaj; Cvitanović, Tanja; Rozman, Damjana; Moškon, Miha; Mraz, Miha

    2017-09-01

    Genome-scale metabolic models (GEMs) have become increasingly important in recent years. Currently, GEMs are the most accurate in silico representation of the genotype-phenotype link. They allow us to study complex networks from the systems perspective. Their application may drastically reduce the amount of experimental and clinical work, improve diagnostic tools and increase our understanding of complex biological phenomena. GEMs have also demonstrated high potential for the optimisation of bio-based production of recombinant proteins. Herein, we review the basic concepts, methods, resources and software tools used for the reconstruction and application of GEMs. We overview the evolution of the modelling efforts devoted to the metabolism of Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells. We present a case study on CHO cell metabolism under different amino acid depletions. This leads us to the identification of the most influential as well as essential amino acids in selected CHO cell lines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A critique of race-based and genomic medicine.

    PubMed

    Meier, Robert J

    2012-03-01

    Now that a composite human genome has been sequenced (HGP), research has accelerated to discover precise genetic bases of several chronic health issues, particularly in the realms of cancer and cardiovascular disease. It is anticipated that in the future it will be possible and cost effective to regularly sequence individual genomes, and thereby produce a DNA profile that potentially can be used to assess the health risks for each person with respect to certain genetically predisposed conditions. Coupled with that enormous diagnostic power, it will then depend upon equally rapid research efforts to develop personalized courses of treatment, including that of pharmaceutical therapy. Initial treatment attempts have been made to match drug efficacy and safety to individuals of assigned or self-identified groups according to their genetic ancestry or presumed race. A prime example is that of BiDil, which was the first drug approved by the US FDA for the explicit treatment of heart patients of African American ancestry. This race-based approach to medicine has been met with justifiable criticism, notably on ethical grounds that have long plagued historical applications and misuses of human race classification, and also on questionable science. This paper will assess race-based medical research and practice in light of a more thorough understanding of human genetic variability. Additional concerns will be expressed with regard to the rapidly developing area of pharmacogenomics, promoted to be the future of personalized medicine. Genomic epidemiology will be discussed with several examples of on-going research that hopefully will provide a solid scientific grounding for personalized medicine to build upon.

  11. Cell Context Dependent p53 Genome-Wide Binding Patterns and Enrichment at Repeats

    DOE PAGES

    Botcheva, Krassimira; McCorkle, Sean R.

    2014-11-21

    The p53 ability to elicit stress specific and cell type specific responses is well recognized, but how that specificity is established remains to be defined. Whether upon activation p53 binds to its genomic targets in a cell type and stress type dependent manner is still an open question. Here we show that the p53 binding to the human genome is selective and cell context-dependent. We mapped the genomic binding sites for the endogenous wild type p53 protein in the human cancer cell line HCT116 and compared them to those we previously determined in the normal cell line IMR90. We reportmore » distinct p53 genome-wide binding landscapes in two different cell lines, analyzed under the same treatment and experimental conditions, using the same ChIP-seq approach. This is evidence for cell context dependent p53 genomic binding. The observed differences affect the p53 binding sites distribution with respect to major genomic and epigenomic elements (promoter regions, CpG islands and repeats). We correlated the high-confidence p53 ChIP-seq peaks positions with the annotated human repeats (UCSC Human Genome Browser) and observed both common and cell line specific trends. In HCT116, the p53 binding was specifically enriched at LINE repeats, compared to IMR90 cells. The p53 genome-wide binding patterns in HCT116 and IMR90 likely reflect the different epigenetic landscapes in these two cell lines, resulting from cancer-associated changes (accumulated in HCT116) superimposed on tissue specific differences (HCT116 has epithelial, while IMR90 has mesenchymal origin). In conclusion, our data support the model for p53 binding to the human genome in a highly selective manner, mobilizing distinct sets of genes, contributing to distinct pathways.« less

  12. Cell Context Dependent p53 Genome-Wide Binding Patterns and Enrichment at Repeats

    SciTech Connect

    Botcheva, Krassimira; McCorkle, Sean R.

    2014-11-21

    The p53 ability to elicit stress specific and cell type specific responses is well recognized, but how that specificity is established remains to be defined. Whether upon activation p53 binds to its genomic targets in a cell type and stress type dependent manner is still an open question. Here we show that the p53 binding to the human genome is selective and cell context-dependent. We mapped the genomic binding sites for the endogenous wild type p53 protein in the human cancer cell line HCT116 and compared them to those we previously determined in the normal cell line IMR90. We report distinct p53 genome-wide binding landscapes in two different cell lines, analyzed under the same treatment and experimental conditions, using the same ChIP-seq approach. This is evidence for cell context dependent p53 genomic binding. The observed differences affect the p53 binding sites distribution with respect to major genomic and epigenomic elements (promoter regions, CpG islands and repeats). We correlated the high-confidence p53 ChIP-seq peaks positions with the annotated human repeats (UCSC Human Genome Browser) and observed both common and cell line specific trends. In HCT116, the p53 binding was specifically enriched at LINE repeats, compared to IMR90 cells. The p53 genome-wide binding patterns in HCT116 and IMR90 likely reflect the different epigenetic landscapes in these two cell lines, resulting from cancer-associated changes (accumulated in HCT116) superimposed on tissue specific differences (HCT116 has epithelial, while IMR90 has mesenchymal origin). In conclusion, our data support the model for p53 binding to the human genome in a highly selective manner, mobilizing distinct sets of genes, contributing to distinct pathways.

  13. Cell context dependent p53 genome-wide binding patterns and enrichment at repeats.

    PubMed

    Botcheva, Krassimira; McCorkle, Sean R

    2014-01-01

    The p53 ability to elicit stress specific and cell type specific responses is well recognized, but how that specificity is established remains to be defined. Whether upon activation p53 binds to its genomic targets in a cell type and stress type dependent manner is still an open question. Here we show that the p53 binding to the human genome is selective and cell context-dependent. We mapped the genomic binding sites for the endogenous wild type p53 protein in the human cancer cell line HCT116 and compared them to those we previously determined in the normal cell line IMR90. We report distinct p53 genome-wide binding landscapes in two different cell lines, analyzed under the same treatment and experimental conditions, using the same ChIP-seq approach. This is evidence for cell context dependent p53 genomic binding. The observed differences affect the p53 binding sites distribution with respect to major genomic and epigenomic elements (promoter regions, CpG islands and repeats). We correlated the high-confidence p53 ChIP-seq peaks positions with the annotated human repeats (UCSC Human Genome Browser) and observed both common and cell line specific trends. In HCT116, the p53 binding was specifically enriched at LINE repeats, compared to IMR90 cells. The p53 genome-wide binding patterns in HCT116 and IMR90 likely reflect the different epigenetic landscapes in these two cell lines, resulting from cancer-associated changes (accumulated in HCT116) superimposed on tissue specific differences (HCT116 has epithelial, while IMR90 has mesenchymal origin). Our data support the model for p53 binding to the human genome in a highly selective manner, mobilizing distinct sets of genes, contributing to distinct pathways.

  14. Cell Context Dependent p53 Genome-Wide Binding Patterns and Enrichment at Repeats

    PubMed Central

    Botcheva, Krassimira; McCorkle, Sean R.

    2014-01-01

    The p53 ability to elicit stress specific and cell type specific responses is well recognized, but how that specificity is established remains to be defined. Whether upon activation p53 binds to its genomic targets in a cell type and stress type dependent manner is still an open question. Here we show that the p53 binding to the human genome is selective and cell context-dependent. We mapped the genomic binding sites for the endogenous wild type p53 protein in the human cancer cell line HCT116 and compared them to those we previously determined in the normal cell line IMR90. We report distinct p53 genome-wide binding landscapes in two different cell lines, analyzed under the same treatment and experimental conditions, using the same ChIP-seq approach. This is evidence for cell context dependent p53 genomic binding. The observed differences affect the p53 binding sites distribution with respect to major genomic and epigenomic elements (promoter regions, CpG islands and repeats). We correlated the high-confidence p53 ChIP-seq peaks positions with the annotated human repeats (UCSC Human Genome Browser) and observed both common and cell line specific trends. In HCT116, the p53 binding was specifically enriched at LINE repeats, compared to IMR90 cells. The p53 genome-wide binding patterns in HCT116 and IMR90 likely reflect the different epigenetic landscapes in these two cell lines, resulting from cancer-associated changes (accumulated in HCT116) superimposed on tissue specific differences (HCT116 has epithelial, while IMR90 has mesenchymal origin). Our data support the model for p53 binding to the human genome in a highly selective manner, mobilizing distinct sets of genes, contributing to distinct pathways. PMID:25415302

  15. Genome editing and stem cell therapy pave the path for new treatment of sickle-cell disease.

    PubMed

    Randolph, Mary Katherine; Zhao, Wanke

    2015-01-01

    Sickle-cell disease (SCD), also known as sickle-cell anemia, is a hereditary blood disorder characterized by the presence of abnormal hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying protein found in red blood cells. This devastating hematologic disease affects millions of children worldwide. Currently the only available cure is an allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) which is limited by the scarcity of fully-matched donors. SCD is caused by a single nucleotide mutation in the beta-globin gene. Correction of this genetic defect would provide a cure for the disease. Two recent murine studies have provided proof of principle for such a strategy by correcting the mutation in hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) using genome editing techniques. With transformative advances being made in the genome editing field, effective and precise manipulation of cellular genomes is becoming highly feasible. Genome editing techniques in combination with stem cell therapy should provide a safe and curative treatment of various genetic diseases such as SCD.

  16. Neogastropod phylogenetic relationships based on entire mitochondrial genomes

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Regina L; Grande, Cristina; Zardoya, Rafael

    2009-01-01

    Background The Neogastropoda is a highly diversified group of predatory marine snails (Gastropoda: Caenogastropoda). Traditionally, its monophyly has been widely accepted based on several morphological synapomorphies mostly related with the digestive system. However, recent molecular phylogenetic studies challenged the monophyly of Neogastropoda due to the inclusion of representatives of other caenogastropod lineages (e.g. Littorinimorpha) within the group. Neogastropoda has been classified into up to six superfamilies including Buccinoidea, Muricoidea, Olivoidea, Pseudolivoidea, Conoidea, and Cancellarioidea. Phylogenetic relationships among neogastropod superfamilies remain unresolved. Results The complete mitochondrial (mt) genomes of seven Neogastropoda (Bolinus brandaris, Cancellaria cancellata, Conus borgesi, Cymbium olla, Fusiturris similis, Nassarius reticulatus, and Terebra dimidiata) and of the tonnoidean Cymatium parthenopeum (Littorinimorpha), a putative sister group to Neogastropoda, were sequenced. In addition, the partial sequence of the mitochondrial genome of the calyptraeoidean Calyptraea chinensis (Littorinimorpha) was also determined. All sequenced neogastropod mt genomes shared a highly conserved gene order with only two instances of tRNA gene translocation. Phylogenetic relationships of Neogastropoda were inferred based on the 13 mt protein coding genes (both at the amino acid and nucleotide level) of all available caenogastropod mitochondrial genomes. Maximum likelihood (ML) and Bayesian inference (BI) phylogenetic analyses failed to recover the monophyly of Neogastropoda due to the inclusion of the tonnoidean Cymatium parthenopeum within the group. At the superfamily level, all phylogenetic analyses questioned the taxonomic validity of Muricoidea, whereas the monophyly of Conoidea was supported by most phylogenetic analyses, albeit weakly. All analyzed families were recovered as monophyletic except Turridae due to the inclusion of Terebridae

  17. Single-cell Sequencing of Thiomargarita Reveals Genomic Flexibility for Adaptation to Dynamic Redox Conditions.

    PubMed

    Winkel, Matthias; Salman-Carvalho, Verena; Woyke, Tanja; Richter, Michael; Schulz-Vogt, Heide N; Flood, Beverly E; Bailey, Jake V; Mußmann, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Large, colorless sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (LSB) of the family Beggiatoaceae form thick mats at sulfidic sediment surfaces, where they efficiently detoxify sulfide before it enters the water column. The genus Thiomargarita harbors the largest known free-living bacteria with cell sizes of up to 750 μm in diameter. In addition to their ability to oxidize reduced sulfur compounds, some Thiomargarita spp. are known to store large amounts of nitrate, phosphate and elemental sulfur internally. To date little is known about their energy yielding metabolic pathways, and how these pathways compare to other Beggiatoaceae. Here, we present a draft single-cell genome of a chain-forming "Candidatus Thiomargarita nelsonii Thio36", and conduct a comparative analysis to five draft and one full genome of other members of the Beggiatoaceae. "Ca. T. nelsonii Thio36" is able to respire nitrate to both ammonium and dinitrogen, which allows them to flexibly respond to environmental changes. Genes for sulfur oxidation and inorganic carbon fixation confirmed that "Ca. T. nelsonii Thio36" can function as a chemolithoautotroph. Carbon can be fixed via the Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle, which is common among the Beggiatoaceae. In addition we found key genes of the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle that point toward an alternative CO2 fixation pathway. Surprisingly, "Ca. T. nelsonii Thio36" also encodes key genes of the C2-cycle that convert 2-phosphoglycolate to 3-phosphoglycerate during photorespiration in higher plants and cyanobacteria. Moreover, we identified a novel trait of a flavin-based energy bifurcation pathway coupled to a Na(+)-translocating membrane complex (Rnf). The coupling of these pathways may be key to surviving long periods of anoxia. As other Beggiatoaceae "Ca. T. nelsonii Thio36" encodes many genes similar to those of (filamentous) cyanobacteria. In summary, the genome of "Ca. T. nelsonii Thio36" provides additional insight into the ecology of giant sulfur

  18. G&T-seq: parallel sequencing of single-cell genomes and transcriptomes.

    PubMed

    Macaulay, Iain C; Haerty, Wilfried; Kumar, Parveen; Li, Yang I; Hu, Tim Xiaoming; Teng, Mabel J; Goolam, Mubeen; Saurat, Nathalie; Coupland, Paul; Shirley, Lesley M; Smith, Miriam; Van der Aa, Niels; Banerjee, Ruby; Ellis, Peter D; Quail, Michael A; Swerdlow, Harold P; Zernicka-Goetz, Magdalena; Livesey, Frederick J; Ponting, Chris P; Voet, Thierry

    2015-06-01

    The simultaneous sequencing of a single cell's genome and transcriptome offers a powerful means to dissect genetic variation and its effect on gene expression. Here we describe G&T-seq, a method for separating and sequencing genomic DNA and full-length mRNA from single cells. By applying G&T-seq to over 220 single cells from mice and humans, we discovered cellular properties that could not be inferred from DNA or RNA sequencing alone.

  19. Human embryonic stem cells reveal recurrent genomic instability at 20q11.21.

    PubMed

    Lefort, Nathalie; Feyeux, Maxime; Bas, Cécile; Féraud, Olivier; Bennaceur-Griscelli, Annelise; Tachdjian, Gerard; Peschanski, Marc; Perrier, Anselme L

    2008-12-01

    By analyzing five human embryonic stem (hES) cell lines over long-term culture, we identified a recurrent genomic instability in the human genome. An amplification of 2.5-4.6 Mb at 20q11.21, encompassing approximately 23 genes in common, was detected in four cell lines of different origins. This amplification, which has been associated with oncogenic transformation, may provide a selective advantage to hES cells in culture.

  20. Human genome-specific real-time PCR method for sensitive detection and reproducible quantitation of human cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Song, Pengyue; Xie, Zhenhua; Guo, Ling; Wang, Chengmei; Xie, Weidong; Wu, Yaojiong

    2012-12-01

    Xenotransplantation of human cells into immunodeficiency mice has been frequently used to study stem cells in tissue repair and regeneration and cancer cell metastasis. However, a sensitive and reproducible method to quantify cell engraftment lacks. Here, we developed a Real-Time PCR-based method which facilitated consistent detection and quantification of small amounts of human cells distributed in mouse organs after infusion. The principle of the method was to directly detect a humans-specific sequence in the human-murine genomic DNA mixture. In a mouse myocardial infarction model, the Real-Time PCR-based method consistently determined the amounts of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) engrafted into the heart and other organs 7 days after infusion of as little as 2.5 × 10(5) cells, indicating a high sensitivity, and the amounts of hMSCs detected in mice highly correlated to the numbers of hMSCs transplanted. Importantly, different from previous PCR-based methods, our method produced highly consistent and reproducible results. The reliability of the method was further proven by parallel analyses of DiI-labeled hMSCs in tissue sections and in single cell suspensions of mice. Our data show that the present human genomic DNA-specific primers-based Real-Time PCR method is sensitive and highly reproducible in determining the amount of xenotransplanted human cells in murine tissues.

  1. The genome of the chicken DT40 bursal lymphoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Molnár, János; Póti, Ádám; Pipek, Orsolya; Krzystanek, Marcin; Kanu, Nnennaya; Swanton, Charles; Tusnády, Gábor E; Szallasi, Zoltan; Csabai, István; Szüts, Dávid

    2014-09-15

    The chicken DT40 cell line is a widely used model system in the study of multiple cellular processes due to the efficiency of homologous gene targeting. The cell line was derived from a bursal lymphoma induced by avian leukosis virus infection. In this study we characterized the genome of the cell line using whole genome shotgun sequencing and single nucleotide polymorphism array hybridization. The results indicate that wild-type DT40 has a relatively normal karyotype, except for whole chromosome copy number gains, and no karyotype variability within stocks. In a comparison to two domestic chicken genomes and the Gallus gallus reference genome, we found no unique mutational processes shaping the DT40 genome except for a mild increase in insertion and deletion events, particularly deletions at tandem repeats. We mapped coding sequence mutations that are unique to the DT40 genome; mutations inactivating the PIK3R1 and ATRX genes likely contributed to the oncogenic transformation. In addition to a known avian leukosis virus integration in the MYC gene, we detected further integration sites that are likely to de-regulate gene expression. The new findings support the hypothesis that DT40 is a typical transformed cell line with a relatively intact genome; therefore, it is well-suited to the role of a model system for DNA repair and related processes. The sequence data generated by this study, including a searchable de novo genome assembly and annotated lists of mutated genes, will support future research using this cell line.

  2. cDNA-AFLP-based genetical genomics in cotton fibers.

    PubMed

    Claverie, Michel; Souquet, Marlène; Jean, Janine; Forestier-Chiron, Nelly; Lepitre, Vincent; Pré, Martial; Jacobs, John; Llewellyn, Danny; Lacape, Jean-Marc

    2012-03-01

    Genetical genomics, or genetic analysis applied to gene expression data, has not been widely used in plants. We used quantitative cDNA-AFLP to monitor the variation in the expression level of cotton fiber transcripts among a population of inter-specific Gossypium hirsutum × G. barbadense recombinant inbred lines (RILs). Two key fiber developmental stages, elongation (10 days post anthesis, dpa), and secondary cell wall thickening (22 dpa), were studied. Normalized intensity ratios of 3,263 and 1,201 transcript-derived fragments (TDFs) segregating over 88 RILs were analyzed for quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping for the 10 and 22 dpa fibers, respectively. Two-thirds of all TDFs mapped between 1 and 6 eQTLs (LOD > 3.5). Chromosome 21 had a higher density of eQTLs than other chromosomes in both data sets and, within chromosomes, hotspots of presumably trans-acting eQTLs were identified. The eQTL hotspots were compared to the location of phenotypic QTLs for fiber characteristics among the RILs, and several cases of co-localization were detected. Quantitative RT-PCR for 15 sequenced TDFs showed that 3 TDFs had at least one eQTL at a similar location to those identified by cDNA-AFLP, while 3 other TDFs mapped an eQTL at a similar location but with opposite additive effect. In conclusion, cDNA-AFLP proved to be a cost-effective and highly transferable platform for genome-wide and population-wide gene expression profiling. Because TDFs are anonymous, further validation and interpretation (in silico analysis, qPCR gene profiling) of the eQTL and eQTL hotspots will be facilitated by the increasing availability of cDNA and genomic sequence resources in cotton.

  3. Single-cell Genomics Unveils Critical Regulators of Th17 cell Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Gaublomme, Jellert T.; Yosef, Nir; Lee, Youjin; Gertner, Rona S.; Yang, Li V.; Wu, Chuan; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Mak, Tak; Satija, Rahul; Shalek, Alex K.; Kuchroo, Vijay K.; Park, Hongkun; Regev, Aviv

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Extensive cellular heterogeneity exists within specific immune-cell subtypes classified as a single lineage, but its molecular underpinnings are rarely characterized at a genomic scale. Here, we use single-cell RNA-seq to investigate the molecular mechanisms governing heterogeneity and pathogenicity of Th17 cells isolated from the central nervous system (CNS) and lymph nodes (LN) at the peak of autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) or differentiated in vitro under either pathogenic or non-pathogenic polarization conditions. Computational analysis relates a spectrum of cellular states in vivo to in vitro differentiated Th17 cells, and unveils genes governing pathogenicity and disease susceptibility. Using knockout mice, we validate four new genes: Gpr65, Plzp, Toso and Cd5l (in a companion paper). Cellular heterogeneity thus informs Th17 function in autoimmunity, and can identify targets for selective suppression of pathogenic Th17 cells while potentially sparing non-pathogenic tissue-protective ones. PMID:26607794

  4. Transcriptome-guided characterization of genomic rearrangements in a breast cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qi; Caballero, Otavia L; Levy, Samuel; Stevenson, Brian J; Iseli, Christian; de Souza, Sandro J; Galante, Pedro A; Busam, Dana; Leversha, Margaret A; Chadalavada, Kalyani; Rogers, Yu-Hui; Venter, J Craig; Simpson, Andrew J G; Strausberg, Robert L

    2009-02-10

    We have identified new genomic alterations in the breast cancer cell line HCC1954, using high-throughput transcriptome sequencing. With 120 Mb of cDNA sequences, we were able to identify genomic rearrangement events leading to fusions or truncations of genes including MRE11 and NSD1, genes already implicated in oncogenesis, and 7 rearrangements involving other additional genes. This approach demonstrates that high-throughput transcriptome sequencing is an effective strategy for the characterization of genomic rearrangements in cancers.

  5. Massively parallel whole genome amplification for single-cell sequencing using droplet microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Masahito; Nishikawa, Yohei; Kogawa, Masato; Takeyama, Haruko

    2017-07-12

    Massively parallel single-cell genome sequencing is required to further understand genetic diversities in complex biological systems. Whole genome amplification (WGA) is the first step for single-cell sequencing, but its throughput and accuracy are insufficient in conventional reaction platforms. Here, we introduce single droplet multiple displacement amplification (sd-MDA), a method that enables massively parallel amplification of single cell genomes while maintaining sequence accuracy and specificity. Tens of thousands of single cells are compartmentalized in millions of picoliter droplets and then subjected to lysis and WGA by passive droplet fusion in microfluidic channels. Because single cells are isolated in compartments, their genomes are amplified to saturation without contamination. This enables the high-throughput acquisition of contamination-free and cell specific sequence reads from single cells (21,000 single-cells/h), resulting in enhancement of the sequence data quality compared to conventional methods. This method allowed WGA of both single bacterial cells and human cancer cells. The obtained sequencing coverage rivals those of conventional techniques with superior sequence quality. In addition, we also demonstrate de novo assembly of uncultured soil bacteria and obtain draft genomes from single cell sequencing. This sd-MDA is promising for flexible and scalable use in single-cell sequencing.

  6. Genomic loci susceptible to replication errors in cancer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Krajinovic, M.; Richer, C.; Gorska-Flipot, I.; Gaboury, L.; Novakovic, I.; Labuda, D.; Sinnett, D.

    1998-01-01

    Microsatellite instability due to a deficiency in DNA mismatch repair is characteristic of a replication error (RER) phenotype. This widespread genomic instability is well documented in hereditary non-polyposis colon cancer (HNPCC) as well as subsets of sporadic carcinomas. Features of the RER phenotype such as the early appearance in tumour development and better prognosis of RER+ colorectal tumours render its examination important for cancer patients. Recently, we identified four loci that were shown to be highly susceptible to RER in cancer cells. Here, we used these loci to detect the RER phenotype in sporadic carcinomas of colon, breast, lung, endometrium and ovary. Replication errors revealed by these four markers followed the same tumour specificity as observed in HNPCC patients. In particular, 24% (6/25) of colorectal, 33% (4/12) of endometrial and 17% (2/12) of ovarian cancers displayed the RER phenotype characterized by an increased allelic mobility, whereas none of the breast (n = 22) and the lung (n = 27) carcinomas were found to be unstable. Assaying RERs sensitive loci provides us with a useful diagnostic tool for HNPCC-like sporadic tumours. Images Figure 1 PMID:9792139

  7. Identification of genomic sites for CRISPR/Cas9-based genome editing in the Vitis vinifera genome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Liu, Xianju; Ren, Chong; Zhong, Gan-Yuan; Yang, Long; Li, Shaohua; Liang, Zhenchang

    2016-04-21

    CRISPR/Cas9 has been recently demonstrated as an effective and popular genome editing tool for modifying genomes of humans, animals, microorganisms, and plants. Success of such genome editing is highly dependent on the availability of suitable target sites in the genomes to be edited. Many specific target sites for CRISPR/Cas9 have been computationally identified for several annual model and crop species, but such sites have not been reported for perennial, woody fruit species. In this study, we identified and characterized five types of CRISPR/Cas9 target sites in the widely cultivated grape species Vitis vinifera and developed a user-friendly database for editing grape genomes in the future. A total of 35,767,960 potential CRISPR/Cas9 target sites were identified from grape genomes in this study. Among them, 22,597,817 target sites were mapped to specific genomic locations and 7,269,788 were found to be highly specific. Protospacers and PAMs were found to distribute uniformly and abundantly in the grape genomes. They were present in all the structural elements of genes with the coding region having the highest abundance. Five PAM types, TGG, AGG, GGG, CGG and NGG, were observed. With the exception of the NGG type, they were abundantly present in the grape genomes. Synteny analysis of similar genes revealed that the synteny of protospacers matched the synteny of homologous genes. A user-friendly database containing protospacers and detailed information of the sites was developed and is available for public use at the Grape-CRISPR website ( http://biodb.sdau.edu.cn/gc/index.html ). Grape genomes harbour millions of potential CRISPR/Cas9 target sites. These sites are widely distributed among and within chromosomes with predominant abundance in the coding regions of genes. We developed a publicly-accessible Grape-CRISPR database for facilitating the use of the CRISPR/Cas9 system as a genome editing tool for functional studies and molecular breeding of grapes. Among

  8. CrusView: a Java-based visualization platform for comparative genomics analyses in Brassicaceae species.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Wang, Xiangfeng

    2013-09-01

    In plants and animals, chromosomal breakage and fusion events based on conserved syntenic genomic blocks lead to conserved patterns of karyotype evolution among species of the same family. However, karyotype information has not been well utilized in genomic comparison studies. We present CrusView, a Java-based bioinformatic application utilizing Standard Widget Toolkit/Swing graphics libraries and a SQLite database for performing visualized analyses of comparative genomics data in Brassicaceae (crucifer) plants. Compared with similar software and databases, one of the unique features of CrusView is its integration of karyotype information when comparing two genomes. This feature allows users to perform karyotype-based genome assembly and karyotype-assisted genome synteny analyses with preset karyotype patterns of the Brassicaceae genomes. Additionally, CrusView is a local program, which gives its users high flexibility when analyzing unpublished genomes and allows users to upload self-defined genomic information so that they can visually study the associations between genome structural variations and genetic elements, including chromosomal rearrangements, genomic macrosynteny, gene families, high-frequency recombination sites, and tandem and segmental duplications between related species. This tool will greatly facilitate karyotype, chromosome, and genome evolution studies using visualized comparative genomics approaches in Brassicaceae species. CrusView is freely available at http://www.cmbb.arizona.edu/CrusView/.

  9. Follicular cell thyroid neoplasia: insights from genomics and The Cancer Genome Atlas research network.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    The present review is focused on the recently published study on the genomics of papillary thyroid carcinoma performed by The Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network and its implications for the follicular variant of papillary carcinoma. The Cancer Genome Atlas study of papillary thyroid carcinoma comprehensively examined the cancer genome of nearly 500 primary tumors. Using a highly integrated bioinformatic analysis, papillary carcinoma was shown at the genomic level to consist of two highly distinct classes that reflected both tumor histology and underlying genotype. Tumors with true papillary architecture were dominated by BRAF(V600E) mutations and RET kinase fusions and were designated as BRAF(V600E)-like. Tumors with follicular architecture were conversely dominated by RAS mutations and were designated as RAS-like. Given the strong genotype:phenotype correlation known to be present in thyroid cancer, the separation of BRAF(V600E)-like and RAS-like tumors has profound implications for its classification, especially the follicular variant of papillary carcinoma. The recent genomic characterization of papillary thyroid carcinoma is challenging the established pathological classification of thyroid cancer with significance for the care of patients.

  10. Automating Genomic Data Mining via a Sequence-based Matrix Format and Associative Rule Set

    PubMed Central

    Wren, Jonathan D; Johnson, David; Gruenwald, Le

    2005-01-01

    There is an enormous amount of information encoded in each genome – enough to create living, responsive and adaptive organisms. Raw sequence data alone is not enough to understand function, mechanisms or interactions. Changes in a single base pair can lead to disease, such as sickle-cell anemia, while some large megabase deletions have no apparent phenotypic effect. Genomic features are varied in their data types and annotation of these features is spread across multiple databases. Herein, we develop a method to automate exploration of genomes by iteratively exploring sequence data for correlations and building upon them. First, to integrate and compare different annotation sources, a sequence matrix (SM) is developed to contain position-dependant information. Second, a classification tree is developed for matrix row types, specifying how each data type is to be treated with respect to other data types for analysis purposes. Third, correlative analyses are developed to analyze features of each matrix row in terms of the other rows, guided by the classification tree as to which analyses are appropriate. A prototype was developed and successful in detecting coinciding genomic features among genes, exons, repetitive elements and CpG islands. PMID:16026599

  11. Towards precision medicine-based therapies for glioblastoma: interrogating human disease genomics and mouse phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yang; Gao, Zhen; Wang, Bingcheng; Xu, Rong

    2016-08-22

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and aggressive brain tumors. It has poor prognosis even with optimal radio- and chemo-therapies. Since GBM is highly heterogeneous, drugs that target on specific molecular profiles of individual tumors may achieve maximized efficacy. Currently, the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) projects have identified hundreds of GBM-associated genes. We develop a drug repositioning approach combining disease genomics and mouse phenotype data towards predicting targeted therapies for GBM. We first identified disease specific mouse phenotypes using the most recently discovered GBM genes. Then we systematically searched all FDA-approved drugs for candidates that share similar mouse phenotype profiles with GBM. We evaluated the ranks for approved and novel GBM drugs, and compared with an existing approach, which also use the mouse phenotype data but not the disease genomics data. We achieved significantly higher ranks for the approved and novel GBM drugs than the earlier approach. For all positive examples of GBM drugs, we achieved a median rank of 9.2 45.6 of the top predictions have been demonstrated effective in inhibiting the growth of human GBM cells. We developed a computational drug repositioning approach based on both genomic and phenotypic data. Our approach prioritized existing GBM drugs and outperformed a recent approach. Overall, our approach shows potential in discovering new targeted therapies for GBM.

  12. Large, Male Germ Cell-Specific Hypomethylated DNA Domains With Unique Genomic and Epigenomic Features on the Mouse X Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Rieko; Shiura, Hirosuke; Numata, Koji; Sugimoto, Michihiko; Kondo, Masayo; Mise, Nathan; Suzuki, Masako; Greally, John M.; Abe, Kuniya

    2013-01-01

    To understand the epigenetic regulation required for germ cell-specific gene expression in the mouse, we analysed DNA methylation profiles of developing germ cells using a microarray-based assay adapted for a small number of cells. The analysis revealed differentially methylated sites between cell types tested. Here, we focused on a group of genomic sequences hypomethylated specifically in germline cells as candidate regions involved in the epigenetic regulation of germline gene expression. These hypomethylated sequences tend to be clustered, forming large (10 kb to ∼9 Mb) genomic domains, particularly on the X chromosome of male germ cells. Most of these regions, designated here as large hypomethylated domains (LoDs), correspond to segmentally duplicated regions that contain gene families showing germ cell- or testis-specific expression, including cancer testis antigen genes. We found an inverse correlation between DNA methylation level and expression of genes in these domains. Most LoDs appear to be enriched with H3 lysine 9 dimethylation, usually regarded as a repressive histone modification, although some LoD genes can be expressed in male germ cells. It thus appears that such a unique epigenomic state associated with the LoDs may constitute a basis for the specific expression of genes contained in these genomic domains. PMID:23861320

  13. Genomic dissection of conserved transcriptional regulation in intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Camp, J. Gray; Weiser, Matthew; Cocchiaro, Jordan L.; Kingsley, David M.; Furey, Terrence S.; Sheikh, Shehzad Z.; Rawls, John F.

    2017-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium serves critical physiologic functions that are shared among all vertebrates. However, it is unknown how the transcriptional regulatory mechanisms underlying these functions have changed over the course of vertebrate evolution. We generated genome-wide mRNA and accessible chromatin data from adult intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) in zebrafish, stickleback, mouse, and human species to determine if conserved IEC functions are achieved through common transcriptional regulation. We found evidence for su