Science.gov

Sample records for genome program contractor-grantee

  1. DOE Human Genome Program contractor-grantee workshop

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    This volume contains the proceedings for the DOE Human Genome Program`s Contractor-Grantee Workshop V held in Sante Fe, New Mexico January 28, February 1, 1996. Presentations were divided into sessions entitled Sequencing; Mapping; Informatics; Ethical, Legal, and Social Issues; and Infrastructure. Reports of individual projects described herein are separately indexed and abstracted for the database.

  2. DOE Human Genome Program: Contractor-Grantee Workshop IV, November 13--17, 1994, Santa Fe, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the fourth Contractor-Grantee Workshop for the Department of Energy (DOE) Human Genome Program. Of the 204 abstracts in this book, some 200 describe the genome research of DOE-funded grantees and contractors located at the multidisciplinary centers at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Los Alamos National Laboratory; other DOE-supported laboratories; and more than 54 universities, research organizations, and companies in the United States and abroad. Included are 16 abstracts from ongoing projects in the Ethical, Legal, and Social Issues (ELSI) component, an area that continues to attract considerable attention from a wide variety of interested parties. Three abstracts summarize work in the new Microbial Genome Initiative launched this year by the Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) to provide genome sequence and mapping data on industrially important microorganisms and those that live under extreme conditions. Many of the projects will be discussed at plenary sessions held throughout the workshop, and all are represented in the poster sessions.

  3. Genomics:GTL Contractor-Grantee Workshop IV and Metabolic Engineering Working Group Inter-Agency Conference on Metabolic Engineering 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfield, Betty Kay; Martin, Sheryl A

    2006-02-01

    Welcome to the 2006 joint meeting of the fourth Genomics:GTL Contractor-Grantee Workshop and the six Metabolic Engineering Working Group Inter-Agency Conference. The vision and scope of the Genomics:GTL program continue to expand and encompass research and technology issues from diverse scientific disciplines, attracting broad interest and support from researchers at universities, DOE national laboratories, and industry. Metabolic engineering's vision is the targeted and purposeful alteration of metabolic pathways to improve the understanding and use of cellular pathways for chemical transformation, energy transduction, and supramolecular assembly. These two programs have much complementarity in both vision and technological approaches, as reflected in this joint workshop. GLT's challenge to the scientific community remains the further development and use of a broad array of innovative technologies and computational tools to systematically leverage the knowledge and capabilities brought to us by DNA sequencing projects. The goal is to seek a broad and predictive understanding of the functioning and control of complex systems--individual microbes, microbial communities, and plants. GTL's prominent position at the interface of the physical, computational, and biological sciences is both a strength and challenge. Microbes remain GTL's principal biological focus. In the complex 'simplicity' of microbes, they find capabilities needed by DOE and the nation for clean and secure energy, cleanup of environmental contamination, and sequestration of atmospheric carbon dioxide that contributes to global warming. An ongoing challenge for the entire GTL community is to demonstrate that the fundamental science conducted in each of your research projects brings us a step closer to biology-based solutions for these important national energy and environmental needs.

  4. JGI Fungal Genomics Program

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2011-03-14

    Genomes of energy and environment fungi are in focus of the Fungal Genomic Program at the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI). Its key project, the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts), and explores fungal diversity by means of genome sequencing and analysis. Over 50 fungal genomes have been sequenced by JGI to date and released through MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a fungal web-portal, which integrates sequence and functional data with genome analysis tools for user community. Sequence analysis supported by functional genomics leads to developing parts list for complex systems ranging from ecosystems of biofuel crops to biorefineries. Recent examples of such 'parts' suggested by comparative genomics and functional analysis in these areas are presented here

  5. Epidemiology & Genomics Research Program

    Cancer.gov

    The Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program, in the National Cancer Institute's Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, funds research in human populations to understand the determinants of cancer occurrence and outcomes.

  6. Fungal Genomics Program

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriev, Igor

    2012-03-12

    The JGI Fungal Genomics Program aims to scale up sequencing and analysis of fungal genomes to explore the diversity of fungi important for energy and the environment, and to promote functional studies on a system level. Combining new sequencing technologies and comparative genomics tools, JGI is now leading the world in fungal genome sequencing and analysis. Over 120 sequenced fungal genomes with analytical tools are available via MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a web-portal for fungal biologists. Our model of interacting with user communities, unique among other sequencing centers, helps organize these communities, improves genome annotation and analysis work, and facilitates new larger-scale genomic projects. This resulted in 20 high-profile papers published in 2011 alone and contributing to the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, which targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts). Our next grand challenges include larger scale exploration of fungal diversity (1000 fungal genomes), developing molecular tools for DOE-relevant model organisms, and analysis of complex systems and metagenomes.

  7. Human Genome Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The DOE Human Genome program has grown tremendously, as shown by the marked increase in the number of genome-funded projects since the last workshop held in 1991. The abstracts in this book describe the genome research of DOE-funded grantees and contractors and invited guests, and all projects are represented at the workshop by posters. The 3-day meeting includes plenary sessions on ethical, legal, and social issues pertaining to the availability of genetic data; sequencing techniques, informatics support; and chromosome and cDNA mapping and sequencing.

  8. The Human Genome Program

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, G.I.

    1989-01-01

    Early in 1986, Charles DeLisi, then head of the Office of Health and Environmental Research at the Department of Energy (DOE) requested the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to organize a workshop charged with inquiring whether the state of technology and potential payoffs in biological knowledge and medical practice were such as to justify an organized program to map and sequence the human genome. The DOE's interest arose from its mission to assess the effects of radiation and other products of energy generation on human health in general and genetic material in particular. The workshop concluded that the technology was ripe, the benefits would be great, and a national program should be promptly initiated. Later committees, reporting to DOE, to the NIH, to the Office of Technology Assessment of the US Congress, and to the National Academy of Science have reviewed these issues more deliberately and come to the same conclusion. As a consequence, there has been established in the United States, a Human Genome Program, with funding largely from the NIH and the DOE, as indicated in Table 1. Moreover, the Program has attracted international interest, and Great Britain, France, Italy, and the Soviet Union, among other countries, have been reported to be starting human genome initiatives. Coordination of these programs, clearly in the interests of each, remains to be worked out, although an international Human Genome Organization (HUGO) is considering such coordination. 5 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  9. Programs | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    OCG facilitates cancer genomics research through a series of highly-focused programs. These programs generate and disseminate genomic data for use by the cancer research community. OCG programs also promote advances in technology-based infrastructure and create valuable experimental reagents and tools. OCG programs encourage collaboration by interconnecting with other genomics and cancer projects in order to accelerate translation of findings into the clinic. Below are OCG’s current, completed, and initiated programs:

  10. Programs | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    OCG facilitates cancer genomics research through a series of highly-focused programs. These programs generate and disseminate genomic data for use by the cancer research community. OCG programs also promote advances in technology-based infrastructure and create valuable experimental reagents and tools. OCG programs encourage collaboration by interconnecting with other genomics and cancer projects in order to accelerate translation of findings into the clinic. Below are OCG’s current, completed, and initiated programs:

  11. Human genome. 1993 Program report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to update the Human Genome 1991-92 Program Report and provide new information on the DOE genome program to researchers, program managers, other government agencies, and the interested public. This FY 1993 supplement includes abstracts of 60 new or renewed projects and listings of 112 continuing and 28 completed projects. These two reports, taken together, present the most complete published view of the DOE Human Genome Program through FY 1993. Research is progressing rapidly toward 15-year goals of mapping and sequencing the DNA of each of the 24 different human chromosomes.

  12. Human Genome Education Program

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Myers; Lane Conn

    2000-05-01

    The funds from the DOE Human Genome Program, for the project period 2/1/96 through 1/31/98, have provided major support for the curriculum development and field testing efforts for two high school level instructional units: Unit 1, ''Exploring Genetic Conditions: Genes, Culture and Choices''; and Unit 2, ''DNA Snapshots: Peaking at Your DNA''. In the original proposal, they requested DOE support for the partial salary and benefits of a Field Test Coordinator position to: (1) complete the field testing and revision of two high school curriculum units, and (2) initiate the education of teachers using these units. During the project period of this two-year DOE grant, a part-time Field-Test Coordinator was hired (Ms. Geraldine Horsma) and significant progress has been made in both of the original proposal objectives. Field testing for Unit 1 has occurred in over 12 schools (local and non-local sites with diverse student populations). Field testing for Unit 2 has occurred in over 15 schools (local and non-local sites) and will continue in 12-15 schools during the 96-97 school year. For both curricula, field-test sites and site teachers were selected for their interest in genetics education and in hands-on science education. Many of the site teachers had no previous experience with HGEP or the unit under development. Both of these first-year biology curriculum units, which contain genetics, biotechnology, societal, ethical and cultural issues related to HGP, are being implemented in many local and non-local schools (SF Bay Area, Southern California, Nebraska, Hawaii, and Texas) and in programs for teachers. These units will reach over 10,000 students in the SF Bay Area and continues to receive support from local corporate and private philanthropic organizations. Although HGEP unit development is nearing completion for both units, data is still being gathered and analyzed on unit effectiveness and student learning. The final field testing result from this analysis will

  13. Mating programs including genomic relationships

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Computer mating programs have helped breeders minimize pedigree inbreeding and avoid recessive defects by mating animals with parents that have fewer common ancestors. With genomic selection, breed associations, AI organizations, and on-farm software providers could use new programs to minimize geno...

  14. Programmed Genome Rearrangements in Tetrahymena.

    PubMed

    Yao, Meng-Chao; Chao, Ju-Lan; Cheng, Chao-Yin

    2014-12-01

    Ciliates are champions in programmed genome rearrangements. They carry out extensive restructuring during differentiation to drastically alter the complexity, relative copy number, and arrangement of sequences in the somatic genome. This chapter focuses on the model ciliate Tetrahymena, perhaps the simplest and best-understood ciliate studied. It summarizes past studies on various genome rearrangement processes and describes in detail the remarkable progress made in the past decade on the understanding of DNA deletion and other processes. The process occurs at thousands of specific sites to remove defined DNA segments that comprise roughly one-third of the genome including all transposons. Interestingly, this DNA rearranging process is a special form of RNA interference. It involves the production of double-stranded RNA and small RNA that guides the formation of heterochromatin. A domesticated piggyBac transposase is believed to cut off the marked chromatin, and the retained sequences are joined together through nonhomologous end-joining processes. Many of the proteins and DNA players involved have been analyzed and are described. This link provides possible explanations for the evolution, mechanism, and functional roles of the process. The article also discusses the interactions between parental and progeny somatic nuclei that affect the selection of sequences for deletion, and how the specific deletion boundaries are determined after heterochromatin marking.

  15. Human Genome Program Image Gallery (from genomics.energy.gov)

    DOE Data Explorer

    This collection contains approximately 240 images from the genome programs of DOE's Office of Science. The images are divided into galleries related to biofuels research, systems biology, and basic genomics. Each image has a title, a basic citation, and a credit or source. Most of the images are original graphics created by the Genome Management Information System (GMIS). GMIS images are recognizable by their credit line. Permission to use these graphics is not needed, but please credit the U.S. Department of Energy Genome Programs and provide the website http://genomics.energy.gov. Other images were provided by third parties and not created by the U.S. Department of Energy. Users must contact the person listed in the credit line before using those images. The high-resolution images can be downloaded.

  16. Economic evaluation of genomic breeding programs.

    PubMed

    König, S; Simianer, H; Willam, A

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare a conventional dairy cattle breeding program characterized by a progeny testing scheme with different scenarios of genomic breeding programs. The ultimate economic evaluation criterion was discounted profit reflecting discounted returns minus discounted costs per cow in a balanced breeding goal of production and functionality. A deterministic approach mainly based on the gene flow method and selection index calculations was used to model a conventional progeny testing program and different scenarios of genomic breeding programs. As a novel idea, the modeling of the genomic breeding program accounted for the proportion of farmers waiting for daughter records of genotyped young bulls before using them for artificial insemination. Technical and biological coefficients for modeling were chosen to correspond to a German breeding organization. The conventional breeding program for 50 test bulls per year within a population of 100,000 cows served as a base scenario. Scenarios of genomic breeding programs considered the variation of costs for genotyping, selection intensity of cow sires, proportion of farmers waiting for daughter records of genotyped young bulls, and different accuracies of genomic indices for bulls and cows. Given that the accuracies of genomic indices are greater than 0.70, a distinct economic advantage was found for all scenarios of genomic breeding programs up to factor 2.59, mainly due to the reduction in generation intervals. Costs for genotyping were negligible when focusing on a population-wide perspective and considering additional costs for herdbook registration, milk recording, or keeping of bulls, especially if there is no need for yearly recalculation of effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms. Genomic breeding programs generated a higher discounted profit than a conventional progeny testing program for all scenarios where at least 20% of the inseminations were done by genotyped young bulls without

  17. Genomic selection in animal breeding programs.

    PubMed

    van der Werf, Julius

    2013-01-01

    Genomic selection can have a major impact on animal breeding programs, especially where traits that are important in the breeding objective are hard to select for otherwise. Genomic selection provides more accurate estimates for breeding value earlier in the life of breeding animals, giving more selection accuracy and allowing lower generation intervals. From sheep to dairy cattle, the rates of genetic improvement could increase from 20 to 100 % and hard-to-measure traits can be improved more effectively.Reference populations for genomic selection need to be large, with thousands of animals measured for phenotype and genotype. The smaller the effective size of the breeding population, the larger the DNA segments they potentially share and the more accurate genomic prediction will be. The relative contribution of information from relatives in the reference population will be larger if the baseline accuracy is low, but such information is limited to closely related individuals and does not last over generations.

  18. [Mapping and human genome sequence program].

    PubMed

    Weissenbach, J

    1997-03-01

    Until recently, human genome programs focused primarily on establishing maps that would provide signposts to researchers seeking to identify genes responsible for inherited diseases, as well as a basis for genome sequencing studies. Preestablished gene mapping goals have been reached. The over 7,000 microsatellite markers identified to date provide a map of sufficient density to allow localization of the gene of a monogenic disease with a precision of 1 to 2 million base pairs. The physical map, based on systematically arranged overlapping sets of artificial yeast chromosomes (YACs), has also made considerable headway during the last few years. The most recently published map covers more than 90% of the genome. However, currently available physical maps cannot be used for sequencing studies because multiple rearrangements occur in YACs. The recently developed sets of radioinduced hybrids are extremely useful for incorporating genes into existing maps. A network of American and European laboratories has successfully used these radioinduced hybrids to map 15,000 gene tags from large-scale cDNA library sequencing programs. There are increasingly pressing reasons for initiating large scale human genome sequencing studies.

  19. Mating programs including genomic relationships and dominance effects

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Breed associations, artificial-insemination organizations, and on-farm software providers need new computerized mating programs for genomic selection so that genomic inbreeding could be minimized by comparing genotypes of potential mates. Efficient methods for transferring elements of the genomic re...

  20. Survey of university programs in remote sensing funded under grants from the NASA University-Space Applications program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madigan, J. A.; Earhart, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    NASA's Office of Space and Terrestrial Applications (OSTA) is currently assessing approaches to transferring NASA technology to both the public and private sectors. As part of this assessment, NASA is evaluating the effectiveness of an ongoing program in remote sensing technology transfer conducted by 20 university contractors/grantees, each supported totally or partially by NASA funds. The University-Space Applications program has as its objective the demonstration of practical benefits from the use of remote sensing technology to a broad spectrum of new users, principally in state and local governments. To evaluate the University-Space Applications program, NASA has a near-term requirement for data on each university effort including total funding, funding sources, length of program, program description, and effectiveness measures.

  1. [Human genome project: a federator program of genomic medicine].

    PubMed

    Sfar, S; Chouchane, L

    2008-05-01

    The Human Genome Project improves our understanding of the molecular genetics basis of the inherited and complex diseases such as diabetes, schizophrenia, and cancer. Information from the human genome sequence is essential for several antenatal and neonatal screening programmes. The new genomic tools emerging from this project have revolutionized biology and medicine and have transformed our understanding of health and the provision of healthcare. Its implications pervade all areas of medicine, from disease prediction and prevention to the diagnosis and treatment of all forms of disease. Increasingly, it will be possible to drive predisposition testing into clinical practice, to develop new treatments or to adapt available treatments more specifically to an individual's genetic make-up. This genomic information should transform the traditional medications that are effective for every members of the population to personalized medicine and personalized therapy. The pharmacogenomics could give rise to a new generation of highly effective drugs that treat causes, not just symptoms.

  2. Developmentally Programmed, RNA-Directed Genome Rearrangement in Tetrahymena

    PubMed Central

    Mochizuki, Kazufumi

    2013-01-01

    Developmentally programmed genome rearrangement has been observed in a variety of eukaryotes from vertebrates to worms to protists, and it provides an interesting exception to the general rule of the constancy of the genome. DNA elimination in the ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena is one of the most well-characterized programmed genome rearrangement events. DNA elimination in the newly formed macronucleus of Tetrahymena is epigenetically regulated by the DNA sequence of the parental macronucleus. Dicer-produced, Piwi-associated small RNAs mediate this epigenetic regulation, probably through a whole-genome comparison of the germline micronucleus to the somatic macronucleus. However, a correlation between small RNAs and programmed genome rearrangement could not be detected in the worm Ascaris suum. Therefore, different types of eukaryotes may have developed unique solutions to perform genome rearrangement. PMID:22103557

  3. VIGOR, an annotation program for small viral genomes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The decrease in cost for sequencing and improvement in technologies has made it easier and more common for the re-sequencing of large genomes as well as parallel sequencing of small genomes. It is possible to completely sequence a small genome within days and this increases the number of publicly available genomes. Among the types of genomes being rapidly sequenced are those of microbial and viral genomes responsible for infectious diseases. However, accurate gene prediction is a challenge that persists for decoding a newly sequenced genome. Therefore, accurate and efficient gene prediction programs are highly desired for rapid and cost effective surveillance of RNA viruses through full genome sequencing. Results We have developed VIGOR (Viral Genome ORF Reader), a web application tool for gene prediction in influenza virus, rotavirus, rhinovirus and coronavirus subtypes. VIGOR detects protein coding regions based on sequence similarity searches and can accurately detect genome specific features such as frame shifts, overlapping genes, embedded genes, and can predict mature peptides within the context of a single polypeptide open reading frame. Genotyping capability for influenza and rotavirus is built into the program. We compared VIGOR to previously described gene prediction programs, ZCURVE_V, GeneMarkS and FLAN. The specificity and sensitivity of VIGOR are greater than 99% for the RNA viral genomes tested. Conclusions VIGOR is a user friendly web-based genome annotation program for five different viral agents, influenza, rotavirus, rhinovirus, coronavirus and SARS coronavirus. This is the first gene prediction program for rotavirus and rhinovirus for public access. VIGOR is able to accurately predict protein coding genes for the above five viral types and has the capability to assign function to the predicted open reading frames and genotype influenza virus. The prediction software was designed for performing high throughput annotation and closure

  4. Dairy cattle genomics evaluation program update

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Implementation of genomic evaluation has caused profound changes in dairy cattle breeding. All young bulls bought by major artificial-insemination organizations now are selected based on these evaluation. Evaluation reliability can reach ~75% for yield traits, which is adequate for marketing semen o...

  5. Human Genome Program Report. Part 1, Overview and Progress

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    1997-11-01

    This report contains Part 1 of a two-part report to reflect research and progress in the U.S. Department of Energy Human Genome Program from 1994 through 1996, with specified updates made just before publication. Part 1 consists of the program overview and report on progress.

  6. Human genome program report. Part 1, overview and progress

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    This report contains Part 1 of a two-part report to reflect research and progress in the U.S. Department of Energy Human Genome Program from 1994 through 1996, with specified updates made just before publication. Part 1 consists of the program overview and report on progress.

  7. Mating programs including genomic relationships and dominance effects

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Computer mating programs have helped breeders minimize pedigree inbreeding and avoid recessive defects by mating animals with parents that have fewer common ancestors. With genomic selection, breed associations, AI organizations, and on-farm software providers could use new programs to minimize geno...

  8. Primer on Molecular Genetics; DOE Human Genome Program

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    1992-04-01

    This report is taken from the April 1992 draft of the DOE Human Genome 1991--1992 Program Report, which is expected to be published in May 1992. The primer is intended to be an introduction to basic principles of molecular genetics pertaining to the genome project. The material contained herein is not final and may be incomplete. Techniques of genetic mapping and DNA sequencing are described.

  9. Primer on molecular genetics. DOE Human Genome Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    This report is taken from the April 1992 draft of the DOE Human Genome 1991--1992 Program Report, which is expected to be published in May 1992. The primer is intended to be an introduction to basic principles of molecular genetics pertaining to the genome project. The material contained herein is not final and may be incomplete. Techniques of genetic mapping and DNA sequencing are described.

  10. Mating programs including genomic relationships and dominance effects.

    PubMed

    Sun, C; VanRaden, P M; O'Connell, J R; Weigel, K A; Gianola, D

    2013-01-01

    Computerized mating programs using genomic information are needed by breed associations, artificial-insemination organizations, and on-farm software providers, but such software is already challenged by the size of the relationship matrix. As of October 2012, over 230,000 Holsteins obtained genomic predictions in North America. Efficient methods of storing, computing, and transferring genomic relationships from a central database to customers via a web query were developed for approximately 165,000 genotyped cows and the subset of 1,518 bulls whose semen was available for purchase at that time. This study, utilizing 3 breeds, investigated differences in sire selection, methods of assigning mates, the use of genomic or pedigree relationships, and the effect of including dominance effects in a mating program. For both Jerseys and Holsteins, selection and mating programs were tested using the top 50 marketed bulls for genomic and traditional lifetime net merit as well as 50 randomly selected bulls. The 500 youngest genotyped cows in the largest herd in each breed were assigned mates of the same breed with limits of 10 cows per bull and 1 bull per cow (only 79 cows and 8 bulls for Brown Swiss). A dominance variance of 4.1 and 3.7% was estimated for Holsteins and Jerseys using 45,187 markers and management group deviation for milk yield. Sire selection was identified as the most important component of improving expected progeny value, followed by managing inbreeding and then inclusion of dominance. The respective percentage gains for milk yield in this study were 64, 27, and 9, for Holsteins and 73, 20, and 7 for Jerseys. The linear programming method of assigning a mate outperformed sequential selection by reducing genomic or pedigree inbreeding by 0.86 to 1.06 and 0.93 to 1.41, respectively. Use of genomic over pedigree relationship information provided a larger decrease in expected progeny inbreeding and thus greater expected progeny value. Based on lifetime net

  11. Human Genome Program Report. Part 2, 1996 Research Abstracts

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    1997-11-01

    This report contains Part 2 of a two-part report to reflect research and progress in the US Department of Energy Human Genome Program from 1994 through 1996, with specified updates made just before publication. Part 2 consists of 1996 research abstracts. Attention is focused on the following: sequencing; mapping; informatics; ethical, legal, and social issues; infrastructure; and small business innovation research.

  12. Human genome program report. Part 2, 1996 research abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    This report contains Part 2 of a two-part report to reflect research and progress in the US Department of Energy Human Genome Program from 1994 through 1996, with specified updates made just before publication. Part 2 consists of 1996 research abstracts. Attention is focused on the following: sequencing; mapping; informatics; ethical, legal, and social issues; infrastructure; and small business innovation research.

  13. Genomic Tools in Groundnut Breeding Program: Status and Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Janila, P; Variath, Murali T; Pandey, Manish K; Desmae, Haile; Motagi, Babu N; Okori, Patrick; Manohar, Surendra S; Rathnakumar, A L; Radhakrishnan, T; Liao, Boshou; Varshney, Rajeev K

    2016-01-01

    Groundnut, a nutrient-rich food legume, is cultivated world over. It is valued for its good quality cooking oil, energy and protein rich food, and nutrient-rich fodder. Globally, groundnut improvement programs have developed varieties to meet the preferences of farmers, traders, processors, and consumers. Enhanced yield, tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses and quality parameters have been the target traits. Spurt in genetic information of groundnut was facilitated by development of molecular markers, genetic, and physical maps, generation of expressed sequence tags (EST), discovery of genes, and identification of quantitative trait loci (QTL) for some important biotic and abiotic stresses and quality traits. The first groundnut variety developed using marker assisted breeding (MAB) was registered in 2003. Since then, USA, China, Japan, and India have begun to use genomic tools in routine groundnut improvement programs. Introgression lines that combine foliar fungal disease resistance and early maturity were developed using MAB. Establishment of marker-trait associations (MTA) paved way to integrate genomic tools in groundnut breeding for accelerated genetic gain. Genomic Selection (GS) tools are employed to improve drought tolerance and pod yield, governed by several minor effect QTLs. Draft genome sequence and low cost genotyping tools such as genotyping by sequencing (GBS) are expected to accelerate use of genomic tools to enhance genetic gains for target traits in groundnut.

  14. Genomic Tools in Groundnut Breeding Program: Status and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Janila, P.; Variath, Murali T.; Pandey, Manish K.; Desmae, Haile; Motagi, Babu N.; Okori, Patrick; Manohar, Surendra S.; Rathnakumar, A. L.; Radhakrishnan, T.; Liao, Boshou; Varshney, Rajeev K.

    2016-01-01

    Groundnut, a nutrient-rich food legume, is cultivated world over. It is valued for its good quality cooking oil, energy and protein rich food, and nutrient-rich fodder. Globally, groundnut improvement programs have developed varieties to meet the preferences of farmers, traders, processors, and consumers. Enhanced yield, tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses and quality parameters have been the target traits. Spurt in genetic information of groundnut was facilitated by development of molecular markers, genetic, and physical maps, generation of expressed sequence tags (EST), discovery of genes, and identification of quantitative trait loci (QTL) for some important biotic and abiotic stresses and quality traits. The first groundnut variety developed using marker assisted breeding (MAB) was registered in 2003. Since then, USA, China, Japan, and India have begun to use genomic tools in routine groundnut improvement programs. Introgression lines that combine foliar fungal disease resistance and early maturity were developed using MAB. Establishment of marker-trait associations (MTA) paved way to integrate genomic tools in groundnut breeding for accelerated genetic gain. Genomic Selection (GS) tools are employed to improve drought tolerance and pod yield, governed by several minor effect QTLs. Draft genome sequence and low cost genotyping tools such as genotyping by sequencing (GBS) are expected to accelerate use of genomic tools to enhance genetic gains for target traits in groundnut. PMID:27014312

  15. Genomic prediction in CIMMYT maize and wheat breeding programs

    PubMed Central

    Crossa, J; Pérez, P; Hickey, J; Burgueño, J; Ornella, L; Cerón-Rojas, J; Zhang, X; Dreisigacker, S; Babu, R; Li, Y; Bonnett, D; Mathews, K

    2014-01-01

    Genomic selection (GS) has been implemented in animal and plant species, and is regarded as a useful tool for accelerating genetic gains. Varying levels of genomic prediction accuracy have been obtained in plants, depending on the prediction problem assessed and on several other factors, such as trait heritability, the relationship between the individuals to be predicted and those used to train the models for prediction, number of markers, sample size and genotype × environment interaction (GE). The main objective of this article is to describe the results of genomic prediction in International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center's (CIMMYT's) maize and wheat breeding programs, from the initial assessment of the predictive ability of different models using pedigree and marker information to the present, when methods for implementing GS in practical global maize and wheat breeding programs are being studied and investigated. Results show that pedigree (population structure) accounts for a sizeable proportion of the prediction accuracy when a global population is the prediction problem to be assessed. However, when the prediction uses unrelated populations to train the prediction equations, prediction accuracy becomes negligible. When genomic prediction includes modeling GE, an increase in prediction accuracy can be achieved by borrowing information from correlated environments. Several questions on how to incorporate GS into CIMMYT's maize and wheat programs remain unanswered and subject to further investigation, for example, prediction within and between related bi-parental crosses. Further research on the quantification of breeding value components for GS in plant breeding populations is required. PMID:23572121

  16. 75 FR 26846 - Genomic Medicine Program Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-12

    ...] [FR Doc No: 2010-11322] DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Genomic Medicine Program Advisory Committee... Advisory Committee Act) that the Genomic Medicine Program Advisory Committee will meet on May 21, 2010, at... genomic medicine delivery within VHA and proof of concept for genome-phenome associations using...

  17. Asking complex questions of the genome without programming.

    PubMed

    Woollard, Peter M

    2010-01-01

    Increasingly, vast amounts of genomics and genetic data are available. Although much of the data is largely accessible to relatively simple web queries, in some cases, more complex queries are required. This paper reviews the hierarchy of tools for querying genetic and genomic data. For querying multiple genes, variants or regions ENSEMBL BioMart and the UCSC Table Browser offer flexible interfaces. For more complex queries, GALAXY is a sophisticated tool for building workflows over existing internet resources. For the most challenging genome scale queries, programmatic access may be required through a defined application programming interface (API) - such as the one provided by Ensembl. All these tools allow one to rapidly ask many questions that were difficult to answer a few years ago, but choosing the appropriate tool for the job is critical.

  18. Assembling networks of microbial genomes using linear programming

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Microbial genomes exhibit complex sets of genetic affinities due to lateral genetic transfer. Assessing the relative contributions of parent-to-offspring inheritance and gene sharing is a vital step in understanding the evolutionary origins and modern-day function of an organism, but recovering and showing these relationships is a challenging problem. Results We have developed a new approach that uses linear programming to find between-genome relationships, by treating tables of genetic affinities (here, represented by transformed BLAST e-values) as an optimization problem. Validation trials on simulated data demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach in recovering and representing vertical and lateral relationships among genomes. Application of the technique to a set comprising Aquifex aeolicus and 75 other thermophiles showed an important role for large genomes as 'hubs' in the gene sharing network, and suggested that genes are preferentially shared between organisms with similar optimal growth temperatures. We were also able to discover distinct and common genetic contributors to each sequenced representative of genus Pseudomonas. Conclusions The linear programming approach we have developed can serve as an effective inference tool in its own right, and can be an efficient first step in a more-intensive phylogenomic analysis. PMID:21092133

  19. Assembling networks of microbial genomes using linear programming.

    PubMed

    Holloway, Catherine; Beiko, Robert G

    2010-11-20

    Microbial genomes exhibit complex sets of genetic affinities due to lateral genetic transfer. Assessing the relative contributions of parent-to-offspring inheritance and gene sharing is a vital step in understanding the evolutionary origins and modern-day function of an organism, but recovering and showing these relationships is a challenging problem. We have developed a new approach that uses linear programming to find between-genome relationships, by treating tables of genetic affinities (here, represented by transformed BLAST e-values) as an optimization problem. Validation trials on simulated data demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach in recovering and representing vertical and lateral relationships among genomes. Application of the technique to a set comprising Aquifex aeolicus and 75 other thermophiles showed an important role for large genomes as 'hubs' in the gene sharing network, and suggested that genes are preferentially shared between organisms with similar optimal growth temperatures. We were also able to discover distinct and common genetic contributors to each sequenced representative of genus Pseudomonas. The linear programming approach we have developed can serve as an effective inference tool in its own right, and can be an efficient first step in a more-intensive phylogenomic analysis.

  20. Genomic resources in mungbean for future breeding programs

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sue K.; Nair, Ramakrishnan M.; Lee, Jayern; Lee, Suk-Ha

    2015-01-01

    Among the legume family, mungbean (Vigna radiata) has become one of the important crops in Asia, showing a steady increase in global production. It provides a good source of protein and contains most notably folate and iron. Beyond the nutritional value of mungbean, certain features make it a well-suited model organism among legume plants because of its small genome size, short life-cycle, self-pollinating, and close genetic relationship to other legumes. In the past, there have been several efforts to develop molecular markers and linkage maps associated with agronomic traits for the genetic improvement of mungbean and, ultimately, breeding for cultivar development to increase the average yields of mungbean. The recent release of a reference genome of the cultivated mungbean (V. radiata var. radiata VC1973A) and an additional de novo sequencing of a wild relative mungbean (V. radiata var. sublobata) has provided a framework for mungbean genetic and genome research, that can further be used for genome-wide association and functional studies to identify genes related to specific agronomic traits. Moreover, the diverse gene pool of wild mungbean comprises valuable genetic resources of beneficial genes that may be helpful in widening the genetic diversity of cultivated mungbean. This review paper covers the research progress on molecular and genomics approaches and the current status of breeding programs that have developed to move toward the ultimate goal of mungbean improvement. PMID:26322067

  1. Programming cells by multiplex genome engineering and accelerated evolution

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Peter A.; Sun, Zachary Z.; Xu, George; Forest, Craig R.; Church, George M.

    2015-01-01

    The breadth of genomic diversity found among organisms in nature allows populations to adapt to diverse environments1,2. However, genomic diversity is difficult to generate in the laboratory and new phenotypes do not easily arise on practical timescales3. Although in vitro and directed evolution methods4–9 have created genetic variants with usefully altered phenotypes, these methods are limited to laborious and serial manipulation of single genes and are not used for parallel and continuous directed evolution of gene networks or genomes. Here, we describe multiplex automated genome engineering (MAGE) for large-scale programming and evolution of cells. MAGE simultaneously targets many locations on the chromosome for modification in a single cell or across a population of cells, thus producing combinatorial genomic diversity. Because the process is cyclical and scalable, we constructed prototype devices that automate the MAGE technology to facilitate rapid and continuous generation of a diverse set of genetic changes (mismatches, insertions, deletions). We applied MAGE to optimize the 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate (DXP) biosynthesis pathway in Escherichia coli to overproduce the industrially important isoprenoid lycopene. Twenty-four genetic components in the DXP pathway were modified simultaneously using a complex pool of synthetic DNA, creating over 4.3 billion combinatorial genomic variants per day. We isolated variants with more than fivefold increase in lycopene production within 3 days, a significant improvement over existing metabolic engineering techniques. Our multiplex approach embraces engineering in the context of evolution by expediting the design and evolution of organisms with new and improved properties. PMID:19633652

  2. Post-Genome Era Pedagogy: How a BS Biotechnology Program Benefits the Liberal Arts Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eden, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Genomics profoundly affects society, because genome sequence information is widely used in such areas as genetic testing, genomic medicine/vaccine development, and so forth. Therefore, a responsibility to modernize science curricula exists for "post-genome era" educators. At my university, we developed a BS biotechnology program within a…

  3. Post-Genome Era Pedagogy: How a BS Biotechnology Program Benefits the Liberal Arts Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eden, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Genomics profoundly affects society, because genome sequence information is widely used in such areas as genetic testing, genomic medicine/vaccine development, and so forth. Therefore, a responsibility to modernize science curricula exists for "post-genome era" educators. At my university, we developed a BS biotechnology program within a…

  4. RNA-programmed genome editing in human cells.

    PubMed

    Jinek, Martin; East, Alexandra; Cheng, Aaron; Lin, Steven; Ma, Enbo; Doudna, Jennifer

    2013-01-29

    Type II CRISPR immune systems in bacteria use a dual RNA-guided DNA endonuclease, Cas9, to cleave foreign DNA at specific sites. We show here that Cas9 assembles with hybrid guide RNAs in human cells and can induce the formation of double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs) at a site complementary to the guide RNA sequence in genomic DNA. This cleavage activity requires both Cas9 and the complementary binding of the guide RNA. Experiments using extracts from transfected cells show that RNA expression and/or assembly into Cas9 is the limiting factor for Cas9-mediated DNA cleavage. In addition, we find that extension of the RNA sequence at the 3' end enhances DNA targeting activity in vivo. These results show that RNA-programmed genome editing is a facile strategy for introducing site-specific genetic changes in human cells.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00471.001.

  5. Assessing the integration of genomic medicine in genetic counseling training programs.

    PubMed

    Profato, Jessica; Gordon, Erynn S; Dixon, Shannan; Kwan, Andrea

    2014-08-01

    Medical genetics has entered a period of transition from genetics to genomics. Genetic counselors (GCs) may take on roles in the clinical implementation of genomics. This study explores the perspectives of program directors (PDs) on including genomic medicine in GC training programs, as well as the status of this integration. Study methods included an online survey, an optional one-on-one telephone interview, and an optional curricula content analysis. The majority of respondents (15/16) reported that it is important to include genomic medicine in program curricula. Most topics of genomic medicine are either "currently taught" or "under development" in all participating programs. Interview data from five PDs and one faculty member supported the survey data. Integrating genomics in training programs is challenging, and it is essential to develop genomics resources for curricula.

  6. 78 FR 18680 - Genomic Medicine Program Advisory Committee, Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-27

    ... AFFAIRS Genomic Medicine Program Advisory Committee, Notice of Meeting The Department of Veterans Affairs... Medicine Program Advisory Committee will meet on April 11, 2013, in Suite 1000 at the United States Access... Million Veteran Program, as well as the clinical Genomic Medicine Service. The emerging implications...

  7. Genomic Tools in Cowpea Breeding Programs: Status and Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Boukar, Ousmane; Fatokun, Christian A; Huynh, Bao-Lam; Roberts, Philip A; Close, Timothy J

    2016-01-01

    Cowpea is one of the most important grain legumes in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). It provides strong support to the livelihood of small-scale farmers through its contributions to their nutritional security, income generation and soil fertility enhancement. Worldwide about 6.5 million metric tons of cowpea are produced annually on about 14.5 million hectares. The low productivity of cowpea is attributable to numerous abiotic and biotic constraints. The abiotic stress factors comprise drought, low soil fertility, and heat while biotic constraints include insects, diseases, parasitic weeds, and nematodes. Cowpea farmers also have limited access to quality seeds of improved varieties for planting. Some progress has been made through conventional breeding at international and national research institutions in the last three decades. Cowpea improvement could also benefit from modern breeding methods based on molecular genetic tools. A number of advances in cowpea genetic linkage maps, and quantitative trait loci associated with some desirable traits such as resistance to Striga, Macrophomina, Fusarium wilt, bacterial blight, root-knot nematodes, aphids, and foliar thrips have been reported. An improved consensus genetic linkage map has been developed and used to identify QTLs of additional traits. In order to take advantage of these developments single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping is being streamlined to establish an efficient workflow supported by genotyping support service (GSS)-client interactions. About 1100 SNPs mapped on the cowpea genome were converted by LGC Genomics to KASP assays. Several cowpea breeding programs have been exploiting these resources to implement molecular breeding, especially for MARS and MABC, to accelerate cowpea variety improvement. The combination of conventional breeding and molecular breeding strategies, with workflow managed through the CGIAR breeding management system (BMS), promises an increase in the number of improved

  8. Genomic Tools in Cowpea Breeding Programs: Status and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Boukar, Ousmane; Fatokun, Christian A.; Huynh, Bao-Lam; Roberts, Philip A.; Close, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    Cowpea is one of the most important grain legumes in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). It provides strong support to the livelihood of small-scale farmers through its contributions to their nutritional security, income generation and soil fertility enhancement. Worldwide about 6.5 million metric tons of cowpea are produced annually on about 14.5 million hectares. The low productivity of cowpea is attributable to numerous abiotic and biotic constraints. The abiotic stress factors comprise drought, low soil fertility, and heat while biotic constraints include insects, diseases, parasitic weeds, and nematodes. Cowpea farmers also have limited access to quality seeds of improved varieties for planting. Some progress has been made through conventional breeding at international and national research institutions in the last three decades. Cowpea improvement could also benefit from modern breeding methods based on molecular genetic tools. A number of advances in cowpea genetic linkage maps, and quantitative trait loci associated with some desirable traits such as resistance to Striga, Macrophomina, Fusarium wilt, bacterial blight, root-knot nematodes, aphids, and foliar thrips have been reported. An improved consensus genetic linkage map has been developed and used to identify QTLs of additional traits. In order to take advantage of these developments single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping is being streamlined to establish an efficient workflow supported by genotyping support service (GSS)-client interactions. About 1100 SNPs mapped on the cowpea genome were converted by LGC Genomics to KASP assays. Several cowpea breeding programs have been exploiting these resources to implement molecular breeding, especially for MARS and MABC, to accelerate cowpea variety improvement. The combination of conventional breeding and molecular breeding strategies, with workflow managed through the CGIAR breeding management system (BMS), promises an increase in the number of improved

  9. GIANT API: an application programming interface for functional genomics.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Andrew M; Wong, Aaron K; Fisk, Ian; Troyanskaya, Olga G

    2016-07-08

    GIANT API provides biomedical researchers programmatic access to tissue-specific and global networks in humans and model organisms, and associated tools, which includes functional re-prioritization of existing genome-wide association study (GWAS) data. Using tissue-specific interaction networks, researchers are able to predict relationships between genes specific to a tissue or cell lineage, identify the changing roles of genes across tissues and uncover disease-gene associations. Additionally, GIANT API enables computational tools like NetWAS, which leverages tissue-specific networks for re-prioritization of GWAS results. The web services covered by the API include 144 tissue-specific functional gene networks in human, global functional networks for human and six common model organisms and the NetWAS method. GIANT API conforms to the REST architecture, which makes it stateless, cacheable and highly scalable. It can be used by a diverse range of clients including web browsers, command terminals, programming languages and standalone apps for data analysis and visualization. The API is freely available for use at http://giant-api.princeton.edu. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  10. GIANT API: an application programming interface for functional genomics

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Andrew M.; Wong, Aaron K.; Fisk, Ian; Troyanskaya, Olga G.

    2016-01-01

    GIANT API provides biomedical researchers programmatic access to tissue-specific and global networks in humans and model organisms, and associated tools, which includes functional re-prioritization of existing genome-wide association study (GWAS) data. Using tissue-specific interaction networks, researchers are able to predict relationships between genes specific to a tissue or cell lineage, identify the changing roles of genes across tissues and uncover disease-gene associations. Additionally, GIANT API enables computational tools like NetWAS, which leverages tissue-specific networks for re-prioritization of GWAS results. The web services covered by the API include 144 tissue-specific functional gene networks in human, global functional networks for human and six common model organisms and the NetWAS method. GIANT API conforms to the REST architecture, which makes it stateless, cacheable and highly scalable. It can be used by a diverse range of clients including web browsers, command terminals, programming languages and standalone apps for data analysis and visualization. The API is freely available for use at http://giant-api.princeton.edu. PMID:27098035

  11. Strategies to prepare faculty to integrate genomics into nursing education programs.

    PubMed

    Williams, Janet K; Prows, Cynthia A; Conley, Yvette P; Eggert, Julie; Kirk, Maggie; Nichols, Francine

    2011-09-01

    Faculty knowledge of genomics, learner competencies, and program requirements for nursing education are described to assist educators in introducing genomic information into nursing undergraduate, graduate, postgraduate, and continuing education programs regardless of geographic location. Selected programs in the United States and the United Kingdom are described to illustrate successful approaches used by nursing faculty to enhance their genomic knowledge in order to increase application of genetic and genomic content within nursing education curricula. Nursing education guidelines and nursing competencies provide benchmarks for educators in planning genetic and genomic curriculum content and expected learner outcomes. Elements within competencies from the United States and the United Kingdom are reviewed to provide the framework for faculty knowledge. Strategies to address development of faculty knowledge and expertise are suggested. Continuing education faculty development programs and strategies to develop doctorally prepared nurse scientists who will educate future students in the profession are described. Multiple faculty who are prepared to implement education on genetic and genomic topics are needed at all levels of nursing education. Faculty networking and application of genomic principles to nursing are key elements for sustaining nursing education to produce a nursing workforce that can apply essential genomic knowledge. There is an urgent need to offer genomics in accessible and effective education for nursing practice to optimize health outcomes regardless of geographic location. © 2011 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  12. Some problems with a crash program. [Human Genome Project

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, B.D. )

    1991-01-01

    This brief article describes the controversy over funding for the Human Genome Project. The author states that if the goal of the project is to understand the human genome by relating structure to function if would not appear justifiable to invest massive amounts of money now in improving sequencing techniques. Complete sequencing data may emerge eventually from expanding regions of interest.

  13. Programming biological operating systems: genome design, assembly and activation.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Daniel G

    2014-05-01

    The DNA technologies developed over the past 20 years for reading and writing the genetic code converged when the first synthetic cell was created 4 years ago. An outcome of this work has been an extraordinary set of tools for synthesizing, assembling, engineering and transplanting whole bacterial genomes. Technical progress, options and applications for bacterial genome design, assembly and activation are discussed.

  14. 77 FR 58913 - Genomic Medicine Program Advisory Committee, Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Genomic Medicine Program Advisory Committee, Notice of Meeting The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) gives notice under Public Law 92-463 (Federal Advisory Committee Act) that the Genomic...

  15. 77 FR 16898 - Genomic Medicine Program Advisory Committee, Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Genomic Medicine Program Advisory Committee, Notice of Meeting The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) gives notice under Public Law 92-463 (Federal Advisory Committee Act) that the Genomic...

  16. 78 FR 58612 - Genomic Medicine Program Advisory Committee, Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Genomic Medicine Program Advisory Committee, Notice of Meeting The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) gives notice under the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. 2, that the Genomic...

  17. 75 FR 61861 - Genomic Medicine Program Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Genomic Medicine Program Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) gives notice under Public Law 92-463 (Federal Advisory Committee Act) that the Genomic...

  18. 76 FR 24573 - Genomic Medicine Program Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Genomic Medicine Program Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) gives notice under Public Law 92-463 (Federal Advisory Committee Act) that the Genomic...

  19. BARC 2010 Annual Report for NRSP-8 National Animal Genome Research Program (NAGRP)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    BARC 2010 has contributed to the National Animal Genome Research Program (NAGRP). The NRSP8 NAGRP’s objectives are 1) Enhance and integrate genetic and physical maps of agriculturally important animals for cross species comparisons and sequence annotation; 2) Facilitate integration of genomic, trans...

  20. BARC 2009 Annual Report for NRSP-8 National Animal Genome Research Program (NAGRP)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    BARC 2009 has contributed to the National Animal Genome Research Program (NAGRP). The NRSP8 NAGRP’s objectives are 1) Enhance and integrate genetic and physical maps of agriculturally important animals for cross species comparisons and sequence annotation; 2) Facilitate integration of genomic, trans...

  1. Genomic selection accuracy using multi-family prediction models in a wheat breeding program

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Genomic selection (GS) uses genome-wide molecular marker data to predict the genetic value of selection candidates in breeding programs. In plant breeding, the ability to produce large numbers of progeny per cross allows GS to be conducted within each family. However, this approach requires phenotyp...

  2. USDA animal genomics program: the view from the chicken coop

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    In 2007, the USDA Animal Genomics Strategic Planning Task Force prepared a Blueprint to direct national needs for future research, education, and extension efforts in agricultural animal genomics. This plan is entitled "Blueprint for USDA Efforts in Agricultural Animal Genomics 2008–2017". The Blueprint is reviewed from the perspective of a molecular biologist working within the poultry breeding industry. The diverse species used in animal agriculture require different tools, resources and technologies for their improvement. The specific requirements for chickens are described in this report. PMID:19607651

  3. RNA-Mediated Epigenetic Programming of Genome Rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Nowacki, Mariusz; Shetty, Keerthi; Landweber, Laura F.

    2012-01-01

    RNA, normally thought of as a conduit in gene expression, has a novel mode of action in ciliated protozoa. Maternal RNA templates provide both an organizing guide for DNA rearrangements and a template that can transport somatic mutations to the next generation. This opportunity for RNA-mediated genome rearrangement and DNA repair is profound in the ciliate Oxytricha, which deletes 95% of its germline genome during development in a process that severely fragments its chromosomes and then sorts and reorders the hundreds of thousands of pieces remaining. Oxytricha’s somatic nuclear genome is therefore an epigenome formed through RNA templates and signals arising from the previous generation. Furthermore, this mechanism of RNA-mediated epigenetic inheritance can function across multiple generations, and the discovery of maternal template RNA molecules has revealed new biological roles for RNA and has hinted at the power of RNA molecules to sculpt genomic information in cells. PMID:21801022

  4. Coordination of Programs on Domestic Animal Genomics: The Federal Framework

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-01

    including: • Large-scale sequencing to produce draft genome sequences (8-fold sequence coverage) of honeybee, chicken, dog , cattle, swine, and cat ...develop draft-quality genome sequences for the chicken, cow, honeybee, pig, dog , and cat . All were designated to be “high priority” for sequencing by...NHGRI supported sequencing centers (with the understanding that close evolutionary relationships between dog / cat and cow/pig would only allow

  5. Genomic selection needs to be carefully assessed to meet specific requirements in livestock breeding programs

    PubMed Central

    Jonas, Elisabeth; de Koning, Dirk-Jan

    2015-01-01

    Genomic selection is a promising development in agriculture, aiming improved production by exploiting molecular genetic markers to design novel breeding programs and to develop new markers-based models for genetic evaluation. It opens opportunities for research, as novel algorithms and lab methodologies are developed. Genomic selection can be applied in many breeds and species. Further research on the implementation of genomic selection (GS) in breeding programs is highly desirable not only for the common good, but also the private sector (breeding companies). It has been projected that this approach will improve selection routines, especially in species with long reproduction cycles, late or sex-limited or expensive trait recording and for complex traits. The task of integrating GS into existing breeding programs is, however, not straightforward. Despite successful integration into breeding programs for dairy cattle, it has yet to be shown how much emphasis can be given to the genomic information and how much additional phenotypic information is needed from new selection candidates. Genomic selection is already part of future planning in many breeding companies of pigs and beef cattle among others, but further research is needed to fully estimate how effective the use of genomic information will be for the prediction of the performance of future breeding stock. Genomic prediction of production in crossbreeding and across-breed schemes, costs and choice of individuals for genotyping are reasons for a reluctance to fully rely on genomic information for selection decisions. Breeding objectives are highly dependent on the industry and the additional gain when using genomic information has to be considered carefully. This review synthesizes some of the suggested approaches in selected livestock species including cattle, pig, chicken, and fish. It outlines tasks to help understanding possible consequences when applying genomic information in breeding scenarios. PMID

  6. Genomic selection needs to be carefully assessed to meet specific requirements in livestock breeding programs.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Elisabeth; de Koning, Dirk-Jan

    2015-01-01

    Genomic selection is a promising development in agriculture, aiming improved production by exploiting molecular genetic markers to design novel breeding programs and to develop new markers-based models for genetic evaluation. It opens opportunities for research, as novel algorithms and lab methodologies are developed. Genomic selection can be applied in many breeds and species. Further research on the implementation of genomic selection (GS) in breeding programs is highly desirable not only for the common good, but also the private sector (breeding companies). It has been projected that this approach will improve selection routines, especially in species with long reproduction cycles, late or sex-limited or expensive trait recording and for complex traits. The task of integrating GS into existing breeding programs is, however, not straightforward. Despite successful integration into breeding programs for dairy cattle, it has yet to be shown how much emphasis can be given to the genomic information and how much additional phenotypic information is needed from new selection candidates. Genomic selection is already part of future planning in many breeding companies of pigs and beef cattle among others, but further research is needed to fully estimate how effective the use of genomic information will be for the prediction of the performance of future breeding stock. Genomic prediction of production in crossbreeding and across-breed schemes, costs and choice of individuals for genotyping are reasons for a reluctance to fully rely on genomic information for selection decisions. Breeding objectives are highly dependent on the industry and the additional gain when using genomic information has to be considered carefully. This review synthesizes some of the suggested approaches in selected livestock species including cattle, pig, chicken, and fish. It outlines tasks to help understanding possible consequences when applying genomic information in breeding scenarios.

  7. Coordination of Programs on Domestic Animal Genomics: A Federal Framework

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-01

    Executive Office of the President Food Animal Production Agriculture Research Service U.S. Department of Agriculture Associates: Rodney J. Brown...diseases will benefit human health and the development of new pharmaceutical products . With significant input from Federal agencies currently investing...their functional products on a molecular level and their interactions with other genes. Genome sequencing projects are underway for several animals

  8. Genomic Tools in Pea Breeding Programs: Status and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Tayeh, Nadim; Aubert, Grégoire; Pilet-Nayel, Marie-Laure; Lejeune-Hénaut, Isabelle; Warkentin, Thomas D.; Burstin, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Pea (Pisum sativum L.) is an annual cool-season legume and one of the oldest domesticated crops. Dry pea seeds contain 22–25% protein, complex starch and fiber constituents, and a rich array of vitamins, minerals, and phytochemicals which make them a valuable source for human consumption and livestock feed. Dry pea ranks third to common bean and chickpea as the most widely grown pulse in the world with more than 11 million tons produced in 2013. Pea breeding has achieved great success since the time of Mendel's experiments in the mid-1800s. However, several traits still require significant improvement for better yield stability in a larger growing area. Key breeding objectives in pea include improving biotic and abiotic stress resistance and enhancing yield components and seed quality. Taking advantage of the diversity present in the pea genepool, many mapping populations have been constructed in the last decades and efforts have been deployed to identify loci involved in the control of target traits and further introgress them into elite breeding materials. Pea now benefits from next-generation sequencing and high-throughput genotyping technologies that are paving the way for genome-wide association studies and genomic selection approaches. This review covers the significant development and deployment of genomic tools for pea breeding in recent years. Future prospects are discussed especially in light of current progress toward deciphering the pea genome. PMID:26640470

  9. Flexible Approaches for Teaching Computational Genomics in a Health Information Management Program

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Leming; Watzlaf, Valerie; Abdelhak, Mervat

    2013-01-01

    The astonishing improvement of high-throughput biotechnologies in recent years makes it possible to access a huge amount of genomic data. The association between genomic data and genetic disease has already been and will continue to be applied to personalized healthcare. Health information management (HIM) professionals are the ones who will handle personal genetic information and provide solid evidence to support physicians’ diagnoses and personalized treatment strategies, and therefore they will need to have the knowledge and skills to process genomic data. In this paper, we describe flexible approaches for teaching a computational genomics course in the HIM program at the University of Pittsburgh. HIM programs at other universities may choose an appropriate approach to fit into their own curriculum. PMID:23861672

  10. Flexible approaches for teaching computational genomics in a health information management program.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Leming; Watzlaf, Valerie; Abdelhak, Mervat

    2013-01-01

    The astonishing improvement of high-throughput biotechnologies in recent years makes it possible to access a huge amount of genomic data. The association between genomic data and genetic disease has already been and will continue to be applied to personalized healthcare. Health information management (HIM) professionals are the ones who will handle personal genetic information and provide solid evidence to support physicians' diagnoses and personalized treatment strategies, and therefore they will need to have the knowledge and skills to process genomic data. In this paper, we describe flexible approaches for teaching a computational genomics course in the HIM program at the University of Pittsburgh. HIM programs at other universities may choose an appropriate approach to fit into their own curriculum.

  11. CHALLENGES FOR IMPLEMENTING A PTSD PREVENTIVE GENOMIC SEQUENCING PROGRAM IN THE U.S. MILITARY

    PubMed Central

    Lázaro-Muñoz, Gabriel; Juengst, Eric T.

    2015-01-01

    There is growing interest in using the quickly developing field of genomics to contribute to military readiness and effectiveness. Specifically, influential military advisory panels have recommended that the U.S. military apply genomics to help treat, prevent, or minimize the risk for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among service members. This article highlights some important scientific, legal, and ethical challenges regarding the development and deployment of a preventive genomic sequencing (PGS) program to predict the risk of PTSD among military service members. PMID:26401056

  12. Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program (CTEP) seeks to improve the lives of cancer patients by finding better treatments, control mechanisms, and cures for cancer. CTEP funds a national program of cancer research, sponsoring clinical trials to evaluate new anti-cancer agents.

  13. Genome-wide alterations of the DNA replication program during tumor progression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arneodo, A.; Goldar, A.; Argoul, F.; Hyrien, O.; Audit, B.

    2016-08-01

    Oncogenic stress is a major driving force in the early stages of cancer development. Recent experimental findings reveal that, in precancerous lesions and cancers, activated oncogenes may induce stalling and dissociation of DNA replication forks resulting in DNA damage. Replication timing is emerging as an important epigenetic feature that recapitulates several genomic, epigenetic and functional specificities of even closely related cell types. There is increasing evidence that chromosome rearrangements, the hallmark of many cancer genomes, are intimately associated with the DNA replication program and that epigenetic replication timing changes often precede chromosomic rearrangements. The recent development of a novel methodology to map replication fork polarity using deep sequencing of Okazaki fragments has provided new and complementary genome-wide replication profiling data. We review the results of a wavelet-based multi-scale analysis of genomic and epigenetic data including replication profiles along human chromosomes. These results provide new insight into the spatio-temporal replication program and its dynamics during differentiation. Here our goal is to bring to cancer research, the experimental protocols and computational methodologies for replication program profiling, and also the modeling of the spatio-temporal replication program. To illustrate our purpose, we report very preliminary results obtained for the chronic myelogeneous leukemia, the archetype model of cancer. Finally, we discuss promising perspectives on using genome-wide DNA replication profiling as a novel efficient tool for cancer diagnosis, prognosis and personalized treatment.

  14. Programming the genome in embryonic and somatic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Collas, Philippe; Noer, Agate; Timoskainen, Sanna

    2007-01-01

    In opposition to terminally differentiated cells, stem cells can self-renew and give rise to multiple cell types. Embryonic stem cells retain the ability of the inner cell mass of blastocysts to differentiate into all cell types of the body and have acquired in culture unlimited self-renewal capacity. Somatic stem cells are found in many adult tissues, have an extensive but finite lifespan and can differentiate into a more restricted array of cell types. A growing body of evidence indicates that multi-lineage differentiation ability of stem cells can be defined by the potential for expression of lineage-specification genes. Gene expression, or as emphasized here, potential for gene expression, is largely controlled by epigenetic modifications of DNA and chromatin on genomic regulatory and coding regions. These modifications modulate chromatin organization not only on specific genes but also at the level of the whole nucleus; they can also affect timing of DNA replication. This review highlights how mechanisms by which genes are poised for transcription in undifferentiated stem cells are being uncovered through primarily the mapping of DNA methylation, histone modifications and transcription factor binding throughout the genome. The combinatorial association of epigenetic marks on developmentally regulated and lineage-specifying genes in undifferentiated cells seems to define a pluripotent state.

  15. A Genome Sequencing Program for Novel Undiagnosed Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bloss, Cinnamon S.; Scott-Van Zeeland, Ashley A.; Topol, Sarah E.; Darst, Burcu F.; Boeldt, Debra L.; Erikson, Galina A.; Bethel, Kelly J.; Bjork, Robert L.; Friedman, Jennifer R.; Hwynn, Nelson; Patay, Bradley A.; Pockros, Paul J.; Scott, Erick R.; Simon, Ronald A.; Williams, Gary W.; Schork, Nicholas J.; Topol, Eric J.; Torkamani, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The Scripps Idiopathic Diseases of huMan (IDIOM) study aims to discover novel gene-disease relationships and provide molecular genetic diagnosis and treatment guidance for individuals with novel diseases using genome sequencing integrated with clinical assessment and multidisciplinary case review. Methods Here we describe the IDIOM study operational protocol and initial results. Results 121 cases underwent first tier review by the principal investigators to determine if the primary inclusion criteria were satisfied, 59 (48.8%) underwent second tier review by our clinician-scientist review panel, and 17 (14.0%) patients and their family members were enrolled. 60% of cases resulted in a plausible molecular diagnosis. 18% of cases resulted in a confirmed molecular diagnosis. 2 of 3 confirmed cases led to the identification of novel gene-disease relationships. In the third confirmed case, a previously described but unrecognized disease was revealed. In all three confirmed cases, a new clinical management strategy was initiated based on the genetic findings. Conclusions Genome sequencing provides tangible clinical benefit for individuals with idiopathic genetic disease, not only in the context of molecular genetic diagnosis of known rare conditions, but also in cases where prior clinical information regarding a new genetic disorder is lacking. PMID:25790160

  16. Introduction to Metagenomics at DOE JGI: Program Overview and Program Informatics (Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    SciTech Connect

    Tringe, Susannah

    2011-10-12

    Susannah Tringe of the DOE Joint Genome Institute talks about the Program Overview and Program Informatics at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011

  17. Introduction to Metagenomics at DOE JGI: Program Overview and Program Informatics (Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    ScienceCinema

    Tringe, Susannah [DOE JGI

    2016-07-12

    Susannah Tringe of the DOE Joint Genome Institute talks about the Program Overview and Program Informatics at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011

  18. Efficiency of genomic selection in an established commercial layer breeding program.

    PubMed

    Sitzenstock, Florian; Ytournel, Florence; Sharifi, Ahmad R; Cavero, David; Täubert, Helge; Preisinger, Rudolf; Simianer, Henner

    2013-07-31

    In breeding programs for layers, selection of hens and cocks is based on recording phenotypic data from hens in different housing systems. Genomic information can provide additional information for selection and/or allow for a strong reduction in the generation interval. In this study, a typical conventional layer breeding program using a four-line cross was modeled and the expected genetic progress was derived deterministically with the software ZPLAN+. This non-genomic reference scenario was compared to two genomic breeding programs to determine the best strategy for implementing genomic information in layer breeding programs. In scenario I, genomic information was used in addition to all other information available in the conventional breeding program, so the generation interval was the same as in the reference scenario, i.e. 14.5 months. Here, we assumed that either only young cocks or young cocks and hens were genotyped as selection candidates. In scenario II, we assumed that breeders of both sexes were used at the biologically earliest possible age, so that at the time of selection only performance data of the parent generation and genomic information of the selection candidates were available. In this case, the generation interval was reduced to eight months. In both scenarios, the number of genotyped male selection candidates was varied between 800 and 4800 males and two sizes of the calibration set (500 or 2000 animals) were considered. All genomic scenarios increased the expected genetic gain and the economic profit of the breeding program. In scenario II, the increase was much more pronounced and even in the most conservative implementation led to a 60% improvement in genetic gain and economic profit. This increase was in all cases associated with higher breeding costs. While genomic selection is shown to have the potential to improve genetic gain in layer breeding programs, its implementation remains a business decision of the breeding company; the

  19. Strategies, actions, and outcomes of pilot state programs in public health genomics, 2003-2008.

    PubMed

    St Pierre, Jeanette; Bach, Janice; Duquette, Debra; Oehlke, Kristen; Nystrom, Robert; Silvey, Kerry; Zlot, Amy; Giles, Rebecca; Johnson, Jenny; Anders, H Mack; Gwinn, Marta; Bowen, Scott; Khoury, Muin J

    2014-06-12

    State health departments in Michigan, Minnesota, Oregon, and Utah explored the use of genomic information, including family health history, in chronic disease prevention programs. To support these explorations, the Office of Public Health Genomics at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provided cooperative agreement funds from 2003 through 2008. The 4 states' chronic disease programs identified advocates, formed partnerships, and assessed public data; they integrated genomics into existing state plans for genetics and chronic disease prevention; they developed projects focused on prevention of asthma, cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and other chronic conditions; and they created educational curricula and materials for health workers, policymakers, and the public. Each state's program was different because of the need to adapt to existing culture, infrastructure, and resources, yet all were able to enhance their chronic disease prevention programs with the use of family health history, a low-tech "genomic tool." Additional states are drawing on the experience of these 4 states to develop their own approaches.

  20. Strategies, Actions, and Outcomes of Pilot State Programs in Public Health Genomics, 2003–2008

    PubMed Central

    St. Pierre, Jeanette; Bach, Janice; Duquette, Debra; Oehlke, Kristen; Nystrom, Robert; Silvey, Kerry; Zlot, Amy; Giles, Rebecca; Johnson, Jenny; Anders, H. Mack; Gwinn, Marta; Khoury, Muin J.

    2014-01-01

    State health departments in Michigan, Minnesota, Oregon, and Utah explored the use of genomic information, including family health history, in chronic disease prevention programs. To support these explorations, the Office of Public Health Genomics at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provided cooperative agreement funds from 2003 through 2008. The 4 states’ chronic disease programs identified advocates, formed partnerships, and assessed public data; they integrated genomics into existing state plans for genetics and chronic disease prevention; they developed projects focused on prevention of asthma, cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and other chronic conditions; and they created educational curricula and materials for health workers, policymakers, and the public. Each state’s program was different because of the need to adapt to existing culture, infrastructure, and resources, yet all were able to enhance their chronic disease prevention programs with the use of family health history, a low-tech “genomic tool.” Additional states are drawing on the experience of these 4 states to develop their own approaches. PMID:24921900

  1. Bromodomain-dependent stage-specific male genome programming by Brdt.

    PubMed

    Gaucher, Jonathan; Boussouar, Fayçal; Montellier, Emilie; Curtet, Sandrine; Buchou, Thierry; Bertrand, Sarah; Hery, Patrick; Jounier, Sylvie; Depaux, Arnaud; Vitte, Anne-Laure; Guardiola, Philippe; Pernet, Karin; Debernardi, Alexandra; Lopez, Fabrice; Holota, Hélène; Imbert, Jean; Wolgemuth, Debra J; Gérard, Matthieu; Rousseaux, Sophie; Khochbin, Saadi

    2012-10-03

    Male germ cell differentiation is a highly regulated multistep process initiated by the commitment of progenitor cells into meiosis and characterized by major chromatin reorganizations in haploid spermatids. We report here that a single member of the double bromodomain BET factors, Brdt, is a master regulator of both meiotic divisions and post-meiotic genome repackaging. Upon its activation at the onset of meiosis, Brdt drives and determines the developmental timing of a testis-specific gene expression program. In meiotic and post-meiotic cells, Brdt initiates a genuine histone acetylation-guided programming of the genome by activating essential genes and repressing a 'progenitor cells' gene expression program. At post-meiotic stages, a global chromatin hyperacetylation gives the signal for Brdt's first bromodomain to direct the genome-wide replacement of histones by transition proteins. Brdt is therefore a unique and essential regulator of male germ cell differentiation, which, by using various domains in a developmentally controlled manner, first drives a specific spermatogenic gene expression program, and later controls the tight packaging of the male genome.

  2. The effect of genomic information on optimal contribution selection in livestock breeding programs.

    PubMed

    Clark, Samuel A; Kinghorn, Brian P; Hickey, John M; van der Werf, Julius H J

    2013-10-30

    Long-term benefits in animal breeding programs require that increases in genetic merit be balanced with the need to maintain diversity (lost due to inbreeding). This can be achieved by using optimal contribution selection. The availability of high-density DNA marker information enables the incorporation of genomic data into optimal contribution selection but this raises the question about how this information affects the balance between genetic merit and diversity. The effect of using genomic information in optimal contribution selection was examined based on simulated and real data on dairy bulls. We compared the genetic merit of selected animals at various levels of co-ancestry restrictions when using estimated breeding values based on parent average, genomic or progeny test information. Furthermore, we estimated the proportion of variation in estimated breeding values that is due to within-family differences. Optimal selection on genomic estimated breeding values increased genetic gain. Genetic merit was further increased using genomic rather than pedigree-based measures of co-ancestry under an inbreeding restriction policy. Using genomic instead of pedigree relationships to restrict inbreeding had a significant effect only when the population consisted of many large full-sib families; with a half-sib family structure, no difference was observed. In real data from dairy bulls, optimal contribution selection based on genomic estimated breeding values allowed for additional improvements in genetic merit at low to moderate inbreeding levels. Genomic estimated breeding values were more accurate and showed more within-family variation than parent average breeding values; for genomic estimated breeding values, 30 to 40% of the variation was due to within-family differences. Finally, there was no difference between constraining inbreeding via pedigree or genomic relationships in the real data. The use of genomic estimated breeding values increased genetic gain in

  3. The collaborative African genomics network training program: A trainee perspective on training the next generation of African scientists

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Collaborative African Genomics Network (CAfGEN) aims to establish sustainable genomics research programs in Botswana and Uganda through long-term training of PhD students from these countries at Baylor College of Medicine. Here, we present an overview of the CAfGEN PhD training program alongside...

  4. Potential benefits of genomic selection on genetic gain of small ruminant breeding programs.

    PubMed

    Shumbusho, F; Raoul, J; Astruc, J M; Palhiere, I; Elsen, J M

    2013-08-01

    In conventional small ruminant breeding programs, only pedigree and phenotype records are used to make selection decisions but prospects of including genomic information are now under consideration. The objective of this study was to assess the potential benefits of genomic selection on the genetic gain in French sheep and goat breeding designs of today. Traditional and genomic scenarios were modeled with deterministic methods for 3 breeding programs. The models included decisional variables related to male selection candidates, progeny testing capacity, and economic weights that were optimized to maximize annual genetic gain (AGG) of i) a meat sheep breeding program that improved a meat trait of heritability (h(2)) = 0.30 and a maternal trait of h(2) = 0.09 and ii) dairy sheep and goat breeding programs that improved a milk trait of h(2) = 0.30. Values of ±0.20 of genetic correlation between meat and maternal traits were considered to study their effects on AGG. The Bulmer effect was accounted for and the results presented here are the averages of AGG after 10 generations of selection. Results showed that current traditional breeding programs provide an AGG of 0.095 genetic standard deviation (σa) for meat and 0.061 σa for maternal trait in meat breed and 0.147 σa and 0.120 σa in sheep and goat dairy breeds, respectively. By optimizing decisional variables, the AGG with traditional selection methods increased to 0.139 σa for meat and 0.096 σa for maternal traits in meat breeding programs and to 0.174 σa and 0.183 σa in dairy sheep and goat breeding programs, respectively. With a medium-sized reference population (nref) of 2,000 individuals, the best genomic scenarios gave an AGG that was 17.9% greater than with traditional selection methods with optimized values of decisional variables for combined meat and maternal traits in meat sheep, 51.7% in dairy sheep, and 26.2% in dairy goats. The superiority of genomic schemes increased with the size of the

  5. The Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications Program of the National Human Genome Research Institute: reflections on an ongoing experiment.

    PubMed

    McEwen, Jean E; Boyer, Joy T; Sun, Kathie Y; Rothenberg, Karen H; Lockhart, Nicole C; Guyer, Mark S

    2014-01-01

    For more than 20 years, the Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications (ELSI) Program of the National Human Genome Research Institute has supported empirical and conceptual research to anticipate and address the ethical, legal, and social implications of genomics. As a component of the agency that funds much of the underlying science, the program has always been an experiment. The ever-expanding number of issues the program addresses and the relatively low level of commitment on the part of other funding agencies to support such research make setting priorities especially challenging. Program-supported studies have had a significant impact on the conduct of genomics research, the implementation of genomic medicine, and broader public policies. The program's influence is likely to grow as ELSI research, genomics research, and policy development activities become increasingly integrated. Achieving the benefits of increased integration while preserving the autonomy, objectivity, and intellectual independence of ELSI investigators presents ongoing challenges and new opportunities.

  6. The Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications Research Program at the National Human Genome Research Institute.

    PubMed

    Meslin, Eric M; Thomson, Elizabeth J; Boyer, Joy T

    1997-09-01

    Organizers of the Human Genome Project (HGP) understood from the beginning that the scientific activities of mapping and sequencing the human genome would raise ethical, legal, and social issues that would require careful attention by scientists, health care professionals, government officials, and the public. The establishment of the ELSI (ethical, legal, and social implications) programs at the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) and the Department of Energy (DOE) was thought to be vital to the success of the HGP in the United States. It also provided a novel approach to the simultaneous study of ethical, legal, and social issues and basic scientific issues. Eric Juengst, the first director of the ELSI program, described its origins in a previous issue of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal (Juengst 1991). Now in its seventh year, the ELSI program has accomplished much. This article summarizes the evolution and goals of the ELSI program at NHGRI, outlines the program's current research priorities with examples of activities within each priority area, and provides a look to the future, including the initiation of a strategic planning process.

  7. Data Standards for the Genomes to Life Program

    SciTech Connect

    Arkin, Adam; Ambrosiano, John; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Frank, Ed; Geist,Al; Giometti, Carol; Jacobsen, Janet; Samatova, Nagiza; Slater, Nancy; Taylor, Ron

    2004-01-31

    Existing GTL Projects already have produced volumes of dataand, over the course of the next five years, will produce an estimatedhundreds, or possibly thousands, of terabytes of data from hundreds ofexperiments conducted at dozens of laboratories in National Labs anduniversities across the nation. These data will be the basis forpublications by individual researchers, research groups, andmulti-institutional collaborations, and the basis for future DOEdecisions on funding further research in bioremediation. The short-termand long-term value of the data to project participants, to the DOE, andto the nation depends, however, on being able to access the data and onhow, or whether, the data are archived. The ability to access data is thestarting point for data analysis and interpretation, data integration,data mining, and development of data-driven models. Limited orinefficient data access means that less data are analyzed in acost-effective and timely manner. Data production in the GTL Program willlikely outstrip, or may have already outstripped, the ability to analyzethe data. Being able to access data depends on two key factors: datastandards and implementation of the data standards. For the purpose ofthis proposal, a data standard is defined as a standard, documented wayin which data and information about the data are describe. The attributesof the experiment in which the data were collected need to be known andthe measurements corresponding to the data collected need to bedescribed. In general terms, a data standard could be a form (electronicor paper) that is completed by a researcher or a document that prescribeshow a protocol or experiment should be described in writing.Datastandards are critical to data access because they provide a frameworkfor organizing and managing data. Researchers spend significant amountsof time managing data and information about experiments using labnotebooks, computer files, Excel spreadsheets, etc. In addition, dataoutput format

  8. Development of Structural Neurobiology and Genomics Programs in the Neurogenetic Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Brian E., M.D.

    2006-11-10

    The purpose of the DOE equipment-only grant was to purchase instrumentation in support of structural biology and genomics core facilities in the Zilkha Neurogenetic Institute (ZNI). The ZNI, a new laboratory facility (125,000 GSF) and a center of excellence at the Keck School of Medicine of USC, was opened in 2003. The goal of the ZNI is to recruit upwards of 30 new faculty investigators engaged in interdisciplinary research programs that will add breadth and depth to existing school strengths in neuroscience, epidemiology and genetics. Many of these faculty, and other faculty researchers at the Keck School will access structural biology and genomics facilities developed in the ZNI.

  9. Efficient and exact maximum likelihood quantisation of genomic features using dynamic programming.

    PubMed

    Song, Mingzhou; Haralick, Robert M; Boissinot, Stéphane

    2010-01-01

    An efficient and exact dynamic programming algorithm is introduced to quantise a continuous random variable into a discrete random variable that maximises the likelihood of the quantised probability distribution for the original continuous random variable. Quantisation is often useful before statistical analysis and modelling of large discrete network models from observations of multiple continuous random variables. The quantisation algorithm is applied to genomic features including the recombination rate distribution across the chromosomes and the non-coding transposable element LINE-1 in the human genome. The association pattern is studied between the recombination rate, obtained by quantisation at genomic locations around LINE-1 elements, and the length groups of LINE-1 elements, also obtained by quantisation on LINE-1 length. The exact and density-preserving quantisation approach provides an alternative superior to the inexact and distance-based univariate iterative k-means clustering algorithm for discretisation.

  10. A genome resource to address mechanisms of developmental programming: determination of the fetal sheep heart transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Cox, Laura A; Glenn, Jeremy P; Spradling, Kimberly D; Nijland, Mark J; Garcia, Roy; Nathanielsz, Peter W; Ford, Stephen P

    2012-06-15

    The pregnant sheep has provided seminal insights into reproduction related to animal and human development (ovarian function, fertility, implantation, fetal growth, parturition and lactation). Fetal sheep physiology has been extensively studied since 1950, contributing significantly to the basis for our understanding of many aspects of fetal development and behaviour that remain in use in clinical practice today. Understanding mechanisms requires the combination of systems approaches uniquely available in fetal sheep with the power of genomic studies. Absence of the full range of sheep genomic resources has limited the full realization of the power of this model, impeding progress in emerging areas of pregnancy biology such as developmental programming. We have examined the expressed fetal sheep heart transcriptome using high-throughput sequencing technologies. In so doing we identified 36,737 novel transcripts and describe genes, gene variants and pathways relevant to fundamental developmental mechanisms. Genes with the highest expression levels and with novel exons in the fetal heart transcriptome are known to play central roles in muscle development. We show that high-throughput sequencing methods can generate extensive transcriptome information in the absence of an assembled and annotated genome for that species. The gene sequence data obtained provide a unique genomic resource for sheep specific genetic technology development and, combined with the polymorphism data, augment annotation and assembly of the sheep genome. In addition, identification and pathway analysis of novel fetal sheep heart transcriptome splice variants is a first step towards revealing mechanisms of genetic variation and gene environment interactions during fetal heart development.

  11. Programmed Minichromosome Elimination as a Mechanism for Somatic Genome Reduction in Tetrahymena thermophila

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Meng-Chao

    2016-01-01

    The maintenance of chromosome integrity is crucial for genetic stability. However, programmed chromosome fragmentations are known to occur in many organisms, and in the ciliate Tetrahymena the five germline chromosomes are fragmented into hundreds of minichromosomes during somatic nuclear differentiation. Here, we showed that there are different fates of these minichromosomes after chromosome breakage. Among the 326 somatic minichromosomes identified using genomic data, 50 are selectively eliminated from the mature somatic genome. Interestingly, many and probably most of these minichromosomes are eliminated during the growth period between 6 and 20 doublings right after conjugation. Genes with potential conjugation-specific functions are found in these minichromosomes. This study revealed a new mode of programmed DNA elimination in ciliates similar to those observed in parasitic nematodes, which could play a role in developmental gene regulation. PMID:27806059

  12. READSCAN: a fast and scalable pathogen discovery program with accurate genome relative abundance estimation.

    PubMed

    Naeem, Raeece; Rashid, Mamoon; Pain, Arnab

    2013-02-01

    READSCAN is a highly scalable parallel program to identify non-host sequences (of potential pathogen origin) and estimate their genome relative abundance in high-throughput sequence datasets. READSCAN accurately classified human and viral sequences on a 20.1 million reads simulated dataset in <27 min using a small Beowulf compute cluster with 16 nodes (Supplementary Material). http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/readscan.

  13. Optimal strategies for the use of genomic selection in dairy cattle breeding programs.

    PubMed

    Wensch-Dorendorf, M; Yin, T; Swalve, H H; König, S

    2011-08-01

    The objective of the present study was to conduct a stochastic simulation study on the possible benefits of an application of genomic selection in dairy cattle breeding programs according to a variety of selection schemes. In addition, the heritability of the trait in question, the accuracy of genomic breeding values, and the number of animals to be genotyped were varied. Specifically, the question of genotyping males, females, or both, was addressed. Selection schemes were compared with a young bull breeding program. The main criterion for comparison was the average of true breeding values of selected young males to be used as replacements for artificial insemination bulls. Stochastic simulations were run with 50 repetitions each to generate individuals with phenotypes, breeding values estimated by BLUP, and true breeding values. Genomic breeding values were generated from true breeding values with defined accuracy. Examined scenarios included a group of selection schemes that featured genotyping of parents of future bulls only. Such schemes can be viewed as improvements of young bull programs, and they were found to be competitive with or superior to a classical young bull program. However, a genomic breeding program usually involves at least genotyping young male candidates. A second group of selection schemes reflected this requirement. Scenarios in this group were found to be superior over the young bull program by 1.0 to 1.2 standard deviations of the average true breeding value of young male candidates. Within this group of scenarios, one scheme referred to an ideal situation under which genotypes for male calves were available without limitation. Using the average of true breeding values as the criterion for comparison, this idealistic scenario was competitive with other scenarios only if the reliability of genomic breeding values was larger than 0.50. Conventionally, not all males available will have genotypes, and the 2 most promising scenarios included a

  14. Economic evaluation of genomic selection in small ruminants: a sheep meat breeding program.

    PubMed

    Shumbusho, F; Raoul, J; Astruc, J M; Palhiere, I; Lemarié, S; Fugeray-Scarbel, A; Elsen, J M

    2016-06-01

    Recent genomic evaluation studies using real data and predicting genetic gain by modeling breeding programs have reported moderate expected benefits from the replacement of classic selection schemes by genomic selection (GS) in small ruminants. The objectives of this study were to compare the cost, monetary genetic gain and economic efficiency of classic selection and GS schemes in the meat sheep industry. Deterministic methods were used to model selection based on multi-trait indices from a sheep meat breeding program. Decisional variables related to male selection candidates and progeny testing were optimized to maximize the annual monetary genetic gain (AMGG), that is, a weighted sum of meat and maternal traits annual genetic gains. For GS, a reference population of 2000 individuals was assumed and genomic information was available for evaluation of male candidates only. In the classic selection scheme, males breeding values were estimated from own and offspring phenotypes. In GS, different scenarios were considered, differing by the information used to select males (genomic only, genomic+own performance, genomic+offspring phenotypes). The results showed that all GS scenarios were associated with higher total variable costs than classic selection (if the cost of genotyping was 123 euros/animal). In terms of AMGG and economic returns, GS scenarios were found to be superior to classic selection only if genomic information was combined with their own meat phenotypes (GS-Pheno) or with their progeny test information. The predicted economic efficiency, defined as returns (proportional to number of expressions of AMGG in the nucleus and commercial flocks) minus total variable costs, showed that the best GS scenario (GS-Pheno) was up to 15% more efficient than classic selection. For all selection scenarios, optimization increased the overall AMGG, returns and economic efficiency. As a conclusion, our study shows that some forms of GS strategies are more advantageous

  15. A survey of application: genomics and genetic programming, a new frontier.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammad Wahab; Alam, Mansaf

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide an introduction to the rapidly developing field of genetic programming (GP). Particular emphasis is placed on the application of GP to genomics. First, the basic methodology of GP is introduced. This is followed by a review of applications in the areas of gene network inference, gene expression data analysis, SNP analysis, epistasis analysis and gene annotation. Finally this paper concluded by suggesting potential avenues of possible future research on genetic programming, opportunities to extend the technique, and areas for possible practical applications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Design and implementation of a genomics field trip program aimed at secondary school students.

    PubMed

    McQueen, Jennifer; Wright, Jody J; Fox, Joanne A

    2012-01-01

    With the rapid pace of advancements in biological research brought about by the application of computer science and information technology, we believe the time is right for introducing genomics and bioinformatics tools and concepts to secondary school students. Our approach has been to offer a full-day field trip in our research facility where secondary school students carry out experiments at the laboratory bench and on a laptop computer. This experience offers benefits for students, teachers, and field trip instructors. In delivering a wide variety of science outreach and education programs, we have learned that a number of factors contribute to designing a successful experience for secondary school students. First, it is important to engage students with authentic and fun activities that are linked to real-world applications and/or research questions. Second, connecting with a local high school teacher to pilot programs and linking to curricula taught in secondary schools will enrich the field trip experience. Whether or not programs are linked directly to local teachers, it is important to be flexible and build in mechanisms for collecting feedback in field trip programs. Finally, graduate students can be very powerful mentors for students and should be encouraged to share their enthusiasm for science and to talk about career paths. Our experiences suggest a real need for effective science outreach programs at the secondary school level and that genomics and bioinformatics are ideal areas to explore.

  17. Design and Implementation of a Genomics Field Trip Program Aimed at Secondary School Students

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Joanne A.

    2012-01-01

    With the rapid pace of advancements in biological research brought about by the application of computer science and information technology, we believe the time is right for introducing genomics and bioinformatics tools and concepts to secondary school students. Our approach has been to offer a full-day field trip in our research facility where secondary school students carry out experiments at the laboratory bench and on a laptop computer. This experience offers benefits for students, teachers, and field trip instructors. In delivering a wide variety of science outreach and education programs, we have learned that a number of factors contribute to designing a successful experience for secondary school students. First, it is important to engage students with authentic and fun activities that are linked to real-world applications and/or research questions. Second, connecting with a local high school teacher to pilot programs and linking to curricula taught in secondary schools will enrich the field trip experience. Whether or not programs are linked directly to local teachers, it is important to be flexible and build in mechanisms for collecting feedback in field trip programs. Finally, graduate students can be very powerful mentors for students and should be encouraged to share their enthusiasm for science and to talk about career paths. Our experiences suggest a real need for effective science outreach programs at the secondary school level and that genomics and bioinformatics are ideal areas to explore. PMID:22956895

  18. Potential of gene drives with genome editing to increase genetic gain in livestock breeding programs.

    PubMed

    Gonen, Serap; Jenko, Janez; Gorjanc, Gregor; Mileham, Alan J; Whitelaw, C Bruce A; Hickey, John M

    2017-01-04

    This paper uses simulation to explore how gene drives can increase genetic gain in livestock breeding programs. Gene drives are naturally occurring phenomena that cause a mutation on one chromosome to copy itself onto its homologous chromosome. We simulated nine different breeding and editing scenarios with a common overall structure. Each scenario began with 21 generations of selection, followed by 20 generations of selection based on true breeding values where the breeder used selection alone, selection in combination with genome editing, or selection with genome editing and gene drives. In the scenarios that used gene drives, we varied the probability of successfully incorporating the gene drive. For each scenario, we evaluated genetic gain, genetic variance [Formula: see text], rate of change in inbreeding ([Formula: see text]), number of distinct quantitative trait nucleotides (QTN) edited, rate of increase in favourable allele frequencies of edited QTN and the time to fix favourable alleles. Gene drives enhanced the benefits of genome editing in seven ways: (1) they amplified the increase in genetic gain brought about by genome editing; (2) they amplified the rate of increase in the frequency of favourable alleles and reduced the time it took to fix them; (3) they enabled more rapid targeting of QTN with lesser effect for genome editing; (4) they distributed fixed editing resources across a larger number of distinct QTN across generations; (5) they focussed editing on a smaller number of QTN within a given generation; (6) they reduced the level of inbreeding when editing a subset of the sires; and (7) they increased the efficiency of converting genetic variation into genetic gain. Genome editing in livestock breeding results in short-, medium- and long-term increases in genetic gain. The increase in genetic gain occurs because editing increases the frequency of favourable alleles in the population. Gene drives accelerate the increase in allele frequency

  19. Prokaryotic Super Program Advisory Committee DOE Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, CA, March 27, 2013.

    PubMed

    Garrity, George M; Banfield, Jill; Eisen, Jonathan; van der Lelie, Niels; McMahon, Trina; Rusch, Doug; Delong, Edward; Moran, Mary Ann; Currie, Cameron; Furhman, Jed; Hallam, Steve; Hugenholtz, Phil; Moran, Nancy; Nelson, Karen; Roberts, Richard; Stepanauskas, Ramunas

    2013-07-30

    The Prokaryotic Super Program Advisory Committee met on March 27, 2013 for their annual review the Prokaryotic Super Program at the DOE Joint Genome Institute. As is the case with any site visit or program review, the objective is to evaluate progress in meeting organizational objectives, provide feedback to from the user-community and to assist the JGI in formulating plans for the coming year. The advisors want to commend the JGI for its central role in developing new technologies and capabilities, and for catalyzing the formation of new collaborative user communities. Highlights of the post-meeting exchanges among the advisors focused on the importance of programmatic initiatives including: • GEBA, which serves as a phylogenetic "base-map" on which our knowledge of functional diversity can be layered. • FEBA, which promises to provide new insights into the physiological capabilities of prokaryotes under highly standardized conditions. • Single-cell genomics technology, which is seen to significantly enhance our ability to interpret genomic and metagenomic data and broaden the scope of the GEBA program to encompass at least a part of the microbial "dark-matter". • IMG, which is seen to play a central role in JGI programs and is viewed as a strategically important asset in the JGI portfolio. On this latter point, the committee encourages the formation of a strategic relationship between IMG and the Kbase to ensure that the intelligence, deep knowledge and experience captured in the former is not lost. The committee strongly urges the DOE to continue its support for maintaining this critical resource.

  20. Prokaryotic Super Program Advisory Committee DOE Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, CA, March 27, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Garrity, George M.; Banfield, Jill; Eisen, Jonathan; van der Lelie, Niels; McMahon, Trina; Rusch, Doug; DeLong, Edward; Moran, Mary Ann; Currie, Cameron; Furhman, Jed; Hallam, Steve; Hugenholtz, Phil; Moran, Nancy; Nelson, Karen; Roberts, Richard; Stepanauskas, Ramunas

    2013-01-01

    The Prokaryotic Super Program Advisory Committee met on March 27, 2013 for their annual review the Prokaryotic Super Program at the DOE Joint Genome Institute. As is the case with any site visit or program review, the objective is to evaluate progress in meeting organizational objectives, provide feedback to from the user-community and to assist the JGI in formulating plans for the coming year. The advisors want to commend the JGI for its central role in developing new technologies and capabilities, and for catalyzing the formation of new collaborative user communities. Highlights of the post-meeting exchanges among the advisors focused on the importance of programmatic initiatives including: • GEBA, which serves as a phylogenetic “base-map” on which our knowledge of functional diversity can be layered. • FEBA, which promises to provide new insights into the physiological capabilities of prokaryotes under highly standardized conditions. • Single-cell genomics technology, which is seen to significantly enhance our ability to interpret genomic and metagenomic data and broaden the scope of the GEBA program to encompass at least a part of the microbial “dark-matter”. • IMG, which is seen to play a central role in JGI programs and is viewed as a strategically important asset in the JGI portfolio. On this latter point, the committee encourages the formation of a strategic relationship between IMG and the Kbase to ensure that the intelligence, deep knowledge and experience captured in the former is not lost. The committee strongly urges the DOE to continue its support for maintaining this critical resource. PMID:24501639

  1. Genetic Gain and Inbreeding from Genomic Selection in a Simulated Commercial Breeding Program for Perennial Ryegrass.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zibei; Cogan, Noel O I; Pembleton, Luke W; Spangenberg, German C; Forster, John W; Hayes, Ben J; Daetwyler, Hans D

    2016-03-01

    Genomic selection (GS) provides an attractive option for accelerating genetic gain in perennial ryegrass () improvement given the long cycle times of most current breeding programs. The present study used simulation to investigate the level of genetic gain and inbreeding obtained from GS breeding strategies compared with traditional breeding strategies for key traits (persistency, yield, and flowering time). Base population genomes were simulated through random mating for 60,000 generations at an effective population size of 10,000. The degree of linkage disequilibrium (LD) in the resulting population was compared with that obtained from empirical studies. Initial parental varieties were simulated to match diversity of current commercial cultivars. Genomic selection was designed to fit into a company breeding program at two selection points in the breeding cycle (spaced plants and miniplot). Genomic estimated breeding values (GEBVs) for productivity traits were trained with phenotypes and genotypes from plots. Accuracy of GEBVs was 0.24 for persistency and 0.36 for yield for single plants, while for plots it was lower (0.17 and 0.19, respectively). Higher accuracy of GEBVs was obtained for flowering time (up to 0.7), partially as a result of the larger reference population size that was available from the clonal row stage. The availability of GEBVs permit a 4-yr reduction in cycle time, which led to at least a doubling and trebling genetic gain for persistency and yield, respectively, than the traditional program. However, a higher rate of inbreeding per cycle among varieties was also observed for the GS strategy. Copyright © 2016 Crop Science Society of America.

  2. Cellular and Molecular Features of Developmentally Programmed Genome Rearrangement in a Vertebrate (Sea Lamprey: Petromyzon marinus).

    PubMed

    Timoshevskiy, Vladimir A; Herdy, Joseph R; Keinath, Melissa C; Smith, Jeramiah J

    2016-06-01

    The sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) represents one of the few vertebrate species known to undergo large-scale programmatic elimination of genomic DNA over the course of its normal development. Programmed genome rearrangements (PGRs) result in the reproducible loss of ~20% of the genome from somatic cell lineages during early embryogenesis. Studies of PGR hold the potential to provide novel insights related to the maintenance of genome stability during the cell cycle and coordination between mechanisms responsible for the accurate distribution of chromosomes into daughter cells, yet little is known regarding the mechanistic basis or cellular context of PGR in this or any other vertebrate lineage. Here we identify epigenetic silencing events that are associated with the programmed elimination of DNA and describe the spatiotemporal dynamics of PGR during lamprey embryogenesis. In situ analyses reveal that the earliest DNA methylation (and to some extent H3K9 trimethylation) events are limited to specific extranuclear structures (micronuclei) containing eliminated DNA. During early embryogenesis a majority of micronuclei (~60%) show strong enrichment for repressive chromatin modifications (H3K9me3 and 5meC). These analyses also led to the discovery that eliminated DNA is packaged into chromatin that does not migrate with somatically retained chromosomes during anaphase, a condition that is superficially similar to lagging chromosomes observed in some cancer subtypes. Closer examination of "lagging" chromatin revealed distributions of repetitive elements, cytoskeletal contacts and chromatin contacts that provide new insights into the cellular mechanisms underlying the programmed loss of these segments. Our analyses provide additional perspective on the cellular and molecular context of PGR, identify new structures associated with elimination of DNA and reveal that PGR is completed over the course of several successive cell divisions.

  3. Report on the Imaging Workshop for the Genomes to Life Program, April 16-18, 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Colson, STEVEN

    2003-08-04

    This report is a result of the Imaging Workshop for the Genomes to Life (GTL) program held April 16-19, 2002, in Charlotte, North Carolina. The meeting was sponsored by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research and the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science. The purpose of the workshop was to project a broad vision for future needs and determine the value of imaging to GTL program research. The workshop included four technical sessions with plenary lectures on biology and technology perspectives and technical presentations on needs and approaches as they related to the following areas of the GTL program: (1) Molecular machines (protein complexes); (2) Intracellular and cellular structure, function, and processes; (3) Multicellular: Monoclonal and heterogeneous multicellular systems, cell-cell signaling, and model systems; and (4) Cells in situ and in vivo: Bacteria in the natural environment, microenvironment, and in vivo systems.

  4. Report on the Imaging Workshop for the Genomes to Life Program

    SciTech Connect

    Colson, Steven; Sudar, Damir

    2002-11-01

    DOE's Genomes to Life program seeks to understand the composition and function of biochemical networks and pathways that carry out the essential processes of living organisms. Such understanding is critical for DOE to more effectively address its missions-clean energy, carbon management, bioremediation, and mitigation of bioterrorism. Imaging of living organisms links the genome to function and recognizes many of the steps along the way to understanding how cell function changes with time and environmental challenges. Innovations in imaging, coupled with computational advances, will accelerate scientific discovery and enable biological solutions to energy challenges. GTL has four main goals: (1) Identify and characterize the molecular machines of life-multiprotein complexes that execute cellular functions and govern cell form. (2) Characterize gene regulatory networks. (3) Characterize the functional repertoire of complex microbial communities in their natural environments at the molecular level. (4) Develop computational methods and capabilities to advance understanding of complex biological systems and predict their behavior.

  5. A genome resource to address mechanisms of developmental programming: determination of the fetal sheep heart transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Laura A; Glenn, Jeremy P; Spradling, Kimberly D; Nijland, Mark J; Garcia, Roy; Nathanielsz, Peter W; Ford, Stephen P

    2012-01-01

    The pregnant sheep has provided seminal insights into reproduction related to animal and human development (ovarian function, fertility, implantation, fetal growth, parturition and lactation). Fetal sheep physiology has been extensively studied since 1950, contributing significantly to the basis for our understanding of many aspects of fetal development and behaviour that remain in use in clinical practice today. Understanding mechanisms requires the combination of systems approaches uniquely available in fetal sheep with the power of genomic studies. Absence of the full range of sheep genomic resources has limited the full realization of the power of this model, impeding progress in emerging areas of pregnancy biology such as developmental programming. We have examined the expressed fetal sheep heart transcriptome using high-throughput sequencing technologies. In so doing we identified 36,737 novel transcripts and describe genes, gene variants and pathways relevant to fundamental developmental mechanisms. Genes with the highest expression levels and with novel exons in the fetal heart transcriptome are known to play central roles in muscle development. We show that high-throughput sequencing methods can generate extensive transcriptome information in the absence of an assembled and annotated genome for that species. The gene sequence data obtained provide a unique genomic resource for sheep specific genetic technology development and, combined with the polymorphism data, augment annotation and assembly of the sheep genome. In addition, identification and pathway analysis of novel fetal sheep heart transcriptome splice variants is a first step towards revealing mechanisms of genetic variation and gene environment interactions during fetal heart development. PMID:22508961

  6. Whole-Genome Screening of Newborns? The Constitutional Boundaries of State Newborn Screening Programs

    PubMed Central

    King, Jaime S.; Smith, Monica E.

    2016-01-01

    State newborn screening (NBS) programs routinely screen nearly all of the 4 million newborns in the United States each year for ~30 primary conditions and a number of secondary conditions. NBS could be on the cusp of an unprecedented expansion as a result of advances in whole-genome sequencing (WGS). As WGS becomes cheaper and easier and as our knowledge and understanding of human genetics expand, the question of whether WGS has a role to play in state NBS programs becomes increasingly relevant and complex. As geneticists and state public health officials begin to contemplate the technical and procedural details of whether WGS could benefit existing NBS programs, this is an opportune time to revisit the legal framework of state NBS programs. In this article, we examine the constitutional underpinnings of state-mandated NBS and explore the range of current state statutes and regulations that govern the programs. We consider the legal refinements that will be needed to keep state NBS programs within constitutional bounds, focusing on 2 areas of concern: consent procedures and the criteria used to select new conditions for NBS panels. We conclude by providing options for states to consider when contemplating the use of WGS for NBS. PMID:26729704

  7. Whole-Genome Screening of Newborns? The Constitutional Boundaries of State Newborn Screening Programs.

    PubMed

    King, Jaime S; Smith, Monica E

    2016-01-01

    State newborn screening (NBS) programs routinely screen nearly all of the 4 million newborns in the United States each year for ∼30 primary conditions and a number of secondary conditions. NBS could be on the cusp of an unprecedented expansion as a result of advances in whole-genome sequencing (WGS). As WGS becomes cheaper and easier and as our knowledge and understanding of human genetics expand, the question of whether WGS has a role to play in state NBS programs becomes increasingly relevant and complex. As geneticists and state public health officials begin to contemplate the technical and procedural details of whether WGS could benefit existing NBS programs, this is an opportune time to revisit the legal framework of state NBS programs. In this article, we examine the constitutional underpinnings of state-mandated NBS and explore the range of current state statutes and regulations that govern the programs. We consider the legal refinements that will be needed to keep state NBS programs within constitutional bounds, focusing on 2 areas of concern: consent procedures and the criteria used to select new conditions for NBS panels. We conclude by providing options for states to consider when contemplating the use of WGS for NBS.

  8. The Human Genome Project and Mental Retardation: An Educational Program. Final Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Sharon

    1999-05-03

    The Arc, a national organization on mental retardation, conducted an educational program for members, many of whom have a family member with a genetic condition causing mental retardation. The project informed members about the Human Genome scientific efforts, conducted training regarding ethical, legal and social implications and involved members in issue discussions. Short reports and fact sheets on genetic and ELSI topics were disseminated to 2,200 of the Arc's leaders across the country and to other interested individuals. Materials produced by the project can e found on the Arc's web site, TheArc.org.

  9. READSCAN: a fast and scalable pathogen discovery program with accurate genome relative abundance estimation

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Mamoon; Pain, Arnab

    2013-01-01

    Summary: READSCAN is a highly scalable parallel program to identify non-host sequences (of potential pathogen origin) and estimate their genome relative abundance in high-throughput sequence datasets. READSCAN accurately classified human and viral sequences on a 20.1 million reads simulated dataset in <27 min using a small Beowulf compute cluster with 16 nodes (Supplementary Material). Availability: http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/readscan Contact: arnab.pain@kaust.edu.sa or raeece.naeem@gmail.com Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:23193222

  10. A genomic lifespan program that reorganises the young adult brain is targeted in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Skene, Nathan G; Roy, Marcia

    2017-01-01

    The genetic mechanisms regulating the brain and behaviour across the lifespan are poorly understood. We found that lifespan transcriptome trajectories describe a calendar of gene regulatory events in the brain of humans and mice. Transcriptome trajectories defined a sequence of gene expression changes in neuronal, glial and endothelial cell-types, which enabled prediction of age from tissue samples. A major lifespan landmark was the peak change in trajectories occurring in humans at 26 years and in mice at 5 months of age. This species-conserved peak was delayed in females and marked a reorganization of expression of synaptic and schizophrenia-susceptibility genes. The lifespan calendar predicted the characteristic age of onset in young adults and sex differences in schizophrenia. We propose a genomic program generates a lifespan calendar of gene regulation that times age-dependent molecular organization of the brain and mutations that interrupt the program in young adults cause schizophrenia. PMID:28893375

  11. Identifying repeats and transposable elements in sequenced genomes: how to find your way through the dense forest of programs.

    PubMed

    Lerat, E

    2010-06-01

    The production of genome sequences has led to another important advance in their annotation, which is closely linked to the exact determination of their content in terms of repeats, among which are transposable elements (TEs). The evolutionary implications and the presence of coding regions in some TEs can confuse gene annotation, and also hinder the process of genome assembly, making particularly crucial to be able to annotate and classify them correctly in genome sequences. This review is intended to provide an overview as comprehensive as possible of the automated methods currently used to annotate and classify TEs in sequenced genomes. Different categories of programs exist according to their methodology and the repeat, which they can identify. I describe here the main characteristics of the programs, their main goals and the difficulties they can entail. The drawbacks of the different methods are also highlighted to help biologists who are unfamiliar with algorithmic methods to understand this methodology better. Globally, using several different programs and carrying out a cross comparison of their results has the best chance of finding reliable results as any single program. However, this makes it essential to verify the results provided by each program independently. The ideal solution would be to test all programs against the same data set to obtain a true comparison of their actual performance.

  12. Highly precise and developmentally programmed genome assembly in Paramecium requires ligase IV-dependent end joining.

    PubMed

    Kapusta, Aurélie; Matsuda, Atsushi; Marmignon, Antoine; Ku, Michael; Silve, Aude; Meyer, Eric; Forney, James D; Malinsky, Sophie; Bétermier, Mireille

    2011-04-01

    During the sexual cycle of the ciliate Paramecium, assembly of the somatic genome includes the precise excision of tens of thousands of short, non-coding germline sequences (Internal Eliminated Sequences or IESs), each one flanked by two TA dinucleotides. It has been reported previously that these genome rearrangements are initiated by the introduction of developmentally programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), which depend on the domesticated transposase PiggyMac. These DSBs all exhibit a characteristic geometry, with 4-base 5' overhangs centered on the conserved TA, and may readily align and undergo ligation with minimal processing. However, the molecular steps and actors involved in the final and precise assembly of somatic genes have remained unknown. We demonstrate here that Ligase IV and Xrcc4p, core components of the non-homologous end-joining pathway (NHEJ), are required both for the repair of IES excision sites and for the circularization of excised IESs. The transcription of LIG4 and XRCC4 is induced early during the sexual cycle and a Lig4p-GFP fusion protein accumulates in the developing somatic nucleus by the time IES excision takes place. RNAi-mediated silencing of either gene results in the persistence of free broken DNA ends, apparently protected against extensive resection. At the nucleotide level, controlled removal of the 5'-terminal nucleotide occurs normally in LIG4-silenced cells, while nucleotide addition to the 3' ends of the breaks is blocked, together with the final joining step, indicative of a coupling between NHEJ polymerase and ligase activities. Taken together, our data indicate that IES excision is a "cut-and-close" mechanism, which involves the introduction of initiating double-strand cleavages at both ends of each IES, followed by DSB repair via highly precise end joining. This work broadens our current view on how the cellular NHEJ pathway has cooperated with domesticated transposases for the emergence of new mechanisms

  13. New accuracy estimators for genomic selection with application in a cassava (Manihot esculenta) breeding program.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, C F; Resende, M D V; Silva, F F; Viana, J M S; Valente, M S F; Resende, M F R; Oliveira, E J

    2016-10-05

    Genomic selection is the main force driving applied breeding programs and accuracy is the main measure for evaluating its efficiency. The traditional estimator (TE) of experimental accuracy is not fully adequate. This study proposes and evaluates the performance and efficiency of two new accuracy estimators, called regularized estimator (RE) and hybrid estimator (HE), which were applied to a practical cassava breeding program and also to simulated data. The simulation study considered two individual narrow sense heritability levels and two genetic architectures for traits. TE, RE, and HE were compared under four validation procedures: without validation (WV), independent validation, ten-fold validation through jacknife allowing different markers, and with the same markers selected in each cycle. RE presented accuracies closer to the parametric ones and less biased and more precise ones than TE. HE proved to be very effective in the WV procedure. The estimators were applied to five traits evaluated in a cassava experiment, including 358 clones genotyped for 390 SNPs. Accuracies ranged from 0.67 to 1.12 with TE and from 0.22 to 0.51 with RE. These results indicated that TE overestimated the accuracy and led to one accuracy estimate (1.12) higher than one, which is outside of the parameter space. Use of RE turned the accuracy into the parameter space. Cassava breeding programs can be more realistically implemented using the new estimators proposed in this study, providing less risky practical inferences.

  14. A mixed-integer linear programming approach to the reduction of genome-scale metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Röhl, Annika; Bockmayr, Alexander

    2017-01-03

    Constraint-based analysis has become a widely used method to study metabolic networks. While some of the associated algorithms can be applied to genome-scale network reconstructions with several thousands of reactions, others are limited to small or medium-sized models. In 2015, Erdrich et al. introduced a method called NetworkReducer, which reduces large metabolic networks to smaller subnetworks, while preserving a set of biological requirements that can be specified by the user. Already in 2001, Burgard et al. developed a mixed-integer linear programming (MILP) approach for computing minimal reaction sets under a given growth requirement. Here we present an MILP approach for computing minimum subnetworks with the given properties. The minimality (with respect to the number of active reactions) is not guaranteed by NetworkReducer, while the method by Burgard et al. does not allow specifying the different biological requirements. Our procedure is about 5-10 times faster than NetworkReducer and can enumerate all minimum subnetworks in case there exist several ones. This allows identifying common reactions that are present in all subnetworks, and reactions appearing in alternative pathways. Applying complex analysis methods to genome-scale metabolic networks is often not possible in practice. Thus it may become necessary to reduce the size of the network while keeping important functionalities. We propose a MILP solution to this problem. Compared to previous work, our approach is more efficient and allows computing not only one, but even all minimum subnetworks satisfying the required properties.

  15. Tool for rapid annotation of microbial SNPs (TRAMS): a simple program for rapid annotation of genomic variation in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Reumerman, Richard A; Tucker, Nicholas P; Herron, Paul R; Hoskisson, Paul A; Sangal, Vartul

    2013-09-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) has been widely used to study genomic variation in a variety of prokaryotes. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) resulting from genomic comparisons need to be annotated for their functional impact on the coding sequences. We have developed a program, TRAMS, for functional annotation of genomic SNPs which is available to download as a single file executable for WINDOWS users with limited computational experience and as a Python script for Mac OS and Linux users. TRAMS needs a tab delimited text file containing SNP locations, reference nucleotide and SNPs in variant strains along with a reference genome sequence in GenBank or EMBL format. SNPs are annotated as synonymous, nonsynonymous or nonsense. Nonsynonymous SNPs in start and stop codons are separated as non-start and non-stop SNPs, respectively. SNPs in multiple overlapping features are annotated separately for each feature and multiple nucleotide polymorphisms within a codon are combined before annotation. We have also developed a workflow for Galaxy, a highly used tool for analysing NGS data, to map short reads to a reference genome and extract and annotate the SNPs. TRAMS is a simple program for rapid and accurate annotation of SNPs that will be very useful for microbiologists in analysing genomic diversity in microbial populations.

  16. The Saudi Human Genome Program: An oasis in the desert of Arab medicine is providing clues to genetic disease.

    PubMed

    Project Team, Saudi Genome

    2015-01-01

    Oil wells, endless deserts, stifling heat, masses of pilgrims, and wealthy-looking urban areas still dominate the widespread mental image of Saudi Arabia. Currently, this image is being extended to include a recent endeavor that is reserving a global share in the limelight as one of the top ten genomics projects currently underway: the Saudi Human Genome Program (SHGP). With sound funding, dedicated resources, and national determination, the SHGP targets the sequencing of 100,000 human genomes over the next five years to conduct world-class genomics-based biomedical research in the Saudi population. Why this project was conceived and thought to be feasible, what is the ultimate target, and how it operates are the questions we answer in this article.

  17. Optimization of a genomic breeding program for a moderately sized dairy cattle population.

    PubMed

    Reiner-Benaim, A; Ezra, E; Weller, J I

    2017-04-01

    Although it now standard practice to genotype thousands of female calves, genotyping of bull calves is generally limited to progeny of elite cows. In addition to genotyping costs, increasing the pool of candidate sires requires purchase, isolation, and identification of calves until selection decisions are made. We economically optimized via simulation a genomic breeding program for a population of approximately 120,000 milk-recorded cows, corresponding to the Israeli Holstein population. All 30,000 heifers and 60,000 older cows of parities 1 to 3 were potential bull dams. Animals were assumed to have genetic evaluations for a trait with heritability of 0.25 derived by an animal model evaluation of the population. Only bull calves were assumed to be genotyped. A pseudo-phenotype corresponding to each animal's genetic evaluation was generated, consisting of the animal's genetic value plus a residual with variance set to obtain the assumed reliability for each group of animals. Between 4 and 15 bulls and between 200 and 27,000 cows with the highest pseudo-phenotypes were selected as candidate bull parents. For all progeny of the founder animals, genetic values were simulated as the mean of the parental values plus a Mendelian sampling effect with variance of 0.5. A probability of 0.3 for a healthy bull calf per mating, and a genomic reliability of 0.43 were assumed. The 40 bull calves with the highest genomic evaluations were selected for general service for 1 yr. Costs included genotyping of candidate bulls and their dams, purchase of the calves from the farmers, and identification. Costs of raising culled calves were partially recovered by resale for beef. Annual costs were estimated as $10,922 + $305 × candidate bulls. Nominal profit per cow per genetic standard deviation was $106. Economic optimum with a discount rate of 5%, first returns after 4 yr, and a profit horizon of 15 yr were obtained with genotyping 1,620 to 1,750 calves for all numbers of bull sires

  18. Highly Precise and Developmentally Programmed Genome Assembly in Paramecium Requires Ligase IV–Dependent End Joining

    PubMed Central

    Marmignon, Antoine; Ku, Michael; Silve, Aude; Meyer, Eric; Forney, James D.; Malinsky, Sophie; Bétermier, Mireille

    2011-01-01

    During the sexual cycle of the ciliate Paramecium, assembly of the somatic genome includes the precise excision of tens of thousands of short, non-coding germline sequences (Internal Eliminated Sequences or IESs), each one flanked by two TA dinucleotides. It has been reported previously that these genome rearrangements are initiated by the introduction of developmentally programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), which depend on the domesticated transposase PiggyMac. These DSBs all exhibit a characteristic geometry, with 4-base 5′ overhangs centered on the conserved TA, and may readily align and undergo ligation with minimal processing. However, the molecular steps and actors involved in the final and precise assembly of somatic genes have remained unknown. We demonstrate here that Ligase IV and Xrcc4p, core components of the non-homologous end-joining pathway (NHEJ), are required both for the repair of IES excision sites and for the circularization of excised IESs. The transcription of LIG4 and XRCC4 is induced early during the sexual cycle and a Lig4p-GFP fusion protein accumulates in the developing somatic nucleus by the time IES excision takes place. RNAi–mediated silencing of either gene results in the persistence of free broken DNA ends, apparently protected against extensive resection. At the nucleotide level, controlled removal of the 5′-terminal nucleotide occurs normally in LIG4-silenced cells, while nucleotide addition to the 3′ ends of the breaks is blocked, together with the final joining step, indicative of a coupling between NHEJ polymerase and ligase activities. Taken together, our data indicate that IES excision is a “cut-and-close” mechanism, which involves the introduction of initiating double-strand cleavages at both ends of each IES, followed by DSB repair via highly precise end joining. This work broadens our current view on how the cellular NHEJ pathway has cooperated with domesticated transposases for the emergence of new

  19. Genetic testing and Alzheimer disease: recommendations of the Stanford Program in Genomics, Ethics, and Society.

    PubMed

    McConnell, L M; Koenig, B A; Greely, H T; Raffin, T A

    1999-01-01

    Several genes associated with Alzheimer disease (AD) have been localized and cloned; two genetic tests are already commercially available, and new tests are being developed. Genetic testing for AD--either for disease prediction or for diagnosis--raises critical ethical concerns. The multidisciplinary Alzheimer Disease Working Group of the Stanford Program in Genomics, Ethics, and Society (PGES) presents comprehensive recommendations on genetic testing for AD. The Group concludes that under current conditions, genetic testing for AD prediction or diagnosis is only rarely appropriate. Criteria for judging the readiness of a test for introduction into routine clinical practice typically rely heavily on evaluation of technical efficacy. PGES recommends a broader and more comprehensive approach, considering: 1) the unique social and historical meanings of AD; 2) the availability of procedures to promote good surrogate decision making for incompetent patients and to safeguard confidentiality; 3) access to sophisticated genetic counselors able to communicate complex risk information and effectively convey the social costs and psychological burdens of testing, such as unintentional disclosure of predictive genetic information to family members; 4) protection from inappropriate advertising and marketing of genetic tests; and 5) recognition of the need for public education about the meaning and usefulness of predictive and diagnostic tests for AD. In this special issue of Genetic Testing, the PGES recommendations are published along with comprehensive background papers authored by Working Group members.

  20. Control of VEGF-A transcriptional programs by pausing and genomic compartmentalization

    PubMed Central

    Kaikkonen, Minna U.; Niskanen, Henri; Romanoski, Casey E.; Kansanen, Emilia; Kivelä, Annukka M.; Laitalainen, Jarkko; Heinz, Sven; Benner, Christopher; Glass, Christopher K.; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2014-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) is a master regulator of angiogenesis, vascular development and function. In this study we investigated the transcriptional regulation of VEGF-A-responsive genes in primary human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) using genome-wide global run-on sequencing (GRO-Seq). We demonstrate that half of VEGF-A-regulated gene promoters are characterized by a transcriptionally competent paused RNA polymerase II (Pol II). We show that transition into productive elongation is a major mechanism of gene activation of virtually all VEGF-regulated genes, whereas only ∼40% of the genes are induced at the level of initiation. In addition, we report a comprehensive chromatin interaction map generated in HUVECs using tethered conformation capture (TCC) and characterize chromatin interactions in relation to transcriptional activity. We demonstrate that sites of active transcription are more likely to engage in chromatin looping and cell type-specific transcriptional activity reflects the boundaries of chromatin interactions. Furthermore, we identify large chromatin compartments with a tendency to be coordinately transcribed upon VEGF-A stimulation. We provide evidence that these compartments are enriched for clusters of regulatory regions such as super-enhancers and for disease-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Collectively, these findings provide new insights into mechanisms behind VEGF-A-regulated transcriptional programs in endothelial cells. PMID:25352550

  1. MaxSSmap: a GPU program for mapping divergent short reads to genomes with the maximum scoring subsequence.

    PubMed

    Turki, Turki; Roshan, Usman

    2014-11-15

    Programs based on hash tables and Burrows-Wheeler are very fast for mapping short reads to genomes but have low accuracy in the presence of mismatches and gaps. Such reads can be aligned accurately with the Smith-Waterman algorithm but it can take hours and days to map millions of reads even for bacteria genomes. We introduce a GPU program called MaxSSmap with the aim of achieving comparable accuracy to Smith-Waterman but with faster runtimes. Similar to most programs MaxSSmap identifies a local region of the genome followed by exact alignment. Instead of using hash tables or Burrows-Wheeler in the first part, MaxSSmap calculates maximum scoring subsequence score between the read and disjoint fragments of the genome in parallel on a GPU and selects the highest scoring fragment for exact alignment. We evaluate MaxSSmap's accuracy and runtime when mapping simulated Illumina E.coli and human chromosome one reads of different lengths and 10% to 30% mismatches with gaps to the E.coli genome and human chromosome one. We also demonstrate applications on real data by mapping ancient horse DNA reads to modern genomes and unmapped paired reads from NA12878 in 1000 genomes. We show that MaxSSmap attains comparable high accuracy and low error to fast Smith-Waterman programs yet has much lower runtimes. We show that MaxSSmap can map reads rejected by BWA and NextGenMap with high accuracy and low error much faster than if Smith-Waterman were used. On short read lengths of 36 and 51 both MaxSSmap and Smith-Waterman have lower accuracy compared to at higher lengths. On real data MaxSSmap produces many alignments with high score and mapping quality that are not given by NextGenMap and BWA. The MaxSSmap source code in CUDA and OpenCL is freely available from http://www.cs.njit.edu/usman/MaxSSmap.

  2. Genomic predictors of the maximal O2 uptake response to standardized exercise training programs

    PubMed Central

    Sarzynski, Mark A.; Rice, Treva K.; Kraus, William E.; Church, Timothy S.; Sung, Yun Ju; Rao, D. C.; Rankinen, Tuomo

    2011-01-01

    Low cardiorespiratory fitness is a powerful predictor of morbidity and cardiovascular mortality. In 473 sedentary adults, all whites, from 99 families of the Health, Risk Factors, Exercise Training, and Genetics (HERITAGE) Family Study, the heritability of gains in maximal O2 uptake (V̇o2max) after exposure to a standardized 20-wk exercise program was estimated at 47%. A genome-wide association study based on 324,611 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was undertaken to identify SNPs associated with improvements in V̇o2max Based on single-SNP analysis, 39 SNPs were associated with the gains with P < 1.5 × 10−4. Stepwise multiple regression analysis of the 39 SNPs identified a panel of 21 SNPs that accounted for 49% of the variance in V̇o2max trainability. Subjects who carried ≤9 favorable alleles at these 21 SNPs improved their V̇o2max by 221 ml/min, whereas those who carried ≥19 of these alleles gained, on average, 604 ml/min. The strongest association was with rs6552828, located in the acyl-CoA synthase long-chain member 1 (ACSL1) gene, which accounted by itself for ∼6% of the training response of V̇o2max. The genes nearest to the SNPs that were the strongest predictors were PR domain-containing 1 with ZNF domain (PRDM1); glutamate receptor, ionotropic, N-methyl-d-aspartate 3A (GRIN3A); K+ channel, voltage gated, subfamily H, member 8 (KCNH8); and zinc finger protein of the cerebellum 4 (ZIC4). The association with the SNP nearest to ZIC4 was replicated in 40- to 65-yr-old, sedentary, overweight, and dyslipidemic subjects trained in Studies of a Targeted Risk Reduction Intervention Through Defined Exercise (STRRIDE; n = 183). Two SNPs were replicated in sedentary obese white women exercise trained in the Dose Response to Exercise (DREW) study (n = 112): rs1956197 near dishevelled associated activator of morphogenesis 1 (DAAM1) and rs17117533 in the vicinity of necdin (NDN). The association of SNPs rs884736 in the calmodulin-binding transcription

  3. FrameD: A flexible program for quality check and gene prediction in prokaryotic genomes and noisy matured eukaryotic sequences.

    PubMed

    Schiex, Thomas; Gouzy, Jérôme; Moisan, Annick; de Oliveira, Yannick

    2003-07-01

    We describe FrameD, a program that predicts coding regions in prokaryotic and matured eukaryotic sequences. Initially targeted at gene prediction in bacterial GC rich genomes, the gene model used in FrameD also allows to predict genes in the presence of frameshifts and partially undetermined sequences which makes it also very suitable for gene prediction and frameshift correction in unfinished sequences such as EST and EST cluster sequences. Like recent eukaryotic gene prediction programs, FrameD also includes the ability to take into account protein similarity information both in its prediction and its graphical output. Its performances are evaluated on different bacterial genomes. The web site (http://genopole.toulouse.inra.fr/bioinfo/FrameD/FD) allows direct prediction, sequence correction and translation and the ability to learn new models for new organisms.

  4. FrameD: a flexible program for quality check and gene prediction in prokaryotic genomes and noisy matured eukaryotic sequences

    PubMed Central

    Schiex, Thomas; Gouzy, Jérôme; Moisan, Annick; de Oliveira, Yannick

    2003-01-01

    We describe FrameD, a program that predicts coding regions in prokaryotic and matured eukaryotic sequences. Initially targeted at gene prediction in bacterial GC rich genomes, the gene model used in FrameD also allows to predict genes in the presence of frameshifts and partially undetermined sequences which makes it also very suitable for gene prediction and frameshift correction in unfinished sequences such as EST and EST cluster sequences. Like recent eukaryotic gene prediction programs, FrameD also includes the ability to take into account protein similarity information both in its prediction and its graphical output. Its performances are evaluated on different bacterial genomes. The web site (http://genopole.toulouse.inra.fr/bioinfo/FrameD/FD) allows direct prediction, sequence correction and translation and the ability to learn new models for new organisms. PMID:12824407

  5. An Innovative Plant Genomics and Gene Annotation Program for High School, Community College, and University Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hacisalihoglu, Gokhan; Hilgert, Uwe; Nash, E. Bruce; Micklos, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Today's biology educators face the challenge of training their students in modern molecular biology techniques including genomics and bioinformatics. The Dolan DNA Learning Center (DNALC) of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory has developed and disseminated a bench- and computer-based plant genomics curriculum for biology faculty. In 2007, a five-day…

  6. An Innovative Plant Genomics and Gene Annotation Program for High School, Community College, and University Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hacisalihoglu, Gokhan; Hilgert, Uwe; Nash, E. Bruce; Micklos, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Today's biology educators face the challenge of training their students in modern molecular biology techniques including genomics and bioinformatics. The Dolan DNA Learning Center (DNALC) of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory has developed and disseminated a bench- and computer-based plant genomics curriculum for biology faculty. In 2007, a five-day…

  7. Assessment of the scientific-technological production in molecular biology in Brazil (1996-2007): the contribution of genomics programs.

    PubMed

    Meneghini, Rogério; Gamba, Estêvão C

    2011-06-01

    Several genome sequencing programs were launched in Brazil by the end of the nineties and the early 2000s.The most important initiatives were supported by the ONSA program (http://watson.fapesp.br/onsa/Genoma3.htm) and aimed at gaining domain in genomic technology and bringing molecular biology to the state of art. Two main sets of data were collected in the 1996-2007 period to evaluate the results of these genome programs: the scientific production (Scopus and Web of Science databases) and the register of patents (US Patent and Trademark Office), both related to the progress of molecular biology along this period. In regard to the former, Brazil took a great leap in comparison to 17 other developed and developing countries, being only surpassed by China. As to the register of patents in the area of molecular biology, Brazil's performance lags far behind most of the countries focused in the present study, confirming the Brazilian long-standing tendency of poor achievements in technological innovations when compared with scientific production. Possible solutions to surpass this inequality are discussed.

  8. Extension of type 2 diabetes genome-wide association scan results in the diabetes prevention program.

    PubMed

    Moore, Allan F; Jablonski, Kathleen A; McAteer, Jarred B; Saxena, Richa; Pollin, Toni I; Franks, Paul W; Hanson, Robert L; Shuldiner, Alan R; Knowler, William C; Altshuler, David; Florez, Jose C

    2008-09-01

    Genome-wide association scans (GWASs) have identified novel diabetes-associated genes. We evaluated how these variants impact diabetes incidence, quantitative glycemic traits, and response to preventive interventions in 3,548 subjects at high risk of type 2 diabetes enrolled in the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), which examined the effects of lifestyle intervention, metformin, and troglitazone versus placebo. We genotyped selected single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in or near diabetes-associated loci, including EXT2, CDKAL1, CDKN2A/B, IGF2BP2, HHEX, LOC387761, and SLC30A8 in DPP participants and performed Cox regression analyses using genotype, intervention, and their interactions as predictors of diabetes incidence. We evaluated their effect on insulin resistance and secretion at 1 year. None of the selected SNPs were associated with increased diabetes incidence in this population. After adjustments for ethnicity, baseline insulin secretion was lower in subjects with the risk genotype at HHEX rs1111875 (P = 0.01); there were no significant differences in baseline insulin sensitivity. Both at baseline and at 1 year, subjects with the risk genotype at LOC387761 had paradoxically increased insulin secretion; adjustment for self-reported ethnicity abolished these differences. In ethnicity-adjusted analyses, we noted a nominal differential improvement in beta-cell function for carriers of the protective genotype at CDKN2A/B after 1 year of troglitazone treatment (P = 0.01) and possibly lifestyle modification (P = 0.05). We were unable to replicate the GWAS findings regarding diabetes risk in the DPP. We did observe genotype associations with differences in baseline insulin secretion at the HHEX locus and a possible pharmacogenetic interaction at CDKNA2/B.

  9. The Spatiotemporal Program of Replication in the Genome of Lachancea kluyveri

    PubMed Central

    Agier, Nicolas; Romano, Orso Maria; Touzain, Fabrice; Cosentino Lagomarsino, Marco; Fischer, Gilles

    2013-01-01

    We generated a genome-wide replication profile in the genome of Lachancea kluyveri and assessed the relationship between replication and base composition. This species diverged from Saccharomyces cerevisiae before the ancestral whole genome duplication. The genome comprises eight chromosomes among which a chromosomal arm of 1 Mb has a G + C-content much higher than the rest of the genome. We identified 252 active replication origins in L. kluyveri and found considerable divergence in origin location with S. cerevisiae and with Lachancea waltii. Although some global features of S. cerevisiae replication are conserved: Centromeres replicate early, whereas telomeres replicate late, we found that replication origins both in L. kluyveri and L. waltii do not behave as evolutionary fragile sites. In L. kluyveri, replication timing along chromosomes alternates between regions of early and late activating origins, except for the 1 Mb GC-rich chromosomal arm. This chromosomal arm contains an origin consensus motif different from other chromosomes and is replicated early during S-phase. We showed that precocious replication results from the specific absence of late firing origins in this chromosomal arm. In addition, we found a correlation between GC-content and distance from replication origins as well as a lack of replication-associated compositional skew between leading and lagging strands specifically in this GC-rich chromosomal arm. These findings suggest that the unusual base composition in the genome of L. kluyveri could be linked to replication. PMID:23355306

  10. EXONSAMPLER: a computer program for genome-wide and candidate gene exon sampling for targeted next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Cosart, Ted; Beja-Pereira, Albano; Luikart, Gordon

    2014-11-01

    The computer program EXONSAMPLER automates the sampling of thousands of exon sequences from publicly available reference genome sequences and gene annotation databases. It was designed to provide exon sequences for the efficient, next-generation gene sequencing method called exon capture. The exon sequences can be sampled by a list of gene name abbreviations (e.g. IFNG, TLR1), or by sampling exons from genes spaced evenly across chromosomes. It provides a list of genomic coordinates (a bed file), as well as a set of sequences in fasta format. User-adjustable parameters for collecting exon sequences include a minimum and maximum acceptable exon length, maximum number of exonic base pairs (bp) to sample per gene, and maximum total bp for the entire collection. It allows for partial sampling of very large exons. It can preferentially sample upstream (5 prime) exons, downstream (3 prime) exons, both external exons, or all internal exons. It is written in the Python programming language using its free libraries. We describe the use of EXONSAMPLER to collect exon sequences from the domestic cow (Bos taurus) genome for the design of an exon-capture microarray to sequence exons from related species, including the zebu cow and wild bison. We collected ~10% of the exome (~3 million bp), including 155 candidate genes, and ~16,000 exons evenly spaced genomewide. We prioritized the collection of 5 prime exons to facilitate discovery and genotyping of SNPs near upstream gene regulatory DNA sequences, which control gene expression and are often under natural selection.

  11. Whole Genome Sequence Analysis of Salmonella Typhi Isolated in Thailand before and after the Introduction of a National Immunization Program

    PubMed Central

    Thanh, Duy Pham; Bodhidatta, Ladaporn; Mason, Carl Jeffries; Srijan, Apichai; Rabaa, Maia A.; Vinh, Phat Voong; Thanh, Tuyen Ha; Thwaites, Guy E.; Baker, Stephen; Holt, Kathryn E.

    2017-01-01

    Vaccines against Salmonella Typhi, the causative agent of typhoid fever, are commonly used by travellers, however, there are few examples of national immunization programs in endemic areas. There is therefore a paucity of data on the impact of typhoid immunization programs on localised populations of S. Typhi. Here we have used whole genome sequencing (WGS) to characterise 44 historical bacterial isolates collected before and after a national typhoid immunization program that was implemented in Thailand in 1977 in response to a large outbreak; the program was highly effective in reducing typhoid case numbers. Thai isolates were highly diverse, including 10 distinct phylogenetic lineages or genotypes. Novel prophage and plasmids were also detected, including examples that were previously only reported in Shigella sonnei and Escherichia coli. The majority of S. Typhi genotypes observed prior to the immunization program were not observed following it. Post-vaccine era isolates were more closely related to S. Typhi isolated from neighbouring countries than to earlier Thai isolates, providing no evidence for the local persistence of endemic S. Typhi following the national immunization program. Rather, later cases of typhoid appeared to be caused by the occasional importation of common genotypes from neighbouring Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia. These data show the value of WGS in understanding the impacts of vaccination on pathogen populations and provide support for the proposal that large-scale typhoid immunization programs in endemic areas could result in lasting local disease elimination, although larger prospective studies are needed to test this directly. PMID:28060810

  12. Whole Genome Sequence Analysis of Salmonella Typhi Isolated in Thailand before and after the Introduction of a National Immunization Program.

    PubMed

    Dyson, Zoe A; Thanh, Duy Pham; Bodhidatta, Ladaporn; Mason, Carl Jeffries; Srijan, Apichai; Rabaa, Maia A; Vinh, Phat Voong; Thanh, Tuyen Ha; Thwaites, Guy E; Baker, Stephen; Holt, Kathryn E

    2017-01-01

    Vaccines against Salmonella Typhi, the causative agent of typhoid fever, are commonly used by travellers, however, there are few examples of national immunization programs in endemic areas. There is therefore a paucity of data on the impact of typhoid immunization programs on localised populations of S. Typhi. Here we have used whole genome sequencing (WGS) to characterise 44 historical bacterial isolates collected before and after a national typhoid immunization program that was implemented in Thailand in 1977 in response to a large outbreak; the program was highly effective in reducing typhoid case numbers. Thai isolates were highly diverse, including 10 distinct phylogenetic lineages or genotypes. Novel prophage and plasmids were also detected, including examples that were previously only reported in Shigella sonnei and Escherichia coli. The majority of S. Typhi genotypes observed prior to the immunization program were not observed following it. Post-vaccine era isolates were more closely related to S. Typhi isolated from neighbouring countries than to earlier Thai isolates, providing no evidence for the local persistence of endemic S. Typhi following the national immunization program. Rather, later cases of typhoid appeared to be caused by the occasional importation of common genotypes from neighbouring Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia. These data show the value of WGS in understanding the impacts of vaccination on pathogen populations and provide support for the proposal that large-scale typhoid immunization programs in endemic areas could result in lasting local disease elimination, although larger prospective studies are needed to test this directly.

  13. Allele frequency changes due to hitch-hiking in genomic selection programs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Genomic selection makes it possible to reduce pedigree-based inbreeding over best linear unbiased prediction (BLUP) by increasing emphasis on own rather than family information. However, pedigree inbreeding might not accurately reflect loss of genetic variation and the true level of inbreeding due to changes in allele frequencies and hitch-hiking. This study aimed at understanding the impact of using long-term genomic selection on changes in allele frequencies, genetic variation and level of inbreeding. Methods Selection was performed in simulated scenarios with a population of 400 animals for 25 consecutive generations. Six genetic models were considered with different heritabilities and numbers of QTL (quantitative trait loci) affecting the trait. Four selection criteria were used, including selection on own phenotype and on estimated breeding values (EBV) derived using phenotype-BLUP, genomic BLUP and Bayesian Lasso. Changes in allele frequencies at QTL, markers and linked neutral loci were investigated for the different selection criteria and different scenarios, along with the loss of favourable alleles and the rate of inbreeding measured by pedigree and runs of homozygosity. Results For each selection criterion, hitch-hiking in the vicinity of the QTL appeared more extensive when accuracy of selection was higher and the number of QTL was lower. When inbreeding was measured by pedigree information, selection on genomic BLUP EBV resulted in lower levels of inbreeding than selection on phenotype BLUP EBV, but this did not always apply when inbreeding was measured by runs of homozygosity. Compared to genomic BLUP, selection on EBV from Bayesian Lasso led to less genetic drift, reduced loss of favourable alleles and more effectively controlled the rate of both pedigree and genomic inbreeding in all simulated scenarios. In addition, selection on EBV from Bayesian Lasso showed a higher selection differential for mendelian sampling terms than selection on

  14. Controlling inbreeding and maximizing genetic gain using semi-definite programming with pedigree-based and genomic relationships.

    PubMed

    Schierenbeck, S; Pimentel, E C G; Tietze, M; Körte, J; Reents, R; Reinhardt, F; Simianer, H; König, S

    2011-12-01

    Because of the relatively high levels of genetic relationships among potential bull sires and bull dams, innovative selection tools should consider both genetic gain and genetic relationships in a long-term perspective. Optimum genetic contribution theory using official estimated breeding values for a moderately heritable trait (production index, Index-PROD), and a lowly heritable functional trait (index for somatic cell score, Index-SCS) was applied to find optimal allocations of bull dams and bull sires. In contrast to previous practical applications using optimizations based on Lagrange multipliers, we focused on semi-definite programming (SDP). The SDP methodology was combined with either pedigree (a(ij)) or genomic relationships (f(ij)) among selection candidates. Selection candidates were 484 genotyped bulls, and 499 preselected genotyped bull dams completing a central test on station. In different scenarios separately for PROD and SCS, constraints on the average pedigree relationships among future progeny were varied from a(ij)=0.08 to a(ij)=0.20 in increments of 0.01. Corresponding constraints for single nucleotide polymorphism-based kinship coefficients were derived from regression analysis. Applying the coefficient of 0.52 with an intercept of 0.14 estimated for the regression pedigree relationship on genomic relationship, the corresponding range to alter genomic relationships varied from f(ij) = 0.18 to f(ij) = 0.24. Despite differences for some bulls in genomic and pedigree relationships, the same trends were observed for constraints on pedigree and corresponding genomic relationships regarding results in genetic gain and achieved coefficients of relationships. Generally, allowing higher values for relationships resulted in an increase of genetic gain for Index-PROD and Index-SCS and in a reduction in the number of selected sires. Interestingly, more sires were selected for all scenarios when restricting genomic relationships compared with restricting

  15. Genomic prediction unifies animal and plant breeding programs to form platforms for biological discovery.

    PubMed

    Hickey, John M; Chiurugwi, Tinashe; Mackay, Ian; Powell, Wayne

    2017-08-30

    The rate of annual yield increases for major staple crops must more than double relative to current levels in order to feed a predicted global population of 9 billion by 2050. Controlled hybridization and selective breeding have been used for centuries to adapt plant and animal species for human use. However, achieving higher, sustainable rates of improvement in yields in various species will require renewed genetic interventions and dramatic improvement of agricultural practices. Genomic prediction of breeding values has the potential to improve selection, reduce costs and provide a platform that unifies breeding approaches, biological discovery, and tools and methods. Here we compare and contrast some animal and plant breeding approaches to make a case for bringing the two together through the application of genomic selection. We propose a strategy for the use of genomic selection as a unifying approach to deliver innovative 'step changes' in the rate of genetic gain at scale.

  16. The Human Genome Initiative: Implications for the Comprehensive School Health Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Delores C. S.

    1994-01-01

    The Human Genome Initiative (HGI) constructs common resources for studying human genetics. Early identification of people at risk for genetic disorders allows for early education and counseling. HGI research will create inexpensive, reliable genetic tests and diagnoses to help teachers and school staff assess, compare, and channel students. (SM)

  17. The Human Genome Initiative: Implications for the Comprehensive School Health Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Delores C. S.

    1994-01-01

    The Human Genome Initiative (HGI) constructs common resources for studying human genetics. Early identification of people at risk for genetic disorders allows for early education and counseling. HGI research will create inexpensive, reliable genetic tests and diagnoses to help teachers and school staff assess, compare, and channel students. (SM)

  18. Conserved Transcription Factors Steer Growth-Related Genomic Programs in Daphnia

    PubMed Central

    Spanier, Katina I.; Jansen, Mieke; Decaestecker, Ellen; Hulselmans, Gert; Becker, Dörthe; Colbourne, John K.; Orsini, Luisa

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Ecological genomics aims to understand the functional association between environmental gradients and the genes underlying adaptive traits. Many genes that are identified by genome-wide screening in ecologically relevant species lack functional annotations. Although gene functions can be inferred from sequence homology, such approaches have limited power. Here, we introduce ecological regulatory genomics by presenting an ontology-free gene prioritization method. Specifically, our method combines transcriptome profiling with high-throughput cis-regulatory sequence analysis in the water fleas Daphnia pulex and Daphnia magna. It screens coexpressed genes for overrepresented DNA motifs that serve as transcription factor binding sites, thereby providing insight into conserved transcription factors and gene regulatory networks shaping the expression profile. We first validated our method, called Daphnia-cisTarget, on a D. pulex heat shock data set, which revealed a network driven by the heat shock factor. Next, we performed RNA-Seq in D. magna exposed to the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa. Daphnia-cisTarget identified coregulated gene networks that associate with the moulting cycle and potentially regulate life history changes in growth rate and age at maturity. These networks are predicted to be regulated by evolutionary conserved transcription factors such as the homologues of Drosophila Shavenbaby and Grainyhead, nuclear receptors, and a GATA family member. In conclusion, our approach allows prioritising candidate genes in Daphnia without bias towards prior knowledge about functional gene annotation and represents an important step towards exploring the molecular mechanisms of ecological responses in organisms with poorly annotated genomes. PMID:28854641

  19. Democratizing Human Genome Project Information: A Model Program for Education, Information and Debate in Public Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollack, Miriam

    The "Mapping the Human Genome" project demonstrated that librarians can help whomever they serve in accessing information resources in the areas of biological and health information, whether it is the scientists who are developing the information or a member of the public who is using the information. Public libraries can guide library…

  20. Replication of the Wellcome Trust genome-wide association study of essential hypertension: the Family Blood Pressure Program.

    PubMed

    Ehret, Georg B; Morrison, Alanna C; O'Connor, Ashley A; Grove, Megan L; Baird, Lisa; Schwander, Karen; Weder, Alan; Cooper, Richard S; Rao, D C; Hunt, Steven C; Boerwinkle, Eric; Chakravarti, Aravinda

    2008-12-01

    Essential hypertension is a principal cardiovascular risk factor whose origin remains unknown. Classical genetic studies have shown that blood pressure is at least partially heritable, opening a window to understanding the pathophysiology of essential hypertension in the human using modern genetic tools. The Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium has recently published the results of screening the genomes of 2000 essential hypertension cases and 3000 controls using 500 000 genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). None of the variants proved to be genome-wide significant after correction for multiple tests but the most significantly associated SNPs (P<10(-5)) constitute a priority list that warrant follow-up in other studies. We describe here replication studies of the top six SNPs in subjects from the US National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute funded Family Blood Pressure Program comprising 11 433 individuals recruited by hypertensive families. The results suggest that only one of the six SNPs might be associated with essential hypertension in Americans of European origin. This SNP shows a significant but opposite effect in Americans of Hispanic origin and no association in African Americans. The significance of the opposing effect estimates is unclear. No replication could be shown for hypertension status, but there are differences in study design. This attempted replication highlights that essential hypertension studies will require more comprehensive and larger genetic screens.

  1. Ku-mediated coupling of DNA cleavage and repair during programmed genome rearrangements in the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Marmignon, Antoine; Bischerour, Julien; Silve, Aude; Fojcik, Clémentine; Dubois, Emeline; Arnaiz, Olivier; Kapusta, Aurélie; Malinsky, Sophie; Bétermier, Mireille

    2014-08-01

    During somatic differentiation, physiological DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) can drive programmed genome rearrangements (PGR), during which DSB repair pathways are mobilized to safeguard genome integrity. Because of their unique nuclear dimorphism, ciliates are powerful unicellular eukaryotic models to study the mechanisms involved in PGR. At each sexual cycle, the germline nucleus is transmitted to the progeny, but the somatic nucleus, essential for gene expression, is destroyed and a new somatic nucleus differentiates from a copy of the germline nucleus. In Paramecium tetraurelia, the development of the somatic nucleus involves massive PGR, including the precise elimination of at least 45,000 germline sequences (Internal Eliminated Sequences, IES). IES excision proceeds through a cut-and-close mechanism: a domesticated transposase, PiggyMac, is essential for DNA cleavage, and DSB repair at excision sites involves the Ligase IV, a specific component of the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway. At the genome-wide level, a huge number of programmed DSBs must be repaired during this process to allow the assembly of functional somatic chromosomes. To understand how DNA cleavage and DSB repair are coordinated during PGR, we have focused on Ku, the earliest actor of NHEJ-mediated repair. Two Ku70 and three Ku80 paralogs are encoded in the genome of P. tetraurelia: Ku70a and Ku80c are produced during sexual processes and localize specifically in the developing new somatic nucleus. Using RNA interference, we show that the development-specific Ku70/Ku80c heterodimer is essential for the recovery of a functional somatic nucleus. Strikingly, at the molecular level, PiggyMac-dependent DNA cleavage is abolished at IES boundaries in cells depleted for Ku80c, resulting in IES retention in the somatic genome. PiggyMac and Ku70a/Ku80c co-purify as a complex when overproduced in a heterologous system. We conclude that Ku has been integrated in the Paramecium DNA cleavage

  2. Ku-Mediated Coupling of DNA Cleavage and Repair during Programmed Genome Rearrangements in the Ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia

    PubMed Central

    Marmignon, Antoine; Bischerour, Julien; Silve, Aude; Fojcik, Clémentine; Dubois, Emeline; Arnaiz, Olivier; Kapusta, Aurélie; Malinsky, Sophie; Bétermier, Mireille

    2014-01-01

    During somatic differentiation, physiological DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) can drive programmed genome rearrangements (PGR), during which DSB repair pathways are mobilized to safeguard genome integrity. Because of their unique nuclear dimorphism, ciliates are powerful unicellular eukaryotic models to study the mechanisms involved in PGR. At each sexual cycle, the germline nucleus is transmitted to the progeny, but the somatic nucleus, essential for gene expression, is destroyed and a new somatic nucleus differentiates from a copy of the germline nucleus. In Paramecium tetraurelia, the development of the somatic nucleus involves massive PGR, including the precise elimination of at least 45,000 germline sequences (Internal Eliminated Sequences, IES). IES excision proceeds through a cut-and-close mechanism: a domesticated transposase, PiggyMac, is essential for DNA cleavage, and DSB repair at excision sites involves the Ligase IV, a specific component of the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway. At the genome-wide level, a huge number of programmed DSBs must be repaired during this process to allow the assembly of functional somatic chromosomes. To understand how DNA cleavage and DSB repair are coordinated during PGR, we have focused on Ku, the earliest actor of NHEJ-mediated repair. Two Ku70 and three Ku80 paralogs are encoded in the genome of P. tetraurelia: Ku70a and Ku80c are produced during sexual processes and localize specifically in the developing new somatic nucleus. Using RNA interference, we show that the development-specific Ku70/Ku80c heterodimer is essential for the recovery of a functional somatic nucleus. Strikingly, at the molecular level, PiggyMac-dependent DNA cleavage is abolished at IES boundaries in cells depleted for Ku80c, resulting in IES retention in the somatic genome. PiggyMac and Ku70a/Ku80c co-purify as a complex when overproduced in a heterologous system. We conclude that Ku has been integrated in the Paramecium DNA cleavage

  3. Recurrent parent genome recovery analysis in a marker-assisted backcrossing program of rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Miah, Gous; Rafii, Mohd Y; Ismail, Mohd R; Puteh, Adam B; Rahim, Harun A; Latif, Mohammad A

    2015-02-01

    Backcross breeding is the most commonly used method for incorporating a blast resistance gene into a rice cultivar. Linkage between the resistance gene and undesirable units can persist for many generations of backcrossing. Marker-assisted backcrossing (MABC) along with marker-assisted selection (MAS) contributes immensely to overcome the main limitation of the conventional breeding and accelerates recurrent parent genome (RPG) recovery. The MABC approach was employed to incorporate (a) blast resistance gene(s) from the donor parent Pongsu Seribu 1, the blast-resistant local variety in Malaysia, into the genetic background of MR219, a popular high-yielding rice variety that is blast susceptible, to develop a blast-resistant MR219 improved variety. In this perspective, the recurrent parent genome recovery was analyzed in early generations of backcrossing using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. Out of 375 SSR markers, 70 markers were found polymorphic between the parents, and these markers were used to evaluate the plants in subsequent generations. Background analysis revealed that the extent of RPG recovery ranged from 75.40% to 91.3% and from 80.40% to 96.70% in BC1F1 and BC2F1 generations, respectively. In this study, the recurrent parent genome content in the selected BC2F2 lines ranged from 92.7% to 97.7%. The average proportion of the recurrent parent in the selected improved line was 95.98%. MAS allowed identification of the plants that are more similar to the recurrent parent for the loci evaluated in backcross generations. The application of MAS with the MABC breeding program accelerated the recovery of the RP genome, reducing the number of generations and the time for incorporating resistance against rice blast. Copyright © 2014 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Sequential computation of elementary modes and minimal cut sets in genome-scale metabolic networks using alternate integer linear programming.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyun-Seob; Goldberg, Noam; Mahajan, Ashutosh; Ramkrishna, Doraiswami

    2017-08-01

    Elementary (flux) modes (EMs) have served as a valuable tool for investigating structural and functional properties of metabolic networks. Identification of the full set of EMs in genome-scale networks remains challenging due to combinatorial explosion of EMs in complex networks. It is often, however, that only a small subset of relevant EMs needs to be known, for which optimization-based sequential computation is a useful alternative. Most of the currently available methods along this line are based on the iterative use of mixed integer linear programming (MILP), the effectiveness of which significantly deteriorates as the number of iterations builds up. To alleviate the computational burden associated with the MILP implementation, we here present a novel optimization algorithm termed alternate integer linear programming (AILP). Our algorithm was designed to iteratively solve a pair of integer programming (IP) and linear programming (LP) to compute EMs in a sequential manner. In each step, the IP identifies a minimal subset of reactions, the deletion of which disables all previously identified EMs. Thus, a subsequent LP solution subject to this reaction deletion constraint becomes a distinct EM. In cases where no feasible LP solution is available, IP-derived reaction deletion sets represent minimal cut sets (MCSs). Despite the additional computation of MCSs, AILP achieved significant time reduction in computing EMs by orders of magnitude. The proposed AILP algorithm not only offers a computational advantage in the EM analysis of genome-scale networks, but also improves the understanding of the linkage between EMs and MCSs. The software is implemented in Matlab, and is provided as supplementary information . hyunseob.song@pnnl.gov. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  5. Proceedings of the relevance of mass spectrometry to DNA sequence determination: Research needs for the Human Genome Program

    SciTech Connect

    Edmonds, C.G.; Smith, R.D. ); Smith, L.M. )

    1990-11-01

    A workshop was sponsored for the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Health and Environmental Research by Pacific Northwest Laboratory, April 4--5, 1990, in Seattle, Washington, to examine the potential role of mass spectrometry in the joint DOE/National Institutes of Health (NIH) Human Genome Program. The workshop was occasioned by recent developments in mass spectrometry that are providing new levels for selectivity, sensitivity, and, in particular, new methods of ionization appropriate for large biopolymers such as DNA. During discussions, three general mass spectrometric approaches to the determination of DNA sequence were considered: (1) the mass spectrometric detection of isotopic labels from DNA sequencing mixtures separated using gel electrophoresis, (2) the direct mass spectrometric analysis from direct ionization of unfractionated sequencing mixtures where the measured mass of the constituents functions to identify and order the base sequence (replacing separation by gel electrophoresis), and (3) an approach in which a single highly charged molecular ion of a large DNA segment produced is rapidly sequenced in an ion cyclotron resonance ion trap. The consensus of the workshop was that, on the basis of the new developments, mass spectrometry has the potential to provide the substantial increases in sequencing speed required for the Human Genome Program. 66 refs., 3 tabs.

  6. Educational Gaps in Molecular Diagnostics, Genomics, and Personalized Medicine in Dermatopathology Training: A Survey of US Dermatopathology Fellowship Program Directors.

    PubMed

    Torre, Kristin; Russomanno, Kristen; Ferringer, Tammie; Elston, Dirk; Murphy, Michael J

    2017-05-02

    Molecular technologies offer clinicians the tools to provide high-quality, cost-effective patient care. We evaluated education focused on molecular diagnostics, genomics, and personalized medicine in dermatopathology fellowship. A 20-question online survey was emailed to all (n = 53) Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-accredited dermatopathology training programs in the United States. Thirty-one of 53 program directors responded (response rate = 58%). Molecular training is undertaken in 74% of responding dermatopathology fellowships, with levels of instruction varying among dermatology-based and pathology-based programs. Education differed for dermatology- and pathology-trained fellows in approximately one-fifth (19%) of programs. Almost half (48%) of responding program directors believe that fellows are not currently receiving adequate molecular education although the majority (97%) expect to incorporate additional instruction in the next 2-5 years. Factors influencing the incorporation of relevant education include perceived clinical utility and Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education/residency review committee (RRC) requirements. Potential benefits of molecular education include increased medical knowledge, improved patient care, and promotion of effective communication with other healthcare professionals. More than two-thirds (68%) of responding program directors believe that instruction in molecular technologies should be required in dermatopathology fellowship training. Although all responding dermatopathology fellowship program directors agreed that molecular education is important, only a little over half of survey participants believe that their fellows receive adequate instruction. This represents an important educational gap. Discussion among those who oversee fellow education is necessary to best integrate and evaluate teaching of molecular dermatopathology.

  7. An innovative plant genomics and gene annotation program for high school, community college, and university faculty.

    PubMed

    Hacisalihoglu, Gokhan; Hilgert, Uwe; Nash, E Bruce; Micklos, David A

    2008-01-01

    Today's biology educators face the challenge of training their students in modern molecular biology techniques including genomics and bioinformatics. The Dolan DNA Learning Center (DNALC) of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory has developed and disseminated a bench- and computer-based plant genomics curriculum for biology faculty. In 2007, a five-day "Plant Genomics and Gene Annotation" workshop was held at Florida A&M University in Tallahassee, FL, to enhance participants' knowledge and understanding of plant molecular genetics and assist them in developing and honing their laboratory and computer skills. Florida A&M University is a historically black university with over 95% African-American student enrollment. Sixteen participants, including high school (56%) and community college faculty (25%), attended the workshop. Participants carried out in vitro and in silico experiments with maize, Arabidopsis, soybean, and food products to determine the genotype of the samples. Benefits of the workshop included increased awareness of plant biology research for high school and college level students. Participants completed pre- and postworkshop evaluations for the measurement of effectiveness. Participants demonstrated an overall improvement in their postworkshop evaluation scores. This article provides a detailed description of workshop activities, as well as assessment and long-term support for broad classroom implementation.

  8. An Innovative Plant Genomics and Gene Annotation Program for High School, Community College, and University Faculty

    PubMed Central

    Hilgert, Uwe; Nash, E. Bruce; Micklos, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Today's biology educators face the challenge of training their students in modern molecular biology techniques including genomics and bioinformatics. The Dolan DNA Learning Center (DNALC) of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory has developed and disseminated a bench- and computer-based plant genomics curriculum for biology faculty. In 2007, a five-day “Plant Genomics and Gene Annotation” workshop was held at Florida A&M University in Tallahassee, FL, to enhance participants' knowledge and understanding of plant molecular genetics and assist them in developing and honing their laboratory and computer skills. Florida A&M University is a historically black university with over 95% African-American student enrollment. Sixteen participants, including high school (56%) and community college faculty (25%), attended the workshop. Participants carried out in vitro and in silico experiments with maize, Arabidopsis, soybean, and food products to determine the genotype of the samples. Benefits of the workshop included increased awareness of plant biology research for high school and college level students. Participants completed pre- and postworkshop evaluations for the measurement of effectiveness. Participants demonstrated an overall improvement in their postworkshop evaluation scores. This article provides a detailed description of workshop activities, as well as assessment and long-term support for broad classroom implementation. PMID:18765753

  9. Identification of programmed translational -1 frameshifting sites in the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Bekaert, Michaël; Richard, Hugues; Prum, Bernard; Rousset, Jean-Pierre

    2005-01-01

    Frameshifting is a recoding event that allows the expression of two polypeptides from the same mRNA molecule. Most recoding events described so far are used by viruses and transposons to express their replicase protein. The very few number of cellular proteins known to be expressed by a -1 ribosomal frameshifting has been identified by chance. The goal of the present work was to set up a systematic strategy, based on complementary bioinformatics, molecular biology, and functional approaches, without a priori knowledge of the mechanism involved. Two independent methods were devised. The first looks for genomic regions in which two ORFs, each carrying a protein pattern, are in a frameshifted arrangement. The second uses Hidden Markov Models and likelihood in a two-step approach. When this strategy was applied to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome, 189 candidate regions were found, of which 58 were further functionally investigated. Twenty-eight of them expressed a full-length mRNA covering the two ORFs, and 11 showed a -1 frameshift efficiency varying from 5% to 13% (50-fold higher than background), some of which corresponds to genes with known functions. From other ascomycetes, four frameshifted ORFs are found fully conserved. Strikingly, most of the candidates do not display a classical viral-like frameshift signal and would have escaped a search based on current models of frameshifting. These results strongly suggest that -1 frameshifting might be more widely distributed than previously thought. PMID:16204194

  10. Programmed DNA elimination in Tetrahymena: a small RNA-mediated genome surveillance mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, Kensuke; Mochizuki, Kazufumi

    2013-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) was initially discovered as a post-transcriptional gene silencing mechanism in which short RNAs are used to target complementary RNAs for degradation. During the past several years, it has been demonstrated that RNAi-related processes are also involved in transcriptional gene silencing by directing formation of heterochromatin. The dynamic DNA rearrangement during sexual reproduction of the ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena provides an extreme example of RNAi-directed heterochromatin formation. In this process, small RNAs of ~28-29 nt, which are processed by the Dicer-like protein Dcl1p and are associated with the Argonaute family protein Twi1p, induce heterochromatin formation at complementary genomic sequences by recruiting the histone H3 lysine 9/27 methyltransferase Ezl1p and chromodomain proteins. Eventually these heterochromatinized regions are targeted for DNA elimination. In many eukaryotes, one of the major roles for RNAi-related mechanisms is silencing transposons, and DNA elimination in Tetrahymena is also believed to have evolved as a transposon defense by removing transposon-related sequences from the somatic genome. Because DNA elimination is achieved by the coordinated actions of non-coding RNA transcription, RNA processing, RNA transport, RNA-RNA and RNA-protein interactions, RNA degradation and RNA-directed chromatin modifications, DNA elimination in Tetrahymena is a useful model to study ‘RNA infrastructure’. PMID:21915788

  11. Identification of programmed translational -1 frameshifting sites in the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Bekaert, Michaël; Richard, Hugues; Prum, Bernard; Rousset, Jean-Pierre

    2005-10-01

    Frameshifting is a recoding event that allows the expression of two polypeptides from the same mRNA molecule. Most recoding events described so far are used by viruses and transposons to express their replicase protein. The very few number of cellular proteins known to be expressed by a -1 ribosomal frameshifting has been identified by chance. The goal of the present work was to set up a systematic strategy, based on complementary bioinformatics, molecular biology, and functional approaches, without a priori knowledge of the mechanism involved. Two independent methods were devised. The first looks for genomic regions in which two ORFs, each carrying a protein pattern, are in a frameshifted arrangement. The second uses Hidden Markov Models and likelihood in a two-step approach. When this strategy was applied to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome, 189 candidate regions were found, of which 58 were further functionally investigated. Twenty-eight of them expressed a full-length mRNA covering the two ORFs, and 11 showed a -1 frameshift efficiency varying from 5% to 13% (50-fold higher than background), some of which corresponds to genes with known functions. From other ascomycetes, four frameshifted ORFs are found fully conserved. Strikingly, most of the candidates do not display a classical viral-like frameshift signal and would have escaped a search based on current models of frameshifting. These results strongly suggest that -1 frameshifting might be more widely distributed than previously thought.

  12. Enhanced genome annotation using structural profiles in the program 3D-PSSM.

    PubMed

    Kelley, L A; MacCallum, R M; Sternberg, M J

    2000-06-02

    A method (three-dimensional position-specific scoring matrix, 3D-PSSM) to recognise remote protein sequence homologues is described. The method combines the power of multiple sequence profiles with knowledge of protein structure to provide enhanced recognition and thus functional assignment of newly sequenced genomes. The method uses structural alignments of homologous proteins of similar three-dimensional structure in the structural classification of proteins (SCOP) database to obtain a structural equivalence of residues. These equivalences are used to extend multiply aligned sequences obtained by standard sequence searches. The resulting large superfamily-based multiple alignment is converted into a PSSM. Combined with secondary structure matching and solvation potentials, 3D-PSSM can recognise structural and functional relationships beyond state-of-the-art sequence methods. In a cross-validated benchmark on 136 homologous relationships unambiguously undetectable by position-specific iterated basic local alignment search tool (PSI-Blast), 3D-PSSM can confidently assign 18 %. The method was applied to the remaining unassigned regions of the Mycoplasma genitalium genome and an additional 13 regions were assigned with 95 % confidence. 3D-PSSM is available to the community as a web server: http://www.bmm.icnet.uk/servers/3dpssm

  13. Genome-wide analysis of genetic and epigenetic control of programmed DNA deletion

    PubMed Central

    Swart, Estienne C.; Wilkes, Cyril Denby; Sandoval, Pamela Y.; Arambasic, Miroslav; Sperling, Linda; Nowacki, Mariusz

    2014-01-01

    During the development of the somatic genome from the Paramecium germline genome the bulk of the copies of ∼45 000 unique, internal eliminated sequences (IESs) are deleted. IES targeting is facilitated by two small RNA (sRNA) classes: scnRNAs, which relay epigenetic information from the parental nucleus to the developing nucleus, and iesRNAs, which are produced and used in the developing nucleus. Why only certain IESs require sRNAs for their removal has been enigmatic. By analyzing the silencing effects of three genes: PGM (responsible for DNA excision), DCL2/3 (scnRNA production) and DCL5 (iesRNA production), we identify key properties required for IES elimination. Based on these results, we propose that, depending on the exact combination of their lengths and end bases, some IESs are less efficiently recognized or excised and have a greater requirement for targeting by scnRNAs and iesRNAs. We suggest that the variation in IES retention following silencing of DCL2/3 is not primarily due to scnRNA density, which is comparatively uniform relative to IES retention, but rather the genetic properties of IESs. Taken together, our analyses demonstrate that in Paramecium the underlying genetic properties of developmentally deleted DNA sequences are essential in determining the sensitivity of these sequences to epigenetic control. PMID:25016527

  14. Mosaic genome structure of the barley powdery mildew pathogen and conservation of transcriptional programs in divergent hosts

    PubMed Central

    Hacquard, Stéphane; Kracher, Barbara; Maekawa, Takaki; Vernaldi, Saskia; Schulze-Lefert, Paul; Ver Loren van Themaat, Emiel

    2013-01-01

    Barley powdery mildew, Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei (Bgh), is an obligate biotrophic ascomycete fungal pathogen that can grow and reproduce only on living cells of wild or domesticated barley (Hordeum sp.). Domestication and deployment of resistant barley cultivars by humans selected for amplification of Bgh isolates with different virulence combinations. We sequenced the genomes of two European Bgh isolates, A6 and K1, for comparative analysis with the reference genome of isolate DH14. This revealed a mosaic genome structure consisting of large isolate-specific DNA blocks with either high or low SNP densities. Some of the highly polymorphic blocks likely accumulated SNPs for over 10,000 years, well before the domestication of barley. These isolate-specific blocks of alternating monomorphic and polymorphic regions imply an exceptionally large standing genetic variation in the Bgh population and might be generated and maintained by rare outbreeding and frequent clonal reproduction. RNA-sequencing experiments with isolates A6 and K1 during four early stages of compatible and incompatible interactions on leaves of partially immunocompromised Arabidopsis mutants revealed a conserved Bgh transcriptional program during pathogenesis compared with the natural host barley despite ∼200 million years of reproductive isolation of these hosts. Transcripts encoding candidate-secreted effector proteins are massively induced in successive waves. A specific decrease in candidate-secreted effector protein transcript abundance in the incompatible interaction follows extensive transcriptional reprogramming of the host transcriptome and coincides with the onset of localized host cell death, suggesting a host-inducible defense mechanism that targets fungal effector secretion or production. PMID:23696672

  15. 45 CFR 89.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... providing any commercial sex act. Recipients are contractors, grantees, applicants or awardees who receive Leadership Act funds for HIV/AIDS programs directly or indirectly from HHS. Sex trafficking means the...: Commercial sex act means any sex act on account of which anything of value is given to or received by...

  16. 45 CFR 89.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... providing any commercial sex act. Recipients are contractors, grantees, applicants or awardees who receive Leadership Act funds for HIV/AIDS programs directly or indirectly from HHS. Sex trafficking means the...: Commercial sex act means any sex act on account of which anything of value is given to or received by...

  17. 45 CFR 89.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... providing any commercial sex act. Recipients are contractors, grantees, applicants or awardees who receive Leadership Act funds for HIV/AIDS programs directly or indirectly from HHS. Sex trafficking means the...: Commercial sex act means any sex act on account of which anything of value is given to or received by...

  18. 45 CFR 89.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... providing any commercial sex act. Recipients are contractors, grantees, applicants or awardees who receive Leadership Act funds for HIV/AIDS programs directly or indirectly from HHS. Sex trafficking means the...: Commercial sex act means any sex act on account of which anything of value is given to or received by...

  19. Multimedia Presentations on the Human Genome: Implementation and Assessment of a Teaching Program for the Introduction to Genome Science Using a Poster and Animations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kano, Kei; Yahata, Saiko; Muroi, Kaori; Kawakami, Masahiro; Tomoda, Mari; Miyaki, Koichi; Nakayama, Takeo; Kosugi, Shinji; Kato, Kazuto

    2008-01-01

    Genome science, including topics such as gene recombination, cloning, genetic tests, and gene therapy, is now an established part of our daily lives; thus we need to learn genome science to better equip ourselves for the present day. Learning from topics directly related to the human has been suggested to be more effective than learning from…

  20. Multimedia Presentations on the Human Genome: Implementation and Assessment of a Teaching Program for the Introduction to Genome Science Using a Poster and Animations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kano, Kei; Yahata, Saiko; Muroi, Kaori; Kawakami, Masahiro; Tomoda, Mari; Miyaki, Koichi; Nakayama, Takeo; Kosugi, Shinji; Kato, Kazuto

    2008-01-01

    Genome science, including topics such as gene recombination, cloning, genetic tests, and gene therapy, is now an established part of our daily lives; thus we need to learn genome science to better equip ourselves for the present day. Learning from topics directly related to the human has been suggested to be more effective than learning from…

  1. Genomes to Life''Center for Molecular and Cellular Systems'': A research program for identification and characterization of protein complexes.

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, M V.; Larimer, Frank; Wiley, H S.; Kennel, S J.; Squier, Thomas C.; Ramsey, John M.; Rodland, Karin D.; Hurst, G B.; Smith, Richard D.; Xu, Ying; Dixon, David A.; Doktycz, M J.; Colson, Steve D.; Gesteland, R; Giometti, Carol S.; Young, Mark E.; Giddings, Ralph M.

    2002-02-01

    Goal 1 of Department of Energy's Genomes to Life (GTL) program seeks to identify and characterize the complete set of protein complexes within a cell. Goal 1 forms the foundation necessary to accomplish the other objectives of the GTL program, which focus on gene regulatory networks and molecular level characterization of interactions in microbial communities. Together this information would allow cells and their components to be understood in sufficient detail to predict, test, and understand the responses of a biological system to its environment. The Center for Molecular and Cellular Systems has been established to identify and characterize protein complexes using high through-put analytical technologies. A dynamic research program is being developed that supports the goals of the Center by focusing on the development of new capabilities for sample preparation and complex separations, molecular level identification of the protein complexes by mass spectrometry, characterization of the complexes in living cells by imaging techniques, and bioinformatics and computational tools for the collection and interpretation of data and formation of databases and tools to allow the data to be shared by the biological community.

  2. Integrating Public Health and Deliberative Public Bioethics: Lessons from the Human Genome Project Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications Program

    PubMed Central

    Meagher, Karen M.

    2016-01-01

    Public health policy works best when grounded in firm public health standards of evidence and widely shared social values. In this article, we argue for incorporating a specific method of ethical deliberation—deliberative public bioethics—into public health. We describe how deliberative public bioethics is a method of engagement that can be helpful in public health. Although medical, research, and public health ethics can be considered some of what bioethics addresses, deliberative public bioethics offers both a how and where. Using the Human Genome Project Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications program as an example of effective incorporation of deliberative processes to integrate ethics into public health policy, we examine how deliberative public bioethics can integrate both public health and bioethics perspectives into three areas of public health practice: research, education, and health policy. We then offer recommendations for future collaborations that integrate deliberative methods into public health policy and practice. PMID:26843669

  3. Integrating Public Health and Deliberative Public Bioethics: Lessons from the Human Genome Project Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications Program.

    PubMed

    Meagher, Karen M; Lee, Lisa M

    2016-01-01

    Public health policy works best when grounded in firm public health standards of evidence and widely shared social values. In this article, we argue for incorporating a specific method of ethical deliberation--deliberative public bioethics--into public health. We describe how deliberative public bioethics is a method of engagement that can be helpful in public health. Although medical, research, and public health ethics can be considered some of what bioethics addresses, deliberative public bioethics offers both a how and where. Using the Human Genome Project Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications program as an example of effective incorporation of deliberative processes to integrate ethics into public health policy, we examine how deliberative public bioethics can integrate both public health and bioethics perspectives into three areas of public health practice: research, education, and health policy. We then offer recommendations for future collaborations that integrate deliberative methods into public health policy and practice.

  4. Genomic prediction in early selection stages using multi-year data in a hybrid rye breeding program.

    PubMed

    Bernal-Vasquez, Angela-Maria; Gordillo, Andres; Schmidt, Malthe; Piepho, Hans-Peter

    2017-05-31

    The use of multiple genetic backgrounds across years is appealing for genomic prediction (GP) because past years' data provide valuable information on marker effects. Nonetheless, single-year GP models are less complex and computationally less demanding than multi-year GP models. In devising a suitable analysis strategy for multi-year data, we may exploit the fact that even if there is no replication of genotypes across years, there is plenty of replication at the level of marker loci. Our principal aim was to evaluate different GP approaches to simultaneously model genotype-by-year (GY) effects and breeding values using multi-year data in terms of predictive ability. The models were evaluated under different scenarios reflecting common practice in plant breeding programs, such as different degrees of relatedness between training and validation sets, and using a selected fraction of genotypes in the training set. We used empirical grain yield data of a rye hybrid breeding program. A detailed description of the prediction approaches highlighting the use of kinship for modeling GY is presented. Using the kinship to model GY was advantageous in particular for datasets disconnected across years. On average, predictive abilities were 5% higher for models using kinship to model GY over models without kinship. We confirmed that using data from multiple selection stages provides valuable GY information and helps increasing predictive ability. This increase is on average 30% higher when the predicted genotypes are closely related with the genotypes in the training set. A selection of top-yielding genotypes together with the use of kinship to model GY improves the predictive ability in datasets composed of single years of several selection cycles. Our results clearly demonstrate that the use of multi-year data and appropriate modeling is beneficial for GP because it allows dissecting GY effects from genomic estimated breeding values. The model choice, as well as ensuring

  5. Genomic expression program of Saccharomyces cerevisiae along a mixed-culture wine fermentation with Hanseniaspora guilliermondii.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Catarina; Mendes-Faia, Arlete; Lage, Patrícia; Mira, Nuno P; Mendes-Ferreira, Ana

    2015-08-28

    The introduction of yeast starter cultures consisting in a blend of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and non-Saccharomyces yeast strains is emerging for production of wines with improved complexity of flavor. The rational use of this approach is, however, dependent on knowing the impact that co-inoculation has in the physiology of S. cerevisiae. In this work the transcriptome of S. cerevisiae was monitored throughout a wine fermentation, carried out in single culture or in a consortium with Hanseniaspora guilliermondii, this being the first time that this relevant yeast-yeast interaction is examined at a genomic scale. Co-inoculation with H. guilliermondii reduced the overall genome-wide transcriptional response of S. cerevisiae throughout the fermentation, which was attributable to a lower fermentative activity of S. cerevisiae while in the mixed-fermentation. Approximately 350 genes S. cerevisiae genes were found to be differently expressed (FDR < 0.05) in response to the presence of H. guilliermondii in the fermentation medium. Genes involved in biosynthesis of vitamins were enriched among those up-regulated in the mixed-culture fermentation, while genes related with the uptake and biosynthesis of amino acids were enriched among those more expressed in the single-culture. The differences in the aromatic profiles of wines obtained in the single and in the mixed-fermentations correlated with the differential expression of S. cerevisiae genes encoding enzymes required for formation of aroma compounds. By integrating results obtained in the transcriptomic analysis performed with physiological data our study provided, for the first time, an integrated view into the adaptive responses of S. cerevisiae to the challenging environment of mixed culture fermentation. The availability of nutrients, in particular, of nitrogen and vitamins, stands out as a factor that may determine population dynamics, fermentative activity and by-product formation.

  6. ParaHaplo: A program package for haplotype-based whole-genome association study using parallel computing.

    PubMed

    Misawa, Kazuharu; Kamatani, Naoyuki

    2009-10-21

    Since more than a million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are analyzed in any given genome-wide association study (GWAS), performing multiple comparisons can be problematic. To cope with multiple-comparison problems in GWAS, haplotype-based algorithms were developed to correct for multiple comparisons at multiple SNP loci in linkage disequilibrium. A permutation test can also control problems inherent in multiple testing; however, both the calculation of exact probability and the execution of permutation tests are time-consuming. Faster methods for calculating exact probabilities and executing permutation tests are required. We developed a set of computer programs for the parallel computation of accurate P-values in haplotype-based GWAS. Our program, ParaHaplo, is intended for workstation clusters using the Intel Message Passing Interface (MPI). We compared the performance of our algorithm to that of the regular permutation test on JPT and CHB of HapMap. ParaHaplo can detect smaller differences between 2 populations than SNP-based GWAS. We also found that parallel-computing techniques made ParaHaplo 100-fold faster than a non-parallel version of the program. ParaHaplo is a useful tool in conducting haplotype-based GWAS. Since the data sizes of such projects continue to increase, the use of fast computations with parallel computing--such as that used in ParaHaplo--will become increasingly important. The executable binaries and program sources of ParaHaplo are available at the following address: http://sourceforge.jp/projects/parallelgwas/?_sl=1.

  7. Cultural differences define diagnosis and genomic medicine practice: implications for undiagnosed diseases program in China

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xiaohong; Markello, Thomas; Adams, David; Toro, Camilo; Tifft, Cynthia; Gahl, William A.; Boerkoel, Cornelius F.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the current acceleration and increasing leadership of Chinese genetics research, genetics and its clinical application have largely been imported to China from the Occident. Neither genetics nor the scientific reductionism underpinning its clinical application is integral to the traditional Chinese worldview. Given that disease concepts and their incumbent diagnoses are historically derived and culturally meaningful, we hypothesize that the cultural expectations of genetic diagnoses and medical genetics practice differs between the Occident and China. Specifically, we suggest that an undiagnosed diseases program in China will differ from the recently established Undiagnosed Diseases Program at the United States National Institutes of Health; a culturally sensitive concept will integrate traditional Chinese understanding of disease with the scientific reductionism of Occidental medicine. PMID:23856975

  8. Cultural differences define diagnosis and genomic medicine practice: implications for undiagnosed diseases program in China.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xiaohong; Markello, Thomas; Adams, David; Toro, Camilo; Tifft, Cynthia; Gahl, William A; Boerkoel, Cornelius F

    2013-09-01

    Despite the current acceleration and increasing leadership of Chinese genetics research, genetics and its clinical application have largely been imported to China from the Occident. Neither genetics nor the scientific reductionism underpinning its clinical application is integral to the traditional Chinese worldview. Given that disease concepts and their incumbent diagnoses are historically derived and culturally meaningful, we hypothesize that the cultural expectations of genetic diagnoses and medical genetics practice differ between the Occident and China. Specifically, we suggest that an undiagnosed diseases program in China will differ from the recently established Undiagnosed Diseases Program at the United States National Institutes of Health; a culturally sensitive concept will integrate traditional Chinese understanding of disease with the scientific reductionism of Occidental medicine.

  9. Adenovirus type 5 exerts genome-wide control over cellular programs governing proliferation, quiescence, and survival

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Daniel L; Myers, Chad L; Rickards, Brenden; Coller, Hilary A; Flint, S Jane

    2007-01-01

    Background Human adenoviruses, such as serotype 5 (Ad5), encode several proteins that can perturb cellular mechanisms that regulate cell cycle progression and apoptosis, as well as those that mediate mRNA production and translation. However, a global view of the effects of Ad5 infection on such programs in normal human cells is not available, despite widespread efforts to develop adenoviruses for therapeutic applications. Results We used two-color hybridization and oligonucleotide microarrays to monitor changes in cellular RNA concentrations as a function of time after Ad5 infection of quiescent, normal human fibroblasts. We observed that the expression of some 2,000 genes, about 10% of those examined, increased or decreased by a factor of two or greater following Ad5 infection, but were not altered in mock-infected cells. Consensus k-means clustering established that the temporal patterns of these changes were unexpectedly complex. Gene Ontology terms associated with cell proliferation were significantly over-represented in several clusters. The results of comparative analyses demonstrate that Ad5 infection induces reversal of the quiescence program and recapitulation of the core serum response, and that only a small subset of the observed changes in cellular gene expression can be ascribed to well characterized functions of the viral E1A and E1B proteins. Conclusion These findings establish that the impact of adenovirus infection on host cell programs is far greater than appreciated hitherto. Furthermore, they provide a new framework for investigating the molecular functions of viral early proteins and information relevant to the design of conditionally replicating adenoviral vectors. PMID:17430596

  10. The pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) genome encodes two divergent early developmental programs.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Elizabeth J; Leask, Megan P; Dearden, Peter K

    2013-05-01

    The pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) can reproduce either sexually or asexually (parthenogenetically), giving rise, in each case, to almost identical adults. These two modes of reproduction are accompanied by differences in ovarian morphology and the developmental environment of the offspring, with sexual forms producing eggs that are laid, whereas asexual development occurs within the mother. Here we examine the effect each mode of reproduction has on the expression of key maternal and axis patterning genes; orthodenticle (otd), hunchback (hb), caudal (cad) and nanos (nos). We show that three of these genes (Ap-hb, Ap-otd and Ap-cad) are expressed differently between the sexually and asexually produced oocytes and embryos of the pea aphid. We also show, using immunohistochemistry and cytoskeletal inhibitors, that Ap-hb RNA is localized differently between sexually and asexually produced oocytes, and that this is likely due to differences in the 3' untranslated regions of the RNA. Furthermore, Ap-hb and Ap-otd have extensive expression domains in early sexually produced embryos, but are not expressed at equivalent stages in asexually produced embryos. These differences in expression likely correspond with substantial changes in the gene regulatory networks controlling early development in the pea aphid. These data imply that in the evolution of parthenogenesis a new program has evolved to control the development of asexually produced embryos, whilst retaining the existing, sexual, developmental program. The patterns of modification of these developmental processes mirror the changes that we see in developmental processes between species, in that early acting pathways in development are less constrained, and evolve faster, than later ones. We suggest that the evolution of the novel asexual development pathway in aphids is not a simple modification of an ancestral system, but the evolution of two very different developmental mechanisms occurring within a single

  11. Integrating Genomics and Proteomics Data to Predict Drug Effects Using Binary Linear Programming

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Zhiwei; Su, Jing; Liu, Chenglin; Wang, Hongyan; Huang, Deshuang; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2014-01-01

    The Library of Integrated Network-Based Cellular Signatures (LINCS) project aims to create a network-based understanding of biology by cataloging changes in gene expression and signal transduction that occur when cells are exposed to a variety of perturbations. It is helpful for understanding cell pathways and facilitating drug discovery. Here, we developed a novel approach to infer cell-specific pathways and identify a compound's effects using gene expression and phosphoproteomics data under treatments with different compounds. Gene expression data were employed to infer potential targets of compounds and create a generic pathway map. Binary linear programming (BLP) was then developed to optimize the generic pathway topology based on the mid-stage signaling response of phosphorylation. To demonstrate effectiveness of this approach, we built a generic pathway map for the MCF7 breast cancer cell line and inferred the cell-specific pathways by BLP. The first group of 11 compounds was utilized to optimize the generic pathways, and then 4 compounds were used to identify effects based on the inferred cell-specific pathways. Cross-validation indicated that the cell-specific pathways reliably predicted a compound's effects. Finally, we applied BLP to re-optimize the cell-specific pathways to predict the effects of 4 compounds (trichostatin A, MS-275, staurosporine, and digoxigenin) according to compound-induced topological alterations. Trichostatin A and MS-275 (both HDAC inhibitors) inhibited the downstream pathway of HDAC1 and caused cell growth arrest via activation of p53 and p21; the effects of digoxigenin were totally opposite. Staurosporine blocked the cell cycle via p53 and p21, but also promoted cell growth via activated HDAC1 and its downstream pathway. Our approach was also applied to the PC3 prostate cancer cell line, and the cross-validation analysis showed very good accuracy in predicting effects of 4 compounds. In summary, our computational model can be

  12. Integrating genomics and proteomics data to predict drug effects using binary linear programming.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zhiwei; Su, Jing; Liu, Chenglin; Wang, Hongyan; Huang, Deshuang; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2014-01-01

    The Library of Integrated Network-Based Cellular Signatures (LINCS) project aims to create a network-based understanding of biology by cataloging changes in gene expression and signal transduction that occur when cells are exposed to a variety of perturbations. It is helpful for understanding cell pathways and facilitating drug discovery. Here, we developed a novel approach to infer cell-specific pathways and identify a compound's effects using gene expression and phosphoproteomics data under treatments with different compounds. Gene expression data were employed to infer potential targets of compounds and create a generic pathway map. Binary linear programming (BLP) was then developed to optimize the generic pathway topology based on the mid-stage signaling response of phosphorylation. To demonstrate effectiveness of this approach, we built a generic pathway map for the MCF7 breast cancer cell line and inferred the cell-specific pathways by BLP. The first group of 11 compounds was utilized to optimize the generic pathways, and then 4 compounds were used to identify effects based on the inferred cell-specific pathways. Cross-validation indicated that the cell-specific pathways reliably predicted a compound's effects. Finally, we applied BLP to re-optimize the cell-specific pathways to predict the effects of 4 compounds (trichostatin A, MS-275, staurosporine, and digoxigenin) according to compound-induced topological alterations. Trichostatin A and MS-275 (both HDAC inhibitors) inhibited the downstream pathway of HDAC1 and caused cell growth arrest via activation of p53 and p21; the effects of digoxigenin were totally opposite. Staurosporine blocked the cell cycle via p53 and p21, but also promoted cell growth via activated HDAC1 and its downstream pathway. Our approach was also applied to the PC3 prostate cancer cell line, and the cross-validation analysis showed very good accuracy in predicting effects of 4 compounds. In summary, our computational model can be

  13. Genome-wide linkage scans for loci affecting total cholesterol, HDL-C, and triglycerides: the Family Blood Pressure Program.

    PubMed

    Bielinski, Suzette J; Tang, Weihong; Pankow, James S; Miller, Michael B; Mosley, Thomas H; Boerwinkle, Eric; Olshen, Richard A; Curb, J David; Jaquish, Cashell E; Rao, D C; Weder, Alan; Arnett, Donna K

    2006-10-01

    Atherosclerosis accounts for 75% of all deaths from cardiovascular disease and includes coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, and other diseases of the arteries. More than half of all CHD is attributable to abnormalities in levels and metabolism of lipids. To locate genes that affect total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and triglycerides, genome-wide linkage scans for quantitative trait loci were performed using variance components methods as implemented in SOLAR on a large diverse sample recruited as part of the Family Blood Pressure Program. Phenotype and genetic marker data were available for 9,299 subjects in 2,953 families for total cholesterol, 8,668 subjects in 2,736 families for HDL, and 7,760 subjects in 2,499 families for triglycerides. Mean lipid levels were adjusted for the effects of sex, age, age2, age-by-sex interaction, body mass index, smoking status, and field center. HDL-C and triglycerides were further adjusted for average total alcoholic drinks per week and estrogen use. Significant linkage was found for total cholesterol on chromosome 2 (LOD=3.1 at 43 cM) in Hispanics and for HDL-C on chromosome 3 (LOD=3.0 at 182 cM) and 12 (LOD=3.5 at 124 cM) in Asians. In addition, there were 13 regions that showed suggestive linkage (LOD >or= 2.0); 7 for total cholesterol, 4 for HDL, and 2 for triglycerides. The identification of these loci affecting lipid phenotypes and the apparent congruence with previous linkage results provides increased support that these regions contain genes influencing lipid levels.

  14. Generating information-rich high-throughput experimental materials genomes using functional clustering via multitree genetic programming and information theory.

    PubMed

    Suram, Santosh K; Haber, Joel A; Jin, Jian; Gregoire, John M

    2015-04-13

    High-throughput experimental methodologies are capable of synthesizing, screening and characterizing vast arrays of combinatorial material libraries at a very rapid rate. These methodologies strategically employ tiered screening wherein the number of compositions screened decreases as the complexity, and very often the scientific information obtained from a screening experiment, increases. The algorithm used for down-selection of samples from higher throughput screening experiment to a lower throughput screening experiment is vital in achieving information-rich experimental materials genomes. The fundamental science of material discovery lies in the establishment of composition-structure-property relationships, motivating the development of advanced down-selection algorithms which consider the information value of the selected compositions, as opposed to simply selecting the best performing compositions from a high throughput experiment. Identification of property fields (composition regions with distinct composition-property relationships) in high throughput data enables down-selection algorithms to employ advanced selection strategies, such as the selection of representative compositions from each field or selection of compositions that span the composition space of the highest performing field. Such strategies would greatly enhance the generation of data-driven discoveries. We introduce an informatics-based clustering of composition-property functional relationships using a combination of information theory and multitree genetic programming concepts for identification of property fields in a composition library. We demonstrate our approach using a complex synthetic composition-property map for a 5 at. % step ternary library consisting of four distinct property fields and finally explore the application of this methodology for capturing relationships between composition and catalytic activity for the oxygen evolution reaction for 5429 catalyst compositions in a

  15. Genomic Encyclopedia of Fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriev, Igor

    2012-08-10

    Genomes of fungi relevant to energy and environment are in focus of the Fungal Genomic Program at the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI). Its key project, the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts), and explores fungal diversity by means of genome sequencing and analysis. Over 150 fungal genomes have been sequenced by JGI to date and released through MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a fungal web-portal, which integrates sequence and functional data with genome analysis tools for user community. Sequence analysis supported by functional genomics leads to developing parts list for complex systems ranging from ecosystems of biofuel crops to biorefineries. Recent examples of such parts suggested by comparative genomics and functional analysis in these areas are presented here.

  16. Genome Informatics

    PubMed Central

    Winslow, Raimond L.; Boguski, Mark S.

    2005-01-01

    This article reviews recent advances in genomics and informatics relevant to cardiovascular research. In particular, we review the status of (1) whole genome sequencing efforts in human, mouse, rat, zebrafish, and dog; (2) the development of data mining and analysis tools; (3) the launching of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Programs for Genomics Applications and Proteomics Initiative; (4) efforts to characterize the cardiac transcriptome and proteome; and (5) the current status of computational modeling of the cardiac myocyte. In each instance, we provide links to relevant sources of information on the World Wide Web and critical appraisals of the promises and the challenges of an expanding and diverse information landscape. PMID:12750305

  17. Ontology for Genome Comparison and Genomic Rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, Keith; Stevens, Robert; Pocock, Matthew; Lee, Pete

    2004-01-01

    We present an ontology for describing genomes, genome comparisons, their evolution and biological function. This ontology will support the development of novel genome comparison algorithms and aid the community in discussing genomic evolution. It provides a framework for communication about comparative genomics, and a basis upon which further automated analysis can be built. The nomenclature defined by the ontology will foster clearer communication between biologists, and also standardize terms used by data publishers in the results of analysis programs. The overriding aim of this ontology is the facilitation of consistent annotation of genomes through computational methods, rather than human annotators. To this end, the ontology includes definitions that support computer analysis and automated transfer of annotations between genomes, rather than relying upon human mediation. PMID:18629137

  18. Increased genetic gains in sheep, beef and dairy breeding programs from using female reproductive technologies combined with optimal contribution selection and genomic breeding values.

    PubMed

    Granleese, Tom; Clark, Samuel A; Swan, Andrew A; van der Werf, Julius H J

    2015-09-14

    Female reproductive technologies such as multiple ovulation and embryo transfer (MOET) and juvenile in vitro embryo production and embryo transfer (JIVET) can boost rates of genetic gain but they can also increase rates of inbreeding. Inbreeding can be managed using the principles of optimal contribution selection (OCS), which maximizes genetic gain while placing a penalty on the rate of inbreeding. We evaluated the potential benefits and synergies that exist between genomic selection (GS) and reproductive technologies under OCS for sheep and cattle breeding programs. Various breeding program scenarios were simulated stochastically including: (1) a sheep breeding program for the selection of a single trait that could be measured either early or late in life; (2) a beef breeding program with an early or late trait; and (3) a dairy breeding program with a sex limited trait. OCS was applied using a range of penalties (severe to no penalty) on co-ancestry of selection candidates, with the possibility of using multiple ovulation and embryo transfer (MOET) and/or juvenile in vitro embryo production and embryo transfer (JIVET) for females. Each breeding program was simulated with and without genomic selection. All breeding programs could be penalized to result in an inbreeding rate of 1 % increase per generation. The addition of MOET to artificial insemination or natural breeding (AI/N), without the use of GS yielded an extra 25 to 60 % genetic gain. The further addition of JIVET did not yield an extra genetic gain. When GS was used, MOET and MOET + JIVET programs increased rates of genetic gain by 38 to 76 % and 51 to 81 % compared to AI/N, respectively. Large increases in genetic gain were found across species when female reproductive technologies combined with genomic selection were applied and inbreeding was managed, especially for breeding programs that focus on the selection of traits measured late in life or that are sex-limited. Optimal contribution selection was

  19. Phytozome Comparative Plant Genomics Portal

    SciTech Connect

    Goodstein, David; Batra, Sajeev; Carlson, Joseph; Hayes, Richard; Phillips, Jeremy; Shu, Shengqiang; Schmutz, Jeremy; Rokhsar, Daniel

    2014-09-09

    The Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Institute is a genomics user facility supporting DOE mission science in the areas of Bioenergy, Carbon Cycling, and Biogeochemistry. The Plant Program at the JGI applies genomic, analytical, computational and informatics platforms and methods to: 1. Understand and accelerate the improvement (domestication) of bioenergy crops 2. Characterize and moderate plant response to climate change 3. Use comparative genomics to identify constrained elements and infer gene function 4. Build high quality genomic resource platforms of JGI Plant Flagship genomes for functional and experimental work 5. Expand functional genomic resources for Plant Flagship genomes

  20. Fisher: a program for the detection of H/ACA snoRNAs using MFE secondary structure prediction and comparative genomics – assessment and update

    PubMed Central

    Freyhult, Eva; Edvardsson, Sverker; Tamas, Ivica; Moulton, Vincent; Poole, Anthony M

    2008-01-01

    Background The H/ACA family of small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) plays a central role in guiding the pseudouridylation of ribosomal RNA (rRNA). In an effort to systematically identify the complete set of rRNA-modifying H/ACA snoRNAs from the genome sequence of the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we developed a program – Fisher – and previously presented several candidate snoRNAs based on our analysis [1]. Findings In this report, we provide a brief update of this work, which was aborted after the publication of experimentally-identified snoRNAs [2] identical to candidates we had identified bioinformatically using Fisher. Our motivation for revisiting this work is to report on the status of the candidate snoRNAs described in [1], and secondly, to report that a modified version of Fisher together with the available multiple yeast genome sequences was able to correctly identify several H/ACA snoRNAs for modification sites not identified by the snoGPS program [3]. While we are no longer developing Fisher, we briefly consider the merits of the Fisher algorithm relative to snoGPS, which may be of use for workers considering pursuing a similar search strategy for the identification of small RNAs. The modified source code for Fisher is made available as supplementary material. Conclusion Our results confirm the validity of using minimum free energy (MFE) secondary structure prediction to guide comparative genomic screening for RNA families with few sequence constraints. PMID:18710502

  1. Optimizing the creation of base populations for aquaculture breeding programs using phenotypic and genomic data and its consequences on genetic progress.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Jesús; Toro, Miguel Á; Sonesson, Anna K; Villanueva, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    The success of an aquaculture breeding program critically depends on the way in which the base population of breeders is constructed since all the genetic variability for the traits included originally in the breeding goal as well as those to be included in the future is contained in the initial founders. Traditionally, base populations were created from a number of wild strains by sampling equal numbers from each strain. However, for some aquaculture species improved strains are already available and, therefore, mean phenotypic values for economically important traits can be used as a criterion to optimize the sampling when creating base populations. Also, the increasing availability of genome-wide genotype information in aquaculture species could help to refine the estimation of relationships within and between candidate strains and, thus, to optimize the percentage of individuals to be sampled from each strain. This study explores the advantages of using phenotypic and genome-wide information when constructing base populations for aquaculture breeding programs in terms of initial and subsequent trait performance and genetic diversity level. Results show that a compromise solution between diversity and performance can be found when creating base populations. Up to 6% higher levels of phenotypic performance can be achieved at the same level of global diversity in the base population by optimizing the selection of breeders instead of sampling equal numbers from each strain. The higher performance observed in the base population persisted during 10 generations of phenotypic selection applied in the subsequent breeding program.

  2. Optimizing the creation of base populations for aquaculture breeding programs using phenotypic and genomic data and its consequences on genetic progress

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Jesús; Toro, Miguel Á.; Sonesson, Anna K.; Villanueva, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    The success of an aquaculture breeding program critically depends on the way in which the base population of breeders is constructed since all the genetic variability for the traits included originally in the breeding goal as well as those to be included in the future is contained in the initial founders. Traditionally, base populations were created from a number of wild strains by sampling equal numbers from each strain. However, for some aquaculture species improved strains are already available and, therefore, mean phenotypic values for economically important traits can be used as a criterion to optimize the sampling when creating base populations. Also, the increasing availability of genome-wide genotype information in aquaculture species could help to refine the estimation of relationships within and between candidate strains and, thus, to optimize the percentage of individuals to be sampled from each strain. This study explores the advantages of using phenotypic and genome-wide information when constructing base populations for aquaculture breeding programs in terms of initial and subsequent trait performance and genetic diversity level. Results show that a compromise solution between diversity and performance can be found when creating base populations. Up to 6% higher levels of phenotypic performance can be achieved at the same level of global diversity in the base population by optimizing the selection of breeders instead of sampling equal numbers from each strain. The higher performance observed in the base population persisted during 10 generations of phenotypic selection applied in the subsequent breeding program. PMID:25505485

  3. Frontiers in cancer epidemiology: a challenge to the research community from the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program at the National Cancer Institute.

    PubMed

    Khoury, Muin J; Freedman, Andrew N; Gillanders, Elizabeth M; Harvey, Chinonye E; Kaefer, Christie; Reid, Britt C; Rogers, Scott; Schully, Sheri D; Seminara, Daniela; Verma, Mukesh

    2012-07-01

    The Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program (EGRP) at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) is developing scientific priorities for cancer epidemiology research in the next decade. We would like to engage the research community and other stakeholders in a planning effort that will include a workshop in December 2012 to help shape new foci for cancer epidemiology research. To facilitate the process of defining the future of cancer epidemiology, we invite the research community to join in an ongoing web-based conversation at http://blog-epi.grants.cancer.gov/ to develop priorities and the next generation of high-impact studies. ©2012 AACR

  4. Assessing the impact of natural service bulls and genotype by environment interactions on genetic gain and inbreeding in organic dairy cattle genomic breeding programs.

    PubMed

    Yin, T; Wensch-Dorendorf, M; Simianer, H; Swalve, H H; König, S

    2014-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to compare genetic gain and inbreeding coefficients of dairy cattle in organic breeding program designs by applying stochastic simulations. Evaluated breeding strategies were: (i) selecting bulls from conventional breeding programs, and taking into account genotype by environment (G×E) interactions, (ii) selecting genotyped bulls within the organic environment for artificial insemination (AI) programs and (iii) selecting genotyped natural service bulls within organic herds. The simulated conventional population comprised 148 800 cows from 2976 herds with an average herd size of 50 cows per herd, and 1200 cows were assigned to 60 organic herds. In a young bull program, selection criteria of young bulls in both production systems (conventional and organic) were either 'conventional' estimated breeding values (EBV) or genomic estimated breeding values (GEBV) for two traits with low (h 2=0.05) and moderate heritability (h 2=0.30). GEBV were calculated for different accuracies (r mg), and G×E interactions were considered by modifying originally simulated true breeding values in the range from r g=0.5 to 1.0. For both traits (h 2=0.05 and 0.30) and r mg⩾0.8, genomic selection of bulls directly in the organic population and using selected bulls via AI revealed higher genetic gain than selecting young bulls in the larger conventional population based on EBV; also without the existence of G×E interactions. Only for pronounced G×E interactions (r g=0.5), and for highly accurate GEBV for natural service bulls (r mg>0.9), results suggests the use of genotyped organic natural service bulls instead of implementing an AI program. Inbreeding coefficients of selected bulls and their offspring were generally lower when basing selection decisions for young bulls on GEBV compared with selection strategies based on pedigree indices.

  5. Microbial genome program report: Optical approaches for physical mapping and sequence assembly of the Deinococcus radiodurans chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, David C.

    1999-11-23

    Maps of genomic or cloned DNA are frequently constructed by analyzing the cleavage patterns produced by restriction enzymes. Restriction enzymes are remarkable reagents that faithfully cleave only at specific sequences of between 4 and 8 nucleotides, which vary according to the specific enzymes. Restriction enzymes are reliable, numerous, and easily obtainable and presently, there are approximately 250 different sequences represented among thousands of enzymes. Restriction maps characterize gene structure and even entire genomes. Furthermore, such maps provide a useful scaffold for the alignment and verification of sequence data. Restriction maps generated by computer and predicted from the sequence are aligned with the actual restriction map. Restriction enzyme action has traditionally been assayed by gel electrophoresis. This technique separates cleaved molecules on the basis of their nobilities under the influence of an applied electrical field, within a gel separation matrix (small fragments have a greater mobility than large ones). Although gel electrophoresis distinguishes different sized DNA fragments (known as a fingerprint), the original order of these fragments remains unknown. The subsequent task of determining the order of such fragments is a labor intensive task, especially when making restriction maps of whole genomes, and therefore despite its obvious utility to genome analysis, it is not widely used.

  6. Whole-Genome Sequences of Two Campylobacter coli Isolates from the Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring Program in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Bernal, Johan F.; Donado-Godoy, Pilar; Valencia, María Fernanda; León, Maribel; Gómez, Yolanda; Rodríguez, Fernando; Agarwala, Richa; Landsman, David

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter coli, along with Campylobacter jejuni, is a major agent of gastroenteritis and acute enterocolitis in humans. We report the whole-genome sequences of two multidrug-resistance C. coli strains, isolated from the Colombian poultry chain. The isolates contain a variety of antimicrobial resistance genes for aminoglycosides, lincosamides, fluoroquinolones, and tetracycline. PMID:26988048

  7. Whole-Genome Sequences of Two Campylobacter coli Isolates from the Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring Program in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Johan F; Donado-Godoy, Pilar; Valencia, María Fernanda; León, Maribel; Gómez, Yolanda; Rodríguez, Fernando; Agarwala, Richa; Landsman, David; Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo

    2016-03-17

    Campylobacter coli, along with Campylobacter jejuni, is a major agent of gastroenteritis and acute enterocolitis in humans. We report the whole-genome sequences of two multidrug-resistance C. coli strains, isolated from the Colombian poultry chain. The isolates contain a variety of antimicrobial resistance genes for aminoglycosides, lincosamides, fluoroquinolones, and tetracycline. Copyright © 2016 Bernal et al.

  8. Genotype by environment interaction and the use of unbalanced historical data for genomic selection in an international wheat breeding program

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Genomic selection (GS) offers breeders the possibility of using historic data and unbalanced breeding trials to form training populations for predicting the performance of new lines. However, in using datasets that are unbalanced over time and space, there is increasing exposure to particular genoty...

  9. A genome-wide association study of malting quality across eight U.S. barley breeding programs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study leverages the breeding data of 1,862 breeding lines evaluated in 97 field trials for genome-wide association study of malting quality traits in barley. The breeding lines were six-row and two-row barley advanced breeding lines from eight barley breeding populations established at six pub...

  10. Querying genomic databases

    SciTech Connect

    Baehr, A.; Hagstrom, R.; Joerg, D.; Overbeek, R.

    1991-09-01

    A natural-language interface has been developed that retrieves genomic information by using a simple subset of English. The interface spares the biologist from the task of learning database-specific query languages and computer programming. Currently, the interface deals with the E. coli genome. It can, however, be readily extended and shows promise as a means of easy access to other sequenced genomic databases as well.

  11. Five blood pressure loci identified by an updated genome-wide linkage scan: meta-analysis of the Family Blood Pressure Program.

    PubMed

    Simino, Jeannette; Shi, Gang; Kume, Rezart; Schwander, Karen; Province, Michael A; Gu, C Charles; Kardia, Sharon; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Ehret, Georg; Olshen, Richard A; Turner, Stephen T; Ho, Low-Tone; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Jaquish, Cashell; Paltoo, Dina; Cooper, Richard S; Weder, Alan; Curb, J David; Boerwinkle, Eric; Hunt, Steven C; Rao, Dabeeru C

    2011-03-01

    A preliminary genome-wide linkage analysis of blood pressure in the Family Blood Pressure Program (FBPP) was reported previously. We harnessed the power and ethnic diversity of the final pooled FBPP dataset to identify novel loci for blood pressure thereby enhancing localization of genes containing less common variants with large effects on blood pressure levels and hypertension. We performed one overall and 4 race-specific meta-analyses of genome-wide blood pressure linkage scans using data on 4,226 African-American, 2,154 Asian, 4,229 Caucasian, and 2,435 Mexican-American participants (total N = 13,044). Variance components models were fit to measured (raw) blood pressure levels and two types of antihypertensive medication adjusted blood pressure phenotypes within each of 10 subgroups defined by race and network. A modified Fisher's method was used to combine the P values for each linkage marker across the 10 subgroups. Five quantitative trait loci (QTLs) were detected on chromosomes 6p22.3, 8q23.1, 20q13.12, 21q21.1, and 21q21.3 based on significant linkage evidence (defined by logarithm of odds (lod) score ≥3) in at least one meta-analysis and lod scores ≥1 in at least 2 subgroups defined by network and race. The chromosome 8q23.1 locus was supported by Asian-, Caucasian-, and Mexican-American-specific meta-analyses. The new QTLs reported justify new candidate gene studies. They may help support results from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) that fall in these QTL regions but fail to achieve the genome-wide significance.

  12. Genome Maps, a new generation genome browser

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Ignacio; Salavert, Francisco; Sanchez, Rubén; de Maria, Alejandro; Alonso, Roberto; Escobar, Pablo; Bleda, Marta; Dopazo, Joaquín

    2013-01-01

    Genome browsers have gained importance as more genomes and related genomic information become available. However, the increase of information brought about by new generation sequencing technologies is, at the same time, causing a subtle but continuous decrease in the efficiency of conventional genome browsers. Here, we present Genome Maps, a genome browser that implements an innovative model of data transfer and management. The program uses highly efficient technologies from the new HTML5 standard, such as scalable vector graphics, that optimize workloads at both server and client sides and ensure future scalability. Thus, data management and representation are entirely carried out by the browser, without the need of any Java Applet, Flash or other plug-in technology installation. Relevant biological data on genes, transcripts, exons, regulatory features, single-nucleotide polymorphisms, karyotype and so forth, are imported from web services and are available as tracks. In addition, several DAS servers are already included in Genome Maps. As a novelty, this web-based genome browser allows the local upload of huge genomic data files (e.g. VCF or BAM) that can be dynamically visualized in real time at the client side, thus facilitating the management of medical data affected by privacy restrictions. Finally, Genome Maps can easily be integrated in any web application by including only a few lines of code. Genome Maps is an open source collaborative initiative available in the GitHub repository (https://github.com/compbio-bigdata-viz/genome-maps). Genome Maps is available at: http://www.genomemaps.org. PMID:23748955

  13. Genome Maps, a new generation genome browser.

    PubMed

    Medina, Ignacio; Salavert, Francisco; Sanchez, Rubén; de Maria, Alejandro; Alonso, Roberto; Escobar, Pablo; Bleda, Marta; Dopazo, Joaquín

    2013-07-01

    Genome browsers have gained importance as more genomes and related genomic information become available. However, the increase of information brought about by new generation sequencing technologies is, at the same time, causing a subtle but continuous decrease in the efficiency of conventional genome browsers. Here, we present Genome Maps, a genome browser that implements an innovative model of data transfer and management. The program uses highly efficient technologies from the new HTML5 standard, such as scalable vector graphics, that optimize workloads at both server and client sides and ensure future scalability. Thus, data management and representation are entirely carried out by the browser, without the need of any Java Applet, Flash or other plug-in technology installation. Relevant biological data on genes, transcripts, exons, regulatory features, single-nucleotide polymorphisms, karyotype and so forth, are imported from web services and are available as tracks. In addition, several DAS servers are already included in Genome Maps. As a novelty, this web-based genome browser allows the local upload of huge genomic data files (e.g. VCF or BAM) that can be dynamically visualized in real time at the client side, thus facilitating the management of medical data affected by privacy restrictions. Finally, Genome Maps can easily be integrated in any web application by including only a few lines of code. Genome Maps is an open source collaborative initiative available in the GitHub repository (https://github.com/compbio-bigdata-viz/genome-maps). Genome Maps is available at: http://www.genomemaps.org.

  14. Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Genome Programming during the Early Stages of Primary Infection of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Hem C.; Lu, Jie; Verma, Subhash C.; Banerjee, Shuvomoy; Mehta, Devan

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The early period of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infection involves the dynamic expression of viral genes, which are temporally and epigenetically regulated. KSHV can effectively infect and persist in endothelial as well as human B cells with different gene expression patterns. To understand the temporal epigenetic changes which occur when KSHV infects the lymphocytic compartment, we infected human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and comprehensively analyzed the changes which occurred at the binding sites of virally encoded lytic as well as latent proteins along with epigenetic modifications across the KSHV genome during early primary infection. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays, we showed that the KSHV genome acquires a uniquely distinct histone modification pattern of methylation (H3K4me3, H3K9me3, and H3K27me3) and acetylation (H3Ac) during de novo infection of human PBMCs. This pattern showed that the epigenetic changes were temporally controlled. The binding profiles of KSHV latent protein LANA and the immediate early proteins RTA and K8 showed specific patterns at different times postinfection, which reflects the gene expression program. Further analysis demonstrated that KSHV can concurrently express lytic and latent genes which were associated with histone modifications at these specific regions on the viral genome. We identified three KSHV genes, K3, ORF49, and ORF64, which exhibited different profiles of histone modifications during the early stages of PBMC infection. These studies established a distinct pattern of epigenetic modification which correlates with viral gene expression temporally regulated during the first 7 days of PBMC infection and provides clues to the regulatory program required for successful infection by KSHV of human PBMCs. PMID:25516617

  15. Program in Functional Genomics of Autoimmunity and Immunology of yhe University of Kentucky and the University of Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Alan M Kaplan

    2012-10-12

    This grant will be used to augment the equipment infrastructure and core support at the University of Kentucky and the University of Alabama particularly in the areas of genomics/informatics, molecular analysis and cell separation. In addition, we will promote collaborative research interactions through scientific workshops and exchange of scientists, as well as joint exploration of the role of immune receptors as targets in autoimmunity and host defense, innate and adaptive immune responses, and mucosal immunity in host defense.

  16. Genome-wide analysis of MEF2 transcriptional program reveals synaptic target genes and neuronal activity-dependent polyadenylation site selection

    PubMed Central

    Flavell, Steven W.; Kim, Tae-Kyung; Gray, Jesse M.; Harmin, David A.; Hemberg, Martin; Hong, Elizabeth J.; Markenscoff-Papadimitriou, Eirene; Bear, Daniel M.; Greenberg, Michael E.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Although many transcription factors are known to control important aspects of neural development, the genome-wide programs that are directly regulated by these factors are not known. We have characterized the genetic program that is activated by MEF2, a key regulator of activity-dependent synapse development. These MEF2 target genes have diverse functions at synapses, revealing a broad role for MEF2 in synapse development. Several of the MEF2 targets are mutated in human neurological disorders including epilepsy and autism-spectrum disorders, suggesting that these disorders may be caused by disruption of an activity-dependent gene program that controls synapse development. Our analyses also reveal that neuronal activity promotes alternative polyadenylation site usage at many of the MEF2 target genes, leading to the production of truncated mRNAs that may have different functions than their full-length counterparts. Taken together, these analyses suggest that the ubiquitously expressed transcription factor MEF2 regulates an intricate transcriptional program in neurons that controls synapse development. PMID:19109909

  17. Human Genome Project

    SciTech Connect

    Block, S.; Cornwall, J.; Dally, W.; Dyson, F.; Fortson, N.; Joyce, G.; Kimble, H. J.; Lewis, N.; Max, C.; Prince, T.; Schwitters, R.; Weinberger, P.; Woodin, W. H.

    1998-01-04

    The study reviews Department of Energy supported aspects of the United States Human Genome Project, the joint National Institutes of Health/Department of Energy program to characterize all human genetic material, to discover the set of human genes, and to render them accessible for further biological study. The study concentrates on issues of technology, quality assurance/control, and informatics relevant to current effort on the genome project and needs beyond it. Recommendations are presented on areas of the genome program that are of particular interest to and supported by the Department of Energy.

  18. Genomic-Based Optimum Contribution in Conservation and Genetic Improvement Programs with Antagonistic Fitness and Productivity Traits.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Molano, Enrique; Pong-Wong, Ricardo; Banos, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Animal selection for genetic improvement of productivity may lead to an increase in inbreeding through the use of techniques that enhance the reproductive capability of selected animals. Therefore, breeding strategies aim to balance maintaining genetic variability and acceptable fitness levels with increasing productivity. The present study demonstrates the effectiveness of genomic-based optimum contribution strategies at addressing this objective when fitness and productivity are genetically antagonistic traits. Strategies are evaluated in directional selection (increasing productivity) or conservation (maintaining fitness) scenarios. In the former case, substantial rates of genetic gain can be achieved while greatly constraining the rate of increase in inbreeding. Under a conservation approach, inbreeding depression can be effectively halted while also achieving a modest rate of genetic gain for productivity. Furthermore, the use of optimum contribution strategies when combined with a simple non-random mating scheme (minimum kinship method) showed an additional delay in the increase of inbreeding in the short term. In conclusion, genomic-based optimum contribution methods can be effectively used to control inbreeding and inbreeding depression, and still allow genetic gain for productivity traits even when fitness and productivity are antagonistically correlated.

  19. Satellite-tagged transcribing sequences in Bubalus bubalis genome undergo programmed modulation in meiocytes: possible implications for transcriptional inactivation.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, M; Gangadharan, S; Kapur, V; Azfer, M A; Prakash, B; Ali, S

    2001-09-01

    We cloned and sequenced a 1378 bp BamHI satellite DNA fraction from the water buffalo Bubalus bubalis and have studied its expression in different tissues. The GC-rich sequences of the resultant contig pDS5 crosshybridize only with bovid DNA and are not conserved evolutionarily. Typing of buffalo genomic DNA using pDS5 with several restriction enzymes revealed multilocus monomorphic bands. Similar typing of cattle, buffalo, goat, sheep, and gaur genomic DNA revealed variations in copy number and allele length giving rise to species-specific band patterns. Expression study of pDS5 in bubaline samples by RNA slot-blot, Northern blot, and RT-PCR showed various levels of signal in all the somatic tissues and germline cells except heart. A GenBank database search revealed homology of pDS5 sequences in the 5' region from nt 1-1261 with collagen gene. An AluI typing analysis of DNA from bubaline semen samples showed consistent loss of two bands. The presence of corresponding bands in somatic tissues suggests a sequence modulation within the pDS5 array in meiocytes during spermatogenesis, which is restored in the somatic cells after fertilization. Modulation of the satellite-tagged transcribing sequence in the meiocytes may be a mechanism of its inactivation.

  20. National Dam Safety Program. Wallace Lake Dam (MO 31263), White River Basin, Carter County, Missouri. Phase I Inspection Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    series numbers for in-house reports or a contractor/grantee number assigned by him, will be placed in this space. If no such numbers are used, leave...million years. Soils in the area of the dam appear to be primarily Clarksville Stony Loam. The Clarksville series subsoil is a reddish-yellow to red...PROFILE -789 . .. 784 DAM -782 ____ __ -780 ___ ___ ___ ___ _ -778 OWNSTR___ ___ _ 776 M 50 100 A1).’N’E SON IN( I NIIFING . I N(’ 7. 31 NORTH Fll-NrON

  1. A chromatin-wide transition to H4K20 monomethylation impairs genome integrity and programmed DNA rearrangements in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Schotta, Gunnar; Sengupta, Roopsha; Kubicek, Stefan; Malin, Stephen; Kauer, Monika; Callén, Elsa; Celeste, Arkady; Pagani, Michaela; Opravil, Susanne; De La Rosa-Velazquez, Inti A.; Espejo, Alexsandra; Bedford, Mark T.; Nussenzweig, André; Busslinger, Meinrad; Jenuwein, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    H4K20 methylation is a broad chromatin modification that has been linked with diverse epigenetic functions. Several enzymes target H4K20 methylation, consistent with distinct mono-, di-, and trimethylation states controlling different biological outputs. To analyze the roles of H4K20 methylation states, we generated conditional null alleles for the two Suv4-20h histone methyltransferase (HMTase) genes in the mouse. Suv4-20h-double-null (dn) mice are perinatally lethal and have lost nearly all H4K20me3 and H4K20me2 states. The genome-wide transition to an H4K20me1 state results in increased sensitivity to damaging stress, since Suv4-20h-dn chromatin is less efficient for DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair and prone to chromosomal aberrations. Notably, Suv4-20h-dn B cells are defective in immunoglobulin class-switch recombination, and Suv4-20h-dn deficiency impairs the stem cell pool of lymphoid progenitors. Thus, conversion to an H4K20me1 state results in compromised chromatin that is insufficient to protect genome integrity and to process a DNA-rearranging differentiation program in the mouse. PMID:18676810

  2. Genome-wide functional analysis of CREB/long-term memory-dependent transcription reveals distinct basal and memory gene expression programs.

    PubMed

    Lakhina, Vanisha; Arey, Rachel N; Kaletsky, Rachel; Kauffman, Amanda; Stein, Geneva; Keyes, William; Xu, Daniel; Murphy, Coleen T

    2015-01-21

    Induced CREB activity is a hallmark of long-term memory, but the full repertoire of CREB transcriptional targets required specifically for memory is not known in any system. To obtain a more complete picture of the mechanisms involved in memory, we combined memory training with genome-wide transcriptional analysis of C. elegans CREB mutants. This approach identified 757 significant CREB/memory-induced targets and confirmed the involvement of known memory genes from other organisms, but also suggested new mechanisms and novel components that may be conserved through mammals. CREB mediates distinct basal and memory transcriptional programs at least partially through spatial restriction of CREB activity: basal targets are regulated primarily in nonneuronal tissues, while memory targets are enriched for neuronal expression, emanating from CREB activity in AIM neurons. This suite of novel memory-associated genes will provide a platform for the discovery of orthologous mammalian long-term memory components.

  3. Genome-wide Functional Analysis of CREB/Long-Term Memory-Dependent Transcription Reveals Distinct Basal and Memory Gene Expression Programs

    PubMed Central

    Lakhina, Vanisha; Arey, Rachel N.; Kaletsky, Rachel; Kauffman, Amanda; Stein, Geneva; Keyes, William; Xu, Daniel; Murphy, Coleen T.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Induced CREB activity is a hallmark of long-term memory, but the full repertoire of CREB transcriptional targets required specifically for memory is not known in any system. To obtain a more complete picture of the mechanisms involved in memory, we combined memory training with genome-wide transcriptional analysis of C. elegans CREB mutants. This approach identified 757 significant CREB/memory-induced targets and confirmed the involvement of known memory genes from other organisms, but also suggested new mechanisms and novel components that may be conserved through mammals. CREB mediates distinct basal and memory transcriptional programs at least partially through spatial restriction of CREB activity: basal targets are regulated primarily in nonneuronal tissues, while memory targets are enriched for neuronal expression, emanating from CREB activity in AIM neurons. This suite of novel memory-associated genes will provide a platform for the discovery of orthologous mammalian long-term memory components. PMID:25611510

  4. Genomic Expression Program Involving the Haa1p-Regulon in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Response to Acetic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Jorg D.; Sá-Correia, Isabel

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The alterations occurring in yeast genomic expression during early response to acetic acid and the involvement of the transcription factor Haa1p in this transcriptional reprogramming are described in this study. Haa1p was found to regulate, directly or indirectly, the transcription of approximately 80% of the acetic acid-activated genes, suggesting that Haa1p is the main player in the control of yeast response to this weak acid. The genes identified in this work as being activated in response to acetic acid in a Haa1p-dependent manner include protein kinases, multidrug resistance transporters, proteins involved in lipid metabolism, in nucleic acid processing, and proteins of unknown function. Among these genes, the expression of SAP30 and HRK1 provided the strongest protective effect toward acetic acid. SAP30 encode a subunit of a histone deacetylase complex and HRK1 encode a protein kinase belonging to a family of protein kinases dedicated to the regulation of plasma membrane transporters activity. The deletion of the HRK1 gene was found to lead to the increase of the accumulation of labeled acetic acid into acid-stressed yeast cells, suggesting that the role of both HAA1 and HRK1 in providing protection against acetic acid is, at least partially, related with their involvement in the reduction of intracellular acetate concentration. PMID:20955010

  5. HIV-1 and M-PMV RNA Nuclear Export Elements Program Viral Genomes for Distinct Cytoplasmic Trafficking Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Pocock, Ginger M; Becker, Jordan T; Swanson, Chad M; Ahlquist, Paul; Sherer, Nathan M

    2016-04-01

    Retroviruses encode cis-acting RNA nuclear export elements that override nuclear retention of intron-containing viral mRNAs including the full-length, unspliced genomic RNAs (gRNAs) packaged into assembling virions. The HIV-1 Rev-response element (RRE) recruits the cellular nuclear export receptor CRM1 (also known as exportin-1/XPO1) using the viral protein Rev, while simple retroviruses encode constitutive transport elements (CTEs) that directly recruit components of the NXF1(Tap)/NXT1(p15) mRNA nuclear export machinery. How gRNA nuclear export is linked to trafficking machineries in the cytoplasm upstream of virus particle assembly is unknown. Here we used long-term (>24 h), multicolor live cell imaging to directly visualize HIV-1 gRNA nuclear export, translation, cytoplasmic trafficking, and virus particle production in single cells. We show that the HIV-1 RRE regulates unique, en masse, Rev- and CRM1-dependent "burst-like" transitions of mRNAs from the nucleus to flood the cytoplasm in a non-localized fashion. By contrast, the CTE derived from Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (M-PMV) links gRNAs to microtubules in the cytoplasm, driving them to cluster markedly to the centrosome that forms the pericentriolar core of the microtubule-organizing center (MTOC). Adding each export element to selected heterologous mRNAs was sufficient to confer each distinct export behavior, as was directing Rev/CRM1 or NXF1/NXT1 transport modules to mRNAs using a site-specific RNA tethering strategy. Moreover, multiple CTEs per transcript enhanced MTOC targeting, suggesting that a cooperative mechanism links NXF1/NXT1 to microtubules. Combined, these results reveal striking, unexpected features of retroviral gRNA nucleocytoplasmic transport and demonstrate roles for mRNA export elements that extend beyond nuclear pores to impact gRNA distribution in the cytoplasm.

  6. HIV-1 and M-PMV RNA Nuclear Export Elements Program Viral Genomes for Distinct Cytoplasmic Trafficking Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Pocock, Ginger M.; Becker, Jordan T.; Swanson, Chad M.; Ahlquist, Paul; Sherer, Nathan M.

    2016-01-01

    Retroviruses encode cis-acting RNA nuclear export elements that override nuclear retention of intron-containing viral mRNAs including the full-length, unspliced genomic RNAs (gRNAs) packaged into assembling virions. The HIV-1 Rev-response element (RRE) recruits the cellular nuclear export receptor CRM1 (also known as exportin-1/XPO1) using the viral protein Rev, while simple retroviruses encode constitutive transport elements (CTEs) that directly recruit components of the NXF1(Tap)/NXT1(p15) mRNA nuclear export machinery. How gRNA nuclear export is linked to trafficking machineries in the cytoplasm upstream of virus particle assembly is unknown. Here we used long-term (>24 h), multicolor live cell imaging to directly visualize HIV-1 gRNA nuclear export, translation, cytoplasmic trafficking, and virus particle production in single cells. We show that the HIV-1 RRE regulates unique, en masse, Rev- and CRM1-dependent “burst-like” transitions of mRNAs from the nucleus to flood the cytoplasm in a non-localized fashion. By contrast, the CTE derived from Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (M-PMV) links gRNAs to microtubules in the cytoplasm, driving them to cluster markedly to the centrosome that forms the pericentriolar core of the microtubule-organizing center (MTOC). Adding each export element to selected heterologous mRNAs was sufficient to confer each distinct export behavior, as was directing Rev/CRM1 or NXF1/NXT1 transport modules to mRNAs using a site-specific RNA tethering strategy. Moreover, multiple CTEs per transcript enhanced MTOC targeting, suggesting that a cooperative mechanism links NXF1/NXT1 to microtubules. Combined, these results reveal striking, unexpected features of retroviral gRNA nucleocytoplasmic transport and demonstrate roles for mRNA export elements that extend beyond nuclear pores to impact gRNA distribution in the cytoplasm. PMID:27070420

  7. Prenatal stress-induced programming of genome-wide promoter DNA methylation in 5-HTT-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Schraut, K G; Jakob, S B; Weidner, M T; Schmitt, A G; Scholz, C J; Strekalova, T; El Hajj, N; Eijssen, L M T; Domschke, K; Reif, A; Haaf, T; Ortega, G; Steinbusch, H W M; Lesch, K P; Van den Hove, D L

    2014-10-21

    The serotonin transporter gene (5-HTT/SLC6A4)-linked polymorphic region has been suggested to have a modulatory role in mediating effects of early-life stress exposure on psychopathology rendering carriers of the low-expression short (s)-variant more vulnerable to environmental adversity in later life. The underlying molecular mechanisms of this gene-by-environment interaction are not well understood, but epigenetic regulation including differential DNA methylation has been postulated to have a critical role. Recently, we used a maternal restraint stress paradigm of prenatal stress (PS) in 5-HTT-deficient mice and showed that the effects on behavior and gene expression were particularly marked in the hippocampus of female 5-Htt+/- offspring. Here, we examined to which extent these effects are mediated by differential methylation of DNA. For this purpose, we performed a genome-wide hippocampal DNA methylation screening using methylated-DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP) on Affymetrix GeneChip Mouse Promoter 1.0 R arrays. Using hippocampal DNA from the same mice as assessed before enabled us to correlate gene-specific DNA methylation, mRNA expression and behavior. We found that 5-Htt genotype, PS and their interaction differentially affected the DNA methylation signature of numerous genes, a subset of which showed overlap with the expression profiles of the corresponding transcripts. For example, a differentially methylated region in the gene encoding myelin basic protein (Mbp) was associated with its expression in a 5-Htt-, PS- and 5-Htt × PS-dependent manner. Subsequent fine-mapping of this Mbp locus linked the methylation status of two specific CpG sites to Mbp expression and anxiety-related behavior. In conclusion, hippocampal DNA methylation patterns and expression profiles of female prenatally stressed 5-Htt+/- mice suggest that distinct molecular mechanisms, some of which are promoter methylation-dependent, contribute to the behavioral effects of the 5-Htt

  8. Environmental programming of stress responses through DNA methylation: life at the interface between a dynamic environment and a fixed genome.

    PubMed

    Meaney, Michael J; Szyf, Moshe

    2005-01-01

    Early experience permanently alters behavior and physiology. These effects are, in part, mediated by sustained alterations in gene expression in selected brain regions. The critical question concerns the mechanism of these environmental "programming" effects. We examine this issue with an animal model that studies the consequences of variations in mother-infant interactions on the development of individual differences in behavioral and endocrine responses to stress in adulthood. Increased levels of pup licking/grooming by rat mothers in the first week of life alter DNA structure at a glucocorticoid receptor gene promoter in the hippocampus of the offspring. Differences in the DNA methylation pattern between the offspring of high- and low-licking/grooming mothers emerge over the first week of life; they are reversed with cross-fostering; they persist into adulthood; and they are associated with altered histone acetylation and transcription factor (nerve growth factor-induced clone A [NGFIA]) binding to the glucocorticoid receptor promoter. DNA methylation alters glucocorticoid receptor expression through modifications of chromatin structure. Pharmacological reversal of the effects on chromatin structure completely eliminates the effects of maternal care on glucocorticoid receptor expression and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) responses to stress, thus suggesting a causal relation between the maternally induced, epigenetic modification of the glucocorticoid receptor gene and the effects on stress responses in the offspring. These findings demonstrate that the structural modifications of the DNA can be established through environmental programming and that, in spite of the inherent stability of this epigenomic marker, it is dynamic and potentially reversible.

  9. Breeding-assisted genomics.

    PubMed

    Poland, Jesse

    2015-04-01

    The revolution of inexpensive sequencing has ushered in an unprecedented age of genomics. The promise of using this technology to accelerate plant breeding is being realized with a vision of genomics-assisted breeding that will lead to rapid genetic gain for expensive and difficult traits. The reality is now that robust phenotypic data is an increasing limiting resource to complement the current wealth of genomic information. While genomics has been hailed as the discipline to fundamentally change the scope of plant breeding, a more symbiotic relationship is likely to emerge. In the context of developing and evaluating large populations needed for functional genomics, none excel in this area more than plant breeders. While genetic studies have long relied on dedicated, well-structured populations, the resources dedicated to these populations in the context of readily available, inexpensive genotyping is making this philosophy less tractable relative to directly focusing functional genomics on material in breeding programs. Through shifting effort for basic genomic studies from dedicated structured populations, to capturing the entire scope of genetic determinants in breeding lines, we can move towards not only furthering our understanding of functional genomics in plants, but also rapidly improving crops for increased food security, availability and nutrition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Bisprimer--a program for the design of primers for bisulfite-based genomic sequencing of both plant and Mammalian DNA samples.

    PubMed

    Kovacova, Viera; Janousek, Bohuslav

    2012-01-01

    Plants and animals differ in the sequence context of the methylated sites in DNA. Plants exhibit cytosine methylation in CG, CHG, and CHH sites, whereas CG methylation is the only form present in mammals (with an exception of the early embryonic development). This fact must be taken into account in the design of primers for bisulfite-based genomic sequencing because CHG and CHH sites can remain unmodified. Surprisingly, no user-friendly primer design program is publicly available that could be used to design primers in plants and to simultaneously check the properties of primers such as the potential for primer-dimer formation. For studies concentrating on particular DNA loci, the correct design of primers is crucial. The program, called BisPrimer, includes 2 different subprograms for the primer design, the first one for mammals and the second one for angiosperm plants. Each subprogram is divided into 2 variants. The first variant serves to design primers that preferentially bind to the bisulfite-modified primer-binding sites (C to U conversion). This type of primer preferentially amplifies the bisulfite-converted DNA strands. This feature can help to avoid problems connected with an incomplete bisulfite modification that can sometimes occur for technical reasons. The second variant is intended for the analysis of samples that are supposed to consist of a mixture of DNA molecules that have different levels of cytosine methylation (e.g., pollen DNA). In this case, the aim is to minimize the selection in favor of either less methylated or more methylated molecules.

  11. Human genome project: Past, present, and future

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, J.D.

    1990-04-06

    The article presents a short discussion of the development of the human genome program in the United States, a summary of the current status of the organization and administration of the National Institutes of Health component of the program, and some prospects for the future directions of the program and the applications of genome information.

  12. Fungal Genome Sequencing and Bioenergy

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Scott E.; Thykaer, Jette; Adney, William S.; Brettin, T.; Brockman, Fred J.; D'haeseleer, Patrik; Martinez, Antonio D.; Miller, R. M.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.; Schadt, Christopher W.; Torok, Tamas; Tuskan, Gerald; Bennett, Joan W.; Berka, Randy; Briggs, Steve; Heitman, Joseph; Taylor, John; Turgeon, Barbara G.; Werner-Washburne, Maggie; Himmel, Michael E.

    2008-09-30

    To date, the number of ongoing filamentous fungal genome sequencing projects is almost tenfold fewer than those of bacterial and archaeal genome projects. The fungi chosen for sequencing represent narrow kingdom diversity; most are pathogens or models. We advocate an ambitious, forward-looking phylogenetic-based genome sequencing program, designed to capture metabolic diversity within the fungal kingdom, thereby enhancing research into alternative bioenergy sources, bioremediation, and fungal-environment interactions.

  13. Genome rearrangements: mother knows best!

    PubMed

    Chalker, Douglas L

    2005-10-25

    In Paramecium, developmentally programmed genome rearrangements can be altered by the presence of homologous sequences within the maternal somatic nucleus. Newly identified RNA-binding proteins appear to mediate the transfer of homologous sequence information from the maternal to the developing somatic nucleus, facilitating epigenetic regulation of this large-scale genome reorganization.

  14. Collaborators | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The TARGET initiative is jointly managed within the National Cancer Institute (NCI) by the Office of Cancer Genomics (OCG)Opens in a New Tab and the Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program (CTEP)Opens in a New Tab.

  15. Genomic Resources for Cancer Epidemiology

    Cancer.gov

    This page provides links to research resources, complied by the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program, that may be of interest to genetic epidemiologists conducting cancer research, but is not exhaustive.

  16. Collaborators | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The TARGET initiative is jointly managed within the National Cancer Institute (NCI) by the Office of Cancer Genomics (OCG)Opens in a New Tab and the Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program (CTEP)Opens in a New Tab.

  17. Glucose metabolism ontogenesis in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in the light of the recently sequenced genome: new tools for intermediary metabolism programming.

    PubMed

    Marandel, Lucie; Véron, Vincent; Surget, Anne; Plagnes-Juan, Élisabeth; Panserat, Stéphane

    2016-03-01

    The rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), a carnivorous fish species, displays a 'glucose-intolerant' phenotype when fed a high-carbohydrate diet. The importance of carbohydrate metabolism during embryogenesis and the timing of establishing this later phenotype are currently unclear. In addition, the mechanisms underlying the poor ability of carnivorous fish to use dietary carbohydrates as a major energy substrate are not well understood. It has recently been shown in trout that duplicated genes involved in glucose metabolism may participate in establishing the glucose-intolerant phenotype. The aim of this study was therefore to provide new understanding of glucose metabolism during ontogenesis and nutritional transition, taking into consideration the complexity of the trout genome. Trout were sampled at several stages of development from fertilization to hatching, and alevins were then fed a non-carbohydrate or a high-carbohydrate diet during first feeding. mRNA levels of all glucose metabolism-related genes increased in embryos during the setting up of the primitive liver. After the first meal, genes rapidly displayed expression patterns equivalent to those observed in the livers of juveniles. g6pcb2.a (a glucose 6-phosphatase-encoding gene) was up-regulated in alevins fed a high-carbohydrate diet, mimicking the expression pattern of gck genes. The g6pcb2.a gene may contribute to the non-inhibition of the last step of gluconeogenesis and thus to establishing the glucose-intolerant phenotype in trout fed a high-carbohydrate diet as early as first feeding. This information is crucial for nutritional programming investigations as it suggests that first feeding would be too late to programme glucose metabolism in the long term. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. Toward 959 nematode genomes

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sujai; Koutsovoulos, Georgios; Kaur, Gaganjot; Blaxter, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The sequencing of the complete genome of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans was a landmark achievement and ushered in a new era of whole-organism, systems analyses of the biology of this powerful model organism. The success of the C. elegans genome sequencing project also inspired communities working on other organisms to approach genome sequencing of their species. The phylum Nematoda is rich and diverse and of interest to a wide range of research fields from basic biology through ecology and parasitic disease. For all these communities, it is now clear that access to genome scale data will be key to advancing understanding, and in the case of parasites, developing new ways to control or cure diseases. The advent of second-generation sequencing technologies, improvements in computing algorithms and infrastructure and growth in bioinformatics and genomics literacy is making the addition of genome sequencing to the research goals of any nematode research program a less daunting prospect. To inspire, promote and coordinate genomic sequencing across the diversity of the phylum, we have launched a community wiki and the 959 Nematode Genomes initiative (www.nematodegenomes.org/). Just as the deciphering of the developmental lineage of the 959 cells of the adult hermaphrodite C. elegans was the gateway to broad advances in biomedical science, we hope that a nematode phylogeny with (at least) 959 sequenced species will underpin further advances in understanding the origins of parasitism, the dynamics of genomic change and the adaptations that have made Nematoda one of the most successful animal phyla. PMID:24058822

  19. Functional Genomics Group. Program Description

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    s.expected.to.mpact ..Gene.expresson.research. by.mcroarray.s.a.prmary.component.of.bomarker.ds- covery.because.t.s.hgh.throughput,. scann ...currently. beng. ntegrated. nto. drug . development. decson.makng.and.clncal.practce .”.health.care.prog- nostcators.foresee.a.day.when.an.ndv

  20. Prophage Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Canchaya, Carlos; Proux, Caroline; Fournous, Ghislain; Bruttin, Anne; Brüssow, Harald

    2003-01-01

    The majority of the bacterial genome sequences deposited in the National Center for Biotechnology Information database contain prophage sequences. Analysis of the prophages suggested that after being integrated into bacterial genomes, they undergo a complex decay process consisting of inactivating point mutations, genome rearrangements, modular exchanges, invasion by further mobile DNA elements, and massive DNA deletion. We review the technical difficulties in defining such altered prophage sequences in bacterial genomes and discuss theoretical frameworks for the phage-bacterium interaction at the genomic level. The published genome sequences from three groups of eubacteria (low- and high-G+C gram-positive bacteria and γ-proteobacteria) were screened for prophage sequences. The prophages from Streptococcus pyogenes served as test case for theoretical predictions of the role of prophages in the evolution of pathogenic bacteria. The genomes from further human, animal, and plant pathogens, as well as commensal and free-living bacteria, were included in the analysis to see whether the same principles of prophage genomics apply for bacteria living in different ecological niches and coming from distinct phylogenetical affinities. The effect of selection pressure on the host bacterium is apparently an important force shaping the prophage genomes in low-G+C gram-positive bacteria and γ-proteobacteria. PMID:12794192

  1. Molluscan Evolutionary Genomics

    SciTech Connect

    Simison, W. Brian; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2005-12-01

    In the last 20 years there have been dramatic advances in techniques of high-throughput DNA sequencing, most recently accelerated by the Human Genome Project, a program that has determined the three billion base pair code on which we are based. Now this tremendous capability is being directed at other genome targets that are being sampled across the broad range of life. This opens up opportunities as never before for evolutionary and organismal biologists to address questions of both processes and patterns of organismal change. We stand at the dawn of a new 'modern synthesis' period, paralleling that of the early 20th century when the fledgling field of genetics first identified the underlying basis for Darwin's theory. We must now unite the efforts of systematists, paleontologists, mathematicians, computer programmers, molecular biologists, developmental biologists, and others in the pursuit of discovering what genomics can teach us about the diversity of life. Genome-level sampling for mollusks to date has mostly been limited to mitochondrial genomes and it is likely that these will continue to provide the best targets for broad phylogenetic sampling in the near future. However, we are just beginning to see an inroad into complete nuclear genome sequencing, with several mollusks and other eutrochozoans having been selected for work about to begin. Here, we provide an overview of the state of molluscan mitochondrial genomics, highlight a few of the discoveries from this research, outline the promise of broadening this dataset, describe upcoming projects to sequence whole mollusk nuclear genomes, and challenge the community to prepare for making the best use of these data.

  2. Efficient Breeding by Genomic Mating.

    PubMed

    Akdemir, Deniz; Sánchez, Julio I

    2016-01-01

    Selection in breeding programs can be done by using phenotypes (phenotypic selection), pedigree relationship (breeding value selection) or molecular markers (marker assisted selection or genomic selection). All these methods are based on truncation selection, focusing on the best performance of parents before mating. In this article we proposed an approach to breeding, named genomic mating, which focuses on mating instead of truncation selection. Genomic mating uses information in a similar fashion to genomic selection but includes information on complementation of parents to be mated. Following the efficiency frontier surface, genomic mating uses concepts of estimated breeding values, risk (usefulness) and coefficient of ancestry to optimize mating between parents. We used a genetic algorithm to find solutions to this optimization problem and the results from our simulations comparing genomic selection, phenotypic selection and the mating approach indicate that current approach for breeding complex traits is more favorable than phenotypic and genomic selection. Genomic mating is similar to genomic selection in terms of estimating marker effects, but in genomic mating the genetic information and the estimated marker effects are used to decide which genotypes should be crossed to obtain the next breeding population.

  3. Efficient Breeding by Genomic Mating

    PubMed Central

    Akdemir, Deniz; Sánchez, Julio I.

    2016-01-01

    Selection in breeding programs can be done by using phenotypes (phenotypic selection), pedigree relationship (breeding value selection) or molecular markers (marker assisted selection or genomic selection). All these methods are based on truncation selection, focusing on the best performance of parents before mating. In this article we proposed an approach to breeding, named genomic mating, which focuses on mating instead of truncation selection. Genomic mating uses information in a similar fashion to genomic selection but includes information on complementation of parents to be mated. Following the efficiency frontier surface, genomic mating uses concepts of estimated breeding values, risk (usefulness) and coefficient of ancestry to optimize mating between parents. We used a genetic algorithm to find solutions to this optimization problem and the results from our simulations comparing genomic selection, phenotypic selection and the mating approach indicate that current approach for breeding complex traits is more favorable than phenotypic and genomic selection. Genomic mating is similar to genomic selection in terms of estimating marker effects, but in genomic mating the genetic information and the estimated marker effects are used to decide which genotypes should be crossed to obtain the next breeding population. PMID:27965707

  4. Aquaculture Genomics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The genomics chapter covers the basics of genome mapping and sequencing and the current status of several relevant species. The chapter briefly describes the development and use of (cDNA, BAC, etc.) libraries for mapping and obtaining specific sequence information. Other topics include comparative ...

  5. Fungal genome sequencing: basic biology to biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Krishna Kant

    2016-08-01

    The genome sequences provide a first glimpse into the genomic basis of the biological diversity of filamentous fungi and yeast. The genome sequence of the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with a small genome size, unicellular growth, and rich history of genetic and molecular analyses was a milestone of early genomics in the 1990s. The subsequent completion of fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe and genetic model, Neurospora crassa initiated a revolution in the genomics of the fungal kingdom. In due course of time, a substantial number of fungal genomes have been sequenced and publicly released, representing the widest sampling of genomes from any eukaryotic kingdom. An ambitious genome-sequencing program provides a wealth of data on metabolic diversity within the fungal kingdom, thereby enhancing research into medical science, agriculture science, ecology, bioremediation, bioenergy, and the biotechnology industry. Fungal genomics have higher potential to positively affect human health, environmental health, and the planet's stored energy. With a significant increase in sequenced fungal genomes, the known diversity of genes encoding organic acids, antibiotics, enzymes, and their pathways has increased exponentially. Currently, over a hundred fungal genome sequences are publicly available; however, no inclusive review has been published. This review is an initiative to address the significance of the fungal genome-sequencing program and provides the road map for basic and applied research.

  6. Antarctic Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Andrew; Cockell, Charles S.; Convey, Peter; Detrich III, H. William; Fraser, Keiron P. P.; Johnston, Ian A.; Methe, Barbara A.; Murray, Alison E.; Peck, Lloyd S.; Römisch, Karin; Rogers, Alex D.

    2004-01-01

    With the development of genomic science and its battery of technologies, polar biology stands on the threshold of a revolution, one that will enable the investigation of important questions of unprecedented scope and with extraordinary depth and precision. The exotic organisms of polar ecosystems are ideal candidates for genomic analysis. Through such analyses, it will be possible to learn not only the novel features that enable polar organisms to survive, and indeed thrive, in their extreme environments, but also fundamental biological principles that are common to most, if not all, organisms. This article aims to review recent developments in Antarctic genomics and to demonstrate the global context of such studies. PMID:18629155

  7. Genome-wide association and genomic selection in animal breeding.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Ben; Goddard, Mike

    2010-11-01

    Results from genome-wide association studies in livestock, and humans, has lead to the conclusion that the effect of individual quantitative trait loci (QTL) on complex traits, such as yield, are likely to be small; therefore, a large number of QTL are necessary to explain genetic variation in these traits. Given this genetic architecture, gains from marker-assisted selection (MAS) programs using only a small number of DNA markers to trace a limited number of QTL is likely to be small. This has lead to the development of alternative technology for using the available dense single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) information, called genomic selection. Genomic selection uses a genome-wide panel of dense markers so that all QTL are likely to be in linkage disequilibrium with at least one SNP. The genomic breeding values are predicted to be the sum of the effect of these SNPs across the entire genome. In dairy cattle breeding, the accuracy of genomic estimated breeding values (GEBV) that can be achieved and the fact that these are available early in life have lead to rapid adoption of the technology. Here, we discuss the design of experiments necessary to achieve accurate prediction of GEBV in future generations in terms of the number of markers necessary and the size of the reference population where marker effects are estimated. We also present a simple method for implementing genomic selection using a genomic relationship matrix. Future challenges discussed include using whole genome sequence data to improve the accuracy of genomic selection and management of inbreeding through genomic relationships.

  8. Genome Science: A Video Tour of the Washington University Genome Sequencing Center for High School and Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flowers, Susan K.; Easter, Carla; Holmes, Andrea; Cohen, Brian; Bednarski, April E.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.; Elgin, Sarah C. R.

    2005-01-01

    Sequencing of the human genome has ushered in a new era of biology. The technologies developed to facilitate the sequencing of the human genome are now being applied to the sequencing of other genomes. In 2004, a partnership was formed between Washington University School of Medicine Genome Sequencing Center's Outreach Program and Washington…

  9. Genome Science: A Video Tour of the Washington University Genome Sequencing Center for High School and Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flowers, Susan K.; Easter, Carla; Holmes, Andrea; Cohen, Brian; Bednarski, April E.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.; Elgin, Sarah C. R.

    2005-01-01

    Sequencing of the human genome has ushered in a new era of biology. The technologies developed to facilitate the sequencing of the human genome are now being applied to the sequencing of other genomes. In 2004, a partnership was formed between Washington University School of Medicine Genome Sequencing Center's Outreach Program and Washington…

  10. The life cycle of a genome project: perspectives and guidelines inspired by insect genome projects.

    PubMed

    Papanicolaou, Alexie

    2016-01-01

    Many research programs on non-model species biology have been empowered by genomics. In turn, genomics is underpinned by a reference sequence and ancillary information created by so-called "genome projects". The most reliable genome projects are the ones created as part of an active research program and designed to address specific questions but their life extends past publication. In this opinion paper I outline four key insights that have facilitated maintaining genomic communities: the key role of computational capability, the iterative process of building genomic resources, the value of community participation and the importance of manual curation. Taken together, these ideas can and do ensure the longevity of genome projects and the growing non-model species community can use them to focus a discussion with regards to its future genomic infrastructure.

  11. The life cycle of a genome project: perspectives and guidelines inspired by insect genome projects

    PubMed Central

    Papanicolaou, Alexie

    2016-01-01

    Many research programs on non-model species biology have been empowered by genomics. In turn, genomics is underpinned by a reference sequence and ancillary information created by so-called “genome projects”. The most reliable genome projects are the ones created as part of an active research program and designed to address specific questions but their life extends past publication. In this opinion paper I outline four key insights that have facilitated maintaining genomic communities: the key role of computational capability, the iterative process of building genomic resources, the value of community participation and the importance of manual curation. Taken together, these ideas can and do ensure the longevity of genome projects and the growing non-model species community can use them to focus a discussion with regards to its future genomic infrastructure. PMID:27006757

  12. 78 FR 20933 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel Loan Repayment Program... applications. Place: National Human Genome Research Institute, Room 3055, 5635 Fishers Lane, Rockville,...

  13. Breeding nursery tissue collection for possible genomic analysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Phenotyping is considered a major bottleneck in breeding programs. With new genomic technologies, high throughput genotype schemes are constantly being developed. However, every genomic technology requires phenotypic data to inform prediction models generated from the technology. Forage breeders con...

  14. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA): The next stage - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), the NIH research program that has helped set the standards for characterizing the genomic underpinnings of dozens of cancers on a large scale, is moving to its next phase.

  15. Endometrial and acute myeloid leukemia cancer genomes characterized

    Cancer.gov

    Two studies from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) program reveal details about the genomic landscapes of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and endometrial cancer. Both provide new insights into the molecular underpinnings of these cancers.

  16. Genotypes are useful for more than genomic evaluation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    New services that provide pedigree discovery, breed composition, mating programs, genomic inbreeding, fertility defects, and inheritance tracking all are possible from low cost genotyping, in addition to genomic evaluation. Genetic markers let breeders select among sibs before their phenotypes becam...

  17. Genome Radio Project: Quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    The process of conducting background research for the programs of the Genome Radio Project is continuing. The most developed of the program ``backgrounders`` have been reviewed by series and program advisors from various fields. Preliminary and background interviews have been conducted with dozens of potential program participants and advisors. Structurally, efforts are being directed toward developing and formalizing the project and series advisor relationships so that the best use can be made of those experts who have offered to assist the project in its presentation of program content. The library of research materials has been expanded considerably, creating a useful resource library for the producers.

  18. Genome databases

    SciTech Connect

    Courteau, J.

    1991-10-11

    Since the Genome Project began several years ago, a plethora of databases have been developed or are in the works. They range from the massive Genome Data Base at Johns Hopkins University, the central repository of all gene mapping information, to small databases focusing on single chromosomes or organisms. Some are publicly available, others are essentially private electronic lab notebooks. Still others limit access to a consortium of researchers working on, say, a single human chromosome. An increasing number incorporate sophisticated search and analytical software, while others operate as little more than data lists. In consultation with numerous experts in the field, a list has been compiled of some key genome-related databases. The list was not limited to map and sequence databases but also included the tools investigators use to interpret and elucidate genetic data, such as protein sequence and protein structure databases. Because a major goal of the Genome Project is to map and sequence the genomes of several experimental animals, including E. coli, yeast, fruit fly, nematode, and mouse, the available databases for those organisms are listed as well. The author also includes several databases that are still under development - including some ambitious efforts that go beyond data compilation to create what are being called electronic research communities, enabling many users, rather than just one or a few curators, to add or edit the data and tag it as raw or confirmed.

  19. Genome Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Verma, Mansi; Kulshrestha, Samarth; Puri, Ayush

    2017-01-01

    Genome sequencing is an important step toward correlating genotypes with phenotypic characters. Sequencing technologies are important in many fields in the life sciences, including functional genomics, transcriptomics, oncology, evolutionary biology, forensic sciences, and many more. The era of sequencing has been divided into three generations. First generation sequencing involved sequencing by synthesis (Sanger sequencing) and sequencing by cleavage (Maxam-Gilbert sequencing). Sanger sequencing led to the completion of various genome sequences (including human) and provided the foundation for development of other sequencing technologies. Since then, various techniques have been developed which can overcome some of the limitations of Sanger sequencing. These techniques are collectively known as "Next-generation sequencing" (NGS), and are further classified into second and third generation technologies. Although NGS methods have many advantages in terms of speed, cost, and parallelism, the accuracy and read length of Sanger sequencing is still superior and has confined the use of NGS mainly to resequencing genomes. Consequently, there is a continuing need to develop improved real time sequencing techniques. This chapter reviews some of the options currently available and provides a generic workflow for sequencing a genome.

  20. Single genome amplification of proviral HIV-1 DNA from dried blood spot specimens collected during early infant screening programs in Lusaka, Zambia.

    PubMed

    Seu, Lillian; Mwape, Innocent; Guffey, M Bradford

    2014-07-01

    The ability to evaluate individual HIV-1 virions from the quasispecies of vertically infected infants was evaluated in a field setting at the Centre for Infectious Disease Research in Zambia. Infant heel-prick blood specimens were spotted onto dried blood spot (DBS) filter paper cards at government health clinics. Nucleic acid was extracted and used as a template for HIV-1 proviral DNA detection by a commercial Amplicor HIV-1 PCR test (Roche, version 1.5). On samples that tested positive by commercial diagnostic assay, amplification of DNA was performed using an in-house assay of the 5' and 3' region of the HIV-1 genome. Additionally, fragments covering 1200 nucleotides within pol (full length protease and partial reverse transcriptase) and 1400 nucleotides within env (variable 1-variable 5 region) were further analyzed by single genome amplification (SGA). In summary, we have demonstrated an in-house assay for amplifying the 5' and 3' proviral HIV-1 DNA as well as pol and env proviral DNA fragments from DBS cards collected and analyzed entirely in Zambia. In conclusion, this study shows the feasibility of utilizing DBS cards to amplify the whole proviral HIV-1 genome as well as perform SGA on key HIV-1 genes.

  1. Allerton III. Beyond livestock genomics.

    PubMed

    Hamernik, Debora L; Lewin, Harris A; Schook, Lawrence B

    2003-05-01

    Throughout the Allerton III Conference, several consistent research needs were identified across scientific disciplines. First, additional basic research is needed to identify genomic mechanisms and novel genes/proteins in a variety of tissues under different conditions. Second, expansion of the infrastructure of the scientific community is needed. This can best be accomplished by additional competitive grants programs for training grants, program project grants, and multidisciplinary research projects. Third, the need for improved tools for animal bioinformatics was emphasized. Fourth, competitive grants programs for extension/outreach efforts and application of genomic technologies to production systems are needed. Finally, efforts to publicize and document the benefits of animal genomics for improved human health and animal production systems to members of Congress and the general public should be enhanced.

  2. The Atlas Genome Assembly System

    PubMed Central

    Havlak, Paul; Chen, Rui; Durbin, K. James; Egan, Amy; Ren, Yanru; Song, Xing-Zhi; Weinstock, George M.; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2004-01-01

    Atlas is a suite of programs developed for assembly of genomes by a “combined approach” that uses DNA sequence reads from both BACs and whole-genome shotgun (WGS) libraries. The BAC clones afford advantages of localized assembly with reduced computational load, and provide a robust method for dealing with repeated sequences. Inclusion of WGS sequences facilitates use of different clone insert sizes and reduces data production costs. A core function of Atlas software is recruitment of WGS sequences into appropriate BACs based on sequence overlaps. Because construction of consensus sequences is from local assembly of these reads, only small (<0.1%) units of the genome are assembled at a time. Once assembled, each BAC is used to derive a genomic layout. This “sequence-based” growth of the genome map has greater precision than with non-sequence-based methods. Use of BACs allows correction of artifacts due to repeats at each stage of the process. This is aided by ancillary data such as BAC fingerprint, other genomic maps, and syntenic relations with other genomes. Atlas was used to assemble a draft DNA sequence of the rat genome; its major components including overlapper and split-scaffold are also being used in pure WGS projects. PMID:15060016

  3. Listeria Genomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabanes, Didier; Sousa, Sandra; Cossart, Pascale

    The opportunistic intracellular foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes has become a paradigm for the study of host-pathogen interactions and bacterial adaptation to mammalian hosts. Analysis of L. monocytogenes infection has provided considerable insight into how bacteria invade cells, move intracellularly, and disseminate in tissues, as well as tools to address fundamental processes in cell biology. Moreover, the vast amount of knowledge that has been gathered through in-depth comparative genomic analyses and in vivo studies makes L. monocytogenes one of the most well-studied bacterial pathogens. This chapter provides an overview of progress in the exploration of genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic data in Listeria spp. to understand genome evolution and diversity, as well as physiological aspects of metabolism used by bacteria when growing in diverse environments, in particular in infected hosts.

  4. Genome Improvement at JGI-HAGSC

    SciTech Connect

    Grimwood, Jane; Schmutz, Jeremy J.; Myers, Richard M.

    2012-03-03

    Since the completion of the sequencing of the human genome, the Joint Genome Institute (JGI) has rapidly expanded its scientific goals in several DOE mission-relevant areas. At the JGI-HAGSC, we have kept pace with this rapid expansion of projects with our focus on assessing, assembling, improving and finishing eukaryotic whole genome shotgun (WGS) projects for which the shotgun sequence is generated at the Production Genomic Facility (JGI-PGF). We follow this by combining the draft WGS with genomic resources generated at JGI-HAGSC or in collaborator laboratories (including BAC end sequences, genetic maps and FLcDNA sequences) to produce an improved draft sequence. For eukaryotic genomes important to the DOE mission, we then add further information from directed experiments to produce reference genomic sequences that are publicly available for any scientific researcher. Also, we have continued our program for producing BAC-based finished sequence, both for adding information to JGI genome projects and for small BAC-based sequencing projects proposed through any of the JGI sequencing programs. We have now built our computational expertise in WGS assembly and analysis and have moved eukaryotic genome assembly from the JGI-PGF to JGI-HAGSC. We have concentrated our assembly development work on large plant genomes and complex fungal and algal genomes.

  5. Fungal Genomics for Energy and Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2013-03-11

    Genomes of fungi relevant to energy and environment are in focus of the Fungal Genomic Program at the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI). One of its projects, the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts) by means of genome sequencing and analysis. New chapters of the Encyclopedia can be opened with user proposals to the JGI Community Sequencing Program (CSP). Another JGI project, the 1000 fungal genomes, explores fungal diversity on genome level at scale and is open for users to nominate new species for sequencing. Over 200 fungal genomes have been sequenced by JGI to date and released through MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a fungal web-portal, which integrates sequence and functional data with genome analysis tools for user community. Sequence analysis supported by functional genomics leads to developing parts list for complex systems ranging from ecosystems of biofuel crops to biorefineries. Recent examples of such parts suggested by comparative genomics and functional analysis in these areas are presented here.

  6. [RadGenomics project].

    PubMed

    Iwakawa, Mayumi; Imai, Takashi; Harada, Yoshinobu; Ban, Sadayuki; Michikawa, Yu-ichi; Saegusa, Kumiko; Sagara, Masasi; Tsuji, Atsushi; Noda, Shuhei; Ishikawa, Atsuko

    2002-08-01

    Human health conditions are largely determined by a complex interplay among genetic susceptibility, environmental factors, and aging. The RadGenomics project, which began in April 2001, promotes analysis of genes in response to irradiation, identification of their allelic variants in the human population, development of an effective procedure for quantitating individual radio-sensitivity, and analysis of the interrelationship between genetic heterogeneity and susceptibility to irradiation. Major groups of genes with which the project will concern itself include DNA repair genes, cell cycle genes, oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, genes for programmed cell death, genes for signal transduction, and genes for oxidative processes. The outcome of the RadGenomics project should lead to improved protocols for personalized radiotherapy and reduce the possible side effects of treatment. The project will contribute to future research on the molecular mechanisms of radiation sensitivity in humans and stimulate the development of new high-throughput technology for a broader application of the biological and medical sciences. Identification of functionally important polymorphisms in the radiation response genes may determine individual differences in sensitivity to radiation exposure. The staff members, who are specialists in a variety of fields including genome science, radiation biology, medical science, molecular biology, and bioinformatics, have come to the RadGenomics project from various universities, companies, and research institutes.

  7. Genome mapping

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Genome maps can be thought of much like road maps except that, instead of traversing across land, they traverse across the chromosomes of an organism. Genetic markers serve as landmarks along the chromosome and provide researchers information as to how close they may be to a gene or region of inter...

  8. Teaching residents genomic pathology: a novel approach for new technology.

    PubMed

    Haspel, Richard L

    2013-03-01

    Genomics-based diagnostics have become part of patient care. As pathologists have the expertise in clinical laboratory testing as well as access to patient samples, all genomic medicine is genomic pathology. This article will review the evidence that there is a critical need for pathology resident training in genomics. Several individual program curricula are described as well as the progress of the Training Residents in Genomics Working Group. This group has made significant advances toward developing, implementing, and evaluating a national curriculum in genomics for pathology residents. The novel approach of the Training Residents in Genomics Working Group can be used as a model for training pathology professionals in any new technology.

  9. The human genome project: Past, present, and future

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, J.D. )

    1990-04-06

    This article presents a short discussion of the development of the human genome program in the United States, a summary of the current status of the organization and administration of the National Institutes of Health component of the program, and some prospects for the future directions of the program and the applications of genome information.

  10. The Human Genome Project: Past, Present, and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, James D.

    1990-04-01

    This article presents a short discussion of the development of the human genome program in the United States, a summary of the current status of the organization and administration of the National Institutes of Health component of the program, and some prospects for the future directions of the program and the applications of genome information.

  11. The Human Genome Initiative of the Department of Energy

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    1988-01-01

    The structural characterization of genes and elucidation of their encoded functions have become a cornerstone of modern health research, biology and biotechnology. A genome program is an organized effort to locate and identify the functions of all the genes of an organism. Beginning with the DOE-sponsored, 1986 human genome workshop at Santa Fe, the value of broadly organized efforts supporting total genome characterization became a subject of intensive study. There is now national recognition that benefits will rapidly accrue from an effective scientific infrastructure for total genome research. In the US genome research is now receiving dedicated funds. Several other nations are implementing genome programs. Supportive infrastructure is being improved through both national and international cooperation. The Human Genome Initiative of the Department of Energy (DOE) is a focused program of Resource and Technology Development, with objectives of speeding and bringing economies to the national human genome effort. This report relates the origins and progress of the Initiative.

  12. The Human Genome Initiative of the Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect

    1988-01-01

    The structural characterization of genes and elucidation of their encoded functions have become a cornerstone of modern health research, biology and biotechnology. A genome program is an organized effort to locate and identify the functions of all the genes of an organism. Beginning with the DOE-sponsored, 1986 human genome workshop at Santa Fe, the value of broadly organized efforts supporting total genome characterization became a subject of intensive study. There is now national recognition that benefits will rapidly accrue from an effective scientific infrastructure for total genome research. In the US genome research is now receiving dedicated funds. Several other nations are implementing genome programs. Supportive infrastructure is being improved through both national and international cooperation. The Human Genome Initiative of the Department of Energy (DOE) is a focused program of Resource and Technology Development, with objectives of speeding and bringing economies to the national human genome effort. This report relates the origins and progress of the Initiative. 34 refs.

  13. Fueling the Future with Fungal Genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2014-10-27

    Genomes of fungi relevant to energy and environment are in focus of the JGI Fungal Genomic Program. One of its projects, the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts and pathogens) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation and sugar fermentation) by means of genome sequencing and analysis. New chapters of the Encyclopedia can be opened with user proposals to the JGI Community Science Program (CSP). Another JGI project, the 1000 fungal genomes, explores fungal diversity on genome level at scale and is open for users to nominate new species for sequencing. Over 400 fungal genomes have been sequenced by JGI to date and released through MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a fungal web-portal, which integrates sequence and functional data with genome analysis tools for user community. Sequence analysis supported by functional genomics will lead to developing parts list for complex systems ranging from ecosystems of biofuel crops to biorefineries. Recent examples of such ‘parts’ suggested by comparative genomics and functional analysis in these areas are presented here.

  14. Personal genomics services: whose genomes?

    PubMed Central

    Gurwitz, David; Bregman-Eschet, Yael

    2009-01-01

    New companies offering personal whole-genome information services over the internet are dynamic and highly visible players in the personal genomics field. For fees currently ranging from US$399 to US$2500 and a vial of saliva, individuals can now purchase online access to their individual genetic information regarding susceptibility to a range of chronic diseases and phenotypic traits based on a genome-wide SNP scan. Most of the companies offering such services are based in the United States, but their clients may come from nearly anywhere in the world. Although the scientific validity, clinical utility and potential future implications of such services are being hotly debated, several ethical and regulatory questions related to direct-to-consumer (DTC) marketing strategies of genetic tests have not yet received sufficient attention. For example, how can we minimize the risk of unauthorized third parties from submitting other people's DNA for testing? Another pressing question concerns the ownership of (genotypic and phenotypic) information, as well as the unclear legal status of customers regarding their own personal information. Current legislation in the US and Europe falls short of providing clear answers to these questions. Until the regulation of personal genomics services catches up with the technology, we call upon commercial providers to self-regulate and coordinate their activities to minimize potential risks to individual privacy. We also point out some specific steps, along the trustee model, that providers of DTC personal genomics services as well as regulators and policy makers could consider for addressing some of the concerns raised below. PMID:19259127

  15. Citrus Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Talon, Manuel; Gmitter Jr., Fred G.

    2008-01-01

    Citrus is one of the most widespread fruit crops globally, with great economic and health value. It is among the most difficult plants to improve through traditional breeding approaches. Currently, there is risk of devastation by diseases threatening to limit production and future availability to the human population. As technologies rapidly advance in genomic science, they are quickly adapted to address the biological challenges of the citrus plant system and the world's industries. The historical developments of linkage mapping, markers and breeding, EST projects, physical mapping, an international citrus genome sequencing project, and critical functional analysis are described. Despite the challenges of working with citrus, there has been substantial progress. Citrus researchers engaged in international collaborations provide optimism about future productivity and contributions to the benefit of citrus industries worldwide and to the human population who can rely on future widespread availability of this health-promoting and aesthetically pleasing fruit crop. PMID:18509486

  16. Imaging genomics.

    PubMed

    Hariri, Ahmad R; Weinberger, Daniel R

    2003-01-01

    The recent completion of a working draft of the human genome sequence promises to provide unprecedented opportunities to explore the genetic basis of individual differences in complex behaviours and vulnerability to neuropsychiatric illness. Functional neuroimaging, because of its unique ability to assay information processing at the level of brain within individuals, provides a powerful approach to such functional genomics. Recent fMRI studies have established important physiological links between functional genetic polymorphisms and robust differences in information processing within distinct brain regions and circuits that have been linked to the manifestation of various disease states such as Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia and anxiety disorders. Importantly, all of these biological relationships have been revealed in relatively small samples of healthy volunteers and in the absence of observable differences at the level of behaviour, underscoring the power of a direct assay of brain physiology like fMRI in exploring the functional impact of genetic variation.

  17. Genome Annotation Transfer Utility (GATU): rapid annotation of viral genomes using a closely related reference genome.

    PubMed

    Tcherepanov, Vasily; Ehlers, Angelika; Upton, Chris

    2006-06-13

    Since DNA sequencing has become easier and cheaper, an increasing number of closely related viral genomes have been sequenced. However, many of these have been deposited in GenBank without annotations, severely limiting their value to researchers. While maintaining comprehensive genomic databases for a set of virus families at the Viral Bioinformatics Resource Center http://www.biovirus.org and Viral Bioinformatics - Canada http://www.virology.ca, we found that researchers were unnecessarily spending time annotating viral genomes that were close relatives of already annotated viruses. We have therefore designed and implemented a novel tool, Genome Annotation Transfer Utility (GATU), to transfer annotations from a previously annotated reference genome to a new target genome, thereby greatly reducing this laborious task. GATU transfers annotations from a reference genome to a closely related target genome, while still giving the user final control over which annotations should be included. GATU also detects open reading frames present in the target but not the reference genome and provides the user with a variety of bioinformatics tools to quickly determine if these ORFs should also be included in the annotation. After this process is complete, GATU saves the newly annotated genome as a GenBank, EMBL or XML-format file. The software is coded in Java and runs on a variety of computer platforms. Its user-friendly Graphical User Interface is specifically designed for users trained in the biological sciences. GATU greatly simplifies the initial stages of genome annotation by using a closely related genome as a reference. It is not intended to be a gene prediction tool or a "complete" annotation system, but we have found that it significantly reduces the time required for annotation of genes and mature peptides as well as helping to standardize gene names between related organisms by transferring reference genome annotations to the target genome. The program is freely

  18. Ancient genomics

    PubMed Central

    Der Sarkissian, Clio; Allentoft, Morten E.; Ávila-Arcos, María C.; Barnett, Ross; Campos, Paula F.; Cappellini, Enrico; Ermini, Luca; Fernández, Ruth; da Fonseca, Rute; Ginolhac, Aurélien; Hansen, Anders J.; Jónsson, Hákon; Korneliussen, Thorfinn; Margaryan, Ashot; Martin, Michael D.; Moreno-Mayar, J. Víctor; Raghavan, Maanasa; Rasmussen, Morten; Velasco, Marcela Sandoval; Schroeder, Hannes; Schubert, Mikkel; Seguin-Orlando, Andaine; Wales, Nathan; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Willerslev, Eske; Orlando, Ludovic

    2015-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed a revolution in ancient DNA (aDNA) research. Although the field's focus was previously limited to mitochondrial DNA and a few nuclear markers, whole genome sequences from the deep past can now be retrieved. This breakthrough is tightly connected to the massive sequence throughput of next generation sequencing platforms and the ability to target short and degraded DNA molecules. Many ancient specimens previously unsuitable for DNA analyses because of extensive degradation can now successfully be used as source materials. Additionally, the analytical power obtained by increasing the number of sequence reads to billions effectively means that contamination issues that have haunted aDNA research for decades, particularly in human studies, can now be efficiently and confidently quantified. At present, whole genomes have been sequenced from ancient anatomically modern humans, archaic hominins, ancient pathogens and megafaunal species. Those have revealed important functional and phenotypic information, as well as unexpected adaptation, migration and admixture patterns. As such, the field of aDNA has entered the new era of genomics and has provided valuable information when testing specific hypotheses related to the past. PMID:25487338

  19. Ancient genomics.

    PubMed

    Der Sarkissian, Clio; Allentoft, Morten E; Ávila-Arcos, María C; Barnett, Ross; Campos, Paula F; Cappellini, Enrico; Ermini, Luca; Fernández, Ruth; da Fonseca, Rute; Ginolhac, Aurélien; Hansen, Anders J; Jónsson, Hákon; Korneliussen, Thorfinn; Margaryan, Ashot; Martin, Michael D; Moreno-Mayar, J Víctor; Raghavan, Maanasa; Rasmussen, Morten; Velasco, Marcela Sandoval; Schroeder, Hannes; Schubert, Mikkel; Seguin-Orlando, Andaine; Wales, Nathan; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Willerslev, Eske; Orlando, Ludovic

    2015-01-19

    The past decade has witnessed a revolution in ancient DNA (aDNA) research. Although the field's focus was previously limited to mitochondrial DNA and a few nuclear markers, whole genome sequences from the deep past can now be retrieved. This breakthrough is tightly connected to the massive sequence throughput of next generation sequencing platforms and the ability to target short and degraded DNA molecules. Many ancient specimens previously unsuitable for DNA analyses because of extensive degradation can now successfully be used as source materials. Additionally, the analytical power obtained by increasing the number of sequence reads to billions effectively means that contamination issues that have haunted aDNA research for decades, particularly in human studies, can now be efficiently and confidently quantified. At present, whole genomes have been sequenced from ancient anatomically modern humans, archaic hominins, ancient pathogens and megafaunal species. Those have revealed important functional and phenotypic information, as well as unexpected adaptation, migration and admixture patterns. As such, the field of aDNA has entered the new era of genomics and has provided valuable information when testing specific hypotheses related to the past.

  20. The human genome project and international health

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, J.D.; Cook-Deegan, R.M. )

    1990-06-27

    The human genome project is designed to provide common resources for the study of human genetics, and to assist biomedical researchers in their assault on disease. The main benefit will be to provide several kinds of maps of the human genome, and those of other organisms, to permit rapid isolation of genes for further study about DNA structure and function. This article describes genome research programs in developed and developing countries, and the international efforts that have contributed to genome research programs. For example, the large-scale collaborations to study Duchenne's muscular dystrophy, Huntington's disease, Alzheimer's disease, cystic fibrosis involve collaborators from many nations and families spread throughout the world. In the USA, the US Department of Energy was first to start a dedicated genome research program in 1987. Since then, another major government program has begun at the National Center for Human Genome Research of the National Institutes of Health. Italy, China, Australia, France, Canada, and Japan have genome research programs also.

  1. An alternative approach to multiple genome comparison.

    PubMed

    Mancheron, Alban; Uricaru, Raluca; Rivals, Eric

    2011-08-01

    Genome comparison is now a crucial step for genome annotation and identification of regulatory motifs. Genome comparison aims for instance at finding genomic regions either specific to or in one-to-one correspondence between individuals/strains/species. It serves e.g. to pre-annotate a new genome by automatically transferring annotations from a known one. However, efficiency, flexibility and objectives of current methods do not suit the whole spectrum of applications, genome sizes and organizations. Innovative approaches are still needed. Hence, we propose an alternative way of comparing multiple genomes based on segmentation by similarity. In this framework, rather than being formulated as a complex optimization problem, genome comparison is seen as a segmentation question for which a single optimal solution can be found in almost linear time. We apply our method to analyse three strains of a virulent pathogenic bacteria, Ehrlichia ruminantium, and identify 92 new genes. We also find out that a substantial number of genes thought to be strain specific have potential orthologs in the other strains. Our solution is implemented in an efficient program, qod, equipped with a user-friendly interface, and enables the automatic transfer of annotations between compared genomes or contigs (Video in Supplementary Data). Because it somehow disregards the relative order of genomic blocks, qod can handle unfinished genomes, which due to the difficulty of sequencing completion may become an interesting characteristic for the future. Availabilty: http://www.atgc-montpellier.fr/qod.

  2. TGF-β Stimulation of EMT Programs Elicits Non-genomic ER-α Activity and Anti-estrogen Resistance in Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Tian, Maozhen; Schiemann, William P

    2017-01-01

    Estrogen receptor-α (ER-α) activation drives the progression of luminal breast cancers. Signaling by transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) typically opposes the actions of ER-α; it also induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) programs that promote breast cancer dissemination, stemness, and chemoresistance. The impact of EMT programs on nongenomic ER-α signaling remains unknown and was studied herein. MCF-7 and BT474 cells were stimulated with TGF-β to induce EMT programs, at which point ER-α expression, localization, and nongenomic interactions with receptor tyrosine kinases and MAP kinases (MAPKs) were determined. Cell sensitivity to anti-estrogens both before and after traversing the EMT program was also investigated. TGF-β stimulated MCF-7 and BT474 cells to acquire EMT phenotypes, which enhanced cytoplasmic accumulation of ER-α without altering its expression. Post-EMT cells exhibited (i) elevated expression of EGFR and IGF1R, which together with Src formed cytoplasmic complexes with ER-α; (ii) enhanced coupling of EGF, IGF-1 and estrogen to the activation of MAPKs; and (iii) reduced sensitivity to tamoxifen, an event reversed by administration of small molecule inhibitors against the receptors for TGF-β, EGF, and IGF-1, as well as those against MAPKs. EMT stimulated by TGF-β promotes anti-estrogen resistance by activating EGFR-, IGF1R-, and MAPK-dependent nongenomic ER-α signaling.

  3. Jean C. Zenklusen, M.S., Ph.D., Discusses the NCI Genomics Data Commons at AACR 2014 - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    At the AACR 2014 meeting, Dr. Jean C. Zenklusen, Director of The Cancer Genome Atlas Program Office, highlights the Genomics Data Commons, a harmonized data repository that will allow simultaneous access and analysis of NCI genomics data, including The Ca

  4. The development of genomics applied to dairy breeding

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Genomic selection (GS) has profoundly changed dairy cattle breeding in the last decade and can be defined as the use of genomic breeding values (GEBV) in selection programs. The GEBV is the sum of the effects of dense DNA markers across the whole genome, capturing all the quantitative trait loci (QT...

  5. Genomic selection in wheat using genotyping-by-sequencing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Genomic selection (GS) is a promising approach to accelerate gain in plant breeding programs. In GS, genome-wide molecular markers are used to predict total breeding values and make selections of individuals or breeding lines prior to phenotyping. One premise of applying GS is that low-cost genome...

  6. inGeno – an integrated genome and ortholog viewer for improved genome to genome comparisons

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Chunguang; Dandekar, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Background Systematic genome comparisons are an important tool to reveal gene functions, pathogenic features, metabolic pathways and genome evolution in the era of post-genomics. Furthermore, such comparisons provide important clues for vaccines and drug development. Existing genome comparison software often lacks accurate information on orthologs, the function of similar genes identified and genome-wide reports and lists on specific functions. All these features and further analyses are provided here in the context of a modular software tool "inGeno" written in Java with Biojava subroutines. Results InGeno provides a user-friendly interactive visualization platform for sequence comparisons (comprehensive reciprocal protein – protein comparisons) between complete genome sequences and all associated annotations and features. The comparison data can be acquired from several different sequence analysis programs in flexible formats. Automatic dot-plot analysis includes output reduction, filtering, ortholog testing and linear regression, followed by smart clustering (local collinear blocks; LCBs) to reveal similar genome regions. Further, the system provides genome alignment and visualization editor, collinear relationships and strain-specific islands. Specific annotations and functions are parsed, recognized, clustered, logically concatenated and visualized and summarized in reports. Conclusion As shown in this study, inGeno can be applied to study and compare in particular prokaryotic genomes against each other (gram positive and negative as well as close and more distantly related species) and has been proven to be sensitive and accurate. This modular software is user-friendly and easily accommodates new routines to meet specific user-defined requirements. PMID:17054788

  7. gmos: Rapid Detection of Genome Mosaicism over Short Evolutionary Distances

    PubMed Central

    Domazet-Lošo, Mirjana; Domazet-Lošo, Tomislav

    2016-01-01

    Prokaryotic and viral genomes are often altered by recombination and horizontal gene transfer. The existing methods for detecting recombination are primarily aimed at viral genomes or sets of loci, since the expensive computation of underlying statistical models often hinders the comparison of complete prokaryotic genomes. As an alternative, alignment-free solutions are more efficient, but cannot map (align) a query to subject genomes. To address this problem, we have developed gmos (Genome MOsaic Structure), a new program that determines the mosaic structure of query genomes when compared to a set of closely related subject genomes. The program first computes local alignments between query and subject genomes and then reconstructs the query mosaic structure by choosing the best local alignment for each query region. To accomplish the analysis quickly, the program mostly relies on pairwise alignments and constructs multiple sequence alignments over short overlapping subject regions only when necessary. This fine-tuned implementation achieves an efficiency comparable to an alignment-free tool. The program performs well for simulated and real data sets of closely related genomes and can be used for fast recombination detection; for instance, when a new prokaryotic pathogen is discovered. As an example, gmos was used to detect genome mosaicism in a pathogenic Enterococcus faecium strain compared to seven closely related genomes. The analysis took less than two minutes on a single 2.1 GHz processor. The output is available in fasta format and can be visualized using an accessory program, gmosDraw (freely available with gmos). PMID:27846272

  8. gmos: Rapid Detection of Genome Mosaicism over Short Evolutionary Distances.

    PubMed

    Domazet-Lošo, Mirjana; Domazet-Lošo, Tomislav

    2016-01-01

    Prokaryotic and viral genomes are often altered by recombination and horizontal gene transfer. The existing methods for detecting recombination are primarily aimed at viral genomes or sets of loci, since the expensive computation of underlying statistical models often hinders the comparison of complete prokaryotic genomes. As an alternative, alignment-free solutions are more efficient, but cannot map (align) a query to subject genomes. To address this problem, we have developed gmos (Genome MOsaic Structure), a new program that determines the mosaic structure of query genomes when compared to a set of closely related subject genomes. The program first computes local alignments between query and subject genomes and then reconstructs the query mosaic structure by choosing the best local alignment for each query region. To accomplish the analysis quickly, the program mostly relies on pairwise alignments and constructs multiple sequence alignments over short overlapping subject regions only when necessary. This fine-tuned implementation achieves an efficiency comparable to an alignment-free tool. The program performs well for simulated and real data sets of closely related genomes and can be used for fast recombination detection; for instance, when a new prokaryotic pathogen is discovered. As an example, gmos was used to detect genome mosaicism in a pathogenic Enterococcus faecium strain compared to seven closely related genomes. The analysis took less than two minutes on a single 2.1 GHz processor. The output is available in fasta format and can be visualized using an accessory program, gmosDraw (freely available with gmos).

  9. Developing Breast Cancer Program at Xavier; Genomic and Proteomic Analysis of Signaling Pathways Involved in Xenohormone and MEK5 Regulation of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    relatively high. The second part of the program aims to increase the number of faculty at XU involved in BC research by supporting two junior faculty...included isomers and metabolites of DDT and methoxychlor. Each are known to have weak estrogen, androgen and/or progesterone activity. A series of...what genes are unique to each treatment. Due to the close structure relationship to DDT type pesticides, bisphenol A, a component of some plastics

  10. Developing Breast Cancer Program at Xavier; Genomic and Proteomic Analysis of Signaling Pathways Involved in Xenohormone and MEK5 Regulation of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    pesticide exposure is relatively high. The second part of the program aims to increase the number of faculty at XU involved in BC research by supporting two...included isomers and metabolites of DDT and methoxychlor. Each are known to have weak estrogen, androgen and/or progesterone activity. A series...what genes are unique to each treatment. Due to the close structure relationship to DDT type pesticides, bisphenol A, a component of some plastics

  11. A pilot examination of the genome-wide DNA methylation signatures of subjects entering and exiting short-term alcohol dependence treatment programs

    PubMed Central

    Philibert, Robert A; Penaluna, Brandan; White, Teresa; Shires, Sarah; Gunter, Tracy; Liesveld, Jill; Erwin, Cheryl; Hollenbeck, Nancy; Osborn, Terry

    2014-01-01

    Alcoholism has a profound impact on millions of people throughout the world. However, the ability to determine if a patient needs treatment is hindered by reliance on self-reporting and the clinician’s capability to monitor the patient’s response to treatment is challenged by the lack of reliable biomarkers. Using a genome-wide approach, we have previously shown that chronic alcohol use is associated with methylation changes in DNA from human cell lines. In this pilot study, we now examine DNA methylation in peripheral mononuclear cell DNA gathered from subjects as they enter and leave short-term alcohol treatment. When compared with abstinent controls, subjects with heavy alcohol use show widespread changes in DNA methylation that have a tendency to reverse with abstinence. Pathway analysis demonstrates that these changes map to gene networks involved in apoptosis. There is no significant overlap of the alcohol signature with the methylation signature previously derived for smoking. We conclude that DNA methylation may have future clinical utility in assessing acute alcohol use status and monitoring treatment response. PMID:25147915

  12. Teaching strategies to incorporate genomics education into academic nursing curricula.

    PubMed

    Quevedo Garcia, Sylvia P; Greco, Karen E; Loescher, Lois J

    2011-11-01

    The translation of genomic science into health care has expanded our ability to understand the effects of genomics on human health and disease. As genomic advances continue, nurses are expected to have the knowledge and skills to translate genomic information into improved patient care. This integrative review describes strategies used to teach genomics in academic nursing programs and their facilitators and barriers to inclusion in nursing curricula. The Learning Engagement Model and the Diffusion of Innovations Theory guided the interpretation of findings. CINAHL, Medline, and Web of Science were resources for articles published during the past decade that included strategies for teaching genomics in academic nursing programs. Of 135 articles, 13 met criteria for review. Examples of effective genomics teaching strategies included clinical application through case studies, storytelling, online genomics resources, student self-assessment, guest lecturers, and a genetics focus group. Most strategies were not evaluated for effectiveness. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Genomics screens for metastasis genes

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jinchun; Huang, Qihong

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis is responsible for most cancer mortality. The process of metastasis is complex, requiring the coordinated expression and fine regulation of many genes in multiple pathways in both the tumor and host tissues. Identification and characterization of the genetic programs that regulate metastasis is critical to understanding the metastatic process and discovering molecular targets for the prevention and treatment of metastasis. Genomic approaches and functional genomic analyses can systemically discover metastasis genes. In this review, we summarize the genetic tools and methods that have been used to identify and characterize the genes that play critical roles in metastasis. PMID:22684367

  14. Developing Breast Cancer Program at Xavier; Genomic and Proteomic Analysis of Signaling Pathways Involved in Xenohormone and MEK5 Regulation of Breast

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-01

    relatively high. The second part of the program aims to increase the number of faculty at XU involved in BC research by supporting two junior faculty...metabolites of DDT and methoxychlor. Each are known to have weak estrogen, androgen and/or progesterone activity. A series of MCF-7...2.40* (2.262) 3.043* (2.120) From the data, it was determined that cells null for p23 were more susceptible to drugs. With this knowledge in hand

  15. The Oxytricha trifallax Macronuclear Genome: A Complex Eukaryotic Genome with 16,000 Tiny Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Swart, Estienne C.; Bracht, John R.; Magrini, Vincent; Minx, Patrick; Chen, Xiao; Zhou, Yi; Khurana, Jaspreet S.; Goldman, Aaron D.; Nowacki, Mariusz; Schotanus, Klaas; Jung, Seolkyoung; Fulton, Robert S.; Ly, Amy; McGrath, Sean; Haub, Kevin; Wiggins, Jessica L.; Storton, Donna; Matese, John C.; Parsons, Lance; Chang, Wei-Jen; Bowen, Michael S.; Stover, Nicholas A.; Jones, Thomas A.; Eddy, Sean R.; Herrick, Glenn A.; Doak, Thomas G.; Wilson, Richard K.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Landweber, Laura F.

    2013-01-01

    The macronuclear genome of the ciliate Oxytricha trifallax displays an extreme and unique eukaryotic genome architecture with extensive genomic variation. During sexual genome development, the expressed, somatic macronuclear genome is whittled down to the genic portion of a small fraction (∼5%) of its precursor “silent” germline micronuclear genome by a process of “unscrambling” and fragmentation. The tiny macronuclear “nanochromosomes” typically encode single, protein-coding genes (a small portion, 10%, encode 2–8 genes), have minimal noncoding regions, and are differentially amplified to an average of ∼2,000 copies. We report the high-quality genome assembly of ∼16,000 complete nanochromosomes (∼50 Mb haploid genome size) that vary from 469 bp to 66 kb long (mean ∼3.2 kb) and encode ∼18,500 genes. Alternative DNA fragmentation processes ∼10% of the nanochromosomes into multiple isoforms that usually encode complete genes. Nucleotide diversity in the macronucleus is very high (SNP heterozygosity is ∼4.0%), suggesting that Oxytricha trifallax may have one of the largest known effective population sizes of eukaryotes. Comparison to other ciliates with nonscrambled genomes and long macronuclear chromosomes (on the order of 100 kb) suggests several candidate proteins that could be involved in genome rearrangement, including domesticated MULE and IS1595-like DDE transposases. The assembly of the highly fragmented Oxytricha macronuclear genome is the first completed genome with such an unusual architecture. This genome sequence provides tantalizing glimpses into novel molecular biology and evolution. For example, Oxytricha maintains tens of millions of telomeres per cell and has also evolved an intriguing expansion of telomere end-binding proteins. In conjunction with the micronuclear genome in progress, the O. trifallax macronuclear genome will provide an invaluable resource for investigating programmed genome rearrangements, complementing

  16. Dissection of genomic correlation matrices using multivariate factor analysis in dairy and dual-purpose cattle breeds

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    SNP effects estimated in genomic selection programs allow for the prediction of direct genomic values (DGV) both at genome-wide and chromosomal level. As a consequence, genome-wide (G_GW) or chromosomal (G_CHR) correlation matrices between genomic predictions for different traits can be calculated. ...

  17. Whole Genome Sequencing

    MedlinePlus

    ... you want to learn. Search form Search Whole Genome Sequencing You are here Home Testing & Services Testing ... the full story, click here . What is whole genome sequencing? Whole genome sequencing is the mapping out ...

  18. The platypus genome unraveled.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Stephen J

    2008-06-13

    The genome of the platypus has been sequenced, assembled, and annotated by an international genomics team. Like the animal itself the platypus genome contains an amalgam of mammal, reptile, and bird-like features.

  19. Building International Genomics Collaboration for Global Health Security

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Helen H.; Erkkila, Tracy; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Vuyisich, Momchilo

    2015-01-01

    Genome science and technologies are transforming life sciences globally in many ways and becoming a highly desirable area for international collaboration to strengthen global health. The Genome Science Program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is leveraging a long history of expertise in genomics research to assist multiple partner nations in advancing their genomics and bioinformatics capabilities. The capability development objectives focus on providing a molecular genomics-based scientific approach for pathogen detection, characterization, and biosurveillance applications. The general approaches include introduction of basic principles in genomics technologies, training on laboratory methodologies and bioinformatic analysis of resulting data, procurement, and installation of next-generation sequencing instruments, establishing bioinformatics software capabilities, and exploring collaborative applications of the genomics capabilities in public health. Genome centers have been established with public health and research institutions in the Republic of Georgia, Kingdom of Jordan, Uganda, and Gabon; broader collaborations in genomics applications have also been developed with research institutions in many other countries. PMID:26697418

  20. Building international genomics collaboration for global health security

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Helen H.; Erkkila, Tracy; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Vuyisich, Momchilo

    2015-12-07

    Genome science and technologies are transforming life sciences globally in many ways and becoming a highly desirable area for international collaboration to strengthen global health. The Genome Science Program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is leveraging a long history of expertise in genomics research to assist multiple partner nations in advancing their genomics and bioinformatics capabilities. The capability development objectives focus on providing a molecular genomics-based scientific approach for pathogen detection, characterization, and biosurveillance applications. The general approaches include introduction of basic principles in genomics technologies, training on laboratory methodologies and bioinformatic analysis of resulting data, procurement, and installation of next-generation sequencing instruments, establishing bioinformatics software capabilities, and exploring collaborative applications of the genomics capabilities in public health. Genome centers have been established with public health and research institutions in the Republic of Georgia, Kingdom of Jordan, Uganda, and Gabon; broader collaborations in genomics applications have also been developed with research institutions in many other countries.

  1. Building International Genomics Collaboration for Global Health Security.

    PubMed

    Cui, Helen H; Erkkila, Tracy; Chain, Patrick S G; Vuyisich, Momchilo

    2015-01-01

    Genome science and technologies are transforming life sciences globally in many ways and becoming a highly desirable area for international collaboration to strengthen global health. The Genome Science Program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is leveraging a long history of expertise in genomics research to assist multiple partner nations in advancing their genomics and bioinformatics capabilities. The capability development objectives focus on providing a molecular genomics-based scientific approach for pathogen detection, characterization, and biosurveillance applications. The general approaches include introduction of basic principles in genomics technologies, training on laboratory methodologies and bioinformatic analysis of resulting data, procurement, and installation of next-generation sequencing instruments, establishing bioinformatics software capabilities, and exploring collaborative applications of the genomics capabilities in public health. Genome centers have been established with public health and research institutions in the Republic of Georgia, Kingdom of Jordan, Uganda, and Gabon; broader collaborations in genomics applications have also been developed with research institutions in many other countries.

  2. Genome evolution: the dynamics of static genomes.

    PubMed

    Stechmann, Alexandra

    2004-06-22

    A random survey of a microsporidian genome has revealed some striking features. Although the genomes of microsporidians are among the smallest known for eukaryotes, their organisation appears to be well conserved.

  3. Genome cartography: charting the apicomplexan genome.

    PubMed

    Kissinger, Jessica C; DeBarry, Jeremy

    2011-08-01

    Genes reside in particular genomic contexts that can be mapped at many levels. Historically, 'genetic maps' were used primarily to locate genes. Recent technological advances in the determination of genome sequences have made the analysis and comparison of whole genomes possible and increasingly tractable. What do we see if we shift our focus from gene content (the 'inventory' of genes contained within a genome) to the composition and organization of a genome? This review examines what has been learned about the evolution of the apicomplexan genome as well as the significance and impact of genomic location on our understanding of the eukaryotic genome and parasite biology. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Genomic selection requires genomic control of inbreeding.

    PubMed

    Sonesson, Anna K; Woolliams, John A; Meuwissen, Theo H E

    2012-08-16

    In the past, pedigree relationships were used to control and monitor inbreeding because genomic relationships among selection candidates were not available until recently. The aim of this study was to understand the consequences for genetic variability across the genome when genomic information is used to estimate breeding values and in managing the inbreeding generated in the course of selection on genome-enhanced estimated breeding values. These consequences were measured by genetic gain, pedigree- and genome-based rates of inbreeding, and local inbreeding across the genome. Breeding schemes were compared by simulating truncation selection or optimum contribution selection with a restriction on pedigree- or genome-based inbreeding, and with selection using estimated breeding values based on genome- or pedigree-based BLUP. Trait information was recorded on full-sibs of the candidates. When the information used to estimate breeding values and to constrain rates of inbreeding were either both pedigree-based or both genome-based, rates of genomic inbreeding were close to the desired values and the identical-by-descent profiles were reasonably uniform across the genome. However, with a pedigree-based inbreeding constraint and genome-based estimated breeding values, genomic rates of inbreeding were much higher than expected. With pedigree-instead of genome-based estimated breeding values, the impact of the largest QTL on the breeding values was much smaller, resulting in a more uniform genome-wide identical-by-descent profile but genomic rates of inbreeding were still higher than expected based on pedigree relationships, because they measure the inbreeding at a neutral locus not linked to any QTL. Neutral loci did not exist here, where there were 100 QTL on each chromosome. With a pedigree-based inbreeding constraint and genome-based estimated breeding values, genomic rates of inbreeding substantially exceeded the value of its constraint. In contrast, with a genome

  5. Plant Genome Duplication Database.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tae-Ho; Kim, Junah; Robertson, Jon S; Paterson, Andrew H

    2017-01-01

    Genome duplication, widespread in flowering plants, is a driving force in evolution. Genome alignments between/within genomes facilitate identification of homologous regions and individual genes to investigate evolutionary consequences of genome duplication. PGDD (the Plant Genome Duplication Database), a public web service database, provides intra- or interplant genome alignment information. At present, PGDD contains information for 47 plants whose genome sequences have been released. Here, we describe methods for identification and estimation of dates of genome duplication and speciation by functions of PGDD.The database is freely available at http://chibba.agtec.uga.edu/duplication/.

  6. Ensembl genomes 2016: more genomes, more complexity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ensembl Genomes (http://www.ensemblgenomes.org) is an integrating resource for genome-scale data from non-vertebrate species, complementing the resources for vertebrate genomics developed in the context of the Ensembl project (http://www.ensembl.org). Together, the two resources provide a consistent...

  7. Ensembl Genomes 2016: more genomes, more complexity.

    PubMed

    Kersey, Paul Julian; Allen, James E; Armean, Irina; Boddu, Sanjay; Bolt, Bruce J; Carvalho-Silva, Denise; Christensen, Mikkel; Davis, Paul; Falin, Lee J; Grabmueller, Christoph; Humphrey, Jay; Kerhornou, Arnaud; Khobova, Julia; Aranganathan, Naveen K; Langridge, Nicholas; Lowy, Ernesto; McDowall, Mark D; Maheswari, Uma; Nuhn, Michael; Ong, Chuang Kee; Overduin, Bert; Paulini, Michael; Pedro, Helder; Perry, Emily; Spudich, Giulietta; Tapanari, Electra; Walts, Brandon; Williams, Gareth; Tello-Ruiz, Marcela; Stein, Joshua; Wei, Sharon; Ware, Doreen; Bolser, Daniel M; Howe, Kevin L; Kulesha, Eugene; Lawson, Daniel; Maslen, Gareth; Staines, Daniel M

    2016-01-04

    Ensembl Genomes (http://www.ensemblgenomes.org) is an integrating resource for genome-scale data from non-vertebrate species, complementing the resources for vertebrate genomics developed in the context of the Ensembl project (http://www.ensembl.org). Together, the two resources provide a consistent set of programmatic and interactive interfaces to a rich range of data including reference sequence, gene models, transcriptional data, genetic variation and comparative analysis. This paper provides an update to the previous publications about the resource, with a focus on recent developments. These include the development of new analyses and views to represent polyploid genomes (of which bread wheat is the primary exemplar); and the continued up-scaling of the resource, which now includes over 23 000 bacterial genomes, 400 fungal genomes and 100 protist genomes, in addition to 55 genomes from invertebrate metazoa and 39 genomes from plants. This dramatic increase in the number of included genomes is one part of a broader effort to automate the integration of archival data (genome sequence, but also associated RNA sequence data and variant calls) within the context of reference genomes and make it available through the Ensembl user interfaces.

  8. Ensembl Genomes 2016: more genomes, more complexity

    PubMed Central

    Kersey, Paul Julian; Allen, James E.; Armean, Irina; Boddu, Sanjay; Bolt, Bruce J.; Carvalho-Silva, Denise; Christensen, Mikkel; Davis, Paul; Falin, Lee J.; Grabmueller, Christoph; Humphrey, Jay; Kerhornou, Arnaud; Khobova, Julia; Aranganathan, Naveen K.; Langridge, Nicholas; Lowy, Ernesto; McDowall, Mark D.; Maheswari, Uma; Nuhn, Michael; Ong, Chuang Kee; Overduin, Bert; Paulini, Michael; Pedro, Helder; Perry, Emily; Spudich, Giulietta; Tapanari, Electra; Walts, Brandon; Williams, Gareth; Tello–Ruiz, Marcela; Stein, Joshua; Wei, Sharon; Ware, Doreen; Bolser, Daniel M.; Howe, Kevin L.; Kulesha, Eugene; Lawson, Daniel; Maslen, Gareth; Staines, Daniel M.

    2016-01-01

    Ensembl Genomes (http://www.ensemblgenomes.org) is an integrating resource for genome-scale data from non-vertebrate species, complementing the resources for vertebrate genomics developed in the context of the Ensembl project (http://www.ensembl.org). Together, the two resources provide a consistent set of programmatic and interactive interfaces to a rich range of data including reference sequence, gene models, transcriptional data, genetic variation and comparative analysis. This paper provides an update to the previous publications about the resource, with a focus on recent developments. These include the development of new analyses and views to represent polyploid genomes (of which bread wheat is the primary exemplar); and the continued up-scaling of the resource, which now includes over 23 000 bacterial genomes, 400 fungal genomes and 100 protist genomes, in addition to 55 genomes from invertebrate metazoa and 39 genomes from plants. This dramatic increase in the number of included genomes is one part of a broader effort to automate the integration of archival data (genome sequence, but also associated RNA sequence data and variant calls) within the context of reference genomes and make it available through the Ensembl user interfaces. PMID:26578574

  9. Transposable element junctions in marker development and genomic characterization of barley

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Barley is a model plant in genomic studies of Triticeae species. A complete barley genome sequence will facilitate not only barley breeding programs, but also those for related species. However, the large genome size and high repetitive sequence content complicate the barley genome assembly. The ma...

  10. 75 FR 2148 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Initial Review Group, Genome Research Review... Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS)...

  11. 75 FR 52537 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Initial Review Group; Genome Research Review... Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS)...

  12. 76 FR 3643 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Initial Review Group; Genome Research Review... Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: January 13...

  13. Comparative genomics of phylogenetically diverse unicellular eukaryotes provide new insights into the genetic basis for the evolution of the programmed cell death machinery.

    PubMed

    Nedelcu, Aurora M

    2009-03-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) represents a significant component of normal growth and development in multicellular organisms. Recently, PCD-like processes have been reported in single-celled eukaryotes, implying that some components of the PCD machinery existed early in eukaryotic evolution. This study provides a comparative analysis of PCD-related sequences across more than 50 unicellular genera from four eukaryotic supergroups: Unikonts, Excavata, Chromalveolata, and Plantae. A complex set of PCD-related sequences that correspond to domains or proteins associated with all main functional classes--from ligands and receptors to executors of PCD--was found in many unicellular lineages. Several PCD domains and proteins previously thought to be restricted to animals or land plants are also present in unicellular species. Noteworthy, the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae--used as an experimental model system for PCD research, has a rather reduced set of PCD-related sequences relative to other unicellular species. The phylogenetic distribution of the PCD-related sequences identified in unicellular lineages suggests that the genetic basis for the evolution of the complex PCD machinery present in extant multicellular lineages has been established early in the evolution of eukaryotes. The shaping of the PCD machinery in multicellular lineages involved the duplication, co-option, recruitment, and shuffling of domains already present in their unicellular ancestors.

  14. Funding Opportunity: Genomic Data Centers

    Cancer.gov

    Funding Opportunity CCG, Funding Opportunity Center for Cancer Genomics, CCG, Center for Cancer Genomics, CCG RFA, Center for cancer genomics rfa, genomic data analysis network, genomic data analysis network centers,

  15. Enabling functional genomics with genome engineering.

    PubMed

    Hilton, Isaac B; Gersbach, Charles A

    2015-10-01

    Advances in genome engineering technologies have made the precise control over genome sequence and regulation possible across a variety of disciplines. These tools can expand our understanding of fundamental biological processes and create new opportunities for therapeutic designs. The rapid evolution of these methods has also catalyzed a new era of genomics that includes multiple approaches to functionally characterize and manipulate the regulation of genomic information. Here, we review the recent advances of the most widely adopted genome engineering platforms and their application to functional genomics. This includes engineered zinc finger proteins, TALEs/TALENs, and the CRISPR/Cas9 system as nucleases for genome editing, transcription factors for epigenome editing, and other emerging applications. We also present current and potential future applications of these tools, as well as their current limitations and areas for future advances. © 2015 Hilton and Gersbach; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  16. Enabling functional genomics with genome engineering

    PubMed Central

    Hilton, Isaac B.; Gersbach, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in genome engineering technologies have made the precise control over genome sequence and regulation possible across a variety of disciplines. These tools can expand our understanding of fundamental biological processes and create new opportunities for therapeutic designs. The rapid evolution of these methods has also catalyzed a new era of genomics that includes multiple approaches to functionally characterize and manipulate the regulation of genomic information. Here, we review the recent advances of the most widely adopted genome engineering platforms and their application to functional genomics. This includes engineered zinc finger proteins, TALEs/TALENs, and the CRISPR/Cas9 system as nucleases for genome editing, transcription factors for epigenome editing, and other emerging applications. We also present current and potential future applications of these tools, as well as their current limitations and areas for future advances. PMID:26430154

  17. Navigating yeast genome maintenance with functional genomics.

    PubMed

    Measday, Vivien; Stirling, Peter C

    2016-03-01

    Maintenance of genome integrity is a fundamental requirement of all organisms. To address this, organisms have evolved extremely faithful modes of replication, DNA repair and chromosome segregation to combat the deleterious effects of an unstable genome. Nonetheless, a small amount of genome instability is the driver of evolutionary change and adaptation, and thus a low level of instability is permitted in populations. While defects in genome maintenance almost invariably reduce fitness in the short term, they can create an environment where beneficial mutations are more likely to occur. The importance of this fact is clearest in the development of human cancer, where genome instability is a well-established enabling characteristic of carcinogenesis. This raises the crucial question: what are the cellular pathways that promote genome maintenance and what are their mechanisms? Work in model organisms, in particular the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has provided the global foundations of genome maintenance mechanisms in eukaryotes. The development of pioneering genomic tools inS. cerevisiae, such as the systematic creation of mutants in all nonessential and essential genes, has enabled whole-genome approaches to identifying genes with roles in genome maintenance. Here, we review the extensive whole-genome approaches taken in yeast, with an emphasis on functional genomic screens, to understand the genetic basis of genome instability, highlighting a range of genetic and cytological screening modalities. By revealing the biological pathways and processes regulating genome integrity, these analyses contribute to the systems-level map of the yeast cell and inform studies of human disease, especially cancer. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Culex genome is not just another genome for comparative genomics.

    PubMed

    Reddy, B P Niranjan; Labbé, Pierrick; Corbel, Vincent

    2012-03-30

    Formal publication of the Culex genome sequence has closed the human disease vector triangle by meeting the Anopheles gambiae and Aedes aegypti genome sequences. Compared to these other mosquitoes, Culex quinquefasciatus possesses many specific hallmark characteristics, and may thus provide different angles for research which ultimately leads to a practical solution for controlling the ever increasing burden of insect-vector-borne diseases around the globe. We argue the special importance of the cosmopolitan species- Culex genome sequence by invoking many interesting questions and the possible of potential of the Culex genome to answer those.

  19. Culex genome is not just another genome for comparative genomics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Formal publication of the Culex genome sequence has closed the human disease vector triangle by meeting the Anopheles gambiae and Aedes aegypti genome sequences. Compared to these other mosquitoes, Culex quinquefasciatus possesses many specific hallmark characteristics, and may thus provide different angles for research which ultimately leads to a practical solution for controlling the ever increasing burden of insect-vector-borne diseases around the globe. We argue the special importance of the cosmopolitan species- Culex genome sequence by invoking many interesting questions and the possible of potential of the Culex genome to answer those. PMID:22463777

  20. GenomeFingerprinter: the genome fingerprint and the universal genome fingerprint analysis for systematic comparative genomics.

    PubMed

    Ai, Yuncan; Ai, Hannan; Meng, Fanmei; Zhao, Lei

    2013-01-01

    No attention has been paid on comparing a set of genome sequences crossing genetic components and biological categories with far divergence over large size range. We define it as the systematic comparative genomics and aim to develop the methodology. First, we create a method, GenomeFingerprinter, to unambiguously produce a set of three-dimensional coordinates from a sequence, followed by one three-dimensional plot and six two-dimensional trajectory projections, to illustrate the genome fingerprint of a given genome sequence. Second, we develop a set of concepts and tools, and thereby establish a method called the universal genome fingerprint analysis (UGFA). Particularly, we define the total genetic component configuration (TGCC) (including chromosome, plasmid, and phage) for describing a strain as a systematic unit, the universal genome fingerprint map (UGFM) of TGCC for differentiating strains as a universal system, and the systematic comparative genomics (SCG) for comparing a set of genomes crossing genetic components and biological categories. Third, we construct a method of quantitative analysis to compare two genomes by using the outcome dataset of genome fingerprint analysis. Specifically, we define the geometric center and its geometric mean for a given genome fingerprint map, followed by the Euclidean distance, the differentiate rate, and the weighted differentiate rate to quantitatively describe the difference between two genomes of comparison. Moreover, we demonstrate the applications through case studies on various genome sequences, giving tremendous insights into the critical issues in microbial genomics and taxonomy. We have created a method, GenomeFingerprinter, for rapidly computing, geometrically visualizing, intuitively comparing a set of genomes at genome fingerprint level, and hence established a method called the universal genome fingerprint analysis, as well as developed a method of quantitative analysis of the outcome dataset. These have set

  1. GenomeFingerprinter: The Genome Fingerprint and the Universal Genome Fingerprint Analysis for Systematic Comparative Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Yuncan; Ai, Hannan; Meng, Fanmei; Zhao, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Background No attention has been paid on comparing a set of genome sequences crossing genetic components and biological categories with far divergence over large size range. We define it as the systematic comparative genomics and aim to develop the methodology. Results First, we create a method, GenomeFingerprinter, to unambiguously produce a set of three-dimensional coordinates from a sequence, followed by one three-dimensional plot and six two-dimensional trajectory projections, to illustrate the genome fingerprint of a given genome sequence. Second, we develop a set of concepts and tools, and thereby establish a method called the universal genome fingerprint analysis (UGFA). Particularly, we define the total genetic component configuration (TGCC) (including chromosome, plasmid, and phage) for describing a strain as a systematic unit, the universal genome fingerprint map (UGFM) of TGCC for differentiating strains as a universal system, and the systematic comparative genomics (SCG) for comparing a set of genomes crossing genetic components and biological categories. Third, we construct a method of quantitative analysis to compare two genomes by using the outcome dataset of genome fingerprint analysis. Specifically, we define the geometric center and its geometric mean for a given genome fingerprint map, followed by the Euclidean distance, the differentiate rate, and the weighted differentiate rate to quantitatively describe the difference between two genomes of comparison. Moreover, we demonstrate the applications through case studies on various genome sequences, giving tremendous insights into the critical issues in microbial genomics and taxonomy. Conclusions We have created a method, GenomeFingerprinter, for rapidly computing, geometrically visualizing, intuitively comparing a set of genomes at genome fingerprint level, and hence established a method called the universal genome fingerprint analysis, as well as developed a method of quantitative analysis of the

  2. Exploring Other Genomes: Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura C.

    2001-01-01

    Points out the importance of genomes other than the human genome project and provides information on the identified bacterial genomes Pseudomonas aeuroginosa, Leprosy, Cholera, Meningitis, Tuberculosis, Bubonic Plague, and plant pathogens. Considers the computer's use in genome studies. (Contains 14 references.) (YDS)

  3. Exploring Other Genomes: Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura C.

    2001-01-01

    Points out the importance of genomes other than the human genome project and provides information on the identified bacterial genomes Pseudomonas aeuroginosa, Leprosy, Cholera, Meningitis, Tuberculosis, Bubonic Plague, and plant pathogens. Considers the computer's use in genome studies. (Contains 14 references.) (YDS)

  4. Genomics of apicomplexan parasites.

    PubMed

    Swapna, Lakshmipuram Seshadri; Parkinson, John

    2017-02-22

    The increasing prevalence of infections involving intracellular apicomplexan parasites such as Plasmodium, Toxoplasma, and Cryptosporidium (the causative agents of malaria, toxoplasmosis, and cryptosporidiosis, respectively) represent a significant global healthcare burden. Despite their significance, few treatments are available; a situation that is likely to deteriorate with the emergence of new resistant strains of parasites. To lay the foundation for programs of drug discovery and vaccine development, genome sequences for many of these organisms have been generated, together with large-scale expression and proteomic datasets. Comparative analyses of these datasets are beginning to identify the molecular innovations supporting both conserved processes mediating fundamental roles in parasite survival and persistence, as well as lineage-specific adaptations associated with divergent life-cycle strategies. The challenge is how best to exploit these data to derive insights into parasite virulence and identify those genes representing the most amenable targets. In this review, we outline genomic datasets currently available for apicomplexans and discuss biological insights that have emerged as a consequence of their analysis. Of particular interest are systems-based resources, focusing on areas of metabolism and host invasion that are opening up opportunities for discovering new therapeutic targets.

  5. Structure of the germline genome of Tetrahymena thermophila and relationship to the massively rearranged somatic genome.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Eileen P; Kapusta, Aurélie; Huvos, Piroska E; Bidwell, Shelby L; Zafar, Nikhat; Tang, Haibao; Hadjithomas, Michalis; Krishnakumar, Vivek; Badger, Jonathan H; Caler, Elisabet V; Russ, Carsten; Zeng, Qiandong; Fan, Lin; Levin, Joshua Z; Shea, Terrance; Young, Sarah K; Hegarty, Ryan; Daza, Riza; Gujja, Sharvari; Wortman, Jennifer R; Birren, Bruce W; Nusbaum, Chad; Thomas, Jainy; Carey, Clayton M; Pritham, Ellen J; Feschotte, Cédric; Noto, Tomoko; Mochizuki, Kazufumi; Papazyan, Romeo; Taverna, Sean D; Dear, Paul H; Cassidy-Hanley, Donna M; Xiong, Jie; Miao, Wei; Orias, Eduardo; Coyne, Robert S

    2016-11-28

    The germline genome of the binucleated ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila undergoes programmed chromosome breakage and massive DNA elimination to generate the somatic genome. Here, we present a complete sequence assembly of the germline genome and analyze multiple features of its structure and its relationship to the somatic genome, shedding light on the mechanisms of genome rearrangement as well as the evolutionary history of this remarkable germline/soma differentiation. Our results strengthen the notion that a complex, dynamic, and ongoing interplay between mobile DNA elements and the host genome have shaped Tetrahymena chromosome structure, locally and globally. Non-standard outcomes of rearrangement events, including the generation of short-lived somatic chromosomes and excision of DNA interrupting protein-coding regions, may represent novel forms of developmental gene regulation. We also compare Tetrahymena's germline/soma differentiation to that of other characterized ciliates, illustrating the wide diversity of adaptations that have occurred within this phylum.

  6. Genomic definition of species. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Crkvenjakov, R.; Drmanac, R.

    1993-03-01

    A genome is the sum total of the DNA sequences in the cells of an individual organism. The common usage that species possess genomes comes naturally to biochemists, who have shown that all protein and nucleic acid molecules are at the same time species- and individual-specific, with minor individual variations being superimposed on a consensus sequence that is constant for a species. By extension, this property is attributed to the common features of DNA in the chromosomes of members of a given species and is called species genome. Our proposal for the definition of a biological species is as follows: A species comprises a group of actual and potential biological organisms built according to a unique genome program that is recorded, and at least in part expressed, in the structures of their genomic nucleic acid molecule(s), having intragroup sequence differences which can be fully interconverted in the process of organismal reproduction.

  7. Emerging issues in public health genomics

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, J. Scott

    2014-01-01

    This review highlights emerging areas of interest in public health genomics. First, recent advances in newborn screening (NBS) are described, with a focus on practice and policy implications of current and future efforts to expand NBS programs (e.g., via next-generation sequencing). Next, research findings from the rapidly progressing field of epigenetics and epigenomics are detailed, highlighting ways in which our emerging understanding in these areas could guide future intervention and research efforts in public health. We close by considering various ethical, legal and social issues posed by recent developments in public health genomics; these include policies to regulate access to personal genomic information; the need to enhance genetic literacy in both health professionals and the public; and challenges in ensuring that the benefits (and burdens) from genomic discoveries and applications are equitably distributed. Needs for future genomics research that integrates across basic and social sciences are also noted. PMID:25184533

  8. Emerging issues in public health genomics.

    PubMed

    Roberts, J Scott; Dolinoy, Dana; Tarini, Beth

    2014-01-01

    This review highlights emerging areas of interest in public health genomics. First, we describe recent advances in newborn screening (NBS), with a focus on the practice and policy implications of current and future efforts to expand NBS programs (e.g., via next-generation sequencing). Next, we detail research findings from the rapidly progressing field of epigenetics and epigenomics, highlighting ways in which our emerging understanding in these areas could guide future intervention and research efforts in public health. We close by considering various ethical, legal, and social issues posed by recent developments in public health genomics; these include policies to regulate access to personal genomic information, the need to enhance genetic literacy in both health professionals and the public, and challenges in ensuring that the benefits (and burdens) of genomic discoveries and applications are equitably distributed. We also note needs for future genomic research that integrates across basic and social sciences.

  9. Exploiting the Genome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-11

    complete human genome sequence . 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF REPORT Unclassified 18. SECURITY...goal of the project is to ob- tain the complete sequence of the human genome by the year 2005. The genome contains approximately 3.3 Gb (billion base...and second, to consider possible roles for the DOE in the "post- genomic " era, following acquisition of the complete human genome

  10. The kangaroo genome

    PubMed Central

    Wakefield, Matthew J.; Graves, Jennifer A. Marshall

    2003-01-01

    The kangaroo genome is a rich and unique resource for comparative genomics. Marsupial genetics and cytology have made significant contributions to the understanding of gene function and evolution, and increasing the availability of kangaroo DNA sequence information would provide these benefits on a genomic scale. Here we summarize the contributions from cytogenetic and genetic studies of marsupials, describe the genomic resources currently available and those being developed, and explore the benefits of a kangaroo genome project. PMID:12612602

  11. MycoCosm, an Integrated Fungal Genomics Resource

    SciTech Connect

    Shabalov, Igor; Grigoriev, Igor

    2012-03-16

    MycoCosm is a web-based interactive fungal genomics resource, which was first released in March 2010, in response to an urgent call from the fungal community for integration of all fungal genomes and analytical tools in one place (Pan-fungal data resources meeting, Feb 21-22, 2010, Alexandria, VA). MycoCosm integrates genomics data and analysis tools to navigate through over 100 fungal genomes sequenced at JGI and elsewhere. This resource allows users to explore fungal genomes in the context of both genome-centric analysis and comparative genomics, and promotes user community participation in data submission, annotation and analysis. MycoCosm has over 4500 unique visitors/month or 35000+ visitors/year as well as hundreds of registered users contributing their data and expertise to this resource. Its scalable architecture allows significant expansion of the data expected from JGI Fungal Genomics Program, its users, and integration with external resources used by fungal community.

  12. Accelerating Genome Sequencing 100X with FPGAs

    SciTech Connect

    Storaasli, Olaf O; Strenski, Dave

    2007-01-01

    The performance of two Cray XD1 systems with Virtex-II Pro 50 and Virtex-4 LX160 FPGAs was evaluated using the FASTA computational biology program for human genome (DNA and protein) sequence comparisons. FPGA speedups of 50X (Virtex-II Pro 50) and 100X (Virtex-4 LX160) over a 2.2 GHz Opteron were obtained. FPGA coding issues for human genome data are described.

  13. GAAP: Genome-organization-framework-Assisted Assembly Pipeline for prokaryotic genomes.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lina; Yu, Yang; Zhu, Yanmin; Li, Yulai; Li, Changqing; Li, Rujiao; Ma, Qin; Siu, Gilman Kit-Hang; Yu, Jun; Jiang, Taijiao; Xiao, Jingfa; Kang, Yu

    2017-01-25

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have greatly promoted the genomic study of prokaryotes. However, highly fragmented assemblies due to short reads from NGS are still a limiting factor in gaining insights into the genome biology. Reference-assisted tools are promising in genome assembly, but tend to result in false assembly when the assigned reference has extensive rearrangements. Herein, we present GAAP, a genome assembly pipeline for scaffolding based on core-gene-defined Genome Organizational Framework (cGOF) described in our previous study. Instead of assigning references, we use the multiple-reference-derived cGOFs as indexes to assist in order and orientation of the scaffolds and build a skeleton structure, and then use read pairs to extend scaffolds, called local scaffolding, and distinguish between true and chimeric adjacencies in the scaffolds. In our performance tests using both empirical and simulated data of 15 genomes in six species with diverse genome size, complexity, and all three categories of cGOFs, GAAP outcompetes or achieves comparable results when compared to three other reference-assisted programs, AlignGraph, Ragout and MeDuSa. GAAP uses both cGOF and pair-end reads to create assemblies in genomic scale, and performs better than the currently available reference-assisted assembly tools as it recovers more assemblies and makes fewer false locations, especially for species with extensive rearranged genomes. Our method is a promising solution for reconstruction of genome sequence from short reads of NGS.

  14. A Genome-Wide Perspective on Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Rauch, Alexander; Mandrup, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Mammals have at least 210 histologically diverse cell types (Alberts, Molecular biology of the cell. Garland Science, New York, 2008) and the number would be even higher if functional differences are taken into account. The genome in each of these cell types is differentially programmed to express the specific set of genes needed to fulfill the phenotypical requirements of the cell. Furthermore, in each of these cell types, the gene program can be differentially modulated by exposure to external signals such as hormones or nutrients. The basis for the distinct gene programs relies on cell type-selective activation of transcriptional enhancers, which in turn are particularly sensitive to modulation. Until recently we had only fragmented insight into the regulation of a few of these enhancers; however, the recent advances in high-throughput sequencing technologies have enabled the development of a large number of technologies that can be used to obtain genome-wide insight into how genomes are reprogrammed during development and in response to specific external signals. By applying such technologies, we have begun to reveal the cross-talk between metabolism and the genome, i.e., how genomes are reprogrammed in response to metabolites, and how the regulation of metabolic networks is coordinated at the genomic level.

  15. A flexible approach to genome map assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Harley, E.; Bonner, A.J.

    1994-12-31

    A major goal of the Human Genome Project is to construct detailed physical maps of the human genome. A physical map is an assignment of DNA fragments to their locations on the genome. Complete maps of large genomes require the integration of many kinds of experimental data, each with its own forms of noise and experimental error. To facilitate this integration, we are developing a flexible approach to map assembly based on logic programming and data visualization. Logic programming provides a convenient, and mathematically rigorous way of reasoning about data, while data visualization provides layout algorithms for assembling and displaying genome maps. To demonstrate the approach, this paper describes numerous rules for map assembly implemented in a data-visualization system called Hy+. Using these rules, we have successfully assembled contigs (partial maps) from real and simulated mapping data-data that is noisy, imprecise and contradictory. The main advantage of the approach is that it allows a user to rapidly develop, implement and test new rules for genome map assembly, with a minimum of programming effort.

  16. TCGA's Pan-Cancer Efforts and Expansion to Include Whole Genome Sequence - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    Carolyn Hutter, Ph.D., Program Director of NHGRI's Division of Genomic Medicine, discusses the expansion of TCGA's Pan-Cancer efforts to include the Pan-Cancer Analysis of Whole Genomes (PAWG) project.

  17. Intrauterine programming

    PubMed Central

    Sedaghat, Katayoun; Zahediasl, Saleh; Ghasemi, Asghar

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, the intrauterine condition has an important role in the development of fetal physiological systems in later life. Suboptimal maternal environment can alter the regulatory pathways that determine the normal development of the fetus in utero, which in post-natal life may render the individual more susceptible to cardiovascular or metabolic adult-life diseases. Changes in the intrauterine availability of nutrients, oxygen and hormones can change the fetal tissue developmental regulatory planning, which occurs genomically and non-genomically and can cause permanent structural and functional changes in the systems, leading to diseases in early years of life and those that particularly become overt in adulthood. In this review we take a brief look at the main elements which program the fetal system development and consequently induce a crucial impact on the cardiovascular, nervous and hormonal systems in adulthood. PMID:25945232

  18. Plant genomics: an overview.

    PubMed

    Campos-de Quiroz, Hugo

    2002-01-01

    Recent technological advancements have substantially expanded our ability to analyze and understand plant genomes and to reduce the gap existing between genotype and phenotype. The fast evolving field of genomics allows scientists to analyze thousand of genes in parallel, to understand the genetic architecture of plant genomes and also to isolate the genes responsible for mutations. Furthermore, whole genomes can now be sequenced. This review addresses these issues and also discusses ways to extract biological meaning from DNA data. Although genomic issuesare addressed from a plant perspective, this review provides insights into the genomic analyses of other organisms.

  19. Genome instability, cancer and aging

    PubMed Central

    Maslov, Alexander Y.; Vijg, Jan

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage-driven genome instability underlies the diversity of life forms generated by the evolutionary process but is detrimental to the somatic cells of individual organisms. The cellular response to DNA damage can be roughly divided in two parts. First, when damage is severe, programmed cell death may occur or, alternatively, temporary or permanent cell cycle arrest. This protects against cancer but can have negative effects on the long term, e.g., by depleting stem cell reservoirs. Second, damage can be repaired through one or more of the many sophisticated genome maintenance pathways. However, erroneous DNA repair and incomplete restoration of chromatin after damage is resolved, produce mutations and epimutations, respectively, both of which have been shown to accumulate with age. An increased burden of mutations and/or epimutations in aged tissues increases cancer risk and adversely affects gene transcriptional regulation, leading to progressive decline in organ function. Cellular degeneration and uncontrolled cell proliferation are both major hallmarks of aging. Despite the fact that one seems to exclude the other, they both may be driven by a common mechanism. Here, we review age related changes in the mammalian genome and their possible functional consequences, with special emphasis on genome instability in stem/progenitor cells. PMID:19344750

  20. Integrating sequence, evolution and functional genomics in regulatory genomics

    PubMed Central

    Vingron, Martin; Brazma, Alvis; Coulson, Richard; van Helden, Jacques; Manke, Thomas; Palin, Kimmo; Sand, Olivier; Ukkonen, Esko

    2009-01-01

    With genome analysis expanding from the study of genes to the study of gene regulation, 'regulatory genomics' utilizes sequence information, evolution and functional genomics measurements to unravel how regulatory information is encoded in the genome. PMID:19226437

  1. Genomic Data Commons | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI’s Center for Cancer Genomics launches the Genomic Data Commons (GDC), a unified data sharing platform for the cancer research community. The mission of the GDC is to enable data sharing across the entire cancer research community, to ultimately support precision medicine in oncology.

  2. Genomics to feed a switchgrass breeding program

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Development of improved cultivars is one of three pillars, along with sustainable production and efficient conversion, required for dedicated cellulosic bioenergy crops to succeed. Breeding new cultivars is a long, slow process requiring patience, dedication, and motivation to realize gains and adva...

  3. About the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program

    Cancer.gov

    Epidemiology is the scientific study of the causes and distribution of disease in populations. NCI-funded epidemiology research is conducted through research at institutions in the United States and internationally.

  4. GenomeVISTA—an integrated software package for whole-genome alignment and visualization

    PubMed Central

    Poliakov, Alexandre; Foong, Justin; Brudno, Michael; Dubchak, Inna

    2014-01-01

    Summary: With the ubiquitous generation of complete genome assemblies for a variety of species, efficient tools for whole-genome alignment along with user-friendly visualization are critically important. Our VISTA family of tools for comparative genomics, based on algorithms for pairwise and multiple alignments of genomic sequences and whole-genome assemblies, has become one of the standard techniques for comparative analysis. Most of the VISTA programs have been implemented as Web-accessible servers and are extensively used by the biomedical community. In this manuscript, we introduce GenomeVISTA: a novel implementation that incorporates most features of the VISTA family—fast and accurate alignment, visualization capabilities, GUI and analytical tools within a stand-alone software package. GenomeVISTA thus provides flexibility and security for users who need to conduct whole-genome comparisons on their own computers. Availability and implementation: Implemented in Perl, C/C++ and Java, the source code is freely available for download at the VISTA Web site: http://genome.lbl.gov/vista/ Contact: avpoliakov@lbl.gov or ildubchak@lbl.gov Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24860159

  5. GenomeVISTA--an integrated software package for whole-genome alignment and visualization.

    PubMed

    Poliakov, Alexandre; Foong, Justin; Brudno, Michael; Dubchak, Inna

    2014-09-15

    With the ubiquitous generation of complete genome assemblies for a variety of species, efficient tools for whole-genome alignment along with user-friendly visualization are critically important. Our VISTA family of tools for comparative genomics, based on algorithms for pairwise and multiple alignments of genomic sequences and whole-genome assemblies, has become one of the standard techniques for comparative analysis. Most of the VISTA programs have been implemented as Web-accessible servers and are extensively used by the biomedical community. In this manuscript, we introduce GenomeVISTA: a novel implementation that incorporates most features of the VISTA family--fast and accurate alignment, visualization capabilities, GUI and analytical tools within a stand-alone software package. GenomeVISTA thus provides flexibility and security for users who need to conduct whole-genome comparisons on their own computers. Implemented in Perl, C/C++ and Java, the source code is freely available for download at the VISTA Web site: http://genome.lbl.gov/vista/. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Genomic Data Commons launches

    Cancer.gov

    The Genomic Data Commons (GDC), a unified data system that promotes sharing of genomic and clinical data between researchers, launched today with a visit from Vice President Joe Biden to the operations center at the University of Chicago.

  7. GENOMICS AND ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The impact of recently developed and emerging genomics technologies on environmental sciences has significant implications for human and ecological risk assessment issues. The linkage of data generated from genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabalomics, and ecology can be ...

  8. GENOMICS AND ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The impact of recently developed and emerging genomics technologies on environmental sciences has significant implications for human and ecological risk assessment issues. The linkage of data generated from genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabalomics, and ecology can be ...

  9. Exploiting the genome

    SciTech Connect

    Block, S.; Cornwall, J.; Dyson, F.; Koonin, S.; Lewis, N.; Schwitters, R.

    1998-09-11

    In 1997, JASON conducted a DOE-sponsored study of the human genome project with special emphasis on the areas of technology, quality assurance and quality control, and informatics. The present study has two aims: first, to update the 1997 Report in light of recent developments in genome sequencing technology, and second, to consider possible roles for the DOE in the ''post-genomic" era, following acquisition of the complete human genome sequence.

  10. National Plant Genome Initiative

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    JAN 2005 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2005 to 00-00-2005 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE National Plant Genome Initiative. Progress Report 5a...refl ected in future Administration budgets. Cover Photo: National Plant Genome Initiative Progress Report January 2005 National Science and...Technology Council Committee on Science Interagency Working Group on Plant Genomes [Blank Page] Interagency Working Group on Plant Genomes Committee on

  11. GENESIS: genome evolution scenarios.

    PubMed

    Gog, Simon; Bader, Martin; Ohlebusch, Enno

    2008-03-01

    We implemented a software tool called GENESIS for three different genome rearrangement problems: Sorting a unichromosomal genome by weighted reversals and transpositions (SwRT), sorting a multichromosomal genome by reversals, translocations, fusions and fissions (SRTl), and sorting a multichromosomal genome by weighted reversals, translocations, fusions, fissions and transpositions (SwRTTl). Source code can be obtained by the authors, or use the web interface http://www.uni-ulm.de/in/theo/research/genesis.html.

  12. Whole-genome patenting.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Maureen A; Bostanci, Adam; Calvert, Jane

    2005-06-01

    Gene patenting is now a familiar commercial practice, but there is little awareness that several patents claim ownership of the complete genome sequence of a prokaryote or virus. When these patents are analysed and compared to those for other biological entities, it becomes clear that genome patents seek to exploit the genome as an information base and are part of a broader shift towards intangible intellectual property in genomics.

  13. CAR: contig assembly of prokaryotic draft genomes using rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chin Lung; Chen, Kun-Tze; Huang, Shih-Yuan; Chiu, Hsien-Tai

    2014-11-28

    Next generation sequencing technology has allowed efficient production of draft genomes for many organisms of interest. However, most draft genomes are just collections of independent contigs, whose relative positions and orientations along the genome being sequenced are unknown. Although several tools have been developed to order and orient the contigs of draft genomes, more accurate tools are still needed. In this study, we present a novel reference-based contig assembly (or scaffolding) tool, named as CAR, that can efficiently and more accurately order and orient the contigs of a prokaryotic draft genome based on a reference genome of a related organism. Given a set of contigs in multi-FASTA format and a reference genome in FASTA format, CAR can output a list of scaffolds, each of which is a set of ordered and oriented contigs. For validation, we have tested CAR on a real dataset composed of several prokaryotic genomes and also compared its performance with several other reference-based contig assembly tools. Consequently, our experimental results have shown that CAR indeed performs better than all these other reference-based contig assembly tools in terms of sensitivity, precision and genome coverage. CAR serves as an efficient tool that can more accurately order and orient the contigs of a prokaryotic draft genome based on a reference genome. The web server of CAR is freely available at http://genome.cs.nthu.edu.tw/CAR/ and its stand-alone program can also be downloaded from the same website.

  14. Office of Cancer Genomics |

    Cancer.gov

    The mission of the NCI’s Office of Cancer Genomics (OCG) is to enhance the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of cancer, advance and accelerate genomics science and technology development, and efficiently translate the genomics data to improve cancer research, prevention, early detection, diagnosis and treatment.

  15. The human genome project

    SciTech Connect

    Yager, T.D.; Zewert, T.E.; Hood, L.E. )

    1994-04-01

    The Human Genome Project (HGP) is a coordinated worldwide effort to precisely map the human genome and the genomes of selected model organisms. The first explicit proposal for this project dates from 1985 although its foundations (both conceptual and technological) can be traced back many years in genetics, molecular biology, and biotechnology. The HGP has matured rapidly and is producing results of great significance.

  16. Office of Cancer Genomics |

    Cancer.gov

    The mission of the NCI’s Office of Cancer Genomics (OCG) is to enhance the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of cancer, advance and accelerate genomics science and technology development, and efficiently translate the genomics data to improve cancer research, prevention, early detection, diagnosis and treatment.

  17. Assembly complexity of prokaryotic genomes using short reads

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background De Bruijn graphs are a theoretical framework underlying several modern genome assembly programs, especially those that deal with very short reads. We describe an application of de Bruijn graphs to analyze the global repeat structure of prokaryotic genomes. Results We provide the first survey of the repeat structure of a large number of genomes. The analysis gives an upper-bound on the performance of genome assemblers for de novo reconstruction of genomes across a wide range of read lengths. Further, we demonstrate that the majority of genes in prokaryotic genomes can be reconstructed uniquely using very short reads even if the genomes themselves cannot. The non-reconstructible genes are overwhelmingly related to mobile elements (transposons, IS elements, and prophages). Conclusions Our results improve upon previous studies on the feasibility of assembly with short reads and provide a comprehensive benchmark against which to compare the performance of the short-read assemblers currently being developed. PMID:20064276

  18. 10. international mouse genome conference

    SciTech Connect

    Meisler, M.H.

    1996-12-31

    Ten years after hosting the First International Mammalian Genome Conference in Paris in 1986, Dr. Jean-Louis Guenet presided over the Tenth Conference at the Pasteur Institute, October 7--10, 1996. The 1986 conference was a satellite to the Human Gene Mapping Workshop and had approximately 50 attendees. The 1996 meeting was attended by 300 scientists from around the world. In the interim, the number of mapped loci in the mouse increased from 1,000 to over 20,000. This report contains a listing of the program and its participants, and two articles that review the meeting and the role of the laboratory mouse in the Human Genome project. More than 200 papers were presented at the conference covering the following topics: International mouse chromosome committee meetings; Mutant generation and identification; Physical and genetic maps; New technology and resources; Chromatin structure and gene regulation; Rate and hamster genetic maps; Informatics and databases; and Quantitative trait analysis.

  19. Comparative genomics of Lactobacillus

    PubMed Central

    Kant, Ravi; Blom, Jochen; Palva, Airi; Siezen, Roland J.; de Vos, Willem M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The genus Lactobacillus includes a diverse group of bacteria consisting of many species that are associated with fermentations of plants, meat or milk. In addition, various lactobacilli are natural inhabitants of the intestinal tract of humans and other animals. Finally, several Lactobacillus strains are marketed as probiotics as their consumption can confer a health benefit to host. Presently, 154 Lactobacillus species are known and a growing fraction of these are subject to draft genome sequencing. However, complete genome sequences are needed to provide a platform for detailed genomic comparisons. Therefore, we selected a total of 20 genomes of various Lactobacillus strains for which complete genomic sequences have been reported. These genomes had sizes varying from 1.8 to 3.3 Mb and other characteristic features, such as G+C content that ranged from 33% to 51%. The Lactobacillus pan genome was found to consist of approximately 14 000 protein‐encoding genes while all 20 genomes shared a total of 383 sets of orthologous genes that defined the Lactobacillus core genome (LCG). Based on advanced phylogeny of the proteins encoded by this LCG, we grouped the 20 strains into three main groups and defined core group genes present in all genomes of a single group, signature group genes shared in all genomes of one group but absent in all other Lactobacillus genomes, and Group‐specific ORFans present in core group genes of one group and absent in all other complete genomes. The latter are of specific value in defining the different groups of genomes. The study provides a platform for present individual comparisons as well as future analysis of new Lactobacillus genomes. PMID:21375712

  20. Skittle: a 2-dimensional genome visualization tool.

    PubMed

    Seaman, Josiah D; Sanford, John C

    2009-12-30

    It is increasingly evident that there are multiple and overlapping patterns within the genome, and that these patterns contain different types of information--regarding both genome function and genome history. In order to discover additional genomic patterns which may have biological significance, novel strategies are required. To partially address this need, we introduce a new data visualization tool entitled Skittle. This program first creates a 2-dimensional nucleotide display by assigning four colors to the four nucleotides, and then text-wraps to a user adjustable width. This nucleotide display is accompanied by a "repeat map" which comprehensively displays all local repeating units, based upon analysis of all possible local alignments. Skittle includes a smooth-zooming interface which allows the user to analyze genomic patterns at any scale.Skittle is especially useful in identifying and analyzing tandem repeats, including repeats not normally detectable by other methods. However, Skittle is also more generally useful for analysis of any genomic data, allowing users to correlate published annotations and observable visual patterns, and allowing for sequence and construct quality control. Preliminary observations using Skittle reveal intriguing genomic patterns not otherwise obvious, including structured variations inside tandem repeats. The striking visual patterns revealed by Skittle appear to be useful for hypothesis development, and have already led the authors to theorize that imperfect tandem repeats could act as information carriers, and may form tertiary structures within the interphase nucleus.

  1. Wheat Genomics: Present Status and Future Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, P. K.; Mir, R. R.; Mohan, A.; Kumar, J.

    2008-01-01

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), with a large genome (16000 Mb) and high proportion (∼80%) of repetitive sequences, has been a difficult crop for genomics research. However, the availability of extensive cytogenetics stocks has been an asset, which facilitated significant progress in wheat genomic research in recent years. For instance, fairly dense molecular maps (both genetic and physical maps) and a large set of ESTs allowed genome-wide identification of gene-rich and gene-poor regions as well as QTL including eQTL. The availability of markers associated with major economic traits also allowed development of major programs on marker-assisted selection (MAS) in some countries, and facilitated map-based cloning of a number of genes/QTL. Resources for functional genomics including TILLING and RNA interference (RNAi) along with some new approaches like epigenetics and association mapping are also being successfully used for wheat genomics research. BAC/BIBAC libraries for the subgenome D and some individual chromosomes have also been prepared to facilitate sequencing of gene space. In this brief review, we discuss all these advances in some detail, and also describe briefly the available resources, which can be used for future genomics research in this important crop. PMID:18528518

  2. Collaborative Research to Advance Precision Medicine in the Post-Genomic World | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    My name is Subhashini Jagu, and I am the Scientific Program Manager for the Cancer Target Discovery and Development (CTD2) Network at the Office of Cancer Genomics (OCG). In my new role, I help CTD2 work toward its mission, which is to develop new scientific approaches to accelerate the translation of genomic discoveries into new treatments. Collaborative efforts that bring together a variety of expertise and infrastructure are needed to understand and successfully treat cancer, a highly complex disease.

  3. A genome blogger manifesto.

    PubMed

    Corpas, Manuel

    2012-10-26

    Cheap prices for genomic testing have revolutionized consumers' access to personal genomics. Exploration of personal genomes poses significant challenges for customers wishing to learn beyond provider customer reports. A vibrant community has spontaneously appeared blogging experiences and data as a way to learn about their personal genomes. No set of values has publicly been described to date encapsulating ideals and code of conduct for this community. Here I present a first attempt to address this vacuum based on my own personal experiences as genome blogger.

  4. Chromium and Genomic Stability

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Sandra S.; Wise, John Pierce

    2014-01-01

    Many metals serve as micronutrients which protect against genomic instability. Chromium is most abundant in its trivalent and hexavalent forms. Trivalent chromium has historically been considered an essential element, though recent data indicate that while it can have pharmacological effects and value, it is not essential. There are no data indicating that trivalent chromium promotes genomic stability and, instead may promote genomic instability. Hexavalent chromium is widely accepted as highly toxic and carcinogenic with no nutritional value. Recent data indicate that it causes genomic instability and also has no role in promoting genomic stability. PMID:22192535

  5. The Genomic Medicine Game.

    PubMed

    Tran, Elvis; de Andrés-Galiana, Enrique J; Benitez, Sonia; Martin-Sanchez, Fernando; Lopez-Campos, Guillermo H

    2016-01-01

    With advancements in genomics technology, health care has been improving and new paradigms of medicine such as genomic medicine have evolved. The education of clinicians, researchers and students to face the challenges posed by these new approaches, however, has been often lagging behind. From this the Genomic Medicine Game, an educational tool, was created for the purpose of conceptualizing the key components of Genomic Medicine. A number of phenotype-genotype associations were found through a literature review, which was used to be a base for the concepts the Genomic Medicine Game would focus on. Built in Java, the game was successfully tested with promising results.

  6. Towards a whole genome physical map in rainbow trout

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Over the last five years, tremendous genomic resources were developed in salmonids. In 2005, INRA joined formally the consortium for Genome Research on All Salmonids Program (cGRASP). This consortium (www.cgrasp.org) is the international collaborative structure for establishing needed pre- and post-...

  7. Almost finished: the complete genome sequence of Mycosphaerella graminicola

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mycosphaerella graminicola causes septoria tritici blotch of wheat. An 8.9x shotgun sequence of bread wheat strain IPO323 was generated through the Community Sequencing Program of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Joint Genome Institute (JGI), and was finished at the Stanford Human Genome Center. The ...

  8. Genotypes are useful for more than genomic evaluation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    New services that provide pedigree discovery, breed composition, mating programs, genomic inbreeding, fertility defects, and inheritance tracking all are possible from low-cost genotyping in addition to genomic evaluation. Genetic markers let breeders select among sibs before their phenotypes became...

  9. Global Implementation of Genomic Medicine: We Are Not Alone

    PubMed Central

    Manolio, Teri A.; Abramowicz, Marc; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Anderson, Warwick; Balling, Rudi; Berger, Adam C.; Bleyl, Steven; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chantratita, Wasun; Chisholm, Rex L.; Dissanayake, Vajira H. W.; Dunn, Michael; Dzau, Victor J.; Han, Bok-Ghee; Hubbard, Tim; Kolbe, Anne; Korf, Bruce; Kubo, Michiaki; Lasko, Paul; Leego, Erkki; Mahasirimongkol, Surakameth; Majumdar, Partha P.; Matthijs, Gert; McLeod, Howard L.; Metspalu, Andres; Meulien, Pierre; Miyano, Satoru; Naparstek, Yaakov; O’Rourke, P. Pearl; Patrinos, George P.; Rehm, Heidi L.; Relling, Mary V.; Rennert, Gad; Rodriguez, Laura Lyman; Roden, Dan M.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Sinha, Sukdev; Tan, Patrick; Ulfendahl, Mats; Ward, Robyn; Williams, Marc S.; Wong, John E.L.; Green, Eric D.; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    Advances in high-throughput genomic technologies coupled with a growing number of genomic results potentially useful in clinical care have led to ground-breaking genomic medicine implementation programs in various nations. Many of these innovative programs capitalize on unique local capabilities arising from the structure of their health care systems or their cultural or political milieu, as well as from unusual burdens of disease or risk alleles. Many such programs are being conducted in relative isolation and might benefit from sharing of approaches and lessons learned in other nations. The National Human Genome Research Institute recently brought together 25 of these groups from around the world to describe and compare projects, examine the current state of implementation and desired near-term capabilities, and identify opportunities for collaboration to promote the responsible implementation of genomic medicine. The wide variety of nascent programs in diverse settings demonstrates that implementation of genomic medicine is expanding globally in varied and highly innovative ways. Opportunities for collaboration abound in the areas of evidence generation, health information technology, education, workforce development, pharmacogenomics, and policy and regulatory issues. Several international organizations that are already facilitating effective research collaborations should engage to ensure implementation proceeds collaboratively without potentially wasteful duplication. Efforts to coalesce these groups around concrete but compelling signature projects, such as global eradication of genetically-mediated drug reactions or developing a truly global genomic variant data resource across a wide number of ethnicities, would accelerate appropriate implementation of genomics to improve clinical care world-wide. PMID:26041702

  10. The Bluejay genome browser.

    PubMed

    Soh, Jung; Gordon, Paul M K; Sensen, Christoph W

    2012-03-01

    The Bluejay genome browser is a stand-alone visualization tool for the multi-scale viewing of annotated genomes and other genomic elements. Bluejay allows users to customize display features to suit their needs, and produces publication-quality graphics. Bluejay provides a multitude of ways to interrelate biological data at the genome scale. Users can load gene expression data into a genome display for expression visualization in context. Multiple genomes can be compared concurrently, including time series expression data, based on Gene Ontology labels. External, context-sensitive biological Web Services are linked to the displayed genomic elements ad hoc for in-depth genomic data analysis and interpretation. Users can mark multiple points of interest in a genome by creating waypoints, and exploit them for easy navigation of single or multiple genomes. Using this comprehensive visual environment, users can study a gene not just in relation to its genome, but also its transcriptome and evolutionary origins. Written in Java, Bluejay is platform-independent and is freely available from http://bluejay.ucalgary.ca.

  11. Microbial genomic taxonomy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A need for a genomic species definition is emerging from several independent studies worldwide. In this commentary paper, we discuss recent studies on the genomic taxonomy of diverse microbial groups and a unified species definition based on genomics. Accordingly, strains from the same microbial species share >95% Average Amino Acid Identity (AAI) and Average Nucleotide Identity (ANI), >95% identity based on multiple alignment genes, <10 in Karlin genomic signature, and > 70% in silico Genome-to-Genome Hybridization similarity (GGDH). Species of the same genus will form monophyletic groups on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequences, Multilocus Sequence Analysis (MLSA) and supertree analysis. In addition to the established requirements for species descriptions, we propose that new taxa descriptions should also include at least a draft genome sequence of the type strain in order to obtain a clear outlook on the genomic landscape of the novel microbe. The application of the new genomic species definition put forward here will allow researchers to use genome sequences to define simultaneously coherent phenotypic and genomic groups. PMID:24365132

  12. UCSC genome browser tutorial.

    PubMed

    Zweig, Ann S; Karolchik, Donna; Kuhn, Robert M; Haussler, David; Kent, W James

    2008-08-01

    The University of California Santa Cruz (UCSC) Genome Bioinformatics website consists of a suite of free, open-source, on-line tools that can be used to browse, analyze, and query genomic data. These tools are available to anyone who has an Internet browser and an interest in genomics. The website provides a quick and easy-to-use visual display of genomic data. It places annotation tracks beneath genome coordinate positions, allowing rapid visual correlation of different types of information. Many of the annotation tracks are submitted by scientists worldwide; the others are computed by the UCSC Genome Bioinformatics group from publicly available sequence data. It also allows users to upload and display their own experimental results or annotation sets by creating a custom track. The suite of tools, downloadable data files, and links to documentation and other information can be found at http://genome.ucsc.edu/.

  13. Bacterial Genome Instability

    PubMed Central

    Darmon, Elise

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacterial genomes are remarkably stable from one generation to the next but are plastic on an evolutionary time scale, substantially shaped by horizontal gene transfer, genome rearrangement, and the activities of mobile DNA elements. This implies the existence of a delicate balance between the maintenance of genome stability and the tolerance of genome instability. In this review, we describe the specialized genetic elements and the endogenous processes that contribute to genome instability. We then discuss the consequences of genome instability at the physiological level, where cells have harnessed instability to mediate phase and antigenic variation, and at the evolutionary level, where horizontal gene transfer has played an important role. Indeed, this ability to share DNA sequences has played a major part in the evolution of life on Earth. The evolutionary plasticity of bacterial genomes, coupled with the vast numbers of bacteria on the planet, substantially limits our ability to control disease. PMID:24600039

  14. Whole-genome alignment.

    PubMed

    Dewey, Colin N

    2012-01-01

    Whole-genome alignment (WGA) is the prediction of evolutionary relationships at the nucleotide level between two or more genomes. It combines aspects of both colinear sequence alignment and gene orthology prediction, and is typically more challenging to address than either of these tasks due to the size and complexity of whole genomes. Despite the difficulty of this problem, numerous methods have been developed for its solution because WGAs are valuable for genome-wide analyses, such as phylogenetic inference, genome annotation, and function prediction. In this chapter, we discuss the meaning and significance of WGA and present an overview of the methods that address it. We also examine the problem of evaluating whole-genome aligners and offer a set of methodological challenges that need to be tackled in order to make the most effective use of our rapidly growing databases of whole genomes.

  15. Genomic Sequencing in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tuna, Musaffe; Amos, Christopher I.

    2013-01-01

    Genomic sequencing has provided critical insights into the etiology of both simple and complex diseases. The enormous reductions in cost for whole genome sequencing have allowed this technology to gain increasing use. Whole genome analysis has impacted research of complex diseases including cancer by allowing the systematic analysis of entire genomes in a single experiment, thereby facilitating the discovery of somatic and germline mutations, and identification of the function and impact of the insertions, deletions, and structural rearrangements, including translocations and inversions, in novel disease genes. Whole-genome sequencing can be used to provide the most comprehensive characterization of the cancer genome, the complexity of which we are only beginning to understand. Hence in this review, we focus on whole-genome sequencing in cancer. PMID:23178448

  16. 2012 U.S. Department of Energy: Joint Genome Institute: Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, David

    2013-01-01

    The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI) is to serve the diverse scientific community as a user facility, enabling the application of large-scale genomics and analysis of plants, microbes, and communities of microbes to address the DOE mission goals in bioenergy and the environment. The DOE JGI's sequencing efforts fall under the Eukaryote Super Program, which includes the Plant and Fungal Genomics Programs; and the Prokaryote Super Program, which includes the Microbial Genomics and Metagenomics Programs. In 2012, several projects made news for their contributions to energy and environment research.

  17. HomologMiner: looking for homologous genomic groups in whole genomes.

    PubMed

    Hou, Minmei; Berman, Piotr; Hsu, Chih-Hao; Harris, Robert S

    2007-04-15

    Complex genomes contain numerous repeated sequences, and genomic duplication is believed to be a main evolutionary mechanism to obtain new functions. Several tools are available for de novo repeat sequence identification, and many approaches exist for clustering homologous protein sequences. We present an efficient new approach to identify and cluster homologous DNA sequences with high accuracy at the level of whole genomes, excluding low-complexity repeats, tandem repeats and annotated interspersed repeats. We also determine the boundaries of each group member so that it closely represents a biological unit, e.g. a complete gene, or a partial gene coding a protein domain. We developed a program called HomologMiner to identify homologous groups applicable to genome sequences that have been properly marked for low-complexity repeats and annotated interspersed repeats. We applied it to the whole genomes of human (hg17), macaque (rheMac2) and mouse (mm8). Groups obtained include gene families (e.g. olfactory receptor gene family, zinc finger families), unannotated interspersed repeats and additional homologous groups that resulted from recent segmental duplications. Our program incorporates several new methods: a new abstract definition of consistent duplicate units, a new criterion to remove moderately frequent tandem repeats, and new algorithmic techniques. We also provide preliminary analysis of the output on the three genomes mentioned above, and show several applications including identifying boundaries of tandem gene clusters and novel interspersed repeat families. All programs and datasets are downloadable from www.bx.psu.edu/miller_lab.

  18. Enabling responsible public genomics.

    PubMed

    Conley, John M; Doerr, Adam K; Vorhaus, Daniel B

    2010-01-01

    As scientific understandings of genetics advance, researchers require increasingly rich datasets that combine genomic data from large numbers of individuals with medical and other personal information. Linking individuals' genetic data and personal information precludes anonymity and produces medically significant information--a result not contemplated by the established legal and ethical conventions governing human genomic research. To pursue the next generation of human genomic research and commerce in a responsible fashion, scientists, lawyers, and regulators must address substantial new issues, including researchers' duties with respect to clinically significant data, the challenges to privacy presented by genomic data, the boundary between genomic research and commerce, and the practice of medicine. This Article presents a new model for understanding and addressing these new challenges--a "public genomics" premised on the idea that ethically, legally, and socially responsible genomics research requires openness, not privacy, as its organizing principle. Responsible public genomics combines the data contributed by informed and fully consenting information altruists and the research potential of rich datasets in a genomic commons that is freely and globally available. This Article examines the risks and benefits of this public genomics model in the context of an ambitious genetic research project currently under way--the Personal Genome Project. This Article also (i) demonstrates that large-scale genomic projects are desirable, (ii) evaluates the risks and challenges presented by public genomics research, and (iii) determines that the current legal and regulatory regimes restrict beneficial and responsible scientific inquiry while failing to adequately protect participants. The Article concludes by proposing a modified normative and legal framework that embraces and enables a future of responsible public genomics.

  19. R for genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Gondro, Cedric; Porto-Neto, Laercio R; Lee, Seung Hwan

    2013-01-01

    In recent years R has become de facto statistical programming language of choice for statisticians and it is also arguably the most widely used generic environment for analysis of high-throughput genomic data. In this chapter we discuss some approaches to improve performance of R when working with large SNP datasets.

  20. Efficient Methods to Compute Genomic Predictions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Efficient methods for processing genomic data were developed to increase reliability of estimated breeding values and simultaneously estimate thousands of marker effects. Algorithms were derived and computer programs tested on simulated data for 50,000 markers and 2,967 bulls. Accurate estimates of ...

  1. Whole-exome/genome sequencing and genomics.

    PubMed

    Grody, Wayne W; Thompson, Barry H; Hudgins, Louanne

    2013-12-01

    As medical genetics has progressed from a descriptive entity to one focused on the functional relationship between genes and clinical disorders, emphasis has been placed on genomics. Genomics, a subelement of genetics, is the study of the genome, the sum total of all the genes of an organism. The human genome, which is contained in the 23 pairs of nuclear chromosomes and in the mitochondrial DNA of each cell, comprises >6 billion nucleotides of genetic code. There are some 23,000 protein-coding genes, a surprisingly small fraction of the total genetic material, with the remainder composed of noncoding DNA, regulatory sequences, and introns. The Human Genome Project, launched in 1990, produced a draft of the genome in 2001 and then a finished sequence in 2003, on the 50th anniversary of the initial publication of Watson and Crick's paper on the double-helical structure of DNA. Since then, this mass of genetic information has been translated at an ever-increasing pace into useable knowledge applicable to clinical medicine. The recent advent of massively parallel DNA sequencing (also known as shotgun, high-throughput, and next-generation sequencing) has brought whole-genome analysis into the clinic for the first time, and most of the current applications are directed at children with congenital conditions that are undiagnosable by using standard genetic tests for single-gene disorders. Thus, pediatricians must become familiar with this technology, what it can and cannot offer, and its technical and ethical challenges. Here, we address the concepts of human genomic analysis and its clinical applicability for primary care providers.

  2. HeteroGenome: database of genome periodicity

    PubMed Central

    Chaley, Maria; Kutyrkin, Vladimir; Tulbasheva, Gayane; Teplukhina, Elena; Nazipova, Nafisa

    2014-01-01

    We present the first release of the HeteroGenome database collecting latent periodicity regions in genomes. Tandem repeats and highly divergent tandem repeats along with the regions of a new type of periodicity, known as profile periodicity, have been collected for the genomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Arabidopsis thaliana, Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster. We obtained data with the aid of a spectral-statistical approach to search for reliable latent periodicity regions (with periods up to 2000 bp) in DNA sequences. The original two-level mode of data presentation (a broad view of the region of latent periodicity and a second level indicating conservative fragments of its structure) was further developed to enable us to obtain the estimate, without redundancy, that latent periodicity regions make up ∼10% of the analyzed genomes. Analysis of the quantitative and qualitative content of located periodicity regions on all chromosomes of the analyzed organisms revealed dominant characteristic types of periodicity in the genomes. The pattern of density distribution of latent periodicity regions on chromosome unambiguously characterizes each chromosome in genome. Database URL: http://www.jcbi.ru/lp_baze/ PMID:24857969

  3. Methods of Genomic Competency Integration in Practice

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Jean; Calzone, Kathleen A.; Caskey, Sarah; Culp, Stacey; Weiner, Marsha; Badzek, Laurie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Genomics is increasingly relevant to health care, necessitating support for nurses to incorporate genomic competencies into practice. The primary aim of this project was to develop, implement, and evaluate a year-long genomic education intervention that trained, supported, and supervised institutional administrator and educator champion dyads to increase nursing capacity to integrate genomics through assessments of program satisfaction and institutional achieved outcomes. Design Longitudinal study of 23 Magnet Recognition Program® Hospitals (21 intervention, 2 controls) participating in a 1-year new competency integration effort aimed at increasing genomic nursing competency and overcoming barriers to genomics integration in practice. Methods Champion dyads underwent genomic training consisting of one in-person kick-off training meeting followed by monthly education webinars. Champion dyads designed institution-specific action plans detailing objectives, methods or strategies used to engage and educate nursing staff, timeline for implementation, and outcomes achieved. Action plans focused on a minimum of seven genomic priority areas: champion dyad personal development; practice assessment; policy content assessment; staff knowledge needs assessment; staff development; plans for integration; and anticipated obstacles and challenges. Action plans were updated quarterly, outlining progress made as well as inclusion of new methods or strategies. Progress was validated through virtual site visits with the champion dyads and chief nursing officers. Descriptive data were collected on all strategies or methods utilized, and timeline for achievement. Descriptive data were analyzed using content analysis. Findings The complexity of the competency content and the uniqueness of social systems and infrastructure resulted in a significant variation of champion dyad interventions. Conclusions Nursing champions can facilitate change in genomic nursing capacity through

  4. Complete genome sequence of Methanoculleus marisnigri type strain JR1

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iain; Sieprawska-Lupa, Magdalena; Goltsman, Eugene; Lapidus, Alla L.; Copeland, A; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Dalin, Eileen; Barry, Kerrie; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Han, Cliff; Brettin, Tom; Detter, J. Chris; Bruce, David; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pitluck, Sam; Hauser, Loren John; Land, Miriam L; Lucas, Susan; Richardson, P M; Whitman, W. B.; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2009-01-01

    Methanoculleus marisnigri Romesser et al. 1981 is a methanogen belonging to the order Methanomicrobiales within the archaeal phylum Euryarchaeota. The type strain, JR1, was isolated from anoxic sediments of the Black Sea. M. marisnigri is of phylogenetic interest because at the time the sequencing project began only one genome had previously been sequenced from the order Methanomicrobiales. We report here the complete genome sequence of M. marisnigri type strain JR1 and its annotation. This is part of a Joint Genome Institute 2006 Community Sequencing Program to sequence genomes of diverse Archaea.

  5. Complete genome sequence of Methanocorpusculum labreanum type strain Z

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iain; Sieprawska-Lupa, Magdalena; Goltsman, Eugene; Lapidus, Alla L.; Copeland, A; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Dalin, Eileen; Barry, Kerrie; Pitluck, Sam; Hauser, Loren John; Land, Miriam L; Lucas, Susan; Richardson, P M; Whitman, W. B.; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2009-01-01

    Methanocorpusculum labreanum is a methanogen belonging to the order Methanomicrobiales within the archaeal phylum Euryarchaeota. The type strain Z was isolated from surface sediments of Tar Pit Lake in the La Brea Tar Pits in Los Angeles, California. M. labreanum is of phylogenetic interest because at the time the sequencing project began only one genome had previously been sequenced from the order Methanomicrobiales. We report here the complete genome sequence of M. labreanum type strain Z and its annotation. This is part of a 2006 Joint Genome Institute Community Sequencing Program project to sequence genomes of diverse Archaea.

  6. Universal genome in the origin of metazoa: thoughts about evolution.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Michael

    2007-08-01

    Recent advances in paleontology, genome analysis, genetics and embryology raise a number of questions about the origin of Animal Kingdom. These questions include:(1) seemingly simultaneous appearance of diverse Metazoan phyla in Cambrian period, (2) similarities of genomes among Metazoan phyla of diverse complexity, (3) seemingly excessive complexity of genomes of lower taxons and (4) similar genetic switches of functionally similar but non-homologous developmental programs. Here I propose an experimentally testable hypothesis of Universal Genome that addresses these questions. According to this model, (a) the Universal Genome that encodes all major developmental programs essential for various phyla of Metazoa emerged in a unicellular or a primitive multicellular organism shortly before the Cambrian period; (b) The Metazoan phyla, all having similar genomes, are nonetheless so distinct because they utilize specific combinations of developmental programs. This model has two major predictions, first that a significant fraction of genetic information in lower taxons must be functionally useless but becomes useful in higher taxons, and second that one should be able to turn on in lower taxons some of the complex latent developmental programs, e.g., a program of eye development or antibody synthesis in sea urchin. An example of natural turning on of a complex latent program in a lower taxon is discussed.

  7. 77 FR 20646 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-05

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    2010-02-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed.... Nakamura, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Human Genome Research...-402-0838. (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome...

  18. 76 FR 9031 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed..., PhD, Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes... . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes...

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    2012-10-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed...: Camilla E. Day, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National... . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes...

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    2011-02-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed.... Nakamura, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Human Genome Research...-402-0838. (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome...

  1. 75 FR 32957 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel, Protein Resource RFA... of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes...

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    2010-02-26

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  8. 77 FR 50140 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2012-08-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed.... Day, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National... . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes of...

  9. 77 FR 35991 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2012-06-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed...: Camilla E. Day, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National... . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes of...

  10. 75 FR 48977 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed.... Day, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National... . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes of...

  11. 76 FR 66731 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2011-10-27

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    2010-09-15

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    2011-04-08

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  15. 75 FR 62548 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2010-10-12

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    2010-09-01

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    2011-08-15

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-22

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  20. 76 FR 28056 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-13

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  1. 77 FR 64816 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-23

    ... intramural programs and projects conducted by the National Human Genome Research Institute, including... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Meeting... hereby given of a meeting of the Board of Scientific Counselors, National Human Genome Research Institute...

  2. 78 FR 70063 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-22

    ... individual intramural programs and projects conducted by the NATIONAL HUMAN GENOME RESEARCH INSTITUTE... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed....), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the Board of Scientific Counselors, National Human Genome Research...

  3. 76 FR 65204 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-20

    ... intramural programs and projects conducted by the National Human Genome Research Institute, including... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Meeting... hereby given of a meeting of the Board of Scientific Counselors, National Human Genome Research Institute...

  4. Marine genomics: News and views.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Ângela M; Foote, Andrew D; Kupczok, Anne; Frazão, Bárbara; Limborg, Morten T; Piñeiro, Rosalía; Abalde, Samuel; Rocha, Sara; da Fonseca, Rute R

    2017-02-01

    Marine ecosystems occupy 71% of the surface of our planet, yet we know little about their diversity. Although the inventory of species is continually increasing, as registered by the Census of Marine Life program, only about 10% of the estimated two million marine species are known. This lag between observed and estimated diversity is in part due to the elusiveness of most aquatic species and the technical difficulties of exploring extreme environments, as for instance the abyssal plains and polar waters. In the last decade, the rapid development of affordable and flexible high-throughput sequencing approaches have been helping to improve our knowledge of marine biodiversity, from the rich microbial biota that forms the base of the tree of life to a wealth of plant and animal species. In this review, we present an overview of the applications of genomics to the study of marine life, from evolutionary biology of non-model organisms to species of commercial relevance for fishing, aquaculture and biomedicine. Instead of providing an exhaustive list of available genomic data, we rather set to present contextualized examples that best represent the current status of the field of marine genomics.

  5. Multiple models for Rosaceae genomics.

    PubMed

    Shulaev, Vladimir; Korban, Schuyler S; Sosinski, Bryon; Abbott, Albert G; Aldwinckle, Herb S; Folta, Kevin M; Iezzoni, Amy; Main, Dorrie; Arús, Pere; Dandekar, Abhaya M; Lewers, Kim; Brown, Susan K; Davis, Thomas M; Gardiner, Susan E; Potter, Daniel; Veilleux, Richard E

    2008-07-01

    The plant family Rosaceae consists of over 100 genera and 3,000 species that include many important fruit, nut, ornamental, and wood crops. Members of this family provide high-value nutritional foods and contribute desirable aesthetic and industrial products. Most rosaceous crops have been enhanced by human intervention through sexual hybridization, asexual propagation, and genetic improvement since ancient times, 4,000 to 5,000 B.C. Modern breeding programs have contributed to the selection and release of numerous cultivars having significant economic impact on the U.S. and world markets. In recent years, the Rosaceae community, both in the United States and internationally, has benefited from newfound organization and collaboration that have hastened progress in developing genetic and genomic resources for representative crops such as apple (Malus spp.), peach (Prunus spp.), and strawberry (Fragaria spp.). These resources, including expressed sequence tags, bacterial artificial chromosome libraries, physical and genetic maps, and molecular markers, combined with genetic transformation protocols and bioinformatics tools, have rendered various rosaceous crops highly amenable to comparative and functional genomics studies. This report serves as a synopsis of the resources and initiatives of the Rosaceae community, recent developments in Rosaceae genomics, and plans to apply newly accumulated knowledge and resources toward breeding and crop improvement.

  6. State of cat genomics.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Stephen J; Johnson, Warren; Driscoll, Carlos; Pontius, Joan; Pecon-Slattery, Jill; Menotti-Raymond, Marilyn

    2008-06-01

    Our knowledge of cat family biology was recently expanded to include a genomics perspective with the completion of a draft whole genome sequence of an Abyssinian cat. The utility of the new genome information has been demonstrated by applications ranging from disease gene discovery and comparative genomics to species conservation. Patterns of genomic organization among cats and inbred domestic cat breeds have illuminated our view of domestication, revealing linkage disequilibrium tracks consequent of breed formation, defining chromosome exchanges that punctuated major lineages of mammals and suggesting ancestral continental migration events that led to 37 modern species of Felidae. We review these recent advances here. As the genome resources develop, the cat is poised to make a major contribution to many areas in genetics and biology.

  7. Genomics of oral bacteria.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Margaret J

    2003-01-01

    Advances in bacterial genetics came with the discovery of the genetic code, followed by the development of recombinant DNA technologies. Now the field is undergoing a new revolution because of investigators' ability to sequence and assemble complete bacterial genomes. Over 200 genome projects have been completed or are in progress, and the oral microbiology research community has benefited through projects for oral bacteria and their non-oral-pathogen relatives. This review describes features of several oral bacterial genomes, and emphasizes the themes of species relationships, comparative genomics, and lateral gene transfer. Genomics is having a broad impact on basic research in microbial pathogenesis, and will lead to new approaches in clinical research and therapeutics. The oral microbiota is a unique community especially suited for new challenges to sequence the metagenomes of microbial consortia, and the genomes of uncultivable bacteria.

  8. Brad Ozenberger, Ph.D., Presents the Achievements of The Cancer Genome Atlas During its Early Years - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Brad Ozenberger, former TCGA Program Director for the National Human Genome Research Institute, describes the goals and achievements of TCGA during its pilot phase, which involved the genomic characterization of brain, ovarian, and lung cancers.

  9. Developing a platform for genomic medicine in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Sanchez, Gerardo

    2003-04-11

    Mexico is preparing to develop a genomic medicine program focused on national health problems. Modern Mexicans result from an admixture of more than 65 native Indian groups with Spaniards, leading to a unique genetic makeup and a characteristic set of disease susceptibilities. Since 1999, more than 100 experts from different fields have joined efforts with government, academia, and industry to identify priorities and goals for genomic medicine in Mexico. The plan includes establishment of an Institute of Genomic Medicine with strong intramural and extramural programs. This project is expected to ease the social and financial burden of health problems in Mexico.

  10. Next Generation Characterisation of Cereal Genomes for Marker Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Visendi, Paul; Batley, Jacqueline; Edwards, David

    2013-01-01

    Cereal crops form the bulk of the world’s food sources, and thus their importance cannot be understated. Crop breeding programs increasingly rely on high-resolution molecular genetic markers to accelerate the breeding process. The development of these markers is hampered by the complexity of some of the major cereal crop genomes, as well as the time and cost required. In this review, we address current and future methods available for the characterisation of cereal genomes, with an emphasis on faster and more cost effective approaches for genome sequencing and the development of markers for trait association and marker assisted selection (MAS) in crop breeding programs. PMID:24833229

  11. Genomes by design

    PubMed Central

    Haimovich, Adrian D.; Muir, Paul; Isaacs, Farren J.

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation DNA sequencing has revealed the complete genome sequences of numerous organisms, establishing a fundamental and growing understanding of genetic variation and phenotypic diversity. Engineering at the gene, network and whole-genome scale aims to introduce targeted genetic changes both to explore emergent phenotypes and to introduce new functionalities. Expansion of these approaches into massively parallel platforms establishes the ability to generate targeted genome modifications, elucidating causal links between genotype and phenotype, as well as the ability to design and reprogramme organisms. In this Review, we explore techniques and applications in genome engineering, outlining key advances and defining challenges. PMID:26260262

  12. Genomics of Clostridium tetani.

    PubMed

    Brüggemann, Holger; Brzuszkiewicz, Elzbieta; Chapeton-Montes, Diana; Plourde, Lucile; Speck, Denis; Popoff, Michel R

    2015-05-01

    Genomic information about Clostridium tetani, the causative agent of the tetanus disease, is scarce. The genome of strain E88, a strain used in vaccine production, was sequenced about 10 years ago. One additional genome (strain 12124569) has recently been released. Here we report three new genomes of C. tetani and describe major differences among all five C. tetani genomes. They all harbor tetanus-toxin-encoding plasmids that contain highly conserved genes for TeNT (tetanus toxin), TetR (transcriptional regulator of TeNT) and ColT (collagenase), but substantially differ in other plasmid regions. The chromosomes share a large core genome that contains about 85% of all genes of a given chromosome. The non-core chromosome comprises mainly prophage-like genomic regions and genes encoding environmental interaction and defense functions (e.g. surface proteins, restriction-modification systems, toxin-antitoxin systems, CRISPR/Cas systems) and other fitness functions (e.g. transport systems, metabolic activities). This new genome information will help to assess the level of genome plasticity of the species C. tetani and provide the basis for detailed comparative studies.

  13. Filarial and Wolbachia genomics

    PubMed Central

    SCOTT, A. L.; GHEDIN, E.; NUTMAN, T. B.; McREYNOLDS, L. A.; POOLE, C. B.; SLATKO, B. E.; FOSTER, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Filarial nematode parasites, the causative agents for a spectrum of acute and chronic diseases including lymphatic filariasis and river blindness, threaten the well-being and livelihood of hundreds of millions of people in the developing regions of the world. The 2007 publication on a draft assembly of the 95-Mb genome of the human filarial parasite Brugia malayi – representing the first helminth parasite genome to be sequenced – has been followed in rapid succession by projects that have resulted in the genome sequencing of six additional filarial species, seven nonfilarial nematode parasites of animals and nearly 30 plant parasitic and free-living species. Parallel to the genomic sequencing, transcriptomic and proteomic projects have facilitated genome annotation, expanded our understanding of stage-associated gene expression and provided a first look at the role of epigenetic regulation of filarial genomes through microRNAs. The expansion in filarial genomics will also provide a significant enrichment in our knowledge of the diversity and variability in the genomes of the endosymbiotic bacterium Wolbachia leading to a better understanding of the genetic principles that govern filarial–Wolbachia mutualism. The goal here is to provide an overview of the trends and advances in filarial and Wolbachia genomics. PMID:22098559

  14. Between Two Fern Genomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Ferns are the only major lineage of vascular plants not represented by a sequenced nuclear genome. This lack of genome sequence information significantly impedes our ability to understand and reconstruct genome evolution not only in ferns, but across all land plants. Azolla and Ceratopteris are ideal and complementary candidates to be the first ferns to have their nuclear genomes sequenced. They differ dramatically in genome size, life history, and habit, and thus represent the immense diversity of extant ferns. Together, this pair of genomes will facilitate myriad large-scale comparative analyses across ferns and all land plants. Here we review the unique biological characteristics of ferns and describe a number of outstanding questions in plant biology that will benefit from the addition of ferns to the set of taxa with sequenced nuclear genomes. We explain why the fern clade is pivotal for understanding genome evolution across land plants, and we provide a rationale for how knowledge of fern genomes will enable progress in research beyond the ferns themselves. PMID:25324969

  15. [Landscape and ecological genomics].

    PubMed

    Tetushkin, E Ia

    2013-10-01

    Landscape genomics is the modern version of landscape genetics, a discipline that arose approximately 10 years ago as a combination of population genetics, landscape ecology, and spatial statistics. It studies the effects of environmental variables on gene flow and other microevolutionary processes that determine genetic connectivity and variations in populations. In contrast to population genetics, it operates at the level of individual specimens rather than at the level of population samples. Another important difference between landscape genetics and genomics and population genetics is that, in the former, the analysis of gene flow and local adaptations takes quantitative account of landforms and features of the matrix, i.e., hostile spaces that separate species habitats. Landscape genomics is a part of population ecogenomics, which, along with community genomics, is a major part of ecological genomics. One of the principal purposes of landscape genomics is the identification and differentiation of various genome-wide and locus-specific effects. The approaches and computation tools developed for combined analysis of genomic and landscape variables make it possible to detect adaptation-related genome fragments, which facilitates the planning of conservation efforts and the prediction of species' fate in response to expected changes in the environment.

  16. Between two fern genomes.

    PubMed

    Sessa, Emily B; Banks, Jo Ann; Barker, Michael S; Der, Joshua P; Duffy, Aaron M; Graham, Sean W; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu; Langdale, Jane; Li, Fay-Wei; Marchant, D Blaine; Pryer, Kathleen M; Rothfels, Carl J; Roux, Stanley J; Salmi, Mari L; Sigel, Erin M; Soltis, Douglas E; Soltis, Pamela S; Stevenson, Dennis W; Wolf, Paul G

    2014-01-01

    Ferns are the only major lineage of vascular plants not represented by a sequenced nuclear genome. This lack of genome sequence information significantly impedes our ability to understand and reconstruct genome evolution not only in ferns, but across all land plants. Azolla and Ceratopteris are ideal and complementary candidates to be the first ferns to have their nuclear genomes sequenced. They differ dramatically in genome size, life history, and habit, and thus represent the immense diversity of extant ferns. Together, this pair of genomes will facilitate myriad large-scale comparative analyses across ferns and all land plants. Here we review the unique biological characteristics of ferns and describe a number of outstanding questions in plant biology that will benefit from the addition of ferns to the set of taxa with sequenced nuclear genomes. We explain why the fern clade is pivotal for understanding genome evolution across land plants, and we provide a rationale for how knowledge of fern genomes will enable progress in research beyond the ferns themselves.

  17. The UCSC Genome Browser database: 2017 update.

    PubMed

    Tyner, Cath; Barber, Galt P; Casper, Jonathan; Clawson, Hiram; Diekhans, Mark; Eisenhart, Christopher; Fischer, Clayton M; Gibson, David; Gonzalez, Jairo Navarro; Guruvadoo, Luvina; Haeussler, Maximilian; Heitner, Steve; Hinrichs, Angie S; Karolchik, Donna; Lee, Brian T; Lee, Christopher M; Nejad, Parisa; Raney, Brian J; Rosenbloom, Kate R; Speir, Matthew L; Villarreal, Chris; Vivian, John; Zweig, Ann S; Haussler, David; Kuhn, Robert M; Kent, W James

    2017-01-04

    Since its 2001 debut, the University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC) Genome Browser (http://genome.ucsc.edu/) team has provided continuous support to the international genomics and biomedical communities through a web-based, open source platform designed for the fast, scalable display of sequence alignments and annotations landscaped against a vast collection of quality reference genome assemblies. The browser's publicly accessible databases are the backbone of a rich, integrated bioinformatics tool suite that includes a graphical interface for data queries and downloads, alignment programs, command-line utilities and more. This year's highlights include newly designed home and gateway pages; a new 'multi-region' track display configuration for exon-only, gene-only and custom regions visualization; new genome browsers for three species (brown kiwi, crab-eating macaque and Malayan flying lemur); eight updated genome assemblies; extended support for new data types such as CRAM, RNA-seq expression data and long-range chromatin interaction pairs; and the unveiling of a new supported mirror site in Japan. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. Genomic sequencing of Pleistocene cave bears

    SciTech Connect

    Noonan, James P.; Hofreiter, Michael; Smith, Doug; Priest, JamesR.; Rohland, Nadin; Rabeder, Gernot; Krause, Johannes; Detter, J. Chris; Paabo, Svante; Rubin, Edward M.

    2005-04-01

    Despite the information content of genomic DNA, ancient DNA studies to date have largely been limited to amplification of mitochondrial DNA due to technical hurdles such as contamination and degradation of ancient DNAs. In this study, we describe two metagenomic libraries constructed using unamplified DNA extracted from the bones of two 40,000-year-old extinct cave bears. Analysis of {approx}1 Mb of sequence from each library showed that, despite significant microbial contamination, 5.8 percent and 1.1 percent of clones in the libraries contain cave bear inserts, yielding 26,861 bp of cave bear genome sequence. Alignment of this sequence to the dog genome, the closest sequenced genome to cave bear in terms of evolutionary distance, revealed roughly the expected ratio of cave bear exons, repeats and conserved noncoding sequences. Only 0.04 percent of all clones sequenced were derived from contamination with modern human DNA. Comparison of cave bear with orthologous sequences from several modern bear species revealed the evolutionary relationship of these lineages. Using the metagenomic approach described here, we have recovered substantial quantities of mammalian genomic sequence more than twice as old as any previously reported, establishing the feasibility of ancient DNA genomic sequencing programs.

  19. The UCSC Genome Browser database: 2017 update

    PubMed Central

    Tyner, Cath; Barber, Galt P.; Casper, Jonathan; Clawson, Hiram; Diekhans, Mark; Eisenhart, Christopher; Fischer, Clayton M.; Gibson, David; Gonzalez, Jairo Navarro; Guruvadoo, Luvina; Haeussler, Maximilian; Heitner, Steve; Hinrichs, Angie S.; Karolchik, Donna; Lee, Brian T.; Lee, Christopher M.; Nejad, Parisa; Raney, Brian J.; Rosenbloom, Kate R.; Speir, Matthew L.; Villarreal, Chris; Vivian, John; Zweig, Ann S.; Haussler, David; Kuhn, Robert M.; Kent, W. James

    2017-01-01

    Since its 2001 debut, the University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC) Genome Browser (http://genome.ucsc.edu/) team has provided continuous support to the international genomics and biomedical communities through a web-based, open source platform designed for the fast, scalable display of sequence alignments and annotations landscaped against a vast collection of quality reference genome assemblies. The browser's publicly accessible databases are the backbone of a rich, integrated bioinformatics tool suite that includes a graphical interface for data queries and downloads, alignment programs, command-line utilities and more. This year's highlights include newly designed home and gateway pages; a new ‘multi-region’ track display configuration for exon-only, gene-only and custom regions visualization; new genome browsers for three species (brown kiwi, crab-eating macaque and Malayan flying lemur); eight updated genome assemblies; extended support for new data types such as CRAM, RNA-seq expression data and long-range chromatin interaction pairs; and the unveiling of a new supported mirror site in Japan. PMID:27899642

  20. MIPS plant genome information resources.

    PubMed

    Spannagl, Manuel; Haberer, Georg; Ernst, Rebecca; Schoof, Heiko; Mayer, Klaus F X

    2007-01-01

    The Munich Institute for Protein Sequences (MIPS) has been involved in maintaining plant genome databases since the Arabidopsis thaliana genome project. Genome databases and analysis resources have focused on individual genomes and aim to provide flexible and maintainable data sets for model plant genomes as a backbone against which experimental data, for example from high-throughput functional genomics, can be organized and evaluated. In addition, model genomes also form a scaffold for comparative genomics, and much can be learned from genome-wide evolutionary studies.

  1. Exploring Horizons for Domestic Animal Genomics: Workshop Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources, Board on Life Sciences, Division on Earth and Life Studies, National Research Council by Robert Pool and Kim Waddell

    2002-09-03

    Recognizing the important contributions that genomics analysis can make to agriculture,production and companion animal science, evolutionary biology and human health with respect to the creation of models for genetic disorders, the National Academies convened a group of individuals to plan a public workshop that would (1) assess these contributions; (2) identify potential research directions for existing genomics programs; and (3) highlight the opportunities of a coordinated, multi-species genomics effort for the science and policymaking communities. Their efforts culminated in a workshop the goal of which was to focus on domestic animal genomics and its integration with other genomics and functional genomics projects. A summary and synthesis of the discussion was produced and is a factual account of what occurred at the workshop.

  2. Genomics of pear and other Rosaceae fruit trees

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Toshiya; Terakami, Shingo

    2016-01-01

    The family Rosaceae includes many economically important fruit trees, such as pear, apple, peach, cherry, quince, apricot, plum, raspberry, and loquat. Over the past few years, whole-genome sequences have been released for Chinese pear, European pear, apple, peach, Japanese apricot, and strawberry. These sequences help us to conduct functional and comparative genomics studies and to develop new cultivars with desirable traits by marker-assisted selection in breeding programs. These genomics resources also allow identification of evolutionary relationships in Rosaceae, development of genome-wide SNP and SSR markers, and construction of reference genetic linkage maps, which are available through the Genome Database for the Rosaceae website. Here, we review the recent advances in genomics studies and their practical applications for Rosaceae fruit trees, particularly pear, apple, peach, and cherry. PMID:27069399

  3. Genomics of pear and other Rosaceae fruit trees.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Toshiya; Terakami, Shingo

    2016-01-01

    The family Rosaceae includes many economically important fruit trees, such as pear, apple, peach, cherry, quince, apricot, plum, raspberry, and loquat. Over the past few years, whole-genome sequences have been released for Chinese pear, European pear, apple, peach, Japanese apricot, and strawberry. These sequences help us to conduct functional and comparative genomics studies and to develop new cultivars with desirable traits by marker-assisted selection in breeding programs. These genomics resources also allow identification of evolutionary relationships in Rosaceae, development of genome-wide SNP and SSR markers, and construction of reference genetic linkage maps, which are available through the Genome Database for the Rosaceae website. Here, we review the recent advances in genomics studies and their practical applications for Rosaceae fruit trees, particularly pear, apple, peach, and cherry.

  4. Advances and Challenges in Genomic Selection for Disease Resistance.

    PubMed

    Poland, Jesse; Rutkoski, Jessica

    2016-08-04

    Breeding for disease resistance is a central focus of plant breeding programs, as any successful variety must have the complete package of high yield, disease resistance, agronomic performance, and end-use quality. With the need to accelerate the development of improved varieties, genomics-assisted breeding is becoming an important tool in breeding programs. With marker-assisted selection, there has been success in breeding for disease resistance; however, much of this work and research has focused on identifying, mapping, and selecting for major resistance genes that tend to be highly effective but vulnerable to breakdown with rapid changes in pathogen races. In contrast, breeding for minor-gene quantitative resistance tends to produce more durable varieties but is a more challenging breeding objective. As the genetic architecture of resistance shifts from single major R genes to a diffused architecture of many minor genes, the best approach for molecular breeding will shift from marker-assisted selection to genomic selection. Genomics-assisted breeding for quantitative resistance will therefore necessitate whole-genome prediction models and selection methodology as implemented for classical complex traits such as yield. Here, we examine multiple case studies testing whole-genome prediction models and genomic selection for disease resistance. In general, whole-genome models for disease resistance can produce prediction accuracy suitable for application in breeding. These models also largely outperform multiple linear regression as would be applied in marker-assisted selection. With the implementation of genomic selection for yield and other agronomic traits, whole-genome marker profiles will be available for the entire set of breeding lines, enabling genomic selection for disease at no additional direct cost. In this context, the scope of implementing genomics selection for disease resistance, and specifically for quantitative resistance and quarantined pathogens

  5. Promoting Public Awareness and Engagement in Genome Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Haga, Susanne B.; Rosanbalm, Katie D.; Boles, Larry; Tindall, Genevieve M.; Livingston, Troy M.; O'Daniel, Julianne M.

    2013-01-01

    Public understanding of genetic concepts and associated ethical and policy issues can enable informed deliberation and decision-making. Effective strategies for increasing public understanding involve providing forums incorporating the unique perspectives and attitudes of the public, while allowing opportunities to learn first-hand from scientists about genome research and related applications. Through a partnership between the Duke Institute for Genome Sciences & Policy (IGSP) and the Museum of Life and Science in Durham, NC, we developed and piloted a program aimed to bridge the concepts of formal (public school) and informal (community-based science museum) science learning with the experiential context of family and participatory learning. Called Genome Diner, we piloted the program with 40 genetic/genomic researchers, 76 middle school students and their parents (n=83) from Durham, NC. Program impact was assessed via pre/post surveys for each participant group. Following participation, parents were significantly more likely to correctly interpret the implications of a genome research finding, and both students and parents indicated higher interest in research as well as higher confidence in accessing and understanding genome research. Genetic literacy of parents and students was not affected by participation in the program, likely due to the relatively high knowledge scores pre-Diner: 88.3% and 78.5%, respectively. The interactive format of Genome Diner provided an opportunity for students and parents to explore and discuss interests and issues about genomic research alongside genome scientists, positively influencing attitudes toward genetic research and researchers themselves. These interactions are critical for maintaining public interest and knowledge about genomic research and applications. PMID:23435715

  6. Genome Biology of the Cyclostomes and Insights into the Evolutionary Biology of Vertebrate Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J. J.; Saha, N. R.; Amemiya, C. T.

    2010-01-01

    The jawless vertebrates (lamprey and hagfish) are the closest extant outgroups to all jawed vertebrates (gnathostomes) and can therefore provide critical insight into the evolution and basic biology of vertebrate genomes. As such, it is notable that the genomes of lamprey and hagfish posses a capacity for rearrangement that is beyond anything known from the gnathostomes. Like the jawed vertebrates, lamprey and hagfish undergo rearrangement of adaptive immune receptors. However, the receptors and the mechanisms for rearrangement that are utilized by jawless vertebrates clearly evolved independently of the gnathostome system. Unlike the jawed vertebrates, lamprey and hagfish also undergo extensive programmed rearrangements of the genome during embryonic development. By considering these fascinating genome biologies in the context of proposed (albeit contentious) phylogenetic relationships among lamprey, hagfish, and gnathostomes, we can begin to understand the evolutionary history of the vertebrate genome. Specifically, the deep shared ancestry and rapid divergence of lampreys, hagfish and gnathostomes is considered evidence that the two versions of programmed rearrangement present in lamprey and hagfish (embryonic and immune receptor) were present in an ancestral lineage that existed more than 400 million years ago and perhaps included the ancestor of the jawed vertebrates. Validating this premise will require better characterization of the genome sequence and mechanisms of rearrangement in lamprey and hagfish. PMID:21558194

  7. Home - The Cancer Genome Atlas - Cancer Genome - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) is a comprehensive and coordinated effort to accelerate our understanding of the molecular basis of cancer through the application of genome analysis technologies, including large-scale genome sequencing.

  8. The Genomic Evolution of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: DoD Award W81XWH-13-1-0451 TITLE: The Genomic Evolution of Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: David VanderWeele, M.D...CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0451 W81XWH-13-1-0451 W81XWH-13-1-0451 The Genomic Evolution of Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...addition, multiple genetic alterations are associated with disease evolution in response to therapy. This project aims to characterize evolution of

  9. Alfresco—A Workbench for Comparative Genomic Sequence Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jareborg, Niclas; Durbin, Richard

    2000-01-01

    Comparative analysis of genomic sequences provides a powerful tool for identifying regions of potential biologic function; by comparing corresponding regions of genomes from suitable species, protein coding or regulatory regions can be identified by their homology. This requires the use of several specific types of computational analysis tools. Many programs exist for these types of analysis; not many exist for overall view/control of the results, which is necessary for large-scale genomic sequence analysis. Using Java, we have developed a new visualization tool that allows effective comparative genome sequence analysis. The program handles a pair of sequences from putatively homologous regions in different species. Results from various different existing external analysis programs, such as database searching, gene prediction, repeat masking, and alignment programs, are visualized and used to find corresponding functional sequence domains in the two sequences. The user interacts with the program through a graphic display of the genome regions, in which an independently scrollable and zoomable symbolic representation of the sequences is shown. As an example, the analysis of two unannotated orthologous genomic sequences from human and mouse containing parts of the UTY locus is presented. PMID:10958633

  10. TNF-α modulates genome-wide redistribution of ΔNp63α/TAp73 and NF-κB c-REL interactive binding on TP53 and AP-1 motifs to promote an oncogenic gene program in squamous cancer

    PubMed Central

    Si, Han; Lu, Hai; Yang, Xinping; Mattox, Austin; Jang, Minyoung; Bian, Yansong; Sano, Eleanor; Viadiu, Hector; Yan, Bin; Yau, Christina; Ng, Sam; Lee, Steven K.; Romano, Rose-Anne; Davis, Sean; Walker, Robert L.; Xiao, Wenming; Sun, Hongwei; Wei, Lai; Sinha, Satrajit; Benz, Christopher C; Stuart, Joshua M.; Meltzer, Paul S.; Van Waes, Carter; Chen, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) network study of 12 cancer types (PanCancer 12) revealed frequent mutation of TP53, and amplification and expression of related TP63 isoform ΔNp63 in squamous cancers. Further, aberrant expression of inflammatory genes and TP53/p63/p73 targets were detected in the PanCancer 12 project, reminiscent of gene programs co-modulated by cREL/ΔNp63/TAp73 transcription factors we uncovered in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). However, how inflammatory gene signatures and cREL/p63/p73 targets are co-modulated genome-wide is unclear. Here, we examined how inflammatory factor TNF-α broadly modulates redistribution of cREL with ΔNp63α/TAp73 complexes and signatures genome-wide in the HNSCC model UM-SCC46 using chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq). TNF-α enhanced genome-wide co-occupancy of cREL with ΔNp63α on TP53/p63 sites, while unexpectedly promoting redistribution of TAp73 from TP53 to Activator Protein-1 (AP-1) sites. cREL, ΔNp63α, and TAp73 binding and oligomerization on NF-κB, TP53 or AP-1 specific sequences were independently validated by ChIP-qPCR, oligonucleotide-binding assays, and analytical ultracentrifugation. Function of the binding activity was confirmed using TP53, AP-1, and NF-κB specific response elements, or p21, SERPINE1, and IL-6 promoter luciferase reporter activities. Concurrently, TNF-α regulated a broad gene network with co-binding activities for cREL, ΔNp63α, and TAp73 observed upon array profiling and RT-PCR. Overlapping target gene signatures were observed in squamous cancer subsets and in inflamed skin of transgenic mice overexpressing ΔNp63α. Furthermore, multiple target genes identified in this study were linked to TP63 and TP73 activity and increased gene expression in large squamous cancer samples from PanCancer 12 TCGA by CircleMap. PARADIGM inferred pathway analysis revealed the network connection of TP63 and NF-κB complexes through an AP-1 hub, further supporting

  11. The Drosophila genome nexus: a population genomic resource of 623 Drosophila melanogaster genomes, including 197 from a single ancestral range population.

    PubMed

    Lack, Justin B; Cardeno, Charis M; Crepeau, Marc W; Taylor, William; Corbett-Detig, Russell B; Stevens, Kristian A; Langley, Charles H; Pool, John E

    2015-04-01

    Hundreds of wild-derived Drosophila melanogaster genomes have been published, but rigorous comparisons across data sets are precluded by differences in alignment methodology. The most common approach to reference-based genome assembly is a single round of alignment followed by quality filtering and variant detection. We evaluated variations and extensions of this approach and settled on an assembly strategy that utilizes two alignment programs and incorporates both substitutions and short indels to construct an updated reference for a second round of mapping prior to final variant detection. Utilizing this approach, we reassembled published D. melanogaster population genomic data sets and added unpublished genomes from several sub-Saharan populations. Most notably, we present aligned data from phase 3 of the Drosophila Population Genomics Project (DPGP3), which provides 197 genomes from a single ancestral range population of D. melanogaster (from Zambia). The large sample size, high genetic diversity, and potentially simpler demographic history of the DPGP3 sample will make this a highly valuable resource for fundamental population genetic research. The complete set of assemblies described here, termed the Drosophila Genome Nexus, presently comprises 623 consistently aligned genomes and is publicly available in multiple formats with supporting documentation and bioinformatic tools. This resource will greatly facilitate population genomic analysis in this model species by reducing the methodological differences between data sets. Copyright © 2015 by the Genetics Society of America.

  12. The emerging genomics and systems biology research lead to systems genomics studies.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mary Qu; Yoshigoe, Kenji; Yang, William; Tong, Weida; Qin, Xiang; Dunker, A; Chen, Zhongxue; Arbania, Hamid R; Liu, Jun S; Niemierko, Andrzej; Yang, Jack Y

    2014-01-01

    Synergistically integrating multi-layer genomic data at systems level not only can lead to deeper insights into the molecular mechanisms related to disease initiation and progression, but also can guide pathway-based biomarker and drug target identification. With the advent of high-throughput next-generation sequencing technologies, sequencing both DNA and RNA has generated multi-layer genomic data that can provide DNA polymorphism, non-coding RNA, messenger RNA, gene expression, isoform and alternative splicing information. Systems biology on the other hand studies complex biological systems, particularly systematic study of complex molecular interactions within specific cells or organisms. Genomics and molecular systems biology can be merged into the study of genomic profiles and implicated biological functions at cellular or organism level. The prospectively emerging field can be referred to as systems genomics or genomic systems biology. The Mid-South Bioinformatics Centre (MBC) and Joint Bioinformatics Ph.D. Program of University of Arkansas at Little Rock and University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences are particularly interested in promoting education and research advancement in this prospectively emerging field. Based on past investigations and research outcomes, MBC is further utilizing differential gene and isoform/exon expression from RNA-seq and co-regulation from the ChiP-seq specific for different phenotypes in combination with protein-protein interactions, and protein-DNA interactions to construct high-level gene networks for an integrative genome-phoneme investigation at systems biology level.

  13. Integrative genomic analysis by interoperation of bioinformatics tools in GenomeSpace

    PubMed Central

    Thorvaldsdottir, Helga; Liefeld, Ted; Ocana, Marco; Borges-Rivera, Diego; Pochet, Nathalie; Robinson, James T.; Demchak, Barry; Hull, Tim; Ben-Artzi, Gil; Blankenberg, Daniel; Barber, Galt P.; Lee, Brian T.; Kuhn, Robert M.; Nekrutenko, Anton; Segal, Eran; Ideker, Trey; Reich, Michael; Regev, Aviv; Chang, Howard Y.; Mesirov, Jill P.

    2015-01-01

    Integrative analysis of multiple data types to address complex biomedical questions requires the use of multiple software tools in concert and remains an enormous challenge for most of the biomedical research community. Here we introduce GenomeSpace (http://www.genomespace.org), a cloud-based, cooperative community resource. Seeded as a collaboration of six of the most popular genomics analysis tools, GenomeSpace now supports the streamlined interaction of 20 bioinformatics tools and data resources. To facilitate the ability of non-programming users’ to leverage GenomeSpace in integrative analysis, it offers a growing set of ‘recipes’, short workflows involving a few tools and steps to guide investigators through high utility analysis tasks. PMID:26780094

  14. Automated Microbial Genome Annotation

    SciTech Connect

    Land, Miriam

    2009-05-29

    Miriam Land of the DOE Joint Genome Institute at Oak Ridge National Laboratory gives a talk on the current state and future challenges of moving toward automated microbial genome annotation at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

  15. Phanerochaete chrysosporium genomics

    Treesearch

    Luis F. Larrondo; Rafael Vicuna; Dan Cullen

    2005-01-01

    A high quality draft genome sequence has been generated for the lignocellulose-degrading basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium (Martinez et al. 2004). Analysis of the genome in the context of previously established genetics and physiology is presented. Transposable elements and their potential relationship to genes involved in lignin degradation are systematically...

  16. Unlocking the bovine genome

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The draft genome sequence of cattle (Bos taurus) has now been analyzed by the Bovine Genome Sequencing and Analysis Consortium and the Bovine HapMap Consortium, which together represent an extensive collaboration involving more than 300 scientists from 25 different countries. ...

  17. Genomics for Weed Science

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Numerous genomic-based studies have provided insight to the physiological and evolutionary processes involved in developmental and environmental processes of model plants such as arabidopsis and rice. However, far fewer efforts have been attempted to use genomic resources to study physiological and ...

  18. The cybernetic genome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    We propose a new picture of the genome as an adaptive cybernetic unit with self-awareness. We further propose that under colonial stress bacteria employ genetic communication which leads to the emergence of creative genomic web or “global brain”.

  19. Genetics and Genomics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Good progress is being made on genetics and genomics of sugar beet, however it is in process and the tools are now being generated and some results are being analyzed. The GABI BeetSeq project released a first draft of the sugar beet genome of KWS2320, a dihaploid (see http://bvseq.molgen.mpg.de/Gen...

  20. Genomics of Disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This edited book represents the 23rd symposium in the Stadler Genetics Symposia series, and the general theme of this conference was "The Genomics of Disease." The 24 national and international speakers were invited to discuss their world-class research into the advances that genomics has made on c...

  1. The Future of Microbial Genomics

    SciTech Connect

    Kyrpides, Nikos

    2010-06-02

    Nikos Kyrpides, head of the Genome Biology group at the DOE Joint Genome Institute discusses current challenges in the field of microbial genomics on June 2, 2010 at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

  2. AutoGenomics, Inc.

    PubMed

    Vairavan, Ram

    2004-07-01

    AutoGenomics has created an automated multiplexing microarray platform to make genomic and proteomic analyses routine and efficient for clinical and research laboratories. While the emergence of microarrays has advanced genomic analyses, a number of underlying issues, such as cross-hybridization, poor spot morphology and intrinsic fluorescence of the solid substrate, have yet to be fully resolved. Current methods use discrete instrumentation, are manual and require highly skilled labor, which leads to inconsistent results. AutoGenomics' automated platform uses a three-dimensional BioFilmChip microarray to circumvent these issues, providing optimal spot morphology and utilizing solution-based hybridization with allele-specific primer extension to improve single-base discrimination. AutoGenomics is developing applications for the early detection and management of complex disease states in oncology, cardiology, and mental disorders. Customers include clinical reference laboratories, hospitals, academic institutions, and pharmaceutical and biotech companies. Founded in 1999, the company is headquartered in Carlsbad, California, USA.

  3. Microbial Genomes Multiply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doolittle, Russell F.

    2002-01-01

    The publication of the first complete sequence of a bacterial genome in 1995 was a signal event, underscored by the fact that the article has been cited more than 2,100 times during the intervening seven years. It was a marvelous technical achievement, made possible by automatic DNA-sequencing machines. The feat is the more impressive in that complete genome sequencing has now been adopted in many different laboratories around the world. Four years ago in these columns I examined the situation after a dozen microbial genomes had been completed. Now, with upwards of 60 microbial genome sequences determined and twice that many in progress, it seems reasonable to assess just what is being learned. Are new concepts emerging about how cells work? Have there been practical benefits in the fields of medicine and agriculture? Is it feasible to determine the genomic sequence of every bacterial species on Earth? The answers to these questions maybe Yes, Perhaps, and No, respectively.

  4. The UCSC Genome Browser

    PubMed Central

    Karolchik, Donna; Hinrichs, Angie S.; Kent, W. James

    2011-01-01

    The University of California Santa Cruz (UCSC) Genome Browser is a popular Web-based tool for quickly displaying a requested portion of a genome at any scale, accompanied by a series of aligned annotation “tracks.” The annotations generated by the UCSC Genome Bioinformatics Group and external collaborators include gene predictions, mRNA and expressed sequence tag alignments, simple nucleotide polymorphisms, expression and regulatory data, phenotype and variation data, and pairwise and multiple-species comparative genomics data. All information relevant to a region is presented in one window, facilitating biological analysis and interpretation. The database tables underlying the Genome Browser tracks can be viewed, downloaded, and manipulated using another Web-based application, the UCSC Table Browser. Users can upload personal datasets in a wide variety of formats as custom annotation tracks in both browsers for research or educational purposes. PMID:21975940

  5. Microbial Genomes Multiply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doolittle, Russell F.

    2002-01-01

    The publication of the first complete sequence of a bacterial genome in 1995 was a signal event, underscored by the fact that the article has been cited more than 2,100 times during the intervening seven years. It was a marvelous technical achievement, made possible by automatic DNA-sequencing machines. The feat is the more impressive in that complete genome sequencing has now been adopted in many different laboratories around the world. Four years ago in these columns I examined the situation after a dozen microbial genomes had been completed. Now, with upwards of 60 microbial genome sequences determined and twice that many in progress, it seems reasonable to assess just what is being learned. Are new concepts emerging about how cells work? Have there been practical benefits in the fields of medicine and agriculture? Is it feasible to determine the genomic sequence of every bacterial species on Earth? The answers to these questions maybe Yes, Perhaps, and No, respectively.

  6. Comparative genomics of nematodes.

    PubMed

    Mitreva, Makedonka; Blaxter, Mark L; Bird, David M; McCarter, James P

    2005-10-01

    Recent transcriptome and genome projects have dramatically expanded the biological data available across the phylum Nematoda. Here we summarize analyses of these sequences, which have revealed multiple unexpected results. Despite a uniform body plan, nematodes are more diverse at the molecular level than was previously recognized, with many species- and group-specific novel genes. In the genus Caenorhabditis, changes in chromosome arrangement, particularly local inversions, are also rapid, with breakpoints occurring at 50-fold the rate in vertebrates. Tylenchid plant parasitic nematode genomes contain several genes closely related to genes in bacteria, implicating horizontal gene transfer events in the origins of plant parasitism. Functional genomics techniques are also moving from Caenorhabditis elegans to application throughout the phylum. Soon, eight more draft nematode genome sequences will be available. This unique resource will underpin both molecular understanding of these most abundant metazoan organisms and aid in the examination of the dynamics of genome evolution in animals.

  7. Evolution of Genome Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Koonin, Eugene V.

    2012-01-01

    Charles Darwin believed that all traits of organisms have been honed to near perfection by natural selection. The empirical basis underlying Darwin’s conclusions consisted of numerous observations made by him and other naturalists on the exquisite adaptations of animals and plants to their natural habitats and on the impressive results of artificial selection. Darwin fully appreciated the importance of heredity but was unaware of the nature and, in fact, the very existence of genomes. A century and a half after the publication of the “Origin”, we have the opportunity to draw conclusions from the comparisons of hundreds of genome sequences from all walks of life. These comparisons suggest that the dominant mode of genome evolution is quite different from that of the phenotypic evolution. The genomes of vertebrates, those purported paragons of biological perfection, turned out to be veritable junkyards of selfish genetic elements where only a small fraction of the genetic material is dedicated to encoding biologically relevant information. In sharp contrast, genomes of microbes and viruses are incomparably more compact, with most of the genetic material assigned to distinct biological functions. However, even in these genomes, the specific genome organization (gene order) is poorly conserved. The results of comparative genomics lead to the conclusion that the genome architecture is not a straightforward result of continuous adaptation but rather is determined by the balance between the selection pressure, that is itself dependent on the effective population size and mutation rate, the level of recombination, and the activity of selfish elements. Although genes and, in many cases, multigene regions of genomes possess elaborate architectures that ensure regulation of expression, these arrangements are evolutionarily volatile and typically change substantially even on short evolutionary scales when gene sequences diverge minimally. Thus, the observed genome

  8. Entering the Public Health Genomics Era: Why Must Health Educators Develop Genomic Competencies?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Lei-Shih; Goodson, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    Although the completion of the Human Genome Project will offer new insight into diseases and help develop efficient, personalized treatment or prevention programs, it will also raise new and non-trivial public health issues. Many of these issues fall under the professional purview of public health workers. As members of the public health…

  9. Maintaining Genome Stability in the Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    McKinnon, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Active maintenance of genome stability is a prerequisite for the development and function of the nervous system. The high replication index during neurogenesis and the long life of mature neurons highlight the need for efficient cellular programs to safeguard genetic fidelity. Multiple DNA damage response pathways ensure that replication stress and other types of DNA lesions such as oxidative damage do not impact neural homeostasis. Numerous human neurologic syndromes result from defective DNA damage signaling and compromised genome integrity. These syndromes can involve different neuropathology, which highlights the diverse maintenance roles required for genome stability in the nervous system. Understanding how DNA damage signaling pathways promote neural development and preserve homeostasis is essential for understanding fundamental brain function. PMID:24165679

  10. Genomic sequencing of Pleistocene cave bears.

    PubMed

    Noonan, James P; Hofreiter, Michael; Smith, Doug; Priest, James R; Rohland, Nadin; Rabeder, Gernot; Krause, Johannes; Detter, J Chris; Pääbo, Svante; Rubin, Edward M

    2005-07-22

    Despite the greater information content of genomic DNA, ancient DNA studies have largely been limited to the amplification of mitochondrial sequences. Here we describe metagenomic libraries constructed with unamplified DNA extracted from skeletal remains of two 40,000-year-old extinct cave bears. Analysis of approximately 1 megabase of sequence from each library showed that despite significant microbial contamination, 5.8 and 1.1% of clones contained cave bear inserts, yielding 26,861 base pairs of cave bear genome sequence. Comparison of cave bear and modern bear sequences revealed the evolutionary relationship of these lineages. The metagenomic approach used here establishes the feasibility of ancient DNA genome sequencing programs.

  11. Implementing genomic medicine in the clinic: the future is here

    PubMed Central

    Manolio, Teri A.; Chisholm, Rex L.; Ozenberger, Brad; Roden, Dan M.; Williams, Marc S.; Wilson, Richard; Bick, David; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Brilliant, Murray H.; Eng, Charis; Frazer, Kelly A.; Korf, Bruce; Ledbetter, David H.; Lupski, James R.; Marsh, Clay; Mrazek, David; Murray, Michael F.; O'Donnell, Peter H.; Rader, Daniel J.; Relling, Mary V.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Valle, David; Weinshilboum, Richard; Green, Eric D.; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S.

    2013-01-01

    Although the potential for genomics to contribute to clinical care has long been anticipated, the pace of defining the risks and benefits of incorporating genomic findings into medical practice has been relatively slow. Several institutions have recently begun genomic medicine programs, encountering many of the same obstacles and developing the same solutions, often independently. Recognizing that successful early experiences can inform subsequent efforts, the National Human Genome Research Institute brought together a number of these groups to describe their ongoing projects and challenges, identify common infrastructure and research needs, and outline an implementation framework for investigating and introducing similar programs elsewhere. Chief among the challenges were limited evidence and consensus on which genomic variants were medically relevant; lack of reimbursement for genomically driven interventions; and burden to patients and clinicians of assaying, reporting, intervening, and following up genomic findings. Key infrastructure needs included an openly accessible knowledge base capturing sequence variants and their phenotypic associations and a framework for defining and cataloging clinically actionable variants. Multiple institutions are actively engaged in using genomic information in clinical care. Much of this work is being done in isolation and would benefit from more structured collaboration and sharing of best practices. Genet Med 2013:15(4):258–267 PMID:23306799

  12. The banana genome hub.

    PubMed

    Droc, Gaëtan; Larivière, Delphine; Guignon, Valentin; Yahiaoui, Nabila; This, Dominique; Garsmeur, Olivier; Dereeper, Alexis; Hamelin, Chantal; Argout, Xavier; Dufayard, Jean-François; Lengelle, Juliette; Baurens, Franc-Christophe; Cenci, Alberto; Pitollat, Bertrand; D'Hont, Angélique; Ruiz, Manuel; Rouard, Mathieu; Bocs, Stéphanie

    2013-01-01

    Banana is one of the world's favorite fruits and one of the most important crops for developing countries. The banana reference genome sequence (Musa acuminata) was recently released. Given the taxonomic position of Musa, the completed genomic sequence has particular comparative value to provide fresh insights about the evolution of the monocotyledons. The study of the banana genome has been enhanced by a number of tools and resources that allows harnessing its sequence. First, we set up essential tools such as a Community Annotation System, phylogenomics resources and metabolic pathways. Then, to support post-genomic efforts, we improved banana existing systems (e.g. web front end, query builder), we integrated available Musa data into generic systems (e.g. markers and genetic maps, synteny blocks), we have made interoperable with the banana hub, other existing systems containing Musa data (e.g. transcriptomics, rice reference genome, workflow manager) and finally, we generated new results from sequence analyses (e.g. SNP and polymorphism analysis). Several uses cases illustrate how the Banana Genome Hub can be used to study gene families. Overall, with this collaborative effort, we discuss the importance of the interoperability toward data integration between existing information systems. Database URL: http://banana-genome.cirad.fr/

  13. The Banana Genome Hub

    PubMed Central

    Droc, Gaëtan; Larivière, Delphine; Guignon, Valentin; Yahiaoui, Nabila; This, Dominique; Garsmeur, Olivier; Dereeper, Alexis; Hamelin, Chantal; Argout, Xavier; Dufayard, Jean-François; Lengelle, Juliette; Baurens, Franc-Christophe; Cenci, Alberto; Pitollat, Bertrand; D’Hont, Angélique; Ruiz, Manuel; Rouard, Mathieu; Bocs, Stéphanie

    2013-01-01

    Banana is one of the world’s favorite fruits and one of the most important crops for developing countries. The banana reference genome sequence (Musa acuminata) was recently released. Given the taxonomic position of Musa, the completed genomic sequence has particular comparative value to provide fresh insights about the evolution of the monocotyledons. The study of the banana genome has been enhanced by a number of tools and resources that allows harnessing its sequence. First, we set up essential tools such as a Community Annotation System, phylogenomics resources and metabolic pathways. Then, to support post-genomic efforts, we improved banana existing systems (e.g. web front end, query builder), we integrated available Musa data into generic systems (e.g. markers and genetic maps, synteny blocks), we have made interoperable with the banana hub, other existing systems containing Musa data (e.g. transcriptomics, rice reference genome, workflow manager) and finally, we generated new results from sequence analyses (e.g. SNP and polymorphism analysis). Several uses cases illustrate how the Banana Genome Hub can be used to study gene families. Overall, with this collaborative effort, we discuss the importance of the interoperability toward data integration between existing information systems. Database URL: http://banana-genome.cirad.fr/ PMID:23707967

  14. Genomic Insights into Bifidobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju-Hoon; O'Sullivan, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Since the discovery in 1899 of bifidobacteria as numerically dominant microbes in the feces of breast-fed infants, there have been numerous studies addressing their role in modulating gut microflora as well as their other potential health benefits. Because of this, they are frequently incorporated into foods as probiotic cultures. An understanding of their full interactions with intestinal microbes and the host is needed to scientifically validate any health benefits they may afford. Recently, the genome sequences of nine strains representing four species of Bifidobacterium became available. A comparative genome analysis of these genomes reveals a likely efficient capacity to adapt to their habitats, with B. longum subsp. infantis exhibiting more genomic potential to utilize human milk oligosaccharides, consistent with its habitat in the infant gut. Conversely, B. longum subsp. longum exhibits a higher genomic potential for utilization of plant-derived complex carbohydrates and polyols, consistent with its habitat in an adult gut. An intriguing observation is the loss of much of this genome potential when strains are adapted to pure culture environments, as highlighted by the genomes of B. animalis subsp. lactis strains, which exhibit the least potential for a gut habitat and are believed to have evolved from the B. animalis species during adaptation to dairy fermentation environments. PMID:20805404

  15. NCBI viral genomes resource.

    PubMed

    Brister, J Rodney; Ako-Adjei, Danso; Bao, Yiming; Blinkova, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Recent technological innovations have ignited an explosion in virus genome sequencing that promises to fundamentally alter our understanding of viral biology and profoundly impact public health policy. Yet, any potential benefits from the billowing cloud of next generation sequence data hinge upon well implemented reference resources that facilitate the identification of sequences, aid in the assembly of sequence reads and provide reference annotation sources. The NCBI Viral Genomes Resource is a reference resource designed to bring order to this sequence shockwave and improve usability of viral sequence data. The resource can be accessed at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genome/viruses/ and catalogs all publicly available virus genome sequences and curates reference genome sequences. As the number of genome sequences has grown, so too have the difficulties in annotating and maintaining reference sequences. The rapid expansion of the viral sequence universe has forced a recalibration of the data model to better provide extant sequence representation and enhanced reference sequence products to serve the needs of the various viral communities. This, in turn, has placed increased emphasis on leveraging the knowledge of individual scientific communities to identify important viral sequences and develop well annotated reference virus genome sets. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research 2014. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  16. NCBI Viral Genomes Resource

    PubMed Central

    Brister, J. Rodney; Ako-adjei, Danso; Bao, Yiming; Blinkova, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Recent technological innovations have ignited an explosion in virus genome sequencing that promises to fundamentally alter our understanding of viral biology and profoundly impact public health policy. Yet, any potential benefits from the billowing cloud of next generation sequence data hinge upon well implemented reference resources that facilitate the identification of sequences, aid in the assembly of sequence reads and provide reference annotation sources. The NCBI Viral Genomes Resource is a reference resource designed to bring order to this sequence shockwave and improve usability of viral sequence data. The resource can be accessed at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genome/viruses/ and catalogs all publicly available virus genome sequences and curates reference genome sequences. As the number of genome sequences has grown, so too have the difficulties in annotating and maintaining reference sequences. The rapid expansion of the viral sequence universe has forced a recalibration of the data model to better provide extant sequence representation and enhanced reference sequence products to serve the needs of the various viral communities. This, in turn, has placed increased emphasis on leveraging the knowledge of individual scientific communities to identify important viral sequences and develop well annotated reference virus genome sets. PMID:25428358

  17. Training in Psychiatric Genomics during Residency: A New Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winner, Joel G.; Goebert, Deborah; Matsu, Courtenay; Mrazek, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors ascertained the amount of training in psychiatric genomics that is provided in North American psychiatric residency programs. Methods: A sample of 217 chief residents in psychiatric residency programs in the United States and Canada were identified by e-mail and surveyed to assess their training in psychiatric genetics and…

  18. Genomic Dark Matter Sheds Light on EVI1-driven Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Koche, Richard; Armstrong, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    The orchestration of transcriptional programs depends on proper gene-enhancer pairing. While much remains to be learned about this process in normal development, two recent studies in Cell and Cancer Cell highlight how the genomic rearrangement of an enhancer plays a causal role in the onset of a leukemogenic program. PMID:24735919

  19. Training in Psychiatric Genomics during Residency: A New Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winner, Joel G.; Goebert, Deborah; Matsu, Courtenay; Mrazek, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors ascertained the amount of training in psychiatric genomics that is provided in North American psychiatric residency programs. Methods: A sample of 217 chief residents in psychiatric residency programs in the United States and Canada were identified by e-mail and surveyed to assess their training in psychiatric genetics and…

  20. Ensembl comparative genomics resources

    PubMed Central

    Muffato, Matthieu; Beal, Kathryn; Fitzgerald, Stephen; Gordon, Leo; Pignatelli, Miguel; Vilella, Albert J.; Searle, Stephen M. J.; Amode, Ridwan; Brent, Simon; Spooner, William; Kulesha, Eugene; Yates, Andrew; Flicek, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Evolution provides the unifying framework with which to understand biology. The coherent investigation of genic and genomic data often requires comparative genomics analyses based on whole-genome alignments, sets of homologous genes and other relevant datasets in order to evaluate and answer evolutionary-related questions. However, the complexity and computational requirements of producing such data are substantial: this has led to only a small number of reference resources that are used for most comparative analyses. The Ensembl comparative genomics resources are one such reference set that facilitates comprehensive and reproducible analysis of chordate genome data. Ensembl computes pairwise and multiple whole-genome alignments from which large-scale synteny, per-base conservation scores and constrained elements are obtained. Gene alignments are used to define Ensembl Protein Families, GeneTrees and homologies for both protein-coding and non-coding RNA genes. These resources are updated frequently and have a consistent informatics infrastructure and data presentation across all supported species. Specialized web-based visualizations are also available including synteny displays, collapsible gene tree plots, a gene family locator and different alignment views. The Ensembl comparative genomics infrastructure is extensively reused for the analysis of non-vertebrate species by other projects including Ensembl Genomes and Gramene and much of the information here is relevant to these projects. The consistency of the annotation across species and the focus on vertebrates makes Ensembl an ideal system to perform and support vertebrate comparative genomic analyses. We use robust software and pipelines to produce reference comparative data and make it freely available. Database URL: http://www.ensembl.org. PMID:26896847

  1. Ensembl comparative genomics resources.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Javier; Muffato, Matthieu; Beal, Kathryn; Fitzgerald, Stephen; Gordon, Leo; Pignatelli, Miguel; Vilella, Albert J; Searle, Stephen M J; Amode, Ridwan; Brent, Simon; Spooner, William; Kulesha, Eugene; Yates, Andrew; Flicek, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Evolution provides the unifying framework with which to understand biology. The coherent investigation of genic and genomic data often requires comparative genomics analyses based on whole-genome alignments, sets of homologous genes and other relevant datasets in order to evaluate and answer evolutionary-related questions. However, the complexity and computational requirements of producing such data are substantial: this has led to only a small number of reference resources that are used for most comparative analyses. The Ensembl comparative genomics resources are one such reference set that facilitates comprehensive and reproducible analysis of chordate genome data. Ensembl computes pairwise and multiple whole-genome alignments from which large-scale synteny, per-base conservation scores and constrained elements are obtained. Gene alignments are used to define Ensembl Protein Families, GeneTrees and homologies for both protein-coding and non-coding RNA genes. These resources are updated frequently and have a consistent informatics infrastructure and data presentation across all supported species. Specialized web-based visualizations are also available including synteny displays, collapsible gene tree plots, a gene family locator and different alignment views. The Ensembl comparative genomics infrastructure is extensively reused for the analysis of non-vertebrate species by other projects including Ensembl Genomes and Gramene and much of the information here is relevant to these projects. The consistency of the annotation across species and the focus on vertebrates makes Ensembl an ideal system to perform and support vertebrate comparative genomic analyses. We use robust software and pipelines to produce reference comparative data and make it freely available. Database URL: http://www.ensembl.org. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  2. Traditional medicine and genomics

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Kalpana; Ghodke, Yogita; Shintre, Pooja

    2010-01-01

    ‘Omics’ developments in the form of genomics, proteomics and metabolomics have increased the impetus of traditional medicine research. Studies exploring the genomic, proteomic and metabolomic basis of human constitutional types based on Ayurveda and other systems of oriental medicine are becoming popular. Such studies remain important to developing better understanding of human variations and individual differences. Countries like India, Korea, China and Japan are investing in research on evidence-based traditional medicines and scientific validation of fundamental principles. This review provides an account of studies addressing relationships between traditional medicine and genomics. PMID:21829298

  3. Genetics and genomic medicine.

    PubMed

    Bogaard, Kali; Johnson, Marlene

    2009-01-01

    Genetics is playing an increasingly important role in the diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of diseases, and the expansion of genetics into health care has generated the field of genomic medicine. Health care delivery is shifting away from general diagnostic evaluation toward a generation of therapeutics based on a patient's genetic makeup. Meanwhile, the scientific community debates how best to incorporate genetics and genomic medicine into practice. While obstacles remain, the ultimate goal is to use information generated from the study of human genetics to improve disease treatment, cure and prevention. As the use of genetics in medical diagnosis and treatment increases, health care workers will require an understanding of genetics and genomic medicine.

  4. Genomic variation in maize

    SciTech Connect

    Rivin, C.J.

    1990-01-01

    We have endeavored to learn to learn how different DNA sequences and sequence arrangements contribute to genome plasticity in maize. We describe quantitative variation among maize inbred lines for tandemly arrayed and dispersed repeated DNA sequences and gene families, and qualitative variation for sequences homologous to the Mutator family of transposons. The potential of these sequences to undergo unequal crossing over, non-allelic (ectopic) recombination and transposition makes them a source of genome instability. We have found examples of rapid genomic change involving these sequences in F1 hybrids, tissue culture cells and regenerated plants.

  5. What Is a Genome?

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Aaron David; Landweber, Laura F.

    2016-01-01

    The genome is often described as the information repository of an organism. Whether millions or billions of letters of DNA, its transmission across generations confers the principal medium for inheritance of organismal traits. Several emerging areas of research demonstrate that this definition is an oversimplification. Here, we explore ways in which a deeper understanding of genomic diversity and cell physiology is challenging the concepts of physical permanence attached to the genome as well as its role as the sole information source for an organism. PMID:27442251

  6. A De-Novo Genome Analysis Pipeline (DeNoGAP) for large-scale comparative prokaryotic genomics studies.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Shalabh; Guttman, David S

    2016-06-30

    Comparative analysis of whole genome sequence data from closely related prokaryotic species or strains is becoming an increasingly important and accessible approach for addressing both fundamental and applied biological questions. While there are number of excellent tools developed for performing this task, most scale poorly when faced with hundreds of genome sequences, and many require extensive manual curation. We have developed a de-novo genome analysis pipeline (DeNoGAP) for the automated, iterative and high-throughput analysis of data from comparative genomics projects involving hundreds of whole genome sequences. The pipeline is designed to perform reference-assisted and de novo gene prediction, homolog protein family assignment, ortholog prediction, functional annotation, and pan-genome analysis using a range of proven tools and databases. While most existing methods scale quadratically with the number of genomes since they rely on pairwise comparisons among predicted protein sequences, DeNoGAP scales linearly since the homology assignment is based on iteratively refined hidden Markov models. This iterative clustering strategy enables DeNoGAP to handle a very large number of genomes using minimal computational resources. Moreover, the modular structure of the pipeline permits easy updates as new analysis programs become available. DeNoGAP integrates bioinformatics tools and databases for comparative analysis of a large number of genomes. The pipeline offers tools and algorithms for annotation and analysis of completed and draft genome sequences. The pipeline is developed using Perl, BioPerl and SQLite on Ubuntu Linux version 12.04 LTS. Currently, the software package accompanies script for automated installation of necessary external programs on Ubuntu Linux; however, the pipeline should be also compatible with other Linux and Unix systems after necessary external programs are installed. DeNoGAP is freely available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/denogap/ .

  7. Center for Cancer Genomics | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The Center for Cancer Genomics (CCG) was established to unify the National Cancer Institute's activities in cancer genomics, with the goal of advancing genomics research and translating findings into the clinic to improve the precise diagnosis and treatment of cancers. In addition to promoting genomic sequencing app

  8. Predicting discovery rates of genomic features.

    PubMed

    Gravel, Simon

    2014-06-01

    Successful sequencing experiments require judicious sample selection. However, this selection must often be performed on the basis of limited preliminary data. Predicting the statistical properties of the final sample based on preliminary data can be challenging, because numerous uncertain model assumptions may be involved. Here, we ask whether we can predict "omics" variation across many samples by sequencing only a fraction of them. In the infinite-genome limit, we find that a pilot study sequencing 5% of a population is sufficient to predict the number of genetic variants in the entire population within 6% of the correct value, using an estimator agnostic to demography, selection, or population structure. To reach similar accuracy in a finite genome with millions of polymorphisms, the pilot study would require ∼15% of the population. We present computationally efficient jackknife and linear programming methods that exhibit substantially less bias than the state of the art when applied to simulated data and subsampled 1000 Genomes Project data. Extrapolating based on the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Exome Sequencing Project data, we predict that 7.2% of sites in the capture region would be variable in a sample of 50,000 African Americans and 8.8% in a European sample of equal size. Finally, we show how the linear programming method can also predict discovery rates of various genomic features, such as the number of transcription factor binding sites across different cell types.

  9. Parasitic nematodes - from genomes to control.

    PubMed

    Mitreva, Makedonka; Zarlenga, Dante S; McCarter, James P; Jasmer, Douglas P

    2007-08-19

    The diseases caused by parasitic nematodes in domestic and companion animals are major factors that decrease production and quality of the agricultural products. Methods available for the control of the parasitic nematode infections are mainly based on chemical treatment, non-chemical management practices, immune modulation and biological control. However, even with integrated pest management that frequently combines these approaches, the effective and long-lasting control strategies are hampered by the persistent exposure of host animals to environmental stages of parasites, the incomplete protective response of the host and acquisition of anthelmintic resistance by an increasing number of parasitic nematodes. Therefore, the challenges to improve control of parasitic nematode infections are multi-fold and no single category of information will meet them all. However, new information, such as nematode genomics, functional genomics and proteomics, can strengthen basic and applied biological research aimed to develop improvements. In this review we will, summarize existing control strategies of nematode infections and discuss ongoing developments in nematode genomics. Genomics approaches offer a growing and fundamental base of information, which when coupled with downstream functional genomics and proteomics can accelerate progress towards developing more efficient and sustainable control programs.

  10. A bedr way of genomic interval processing.

    PubMed

    Haider, Syed; Waggott, Daryl; Lalonde, Emilie; Fung, Clement; Liu, Fei-Fei; Boutros, Paul C

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing is making it critical to robustly and rapidly handle genomic ranges within standard pipelines. Standard use-cases include annotating sequence ranges with gene or other genomic annotation, merging multiple experiments together and subsequently quantifying and visualizing the overlap. The most widely-used tools for these tasks work at the command-line (e.g. BEDTools) and the small number of available R packages are either slow or have distinct semantics and features from command-line interfaces. To provide a robust R-based interface to standard command-line tools for genomic coordinate manipulation, we created bedr. This open-source R package can use either BEDTools or BEDOPS as a back-end and performs data-manipulation extremely quickly, creating R data structures that can be readily interfaced with existing computational pipelines. It includes data-visualization capabilities and a number of data-access functions that interface with standard databases like UCSC and COSMIC. bedr package provides an open source solution to enable genomic interval data manipulation and restructuring in R programming language which is commonly used in bioinformatics, and therefore would be useful to bioinformaticians and genomic researchers.

  11. Comparative primate genomics: emerging patterns of genome content and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Jeffrey; Gibbs, Richard A

    2014-05-01

    Advances in genome sequencing technologies have created new opportunities for comparative primate genomics. Genome assemblies have been published for various primate species, and analyses of several others are underway. Whole-genome assemblies for the great apes provide remarkable new information about the evolutionary origins of the human genome and the processes involved. Genomic data for macaques and other non-human primates offer valuable insights into genetic similarities and differences among species that are used as models for disease-related research. This Review summarizes current knowledge regarding primate genome content and dynamics, and proposes a series of goals for the near future.

  12. Comparative primate genomics: emerging patterns of genome content and dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Jeffrey; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Preface Advances in genome sequencing technologies have created new opportunities for comparative primate genomics. Genome assemblies have been published for several primates, with analyses of several others underway. Whole genome assemblies for the great apes provide remarkable new information about the evolutionary origins of the human genome and the processes involved. Genomic data for macaques and other nonhuman primates provide valuable insight into genetic similarities and differences among species used as models for disease-related research. This review summarizes current knowledge regarding primate genome content and dynamics and offers a series of goals for the near future. PMID:24709753

  13. Transposon Domestication versus Mutualism in Ciliate Genome Rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Alexander; Goldman, Aaron David; Mochizuki, Kazufumi; Landweber, Laura F.

    2013-01-01

    Ciliated protists rearrange their genomes dramatically during nuclear development via chromosome fragmentation and DNA deletion to produce a trimmer and highly reorganized somatic genome. The deleted portion of the genome includes potentially active transposons or transposon-like sequences that reside in the germline. Three independent studies recently showed that transposase proteins of the DDE/DDD superfamily are indispensible for DNA processing in three distantly related ciliates. In the spirotrich Oxytricha trifallax, high copy-number germline-limited transposons mediate their own excision from the somatic genome but also contribute to programmed genome rearrangement through a remarkable transposon mutualism with the host. By contrast, the genomes of two oligohymenophorean ciliates, Tetrahymena thermophila and Paramecium tetraurelia, encode homologous PiggyBac-like transposases as single-copy genes in both their germline and somatic genomes. These domesticated transposases are essential for deletion of thousands of different internal sequences in these species. This review contrasts the events underlying somatic genome reduction in three different ciliates and considers their evolutionary origins and the relationships among their distinct mechanisms for genome remodeling. PMID:23935529

  14. Building international genomics collaboration for global health security

    DOE PAGES

    Cui, Helen H.; Erkkila, Tracy; Chain, Patrick S. G.; ...

    2015-12-07

    Genome science and technologies are transforming life sciences globally in many ways and becoming a highly desirable area for international collaboration to strengthen global health. The Genome Science Program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is leveraging a long history of expertise in genomics research to assist multiple partner nations in advancing their genomics and bioinformatics capabilities. The capability development objectives focus on providing a molecular genomics-based scientific approach for pathogen detection, characterization, and biosurveillance applications. The general approaches include introduction of basic principles in genomics technologies, training on laboratory methodologies and bioinformatic analysis of resulting data, procurement, and installationmore » of next-generation sequencing instruments, establishing bioinformatics software capabilities, and exploring collaborative applications of the genomics capabilities in public health. Genome centers have been established with public health and research institutions in the Republic of Georgia, Kingdom of Jordan, Uganda, and Gabon; broader collaborations in genomics applications have also been developed with research institutions in many other countries.« less

  15. Hymenoptera Genome Database: integrating genome annotations in HymenopteraMine

    PubMed Central

    Elsik, Christine G.; Tayal, Aditi; Diesh, Colin M.; Unni, Deepak R.; Emery, Marianne L.; Nguyen, Hung N.; Hagen, Darren E.

    2016-01-01

    We report an update of the Hymenoptera Genome Database (HGD) (http://HymenopteraGenome.org), a model organism database for insect species of the order Hymenoptera (ants, bees and wasps). HGD maintains genomic data for 9 bee species, 10 ant species and 1 wasp, including the versions of genome and annotation data sets published by the genome sequencing consortiums and those provided by NCBI. A new data-mining warehouse, HymenopteraMine, based on the InterMine data warehousing system, integrates the genome data with data from external sources and facilitates cross-species analyses based on orthology. New genome browsers and annotation tools based on JBrowse/WebApollo provide easy genome navigation, and viewing of high throughput sequence data sets and can be used for collaborative genome annotation. All of the genomes and annotation data sets are combined into a single BLAST server that allows users to select and combine sequence data sets to search. PMID:26578564

  16. Genomic definition of species

    SciTech Connect

    Crkvenjakov, R.; Drmanac, R.

    1991-07-01

    The subject of this paper is the definition of species based on the assumption that genome is the fundamental level for the origin and maintenance of biological diversity. For this view to be logically consistent it is necessary to assume the existence and operation of the new law which we call genome law. For this reason the genome law is included in the explanation of species phenomenon presented here even if its precise formulation and elaboration are left for the future. The intellectual underpinnings of this definition can be traced to Goldschmidt. We wish to explore some philosophical aspects of the definition of species in terms of the genome. The point of proposing the definition on these grounds is that any real advance in evolutionary theory has to be correct in both its philosophy and its science.

  17. Human genomic variation

    PubMed Central

    Disotell, Todd R

    2000-01-01

    The recent completion and assembly of the first draft of the human genome, which combines samples from several ethnically diverse males and females, provides preliminary data on the extent of human genetic variation. PMID:11178257

  18. The rise of genomics.

    PubMed

    Weissenbach, Jean

    2016-01-01

    A brief history of the development of genomics is provided. Complete sequencing of genomes of uni- and multicellular organisms is based on important progress in sequencing and bioinformatics. Evolution of these methods is ongoing and has triggered an explosion in data production and analysis. Initial analyses focused on the inventory of genes encoding proteins. Completeness and quality of gene prediction remains crucial. Genome analyses profoundly modified our views on evolution, biodiversity and contributed to the detection of new functions, yet to be fully elucidated, such as those fulfilled by non-coding RNAs. Genomics has become the basis for the study of biology and provides the molecular support for a bunch of large-scale studies, the omics.

  19. Rubicon Genomics, Inc.

    PubMed

    Langmore, John P

    2002-07-01

    Rubicon Genomics, Inc. is a leader in development and application of effective methods to analyze human DNA for genome-wide genotyping and haplotyping. The company is developing its proprietary OmniPlex technology as an integrated platform for archiving, amplifying and analyzing patient DNA for drug target discovery, pharmacogenomics and diagnostics. Single-site, multiple-site or whole genome amplification can be done using small samples of DNA that have been archived as OmniPlex DNA. Rubicon technology will make genome-wide SNP scoring faster, more accurate, more robust and less expensive. Rubicon will partner with pharmaceutical and diagnostic companies, as well as the makers of instruments and reagents to bring OmniPlex technology to the widest market - increasing the pipeline of more effective and safer drugs and ushering in the practice of gene-based medicine.

  20. The genomics of adaptation.

    PubMed

    Radwan, Jacek; Babik, Wiesław

    2012-12-22

    The amount and nature of genetic variation available to natural selection affect the rate, course and outcome of evolution. Consequently, the study of the genetic basis of adaptive evolutionary change has occupied biologists for decades, but progress has been hampered by the lack of resolution and the absence of a genome-level perspective. Technological advances in recent years should now allow us to answer many long-standing questions about the nature of adaptation. The data gathered so far are beginning to challenge some widespread views of the way in which natural selection operates at the genomic level. Papers in this Special Feature of Proceedings of the Royal Society B illustrate various aspects of the broad field of adaptation genomics. This introductory article sets up a context and, on the basis of a few selected examples, discusses how genomic data can advance our understanding of the process of adaptation.

  1. The genomics of Colletotrichum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Colletotrichum are devastating fungal pathogens of major crop plants worldwide. This book chapter provides an overview of the genomics and transcriptomics of Colletotrichum. Included is an overview of the agricultural relevance of the genus Colletotrichum, the taxonomic position, information about ...

  2. Genomics of Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Tetsuo; Abe, Keietsu; Asai, Kiyoshi; Gomi, Katsuya; Juvvadi, Praveen Rao; Kato, Masashi; Kitamoto, Katsuhiko; Takeuchi, Michio; Machida, Masayuki

    2007-03-01

    The genome sequence of Aspergillus oryzae, a fungus used in the production of the traditional Japanese fermentation foods sake (rice wine), shoyu (soy sauce), and miso (soybean paste), has revealed prominent features in its gene composition as compared to those of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Neurospora crassa. The A. oryzae genome is extremely enriched with genes involved in biomass degradation, primary and secondary metabolism, transcriptional regulation, and cell signaling. Even compared to the related species A. nidulans and A. fumigatus, an abundance of metabolic genes is apparent, with acquisition of more than 6 Mb of sequence in the A. oryzae lineage, interspersed throughout the A. oryzae genome. Besides the various already established merits of A. oryzae for industrial uses, the genome sequence and the abundance of metabolic genes should significantly accelerate the biotechnological use of A. oryzae in industry.

  3. Genomic imprinting and reproduction.

    PubMed

    Swales, A K E; Spears, N

    2005-10-01

    Genomic imprinting is the parent-of-origin specific gene expression which is a vital mechanism through both development and adult life. One of the key elements of the imprinting mechanism is DNA methylation, controlled by DNA methyltransferase enzymes. Germ cells undergo reprogramming to ensure that sex-specific genomic imprinting is initiated, thus allowing normal embryo development to progress after fertilisation. In some cases, errors in genomic imprinting are embryo lethal while in others they lead to developmental disorders and disease. Recent studies have suggested a link between the use of assisted reproductive techniques and an increase in normally rare imprinting disorders. A greater understanding of the mechanisms of genomic imprinting and the factors that influence them are important in assessing the safety of these techniques.

  4. Lophotrochozoan mitochondrial genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Valles, Yvonne; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2005-10-01

    Progress in both molecular techniques and phylogeneticmethods has challenged many of the interpretations of traditionaltaxonomy. One example is in the recognition of the animal superphylumLophotrochozoa (annelids, mollusks, echiurans, platyhelminthes,brachiopods, and other phyla), although the relationships within thisgroup and the inclusion of some phyla remain uncertain. While much ofthis progress in phylogenetic reconstruction has been based on comparingsingle gene sequences, we are beginning to see the potential of comparinglarge-scale features of genomes, such as the relative order of genes.Even though tremendous progress is being made on the sequencedetermination of whole nuclear genomes, the dataset of choice forgenome-level characters for many animals across a broad taxonomic rangeremains mitochondrial genomes. We review here what is known aboutmitochondrial genomes of the lophotrochozoans and discuss the promisethat this dataset will enable insight into theirrelationships.

  5. Platyzoan mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Wey-Fabrizius, Alexandra R; Podsiadlowski, Lars; Herlyn, Holger; Hankeln, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    Platyzoa is a putative lophotrochozoan (spiralian) subtaxon within the protostome clade of Metazoa, comprising a range of biologically diverse, mostly small worm-shaped animals. The monophyly of Platyzoa, the relationships between the putative subgroups Platyhelminthes, Gastrotricha and Gnathifera (the latter comprising at least Gnathostomulida, "Rotifera" and Acanthocephala) as well as some aspects of the internal phylogenies of these subgroups are highly debated. Here we review how complete mitochondrial (mt) genome data contribute to these debates. We highlight special features of the mt genomes and discuss problems in mtDNA phylogenies of the clade. Mitochondrial genome data seem to be insufficient to resolve the position of the platyzoan clade within the Spiralia but can help to address internal phylogenetic questions. The present review includes a tabular survey of all published platyzoan mt genomes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Mouse genome database 2016

    PubMed Central

    Bult, Carol J.; Eppig, Janan T.; Blake, Judith A.; Kadin, James A.; Richardson, Joel E.

    2016-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD; http://www.informatics.jax.org) is the primary community model organism database for the laboratory mouse and serves as the source for key biological reference data related to mouse genes, gene functions, phenotypes and disease models with a strong emphasis on the relationship of these data to human biology and disease. As the cost of genome-scale sequencing continues to decrease and new technologies for genome editing become widely adopted, the laboratory mouse is more important than ever as a model system for understanding the biological significance of human genetic variation and for advancing the basic research needed to support the emergence of genome-guided precision medicine. Recent enhancements to MGD include new graphical summaries of biological annotations for mouse genes, support for mobile access to the database, tools to support the annotation and analysis of sets of genes, and expanded support for comparative biology through the expansion of homology data. PMID:26578600

  7. Biobanks for Genomics and Genomics for Biobanks

    PubMed Central

    Ducournau, Pascal; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Pontille, David

    2003-01-01

    Biobanks include biological samples and attached databases. Human biobanks occur in research, technological development and medical activities. Population genomics is highly dependent on the availability of large biobanks. Ethical issues must be considered: protecting the rights of those people whose samples or data are in biobanks (information, autonomy, confidentiality, protection of private life), assuring the non-commercial use of human body elements and the optimal use of samples and data. They balance other issues, such as protecting the rights of researchers and companies, allowing long-term use of biobanks while detailed information on future uses is not available. At the level of populations, the traditional form of informed consent is challenged. Other dimensions relate to the rights of a group as such, in addition to individual rights. Conditions of return of results and/or benefit to a population need to be defined. With ‘large-scale biobanking’ a marked trend in genomics, new societal dimensions appear, regarding communication, debate, regulation, societal control and valorization of such large biobanks. Exploring how genomics can help health sector biobanks to become more rationally constituted and exploited is an interesting perspective. For example, evaluating how genomic approaches can help in optimizing haematopoietic stem cell donor registries using new markers and high-throughput techniques to increase immunogenetic variability in such registries is a challenge currently being addressed. Ethical issues in such contexts are important, as not only individual decisions or projects are concerned, but also national policies in the international arena and organization of democratic debate about science, medicine and society. PMID:18629026

  8. Bacteriophage T4 genome.

    PubMed

    Miller, Eric S; Kutter, Elizabeth; Mosig, Gisela; Arisaka, Fumio; Kunisawa, Takashi; Rüger, Wolfgang

    2003-03-01

    Phage T4 has provided countless contributions to the paradigms of genetics and biochemistry. Its complete genome sequence of 168,903 bp encodes about 300 gene products. T4 biology and its genomic sequence provide the best-understood model for modern functional genomics and proteomics. Variations on gene expression, including overlapping genes, internal translation initiation, spliced genes, translational bypassing, and RNA processing, alert us to the caveats of purely computational methods. The T4 transcriptional pattern reflects its dependence on the host RNA polymerase and the use of phage-encoded proteins that sequentially modify RNA polymerase; transcriptional activator proteins, a phage sigma factor, anti-sigma, and sigma decoy proteins also act to specify early, middle, and late promoter recognition. Posttranscriptional controls by T4 provide excellent systems for the study of RNA-dependent processes, particularly at the structural level. The redundancy of DNA replication and recombination systems of T4 reveals how phage and other genomes are stably replicated and repaired in different environments, providing insight into genome evolution and adaptations to new hosts and growth environments. Moreover, genomic sequence analysis has provided new insights into tail fiber variation, lysis, gene duplications, and membrane localization of proteins, while high-resolution structural determination of the "cell-puncturing device," combined with the three-dimensional image reconstruction of the baseplate, has revealed the mechanism of penetration during infection. Despite these advances, nearly 130 potential T4 genes remain uncharacterized. Current phage-sequencing initiatives are now revealing the similarities and differences among members of the T4 family, including those that infect bacteria other than Escherichia coli. T4 functional genomics will aid in the interpretation of these newly sequenced T4-related genomes and in broadening our understanding of the complex

  9. An Introduction to Genome Annotation.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Michael S; Yandell, Mark

    2015-12-17

    Genome projects have evolved from large international undertakings to tractable endeavors for a single lab. Accurate genome annotation is critical for successful genomic, genetic, and molecular biology experiments. These annotations can be generated using a number of approaches and available software tools. This unit describes methods for genome annotation and a number of software tools commonly used in gene annotation.

  10. Faculty Performance on the Genomic Nursing Concept Inventory.

    PubMed

    Read, Catherine Y; Ward, Linda D

    2016-01-01

    To use the newly developed Genomic Nursing Concept Inventory (GNCI) to evaluate faculty understanding of foundational genomic concepts, explore relative areas of strength and weakness, and compare the results with those of a student sample. An anonymous online survey instrument consisting of demographic or background items and the 31 multiple-choice questions that make up the GNCI was completed by 495 nursing faculty from across the United States in the fall of 2014. Total GNCI score and scores on four subcategories (genome basics, mutations, inheritance, genomic health) were calculated. Relationships between demographic or background variables and total GNCI score were explored. The mean score on the GNCI was 14.93 (SD = 5.31), or 48% correct; topical category scores were highest on the inheritance and genomic health items (59% and 58% correct, respectively), moderate on the mutations items (54% correct), and lowest on the genome basics items (33% correct). These results are strikingly similar to those of a recent study of nursing students. Factors associated with a higher total score on the GNCI included higher self-rated proficiency with genetic/genomic content, having a doctoral degree, having taken a genetics course for academic credit or continuing education, and having taught either a stand-alone genetic/genomic course or lecture content as part of nursing or related course. Self-rated proficiency with genetic/genomic content was fair or poor (70%), with only 7% rating their proficiency as very good or excellent. Faculty knowledge of foundational genomic concepts is similar to that of the students they teach and weakest in the areas related to basic science information. Genomics is increasingly relevant in all areas of clinical nursing practice, and the faculty charged with educating the next generation of nurses must understand foundational concepts. Faculty need to be proactive in seeking out relevant educational programs that include basic genetic/genomic

  11. Structure of the germline genome of Tetrahymena thermophila and relationship to the massively rearranged somatic genome

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Eileen P; Kapusta, Aurélie; Huvos, Piroska E; Bidwell, Shelby L; Zafar, Nikhat; Tang, Haibao; Hadjithomas, Michalis; Krishnakumar, Vivek; Badger, Jonathan H; Caler, Elisabet V; Russ, Carsten; Zeng, Qiandong; Fan, Lin; Levin, Joshua Z; Shea, Terrance; Young, Sarah K; Hegarty, Ryan; Daza, Riza; Gujja, Sharvari; Wortman, Jennifer R; Birren, Bruce W; Nusbaum, Chad; Thomas, Jainy; Carey, Clayton M; Pritham, Ellen J; Feschotte, Cédric; Noto, Tomoko; Mochizuki, Kazufumi; Papazyan, Romeo; Taverna, Sean D; Dear, Paul H; Cassidy-Hanley, Donna M; Xiong, Jie; Miao, Wei; Orias, Eduardo; Coyne, Robert S

    2016-01-01

    The germline genome of the binucleated ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila undergoes programmed chromosome breakage and massive DNA elimination to generate the somatic genome. Here, we present a complete sequence assembly of the germline genome and analyze multiple features of its structure and its relationship to the somatic genome, shedding light on the mechanisms of genome rearrangement as well as the evolutionary history of this remarkable germline/soma differentiation. Our results strengthen the notion that a complex, dynamic, and ongoing interplay between mobile DNA elements and the host genome have shaped Tetrahymena chromosome structure, locally and globally. Non-standard outcomes of rearrangement events, including the generation of short-lived somatic chromosomes and excision of DNA interrupting protein-coding regions, may represent novel forms of developmental gene regulation. We also compare Tetrahymena’s germline/soma differentiation to that of other characterized ciliates, illustrating the wide diversity of adaptations that have occurred within this phylum. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19090.001 PMID:27892853

  12. Megabase replication domains along the human genome: relation to chromatin structure and genome organisation.

    PubMed

    Audit, Benjamin; Zaghloul, Lamia; Baker, Antoine; Arneodo, Alain; Chen, Chun-Long; d'Aubenton-Carafa, Yves; Thermes, Claude

    2013-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the absence of specific sequence motifs, marking the origins of replication has been a serious hindrance to the understanding of (i) the mechanisms that regulate the spatio-temporal replication program, and (ii) the links between origins activation, chromatin structure and transcription. In this chapter, we review the partitioning of the human genome into megabased-size replication domains delineated as N-shaped motifs in the strand compositional asymmetry profiles. They collectively span 28.3% of the genome and are bordered by more than 1,000 putative replication origins. We recapitulate the comparison of this partition of the human genome with high-resolution experimental data that confirms that replication domain borders are likely to be preferential replication initiation zones in the germline. In addition, we highlight the specific distribution of experimental and numerical chromatin marks along replication domains. Domain borders correspond to particular open chromatin regions, possibly encoded in the DNA sequence, and around which replication and transcription are highly coordinated. These regions also present a high evolutionary breakpoint density, suggesting that susceptibility to breakage might be linked to local open chromatin fiber state. Altogether, this chapter presents a compartmentalization of the human genome into replication domains that are landmarks of the human genome organization and are likely to play a key role in genome dynamics during evolution and in pathological situations.

  13. Using comparative genome analysis to identify problems in annotated microbial genomes.

    PubMed

    Poptsova, Maria S; Gogarten, J Peter

    2010-07-01

    Genome annotation is a tedious task that is mostly done by automated methods; however, the accuracy of these approaches has been questioned since the beginning of the sequencing era. Genome annotation is a multilevel process, and errors can emerge at different stages: during sequencing, as a result of gene-calling procedures, and in the process of assigning gene functions. Missed or wrongly annotated genes differentially impact different types of analyses. Here we discuss and demonstrate how the methods of comparative genome analysis can refine annotations by locating missing orthologues. We also discuss possible reasons for errors and show that the second-generation annotation systems, which combine multiple gene-calling programs with similarity-based methods, perform much better than the first annotation tools. Since old errors may propagate to the newly sequenced genomes, we emphasize that the problem of continuously updating popular public databases is an urgent and unresolved one. Due to the progress in genome-sequencing technologies, automated annotation techniques will remain the main approach in the future. Researchers need to be aware of the existing errors in the annotation of even well-studied genomes, such as Escherichia coli, and consider additional quality control for their results.

  14. The genome sequence of sweet cherry (Prunus avium) for use in genomics-assisted breeding.

    PubMed

    Shirasawa, Kenta; Isuzugawa, Kanji; Ikenaga, Mitsunobu; Saito, Yutaro; Yamamoto, Toshiya; Hirakawa, Hideki; Isobe, Sachiko

    2017-05-25

    We determined the genome sequence of sweet cherry (Prunus avium) using next-generation sequencing technology. The total length of the assembled sequences was 272.4 Mb, consisting of 10,148 scaffold sequences with an N50 length of 219.6 kb. The sequences covered 77.8% of the 352.9 Mb sweet cherry genome, as estimated by k-mer analysis, and included >96.0% of the core eukaryotic genes. We predicted 43,349 complete and partial protein-encoding genes. A high-density consensus map with 2,382 loci was constructed using double-digest restriction site-associated DNA sequencing. Comparing the genetic maps of sweet cherry and peach revealed high synteny between the two genomes; thus the scaffolds were integrated into pseudomolecules using map- and synteny-based strategies. Whole-genome resequencing of six modern cultivars found 1,016,866 SNPs and 162,402 insertions/deletions, out of which 0.7% were deleterious. The sequence variants, as well as simple sequence repeats, can be used as DNA markers. The genomic information helps us to identify agronomically important genes and will accelerate genetic studies and breeding programs for sweet cherries. Further information on the genomic sequences and DNA markers is available in DBcherry (http://cherry.kazusa.or.jp (8 May 2017, date last accessed)). © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  15. Ebolavirus comparative genomics

    DOE PAGES

    Jun, Se-Ran; Leuze, Michael R.; Nookaew, Intawat; ...

    2015-07-14

    The 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa is the largest documented for this virus. We examine the dynamics of this genome, comparing more than one hundred currently available ebolavirus genomes to each other and to other viral genomes. Based on oligomer frequency analysis, the family Filoviridae forms a distinct group from all other sequenced viral genomes. All filovirus genomes sequenced to date encode proteins with similar functions and gene order, although there is considerable divergence in sequences between the three genera Ebolavirus, Cuevavirus, and Marburgvirus within the family Filoviridae. Whereas all ebolavirus genomes are quite similar (multiple sequences of themore » same strain are often identical), variation is most common in the intergenic regions and within specific areas of the genes encoding the glycoprotein (GP), nucleoprotein (NP), and polymerase (L). We predict regions that could contain epitope-binding sites, which might be good vaccine targets. In conclusion, this information, combined with glycosylation sites and experimentally determined epitopes, can identify the most promising regions for the development of therapeutic strategies.« less

  16. Human Social Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Steven W.

    2014-01-01

    A growing literature in human social genomics has begun to analyze how everyday life circumstances influence human gene expression. Social-environmental conditions such as urbanity, low socioeconomic status, social isolation, social threat, and low or unstable social status have been found to associate with differential expression of hundreds of gene transcripts in leukocytes and diseased tissues such as metastatic cancers. In leukocytes, diverse types of social adversity evoke a common conserved transcriptional response to adversity (CTRA) characterized by increased expression of proinflammatory genes and decreased expression of genes involved in innate antiviral responses and antibody synthesis. Mechanistic analyses have mapped the neural “social signal transduction” pathways that stimulate CTRA gene expression in response to social threat and may contribute to social gradients in health. Research has also begun to analyze the functional genomics of optimal health and thriving. Two emerging opportunities now stand to revolutionize our understanding of the everyday life of the human genome: network genomics analyses examining how systems-level capabilities emerge from groups of individual socially sensitive genomes and near-real-time transcriptional biofeedback to empirically optimize individual well-being in the context of the unique genetic, geographic, historical, developmental, and social contexts that jointly shape the transcriptional realization of our innate human genomic potential for thriving. PMID:25166010

  17. An archaeal genomic signature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, D. E.; Overbeek, R.; Olsen, G. J.; Woese, C. R.

    2000-01-01

    Comparisons of complete genome sequences allow the most objective and comprehensive descriptions possible of a lineage's evolution. This communication uses the completed genomes from four major euryarchaeal taxa to define a genomic signature for the Euryarchaeota and, by extension, the Archaea as a whole. The signature is defined in terms of the set of protein-encoding genes found in at least two diverse members of the euryarchaeal taxa that function uniquely within the Archaea; most signature proteins have no recognizable bacterial or eukaryal homologs. By this definition, 351 clusters of signature proteins have been identified. Functions of most proteins in this signature set are currently unknown. At least 70% of the clusters that contain proteins from all the euryarchaeal genomes also have crenarchaeal homologs. This conservative set, which appears refractory to horizontal gene transfer to the Bacteria or the Eukarya, would seem to reflect the significant innovations that were unique and fundamental to the archaeal "design fabric." Genomic protein signature analysis methods may be extended to characterize the evolution of any phylogenetically defined lineage. The complete set of protein clusters for the archaeal genomic signature is presented as supplementary material (see the PNAS web site, www.pnas.org).

  18. Genomic Instability in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Tarek; Keaton, Mignon A.; Dutta, Anindya

    2013-01-01

    One of the fundamental challenges facing the cell is to accurately copy its genetic material to daughter cells. When this process goes awry, genomic instability ensues in which genetic alterations ranging from nucleotide changes to chromosomal translocations and aneuploidy occur. Organisms have developed multiple mechanisms that can be classified into two major classes to ensure the fidelity of DNA replication. The first class includes mechanisms that prevent premature initiation of DNA replication and ensure that the genome is fully replicated once and only once during each division cycle. These include cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)-dependent mechanisms and CDK-independent mechanisms. Although CDK-dependent mechanisms are largely conserved in eukaryotes, higher eukaryotes have evolved additional mechanisms that seem to play a larger role in preventing aberrant DNA replication and genome instability. The second class ensures that cells are able to respond to various cues that continuously threaten the integrity of the genome by initiating DNA-damage-dependent “checkpoints” and coordinating DNA damage repair mechanisms. Defects in the ability to safeguard against aberrant DNA replication and to respond to DNA damage contribute to genomic instability and the development of human malignancy. In this article, we summarize our current knowledge of how genomic instability arises, with a particular emphasis on how the DNA replication process can give rise to such instability. PMID:23335075

  19. An archaeal genomic signature.

    PubMed

    Graham, D E; Overbeek, R; Olsen, G J; Woese, C R

    2000-03-28

    Comparisons of complete genome sequences allow the most objective and comprehensive descriptions possible of a lineage's evolution. This communication uses the completed genomes from four major euryarchaeal taxa to define a genomic signature for the Euryarchaeota and, by extension, the Archaea as a whole. The signature is defined in terms of the set of protein-encoding genes found in at least two diverse members of the euryarchaeal taxa that function uniquely within the Archaea; most signature proteins have no recognizable bacterial or eukaryal homologs. By this definition, 351 clusters of signature proteins have been identified. Functions of most proteins in this signature set are currently unknown. At least 70% of the clusters that contain proteins from all the euryarchaeal genomes also have crenarchaeal homologs. This conservative set, which appears refractory to horizontal gene transfer to the Bacteria or the Eukarya, would seem to reflect the significant innovations that were unique and fundamental to the archaeal "design fabric." Genomic protein signature analysis methods may be extended to characterize the evolution of any phylogenetically defined lineage. The complete set of protein clusters for the archaeal genomic signature is presented as supplementary material (see the PNAS web site, www.pnas.org).

  20. An archaeal genomic signature

    PubMed Central

    Graham, David E.; Overbeek, Ross; Olsen, Gary J.; Woese, Carl R.

    2000-01-01

    Comparisons of complete genome sequences allow the most objective and comprehensive descriptions possible of a lineage's evolution. This communication uses the completed genomes from four major euryarchaeal taxa to define a genomic signature for the Euryarchaeota and, by extension, the Archaea as a whole. The signature is defined in terms of the set of protein-encoding genes found in at least two diverse members of the euryarchaeal taxa that function uniquely within the Archaea; most signature proteins have no recognizable bacterial or eukaryal homologs. By this definition, 351 clusters of signature proteins have been identified. Functions of most proteins in this signature set are currently unknown. At least 70% of the clusters that contain proteins from all the euryarchaeal genomes also have crenarchaeal homologs. This conservative set, which appears refractory to horizontal gene transfer to the Bacteria or the Eukarya, would seem to reflect the significant innovations that were unique and fundamental to the archaeal “design fabric.” Genomic protein signature analysis methods may be extended to characterize the evolution of any phylogenetically defined lineage. The complete set of protein clusters for the archaeal genomic signature is presented as supplementary material (see the PNAS web site, www.pnas.org). PMID:10716711