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Sample records for genome studies progress

  1. Progress of genome wide association study in domestic animals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Wang, Zhipeng; Wang, Shouzhi; Li, Hui

    2012-08-22

    Domestic animals are invaluable resources for study of the molecular architecture of complex traits. Although the mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL) responsible for economically important traits in domestic animals has achieved remarkable results in recent decades, not all of the genetic variation in the complex traits has been captured because of the low density of markers used in QTL mapping studies. The genome wide association study (GWAS), which utilizes high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), provides a new way to tackle this issue. Encouraging achievements in dissection of the genetic mechanisms of complex diseases in humans have resulted from the use of GWAS. At present, GWAS has been applied to the field of domestic animal breeding and genetics, and some advances have been made. Many genes or markers that affect economic traits of interest in domestic animals have been identified. In this review, advances in the use of GWAS in domestic animals are described.

  2. Identification of genetic variants associated with Huntington's disease progression: a genome-wide association study.

    PubMed

    Moss, Davina J Hensman; Pardiñas, Antonio F; Langbehn, Douglas; Lo, Kitty; Leavitt, Blair R; Roos, Raymund; Durr, Alexandra; Mead, Simon; Holmans, Peter; Jones, Lesley; Tabrizi, Sarah J

    2017-09-01

    Huntington's disease is caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the huntingtin gene, HTT. Age at onset has been used as a quantitative phenotype in genetic analysis looking for Huntington's disease modifiers, but is hard to define and not always available. Therefore, we aimed to generate a novel measure of disease progression and to identify genetic markers associated with this progression measure. We generated a progression score on the basis of principal component analysis of prospectively acquired longitudinal changes in motor, cognitive, and imaging measures in the 218 indivduals in the TRACK-HD cohort of Huntington's disease gene mutation carriers (data collected 2008-11). We generated a parallel progression score using data from 1773 previously genotyped participants from the European Huntington's Disease Network REGISTRY study of Huntington's disease mutation carriers (data collected 2003-13). We did a genome-wide association analyses in terms of progression for 216 TRACK-HD participants and 1773 REGISTRY participants, then a meta-analysis of these results was undertaken. Longitudinal motor, cognitive, and imaging scores were correlated with each other in TRACK-HD participants, justifying use of a single, cross-domain measure of disease progression in both studies. The TRACK-HD and REGISTRY progression measures were correlated with each other (r=0·674), and with age at onset (TRACK-HD, r=0·315; REGISTRY, r=0·234). The meta-analysis of progression in TRACK-HD and REGISTRY gave a genome-wide significant signal (p=1·12 × 10(-10)) on chromosome 5 spanning three genes: MSH3, DHFR, and MTRNR2L2. The genes in this locus were associated with progression in TRACK-HD (MSH3 p=2·94 × 10(-8)DHFR p=8·37 × 10(-7) MTRNR2L2 p=2·15 × 10(-9)) and to a lesser extent in REGISTRY (MSH3 p=9·36 × 10(-4)DHFR p=8·45 × 10(-4)MTRNR2L2 p=1·20 × 10(-3)). The lead single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in TRACK-HD (rs557874766) was genome

  3. Progress and Promise of Genome-Wide Association Studies for Human Complex Trait Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Stranger, Barbara E.; Stahl, Eli A.; Raj, Towfique

    2011-01-01

    Enormous progress in mapping complex traits in humans has been made in the last 5 yr. There has been early success for prevalent diseases with complex phenotypes. These studies have demonstrated clearly that, while complex traits differ in their underlying genetic architectures, for many common disorders the predominant pattern is that of many loci, individually with small effects on phenotype. For some traits, loci of large effect have been identified. For almost all complex traits studied in humans, the sum of the identified genetic effects comprises only a portion, generally less than half, of the estimated trait heritability. A variety of hypotheses have been proposed to explain why this might be the case, including untested rare variants, and gene–gene and gene–environment interaction. Effort is currently being directed toward implementation of novel analytic approaches and testing rare variants for association with complex traits using imputed variants from the publicly available 1000 Genomes Project resequencing data and from direct resequencing of clinical samples. Through integration with annotations and functional genomic data as well as by in vitro and in vivo experimentation, mapping studies continue to characterize functional variants associated with complex traits and address fundamental issues such as epistasis and pleiotropy. This review focuses primarily on the ways in which genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have revolutionized the field of human quantitative genetics. PMID:21115973

  4. Genome-Wide Association of CKD Progression: The Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Parsa, Afshin; Kanetsky, Peter A; Xiao, Rui; Gupta, Jayanta; Mitra, Nandita; Limou, Sophie; Xie, Dawei; Xu, Huichun; Anderson, Amanda Hyre; Ojo, Akinlolu; Kusek, John W; Lora, Claudia M; Hamm, L Lee; He, Jiang; Sandholm, Niina; Jeff, Janina; Raj, Dominic E; Böger, Carsten A; Bottinger, Erwin; Salimi, Shabnam; Parekh, Rulan S; Adler, Sharon G; Langefeld, Carl D; Bowden, Donald W; Groop, Per-Henrik; Forsblom, Carol; Freedman, Barry I; Lipkowitz, Michael; Fox, Caroline S; Winkler, Cheryl A; Feldman, Harold I

    2017-03-01

    The rate of decline of renal function varies significantly among individuals with CKD. To understand better the contribution of genetics to CKD progression, we performed a genome-wide association study among participants in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study. Our outcome of interest was CKD progression measured as change in eGFR over time among 1331 blacks and 1476 whites with CKD. We stratified all analyses by race and subsequently, diabetes status. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that surpassed a significance threshold of P<1×10(-6) for association with eGFR slope were selected as candidates for follow-up and secondarily tested for association with proteinuria and time to ESRD. We identified 12 such SNPs among black patients and six such SNPs among white patients. We were able to conduct follow-up analyses of three candidate SNPs in similar (replication) cohorts and eight candidate SNPs in phenotype-related (validation) cohorts. Among blacks without diabetes, rs653747 in LINC00923 replicated in the African American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension cohort (discovery P=5.42×10(-7); replication P=0.039; combined P=7.42×10(-9)). This SNP also associated with ESRD (hazard ratio, 2.0 (95% confidence interval, 1.5 to 2.7); P=4.90×10(-6)). Similarly, rs931891 in LINC00923 associated with eGFR decline (P=1.44×10(-4)) in white patients without diabetes. In summary, SNPs in LINC00923, an RNA gene expressed in the kidney, significantly associated with CKD progression in individuals with nondiabetic CKD. However, the lack of equivalent cohorts hampered replication for most discovery loci. Further replication of our findings in comparable study populations is warranted.

  5. Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Variants Associated with Progression of Liver Fibrosis from HCV Infection

    PubMed Central

    PATIN, ETIENNE; KUTALIK, ZOLTÁN; GUERGNON, JULIEN; BIBERT, STÉPHANIE; NALPAS, BERTRAND; JOUANGUY, EMMANUELLE; MUNTEANU, MONA; BOUSQUET, LAURENCE; ARGIRO, LAURENT; HALFON, PHILIPPE; BOLAND, ANNE; MÜLLHAUPT, BEAT; SEMELA, DAVID; DUFOUR, JEAN-FRANÇOIS; HEIM, MARKUS H.; MORADPOUR, DARIUS; CERNY, ANDREAS; MALINVERNI, RAFFAELE; HIRSCH, HANS; MARTINETTI, GLADYS; SUPPIAH, VIJAYAPRAKASH; STEWART, GRAEME; BOOTH, DAVID R.; GEORGE, JACOB; CASANOVA, JEAN-LAURENT; BRÉCHOT, CHRISTIAN; RICE, CHARLES M.; TALAL, ANDREW H.; JACOBSON, IRA M.; BOURLIÈRE, MARC; THEODOROU, IOANNIS; POYNARD, THIERRY; NEGRO, FRANCESCO; POL, STANISLAS; BOCHUD, PIERRE-YVES; ABEL, LAURENT

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Polymorphisms in IL28B were shown to affect clearance of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in genome-wide association (GWA) studies. Only a fraction of patients with chronic HCV infection develop liver fibrosis, a process that might also be affected by genetic factors. We carried out a 2-stage GWA study of liver fibrosis progression related to HCV infection. METHODS We studied well-characterized HCV-infected patients of European descent who had liver biopsies before treatment. We defined various liver fibrosis phenotypes on the basis of Metavir scores, with and without taking the duration of HCV infection into account. Our GWA analyses were conducted on a filtered primary cohort of 1161 patients using 780,650 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We genotyped 96 SNPs with P-values<5×10−5 from an independent replication cohort of 962 patients. We then assessed the most interesting replicated SNPs using DNA samples collected from 219 patients who participated in separate GWA studies of HCV clearance. RESULTS In the combined cohort of 2342 HCV-infected patients, the SNPs rs16851720 (in the total sample) and rs4374383 (in patients that received blood transfusions) were associated with fibrosis progression (Pcombined=8.9×10−9 and 1.1×10−9, respectively). The SNP rs16851720 is located within RNF7, which encodes an antioxidant that protects against apoptosis. The SNP rs4374383, together with another replicated SNP, rs9380516 (Pcombined=5.4×10−7), were linked to the functionally related genes MERTK and TULP1, which encode factors involved in phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by macrophages. CONCLUSIONS Our GWA study identified several susceptibility loci for HCV-induced liver fibrosis; these were linked to genes that regulate apoptosis. Apoptotic control might therefore be involved in liver fibrosis. PMID:22841784

  6. Current Progress in Sports Genomics.

    PubMed

    Ahmetov, Ildus I; Fedotovskaya, Olga N

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the genetic architecture of athletic performance is an important step in the development of methods for talent identification in sport. Research concerned with molecular predictors has highlighted a number of potentially important DNA polymorphisms contributing to predisposition to success in certain types of sport. This review summarizes the evidence and mechanistic insights on the associations between DNA polymorphisms and athletic performance. A literature search (period: 1997-2014) revealed that at least 120 genetic markers are linked to elite athlete status (77 endurance-related genetic markers and 43 power/strength-related genetic markers). Notably, 11 (9%) of these genetic markers (endurance markers: ACE I, ACTN3 577X, PPARA rs4253778 G, PPARGC1A Gly482; power/strength markers: ACE D, ACTN3 Arg577, AMPD1 Gln12, HIF1A 582Ser, MTHFR rs1801131 C, NOS3 rs2070744 T, PPARG 12Ala) have shown positive associations with athlete status in three or more studies, and six markers (CREM rs1531550 A, DMD rs939787 T, GALNT13 rs10196189 G, NFIA-AS1 rs1572312 C, RBFOX1 rs7191721 G, TSHR rs7144481 C) were identified after performing genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of African-American, Jamaican, Japanese, and Russian athletes. On the other hand, the significance of 29 (24%) markers was not replicated in at least one study. Future research including multicenter GWAS, whole-genome sequencing, epigenetic, transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic profiling and performing meta-analyses in large cohorts of athletes is needed before these findings can be extended to practice in sport. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The use of whole genome amplification to study chromosomal changes in prostate cancer: insights into genome-wide signature of preneoplasia associated with cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Simon; Yoshimoto, Maisa; Beheshti, Ben; Houlston, Richard S; Squire, Jeremy A; Evans, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer (CaP) is a disease with multifactorial etiology that includes both genetic and environmental components. The knowledge of the genetic basis of CaP has increased over the past years, mainly in the pathways that underlie tumourigenesis, progression and drug resistance. The vast majority of cases of CaP are adenocarcinomas that likely develop through a pre-malignant lesion and high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HPIN). Histologically, CaP is a heterogeneous disease consisting of multiple, discrete foci of invasive carcinoma and HPIN that are commonly interspersed with benign glands and stroma. This admixture with benign tissue can complicate genomic analyses in CaP. Specifically, when DNA is bulk-extracted the genetic information obtained represents an average for all of the cells within the sample. Results To minimize this problem, we obtained DNA from individual foci of HPIN and CaP by laser capture microdissection (LCM). The small quantities of DNA thus obtained were then amplified by means of multiple-displacement amplification (MDA), for use in genomic DNA array comparative genomic hybridisation (gaCGH). Recurrent chromosome copy number abnormalities (CNAs) were observed in both HPIN and CaP. In HPIN, chromosomal imbalances involving chromosome 8 where common, whilst in CaP additional chromosomal changes involving chromosomes 6, 10, 13 and 16 where also frequently observed. Conclusion An overall increase in chromosomal changes was seen in CaP compared to HPIN, suggesting a universal breakdown in chromosomal stability. The accumulation of CNAs, which occurs during this process is non-random and may indicate chromosomal regions important in tumourigenesis. It is therefore likely that the alterations in copy number are part of a programmed cycle of events that promote tumour development, progression and survival. The combination of LCM, MDA and gaCGH is ideally suited for the identification of CNAs from small cell clusters and

  8. A Multiancestral Genome-Wide Exome Array Study of Alzheimer Disease, Frontotemporal Dementia, and Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jason A.; Wang, Qing; Davis-Turak, Jeremy; Li, Yun; Karydas, Anna M.; Hsu, Sandy C.; Sears, Renee L.; Chatzopoulou, Doxa; Huang, Alden Y.; Wojta, Kevin J.; Klein, Eric; Lee, Jason; Beekly, Duane L.; Boxer, Adam; Faber, Kelley M.; Haase, Claudia M.; Miller, Josh; Poon, Wayne W.; Rosen, Ami; Rosen, Howard; Sapozhnikova, Anna; Shapira, Jill; Varpetian, Arousiak; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Levenson, Robert W.; Levey, Allan I.; Kukull, Walter A.; Mendez, Mario F.; Ringman, John; Chui, Helena; Cotman, Carl; DeCarli, Charles; Miller, Bruce L.; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Coppola, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Previous studies have indicated a heritable component of the etiology of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease (AD), frontotemporal dementia (FTD), and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). However, few have examined the contribution of low-frequency coding variants on a genome-wide level. OBJECTIVE To identify low-frequency coding variants that affect susceptibility to AD, FTD, and PSP. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS We used the Illumina HumanExome BeadChip array to genotype a large number of variants (most of which are low-frequency coding variants) in a cohort of patients with neurodegenerative disease (224 with AD, 168 with FTD, and 48 with PSP) and in 224 control individuals without dementia enrolled between 2005–2012 from multiple centers participating in the Genetic Investigation in Frontotemporal Dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease (GIFT) Study. An additional multiancestral replication cohort of 240 patients with AD and 240 controls without dementia was used to validate suggestive findings. Variant-level association testing and gene-based testing were performed. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Statistical association of genetic variants with clinical diagnosis of AD, FTD, and PSP. RESULTS Genetic variants typed by the exome array explained 44%, 53%, and 57% of the total phenotypic variance of AD, FTD, and PSP, respectively. An association with the known AD gene ABCA7 was replicated in several ancestries (discovery P = .0049, European P = .041, African American P = .043, and Asian P = .027), suggesting that exonic variants within this gene modify AD susceptibility. In addition, 2 suggestive candidate genes, DYSF (P = 5.53 × 10−5) and PAXIP1 (P = 2.26 × 10−4), were highlighted in patients with AD and differentially expressed in AD brain. Corroborating evidence from other exome array studies and gene expression data points toward potential involvement of these genes in the pathogenesis of AD. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Low

  9. A multiancestral genome-wide exome array study of Alzheimer disease, frontotemporal dementia, and progressive supranuclear palsy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jason A; Wang, Qing; Davis-Turak, Jeremy; Li, Yun; Karydas, Anna M; Hsu, Sandy C; Sears, Renee L; Chatzopoulou, Doxa; Huang, Alden Y; Wojta, Kevin J; Klein, Eric; Lee, Jason; Beekly, Duane L; Boxer, Adam; Faber, Kelley M; Haase, Claudia M; Miller, Josh; Poon, Wayne W; Rosen, Ami; Rosen, Howard; Sapozhnikova, Anna; Shapira, Jill; Varpetian, Arousiak; Foroud, Tatiana M; Levenson, Robert W; Levey, Allan I; Kukull, Walter A; Mendez, Mario F; Ringman, John; Chui, Helena; Cotman, Carl; DeCarli, Charles; Miller, Bruce L; Geschwind, Daniel H; Coppola, Giovanni

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies have indicated a heritable component of the etiology of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease (AD), frontotemporal dementia (FTD), and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). However, few have examined the contribution of low-frequency coding variants on a genome-wide level. To identify low-frequency coding variants that affect susceptibility to AD, FTD, and PSP. We used the Illumina HumanExome BeadChip array to genotype a large number of variants (most of which are low-frequency coding variants) in a cohort of patients with neurodegenerative disease (224 with AD, 168 with FTD, and 48 with PSP) and in 224 control individuals without dementia enrolled between 2005-2012 from multiple centers participating in the Genetic Investigation in Frontotemporal Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease (GIFT) Study. An additional multiancestral replication cohort of 240 patients with AD and 240 controls without dementia was used to validate suggestive findings. Variant-level association testing and gene-based testing were performed. Statistical association of genetic variants with clinical diagnosis of AD, FTD, and PSP. Genetic variants typed by the exome array explained 44%, 53%, and 57% of the total phenotypic variance of AD, FTD, and PSP, respectively. An association with the known AD gene ABCA7 was replicated in several ancestries (discovery P=.0049, European P=.041, African American P=.043, and Asian P=.027), suggesting that exonic variants within this gene modify AD susceptibility. In addition, 2 suggestive candidate genes, DYSF (P=5.53×10(-5)) and PAXIP1 (P=2.26×10(-4)), were highlighted in patients with AD and differentially expressed in AD brain. Corroborating evidence from other exome array studies and gene expression data points toward potential involvement of these genes in the pathogenesis of AD. Low-frequency coding variants with intermediate effect size may account for a significant fraction of the genetic susceptibility to AD and FTD

  10. DOE Joint Genome Institute 2008 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, David

    2009-03-12

    dominated how sequencing was done in the last decade is being replaced by a variety of new processes and sequencing instruments. The JGI, with an increasing number of next-generation sequencers, whose throughput is 100- to 1,000-fold greater than the Sanger capillary-based sequencers, is increasingly focused in new directions on projects of scale and complexity not previously attempted. These new directions for the JGI come, in part, from the 2008 National Research Council report on the goals of the National Plant Genome Initiative as well as the 2007 National Research Council report on the New Science of Metagenomics. Both reports outline a crucial need for systematic large-scale surveys of the plant and microbial components of the biosphere as well as an increasing need for large-scale analysis capabilities to meet the challenge of converting sequence data into knowledge. The JGI is extensively discussed in both reports as vital to progress in these fields of major national interest. JGI's future plan for plants and microbes includes a systematic approach for investigation of these organisms at a scale requiring the special capabilities of the JGI to generate, manage, and analyze the datasets. JGI will generate and provide not only community access to these plant and microbial datasets, but also the tools for analyzing them. These activities will produce essential knowledge that will be needed if we are to be able to respond to the world's energy and environmental challenges. As the JGI Plant and Microbial programs advance, the JGI as a user facility is also evolving. The Institute has been highly successful in bending its technical and analytical skills to help users solve large complex problems of major importance, and that effort will continue unabated. The JGI will increasingly move from a central focus on 'one-off' user projects coming from small user communities to much larger scale projects driven by systematic and problem-focused approaches to selection of

  11. Overcoming Barriers to Progress in Exercise Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard, Claude

    2011-01-01

    This commentary focuses on the issues of statistical power, the usefulness of hypothesis-free approaches such as in genome-wide association explorations, the necessity of expanding the research beyond common DNA variants, the advantage of combining transcriptomics with genomics, and the complexities inherent to the search for links between genotype and phenotype in exercise genomics research. PMID:21697717

  12. Progress report- African goat genome and genetic improvement project

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An overview of the progress for the Feed the Future funded African Goat Project will be presented. The overview will include progress on producing a goat genome assembly from a San Clemente goat. Additional progress will be reported for phnotype and sample collection from African goat populations an...

  13. Genomic variation in maize. Progress report, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Rivin, C.J.

    1990-12-31

    We have endeavored to learn to learn how different DNA sequences and sequence arrangements contribute to genome plasticity in maize. We describe quantitative variation among maize inbred lines for tandemly arrayed and dispersed repeated DNA sequences and gene families, and qualitative variation for sequences homologous to the Mutator family of transposons. The potential of these sequences to undergo unequal crossing over, non-allelic (ectopic) recombination and transposition makes them a source of genome instability. We have found examples of rapid genomic change involving these sequences in F1 hybrids, tissue culture cells and regenerated plants.

  14. Human Genome Program Report. Part 1, Overview and Progress

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    1997-11-01

    This report contains Part 1 of a two-part report to reflect research and progress in the U.S. Department of Energy Human Genome Program from 1994 through 1996, with specified updates made just before publication. Part 1 consists of the program overview and report on progress.

  15. Human genome program report. Part 1, overview and progress

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    This report contains Part 1 of a two-part report to reflect research and progress in the U.S. Department of Energy Human Genome Program from 1994 through 1996, with specified updates made just before publication. Part 1 consists of the program overview and report on progress.

  16. The Cassava Genome: Current Progress, Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Prochnik, Simon; Marri, Pradeep Reddy; Desany, Brian; Rabinowicz, Pablo D; Kodira, Chinnappa; Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Rodriguez, Fausto; Fauquet, Claude; Tohme, Joseph; Harkins, Timothy; Rokhsar, Daniel S; Rounsley, Steve

    2012-03-01

    The starchy swollen roots of cassava provide an essential food source for nearly a billion people, as well as possibilities for bioenergy, yet improvements to nutritional content and resistance to threatening diseases are currently impeded. A 454-based whole genome shotgun sequence has been assembled, which covers 69% of the predicted genome size and 96% of protein-coding gene space, with genome finishing underway. The predicted 30,666 genes and 3,485 alternate splice forms are supported by 1.4 M expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Maps based on simple sequence repeat (SSR)-, and EST-derived single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) already exist. Thanks to the genome sequence, a high-density linkage map is currently being developed from a cross between two diverse cassava cultivars: one susceptible to cassava brown streak disease; the other resistant. An efficient genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) approach is being developed to catalog SNPs both within the mapping population and among diverse African farmer-preferred varieties of cassava. These resources will accelerate marker-assisted breeding programs, allowing improvements in disease-resistance and nutrition, and will help us understand the genetic basis for disease resistance.

  17. Studying Culicoides vectors of BTV in the post-genomic era: resources, bottlenecks to progress and future directions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are a major vector group responsible for the biological transmission of a wide variety of globally significant arboviruses, including bluetongue virus (BTV). In this review we examine current biological resources for the study of this genus, with a...

  18. 2013 Progress Report -- DOE Joint Genome Institute

    SciTech Connect

    2013-11-01

    In October 2012, we introduced a 10-Year Strategic Vision [http://bit.ly/JGI-Vision] for the Institute. A central focus of this Strategic Vision is to bridge the gap between sequenced genomes and an understanding of biological functions at the organism and ecosystem level. This involves the continued massive-scale generation of sequence data, complemented by orthogonal new capabilities to functionally annotate these large sequence data sets. Our Strategic Vision lays out a path to guide our decisions and ensure that the evolving set of experimental and computational capabilities available to DOE JGI users will continue to enable groundbreaking science.

  19. Completing the human genome: the progress and challenge of satellite DNA assembly.

    PubMed

    Miga, Karen H

    2015-09-01

    Genomic studies rely on accurate chromosome assemblies to explore sequence-based models of cell biology, evolution and biomedical disease. However, even the extensively studied human genome has not yet reached a complete, 'telomere-to-telomere', chromosome assembly. The largest assembly gaps remain in centromeric regions and acrocentric short arms, sites known to contain megabase-sized arrays of tandem repeats, or satellite DNAs. This review aims to briefly address the progress and challenges of generating correct assemblies of satellite DNA arrays. Although the focus is placed on the human genome, many concepts presented here are applicable to other genomes.

  20. The genomic dynamics during progression of lung adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Luo, Longhai; Luo, Wen; Zhou, Yong; Yang, Chao; Xiong, Teng; Li, Xiangchun; Meng, Xuan; Li, Lin; Zhang, Xiaopin; Wang, Zhe; Wang, Zhixin

    2017-08-01

    Intra-tumor heterogeneity is a big barrier to precision medicine. To explore the underlying clonal diversity in lung adenocarcinomas, we selected nine individuals with whole-genome sequencing data from primary and matched metastatic tumors as a cohort for study. Similar global pattern of arm-level copy number changes and large variations of somatic single-nucleotide variant between the primary and metastasis are observed in the majority of cases. Importantly, we found breakage-fusion-bridge (BFB) cycles acting as an important mechanism for underlying cancer gene amplification, such as amplification of CDK4, CDKN3 and FGFR1 in early stage. We also identified recurrent focal amplification of gene CCNY derived from BFB in two metastatic tumors, but not in primary tumor. Clonal analysis of case 236T demonstrated that mutational processes are varying with tumor progression. Collectively, our data provide new insights into genetic diversity and potential therapeutic target in lung adenocarcinoma.

  1. Progressive alignment of genomic signals by multiple dynamic time warping.

    PubMed

    Skutkova, Helena; Vitek, Martin; Sedlar, Karel; Provaznik, Ivo

    2015-11-21

    This paper presents the utilization of progressive alignment principle for positional adjustment of a set of genomic signals with different lengths. The new method of multiple alignment of signals based on dynamic time warping is tested for the purpose of evaluating the similarity of different length genes in phylogenetic studies. Two sets of phylogenetic markers were used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the evaluation of intraspecies and interspecies genetic variability. The part of the proposed method is modification of pairwise alignment of two signals by dynamic time warping with using correlation in a sliding window. The correlation based dynamic time warping allows more accurate alignment dependent on local homologies in sequences without the need of scoring matrix or evolutionary models, because mutual similarities of residues are included in the numerical code of signals.

  2. Genome Wide Association Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastiani, Paola; Solovieff, Nadia

    The availability of high throughput technology for parallel genotyping has opened the field of genetics to genome-wide association studies (GWAS). These studies generate massive amount of genetic data that challenge investigators with issues related to data management, statistical analysis of large data sets, visualization, and annotation of results. We will review the common approach to analysis of GWAS data and then discuss options to learn more from these data.

  3. In situ quantification of genomic instability in breast cancer progression

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz de Solorzano, Carlos; Chin, Koei; Gray, Joe W.; Lockett, Stephen J.

    2003-05-15

    Genomic instability is a hallmark of breast and other solid cancers. Presumably caused by critical telomere reduction, GI is responsible for providing the genetic diversity required in the multi-step progression of the disease. We have used multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization and 3D image analysis to quantify genomic instability cell-by-cell in thick, intact tissue sections of normal breast epithelium, preneoplastic lesions (usual ductal hyperplasia), ductal carcinona is situ or invasive carcinoma of the breast. Our in situ-cell by cell-analysis of genomic instability shows an important increase of genomic instability in the transition from hyperplasia to in situ carcinoma, followed by a reduction of instability in invasive carcinoma. This pattern suggests that the transition from hyperplasia to in situ carcinoma corresponds to telomere crisis and invasive carcinoma is a consequence of telomerase reactivation afertelomere crisis.

  4. Research progress of plant population genomics based on high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Yunsheng, Wang

    2016-08-01

    Population genomics, a new paradigm for population genetics, combine the concepts and techniques of genomics with the theoretical system of population genetics and improve our understanding of microevolution through identification of site-specific effect and genome-wide effects using genome-wide polymorphic sites genotypeing. With the appearance and improvement of the next generation high-throughput sequencing technology, the numbers of plant species with complete genome sequences increased rapidly and large scale resequencing has also been carried out in recent years. Parallel sequencing has also been done in some plant species without complete genome sequences. These studies have greatly promoted the development of population genomics and deepened our understanding of the genetic diversity, level of linking disequilibium, selection effect, demographical history and molecular mechanism of complex traits of relevant plant population at a genomic level. In this review, I briely introduced the concept and research methods of population genomics and summarized the research progress of plant population genomics based on high-throughput sequencing. I also discussed the prospect as well as existing problems of plant population genomics in order to provide references for related studies.

  5. Progress in Understanding and Sequencing the Genome of Brassica rapa

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Chang Pyo; Kwon, Soo-Jin; Kim, Jung Sun; Yang, Tae-Jin; Park, Beom-Seok; Lim, Yong Pyo

    2008-01-01

    Brassica rapa, which is closely related to Arabidopsis thaliana, is an important crop and a model plant for studying genome evolution via polyploidization. We report the current understanding of the genome structure of B. rapa and efforts for the whole-genome sequencing of the species. The tribe Brassicaceae, which comprises ca. 240 species, descended from a common hexaploid ancestor with a basic genome similar to that of Arabidopsis. Chromosome rearrangements, including fusions and/or fissions, resulted in the present-day “diploid” Brassica species with variation in chromosome number and phenotype. Triplicated genomic segments of B. rapa are collinear to those of A. thaliana with InDels. The genome triplication has led to an approximately 1.7-fold increase in the B. rapa gene number compared to that of A. thaliana. Repetitive DNA of B. rapa has also been extensively amplified and has diverged from that of A. thaliana. For its whole-genome sequencing, the Brassica rapa Genome Sequencing Project (BrGSP) consortium has developed suitable genomic resources and constructed genetic and physical maps. Ten chromosomes of B. rapa are being allocated to BrGSP consortium participants, and each chromosome will be sequenced by a BAC-by-BAC approach. Genome sequencing of B. rapa will offer a new perspective for plant biology and evolution in the context of polyploidization. PMID:18288250

  6. Genomic events associated with progression of pleural malignant mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Sergey V.; Miller, Jeremy; Lucito, Robert; Tang, Chunlao; Ivanova, Alla V.; Pei, Jianming; Carbone, Michele; Cruz, Christina; Beck, Amanda; Webb, Craig; Nonaka, Daisuke; Testa, Joseph R.; Pass, Harvey I.

    2008-01-01

    Pleural malignant mesothelioma (MM) is an aggressive cancer with a very long latency and a very short median survival. Little is known about the genetic events that trigger MM and their relation to poor outcome. The goal of our study was to characterize major genomic gains and losses associated with MM origin and progression and assess their clinical significance. We performed Representative Oligonucleotide Microarray Analysis (ROMA) on DNA isolated from tumors of 22 patients who recurred at variable interval with the disease after surgery. The total number of copy number alterations (CNA) and frequent imbalances for patients with short time (<12 months from surgery) and long time to recurrence were recorded and mapped using the Analysis of Copy Errors (ACE) algorithm. We report a profound increase in CNA in the short-time recurrence group with most chromosomes affected, which can be explained by chromosomal instability associated with MM. Deletions in chromosomes 22q12.2, 19q13.32, and 17p13.1 appeared to be the most frequent events (55-74%) shared between MM patients followed by deletions in 1p, 9p, 9q, 4p, 3p and gains in 5p, 18q, 8q, and 17q (23-55%). Deletions in 9p21.3 encompassing CDKN2A/ARF and CDKN2B were characterized as specific for the short-term recurrence group. Analysis of the minimal common areas of frequent gains and losses identified candidate genes that may be involved in different stages of MM: OSM (22q12.2), FUS1 and PL6 (3p21.3), DNAJA1 (9p21.1), and CDH2 (18q11.2-q12.3). Imbalances seen by ROMA were confirmed by Affymetrix genome analysis in a subset of samples. PMID:18973227

  7. Progress in genome sequencing will accelerate molecular breeding in cotton (Gossypium spp.).

    PubMed

    Yan, Rong; Liang, Chengzhen; Meng, Zhigang; Malik, Waqas; Zhu, Tao; Zong, Xuefeng; Guo, Sandui; Zhang, Rui

    2016-12-01

    Cotton (Gossypium spp.) is the single most important spinning fiber that has economic significance worldwide. Cotton is one of the most value-added crops and an excellent model system for the analysis of polyploidization and cell development. Thus, the Cotton Genome Consortium has made rapid and significant progress in whole genome sequencing studies in the last decade. Developments in cotton genome sequencing and assembly provide powerful tools for dissecting the genetic and molecular bases of agronomically important traits and establishing regulatory networks on these processes, which leads to molecular breeding. Here, we briefly review these advances, emphasizing their implications in the genetic improvement of cotton with a particular focus on fiber quality and yield. Moreover, major progresses in chloroplast and mitochondrial genomes have also been summarized.

  8. White matter lesion progression: A genome-wide search for genetic influences

    PubMed Central

    Hofer, Edith; Cavalieri, Margherita; Bis, Joshua C; DeCarli, Charles; Fornage, Myriam; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Srikanth, Velandai; Trompet, Stella; Verhaaren, Benjamin FJ; Wolf, Christiane; Yang, Qiong; Adams, Hieab HH; Amouyel, Philippe; Beiser, Alexa; Buckley, Brendan M; Callisaya, Michele; Chauhan, Ganesh; de Craen, Anton JM; Dufouil, Carole; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Ford, Ian; Freudenberger, Paul; Gottesman, Rebecca F; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Heiss, Gerardo; Hofman, Albert; Lumley, Thomas; Martinez, Oliver; Mazoyer, Bernard; Moran, Chris; Niessen, Wiro J.; Phan, Thanh; Psaty, Bruce M; Satizabal, Claudia L; Sattar, Naveed; Schilling, Sabrina; Shibata, Dean K; Slagboom, P Eline; Smith, Albert; Stott, David J; Taylor, Kent D; Thomson, Russell; Töglhofer, Anna M; Tzourio, Christophe; van Buchem, Mark; Wang, Jing; Westendorp, Rudi GJ; Windham, B Gwen; Vernooij, Meike W; Zijdenbos, Alex; Beare, Richard; Debette, Stéphanie; Ikram, M Arfan; Jukema, J Wouter; Launer, Lenore J; Longstreth, W T; Mosley, Thomas H; Seshadri, Sudha; Schmidt, Helena; Schmidt, Reinhold

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose White matter lesion (WML) progression on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is related to cognitive decline and stroke, but its determinants besides baseline WML burden are largely unknown. Here, we estimated heritability of WML progression, and sought common genetic variants associated with WML progression in elderly participants from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology (CHARGE) consortium. Methods Heritability of WML progression was calculated in the Framingham Heart Study. The genome-wide association study included 7773 elderly participants from 10 cohorts. To assess the relative contribution of genetic factors to progression of WML, we compared in seven cohorts risk models including demographics, vascular risk factors plus single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that have been shown to be associated cross-sectionally with WML in the current and previous association studies. Results A total of 1085 subjects showed WML progression. The heritability estimate for WML progression was low at 6.5%, and no SNPs achieved genome-wide significance (p-value < 5×10−8). Four loci were suggestive (p-value < 1×10−5) of an association with WML progression: 10q24.32 (rs10883817, p=1.46×10−6); 12q13.13 (rs4761974, p=8.71×10−7); 20p12.1 (rs6135309, p=3.69×10−6); and 4p15.31 (rs7664442, p=2.26×10−6). Variants that have been previously related to WML explained only 0.8% to 11.7% more of the variance in WML progression than age, vascular risk factors and baseline WML burden. Conclusions Common genetic factors contribute little to the progression of age-related WML in middle-aged and older adults. Future research on determinants of WML progression should focus more on environmental, life-style or host-related biological factors. PMID:26451028

  9. [Research progress on mitochondrial genome structure in the phylum apicomplexa].

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-mei; Li, Xiao-bing; Huang, Wei

    2014-10-01

    Mitochondria are ubiquitous organelles in all eukaryotic cells which are essential for a series of cellular processes and signal transduction. The phylum Apicomplexa includes series of unicellular eukaryotes and some of them are clinically or economically important parasites. Recent studies have demonstrated that apicomplexan parasites' mitochondrial genomes exhibit remarkably diverse structures and they are ideal biological models to comprehend the evolution of mitochondrial genomes. This paper summarizes the mitochondrial genome structure of some representative apicomplexan, highlights their structure characteristics along with evolution process, and briefly describes their nuclear mitochondrial DNA and nuclear plastid DNA.

  10. Progression of Structural Change in the Breast Cancer Genome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    mutations),! NanoString !Copy!Number!Variation!beta!( NanoString !CNV;!targeted!copy!number),!bisulfite!converted! RainDance!targeted!amplification...process,!To!send=will!begin!in!~1!month.!! Patient Sample Type Site Tumor Type Affy6.0 AmpliSeq2.0 NanoString CNV RainDance Mate-Pair RJH-MET-1 Tumor...during# progression/metastasis.# In#addition#to#the#genomeHwide#copy#number#analysis,#a#targeted#approach#was#undertaken#using#the# NanoString # Copy

  11. Genomic aberrations of myeloproliferative and myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms in chronic phase and during disease progression.

    PubMed

    Hahm, C; Huh, H J; Mun, Y C; Seong, C M; Chung, W S; Huh, J

    2015-04-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) and myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms (MDS/MPN) may transform into secondary myelofibrosis (MF) or evolve into acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The genetic mechanisms underlying disease progression in MPN and MDS/MPN patients remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate sequential genomic aberrations identified by single nucleotide polymorphism array (SNP-A)-based karyotyping that can detect cryptic aberrations or copy neutral loss of heterozygosity (CN-LOH) in the chronic phase and during disease progression of MPN and MDS/MPN patients. The study group included 13 MPN and four MDS/MPN patients (seven polycythemia vera (PV); four essential thrombocythemia (ET); two MPN-unclassifiable (MPN-U); one chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML); one atypical chronic myeloid leukemia, BCR-ABL1 negative (aCML); and two MDS/MPN-unclassifiable (MDS/MPN-U)). Among them, five patients (two PV, two MPN-U, and one MDS/MPN-U) progressed to MF and three patients (one CMML, one aCML, and one MDS/MPN-U) transformed to AML. The median follow-up period was 70 months (range, 7-152). Whole-genome SNP-A (SNP 6.0; Affymetrix, Santa Clara, CA, USA)-based karyotyping and JAK2 mutation analysis were performed according to the manufacturer's instructions. SNP-A showed 19 kinds of genomic aberrations, including seven gains, eight deletions, and four CN-LOH. CN-LOH of 9p involving JAK2 was the most common aberration, followed by 5q deletion and 9p gain. The incidence of genomic changes identified by SNP was not different in patients with disease progression (75%), compared with those without disease progression (56%) (P = 0.4). However, when excluding 9p CN-LOH, the incidence of genomic changes was significantly higher in patients with disease progression than in patients without disease progression (63% and 0%, respectively, P = 0.01). Among eight patients with disease progression, two patients (two MPN-U) showed abnormal SNP-A results

  12. Personal genomes in progress: from the human genome project to the personal genome project.

    PubMed

    Lunshof, Jeantine E; Bobe, Jason; Aach, John; Angrist, Misha; Thakuria, Joseph V; Vorhaus, Daniel B; Hoehe, Margret R; Church, George M

    2010-01-01

    The cost of a diploid human genome sequence has dropped from about $70M to $2000 since 2007--even as the standards for redundancy have increased from 7x to 40x in order to improve call rates. Coupled with the low return on investment for common single-nucleotide polylmorphisms, this has caused a significant rise in interest in correlating genome sequences with comprehensive environmental and trait data (GET). The cost of electronic health records, imaging, and microbial, immunological, and behavioral data are also dropping quickly. Sharing such integrated GET datasets and their interpretations with a diversity of researchers and research subjects highlights the need for informed-consent models capable of addressing novel privacy and other issues, as well as for flexible data-sharing resources that make materials and data available with minimum restrictions on use. This article examines the Personal Genome Project's effort to develop a GET database as a public genomics resource broadly accessible to both researchers and research participants, while pursuing the highest standards in research ethics.

  13. The research progress of farm animal genomics based on sequencing technologies.

    PubMed

    Liang, Su-yun; Zhou, Zheng-kui; Hou, Shui-sheng

    2017-04-20

    Various farm animal breeds have been domesticated and bred for thousands years, and they provide adequate animal-derived proteins to meet the human nutrition requirement. Although quantitative genetics was applied in animal breeding, which launched a technological revolution in the past century, a number of complex traits remain difficult to be selected based on pedigree derived breeding, due to complicated animal genetics and development mechanisms. Farm animal's genetic potential hasn't yet to be fully exploited. The concept and technology from the Human Genome Project have greatly promoted farm animal genomic researches. It is possible to fine map the causal variations at the whole genome level and then exploit their biological functions, thus providing the theoretical basis for molecular designed breeding. In this review, we summarize the genomics research progress of main farm animals during the past decade, including pigs, cattle, yaks, goats, sheep, chickens, ducks and geese. We focus on the reference genome sequencing and follow-up population-level genomic studies based on high throughput resequencing technologies, and meanwhile envision the future work of farm animal genomics.

  14. Progress in Genome Editing Technology and Its Application in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kai; Raboanatahiry, Nadia; Zhu, Bin; Li, Maoteng

    2017-01-01

    Genome editing technology (GET) is a versatile approach that has progressed rapidly as a mechanism to alter the genotype and phenotype of organisms. However, conventional genome modification using GET cannot satisfy current demand for high-efficiency and site-directed mutagenesis, retrofitting of artificial nucleases has developed into a new avenue within this field. Based on mechanisms to recognize target genes, newly-developed GETs can generally be subdivided into three cleavage systems, protein-dependent DNA cleavage systems (i.e., zinc-finger nucleases, ZFN, and transcription activator-like effector nucleases, TALEN), RNA-dependent DNA cleavage systems (i.e., clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR associated proteins, CRISPR-Cas9, CRISPR-Cpf1, and CRISPR-C2c1), and RNA-dependent RNA cleavage systems (i.e., RNA interference, RNAi, and CRISPR-C2c2). All these techniques can lead to double-stranded (DSB) or single-stranded breaks (SSB), and result in either random mutations via non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) or targeted mutation via homologous recombination (HR). Thus, site-directed mutagenesis can be induced via targeted gene knock-out, knock-in, or replacement to modify specific characteristics including morphology-modification, resistance-enhancement, and physiological mechanism-improvement along with plant growth and development. In this paper, an non-comprehensive review on the development of different GETs as applied to plants is presented. PMID:28261237

  15. Progress in Genome Editing Technology and Its Application in Plants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Raboanatahiry, Nadia; Zhu, Bin; Li, Maoteng

    2017-01-01

    Genome editing technology (GET) is a versatile approach that has progressed rapidly as a mechanism to alter the genotype and phenotype of organisms. However, conventional genome modification using GET cannot satisfy current demand for high-efficiency and site-directed mutagenesis, retrofitting of artificial nucleases has developed into a new avenue within this field. Based on mechanisms to recognize target genes, newly-developed GETs can generally be subdivided into three cleavage systems, protein-dependent DNA cleavage systems (i.e., zinc-finger nucleases, ZFN, and transcription activator-like effector nucleases, TALEN), RNA-dependent DNA cleavage systems (i.e., clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR associated proteins, CRISPR-Cas9, CRISPR-Cpf1, and CRISPR-C2c1), and RNA-dependent RNA cleavage systems (i.e., RNA interference, RNAi, and CRISPR-C2c2). All these techniques can lead to double-stranded (DSB) or single-stranded breaks (SSB), and result in either random mutations via non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) or targeted mutation via homologous recombination (HR). Thus, site-directed mutagenesis can be induced via targeted gene knock-out, knock-in, or replacement to modify specific characteristics including morphology-modification, resistance-enhancement, and physiological mechanism-improvement along with plant growth and development. In this paper, an non-comprehensive review on the development of different GETs as applied to plants is presented.

  16. Convergence of advances in genomics, team science, and repositories as drivers of progress in psychiatric genomics.

    PubMed

    Lehner, Thomas; Senthil, Geetha; Addington, Anjené M

    2015-01-01

    After many years of unfilled promise, psychiatric genetics has seen an unprecedented number of successes in recent years. We hypothesize that the field has reached an inflection point through a confluence of four key developments: advances in genomics; the orientation of the scientific community around large collaborative team science projects; the development of sample and data repositories; and a policy framework for sharing and accessing these resources. We discuss these domains and their effect on scientific progress and provide a perspective on why we think this is only the beginning of a new era in scientific discovery. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Progresses in proton radioactivity studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, L. S.; Maglione, E.

    2016-07-07

    In the present talk, we will discuss recent progresses in the theoretical study of proton radioactivity and their impact on the present understanding of nuclear structure at the extremes of proton stability.

  18. The research progress of genomic selection in livestock.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-wei; Wang, Rui-jun; Wang, Zhi-ying; Li, Xue-wu; Wang, Zhen-yu; Yanjun, Zhang; Rui, Su; Zhihong, Liu; Jinquan, Li

    2017-05-20

    With the development of gene chip and breeding technology, genomic selection in plants and animals has become research hotspots in recent years. Genomic selection has been extensively applied to all kinds of economic livestock, due to its high accuracy, short generation intervals and low breeding costs. In this review, we summarize genotyping technology and the methods for genomic breeding value estimation, the latter including the least square method, RR-BLUP, GBLUP, ssGBLUP, BayesA and BayesB. We also cover basic principles of genomic selection and compare their genetic marker ranges, genomic selection accuracy and operational speed. In addition, we list common indicators, methods and influencing factors that are related to genomic selection accuracy. Lastly, we discuss latest applications and the current problems of genomic selection at home and abroad. Importantly, we envision future status of genomic selection research, including multi-trait and multi-population genomic selection, as well as impact of whole genome sequencing and dominant effects on genomic selection. This review will provide some venues for other breeders to further understand genome selection.

  19. Comparative studies on the structure of human adenovirus genomes 4, 7 and 21. Annual progress report 1 Feb 80-2 Feb 81

    SciTech Connect

    Padmanabhan, R.

    1980-02-01

    A sensitive method was developed to label the 5' termini of Ad DNA which was found to be applicable to Ad 7, Ad 4 and Ad 21 DNA due to the presence of a tyrosine-containing peptide covalently attached to these DNA molecules. Ad 7 vaccine strain was passaged in 293 cells and then grown in large amounts in suspension cultures of KB cells. The DNA was extracted and purified. Restriction enzyme analysis of vaccine and Greider Ad 7 strains revealed that the two strains gave identical cleavage patterns with 8 restriction enzymes. Ad 4 prototype strain (ATCC) have been passaged in 293 cells and then grown in large amounts in suspension cultures of human KB cells. The DNA from these virions have been extracted and purified. Ad 21 vaccine strain has been passaged in 293 cells and then the virus was grown in KB cell suspension cultures. We are currently in the process of isolating the DNA and analyzing its genomic organization with several restriction enzymes. We analyzed the efficiencies of different protocols for titering the live Ad vaccine strains Ad 4, Ad 7 and Ad 21 present in enteric coated tablets.

  20. Genetic changes at specific stages of breast cancer progression detected by comparative genomic hybridization.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuxia; Niu, Yun; Wang, Xiaowei; Wei, Li; Lu, Song

    2009-02-01

    Although a simple linear progression model for breast cancer has already been proposed, its validity still remains controversial. Especially, the genetic and molecular features of breast cancer at different stages during the development and progression, as well as their relationship, have rarely been studied under the same experimental conditions simultaneously. According to these limitations in this research area, the current study applied comparative genomic hybridization technique to investigate genomic changes in 15 cases of breast atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH), 15 cases of ductal carcinomas in situ (DCIS), and 15 cases of invasive ductal carcinomas (IDC) and the relationship among the genetic changes. Thirty commonly altered regions that were identified included known (gains of 1q,8q, 17q,20q,Xq and losses of 8p,13q,16q,17p,22q) and several uncharacterized (gains of 2q,5p, 10p,12q,16p,18q, etc. and losses of 11p13-pter,11q,14q,Xp, etc). The overall frequency of copy number losses was higher in IDC than that in DCIS (P = 0.013). ADH showed more frequent gain of 17q than that in IDC (P = 0.007), and IDC exhibited a higher frequency for the loss of 22q than that in ADH (P = 0.018). On one hand, several common genomic changes shared by ADH, DCIS, and IDC make a linear relationship for these three lesions possible. On the other hand, the heterogeneity has also showed clonal diversification and different pathways of breast cancer progression. The regions of chromosomal copy number alterations may bring new insights into the strategy for tumor progression blocking and the discovery of new potential targets for breast cancer treatment.

  1. Progress from chicken genetics to the chicken genome.

    PubMed

    Siegel, P B; Dodgson, J B; Andersson, L

    2006-12-01

    The chicken has a proud history, both in genetic research and as a source of food. Here we attempt to provide an overview of past contributions of the chicken in both arenas and to link those contributions to the near future from a genetic perspective. Companion articles will discuss current poultry genetics research in greater detail. The chicken was the first animal species in which Mendelian inheritance was demonstrated. A century later, the chicken was the first among farm animals to have its genome sequenced. Between these firsts, the chicken remained a key organism used in genetic research. Breeding programs, based on sound genetic principles, facilitated the global emergence of the chicken meat and egg industries. Concomitantly, the chicken served as a model whose experimental populations and mutant stocks were used in basic and applied studies with broad application to other species, including humans. In this paper, we review some of these contributions, trace the path from the origin of molecular genetics to the sequence of the chicken genome, and discuss the merits of the chicken as a model organism for furthering our understanding of biology.

  2. Longitudinal study of keratoconus progression.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaohui; Yang, Huiying; Rabinowitz, Yaron S

    2007-10-01

    To determine if differences in topographic progression between unaffected keratoconus relatives and normal controls can predict factors associated with the development of keratoconus in a longitudinal study. We recruited 369 unaffected keratoconus relatives and 119 normal controls in Los Angeles. Both eyes of subjects were examined at baseline clinically and by quantitative videokeratography and at a period ranging from 1 year to 8 years. Progression to keratoconus was evaluated by quantitative videokeratography variables. Unaffected relatives had higher Central K (CK), I-S and KISA values and were younger than normal controls (CK: 44.70 vs 44.01, P<0.01; I-S: 0.76 vs 0.58, P<0.01, KISA: 29.97 vs 23.89, P=0.02; age: 34.8 vs 41.0, P<0.01) at baseline. All three indices significantly increased with age, and CK and KISA values were associated with a positive family history for keratoconus (P<0.001 for CK and P=0.05 for KISA), however, the two groups were not statistically different in progression of keratoconus. After grouping unaffected relatives as high risk (age< or = 30 or Central K > or = 47.2 and I-S> or =1.2 or KISA> or = 60) and low risk (age>30 and Central K<47.2 and I-S<1.2 and KISA< 60), relatives in the high risk group had a greater increase in CK and I-S values than those in the low risk group (CK: P=0.009; I-S: P<0.001), which indicated that there were significantly different rates of progression between two groups. Unaffected relatives had higher videokeratography indices than normal controls, but overall they did not progress to keratoconus quicker than normal controls. However, relatives in the high risk group may have a greater risk of progression to keratoconus.

  3. Longitudinal study of keratoconus progression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaohui; Yang, Huiying; Rabinowitz, Yaron S.

    2013-01-01

    To determine if differences in topographic progression between unaffected keratoconus relatives and normal controls can predict factors associated with the development of keratoconus in a longitudinal study. We recruited 369 unaffected keratoconus relatives and 119 normal controls in Los Angeles. Both eyes of subjects were examined at baseline clinically and by quantitative videokeratography and at a period ranging from 1 year to 8 years. Progression to keratoconus was evaluated by quantitative videokeratography variables. Unaffected relatives had higher Central K (CK), I-S and KISA values and were younger than normal controls (CK: 44.70 vs 44.01, P<0.01; I-S: 0.76 vs 0.58, P<0.01, KISA: 29.97 vs 23.89, P=0.02; age: 34.8 vs 41.0, P<0.01) at baseline. All three indices significantly increased with age, and CK and KISA values were associated with a positive family history for keratoconus (P<0.001 for CK and P=0.05 for KISA), however, the two groups were not statistically different in progression of keratoconus. After grouped unaffected relatives as the high risk (age<=30 or Central K>=47.2 or I-S >=1.2 or KISA>=60) and the low risk (age>30 and Central K<47.2 and I-S <1.2 and KISA<60), relatives in the high risk group had a greater increase in CK and I-S values than those in the low risk group (CK: p=0.009; I-S: p<0.001), which indicated that there were significantly different rates of progression between two groups. Unaffected relatives had higher videokeratography indices than normal controls, but overall they did not progress to keratoconus quicker than normal controls. However, relatives in a high risk group may have a greater risk of progression to keratoconus. PMID:17681291

  4. Progress toward a low budget reference grade genome assembly

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Reference quality de novo genome assemblies were once solely the domain of large, well-funded genome projects. While next-generation short read technology removed some of the cost barriers, accurate chromosome-scale assembly remains a real challenge. Here we present efforts to de novo assemble the...

  5. Genome editing: progress and challenges for medical applications.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Dana

    2016-11-15

    The development of the CRISPR-Cas platform for genome editing has greatly simplified the process of making targeted genetic modifications. Applications of genome editing are expected to have a substantial impact on human therapies through the development of better animal models, new target discovery, and direct therapeutic intervention.

  6. Data management tools for genomic applications: A progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Markowitz, V.M.; Chen, I-Min A.

    1993-09-01

    We report in this paper on the development of data management tools that allow scientist to construct and manipulate genomic data bases in terms of application-specific objects and protocols. We are developing tools for specifying genomic database structures, as well as for entering, changing, maintaining, browsing and querying data in genomic data bases. These tools are based on the Object-protocol Model (OPM) developed by us and target commercial relational database management systems which are widely used in molecular biology laboratories. OPM allows scientists to interact with genomic databases in terms of their own frame or reference, namely genomic objects and protocols. Databases developed using the data management tools are easier to use, manage, and adapt.

  7. Genome-wide association and linkage analyses localize a progressive retinal atrophy locus in Persian cats.

    PubMed

    Alhaddad, Hasan; Gandolfi, Barbara; Grahn, Robert A; Rah, Hyung-Chul; Peterson, Carlyn B; Maggs, David J; Good, Kathryn L; Pedersen, Niels C; Lyons, Leslie A

    2014-08-01

    Hereditary eye diseases of animals serve as excellent models of human ocular disorders and assist in the development of gene and drug therapies for inherited forms of blindness. Several primary hereditary eye conditions affecting various ocular tissues and having different rates of progression have been documented in domestic cats. Gene therapy for canine retinopathies has been successful, thus the cat could be a gene therapy candidate for other forms of retinal degenerations. The current study investigates a hereditary, autosomal recessive, retinal degeneration specific to Persian cats. A multi-generational pedigree segregating for this progressive retinal atrophy was genotyped using a 63 K SNP array and analyzed via genome-wide linkage and association methods. A multi-point parametric linkage analysis localized the blindness phenotype to a ~1.75 Mb region with significant LOD scores (Z ≈ 14, θ = 0.00) on cat chromosome E1. Genome-wide TDT, sib-TDT, and case-control analyses also consistently supported significant association within the same region on chromosome E1, which is homologous to human chromosome 17. Using haplotype analysis, a ~1.3 Mb region was identified as highly associated for progressive retinal atrophy in Persian cats. Several candidate genes within the region are reasonable candidates as a potential causative gene and should be considered for molecular analyses.

  8. The sheep genome reference sequence: a work in progress.

    PubMed

    Archibald, A L; Cockett, N E; Dalrymple, B P; Faraut, T; Kijas, J W; Maddox, J F; McEwan, J C; Hutton Oddy, V; Raadsma, H W; Wade, C; Wang, J; Wang, W; Xun, X

    2010-10-01

    Until recently, the construction of a reference genome was performed using Sanger sequencing alone. The emergence of next-generation sequencing platforms now means reference genomes may incorporate sequence data generated from a range of sequencing platforms, each of which have different read length, systematic biases and mate-pair characteristics. The objective of this review is to inform the mammalian genomics community about the experimental strategy being pursued by the International Sheep Genomics Consortium (ISGC) to construct the draft reference genome of sheep (Ovis aries). Component activities such as data generation, sequence assembly and annotation are described, along with information concerning the key researchers performing the work. This aims to foster future participation from across the research community through the coordinated activities of the consortium. The review also serves as a 'marker paper' by providing information concerning the pre-publication release of the reference genome. This ensures the ISGC adheres to the framework for data sharing established at the recent Toronto International Data Release Workshop and provides guidelines for data users.

  9. The emerging genomics and systems biology research lead to systems genomics studies.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mary Qu; Yoshigoe, Kenji; Yang, William; Tong, Weida; Qin, Xiang; Dunker, A; Chen, Zhongxue; Arbania, Hamid R; Liu, Jun S; Niemierko, Andrzej; Yang, Jack Y

    2014-01-01

    Synergistically integrating multi-layer genomic data at systems level not only can lead to deeper insights into the molecular mechanisms related to disease initiation and progression, but also can guide pathway-based biomarker and drug target identification. With the advent of high-throughput next-generation sequencing technologies, sequencing both DNA and RNA has generated multi-layer genomic data that can provide DNA polymorphism, non-coding RNA, messenger RNA, gene expression, isoform and alternative splicing information. Systems biology on the other hand studies complex biological systems, particularly systematic study of complex molecular interactions within specific cells or organisms. Genomics and molecular systems biology can be merged into the study of genomic profiles and implicated biological functions at cellular or organism level. The prospectively emerging field can be referred to as systems genomics or genomic systems biology. The Mid-South Bioinformatics Centre (MBC) and Joint Bioinformatics Ph.D. Program of University of Arkansas at Little Rock and University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences are particularly interested in promoting education and research advancement in this prospectively emerging field. Based on past investigations and research outcomes, MBC is further utilizing differential gene and isoform/exon expression from RNA-seq and co-regulation from the ChiP-seq specific for different phenotypes in combination with protein-protein interactions, and protein-DNA interactions to construct high-level gene networks for an integrative genome-phoneme investigation at systems biology level.

  10. From genome to proteome: great progress in the domesticated silkworm (Bombyx mori L.).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhonghua; Yang, Huijuan; Zhong, Boxiong

    2008-07-01

    As the only truly domesticated insect, the silkworm not only has great economic value, but it also has value as a model for genetics and molecular biology research. Genomics and proteomics have recently shown vast potential to be essential tools in domesticated silkworm research, especially after the completion of the Bombyx mori genome sequence. This paper reviews the progress of the domesticated silkworm genome, particularly focusing on its genetic map, physical map and functional genome. This review also presents proteomics, the proteomic technique and its application in silkworm research.

  11. Bacterial genome reduction using the progressive clustering of deletions via yeast sexual cycling

    DOE PAGES

    Suzuki, Yo; Assad-Garcia, Nacyra; Kostylev, Maxim; ...

    2015-02-05

    The availability of genetically tractable organisms with simple genomes is critical for the rapid, systems-level understanding of basic biological processes. Mycoplasma bacteria, with the smallest known genomes among free-living cellular organisms, are ideal models for this purpose, but the natural versions of these cells have genome complexities still too great to offer a comprehensive view of a fundamental life form. Here in this paper we describe an efficient method for reducing genomes from these organisms by identifying individually deletable regions using transposon mutagenesis and progressively clustering deleted genomic segments using meiotic recombination between the bacterial genomes harbored in yeast. Mycoplasmalmore » genomes subjected to this process and transplanted into recipient cells yielded two mycoplasma strains. The first simultaneously lacked eight singly deletable regions of the genome, representing a total of 91 genes and ~10%of the original genome. The second strain lacked seven of the eight regions, representing 84 genes. Growth assay data revealed an absence of genetic interactions among the 91 genes under tested conditions. Despite predicted effects of the deletions on sugar metabolism and the proteome, growth rates were unaffected by the gene deletions in the seven-deletion strain. These results support the feasibility of using single-gene disruption data to design and construct viable genomes lacking multiple genes, paving the way toward genome minimization. The progressive clustering method is expected to be effective for the reorganization of any mega-sized DNA molecules cloned in yeast, facilitating the construction of designer genomes in microbes as well as genomic fragments for genetic engineering of higher eukaryotes.« less

  12. Bacterial genome reduction using the progressive clustering of deletions via yeast sexual cycling

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Yo; Assad-Garcia, Nacyra; Kostylev, Maxim; Noskov, Vladimir N.; Wise, Kim S.; Karas, Bogumil J.; Stam, Jason; Montague, Michael G.; Hanly, Timothy J.; Enriquez, Nico J.; Ramon, Adi; Goldgof, Gregory M.; Richter, R. Alexander; Vashee, Sanjay; Chuang, Ray-Yuan; Winzeler, Elizabeth A.; Hutchison, Clyde A.; Gibson, Daniel G.; Smith, Hamilton O.; Glass, John I.; Venter, J. Craig

    2015-02-05

    The availability of genetically tractable organisms with simple genomes is critical for the rapid, systems-level understanding of basic biological processes. Mycoplasma bacteria, with the smallest known genomes among free-living cellular organisms, are ideal models for this purpose, but the natural versions of these cells have genome complexities still too great to offer a comprehensive view of a fundamental life form. Here in this paper we describe an efficient method for reducing genomes from these organisms by identifying individually deletable regions using transposon mutagenesis and progressively clustering deleted genomic segments using meiotic recombination between the bacterial genomes harbored in yeast. Mycoplasmal genomes subjected to this process and transplanted into recipient cells yielded two mycoplasma strains. The first simultaneously lacked eight singly deletable regions of the genome, representing a total of 91 genes and ~10%of the original genome. The second strain lacked seven of the eight regions, representing 84 genes. Growth assay data revealed an absence of genetic interactions among the 91 genes under tested conditions. Despite predicted effects of the deletions on sugar metabolism and the proteome, growth rates were unaffected by the gene deletions in the seven-deletion strain. These results support the feasibility of using single-gene disruption data to design and construct viable genomes lacking multiple genes, paving the way toward genome minimization. The progressive clustering method is expected to be effective for the reorganization of any mega-sized DNA molecules cloned in yeast, facilitating the construction of designer genomes in microbes as well as genomic fragments for genetic engineering of higher eukaryotes.

  13. Bacterial genome reduction using the progressive clustering of deletions via yeast sexual cycling

    PubMed Central

    Assad-Garcia, Nacyra; Kostylev, Maxim; Noskov, Vladimir N.; Wise, Kim S.; Karas, Bogumil J.; Stam, Jason; Montague, Michael G.; Hanly, Timothy J.; Enriquez, Nico J.; Ramon, Adi; Goldgof, Gregory M.; Richter, R. Alexander; Vashee, Sanjay; Chuang, Ray-Yuan; Winzeler, Elizabeth A.; Hutchison, Clyde A.; Gibson, Daniel G.; Smith, Hamilton O.; Glass, John I.; Venter, J. Craig

    2015-01-01

    The availability of genetically tractable organisms with simple genomes is critical for the rapid, systems-level understanding of basic biological processes. Mycoplasma bacteria, with the smallest known genomes among free-living cellular organisms, are ideal models for this purpose, but the natural versions of these cells have genome complexities still too great to offer a comprehensive view of a fundamental life form. Here we describe an efficient method for reducing genomes from these organisms by identifying individually deletable regions using transposon mutagenesis and progressively clustering deleted genomic segments using meiotic recombination between the bacterial genomes harbored in yeast. Mycoplasmal genomes subjected to this process and transplanted into recipient cells yielded two mycoplasma strains. The first simultaneously lacked eight singly deletable regions of the genome, representing a total of 91 genes and ∼10% of the original genome. The second strain lacked seven of the eight regions, representing 84 genes. Growth assay data revealed an absence of genetic interactions among the 91 genes under tested conditions. Despite predicted effects of the deletions on sugar metabolism and the proteome, growth rates were unaffected by the gene deletions in the seven-deletion strain. These results support the feasibility of using single-gene disruption data to design and construct viable genomes lacking multiple genes, paving the way toward genome minimization. The progressive clustering method is expected to be effective for the reorganization of any mega-sized DNA molecules cloned in yeast, facilitating the construction of designer genomes in microbes as well as genomic fragments for genetic engineering of higher eukaryotes. PMID:25654978

  14. Bacterial genome reduction using the progressive clustering of deletions via yeast sexual cycling.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yo; Assad-Garcia, Nacyra; Kostylev, Maxim; Noskov, Vladimir N; Wise, Kim S; Karas, Bogumil J; Stam, Jason; Montague, Michael G; Hanly, Timothy J; Enriquez, Nico J; Ramon, Adi; Goldgof, Gregory M; Richter, R Alexander; Vashee, Sanjay; Chuang, Ray-Yuan; Winzeler, Elizabeth A; Hutchison, Clyde A; Gibson, Daniel G; Smith, Hamilton O; Glass, John I; Venter, J Craig

    2015-03-01

    The availability of genetically tractable organisms with simple genomes is critical for the rapid, systems-level understanding of basic biological processes. Mycoplasma bacteria, with the smallest known genomes among free-living cellular organisms, are ideal models for this purpose, but the natural versions of these cells have genome complexities still too great to offer a comprehensive view of a fundamental life form. Here we describe an efficient method for reducing genomes from these organisms by identifying individually deletable regions using transposon mutagenesis and progressively clustering deleted genomic segments using meiotic recombination between the bacterial genomes harbored in yeast. Mycoplasmal genomes subjected to this process and transplanted into recipient cells yielded two mycoplasma strains. The first simultaneously lacked eight singly deletable regions of the genome, representing a total of 91 genes and ∼ 10% of the original genome. The second strain lacked seven of the eight regions, representing 84 genes. Growth assay data revealed an absence of genetic interactions among the 91 genes under tested conditions. Despite predicted effects of the deletions on sugar metabolism and the proteome, growth rates were unaffected by the gene deletions in the seven-deletion strain. These results support the feasibility of using single-gene disruption data to design and construct viable genomes lacking multiple genes, paving the way toward genome minimization. The progressive clustering method is expected to be effective for the reorganization of any mega-sized DNA molecules cloned in yeast, facilitating the construction of designer genomes in microbes as well as genomic fragments for genetic engineering of higher eukaryotes. © 2015 Suzuki et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  15. Genome-wide association studies in maize: praise and stargaze

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Genome-wide association study (GWAS) has appeared as a widespread strategy in decoding genotype-phenotype associations in many species thanks to technical advances in next-generation sequencing (NGS) applications. Maize is an ideal crop for GWAS and significant progress has been made in the last dec...

  16. Progress of the rainbow trout reference genome assembly project

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rainbow trout are the most widely cultivated cold freshwater fish in the world and an important model species for many research areas. Despite this importance, the complex nature of the rainbow trout genome (pseudotetraploid and high repeat content) has hindered the production of a high-quality refe...

  17. Adaptive radiations: From field to genomic studies

    PubMed Central

    Hodges, Scott A.; Derieg, Nathan J.

    2009-01-01

    Adaptive radiations were central to Darwin's formation of his theory of natural selection, and today they are still the centerpiece for many studies of adaptation and speciation. Here, we review the advantages of adaptive radiations, especially recent ones, for detecting evolutionary trends and the genetic dissection of adaptive traits. We focus on Aquilegia as a primary example of these advantages and highlight progress in understanding the genetic basis of flower color. Phylogenetic analysis of Aquilegia indicates that flower color transitions proceed by changes in the types of anthocyanin pigments produced or their complete loss. Biochemical, crossing, and gene expression studies have provided a wealth of information about the genetic basis of these transitions in Aquilegia. To obtain both enzymatic and regulatory candidate genes for the entire flavonoid pathway, which produces anthocyanins, we used a combination of sequence searches of the Aquilegia Gene Index, phylogenetic analyses, and the isolation of novel sequences by using degenerate PCR and RACE. In total we identified 34 genes that are likely involved in the flavonoid pathway. A number of these genes appear to be single copy in Aquilegia and thus variation in their expression may have been key for floral color evolution. Future studies will be able to use these sequences along with next-generation sequencing technologies to follow expression and sequence variation at the population level. The genetic dissection of other adaptive traits in Aquilegia should also be possible soon as genomic resources such as whole-genome sequencing become available. PMID:19528644

  18. Challenges of flow-cytometric estimation of nuclear genome size in orchids, a plant group with both whole-genome and progressively partial endoreplication.

    PubMed

    Trávníček, Pavel; Ponert, Jan; Urfus, Tomáš; Jersáková, Jana; Vrána, Jan; Hřibová, Eva; Doležel, Jaroslav; Suda, Jan

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear genome size is an inherited quantitative trait of eukaryotic organisms with both practical and biological consequences. A detailed analysis of major families is a promising approach to fully understand the biological meaning of the extensive variation in genome size in plants. Although Orchidaceae accounts for ∼10% of the angiosperm diversity, the knowledge of patterns and dynamics of their genome size is limited, in part due to difficulties in flow cytometric analyses. Cells in various somatic tissues of orchids undergo extensive endoreplication, either whole-genome or partial, and the G1-phase nuclei with 2C DNA amounts may be lacking, resulting in overestimated genome size values. Interpretation of DNA content histograms is particularly challenging in species with progressively partial endoreplication, in which the ratios between the positions of two neighboring DNA peaks are lower than two. In order to assess distributions of nuclear DNA amounts and identify tissue suitable for reliable estimation of nuclear DNA content, we analyzed six different tissue types in 48 orchid species belonging to all recognized subfamilies. Although traditionally used leaves may provide incorrect C-values, particularly in species with progressively partial endoreplication, young ovaries and pollinaria consistently yield 2C and 1C peaks of their G1-phase nuclei, respectively, and are, therefore, the most suitable parts for genome size studies in orchids. We also provide new DNA C-values for 22 orchid genera and 42 species. Adhering to the proposed methodology would allow for reliable genome size estimates in this largest plant family. Although our research was limited to orchids, the need to find a suitable tissue with dominant 2C peak of G1-phase nuclei applies to all endopolyploid species.

  19. Microenvironmental Heterogeneity Parallels Breast Cancer Progression: A Histology–Genomic Integration Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Natrajan, Rachael; Sailem, Heba; Mardakheh, Faraz K.; Arias Garcia, Mar; Tape, Christopher J.; Dowsett, Mitch; Bakal, Chris; Yuan, Yinyin

    2016-01-01

    Background The intra-tumor diversity of cancer cells is under intense investigation; however, little is known about the heterogeneity of the tumor microenvironment that is key to cancer progression and evolution. We aimed to assess the degree of microenvironmental heterogeneity in breast cancer and correlate this with genomic and clinical parameters. Methods and Findings We developed a quantitative measure of microenvironmental heterogeneity along three spatial dimensions (3-D) in solid tumors, termed the tumor ecosystem diversity index (EDI), using fully automated histology image analysis coupled with statistical measures commonly used in ecology. This measure was compared with disease-specific survival, key mutations, genome-wide copy number, and expression profiling data in a retrospective study of 510 breast cancer patients as a test set and 516 breast cancer patients as an independent validation set. In high-grade (grade 3) breast cancers, we uncovered a striking link between high microenvironmental heterogeneity measured by EDI and a poor prognosis that cannot be explained by tumor size, genomics, or any other data types. However, this association was not observed in low-grade (grade 1 and 2) breast cancers. The prognostic value of EDI was superior to known prognostic factors and was enhanced with the addition of TP53 mutation status (multivariate analysis test set, p = 9 × 10−4, hazard ratio = 1.47, 95% CI 1.17–1.84; validation set, p = 0.0011, hazard ratio = 1.78, 95% CI 1.26–2.52). Integration with genome-wide profiling data identified losses of specific genes on 4p14 and 5q13 that were enriched in grade 3 tumors with high microenvironmental diversity that also substratified patients into poor prognostic groups. Limitations of this study include the number of cell types included in the model, that EDI has prognostic value only in grade 3 tumors, and that our spatial heterogeneity measure was dependent on spatial scale and tumor size. Conclusions To

  20. The ISCE ECG genome pilot challenge: a 2004 progress report.

    PubMed

    Kligfield, Paul; Badilini, Fabio; Brown, Barry; Helfenbein, Erich; Kohls, Mark

    2004-01-01

    The International Society for Computerized Electrocardiography (ISCE) "genome project" began in 2000 as an open-ended discussion of ECG database needs and opportunities. Cooperation within ISCE led to a "pilot challenge" of the database concept, which called for establishment of methodology for transmission, storage, and integrated re-analysis of digitized waveforms of three different ECG manufacturers. The present report documents the early implementation of that goal.

  1. Progress in functional genomics approaches to antifungal drug target discovery.

    PubMed

    De Backer, Marianne D; Van Dijck, Patrick

    2003-10-01

    Antifungal drug discovery is starting to benefit from the enormous advances in the genomics field, which have occurred in the past decade. As traditional drug screening on existing targets is not delivering the long-awaited potent antifungals, efforts to use novel genetics and genomics-based strategies to aid in the discovery of novel drug targets are gaining increased importance. The current paradigm in antifungal drug target discovery focuses on basically two main classes of targets to evaluate: genes essential for viability and virulence or pathogenicity factors. Here we report on recent advances in genetics and genomics-based technologies that will allow us not only to identify and validate novel fungal drug targets, but hopefully in the longer run also to discover potent novel therapeutic agents. Fungal pathogens have typically presented significant obstacles when subjected to genetics, but the creativity of scientists in the anti-infectives field and the cross-talk with scientists in other areas is now yielding exciting new tools and technologies to tackle the problem of finding potent, specific and non-toxic antifungal therapeutics.

  2. Electric fish genomics: Progress, prospects, and new tools for neuroethology.

    PubMed

    Pitchers, William R; Constantinou, Savvas J; Losilla, Mauricio; Gallant, Jason R

    2016-10-01

    Electric fish have served as a model system in biology since the 18th century, providing deep insight into the nature of bioelectrogenesis, the molecular structure of the synapse, and brain circuitry underlying complex behavior. Neuroethologists have collected extensive phenotypic data that span biological levels of analysis from molecules to ecosystems. This phenotypic data, together with genomic resources obtained over the past decades, have motivated new and exciting hypotheses that position the weakly electric fish model to address fundamental 21(st) century biological questions. This review article considers the molecular data collected for weakly electric fish over the past three decades, and the insights that data of this nature has motivated. For readers relatively new to molecular genetics techniques, we also provide a table of terminology aimed at clarifying the numerous acronyms and techniques that accompany this field. Next, we pose a research agenda for expanding genomic resources for electric fish research over the next 10years. We conclude by considering some of the exciting research prospects for neuroethology that electric fish genomics may offer over the coming decades, if the electric fish community is successful in these endeavors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. International Study Group Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Raubenheimer, Tor O

    2000-07-18

    The focus of the ISG work was on advancing the accelerator design and supporting technologies. This is a complex process which involves a close interaction between theoretical analysis of the collider design and R and D progress on hardware components. The sequence of efforts took place roughly in the following order: (1) Optimization of the collider parameters and definition of system and subsystem requirements, (2) Identification of design strategies and options, and (3) Development of specific technologies to achieve these requirements. Development and testing of the required components, and R and D on manufacturing techniques have been important activities of the ISG. Experiments at the major test facilities such as the ATF at KEK and ASSET at SLAC have also played a significant role in the ISG studies.

  4. Discovery of Genomic Breakpoints Affecting Breast Cancer Progression and Prognosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    Delgado DA, Li J, Coarfa C, Harris RA, Richards S, Scherer SE, Muzny DM, Gibbs RA, Lee AV, Milosavljevic A: A sequence-level map of chromosomal...genome Oliver A. Hampton,1,3,5 Petra Den Hollander,4,5 Christopher A. Miller,1,3 David A. Delgado ,4,5 Jian Li,1,3 Cristian Coarfa,1,2 Ronald A. Harris...to the manufacturer’s protocol. After 48 h, the cells were prepared the respective assays. Acknowledgments We thank Andrew R. Jackson and Dr. Manuel

  5. DOE project on genome mapping and sequencing. Progress report, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, G.A.

    1992-12-31

    These efforts on the human genome project were initiated in September, 1990, to contribute towards completion of the human genome project physical mapping effort. In the original application, the authors proposed a novel strategy for constructing a physical map of human chromosome 11, based upon techniques derived in this group and by others. The original goals were to (1) produce a set of cosmid reference clones mapped to specific sites by high resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization, (2) produce a set of associated STS sequences and PCR primers for each site, (3) isolate YAC clones corresponding to each STS and, (4) construct YAC contigs such that > 90% of the chromosome would be covered by contigs of 2 mb or greater. Since that time, and with the advent of new technology and reagents, the strategy has been modified slightly but still retains the same goals as originally proposed. The authors have added a project to produce chromosome 11-specific cDNAs and determine the map location and DNA sequence of a selected portion of them.

  6. Effort to map and sequence the human genome makes significant progress

    SciTech Connect

    Borman, S.

    1994-11-07

    The Human Genome Project, an international research effort to map and sequence the genomes of humans and selected model organisms, is making significant progress toward its goals four years into its projected 15-year life. A detailed human genetic linkage map has been developed ahead of time. A physical map, consisting of overlapping pieces of DNA, is only slightly behind schedule. Base-by-base sequencing of the human genome is lagging, but sequencing of model organisms is moving along very well, with the first complete eukaryotic genome likely to be completed within two years. Human Genome Project sponsorship of a map that would show the location of expressed human genes is still in the planning stage. However, such maps have been and are being produced privately on a large scale--a state of affairs that has stirred up considerable controversy about whether the ''market'' for such data is being cornered by proprietary interests.

  7. Ancient population genomics and the study of evolution.

    PubMed

    Parks, M; Subramanian, S; Baroni, C; Salvatore, M C; Zhang, G; Millar, C D; Lambert, D M

    2015-01-19

    Recently, the study of ancient DNA (aDNA) has been greatly enhanced by the development of second-generation DNA sequencing technologies and targeted enrichment strategies. These developments have allowed the recovery of several complete ancient genomes, a result that would have been considered virtually impossible only a decade ago. Prior to these developments, aDNA research was largely focused on the recovery of short DNA sequences and their use in the study of phylogenetic relationships, molecular rates, species identification and population structure. However, it is now possible to sequence a large number of modern and ancient complete genomes from a single species and thereby study the genomic patterns of evolutionary change over time. Such a study would herald the beginnings of ancient population genomics and its use in the study of evolution. Species that are amenable to such large-scale studies warrant increased research effort. We report here progress on a population genomic study of the Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae). This species is ideally suited to ancient population genomic research because both modern and ancient samples are abundant in the permafrost conditions of Antarctica. This species will enable us to directly address many of the fundamental questions in ecology and evolution. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  8. Ancient population genomics and the study of evolution

    PubMed Central

    Parks, M.; Subramanian, S.; Baroni, C.; Salvatore, M. C.; Zhang, G.; Millar, C. D.; Lambert, D. M.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the study of ancient DNA (aDNA) has been greatly enhanced by the development of second-generation DNA sequencing technologies and targeted enrichment strategies. These developments have allowed the recovery of several complete ancient genomes, a result that would have been considered virtually impossible only a decade ago. Prior to these developments, aDNA research was largely focused on the recovery of short DNA sequences and their use in the study of phylogenetic relationships, molecular rates, species identification and population structure. However, it is now possible to sequence a large number of modern and ancient complete genomes from a single species and thereby study the genomic patterns of evolutionary change over time. Such a study would herald the beginnings of ancient population genomics and its use in the study of evolution. Species that are amenable to such large-scale studies warrant increased research effort. We report here progress on a population genomic study of the Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae). This species is ideally suited to ancient population genomic research because both modern and ancient samples are abundant in the permafrost conditions of Antarctica. This species will enable us to directly address many of the fundamental questions in ecology and evolution. PMID:25487332

  9. The TB Structural Genomics Consortium: A decade of progress

    PubMed Central

    Chim, Nicholas; Habel, Jeff E.; Johnston, Jodie M.; Krieger, Inna; Miallau, Linda; Sankaranarayanan, Ramasamy; Morse, Robert P.; Bruning, John; Swanson, Stephanie; Kim, Haelee; Kim, Chang-Yub; Li, Hongye; Bulloch, Esther M.; Payne, Richard J.; Manos-Turvey, Alexandra; Hung, Li-Wei; Baker, Edward N.; Lott, J. Shaun; James, Michael N.G.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Eisenberg, David S.; Sacchettini, James C.; Goulding, Celia W.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The TB Structural Genomics Consortium is a worldwide organization of collaborators whose mission is the comprehensive structural determination and analyses of Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteins to ultimately aid in tuberculosis diagnosis and treatment. Congruent to the overall vision, Consortium members have additionally established an integrated facilities core to streamline M. tuberculosis structural biology and developed bioinformatics resources for data mining. This review aims to share the latest Consortium developments with the TB community, including recent structures of proteins that play significant roles within M. tuberculosis. Atomic resolution details may unravel mechanistic insights and reveal unique and novel protein features, as well as important protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions, which ultimately leads to a better understanding of M. tuberculosis biology and may be exploited for rational, structure-based therapeutics design. PMID:21247804

  10. Molecular genetics and genomics progress in urothelial bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Netto, George J

    2013-11-01

    The clinical management of solid tumor patients has recently undergone a paradigm shift as the result of the accelerated advances in cancer genetics and genomics. Molecular diagnostics is now an integral part of routine clinical management in lung, colon, and breast cancer patients. In a disappointing contrast, molecular biomarkers remain largely excluded from current management algorithms of urologic malignancies. The need for new treatment alternatives and validated prognostic molecular biomarkers that can help clinicians identify patients in need of early aggressive management is pressing. Identifying robust predictive biomarkers that can stratify response to newly introduced targeted therapeutics is another crucially needed development. The following is a brief discussion of some promising candidate biomarkers that may soon become a part of clinical management of bladder cancers.

  11. Recent progress in genome engineering techniques in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Daimon, Takaaki; Kiuchi, Takashi; Takasu, Yoko

    2014-01-01

    Rapid advances in genome engineering tools, such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and the clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated (CRISPR/Cas) system, have enabled efficient gene knockout experiments in a wide variety of organisms. Here, we review the recent progress in targeted gene disruption techniques in the silkworm, Bombyx mori. Although efficiency of targeted mutagenesis was very low in an early experiment using ZFNs, recent studies have shown that TALENs can induce highly efficient mutagenesis of desired target genes in Bombyx. Notably, mutation frequencies induced by TALENs can reach more than 50% of G0 gametes. Thus, TALENs can now be used as a standard tool for gene targeting studies, even when mutant phenotypes are unknown. We also propose guidelines for experimental design and strategy for knockout experiments in Bombyx. Genome editing technologies will greatly increase the usefulness of Bombyx as a model for lepidopteran insects, the major agricultural pests, and lead to sophisticated breeding of Bombyx for use in sericulture and biotechnology.

  12. Imaging Genetics and Genomics in Psychiatry: A Critical Review of Progress and Potential.

    PubMed

    Bogdan, Ryan; Salmeron, Betty Jo; Carey, Caitlin E; Agrawal, Arpana; Calhoun, Vince D; Garavan, Hugh; Hariri, Ahmad R; Heinz, Andreas; Hill, Matthew N; Holmes, Andrew; Kalin, Ned H; Goldman, David

    2017-01-13

    Imaging genetics and genomics research has begun to provide insight into the molecular and genetic architecture of neural phenotypes and the neural mechanisms through which genetic risk for psychopathology may emerge. As it approaches its third decade, imaging genetics is confronted by many challenges, including the proliferation of studies using small sample sizes and diverse designs, limited replication, problems with harmonization of neural phenotypes for meta-analysis, unclear mechanisms, and evidence that effect sizes may be more modest than originally posited, with increasing evidence of polygenicity. These concerns have encouraged the field to grow in many new directions, including the development of consortia and large-scale data collection projects and the use of novel methods (e.g., polygenic approaches, machine learning) that enhance the quality of imaging genetic studies but also introduce new challenges. We critically review progress in imaging genetics and offer suggestions and highlight potential pitfalls of novel approaches. Ultimately, the strength of imaging genetics and genomics lies in their translational and integrative potential with other research approaches (e.g., nonhuman animal models, psychiatric genetics, pharmacologic challenge) to elucidate brain-based pathways that give rise to the vast individual differences in behavior as well as risk for psychopathology.

  13. Genomic tools to improve progress and preserve variation for future generations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Use of genomic tools has greatly decreased generation intervals and increased genetic progress in dairy cattle, but faster selection cycles can also increase rates of inbreeding per unit of time. Average pedigree inbreeding of Holstein cows increased from 4.6% in 2000 to 5.6% in 2009 to 6.6% in 201...

  14. Final progress report, Construction of a genome-wide highly characterized clone resource for genome sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Nierman, William C.

    2000-02-14

    At TIGR, the human Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) end sequencing and trimming were with an overall sequencing success rate of 65%. CalTech human BAC libraries A, B, C and D as well as Roswell Park Cancer Institute's library RPCI-11 were used. To date, we have generated >300,000 end sequences from >186,000 human BAC clones with an average read length {approx}460 bp for a total of 141 Mb covering {approx}4.7% of the genome. Over sixty percent of the clones have BAC end sequences (BESs) from both ends representing over five-fold coverage of the genome by the paired-end clones. The average phred Q20 length is {approx}400 bp. This high accuracy makes our BESs match the human finished sequences with an average identity of 99% and a match length of 450 bp, and a frequency of one match per 12.8 kb contig sequence. Our sample tracking has ensured a clone tracking accuracy of >90%, which gives researchers a high confidence in (1) retrieving the right clone from the BA C libraries based on the sequence matches; and (2) building a minimum tiling path of sequence-ready clones across the genome and genome assembly scaffolds.

  15. Microfluidics for genome-wide studies involving next generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Travis W.; Lu, Chang

    2017-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has revolutionized how molecular biology studies are conducted. Its decreasing cost and increasing throughput permit profiling of genomic, transcriptomic, and epigenomic features for a wide range of applications. Microfluidics has been proven to be highly complementary to NGS technology with its unique capabilities for handling small volumes of samples and providing platforms for automation, integration, and multiplexing. In this article, we review recent progress on applying microfluidics to facilitate genome-wide studies. We emphasize on several technical aspects of NGS and how they benefit from coupling with microfluidic technology. We also summarize recent efforts on developing microfluidic technology for genomic, transcriptomic, and epigenomic studies, with emphasis on single cell analysis. We envision rapid growth in these directions, driven by the needs for testing scarce primary cell samples from patients in the context of precision medicine. PMID:28396707

  16. Considerations for creating and annotating the budding yeast Genome Map at SGD: a progress report

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, J. Michael

    2012-01-01

    The Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD) is compiling and annotating a comprehensive catalogue of functional sequence elements identified in the budding yeast genome. Recent advances in deep sequencing technologies have enabled for example, global analyses of transcription profiling and assembly of maps of transcription factor occupancy and higher order chromatin organization, at nucleotide level resolution. With this growing influx of published genome-scale data, come new challenges for their storage, display, analysis and integration. Here, we describe SGD's progress in the creation of a consolidated resource for genome sequence elements in the budding yeast, the considerations taken in its design and the lessons learned thus far. The data within this collection can be accessed at http://browse.yeastgenome.org and downloaded from http://downloads.yeastgenome.org. Database URL: http://www.yeastgenome.org PMID:22434826

  17. Genetic Control of Canine Leishmaniasis: Genome-Wide Association Study and Genomic Selection Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Quilez, Javier; Martínez, Verónica; Woolliams, John A.; Sanchez, Armand; Pong-Wong, Ricardo; Kennedy, Lorna J.; Quinnell, Rupert J.; Ollier, William E. R.; Roura, Xavier; Ferrer, Lluís; Altet, Laura; Francino, Olga

    2012-01-01

    Background The current disease model for leishmaniasis suggests that only a proportion of infected individuals develop clinical disease, while others are asymptomatically infected due to immune control of infection. The factors that determine whether individuals progress to clinical disease following Leishmania infection are unclear, although previous studies suggest a role for host genetics. Our hypothesis was that canine leishmaniasis is a complex disease with multiple loci responsible for the progression of the disease from Leishmania infection. Methodology/Principal Findings Genome-wide association and genomic selection approaches were applied to a population-based case-control dataset of 219 dogs from a single breed (Boxer) genotyped for ∼170,000 SNPs. Firstly, we aimed to identify individual disease loci; secondly, we quantified the genetic component of the observed phenotypic variance; and thirdly, we tested whether genome-wide SNP data could accurately predict the disease. Conclusions/Significance We estimated that a substantial proportion of the genome is affecting the trait and that its heritability could be as high as 60%. Using the genome-wide association approach, the strongest associations were on chromosomes 1, 4 and 20, although none of these were statistically significant at a genome-wide level and after correcting for genetic stratification and lifestyle. Amongst these associations, chromosome 4: 61.2–76.9 Mb maps to a locus that has previously been associated with host susceptibility to human and murine leishmaniasis, and genomic selection estimated markers in this region to have the greatest effect on the phenotype. We therefore propose these regions as candidates for replication studies. An important finding of this study was the significant predictive value from using the genomic information. We found that the phenotype could be predicted with an accuracy of ∼0.29 in new samples and that the affection status was correctly predicted in 60

  18. [Research progress in developing reporter systems for the enrichment of positive cells with targeted genome modification].

    PubMed

    Bai, Yichun; Xu, Kun; Wei, Zehui; Ma, Zheng; Zhang, Zhiying

    2016-01-01

    Targeted genome editing technology plays an important role in studies of gene function, gene therapy and transgenic breeding. Moreover, the efficiency of targeted genome editing is increased dramatically with the application of recently developed artificial nucleases such as ZFNs, TALENs and CRISPR/Cas9. However, obtaining positive cells with targeted genome modification is restricted to some extent by nucleases expression plasmid transfection efficiency, nucleases expression and activity, and repair efficiency after genome editing. Thus, the enrichment and screening of positive cells with targeted genome modification remains a problem that need to be solved. Surrogate reporter systems could be used to reflect the efficiency of nucleases indirectly and enrich genetically modified positive cells effectively, which may increase the efficiency of the enrichment and screening of positive cells with targeted genome modification. In this review, we mainly summarized principles and applications of reporter systems based on NHEJ and SSA repair mechanisms, which may provide references for related studies in future.

  19. Genome-wide association studies of cancer.

    PubMed

    Jorgenson, Eric; Witte, John S

    2007-08-01

    Genome-wide association studies provide a new and powerful approach to investigate the effect of inherited genetic variation on the risk of human disease. These studies rely on high throughput DNA microarray technology to genotype hundreds of thousands of genetic variants across the human genome. The first genome-wide association studies have identified previously unknown genetic risk factors that influence a range of diseases, including prostate cancer, breast cancer, myocardial infarction, age-related macular degeneration, diabetes, Crohn's disease and obesity. Many more studies are currently underway, including a number that will focus on other cancers (e.g., colorectal). Here we discuss the major issues involved in conducting genome-wide association studies and how these studies can be used to examine cancer phenotypes.

  20. progressiveMauve: Multiple Genome Alignment with Gene Gain, Loss and Rearrangement

    PubMed Central

    Darling, Aaron E.; Mau, Bob; Perna, Nicole T.

    2010-01-01

    . Conclusions The multiple genome alignments generated by our software provide a platform for comparative genomic and population genomic studies. Free, open-source software implementing the described genome alignment approach is available from http://gel.ahabs.wisc.edu/mauve. PMID:20593022

  1. Cancer genome-sequencing study design.

    PubMed

    Mwenifumbo, Jill C; Marra, Marco A

    2013-05-01

    Discoveries from cancer genome sequencing have the potential to translate into advances in cancer prevention, diagnostics, prognostics, treatment and basic biology. Given the diversity of downstream applications, cancer genome-sequencing studies need to be designed to best fulfil specific aims. Knowledge of second-generation cancer genome-sequencing study design also facilitates assessment of the validity and importance of the rapidly growing number of published studies. In this Review, we focus on the practical application of second-generation sequencing technology (also known as next-generation sequencing) to cancer genomics and discuss how aspects of study design and methodological considerations - such as the size and composition of the discovery cohort - can be tailored to serve specific research aims.

  2. The origins and progress of genomics research on Tef (Eragrostis tef).

    PubMed

    Girma, Dejene; Assefa, Kebebew; Chanyalew, Solomon; Cannarozzi, Gina; Kuhlemeier, Cris; Tadele, Zerihun

    2014-06-01

    Tef, Eragrostis tef (Zucc.) Trotter, is the most important cereal in Ethiopia. Tef is cultivated by more than five million small-scale farmers annually and constitutes the staple food for more than half of the population of 80 million. The crop is preferred by both farmers and consumers due to its beneficial traits associated with its agronomy and utilization. The genetic and phenotypic diversity of tef in Ethiopia is a national treasure of potentially global importance. In order for this diversity to be effectively conserved and utilized, a better understanding at the genomic level is necessary. In the recent years, tef has become the subject of genomic research in Ethiopia and abroad. Genomic-assisted tef improvement holds tremendous potential for improving productivity, thereby benefiting the smallholder farmers who have cultivated and relied on the crop for thousands of years. It is hoped that such research endeavours will provide solutions to some of the age-old problems of tef's husbandry. In this review, we provide a brief description of the genesis and progress of tef genomic research to date, suggest ways to utilize the genomic tools developed so far, discuss the potential of genomics to enable sustainable conservation and use of tef genetic diversity and suggest opportunities for the future research.

  3. Comparative genome analyses of Mycobacterium avium reveal genomic features of its subspecies and strains that cause progression of pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Uchiya, Kei-ichi; Tomida, Shuta; Nakagawa, Taku; Asahi, Shoki; Nikai, Toshiaki; Ogawa, Kenji

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary disease caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) is increasing worldwide. Mycobacterium avium is the most clinically significant NTM species in humans and animals, and comprises four subspecies: M. avium subsp. avium (MAA), M. avium subsp. silvaticum (MAS), M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), and M. avium subsp. hominissuis (MAH). To improve our understanding of the genetic landscape and diversity of M. avium and its role in disease, we performed a comparative genome analysis of 79 M. avium strains. Our analysis demonstrated that MAH is an open pan-genome species. Phylogenetic analysis based on single nucleotide variants showed that MAH had the highest degree of sequence variability among the subspecies, and MAH strains isolated in Japan and those isolated abroad possessed distinct phylogenetic features. Furthermore, MAP strains, MAS and MAA strains isolated from birds, and many MAH strains that cause the progression of pulmonary disease were grouped in each specific cluster. Comparative genome analysis revealed the presence of genetic elements specific to each lineage, which are thought to be acquired via horizontal gene transfer during the evolutionary process, and identified potential genetic determinants accounting for the pathogenic and host range characteristics of M. avium. PMID:28045086

  4. ING2 controls the progression of DNA replication forks to maintain genome stability

    PubMed Central

    Larrieu, Delphine; Ythier, Damien; Binet, Romuald; Brambilla, Christian; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Sengupta, Sagar; Pedeux, Rémy

    2009-01-01

    Inhibitor of growth 2 (ING2) is a candidate tumour suppressor gene the expression of which is frequently lost in tumours. Here, we identified a new function for ING2 in the control of DNA replication and in the maintenance of genome stability. Global replication rate was markedly reduced during normal S-phase in small interfering RNA (siRNA) ING2 cells, as seen in a DNA fibre spreading experiment. Accordingly, we found that ING2 interacts with proliferating cell nuclear antigen and regulates its amount to the chromatin fraction, allowing normal replication progression and normal cell proliferation. Deregulation of DNA replication has been previously associated with genome instability. Hence, a high proportion of siRNA ING2 cells presented endoreduplication of their genome as well as an increased frequency of sister chromatid exchange. Thus, we propose for the first time that ING2 might function as a tumour suppressor gene by directly maintaining DNA integrity. PMID:19730436

  5. From prenatal genomic diagnosis to fetal personalized medicine: progress and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Diana W

    2015-01-01

    Thus far, the focus of personalized medicine has been the prevention and treatment of conditions that affect adults. Although advances in genetic technology have been applied more frequently to prenatal diagnosis than to fetal treatment, genetic and genomic information is beginning to influence pregnancy management. Recent developments in sequencing the fetal genome combined with progress in understanding fetal physiology using gene expression arrays indicate that we could have the technical capabilities to apply an individualized medicine approach to the fetus. Here I review recent advances in prenatal genetic diagnostics, the challenges associated with these new technologies and how the information derived from them can be used to advance fetal care. Historically, the goal of prenatal diagnosis has been to provide an informed choice to prospective parents. We are now at a point where that goal can and should be expanded to incorporate genetic, genomic and transcriptomic data to develop new approaches to fetal treatment. PMID:22772565

  6. The Cancer Genome Anatomy Project: EST Sequencing and the Genetics of Cancer Progression1

    PubMed Central

    Krizman, David B; Wagner, Lukas; Lash, Alex; Strausberg, Robert L; Emmert-Buck, Michael R

    1999-01-01

    Abstract As the process of tumor progression proceeds from the normal cellular state to a preneoplastic condition and finally to the fully invasive form, the molecular characteristics of the cell change as well. These characteristics can be considered a molecular fingerprint of the cell at each stage of progression and, analogous to fingerprinting a criminal, can be used as markers of the progression process. Based on this premise, the Cancer Genome Anatomy Project was initiated with the broad goal of determining the comprehensive molecular characterization of normal, premalignant, and malignant tumor cells, thus making a reality the identification of all major cellular mechanisms leading to tumor initiation and progression ([Strausberg, R.L., Dahl, C.A., and Klausner, R.D. (1997). “New opportunities for uncovering the molecular basis of cancer.” Nat. Genet., 16: 415–516.], www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/ncicgap/). The expectation of determining the genetic fingerprints of cancer progression will allow for 1) correlation of disease progression with therapeutic outcome; 2) improved evaluation of disease treatment; 3) stimulation of novel approaches to prevention, detection, and therapy; and 4) enhanced diagnostic tools for clinical applications. Whereas acquiring the comprehensive molecular analysis of cancer progression may take years, results from initial, short-term goals are currently being realized and are proving very fruitful. PMID:10933042

  7. The Cancer Genome Anatomy Project: EST sequencing and the genetics of cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Krizman, D B; Wagner, L; Lash, A; Strausberg, R L; Emmert-Buck, M R

    1999-06-01

    As the process of tumor progression proceeds from the normal cellular state to a preneoplastic condition and finally to the fully invasive form, the molecular characteristics of the cell change as well. These characteristics can be considered a molecular fingerprint of the cell at each stage of progression and, analogous to fingerprinting a criminal, can be used as markers of the progression process. Based on this premise, the Cancer Genome Anatomy Project was initiated with the broad goal of determining the comprehensive molecular characterization of normal, premalignant, and malignant tumor cells, thus making a reality the identification of all major cellular mechanisms leading to tumor initiation and progression ([Strausberg, R.L., Dahl, C.A., and Klausner, R.D. (1997). "New opportunities for uncovering the molecular basis of cancer." Nat. Genet., 16: 415-516.], www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/ncicgap/). The expectation of determining the genetic fingerprints of cancer progression will allow for 1) correlation of disease progression with therapeutic outcome; 2) improved evaluation of disease treatment; 3) stimulation of novel approaches to prevention, detection, and therapy; and 4) enhanced diagnostic tools for clinical applications. Whereas acquiring the comprehensive molecular analysis of cancer progression may take years, results from initial, short-term goals are currently being realized and are proving very fruitful.

  8. PIGN gene expression aberration is associated with genomic instability and leukemic progression in acute myeloid leukemia with myelodysplastic features

    PubMed Central

    Teye, Emmanuel K.; Sido, Abigail; Xin, Ping; Finnberg, Niklas K.; Gokare, Prashanth; Kawasawa, Yuka I.; Salzberg, Anna C.; Shimko, Sara; Bayerl, Michael; Ehmann, W. Christopher; Claxton, David F.; Rybka, Witold B.; Drabick, Joseph J.; Wang, Hong-Gang; Abraham, Thomas; El-Deiry, Wafik S.; Brodsky, Robert A.; Hohl, Raymond J.; Pu, Jeffrey J.

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have linked increased frequency of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchor protein (GPI-AP) deficiency with genomic instability and the risk of carcinogenesis. However, the underlying mechanism is still not clear. A randomForest analysis of the gene expression array data from 55 MDS patients (GSE4619) demonstrated a significant (p = 0.0007) correlation (Pearson r =-0.4068) between GPI-anchor biosynthesis gene expression and genomic instability, in which PIGN, a gene participating in GPI-AP biosynthesis, was ranked as the third most important in predicting risk of MDS progression. Furthermore, we observed that PIGN gene expression aberrations (increased transcriptional activity but diminished to no protein production) were associated with increased frequency of GPI-AP deficiency in leukemic cells during leukemic transformation/progression. PIGN gene expression aberrations were attributed to partial intron retentions between exons 14 and 15 resulting in frameshifts and premature termination which were confirmed by examining the RNA-seq data from a group of AML patients (phs001027.v1.p1). PIGN gene expression aberration correlated with the elevation of genomic instability marker expression that was independent of the TP53 regulatory pathway. Suppression/elimination of PIGN protein expression caused a similar pattern of genomic instability that was rescued by PIGN restoration. Finally, we found that PIGN bound to the spindle assembly checkpoint protein, MAD1, and regulated its expression during the cell cycle. In conclusion, PIGN gene is crucial in regulating mitotic integrity to maintain chromosomal stability and prevents leukemic transformation/progression. PMID:28187452

  9. Phosphorylation of EB2 by Aurora B and CDK1 ensures mitotic progression and genome stability

    PubMed Central

    Iimori, Makoto; Watanabe, Sugiko; Kiyonari, Shinichi; Matsuoka, Kazuaki; Sakasai, Ryo; Saeki, Hiroshi; Oki, Eiji; Kitao, Hiroyuki; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Temporal regulation of microtubule dynamics is essential for proper progression of mitosis and control of microtubule plus-end tracking proteins by phosphorylation is an essential component of this regulation. Here we show that Aurora B and CDK1 phosphorylate microtubule end-binding protein 2 (EB2) at multiple sites within the amino terminus and a cluster of serine/threonine residues in the linker connecting the calponin homology and end-binding homology domains. EB2 phosphorylation, which is strictly associated with mitotic entry and progression, reduces the binding affinity of EB2 for microtubules. Expression of non-phosphorylatable EB2 induces stable kinetochore microtubule dynamics and delays formation of bipolar metaphase plates in a microtubule binding-dependent manner, and leads to aneuploidy even in unperturbed mitosis. We propose that Aurora B and CDK1 temporally regulate the binding affinity of EB2 for microtubules, thereby ensuring kinetochore microtubule dynamics, proper mitotic progression and genome stability. PMID:27030108

  10. Phosphorylation of EB2 by Aurora B and CDK1 ensures mitotic progression and genome stability.

    PubMed

    Iimori, Makoto; Watanabe, Sugiko; Kiyonari, Shinichi; Matsuoka, Kazuaki; Sakasai, Ryo; Saeki, Hiroshi; Oki, Eiji; Kitao, Hiroyuki; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2016-03-31

    Temporal regulation of microtubule dynamics is essential for proper progression of mitosis and control of microtubule plus-end tracking proteins by phosphorylation is an essential component of this regulation. Here we show that Aurora B and CDK1 phosphorylate microtubule end-binding protein 2 (EB2) at multiple sites within the amino terminus and a cluster of serine/threonine residues in the linker connecting the calponin homology and end-binding homology domains. EB2 phosphorylation, which is strictly associated with mitotic entry and progression, reduces the binding affinity of EB2 for microtubules. Expression of non-phosphorylatable EB2 induces stable kinetochore microtubule dynamics and delays formation of bipolar metaphase plates in a microtubule binding-dependent manner, and leads to aneuploidy even in unperturbed mitosis. We propose that Aurora B and CDK1 temporally regulate the binding affinity of EB2 for microtubules, thereby ensuring kinetochore microtubule dynamics, proper mitotic progression and genome stability.

  11. Nuclear spectroscopic studies. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, C.R.; Guidry, M.W.; Riedinger, L.L.; Sorensen, S.P.

    1994-02-18

    The Nuclear Physics group at UTK is involved in heavy-ion physics including both nuclear structure and reaction mechanisms. During the last year experimental work has been in 3 broad areas: structure of nuclei at high angular momentum, structure of nuclei far from stability, and ultra-relativistic heavy-ion physics. Results in these areas are described in this document under: properties of high-spin states, study of low-energy levels of nuclei far from stability, and high-energy heavy-ion physics (PHENIX, etc.). Another important component of the work is theoretical interpretation of experimental results (Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research).

  12. Genome-Wide Association Studies of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stadler, Zsofia K.; Thom, Peter; Robson, Mark E.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Kauff, Noah D.; Hurley, Karen E.; Devlin, Vincent; Gold, Bert; Klein, Robert J.; Offit, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of the inherited risk for cancer is an important component of preventive oncology. In addition to well-established syndromes of cancer predisposition, much remains to be discovered about the genetic variation underlying susceptibility to common malignancies. Increased knowledge about the human genome and advances in genotyping technology have made possible genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of human diseases. These studies have identified many important regions of genetic variation associated with an increased risk for human traits and diseases including cancer. Understanding the principles, major findings, and limitations of GWAS is becoming increasingly important for oncologists as dissemination of genomic risk tests directly to consumers is already occurring through commercial companies. GWAS have contributed to our understanding of the genetic basis of cancer and will shed light on biologic pathways and possible new strategies for targeted prevention. To date, however, the clinical utility of GWAS-derived risk markers remains limited. PMID:20585100

  13. Drosophila Sld5 is essential for normal cell cycle progression and maintenance of genomic integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Gouge, Catherine A.; Christensen, Tim W.

    2010-09-10

    Research highlights: {yields} Drosophila Sld5 interacts with Psf1, PPsf2, and Mcm10. {yields} Haploinsufficiency of Sld5 leads to M-phase delay and genomic instability. {yields} Sld5 is also required for normal S phase progression. -- Abstract: Essential for the normal functioning of a cell is the maintenance of genomic integrity. Failure in this process is often catastrophic for the organism, leading to cell death or mis-proliferation. Central to genomic integrity is the faithful replication of DNA during S phase. The GINS complex has recently come to light as a critical player in DNA replication through stabilization of MCM2-7 and Cdc45 as a member of the CMG complex which is likely responsible for the processivity of helicase activity during S phase. The GINS complex is made up of 4 members in a 1:1:1:1 ratio: Psf1, Psf2, Psf3, And Sld5. Here we present the first analysis of the function of the Sld5 subunit in a multicellular organism. We show that Drosophila Sld5 interacts with Psf1, Psf2, and Mcm10 and that mutations in Sld5 lead to M and S phase delays with chromosomes exhibiting hallmarks of genomic instability.

  14. Studies of human mutation rates: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Neel, J.V.

    1988-07-01

    Progress was recorded between January 1 and July 1, 1987 on a project entitled ''Studies of Human Mutation Rates''. Studies underway include methodology for studying mutation at the DNA level, algorithms for automated analyses of two-dimensional polyacrylamide DNA gels, theoretical and applied population genetics, and studies of mutation frequency in A-bomb survivors.

  15. Nuclear spectroscopic studies. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, C.R.; Guidry, M.W.; Riedinger, L.L.; Sorensen, S.P.

    1993-02-08

    The Nuclear Physics group at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville is involved in several aspects of heavy-ion physics including both nuclear structure and reaction mechanisms. While our main emphasis is on experimental problems involving heavy-ion accelerators, we have maintained a strong collaboration with several theorists in order to best pursue the physics of our measurements. During the last year we have led several experiments at the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility and participated in others at Argonne National Laboratory. Also, we continue to be very active in the collaboration to study ultra-relativistic heavy ion physics utilizing the SPS accelerator at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland and in a RHIC detector R&D project. Our experimental work is in four broad areas: (1) the structure of nuclei at high angular momentum, (2) heavy-ion induced transfer reactions, (3) the structure of nuclei far from stability, and (4) ultra-relativistic heavy-ion physics. The results of studies in these particular areas will be described in this document in sections IIA, IIB, IIC, and IID, respectively. Areas (1), (3), and (4) concentrate on the structure of nuclear matter in extreme conditions of rotational motion, imbalance of neutrons and protons, or very high temperature and density. Area (2) pursues the transfer of nucleons to states with high angular momentum, both to learn about their structure and to understand the transfer of particles, energy, and angular momentum in collisions between heavy ions. An important component of our program is the strong emphasis on the theoretical aspects of nuclear structure and reactions.

  16. Progressive hemifacial atrophy. A natural history study.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, M T; Spencer, M A

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe two very different natural history courses in 2 patients with hemifacial atrophy. Progressive hemifacial atrophy (Parry-Romberg syndrome, Romberg syndrome, PHA) is characterized by slowly progressive atrophy, frequently involving only one side of the face, primarily affecting the subcutaneous tissue and fat. The onset usually occurs during the first 2 decades of life. The cause and pathophysiology are unknown. Ophthalmic involvement is common, with progressive enophthalmos a frequent finding. Pupillary disturbances, heterochromia, uveitis, pigmentary disturbances of the ocular fundus, and restrictive strabismus have also been reported. Neurologic findings may be present, but the natural history and progression of ocular findings are often not described in the literature. METHODS: We studied the records and present findings of 2 patients with progressive hemifacial atrophy who were observed in our institution over a 10-year period. RESULTS: Both patients showed progression of ophthalmic findings, primarily on the affected side. One patient has had chronic uveitis with secondary cataract and glaucoma, in addition to retinal pigmentary changes. She also had a third-nerve paresis of the contralateral eye and mild seizure activity. The other patient had mild uveitis, some progression of unilateral retinal pigmentary changes, and a significant increase in hyperopia in the affected eye, in addition to hypotony at age 19 without a clear cause, but with secondary retinal and refractive changes. CONCLUSION: Ocular manifestations of progressive hemifacial atrophy are varied, but can progress from mild visual impairment to blindness. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3A FIGURE 3B FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:8719679

  17. Genome-wide association study of swine farrowing traits. Part I: genetic and genomic parameter estimates.

    PubMed

    Schneider, J F; Rempel, L A; Rohrer, G A

    2012-10-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine genetic and genomic parameters among swine (Sus scrofa) farrowing traits. Genetic parameters were obtained using MTDFREML. Genomic parameters were obtained using GENSEL. Genetic and residual variances obtained from MTDFREML were used as priors for the Bayes C analysis of GENSEL. Farrowing traits included total number born (TNB), number born alive (NBA), number born dead (NBD), number stillborn (NSB), number of mummies (MUM), litter birth weight (LBW), and average piglet birth weight (ABW). Statistically significant heritabilities included TNB (0.09, P = 0.048), NBA (0.09, P = 0.041), LBW (0.20, P = 0.002), and ABW (0.26, P < 0.0001). Statistically significant genetic correlations included TNB-NBA (0.97, P < 0.0001), TNB-LBW (0.74, P < 0.0001), NBA-LBW (0.56, P < 0.0017), NSB-LBW (0.87, P < 0.0395), and LBW-ABW (0.63, P < 0.0002). Genetic parameters are similar to others found in the literature. The proportion of phenotypic variance explained by genomic markers (GP) generated by GENSEL was TNB (0.04), NBA (0.06), NBD (0.00), NSB (0.01), MUM (0.00), LBW (0.11), and ABW (0.31). Limited information is available in the literature about genomic parameters. Only the GP estimate for NSB is significantly lower than what has been published. The GP estimate for ABW is greater than the estimate for heritability found in this study. Other traits with significant heritability had GP estimates half the value of heritability. This research indicates that significant genetic markers will be found for TNB, NBA, LBW, and ABW that will have either immediate use in industry or provide a roadmap to further research with fine mapping or sequencing of areas of significance. Furthermore, these results indicate that genomic selection implemented at an early age would have similar annual progress as traditional selection, and could be incorporated along with traditional selection procedures to improve genetic progress of litter traits.

  18. Structure and Functional Studies of DEN-2 Virus Genome.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    Structure and Functional Studies on Dengue -2 Progress Report Virus Genome 1 Mar 82 - I Sep 82 6. PERFORMING ORO. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(e) 8. CONTRACT OR...Identify by block number) Complementdry DNA synthesis of Dengue -2 RNA by avian reverse transcriptase in vitro. The size of the DNA copy of Dengue RNA is in...Unannounced 0 Justification ............ By........... Di.A b-Aio: i Availability Codes S Avail and (or 2 Abstract 1. Dengue -2 RNA (DEN-2 RNA) was extracted

  19. Recurrent genomic alterations in sequential progressive leukoplakia and oral cancer: drivers of oral tumorigenesis?

    PubMed

    Cervigne, Nilva K; Machado, Jerry; Goswami, Rashmi S; Sadikovic, Bekim; Bradley, Grace; Perez-Ordonez, Bayardo; Galloni, Natalie Naranjo; Gilbert, Ralph; Gullane, Patrick; Irish, Jonathan C; Jurisica, Igor; Reis, Patricia P; Kamel-Reid, Suzanne

    2014-05-15

    A significant proportion (up to 62%) of oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs) may arise from oral potential malignant lesions (OPMLs), such as leukoplakia. Patient outcomes may thus be improved through detection of lesions at a risk for malignant transformation, by identifying and categorizing genetic changes in sequential, progressive OPMLs. We conducted array comparative genomic hybridization analysis of 25 sequential, progressive OPMLs and same-site OSCCs from five patients. Recurrent DNA copy number gains were identified on 1p in 20/25 cases (80%) with minimal, high-level amplification regions on 1p35 and 1p36. Other regions of gains were frequently observed: 11q13.4 (68%), 9q34.13 (64%), 21q22.3 (60%), 6p21 and 6q25 (56%) and 10q24, 19q13.2, 22q12, 5q31.2, 7p13, 10q24 and 14q22 (48%). DNA losses were observed in >20% of samples and mainly detected on 5q31.2 (35%), 16p13.2 (30%), 9q33.1 and 9q33.29 (25%) and 17q11.2, 3p26.2, 18q21.1, 4q34.1 and 8p23.2 (20%). Such copy number alterations (CNAs) were mapped in all grades of dysplasia that progressed, and their corresponding OSCCs, in 70% of patients, indicating that these CNAs may be associated with disease progression. Amplified genes mapping within recurrent CNAs (KHDRBS1, PARP1, RAB1A, HBEGF, PAIP2, BTBD7) were selected for validation, by quantitative real-time PCR, in an independent set of 32 progressive leukoplakia, 32 OSSCs and 21 non-progressive leukoplakia samples. Amplification of BTBD7, KHDRBS1, PARP1 and RAB1A was exclusively detected in progressive leukoplakia and corresponding OSCC. BTBD7, KHDRBS1, PARP1 and RAB1A may be associated with OSCC progression. Protein-protein interaction networks were created to identify possible pathways associated with OSCC progression.

  20. Genomics and disease resistance studies in livestock☆

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Stephen C; Woolliams, John A

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers the application of genetic and genomic techniques to disease resistance, the interpretation of data arising from such studies and the utilisation of the research outcomes to breed animals for enhanced resistance. Resistance and tolerance are defined and contrasted, factors affecting the analysis and interpretation of field data presented, and appropriate experimental designs discussed. These general principles are then applied to two detailed case studies, infectious pancreatic necrosis in Atlantic salmon and bovine tuberculosis in dairy cattle, and the lessons learnt are considered in detail. It is concluded that the rate limiting step in disease genetic studies will generally be provision of adequate phenotypic data, and its interpretation, rather than the genomic resources. Lastly, the importance of cross-disciplinary dialogue between the animal health and animal genetics communities is stressed. PMID:26339300

  1. Comparative genomics approaches to study organism similarities and differences

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Liping; Liu, Yueyi; Dubchak, Inna; Shon, John; Park, John

    2002-06-01

    Comparative genomics is a large-scale, holistic approach that compares two or more genomes to discover the similarities and differences between the genomes and to study the biology of the individual genomes. Comparative studies can be performed at different levels of the genomes to obtain multiple perspectives about the organisms. We discuss in detail the type of analyses that offer significant biological insights in the comparisons of (1) genome structure including overall genome statistics, repeats, genome rearrangement at both DNA and gene level, synteny, and breakpoints; (2) coding regions including gene content, protein content, orthologs, and paralogs; and (3) noncoding regions including the prediction of regulatory elements. We also briefly review the currently available computational tools in comparative genomics such as algorithms for genome-scale sequence alignment, gene identification, and nonhomology-based function prediction.

  2. The multiple facets of homology and their use in comparative genomics to study the evolution of genes, genomes, and species.

    PubMed

    Descorps-Declère, Stéphane; Lemoine, Frédéric; Sculo, Quentin; Lespinet, Olivier; Labedan, Bernard

    2008-04-01

    The incredible development of comparative genomics during the last decade has required a correct use of the concept of homology that was previously utilized only by evolutionary biologists. Unhappily, this concept has been often misunderstood and thus misused when exploited outside its evolutionary context. This review brings back to the correct definition of homology and explains how this definition has been progressively refined in order to adapt it to the various new kinds of analysis of gene properties and of their products that appear with the progress of comparative genomics. Then, we illustrate the power and the proficiency of such a concept when using the available genomics data in order to study the evolution of individual genes, of entire genomes and of species, respectively. After explaining how we detect homologues by an exhaustive comparison of a hundred of complete proteomes, we describe three main lines of research we have developed in the recent years. The first one exploits synteny and gene context data to better understand the mechanisms of genome evolution in prokaryotes. The second one is based on phylogenomics approaches to reconstruct the tree of life. The last one is devoted to reminding that protein homology is often limited to structural segments (SOH=segment of homology or module). Detecting and numbering modules allows tracing back protein history by identifying the events of gene duplication and gene fusion. We insist that one of the main present difficulties in such studies is a lack of a reliable method to identify genuine orthologues. Finally, we show how these homology studies are helpful to annotate genes and genomes and to study the complexity of the relationships between sequence and function of a gene.

  3. Glycomics meets genomics, epigenomics and other high throughput omics for system biology studies.

    PubMed

    Zoldoš, Vlatka; Horvat, Tomislav; Lauc, Gordan

    2013-02-01

    Majority of eukaryotic proteins are glycosylated and their glycan moieties have numerous important structural, functional and regulatory roles. Because of structural complexity of glycans and technological limitations glycomics, and particularly glycoproteomics was not able to follow rapid progress in genomics and proteomics over last 30 years. However, the field of glycan has been progressing rapidly and first large-scale studies of the glycome have been completed recently. These studies have revealed significant differences in glycome composition between individuals, which may contribute to the human phenotypic variability. The current state-of-the-art in high-throughput glycomics and its integration with genomics, epigenomics and lipidomics is reviewed in this article.

  4. Human genome libraries. Final progress report, February 1, 1994--August 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Fa-Ten

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this program is to use a novel technology of chromosome microdissection and microcloning to construct chromosome region-specific libraries as resources for various human genome program studies. Region specific libraries have been constructed for the entire human chromosomes 2 and 18.

  5. Genomics approaches to study musical aptitude.

    PubMed

    Oikkonen, Jaana; Järvelä, Irma

    2014-11-01

    Although music and other forms of art can develop in diverse directions, they are linked to the genetic profiles of populations. Hearing music is a strong environmental trigger that serves as an excellent model to study the crosstalk between genes and the environment. We propose that the ability to enjoy and practice music requires musical aptitude, which is a common and innate trait facilitating the enjoyment and practice of music. The innate drive for music can only have arisen by exposure to music, and it develops with motivation and training in musically rich environments. Recent genomic approaches have shown that the genes responsible for inner ear development, auditory pathways and neurocognitive processes may underlay musical aptitude. It is expected that genomic approaches can be applied to musical traits and will reveal new biological mechanisms that affect human evolution, brain function, and civilisation. © 2014 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  6. HCV Genome-Wide Genetic Analyses in Context of Disease Progression and Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Donlin, Maureen J.; Lomonosova, Elena; Kiss, Alexi; Cheng, Xiaohong; Cao, Feng; Curto, Teresa M.; Di Bisceglie, Adrian; Tavis, John E.

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of hepatitis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) world-wide. Most HCV patients have relatively stable disease, but approximately 25% have progressive disease that often terminates in liver failure or HCC. HCV is highly variable genetically, with seven genotypes and multiple subtypes per genotype. This variation affects HCV’s sensitivity to antiviral therapy and has been implicated to contribute to differences in disease. We sequenced the complete viral coding capacity for 107 HCV genotype 1 isolates to determine whether genetic variation between independent HCV isolates is associated with the rate of disease progression or development of HCC. Consensus sequences were determined by sequencing RT-PCR products from serum or plasma. Positions of amino acid conservation, amino acid diversity patterns, selection pressures, and genome-wide patterns of amino acid covariance were assessed in context of the clinical phenotypes. A few positions were found where the amino acid distributions or degree of positive selection differed between in the HCC and cirrhotic sequences. All other assessments of viral genetic variation and HCC failed to yield significant associations. Sequences from patients with slow disease progression were under a greater degree of positive selection than sequences from rapid progressors, but all other analyses comparing HCV from rapid and slow disease progressors were statistically insignificant. The failure to observe distinct sequence differences associated with disease progression or HCC employing methods that previously revealed strong associations with the outcome of interferon α-based therapy implies that variable ability of HCV to modulate interferon responses is not a dominant cause for differential pathology among HCV patients. This lack of significant associations also implies that host and/or environmental factors are the major causes of differential disease presentation in HCV patients. PMID

  7. The search for host genetic factors of HIV/AIDS pathogenesis in the post-genome era: progress to date and new avenues for discovery.

    PubMed

    Aouizerat, Bradley E; Pearce, C Leigh; Miaskowski, Christine

    2011-03-01

    Though pursuit of host genetic factors that influence the pathogenesis of HIV began over two decades ago, progress has been slow. Initial genome-level searches for variations associated with HIV-related traits have yielded interesting candidates, but less in the way of novel pathways to be exploited for therapeutic targets. More recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) that include different phenotypes, novel designs, and that have examined different population characteristics suggest novel targets and affirm the utility of additional searches. Recent findings from these GWAS are reviewed, new directions for research are identified, and the promise of systems biology to yield novel insights is discussed.

  8. PROGRESSIVE RECRUITMENT OF RUNX2 TO GENOMIC TARGETS DESPITE DECREASING EXPRESSION DURING OSTEOBLAST DIFFERENTIATION

    PubMed Central

    Pregizer, Steven; Baniwal, Sanjeev K.; Yan, Xiting; Borok, Zea; Frenkel, Baruch

    2008-01-01

    The mRNAs encoding Runx2, a master osteoblast transcription factor, and its target gene Osteocalcin (OC), are commonly used as markers of osteoblast differentiation. We found that while OC mRNA levels do indeed increase during development of the osteoblast phenotype in MC3T3-E1 cultures, Runx2 mRNA levels surprisingly decrease. Neither translational control of Runx2 (based on Western analysis) nor regulation of its DNA-binding ability (assessed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay) could explain the unexpected opposite patterns of Runx2 and OC expression. Instead, a series of ChIP assays during osteoblast differentiation revealed that early on, when Runx2 protein amount and DNA-binding activity are maximal, it is practically absent from the OC promoter. At later stages, Runx2 is recruited to the OC promoter while Runx2 mRNA, protein, and in vitro DNA binding progressively decrease. We also followed Runx2 occupancy at a novel genomic target discovered by ChIP-Chip analysis of cells in which the OC promoter is maximally occupied. The results revealed that Runx2 is recruited to this locus and to the OC promoter with a remarkably similar temporal pattern . These observations highlight a mechanism that restrains Runx2-mediated transcriptional control by confining its access to genomic targets to a narrow window of time. The need for such stringent control is consistent with the severe consequences of Runx2 over-expression in vivo. PMID:18821584

  9. Application of genomics-assisted breeding for generation of climate resilient crops: Progress and prospects

    DOE PAGES

    Kole, Chittaranjan; Muthamiliarasan, Mehanathan; Henry, Robert; ...

    2015-08-11

    Climate change affects agricultural productivity worldwide. Increased prices of food commodities are the initial indication of drastic edible yield loss, which is expected to increase further due to global warming. This situation has compelled plant scientists to develop climate change-resilient crops, which can withstand broad-spectrum stresses such as drought, heat, cold, salinity, flood, submergence and pests, thus helping to deliver increased productivity. Genomics appears to be a promising tool for deciphering the stress responsiveness of crop species with adaptation traits or in wild relatives toward identifying underlying genes, alleles or quantitative trait loci. Molecular breeding approaches have proven helpful inmore » enhancing the stress adaptation of crop plants, and recent advances in high-throughput sequencing and phenotyping platforms have transformed molecular breeding to genomics-assisted breeding (GAB). In view of this, the present review elaborates the progress and prospects of GAB for improving climate change resilience in crops, which is likely to play an ever increasing role in the effort to ensure global food security.« less

  10. Application of genomics-assisted breeding for generation of climate resilient crops: Progress and prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Kole, Chittaranjan; Muthamiliarasan, Mehanathan; Henry, Robert; Edwards, David; Sharma, Rishu; Abberton, Michael; Batley, Jacqueline; Bentley, Alison; Blakeney, Michael; Bryant, John; Cai, Hongwei; Cakir, Mehmet; Cseke, Leland J.; Cockram, James; de Oliveira, Antonio Costa; De Pace, Ciro; Dempewolf, Hannes; Ellison, Shelby; Gepts, Paul; Greenland, Andy; Hall, Anthony; Hori, Kiyosumi; Hughes, Stephen; Humphreys, Mike W.; Iorizzo, Massimo; Ismail, Abdelgabi M.; Marshall, Athole; Mayes, Sean; Nguyen, Henry T.; Ogbannaya, Francis C.; Ortiz, Rodomiro; Paterson, Andrew H.; Simon, Philipp W.; Tohme, Joe; Tuberosa, Roberto; Valliyodan, Babu; Varshney, Rajeev K.; Wullschleger, Stan D.; Yano, Masahiro; Prasad, Manoj

    2015-08-11

    Climate change affects agricultural productivity worldwide. Increased prices of food commodities are the initial indication of drastic edible yield loss, which is expected to increase further due to global warming. This situation has compelled plant scientists to develop climate change-resilient crops, which can withstand broad-spectrum stresses such as drought, heat, cold, salinity, flood, submergence and pests, thus helping to deliver increased productivity. Genomics appears to be a promising tool for deciphering the stress responsiveness of crop species with adaptation traits or in wild relatives toward identifying underlying genes, alleles or quantitative trait loci. Molecular breeding approaches have proven helpful in enhancing the stress adaptation of crop plants, and recent advances in high-throughput sequencing and phenotyping platforms have transformed molecular breeding to genomics-assisted breeding (GAB). In view of this, the present review elaborates the progress and prospects of GAB for improving climate change resilience in crops, which is likely to play an ever increasing role in the effort to ensure global food security.

  11. Genomics of Ovarian Cancer Progression Reveals Diverse Metastatic Trajectories Including Intraepithelial Metastasis to the Fallopian Tube.

    PubMed

    Eckert, Mark A; Pan, Shawn; Hernandez, Kyle M; Loth, Rachel M; Andrade, Jorge; Volchenboum, Samuel L; Faber, Pieter; Montag, Anthony; Lastra, Ricardo; Peter, Marcus E; Yamada, S Diane; Lengyel, Ernst

    2016-12-01

    Accumulating evidence has supported the fallopian tube rather than the ovary as the origin for high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC). To understand the relationship between putative precursor lesions and metastatic tumors, we performed whole-exome sequencing on specimens from eight HGSOC patient progression series consisting of serous tubal intraepithelial carcinomas (STIC), invasive fallopian tube lesions, invasive ovarian lesions, and omental metastases. Integration of copy number and somatic mutations revealed patient-specific patterns with similar mutational signatures and copy-number variation profiles across all anatomic sites, suggesting that genomic instability is an early event in HGSOC. Phylogenetic analyses supported STIC as precursor lesions in half of our patient cohort, but also identified STIC as metastases in 2 patients. Ex vivo assays revealed that HGSOC spheroids can implant in the fallopian tube epithelium and mimic STIC lesions. That STIC may represent metastases calls into question the assumption that STIC are always indicative of primary fallopian tube cancers. We find that the putative precursor lesions for HGSOC, STIC, possess most of the genomic aberrations present in advanced cancers. In addition, a proportion of STIC represent intraepithelial metastases to the fallopian tube rather than the origin of HGSOC. Cancer Discov; 6(12); 1342-51. ©2016 AACR.See related commentary by Swisher et al., p. 1309This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 1293. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Application of genomics-assisted breeding for generation of climate resilient crops: progress and prospects

    PubMed Central

    Kole, Chittaranjan; Muthamilarasan, Mehanathan; Henry, Robert; Edwards, David; Sharma, Rishu; Abberton, Michael; Batley, Jacqueline; Bentley, Alison; Blakeney, Michael; Bryant, John; Cai, Hongwei; Cakir, Mehmet; Cseke, Leland J.; Cockram, James; de Oliveira, Antonio Costa; De Pace, Ciro; Dempewolf, Hannes; Ellison, Shelby; Gepts, Paul; Greenland, Andy; Hall, Anthony; Hori, Kiyosumi; Hughes, Stephen; Humphreys, Mike W.; Iorizzo, Massimo; Ismail, Abdelbagi M.; Marshall, Athole; Mayes, Sean; Nguyen, Henry T.; Ogbonnaya, Francis C.; Ortiz, Rodomiro; Paterson, Andrew H.; Simon, Philipp W.; Tohme, Joe; Tuberosa, Roberto; Valliyodan, Babu; Varshney, Rajeev K.; Wullschleger, Stan D.; Yano, Masahiro; Prasad, Manoj

    2015-01-01

    Climate change affects agricultural productivity worldwide. Increased prices of food commodities are the initial indication of drastic edible yield loss, which is expected to increase further due to global warming. This situation has compelled plant scientists to develop climate change-resilient crops, which can withstand broad-spectrum stresses such as drought, heat, cold, salinity, flood, submergence and pests, thus helping to deliver increased productivity. Genomics appears to be a promising tool for deciphering the stress responsiveness of crop species with adaptation traits or in wild relatives toward identifying underlying genes, alleles or quantitative trait loci. Molecular breeding approaches have proven helpful in enhancing the stress adaptation of crop plants, and recent advances in high-throughput sequencing and phenotyping platforms have transformed molecular breeding to genomics-assisted breeding (GAB). In view of this, the present review elaborates the progress and prospects of GAB for improving climate change resilience in crops, which is likely to play an ever increasing role in the effort to ensure global food security. PMID:26322050

  13. Application of genomics-assisted breeding for generation of climate resilient crops: progress and prospects.

    PubMed

    Kole, Chittaranjan; Muthamilarasan, Mehanathan; Henry, Robert; Edwards, David; Sharma, Rishu; Abberton, Michael; Batley, Jacqueline; Bentley, Alison; Blakeney, Michael; Bryant, John; Cai, Hongwei; Cakir, Mehmet; Cseke, Leland J; Cockram, James; de Oliveira, Antonio Costa; De Pace, Ciro; Dempewolf, Hannes; Ellison, Shelby; Gepts, Paul; Greenland, Andy; Hall, Anthony; Hori, Kiyosumi; Hughes, Stephen; Humphreys, Mike W; Iorizzo, Massimo; Ismail, Abdelbagi M; Marshall, Athole; Mayes, Sean; Nguyen, Henry T; Ogbonnaya, Francis C; Ortiz, Rodomiro; Paterson, Andrew H; Simon, Philipp W; Tohme, Joe; Tuberosa, Roberto; Valliyodan, Babu; Varshney, Rajeev K; Wullschleger, Stan D; Yano, Masahiro; Prasad, Manoj

    2015-01-01

    Climate change affects agricultural productivity worldwide. Increased prices of food commodities are the initial indication of drastic edible yield loss, which is expected to increase further due to global warming. This situation has compelled plant scientists to develop climate change-resilient crops, which can withstand broad-spectrum stresses such as drought, heat, cold, salinity, flood, submergence and pests, thus helping to deliver increased productivity. Genomics appears to be a promising tool for deciphering the stress responsiveness of crop species with adaptation traits or in wild relatives toward identifying underlying genes, alleles or quantitative trait loci. Molecular breeding approaches have proven helpful in enhancing the stress adaptation of crop plants, and recent advances in high-throughput sequencing and phenotyping platforms have transformed molecular breeding to genomics-assisted breeding (GAB). In view of this, the present review elaborates the progress and prospects of GAB for improving climate change resilience in crops, which is likely to play an ever increasing role in the effort to ensure global food security.

  14. [Progress in molecular biology study of DNA computer].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Zhou; Zhao, Jian; He, Lin

    2003-09-01

    DNA (deoxyribonucleotide acids) computer is an emerging new study area that basically combines molecular biology study of DNA molecules and computational study on how to employ these specific molecules to calculate. In 1994 Adleman described his pioneering research on DNA computing in Science. This is the first experimental report on DNA computer study. In 2001 Benenson et al published a paper in Nature regarding a programmable and autonomous DNA computing device. Because of its Turing-like functions, the device is regarded as another milestone progress for DNA computer study. The main features of DNA computer are massively parallel computing ability and potential enormous data storage capacity. Comparing with conventional electronic computers, DNA molecules provide conceptually a revolution in computing, and more and more implications have been found in various disciplines. DNA computer studies have brought great progress not only in its own computing mechanisms, but also in DNA manipulation technologies especially nano-technology. This article presents the basic principles of DNA computer, its applications, its important relationship with genomic research and our comments on all above issues.

  15. Simplified DGS procedure for large-scale genome structural study.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yong-Chul; Xu, Jia; Chen, Jun; Kim, Yeong; Winchester, David; Wang, San Ming

    2009-11-01

    Ditag genome scanning (DGS) uses next-generation DNA sequencing to sequence the ends of ditag fragments produced by restriction enzymes. These sequences are compared to known genome sequences to determine their structure. In order to use DGS for large-scale genome structural studies, we have substantially revised the original protocol by replacing the in vivo genomic DNA cloning with in vitro adaptor ligation, eliminating the ditag concatemerization steps, and replacing the 454 sequencer with Solexa or SOLiD sequencers for ditag sequence collection. This revised protocol further increases genome coverage and resolution and allows DGS to be used to analyze multiple genomes simultaneously.

  16. Clonal expansion and linear genome evolution through breast cancer progression from pre-invasive stages to asynchronous metastasis.

    PubMed

    Krøigård, Anne Bruun; Larsen, Martin Jakob; Lænkholm, Anne-Vibeke; Knoop, Ann S; Jensen, Jeanette D; Bak, Martin; Mollenhauer, Jan; Kruse, Torben A; Thomassen, Mads

    2015-03-20

    Evolution of the breast cancer genome from pre-invasive stages to asynchronous metastasis is complex and mostly unexplored, but highly demanded as it may provide novel markers for and mechanistic insights in cancer progression. The increasing use of personalized therapy of breast cancer necessitates knowledge of the degree of genomic concordance between different steps of malignant progression as primary tumors often are used as surrogates of systemic disease. Based on exome sequencing we performed copy number profiling and point mutation detection on successive steps of breast cancer progression from one breast cancer patient, including two different regions of Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS), primary tumor and an asynchronous metastasis. We identify a remarkable landscape of somatic mutations, retained throughout breast cancer progression and with new mutational events emerging at each step. Our data, contrary to the proposed model of early dissemination of metastatic cells and parallel progression of primary tumors and metastases, provide evidence of linear progression of breast cancer with relatively late dissemination from the primary tumor. The genomic discordance between the different stages of tumor evolution in this patient emphasizes the importance of molecular profiling of metastatic tissue directing molecularly targeted therapy at recurrence.

  17. Sinbase: an integrated database to study genomics, genetics and comparative genomics in Sesamum indicum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Linhai; Yu, Jingyin; Li, Donghua; Zhang, Xiurong

    2015-01-01

    Sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) is an ancient and important oilseed crop grown widely in tropical and subtropical areas. It belongs to the gigantic order Lamiales, which includes many well-known or economically important species, such as olive (Olea europaea), leonurus (Leonurus japonicus) and lavender (Lavandula spica), many of which have important pharmacological properties. Despite their importance, genetic and genomic analyses on these species have been insufficient due to a lack of reference genome information. The now available S. indicum genome will provide an unprecedented opportunity for studying both S. indicum genetic traits and comparative genomics. To deliver S. indicum genomic information to the worldwide research community, we designed Sinbase, a web-based database with comprehensive sesame genomic, genetic and comparative genomic information. Sinbase includes sequences of assembled sesame pseudomolecular chromosomes, protein-coding genes (27,148), transposable elements (372,167) and non-coding RNAs (1,748). In particular, Sinbase provides unique and valuable information on colinear regions with various plant genomes, including Arabidopsis thaliana, Glycine max, Vitis vinifera and Solanum lycopersicum. Sinbase also provides a useful search function and data mining tools, including a keyword search and local BLAST service. Sinbase will be updated regularly with new features, improvements to genome annotation and new genomic sequences, and is freely accessible at http://ocri-genomics.org/Sinbase/.

  18. Pre-genomic, genomic and post-genomic study of microbial communities involved in bioenergy.

    PubMed

    Rittmann, Bruce E; Krajmalnik-Brown, Rosa; Halden, Rolf U

    2008-08-01

    Microorganisms can produce renewable energy in large quantities and without damaging the environment or disrupting food supply. The microbial communities must be robust and self-stabilizing, and their essential syntrophies must be managed. Pre-genomic, genomic and post-genomic tools can provide crucial information about the structure and function of these microbial communities. Applying these tools will help accelerate the rate at which microbial bioenergy processes move from intriguing science to real-world practice.

  19. cDNA expression map of the human genome: Methods development and applications using brain cDNAs. Progress report, October 15, 1991--March 14, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Sikela, J.M.

    1991-12-31

    The following describes progress on human brain cDNA sequencing and mapping that our laboratory has made over the past few months. It should be noted that our first funding installment for the first phase of this grant was obtained approximately two weeks ago. Therefore, the progress that is described represents efforts that were carried out without DOE Genome funds and thus largely are a continuation of pilot studies we began last year. We anticipate, now that DOE funds have arrived, that we will be able to significantly scale up our efforts and productivity.

  20. Progress in unraveling the genetic etiology of Parkinson disease in a genomic era.

    PubMed

    Verstraeten, Aline; Theuns, Jessie; Van Broeckhoven, Christine

    2015-03-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) and Parkinson-plus syndromes are genetically heterogeneous neurological diseases. Initial studies into the genetic causes of PD relied on classical molecular genetic approaches in well-documented case families. More recently, these approaches have been combined with exome sequencing and together have identified 15 causal genes. Additionally, genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have discovered over 25 genetic risk factors. Elucidation of the genetic architecture of sporadic and familial parkinsonism, however, has lagged behind that of simple Mendelian conditions, suggesting the existence of features confounding genetic data interpretation. Here we discuss the successes and potential pitfalls of gene discovery in PD and related disorders in the post-genomic era. With an estimated 30% of trait variance currently unexplained, tackling current limitations will further expedite gene discovery and lead to increased application of these genetic insights in molecular diagnostics using gene panel and exome sequencing strategies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Replication in genome-wide association studies

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, Peter; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Ioannidis, John P. A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Replication helps ensure that a genotype-phenotype association observed in a genome-wide association (GWA) study represents a credible association and is not a chance finding or an artifact due to uncontrolled biases. We discuss prerequisites for exact replication; issues of heterogeneity; advantages and disadvantages of different methods of data synthesis across multiple studies; frequentist vs. Bayesian inferences for replication; and challenges that arise from multi-team collaborations. While consistent replication can greatly improve the credibility of a genotype-phenotype association, it may not eliminate spurious associations due to biases shared by many studies. Conversely, lack of replication in well-powered follow-up studies usually invalidates the initially proposed association, although occasionally it may point to differences in linkage disequilibrium or effect modifiers across studies. PMID:20454541

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Strain MtURU-001, Isolated from a Rapidly Progressing Outbreak in Uruguay

    PubMed Central

    Greif, Gonzalo; Iraola, Gregorio; Berná, Luisa; Coitinho, Cecilia; Rivas, Carlos M.; Naya, Hugo

    2014-01-01

    Despite efficient control programs, large clonal outbreaks of tuberculosis (TB) may arise in low-risk populations. Recently, an unusual TB outbreak was reported in Uruguay, reaching an elevated disease attack rate (53 to 69%). Here, we report the genome sequence of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain associated with this rapidly progressing outbreak, named MtURU-001. PMID:24459279

  3. Coordination: southeast continental shelf studies. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Menzel, D.W.

    1980-03-01

    The GABEX I experiment is designed to provide synoptic coverage of a series of Gulf Stream wave-like disturbances, the effect of these on the circulation of the entire shelf, and on biological and chemical processes. This study was initiated in February 1980 when current meter arrays were deployed. These meters will be removed in July 1980. In April three ships will simultaneously study the effects of Gulf Stream disturbances on the hydrography, chemistry, and biology of the shelf. One vessel will track a specific wave-like disturbance and provide synoptic coverage of the shelf area. The second vessel will determine the effect of shelf break processes on adjacent shelf water; and the third will study trace metal distributions in and outside of disturbances. Research progress is reported in continental shelf studies, nearshore and estuarine studies (diffusion of freshwater out of nearshore zone), tidal currents and material transport, and mixing of inlet plumes.

  4. Progress and knowledge gaps in Culicoides genetics, genomics and population modelling: 2003 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Simon

    2016-09-30

    In the 10 years, since the last international meeting on Bluetongue virus (BTV) and related Orbiviruses in Sicily, there have been huge advances in explorations of the genetics and genomics of Culicoides, culminating in the imminent release of the rst full genome de novo assembly for the genus. In parallel, mathematical models used to predict Culicoides adult distribution, seasonality, and dispersal have also increased in sophistication, re ecting advances in available computational power and expertise. While these advances have focused upon the outbreaks of BTV in Europe, there is an opportunity to extend these techniques to other regions as part of global studies of the genus. This review takes a selective approach to examining the past decade of research in these areas and provides a personal viewpoint of future directions of research that may prove productive.

  5. Genomic Analyses of Breast Cancer Progression Reveal Distinct Routes of Metastasis Emergence

    PubMed Central

    Krøigård, Anne Bruun; Larsen, Martin Jakob; Brasch-Andersen, Charlotte; Lænkholm, Anne-Vibeke; Knoop, Ann S.; Jensen, Jeanette Dupont; Bak, Martin; Mollenhauer, Jan; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A.

    2017-01-01

    A main controversy in cancer research is whether metastatic abilities are present in the most advanced clone of the primary tumor or result from independently acquired aberrations in early disseminated cancer cells as suggested by the linear and the parallel progression models, respectively. The genetic concordance between different steps of malignant progression is mostly unexplored as very few studies have included cancer samples separated by both space and time. We applied whole exome sequencing and targeted deep sequencing to 26 successive samples from six patients with metastatic estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer. Our data provide support for both linear and parallel progression towards metastasis. We report for the first time evidence of metastasis-to-metastasis seeding in breast cancer. Our results point to three distinct routes of metastasis emergence. This may have profound clinical implications and provides substantial novel molecular insights into the timing and mutational evolution of breast cancer metastasis. PMID:28276460

  6. Dual Roles of RNF2 in Melanoma Progression | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Epigenetic regulators have emerged as critical factors governing the biology of cancer. Here, in the context of melanoma, we show that RNF2 is prognostic, exhibiting progression-correlated expression in human melanocytic neoplasms. Through a series of complementary gain-of-function and loss-of-function studies in mouse and human systems, we establish that RNF2 is oncogenic and prometastatic.

  7. A new model army: Emerging fish models to study the genomics of vertebrate Evo-Devo.

    PubMed

    Braasch, Ingo; Peterson, Samuel M; Desvignes, Thomas; McCluskey, Braedan M; Batzel, Peter; Postlethwait, John H

    2015-06-01

    Many fields of biology--including vertebrate Evo-Devo research--are facing an explosion of genomic and transcriptomic sequence information and a multitude of fish species are now swimming in this "genomic tsunami." Here, we first give an overview of recent developments in sequencing fish genomes and transcriptomes that identify properties of fish genomes requiring particular attention and propose strategies to overcome common challenges in fish genomics. We suggest that the generation of chromosome-level genome assemblies--for which we introduce the term "chromonome"--should be a key component of genomic investigations in fish because they enable large-scale conserved synteny analyses that inform orthology detection, a process critical for connectivity of genomes. Orthology calls in vertebrates, especially in teleost fish, are complicated by divergent evolution of gene repertoires and functions following two rounds of genome duplication in the ancestor of vertebrates and a third round at the base of teleost fish. Second, using examples of spotted gar, basal teleosts, zebrafish-related cyprinids, cavefish, livebearers, icefish, and lobefin fish, we illustrate how next generation sequencing technologies liberate emerging fish systems from genomic ignorance and transform them into a new model army to answer longstanding questions on the genomic and developmental basis of their biodiversity. Finally, we discuss recent progress in the genetic toolbox for the major fish models for functional analysis, zebrafish, and medaka, that can be transferred to many other fish species to study in vivo the functional effect of evolutionary genomic change as Evo-Devo research enters the postgenomic era.

  8. A New Model Army: Emerging fish models to study the genomics of vertebrate Evo-Devo

    PubMed Central

    Braasch, Ingo; Peterson, Samuel M.; Desvignes, Thomas; McCluskey, Braedan M.; Batzel, Peter; Postlethwait, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Many fields of biology – including vertebrate Evo-Devo research – are facing an explosion of genomic and transcriptomic sequence information and a multitude of fish species are now swimming in this ‘genomic tsunami’. Here, we first give an overview of recent developments in sequencing fish genomes and transcriptomes that identify properties of fish genomes requiring particular attention and propose strategies to overcome common challenges in fish genomics. We suggest that the generation of chromosome-level genome assemblies - for which we introduce the term ‘chromonome’ – should be a key component of genomic investigations in fish because they enable large-scale conserved synteny analyses that inform orthology detection, a process critical for connectivity of genomes. Orthology calls in vertebrates, especially in teleost fish, are complicated by divergent evolution of gene repertoires and functions following two rounds of genome duplication in the ancestor of vertebrates and a third round at the base of teleost fish. Second, using examples of spotted gar, basal teleosts, zebrafish-related cyprinids, cavefish, livebearers, icefish, and lobefin fish, we illustrate how next generation sequencing technologies liberate emerging fish systems from genomic ignorance and transform them into a new model army to answer longstanding questions on the genomic and developmental basis of their biodiversity. Finally, we discuss recent progress in the genetic toolbox for the major fish models for functional analysis, zebrafish and medaka, that can be transferred to many other fish species to study in vivo the functional effect of evolutionary genomic change as Evo-Devo research enters the postgenomic era. PMID:25111899

  9. Integrated genomic analysis of colorectal cancer progression reveals activation of EGFR through demethylation of the EREG promoter

    PubMed Central

    Qu, X; Sandmann, T; Frierson, H; Fu, L; Fuentes, E; Walter, K; Okrah, K; Rumpel, C; Moskaluk, C; Lu, S; Wang, Y; Bourgon, R; Penuel, E; Pirzkall, A; Amler, L; Lackner, M R; Tabernero, J; Hampton, G M; Kabbarah, O

    2016-01-01

    Key molecular drivers that underlie transformation of colonic epithelium into colorectal adenocarcinoma (CRC) are well described. However, the mechanisms through which clinically targeted pathways are activated during CRC progression have yet to be elucidated. Here, we used an integrative genomics approach to examine CRC progression. We used laser capture microdissection to isolate colonic crypt cells, differentiated surface epithelium, adenomas, carcinomas and metastases, and used gene expression profiling to identify pathways that were differentially expressed between the different cell types. We identified a number of potentially important transcriptional changes in developmental and oncogenic pathways, and noted a marked upregulation of EREG in primary and metastatic cancer cells. We confirmed this pattern of gene expression by in situ hybridization and observed staining consistent with autocrine expression in the tumor cells. Upregulation of EREG during the adenoma–carcinoma transition was associated with demethylation of two key sites within its promoter, and this was accompanied by an increase in the levels of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) phosphorylation, as assessed by reverse-phase protein analysis. In CRC cell lines, we demonstrated that EREG demethylation led to its transcriptional upregulation, higher levels of EGFR phosphorylation, and sensitization to EGFR inhibitors. Low levels of EREG methylation in patients who received cetuximab as part of a phase II study were associated with high expression of the ligand and a favorable response to therapy. Conversely, high levels of promoter methylation and low levels of EREG expression were observed in tumors that progressed after treatment. We also noted an inverse correlation between EREG methylation and expression levels in several other cancers, including those of the head and neck, lung and bladder. Therefore, we propose that upregulation of EREG expression through promoter demethylation

  10. Genome-wide association study for semen quality traits in German Warmblood stallions.

    PubMed

    Gottschalk, Maren; Metzger, Julia; Martinsson, Gunilla; Sieme, Harald; Distl, Ottmar

    2016-08-01

    We performed a genome-wide association study for semen quality traits in 139 German Warmblood stallions. Stallions were genotyped using the Illumina equine SNP50 Beadchip. Traits analysed were de-regressed estimated breeding values (EBVs) for gel-free volume, sperm concentration, total number of sperm, progressive motility and the total number of progressively motile sperm. The GWAS revealed 29 SNPs on 12 different chromosomes as genome-wide significantly associated with semen quality traits. For ten genomic regions we could retrieve candidate genes influencing stallion fertility. Among the candidate genes, we could find the genes encoding cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISP1, CRISP2 and CRISP3). This was the first GWAS in horses performed for semen quality traits.

  11. Genome-wide significant risk factors for Alzheimer's disease: role in progression to dementia due to Alzheimer's disease among subjects with mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Lacour, A; Espinosa, A; Louwersheimer, E; Heilmann, S; Hernández, I; Wolfsgruber, S; Fernández, V; Wagner, H; Rosende-Roca, M; Mauleón, A; Moreno-Grau, S; Vargas, L; Pijnenburg, Y A L; Koene, T; Rodríguez-Gómez, O; Ortega, G; Ruiz, S; Holstege, H; Sotolongo-Grau, O; Kornhuber, J; Peters, O; Frölich, L; Hüll, M; Rüther, E; Wiltfang, J; Scherer, M; Riedel-Heller, S; Alegret, M; Nöthen, M M; Scheltens, P; Wagner, M; Tárraga, L; Jessen, F; Boada, M; Maier, W; van der Flier, W M; Becker, T; Ramirez, A; Ruiz, A

    2017-01-01

    Few data are available concerning the role of risk markers for Alzheimer's disease (AD) in progression to AD dementia among subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). We therefore investigated the role of well-known AD-associated single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the progression from MCI to AD dementia. Four independent MCI data sets were included in the analysis: (a) the German study on Aging, Cognition and Dementia in primary care patients (n=853); (b) the German Dementia Competence Network (n=812); (c) the Fundació ACE from Barcelona, Spain (n=1245); and (d) the MCI data set of the Amsterdam Dementia Cohort (n=306). The effects of single markers and combined polygenic scores were measured using Cox proportional hazards models and meta-analyses. The clusterin (CLU) locus was an independent genetic risk factor for MCI to AD progression (CLU rs9331888: hazard ratio (HR)=1.187 (1.054-1.32); P=0.0035). A polygenic score (PGS1) comprising nine established genome-wide AD risk loci predicted a small effect on the risk of MCI to AD progression in APOE-ɛ4 (apolipoprotein E-ɛ4) carriers (HR=1.746 (1.029-2.965); P=0.038). The novel AD loci reported by the International Genomics of Alzheimer's Project were not implicated in MCI to AD dementia progression. SNP-based polygenic risk scores comprising currently available AD genetic markers did not predict MCI to AD progression. We conclude that SNPs in CLU are potential markers for MCI to AD progression.

  12. Genome-wide significant risk factors for Alzheimer's disease: role in progression to dementia due to Alzheimer's disease among subjects with mild cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Lacour, A; Espinosa, A; Louwersheimer, E; Heilmann, S; Hernández, I; Wolfsgruber, S; Fernández, V; Wagner, H; Rosende-Roca, M; Mauleón, A; Moreno-Grau, S; Vargas, L; Pijnenburg, Y A L; Koene, T; Rodríguez-Gómez, O; Ortega, G; Ruiz, S; Holstege, H; Sotolongo-Grau, O; Kornhuber, J; Peters, O; Frölich, L; Hüll, M; Rüther, E; Wiltfang, J; Scherer, M; Riedel-Heller, S; Alegret, M; Nöthen, M M; Scheltens, P; Wagner, M; Tárraga, L; Jessen, F; Boada, M; Maier, W; van der Flier, W M; Becker, T; Ramirez, A; Ruiz, A

    2017-01-01

    Few data are available concerning the role of risk markers for Alzheimer's disease (AD) in progression to AD dementia among subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). We therefore investigated the role of well-known AD-associated single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the progression from MCI to AD dementia. Four independent MCI data sets were included in the analysis: (a) the German study on Aging, Cognition and Dementia in primary care patients (n=853); (b) the German Dementia Competence Network (n=812); (c) the Fundació ACE from Barcelona, Spain (n=1245); and (d) the MCI data set of the Amsterdam Dementia Cohort (n=306). The effects of single markers and combined polygenic scores were measured using Cox proportional hazards models and meta-analyses. The clusterin (CLU) locus was an independent genetic risk factor for MCI to AD progression (CLU rs9331888: hazard ratio (HR)=1.187 (1.054–1.32); P=0.0035). A polygenic score (PGS1) comprising nine established genome-wide AD risk loci predicted a small effect on the risk of MCI to AD progression in APOE-ɛ4 (apolipoprotein E-ɛ4) carriers (HR=1.746 (1.029–2.965); P=0.038). The novel AD loci reported by the International Genomics of Alzheimer's Project were not implicated in MCI to AD dementia progression. SNP-based polygenic risk scores comprising currently available AD genetic markers did not predict MCI to AD progression. We conclude that SNPs in CLU are potential markers for MCI to AD progression. PMID:26976043

  13. Current progress in the biology of members of the Sporothrix schenckii complex following the genomic era.

    PubMed

    Mora-Montes, Héctor M; Dantas, Alessandra da Silva; Trujillo-Esquivel, Elías; de Souza Baptista, Andrea R; Lopes-Bezerra, Leila M

    2015-09-01

    Sporotrichosis has been attributed for more than a century to one single etiological agent, Sporothrix schencki. Only eight years ago, it was described that, in fact, the disease is caused by several pathogenic cryptic species. The present review will focus on recent advances to understand the biology and virulence of epidemiologically relevant pathogenic species of the S. schenckii complex. The main subjects covered are the new clinical and epidemiological aspects including diagnostic and therapeutic challenges, the development of molecular tools, the genome database and the perspectives for study of virulence of emerging Sporothrix species.

  14. Computational Tools for Genomic Studies in Plants.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Manuel

    2016-12-01

    In recent years, the genomic sequence of numerous plant species including the main crop species has been determined. Computational tools have been developed to deal with the issue of which plant has been sequenced and where is the sequence hosted. In this mini-review, the databases for genome projects, the databases created to host species/clade projects and the databases developed to perform plant comparative genomics are revised. Because of their importance in modern research, an in-depth analysis of the plant comparative genomics databases has been performed. This comparative analysis is focused in the common and specific computational tools developed to achieve the particular objectives of each database. Besides, emerging high-performance bioinformatics tools specific for plant research are commented. What kind of computational approaches should be implemented in next years to efficiently analyze plant genomes is discussed.

  15. Genomic study of ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament of the spine

    PubMed Central

    IKEGAWA, Shiro

    2014-01-01

    Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament of the spine (OPLL) is a common disease after the middle age. OPLL frequently causes serious neurological problems due to compression of the spinal cord and/or nerve roots. OPLL occurs in patients with monogenic metabolic diseases including rickets/osteomalacia and hypoparathyroidism; however most of OPLL is idiopathic and is considered as a multi-factorial (polygenic) disease influenced by genetic and environmental factors. Genomic studies for the genetic factors of OPLL have been conducted, mainly in Japan, including linkage and association studies. This paper reviews the recent progress in the genomic study of OPLL and comments on its future direction. PMID:25504229

  16. Patterns of progression, treatment of progressive disease and post-progression survival in the New EPOC study

    PubMed Central

    Pugh, Siân A; Bowers, Megan; Ball, Alexandre; Falk, Stephen; Finch-Jones, Meg; Valle, Juan W; O'Reilly, Derek A; Siriwardena, Ajith K; Hornbuckle, Joanne; Rees, Myrddin; Rees, Charlotte; Iveson, Tim; Hickish, Tamas; Maishman, Tom; Stanton, Louise; Dixon, Elizabeth; Corkhill, Andrea; Radford, Mike; Garden, O James; Cunningham, David; Maughan, Tim S; Bridgewater, John A; Primrose, John N

    2016-01-01

    Background: The addition of cetuximab (CTX) to perioperative chemotherapy (CT) for operable colorectal liver metastases resulted in a shorter progression-free survival. Details of disease progression are described to further inform the primary study outcome. Methods: A total of 257 KRAS wild-type patients were randomised to CT alone or CT with CTX. Data regarding sites and treatment of progressive disease were obtained for the 109 (CT n=48, CT and CTX n=61) patients with progressive disease at the cut-off date for analysis of November 2012. Results: The liver was the most frequent site of progression (CT 67% (32/48); CT and CTX 66% (40/61)). A higher proportion of patients in the CT and group had multiple sites of progressive disease (CT 8%, 4/48; CT and CTX 23%, 14/61 P=0.04). Further treatment for progressive disease is known for 84 patients of whom 69 received further CT, most frequently irinotecan based. Twenty-two patients, 11 in each arm, received CTX as a further line agent. Conclusions: Both the distribution of progressive disease and further treatment are as expected for such a cohort. The pattern of disease progression seen is consistent with failure of systemic micrometastatic disease control rather than failure of local disease control following liver surgery. PMID:27434036

  17. Patterns of progression, treatment of progressive disease and post-progression survival in the New EPOC study.

    PubMed

    Pugh, Siân A; Bowers, Megan; Ball, Alexandre; Falk, Stephen; Finch-Jones, Meg; Valle, Juan W; O'Reilly, Derek A; Siriwardena, Ajith K; Hornbuckle, Joanne; Rees, Myrddin; Rees, Charlotte; Iveson, Tim; Hickish, Tamas; Maishman, Tom; Stanton, Louise; Dixon, Elizabeth; Corkhill, Andrea; Radford, Mike; Garden, O James; Cunningham, David; Maughan, Tim S; Bridgewater, John A; Primrose, John N

    2016-08-09

    The addition of cetuximab (CTX) to perioperative chemotherapy (CT) for operable colorectal liver metastases resulted in a shorter progression-free survival. Details of disease progression are described to further inform the primary study outcome. A total of 257 KRAS wild-type patients were randomised to CT alone or CT with CTX. Data regarding sites and treatment of progressive disease were obtained for the 109 (CT n=48, CT and CTX n=61) patients with progressive disease at the cut-off date for analysis of November 2012. The liver was the most frequent site of progression (CT 67% (32/48); CT and CTX 66% (40/61)). A higher proportion of patients in the CT and group had multiple sites of progressive disease (CT 8%, 4/48; CT and CTX 23%, 14/61 P=0.04). Further treatment for progressive disease is known for 84 patients of whom 69 received further CT, most frequently irinotecan based. Twenty-two patients, 11 in each arm, received CTX as a further line agent. Both the distribution of progressive disease and further treatment are as expected for such a cohort. The pattern of disease progression seen is consistent with failure of systemic micrometastatic disease control rather than failure of local disease control following liver surgery.

  18. A Gene Gravity Model for the Evolution of Cancer Genomes: A Study of 3,000 Cancer Genomes across 9 Cancer Types

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chen-Ching; Zhao, Junfei; Jia, Peilin; Li, Wen-Hsiung; Zhao, Zhongming

    2015-01-01

    Cancer development and progression result from somatic evolution by an accumulation of genomic alterations. The effects of those alterations on the fitness of somatic cells lead to evolutionary adaptations such as increased cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and altered anticancer drug responses. However, there are few general mathematical models to quantitatively examine how perturbations of a single gene shape subsequent evolution of the cancer genome. In this study, we proposed the gene gravity model to study the evolution of cancer genomes by incorporating the genome-wide transcription and somatic mutation profiles of ~3,000 tumors across 9 cancer types from The Cancer Genome Atlas into a broad gene network. We found that somatic mutations of a cancer driver gene may drive cancer genome evolution by inducing mutations in other genes. This functional consequence is often generated by the combined effect of genetic and epigenetic (e.g., chromatin regulation) alterations. By quantifying cancer genome evolution using the gene gravity model, we identified six putative cancer genes (AHNAK, COL11A1, DDX3X, FAT4, STAG2, and SYNE1). The tumor genomes harboring the nonsynonymous somatic mutations in these genes had a higher mutation density at the genome level compared to the wild-type groups. Furthermore, we provided statistical evidence that hypermutation of cancer driver genes on inactive X chromosomes is a general feature in female cancer genomes. In summary, this study sheds light on the functional consequences and evolutionary characteristics of somatic mutations during tumorigenesis by propelling adaptive cancer genome evolution, which would provide new perspectives for cancer research and therapeutics. PMID:26352260

  19. A Gene Gravity Model for the Evolution of Cancer Genomes: A Study of 3,000 Cancer Genomes across 9 Cancer Types.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Feixiong; Liu, Chuang; Lin, Chen-Ching; Zhao, Junfei; Jia, Peilin; Li, Wen-Hsiung; Zhao, Zhongming

    2015-09-01

    Cancer development and progression result from somatic evolution by an accumulation of genomic alterations. The effects of those alterations on the fitness of somatic cells lead to evolutionary adaptations such as increased cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and altered anticancer drug responses. However, there are few general mathematical models to quantitatively examine how perturbations of a single gene shape subsequent evolution of the cancer genome. In this study, we proposed the gene gravity model to study the evolution of cancer genomes by incorporating the genome-wide transcription and somatic mutation profiles of ~3,000 tumors across 9 cancer types from The Cancer Genome Atlas into a broad gene network. We found that somatic mutations of a cancer driver gene may drive cancer genome evolution by inducing mutations in other genes. This functional consequence is often generated by the combined effect of genetic and epigenetic (e.g., chromatin regulation) alterations. By quantifying cancer genome evolution using the gene gravity model, we identified six putative cancer genes (AHNAK, COL11A1, DDX3X, FAT4, STAG2, and SYNE1). The tumor genomes harboring the nonsynonymous somatic mutations in these genes had a higher mutation density at the genome level compared to the wild-type groups. Furthermore, we provided statistical evidence that hypermutation of cancer driver genes on inactive X chromosomes is a general feature in female cancer genomes. In summary, this study sheds light on the functional consequences and evolutionary characteristics of somatic mutations during tumorigenesis by propelling adaptive cancer genome evolution, which would provide new perspectives for cancer research and therapeutics.

  20. Developing Progress Files: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fry, Heather; Davenport, Elizabeth S.; Woodman, Theresa; Pee, Barbel

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports the development of a progress file, a tool to promote learning, planning and the recording of achievement, for dental therapists in training and professional practice. Progress files are to become obligatory in higher education in the United Kingdom. The aims of the file, its development and the naturalistic approach taken to…

  1. EUPAN enables pan-genome studies of a large number of eukaryotic genomes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhiqiang; Sun, Chen; Lu, Kuang-Chen; Chu, Xixia; Zhao, Yue; Lu, Jinyuan; Shi, Jianxin; Wei, Chaochun

    2017-08-01

    Pan-genome analyses are routinely carried out for bacteria to interpret the within-species gene presence/absence variations (PAVs). However, pan-genome analyses are rare for eukaryotes due to the large sizes and higher complexities of their genomes. Here we proposed EUPAN, a eukaryotic pan-genome analysis toolkit, enabling automatic large-scale eukaryotic pan-genome analyses and detection of gene PAVs at a relatively low sequencing depth. In the previous studies, we demonstrated the effectiveness and high accuracy of EUPAN in the pan-genome analysis of 453 rice genomes, in which we also revealed widespread gene PAVs among individual rice genomes. Moreover, EUPAN can be directly applied to the current re-sequencing projects primarily focusing on single nucleotide polymorphisms. EUPAN is implemented in Perl, R and C ++. It is supported under Linux and preferred for a computer cluster with LSF and SLURM job scheduling system. EUPAN together with its standard operating procedure (SOP) is freely available for non-commercial use (CC BY-NC 4.0) at http://cgm.sjtu.edu.cn/eupan/index.html . ccwei@sjtu.edu.cn or jianxin.shi@sjtu.edu.cn. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  2. Appearance traits in fish farming: progress from classical genetics to genomics, providing insight into current and potential genetic improvement

    PubMed Central

    Colihueque, Nelson; Araneda, Cristian

    2014-01-01

    Appearance traits in fish, those external body characteristics that influence consumer acceptance at point of sale, have come to the forefront of commercial fish farming, as culture profitability is closely linked to management of these traits. Appearance traits comprise mainly body shape and skin pigmentation. Analysis of the genetic basis of these traits in different fish reveals significant genetic variation within populations, indicating potential for their genetic improvement. Work into ascertaining the minor or major genes underlying appearance traits for commercial fish is emerging, with substantial progress in model fish in terms of identifying genes that control body shape and skin colors. In this review, we describe research progress to date, especially with regard to commercial fish, and discuss genomic findings in model fish in order to better address the genetic basis of the traits. Given that appearance traits are important in commercial fish, the genomic information related to this issue promises to accelerate the selection process in coming years. PMID:25140172

  3. DNA methylation in schizophrenia: progress and challenges of epigenetic studies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe psychiatric disease affecting about 1% of the world's population, with significant effects on patients and society. Genetic studies have identified several candidate risk genes or genomic regions for schizophrenia, and epidemiological studies have revealed several environmental risk factors. However, the etiology of schizophrenia still remains largely unknown. Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation and histone modifications can explain the interaction between genetic and environmental factors at the molecular level, and accumulating evidence suggests that such epigenetic alterations are involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. However, replication studies to validate previous findings and investigations of the causality of epigenetic alterations in schizophrenia are needed. Here, we review epigenetic studies of schizophrenia patients using postmortem brains or peripheral tissues, focusing mainly on DNA methylation. We also highlight the recent progress and challenges in characterizing the potentially complex and dynamic patterns of epigenomic variations. Such studies are expected to contribute to our understanding of schizophrenia etiology and should provide novel opportunities for the development of therapeutic drugs. PMID:23234572

  4. Promoter-Targeted Histone Acetylation of Chromatinized Parvoviral Genome Is Essential for the Progress of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mäntylä, Elina; Salokas, Kari; Oittinen, Mikko; Aho, Vesa; Mäntysaari, Pekka; Palmujoki, Lassi; Kalliolinna, Olli; Ihalainen, Teemu O.; Niskanen, Einari A.; Timonen, Jussi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The association of host histones with parvoviral DNA is poorly understood. We analyzed the chromatinization and histone acetylation of canine parvovirus DNA during infection by confocal imaging and in situ proximity ligation assay combined with chromatin immunoprecipitation and high-throughput sequencing. We found that during late infection, parvovirus replication bodies were rich in histones bearing modifications characteristic of transcriptionally active chromatin, i.e., histone H3 lysine 27 acetylation (H3K27ac). H3K27ac, in particular, was located in close proximity to the viral DNA-binding protein NS1. Importantly, our results show for the first time that in the chromatinized parvoviral genome, the two viral promoters in particular were rich in H3K27ac. Histone acetyltransferase (HAT) inhibitors efficiently interfered with the expression of viral proteins and infection progress. Altogether, our data suggest that the acetylation of histones on parvoviral DNA is essential for viral gene expression and the completion of the viral life cycle. IMPORTANCE Viral DNA introduced into cell nuclei is exposed to cellular responses to foreign DNA, including chromatinization and epigenetic silencing, both of which determine the outcome of infection. How the incoming parvovirus resists cellular epigenetic downregulation of its genes is not understood. Here, the critical role of epigenetic modifications in the regulation of parvovirus infection was demonstrated. We showed for the first time that a successful parvovirus infection is characterized by the deposition of nucleosomes with active histone acetylation on the viral promoter areas. The results provide new insights into the regulation of parvoviral gene expression, which is an important aspect of the development of parvovirus-based virotherapy. PMID:26842481

  5. FY-1979 progress report. Hydrotransport plugging study.

    SciTech Connect

    Eyler, L.L.; Lombardo, N.J.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of the Hydrotransport Plugging Study is to investigate phenomena associated with predicting the onset and occurrence of plugging in pipeline transport of coal. This study addresses large particle transport plugging phenomena that may be encountered in run-of-mine operations. The project is being conducted in four tasks: review and analysis of current capabilities and available data, analytical modeling, experimental investigations, and unplugging and static start-up. This report documents work completed in FY-1979 as well as work currently in progress. A review of currently available prediction methods was completed. Applicability of the methods to large particle hydrotransport and the prediction of plugging was evaluated. It was determined that available models were inadequate, either because they are empirical and tuned to a given solid or because they are simplified analytical models incapable of accounting for a wide range of parameters. Complicated regression curve fit models lacking a physical basis cannot be extrapolated with confidence. Several specific conclusions were reached: Recent developments in mechanistic modeling, describing flow conditions at the limit of stationary deposition, provide the best basis for prediction and extrapolation of large particle flow. Certain modeled phenomena require further analytical and experimental investigation to improve confidence levels. Experimental work needs to be performed to support modeling and to provide an adequate data base for comparison purposes. No available model permits treatment of solids mixtures such as coal and rock.

  6. A progress report on seismic model studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Healy, J.H.; Mangan, G.B.

    1963-01-01

    The value of seismic-model studies as an aid to understanding wave propagation in the Earth's crust was recognized by early investigators (Tatel and Tuve, 1955). Preliminary model results were very promising, but progress in model seismology has been restricted by two problems: (1) difficulties in the development of models with continuously variable velocity-depth functions, and (2) difficulties in the construction of models of adequate size to provide a meaningful wave-length to layer-thickness ratio. The problem of a continuously variable velocity-depth function has been partly solved by a technique using two-dimensional plate models constructed by laminating plastic to aluminum, so that the ratio of plastic to aluminum controls the velocity-depth function (Healy and Press, 1960). These techniques provide a continuously variable velocity-depth function, but it is not possible to construct such models large enough to study short-period wave propagation in the crust. This report describes improvements in our ability to machine large models. Two types of models are being used: one is a cylindrical aluminum tube machined on a lathe, and the other is a large plate machined on a precision planer. Both of these modeling techniques give promising results and are a significant improvement over earlier efforts.

  7. Study of heavy flavored particles. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    This report discusses progress on the following topics: time-of- flight system; charmed baryon production and decays; D decays to baryons; measurement of sigma plus particles magnetic moments; and strong interaction coupling. (LSP)

  8. Population Genetics, Evolutionary Genomics, and Genome-Wide Studies of Malaria: A View Across the International Centers of Excellence for Malaria Research.

    PubMed

    Carlton, Jane M; Volkman, Sarah K; Uplekar, Swapna; Hupalo, Daniel N; Pereira Alves, João Marcelo; Cui, Liwang; Donnelly, Martin; Roos, David S; Harb, Omar S; Acosta, Monica; Read, Andrew; Ribolla, Paulo E M; Singh, Om P; Valecha, Neena; Wassmer, Samuel C; Ferreira, Marcelo; Escalante, Ananias A

    2015-09-01

    The study of the three protagonists in malaria-the Plasmodium parasite, the Anopheles mosquito, and the human host-is key to developing methods to control and eventually eliminate the disease. Genomic technologies, including the recent development of next-generation sequencing, enable interrogation of this triangle to an unprecedented level of scrutiny, and promise exciting progress toward real-time epidemiology studies and the study of evolutionary adaptation. We discuss the use of genomics by the International Centers of Excellence for Malaria Research, a network of field sites and laboratories in malaria-endemic countries that undertake cutting-edge research, training, and technology transfer in malarious countries of the world.

  9. In Silico Whole Genome Sequencer and Analyzer (iWGS): a Computational Pipeline to Guide the Design and Analysis of de novo Genome Sequencing Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaofan; Peris, David; Kominek, Jacek; Kurtzman, Cletus P.; Hittinger, Chris Todd; Rokas, Antonis

    2016-01-01

    The availability of genomes across the tree of life is highly biased toward vertebrates, pathogens, human disease models, and organisms with relatively small and simple genomes. Recent progress in genomics has enabled the de novo decoding of the genome of virtually any organism, greatly expanding its potential for understanding the biology and evolution of the full spectrum of biodiversity. The increasing diversity of sequencing technologies, assays, and de novo assembly algorithms have augmented the complexity of de novo genome sequencing projects in nonmodel organisms. To reduce the costs and challenges in de novo genome sequencing projects and streamline their experimental design and analysis, we developed iWGS (in silico Whole Genome Sequencer and Analyzer), an automated pipeline for guiding the choice of appropriate sequencing strategy and assembly protocols. iWGS seamlessly integrates the four key steps of a de novo genome sequencing project: data generation (through simulation), data quality control, de novo assembly, and assembly evaluation and validation. The last three steps can also be applied to the analysis of real data. iWGS is designed to enable the user to have great flexibility in testing the range of experimental designs available for genome sequencing projects, and supports all major sequencing technologies and popular assembly tools. Three case studies illustrate how iWGS can guide the design of de novo genome sequencing projects, and evaluate the performance of a wide variety of user-specified sequencing strategies and assembly protocols on genomes of differing architectures. iWGS, along with a detailed documentation, is freely available at https://github.com/zhouxiaofan1983/iWGS. PMID:27638685

  10. in silico Whole Genome Sequencer & Analyzer (iWGS): A Computational Pipeline to Guide the Design and Analysis of de novo Genome Sequencing Studies.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaofan; Peris, David; Kominek, Jacek; Kurtzman, Cletus P; Hittinger, Chris Todd; Rokas, Antonis

    2016-09-16

    The availability of genomes across the tree of life is highly biased toward vertebrates, pathogens, human disease models, and organisms with relatively small and simple genomes. Recent progress in genomics has enabled the de novo decoding of the genome of virtually any organism, greatly expanding its potential for understanding the biology and evolution of the full spectrum of biodiversity. The increasing diversity of sequencing technologies, assays, and de novo assembly algorithms have augmented the complexity of de novo genome sequencing projects in non-model organisms. To reduce the costs and challenges in de novo genome sequencing projects and streamline their experimental design and analysis, we developed iWGS (in silico Whole Genome Sequencer and Analyzer), an automated pipeline for guiding the choice of appropriate sequencing strategy and assembly protocols. iWGS seamlessly integrates the four key steps of a de novo genome sequencing project: data generation (through simulation), data quality control, de novo assembly, and assembly evaluation and validation. The last three steps can also be applied to the analysis of real data. iWGS is designed to enable the user to have great flexibility in testing the range of experimental designs available for genome sequencing projects, and supports all major sequencing technologies and popular assembly tools. Three case studies illustrate how iWGS can guide the design of de novo genome sequencing projects and evaluate the performance of a wide variety of user-specified sequencing strategies and assembly protocols on genomes of differing architectures. iWGS, along with a detailed documentation, is freely available at https://github.com/zhouxiaofan1983/iWGS.

  11. in silico Whole Genome Sequencer & Analyzer (iWGS): A Computational Pipeline to Guide the Design and Analysis of de novo Genome Sequencing Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xiaofan; Peris, David; Kominek, Jacek; Kurtzman, Cletus P.; Hittinger, Chris Todd; Rokas, A.

    2016-09-16

    The availability of genomes across the tree of life is highly biased toward vertebrates, pathogens, human disease models, and organisms with relatively small and simple genomes. Recent progress in genomics has enabled the de novo decoding of the genome of virtually any organism, greatly expanding its potential for understanding the biology and evolution of the full spectrum of biodiversity. The increasing diversity of sequencing technologies, assays, and de novo assembly algorithms have augmented the complexity of de novo genome sequencing projects in nonmodel organisms. To reduce the costs and challenges in de novo genome sequencing projects and streamline their experimental design and analysis, we developed iWGS (in silico Whole Genome Sequencer and Analyzer), an automated pipeline for guiding the choice of appropriate sequencing strategy and assembly protocols. iWGS seamlessly integrates the four key steps of a de novo genome sequencing project: data generation (through simulation), data quality control, de novo assembly, and assembly evaluation and validation. The last three steps can also be applied to the analysis of real data. iWGS is designed to enable the user to have great flexibility in testing the range of experimental designs available for genome sequencing projects, and supports all major sequencing technologies and popular assembly tools. Three case studies illustrate how iWGS can guide the design of de novo genome sequencing projects, and evaluate the performance of a wide variety of user-specified sequencing strategies and assembly protocols on genomes of differing architectures. iWGS, along with a detailed documentation, is freely available at https://github.com/zhouxiaofan1983/iWGS.

  12. in silico Whole Genome Sequencer & Analyzer (iWGS): A Computational Pipeline to Guide the Design and Analysis of de novo Genome Sequencing Studies

    DOE PAGES

    Zhou, Xiaofan; Peris, David; Kominek, Jacek; ...

    2016-09-16

    The availability of genomes across the tree of life is highly biased toward vertebrates, pathogens, human disease models, and organisms with relatively small and simple genomes. Recent progress in genomics has enabled the de novo decoding of the genome of virtually any organism, greatly expanding its potential for understanding the biology and evolution of the full spectrum of biodiversity. The increasing diversity of sequencing technologies, assays, and de novo assembly algorithms have augmented the complexity of de novo genome sequencing projects in nonmodel organisms. To reduce the costs and challenges in de novo genome sequencing projects and streamline their experimentalmore » design and analysis, we developed iWGS (in silico Whole Genome Sequencer and Analyzer), an automated pipeline for guiding the choice of appropriate sequencing strategy and assembly protocols. iWGS seamlessly integrates the four key steps of a de novo genome sequencing project: data generation (through simulation), data quality control, de novo assembly, and assembly evaluation and validation. The last three steps can also be applied to the analysis of real data. iWGS is designed to enable the user to have great flexibility in testing the range of experimental designs available for genome sequencing projects, and supports all major sequencing technologies and popular assembly tools. Three case studies illustrate how iWGS can guide the design of de novo genome sequencing projects, and evaluate the performance of a wide variety of user-specified sequencing strategies and assembly protocols on genomes of differing architectures. iWGS, along with a detailed documentation, is freely available at https://github.com/zhouxiaofan1983/iWGS.« less

  13. Current status and prospects for the study of Nicotiana genomics, genetics, and nicotine biosynthesis genes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuewen; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L

    2015-02-01

    Nicotiana, a member of the Solanaceae family, is one of the most important research model plants, and of high agricultural and economic value worldwide. To better understand the substantial and rapid research progress with Nicotiana in recent years, its genomics, genetics, and nicotine gene studies are summarized, with useful web links. Several important genetic maps, including a high-density map of N. tabacum consisting of ~2,000 markers published in 2012, provide tools for genetics research. Four whole genome sequences are from allotetraploid species, including N. benthamiana in 2012, and three N. tabacum cultivars (TN90, K326, and BX) in 2014. Three whole genome sequences are from diploids, including progenitors N. sylvestris and N. tomentosiformis in 2013 and N. otophora in 2014. These and additional studies provide numerous insights into genome evolution after polyploidization, including changes in gene composition and transcriptome expression in N. tabacum. The major genes involved in the nicotine biosynthetic pathway have been identified and the genetic basis of the differences in nicotine levels among Nicotiana species has been revealed. In addition, other progress on chloroplast, mitochondrial, and NCBI-registered projects on Nicotiana are discussed. The challenges and prospects for genomic, genetic and application research are addressed. Hence, this review provides important resources and guidance for current and future research and application in Nicotiana.

  14. 2012 U.S. Department of Energy: Joint Genome Institute: Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, David

    2013-01-01

    The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI) is to serve the diverse scientific community as a user facility, enabling the application of large-scale genomics and analysis of plants, microbes, and communities of microbes to address the DOE mission goals in bioenergy and the environment. The DOE JGI's sequencing efforts fall under the Eukaryote Super Program, which includes the Plant and Fungal Genomics Programs; and the Prokaryote Super Program, which includes the Microbial Genomics and Metagenomics Programs. In 2012, several projects made news for their contributions to energy and environment research.

  15. in silico Whole Genome Sequencer & Analyzer (iWGS): a computational pipeline to guide the design and analysis of de novo genome sequencing studies

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The availability of genomes across the tree of life is highly biased toward vertebrates, pathogens, human disease models, and organisms with relatively small and simple genomes. Recent progress in genomics has enabled the de novo decoding of the genome of virtually any organism, greatly expanding it...

  16. Tracking the progression of speciation: variable patterns of introgression across the genome provide insights on the species delimitation between progenitor-derivative spruces (Picea mariana × P. rubens).

    PubMed

    de Lafontaine, Guillaume; Prunier, Julien; Gérardi, Sébastien; Bousquet, Jean

    2015-10-01

    The genic species concept implies that while most of the genome can be exchanged somewhat freely between species through introgression, some genomic regions remain impermeable to interspecific gene flow. Hence, interspecific differences can be maintained despite ongoing gene exchange within contact zones. This study assessed the heterogeneous patterns of introgression at gene loci across the hybrid zone of an incipient progenitor-derivative species pair, Picea mariana (black spruce) and Picea rubens (red spruce). The spruce taxa likely diverged in geographic isolation during the Pleistocene and came into secondary contact during late Holocene. A total of 300 SNPs distributed across the 12 linkage groups (LG) of black spruce were genotyped for 385 individual trees from 33 populations distributed across the allopatric zone of each species and within the zone of sympatry. An integrative framework combining three population genomic approaches was used to scan the genomes, revealing heterogeneous patterns of introgression. A total of 23 SNPs scattered over 10 LG were considered impermeable to introgression and putatively under diverging selection. These loci revealed the existence of impermeable genomic regions forming the species boundary and are thus indicative of ongoing speciation between these two genetic lineages. Another 238 SNPs reflected selectively neutral diffusion across the porous species barrier. Finally, 39 highly permeable SNPs suggested ancestral polymorphism along with balancing selection. The heterogeneous patterns of introgression across the genome indicated that the speciation process between black spruce and red spruce is young and incomplete, albeit some interspecific differences are maintained, allowing ongoing species divergence even in sympatry. The approach developed in this study can be used to track the progression of ongoing speciation processes.

  17. [A review of the genomic and gene cloning studies in trees].

    PubMed

    Yin, Tong-Ming

    2010-07-01

    Supported by the Department of Energy (DOE) of U.S., the first tree genome, black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa), has been completely sequenced and publicly release. This is the milestone that indicates the beginning of post-genome era for forest trees. Identification and cloning genes underlying important traits are one of the main tasks for the post-genome-era tree genomic studies. Recently, great achievements have been made in cloning genes coordinating important domestication traits in some crops, such as rice, tomato, maize and so on. Molecular breeding has been applied in the practical breeding programs for many crops. By contrast, molecular studies in trees are lagging behind. Trees possess some characteristics that make them as difficult organisms for studying on locating and cloning of genes. With the advances in techniques, given also the fast growth of tree genomic resources, great achievements are desirable in cloning unknown genes from trees, which will facilitate tree improvement programs by means of molecular breeding. In this paper, the author reviewed the progress in tree genomic and gene cloning studies, and prospected the future achievements in order to provide a useful reference for researchers working in this area.

  18. Galaxy tools to study genome diversity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Intra-species genetic variation can be used to investigate population structure, selection, and gene flow in non-model vertebrates; and due to the plummeting costs for genome sequencing, it is now possible for small labs to obtain full-genome variation data from their species of interest. However, those labs may not have easy access to, and familiarity with, computational tools to analyze those data. Results We have created a suite of tools for the Galaxy web server aimed at handling nucleotide and amino-acid polymorphisms discovered by full-genome sequencing of several individuals of the same species, or using a SNP genotyping microarray. In addition to providing user-friendly tools, a main goal is to make published analyses reproducible. While most of the examples discussed in this paper deal with nuclear-genome diversity in non-human vertebrates, we also illustrate the application of the tools to fungal genomes, human biomedical data, and mitochondrial sequences. Conclusions This project illustrates that a small group can design, implement, test, document, and distribute a Galaxy tool collection to meet the needs of a particular community of biologists. PMID:24377391

  19. The genomic landscape and evolution of endometrial carcinoma progression and abdominopelvic metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, William J.; Hoivik, Erling A.; Halle, Mari K.; Taylor-Weiner, Amaro; Cherniack, Andrew D.; Berg, Anna; Holst, Frederik; Zack, Travis I.; Werner, Henrica M. J.; Staby, Kjersti M.; Rosenberg, Mara; Stefansson, Ingunn M.; Kusonmano, Kanthida; Chevalier, Aaron; Mauland, Karen K.; Trovik, Jone; Krakstad, Camilla; Giannakis, Marios; Hodis, Eran; Woie, Kathrine; Bjorge, Line; Vintermyr, Olav K.; Wala, Jeremiah A.; Lawrence, Michael S.; Getz, Gad; Carter, Scott L.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Salvesen, Helga B.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have detailed the genomic landscape of primary endometrial cancers, but their evolution into metastases has not been characterized. We performed whole-exome sequencing of 98 tumor biopsies including complex atypical hyperplasias, primary tumors, and paired abdominopelvic metastases to survey the evolutionary landscape of endometrial cancer. We expanded and reanalyzed TCGA-data, identifying novel recurrent alterations in primary tumors, including mutations in the estrogen receptor cofactor NRIP1 in 12% of patients. We found that likely driver events tended to be shared by primary and metastatic tissue-samples, with notable exceptions such as ARID1A mutations. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that the sampled metastases typically arose from a common ancestral subclone that was not detected in the primary tumor biopsy. These data demonstrate extensive genetic heterogeneity within endometrial cancers and relative homogeneity across metastatic sites. PMID:27348297

  20. Genomic Study of Cardiovascular Continuum Comorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Makeeva, O. A.; Sleptsov, A. A.; Kulish, E. V.; Barbarash, O. L.; Mazur, A. M.; Prokhorchuk, E. B.; Chekanov, N. N.; Stepanov, V. A.; Puzyrev, V. P.

    2015-01-01

    Comorbidity or a combination of several diseases in the same individual is a common and widely investigated phenomenon. However, the genetic background for non–random disease combinations is not fully understood. Modern technologies and approaches to genomic data analysis enable the investigation of the genetic profile of patients burdened with several diseases (polypathia, disease conglomerates) and its comparison with the profiles of patients with single diseases. An association study featuring three groups of patients with various combinations of cardiovascular disorders and a control group of relatively healthy individuals was conducted. Patients were selected as follows: presence of only one disease, ischemic heart disease (IHD); a combination of two diseases, IHD and arterial hypertension (AH); and a combination of several diseases, including IHD, AH, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and hypercholesterolemia (HC). Genotyping was performed using the “My Gene” genomic service (www.i–gene.ru). An analysis of 1,400 polymorphic genetic variants and their associations with the studied phenotypes are presented. A total of 14 polymorphic variants were associated with the phenotype “IHD only,” including those in the APOB, CD226, NKX2–5, TLR2, DPP6, KLRB1, VDR, SCARB1, NEDD4L, and SREBF2 genes, and intragenic variants rs12487066, rs7807268, rs10896449, and rs944289. A total of 13 genetic markers were associated with the “IHD and AH” phenotype, including variants in the BTNL2, EGFR, CNTNAP2, SCARB1, and HNF1A genes, and intragenic polymorphisms rs801114, rs10499194, rs13207033, rs2398162, rs6501455, and rs1160312. A total of 14 genetic variants were associated with a combination of several diseases of cardiovascular continuum (CVC), including those in the TAS2R38, SEZ6L, APOA2, KLF7, CETP, ITGA4, RAD54B, LDLR, and MTAP genes, along with intragenic variants rs1333048, rs1333049, and rs6501455. One common genetic marker was identified for the

  1. Identifying disease mutations in genomic medicine settings: current challenges and how to accelerate progress

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The pace of exome and genome sequencing is accelerating, with the identification of many new disease-causing mutations in research settings, and it is likely that whole exome or genome sequencing could have a major impact in the clinical arena in the relatively near future. However, the human genomics community is currently facing several challenges, including phenotyping, sample collection, sequencing strategies, bioinformatics analysis, biological validation of variant function, clinical interpretation and validity of variant data, and delivery of genomic information to various constituents. Here we review these challenges and summarize the bottlenecks for the clinical application of exome and genome sequencing, and we discuss ways for moving the field forward. In particular, we urge the need for clinical-grade sample collection, high-quality sequencing data acquisition, digitalized phenotyping, rigorous generation of variant calls, and comprehensive functional annotation of variants. Additionally, we suggest that a 'networking of science' model that encourages much more collaboration and online sharing of medical history, genomic data and biological knowledge, including among research participants and consumers/patients, will help establish causation and penetrance for disease causal variants and genes. As we enter this new era of genomic medicine, we envision that consumer-driven and consumer-oriented efforts will take center stage, thus allowing insights from the human genome project to translate directly back into individualized medicine. PMID:22830651

  2. The International Pea Genome Sequencing Project: Sequencing and Assembly Progresses Updates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The International Consortium for the Pea Genome Sequencing (ICPG) includes scientists from six countries around the world. Its aim is to provide a high quality reference of the pea genome to the scientific community as well as to the pea breeder community. The consortium proposed a strategy that int...

  3. The genomics of preterm birth: from animal models to human studies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Preterm birth (delivery at less than 37 weeks of gestation) is the leading cause of infant mortality worldwide. So far, the application of animal models to understand human birth timing has not substantially revealed mechanisms that could be used to prevent prematurity. However, with amassing data implicating an important role for genetics in the timing of the onset of human labor, the use of modern genomic approaches, such as genome-wide association studies, rare variant analyses using whole-exome or genome sequencing, and family-based designs, holds enormous potential. Although some progress has been made in the search for causative genes and variants associated with preterm birth, the major genetic determinants remain to be identified. Here, we review insights from and limitations of animal models for understanding the physiology of parturition, recent human genetic and genomic studies to identify genes involved in preterm birth, and emerging areas that are likely to be informative in future investigations. Further advances in understanding fundamental mechanisms, and the development of preventative measures, will depend upon the acquisition of greater numbers of carefully phenotyped pregnancies, large-scale informatics approaches combining genomic information with information on environmental exposures, and new conceptual models for studying the interaction between the maternal and fetal genomes to personalize therapies for mothers and infants. Information emerging from these advances will help us to identify new biomarkers for earlier detection of preterm labor, develop more effective therapeutic agents, and/or promote prophylactic measures even before conception. PMID:23673148

  4. A Discovery Genome-Wide Association Study of Entrepreneurship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quaye, Lydia; Nicolaou, Nicos; Shane, Scott; Mangino, Massimo

    2012-01-01

    To identify specific genetic variants influencing the phenotype of entrepreneurship, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) with 3,933 Caucasian females from the TwinsUK Adult Twin Registry. Following stringent genotype quality control, GWAF (genome-wide association analyses for family data) software was used to assess the association…

  5. R for genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Gondro, Cedric; Porto-Neto, Laercio R; Lee, Seung Hwan

    2013-01-01

    In recent years R has become de facto statistical programming language of choice for statisticians and it is also arguably the most widely used generic environment for analysis of high-throughput genomic data. In this chapter we discuss some approaches to improve performance of R when working with large SNP datasets.

  6. Gait abnormalities and progressive myelin degeneration in a new murine model of Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease with tandem genomic duplication.

    PubMed

    Clark, Kristi; Sakowski, Lauren; Sperle, Karen; Banser, Linda; Landel, Carlisle P; Bessert, Denise A; Skoff, Robert P; Hobson, Grace M

    2013-07-17

    Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) is a hypomyelinating leukodystrophy caused by mutations of the proteolipid protein 1 gene (PLP1), which is located on the X chromosome and encodes the most abundant protein of myelin in the central nervous sytem. Approximately 60% of PMD cases result from genomic duplications of a region of the X chromosome that includes the entire PLP1 gene. The duplications are typically in a head-to-tail arrangement, and they vary in size and gene content. Although rodent models with extra copies of Plp1 have been developed, none contains an actual genomic rearrangement that resembles those found in PMD patients. We used mutagenic insertion chromosome engineering resources to generate the Plp1dup mouse model by introducing an X chromosome duplication in the mouse genome that contains Plp1 and five neighboring genes that are also commonly duplicated in PMD patients. The Plp1dup mice display progressive gait abnormalities compared with wild-type littermates. The single duplication leads to increased transcript levels of Plp1 and four of the five other duplicated genes over wild-type levels in the brain beginning the second postnatal week. The Plp1dup mice also display altered transcript levels of other important myelin proteins leading to a progressive degeneration of myelin. Our results show that a single duplication of the Plp1 gene leads to a phenotype similar to the pattern seen in human PMD patients with duplications.

  7. Gait Abnormalities and Progressive Myelin Degeneration in a New Murine Model of Pelizaeus-Merzbacher Disease with Tandem Genomic Duplication

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Kristi; Sakowski, Lauren; Sperle, Karen; Banser, Linda; Landel, Carlisle P.; Bessert, Denise A.; Skoff, Robert P.

    2013-01-01

    Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) is a hypomyelinating leukodystrophy caused by mutations of the proteolipid protein 1 gene (PLP1), which is located on the X chromosome and encodes the most abundant protein of myelin in the central nervous sytem. Approximately 60% of PMD cases result from genomic duplications of a region of the X chromosome that includes the entire PLP1 gene. The duplications are typically in a head-to-tail arrangement, and they vary in size and gene content. Although rodent models with extra copies of Plp1 have been developed, none contains an actual genomic rearrangement that resembles those found in PMD patients. We used mutagenic insertion chromosome engineering resources to generate the Plp1dup mouse model by introducing an X chromosome duplication in the mouse genome that contains Plp1 and five neighboring genes that are also commonly duplicated in PMD patients. The Plp1dup mice display progressive gait abnormalities compared with wild-type littermates. The single duplication leads to increased transcript levels of Plp1 and four of the five other duplicated genes over wild-type levels in the brain beginning the second postnatal week. The Plp1dup mice also display altered transcript levels of other important myelin proteins leading to a progressive degeneration of myelin. Our results show that a single duplication of the Plp1 gene leads to a phenotype similar to the pattern seen in human PMD patients with duplications. PMID:23864668

  8. A Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies the Genomic Region Associated with Shell Color in Yesso Scallop, Patinopecten yessoensis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liang; Li, Yangping; Li, Yajuan; Yu, Jiachen; Liao, Huan; Wang, Shuyue; Lv, Jia; Liang, Jun; Huang, Xiaoting; Bao, Zhenmin

    2017-06-01

    The shell color polymorphism widely exists in economic shellfish, which not only results in a better visual perception but also shows great value as an economic trait for breeding. Small numbers of reddish-orange shell Yesso scallops, Patinopecten yessoensis, were found in cultured populations compared to the brown majority. In this study, a genome-wide association study was conducted to understand the genetic basis of shell color. Sixty-six 2b-RAD libraries with equal numbers of reddish-orange and brown shell individuals were constructed and sequenced using the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. A total of 322,332,684 high-quality reads were obtained, and the average sequencing depth was 18.4×. One genomic region on chromosome 11 that included 239 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was identified as significantly associated with shell color. After verification by high-resolution melting in another population, two SNPs were selected as specific loci for reddish-orange shell color. These two SNPs could be used to improve the selective breeding progress of true-breeding strains with complete reddish-orange scallops. In addition, within the significantly associated genomic region, candidate genes were identified using marker sequences to search the draft genome of Yesso scallop. Three genes (LDLR, FRIS, and FRIY) with known functions in carotenoid metabolism were identified. Further study using high-performance liquid chromatography proved that the relative level of carotenoids in the reddish-orange shells was 40 times higher than that in the brown shells. These results suggested that the accumulation of carotenoids contributes to the formation of reddish-orange shells.

  9. Chemical genomics for studying parasite gene function and interaction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian; Yuan, Jing; Chen, Chin-chien; Inglese, James; Su, Xin-zhuan

    2013-01-01

    With the development of new technologies in genome sequencing, gene expression profiling, genotyping, and high-throughput screening of chemical compound libraries, small molecules are playing increasingly important roles in studying gene expression regulation, gene-gene interaction, and gene function. Here we briefly review and discuss some recent advancements in drug target identification and phenotype characterization using combinations of high-throughput screening of small-molecule libraries and various genome-wide methods such as whole genome sequencing, genome-wide association studies, and genome-wide expressional analysis. These approaches can be used to search for new drugs against parasitic infections, to identify drug targets or drug-resistance genes, and to infer gene function. PMID:24215777

  10. Elucidating Genomic Characteristics of Lung Cancer Progression from In Situ to Invasive Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Vinayanuwattikun, Chanida; Le Calvez-Kelm, Florence; Abedi-Ardekani, Behnoush; Zaridze, David; Mukeria, Anush; Voegele, Catherine; Vallée, Maxime; Purnomosari, Dewajani; Forey, Nathalie; Durand, Geoffroy; Byrnes, Graham; Mckay, James; Brennan, Paul; Scelo, Ghislaine

    2016-01-01

    To examine the diversity of somatic alterations and clonal evolution according to aggressiveness of disease, nineteen tumor-blood pairs of ‘formerly bronchiolo-alveolar carcinoma (BAC)’ which had been reclassified into preinvasive lesion (adenocarcinoma in situ; AIS), focal invasive lesion (minimally invasive adenocarcinoma; MIA), and invasive lesion (lepidic predominant adenocarcinoma; LPA and non-lepidic predominant adenocarcinoma; non-LPA) according to IASLC/ATS/ERS 2011 classification were explored by whole exome sequencing. Several distinct somatic alterations were observed compare to the lung adenocarcinoma study from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). There were higher numbers of tumors with significant APOBEC mutation fold enrichment (73% vs. 58% TCGA). The frequency of KRAS mutations was lower in our study (5% vs. 32% TCGA), while a higher number of mutations of RNA-splicing genes, RBM10 and U2AF1, were found (37% vs. 11% TCGA). We found neither mutational pattern nor somatic copy number alterations that were specific to AIS/MIA. We demonstrated that clonal cell fraction was the only distinctive feature that discriminated LPA/non-LPA from AIS/MIA. The broad range of clonal frequency signified a more branched clonal evolution at the time of diagnosis. Assessment of tumor clonal cell fraction might provide critical information for individualized therapy as a prognostic factor, however this needs further study. PMID:27545006

  11. Genome-wide association study and genomic prediction in citrus: Potential of genomics-assisted breeding for fruit quality traits.

    PubMed

    Minamikawa, Mai F; Nonaka, Keisuke; Kaminuma, Eli; Kajiya-Kanegae, Hiromi; Onogi, Akio; Goto, Shingo; Yoshioka, Terutaka; Imai, Atsushi; Hamada, Hiroko; Hayashi, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Satomi; Katayose, Yuichi; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Nakamura, Yasukazu; Shimizu, Tokurou; Iwata, Hiroyoshi

    2017-07-05

    Novel genomics-based approaches such as genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and genomic selection (GS) are expected to be useful in fruit tree breeding, which requires much time from the cross to the release of a cultivar because of the long generation time. In this study, a citrus parental population (111 varieties) and a breeding population (676 individuals from 35 full-sib families) were genotyped for 1,841 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and phenotyped for 17 fruit quality traits. GWAS power and prediction accuracy were increased by combining the parental and breeding populations. A multi-kernel model considering both additive and dominance effects improved prediction accuracy for acidity and juiciness, implying that the effects of both types are important for these traits. Genomic best linear unbiased prediction (GBLUP) with linear ridge kernel regression (RR) was more robust and accurate than GBLUP with non-linear Gaussian kernel regression (GAUSS) in the tails of the phenotypic distribution. The results of this study suggest that both GWAS and GS are effective for genetic improvement of citrus fruit traits. Furthermore, the data collected from breeding populations are beneficial for increasing the detection power of GWAS and the prediction accuracy of GS.

  12. The Global Invertebrate Genomics Alliance (GIGA): Developing Community Resources to Study Diverse Invertebrate Genomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Over 95% of all metazoan (animal) species comprise the “invertebrates,” but very few genomes from these organisms have been sequenced. We have, therefore, formed a “Global Invertebrate Genomics Alliance” (GIGA). Our intent is to build a collaborative network of diverse scientists to tackle major challenges (e.g., species selection, sample collection and storage, sequence assembly, annotation, analytical tools) associated with genome/transcriptome sequencing across a large taxonomic spectrum. We aim to promote standards that will facilitate comparative approaches to invertebrate genomics and collaborations across the international scientific community. Candidate study taxa include species from Porifera, Ctenophora, Cnidaria, Placozoa, Mollusca, Arthropoda, Echinodermata, Annelida, Bryozoa, and Platyhelminthes, among others. GIGA will target 7000 noninsect/nonnematode species, with an emphasis on marine taxa because of the unrivaled phyletic diversity in the oceans. Priorities for selecting invertebrates for sequencing will include, but are not restricted to, their phylogenetic placement; relevance to organismal, ecological, and conservation research; and their importance to fisheries and human health. We highlight benefits of sequencing both whole genomes (DNA) and transcriptomes and also suggest policies for genomic-level data access and sharing based on transparency and inclusiveness. The GIGA Web site (http://giga.nova.edu) has been launched to facilitate this collaborative venture. PMID:24336862

  13. The Global Invertebrate Genomics Alliance (GIGA): developing community resources to study diverse invertebrate genomes.

    PubMed

    Bracken-Grissom, Heather; Collins, Allen G; Collins, Timothy; Crandall, Keith; Distel, Daniel; Dunn, Casey; Giribet, Gonzalo; Haddock, Steven; Knowlton, Nancy; Martindale, Mark; Medina, Mónica; Messing, Charles; O'Brien, Stephen J; Paulay, Gustav; Putnam, Nicolas; Ravasi, Timothy; Rouse, Greg W; Ryan, Joseph F; Schulze, Anja; Wörheide, Gert; Adamska, Maja; Bailly, Xavier; Breinholt, Jesse; Browne, William E; Diaz, M Christina; Evans, Nathaniel; Flot, Jean-François; Fogarty, Nicole; Johnston, Matthew; Kamel, Bishoy; Kawahara, Akito Y; Laberge, Tammy; Lavrov, Dennis; Michonneau, François; Moroz, Leonid L; Oakley, Todd; Osborne, Karen; Pomponi, Shirley A; Rhodes, Adelaide; Santos, Scott R; Satoh, Nori; Thacker, Robert W; Van de Peer, Yves; Voolstra, Christian R; Welch, David Mark; Winston, Judith; Zhou, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Over 95% of all metazoan (animal) species comprise the "invertebrates," but very few genomes from these organisms have been sequenced. We have, therefore, formed a "Global Invertebrate Genomics Alliance" (GIGA). Our intent is to build a collaborative network of diverse scientists to tackle major challenges (e.g., species selection, sample collection and storage, sequence assembly, annotation, analytical tools) associated with genome/transcriptome sequencing across a large taxonomic spectrum. We aim to promote standards that will facilitate comparative approaches to invertebrate genomics and collaborations across the international scientific community. Candidate study taxa include species from Porifera, Ctenophora, Cnidaria, Placozoa, Mollusca, Arthropoda, Echinodermata, Annelida, Bryozoa, and Platyhelminthes, among others. GIGA will target 7000 noninsect/nonnematode species, with an emphasis on marine taxa because of the unrivaled phyletic diversity in the oceans. Priorities for selecting invertebrates for sequencing will include, but are not restricted to, their phylogenetic placement; relevance to organismal, ecological, and conservation research; and their importance to fisheries and human health. We highlight benefits of sequencing both whole genomes (DNA) and transcriptomes and also suggest policies for genomic-level data access and sharing based on transparency and inclusiveness. The GIGA Web site (http://giga.nova.edu) has been launched to facilitate this collaborative venture.

  14. 78 FR 47674 - Genome in a Bottle Consortium-Progress and Planning Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-06

    ...: select appropriate sources for whole genome RMs and identify or design synthetic DNA constructs that... and synthetic DNA RMs along with the methods (documentary standards) and reference data necessary for...

  15. Have genomic discoveries in inflammatory bowel disease translated into clinical progress?

    PubMed

    Weizman, Adam V; Silverberg, Mark S

    2012-04-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a heterogeneous disease that can be challenging to diagnose and manage. As a result, significant efforts have been made in attempting to identify clinical, genomic, and serologic markers of disease that can aid in patient assessment and treatment. Recent genomic discoveries have the potential to change clinical practice by identifying those susceptible to IBD, predict natural history and guide choice of therapy. Panels of genetic and genomic markers are more likely to emerge as clinical tools, as opposed to individual allelic variants. Serology and biomarkers are already being used and guiding management but await integration with genomic panels before achieving their maximal potential. This article reviews the current state of IBD genetics and evolving molecular approaches that may have potential clinical impact.

  16. Coordination: southeast continental shelf studies. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Menzel, D.W.

    1981-02-01

    The objectives are to identify important physical, chemical and biological processes which affect the transfer of materials on the southeast continental shelf, determine important parameters which govern observed temporal and spatial varibility on the continental shelf, determine the extent and modes of coupling between events at the shelf break and nearshore, and determine physical, chemical and biological exchange rates on the inner shelf. Progress in meeting these research objectives is presented. (ACR)

  17. The contribution of genomics to the study of Q fever.

    PubMed

    D'Amato, Felicetta; Eldin, Carole; Raoult, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii is the etiological agent of Q fever, a worldwide zoonosis that can result in large outbreaks. The birth of genomics and sequencing of C. burnetii strains has revolutionized many fields of study of this infection. Accurate genotyping methods and comparative genomic analysis have enabled description of the diversity of strains around the world and their link with pathogenicity. Genomics has also permitted the development of qPCR tools and axenic culture medium, facilitating the diagnosis of Q fever. Moreover, several pathophysiological mechanisms can now be predicted and therapeutic strategies can be determined thanks to in silico genome analysis. An extensive pan-genomic analysis will allow for a comprehensive view of the clonal diversity of C. burnetii and its link with virulence.

  18. Recent progress on bioinformatics, functional genomics, and metabolomics research of cytochrome P450 and its impact on drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Zhao, Mingzhu; Pang, Yushu; Zhang, Wen; Angela Liu, Limin; Wei, Dong-Qing

    2012-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 superfamily is responsible primarily for human drug metabolism, which is of critical importance for the drug discovery and development. Rapid advancement of bioinformatics, functional genomics and metabolomics has been made over the last decade. These disciplines are essential in target identification, lead discovery and optimization. In this review, we summarize the recent progress on cytochrome P450 and its role on drug metabolism in the context of bioinformatics, functional genomics and metabolomics. Data are integrated into various databases and web-based platforms on cytochrome P450. These research tools and resources are playing an increasingly important role in drug discovery, and are helping in achieving the ultimate goal of personalized medicine, that is, to prescribe personalized drugs according to each person's genetic makeup, metabolic level, and drug disposition.

  19. Personal Commitment, Support and Progress in Doctoral Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinsuo, Miia; Turkulainen, Virpi

    2011-01-01

    Earlier research on doctoral education has associated study progress with the student's own capabilities and faculty support. The purpose of this study is to investigate how students' personal commitment and various forms of support, as well as their complementary effects, explain progress in doctoral studies. Data were collected by a…

  20. Personal Commitment, Support and Progress in Doctoral Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinsuo, Miia; Turkulainen, Virpi

    2011-01-01

    Earlier research on doctoral education has associated study progress with the student's own capabilities and faculty support. The purpose of this study is to investigate how students' personal commitment and various forms of support, as well as their complementary effects, explain progress in doctoral studies. Data were collected by a…

  1. Transitional progressive multiple sclerosis: a clinical and imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Gayou, A.; Brochet, B.; Dousset, V.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To study the prevalence and the natural course of transitional progressive multiple sclerosis (TPMS). This clinical form is defined by a progressive course beginning many years after an isolated bout.
METHODS—214 consecutive outpatients with definite or probable multiple sclerosis were studied. The prevalence of TPMS was established. Patients with TPMS were compared with patients with other progressive forms of multiple sclerosis according to the clinical course. A prospective one year follow up study was performed in a subgroup of patients to compare progression of the disease using clinical indices and MRI.
RESULTS—In this clinical population of 214 outpatients with multiple sclerosis, 55 had secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS), 38 primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS), and 12 TPMS. Retrospective analysis of the clinical data of these patients shows that TPMS is very similar to SPMS at the beginning of the disease (age at onset, time before progression, clinical symptoms at onset, progression index). In addition a cohort of patients was prospectively followed up clinically and by MRI for one year.
CONCLUSIONS—The results did not show any significant differences between the three forms during this follow up. However, all data showed a concordant trend suggesting that at this progressive stage, TPMS is closer to PPMS in terms of progression of disability and new MRI lesions.

 PMID:9328264

  2. Transitional progressive multiple sclerosis: a clinical and imaging study.

    PubMed

    Gayou, A; Brochet, B; Dousset, V

    1997-09-01

    To study the prevalence and the natural course of transitional progressive multiple sclerosis (TPMS). This clinical form is defined by a progressive course beginning many years after an isolated bout. 214 consecutive outpatients with definite or probable multiple sclerosis were studied. The prevalence of TPMS was established. Patients with TPMS were compared with patients with other progressive forms of multiple sclerosis according to the clinical course. A prospective one year follow up study was performed in a subgroup of patients to compare progression of the disease using clinical indices and MRI. In this clinical population of 214 outpatients with multiple sclerosis, 55 had secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS), 38 primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS), and 12 TPMS. Retrospective analysis of the clinical data of these patients shows that TPMS is very similar to SPMS at the beginning of the disease (age at onset, time before progression, clinical symptoms at onset, progression index). In addition a cohort of patients was prospectively followed up clinically and by MRI for one year. The results did not show any significant differences between the three forms during this follow up. However, all data showed a concordant trend suggesting that at this progressive stage, TPMS is closer to PPMS in terms of progression of disability and new MRI lesions.

  3. Functional Analysis of the Human Genome:. Study of Genetic Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, Lap-Chee

    2003-04-01

    I will divide my remarks into 3 parts. First, I will give a brief summary of the Human Genome Project. Second, I will describe our work on human chromosome 7 to illustrate how we could contribute to the Project and disease research. Third, I would like to bring across the argument that study of genetic disease is an integral component of the Human Genome Project. In particular, I will use cystic fibrosis as an example to elaborate why I consider disease study is a part of functional genomics.

  4. A genome-wide association study of global gene expression.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Anna L; Liang, Liming; Moffatt, Miriam F; Chen, Wei; Heath, Simon; Wong, Kenny C C; Taylor, Jenny; Burnett, Edward; Gut, Ivo; Farrall, Martin; Lathrop, G Mark; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Cookson, William O C

    2007-10-01

    We have created a global map of the effects of polymorphism on gene expression in 400 children from families recruited through a proband with asthma. We genotyped 408,273 SNPs and identified expression quantitative trait loci from measurements of 54,675 transcripts representing 20,599 genes in Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines. We found that 15,084 transcripts (28%) representing 6,660 genes had narrow-sense heritabilities (H2) > 0.3. We executed genome-wide association scans for these traits and found peak lod scores between 3.68 and 59.1. The most highly heritable traits were markedly enriched in Gene Ontology descriptors for response to unfolded protein (chaperonins and heat shock proteins), regulation of progression through the cell cycle, RNA processing, DNA repair, immune responses and apoptosis. SNPs that regulate expression of these genes are candidates in the study of degenerative diseases, malignancy, infection and inflammation. We have created a downloadable database to facilitate use of our findings in the mapping of complex disease loci.

  5. Genome-Based Studies of Marine Microorganisms to Maximize the Diversity of Natural Products Discovery for Medical Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xin-Qing

    2011-01-01

    Marine microorganisms are rich source for natural products which play important roles in pharmaceutical industry. Over the past decade, genome-based studies of marine microorganisms have unveiled the tremendous diversity of the producers of natural products and also contributed to the efficiency of harness the strain diversity and chemical diversity, as well as the genetic diversity of marine microorganisms for the rapid discovery and generation of new natural products. In the meantime, genomic information retrieved from marine symbiotic microorganisms can also be employed for the discovery of new medical molecules from yet-unculturable microorganisms. In this paper, the recent progress in the genomic research of marine microorganisms is reviewed; new tools of genome mining as well as the advance in the activation of orphan pathways and metagenomic studies are summarized. Genome-based research of marine microorganisms will maximize the biodiscovery process and solve the problems of supply and sustainability of drug molecules for medical treatments. PMID:21826184

  6. Early Onset Malignancies - Genomic Study of Cancer Disparities

    Cancer.gov

    The Early Onset Malignancies Initiative studies the genomic basis of six cancers that develop at an earlier age, occur in higher rates, and are typically more aggressive in certain minority populations.

  7. Integrated Genome-Based Studies of Shewanella Ecophysiology

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jizhong; He, Zhili

    2014-04-08

    As a part of the Shewanella Federation project, we have used integrated genomic, proteomic and computational technologies to study various aspects of energy metabolism of two Shewanella strains from a systems-level perspective.

  8. Mycobacterial species as case-study of comparative genome analysis.

    PubMed

    Zakham, F; Belayachi, L; Ussery, D; Akrim, M; Benjouad, A; El Aouad, R; Ennaji, M M

    2011-02-08

    The genus Mycobacterium represents more than 120 species including important pathogens of human and cause major public health problems and illnesses. Further, with more than 100 genome sequences from this genus, comparative genome analysis can provide new insights for better understanding the evolutionary events of these species and improving drugs, vaccines, and diagnostics tools for controlling Mycobacterial diseases. In this present study we aim to outline a comparative genome analysis of fourteen Mycobacterial genomes: M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis K—10, M. bovis AF2122/97, M. bovis BCG str. Pasteur 1173P2, M. leprae Br4923, M. marinum M, M. sp. KMS, M. sp. MCS, M. tuberculosis CDC1551, M. tuberculosis F11, M. tuberculosis H37Ra, M. tuberculosis H37Rv, M. tuberculosis KZN 1435 , M. ulcerans Agy99,and M. vanbaalenii PYR—1, For this purpose a comparison has been done based on their length of genomes, GC content, number of genes in different data bases (Genbank, Refseq, and Prodigal). The BLAST matrix of these genomes has been figured to give a lot of information about the similarity between species in a simple scheme. As a result of multiple genome analysis, the pan and core genome have been defined for twelve Mycobacterial species. We have also introduced the genome atlas of the reference strain M. tuberculosis H37Rv which can give a good overview of this genome. And for examining the phylogenetic relationships among these bacteria, a phylogenic tree has been constructed from 16S rRNA gene for tuberculosis and non tuberculosis Mycobacteria to understand the evolutionary events of these species.

  9. Genome-wide alterations of the DNA replication program during tumor progression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arneodo, A.; Goldar, A.; Argoul, F.; Hyrien, O.; Audit, B.

    2016-08-01

    Oncogenic stress is a major driving force in the early stages of cancer development. Recent experimental findings reveal that, in precancerous lesions and cancers, activated oncogenes may induce stalling and dissociation of DNA replication forks resulting in DNA damage. Replication timing is emerging as an important epigenetic feature that recapitulates several genomic, epigenetic and functional specificities of even closely related cell types. There is increasing evidence that chromosome rearrangements, the hallmark of many cancer genomes, are intimately associated with the DNA replication program and that epigenetic replication timing changes often precede chromosomic rearrangements. The recent development of a novel methodology to map replication fork polarity using deep sequencing of Okazaki fragments has provided new and complementary genome-wide replication profiling data. We review the results of a wavelet-based multi-scale analysis of genomic and epigenetic data including replication profiles along human chromosomes. These results provide new insight into the spatio-temporal replication program and its dynamics during differentiation. Here our goal is to bring to cancer research, the experimental protocols and computational methodologies for replication program profiling, and also the modeling of the spatio-temporal replication program. To illustrate our purpose, we report very preliminary results obtained for the chronic myelogeneous leukemia, the archetype model of cancer. Finally, we discuss promising perspectives on using genome-wide DNA replication profiling as a novel efficient tool for cancer diagnosis, prognosis and personalized treatment.

  10. Teacher Stance in Creative Learning: A Study of Progression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craft, Anna; Cremin, Teresa; Burnard, Pamela; Chappell, Kerry

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports focused findings from a qualitative scoping study undertaken in four sites in England focusing on progression in creative learning (PICL) (February 2005-January 2006), funded by Creative Partnerships, a national development programme. The study sought to explore how progression in creative learning can be described in two…

  11. Genome-Wide Association Studies: Contribution of Genomics to Understanding Blood Pressure and Essential Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Contemporary genomic tools now allow the fast and reliable genotyping of hundreds of thousands of variants and permit an unbiased interrogation of the common variability across the human genome. These technical advances have been the basis of numerous recent investigations of genes underlying complex genetic traits, and the results for blood pressure and hypertension have been of particular interest. The pathophysiology of the complex genetic trait blood pressure and hypertension is unclear. The heritability of essential hypertension is high and insights can be gained by finding associated genes. Current genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 10 to 20 loci in or near genes that generally were not expected to be associated with blood pressure or essential hypertension; more significant variants will be discovered when even larger and more refined studies become available. This article gives a short introduction to GWAS and summarizes the current findings for blood pressure and hypertension. PMID:20425154

  12. Genome-wide effects of acute progressive feed restriction in liver and white adipose tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Pohjanvirta, Raimo Boutros, Paul C.; Moffat, Ivy D.; Linden, Jere; Wendelin, Dominique; Okey, Allan B.

    2008-07-01

    Acute progressive feed restriction (APFR) represents a specific form of caloric restriction in which feed availability is increasingly curtailed over a period of a few days to a few weeks. It is often used for control animals in toxicological and pharmacological studies on compounds causing body weight loss to equalize weight changes between experimental and control groups and thereby, intuitively, to also set their metabolic states to the same phase. However, scientific justification for this procedure is lacking. In the present study, we analyzed by microarrays the impact on hepatic gene expression in rats of two APFR regimens that caused identical diminution of body weight (19%) but differed slightly in duration (4 vs. 10 days). In addition, white adipose tissue (WAT) was also subjected to the transcriptomic analysis on day-4. The data revealed that the two regimens led to distinct patterns of differentially expressed genes in liver, albeit some major pathways of energy metabolism were similarly affected (particularly fatty acid and amino acid catabolism). The reason for the divergence appeared to be entrainment by the longer APFR protocol of peripheral oscillator genes, which resulted in derailment of circadian rhythms and consequent interaction of altered diurnal fluctuations with metabolic adjustments in gene expression activities. WAT proved to be highly unresponsive to the 4-day APFR as only 17 mRNA levels were influenced by the treatment. This study demonstrates that body weight is a poor proxy of metabolic state and that the customary protocols of feed restriction can lead to rhythm entrainment.

  13. An Integrative Breakage Model of genome architecture, reshuffling and evolution: The Integrative Breakage Model of genome evolution, a novel multidisciplinary hypothesis for the study of genome plasticity.

    PubMed

    Farré, Marta; Robinson, Terence J; Ruiz-Herrera, Aurora

    2015-05-01

    Our understanding of genomic reorganization, the mechanics of genomic transmission to offspring during germ line formation, and how these structural changes contribute to the speciation process, and genetic disease is far from complete. Earlier attempts to understand the mechanism(s) and constraints that govern genome remodeling suffered from being too narrowly focused, and failed to provide a unified and encompassing view of how genomes are organized and regulated inside cells. Here, we propose a new multidisciplinary Integrative Breakage Model for the study of genome evolution. The analysis of the high-level structural organization of genomes (nucleome), together with the functional constrains that accompany genome reshuffling, provide insights into the origin and plasticity of genome organization that may assist with the detection and isolation of therapeutic targets for the treatment of complex human disorders. © 2015 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Genomic imprinting--insights from studies in mice.

    PubMed

    Ferguson-Smith, Anne; Lin, Shau-Ping; Tsai, Chen-En; Youngson, Neil; Tevendale, Maxine

    2003-02-01

    A subset of mammalian genes is controlled by genomic imprinting. This process causes a gene to be expressed from only one chromosome homologue depending on whether it originally came from the egg or the sperm. Parental origin-specific gene regulation is controlled by epigenetic modifications to DNA and chromatin. Genomic imprinting is therefore a useful model system to study the epigenetic control of genome function. Here we consider the value of the mouse as an experimental organism to address questions about the role of imprinted genes, about the regulation of mono-allelic gene expression and about the evolution of the imprinting function and mechanism.

  15. Construction of a genome-wide human BAC-Unigene resource. Final progress report, 1989--1996

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, C.S.; Xu, R.X.; Wang, M.

    1996-12-31

    Currently, over 30,000 mapped STSs and 27,000 mapped Unigenes (non-redundant, unigene sets of cDNA representing EST clusters) are available for human alone. A total of 44,000 Unigene cDNA clones have been supplied by Research Genetics. Unigenes, or cDNAs are excellent resource for map building for two reasons. Firstly, they exist in two alternative forms -- as both sequence information for PCR primer pairs, and cDNA clones -- thus making library screening by colony hybridization as well as pooled library PCR possible. The authors have developed an efficient and robust procedure to screen genomic libraries with large number of DNA probes. Secondly, the linkage and order of expressed sequences, or genes are highly conserved among human, mouse and other mammalian species. Therefore, mapping with cDNA markers rather than random anonymous STSs will greatly facilitate comparative, evolutionary studies as well as physical map building. They have currently deconvoluted over 10,000 Unigene probes against a 4X coverage human BAC clones from the approved library D by high density colony hybridization method. 10,000 batches of Unigenes are arrayed in an imaginary 100 X 100 matrix from which 100 row pools and 100 column pools are obtained. Library filters are hybridized with pooled probes, thus reducing the number of hybridization required for addressing the positives for each Unigene from 10,000 to 200. Details on the experimental scheme as well as daily progress report is posted on the Web site (http://www.tree.caltech.edu).

  16. The ten years (2004-2014): Progress in peanut genetics and genomics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plant breeding, genetics, and genomics play a critical role in sustainable agriculture specifically in improving crop productivity, quality, and resistance to pests and diseases. The germplasm collections have been treasures of crop genetic resources. Utilization of the collections of wild peanut sp...

  17. A process for analysis of microarray comparative genomics hybridisation studies for bacterial genomes

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Ben; Wu, Guanghui; Woodward, Martin J; Anjum, Muna F

    2008-01-01

    Background Microarray based comparative genomic hybridisation (CGH) experiments have been used to study numerous biological problems including understanding genome plasticity in pathogenic bacteria. Typically such experiments produce large data sets that are difficult for biologists to handle. Although there are some programmes available for interpretation of bacterial transcriptomics data and CGH microarray data for looking at genetic stability in oncogenes, there are none specifically to understand the mosaic nature of bacterial genomes. Consequently a bottle neck still persists in accurate processing and mathematical analysis of these data. To address this shortfall we have produced a simple and robust CGH microarray data analysis process that may be automated in the future to understand bacterial genomic diversity. Results The process involves five steps: cleaning, normalisation, estimating gene presence and absence or divergence, validation, and analysis of data from test against three reference strains simultaneously. Each stage of the process is described and we have compared a number of methods available for characterising bacterial genomic diversity, for calculating the cut-off between gene presence and absence or divergence, and shown that a simple dynamic approach using a kernel density estimator performed better than both established, as well as a more sophisticated mixture modelling technique. We have also shown that current methods commonly used for CGH microarray analysis in tumour and cancer cell lines are not appropriate for analysing our data. Conclusion After carrying out the analysis and validation for three sequenced Escherichia coli strains, CGH microarray data from 19 E. coli O157 pathogenic test strains were used to demonstrate the benefits of applying this simple and robust process to CGH microarray studies using bacterial genomes. PMID:18230148

  18. Genome-Wide Association Studies and Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Speliotes, Elizabeth K.

    2016-01-01

    Sequencing of the human genome has opened up many opportunities to learn about our own genetic susceptibilities to disease. In this Foreword to this issue of Seminars in Liver Disease, I provide some required background to understanding genome-wide association analyses in general, including a list of terms (Table 1) often used in such studies. Five areas of particular significance are then reviewed in detail in the articles that follow. PMID:26676811

  19. Use of information theory to study genome sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohya, Masanori; Sato, Keiko

    2000-12-01

    The genome sequence carries information about life as an order of four bases. It is considered that this order indicates a special code structure. In this paper we discuss how the mutual entropy, the main concept in Shannon's communication theory, can be used to study genome sequences, and how a measure introduced in our previous paper [10] for the analysis of similarities of code structures is applied for examining the coding structure of several species, in particular, HIV-1.

  20. The tumor suppressor SirT2 regulates cell cycle progression and genome stability by modulating the mitotic deposition of H4K20 methylation

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Lourdes; Martínez-Redondo, Paloma; Marazuela-Duque, Anna; Vazquez, Berta N.; Dooley, Scott J.; Voigt, Philipp; Beck, David B.; Kane-Goldsmith, Noriko; Tong, Qiang; Rabanal, Rosa M.; Fondevila, Dolors; Muñoz, Purificación; Krüger, Marcus; Tischfield, Jay A.; Vaquero, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    The establishment of the epigenetic mark H4K20me1 (monomethylation of H4K20) by PR-Set7 during G2/M directly impacts S-phase progression and genome stability. However, the mechanisms involved in the regulation of this event are not well understood. Here we show that SirT2 regulates H4K20me1 deposition through the deacetylation of H4K16Ac (acetylation of H4K16) and determines the levels of H4K20me2/3 throughout the cell cycle. SirT2 binds and deacetylates PR-Set7 at K90, modulating its chromatin localization. Consistently, SirT2 depletion significantly reduces PR-Set7 chromatin levels, alters the size and number of PR-Set7 foci, and decreases the overall mitotic deposition of H4K20me1. Upon stress, the interaction between SirT2 and PR-Set7 increases along with the H4K20me1 levels, suggesting a novel mitotic checkpoint mechanism. SirT2 loss in mice induces significant defects associated with defective H4K20me1–3 levels. Accordingly, SirT2-deficient animals exhibit genomic instability and chromosomal aberrations and are prone to tumorigenesis. Our studies suggest that the dynamic cross-talk between the environment and the genome during mitosis determines the fate of the subsequent cell cycle. PMID:23468428

  1. Integrated genome based studies of Shewanella ecophysiology

    SciTech Connect

    Saffarini, Daad A

    2013-03-07

    Progress is reported in these areas: Regulation of anaerobic respiration by cAMP receptor protein and role of adenylate cyclases; Identification of an octaheme c cytochrome as the terminal sulfite reductase in S. oneidensis MR-1; Identification and analysis of components of the electron transport chains that lead to reduction of thiosulfate, tetrathionate, and elemental sulfur in MR-1; Involvement of pili and flagella in metal reduction by S. oneidensis MR-1; and work suggesting that HemN1 is the major enzyme that is involved in heme biosynthesis under anaerobic conditions.

  2. Harnessing ancient genomes to study the history of human adaptation.

    PubMed

    Marciniak, Stephanie; Perry, George H

    2017-09-11

    The past several years have witnessed an explosion of successful ancient human genome-sequencing projects, with genomic-scale ancient DNA data sets now available for more than 1,100 ancient human and archaic hominin (for example, Neandertal) individuals. Recent 'evolution in action' analyses have started using these data sets to identify and track the spatiotemporal trajectories of genetic variants associated with human adaptations to novel and changing environments, agricultural lifestyles, and introduced or co-evolving pathogens. Together with evidence of adaptive introgression of genetic variants from archaic hominins to humans and emerging ancient genome data sets for domesticated animals and plants, these studies provide novel insights into human evolution and the evolutionary consequences of human behaviour that go well beyond those that can be obtained from modern genomic data or the fossil and archaeological records alone.

  3. Study of Transposable Elements and Their Genomic Impact.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Lopez, Martin; Vilar-Astasio, Raquel; Tristan-Ramos, Pablo; Lopez-Ruiz, Cesar; Garcia-Pérez, Jose L

    2016-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) have been considered traditionally as junk DNA, i.e., DNA sequences that despite representing a high proportion of genomes had no evident cellular functions. However, over the last decades, it has become undeniable that not only TE-derived DNA sequences have (and had) a fundamental role during genome evolution, but also TEs have important implications in the origin and evolution of many genomic disorders. This concise review provides a brief overview of the different types of TEs that can be found in genomes, as well as a list of techniques and methods used to study their impact and mobilization. Some of these techniques will be covered in detail in this Method Book.

  4. Recent Progress in Development of Tnt1 Functional Genomics Platform for Medicago truncatula and Lotus japonicus in Bulgaria.

    PubMed

    Revalska, Miglena; Vassileva, Valya; Goormachtig, Sofie; Van Hautegem, Tom; Ratet, Pascal; Iantcheva, Anelia

    2011-04-01

    Legumes, as protein-rich crops, are widely used for human food, animal feed and vegetable oil production. Over the past decade, two legume species, Medicago truncatula and Lotus japonicus, have been adopted as model legumes for genomics and physiological studies. The tobacco transposable element, Tnt1, is a powerful tool for insertional mutagenesis and gene inactivation in plants. A large collection of Tnt1-tagged lines of M. truncatula cv. Jemalong was generated during the course of the project 'GLIP': Grain Legumes Integrated Project, funded by the European Union (www.eugrainlegumes.org). In the project 'IFCOSMO': Integrated Functional and COmparative genomics Studies on the MOdel Legumes Medicago truncatula and Lotus japonicus, supported by a grant from the Ministry of Education, Youth and Science, Bulgaria, these lines are used for development of functional genomics platform of legumes in Bulgaria. This review presents recent advances in the evaluation of the M. truncatula Tnt1 mutant collection and outlines the steps that are taken in using the Tnt1-tagging for generation of a mutant collection of the second model legume L. japonicus. Both collections will provide a number of legume-specific mutants and serve as a resource for functional and comparative genomics research on legumes. Genomics technologies are expected to advance genetics and breeding of important legume crops (pea, faba bean, alfalfa and clover) in Bulgaria and worldwide.

  5. [Progress of genome engineering technology via clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats--a review].

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Qiu, Shaofu; Song, Hongbin

    2013-10-04

    In survival competition with phage, bacteria and archaea gradually evolved the acquired immune system--Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR), presenting the trait of transcribing the crRNA and the CRISPR-associated protein (Cas) to silence or cleaving the foreign double-stranded DNA specifically. In recent years, strong interest arises in prokaryotes primitive immune system and many in-depth researches are going on. Recently, researchers successfully repurposed CRISPR as an RNA-guided platform for sequence-specific gene expression, which provides a simple approach for selectively perturbing gene expression on a genome-wide scale. It will undoubtedly bring genome engineering into a more convenient and accurate new era.

  6. Clinical Application of a Modular Genomics Technique in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Progress towards Precision Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Bethany J.; Allaire, Norm; Ranger, Ann; Hardiman, Gary; Petri, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring disease activity in a complex, heterogeneous disease such as lupus is difficult. Both over- and undertreatment lead to damage. Current standard of care serologies are unreliable. Better measures of disease activity are necessary as we move into the era of precision medicine. We show here the use of a data-driven, modular approach to genomic biomarker development within lupus—specifically lupus nephritis. PMID:27656648

  7. Evaluation of Genomic Instability as an Early Event in the Progression of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    dysfunctional telomeres and genomic instability implies that shortened telomeres are also associated with altered gene expression. The latter is a primary...2005;173:610-4. 29. Odagiri E, Kanada N, Jibiki K, Demura R, Aikawa E, Demura H. Reduction of telomeric length and c-erbB-2 gene amplification in human...loss or structural rearrangement of a critical gene or genes - occurs in virtually all cancers [6]. The phenotype of a tumor is a reflection of its

  8. Potential assessment of genome-wide association study and genomic selection in Japanese pear Pyrus pyrifolia.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Hiroyoshi; Hayashi, Takeshi; Terakami, Shingo; Takada, Norio; Sawamura, Yutaka; Yamamoto, Toshiya

    2013-03-01

    Although the potential of marker-assisted selection (MAS) in fruit tree breeding has been reported, bi-parental QTL mapping before MAS has hindered the introduction of MAS to fruit tree breeding programs. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are an alternative to bi-parental QTL mapping in long-lived perennials. Selection based on genomic predictions of breeding values (genomic selection: GS) is another alternative for MAS. This study examined the potential of GWAS and GS in pear breeding with 76 Japanese pear cultivars to detect significant associations of 162 markers with nine agronomic traits. We applied multilocus Bayesian models accounting for ordinal categorical phenotypes for GWAS and GS model training. Significant associations were detected at harvest time, black spot resistance and the number of spurs and two of the associations were closely linked to known loci. Genome-wide predictions for GS were accurate at the highest level (0.75) in harvest time, at medium levels (0.38-0.61) in resistance to black spot, firmness of flesh, fruit shape in longitudinal section, fruit size, acid content and number of spurs and at low levels (<0.2) in all soluble solid content and vigor of tree. Results suggest the potential of GWAS and GS for use in future breeding programs in Japanese pear.

  9. CRISPR/Cas9 for genome editing: progress, implications and challenges.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; Wen, Yan; Guo, Xiong

    2014-09-15

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) protein 9 system provides a robust and multiplexable genome editing tool, enabling researchers to precisely manipulate specific genomic elements, and facilitating the elucidation of target gene function in biology and diseases. CRISPR/Cas9 comprises of a nonspecific Cas9 nuclease and a set of programmable sequence-specific CRISPR RNA (crRNA), which can guide Cas9 to cleave DNA and generate double-strand breaks at target sites. Subsequent cellular DNA repair process leads to desired insertions, deletions or substitutions at target sites. The specificity of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated DNA cleavage requires target sequences matching crRNA and a protospacer adjacent motif locating at downstream of target sequences. Here, we review the molecular mechanism, applications and challenges of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing and clinical therapeutic potential of CRISPR/Cas9 in future. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Genome-wide association studies of chronic kidney disease: what have we learned?

    PubMed Central

    O'Seaghdha, Conall M.; Fox, Caroline S.

    2015-01-01

    The past 3 years have witnessed a dramatic expansion in our knowledge of the genetic determinants of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, heritability estimates of eGFR indicate that we have only identified a small proportion of the total heritable contribution to the phenotypic variation. The majority of associations reported from genome-wide association studies identify genomic regions of interest and further work will be required to identify the causal variants responsible for a specific phenotype. Progress in this area is likely to stem from the identification of novel risk genotypes, which will offer insight into the pathogenesis of disease and potential novel therapeutic targets. Follow-up studies stimulated by findings from genome-wide association studies of kidney disease are already yielding promising results, such as the identification of an association between urinary uromodulin levels and incident CKD. Although this work is at an early stage, prospects for progress in our understanding of CKD and its treatment look more promising now than at any point in the past. PMID:22143329

  11. Proteomic and genomic studies of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease - clues in the pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jun Wei; Dillon, John; Miller, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a widely prevalent hepatic disorder that covers wide spectrum of liver pathology. NAFLD is strongly associated with liver inflammation, metabolic hyperlipidaemia and insulin resistance. Frequently, NAFLD has been considered as the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome. The pathophysiology of NAFLD has not been fully elucidated. Some patients can remain in the stage of simple steatosis, which generally is a benign condition; whereas others can develop liver inflammation and progress into non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The mechanism behind the progression is still not fully understood. Much ongoing proteomic researches have focused on discovering the unbiased circulating biochemical markers to allow early detection and treatment of NAFLD. Comprehensive genomic studies have also begun to provide new insights into the gene polymorphism to understand patient-disease variations. Therefore, NAFLD is considered a complex and mutifactorial disease phenotype resulting from environmental exposures acting on a susceptible polygenic background. This paper reviewed the current status of proteomic and genomic studies that have contributed to the understanding of NAFLD pathogenesis. For proteomics section, this review highlighted functional proteins that involved in: (1) transportation; (2) metabolic pathway; (3) acute phase reaction; (4) anti-inflammatory; (5) extracellular matrix; and (6) immune system. In the genomic studies, this review will discuss genes which involved in: (1) lipolysis; (2) adipokines; and (3) cytokines production. PMID:25024592

  12. Proteomic and genomic studies of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease--clues in the pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jun Wei; Dillon, John; Miller, Michael

    2014-07-14

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a widely prevalent hepatic disorder that covers wide spectrum of liver pathology. NAFLD is strongly associated with liver inflammation, metabolic hyperlipidaemia and insulin resistance. Frequently, NAFLD has been considered as the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome. The pathophysiology of NAFLD has not been fully elucidated. Some patients can remain in the stage of simple steatosis, which generally is a benign condition; whereas others can develop liver inflammation and progress into non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The mechanism behind the progression is still not fully understood. Much ongoing proteomic researches have focused on discovering the unbiased circulating biochemical markers to allow early detection and treatment of NAFLD. Comprehensive genomic studies have also begun to provide new insights into the gene polymorphism to understand patient-disease variations. Therefore, NAFLD is considered a complex and mutifactorial disease phenotype resulting from environmental exposures acting on a susceptible polygenic background. This paper reviewed the current status of proteomic and genomic studies that have contributed to the understanding of NAFLD pathogenesis. For proteomics section, this review highlighted functional proteins that involved in: (1) transportation; (2) metabolic pathway; (3) acute phase reaction; (4) anti-inflammatory; (5) extracellular matrix; and (6) immune system. In the genomic studies, this review will discuss genes which involved in: (1) lipolysis; (2) adipokines; and (3) cytokines production.

  13. Case Study Evaluations: A Decade of Progress?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yin, Robert K.

    1997-01-01

    In the last 10 years, there has been increased use of case study methodology, with accompanying refinement and improvement of the methods. Case studies have become legitimate research methods in evaluation, but it is too soon to say whether improvements in methodology are really resulting in improvements in the case studies conducted. (SLD)

  14. Case Study Evaluations: A Decade of Progress?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yin, Robert K.

    1997-01-01

    In the last 10 years, there has been increased use of case study methodology, with accompanying refinement and improvement of the methods. Case studies have become legitimate research methods in evaluation, but it is too soon to say whether improvements in methodology are really resulting in improvements in the case studies conducted. (SLD)

  15. Genome-wide study of correlations between genomic features and their relationship with the regulation of gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Kravatsky, Yuri V.; Chechetkin, Vladimir R.; Tchurikov, Nikolai A.; Kravatskaya, Galina I.

    2015-01-01

    The broad class of tasks in genetics and epigenetics can be reduced to the study of various features that are distributed over the genome (genome tracks). The rapid and efficient processing of the huge amount of data stored in the genome-scale databases cannot be achieved without the software packages based on the analytical criteria. However, strong inhomogeneity of genome tracks hampers the development of relevant statistics. We developed the criteria for the assessment of genome track inhomogeneity and correlations between two genome tracks. We also developed a software package, Genome Track Analyzer, based on this theory. The theory and software were tested on simulated data and were applied to the study of correlations between CpG islands and transcription start sites in the Homo sapiens genome, between profiles of protein-binding sites in chromosomes of Drosophila melanogaster, and between DNA double-strand breaks and histone marks in the H. sapiens genome. Significant correlations between transcription start sites on the forward and the reverse strands were observed in genomes of D. melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, Mus musculus, H. sapiens, and Danio rerio. The observed correlations may be related to the regulation of gene expression in eukaryotes. Genome Track Analyzer is freely available at http://ancorr.eimb.ru/. PMID:25627242

  16. Genomic Diversity and the Microenvironment as Drivers of Progression in DCIS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    TERMS DCIS, intra-tumor heterogeneity, genetic diversity, phenotypic diversity, somatic evolution , microenvironment, mammographic biomarkers 16...DCIS, cancer progression, intra-tumor heterogeneity, genetic diversity, phenotypic diversity, somatic evolution , microenvironment, mammographic...Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The project is designed to test whether genetic and/or tumor environmental heterogeneity is a

  17. Genome-Wide Analysis of Copy Number Variation Identifies Candidate Gene Loci Associated with the Progression of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zain, Shamsul Mohd; Mohamed, Rosmawati; Cooper, David N.; Razali, Rozaimi; Rampal, Sanjay; Mahadeva, Sanjiv; Chan, Wah-Kheong; Anwar, Arif; Rosli, Nurul Shielawati Mohamed; Mahfudz, Anis Shafina; Cheah, Phaik-Leng; Basu, Roma Choudhury; Mohamed, Zahurin

    2014-01-01

    Between 10 and 25% of individuals with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) develop hepatic fibrosis leading to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). To investigate the molecular basis of disease progression, we performed a genome-wide analysis of copy number variation (CNV) in a total of 49 patients with NAFLD [10 simple steatosis and 39 non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH)] and 49 matched controls using high-density comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) microarrays. A total of 11 CNVs were found to be unique to individuals with simple steatosis, whilst 22 were common between simple steatosis and NASH, and 224 were unique to NASH. We postulated that these CNVs could be involved in the pathogenesis of NAFLD progression. After stringent filtering, we identified four rare and/or novel CNVs that may influence the pathogenesis of NASH. Two of these CNVs, located at 13q12.11 and 12q13.2 respectively, harbour the exportin 4 (XPO4) and phosphodiesterase 1B (PDE1B) genes which are already known to be involved in the etiology of liver cirrhosis and HCC. Cross-comparison of the genes located at these four CNV loci with genes already known to be associated with NAFLD yielded a set of genes associated with shared biological processes including cell death, the key process involved in ‘second hit’ hepatic injury. To our knowledge, this pilot study is the first to provide CNV information of potential relevance to the NAFLD spectrum. These data could prove invaluable in predicting patients at risk of developing NAFLD and more importantly, those who will subsequently progress to NASH. PMID:24743702

  18. [Study progress in Sinomenium acutum (Thunb.) Rehd. et Wils].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Zhou, Liling; Li, Rui

    2002-03-01

    This article reviewed the progress in the study of the pharmacognosy, chemical compositions, pharmacological actions and clinical practices of Sinomenium acutum (Thunb.) Rehd. et Wils. An expectation for the further development and utilization of this plant was put forward.

  19. Studying Genome Heterogeneity within the Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungal Cytoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Halary, Sébastien; Bapteste, Eric; Hijri, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Although heterokaryons have been reported in nature, multicellular organisms are generally assumed genetically homogeneous. Here, we investigate the case of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) that form symbiosis with plant roots. The growth advantages they confer to their hosts are of great potential benefit to sustainable agricultural practices. However, measuring genetic diversity for these coenocytes is a major challenge: Within the same cytoplasm, AMF contain thousands of nuclei and show extremely high levels of genetic variation for some loci. The extent and physical location of polymorphism within and between AMF genomes is unclear. We used two complementary strategies to estimate genetic diversity in AMF, investigating polymorphism both on a genome scale and in putative single copy loci. First, we used data from whole-genome pyrosequencing of four AMF isolates to describe genetic diversity, based on a conservative network-based clustering approach. AMF isolates showed marked differences in genome-wide diversity patterns in comparison to a panel of control fungal genomes. This clustering approach further allowed us to provide conservative estimates of Rhizophagus spp. genomes sizes. Second, we designed new putative single copy genomic markers, which we investigated by massive parallel amplicon sequencing for two Rhizophagus irregularis and one Rhizophagus sp. isolates. Most loci showed high polymorphism, with up to 103 alleles per marker. This polymorphism could be distributed within or between nuclei. However, we argue that the Rhizophagus isolates under study might be heterokaryotic, at least for the putative single copy markers we studied. Considering that genetic information is the main resource for identification of AMF, we suggest that special attention is warranted for the study of these ecologically important organisms. PMID:25573960

  20. Genomic and Phenomic Study of Mammary Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Shlomo E.; Heller, Elimelech D.; Sela, Shlomo; Elad, Daniel; Edery, Nir; Leitner, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a major etiological agent of intra-mammary infections (IMI) in cows, leading to acute mastitis and causing great economic losses in dairy production worldwide. Particular strains cause persistent IMI, leading to recurrent mastitis. Virulence factors of mammary pathogenic E. coli (MPEC) involved pathogenesis of mastitis as well as those differentiating strains causing acute or persistent mastitis are largely unknown. This study aimed to identify virulence markers in MPEC through whole genome and phenome comparative analysis. MPEC strains causing acute (VL2874 and P4) or persistent (VL2732) mastitis were compared to an environmental strain (K71) and to the genomes of strains representing different E. coli pathotypes. Intra-mammary challenge in mice confirmed experimentally that the strains studied here have different pathogenic potential, and that the environmental strain K71 is non-pathogenic in the mammary gland. Analysis of whole genome sequences and predicted proteomes revealed high similarity among MPEC, whereas MPEC significantly differed from the non-mammary pathogenic strain K71, and from E. coli genomes from other pathotypes. Functional features identified in MPEC genomes and lacking in the non-mammary pathogenic strain were associated with synthesis of lipopolysaccharide and other membrane antigens, ferric-dicitrate iron acquisition and sugars metabolism. Features associated with cytotoxicity or intra-cellular survival were found specifically in the genomes of strains from severe and acute (VL2874) or persistent (VL2732) mastitis, respectively. MPEC genomes were relatively similar to strain K-12, which was subsequently shown here to be possibly pathogenic in the mammary gland. Phenome analysis showed that the persistent MPEC was the most versatile in terms of nutrients metabolized and acute MPEC the least. Among phenotypes unique to MPEC compared to the non-mammary pathogenic strain were uric acid and D-serine metabolism. This study

  1. EPA releases progress report on hydraulic fracturing study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) provided a 21 December progress report on its ongoing national study about the potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing on drinking water resources. The agency said that a draft of the congressionally requested study will be released in 2014 for public and peer review and that its progress report does not draw conclusions about the potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing, often referred to as fracking.

  2. Studies in genetic discrimination. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    We have screened 1006 respondents in a study of genetic discrimination. Analysis of these responses has produced evidence of the range of institutions engaged in genetic discrimination and demonstrates the impact of this discrimination on the respondents to the study. We have found that both ignorance and policy underlie genetic discrimination and that anti-discrimination laws are being violated.

  3. Progress Toward Synthesis: The Graduate Studies Broker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bach, Bert C.

    1975-01-01

    A case study of the Graduate Studies Center at Milliken University, a cooperative project of Milliken (a private, church-related undergraduate university) and four state institutions, funded by the Illinois Higher Education Cooperation Act (HECA), reveals benefits to students, the state schools, and Milliken (the broker) with no threat to…

  4. The Human Genome Project and Mental Retardation: An Educational Program. Final Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Sharon

    1999-05-03

    The Arc, a national organization on mental retardation, conducted an educational program for members, many of whom have a family member with a genetic condition causing mental retardation. The project informed members about the Human Genome scientific efforts, conducted training regarding ethical, legal and social implications and involved members in issue discussions. Short reports and fact sheets on genetic and ELSI topics were disseminated to 2,200 of the Arc's leaders across the country and to other interested individuals. Materials produced by the project can e found on the Arc's web site, TheArc.org.

  5. Elucidation and pharmacological targeting of novel molecular drivers of follicular lymphoma progression | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Follicular lymphoma (FL), the most common indolent subtype of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, is associated with a relatively long overall survival rate ranging from 6 to 10 years from time of diagnosis. However, in 20-60% of FL patients, transformation to aggressive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) reduces median survival to only 1.2 years. The specific functional and genetic determinants of FL transformation remain elusive, and genomic alterations underlying disease advancement have only been identified for a subset of cases.

  6. BACs as tools for the study of genomic imprinting.

    PubMed

    Tunster, S J; Van De Pette, M; John, R M

    2011-01-01

    Genomic imprinting in mammals results in the expression of genes from only one parental allele. Imprinting occurs as a consequence of epigenetic marks set down either in the father's or the mother's germ line and affects a very specific category of mammalian gene. A greater understanding of this distinctive phenomenon can be gained from studies using large genomic clones, called bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs). Here, we review the important applications of BACs to imprinting research, covering physical mapping studies and the use of BACs as transgenes in mice to study gene expression patterns, to identify imprinting centres, and to isolate the consequences of altered gene dosage. We also highlight the significant and unique advantages that rapid BAC engineering brings to genomic imprinting research.

  7. Significance of genome-wide association studies in molecular anthropology.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vipin; Khadgawat, Rajesh; Sachdeva, Mohinder Pal

    2009-12-01

    The successful advent of a genome-wide approach in association studies raises the hopes of human geneticists for solving a genetic maze of complex traits especially the disorders. This approach, which is replete with the application of cutting-edge technology and supported by big science projects (like Human Genome Project; and even more importantly the International HapMap Project) and various important databases (SNP database, CNV database, etc.), has had unprecedented success in rapidly uncovering many of the genetic determinants of complex disorders. The magnitude of this approach in the genetics of classical anthropological variables like height, skin color, eye color, and other genome diversity projects has certainly expanded the horizons of molecular anthropology. Therefore, in this article we have proposed a genome-wide association approach in molecular anthropological studies by providing lessons from the exemplary study of the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium. We have also highlighted the importance and uniqueness of Indian population groups in facilitating the design and finding optimum solutions for other genome-wide association-related challenges.

  8. Genome-Wide Association Studies In Plant Pathosystems: Toward an Ecological Genomics Approach

    PubMed Central

    Bartoli, Claudia; Roux, Fabrice

    2017-01-01

    The emergence and re-emergence of plant pathogenic microorganisms are processes that imply perturbations in both host and pathogen ecological niches. Global change is largely assumed to drive the emergence of new etiological agents by altering the equilibrium of the ecological habitats which in turn places hosts more in contact with pathogen reservoirs. In this context, the number of epidemics is expected to increase dramatically in the next coming decades both in wild and crop plants. Under these considerations, the identification of the genetic variants underlying natural variation of resistance is a pre-requisite to estimate the adaptive potential of wild plant populations and to develop new breeding resistant cultivars. On the other hand, the prediction of pathogen's genetic determinants underlying disease emergence can help to identify plant resistance alleles. In the genomic era, whole genome sequencing combined with the development of statistical methods led to the emergence of Genome Wide Association (GWA) mapping, a powerful tool for detecting genomic regions associated with natural variation of disease resistance in both wild and cultivated plants. However, GWA mapping has been less employed for the detection of genetic variants associated with pathogenicity in microbes. Here, we reviewed GWA studies performed either in plants or in pathogenic microorganisms (bacteria, fungi and oomycetes). In addition, we highlighted the benefits and caveats of the emerging joint GWA mapping approach that allows for the simultaneous identification of genes interacting between genomes of both partners. Finally, based on co-evolutionary processes in wild populations, we highlighted a phenotyping-free joint GWA mapping approach as a promising tool for describing the molecular landscape underlying plant - microbe interactions. PMID:28588588

  9. Genome-Wide Association Studies with a Genomic Relationship Matrix: A Case Study with Wheat and Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Gianola, Daniel; Fariello, Maria I.; Naya, Hugo; Schön, Chris-Carolin

    2016-01-01

    Standard genome-wide association studies (GWAS) scan for relationships between each of p molecular markers and a continuously distributed target trait. Typically, a marker-based matrix of genomic similarities among individuals (G) is constructed, to account more properly for the covariance structure in the linear regression model used. We show that the generalized least-squares estimator of the regression of phenotype on one or on m markers is invariant with respect to whether or not the marker(s) tested is(are) used for building G, provided variance components are unaffected by exclusion of such marker(s) from G. The result is arrived at by using a matrix expression such that one can find many inverses of genomic relationship, or of phenotypic covariance matrices, stemming from removing markers tested as fixed, but carrying out a single inversion. When eigenvectors of the genomic relationship matrix are used as regressors with fixed regression coefficients, e.g., to account for population stratification, their removal from G does matter. Removal of eigenvectors from G can have a noticeable effect on estimates of genomic and residual variances, so caution is needed. Concepts were illustrated using genomic data on 599 wheat inbred lines, with grain yield as target trait, and on close to 200 Arabidopsis thaliana accessions. PMID:27520956

  10. Pfh1 Is an Accessory Replicative Helicase that Interacts with the Replisome to Facilitate Fork Progression and Preserve Genome Integrity

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Karin R.; Pourbozorgi-Langroudi, Parham; Cristea, Ileana M.; Zakian, Virginia A.; Capra, John A.; Sabouri, Nasim

    2016-01-01

    Replicative DNA helicases expose the two strands of the double helix to the replication apparatus, but accessory helicases are often needed to help forks move past naturally occurring hard-to-replicate sites, such as tightly bound proteins, RNA/DNA hybrids, and DNA secondary structures. Although the Schizosaccharomyces pombe 5’-to-3’ DNA helicase Pfh1 is known to promote fork progression, its genomic targets, dynamics, and mechanisms of action are largely unknown. Here we address these questions by integrating genome-wide identification of Pfh1 binding sites, comprehensive analysis of the effects of Pfh1 depletion on replication and DNA damage, and proteomic analysis of Pfh1 interaction partners by immunoaffinity purification mass spectrometry. Of the 621 high confidence Pfh1-binding sites in wild type cells, about 40% were sites of fork slowing (as marked by high DNA polymerase occupancy) and/or DNA damage (as marked by high levels of phosphorylated H2A). The replication and integrity of tRNA and 5S rRNA genes, highly transcribed RNA polymerase II genes, and nucleosome depleted regions were particularly Pfh1-dependent. The association of Pfh1 with genomic integrity at highly transcribed genes was S phase dependent, and thus unlikely to be an artifact of high transcription rates. Although Pfh1 affected replication and suppressed DNA damage at discrete sites throughout the genome, Pfh1 and the replicative DNA polymerase bound to similar extents to both Pfh1-dependent and independent sites, suggesting that Pfh1 is proximal to the replication machinery during S phase. Consistent with this interpretation, Pfh1 co-purified with many key replisome components, including the hexameric MCM helicase, replicative DNA polymerases, RPA, and the processivity clamp PCNA in an S phase dependent manner. Thus, we conclude that Pfh1 is an accessory DNA helicase that interacts with the replisome and promotes replication and suppresses DNA damage at hard-to-replicate sites. These

  11. Human genome research and the public interest: Progress notes from an American Science Policy Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Juengst, E.T. )

    1994-01-01

    This essay reviews the efforts of the US Human Genome Project to anticipate and address the ethical, legal, and social implications of new advances in human genetics. Since 1990, approximately $10 million has been awarded by the National Institutes of Health and the DOE, in support of 65 research, education, and public discussion projects. These projects address four major areas of need: (1) the need for both client-centered assessments of new genetic services and for improved knowledge of the psychosocial and ethnocultural factors that shape clients' clinical genetic experiences; (2) the need for clear professional policies regarding human-subject research, clinical practical standards, and public health goals in human genetics; (3) the need for social policy protection against unfair access to and use of personal genetic information; (4) the need for improved public and professional understanding and discussion of these issues. The Human Genome Project's goal is to have defined, by 1995, policy options and programs capable of addressing these needs. 47 refs.

  12. Recent Progress in Presolar Grain Studies

    PubMed Central

    Amari, Sachiko

    2014-01-01

    Presolar grains are stardust that condensed in stellar outflows or stellar ejecta, and was incorporated in meteorites. They remain mostly intact throughout the journey from stars to the earth, keeping information of their birthplaces. Studies of presolar grains, which started in 1987, have produced a wealth of information about nucleosynthesis in stars, mixing in stellar ejecta, and temporal variations of isotopic and elemental abundances in the Galaxy. Recent instrumental advancements in secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) brought about the identification of presolar silicate grains. Isotopic and mineralogical investigations of sub-μm grains have been performed using a combination of SIMS, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and focused ion beam (FIB) techniques. Two instruments have been developed to study even smaller grains (∼50 nm) and measure isotopes and elements of lower abundances than those in previous studies. PMID:26819886

  13. Recent Progress in Presolar Grain Studies.

    PubMed

    Amari, Sachiko

    2014-01-01

    Presolar grains are stardust that condensed in stellar outflows or stellar ejecta, and was incorporated in meteorites. They remain mostly intact throughout the journey from stars to the earth, keeping information of their birthplaces. Studies of presolar grains, which started in 1987, have produced a wealth of information about nucleosynthesis in stars, mixing in stellar ejecta, and temporal variations of isotopic and elemental abundances in the Galaxy. Recent instrumental advancements in secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) brought about the identification of presolar silicate grains. Isotopic and mineralogical investigations of sub-μm grains have been performed using a combination of SIMS, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and focused ion beam (FIB) techniques. Two instruments have been developed to study even smaller grains (∼50 nm) and measure isotopes and elements of lower abundances than those in previous studies.

  14. Structure and Functional Studies on Dengue-2 Virus Genome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-01

    AD STRUCTURE AND FUNCTIONAL STUDIES ON DENGUE -2 VIRUS GENOME FINAL Report Lfl C’) Radha Krishnan Padmanabhan, Ph.D. 0) March 1, 1986 Supported by U.S...and Functional Studies on Dengue -2 Virus Genome 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Radha Krishnan Padmanabhan 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14. DATE OF...3’-end of Dengue RNA in order to facilitate cDNA synthesis by oligo d(T) priming as proposed in the original research project. 2. We also showed that

  15. Structure and Functional Studies on Dengue-2 Virus Genome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-01

    AD_ _ _ Lfl oSTRUCTURE AND FUNCTIONAL STUDIES ON DENGUE -2 VIRUS GENOME 0Annual Report Radha Krishnan Padmanabhan, Ph.D. March 1, 1986 Supported by...Studies on Dengue -2 Virus Genome 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Radha Krishnan Padmanabhan 13a TYPE OF REPORT 1 3b TIME COVERED 14 DATE OF REPORT (Year, Month, Day...analysis of these clones totalling 06 01 14,586 nucleotides: Deduced amino acid sequences of dengue virI 19 ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse of

  16. Coordination: Southeast Continental Shelf studies. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Menzel, D.W.

    1981-02-01

    An overview of the Oceanograhic Program of Skidaway Institute of Oceanograhy is presented. Included are the current five year plan for studies of the Southeast Continental Shelf, a summary of research accomplishments, proposed research for 1981-1982, current status of the Savannah Navigational Light Tower, and a list of publications. (ACR)

  17. Black walnut progeny study: a progress report

    Treesearch

    F. Bryan Clark

    1963-01-01

    Black walnut (Juglans nigra L.) timber varies more in value and quality than any other hardwood species native to the Central States. While much of the quality variation can be attributed to environment, there is little doubt that part of the variation is due to inherent characteristics. In 1961 a study was undertaken by the Central States Forest Experiment Station of...

  18. Progression or Resolution of Coxsackievirus B4-Induced Pancreatitis: a Genomic Analysis†

    PubMed Central

    Ostrowski, Stephanie E.; Reilly, Andrew A.; Collins, Doris N.; Ramsingh, Arlene I.

    2004-01-01

    Group B coxsackieviruses are associated with chronic inflammatory diseases of the pancreas, heart, and central nervous system. Chronic pancreatitis, which can develop from acute pancreatitis, is considered a premalignant disorder because it is a major risk factor for pancreatic cancer. To explore the genetic events underlying the progression of acute to chronic disease, a comparative analysis of global gene expression during coxsackievirus B4-induced acute and chronic pancreatitis was undertaken. A key feature of acute pancreatitis that resolved was tissue regeneration, which was accompanied by increased expression of genes involved in cell growth, inhibition of apoptosis, and embryogenesis and by increased division of acinar cells. Acute pancreatitis that progressed to chronic pancreatitis was characterized by lack of tissue repair, and the expression map highlighted genes involved in apoptosis, acinoductular metaplasia, remodeling of the extracellular matrix, and fibrosis. Furthermore, immune responses appeared skewed toward development of alternatively activated (M2) macrophages and T helper 2 (Th2) cells during disease that resolved and toward classically activated (M1) macrophages and Th1 cells during disease that progressed. Our hypothesis is that growth and differentiation signals coupled with the M2/Th2 milieu favor acinar cell proliferation, while diminished growth signals and the M1/Th1 milieu favor apoptosis of acinar cells and remodeling/proliferation of the extracellular matrix, resulting in fibrosis. PMID:15254194

  19. Advances in genome studies in plants and animals.

    PubMed

    Appels, R; Nystrom-Persson, J; Keeble-Gagnere, G

    2014-03-01

    The area of plant and animal genomics covers the entire suite of issues in biology because it aims to determine the structure and function of genetic material. Although specific issues define research advances at an organism level, it is evident that many of the fundamental features of genome structure and the translation of encoded information to function share common ground. The Plant and Animal Genome (PAG) conference held in San Diego (California), in January each year provides an overview across all organisms at the genome level, and often it is evident that investments in the human area provide leadership, applications, and discoveries for researchers studying other organisms. This mini-review utilizes the plenary lectures as a basis for summarizing the trends in the genome-level studies of organisms, and the lectures include presentations by Ewan Birney (EBI, UK), Eric Green (NIH, USA), John Butler (NIST, USA), Elaine Mardis (Washington, USA), Caroline Dean (John Innes Centre, UK), Trudy Mackay (NC State University, USA), Sue Wessler (UC Riverside, USA), and Patrick Wincker (Genoscope, France). The work reviewed is based on published papers. Where unpublished information is cited, permission to include the information in this manuscript was obtained from the presenters.

  20. Genome-wide approaches to studying yeast chromatin modifications.

    PubMed

    Schones, Dustin E; Cui, Kairong; Cuddapah, Suresh

    2011-01-01

    The genomes of eukaryotic organisms are packaged into nuclei by wrapping DNA around proteins in a structure known as chromatin. The most basic unit of chromatin, the nucleosome, consists of approximately 146 bp of DNA wrapped around an octamer of histone proteins. The placement of nucleosomes relative to a gene can influence the regulation of the transcription of this gene. Furthermore, the N-terminal tails of histone proteins are subjected to numerous post-translational modifications that are also known to influence gene regulation. In recent years, a number of genome-scale approaches to identify modifications to chromatin have been developed. Techniques combining chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) with microarrays (ChIP-chip) and second-generation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) have led to great advances in our understanding of how chromatin modifications contribute to gene regulation. Many excellent protocols related to ChIP-chip have been published recently (Lieb, J. D. (2003) Genome-wide mapping of protein-DNA interactions by chromatin immunoprecipitation and DNA microarray hybridization. Methods Mol. Biol. 224, 99-109.). For this reason, we will focus our attention here on the application of second-generation sequencing platforms to the study of chromatin modifications in yeast. As these genome-scale experiments require both wet-lab and bioinformatic components to reach their full potential, we will detail both the wet-lab protocols and bioinformatic steps necessary to fully conduct genome-scale studies of chromatin modifications.

  1. Integrated genome-based studies of Shewanella Ecophysiology

    SciTech Connect

    Tiedje, James M.; Konstantinidis, Kostas; Worden, Mark

    2014-01-08

    The aim of the work reported is to study Shewanella population genomics, and to understand the evolution, ecophysiology, and speciation of Shewanella. The tasks supporting this aim are: to study genetic and ecophysiological bases defining the core and diversification of Shewanella species; to determine gene content patterns along redox gradients; and to Investigate the evolutionary processes, patterns and mechanisms of Shewanella.

  2. Genome-wide association study identifies 14 novel risk alleles associated with basal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chahal, Harvind S.; Wu, Wenting; Ransohoff, Katherine J.; Yang, Lingyao; Hedlin, Haley; Desai, Manisha; Lin, Yuan; Dai, Hong-Ji; Qureshi, Abrar A.; Li, Wen-Qing; Kraft, Peter; Hinds, David A.; Tang, Jean Y.; Han, Jiali; Sarin, Kavita Y.

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common cancer worldwide with an annual incidence of 2.8 million cases in the United States alone. Previous studies have demonstrated an association between 21 distinct genetic loci and BCC risk. Here, we report the results of a two-stage genome-wide association study of BCC, totalling 17,187 cases and 287,054 controls. We confirm 17 previously reported loci and identify 14 new susceptibility loci reaching genome-wide significance (P<5 × 10−8, logistic regression). These newly associated SNPs lie within predicted keratinocyte regulatory elements and in expression quantitative trait loci; furthermore, we identify candidate genes and non-coding RNAs involved in telomere maintenance, immune regulation and tumour progression, providing deeper insight into the pathogenesis of BCC. PMID:27539887

  3. Using high-throughput genomics to study hepatitis C: what determines the outcome of infection?

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Kathie-Anne; Katze, Michael G.

    2009-01-01

    High-throughput genomics methods are now being used to study a wide variety of viral diseases, in an effort to understand how host responses to infection can lead either to efficient elimination of the pathogen or the development of severe disease. This article reviews how gene expression studies are addressing important clinical issues related to hepatitis C virus infection, in which some 15–25% of infected individuals are able to clear the virus without treatment, while the remainder progress to chronic liver disease that can lead to cirrhosis and death. Similar methods are also being used in an effort to identify the mechanisms underlying the failure of some hepatitis C patients to respond to interferon-α/ribavirin therapy. By providing a detailed picture of virus-host interactions, high-throughput genomics could potentially lead to the identification of novel cellular targets for the treatment of hepatitis C. PMID:19135090

  4. ICPP water inventory study progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, B.T.

    1993-05-01

    Recent data from the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) indicate that water is entering the sumps located in the bottom of Tank Firm Vaults in quantities that exceed expected levels. In addition, perched water body(s) exist beneath the northern portion of the ICPP. Questions have been raised concerning the origin of water entering the Tank Farm sumps and the recharge sources for the perched water bodies. Therefore, in an effort to determine the source of water, a project has been initiated to identify the source of water for Tank Farm sumps and the perched water bodies. In addition, an accurate water balance for the ICPP will be developed. The purpose of this report is to present the specific results and conclusions for the ICPP water balance portion of the study. In addition, the status of the other activities being conducted as part of study, along with the associated action plans, is provided.

  5. Progress Report: Pressure Vessel Burst Test Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-08-01

    report is provided on a program developed to study through test and analysis, the characteristics of blast waves and fragmentation generated by ruptured ...vessels were composite overwrapped pressure vessels ( COPV ) and were cut with a shaped charge (no groove) around its center. The burst location on the...and the shaped charge cut area (shown with dotted lines). BURST INITIATION Longitudinal stress in the circumferential grooves (for developing axial

  6. Progress report on nuclear spectroscopic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, C.R.; Guidry, M.W.; Riedinger, L.L.; Sorensen, S.P.

    1994-02-18

    The Nuclear Physics group at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) is involved in several aspects of heavy-ion physics including both nuclear structure and reaction mechanisms. While the main emphasis is on experimental problems, the authors have maintained a strong collaboration with several theorists in order to best pursue the physics of their measurements. During the last year they have had several experiments at the ATLAS at Argonne National Laboratory, the GAMMASPHERE at the LBL 88 Cyclotron, and with the NORDBALL at the Niels Bohr Institute Tandem. Also, they continue to be very active in the WA93/98 collaboration studying ultra-relativistic heavy ion physics utilizing the SPS accelerator at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland and in the PHENIX Collaboration at the RHIC accelerator under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. During the last year their experimental work has been in three broad areas: (1) the structure of nuclei at high angular momentum, (2) the structure of nuclei far from stability, and (3) ultra-relativistic heavy-ion physics. The results of studies in these particular areas are described in this document. These studies concentrate on the structure of nuclear matter in extreme conditions of rotational motion, imbalance of neutrons and protons, or very high temperature and density. Another area of research is heavy-ion-induced transfer reactions, which utilize the transfer of nucleons to states with high angular momentum to learn about their structure and to understand the transfer of particles, energy, and angular momentum in collisions between heavy ions.

  7. Progress report on the sea lamprey study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Oosten, John

    1949-01-01

    SUMMARY: The Peromyscus leucopus on a 17-acre study area were live-trapped, marked, and released over a seven-day period. On the three following nights intensive snap-trapping was done on the central acre of the study plot. The animals caught by snap traps in the central acre represented the population of the central acre and several surrounding acres. By the currently accepted methods of interpreting snap-trap data, the population per acre would be considered to be 23 adults. The live-trap data show that the true population was between six and seven adults per acre. Modern methods of live-trapping are shown to be valid for population studies. Two methods are presented for the conversion of live-trap data into per acre figures. Errors involved in the current use of snap-trap data are discussed and snap-trap methods are shown to be invalid for determining actual population numbers. It should be practical to use a snap-trap quadrant technique to obtain a relative measure or index figure for small mammal populations.

  8. Towards a Quantitative Endogenous Network Theory of Cancer Genesis and Progression: beyond ``cancer as diseases of genome''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ao, Ping

    2011-03-01

    There has been a tremendous progress in cancer research. However, it appears the current dominant cancer research framework of regarding cancer as diseases of genome leads impasse. Naturally questions have been asked that whether it is possible to develop alternative frameworks such that they can connect both to mutations and other genetic/genomic effects and to environmental factors. Furthermore, such framework can be made quantitative and with predictions experimentally testable. In this talk, I will present a positive answer to this calling. I will explain on our construction of endogenous network theory based on molecular-cellular agencies as dynamical variable. Such cancer theory explicitly demonstrates a profound connection to many fundamental concepts in physics, as such stochastic non-equilibrium processes, ``energy'' landscape, metastability, etc. It suggests that neneath cancer's daunting complexity may lie a simplicity that gives grounds for hope. The rationales behind such theory, its predictions, and its initial experimental verifications will be presented. Supported by USA NIH and China NSF.

  9. Improving livestock for agriculture - technological progress from random transgenesis to precision genome editing heralds a new era.

    PubMed

    Laible, Götz; Wei, Jingwei; Wagner, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Humans have a long history in shaping the genetic makeup of livestock to optimize production and meet growing human demands for food and other animal products. Until recently, this has only been possible through traditional breeding and selection, which is a painstakingly slow process of accumulating incremental gains over a long period. The development of transgenic livestock technology offers a more direct approach with the possibility for making genetic improvements with greater impact and within a single generation. However, initially the technology was hampered by technical difficulties and limitations, which have now largely been overcome by progressive improvements over the past 30 years. Particularly, the advent of genome editing in combination with homologous recombination has added a new level of efficiency and precision that holds much promise for the genetic improvement of livestock using the increasing knowledge of the phenotypic impact of genetic sequence variants. So far not a single line of transgenic livestock has gained approval for commercialization. The step change to genome-edited livestock with precise sequence changes may accelerate the path to market, provided applications of this new technology for agriculture can deliver, in addition to economic incentives for producers, also compelling benefits for animals, consumers, and the environment.

  10. Gene-Environment Interactions in Genome-Wide Association Studies: Current Approaches and New Directions

    PubMed Central

    Winham, Stacey J; Biernacka, Joanna M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Complex psychiatric traits have long been thought to be the result of a combination of genetic and environmental factors, and gene-environment interactions are thought to play a crucial role in behavioral phenotypes and the susceptibility and progression of psychiatric disorders. Candidate gene studies to investigate hypothesized gene-environment interactions are now fairly common in human genetic research, and with the shift towards genome-wide association studies, genome-wide gene-environment interaction studies are beginning to emerge. Methods We summarize the basic ideas behind gene-environment interaction, and provide an overview of possible study designs and traditional analysis methods in the context of genome-wide analysis. We then discuss novel approaches beyond the traditional strategy of analyzing the interaction between the environmental factor and each polymorphism individually. Results Two-step filtering approaches that reduce the number of polymorphisms tested for interactions can substantially increase the power of genome-wide gene-environment studies. New analytical methods including data-mining approaches, and gene-level and pathway-level analyses, also have the capacity to improve our understanding of how complex genetic and environmental factors interact to influence psychological and psychiatric traits. Such methods, however, have not yet been utilized much in behavioral and mental health research. Conclusions Although methods to investigate gene-environment interactions are available, there is a need for further development and extension of these methods to identify gene-environment interactions in the context of genome-wide association studies. These novel approaches need to be applied in studies of psychology and psychiatry. PMID:23808649

  11. [Laser enhanced chemical reaction studies]. [Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    Experimental studies of dynamic molecular processes are described with particular emphasis on the use of a powerful infrared diode laser probe technique developed in our laboratory. This technique allows us to determine the final states of CO{sub 2} (and other molecules) produced by collisions, photofragmentation, or chemical reactions with a spectral resolution of 0.0003 cm{sup {minus}1} and a time resolution of 10{sup {minus}7} sec. Such high spectral resolution provides a detailed picture of the vibrational and rotational states of molecules produced by these dynamic events. We have used this experimental method to probe collisions between hot hydrogen/deuterium atoms and CO{sub 2}, between O({sup 1}D) atoms and CO{sub 2}, to study the final states of DC1 molecules produced as a result of the reactions of hot Cl atoms, and to investigate the dynamics of the reaction between OH and CO molecules. Advances in our techniques over the past two years have allowed us to identify and study more than 200 final rotational states in ten different vibrational levels of CO{sub 2} encompassing all 3 normal modes, many overtones, and combination states of the molecule. We have extended the technique to probe a variety of new molecules such as OCS, N{sub 2}O, DCl, and CS{sub 2}. All of this work is aimed at providing experimental tests for polyatomic molecule potential energy surfaces, chemical transition states in complex systems, and theories of reaction dynamic in molecules with more than 3 atoms.

  12. Progress report on nuclear spectroscopic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, C.R.; Riedinger, L.L.; Sorensen, S.P.

    1996-01-16

    The experimental program in nuclear physics at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, is led by Professors Carrol Bingham, Lee Riedinger, and Soren Sorenseni who respectively lead the studies of the exotic decay modes of nuclei far from stability, the program of high-spin research, and our effort in relativistic heavy-ion physics. Over the years, this broad program of research has been successful partially because of the shared University resources applied to this group effort. The proximity of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has allowed us to build extremely strong programs of joint research, and in addition to play an important leadership role in the Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research (JIHIR). Our experimental program is also very closely linked with those at other national laboratories: Argonne (collaborations involving the Fragment Mass Analyzer (FMA) and {gamma}-ray arrays), Brookhaven (the RHIC and Phenix projects), and Berkeley (GAMMASPHERE). We have worked closely with a variety of university groups in the last three years, especially those in the UNISOR and now UNIRIB collaborations. And, in all aspects of our program, we have maintained close collaborations with theorists, both to inspire the most exciting experiments to perform and to extract the pertinent physics from the results. The specific areas discussed in this report are: properties of high-spin states; study of low-energy levels of nuclei far from stability; and high energy heavy-ion physics.

  13. Accurate Computation of Survival Statistics in Genome-Wide Studies

    PubMed Central

    Vandin, Fabio; Papoutsaki, Alexandra; Raphael, Benjamin J.; Upfal, Eli

    2015-01-01

    A key challenge in genomics is to identify genetic variants that distinguish patients with different survival time following diagnosis or treatment. While the log-rank test is widely used for this purpose, nearly all implementations of the log-rank test rely on an asymptotic approximation that is not appropriate in many genomics applications. This is because: the two populations determined by a genetic variant may have very different sizes; and the evaluation of many possible variants demands highly accurate computation of very small p-values. We demonstrate this problem for cancer genomics data where the standard log-rank test leads to many false positive associations between somatic mutations and survival time. We develop and analyze a novel algorithm, Exact Log-rank Test (ExaLT), that accurately computes the p-value of the log-rank statistic under an exact distribution that is appropriate for any size populations. We demonstrate the advantages of ExaLT on data from published cancer genomics studies, finding significant differences from the reported p-values. We analyze somatic mutations in six cancer types from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), finding mutations with known association to survival as well as several novel associations. In contrast, standard implementations of the log-rank test report dozens-hundreds of likely false positive associations as more significant than these known associations. PMID:25950620

  14. Genome Wide Association Study of Sepsis in Extremely Premature Infants

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Lakshmi; Page, Grier; Kirpalani, Haresh; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Das, Abhik; Higgins, Rosemary D.; Carlo, Waldemar A.; Bell, Edward F.; Goldberg, Ronald N.; Schibler, Kurt; Sood, Beena G.; Stevenson, David K.; Stoll, Barbara J.; Van Meurs, Krisa P.; Johnson, Karen J.; Levy, Joshua; McDonald, Scott A.; Zaterka-Baxter, Kristin M.; Kennedy, Kathleen A.; Sánchez, Pablo J.; Duara, Shahnaz; Walsh, Michele C.; Shankaran, Seetha; Wynn, James L.; Cotten, C. Michael

    2017-01-01

    Objective To identify genetic variants associated with sepsis (early and late-onset) using a genome wide association (GWA) analysis in a cohort of extremely premature infants. Study Design Previously generated GWA data from the Neonatal Research Network’s anonymized genomic database biorepository of extremely premature infants were used for this study. Sepsis was defined as culture-positive early-onset or late-onset sepsis or culture-proven meningitis. Genomic and whole genome amplified DNA was genotyped for 1.2 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs); 91% of SNPs were successfully genotyped. We imputed 7.2 million additional SNPs. P values and false discovery rates were calculated from multivariate logistic regression analysis adjusting for gender, gestational age and ancestry. Target statistical value was p<10−5. Secondary analyses assessed associations of SNPs with pathogen type. Pathway analyses were also run on primary and secondary end points. Results Data from 757 extremely premature infants were included: 351 infants with sepsis and 406 infants without sepsis. No SNPs reached genome-wide significance levels (5×10−8); two SNPs in proximity to FOXC2 and FOXL1 genes achieved target levels of significance. In secondary analyses, SNPs for ELMO1, IRAK2 (Gram positive sepsis), RALA, IMMP2L (Gram negative sepsis) and PIEZO2 (fungal sepsis) met target significance levels. Pathways associated with sepsis and Gram negative sepsis included gap junctions, fibroblast growth factor receptors, regulators of cell division and Interleukin-1 associated receptor kinase 2 (p values<0.001 and FDR<20%). Conclusions No SNPs met genome-wide significance in this cohort of ELBW infants; however, areas of potential association and pathways meriting further study were identified. PMID:28283553

  15. Analysis of potential genomic confounding in genetic association studies and an online genomic confounding browser (GCB).

    PubMed

    Raistrick, Christopher A; Alharbi, Khalid K; Day, Ian N M; Gaunt, Tom R

    2011-11-01

    Genome-wide association studies have transformed genetic studies of disease susceptibility, identifying many variants that may tag functional polymorphism nearby. Variants are often ascribed to a physically close gene exhibiting plausible functionality for a causal pathway. However, more physically remote genes may be at a lesser linkage or linkage disequilibrium (LD) distance from the tested SNP and could therefore contain the functional variant tagged. This analysis aims to identify instances where research may be misled by misassociation of a variant with a gene and develop tools to analyse genomic confounding. A catalogue of reported associations was systematically analysed for unreported genes which may represent the true functionality ascribed to a reported variant, calculating physical and genetic distances for all genes within 1 cM of the tagging polymorphism. Results revealed 55 SNPs where recombination was lower between the identified SNP and a physically more remote gene than initially reported, and 374 where an alternative gene was genetically and physically closer than the reported gene. Analyses show potential for genomic confounding through false inferences of variant association to a gene. An online visualization tool (http://gcb.genes.org.uk/) was developed to plot genes by physical and genetic distance relative to a variant, along with LD data. © 2011 The Authors Annals of Human Genetics © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/University College London.

  16. Machine learning in genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Szymczak, Silke; Biernacka, Joanna M; Cordell, Heather J; González-Recio, Oscar; König, Inke R; Zhang, Heping; Sun, Yan V

    2009-01-01

    Recently, genome-wide association studies have substantially expanded our knowledge about genetic variants that influence the susceptibility to complex diseases. Although standard statistical tests for each single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) separately are able to capture main genetic effects, different approaches are necessary to identify SNPs that influence disease risk jointly or in complex interactions. Experimental and simulated genome-wide SNP data provided by the Genetic Analysis Workshop 16 afforded an opportunity to analyze the applicability and benefit of several machine learning methods. Penalized regression, ensemble methods, and network analyses resulted in several new findings while known and simulated genetic risk variants were also identified. In conclusion, machine learning approaches are promising complements to standard single-and multi-SNP analysis methods for understanding the overall genetic architecture of complex human diseases. However, because they are not optimized for genome-wide SNP data, improved implementations and new variable selection procedures are required. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Modeling tumor progression by the sequential introduction of genetic alterations into the genome of human normal cells.

    PubMed

    Zecchin, Davide; Arena, Sabrina; Martini, Miriam; Sassi, Francesco; Pisacane, Alberto; Di Nicolantonio, Federica; Bardelli, Alberto

    2013-02-01

    Cancer genomes display a complex blend of genetic lesions affecting oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Multiple modeling approaches indicate that 5-15 driver oncogenic events are required to achieve tumor progression in common epithelial cancers. In vitro, a lower number (2-3) of events is typically sufficient to achieve full transformation. We developed cellular models that closely resemble the occurrence of multiple genetic lesions to understand their role in tumor progression. Homologous recombination and transcriptional downregulation were used to recapitulate the co-occurrence of driver mutations targeting oncogenes and inactivation of tumor suppressor genes in human nontransformed epithelial cells. Knockdown of the tumor suppressor genes PTEN or RB1 was combined with mutagenic activation of individual oncogenes (EGFR, KRAS, BRAF, or PIK3CA), thus generating a combinatorial model. The simultaneous presence of oncogenic and tumor suppressive events resulted in distinct biochemical properties and anchorage-independent growth abilities. Notably, however, we found that even when up to four individual alterations were concomitantly present they were not sufficient to fully transform the target cells. Our results suggest that the close recapitulation of cancer lesions in not-transformed cells is essential to unveil their oncogenic potential and raise questions concerning the minimal requirements for neoplastic transformation of epithelial cells. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Population Genetics, Evolutionary Genomics, and Genome-Wide Studies of Malaria: A View across the International Centers of Excellence for Malaria Research

    PubMed Central

    Carlton, Jane M.; Volkman, Sarah K.; Uplekar, Swapna; Hupalo, Daniel N.; Alves, João Marcelo Pereira; Cui, Liwang; Donnelly, Martin; Roos, David S.; Harb, Omar S.; Acosta, Monica; Read, Andrew; Ribolla, Paulo E. M.; Singh, Om P.; Valecha, Neena; Wassmer, Samuel C.; Ferreira, Marcelo; Escalante, Ananias A.

    2015-01-01

    The study of the three protagonists in malaria—the Plasmodium parasite, the Anopheles mosquito, and the human host—is key to developing methods to control and eventually eliminate the disease. Genomic technologies, including the recent development of next-generation sequencing, enable interrogation of this triangle to an unprecedented level of scrutiny, and promise exciting progress toward real-time epidemiology studies and the study of evolutionary adaptation. We discuss the use of genomics by the International Centers of Excellence for Malaria Research, a network of field sites and laboratories in malaria-endemic countries that undertake cutting-edge research, training, and technology transfer in malarious countries of the world. PMID:26259940

  19. Modeling Grade Progression In An Active Surveillance Study

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Lurdes Y.T.; Trock, Bruce J.; Partin, Alan W.; Carter, H. Ballentine; Etzioni, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer grade, assessed with the Gleason score, describes how abnormal the tumor tissue and cells appear and it is an important prognostic indicator of disease progression. Whether prostate tumors change grade is a question that has implications for screening and treatment. Empirical data on tumor grade over time have become available from men biopsied regularly as part of active surveillance (AS). However, biopsy grade is subject to misclassification. In this article we develop a model that allows for estimation of the time of grade change while accounting for the misclassification error from biopsy grade. We use misclassification rates from studies of prostate cancer biopsies followed by radical prostatectomy. Estimation of the transition times from true low-grade to high-grade disease is conducted within a Bayesian framework. We apply our model to serial observations on biopsy grade among 627 cases enrolled in a cohort of AS patients at Johns Hopkins University who were biopsied annually and referred to treatment if there was any evidence of disease progression on biopsy. We consider different prior distributions for the time to true grade progression. The estimated likelihood of grade progression within 10 years of study entry ranges from 12% to 24% depending on the prior. We conclude that knowledge of rates of grade misclassification allows for determination of true grade progression rates among men with serial biopsies on AS. While our results are sensitive to prior specifications they indicate that in a non-trivial fraction of the patient population, tumor grade can progress. PMID:24123208

  20. Modeling grade progression in an active surveillance study.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Lurdes Y T; Trock, Bruce J; Partin, Alan W; Carter, Herbert B; Etzioni, Ruth

    2014-03-15

    Prostate cancer grade, assessed with the Gleason score, describes how abnormal the tumor tissue and cells appear, and it is an important prognostic indicator of disease progression. Whether prostate tumors change grade is a question that has implications for screening and treatment. Empirical data on tumor grade over time have become available from men biopsied regularly as part of active surveillance (AS). However, biopsy (BX) grade is subject to misclassification. In this article, we develop a model that allows for estimation of the time of grade change while accounting for the misclassification error from BX grade. We use misclassification rates from studies of prostate cancer BXs followed by radical prostatectomy. Estimation of the transition times from true low-grade to high-grade disease is conducted within a Bayesian framework. We apply our model to serial observations on BX grade among 627 cases enrolled in a cohort of AS patients at Johns Hopkins University who were biopsied annually and referred to treatment if there was any evidence of disease progression on BX. We consider different prior distributions for the time to true grade progression. The estimated likelihood of grade progression within 10 years of study entry ranges from 12% to 24% depending on the prior. We conclude that knowledge of rates of grade misclassification allows for determination of true grade progression rates among men with serial BXs on AS. Although our results are sensitive to prior specifications, they indicate that in a nontrivial fraction of the patient population, tumor grade can progress.

  1. Listeria Genomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabanes, Didier; Sousa, Sandra; Cossart, Pascale

    The opportunistic intracellular foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes has become a paradigm for the study of host-pathogen interactions and bacterial adaptation to mammalian hosts. Analysis of L. monocytogenes infection has provided considerable insight into how bacteria invade cells, move intracellularly, and disseminate in tissues, as well as tools to address fundamental processes in cell biology. Moreover, the vast amount of knowledge that has been gathered through in-depth comparative genomic analyses and in vivo studies makes L. monocytogenes one of the most well-studied bacterial pathogens. This chapter provides an overview of progress in the exploration of genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic data in Listeria spp. to understand genome evolution and diversity, as well as physiological aspects of metabolism used by bacteria when growing in diverse environments, in particular in infected hosts.

  2. A super powerful method for genome wide association study

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Genome-Wide Association Studies shed light on the identification of genes underlying human diseases and agriculturally important traits. This potential has been shadowed by false positive findings. The Mixed Linear Model (MLM) method is flexible enough to simultaneously incorporate population struct...

  3. STUDIES IN LANGUAGE AND LANGUAGE BEHAVIOR. PROGRESS REPORT NO. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LANE, HARLAN L.

    THE FOUR STUDIES INCORPORATED IN THIS PROGRESS REPORT ATTEMPTED TO ANALYZE STABILIZED LANGUAGE PROCESSES AND TO EXAMINE THE COMPONENTS OF LANGUAGE PERFORMANCE, RANGING FROM SYSTEMATIC PHONETICS TO LOGICAL DISCOURSE. THE FIRST STUDY REPORTED WORK ON HUMAN AUDITORY SENSITIVITY AS A FUNCTION OF FREQUENCY AND INTENSITY. THE NEXT TWO STUDIES WERE…

  4. Evaluation of the National Assessment of Educational Progress. Study Reports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckendahl, Chad W.; Davis, Susan L.; Plake, Barbara S.; Sireci, Stephen G.; Hambleton, Ronald K.; Zenisky, April L.; Wells, Craig S.

    2009-01-01

    The "Evaluation of the National Assessment of Educational Progress: Study Reports" describes the special studies that comprised the design of the evaluation. In the Final Report, the authors presented a practical discussion of the evaluation studies to its primary, intended audience, namely policymakers. On this accompanying CD, readers…

  5. Patella malalignment, pain and patellofemoral progression: The Health ABC Study

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, DJ; Zhang, YQ; Niu, JB; Felson, DT; Kwoh, K; Newman, A; Kritchevsky, S; Harris, T; Carbone, L; Nevitt, M

    2007-01-01

    Objective Patellofemoral (PF) joint OA is strongly correlated with lower extremity disability and knee pain. Risk factors for pain and structural progression in patellofemoral OA are poorly understood. Our objective was to determine the association between patella malalignment and its relation to pain severity, and PF OA disease progression. Methods We conducted an analysis of data from the Health ABC knee OA study. Health ABC is a community based, multi-center cohort study of 3,075 Caucasian and Black men and women aged 70–79 at enrollment. Weight bearing skyline knee x-rays were obtained in a subset (595) of subjects, with and without knee pain, at year 2 and year 5 (mean follow-up 36 months). Films were read paired, and patellofemoral osteophytes (OST) and narrowing (JSN) were scored on a 0–3 scale using the OARSI atlas. We defined progression of PF OA as any increase in JSN score. 3 measures of patella malalignment were made: sulcus angle; patella tilt angle; and patella subluxation medially or laterally (bisect offset). Knee symptoms were assessed using a knee specific WOMAC knee pain subscale. We assessed the relationship between baseline patella malalignment and pain severity (linear regression for WOMAC) and compartment specific PF OA progression (logistic regression for dichotomous outcomes). We classified continuous measures of patella alignment into quartile groups. We performed multivariable adjusted logistic regression models, including age, gender and BMI to assess the relation of baseline patella alignment to the occurrence of PF JSN progression using generalized estimating equations. Results The subjects had a mean age 73.6 (SD 2.9), BMI 28.8 (SD 4.9), 40.3% male, and 46% were Black. Medial displacement of the patella predisposed to medial JSN progression; odds for each quartile 1, 1.2, 1.2, 2.2 (p for trend=0.03), whilst protecting from lateral JSN progression; odds for each quartile 1, 0.7, 0.6, 0.4 (p for trend=0.0004). Increasing patella

  6. Genome-Wide Association Study of HIV Whole Genome Sequences Validated using Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Power, Robert A.; Davaniah, Siva; Derache, Anne; Wilkinson, Eduan; Tanser, Frank; Pillay, Deenan; de Oliveira, Tulio

    2016-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have considerably advanced our understanding of human traits and diseases. With the increasing availability of whole genome sequences (WGS) for pathogens, it is important to establish whether GWAS of viral genomes could reveal important biological insights. Here we perform the first proof of concept viral GWAS examining drug resistance (DR), a phenotype with well understood genetics. Method We performed a GWAS of DR in a sample of 343 HIV subtype C patients failing 1st line antiretroviral treatment in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The majority and minority variants within each sequence were called using PILON, and GWAS was performed within PLINK. HIV WGS from patients failing on different antiretroviral treatments were compared to sequences derived from individuals naïve to the respective treatment. Results GWAS methodology was validated by identifying five associations on a genetic level that led to amino acid changes known to cause DR. Further, we highlighted the ability of GWAS to identify epistatic effects, identifying two replicable variants within amino acid 68 of the reverse transcriptase protein previously described as potential fitness compensatory mutations. A possible additional DR variant within amino acid 91 of the matrix region of the Gag protein was associated with tenofovir failure, highlighting GWAS’s ability to identify variants outside classical candidate genes. Our results also suggest a polygenic component to DR. Conclusions These results validate the applicability of GWAS to HIV WGS data even in relative small samples, and emphasise how high throughput sequencing can provide novel and clinically relevant insights. Further they suggested that for viruses like HIV, population structure was only minor concern compared to that seen in bacteria or parasite GWAS. Given the small genome length and reduced burden for multiple testing, this makes HIV an ideal candidate for GWAS. PMID:27677172

  7. Polygenic risk and the developmental progression to heavy, persistent smoking and nicotine dependence: evidence from a 4-decade longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Belsky, Daniel W; Moffitt, Terrie E; Baker, Timothy B; Biddle, Andrea K; Evans, James P; Harrington, HonaLee; Houts, Renate; Meier, Madeline; Sugden, Karen; Williams, Benjamin; Poulton, Richie; Caspi, Avshalom

    2013-05-01

    Genome-wide hypothesis-free discovery methods have identified loci that are associated with heavy smoking in adulthood. Research is needed to understand developmental processes that link newly discovered genetic risks with adult heavy smoking. To test how genetic risks discovered in genome-wide association studies of adult smoking influence the developmental progression of smoking behavior from initiation through conversion to daily smoking, progression to heavy smoking, nicotine dependence, and struggles with cessation. A 38-year, prospective, longitudinal study of a representative birth cohort. The Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study of New Zealand. The study included 1037 male and female participants. We assessed genetic risk with a multilocus genetic risk score. The genetic risk score was composed of single-nucleotide polymorphisms identified in 3 meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies of smoking quantity phenotypes. Smoking initiation, conversion to daily smoking, progression to heavy smoking, nicotine dependence (Fagerström Test of Nicotine Dependence), and cessation difficulties were evaluated at 8 assessments spanning the ages of 11 to 38 years. Genetic risk score was unrelated to smoking initiation. However, individuals at higher genetic risk were more likely to convert to daily smoking as teenagers, progressed more rapidly from smoking initiation to heavy smoking, persisted longer in smoking heavily, developed nicotine dependence more frequently, were more reliant on smoking to cope with stress, and were more likely to fail in their cessation attempts. Further analysis revealed that 2 adolescent developmental phenotypes-early conversion to daily smoking and rapid progression to heavy smoking-mediated associations between the genetic risk score and mature phenotypes of persistent heavy smoking, nicotine dependence, and cessation failure. The genetic risk score predicted smoking risk over and above family history. Initiatives

  8. A Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS) for Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; St. Julien, Krystal R.; Stevenson, David K.; Hoffmann, Thomas J.; Witte, John S.; Lazzeroni, Laura C.; Krasnow, Mark A.; Quaintance, Cecele C.; Oehlert, John W.; Jelliffe-Pawlowski, Laura L.; Gould, Jeffrey B.; Shaw, Gary M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Twin studies suggest that heritability of moderate-severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is 53% to 79%, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify genetic variants associated with the risk for BPD. METHODS: The discovery GWAS was completed on 1726 very low birth weight infants (gestational age = 250–296/7 weeks) who had a minimum of 3 days of intermittent positive pressure ventilation and were in the hospital at 36 weeks’ postmenstrual age. At 36 weeks’ postmenstrual age, moderate-severe BPD cases (n = 899) were defined as requiring continuous supplemental oxygen, whereas controls (n = 827) inhaled room air. An additional 795 comparable infants (371 cases, 424 controls) were a replication population. Genomic DNA from case and control newborn screening bloodspots was used for the GWAS. The replication study interrogated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified in the discovery GWAS and those within the HumanExome beadchip. RESULTS: Genotyping using genomic DNA was successful. We did not identify SNPs associated with BPD at the genome-wide significance level (5 × 10−8) and no SNP identified in previous studies reached statistical significance (Bonferroni-corrected P value threshold .0018). Pathway analyses were not informative. CONCLUSIONS: We did not identify genomic loci or pathways that account for the previously described heritability for BPD. Potential explanations include causal mutations that are genetic variants and were not assayed or are mapped to many distributed loci, inadequate sample size, race ethnicity of our study population, or case-control differences investigated are not attributable to underlying common genetic variation. PMID:23897914

  9. Genomic approaches to studying the human microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Weinstock, George M.

    2013-01-01

    The human body is colonized by a vast array of microbes, which form communities of bacteria, viruses and microbial eukaryotes that are specific to each anatomical environment. Every community must be studied as a whole because many organisms have never been cultured independently, and this poses formidable challenges. The advent of next-generation DNA sequencing has allowed more sophisticated analysis and sampling of these complex systems by culture-independent methods. These methods are revealing differences in community structure between anatomical sites, between individuals, and between healthy and diseased states, and are transforming our view of human biology. PMID:22972298

  10. Applying functional genomics research to the study of pig reproduction.

    PubMed

    Pomp, D; Caetano, A R; Bertani, G R; Gladney, C D; Johnson, R K

    2001-01-01

    Functional genomics is an experimental approach that incorporates genome-wide or system-wide experimentation, expanding the scope of biological investigation from studying single genes to studying potentially all genes at once in a systematic manner. This technology is highly appealing because of its high throughput and relatively low cost. Furthermore, analysis of gene expression using microarrays is likely to be more biologically relevant than the conventional paradigm of reductionism, because it has the potential to uncover new biological connections between genes and biochemical pathways. However, functional genomics is still in its infancy, especially with regard to the study of pig reproduction. Currently, efforts are centred on developing the necessary resources to enable high throughput evaluation and comparison of gene expression. However, it is clear that in the near future functional genomics will be applied on a large scale to study the biology and physiology of reproduction in pigs, and to understand better the complex nature of genetic control over polygenic characteristics, such as ovulation rate and litter size. We can look forward to generating a significant amount of new data on differences in gene expression between genotypes, treatments, or at various temporal and spatial coordinates within a variety of reproductively relevant systems. Along with this capability will be the challenge of collating, analysing and interpreting datasets that are orders of magnitude more extensive and complex than those currently used. Furthermore, integration of functional genomics with traditional genetic approaches and with detailed analysis of the proteome and relevant whole animal phenotypes will be required to make full use of this powerful new experimental paradigm as a beneficial research tool.

  11. Social Studies Progress Monitoring and Intervention for Middle School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyers, Sarah J.; Lembke, Erica S.; Curs, Bradley

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the technical adequacy of vocabulary-matching curriculum-based measurement (CBM) to identify and monitor the progress of 148 middle school students in social studies. In addition, the effectiveness of a reading comprehension intervention, Collaborative Strategic Reading (Klingner, Vaughn, Dimino, Schumm, & Bryant, 2001),…

  12. Social Studies Progress Monitoring and Intervention for Middle School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyers, Sarah J.; Lembke, Erica S.; Curs, Bradley

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the technical adequacy of vocabulary-matching curriculum-based measurement (CBM) to identify and monitor the progress of 148 middle school students in social studies. In addition, the effectiveness of a reading comprehension intervention, Collaborative Strategic Reading (Klingner, Vaughn, Dimino, Schumm, & Bryant, 2001),…

  13. Genomic integration of oncogenic HPV and gain of the human telomerase gene TERC at 3q26 are strongly associated events in the progression of uterine cervical dysplasia to invasive cancer.

    PubMed

    Hopman, A H N; Theelen, W; Hommelberg, P P H; Kamps, M A F; Herrington, C S; Morrison, L E; Speel, E-J M; Smedts, F; Ramaekers, F C S

    2006-12-01

    Recently proposed events associated with the progression of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) 2/3 to cervical carcinoma include integration of human papillomavirus (HPV) into the host genome, genomic instability, and an increase in chromosome 3q copy number. In particular, the gene coding for the RNA component of telomerase (TERC) at 3q26 has been implicated as a possible candidate gene. Since it is not known to date how these events are temporally related during cervical carcinogenesis, the aim of the present study was to assess the correlation between TERC gene copy number and the physical status of HPV during progression in cervical neoplasia. Solitary precursor lesions of the uterine cervix (CIN 2/3, n = 17), lesions associated with a micro-invasive carcinoma (CIN 3&mCA, n = 13), and advanced invasive carcinomas (invCA, n = 7) were analysed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to determine the physical status of the virus and TERC gene copy number. The TERC gene was increasingly gained with progression of CIN 2/3 (3 of 17) through CIN 3&mCA (7 of 13) to invCA (5 of 7). In the lesions exhibiting gain of TERC, the virus was predominantly integrated. This was seen in eight of ten diploid lesions, indicating that these events can occur prior to aneuploidization and are strongly associated with the progression of CIN 3 to mCA and invCA (p < 0.001). With progression to carcinoma, a number of these lesions show polyploidization, resulting in aneuploidy and high TERC gene copy numbers. In conclusion, genomic integration of oncogenic HPV and gain of the human telomerase gene TERC appear to be important associated genetic events in the progression of uterine cervical dysplasia to invasive cancer.

  14. Clonal evolution of acute myeloid leukemia highlighted by latest genome sequencing studies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuehong; Lv, Dekang; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Quentin; Li, Zhiguang

    2016-09-06

    Decades of years might be required for an initiated cell to become a fully-pledged, metastasized tumor. DNA mutations are accumulated during this process including background mutations that emerge scholastically, as well as driver mutations that selectively occur in a handful of cancer genes and confer the cell a growth advantage over its neighbors. A clone of tumor cells could be superseded by another clone that acquires new mutations and grows more aggressively. Tumor evolutional patterns have been studied for years using conventional approaches that focus on the investigation of a single or a couple of genes. Latest deep sequencing technology enables a global view of tumor evolution by deciphering almost all genome aberrations in a tumor. Tumor clones and the fate of each clone during tumor evolution can be depicted with the help of the concept of variant allele frequency. Here, we summarize the new insights of cancer evolutional progression in acute myeloid leukemia. Cancer evolution is currently thought to start from a clone that has accumulated the requisite somatically-acquired genetic aberrations through a series of increasingly disordered clinical and pathological phases, eventually leading to malignant transformation [1-3]. The observations in invasive colorectal cancer that usually emerges from an antecedent benign adenomatous polyp and in cervical cancer that proceeds through intraepithelial neoplasia support the idea of stepwise or linear cancerous progression [3-5]. Genetically, such progression is achieved by successive waves of clonal expansion during which cells acquire novel genomic alterations including single nucleotide variants (SNVs), small insertions and deletions (indels), and/or copy number variations (CNVs) [6]. The latest improvement in sequencing technology has allowed the deciphering of the whole exome or genome in different types of tumor and normal tissue pairs, providing detailed catalogue about genome aberrations during tumor

  15. Disturbed mitotic progression and genome segregation are involved in cell transformation mediated by nano-TiO2 long-term exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Shing; Chueh Pinju; Lin Yunwei; Shih Tungsheng; Chuang Showmei

    2009-12-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nano-particles (< 100 nm in diameter) have been of interest in a wide range of applications, such as in cosmetics and pharmaceuticals because of their low toxicity. However, recent studies have shown that TiO2 nano-particles (nano-TiO2) induce cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in various lines of cultured cells as well as tumorigenesis in animal models. The biological roles of nano-TiO2 are shown to be controversial and no comprehensive study paradigm has been developed to investigate their molecular mechanisms. In this study, we showed that short-term exposure to nano-TiO2 enhanced cell proliferation, survival, ERK signaling activation and ROS production in cultured fibroblast cells. Moreover, long-term exposure to nano-TiO2 not only increased cell survival and growth on soft agar but also the numbers of multinucleated cells and micronucleus (MN) as suggested in confocal microscopy analysis. Cell cycle phase analysis showed G2/M delay and slower cell division in long-term exposed cells. Most importantly, long-term TiO2 exposure remarkably affected mitotic progression at anaphase and telophase leading to aberrant multipolar spindles and chromatin alignment/segregation. Moreover, PLK1 was demonstrated as the target for nano-TiO2 in the regulation of mitotic progression and exit. Notably, a higher fraction of sub-G1 phase population appeared in TiO2-exposed cells after releasing from G2/M synchronization. Our results demonstrate that long-term exposure to nano-TiO2 disturbs cell cycle progression and duplicated genome segregation, leading to chromosomal instability and cell transformation.

  16. Genome-Wide Association Studies and Hepatitis C: Harvesting the Benefits of the Genomic Revolution.

    PubMed

    Eslam, Mohammed; George, Jacob

    2015-11-01

    Utilizing genome-wide association studies (GWASs) to examine the variation in hepatitis C virus (HCV) phenotypes has led to quantum improvements in our understanding of both the genetic basis and the underlying pathogenesis of HCV infection. In this context, the discovery of interferon lambda polymorphisms is unique with far reaching implications that extend well beyond HCV to various other liver and extrahepatic diseases. In this review, we summarize the data on the impact of GWASs on our understanding of HCV disease. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  17. Progression from colorectal adenoma to carcinoma is associated with non-random chromosomal gains as detected by comparative genomic hybridisation.

    PubMed Central

    Meijer, G A; Hermsen, M A; Baak, J P; van Diest, P J; Meuwissen, S G; Beliën, J A; Hoovers, J M; Joenje, H; Snijders, P J; Walboomers, J M

    1998-01-01

    AIMS: Chromosomal gains and losses were surveyed by comparative genomic hybridisation (CGH) in a series of colorectal adenomas and carcinomas, in search of high risk genomic changes involved in colorectal carcinogenesis. METHODS: Nine colorectal adenomas and 14 carcinomas were analysed by CGH, and DNA ploidy was assessed with both flow and image cytometry. RESULTS: In the nine adenomas analysed, an average of 6.6 (range 1 to 11) chromosomal aberrations were identified. In the 14 carcinomas an average of 11.9 (range 5 to 17) events were found per tumour. In the adenomas the number of gains and losses was in balance (3.6 v 3.0) while in carcinomas gains occurred more often than losses (8.2 v 3.7). Frequent gains involved 13q, 7p, 8q, and 20q, whereas losses most often occurred at 18q, 4q, and 8p. Gains of 13q, 8q, and 20q, and loss of 18q occurred more often in carcinomas than in adenomas (p = 0.005, p = 0.05, p = 0.05, and p = 0.02, respectively). Aneuploid tumours showed more gains than losses (mean 9.3 v 4.9, p = 0.02), in contrast to diploid tumours where gains and losses were nearly balanced (mean 3.1 v 4.1, p = 0.5). CONCLUSIONS: The most striking difference between chromosomal aberrations in colorectal adenomas and carcinomas, as detected by CGH, is an increased number of chromosomal gains that show a nonrandom distribution. Gains of 13q and also of 20q and 8q seem especially to be involved in the progression of adenomas to carcinomas, possibly owing to low level overexpression of oncogenes at these loci. Images PMID:10070331

  18. Genomic Comparative Study of Bovine Mastitis Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kempf, Florent; Slugocki, Cindy; Blum, Shlomo E.; Leitner, Gabriel; Germon, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli, one of the main causative agents of bovine mastitis, is responsible for significant losses on dairy farms. In order to better understand the pathogenicity of E. coli mastitis, an accurate characterization of E. coli strains isolated from mastitis cases is required. By using phylogenetic analyses and whole genome comparison of 5 currently available mastitis E. coli genome sequences, we searched for genotypic traits specific for mastitis isolates. Our data confirm that there is a bias in the distribution of mastitis isolates in the different phylogenetic groups of the E. coli species, with the majority of strains belonging to phylogenetic groups A and B1. An interesting feature is that clustering of strains based on their accessory genome is very similar to that obtained using the core genome. This finding illustrates the fact that phenotypic properties of strains from different phylogroups are likely to be different. As a consequence, it is possible that different strategies could be used by mastitis isolates of different phylogroups to trigger mastitis. Our results indicate that mastitis E. coli isolates analyzed in this study carry very few of the virulence genes described in other pathogenic E. coli strains. A more detailed analysis of the presence/absence of genes involved in LPS synthesis, iron acquisition and type 6 secretion systems did not uncover specific properties of mastitis isolates. Altogether, these results indicate that mastitis E. coli isolates are rather characterized by a lack of bona fide currently described virulence genes. PMID:26809117

  19. Genome-wide association study identifies five new schizophrenia loci

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We examined the role of common genetic variation in schizophrenia in a genome-wide association study of substantial size: a stage 1 discovery sample of 21,856 individuals of European ancestry and a stage 2 replication sample of 29,839 independent subjects. The combined stage 1 and 2 analysis yielded genome-wide significant associations with schizophrenia for seven loci, five of which are new (1p21.3, 2q32.3, 8p23.2, 8q21.3 and 10q24.32-q24.33) and two of which have been previously implicated (6p21.32-p22.1 and 18q21.2). The strongest new finding (P = 1.6 × 10−11) was with rs1625579 within an intron of a putative primary transcript for MIR137 (microRNA 137), a known regulator of neuronal development. Four other schizophrenia loci achieving genome-wide significance contain predicted targets of MIR137, suggesting MIR137-mediated dysregulation as a previously unknown etiologic mechanism in schizophrenia. In a joint analysis with a bipolar disorder sample (16,374 affected individuals and 14,044 controls), three loci reached genome-wide significance: CACNA1C (rs4765905, P = 7.0 × 10−9), ANK3 (rs10994359, P = 2.5 × 10−8) and the ITIH3-ITIH4 region (rs2239547, P = 7.8 × 10−9). PMID:21926974

  20. Genomic Comparative Study of Bovine Mastitis Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kempf, Florent; Slugocki, Cindy; Blum, Shlomo E; Leitner, Gabriel; Germon, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli, one of the main causative agents of bovine mastitis, is responsible for significant losses on dairy farms. In order to better understand the pathogenicity of E. coli mastitis, an accurate characterization of E. coli strains isolated from mastitis cases is required. By using phylogenetic analyses and whole genome comparison of 5 currently available mastitis E. coli genome sequences, we searched for genotypic traits specific for mastitis isolates. Our data confirm that there is a bias in the distribution of mastitis isolates in the different phylogenetic groups of the E. coli species, with the majority of strains belonging to phylogenetic groups A and B1. An interesting feature is that clustering of strains based on their accessory genome is very similar to that obtained using the core genome. This finding illustrates the fact that phenotypic properties of strains from different phylogroups are likely to be different. As a consequence, it is possible that different strategies could be used by mastitis isolates of different phylogroups to trigger mastitis. Our results indicate that mastitis E. coli isolates analyzed in this study carry very few of the virulence genes described in other pathogenic E. coli strains. A more detailed analysis of the presence/absence of genes involved in LPS synthesis, iron acquisition and type 6 secretion systems did not uncover specific properties of mastitis isolates. Altogether, these results indicate that mastitis E. coli isolates are rather characterized by a lack of bona fide currently described virulence genes.

  1. Genomic and phenotypic analysis of BRCA2 mutated breast cancers reveals co-occurring changes linked to progression.

    PubMed

    Stefansson, Olafur A; Jonasson, Jon G; Olafsdottir, Kristrun; Bjarnason, Hordur; Th Johannsson, Oskar; Bodvarsdottir, Sigridur K; Valgeirsdottir, Sigridur; Eyfjord, Jorunn E

    2011-09-29

    Inherited mutations in the BRCA2 gene greatly increase the risk of developing breast cancer. Consistent with an important role for BRCA2 in error-free DNA repair, complex genomic changes are frequently observed in tumors derived from BRCA2 mutation carriers. Here, we explore the impact of DNA copy-number changes in BRCA2 tumors with respect to phenotype and clinical staging of the disease. Breast tumors (n = 33) derived from BRCA2 999del5 mutation carriers were examined in terms of copy-number changes with high-resolution aCGH (array comparative genomic hybridization) containing 385 thousand probes (about one for each 7 kbp) and expression of phenotypic markers on TMAs (tissue microarrays). The data were examined with respect to clinical parameters including TNM staging, histologic grade, S phase, and ploidy. Tumors from BRCA2 carriers of luminal and basal/triple-negative phenotypes (TNPs) differ with respect to patterns of DNA copy-number changes. The basal/TNP subtype was characterized by lack of pRb (RB1) coupled with high/intense expression of p16 (CDKN2A) gene products. We found increased proportions of Ki-67-positive cells to be significantly associated with loss of the wild-type (wt) BRCA2 allele in luminal types, whereas BRCA2wt loss was less frequent in BRCA2 tumors displaying basal/TNP phenotypes. Furthermore, we show that deletions at 13q13.1, involving the BRCA2wt allele, represents a part of a larger network of co-occurring genetic changes, including deletions at 6q22.32-q22.33, 11q14.2-q24.1, and gains at 17q24.1. Importantly, copy-number changes at these BRCA2-linked networking regions coincide with those associated with advanced progression, involving the capacity to metastasize to the nodes or more-distant sites at diagnosis. The results presented here demonstrate divergent paths of tumor evolution in BRCA2 carriers and that deletion of the wild-type BRCA2 allele, together with co-occurring changes at 6 q, 11 q, and 17 q, are important events in

  2. Genomic and phenotypic analysis of BRCA2 mutated breast cancers reveals co-occurring changes linked to progression

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Inherited mutations in the BRCA2 gene greatly increase the risk of developing breast cancer. Consistent with an important role for BRCA2 in error-free DNA repair, complex genomic changes are frequently observed in tumors derived from BRCA2 mutation carriers. Here, we explore the impact of DNA copy-number changes in BRCA2 tumors with respect to phenotype and clinical staging of the disease. Methods Breast tumors (n = 33) derived from BRCA2 999del5 mutation carriers were examined in terms of copy-number changes with high-resolution aCGH (array comparative genomic hybridization) containing 385 thousand probes (about one for each 7 kbp) and expression of phenotypic markers on TMAs (tissue microarrays). The data were examined with respect to clinical parameters including TNM staging, histologic grade, S phase, and ploidy. Results Tumors from BRCA2 carriers of luminal and basal/triple-negative phenotypes (TNPs) differ with respect to patterns of DNA copy-number changes. The basal/TNP subtype was characterized by lack of pRb (RB1) coupled with high/intense expression of p16 (CDKN2A) gene products. We found increased proportions of Ki-67-positive cells to be significantly associated with loss of the wild-type (wt) BRCA2 allele in luminal types, whereas BRCA2wt loss was less frequent in BRCA2 tumors displaying basal/TNP phenotypes. Furthermore, we show that deletions at 13q13.1, involving the BRCA2wt allele, represents a part of a larger network of co-occurring genetic changes, including deletions at 6q22.32-q22.33, 11q14.2-q24.1, and gains at 17q24.1. Importantly, copy-number changes at these BRCA2-linked networking regions coincide with those associated with advanced progression, involving the capacity to metastasize to the nodes or more-distant sites at diagnosis. Conclusions The results presented here demonstrate divergent paths of tumor evolution in BRCA2 carriers and that deletion of the wild-type BRCA2 allele, together with co-occurring changes at 6 q, 11

  3. [Application progress of CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing technology in the treatment of HIV-1 infection].

    PubMed

    Han, Yinglun; Li, Qingwei

    2016-01-01

    The goal of gene therapy is to introduce foreign genes into human target cells in a certain way to correct or compensate diseases caused by defective or abnormal genes. Therefore, gene therapy has great practical significance in studying the treatment of persistent or latent HIV-1 infection. At present, the existing methods of gene therapy have some major defects such as limited target site recognition and high frequency of off-targets. The latest research showed that the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) /CRISPR-associated nuclease 9 (Cas9) system from bacteria and archaea has been successfully reformed to a targeted genome editing tool. Thus, how to achieve the goal of treating HIV-1 infection by modifying targeted HIV-1 virus genome effectively using the CRISPR/Cas9 system has become a current research focus. Here we review the latest achievements worldwide and briefly introduce applications of the CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing technology in the treatment of HIV-1 infection, including CCR5 gene editing, removal of HIV-1 virus and activation of HIV-1 virus, in order to provide reference for the prevention and treatment of HIV-1 infection.

  4. Beyond Genomics: Studying Evolution with Gene Coexpression Networks.

    PubMed

    Ruprecht, Colin; Vaid, Neha; Proost, Sebastian; Persson, Staffan; Mutwil, Marek

    2017-04-01

    Understanding how genomes change as organisms become more complex is a central question in evolution. Molecular evolutionary studies typically correlate the appearance of genes and gene families with the emergence of biological pathways and morphological features. While such approaches are of great importance to understand how organisms evolve, they are also limited, as functionally related genes work together in contexts of dynamic gene networks. Since functionally related genes are often transcriptionally coregulated, gene coexpression networks present a resource to study the evolution of biological pathways. In this opinion article, we discuss recent developments in this field and how coexpression analyses can be merged with existing genomic approaches to transfer functional knowledge between species to study the appearance or extension of pathways.

  5. Exploring Relationships between Host Genome and Microbiome: New Insights from Genome-Wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Abdul-Aziz, Muslihudeen A.; Cooper, Alan; Weyrich, Laura S.

    2016-01-01

    As our understanding of the human microbiome expands, impacts on health and disease continue to be revealed. Alterations in the microbiome can result in dysbiosis, which has now been linked to subsequent autoimmune and metabolic diseases, highlighting the need to identify factors that shape the microbiome. Research has identified that the composition and functions of the human microbiome can be influenced by diet, age, sex, and environment. More recently, studies have explored how human genetic variation may also influence the microbiome. Here, we review several recent analytical advances in this new research area, including those that use genome-wide association studies to examine host genome–microbiome interactions, while controlling for the influence of other factors. We find that current research is limited by small sample sizes, lack of cohort replication, and insufficient confirmatory mechanistic studies. In addition, we discuss the importance of understanding long-term interactions between the host genome and microbiome, as well as the potential impacts of disrupting this relationship, and explore new research avenues that may provide information about the co-evolutionary history of humans and their microorganisms. PMID:27785127

  6. New study reveals relatively few mutations in AML genomes - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    Investigators for The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network have detailed and broadly classified the genomic alterations that frequently underlie the development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

  7. A Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Genetic Variants Associated with Mathematics Ability.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huan; Gu, Xiao-Hong; Zhou, Yuxi; Ge, Zeng; Wang, Bin; Siok, Wai Ting; Wang, Guoqing; Huen, Michael; Jiang, Yuyang; Tan, Li-Hai; Sun, Yimin

    2017-02-03

    Mathematics ability is a complex cognitive trait with polygenic heritability. Genome-wide association study (GWAS) has been an effective approach to investigate genetic components underlying mathematic ability. Although previous studies reported several candidate genetic variants, none of them exceeded genome-wide significant threshold in general populations. Herein, we performed GWAS in Chinese elementary school students to identify potential genetic variants associated with mathematics ability. The discovery stage included 494 and 504 individuals from two independent cohorts respectively. The replication stage included another cohort of 599 individuals. In total, 28 of 81 candidate SNPs that met validation criteria were further replicated. Combined meta-analysis of three cohorts identified four SNPs (rs1012694, rs11743006, rs17778739 and rs17777541) of SPOCK1 gene showing association with mathematics ability (minimum p value 5.67 × 10(-10), maximum β -2.43). The SPOCK1 gene is located on chromosome 5q31.2 and encodes a highly conserved glycoprotein testican-1 which was associated with tumor progression and prognosis as well as neurogenesis. This is the first study to report genome-wide significant association of individual SNPs with mathematics ability in general populations. Our preliminary results further supported the role of SPOCK1 during neurodevelopment. The genetic complexities underlying mathematics ability might contribute to explain the basis of human cognition and intelligence at genetic level.

  8. A Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Genetic Variants Associated with Mathematics Ability

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huan; Gu, Xiao-hong; Zhou, Yuxi; Ge, Zeng; Wang, Bin; Siok, Wai Ting; Wang, Guoqing; Huen, Michael; Jiang, Yuyang; Tan, Li-Hai; Sun, Yimin

    2017-01-01

    Mathematics ability is a complex cognitive trait with polygenic heritability. Genome-wide association study (GWAS) has been an effective approach to investigate genetic components underlying mathematic ability. Although previous studies reported several candidate genetic variants, none of them exceeded genome-wide significant threshold in general populations. Herein, we performed GWAS in Chinese elementary school students to identify potential genetic variants associated with mathematics ability. The discovery stage included 494 and 504 individuals from two independent cohorts respectively. The replication stage included another cohort of 599 individuals. In total, 28 of 81 candidate SNPs that met validation criteria were further replicated. Combined meta-analysis of three cohorts identified four SNPs (rs1012694, rs11743006, rs17778739 and rs17777541) of SPOCK1 gene showing association with mathematics ability (minimum p value 5.67 × 10−10, maximum β −2.43). The SPOCK1 gene is located on chromosome 5q31.2 and encodes a highly conserved glycoprotein testican-1 which was associated with tumor progression and prognosis as well as neurogenesis. This is the first study to report genome-wide significant association of individual SNPs with mathematics ability in general populations. Our preliminary results further supported the role of SPOCK1 during neurodevelopment. The genetic complexities underlying mathematics ability might contribute to explain the basis of human cognition and intelligence at genetic level. PMID:28155865

  9. Public attitudes to the promotion of genomic crop studies in Japan: correlations between genomic literacy, trust, and favourable attitude.

    PubMed

    Ishiyama, Izumi; Tanzawa, Tetsuro; Watanabe, Maiko; Maeda, Tadahiko; Muto, Kaori; Tamakoshi, Akiko; Nagai, Akiko; Yamagata, Zentaro

    2012-05-01

    This study aimed to assess public attitudes in Japan to the promotion of genomic selection in crop studies and to examine associated factors. We analysed data from a nationwide opinion survey. A total of 4,000 people were selected from the Japanese general population by a stratified two-phase sampling method, and 2,171 people participated by post; this survey asked about the pros and cons of crop-related genomic studies promotion, examined people's scientific literacy in genomics, and investigated factors thought to be related to genomic literacy and attitude. The relationships were examined using logistic regression models stratified by gender. Survey results showed that 50.0% of respondents approved of the promotion of crop-related genomic studies, while 6.7% disapproved. No correlation was found between literacy and attitude towards promotion. Trust in experts, belief in science, an interest in genomic studies and willingness to purchase new products correlated with a positive attitude towards crop-related genomic studies.

  10. Biological Sciences Curriculum Study Newsletter Number 56, Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, George M., Ed.

    This newsletter presents a progress report for the 1973-74 year for the Biological Sciences Curriculum Study (BSCS). The program for the Educable Mentally Handicapped is reviewed and a new series of Animal Behavior films is described. Other articles in the newsletter include information on the Human Sciences Program with emphasis on the…

  11. Promoting Student Progressions in Science Classrooms: A Video Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jin, Hui; Johnson, Michele E.; Shin, Hyo Jeong; Anderson, Charles W.

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted in a large-scale environmental literacy project. In the project, we developed a Learning Progression Framework (LPF) for matter and energy in social-ecological systems; the LPF contains four achievement levels. Based on the LPF, we designed a Plant Unit to help Levels 2 and 3 students advance to Level 4 of the LPF. In the…

  12. Unclassified renal cell carcinoma: a clinicopathological, comparative genomic hybridization, and whole-genome exon sequencing study

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhen-Yan; Pang, Li-Juan; Qi, Yan; Kang, Xue-Ling; Hu, Jian-Ming; Wang, Lianghai; Liu, Kun-Peng; Ren, Yuan; Cui, Mei; Song, Li-Li; Li, Hong-An; Zou, Hong; Li, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Unclassified renal cell carcinoma (URCC) is a rare variant of RCC, accounting for only 3-5% of all cases. Studies on the molecular genetics of URCC are limited, and hence, we report on 2 cases of URCC analyzed using comparative genome hybridization (CGH) and the genome-wide human exon GeneChip technique to identify the genomic alterations of URCC. Both URCC patients (mean age, 72 years) presented at an advanced stage and died within 30 months post-surgery. Histologically, the URCCs were composed of undifferentiated, multinucleated, giant cells with eosinophilic cytoplasm. Immunostaining revealed that both URCC cases had strong p53 protein expression and partial expression of cluster of differentiation-10 and cytokeratin. The CGH profiles showed chromosomal imbalances in both URCC cases: gains were observed in chromosomes 1p11-12, 1q12-13, 2q20-23, 3q22-23, 8p12, and 16q11-15, whereas losses were detected on chromosomes 1q22-23, 3p12-22, 5p30-ter, 6p, 11q, 16q18-22, 17p12-14, and 20p. Compared with 18 normal renal tissues, 40 mutated genes were detected in the URCC tissues, including 32 missense and 8 silent mutations. Functional enrichment analysis revealed that the missense mutation genes were involved in 11 different biological processes and pathways, including cell cycle regulation, lipid localization and transport, neuropeptide signaling, organic ether metabolism, and ATP-binding cassette transporter signaling. Our findings indicate that URCC may be a highly aggressive cancer, and the genetic alterations identified herein may provide clues regarding the tumorigenesis of URCC and serve as a basis for the development of targeted therapies against URCC in the future. PMID:25120763

  13. Preterm Birth Genome Project (PGP) -- validation of resources for preterm birth genome-wide studies.

    PubMed

    Pennell, Craig E; Vadillo-Ortega, Felipe; Olson, David M; Ha, Eun-Hee; Williams, Scott; Frayling, Tim M; Dolan, Siobhan; Katz, Michael; Merialdi, Mario; Menon, Ramkumar

    2013-01-01

    We determined a series of quality control (QC) analyses to assess the usability of DNA collected and processed from different countries utilizing different DNA extraction techniques prior to genome-wide association studies (GWAS). The quality of DNA collected utilizing four different DNA extraction techniques and the impact of shipping DNA at different temperatures on array performance were evaluated. Fifteen maternal-fetal pairs were used from four countries. DNA was extracted using four approaches: whole blood, blood spots with whole genome amplification (WGA), saliva and buccal swab. Samples were sent to a genotyping facility, either on dry ice or at room temperature and genotyped using Affymetrix SNP array 6.0. QC measured included extraction techniques, effect of shipping temperatures, accuracy and Mendelian concordance. Significantly fewer (50 % ) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) passed QC metrics for buccal swab DNA (P < 0.0001) due to missing genotype data (P < 0.0001). Whole blood or saliva DNA had the highest call rates (99.2 0.4 % and 99.3 0.2 % , respectively) and Mendelian concordance. Shipment temperature had no effect. DNA from blood or saliva had the highest call rate accuracy, and buccal swabs had the lowest. DNA extracted from blood, saliva and blood spots were found suitable for GWAS in our study.

  14. Resources for Functional Genomics Studies in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, Stephanie E.; Hu, Yanhui; Kim, Kevin; Housden, Benjamin E.; Perrimon, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster has become a system of choice for functional genomic studies. Many resources, including online databases and software tools, are now available to support design or identification of relevant fly stocks and reagents or analysis and mining of existing functional genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, etc. datasets. These include large community collections of fly stocks and plasmid clones, “meta” information sites like FlyBase and FlyMine, and an increasing number of more specialized reagents, databases, and online tools. Here, we introduce key resources useful to plan large-scale functional genomics studies in Drosophila and to analyze, integrate, and mine the results of those studies in ways that facilitate identification of highest-confidence results and generation of new hypotheses. We also discuss ways in which existing resources can be used and might be improved and suggest a few areas of future development that would further support large- and small-scale studies in Drosophila and facilitate use of Drosophila information by the research community more generally. PMID:24653003

  15. Implications of genome-wide association studies in cancer therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Jai N; McLeod, Howard L; Innocenti, Federico

    2013-01-01

    Genome wide association studies (GWAS) provide an agnostic approach to identifying potential genetic variants associated with disease susceptibility, prognosis of survival and/or predictive of drug response. Although these techniques are costly and interpretation of study results is challenging, they do allow for a more unbiased interrogation of the entire genome, resulting in the discovery of novel genes and understanding of novel biological associations. This review will focus on the implications of GWAS in cancer therapy, in particular germ-line mutations, including findings from major GWAS which have identified predictive genetic loci for clinical outcome and/or toxicity. Lessons and challenges in cancer GWAS are also discussed, including the need for functional analysis and replication, as well as future perspectives for biological and clinical utility. Given the large heterogeneity in response to cancer therapeutics, novel methods of identifying mechanisms and biology of variable drug response and ultimately treatment individualization will be indispensable. PMID:23701381

  16. Implications of genome-wide association studies in cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jai N; McLeod, Howard L; Innocenti, Federico

    2013-09-01

    Genome wide association studies (GWAS) provide an agnostic approach to identifying potential genetic variants associated with disease susceptibility, prognosis of survival and/or predictive of drug response. Although these techniques are costly and interpretation of study results is challenging, they do allow for a more unbiased interrogation of the entire genome, resulting in the discovery of novel genes and understanding of novel biological associations. This review will focus on the implications of GWAS in cancer therapy, in particular germ-line mutations, including findings from major GWAS which have identified predictive genetic loci for clinical outcome and/or toxicity. Lessons and challenges in cancer GWAS are also discussed, including the need for functional analysis and replication, as well as future perspectives for biological and clinical utility. Given the large heterogeneity in response to cancer therapeutics, novel methods of identifying mechanisms and biology of variable drug response and ultimately treatment individualization will be indispensable. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  17. Bioinformatics challenges in genome-wide association studies (GWAS).

    PubMed

    De, Rishika; Bush, William S; Moore, Jason H

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are a powerful tool for investigators to examine the human genome to detect genetic risk factors, reveal the genetic architecture of diseases and open up new opportunities for treatment and prevention. However, despite its successes, GWAS have not been able to identify genetic loci that are effective classifiers of disease, limiting their value for genetic testing. This chapter highlights the challenges that lie ahead for GWAS in better identifying disease risk predictors, and how we may address them. In this regard, we review basic concepts regarding GWAS, the technologies used for capturing genetic variation, the missing heritability problem, the need for efficient study design especially for replication efforts, reducing the bias introduced into a dataset, and how to utilize new resources available, such as electronic medical records. We also look to what lies ahead for the field, and the approaches that can be taken to realize the full potential of GWAS.

  18. Integrated metabolomics and phytochemical genomics approaches for studies on rice.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Yozo; Saito, Kazuki

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics is widely employed to monitor the cellular metabolic state and assess the quality of plant-derived foodstuffs because it can be used to manage datasets that include a wide range of metabolites in their analytical samples. In this review, we discuss metabolomics research on rice in order to elucidate the overall regulation of the metabolism as it is related to the growth and mechanisms of adaptation to genetic modifications and environmental stresses such as fungal infections, submergence, and oxidative stress. We also focus on phytochemical genomics studies based on a combination of metabolomics and quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping techniques. In addition to starch, rice produces many metabolites that also serve as nutrients for human consumers. The outcomes of recent phytochemical genomics studies of diverse natural rice resources suggest there is potential for using further effective breeding strategies to improve the quality of ingredients in rice grains.

  19. Xenopus egg extract to study regulation of genome-wide and locus-specific DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Raspelli, Erica; Falbo, Lucia; Costanzo, Vincenzo

    2017-01-01

    Faithful DNA replication, coupled with accurate repair of DNA damage, is essential to maintain genome stability and relies on different DNA metabolism genes. Many of these genes are involved in the assembly of replication origins, in the coordination of DNA repair to protect replication forks progression in the presence of DNA damage and in the replication of repetitive chromatin regions. Some DNA metabolism genes are essential in higher eukaryotes, suggesting the existence of specialized mechanisms of repair and replication in organisms with complex genomes. The impact on cell survival of many of these genes has so far precluded in depth molecular analysis of their function. The cell-free Xenopus laevis egg extract represents an ideal system to overcome survival issues and to facilitate the biochemical study of replication-associated functions of essential proteins in vertebrate organisms. Here, we will discuss how Xenopus egg extracts have been used to study cellular and molecular processes, such as DNA replication and DNA repair. In particular, we will focus on innovative imaging and proteomic-based experimental approaches to characterize the molecular function of a number of essential DNA metabolism factors involved in the duplication of complex vertebrate genomes.

  20. Big data challenges in bone research: genome-wide association studies and next-generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Nerea; Lucas, Gavin; Hysi, Pirro

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been developed as a practical method to identify genetic loci associated with disease by scanning multiple markers across the genome. Significant advances in the genetics of complex diseases have been made owing to advances in genotyping technologies, the progress of projects such as HapMap and 1000G and the emergence of genetics as a collaborative discipline. Because of its great potential to be used in parallel by multiple collaborators, it is important to adhere to strict protocols assuring data quality and analyses. Quality control analyses must be applied to each sample and each single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). The software package PLINK is capable of performing the whole range of necessary quality control tests. Genotype imputation has also been developed to substantially increase the power of GWAS methodology. Imputation permits the investigation of associations at genetic markers that are not directly genotyped. Results of individual GWAS reports can be combined through meta-analysis. Finally, next-generation sequencing (NGS) has gained popularity in recent years through its capacity to analyse a much greater number of markers across the genome. Although NGS platforms are capable of examining a higher number of SNPs compared with GWA studies, the results obtained by NGS require careful interpretation, as their biological correlation is incompletely understood. In this article, we will discuss the basic features of such protocols. PMID:25709812

  1. Voxelwise genome-wide association study (vGWAS).

    PubMed

    Stein, Jason L; Hua, Xue; Lee, Suh; Ho, April J; Leow, Alex D; Toga, Arthur W; Saykin, Andrew J; Shen, Li; Foroud, Tatiana; Pankratz, Nathan; Huentelman, Matthew J; Craig, David W; Gerber, Jill D; Allen, April N; Corneveaux, Jason J; Dechairo, Bryan M; Potkin, Steven G; Weiner, Michael W; Thompson, Paul

    2010-11-15

    The structure of the human brain is highly heritable, and is thought to be influenced by many common genetic variants, many of which are currently unknown. Recent advances in neuroimaging and genetics have allowed collection of both highly detailed structural brain scans and genome-wide genotype information. This wealth of information presents a new opportunity to find the genes influencing brain structure. Here we explore the relation between 448,293 single nucleotide polymorphisms in each of 31,622 voxels of the entire brain across 740 elderly subjects (mean age+/-s.d.: 75.52+/-6.82 years; 438 male) including subjects with Alzheimer's disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, and healthy elderly controls from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). We used tensor-based morphometry to measure individual differences in brain structure at the voxel level relative to a study-specific template based on healthy elderly subjects. We then conducted a genome-wide association at each voxel to identify genetic variants of interest. By studying only the most associated variant at each voxel, we developed a novel method to address the multiple comparisons problem and computational burden associated with the unprecedented amount of data. No variant survived the strict significance criterion, but several genes worthy of further exploration were identified, including CSMD2 and CADPS2. These genes have high relevance to brain structure. This is the first voxelwise genome wide association study to our knowledge, and offers a novel method to discover genetic influences on brain structure.

  2. A Pooled Genome-Wide Association Study of Asperger Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Warrier, Varun; Chakrabarti, Bhismadev; Murphy, Laura; Chan, Allen; Craig, Ian; Mallya, Uma; Lakatošová, Silvia; Rehnstrom, Karola; Peltonen, Leena; Wheelwright, Sally; Allison, Carrie; Fisher, Simon E; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Asperger Syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental condition characterized by impairments in social interaction and communication, alongside the presence of unusually repetitive, restricted interests and stereotyped behaviour. Individuals with AS have no delay in cognitive and language development. It is a subset of Autism Spectrum Conditions (ASC), which are highly heritable and has a population prevalence of approximately 1%. Few studies have investigated the genetic basis of AS. To address this gap in the literature, we performed a genome-wide pooled DNA association study to identify candidate loci in 612 individuals (294 cases and 318 controls) of Caucasian ancestry, using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping version 6.0 array. We identified 11 SNPs that had a p-value below 1x10-5. These SNPs were independently genotyped in the same sample. Three of the SNPs (rs1268055, rs7785891 and rs2782448) were nominally significant, though none remained significant after Bonferroni correction. Two of our top three SNPs (rs7785891 and rs2782448) lie in loci previously implicated in ASC. However, investigation of the three SNPs in the ASC genome-wide association dataset from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium indicated that these three SNPs were not significantly associated with ASC. The effect sizes of the variants were modest, indicating that our study was not sufficiently powered to identify causal variants with precision.

  3. A Pooled Genome-Wide Association Study of Asperger Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Warrier, Varun; Chakrabarti, Bhismadev; Murphy, Laura; Chan, Allen; Craig, Ian; Mallya, Uma; Lakatošová, Silvia; Rehnstrom, Karola; Wheelwright, Sally; Allison, Carrie; Fisher, Simon E.; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Asperger Syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental condition characterized by impairments in social interaction and communication, alongside the presence of unusually repetitive, restricted interests and stereotyped behaviour. Individuals with AS have no delay in cognitive and language development. It is a subset of Autism Spectrum Conditions (ASC), which are highly heritable and has a population prevalence of approximately 1%. Few studies have investigated the genetic basis of AS. To address this gap in the literature, we performed a genome-wide pooled DNA association study to identify candidate loci in 612 individuals (294 cases and 318 controls) of Caucasian ancestry, using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping version 6.0 array. We identified 11 SNPs that had a p-value below 1x10-5. These SNPs were independently genotyped in the same sample. Three of the SNPs (rs1268055, rs7785891 and rs2782448) were nominally significant, though none remained significant after Bonferroni correction. Two of our top three SNPs (rs7785891 and rs2782448) lie in loci previously implicated in ASC. However, investigation of the three SNPs in the ASC genome-wide association dataset from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium indicated that these three SNPs were not significantly associated with ASC. The effect sizes of the variants were modest, indicating that our study was not sufficiently powered to identify causal variants with precision. PMID:26176695

  4. The application of genome editing in studying hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Zou, Bing; Mittal, Rahul; Grati, M'hamed; Lu, Zhongmin; Shu, Yilai; Tao, Yong; Feng, Youg; Xie, Dinghua; Kong, Weijia; Yang, Shiming; Chen, Zheng-Yi; Liu, Xuezhong

    2015-09-01

    Targeted genome editing mediated by clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated nuclease 9 (Cas9) technology has emerged as one of the most powerful tools to study gene functions, and with potential to treat genetic disorders. Hearing loss is one of the most common sensory disorders, affecting approximately 1 in 500 newborns with no treatment. Mutations of inner ear genes contribute to the largest portion of genetic deafness. The simplicity and robustness of CRISPR/Cas9-directed genome editing in human cells and model organisms such as zebrafish, mice and primates make it a promising technology in hearing research. With CRISPR/Cas9 technology, functions of inner ear genes can be studied efficiently by the disruption of normal gene alleles through non-homologous-end-joining (NHEJ) mechanism. For genetic hearing loss, CRISPR/Cas9 has potential to repair gene mutations by homology-directed-repair (HDR) or to disrupt dominant mutations by NHEJ, which could restore hearing. Our recent work has shown CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing can be efficiently performed in the mammalian inner ear in vivo. Thus, application of CRISPR/Cas9 in hearing research will open up new avenues for understanding the pathology of genetic hearing loss and provide new routes in the development of treatment to restore hearing. In this review, we describe major methodologies currently used for genome editing. We will highlight applications of these technologies in studies of genetic disorders and discuss issues pertaining to applications of CRISPR/Cas9 in auditory systems implicated in genetic hearing loss. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The Application of Genome Editing in Studying Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Bing; Mittal, Rahul; Grati, M’hamed; Lu, Zhongmin; Shu, Yilai; Tao, Yong; Feng, Youg; Xie, Dinghua; Kong, Weijia; Yang, Shiming; Chen, Zheng-Yi; Liu, Xuezhong

    2015-01-01

    Targeted genome editing mediated by clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated nuclease 9 (Cas9) technology has emerged as one of the most powerful tools to study gene functions, and with potential to treat genetic disorders. Hearing loss is one of the most common sensory disorders, affecting approximately 1 in 500 newborns with no treatment. Mutations of inner ear genes contribute to the largest portion of genetic deafness. The simplicity and robustness of CRISPR/Cas9-directed genome editing in human cells and model organisms such as zebrafish, mice and primates make it a promising technology in hearing research. With CRISPR/Cas9 technology, functions of inner ear genes can be studied efficiently by the disruption of normal gene alleles through non-homologous-end-joining (NHEJ) mechanism. For genetic hearing loss, CRISPR/Cas9 has potential to repair gene mutations by homology-directed-repair (HDR) or to disrupt dominant mutations by NHEJ, which could restore hearing. Our recent work has shown CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing can be efficiently performed in the mammalian inner ear in vivo. Thus, application of CRISPR/Cas9 in hearing research will open up new avenues for understanding the pathology of genetic hearing loss and provide new routes in the development of treatment to restore hearing. In this review, we describe major methodologies currently used for genome editing. We will highlight applications of these technologies in studies of genetic disorders and discuss issues pertaining to applications of CRISPR/Cas9 in auditory systems implicated in genetic hearing loss. PMID:25987504

  6. Genome-wide association study of paliperidone efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Wineinger, Nathan E.; Fu, Dong-Jing; Libiger, Ondrej; Alphs, Larry; Savitz, Adam; Gopal, Srihari; Cohen, Nadine; Schork, Nicholas J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Clinical response to the atypical antipsychotic paliperidone is known to vary among schizophrenic patients. We carried out a genome-wide association study to identify common genetic variants predictive of paliperidone efficacy. Methods We leveraged a collection of 1390 samples from individuals of European ancestry enrolled in 12 clinical studies investigating the efficacy of the extended-release tablet paliperidone ER (n1=490) and the once-monthly injection paliperidone palmitate (n2=550 and n3=350). We carried out a genome-wide association study using a general linear model (GLM) analysis on three separate cohorts, followed by meta-analysis and using a mixed linear model analysis on all samples. The variations in response explained by each single nucleotide polymorphism (h2SNP) were estimated. Results No SNP passed genome-wide significance in the GLM-based analyses with suggestive signals from rs56240334 [P=7.97×10−8 for change in the Clinical Global Impression Scale-Severity (CGI-S); P=8.72×10−7 for change in the total Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS)] in the intron of ADCK1. The mixed linear model-based association P-values for rs56240334 were consistent with the results from GLM-based analyses and the association with change in CGI-S (P=4.26×10−8) reached genome-wide significance (i.e. P<5×10−8). We also found suggestive evidence for a polygenic contribution toward paliperidone treatment response with estimates of heritability, h2SNP, ranging from 0.31 to 0.43 for change in the total PANSS score, the PANSS positive Marder factor score, and CGI-S. Conclusion Genetic variations in the ADCK1 gene may differentially predict paliperidone efficacy in schizophrenic patients. However, this finding should be replicated in additional samples. PMID:27846195

  7. Quantifying the mapping precision of genome-wide association studies using whole-genome sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yang; Zheng, Zhili; Visscher, Peter M; Yang, Jian

    2017-05-16

    Understanding the mapping precision of genome-wide association studies (GWAS), that is the physical distances between the top associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and the causal variants, is essential to design fine-mapping experiments for complex traits and diseases. Using simulations based on whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data from 3642 unrelated individuals of European descent, we show that the association signals at rare causal variants (minor allele frequency ≤ 0.01) are very unlikely to be mapped to common variants in GWAS using either WGS data or imputed data and vice versa. We predict that at least 80% of the common variants identified from published GWAS using imputed data are within 33.5 Kbp of the causal variants, a resolution that is comparable with that using WGS data. Mapping precision at these loci will improve with increasing sample sizes of GWAS in the future. For rare variants, the mapping precision of GWAS using WGS data is extremely high, suggesting WGS is an efficient strategy to detect and fine-map rare variants simultaneously. We further assess the mapping precision by linkage disequilibrium between GWAS hits and causal variants and develop an online tool (gwasMP) to query our results with different thresholds of physical distance and/or linkage disequilibrium ( http://cnsgenomics.com/shiny/gwasMP ). Our findings provide a benchmark to inform future design and development of fine-mapping experiments and technologies to pinpoint the causal variants at GWAS loci.

  8. Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals Natural Variations Contributing to Drought Resistance in Crops

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongwei; Qin, Feng

    2017-01-01

    Crops are often cultivated in regions where they will face environmental adversities; resulting in substantial yield loss which can ultimately lead to food and societal problems. Thus, significant efforts have been made to breed stress tolerant cultivars in an attempt to minimize these problems and to produce more stability with respect to crop yields across broad geographies. Since stress tolerance is a complex and multi-genic trait, advancements with classical breeding approaches have been challenging. On the other hand, molecular breeding, which is based on transgenics, marker-assisted selection and genome editing technologies; holds great promise to enable farmers to better cope with these challenges. However, identification of the key genetic components underlying the trait is critical and will serve as the foundation for future crop genetic improvement. Recently, genome-wide association studies have made significant contributions to facilitate the discovery of natural variation contributing to stress tolerance in crops. From these studies, the identified loci can serve as targets for genomic selection or editing to enable the molecular design of new cultivars. Here, we summarize research progress on this issue and focus on the genetic basis of drought tolerance as revealed by genome-wide association studies and quantitative trait loci mapping. Although many favorable loci have been identified, elucidation of their molecular mechanisms contributing to increased stress tolerance still remains a challenge. Thus, continuous efforts are still required to functionally dissect this complex trait through comprehensive approaches, such as system biological studies. It is expected that proper application of the acquired knowledge will enable the development of stress tolerant cultivars; allowing agricultural production to become more sustainable under dynamic environmental conditions. PMID:28713401

  9. Genome-wide association studies of obesity and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fall, Tove; Ingelsson, Erik

    2014-01-25

    Until just a few years ago, the genetic determinants of obesity and metabolic syndrome were largely unknown, with the exception of a few forms of monogenic extreme obesity. Since genome-wide association studies (GWAS) became available, large advances have been made. The first single nucleotide polymorphism robustly associated with increased body mass index (BMI) was in 2007 mapped to a gene with for the time unknown function. This gene, now known as fat mass and obesity associated (FTO) has been repeatedly replicated in several ethnicities and is affecting obesity by regulating appetite. Since the first report from a GWAS of obesity, an increasing number of markers have been shown to be associated with BMI, other measures of obesity or fat distribution and metabolic syndrome. This systematic review of obesity GWAS will summarize genome-wide significant findings for obesity and metabolic syndrome and briefly give a few suggestions of what is to be expected in the next few years.

  10. Mitochondrial genome interrogation for forensic casework and research studies.

    PubMed

    Roby, Rhonda K; Sprouse, Marc; Phillips, Nicole; Alicea-Centeno, Alessandra; Shewale, Shantanu; Shore, Sabrina; Paul, Natasha

    2014-04-24

    This unit describes methods used in the analysis of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) for forensic and research applications. UNIT describes procedures specifically for forensic casework where the DNA from evidentiary material is often degraded or inhibited. In this unit, protocols are described for quantification of mtDNA before amplification; amplification of the entire control region from high-quality samples as well as procedures for interrogating the whole mitochondrial genome (mtGenome); quantification of mtDNA post-amplification; and, post-PCR cleanup and sequencing. The protocols for amplification were developed for high-throughput databasing applications for forensic DNA testing such as reference samples and population studies. However, these same protocols can be applied to biomedical research such as age-related disease and health disparities research.

  11. Genome-wide association study of Tourette Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Scharf, Jeremiah M.; Yu, Dongmei; Mathews, Carol A.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Stewart, S. Evelyn; Fagerness, Jesen A; Evans, Patrick; Gamazon, Eric; Edlund, Christopher K.; Service, Susan; Tikhomirov, Anna; Osiecki, Lisa; Illmann, Cornelia; Pluzhnikov, Anna; Konkashbaev, Anuar; Davis, Lea K; Han, Buhm; Crane, Jacquelyn; Moorjani, Priya; Crenshaw, Andrew T.; Parkin, Melissa A.; Reus, Victor I.; Lowe, Thomas L.; Rangel-Lugo, Martha; Chouinard, Sylvain; Dion, Yves; Girard, Simon; Cath, Danielle C; Smit, Jan H; King, Robert A.; Fernandez, Thomas; Leckman, James F.; Kidd, Kenneth K.; Kidd, Judith R.; Pakstis, Andrew J.; State, Matthew; Herrera, Luis Diego; Romero, Roxana; Fournier, Eduardo; Sandor, Paul; Barr, Cathy L; Phan, Nam; Gross-Tsur, Varda; Benarroch, Fortu; Pollak, Yehuda; Budman, Cathy L.; Bruun, Ruth D.; Erenberg, Gerald; Naarden, Allan L; Lee, Paul C; Weiss, Nicholas; Kremeyer, Barbara; Berrío, Gabriel Bedoya; Campbell, Desmond; Silgado, Julio C. Cardona; Ochoa, William Cornejo; Restrepo, Sandra C. Mesa; Muller, Heike; Duarte, Ana V. Valencia; Lyon, Gholson J; Leppert, Mark; Morgan, Jubel; Weiss, Robert; Grados, Marco A.; Anderson, Kelley; Davarya, Sarah; Singer, Harvey; Walkup, John; Jankovic, Joseph; Tischfield, Jay A.; Heiman, Gary A.; Gilbert, Donald L.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Robertson, Mary M.; Kurlan, Roger; Liu, Chunyu; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Singleton, Andrew; Hardy, John; Strengman, Eric; Ophoff, Roel; Wagner, Michael; Moessner, Rainald; Mirel, Daniel B.; Posthuma, Danielle; Sabatti, Chiara; Eskin, Eleazar; Conti, David V.; Knowles, James A.; Ruiz-Linares, Andres; Rouleau, Guy A.; Purcell, Shaun; Heutink, Peter; Oostra, Ben A.; McMahon, William; Freimer, Nelson; Cox, Nancy J.; Pauls, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a developmental disorder that has one of the highest familial recurrence rates among neuropsychiatric diseases with complex inheritance. However, the identification of definitive TS susceptibility genes remains elusive. Here, we report the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) of TS in 1285 cases and 4964 ancestry-matched controls of European ancestry, including two European-derived population isolates, Ashkenazi Jews from North America and Israel, and French Canadians from Quebec, Canada. In a primary meta-analysis of GWAS data from these European ancestry samples, no markers achieved a genome-wide threshold of significance (p<5 × 10−8); the top signal was found in rs7868992 on chromosome 9q32 within COL27A1 (p=1.85 × 10−6). A secondary analysis including an additional 211 cases and 285 controls from two closely-related Latin-American population isolates from the Central Valley of Costa Rica and Antioquia, Colombia also identified rs7868992 as the top signal (p=3.6 × 10−7 for the combined sample of 1496 cases and 5249 controls following imputation with 1000 Genomes data). This study lays the groundwork for the eventual identification of common TS susceptibility variants in larger cohorts and helps to provide a more complete understanding of the full genetic architecture of this disorder. PMID:22889924

  12. A Genome-Wide Association Study of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Stefan; Atzmon, Gil; Demerath, Ellen W.; Garcia, Melissa E.; Kaplan, Robert C.; Kumari, Meena; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Milaneschi, Yuri; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tranah, Gregory J.; Völker, Uwe; Yu, Lei; Arnold, Alice; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Biffar, Reiner; Buchman, Aron S.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Couper, David; De Jager, Philip L.; Evans, Denis A.; Harris, Tamara B.; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hofman, Albert; Karasik, David; Kiel, Douglas P.; Kocher, Thomas; Kuningas, Maris; Launer, Lenore J.; Lohman, Kurt K.; Lutsey, Pamela L.; Mackenbach, Johan; Marciante, Kristin; Psaty, Bruce M.; Reiman, Eric M.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Seshadri, Sudha; Shardell, Michelle D.; Smith, Albert V.; van Duijn, Cornelia; Walston, Jeremy; Zillikens, M. Carola; Bandinelli, Stefania; Baumeister, Sebastian E.; Bennett, David A.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kivimaki, Mika; Liu, Yongmei; Murabito, Joanne M.; Newman, Anne B.; Tiemeier, Henning; Franceschini, Nora

    2011-01-01

    Human longevity and healthy aging show moderate heritability (20–50%). We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies from nine studies from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology Consortium for two outcomes: a) all-cause mortality and b) survival free of major disease or death. No single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was a genome-wide significant predictor of either outcome (p < 5 × 10−8). We found fourteen independent SNPs that predicted risk of death, and eight SNPs that predicted event-free survival (p < 10−5). These SNPs are in or near genes that are highly expressed in the brain (HECW2, HIP1, BIN2, GRIA1), genes involved in neural development and function (KCNQ4, LMO4, GRIA1, NETO1) and autophagy (ATG4C), and genes that are associated with risk of various diseases including cancer and Alzheimer’s disease. In addition to considerable overlap between the traits, pathway and network analysis corroborated these findings. These findings indicate that variation in genes involved in neurological processes may be an important factor in regulating aging free of major disease and achieving longevity. PMID:21782286

  13. Functional Genomics in the Study of Mind-Body Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Niles, Halsey; Mehta, Darshan H.; Corrigan, Alexandra A.; Bhasin, Manoj K.; Denninger, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Mind-body therapies (MBTs) are used throughout the world in treatment, disease prevention, and health promotion. However, the mechanisms by which MBTs exert their positive effects are not well understood. Investigations into MBTs using functional genomics have revolutionized the understanding of MBT mechanisms and their effects on human physiology. Methods We searched the literature for the effects of MBTs on functional genomics determinants using MEDLINE, supplemented by a manual search of additional journals and a reference list review. Results We reviewed 15 trials that measured global or targeted transcriptomic, epigenomic, or proteomic changes in peripheral blood. Sample sizes ranged from small pilot studies (n=2) to large trials (n=500). While the reliability of individual genes from trial to trial was often inconsistent, genes related to inflammatory response, particularly those involved in the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) pathway, were consistently downregulated across most studies. Conclusion In general, existing trials focusing on gene expression changes brought about by MBTs have revealed intriguing connections to the immune system through the NF-κB cascade, to telomere maintenance, and to apoptotic regulation. However, these findings are limited to a small number of trials and relatively small sample sizes. More rigorous randomized controlled trials of healthy subjects and specific disease states are warranted. Future research should investigate functional genomics areas both upstream and downstream of MBT-related gene expression changes—from epigenomics to proteomics and metabolomics. PMID:25598735

  14. A genome-wide association study of aging.

    PubMed

    Walter, Stefan; Atzmon, Gil; Demerath, Ellen W; Garcia, Melissa E; Kaplan, Robert C; Kumari, Meena; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Milaneschi, Yuri; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tranah, Gregory J; Völker, Uwe; Yu, Lei; Arnold, Alice; Benjamin, Emelia J; Biffar, Reiner; Buchman, Aron S; Boerwinkle, Eric; Couper, David; De Jager, Philip L; Evans, Denis A; Harris, Tamara B; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hofman, Albert; Karasik, David; Kiel, Douglas P; Kocher, Thomas; Kuningas, Maris; Launer, Lenore J; Lohman, Kurt K; Lutsey, Pamela L; Mackenbach, Johan; Marciante, Kristin; Psaty, Bruce M; Reiman, Eric M; Rotter, Jerome I; Seshadri, Sudha; Shardell, Michelle D; Smith, Albert V; van Duijn, Cornelia; Walston, Jeremy; Zillikens, M Carola; Bandinelli, Stefania; Baumeister, Sebastian E; Bennett, David A; Ferrucci, Luigi; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kivimaki, Mika; Liu, Yongmei; Murabito, Joanne M; Newman, Anne B; Tiemeier, Henning; Franceschini, Nora

    2011-11-01

    Human longevity and healthy aging show moderate heritability (20%-50%). We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies from 9 studies from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology Consortium for 2 outcomes: (1) all-cause mortality, and (2) survival free of major disease or death. No single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was a genome-wide significant predictor of either outcome (p < 5 × 10(-8)). We found 14 independent SNPs that predicted risk of death, and 8 SNPs that predicted event-free survival (p < 10(-5)). These SNPs are in or near genes that are highly expressed in the brain (HECW2, HIP1, BIN2, GRIA1), genes involved in neural development and function (KCNQ4, LMO4, GRIA1, NETO1) and autophagy (ATG4C), and genes that are associated with risk of various diseases including cancer and Alzheimer's disease. In addition to considerable overlap between the traits, pathway and network analysis corroborated these findings. These findings indicate that variation in genes involved in neurological processes may be an important factor in regulating aging free of major disease and achieving longevity.

  15. Genome-wide association study of schizophrenia in Ashkenazi Jews.

    PubMed

    Goes, Fernando S; McGrath, John; Avramopoulos, Dimitrios; Wolyniec, Paula; Pirooznia, Mehdi; Ruczinski, Ingo; Nestadt, Gerald; Kenny, Eimear E; Vacic, Vladimir; Peters, Inga; Lencz, Todd; Darvasi, Ariel; Mulle, Jennifer G; Warren, Stephen T; Pulver, Ann E

    2015-12-01

    Schizophrenia is a common, clinically heterogeneous disorder associated with lifelong morbidity and early mortality. Several genetic variants associated with schizophrenia have been identified, but the majority of the heritability remains unknown. In this study, we report on a case-control sample of Ashkenazi Jews (AJ), a founder population that may provide additional insights into genetic etiology of schizophrenia. We performed a genome-wide association analysis (GWAS) of 592 cases and 505 controls of AJ ancestry ascertained in the US. Subsequently, we performed a meta-analysis with an Israeli AJ sample of 913 cases and 1640 controls, followed by a meta-analysis and polygenic risk scoring using summary results from Psychiatric GWAS Consortium 2 schizophrenia study. The U.S. AJ sample showed strong evidence of polygenic inheritance (pseudo-R(2) ∼9.7%) and a SNP-heritability estimate of 0.39 (P = 0.00046). We found no genome-wide significant associations in the U.S. sample or in the combined US/Israeli AJ meta-analysis of 1505 cases and 2145 controls. The strongest AJ specific associations (P-values in 10(-6) -10(-7) range) were in the 22q 11.2 deletion region and included the genes TBX1, GLN1, and COMT. Supportive evidence (meta P < 1 × 10(-4) ) was also found for several previously identified genome-wide significant findings, including the HLA region, CNTN4, IMMP2L, and GRIN2A. The meta-analysis of the U.S. sample with the PGC2 results provided initial genome-wide significant evidence for six new loci. Among the novel potential susceptibility genes is PEPD, a gene involved in proline metabolism, which is associated with a Mendelian disorder characterized by developmental delay and cognitive deficits. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Genome-wide Association Studies from the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS) Initiative | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    CGEMS identifies common inherited genetic variations associated with a number of cancers, including breast and prostate. Data from these genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are available through the Division of Cancer Epidemiology & Genetics website.

  17. Somatic Genomics and Clinical Features of Lung Adenocarcinoma: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Bin; Wang, Mingyi; Pariscenti, Gianluca; Jones, Kristine; Bouk, Aaron J.; Boland, Joseph; Luke, Brian T.; Song, Lei; Duan, Jubao; Liu, Pengyuan; Kohno, Takashi; Chen, Qingrong; Meerzaman, Daoud; Marconett, Crystal; Mills, Ian; Caporaso, Neil E.; Gail, Mitchell H.; Pesatori, Angela C.; Consonni, Dario; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Chanock, Stephen J.; Landi, Maria Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Background Lung adenocarcinoma (LUAD) is the most common histologic subtype of lung cancer and has a high risk of distant metastasis at every disease stage. We aimed to characterize the genomic landscape of LUAD and identify mutation signatures associated with tumor progression. Methods and Findings We performed an integrative genomic analysis, incorporating whole exome sequencing (WES), determination of DNA copy number and DNA methylation, and transcriptome sequencing for 101 LUAD samples from the Environment And Genetics in Lung cancer Etiology (EAGLE) study. We detected driver genes by testing whether the nonsynonymous mutation rate was significantly higher than the background mutation rate and replicated our findings in public datasets with 724 samples. We performed subclonality analysis for mutations based on mutant allele data and copy number alteration data. We also tested the association between mutation signatures and clinical outcomes, including distant metastasis, survival, and tumor grade. We identified and replicated two novel candidate driver genes, POU class 4 homeobox 2 (POU4F2) (mutated in 9 [8.9%] samples) and ZKSCAN1 (mutated in 6 [5.9%] samples), and characterized their major deleterious mutations. ZKSCAN1 was part of a mutually exclusive gene set that included the RTK/RAS/RAF pathway genes BRAF, EGFR, KRAS, MET, and NF1, indicating an important driver role for this gene. Moreover, we observed strong associations between methylation in specific genomic regions and somatic mutation patterns. In the tumor evolution analysis, four driver genes had a significantly lower fraction of subclonal mutations (FSM), including TP53 (p = 0.007), KEAP1 (p = 0.012), STK11 (p = 0.0076), and EGFR (p = 0.0078), suggesting a tumor initiation role for these genes. Subclonal mutations were significantly enriched in APOBEC-related signatures (p < 2.5×10−50). The total number of somatic mutations (p = 0.0039) and the fraction of transitions (p = 5.5×10−4) were

  18. A salmonid EST genomic study: genes, duplications, phylogeny and microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Koop, Ben F; von Schalburg, Kristian R; Leong, Jong; Walker, Neil; Lieph, Ryan; Cooper, Glenn A; Robb, Adrienne; Beetz-Sargent, Marianne; Holt, Robert A; Moore, Richard; Brahmbhatt, Sonal; Rosner, Jamie; Rexroad, Caird E; McGowan, Colin R; Davidson, William S

    2008-01-01

    Background Salmonids are of interest because of their relatively recent genome duplication, and their extensive use in wild fisheries and aquaculture. A comprehensive gene list and a comparison of genes in some of the different species provide valuable genomic information for one of the most widely studied groups of fish. Results 298,304 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from Atlantic salmon (69% of the total), 11,664 chinook, 10,813 sockeye, 10,051 brook trout, 10,975 grayling, 8,630 lake whitefish, and 3,624 northern pike ESTs were obtained in this study and have been deposited into the public databases. Contigs were built and putative full-length Atlantic salmon clones have been identified. A database containing ESTs, assemblies, consensus sequences, open reading frames, gene predictions and putative annotation is available. The overall similarity between Atlantic salmon ESTs and those of rainbow trout, chinook, sockeye, brook trout, grayling, lake whitefish, northern pike and rainbow smelt is 93.4, 94.2, 94.6, 94.4, 92.5, 91.7, 89.6, and 86.2% respectively. An analysis of 78 transcript sets show Salmo as a sister group to Oncorhynchus and Salvelinus within Salmoninae, and Thymallinae as a sister group to Salmoninae and Coregoninae within Salmonidae. Extensive gene duplication is consistent with a genome duplication in the common ancestor of salmonids. Using all of the available EST data, a new expanded salmonid cDNA microarray of 32,000 features was created. Cross-species hybridizations to this cDNA microarray indicate that this resource will be useful for studies of all 68 salmonid species. Conclusion An extensive collection and analysis of salmonid RNA putative transcripts indicate that Pacific salmon, Atlantic salmon and charr are 94–96% similar while the more distant whitefish, grayling, pike and smelt are 93, 92, 89 and 86% similar to salmon. The salmonid transcriptome reveals a complex history of gene duplication that is consistent with an ancestral

  19. Genome-Wide Association Study of Polymorphisms Predisposing to Bronchiolitis

    PubMed Central

    Pasanen, Anu; Karjalainen, Minna K.; Bont, Louis; Piippo-Savolainen, Eija; Ruotsalainen, Marja; Goksör, Emma; Kumawat, Kuldeep; Hodemaekers, Hennie; Nuolivirta, Kirsi; Jartti, Tuomas; Wennergren, Göran; Hallman, Mikko; Rämet, Mika; Korppi, Matti

    2017-01-01

    Bronchiolitis is a major cause of hospitalization among infants. Severe bronchiolitis is associated with later asthma, suggesting a common genetic predisposition. Genetic background of bronchiolitis is not well characterized. To identify polymorphisms associated with bronchiolitis, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in which 5,300,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were tested for association in a Finnish–Swedish population of 217 children hospitalized for bronchiolitis and 778 controls. The most promising SNPs (n = 77) were genotyped in a Dutch replication population of 416 cases and 432 controls. Finally, we used a set of 202 Finnish bronchiolitis cases to further investigate candidate SNPs. We did not detect genome-wide significant associations, but several suggestive association signals (p < 10−5) were observed in the GWAS. In the replication population, three SNPs were nominally associated (p < 0.05). Of them, rs269094 was an expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) for KCND3, previously shown to be associated with occupational asthma. In the additional set of Finnish cases, the association for another SNP (rs9591920) within a noncoding RNA locus was further strengthened. Our results provide a first genome-wide examination of the genetics underlying bronchiolitis. These preliminary findings require further validation in a larger sample size. PMID:28139761

  20. Using Genomics to Study Human Biology and Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, Ricard M.

    2005-04-06

    The Human Genome Project culminated in April 2003 with the finished DNA sequence of all of the human chromosomes. This book of information, particularly in conjunction with the genome sequences of many other organisms, has already begun to revolutionize the way that biomedical scientists study our species. The identification of essentially all of our genes has provided a template upon which researchers can discover basic processes that govern cells, organs, and the whole organism, and to understand the fundamental causes of the diseases that occur when something goes wrong with a gene or a set of genes. The Genome Project has already made it possible to identify the genes that are defective in more than 1,000 rare inherited diseases, and these discoveries have helped to understand the mechanisms of the more common forms of these disorders. This understanding of primary defects in diseases - which is translated as mutations in genes that encode proteins that serve specific functions - is transforming the way that biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies identify drug targets, and a few notable cases have already had a striking impact on specific diseases. In addition, it has become clear that the differential response to drugs in human populations is heavily influenced by genes, and a whole field called pharmacogenetics has begun to identify these genetic factors. Such knowledge will allow physicians to prescribe drugs targeted to each individual, with the potential to increase efficacy and decrease side-effects. Determining the DNA sequence of the human genome and identifying the genes has been an exciting endeavor, but we are only just beginning to understand the treasures present in all of our DNA. My presentation will briefly describe the road we took to get the sequence, as well as the tools that we are developing to unlock its secrets.

  1. Progress in a genome scan for linkage in schizophrenia in a large Swedish kindred

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, C.L.; Kennedy, J.L.; Pakstis, A.J.

    1994-03-15

    Genetic linkage studies of a kindred from Sweden segregating for schizophrenia have been performed using a genetic model (autosomal dominant, f - 0.72, q - 0.02, phenocopies=0.001) as described in Kennedy et al., 1988. Analyses of the restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), allele-specific oligonucleotides (ASO), and short tandem repeat (STR also called microsatellite) data for 180 polymorphisms (individual probe-enzyme, ASO, or STR systems) at 155 loci have been completed using the MLINK and LIPED programs. Linkage to schizophrenia was excluded, under the given model, at 47 loci; indeterminate lod scores occurred at 108 loci. The total exclusion region across 20 chromosomes is estimated at 330 cM; 211 cM excluded by pairwise analyses and 119 cM previously excluded by multipoint analyses. 37 refs., 2 tabs.

  2. A genome-wide association study of sporadic ALS in a homogenous Irish population.

    PubMed

    Cronin, Simon; Berger, Stephen; Ding, Jinhui; Schymick, Jennifer C; Washecka, Nicole; Hernandez, Dena G; Greenway, Matthew J; Bradley, Daniel G; Traynor, Bryan J; Hardiman, Orla

    2008-03-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive limb or bulbar weakness. Efforts to elucidate the disease-associated loci have to date produced conflicting results. One strategy to improve power in genome-wide studies is to genotype a genetically homogenous population. Such a population exhibits extended linkage disequilibrium (LD) and lower allelic heterogeneity to facilitate disease gene mapping. We sought to identify associated variants for ALS in the Irish, a stable population of relatively homogenous genetic background, and to replicate these findings in larger genetically out-bred populations. We conducted a genome-wide association study in 432 Irish individuals using Illumina HumanHap 550K single nucleotide polymorphism chips. We demonstrated extended LD and increased homogeneity in the Irish sample when compared to an out-bred population of mixed European ancestry. The Irish scan identified 35 loci associated with P-values below 0.0001. For replication, we identified seven chromosomal regions commonly associated in a joint analysis of genome-wide data on 958 ALS cases and 932 controls from Ireland and the previously published datasets from the US and The Netherlands. When pooled, the strongest association was a variant in the gene encoding DPP6, a component of type A neuronal transmembrane potassium channels. Further confirmation of the candidate loci is warranted in additional genome-wide datasets. We have made our individual genotyping data publicly available, contributing to a powerful world-wide resource to refine our understanding of the genetics of sporadic ALS.

  3. Genome-wide Association Studies for Osteoporosis: A 2013 Update

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yong-Jun; Zhang, Lei; Papasian, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    In the past few years, the bone field has witnessed great advances in genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of osteoporosis, with a number of promising genes identified. In particular, meta-analysis of GWASs, aimed at increasing the power of studies by combining the results from different study populations, have led to the identification of novel associations that would not otherwise have been identified in individual GWASs. Recently, the first whole genome sequencing study for osteoporosis and fractures was published, reporting a novel rare nonsense mutation. This review summarizes the important and representative findings published by December 2013. Comments are made on the notable findings and representative studies for their potential influence and implications on our present understanding of the genetics of osteoporosis. Potential limitations of GWASs and their meta-analyses are evaluated, with an emphasis on understanding the reasons for inconsistent results between different studies and clarification of misinterpretation of GWAS meta-analysis results. Implications and challenges of GWAS are also discussed, including the need for multi- and inter-disciplinary studies. PMID:25006567

  4. Genome-wide association studies and contribution to cardiovascular physiology

    PubMed Central

    Munroe, Patricia B.

    2015-01-01

    The study of family pedigrees with rare monogenic cardiovascular disorders has revealed new molecular players in physiological processes. Genome-wide association studies of complex traits with a heritable component may afford a similar and potentially intellectually richer opportunity. In this review we focus on the interpretation of genetic associations and the issue of causality in relation to known and potentially new physiology. We mainly discuss cardiometabolic traits as it reflects our personal interests, but the issues pertain broadly in many other disciplines. We also describe some of the resources that are now available that may expedite follow up of genetic association signals into observations on causal mechanisms and pathophysiology. PMID:26106147

  5. [Genome-wide association study for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis].

    PubMed

    Ogura, Yoji; Kou, Ikuyo; Scoliosis, Japan; Matsumoto, Morio; Watanabe, Kota; Ikegawa, Shiro

    2016-04-01

    Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis(AIS)is a polygenic disease. Genome-wide association studies(GWASs)have been performed for a lot of polygenic diseases. For AIS, we conducted GWAS and identified the first AIS locus near LBX1. After the discovery, we have extended our study by increasing the numbers of subjects and SNPs. In total, our Japanese GWAS has identified four susceptibility genes. GWASs for AIS have also been performed in the USA and China, which identified one and three susceptibility genes, respectively. Here we review GWASs in Japan and abroad and functional analysis to clarify the pathomechanism of AIS.

  6. A Review on Progress in QSPR Studies for Surfactants

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jiwei; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Wang, Zhengwu

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a review on recent progress in quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) studies of surfactants and applications of various molecular descriptors. QSPR studies on critical micelle concentration (cmc) and surface tension (γ) of surfactants are introduced. Studies on charge distribution in ionic surfactants by quantum chemical calculations and its effects on the structures and properties of the colloids of surfactants are also reviewed. The trends of QSPR studies on cloud point (for nonionic surfactants), biodegradation potential and some other properties of surfactants are evaluated. PMID:20479997

  7. Study Progress on Tissue Culture of Maize Mature Embryo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongzhen; Cheng, Jun; Cheng, Yanping; Zhou, Xioafu

    It has been paid more and more attention on maize tissue culture as it is a basic work in maize genetic transformation, especially huge breakthrough has been made in maize tissue culture utilizing mature embryos as explants in the recent years. This paper reviewed the study progress on maize tissue culture and plant regeneration utilizing mature embryos as explants from callus induction, subculture, plant regeneration and browning reduction and so on.

  8. Sources for Comparative Studies of Placentation. II. Genomic Resources

    PubMed Central

    Wildman, Derek E.

    2008-01-01

    The genomes of dozens of placental mammal species are now publicly available. These genome sequences have the potential to provide insight into the development and evolution of the placenta. In particular, the variable anatomy of the placenta has likely been affected by natural selection on the genomes of living and extinct mammals. In this note the current availability of mammal genome sequences is reviewed, and strengths and limitations of these data are discussed. Additionally, museums, zoos, and commercial entities are available to provide genomic resources to the placental research community. Recommendations for tissue storage conditions of placentas in genomic research are given. PMID:18155141

  9. Anonymizing patient genomic data for public sharing association studies.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Lozano, Carlos; Lopez-Campos, Guillermo; Seoane, Jose A; Lopez-Alonso, Victoria; Dorado, Julian; Martín-Sanchez, Fernando; Pazos, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    The development of personalized medicine is tightly linked with the correct exploitation of molecular data, especially those associated with the genome sequence along with these use of genomic data there is an increasing demand to share these data for research purposes. Transition of clinical data to research is based in the anonymization of these data so the patient cannot be identified, the use of genomic data poses a great challenge because its nature of identifying data. In this work we have analyzed current methods for genome anonymization and propose a one way encryption method that may enable the process of genomic data sharing accessing only to certain regions of genomes for research purposes.

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptomyces ambofaciens DSM 40697, a Paradigm for Genome Plasticity Studies

    PubMed Central

    Thibessard, Annabelle

    2016-01-01

    The sequence of Streptomyces ambofaciens DSM 40697 was completely determined. The genome consists of an 8.1-Mbp linear chromosome with terminal inverted repeats of 210 kb. Genomic islands were identified, one of which corresponds to a new putative integrative and conjugative element (ICE) called pSAM3. PMID:27257195

  11. The tumor suppressor SirT2 regulates cell cycle progression and genome stability by modulating the mitotic deposition of H4K20 methylation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The establishment of the epigenetic mark H4K20me1 (monomethylation of H4K20) by PR-Set7 during G2/M directly impacts S-phase progression and genome stability. However, the mechanisms involved in the regulation of this event are not well understood. Here we show that SirT2 regulates H4K20me1 depositi...

  12. Chromosome region-specific libraries for human genome analysis. Final progress report, 1 March 1991--28 February 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, F.T.

    1994-04-01

    The objectives of this grant proposal include (1) development of a chromosome microdissection and PCR-mediated microcloning technology, (2) application of this microtechnology to the construction of region-specific libraries for human genome analysis. During this grant period, the authors have successfully developed this microtechnology and have applied it to the construction of microdissection libraries for the following chromosome regions: a whole chromosome 21 (21E), 2 region-specific libraries for the long arm of chromosome 2, 2q35-q37 (2Q1) and 2q33-q35 (2Q2), and 4 region-specific libraries for the entire short arm of chromosome 2, 2p23-p25 (2P1), 2p21-p23 (2P2), 2p14-p16 (wP3) and 2p11-p13 (2P4). In addition, 20--40 unique sequence microclones have been isolated and characterized for genomic studies. These region-specific libraries and the single-copy microclones from the library have been used as valuable resources for (1) isolating microsatellite probes in linkage analysis to further refine the disease locus; (2) isolating corresponding clones with large inserts, e.g. YAC, BAC, P1, cosmid and phage, to facilitate construction of contigs for high resolution physical mapping; and (3) isolating region-specific cDNA clones for use as candidate genes. These libraries are being deposited in the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) for general distribution.

  13. Genome-wide association study of parity in Bangladeshi women.

    PubMed

    Aschebrook-Kilfoy, Briseis; Argos, Maria; Pierce, Brandon L; Tong, Lin; Jasmine, Farzana; Roy, Shantanu; Parvez, Faruque; Ahmed, Alauddin; Islam, Tariqul; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Ahsan, Habibul

    2015-01-01

    Human fertility is a complex trait determined by gene-environment interactions in which genetic factors represent a significant component. To better understand inter-individual variability in fertility, we performed one of the first genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of common fertility phenotypes, lifetime number of pregnancies and number of children in a developing country population. The fertility phenotype data and DNA samples were obtained at baseline recruitment from individuals participating in a large prospective cohort study in Bangladesh. GWAS analyses of fertility phenotypes were conducted among 1,686 married women. One SNP on chromosome 4 was non-significantly associated with number of children at P <10(-7) and number of pregnancies at P <10(-6). This SNP is located in a region without a gene within 1 Mb. One SNP on chromosome 6 was non-significantly associated with extreme number of children at P <10(-6). The closest gene to this SNP is HDGFL1, a hepatoma-derived growth factor. When we excluded hormonal contraceptive users, a SNP on chromosome 5 was non-significantly associated at P <10(-5) for number of children and number of pregnancies. This SNP is located near C5orf64, an open reading frame, and ZSWIM6, a zinc ion binding gene. We also estimated the heritability of these phenotypes from our genotype data using GCTA (Genome-wide Complex Trait Analysis) for number of children (hg2 = 0.149, SE = 0.24, p-value = 0.265) and number of pregnancies (hg2 = 0.007, SE = 0.22, p-value = 0.487). Our genome-wide association study and heritability estimates of number of pregnancies and number of children in Bangladesh did not confer strong evidence of common variants for parity variation. However, our results suggest that future studies may want to consider the role of 3 notable SNPs in their analysis.

  14. A model for the initiation and progression of non-chromaffin paragangliomas: An autosomal dominant disorder with genetic heterogeneity and genomic imprinting

    SciTech Connect

    Mariman, E.C.M.; Beersum, S.E.C. van; Ropers, H.H.

    1994-09-01

    Non-chromaffin paragangliomas are autosomal dominantly inherited tumors of the head and neck region (frequency: 1:30,000). Genomic imprinting influences the expression of the disorder. Tumor development is restricted to offspring of male disease gene carriers. By linkage analysis and haplotyping of a single family, in which the pattern of inheritance is consistent with genomic imprinting, we have mapped the gene to a 5 cM region of chromosome 11q13.1 between D11S956 and PYGM. A maximum lod score of 7.62 at {theta}=0.0 was obtained for D11S480. This interval does not overlap with the segment 11q22.3-q23.3, to which a locus for glomus tumors has been assigned in other families. Moreover, the 5cM interval was excluded as the location of the disease gene in a second family showing the imprinting phenomenon, whereas an indication for linkage was obtained (Z=+2.65) with markers from the distal locus. These observations argue for the presence of two distinct imprinted genes for paragangliomas on 11q. Clinical findings suggest that at least one, but probably both genes code for tumor suppressor required for tumor initiation. According to this model, imprinting would account for the silencing of the two maternal copies, whereas a paternal copy would be inactive due to an inherited mutation. Tumors would then result from somatic inactivation of the other paternal gene copy in individual cells. In tumors, relaxation of imprinting seems to be a frequent feature. Here, it would necessitate subsequent inactivation of maternal gene copies to allow tumor progression. Indeed, selective loss of maternal alleles in paragangliomas has been observed with markers from 11 q. Definite proof for this model should come from the isolation and expression studies of the involved genes.

  15. Advances in silkworm studies accelerated by the genome sequencing of Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Xia, Qingyou; Li, Sheng; Feng, Qili

    2014-01-01

    Significant progress has been achieved in silkworm (Bombyx mori) research since the last review on this insect was published in this journal in 2005. In this article, we review the new and exciting progress and discoveries that have been made in B. mori during the past 10 years, which include the construction of a fine genome sequence and a genetic variation map, the evolution of genomes, the advent of functional genomics, the genetic basis of silk production, metamorphic development, immune response, and the advances in genetic manipulation. These advances, which were accelerated by the genome sequencing project, have promoted B. mori as a model organism not only for lepidopterans but also for general biology.

  16. A genome-wide association study for malignant mesothelioma risk.

    PubMed

    Cadby, Gemma; Mukherjee, Sutapa; Musk, A W Bill; Reid, Alison; Garlepp, Mike; Dick, Ian; Robinson, Cleo; Hui, Jennie; Fiorito, Giovanni; Guarrera, Simonetta; Beilby, John; Melton, Phillip E; Moses, Eric K; Ugolini, Donatella; Mirabelli, Dario; Bonassi, Stefano; Magnani, Corrado; Dianzani, Irma; Matullo, Giuseppe; Robinson, Bruce; Creaney, Jenette; Palmer, Lyle J

    2013-10-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is a uniformly fatal tumour of mesothelial cells. MM is caused by exposure to asbestos however most individuals with documented asbestos exposure do not develop MM. Although MM appears to aggregate within families, the genetics of MM susceptibility is a relatively unexplored area. The aim of the current study was to identify genetic factors that contribute to MM risk. A genome-wide association analysis of 2,508,203 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 428 MM cases and 1269 controls from Western Australia was performed. Additional genotyping was performed on a sample of 778 asbestos-exposed Western Australian controls. Replication of the most strongly associated SNPs was undertaken in an independent case-control study of 392 asbestos-exposed cases and 367 asbestos-exposed controls from Italy. No SNPs achieved formal genome-wide statistical significance in the Western Australian study. However, suggestive results for MM risk were identified in the SDK1, CRTAM and RASGRF2 genes, and in the 2p12 chromosomal region. These findings were not replicated in the Italian study, although there was some evidence of replication in the region of SDK1. These suggestive associations will be further investigated in sequencing and functional studies. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  17. Genome-wide association study and premature ovarian failure.

    PubMed

    Christin-Maitre, S; Tachdjian, G

    2010-05-01

    Premature ovarian failure (POF) is defined as an amenorrhea for more than 4months, associated with elevated gonadotropins, usually higher than 20mIU/ml, occurring in a woman before the age of 40. Some candidate genes have been identified in the past 15years, such as FOXL2, FSHR, BMP15, GDF9, Xfra premutation. However, POF etiology remains unknown in more than 90% of cases. The first strategy to identify candidate gene, apart from studying genes involved in ovarian failure in animal models, relies on the study of X chromosome deletions and X;autosome translocations in patients. The second strategy is based on linkage analysis, the third one on Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) array. The latest strategy relies on Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS). This technique consists in screening single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in patients and controls. So far, three studies have been performed and have identified different loci potentially linked to POF, such as PTHB1 and ADAMTS19. However, replications in independent cohorts need to be performed. GWAS studies on large cohorts of women with POF should find new candidate genes in the near future. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  18. Voxelwise genome-wide association study (vGWAS)

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Jason L.; Hua, Xue; Lee, Suh; Ho, April J.; Leow, Alex D.; Toga, Arthur W.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Shen, Li; Foroud, Tatiana; Pankratz, Nathan; Huentelman, Matthew J.; Craig, David W.; Gerber, Jill D.; Allen, April N.; Corneveaux, Jason J.; DeChairo, Bryan M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Weiner, Michael W.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2010-01-01

    The structure of the human brain is highly heritable, and is thought to be influenced by many common genetic variants, many of which are currently unknown. Recent advances in neuroimaging and genetics have allowed collection of both highly detailed structural brain scans and genome-wide genotype information. This wealth of information presents a new opportunity to find the genes influencing brain structure. Here we explore the relation between 448,293 single nucleotide polymorphisms in each of 31,622 voxels of the entire brain across 740 elderly subjects (mean age±s.d.: 75.52±6.82 years; 438 male) including subjects with Alzheimer's disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, and healthy elderly controls from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). We used tensor-based morphometry to measure individual differences in brain structure at the voxel level relative to a study-specific template based on healthy elderly subjects. We then conducted a genome-wide association at each voxel to identify genetic variants of interest. By studying only the most associated variant at each voxel, we developed a novel method to address the multiple comparisons problem and computational burden associated with the unprecedented amount of data. No variant survived the strict significance criterion, but several genes worthy of further exploration were identified, including CSMD2 and CADPS2. These genes have high relevance to brain structure. This is the first voxelwise genome wide association study to our knowledge, and offers a novel method to discover genetic influences on brain structure. PMID:20171287

  19. Genome-wide association study of conduct disorder symptomatology

    PubMed Central

    Dick, DM; Aliev, F; Krueger, RF; Edwards, A; Agrawal, A; Lynskey, M; Lin, P; Schuckit, M; Hesselbrock, V; Nurnberger, J; Almasy, L; Porjesz, B; Edenberg, HJ; Bucholz, K; Kramer, J; Kuperman, S; Bierut, L

    2013-01-01

    Conduct disorder (CD) is one of the most prevalent childhood psychiatric conditions, and is associated with a number of serious concomitant and future problems. CD symptomatology is known to have a considerable genetic component, with heritability estimates in the range of 50%. Despite this, there is a relative paucity of studies aimed at identifying genes involved in the susceptibility to CD. In this study, we report results from a genome-wide association study of CD symptoms. CD symptoms were retrospectively reported by a psychiatric interview among a sample of cases and controls, in which cases met the criteria for alcohol dependence. Our primary phenotype was the natural log transformation of the number of CD symptoms that were endorsed, with data available for 3963 individuals who were genotyped on the Illumina Human 1M beadchip array. Secondary analyses are presented for case versus control status, in which caseness was established as endorsing three or more CD symptoms (N= 872 with CD and N= 3091 without CD). We find four markers that meet the criteria for genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10−8) with the CD symptom count, two of which are located in the gene C1QTNF7 (C1q and tumor necrosis factor-related protein 7). There were six additional SNPs in the gene that yielded converging evidence of association. These data provide the first evidence of a specific gene that is associated with CD symptomatology. None of the top signals resided in traditional candidate genes, underscoring the importance of a genome-wide approach for identifying novel variants involved in this serious childhood disorder. PMID:20585324

  20. Genetic studies of quantitative MCI and AD phenotypes in ADNI: Progress, opportunities, and plans.

    PubMed

    Saykin, Andrew J; Shen, Li; Yao, Xiaohui; Kim, Sungeun; Nho, Kwangsik; Risacher, Shannon L; Ramanan, Vijay K; Foroud, Tatiana M; Faber, Kelley M; Sarwar, Nadeem; Munsie, Leanne M; Hu, Xiaolan; Soares, Holly D; Potkin, Steven G; Thompson, Paul M; Kauwe, John S K; Kaddurah-Daouk, Rima; Green, Robert C; Toga, Arthur W; Weiner, Michael W

    2015-07-01

    Genetic data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) have been crucial in advancing the understanding of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathophysiology. Here, we provide an update on sample collection, scientific progress and opportunities, conceptual issues, and future plans. Lymphoblastoid cell lines and DNA and RNA samples from blood have been collected and banked, and data and biosamples have been widely disseminated. To date, APOE genotyping, genome-wide association study (GWAS), and whole exome and whole genome sequencing data have been obtained and disseminated. ADNI genetic data have been downloaded thousands of times, and >300 publications have resulted, including reports of large-scale GWAS by consortia to which ADNI contributed. Many of the first applications of quantitative endophenotype association studies used ADNI data, including some of the earliest GWAS and pathway-based studies of biospecimen and imaging biomarkers, as well as memory and other clinical/cognitive variables. Other contributions include some of the first whole exome and whole genome sequencing data sets and reports in healthy controls, mild cognitive impairment, and AD. Numerous genetic susceptibility and protective markers for AD and disease biomarkers have been identified and replicated using ADNI data and have heavily implicated immune, mitochondrial, cell cycle/fate, and other biological processes. Early sequencing studies suggest that rare and structural variants are likely to account for significant additional phenotypic variation. Longitudinal analyses of transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolomic, and epigenomic changes will also further elucidate dynamic processes underlying preclinical and prodromal stages of disease. Integration of this unique collection of multiomics data within a systems biology framework will help to separate truly informative markers of early disease mechanisms and potential novel therapeutic targets from the vast background of less relevant

  1. [New insight of genome-wide association study (GWAS)].

    PubMed

    Hotta, Kikuko

    2013-02-01

    The number of obese patients is increasing in Japan, due to the westernization of lifestyle. Obesity, especially visceral fat obesity, is important for the development of metabolic syndrome. Genetic factors are important for the development of obesity as well as environmental factors. Importance of genetic factors of fat distribution is also reported. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have revealed the obesity and fat distribution-related polymorphisms. GWAS will highlight a better understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms in the regulation of obesity and distribution of body fat.

  2. Genomics for public health improvement: relevant international ethical and policy issues around genome-wide association studies and biobanks.

    PubMed

    Pang, T

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies and biobanks are at the forefront of genomics research and possess unprecedented potential to improve public health. However, for public health genomics to ultimately fulfill its potential, technological and scientific advances alone are insufficient. Scientists, ethicists, policy makers, and regulators must work closely together with research participants and communities in order to craft an equitable and just ethical framework, and a sustainable environment for effective policies. Such a framework should be a 'hybrid' form which balances equity and solidarity with entrepreneurship and scientific advances. A good balance between research and policy on one hand, and privacy, protection and trust on the other is the key for public health improvement based on advances in genomics science.

  3. Genome-Wide Association Study of Metabolic Syndrome in Koreans

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Seok Won; Chung, Myungguen; Park, Soo-Jung; Cho, Seong Beom

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (METS) is a disorder of energy utilization and storage and increases the risk of developing cardiovascular disease and diabetes. To identify the genetic risk factors of METS, we carried out a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for 2,657 cases and 5,917 controls in Korean populations. As a result, we could identify 2 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with genome-wide significance level p-values (<5 × 10-8), 8 SNPs with genome-wide suggestive p-values (5 × 10-8 ≤ p < 1 × 10-5), and 2 SNPs of more functional variants with borderline p-values (5 × 10-5 ≤ p < 1 × 10-4). On the other hand, the multiple correction criteria of conventional GWASs exclude false-positive loci, but simultaneously, they discard many true-positive loci. To reconsider the discarded true-positive loci, we attempted to include the functional variants (nonsynonymous SNPs [nsSNPs] and expression quantitative trait loci [eQTL]) among the top 5,000 SNPs based on the proportion of phenotypic variance explained by genotypic variance. In total, 159 eQTLs and 18 nsSNPs were presented in the top 5,000 SNPs. Although they should be replicated in other independent populations, 6 eQTLs and 2 nsSNP loci were located in the molecular pathways of LPL, APOA5, and CHRM2, which were the significant or suggestive loci in the METS GWAS. Conclusively, our approach using the conventional GWAS, reconsidering functional variants and pathway-based interpretation, suggests a useful method to understand the GWAS results of complex traits and can be expanded in other genomewide association studies. PMID:25705157

  4. GenomicusPlants: a web resource to study genome evolution in flowering plants.

    PubMed

    Louis, Alexandra; Murat, Florent; Salse, Jérôme; Crollius, Hugues Roest

    2015-01-01

    Comparative genomics combined with phylogenetic reconstructions are powerful approaches to study the evolution of genes and genomes. However, the current rapid expansion of the volume of genomic information makes it increasingly difficult to interrogate, integrate and synthesize comparative genome data while taking into account the maximum breadth of information available. GenomicusPlants (http://www.genomicus.biologie.ens.fr/genomicus-plants) is an extension of the Genomicus webserver that addresses this issue by allowing users to explore flowering plant genomes in an intuitive way, across the broadest evolutionary scales. Extant genomes of 26 flowering plants can be analyzed, as well as 23 ancestral reconstructed genomes. Ancestral gene order provides a long-term chronological view of gene order evolution, greatly facilitating comparative genomics and evolutionary studies. Four main interfaces ('views') are available where: (i) PhyloView combines phylogenetic trees with comparisons of genomic loci across any number of genomes; (ii) AlignView projects loci of interest against all other genomes to visualize its topological conservation; (iii) MatrixView compares two genomes in a classical dotplot representation; and (iv) Karyoview visualizes chromosome karyotypes 'painted' with colours of another genome of interest. All four views are interconnected and benefit from many customizable features.

  5. GenomicusPlants: A Web Resource to Study Genome Evolution in Flowering Plants

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Alexandra; Murat, Florent; Salse, Jérôme; Roest Crollius, Hugues

    2015-01-01

    Comparative genomics combined with phylogenetic reconstructions are powerful approaches to study the evolution of genes and genomes. However, the current rapid expansion of the volume of genomic information makes it increasingly difficult to interrogate, integrate and synthesize comparative genome data while taking into account the maximum breadth of information available. GenomicusPlants (http://www.genomicus.biologie.ens.fr/genomicus-plants) is an extension of the Genomicus webserver that addresses this issue by allowing users to explore flowering plant genomes in an intuitive way, across the broadest evolutionary scales. Extant genomes of 26 flowering plants can be analyzed, as well as 23 ancestral reconstructed genomes. Ancestral gene order provides a long-term chronological view of gene order evolution, greatly facilitating comparative genomics and evolutionary studies. Four main interfaces (‘views’) are available where: (i) PhyloView combines phylogenetic trees with comparisons of genomic loci across any number of genomes; (ii) AlignView projects loci of interest against all other genomes to visualize its topological conservation; (iii) MatrixView compares two genomes in a classical dotplot representation; and (iv) Karyoview visualizes chromosome karyotypes ‘painted’ with colours of another genome of interest. All four views are interconnected and benefit from many customizable features. PMID:25432975

  6. Study of atmospheric pollution scavenging. Twenty-fourth progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, A.L.

    1990-08-01

    Atmospheric scavenging research conducted by the Illinois State Water Survey under contract with the Department of Energy has been a significant factor in the historical development of the field of precipitation scavenging. Emphasis of the work during the 1980`s became focused on the problem of acid rain problem with the Survey being chosen as the Central Analytical Laboratory for sample analysis of the National Atmospheric Deposition Program National Trends Network (NADP/NTN). The DOE research was responsible for laying the groundwork from the standpoint of sampling and chemical analysis that has now become routine features of NADP/NTN. A significant aspect of the research has been the participation by the Water Survey in the MAP3S precipitation sampling network which is totally supported by DOE, is the longest continuous precipitation sampling network in existence, and maintains an event sampling protocol. The following review consists of a short description of each of the papers appearing in the Study of Atmospheric Scavenging progress reports starting with the Eighteenth Progress Report in 1980 to the Twenty- Third Progress Report in 1989. In addition a listing of the significant publications and interviews associated with the program are given in the bibliography.

  7. Genome-Wide Association Studies of the Human Gut Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, Emily R.; Cusanovich, Darren A.; Michelini, Katelyn; Barreiro, Luis B.; Ober, Carole; Gilad, Yoav

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial composition of the human fecal microbiome is influenced by many lifestyle factors, notably diet. It is less clear, however, what role host genetics plays in dictating the composition of bacteria living in the gut. In this study, we examined the association of ~200K host genotypes with the relative abundance of fecal bacterial taxa in a founder population, the Hutterites, during two seasons (n = 91 summer, n = 93 winter, n = 57 individuals collected in both). These individuals live and eat communally, minimizing variation due to environmental exposures, including diet, which could potentially mask small genetic effects. Using a GWAS approach that takes into account the relatedness between subjects, we identified at least 8 bacterial taxa whose abundances were associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms in the host genome in each season (at genome-wide FDR of 20%). For example, we identified an association between a taxon known to affect obesity (genus Akkermansia) and a variant near PLD1, a gene previously associated with body mass index. Moreover, we replicate a previously reported association from a quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping study of fecal microbiome abundance in mice (genus Lactococcus, rs3747113, P = 3.13 x 10−7). Finally, based on the significance distribution of the associated microbiome QTLs in our study with respect to chromatin accessibility profiles, we identified tissues in which host genetic variation may be acting to influence bacterial abundance in the gut. PMID:26528553

  8. Defining personal utility in genomics: A Delphi study.

    PubMed

    Kohler, J; Turbitt, E; Lewis, K L; Wilfond, B S; Jamal, L; Peay, H L; Biesecker, L G; Biesecker, B B

    2017-02-20

    Individual genome sequencing results are valued by patients in ways distinct from clinical utility. Such outcomes have been described as components of "personal utility," a concept that broadly encompasses patient-endorsed benefits, that is operationally defined as non-clinical outcomes. No empirical delineation of these outcomes has been reported. To address this gap, we administered a Delphi survey to adult participants in a NIH clinical exome study to extract the most highly endorsed outcomes constituting personal utility. Forty research participants responded to a Delphi survey to rate 35 items identified by a systematic literature review of personal utility. Two rounds of ranking resulted in 24 items that represented 14 distinct elements of personal utility. Elements most highly endorsed by participants were: increased self-knowledge, knowledge of "the condition," altruism, and anticipated coping. Our findings represent the first systematic effort to delineate elements of personal utility that may be used to anticipate participant expectation and inform genetic counseling prior to sequencing. The 24 items reported need to be studied further in additional clinical genome sequencing studies to assess generalizability in other populations. Further research will help to understand motivations and to predict the meaning and use of results.

  9. Relationship between public attitudes toward genomic studies related to medicine and their level of genomic literacy in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ishiyama, Izumi; Nagai, Akiko; Muto, Kaori; Tamakoshi, Akiko; Kokado, Minori; Mimura, Kyoko; Tanzawa, Tetsuro; Yamagata, Zentaro

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess public attitudes toward the promotion of genomic studies related to medicine and to examine the relationship between public attitudes and the level of genomic literacy by analyzing data from a nationwide opinion survey. The participants comprised 4,000 people (age, 20-69) selected from the Japanese general population by using the two-step stratified random sampling method. They were queried on the following topics in a mail survey: (1) pros and cons of the promotion of genomic studies related to medicine, (2) level of scientific literacy in genomics, (3) demographic and socioeconomic background, and (4) knowledge and attitudes toward science in general and genetic testing in particular. We examined the relationship between the approval of promotion and literacy level, using logistic regression models stratified by gender. Our results showed the response rate was 54.3% (2,171/4,000), and 69.4% participants favored the promotion of genomic studies related to medicine. Only 1.3% participants expressed a negative attitude. Multivariate analysis revealed that approval of promotion was related to a high literacy score. This relationship was stronger in males than in females (the highest quartile of score vs. the lowest: adjusted odds ratio, 3.36 for males and 1.86 for females; 95% confidence interval, 1.88-5.98 for males and 1.17-2.95 for females). We determined that a majority of the Japanese participants currently approved of the promotion of genomic studies related to medicine and that people with a high level of genomic literacy tended to approve the promotion.

  10. Genome-wide association study of working memory brain activation.

    PubMed

    Blokland, Gabriëlla A M; Wallace, Angus K; Hansell, Narelle K; Thompson, Paul M; Hickie, Ian B; Montgomery, Grant W; Martin, Nicholas G; McMahon, Katie L; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Wright, Margaret J

    2017-05-01

    In a population-based genome-wide association (GWA) study of n-back working memory task-related brain activation, we extracted the average percent BOLD signal change (2-back minus 0-back) from 46 regions-of-interest (ROIs) in functional MRI scans from 863 healthy twins and siblings. ROIs were obtained by creating spheres around group random effects analysis local maxima, and by thresholding a voxel-based heritability map of working memory brain activation at 50%. Quality control for test-retest reliability and heritability of ROI measures yielded 20 reliable (r>0.7) and heritable (h(2)>20%) ROIs. For GWA analysis, the cohort was divided into a discovery (n=679) and replication (n=97) sample. No variants survived the stringent multiple-testing-corrected genome-wide significance threshold (p<4.5×10(-9)), or were replicated (p<0.0016), but several genes were identified that are worthy of further investigation. A search of 529,379 genomic markers resulted in discovery of 31 independent single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with BOLD signal change at a discovery level of p<1×10(-5). Two SNPs (rs7917410 and rs7672408) were associated at a significance level of p<1×10(-7). Only one, most strongly affecting BOLD signal change in the left supramarginal gyrus (R(2)=5.5%), had multiple SNPs associated at p<1×10(-5) in linkage disequilibrium with it, all located in and around the BANK1 gene. BANK1 encodes a B-cell-specific scaffold protein and has been shown to negatively regulate CD40-mediated AKT activation. AKT is part of the dopamine-signaling pathway, suggesting a mechanism for the involvement of BANK1 in the BOLD response to working memory. Variants identified here may be relevant to (the susceptibility to) common disorders affecting brain function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Informed decision-making among students analyzing their personal genomes on a whole genome sequencing course: a longitudinal cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Multiple laboratories now offer clinical whole genome sequencing (WGS). We anticipate WGS becoming routinely used in research and clinical practice. Many institutions are exploring how best to educate geneticists and other professionals about WGS. Providing students in WGS courses with the option to analyze their own genome sequence is one strategy that might enhance students’ engagement and motivation to learn about personal genomics. However, if this option is presented to students, it is vital they make informed decisions, do not feel pressured into analyzing their own genomes by their course directors or peers, and feel free to analyze a third-party genome if they prefer. We therefore developed a 26-hour introductory genomics course in part to help students make informed decisions about whether to receive personal WGS data in a subsequent advanced genomics course. In the advanced course, they had the option to receive their own personal genome data, or an anonymous genome, at no financial cost to them. Our primary aims were to examine whether students made informed decisions regarding analyzing their personal genomes, and whether there was evidence that the introductory course enabled the students to make a more informed decision. Methods This was a longitudinal cohort study in which students (N = 19) completed questionnaires assessing their intentions, informed decision-making, attitudes and knowledge before (T1) and after (T2) the introductory course, and before the advanced course (T3). Informed decision-making was assessed using the Decisional Conflict Scale. Results At the start of the introductory course (T1), most (17/19) students intended to receive their personal WGS data in the subsequent course, but many expressed conflict around this decision. Decisional conflict decreased after the introductory course (T2) indicating there was an increase in informed decision-making, and did not change before the advanced course (T3). This suggests

  12. Structural genomics studies of human caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Li, Lanfen; Nan, Jie; Li, Dan; Brostromer, Erik; Wang, Zixi; Liu, Cong; Hou, Qiaoming; Fan, Xuexin; Ye, Zhaoyang; Su, Xiao-Dong

    2014-09-01

    Gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus mutans is the primary causative agent of human dental caries. To better understand this pathogen at the atomic structure level and to establish potential drug and vaccine targets, we have carried out structural genomics research since 2005. To achieve the goal, we have developed various in-house automation systems including novel high-throughput crystallization equipment and methods, based on which a large-scale, high-efficiency and low-cost platform has been establish in our laboratory. From a total of 1,963 annotated open reading frames, 1,391 non-membrane targets were selected prioritized by protein sequence similarities to unknown structures, and clustered by restriction sites to allow for cost-effective high-throughput conventional cloning. Selected proteins were over-expressed in different strains of Escherichia coli. Clones expressed soluble proteins were selected, expanded, and expressed proteins were purified and subjected to crystallization trials. Finally, protein crystals were subjected to X-ray analysis and structures were determined by crystallographic methods. Using the previously established procedures, we have so far obtained more than 200 kinds of protein crystals and 100 kinds of crystal structures involved in different biological pathways. In this paper we demonstrate and review a possibility of performing structural genomics studies at moderate laboratory scale. Furthermore, the techniques and methods developed in our study can be widely applied to conventional structural biology research practice.

  13. A whole genome association study of neuroticism using DNA pooling

    PubMed Central

    Shifman, S; Bhomra, A; Smiley, S; Wray, NR; James, MR; Martin, NG; Hettema, JM; An, SS; Neale, MC; van den Oord, EJCG; Kendler, KS; Chen, X; Boomsma, DI; Middeldorp, CM; Hottenga, JJ; Slagboom, PE; Flint, J

    2014-01-01

    We describe a multistage approach to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with neuroticism, a personality trait that shares genetic determinants with major depression and anxiety disorders. Whole genome association with 452 574 SNPs was performed on DNA pools from ~2000 individuals selected on extremes of neuroticism scores from a cohort of 88 142 people from southwest England. The most significant SNPs were then genotyped on independent samples to replicate findings. We were able to replicate association of one SNP within the PDE4D gene in a second sample collected by our laboratory and in a family-based test in an independent sample; however, the SNP was not significantly associated with neuroticism in two other independent samples. We also observed an enrichment of low P-values in known regions of copy number variations. Simulation indicates that our study had ~80% power to identify neuroticism loci in the genome with odds ratio (OR) > 2, and ~50% power to identify small effects (OR = 1.5). Since we failed to find any loci accounting for more than 1% of the variance, the heritability of neuroticism probably arises from many loci each explaining much less than 1%. Our findings argue the need for much larger samples than anticipated in genetic association studies and that the biological basis of emotional disorders is extremely complex. PMID:17667963

  14. From genome-wide arrays to tailor-made biomarker readout - Progress towards routine analysis of skin sensitizing chemicals with GARD.

    PubMed

    Forreryd, Andy; Zeller, Kathrin S; Lindberg, Tim; Johansson, Henrik; Lindstedt, Malin

    2016-12-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) initiated by chemical sensitizers is an important public health concern. To prevent ACD, it is important to identify chemical allergens to limit the use of such compounds in various products. EU legislations, as well as increased mechanistic knowledge of skin sensitization have promoted development of non-animal based approaches for hazard classification of chemicals. GARD is an in vitro testing strategy based on measurements of a genomic biomarker signature. However, current GARD protocols are optimized for identification of predictive biomarker signatures, and not suitable for standardized screening. This study describes improvements to GARD to progress from biomarker discovery into a reliable and cost-effective assay for routine testing. Gene expression measurements were transferred to NanoString nCounter platform, normalization strategy was adjusted to fit serial arrival of testing substances, and a novel strategy to correct batch variations was presented. When challenging GARD with 29 compounds, sensitivity, specificity and accuracy could be estimated to 94%, 83% and 90%, respectively. In conclusion, we present a GARD workflow with improved sample capacity, retained predictive performance, and in a format adapted to standardized screening. We propose that GARD is ready to be considered as part of an integrated testing strategy for skin sensitization.

  15. Genetic and functional genomic approaches for the study of plant cell wall degradation in Cellvibrio japonicus.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Jeffrey G; Keating, David H

    2012-01-01

    Microbial degradation of plant cell walls is a critical contributor to the global carbon cycle, and enzymes derived from microbes play a key role in the sustainable biofuels industry. Despite its biological and biotechnological importance, relatively little is known about how microbes degrade plant cell walls. Much of this gap in knowledge has resulted from difficulties in extending modern molecular tools to the study of plant cell wall-degrading microbes. The bacterium Cellvibrio japonicus has recently emerged as a powerful model system for the study of microbial plant cell wall degradation. C. japonicus is unique among microbial model systems in that it possesses the ability to carry out the complete degradation of plant cell wall polysaccharides. Furthermore, an extensive array of genetic and molecular tools exists for functional genomic analysis. In this review, we describe progress in the development of methodology for the functional genomic study of plant cell wall degradation by this microbe, and discuss future directions for research. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of general medical health on Alzheimer's progression: the Cache County Dementia Progression Study.

    PubMed

    Leoutsakos, Jeannie-Marie S; Han, Dingfen; Mielke, Michelle M; Forrester, Sarah N; Tschanz, JoAnn T; Corcoran, Chris D; Green, Robert C; Norton, Maria C; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A; Lyketsos, Constantine G

    2012-10-01

    Several observational studies have suggested a link between health status and rate of decline among individuals with Alzheimer's disease (AD). We sought to quantify the relationship in a population-based study of incident AD, and to compare global comorbidity ratings to counts of comorbid conditions and medications as predictors of AD progression. This was a case-only cohort study arising from a population-based longitudinal study of memory and aging, in Cache County, Utah. Participants comprised 335 individuals with incident AD followed for up to 11 years. Patient descriptors included sex, age, education, dementia duration at baseline, and APOE genotype. Measures of health status made at each visit included the General Medical Health Rating (GMHR), number of comorbid medical conditions, and number of non-psychiatric medications. Dementia outcomes included the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Clinical Dementia Rating - sum of boxes (CDR-sb), and the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI). Health status tended to fluctuate over time within individuals. None of the baseline medical variables (GMHR, comorbidities, and non-psychiatric medications) was associated with differences in rates of decline in longitudinal linear mixed effects models. Over time, low GMHR ratings, but not comorbidities or medications, were associated with poorer outcomes (MMSE: β = -1.07 p = 0.01; CDR-sb: β = 1.79 p < 0.001; NPI: β = 4.57 p = 0.01). Given that time-varying GMHR, but not baseline GMHR, was associated with the outcomes, it seems likely that there is a dynamic relationship between medical and cognitive health. GMHR is a more sensitive measure of health than simple counts of comorbidities or medications. Since health status is a potentially modifiable risk factor, further study is warranted.

  17. Effects of General Medical Health on Alzheimer Progression: the Cache County Dementia Progression Study

    PubMed Central

    Leoutsakos, Jeannie-Marie S.; Han, Dingfen; Mielke, Michelle M.; Forrester, Sarah N.; Tschanz, JoAnn T.; Corcoran, Chris D.; Green, Robert C.; Norton, Maria C.; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A.; Lyketsos, Constantine G.

    2012-01-01

    Background Several observational studies suggested a link between health status and rate of decline among individuals with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We sought to quantify the relationship in a population-based study of incident AD, and to compare global comorbidity ratings to counts of comorbid conditions and medications as predictors of AD progression. Methods Design Case-only cohort study arising from population-based longitudinal study of memory and aging. Setting Cache County, Utah Participants 335 individuals with incident AD followed for up to 11 years. Measurements Patient descriptors included sex, age, education, dementia duration at baseline, and APOE genotype. Measures of health status made at each visit included the GMHR (General Medical Health Rating), number of comorbid medical conditions, and number of non-psychiatric medications. Dementia outcomes included the Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE), Clinical Dementia Rating – sum of boxes (CDR-sb), and the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI). Results Health Status tended to fluctuate over time within individuals. None of the baseline medical variables (GMHR, comorbidities, non-psychiatric medications) were associated with differences in rates of decline in longitudinal linear mixed effects models. Over time, low GMHR ratings, but not comorbidities or medications, were associated with poorer outcomes (MMSE: β=−1.07 p=0.01; CDR-sb: β=1.79 p<0.001; NPI: β=4.57 p=0.01) Conclusions Given that time-varying GMHR, but not baseline GMHR, was associated with the outcomes, there is likely a dynamic relationship between medical and cognitive health. GMHR is a more sensitive measure of health than simple counts of comorbidities or medications. Since health status is a potentially modifiable risk factor, further study is warranted. PMID:22687143

  18. Polygenic risk accelerates the developmental progression to heavy, persistent smoking and nicotine dependence: Evidence from a 4-Decade Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Moffitt, Terrie E; Baker, Timothy B; Biddle, Andrea K; Evans, James P; Harrington, HonaLee; Houts, Renate; Meier, Madeline; Sugden, Karen; Williams, Benjamin; Poulton, Richie; Caspi, Avshalom

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To test how genomic loci identified in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) influence the developmental progression of smoking behavior. DESIGN A 38-year prospective longitudinal study of a representative birth-cohort. SETTING The Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study, New Zealand. PARTICIPANTS N=1037 male and female study members. MAIN EXPOSURES We assessed genetic risk with a multi-locus genetic risk score (GRS). The GRS was composed of single-nucleotide polymorphisms identified in three meta-analyses of GWAS of smoking quantity phenotypes. OUTCOME MEASURES Smoking initiation, conversion to daily smoking, progression to heavy smoking, nicotine dependence (Fagerstrom Test of Nicotine Dependence), and cessation difficulties were evaluated at eight assessments spanning ages 11-38 years. RESULTS Genetic risk score was unrelated to smoking initiation. However, individuals at higher genetic risk were more likely to convert to daily smoking as teenagers, progressed more rapidly from smoking initiation to heavy smoking, persisted longer in smoking heavily, developed nicotine dependence more frequently, were more reliant on smoking to cope with stress, and were more likely to fail in their cessation attempts. Further analysis revealed that two adolescent developmental phenotypes—early conversion to daily smoking and rapid progression to heavy smoking--mediated associations between the genetic risk score and mature phenotypes of persistent heavy smoking, nicotine dependence, and cessation failure. The genetic risk score predicted smoking risk over and above family history. CONCLUSIONS Initiatives that disrupt the developmental progression of smoking behavior among adolescents may mitigate genetic risks for developing adult smoking problems. Future genetic research may maximize discovery potential by focusing on smoking behavior soon after smoking initiation and by studying young smokers. PMID:23536134

  19. Genome-Wide Association Studies of Drug-Resistance Determinants.

    PubMed

    Volkman, Sarah K; Herman, Jonathan; Lukens, Amanda K; Hartl, Daniel L

    2017-03-01

    Population genetic strategies that leverage association, selection, and linkage have identified drug-resistant loci. However, challenges and limitations persist in identifying drug-resistance loci in malaria. In this review we discuss the genetic basis of drug resistance and the use of genome-wide association studies, complemented by selection and linkage studies, to identify and understand mechanisms of drug resistance and response. We also discuss the implications of nongenetic mechanisms of drug resistance recently reported in the literature, and present models of the interplay between nongenetic and genetic processes that contribute to the emergence of drug resistance. Throughout, we examine artemisinin resistance as an example to emphasize challenges in identifying phenotypes suitable for population genetic studies as well as complications due to multiple-factor drug resistance. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. The utility of genome-wide association studies in hepatology.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Tom H; Melum, Espen; Franke, Andre

    2010-05-01

    Over the last 4 years, more than 450 genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been successfully performed in a variety of human traits, of which approximately 2% relates to the field of hepatology. Whereas the many robust susceptibility gene findings have provided insight into fundamental physiological aspects of the phenotypes that have been studied, the widespread application has also revealed important limitations of the GWAS design. This review aims to systematically summarize both the strengths and the weaknesses of GWAS, as well as underscore important experiences made in model diseases outside the field of hepatology. By reviewing the GWAS performed in hepatology so far on this broader background, extensions and guidelines for the rational application of the study design in hepatology are proposed.

  1. Genome-wide association studies in pharmacogenomics of antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Lin, Eugene; Lane, Hsien-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is one of the most common psychiatric disorders worldwide. Doctors must prescribe antidepressants based on educated guesses due to the fact that it is unmanageable to predict the effectiveness of any particular antidepressant in an individual patient. With the recent advent of scientific research, the genome-wide association study (GWAS) is extensively employed to analyze hundreds of thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms by high-throughput genotyping technologies. In addition to the candidate-gene approach, the GWAS approach has recently been utilized to investigate the determinants of antidepressant response to therapy. In this study, we reviewed GWAS studies, their limitations and future directions with respect to the pharmacogenomics of antidepressants in MDD.

  2. Progressive Failure Studies of Stiffened Panels Subjected to Shear Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambur, Damodar R.; Jaunky, Navin; Hilburger, Mark W.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Experimental and analytical results are presented for progressive failure of stiffened composite panels with and without a notch and subjected to in plane shear loading well into their postbuckling regime. Initial geometric imperfections are included in the finite element models. Ply damage modes such as matrix cracking, fiber-matrix shear, and fiber failure are modeled by degrading the material properties. Experimental results from the test include strain field data from video image correlation in three dimensions in addition to other strain and displacement measurements. Results from nonlinear finite element analyses are compared with experimental data. Good agreement between experimental data and numerical results are observed for the stitched stiffened composite panels studied.

  3. Progress in the magnetic helicity studies in solar physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Fan; Zhang, Hong-Qi

    2005-03-01

    This paper reviews the history of magnetic helicity studies and its concepts introduced into solar physics. With the physical discussions on a new measurable quantity (relative magnetic helicity), some problems in both theory and observations are pointed out. The balance of magnetic helicity attracts much attention during recent helicity research, which is discussed in detail. Both the relationship between magnetic and current helicity, and research progress in helicity's hemispheric chirality are briefly discussed. This paper summarizes the role of helicity in some solar activities, keeping an eye on the restrictive effect of helicity in solar explosive events. Some unresolved problems and highlights are also drawn.

  4. Cutting edge genomics reveal new insights into tumour development, disease progression and therapeutic impacts in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Ankit K; Hewett, Duncan R; Fink, J Lynn; Grady, John P; Zannettino, Andrew C W

    2017-07-01

    Multiple Myeloma (MM) is a haematological malignancy characterised by the clonal expansion of plasma cells (PCs) within the bone marrow. Despite advances in therapy, MM remains a largely incurable disease with a median survival of 6 years. In almost all cases, the development of MM is preceded by the benign PC condition Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance (MGUS). Recent studies show that the transformation of MGUS to MM is associated with complex genetic changes. Understanding how these changes contribute to evolution will present targets for clinical intervention. We discuss three models of MM evolution; the linear, the expansionist and the intraclonal heterogeneity models. Of particular interest is the intraclonal heterogeneity model. Here, distinct populations of MM PCs carry differing combinations of genetic mutations. Acquisition of additional mutations can contribute to subclonal lineages where "driver" mutations may influence selective pressure and dominance, and "passenger" mutations are neutral in their effects. Furthermore, studies show that clinical intervention introduces additional selective pressure on tumour cells and can influence subclone survival, leading to therapy resistance. This review discusses how Next Generation Sequencing approaches are revealing critical insights into the genetics of MM development, disease progression and treatment. MM disease progression will illuminate possible mechanisms underlying the tumour. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Genome-wide association study identifies four novel loci associated with Alzheimer's endophenotypes and disease modifiers.

    PubMed

    Deming, Yuetiva; Li, Zeran; Kapoor, Manav; Harari, Oscar; Del-Aguila, Jorge L; Black, Kathleen; Carrell, David; Cai, Yefei; Fernandez, Maria Victoria; Budde, John; Ma, Shengmei; Saef, Benjamin; Howells, Bill; Huang, Kuan-Lin; Bertelsen, Sarah; Fagan, Anne M; Holtzman, David M; Morris, John C; Kim, Sungeun; Saykin, Andrew J; De Jager, Philip L; Albert, Marilyn; Moghekar, Abhay; O'Brien, Richard; Riemenschneider, Matthias; Petersen, Ronald C; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Minthon, Lennart; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M; Lee, Virginia Man-Yee; Shaw, Leslie M; Trojanowski, John Q; Schellenberg, Gerard; Haines, Jonathan L; Mayeux, Richard; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Farrer, Lindsay A; Peskind, Elaine R; Li, Ge; Di Narzo, Antonio F; Kauwe, John S K; Goate, Alison M; Cruchaga, Carlos

    2017-05-01

    More than 20 genetic loci have been associated with risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD), but reported genome-wide significant loci do not account for all the estimated heritability and provide little information about underlying biological mechanisms. Genetic studies using intermediate quantitative traits such as biomarkers, or endophenotypes, benefit from increased statistical power to identify variants that may not pass the stringent multiple test correction in case-control studies. Endophenotypes also contain additional information helpful for identifying variants and genes associated with other aspects of disease, such as rate of progression or onset, and provide context to interpret the results from genome-wide association studies (GWAS). We conducted GWAS of amyloid beta (Aβ42), tau, and phosphorylated tau (ptau181) levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 3146 participants across nine studies to identify novel variants associated with AD. Five genome-wide significant loci (two novel) were associated with ptau181, including loci that have also been associated with AD risk or brain-related phenotypes. Two novel loci associated with Aβ42 near GLIS1 on 1p32.3 (β = -0.059, P = 2.08 × 10(-8)) and within SERPINB1 on 6p25 (β = -0.025, P = 1.72 × 10(-8)) were also associated with AD risk (GLIS1: OR = 1.105, P = 3.43 × 10(-2)), disease progression (GLIS1: β = 0.277, P = 1.92 × 10(-2)), and age at onset (SERPINB1: β = 0.043, P = 4.62 × 10(-3)). Bioinformatics indicate that the intronic SERPINB1 variant (rs316341) affects expression of SERPINB1 in various tissues, including the hippocampus, suggesting that SERPINB1 influences AD through an Aβ-associated mechanism. Analyses of known AD risk loci suggest CLU and FERMT2 may influence CSF Aβ42 (P = 0.001 and P = 0.009, respectively) and the INPP5D locus may affect ptau181 levels (P = 0.009); larger studies are necessary to verify these results. Together the findings from this

  6. Integrated genome-wide analysis of expression quantitative trait loci aids interpretation of genomic association studies.

    PubMed

    Joehanes, Roby; Zhang, Xiaoling; Huan, Tianxiao; Yao, Chen; Ying, Sai-Xia; Nguyen, Quang Tri; Demirkale, Cumhur Yusuf; Feolo, Michael L; Sharopova, Nataliya R; Sturcke, Anne; Schäffer, Alejandro A; Heard-Costa, Nancy; Chen, Han; Liu, Po-Ching; Wang, Richard; Woodhouse, Kimberly A; Tanriverdi, Kahraman; Freedman, Jane E; Raghavachari, Nalini; Dupuis, Josée; Johnson, Andrew D; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Levy, Daniel; Munson, Peter J

    2017-01-25

    Identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with gene expression levels, known as expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs), may improve understanding of the functional role of phenotype-associated SNPs in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). The small sample sizes of some previous eQTL studies have limited their statistical power. We conducted an eQTL investigation of microarray-based gene and exon expression levels in whole blood in a cohort of 5257 individuals, exceeding the single cohort size of previous studies by more than a factor of 2. We detected over 19,000 independent lead cis-eQTLs and over 6000 independent lead trans-eQTLs, targeting over 10,000 gene targets (eGenes), with a false discovery rate (FDR) < 5%. Of previously published significant GWAS SNPs, 48% are identified to be significant eQTLs in our study. Some trans-eQTLs point toward novel mechanistic explanations for the association of the SNP with the GWAS-related phenotype. We also identify 59 distinct blocks or clusters of trans-eQTLs, each targeting the expression of sets of six to 229 distinct trans-eGenes. Ten of these sets of target genes are significantly enriched for microRNA targets (FDR < 5%). Many of these clusters are associated in GWAS with multiple phenotypes. These findings provide insights into the molecular regulatory patterns involved in human physiology and pathophysiology. We illustrate the value of our eQTL database in the context of a recent GWAS meta-analysis of coronary artery disease and provide a list of targeted eGenes for 21 of 58 GWAS loci.

  7. Chronic Periodontitis Genome-wide Association Study in the Hispanic Community Health Study / Study of Latinos.

    PubMed

    Sanders, A E; Sofer, T; Wong, Q; Kerr, K F; Agler, C; Shaffer, J R; Beck, J D; Offenbacher, S; Salazar, C R; North, K E; Marazita, M L; Laurie, C C; Singer, R H; Cai, J; Finlayson, T L; Divaris, K

    2017-01-01

    Chronic periodontitis (CP) has a genetic component, particularly its severe forms. Evidence from genome-wide association studies (GWASs) has highlighted several potential novel loci. Here, the authors report the first GWAS of CP among a large community-based sample of Hispanics/Latinos. The authors interrogated a quantitative trait of CP (mean interproximal clinical attachment level determined by full-mouth periodontal examinations) among 10,935 adult participants (mean age: 45 y, range: 18 to 76 y) from the Hispanic Community Health Study / Study of Latinos. Genotyping was done with a custom Illumina Omni2.5M array, and imputation to approximately 20 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms was based on the 1000 Genomes Project phase 1 reference panel. Analyses were based on linear mixed models adjusting for sex, age, study design features, ancestry, and kinship and employed a conventional P < 5 × 10(-8) statistical significance threshold. The authors identified a genome-wide significant association signal in the 1q42.2 locus ( TSNAX-DISC1 noncoding RNA, lead single-nucleotide polymorphism: rs149133391, minor allele [C] frequency = 0.01, P = 7.9 × 10(-9)) and 4 more loci with suggestive evidence of association ( P < 5 × 10(-6)): 1q22 (rs13373934), 5p15.33 (rs186066047), 6p22.3 (rs10456847), and 11p15.1 (rs75715012). We tested these loci for replication in independent samples of European-American ( n = 4,402) and African-American ( n = 908) participants of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study. There was no replication among the European Americans; however, the TSNAX-DISC1 locus replicated in the African-American sample (rs149133391, minor allele frequency = 0.02, P = 9.1 × 10(-3)), while the 1q22 locus was directionally concordant and nominally significant (rs13373934, P = 4.0 × 10(-2)). This discovery GWAS of interproximal clinical attachment level-a measure of lifetime periodontal tissue destruction-was conducted in a large, community-based sample of

  8. Patient safety in genomic medicine: an exploratory study

    PubMed Central

    Korngiebel, Diane M.; Fullerton, Stephanie M.; Burke, Wylie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Concerns about patient safety and the potential for medical error are largely unexplored for genetic testing despite the expansion of test use. In this preliminary qualitative study we sought the views of genetics professionals about error and patient safety concerns in genomic medicine and factors that might mitigate them. Methods Twelve semi-structured interviews with experienced genetics professionals were conducted. Transcripts were analyzed using selective coding for issues related to error definition, mitigation, and communication. Additional thematic analysis captured themes across content categories. Results Key informants suggested that the potential for adverse events exists in all phases of genetic testing, from ordering to analysis, interpretation, and follow-up. A perceived contributor was lack of physician knowledge about genetics, resulting in errors in test ordering and interpretation. The limitations and uncertainty inherent to rapidly evolving technology were also seen as contributing factors. Strategies to prevent errors included physician education, availability of genetic experts for consultation, and enhanced communication such as improved test reports and electronic decision support. Conclusion Genetic testing poses concerns for patient safety, due to errors and the limitations of current tests. As genomic tests are integrated into medical care, anticipating and addressing the patient safety concerns these key informants identified will be crucial. PMID:27011058

  9. Biostatistical aspects of genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Andreas; König, Inke R; Thompson, John R

    2008-02-01

    To search the entire human genome for association is a novel and promising approach to unravelling the genetic basis of complex genetic diseases. In these genome-wide association studies (GWAs), several hundreds of thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are analyzed at the same time, posing substantial biostatistical and computational challenges. In this paper, we discuss a number of biostatistical aspects of GWAs in detail. We specifically consider quality control issues and show that signal intensity plots are a sine qua condition non in today's GWAs. Approaches to detect and adjust for population stratification are briefly examined. We discuss different strategies aimed at tackling the problem of multiple testing, including adjustment of p -values, the false positive report probability and the false discovery rate. Another aspect of GWAs requiring special attention is the search for gene-gene and gene-environment interactions. We finally describe multistage approaches to GWAs. (c) 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim

  10. Retinopathy and Progression of CKD: The CRIC Study

    PubMed Central

    Pistilli, Maxwell; Ying, Gui-Shuang; Daniel, Ebenezer; Maguire, Maureen G.; Xie, Dawei; Whittock-Martin, Revell; Parker Ostroff, Candace; Lo, Joan C.; Townsend, Raymond R.; Gadegbeku, Crystal A.; Lash, James P.; Fink, Jeffrey C.; Rahman, Mahboob; Feldman, Harold I.; Kusek, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives Retinal abnormalities may be associated with changes in the renal vasculature. This study assessed the association between retinopathy and progression of kidney disease in participants of the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This was a prospective study in which patients with CKD enrolled in CRIC had nonmydriatic fundus photographs of both eyes. All CRIC participants in six clinical sites in which fundus cameras were deployed were offered participation. Photographs were reviewed at a reading center. The presence and severity of retinopathy and vessel calibers were assessed using standard protocols by graders masked to clinical information. The associations of retinal features with changes in eGFR and the need for RRT (ESRD) were assessed. Results Retinal images and renal progression outcomes were obtained from 1852 of the 2605 participants (71.1%) approached. During follow-up (median 2.3 years), 152 participants (8.2%) developed ESRD. Presence and severity of retinopathy at baseline were strongly associated with the risk of subsequent progression to ESRD and reductions in eGFR in unadjusted analyses. For example, participants with retinopathy were 4.4 times (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 3.12 to 6.31) more likely to develop ESRD than those without retinopathy (P<0.001). However, this association was not statistically significant after adjustment for initial eGFR and 24-hour proteinuria. Venular and arteriolar diameter calibers were not associated with ESRD or eGFR decline. The results showed a nonlinear relationship between mean ratio of arteriole/vein calibers and the risk of progression to ESRD; participants within the fourth arteriole/vein ratio quartile were 3.11 times (95% CI, 1.51 to 6.40) more likely to develop ESRD than those in the first quartile (P<0.001). Conclusions The presence and severity of retinopathy were not associated with ESRD and decline in eGFR after

  11. The draft genome sequence of the ferret (Mustela putorius furo) facilitates study of human respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xinxia; Alföldi, Jessica; Gori, Kevin; Eisfeld, Amie J; Tyler, Scott R; Tisoncik-Go, Jennifer; Brawand, David; Law, G Lynn; Skunca, Nives; Hatta, Masato; Gasper, David J; Kelly, Sara M; Chang, Jean; Thomas, Matthew J; Johnson, Jeremy; Berlin, Aaron M; Lara, Marcia; Russell, Pamela; Swofford, Ross; Turner-Maier, Jason; Young, Sarah; Hourlier, Thibaut; Aken, Bronwen; Searle, Steve; Sun, Xingshen; Yi, Yaling; Suresh, M; Tumpey, Terrence M; Siepel, Adam; Wisely, Samantha M; Dessimoz, Christophe; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Birren, Bruce W; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Di Palma, Federica; Engelhardt, John F; Palermo, Robert E; Katze, Michael G

    2014-12-01

    The domestic ferret (Mustela putorius furo) is an important animal model for multiple human respiratory diseases. It is considered the 'gold standard' for modeling human influenza virus infection and transmission. Here we describe the 2.41 Gb draft genome assembly of the domestic ferret, constituting 2.28 Gb of sequence plus gaps. We annotated 19,910 protein-coding genes on this assembly using RNA-seq data from 21 ferret tissues. We characterized the ferret host response to two influenza virus infections by RNA-seq analysis of 42 ferret samples from influenza time-course data and showed distinct signatures in ferret trachea and lung tissues specific to 1918 or 2009 human pandemic influenza virus infections. Using microarray data from 16 ferret samples reflecting cystic fibrosis disease progression, we showed that transcriptional changes in the CFTR-knockout ferret lung reflect pathways of early disease that cannot be readily studied in human infants with cystic fibrosis disease.

  12. Clonal evolution of acute myeloid leukemia highlighted by latest genome sequencing studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuehong; Lv, Dekang; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Quentin; Li, Zhiguang

    2016-01-01

    Decades of years might be required for an initiated cell to become a fully-pledged, metastasized tumor. DNA mutations are accumulated during this process including background mutations that emerge scholastically, as well as driver mutations that selectively occur in a handful of cancer genes and confer the cell a growth advantage over its neighbors. A clone of tumor cells could be superseded by another clone that acquires new mutations and grows more aggressively. Tumor evolutional patterns have been studied for years using conventional approaches that focus on the investigation of a single or a couple of genes. Latest deep sequencing technology enables a global view of tumor evolution by deciphering almost all genome aberrations in a tumor. Tumor clones and the fate of each clone during tumor evolution can be depicted with the help of the concept of variant allele frequency. Here, we summarize the new insights of cancer evolutional progression in acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:27474172

  13. Clonal development of a blastoid mantle cell lymphoma studied with comparative genomic hybridization.

    PubMed

    Flordal, Emma; Berglund, Mattias; Rosenquist, Richard; Erlanson, Martin; Enblad, Gunilla; Roos, Göran; Larsson, Catharina; Lagercrantz, Svetlana

    2002-11-01

    A molecular cytogenetic study was performed on the diagnostic tumor sample and three relapses from a case with blastoid mantle cell lymphoma. The clonal relatedness of the tumors was demonstrated by identical rearrangements of the immunoglobulin heavy chain gene and was supported by results from comparative genomic hybridization analyses. All samples shared the common alterations of losses of 6q, 9p, and 11q and gains of 3q, 9q, 12p, and 13q, suggesting that they were relatively early events in the tumorigenesis. Relapse 1 also showed a loss of 8p, while relapses 2 and 3 had gained the X chromosome and 7p, in addition, relapse 3 displayed gains of chromosomes 3 and 20. Taken together, the findings suggest that relapses 2 and 3 developed from the diagnostic tumor sample, while relapse 1 represents a separate lineage of tumor progression originating directly from a postulated ancestral tumor cell carrying the common chromosomal alterations identified in all tumors.

  14. Genome-Wide Association Study of Meiotic Recombination Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Begum, Ferdouse; Chowdhury, Reshmi; Cheung, Vivian G.; Sherman, Stephanie L.; Feingold, Eleanor

    2016-01-01

    Meiotic recombination is an essential step in gametogenesis, and is one that also generates genetic diversity. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and molecular studies have identified genes that influence of human meiotic recombination. RNF212 is associated with total or average number of recombination events, and PRDM9 is associated with the locations of hotspots, or sequences where crossing over appears to cluster. In addition, a common inversion on chromosome 17 is strongly associated with recombination. Other genes have been identified by GWAS, but those results have not been replicated. In this study, using new datasets, we characterized additional recombination phenotypes to uncover novel candidates and further dissect the role of already known loci. We used three datasets totaling 1562 two-generation families, including 3108 parents with 4304 children. We estimated five different recombination phenotypes including two novel phenotypes (average recombination counts within recombination hotspots and outside of hotspots) using dense SNP array genotype data. We then performed gender-specific and combined-sex genome-wide association studies (GWAS) meta-analyses. We replicated associations for several previously reported recombination genes, including RNF212 and PRDM9. By looking specifically at recombination events outside of hotspots, we showed for the first time that PRDM9 has different effects in males and females. We identified several new candidate loci, particularly for recombination events outside of hotspots. These include regions near the genes SPINK6, EVC2, ARHGAP25, and DLGAP2. This study expands our understanding of human meiotic recombination by characterizing additional features that vary across individuals, and identifying regulatory variants influencing the numbers and locations of recombination events. PMID:27733454

  15. Genome-Wide Association Study of Meiotic Recombination Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Begum, Ferdouse; Chowdhury, Reshmi; Cheung, Vivian G; Sherman, Stephanie L; Feingold, Eleanor

    2016-12-07

    Meiotic recombination is an essential step in gametogenesis, and is one that also generates genetic diversity. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and molecular studies have identified genes that influence of human meiotic recombination. RNF212 is associated with total or average number of recombination events, and PRDM9 is associated with the locations of hotspots, or sequences where crossing over appears to cluster. In addition, a common inversion on chromosome 17 is strongly associated with recombination. Other genes have been identified by GWAS, but those results have not been replicated. In this study, using new datasets, we characterized additional recombination phenotypes to uncover novel candidates and further dissect the role of already known loci. We used three datasets totaling 1562 two-generation families, including 3108 parents with 4304 children. We estimated five different recombination phenotypes including two novel phenotypes (average recombination counts within recombination hotspots and outside of hotspots) using dense SNP array genotype data. We then performed gender-specific and combined-sex genome-wide association studies (GWAS) meta-analyses. We replicated associations for several previously reported recombination genes, including RNF212 and PRDM9 By looking specifically at recombination events outside of hotspots, we showed for the first time that PRDM9 has different effects in males and females. We identified several new candidate loci, particularly for recombination events outside of hotspots. These include regions near the genes SPINK6, EVC2, ARHGAP25, and DLGAP2 This study expands our understanding of human meiotic recombination by characterizing additional features that vary across individuals, and identifying regulatory variants influencing the numbers and locations of recombination events.

  16. Genomic Aspects of Research Involving Polyploid Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaohan; Ye, Chuyu; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Wullschleger, Stan D; Tuskan, Gerald A

    2011-01-01

    Almost all extant plant species have spontaneously doubled their genomes at least once in their evolutionary histories, resulting in polyploidy which provided a rich genomic resource for evolutionary processes. Moreover, superior polyploid clones have been created during the process of crop domestication. Polyploid plants generated by evolutionary processes and/or crop domestication have been the intentional or serendipitous focus of research dealing with the dynamics and consequences of genome evolution. One of the new trends in genomics research is to create synthetic polyploid plants which provide materials for studying the initial genomic changes/responses immediately after polyploid formation. Polyploid plants are also used in functional genomics research to study gene expression in a complex genomic background. In this review, we summarize the recent progress in genomics research involving ancient, young, and synthetic polyploid plants, with a focus on genome size evolution, genomics diversity, genomic rearrangement, genetic and epigenetic changes in duplicated genes, gene discovery, and comparative genomics. Implications on plant sciences including evolution, functional genomics, and plant breeding are presented. It is anticipated that polyploids will be a regular subject of genomics research in the foreseeable future as the rapid advances in DNA sequencing technology create unprecedented opportunities for discovering and monitoring genomic and transcriptomic changes in polyploid plants. The fast accumulation of knowledge on polyploid formation, maintenance, and divergence at whole-genome and subgenome levels will not only help plant biologists understand how plants have evolved and diversified, but also assist plant breeders in designing new strategies for crop improvement.

  17. Streptococcus thermophilus core genome: comparative genome hybridization study of 47 strains.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bovbjerg; Danielsen, Morten; Valina, Ondrej; Garrigues, Christel; Johansen, Eric; Pedersen, Martin Bastian

    2008-08-01

    A DNA microarray platform based on 2,200 genes from publicly available sequences was designed for Streptococcus thermophilus. We determined how single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the 65- to 75-mer oligonucleotide probe sequences affect the hybridization signals. The microarrays were then used for comparative genome hybridization (CGH) of 47 dairy S. thermophilus strains. An analysis of the exopolysaccharide genes in each strain confirmed previous findings that this class of genes is indeed highly variable. A phylogenetic tree based on the CGH data showed similar distances for most strains, indicating frequent recombination or gene transfer within S. thermophilus. By comparing genome sizes estimated from the microarrays and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, the amount of unknown DNA in each strain was estimated. A core genome comprised of 1,271 genes detected in all 47 strains was identified. Likewise, a set of noncore genes detected in only some strains was identified. The concept of an industrial core genome is proposed. This is comprised of the genes in the core genome plus genes that are necessary in an applied industrial context.

  18. The Human Genome Diversity Project: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Cavalli-Sforza, L Luca

    2005-04-01

    The Human Genome Project, in accomplishing its goal of sequencing one human genome, heralded a new era of research, a component of which is the systematic study of human genetic variation. Despite delays, the Human Genome Diversity Project has started to make progress in understanding the patterns of this variation and its causes, and also promises to provide important information for biomedical studies.

  19. Genome-wide association study of antisocial personality disorder

    PubMed Central

    Rautiainen, M-R; Paunio, T; Repo-Tiihonen, E; Virkkunen, M; Ollila, H M; Sulkava, S; Jolanki, O; Palotie, A; Tiihonen, J

    2016-01-01

    The pathophysiology of antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) remains unclear. Although the most consistent biological finding is reduced grey matter volume in the frontal cortex, about 50% of the total liability to developing ASPD has been attributed to genetic factors. The contributing genes remain largely unknown. Therefore, we sought to study the genetic background of ASPD. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) and a replication analysis of Finnish criminal offenders fulfilling DSM-IV criteria for ASPD (N=370, N=5850 for controls, GWAS; N=173, N=3766 for controls and replication sample). The GWAS resulted in suggestive associations of two clusters of single-nucleotide polymorphisms at 6p21.2 and at 6p21.32 at the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region. Imputation of HLA alleles revealed an independent association with DRB1*01:01 (odds ratio (OR)=2.19 (1.53–3.14), P=1.9 × 10-5). Two polymorphisms at 6p21.2 LINC00951–LRFN2 gene region were replicated in a separate data set, and rs4714329 reached genome-wide significance (OR=1.59 (1.37–1.85), P=1.6 × 10−9) in the meta-analysis. The risk allele also associated with antisocial features in the general population conditioned for severe problems in childhood family (β=0.68, P=0.012). Functional analysis in brain tissue in open access GTEx and Braineac databases revealed eQTL associations of rs4714329 with LINC00951 and LRFN2 in cerebellum. In humans, LINC00951 and LRFN2 are both expressed in the brain, especially in the frontal cortex, which is intriguing considering the role of the frontal cortex in behavior and the neuroanatomical findings of reduced gray matter volume in ASPD. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing genome-wide significant and replicable findings on genetic variants associated with any personality disorder. PMID:27598967

  20. The Siblings With Ischemic Stroke Study (SWISS): A Progress Report

    PubMed Central

    Meschia, James F.; Kissela, Brett M.; Brott, Thomas G.; Brown, Robert D.; Worrall, Bradford B.; Beck, Jeanne; Skarp, Alexa N.

    2006-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that genetic factors are associated with ischemic stroke, including multiple recent reports of association with the gene PDE4D, encoding phosphodiesterase 4D, on chromosome 5q12. Genetic studies of stroke are important but can be logistically difficult to perform. This article reviews the design of the Siblings With Ischemic Stroke Study (SWISS) and discusses problems in performing a sibling-based pedigree study where proband-initiated consent is used to enroll pedigree members. Proband-initiated enrollment optimizes privacy protections for family members, but it is associated with a substantial pedigree non-completion rate such that 3 to 4 probands must be identified to obtain one completed sibling pedigree. This report updates the progress of enrollment in the SWISS protocol, discusses barriers to pedigree completion and describes innovative approaches used by the SWISS investigators to enhance enrollment. PMID:16595789

  1. The revolution of whole genome sequencing to study parasites.

    PubMed

    Forrester, Sarah Jayne; Hall, Neil

    2014-07-01

    Genome sequencing has revolutionized the way in which we approach biological research from fundamental molecular biology to ecology and epidemiology. In the last 10 years the field of genomics has changed enormously as technology has improved and the tools for genomic sequencing have moved out of a few dedicated centers and now can be performed on bench-top instruments. In this review we will cover some of the key discoveries that were catalyzed by some of the first genome projects and discuss how this field is developing, what the new challenges are and how this may impact on research in the near future.

  2. A haplotype map of genomic variations and genome-wide association studies of agronomic traits in foxtail millet (Setaria italica).

    PubMed

    Jia, Guanqing; Huang, Xuehui; Zhi, Hui; Zhao, Yan; Zhao, Qiang; Li, Wenjun; Chai, Yang; Yang, Lifang; Liu, Kunyan; Lu, Hengyun; Zhu, Chuanrang; Lu, Yiqi; Zhou, Congcong; Fan, Danlin; Weng, Qijun; Guo, Yunli; Huang, Tao; Zhang, Lei; Lu, Tingting; Feng, Qi; Hao, Hangfei; Liu, Hongkuan; Lu, Ping; Zhang, Ning; Li, Yuhui; Guo, Erhu; Wang, Shujun; Wang, Suying; Liu, Jinrong; Zhang, Wenfei; Chen, Guoqiu; Zhang, Baojin; Li, Wei; Wang, Yongfang; Li, Haiquan; Zhao, Baohua; Li, Jiayang; Diao, Xianmin; Han, Bin

    2013-08-01

    Foxtail millet (Setaria italica) is an important grain crop that is grown in arid regions. Here we sequenced 916 diverse foxtail millet varieties, identified 2.58 million SNPs and used 0.8 million common SNPs to construct a haplotype map of the foxtail millet genome. We classified the foxtail millet varieties into two divergent groups that are strongly correlated with early and late flowering times. We phenotyped the 916 varieties under five different environments and identified 512 loci associated with 47 agronomic traits by genome-wide association studies. We performed a de novo assembly of deeply sequenced genomes of a Setaria viridis accession (the wild progenitor of S. italica) and an S. italica variety and identified complex interspecies and intraspecies variants. We also identified 36 selective sweeps that seem to have occurred during modern breeding. This study provides fundamental resources for genetics research and genetic improvement in foxtail millet.

  3. Phenotype-Genotype Integrator (PheGenI): synthesizing genome-wide association study (GWAS) data with existing genomic resources.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Erin M; Hoffman, Douglas; Junkins, Heather A; Maglott, Donna; Phan, Lon; Sherry, Stephen T; Feolo, Mike; Hindorff, Lucia A

    2014-01-01

    Rapidly accumulating data from genome-wide association studies (GWASs) and other large-scale studies are most useful when synthesized with existing databases. To address this opportunity, we developed the Phenotype-Genotype Integrator (PheGenI), a user-friendly web interface that integrates various National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) genomic databases with association data from the National Human Genome Research Institute GWAS Catalog and supports downloads of search results. Here, we describe the rationale for and development of this resource. Integrating over 66,000 association records with extensive single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), gene, and expression quantitative trait loci data already available from the NCBI, PheGenI enables deeper investigation and interrogation of SNPs associated with a wide range of traits, facilitating the examination of the relationships between genetic variation and human diseases.

  4. Genome-Wide Association Studies for Comb Traits in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Meng; Dou, Taocun; Lu, Jian; Guo, Jun; Hu, Yuping; Yi, Guoqiang; Yuan, Jingwei; Sun, Congjiao; Wang, Kehua; Yang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    The comb, as a secondary sexual character, is an important trait in chicken. Indicators of comb length (CL), comb height (CH), and comb weight (CW) are often selected in production. DNA-based marker-assisted selection could help chicken breeders to accelerate genetic improvement for comb or related economic characters by early selection. Although a number of quantitative trait loci (QTL) and candidate genes have been identified with advances in molecular genetics, candidate genes underlying comb traits are limited. The aim of the study was to use genome-wide association (GWA) studies by 600 K Affymetrix chicken SNP arrays to detect genes that are related to comb, using an F2 resource population. For all comb characters, comb exhibited high SNP-based heritability estimates (0.61–0.69). Chromosome 1 explained 20.80% genetic variance, while chromosome 4 explained 6.89%. Independent univariate genome-wide screens for each character identified 127, 197, and 268 novel significant SNPs with CL, CH, and CW, respectively. Three candidate genes, VPS36, AR, and WNT11B, were determined to have a plausible function in all comb characters. These genes are important to the initiation of follicle development, gonadal growth, and dermal development, respectively. The current study provides the first GWA analysis for comb traits. Identification of the genetic basis as well as promising candidate genes will help us understand the underlying genetic architecture of comb development and has practical significance in breeding programs for the selection of comb as an index for sexual maturity or reproduction. PMID:27427764

  5. Genome-wide association study of atypical psychosis.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Tetsufumi; Ikeda, Masashi; Glatt, Stephen J; Tsutsumi, Atsushi; Kikuyama, Hiroki; Kawamura, Yoshiya; Nishida, Nao; Miyagawa, Taku; Hashimoto, Ryota; Takeda, Masatoshi; Sasaki, Tsukasa; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Koh, Jun; Iwata, Nakao; Yoneda, Hiroshi

    2013-10-01

    Atypical psychosis with a periodic course of exacerbation and features of major psychiatric disorders [schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD)] has a long history in clinical psychiatry in Japan. Based upon the new criteria of atypical psychosis, a Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS) was conducted to identify the risk gene or variants. The relationships between atypical psychosis, SZ and BD were then assessed using independent GWAS data. Forty-seven patients with solid criteria of atypical psychosis and 882 normal controls (NCs) were scanned using an Affymetrics 6.0 chip. GWAS SZ data (560 SZ cases and 548 NCs) and GWAS BD (107 cases with BD type 1 and 107 NCs) were compared using gene-based analysis. The most significant SNPs were detected around the CHN2/CPVL genes (rs245914, P = 1.6 × 10(-7)) , COL21A1 gene (rs12196860, P = 2.45 × 10(-7) ), and PYGL/TRIM9 genes (rs1959536, P = 7.73 × 10(-7) ), although none of the single-nucleotide polymorphisms exhibited genome-wide significance (P = 5 × 10(-8) ). One of the highest peaks was detected on the major histocompatibility complex region, where large SZ GWASs have previously disclosed an association. The gene-based analysis suggested significant enrichment between SZ and atypical psychosis (P = 0.01), but not BD. This study provides clues about the types of patient whose diagnosis lies between SZ and BD. Studies with larger samples are required to determine the causal variant.

  6. Genome instability mechanisms and the structure of cancer genomes.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, Liam D; Venkitaraman, Ashok R

    2012-02-01

    Genomic instability is a hallmark of cancer cells, and arises from the aberrations that these cells exhibit in the normal biological mechanisms that repair and replicate the genome, or ensure its accurate segregation during cell division. Increasingly detailed descriptions of cancer genomes have begun to emerge from next-generation sequencing (NGS), providing snapshots of their nature and heterogeneity in different cancers at different stages in their evolution. Here, we attempt to extract from these sequencing studies insights into the role of genome instability mechanisms in carcinogenesis, and to identify challenges impeding further progress.

  7. The human genome project: Information management, access, and regulation. Technical progress report, 1 April--31 August 1993

    SciTech Connect

    McInerney, J.D.; Micikas, L.B.

    1993-09-10

    Efforts are described to prepare educational materials including computer based as well as conventional type teaching materials for training interested high school and elementary students in aspects of Human Genome Project.

  8. Genome-wide studies of telomere biology in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Harari, Yaniv; Kupiec, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Telomeres are specialized DNA-protein structures at the ends of eukaryotic chromosomes. Telomeres are essential for chromosomal stability and integrity, as they prevent chromosome ends from being recognized as double strand breaks. In rapidly proliferating cells, telomeric DNA is synthesized by the enzyme telomerase, which copies a short template sequence within its own RNA moiety, thus helping to solve the “end-replication problem”, in which information is lost at the ends of chromosomes with each DNA replication cycle. The basic mechanisms of telomere length, structure and function maintenance are conserved among eukaryotes. Studies in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been instrumental in deciphering the basic aspects of telomere biology. In the last decade, technical advances, such as the availability of mutant collections, have allowed carrying out systematic genome-wide screens for mutants affecting various aspects of telomere biology. In this review we summarize these efforts, and the insights that this Systems Biology approach has produced so far.

  9. Life Sciences Division and Center for Human Genome Studies 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Cram, L.S.; Stafford, C.

    1995-09-01

    This report summarizes the research and development activities of the Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Life Sciences Division and the biological aspects of the Center for Human Genome Studies for the calendar year 1994. The technical portion of the report is divided into two parts, (1) selected research highlights and (2) research projects and accomplishments. The research highlights provide a more detailed description of a select set of projects. A technical description of all projects is presented in sufficient detail so that the informed reader will be able to assess the scope and significance of each project. Summaries useful to the casual reader desiring general information have been prepared by the group leaders and appear in each group overview. Investigators on the staff of the Life Sciences Division will be pleased to provide further information.

  10. Quality control for genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Gondro, Cedric; Lee, Seung Hwan; Lee, Hak Kyo; Porto-Neto, Laercio R

    2013-01-01

    This chapter overviews the quality control (QC) issues for SNP-based genotyping methods used in genome-wide association studies. The main metrics for evaluating the quality of the genotypes are discussed followed by a worked out example of QC pipeline starting with raw data and finishing with a fully filtered dataset ready for downstream analysis. The emphasis is on automation of data storage, filtering, and manipulation to ensure data integrity throughput the process and on how to extract a global summary from these high dimensional datasets to allow better-informed downstream analytical decisions. All examples will be run using the R statistical programming language followed by a practical example using a fully automated QC pipeline for the Illumina platform.

  11. [Genetics and genomics for the study of bacterial resistance].

    PubMed

    Garza-Ramos, Ulises; Silva-Sánchez, Jesús; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial resistance is a public health problem causing high rates of morbidity and mortality in hospital settings. To the extent that different antibiotics are used, bacteria resistant to multiple drugs are selected. The development of new molecular genomic and proteomic tools such as real-time PCR, DNA pyrosequencing, mass spectrometry, DNA microarrays, and bioinformatics allow for more in-depth knowledge about the physiology and structure of bacteria and mechanisms involved in antibiotic resistance. These studies identify new targets for drugs and design specific antibiotics to provide more accurate treatments to combat infections caused by bacteria. Using these techniques, it will also be possible to rapidly identify genes that confer resistance to antibiotics, and to identify complex genetic structures, such as integrons that are involved in the spread of genes that confer multidrug-resistance.

  12. Structure and Functional Studies of DEN-2 Virus Genome.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-01

    No. 3. RECIPIENT’S CAT ALO NUMBER 4. TI TL E (and Subtitle) 5. TYPE OF REPORT A PERIOD COVERED Structure and Functional Studies on Dengue -2 Progress... Dengue virus glycoprotein antigen E. . Cloning of complementary DNA (eDNA) copy of Dengue viral RNA into E. coli HB101/pBR322 host/vector system and...characterization of a alone that containe-a 400 bp insert complementary to Dengue RNA will be described. 2. Construction of a cDNA library using Dengue

  13. Genome-wide association study identifies novel susceptibility loci for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chahal, Harvind S.; Lin, Yuan; Ransohoff, Katherine J.; Hinds, David A.; Wu, Wenting; Dai, Hong-Ji; Qureshi, Abrar A.; Li, Wen-Qing; Kraft, Peter; Tang, Jean Y.; Han, Jiali; Sarin, Kavita Y.

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma represents the second most common cutaneous malignancy, affecting 7–11% of Caucasians in the United States. The genetic determinants of susceptibility to cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma remain largely unknown. Here we report the results of a two-stage genome-wide association study of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, totalling 7,404 cases and 292,076 controls. Eleven loci reached genome-wide significance (P<5 × 10−8) including seven previously confirmed pigmentation-related loci: MC1R, ASIP, TYR, SLC45A2, OCA2, IRF4 and BNC2. We identify an additional four susceptibility loci: 11q23.3 CADM1, a metastasis suppressor gene involved in modifying tumour interaction with cell-mediated immunity; 2p22.3; 7p21.1 AHR, the dioxin receptor involved in anti-apoptotic pathways and melanoma progression; and 9q34.3 SEC16A, a putative oncogene with roles in secretion and cellular proliferation. These susceptibility loci provide deeper insight into the pathogenesis of squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:27424798

  14. Integrative computational approach for genome-based study of microbial lipid-degrading enzymes.

    PubMed

    Vorapreeda, Tayvich; Thammarongtham, Chinae; Laoteng, Kobkul

    2016-07-01

    Lipid-degrading or lipolytic enzymes have gained enormous attention in academic and industrial sectors. Several efforts are underway to discover new lipase enzymes from a variety of microorganisms with particular catalytic properties to be used for extensive applications. In addition, various tools and strategies have been implemented to unravel the functional relevance of the versatile lipid-degrading enzymes for special purposes. This review highlights the study of microbial lipid-degrading enzymes through an integrative computational approach. The identification of putative lipase genes from microbial genomes and metagenomic libraries using homology-based mining is discussed, with an emphasis on sequence analysis of conserved motifs and enzyme topology. Molecular modelling of three-dimensional structure on the basis of sequence similarity is shown to be a potential approach for exploring the structural and functional relationships of candidate lipase enzymes. The perspectives on a discriminative framework of cutting-edge tools and technologies, including bioinformatics, computational biology, functional genomics and functional proteomics, intended to facilitate rapid progress in understanding lipolysis mechanism and to discover novel lipid-degrading enzymes of microorganisms are discussed.

  15. A genome-wide association study of anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Boraska, Vesna; Franklin, Christopher S; Floyd, James AB; Thornton, Laura M; Huckins, Laura M; Southam, Lorraine; Rayner, N William; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Klump, Kelly L; Treasure, Janet; Lewis, Cathryn M; Schmidt, Ulrike; Tozzi, Federica; Kiezebrink, Kirsty; Hebebrand, Johannes; Gorwood, Philip; Adan, Roger AH; Kas, Martien JH; Favaro, Angela; Santonastaso, Paolo; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando; Gratacos, Monica; Rybakowski, Filip; Dmitrzak-Weglarz, Monika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Keski-Rahkonen, Anna; Raevuori, Anu; Van Furth, Eric F; Landt, Margarita CT Slof-Op t; Hudson, James I; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted; Knudsen, Gun Peggy S; Monteleone, Palmiero; Kaplan, Allan S; Karwautz, Andreas; Hakonarson, Hakon; Berrettini, Wade H; Guo, Yiran; Li, Dong; Schork, Nicholas J.; Komaki, Gen; Ando, Tetsuya; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Esko, Tõnu; Fischer, Krista; Männik, Katrin; Metspalu, Andres; Baker, Jessica H; Cone, Roger D; Dackor, Jennifer; DeSocio, Janiece E; Hilliard, Christopher E; O'Toole, Julie K; Pantel, Jacques; Szatkiewicz, Jin P; Taico, Chrysecolla; Zerwas, Stephanie; Trace, Sara E; Davis, Oliver SP; Helder, Sietske; Bühren, Katharina; Burghardt, Roland; de Zwaan, Martina; Egberts, Karin; Ehrlich, Stefan; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate; Herzog, Wolfgang; Imgart, Hartmut; Scherag, André; Scherag, Susann; Zipfel, Stephan; Boni, Claudette; Ramoz, Nicolas; Versini, Audrey; Brandys, Marek K; Danner, Unna N; de Kovel, Carolien; Hendriks, Judith; Koeleman, Bobby PC; Ophoff, Roel A; Strengman, Eric; van Elburg, Annemarie A; Bruson, Alice; Clementi, Maurizio; Degortes, Daniela; Forzan, Monica; Tenconi, Elena; Docampo, Elisa; Escaramís, Geòrgia; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Lissowska, Jolanta; Rajewski, Andrzej; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Slopien, Agnieszka; Hauser, Joanna; Karhunen, Leila; Meulenbelt, Ingrid; Slagboom, P Eline; Tortorella, Alfonso; Maj, Mario; Dedoussis, George; Dikeos, Dimitris; Gonidakis, Fragiskos; Tziouvas, Konstantinos; Tsitsika, Artemis; Papezova, Hana; Slachtova, Lenka; Martaskova, Debora; Kennedy, James L.; Levitan, Robert D.; Yilmaz, Zeynep; Huemer, Julia; Koubek, Doris; Merl, Elisabeth; Wagner, Gudrun; Lichtenstein, Paul; Breen, Gerome; Cohen-Woods, Sarah; Farmer, Anne; McGuffin, Peter; Cichon, Sven; Giegling, Ina; Herms, Stefan; Rujescu, Dan; Schreiber, Stefan; Wichmann, H-Erich; Dina, Christian; Sladek, Rob; Gambaro, Giovanni; Soranzo, Nicole; Julia, Antonio; Marsal, Sara; Rabionet, Raquel; Gaborieau, Valerie; Dick, Danielle M; Palotie, Aarno; Ripatti, Samuli; Widén, Elisabeth; Andreassen, Ole A; Espeseth, Thomas; Lundervold, Astri; Reinvang, Ivar; Steen, Vidar M; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Mattingsdal, Morten; Ntalla, Ioanna; Bencko, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Navratilova, Marie; Gallinger, Steven; Pinto, Dalila; Scherer, Stephen; Aschauer, Harald; Carlberg, Laura; Schosser, Alexandra; Alfredsson, Lars; Ding, Bo; Klareskog, Lars; Padyukov, Leonid; Finan, Chris; Kalsi, Gursharan; Roberts, Marion; Logan, Darren W; Peltonen, Leena; Ritchie, Graham RS; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Estivill, Xavier; Hinney, Anke; Sullivan, Patrick F; Collier, David A; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Bulik, Cynthia M

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a complex and heritable eating disorder characterized by dangerously low body weight. Neither candidate gene studies nor an initial genome wide association study (GWAS) have yielded significant and replicated results. We performed a GWAS in 2,907 cases with AN from 14 countries (15 sites) and 14,860 ancestrally matched controls as part of the Genetic Consortium for AN (GCAN) and the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 3 (WTCCC3). Individual association analyses were conducted in each stratum and meta-analyzed across all 15 discovery datasets. Seventy-six (72 independent) SNPs were taken forward for in silico (two datasets) or de novo (13 datasets) replication genotyping in 2,677 independent AN cases and 8,629 European ancestry controls along with 458 AN cases and 421 controls from Japan. The final global meta-analysis across discovery and replication datasets comprised 5,551 AN cases and 21,080 controls. AN subtype analyses (1,606 AN restricting; 1,445 AN binge-purge) were performed. No findings reached genome-wide significance. Two intronic variants were suggestively associated: rs9839776 (P=3.01×10-7) in SOX2OT and rs17030795 (P=5.84×10-6) in PPP3CA. Two additional signals were specific to Europeans: rs1523921 (P=5.76×10-6) between CUL3 and FAM124B and rs1886797 (P=8.05×10-6) near SPATA13. Comparing discovery to replication results, 76% of the effects were in the same direction, an observation highly unlikely to be due to chance (P=4×10-6), strongly suggesting that true findings exist but that our sample, the largest yet reported, was underpowered for their detection. The accrual of large genotyped AN case-control samples should be an immediate priority for the field. PMID:24514567

  16. A Whole Genome Association Study on Meat Palatability in Hanwoo

    PubMed Central

    Hyeong, K.-E.; Lee, Y.-M.; Kim, Y.-S.; Nam, K. C.; Jo, C.; Lee, K.-H.; Lee, J.-E.; Kim, J.-J.

    2014-01-01

    A whole genome association (WGA) study was carried out to find quantitative trait loci (QTL) for sensory evaluation traits in Hanwoo. Carcass samples of 250 Hanwoo steers were collected from National Agricultural Cooperative Livestock Research Institute, Ansung, Gyeonggi province, Korea, between 2011 and 2012 and genotyped with the Affymetrix Bovine Axiom Array 640K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chip. Among the SNPs in the chip, a total of 322,160 SNPs were chosen after quality control tests. After adjusting for the effects of age, slaughter-year-season, and polygenic effects using genome relationship matrix, the corrected phenotypes for the sensory evaluation measurements were regressed on each SNP using a simple linear regression additive based model. A total of 1,631 SNPs were detected for color, aroma, tenderness, juiciness and palatability at 0.1% comparison-wise level. Among the significant SNPs, the best set of 52 SNP markers were chosen using a forward regression procedure at 0.05 level, among which the sets of 8, 14, 11, 10, and 9 SNPs were determined for the respectively sensory evaluation traits. The sets of significant SNPs explained 18% to 31% of phenotypic variance. Three SNPs were pleiotropic, i.e. AX-26703353 and AX-26742891 that were located at 101 and 110 Mb of BTA6, respectively, influencing tenderness, juiciness and palatability, while AX-18624743 at 3 Mb of BTA10 affected tenderness and palatability. Our results suggest that some QTL for sensory measures are segregating in a Hanwoo steer population. Additional WGA studies on fatty acid and nutritional components as well as the sensory panels are in process to characterize genetic architecture of meat quality and palatability in Hanwoo. PMID:25178363

  17. A genome-wide methylation study on obesity

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaojing; Su, Shaoyong; Barnes, Vernon A.; De Miguel, Carmen; Pollock, Jennifer; Ownby, Dennis; Shi, Huidong; Zhu, Haidong; Snieder, Harold; Wang, Xiaoling

    2013-01-01

    Besides differential methylation, DNA methylation variation has recently been proposed and demonstrated to be a potential contributing factor to cancer risk. Here we aim to examine whether differential variability in methylation is also an important feature of obesity, a typical non-malignant common complex disease. We analyzed genome-wide methylation profiles of over 470,000 CpGs in peripheral blood samples from 48 obese and 48 lean African-American youth aged 14–20 y old. A substantial number of differentially variable CpG sites (DVCs), using statistics based on variances, as well as a substantial number of differentially methylated CpG sites (DMCs), using statistics based on means, were identified. Similar to the findings in cancers, DVCs generally exhibited an outlier structure and were more variable in cases than in controls. By randomly splitting the current sample into a discovery and validation set, we observed that both the DVCs and DMCs identified from the first set could independently predict obesity status in the second set. Furthermore, both the genes harboring DMCs and the genes harboring DVCs showed significant enrichment of genes identified by genome-wide association studies on obesity and related diseases, such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, type 2 diabetes and certain types of cancers, supporting their roles in the etiology and pathogenesis of obesity. We generalized the recent finding on methylation variability in cancer research to obesity and demonstrated that differential variability is also an important feature of obesity-related methylation changes. Future studies on the epigenetics of obesity will benefit from both statistics based on means and statistics based on variances. PMID:23644594

  18. A genome-wide association study of anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Boraska, Vesna; Franklin, Christopher S; Floyd, James AB; Thornton, Laura M; Huckins, Laura M; Southam, Lorraine; Rayner, N William; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Klump, Kelly L; Treasure, Janet; Lewis, Cathryn M; Schmidt, Ulrike; Tozzi, Federica; Kiezebrink, Kirsty; Hebebrand, Johannes; Gorwood, Philip; Adan, Roger AH; Kas, Martien JH; Favaro, Angela; Santonastaso, Paolo; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando; Gratacos, Monica; Rybakowski, Filip; Dmitrzak-Weglarz, Monika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Keski-Rahkonen, Anna; Raevuori, Anu; Van Furth, Eric F; Slof-Op t Landt, Margarita CT; Hudson, James I; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted; Knudsen, Gun Peggy S; Monteleone, Palmiero; Kaplan, Allan S; Karwautz, Andreas; Hakonarson, Hakon; Berrettini, Wade H; Guo, Yiran; Li, Dong; Schork, Nicholas J.; Komaki, Gen; Ando, Tetsuya; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Esko, Tõnu; Fischer, Krista; Männik, Katrin; Metspalu, Andres; Baker, Jessica H; Cone, Roger D; Dackor, Jennifer; DeSocio, Janiece E; Hilliard, Christopher E; O’Toole, Julie K; Pantel, Jacques; Szatkiewicz, Jin P; Taico, Chrysecolla; Zerwas, Stephanie; Trace, Sara E; Davis, Oliver SP; Helder, Sietske; Bühren, Katharina; Burghardt, Roland; de Zwaan, Martina; Egberts, Karin; Ehrlich, Stefan; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate; Herzog, Wolfgang; Imgart, Hartmut; Scherag, André; Scherag, Susann; Zipfel, Stephan; Boni, Claudette; Ramoz, Nicolas; Versini, Audrey; Brandys, Marek K; Danner, Unna N; de Kovel, Carolien; Hendriks, Judith; Koeleman, Bobby PC; Ophoff, Roel A; Strengman, Eric; van Elburg, Annemarie A; Bruson, Alice; Clementi, Maurizio; Degortes, Daniela; Forzan, Monica; Tenconi, Elena; Docampo, Elisa; Escaramís, Geòrgia; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Lissowska, Jolanta; Rajewski, Andrzej; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Slopien, Agnieszka; Hauser, Joanna; Karhunen, Leila; Meulenbelt, Ingrid; Slagboom, P Eline; Tortorella, Alfonso; Maj, Mario; Dedoussis, George; Dikeos, Dimitris; Gonidakis, Fragiskos; Tziouvas, Konstantinos; Tsitsika, Artemis; Papezova, Hana; Slachtova, Lenka; Martaskova, Debora; Kennedy, James L.; Levitan, Robert D.; Yilmaz, Zeynep; Huemer, Julia; Koubek, Doris; Merl, Elisabeth; Wagner, Gudrun; Lichtenstein, Paul; Breen, Gerome; Cohen-Woods, Sarah; Farmer, Anne; McGuffin, Peter; Cichon, Sven; Giegling, Ina; Herms, Stefan; Rujescu, Dan; Schreiber, Stefan; Wichmann, H-Erich; Dina, Christian; Sladek, Rob; Gambaro, Giovanni; Soranzo, Nicole; Julia, Antonio; Marsal, Sara; Rabionet, Raquel; Gaborieau, Valerie; Dick, Danielle M; Palotie, Aarno; Ripatti, Samuli; Widén, Elisabeth; Andreassen, Ole A; Espeseth, Thomas; Lundervold, Astri; Reinvang, Ivar; Steen, Vidar M; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Mattingsdal, Morten; Ntalla, Ioanna; Bencko, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Navratilova, Marie; Gallinger, Steven; Pinto, Dalila; Scherer, Stephen; Aschauer, Harald; Carlberg, Laura; Schosser, Alexandra; Alfredsson, Lars; Ding, Bo; Klareskog, Lars; Padyukov, Leonid; Finan, Chris; Kalsi, Gursharan; Roberts, Marion; Logan, Darren W; Peltonen, Leena; Ritchie, Graham RS; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Estivill, Xavier; Hinney, Anke; Sullivan, Patrick F; Collier, David A; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Bulik, Cynthia M

    2013-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a complex and heritable eating disorder characterized by dangerously low body weight. Neither candidate gene studies nor an initial genome wide association study (GWAS) have yielded significant and replicated results. We performed a GWAS in 2,907 cases with AN from 14 countries (15 sites) and 14,860 ancestrally matched controls as part of the Genetic Consortium for AN (GCAN) and the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 3 (WTCCC3). Individual association analyses were conducted in each stratum and meta-analyzed across all 15 discovery datasets. Seventy-six (72 independent) SNPs were taken forward for in silico (two datasets) or de novo (13 datasets) replication genotyping in 2,677 independent AN cases and 8,629 European ancestry controls along with 458 AN cases and 421 controls from Japan. The final global meta-analysis across discovery and replication datasets comprised 5,551 AN cases and 21,080 controls. AN subtype analyses (1,606 AN restricting; 1,445 AN binge-purge) were performed. No findings reached genome-wide significance. Two intronic variants were suggestively associated: rs9839776 (P=3.01×10−7) in SOX2OT and rs17030795 (P=5.84×10−6) in PPP3CA. Two additional signals were specific to Europeans: rs1523921 (P=5.76×10−6) between CUL3 and FAM124B and rs1886797 (P=8.05×10−6) near SPATA13. Comparing discovery to replication results, 76% of the effects were in the same direction, an observation highly unlikely to be due to chance (P= 4×10−6), strongly suggesting that true findings exist but that our sample, the largest yet reported, was underpowered for their detection. The accrual of large genotyped AN case-control samples should be an immediate priority for the field. PMID:21079607

  19. A genome-wide association study of anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Boraska, V; Franklin, C S; Floyd, J A B; Thornton, L M; Huckins, L M; Southam, L; Rayner, N W; Tachmazidou, I; Klump, K L; Treasure, J; Lewis, C M; Schmidt, U; Tozzi, F; Kiezebrink, K; Hebebrand, J; Gorwood, P; Adan, R A H; Kas, M J H; Favaro, A; Santonastaso, P; Fernández-Aranda, F; Gratacos, M; Rybakowski, F; Dmitrzak-Weglarz, M; Kaprio, J; Keski-Rahkonen, A; Raevuori, A; Van Furth, E F; Slof-Op 't Landt, M C T; Hudson, J I; Reichborn-Kjennerud, T; Knudsen, G P S; Monteleone, P; Kaplan, A S; Karwautz, A; Hakonarson, H; Berrettini, W H; Guo, Y; Li, D; Schork, N J; Komaki, G; Ando, T; Inoko, H; Esko, T; Fischer, K; Männik, K; Metspalu, A; Baker, J H; Cone, R D; Dackor, J; DeSocio, J E; Hilliard, C E; O'Toole, J K; Pantel, J; Szatkiewicz, J P; Taico, C; Zerwas, S; Trace, S E; Davis, O S P; Helder, S; Bühren, K; Burghardt, R; de Zwaan, M; Egberts, K; Ehrlich, S; Herpertz-Dahlmann, B; Herzog, W; Imgart, H; Scherag, A; Scherag, S; Zipfel, S; Boni, C; Ramoz, N; Versini, A; Brandys, M K; Danner, U N; de Kovel, C; Hendriks, J; Koeleman, B P C; Ophoff, R A; Strengman, E; van Elburg, A A; Bruson, A; Clementi, M; Degortes, D; Forzan, M; Tenconi, E; Docampo, E; Escaramís, G; Jiménez-Murcia, S; Lissowska, J; Rajewski, A; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, N; Slopien, A; Hauser, J; Karhunen, L; Meulenbelt, I; Slagboom, P E; Tortorella, A; Maj, M; Dedoussis, G; Dikeos, D; Gonidakis, F; Tziouvas, K; Tsitsika, A; Papezova, H; Slachtova, L; Martaskova, D; Kennedy, J L; Levitan, R D; Yilmaz, Z; Huemer, J; Koubek, D; Merl, E; Wagner, G; Lichtenstein, P; Breen, G; Cohen-Woods, S; Farmer, A; McGuffin, P; Cichon, S; Giegling, I; Herms, S; Rujescu, D; Schreiber, S; Wichmann, H-E; Dina, C; Sladek, R; Gambaro, G; Soranzo, N; Julia, A; Marsal, S; Rabionet, R; Gaborieau, V; Dick, D M; Palotie, A; Ripatti, S; Widén, E; Andreassen, O A; Espeseth, T; Lundervold, A; Reinvang, I; Steen, V M; Le Hellard, S; Mattingsdal, M; Ntalla, I; Bencko, V; Foretova, L; Janout, V; Navratilova, M; Gallinger, S; Pinto, D; Scherer, S W; Aschauer, H; Carlberg, L; Schosser, A; Alfredsson, L; Ding, B; Klareskog, L; Padyukov, L; Courtet, P; Guillaume, S; Jaussent, I; Finan, C; Kalsi, G; Roberts, M; Logan, D W; Peltonen, L; Ritchie, G R S; Barrett, J C; Estivill, X; Hinney, A; Sullivan, P F; Collier, D A; Zeggini, E; Bulik, C M

    2014-10-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a complex and heritable eating disorder characterized by dangerously low body weight. Neither candidate gene studies nor an initial genome-wide association study (GWAS) have yielded significant and replicated results. We performed a GWAS in 2907 cases with AN from 14 countries (15 sites) and 14 860 ancestrally matched controls as part of the Genetic Consortium for AN (GCAN) and the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 3 (WTCCC3). Individual association analyses were conducted in each stratum and meta-analyzed across all 15 discovery data sets. Seventy-six (72 independent) single nucleotide polymorphisms were taken forward for in silico (two data sets) or de novo (13 data sets) replication genotyping in 2677 independent AN cases and 8629 European ancestry controls along with 458 AN cases and 421 controls from Japan. The final global meta-analysis across discovery and replication data sets comprised 5551 AN cases and 21 080 controls. AN subtype analyses (1606 AN restricting; 1445 AN binge-purge) were performed. No findings reached genome-wide significance. Two intronic variants were suggestively associated: rs9839776 (P=3.01 × 10(-7)) in SOX2OT and rs17030795 (P=5.84 × 10(-6)) in PPP3CA. Two additional signals were specific to Europeans: rs1523921 (P=5.76 × 10(-)(6)) between CUL3 and FAM124B and rs1886797 (P=8.05 × 10(-)(6)) near SPATA13. Comparing discovery with replication results, 76% of the effects were in the same direction, an observation highly unlikely to be due to chance (P=4 × 10(-6)), strongly suggesting that true findings exist but our sample, the largest yet reported, was underpowered for their detection. The accrual of large genotyped AN case-control samples should be an immediate priority for the field.

  20. Genomic MRI - a Public Resource for Studying Sequence Patterns within Genomic DNA

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Ashwin; Bechtel, Jason; Fedorov, Alexei

    2011-01-01

    Non-coding genomic regions in complex eukaryotes, including intergenic areas, introns, and untranslated segments of exons, are profoundly non-random in their nucleotide composition and consist of a complex mosaic of sequence patterns. These patterns include so-called Mid-Range Inhomogeneity (MRI) regions -- sequences 30-10000 nucleotides in length that are enriched by a particular base or combination of bases (e.g. (G+T)-rich, purine-rich, etc.). MRI regions are associated with unusual (non-B-form) DNA structures that are often involved in regulation of gene expression, recombination, and other genetic processes (Fedorova & Fedorov 2010). The existence of a strong fixation bias within MRI regions against mutations that tend to reduce their sequence inhomogeneity additionally supports the functionality and importance of these genomic sequences (Prakash et al. 2009). Here we demonstrate a freely available Internet resource -- the Genomic MRI program package -- designed for computational analysis of genomic sequences in order to find and characterize various MRI patterns within them (Bechtel et al. 2008). This package also allows generation of randomized sequences with various properties and level of correspondence to the natural input DNA sequences. The main goal of this resource is to facilitate examination of vast regions of non-coding DNA that are still scarcely investigated and await thorough exploration and recognition. PMID:21610667

  1. Enhancing genomic prediction with genome-wide association studies in multiparental maize populations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Genome-wide association mapping using dense marker sets has identified some nucleotide variants affecting complex traits which have been validated with fine-mapping and functional analysis. Many sequence variants associated with complex traits in maize have small effects and low repeatability, howev...

  2. A salmonid EST genomic study: genes, duplications, phylogeny and microarrays

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Salmonids are of interest because of their relatively recent genome duplication, and their extensive use in wild fisheries and aquaculture. A comprehensive gene list and a comparison of genes in some of the different species provide valuable genomic information for one of the most wide...

  3. Novel Genetic Analysis for Case-Control Genome-Wide Association Studies: Quantification of Power and Genomic Prediction Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Hong; Wray, Naomi R.

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are routinely conducted for both quantitative and binary (disease) traits. We present two analytical tools for use in the experimental design of GWAS. Firstly, we present power calculations quantifying power in a unified framework for a range of scenarios. In this context we consider the utility of quantitative scores (e.g. endophenotypes) that may be available on cases only or both cases and controls. Secondly, we consider, the accuracy of prediction of genetic risk from genome-wide SNPs and derive an expression for genomic prediction accuracy using a liability threshold model for disease traits in a case-control design. The expected values based on our derived equations for both power and prediction accuracy agree well with observed estimates from simulations. PMID:23977056

  4. Combining cow and bull reference populations to increase accuracy of genomic prediction and genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Calus, M P L; de Haas, Y; Veerkamp, R F

    2013-10-01

    Genomic selection holds the promise to be particularly beneficial for traits that are difficult or expensive to measure, such that access to phenotypes on large daughter groups of bulls is limited. Instead, cow reference populations can be generated, potentially supplemented with existing information from the same or (highly) correlated traits available on bull reference populations. The objective of this study, therefore, was to develop a model to perform genomic predictions and genome-wide association studies based on a combined cow and bull reference data set, with the accuracy of the phenotypes differing between the cow and bull genomic selection reference populations. The developed bivariate Bayesian stochastic search variable selection model allowed for an unbalanced design by imputing residuals in the residual updating scheme for all missing records. The performance of this model is demonstrated on a real data example, where the analyzed trait, being milk fat or protein yield, was either measured only on a cow or a bull reference population, or recorded on both. Our results were that the developed bivariate Bayesian stochastic search variable selection model was able to analyze 2 traits, even though animals had measurements on only 1 of 2 traits. The Bayesian stochastic search variable selection model yielded consistently higher accuracy for fat yield compared with a model without variable selection, both for the univariate and bivariate analyses, whereas the accuracy of both models was very similar for protein yield. The bivariate model identified several additional quantitative trait loci peaks compared with the single-trait models on either trait. In addition, the bivariate models showed a marginal increase in accuracy of genomic predictions for the cow traits (0.01-0.05), although a greater increase in accuracy is expected as the size of the bull population increases. Our results emphasize that the chosen value of priors in Bayesian genomic prediction

  5. A genome-wide association study of attempted suicide

    PubMed Central

    Willour, Virginia L.; Seifuddin, Fayaz; Mahon, Pamela B.; Jancic, Dubravka; Pirooznia, Mehdi; Steele, Jo; Schweizer, Barbara; Goes, Fernando S.; Mondimore, Francis M.; MacKinnon, Dean F.; Perlis, Roy H.; Lee, Phil Hyoun; Huang, Jie; Kelsoe, John R.; Shilling, Paul D.; Rietschel, Marcella; Nöthen, Markus; Cichon, Sven; Gurling, Hugh; Purcell, Shaun; Smoller, Jordan W.; Craddock, Nicholas; DePaulo, J. Raymond; Schulze, Thomas G.; McMahon, Francis J.; Zandi, Peter P.; Potash, James B.

    2011-01-01

    The heritable component to attempted and completed suicide is partly related to psychiatric disorders and also partly independent of them. While attempted suicide linkage regions have been identified on 2p11–12 and 6q25–26, there are likely many more such loci, the discovery of which will require a much higher resolution approach, such as the genome-wide association study (GWAS). With this in mind, we conducted an attempted suicide GWAS that compared the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotypes of 1,201 bipolar (BP) subjects with a history of suicide attempts to the genotypes of 1,497 BP subjects without a history of suicide attempts. 2,507 SNPs with evidence for association at p<0.001 were identified. These associated SNPs were subsequently tested for association in a large and independent BP sample set. None of these SNPs were significantly associated in the replication sample after correcting for multiple testing, but the combined analysis of the two sample sets produced an association signal on 2p25 (rs300774) at the threshold of genome-wide significance (p= 5.07 × 10−8). The associated SNPs on 2p25 fall in a large linkage disequilibrium block containing the ACP1 gene, a gene whose expression is significantly elevated in BP subjects who have completed suicide. Furthermore, the ACP1 protein is a tyrosine phosphatase that influences Wnt signaling, a pathway regulated by lithium, making ACP1 a functional candidate for involvement in the phenotype. Larger GWAS sample sets will be required to confirm the signal on 2p25 and to identify additional genetic risk factors increasing susceptibility for attempted suicide. PMID:21423239

  6. Snake Genome Sequencing: Results and Future Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Kerkkamp, Harald M. I.; Kini, R. Manjunatha; Pospelov, Alexey S.; Vonk, Freek J.; Henkel, Christiaan V.; Richardson, Michael K.

    2016-01-01

    Snake genome sequencing is in its infancy—very much behind the progress made in sequencing the genomes of humans, model organisms and pathogens relevant to biomedical research, and agricultural species. We provide here an overview of some of the snake genome projects in progress, and discuss the biological findings, with special emphasis on toxinology, from the small number of draft snake genomes already published. We discuss the future of snake genomics, pointing out that new sequencing technologies will help overcome the problem of repetitive sequences in assembling snake genomes. Genome sequences are also likely to be valuable in examining the clustering of toxin genes on the chromosomes, in designing recombinant antivenoms and in studying the epigenetic regulation of toxin gene expression. PMID:27916957

  7. [Progress in the study of some important natural bioactive cyclopeptides].

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen-Yan; Zhao, Si-Meng; Zeng, Guang-Zhi; He, Wen-Jun; Xu, Hui-Min; Tan, Ning-Hu

    2012-03-01

    Natural cyclopeptides are hot spots in chemical and pharmaceutical fields because of the wide spreading bio-resources, complex molecular structures and various bioactivities. Bio-producers of cyclopeptides distribute over almost every kingdom from bacteria to plants and animals. Many cyclopeptides contain non-coded amino acids and non-pepditic bonds. Most exciting characteristic of cyclopeptides is a range of interesting bioactivities such as antibiotics gramicidin-S (2), vancomycin (3) and daptomycin (4), immunosuppressive cyclosporin-A (1) and astin-C (8), and anti-tumor aplidine (5), RA-V (6) and RA-VII (7). Compounds 1-4 are being used in clinics; compounds 5-8 are in the stages of clinical trial or as a candidate for drug research. In this review, the progress in chemical and bioactive studies on these important natural bioactive cyclopeptides 1-8 are introduced, mainly including discovery, bioactivity, mechanism, QSAR and synthesis.

  8. [Progresses and perspectives in the study on citrin deficiency].

    PubMed

    Lu, Yao-bang; Peng, Fei; Li, Meng-xian; Kobayashi, Keiko; Saheki, Takeyori

    2006-12-01

    Citrin deficiency causes autosomal recessive disorders including adult-onset type II citrullinemia (CTLN2) and neonatal intrahepatic cholestasis caused by citrin deficiency (NICCD). The responsive gene of citrin deficiency, SLC25A13, locates on chromosome 7q21.3 and encodes citrin as a liver-type mitochondrial aspartate/glutamate carrier (AGC). The mutations on SLC25A13 will result in deficiency of citrin and CTLN2 or NICCD. Citrin deficiency was found at first in Japan. However, recently, some of cases were identified in China, Korea, Vietnam, Israel, Czech, United States and England, and racial differences of the SLC25A13 mutations were found, suggesting the patients with citrin deficiency maybe exist worldwide. In this article, authors reviewed the progresses in the study on citrin deficiency up to now and put forward authors' considerations for further research on it.

  9. Genome-wide association study for host response to bovine leukemia virus in Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Brym, P; Bojarojć-Nosowicz, B; Oleński, K; Hering, D M; Ruść, A; Kaczmarczyk, E; Kamiński, S

    2016-07-01

    The mechanisms of leukemogenesis induced by bovine leukemia virus (BLV) and the processes underlying the phenomenon of differential host response to BLV infection still remain poorly understood. The aim of the study was to screen the entire cattle genome to identify markers and candidate genes that might be involved in host response to bovine leukemia virus infection. A genome-wide association study was performed using Holstein cows naturally infected by BLV. A data set included 43 cows (BLV positive) and 30 cows (BLV negative) genotyped for 54,609 SNP markers (Illumina Bovine SNP50 BeadChip). The BLV status of cows was determined by serum ELISA, nested-PCR and hematological counts. Linear Regression Analysis with a False Discovery Rate and kinship matrix (computed on the autosomal SNPs) was calculated to find out which SNP markers significantly differentiate BLV-positive and BLV-negative cows. Nine markers reached genome-wide significance. The most significant SNPs were located on chromosomes 23 (rs41583098), 3 (rs109405425, rs110785500) and 8 (rs43564499) in close vicinity of a patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 1 (PNPLA1); adaptor-related protein complex 4, beta 1 subunit (AP4B1); tripartite motif-containing 45 (TRIM45) and cell division cycle associated 2 (CDCA2) genes, respectively. Furthermore, a list of 41 candidate genes was composed based on their proximity to significant markers (within a distance of ca. 1 Mb) and functional involvement in processes potentially underlying BLV-induced pathogenesis. In conclusion, it was demonstrated that host response to BLV infection involves nine sub-regions of the cattle genome (represented by 9 SNP markers), containing many genes which, based on the literature, could be involved to enzootic bovine leukemia progression. New group of promising candidate genes associated with the host response to BLV infection were identified and could therefore be a target for future studies. The functions of candidate genes

  10. Genetic Studies of Quantitative MCI and AD Phenotypes in ADNI: Progress, Opportunities, and Plans

    PubMed Central

    Saykin, Andrew J.; Shen, Li; Yao, Xiaohui; Kim, Sungeun; Nho, Kwangsik; Risacher, Shannon L.; Ramanan, Vijay K.; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Faber, Kelly M.; Sarwar, Nadeem; Munsie, Leanne M.; Hu, Xiaolan; Soares, Holly D.; Potkin, Steven G.; Thompson, Paul M.; Kauwe, John S.K.; Kaddurah-Daouk, Rima; Green, Robert C.; Toga, Arthur W.; Weiner, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Genetic data from the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) has been crucial in advancing the understanding of AD pathophysiology. Here we provide an update on sample collection, scientific progress and opportunities, conceptual issues, and future plans. METHODS Lymphoblastoid cell lines and DNA and RNA samples from blood have been collected and banked, and data and biosamples have been widely disseminated. To date, APOE genotyping, genome-wide association study (GWAS), and whole exome and whole genome sequencing (WES, WGS) data have been obtained and disseminated. RESULTS ADNI genetic data have been downloaded thousands of times and over 300 publications have resulted, including reports of large scale GWAS by consortia to which ADNI contributed. Many of the first applications of quantitative endophenotype association studies employed ADNI data, including some of the earliest GWAS and pathway-based studies of biospecimen and imaging biomarkers, as well as memory and other clinical/cognitive variables. Other contributions include some of the first WES and WGS data sets and reports in healthy controls, MCI, and AD. DISCUSSION Numerous genetic susceptibility and protective markers for AD and disease biomarkers have been identified and replicated using ADNI data, and have heavily implicated immune, mitochondrial, cell cycle/fate, and other biological processes. Early sequencing studies suggest that rare and structural variants are likely to account for significant additional phenotypic variation. Longitudinal analyses of transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolomic, and epigenomic changes will also further elucidate dynamic processes underlying preclinical and prodromal stages of disease. Integration of this unique collection of multi-omics data within a systems biology framework will help to separate truly informative markers of early disease mechanisms and potential novel therapeutic targets from the vast background of less relevant biological

  11. Genome-wide association study of circulating retinol levels.

    PubMed

    Mondul, Alison M; Yu, Kai; Wheeler, William; Zhang, Hong; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Major, Jacqueline M; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Männistö, Satu; Hazra, Aditi; Hsing, Ann W; Jacobs, Kevin B; Eliassen, Heather; Tanaka, Toshiko; Reding, Douglas J; Hendrickson, Sara; Ferrucci, Luigi; Virtamo, Jarmo; Hunter, David J; Chanock, Stephen J; Kraft, Peter; Albanes, Demetrius

    2011-12-01

    Retinol is one of the most biologically active forms of vitamin A and is hypothesized to influence a wide range of human diseases including asthma, cardiovascular disease, infectious diseases and cancer. We conducted a genome-wide association study of 5006 Caucasian individuals drawn from two cohorts of men: the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention (ATBC) Study and the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial. We identified two independent single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with circulating retinol levels, which are located near the transthyretin (TTR) and retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4) genes which encode major carrier proteins of retinol: rs1667255 (P =2.30× 10(-17)) and rs10882272 (P =6.04× 10(-12)). We replicated the association with rs10882272 in RBP4 in independent samples from the Nurses' Health Study and the Invecchiare in Chianti Study (InCHIANTI) that included 3792 women and 504 men (P =9.49× 10(-5)), but found no association for retinol with rs1667255 in TTR among women, thus suggesting evidence for gender dimorphism (P-interaction=1.31× 10(-5)). Discovery of common genetic variants associated with serum retinol levels may provide further insight into the contribution of retinol and other vitamin A compounds to the development of cancer and other complex diseases.

  12. Direct-to-consumer personal genomic testing: a case study and practical recommendations for “genomic counseling”.

    PubMed

    Sturm, Amy C; Manickam, Kandamurugu

    2012-06-01

    Technological advances and information-seeking consumers have pushed forward the movement of direct-to consumer(DTC) genetic testing. Just like with other types of testing, there are potential risks, benefits and limitations. A major limitation of DTC testing is the incomplete view it provides regarding lifetime risk for common, complex diseases,since most tests only analyze 1–2 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and do not include evaluation of medical or family histories, which is necessary to risk assessment. Further, it is not currently well-established whether personal genomic testing results will lead toward improved health behaviors, adverse psychological effects or potential overuse of the health care system. To display these and other issues, we present an in-depth case study of an individual who ordered DTC genetic testing and subsequently sought genetic counseling. This case presents a unique learning experience for the field of genomic counseling, as the patient did not fit the typical assumptions regarding ‘early adopters’ of DTC testing. It also allowed the genetics health care providers involved in the case to identify gaps in current genetic counseling practice that need to be filled and approaches to employ for successful delivery of genomic counseling. Based on our experience, we developed practical recommendations for genomic counseling, which include novel approaches to case preparation, use of electronic tools during the counseling session, and focusing on education as the major component of the genomic counseling session, in order to provide patients with the knowledge necessary to independently interpret and understand large amounts of genomic testing information provided to them.

  13. Implications of genome wide association studies for addiction: Are our a priori assumptions all wrong?

    PubMed Central

    Hall, F. Scott; Drgonova, Jana; Jain, Siddharth; Uhl, George R.

    2013-01-01

    Substantial genetic contributions to addiction vulnerability are supported by data from twin studies, linkage studies, candidate gene association studies and, more recently, Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS). Parallel to this work, animal studies have attempted to identify the genes that may contribute to responses to addictive drugs and addiction liability, initially focusing upon genes for the targets of the major drugs of abuse. These studies identified genes/proteins that affect responses to drugs of abuse; however, this does not necessarily mean that variation in these genes contributes to the genetic component of addiction liability. One of the major problems with initial linkage and candidate gene studies was an a priori focus on the genes thought to be involved in addiction based upon the known contributions of those proteins to drug actions, making the identification of novel genes unlikely. The GWAS approach is systematic and agnostic to such a priori assumptions. From the numerous GWAS now completed several conclusions may be drawn: (1) addiction is highly polygenic; each allelic variant contributing in a small, additive fashion to addiction vulnerability; (2) unexpected, compared to our a priori assumptions, classes of genes are most important in explaining addiction vulnerability; (3) although substantial genetic heterogeneity exists, there is substantial convergence of GWAS signals on particular genes. This review traces the history of this research; from initial transgenic mouse models based upon candidate gene and linkage studies, through the progression of GWAS for addiction and nicotine cessation, to the current human and transgenic mouse studies post-GWAS. PMID:23872493

  14. Implications of genome wide association studies for addiction: are our a priori assumptions all wrong?

    PubMed

    Hall, F Scott; Drgonova, Jana; Jain, Siddharth; Uhl, George R

    2013-12-01

    Substantial genetic contributions to addiction vulnerability are supported by data from twin studies, linkage studies, candidate gene association studies and, more recently, Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS). Parallel to this work, animal studies have attempted to identify the genes that may contribute to responses to addictive drugs and addiction liability, initially focusing upon genes for the targets of the major drugs of abuse. These studies identified genes/proteins that affect responses to drugs of abuse; however, this does not necessarily mean that variation in these genes contributes to the genetic component of addiction liability. One of the major problems with initial linkage and candidate gene studies was an a priori focus on the genes thought to be involved in addiction based upon the known contributions of those proteins to drug actions, making the identification of novel genes unlikely. The GWAS approach is systematic and agnostic to such a priori assumptions. From the numerous GWAS now completed several conclusions may be drawn: (1) addiction is highly polygenic; each allelic variant contributing in a small, additive fashion to addiction vulnerability; (2) unexpected, compared to our a priori assumptions, classes of genes are most important in explaining addiction vulnerability; (3) although substantial genetic heterogeneity exists, there is substantial convergence of GWAS signals on particular genes. This review traces the history of this research; from initial transgenic mouse models based upon candidate gene and linkage studies, through the progression of GWAS for addiction and nicotine cessation, to the current human and transgenic mouse studies post-GWAS.

  15. Molecular studies of functional aspects of plant mitochondria. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Siedow, J.N.

    1992-03-03

    The goal of this research is to characterize the mechanism by which a protein encoded by mitochondrial genome of cms-T maize (URF13) interacts with a family of the compounds produced by certain fungi (T-toxins) to permeabilize biological membranes. The research carried out during the current funding period has focused on the structure of URF13, and the results support the validity of the three-helix model of URF13 and provide direct evidence for the oligomeric nature of at least some of the URF13 molecules in the membrane. In addition, the toxin binding studies have provided insight into the dynamic nature of the T-toxin:URF13 interaction and the extent to which Asp-39 is crucial to the interaction that leads to membrane pore formation. Additional knowledge of the structure of URF13 is needed if the nature of the interaction between URF13 and T-toxin to produce a hydrophilic pore within the membrane is to ultimately be understood.

  16. Theoretical studies in nuclear reactions and nuclear structure. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    Research in the Maryland Nuclear Theory Group focusses on problems in four basic areas of current relevance. Hadrons in nuclear matter; the structure of hadrons; relativistic nuclear physics and heavy ion dynamics and related processes. The section on hadrons in nuclear matter groups together research items which are aimed at exploring ways in which the properties of nucleons and the mesons which play a role in the nuclear force are modified in the nuclear medium. A very interesting result has been the finding that QCD sum rules supply a new insight into the decrease of the nucleon`s mass in the nuclear medium. The quark condensate, which characterizes spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking of the late QCD vacuum, decreases in nuclear matter and this is responsible for the decrease of the nucleon`s mass. The section on the structure of hadrons contains progress reports on our research aimed at understanding the structure of the nucleon. Widely different approaches are being studied, e.g., lattice gauge calculations, QCD sum rules, quark-meson models with confinement and other hedgehog models. A major goal of this type of research is to develop appropriate links between nuclear physics and QCD. The section on relativistic nuclear physics represents our continuing interest in developing an appropriate relativistic framework for nuclear dynamics. A Lorentz-invariant description of the nuclear force suggests a similar decrease of the nucleon`s mass in the nuclear medium as has been found from QCD sum rules. Work in progress extends previous successes in elastic scattering to inelastic scattering of protons by nuclei. The section on heavy ion dynamics and related processes reports on research into the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} problem and heavy ion dynamics.

  17. [Recent progress of neuroimaging studies on sleeping brain].

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Yuka

    2012-06-01

    Although sleep is a familiar phenomenon, its functions are yet to be elucidated. Understanding these functions of sleep is an important focus area in neuroscience. Electroencephalography (EEG) has been the predominantly used method in human sleep research but does not provide detailed spatial information about brain activation during sleep. To supplement the spatial information provided by this method, researchers have started using a combination of EEG and various advanced neuroimaging techniques that have been recently developed, including positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this paper, we will review the recent progress in sleep studies, especially studies that have used such advanced neuroimaging techniques. First, we will briefly introduce several neuroimaging techniques available for use in sleep studies. Next, we will review the spatiotemporal brain activation patterns during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, the dynamics of functional connectivity during sleep, and the consolidation of learning and memory during sleep; studies on the neural correlates of dreams, which have not yet been identified, will also be discussed. Lastly, possible directions for future research in this area will be discussed.

  18. Progressive Non-Fluent Aphasia in Malayalam: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Annamma; Mathuranath, P. S.

    2010-01-01

    Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA) is a degenerative condition characterized by deterioration in language for at least two years without deterioration in other cognitive domains. This report highlights the language profile in a 79-year-old male with progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA) who was assessed using the Western Aphasia Battery and the…

  19. Epidemiological studies of esophageal cancer in the era of genome-wide association studies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, An-Hui; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Bo; He, Yi-Xuan; Fang, Ye-Xian; Yan, Yong-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal cancer (EC) caused about 395000 deaths in 2010. China has the most cases of EC and EC is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in China. Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is the predominant histologic type (90%-95%), while the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) remains extremely low in China. Traditional epidemiological studies have revealed that environmental carcinogens are risk factors for EC. Molecular epidemiological studies revealed that susceptibility to EC is influenced by both environmental and genetic risk factors. Of all the risk factors for EC, some are associated with the risk of ESCC and others with the risk of EAC. However, the details and mechanisms of risk factors involved in the process for EC are unclear. The advanced methods and techniques used in human genome studies bring a great opportunity for researchers to explore and identify the details of those risk factors or susceptibility genes involved in the process of EC. Human genome epidemiology is a new branch of epidemiology, which leads the epidemiology study from the molecular epidemiology era to the era of genome wide association studies (GWAS). Here we review the epidemiological studies of EC (especially ESCC) in the era of GWAS, and provide an overview of the general risk factors and those genomic variants (genes, SNPs, miRNAs, proteins) involved in the process of ESCC. PMID:25133033

  20. Study establishes basis for genomic classification of endometrial cancers

    Cancer.gov

    A comprehensive genomic analysis of nearly 400 endometrial tumors suggests that certain molecular characteristics – such as the frequency of mutations – could complement current pathology methods and help distinguish between principal types of endometrial

  1. CRISPR system for genome engineering: the application for autophagy study.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jianzhou; Chew, Shirley Jia Li; Shi, Yin; Gong, Zhiyuan; Shen, Han-Ming

    2017-03-14

    CRISPR/Cas9 is the latest tool introduced in the field of genome engineering and is so far the best genome-editing tool as compared to its precedents such as, meganucleases, zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator-like effectors (TALENs). The simple design and assembly of the CRISPR/Cas9 system makes genome editing easy to perform as it uses small guide RNAs that correspond to their DNA targets for high efficiency editing. This has helped open the doors for multiplexible genome targeting in many species that were intractable using old genetic perturbation techniques. Currently, The CRISPR system is revolutionizing the way biological researches are conducted and paves a bright future not only in research but also in medicine and biotechnology. In this review, we evaluated the history, types and structure, the mechanism of action of CRISPR/Cas System. In particular, we focused on the application of this powerful tool in autophagy research.

  2. FLAGdb(++): A Bioinformatic Environment to Study and Compare Plant Genomes.

    PubMed

    Tamby, Jean Philippe; Brunaud, Véronique

    2017-01-01

    Today, the growing knowledge and data accumulation on plant genomes do not solve in a simple way the task of gene function inference. Because data of different types are coming from various sources, we need to integrate and analyze them to help biologists in this task. We created FLAGdb(++) ( http://tools.ips2.u-psud.fr/FLAGdb ) to take up this challenge for a selection of plant genomes. In order to enrich gene function predictions, structural and functional annotations of the genomes are explored to generate meta-data and to compare them. Since data are numerous and complex, we focused on accessibility and visualization with an original and user-friendly interface. In this chapter we present the main tools of FLAGdb(++) and a use-case to explore a gene family: structural and functional properties of this family and research of orthologous genes in the other plant genomes.

  3. Genomic Resources for Gene Discovery, Functional Genome Annotation, and Evolutionary Studies of Maize and Its Close Relatives

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Shi, Xue; Liu, Lin; Li, Haiyan; Ammiraju, Jetty S.S.; Kudrna, David A.; Xiong, Wentao; Wang, Hao; Dai, Zhaozhao; Zheng, Yonglian; Lai, Jinsheng; Jin, Weiwei; Messing, Joachim; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L; Wing, Rod A.; Luo, Meizhong

    2013-01-01

    Maize is one of the most important food crops and a key model for genetics and developmental biology. A genetically anchored and high-quality draft genome sequence of maize inbred B73 has been obtained to serve as a reference sequence. To facilitate evolutionary studies in maize and its close relatives, much like the Oryza Map Alignment Project (OMAP) (www.OMAP.org) bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) resource did for the rice community, we constructed BAC libraries for maize inbred lines Zheng58, Chang7-2, and Mo17 and maize wild relatives Zea mays ssp. parviglumis and Tripsacum dactyloides. Furthermore, to extend functional genomic studies to maize and sorghum, we also constructed binary BAC (BIBAC) libraries for the maize inbred B73 and the sorghum landrace Nengsi-1. The BAC/BIBAC vectors facilitate transfer of large intact DNA inserts from BAC clones to the BIBAC vector and functional complementation of large DNA fragments. These seven Zea Map Alignment Project (ZMAP) BAC/BIBAC libraries have average insert sizes ranging from 92 to 148 kb, organellar DNA from 0.17 to 2.3%, empty vector rates between 0.35 and 5.56%, and genome equivalents of 4.7- to 8.4-fold. The usefulness of the Parviglumis and Tripsacum BAC libraries was demonstrated by mapping clones to the reference genome. Novel genes and alleles present in these ZMAP libraries can now be used for functional complementation studies and positional or homology-based cloning of genes for translational genomics. PMID:24037269

  4. Genomic resources for gene discovery, functional genome annotation, and evolutionary studies of maize and its close relatives.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Shi, Xue; Liu, Lin; Li, Haiyan; Ammiraju, Jetty S S; Kudrna, David A; Xiong, Wentao; Wang, Hao; Dai, Zhaozhao; Zheng, Yonglian; Lai, Jinsheng; Jin, Weiwei; Messing, Joachim; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L; Wing, Rod A; Luo, Meizhong

    2013-11-01

    Maize is one of the most important food crops and a key model for genetics and developmental biology. A genetically anchored and high-quality draft genome sequence of maize inbred B73 has been obtained to serve as a reference sequence. To facilitate evolutionary studies in maize and its close relatives, much like the Oryza Map Alignment Project (OMAP) (www.OMAP.org) bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) resource did for the rice community, we constructed BAC libraries for maize inbred lines Zheng58, Chang7-2, and Mo17 and maize wild relatives Zea mays ssp. parviglumis and Tripsacum dactyloides. Furthermore, to extend functional genomic studies to maize and sorghum, we also constructed binary BAC (BIBAC) libraries for the maize inbred B73 and the sorghum landrace Nengsi-1. The BAC/BIBAC vectors facilitate transfer of large intact DNA inserts from BAC clones to the BIBAC vector and functional complementation of large DNA fragments. These seven Zea Map Alignment Project (ZMAP) BAC/BIBAC libraries have average insert sizes ranging from 92 to 148 kb, organellar DNA from 0.17 to 2.3%, empty vector rates between 0.35 and 5.56%, and genome equivalents of 4.7- to 8.4-fold. The usefulness of the Parviglumis and Tripsacum BAC libraries was demonstrated by mapping clones to the reference genome. Novel genes and alleles present in these ZMAP libraries can now be used for functional complementation studies and positional or homology-based cloning of genes for translational genomics.

  5. Current progress of DNA vaccine studies in humans.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shan; Wang, Shixia; Grimes-Serrano, Jill M

    2008-03-01

    Despite remarkable progress in the field of DNA vaccine research since its discovery in the early 1990 s, the formal acceptance of this novel technology as a new modality of human vaccines depends on the successful demonstration of its safety and efficacy in advanced clinical trials. Although clinical trials conducted so far have provided overwhelming evidence that DNA vaccines are well tolerated and have an excellent safety profile, the early designs of DNA vaccines failed to demonstrate sufficient immunogenicity in humans. However, studies conducted over the last few years have led to promising results, particularly when DNA vaccines were used in combination with other forms of vaccines. Here, we provide a review of the data from reported DNA vaccine clinical studies with an emphasis on the ability of DNA vaccines to elicit antigen-specific, cell-mediated and antibody responses in humans. The majority of these trials are designed to test candidate vaccines against several major human pathogens and the remaining studies tested the immunogenicity of therapeutic vaccines against cancer.

  6. A genome-wide association study in multiple system atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Sailer, Anna; Nalls, Michael A.; Schulte, Claudia; Federoff, Monica; Price, T. Ryan; Lees, Andrew; Ross, Owen A.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Mok, Kin; Mencacci, Niccolo E.; Schottlaender, Lucia; Chelban, Viorica; Ling, Helen; O'Sullivan, Sean S.; Wood, Nicholas W.; Traynor, Bryan J.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Federoff, Howard J.; Mhyre, Timothy R.; Morris, Huw R.; Deuschl, Günther; Quinn, Niall; Widner, Hakan; Albanese, Alberto; Infante, Jon; Bhatia, Kailash P.; Poewe, Werner; Oertel, Wolfgang; Höglinger, Günter U.; Wüllner, Ullrich; Goldwurm, Stefano; Pellecchia, Maria Teresa; Ferreira, Joaquim; Tolosa, Eduardo; Bloem, Bastiaan R.; Rascol, Olivier; Meissner, Wassilios G.; Hardy, John A.; Revesz, Tamas; Holton, Janice L.; Gasser, Thomas; Wenning, Gregor K.; Singleton, Andrew B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify genetic variants that play a role in the pathogenesis of multiple system atrophy (MSA), we undertook a genome-wide association study (GWAS). Methods: We performed a GWAS with >5 million genotyped and imputed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 918 patients with MSA of European ancestry and 3,864 controls. MSA cases were collected from North American and European centers, one third of which were neuropathologically confirmed. Results: We found no significant loci after stringent multiple testing correction. A number of regions emerged as potentially interesting for follow-up at p < 1 × 10−6, including SNPs in the genes FBXO47, ELOVL7, EDN1, and MAPT. Contrary to previous reports, we found no association of the genes SNCA and COQ2 with MSA. Conclusions: We present a GWAS in MSA. We have identified several potentially interesting gene loci, including the MAPT locus, whose significance will have to be evaluated in a larger sample set. Common genetic variation in SNCA and COQ2 does not seem to be associated with MSA. In the future, additional samples of well-characterized patients with MSA will need to be collected to perform a larger MSA GWAS, but this initial study forms the basis for these next steps. PMID:27629089

  7. Distinguishing true from false positives in genomic studies: p values.

    PubMed

    Broer, Linda; Lill, Christina M; Schuur, Maaike; Amin, Najaf; Roehr, Johannes T; Bertram, Lars; Ioannidis, John P A; van Duijn, Cornelia M

    2013-02-01

    Distinguishing true from false positive findings is a major challenge in human genetic epidemiology. Several strategies have been devised to facilitate this, including the positive predictive value (PPV) and a set of epidemiological criteria, known as the "Venice" criteria. The PPV measures the probability of a true association, given a statistically significant finding, while the Venice criteria grade the credibility based on the amount of evidence, consistency of replication and protection from bias. A vast majority of journals use significance thresholds to identify the true positive findings. We studied the effect of p value thresholds on the PPV and used the PPV and Venice criteria to define usable thresholds of statistical significance. Theoretical and empirical analyses of data published on AlzGene show that at a nominal p value threshold of 0.05 most "positive" findings will turn out to be false if the prior probability of association is below 0.10 even if the statistical power of the study is higher than 0.80. However, in underpowered studies (0.25) with a low prior probability of 1 × 10(-3), a p value of 1 × 10(-5) yields a high PPV (>96 %). Here we have shown that the p value threshold of 1 × 10(-5) gives a very strong evidence of association in almost all studies. However, in the case of a very high prior probability of association (0.50) a p value threshold of 0.05 may be sufficient, while for studies with very low prior probability of association (1 × 10(-4); genome-wide association studies for instance) 1 × 10(-7) may serve as a useful threshold to declare significance.

  8. The KRAB Zinc Finger Protein Roma/Zfp157 Is a Critical Regulator of Cell-Cycle Progression and Genomic Stability

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Teresa L.F.; Guilbaud, Guillaume; Blow, J. Julian; Sale, Julian E.; Watson, Christine J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Regulation of DNA replication and cell division is essential for tissue growth and maintenance of genomic integrity and is particularly important in tissues that undergo continuous regeneration such as mammary glands. We have previously shown that disruption of the KRAB-domain zinc finger protein Roma/Zfp157 results in hyperproliferation of mammary epithelial cells (MECs) during pregnancy. Here, we delineate the mechanism by which Roma engenders this phenotype. Ablation of Roma in MECs leads to unscheduled proliferation, replication stress, DNA damage, and genomic instability. Furthermore, mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) depleted for Roma exhibit downregulation of p21Cip1 and geminin and have accelerated replication fork velocities, which is accompanied by a high rate of mitotic errors and polyploidy. In contrast, overexpression of Roma in MECs halts cell-cycle progression, whereas siRNA-mediated p21Cip1 knockdown ameliorates, in part, this phenotype. Thus, Roma is an essential regulator of the cell cycle and is required to maintain genomic stability. PMID:27149840

  9. The rise of genomics.

    PubMed

    Weissenbach, Jean

    2016-01-01

    A brief history of the development of genomics is provided. Complete sequencing of genomes of uni- and multicellular organisms is based on important progress in sequencing and bioinformatics. Evolution of these methods is ongoing and has triggered an explosion in data production and analysis. Initial analyses focused on the inventory of genes encoding proteins. Completeness and quality of gene prediction remains crucial. Genome analyses profoundly modified our views on evolution, biodiversity and contributed to the detection of new functions, yet to be fully elucidated, such as those fulfilled by non-coding RNAs. Genomics has become the basis for the study of biology and provides the molecular support for a bunch of large-scale studies, the omics.

  10. Genome-Wide Association Studies of Multiple Keratinocyte Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Verkouteren, Joris A. C.; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G.; Kraft, Peter; Turman, Constance; Han, Jiali; Cho, Eunyoung; Murabito, Joanne M.; Levy, Daniel; Qureshi, Abrar A.; Nijsten, Tamar

    2017-01-01

    There is strong evidence for a role of environmental risk factors involved in susceptibility to develop multiple keratinocyte cancers (mKCs), but whether genes are also involved in mKCs susceptibility has not been thoroughly investigated. We investigated whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are associated with susceptibility for mKCs. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 1,666 cases with mKCs and 1,950 cases with single KC (sKCs; controls) from Harvard cohorts (the Nurses' Health Study [NHS], NHS II, and the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study) and the Framingham Heart Study was carried-out using over 8 million SNPs (stage-1). We sought to replicate the most significant statistical associations (p-value≤ 5.5x10-6) in an independent cohort of 574 mKCs and 872 sKCs from the Rotterdam Study. In the discovery stage, 40 SNPs with suggestive associations (p-value ≤5.5x10-6) were identified, with eight independent SNPs tagging all 40 SNPs. The most significant SNP was located at chromosome 9 (rs7468390; p-value = 3.92x10-7). In stage-2, none of these SNPs replicated and only two of them were associated with mKCs in the same direction in the combined meta-analysis. We tested the associations for 19 previously reported basal cell carcinoma-related SNPs (candidate gene association analysis), and found that rs1805007 (MC1R locus) was significantly associated with risk of mKCs (p-value = 2.80x10-4). Although the suggestive SNPs with susceptibility for mKCs were not replicated, we found that previously identified BCC variants may also be associated with mKC, which the most significant association (rs1805007) located at the MC1R gene. PMID:28081215

  11. Replication Study: Melanoma genome sequencing reveals frequent PREX2 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Horrigan, Stephen K; Courville, Pascal; Sampey, Darryl; Zhou, Faren; Cai, Steve

    2017-01-01

    In 2015, as part of the Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology, we published a Registered Report (Chroscinski et al., 2014) that described how we intended to replicate selected experiments from the paper "Melanoma genome sequencing reveals frequent PREX2 mutations" (Berger et al., 2012). Here we report the results of those experiments. We regenerated cells stably expressing ectopic wild-type and mutant phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate-dependent Rac exchange factor 2 (PREX2) using the same immortalized human NRASG12D melanocytes as the original study. Evaluation of PREX2 expression in these newly generated stable cells revealed varying levels of expression among the PREX2 isoforms, which was also observed in the stable cells made in the original study (Figure S6A; Berger et al., 2012). Additionally, ectopically expressed PREX2 was found to be at least 5 times above endogenous PREX2 expression. The monitoring of tumor formation of these stable cells in vivo resulted in no statistically significant difference in tumor-free survival driven by PREX2 variants, whereas the original study reported that these PREX2 mutations increased the rate of tumor incidence compared to controls (Figure 3B and S6B; Berger et al., 2012). Surprisingly, the median tumor-free survival was 1 week in this replication attempt, while 70% of the control mice were reported to be tumor-free after 9 weeks in the original study. The rapid tumor onset observed in this replication attempt, compared to the original study, makes the detection of accelerated tumor growth in PREX2 expressing NRASG12D melanocytes extremely difficult. Finally, we report meta-analyses for each result. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21634.001 PMID:28100394

  12. The Progress of Metabolomics Study in Traditional Chinese Medicine Research.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pengcheng; Wang, Qiuhong; Yang, Bingyou; Zhao, Shan; Kuang, Haixue

    2015-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has played important roles in health protection and disease treatment for thousands of years in China and has gained the gradual acceptance of the international community. However, many intricate issues, which cannot be explained by traditional methods, still remain, thus, new ideas and technologies are needed. As an emerging system biology technology, the holistic view adopted by metabolomics is similar to that of TCM, which allows us to investigate TCM with complicated conditions and multiple factors in depth. In this paper, we tried to give a timely and comprehensive update about the methodology progression of metabolomics, as well as its applications, in different fields of TCM studies including quality control, processing, safety and efficacy evaluation. The herbs investigated by metabolomics were selected for detailed examination, including Anemarrhena asphodeloides Bunge, Atractylodes macrocephala Kidd, Pinellia ternate, etc.; furthermore, some valuable results have been obtained and summarized. In conclusion, although the study of metabolomics is at the early phase and requires further scrutiny and validation, it still provides bright prospects to dissect the synergistic action of multiple components from TCM. Overall, with the further development of analytical techniques, especially multi-analysis techniques, we expect that metabolomics will greatly promote TCM research and the establishment of international standards, which is beneficial to TCM modernization.

  13. A Genome-wide Association Study of Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Renton, Alan E.; Pliner, Hannah A.; Provenzano, Carlo; Evoli, Amelia; Ricciardi, Roberta; Nalls, Michael A.; Marangi, Giuseppe; Abramzon, Yevgeniya; Arepalli, Sampath; Chong, Sean; Hernandez, Dena G.; Johnson, Janel O.; Bartoccioni, Emanuela; Scuderi, Flavia; Maestri, Michelangelo; Raphael Gibbs, J.; Errichiello, Edoardo; Chiò, Adriano; Restagno, Gabriella; Sabatelli, Mario; Macek, Mark; Scholz, Sonja W.; Corse, Andrea; Chaudhry, Vinay; Benatar, Michael; Barohn, Richard J.; McVey, April; Pasnoor, Mamatha; Dimachkie, Mazen M.; Rowin, Julie; Kissel, John; Freimer, Miriam; Kaminski, Henry J.; Sanders, Donald B.; Lipscomb, Bernadette; Massey, Janice M.; Chopra, Manisha; Howard, James F.; Koopman, Wilma J.; Nicolle, Michael W.; Pascuzzi, Robert M.; Pestronk, Alan; Wulf, Charlie; Florence, Julaine; Blackmore, Derrick; Soloway, Aimee; Siddiqi, Zaeem; Muppidi, Srikanth; Wolfe, Gil; Richman, David; Mezei, Michelle M.; Jiwa, Theresa; Oger, Joel; Drachman, Daniel B.; Traynor, Bryan J.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Myasthenia gravis is a chronic, autoimmune, neuromuscular disease characterized by fluctuating weakness of voluntary muscle groups. Although genetic factors are known to play a role in this neuroimmunological condition, the genetic etiology underlying myasthenia gravis is not well understood. OBJECTIVE To identify genetic variants that alter susceptibility to myasthenia gravis, we performed a genome-wide association study. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS DNA was obtained from 1032 white individuals from North America diagnosed as having acetylcholine receptor antibody–positive myasthenia gravis and 1998 race/ethnicity-matched control individuals from January 2010 to January 2011. These samples were genotyped on Illumina OmniExpress single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays. An independent cohort of 423 Italian cases and 467 Italian control individuals were used for replication. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES We calculated P values for association between 8114394 genotyped and imputed variants across the genome and risk for developing myasthenia gravis using logistic regression modeling. A threshold P value of 5.0 × 10−8 was set for genome-wide significance after Bonferroni correction for multiple testing. RESULTS In the over all case-control cohort, we identified association signals at CTLA4 (rs231770; P = 3.98 × 10−8; odds ratio, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.25–1.49), HLA-DQA1 (rs9271871; P = 1.08 × 10−8; odds ratio, 2.31; 95% CI, 2.02 – 2.60), and TNFRSF11A (rs4263037; P = 1.60 × 10−9; odds ratio, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.29–1.53). These findings replicated for CTLA4 and HLA-DQA1 in an independent cohort of Italian cases and control individuals. Further analysis revealed distinct, but overlapping, disease-associated loci for early- and late-onset forms of myasthenia gravis. In the late-onset cases, we identified 2 association peaks: one was located in TNFRSF11A (rs4263037; P = 1.32 × 10−12; odds ratio, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.44–1.68) and the other was detected

  14. A genome-wide association study of myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Renton, Alan E; Pliner, Hannah A; Provenzano, Carlo; Evoli, Amelia; Ricciardi, Roberta; Nalls, Michael A; Marangi, Giuseppe; Abramzon, Yevgeniya; Arepalli, Sampath; Chong, Sean; Hernandez, Dena G; Johnson, Janel O; Bartoccioni, Emanuela; Scuderi, Flavia; Maestri, Michelangelo; Gibbs, J Raphael; Errichiello, Edoardo; Chiò, Adriano; Restagno, Gabriella; Sabatelli, Mario; Macek, Mark; Scholz, Sonja W; Corse, Andrea; Chaudhry, Vinay; Benatar, Michael; Barohn, Richard J; McVey, April; Pasnoor, Mamatha; Dimachkie, Mazen M; Rowin, Julie; Kissel, John; Freimer, Miriam; Kaminski, Henry J; Sanders, Donald B; Lipscomb, Bernadette; Massey, Janice M; Chopra, Manisha; Howard, James F; Koopman, Wilma J; Nicolle, Michael W; Pascuzzi, Robert M; Pestronk, Alan; Wulf, Charlie; Florence, Julaine; Blackmore, Derrick; Soloway, Aimee; Siddiqi, Zaeem; Muppidi, Srikanth; Wolfe, Gil; Richman, David; Mezei, Michelle M; Jiwa, Theresa; Oger, Joel; Drachman, Daniel B; Traynor, Bryan J

    2015-04-01

    Myasthenia gravis is a chronic, autoimmune, neuromuscular disease characterized by fluctuating weakness of voluntary muscle groups. Although genetic factors are known to play a role in this neuroimmunological condition, the genetic etiology underlying myasthenia gravis is not well understood. To identify genetic variants that alter susceptibility to myasthenia gravis, we performed a genome-wide association study. DNA was obtained from 1032 white individuals from North America diagnosed as having acetylcholine receptor antibody-positive myasthenia gravis and 1998 race/ethnicity-matched control individuals from January 2010 to January 2011. These samples were genotyped on Illumina OmniExpress single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays. An independent cohort of 423 Italian cases and 467 Italian control individuals were used for replication. We calculated P values for association between 8,114,394 genotyped and imputed variants across the genome and risk for developing myasthenia gravis using logistic regression modeling. A threshold P value of 5.0×10(-8) was set for genome-wide significance after Bonferroni correction for multiple testing. In the overall case-control cohort, we identified association signals at CTLA4 (rs231770; P=3.98×10(-8); odds ratio, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.25-1.49), HLA-DQA1 (rs9271871; P=1.08×10(-8); odds ratio, 2.31; 95% CI, 2.02-2.60), and TNFRSF11A (rs4263037; P=1.60×10(-9); odds ratio, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.29-1.53). These findings replicated for CTLA4 and HLA-DQA1 in an independent cohort of Italian cases and control individuals. Further analysis revealed distinct, but overlapping, disease-associated loci for early- and late-onset forms of myasthenia gravis. In the late-onset cases, we identified 2 association peaks: one was located in TNFRSF11A (rs4263037; P=1.32×10(-12); odds ratio, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.44-1.68) and the other was detected in the major histocompatibility complex on chromosome 6p21 (HLA-DQA1; rs9271871; P=7.02×10(-18); odds ratio, 4.27; 95

  15. Geneious! Simplified genome skimming methods for phylogenetic systematic studies: A case study in Oreocarya (Boraginaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Ripma, Lee A.; Simpson, Michael G.; Hasenstab-Lehman, Kristen

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: As systematists grapple with how to best harness the power of next-generation sequencing (NGS), a deluge of review papers, methods, and analytical tools make choosing the right method difficult. Oreocarya (Boraginaceae), a genus of 63 species, is a good example of a group lacking both species-level resolution and genomic resources. The use of Geneious removes bioinformatic barriers and makes NGS genome skimming accessible to even the least tech-savvy systematists. • Methods: A combination of de novo and reference-guided assemblies was used to process 100-bp single-end Illumina HiSeq 2000 reads. A subset of 25 taxa was used to test the suitability of genome skimming for future systematic studies in recalcitrant lineages like Oreocarya. • Results: The nuclear ribosomal cistron, the plastome, and 12 mitochondrial genes were recovered from all 25 taxa. All data processing and phylogenomic analyses were performed in Geneious. We report possible future multiplexing levels and published low-copy nuclear genes represented within de novo contigs. • Discussion: Genome skimming represents a much-improved primary data collection over PCR+Sanger sequencing when chloroplast DNA (cpDNA), nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA), and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are the target sequences. This study details methods that plant systematists can employ to study their own taxa of interest. PMID:25506521

  16. Genome-wide association study of circulating vitamin D levels.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jiyoung; Yu, Kai; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael; Simon, K Claire; McCullough, Marjorie L; Gallicchio, Lisa; Jacobs, Eric J; Ascherio, Alberto; Helzlsouer, Kathy; Jacobs, Kevin B; Li, Qizhai; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Purdue, Mark; Virtamo, Jarmo; Horst, Ronald; Wheeler, William; Chanock, Stephen; Hunter, David J; Hayes, Richard B; Kraft, Peter; Albanes, Demetrius

    2010-07-01

    The primary circulating form of vitamin D, 25-hydroxy-vitamin D [25(OH)D], is associated with multiple medical outcomes, including rickets, osteoporosis, multiple sclerosis and cancer. In a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 4501 persons of European ancestry drawn from five cohorts, we identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the gene encoding group-specific component (vitamin D binding) protein, GC, on chromosome 4q12-13 that were associated with 25(OH)D concentrations: rs2282679 (P=2.0x10(-30)), in linkage disequilibrium (LD) with rs7041, a non-synonymous SNP (D432E; P=4.1x10(-22)) and rs1155563 (P=3.8x10(-25)). Suggestive signals for association with 25(OH)D were also observed for SNPs in or near three other genes involved in vitamin D synthesis or activation: rs3829251 on chromosome 11q13.4 in NADSYN1 [encoding nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) synthetase; P=8.8x10(-7)], which was in high LD with rs1790349, located in DHCR7, the gene encoding 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase that synthesizes cholesterol from 7-dehydrocholesterol; rs6599638 in the region harboring the open-reading frame 88 (C10orf88) on chromosome 10q26.13 in the vicinity of ACADSB (acyl-Coenzyme A dehydrogenase), involved in cholesterol and vitamin D synthesis (P=3.3x10(-7)); and rs2060793 on chromosome 11p15.2 in CYP2R1 (cytochrome P450, family 2, subfamily R, polypeptide 1, encoding a key C-25 hydroxylase that converts vitamin D3 to an active vitamin D receptor ligand; P=1.4x10(-5)). We genotyped SNPs in these four regions in 2221 additional samples and confirmed strong genome-wide significant associations with 25(OH)D through meta-analysis with the GWAS data for GC (P=1.8x10(-49)), NADSYN1/DHCR7 (P=3.4x10(-9)) and CYP2R1 (P=2.9x10(-17)), but not C10orf88 (P=2.4x10(-5)).

  17. Progressive statistics for studies in sports medicine and exercise science.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, William G; Marshall, Stephen W; Batterham, Alan M; Hanin, Juri

    2009-01-01

    Statistical guidelines and expert statements are now available to assist in the analysis and reporting of studies in some biomedical disciplines. We present here a more progressive resource for sample-based studies, meta-analyses, and case studies in sports medicine and exercise science. We offer forthright advice on the following controversial or novel issues: using precision of estimation for inferences about population effects in preference to null-hypothesis testing, which is inadequate for assessing clinical or practical importance; justifying sample size via acceptable precision or confidence for clinical decisions rather than via adequate power for statistical significance; showing SD rather than SEM, to better communicate the magnitude of differences in means and nonuniformity of error; avoiding purely nonparametric analyses, which cannot provide inferences about magnitude and are unnecessary; using regression statistics in validity studies, in preference to the impractical and biased limits of agreement; making greater use of qualitative methods to enrich sample-based quantitative projects; and seeking ethics approval for public access to the depersonalized raw data of a study, to address the need for more scrutiny of research and better meta-analyses. Advice on less contentious issues includes the following: using covariates in linear models to adjust for confounders, to account for individual differences, and to identify potential mechanisms of an effect; using log transformation to deal with nonuniformity of effects and error; identifying and deleting outliers; presenting descriptive, effect, and inferential statistics in appropriate formats; and contending with bias arising from problems with sampling, assignment, blinding, measurement error, and researchers' prejudices. This article should advance the field by stimulating debate, promoting innovative approaches, and serving as a useful checklist for authors, reviewers, and editors.

  18. Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neale, Benjamin M.; Medland, Sarah E.; Ripke, Stephan; Asherson, Philip; Franke, Barbara; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Faraone, Stephen V.; Nguyen, Thuy Trang; Schafer, Helmut; Holmans, Peter; Daly, Mark; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Freitag, Christine; Reif, Andreas; Renner, Tobias J.; Romanos, Marcel; Romanos, Jasmin; Walitza, Susanne; Warnke, Andreas; Meyer, Jobst; Palmason, Haukur; Buitelaar, Jan; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Lambregts-Rommelse, Nanda; Gill, Michael; Anney, Richard J. L.; Langely, Kate; O'Donovan, Michael; Williams, Nigel; Owen, Michael; Thapar, Anita; Kent, Lindsey; Sergeant, Joseph; Roeyers, Herbert; Mick, Eric; Biederman, Joseph; Doyle, Alysa; Smalley, Susan; Loo, Sandra; Hakonarson, Hakon; Elia, Josephine; Todorov, Alexandre; Miranda, Ana; Mulas, Fernando; Ebstein, Richard P.; Rothenberger, Aribert; Banaschewski, Tobias; Oades, Robert D.; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund; McGough, James; Nisenbaum, Laura; Middleton, Frank; Hu, Xiaolan; Nelson, Stan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Although twin and family studies have shown attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to be highly heritable, genetic variants influencing the trait at a genome-wide significant level have yet to be identified. As prior genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have not yielded significant results, we conducted a meta-analysis of…

  19. Case-Control Genome-Wide Association Study of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neale, Benjamin M.; Medland, Sarah; Ripke, Stephan; Anney, Richard J. L.; Asherson, Philip; Buitelaar, Jan; Franke, Barbara; Gill, Michael; Kent, Lindsey; Holmans, Peter; Middleton, Frank; Thapar, Anita; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Faraone, Stephen V.; Daly, Mark; Nguyen, Thuy Trang; Schafer, Helmut; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Reif, Andreas; Renner, Tobias J.; Romanos, Marcel; Romanos, Jasmin; Warnke, Andreas; Walitza, Susanne; Freitag, Christine; Meyer, Jobst; Palmason, Haukur; Rothenberger, Aribert; Hawi, Ziarih; Sergeant, Joseph; Roeyers, Herbert; Mick, Eric; Biederman, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Although twin and family studies have shown attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to be highly heritable, genetic variants influencing the trait at a genome-wide significant level have yet to be identified. Thus additional genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are needed. Method: We used case-control analyses of 896 cases…

  20. Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neale, Benjamin M.; Medland, Sarah E.; Ripke, Stephan; Asherson, Philip; Franke, Barbara; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Faraone, Stephen V.; Nguyen, Thuy Trang; Schafer, Helmut; Holmans, Peter; Daly, Mark; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Freitag, Christine; Reif, Andreas; Renner, Tobias J.; Romanos, Marcel; Romanos, Jasmin; Walitza, Susanne; Warnke, Andreas; Meyer, Jobst; Palmason, Haukur; Buitelaar, Jan; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Lambregts-Rommelse, Nanda; Gill, Michael; Anney, Richard J. L.; Langely, Kate; O'Donovan, Michael; Williams, Nigel; Owen, Michael; Thapar, Anita; Kent, Lindsey; Sergeant, Joseph; Roeyers, Herbert; Mick, Eric; Biederman, Joseph; Doyle, Alysa; Smalley, Susan; Loo, Sandra; Hakonarson, Hakon; Elia, Josephine; Todorov, Alexandre; Miranda, Ana; Mulas, Fernando; Ebstein, Richard P.; Rothenberger, Aribert; Banaschewski, Tobias; Oades, Robert D.; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund; McGough, James; Nisenbaum, Laura; Middleton, Frank; Hu, Xiaolan; Nelson, Stan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Although twin and family studies have shown attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to be highly heritable, genetic variants influencing the trait at a genome-wide significant level have yet to be identified. As prior genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have not yielded significant results, we conducted a meta-analysis of…

  1. Case-Control Genome-Wide Association Study of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neale, Benjamin M.; Medland, Sarah; Ripke, Stephan; Anney, Richard J. L.; Asherson, Philip; Buitelaar, Jan; Franke, Barbara; Gill, Michael; Kent, Lindsey; Holmans, Peter; Middleton, Frank; Thapar, Anita; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Faraone, Stephen V.; Daly, Mark; Nguyen, Thuy Trang; Schafer, Helmut; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Reif, Andreas; Renner, Tobias J.; Romanos, Marcel; Romanos, Jasmin; Warnke, Andreas; Walitza, Susanne; Freitag, Christine; Meyer, Jobst; Palmason, Haukur; Rothenberger, Aribert; Hawi, Ziarih; Sergeant, Joseph; Roeyers, Herbert; Mick, Eric; Biederman, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Although twin and family studies have shown attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to be highly heritable, genetic variants influencing the trait at a genome-wide significant level have yet to be identified. Thus additional genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are needed. Method: We used case-control analyses of 896 cases…

  2. INTEGRATED GENOME-BASED STUDIES OF SHEWANELLA ECOPHYSIOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    NEALSON, KENNETH H.

    2013-10-15

    This project had as its goals the understanding of the ecophysiology of the genus Shewanella using various genomics approaches. As opposed to other programs involving Shewanella, this one branched out into the various areas in which Shewanella cells are active, and included both basic and applied studies. All of the work was, to some extent, related to the ability of the bacteria to accomplish electron exchange between the cell and solid state electron acceptors and/or electron donors, a process we call Extracellular Electron Transport, or EET. The major accomplishments related to several different areas: Basic Science Studies: 1. Genetics and genomics of nitrate reduction, resulting in elucidation of atypical nitrate reduction systems in Shewanella oneidensis (MR-1)[2]. 2. Influence of bacterial strain and growth conditions on iron reduction, showing that rates of reduction, extents of reduction, and the formation of secondary minerals were different for different strains of Shewanella [3,4,9]. 3. Comparative genomics as a tool for comparing metabolic capacities of different Shewanella strains, and for predicting growth and metabolism [6,10,15]. In these studies, collaboration with ORNL, PNNL, and 4. Basic studies of electron transport in strain MR-1, both to poised electrodes, and via conductive nanowires [12,13]. This included the first accurate measurements of electrical energy generation by a single cell during electrode growth [12], and the demonstration of electrical conductivity along the length of bacterial nanowires [13]. 5. Impact of surface charge and electron flow on cell movement, cell attachment, cell growth, and biofilm formation [7.18]. The demonstration that interaction with solid state electron acceptors resulted in increased motility [7] led to the description of a phenomenon called electrokinesis. The importance of this for biofilm formation and for electron flow was hypothesized by Nealson & Finkel [18], and is now under study in several

  3. Weighted SNP set analysis in genome-wide association study.

    PubMed

    Dai, Hui; Zhao, Yang; Qian, Cheng; Cai, Min; Zhang, Ruyang; Chu, Minjie; Dai, Juncheng; Hu, Zhibin; Shen, Hongbing; Chen, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are popular for identifying genetic variants which are associated with disease risk. Many approaches have been proposed to test multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a region simultaneously which considering disadvantages of methods in single locus association analysis. Kernel machine based SNP set analysis is more powerful than single locus analysis, which borrows information from SNPs correlated with causal or tag SNPs. Four types of kernel machine functions and principal component based approach (PCA) were also compared. However, given the loss of power caused by low minor allele frequencies (MAF), we conducted an extension work on PCA and used a new method called weighted PCA (wPCA). Comparative analysis was performed for weighted principal component analysis (wPCA), logistic kernel machine based test (LKM) and principal component analysis (PCA) based on SNP set in the case of different minor allele frequencies (MAF) and linkage disequilibrium (LD) structures. We also applied the three methods to analyze two SNP sets extracted from a real GWAS dataset of non-small cell lung cancer in Han Chinese population. Simulation results show that when the MAF of the causal SNP is low, weighted principal component and weighted IBS are more powerful than PCA and other kernel machine functions at different LD structures and different numbers of causal SNPs. Application of the three methods to a real GWAS dataset indicates that wPCA and wIBS have better performance than the linear kernel, IBS kernel and PCA.

  4. Genome-wide association study of aggressive behaviour in chicken

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenhui; Zheng, Ming; Abdalla, Bahareldin Ali; Zhang, Zhe; Xu, Zhenqiang; Ye, Qiao; Xu, Haiping; Luo, Wei; Nie, Qinghua; Zhang, Xiquan

    2016-01-01

    In the poultry industry, aggressive behaviour is a large animal welfare issue all over the world. To date, little is known about the underlying genetics of the aggressive behaviour. Here, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to explore the genetic mechanism associated with aggressive behaviour in chickens. The GWAS results showed that a total of 33 SNPs were associated with aggressive behaviour traits (P < 4.6E-6). rs312463697 on chromosome 4 was significantly associated with aggression (P = 2.10905E-07), and it was in the intron region of the sortilin-related VPS10 domain containing receptor 2 (SORCS2) gene. In addition, biological function analysis of the nearest 26 genes around the significant SNPs was performed with Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. An interaction network contained 17 genes was obtained and SORCS2 was involved in this network, interacted with nerve growth factor (NGF), nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR), dopa decarboxylase (L-dopa) and dopamine. After knockdown of SORCS2, the mRNA levels of NGF, L-dopa and dopamine receptor genes DRD1, DRD2, DRD3 and DRD4 were significantly decreased (P < 0.05). In summary, our data indicated that SORCS2 might play an important role in chicken aggressive behaviour through the regulation of dopaminergic pathways and NGF. PMID:27485826

  5. Identification of differential translation in genome wide studies.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Ola; Sonenberg, Nahum; Nadon, Robert

    2010-12-14

    Regulation of gene expression through translational control is a fundamental mechanism implicated in many biological processes ranging from memory formation to innate immunity and whose dysregulation contributes to human diseases. Genome wide analyses of translational control strive to identify differential translation independent of cytosolic mRNA levels. For this reason, most studies measure genes' translation levels as log ratios (translation levels divided by corresponding cytosolic mRNA levels obtained in parallel). Counterintuitively, arising from a mathematical necessity, these log ratios tend to be highly correlated with the cytosolic mRNA levels. Accordingly, they do not effectively correct for cytosolic mRNA level and generate substantial numbers of biological false positives and false negatives. We show that analysis of partial variance, which produces estimates of translational activity that are independent of cytosolic mRNA levels, is a superior alternative. When combined with a variance shrinkage method for estimating error variance, analysis of partial variance has the additional benefit of having greater statistical power and identifying fewer genes as translationally regulated resulting merely from unrealistically low variance estimates rather than from large changes in translational activity. In contrast to log ratios, this formal analytical approach estimates translation effects in a statistically rigorous manner, eliminates the need for inefficient and error-prone heuristics, and produces results that agree with biological function. The method is applicable to datasets obtained from both the commonly used polysome microarray method and the sequencing-based ribosome profiling method.

  6. Progress of pharmacological studies on alkaloids from Apocynaceae.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lu; Cao, Jian-Xin; Yao, Yuan-Cheng; Xu, Sheng-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Alkaloid was a kind of biological active ingredient. There were various types of alkaloids in Apocynaceae. This paper reviewed the progress on alkaloids from Apocynaceae, which contained origin, structure, and pharmacological activity.

  7. Genome-wide association study of sleep in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sleep is a highly conserved behavior, yet its duration and pattern vary extensively among species and between individuals within species. The genetic basis of natural variation in sleep remains unknown. Results We used the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP) to perform a genome-wide association (GWA) study of sleep in D. melanogaster. We identified candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with differences in the mean as well as the environmental sensitivity of sleep traits; these SNPs typically had sex-specific or sex-biased effects, and were generally located in non-coding regions. The majority of SNPs (80.3%) affecting sleep were at low frequency and had moderately large effects. Additive models incorporating multiple SNPs explained as much as 55% of the genetic variance for sleep in males and females. Many of these loci are known to interact physically and/or genetically, enabling us to place them in candidate genetic networks. We confirmed the role of seven novel loci on sleep using insertional mutagenesis and RNA interference. Conclusions We identified many SNPs in novel loci that are potentially associated with natural variation in sleep, as well as SNPs within genes previously known to affect Drosophila sleep. Several of the candidate genes have human homologues that were identified in studies of human sleep, suggesting that genes affecting variation in sleep are conserved across species. Our discovery of genetic variants that influence environmental sensitivity to sleep may have a wider application to all GWA studies, because individuals with highly plastic genotypes will not have consistent phenotypes. PMID:23617951

  8. Multicentric Genome-Wide Association Study for Primary Spontaneous Pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Abrantes, Patrícia; Francisco, Vânia; Teixeira, Gilberto; Monteiro, Marta; Neves, João; Norte, Ana; Robalo Cordeiro, Carlos; Moura e Sá, João; Reis, Ernestina; Santos, Patrícia; Oliveira, Manuela; Sousa, Susana; Fradinho, Marta; Malheiro, Filipa; Negrão, Luís

    2016-01-01

    Despite elevated incidence and recurrence rates for Primary Spontaneous Pneumothorax (PSP), little is known about its etiology, and the genetics of idiopathic PSP remains unexplored. To identify genetic variants contributing to sporadic PSP risk, we conducted the first PSP genome-wide association study. Two replicate pools of 92 Portuguese PSP cases and of 129 age- and sex-matched controls were allelotyped in triplicate on the Affymetrix Human SNP Array 6.0 arrays. Markers passing quality control were ranked by relative allele score difference between cases and controls (|RASdiff|), by a novel cluster method and by a combined Z-test. 101 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected using these three approaches for technical validation by individual genotyping in the discovery dataset. 87 out of 94 successfully tested SNPs were nominally associated in the discovery dataset. Replication of the 87 technically validated SNPs was then carried out in an independent replication dataset of 100 Portuguese cases and 425 controls. The intergenic rs4733649 SNP in chromosome 8 (between LINC00824 and LINC00977) was associated with PSP in the discovery (P = 4.07E-03, ORC[95% CI] = 1.88[1.22–2.89]), replication (P = 1.50E-02, ORC[95% CI] = 1.50[1.08–2.09]) and combined datasets (P = 8.61E-05, ORC[95% CI] = 1.65[1.29–2.13]). This study identified for the first time one genetic risk factor for sporadic PSP, but future studies are warranted to further confirm this finding in other populations and uncover its functional role in PSP pathogenesis. PMID:27203581

  9. Multicentric Genome-Wide Association Study for Primary Spontaneous Pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Inês; Abrantes, Patrícia; Francisco, Vânia; Teixeira, Gilberto; Monteiro, Marta; Neves, João; Norte, Ana; Robalo Cordeiro, Carlos; Moura E Sá, João; Reis, Ernestina; Santos, Patrícia; Oliveira, Manuela; Sousa, Susana; Fradinho, Marta; Malheiro, Filipa; Negrão, Luís; Feijó, Salvato; Oliveira, Sofia A

    2016-01-01

    Despite elevated incidence and recurrence rates for Primary Spontaneous Pneumothorax (PSP), little is known about its etiology, and the genetics of idiopathic PSP remains unexplored. To identify genetic variants contributing to sporadic PSP risk, we conducted the first PSP genome-wide association study. Two replicate pools of 92 Portuguese PSP cases and of 129 age- and sex-matched controls were allelotyped in triplicate on the Affymetrix Human SNP Array 6.0 arrays. Markers passing quality control were ranked by relative allele score difference between cases and controls (|RASdiff|), by a novel cluster method and by a combined Z-test. 101 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected using these three approaches for technical validation by individual genotyping in the discovery dataset. 87 out of 94 successfully tested SNPs were nominally associated in the discovery dataset. Replication of the 87 technically validated SNPs was then carried out in an independent replication dataset of 100 Portuguese cases and 425 controls. The intergenic rs4733649 SNP in chromosome 8 (between LINC00824 and LINC00977) was associated with PSP in the discovery (P = 4.07E-03, ORC[95% CI] = 1.88[1.22-2.89]), replication (P = 1.50E-02, ORC[95% CI] = 1.50[1.08-2.09]) and combined datasets (P = 8.61E-05, ORC[95% CI] = 1.65[1.29-2.13]). This study identified for the first time one genetic risk factor for sporadic PSP, but future studies are warranted to further confirm this finding in other populations and uncover its functional role in PSP pathogenesis.

  10. Rare variant genotype imputation with thousands of study-specific whole-genome sequences: implications for cost-effective study designs

    PubMed Central

    Pistis, Giorgio; Porcu, Eleonora; Vrieze, Scott I; Sidore, Carlo; Steri, Maristella; Danjou, Fabrice; Busonero, Fabio; Mulas, Antonella; Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Maschio, Andrea; Brennan, Christine; Lai, Sandra; Miller, Michael B; Marcelli, Marco; Urru, Maria Francesca; Pitzalis, Maristella; Lyons, Robert H; Kang, Hyun M; Jones, Chris M; Angius, Andrea; Iacono, William G; Schlessinger, David; McGue, Matt; Cucca, Francesco; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Sanna, Serena

    2015-01-01

    The utility of genotype imputation in genome-wide association studies is increasing as progressively larger reference panels are improved and expanded through whole-genome sequencing. Developing general guidelines for optimally cost-effective imputation, however, requires evaluation of performance issues that include the relative utility of study-specific compared with general/multipopulation reference panels; genotyping with various array scaffolds; effects of different ethnic backgrounds; and assessment of ranges of allele frequencies. Here we compared the effectiveness of study-specific reference panels to the commonly used 1000 Genomes Project (1000G) reference panels in the isolated Sardinian population and in cohorts of European ancestry including samples from Minnesota (USA). We also examined different combinations of genome-wide and custom arrays for baseline genotypes. In Sardinians, the study-specific reference panel provided better coverage and genotype imputation accuracy than the 1000G panels and other large European panels. In fact, even gene-centered custom arrays (interrogating ~200 000 variants) provided highly informative content across the entire genome. Gain in accuracy was also observed for Minnesotans using the study-specific reference panel, although the increase was smaller than in Sardinians, especially for rare variants. Notably, a combined panel including both study-specific and 1000G reference panels improved imputation accuracy only in the Minnesota sample, and only at rare sites. Finally, we found that when imputation is performed with a study-specific reference panel, cutoffs different from the standard thresholds of MACH-Rsq and IMPUTE-INFO metrics should be used to efficiently filter badly imputed rare variants. This study thus provides general guidelines for researchers planning large-scale genetic studies. PMID:25293720

  11. [Chronologic study of signs of myocardiopathy in progressive muscular dystrophy].

    PubMed

    Barona Zamora, P; Narbona García, J; Alvarez Gómez, M J; Fidalgo Andrés, M L; Sáenz de Buruaga, J; Villa Elizaga, I

    1993-02-01

    In order to analyze the evolution of cardiomyopathy in progressive muscular dystrophies, thirty-three patients (17 with Duchenne type, 11 with Becker type and 5 with the autosomal recessive type dystrophy) were studied retrospectively. Cardiac and systemic follow-up every 3-6 months was made in 29 patients. The electrocardiogram was the first test that became altered, followed by the echocardiogram and thoracic radiograph and finally heart failure manifestations. There was a direct correlation between age and the appearance of abnormal cardiac tests. Electrocardiographic alterations, in patients who were less than 12.5 years of age, were significantly more frequent in the group with Duchenne dystrophy that in the no-Duchenne group. In regards to the appearance of the echocardiographic and radiographic abnormalities, there were no significant differences between the two groups. However, we have noticed a trend towards a more frequent and earlier presentation of these abnormalities in the Duchenne's muscular dystrophy than in the no-Duchenne group.

  12. [Progresses of studies on acupuncture analgesia for postoperative reaction].

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Ting; Fu, Guo-Qiang; Shen, Wei-Dong

    2013-02-01

    A large number of clinical trials and animal experiments have been carried out to focus on neurochemical mechanisms of acupuncture analgesia including postoperation pain relief, which may provide guidance for developing a novel clinical approach for postoperative analgesia. In the present paper, the authors review new progresses of researches on acupuncture analgesia for postoperative pain and side effects in the past few years from thyroidectomy, chest surgery, abdominal surgery, five sense organs (ear, nose, eye and throat) surgery, and others. Regarding the mechanism of acupuncture, central neurotransmitters (including the endop endorphin, 5-HT, gamma-aminobutyric acid, etc.), immune cytokines, cytokines from the spinal glia cells are complicated in the process of acupuncture analgesia. A lot of findings of researches demonstrated that acupuncture therapy is effective in reducing postoperative pain and adverse reactions as nausea, vomiting, etc. As a common technique widely used in the field of clinical medicine, the underlying mechanisms of acupuncture therapy for relieving post-surgery pain and side-effects should be studied profoundly in the future.

  13. Progress on upwelling studies in the China seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jianyu; Wang, Xiao Hua

    2016-09-01

    East Asian marginal seas surrounding China exhibit rich ocean upwelling, mostly in response to the southwesterly summer monsoon. Upwelling in the China seas, namely, the South China Sea, the Taiwan Strait, the East China Sea, the Yellow Sea, and the Bohai Sea, has become increasingly important because the potential changes in the upwelling may have dramatic ecosystem, socioeconomic, and climate impacts. This paper reviews the progress of upwelling studies in the China seas since the year 2000, by presenting the principal characteristics and new understanding of 12 major upwelling regions in the China seas. Upwelling exhibits long-term variability at intraseasonal to multidecadal scales as well as short-term variability frequently caused by tropical cyclones. It is also associated with the El Niño-Southern Oscillation, local environmental variation, and biogeochemical factors. The coastal upwelling around Hainan Island and the upwelling or cold dome northeast of Taiwan Island are specifically highlighted because they have attracted great interest for decades. This paper summarizes upwelling mechanisms in terms of wind, topography, tide, stratification, and background flow, with applications mostly to the China seas. Finally, we propose some topics for future upwelling research, i.e., potential intensification of coastal upwelling under global climate change, downwelling, intrusion of upwelling into coastal embayments, and the influence of upwelling on fishery and biogeochemical processes.

  14. Bioinformatic progress and applications in metaproteogenomics for bridging the gap between genomic sequences and metabolic functions in microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Jana; Herbst, Florian-Alexander; Halkjaer Nielsen, Per; Planes, Francisco J; Jehmlich, Nico; Ferrer, Manuel; von Bergen, Martin

    2013-10-01

    Metaproteomics of microbial communities promises to add functional information to the blueprint of genes derived from metagenomics. Right from its beginning, the achievements and developments in metaproteomics were closely interlinked with metagenomics. In addition, the evaluation, visualization, and interpretation of metaproteome data demanded for the developments in bioinformatics. This review will give an overview about recent strategies to use genomic data either from public databases or organismal specific genomes/metagenomes to increase the number of identified proteins obtained by mass spectrometric measurements. We will review different published metaproteogenomic approaches in respect to the used MS pipeline and to the used protein identification workflow. Furthermore, different approaches of data visualization and strategies for phylogenetic interpretation of metaproteome data are discussed as well as approaches for functional mapping of the results to the investigated biological systems. This information will in the end allow a comprehensive analysis of interactions and interdependencies within microbial communities.

  15. Students’ perspective on genomics: from sample to sequence using the case study of blueberry

    PubMed Central

    Mudd, Austin B.; White, Elizabeth J.; Bolloskis, Michael P.; Kapur, Nicholas P.; Everhart, Koyt W.; Lin, Ying-Chen; Bussler, Weston W.; Reid, Robert W.; Brown, Ryan H.

    2013-01-01

    Advances in genomic sequencing technologies in the past decade have revolutionized the field of genomics, resulting in faster and less expensive sequencing. Holding back the potential for innovation, however, is a widespread lack of understanding of genomics and sequencing by the general public. In an attempt to remedy this problem, this paper presents an introduction to the fields of genomics, bioinformatics, and proteomics using the blueberry genome as a model case study of the plant genomics field. The blueberry (Vaccinium sect. Cyanococcus) is often cited as a “super food” in the media due to its nutritional benefits and global economic importance. There have been a number of related genomic publications in the past 20 years; however, a completed genome and a full analysis into the health-related pathways are still needed. As exemplified by this blueberry case study, there are opportunities for future genomic research into numerous beneficial plant species. The solid background presented in this paper provides future researchers the foundation to explore these uncharted areas. PMID:24324481

  16. Progressive macular hypomelanosis among Egyptian patients: a clinicopathological study

    PubMed Central

    Selim, Mohamed Khaled; Ahmed, El-Shahat Farag; Abdelgawad, Mamdouh Morsy; El-Kamel, Mohammed Fawzy

    2011-01-01

    Background: Progressive macular hypomelanosis (PMH) is a disease of unclear etiology. Propionbacterium acnes (P. acnes) was claimed to be an etiological factor. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to document the clinicopathological features of PMH in Egyptian patients and to evaluate the therapeutic outcome. Methods: Patients with clinical features of PMH were recruited. Wood’s lamp examination, skin scrapings for fungi, and skin biopsy specimens were obtained. Biopsies were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, PAS, Fontana-Masson, and S100 protein. Patients received either narrow-band UVB (nbUVB) or nbUVB plus daily topical clindamycin 1% and benzoyl peroxide gel 5% (bcUVB). The period of active treatment was 14 weeks followed by a follow-up period of 24 weeks. Results: Twenty-nine patients were included. Microscopic evaluation of skin biopsy specimens showed no significant differences between lesional and normal skin. Fontana-Masson stained sections showed overall reduction of melanin granules in the basal layer of lesional skin only and S100 staining did not detect significant differences in the number of melanocytes in lesional and normal skin. Nearly complete repigmentation was reported in 10 patients treated with bcUVB compared to 9 patients treated with nbUVb with no significant differences between both groups after 14 weeks. Only 2 patients in each group retained the pigmentation and the remaining patients returned to the baseline color before treatment. Conclusions: This study documented the clinicopathological features of PMH among Egyptians. No permanently effective treatment is available. Further studies are needed to prove or disprove the pathogenic role of P. acnes in PMH. PMID:24396712

  17. Progress in preliminary studies at Ottana Solar Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demontis, V.; Camerada, M.; Cau, G.; Cocco, D.; Damiano, A.; Melis, T.; Musio, M.

    2016-05-01

    The fast increasing share of distributed generation from non-programmable renewable energy sources, such as the strong penetration of photovoltaic technology in the distribution networks, has generated several problems for the management and security of the whole power grid. In order to meet the challenge of a significant share of solar energy in the electricity mix, several actions aimed at increasing the grid flexibility and its hosting capacity, as well as at improving the generation programmability, need to be investigated. This paper focuses on the ongoing preliminary studies at the Ottana Solar Facility, a new experimental power plant located in Sardinia (Italy) currently under construction, which will offer the possibility to progress in the study of solar plants integration in the power grid. The facility integrates a concentrating solar power (CSP) plant, including a thermal energy storage system and an organic Rankine cycle (ORC) unit, with a concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) plant and an electrical energy storage system. The facility has the main goal to assess in real operating conditions the small scale concentrating solar power technology and to study the integration of the two technologies and the storage systems to produce programmable and controllable power profiles. A model for the CSP plant yield was developed to assess different operational strategies that significantly influence the plant yearly yield and its global economic effectiveness. In particular, precise assumptions for the ORC module start-up operation behavior, based on discussions with the manufacturers and technical datasheets, will be described. Finally, the results of the analysis of the: "solar driven", "weather forecasts" and "combined storage state of charge (SOC)/ weather forecasts" operational strategies will be presented.

  18. The Chlamydomonas genome project: a decade on

    PubMed Central

    Blaby, Ian K.; Blaby-Haas, Crysten; Tourasse, Nicolas; Hom, Erik F. Y.; Lopez, David; Aksoy, Munevver; Grossman, Arthur; Umen, James; Dutcher, Susan; Porter, Mary; King, Stephen; Witman, George; Stanke, Mario; Harris, Elizabeth H.; Goodstein, David; Grimwood, Jane; Schmutz, Jeremy; Vallon, Olivier; Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Prochnik, Simon

    2014-01-01

    The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a popular unicellular organism for studying photosynthesis, cilia biogenesis and micronutrient homeostasis. Ten years since its genome project was initiated, an iterative process of improvements to the genome and gene predictions has propelled this organism to the forefront of the “omics” era. Housed at Phytozome, the Joint Genome Institute’s (JGI) plant genomics portal, the most up-to-date genomic data include a genome arranged on chromosomes and high-quality gene models with alternative splice forms supported by an abundance of RNA-Seq data. Here, we present the past, present and future of Chlamydomonas genomics. Specifically, we detail progress on genome assembly and gene model refinement, discuss resources for gene annotations, functional predictions and locus ID mapping between versions and, importantly, outline a standardized framework for naming genes. PMID:24950814

  19. The genomics of adaptation.

    PubMed

    Radwan, Jacek; Babik, Wiesław

    2012-12-22

    The amount and nature of genetic variation available to natural selection affect the rate, course and outcome of evolution. Consequently, the study of the genetic basis of adaptive evolutionary change has occupied biologists for decades, but progress has been hampered by the lack of resolution and the absence of a genome-level perspective. Technological advances in recent years should now allow us to answer many long-standing questions about the nature of adaptation. The data gathered so far are beginning to challenge some widespread views of the way in which natural selection operates at the genomic level. Papers in this Special Feature of Proceedings of the Royal Society B illustrate various aspects of the broad field of adaptation genomics. This introductory article sets up a context and, on the basis of a few selected examples, discusses how genomic data can advance our understanding of the process of adaptation.

  20. Genomic imprinting and reproduction.

    PubMed

    Swales, A K E; Spears, N

    2005-10-01

    Genomic imprinting is the parent-of-origin specific gene expression which is a vital mechanism through both development and adult life. One of the key elements of the imprinting mechanism is DNA methylation, controlled by DNA methyltransferase enzymes. Germ cells undergo reprogramming to ensure that sex-specific genomic imprinting is initiated, thus allowing normal embryo development to progress after fertilisation. In some cases, errors in genomic imprinting are embryo lethal while in others they lead to developmental disorders and disease. Recent studies have suggested a link between the use of assisted reproductive techniques and an increase in normally rare imprinting disorders. A greater understanding of the mechanisms of genomic imprinting and the factors that influence them are important in assessing the safety of these techniques.

  1. Genome-wide association study on differentiated thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Aleksandra; Chen, Bowang; Gemignani, Federica; Elisei, Rossella; Romei, Cristina; Figlioli, Gisella; Cipollini, Monica; Cristaudo, Alfonso; Bambi, Franco; Hoffmann, Per; Herms, Stefan; Kalemba, Michal; Kula, Dorota; Harris, Shelley; Broderick, Peter; Houlston, Richard; Pastor, Susana; Marcos, Ricard; Velázquez, Antonia; Jarzab, Barbara; Hemminki, Kari; Landi, Stefano; Försti, Asta

    2013-10-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) have identified associations with polymorphisms at 2q35 (DIRC3), 8p12 (NRG1), 9q22.33 (FOXE1), and 14q13.2 (NKX2-1). However, most of the inherited genetic risk factors of DTC remain to be discovered. Our objective was to identify additional common DTC susceptibility loci. We conducted a GWAS in a high-incidence Italian population of 690 cases and 497 controls and followed up the most significant polymorphisms in 2 additional Italian series and in 3 low-incidence populations totaling 2958 cases and 3727 controls. After excluding the most robust previously identified locus (9q22.33), the strongest association was shown by rs6759952, confirming the recently published association in DIRC3 (odds ratio [OR] = 1.21, P = 6.4 × 10(-10), GWAS and all replications combined). Additionally, in the combined analysis of the Italian series, suggestive associations were attained with rs10238549 and rs7800391 in IMMP2L (OR = 1.27, P = 4.1 × 10(-6); and OR = 1.25, P = 5.7 × 10(-6)), rs7617304 in RARRES1 (OR = 1.25, P = 4.6 × 10(-5)) and rs10781500 in SNAPC4/CARD9 (OR = 1.23, P = 3.5 × 10(-5)). Our findings provide additional insights into the genetic and biological basis of inherited genetic susceptibility to DTC. Additional studies are needed to determine the role of the identified polymorphisms in the development of DTC and their possible use in the clinical practice.

  2. Integrating Genomes, Brain and Behavior in the Study of Songbirds

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, David F.; Balakrishnan, Christopher N.; London, Sarah E.

    2010-01-01

    Songbirds share some essential traits but are extraordinarily diverse, allowing comparative analyses aimed at identifying specific genotype–phenotype associations. This diversity encompasses traits like vocal communication and complex social behaviors that are of great interest to humans, but that are not well represented in other accessible research organisms. Many songbirds are readily observable in nature and thus afford unique insight into the links between environment and organism. The distinctive organization of the songbird brain will facilitate analysis of genomic links to brain and behavior. Access to the zebra finch genome sequence will, therefore, prompt new questions and provide the ability to answer those questions. PMID:19788884

  3. Databases and Web Tools for Cancer Genomics Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yadong; Dong, Xunong; Xie, Bingbing; Ding, Nan; Chen, Juan; Li, Yongjun; Zhang, Qian; Qu, Hongzhu; Fang, Xiangdong

    2015-01-01

    Publicly-accessible resources have promoted the advance of scientific discovery. The era of genomics and big data has brought the need for collaboration and data sharing in order to make effective use of this new knowledge. Here, we describe the web resources for cancer genomics research and rate them on the basis of the diversity of cancer types, sample size, omics data comprehensiveness, and user experience. The resources reviewed include data repository and analysis tools; and we hope such introduction will promote the awareness and facilitate the usage of these resources in the cancer research community. PMID:25707591

  4. Databases and web tools for cancer genomics study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yadong; Dong, Xunong; Xie, Bingbing; Ding, Nan; Chen, Juan; Li, Yongjun; Zhang, Qian; Qu, Hongzhu; Fang, Xiangdong

    2015-02-01

    Publicly-accessible resources have promoted the advance of scientific discovery. The era of genomics and big data has brought the need for collaboration and data sharing in order to make effective use of this new knowledge. Here, we describe the web resources for cancer genomics research and rate them on the basis of the diversity of cancer types, sample size, omics data comprehensiveness, and user experience. The resources reviewed include data repository and analysis tools; and we hope such introduction will promote the awareness and facilitate the usage of these resources in the cancer research community. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Massive parallel sequencing of human whole mitochondrial genomes with Ion Torrent technology: an optimized workflow for Anthropological and Population Genetics studies.

    PubMed

    De Fanti, Sara; Vianello, Dario; Giuliani, Cristina; Quagliariello, Andrea; Cherubini, Anna; Sevini, Federica; Iaquilano, Nicoletta; Franceschi, Claudio; Sazzini, Marco; Luiselli, Donata

    2017-11-01

    Investigation of human mitochondrial DNA variation patterns and phylogeny has been extensively used in Anthropological and Population Genetics studies and sequencing the whole mitochondrial genome is progressively becoming the gold standard. Among the currently available massive parallel sequencing technologies, Ion Torrent™ semiconductor sequencing represents a promising approach for such studies. Nevertheless, an experimental protocol conceived to enable the achievement of both as high as possible yield and of the most homogeneous sequence coverage through the whole mitochondrial genome is still not available. The present work was thus aimed at improving the overall performance of whole mitochondrial genomes Ion Torrent™ sequencing, with special focus on the capability to obtain robust coverage and highly reliable variants calling. For this purpose, a series of cost-effective modifications in standard laboratory workflows was fine-tuned to optimize them for medium- and large-scale population studies. A total of 54 human samples were thus subjected to sequencing of the whole mitochondrial genome with the Ion Personal Genome Machine™ System in four distinct experiments and using Ion 314 chips. Seven of the selected samples were also characterized by means of conventional Sanger sequencing for the sake of comparison. Obtained results demonstrated that the implemented optimizations had definitely improved sequencing outputs in terms of both variants calling efficiency and coverage uniformity, enabling to setup an effective and accurate protocol for whole mitochondrial genome sequencing and a considerable reduction in experimental time consumption and sequencing costs.

  6. Application of genome editing technologies to the study and treatment of hematological disease.

    PubMed

    Pellagatti, Andrea; Dolatshad, Hamid; Yip, Bon Ham; Valletta, Simona; Boultwood, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    Genome editing technologies have advanced significantly over the past few years, providing a fast and effective tool to precisely manipulate the genome at specific locations. The three commonly used genome editing technologies are Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs), Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs), and the Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)-associated Cas9 (CRISPR/Cas9) system. ZFNs and TALENs consist of endonucleases fused to a DNA-binding domain, while the CRISPR/Cas9 system uses guide RNAs to target the bacterial Cas9 endonuclease to the desired genomic location. The double-strand breaks made by these endonucleases are repaired in the cells either by non-homologous end joining, resulting in the introduction of insertions/deletions, or, if a repair template is provided, by homology directed repair. The ZFNs, TALENs and CRISPR/Cas9 systems take advantage of these repair mechanisms for targeted genome modification and have been successfully used to manipulate the genome in human cells. These genome editing tools can be used to investigate gene function, to discover new therapeutic targets, and to develop disease models. Moreover, these genome editing technologies have great potential in gene therapy. Here, we review the latest advances in the application of genome editing technology to the study and treatment of hematological disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Improving the Accuracy of Whole Genome Prediction for Complex Traits Using the Results of Genome Wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhe; Ober, Ulrike; Erbe, Malena; Zhang, Hao; Gao, Ning; He, Jinlong; Li, Jiaqi; Simianer, Henner

    2014-01-01

    Utilizing the whole genomic variation of complex traits to predict the yet-to-be observed phenotypes or unobserved genetic values via whole genome prediction (WGP) and to infer the underlying genetic architecture via genome wide association study (GWAS) is an interesting and fast developing area in the context of human disease studies as well as in animal and plant breeding. Though thousands of significant loci for several species were detected via GWAS in the past decade, they were not used directly to improve WGP due to lack of proper models. Here, we propose a generalized way of building trait-specific genomic relationship matrices which can exploit GWAS results in WGP via a best linear unbiased prediction (BLUP) model for which we suggest the name BLUP|GA. Results from two illustrative examples show that using already existing GWAS results from public databases in BLUP|GA improved the accuracy of WGP for two out of the three model traits in a dairy cattle data set, and for nine out of the 11 traits in a rice diversity data set, compared to the reference methods GBLUP and BayesB. While BLUP|GA outperforms BayesB, its required computing time is comparable to GBLUP. Further simulation results suggest that accounting for publicly available GWAS results is potentially more useful for WGP utilizing smaller data sets and/or traits of low heritability, depending on the genetic architecture of the trait under consideration. To our knowledge, this is the first study incorporating public GWAS results formally into the standard GBLUP model and we think that the BLUP|GA approach deserves further investigations in animal breeding, plant breeding as well as human genetics. PMID:24663104

  8. Implementing Meta-analysis for genome-wide association studies of pork quality traits

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pork quality is a critical concern in the meat industry. Implementation of genome-wide association studies (GWA) allows identification of genomic regions that explain a substantial portion of the variation of relevant traits. It is also important to determine the consistency of results of GWA across...

  9. Personal Genomic Testing for Cancer Risk: Results From the Impact of Personal Genomics Study.

    PubMed

    Gray, Stacy W; Gollust, Sarah E; Carere, Deanna Alexis; Chen, Clara A; Cronin, Angel; Kalia, Sarah S; Rana, Huma Q; Ruffin, Mack T; Wang, Catharine; Roberts, J Scott; Green, Robert C

    2017-02-20

    Purpose Significant concerns exist regarding the potential for unwarranted behavior changes and the overuse of health care resources in response to direct-to-consumer personal genomic testing (PGT). However, little is known about customers' behaviors after PGT. Methods Longitudinal surveys were given to new customers of 23andMe (Mountain View, CA) and Pathway Genomics (San Diego, CA). Survey data were linked to individual-level PGT results through a secure data transfer process. Results Of the 1,042 customers who completed baseline and 6-month surveys (response rate, 71.2%), 762 had complete cancer-related data and were analyzed. Most customers reported that learning about their genetic risk of cancers was a motivation for testing (colorectal, 88%; prostate, 95%; breast, 94%). No customers tested positive for pathogenic mutations in highly penetrant cancer susceptibility genes. A minority of individuals received elevated single nucleotide polymorphism-based PGT cancer risk estimates (colorectal, 24%; prostate, 24%; breast, 12%). At 6 months, customers who received elevated PGT cancer risk estimates were not significantly more likely to change their diet, exercise, or advanced planning behaviors or engage in cancer screening, compared with individuals at average or reduced risk. Men who received elevated PGT prostate cancer risk estimates changed their vitamin and supplement use more than those at average or reduced risk (22% v 7.6%, respectively; adjusted odds ratio, 3.41; 95% CI, 1.44 to 8.18). Predictors of 6-month behavior include baseline behavior (exercise, vitamin or supplement use, and screening), worse health status (diet and vitamin or supplement use), and older age (advanced planning, screening). Conclusion Most adults receiving elevated direct-to-consumer PGT single nucleotide polymorphism-based cancer risk estimates did not significantly change their diet, exercise, advanced care planning, or cancer screening behaviors.

  10. More heritability probably captured by psoriasis genome-wide association study in Han Chinese.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Long; Liu, Lu; Cheng, Yuyan; Lin, Yan; Shen, Changbing; Zhu, Caihong; Yang, Sen; Yin, Xianyong; Zhang, Xuejun

    2015-11-15

    Missing heritability is a common problem in genome-wide association studies in complex diseases/traits. To quantify the unbiased heritability estimate, we applied the phenotype correlation-genotype correlation regression in psoriasis genome-wide association data in Han Chinese which comprises 1139 cases and 1132 controls. We estimated that 45.7% heritability of psoriasis in Han Chinese were captured by common variants (s.e.=12.5%), which reinforced that the majority of psoriasis heritability can be covered by common variants in genome-wide association data (68.2%). The results provided evidence that the heritability covered by psoriasis genome-wide genotyping data was probably underestimated in previous restricted maximum likelihood method. Our study highlights the broad role of common variants in the etiology of psoriasis and sheds light on the possibility to identify more common variants of small effect by increasing the sample size in psoriasis genome-wide association studies.

  11. Genome-Wide Association Study of Schizophrenia in Japanese Population

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Kazuo; Iwayama, Yoshimi; Hattori, Eiji; Iwamoto, Kazuya; Toyota, Tomoko; Ohnishi, Tetsuo; Ohba, Hisako; Maekawa, Motoko; Kato, Tadafumi; Yoshikawa, Takeo

    2011-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a devastating neuropsychiatric disorder with genetically complex traits. Genetic variants should explain a considerable portion of the risk for schizophrenia, and genome-wide association study (GWAS) is a potentially powerful tool for identifying the risk variants that underlie the disease. Here, we report the results of a three-stage analysis of three independent cohorts consisting of a total of 2,535 samples from Japanese and Chinese populations for searching schizophrenia susceptibility genes using a GWAS approach. Firstly, we examined 115,770 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 120 patient-parents trio samples from Japanese schizophrenia pedigrees. In stage II, we evaluated 1,632 SNPs (1,159 SNPs of p<0.01 and 473 SNPs of p<0.05 that located in previously reported linkage regions). The second sample consisted of 1,012 case-control samples of Japanese origin. The most significant p value was obtained for the SNP in the ELAVL2 [(embryonic lethal, abnormal vision, Drosophila)-like 2] gene located on 9p21.3 (p = 0.00087). In stage III, we scrutinized the ELAVL2 gene by genotyping gene-centric tagSNPs in the third sample set of 293 family samples (1,163 individuals) of Chinese descent and the SNP in the gene showed a nominal association with schizophrenia in Chinese population (p = 0.026). The current data in Asian population would be helpful for deciphering ethnic diversity of schizophrenia etiology. PMID:21674006

  12. A genome-wide DNA methylation study in azoospermia.

    PubMed

    Ferfouri, F; Boitrelle, F; Ghout, I; Albert, M; Molina Gomes, D; Wainer, R; Bailly, M; Selva, J; Vialard, F

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this study was to assess genome-wide DNA methylation in testicular tissue from azoospermic patients. A total of 94 azoospermic patients were recruited and classified into three groups: 29 patients presented obstructive azoospermia (OA), 26 displayed non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA) and successful retrieval of spermatozoa by testicular sperm extraction (TESE+) and 39 displayed NOA and failure to retrieve spermatozoa by TESE (TESE-). An Illumina Infinium Human Methylation27 BeadChip DNA methylation array was used to establish a testicular DNA methylation pattern for each type of azoospermic patient. The OA and NOA groups were compared in terms of the relative M-value (the log2 ratio between methylated and non-methylated probe intensities) for each CpG site. We observed significantly different DNA methylation profiles for the NOA and OA groups, with differences at over 9000 of the 27 578 CpG sites; 212 CpG sites had a relative M-value >3. The results highlighted 14 testis-specific genes. Patient clustering with respect to these 212 CpG sites corresponded closely to the clinical classification. The DNA methylation patterns showed that in the NOA group, 78 of the 212 CpG sites were hypomethylated and 134 were hypermethylated (relative to the OA group). On the basis of these DNA methylation profiles, azoospermic patients could be classified as OA or NOA by considering the 212 CpG sites with the greatest methylation differences. Furthermore, we identified genes that may provide insight into the mechanism of idiopathic NOA.

  13. Advancement in genetic variants conferring obesity susceptibility from genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Jia, Weiping; Hu, Cheng

    2015-06-01

    Obesity prevalence has increased in recent years. Lifestyle change fuels obesity, but genetic factors cause more than 50% of average variations in obesity. The advent of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has hastened the progress of polygenic obesity research. As of this writing, more than 73 obesity susceptibility loci have been identified in ethnic groups through GWAS. The identified loci explain only 2% to 4% of obesity heritability, thereby indicating that a large proportion of loci remain undiscovered. Thus, the next step is to identify and confirm novel loci, which may exhibit smaller effects and lower allele frequencies than established loci. However, achieving these tasks has been difficult for researchers. GWAS help researchers discover the causal loci. Moreover, numerous biological studies have been performed on the polygenic effects on obesity, such as studies on fat mass- and obesity-associated gene (FTO), but the role of these polygenic effects in the mechanism of obesity remains unclear. Thus, obesity-causing variations should be identified, and insights into the biology of polygenic effects on obesity are needed.