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Sample records for genome-wide analysis reveals

  1. Diversity of Eukaryotic DNA Replication Origins Revealed by Genome-Wide Analysis of Chromatin Structure

    PubMed Central

    Berbenetz, Nicolas M.; Nislow, Corey; Brown, Grant W.

    2010-01-01

    Eukaryotic DNA replication origins differ both in their efficiency and in the characteristic time during S phase when they become active. The biological basis for these differences remains unknown, but they could be a consequence of chromatin structure. The availability of genome-wide maps of nucleosome positions has led to an explosion of information about how nucleosomes are assembled at transcription start sites, but no similar maps exist for DNA replication origins. Here we combine high-resolution genome-wide nucleosome maps with comprehensive annotations of DNA replication origins to identify patterns of nucleosome occupancy at eukaryotic replication origins. On average, replication origins contain a nucleosome depleted region centered next to the ACS element, flanked on both sides by arrays of well-positioned nucleosomes. Our analysis identified DNA sequence properties that correlate with nucleosome occupancy at replication origins genome-wide and that are correlated with the nucleosome-depleted region. Clustering analysis of all annotated replication origins revealed a surprising diversity of nucleosome occupancy patterns. We provide evidence that the origin recognition complex, which binds to the origin, acts as a barrier element to position and phase nucleosomes on both sides of the origin. Finally, analysis of chromatin reconstituted in vitro reveals that origins are inherently nucleosome depleted. Together our data provide a comprehensive, genome-wide view of chromatin structure at replication origins and suggest a model of nucleosome positioning at replication origins in which the underlying sequence occludes nucleosomes to permit binding of the origin recognition complex, which then (likely in concert with nucleosome modifiers and remodelers) positions nucleosomes adjacent to the origin to promote replication origin function. PMID:20824081

  2. Genome-wide association analysis reveals new targets for carotenoid biofortification in maize.

    PubMed

    Suwarno, Willy B; Pixley, Kevin V; Palacios-Rojas, Natalia; Kaeppler, Shawn M; Babu, Raman

    2015-05-01

    Genome-wide association analysis in CIMMYT's association panel revealed new favorable native genomic variations in/nearby important genes such as hydroxylases and CCD1 that have potential for carotenoid biofortification in maize. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been used extensively to identify allelic variation for genes controlling important agronomic and nutritional traits in plants. Provitamin A (proVA) enhancing alleles of lycopene epsilon cyclase (LCYE) and β-carotene hydroxylase 1 (CRTRB1), previously identified through candidate-gene based GWAS, are currently used in CIMMYT's maize breeding program. The objective of this study was to identify genes or genomic regions controlling variation for carotenoid concentrations in grain for CIMMYT's carotenoid association mapping panel of 380 inbred maize lines, using high-density genome-wide platforms with ~476,000 SNP markers. Population structure effects were minimized by adjustments using principal components and kinship matrix with mixed models. Genome-wide linkage disequilibrium (LD) analysis indicated faster LD decay (3.9 kb; r (2) = 0.1) than commonly reported for temperate germplasm, and therefore the possibility of achieving higher mapping resolution with our mostly tropical diversity panel. GWAS for various carotenoids identified CRTRB1, LCYE and other key genes or genomic regions that govern rate-critical steps in the upstream pathway, such as DXS1, GGPS1, and GGPS2 that are known to play important roles in the accumulation of precursor isoprenoids as well as downstream genes HYD5, CCD1, and ZEP1, which are involved in hydroxylation and carotenoid degradation. SNPs at or near all of these regions were identified and may be useful target regions for carotenoid biofortification breeding efforts in maize; for example a genomic region on chromosome 2 explained ~16% of the phenotypic variance for β-carotene independently of CRTRB1, and a variant of CCD1 that resulted in reduced

  3. Genome Wide Analysis of Chromatin Regulation by Cocaine Reveals a Novel Role for Sirtuins

    PubMed Central

    Renthal, William; Kumar, Arvind; Xiao, Guanghua; Wilkinson, Matthew; Covington, Herbert E.; Maze, Ian; Sikder, Devanjan; Robison, Alfred J.; LaPlant, Quincey; Dietz, David M.; Russo, Scott J.; Vialou, Vincent; Chakravarty, Sumana; Kodadek, Thomas J.; Stack, Ashley; Kabbaj, Mohammed; Nestler, Eric J.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Changes in gene expression contribute to the long-lasting regulation of the brain’s reward circuitry seen in drug addiction, however, the specific genes regulated and the transcriptional mechanisms underlying such regulation remain poorly understood. Here, we used chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with promoter microarray analysis to characterize genome-wide chromatin changes in the mouse nucleus accumbens, a crucial brain reward region, after repeated cocaine administration. Our findings reveal several interesting principles of gene regulation by cocaine and of the role of ΔFosB and CREB, two prominent cocaine-induced transcription factors, in this brain region. The findings also provide novel and comprehensive insight into the molecular pathways regulated by cocaine – including a new role for sirtuins (Sirt1 and Sirt2) –which are induced in the nucleus accumbens by cocaine and, in turn, dramatically enhance the behavioral effects of the drug. PMID:19447090

  4. Genome-wide location analysis reveals a role for Sub1 in RNA polymerase III transcription

    PubMed Central

    Tavenet, Arounie; Suleau, Audrey; Dubreuil, Géraldine; Ferrari, Roberto; Ducrot, Cécile; Michaut, Magali; Aude, Jean-Christophe; Dieci, Giorgio; Lefebvre, Olivier; Conesa, Christine; Acker, Joël

    2009-01-01

    Human PC4 and the yeast ortholog Sub1 have multiple functions in RNA polymerase II transcription. Genome-wide mapping revealed that Sub1 is present on Pol III-transcribed genes. Sub1 was found to interact with components of the Pol III transcription system and to stimulate the initiation and reinitiation steps in a system reconstituted with all recombinant factors. Sub1 was required for optimal Pol III gene transcription in exponentially growing cells. PMID:19706510

  5. Genome-wide analysis of homeobox genes from Mesobuthus martensii reveals Hox gene duplication in scorpions.

    PubMed

    Di, Zhiyong; Yu, Yao; Wu, Yingliang; Hao, Pei; He, Yawen; Zhao, Huabin; Li, Yixue; Zhao, Guoping; Li, Xuan; Li, Wenxin; Cao, Zhijian

    2015-06-01

    Homeobox genes belong to a large gene group, which encodes the famous DNA-binding homeodomain that plays a key role in development and cellular differentiation during embryogenesis in animals. Here, one hundred forty-nine homeobox genes were identified from the Asian scorpion, Mesobuthus martensii (Chelicerata: Arachnida: Scorpiones: Buthidae) based on our newly assembled genome sequence with approximately 248 × coverage. The identified homeobox genes were categorized into eight classes including 82 families: 67 ANTP class genes, 33 PRD genes, 11 LIM genes, five POU genes, six SINE genes, 14 TALE genes, five CUT genes, two ZF genes and six unclassified genes. Transcriptome data confirmed that more than half of the genes were expressed in adults. The homeobox gene diversity of the eight classes is similar to the previously analyzed Mandibulata arthropods. Interestingly, it is hypothesized that the scorpion M. martensii may have two Hox clusters. The first complete genome-wide analysis of homeobox genes in Chelicerata not only reveals the repertoire of scorpion, arachnid and chelicerate homeobox genes, but also shows some insights into the evolution of arthropod homeobox genes.

  6. Genome-wide analysis reveals adaptation to high altitudes in Tibetan sheep

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Caihong; Wang, Huihua; Liu, Gang; Zhao, Fuping; Kijas, James W.; Ma, Youji; Lu, Jian; Zhang, Li; Cao, Jiaxue; Wu, Mingming; Wang, Guangkai; Liu, Ruizao; Liu, Zhen; Zhang, Shuzhen; Liu, Chousheng; Du, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    Tibetan sheep have lived on the Tibetan Plateau for thousands of years; however, the process and consequences of adaptation to this extreme environment have not been elucidated for important livestock such as sheep. Here, seven sheep breeds, representing both highland and lowland breeds from different areas of China, were genotyped for a genome-wide collection of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The FST and XP-EHH approaches were used to identify regions harbouring local positive selection between these highland and lowland breeds, and 236 genes were identified. We detected selection events spanning genes involved in angiogenesis, energy production and erythropoiesis. In particular, several candidate genes were associated with high-altitude hypoxia, including EPAS1, CRYAA, LONP1, NF1, DPP4, SOD1, PPARG and SOCS2. EPAS1 plays a crucial role in hypoxia adaption; therefore, we investigated the exon sequences of EPAS1 and identified 12 mutations. Analysis of the relationship between blood-related phenotypes and EPAS1 genotypes in additional highland sheep revealed that a homozygous mutation at a relatively conserved site in the EPAS1 3′ untranslated region was associated with increased mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration and mean corpuscular volume. Taken together, our results provide evidence of the genetic diversity of highland sheep and indicate potential high-altitude hypoxia adaptation mechanisms, including the role of EPAS1 in adaptation. PMID:27230812

  7. Genetic architecture dissection by genome-wide association analysis reveals avian eggshell ultrastructure traits

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Zhongyi; Sun, Congjiao; Shen, ManMan; Wang, Kehua; Yang, Ning; Zheng, Jiangxia; Xu, Guiyun

    2016-01-01

    The ultrastructure of an eggshell is considered the major determinant of eggshell quality, which has biological and economic significance for the avian and poultry industries. However, the interrelationships and genome-wide architecture of eggshell ultrastructure remain to be elucidated. Herein, we measured eggshell thickness (EST), effective layer thickness (ET), mammillary layer thickness (MT), and mammillary density (MD) and conducted genome-wide association studies in 927 F2 hens. The SNP-based heritabilities of eggshell ultrastructure traits were estimated to be 0.39, 0.36, 0.17 and 0.19 for EST, ET, MT and MD, respectively, and a total of 719, 784, 1 and 10 genome-wide significant SNPs were associated with EST, ET, MT and MD, respectively. ABCC9, ITPR2, KCNJ8 and WNK1, which are involved in ion transport, were suggested to be the key genes regulating EST and ET. ITM2C and KNDC1 likely affect MT and MD, respectively. Additionally, there were linear relationships between the chromosome lengths and the variance explained per chromosome for EST (R2 = 0.57) and ET (R2 = 0.67). In conclusion, the interrelationships and genetic architecture of eggshell ultrastructure traits revealed in this study are valuable for our understanding of the avian eggshell and contribute to research on a variety of other calcified shells. PMID:27456605

  8. Genome-Wide Analysis of Gene Expression in Primate Taste Buds Reveals Links to Diverse Processes

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Min; Gao, Na; White, Evan; Echeverri, Fernando; Kalabat, Dalia; Soto, Hortensia; Laita, Bianca; Li, Cherry; Yeh, Shaoyang Anthony; Zoller, Mark; Zlotnik, Albert

    2009-01-01

    Efforts to unravel the mechanisms underlying taste sensation (gustation) have largely focused on rodents. Here we present the first comprehensive characterization of gene expression in primate taste buds. Our findings reveal unique new insights into the biology of taste buds. We generated a taste bud gene expression database using laser capture microdissection (LCM) procured fungiform (FG) and circumvallate (CV) taste buds from primates. We also used LCM to collect the top and bottom portions of CV taste buds. Affymetrix genome wide arrays were used to analyze gene expression in all samples. Known taste receptors are preferentially expressed in the top portion of taste buds. Genes associated with the cell cycle and stem cells are preferentially expressed in the bottom portion of taste buds, suggesting that precursor cells are located there. Several chemokines including CXCL14 and CXCL8 are among the highest expressed genes in taste buds, indicating that immune system related processes are active in taste buds. Several genes expressed specifically in endocrine glands including growth hormone releasing hormone and its receptor are also strongly expressed in taste buds, suggesting a link between metabolism and taste. Cell type-specific expression of transcription factors and signaling molecules involved in cell fate, including KIT, reveals the taste bud as an active site of cell regeneration, differentiation, and development. IKBKAP, a gene mutated in familial dysautonomia, a disease that results in loss of taste buds, is expressed in taste cells that communicate with afferent nerve fibers via synaptic transmission. This database highlights the power of LCM coupled with transcriptional profiling to dissect the molecular composition of normal tissues, represents the most comprehensive molecular analysis of primate taste buds to date, and provides a foundation for further studies in diverse aspects of taste biology. PMID:19636377

  9. Differential network analysis reveals the genome-wide landscape of estrogen receptor modulation in hormonal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Tzu-Hung; Chiu, Yu-Chiao; Hsu, Pei-Yin; Lu, Tzu-Pin; Lai, Liang-Chuan; Tsai, Mong-Hsun; Huang, Tim H.-M.; Chuang, Eric Y.; Chen, Yidong

    2016-01-01

    Several mutual information (MI)-based algorithms have been developed to identify dynamic gene-gene and function-function interactions governed by key modulators (genes, proteins, etc.). Due to intensive computation, however, these methods rely heavily on prior knowledge and are limited in genome-wide analysis. We present the modulated gene/gene set interaction (MAGIC) analysis to systematically identify genome-wide modulation of interaction networks. Based on a novel statistical test employing conjugate Fisher transformations of correlation coefficients, MAGIC features fast computation and adaption to variations of clinical cohorts. In simulated datasets MAGIC achieved greatly improved computation efficiency and overall superior performance than the MI-based method. We applied MAGIC to construct the estrogen receptor (ER) modulated gene and gene set (representing biological function) interaction networks in breast cancer. Several novel interaction hubs and functional interactions were discovered. ER+ dependent interaction between TGFβ and NFκB was further shown to be associated with patient survival. The findings were verified in independent datasets. Using MAGIC, we also assessed the essential roles of ER modulation in another hormonal cancer, ovarian cancer. Overall, MAGIC is a systematic framework for comprehensively identifying and constructing the modulated interaction networks in a whole-genome landscape. MATLAB implementation of MAGIC is available for academic uses at https://github.com/chiuyc/MAGIC. PMID:26972162

  10. Genome-wide interaction analysis reveals replicated epistatic effects on brain structure

    PubMed Central

    Hibar, Derrek P.; Stein, Jason L.; Jahanshad, Neda; Kohannim, Omid; Hua, Xue; Toga, Arthur W.; McMahon, Katie L.; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Wright, Margaret J.; Weiner, Michael W.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of several genes that affect risk for Alzheimer's disease ignited a worldwide search for Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs), common genetic variants that affect the brain. Genome-wide search of all possible SNP-SNP interactions is challenging and rarely attempted, due to the complexity of conducting ∼1011 pairwise statistical tests. However, recent advances in machine learning, e.g., iterative sure independence screening (SIS), make it possible to analyze datasets with vastly more predictors than observations. Using an implementation of the SIS algorithm (called EPISIS), we performed a genome-wide interaction analysis testing all possible SNP-SNP interactions affecting regional brain volumes measured on MRI and mapped using tensor-based morphometry. We identified a significant SNP-SNP interaction between rs1345203 and rs1213205 that explains 1.9% of the variance in temporal lobe volume. We mapped the whole-brain, voxelwise effects of the interaction in the ADNI dataset and separately in an independent replication dataset of healthy twins (QTIM). Each additional loading in the interaction effect was associated with ∼5% greater brain regional brain volume (a protective effect) in both ADNI and QTIM samples. PMID:25264344

  11. Genome-Wide Analysis Reveals Novel Regulators of Growth in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Vonesch, Sibylle Chantal; Lamparter, David; Mackay, Trudy F. C.; Bergmann, Sven; Hafen, Ernst

    2016-01-01

    Organismal size depends on the interplay between genetic and environmental factors. Genome-wide association (GWA) analyses in humans have implied many genes in the control of height but suffer from the inability to control the environment. Genetic analyses in Drosophila have identified conserved signaling pathways controlling size; however, how these pathways control phenotypic diversity is unclear. We performed GWA of size traits using the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel of inbred, sequenced lines. We find that the top associated variants differ between traits and sexes; do not map to canonical growth pathway genes, but can be linked to these by epistasis analysis; and are enriched for genes and putative enhancers. Performing GWA on well-studied developmental traits under controlled conditions expands our understanding of developmental processes underlying phenotypic diversity. PMID:26751788

  12. Genome-wide enrichment analysis between endometriosis and obesity-related traits reveals novel susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Rahmioglu, Nilufer; Macgregor, Stuart; Drong, Alexander W.; Hedman, Åsa K.; Harris, Holly R.; Randall, Joshua C.; Prokopenko, Inga; Nyholt, Dale R.; Morris, Andrew P.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Missmer, Stacey A.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Zondervan, Krina T.

    2015-01-01

    Endometriosis is a chronic inflammatory condition in women that results in pelvic pain and subfertility, and has been associated with decreased body mass index (BMI). Genetic variants contributing to the heritable component have started to emerge from genome-wide association studies (GWAS), although the majority remain unknown. Unexpectedly, we observed an intergenic locus on 7p15.2 that was genome-wide significantly associated with both endometriosis and fat distribution (waist-to-hip ratio adjusted for BMI; WHRadjBMI) in an independent meta-GWAS of European ancestry individuals. This led us to investigate the potential overlap in genetic variants underlying the aetiology of endometriosis, WHRadjBMI and BMI using GWAS data. Our analyses demonstrated significant enrichment of common variants between fat distribution and endometriosis (P = 3.7 × 10−3), which was stronger when we restricted the investigation to more severe (Stage B) cases (P = 4.5 × 10−4). However, no genetic enrichment was observed between endometriosis and BMI (P = 0.79). In addition to 7p15.2, we identify four more variants with statistically significant evidence of involvement in both endometriosis and WHRadjBMI (in/near KIFAP3, CAB39L, WNT4, GRB14); two of these, KIFAP3 and CAB39L, are novel associations for both traits. KIFAP3, WNT4 and 7p15.2 are associated with the WNT signalling pathway; formal pathway analysis confirmed a statistically significant (P = 6.41 × 10−4) overrepresentation of shared associations in developmental processes/WNT signalling between the two traits. Our results demonstrate an example of potential biological pleiotropy that was hitherto unknown, and represent an opportunity for functional follow-up of loci and further cross-phenotype comparisons to assess how fat distribution and endometriosis pathogenesis research fields can inform each other. PMID:25296917

  13. Genome-wide analysis of LXRα activation reveals new transcriptional networks in human atherosclerotic foam cells.

    PubMed

    Feldmann, Radmila; Fischer, Cornelius; Kodelja, Vitam; Behrens, Sarah; Haas, Stefan; Vingron, Martin; Timmermann, Bernd; Geikowski, Anne; Sauer, Sascha

    2013-04-01

    Increased physiological levels of oxysterols are major risk factors for developing atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. Lipid-loaded macrophages, termed foam cells, are important during the early development of atherosclerotic plaques. To pursue the hypothesis that ligand-based modulation of the nuclear receptor LXRα is crucial for cell homeostasis during atherosclerotic processes, we analysed genome-wide the action of LXRα in foam cells and macrophages. By integrating chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-seq) and gene expression profile analyses, we generated a highly stringent set of 186 LXRα target genes. Treatment with the nanomolar-binding ligand T0901317 and subsequent auto-regulatory LXRα activation resulted in sequence-dependent sharpening of the genome-binding patterns of LXRα. LXRα-binding loci that correlated with differential gene expression revealed 32 novel target genes with potential beneficial effects, which in part explained the implications of disease-associated genetic variation data. These observations identified highly integrated LXRα ligand-dependent transcriptional networks, including the APOE/C1/C4/C2-gene cluster, which contribute to the reversal of cholesterol efflux and the dampening of inflammation processes in foam cells to prevent atherogenesis.

  14. Genome-Wide Analysis Reveals the Vacuolar pH-Stat of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Brett, Christopher L.; Kallay, Laura; Hua, Zhaolin; Green, Richard; Chyou, Anthony; Zhang, Yongqiang; Graham, Todd R.; Donowitz, Mark; Rao, Rajini

    2011-01-01

    Protons, the smallest and most ubiquitous of ions, are central to physiological processes. Transmembrane proton gradients drive ATP synthesis, metabolite transport, receptor recycling and vesicle trafficking, while compartmental pH controls enzyme function. Despite this fundamental importance, the mechanisms underlying pH homeostasis are not entirely accounted for in any organelle or organism. We undertook a genome-wide survey of vacuole pH (pHv) in 4,606 single-gene deletion mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae under control, acid and alkali stress conditions to reveal the vacuolar pH-stat. Median pHv (5.27±0.13) was resistant to acid stress (5.28±0.14) but shifted significantly in response to alkali stress (5.83±0.13). Of 107 mutants that displayed aberrant pHv under more than one external pH condition, functional categories of transporters, membrane biogenesis and trafficking machinery were significantly enriched. Phospholipid flippases, encoded by the family of P4-type ATPases, emerged as pH regulators, as did the yeast ortholog of Niemann Pick Type C protein, implicated in sterol trafficking. An independent genetic screen revealed that correction of pHv dysregulation in a neo1ts mutant restored viability whereas cholesterol accumulation in human NPC1−/− fibroblasts diminished upon treatment with a proton ionophore. Furthermore, while it is established that lumenal pH affects trafficking, this study revealed a reciprocal link with many mutants defective in anterograde pathways being hyperacidic and retrograde pathway mutants with alkaline vacuoles. In these and other examples, pH perturbations emerge as a hitherto unrecognized phenotype that may contribute to the cellular basis of disease and offer potential therapeutic intervention through pH modulation. PMID:21423800

  15. Genome-Wide Analysis in Brazilian Xavante Indians Reveals Low Degree of Admixture

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Patricia C.; Horimoto, Andréa R. V. Russo.; Sanches, José Maurício; Vieira Filho, João Paulo B.; Franco, Luciana; Fabbro, Amaury Dal; Franco, Laercio Joel; Pereira, Alexandre C.; Moises, Regina S

    2012-01-01

    Characterization of population genetic variation and structure can be used as tools for research in human genetics and population isolates are of great interest. The aim of the present study was to characterize the genetic structure of Xavante Indians and compare it with other populations. The Xavante, an indigenous population living in Brazilian Central Plateau, is one of the largest native groups in Brazil. A subset of 53 unrelated subjects was selected from the initial sample of 300 Xavante Indians. Using 86,197 markers, Xavante were compared with all populations of HapMap Phase III and HGDP-CEPH projects and with a Southeast Brazilian population sample to establish its population structure. Principal Components Analysis showed that the Xavante Indians are concentrated in the Amerindian axis near other populations of known Amerindian ancestry such as Karitiana, Pima, Surui and Maya and a low degree of genetic admixture was observed. This is consistent with the historical records of bottlenecks experience and cultural isolation. By calculating pair-wise Fst statistics we characterized the genetic differentiation between Xavante Indians and representative populations of the HapMap and from HGDP-CEPH project. We found that the genetic differentiation between Xavante Indians and populations of Ameridian, Asian, European, and African ancestry increased progressively. Our results indicate that the Xavante is a population that remained genetically isolated over the past decades and can offer advantages for genome-wide mapping studies of inherited disorders. PMID:22900041

  16. Genome-wide analysis reveals positional-nucleosome-oriented binding pattern of pioneer factor FOXA1

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Zhenqing; Chen, Zhong; Sunkel, Benjamin; Frietze, Seth; Huang, Tim H.-M.; Wang, Qianben; Jin, Victor X.

    2016-01-01

    The compaction of nucleosomal structures creates a barrier for DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs) to access their cognate cis-regulatory elements. Pioneer factors (PFs) such as FOXA1 are able to directly access these cis-targets within compact chromatin. However, how these PFs interplay with nucleosomes remains to be elucidated, and is critical for us to understand the underlying mechanism of gene regulation. Here, we have conducted a computational analysis on a strand-specific paired-end ChIP-exo (termed as ChIP-ePENS) data of FOXA1 in LNCaP cells by our novel algorithm ePEST. We find that FOXA1 chromatin binding occurs via four distinct border modes (or footprint boundary patterns), with a preferential footprint boundary patterns relative to FOXA1 motif orientation. In addition, from this analysis three fundamental nucleotide positions (oG, oS and oH) emerged as major determinants for blocking exo-digestion and forming these four distinct border modes. By integrating histone MNase-seq data, we found an astonishingly consistent, ‘well-positioned’ configuration occurs between FOXA1 motifs and dyads of nucleosomes genome-wide. We further performed ChIP-seq of eight chromatin remodelers and found an increased occupancy of these remodelers on FOXA1 motifs for all four border modes (or footprint boundary patterns), indicating the full occupancy of FOXA1 complex on the three blocking sites (oG, oS and oH) likely produces an active regulatory status with well-positioned phasing for protein binding events. Together, our results suggest a positional-nucleosome-oriented accessing model for PFs seeking target motifs, in which FOXA1 can examine each underlying DNA nucleotide and is able to sense all potential motifs regardless of whether they face inward or outward from histone octamers along the DNA helix axis. PMID:27458208

  17. Genome-wide CNV analysis reveals variants associated with growth traits in Bos indicus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Apart from single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), copy number variation (CNV) is another important type of genetic variation, which may affect growth traits and play key roles for the production of beef cattle. To date, no genome-wide association study (GWAS) for CNV and body traits in be...

  18. Genome-wide CNV analysis reveals variants associated with growth traits in Bos indicus.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yang; Utsunomiya, Yuri T; Xu, Lingyang; Hay, El Hamidi Abdel; Bickhart, Derek M; Alexandre, Pamela Almeida; Rosen, Benjamin D; Schroeder, Steven G; Carvalheiro, Roberto; de Rezende Neves, Haroldo Henrique; Sonstegard, Tad S; Van Tassell, Curtis P; Ferraz, José Bento Sterman; Fukumasu, Heidge; Garcia, Jose Fernando; Liu, George E

    2016-06-01

    Apart from single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), copy number variation (CNV) is another important type of genetic variation, which may affect growth traits and play key roles for the production of beef cattle. To date, no genome-wide association study (GWAS) for CNV and body traits in beef cattle has been reported, so the present study aimed to investigate this type of association in one of the most important cattle subspecies: Bos indicus (Nellore breed). We have used intensity data from over 700,000 SNP probes across the bovine genome to detect common CNVs in a sample of 2230 Nellore cattle, and performed GWAS between the detected CNVs and nine growth traits. After filtering for frequency and length, a total of 231 CNVs ranging from 894 bp to 4,855,088 bp were kept and tested as predictors for each growth trait using linear regression analysis with principal components correction. There were 49 significant associations identified among 17 CNVs and seven body traits after false discovery rate correction (P < 0.05). Among the 17 CNVs, three were significant or marginally significant for all the traits. We have compared the locations of associated CNVs with quantitative trait locus and the RefGene database, and found two sets of 9 CNVs overlapping with either known QTLs or genes, respectively. The gene overlapping with CNV100, KCNJ12, is a functional candidate for muscle development and plays critical roles in muscling traits. This study presents the first CNV-based GWAS of growth traits using high density SNP microarray data in cattle. We detected 17 CNVs significantly associated with seven growth traits and one of them (CNV100) may be involved in growth traits through KCNJ12.

  19. Genome-Wide Analysis in Brazilians Reveals Highly Differentiated Native American Genome Regions.

    PubMed

    Mychaleckyj, Josyf C; Havt, Alexandre; Nayak, Uma; Pinkerton, Relana; Farber, Emily; Concannon, Patrick; Lima, Aldo A; Guerrant, Richard L

    2017-03-01

    Despite its population, geographic size, and emerging economic importance, disproportionately little genome-scale research exists into genetic factors that predispose Brazilians to disease, or the population genetics of risk. After identification of suitable proxy populations and careful analysis of tri-continental admixture in 1,538 North-Eastern Brazilians to estimate individual ancestry and ancestral allele frequencies, we computed 400,000 genome-wide locus-specific branch length (LSBL) Fst statistics of Brazilian Amerindian ancestry compared to European and African; and a similar set of differentiation statistics for their Amerindian component compared with the closest Asian 1000 Genomes population (surprisingly, Bengalis in Bangladesh). After ranking SNPs by these statistics, we identified the top 10 highly differentiated SNPs in five genome regions in the LSBL tests of Brazilian Amerindian ancestry compared to European and African; and the top 10 SNPs in eight regions comparing their Amerindian component to the closest Asian 1000 Genomes population. We found SNPs within or proximal to the genes CIITA (rs6498115), SMC6 (rs1834619), and KLHL29 (rs2288697) were most differentiated in the Amerindian-specific branch, while SNPs in the genes ADAMTS9 (rs7631391), DOCK2 (rs77594147), SLC28A1 (rs28649017), ARHGAP5 (rs7151991), and CIITA (rs45601437) were most highly differentiated in the Asian comparison. These genes are known to influence immune function, metabolic and anthropometry traits, and embryonic development. These analyses have identified candidate genes for selection within Amerindian ancestry, and by comparison of the two analyses, those for which the differentiation may have arisen during the migration from Asia to the Americas.

  20. Genome-Wide Analysis in Brazilians Reveals Highly Differentiated Native American Genome Regions

    PubMed Central

    Havt, Alexandre; Nayak, Uma; Pinkerton, Relana; Farber, Emily; Concannon, Patrick; Lima, Aldo A.; Guerrant, Richard L.

    2017-01-01

    Despite its population, geographic size, and emerging economic importance, disproportionately little genome-scale research exists into genetic factors that predispose Brazilians to disease, or the population genetics of risk. After identification of suitable proxy populations and careful analysis of tri-continental admixture in 1,538 North-Eastern Brazilians to estimate individual ancestry and ancestral allele frequencies, we computed 400,000 genome-wide locus-specific branch length (LSBL) Fst statistics of Brazilian Amerindian ancestry compared to European and African; and a similar set of differentiation statistics for their Amerindian component compared with the closest Asian 1000 Genomes population (surprisingly, Bengalis in Bangladesh). After ranking SNPs by these statistics, we identified the top 10 highly differentiated SNPs in five genome regions in the LSBL tests of Brazilian Amerindian ancestry compared to European and African; and the top 10 SNPs in eight regions comparing their Amerindian component to the closest Asian 1000 Genomes population. We found SNPs within or proximal to the genes CIITA (rs6498115), SMC6 (rs1834619), and KLHL29 (rs2288697) were most differentiated in the Amerindian-specific branch, while SNPs in the genes ADAMTS9 (rs7631391), DOCK2 (rs77594147), SLC28A1 (rs28649017), ARHGAP5 (rs7151991), and CIITA (rs45601437) were most highly differentiated in the Asian comparison. These genes are known to influence immune function, metabolic and anthropometry traits, and embryonic development. These analyses have identified candidate genes for selection within Amerindian ancestry, and by comparison of the two analyses, those for which the differentiation may have arisen during the migration from Asia to the Americas. PMID:28100790

  1. Genome wide analysis of Silurana (Xenopus) tropicalis development reveals dynamic expression using network enrichment analysis.

    PubMed

    Langlois, Valérie S; Martyniuk, Christopher J

    2013-01-01

    Development involves precise timing of gene expression and coordinated pathways for organogenesis and morphogenesis. Functional and sub-network enrichment analysis provides an integrated approach for identifying networks underlying development. The objectives of this study were to characterize early gene regulatory networks over Silurana tropicalis development from NF stage 2 to 46 using a custom Agilent 4×44K microarray. There were >8000 unique gene probes that were differentially expressed between Nieuwkoop-Faber (NF) stage 2 and stage 16, and >2000 gene probes differentially expressed between NF 34 and 46. Gene ontology revealed that genes involved in nucleosome assembly, cell division, pattern specification, neurotransmission, and general metabolism were increasingly regulated throughout development, consistent with active development. Sub-network enrichment analysis revealed that processes such as membrane hyperpolarisation, retinoic acid, cholesterol, and dopamine metabolic gene networks were activated/inhibited over time. This study identifies RNA transcripts that are potentially maternally inherited in an anuran species, provides evidence that the expression of genes involved in retinoic acid receptor signaling may increase prior to those involved in thyroid receptor signaling, and characterizes novel gene expression networks preceding organogenesis which increases understanding of the spatiotemporal embryonic development in frogs.

  2. Genome-wide functional analysis reveals central signaling regulators of lymphatic endothelial cell migration and remodeling.

    PubMed

    Williams, Steven P; Odell, Adam F; Karnezis, Tara; Farnsworth, Rae H; Gould, Cathryn M; Li, Jason; Paquet-Fifield, Sophie; Harris, Nicole C; Walter, Anne; Gregory, Julia L; Lamont, Sara F; Liu, Ruofei; Takano, Elena A; Nowell, Cameron J; Bower, Neil I; Resnick, Daniel; Smyth, Gordon K; Coultas, Leigh; Hogan, Benjamin M; Fox, Stephen B; Mueller, Scott N; Simpson, Kaylene J; Achen, Marc G; Stacker, Steven A

    2017-10-03

    Lymphatic vessels constitute a specialized vasculature that is involved in development, cancer, obesity, and immune regulation. The migration of lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) is critical for vessel growth (lymphangiogenesis) and vessel remodeling, processes that modify the lymphatic network in response to developmental or pathological demands. Using the publicly accessible results of our genome-wide siRNA screen, we characterized the migratome of primary human LECs and identified individual genes and signaling pathways that regulate LEC migration. We compared our data set with mRNA differential expression data from endothelial and stromal cells derived from two in vivo models of lymphatic vessel remodeling, viral infection and contact hypersensitivity-induced inflammation, which identified genes selectively involved in regulating LEC migration and remodeling. We also characterized the top candidates in the LEC migratome in primary blood vascular endothelial cells to identify genes with functions common to lymphatic and blood vascular endothelium. On the basis of these analyses, we showed that LGALS1, which encodes the glycan-binding protein Galectin-1, promoted lymphatic vascular growth in vitro and in vivo and contributed to maintenance of the lymphatic endothelial phenotype. Our results provide insight into the signaling networks that control lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic remodeling and potentially identify therapeutic targets and biomarkers in disease specific to lymphatic or blood vessels. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  3. Genome-wide analysis reveals mechanisms modulating autophagy in normal brain aging and in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Lipinski, Marta M.; Zheng, Bin; Lu, Tao; Yan, Zhenyu; Py, Bénédicte F.; Ng, Aylwin; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Li, Cheng; Yankner, Bruce A.; Scherzer, Clemens R.; Yuan, Junying

    2010-01-01

    Dysregulation of autophagy, a cellular catabolic mechanism essential for degradation of misfolded proteins, has been implicated in multiple neurodegenerative diseases. However, the mechanisms that lead to the autophagy dysfunction are still not clear. Based on the results of a genome-wide screen, we show that reactive oxygen species (ROS) serve as common mediators upstream of the activation of the type III PI3 kinase, which is critical for the initiation of autophagy. Furthermore, ROS play an essential function in the induction of the type III PI3 kinase and autophagy in response to amyloid β peptide, the main pathogenic mediator of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, lysosomal blockage also caused by Aβ is independent of ROS. In addition, we demonstrate that autophagy is transcriptionally down-regulated during normal aging in the human brain. Strikingly, in contrast to normal aging, we observe transcriptional up-regulation of autophagy in the brains of AD patients, suggesting that there might be a compensatory regulation of autophagy. Interestingly, we show that an AD drug and an AD drug candidate have inhibitory effects on autophagy, raising the possibility that decreasing input into the lysosomal system may help to reduce cellular stress in AD. Finally, we provide a list of candidate drug targets that can be used to safely modulate levels of autophagy without causing cell death. PMID:20660724

  4. Genome-wide Analysis Reveals Novel and Discrete Functions for Tubulin Carboxy-terminal Tails

    PubMed Central

    Aiken, Jayne; Sept, David; Costanzo, Michael; Boone, Charles; Cooper, John A.; Moore, Jeffrey K.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Microtubules (MTs) support diverse transport and force generation processes in cells. Both α- and β-tubulin proteins possess carboxy-terminal tail regions (CTTs) that are negatively charged, intrinsically disordered, and project from the MT surface where they interact with motors and other proteins. Although CTTs are presumed to play important roles in MT networks, these roles have not been determined in vivo. Results We examined the function of CTTs in vivo using a systematic collection of mutants in budding yeast. We find that CTTs are not essential; however, loss of either α- or β-CTT sensitizes cells to MT destabilizing drugs. β-CTT, but not α-CTT, regulates MT dynamics by increasing frequencies of catastrophe and rescue events. In addition, β-CTT is critical for the assembly of the mitotic spindle and its elongation during anaphase. We use genome-wide genetic interaction screens to identify roles for α- and β-CTTs, including a specific role for β-CTT in supporting kinesin-5/Cin8. Our genetic screens also identified novel interactions with pathways not related to canonical MT functions. Conclusions We conclude that α- and β-CTTs play important and largely discrete roles in MT networks. β-CTT promotes MT dynamics. β-CTT also regulates force generation in the mitotic spindle by supporting kinesin-5/Cin8 and dampening dynein. Our genetic screens identify links between α- and β-CTT and additional cellular pathways, and suggest novel functions. PMID:24835459

  5. Genome-wide analysis reveals novel and discrete functions for tubulin carboxy-terminal tails.

    PubMed

    Aiken, Jayne; Sept, David; Costanzo, Michael; Boone, Charles; Cooper, John A; Moore, Jeffrey K

    2014-06-16

    Microtubules (MTs) support diverse transport and force generation processes in cells. Both α- and β-tubulin proteins possess carboxy-terminal tail regions (CTTs) that are negatively charged, intrinsically disordered, and project from the MT surface where they interact with motors and other proteins. Although CTTs are presumed to play important roles in MT networks, these roles have not been determined in vivo. We examined the function of CTTs in vivo by using a systematic collection of mutants in budding yeast. We find that CTTs are not essential; however, loss of either α- or β-CTT sensitizes cells to MT-destabilizing drugs. β-CTT, but not α-CTT, regulates MT dynamics by increasing frequencies of catastrophe and rescue events. In addition, β-CTT is critical for the assembly of the mitotic spindle and its elongation during anaphase. We use genome-wide genetic interaction screens to identify roles for α- and β-CTTs, including a specific role for β-CTT in supporting kinesin-5/Cin8. Our genetic screens also identified novel interactions with pathways not related to canonical MT functions. We conclude that α- and β-CTTs play important and largely discrete roles in MT networks. β-CTT promotes MT dynamics. β-CTT also regulates force generation in the mitotic spindle by supporting kinesin-5/Cin8 and dampening dynein. Our genetic screens identify links between α- and β-CTT and additional cellular pathways and suggest novel functions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Genome-wide analysis of transcriptional regulators in human HSPCs reveals a densely interconnected network of coding and noncoding genes.

    PubMed

    Beck, Dominik; Thoms, Julie A I; Perera, Dilmi; Schütte, Judith; Unnikrishnan, Ashwin; Knezevic, Kathy; Kinston, Sarah J; Wilson, Nicola K; O'Brien, Tracey A; Göttgens, Berthold; Wong, Jason W H; Pimanda, John E

    2013-10-03

    Genome-wide combinatorial binding patterns for key transcription factors (TFs) have not been reported for primary human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs), and have constrained analysis of the global architecture of molecular circuits controlling these cells. Here we provide high-resolution genome-wide binding maps for a heptad of key TFs (FLI1, ERG, GATA2, RUNX1, SCL, LYL1, and LMO2) in human CD34(+) HSPCs, together with quantitative RNA and microRNA expression profiles. We catalog binding of TFs at coding genes and microRNA promoters, and report that combinatorial binding of all 7 TFs is favored and associated with differential expression of genes and microRNA in HSPCs. We also uncover a previously unrecognized association between FLI1 and RUNX1 pairing in HSPCs, we establish a correlation between the density of histone modifications that mark active enhancers and the number of overlapping TFs at a peak, we demonstrate bivalent histone marks at promoters of heptad target genes in CD34(+) cells that are poised for later expression, and we identify complex relationships between specific microRNAs and coding genes regulated by the heptad. Taken together, these data reveal the power of integrating multifactor sequencing of chromatin immunoprecipitates with coding and noncoding gene expression to identify regulatory circuits controlling cell identity.

  7. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis of T cell activation reveals differential gene expression associated with psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Palau, Nuria; Julià, Antonio; Ferrándiz, Carlos; Puig, Lluís; Fonseca, Eduardo; Fernández, Emilia; López-Lasanta, María; Tortosa, Raül; Marsal, Sara

    2013-11-23

    Psoriasis is a chronic autoimmune disease in which T cells have a predominant role in initiating and perpetuating the chronic inflammation in skin. However, the mechanisms that regulate T cell activation in psoriasis are still incompletely understood. The objective of the present study was to characterize the main genetic pathways associated with T cell activation in psoriasis. Gene expression profiles from in vitro activated T cells were obtained from 17 psoriasis patients and 7 healthy controls using Illumina HT-12 v4 microarrays. From a total of 47,321 analyzed transcripts, 42 genes were found to be differentially expressed between psoriasis and controls (FDR p-value < 0.1, absolute fold-change > 1.2). Using an independent cohort of 8 patients and 8 healthy controls we validated the overexpression of SPATS2L (p-value =0.0009) and KLF6 (p-value =0.0012) genes in activated T cells from psoriasis patients. Using weighted correlation analysis we identified SPATS2L and KLF6 coexpression networks, which were also significantly associated with psoriasis (p-value < 0.05). Gene Ontology analysis allowed the identification of several biological processes associated with each coexpression network. Finally, using Gene Set Enrichment Analysis over the global T cell transcriptome we also found additional genetic pathways strongly associated with psoriasis (p-value < 0.0001). This study has identified two new genes, SPATS2L and KLF6, strongly associated with T cell activation in psoriasis. Functional analyses of the gene expression profiles also revealed new biological processes and genetic pathways associated with psoriasis. The results of this study provide an important insight into the biology of this common chronic inflammatory disease.

  8. Genome-wide analysis reveals population structure and selection in Chinese indigenous sheep breeds.

    PubMed

    Wei, Caihong; Wang, Huihua; Liu, Gang; Wu, Mingming; Cao, Jiaxve; Liu, Zhen; Liu, Ruizao; Zhao, Fuping; Zhang, Li; Lu, Jian; Liu, Chousheng; Du, Lixin

    2015-03-17

    Traditionally, Chinese indigenous sheep were classified geographically and morphologically into three groups: Mongolian, Kazakh and Tibetan. Herein, we aimed to evaluate the population structure and genome selection among 140 individuals from ten representative Chinese indigenous sheep breeds: Ujimqin, Hu, Tong, Large-Tailed Han and Lop breed (Mongolian group); Duolang and Kazakh (Kazakh group); and Diqing, Plateau-type Tibetan, and Valley-type Tibetan breed (Tibetan group). We analyzed the population using principal component analysis (PCA), STRUCTURE and a Neighbor-Joining (NJ)-tree. In PCA plot, the Tibetan and Mongolian groups were clustered as expected; however, Duolang and Kazakh (Kazakh group) were segregated. STRUCTURE analyses suggested two subpopulations: one from North China (Kazakh and Mongolian groups) and the other from the Southwest (Tibetan group). In the NJ-tree, the Tibetan group formed an independent branch and the Kazakh and Mongolian groups were mixed. We then used the d i statistic approach to reveal selection in Chinese indigenous sheep breeds. Among the 599 genome sequence windows analyzed, sixteen (2.7%) exhibited signatures of selection in four or more breeds. We detected three strong selection windows involving three functional genes: RXFP2, PPP1CC and PDGFD. PDGFD, one of the four subfamilies of PDGF, which promotes proliferation and inhibits differentiation of preadipocytes, was significantly selected in fat type breeds by the Rsb (across pairs of populations) approach. Two consecutive selection regions in Duolang sheep were obviously different to other breeds. One region was in OAR2 including three genes (NPR2, SPAG8 and HINT2) the influence growth traits. The other region was in OAR 6 including four genes (PKD2, SPP1, MEPE, and IBSP) associated with a milk production quantitative trait locus. We also identified known candidate genes such as BMPR1B, MSRB3, and three genes (KIT, MC1R, and FRY) that influence lambing percentage, ear size

  9. Genome-wide analysis reveals the ancient and recent admixture history of East African Shorthorn Zebu (EASZ)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Indigenous zebu cattle are widespread across East Africa owing to their tropically-adapted physiology. Previous studies using microsatellite loci revealed the complex history of these populations with the presence of taurine and zebu genetic backgrounds. Here, we estimate at the genome-wide level th...

  10. Genome-wide analysis of HPV integration in human cancers reveals recurrent, focal genomic instability

    PubMed Central

    Akagi, Keiko; Li, Jingfeng; Broutian, Tatevik R.; Padilla-Nash, Hesed; Xiao, Weihong; Jiang, Bo; Rocco, James W.; Teknos, Theodoros N.; Kumar, Bhavna; Wangsa, Danny; He, Dandan; Ried, Thomas; Symer, David E.; Gillison, Maura L.

    2014-01-01

    Genomic instability is a hallmark of human cancers, including the 5% caused by human papillomavirus (HPV). Here we report a striking association between HPV integration and adjacent host genomic structural variation in human cancer cell lines and primary tumors. Whole-genome sequencing revealed HPV integrants flanking and bridging extensive host genomic amplifications and rearrangements, including deletions, inversions, and chromosomal translocations. We present a model of “looping” by which HPV integrant-mediated DNA replication and recombination may result in viral–host DNA concatemers, frequently disrupting genes involved in oncogenesis and amplifying HPV oncogenes E6 and E7. Our high-resolution results shed new light on a catastrophic process, distinct from chromothripsis and other mutational processes, by which HPV directly promotes genomic instability. PMID:24201445

  11. Genome-wide Analysis Reveals SR Protein Cooperation and Competition in Regulated Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Pandit, Shatakshi; Zhou, Yu; Shiue, Lily; Coutinho-Mansfield, Gabriela; Li, Hairi; Qiu, Jinsong; Huang, Jie; Yeo, Gene W.; Ares, Manuel; Fu, Xiang-Dong

    2013-01-01

    Summary SR proteins are well-characterized RNA binding proteins that promote exon inclusion by binding to exonic splicing enhancers (ESEs). However, it has been unclear whether regulatory rules deduced on model genes apply generally to activities of SR proteins in the cell. Here, we report global analyses of two prototypical SR proteins SRSF1 (SF2/ASF) and SRSF2 (SC35) using splicing-sensitive arrays and CLIP-seq on mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs). Unexpectedly, we find that these SR proteins promote both inclusion and skipping of exons in vivo, but their binding patterns do not explain such opposite responses. Further analyses reveal that loss of one SR protein is accompanied by coordinated loss or compensatory gain in the interaction of other SR proteins at the affected exons. Therefore, specific effects on regulated splicing by one SR protein actually depend on a complex set of relationships with multiple other SR proteins in mammalian genomes. PMID:23562324

  12. Integrative genome-wide analysis reveals cooperative regulation of alternative splicing by hnRNP proteins.

    PubMed

    Huelga, Stephanie C; Vu, Anthony Q; Arnold, Justin D; Liang, Tiffany Y; Liu, Patrick P; Yan, Bernice Y; Donohue, John Paul; Shiue, Lily; Hoon, Shawn; Brenner, Sydney; Ares, Manuel; Yeo, Gene W

    2012-02-23

    Understanding how RNA binding proteins control the splicing code is fundamental to human biology and disease. Here, we present a comprehensive study to elucidate how heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoparticle (hnRNP) proteins, among the most abundant RNA binding proteins, coordinate to regulate alternative pre-mRNA splicing (AS) in human cells. Using splicing-sensitive microarrays, crosslinking and immunoprecipitation coupled with high-throughput sequencing (CLIP-seq), and cDNA sequencing, we find that more than half of all AS events are regulated by multiple hnRNP proteins and that some combinations of hnRNP proteins exhibit significant synergy, whereas others act antagonistically. Our analyses reveal position-dependent RNA splicing maps, in vivo consensus binding sites, a surprising level of cross- and autoregulation among hnRNP proteins, and the coordinated regulation by hnRNP proteins of dozens of other RNA binding proteins and genes associated with cancer. Our findings define an unprecedented degree of complexity and compensatory relationships among hnRNP proteins and their splicing targets that likely confer robustness to cells.

  13. Integrative genome-wide analysis reveals cooperative regulation of alternative splicing by hnRNP proteins

    PubMed Central

    Huelga, Stephanie C.; Vu, Anthony Q.; Arnold, Justin D.; Liang, Tiffany Y.; Liu, Patrick P.; Yan, Bernice Y.; Donohue, John Paul; Shiue, Lily; Hoon, Shawn; Brenner, Sydney; Ares, Manuel; Yeo, Gene W.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Understanding how RNA binding proteins control the splicing code is fundamental to human biology and disease. Here we present a comprehensive study to elucidate how heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoparticle (hnRNP) proteins, among the most abundant RNA binding proteins, coordinate to regulate alternative pre-mRNA splicing (AS) in human cells. Using splicing-sensitive microarrays, cross-linking and immunoprecipitation coupled with high-throughput sequencing, and cDNA sequencing, we find that more than half of all AS events are regulated by multiple hnRNP proteins, and that some combinations of hnRNP proteins exhibit significant synergy, whereas others act antagonistically. Our analyses reveal position-dependent RNA splicing maps, in vivo consensus binding sites, a surprising level of cross- and auto-regulation among hnRNP proteins, and the coordinated regulation by hnRNP proteins of dozens of other RNA binding proteins and genes associated with cancer. Our findings define an unprecedented degree of complexity and compensatory relationships among hnRNP proteins and their splicing targets that likely confer robustness to cells. PMID:22574288

  14. Genome-wide comparative analysis reveals human-mouse regulatory landscape and evolution.

    PubMed

    Denas, Olgert; Sandstrom, Richard; Cheng, Yong; Beal, Kathryn; Herrero, Javier; Hardison, Ross C; Taylor, James

    2015-02-14

    Because species-specific gene expression is driven by species-specific regulation, understanding the relationship between sequence and function of the regulatory regions in different species will help elucidate how differences among species arise. Despite active experimental and computational research, relationships among sequence, conservation, and function are still poorly understood. We compared transcription factor occupied segments (TFos) for 116 human and 35 mouse TFs in 546 human and 125 mouse cell types and tissues from the Human and the Mouse ENCODE projects. We based the map between human and mouse TFos on a one-to-one nucleotide cross-species mapper, bnMapper, that utilizes whole genome alignments (WGA). Our analysis shows that TFos are under evolutionary constraint, but a substantial portion (25.1% of mouse and 25.85% of human on average) of the TFos does not have a homologous sequence on the other species; this portion varies among cell types and TFs. Furthermore, 47.67% and 57.01% of the homologous TFos sequence shows binding activity on the other species for human and mouse respectively. However, 79.87% and 69.22% is repurposed such that it binds the same TF in different cells or different TFs in the same cells. Remarkably, within the set of repurposed TFos, the corresponding genome regions in the other species are preferred locations of novel TFos. These events suggest exaptation of some functional regulatory sequences into new function. Despite TFos repurposing, we did not find substantial changes in their predicted target genes, suggesting that CRMs buffer evolutionary events allowing little or no change in the TFos - target gene associations. Thus, the small portion of TFos with strictly conserved occupancy underestimates the degree of conservation of regulatory interactions. We mapped regulatory sequences from an extensive number of TFs and cell types between human and mouse using WGA. A comparative analysis of this correspondence unveiled the

  15. Genetic factors in nonsmokers with age-related macular degeneration revealed through genome-wide gene-environment interaction analysis.

    PubMed

    Naj, Adam C; Scott, William K; Courtenay, Monique D; Cade, William H; Schwartz, Stephen G; Kovach, Jaclyn L; Agarwal, Anita; Wang, Gaofeng; Haines, Jonathan L; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A

    2013-05-01

    Relatively little is known about the interaction between genes and environment in the complex etiology of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). This study aimed to identify novel factors associated with AMD by analyzing gene-smoking interactions in a genome-wide association study of 1207 AMD cases and 686 controls of Caucasian background with genotype data on 668,238 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) after quality control. Participants' history of smoking at least 100 cigarettes lifetime was determined by a self-administered questionnaire. SNP associations modeled the effect of the minor allele additively on AMD using logistic regression, with adjustment for age, sex, and ever/never smoking. Joint effects of SNPs and smoking were examined comparing a null model containing only age, sex, and smoking against an extended model including genotypic and interaction terms. Genome-wide significant main effects were detected at three known AMD loci: CFH (P = 7.51×10(-30) ), ARMS2 (P = 1.94×10(-23) ), and RDBP/CFB/C2 (P = 4.37×10(-10) ), while joint effects analysis revealed three genomic regions with P < 10(-5) . Analyses stratified by smoking found genetic associations largely restricted to nonsmokers, with one notable exception: the chromosome 18q22.1 intergenic SNP rs17073641 (between SERPINB8 and CDH7), more strongly associated in nonsmokers (OR = 0.57, P = 2.73 × 10(-5) ), with an inverse association among smokers (OR = 1.42, P = 0.00228), suggesting that smoking modifies the effect of some genetic polymorphisms on AMD risk.

  16. Genome-wide analysis of ruminant Staphylococcus aureus reveals diversification of the core genome.

    PubMed

    Ben Zakour, Nouri L; Sturdevant, Daniel E; Even, Sergine; Guinane, Caitriona M; Barbey, Corinne; Alves, Priscila D; Cochet, Marie-Françoise; Gautier, Michel; Otto, Michael; Fitzgerald, J Ross; Le Loir, Yves

    2008-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus causes disease in humans and a wide array of animals. Of note, S. aureus mastitis of ruminants, including cows, sheep, and goats, results in major economic losses worldwide. Extensive variation in genome content exists among S. aureus pathogenic clones. However, the genomic variation among S. aureus strains infecting different animal species has not been well examined. To investigate variation in the genome content of human and ruminant S. aureus, we carried out whole-genome PCR scanning (WGPS), comparative genomic hybridizations (CGH), and the directed DNA sequence analysis of strains of human, bovine, ovine, and caprine origin. Extensive variation in genome content was discovered, including host- and ruminant-specific genetic loci. Ovine and caprine strains were genetically allied, whereas bovine strains were heterogeneous in gene content. As expected, mobile genetic elements such as pathogenicity islands and bacteriophages contributed to the variation in genome content between strains. However, differences specific for ruminant strains were restricted to regions of the conserved core genome, which contained allelic variation in genes encoding proteins of known and unknown function. Many of these proteins are predicted to be exported and could play a role in host-pathogen interactions. The genomic regions of difference identified by the whole-genome approaches adopted in the current study represent excellent targets for studies of the molecular basis of S. aureus host adaptation.

  17. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis revealed organelle specific responses to temperature variations in algae

    PubMed Central

    Shin, HyeonSeok; Hong, Seong-Joo; Yoo, Chan; Han, Mi-Ae; Lee, Hookeun; Choi, Hyung-Kyoon; Cho, Suhyung; Lee, Choul-Gyun; Cho, Byung-Kwan

    2016-01-01

    Temperature is a critical environmental factor that affects microalgal growth. However, microalgal coping mechanisms for temperature variations are unclear. Here, we determined changes in transcriptome, total carbohydrate, total fatty acid methyl ester, and fatty acid composition of Tetraselmis sp. KCTC12432BP, a strain with a broad temperature tolerance range, to elucidate the tolerance mechanisms in response to large temperature variations. Owing to unavailability of genome sequence information, de novo transcriptome assembly coupled with BLAST analysis was performed using strand specific RNA-seq data. This resulted in 26,245 protein-coding transcripts, of which 83.7% could be annotated to putative functions. We identified more than 681 genes differentially expressed, suggesting an organelle-specific response to temperature variation. Among these, the genes related to the photosynthetic electron transfer chain, which are localized in the plastid thylakoid membrane, were upregulated at low temperature. However, the transcripts related to the electron transport chain and biosynthesis of phosphatidylethanolamine localized in mitochondria were upregulated at high temperature. These results show that the low energy uptake by repressed photosynthesis under low and high temperature conditions is compensated by different mechanisms, including photosystem I and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, respectively. This study illustrates that microalgae tolerate different temperature conditions through organelle specific mechanisms. PMID:27883062

  18. Genome-wide analysis reveals regulatory role of G4 DNA in gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhuo; Zhao, Yiqiang; Li, Ning

    2008-02-01

    G-quadruplex or G4 DNA, a four-stranded DNA structure formed in G-rich sequences, has been hypothesized to be a structural motif involved in gene regulation. In this study, we examined the regulatory role of potential G4 DNA motifs (PG4Ms) located in the putative transcriptional regulatory region (TRR, -500 to +500) of genes across the human genome. We found that PG4Ms in the 500-bp region downstream of the annotated transcription start site (TSS; PG4M(D500)) are associated with gene expression. Generally, PG4M(D500)-positive genes are expressed at higher levels than PG4M(D500)-negative genes, and an increased number of PG4M(D500) provides a cumulative effect. This observation was validated by controlling for attributes, including gene family, function, and promoter similarity. We also observed an asymmetric pattern of PG4M(D500) distribution between strands, whereby the frequency of PG4M(D500) in the coding strand is generally higher than that in the template strand. Further analysis showed that the presence of PG4M(D500) and its strand asymmetry are associated with significant enrichment of RNAP II at the putative TRR. On the basis of these results, we propose a model of G4 DNA-mediated stimulation of transcription with the hypothesis that PG4M(D500) contributes to gene transcription by maintaining the DNA in an open conformation, while the asymmetric distribution of PG4M(D500) considerably reduces the probability of blocking the progression of the RNA polymerase complex on the template strand. Our findings provide a comprehensive view of the regulatory function of G4 DNA in gene transcription.

  19. Genome-Wide Analysis Reveals Selection for Important Traits in Domestic Horse Breeds

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Jessica L.; Mickelson, James R.; Rendahl, Aaron K.; Valberg, Stephanie J.; Andersson, Lisa S.; Axelsson, Jeanette; Bailey, Ernie; Bannasch, Danika; Binns, Matthew M.; Borges, Alexandre S.; Brama, Pieter; da Câmara Machado, Artur; Capomaccio, Stefano; Cappelli, Katia; Cothran, E. Gus; Distl, Ottmar; Fox-Clipsham, Laura; Graves, Kathryn T.; Guérin, Gérard; Haase, Bianca; Hasegawa, Telhisa; Hemmann, Karin; Hill, Emmeline W.; Leeb, Tosso; Lindgren, Gabriella; Lohi, Hannes; Lopes, Maria Susana; McGivney, Beatrice A.; Mikko, Sofia; Orr, Nicholas; Penedo, M. Cecilia T.; Piercy, Richard J.; Raekallio, Marja; Rieder, Stefan; Røed, Knut H.; Swinburne, June; Tozaki, Teruaki; Vaudin, Mark; Wade, Claire M.; McCue, Molly E.

    2013-01-01

    Intense selective pressures applied over short evolutionary time have resulted in homogeneity within, but substantial variation among, horse breeds. Utilizing this population structure, 744 individuals from 33 breeds, and a 54,000 SNP genotyping array, breed-specific targets of selection were identified using an FST-based statistic calculated in 500-kb windows across the genome. A 5.5-Mb region of ECA18, in which the myostatin (MSTN) gene was centered, contained the highest signature of selection in both the Paint and Quarter Horse. Gene sequencing and histological analysis of gluteal muscle biopsies showed a promoter variant and intronic SNP of MSTN were each significantly associated with higher Type 2B and lower Type 1 muscle fiber proportions in the Quarter Horse, demonstrating a functional consequence of selection at this locus. Signatures of selection on ECA23 in all gaited breeds in the sample led to the identification of a shared, 186-kb haplotype including two doublesex related mab transcription factor genes (DMRT2 and 3). The recent identification of a DMRT3 mutation within this haplotype, which appears necessary for the ability to perform alternative gaits, provides further evidence for selection at this locus. Finally, putative loci for the determination of size were identified in the draft breeds and the Miniature horse on ECA11, as well as when signatures of selection surrounding candidate genes at other loci were examined. This work provides further evidence of the importance of MSTN in racing breeds, provides strong evidence for selection upon gait and size, and illustrates the potential for population-based techniques to find genomic regions driving important phenotypes in the modern horse. PMID:23349635

  20. Genome-wide analysis reveals selection for important traits in domestic horse breeds.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Jessica L; Mickelson, James R; Rendahl, Aaron K; Valberg, Stephanie J; Andersson, Lisa S; Axelsson, Jeanette; Bailey, Ernie; Bannasch, Danika; Binns, Matthew M; Borges, Alexandre S; Brama, Pieter; da Câmara Machado, Artur; Capomaccio, Stefano; Cappelli, Katia; Cothran, E Gus; Distl, Ottmar; Fox-Clipsham, Laura; Graves, Kathryn T; Guérin, Gérard; Haase, Bianca; Hasegawa, Telhisa; Hemmann, Karin; Hill, Emmeline W; Leeb, Tosso; Lindgren, Gabriella; Lohi, Hannes; Lopes, Maria Susana; McGivney, Beatrice A; Mikko, Sofia; Orr, Nicholas; Penedo, M Cecilia T; Piercy, Richard J; Raekallio, Marja; Rieder, Stefan; Røed, Knut H; Swinburne, June; Tozaki, Teruaki; Vaudin, Mark; Wade, Claire M; McCue, Molly E

    2013-01-01

    Intense selective pressures applied over short evolutionary time have resulted in homogeneity within, but substantial variation among, horse breeds. Utilizing this population structure, 744 individuals from 33 breeds, and a 54,000 SNP genotyping array, breed-specific targets of selection were identified using an F(ST)-based statistic calculated in 500-kb windows across the genome. A 5.5-Mb region of ECA18, in which the myostatin (MSTN) gene was centered, contained the highest signature of selection in both the Paint and Quarter Horse. Gene sequencing and histological analysis of gluteal muscle biopsies showed a promoter variant and intronic SNP of MSTN were each significantly associated with higher Type 2B and lower Type 1 muscle fiber proportions in the Quarter Horse, demonstrating a functional consequence of selection at this locus. Signatures of selection on ECA23 in all gaited breeds in the sample led to the identification of a shared, 186-kb haplotype including two doublesex related mab transcription factor genes (DMRT2 and 3). The recent identification of a DMRT3 mutation within this haplotype, which appears necessary for the ability to perform alternative gaits, provides further evidence for selection at this locus. Finally, putative loci for the determination of size were identified in the draft breeds and the Miniature horse on ECA11, as well as when signatures of selection surrounding candidate genes at other loci were examined. This work provides further evidence of the importance of MSTN in racing breeds, provides strong evidence for selection upon gait and size, and illustrates the potential for population-based techniques to find genomic regions driving important phenotypes in the modern horse.

  1. Rumen cellulosomics: divergent fiber-degrading strategies revealed by comparative genome-wide analysis of six ruminococcal strains.

    PubMed

    Dassa, Bareket; Borovok, Ilya; Ruimy-Israeli, Vered; Lamed, Raphael; Flint, Harry J; Duncan, Sylvia H; Henrissat, Bernard; Coutinho, Pedro; Morrison, Mark; Mosoni, Pascale; Yeoman, Carl J; White, Bryan A; Bayer, Edward A

    2014-01-01

    A complex community of microorganisms is responsible for efficient plant cell wall digestion by many herbivores, notably the ruminants. Understanding the different fibrolytic mechanisms utilized by these bacteria has been of great interest in agricultural and technological fields, reinforced more recently by current efforts to convert cellulosic biomass to biofuels. Here, we have used a bioinformatics-based approach to explore the cellulosome-related components of six genomes from two of the primary fiber-degrading bacteria in the rumen: Ruminococcus flavefaciens (strains FD-1, 007c and 17) and Ruminococcus albus (strains 7, 8 and SY3). The genomes of two of these strains are reported for the first time herein. The data reveal that the three R. flavefaciens strains encode for an elaborate reservoir of cohesin- and dockerin-containing proteins, whereas the three R. albus strains are cohesin-deficient and encode mainly dockerins and a unique family of cell-anchoring carbohydrate-binding modules (family 37). Our comparative genome-wide analysis pinpoints rare and novel strain-specific protein architectures and provides an exhaustive profile of their numerous lignocellulose-degrading enzymes. This work provides blueprints of the divergent cellulolytic systems in these two prominent fibrolytic rumen bacterial species, each of which reflects a distinct mechanistic model for efficient degradation of cellulosic biomass.

  2. Rumen Cellulosomics: Divergent Fiber-Degrading Strategies Revealed by Comparative Genome-Wide Analysis of Six Ruminococcal Strains

    PubMed Central

    Dassa, Bareket; Borovok, Ilya; Ruimy-Israeli, Vered; Lamed, Raphael; Flint, Harry J.; Duncan, Sylvia H.; Henrissat, Bernard; Coutinho, Pedro; Morrison, Mark; Mosoni, Pascale; Yeoman, Carl J.; White, Bryan A.; Bayer, Edward A.

    2014-01-01

    Background A complex community of microorganisms is responsible for efficient plant cell wall digestion by many herbivores, notably the ruminants. Understanding the different fibrolytic mechanisms utilized by these bacteria has been of great interest in agricultural and technological fields, reinforced more recently by current efforts to convert cellulosic biomass to biofuels. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we have used a bioinformatics-based approach to explore the cellulosome-related components of six genomes from two of the primary fiber-degrading bacteria in the rumen: Ruminococcus flavefaciens (strains FD-1, 007c and 17) and Ruminococcus albus (strains 7, 8 and SY3). The genomes of two of these strains are reported for the first time herein. The data reveal that the three R. flavefaciens strains encode for an elaborate reservoir of cohesin- and dockerin-containing proteins, whereas the three R. albus strains are cohesin-deficient and encode mainly dockerins and a unique family of cell-anchoring carbohydrate-binding modules (family 37). Conclusions/Significance Our comparative genome-wide analysis pinpoints rare and novel strain-specific protein architectures and provides an exhaustive profile of their numerous lignocellulose-degrading enzymes. This work provides blueprints of the divergent cellulolytic systems in these two prominent fibrolytic rumen bacterial species, each of which reflects a distinct mechanistic model for efficient degradation of cellulosic biomass. PMID:24992679

  3. A genome-wide association analysis of temozolomide response using lymphoblastoid cell lines reveals a clinically relevant association with MGMT

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Chad C.; Havener, Tammy M.; Medina, Marisa Wong; Auman, J. Todd; Mangravite, Lara M.; Krauss, Ronald M.; McLeod, Howard L.; Motsinger-Reif, Alison A.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) have emerged as an innovative model system for mapping gene variants that predict dose response to chemotherapy drugs. In the current study, this strategy was expanded to the in vitro genome-wide association approach, using 516 LCLs derived from a Caucasian cohort to assess cytotoxic response to temozolomide. Genome-wide association analysis using approximately 2.1 million quality controlled single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified a statistically significant association (p < 10−8) with SNPs in the O6-methylguanine–DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) gene. We also demonstrate that the primary SNP in this region is significantly associated with differential gene expression of MGMT (p< 10−26) in LCLs, and differential methylation in glioblastoma samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas. The previously documented clinical and functional relationships between MGMT and temozolomide response highlight the potential of well-powered GWAS of the LCL model system to identify meaningful genetic associations. PMID:23047291

  4. Genome-wide analysis reveals the ancient and recent admixture history of East African Shorthorn Zebu from Western Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Mbole-Kariuki, M N; Sonstegard, T; Orth, A; Thumbi, S M; Bronsvoort, B M de C; Kiara, H; Toye, P; Conradie, I; Jennings, A; Coetzer, K; Woolhouse, M E J; Hanotte, O; Tapio, M

    2014-01-01

    The Kenyan East African zebu cattle are valuable and widely used genetic resources. Previous studies using microsatellite loci revealed the complex history of these populations with the presence of taurine and zebu genetic backgrounds. Here, we estimate at genome-wide level the genetic composition and population structure of the East African Shorthorn Zebu (EASZ) of western Kenya. A total of 548 EASZ from 20 sub-locations were genotyped using the Illumina BovineSNP50 v. 1 beadchip. STRUCTURE analysis reveals admixture with Asian zebu, African and European taurine cattle. The EASZ were separated into three categories: substantial (⩾12.5%), moderate (1.56%

  5. Genome-wide direct target analysis reveals a role for SHORT-ROOT in root vascular patterning through cytokinin homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hongchang; Hao, Yueling; Kovtun, Mikhail; Stolc, Viktor; Deng, Xing-Wang; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Kojima, Mikiko

    2011-11-01

    SHORT-ROOT (SHR) is a key regulator of root growth and development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Made in the stele, the SHR protein moves into an adjacent cell layer, where it specifies endodermal cell fate; it is also essential for apical meristem maintenance, ground tissue patterning, vascular differentiation, and lateral root formation. Much has been learned about the mechanism by which SHR controls radial patterning, but how it regulates other aspects of root morphogenesis is still unclear. To dissect the SHR developmental pathway, we have determined the genome-wide locations of SHR direct targets using a chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by microarray analysis method. K-means clustering analysis not only identified additional quiescent center-specific SHR targets but also revealed a direct role for SHR in gene regulation in the pericycle and xylem. Using cell type-specific markers, we showed that in shr, the phloem and the phloem-associated pericycle expanded, whereas the xylem and xylem-associated pericycle diminished. Interestingly, we found that cytokinin level was elevated in shr and that exogenous cytokinin conferred a shr-like vascular patterning phenotype in wild-type root. By chromatin immunoprecipitation-polymerase chain reaction and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assays, we showed that SHR regulates cytokinin homeostasis by directly controlling the transcription of cytokinin oxidase 3, a cytokinin catabolism enzyme preferentially expressed in the stele. Finally, overexpression of a cytokinin oxidase in shr alleviated its vascular patterning defect. On the basis of these results, we suggest that one mechanism by which SHR controls vascular patterning is the regulation of cytokinin homeostasis.

  6. Genome-wide copy number analysis reveals candidate gene loci that confer susceptibility to high-grade prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Poniah, Prevathe; Mohd Zain, Shamsul; Abdul Razack, Azad Hassan; Kuppusamy, Shanggar; Karuppayah, Shankar; Sian Eng, Hooi; Mohamed, Zahurin

    2017-09-01

    Two key issues in prostate cancer (PCa) that demand attention currently are the need for a more precise and minimally invasive screening test owing to the inaccuracy of prostate-specific antigen and differential diagnosis to distinguish advanced vs. indolent cancers. This continues to pose a tremendous challenge in diagnosis and prognosis of PCa and could potentially lead to overdiagnosis and overtreatment complications. Copy number variations (CNVs) in the human genome have been linked to various carcinomas including PCa. Detection of these variants may improve clinical treatment as well as an understanding of the pathobiology underlying this complex disease. To this end, we undertook a pilot genome-wide CNV analysis approach in 36 subjects (18 patients with high-grade PCa and 18 controls that were matched by age and ethnicity) in search of more accurate biomarkers that could potentially explain susceptibility toward high-grade PCa. We conducted this study using the array comparative genomic hybridization technique. Array results were validated in 92 independent samples (46 high-grade PCa, 23 benign prostatic hyperplasia, and 23 healthy controls) using polymerase chain reaction-based copy number counting method. A total of 314 CNV regions were found to be unique to PCa subjects in this cohort (P<0.05). A log2 ratio-based copy number analysis revealed 5 putative rare or novel CNV loci or both associated with susceptibility to PCa. The CNV gain regions were 1q21.3, 15q15, 7p12.1, and a novel CNV in PCa 12q23.1, harboring ARNT, THBS1, SLC5A8, and DDC genes that are crucial in the p53 and cancer pathways. A CNV loss and deletion event was observed at 8p11.21, which contains the SFRP1 gene from the Wnt signaling pathway. Cross-comparison analysis with genes associated to PCa revealed significant CNVs involved in biological processes that elicit cancer pathogenesis via cytokine production and endothelial cell proliferation. In conclusion, we postulated that the CNVs

  7. Meta-analysis of heterogeneous Down Syndrome data reveals consistent genome-wide dosage effects related to neurological processes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Down syndrome (DS; trisomy 21) is the most common genetic cause of mental retardation in the human population and key molecular networks dysregulated in DS are still unknown. Many different experimental techniques have been applied to analyse the effects of dosage imbalance at the molecular and phenotypical level, however, currently no integrative approach exists that attempts to extract the common information. Results We have performed a statistical meta-analysis from 45 heterogeneous publicly available DS data sets in order to identify consistent dosage effects from these studies. We identified 324 genes with significant genome-wide dosage effects, including well investigated genes like SOD1, APP, RUNX1 and DYRK1A as well as a large proportion of novel genes (N = 62). Furthermore, we characterized these genes using gene ontology, molecular interactions and promoter sequence analysis. In order to judge relevance of the 324 genes for more general cerebral pathologies we used independent publicly available microarry data from brain studies not related with DS and identified a subset of 79 genes with potential impact for neurocognitive processes. All results have been made available through a web server under http://ds-geneminer.molgen.mpg.de/. Conclusions Our study represents a comprehensive integrative analysis of heterogeneous data including genome-wide transcript levels in the domain of trisomy 21. The detected dosage effects build a resource for further studies of DS pathology and the development of new therapies. PMID:21569303

  8. The histone modification pattern of active genes revealed through genome-wide chromatin analysis of a higher eukaryote

    PubMed Central

    Schübeler, Dirk; MacAlpine, David M.; Scalzo, David; Wirbelauer, Christiane; Kooperberg, Charles; van Leeuwen, Fred; Gottschling, Daniel E.; O'Neill, Laura P.; Turner, Bryan M.; Delrow, Jeffrey; Bell, Stephen P.; Groudine, Mark

    2004-01-01

    The covalent modification of nucleosomal histones has emerged as a major determinant of chromatin structure and gene activity. To understand the interplay between various histone modifications, including acetylation and methylation, we performed a genome-wide chromatin structure analysis in a higher eukaryote. We found a binary pattern of histone modifications among euchromatic genes, with active genes being hyperacetylated for H3 and H4 and hypermethylated at Lys 4 and Lys 79 of H3, and inactive genes being hypomethylated and deacetylated at the same residues. Furthermore, the degree of modification correlates with the level of transcription, and modifications are largely restricted to transcribed regions, suggesting that their regulation is tightly linked to polymerase activity. PMID:15175259

  9. Genome-wide analysis of the AP2/ERF family in Musa species reveals divergence and neofunctionalisation during evolution.

    PubMed

    Lakhwani, Deepika; Pandey, Ashutosh; Dhar, Yogeshwar Vikram; Bag, Sumit Kumar; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar; Asif, Mehar Hasan

    2016-01-06

    AP2/ERF domain containing transcription factor super family is one of the important regulators in the plant kingdom. The involvement of AP2/ERF family members has been elucidated in various processes associated with plant growth, development as well as in response to hormones, biotic and abiotic stresses. In this study, we carried out genome-wide analysis to identify members of AP2/ERF family in Musa acuminata (A genome) and Musa balbisiana (B genome) and changes leading to neofunctionalisation of genes. Analysis identified 265 and 318 AP2/ERF encoding genes in M. acuminata and M. balbisiana respectively which were further classified into ERF, DREB, AP2, RAV and Soloist groups. Comparative analysis indicated that AP2/ERF family has undergone duplication, loss and divergence during evolution and speciation of the Musa A and B genomes. We identified nine genes which are up-regulated during fruit ripening and might be components of the regulatory machinery operating during ethylene-dependent ripening in banana. Tissue-specific expression analysis of the genes suggests that different regulatory mechanisms might be involved in peel and pulp ripening process through recruiting specific ERFs in these tissues. Analysis also suggests that MaRAV-6 and MaERF026 have structurally diverged from their M. balbisiana counterparts and have attained new functions during ripening.

  10. Genome-wide analysis of the AP2/ERF family in Musa species reveals divergence and neofunctionalisation during evolution

    PubMed Central

    Lakhwani, Deepika; Pandey, Ashutosh; Dhar, Yogeshwar Vikram; Bag, Sumit Kumar; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar; Asif, Mehar Hasan

    2016-01-01

    AP2/ERF domain containing transcription factor super family is one of the important regulators in the plant kingdom. The involvement of AP2/ERF family members has been elucidated in various processes associated with plant growth, development as well as in response to hormones, biotic and abiotic stresses. In this study, we carried out genome-wide analysis to identify members of AP2/ERF family in Musa acuminata (A genome) and Musa balbisiana (B genome) and changes leading to neofunctionalisation of genes. Analysis identified 265 and 318 AP2/ERF encoding genes in M. acuminata and M. balbisiana respectively which were further classified into ERF, DREB, AP2, RAV and Soloist groups. Comparative analysis indicated that AP2/ERF family has undergone duplication, loss and divergence during evolution and speciation of the Musa A and B genomes. We identified nine genes which are up-regulated during fruit ripening and might be components of the regulatory machinery operating during ethylene-dependent ripening in banana. Tissue-specific expression analysis of the genes suggests that different regulatory mechanisms might be involved in peel and pulp ripening process through recruiting specific ERFs in these tissues. Analysis also suggests that MaRAV-6 and MaERF026 have structurally diverged from their M. balbisiana counterparts and have attained new functions during ripening. PMID:26733055

  11. GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION STUDY META-ANALYSIS REVEALS TRANS-ETHNIC REPLICATION OF MEAN ARTERIAL AND PULSE PRESSURE LOCI

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Tanika N.; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Tabara, Yasuharu; Edwards, Todd L.; Kim, Young Jin; Chen, Peng; Li, Huaixing; Wu, Ying; Yang, Chi-Fan; Zhang, Yonghong; Gu, Dongfeng; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Gao, Yu-Tang; Go, Min Jin; Teo, Yik Ying; Lu, Ling; Lee, Nanette R.; Chang, Li-Ching; Peng, Hao; Zhao, Qi; Nakashima, Eitaro; Kita, Yoshikuni; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Kim, Nam Hee; Tai, E Shyong; Wang, Yiqin; Adair, Linda S.; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; Zhang, Shihiu; Li, Changwei; Nabika, Toru; Umemura, Satoshi; Cai, Qiuyin; Cho, Yoon Shin; Wong, Tien Yin; Zhu, Jingwen; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Gao, Xin; Hixson, James E.; Cai, Hui; Lee, Juyoung; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Rao, Dabeeru C.; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Cho, Myeong-Chan; Han, Bok-Ghee; Wang, Aili; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Mohlke, Karen; Lin, Xu; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran; Lee, Jong-Young; Zheng, Wei; Tetsuro, Miki; Kato, Norihiro; He, Jiang

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a genome-wide association study meta-analysis of mean arterial pressure and pulse pressure among 26,600 East Asian participants (stage-1) followed by replication study of up to 28,783 participants (stage-2). For novel loci, statistical significance was determined by a P<5.0×10−8 in joint analysis of stage-1 and stage-2 data. For loci reported by the previous mean arterial and pulse pressure genome-wide association study meta-analysis in Europeans, evidence of trans-ethnic replication was determined by consistency in effect direction and a Bonferroni-corrected P<1.4×10−3. No novel loci were identified by the current study. Five independent mean arterial pressure variants demonstrated robust evidence for trans-ethnic replication including rs17249754 at ATP2B1 (P=7.5×10−15), rs2681492 at ATP2B1 (P=3.4×10−7), rs11191593 at NT5C2 (1.1×10−6), rs3824755 at CYP17A1 (P=1.2×10−6), and rs13149993 at FGF5 (P=2.4×10−4). Two additional variants showed suggestive evidence of trans-ethnic replication (consistency in effect direction and P<0.05), including rs319690 at MAP4 (P=0.014) and rs1173771 at NPR3 (P=0.018). For pulse pressure, robust evidence of replication was identified for 2 independent variants, including rs17249754 at ATP2B1 (P=1.2×10−5) and rs11191593 at NT5C2 (P=1.1×10−3), with suggestive evidence of replication among an additional 2 variants including rs3824755 at CYP17A1 (P=6.1×10−3) and rs2681492 at ATP2B1 (P=9.0×10−3). Replicated variants demonstrated consistency in effect sizes between East Asian and European samples, with effect size differences ranging from 0.03 to 0.24 mmHg for mean arterial pressure and from 0.03 to 0.21 mmHg for pulse pressure. In conclusion, we present the first evidence of trans-ethnic replication of several mean arterial and pulse pressure loci in an East Asian population. PMID:24001895

  12. Genome-wide association study meta-analysis reveals transethnic replication of mean arterial and pulse pressure loci.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Tanika N; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Tabara, Yasuharu; Edwards, Todd L; Kim, Young Jin; Chen, Peng; Li, Huaixing; Wu, Ying; Yang, Chi-Fan; Zhang, Yonghong; Gu, Dongfeng; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Gao, Yu-Tang; Go, Min Jin; Teo, Yik Ying; Lu, Ling; Lee, Nanette R; Chang, Li-Ching; Peng, Hao; Zhao, Qi; Nakashima, Eitaro; Kita, Yoshikuni; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Kim, Nam Hee; Tai, E Shyong; Wang, Yiqin; Adair, Linda S; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; Zhang, Shihiu; Li, Changwei; Nabika, Toru; Umemura, Satoshi; Cai, Qiuyin; Cho, Yoon Shin; Wong, Tien Yin; Zhu, Jingwen; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Gao, Xin; Hixson, James E; Cai, Hui; Lee, Juyoung; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Rao, Dabeeru C; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Cho, Myeong-Chan; Han, Bok-Ghee; Wang, Aili; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Mohlke, Karen; Lin, Xu; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran; Lee, Jong-Young; Zheng, Wei; Tetsuro, Miki; Kato, Norihiro; He, Jiang

    2013-11-01

    We conducted a genome-wide association study meta-analysis of mean arterial pressure and pulse pressure among 26,600 East Asian participants (stage 1) followed by replication study of up to 28,783 participants (stage 2). For novel loci, statistical significance was determined by a P<5.0×10(-8) in joint analysis of stage 1 and stage 2 data. For loci reported by the previous mean arterial and pulse pressure genome-wide association study meta-analysis in Europeans, evidence of transethnic replication was determined by consistency in effect direction and a Bonferroni-corrected P<1.4×10(-3). No novel loci were identified by the current study. Five independent mean arterial pressure variants demonstrated robust evidence for transethnic replication including rs17249754 at ATP2B1 (P=7.5×10(-15)), rs2681492 at ATP2B1 (P=3.4×10(-7)), rs11191593 at NT5C2 (1.1×10(-6)), rs3824755 at CYP17A1 (P=1.2×10(-6)), and rs13149993 at FGF5 (P=2.4×10(-4)). Two additional variants showed suggestive evidence of transethnic replication (consistency in effect direction and P<0.05), including rs319690 at MAP4 (P=0.014) and rs1173771 at NPR3 (P=0.018). For pulse pressure, robust evidence of replication was identified for 2 independent variants, including rs17249754 at ATP2B1 (P=1.2×10(-5)) and rs11191593 at NT5C2 (P=1.1×10(-3)), with suggestive evidence of replication among an additional 2 variants including rs3824755 at CYP17A1 (P=6.1×10(-3)) and rs2681492 at ATP2B1 (P=9.0×10(-3)). Replicated variants demonstrated consistency in effect sizes between East Asian and European samples, with effect size differences ranging from 0.03 to 0.24 mm Hg for mean arterial pressure and from 0.03 to 0.21 mm Hg for pulse pressure. In conclusion, we present the first evidence of transethnic replication of several mean arterial and pulse pressure loci in an East Asian population.

  13. Genome-wide computational analysis reveals cardiomyocyte-specific transcriptional Cis-regulatory motifs that enable efficient cardiac gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Rincon, Melvin Y; Sarcar, Shilpita; Danso-Abeam, Dina; Keyaerts, Marleen; Matrai, Janka; Samara-Kuko, Ermira; Acosta-Sanchez, Abel; Athanasopoulos, Takis; Dickson, George; Lahoutte, Tony; De Bleser, Pieter; VandenDriessche, Thierry; Chuah, Marinee K

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy is a promising emerging therapeutic modality for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases and hereditary diseases that afflict the heart. Hence, there is a need to develop robust cardiac-specific expression modules that allow for stable expression of the gene of interest in cardiomyocytes. We therefore explored a new approach based on a genome-wide bioinformatics strategy that revealed novel cardiac-specific cis-acting regulatory modules (CS-CRMs). These transcriptional modules contained evolutionary-conserved clusters of putative transcription factor binding sites that correspond to a "molecular signature" associated with robust gene expression in the heart. We then validated these CS-CRMs in vivo using an adeno-associated viral vector serotype 9 that drives a reporter gene from a quintessential cardiac-specific α-myosin heavy chain promoter. Most de novo designed CS-CRMs resulted in a >10-fold increase in cardiac gene expression. The most robust CRMs enhanced cardiac-specific transcription 70- to 100-fold. Expression was sustained and restricted to cardiomyocytes. We then combined the most potent CS-CRM4 with a synthetic heart and muscle-specific promoter (SPc5-12) and obtained a significant 20-fold increase in cardiac gene expression compared to the cytomegalovirus promoter. This study underscores the potential of rational vector design to improve the robustness of cardiac gene therapy.

  14. Genome-Wide Analysis Reveals Novel Genes Influencing Temporal Lobe Structure with Relevance to Neurodegeneration in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Jason L.; Hua, Xue; Morra, Jonathan H.; Lee, Suh; Hibar, Derrek P.; Ho, April J.; Leow, Alex D.; Toga, Arthur W.; Sul, Jae Hoon; Kang, Hyun Min; Eskin, Eleazar; Saykin, Andrew J.; Shen, Li; Foroud, Tatiana; Pankratz, Nathan; Huentelman, Matthew J.; Craig, David W.; Gerber, Jill D.; Allen, April N.; Corneveaux, Jason J.; Stephan, Dietrich A.; Webster, Jennifer; DeChairo, Bryan M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Jack, Clifford R.; Weiner, Michael W.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2010-01-01

    In a genome-wide association study of structural brain degeneration, we mapped the 3D profile of temporal lobe volume differences in 742 brain MRI scans of Alzheimer’s disease patients, mildly impaired, and healthy elderly subjects. After searching 546,314 genomic markers, 2 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were associated with bilateral temporal lobe volume (P < 5×10−7). One SNP, rs10845840, is located in the GRIN2B gene which encodes the N-Methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor NR2B subunit. This protein - involved in learning and memory, and excitotoxic cell death - has age-dependent prevalence in the synapse and is already a therapeutic target in Alzheimer’s disease. Risk alleles for lower temporal lobe volume at this SNP were significantly over-represented in AD and MCI subjects versus controls (odds ratio = 1.273; P = 0.039) and were associated with the mini-mental state exam (MMSE; t = −2.114; P = 0.035) demonstrating a negative effect on global cognitive function. Voxelwise maps of genetic association of this SNP with regional brain volumes, revealed intense temporal lobe effects (FDR correction at q = 0.05; critical P = 0.0257). This study uses large-scale brain mapping for gene discovery with implications for Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:20197096

  15. Genome-wide Computational Analysis Reveals Cardiomyocyte-specific Transcriptional Cis-regulatory Motifs That Enable Efficient Cardiac Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rincon, Melvin Y; Sarcar, Shilpita; Danso-Abeam, Dina; Keyaerts, Marleen; Matrai, Janka; Samara-Kuko, Ermira; Acosta-Sanchez, Abel; Athanasopoulos, Takis; Dickson, George; Lahoutte, Tony; De Bleser, Pieter; VandenDriessche, Thierry; Chuah, Marinee K

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy is a promising emerging therapeutic modality for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases and hereditary diseases that afflict the heart. Hence, there is a need to develop robust cardiac-specific expression modules that allow for stable expression of the gene of interest in cardiomyocytes. We therefore explored a new approach based on a genome-wide bioinformatics strategy that revealed novel cardiac-specific cis-acting regulatory modules (CS-CRMs). These transcriptional modules contained evolutionary-conserved clusters of putative transcription factor binding sites that correspond to a “molecular signature” associated with robust gene expression in the heart. We then validated these CS-CRMs in vivo using an adeno-associated viral vector serotype 9 that drives a reporter gene from a quintessential cardiac-specific α-myosin heavy chain promoter. Most de novo designed CS-CRMs resulted in a >10-fold increase in cardiac gene expression. The most robust CRMs enhanced cardiac-specific transcription 70- to 100-fold. Expression was sustained and restricted to cardiomyocytes. We then combined the most potent CS-CRM4 with a synthetic heart and muscle-specific promoter (SPc5-12) and obtained a significant 20-fold increase in cardiac gene expression compared to the cytomegalovirus promoter. This study underscores the potential of rational vector design to improve the robustness of cardiac gene therapy. PMID:25195597

  16. Genome-Wide Analysis Reveals Loci Encoding Anti-Macrophage Factors in the Human Pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei K96243

    PubMed Central

    Dowling, Andrea J.; Wilkinson, Paul A.; Holden, Matthew T. G.; Quail, Michael A.; Bentley, Stephen D.; Reger, Julia; Waterfield, Nicholas R.; Titball, Richard W.; ffrench-Constant, Richard H.

    2010-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is an important human pathogen whose infection biology is still poorly understood. The bacterium is endemic to tropical regions, including South East Asia and Northern Australia, where it causes melioidosis, a serious disease associated with both high mortality and antibiotic resistance. B. pseudomallei is a Gram-negative facultative intracellular pathogen that is able to replicate in macrophages. However despite the critical nature of its interaction with macrophages, few anti-macrophage factors have been characterized to date. Here we perform a genome-wide gain of function screen of B. pseudomallei strain K96243 to identify loci encoding factors with anti-macrophage activity. We identify a total of 113 such loci scattered across both chromosomes, with positive gene clusters encoding transporters and secretion systems, enzymes/toxins, secondary metabolite, biofilm, adhesion and signal response related factors. Further phenotypic analysis of four of these regions shows that the encoded factors cause striking cellular phenotypes relevant to infection biology, including apoptosis, formation of actin ‘tails’ and multi-nucleation within treated macrophages. The detailed analysis of the remaining host of loci will facilitate genetic dissection of the interaction of this important pathogen with host macrophages and thus further elucidate this critical part of its infection cycle. PMID:21203527

  17. Genome-Wide Analysis in German Shepherd Dogs Reveals Association of a Locus on CFA 27 with Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Tengvall, Katarina; Kierczak, Marcin; Bergvall, Kerstin; Olsson, Mia; Frankowiack, Marcel; Farias, Fabiana H. G.; Pielberg, Gerli; Carlborg, Örjan; Leeb, Tosso; Andersson, Göran; Hammarström, Lennart; Hedhammar, Åke; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin

    2013-01-01

    Humans and dogs are both affected by the allergic skin disease atopic dermatitis (AD), caused by an interaction between genetic and environmental factors. The German shepherd dog (GSD) is a high-risk breed for canine AD (CAD). In this study, we used a Swedish cohort of GSDs as a model for human AD. Serum IgA levels are known to be lower in GSDs compared to other breeds. We detected significantly lower IgA levels in the CAD cases compared to controls (p = 1.1×10−5) in our study population. We also detected a separation within the GSD cohort, where dogs could be grouped into two different subpopulations. Disease prevalence differed significantly between the subpopulations contributing to population stratification (λ = 1.3), which was successfully corrected for using a mixed model approach. A genome-wide association analysis of CAD was performed (n cases = 91, n controls = 88). IgA levels were included in the model, due to the high correlation between CAD and low IgA levels. In addition, we detected a correlation between IgA levels and the age at the time of sampling (corr = 0.42, p = 3.0×10−9), thus age was included in the model. A genome-wide significant association was detected on chromosome 27 (praw = 3.1×10−7, pgenome = 0.03). The total associated region was defined as a ∼1.5-Mb-long haplotype including eight genes. Through targeted re-sequencing and additional genotyping of a subset of identified SNPs, we defined 11 smaller haplotype blocks within the associated region. Two blocks showed the strongest association to CAD. The ∼209-kb region, defined by the two blocks, harbors only the PKP2 gene, encoding Plakophilin 2 expressed in the desmosomes and important for skin structure. Our results may yield further insight into the genetics behind both canine and human AD. PMID:23671420

  18. Genome-wide Association Analysis of Psoriatic Arthritis and Cutaneous Psoriasis Reveals Differences in Their Genetic Architecture.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Philip E; Nair, Rajan P; Tsoi, Lam C; Tejasvi, Trilokraj; Das, Sayantan; Kang, Hyun Min; Ellinghaus, Eva; Chandran, Vinod; Callis-Duffin, Kristina; Ike, Robert; Li, Yanming; Wen, Xiaoquan; Enerbäck, Charlotta; Gudjonsson, Johann E; Kõks, Sulev; Kingo, Külli; Esko, Tõnu; Mrowietz, Ulrich; Reis, Andre; Wichmann, H Erich; Gieger, Christian; Hoffmann, Per; Nöthen, Markus M; Winkelmann, Juliane; Kunz, Manfred; Moreta, Elvia G; Mease, Philip J; Ritchlin, Christopher T; Bowcock, Anne M; Krueger, Gerald G; Lim, Henry W; Weidinger, Stephan; Weichenthal, Michael; Voorhees, John J; Rahman, Proton; Gregersen, Peter K; Franke, Andre; Gladman, Dafna D; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Elder, James T

    2015-12-03

    Psoriasis vulgaris (PsV) is a common inflammatory and hyperproliferative skin disease. Up to 30% of people with PsV eventually develop psoriatic arthritis (PsA), an inflammatory musculoskeletal condition. To discern differences in genetic risk factors for PsA and cutaneous-only psoriasis (PsC), we carried out a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 1,430 PsA case subjects and 1,417 unaffected control subjects. Meta-analysis of this study with three other GWASs and two targeted genotyping studies, encompassing a total of 9,293 PsV case subjects, 3,061 PsA case subjects, 3,110 PsC case subjects, and 13,670 unaffected control subjects of European descent, detected 10 regions associated with PsA and 11 with PsC at genome-wide (GW) significance. Several of these association signals (IFNLR1, IFIH1, NFKBIA for PsA; TNFRSF9, LCE3C/B, TRAF3IP2, IL23A, NFKBIA for PsC) have not previously achieved GW significance. After replication, we also identified a PsV-associated SNP near CDKAL1 (rs4712528, odds ratio [OR] = 1.16, p = 8.4 × 10(-11)). Among identified psoriasis risk variants, three were more strongly associated with PsC than PsA (rs12189871 near HLA-C, p = 5.0 × 10(-19); rs4908742 near TNFRSF9, p = 0.00020; rs10888503 near LCE3A, p = 0.0014), and two were more strongly associated with PsA than PsC (rs12044149 near IL23R, p = 0.00018; rs9321623 near TNFAIP3, p = 0.00022). The PsA-specific variants were independent of previously identified psoriasis variants near IL23R and TNFAIP3. We also found multiple independent susceptibility variants in the IL12B, NOS2, and IFIH1 regions. These results provide insights into the pathogenetic similarities and differences between PsC and PsA.

  19. Genome-wide Association Analysis of Psoriatic Arthritis and Cutaneous Psoriasis Reveals Differences in Their Genetic Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, Philip E.; Nair, Rajan P.; Tsoi, Lam C.; Tejasvi, Trilokraj; Das, Sayantan; Kang, Hyun Min; Ellinghaus, Eva; Chandran, Vinod; Callis-Duffin, Kristina; Ike, Robert; Li, Yanming; Wen, Xiaoquan; Enerbäck, Charlotta; Gudjonsson, Johann E.; Kõks, Sulev; Kingo, Külli; Esko, Tõnu; Mrowietz, Ulrich; Reis, Andre; Wichmann, H. Erich; Gieger, Christian; Hoffmann, Per; Nöthen, Markus M.; Winkelmann, Juliane; Kunz, Manfred; Moreta, Elvia G.; Mease, Philip J.; Ritchlin, Christopher T.; Bowcock, Anne M.; Krueger, Gerald G.; Lim, Henry W.; Weidinger, Stephan; Weichenthal, Michael; Voorhees, John J.; Rahman, Proton; Gregersen, Peter K.; Franke, Andre; Gladman, Dafna D.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Elder, James T.

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis vulgaris (PsV) is a common inflammatory and hyperproliferative skin disease. Up to 30% of people with PsV eventually develop psoriatic arthritis (PsA), an inflammatory musculoskeletal condition. To discern differences in genetic risk factors for PsA and cutaneous-only psoriasis (PsC), we carried out a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 1,430 PsA case subjects and 1,417 unaffected control subjects. Meta-analysis of this study with three other GWASs and two targeted genotyping studies, encompassing a total of 9,293 PsV case subjects, 3,061 PsA case subjects, 3,110 PsC case subjects, and 13,670 unaffected control subjects of European descent, detected 10 regions associated with PsA and 11 with PsC at genome-wide (GW) significance. Several of these association signals (IFNLR1, IFIH1, NFKBIA for PsA; TNFRSF9, LCE3C/B, TRAF3IP2, IL23A, NFKBIA for PsC) have not previously achieved GW significance. After replication, we also identified a PsV-associated SNP near CDKAL1 (rs4712528, odds ratio [OR] = 1.16, p = 8.4 × 10−11). Among identified psoriasis risk variants, three were more strongly associated with PsC than PsA (rs12189871 near HLA-C, p = 5.0 × 10−19; rs4908742 near TNFRSF9, p = 0.00020; rs10888503 near LCE3A, p = 0.0014), and two were more strongly associated with PsA than PsC (rs12044149 near IL23R, p = 0.00018; rs9321623 near TNFAIP3, p = 0.00022). The PsA-specific variants were independent of previously identified psoriasis variants near IL23R and TNFAIP3. We also found multiple independent susceptibility variants in the IL12B, NOS2, and IFIH1 regions. These results provide insights into the pathogenetic similarities and differences between PsC and PsA. PMID:26626624

  20. Genome-wide location analysis reveals distinct transcriptional circuitry by paralogous regulators Foxa1 and Foxa2.

    PubMed

    Bochkis, Irina M; Schug, Jonathan; Ye, Diana Z; Kurinna, Svitlana; Stratton, Sabrina A; Barton, Michelle C; Kaestner, Klaus H

    2012-01-01

    Gene duplication is a powerful driver of evolution. Newly duplicated genes acquire new roles that are relevant to fitness, or they will be lost over time. A potential path to functional relevance is mutation of the coding sequence leading to the acquisition of novel biochemical properties, as analyzed here for the highly homologous paralogs Foxa1 and Foxa2 transcriptional regulators. We determine by genome-wide location analysis (ChIP-Seq) that, although Foxa1 and Foxa2 share a large fraction of binding sites in the liver, each protein also occupies distinct regulatory elements in vivo. Foxa1-only sites are enriched for p53 binding sites and are frequently found near genes important to cell cycle regulation, while Foxa2-restricted sites show only a limited match to the forkhead consensus and are found in genes involved in steroid and lipid metabolism. Thus, Foxa1 and Foxa2, while redundant during development, have evolved divergent roles in the adult liver, ensuring the maintenance of both genes during evolution.

  1. Genome-Wide Location Analysis Reveals Distinct Transcriptional Circuitry by Paralogous Regulators Foxa1 and Foxa2

    PubMed Central

    Bochkis, Irina M.; Schug, Jonathan; Ye, Diana Z.; Kurinna, Svitlana; Stratton, Sabrina A.; Barton, Michelle C.; Kaestner, Klaus H.

    2012-01-01

    Gene duplication is a powerful driver of evolution. Newly duplicated genes acquire new roles that are relevant to fitness, or they will be lost over time. A potential path to functional relevance is mutation of the coding sequence leading to the acquisition of novel biochemical properties, as analyzed here for the highly homologous paralogs Foxa1 and Foxa2 transcriptional regulators. We determine by genome-wide location analysis (ChIP-Seq) that, although Foxa1 and Foxa2 share a large fraction of binding sites in the liver, each protein also occupies distinct regulatory elements in vivo. Foxa1-only sites are enriched for p53 binding sites and are frequently found near genes important to cell cycle regulation, while Foxa2-restricted sites show only a limited match to the forkhead consensus and are found in genes involved in steroid and lipid metabolism. Thus, Foxa1 and Foxa2, while redundant during development, have evolved divergent roles in the adult liver, ensuring the maintenance of both genes during evolution. PMID:22737085

  2. Cross-Cancer Genome-Wide Analysis of Lung, Ovary, Breast, Prostate, and Colorectal Cancer Reveals Novel Pleiotropic Associations.

    PubMed

    Fehringer, Gordon; Kraft, Peter; Pharoah, Paul D; Eeles, Rosalind A; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Lindström, Sara; Brennan, Paul; Bickeböller, Heike; Houlston, Richard S; Landi, Maria Teresa; Caporaso, Neil; Risch, Angela; Amin Al Olama, Ali; Berndt, Sonja I; Giovannucci, Edward L; Grönberg, Henrik; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Ma, Jing; Muir, Kenneth; Stampfer, Meir J; Stevens, Victoria L; Wiklund, Fredrik; Willett, Walter C; Goode, Ellen L; Permuth, Jennifer B; Risch, Harvey A; Reid, Brett M; Bezieau, Stephane; Brenner, Hermann; Chan, Andrew T; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hudson, Thomas J; Kocarnik, Jonathan K; Newcomb, Polly A; Schoen, Robert E; Slattery, Martha L; White, Emily; Adank, Muriel A; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Baglietto, Laura; Blomquist, Carl; Canzian, Federico; Czene, Kamila; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Eliassen, A Heather; Figueroa, Jonine D; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Gaudet, Mia M; Johnson, Nichola; Hall, Per; Hazra, Aditi; Hein, Rebecca; Hofman, Albert; Hopper, John L; Irwanto, Astrid; Johansson, Mattias; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Lichtner, Peter; Liu, Jianjun; Lund, Eiliv; Makalic, Enes; Meindl, Alfons; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Muranen, Taru A; Nevanlinna, Heli; Peeters, Petra H; Peto, Julian; Prentice, Ross L; Rahman, Nazneen; Sanchez, Maria Jose; Schmidt, Daniel F; Schmutzler, Rita K; Southey, Melissa C; Tamimi, Rulla; Travis, Ruth C; Turnbull, Clare; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Wang, Zhaoming; Whittemore, Alice S; Yang, Xiaohong R; Zheng, Wei; Buchanan, Daniel D; Casey, Graham; Conti, David V; Edlund, Christopher K; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W; Jenkins, Mark; Le Marchand, Loïc; Li, Li; Lindor, Noralene M; Schmit, Stephanie L; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Woods, Michael O; Rafnar, Thorunn; Gudmundsson, Julius; Stacey, Simon N; Stefansson, Kari; Sulem, Patrick; Chen, Y Ann; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Christiani, David C; Wei, Yongyue; Shen, Hongbing; Hu, Zhibin; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shiraishi, Kouya; Takahashi, Atsushi; Bossé, Yohan; Obeidat, Ma'en; Nickle, David; Timens, Wim; Freedman, Matthew L; Li, Qiyuan; Seminara, Daniela; Chanock, Stephen J; Gong, Jian; Peters, Ulrike; Gruber, Stephen B; Amos, Christopher I; Sellers, Thomas A; Easton, Douglas F; Hunter, David J; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Hung, Rayjean J

    2016-09-01

    Identifying genetic variants with pleiotropic associations can uncover common pathways influencing multiple cancers. We took a two-stage approach to conduct genome-wide association studies for lung, ovary, breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer from the GAME-ON/GECCO Network (61,851 cases, 61,820 controls) to identify pleiotropic loci. Findings were replicated in independent association studies (55,789 cases, 330,490 controls). We identified a novel pleiotropic association at 1q22 involving breast and lung squamous cell carcinoma, with eQTL analysis showing an association with ADAM15/THBS3 gene expression in lung. We also identified a known breast cancer locus CASP8/ALS2CR12 associated with prostate cancer, a known cancer locus at CDKN2B-AS1 with different variants associated with lung adenocarcinoma and prostate cancer, and confirmed the associations of a breast BRCA2 locus with lung and serous ovarian cancer. This is the largest study to date examining pleiotropy across multiple cancer-associated loci, identifying common mechanisms of cancer development and progression. Cancer Res; 76(17); 5103-14. ©2016 AACR.

  3. Cross-cancer genome-wide analysis of lung, ovary, breast, prostate and colorectal cancer reveals novel pleiotropic associations

    PubMed Central

    Fehringer, Gordon; Kraft, Peter; Pharoah, Paul D.; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Schumacher, Fred; Schildkraut, Joellen; Lindström, Sara; Brennan, Paul; Bickeböller, Heike; Houlston, Richard S.; Landi, Maria Teresa; Caporaso, Neil; Risch, Angela; Olama, Ali Amin Al; Berndt, Sonja I; Giovannucci, Edward; Grönberg, Henrik; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Ma, Jing; Muir, Kenneth; Stampfer, Meir; Stevens, Victoria L.; Wiklund, Fredrik; Willett, Walter; Goode, Ellen L.; Permuth, Jennifer; Risch, Harvey A.; Reid, Brett M.; Bezieau, Stephane; Brenner, Hermann; Chan, Andrew T.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hudson, Thomas J.; Kocarnik, Jonathan K.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Schoen, Robert E.; Slattery, Martha L.; White, Emily; Adank, Muriel A.; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Baglietto, Laura; Blomquist, Carl; Canzian, Federico; Czene, Kamila; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Eliassen, A. Heather; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Gaudet, Mia M.; Johnson, Nichola; Hall, Per; Hazra, Aditi; Hein, Rebecca; Hofman, Albert; Hopper, John L.; Irwanto, Astrid; Johansson, Mattias; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kibriya, Muhammad G.; Lichtner, Peter; Liu, Jianjun; Lund, Eiliv; Makalic, Enes; Meindl, Alfons; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Muranen, Taru A.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Peeters, Petra H.; Peto, Julian; Prentice, Ross L.; Rahman, Nazneen; Sanchez, Maria Jose; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Southey, Melissa C.; Tamimi, Rulla; Travis, Ruth C.; Turnbull, Clare; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Wang, Zhaoming; Whittemore, Alice S.; Yang, Xiaohong R.; Zheng, Wei; Rafnar, Thorunn; Gudmundsson, Julius; Stacey, Simon N.; Stefansson, Kari; Sulem, Patrick; Chen, Y. Ann; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Christiani, David C.; Wei, Yongyue; Shen, Hongbing; Hu, Zhibin; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shiraishi, Kouya; Takahashi, Atsushi; Bossé, Yohan; Obeidat, Ma’en; Nickle, David; Timens, Wim; Freedman, Matthew L.; Li, Qiyuan; Seminara, Daniela; Chanock, Stephen J.; Gong, Jian; Peters, Ulrike; Gruber, Stephen B.; Amos, Christopher I.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Hunter, David J.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Hung, Rayjean J.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying genetic variants with pleiotropic associations can uncover common pathways influencing multiple cancers. We took a two-staged approach to conduct genome-wide association studies for lung, ovary, breast, prostate and colorectal cancer from the GAME-ON/GECCO Network (61,851 cases, 61,820 controls) to identify pleiotropic loci. Findings were replicated in independent association studies (55,789 cases, 330,490 controls). We identified a novel pleiotropic association at 1q22 involving breast and lung squamous cell carcinoma, with eQTL analysis showing an association with ADAM15/THBS3 gene expression in lung. We also identified a known breast cancer locus CASP8/ALS2CR12 associated with prostate cancer, a known cancer locus at CDKN2B-AS1 with different variants associated with lung adenocarcinoma and prostate cancer and confirmed the associations of a breast BRCA2 locus with lung and serous ovarian cancer. This is the largest study to date examining pleiotropy across multiple cancer-associated loci, identifying common mechanisms of cancer development and progression. PMID:27197191

  4. Genome-Wide Analysis of PDZ Domain Binding Reveals Inherent Functional Overlap within the PDZ Interaction Network

    PubMed Central

    te Velthuis, Aartjan J. W.; Sakalis, Philippe A.; Fowler, Donald A.; Bagowski, Christoph P.

    2011-01-01

    Binding selectivity and cross-reactivity within one of the largest and most abundant interaction domain families, the PDZ family, has long been enigmatic. The complete human PDZ domain complement (the PDZome) consists of 267 domains and we applied here a Bayesian selectivity model to predict hundreds of human PDZ domain interactions, using target sequences of 22,997 non-redundant proteins. Subsequent analysis of these binding scores shows that PDZs can be divided into two genome-wide clusters that coincide well with the division between canonical class 1 and 2 PDZs. Within the class 1 PDZs we observed binding overlap at unprecedented levels, mediated by two residues at positions 1 and 5 of the second α-helix of the binding pocket. Eight PDZ domains were subsequently selected for experimental binding studies and to verify the basics of our predictions. Overall, the PDZ domain class 1 cross-reactivity identified here implies that auxiliary mechanisms must be in place to overcome this inherent functional overlap and to minimize cross-selectivity within the living cell. Indeed, when we superimpose PDZ domain binding affinities with gene ontologies, network topology data and the domain position within a PDZ superfamily protein, functional overlap is minimized and PDZ domains position optimally in the binding space. We therefore propose that PDZ domain selectivity is achieved through cellular context rather than inherent binding specificity. PMID:21283644

  5. Genome-Wide Analysis of the Expansin Gene Superfamily Reveals Grapevine-Specific Structural and Functional Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Tornielli, Giovanni Battista; Fasoli, Marianna; Venturini, Luca; Pezzotti, Mario; Zenoni, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Background Expansins are proteins that loosen plant cell walls in a pH-dependent manner, probably by increasing the relative movement among polymers thus causing irreversible expansion. The expansin superfamily (EXP) comprises four distinct families: expansin A (EXPA), expansin B (EXPB), expansin-like A (EXLA) and expansin-like B (EXLB). There is experimental evidence that EXPA and EXPB proteins are required for cell expansion and developmental processes involving cell wall modification, whereas the exact functions of EXLA and EXLB remain unclear. The complete grapevine (Vitis vinifera) genome sequence has allowed the characterization of many gene families, but an exhaustive genome-wide analysis of expansin gene expression has not been attempted thus far. Methodology/Principal Findings We identified 29 EXP superfamily genes in the grapevine genome, representing all four EXP families. Members of the same EXP family shared the same exon–intron structure, and phylogenetic analysis confirmed a closer relationship between EXP genes from woody species, i.e. grapevine and poplar (Populus trichocarpa), compared to those from Arabidopsis thaliana and rice (Oryza sativa). We also identified grapevine-specific duplication events involving the EXLB family. Global gene expression analysis confirmed a strong correlation among EXP genes expressed in mature and green/vegetative samples, respectively, as reported for other gene families in the recently-published grapevine gene expression atlas. We also observed the specific co-expression of EXLB genes in woody organs, and the involvement of certain grapevine EXP genes in berry development and post-harvest withering. Conclusion Our comprehensive analysis of the grapevine EXP superfamily confirmed and extended current knowledge about the structural and functional characteristics of this gene family, and also identified properties that are currently unique to grapevine expansin genes. Our data provide a model for the functional

  6. Genome-wide regulatory analysis reveals T-bet controls Th17 lineage differentiation through direct suppression of IRF41

    PubMed Central

    Gökmen, M. Refik; Dong, Rong; Kanhere, Aditi; Powell, Nick; Perucha, Esperanza; Jackson, Ian; Howard, Jane K.; Hernandez-Fuentes, Maria; Jenner, Richard G.; Lord, Graham M.

    2013-01-01

    The complex relationship between Th1 and Th17 cells is incompletely understood. The transcription factor T-bet is best known as the master regulator of Th1 lineage commitment. However, attention is now focused on the repression of alternate T cell subsets mediated by T-bet, particularly the Th17 lineage. It has recently been suggested that pathogenic Th17 cells express T-bet and are dependent on IL-23. However, T-bet has previously been shown to be a negative regulator of Th17 cells. We have taken an unbiased approach to determine the functional impact of T-bet on Th17 lineage commitment. Genome-wide analysis of functional T-bet binding sites provides an improved understanding of the transcriptional regulation mediated by T-bet, and suggests novel mechanisms by which T-bet regulates T helper cell differentiation. Specifically, we show that T-bet negatively regulates Th17 lineage commitment via direct repression of the transcription factor interferon regulatory factor-4 (IRF4). An in vivo analysis of the pathogenicity of T-bet deficient T cells demonstrated that mucosal Th17 responses were augmented in the absence of T-bet, and we have demonstrated that the role of T-bet in enforcing Th1 responses and suppressing Th17 responses are separable. The interaction of the two key transcription factors T-bet and IRF4 during the determination of T cell fate choice significantly advances our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the development of pathogenic T cells. PMID:24249732

  7. Genome-wide analysis reveals artificial selection on coat colour and reproductive traits in Chinese domestic pigs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Wang, Hongyang; Zhang, Yu; Tang, Zhonglin; Li, Kui; Liu, Bang

    2015-03-01

    Pigs from Asia and Europe were independently domesticated from c. 9000 years ago. During this period, strong artificial selection has led to dramatic phenotypic changes in domestic pigs. However, the genetic basis underlying these morphological and behavioural adaptations is relatively unknown, particularly for indigenous Chinese pigs. Here, we performed a genome-wide analysis to screen 196 regions with selective sweep signals in Tongcheng pigs, which are a typical indigenous Chinese breed. Genes located in these regions have been found to be involved in lipid metabolism, melanocyte differentiation, neural development and other biological processes, which coincide with the evolutionary phenotypic changes in this breed. A synonymous substitution, c.669T>C, in ESR1, which colocalizes with a major quantitative trait locus for litter size, shows extreme differences in allele frequency between Tongcheng pigs and wild boars. Notably, the variant C allele in this locus exhibits high allele frequency in most Chinese populations, suggesting a consequence of positive selection. Five genes (PRM1, PRM2, TNP2, GPR149 and JMJD1C) related to reproductive traits were found to have high haplotype similarity in Chinese breeds. Two selected genes, MITF and EDNRB, are implied to shape the two-end black colour trait in Tongcheng pig. Subsequent SNP microarray studies of five Chinese white-spotted breeds displayed a concordant signature at both loci, suggesting that these two genes are responsible for colour variations in Chinese breeds. Utilizing massively parallel sequencing, we characterized the candidate sites that adapt to artificial and environmental selections during the Chinese pig domestication. This study provides fundamental proof for further research on the evolutionary adaptation of Chinese pigs.

  8. Genome-wide analysis of redox reactions reveals metabolic engineering targets for D-lactate overproduction in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Ju; Hou, Bo Kyeng; Lee, Sung Gun; Kim, Joong Su; Lee, Dong-Woo; Lee, Sang Jun

    2013-07-01

    Most current metabolic engineering applications rely on the inactivation of unwanted reactions and the amplification of product-oriented reactions. All of the biochemical reactions involved with cellular metabolism are tightly coordinated with the electron flow, which depends on the cellular energy status. Thus, the cellular metabolic flux can be controlled either by modulation of the electron flow or the regulation of redox reactions. This study analyzed the genome-wide anaerobic fermentation products of 472 Escherichia coli single gene knockouts, which comprised mainly of dehydrogenases, oxidoreductases, and redox-related proteins. Many metabolic pathways that were located far from anaerobic mixed-acid fermentation significantly affected the profiles of lactic acid, succinic acid, acetic acid, formic acid, and ethanol. Unexpectedly, D-lactate overproduction was determined by a single gene deletion in dehydrogenases (e.g., guaB, pyrD, and serA) involved with nucleotide and amino acid metabolism. Furthermore, the combined knockouts of guaB, pyrD, serA, fnr, arcA, or arcB genes, which are involved with anaerobic transcription regulation, enhanced D-lactate overproduction. These results suggest that the anaerobic fermentation profiles of E. coli can be tuned via the disruption of peripheral dehydrogenases in anaerobic conditions.

  9. Genome-wide RNAi analysis reveals that simultaneous inhibition of specific mevalonate pathway genes potentiates tumor cell death.

    PubMed

    Pandyra, Aleksandra A; Mullen, Peter J; Goard, Carolyn A; Ericson, Elke; Sharma, Piyush; Kalkat, Manpreet; Yu, Rosemary; Pong, Janice T; Brown, Kevin R; Hart, Traver; Gebbia, Marinella; Lang, Karl S; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey; Moffat, Jason; Penn, Linda Z

    2015-09-29

    The mevalonate (MVA) pathway is often dysregulated or overexpressed in many cancers suggesting tumor dependency on this classic metabolic pathway. Statins, which target the rate-limiting enzyme of this pathway, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR), are promising agents currently being evaluated in clinical trials for anti-cancer efficacy. To uncover novel targets that potentiate statin-induced apoptosis when knocked down, we carried out a pooled genome-wide short hairpin RNA (shRNA) screen. Genes of the MVA pathway were amongst the top-scoring targets, including sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor 2 (SREBP2), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase 1 (HMGCS1) and geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase 1 (GGPS1). Each gene was independently validated and shown to significantly sensitize A549 cells to statin-induced apoptosis when knocked down. SREBP2 knockdown in lung and breast cancer cells completely abrogated the fluvastatin-induced upregulation of sterol-responsive genes HMGCR and HMGCS1. Knockdown of SREBP2 alone did not affect three-dimensional growth of lung and breast cancer cells, yet in combination with fluvastatin cell growth was disrupted. Taken together, these results show that directly targeting multiple levels of the MVA pathway, including blocking the sterol-feedback loop initiated by statin treatment, is an effective and targetable anti-tumor strategy.

  10. Genome-wide RNAi analysis reveals that simultaneous inhibition of specific mevalonate pathway genes potentiates tumor cell death

    PubMed Central

    Pandyra, Aleksandra A.; Mullen, Peter J.; Goard, Carolyn A.; Ericson, Elke; Sharma, Piyush; Kalkat, Manpreet; Yu, Rosemary; Pong, Janice T.; Brown, Kevin R.; Hart, Traver; Gebbia, Marinella; Lang, Karl S.; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey; Moffat, Jason; Penn, Linda Z.

    2015-01-01

    The mevalonate (MVA) pathway is often dysregulated or overexpressed in many cancers suggesting tumor dependency on this classic metabolic pathway. Statins, which target the rate-limiting enzyme of this pathway, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR), are promising agents currently being evaluated in clinical trials for anti-cancer efficacy. To uncover novel targets that potentiate statin-induced apoptosis when knocked down, we carried out a pooled genome-wide short hairpin RNA (shRNA) screen. Genes of the MVA pathway were amongst the top-scoring targets, including sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor 2 (SREBP2), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase 1 (HMGCS1) and geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase 1 (GGPS1). Each gene was independently validated and shown to significantly sensitize A549 cells to statin-induced apoptosis when knocked down. SREBP2 knockdown in lung and breast cancer cells completely abrogated the fluvastatin-induced upregulation of sterol-responsive genes HMGCR and HMGCS1. Knockdown of SREBP2 alone did not affect three-dimensional growth of lung and breast cancer cells, yet in combination with fluvastatin cell growth was disrupted. Taken together, these results show that directly targeting multiple levels of the MVA pathway, including blocking the sterol-feedback loop initiated by statin treatment, is an effective and targetable anti-tumor strategy. PMID:26353928

  11. Genome-wide analysis reveals signatures of selection for important traits in domestic sheep from different ecoregions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhaohua; Ji, Zhibin; Wang, Guizhi; Chao, Tianle; Hou, Lei; Wang, Jianmin

    2016-11-03

    Throughout a long period of adaptation and selection, sheep have thrived in a diverse range of ecological environments. Mongolian sheep is the common ancestor of the Chinese short fat-tailed sheep. Migration to different ecoregions leads to changes in selection pressures and results in microevolution. Mongolian sheep and its subspecies differ in a number of important traits, especially reproductive traits. Genome-wide intraspecific variation is required to dissect the genetic basis of these traits. This research resequenced 3 short fat-tailed sheep breeds with a 43.2-fold coverage of the sheep genome. We report more than 17 million single nucleotide polymorphisms and 2.9 million indels and identify 143 genomic regions with reduced pooled heterozygosity or increased genetic distance to each other breed that represent likely targets for selection during the migration. These regions harbor genes related to developmental processes, cellular processes, multicellular organismal processes, biological regulation, metabolic processes, reproduction, localization, growth and various components of the stress responses. Furthermore, we examined the haplotype diversity of 3 genomic regions involved in reproduction and found significant differences in TSHR and PRL gene regions among 8 sheep breeds. Our results provide useful genomic information for identifying genes or causal mutations associated with important economic traits in sheep and for understanding the genetic basis of adaptation to different ecological environments.

  12. Genome Wide Analysis Reveals Zic3 Interaction with Distal Regulatory Elements of Stage Specific Developmental Genes in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vibhor; Srinivasan, Kandhadayar G.; Orlov, Yuriy; Ravishankar, Ashwini; Prabhakar, Shyam; Stanton, Lawrence W.; Korzh, Vladimir; Mathavan, Sinnakaruppan

    2013-01-01

    Zic3 regulates early embryonic patterning in vertebrates. Loss of Zic3 function is known to disrupt gastrulation, left-right patterning, and neurogenesis. However, molecular events downstream of this transcription factor are poorly characterized. Here we use the zebrafish as a model to study the developmental role of Zic3 in vivo, by applying a combination of two powerful genomics approaches – ChIP-seq and microarray. Besides confirming direct regulation of previously implicated Zic3 targets of the Nodal and canonical Wnt pathways, analysis of gastrula stage embryos uncovered a number of novel candidate target genes, among which were members of the non-canonical Wnt pathway and the neural pre-pattern genes. A similar analysis in zic3-expressing cells obtained by FACS at segmentation stage revealed a dramatic shift in Zic3 binding site locations and identified an entirely distinct set of target genes associated with later developmental functions such as neural development. We demonstrate cis-regulation of several of these target genes by Zic3 using in vivo enhancer assay. Analysis of Zic3 binding sites revealed a distribution biased towards distal intergenic regions, indicative of a long distance regulatory mechanism; some of these binding sites are highly conserved during evolution and act as functional enhancers. This demonstrated that Zic3 regulation of developmental genes is achieved predominantly through long distance regulatory mechanism and revealed that developmental transitions could be accompanied by dramatic changes in regulatory landscape. PMID:24204288

  13. Genome wide analysis reveals Zic3 interaction with distal regulatory elements of stage specific developmental genes in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Winata, Cecilia L; Kondrychyn, Igor; Kumar, Vibhor; Srinivasan, Kandhadayar G; Orlov, Yuriy; Ravishankar, Ashwini; Prabhakar, Shyam; Stanton, Lawrence W; Korzh, Vladimir; Mathavan, Sinnakaruppan

    2013-10-01

    Zic3 regulates early embryonic patterning in vertebrates. Loss of Zic3 function is known to disrupt gastrulation, left-right patterning, and neurogenesis. However, molecular events downstream of this transcription factor are poorly characterized. Here we use the zebrafish as a model to study the developmental role of Zic3 in vivo, by applying a combination of two powerful genomics approaches--ChIP-seq and microarray. Besides confirming direct regulation of previously implicated Zic3 targets of the Nodal and canonical Wnt pathways, analysis of gastrula stage embryos uncovered a number of novel candidate target genes, among which were members of the non-canonical Wnt pathway and the neural pre-pattern genes. A similar analysis in zic3-expressing cells obtained by FACS at segmentation stage revealed a dramatic shift in Zic3 binding site locations and identified an entirely distinct set of target genes associated with later developmental functions such as neural development. We demonstrate cis-regulation of several of these target genes by Zic3 using in vivo enhancer assay. Analysis of Zic3 binding sites revealed a distribution biased towards distal intergenic regions, indicative of a long distance regulatory mechanism; some of these binding sites are highly conserved during evolution and act as functional enhancers. This demonstrated that Zic3 regulation of developmental genes is achieved predominantly through long distance regulatory mechanism and revealed that developmental transitions could be accompanied by dramatic changes in regulatory landscape.

  14. Genome-wide analysis of tandem repeats in Tribolium castaneum genome reveals abundant and highly dynamic tandem repeat families with satellite DNA features in euchromatic chromosomal arms.

    PubMed

    Pavlek, Martina; Gelfand, Yevgeniy; Plohl, Miroslav; Meštrović, Nevenka

    2015-12-01

    Although satellite DNAs are well-explored components of heterochromatin and centromeres, little is known about emergence, dispersal and possible impact of comparably structured tandem repeats (TRs) on the genome-wide scale. Our bioinformatics analysis of assembled Tribolium castaneum genome disclosed significant contribution of TRs in euchromatic chromosomal arms and clear predominance of satellite DNA-typical 170 bp monomers in arrays of ≥5 repeats. By applying different experimental approaches, we revealed that the nine most prominent TR families Cast1-Cast9 extracted from the assembly comprise ∼4.3% of the entire genome and reside almost exclusively in euchromatic regions. Among them, seven families that build ∼3.9% of the genome are based on ∼170 and ∼340 bp long monomers. Results of phylogenetic analyses of 2500 monomers originating from these families show high-sequence dynamics, evident by extensive exchanges between arrays on non-homologous chromosomes. In addition, our analysis shows that concerted evolution acts more efficiently on longer than on shorter arrays. Efficient genome-wide distribution of nine TR families implies the role of transposition only in expansion of the most dispersed family, and involvement of other mechanisms is anticipated. Despite similarities in sequence features, FISH experiments indicate high-level compartmentalization of centromeric and euchromatic tandem repeats.

  15. Genome-Wide Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Conserved and Distinct Molecular Mechanisms of Al Resistance in Buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench) Leaves.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei Wei; Xu, Jia Meng; Jin, Jian Feng; Lou, He Qiang; Fan, Wei; Yang, Jian Li

    2017-08-27

    Being an Al-accumulating crop, buckwheat detoxifies and tolerates Al not only in roots but also in leaves. While much progress has recently been made toward Al toxicity and resistance mechanisms in roots, little is known about the molecular basis responsible for detoxification and tolerance processes in leaves. Here, we carried out transcriptome analysis of buckwheat leaves in response to Al stress (20 µM, 24 h). We obtained 33,931 unigenes with 26,300 unigenes annotated in the NCBI database, and identified 1063 upregulated and 944 downregulated genes under Al stress. Functional category analysis revealed that genes related to protein translation, processing, degradation and metabolism comprised the biological processes most affected by Al, suggesting that buckwheat leaves maintain flexibility under Al stress by rapidly reprogramming their physiology and metabolism. Analysis of genes related to transcription regulation revealed that a large proportion of chromatin-regulation genes are specifically downregulated by Al stress, whereas transcription factor genes are overwhelmingly upregulated. Furthermore, we identified 78 upregulated and 22 downregulated genes that encode transporters. Intriguingly, only a few genes were overlapped with root Al-regulated transporter genes, which include homologs of AtMATE, ALS1, STAR1, ALS3 and a divalent ion symporter. In addition, we identified a subset of genes involved in development, in which genes associated with flowering regulation were important. Based on these data, it is proposed that buckwheat leaves develop conserved and distinct mechanisms to cope with Al toxicity.

  16. Genome-Wide Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Conserved and Distinct Molecular Mechanisms of Al Resistance in Buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench) Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei Wei; Xu, Jia Meng; Jin, Jian Feng; Lou, He Qiang; Fan, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Being an Al-accumulating crop, buckwheat detoxifies and tolerates Al not only in roots but also in leaves. While much progress has recently been made toward Al toxicity and resistance mechanisms in roots, little is known about the molecular basis responsible for detoxification and tolerance processes in leaves. Here, we carried out transcriptome analysis of buckwheat leaves in response to Al stress (20 µM, 24 h). We obtained 33,931 unigenes with 26,300 unigenes annotated in the NCBI database, and identified 1063 upregulated and 944 downregulated genes under Al stress. Functional category analysis revealed that genes related to protein translation, processing, degradation and metabolism comprised the biological processes most affected by Al, suggesting that buckwheat leaves maintain flexibility under Al stress by rapidly reprogramming their physiology and metabolism. Analysis of genes related to transcription regulation revealed that a large proportion of chromatin-regulation genes are specifically downregulated by Al stress, whereas transcription factor genes are overwhelmingly upregulated. Furthermore, we identified 78 upregulated and 22 downregulated genes that encode transporters. Intriguingly, only a few genes were overlapped with root Al-regulated transporter genes, which include homologs of AtMATE, ALS1, STAR1, ALS3 and a divalent ion symporter. In addition, we identified a subset of genes involved in development, in which genes associated with flowering regulation were important. Based on these data, it is proposed that buckwheat leaves develop conserved and distinct mechanisms to cope with Al toxicity. PMID:28846612

  17. Genome-Wide Association Analysis Reveals Genetic Heterogeneity of Sjögren's Syndrome According to Ancestry.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Kimberly E; Wong, Quenna; Levine, David M; McHugh, Caitlin; Laurie, Cathy; Doheny, Kimberly; Lam, Mi Y; Baer, Alan N; Challacombe, Stephen; Lanfranchi, Hector; Schiødt, Morten; Srinivasan, M; Umehara, Hisanori; Vivino, Frederick B; Zhao, Yan; Shiboski, Stephen C; Daniels, Troy E; Greenspan, John S; Shiboski, Caroline H; Criswell, Lindsey A

    2017-06-01

    The Sjögren's International Collaborative Clinical Alliance (SICCA) is an international data registry and biorepository derived from a multisite observational study of participants in whom genotyping was performed on the Omni2.5M platform and who had undergone deep phenotyping using common protocol-directed methods. The aim of this study was to examine the genetic etiology of Sjögren's syndrome (SS) across ancestry and disease subsets. We performed genome-wide association study analyses using SICCA subjects and external controls obtained from dbGaP data sets, one using all participants (1,405 cases, 1,622 SICCA controls, and 3,125 external controls), one using European participants (585, 966, and 580, respectively), and one using Asian participants (460, 224, and 901, respectively) with ancestry adjustments via principal components analyses. We also investigated whether subphenotype distributions differ by ethnicity, and whether this contributes to the heterogeneity of genetic associations. We observed significant associations in established regions of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), IRF5, and STAT4 (P = 3 × 10(-42) , P = 3 × 10(-14) , and P = 9 × 10(-10) , respectively), and several novel suggestive regions (those with 2 or more associations at P < 1 × 10(-5) ). Two regions have been previously implicated in autoimmune disease: KLRG1 (P = 6 × 10(-7) [Asian cluster]) and SH2D2A (P = 2 × 10(-6) [all participants]). We observed striking differences between the associations in Europeans and Asians, with high heterogeneity especially in the MHC; representative single-nucleotide polymorphisms from established and suggestive regions had highly significant differences in the allele frequencies in the study populations. We showed that SSA/SSB autoantibody production and the labial salivary gland focus score criteria were associated with the first worldwide principal component, indicative of higher non-European ancestry (P = 4

  18. Genome-Wide Analysis of Arabidopsis Pentatricopeptide Repeat Proteins Reveals Their Essential Role in Organelle BiogenesisW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Lurin, Claire; Andrés, Charles; Aubourg, Sébastien; Bellaoui, Mohammed; Bitton, Frédérique; Bruyère, Clémence; Caboche, Michel; Debast, Cédrig; Gualberto, José; Hoffmann, Beate; Lecharny, Alain; Le Ret, Monique; Martin-Magniette, Marie-Laure; Mireau, Hakim; Peeters, Nemo; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Szurek, Boris; Taconnat, Ludivine; Small, Ian

    2004-01-01

    The complete sequence of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome revealed thousands of previously unsuspected genes, many of which cannot be ascribed even putative functions. One of the largest and most enigmatic gene families discovered in this way is characterized by tandem arrays of pentatricopeptide repeats (PPRs). We describe a detailed bioinformatic analysis of 441 members of the Arabidopsis PPR family plus genomic and genetic data on the expression (microarray data), localization (green fluorescent protein and red fluorescent protein fusions), and general function (insertion mutants and RNA binding assays) of many family members. The basic picture that arises from these studies is that PPR proteins play constitutive, often essential roles in mitochondria and chloroplasts, probably via binding to organellar transcripts. These results confirm, but massively extend, the very sparse observations previously obtained from detailed characterization of individual mutants in other organisms. PMID:15269332

  19. Genome-wide analysis of the Dof transcription factor gene family reveals soybean-specific duplicable and functional characteristics.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yong; Qiu, Li-Juan

    2013-01-01

    The Dof domain protein family is a classic plant-specific zinc-finger transcription factor family involved in a variety of biological processes. There is great diversity in the number of Dof genes in different plants. However, there are only very limited reports on the characterization of Dof transcription factors in soybean (Glycine max). In the present study, 78 putative Dof genes were identified from the whole-genome sequence of soybean. The predicted GmDof genes were non-randomly distributed within and across 19 out of 20 chromosomes and 97.4% (38 pairs) were preferentially retained duplicate paralogous genes located in duplicated regions of the genome. Soybean-specific segmental duplications contributed significantly to the expansion of the soybean Dof gene family. These Dof proteins were phylogenetically clustered into nine distinct subgroups among which the gene structure and motif compositions were considerably conserved. Comparative phylogenetic analysis of these Dof proteins revealed four major groups, similar to those reported for Arabidopsis and rice. Most of the GmDofs showed specific expression patterns based on RNA-seq data analyses. The expression patterns of some duplicate genes were partially redundant while others showed functional diversity, suggesting the occurrence of sub-functionalization during subsequent evolution. Comprehensive expression profile analysis also provided insights into the soybean-specific functional divergence among members of the Dof gene family. Cis-regulatory element analysis of these GmDof genes suggested diverse functions associated with different processes. Taken together, our results provide useful information for the functional characterization of soybean Dof genes by combining phylogenetic analysis with global gene-expression profiling.

  20. Genome-wide meta-analysis of maize heterosis reveals the potential role of additive gene expression at pericentromeric loci

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The identification of QTL involved in heterosis formation is one approach to unravel the not yet fully understood genetic basis of heterosis - the improved agronomic performance of hybrid F1 plants compared to their inbred parents. The identification of candidate genes underlying a QTL is important both for developing markers and determining the molecular genetic basis of a trait, but remains difficult owing to the large number of genes often contained within individual QTL. To address this problem in heterosis analysis, we applied a meta-analysis strategy for grain yield (GY) of Zea mays L. as example, incorporating QTL-, hybrid field-, and parental gene expression data. Results For the identification of genes underlying known heterotic QTL, we made use of tight associations between gene expression pattern and the trait of interest, identified by correlation analyses. Using this approach genes strongly associated with heterosis for GY were discovered to be clustered in pericentromeric regions of the complex maize genome. This suggests that expression differences of sequences in recombination-suppressed regions are important in the establishment of heterosis for GY in F1 hybrids and also in the conservation of heterosis for GY across genotypes. Importantly functional analysis of heterosis-associated genes from these genomic regions revealed over-representation of a number of functional classes, identifying key processes contributing to heterosis for GY. Based on the finding that the majority of the analyzed heterosis-associated genes were addtitively expressed, we propose a model referring to the influence of cis-regulatory variation on heterosis for GY by the compensation of fixed detrimental expression levels in parents. Conclusions The study highlights the utility of a meta-analysis approach that integrates phenotypic and multi-level molecular data to unravel complex traits in plants. It provides prospects for the identification of genes relevant for

  1. High Differentiation among Eight Villages in a Secluded Area of Sardinia Revealed by Genome-Wide High Density SNPs Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pirastu, Nicola; Persico, Ivana; Sassu, Alessandro; Picciau, Andrea; Prodi, Dionigio; Fraumene, Cristina; Mocci, Evelina; Manias, Maria Teresa; Atzeni, Rossano; Cosso, Massimiliano; Pirastu, Mario

    2009-01-01

    To better design association studies for complex traits in isolated populations it's important to understand how history and isolation moulded the genetic features of different communities. Population isolates should not “a priori” be considered homogeneous, even if the communities are not distant and part of a small region. We studied a particular area of Sardinia called Ogliastra, characterized by the presence of several distinct villages that display different history, immigration events and population size. Cultural and geographic isolation characterized the history of these communities. We determined LD parameters in 8 villages and defined population structure through high density SNPs (about 360 K) on 360 unrelated people (45 selected samples from each village). These isolates showed differences in LD values and LD map length. Five of these villages show high LD values probably due to their reduced population size and extreme isolation. High genetic differentiation among villages was detected. Moreover population structure analysis revealed a high correlation between genetic and geographic distances. Our study indicates that history, geography and biodemography have influenced the genetic features of Ogliastra communities producing differences in LD and population structure. All these data demonstrate that we can consider each village an isolate with specific characteristics. We suggest that, in order to optimize the study design of complex traits, a thorough characterization of genetic features is useful to identify the presence of sub-populations and stratification within genetic isolates. PMID:19247500

  2. Genome-wide expression analysis of soybean NF-Y genes reveals potential function in development and drought response.

    PubMed

    Quach, Truyen N; Nguyen, Hanh T M; Valliyodan, Babu; Joshi, Trupti; Xu, Dong; Nguyen, Henry T

    2015-06-01

    Nuclear factor-Y (NF-Y), a heterotrimeric transcription factor, is composed of NF-YA, NF-YB and NF-YC proteins. In plants, there are usually more than 10 genes for each family and their members have been identified to be key regulators in many developmental and physiological processes controlling gametogenesis, embryogenesis, nodule development, seed development, abscisic acid (ABA) signaling, flowering time, primary root elongation, blue light responses, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response and drought tolerance. Taking the advantages of the recent soybean genome draft and information on functional characterizations of nuclear factor Y (NF-Y) transcription factor family in plants, we identified 21 GmNF-YA, 32 GmNF-YB, and 15 GmNF-YC genes in the soybean (Glycine max) genome. Phylogenetic analyses show that soybean's proteins share strong homology to Arabidopsis and many of them are closely related to functionally characterized NF-Y in plants. Expression analysis in various tissues of flower, leaf, root, seeds of different developmental stages, root hairs under rhizobium inoculation, and drought-treated roots and leaves revealed that certain groups of soybean NF-Y are likely involved in specific developmental and stress responses. This study provides extensive evaluation of the soybean NF-Y family and is particularly useful for further functional characterization of GmNF-Y proteins in seed development, nodulation and drought adaptation of soybean.

  3. Genome-wide allelic methylation analysis reveals disease-specific susceptibility to multiple methylation defects in imprinting syndromes.

    PubMed

    Court, Franck; Martin-Trujillo, Alex; Romanelli, Valeria; Garin, Intza; Iglesias-Platas, Isabel; Salafsky, Ira; Guitart, Miriam; Perez de Nanclares, Guiomar; Lapunzina, Pablo; Monk, David

    2013-04-01

    Genomic imprinting is the parent-of-origin-specific allelic transcriptional silencing observed in mammals, which is governed by DNA methylation established in the gametes and maintained throughout the development. The frequency and extent of epimutations associated with the nine reported imprinting syndromes varies because it is evident that aberrant preimplantation maintenance of imprinted differentially methylated regions (DMRs) may affect multiple loci. Using a custom Illumina GoldenGate array targeting 27 imprinted DMRs, we profiled allelic methylation in 65 imprinting defect patients. We identify multilocus hypomethylation in numerous Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, transient neonatal diabetes mellitus (TNDM), and pseudohypoparathyroidism 1B patients, and an individual with Silver-Russell syndrome. Our data reveal a broad range of epimutations exist in certain imprinting syndromes, with the exception of Prader-Willi syndrome and Angelman syndrome patients that are associated with solitary SNRPN-DMR defects. A mutation analysis identified a 1 bp deletion in the ZFP57 gene in a TNDM patient with methylation defects at multiple maternal DMRs. In addition, we observe missense variants in ZFP57, NLRP2, and NLRP7 that are not consistent with maternal effect and aberrant establishment or methylation maintenance, and are likely benign. This work illustrates that further extensive molecular characterization of these rare patients is required to fully understand the mechanism underlying the etiology of imprint establishment and maintenance.

  4. Genome-wide analysis correlates Ayurveda Prakriti

    PubMed Central

    Govindaraj, Periyasamy; Nizamuddin, Sheikh; Sharath, Anugula; Jyothi, Vuskamalla; Rotti, Harish; Raval, Ritu; Nayak, Jayakrishna; Bhat, Balakrishna K.; Prasanna, B. V.; Shintre, Pooja; Sule, Mayura; Joshi, Kalpana S.; Dedge, Amrish P.; Bharadwaj, Ramachandra; Gangadharan, G. G.; Nair, Sreekumaran; Gopinath, Puthiya M.; Patwardhan, Bhushan; Kondaiah, Paturu; Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu; Valiathan, Marthanda Varma Sankaran; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy

    2015-01-01

    The practice of Ayurveda, the traditional medicine of India, is based on the concept of three major constitutional types (Vata, Pitta and Kapha) defined as “Prakriti”. To the best of our knowledge, no study has convincingly correlated genomic variations with the classification of Prakriti. In the present study, we performed genome-wide SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) analysis (Affymetrix, 6.0) of 262 well-classified male individuals (after screening 3416 subjects) belonging to three Prakritis. We found 52 SNPs (p ≤ 1 × 10−5) were significantly different between Prakritis, without any confounding effect of stratification, after 106 permutations. Principal component analysis (PCA) of these SNPs classified 262 individuals into their respective groups (Vata, Pitta and Kapha) irrespective of their ancestry, which represent its power in categorization. We further validated our finding with 297 Indian population samples with known ancestry. Subsequently, we found that PGM1 correlates with phenotype of Pitta as described in the ancient text of Caraka Samhita, suggesting that the phenotypic classification of India’s traditional medicine has a genetic basis; and its Prakriti-based practice in vogue for many centuries resonates with personalized medicine. PMID:26511157

  5. A Genome-Wide Analysis Reveals Stress and Hormone Responsive Patterns of TIFY Family Genes in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Saha, Gopal; Park, Jong-In; Kayum, Md Abdul; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2016-01-01

    The TIFY family is a plant-specific group of proteins with a diversity of functions and includes four subfamilies, viz. ZML, TIFY, PPD, and JASMONATE ZIM-domain (JAZ) proteins. TIFY family members, particularly JAZ subfamily proteins, play roles in biological processes such as development and stress and hormone responses in Arabidopsis, rice, chickpea, and grape. However, there is no information about this family in any Brassica crop. This study identifies 36 TIFY genes in Brassica rapa, an economically important crop species in the Brassicaceae. An extensive in silico analysis of phylogenetic grouping, protein motif organization and intron-exon distribution confirmed that there are four subfamilies of BrTIFY proteins. Out of 36 BrTIFY genes, we identified 21 in the JAZ subfamily, seven in the TIFY subfamily, six in ZML and two in PPD. Extensive expression profiling of 21 BrTIFY JAZs in various tissues, especially in floral organs and at different flower growth stages revealed constitutive expression patterns, which suggest that BrTIFY JAZ genes are important during growth and development of B. rapa flowers. A protein interaction network analysis also pointed to association of these proteins with fertility and defense processes of B. rapa. Using a low temperature-treated whole-genome microarray data set, most of the JAZ genes were found to have variable transcript abundance between the contrasting inbred lines Chiifu and Kenshin of B. rapa. Subsequently, the expression of all 21 BrTIFY JAZs in response to cold stress was characterized in the same two lines via qPCR, demonstrating that nine genes were up-regulated. Importantly, the BrTIFY JAZs showed strong and differential expression upon JA treatment, pointing to their probable involvement in JA-mediated growth regulatory functions, especially during flower development and stress responses. Additionally, BrTIFY JAZs were induced in response to salt, drought, Fusarium, ABA, and SA treatments, and six genes (BrTIFY3

  6. A Genome-Wide Analysis Reveals Stress and Hormone Responsive Patterns of TIFY Family Genes in Brassica rapa

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Gopal; Park, Jong-In; Kayum, Md. Abdul; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2016-01-01

    The TIFY family is a plant-specific group of proteins with a diversity of functions and includes four subfamilies, viz. ZML, TIFY, PPD, and JASMONATE ZIM-domain (JAZ) proteins. TIFY family members, particularly JAZ subfamily proteins, play roles in biological processes such as development and stress and hormone responses in Arabidopsis, rice, chickpea, and grape. However, there is no information about this family in any Brassica crop. This study identifies 36 TIFY genes in Brassica rapa, an economically important crop species in the Brassicaceae. An extensive in silico analysis of phylogenetic grouping, protein motif organization and intron-exon distribution confirmed that there are four subfamilies of BrTIFY proteins. Out of 36 BrTIFY genes, we identified 21 in the JAZ subfamily, seven in the TIFY subfamily, six in ZML and two in PPD. Extensive expression profiling of 21 BrTIFY JAZs in various tissues, especially in floral organs and at different flower growth stages revealed constitutive expression patterns, which suggest that BrTIFY JAZ genes are important during growth and development of B. rapa flowers. A protein interaction network analysis also pointed to association of these proteins with fertility and defense processes of B. rapa. Using a low temperature-treated whole-genome microarray data set, most of the JAZ genes were found to have variable transcript abundance between the contrasting inbred lines Chiifu and Kenshin of B. rapa. Subsequently, the expression of all 21 BrTIFY JAZs in response to cold stress was characterized in the same two lines via qPCR, demonstrating that nine genes were up-regulated. Importantly, the BrTIFY JAZs showed strong and differential expression upon JA treatment, pointing to their probable involvement in JA-mediated growth regulatory functions, especially during flower development and stress responses. Additionally, BrTIFY JAZs were induced in response to salt, drought, Fusarium, ABA, and SA treatments, and six genes (BrTIFY3

  7. Novel Comparative Pattern Count Analysis Reveals a Chronic Ethanol-Induced Dynamic Shift in Immediate Early NF-κB Genome-wide Promoter Binding During Liver Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kuttippurathu, Lakshmi; Patra, Biswanath; Hoek, Jan B; Vadigepalli, Rajanikanth

    2016-01-01

    Liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy is a clinically important process that is impaired by adaptation to chronic alcohol intake. We focused on the initial time points following partial hepatectomy (PHx) to analyze genome-wide binding activity of NF-κB, a key immediate early regulator. We investigated the effect of chronic alcohol intake on immediate early NF-κB genome-wide localization, in the adapted state as well as in response to partial hepatectomy, using chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by promoter microarray analysis. We found many ethanol-specific NF-κB binding target promoters in the ethanol-adapted state, corresponding to regulation of biosynthetic processes, oxidation-reduction and apoptosis. Partial hepatectomy induced a diet-independent shift in NF-κB binding loci relative to the transcription start sites. We employed a novel pattern count analysis to exhaustively enumerate and compare the number of promoters corresponding to the temporal binding patterns in ethanol and pair-fed control groups. The highest pattern count corresponded to promoters with NF-κB binding exclusively in the ethanol group at 1h post PHx. This set was associated with regulation of cell death, response to oxidative stress, histone modification, mitochondrial function, and metabolic processes. Integration with the global gene expression profiles to identify putative transcriptional consequences of NF-κB binding patterns revealed that several of ethanol-specific 1h binding targets showed ethanol-specific differential expression through 6h post PHx. Motif analysis yielded co-incident binding loci for STAT3, AP-1, CREB, C/EBP-β, PPAR-γ and C/EBP-α, likely participating in co-regulatory modules with NF-κB in shaping the immediate early response to PHx. We conclude that adaptation to chronic ethanol intake disrupts the NF-κB promoter binding landscape with consequences for the immediate early gene regulatory response to the acute challenge of PHx. PMID:26847025

  8. A genome wide dosage suppressor network reveals genomic robustness

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Biranchi; Kon, Yoshiko; Yadav, Gitanjali; Sevold, Anthony W.; Frumkin, Jesse P.; Vallabhajosyula, Ravishankar R.; Hintze, Arend; Østman, Bjørn; Schossau, Jory; Bhan, Ashish; Marzolf, Bruz; Tamashiro, Jenna K.; Kaur, Amardeep; Baliga, Nitin S.; Grayhack, Elizabeth J.; Adami, Christoph; Galas, David J.; Raval, Alpan; Phizicky, Eric M.; Ray, Animesh

    2017-01-01

    Genomic robustness is the extent to which an organism has evolved to withstand the effects of deleterious mutations. We explored the extent of genomic robustness in budding yeast by genome wide dosage suppressor analysis of 53 conditional lethal mutations in cell division cycle and RNA synthesis related genes, revealing 660 suppressor interactions of which 642 are novel. This collection has several distinctive features, including high co-occurrence of mutant-suppressor pairs within protein modules, highly correlated functions between the pairs and higher diversity of functions among the co-suppressors than previously observed. Dosage suppression of essential genes encoding RNA polymerase subunits and chromosome cohesion complex suggests a surprising degree of functional plasticity of macromolecular complexes, and the existence of numerous degenerate pathways for circumventing the effects of potentially lethal mutations. These results imply that organisms and cancer are likely able to exploit the genomic robustness properties, due the persistence of cryptic gene and pathway functions, to generate variation and adapt to selective pressures. PMID:27899637

  9. Genome-Wide Analysis of the World's Sheep Breeds Reveals High Levels of Historic Mixture and Strong Recent Selection

    PubMed Central

    Kijas, James W.; Lenstra, Johannes A.; Hayes, Ben; Boitard, Simon; Porto Neto, Laercio R.; San Cristobal, Magali; Servin, Bertrand; McCulloch, Russell; Whan, Vicki; Gietzen, Kimberly; Paiva, Samuel; Barendse, William; Ciani, Elena; Raadsma, Herman; McEwan, John; Dalrymple, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Through their domestication and subsequent selection, sheep have been adapted to thrive in a diverse range of environments. To characterise the genetic consequence of both domestication and selection, we genotyped 49,034 SNP in 2,819 animals from a diverse collection of 74 sheep breeds. We find the majority of sheep populations contain high SNP diversity and have retained an effective population size much higher than most cattle or dog breeds, suggesting domestication occurred from a broad genetic base. Extensive haplotype sharing and generally low divergence time between breeds reveal frequent genetic exchange has occurred during the development of modern breeds. A scan of the genome for selection signals revealed 31 regions containing genes for coat pigmentation, skeletal morphology, body size, growth, and reproduction. We demonstrate the strongest selection signal has occurred in response to breeding for the absence of horns. The high density map of genetic variability provides an in-depth view of the genetic history for this important livestock species. PMID:22346734

  10. Genome-wide QTL and bulked transcriptomic analysis reveals new candidate genes for the control of tuber carotenoid content in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.).

    PubMed

    Campbell, Raymond; Pont, Simon D A; Morris, Jenny A; McKenzie, Gaynor; Sharma, Sanjeev Kumar; Hedley, Pete E; Ramsay, Gavin; Bryan, Glenn J; Taylor, Mark A

    2014-09-01

    Genome-wide QTL analysis of potato tuber carotenoid content was investigated in populations of Solanum tuberosum Group Phureja that segregate for flesh colour, revealing a novel major QTL on chromosome 9. The carotenoid content of edible plant storage organs is a key nutritional and quality trait. Although the structural genes that encode the biosynthetic enzymes are well characterised, much less is known about the factors that determine overall storage organ content. In this study, genome-wide QTL mapping, in concert with an efficient 'genetical genomics' analysis using bulked samples, has been employed to investigate the genetic architecture of potato tuber carotenoid content. Two diploid populations of Solanum tuberosum Group Phureja were genotyped (AFLP, SSR and DArT markers) and analysed for their tuber carotenoid content over two growing seasons. Common to both populations were QTL that explained relatively small proportions of the variation in constituent carotenoids and a major QTL on chromosome 3 explaining up to 71 % of the variation in carotenoid content. In one of the populations (01H15), a second major carotenoid QTL was identified on chromosome 9, explaining up to 20 % of the phenotypic variation. Whereas the major chromosome 3 QTL was likely to be due to an allele of a gene encoding β-carotene hydroxylase, no known carotenoid biosynthetic genes are located in the vicinity of the chromosome 9 QTL. A unique expression profiling strategy using phenotypically distinct bulks comprised individuals with similar carotenoid content provided further support for the QTL mapping to chromosome 9. This study shows the potential of using the potato genome sequence to link genetic maps to data arising from eQTL approaches to enhance the discovery of candidate genes underlying QTLs.

  11. Integrative genome-wide analysis reveals a robust genomic glioblastoma signature associated with copy number driving changes in gene expression.

    PubMed

    de Tayrac, Marie; Etcheverry, Amandine; Aubry, Marc; Saïkali, Stephan; Hamlat, Abderrahmane; Quillien, Veronique; Le Treut, André; Galibert, Marie-Dominique; Mosser, Jean

    2009-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme shows multiple chromosomal aberrations, the impact of which on gene expression remains unclear. To investigate this relationship and to identify putative initiating genomic events, we integrated a paired copy number and gene expression survey in glioblastoma using whole human genome arrays. Loci of recurrent copy number alterations were combined with gene expression profiles obtained on the same tumor samples. We identified a set of 406 "cis-acting DNA targeted genes" corresponding to genomic aberrations with direct copy-number-driving changes in gene expression, defined as genes with either significantly concordant or correlated changes in DNA copy number and expression. Functional annotation revealed that these genes participate in key processes of cancer cell biology, providing insights into the genetic mechanisms driving glioblastoma. The robustness of the gene selection was validated on an external microarray data set including 81 glioblastomas and 23 non-neoplastic brain samples. The integration of array CGH and gene expression data highlights a robust cis-acting DNA targeted genes signature that may be critical for glioblastoma progression, with two tumor suppressor genes PCDH9 and STARD13 that could be involved in tumor invasiveness and resistance to etoposide.

  12. Genome-wide analysis of Dof transcription factors reveals functional characteristics during development and response to biotic stresses in pepper.

    PubMed

    Kang, Won-Hee; Kim, Seungill; Lee, Hyun-Ah; Choi, Doil; Yeom, Seon-In

    2016-09-22

    The DNA-binding with one zinc finger proteins (Dofs) are a plant-specific family of transcription factors. The Dofs are involved in a variety of biological processes such as phytohormone production, seed development, and environmental adaptation. Dofs have been previously identified in several plants, but not in pepper. We identified 33 putative Dof genes in pepper (CaDofs). To gain an overview of the CaDofs, we analyzed phylogenetic relationships, protein motifs, and evolutionary history. We divided the 33 CaDofs, containing 25 motifs, into four major groups distributed on eight chromosomes. We discovered an expansion of the CaDofs dated to a recent duplication event. Segmental duplication that occurred before the speciation of the Solanaceae lineages was predominant among the CaDofs. The global gene-expression profiling of the CaDofs by RNA-seq analysis showed distinct temporal and pathogen-specific variation during development and response to biotic stresses (two TMV strains, PepMoV, and Phytophthora capsici), suggesting functional diversity among the CaDofs. These results will provide the useful clues into the responses of Dofs in biotic stresses and promote a better understanding of their multiple function in pepper and other species.

  13. A genome-wide analysis of populations from European Russia reveals a new pole of genetic diversity in northern Europe.

    PubMed

    Khrunin, Andrey V; Khokhrin, Denis V; Filippova, Irina N; Esko, Tõnu; Nelis, Mari; Bebyakova, Natalia A; Bolotova, Natalia L; Klovins, Janis; Nikitina-Zake, Liene; Rehnström, Karola; Ripatti, Samuli; Schreiber, Stefan; Franke, Andre; Macek, Milan; Krulišová, Veronika; Lubinski, Jan; Metspalu, Andres; Limborska, Svetlana A

    2013-01-01

    Several studies examined the fine-scale structure of human genetic variation in Europe. However, the European sets analyzed represent mainly northern, western, central, and southern Europe. Here, we report an analysis of approximately 166,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms in populations from eastern (northeastern) Europe: four Russian populations from European Russia, and three populations from the northernmost Finno-Ugric ethnicities (Veps and two contrast groups of Komi people). These were compared with several reference European samples, including Finns, Estonians, Latvians, Poles, Czechs, Germans, and Italians. The results obtained demonstrated genetic heterogeneity of populations living in the region studied. Russians from the central part of European Russia (Tver, Murom, and Kursk) exhibited similarities with populations from central-eastern Europe, and were distant from Russian sample from the northern Russia (Mezen district, Archangelsk region). Komi samples, especially Izhemski Komi, were significantly different from all other populations studied. These can be considered as a second pole of genetic diversity in northern Europe (in addition to the pole, occupied by Finns), as they had a distinct ancestry component. Russians from Mezen and the Finnic-speaking Veps were positioned between the two poles, but differed from each other in the proportions of Komi and Finnic ancestries. In general, our data provides a more complete genetic map of Europe accounting for the diversity in its most eastern (northeastern) populations.

  14. Genome-wide analysis of Dof transcription factors reveals functional characteristics during development and response to biotic stresses in pepper

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Won-Hee; Kim, Seungill; Lee, Hyun-Ah; Choi, Doil; Yeom, Seon-In

    2016-01-01

    The DNA-binding with one zinc finger proteins (Dofs) are a plant-specific family of transcription factors. The Dofs are involved in a variety of biological processes such as phytohormone production, seed development, and environmental adaptation. Dofs have been previously identified in several plants, but not in pepper. We identified 33 putative Dof genes in pepper (CaDofs). To gain an overview of the CaDofs, we analyzed phylogenetic relationships, protein motifs, and evolutionary history. We divided the 33 CaDofs, containing 25 motifs, into four major groups distributed on eight chromosomes. We discovered an expansion of the CaDofs dated to a recent duplication event. Segmental duplication that occurred before the speciation of the Solanaceae lineages was predominant among the CaDofs. The global gene-expression profiling of the CaDofs by RNA-seq analysis showed distinct temporal and pathogen-specific variation during development and response to biotic stresses (two TMV strains, PepMoV, and Phytophthora capsici), suggesting functional diversity among the CaDofs. These results will provide the useful clues into the responses of Dofs in biotic stresses and promote a better understanding of their multiple function in pepper and other species. PMID:27653666

  15. A Genome-Wide Analysis of Populations from European Russia Reveals a New Pole of Genetic Diversity in Northern Europe

    PubMed Central

    Khrunin, Andrey V.; Khokhrin, Denis V.; Filippova, Irina N.; Esko, Tõnu; Nelis, Mari; Bebyakova, Natalia A.; Bolotova, Natalia L.; Klovins, Janis; Nikitina-Zake, Liene; Rehnström, Karola; Ripatti, Samuli; Schreiber, Stefan; Franke, Andre; Macek, Milan; Krulišová, Veronika; Lubinski, Jan; Metspalu, Andres; Limborska, Svetlana A.

    2013-01-01

    Several studies examined the fine-scale structure of human genetic variation in Europe. However, the European sets analyzed represent mainly northern, western, central, and southern Europe. Here, we report an analysis of approximately 166,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms in populations from eastern (northeastern) Europe: four Russian populations from European Russia, and three populations from the northernmost Finno-Ugric ethnicities (Veps and two contrast groups of Komi people). These were compared with several reference European samples, including Finns, Estonians, Latvians, Poles, Czechs, Germans, and Italians. The results obtained demonstrated genetic heterogeneity of populations living in the region studied. Russians from the central part of European Russia (Tver, Murom, and Kursk) exhibited similarities with populations from central–eastern Europe, and were distant from Russian sample from the northern Russia (Mezen district, Archangelsk region). Komi samples, especially Izhemski Komi, were significantly different from all other populations studied. These can be considered as a second pole of genetic diversity in northern Europe (in addition to the pole, occupied by Finns), as they had a distinct ancestry component. Russians from Mezen and the Finnic-speaking Veps were positioned between the two poles, but differed from each other in the proportions of Komi and Finnic ancestries. In general, our data provides a more complete genetic map of Europe accounting for the diversity in its most eastern (northeastern) populations. PMID:23505534

  16. Genome-wide copy number variant analysis in Holstein cattle reveals variants associated with 10 production traits including residual feed intake and dry matter intake

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Copy number variation (CNV) is an important type of genetic variation contributing to phenotypic differences among mammals and may serve as an alternative molecular marker to single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) for genome-wide association study (GWAS). Recently, GWAS analysis using CNV has been app...

  17. A genome-wide analysis of the RNA-guided silencing pathway in coffee reveals insights into its regulatory mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Noronha Fernandes-Brum, Christiane; Marinho Rezende, Pâmela; Cherubino Ribeiro, Thales Henrique; Ricon de Oliveira, Raphael; Cunha de Sousa Cardoso, Thaís; Rodrigues do Amaral, Laurence; de Souza Gomes, Matheus; Chalfun-Junior, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are derived from self-complementary hairpin structures, while small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are derived from double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) or hairpin precursors. The core mechanism of sRNA production involves DICER-like (DCL) in processing the smallRNAs (sRNAs) and ARGONAUTE (AGO) as effectors of silencing, and siRNA biogenesis also involves action of RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase (RDR), Pol IV and Pol V in biogenesis. Several other proteins interact with the core proteins to guide sRNA biogenesis, action, and turnover. We aimed to unravel the components and functions of the RNA-guided silencing pathway in a non-model plant species of worldwide economic relevance. The sRNA-guided silencing complex members have been identified in the Coffea canephora genome, and they have been characterized at the structural, functional, and evolutionary levels by computational analyses. Eleven AGO proteins, nine DCL proteins (which include a DCL1-like protein that was not previously annotated), and eight RDR proteins were identified. Another 48 proteins implicated in smallRNA (sRNA) pathways were also identified. Furthermore, we identified 235 miRNA precursors and 317 mature miRNAs from 113 MIR families, and we characterized ccp-MIR156, ccp-MIR172, and ccp-MIR390. Target prediction and gene ontology analyses of 2239 putative targets showed that significant pathways in coffee are targeted by miRNAs. We provide evidence of the expansion of the loci related to sRNA pathways, insights into the activities of these proteins by domain and catalytic site analyses, and gene expression analysis. The number of MIR loci and their targeted pathways highlight the importance of miRNAs in coffee. We identified several roles of sRNAs in C. canephora, which offers substantial insight into better understanding the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of this major crop.

  18. Genome-wide analysis reveals conserved transcriptional responses downstream of resting potential change in Xenopus embryos, axolotl regeneration, and human mesenchymal cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Pai, Vaibhav P; Martyniuk, Christopher J; Echeverri, Karen; Sundelacruz, Sarah; Kaplan, David L; Levin, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Endogenous bioelectric signaling via changes in cellular resting potential (V mem) is a key regulator of patterning during regeneration and embryogenesis in numerous model systems. Depolarization of V mem has been functionally implicated in dedifferentiation, tumorigenesis, anatomical re-specification, and appendage regeneration. However, no unbiased analyses have been performed to understand genome-wide transcriptional responses to V mem change in vivo. Moreover, it is unknown which genes or gene networks represent conserved targets of bioelectrical signaling across different patterning contexts and species. Here, we use microarray analysis to comparatively analyze transcriptional responses to V mem depolarization. We compare the response of the transcriptome during embryogenesis (Xenopus development), regeneration (axolotl regeneration), and stem cell differentiation (human mesenchymal stem cells in culture) to identify common networks across model species that are associated with depolarization. Both subnetwork enrichment and PANTHER analyses identified a number of key genetic modules as targets of V mem change, and also revealed important (well-conserved) commonalities in bioelectric signal transduction, despite highly diverse experimental contexts and species. Depolarization regulates specific transcriptional networks across all three germ layers (ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm) such as cell differentiation and apoptosis, and this information will be used for developing mechanistic models of bioelectric regulation of patterning. Moreover, our analysis reveals that V mem change regulates transcripts related to important disease pathways such as cancer and neurodegeneration, which may represent novel targets for emerging electroceutical therapies.

  19. Genome-wide transcriptomic analysis reveals correlation between higher WRKY61 expression and reduced symptom severity in Turnip crinkle virus infected Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ruimin; Liu, Peng; Yong, Yuhan; Wong, Sek-Man

    2016-01-01

    Turnip crinkle virus (TCV) is a carmovirus that infects many Arabidopsis ecotypes. Most studies mainly focused on discovery of resistance genes against TCV infection, and there is no Next Generation Sequencing based comparative genome wide transcriptome analysis reported. In this study, RNA-seq based transcriptome analysis revealed that 238 (155 up-regulated and 83 down-regulated) significant differentially expressed genes with at least 15-fold change were determined. Fifteen genes (including upregulated, unchanged and downregulated) were selected for RNA-seq data validation using quantitative real-time PCR, which showed consistencies between these two sets of data. GO enrichment analysis showed that numerous terms such as stress, immunity, defence and chemical stimulus were affected in TCV-infected plants. One putative plant defence related gene named WRKY61 was selected for further investigation. It showed that WRKY61 overexpression plants displayed reduced symptoms and less virus accumulation, as compared to wild type (WT) and WRKY61 deficient lines, suggesting that higher WRKY61 expression level reduced TCV viral accumulation. In conclusion, our transcriptome analysis showed that global gene expression was detected in TCV-infected Arabidopsis thaliana. WRKY61 gene was shown to be negatively correlated with TCV infection and viral symptoms, which may be connected to plant immunity pathways. PMID:27086702

  20. Genome-wide SNP typing reveals signatures of population history.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Austin L; Welch, Robert; Puri, Vinita; Matthews, Casey; Haque, Kashif; Chanock, Stephen J; Yeager, Meredith

    2008-07-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays have become a popular technology for disease-association studies, but they also have potential for studying the genetic differentiation of human populations. Application of the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping 500K Array Set to a population of 102 individuals representing the major ethnic groups in the United States (African, Asian, European, and Hispanic) revealed patterns of gene diversity and genetic distance that reflected population history. We analyzed allelic frequencies at 388,654 autosomal SNP sites that showed some variation in our study population and 10% or fewer missing values. Despite the small size (23-31 individuals) of each subpopulation, there were no fixed differences at any site between any two subpopulations. As expected from the African origin of modern humans, greater gene diversity was seen in Africans than in either Asians or Europeans, and the genetic distance between the Asian and the European populations was significantly lower than that between either of these two populations and Africans. Principal components analysis applied to a correlation matrix among individuals was able to separate completely the major continental groups of humans (Africans, Asians, and Europeans), while Hispanics overlapped all three of these groups. Genes containing two or more markers with extraordinarily high genetic distance between subpopulations were identified as candidate genes for health differences between subpopulations. The results show that, even with modest sample sizes, genome-wide SNP genotyping technologies have great promise for capturing signatures of gene frequency difference between human subpopulations, with applications in areas as diverse as forensics and the study of ethnic health disparities.

  1. Rank-based genome-wide analysis reveals the association of Ryanodine receptor-2 gene variants with childhood asthma among human populations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The standard approach to determine unique or shared genetic factors across populations is to identify risk alleles in one population and investigate replication in others. However, since populations differ in DNA sequence information, allele frequencies, effect sizes, and linkage disequilibrium patterns, SNP association using a uniform stringent threshold on p values may not be reproducible across populations. Here, we developed rank-based methods to investigate shared or population-specific loci and pathways for childhood asthma across individuals of diverse ancestry. We performed genome-wide association studies on 859,790 SNPs genotyped in 527 affected offspring trios of European, African, and Hispanic ancestry using publically available asthma database in the Genotypes and Phenotypes database. Results Rank-based analyses showed that there are shared genetic factors for asthma across populations, more at the gene and pathway levels than at the SNP level. Although the top 1,000 SNPs were not shared, 11 genes (RYR2, PDE4D, CSMD1, CDH13, ROBO2, RBFOX1, PTPRD, NPAS3, PDE1C, SEMA5A, and CTNNA2) mapped by these SNPs were shared across populations. Ryanodine receptor 2 (RYR2, a statin response-related gene) showed the strongest association in European (p value = 2.55 × 10−7) and was replicated in African (2.57 × 10−4) and Hispanic (1.18 × 10−3) Americans. Imputation analyses based on the 1000 Genomes Project uncovered additional RYR2 variants associated with asthma. Network and functional ontology analyses revealed that RYR2 is an integral part of dermatological or allergic disorder biological networks, specifically in the functional classes involving inflammatory, eosinophilic, and respiratory diseases. Conclusion Our rank-based genome-wide analysis revealed for the first time an association of RYR2 variants with asthma and replicated previously discovered PDE4D asthma gene across human populations. The replication of top

  2. Genome-wide analysis of histone methylation reveals chromatin state-based complex regulation of differential gene transcription and function of CD8 memory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Araki, Yasuto; Wang, Zhibin; Zang, Chongzhi; Wood, William H.; Schones, Dustin; Cui, Kairong; Roh, Tae-Young; Lhotsky, Brad; Wersto, Robert P.; Peng, Weiqun; Becker, Kevin G.; Zhao, Keji; Weng, Nan-ping

    2009-01-01

    Summary Memory lymphocytes are characterized by their ability to exhibit a rapid response to the recall antigen, in which differential transcription plays a significant role, yet the underlying mechanism is not understood. We report here a genome-wide analysis of histone methylation on two histone H3 lysine residues (H3K4me3 and H3K27me3) and gene expression profiles in naïve and memory CD8 T cells. We found that a general correlation exists between the levels of gene expression and the levels of H3K4me3 (positive correlation) and H3K27me3 (negative correlation) across the gene body. These correlations display four distinct modes: repressive, active, poised, and bivalent, reflecting different functions of these genes. Furthermore, a permissive chromatin state of each gene is established by a combination of different histone modifications. Our findings reveal a complex regulation by histone methylation in differential gene expression and suggest that histone methylation may be responsible for memory CD8 T cell function. PMID:19523850

  3. Genome-wide analysis of intracellular pH reveals quantitative control of cell division rate by pH(c) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Orij, Rick; Urbanus, Malene L; Vizeacoumar, Franco J; Giaever, Guri; Boone, Charles; Nislow, Corey; Brul, Stanley; Smits, Gertien J

    2012-09-10

    Because protonation affects the properties of almost all molecules in cells, cytosolic pH (pH(c)) is usually assumed to be constant. In the model organism yeast, however, pH(c) changes in response to the presence of nutrients and varies during growth. Since small changes in pH(c) can lead to major changes in metabolism, signal transduction, and phenotype, we decided to analyze pH(c) control. Introducing a pH-sensitive reporter protein into the yeast deletion collection allowed quantitative genome-wide analysis of pH(c) in live, growing yeast cultures. pH(c) is robust towards gene deletion; no single gene mutation led to a pH(c) of more than 0.3 units lower than that of wild type. Correct pH(c) control required not only vacuolar proton pumps, but also strongly relied on mitochondrial function. Additionally, we identified a striking relationship between pH(c) and growth rate. Careful dissection of cause and consequence revealed that pH(c) quantitatively controls growth rate. Detailed analysis of the genetic basis of this control revealed that the adequate signaling of pH(c) depended on inositol polyphosphates, a set of relatively unknown signaling molecules with exquisitely pH sensitive properties. While pH(c) is a very dynamic parameter in the normal life of yeast, genetically it is a tightly controlled cellular parameter. The coupling of pH(c) to growth rate is even more robust to genetic alteration. Changes in pH(c) control cell division rate in yeast, possibly as a signal. Such a signaling role of pH(c) is probable, and may be central in development and tumorigenesis.

  4. Genome-Wide Analysis of Hydrogen Peroxide-Regulated Gene Expression in Arabidopsis Reveals a High Light-Induced Transcriptional Cluster Involved in Anthocyanin Biosynthesis1[w

    PubMed Central

    Vanderauwera, Sandy; Zimmermann, Philip; Rombauts, Stéphane; Vandenabeele, Steven; Langebartels, Christian; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Inzé, Dirk; Van Breusegem, Frank

    2005-01-01

    In plants, reactive oxygen species and, more particularly, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) play a dual role as toxic by-products of normal cell metabolism and as regulatory molecules in stress perception and signal transduction. Peroxisomal catalases are an important sink for photorespiratory H2O2. Using ATH1 Affymetrix microarrays, expression profiles were compared between control and catalase-deficient Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants. Reduced catalase levels already provoked differences in nuclear gene expression under ambient growth conditions, and these effects were amplified by high light exposure in a sun simulator for 3 and 8 h. This genome-wide expression analysis allowed us to reveal the expression characteristics of complete pathways and functional categories during H2O2 stress. In total, 349 transcripts were significantly up-regulated by high light in catalase-deficient plants and 88 were down-regulated. From this data set, H2O2 was inferred to play a key role in the transcriptional up-regulation of small heat shock proteins during high light stress. In addition, several transcription factors and candidate regulatory genes involved in H2O2 transcriptional gene networks were identified. Comparisons with other publicly available transcriptome data sets of abiotically stressed Arabidopsis revealed an important intersection with H2O2-deregulated genes, positioning elevated H2O2 levels as an important signal within abiotic stress-induced gene expression. Finally, analysis of transcriptional changes in a combination of a genetic (catalase deficiency) and an environmental (high light) perturbation identified a transcriptional cluster that was strongly and rapidly induced by high light in control plants, but impaired in catalase-deficient plants. This cluster comprises the complete known anthocyanin regulatory and biosynthetic pathway, together with genes encoding unknown proteins. PMID:16183842

  5. Arabidopsis transcription factors: genome-wide comparative analysis among eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Riechmann, J L; Heard, J; Martin, G; Reuber, L; Jiang, C; Keddie, J; Adam, L; Pineda, O; Ratcliffe, O J; Samaha, R R; Creelman, R; Pilgrim, M; Broun, P; Zhang, J Z; Ghandehari, D; Sherman, B K; Yu, G

    2000-12-15

    The completion of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome sequence allows a comparative analysis of transcriptional regulators across the three eukaryotic kingdoms. Arabidopsis dedicates over 5% of its genome to code for more than 1500 transcription factors, about 45% of which are from families specific to plants. Arabidopsis transcription factors that belong to families common to all eukaryotes do not share significant similarity with those of the other kingdoms beyond the conserved DNA binding domains, many of which have been arranged in combinations specific to each lineage. The genome-wide comparison reveals the evolutionary generation of diversity in the regulation of transcription.

  6. Genome-wide profiling of 24 hr diel rhythmicity in the water flea, Daphnia pulex: network analysis reveals rhythmic gene expression and enhances functional gene annotation.

    PubMed

    Rund, Samuel S C; Yoo, Boyoung; Alam, Camille; Green, Taryn; Stephens, Melissa T; Zeng, Erliang; George, Gary F; Sheppard, Aaron D; Duffield, Giles E; Milenković, Tijana; Pfrender, Michael E

    2016-08-18

    Marine and freshwater zooplankton exhibit daily rhythmic patterns of behavior and physiology which may be regulated directly by the light:dark (LD) cycle and/or a molecular circadian clock. One of the best-studied zooplankton taxa, the freshwater crustacean Daphnia, has a 24 h diel vertical migration (DVM) behavior whereby the organism travels up and down through the water column daily. DVM plays a critical role in resource tracking and the behavioral avoidance of predators and damaging ultraviolet radiation. However, there is little information at the transcriptional level linking the expression patterns of genes to the rhythmic physiology/behavior of Daphnia. Here we analyzed genome-wide temporal transcriptional patterns from Daphnia pulex collected over a 44 h time period under a 12:12 LD cycle (diel) conditions using a cosine-fitting algorithm. We used a comprehensive network modeling and analysis approach to identify novel co-regulated rhythmic genes that have similar network topological properties and functional annotations as rhythmic genes identified by the cosine-fitting analyses. Furthermore, we used the network approach to predict with high accuracy novel gene-function associations, thus enhancing current functional annotations available for genes in this ecologically relevant model species. Our results reveal that genes in many functional groupings exhibit 24 h rhythms in their expression patterns under diel conditions. We highlight the rhythmic expression of immunity, oxidative detoxification, and sensory process genes. We discuss differences in the chronobiology of D. pulex from other well-characterized terrestrial arthropods. This research adds to a growing body of literature suggesting the genetic mechanisms governing rhythmicity in crustaceans may be divergent from other arthropod lineages including insects. Lastly, these results highlight the power of using a network analysis approach to identify differential gene expression and provide novel

  7. Genome-wide analysis of N1ICD/RBPJ targets in vivo reveals direct transcriptional regulation of Wnt, SHH, and hippo pathway effectors by Notch1.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaochen; Hibbs, Matthew Aaron; Gard, Ashley Lauren; Shylo, Natalia Aliakseeuna; Yun, Kyuson

    2012-04-01

    The Notch pathway plays a pivotal role in regulating cell fate decisions in many stem cell systems. However, the full repertoire of Notch target genes in vivo and the mechanisms through which this pathway activity is integrated with other signaling pathways are largely unknown. Here, we report a transgenic mouse in which the activation of the Notch pathway massively expands the neural stem cell (NSC) pool in a cell context-dependent manner. Using this in vivo system, we identify direct targets of RBPJ/N1ICD in cortical NSCs at a genome-wide level through combined ChIP-Seq and transcriptome analyses. Through a highly conservative analysis of these datasets, we identified 98 genes that are directly regulated by N1ICD/RPBJ in vivo. These include many transcription factors that are known to be critical for NSC self-renewal (Sox2, Pax6, Tlx, and Id4) and the transcriptional effectors of the Wnt, SHH, and Hippo pathways, TCF4, Gli2, Gli3, Yap1, and Tead2. Since little is known about the function of the Hippo-Yap pathway in NSCs, we analyzed Yap1 expression and function in NSCs. We show that Yap1 expression is restricted to the stem cell compartment in the developing forebrain and that its expression is sufficient to rescue Notch pathway inhibition in NSC self-renewal assays. Together, results of this study reveal a previously underappreciated complexity and breadth of Notch1 targets in vivo and show direct interaction between Notch and Hippo-Yap pathways in NSCs.

  8. Genome-wide analysis reveals NRP1 as a direct HIF1α-E2F7 target in the regulation of motorneuron guidance in vivo

    PubMed Central

    de Bruin, Alain; A. Cornelissen, Peter W.; Kirchmaier, Bettina C.; Mokry, Michal; Iich, Elhadi; Nirmala, Ella; Liang, Kuo-Hsuan; D. Végh, Anna M.; Scholman, Koen T.; Groot Koerkamp, Marian J.; Holstege, Frank C.; Cuppen, Edwin; Schulte-Merker, Stefan; Bakker, Walbert J.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we explored the existence of a transcriptional network co-regulated by E2F7 and HIF1α, as we show that expression of E2F7, like HIF1α, is induced in hypoxia, and because of the previously reported ability of E2F7 to interact with HIF1α. Our genome-wide analysis uncovers a transcriptional network that is directly controlled by HIF1α and E2F7, and demonstrates both stimulatory and repressive functions of the HIF1α -E2F7 complex. Among this network we reveal Neuropilin 1 (NRP1) as a HIF1α-E2F7 repressed gene. By performing in vitro and in vivo reporter assays we demonstrate that the HIF1α-E2F7 mediated NRP1 repression depends on a 41 base pairs ‘E2F-binding site hub’, providing a molecular mechanism for a previously unanticipated role for HIF1α in transcriptional repression. To explore the biological significance of this regulation we performed in situ hybridizations and observed enhanced nrp1a expression in spinal motorneurons (MN) of zebrafish embryos, upon morpholino-inhibition of e2f7/8 or hif1α. Consistent with the chemo-repellent role of nrp1a, morpholino-inhibition of e2f7/8 or hif1α caused MN truncations, which was rescued in TALEN-induced nrp1ahu10012 mutants, and phenocopied in e2f7/8 mutant zebrafish. Therefore, we conclude that repression of NRP1 by the HIF1α-E2F7 complex regulates MN axon guidance in vivo. PMID:26681691

  9. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis in dermal fibroblasts from patients with diffuse and limited systemic sclerosis reveals common and subset-specific DNA methylation aberrancies

    PubMed Central

    Altorok, Nezam; Tsou, Pei-Suen; Coit, Patrick; Khanna, Dinesh; Sawalha, Amr H

    2014-01-01

    Background The aetiology of systemic sclerosis (SSc) is not clear, but there is an emerging evidence of gene-specific epigenetic dysregulation in the pathogenesis of SSc. Methods We performed a genome-wide DNA methylation study in dermal fibroblasts in six diffuse cutaneous SSc (dSSc) patients, six limited cutaneous SSc (lSSc) patients compared with 12 age-matched, sex-matched and ethnicity-matched healthy controls. Cytosine methylation was quantified in more than 485 000 methylation sites across the genome. Differentially methylated CpG sites between patients and controls with a fold difference ≥1.2 were identified. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR was performed to assess correlation between DNA methylation changes and gene expression levels. Results We identified 2710 and 1021 differentially methylated CpG sites in dSSc and lSSc, respectively. Of the differentially methylated sites, 61% in dSSc and 90% in lSSc were hypomethylated. There were only 203 CpG sites differentially methylated in both dSSc and lSSc, representing 118 hypomethylated and 6 hypermethylated genes. Common hypomethylated genes include ITGA9, encoding an α integrin. Other relevant genes such as ADAM12, COL23A1, COL4A2 and MYO1E, and transcription factors genes RUNX1, RUNX2 and RUNX3 were also hypomethylated in both dSSc and lSSc. Pathway analysis of differentially methylated genes in both dSSc and lSSc revealed enrichment of genes involved in extracellular matrix–receptor interaction and focal adhesion. We demonstrate significant correlation between DNA methylation status and gene expression in the majority of genes evaluated. Conclusions Our data highlight common and subset-specific aberrancies in dSSc and lSSc fibroblasts at the epigenomic levels and identify novel candidate genes in SSc. PMID:24812288

  10. Genome-Wide Analysis of the Phosphoinositide Kinome from Two Ciliates Reveals Novel Evolutionary Links for Phosphoinositide Kinases in Eukaryotic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Leondaritis, George; Siokos, John; Skaripa, Irini; Galanopoulou, Dia

    2013-01-01

    Background The complexity of phosphoinositide signaling in higher eukaryotes is partly due to expansion of specific families and types of phosphoinositide kinases (PIKs) that can generate all phosphoinositides via multiple routes. This is particularly evident in the PI3Ks and PIPKs, and it is considered an evolutionary trait associated with metazoan diversification. Yet, there are limited comprehensive studies on the PIK repertoire of free living unicellular organisms. Methodology/Principal Findings We undertook a genome-wide analysis of putative PIK genes in two free living ciliated cells, Tetrahymena and Paramecium. The Tetrahymena thermophila and Paramecium tetraurelia genomes were probed with representative kinases from all families and types. Putative homologs were verified by EST, microarray and deep RNA sequencing database searches and further characterized for domain structure, catalytic efficiency, expression patterns and phylogenetic relationships. In total, we identified and characterized 22 genes in the Tetrahymena thermophila genome and 62 highly homologues genes in Paramecium tetraurelia suggesting a tight evolutionary conservation in the ciliate lineage. Comparison to the kinome of fungi reveals a significant expansion of PIK genes in ciliates. Conclusions/Significance Our study highlights four important aspects concerning ciliate and other unicellular PIKs. First, ciliate-specific expansion of PI4KIII-like genes. Second, presence of class I PI3Ks which, at least in Tetrahymena, are associated with a metazoan-type machinery for PIP3 signaling. Third, expansion of divergent PIPK enzymes such as the recently described type IV transmembrane PIPKs. Fourth, presence of possible type II PIPKs and presumably inactive PIKs (hence, pseudo-PIKs) not previously described. Taken together, our results provide a solid framework for future investigation of the roles of PIKs in ciliates and indicate that novel functions and novel regulatory pathways of

  11. Genome-wide analysis of UDP-glycosyltransferase super family in Brassica rapa and Brassica oleracea reveals its evolutionary history and functional characterization.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jingyin; Hu, Fan; Dossa, Komivi; Wang, Zhaokai; Ke, Tao

    2017-06-23

    Glycosyltransferases comprise a highly divergent and polyphyletic multigene family that is involved in widespread modification of plant secondary metabolites in a process called glycosylation. According to conserved domains identified in their amino acid sequences, these glycosyltransferases can be classified into a single UDP-glycosyltransferase (UGT) 1 superfamily. We performed genome-wide comparative analysis of UGT genes to trace evolutionary history in algae, bryophytes, pteridophytes, and angiosperms; then, we further investigated the expansion mechanisms and function characterization of UGT gene families in Brassica rapa and Brassica oleracea. Using Hidden Markov Model search, we identified 3, 21, 140, 200, 115, 147, and 147 UGTs in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Physcomitrella patens, Selaginella moellendorffii, Oryza sativa, Arabidopsis thaliana, B. rapa, and B. oleracea, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that UGT80 gene family is an ancient gene family, which is shared by all plants and UGT74 gene family is shared by ferns and angiosperms, but the remaining UGT gene families were shared by angiosperms. In dicot lineage, UGTs among three species were classified into three subgroups containing 3, 6, and 12 UGT gene families. Analysis of chromosomal distribution indicates that 98.6 and 71.4% of UGTs were located on B. rapa and B. oleracea pseudo-molecules, respectively. Expansion mechanism analyses uncovered that whole genome duplication event exerted larger influence than tandem duplication on expansion of UGT gene families in B. rapa, and B. oleracea. Analysis of selection forces of UGT orthologous gene pairs in B. rapa, and B. oleracea compared to A. thaliana suggested that orthologous genes in B. rapa, and B. oleracea have undergone negative selection, but there were no significant differences between A. thaliana -B. rapa and A. thaliana -B. oleracea lineages. Our comparisons of expression profiling illustrated that UGTs in B. rapa performed more

  12. Genome-wide binding analysis of the transcription activator ideal plant architecture1 reveals a complex network regulating rice plant architecture.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zefu; Yu, Hong; Xiong, Guosheng; Wang, Jing; Jiao, Yongqing; Liu, Guifu; Jing, Yanhui; Meng, Xiangbing; Hu, Xingming; Qian, Qian; Fu, Xiangdong; Wang, Yonghong; Li, Jiayang

    2013-10-01

    Ideal plant architecture1 (IPA1) is critical in regulating rice (Oryza sativa) plant architecture and substantially enhances grain yield. To elucidate its molecular basis, we first confirmed IPA1 as a functional transcription activator and then identified 1067 and 2185 genes associated with IPA1 binding sites in shoot apices and young panicles, respectively, through chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing assays. The Squamosa promoter binding protein-box direct binding core motif GTAC was highly enriched in IPA1 binding peaks; interestingly, a previously uncharacterized indirect binding motif TGGGCC/T was found to be significantly enriched through the interaction of IPA1 with proliferating cell nuclear antigen promoter binding factor1 or promoter binding factor2. Genome-wide expression profiling by RNA sequencing revealed IPA1 roles in diverse pathways. Moreover, our results demonstrated that IPA1 could directly bind to the promoter of rice teosinte branched1, a negative regulator of tiller bud outgrowth, to suppress rice tillering, and directly and positively regulate dense and erect panicle1, an important gene regulating panicle architecture, to influence plant height and panicle length. The elucidation of target genes of IPA1 genome-wide will contribute to understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying plant architecture and to facilitating the breeding of elite varieties with ideal plant architecture.

  13. Genome-Wide Binding Analysis of the Transcription Activator IDEAL PLANT ARCHITECTURE1 Reveals a Complex Network Regulating Rice Plant Architecture[W

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zefu; Yu, Hong; Xiong, Guosheng; Wang, Jing; Jiao, Yongqing; Liu, Guifu; Jing, Yanhui; Meng, Xiangbing; Hu, Xingming; Qian, Qian; Fu, Xiangdong; Wang, Yonghong; Li, Jiayang

    2013-01-01

    IDEAL PLANT ARCHITECTURE1 (IPA1) is critical in regulating rice (Oryza sativa) plant architecture and substantially enhances grain yield. To elucidate its molecular basis, we first confirmed IPA1 as a functional transcription activator and then identified 1067 and 2185 genes associated with IPA1 binding sites in shoot apices and young panicles, respectively, through chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing assays. The SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-box direct binding core motif GTAC was highly enriched in IPA1 binding peaks; interestingly, a previously uncharacterized indirect binding motif TGGGCC/T was found to be significantly enriched through the interaction of IPA1 with proliferating cell nuclear antigen PROMOTER BINDING FACTOR1 or PROMOTER BINDING FACTOR2. Genome-wide expression profiling by RNA sequencing revealed IPA1 roles in diverse pathways. Moreover, our results demonstrated that IPA1 could directly bind to the promoter of rice TEOSINTE BRANCHED1, a negative regulator of tiller bud outgrowth, to suppress rice tillering, and directly and positively regulate DENSE AND ERECT PANICLE1, an important gene regulating panicle architecture, to influence plant height and panicle length. The elucidation of target genes of IPA1 genome-wide will contribute to understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying plant architecture and to facilitating the breeding of elite varieties with ideal plant architecture. PMID:24170127

  14. Genome-wide association interaction analysis for Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Gusareva, Elena S.; Carrasquillo, Minerva M.; Bellenguez, Céline; Cuyvers, Elise; Colon, Samuel; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Mahachie Johna, Jestinah M.; Bessonov, Kyrylo; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Williams, Julie; Amouyel, Philippe; Sleegers, Kristel; Ertekin-Taner, Nilüfer; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Van Steen, Kristel

    2015-01-01

    We propose a minimal protocol for exhaustive genome-wide association interaction analysis that involves screening for epistasis over large-scale genomic data combining strengths of different methods and statistical tools. The different steps of this protocol are illustrated on a real-life data application for Alzheimer's disease (AD) (2259 patients and 6017 controls from France). Particularly, in the exhaustive genome-wide epistasis screening we identified AD-associated interacting SNPs-pair from chromosome 6q11.1 (rs6455128, the KHDRBS2 gene) and 13q12.11 (rs7989332, the CRYL1 gene) (p = 0.006, corrected for multiple testing). A replication analysis in the independent AD cohort from Germany (555 patients and 824 controls) confirmed the discovered epistasis signal (p = 0.036). This signal was also supported by a meta-analysis approach in 5 independent AD cohorts that was applied in the context of epistasis for the first time. Transcriptome analysis revealed negative correlation between expression levels of KHDRBS2 and CRYL1 in both the temporal cortex (β = −0.19, p = 0.0006) and cerebellum (β = −0.23, p < 0.0001) brain regions. This is the first time a replicable epistasis associated with AD was identified using a hypothesis free screening approach. PMID:24958192

  15. High-Resolution Genome-Wide Analysis of Irradiated (UV and γ-Rays) Diploid Yeast Cells Reveals a High Frequency of Genomic Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH) Events

    PubMed Central

    St. Charles, Jordan; Hazkani-Covo, Einat; Yin, Yi; Andersen, Sabrina L.; Dietrich, Fred S.; Greenwell, Patricia W.; Malc, Ewa; Mieczkowski, Piotr; Petes, Thomas D.

    2012-01-01

    In diploid eukaryotes, repair of double-stranded DNA breaks by homologous recombination often leads to loss of heterozygosity (LOH). Most previous studies of mitotic recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have focused on a single chromosome or a single region of one chromosome at which LOH events can be selected. In this study, we used two techniques (single-nucleotide polymorphism microarrays and high-throughput DNA sequencing) to examine genome-wide LOH in a diploid yeast strain at a resolution averaging 1 kb. We examined both selected LOH events on chromosome V and unselected events throughout the genome in untreated cells and in cells treated with either γ-radiation or ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Our analysis shows the following: (1) spontaneous and damage-induced mitotic gene conversion tracts are more than three times larger than meiotic conversion tracts, and conversion tracts associated with crossovers are usually longer and more complex than those unassociated with crossovers; (2) most of the crossovers and conversions reflect the repair of two sister chromatids broken at the same position; and (3) both UV and γ-radiation efficiently induce LOH at doses of radiation that cause no significant loss of viability. Using high-throughput DNA sequencing, we also detected new mutations induced by γ-rays and UV. To our knowledge, our study represents the first high-resolution genome-wide analysis of DNA damage-induced LOH events performed in any eukaryote. PMID:22267500

  16. Genome-wide association analysis of blood-pressure traits in African-ancestry individuals reveals common associated genes in African and non-African populations.

    PubMed

    Franceschini, Nora; Fox, Ervin; Zhang, Zhaogong; Edwards, Todd L; Nalls, Michael A; Sung, Yun Ju; Tayo, Bamidele O; Sun, Yan V; Gottesman, Omri; Adeyemo, Adebawole; Johnson, Andrew D; Young, J Hunter; Rice, Ken; Duan, Qing; Chen, Fang; Li, Yun; Tang, Hua; Fornage, Myriam; Keene, Keith L; Andrews, Jeanette S; Smith, Jennifer A; Faul, Jessica D; Guangfa, Zhang; Guo, Wei; Liu, Yu; Murray, Sarah S; Musani, Solomon K; Srinivasan, Sathanur; Velez Edwards, Digna R; Wang, Heming; Becker, Lewis C; Bovet, Pascal; Bochud, Murielle; Broeckel, Ulrich; Burnier, Michel; Carty, Cara; Chasman, Daniel I; Ehret, Georg; Chen, Wei-Min; Chen, Guanjie; Chen, Wei; Ding, Jingzhong; Dreisbach, Albert W; Evans, Michele K; Guo, Xiuqing; Garcia, Melissa E; Jensen, Rich; Keller, Margaux F; Lettre, Guillaume; Lotay, Vaneet; Martin, Lisa W; Moore, Jason H; Morrison, Alanna C; Mosley, Thomas H; Ogunniyi, Adesola; Palmas, Walter; Papanicolaou, George; Penman, Alan; Polak, Joseph F; Ridker, Paul M; Salako, Babatunde; Singleton, Andrew B; Shriner, Daniel; Taylor, Kent D; Vasan, Ramachandran; Wiggins, Kerri; Williams, Scott M; Yanek, Lisa R; Zhao, Wei; Zonderman, Alan B; Becker, Diane M; Berenson, Gerald; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bottinger, Erwin; Cushman, Mary; Eaton, Charles; Nyberg, Fredrik; Heiss, Gerardo; Hirschhron, Joel N; Howard, Virginia J; Karczewsk, Konrad J; Lanktree, Matthew B; Liu, Kiang; Liu, Yongmei; Loos, Ruth; Margolis, Karen; Snyder, Michael; Psaty, Bruce M; Schork, Nicholas J; Weir, David R; Rotimi, Charles N; Sale, Michele M; Harris, Tamara; Kardia, Sharon L R; Hunt, Steven C; Arnett, Donna; Redline, Susan; Cooper, Richard S; Risch, Neil J; Rao, D C; Rotter, Jerome I; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Reiner, Alex P; Levy, Daniel; Keating, Brendan J; Zhu, Xiaofeng

    2013-09-05

    High blood pressure (BP) is more prevalent and contributes to more severe manifestations of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in African Americans than in any other United States ethnic group. Several small African-ancestry (AA) BP genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have been published, but their findings have failed to replicate to date. We report on a large AA BP GWAS meta-analysis that includes 29,378 individuals from 19 discovery cohorts and subsequent replication in additional samples of AA (n = 10,386), European ancestry (EA) (n = 69,395), and East Asian ancestry (n = 19,601). Five loci (EVX1-HOXA, ULK4, RSPO3, PLEKHG1, and SOX6) reached genome-wide significance (p < 1.0 × 10(-8)) for either systolic or diastolic BP in a transethnic meta-analysis after correction for multiple testing. Three of these BP loci (EVX1-HOXA, RSPO3, and PLEKHG1) lack previous associations with BP. We also identified one independent signal in a known BP locus (SOX6) and provide evidence for fine mapping in four additional validated BP loci. We also demonstrate that validated EA BP GWAS loci, considered jointly, show significant effects in AA samples. Consequently, these findings suggest that BP loci might have universal effects across studied populations, demonstrating that multiethnic samples are an essential component in identifying, fine mapping, and understanding their trait variability. Copyright © 2013 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. High-resolution genome-wide analysis of irradiated (UV and γ-rays) diploid yeast cells reveals a high frequency of genomic loss of heterozygosity (LOH) events.

    PubMed

    St Charles, Jordan; Hazkani-Covo, Einat; Yin, Yi; Andersen, Sabrina L; Dietrich, Fred S; Greenwell, Patricia W; Malc, Ewa; Mieczkowski, Piotr; Petes, Thomas D

    2012-04-01

    In diploid eukaryotes, repair of double-stranded DNA breaks by homologous recombination often leads to loss of heterozygosity (LOH). Most previous studies of mitotic recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have focused on a single chromosome or a single region of one chromosome at which LOH events can be selected. In this study, we used two techniques (single-nucleotide polymorphism microarrays and high-throughput DNA sequencing) to examine genome-wide LOH in a diploid yeast strain at a resolution averaging 1 kb. We examined both selected LOH events on chromosome V and unselected events throughout the genome in untreated cells and in cells treated with either γ-radiation or ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Our analysis shows the following: (1) spontaneous and damage-induced mitotic gene conversion tracts are more than three times larger than meiotic conversion tracts, and conversion tracts associated with crossovers are usually longer and more complex than those unassociated with crossovers; (2) most of the crossovers and conversions reflect the repair of two sister chromatids broken at the same position; and (3) both UV and γ-radiation efficiently induce LOH at doses of radiation that cause no significant loss of viability. Using high-throughput DNA sequencing, we also detected new mutations induced by γ-rays and UV. To our knowledge, our study represents the first high-resolution genome-wide analysis of DNA damage-induced LOH events performed in any eukaryote.

  18. Genome-wide Association Analysis of Blood-Pressure Traits in African-Ancestry Individuals Reveals Common Associated Genes in African and Non-African Populations

    PubMed Central

    Franceschini, Nora; Fox, Ervin; Zhang, Zhaogong; Edwards, Todd L.; Nalls, Michael A.; Sung, Yun Ju; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Sun, Yan V.; Gottesman, Omri; Adeyemo, Adebawole; Johnson, Andrew D.; Young, J. Hunter; Rice, Ken; Duan, Qing; Chen, Fang; Li, Yun; Tang, Hua; Fornage, Myriam; Keene, Keith L.; Andrews, Jeanette S.; Smith, Jennifer A.; Faul, Jessica D.; Guangfa, Zhang; Guo, Wei; Liu, Yu; Murray, Sarah S.; Musani, Solomon K.; Srinivasan, Sathanur; Velez Edwards, Digna R.; Wang, Heming; Becker, Lewis C.; Bovet, Pascal; Bochud, Murielle; Broeckel, Ulrich; Burnier, Michel; Carty, Cara; Chasman, Daniel I.; Ehret, Georg; Chen, Wei-Min; Chen, Guanjie; Chen, Wei; Ding, Jingzhong; Dreisbach, Albert W.; Evans, Michele K.; Guo, Xiuqing; Garcia, Melissa E.; Jensen, Rich; Keller, Margaux F.; Lettre, Guillaume; Lotay, Vaneet; Martin, Lisa W.; Moore, Jason H.; Morrison, Alanna C.; Mosley, Thomas H.; Ogunniyi, Adesola; Palmas, Walter; Papanicolaou, George; Penman, Alan; Polak, Joseph F.; Ridker, Paul M.; Salako, Babatunde; Singleton, Andrew B.; Shriner, Daniel; Taylor, Kent D.; Vasan, Ramachandran; Wiggins, Kerri; Williams, Scott M.; Yanek, Lisa R.; Zhao, Wei; Zonderman, Alan B.; Becker, Diane M.; Berenson, Gerald; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bottinger, Erwin; Cushman, Mary; Eaton, Charles; Nyberg, Fredrik; Heiss, Gerardo; Hirschhron, Joel N.; Howard, Virginia J.; Karczewsk, Konrad J.; Lanktree, Matthew B.; Liu, Kiang; Liu, Yongmei; Loos, Ruth; Margolis, Karen; Snyder, Michael; Go, Min Jin; Kim, Young Jin; Lee, Jong-Young; Jeon, Jae-Pil; Kim, Sung Soo; Han, Bok-Ghee; Cho, Yoon Shin; Sim, Xueling; Tay, Wan Ting; Ong, Rick Twee Hee; Seielstad, Mark; Liu, Jian Jun; Aung, Tin; Wong, Tien Yin; Teo, Yik Ying; Tai, E. Shyong; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; Chang, Li-ching; Chen, Yuan-Tsong; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Kelly, Tanika N.; Gu, Dongfeng; Hixson, James E.; Sung, Yun Ju; He, Jiang; Tabara, Yasuharu; Kokubo, Yoshihiro; Miki, Tetsuro; Iwai, Naoharu; Kato, Norihiro; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Nabika, Toru; Sugiyama, Takao; Zhang, Yi; Huang, Wei; Zhang, Xuegong; Zhou, Xueya; Jin, Li; Zhu, Dingliang; Psaty, Bruce M.; Schork, Nicholas J.; Weir, David R.; Rotimi, Charles N.; Sale, Michele M.; Harris, Tamara; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Hunt, Steven C.; Arnett, Donna; Redline, Susan; Cooper, Richard S.; Risch, Neil J.; Rao, D.C.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Reiner, Alex P.; Levy, Daniel; Keating, Brendan J.; Zhu, Xiaofeng

    2013-01-01

    High blood pressure (BP) is more prevalent and contributes to more severe manifestations of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in African Americans than in any other United States ethnic group. Several small African-ancestry (AA) BP genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have been published, but their findings have failed to replicate to date. We report on a large AA BP GWAS meta-analysis that includes 29,378 individuals from 19 discovery cohorts and subsequent replication in additional samples of AA (n = 10,386), European ancestry (EA) (n = 69,395), and East Asian ancestry (n = 19,601). Five loci (EVX1-HOXA, ULK4, RSPO3, PLEKHG1, and SOX6) reached genome-wide significance (p < 1.0 × 10−8) for either systolic or diastolic BP in a transethnic meta-analysis after correction for multiple testing. Three of these BP loci (EVX1-HOXA, RSPO3, and PLEKHG1) lack previous associations with BP. We also identified one independent signal in a known BP locus (SOX6) and provide evidence for fine mapping in four additional validated BP loci. We also demonstrate that validated EA BP GWAS loci, considered jointly, show significant effects in AA samples. Consequently, these findings suggest that BP loci might have universal effects across studied populations, demonstrating that multiethnic samples are an essential component in identifying, fine mapping, and understanding their trait variability. PMID:23972371

  19. Differential gene expression in soybean leaf tissues at late developmental stages under drought stress revealed by genome-wide transcriptome analysis.

    PubMed

    Le, Dung Tien; Nishiyama, Rie; Watanabe, Yasuko; Tanaka, Maho; Seki, Motoaki; Ham, Le Huy; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Tran, Lam-Son Phan

    2012-01-01

    The availability of complete genome sequence of soybean has allowed research community to design the 66 K Affymetrix Soybean Array GeneChip for genome-wide expression profiling of soybean. In this study, we carried out microarray analysis of leaf tissues of soybean plants, which were subjected to drought stress from late vegetative V6 and from full bloom reproductive R2 stages. Our data analyses showed that out of 46,093 soybean genes, which were predicted with high confidence among approximately 66,000 putative genes, 41,059 genes could be assigned with a known function. Using the criteria of a ratio change > = 2 and a q-value<0.05, we identified 1458 and 1818 upregulated and 1582 and 1688 downregulated genes in drought-stressed V6 and R2 leaves, respectively. These datasets were classified into 19 most abundant biological categories with similar proportions. There were only 612 and 463 genes that were overlapped among the upregulated and downregulated genes, respectively, in both stages, suggesting that both conserved and unconserved pathways might be involved in regulation of drought response in different stages of plant development. A comparative expression analysis using our datasets and that of drought stressed Arabidopsis leaves revealed the existence of both conserved and species-specific mechanisms that regulate drought responses. Many upregulated genes encode either regulatory proteins, such as transcription factors, including those with high homology to Arabidopsis DREB, NAC, AREB and ZAT/STZ transcription factors, kinases and two-component system members, or functional proteins, e.g. late embryogenesis-abundant proteins, glycosyltransferases, glycoside hydrolases, defensins and glyoxalase I family proteins. A detailed analysis of the GmNAC family and the hormone-related gene category showed that expression of many GmNAC and hormone-related genes was altered by drought in V6 and/or R2 leaves. Additionally, the downregulation of many photosynthesis

  20. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies 56 bone mineral density loci and reveals 14 loci associated with risk of fracture.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Karol; Styrkarsdottir, Unnur; Evangelou, Evangelos; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Duncan, Emma L; Ntzani, Evangelia E; Oei, Ling; Albagha, Omar M E; Amin, Najaf; Kemp, John P; Koller, Daniel L; Li, Guo; Liu, Ching-Ti; Minster, Ryan L; Moayyeri, Alireza; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Willner, Dana; Xiao, Su-Mei; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Zheng, Hou-Feng; Alonso, Nerea; Eriksson, Joel; Kammerer, Candace M; Kaptoge, Stephen K; Leo, Paul J; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Wilson, Scott G; Wilson, James F; Aalto, Ville; Alen, Markku; Aragaki, Aaron K; Aspelund, Thor; Center, Jacqueline R; Dailiana, Zoe; Duggan, David J; Garcia, Melissa; Garcia-Giralt, Natàlia; Giroux, Sylvie; Hallmans, Göran; Hocking, Lynne J; Husted, Lise Bjerre; Jameson, Karen A; Khusainova, Rita; Kim, Ghi Su; Kooperberg, Charles; Koromila, Theodora; Kruk, Marcin; Laaksonen, Marika; Lacroix, Andrea Z; Lee, Seung Hun; Leung, Ping C; Lewis, Joshua R; Masi, Laura; Mencej-Bedrac, Simona; Nguyen, Tuan V; Nogues, Xavier; Patel, Millan S; Prezelj, Janez; Rose, Lynda M; Scollen, Serena; Siggeirsdottir, Kristin; Smith, Albert V; Svensson, Olle; Trompet, Stella; Trummer, Olivia; van Schoor, Natasja M; Woo, Jean; Zhu, Kun; Balcells, Susana; Brandi, Maria Luisa; Buckley, Brendan M; Cheng, Sulin; Christiansen, Claus; Cooper, Cyrus; Dedoussis, George; Ford, Ian; Frost, Morten; Goltzman, David; González-Macías, Jesús; Kähönen, Mika; Karlsson, Magnus; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Koh, Jung-Min; Kollia, Panagoula; Langdahl, Bente Lomholt; Leslie, William D; Lips, Paul; Ljunggren, Östen; Lorenc, Roman S; Marc, Janja; Mellström, Dan; Obermayer-Pietsch, Barbara; Olmos, José M; Pettersson-Kymmer, Ulrika; Reid, David M; Riancho, José A; Ridker, Paul M; Rousseau, François; Slagboom, P Eline; Tang, Nelson L S; Urreizti, Roser; Van Hul, Wim; Viikari, Jorma; Zarrabeitia, María T; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Castano-Betancourt, Martha; Grundberg, Elin; Herrera, Lizbeth; Ingvarsson, Thorvaldur; Johannsdottir, Hrefna; Kwan, Tony; Li, Rui; Luben, Robert; Medina-Gómez, Carolina; Palsson, Stefan Th; Reppe, Sjur; Rotter, Jerome I; Sigurdsson, Gunnar; van Meurs, Joyce B J; Verlaan, Dominique; Williams, Frances M K; Wood, Andrew R; Zhou, Yanhua; Gautvik, Kaare M; Pastinen, Tomi; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Cauley, Jane A; Chasman, Daniel I; Clark, Graeme R; Cummings, Steven R; Danoy, Patrick; Dennison, Elaine M; Eastell, Richard; Eisman, John A; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hofman, Albert; Jackson, Rebecca D; Jones, Graeme; Jukema, J Wouter; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Lehtimäki, Terho; Liu, Yongmei; Lorentzon, Mattias; McCloskey, Eugene; Mitchell, Braxton D; Nandakumar, Kannabiran; Nicholson, Geoffrey C; Oostra, Ben A; Peacock, Munro; Pols, Huibert A P; Prince, Richard L; Raitakari, Olli; Reid, Ian R; Robbins, John; Sambrook, Philip N; Sham, Pak Chung; Shuldiner, Alan R; Tylavsky, Frances A; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Wareham, Nick J; Cupples, L Adrienne; Econs, Michael J; Evans, David M; Harris, Tamara B; Kung, Annie Wai Chee; Psaty, Bruce M; Reeve, Jonathan; Spector, Timothy D; Streeten, Elizabeth A; Zillikens, M Carola; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Ohlsson, Claes; Karasik, David; Richards, J Brent; Brown, Matthew A; Stefansson, Kari; Uitterlinden, André G; Ralston, Stuart H; Ioannidis, John P A; Kiel, Douglas P; Rivadeneira, Fernando

    2012-04-15

    Bone mineral density (BMD) is the most widely used predictor of fracture risk. We performed the largest meta-analysis to date on lumbar spine and femoral neck BMD, including 17 genome-wide association studies and 32,961 individuals of European and east Asian ancestry. We tested the top BMD-associated markers for replication in 50,933 independent subjects and for association with risk of low-trauma fracture in 31,016 individuals with a history of fracture (cases) and 102,444 controls. We identified 56 loci (32 new) associated with BMD at genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10(-8)). Several of these factors cluster within the RANK-RANKL-OPG, mesenchymal stem cell differentiation, endochondral ossification and Wnt signaling pathways. However, we also discovered loci that were localized to genes not known to have a role in bone biology. Fourteen BMD-associated loci were also associated with fracture risk (P < 5 × 10(-4), Bonferroni corrected), of which six reached P < 5 × 10(-8), including at 18p11.21 (FAM210A), 7q21.3 (SLC25A13), 11q13.2 (LRP5), 4q22.1 (MEPE), 2p16.2 (SPTBN1) and 10q21.1 (DKK1). These findings shed light on the genetic architecture and pathophysiological mechanisms underlying BMD variation and fracture susceptibility.

  1. Deep sequencing and genome-wide analysis reveals the expansion of MicroRNA genes in the gall midge Mayetiola destructor

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that play critical roles in regulating post transcriptional gene expression. Gall midges encompass a large group of insects that are of economic importance and also possess fascinating biological traits. The gall midge Mayetiola destructor, commonly known as the Hessian fly, is a destructive pest of wheat and model organism for studying gall midge biology and insect – host plant interactions. Results In this study, we systematically analyzed miRNAs from the Hessian fly. Deep-sequencing a Hessian fly larval transcriptome led to the identification of 89 miRNA species that are either identical or very similar to known miRNAs from other insects, and 184 novel miRNAs that have not been reported from other species. A genome-wide search through a draft Hessian fly genome sequence identified a total of 611 putative miRNA-encoding genes based on sequence similarity and the existence of a stem-loop structure for miRNA precursors. Analysis of the 611 putative genes revealed a striking feature: the dramatic expansion of several miRNA gene families. The largest family contained 91 genes that encoded 20 different miRNAs. Microarray analyses revealed the expression of miRNA genes was strictly regulated during Hessian fly larval development and abundance of many miRNA genes were affected by host genotypes. Conclusion The identification of a large number of miRNAs for the first time from a gall midge provides a foundation for further studies of miRNA functions in gall midge biology and behavior. The dramatic expansion of identical or similar miRNAs provides a unique system to study functional relations among miRNA iso-genes as well as changes in sequence specificity due to small changes in miRNAs and in their mRNA targets. These results may also facilitate the identification of miRNA genes for potential pest control through transgenic approaches. PMID:23496979

  2. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis in dermal fibroblasts from patients with diffuse and limited systemic sclerosis reveals common and subset-specific DNA methylation aberrancies.

    PubMed

    Altorok, Nezam; Tsou, Pei-Suen; Coit, Patrick; Khanna, Dinesh; Sawalha, Amr H

    2015-08-01

    The aetiology of systemic sclerosis (SSc) is not clear, but there is an emerging evidence of gene-specific epigenetic dysregulation in the pathogenesis of SSc. We performed a genome-wide DNA methylation study in dermal fibroblasts in six diffuse cutaneous SSc (dSSc) patients, six limited cutaneous SSc (lSSc) patients compared with 12 age-matched, sex-matched and ethnicity-matched healthy controls. Cytosine methylation was quantified in more than 485 000 methylation sites across the genome. Differentially methylated CpG sites between patients and controls with a fold difference ≥1.2 were identified. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR was performed to assess correlation between DNA methylation changes and gene expression levels. We identified 2710 and 1021 differentially methylated CpG sites in dSSc and lSSc, respectively. Of the differentially methylated sites, 61% in dSSc and 90% in lSSc were hypomethylated. There were only 203 CpG sites differentially methylated in both dSSc and lSSc, representing 118 hypomethylated and 6 hypermethylated genes. Common hypomethylated genes include ITGA9, encoding an α integrin. Other relevant genes such as ADAM12, COL23A1, COL4A2 and MYO1E, and transcription factors genes RUNX1, RUNX2 and RUNX3 were also hypomethylated in both dSSc and lSSc. Pathway analysis of differentially methylated genes in both dSSc and lSSc revealed enrichment of genes involved in extracellular matrix-receptor interaction and focal adhesion. We demonstrate significant correlation between DNA methylation status and gene expression in the majority of genes evaluated. Our data highlight common and subset-specific aberrancies in dSSc and lSSc fibroblasts at the epigenomic levels and identify novel candidate genes in SSc. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  3. Genome-wide association and pathway analysis of feed efficiency in pigs reveal candidate genes and pathways for residual feed intake

    PubMed Central

    Do, Duy N.; Strathe, Anders B.; Ostersen, Tage; Pant, Sameer D.; Kadarmideen, Haja N.

    2014-01-01

    Residual feed intake (RFI) is a complex trait that is economically important for livestock production; however, the genetic and biological mechanisms regulating RFI are largely unknown in pigs. Therefore, the study aimed to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), candidate genes and biological pathways involved in regulating RFI using Genome-wide association (GWA) and pathway analyses. A total of 596 Yorkshire boars with phenotypes for two different measures of RFI (RFI1 and 2) and 60k genotypic data was used. GWA analysis was performed using a univariate mixed model and 12 and 7 SNPs were found to be significantly associated with RFI1 and RFI2, respectively. Several genes such as xin actin-binding repeat-containing protein 2 (XIRP2),tetratricopeptide repeat domain 29 (TTC29),suppressor of glucose, autophagy associated 1 (SOGA1),MAS1,G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) kinase 5 (GRK5),prospero-homeobox protein 1 (PROX1),GPCR 155 (GPR155), and FYVE domain containing the 26 (ZFYVE26) were identified as putative candidates for RFI based on their genomic location in the vicinity of these SNPs. Genes located within 50 kbp of SNPs significantly associated with RFI and RFI2 (q-value ≤ 0.2) were subsequently used for pathway analyses. These analyses were performed by assigning genes to biological pathways and then testing the association of individual pathways with RFI using a Fisher’s exact test. Metabolic pathway was significantly associated with both RFIs. Other biological pathways regulating phagosome, tight junctions, olfactory transduction, and insulin secretion were significantly associated with both RFI traits when relaxed threshold for cut-off p-value was used (p ≤ 0.05). These results implied porcine RFI is regulated by multiple biological mechanisms, although the metabolic processes might be the most important. Olfactory transduction pathway controlling the perception of feed via smell, insulin pathway controlling food intake might be important

  4. Genome-wide association and pathway analysis of feed efficiency in pigs reveal candidate genes and pathways for residual feed intake.

    PubMed

    Do, Duy N; Strathe, Anders B; Ostersen, Tage; Pant, Sameer D; Kadarmideen, Haja N

    2014-01-01

    Residual feed intake (RFI) is a complex trait that is economically important for livestock production; however, the genetic and biological mechanisms regulating RFI are largely unknown in pigs. Therefore, the study aimed to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), candidate genes and biological pathways involved in regulating RFI using Genome-wide association (GWA) and pathway analyses. A total of 596 Yorkshire boars with phenotypes for two different measures of RFI (RFI1 and 2) and 60k genotypic data was used. GWA analysis was performed using a univariate mixed model and 12 and 7 SNPs were found to be significantly associated with RFI1 and RFI2, respectively. Several genes such as xin actin-binding repeat-containing protein 2 (XIRP2),tetratricopeptide repeat domain 29 (TTC29),suppressor of glucose, autophagy associated 1 (SOGA1),MAS1,G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) kinase 5 (GRK5),prospero-homeobox protein 1 (PROX1),GPCR 155 (GPR155), and FYVE domain containing the 26 (ZFYVE26) were identified as putative candidates for RFI based on their genomic location in the vicinity of these SNPs. Genes located within 50 kbp of SNPs significantly associated with RFI and RFI2 (q-value ≤ 0.2) were subsequently used for pathway analyses. These analyses were performed by assigning genes to biological pathways and then testing the association of individual pathways with RFI using a Fisher's exact test. Metabolic pathway was significantly associated with both RFIs. Other biological pathways regulating phagosome, tight junctions, olfactory transduction, and insulin secretion were significantly associated with both RFI traits when relaxed threshold for cut-off p-value was used (p ≤ 0.05). These results implied porcine RFI is regulated by multiple biological mechanisms, although the metabolic processes might be the most important. Olfactory transduction pathway controlling the perception of feed via smell, insulin pathway controlling food intake might be important

  5. Genome-wide analysis of H3.3 dissociation reveals high nucleosome turnover at distal regulatory regions of embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ha, Misook; Kraushaar, Daniel C; Zhao, Keji

    2014-01-01

    The histone variant H3.3 plays a critical role in maintaining the pluripotency of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) by regulating gene expression programs important for lineage specification. H3.3 is deposited by various chaperones at regulatory sites, gene bodies, and certain heterochromatic sites such as telomeres and centromeres. Using Tet-inhibited expression of epitope-tagged H3.3 combined with ChIP-Seq we undertook genome-wide measurements of H3.3 dissociation rates across the ESC genome and examined the relationship between H3.3-nucleosome turnover and ESC-specific transcription factors, chromatin modifiers, and epigenetic marks. Our comprehensive analysis of H3.3 dissociation rates revealed distinct H3.3 dissociation dynamics at various functional chromatin domains. At transcription start sites, H3.3 dissociates rapidly with the highest rate at nucleosome-depleted regions (NDRs) just upstream of Pol II binding, followed by low H3.3 dissociation rates across gene bodies. H3.3 turnover at transcription start sites, gene bodies, and transcription end sites was positively correlated with transcriptional activity. H3.3 is found decorated with various histone modifications that regulate transcription and maintain chromatin integrity. We find greatly varying H3.3 dissociation rates across various histone modification domains: high dissociation rates at active histone marks and low dissociation rates at heterochromatic marks. Well- defined zones of high H3.3-nucleosome turnover were detected at binding sites of ESC-specific pluripotency factors and chromatin remodelers, suggesting an important role for H3.3 in facilitating protein binding. Among transcription factor binding sites we detected higher H3.3 turnover at distal cis-acting sites compared to proximal genic transcription factor binding sites. Our results imply that fast H3.3 dissociation is a hallmark of interactions between DNA and transcriptional regulators. Our study demonstrates that H3.3 turnover and

  6. Genome-wide analysis of rare copy number variations reveals PARK2 as a candidate gene for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    PubMed Central

    Jarick, I; Volckmar, A-L; Pütter, C; Pechlivanis, S; Nguyen, T T; Dauvermann, M R; Beck, S; Albayrak, Ö; Scherag, S; Gilsbach, S; Cichon, S; Hoffmann, P; Degenhardt, F; Nöthen, M M; Schreiber, S; Wichmann, H-E; Jöckel, K-H; Heinrich, J; Tiesler, C M T; Faraone, S V; Walitza, S; Sinzig, J; Freitag, C; Meyer, J; Herpertz-Dahlmann, B; Lehmkuhl, G; Renner, T J; Warnke, A; Romanos, M; Lesch, K-P; Reif, A; Schimmelmann, B G; Hebebrand, J; Scherag, A; Hinney, A

    2014-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common, highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorder. Genetic loci have not yet been identified by genome-wide association studies. Rare copy number variations (CNVs), such as chromosomal deletions or duplications, have been implicated in ADHD and other neurodevelopmental disorders. To identify rare (frequency ⩽1%) CNVs that increase the risk of ADHD, we performed a whole-genome CNV analysis based on 489 young ADHD patients and 1285 adult population-based controls and identified one significantly associated CNV region. In tests for a global burden of large (>500 kb) rare CNVs, we observed a nonsignificant (P=0.271) 1.126-fold enriched rate of subjects carrying at least one such CNV in the group of ADHD cases. Locus-specific tests of association were used to assess if there were more rare CNVs in cases compared with controls. Detected CNVs, which were significantly enriched in the ADHD group, were validated by quantitative (q)PCR. Findings were replicated in an independent sample of 386 young patients with ADHD and 781 young population-based healthy controls. We identified rare CNVs within the parkinson protein 2 gene (PARK2) with a significantly higher prevalence in ADHD patients than in controls (P=2.8 × 10−4 after empirical correction for genome-wide testing). In total, the PARK2 locus (chr 6: 162 659 756–162 767 019) harboured three deletions and nine duplications in the ADHD patients and two deletions and two duplications in the controls. By qPCR analysis, we validated 11 of the 12 CNVs in ADHD patients (P=1.2 × 10−3 after empirical correction for genome-wide testing). In the replication sample, CNVs at the PARK2 locus were found in four additional ADHD patients and one additional control (P=4.3 × 10−2). Our results suggest that copy number variants at the PARK2 locus contribute to the genetic susceptibility of ADHD. Mutations and CNVs in PARK2 are known to be associated with Parkinson

  7. Genome-wide analysis of ivermectin response by Onchocerca volvulus reveals that genetic drift and soft selective sweeps contribute to loss of drug sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Nana-Djeunga, Hugues C.; Kengne-Ouafo, Jonas A.; Pion, Sébastien D. S.; Bopda, Jean; Kamgno, Joseph; Wanji, Samuel; Che, Hua; Kuesel, Annette C.; Walker, Martin; Basáñez, Maria-Gloria; Boakye, Daniel A.; Osei-Atweneboana, Mike Y.; Boussinesq, Michel; Prichard, Roger K.; Grant, Warwick N.

    2017-01-01

    Background Treatment of onchocerciasis using mass ivermectin administration has reduced morbidity and transmission throughout Africa and Central/South America. Mass drug administration is likely to exert selection pressure on parasites, and phenotypic and genetic changes in several Onchocerca volvulus populations from Cameroon and Ghana—exposed to more than a decade of regular ivermectin treatment—have raised concern that sub-optimal responses to ivermectin's anti-fecundity effect are becoming more frequent and may spread. Methodology/Principal findings Pooled next generation sequencing (Pool-seq) was used to characterise genetic diversity within and between 108 adult female worms differing in ivermectin treatment history and response. Genome-wide analyses revealed genetic variation that significantly differentiated good responder (GR) and sub-optimal responder (SOR) parasites. These variants were not randomly distributed but clustered in ~31 quantitative trait loci (QTLs), with little overlap in putative QTL position and gene content between the two countries. Published candidate ivermectin SOR genes were largely absent in these regions; QTLs differentiating GR and SOR worms were enriched for genes in molecular pathways associated with neurotransmission, development, and stress responses. Finally, single worm genotyping demonstrated that geographic isolation and genetic change over time (in the presence of drug exposure) had a significantly greater role in shaping genetic diversity than the evolution of SOR. Conclusions/Significance This study is one of the first genome-wide association analyses in a parasitic nematode, and provides insight into the genomics of ivermectin response and population structure of O. volvulus. We argue that ivermectin response is a polygenically-determined quantitative trait (QT) whereby identical or related molecular pathways but not necessarily individual genes are likely to determine the extent of ivermectin response in different

  8. Genome-wide analysis of ivermectin response by Onchocerca volvulus reveals that genetic drift and soft selective sweeps contribute to loss of drug sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Stephen R; Bourguinat, Catherine; Nana-Djeunga, Hugues C; Kengne-Ouafo, Jonas A; Pion, Sébastien D S; Bopda, Jean; Kamgno, Joseph; Wanji, Samuel; Che, Hua; Kuesel, Annette C; Walker, Martin; Basáñez, Maria-Gloria; Boakye, Daniel A; Osei-Atweneboana, Mike Y; Boussinesq, Michel; Prichard, Roger K; Grant, Warwick N

    2017-07-01

    Treatment of onchocerciasis using mass ivermectin administration has reduced morbidity and transmission throughout Africa and Central/South America. Mass drug administration is likely to exert selection pressure on parasites, and phenotypic and genetic changes in several Onchocerca volvulus populations from Cameroon and Ghana-exposed to more than a decade of regular ivermectin treatment-have raised concern that sub-optimal responses to ivermectin's anti-fecundity effect are becoming more frequent and may spread. Pooled next generation sequencing (Pool-seq) was used to characterise genetic diversity within and between 108 adult female worms differing in ivermectin treatment history and response. Genome-wide analyses revealed genetic variation that significantly differentiated good responder (GR) and sub-optimal responder (SOR) parasites. These variants were not randomly distributed but clustered in ~31 quantitative trait loci (QTLs), with little overlap in putative QTL position and gene content between the two countries. Published candidate ivermectin SOR genes were largely absent in these regions; QTLs differentiating GR and SOR worms were enriched for genes in molecular pathways associated with neurotransmission, development, and stress responses. Finally, single worm genotyping demonstrated that geographic isolation and genetic change over time (in the presence of drug exposure) had a significantly greater role in shaping genetic diversity than the evolution of SOR. This study is one of the first genome-wide association analyses in a parasitic nematode, and provides insight into the genomics of ivermectin response and population structure of O. volvulus. We argue that ivermectin response is a polygenically-determined quantitative trait (QT) whereby identical or related molecular pathways but not necessarily individual genes are likely to determine the extent of ivermectin response in different parasite populations. Furthermore, we propose that genetic drift

  9. Genome-wide functional analysis of CREB/long-term memory-dependent transcription reveals distinct basal and memory gene expression programs.

    PubMed

    Lakhina, Vanisha; Arey, Rachel N; Kaletsky, Rachel; Kauffman, Amanda; Stein, Geneva; Keyes, William; Xu, Daniel; Murphy, Coleen T

    2015-01-21

    Induced CREB activity is a hallmark of long-term memory, but the full repertoire of CREB transcriptional targets required specifically for memory is not known in any system. To obtain a more complete picture of the mechanisms involved in memory, we combined memory training with genome-wide transcriptional analysis of C. elegans CREB mutants. This approach identified 757 significant CREB/memory-induced targets and confirmed the involvement of known memory genes from other organisms, but also suggested new mechanisms and novel components that may be conserved through mammals. CREB mediates distinct basal and memory transcriptional programs at least partially through spatial restriction of CREB activity: basal targets are regulated primarily in nonneuronal tissues, while memory targets are enriched for neuronal expression, emanating from CREB activity in AIM neurons. This suite of novel memory-associated genes will provide a platform for the discovery of orthologous mammalian long-term memory components.

  10. Genome-wide Functional Analysis of CREB/Long-Term Memory-Dependent Transcription Reveals Distinct Basal and Memory Gene Expression Programs

    PubMed Central

    Lakhina, Vanisha; Arey, Rachel N.; Kaletsky, Rachel; Kauffman, Amanda; Stein, Geneva; Keyes, William; Xu, Daniel; Murphy, Coleen T.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Induced CREB activity is a hallmark of long-term memory, but the full repertoire of CREB transcriptional targets required specifically for memory is not known in any system. To obtain a more complete picture of the mechanisms involved in memory, we combined memory training with genome-wide transcriptional analysis of C. elegans CREB mutants. This approach identified 757 significant CREB/memory-induced targets and confirmed the involvement of known memory genes from other organisms, but also suggested new mechanisms and novel components that may be conserved through mammals. CREB mediates distinct basal and memory transcriptional programs at least partially through spatial restriction of CREB activity: basal targets are regulated primarily in nonneuronal tissues, while memory targets are enriched for neuronal expression, emanating from CREB activity in AIM neurons. This suite of novel memory-associated genes will provide a platform for the discovery of orthologous mammalian long-term memory components. PMID:25611510

  11. Genome-wide association analysis reveals variants on chromosome 19 that contribute to childhood risk of chronic otitis media with effusion

    PubMed Central

    Einarsdottir, Elisabet; Hafrén, Lena; Leinonen, Eira; Bhutta, Mahmood F.; Kentala, Erna; Kere, Juha; Mattila, Petri S.

    2016-01-01

    To identify genetic risk factors of childhood otitis media (OM), a genome-wide association study was performed on Finnish subjects, 829 affected children, and 2118 randomly selected controls. The most significant and validated finding was an association with an 80 kb region on chromosome 19. It includes the variants rs16974263 (P = 1.77 × 10−7, OR = 1.59), rs268662 (P = 1.564 × 10−6, OR = 1.54), and rs4150992 (P = 3.37 × 10−6, OR = 1.52), and harbors the genes PLD3, SERTAD1, SERTAD3, HIPK4, PRX, and BLVRB, all in strong linkage disequilibrium. In a sub-phenotype analysis of the 512 patients with chronic otitis media with effusion, one marker reached genome-wide significance (rs16974263, P = 2.92 × 10−8). The association to this locus was confirmed but with an association signal in the opposite direction, in a UK family cohort of 4860 subjects (rs16974263, P = 3.21 × 10−4, OR = 0.72; rs4150992, P = 1.62 × 10−4, OR = 0.71). Thus we hypothesize that this region is important for COME risk in both the Finnish and UK populations, although the precise risk variants or haplotype background remain unclear. Our study suggests that the identified region on chromosome 19 includes a novel and previously uncharacterized risk locus for OM. PMID:27632927

  12. Genome-wide analysis of copy number variations reveals that aging processes influence body fat distribution in Korea Associated Resource (KARE) cohorts.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bo-Young; Shin, Dong Hyun; Cho, Seoae; Seo, Kang-Seok; Kim, Heebal

    2012-11-01

    Many anthropometric measures, including body mass index (BMI), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), and subcutaneous fat thickness, are used as indicators of nutritional status, fertility and predictors of future health outcomes. While BMI is currently the best available estimate of body adiposity, WHR and skinfold thickness at various sites (biceps, triceps, suprailiac, and subscapular) are used as indices of body fat distribution. Copy number variation (CNV) is an attractive emerging approach to the study of associations with various diseases. In this study, we investigated the dosage effect of genes in the CNV genome widely associated with fat distribution phenotypes in large cohorts. We used the Affymetrix genome-wide human SNP Array 5.0 data of 8,842 healthy unrelated adults in KARE cohorts and identified CNVs associated with BMI and fat distribution-related traits including WHR and subcutaneous skinfold thickness at suprailiac (SUP) and subscapular (SUB) sites. CNV segmentation of each chromosome was performed using Golden Helix SVS 7.0, and single regression analysis was used to identify CNVs associated with each phenotype. We found one CNV for BMI, 287 for WHR, 2,157 for SUP, and 2,102 for SUB at the 5% significance level after Holm-Bonferroni correction. Genes included in the CNV were used for the analysis of functional annotations using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID v6.7b) tool. Functional gene classification analysis identified five significant gene clusters (metallothionein, ATP-binding proteins, ribosomal proteins, kinesin family members, and zinc finger proteins) for SUP, three (keratin-associated proteins, zinc finger proteins, keratins) for SUB, and one (protamines) for WHR. BMI was excluded from this analysis because the entire structure of no gene was identified in the CNV. Based on the analysis of genes enriched in the clusters, the fat distribution traits of KARE cohorts were related to the fat redistribution

  13. A novel statistic for genome-wide interaction analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xuesen; Dong, Hua; Luo, Li; Zhu, Yun; Peng, Gang; Reveille, John D; Xiong, Momiao

    2010-09-23

    Although great progress in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has been made, the significant SNP associations identified by GWAS account for only a few percent of the genetic variance, leading many to question where and how we can find the missing heritability. There is increasing interest in genome-wide interaction analysis as a possible source of finding heritability unexplained by current GWAS. However, the existing statistics for testing interaction have low power for genome-wide interaction analysis. To meet challenges raised by genome-wide interactional analysis, we have developed a novel statistic for testing interaction between two loci (either linked or unlinked). The null distribution and the type I error rates of the new statistic for testing interaction are validated using simulations. Extensive power studies show that the developed statistic has much higher power to detect interaction than classical logistic regression. The results identified 44 and 211 pairs of SNPs showing significant evidence of interactions with FDR<0.001 and 0.001genome-wide interaction analysis is a valuable tool for finding remaining missing heritability unexplained by the current GWAS, and the developed novel statistic is able to search significant interaction between SNPs across the genome. Real data analysis showed that the results of genome-wide interaction analysis can be replicated in two independent studies.

  14. Genome-wide analysis of MEF2 transcriptional program reveals synaptic target genes and neuronal activity-dependent polyadenylation site selection

    PubMed Central

    Flavell, Steven W.; Kim, Tae-Kyung; Gray, Jesse M.; Harmin, David A.; Hemberg, Martin; Hong, Elizabeth J.; Markenscoff-Papadimitriou, Eirene; Bear, Daniel M.; Greenberg, Michael E.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Although many transcription factors are known to control important aspects of neural development, the genome-wide programs that are directly regulated by these factors are not known. We have characterized the genetic program that is activated by MEF2, a key regulator of activity-dependent synapse development. These MEF2 target genes have diverse functions at synapses, revealing a broad role for MEF2 in synapse development. Several of the MEF2 targets are mutated in human neurological disorders including epilepsy and autism-spectrum disorders, suggesting that these disorders may be caused by disruption of an activity-dependent gene program that controls synapse development. Our analyses also reveal that neuronal activity promotes alternative polyadenylation site usage at many of the MEF2 target genes, leading to the production of truncated mRNAs that may have different functions than their full-length counterparts. Taken together, these analyses suggest that the ubiquitously expressed transcription factor MEF2 regulates an intricate transcriptional program in neurons that controls synapse development. PMID:19109909

  15. Genome-wide SNP analysis reveals population structure and demographic history of the ryukyu islanders in the southern part of the Japanese archipelago.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takehiro; Nakagome, Shigeki; Watanabe, Chiaki; Yamaguchi, Kyoko; Kawaguchi, Akira; Koganebuchi, Kae; Haneji, Kuniaki; Yamaguchi, Tetsutaro; Hanihara, Tsunehiko; Yamamoto, Ken; Ishida, Hajime; Mano, Shuhei; Kimura, Ryosuke; Oota, Hiroki

    2014-11-01

    The Ryukyu Islands are located to the southwest of the Japanese archipelago. Archaeological evidence has revealed the existence of prehistoric cultural differentiation between the northern Ryukyu islands of Amami and Okinawa, and the southern Ryukyu islands of Miyako and Yaeyama. To examine a genetic subdivision in the Ryukyu Islands, we conducted genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism typing of inhabitants from the Okinawa Islands, the Miyako Islands, and the Yaeyama Islands. Principal component and cluster analyses revealed genetic differentiation among the island groups, especially between Okinawa and Miyako. No genetic affinity was observed between aboriginal Taiwanese and any of the Ryukyu populations. The genetic differentiation observed between the inhabitants of the Okinawa Islands and the Miyako Islands is likely to have arisen due to genetic drift rather than admixture with people from neighboring regions. Based on the observed genetic differences, the divergence time between the inhabitants of Okinawa and Miyako islands was dated to the Holocene. These findings suggest that the Pleistocene inhabitants, whose bones have been found on the southern Ryukyu Islands, did not make a major genetic contribution, if any, to the present-day inhabitants of the southern Ryukyu Islands.

  16. Genome-Wide Analysis of the Fasciclin-Like Arabinogalactan Protein Gene Family Reveals Differential Expression Patterns, Localization, and Salt Stress Response in Populus

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Lina; Zheng, Tangchun; Chu, Yanguang; Ding, Changjun; Zhang, Weixi; Huang, Qinjun; Su, Xiaohua

    2015-01-01

    Fasciclin-like arabinogalactan proteins (FLAs) are a subclass of arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) involved in plant growth, development and response to abiotic stress. Although many studies have been performed to identify molecular functions of individual family members, little information is available on genome-wide identification and characterization of FLAs in the genus Populus. Based on genome-wide analysis, we have identified 35 Populus FLAs which were distributed on 16 chromosomes and phylogenetically clustered into four major groups. Gene structure and motif composition were relatively conserved in each group. All the members contained N-terminal signal peptide, 23 of which included predicted glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) modification sites and were anchored to plasma membranes. Subcellular localization analysis showed that PtrFLA2/20/26 were localized in cell membrane and cytoplasm of protoplasts from Populus stem-differentiating xylem. The Ka/Ks ratios showed that purifying selection has played a leading role in the long-term evolutionary period which greatly maintained the function of this family. The expression profiles showed that 32 PtrFLAs were differentially expressed in four tissues at four seasons based on publicly available microarray data. 18 FLAs were further verified with qRT-PCR in different tissues, which indicated that PtrFLA1/2/3/7/11/12/20/21/22/24/26/30 were significantly expressed in male and female flowers, suggesting close correlations with the reproductive development. In addition, PtrFLA1/9/10/11/17/21/23/24/26/28 were highly expressed in the stems and differentiating xylem, which may be involved in stem development. To determine salt response of FLAs, qRT-PCR was performed to analyze the expression of 18 genes under salinity stress across two time points. Results demonstrated that all the 18 FLAs were expressed in root tissues; especially, PtrFLA2/12/20/21/24/30 were significantly induced at different time points. In summary

  17. A combination of genome-wide association and transcriptome analysis reveals candidate genes controlling harvest index-related traits in Brassica napus

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Kun; Xiao, Zhongchun; Jian, Hongju; Peng, Liu; Qu, Cunmin; Fu, Minglian; He, Bin; Tie, Linmei; Liang, Ying; Xu, Xingfu; Li, Jiana

    2016-01-01

    Harvest index (HI), the ratio of seed mass to total biomass of the aboveground plant parts, is an important trait for harvestable yield of crops. Unfortunately, HI of Brassica napus is lower than that of other economically important crops. To identify candidate genes associated with high HI, a genome-wide association study of HI and four HI-related traits was conducted with 520 B. napus accessions cultivated in both Yunnan and Chongqing. We detected 294 single nucleotide polymorphisms significantly associated with the abovementioned traits, including 79 SNPs that affected two or more traits. Differentially expressed genes between extremely high- and low-HI accessions were identified in 8 tissues at two cultivated regions. Combination of linkage disequilibrium and transcriptome analyses revealed 33 functional candidate genes located within the confidence intervals of significant SNPs associated with more than one trait, such as SHOOT GRAVITROPISM 5 (Bna.SGR5), ATP-CITRATE LYASE A-3 (Bna.ACLA-3) and CAROTENOID CLEAVAGE DIOXYGENASE 1 (Bna.CCD1), their orthologs in the Arabidopsis thaliana have been shown to play key roles in photosynthesis, inflorescence, and silique development. Our results provide insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying establishment of high-HI B. napus and lay a foundation for characterization of candidate genes aimed at developing high-HI B. napus varieties. PMID:27811979

  18. Genome-wide parent-of-origin DNA methylation analysis reveals the intricacies of human imprinting and suggests a germline methylation-independent mechanism of establishment

    PubMed Central

    Court, Franck; Tayama, Chiharu; Romanelli, Valeria; Martin-Trujillo, Alex; Iglesias-Platas, Isabel; Okamura, Kohji; Sugahara, Naoko; Simón, Carlos; Moore, Harry; Harness, Julie V.; Keirstead, Hans; Sanchez-Mut, Jose Vicente; Kaneki, Eisuke; Lapunzina, Pablo; Soejima, Hidenobu; Wake, Norio; Esteller, Manel; Ogata, Tsutomu; Hata, Kenichiro; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Monk, David

    2014-01-01

    Differential methylation between the two alleles of a gene has been observed in imprinted regions, where the methylation of one allele occurs on a parent-of-origin basis, the inactive X-chromosome in females, and at those loci whose methylation is driven by genetic variants. We have extensively characterized imprinted methylation in a substantial range of normal human tissues, reciprocal genome-wide uniparental disomies, and hydatidiform moles, using a combination of whole-genome bisulfite sequencing and high-density methylation microarrays. This approach allowed us to define methylation profiles at known imprinted domains at base-pair resolution, as well as to identify 21 novel loci harboring parent-of-origin methylation, 15 of which are restricted to the placenta. We observe that the extent of imprinted differentially methylated regions (DMRs) is extremely similar between tissues, with the exception of the placenta. This extra-embryonic tissue often adopts a different methylation profile compared to somatic tissues. Further, we profiled all imprinted DMRs in sperm and embryonic stem cells derived from parthenogenetically activated oocytes, individual blastomeres, and blastocysts, in order to identify primary DMRs and reveal the extent of reprogramming during preimplantation development. Intriguingly, we find that in contrast to ubiquitous imprints, the majority of placenta-specific imprinted DMRs are unmethylated in sperm and all human embryonic stem cells. Therefore, placental-specific imprinting provides evidence for an inheritable epigenetic state that is independent of DNA methylation and the existence of a novel imprinting mechanism at these loci. PMID:24402520

  19. Genome-wide transcript analysis of early maize leaf development reveals gene cohorts associated with the differentiation of C4 Kranz anatomy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Kelly, Steven; Fouracre, Jim P; Langdale, Jane A

    2013-08-01

    Photosynthesis underpins the viability of most ecosystems, with C4 plants that exhibit 'Kranz' anatomy being the most efficient primary producers. Kranz anatomy is characterized by closely spaced veins that are encircled by two morphologically distinct photosynthetic cell types. Although Kranz anatomy evolved multiple times, the underlying genetic mechanisms remain largely elusive, with only the maize scarecrow gene so far implicated in Kranz patterning. To provide a broader insight into the regulation of Kranz differentiation, we performed a genome-wide comparative analysis of developmental trajectories in Kranz (foliar leaf blade) and non-Kranz (husk leaf sheath) leaves of the C4 plant maize. Using profile classification of gene expression in early leaf primordia, we identified cohorts of genes associated with procambium initiation and vascular patterning. In addition, we used supervised classification criteria inferred from anatomical and developmental analyses of five developmental stages to identify candidate regulators of cell-type specification. Our analysis supports the suggestion that Kranz anatomy is patterned, at least in part, by a SCARECROW/SHORTROOT regulatory network, and suggests likely components of that network. Furthermore, the data imply a role for additional pathways in the development of Kranz leaves. © 2013 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Genome-wide location analysis reveals an important overlap between the targets of the yeast transcriptional regulators Rds2 and Adr1.

    PubMed

    Soontorngun, Nitnipa; Baramee, Sirilak; Tangsombatvichit, Chalinee; Thepnok, Piyasuda; Cheevadhanarak, Supapon; Robert, François; Turcotte, Bernard

    2012-07-13

    Upon glucose depletion, a massive reprogramming of gene expression occurs in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the use of alternate carbon sources such as the nonfermentable compounds ethanol and glycerol. This process is mediated by the master kinase Snf1 that controls the activity of various targets including the transcriptional regulators Cat8, Sip4 and Adr1. We have recently identified Rds2 as an additional player in this pathway. Here, we have performed genome-wide location analysis of Rds2 in cells grown in the presence of glycerol. We show that Rds2 binds to promoters of genes involved in gluconeogenesis, the glyoxylate shunt, and the TCA cycle as well as some genes encoding mitochondrial components or some involved in the stress response. Interestingly, we also detected Rds2 at the promoters of SIP4, ADR1 and HAP4 which encodes the limiting subunit of the Hap2/3/4/5 complex, a regulator of respiration. Strikingly, we observed an important overlap between the targets of Rds2 and Adr1. Finally, we provide a model to account for the complex interplay among these transcriptional regulators.

  1. Genome-wide analysis reveals methyl-CpG-binding protein 2-dependent regulation of microRNAs in a mouse model of Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Tao, Jifang; Chen, Pauline J; Shahab, Atif; Ge, Weihong; Hart, Ronald P; Ruan, Xiaoan; Ruan, Yijun; Sun, Yi E

    2010-10-19

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small, noncoding RNAs that function as posttranscriptional regulators of gene expression. Many miRNAs are expressed in the developing brain and regulate multiple aspects of neural development, including neurogenesis, dendritogenesis, and synapse formation. Rett syndrome (RTT) is a progressive neurodevelopmental disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2). Although Mecp2 is known to act as a global transcriptional regulator, miRNAs that are directly regulated by Mecp2 in the brain are not known. Using massively parallel sequencing methods, we have identified miRNAs whose expression is altered in cerebella of Mecp2-null mice before and after the onset of severe neurological symptoms. In vivo genome-wide analyses indicate that promoter regions of a significant fraction of dysregulated miRNA transcripts, including a large polycistronic cluster of brain-specific miRNAs, are DNA-methylated and are bound directly by Mecp2. Functional analysis demonstrates that the 3' UTR of messenger RNA encoding Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf) can be targeted by multiple miRNAs aberrantly up-regulated in the absence of Mecp2. Taken together, these results suggest that dysregulation of miRNAs may contribute to RTT pathoetiology and also may provide a valuable resource for further investigations of the role of miRNAs in RTT.

  2. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies 56 bone mineral density loci and reveals 14 loci associated with risk of fracture

    PubMed Central

    Estrada, Karol; Styrkarsdottir, Unnur; Evangelou, Evangelos; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Duncan, Emma L; Ntzani, Evangelia E; Oei, Ling; Albagha, Omar M E; Amin, Najaf; Kemp, John P; Koller, Daniel L; Li, Guo; Liu, Ching-Ti; Minster, Ryan L; Moayyeri, Alireza; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Willner, Dana; Xiao, Su-Mei; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Zheng, Hou-Feng; Alonso, Nerea; Eriksson, Joel; Kammerer, Candace M; Kaptoge, Stephen K; Leo, Paul J; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Wilson, Scott G; Wilson, James F; Aalto, Ville; Alen, Markku; Aragaki, Aaron K; Aspelund, Thor; Center, Jacqueline R; Dailiana, Zoe; Duggan, David J; Garcia, Melissa; Garcia-Giralt, Natàlia; Giroux, Sylvie; Hallmans, Göran; Hocking, Lynne J; Husted, Lise Bjerre; Jameson, Karen A; Khusainova, Rita; Kim, Ghi Su; Kooperberg, Charles; Koromila, Theodora; Kruk, Marcin; Laaksonen, Marika; Lacroix, Andrea Z; Lee, Seung Hun; Leung, Ping C; Lewis, Joshua R; Masi, Laura; Mencej-Bedrac, Simona; Nguyen, Tuan V; Nogues, Xavier; Patel, Millan S; Prezelj, Janez; Rose, Lynda M; Scollen, Serena; Siggeirsdottir, Kristin; Smith, Albert V; Svensson, Olle; Trompet, Stella; Trummer, Olivia; van Schoor, Natasja M; Woo, Jean; Zhu, Kun; Balcells, Susana; Brandi, Maria Luisa; Buckley, Brendan M; Cheng, Sulin; Christiansen, Claus; Cooper, Cyrus; Dedoussis, George; Ford, Ian; Frost, Morten; Goltzman, David; González-Macías, Jesús; Kähönen, Mika; Karlsson, Magnus; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Koh, Jung-Min; Kollia, Panagoula; Langdahl, Bente Lomholt; Leslie, William D; Lips, Paul; Ljunggren, Östen; Lorenc, Roman S; Marc, Janja; Mellström, Dan; Obermayer-Pietsch, Barbara; Olmos, José M; Pettersson-Kymmer, Ulrika; Reid, David M; Riancho, José A; Ridker, Paul M; Rousseau, François; Slagboom, P Eline; Tang, Nelson LS; Urreizti, Roser; Van Hul, Wim; Viikari, Jorma; Zarrabeitia, María T; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Castano-Betancourt, Martha; Grundberg, Elin; Herrera, Lizbeth; Ingvarsson, Thorvaldur; Johannsdottir, Hrefna; Kwan, Tony; Li, Rui; Luben, Robert; Medina-Gómez, Carolina; Palsson, Stefan Th; Reppe, Sjur; Rotter, Jerome I; Sigurdsson, Gunnar; van Meurs, Joyce B J; Verlaan, Dominique; Williams, Frances MK; Wood, Andrew R; Zhou, Yanhua; Gautvik, Kaare M; Pastinen, Tomi; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Cauley, Jane A; Chasman, Daniel I; Clark, Graeme R; Cummings, Steven R; Danoy, Patrick; Dennison, Elaine M; Eastell, Richard; Eisman, John A; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hofman, Albert; Jackson, Rebecca D; Jones, Graeme; Jukema, J Wouter; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Lehtimäki, Terho; Liu, Yongmei; Lorentzon, Mattias; McCloskey, Eugene; Mitchell, Braxton D; Nandakumar, Kannabiran; Nicholson, Geoffrey C; Oostra, Ben A; Peacock, Munro; Pols, Huibert A P; Prince, Richard L; Raitakari, Olli; Reid, Ian R; Robbins, John; Sambrook, Philip N; Sham, Pak Chung; Shuldiner, Alan R; Tylavsky, Frances A; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Wareham, Nick J; Cupples, L Adrienne; Econs, Michael J; Evans, David M; Harris, Tamara B; Kung, Annie Wai Chee; Psaty, Bruce M; Reeve, Jonathan; Spector, Timothy D; Streeten, Elizabeth A; Zillikens, M Carola; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Ohlsson, Claes; Karasik, David; Richards, J Brent; Brown, Matthew A; Stefansson, Kari; Uitterlinden, André G; Ralston, Stuart H; Ioannidis, John P A; Kiel, Douglas P; Rivadeneira, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) is the most important predictor of fracture risk. We performed the largest meta-analysis to date on lumbar spine and femoral neck BMD, including 17 genome-wide association studies and 32,961 individuals of European and East Asian ancestry. We tested the top-associated BMD markers for replication in 50,933 independent subjects and for risk of low-trauma fracture in 31,016 cases and 102,444 controls. We identified 56 loci (32 novel)associated with BMD atgenome-wide significant level (P<5×10−8). Several of these factors cluster within the RANK-RANKL-OPG, mesenchymal-stem-cell differentiation, endochondral ossification and the Wnt signalling pathways. However, we also discovered loci containing genes not known to play a role in bone biology. Fourteen BMD loci were also associated with fracture risk (P<5×10−4, Bonferroni corrected), of which six reached P<5×10−8 including: 18p11.21 (C18orf19), 7q21.3 (SLC25A13), 11q13.2 (LRP5), 4q22.1 (MEPE), 2p16.2 (SPTBN1) and 10q21.1 (DKK1). These findings shed light on the genetic architecture and pathophysiological mechanisms underlying BMD variation and fracture susceptibility. PMID:22504420

  3. Analysis of pigmented villonodular synovitis with genome-wide complementary DNA microarray and tissue array technology reveals insight into potential novel therapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Finis, Katharina; Sültmann, Holger; Ruschhaupt, Markus; Buness, Andreas; Helmchen, Birgit; Kuner, Ruprecht; Gross, Marie-Luise; Fink, Bernd; Schirmacher, Peter; Poustka, Annemarie; Berger, Irina

    2006-03-01

    To characterize the gene expression profile and determine potential diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets in pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS). Gene expression patterns in 11 patients with PVNS, 18 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and 19 patients with osteoarthritis (OA) were investigated using genome-wide complementary DNA microarrays. Validation of differentially expressed genes was performed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemical analysis on tissue arrays (80 patients with PVNS, 51 patients with RA, and 20 patients with OA). The gene expression profile in PVNS was clearly distinct from those in RA and OA. One hundred forty-one up-regulated genes and 47 down-regulated genes were found in PVNS compared with RA, and 153 up-regulated genes and 89 down-regulated genes were found in PVNS compared with OA (fold change > or = 1.5; Q < or = 0.001). Genes differentially expressed in PVNS were involved in apoptosis regulation, matrix degradation, and inflammation (ALOX5AP, ATP6V1B2, CD53, CHI3L1, CTSL, CXCR4, HSPA8, HSPCA, LAPTM5, MMP9, MOAP1, and SPP1). The gene expression signature in PVNS is similar to that of activated macrophages and is consistent with the local destructive course of the disease. The gene and protein expression patterns suggest that the ongoing proliferation in PVNS is sustained by apoptosis resistance. This result suggests the possibility of a potential novel therapeutic intervention against PVNS.

  4. Genome-wide analysis reveals recurrent structural abnormalities of TP63 and other p53-related genes in peripheral T-cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Vasmatzis, George; Johnson, Sarah H.; Knudson, Ryan A.; Ketterling, Rhett P.; Braggio, Esteban; Fonseca, Rafael; Viswanatha, David S.; Law, Mark E.; Kip, N. Sertac; Özsan, Nazan; Grebe, Stefan K.; Frederick, Lori A.; Eckloff, Bruce W.; Thompson, E. Aubrey; Kadin, Marshall E.; Milosevic, Dragana; Porcher, Julie C.; Asmann, Yan W.; Smith, David I.; Kovtun, Irina V.; Ansell, Stephen M.; Dogan, Ahmet

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs) are aggressive malignancies of mature T lymphocytes with 5-year overall survival rates of only ∼ 35%. Improvement in outcomes has been stymied by poor understanding of the genetics and molecular pathogenesis of PTCL, with a resulting paucity of molecular targets for therapy. We developed bioinformatic tools to identify chromosomal rearrangements using genome-wide, next-generation sequencing analysis of mate-pair DNA libraries and applied these tools to 16 PTCL patient tissue samples and 6 PTCL cell lines. Thirteen recurrent abnormalities were identified, of which 5 involved p53-related genes (TP53, TP63, CDKN2A, WWOX, and ANKRD11). Among these abnormalities were novel TP63 rearrangements encoding fusion proteins homologous to ΔNp63, a dominant-negative p63 isoform that inhibits the p53 pathway. TP63 rearrangements were seen in 11 (5.8%) of 190 PTCLs and were associated with inferior overall survival; they also were detected in 2 (1.2%) of 164 diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. As TP53 mutations are rare in PTCL compared with other malignancies, our findings suggest that a constellation of alternate genetic abnormalities may contribute to disruption of p53-associated tumor suppressor function in PTCL. PMID:22855598

  5. Genome-Wide Small RNA Sequencing and Gene Expression Analysis Reveals a microRNA Profile of Cancer Susceptibility in ATM-Deficient Human Mammary Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hesse, Jill E.; Liu, Liwen; Innes, Cynthia L.; Cui, Yuxia; Palii, Stela S.; Paules, Richard S.

    2013-01-01

    Deficiencies in the ATM gene are the underlying cause for ataxia telangiectasia, a syndrome characterized by neurological, motor and immunological defects, and a predisposition to cancer. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are useful tools for cancer profiling and prediction of therapeutic responses to clinical regimens. We investigated the consequences of ATM deficiency on miRNA expression and associated gene expression in normal human mammary epithelial cells (HME-CCs). We identified 81 significantly differentially expressed miRNAs in ATM-deficient HME-CCs using small RNA sequencing. Many of these have been implicated in tumorigenesis and proliferation and include down-regulated tumor suppressor miRNAs, such as hsa-miR-29c and hsa-miR-16, as well as over-expressed pro-oncogenic miRNAs, such as hsa-miR-93 and hsa-miR-221. MicroRNA changes were integrated with genome wide gene expression profiles to investigate possible miRNA targets. Predicted mRNA targets of the miRNAs significantly regulated after ATM depletion included many genes associated with cancer formation and progression, such as SOCS1 and the proto-oncogene MAF. While a number of miRNAs have been reported as altered in cancerous cells, there is little understanding as to how these small RNAs might be driving cancer formation or how they might be used as biomarkers for cancer susceptibility. This study provides preliminary data for defining miRNA profiles that may be used as prognostic or predictive biomarkers for breast cancer. Our integrated analysis of miRNA and mRNA expression allows us to gain a better understanding of the signaling involved in breast cancer predisposition and suggests a mechanism for the breast cancer-prone phenotype seen in ATM-deficient patients. PMID:23741392

  6. Genome-Wide DNA Methylation Analysis of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Reveals Persistent Hypomethylation of Interferon Genes and Compositional Changes to CD4+ T-cell Populations

    PubMed Central

    Absher, Devin M.; Li, Xinrui; Waite, Lindsay L.; Gibson, Andrew; Roberts, Kevin; Edberg, Jeffrey; Chatham, W. Winn; Kimberly, Robert P.

    2013-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease with known genetic, epigenetic, and environmental risk factors. To assess the role of DNA methylation in SLE, we collected CD4+ T-cells, CD19+ B-cells, and CD14+ monocytes from 49 SLE patients and 58 controls, and performed genome-wide DNA methylation analysis with Illumina Methylation450 microarrays. We identified 166 CpGs in B-cells, 97 CpGs in monocytes, and 1,033 CpGs in T-cells with highly significant changes in DNA methylation levels (p<1×10−8) among SLE patients. Common to all three cell-types were widespread and severe hypomethylation events near genes involved in interferon signaling (type I). These interferon-related changes were apparent in patients collected during active and quiescent stages of the disease, suggesting that epigenetically-mediated hypersensitivity to interferon persists beyond acute stages of the disease and is independent of circulating interferon levels. This interferon hypersensitivity was apparent in memory, naïve and regulatory T-cells, suggesting that this epigenetic state in lupus patients is established in progenitor cell populations. We also identified a widespread, but lower amplitude shift in methylation in CD4+ T-cells (>16,000 CpGs at FDR<1%) near genes involved in cell division and MAPK signaling. These cell type-specific effects are consistent with disease-specific changes in the composition of the CD4+ population and suggest that shifts in the proportion of CD4+ subtypes can be monitored at CpGs with subtype-specific DNA methylation patterns. PMID:23950730

  7. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis of systemic lupus erythematosus reveals persistent hypomethylation of interferon genes and compositional changes to CD4+ T-cell populations.

    PubMed

    Absher, Devin M; Li, Xinrui; Waite, Lindsay L; Gibson, Andrew; Roberts, Kevin; Edberg, Jeffrey; Chatham, W Winn; Kimberly, Robert P

    2013-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease with known genetic, epigenetic, and environmental risk factors. To assess the role of DNA methylation in SLE, we collected CD4+ T-cells, CD19+ B-cells, and CD14+ monocytes from 49 SLE patients and 58 controls, and performed genome-wide DNA methylation analysis with Illumina Methylation 450 microarrays. We identified 166 CpGs in B-cells, 97 CpGs in monocytes, and 1,033 CpGs in T-cells with highly significant changes in DNA methylation levels (p < 1 × 10(-8)) among SLE patients. Common to all three cell-types were widespread and severe hypomethylation events near genes involved in interferon signaling (type I). These interferon-related changes were apparent in patients collected during active and quiescent stages of the disease, suggesting that epigenetically-mediated hypersensitivity to interferon persists beyond acute stages of the disease and is independent of circulating interferon levels. This interferon hypersensitivity was apparent in memory, naïve and regulatory T-cells, suggesting that this epigenetic state in lupus patients is established in progenitor cell populations. We also identified a widespread, but lower amplitude shift in methylation in CD4+ T-cells (> 16,000 CpGs at FDR < 1%) near genes involved in cell division and MAPK signaling. These cell type-specific effects are consistent with disease-specific changes in the composition of the CD4+ population and suggest that shifts in the proportion of CD4+ subtypes can be monitored at CpGs with subtype-specific DNA methylation patterns.

  8. Genome-wide analysis of BMI in adolescents and young adults reveals additional insight into the effects of genetic loci over the life course

    PubMed Central

    Graff, Mariaelisa; Ngwa, Julius S.; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Homuth, Georg; Schipf, Sabine; Teumer, Alexander; Völzke, Henry; Wallaschofski, Henri; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Edward, Lakatta; Francesco, Cucca; Sanna, Serena; Scheet, Paul; Schlessinger, David; Sidore, Carlo; Xiao, Xiangjun; Wang, Zhaoming; Chanock, Stephen J.; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Hayes, Richard B.; Hu, Frank; Van Dam, Rob M.; Crout, Richard J.; Marazita, Mary L.; Shaffer, John R; Atwood, Larry D.; Fox, Caroline S.; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; White, Charles; Choh, Audrey C.; Czerwinski, Stefan A.; Demerath, Ellen W.; Dyer, Thomas D.; Towne, Bradford; Amin, Najaf; Oostra, Ben A.; Van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Zillikens, M. Carola; Esko, Tõnu; Nelis, Mari; Nikopensius, Tit; Metspalu, Andres; Strachan, David P.; Monda, Keri; Qi, Lu; North, Kari E.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Gordon-Larsen, Penny; Berndt, Sonja I.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic loci for body mass index (BMI) in adolescence and young adulthood, a period of high risk for weight gain, are understudied, yet may yield important insight into the etiology of obesity and early intervention. To identify novel genetic loci and examine the influence of known loci on BMI during this critical time period in late adolescence and early adulthood, we performed a two-stage meta-analysis using 14 genome-wide association studies in populations of European ancestry with data on BMI between ages 16 and 25 in up to 29 880 individuals. We identified seven independent loci (P < 5.0 × 10−8) near FTO (P = 3.72 × 10−23), TMEM18 (P = 3.24 × 10−17), MC4R (P = 4.41 × 10−17), TNNI3K (P = 4.32 × 10−11), SEC16B (P = 6.24 × 10−9), GNPDA2 (P = 1.11 × 10−8) and POMC (P = 4.94 × 10−8) as well as a potential secondary signal at the POMC locus (rs2118404, P = 2.4 × 10−5 after conditioning on the established single-nucleotide polymorphism at this locus) in adolescents and young adults. To evaluate the impact of the established genetic loci on BMI at these young ages, we examined differences between the effect sizes of 32 published BMI loci in European adult populations (aged 18–90) and those observed in our adolescent and young adult meta-analysis. Four loci (near PRKD1, TNNI3K, SEC16B and CADM2) had larger effects and one locus (near SH2B1) had a smaller effect on BMI during adolescence and young adulthood compared with older adults (P < 0.05). These results suggest that genetic loci for BMI can vary in their effects across the life course, underlying the importance of evaluating BMI at different ages. PMID:23669352

  9. Genome-wide analysis of BMI in adolescents and young adults reveals additional insight into the effects of genetic loci over the life course.

    PubMed

    Graff, Mariaelisa; Ngwa, Julius S; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Homuth, Georg; Schipf, Sabine; Teumer, Alexander; Völzke, Henry; Wallaschofski, Henri; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Edward, Lakatta; Francesco, Cucca; Sanna, Serena; Scheet, Paul; Schlessinger, David; Sidore, Carlo; Xiao, Xiangjun; Wang, Zhaoming; Chanock, Stephen J; Jacobs, Kevin B; Hayes, Richard B; Hu, Frank; Van Dam, Rob M; Crout, Richard J; Marazita, Mary L; Shaffer, John R; Atwood, Larry D; Fox, Caroline S; Heard-Costa, Nancy L; White, Charles; Choh, Audrey C; Czerwinski, Stefan A; Demerath, Ellen W; Dyer, Thomas D; Towne, Bradford; Amin, Najaf; Oostra, Ben A; Van Duijn, Cornelia M; Zillikens, M Carola; Esko, Tõnu; Nelis, Mari; Nikopensius, Tit; Metspalu, Andres; Strachan, David P; Monda, Keri; Qi, Lu; North, Kari E; Cupples, L Adrienne; Gordon-Larsen, Penny; Berndt, Sonja I

    2013-09-01

    Genetic loci for body mass index (BMI) in adolescence and young adulthood, a period of high risk for weight gain, are understudied, yet may yield important insight into the etiology of obesity and early intervention. To identify novel genetic loci and examine the influence of known loci on BMI during this critical time period in late adolescence and early adulthood, we performed a two-stage meta-analysis using 14 genome-wide association studies in populations of European ancestry with data on BMI between ages 16 and 25 in up to 29 880 individuals. We identified seven independent loci (P < 5.0 × 10⁻⁸) near FTO (P = 3.72 × 10⁻²³), TMEM18 (P = 3.24 × 10⁻¹⁷), MC4R (P = 4.41 × 10⁻¹⁷), TNNI3K (P = 4.32 × 10⁻¹¹), SEC16B (P = 6.24 × 10⁻⁹), GNPDA2 (P = 1.11 × 10⁻⁸) and POMC (P = 4.94 × 10⁻⁸) as well as a potential secondary signal at the POMC locus (rs2118404, P = 2.4 × 10⁻⁵ after conditioning on the established single-nucleotide polymorphism at this locus) in adolescents and young adults. To evaluate the impact of the established genetic loci on BMI at these young ages, we examined differences between the effect sizes of 32 published BMI loci in European adult populations (aged 18-90) and those observed in our adolescent and young adult meta-analysis. Four loci (near PRKD1, TNNI3K, SEC16B and CADM2) had larger effects and one locus (near SH2B1) had a smaller effect on BMI during adolescence and young adulthood compared with older adults (P < 0.05). These results suggest that genetic loci for BMI can vary in their effects across the life course, underlying the importance of evaluating BMI at different ages.

  10. Genome-Wide Analysis of DNA Methylation in Human Amnion

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinsil; Pitlick, Mitchell M.; Christine, Paul J.; Schaefer, Amanda R.; Saleme, Cesar; Comas, Belén; Cosentino, Viviana; Gadow, Enrique; Murray, Jeffrey C.

    2013-01-01

    The amnion is a specialized tissue in contact with the amniotic fluid, which is in a constantly changing state. To investigate the importance of epigenetic events in this tissue in the physiology and pathophysiology of pregnancy, we performed genome-wide DNA methylation profiling of human amnion from term (with and without labor) and preterm deliveries. Using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation27 BeadChip, we identified genes exhibiting differential methylation associated with normal labor and preterm birth. Functional analysis of the differentially methylated genes revealed biologically relevant enriched gene sets. Bisulfite sequencing analysis of the promoter region of the oxytocin receptor (OXTR) gene detected two CpG dinucleotides showing significant methylation differences among the three groups of samples. Hypermethylation of the CpG island of the solute carrier family 30 member 3 (SLC30A3) gene in preterm amnion was confirmed by methylation-specific PCR. This work provides preliminary evidence that DNA methylation changes in the amnion may be at least partially involved in the physiological process of labor and the etiology of preterm birth and suggests that DNA methylation profiles, in combination with other biological data, may provide valuable insight into the mechanisms underlying normal and pathological pregnancies. PMID:23533356

  11. Genome-wide functional analysis in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Motaung, Thabiso E; Ells, Ruan; Pohl, Carolina H; Albertyn, Jacobus; Tsilo, Toi J

    2017-02-08

    Candida albicans is an important etiological agent of superficial and life-threatening infections in individuals with compromised immune systems. To date, we know of several overlapping genetic networks that govern virulence attributes in this fungal pathogen. Classical use of deletion mutants has led to the discovery of numerous virulence factors over the years, and genome-wide functional analysis has propelled gene discovery at an even faster pace. Indeed, a number of recent studies using large-scale genetic screens followed by genome-wide functional analysis has allowed for the unbiased discovery of many new genes involved in C. albicans biology. Here we share our perspectives on the role of these studies in analyzing fundamental aspects of C. albicans virulence properties.

  12. Analysis of Heritability Using Genome-Wide Data.

    PubMed

    Hall, Jacob B; Bush, William S

    2016-10-11

    Most analyses of genome-wide association data consider each variant independently without considering or adjusting for the genetic background present in the rest of the genome. New approaches to genome analysis use representations of genomic sharing to better account for confounding factors like population stratification or to directly approximate heritability through the estimated sharing of individuals in a dataset. These approaches use mixed linear models, which relate genotypic sharing to phenotypic sharing, and rely on the efficient computation of genetic sharing among individuals in a dataset. This unit describes the principles and practical application of mixed models for the analysis of genome-wide association study data. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  13. Genome-Wide Analysis of Human Metapneumovirus Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Il; Park, Sehee; Lee, Ilseob; Park, Kwang Sook; Kwak, Eun Jung; Moon, Kwang Mee; Lee, Chang Kyu; Bae, Joon-Yong; Park, Man-Seong; Song, Ki-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) has been described as an important etiologic agent of upper and lower respiratory tract infections, especially in young children and the elderly. Most of school-aged children might be introduced to HMPVs, and exacerbation with other viral or bacterial super-infection is common. However, our understanding of the molecular evolution of HMPVs remains limited. To address the comprehensive evolutionary dynamics of HMPVs, we report a genome-wide analysis of the eight genes (N, P, M, F, M2, SH, G, and L) using 103 complete genome sequences. Phylogenetic reconstruction revealed that the eight genes from one HMPV strain grouped into the same genetic group among the five distinct lineages (A1, A2a, A2b, B1, and B2). A few exceptions of phylogenetic incongruence might suggest past recombination events, and we detected possible recombination breakpoints in the F, SH, and G coding regions. The five genetic lineages of HMPVs shared quite remote common ancestors ranging more than 220 to 470 years of age with the most recent origins for the A2b sublineage. Purifying selection was common, but most protein genes except the F and M2-2 coding regions also appeared to experience episodic diversifying selection. Taken together, these suggest that the five lineages of HMPVs maintain their individual evolutionary dynamics and that recombination and selection forces might work on shaping the genetic diversity of HMPVs. PMID:27046055

  14. Genome wide copy number analysis of single cells

    PubMed Central

    Baslan, Timour; Kendall, Jude; Rodgers, Linda; Cox, Hilary; Riggs, Mike; Stepansky, Asya; Troge, Jennifer; Ravi, Kandasamy; Esposito, Diane; Lakshmi, B.; Wigler, Michael; Navin, Nicholas; Hicks, James

    2016-01-01

    Summary Copy number variation (CNV) is increasingly recognized as an important contributor to phenotypic variation in health and disease. Most methods for determining CNV rely on admixtures of cells, where information regarding genetic heterogeneity is lost. Here, we present a protocol that allows for the genome wide copy number analysis of single nuclei isolated from mixed populations of cells. Single nucleus sequencing (SNS), combines flow sorting of single nuclei based on DNA content, whole genome amplification (WGA), followed by next generation sequencing to quantize genomic intervals in a genome wide manner. Multiplexing of single cells is discussed. Additionally, we outline informatic approaches that correct for biases inherent in the WGA procedure and allow for accurate determination of copy number profiles. All together, the protocol takes ~3 days from flow cytometry to sequence-ready DNA libraries. PMID:22555242

  15. A GENOME-WIDE LINKAGE AND ASSOCIATION SCAN REVEALS NOVEL LOCI FOR AUTISM

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Lauren A.; Arking, Dan E.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Although autism is a highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorder, attempts to identify specific susceptibility genes have thus far met with limited success 1. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) using half a million or more markers, particularly those with very large sample sizes achieved through meta-analysis, have shown great success in mapping genes for other complex genetic traits (http://www.genome.gov/26525384). Consequently, we initiated a linkage and association mapping study using half a million genome-wide SNPs in a common set of 1,031 multiplex autism families (1,553 affected offspring). We identified regions of suggestive and significant linkage on chromosomes 6q27 and 20p13, respectively. Initial analysis did not yield genome-wide significant associations; however, genotyping of top hits in additional families revealed a SNP on chromosome 5p15 (between SEMA5A and TAS2R1) that was significantly associated with autism (P = 2 × 10−7). We also demonstrated that expression of SEMA5A is reduced in brains from autistic patients, further implicating SEMA5A as an autism susceptibility gene. The linkage regions reported here provide targets for rare variation screening while the discovery of a single novel association demonstrates the action of common variants. PMID:19812673

  16. A genome-wide linkage and association scan reveals novel loci for autism.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Lauren A; Arking, Dan E; Daly, Mark J; Chakravarti, Aravinda

    2009-10-08

    Although autism is a highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorder, attempts to identify specific susceptibility genes have thus far met with limited success. Genome-wide association studies using half a million or more markers, particularly those with very large sample sizes achieved through meta-analysis, have shown great success in mapping genes for other complex genetic traits. Consequently, we initiated a linkage and association mapping study using half a million genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a common set of 1,031 multiplex autism families (1,553 affected offspring). We identified regions of suggestive and significant linkage on chromosomes 6q27 and 20p13, respectively. Initial analysis did not yield genome-wide significant associations; however, genotyping of top hits in additional families revealed an SNP on chromosome 5p15 (between SEMA5A and TAS2R1) that was significantly associated with autism (P = 2 x 10(-7)). We also demonstrated that expression of SEMA5A is reduced in brains from autistic patients, further implicating SEMA5A as an autism susceptibility gene. The linkage regions reported here provide targets for rare variation screening whereas the discovery of a single novel association demonstrates the action of common variants.

  17. Genome-Wide Detection and Analysis of Multifunctional Genes

    PubMed Central

    Pritykin, Yuri; Ghersi, Dario; Singh, Mona

    2015-01-01

    Many genes can play a role in multiple biological processes or molecular functions. Identifying multifunctional genes at the genome-wide level and studying their properties can shed light upon the complexity of molecular events that underpin cellular functioning, thereby leading to a better understanding of the functional landscape of the cell. However, to date, genome-wide analysis of multifunctional genes (and the proteins they encode) has been limited. Here we introduce a computational approach that uses known functional annotations to extract genes playing a role in at least two distinct biological processes. We leverage functional genomics data sets for three organisms—H. sapiens, D. melanogaster, and S. cerevisiae—and show that, as compared to other annotated genes, genes involved in multiple biological processes possess distinct physicochemical properties, are more broadly expressed, tend to be more central in protein interaction networks, tend to be more evolutionarily conserved, and are more likely to be essential. We also find that multifunctional genes are significantly more likely to be involved in human disorders. These same features also hold when multifunctionality is defined with respect to molecular functions instead of biological processes. Our analysis uncovers key features about multifunctional genes, and is a step towards a better genome-wide understanding of gene multifunctionality. PMID:26436655

  18. The combination of a genome-wide association study of lymphocyte count and analysis of gene expression data reveals novel asthma candidate genes.

    PubMed

    Cusanovich, Darren A; Billstrand, Christine; Zhou, Xiang; Chavarria, Claudia; De Leon, Sherryl; Michelini, Katelyn; Pai, Athma A; Ober, Carole; Gilad, Yoav

    2012-05-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified a number of novel genetic associations with complex human diseases. In spite of these successes, results from GWAS generally explain only a small proportion of disease heritability, an observation termed the 'missing heritability problem'. Several sources for the missing heritability have been proposed, including the contribution of many common variants with small individual effect sizes, which cannot be reliably found using the standard GWAS approach. The goal of our study was to explore a complimentary approach, which combines GWAS results with functional data in order to identify novel genetic associations with small effect sizes. To do so, we conducted a GWAS for lymphocyte count, a physiologic quantitative trait associated with asthma, in 462 Hutterites. In parallel, we performed a genome-wide gene expression study in lymphoblastoid cell lines from 96 Hutterites. We found significant support for genetic associations using the GWAS data when we considered variants near the 193 genes whose expression levels across individuals were most correlated with lymphocyte counts. Interestingly, these variants are also enriched with signatures of an association with asthma susceptibility, an observation we were able to replicate. The associated loci include genes previously implicated in asthma susceptibility as well as novel candidate genes enriched for functions related to T cell receptor signaling and adenosine triphosphate synthesis. Our results, therefore, establish a new set of asthma susceptibility candidate genes. More generally, our observations support the notion that many loci of small effects influence variation in lymphocyte count and asthma susceptibility.

  19. A Genome-Wide Association Meta-Analysis of Circulating Sex Hormone–Binding Globulin Reveals Multiple Loci Implicated in Sex Steroid Hormone Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lunetta, Kathryn L.; He, Chunyan; Fornage, Myriam; Lagou, Vasiliki; Mangino, Massimo; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Chen, Brian; Eriksson, Joel; Garcia, Melissa; Liu, Yong Mei; Koster, Annemarie; Lohman, Kurt; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Prescott, Jennifer; Stolk, Lisette; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Wood, Andrew R.; Zhuang, Wei Vivian; Ruokonen, Aimo; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Pouta, Anneli; Bandinelli, Stefania; Biffar, Reiner; Brabant, Georg; Cox, David G.; Chen, Yuhui; Cummings, Steven; Ferrucci, Luigi; Gunter, Marc J.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Martikainen, Hannu; Hofman, Albert; Homuth, Georg; Illig, Thomas; Jansson, John-Olov; Johnson, Andrew D.; Karasik, David; Karlsson, Magnus; Kettunen, Johannes; Kiel, Douglas P.; Kraft, Peter; Liu, Jingmin; Ljunggren, Östen; Lorentzon, Mattias; Maggio, Marcello; Markus, Marcello R. P.; Mellström, Dan; Miljkovic, Iva; Mirel, Daniel; Nelson, Sarah; Morin Papunen, Laure; Peeters, Petra H. M.; Prokopenko, Inga; Raffel, Leslie; Reincke, Martin; Reiner, Alex P.; Rexrode, Kathryn; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Siscovick, David; Soranzo, Nicole; Stöckl, Doris; Tworoger, Shelley; Uitterlinden, André G.; van Gils, Carla H.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Zhai, Guangju; Bhasin, Shalender; Bidlingmaier, Martin; Chanock, Stephen J.; De Vivo, Immaculata; Harris, Tamara B.; Hunter, David J.; Kähönen, Mika; Liu, Simin; Ouyang, Pamela; Spector, Tim D.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Viikari, Jorma; Wallaschofski, Henri; McCarthy, Mark I.; Frayling, Timothy M.; Murray, Anna; Franks, Steve; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; de Jong, Frank H.; Raitakari, Olli; Teumer, Alexander; Ohlsson, Claes; Murabito, Joanne M.; Perry, John R. B.

    2012-01-01

    Sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) is a glycoprotein responsible for the transport and biologic availability of sex steroid hormones, primarily testosterone and estradiol. SHBG has been associated with chronic diseases including type 2 diabetes (T2D) and with hormone-sensitive cancers such as breast and prostate cancer. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) meta-analysis of 21,791 individuals from 10 epidemiologic studies and validated these findings in 7,046 individuals in an additional six studies. We identified twelve genomic regions (SNPs) associated with circulating SHBG concentrations. Loci near the identified SNPs included SHBG (rs12150660, 17p13.1, p = 1.8×10−106), PRMT6 (rs17496332, 1p13.3, p = 1.4×10−11), GCKR (rs780093, 2p23.3, p = 2.2×10−16), ZBTB10 (rs440837, 8q21.13, p = 3.4×10−09), JMJD1C (rs7910927, 10q21.3, p = 6.1×10−35), SLCO1B1 (rs4149056, 12p12.1, p = 1.9×10−08), NR2F2 (rs8023580, 15q26.2, p = 8.3×10−12), ZNF652 (rs2411984, 17q21.32, p = 3.5×10−14), TDGF3 (rs1573036, Xq22.3, p = 4.1×10−14), LHCGR (rs10454142, 2p16.3, p = 1.3×10−07), BAIAP2L1 (rs3779195, 7q21.3, p = 2.7×10−08), and UGT2B15 (rs293428, 4q13.2, p = 5.5×10−06). These genes encompass multiple biologic pathways, including hepatic function, lipid metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism and T2D, androgen and estrogen receptor function, epigenetic effects, and the biology of sex steroid hormone-responsive cancers including breast and prostate cancer. We found evidence of sex-differentiated genetic influences on SHBG. In a sex-specific GWAS, the loci 4q13.2-UGT2B15 was significant in men only (men p = 2.5×10−08, women p = 0.66, heterogeneity p = 0.003). Additionally, three loci showed strong sex-differentiated effects: 17p13.1-SHBG and Xq22.3-TDGF3 were stronger in men, whereas 8q21.12-ZBTB10 was stronger in women. Conditional analyses identified additional signals at the SHBG

  20. Genome-wide analysis reveals diverged patterns of codon bias, gene expression, and rates of sequence evolution in picea gene families.

    PubMed

    De La Torre, Amanda R; Lin, Yao-Cheng; Van de Peer, Yves; Ingvarsson, Pär K

    2015-03-05

    The recent sequencing of several gymnosperm genomes has greatly facilitated studying the evolution of their genes and gene families. In this study, we examine the evidence for expression-mediated selection in the first two fully sequenced representatives of the gymnosperm plant clade (Picea abies and Picea glauca). We use genome-wide estimates of gene expression (>50,000 expressed genes) to study the relationship between gene expression, codon bias, rates of sequence divergence, protein length, and gene duplication. We found that gene expression is correlated with rates of sequence divergence and codon bias, suggesting that natural selection is acting on Picea protein-coding genes for translational efficiency. Gene expression, rates of sequence divergence, and codon bias are correlated with the size of gene families, with large multicopy gene families having, on average, a lower expression level and breadth, lower codon bias, and higher rates of sequence divergence than single-copy gene families. Tissue-specific patterns of gene expression were more common in large gene families with large gene expression divergence than in single-copy families. Recent family expansions combined with large gene expression variation in paralogs and increased rates of sequence evolution suggest that some Picea gene families are rapidly evolving to cope with biotic and abiotic stress. Our study highlights the importance of gene expression and natural selection in shaping the evolution of protein-coding genes in Picea species, and sets the ground for further studies investigating the evolution of individual gene families in gymnosperms.

  1. Genome-wide analysis of differential RNA editing in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Prashant Kumar; Bagnati, Marta; Delahaye-Duriez, Andree; Ko, Jeong-Hun; Rotival, Maxime; Langley, Sarah R; Shkura, Kirill; Mazzuferi, Manuela; Danis, Bénédicte; van Eyll, Jonathan; Foerch, Patrik; Behmoaras, Jacques; Kaminski, Rafal M; Petretto, Enrico; Johnson, Michael R

    2017-03-01

    The recoding of genetic information through RNA editing contributes to proteomic diversity, but the extent and significance of RNA editing in disease is poorly understood. In particular, few studies have investigated the relationship between RNA editing and disease at a genome-wide level. Here, we developed a framework for the genome-wide detection of RNA sites that are differentially edited in disease. Using RNA-sequencing data from 100 hippocampi from mice with epilepsy (pilocarpine-temporal lobe epilepsy model) and 100 healthy control hippocampi, we identified 256 RNA sites (overlapping with 87 genes) that were significantly differentially edited between epileptic cases and controls. The degree of differential RNA editing in epileptic mice correlated with frequency of seizures, and the set of genes differentially RNA-edited between case and control mice were enriched for functional terms highly relevant to epilepsy, including "neuron projection" and "seizures." Genes with differential RNA editing were preferentially enriched for genes with a genetic association to epilepsy. Indeed, we found that they are significantly enriched for genes that harbor nonsynonymous de novo mutations in patients with epileptic encephalopathy and for common susceptibility variants associated with generalized epilepsy. These analyses reveal a functional convergence between genes that are differentially RNA-edited in acquired symptomatic epilepsy and those that contribute risk for genetic epilepsy. Taken together, our results suggest a potential role for RNA editing in the epileptic hippocampus in the occurrence and severity of epileptic seizures.

  2. Genome-wide analysis of differential RNA editing in epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Prashant Kumar; Bagnati, Marta; Delahaye-Duriez, Andree; Ko, Jeong-Hun; Rotival, Maxime; Langley, Sarah R.; Shkura, Kirill; Mazzuferi, Manuela; Danis, Bénédicte; van Eyll, Jonathan; Foerch, Patrik; Behmoaras, Jacques; Kaminski, Rafal M.; Petretto, Enrico; Johnson, Michael R.

    2017-01-01

    The recoding of genetic information through RNA editing contributes to proteomic diversity, but the extent and significance of RNA editing in disease is poorly understood. In particular, few studies have investigated the relationship between RNA editing and disease at a genome-wide level. Here, we developed a framework for the genome-wide detection of RNA sites that are differentially edited in disease. Using RNA-sequencing data from 100 hippocampi from mice with epilepsy (pilocarpine–temporal lobe epilepsy model) and 100 healthy control hippocampi, we identified 256 RNA sites (overlapping with 87 genes) that were significantly differentially edited between epileptic cases and controls. The degree of differential RNA editing in epileptic mice correlated with frequency of seizures, and the set of genes differentially RNA-edited between case and control mice were enriched for functional terms highly relevant to epilepsy, including “neuron projection” and “seizures.” Genes with differential RNA editing were preferentially enriched for genes with a genetic association to epilepsy. Indeed, we found that they are significantly enriched for genes that harbor nonsynonymous de novo mutations in patients with epileptic encephalopathy and for common susceptibility variants associated with generalized epilepsy. These analyses reveal a functional convergence between genes that are differentially RNA-edited in acquired symptomatic epilepsy and those that contribute risk for genetic epilepsy. Taken together, our results suggest a potential role for RNA editing in the epileptic hippocampus in the occurrence and severity of epileptic seizures. PMID:28250018

  3. Genome-Wide Analysis of Chromatin States Reveals Distinct Mechanisms of Sex-Dependent Gene Regulation in Male and Female Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Sugathan, Aarathi

    2013-01-01

    Chromatin state maps were developed to elucidate sex differences in chromatin structure and their impact on sex-differential chromatin accessibility and sex-biased gene expression in mouse liver. Genes in active, inactive, and poised chromatin states exhibited differential responsiveness to ligand-activated nuclear receptors and distinct enrichments for functional gene categories. Sex-biased genes were clustered by chromatin environments and mapped to DNase-hypersensitive sites (DHS) classified by sex bias in chromatin accessibility and enhancer modifications. Results were integrated with genome-wide binding data for five transcription factors implicated in growth hormone-regulated, sex-biased liver gene expression, leading to the following findings. (i) Sex-biased DHS, but not sex-biased genes, are frequently characterized by sex-differential chromatin states, indicating distal regulation. (ii) Trimethylation of histone H3 at K27 (H3K27me3) is a major sex-biased repressive mark at highly female-biased but not at highly male-biased genes. (iii) FOXA factors are associated with sex-dependent chromatin opening at male-biased but not female-biased regulatory sites. (iv) Sex-biased STAT5 binding is enriched at sex-biased DHS marked as active enhancers and preferentially targets sex-biased genes with sex-differences in local chromatin marks. (v) The male-biased repressor BCL6 preferentially targets female-biased genes and regulatory sites in a sex-independent chromatin state. (vi) CUX2, a female-specific repressor of male-biased genes, also activates strongly female-biased genes, in association with loss of H3K27me3 marks. Chromatin states are thus a major determinant of sex-biased chromatin accessibility and gene expression, with FOXA pioneer factors proposed to confer sex-dependent chromatin opening and STAT5, but not BCL6, regulating sex-biased genes by binding to sites in a sex-biased chromatin state. PMID:23836885

  4. Genome Wide Analysis Reveals Inositol, not Choline, as the Major Effector of Ino2p-Ino4p and Unfolded Protein Response Target Gene Expression in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Jesch, Stephen A.; Zhao, Xin; Wells, Martin T.; Henry, Susan A.

    2005-01-01

    SUMMARY In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae the transcription of many genes encoding enzymes of phospholipid biosynthesis are repressed in cells grown in the presence of the phospholipid precursors inositol and choline. A genome-wide approach using cDNA microarray technology was utilized to profile the changes in the expression of all genes in yeast that respond to the exogenous presence of inositol and choline. We report that the global response to inositol is completely distinct from the effect of choline. Whereas the effect of inositol on gene expression was primarily repressing, the effect of choline on gene expression was activating. Moreover, the combination inositol and choline increased the number of repressed genes compared to inositol alone and enhanced the repression levels of a subset of genes that responded to inositol. In all, 110 genes were repressed in the presence of inositol and choline. Two distinct sets of genes exhibited differential expression in response to inositol or the combination of inositol and choline in wild type cells. One set of genes contained the UASINO sequence and were bound by Ino2p and Ino4p. Many of these genes were also negatively regulated by OPI1, suggesting a common regulatory mechanism for Ino2p, Ino4p, and Opi1p. Another non-overlapping set of genes were coregulated by the unfolded protein response pathway, an ER-localized stress response pathway, but were not dependent on OPI1 and did not show further repression when choline was present together with inositol. These results suggest that inositol is the major effector of target gene expression, while choline plays a minor role. PMID:15611057

  5. Genome-Wide DNA Methylation Analysis Reveals Epigenetic Dysregulation of MicroRNA-34A in TP53-Associated Cancer Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Nardin; Wilson, Gavin; Lemire, Mathieu; Id Said, Badr; Lou, Youliang; Li, Weili; Merino, Diana; Novokmet, Ana; Tran, James; Nichols, Kim E; Finlay, Jonathan L; Choufani, Sanaa; Remke, Marc; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Cavalli, Florence M G; Elser, Christine; Meister, Lynn; Taylor, Michael D; Tabori, Uri; Irwin, Meredith; Weksberg, Rosanna; Wasserman, Jonathan D; Paterson, Andrew D; Hansford, Jordan R; Achatz, Maria Isabel W; Hudson, Thomas J; Malkin, David

    2016-08-22

    Although the link between mutant TP53 and human cancer is unequivocal, a significant knowledge gap exists in clinically actionable molecular targets in Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS), a highly penetrant cancer predisposition syndrome associated with germline mutations in TP53. This study surveyed the epigenome to identify functionally and clinically relevant novel genes implicated in LFS. We performed genome-wide methylation analyses of peripheral blood leukocyte DNA in germline TP53 mutation carriers (n = 72) and individuals with TP53 wild type in whom histologically comparable malignancies developed (n = 111). Targeted bisulfite pyrosequencing was performed on a validation cohort of 30 TP53 mutation carriers and 46 patients with TP53 wild type, and candidate sites were evaluated in primary tumors from patients with LFS across multiple histologic tumor types. In 183 patients, distinct DNA methylation signatures were associated with deleterious TP53 mutations in peripheral blood leukocytes. TP53-associated DNA methylation marks occurred in genomic regions that harbored p53 binding sites and in genes encoding p53 pathway proteins. Moreover, loss-of-function TP53 mutations were significantly associated with differential methylation at the locus encoding microRNA miR-34A, a key component of the p53 regulatory network (adjusted P < .001), and validated in an independent patient cohort (n = 76, P < .001). Targeted bisulfite pyrosequencing demonstrated that miR-34A was inactivated by hypermethylation across many histologic types of primary tumors from patients with LFS. Moreover, miR-34A tumor hypermethylation was associated with decreased overall survival in a cohort of 29 patients with choroid plexus carcinomas, a characteristic LFS tumor (P < .05). Epigenetic dysregulation of miR-34A may comprise an important path in TP53-associated cancer predisposition and represents a therapeutically actionable target with potential clinical relevance. © 2016 by American Society of

  6. Genome-Wide Ultrabithorax Binding Analysis Reveals Highly Targeted Genomic Loci at Developmental Regulators and a Potential Connection to Polycomb-Mediated Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Meireles-Filho, Antonio C. A.; Pagani, Michaela; Stark, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Hox homeodomain transcription factors are key regulators of animal development. They specify the identity of segments along the anterior-posterior body axis in metazoans by controlling the expression of diverse downstream targets, including transcription factors and signaling pathway components. The Drosophila melanogaster Hox factor Ultrabithorax (Ubx) directs the development of thoracic and abdominal segments and appendages, and loss of Ubx function can lead for example to the transformation of third thoracic segment appendages (e.g. halters) into second thoracic segment appendages (e.g. wings), resulting in a characteristic four-wing phenotype. Here we present a Drosophila melanogaster strain with a V5-epitope tagged Ubx allele, which we employed to obtain a high quality genome-wide map of Ubx binding sites using ChIP-seq. We confirm the sensitivity of the V5 ChIP-seq by recovering 7/8 of well-studied Ubx-dependent cis-regulatory regions. Moreover, we show that Ubx binding is predictive of enhancer activity as suggested by comparison with a genome-scale resource of in vivo tested enhancer candidates. We observed densely clustered Ubx binding sites at 12 extended genomic loci that included ANTP-C, BX-C, Polycomb complex genes, and other regulators and the clustered binding sites were frequently active enhancers. Furthermore, Ubx binding was detected at known Polycomb response elements (PREs) and was associated with significant enrichments of Pc and Pho ChIP signals in contrast to binding sites of other developmental TFs. Together, our results show that Ubx targets developmental regulators via strongly clustered binding sites and allow us to hypothesize that regulation by Ubx might involve Polycomb group proteins to maintain specific regulatory states in cooperative or mutually exclusive fashion, an attractive model that combines two groups of proteins with prominent gene regulatory roles during animal development. PMID:27575958

  7. Genome-wide analysis of the R2R3-MYB transcription factor genes in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis) reveals their stress and hormone responsive patterns.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Tang, Jun; Hu, Rong; Wu, Peng; Hou, Xi-Lin; Song, Xiao-Ming; Xiong, Ai-Sheng

    2015-01-23

    The MYB superfamily is one of the most abundant transcription factor (TF) families in plants. MYB proteins include highly conserved N-terminal MYB repeats (1R, R2R3, 3R, and atypical) and various C-terminal sequences that confer extensive functions. However, the functions of most MYB genes are unknown, and have been little studied in Chinese cabbage. Here, we analyzed 256 (55.2% of total MYBs) R2R3-MYB genes from Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis) and anchored them onto the 10 chromosomes and three subgenomes. The R2R3-, 3R- and atypical MYB proteins in Chinese cabbage formed 45 subgroups based on domain similarity and phylogenetic topology. Organization and syntenic analysis revealed the genomic distribution and collinear relationships of the R2R3-BrMYBs. Synonymous nucleotide substitution (Ka/Ks) analysis showed that the Chinese cabbage MYB DNA-binding domain is under strong purifying selection. Moreover, RNA-seq data revealed tissue-specific and distinct R2R3-BrMYB expression profiles, and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) analysis in leaves showed stress responsive expression and crosstalk with ABA-auxin signaling cascades. In this study, we identified the largest MYB gene family in plants to date. Our results indicate that members of this superfamily may be involved in plant development, stress responses and leaf senescence, highlighting their functional diversity.

  8. Genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms reveal population history and adaptive divergence in wild guppies.

    PubMed

    Willing, Eva-Maria; Bentzen, Paul; van Oosterhout, Cock; Hoffmann, Margarete; Cable, Joanne; Breden, Felix; Weigel, Detlef; Dreyer, Christine

    2010-03-01

    Adaptation of guppies (Poecilia reticulata) to contrasting upland and lowland habitats has been extensively studied with respect to behaviour, morphology and life history traits. Yet population history has not been studied at the whole-genome level. Although single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the most abundant form of variation in many genomes and consequently very informative for a genome-wide picture of standing natural variation in populations, genome-wide SNP data are rarely available for wild vertebrates. Here we use genetically mapped SNP markers to comprehensively survey genetic variation within and among naturally occurring guppy populations from a wide geographic range in Trinidad and Venezuela. Results from three different clustering methods, Neighbor-net, principal component analysis (PCA) and Bayesian analysis show that the population substructure agrees with geographic separation and largely with previously hypothesized patterns of historical colonization. Within major drainages (Caroni, Oropouche and Northern), populations are genetically similar, but those in different geographic regions are highly divergent from one another, with some indications of ancient shared polymorphisms. Clear genomic signatures of a previous introduction experiment were seen, and we detected additional potential admixture events. Headwater populations were significantly less heterozygous than downstream populations. Pairwise F(ST) values revealed marked differences in allele frequencies among populations from different regions, and also among populations within the same region. F(ST) outlier methods indicated some regions of the genome as being under directional selection. Overall, this study demonstrates the power of a genome-wide SNP data set to inform for studies on natural variation, adaptation and evolution of wild populations.

  9. Susceptibility to Childhood Pneumonia: A Genome-Wide Analysis.

    PubMed

    Hayden, Lystra P; Cho, Michael H; McDonald, Merry-Lynn N; Crapo, James D; Beaty, Terri H; Silverman, Edwin K; Hersh, Craig P

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that in adult smokers, a history of childhood pneumonia is associated with reduced lung function and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. There have been few previous investigations using genome-wide association studies to investigate genetic predisposition to pneumonia. This study aims to identify the genetic variants associated with the development of pneumonia during childhood and over the course of the lifetime. Study subjects included current and former smokers with and without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease participating in the COPDGene Study. Pneumonia was defined by subject self-report, with childhood pneumonia categorized as having the first episode at <16 years. Genome-wide association studies for childhood pneumonia (843 cases, 9,091 control subjects) and lifetime pneumonia (3,766 cases, 5,659 control subjects) were performed separately in non-Hispanic whites and African Americans. Non-Hispanic white and African American populations were combined in the meta-analysis. Top genetic variants from childhood pneumonia were assessed in network analysis. No single-nucleotide polymorphisms reached genome-wide significance, although we identified potential regions of interest. In the childhood pneumonia analysis, this included variants in NGR1 (P = 6.3 × 10(-8)), PAK6 (P = 3.3 × 10(-7)), and near MATN1 (P = 2.8 × 10(-7)). In the lifetime pneumonia analysis, this included variants in LOC339862 (P = 8.7 × 10(-7)), RAPGEF2 (P = 8.4 × 10(-7)), PHACTR1 (P = 6.1 × 10(-7)), near PRR27 (P = 4.3 × 10(-7)), and near MCPH1 (P = 2.7 × 10(-7)). Network analysis of the genes associated with childhood pneumonia included top networks related to development, blood vessel morphogenesis, muscle contraction, WNT signaling, DNA damage, apoptosis, inflammation, and immune response (P ≤ 0.05). We have identified genes potentially associated with the risk of pneumonia

  10. In vivo genome-wide profiling reveals a tissue-specific role for 5-formylcytosine.

    PubMed

    Iurlaro, Mario; McInroy, Gordon R; Burgess, Heather E; Dean, Wendy; Raiber, Eun-Ang; Bachman, Martin; Beraldi, Dario; Balasubramanian, Shankar; Reik, Wolf

    2016-06-29

    Genome-wide methylation of cytosine can be modulated in the presence of TET and thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG) enzymes. TET is able to oxidise 5-methylcytosine (5mC) to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC). TDG can excise the oxidative products 5fC and 5caC, initiating base excision repair. These modified bases are stable and detectable in the genome, suggesting that they could have epigenetic functions in their own right. However, functional investigation of the genome-wide distribution of 5fC has been restricted to cell culture-based systems, while its in vivo profile remains unknown. Here, we describe the first analysis of the in vivo genome-wide profile of 5fC across a range of tissues from both wild-type and Tdg-deficient E11.5 mouse embryos. Changes in the formylation profile of cytosine upon depletion of TDG suggest TET/TDG-mediated active demethylation occurs preferentially at intron-exon boundaries and reveals a major role for TDG in shaping 5fC distribution at CpG islands. Moreover, we find that active enhancer regions specifically exhibit high levels of 5fC, resulting in characteristic tissue-diagnostic patterns, which suggest a role in embryonic development. The tissue-specific distribution of 5fC can be regulated by the collective contribution of TET-mediated oxidation and excision by TDG. The in vivo profile of 5fC during embryonic development resembles that of embryonic stem cells, sharing key features including enrichment of 5fC in enhancer and intragenic regions. Additionally, by investigating mouse embryo 5fC profiles in a tissue-specific manner, we identify targeted enrichment at active enhancers involved in tissue development.

  11. Signatures of positive selection in East African Shorthorn Zebu: a genome-wide SNP analysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The small East African Shorthorn Zebu is the main indigenous cattle across East Africa. A recent genome wide SNPs analysis has revealed their ancient stable African taurine x Asian zebu admixture. Here, we assess the presence of candidate signature of positive selection in their genome, with the aim...

  12. Genome-wide analysis of the mouse lung transcriptome reveals novel molecular gene interaction networks and cell-specific expression signatures.

    PubMed

    Alberts, Rudi; Lu, Lu; Williams, Robert W; Schughart, Klaus

    2011-05-02

    The lung is critical in surveillance and initial defense against pathogens. In humans, as in mice, individual genetic differences strongly modulate pulmonary responses to infectious agents, severity of lung disease, and potential allergic reactions. In a first step towards understanding genetic predisposition and pulmonary molecular networks that underlie individual differences in disease vulnerability, we performed a global analysis of normative lung gene expression levels in inbred mouse strains and a large family of BXD strains that are widely used for systems genetics. Our goal is to provide a key community resource on the genetics of the normative lung transcriptome that can serve as a foundation for experimental analysis and allow predicting genetic predisposition and response to pathogens, allergens, and xenobiotics. Steady-state polyA+ mRNA levels were assayed across a diverse and fully genotyped panel of 57 isogenic strains using the Affymetrix M430 2.0 array. Correlations of expression levels between genes were determined. Global expression QTL (eQTL) analysis and network covariance analysis was performed using tools and resources in GeneNetwork http://www.genenetwork.org. Expression values were highly variable across strains and in many cases exhibited a high heritability factor. Several genes which showed a restricted expression to lung tissue were identified. Using correlations between gene expression values across all strains, we defined and extended memberships of several important molecular networks in the lung. Furthermore, we were able to extract signatures of immune cell subpopulations and characterize co-variation and shared genetic modulation. Known QTL regions for respiratory infection susceptibility were investigated and several cis-eQTL genes were identified. Numerous cis- and trans-regulated transcripts and chromosomal intervals with strong regulatory activity were mapped. The Cyp1a1 P450 transcript had a strong trans-acting eQTL (LOD 11

  13. Systems-Level Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Data

    PubMed Central

    Farber, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have emerged as the method of choice for identifying common variants affecting complex disease. In a GWAS, particular attention is placed, for obvious reasons, on single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that exceed stringent genome-wide significance thresholds. However, it is expected that many SNPs with only nominal evidence of association (e.g., P < 0.05) truly influence disease. Efforts to extract additional biological information from entire GWAS datasets have primarily focused on pathway-enrichment analyses. However, these methods suffer from a number of limitations and typically fail to lead to testable hypotheses. To evaluate alternative approaches, we performed a systems-level analysis of GWAS data using weighted gene coexpression network analysis. A weighted gene coexpression network was generated for 1918 genes harboring SNPs that displayed nominal evidence of association (P ≤ 0.05) from a GWAS of bone mineral density (BMD) using microarray data on circulating monocytes isolated from individuals with extremely low or high BMD. Thirteen distinct gene modules were identified, each comprising coexpressed and highly interconnected GWAS genes. Through the characterization of module content and topology, we illustrate how network analysis can be used to discover disease-associated subnetworks and characterize novel interactions for genes with a known role in the regulation of BMD. In addition, we provide evidence that network metrics can be used as a prioritizing tool when selecting genes and SNPs for replication studies. Our results highlight the advantages of using systems-level strategies to add value to and inform GWAS. PMID:23316444

  14. Integrative analysis of genome-wide loss of heterozygosity and monoallelic expression at nucleotide resolution reveals disrupted pathways in triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ha, Gavin; Roth, Andrew; Lai, Daniel; Bashashati, Ali; Ding, Jiarui; Goya, Rodrigo; Giuliany, Ryan; Rosner, Jamie; Oloumi, Arusha; Shumansky, Karey; Chin, Suet-Feung; Turashvili, Gulisa; Hirst, Martin; Caldas, Carlos; Marra, Marco A; Aparicio, Samuel; Shah, Sohrab P

    2012-10-01

    Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and copy number alteration (CNA) feature prominently in the somatic genomic landscape of tumors. As such, karyotypic aberrations in cancer genomes have been studied extensively to discover novel oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes. Advances in sequencing technology have enabled the cost-effective detection of tumor genome and transcriptome mutation events at single-base-pair resolution; however, computational methods for predicting segmental regions of LOH in this context are not yet fully explored. Consequently, whole transcriptome, nucleotide-level resolution analysis of monoallelic expression patterns associated with LOH has not yet been undertaken in cancer. We developed a novel approach for inference of LOH from paired tumor/normal sequence data and applied it to a cohort of 23 triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) genomes. Following extensive benchmarking experiments, we describe the nucleotide-resolution landscape of LOH in TNBC and assess the consequent effect of LOH on the transcriptomes of these tumors using RNA-seq-derived measurements of allele-specific expression. We show that the majority of monoallelic expression in the transcriptomes of triple-negative breast cancer can be explained by genomic regions of LOH and establish an upper bound for monoallelic expression that may be explained by other tumor-specific modifications such as epigenetics or mutations. Monoallelically expressed genes associated with LOH reveal that cell cycle, homologous recombination and actin-cytoskeletal functions are putatively disrupted by LOH in TNBC. Finally, we show how inference of LOH can be used to interpret allele frequencies of somatic mutations and postulate on temporal ordering of mutations in the evolutionary history of these tumors.

  15. Integrative analysis of genome-wide loss of heterozygosity and monoallelic expression at nucleotide resolution reveals disrupted pathways in triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Gavin; Roth, Andrew; Lai, Daniel; Bashashati, Ali; Ding, Jiarui; Goya, Rodrigo; Giuliany, Ryan; Rosner, Jamie; Oloumi, Arusha; Shumansky, Karey; Chin, Suet-Feung; Turashvili, Gulisa; Hirst, Martin; Caldas, Carlos; Marra, Marco A.; Aparicio, Samuel; Shah, Sohrab P.

    2012-01-01

    Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and copy number alteration (CNA) feature prominently in the somatic genomic landscape of tumors. As such, karyotypic aberrations in cancer genomes have been studied extensively to discover novel oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes. Advances in sequencing technology have enabled the cost-effective detection of tumor genome and transcriptome mutation events at single-base-pair resolution; however, computational methods for predicting segmental regions of LOH in this context are not yet fully explored. Consequently, whole transcriptome, nucleotide-level resolution analysis of monoallelic expression patterns associated with LOH has not yet been undertaken in cancer. We developed a novel approach for inference of LOH from paired tumor/normal sequence data and applied it to a cohort of 23 triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) genomes. Following extensive benchmarking experiments, we describe the nucleotide-resolution landscape of LOH in TNBC and assess the consequent effect of LOH on the transcriptomes of these tumors using RNA-seq-derived measurements of allele-specific expression. We show that the majority of monoallelic expression in the transcriptomes of triple-negative breast cancer can be explained by genomic regions of LOH and establish an upper bound for monoallelic expression that may be explained by other tumor-specific modifications such as epigenetics or mutations. Monoallelically expressed genes associated with LOH reveal that cell cycle, homologous recombination and actin-cytoskeletal functions are putatively disrupted by LOH in TNBC. Finally, we show how inference of LOH can be used to interpret allele frequencies of somatic mutations and postulate on temporal ordering of mutations in the evolutionary history of these tumors. PMID:22637570

  16. Genome-Wide Transcriptome Analysis During Anthesis Reveals New Insights into the Molecular Basis of Heat Stress Responses in Tolerant and Sensitive Rice Varieties.

    PubMed

    González-Schain, Nahuel; Dreni, Ludovico; Lawas, Lovely M F; Galbiati, Massimo; Colombo, Lucia; Heuer, Sigrid; Jagadish, Krishna S V; Kater, Martin M

    2016-01-01

    Rice is one of the main food crops in the world. In the near future, yield is expected to be under pressure due to unfavorable climatic conditions, such as increasing temperatures. Therefore, improving rice germplasm in order to guarantee rice production under harsh environmental conditions is of top priority. Although many physiological studies have contributed to understanding heat responses during anthesis, the most heat-sensitive stage, molecular data are still largely lacking. In this study, an RNA-sequencing approach of heat- and control-treated reproductive tissues during anthesis was carried out using N22, one of the most heat-tolerant rice cultivars known to date. This analysis revealed that expression of genes encoding a number of transcription factor families, together with signal transduction and metabolic pathway genes, is repressed. On the other hand, expression of genes encoding heat shock factors and heat shock proteins was highly activated. Many of these genes are predominantly expressed at late stages of anther development. Further physiological experiments using heat-tolerant N22 and two sensitive cultivars suggest that reduced yield in heat-sensitive plants may be associated with poor pollen development or production in anthers prior to anthesis. In parallel, induction levels of a set of heat-responsive genes in these tissues correlated well with heat tolerance. Altogether, these findings suggest that proper expression of protective chaperones in anthers is needed before anthesis to overcome stress damage and to ensure fertilization. Genes putatively controlling this process were identified and are valuable candidates to consider for molecular breeding of highly productive heat-tolerant cultivars. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Development and application of a novel genome-wide SNP array reveals domestication history in soybean.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiao; Chu, Shanshan; Zhang, Huairen; Zhu, Ying; Cheng, Hao; Yu, Deyue

    2016-02-09

    Domestication of soybeans occurred under the intense human-directed selections aimed at developing high-yielding lines. Tracing the domestication history and identifying the genes underlying soybean domestication require further exploration. Here, we developed a high-throughput NJAU 355 K SoySNP array and used this array to study the genetic variation patterns in 367 soybean accessions, including 105 wild soybeans and 262 cultivated soybeans. The population genetic analysis suggests that cultivated soybeans have tended to originate from northern and central China, from where they spread to other regions, accompanied with a gradual increase in seed weight. Genome-wide scanning for evidence of artificial selection revealed signs of selective sweeps involving genes controlling domestication-related agronomic traits including seed weight. To further identify genomic regions related to seed weight, a genome-wide association study (GWAS) was conducted across multiple environments in wild and cultivated soybeans. As a result, a strong linkage disequilibrium region on chromosome 20 was found to be significantly correlated with seed weight in cultivated soybeans. Collectively, these findings should provide an important basis for genomic-enabled breeding and advance the study of functional genomics in soybean.

  18. Development and application of a novel genome-wide SNP array reveals domestication history in soybean

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiao; Chu, Shanshan; Zhang, Huairen; Zhu, Ying; Cheng, Hao; Yu, Deyue

    2016-01-01

    Domestication of soybeans occurred under the intense human-directed selections aimed at developing high-yielding lines. Tracing the domestication history and identifying the genes underlying soybean domestication require further exploration. Here, we developed a high-throughput NJAU 355 K SoySNP array and used this array to study the genetic variation patterns in 367 soybean accessions, including 105 wild soybeans and 262 cultivated soybeans. The population genetic analysis suggests that cultivated soybeans have tended to originate from northern and central China, from where they spread to other regions, accompanied with a gradual increase in seed weight. Genome-wide scanning for evidence of artificial selection revealed signs of selective sweeps involving genes controlling domestication-related agronomic traits including seed weight. To further identify genomic regions related to seed weight, a genome-wide association study (GWAS) was conducted across multiple environments in wild and cultivated soybeans. As a result, a strong linkage disequilibrium region on chromosome 20 was found to be significantly correlated with seed weight in cultivated soybeans. Collectively, these findings should provide an important basis for genomic-enabled breeding and advance the study of functional genomics in soybean. PMID:26856884

  19. Genome-wide association study reveals sex-specific selection signals against autosomal nucleotide variants.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Dongchan; Ryu, Jihye; Lee, Chaeyoung

    2016-05-01

    A genome-wide association study (GWAS) was conducted to examine genetic associations of common autosomal nucleotide variants with sex in a Korean population with 4183 males and 4659 females. Nine genetic association signals were identified in four intragenic and five intergenic regions (P<5 × 10(-8)). Further analysis with an independent data set confirmed two intragenic association signals in the genes encoding protein phosphatase 1, regulatory subunit 12B (PPP1R12B, intron 12, rs1819043) and dynein, axonemal, heavy chain 11 (DNAH11, intron 61, rs10255013), which are directly involved in the reproductive system. This study revealed autosomal genetic variants associated with sex ratio by GWAS for the first time. This implies that genetic variants in proximity to the association signals may influence sex-specific selection and contribute to sex ratio variation. Further studies are required to reveal the mechanisms underlying sex-specific selection.

  20. A novel comparative pattern count analysis reveals a chronic ethanol-induced dynamic shift in immediate early NF-κB genome-wide promoter binding during liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Kuttippurathu, Lakshmi; Patra, Biswanath; Hoek, Jan B; Vadigepalli, Rajanikanth

    2016-03-01

    Liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy is a clinically important process that is impaired by adaptation to chronic alcohol intake. We focused on the initial time points following partial hepatectomy (PHx) to analyze the genome-wide binding activity of NF-κB, a key immediate early regulator. We investigated the effect of chronic alcohol intake on immediate early NF-κB genome-wide localization, in the adapted state as well as in response to partial hepatectomy, using chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by promoter microarray analysis. We found many ethanol-specific NF-κB binding target promoters in the ethanol-adapted state, corresponding to the regulation of biosynthetic processes, oxidation-reduction and apoptosis. Partial hepatectomy induced a diet-independent shift in NF-κB binding loci relative to the transcription start sites. We employed a novel pattern count analysis to exhaustively enumerate and compare the number of promoters corresponding to the temporal binding patterns in ethanol and pair-fed control groups. The highest pattern count corresponded to promoters with NF-κB binding exclusively in the ethanol group at 1 h post PHx. This set was associated with the regulation of cell death, response to oxidative stress, histone modification, mitochondrial function, and metabolic processes. Integration with the global gene expression profiles to identify putative transcriptional consequences of NF-κB binding patterns revealed that several of ethanol-specific 1 h binding targets showed ethanol-specific differential expression through 6 h post PHx. Motif analysis yielded co-incident binding loci for STAT3, AP-1, CREB, C/EBP-β, PPAR-γ and C/EBP-α, likely participating in co-regulatory modules with NF-κB in shaping the immediate early response to PHx. We conclude that adaptation to chronic ethanol intake disrupts the NF-κB promoter binding landscape with consequences for the immediate early gene regulatory response to the acute challenge of PHx.

  1. Genome-wide search for eliminylating domains reveals novel function for BLES03-like proteins.

    PubMed

    Khater, Shradha; Mohanty, Debasisa

    2014-07-24

    Bacterial phosphothreonine lyases catalyze a novel posttranslational modification involving formation of dehydrobutyrine/dehyroalanine by β elimination of the phosphate group of phosphothreonine or phosphoserine residues in their substrate proteins. Though there is experimental evidence for presence of dehydro amino acids in human proteins, no eukaryotic homologs of these lyases have been identified as of today. A comprehensive genome-wide search for identifying phosphothreonine lyase homologs in eukaryotes was carried out. Our fold-based search revealed structural and catalytic site similarity between bacterial phosphothreonine lyases and BLES03 (basophilic leukemia-expressed protein 03), a human protein with unknown function. Ligand induced conformational changes similar to bacterial phosphothreonine lyases, and movement of crucial arginines in the loop region to the catalytic pocket upon binding of phosphothreonine-containing peptides was seen during docking and molecular dynamics studies. Genome-wide search for BLES03 homologs using sensitive profile-based methods revealed their presence not only in eukaryotic classes such as chordata and fungi but also in bacterial and archaebacterial classes. The synteny of these archaebacterial BLES03-like proteins was remarkably similar to that of type IV lantibiotic synthetases which harbor LanL-like phosphothreonine lyase domains. Hence, context-based analysis reinforced our earlier sequence/structure-based prediction of phosphothreonine lyase catalytic function for BLES03. Our in silico analysis has revealed that BLES03-like proteins with previously unknown function are novel eukaryotic phosphothreonine lyases involved in biosynthesis of dehydro amino acids, whereas their bacterial and archaebacterial counterparts might be involved in biosynthesis of natural products similar to lantibiotics.

  2. Weighted SNP set analysis in genome-wide association study.

    PubMed

    Dai, Hui; Zhao, Yang; Qian, Cheng; Cai, Min; Zhang, Ruyang; Chu, Minjie; Dai, Juncheng; Hu, Zhibin; Shen, Hongbing; Chen, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are popular for identifying genetic variants which are associated with disease risk. Many approaches have been proposed to test multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a region simultaneously which considering disadvantages of methods in single locus association analysis. Kernel machine based SNP set analysis is more powerful than single locus analysis, which borrows information from SNPs correlated with causal or tag SNPs. Four types of kernel machine functions and principal component based approach (PCA) were also compared. However, given the loss of power caused by low minor allele frequencies (MAF), we conducted an extension work on PCA and used a new method called weighted PCA (wPCA). Comparative analysis was performed for weighted principal component analysis (wPCA), logistic kernel machine based test (LKM) and principal component analysis (PCA) based on SNP set in the case of different minor allele frequencies (MAF) and linkage disequilibrium (LD) structures. We also applied the three methods to analyze two SNP sets extracted from a real GWAS dataset of non-small cell lung cancer in Han Chinese population. Simulation results show that when the MAF of the causal SNP is low, weighted principal component and weighted IBS are more powerful than PCA and other kernel machine functions at different LD structures and different numbers of causal SNPs. Application of the three methods to a real GWAS dataset indicates that wPCA and wIBS have better performance than the linear kernel, IBS kernel and PCA.

  3. Cross-disease Meta-analysis of Genome-wide Association Studies for Systemic Sclerosis and Rheumatoid Arthritis Reveals IRF4 as a New Common Susceptibility Locus

    PubMed Central

    López-Isac, Elena; Martín, Jose-Ezequiel; Assassi, Shervin; Simeón, Carmen P; Carreira, Patricia; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Freire, Mayka; Beltrán, Emma; Narváez, Javier; Alegre-Sancho, Juan J; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Benjamín; Balsa, Alejandro; Ortiz, Ana M; González-Gay, Miguel A; Beretta, Lorenzo; Santaniello, Alessandro; Bellocchi, Chiara; Lunardi, Claudio; Moroncini, Gianluca; Gabrielli, Armando; Witte, Torsten; Hunzelmann, Nicolas; Distler, Jörg HW; Riekemasten, Gabriella; van der Helm-van Mil, Annete H; de Vries-Bouwstra, Jeska; Magro-Checa, Cesar; Voskuyl, Alexandre E; Vonk, Madelon C; Molberg, Øyvind; Merriman, Tony; Hesselstrand, Roger; Nordin, Annika; Padyukov, Leonid; Herrick, Ariane; Eyre, Steve; Koeleman, Bobby PC; Denton, Christopher P; Fonseca, Carmen; Radstake, Timothy RDJ; Worthington, Jane; Mayes, Maureen D; Martín, Javier

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Systemic sclerosis (SSc) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are autoimmune diseases that share clinical and immunological characteristics. To date, several shared SSc-RA loci have been identified independently. In this study, we aimed to systematically search for new common SSc-RA loci through an inter-disease meta-GWAS strategy. Methods We performed a meta-analysis combining GWAS datasets of SSc and RA using a strategy that allowed identification of loci with both same-direction and opposing-direction allelic effects. The top single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were followed-up in independent SSc and RA case-control cohorts. This allowed us to increase the sample size to a total of 8,830 SSc patients, 16,870 RA patients and 43,393 controls. Results The cross-disease meta-analysis of the GWAS datasets identified several loci with nominal association signals (P-value < 5 × 10-6), which also showed evidence of association in the disease-specific GWAS scan. These loci included several genomic regions not previously reported as shared loci, besides risk factors associated with both diseases in previous studies. The follow-up of the putatively new SSc-RA loci identified IRF4 as a shared risk factor for these two diseases (Pcombined = 3.29 × 10-12). In addition, the analysis of the biological relevance of the known SSc-RA shared loci pointed to the type I interferon and the interleukin 12 signaling pathways as the main common etiopathogenic factors. Conclusions Our study has identified a novel shared locus, IRF4, for SSc and RA and highlighted the usefulness of cross-disease GWAS meta-analysis in the identification of common risk loci. PMID:27111665

  4. Genome-Wide Analysis Reveals PADI4 Cooperates with Elk-1 to Activate c-Fos Expression in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stadler, Sonja; Cherrington, Brian D.; Causey, Corey P.; Thompson, Paul R.; Roberson, Mark S.; Kraus, W. Lee; Coonrod, Scott A.

    2011-01-01

    Peptidylarginine deiminase IV (PADI4) catalyzes the conversion of positively charged arginine and methylarginine residues to neutrally charged citrulline, and this activity has been linked to the repression of a limited number of target genes. To broaden our knowledge of the regulatory potential of PADI4, we utilized chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with promoter tiling array (ChIP-chip) analysis to more comprehensively investigate the range of PADI4 target genes across the genome in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Results showed that PADI4 is enriched in gene promoter regions near transcription start sites (TSSs); and, surprisingly, this pattern of binding is primarily associated with actively transcribed genes. Computational analysis found potential binding sites for Elk-1, a member of the ETS oncogene family, to be highly enriched around PADI4 binding sites; and coimmunoprecipitation analysis then confirmed that Elk-1 physically associates with PADI4. To better understand how PADI4 may facilitate gene transactivation, we then show that PADI4 interacts with Elk-1 at the c-Fos promoter and that, following Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) stimulation, PADI4 catalytic activity facilitates Elk-1 phosphorylation, histone H4 acetylation, and c-Fos transcriptional activation. These results define a novel role for PADI4 as a transcription factor co-activator. PMID:21655091

  5. Genome-wide analysis reveals PADI4 cooperates with Elk-1 to activate c-Fos expression in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuesen; Gamble, Matthew J; Stadler, Sonja; Cherrington, Brian D; Causey, Corey P; Thompson, Paul R; Roberson, Mark S; Kraus, W Lee; Coonrod, Scott A

    2011-06-01

    Peptidylarginine deiminase IV (PADI4) catalyzes the conversion of positively charged arginine and methylarginine residues to neutrally charged citrulline, and this activity has been linked to the repression of a limited number of target genes. To broaden our knowledge of the regulatory potential of PADI4, we utilized chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with promoter tiling array (ChIP-chip) analysis to more comprehensively investigate the range of PADI4 target genes across the genome in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Results showed that PADI4 is enriched in gene promoter regions near transcription start sites (TSSs); and, surprisingly, this pattern of binding is primarily associated with actively transcribed genes. Computational analysis found potential binding sites for Elk-1, a member of the ETS oncogene family, to be highly enriched around PADI4 binding sites; and coimmunoprecipitation analysis then confirmed that Elk-1 physically associates with PADI4. To better understand how PADI4 may facilitate gene transactivation, we then show that PADI4 interacts with Elk-1 at the c-Fos promoter and that, following Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) stimulation, PADI4 catalytic activity facilitates Elk-1 phosphorylation, histone H4 acetylation, and c-Fos transcriptional activation. These results define a novel role for PADI4 as a transcription factor co-activator.

  6. Genome-Wide Small RNA Analysis of Soybean Reveals Auxin-Responsive microRNAs that are Differentially Expressed in Response to Salt Stress in Root Apex

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhengxi; Wang, Youning; Mou, Fupeng; Tian, Yinping; Chen, Liang; Zhang, Senlei; Jiang, Qiong; Li, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Root growth and the architecture of the root system in Arabidopsis are largely determined by root meristematic activity. Legume roots show strong developmental plasticity in response to both abiotic and biotic stimuli, including symbiotic rhizobia. However, a global analysis of gene regulation in the root meristem of soybean plants is lacking. In this study, we performed a global analysis of the small RNA transcriptome of root tips from soybean seedlings grown under normal and salt stress conditions. In total, 71 miRNA candidates, including known and novel variants of 59 miRNA families, were identified. We found 66 salt-responsive miRNAs in the soybean root meristem; among them, 22 are novel miRNAs. Interestingly, we found auxin-responsive cis-elements in the promoters of many salt-responsive miRNAs, implying that these miRNAs may be regulated by auxin and auxin signaling plays a key role in regulating the plasticity of the miRNAome and root development in soybean. A functional analysis of miR399, a salt-responsive miRNA in the root meristem, indicates the crucial role of this miRNA in modulating soybean root developmental plasticity. Our data provide novel insight into the miRNAome-mediated regulatory mechanism in soybean root growth under salt stress. PMID:26834773

  7. Genome-wide analysis of the rat colon reveals proximal-distal differences in histone modifications and proto-oncogene expression

    PubMed Central

    Triff, Karen; Konganti, Kranti; Gaddis, Sally; Zhou, Beiyan; Ivanov, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Since disease susceptibility of the intestine exhibits an anatomical bias, we propose that the chromatin landscape, especially the site-specific epigenetic differences in histone modification patterns throughout the colonic longitudinal axis, contributes to the differential incidence of site-specific pathology. To test this hypothesis, we assessed the chromatin structure associated with gene expression profiles in the rat proximal and distal colon by globally correlating chromatin immunoprecipitation next-generation sequencing analysis (ChIP-Seq) with mRNA transcription (RNA-Seq) data. Crypts were isolated from the proximal and distal colonic regions from rats maintained on a semipurified diet, and mRNA gene expression profiles were generated by RNA-Seq. The remaining isolated crypts were formaldehyde-cross-linked and chromatin immunoprecipitated with antibodies against H3K4me3, H3K9me3, and RNA polymerase II. Globally, RNA-Seq results indicate that 9,866 genes were actively expressed, of which 540 genes were differentially expressed between the proximal and distal colon. Gene ontology analysis indicates that crypt location significantly affected both chromatin and transcriptional regulation of genes involved in enterocyte movement, lipid metabolism, lymphatic development, and immune cell trafficking. Gene function analysis indicates that the PI3-kinase signaling pathway was regulated in a site-specific manner, e.g., proto-oncogenes, JUN, FOS, and ATF, were upregulated in the distal colon. Middle and long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) were also detected in the colon, including select lncRNAs formerly only detected in the rat nervous system. In summary, distinct combinatorial patterns of histone modifications exist in the proximal versus distal colon. These site-specific differences may explain the differential effects of chemoprotective agents on cell transformation in the ascending (proximal) and descending (distal) colon. PMID:24151245

  8. Genome-Wide Transcriptome Analysis Reveals that Cadmium Stress Signaling Controls the Expression of Genes in Drought Stress Signal Pathways in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Oono, Youko; Yazawa, Takayuki; Kawahara, Yoshihiro; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Fuminori; Sasaki, Harumi; Mori, Satomi; Wu, Jianzhong; Handa, Hirokazu; Itoh, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Plant growth is severely affected by toxic concentrations of the non-essential heavy metal cadmium (Cd). Comprehensive transcriptome analysis by RNA-Seq following cadmium exposure is required to further understand plant responses to Cd and facilitate future systems-based analyses of the underlying regulatory networks. In this study, rice plants were hydroponically treated with 50 µM Cd for 24 hours and ∼60,000 expressed transcripts, including transcripts that could not be characterized by microarray-based approaches, were evaluated. Upregulation of various ROS-scavenging enzymes, chelators and metal transporters demonstrated the appropriate expression profiles to Cd exposure. Gene Ontology enrichment analysis of the responsive transcripts indicated the upregulation of many drought stress-related genes under Cd exposure. Further investigation into the expression of drought stress marker genes such as DREB suggested that expression of genes in several drought stress signal pathways was activated under Cd exposure. Furthermore, qRT-PCR analyses of randomly selected Cd-responsive metal transporter transcripts under various metal ion stresses suggested that the expression of Cd-responsive transcripts might be easily affected by other ions. Our transcriptome analysis demonstrated a new transcriptional network linking Cd and drought stresses in rice. Considering our data and that Cd is a non-essential metal, the network underlying Cd stress responses and tolerance, which plants have developed to adapt to other stresses, could help to acclimate to Cd exposure. Our examination of this transcriptional network provides useful information for further studies of the molecular mechanisms of plant adaptation to Cd exposure and the improvement of tolerance in crop species. PMID:24816929

  9. Genome-wide analysis on Chlamydomonas reinhardtii reveals the impact of hydrogen peroxide on protein stress responses and overlap with other stress transcriptomes

    SciTech Connect

    Blaby, Ian K.; Blaby-Haas, Crysten E.; Pérez-Pérez, María Esther; Schmollinger, Stefan; Fitz-Gibbon, Sorel; Lemaire, Stéphane D.; Merchant, Sabeeha S.

    2015-12-07

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced by and have the potential to be damaging to all aerobic organisms. In photosynthetic organisms, they are an unavoidable byproduct of electron transfer in both the chloroplast and mitochondrion. Here, in this paper, we employ the reference unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to identify the effect of H2O2 on gene expression by monitoring the changes in the transcriptome in a time-course experiment. Comparison of transcriptomes from cells sampled immediately prior to the addition of H2O2 and 0.5 and 1 h subsequently revealed 1278 differentially abundant transcripts. Of those transcripts that increase in abundance, many encode proteins involved in ROS detoxification, protein degradation and stress responses, whereas among those that decrease are transcripts encoding proteins involved in photosynthesis and central carbon metabolism. In addition to these transcriptomic adjustments, we observe that addition of H2O2 is followed by an accumulation and oxidation of the total intracellular glutathione pool, and a decrease in photosynthetic O2 output. Additionally, we analyze our transcriptomes in the context of changes in transcript abundance in response to singlet O2 (O2*), and relate our H2O2-induced transcripts to a diurnal transcriptome, where we demonstrate enrichments of H2O2-induced transcripts early in the light phase, late in the light phase and 2 h prior to light. In conclusion, on this basis several genes that are highlighted in this work may be involved in previously undiscovered stress remediation pathways or acclimation responses.

  10. Genome-wide analysis on Chlamydomonas reinhardtii reveals the impact of hydrogen peroxide on protein stress responses and overlap with other stress transcriptomes

    DOE PAGES

    Blaby, Ian K.; Blaby-Haas, Crysten E.; Pérez-Pérez, María Esther; ...

    2015-12-07

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced by and have the potential to be damaging to all aerobic organisms. In photosynthetic organisms, they are an unavoidable byproduct of electron transfer in both the chloroplast and mitochondrion. Here, in this paper, we employ the reference unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to identify the effect of H2O2 on gene expression by monitoring the changes in the transcriptome in a time-course experiment. Comparison of transcriptomes from cells sampled immediately prior to the addition of H2O2 and 0.5 and 1 h subsequently revealed 1278 differentially abundant transcripts. Of those transcripts that increase in abundance, manymore » encode proteins involved in ROS detoxification, protein degradation and stress responses, whereas among those that decrease are transcripts encoding proteins involved in photosynthesis and central carbon metabolism. In addition to these transcriptomic adjustments, we observe that addition of H2O2 is followed by an accumulation and oxidation of the total intracellular glutathione pool, and a decrease in photosynthetic O2 output. Additionally, we analyze our transcriptomes in the context of changes in transcript abundance in response to singlet O2 (O2*), and relate our H2O2-induced transcripts to a diurnal transcriptome, where we demonstrate enrichments of H2O2-induced transcripts early in the light phase, late in the light phase and 2 h prior to light. In conclusion, on this basis several genes that are highlighted in this work may be involved in previously undiscovered stress remediation pathways or acclimation responses.« less

  11. Genome-wide array-CGH analysis reveals YRF1 gene copy number variation that modulates genetic stability in distillery yeasts.

    PubMed

    Deregowska, Anna; Skoneczny, Marek; Adamczyk, Jagoda; Kwiatkowska, Aleksandra; Rawska, Ewa; Skoneczna, Adrianna; Lewinska, Anna; Wnuk, Maciej

    2015-10-13

    Industrial yeasts, economically important microorganisms, are widely used in diverse biotechnological processes including brewing, winemaking and distilling. In contrast to a well-established genome of brewer's and wine yeast strains, the comprehensive evaluation of genomic features of distillery strains is lacking. In the present study, twenty two distillery yeast strains were subjected to electrophoretic karyotyping and array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH). The strains analyzed were assigned to the Saccharomyces sensu stricto complex and grouped into four species categories: S. bayanus, S. paradoxus, S. cerevisiae and S. kudriavzevii. The genomic diversity was mainly revealed within subtelomeric regions and the losses and/or gains of fragments of chromosomes I, III, VI and IX were the most frequently observed. Statistically significant differences in the gene copy number were documented in six functional gene categories: 1) telomere maintenance via recombination, DNA helicase activity or DNA binding, 2) maltose metabolism process, glucose transmembrane transporter activity; 3) asparagine catabolism, cellular response to nitrogen starvation, localized in cell wall-bounded periplasmic space, 4) siderophore transport, 5) response to copper ion, cadmium ion binding and 6) L-iditol 2- dehydrogenase activity. The losses of YRF1 genes (Y' element ATP-dependent helicase) were accompanied by decreased level of Y' sequences and an increase in DNA double and single strand breaks, and oxidative DNA damage in the S. paradoxus group compared to the S. bayanus group. We postulate that naturally occurring diversity in the YRF1 gene copy number may promote genetic stability in the S. bayanus group of distillery yeast strains.

  12. Genome-wide array-CGH analysis reveals YRF1 gene copy number variation that modulates genetic stability in distillery yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Adamczyk, Jagoda; Kwiatkowska, Aleksandra; Rawska, Ewa; Skoneczna, Adrianna

    2015-01-01

    Industrial yeasts, economically important microorganisms, are widely used in diverse biotechnological processes including brewing, winemaking and distilling. In contrast to a well-established genome of brewer's and wine yeast strains, the comprehensive evaluation of genomic features of distillery strains is lacking. In the present study, twenty two distillery yeast strains were subjected to electrophoretic karyotyping and array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH). The strains analyzed were assigned to the Saccharomyces sensu stricto complex and grouped into four species categories: S. bayanus, S. paradoxus, S. cerevisiae and S. kudriavzevii. The genomic diversity was mainly revealed within subtelomeric regions and the losses and/or gains of fragments of chromosomes I, III, VI and IX were the most frequently observed. Statistically significant differences in the gene copy number were documented in six functional gene categories: 1) telomere maintenance via recombination, DNA helicase activity or DNA binding, 2) maltose metabolism process, glucose transmembrane transporter activity; 3) asparagine catabolism, cellular response to nitrogen starvation, localized in cell wall-bounded periplasmic space, 4) siderophore transport, 5) response to copper ion, cadmium ion binding and 6) L-iditol 2- dehydrogenase activity. The losses of YRF1 genes (Y' element ATP-dependent helicase) were accompanied by decreased level of Y' sequences and an increase in DNA double and single strand breaks, and oxidative DNA damage in the S. paradoxus group compared to the S. bayanus group. We postulate that naturally occurring diversity in the YRF1 gene copy number may promote genetic stability in the S. bayanus group of distillery yeast strains. PMID:26384347

  13. Genome-wide analysis reveals the expansion of Cytochrome P450 genes associated with xenobiotic metabolism in rice striped stem borer, Chilo suppressalis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baoju; Shahzad, Muhammad Faisal; Zhang, Zan; Sun, Haina; Han, Ping; Li, Fei; Han, Zhaojun

    2014-01-10

    The Cytochrome P450 (CYP) superfamily is a large group of ancient proteins with enzymatic activities involved in various physiological processes. The rice striped stem borer, Chilo suppressalis, is an important insect pest in rice production. Here, we report the identification and characterization of 77 CYP genes from rice striped stem borer (SSB) through genome and transcriptome sequence analyses. All these CYP genes were confirmed by RT-PCR and direct sequencing. Twenty-eight CYP transcripts have full open reading frame (ORF) and four additional transcripts have a nearly full length coding region. The SSB CYP genes were classified into four clans, the mitochondrial, CYP2, CYP3, and CYP4. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that there was an apparent expansion of the CYP3 clan in insects. The CYP6AB subfamily of the CYP3 clan had nine members in SSB. Evolutionary analysis showed that this subfamily was expanded only in lepidopteran insects. In this study, we identified a new P450 subfamily, CYP321F, which is unique to SSB and located in the genome as tandem repeats. Our work provided a foundation for future studies on the functions and mechanism of P450s in the destructive rice pest.

  14. Bivariate genome-wide association meta-analysis of pediatric musculoskeletal traits reveals pleiotropic effects at the SREBF1/TOM1L2 locus.

    PubMed

    Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Kemp, John P; Dimou, Niki L; Kreiner, Eskil; Chesi, Alessandra; Zemel, Babette S; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Boer, Cindy G; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Bisgaard, Hans; Evangelou, Evangelos; Heppe, Denise H M; Bonewald, Lynda F; Gorski, Jeffrey P; Ghanbari, Mohsen; Demissie, Serkalem; Duque, Gustavo; Maurano, Matthew T; Kiel, Douglas P; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; C J van der Eerden, Bram; Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl; Reppe, Sjur; Gautvik, Kaare M; Raastad, Truls; Karasik, David; van de Peppel, Jeroen; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Uitterlinden, André G; Tobias, Jonathan H; Grant, Struan F A; Bagos, Pantelis G; Evans, David M; Rivadeneira, Fernando

    2017-07-25

    Bone mineral density is known to be a heritable, polygenic trait whereas genetic variants contributing to lean mass variation remain largely unknown. We estimated the shared SNP heritability and performed a bivariate GWAS meta-analysis of total-body lean mass (TB-LM) and total-body less head bone mineral density (TBLH-BMD) regions in 10,414 children. The estimated SNP heritability is 43% (95% CI: 34-52%) for TBLH-BMD, and 39% (95% CI: 30-48%) for TB-LM, with a shared genetic component of 43% (95% CI: 29-56%). We identify variants with pleiotropic effects in eight loci, including seven established bone mineral density loci: WNT4, GALNT3, MEPE, CPED1/WNT16, TNFSF11, RIN3, and PPP6R3/LRP5. Variants in the TOM1L2/SREBF1 locus exert opposing effects TB-LM and TBLH-BMD, and have a stronger association with the former trait. We show that SREBF1 is expressed in murine and human osteoblasts, as well as in human muscle tissue. This is the first bivariate GWAS meta-analysis to demonstrate genetic factors with pleiotropic effects on bone mineral density and lean mass.Bone mineral density and lean skeletal mass are heritable traits. Here, Medina-Gomez and colleagues perform bivariate GWAS analyses of total body lean mass and bone mass density in children, and show genetic loci with pleiotropic effects on both traits.

  15. Genome-wide analysis of AP2/ERF transcription factors in carrot (Daucus carota L.) reveals evolution and expression profiles under abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng-Yao; Xu, Zhi-Sheng; Huang, Ying; Tian, Chang; Wang, Feng; Xiong, Ai-Sheng

    2015-12-01

    AP2/ERF is a large transcription factor family that regulates plant physiological processes, such as plant development and stress response. Carrot (Daucus carota L.) is an important economical crop with a genome size of 480 Mb; the draft genome sequencing of this crop has been completed by our group. However, little is known about the AP2/ERF factors in carrot. In this study, a total of 267 putative AP2/ERF factors were identified from the whole-genome sequence of carrot. These AP2/ERF proteins were phylogenetically clustered into five subfamilies based on their similarity to the amino acid sequences from Arabidopsis. The distribution and comparative genome analysis of the AP2/ERF factors among plants showed the AP2/ERF factors had expansion during the evolutionary process, and the AP2 domain was highly conserved during evolution. The number of AP2/ERF factors in land plants expanded during their evolution. A total of 60 orthologous and 145 coorthologous AP2/ERF gene pairs between carrot and Arabidopsis were identified, and the interaction network of orthologous genes was constructed. The expression patterns of eight AP2/ERF family genes from each subfamily (DREB, ERF, AP2, and RAV) were related to abiotic stresses. Yeast one-hybrid and β-galactosidase activity assays confirmed the DRE and GCC box-binding activities of DREB subfamily genes. This study is the first to identify and characterize the AP2/ERF transcription factors in carrot using whole-genome analysis, and the findings may serve as references for future functional research on the transcription factors in carrot.

  16. Genome-wide analysis of the distribution of AP2/ERF transcription factors reveals duplication and CBFs genes elucidate their potential function in Brassica oleracea

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cabbage (Brassica oleracea) is one of the most important leaf vegetables grown worldwide. The entire cabbage genome sequence and more than fifty thousand proteins have been obtained to date. However a high degree of sequence similarity and conserved genome structure remain between cabbage and Arabidopsis; therefore, Arabidopsis is a viable reference species for comparative genomics studies. Transcription factors (TFs) are important regulators involved in plant development and physiological processes and the AP2/ERF protein family contains transcriptional factors that play a crucial role in plant growth and development, as well as response to biotic and abiotic stress conditions in plants. However, no detailed expression profile of AP2/ERF-like genes is available for B. oleracea. Results In the present study, 226 AP2/ERF TFs were identified from B. oleracea based on the available genome sequence. Based on sequence similarity, the AP2/ERF superfamily was classified into five groups (DREB, ERF, AP2, RAV and Soloist) and 15 subgroups. The identification, classification, phylogenetic construction, conserved motifs, chromosome distribution, functional annotation, expression patterns and interaction network were then predicted and analyzed. AP2/ERF transcription factor expression levels exhibited differences in response to varying abiotic stresses based on expressed sequence tags (ESTs). BoCBF1a, 1b, 2, 3 and 4, which were highly conserved in Arabidopsis and B. rapa CBF/DREB genes families were well characterized. Expression analysis enabled elucidation of the molecular and genetic level expression patterns of cold tolerance (CT) and susceptible lines (CS) of cabbage and indicated that all BoCBF genes responded to abiotic stresses. Conclusions Comprehensive analysis of the physiological functions and biological roles of AP2/ERF superfamily genes and BoCBF family genes in B. oleracea is required to fully elucidate AP2/ERF, which will provide rich resources and

  17. Genome-Wide Analysis of Human MicroRNA Stability

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Li, Zhixin; Zhou, Shixin; Wen, Jinhua; Geng, Bin; Yang, Jichun; Cui, Qinghua

    2013-01-01

    Increasing studies have shown that microRNA (miRNA) stability plays important roles in physiology. However, the global picture of miRNA stability remains largely unknown. Here, we had analyzed genome-wide miRNA stability across 10 diverse cell types using miRNA arrays. We found that miRNA stability shows high dynamics and diversity both within individual cells and across cell types. Strikingly, we observed a negative correlation between miRNA stability and miRNA expression level, which is different from current findings on other biological molecules such as proteins and mRNAs that show positive and not negative correlations between stability and expression level. This finding indicates that miRNA has a distinct action mode, which we called “rapid production, rapid turnover; slow production, slow turnover.” This mode further suggests that high expression miRNAs normally degrade fast and may endow the cell with special properties that facilitate cellular status-transition. Moreover, we revealed that the stability of miRNAs is affected by cohorts of factors that include miRNA targets, transcription factors, nucleotide content, evolution, associated disease, and environmental factors. Together, our results provided an extensive description of the global landscape, dynamics, and distinct mode of human miRNA stability, which provide help in investigating their functions in physiology and pathophysiology. PMID:24187663

  18. Genome-Wide Analysis of Stowaway-Like MITEs in Wheat Reveals High Sequence Conservation, Gene Association, and Genomic Diversification1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Yaakov, Beery; Ben-David, Smadar; Kashkush, Khalil

    2013-01-01

    The diversity and evolution of wheat (Triticum-Aegilops group) genomes is determined, in part, by the activity of transposable elements that constitute a large fraction of the genome (up to 90%). In this study, we retrieved sequences from publicly available wheat databases, including a 454-pyrosequencing database, and analyzed 18,217 insertions of 18 Stowaway-like miniature inverted-repeat transposable element (MITE) families previously characterized in wheat that together account for approximately 1.3 Mb of sequence. All 18 families showed high conservation in length, sequence, and target site preference. Furthermore, approximately 55% of the elements were inserted in transcribed regions, into or near known wheat genes. Notably, we observed significant correlation between the mean length of the MITEs and their copy number. In addition, the genomic composition of nine MITE families was studied by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis in 40 accessions of Triticum spp. and Aegilops spp., including diploids, tetraploids, and hexaploids. The quantitative polymerase chain reaction data showed massive and significant intraspecific and interspecific variation as well as genome-specific proliferation and nonadditive quantities in the polyploids. We also observed significant differences in the methylation status of the insertion sites among MITE families. Our data thus suggest a possible role for MITEs in generating genome diversification and in the establishment of nascent polyploid species in wheat. PMID:23104862

  19. Genome-Wide Analysis of NBS-LRR Genes in Sorghum Genome Revealed Several Events Contributing to NBS-LRR Gene Evolution in Grass Species

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiping; Wang, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    The nucleotide-binding site (NBS)–leucine-rich repeat (LRR) gene family is crucially important for offering resistance to pathogens. To explore evolutionary conservation and variability of NBS-LRR genes across grass species, we identified 88, 107, 24, and 44 full-length NBS-LRR genes in sorghum, rice, maize, and Brachypodium, respectively. A comprehensive analysis was performed on classification, genome organization, evolution, expression, and regulation of these NBS-LRR genes using sorghum as a representative of grass species. In general, the full-length NBS-LRR genes are highly clustered and duplicated in sorghum genome mainly due to local duplications. NBS-LRR genes have basal expression levels and are highly potentially targeted by miRNA. The number of NBS-LRR genes in the four grass species is positively correlated with the gene clustering rate. The results provided a valuable genomic resource and insights for functional and evolutionary studies of NBS-LRR genes in grass species. PMID:26792976

  20. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis reveals that a pleiotropic antibiotic regulator, AfsS, modulates nutritional stress response in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2)

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Wei; Jayapal, Karthik P; Charaniya, Salim; Mehra, Sarika; Glod, Frank; Kyung, Yun-Seung; Sherman, David H; Hu, Wei-Shou

    2008-01-01

    Background A small "sigma-like" protein, AfsS, pleiotropically regulates antibiotic biosynthesis in Streptomyces coelicolor. Overexpression of afsS in S. coelicolor and certain related species causes antibiotic stimulatory effects in the host organism. Although recent studies have uncovered some of the upstream events activating this gene, the mechanisms through which this signal is relayed downstream leading to the eventual induction of antibiotic pathways remain unclear. Results In this study, we employed whole-genome DNA microarrays and quantitative PCRs to examine the transcriptome of an afsS disruption mutant that is completely deficient in the production of actinorhodin, a major S. coelicolor antibiotic. The production of undecylprodigiosin, another prominent antibiotic, was, however, perturbed only marginally in the mutant. Principal component analysis of temporal gene expression profiles identified two major gene classes each exhibiting a distinct coordinate differential expression pattern. Surprisingly, nearly 70% of the >117 differentially expressed genes were conspicuously associated with nutrient starvation response, particularly those of phosphate, nitrogen and sulfate. Furthermore, expression profiles of some transcriptional regulators including at least two sigma factors were perturbed in the mutant. In almost every case, the effect of afsS disruption was not observed until the onset of stationary phase. Conclusion Our data suggests a comprehensive role for S. coelicolor AfsS as a master regulator of both antibiotic synthesis and nutritional stress response, reminiscent of alternative sigma factors found in several bacteria. PMID:18230178

  1. Genome-wide analysis of brain and gonad transcripts reveals changes of key sex reversal-related genes expression and signaling pathways in three stages of Monopterus albus

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Qing; Guo, Wei; Li, Dapeng

    2017-01-01

    Background The natural sex reversal severely affects the sex ratio and thus decreases the productivity of the rice field eel (Monopterus albus). How to understand and manipulate this process is one of the major issues for the rice field eel stocking. So far the genomics and transcriptomics data available for this species are still scarce. Here we provide a comprehensive study of transcriptomes of brain and gonad tissue in three sex stages (female, intersex and male) from the rice field eel to investigate changes in transcriptional level during the sex reversal process. Results Approximately 195 thousand unigenes were generated and over 44.4 thousand were functionally annotated. Comparative study between stages provided multiple differentially expressed genes in brain and gonad tissue. Overall 4668 genes were found to be of unequal abundance between gonad tissues, far more than that of the brain tissues (59 genes). These genes were enriched in several different signaling pathways. A number of 231 genes were found with different levels in gonad in each stage, with several reproduction-related genes included. A total of 19 candidate genes that could be most related to sex reversal were screened out, part of these genes’ expression patterns were validated by RT-qPCR. The expression of spef2, maats1, spag6 and dmc1 were abundant in testis, but was barely detected in females, while the 17β-hsd12, zpsbp3, gal3 and foxn5 were only expressed in ovary. Conclusion This study investigated the complexity of brain and gonad transcriptomes in three sex stages of the rice field eel. Integrated analysis of different gene expression and changes in signaling pathways, such as PI3K-Akt pathway, provided crucial data for further study of sex transformation mechanisms. PMID:28319194

  2. Genome-wide identification of citrus ATP-citrate lyase genes and their transcript analysis in fruits reveals their possible role in citrate utilization.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiao-Mei; Shi, Cai-Yun; Liu, Xiao; Jin, Long-Fei; Liu, Yong-Zhong; Peng, Shu-Ang

    2015-02-01

    ATP-citrate lyase (ACL, EC4.1.3.8) catalyzes citrate to oxaloacetate and acetyl-CoA in the cell cytosol, and has important roles in normal plant growth and in the biosynthesis of some secondary metabolites. We identified three ACL genes, CitACLα1, CitACLα2, and CitACLβ1, in the citrus genome database. Both CitACLα1 and CitACLα2 encode putative ACL α subunits with 82.5 % amino acid identity, whereas CitACLβ1 encodes a putative ACL β subunit. Gene structure analysis showed that CitACLα1 and CitACLα2 had 12 exons and 11 introns, and CitACLβ1 had 16 exons and 15 introns. CitACLα1 and CitACLβ1 were predominantly expressed in flower, and CitACLα2 was predominantly expressed in stem and fibrous roots. As fruits ripen, the transcript levels of CitACLα1, CitACLβ1, and/or CitACLα2 in cultivars 'Niuher' and 'Owari' increased, accompanied by significant decreases in citrate content, while their transcript levels decreased significantly in 'Egan No. 1' and 'Iyokan', although citrate content also decreased. In 'HB pummelo', in which acid content increased as fruit ripened, and in acid-free pummelo, transcript levels of CitACLα2, CitACLβ1, and/or CitACLα1 increased. Moreover, mild drought stress and ABA treatment significantly increased citrate contents in fruits. Transcript levels of the three genes were significantly reduced by mild drought stress, and the transcript level of only CitACLβ1 was significantly reduced by ABA treatment. Taken together, these data indicate that the effects of ACL on citrate use during fruit ripening depends on the cultivar, and the reduction in ACL gene expression may be attributed to citrate increases under mild drought stress or ABA treatment.

  3. Genome-wide transcriptomic analysis of response to low temperature reveals candidate genes determining divergent cold-sensitivity of maize inbred lines.

    PubMed

    Sobkowiak, Alicja; Jończyk, Maciej; Jarochowska, Emilia; Biecek, Przemysław; Trzcinska-Danielewicz, Joanna; Leipner, Jörg; Fronk, Jan; Sowiński, Paweł

    2014-06-01

    Maize, despite being thermophyllic due to its tropical origin, demonstrates high intraspecific diversity in cold-tolerance. To search for molecular mechanisms of this diversity, transcriptomic response to cold was studied in two inbred lines of contrasting cold-tolerance. Microarray analysis was followed by extensive statistical elaboration of data, literature data mining, and gene ontology-based classification. The lines used had been bred earlier specifically for determination of QTLs for cold-performance of photosynthesis. This allowed direct comparison of present transcriptomic data with the earlier QTL mapping results. Cold-treated (14 h at 8/6 °C) maize seedlings of cold-tolerant ETH-DH7 and cold-sensitive ETH-DL3 lines at V3 stage showed strong, consistent response of the third leaf transcriptome: several thousand probes showed similar, statistically significant change in both lines, while only tens responded differently in the two lines. The most striking difference between the responses of the two lines to cold was the induction of expression of ca. twenty genes encoding membrane/cell wall proteins exclusively in the cold-tolerant ETH-DH7 line. The common response comprised mainly repression of numerous genes related to photosynthesis and induction of genes related to basic biological activity: transcription, regulation of gene expression, protein phosphorylation, cell wall organization. Among the genes showing differential response, several were close to the QTL regions identified in earlier studies with the same inbred lines and associated with biometrical, physiological or biochemical parameters. These transcripts, including two apparently non-protein-coding ones, are particularly attractive candidates for future studies on mechanisms determining divergent cold-tolerance of inbred maize lines.

  4. Comparative analysis of methods for genome-wide nucleosome cartography.

    PubMed

    Quintales, Luis; Vázquez, Enrique; Antequera, Francisco

    2015-07-01

    Nucleosomes contribute to compacting the genome into the nucleus and regulate the physical access of regulatory proteins to DNA either directly or through the epigenetic modifications of the histone tails. Precise mapping of nucleosome positioning across the genome is, therefore, essential to understanding the genome regulation. In recent years, several experimental protocols have been developed for this purpose that include the enzymatic digestion, chemical cleavage or immunoprecipitation of chromatin followed by next-generation sequencing of the resulting DNA fragments. Here, we compare the performance and resolution of these methods from the initial biochemical steps through the alignment of the millions of short-sequence reads to a reference genome to the final computational analysis to generate genome-wide maps of nucleosome occupancy. Because of the lack of a unified protocol to process data sets obtained through the different approaches, we have developed a new computational tool (NUCwave), which facilitates their analysis, comparison and assessment and will enable researchers to choose the most suitable method for any particular purpose. NUCwave is freely available at http://nucleosome.usal.es/nucwave along with a step-by-step protocol for its use. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Fine mapping by composite genome-wide association analysis.

    PubMed

    Casellas, Joaquim; Cañas-Álvarez, Jhon Jacobo; Fina, Marta; Piedrafita, Jesús; Cecchinato, Alessio

    2017-06-06

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies play a key role in current genetics research, unravelling genomic regions linked to phenotypic traits of interest in multiple species. Nevertheless, the extent of linkage disequilibrium (LD) may provide confounding results when significant genetic markers span along several contiguous cM. In this study, we have adapted the composite interval mapping approach to the GWA framework (composite GWA), in order to evaluate the impact of including competing (possibly linked) genetic markers when testing for the additive allelic effect inherent to a given genetic marker. We tested model performance on simulated data sets under different scenarios (i.e., qualitative trait loci effects, LD between genetic markers and width of the genomic region involved in the analysis). Our results showed that the genomic region had a small impact on the number of competing single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) as well as on the precision of the composite GWA analysis. A similar conclusion was derived from the preferable range of LD between the tested SNP and competing SNPs, although moderate-to-high LD seemed to attenuate the loss of statistical power. The composite GWA improved specificity and reduced the number of significant genetic markers. The composite GWA model contributes a novel point of view for GWA analyses where testing circumscribed to the genomic region flanking each SNP (delimited by the nearest competing SNPs) and conditioning on linked markers increases the precision to locate causal mutations, but possibly at the expense of power.

  6. Natural selection on functional modules, a genome-wide analysis.

    PubMed

    Serra, François; Arbiza, Leonardo; Dopazo, Joaquín; Dopazo, Hernán

    2011-03-01

    Classically, the functional consequences of natural selection over genomes have been analyzed as the compound effects of individual genes. The current paradigm for large-scale analysis of adaptation is based on the observed significant deviations of rates of individual genes from neutral evolutionary expectation. This approach, which assumed independence among genes, has not been able to identify biological functions significantly enriched in positively selected genes in individual species. Alternatively, pooling related species has enhanced the search for signatures of selection. However, grouping signatures does not allow testing for adaptive differences between species. Here we introduce the Gene-Set Selection Analysis (GSSA), a new genome-wide approach to test for evidences of natural selection on functional modules. GSSA is able to detect lineage specific evolutionary rate changes in a notable number of functional modules. For example, in nine mammal and Drosophilae genomes GSSA identifies hundreds of functional modules with significant associations to high and low rates of evolution. Many of the detected functional modules with high evolutionary rates have been previously identified as biological functions under positive selection. Notably, GSSA identifies conserved functional modules with many positively selected genes, which questions whether they are exclusively selected for fitting genomes to environmental changes. Our results agree with previous studies suggesting that adaptation requires positive selection, but not every mutation under positive selection contributes to the adaptive dynamical process of the evolution of species.

  7. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis of human epidermal melanocytes

    PubMed Central

    Haltaufderhyde, Kirk D.; Oancea, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Because human epidermal melanocytes (HEMs) provide critical protection against skin cancer, sunburn, and photoaging, a genome-wide perspective of gene expression in these cells is vital to understanding human skin physiology. In this study we performed high throughput sequencing of HEMs to obtain a complete data set of transcript sizes, abundances, and splicing. As expected, we found that melanocyte specific genes that function in pigmentation were among the highest expressed genes. We analyzed receptor, ion channel and transcription factor gene families to get a better understanding of the cell signalling pathways used by melanocytes. We also performed a comparative transcriptomic analysis of lightly versus darkly pigmented HEMs and found 16 genes differentially expressed in the two pigmentation phenotypes; of those, only one putative melanosomal transporter (SLC45A2) has known function in pigmentation. In addition, we found 166 genes with splice isoforms expressed exclusively in one pigmentation phenotype, 17 of which are genes involved in signal transduction. Our melanocyte transcriptome study provides a comprehensive view and may help identify novel pigmentation genes and potential pharmacological targets. PMID:25451175

  8. Genome-wide association study reveals genetic architecture of coleoptile length in wheat.

    PubMed

    Li, Genqiao; Bai, Guihua; Carver, Brett F; Elliott, Norman C; Bennett, Rebecca S; Wu, Yanqi; Hunger, Robert; Bonman, J Michael; Xu, Xiangyang

    2017-02-01

    Eight QTL for coleoptile length were identified in a genome-wide association study on a set of 893 wheat accessions, four of which are novel loci. Wheat cultivars with long coleoptiles are preferred in wheat-growing regions where deep planting is practiced. However, the wide use of gibberellic acid (GA)-insensitive dwarfing genes, Rht-B1b and Rht-D1b, makes it challenging to breed dwarf wheat cultivars with long coleoptiles. To understand the genetic basis of coleoptile length, we performed a genome-wide association study on a set of 893 landraces and historical cultivars using 5011 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. Structure analysis revealed four subgroups in the association panel. Association analysis results suggested that Rht-B1b and Rht-D1b genes significantly reduced coleoptile length, and eight additional quantitative trait loci (QTL) for coleoptile length were also identified. These QTL explained 1.45-3.18 and 1.36-3.11% of the phenotypic variation in 2015 and 2016, respectively, and their allelic substitution effects ranged from 0.31 to 1.75 cm in 2015, and 0.63-1.55 cm in 2016. Of the eight QTL, QCL.stars-1BS1, QCL.stars-2DS1, QCL.stars-4BS2, and QCL.stars-5BL1 are likely novel loci for coleoptile length. The favorable alleles in each accession ranged from two to eight with an average of 5.8 at eight loci in the panel, and more favorable alleles were significantly associated with longer coleoptile, suggesting that QTL pyramiding is an effective approach to increase wheat coleoptile length.

  9. Genome wide analysis of protein production load in Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Pakula, Tiina M; Nygren, Heli; Barth, Dorothee; Heinonen, Markus; Castillo, Sandra; Penttilä, Merja; Arvas, Mikko

    2016-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei (teleomorph Hypocrea jecorina) is a widely used industrial host organism for protein production. In industrial cultivations, it can produce over 100 g/l of extracellular protein, mostly constituting of cellulases and hemicellulases. In order to improve protein production of T. reesei the transcriptional regulation of cellulases and secretory pathway factors have been extensively studied. However, the metabolism of T. reesei under protein production conditions has not received much attention. To understand the physiology and metabolism of T. reesei under protein production conditions we carried out a well-controlled bioreactor experiment with extensive analysis. We used minimal media to make the data amenable for modelling and three strain pairs to cover different protein production levels. With RNA-sequencing transcriptomics we detected the concentration of the carbon source as the most important determinant of the transcriptome. As the major transcriptional response concomitant to protein production we detected the induction of selected genes that were putatively regulated by xyr1 and were related to protein transport, amino acid metabolism and transcriptional regulation. We found novel metabolic responses such as production of glycerol and a cellotriose-like compound. We then used this cultivation data for flux balance analysis of T. reesei metabolism and demonstrate for the first time the use of genome wide stoichiometric metabolic modelling for T. reesei. We show that our model can predict protein production rate and provides novel insight into the metabolism of protein production. We also provide this unprecedented cultivation and transcriptomics data set for future modelling efforts. The use of stoichiometric modelling can open a novel path for the improvement of protein production in T. reesei. Based on this we propose sulphur assimilation as a major limiting factor of protein production. As an organism with

  10. Genome-wide analysis of condensin binding in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Condensins are multi-subunit protein complexes that are essential for chromosome condensation during mitosis and meiosis, and play key roles in transcription regulation during interphase. Metazoans contain two condensins, I and II, which perform different functions and localize to different chromosomal regions. Caenorhabditis elegans contains a third condensin, IDC, that is targeted to and represses transcription of the X chromosome for dosage compensation. Results To understand condensin binding and function, we performed ChIP-seq analysis of C. elegans condensins in mixed developmental stage embryos, which contain predominantly interphase nuclei. Condensins bind to a subset of active promoters, tRNA genes and putative enhancers. Expression analysis in kle-2-mutant larvae suggests that the primary effect of condensin II on transcription is repression. A DNA sequence motif, GCGC, is enriched at condensin II binding sites. A sequence extension of this core motif, AGGG, creates the condensin IDC motif. In addition to differences in recruitment that result in X-enrichment of condensin IDC and condensin II binding to all chromosomes, we provide evidence for a shared recruitment mechanism, as condensin IDC recruiter SDC-2 also recruits condensin II to the condensin IDC recruitment sites on the X. In addition, we found that condensin sites overlap extensively with the cohesin loader SCC-2, and that SDC-2 also recruits SCC-2 to the condensin IDC recruitment sites. Conclusions Our results provide the first genome-wide view of metazoan condensin II binding in interphase, define putative recruitment motifs, and illustrate shared loading mechanisms for condensin IDC and condensin II. PMID:24125077

  11. Genome-wide view of genetic diversity reveals paths of selection and cultivar differentiation in peach domestication

    PubMed Central

    Akagi, Takashi; Hanada, Toshio; Yaegaki, Hideaki; Gradziel, Thomas M.; Tao, Ryutaro

    2016-01-01

    Domestication and cultivar differentiation are requisite processes for establishing cultivated crops. These processes inherently involve substantial changes in population structure, including those from artificial selection of key genes. In this study, accessions of peach (Prunus persica) and its wild relatives were analysed genome-wide to identify changes in genetic structures and gene selections associated with their differentiation. Analysis of genome-wide informative single-nucleotide polymorphism loci revealed distinct changes in genetic structures and delineations among domesticated peach and its wild relatives and among peach landraces and modern fruit (F) and modern ornamental (O-A) cultivars. Indications of distinct changes in linkage disequilibrium extension/decay and of strong population bottlenecks or inbreeding were identified. Site frequency spectrum- and extended haplotype homozygosity-based evaluation of genome-wide genetic diversities supported selective sweeps distinguishing the domesticated peach from its wild relatives and each F/O-A cluster from the landrace clusters. The regions with strong selective sweeps harboured promising candidates for genes subjected to selection. Further sequence-based evaluation further defined the candidates and revealed their characteristics. All results suggest opportunities for identifying critical genes associated with each differentiation by analysing genome-wide genetic diversity in currently established populations. This approach obviates the special development of genetic populations, which is particularly difficult for long-lived tree crops. PMID:27085183

  12. Genome-wide view of genetic diversity reveals paths of selection and cultivar differentiation in peach domestication.

    PubMed

    Akagi, Takashi; Hanada, Toshio; Yaegaki, Hideaki; Gradziel, Thomas M; Tao, Ryutaro

    2016-06-01

    Domestication and cultivar differentiation are requisite processes for establishing cultivated crops. These processes inherently involve substantial changes in population structure, including those from artificial selection of key genes. In this study, accessions of peach (Prunus persica) and its wild relatives were analysed genome-wide to identify changes in genetic structures and gene selections associated with their differentiation. Analysis of genome-wide informative single-nucleotide polymorphism loci revealed distinct changes in genetic structures and delineations among domesticated peach and its wild relatives and among peach landraces and modern fruit (F) and modern ornamental (O-A) cultivars. Indications of distinct changes in linkage disequilibrium extension/decay and of strong population bottlenecks or inbreeding were identified. Site frequency spectrum- and extended haplotype homozygosity-based evaluation of genome-wide genetic diversities supported selective sweeps distinguishing the domesticated peach from its wild relatives and each F/O-A cluster from the landrace clusters. The regions with strong selective sweeps harboured promising candidates for genes subjected to selection. Further sequence-based evaluation further defined the candidates and revealed their characteristics. All results suggest opportunities for identifying critical genes associated with each differentiation by analysing genome-wide genetic diversity in currently established populations. This approach obviates the special development of genetic populations, which is particularly difficult for long-lived tree crops.

  13. Genome-wide transcript profiling reveals novel breast cancer-associated intronic sense RNAs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Woo; Fishilevich, Elane; Arango-Argoty, Gustavo; Lin, Yuefeng; Liu, Guodong; Li, Zhihua; Monaghan, A Paula; Nichols, Mark; John, Bino

    2015-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) play major roles in development and cancer progression. To identify novel ncRNAs that may identify key pathways in breast cancer development, we performed high-throughput transcript profiling of tumor and normal matched-pair tissue samples. Initial transcriptome profiling using high-density genome-wide tiling arrays revealed changes in over 200 novel candidate genomic regions that map to intronic regions. Sixteen genomic loci were identified that map to the long introns of five key protein-coding genes, CRIM1, EPAS1, ZEB2, RBMS1, and RFX2. Consistent with the known role of the tumor suppressor ZEB2 in the cancer-associated epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), in situ hybridization reveals that the intronic regions deriving from ZEB2 as well as those from RFX2 and EPAS1 are down-regulated in cells of epithelial morphology, suggesting that these regions may be important for maintaining normal epithelial cell morphology. Paired-end deep sequencing analysis reveals a large number of distinct genomic clusters with no coding potential within the introns of these genes. These novel transcripts are only transcribed from the coding strand. A comprehensive search for breast cancer associated genes reveals enrichment for transcribed intronic regions from these loci, pointing to an underappreciated role of introns or mechanisms relating to their biology in EMT and breast cancer.

  14. Genome-Wide Transcript Profiling Reveals Novel Breast Cancer-Associated Intronic Sense RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yuefeng; Liu, Guodong; Li, Zhihua; Monaghan, A. Paula; Nichols, Mark; John, Bino

    2015-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) play major roles in development and cancer progression. To identify novel ncRNAs that may identify key pathways in breast cancer development, we performed high-throughput transcript profiling of tumor and normal matched-pair tissue samples. Initial transcriptome profiling using high-density genome-wide tiling arrays revealed changes in over 200 novel candidate genomic regions that map to intronic regions. Sixteen genomic loci were identified that map to the long introns of five key protein-coding genes, CRIM1, EPAS1, ZEB2, RBMS1, and RFX2. Consistent with the known role of the tumor suppressor ZEB2 in the cancer-associated epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), in situ hybridization reveals that the intronic regions deriving from ZEB2 as well as those from RFX2 and EPAS1 are down-regulated in cells of epithelial morphology, suggesting that these regions may be important for maintaining normal epithelial cell morphology. Paired-end deep sequencing analysis reveals a large number of distinct genomic clusters with no coding potential within the introns of these genes. These novel transcripts are only transcribed from the coding strand. A comprehensive search for breast cancer associated genes reveals enrichment for transcribed intronic regions from these loci, pointing to an underappreciated role of introns or mechanisms relating to their biology in EMT and breast cancer. PMID:25798919

  15. Genome-wide analysis of intraspecific transposon diversity in yeast

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the transposable elements (TEs) consist of LTR (Long Terminal Repeat) retrotransposons called Ty elements belonging to five families, Ty1 to Ty5. They take the form of either full-length coding elements or non-coding solo-LTRs corresponding to remnants of former transposition events. Although the biological features of Ty elements have been studied in detail in S. cerevisiae and the Ty content of the reference strain (S288c) was accurately annotated, the Ty-related intra-specific diversity has not been closely investigated so far. Results In this study, we investigated the Ty contents of 41 available genomes of isolated S. cerevisiae strains of diverse geographical and ecological origins. The strains were compared in terms of the number of Ty copies, the content of the potential transpositionally active elements and the genomic insertion maps. The strain repertoires were also investigated in the closely related Ty1 and Ty2 families and subfamilies. Conclusions This is the first genome-wide analysis of the diversity associated to the Ty elements, carried out for a large set of S. cerevisiae strains. The results of the present analyses suggest that the current Ty-related polymorphism has resulted from multiple causes such as differences between strains, between Ty families and over time, in the recent transpositional activity of Ty elements. Some new Ty1 variants were also identified, and we have established that Ty1 variants have different patterns of distribution among strains, which further contributes to the strain diversity. PMID:23768249

  16. Significant Locus and Metabolic Genetic Correlations Revealed in Genome-Wide Association Study of Anorexia Nervosa.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Laramie; Yilmaz, Zeynep; Gaspar, Helena; Walters, Raymond; Goldstein, Jackie; Anttila, Verneri; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan; Ripke, Stephan; Thornton, Laura; Hinney, Anke; Daly, Mark; Sullivan, Patrick F; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Breen, Gerome; Bulik, Cynthia M

    2017-09-01

    The authors conducted a genome-wide association study of anorexia nervosa and calculated genetic correlations with a series of psychiatric, educational, and metabolic phenotypes. Following uniform quality control and imputation procedures using the 1000 Genomes Project (phase 3) in 12 case-control cohorts comprising 3,495 anorexia nervosa cases and 10,982 controls, the authors performed standard association analysis followed by a meta-analysis across cohorts. Linkage disequilibrium score regression was used to calculate genome-wide common variant heritability (single-nucleotide polymorphism [SNP]-based heritability [h(2)SNP]), partitioned heritability, and genetic correlations (rg) between anorexia nervosa and 159 other phenotypes. Results were obtained for 10,641,224 SNPs and insertion-deletion variants with minor allele frequencies >1% and imputation quality scores >0.6. The h(2)SNP of anorexia nervosa was 0.20 (SE=0.02), suggesting that a substantial fraction of the twin-based heritability arises from common genetic variation. The authors identified one genome-wide significant locus on chromosome 12 (rs4622308) in a region harboring a previously reported type 1 diabetes and autoimmune disorder locus. Significant positive genetic correlations were observed between anorexia nervosa and schizophrenia, neuroticism, educational attainment, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and significant negative genetic correlations were observed between anorexia nervosa and body mass index, insulin, glucose, and lipid phenotypes. Anorexia nervosa is a complex heritable phenotype for which this study has uncovered the first genome-wide significant locus. Anorexia nervosa also has large and significant genetic correlations with both psychiatric phenotypes and metabolic traits. The study results encourage a reconceptualization of this frequently lethal disorder as one with both psychiatric and metabolic etiology.

  17. Genome-Wide Divergence and Linkage Disequilibrium Analyses for Capsicum baccatum Revealed by Genome-Anchored Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Nimmakayala, Padma; Abburi, Venkata L; Saminathan, Thangasamy; Almeida, Aldo; Davenport, Brittany; Davidson, Joshua; Reddy, C V Chandra Mohan; Hankins, Gerald; Ebert, Andreas; Choi, Doil; Stommel, John; Reddy, Umesh K

    2016-01-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) with 36,621 polymorphic genome-anchored single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified collectively for Capsicum annuum and Capsicum baccatum was used to characterize population structure and species domestication of these two important incompatible cultivated pepper species. Estimated mean nucleotide diversity (π) and Tajima's D across various chromosomes revealed biased distribution toward negative values on all chromosomes (except for chromosome 4) in cultivated C. baccatum, indicating a population bottleneck during domestication of C. baccatum. In contrast, C. annuum chromosomes showed positive π and Tajima's D on all chromosomes except chromosome 8, which may be because of domestication at multiple sites contributing to wider genetic diversity. For C. baccatum, 13,129 SNPs were available, with minor allele frequency (MAF) ≥0.05; PCA of the SNPs revealed 283 C. baccatum accessions grouped into 3 distinct clusters, for strong population structure. The fixation index (FST ) between domesticated C. annuum and C. baccatum was 0.78, which indicates genome-wide divergence. We conducted extensive linkage disequilibrium (LD) analysis of C. baccatum var. pendulum cultivars on all adjacent SNP pairs within a chromosome to identify regions of high and low LD interspersed with a genome-wide average LD block size of 99.1 kb. We characterized 1742 haplotypes containing 4420 SNPs (range 9-2 SNPs per haplotype). Genome-wide association study (GWAS) of peduncle length, a trait that differentiates wild and domesticated C. baccatum types, revealed 36 significantly associated genome-wide SNPs. Population structure, identity by state (IBS) and LD patterns across the genome will be of potential use for future GWAS of economically important traits in C. baccatum peppers.

  18. Genome-Wide Divergence and Linkage Disequilibrium Analyses for Capsicum baccatum Revealed by Genome-Anchored Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Nimmakayala, Padma; Abburi, Venkata L.; Saminathan, Thangasamy; Almeida, Aldo; Davenport, Brittany; Davidson, Joshua; Reddy, C. V. Chandra Mohan; Hankins, Gerald; Ebert, Andreas; Choi, Doil; Stommel, John; Reddy, Umesh K.

    2016-01-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) with 36,621 polymorphic genome-anchored single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified collectively for Capsicum annuum and Capsicum baccatum was used to characterize population structure and species domestication of these two important incompatible cultivated pepper species. Estimated mean nucleotide diversity (π) and Tajima's D across various chromosomes revealed biased distribution toward negative values on all chromosomes (except for chromosome 4) in cultivated C. baccatum, indicating a population bottleneck during domestication of C. baccatum. In contrast, C. annuum chromosomes showed positive π and Tajima's D on all chromosomes except chromosome 8, which may be because of domestication at multiple sites contributing to wider genetic diversity. For C. baccatum, 13,129 SNPs were available, with minor allele frequency (MAF) ≥0.05; PCA of the SNPs revealed 283 C. baccatum accessions grouped into 3 distinct clusters, for strong population structure. The fixation index (FST) between domesticated C. annuum and C. baccatum was 0.78, which indicates genome-wide divergence. We conducted extensive linkage disequilibrium (LD) analysis of C. baccatum var. pendulum cultivars on all adjacent SNP pairs within a chromosome to identify regions of high and low LD interspersed with a genome-wide average LD block size of 99.1 kb. We characterized 1742 haplotypes containing 4420 SNPs (range 9–2 SNPs per haplotype). Genome-wide association study (GWAS) of peduncle length, a trait that differentiates wild and domesticated C. baccatum types, revealed 36 significantly associated genome-wide SNPs. Population structure, identity by state (IBS) and LD patterns across the genome will be of potential use for future GWAS of economically important traits in C. baccatum peppers. PMID:27857720

  19. Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neale, Benjamin M.; Medland, Sarah E.; Ripke, Stephan; Asherson, Philip; Franke, Barbara; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Faraone, Stephen V.; Nguyen, Thuy Trang; Schafer, Helmut; Holmans, Peter; Daly, Mark; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Freitag, Christine; Reif, Andreas; Renner, Tobias J.; Romanos, Marcel; Romanos, Jasmin; Walitza, Susanne; Warnke, Andreas; Meyer, Jobst; Palmason, Haukur; Buitelaar, Jan; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Lambregts-Rommelse, Nanda; Gill, Michael; Anney, Richard J. L.; Langely, Kate; O'Donovan, Michael; Williams, Nigel; Owen, Michael; Thapar, Anita; Kent, Lindsey; Sergeant, Joseph; Roeyers, Herbert; Mick, Eric; Biederman, Joseph; Doyle, Alysa; Smalley, Susan; Loo, Sandra; Hakonarson, Hakon; Elia, Josephine; Todorov, Alexandre; Miranda, Ana; Mulas, Fernando; Ebstein, Richard P.; Rothenberger, Aribert; Banaschewski, Tobias; Oades, Robert D.; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund; McGough, James; Nisenbaum, Laura; Middleton, Frank; Hu, Xiaolan; Nelson, Stan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Although twin and family studies have shown attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to be highly heritable, genetic variants influencing the trait at a genome-wide significant level have yet to be identified. As prior genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have not yielded significant results, we conducted a meta-analysis of…

  20. Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neale, Benjamin M.; Medland, Sarah E.; Ripke, Stephan; Asherson, Philip; Franke, Barbara; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Faraone, Stephen V.; Nguyen, Thuy Trang; Schafer, Helmut; Holmans, Peter; Daly, Mark; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Freitag, Christine; Reif, Andreas; Renner, Tobias J.; Romanos, Marcel; Romanos, Jasmin; Walitza, Susanne; Warnke, Andreas; Meyer, Jobst; Palmason, Haukur; Buitelaar, Jan; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Lambregts-Rommelse, Nanda; Gill, Michael; Anney, Richard J. L.; Langely, Kate; O'Donovan, Michael; Williams, Nigel; Owen, Michael; Thapar, Anita; Kent, Lindsey; Sergeant, Joseph; Roeyers, Herbert; Mick, Eric; Biederman, Joseph; Doyle, Alysa; Smalley, Susan; Loo, Sandra; Hakonarson, Hakon; Elia, Josephine; Todorov, Alexandre; Miranda, Ana; Mulas, Fernando; Ebstein, Richard P.; Rothenberger, Aribert; Banaschewski, Tobias; Oades, Robert D.; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund; McGough, James; Nisenbaum, Laura; Middleton, Frank; Hu, Xiaolan; Nelson, Stan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Although twin and family studies have shown attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to be highly heritable, genetic variants influencing the trait at a genome-wide significant level have yet to be identified. As prior genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have not yielded significant results, we conducted a meta-analysis of…

  1. Genome-Wide Sequencing Reveals Two Major Sub-Lineages in the Genetically Monomorphic Pathogen Xanthomonas Campestris Pathovar Musacearum

    PubMed Central

    Wasukira, Arthur; Tayebwa, Johnbosco; Thwaites, Richard; Paszkiewicz, Konrad; Aritua, Valente; Kubiriba, Jerome; Smith, Julian; Grant, Murray; Studholme, David J.

    2012-01-01

    The bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pathovar musacearum (Xcm) is the causal agent of banana Xanthomonas wilt (BXW). This disease has devastated economies based on banana and plantain crops (Musa species) in East Africa. Here we use genome-wide sequencing to discover a set of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) among East African isolates of Xcm. These SNPs have potential as molecular markers for phylogeographic studies of the epidemiology and spread of the pathogen. Our analysis reveals two major sub-lineages of the pathogen, suggesting that the current outbreaks of BXW on Musa species in the region may have more than one introductory event, perhaps from Ethiopia. Also, based on comparisons of genome-wide sequence data from multiple isolates of Xcm and multiple strains of X. vasicola pathovar vasculorum, we identify genes specific to Xcm that could be used to specifically detect Xcm by PCR-based methods. PMID:24704974

  2. Genome-wide sequencing reveals two major sub-lineages in the genetically monomorphic pathogen xanthomonas campestris pathovar musacearum.

    PubMed

    Wasukira, Arthur; Tayebwa, Johnbosco; Thwaites, Richard; Paszkiewicz, Konrad; Aritua, Valente; Kubiriba, Jerome; Smith, Julian; Grant, Murray; Studholme, David J

    2012-07-04

    The bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pathovar musacearum (Xcm) is the causal agent of banana Xanthomonas wilt (BXW). This disease has devastated economies based on banana and plantain crops (Musa species) in East Africa. Here we use genome-wide sequencing to discover a set of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) among East African isolates of Xcm. These SNPs have potential as molecular markers for phylogeographic studies of the epidemiology and spread of the pathogen. Our analysis reveals two major sub-lineages of the pathogen, suggesting that the current outbreaks of BXW on Musa species in the region may have more than one introductory event, perhaps from Ethiopia. Also, based on comparisons of genome-wide sequence data from multiple isolates of Xcm and multiple strains of X. vasicola pathovar vasculorum, we identify genes specific to Xcm that could be used to specifically detect Xcm by PCR-based methods.

  3. High resolution genome wide binding event finding and motif discovery reveals transcription factor spatial binding constraints.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuchun; Mahony, Shaun; Gifford, David K

    2012-01-01

    An essential component of genome function is the syntax of genomic regulatory elements that determine how diverse transcription factors interact to orchestrate a program of regulatory control. A precise characterization of in vivo spacing constraints between key transcription factors would reveal key aspects of this genomic regulatory language. To discover novel transcription factor spatial binding constraints in vivo, we developed a new integrative computational method, genome wide event finding and motif discovery (GEM). GEM resolves ChIP data into explanatory motifs and binding events at high spatial resolution by linking binding event discovery and motif discovery with positional priors in the context of a generative probabilistic model of ChIP data and genome sequence. GEM analysis of 63 transcription factors in 214 ENCODE human ChIP-Seq experiments recovers more known factor motifs than other contemporary methods, and discovers six new motifs for factors with unknown binding specificity. GEM's adaptive learning of binding-event read distributions allows it to further improve upon previous methods for processing ChIP-Seq and ChIP-exo data to yield unsurpassed spatial resolution and discovery of closely spaced binding events of the same factor. In a systematic analysis of in vivo sequence-specific transcription factor binding using GEM, we have found hundreds of spatial binding constraints between factors. GEM found 37 examples of factor binding constraints in mouse ES cells, including strong distance-specific constraints between Klf4 and other key regulatory factors. In human ENCODE data, GEM found 390 examples of spatially constrained pair-wise binding, including such novel pairs as c-Fos:c-Jun/USF1, CTCF/Egr1, and HNF4A/FOXA1. The discovery of new factor-factor spatial constraints in ChIP data is significant because it proposes testable models for regulatory factor interactions that will help elucidate genome function and the implementation of combinatorial

  4. Genome-Wide Analysis of Polyadenylation Events in Schmidtea mediterranea

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmanan, Vairavan; Bansal, Dhiru; Kulkarni, Jahnavi; Poduval, Deepak; Krishna, Srikar; Sasidharan, Vidyanand; Anand, Praveen; Seshasayee, Aswin; Palakodeti, Dasaradhi

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotes, 3′ untranslated regions (UTRs) play important roles in regulating posttranscriptional gene expression. The 3′UTR is defined by regulated cleavage/polyadenylation of the pre-mRNA. The advent of next-generation sequencing technology has now enabled us to identify these events on a genome-wide scale. In this study, we used poly(A)-position profiling by sequencing (3P-Seq) to capture all poly(A) sites across the genome of the freshwater planarian, Schmidtea mediterranea, an ideal model system for exploring the process of regeneration and stem cell function. We identified the 3′UTRs for ∼14,000 transcripts and thus improved the existing gene annotations. We found 97 transcripts, which are polyadenylated within an internal exon, resulting in the shrinking of the ORF and loss of a predicted protein domain. Around 40% of the transcripts in planaria were alternatively polyadenylated (ApA), resulting either in an altered 3′UTR or a change in coding sequence. We identified specific ApA transcript isoforms that were subjected to miRNA mediated gene regulation using degradome sequencing. In this study, we also confirmed a tissue-specific expression pattern for alternate polyadenylated transcripts. The insights from this study highlight the potential role of ApA in regulating the gene expression essential for planarian regeneration. PMID:27489207

  5. Genome-wide analysis links NFATC2 with asparaginase hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Christian A.; Smith, Colton; Yang, Wenjian; Mullighan, Charles G.; Qu, Chunxu; Larsen, Eric; Bowman, W. Paul; Liu, Chengcheng; Ramsey, Laura B.; Chang, Tamara; Karol, Seth E.; Loh, Mignon L.; Raetz, Elizabeth A.; Winick, Naomi J.; Hunger, Stephen P.; Carroll, William L.; Jeha, Sima; Pui, Ching-Hon; Evans, William E.; Devidas, Meenakshi

    2015-01-01

    Asparaginase is used to treat acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL); however, hypersensitivity reactions can lead to suboptimal asparaginase exposure. Our objective was to use a genome-wide approach to identify loci associated with asparaginase hypersensitivity in children with ALL enrolled on St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital (SJCRH) protocols Total XIIIA (n = 154), Total XV (n = 498), and Total XVI (n = 271), or Children’s Oncology Group protocols POG 9906 (n = 222) and AALL0232 (n = 2163). Germline DNA was genotyped using the Affymetrix 500K, Affymetrix 6.0, or the Illumina Exome BeadChip array. In multivariate logistic regression, the intronic rs6021191 variant in nuclear factor of activated T cells 2 (NFATC2) had the strongest association with hypersensitivity (P = 4.1 × 10−8; odds ratio [OR] = 3.11). RNA-seq data available from 65 SJCRH ALL tumor samples and 52 Yoruba HapMap samples showed that samples carrying the rs6021191 variant had higher NFATC2 expression compared with noncarriers (P = 1.1 × 10−3 and 0.03, respectively). The top ranked nonsynonymous polymorphism was rs17885382 in HLA-DRB1 (P = 3.2 × 10−6; OR = 1.63), which is in near complete linkage disequilibrium with the HLA-DRB1*07:01 allele we previously observed in a candidate gene study. The strongest risk factors for asparaginase allergy are variants within genes regulating the immune response. PMID:25987655

  6. Assessing statistical significance in multivariable genome wide association analysis

    PubMed Central

    Buzdugan, Laura; Kalisch, Markus; Navarro, Arcadi; Schunk, Daniel; Fehr, Ernst; Bühlmann, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Although Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS) genotype a very large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), the data are often analyzed one SNP at a time. The low predictive power of single SNPs, coupled with the high significance threshold needed to correct for multiple testing, greatly decreases the power of GWAS. Results: We propose a procedure in which all the SNPs are analyzed in a multiple generalized linear model, and we show its use for extremely high-dimensional datasets. Our method yields P-values for assessing significance of single SNPs or groups of SNPs while controlling for all other SNPs and the family wise error rate (FWER). Thus, our method tests whether or not a SNP carries any additional information about the phenotype beyond that available by all the other SNPs. This rules out spurious correlations between phenotypes and SNPs that can arise from marginal methods because the ‘spuriously correlated’ SNP merely happens to be correlated with the ‘truly causal’ SNP. In addition, the method offers a data driven approach to identifying and refining groups of SNPs that jointly contain informative signals about the phenotype. We demonstrate the value of our method by applying it to the seven diseases analyzed by the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC). We show, in particular, that our method is also capable of finding significant SNPs that were not identified in the original WTCCC study, but were replicated in other independent studies. Availability and implementation: Reproducibility of our research is supported by the open-source Bioconductor package hierGWAS. Contact: peter.buehlmann@stat.math.ethz.ch Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27153677

  7. Genome-wide analysis highlights genetic dilution in Algerian sheep.

    PubMed

    Gaouar, S B S; Lafri, M; Djaout, A; El-Bouyahiaoui, R; Bouri, A; Bouchatal, A; Maftah, A; Ciani, E; Da Silva, A B

    2017-03-01

    Algeria represents a reservoir of genetic diversity with local sheep breeds adapted to a large range of environments and showing specific features necessary to deal with harsh conditions. This remarkable diversity results from the traditional management of dryland by pastoralists over centuries. Most of these breeds are poorly productive, and the economic pressure leads farmers to realize anarchic cross-breeding (that is, not carried out in the framework of selection plans) with the hope to increase animal's conformation. In this study, eight of the nine local Algerian sheep breeds (D'men, Hamra, Ouled-Djellal, Rembi, Sidaoun, Tazegzawt, Berber and Barbarine) were investigated for the first time by genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism genotyping. At an international scale, Algerian sheep occupied an original position shaped by relations with African and European (particularly Italian) breeds. The strong genetic proximity with Caribbean and Brazilian breeds confirmed that the genetic make-up of these American breeds was largely influenced by the Atlantic slave trade. At a national scale, an alarming genetic dilution of the Berber (a primitive breed) and the Rembi was observed, as a consequence of uncontrolled mating practices with Ouled-Djellal. A similar, though less pronounced, phenomenon was also detected for the Barbarine, another ancestral breed. Genetic originality appeared to be better preserved in Tazegzawt, Hamra, D'men and Sidaoun. These breeds should be given high priority in the establishment of conservation plans to halt their progressive loss. For Berber and Barbarine that also occur in the bordering neighbor countries, urgent concerted transnational actions are needed.

  8. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling reveals molecular signatures of secondary xylem differentiation in Populus tomentosa.

    PubMed

    Yang, X H; Li, X G; Li, B L; Zhang, D Q

    2014-11-11

    Wood formation occurs via cell division, primary cell wall and secondary wall formation, and programmed cell death in the vascular cambium. Transcriptional profiling of secondary xylem differentiation is essential for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying wood formation. Differential gene expression in secondary xylem differentiation of Populus has been previously investigated using cDNA microarray analysis. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms from a genome-wide perspective. In this study, the Affymetrix poplar genome chips containing 61,413 probes were used to investigate the changes in the transcriptome during secondary xylem differentiation in Chinese white poplar (Populus tomentosa). Two xylem tissues (newly formed and lignified) were sampled for genome-wide transcriptional profiling. In total, 6843 genes (~11%) were identified with differential expression in the two xylem tissues. Many genes involved in cell division, primary wall modification, and cellulose synthesis were preferentially expressed in the newly formed xylem. In contrast, many genes, including 4-coumarate:cinnamate-4-hydroxylase (C4H), 4-coumarate:CoA ligase (4CL), cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD), and caffeoyl CoA 3-O-methyltransferase (CCoAOMT), associated with lignin biosynthesis were more transcribed in the lignified xylem. The two xylem tissues also showed differential expression of genes related to various hormones; thus, the secondary xylem differentiation could be regulated by hormone signaling. Furthermore, many transcription factor genes were preferentially expressed in the lignified xylem, suggesting that wood lignification involves extensive transcription regulation. The genome-wide transcriptional profiling of secondary xylem differentiation could provide additional insights into the molecular basis of wood formation in poplar species.

  9. Yeast genome-wide screen reveals dissimilar sets of host genes affecting replication of RNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    Panavas, Tadas; Serviene, Elena; Brasher, Jeremy; Nagy, Peter D.

    2005-01-01

    Viruses are devastating pathogens of humans, animals, and plants. To further our understanding of how viruses use the resources of infected cells, we systematically tested the yeast single-gene-knockout library for the effect of each host gene on the replication of tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV), a positive-strand RNA virus of plants. The genome-wide screen identified 96 host genes whose absence either reduced or increased the accumulation of the TBSV replicon. The identified genes are involved in the metabolism of nucleic acids, lipids, proteins, and other compounds and in protein targeting/transport. Comparison with published genome-wide screens reveals that the replication of TBSV and brome mosaic virus (BMV), which belongs to a different supergroup among plus-strand RNA viruses, is affected by vastly different yeast genes. Moreover, a set of yeast genes involved in vacuolar targeting of proteins and vesicle-mediated transport both affected replication of the TBSV replicon and enhanced the cytotoxicity of the Parkinson's disease-related α-synuclein when this protein was expressed in yeast. In addition, a set of host genes involved in ubiquitin-dependent protein catabolism affected both TBSV replication and the cytotoxicity of a mutant huntingtin protein, a candidate agent in Huntington's disease. This finding suggests that virus infection and disease-causing proteins might use or alter similar host pathways and may suggest connections between chronic diseases and prior virus infection. PMID:15883361

  10. Genome-Wide Translocation Sequencing Reveals Mechanisms of Chromosome Breaks and Rearrangements in B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chiarle, Roberto; Zhang, Yu; Frock, Richard L.; Lewis, Susanna M.; Molinie, Benoit; Ho, Yu-Jui; Myers, Darienne R.; Choi, Vivian W.; Compagno, Mara; Malkin, Daniel J.; Neuberg, Donna; Monti, Stefano; Giallourakis, Cosmas C.; Gostissa, Monica; Alt, Frederick W.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY While chromosomal translocations are common pathogenetic events in cancer, mechanisms that promote them are poorly understood. To elucidate translocation mechanisms in mammalian cells, we developed high throughput, genome-wide translocation sequencing (HTGTS). We employed HTGTS to identify tens of thousands of independent translocation junctions involving fixed I-SceI meganuclease-generated DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) within the c-myc oncogene or IgH locus of B lymphocytes induced for Activation Induced-cytidine Deaminase (AID)-dependent IgH class-switching. DSBs translocated very widely across the genome, but were preferentially targeted to transcribed chromosomal regions and also to numerous AID-dependent and AID-independent hotspots, with the latter being comprised mainly of cryptic genomic I-SceI targets. Comparison of translocation junctions with genome-wide nuclear run-ons revealed a marked association between transcription start sites and translocation targeting. The majority of translocation junctions were formed via end-joining with short micro-homologies. We discuss implications of our findings for diverse fields including gene therapy and cancer genomics. PMID:21962511

  11. Genome-wide Selective Sweeps in Natural Bacterial Populations Revealed by Time-series Metagenomics

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Leong-Keat; Bendall, Matthew L.; Malfatti, Stephanie; Schwientek, Patrick; Tremblay, Julien; Schackwitz, Wendy; Martin, Joel; Pati, Amrita; Bushnell, Brian; Foster, Brian; Kang, Dongwan; Tringe, Susannah G.; Bertilsson, Stefan; Moran, Mary Ann; Shade, Ashley; Newton, Ryan J.; Stevens, Sarah; McMcahon, Katherine D.; Mamlstrom, Rex R.

    2014-05-12

    Multiple evolutionary models have been proposed to explain the formation of genetically and ecologically distinct bacterial groups. Time-series metagenomics enables direct observation of evolutionary processes in natural populations, and if applied over a sufficiently long time frame, this approach could capture events such as gene-specific or genome-wide selective sweeps. Direct observations of either process could help resolve how distinct groups form in natural microbial assemblages. Here, from a three-year metagenomic study of a freshwater lake, we explore changes in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) frequencies and patterns of gene gain and loss in populations of Chlorobiaceae and Methylophilaceae. SNP analyses revealed substantial genetic heterogeneity within these populations, although the degree of heterogeneity varied considerably among closely related, co-occurring Methylophilaceae populations. SNP allele frequencies, as well as the relative abundance of certain genes, changed dramatically over time in each population. Interestingly, SNP diversity was purged at nearly every genome position in one of the Chlorobiaceae populations over the course of three years, while at the same time multiple genes either swept through or were swept from this population. These patterns were consistent with a genome-wide selective sweep, a process predicted by the ecotype model? of diversification, but not previously observed in natural populations.

  12. Genome-wide Selective Sweeps in Natural Bacterial Populations Revealed by Time-series Metagenomics

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Leong-Keat; Bendall, Matthew L.; Malfatti, Stephanie; Schwientek, Patrick; Tremblay, Julien; Schackwitz, Wendy; Martin, Joel; Pati, Amrita; Bushnell, Brian; Foster, Brian; Kang, Dongwan; Tringe, Susannah G.; Bertilsson, Stefan; Moran, Mary Ann; Shade, Ashley; Newton, Ryan J.; Stevens, Sarah; McMahon, Katherine D.; Malmstrom, Rex R.

    2014-06-18

    Multiple evolutionary models have been proposed to explain the formation of genetically and ecologically distinct bacterial groups. Time-series metagenomics enables direct observation of evolutionary processes in natural populations, and if applied over a sufficiently long time frame, this approach could capture events such as gene-specific or genome-wide selective sweeps. Direct observations of either process could help resolve how distinct groups form in natural microbial assemblages. Here, from a three-year metagenomic study of a freshwater lake, we explore changes in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) frequencies and patterns of gene gain and loss in populations of Chlorobiaceae and Methylophilaceae. SNP analyses revealed substantial genetic heterogeneity within these populations, although the degree of heterogeneity varied considerably among closely related, co-occurring Methylophilaceae populations. SNP allele frequencies, as well as the relative abundance of certain genes, changed dramatically over time in each population. Interestingly, SNP diversity was purged at nearly every genome position in one of the Chlorobiaceae populations over the course of three years, while at the same time multiple genes either swept through or were swept from this population. These patterns were consistent with a genome-wide selective sweep, a process predicted by the ‘ecotype model’ of diversification, but not previously observed in natural populations.

  13. Meta-analysis of genome-wide scans for total body BMD in children and adults reveals allelic heterogeneity and age-specific effects at the WNT16 locus.

    PubMed

    Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Kemp, John P; Estrada, Karol; Eriksson, Joel; Liu, Jeff; Reppe, Sjur; Evans, David M; Heppe, Denise H M; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Herrera, Lizbeth; Ring, Susan M; Kruithof, Claudia J; Timpson, Nicholas J; Zillikens, M Carola; Olstad, Ole K; Zheng, Hou-Feng; Richards, J Brent; St Pourcain, Beate; Hofman, Albert; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Smith, George Davey; Lorentzon, Mattias; Gautvik, Kaare M; Uitterlinden, André G; Brommage, Robert; Ohlsson, Claes; Tobias, Jonathan H; Rivadeneira, Fernando

    2012-07-01

    To identify genetic loci influencing bone accrual, we performed a genome-wide association scan for total-body bone mineral density (TB-BMD) variation in 2,660 children of different ethnicities. We discovered variants in 7q31.31 associated with BMD measurements, with the lowest P = 4.1 × 10(-11) observed for rs917727 with minor allele frequency of 0.37. We sought replication for all SNPs located ± 500 kb from rs917727 in 11,052 additional individuals from five independent studies including children and adults, together with de novo genotyping of rs3801387 (in perfect linkage disequilibrium (LD) with rs917727) in 1,014 mothers of children from the discovery cohort. The top signal mapping in the surroundings of WNT16 was replicated across studies with a meta-analysis P = 2.6 × 10(-31) and an effect size explaining between 0.6%-1.8% of TB-BMD variance. Conditional analyses on this signal revealed a secondary signal for total body BMD (P = 1.42 × 10(-10)) for rs4609139 and mapping to C7orf58. We also examined the genomic region for association with skull BMD to test if the associations were independent of skeletal loading. We identified two signals influencing skull BMD variation, including rs917727 (P = 1.9 × 10(-16)) and rs7801723 (P = 8.9 × 10(-28)), also mapping to C7orf58 (r(2) = 0.50 with rs4609139). Wnt16 knockout (KO) mice with reduced total body BMD and gene expression profiles in human bone biopsies support a role of C7orf58 and WNT16 on the BMD phenotypes observed at the human population level. In summary, we detected two independent signals influencing total body and skull BMD variation in children and adults, thus demonstrating the presence of allelic heterogeneity at the WNT16 locus. One of the skull BMD signals mapping to C7orf58 is mostly driven by children, suggesting temporal determination on peak bone mass acquisition. Our life-course approach postulates that these genetic effects influencing peak bone mass accrual may impact the risk of

  14. The complex genetics of gait speed: genome-wide meta-analysis approach

    PubMed Central

    Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Smith, Jennifer A.; Eicher, John D.; Vered, Rotem; Deelen, Joris; Arnold, Alice M.; Buchman, Aron S.; Tanaka, Toshiko; Faul, Jessica D.; Nethander, Maria; Fornage, Myriam; Adams, Hieab H.; Matteini, Amy M.; Callisaya, Michele L.; Smith, Albert V.; Yu, Lei; De Jager, Philip L.; Evans, Denis A.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hofman, Albert; Pattie, Alison; Corley, Janie; Launer, Lenore J.; Knopman, Davis S.; Parimi, Neeta; Turner, Stephen T.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Beekman, Marian; Gutman, Danielle; Sharvit, Lital; Mooijaart, Simon P.; Liewald, David C.; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J.; Ohlsson, Claes; Moed, Matthijs; Verlinden, Vincent J.; Mellström, Dan; van der Geest, Jos N.; Karlsson, Magnus; Hernandez, Dena; McWhirter, Rebekah; Liu, Yongmei; Thomson, Russell; Tranah, Gregory J.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Weir, David R.; Zhao, Wei; Starr, John M.; Johnson, Andrew D.; Ikram, M. Arfan; Bennett, David A.; Cummings, Steven R.; Deary, Ian J.; Harris, Tamara B.; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Mosley, Thomas H.; Srikanth, Velandai K.; Windham, Beverly G.; Newman, Ann B.; Walston, Jeremy D.; Davies, Gail; Evans, Daniel S.; Slagboom, Eline P.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Kiel, Douglas P.; Murabito, Joanne M.; Atzmon, Gil

    2017-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that the basis for variation in late-life mobility is attributable, in part, to genetic factors, which may become increasingly important with age. Our objective was to systematically assess the contribution of genetic variation to gait speed in older individuals. We conducted a meta-analysis of gait speed GWASs in 31,478 older adults from 17 cohorts of the CHARGE consortium, and validated our results in 2,588 older adults from 4 independent studies. We followed our initial discoveries with network and eQTL analysis of candidate signals in tissues. The meta-analysis resulted in a list of 536 suggestive genome wide significant SNPs in or near 69 genes. Further interrogation with Pathway Analysis placed gait speed as a polygenic complex trait in five major networks. Subsequent eQTL analysis revealed several SNPs significantly associated with the expression of PRSS16, WDSUB1 and PTPRT, which in addition to the meta-analysis and pathway suggested that genetic effects on gait speed may occur through synaptic function and neuronal development pathways. No genome-wide significant signals for gait speed were identified from this moderately large sample of older adults, suggesting that more refined physical function phenotypes will be needed to identify the genetic basis of gait speed in aging. PMID:28077804

  15. Genome-wide genetic diversity, population structure and admixture analysis in African and Asian cattle breeds.

    PubMed

    Edea, Z; Bhuiyan, M S A; Dessie, T; Rothschild, M F; Dadi, H; Kim, K S

    2015-02-01

    Knowledge about genetic diversity and population structure is useful for designing effective strategies to improve the production, management and conservation of farm animal genetic resources. Here, we present a comprehensive genome-wide analysis of genetic diversity, population structure and admixture based on 244 animals sampled from 10 cattle populations in Asia and Africa and genotyped for 69,903 autosomal single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) mainly derived from the indicine breed. Principal component analysis, STRUCTURE and distance analysis from high-density SNP data clearly revealed that the largest genetic difference occurred between the two domestic lineages (taurine and indicine), whereas Ethiopian cattle populations represent a mosaic of the humped zebu and taurine. Estimation of the genetic influence of zebu and taurine revealed that Ethiopian cattle were characterized by considerable levels of introgression from South Asian zebu, whereas Bangladeshi populations shared very low taurine ancestry. The relationships among Ethiopian cattle populations reflect their history of origin and admixture rather than phenotype-based distinctions. The high within-individual genetic variability observed in Ethiopian cattle represents an untapped opportunity for adaptation to changing environments and for implementation of within-breed genetic improvement schemes. Our results provide a basis for future applications of genome-wide SNP data to exploit the unique genetic makeup of indigenous cattle breeds and to facilitate their improvement and conservation.

  16. Genome-Wide Association in Tomato Reveals 44 Candidate Loci for Fruit Metabolic Traits1[W

    PubMed Central

    Sauvage, Christopher; Segura, Vincent; Bauchet, Guillaume; Stevens, Rebecca; Do, Phuc Thi; Nikoloski, Zoran; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Causse, Mathilde

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have been successful in identifying genes involved in polygenic traits and are valuable for crop improvement. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is a major crop and is highly appreciated worldwide for its health value. We used a core collection of 163 tomato accessions composed of S. lycopersicum, S. lycopersicum var cerasiforme, and Solanum pimpinellifolium to map loci controlling variation in fruit metabolites. Fruits were phenotyped for a broad range of metabolites, including amino acids, sugars, and ascorbate. In parallel, the accessions were genotyped with 5,995 single-nucleotide polymorphism markers spread over the whole genome. Genome-wide association analysis was conducted on a large set of metabolic traits that were stable over 2 years using a multilocus mixed model as a general method for mapping complex traits in structured populations and applied to tomato. We detected a total of 44 loci that were significantly associated with a total of 19 traits, including sucrose, ascorbate, malate, and citrate levels. These results not only provide a list of candidate loci to be functionally validated but also a powerful analytical approach for finding genetic variants that can be directly used for crop improvement and deciphering the genetic architecture of complex traits. PMID:24894148

  17. Genome-wide analysis of a Wnt1-regulated transcriptional network implicates neurodegenerative pathways.

    PubMed

    Wexler, Eric M; Rosen, Ezra; Lu, Daning; Osborn, Gregory E; Martin, Elizabeth; Raybould, Helen; Geschwind, Daniel H

    2011-10-04

    Wnt proteins are critical to mammalian brain development and function. The canonical Wnt signaling pathway involves the stabilization and nuclear translocation of β-catenin; however, Wnt also signals through alternative, noncanonical pathways. To gain a systems-level, genome-wide view of Wnt signaling, we analyzed Wnt1-stimulated changes in gene expression by transcriptional microarray analysis in cultured human neural progenitor (hNP) cells at multiple time points over a 72-hour time course. We observed a widespread oscillatory-like pattern of changes in gene expression, involving components of both the canonical and the noncanonical Wnt signaling pathways. A higher-order, systems-level analysis that combined independent component analysis, waveform analysis, and mutual information-based network construction revealed effects on pathways related to cell death and neurodegenerative disease. Wnt effectors were tightly clustered with presenilin1 (PSEN1) and granulin (GRN), which cause dominantly inherited forms of Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia (FTD), respectively. We further explored a potential link between Wnt1 and GRN and found that Wnt1 decreased GRN expression by hNPs. Conversely, GRN knockdown increased WNT1 expression, demonstrating that Wnt and GRN reciprocally regulate each other. Finally, we provided in vivo validation of the in vitro findings by analyzing gene expression data from individuals with FTD. These unbiased and genome-wide analyses provide evidence for a connection between Wnt signaling and the transcriptional regulation of neurodegenerative disease genes.

  18. A genome-wide association study reveals a QTL influencing caudal supernumerary teats in Holstein cattle.

    PubMed

    Joerg, H; Meili, C; Ruprecht, O; Bangerter, E; Burren, A; Bigler, A

    2014-12-01

    Supernumerary teats represent a common abnormality of the bovine udder. A genome-wide association study was performed based on the proportion of the occurrence of supernumerary teats in the daughters of 1097 Holstein bulls. The heritability of caudal supernumerary teats without mammary gland in this study was 0.604. The largest proportion of the heritability was attributable to BTA 20. The strongest evidence for association was with five SNPs on chromosome 20, referred to as a QTL. The mode of inheritance at this QTL was dominant. These findings reveal that the occurrence of caudal supernumerary teats without mammary gland in Holstein cattle is influenced by a QTL on chromosome 20 and a polygenic part. The data support the high potential of the SNPs in the QTL region as markers for breeding against caudal supernumerary teats. © 2014 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  19. Genome-Wide Association and Functional Follow-Up Reveals New Loci for Kidney Function

    PubMed Central

    Fuchsberger, Christian; Olden, Matthias; Chen, Ming-Huei; Tin, Adrienne; Taliun, Daniel; Li, Man; Gao, Xiaoyi; Gorski, Mathias; Yang, Qiong; Hundertmark, Claudia; Foster, Meredith C.; O'Seaghdha, Conall M.; Glazer, Nicole; Isaacs, Aaron; Liu, Ching-Ti; Smith, Albert V.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Struchalin, Maksim; Tanaka, Toshiko; Li, Guo; Johnson, Andrew D.; Gierman, Hinco J.; Feitosa, Mary; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Lohman, Kurt; Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Johansson, Åsa; Tönjes, Anke; Dehghan, Abbas; Chouraki, Vincent; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Sorice, Rossella; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lehtimäki, Terho; Esko, Tõnu; Deshmukh, Harshal; Ulivi, Sheila; Chu, Audrey Y.; Murgia, Federico; Trompet, Stella; Imboden, Medea; Kollerits, Barbara; Pistis, Giorgio; Harris, Tamara B.; Launer, Lenore J.; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Schmidt, Helena; Cavalieri, Margherita; Rao, Madhumathi; Hu, Frank B.; Demirkan, Ayse; Oostra, Ben A.; de Andrade, Mariza; Turner, Stephen T.; Ding, Jingzhong; Andrews, Jeanette S.; Freedman, Barry I.; Koenig, Wolfgang; Illig, Thomas; Döring, Angela; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Kolcic, Ivana; Zemunik, Tatijana; Boban, Mladen; Minelli, Cosetta; Wheeler, Heather E.; Igl, Wilmar; Zaboli, Ghazal; Wild, Sarah H.; Wright, Alan F.; Campbell, Harry; Ellinghaus, David; Nöthlings, Ute; Jacobs, Gunnar; Biffar, Reiner; Endlich, Karlhans; Ernst, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Kroemer, Heyo K.; Nauck, Matthias; Stracke, Sylvia; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Kovacs, Peter; Stumvoll, Michael; Mägi, Reedik; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Polasek, Ozren; Hastie, Nick; Vitart, Veronique; Helmer, Catherine; Wang, Jie Jin; Ruggiero, Daniela; Bergmann, Sven; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Nikopensius, Tiit; Province, Michael; Ketkar, Shamika; Colhoun, Helen; Doney, Alex; Robino, Antonietta; Giulianini, Franco; Krämer, Bernhard K.; Portas, Laura; Ford, Ian; Buckley, Brendan M.; Adam, Martin; Thun, Gian-Andri; Paulweber, Bernhard; Haun, Margot; Sala, Cinzia; Metzger, Marie; Mitchell, Paul; Ciullo, Marina; Kim, Stuart K.; Vollenweider, Peter; Raitakari, Olli; Metspalu, Andres; Palmer, Colin; Gasparini, Paolo; Pirastu, Mario; Jukema, J. Wouter; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M.; Kronenberg, Florian; Toniolo, Daniela; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Coresh, Josef; Schmidt, Reinhold; Ferrucci, Luigi; Siscovick, David S.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Borecki, Ingrid; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Liu, Yongmei; Curhan, Gary C.; Rudan, Igor; Gyllensten, Ulf; Wilson, James F.; Franke, Andre; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Rettig, Rainer; Prokopenko, Inga; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Hayward, Caroline; Ridker, Paul; Parsa, Afshin; Bochud, Murielle; Heid, Iris M.; Goessling, Wolfram; Chasman, Daniel I.; Kao, W. H. Linda; Fox, Caroline S.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an important public health problem with a genetic component. We performed genome-wide association studies in up to 130,600 European ancestry participants overall, and stratified for key CKD risk factors. We uncovered 6 new loci in association with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), the primary clinical measure of CKD, in or near MPPED2, DDX1, SLC47A1, CDK12, CASP9, and INO80. Morpholino knockdown of mpped2 and casp9 in zebrafish embryos revealed podocyte and tubular abnormalities with altered dextran clearance, suggesting a role for these genes in renal function. By providing new insights into genes that regulate renal function, these results could further our understanding of the pathogenesis of CKD. PMID:22479191

  20. Genome-wide siRNA screen reveals coupling between mitotic apoptosis and adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Martínez, Laura A; Karamysheva, Zemfira N; Warrington, Ross; Li, Bing; Wei, Shuguang; Xie, Xian-Jin; Roth, Michael G; Yu, Hongtao

    2014-01-01

    The antimitotic anti-cancer drugs, including taxol, perturb spindle dynamics, and induce prolonged, spindle checkpoint-dependent mitotic arrest in cancer cells. These cells then either undergo apoptosis triggered by the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway or exit mitosis without proper cell division in an adaptation pathway. Using a genome-wide small interfering RNA (siRNA) screen in taxol-treated HeLa cells, we systematically identify components of the mitotic apoptosis and adaptation pathways. We show that the Mad2 inhibitor p31comet actively promotes mitotic adaptation through cyclin B1 degradation and has a minor separate function in suppressing apoptosis. Conversely, the pro-apoptotic Bcl2 family member, Noxa, is a critical initiator of mitotic cell death. Unexpectedly, the upstream components of the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway and the mitochondrial fission protein Drp1 contribute to mitotic adaption. Our results reveal crosstalk between the apoptosis and adaptation pathways during mitotic arrest. PMID:25024437

  1. Genome-wide association and functional follow-up reveals new loci for kidney function.

    PubMed

    Pattaro, Cristian; Köttgen, Anna; Teumer, Alexander; Garnaas, Maija; Böger, Carsten A; Fuchsberger, Christian; Olden, Matthias; Chen, Ming-Huei; Tin, Adrienne; Taliun, Daniel; Li, Man; Gao, Xiaoyi; Gorski, Mathias; Yang, Qiong; Hundertmark, Claudia; Foster, Meredith C; O'Seaghdha, Conall M; Glazer, Nicole; Isaacs, Aaron; Liu, Ching-Ti; Smith, Albert V; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Struchalin, Maksim; Tanaka, Toshiko; Li, Guo; Johnson, Andrew D; Gierman, Hinco J; Feitosa, Mary; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Atkinson, Elizabeth J; Lohman, Kurt; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Johansson, Åsa; Tönjes, Anke; Dehghan, Abbas; Chouraki, Vincent; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Sorice, Rossella; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lehtimäki, Terho; Esko, Tõnu; Deshmukh, Harshal; Ulivi, Sheila; Chu, Audrey Y; Murgia, Federico; Trompet, Stella; Imboden, Medea; Kollerits, Barbara; Pistis, Giorgio; Harris, Tamara B; Launer, Lenore J; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Mitchell, Braxton D; Boerwinkle, Eric; Schmidt, Helena; Cavalieri, Margherita; Rao, Madhumathi; Hu, Frank B; Demirkan, Ayse; Oostra, Ben A; de Andrade, Mariza; Turner, Stephen T; Ding, Jingzhong; Andrews, Jeanette S; Freedman, Barry I; Koenig, Wolfgang; Illig, Thomas; Döring, Angela; Wichmann, H-Erich; Kolcic, Ivana; Zemunik, Tatijana; Boban, Mladen; Minelli, Cosetta; Wheeler, Heather E; Igl, Wilmar; Zaboli, Ghazal; Wild, Sarah H; Wright, Alan F; Campbell, Harry; Ellinghaus, David; Nöthlings, Ute; Jacobs, Gunnar; Biffar, Reiner; Endlich, Karlhans; Ernst, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Kroemer, Heyo K; Nauck, Matthias; Stracke, Sylvia; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Kovacs, Peter; Stumvoll, Michael; Mägi, Reedik; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Polasek, Ozren; Hastie, Nick; Vitart, Veronique; Helmer, Catherine; Wang, Jie Jin; Ruggiero, Daniela; Bergmann, Sven; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Nikopensius, Tiit; Province, Michael; Ketkar, Shamika; Colhoun, Helen; Doney, Alex; Robino, Antonietta; Giulianini, Franco; Krämer, Bernhard K; Portas, Laura; Ford, Ian; Buckley, Brendan M; Adam, Martin; Thun, Gian-Andri; Paulweber, Bernhard; Haun, Margot; Sala, Cinzia; Metzger, Marie; Mitchell, Paul; Ciullo, Marina; Kim, Stuart K; Vollenweider, Peter; Raitakari, Olli; Metspalu, Andres; Palmer, Colin; Gasparini, Paolo; Pirastu, Mario; Jukema, J Wouter; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M; Kronenberg, Florian; Toniolo, Daniela; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Shuldiner, Alan R; Coresh, Josef; Schmidt, Reinhold; Ferrucci, Luigi; Siscovick, David S; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Borecki, Ingrid; Kardia, Sharon L R; Liu, Yongmei; Curhan, Gary C; Rudan, Igor; Gyllensten, Ulf; Wilson, James F; Franke, Andre; Pramstaller, Peter P; Rettig, Rainer; Prokopenko, Inga; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Hayward, Caroline; Ridker, Paul; Parsa, Afshin; Bochud, Murielle; Heid, Iris M; Goessling, Wolfram; Chasman, Daniel I; Kao, W H Linda; Fox, Caroline S

    2012-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an important public health problem with a genetic component. We performed genome-wide association studies in up to 130,600 European ancestry participants overall, and stratified for key CKD risk factors. We uncovered 6 new loci in association with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), the primary clinical measure of CKD, in or near MPPED2, DDX1, SLC47A1, CDK12, CASP9, and INO80. Morpholino knockdown of mpped2 and casp9 in zebrafish embryos revealed podocyte and tubular abnormalities with altered dextran clearance, suggesting a role for these genes in renal function. By providing new insights into genes that regulate renal function, these results could further our understanding of the pathogenesis of CKD.

  2. A genome-wide analysis of putative functional and exonic variation associated with extremely high intelligence.

    PubMed

    Spain, S L; Pedroso, I; Kadeva, N; Miller, M B; Iacono, W G; McGue, M; Stergiakouli, E; Smith, G D; Putallaz, M; Lubinski, D; Meaburn, E L; Plomin, R; Simpson, M A

    2016-08-01

    Although individual differences in intelligence (general cognitive ability) are highly heritable, molecular genetic analyses to date have had limited success in identifying specific loci responsible for its heritability. This study is the first to investigate exome variation in individuals of extremely high intelligence. Under the quantitative genetic model, sampling from the high extreme of the distribution should provide increased power to detect associations. We therefore performed a case-control association analysis with 1409 individuals drawn from the top 0.0003 (IQ >170) of the population distribution of intelligence and 3253 unselected population-based controls. Our analysis focused on putative functional exonic variants assayed on the Illumina HumanExome BeadChip. We did not observe any individual protein-altering variants that are reproducibly associated with extremely high intelligence and within the entire distribution of intelligence. Moreover, no significant associations were found for multiple rare alleles within individual genes. However, analyses using genome-wide similarity between unrelated individuals (genome-wide complex trait analysis) indicate that the genotyped functional protein-altering variation yields a heritability estimate of 17.4% (s.e. 1.7%) based on a liability model. In addition, investigation of nominally significant associations revealed fewer rare alleles associated with extremely high intelligence than would be expected under the null hypothesis. This observation is consistent with the hypothesis that rare functional alleles are more frequently detrimental than beneficial to intelligence.

  3. A genome-wide analysis of putative functional and exonic variation associated with extremely high intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Spain, S L; Pedroso, I; Kadeva, N; Miller, M B; Iacono, W G; McGue, M; Stergiakouli, E; Smith, G D; Putallaz, M; Lubinski, D; Meaburn, E L; Plomin, R; Simpson, M A

    2016-01-01

    Although individual differences in intelligence (general cognitive ability) are highly heritable, molecular genetic analyses to date have had limited success in identifying specific loci responsible for its heritability. This study is the first to investigate exome variation in individuals of extremely high intelligence. Under the quantitative genetic model, sampling from the high extreme of the distribution should provide increased power to detect associations. We therefore performed a case–control association analysis with 1409 individuals drawn from the top 0.0003 (IQ >170) of the population distribution of intelligence and 3253 unselected population-based controls. Our analysis focused on putative functional exonic variants assayed on the Illumina HumanExome BeadChip. We did not observe any individual protein-altering variants that are reproducibly associated with extremely high intelligence and within the entire distribution of intelligence. Moreover, no significant associations were found for multiple rare alleles within individual genes. However, analyses using genome-wide similarity between unrelated individuals (genome-wide complex trait analysis) indicate that the genotyped functional protein-altering variation yields a heritability estimate of 17.4% (s.e. 1.7%) based on a liability model. In addition, investigation of nominally significant associations revealed fewer rare alleles associated with extremely high intelligence than would be expected under the null hypothesis. This observation is consistent with the hypothesis that rare functional alleles are more frequently detrimental than beneficial to intelligence. PMID:26239293

  4. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis of pseudohypoparathyroidism patients with GNAS imprinting defects.

    PubMed

    Rochtus, Anne; Martin-Trujillo, Alejandro; Izzi, Benedetta; Elli, Francesca; Garin, Intza; Linglart, Agnes; Mantovani, Giovanna; Perez de Nanclares, Guiomar; Thiele, Suzanne; Decallonne, Brigitte; Van Geet, Chris; Monk, David; Freson, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP) is caused by (epi)genetic defects in the imprinted GNAS cluster. Current classification of PHP patients is hampered by clinical and molecular diagnostic overlaps. The European Consortium for the study of PHP designed a genome-wide methylation study to improve molecular diagnosis. The HumanMethylation 450K BeadChip was used to analyze genome-wide methylation in 24 PHP patients with parathyroid hormone resistance and 20 age- and gender-matched controls. Patients were previously diagnosed with GNAS-specific differentially methylated regions (DMRs) and include 6 patients with known STX16 deletion (PHP(Δstx16)) and 18 without deletion (PHP(neg)). The array demonstrated that PHP patients do not show DNA methylation differences at the whole-genome level. Unsupervised clustering of GNAS-specific DMRs divides PHP(Δstx16) versus PHP(neg) patients. Interestingly, in contrast to the notion that all PHP patients share methylation defects in the A/B DMR while only PHP(Δstx16) patients have normal NESP, GNAS-AS1 and XL methylation, we found a novel DMR (named GNAS-AS2) in the GNAS-AS1 region that is significantly different in both PHP(Δstx16) and PHP(neg), as validated by Sequenom EpiTYPER in a larger PHP cohort. The analysis of 58 DMRs revealed that 8/18 PHP(neg) and 1/6 PHP(Δstx16) patients have multi-locus methylation defects. Validation was performed for FANCC and SVOPL DMRs. This is the first genome-wide methylation study for PHP patients that confirmed that GNAS is the most significant DMR, and the presence of STX16 deletion divides PHP patients in two groups. Moreover, a novel GNAS-AS2 DMR affects all PHP patients, and PHP patients seem sensitive to multi-locus methylation defects.

  5. Genome-wide interrogation reveals hundreds of long intergenic noncoding RNAs that associate with cardiometabolic traits.

    PubMed

    Ballantyne, Rachel L; Zhang, Xuan; Nuñez, Sara; Xue, Chenyi; Zhao, Wei; Reed, Eric; Salaheen, Danish; Foulkes, Andrea S; Li, Mingyao; Reilly, Muredach P

    2016-07-15

    Long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) play important roles in disease, but the vast majority of these transcripts remain uncharacterized. We defined a set of 54 944 human lincRNAs by drawing on four publicly available lincRNA datasets, and annotated ∼2.5 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from each of 15 cardiometabolic genome-wide association study datasets into these lincRNAs. We identified hundreds of lincRNAs with at least one trait-associated SNP: 898 SNPs in 343 unique lincRNAs at 5% false discovery rate, and 469 SNPs in 146 unique lincRNAs meeting Bonferroni-corrected P < 0.05. An additional 64 trait-associated lincRNAs were identified using a class-level testing strategy at Bonferroni-corrected P < 0.05. To better understand the genomic context and prioritize trait-associated lincRNAs, we examined the pattern of linkage disequilibrium between SNPs in the lincRNAs and SNPs that met genome-wide-significance in the region (±500 kb of lincRNAs). A subset of the lincRNA-trait association findings was replicated in independent Genome-wide association studies data from the Pakistan Risk of Myocardial Infarction Study study. For trait-associated lincRNAs, we also investigated synteny and conservation relative to mouse, expression patterns in five cardiometabolic-relevant tissues, and allele-specific expression in RNA sequencing data for adipose tissue and leukocytes. Finally, we revealed a functional role in human adipocytes for linc-NFE2L3-1, which is expressed in adipose and is associated with waist-hip ratio adjusted for BMI. This comprehensive profile of trait-associated lincRNAs provides novel insights into disease mechanism and serves as a launching point for interrogation of the biology of specific lincRNAs in cardiometabolic disease. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Graphic analysis of population structure on genome-wide rheumatoid arthritis data.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Weng, Chunhua; Niyogi, Partha

    2009-12-15

    Principal-component analysis (PCA) has been used for decades to summarize the human genetic variation across geographic regions and to infer population migration history. Reduction of spurious associations due to population structure is crucial for the success of disease association studies. Recently, PCA has also become a popular method for detecting population structure and correction of population stratification in disease association studies. Inspired by manifold learning, we propose a novel method based on spectral graph theory. Regarding each study subject as a node with suitably defined weights for its edges to close neighbors, one can form a weighted graph. We suggest using the spectrum of the associated graph Laplacian operator, namely, Laplacian eigenfunctions, to infer population structures instead of principal components (PCs). For the whole genome-wide association data for the North American Rheumatoid Arthritis Consortium (NARAC) provided by Genetic Workshop Analysis 16, Laplacian eigenfunctions revealed more meaningful structures of the underlying population than PCA. The proposed method has connection to PCA, and it naturally includes PCA as a special case. Our simple method is computationally fast and is suitable for disease studies at the genome-wide scale.

  7. Genome-wide association study of toxic metals and trace elements reveals novel associations

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Esther; Lind, P. Monica; Lindgren, Cecilia; Ingelsson, Erik; Mahajan, Anubha; Morris, Andrew; Lind, Lars

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of toxic metals in the human body is influenced by exposure and mechanisms involved in metabolism, some of which may be under genetic control. This is the first genome-wide association study to investigate variants associated with whole blood levels of a range of toxic metals. Eleven toxic metals and trace elements (aluminium, cadmium, cobalt, copper, chromium, mercury, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, lead and zinc) were assayed in a cohort of 949 individuals using mass spectrometry. DNA samples were genotyped on the Infinium Omni Express bead microarray and imputed up to reference panels from the 1000 Genomes Project. Analyses revealed two regions associated with manganese level at genome-wide significance, mapping to 4q24 and 1q41. The lead single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the 4q24 locus was rs13107325 (P-value = 5.1 × 10−11, β = −0.77), located in an exon of SLC39A8, which encodes a protein involved in manganese and zinc transport. The lead SNP in the 1q41 locus is rs1776029 (P-value = 2.2 × 10−14, β = −0.46). The SNP lies within the intronic region of SLC30A10, another transporter protein. Among other metals, the loci 6q14.1 and 3q26.32 were associated with cadmium and mercury levels (P = 1.4 × 10−10, β = −1.2 and P = 1.8 × 10−9, β = −1.8, respectively). Whole blood measurements of toxic metals are associated with genetic variants in metal transporter genes and others. This is relevant in inferring metabolic pathways of metals and identifying subsets of individuals who may be more susceptible to metal toxicity. PMID:26025379

  8. Genome-wide association study of toxic metals and trace elements reveals novel associations.

    PubMed

    Ng, Esther; Lind, P Monica; Lindgren, Cecilia; Ingelsson, Erik; Mahajan, Anubha; Morris, Andrew; Lind, Lars

    2015-08-15

    The accumulation of toxic metals in the human body is influenced by exposure and mechanisms involved in metabolism, some of which may be under genetic control. This is the first genome-wide association study to investigate variants associated with whole blood levels of a range of toxic metals. Eleven toxic metals and trace elements (aluminium, cadmium, cobalt, copper, chromium, mercury, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, lead and zinc) were assayed in a cohort of 949 individuals using mass spectrometry. DNA samples were genotyped on the Infinium Omni Express bead microarray and imputed up to reference panels from the 1000 Genomes Project. Analyses revealed two regions associated with manganese level at genome-wide significance, mapping to 4q24 and 1q41. The lead single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the 4q24 locus was rs13107325 (P-value = 5.1 × 10(-11), β = -0.77), located in an exon of SLC39A8, which encodes a protein involved in manganese and zinc transport. The lead SNP in the 1q41 locus is rs1776029 (P-value = 2.2 × 10(-14), β = -0.46). The SNP lies within the intronic region of SLC30A10, another transporter protein. Among other metals, the loci 6q14.1 and 3q26.32 were associated with cadmium and mercury levels (P = 1.4 × 10(-10), β = -1.2 and P = 1.8 × 10(-9), β = -1.8, respectively). Whole blood measurements of toxic metals are associated with genetic variants in metal transporter genes and others. This is relevant in inferring metabolic pathways of metals and identifying subsets of individuals who may be more susceptible to metal toxicity. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  9. Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals Natural Variations Contributing to Drought Resistance in Crops

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongwei; Qin, Feng

    2017-01-01

    Crops are often cultivated in regions where they will face environmental adversities; resulting in substantial yield loss which can ultimately lead to food and societal problems. Thus, significant efforts have been made to breed stress tolerant cultivars in an attempt to minimize these problems and to produce more stability with respect to crop yields across broad geographies. Since stress tolerance is a complex and multi-genic trait, advancements with classical breeding approaches have been challenging. On the other hand, molecular breeding, which is based on transgenics, marker-assisted selection and genome editing technologies; holds great promise to enable farmers to better cope with these challenges. However, identification of the key genetic components underlying the trait is critical and will serve as the foundation for future crop genetic improvement. Recently, genome-wide association studies have made significant contributions to facilitate the discovery of natural variation contributing to stress tolerance in crops. From these studies, the identified loci can serve as targets for genomic selection or editing to enable the molecular design of new cultivars. Here, we summarize research progress on this issue and focus on the genetic basis of drought tolerance as revealed by genome-wide association studies and quantitative trait loci mapping. Although many favorable loci have been identified, elucidation of their molecular mechanisms contributing to increased stress tolerance still remains a challenge. Thus, continuous efforts are still required to functionally dissect this complex trait through comprehensive approaches, such as system biological studies. It is expected that proper application of the acquired knowledge will enable the development of stress tolerant cultivars; allowing agricultural production to become more sustainable under dynamic environmental conditions. PMID:28713401

  10. Exome sequencing and genome-wide copy number variant mapping reveal novel associations with sensorineural hereditary hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Haraksingh, Rajini R; Jahanbani, Fereshteh; Rodriguez-Paris, Juan; Gelernter, Joel; Nadeau, Kari C; Oghalai, John S; Schrijver, Iris; Snyder, Michael P

    2014-12-20

    The genetic diversity of loci and mutations underlying hereditary hearing loss is an active area of investigation. To identify loci associated with predominantly non-syndromic sensorineural hearing loss, we performed exome sequencing of families and of single probands, as well as copy number variation (CNV) mapping in a case-control cohort. Analysis of three distinct families revealed several candidate loci in two families and a single strong candidate gene, MYH7B, for hearing loss in one family. MYH7B encodes a Type II myosin, consistent with a role for cytoskeletal proteins in hearing. High-resolution genome-wide CNV analysis of 150 cases and 157 controls revealed deletions in genes known to be involved in hearing (e.g. GJB6, OTOA, and STRC, encoding connexin 30, otoancorin, and stereocilin, respectively), supporting CNV contributions to hearing loss phenotypes. Additionally, a novel region on chromosome 16 containing part of the PDXDC1 gene was found to be frequently deleted in hearing loss patients (OR=3.91, 95% CI: 1.62-9.40, p=1.45×10(-7)). We conclude that many known as well as novel loci and distinct types of mutations not typically tested in clinical settings can contribute to the etiology of hearing loss. Our study also demonstrates the challenges of exome sequencing and genome-wide CNV mapping for direct clinical application, and illustrates the need for functional and clinical follow-up as well as curated open-access databases.

  11. Identification of Promising Mutants Associated with Egg Production Traits Revealed by Genome-Wide Association Study

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Taocun; Yi, Guoqiang; Qu, LuJiang; Qu, Liang; Wang, Kehua; Yang, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Egg number (EN), egg laying rate (LR) and age at first egg (AFE) are important production traits related to egg production in poultry industry. To better understand the knowledge of genetic architecture of dynamic EN during the whole laying cycle and provide the precise positions of associated variants for EN, LR and AFE, laying records from 21 to 72 weeks of age were collected individually for 1,534 F2 hens produced by reciprocal crosses between White Leghorn and Dongxiang Blue-shelled chicken, and their genotypes were assayed by chicken 600 K Affymetrix high density genotyping arrays. Subsequently, pedigree and SNP-based genetic parameters were estimated and a genome-wide association study (GWAS) was conducted on EN, LR and AFE. The heritability estimates were similar between pedigree and SNP-based estimates varying from 0.17 to 0.36. In the GWA analysis, we identified nine genome-wide significant loci associated with EN of the laying periods from 21 to 26 weeks, 27 to 36 weeks and 37 to 72 weeks. Analysis of GTF2A1 and CLSPN suggested that they influenced the function of ovary and uterus, and may be considered as relevant candidates. The identified SNP rs314448799 for accumulative EN from 21 to 40 weeks on chromosome 5 created phenotypic differences of 6.86 eggs between two homozygous genotypes, which could be potentially applied to the molecular breeding for EN selection. Moreover, our finding showed that LR was a moderate polygenic trait. The suggestive significant region on chromosome 16 for AFE suggested the relationship between sex maturity and immune in the current population. The present study comprehensively evaluates the role of genetic variants in the development of egg laying. The findings will be helpful to investigation of causative genes function and future marker-assisted selection and genomic selection in chickens. PMID:26496084

  12. Genome-Wide Transcriptional Profiling Reveals Connective Tissue Mast Cell Accumulation in Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Soumyaroop; Go, Diana; Krenitsky, Daria L.; Huyck, Heidi L.; Solleti, Siva Kumar; Lunger, Valerie A.; Metlay, Leon; Srisuma, Sorachai; Wert, Susan E.; Pryhuber, Gloria S.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is a major complication of premature birth. Risk factors for BPD are complex and include prenatal infection and O2 toxicity. BPD pathology is equally complex and characterized by inflammation and dysmorphic airspaces and vasculature. Due to the limited availability of clinical samples, an understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of this disease and its causal mechanisms and associated biomarkers is limited. Objectives: Apply genome-wide expression profiling to define pathways affected in BPD lungs. Methods: Lung tissue was obtained at autopsy from 11 BPD cases and 17 age-matched control subjects without BPD. RNA isolated from these tissue samples was interrogated using microarrays. Standard gene selection and pathway analysis methods were applied to the data set. Abnormal expression patterns were validated by quantitative reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. Measurements and Main Results: We identified 159 genes differentially expressed in BPD tissues. Pathway analysis indicated previously appreciated (e.g., DNA damage regulation of cell cycle) as well as novel (e.g., B-cell development) biological functions were affected. Three of the five most highly induced genes were mast cell (MC)-specific markers. We confirmed an increased accumulation of connective tissue MCTC (chymase expressing) mast cells in BPD tissues. Increased expression of MCTC markers was also demonstrated in an animal model of BPD-like pathology. Conclusions: We present a unique genome-wide expression data set from human BPD lung tissue. Our data provide information on gene expression patterns associated with BPD and facilitated the discovery that MCTC accumulation is a prominent feature of this disease. These observations have significant clinical and mechanistic implications. PMID:22723293

  13. Genome-wide classification and expression analysis of MYB transcription factor families in rice and Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The MYB gene family comprises one of the richest groups of transcription factors in plants. Plant MYB proteins are characterized by a highly conserved MYB DNA-binding domain. MYB proteins are classified into four major groups namely, 1R-MYB, 2R-MYB, 3R-MYB and 4R-MYB based on the number and position of MYB repeats. MYB transcription factors are involved in plant development, secondary metabolism, hormone signal transduction, disease resistance and abiotic stress tolerance. A comparative analysis of MYB family genes in rice and Arabidopsis will help reveal the evolution and function of MYB genes in plants. Results A genome-wide analysis identified at least 155 and 197 MYB genes in rice and Arabidopsis, respectively. Gene structure analysis revealed that MYB family genes possess relatively more number of introns in the middle as compared with C- and N-terminal regions of the predicted genes. Intronless MYB-genes are highly conserved both in rice and Arabidopsis. MYB genes encoding R2R3 repeat MYB proteins retained conserved gene structure with three exons and two introns, whereas genes encoding R1R2R3 repeat containing proteins consist of six exons and five introns. The splicing pattern is similar among R1R2R3 MYB genes in Arabidopsis. In contrast, variation in splicing pattern was observed among R1R2R3 MYB members of rice. Consensus motif analysis of 1kb upstream region (5′ to translation initiation codon) of MYB gene ORFs led to the identification of conserved and over-represented cis-motifs in both rice and Arabidopsis. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that several members of MYBs are up-regulated by various abiotic stresses both in rice and Arabidopsis. Conclusion A comprehensive genome-wide analysis of chromosomal distribution, tandem repeats and phylogenetic relationship of MYB family genes in rice and Arabidopsis suggested their evolution via duplication. Genome-wide comparative analysis of MYB genes and their expression analysis

  14. Genome-wide mRNA and miRNA analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) reveals different miRNAs regulating HIV/HCV co-infection.

    PubMed

    Gupta, P; Liu, B; Wu, J Q; Soriano, V; Vispo, E; Carroll, A P; Goldie, B J; Cairns, M J; Saksena, N K

    2014-02-01

    Co-infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) is common due to shared transmission routes. The genomic basis of HIV/HCV co-infection and its regulation by microRNA (miRNA) is unknown. Therefore, our objective was to investigate genome-wide mRNA expression and its regulation by miRNA in primary PBMCs derived from 27 patients (5 HCV - mono-infected, 5 HIV-mono-infected, 12 HCV/HIV co-infected, and 5 healthy controls). This revealed 27 miRNAs and 476 mRNAs as differentially expressed (DE) in HCV/HIV co-infection when compared to controls (adj p<0.05). Our study shows the first evidence of miRNAs specific for co-infection, several of which are correlated with key gene targets demonstrating functional relationships to pathways in cancer, immune-function, and metabolism. Notable was the up regulation of HCV-specific miR-122 in co-infection (FC>50, p=4.02E-06), which may have clinical/biological implications.

  15. Genome-wide identification and expression analysis of MAPK and MAPKK gene family in Malus domestica.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shizhong; Xu, Ruirui; Luo, Xiaocui; Jiang, Zesheng; Shu, Huairui

    2013-12-01

    MAPK signal transduction modules play crucial roles in regulating many biological processes in plants, which are composed of three classes of hierarchically organized protein kinases, namely MAPKKKs, MAPKKs, and MAPKs. Although genome-wide analysis of this family has been carried out in some species, little is known about MAPK and MAPKK genes in apple (Malus domestica). In this study, a total of 26 putative apple MAPK genes (MdMPKs) and 9 putative apple MAPKK genes (MdMKKs) have been identified and located within the apple genome. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that MdMAPKs and MdMAPKKs could be divided into 4 subfamilies (groups A, B, C and D), respectively. The predicted MdMAPKs and MdMAPKKs were distributed across 13 out of 17 chromosomes with different densities. In addition, analysis of exon-intron junctions and of intron phase inside the predicted coding region of each candidate gene has revealed high levels of conservation within and between phylogenetic groups. According to the microarray and expressed sequence tag (EST) analysis, the different expression patterns indicate that they may play different roles during fruit development and rootstock-scion interaction process. Moreover, MAPK and MAPKK genes were performed expression profile analyses in different tissues (root, stem, leaf, flower and fruit), and all of the selected genes were expressed in at least one of the tissues tested, indicating that the MAPKs and MAPKKs are involved in various aspects of physiological and developmental processes of apple. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a genome-wide analysis of the apple MAPK and MAPKK gene family. This study provides valuable information for understanding the classification and putative functions of the MAPK signal in apple.

  16. Genome Wide Copy Number Analysis of Paediatric Burkitt Lymphoma Using Formalin-Fixed Tissues Reveals a Subset with Gain of Chromosome 13q and Corresponding miRNA Over Expression

    PubMed Central

    Schiffman, Joshua D.; Lorimer, Patrick D.; Rodic, Vladimir; Jahromi, Mona S.; Downie, Jonathan M.; Bayerl, Michael G.; Sanmann, Jennifer N.; Althof, Pamela A.; Sanger, Warren G.; Barnette, Phillip; Perkins, Sherrie L.; Miles, Rodney R.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The majority of paediatric Burkitt lymphoma (pBL) patients that relapse will die of disease, but markers for this high-risk subset are unknown. MYC translocations characterize pBL, but additional genetic changes may relate to prognosis and serve as potential biomarkers. We utilized a molecular inversion probe single nucleotide polymorphism assay to perform high resolution, genome-wide copy number analysis on archival formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded pBL and germline tissues. We identified copy number abnormalities (CNAs) in 18/28 patients (64%) with a total of 62 CNAs that included 32 gains and 30 copy number losses. We identified 7 recurrent CNAs including 1q gain (7/28, 25%), 13q gain (3/28, 11%), and 17p loss (4/28, 14%). The minimum common amplified region on 13q was at 13q31 and included the MIR17HG (MIR17-92) locus. Samples with this gain had higher levels of MIR17 RNA and showed a tendency for early relapse. Tumour-specific uniparental disomy was identified in 32% of cases and usually was recurrent. These results demonstrate that high-resolution copy number analysis can be performed on archival lymphoma tissue specimens, which has significance for the study of rare diseases. PMID:21981616

  17. Genome-wide analysis of the MYB transcription factor superfamily in soybean

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The MYB superfamily constitutes one of the most abundant groups of transcription factors described in plants. Nevertheless, their functions appear to be highly diverse and remain rather unclear. To date, no genome-wide characterization of this gene family has been conducted in a legume species. Here we report the first genome-wide analysis of the whole MYB superfamily in a legume species, soybean (Glycine max), including the gene structures, phylogeny, chromosome locations, conserved motifs, and expression patterns, as well as a comparative genomic analysis with Arabidopsis. Results A total of 244 R2R3-MYB genes were identified and further classified into 48 subfamilies based on a phylogenetic comparative analysis with their putative orthologs, showed both gene loss and duplication events. The phylogenetic analysis showed that most characterized MYB genes with similar functions are clustered in the same subfamily, together with the identification of orthologs by synteny analysis, functional conservation among subgroups of MYB genes was strongly indicated. The phylogenetic relationships of each subgroup of MYB genes were well supported by the highly conserved intron/exon structures and motifs outside the MYB domain. Synonymous nucleotide substitution (dN/dS) analysis showed that the soybean MYB DNA-binding domain is under strong negative selection. The chromosome distribution pattern strongly indicated that genome-wide segmental and tandem duplication contribute to the expansion of soybean MYB genes. In addition, we found that ~ 4% of soybean R2R3-MYB genes had undergone alternative splicing events, producing a variety of transcripts from a single gene, which illustrated the extremely high complexity of transcriptome regulation. Comparative expression profile analysis of R2R3-MYB genes in soybean and Arabidopsis revealed that MYB genes play conserved and various roles in plants, which is indicative of a divergence in function. Conclusions In this

  18. Genome-wide association for abdominal subcutaneous and visceral adipose reveals a novel locus for visceral fat in women.

    PubMed

    Fox, Caroline S; Liu, Yongmei; White, Charles C; Feitosa, Mary; Smith, Albert V; Heard-Costa, Nancy; Lohman, Kurt; Johnson, Andrew D; Foster, Meredith C; Greenawalt, Danielle M; Griffin, Paula; Ding, Jinghong; Newman, Anne B; Tylavsky, Fran; Miljkovic, Iva; Kritchevsky, Stephen B; Launer, Lenore; Garcia, Melissa; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Carr, J Jeffrey; Gudnason, Vilmunder; Harris, Tamara B; Cupples, L Adrienne; Borecki, Ingrid B

    2012-01-01

    Body fat distribution, particularly centralized obesity, is associated with metabolic risk above and beyond total adiposity. We performed genome-wide association of abdominal adipose depots quantified using computed tomography (CT) to uncover novel loci for body fat distribution among participants of European ancestry. Subcutaneous and visceral fat were quantified in 5,560 women and 4,997 men from 4 population-based studies. Genome-wide genotyping was performed using standard arrays and imputed to ~2.5 million Hapmap SNPs. Each study performed a genome-wide association analysis of subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT), visceral adipose tissue (VAT), VAT adjusted for body mass index, and VAT/SAT ratio (a metric of the propensity to store fat viscerally as compared to subcutaneously) in the overall sample and in women and men separately. A weighted z-score meta-analysis was conducted. For the VAT/SAT ratio, our most significant p-value was rs11118316 at LYPLAL1 gene (p = 3.1 × 10E-09), previously identified in association with waist-hip ratio. For SAT, the most significant SNP was in the FTO gene (p = 5.9 × 10E-08). Given the known gender differences in body fat distribution, we performed sex-specific analyses. Our most significant finding was for VAT in women, rs1659258 near THNSL2 (p = 1.6 × 10-08), but not men (p = 0.75). Validation of this SNP in the GIANT consortium data demonstrated a similar sex-specific pattern, with observed significance in women (p = 0.006) but not men (p = 0.24) for BMI and waist circumference (p = 0.04 [women], p = 0.49 [men]). Finally, we interrogated our data for the 14 recently published loci for body fat distribution (measured by waist-hip ratio adjusted for BMI); associations were observed at 7 of these loci. In contrast, we observed associations at only 7/32 loci previously identified in association with BMI; the majority of overlap was observed with SAT. Genome-wide association for visceral and subcutaneous fat revealed a SNP for

  19. Genome-Wide Transcriptome Analysis of Cadmium Stress in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Oono, Youko; Yazawa, Takayuki; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Harumi; Mori, Satomi; Handa, Hirokazu; Matsumoto, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Rice growth is severely affected by toxic concentrations of the nonessential heavy metal cadmium (Cd). To elucidate the molecular basis of the response to Cd stress, we performed mRNA sequencing of rice following our previous study on exposure to high concentrations of Cd (Oono et al., 2014). In this study, rice plants were hydroponically treated with low concentrations of Cd and approximately 211 million sequence reads were mapped onto the IRGSP-1.0 reference rice genome sequence. Many genes, including some identified under high Cd concentration exposure in our previous study, were found to be responsive to low Cd exposure, with an average of about 11,000 transcripts from each condition. However, genes expressed constitutively across the developmental course responded only slightly to low Cd concentrations, in contrast to their clear response to high Cd concentration, which causes fatal damage to rice seedlings according to phenotypic changes. The expression of metal ion transporter genes tended to correlate with Cd concentration, suggesting the potential of the RNA-Seq strategy to reveal novel Cd-responsive transporters by analyzing gene expression under different Cd concentrations. This study could help to develop novel strategies for improving tolerance to Cd exposure in rice and other cereal crops. PMID:27034955

  20. Genome-wide analysis of promoter architecture in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Hoskins, Roger A.; Landolin, Jane M.; Brown, James B.; Sandler, Jeremy E.; Takahashi, Hazuki; Lassmann, Timo; Yu, Charles; Booth, Benjamin W.; Zhang, Dayu; Wan, Kenneth H.; Yang, Li; Boley, Nathan; Andrews, Justen; Kaufman, Thomas C.; Graveley, Brenton R.; Bickel, Peter J.; Carninci, Piero; Carlson, Joseph W.; Celniker, Susan E.

    2010-10-20

    Core promoters are critical regions for gene regulation in higher eukaryotes. However, the boundaries of promoter regions, the relative rates of initiation at the transcription start sites (TSSs) distributed within them, and the functional significance of promoter architecture remain poorly understood. We produced a high-resolution map of promoters active in the Drosophila melanogaster embryo by integrating data from three independent and complementary methods: 21 million cap analysis of gene expression (CAGE) tags, 1.2 million RNA ligase mediated rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RLMRACE) reads, and 50,000 cap-trapped expressed sequence tags (ESTs). We defined 12,454 promoters of 8037 genes. Our analysis indicates that, due to non-promoter-associated RNA background signal, previous studies have likely overestimated the number of promoter-associated CAGE clusters by fivefold. We show that TSS distributions form a complex continuum of shapes, and that promoters active in the embryo and adult have highly similar shapes in 95% of cases. This suggests that these distributions are generally determined by static elements such as local DNA sequence and are not modulated by dynamic signals such as histone modifications. Transcription factor binding motifs are differentially enriched as a function of promoter shape, and peaked promoter shape is correlated with both temporal and spatial regulation of gene expression. Our results contribute to the emerging view that core promoters are functionally diverse and control patterning of gene expression in Drosophila and mammals.

  1. A Genome Wide Survey of SNP Variation Reveals the Genetic Structure of Sheep Breeds

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The genetic structure of sheep reflects their domestication and subsequent formation into discrete breeds. Understanding genetic structure is essential for achieving genetic improvement through genome-wide association studies, genomic selection and the dissection of quantitative traits. After identi...

  2. Genome wide analysis of blood pressure variability and ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muhammad S; Nalls, Michael A; Bevan, Steve; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Chen, Wei-Min; Malik, Rainer; McCarthy, Nina S; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Speed, Douglas; Hasan, Nazeeha; Pucek, Mateusz; Rinne, Paul E.; Sever, Peter; Stanton, Alice; Shields, Denis C; Maguire, Jane M; McEvoy, Mark; Scott, Rodney J; Ferrucci, Luigi; Macleod, Mary J; Attia, John; Markus, Hugh S; Sale, Michele M; Worrall, Bradford B; Mitchell, Braxton D; Dichgans, Martin; Sudlow, Cathy; Meschia, James F; Rothwell, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Visit-to-visit variability in BP is associated with ischemic stroke. We sought to determine whether such variability has a genetic aetiology and whether genetic variants associated with BP variability are also associated with ischemic stroke. Methods A GWAS for loci influencing BP variability was undertaken in 3,802 individuals from the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcome Trial (ASCOT) study where long-term visit-to-visit and within visit BP measures were available. Since BP variability is strongly associated with ischemic stroke, we genotyped the sentinel SNP in an independent ischemic stroke population comprising of 8,624 cases and 12,722 controls and in 3,900 additional (Scandinavian) participants from the ASCOT study in order to replicate our findings. Results The ASCOT discovery GWAS identified a cluster of 17 correlated SNPs within the NLGN1 gene (3q26.31) associated with BP variability. The strongest association was with rs976683 (p=1.4×10−8). Conditional analysis on rs976683 provided no evidence of additional independent associations at the locus. Analysis of rs976683 in ischemic stroke patients found no association for overall stroke (OR 1.02; 95% CI 0.97-1.07; p=0.52) or its sub-types: CE (OR 1.07; 95% CI 0.97-1.16; p=0.17), LVD (OR 0.98; 95% 0.89-1.07; p=0.60) and SVD (OR 1.07; 95% CI 0.97-1.17; p=0.19). No evidence for association was found between rs976683 and BP variability in the additional (Scandinavian) ASCOT participants (p=0.18). Conclusions We identified a cluster of SNPs at the NLGN1 locus showing significant association with BP variability. Follow up analyses did not support an association with risk of ischemic stroke and its subtypes. PMID:23929743

  3. Human genome-wide RNAi screen reveals host factors required for enterovirus 71 replication

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Kan Xing; Phuektes, Patchara; Kumar, Pankaj; Goh, Germaine Yen Lin; Moreau, Dimitri; Chow, Vincent Tak Kwong; Bard, Frederic; Chu, Justin Jang Hann

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a neurotropic enterovirus without antivirals or vaccine, and its host-pathogen interactions remain poorly understood. Here we use a human genome-wide RNAi screen to identify 256 host factors involved in EV71 replication in human rhabdomyosarcoma cells. Enrichment analyses reveal overrepresentation in processes like mitotic cell cycle and transcriptional regulation. We have carried out orthogonal experiments to characterize the roles of selected factors involved in cell cycle regulation and endoplasmatic reticulum-associated degradation. We demonstrate nuclear egress of CDK6 in EV71 infected cells, and identify CDK6 and AURKB as resistance factors. NGLY1, which co-localizes with EV71 replication complexes at the endoplasmatic reticulum, supports EV71 replication. We confirm importance of these factors for EV71 replication in a human neuronal cell line and for coxsackievirus A16 infection. A small molecule inhibitor of NGLY1 reduces EV71 replication. This study provides a comprehensive map of EV71 host factors and reveals potential antiviral targets. PMID:27748395

  4. Time-Resolved Transposon Insertion Sequencing Reveals Genome-Wide Fitness Dynamics during Infection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guanhua; Billings, Gabriel; Hubbard, Troy P; Park, Joseph S; Yin Leung, Ka; Liu, Qin; Davis, Brigid M; Zhang, Yuanxing; Wang, Qiyao; Waldor, Matthew K

    2017-10-03

    Transposon insertion sequencing (TIS) is a powerful high-throughput genetic technique that is transforming functional genomics in prokaryotes, because it enables genome-wide mapping of the determinants of fitness. However, current approaches for analyzing TIS data assume that selective pressures are constant over time and thus do not yield information regarding changes in the genetic requirements for growth in dynamic environments (e.g., during infection). Here, we describe structured analysis of TIS data collected as a time series, termed pattern analysis of conditional essentiality (PACE). From a temporal series of TIS data, PACE derives a quantitative assessment of each mutant's fitness over the course of an experiment and identifies mutants with related fitness profiles. In so doing, PACE circumvents major limitations of existing methodologies, specifically the need for artificial effect size thresholds and enumeration of bacterial population expansion. We used PACE to analyze TIS samples of Edwardsiella piscicida (a fish pathogen) collected over a 2-week infection period from a natural host (the flatfish turbot). PACE uncovered more genes that affect E. piscicida's fitness in vivo than were detected using a cutoff at a terminal sampling point, and it identified subpopulations of mutants with distinct fitness profiles, one of which informed the design of new live vaccine candidates. Overall, PACE enables efficient mining of time series TIS data and enhances the power and sensitivity of TIS-based analyses.IMPORTANCE Transposon insertion sequencing (TIS) enables genome-wide mapping of the genetic determinants of fitness, typically based on observations at a single sampling point. Here, we move beyond analysis of endpoint TIS data to create a framework for analysis of time series TIS data, termed pattern analysis of conditional essentiality (PACE). We applied PACE to identify genes that contribute to colonization of a natural host by the fish pathogen

  5. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis in permanent atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guochang; Zhou, Jian; Gao, Jie; Liu, Yan; Gu, Song; Zhang, Xitao; Su, Pixiong

    2017-10-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a highly heterogeneous genetic disease; however, the pathogenesis of AF cannot be explained by genetic variants alone. DNA methylation is a heritable method of gene expression regulation, and may be a potential regulatory mechanism in AF. Therefore, in the present study, the genome‑wide DNA methylation pattern in cells derived from the left atrium of patients with permanent AF (n=7) was compared with that of healthy heart donors (n=4) with a normal sinus rhythm (SR). Enriched biological functions of the differentially methylated genes were assessed. Integrated analysis of genome‑wide methylation and mRNA expression profiles was performed, and reverse transcription quantitative‑polymerase chain reaction (RT‑qPCR) was used to determine the expression levels of four selected genes. A total of 417 differentially methylated CpG sites were identified in the fibrillating atrium (P<0.05; |β|>0.17); the majority of which were located in gene‑body and intergenic regions outside of CpG islands. Aberrantly methylated genes participated in the activation of inflammation, sodium and potassium ion transport, fibrosis and the reduction of lipid metabolism. Hypermethylation in the AF susceptible loci, paired‑like homeodomain transcription factor 2 (chromosome 4q25) and coiled‑coil domain containing 141 (chromosome 2q31), as well as hypomethylation in the calcium voltage‑gated channel subunit α1C (chromosome 12p13) locus, were identified in all patients with AF. Of the 420 upregulated and 567 downregulated genes previously identified in patients with AF relative to those with normal SR (fold‑change >2.0; P≤0.05), 12 genes were hypomethylated and eight genes were hypermethylated in each group, respectively (|β|>0.2: P<0.05). RT‑qPCR analysis of four of these genes supported the modulatory effect of DNA methylation on gene expression. These results suggest that DNA methylation‑mediated regulation of gene expression may serve

  6. Genome-wide analysis of TCP family in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Chen, Y Q; Ding, A M; Chen, H; Xia, F; Wang, W F; Sun, Y H

    2016-05-23

    The TCP family is a transcription factor family, members of which are extensively involved in plant growth and development as well as in signal transduction in the response against many physiological and biochemical stimuli. In the present study, 61 TCP genes were identified in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) genome. Bioinformatic methods were employed for predicting and analyzing the gene structure, gene expression, phylogenetic analysis, and conserved domains of TCP proteins in tobacco. The 61 NtTCP genes were divided into three diverse groups, based on the division of TCP genes in tomato and Arabidopsis, and the results of the conserved domain and sequence analyses further confirmed the classification of the NtTCP genes. The expression pattern of NtTCP also demonstrated that majority of these genes play important roles in all the tissues, while some special genes exercise their functions only in specific tissues. In brief, the comprehensive and thorough study of the TCP family in other plants provides sufficient resources for studying the structure and functions of TCPs in tobacco.

  7. Genome-wide analysis of VQ motif-containing proteins in Moso bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis).

    PubMed

    Wang, Yujiao; Liu, Huanlong; Zhu, Dongyue; Gao, Yameng; Yan, Hanwei; Xiang, Yan

    2017-07-01

    29 Moso bamboo VQ proteins were genome-wide identified for the first time, and bioinformatics analysis was performed to investigate phylogenetic relationships and evolutionary divergence. The qRT-PCR data show that PeVQ genes response to different stress treatments. Accumulating evidence suggests that VQ motif-containing proteins in rice (Oryza sativa), Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), and maize (Zea mays) play fundamental roles in response to various biotic and abiotic stresses. However, little is known about the functions of VQ family proteins in Moso bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis). In this study, we performed a genome-wide bioinformatic analysis and expression profiling of PeVQ genes. A total of 29 VQ genes was identified and divided into seven subgroups (I-VII) based on phylogenetic analysis. Gene structure and conserved motif analysis revealed that 25 of 29 VQ genes contained no introns. Multiple sequence alignment showed that Moso bamboo VQ motif-containing proteins contained five variations of the conserved motif. The time of duplication and divergence of Moso bamboo from rice and maize was calculated using K s analysis. A heat map was generated using microarray data from 29 Moso bamboo VQ genes suggesting that these genes were expressed in different tissues or developmental stages. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and promoter analysis indicated that PeVQ genes were differentially regulated following treatment with polyethylene glycol, abscisic acid and salicylic acid. Our results provide a solid foundation for further research of the specific functions of VQ motif-containing proteins in Moso bamboo.

  8. Genome-wide differential expression reveals candidate genes involved in the pathogenesis of lupus and lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    AlFadhli, Suad; Ghanem, Aqeel A M; Nizam, Rasheeba

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (lupus) is an autoimmune disease characterized by multiorgan pathology, accelerated apoptosis and hyper-autoantibody production against self-components. The root cause of lupus remains unknown, although multiple susceptibility factors have been reported in different ethnic group. We aimed to explore the genome-wide differential expression spectrum of lupus and its severe form lupus nephritis (LN) in Arab females. A total of 98 subjects: 40 lupus, 18 LN and 40 age/gender/ethnically matched healthy controls (HC) were recruited. Carefully chosen subjects (n = 11) were employed for whole human-genome expression profiling using high-density Human Exon 1.0.ST arrays (Affymetrix) and statistical analysis was carried out using appropriate software. Validation cohorts (n = 98) were investigated to quantify the expression of the nine selected candidate genes relative to GAPDH as endogenous control. Genome-wide differential analysis revealed seven candidate genes in lupus and 36 in LN, when individually compared to HC (anova Welch t-test, P ≤ 0.005, Tukey's honestly post hoc analysis). Analysis of differentially expressed genes with a fold change of 2, revealed 16 Gene Ontology terms satisfying a P ≤ 0.05. We further detected five distinct inflammatory and metabolic pathways such as TWEAK, osteopontin, endochondral ossification, fluropyrimidine activity and urea cycle and metabolism of amino groups that significantly contribute to the pathogenesis of lupus (P < 0.05). Validation of selected candidate genes (IRF9, ABCA1, APOBEC3, CEACAM3, OSCAR, TNFA1P6, MMP9, SLC4A1) revealed significant differences in expression, indicating their promissory role in the pathogenesis of lupus. Our study provides central gene regulators of therapeutic potential, indicating the future prospects of the study. © 2015 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. Genome-Wide Methylome Analyses Reveal Novel Epigenetic Regulation Patterns in Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongsheng; Camarillo, Cynthia; Xu, Juan; Arana, Tania Bedard; Xiao, Yun; Zhao, Zheng; Chen, Hong; Ramirez, Mercedes; Zavala, Juan; Escamilla, Michael A.; Armas, Regina; Mendoza, Ricardo; Ontiveros, Alfonso; Nicolini, Humberto; Jerez Magaña, Alvaro Antonio; Rubin, Lewis P.; Li, Xia; Xu, Chun

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BP) are complex genetic disorders. Their appearance is also likely informed by as yet only partially described epigenetic contributions. Using a sequencing-based method for genome-wide analysis, we quantitatively compared the blood DNA methylation landscapes in SZ and BP subjects to control, both in an understudied population, Hispanics along the US-Mexico border. Remarkably, we identified thousands of differentially methylated regions for SZ and BP preferentially located in promoters 3′-UTRs and 5′-UTRs of genes. Distinct patterns of aberrant methylation of promoter sequences were located surrounding transcription start sites. In these instances, aberrant methylation occurred in CpG islands (CGIs) as well as in flanking regions as well as in CGI sparse promoters. Pathway analysis of genes displaying these distinct aberrant promoter methylation patterns showed enhancement of epigenetic changes in numerous genes previously related to psychiatric disorders and neurodevelopment. Integration of gene expression data further suggests that in SZ aberrant promoter methylation is significantly associated with altered gene transcription. In particular, we found significant associations between (1) promoter CGIs hypermethylation with gene repression and (2) CGI 3′-shore hypomethylation with increased gene expression. Finally, we constructed a specific methylation analysis platform that facilitates viewing and comparing aberrant genome methylation in human neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:25734057

  10. Genome-wide methylome analyses reveal novel epigenetic regulation patterns in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongsheng; Camarillo, Cynthia; Xu, Juan; Arana, Tania Bedard; Xiao, Yun; Zhao, Zheng; Chen, Hong; Ramirez, Mercedes; Zavala, Juan; Escamilla, Michael A; Armas, Regina; Mendoza, Ricardo; Ontiveros, Alfonso; Nicolini, Humberto; Magaña, Alvaro Antonio Jerez; Rubin, Lewis P; Li, Xia; Xu, Chun

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BP) are complex genetic disorders. Their appearance is also likely informed by as yet only partially described epigenetic contributions. Using a sequencing-based method for genome-wide analysis, we quantitatively compared the blood DNA methylation landscapes in SZ and BP subjects to control, both in an understudied population, Hispanics along the US-Mexico border. Remarkably, we identified thousands of differentially methylated regions for SZ and BP preferentially located in promoters 3'-UTRs and 5'-UTRs of genes. Distinct patterns of aberrant methylation of promoter sequences were located surrounding transcription start sites. In these instances, aberrant methylation occurred in CpG islands (CGIs) as well as in flanking regions as well as in CGI sparse promoters. Pathway analysis of genes displaying these distinct aberrant promoter methylation patterns showed enhancement of epigenetic changes in numerous genes previously related to psychiatric disorders and neurodevelopment. Integration of gene expression data further suggests that in SZ aberrant promoter methylation is significantly associated with altered gene transcription. In particular, we found significant associations between (1) promoter CGIs hypermethylation with gene repression and (2) CGI 3'-shore hypomethylation with increased gene expression. Finally, we constructed a specific methylation analysis platform that facilitates viewing and comparing aberrant genome methylation in human neuropsychiatric disorders.

  11. Dynamics of oscillatory phenotypes in S. cerevisiae reveal a network of genome-wide transcriptional oscillators

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Shwe L.; Marcus, Ian M.; Klevecz, Robert R.; Li, Caroline M.

    2012-01-01

    Genetic and environmental factors are well-studied influences on phenotype; however, time is a variable that is rarely considered when studying changes in cellular phenotype. Time-resolved microarray data revealed genome-wide transcriptional oscillation in a yeast continuous culture system with ~2 and ~4 h periods. We mapped the global patterns of transcriptional oscillations into a 3D map to represent different cellular phenotypes of redox cycles. This map shows the dynamic nature of gene expression in that transcripts are ordered and coupled to each other through time and concentration space. Although cells differed in oscillation periods, transcripts involved in certain processes were conserved in a deterministic way. When oscillation period lengthened, the peak to trough ratio of transcripts increased and the fraction of cells in the unbudded (G0/G1) phase of the cell division cycle increased. Decreasing the glucose level in the culture media was one way to increase the redox cycle, possibly from changes in metabolic flux. The period may be responding to lower glucose levels by increasing the fraction of cells in G1 and reducing S-phase gating so that cells can spend more time in catabolic processes. Our results support that gene transcripts are coordinated with metabolic functions and the cell division cycle. PMID:22289124

  12. MGAS: a powerful tool for multivariate gene-based genome-wide association analysis.

    PubMed

    Van der Sluis, Sophie; Dolan, Conor V; Li, Jiang; Song, Youqiang; Sham, Pak; Posthuma, Danielle; Li, Miao-Xin

    2015-04-01

    Standard genome-wide association studies, testing the association between one phenotype and a large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), are limited in two ways: (i) traits are often multivariate, and analysis of composite scores entails loss in statistical power and (ii) gene-based analyses may be preferred, e.g. to decrease the multiple testing problem. Here we present a new method, multivariate gene-based association test by extended Simes procedure (MGAS), that allows gene-based testing of multivariate phenotypes in unrelated individuals. Through extensive simulation, we show that under most trait-generating genotype-phenotype models MGAS has superior statistical power to detect associated genes compared with gene-based analyses of univariate phenotypic composite scores (i.e. GATES, multiple regression), and multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA). Re-analysis of metabolic data revealed 32 False Discovery Rate controlled genome-wide significant genes, and 12 regions harboring multiple genes; of these 44 regions, 30 were not reported in the original analysis. MGAS allows researchers to conduct their multivariate gene-based analyses efficiently, and without the loss of power that is often associated with an incorrectly specified genotype-phenotype models. MGAS is freely available in KGG v3.0 (http://statgenpro.psychiatry.hku.hk/limx/kgg/download.php). Access to the metabolic dataset can be requested at dbGaP (https://dbgap.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/). The R-simulation code is available from http://ctglab.nl/people/sophie_van_der_sluis. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  13. Genome-wide functional analysis of human cell-cycle regulators

    PubMed Central

    Mukherji, Mridul; Bell, Russell; Supekova, Lubica; Wang, Yan; Orth, Anthony P.; Batalov, Serge; Miraglia, Loren; Huesken, Dieter; Lange, Joerg; Martin, Christopher; Sahasrabudhe, Sudhir; Reinhardt, Mischa; Natt, Francois; Hall, Jonathan; Mickanin, Craig; Labow, Mark; Chanda, Sumit K.; Cho, Charles Y.; Schultz, Peter G.

    2006-01-01

    Human cells have evolved complex signaling networks to coordinate the cell cycle. A detailed understanding of the global regulation of this fundamental process requires comprehensive identification of the genes and pathways involved in the various stages of cell-cycle progression. To this end, we report a genome-wide analysis of the human cell cycle, cell size, and proliferation by targeting >95% of the protein-coding genes in the human genome using small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Analysis of >2 million images, acquired by quantitative fluorescence microscopy, showed that depletion of 1,152 genes strongly affected cell-cycle progression. These genes clustered into eight distinct phenotypic categories based on phase of arrest, nuclear area, and nuclear morphology. Phase-specific networks were built by interrogating knowledge-based and physical interaction databases with identified genes. Genome-wide analysis of cell-cycle regulators revealed a number of kinase, phosphatase, and proteolytic proteins and also suggests that processes thought to regulate G1-S phase progression like receptor-mediated signaling, nutrient status, and translation also play important roles in the regulation of G2/M phase transition. Moreover, 15 genes that are integral to TNF/NF-κB signaling were found to regulate G2/M, a previously unanticipated role for this pathway. These analyses provide systems-level insight into both known and novel genes as well as pathways that regulate cell-cycle progression, a number of which may provide new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of cancer. PMID:17001007

  14. Genome-wide linkage analysis and association study identifies loci for polydactyly in chickens.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yanfa; Liu, Ranran; Zhao, Guiping; Zheng, Maiqing; Sun, Yan; Yu, Xiaoqiong; Li, Peng; Wen, Jie

    2014-04-21

    Polydactyly occurs in some chicken breeds, but the molecular mechanism remains incompletely understood. Combined genome-wide linkage analysis and association study (GWAS) for chicken polydactyly helps identify loci or candidate genes for the trait and potentially provides further mechanistic understanding of this phenotype in chickens and perhaps other species. The linkage analysis and GWAS for polydactyly was conducted using an F2 population derived from Beijing-You chickens and commercial broilers. The results identified two QTLs through linkage analysis and seven single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) through GWAS, associated with the polydactyly trait. One QTL located at 35 cM on the GGA2 was significant at the 1% genome-wise level and another QTL at the 1% chromosome-wide significance level was detected at 39 cM on GGA19. A total of seven SNPs, four of 5% genome-wide significance (P < 2.98 × 10(-6)) and three of suggestive significance (5.96 × 10(-5)) were identified, including two SNPs (GGaluGA132178 and Gga_rs14135036) in the QTL on GGA2. Of the identified SNPs, the eight nearest genes were sonic hedgehog (SHH), limb region 1 homolog (mouse) (LMBR1), dipeptidyl-peptidase 6, transcript variant 3 (DPP6), thyroid-stimulating hormone, beta (TSHB), sal-like 4 (Drosophila) (SALL4), par-6 partitioning defective 6 homolog beta (Caenorhabditis elegans) (PARD6B), coenzyme Q5 (COQ5), and tyrosine 3-monooxygenase/tryptophan 5-monooxygenase activation protein, etapolypeptide (YWHAH). The GWAS supports earlier reports of the importance of SHH and LMBR1 as regulating genes for polydactyly in chickens and other species, and identified others, most of which have not previously been associated with limb development. The genes and associated SNPs revealed here provide detailed information for further exploring the molecular and developmental mechanisms underlying polydactyly.

  15. Genome-wide association study reveals putative regulators of bioenergy traits in Populus deltoides.

    PubMed

    Fahrenkrog, Annette M; Neves, Leandro G; Resende, Márcio F R; Vazquez, Ana I; de Los Campos, Gustavo; Dervinis, Christopher; Sykes, Robert; Davis, Mark; Davenport, Ruth; Barbazuk, William B; Kirst, Matias

    2017-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been used extensively to dissect the genetic regulation of complex traits in plants. These studies have focused largely on the analysis of common genetic variants despite the abundance of rare polymorphisms in several species, and their potential role in trait variation. Here, we conducted the first GWAS in Populus deltoides, a genetically diverse keystone forest species in North America and an important short rotation woody crop for the bioenergy industry. We searched for associations between eight growth and wood composition traits, and common and low-frequency single-nucleotide polymorphisms detected by targeted resequencing of 18 153 genes in a population of 391 unrelated individuals. To increase power to detect associations with low-frequency variants, multiple-marker association tests were used in combination with single-marker association tests. Significant associations were discovered for all phenotypes and are indicative that low-frequency polymorphisms contribute to phenotypic variance of several bioenergy traits. Our results suggest that both common and low-frequency variants need to be considered for a comprehensive understanding of the genetic regulation of complex traits, particularly in species that carry large numbers of rare polymorphisms. These polymorphisms may be critical for the development of specialized plant feedstocks for bioenergy.

  16. Novel skin phenotypes revealed by a genome-wide mouse reverse genetic screen

    PubMed Central

    Liakath-Ali, Kifayathullah; Vancollie, Valerie E.; Heath, Emma; Smedley, Damian P.; Estabel, Jeanne; Sunter, David; DiTommaso, Tia; White, Jacqueline K.; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Smyth, Ian; Steel, Karen P.; Watt, Fiona M.

    2014-01-01

    Permanent stop-and-shop large-scale mouse mutant resources provide an excellent platform to decipher tissue phenogenomics. Here we analyse skin from 538 knockout mouse mutants generated by the Sanger Institute Mouse Genetics Project. We optimize immunolabelling of tail epidermal wholemounts to allow systematic annotation of hair follicle, sebaceous gland and interfollicular epidermal abnormalities using ontology terms from the Mammalian Phenotype Ontology. Of the 50 mutants with an epidermal phenotype, 9 map to human genetic conditions with skin abnormalities. Some mutant genes are expressed in the skin, whereas others are not, indicating systemic effects. One phenotype is affected by diet and several are incompletely penetrant. In-depth analysis of three mutants, Krt76, Myo5a (a model of human Griscelli syndrome) and Mysm1, provides validation of the screen. Our study is the first large-scale genome-wide tissue phenotype screen from the International Knockout Mouse Consortium and provides an open access resource for the scientific community. PMID:24721909

  17. Genome-wide Association Study of Dermatomyositis Reveals Genetic Overlap with other Autoimmune Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Frederick W.; Cooper, Robert G.; Vencovsky, Jiri; Rider, Lisa G.; Danko, Katalin; Wedderburn, Lucy R.; Lundberg, Ingrid E.; Pachman, Lauren M.; Reed, Ann M.; Ytterberg, Steven R.; Padyukov, Leonid; Selva-O’Callaghan, Albert; Radstake, Timothy; Isenberg, David A.; Chinoy, Hector; Ollier, William E. R.; O’Hanlon, Terrance P.; Peng, Bo; Lee, Annette; Lamb, Janine A.; Chen, Wei; Amos, Christopher I.; Gregersen, Peter K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify new genetic associations with juvenile and adult dermatomyositis (DM). Methods We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of adult and juvenile DM patients of European ancestry (n = 1178) and controls (n = 4724). To assess genetic overlap with other autoimmune disorders, we examined whether 141 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) outside the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) locus, and previously associated with autoimmune diseases, predispose to DM. Results Compared to controls, patients with DM had a strong signal in the MHC region consisting of GWAS-level significance (P < 5x10−8) at 80 genotyped SNPs. An analysis of 141 non-MHC SNPs previously associated with autoimmune diseases showed that three SNPs linked with three genes were associated with DM, with a false discovery rate (FDR) < 0.05. These genes were phospholipase C like 1 (PLCL1, rs6738825, FDR=0.00089), B lymphoid tyrosine kinase (BLK, rs2736340, FDR=0.00031), and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 21 (CCL21, rs951005, FDR=0.0076). None of these genes was previously reported to be associated with DM. Conclusion Our findings confirm the MHC as the major genetic region associated with DM and indicate that DM shares non-MHC genetic features with other autoimmune diseases, suggesting the presence of additional novel risk loci. This first identification of autoimmune disease genetic predispositions shared with DM may lead to enhanced understanding of pathogenesis and novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. PMID:23983088

  18. Genome-wide association study reveals putative regulators of bioenergy traits in Populus deltoides

    DOE PAGES

    Fahrenkrog, Annette M.; Neves, Leandro G.; Resende, Jr., Marcio F. R.; ...

    2016-09-06

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been used extensively to dissect the genetic regulation of complex traits in plants. These studies have focused largely on the analysis of common genetic variants despite the abundance of rare polymorphisms in several species, and their potential role in trait variation. Here, we conducted the first GWAS in Populus deltoides, a genetically diverse keystone forest species in North America and an important short rotation woody crop for the bioenergy industry. We searched for associations between eight growth and wood composition traits, and common and low-frequency single-nucleotide polymorphisms detected by targeted resequencing of 18 153 genesmore » in a population of 391 unrelated individuals. To increase power to detect associations with low-frequency variants, multiple-marker association tests were used in combination with single-marker association tests. Significant associations were discovered for all phenotypes and are indicative that low-frequency polymorphisms contribute to phenotypic variance of several bioenergy traits. Our results suggest that both common and low-frequency variants need to be considered for a comprehensive understanding of the genetic regulation of complex traits, particularly in species that carry large numbers of rare polymorphisms. Lastly, these polymorphisms may be critical for the development of specialized plant feedstocks for bioenergy.« less

  19. Sample size and power analysis for sparse signal recovery in genome-wide association studies

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jichun; Cai, T. Tony; Li, Hongzhe

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have successfully identified hundreds of novel genetic variants associated with many complex human diseases. However, there is a lack of rigorous work on evaluating the statistical power for identifying these variants. In this paper, we consider sparse signal identification in genome-wide association studies and present two analytical frameworks for detailed analysis of the statistical power for detecting and identifying the disease-associated variants. We present an explicit sample size formula for achieving a given false non-discovery rate while controlling the false discovery rate based on an optimal procedure. Sparse genetic variant recovery is also considered and a boundary condition is established in terms of sparsity and signal strength for almost exact recovery of both disease-associated variants and nondisease-associated variants. A data-adaptive procedure is proposed to achieve this bound. The analytical results are illustrated with a genome-wide association study of neuroblastoma. PMID:23049128

  20. Genome-wide efficient mixed-model analysis for association studies.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiang; Stephens, Matthew

    2012-06-17

    Linear mixed models have attracted considerable attention recently as a powerful and effective tool for accounting for population stratification and relatedness in genetic association tests. However, existing methods for exact computation of standard test statistics are computationally impractical for even moderate-sized genome-wide association studies. To address this issue, several approximate methods have been proposed. Here, we present an efficient exact method, which we refer to as genome-wide efficient mixed-model association (GEMMA), that makes approximations unnecessary in many contexts. This method is approximately n times faster than the widely used exact method known as efficient mixed-model association (EMMA), where n is the sample size, making exact genome-wide association analysis computationally practical for large numbers of individuals.

  1. Genome-Wide Analyses Reveal a Role for Peptide Hormones in Planarian Germline Development

    PubMed Central

    Collins, James J.; Hou, Xiaowen; Romanova, Elena V.; Lambrus, Bramwell G.; Miller, Claire M.; Saberi, Amir; Sweedler, Jonathan V.; Newmark, Phillip A.

    2010-01-01

    Bioactive peptides (i.e., neuropeptides or peptide hormones) represent the largest class of cell-cell signaling molecules in metazoans and are potent regulators of neural and physiological function. In vertebrates, peptide hormones play an integral role in endocrine signaling between the brain and the gonads that controls reproductive development, yet few of these molecules have been shown to influence reproductive development in invertebrates. Here, we define a role for peptide hormones in controlling reproductive physiology of the model flatworm, the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea. Based on our observation that defective neuropeptide processing results in defects in reproductive system development, we employed peptidomic and functional genomic approaches to characterize the planarian peptide hormone complement, identifying 51 prohormone genes and validating 142 peptides biochemically. Comprehensive in situ hybridization analyses of prohormone gene expression revealed the unanticipated complexity of the flatworm nervous system and identified a prohormone specifically expressed in the nervous system of sexually reproducing planarians. We show that this member of the neuropeptide Y superfamily is required for the maintenance of mature reproductive organs and differentiated germ cells in the testes. Additionally, comparative analyses of our biochemically validated prohormones with the genomes of the parasitic flatworms Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma japonicum identified new schistosome prohormones and validated half of all predicted peptide-encoding genes in these parasites. These studies describe the peptide hormone complement of a flatworm on a genome-wide scale and reveal a previously uncharacterized role for peptide hormones in flatworm reproduction. Furthermore, they suggest new opportunities for using planarians as free-living models for understanding the reproductive biology of flatworm parasites. PMID:20967238

  2. Genome wide association studies reveal genetic variants in CTNND2 for high myopia in Singapore Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi-Ju; Goh, Liang; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Fan, Qiao; Yu, Miao; Han, Siyu; Sim, Xueling; Ong, Rick Twee-Hee; Wong, Tien-Yin; Vithana, Eranga Nishanthie; Yap, Eric; Nakanishi, Hideo; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Ohno-Matsui, Kyoko; Yoshimura, Nagahisa; Seielstad, Mark; Tai, E-Shyong; Young, Terri L.; Saw, Seang-Mei

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine susceptibility genes for high myopia in Singaporean Chinese. Design A meta-analysis of two genome wide association (GWA) datasets in Chinese and a follow-up replication cohort in Japanese. Participants and Controls Two independent datasets of Singaporean Chinese individuals aged 10–12 years (SCORM -- Singapore Cohort Study of the Risk factors for Myopia: cases=65, controls=238) and aged > 21 years (SP2 -- Singapore Prospective Study Program: cases=222, controls=435) for GWA studies, and a Japanese dataset aged >20 years (cases=959, controls=2128) for replication. Methods Genomic DNA samples from SCORM and SP2 were genotyped using various Illumina Beadarray platforms (> HumanHap 500). Single-locus association tests were conducted for each dataset with meta-analysis using pooled z-scores. The top-ranked genetic markers were examined for replication in Japanese dataset. Fisher’s P was calculated for the combined analysis of all three cohorts. Main outcome measures High myopia, defined by spherical equivalent (SE) ≤ −6.00 diopters (D); controls defined by SE between −0.50D and +1.00D. Results Two SNPs (rs12716080 and rs6885224) in the gene CTNND2 on chromosome 5p15 ranked top in the meta-analysis of our Chinese datasets (meta- P = 1.14×10−5 and meta- P = 1.51×10−5, respectively) with strong supporting evidence in each individual dataset analysis (Max P = 1.85.x10−4 in SCORM: Max P = 8.8×10−3 in SP2). Evidence of replication was observed in Japanese dataset for rs6885224 (P = 0.035, meta-P of three datasets: 7.84×10−6). Conclusion This study identified strong association of CTNND2 for high myopia in Asian datasets. The CTNND2 gene maps to a known high myopia linkage region on chromosome 5p15. PMID:21095009

  3. Genome-wide Identification and Structural, Functional and Evolutionary Analysis of WRKY Components of Mulberry

    PubMed Central

    Baranwal, Vinay Kumar; Negi, Nisha; Khurana, Paramjit

    2016-01-01

    Mulberry is known to be sensitive to several biotic and abiotic stresses, which in turn have a direct impact on the yield of silk, because it is the sole food source for the silk worm. WRKYs are a family of transcription factors, which play an important role in combating various biotic and abiotic stresses. In this study, we identified 54 genes with conserved WRKY motifs in the Morus notabilis genome. Motif searches coupled with a phylogenetic analysis revealed seven sub-groups as well as the absence of members of Group Ib in mulberry. Analyses of the 2K upstream region in addition to a gene ontology terms enrichment analysis revealed putative functions of mulberry WRKYs under biotic and abiotic stresses. An RNA-seq-based analysis showed that several of the identified WRKYs have shown preferential expression in the leaf, bark, root, male flower, and winter bud of M. notabilis. Finally, expression analysis by qPCR under different stress and hormone treatments revealed genotype-specific responses. Taken together, our results briefs about the genome-wide identification of WRKYs as well as their differential response to stresses and hormones. Importantly, these data can also be utilized to identify potential molecular targets for conferring tolerance to various stresses in mulberry. PMID:27477686

  4. Genome-wide Identification and Structural, Functional and Evolutionary Analysis of WRKY Components of Mulberry.

    PubMed

    Baranwal, Vinay Kumar; Negi, Nisha; Khurana, Paramjit

    2016-08-01

    Mulberry is known to be sensitive to several biotic and abiotic stresses, which in turn have a direct impact on the yield of silk, because it is the sole food source for the silk worm. WRKYs are a family of transcription factors, which play an important role in combating various biotic and abiotic stresses. In this study, we identified 54 genes with conserved WRKY motifs in the Morus notabilis genome. Motif searches coupled with a phylogenetic analysis revealed seven sub-groups as well as the absence of members of Group Ib in mulberry. Analyses of the 2K upstream region in addition to a gene ontology terms enrichment analysis revealed putative functions of mulberry WRKYs under biotic and abiotic stresses. An RNA-seq-based analysis showed that several of the identified WRKYs have shown preferential expression in the leaf, bark, root, male flower, and winter bud of M. notabilis. Finally, expression analysis by qPCR under different stress and hormone treatments revealed genotype-specific responses. Taken together, our results briefs about the genome-wide identification of WRKYs as well as their differential response to stresses and hormones. Importantly, these data can also be utilized to identify potential molecular targets for conferring tolerance to various stresses in mulberry.

  5. Sympatric speciation revealed by genome-wide divergence in the blind mole rat Spalax

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kexin; Hong, Wei; Jiao, Hengwu; Wang, Guo-Dong; Rodriguez, Karl A.; Buffenstein, Rochelle; Zhao, Yang; Nevo, Eviatar; Zhao, Huabin

    2015-01-01

    Sympatric speciation (SS), i.e., speciation within a freely breeding population or in contiguous populations, was first proposed by Darwin [Darwin C (1859) On the Origins of Species by Means of Natural Selection] and is still controversial despite theoretical support [Gavrilets S (2004) Fitness Landscapes and the Origin of Species (MPB-41)] and mounting empirical evidence. Speciation of subterranean mammals generally, including the genus Spalax, was considered hitherto allopatric, whereby new species arise primarily through geographic isolation. Here we show in Spalax a case of genome-wide divergence analysis in mammals, demonstrating that SS in continuous populations, with gene flow, encompasses multiple widespread genomic adaptive complexes, associated with the sharply divergent ecologies. The two abutting soil populations of S. galili in northern Israel habituate the ancestral Senonian chalk population and abutting derivative Plio-Pleistocene basalt population. Population divergence originated ∼0.2–0.4 Mya based on both nuclear and mitochondrial genome analyses. Population structure analysis displayed two distinctly divergent clusters of chalk and basalt populations. Natural selection has acted on 300+ genes across the genome, diverging Spalax chalk and basalt soil populations. Gene ontology enrichment analysis highlights strong but differential soil population adaptive complexes: in basalt, sensory perception, musculature, metabolism, and energetics, and in chalk, nutrition and neurogenetics are outstanding. Population differentiation of chemoreceptor genes suggests intersoil population's mate and habitat choice substantiating SS. Importantly, distinctions in protein degradation may also contribute to SS. Natural selection and natural genetic engineering [Shapiro JA (2011) Evolution: A View From the 21st Century] overrule gene flow, evolving divergent ecological adaptive complexes. Sharp ecological divergences abound in nature; therefore, SS appears to be

  6. Sympatric speciation revealed by genome-wide divergence in the blind mole rat Spalax.

    PubMed

    Li, Kexin; Hong, Wei; Jiao, Hengwu; Wang, Guo-Dong; Rodriguez, Karl A; Buffenstein, Rochelle; Zhao, Yang; Nevo, Eviatar; Zhao, Huabin

    2015-09-22

    Sympatric speciation (SS), i.e., speciation within a freely breeding population or in contiguous populations, was first proposed by Darwin [Darwin C (1859) On the Origins of Species by Means of Natural Selection] and is still controversial despite theoretical support [Gavrilets S (2004) Fitness Landscapes and the Origin of Species (MPB-41)] and mounting empirical evidence. Speciation of subterranean mammals generally, including the genus Spalax, was considered hitherto allopatric, whereby new species arise primarily through geographic isolation. Here we show in Spalax a case of genome-wide divergence analysis in mammals, demonstrating that SS in continuous populations, with gene flow, encompasses multiple widespread genomic adaptive complexes, associated with the sharply divergent ecologies. The two abutting soil populations of S. galili in northern Israel habituate the ancestral Senonian chalk population and abutting derivative Plio-Pleistocene basalt population. Population divergence originated ∼0.2-0.4 Mya based on both nuclear and mitochondrial genome analyses. Population structure analysis displayed two distinctly divergent clusters of chalk and basalt populations. Natural selection has acted on 300+ genes across the genome, diverging Spalax chalk and basalt soil populations. Gene ontology enrichment analysis highlights strong but differential soil population adaptive complexes: in basalt, sensory perception, musculature, metabolism, and energetics, and in chalk, nutrition and neurogenetics are outstanding. Population differentiation of chemoreceptor genes suggests intersoil population's mate and habitat choice substantiating SS. Importantly, distinctions in protein degradation may also contribute to SS. Natural selection and natural genetic engineering [Shapiro JA (2011) Evolution: A View From the 21st Century] overrule gene flow, evolving divergent ecological adaptive complexes. Sharp ecological divergences abound in nature; therefore, SS appears to be an

  7. Genome-wide gene expression profiling reveals unsuspected molecular alterations in pemphigus foliaceus

    PubMed Central

    Malheiros, Danielle; Panepucci, Rodrigo A; Roselino, Ana M; Araújo, Amélia G; Zago, Marco A; Petzl-Erler, Maria Luiza

    2014-01-01

    Pemphigus foliaceus (PF) is a complex autoimmune disease characterized by bullous skin lesions and the presence of antibodies against desmoglein 1. In this study we sought to contribute to a better understanding of the molecular processes in endemic PF, as the identification of factors that participate in the pathogenesis is a prerequisite for understanding its biological basis and may lead to novel therapeutic interventions. CD4+ T lymphocytes are central to the development of the disease. Therefore, we compared genome-wide gene expression profiles of peripheral CD4+ T cells of various PF patient subgroups with each other and with that of healthy individuals. The patient sample was subdivided into three groups: untreated patients with the generalized form of the disease, patients submitted to immunosuppressive treatment, and patients with the localized form of the disease. Comparisons between different subgroups resulted in 135, 54 and 64 genes differentially expressed. These genes are mainly related to lymphocyte adhesion and migration, apoptosis, cellular proliferation, cytotoxicity and antigen presentation. Several of these genes were differentially expressed when comparing lesional and uninvolved skin from the same patient. The chromosomal regions 19q13 and 12p13 concentrate differentially expressed genes and are candidate regions for PF susceptibility genes and disease markers. Our results reveal genes involved in disease severity, potential therapeutic targets and previously unsuspected processes involved in the pathogenesis. Besides, this study adds original information that will contribute to the understanding of PF's pathogenesis and of the still poorly defined in vivo functions of most of these genes. PMID:24813052

  8. Integrated analysis of copy number variation and genome-wide expression profiling in colorectal cancer tissues.

    PubMed

    Ali Hassan, Nur Zarina; Mokhtar, Norfilza Mohd; Kok Sin, Teow; Mohamed Rose, Isa; Sagap, Ismail; Harun, Roslan; Jamal, Rahman

    2014-01-01

    Integrative analyses of multiple genomic datasets for selected samples can provide better insight into the overall data and can enhance our knowledge of cancer. The objective of this study was to elucidate the association between copy number variation (CNV) and gene expression in colorectal cancer (CRC) samples and their corresponding non-cancerous tissues. Sixty-four paired CRC samples from the same patients were subjected to CNV profiling using the Illumina HumanOmni1-Quad assay, and validation was performed using multiplex ligation probe amplification method. Genome-wide expression profiling was performed on 15 paired samples from the same group of patients using the Affymetrix Human Gene 1.0 ST array. Significant genes obtained from both array results were then overlapped. To identify molecular pathways, the data were mapped to the KEGG database. Whole genome CNV analysis that compared primary tumor and non-cancerous epithelium revealed gains in 1638 genes and losses in 36 genes. Significant gains were mostly found in chromosome 20 at position 20q12 with a frequency of 45.31% in tumor samples. Examples of genes that were associated at this cytoband were PTPRT, EMILIN3 and CHD6. The highest number of losses was detected at chromosome 8, position 8p23.2 with 17.19% occurrence in all tumor samples. Among the genes found at this cytoband were CSMD1 and DLC1. Genome-wide expression profiling showed 709 genes to be up-regulated and 699 genes to be down-regulated in CRC compared to non-cancerous samples. Integration of these two datasets identified 56 overlapping genes, which were located in chromosomes 8, 20 and 22. MLPA confirmed that the CRC samples had the highest gains in chromosome 20 compared to the reference samples. Interpretation of the CNV data in the context of the transcriptome via integrative analyses may provide more in-depth knowledge of the genomic landscape of CRC.

  9. Quantitative genome-wide methylation analysis of high-grade non-muscle invasive bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kitchen, Mark O.; Bryan, Richard T.; Emes, Richard D.; Glossop, John R.; Luscombe, Christopher; Cheng, K. K.; Zeegers, Maurice P.; James, Nicholas D.; Devall, Adam J.; Mein, Charles A.; Gommersall, Lyndon; Fryer, Anthony A.; Farrell, William E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT High-grade non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (HG-NMIBC) is a clinically unpredictable disease with greater risks of recurrence and progression relative to their low-intermediate-grade counterparts. The molecular events, including those affecting the epigenome, that characterize this disease entity in the context of tumor development, recurrence, and progression, are incompletely understood. We therefore interrogated genome-wide DNA methylation using HumanMethylation450 BeadChip arrays in 21 primary HG-NMIBC tumors relative to normal bladder controls. Using strict inclusion-exclusion criteria we identified 1,057 hypermethylated CpGs within gene promoter-associated CpG islands, representing 256 genes. We validated the array data by bisulphite pyrosequencing and examined 25 array-identified candidate genes in an independent cohort of 30 HG-NMIBC and 18 low-intermediate-grade NMIBC. These analyses revealed significantly higher methylation frequencies in high-grade tumors relative to low-intermediate-grade tumors for the ATP5G2, IRX1 and VAX2 genes (P<0.05), and similarly significant increases in mean levels of methylation in high-grade tumors for the ATP5G2, VAX2, INSRR, PRDM14, VSX1, TFAP2b, PRRX1, and HIST1H4F genes (P<0.05). Although inappropriate promoter methylation was not invariantly associated with reduced transcript expression, a significant association was apparent for the ARHGEF4, PON3, STAT5a, and VAX2 gene transcripts (P<0.05). Herein, we present the first genome-wide DNA methylation analysis in a unique HG-NMIBC cohort, showing extensive and discrete methylation changes relative to normal bladder and low-intermediate-grade tumors. The genes we identified hold significant potential as targets for novel therapeutic intervention either alone, or in combination, with more conventional therapeutic options in the treatment of this clinically unpredictable disease. PMID:26929985

  10. Genome-wide analysis of influenza viral RNA and nucleoprotein association.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nara; Le Sage, Valerie; Nanni, Adalena V; Snyder, Dan J; Cooper, Vaughn S; Lakdawala, Seema S

    2017-09-06

    Influenza A virus (IAV) genomes are composed of eight single-stranded RNA segments that are coated by viral nucleoprotein (NP) molecules. Classically, the interaction between NP and viral RNA (vRNA) is depicted as a uniform pattern of 'beads on a string'. Using high-throughput sequencing of RNA isolated by crosslinking immunoprecipitation (HITS-CLIP), we identified the vRNA binding profiles of NP for two H1N1 IAV strains in virions. Contrary to the prevailing model for vRNA packaging, NP does not bind vRNA uniformly in the A/WSN/1933 and A/California/07/2009 strains, but instead each vRNA segment exhibits a unique binding profile, containing sites that are enriched or poor in NP association. Intriguingly, both H1N1 strains have similar yet distinct NP binding profiles despite extensive sequence conservation. Peaks identified by HITS-CLIP were verified as true NP binding sites based on insensitivity to DNA antisense oligonucleotide-mediated RNase H digestion. Moreover, nucleotide content analysis of NP peaks revealed that these sites are relatively G-rich and U-poor compared to the genome-wide nucleotide content, indicating an as-yet unidentified sequence bias for NP association in vivo. Taken together, our genome-wide study of NP-vRNA interaction has implications for the understanding of influenza vRNA architecture and genome packaging. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. A genome-wide analysis of the expansin genes in Malus × Domestica.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shizhong; Xu, Ruirui; Gao, Zheng; Chen, Changtian; Jiang, Zesheng; Shu, Huairui

    2014-04-01

    Expansins were first identified as cell wall-loosening proteins; they are involved in regulating cell expansion, fruits softening and many other physiological processes. However, our knowledge about the expansin family members and their evolutionary relationships in fruit trees, such as apple, is limited. In this study, we identified 41 members of the expansin gene family in the genome of apple (Malus × Domestica L. Borkh). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that expansin genes in apple could be divided into four subfamilies according to their gene structures and protein motifs. By phylogenetic analysis of the expansins in five plants (Arabidopsis, rice, poplar, grape and apple), the expansins were divided into 17 subgroups. Our gene duplication analysis revealed that whole-genome and chromosomal-segment duplications contributed to the expansion of Mdexpansins. The microarray and expressed sequence tag (EST) data showed that 34 Mdexpansin genes could be divided into five groups by the EST analysis; they may also play different roles during fruit development. An expression model for MdEXPA16 and MdEXPA20 showed their potential role in developing fruit. Overall, our study provides useful data and novel insights into the functions and regulatory mechanisms of the expansin genes in apple, as well as their evolution and divergence. As the first step towards genome-wide analysis of the expansin genes in apple, our results have established a solid foundation for future studies on the function of the expansin genes in fruit development.

  12. Methods for meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A limitation of many genome-wide association studies (GWA) in animal breeding is that there are many loci with small effect sizes; thus, larger sample sizes (N) are required to guarantee suitable power of detection. For increasing N, results from different GWA can be combined in a meta-analysis (MA-...

  13. Meta-analysis of genome wide association studies for pork quality traits

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Given the importance of pork quality in the meat processing industry, genome-wide association studies were performed for eight meat quality traits and also, a meta-analysis (MA) of GWA was implemented combining independent results from pig populations. Data from three pig datasets (USMARC, Commercia...

  14. Genome-wide Association Analysis of Kernel Weight in Hard Winter Wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wheat kernel weight is an important and heritable component of wheat grain yield and a key predictor of flour extraction. Genome-wide association analysis was conducted to identify genomic regions associated with kernel weight and kernel weight environmental response in 8 trials of 299 hard winter ...

  15. Combining Image Analysis, Genome Wide Association Studies and Different Field Trials to Reveal Stable Genetic Regions Related to Panicle Architecture and the Number of Spikelets per Panicle in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Rebolledo, Maria C.; Peña, Alexandra L.; Duitama, Jorge; Cruz, Daniel F.; Dingkuhn, Michael; Grenier, Cecile; Tohme, Joe

    2016-01-01

    Number of spikelets per panicle (NSP) is a key trait to increase yield potential in rice (O. sativa). The architecture of the rice inflorescence which is mainly determined by the length and number of primary (PBL and PBN) and secondary (SBL and SBN) branches can influence NSP. Although several genes controlling panicle architecture and NSP in rice have been identified, there is little evidence of (i) the genetic control of panicle architecture and NSP in different environments and (ii) the presence of stable genetic associations with panicle architecture across environments. This study combines image phenotyping of 225 accessions belonging to a genetic diversity array of indica rice grown under irrigated field condition in two different environments and Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS) based on the genotyping of the diversity panel, providing 83,374 SNPs. Accessions sown under direct seeding in one environement had reduced Panicle Length (PL), NSP, PBN, PBL, SBN, and SBL compared to those established under transplanting in the second environment. Across environments, NSP was significantly and positively correlated with PBN, SBN and PBL. However, the length of branches (PBL and SBL) was not significantly correlated with variables related to number of branches (PBN and SBN), suggesting independent genetic control. Twenty- three GWAS sites were detected with P ≤ 1.0E-04 and 27 GWAS sites with p ≤ 5.9E−04. We found 17 GWAS sites related to NSP, 10 for PBN and 11 for SBN, 7 for PBL and 11 for SBL. This study revealed new regions related to NSP, but only three associations were related to both branching number (PBN and SBN) and NSP. Two GWAS sites associated with SBL and SBN were stable across contrasting environments and were not related to genes previously reported. The new regions reported in this study can help improving NSP in rice for both direct seeded and transplanted conditions. The integrated approach of high-throughput phenotyping, multi

  16. Combining Image Analysis, Genome Wide Association Studies and Different Field Trials to Reveal Stable Genetic Regions Related to Panicle Architecture and the Number of Spikelets per Panicle in Rice.

    PubMed

    Rebolledo, Maria C; Peña, Alexandra L; Duitama, Jorge; Cruz, Daniel F; Dingkuhn, Michael; Grenier, Cecile; Tohme, Joe

    2016-01-01

    Number of spikelets per panicle (NSP) is a key trait to increase yield potential in rice (O. sativa). The architecture of the rice inflorescence which is mainly determined by the length and number of primary (PBL and PBN) and secondary (SBL and SBN) branches can influence NSP. Although several genes controlling panicle architecture and NSP in rice have been identified, there is little evidence of (i) the genetic control of panicle architecture and NSP in different environments and (ii) the presence of stable genetic associations with panicle architecture across environments. This study combines image phenotyping of 225 accessions belonging to a genetic diversity array of indica rice grown under irrigated field condition in two different environments and Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS) based on the genotyping of the diversity panel, providing 83,374 SNPs. Accessions sown under direct seeding in one environement had reduced Panicle Length (PL), NSP, PBN, PBL, SBN, and SBL compared to those established under transplanting in the second environment. Across environments, NSP was significantly and positively correlated with PBN, SBN and PBL. However, the length of branches (PBL and SBL) was not significantly correlated with variables related to number of branches (PBN and SBN), suggesting independent genetic control. Twenty- three GWAS sites were detected with P ≤ 1.0E-04 and 27 GWAS sites with p ≤ 5.9E-04. We found 17 GWAS sites related to NSP, 10 for PBN and 11 for SBN, 7 for PBL and 11 for SBL. This study revealed new regions related to NSP, but only three associations were related to both branching number (PBN and SBN) and NSP. Two GWAS sites associated with SBL and SBN were stable across contrasting environments and were not related to genes previously reported. The new regions reported in this study can help improving NSP in rice for both direct seeded and transplanted conditions. The integrated approach of high-throughput phenotyping, multi

  17. CNV-based genome wide association study reveals additional variants contributing to meat quality in swine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pork quality is important both to the meat processing industry and consumers’ purchasing attitudes. Copy number variation (CNV) is a burgeoning kind of variant that may influence meat quality. Herein, a genome-wide association study (GWAS) was performed between CNVs and meat quality traits in swine....

  18. On the analysis of a repeated measure design in genome-wide association analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young; Park, Suyeon; Moon, Sanghoon; Lee, Juyoung; Elston, Robert C; Lee, Woojoo; Won, Sungho

    2014-11-28

    Longitudinal data enables detecting the effect of aging/time, and as a repeated measures design is statistically more efficient compared to cross-sectional data if the correlations between repeated measurements are not large. In particular, when genotyping cost is more expensive than phenotyping cost, the collection of longitudinal data can be an efficient strategy for genetic association analysis. However, in spite of these advantages, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) with longitudinal data have rarely been analyzed taking this into account. In this report, we calculate the required sample size to achieve 80% power at the genome-wide significance level for both longitudinal and cross-sectional data, and compare their statistical efficiency. Furthermore, we analyzed the GWAS of eight phenotypes with three observations on each individual in the Korean Association Resource (KARE). A linear mixed model allowing for the correlations between observations for each individual was applied to analyze the longitudinal data, and linear regression was used to analyze the first observation on each individual as cross-sectional data. We found 12 novel genome-wide significant disease susceptibility loci that were then confirmed in the Health Examination cohort, as well as some significant interactions between age/sex and SNPs.

  19. Genome-Wide Analysis of the Aquaporin Gene Family in Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.).

    PubMed

    Deokar, Amit A; Tar'an, Bunyamin

    2016-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are essential membrane proteins that play critical role in the transport of water and many other solutes across cell membranes. In this study, a comprehensive genome-wide analysis identified 40 AQP genes in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.). A complete overview of the chickpea AQP (CaAQP) gene family is presented, including their chromosomal locations, gene structure, phylogeny, gene duplication, conserved functional motifs, gene expression, and conserved promoter motifs. To understand AQP's evolution, a comparative analysis of chickpea AQPs with AQP orthologs from soybean, Medicago, common bean, and Arabidopsis was performed. The chickpea AQP genes were found on all of the chickpea chromosomes, except chromosome 7, with a maximum of six genes on chromosome 6, and a minimum of one gene on chromosome 5. Gene duplication analysis indicated that the expansion of chickpea AQP gene family might have been due to segmental and tandem duplications. CaAQPs were grouped into four subfamilies including 15 NOD26-like intrinsic proteins (NIPs), 13 tonoplast intrinsic proteins (TIPs), eight plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs), and four small basic intrinsic proteins (SIPs) based on sequence similarities and phylogenetic position. Gene structure analysis revealed a highly conserved exon-intron pattern within CaAQP subfamilies supporting the CaAQP family classification. Functional prediction based on conserved Ar/R selectivity filters, Froger's residues, and specificity-determining positions suggested wide differences in substrate specificity among the subfamilies of CaAQPs. Expression analysis of the AQP genes indicated that some of the genes are tissue-specific, whereas few other AQP genes showed differential expression in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Promoter profiling of CaAQP genes for conserved cis-acting regulatory elements revealed enrichment of cis-elements involved in circadian control, light response, defense and stress responsiveness

  20. Genome-Wide Analysis of the Aquaporin Gene Family in Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Deokar, Amit A.; Tar'an, Bunyamin

    2016-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are essential membrane proteins that play critical role in the transport of water and many other solutes across cell membranes. In this study, a comprehensive genome-wide analysis identified 40 AQP genes in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.). A complete overview of the chickpea AQP (CaAQP) gene family is presented, including their chromosomal locations, gene structure, phylogeny, gene duplication, conserved functional motifs, gene expression, and conserved promoter motifs. To understand AQP's evolution, a comparative analysis of chickpea AQPs with AQP orthologs from soybean, Medicago, common bean, and Arabidopsis was performed. The chickpea AQP genes were found on all of the chickpea chromosomes, except chromosome 7, with a maximum of six genes on chromosome 6, and a minimum of one gene on chromosome 5. Gene duplication analysis indicated that the expansion of chickpea AQP gene family might have been due to segmental and tandem duplications. CaAQPs were grouped into four subfamilies including 15 NOD26-like intrinsic proteins (NIPs), 13 tonoplast intrinsic proteins (TIPs), eight plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs), and four small basic intrinsic proteins (SIPs) based on sequence similarities and phylogenetic position. Gene structure analysis revealed a highly conserved exon-intron pattern within CaAQP subfamilies supporting the CaAQP family classification. Functional prediction based on conserved Ar/R selectivity filters, Froger's residues, and specificity-determining positions suggested wide differences in substrate specificity among the subfamilies of CaAQPs. Expression analysis of the AQP genes indicated that some of the genes are tissue-specific, whereas few other AQP genes showed differential expression in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Promoter profiling of CaAQP genes for conserved cis-acting regulatory elements revealed enrichment of cis-elements involved in circadian control, light response, defense and stress responsiveness

  1. Genome-wide identification and phylogenetic analysis of the ERF gene family in cucumbers

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Lifang; Liu, Shiqiang

    2011-01-01

    Members of the ERF transcription-factor family participate in a number of biological processes, viz., responses to hormones, adaptation to biotic and abiotic stress, metabolism regulation, beneficial symbiotic interactions, cell differentiation and developmental processes. So far, no tissue-expression profile of any cucumber ERF protein has been reported in detail. Recent completion of the cucumber full-genome sequence has come to facilitate, not only genome-wide analysis of ERF family members in cucumbers themselves, but also a comparative analysis with those in Arabidopsis and rice. In this study, 103 hypothetical ERF family genes in the cucumber genome were identified, phylogenetic analysis indicating their classification into 10 groups, designated I to X. Motif analysis further indicated that most of the conserved motifs outside the AP2/ERF domain, are selectively distributed among the specific clades in the phylogenetic tree. From chromosomal localization and genome distribution analysis, it appears that tandem-duplication may have contributed to CsERF gene expansion. Intron/exon structure analysis indicated that a few CsERFs still conserved the former intron-position patterns existent in the common ancestor of monocots and eudicots. Expression analysis revealed the widespread distribution of the cucumber ERF gene family within plant tissues, thereby implying the probability of their performing various roles therein. Furthermore, members of some groups presented mutually similar expression patterns that might be related to their phylogenetic groups. PMID:22215967

  2. Genome-Wide Binding of Posterior HOXA/D Transcription Factors Reveals Subgrouping and Association with CTCF

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Stefan; Janetzki, Catrin; González Navarrete, Irene; Mundlos, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Homeotic genes code for key transcription factors (HOX-TFs) that pattern the animal body plan. During embryonic development, Hox genes are expressed in overlapping patterns and function in a partially redundant manner. In vitro biochemical screens probing the HOX-TF sequence specificity revealed largely overlapping sequence preferences, indicating that co-factors might modulate the biological function of HOX-TFs. However, due to their overlapping expression pattern, high protein homology, and insufficiently specific antibodies, little is known about their genome-wide binding preferences. In order to overcome this problem, we virally expressed tagged versions of limb-expressed posterior HOX genes (HOXA9-13, and HOXD9-13) in primary chicken mesenchymal limb progenitor cells (micromass). We determined the effect of each HOX-TF on cellular differentiation (chondrogenesis) and gene expression and found that groups of HOX-TFs induce distinct regulatory programs. We used ChIP-seq to determine their individual genome-wide binding profiles and identified between 12,721 and 28,572 binding sites for each of the nine HOX-TFs. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of binding profiles revealed that the HOX-TFs are clustered in two subgroups (Group 1: HOXA/D9, HOXA/D10, HOXD12, and HOXA13 and Group 2: HOXA/D11 and HOXD13), which are characterized by differences in their sequence specificity and by the presence of cofactor motifs. Specifically, we identified CTCF binding sites in Group 1, indicating that this subgroup of HOX-proteins cooperates with CTCF. We confirmed this interaction by an independent biological assay (Proximity Ligation Assay) and demonstrated that CTCF is a novel HOX cofactor that specifically associates with Group 1 HOX-TFs, pointing towards a possible interplay between HOX-TFs and chromatin architecture. PMID:28103242

  3. Genome-wide association study of dermatomyositis reveals genetic overlap with other autoimmune disorders.

    PubMed

    Miller, Frederick W; Cooper, Robert G; Vencovský, Jiří; Rider, Lisa G; Danko, Katalin; Wedderburn, Lucy R; Lundberg, Ingrid E; Pachman, Lauren M; Reed, Ann M; Ytterberg, Steven R; Padyukov, Leonid; Selva-O'Callaghan, Albert; Radstake, Timothy R D J; Isenberg, David A; Chinoy, Hector; Ollier, William E R; O'Hanlon, Terrance P; Peng, Bo; Lee, Annette; Lamb, Janine A; Chen, Wei; Amos, Christopher I; Gregersen, Peter K

    2013-12-01

    To identify new genetic associations with juvenile and adult dermatomyositis (DM). We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of adult and juvenile DM patients of European ancestry (n = 1,178) and controls (n = 4,724). To assess genetic overlap with other autoimmune disorders, we examined whether 141 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) outside the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) locus, and previously associated with autoimmune diseases, predispose to DM. Compared to controls, patients with DM had a strong signal in the MHC region consisting of GWAS-level significance (P < 5 × 10(-8)) at 80 genotyped SNPs. An analysis of 141 non-MHC SNPs previously associated with autoimmune diseases showed that 3 SNPs linked with 3 genes were associated with DM, with a false discovery rate (FDR) of <0.05. These genes were phospholipase C-like 1 (PLCL1; rs6738825, FDR = 0.00089), B lymphoid tyrosine kinase (BLK; rs2736340, FDR = 0.0031), and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 21 (CCL21; rs951005, FDR = 0.0076). None of these genes was previously reported to be associated with DM. Our findings confirm the MHC as the major genetic region associated with DM and indicate that DM shares non-MHC genetic features with other autoimmune diseases, suggesting the presence of additional novel risk loci. This first identification of autoimmune disease genetic predispositions shared with DM may lead to enhanced understanding of pathogenesis and novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  4. Meta-analysis Reveals Genome-Wide Significance at 15q13 for Nonsyndromic Clefting of Both the Lip and the Palate, and Functional Analyses Implicate GREM1 As a Plausible Causative Gene.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Kerstin U; Ahmed, Syeda Tasnim; Böhmer, Anne C; Sangani, Nasim Bahram; Varghese, Sheryil; Klamt, Johanna; Schuenke, Hannah; Gültepe, Pinar; Hofmann, Andrea; Rubini, Michele; Aldhorae, Khalid Ahmed; Steegers-Theunissen, Regine P; Rojas-Martinez, Augusto; Reiter, Rudolf; Borck, Guntram; Knapp, Michael; Nakatomi, Mitsushiro; Graf, Daniel; Mangold, Elisabeth; Peters, Heiko

    2016-03-01

    Nonsyndromic orofacial clefts are common birth defects with multifactorial etiology. The most common type is cleft lip, which occurs with or without cleft palate (nsCLP and nsCLO, respectively). Although genetic components play an important role in nsCLP, the genetic factors that predispose to palate involvement are largely unknown. In this study, we carried out a meta-analysis on genetic and clinical data from three large cohorts and identified strong association between a region on chromosome 15q13 and nsCLP (P = 8.13 × 10(-14) for rs1258763; relative risk (RR): 1.46, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.32-1.61)) but not nsCLO (P = 0.27; RR: 1.09 (0.94-1.27)). The 5 kb region of strongest association maps downstream of Gremlin-1 (GREM1), which encodes a secreted antagonist of the BMP4 pathway. We show during mouse embryogenesis, Grem1 is expressed in the developing lip and soft palate but not in the hard palate. This is consistent with genotype-phenotype correlations between rs1258763 and a specific nsCLP subphenotype, since a more than two-fold increase in risk was observed in patients displaying clefts of both the lip and soft palate but who had an intact hard palate (RR: 3.76, CI: 1.47-9.61, Pdiff<0.05). While we did not find lip or palate defects in Grem1-deficient mice, wild type embryonic palatal shelves developed divergent shapes when cultured in the presence of ectopic Grem1 protein (P = 0.0014). The present study identified a non-coding region at 15q13 as the second, genome-wide significant locus specific for nsCLP, after 13q31. Moreover, our data suggest that the closely located GREM1 gene contributes to a rare clinical nsCLP entity. This entity specifically involves abnormalities of the lip and soft palate, which develop at different time-points and in separate anatomical regions.

  5. Meta-analysis Reveals Genome-Wide Significance at 15q13 for Nonsyndromic Clefting of Both the Lip and the Palate, and Functional Analyses Implicate GREM1 As a Plausible Causative Gene

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Kerstin U.; Ahmed, Syeda Tasnim; Böhmer, Anne C.; Sangani, Nasim Bahram; Varghese, Sheryil; Klamt, Johanna; Schuenke, Hannah; Gültepe, Pinar; Hofmann, Andrea; Rubini, Michele; Aldhorae, Khalid Ahmed; Steegers-Theunissen, Regine P.; Rojas-Martinez, Augusto; Reiter, Rudolf; Borck, Guntram; Knapp, Michael; Nakatomi, Mitsushiro; Graf, Daniel; Mangold, Elisabeth; Peters, Heiko

    2016-01-01

    Nonsyndromic orofacial clefts are common birth defects with multifactorial etiology. The most common type is cleft lip, which occurs with or without cleft palate (nsCLP and nsCLO, respectively). Although genetic components play an important role in nsCLP, the genetic factors that predispose to palate involvement are largely unknown. In this study, we carried out a meta-analysis on genetic and clinical data from three large cohorts and identified strong association between a region on chromosome 15q13 and nsCLP (P = 8.13×10−14 for rs1258763; relative risk (RR): 1.46, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.32–1.61)) but not nsCLO (P = 0.27; RR: 1.09 (0.94–1.27)). The 5 kb region of strongest association maps downstream of Gremlin-1 (GREM1), which encodes a secreted antagonist of the BMP4 pathway. We show during mouse embryogenesis, Grem1 is expressed in the developing lip and soft palate but not in the hard palate. This is consistent with genotype-phenotype correlations between rs1258763 and a specific nsCLP subphenotype, since a more than two-fold increase in risk was observed in patients displaying clefts of both the lip and soft palate but who had an intact hard palate (RR: 3.76, CI: 1.47–9.61, Pdiff<0.05). While we did not find lip or palate defects in Grem1-deficient mice, wild type embryonic palatal shelves developed divergent shapes when cultured in the presence of ectopic Grem1 protein (P = 0.0014). The present study identified a non-coding region at 15q13 as the second, genome-wide significant locus specific for nsCLP, after 13q31. Moreover, our data suggest that the closely located GREM1 gene contributes to a rare clinical nsCLP entity. This entity specifically involves abnormalities of the lip and soft palate, which develop at different time-points and in separate anatomical regions. PMID:26968009

  6. Genome-wide meta-analysis of cerebral white matter hyperintensities in patients with stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cathy R.; Adib-Samii, Poneh; Devan, William J.; Parsons, Owen E.; Lanfranconi, Silvia; Gregory, Sarah; Cloonan, Lisa; Falcone, Guido J.; Radmanesh, Farid; Fitzpatrick, Kaitlin; Kanakis, Allison; Barrick, Thomas R.; Moynihan, Barry; Lewis, Cathryn M.; Boncoraglio, Giorgio B.; Lemmens, Robin; Thijs, Vincent; Sudlow, Cathie; Wardlaw, Joanna; Rothwell, Peter M.; Meschia, James F.; Worrall, Bradford B.; Levi, Christopher; Bevan, Steve; Furie, Karen L.; Dichgans, Martin; Rosand, Jonathan; Markus, Hugh S.; Rost, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Objective: For 3,670 stroke patients from the United Kingdom, United States, Australia, Belgium, and Italy, we performed a genome-wide meta-analysis of white matter hyperintensity volumes (WMHV) on data imputed to the 1000 Genomes reference dataset to provide insights into disease mechanisms. Methods: We first sought to identify genetic associations with white matter hyperintensities in a stroke population, and then examined whether genetic loci previously linked to WMHV in community populations are also associated in stroke patients. Having established that genetic associations are shared between the 2 populations, we performed a meta-analysis testing which associations with WMHV in stroke-free populations are associated overall when combined with stroke populations. Results: There were no associations at genome-wide significance with WMHV in stroke patients. All previously reported genome-wide significant associations with WMHV in community populations shared direction of effect in stroke patients. In a meta-analysis of the genome-wide significant and suggestive loci (p < 5 × 10−6) from community populations (15 single nucleotide polymorphisms in total) and from stroke patients, 6 independent loci were associated with WMHV in both populations. Four of these are novel associations at the genome-wide level (rs72934505 [NBEAL1], p = 2.2 × 10−8; rs941898 [EVL], p = 4.0 × 10−8; rs962888 [C1QL1], p = 1.1 × 10−8; rs9515201 [COL4A2], p = 6.9 × 10−9). Conclusions: Genetic associations with WMHV are shared in otherwise healthy individuals and patients with stroke, indicating common genetic susceptibility in cerebral small vessel disease. PMID:26674333

  7. Genome-wide analysis and expression profiling of the Solanum tuberosum aquaporins.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Jelli; Yu, Jae-Woong; Park, Se Won

    2013-12-01

    Aquaporins belongs to the major intrinsic proteins involved in the transcellular membrane transport of water and other small solutes. A comprehensive genome-wide search for the homologues of Solanum tuberosum major intrinsic protein (MIP) revealed 41 full-length potato aquaporin genes. All potato aquaporins are grouped into five subfamilies; plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs), tonoplast intrinsic proteins (TIPs), NOD26-like intrinsic proteins (NIPs), small basic intrinsic proteins (SIPs) and x-intrinsic proteins (XIPs). Functional predictions based on the aromatic/arginine (ar/R) selectivity filters and Froger's positions showed a remarkable difference in substrate transport specificity among subfamilies. The expression pattern of potato aquaporins, examined by qPCR analysis, showed distinct expression profiles in various organs and tuber developmental stages. Furthermore, qPCR analysis of potato plantlets, subjected to various abiotic stresses revealed the marked effect of stresses on expression levels of aquaporins. Taken together, the expression profiles of aquaporins imply that aquaporins play important roles in plant growth and development, in addition to maintaining water homeostasis in response to environmental stresses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Genome-wide association mapping reveals a rich genetic architecture of complex traits in Oryza sativa

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Keyan; Tung, Chih-Wei; Eizenga, Georgia C.; Wright, Mark H.; Ali, M. Liakat; Price, Adam H.; Norton, Gareth J.; Islam, M. Rafiqul; Reynolds, Andy; Mezey, Jason; McClung, Anna M.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; McCouch, Susan R.

    2011-01-01

    Asian rice, Oryza sativa is a cultivated, inbreeding species that feeds over half of the world's population. Understanding the genetic basis of diverse physiological, developmental, and morphological traits provides the basis for improving yield, quality and sustainability of rice. Here we show the results of a genome-wide association study based on genotyping 44,100 SNP variants across 413 diverse accessions of O. sativa collected from 82 countries that were systematically phenotyped for 34 traits. Using cross-population-based mapping strategies, we identified dozens of common variants influencing numerous complex traits. Significant heterogeneity was observed in the genetic architecture associated with subpopulation structure and response to environment. This work establishes an open-source translational research platform for genome-wide association studies in rice that directly links molecular variation in genes and metabolic pathways with the germplasm resources needed to accelerate varietal development and crop improvement. PMID:21915109

  9. Genome-wide association mapping reveals a rich genetic architecture of complex traits in Oryza sativa.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Keyan; Tung, Chih-Wei; Eizenga, Georgia C; Wright, Mark H; Ali, M Liakat; Price, Adam H; Norton, Gareth J; Islam, M Rafiqul; Reynolds, Andy; Mezey, Jason; McClung, Anna M; Bustamante, Carlos D; McCouch, Susan R

    2011-09-13

    Asian rice, Oryza sativa is a cultivated, inbreeding species that feeds over half of the world's population. Understanding the genetic basis of diverse physiological, developmental, and morphological traits provides the basis for improving yield, quality and sustainability of rice. Here we show the results of a genome-wide association study based on genotyping 44,100 SNP variants across 413 diverse accessions of O. sativa collected from 82 countries that were systematically phenotyped for 34 traits. Using cross-population-based mapping strategies, we identified dozens of common variants influencing numerous complex traits. Significant heterogeneity was observed in the genetic architecture associated with subpopulation structure and response to environment. This work establishes an open-source translational research platform for genome-wide association studies in rice that directly links molecular variation in genes and metabolic pathways with the germplasm resources needed to accelerate varietal development and crop improvement.

  10. Genome-wide characterization of transcriptional start sites in humans by integrative transcriptome analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Riu; Sathira, Nuankanya P.; Kanai, Akinori; Tanimoto, Kousuke; Arauchi, Takako; Tanaka, Yoshiaki; Hashimoto, Shin-ichi; Sugano, Sumio; Nakai, Kenta; Suzuki, Yutaka

    2011-01-01

    We performed a genome-wide analysis of transcriptional start sites (TSSs) in human genes by multifaceted use of a massively parallel sequencer. By analyzing 800 million sequences that were obtained from various types of transcriptome analyses, we characterized 140 million TSS tags in 12 human cell types. Despite the large number of TSS clusters (TSCs), the number of TSCs was observed to decrease sharply with increasing expression levels. Highly expressed TSCs exhibited several characteristic features: Nucleosome-seq analysis revealed highly ordered nucleosome structures, ChIP-seq analysis detected clear RNA polymerase II binding signals in their surrounding regions, evaluations of previously sequenced and newly shotgun-sequenced complete cDNA sequences showed that they encode preferable transcripts for protein translation, and RNA-seq analysis of polysome-incorporated RNAs yielded direct evidence that those transcripts are actually translated into proteins. We also demonstrate that integrative interpretation of transcriptome data is essential for the selection of putative alternative promoter TSCs, two of which also have protein consequences. Furthermore, discriminative chromatin features that separate TSCs at different expression levels were found for both genic TSCs and intergenic TSCs. The collected integrative information should provide a useful basis for future biological characterization of TSCs. PMID:21372179

  11. Genome-Wide Analysis of Branched-Chain Amino Acid Levels in Arabidopsis Seeds[W

    PubMed Central

    Angelovici, Ruthie; Lipka, Alexander E.; Deason, Nicholas; Gonzalez-Jorge, Sabrina; Lin, Haining; Cepela, Jason; Buell, Robin; Gore, Michael A.; DellaPenna, Dean

    2013-01-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) are three of the nine essential amino acids in human and animal diets and are important for numerous processes in development and growth. However, seed BCAA levels in major crops are insufficient to meet dietary requirements, making genetic improvement for increased and balanced seed BCAAs an important nutritional target. Addressing this issue requires a better understanding of the genetics underlying seed BCAA content and composition. Here, a genome-wide association study and haplotype analysis for seed BCAA traits in Arabidopsis thaliana revealed a strong association with a chromosomal interval containing two BRANCHED-CHAIN AMINO ACID TRANSFERASES, BCAT1 and BCAT2. Linkage analysis, reverse genetic approaches, and molecular complementation analysis demonstrated that allelic variation at BCAT2 is responsible for the natural variation of seed BCAAs in this interval. Complementation analysis of a bcat2 null mutant with two significantly different alleles from accessions Bayreuth-0 and Shahdara is consistent with BCAT2 contributing to natural variation in BCAA levels, glutamate recycling, and free amino acid homeostasis in seeds in an allele-dependent manner. The seed-specific phenotype of bcat2 null alleles, its strong transcription induction during late seed development, and its subcellular localization to the mitochondria are consistent with a unique, catabolic role for BCAT2 in BCAA metabolism in seeds. PMID:24368787

  12. A genome-wide survey reveals a deletion polymorphism associated with resistance to gastrointestinal nematodes in Angus cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Gastrointestinal (GI) nematode infections are a worldwide threat to animal health and production. In this study, we performed a genome-wide association study between copy number variations (CNV) and resistance to GI nematodes in an Angus cattle population. Using a linear regression analysis, we iden...

  13. A genome-wide survey reveals a deletion polymorphism associated with resistance to gastrointestinal nematodes in Angus cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Gastrointestinal (GI) nematode infections are a worldwide threat to animal health and production. In this study, we performed a genome-wide association study between copy number variations (CNV) and resistance to GI nematodes in an Angus cattle population. Using a linear regression analysis, we iden...

  14. Genome-wide association analysis for feed efficiency in Angus cattle

    PubMed Central

    Rolf, M M; Taylor, J F; Schnabel, R D; McKay, S D; McClure, M C; Northcutt, S L; Kerley, M S; Weaber, R L

    2012-01-01

    Estimated breeding values for average daily feed intake (AFI; kg/day), residual feed intake (RFI; kg/day) and average daily gain (ADG; kg/day) were generated using a mixed linear model incorporating genomic relationships for 698 Angus steers genotyped with the Illumina BovineSNP50 assay. Association analyses of estimated breeding values (EBVs) were performed for 41 028 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and permutation analysis was used to empirically establish the genome-wide significance threshold (P < 0.05) for each trait. SNPs significantly associated with each trait were used in a forward selection algorithm to identify genomic regions putatively harbouring genes with effects on each trait. A total of 53, 66 and 68 SNPs explained 54.12% (24.10%), 62.69% (29.85%) and 55.13% (26.54%) of the additive genetic variation (when accounting for the genomic relationships) in steer breeding values for AFI, RFI and ADG, respectively, within this population. Evaluation by pathway analysis revealed that many of these SNPs are in genomic regions that harbour genes with metabolic functions. The presence of genetic correlations between traits resulted in 13.2% of SNPs selected for AFI and 4.5% of SNPs selected for RFI also being selected for ADG in the analysis of breeding values. While our study identifies panels of SNPs significant for efficiency traits in our population, validation of all SNPs in independent populations will be necessary before commercialization. PMID:22497295

  15. Fast genome-wide pedigree quantitative trait loci analysis using MENDEL.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hua; Zhou, Jin; Sobel, Eric M; Lange, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    The linkage era left a rich legacy of pedigree samples that can be used for modern genome-wide association sequencing (GWAS) or next-generation sequencing (NGS) studies. Family designs are naturally equipped to detect rare variants, control for population stratification, and facilitate the study of parent-of-origin effects. Unfortunately, pedigree likelihoods are notoriously hard to compute, and current software for association mapping in pedigrees is prohibitively slow in processing dense marker maps. In a recent release of the comprehensive genetic analysis software MENDEL, we implemented an ultra-fast score test for association mapping with pedigree-based GWAS or NGS study data. Our implementation (a) works for random sample data, pedigree data, or a mix of both;(b) allows for covariate adjustment, including correction for population stratification;(c) accommodates both univariate and multivariate quantitative traits; and (d) allows missing values in multivariate traits. In this paper, we assess the capabilities of MENDEL on the Genetic Analysis Workshop 18 sequencing data. For instance, when jointly testing the 4 longitudinally measured diastolic blood pressure traits, it takes MENDEL less than 51 minutes on a standard laptop computer to read, quality check, and analyze a data set with 959 individuals and 8.3 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Our analysis reveals association of one SNP in the q32.2 region of chromosome 1. MENDEL is freely available on http://www.genetics.ucla.edu/software.

  16. Genome-wide identification and phylogenetic analysis of the SBP-box gene family in melons.

    PubMed

    Ma, Y; Guo, J W; Bade, R; Men, Z H; Hasi, A

    2014-10-27

    The SBP-box gene family is specific to plants and encodes a class of zinc finger-containing transcription factors with a broad range of functions. Although SBP-box genes have been identified in numerous plants, including green algae, moss, silver birch, snapdragon, Arabidopsis, rice, and maize, there is little information concerning SBP-box genes, or the corresponding miR156/157, function in melon. Using the highly conserved sequence of the Arabidopsis thaliana SBP-box domain protein as a probe of information sequence, the genome-wide protein database of melon was explored to obtain 13 SBP-box protein sequences, which were further divided into 4 groups, based on phylogenetic analysis. A further analysis centered on the melon SBP-box genetic family's phylogenetic evolution, sequence similarities, gene structure, and miR156 target sequence was also conducted. Analysis of all the expression patterns of melon SBP-box family genes showed that the SBP-box genes were detected in 7 kinds of tissue, and fruit had the highest expression level. CmSBP11 tends to present its specific expression in melon fruit and root. CmSBP09 expression was the highest in flower. Overall, the molecular evolution and expression pattern of the melon SBP-box gene family, revealed by these results, suggest its function differentiation that followed gene duplication.

  17. Genome-wide analysis of the MADS-box gene family in Brachypodium distachyon.

    PubMed

    Wei, Bo; Zhang, Rong-Zhi; Guo, Juan-Juan; Liu, Dan-Mei; Li, Ai-Li; Fan, Ren-Chun; Mao, Long; Zhang, Xiang-Qi

    2014-01-01

    MADS-box genes are important transcription factors for plant development, especially floral organogenesis. Brachypodium distachyon is a model for biofuel plants and temperate grasses such as wheat and barley, but a comprehensive analysis of MADS-box family proteins in Brachypodium is still missing. We report here a genome-wide analysis of the MADS-box gene family in Brachypodium distachyon. We identified 57 MADS-box genes and classified them into 32 MIKC(c)-type, 7 MIKC*-type, 9 Mα, 7 Mβ and 2 Mγ MADS-box genes according to their phylogenetic relationships to the Arabidopsis and rice MADS-box genes. Detailed gene structure and motif distribution were then studied. Investigation of their chromosomal localizations revealed that Brachypodium MADS-box genes distributed evenly across five chromosomes. In addition, five pairs of type II MADS-box genes were found on synteny blocks derived from whole genome duplication blocks. We then performed a systematic expression analysis of Brachypodium MADS-box genes in various tissues, particular floral organs. Further detection under salt, drought, and low-temperature conditions showed that some MADS-box genes may also be involved in abiotic stress responses, including type I genes. Comparative studies of MADS-box genes among Brachypodium, rice and Arabidopsis showed that Brachypodium had fewer gene duplication events. Taken together, this work provides useful data for further functional studies of MADS-box genes in Brachypodium distachyon.

  18. Genome-wide analysis of radiation-induced mutations in rice (Oryza sativa L. ssp. indica).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zuxin; Lin, Juncheng; Lin, Tongxiang; Xu, Ming; Huang, Zhiwei; Yang, Zhijian; Huang, Xinying; Zheng, Jingui

    2014-04-01

    Radiation has been efficiently used for rice germplasm innovation. However, the molecular mechanisms by which radiation induces mutations are still unclear. In this study, we performed whole genome sequencing to reveal the comprehensive mutations in rice treated with radiation. Red-1 (a rice rich in beneficial ingredients for human health) was derived from rice 9311 after γ-radiation. Solexa sequencing technology was applied to uncover the mutations. Compared with the 9311 genome, 9.19% of genome sequences were altered in the Red-1 genome. Among these alterations, there were 381,403 SNPs, 50,116 1-5 bp Indels, 1279 copy number variations, and 10,026 presence/absence variations. These alterations were located in 14,493 genes, the majority of which contained a kinase domain, leucine rich repeats, or Cyt_P450. Point mutations were the main type of variation in the Red-1 genome. Gene ontology clustering revealed that genes that are associated with cell components, binding function, catalytic activity and metabolic processes were susceptible to γ-radiation. It was also predicted that 8 mutated genes were involved in the biosynthetic pathways of beneficial products or pigment accumulation. We conclude that genome-wide analysis of mutations provides novel insights into the mechanisms by which radiation improves the beneficial ingredients in rice Red-1.

  19. Genome-wide analysis of thyroid hormone receptors shared and specific functions in neural cells

    PubMed Central

    Chatonnet, Fabrice; Guyot, Romain; Benoît, Gérard; Flamant, Frederic

    2013-01-01

    TRα1 and TRβ1, the two main thyroid hormone receptors in mammals, are transcription factors that share similar properties. However, their respective functions are very different. This functional divergence might be explained in two ways: it can reflect different expression patterns or result from different intrinsic properties of the receptors. We tested this second hypothesis by comparing the repertoires of 3,3′,5-triiodo-L-thyronine (T3)-responsive genes of two neural cell lines, expressing either TRα1 or TRβ1. Using transcriptome analysis, we found that a substantial fraction of the T3 target genes display a marked preference for one of the two receptors. So when placed alone in identical situations, the two receptors have different repertoires of target genes. Chromatin occupancy analysis, performed at a genome-wide scale, revealed that TRα1 and TRβ1 cistromes were also different. However, receptor-selective regulation of T3 target genes did not result from receptor-selective chromatin occupancy of their promoter regions. We conclude that modification of TRα1 and TRβ1 intrinsic properties contributes in a large part to the divergent evolution of the receptors’ function, at least during neurodevelopment. PMID:23382204

  20. Pathway Analysis of Seven Common Diseases Assessed by Genome-Wide Association

    PubMed Central

    Torkamani, Ali; Topol, Eric J.; Schork, Nicholas J.

    2008-01-01

    Recent genome wide association studies (GWAS) have identified DNA sequence variations that exhibit unequivocal statistical associations with many common chronic diseases. However, the vast majority of these studies identified variations that explain only a very small fraction of disease burden in the population at large, suggesting that other factors, such as multiple rare or low-penetrance variations and interacting environmental factors, are major contributors to disease susceptibility. Identifying multiple low penetrance variations (or ‘polygenes’) contributing to disease susceptibility will be difficult. We present a pathway analysis approach to characterizing the likely polygenic basis of seven common diseases using the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC) GWAS results. We identify numerous pathways implicated in disease predisposition that would have not been revealed using standard single-locus GWAS statistical analysis criteria. Many of these pathways have long been assumed to contain polymorphic genes that lead to disease predisposition. Additionally, we analyze the genetic relationships between the seven diseases, and based upon similarities with respect to the associated genes and pathways affected in each, propose a new way of categorizing the diseases. PMID:18722519

  1. Genome-Wide Analysis of the Lysine Biosynthesis Pathway Network during Maize Seed Development

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuwei; Xie, Shaojun; Yu, Jingjuan

    2016-01-01

    Lysine is one of the most limiting essential amino acids for humans and livestock. The nutritional value of maize (Zea mays L.) is reduced by its poor lysine content. To better understand the lysine biosynthesis pathway in maize seed, we conducted a genome-wide analysis of the genes involved in lysine biosynthesis. We identified lysine biosynthesis pathway genes (LBPGs) and investigated whether a diaminopimelate pathway variant exists in maize. We analyzed two genes encoding the key enzyme dihydrodipicolinate synthase, and determined that they contribute differently to lysine synthesis during maize seed development. A coexpression network of LBPGs was constructed using RNA-sequencing data from 21 developmental stages of B73 maize seed. We found a large set of genes encoding ribosomal proteins, elongation factors and zein proteins that were coexpressed with LBPGs. The coexpressed genes were enriched in cellular metabolism terms and protein related terms. A phylogenetic analysis of the LBPGs from different plant species revealed different relationships. Additionally, six transcription factor (TF) families containing 13 TFs were identified as the Hub TFs of the LBPGs modules. Several expression quantitative trait loci of LBPGs were also identified. Our results should help to elucidate the lysine biosynthesis pathway network in maize seed. PMID:26829553

  2. Genome-wide identification and expression analysis of TCP transcription factors in Gossypium raimondii.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jun; Wang, Qinglian; Sun, Runrun; Xie, Fuliang; Jones, Don C; Zhang, Baohong

    2014-10-16

    Plant-specific TEOSINTE-BRANCHED1/CYCLOIDEA/PCF (TCP) transcription factors play versatile functions in multiple aspects of plant growth and development. However, no systematical study has been performed in cotton. In this study, we performed for the first time the genome-wide identification and expression analysis of the TCP transcription factor family in Gossypium raimondii. A total of 38 non-redundant cotton TCP encoding genes were identified. The TCP transcription factors were divided into eleven subgroups based on phylogenetic analysis. Most TCP genes within the same subfamily demonstrated similar exon and intron organization and the motif structures were highly conserved among the subfamilies. Additionally, the chromosomal distribution pattern revealed that TCP genes were unevenly distributed across 11 out of the 13 chromosomes; segmental duplication is a predominant duplication event for TCP genes and the major contributor to the expansion of TCP gene family in G. raimondii. Moreover, the expression profiles of TCP genes shed light on their functional divergence.

  3. Genome-wide identification and expression analysis of TCP transcription factors in Gossypium raimondii

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jun; Wang, Qinglian; Sun, Runrun; Xie, Fuliang; Jones, Don C.; Zhang, Baohong

    2014-01-01

    Plant-specific TEOSINTE-BRANCHED1/CYCLOIDEA/PCF (TCP) transcription factors play versatile functions in multiple aspects of plant growth and development. However, no systematical study has been performed in cotton. In this study, we performed for the first time the genome-wide identification and expression analysis of the TCP transcription factor family in Gossypium raimondii. A total of 38 non-redundant cotton TCP encoding genes were identified. The TCP transcription factors were divided into eleven subgroups based on phylogenetic analysis. Most TCP genes within the same subfamily demonstrated similar exon and intron organization and the motif structures were highly conserved among the subfamilies. Additionally, the chromosomal distribution pattern revealed that TCP genes were unevenly distributed across 11 out of the 13 chromosomes; segmental duplication is a predominant duplication event for TCP genes and the major contributor to the expansion of TCP gene family in G. raimondii. Moreover, the expression profiles of TCP genes shed light on their functional divergence. PMID:25322260

  4. Meta-analysis of 32 genome-wide linkage studies of schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Ng, MYM; Levinson, DF; Faraone, SV; Suarez, BK; DeLisi, LE; Arinami, T; Riley, B; Paunio, T; Pulver, AE; Irmansyah; Holmans, PA; Escamilla, M; Wildenauer, DB; Williams, NM; Laurent, C; Mowry, BJ; Brzustowicz, LM; Maziade, M; Sklar, P; Garver, DL; Abecasis, GR; Lerer, B; Fallin, MD; Gurling, HMD; Gejman, PV; Lindholm, E; Moises, HW; Byerley, W; Wijsman, EM; Forabosco, P; Tsuang, MT; Hwu, H-G; Okazaki, Y; Kendler, KS; Wormley, B; Fanous, A; Walsh, D; O’Neill, FA; Peltonen, L; Nestadt, G; Lasseter, VK; Liang, KY; Papadimitriou, GM; Dikeos, DG; Schwab, SG; Owen, MJ; O’Donovan, MC; Norton, N; Hare, E; Raventos, H; Nicolini, H; Albus, M; Maier, W; Nimgaonkar, VL; Terenius, L; Mallet, J; Jay, M; Godard, S; Nertney, D; Alexander, M; Crowe, RR; Silverman, JM; Bassett, AS; Roy, M-A; Mérette, C; Pato, CN; Pato, MT; Roos, J Louw; Kohn, Y; Amann-Zalcenstein, D; Kalsi, G; McQuillin, A; Curtis, D; Brynjolfson, J; Sigmundsson, T; Petursson, H; Sanders, AR; Duan, J; Jazin, E; Myles-Worsley, M; Karayiorgou, M; Lewis, CM

    2009-01-01

    A genome scan meta-analysis (GSMA) was carried out on 32 independent genome-wide linkage scan analyses that included 3255 pedigrees with 7413 genotyped cases affected with schizophrenia (SCZ) or related disorders. The primary GSMA divided the autosomes into 120 bins, rank-ordered the bins within each study according to the most positive linkage result in each bin, summed these ranks (weighted for study size) for each bin across studies and determined the empirical probability of a given summed rank (PSR) by simulation. Suggestive evidence for linkage was observed in two single bins, on chromosomes 5q (142-168 Mb) and 2q (103-134 Mb). Genome-wide evidence for linkage was detected on chromosome 2q (119-152 Mb) when bin boundaries were shifted to the middle of the previous bins. The primary analysis met empirical criteria for ‘aggregate’ genome-wide significance, indicating that some or all of 10 bins are likely to contain loci linked to SCZ, including regions of chromosomes 1, 2q, 3q, 4q, 5q, 8p and 10q. In a secondary analysis of 22 studies of European-ancestry samples, suggestive evidence for linkage was observed on chromosome 8p (16-33 Mb). Although the newer genome-wide association methodology has greater power to detect weak associations to single common DNA sequence variants, linkage analysis can detect diverse genetic effects that segregate in families, including multiple rare variants within one locus or several weakly associated loci in the same region. Therefore, the regions supported by this meta-analysis deserve close attention in future studies. PMID:19349958

  5. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies five new susceptibility loci for cutaneous malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Law, Matthew H.; Bishop, D. Timothy; Martin, Nicholas G.; Moses, Eric K.; Song, Fengju; Barrett, Jennifer H.; Kumar, Rajiv; Easton, Douglas F.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Swerdlow, Anthony J.; Kypreou, Katerina P.; Taylor, John C.; Harland, Mark; Randerson-Moor, Juliette; Akslen, Lars A.; Andresen, Per A.; Avril, Marie-Françoise; Azizi, Esther; Scarrà, Giovanna Bianchi; Brown, Kevin M.; Dębniak, Tadeusz; Duffy, David L.; Elder, David E.; Fang, Shenying; Friedman, Eitan; Galan, Pilar; Ghiorzo, Paola; Gillanders, Elizabeth M.; Goldstein, Alisa M.; Gruis, Nelleke A.; Hansson, Johan; Helsing, Per; Hočevar, Marko; Höiom, Veronica; Ingvar, Christian; Kanetsky, Peter A.; Chen, Wei V.; Landi, Maria Teresa; Lang, Julie; Lathrop, G. Mark; Lubiński, Jan; Mackie, Rona M.; Mann, Graham J.; Molven, Anders; Montgomery, Grant W.; Novaković, Srdjan; Olsson, Håkan; Puig, Susana; Puig-Butille, Joan Anton; Qureshi, Abrar A.; Radford-Smith, Graham L.; van der Stoep, Nienke; van Doorn, Remco; Whiteman, David C.; Craig, Jamie E.; Schadendorf, Dirk; Simms, Lisa A.; Burdon, Kathryn P.; Nyholt, Dale R.; Pooley, Karen A.; Orr, Nick; Stratigos, Alexander J.; Cust, Anne E.; Ward, Sarah V.; Hayward, Nicholas K.; Han, Jiali; Schulze, Hans-Joachim; Dunning, Alison M.; Bishop, Julia A. Newton; MacGregor, Stuart; Iles, Mark M.

    2015-01-01

    Thirteen common susceptibility loci have been reproducibly associated with cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM). We report the results of an international 2-stage meta-analysis of CMM genome-wide association studies (GWAS). This meta-analysis combines 11 GWAS (5 previously unpublished) and a further three stage 2 data sets, totaling 15,990 CMM cases and 26,409 controls. Five loci not previously associated with CMM risk reached genome-wide significance (P < 5×10–8), as did two previously-reported but un-replicated loci and all thirteen established loci. Novel SNPs fall within putative melanocyte regulatory elements, and bioinformatic and expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) data highlight candidate genes including one involved in telomere biology. PMID:26237428

  6. Novel R tools for analysis of genome-wide population genetic data with emphasis on clonality

    PubMed Central

    Kamvar, Zhian N.; Brooks, Jonah C.; Grünwald, Niklaus J.

    2015-01-01

    To gain a detailed understanding of how plant microbes evolve and adapt to hosts, pesticides, and other factors, knowledge of the population dynamics and evolutionary history of populations is crucial. Plant pathogen populations are often clonal or partially clonal which requires different analytical tools. With the advent of high throughput sequencing technologies, obtaining genome-wide population genetic data has become easier than ever before. We previously contributed the R package poppr specifically addressing issues with analysis of clonal populations. In this paper we provide several significant extensions to poppr with a focus on large, genome-wide SNP data. Specifically, we provide several new functionalities including the new function mlg.filter to define clone boundaries allowing for inspection and definition of what is a clonal lineage, minimum spanning networks with reticulation, a sliding-window analysis of the index of association, modular bootstrapping of any genetic distance, and analyses across any level of hierarchies. PMID:26113860

  7. Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals Multiple Loci Influencing Normal Human Facial Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Raffensperger, Zachary D.; Heike, Carrie L.; Cunningham, Michael L.; Hecht, Jacqueline T.; Kau, Chung How; Moreno, Lina M.; Wehby, George L.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Laurie, Cecelia A.; Laurie, Cathy C.; Santorico, Stephanie; Klein, Ophir; Feingold, Eleanor; Hallgrimsson, Benedikt; Spritz, Richard A.; Marazita, Mary L.; Weinberg, Seth M.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous lines of evidence point to a genetic basis for facial morphology in humans, yet little is known about how specific genetic variants relate to the phenotypic expression of many common facial features. We conducted genome-wide association meta-analyses of 20 quantitative facial measurements derived from the 3D surface images of 3118 healthy individuals of European ancestry belonging to two US cohorts. Analyses were performed on just under one million genotyped SNPs (Illumina OmniExpress+Exome v1.2 array) imputed to the 1000 Genomes reference panel (Phase 3). We observed genome-wide significant associations (p < 5 x 10−8) for cranial base width at 14q21.1 and 20q12, intercanthal width at 1p13.3 and Xq13.2, nasal width at 20p11.22, nasal ala length at 14q11.2, and upper facial depth at 11q22.1. Several genes in the associated regions are known to play roles in craniofacial development or in syndromes affecting the face: MAFB, PAX9, MIPOL1, ALX3, HDAC8, and PAX1. We also tested genotype-phenotype associations reported in two previous genome-wide studies and found evidence of replication for nasal ala length and SNPs in CACNA2D3 and PRDM16. These results provide further evidence that common variants in regions harboring genes of known craniofacial function contribute to normal variation in human facial features. Improved understanding of the genes associated with facial morphology in healthy individuals can provide insights into the pathways and mechanisms controlling normal and abnormal facial morphogenesis. PMID:27560520

  8. Genome-wide interaction studies reveal sex-specific asthma risk alleles

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Rachel A.; Scott, Nicole M.; Gauderman, W. James; Qiu, Weiliang; Mathias, Rasika A.; Romieu, Isabelle; Levin, Albert M.; Pino-Yanes, Maria; Graves, Penelope E.; Villarreal, Albino Barraza; Beaty, Terri H.; Carey, Vincent J.; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C.; del Rio Navarro, Blanca; Edlund, Christopher; Hernandez-Cadena, Leticia; Navarro-Olivos, Efrain; Padhukasahasram, Badri; Salam, Muhammad T.; Torgerson, Dara G.; Van den Berg, David J.; Vora, Hita; Bleecker, Eugene R.; Meyers, Deborah A.; Williams, L. Keoki; Martinez, Fernando D.; Burchard, Esteban G.; Barnes, Kathleen C.; Gilliland, Frank D.; Weiss, Scott T.; London, Stephanie J.; Raby, Benjamin A.; Ober, Carole; Nicolae, Dan L.

    2014-01-01

    Asthma is a complex disease with sex-specific differences in prevalence. Candidate gene studies have suggested that genotype-by-sex interaction effects on asthma risk exist, but this has not yet been explored at a genome-wide level. We aimed to identify sex-specific asthma risk alleles by performing a genome-wide scan for genotype-by-sex interactions in the ethnically diverse participants in the EVE Asthma Genetics Consortium. We performed male- and female-specific genome-wide association studies in 2653 male asthma cases, 2566 female asthma cases and 3830 non-asthma controls from European American, African American, African Caribbean and Latino populations. Association tests were conducted in each study sample, and the results were combined in ancestry-specific and cross-ancestry meta-analyses. Six sex-specific asthma risk loci had P-values < 1 × 10−6, of which two were male specific and four were female specific; all were ancestry specific. The most significant sex-specific association in European Americans was at the interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF1) locus on 5q31.1. We also identify a Latino female-specific association in RAP1GAP2. Both of these loci included single-nucleotide polymorphisms that are known expression quantitative trait loci and have been associated with asthma in independent studies. The IRF1 locus is a strong candidate region for male-specific asthma susceptibility due to the association and validation we demonstrate here, the known role of IRF1 in asthma-relevant immune pathways and prior reports of sex-specific differences in interferon responses. PMID:24824216

  9. Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals Multiple Loci Influencing Normal Human Facial Morphology.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, John R; Orlova, Ekaterina; Lee, Myoung Keun; Leslie, Elizabeth J; Raffensperger, Zachary D; Heike, Carrie L; Cunningham, Michael L; Hecht, Jacqueline T; Kau, Chung How; Nidey, Nichole L; Moreno, Lina M; Wehby, George L; Murray, Jeffrey C; Laurie, Cecelia A; Laurie, Cathy C; Cole, Joanne; Ferrara, Tracey; Santorico, Stephanie; Klein, Ophir; Mio, Washington; Feingold, Eleanor; Hallgrimsson, Benedikt; Spritz, Richard A; Marazita, Mary L; Weinberg, Seth M

    2016-08-01

    Numerous lines of evidence point to a genetic basis for facial morphology in humans, yet little is known about how specific genetic variants relate to the phenotypic expression of many common facial features. We conducted genome-wide association meta-analyses of 20 quantitative facial measurements derived from the 3D surface images of 3118 healthy individuals of European ancestry belonging to two US cohorts. Analyses were performed on just under one million genotyped SNPs (Illumina OmniExpress+Exome v1.2 array) imputed to the 1000 Genomes reference panel (Phase 3). We observed genome-wide significant associations (p < 5 x 10-8) for cranial base width at 14q21.1 and 20q12, intercanthal width at 1p13.3 and Xq13.2, nasal width at 20p11.22, nasal ala length at 14q11.2, and upper facial depth at 11q22.1. Several genes in the associated regions are known to play roles in craniofacial development or in syndromes affecting the face: MAFB, PAX9, MIPOL1, ALX3, HDAC8, and PAX1. We also tested genotype-phenotype associations reported in two previous genome-wide studies and found evidence of replication for nasal ala length and SNPs in CACNA2D3 and PRDM16. These results provide further evidence that common variants in regions harboring genes of known craniofacial function contribute to normal variation in human facial features. Improved understanding of the genes associated with facial morphology in healthy individuals can provide insights into the pathways and mechanisms controlling normal and abnormal facial morphogenesis.

  10. Transcriptome sequencing reveals genome-wide variation in molecular evolutionary rate among ferns.

    PubMed

    Grusz, Amanda L; Rothfels, Carl J; Schuettpelz, Eric

    2016-08-30

    Transcriptomics in non-model plant systems has recently reached a point where the examination of nuclear genome-wide patterns in understudied groups is an achievable reality. This progress is especially notable in evolutionary studies of ferns, for which molecular resources to date have been derived primarily from the plastid genome. Here, we utilize transcriptome data in the first genome-wide comparative study of molecular evolutionary rate in ferns. We focus on the ecologically diverse family Pteridaceae, which comprises about 10 % of fern diversity and includes the enigmatic vittarioid ferns-an epiphytic, tropical lineage known for dramatically reduced morphologies and radically elongated phylogenetic branch lengths. Using expressed sequence data for 2091 loci, we perform pairwise comparisons of molecular evolutionary rate among 12 species spanning the three largest clades in the family and ask whether previously documented heterogeneity in plastid substitution rates is reflected in their nuclear genomes. We then inquire whether variation in evolutionary rate is being shaped by genes belonging to specific functional categories and test for differential patterns of selection. We find significant, genome-wide differences in evolutionary rate for vittarioid ferns relative to all other lineages within the Pteridaceae, but we recover few significant correlations between faster/slower vittarioid loci and known functional gene categories. We demonstrate that the faster rates characteristic of the vittarioid ferns are likely not driven by positive selection, nor are they unique to any particular type of nucleotide substitution. Our results reinforce recently reviewed mechanisms hypothesized to shape molecular evolutionary rates in vittarioid ferns and provide novel insight into substitution rate variation both within and among fern nuclear genomes.

  11. Genome-wide chromatin mapping with size resolution reveals a dynamic sub-nucleosomal landscape in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Pass, Daniel Antony; Sornay, Emily; Marchbank, Angela; Crawford, Margaret R; Paszkiewicz, Konrad; Kent, Nicholas A; Murray, James A H

    2017-09-01

    All eukaryotic genomes are packaged as chromatin, with DNA interlaced with both regularly patterned nucleosomes and sub-nucleosomal-sized protein structures such as mobile and labile transcription factors (TF) and initiation complexes, together forming a dynamic chromatin landscape. Whilst details of nucleosome position in Arabidopsis have been previously analysed, there is less understanding of their relationship to more dynamic sub-nucleosomal particles (subNSPs) defined as protected regions shorter than the ~150bp typical of nucleosomes. The genome-wide profile of these subNSPs has not been previously analysed in plants and this study investigates the relationship of dynamic bound particles with transcriptional control. Here we combine differential micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion and a modified paired-end sequencing protocol to reveal the chromatin structure landscape of Arabidopsis cells across a wide particle size range. Linking this data to RNAseq expression analysis provides detailed insight into the relationship of identified DNA-bound particles with transcriptional activity. The use of differential digestion reveals sensitive positions, including a labile -1 nucleosome positioned upstream of the transcription start site (TSS) of active genes. We investigated the response of the chromatin landscape to changes in environmental conditions using light and dark growth, given the large transcriptional changes resulting from this simple alteration. The resulting shifts in the suites of expressed and repressed genes show little correspondence to changes in nucleosome positioning, but led to significant alterations in the profile of subNSPs upstream of TSS both globally and locally. We examined previously mapped positions for the TFs PIF3, PIF4 and CCA1, which regulate light responses, and found that changes in subNSPs co-localized with these binding sites. This small particle structure is detected only under low levels of MNase digestion and is lost on more

  12. Meta-analysis of sex-specific genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Magi, Reedik; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Morris, Andrew P

    2010-12-01

    Despite the success of genome-wide association studies, much of the genetic contribution to complex human traits is still unexplained. One potential source of genetic variation that may contribute to this "missing heritability" is that which differs in magnitude and/or direction between males and females, which could result from sexual dimorphism in gene expression. Such sex-differentiated effects are common in model organisms, and are becoming increasingly evident in human complex traits through large-scale male- and female-specific meta-analyses. In this article, we review the methodology for meta-analysis of sex-specific genome-wide association studies, and propose a sex-differentiated test of association with quantitative or dichotomous traits, which allows for heterogeneity of allelic effects between males and females. We perform detailed simulations to compare the power of the proposed sex-differentiated meta-analysis with the more traditional "sex-combined" approach, which is ambivalent to gender. The results of this study highlight only a small loss in power for the sex-differentiated meta-analysis when the allelic effects of the causal variant are the same in males and females. However, over a range of models of heterogeneity in allelic effects between genders, our sex-differentiated meta-analysis strategy offers substantial gains in power, and thus has the potential to discover novel loci contributing effects to complex human traits with existing genome-wide association data.

  13. Genome-wide methylation and transcriptome analysis in penile carcinoma: uncovering new molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Kuasne, Hellen; Cólus, Ilce Mara de Syllos; Busso, Ariane Fidelis; Hernandez-Vargas, Hector; Barros-Filho, Mateus Camargo; Marchi, Fabio Albuquerque; Scapulatempo-Neto, Cristovam; Faria, Eliney Ferreira; Lopes, Ademar; Guimarães, Gustavo Cardoso; Herceg, Zdenko; Rogatto, Silvia Regina

    2015-01-01

    Despite penile carcinoma (PeCa) being a relatively rare neoplasm, it remains an important public health issue for poor and developing countries. Contrary to most tumors, limited data are available for markers that are capable of assisting in diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of PeCa. We aimed to identify molecular markers for PeCa by evaluating their epigenomic and transcriptome profiles and comparing them with surrounding non-malignant tissue (SNT) and normal glans (NG). Genome-wide methylation analysis revealed 171 hypermethylated probes in PeCa. Transcriptome profiling presented 2,883 underexpressed and 1,378 overexpressed genes. Integrative analysis revealed a panel of 54 genes with an inverse correlation between methylation and gene expression levels. Distinct methylome and transcriptome patterns were found for human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive (38.6%) and negative tumors. Interestingly, grade 3 tumors showed a distinct methylation profile when compared to grade 1. In addition, univariate analysis revealed that low BDNF methylation was associated with lymph node metastasis and shorter disease-free survival. CpG hypermethylation and gene underexpression were confirmed for a panel of genes, including TWIST1, RSOP2, SOX3, SOX17, PROM1, OTX2, HOXA3, and MEIS1. A unique methylome signature was found for PeCa compared to SNT, with aberrant DNA methylation appearing to modulate the expression of specific genes. This study describes new pathways with the potential to regulate penile carcinogenesis, including stem cell regulatory pathways and markers associated to a worse prognosis. These findings may be instrumental in the discovery and application of new genetic and epigenetic biomarkers in PeCa.

  14. Genome-wide association study reveals novel variants for growth and egg traits in Dongxiang blue-shelled and White Leghorn chickens.

    PubMed

    Liao, R; Zhang, X; Chen, Q; Wang, Z; Wang, Q; Yang, C; Pan, Y

    2016-10-01

    This study was designed to investigate the genetic basis of growth and egg traits in Dongxiang blue-shelled chickens and White Leghorn chickens. In this study, we employed a reduced representation sequencing approach called genotyping by genome reducing and sequencing to detect genome-wide SNPs in 252 Dongxiang blue-shelled chickens and 252 White Leghorn chickens. The Dongxiang blue-shelled chicken breed has many specific traits and is characterized by blue-shelled eggs, black plumage, black skin, black bone and black organs. The White Leghorn chicken is an egg-type breed with high productivity. As multibreed genome-wide association studies (GWASs) can improve precision due to less linkage disequilibrium across breeds, a multibreed GWAS was performed with 156 575 SNPs to identify the associated variants underlying growth and egg traits within the two chicken breeds. The analysis revealed 32 SNPs exhibiting a significant genome-wide association with growth and egg traits. Some of the significant SNPs are located in genes that are known to impact growth and egg traits, but nearly half of the significant SNPs are located in genes with unclear functions in chickens. To our knowledge, this is the first multibreed genome-wide report for the genetics of growth and egg traits in the Dongxiang blue-shelled and White Leghorn chickens.

  15. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    PubMed Central

    Neale, Benjamin M; Medland, Sarah E.; Ripke, Stephan; Asherson, Philip; Franke, Barbara; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Faraone, Stephen V.; Nguyen, Thuy Trang; Schäfer, Helmut; Holmans, Peter; Daly, Mark; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Freitag, Christine; Reif, Andreas; Renner, Tobias J.; Romanos, Marcel; Romanos, Jasmin; Walitza, Susanne; Warnke, Andreas; Meyer, Jobst; Palmason, Haukur; Buitelaar, Jan; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Lambregts-Rommelse, Nanda; Gill, Michael; Anney, Richard J.L.; Langely, Kate; O’Donovan, Michael; Williams, Nigel; Owen, Michael; Thapar, Anita; Kent, Lindsey; Sergeant, Joseph; Roeyers, Herbert; Mick, Eric; Biederman, Joseph; Doyle, Alysa; Smalley, Susan; Loo, Sandra; Hakonarson, Hakon; Elia, Josephine; Todorov, Alexandre; Miranda, Ana; Mulas, Fernando; Ebstein, Richard P.; Rothenberger, Aribert; Banaschewski, Tobias; Oades, Robert D.; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund; McGough, James; Nisenbaum, Laura; Middleton, Frank; Hu, Xiaolan; Nelson, Stan

    2010-01-01

    Objective Although twin and family studies have shown Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) to be highly heritable, genetic variants influencing the trait at a genome-wide significant level have yet to be identified. As prior genome-wide association scans (GWAS) have not yielded significant results, we conducted a meta-analysis of existing studies to boost statistical power. Method We used data from four projects: a) the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP), b) phase I of the International Multicenter ADHD Genetics project (IMAGE), c) phase II of IMAGE (IMAGE II), and d) the Pfizer funded study from the University of California, Los Angeles, Washington University and the Massachusetts General Hospital (PUWMa). The final sample size consisted of 2,064 trios, 896 cases and 2,455 controls. For each study, we imputed HapMap SNPs, computed association test statistics and transformed them to Z-scores, and then combined weighted Z-scores in a meta-analysis. Results No genome-wide significant associations were found, although an analysis of candidate genes suggests they may be involved in the disorder. Conclusions Given that ADHD is a highly heritable disorder, our negative results suggest that the effects of common ADHD risk variants must, individually, be very small or that other types of variants, e.g. rare ones, account for much of the disorder’s heritability. PMID:20732625

  16. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Neale, Benjamin M; Medland, Sarah E; Ripke, Stephan; Asherson, Philip; Franke, Barbara; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Faraone, Stephen V; Nguyen, Thuy Trang; Schäfer, Helmut; Holmans, Peter; Daly, Mark; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Freitag, Christine; Reif, Andreas; Renner, Tobias J; Romanos, Marcel; Romanos, Jasmin; Walitza, Susanne; Warnke, Andreas; Meyer, Jobst; Palmason, Haukur; Buitelaar, Jan; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Lambregts-Rommelse, Nanda; Gill, Michael; Anney, Richard J L; Langely, Kate; O'Donovan, Michael; Williams, Nigel; Owen, Michael; Thapar, Anita; Kent, Lindsey; Sergeant, Joseph; Roeyers, Herbert; Mick, Eric; Biederman, Joseph; Doyle, Alysa; Smalley, Susan; Loo, Sandra; Hakonarson, Hakon; Elia, Josephine; Todorov, Alexandre; Miranda, Ana; Mulas, Fernando; Ebstein, Richard P; Rothenberger, Aribert; Banaschewski, Tobias; Oades, Robert D; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund; McGough, James; Nisenbaum, Laura; Middleton, Frank; Hu, Xiaolan; Nelson, Stan

    2010-09-01

    Although twin and family studies have shown attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to be highly heritable, genetic variants influencing the trait at a genome-wide significant level have yet to be identified. As prior genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have not yielded significant results, we conducted a meta-analysis of existing studies to boost statistical power. We used data from four projects: a) the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP); b) phase I of the International Multicenter ADHD Genetics project (IMAGE); c) phase II of IMAGE (IMAGE II); and d) the Pfizer-funded study from the University of California, Los Angeles, Washington University, and Massachusetts General Hospital (PUWMa). The final sample size consisted of 2,064 trios, 896 cases, and 2,455 controls. For each study, we imputed HapMap single nucleotide polymorphisms, computed association test statistics and transformed them to z-scores, and then combined weighted z-scores in a meta-analysis. No genome-wide significant associations were found, although an analysis of candidate genes suggests that they may be involved in the disorder. Given that ADHD is a highly heritable disorder, our negative results suggest that the effects of common ADHD risk variants must, individually, be very small or that other types of variants, e.g., rare ones, account for much of the disorder's heritability. 2010 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Genome-wide association analysis of age at onset and psychotic symptoms in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Belmonte Mahon, Pamela; Pirooznia, Mehdi; Goes, Fernando S; Seifuddin, Fayaz; Steele, Jo; Lee, Phil Hyoun; Huang, Jie; Hamshere, Marian L; Depaulo, J Raymond; Kelsoe, John R; Rietschel, Marcella; Nöthen, Markus; Cichon, Sven; Gurling, Hugh; Purcell, Shaun; Smoller, Jordan W; Craddock, Nick; Schulze, Thomas G; McMahon, Francis J; Potash, James B; Zandi, Peter P

    2011-04-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified several susceptibility loci for bipolar disorder (BP), most notably ANK3. However, most of the inherited risk for BP remains unexplained. One reason for the limited success may be the genetic heterogeneity of BP. Clinical sub-phenotypes of BP may identify more etiologically homogeneous subsets of patients, which can be studied with increased power to detect genetic variation. Here, we report on a mega-analysis of two widely studied sub-phenotypes of BP, age at onset and psychotic symptoms, which are familial and clinically significant. We combined data from three GWAS: NIMH Bipolar Disorder Genetic Association Information Network (GAIN-BP), NIMH Bipolar Disorder Genome Study (BiGS), and a German sample. The combined sample consisted of 2,836 BP cases with information on sub-phenotypes and 2,744 controls. Imputation was performed, resulting in 2.3 million SNPs available for analysis. No SNP reached genome-wide significance for either sub-phenotype. In addition, no SNP reached genome-wide significance in a meta-analysis with an independent replication sample. We had 80% power to detect associations with a common SNP at an OR of 1.6 for psychotic symptoms and a mean difference of 1.8 years in age at onset. Age at onset and psychotic symptoms in BP may be influenced by many genes of smaller effect sizes or other variants not measured well by SNP arrays, such as rare alleles.

  18. Integrated genome-wide analysis of genomic changes and gene regulation in human adrenocortical tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Gara, Sudheer Kumar; Wang, Yonghong; Patel, Dhaval; Liu-Chittenden, Yi; Jain, Meenu; Boufraqech, Myriem; Zhang, Lisa; Meltzer, Paul S; Kebebew, Electron

    2015-10-30

    To gain insight into the pathogenesis of adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) and whether there is progression from normal-to-adenoma-to-carcinoma, we performed genome-wide gene expression, gene methylation, microRNA expression and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analysis in human adrenocortical tissue (normal, adrenocortical adenomas and ACC) samples. A pairwise comparison of normal, adrenocortical adenomas and ACC gene expression profiles with more than four-fold expression differences and an adjusted P-value < 0.05 revealed no major differences in normal versus adrenocortical adenoma whereas there are 808 and 1085, respectively, dysregulated genes between ACC versus adrenocortical adenoma and ACC versus normal. The majority of the dysregulated genes in ACC were downregulated. By integrating the CGH, gene methylation and expression profiles of potential miRNAs with the gene expression of dysregulated genes, we found that there are higher alterations in ACC versus normal compared to ACC versus adrenocortical adenoma. Importantly, we identified several novel molecular pathways that are associated with dysregulated genes and further experimentally validated that oncostatin m signaling induces caspase 3 dependent apoptosis and suppresses cell proliferation. Finally, we propose that there is higher number of genomic changes from normal-to-adenoma-to-carcinoma and identified oncostatin m signaling as a plausible druggable pathway for therapeutics.

  19. The development of an Arabidopsis model system for genome-wide analysis of polyploidy effects

    PubMed Central

    JEFFREY CHEN, Z.; WANG, JIANLIN; TIAN, LU; LEE, HYEON-SE; WANG, JIYUAN J.; CHEN, MENG; LEE, JINSUK J.; JOSEFSSON, CAROLINE; MADLUNG, ANDREAS; WATSON, BRIAN; LIPPMAN, ZACH; VAUGHN, MATT; CHRIS PIRES, J.; COLOT, VINCENT; DOERGE, R. W.; MARTIENSSEN, ROBERT A.; COMAI, LUCA; OSBORN, THOMAS C.

    2007-01-01

    Arabidopsis is a model system not only for studying numerous aspects of plant biology, but also for understanding mechanisms of the rapid evolutionary process associated with genome duplication and polyploidization. Although in animals interspecific hybrids are often sterile and aneuploids are related to disease syndromes, both Arabidopsis autopolyploids and allopolyploids occur in nature and can be readily formed in the laboratory, providing an attractive system for comparing changes in gene expression and genome structure among relatively ‘young’ and ‘established’ or ‘ancient’ polyploids. Powerful reverse and forward genetics in Arabidopsis offer an exceptional means by which regulatory mechanisms of gene and genome duplication may be revealed. Moreover, the Arabidopsis genome is completely sequenced; both coding and non-coding sequences are available. We have developed spotted oligo-gene and chromosome microarrays using the complete Arabidopsis genome sequence. The oligo-gene microarray consists of ~26 000 70-mer oligonucleotides that are designed from all annotated genes in Arabidopsis, and the chromosome microarray contains 1 kb genomic tiling fragments amplified from a chromosomal region or the complete sequence of chromosome 4. We have demonstrated the utility of microarrays for genome-wide analysis of changes in gene expression, genome organization and chromatin structure in Arabidopsis polyploids and related species. PMID:18079994

  20. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Analysis of WRKY Gene Family in Capsicum annuum L.

    PubMed

    Diao, Wei-Ping; Snyder, John C; Wang, Shu-Bin; Liu, Jin-Bing; Pan, Bao-Gui; Guo, Guang-Jun; Wei, Ge

    2016-01-01

    The WRKY family of transcription factors is one of the most important families of plant transcriptional regulators with members regulating multiple biological processes, especially in regulating defense against biotic and abiotic stresses. However, little information is available about WRKYs in pepper (Capsicum annuum L.). The recent release of completely assembled genome sequences of pepper allowed us to perform a genome-wide investigation for pepper WRKY proteins. In the present study, a total of 71 WRKY genes were identified in the pepper genome. According to structural features of their encoded proteins, the pepper WRKY genes (CaWRKY) were classified into three main groups, with the second group further divided into five subgroups. Genome mapping analysis revealed that CaWRKY were enriched on four chromosomes, especially on chromosome 1, and 15.5% of the family members were tandemly duplicated genes. A phylogenetic tree was constructed depending on WRKY domain' sequences derived from pepper and Arabidopsis. The expression of 21 selected CaWRKY genes in response to seven different biotic and abiotic stresses (salt, heat shock, drought, Phytophtora capsici, SA, MeJA, and ABA) was evaluated by quantitative RT-PCR; Some CaWRKYs were highly expressed and up-regulated by stress treatment. Our results will provide a platform for functional identification and molecular breeding studies of WRKY genes in pepper.

  1. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Analysis of WRKY Gene Family in Capsicum annuum L.

    PubMed Central

    Diao, Wei-Ping; Snyder, John C.; Wang, Shu-Bin; Liu, Jin-Bing; Pan, Bao-Gui; Guo, Guang-Jun; Wei, Ge

    2016-01-01

    The WRKY family of transcription factors is one of the most important families of plant transcriptional regulators with members regulating multiple biological processes, especially in regulating defense against biotic and abiotic stresses. However, little information is available about WRKYs in pepper (Capsicum annuum L.). The recent release of completely assembled genome sequences of pepper allowed us to perform a genome-wide investigation for pepper WRKY proteins. In the present study, a total of 71 WRKY genes were identified in the pepper genome. According to structural features of their encoded proteins, the pepper WRKY genes (CaWRKY) were classified into three main groups, with the second group further divided into five subgroups. Genome mapping analysis revealed that CaWRKY were enriched on four chromosomes, especially on chromosome 1, and 15.5% of the family members were tandemly duplicated genes. A phylogenetic tree was constructed depending on WRKY domain' sequences derived from pepper and Arabidopsis. The expression of 21 selected CaWRKY genes in response to seven different biotic and abiotic stresses (salt, heat shock, drought, Phytophtora capsici, SA, MeJA, and ABA) was evaluated by quantitative RT-PCR; Some CaWRKYs were highly expressed and up-regulated by stress treatment. Our results will provide a platform for functional identification and molecular breeding studies of WRKY genes in pepper. PMID:26941768

  2. Genome-wide analysis suggests divergent evolution of lipid phosphotases/phosphotransferase genes in plants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Chen, Zhenxi; Kasimu, Rena; Chen, Yinhua; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Gai, Jiangtao

    2016-08-01

    Genes of the LPPT (lipid phosphatase/phosphotransferase) family play important roles in lipid phosphorous transfer and triacylglycerol accumulation in plants. To provide overviews of the plant LPPT family and their overall relationships, here we carried out genome-wide identifications and analyses of plant LPPT family members. A total of 643 putative LPPT genes were identified from 48 sequenced plant genomes, among which 205 genes from 14 plants were chosen for further analyses. Plant LPPT genes belonged to three distinctive groups, namely the LPT (lipid phosphotransfease), LPP (lipid phosphatase), and pLPP (plastidic lipid phosphotransfease) groups. Genes of the LPT group could be further partitioned into three groups, two of which were only identified in terrestrial plants. Genes in the LPP and pLPP groups experienced duplications in early stages of plant evolution. Among 17 Zea mays LPPT genes, divergence of temporal-spatial expression patterns was revealed based on microarray data analysis. Peptide sequences of plant LPPT genes harbored different conserved motifs. A test of Branch Model versus One-ratio Model did not support significant selective pressures acting on different groups of LPPT genes, although quite different nonsynonymous evolutionary rates and selective pressures were observed. The complete picture of the plant LPPT family provided here should facilitate further investigations of plant LPPT genes and offer a better understanding of lipid biosynthesis in plants.

  3. Genome-wide analysis of glutathione reductase (GR) genes from rice and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Dipesh Kumar; Gill, Sarvajeet Singh; Yadav, Sandep; Tuteja, Narendra

    2013-02-01

    Plant cells and tissues remain always on risk under abiotic and biotic stresses due to increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Plants protect themselves against ROS induced oxidative damage by the upregulation of antioxidant machinery. Out of many components of antioxidant machinery, glutathione reductase (GR, EC 1.6.4.2) and glutathione (GSH, γ-Glu-Cys-Gly) play important role in the protection of cell against oxidative damage. In stress condition, the GR helps in maintaining the reduced glutathione pool for strengthening the antioxidative processes in plants. Present study investigates genome wide analysis of GR from rice and Arabidopsis. We were able to identify 3 rice GR genes (LOC_Os02 g56850, LOC_Os03 g06740, LOC_Os10 g28000) and 2 Arabidopsis GR genes (AT3G54660, AT3G24170) from their respective genomes on the basis of their annotation as well as the presence of pyridine nucleotide-disulphide oxidoreductases class-I active site. The evolutionary relationship of the GR genes from rice and Arabidopsis genomes was analyzed using the multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree. This revealed evolutionary conserved pyridine nucleotide-disulphide oxidoreductases class-I active site among the GR protein in rice and Arabidopsis. This study should make an important contribution to our better understanding of the GR under normal and stress condition in plants.

  4. Active chromatin domains are defined by acetylation islands revealed by genome-wide mapping.

    PubMed

    Roh, Tae-Young; Cuddapah, Suresh; Zhao, Keji

    2005-03-01

    The identity and developmental potential of a human cell is specified by its epigenome that is largely defined by patterns of chromatin modifications including histone acetylation. Here we report high-resolution genome-wide mapping of diacetylation of histone H3 at Lys 9 and Lys 14 in resting and activated human T cells by genome-wide mapping technique (GMAT). Our data show that high levels of the H3 acetylation are detected in gene-rich regions. The chromatin accessibility and gene expression of a genetic domain is correlated with hyperacetylation of promoters and other regulatory elements but not with generally elevated acetylation of the entire domain. Islands of acetylation are identified in the intergenic and transcribed regions. The locations of the 46,813 acetylation islands identified in this study are significantly correlated with conserved noncoding sequences (CNSs) and many of them are colocalized with known regulatory elements in T cells. TCR signaling induces 4045 new acetylation loci that may mediate the global chromatin remodeling and gene activation. We propose that the acetylation islands are epigenetic marks that allow prediction of functional regulatory elements.

  5. Active chromatin domains are defined by acetylation islands revealed by genome-wide mapping

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Tae-Young; Cuddapah, Suresh; Zhao, Keji

    2005-01-01

    The identity and developmental potential of a human cell is specified by its epigenome that is largely defined by patterns of chromatin modifications including histone acetylation. Here we report high-resolution genome-wide mapping of diacetylation of histone H3 at Lys 9 and Lys 14 in resting and activated human T cells by genome-wide mapping technique (GMAT). Our data show that high levels of the H3 acetylation are detected in gene-rich regions. The chromatin accessibility and gene expression of a genetic domain is correlated with hyperacetylation of promoters and other regulatory elements but not with generally elevated acetylation of the entire domain. Islands of acetylation are identified in the intergenic and transcribed regions. The locations of the 46,813 acetylation islands identified in this study are significantly correlated with conserved noncoding sequences (CNSs) and many of them are colocalized with known regulatory elements in T cells. TCR signaling induces 4045 new acetylation loci that may mediate the global chromatin remodeling and gene activation. We propose that the acetylation islands are epigenetic marks that allow prediction of functional regulatory elements. PMID:15706033

  6. Genome-wide association study reveals two new risk loci for bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Mühleisen, Thomas W; Leber, Markus; Schulze, Thomas G; Strohmaier, Jana; Degenhardt, Franziska; Treutlein, Jens; Mattheisen, Manuel; Forstner, Andreas J; Schumacher, Johannes; Breuer, René; Meier, Sandra; Herms, Stefan; Hoffmann, Per; Lacour, André; Witt, Stephanie H; Reif, Andreas; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Lucae, Susanne; Maier, Wolfgang; Schwarz, Markus; Vedder, Helmut; Kammerer-Ciernioch, Jutta; Pfennig, Andrea; Bauer, Michael; Hautzinger, Martin; Moebus, Susanne; Priebe, Lutz; Czerski, Piotr M; Hauser, Joanna; Lissowska, Jolanta; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James D; Wright, Adam; Mitchell, Philip B; Fullerton, Janice M; Schofield, Peter R; Montgomery, Grant W; Medland, Sarah E; Gordon, Scott D; Martin, Nicholas G; Krasnow, Valery; Chuchalin, Alexander; Babadjanova, Gulja; Pantelejeva, Galina; Abramova, Lilia I; Tiganov, Alexander S; Polonikov, Alexey; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Alda, Martin; Grof, Paul; Rouleau, Guy A; Turecki, Gustavo; Laprise, Catherine; Rivas, Fabio; Mayoral, Fermin; Kogevinas, Manolis; Grigoroiu-Serbanescu, Maria; Propping, Peter; Becker, Tim; Rietschel, Marcella; Nöthen, Markus M; Cichon, Sven

    2014-03-11

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a common and highly heritable mental illness and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have robustly identified the first common genetic variants involved in disease aetiology. The data also provide strong evidence for the presence of multiple additional risk loci, each contributing a relatively small effect to BD susceptibility. Large samples are necessary to detect these risk loci. Here we present results from the largest BD GWAS to date by investigating 2.3 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a sample of 24,025 patients and controls. We detect 56 genome-wide significant SNPs in five chromosomal regions including previously reported risk loci ANK3, ODZ4 and TRANK1, as well as the risk locus ADCY2 (5p15.31) and a region between MIR2113 and POU3F2 (6q16.1). ADCY2 is a key enzyme in cAMP signalling and our finding provides new insights into the biological mechanisms involved in the development of BD.

  7. A guide to genome-wide association analysis and post-analytic interrogation.

    PubMed

    Reed, Eric; Nunez, Sara; Kulp, David; Qian, Jing; Reilly, Muredach P; Foulkes, Andrea S

    2015-12-10

    This tutorial is a learning resource that outlines the basic process and provides specific software tools for implementing a complete genome-wide association analysis. Approaches to post-analytic visualization and interrogation of potentially novel findings are also presented. Applications are illustrated using the free and open-source R statistical computing and graphics software environment, Bioconductor software for bioinformatics and the UCSC Genome Browser. Complete genome-wide association data on 1401 individuals across 861,473 typed single nucleotide polymorphisms from the PennCATH study of coronary artery disease are used for illustration. All data and code, as well as additional instructional resources, are publicly available through the Open Resources in Statistical Genomics project: http://www.stat-gen.org.

  8. Genome-wide analysis of microRNA and mRNA expression signatures in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming-hui; Fu, Sheng-bo; Xiao, Hua-sheng

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is an extremely diverse and complex disease that results from various genetic and epigenetic changes such as DNA copy-number variations, mutations, and aberrant mRNA and/or protein expression caused by abnormal transcriptional regulation. The expression profiles of certain microRNAs (miRNAs) and messenger RNAs (mRNAs) are closely related to cancer progression stages. In the past few decades, DNA microarray and next-generation sequencing techniques have been widely applied to identify miRNA and mRNA signatures for cancers on a genome-wide scale and have provided meaningful insights into cancer diagnosis, prognosis and personalized medicine. In this review, we summarize the progress in genome-wide analysis of miRNAs and mRNAs as cancer biomarkers, highlighting their diagnostic and prognostic roles. PMID:26299954

  9. Genome-wide association analysis identifies six new loci associated with forced vital capacity

    PubMed Central

    Loth, Daan W.; Artigas, María Soler; Gharib, Sina A.; Wain, Louise V.; Franceschini, Nora; Koch, Beate; Pottinger, Tess; Smith, Albert Vernon; Duan, Qing; Oldmeadow, Chris; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Strachan, David P.; James, Alan L.; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Vitart, Veronique; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Wang, Xin-Qun; Trochet, Holly; Kähönen, Mika; Flexeder, Claudia; Albrecht, Eva; Lopez, Lorna M.; de Jong, Kim; Thyagarajan, Bharat; Alves, Alexessander Couto; Enroth, Stefan; Omenaas, Ernst; Joshi, Peter K.; Fall, Tove; Viňuela, Ana; Launer, Lenore J.; Loehr, Laura R.; Fornage, Myriam; Li, Guo; Wilk, Jemma B.; Tang, Wenbo; Manichaikul, Ani; Lahousse, Lies; Harris, Tamara B.; North, Kari E.; Rudnicka, Alicja R.; Hui, Jennie; Gu, Xiangjun; Lumley, Thomas; Wright, Alan F.; Hastie, Nicholas D.; Campbell, Susan; Kumar, Rajesh; Pin, Isabelle; Scott, Robert A.; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H.; Surakka, Ida; Liu, Yongmei; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Schulz, Holger; Heinrich, Joachim; Davies, Gail; Vonk, Judith M.; Wojczynski, Mary; Pouta, Anneli; Johansson, Åsa; Wild, Sarah H.; Ingelsson, Erik; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Völzke, Henry; Hysi, Pirro G.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Morrison, Alanna C.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Gao, Wei; Postma, Dirkje S.; White, Wendy B.; Rich, Stephen S.; Hofman, Albert; Aspelund, Thor; Couper, David; Smith, Lewis J.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Lohman, Kurt; Burchard, Esteban G.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Garcia, Melissa; Joubert, Bonnie R.; McArdle, Wendy L.; Musk, A. Bill; Hansel, Nadia; Heckbert, Susan R.; Zgaga, Lina; van Meurs, Joyce B.J.; Navarro, Pau; Rudan, Igor; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Redline, Susan; Jarvis, Deborah; Zhao, Jing Hua; Rantanen, Taina; O’Connor, George T.; Ripatti, Samuli; Scott, Rodney J.; Karrasch, Stefan; Grallert, Harald; Gaddis, Nathan C.; Starr, John M.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Minster, Ryan L.; Lederer, David J.; Pekkanen, Juha; Gyllensten, Ulf; Campbell, Harry; Morris, Andrew P.; Gläser, Sven; Hammond, Christopher J.; Burkart, Kristin M.; Beilby, John; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hancock, Dana B.; Williams, O. Dale; Polasek, Ozren; Zemunik, Tatijana; Kolcic, Ivana; Petrini, Marcy F.; Wjst, Matthias; Kim, Woo Jin; Porteous, David J.; Scotland, Generation; Smith, Blair H.; Viljanen, Anne; Heliövaara, Markku; Attia, John R.; Sayers, Ian; Hampel, Regina; Gieger, Christian; Deary, Ian J.; Boezen, H. Marike; Newman, Anne; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Wilson, James F.; Lind, Lars; Stricker, Bruno H.; Teumer, Alexander; Spector, Timothy D.; Melén, Erik; Peters, Marjolein J.; Lange, Leslie A.; Barr, R. Graham; Bracke, Ken R.; Verhamme, Fien M.; Sung, Joohon; Hiemstra, Pieter S.; Cassano, Patricia A.; Sood, Akshay; Hayward, Caroline; Dupuis, Josée; Hall, Ian P.; Brusselle, Guy G.; Tobin, Martin D.; London, Stephanie J.

    2014-01-01

    Forced vital capacity (FVC), a spirometric measure of pulmonary function, reflects lung volume and is used to diagnose and monitor lung diseases. We performed genome-wide association study meta-analysis of FVC in 52,253 individuals from 26 studies and followed up the top associations in 32,917 additional individuals of European ancestry. We found six new regions associated at genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10−8) with FVC in or near EFEMP1, BMP6, MIR-129-2/HSD17B12, PRDM11, WWOX, and KCNJ2. Two (GSTCD and PTCH1) loci previously associated with spirometric measures were related to FVC. Newly implicated regions were followed-up in samples of African American, Korean, Chinese, and Hispanic individuals. We detected transcripts for all six newly implicated genes in human lung tissue. The new loci may inform mechanisms involved in lung development and pathogenesis of restrictive lung disease. PMID:24929828

  10. Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Linkage Scans of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Kaixin; Dempfle, Astrid; Arcos-Burgos, Mauricio; Bakker, Steven C.; Banaschewski, Tobias; Biederman, Joseph; Buitelaar, Jan; Castellanos, F.Xavier; Doyle, Alysa; Ebstein, Richard P.; Ekholm, Jenny; Forabosco, Paola; Franke, Barbara; Freitag, Christine; Friedel, Susann; Gill, Michael; Hebebrand, Johannes; Hinney, Anke; Jacob, Christian; Lesch, Klaus Peter; Loo, Sandra K.; Lopera, Francisco; McCracken, James T.; McGough, James J.; Meyer, Jobst; Mick, Eric; Miranda, Ana; Muenke, Maximilian; Mulas, Fernando; Nelson, Stanley F.; Nguyen, T.Trang; Oades, Robert D.; Ogdie, Matthew N.; Palacio, Juan David; Pineda, David; Reif, Andreas; Renner, Tobias J.; Roeyers, Herbert; Romanos, Marcel; Rothenberger, Aribert; Schäfer, Helmut; Sergeant, Joseph; Sinke, Richard J.; Smalley, Susan L.; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; van der Meulen, Emma; Walitza, Susanne; Warnke, Andreas; Lewis, Cathryn M; Faraone, Stephen V.; Asherson, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Genetic contribution to the development of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is well established. Seven independent genome-wide linkage scans have been performed to map loci that increase the risk for ADHD. Although significant linkage signals were identified in some of the studies, there has been limited replications between the various independent datasets. The current study gathered the results from all seven of the ADHD linkage scans and performed a Genome Scan Meta Analysis (GSMA) to identify the genomic region with most consistent linkage evidence across the studies. Genome-wide significant linkage (PSR=0.00034, POR=0.04) was identified on chromosome 16 between 64 and 83 Mb. In addition there are nine other genomic regions from the GSMA showing nominal or suggestive evidence of linkage. All these linkage results may be informative and focus the search for novel ADHD susceptibility genes. PMID:18988193

  11. Genome-wide association analysis identifies six new loci associated with forced vital capacity.

    PubMed

    Loth, Daan W; Soler Artigas, María; Gharib, Sina A; Wain, Louise V; Franceschini, Nora; Koch, Beate; Pottinger, Tess D; Smith, Albert Vernon; Duan, Qing; Oldmeadow, Chris; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Strachan, David P; James, Alan L; Huffman, Jennifer E; Vitart, Veronique; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Wareham, Nicholas J; Kaprio, Jaakko; Wang, Xin-Qun; Trochet, Holly; Kähönen, Mika; Flexeder, Claudia; Albrecht, Eva; Lopez, Lorna M; de Jong, Kim; Thyagarajan, Bharat; Alves, Alexessander Couto; Enroth, Stefan; Omenaas, Ernst; Joshi, Peter K; Fall, Tove; Viñuela, Ana; Launer, Lenore J; Loehr, Laura R; Fornage, Myriam; Li, Guo; Wilk, Jemma B; Tang, Wenbo; Manichaikul, Ani; Lahousse, Lies; Harris, Tamara B; North, Kari E; Rudnicka, Alicja R; Hui, Jennie; Gu, Xiangjun; Lumley, Thomas; Wright, Alan F; Hastie, Nicholas D; Campbell, Susan; Kumar, Rajesh; Pin, Isabelle; Scott, Robert A; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H; Surakka, Ida; Liu, Yongmei; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Schulz, Holger; Heinrich, Joachim; Davies, Gail; Vonk, Judith M; Wojczynski, Mary; Pouta, Anneli; Johansson, Asa; Wild, Sarah H; Ingelsson, Erik; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Völzke, Henry; Hysi, Pirro G; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Morrison, Alanna C; Rotter, Jerome I; Gao, Wei; Postma, Dirkje S; White, Wendy B; Rich, Stephen S; Hofman, Albert; Aspelund, Thor; Couper, David; Smith, Lewis J; Psaty, Bruce M; Lohman, Kurt; Burchard, Esteban G; Uitterlinden, André G; Garcia, Melissa; Joubert, Bonnie R; McArdle, Wendy L; Musk, A Bill; Hansel, Nadia; Heckbert, Susan R; Zgaga, Lina; van Meurs, Joyce B J; Navarro, Pau; Rudan, Igor; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Redline, Susan; Jarvis, Deborah L; Zhao, Jing Hua; Rantanen, Taina; O'Connor, George T; Ripatti, Samuli; Scott, Rodney J; Karrasch, Stefan; Grallert, Harald; Gaddis, Nathan C; Starr, John M; Wijmenga, Cisca; Minster, Ryan L; Lederer, David J; Pekkanen, Juha; Gyllensten, Ulf; Campbell, Harry; Morris, Andrew P; Gläser, Sven; Hammond, Christopher J; Burkart, Kristin M; Beilby, John; Kritchevsky, Stephen B; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hancock, Dana B; Williams, O Dale; Polasek, Ozren; Zemunik, Tatijana; Kolcic, Ivana; Petrini, Marcy F; Wjst, Matthias; Kim, Woo Jin; Porteous, David J; Scotland, Generation; Smith, Blair H; Viljanen, Anne; Heliövaara, Markku; Attia, John R; Sayers, Ian; Hampel, Regina; Gieger, Christian; Deary, Ian J; Boezen, H Marike; Newman, Anne; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Wilson, James F; Lind, Lars; Stricker, Bruno H; Teumer, Alexander; Spector, Timothy D; Melén, Erik; Peters, Marjolein J; Lange, Leslie A; Barr, R Graham; Bracke, Ken R; Verhamme, Fien M; Sung, Joohon; Hiemstra, Pieter S; Cassano, Patricia A; Sood, Akshay; Hayward, Caroline; Dupuis, Josée; Hall, Ian P; Brusselle, Guy G; Tobin, Martin D; London, Stephanie J

    2014-07-01

    Forced vital capacity (FVC), a spirometric measure of pulmonary function, reflects lung volume and is used to diagnose and monitor lung diseases. We performed genome-wide association study meta-analysis of FVC in 52,253 individuals from 26 studies and followed up the top associations in 32,917 additional individuals of European ancestry. We found six new regions associated at genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10(-8)) with FVC in or near EFEMP1, BMP6, MIR129-2-HSD17B12, PRDM11, WWOX and KCNJ2. Two loci previously associated with spirometric measures (GSTCD and PTCH1) were related to FVC. Newly implicated regions were followed up in samples from African-American, Korean, Chinese and Hispanic individuals. We detected transcripts for all six newly implicated genes in human lung tissue. The new loci may inform mechanisms involved in lung development and the pathogenesis of restrictive lung disease.

  12. Genome-Wide Meta-Analysis of Longitudinal Alcohol Consumption Across Youth and Early Adulthood.

    PubMed

    Adkins, Daniel E; Clark, Shaunna L; Copeland, William E; Kennedy, Martin; Conway, Kevin; Angold, Adrian; Maes, Hermine; Liu, Youfang; Kumar, Gaurav; Erkanli, Alaattin; Patkar, Ashwin A; Silberg, Judy; Brown, Tyson H; Fergusson, David M; Horwood, L John; Eaves, Lindon; van den Oord, Edwin J C G; Sullivan, Patrick F; Costello, E J

    2015-08-01

    The public health burden of alcohol is unevenly distributed across the life course, with levels of use, abuse, and dependence increasing across adolescence and peaking in early adulthood. Here, we leverage this temporal patterning to search for common genetic variants predicting developmental trajectories of alcohol consumption. Comparable psychiatric evaluations measuring alcohol consumption were collected in three longitudinal community samples (N=2,126, obs=12,166). Consumption-repeated measurements spanning adolescence and early adulthood were analyzed using linear mixed models, estimating individual consumption trajectories, which were then tested for association with Illumina 660W-Quad genotype data (866,099 SNPs after imputation and QC). Association results were combined across samples using standard meta-analysis methods. Four meta-analysis associations satisfied our pre-determined genome-wide significance criterion (FDR<0.1) and six others met our 'suggestive' criterion (FDR<0.2). Genome-wide significant associations were highly biological plausible, including associations within GABA transporter 1, SLC6A1 (solute carrier family 6, member 1), and exonic hits in LOC100129340 (mitofusin-1-like). Pathway analyses elaborated single marker results, indicating significant enriched associations to intuitive biological mechanisms, including neurotransmission, xenobiotic pharmacodynamics, and nuclear hormone receptors (NHR). These findings underscore the value of combining longitudinal behavioral data and genome-wide genotype information in order to study developmental patterns and improve statistical power in genomic studies.

  13. Five endometrial cancer risk loci identified through genome-wide association analysis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Timothy H T; Thompson, Deborah J; O'Mara, Tracy A; Painter, Jodie N; Glubb, Dylan M; Flach, Susanne; Lewis, Annabelle; French, Juliet D; Freeman-Mills, Luke; Church, David; Gorman, Maggie; Martin, Lynn; Hodgson, Shirley; Webb, Penelope M; Attia, John; Holliday, Elizabeth G; McEvoy, Mark; Scott, Rodney J; Henders, Anjali K; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Nyholt, Dale R; Ahmed, Shahana; Healey, Catherine S; Shah, Mitul; Dennis, Joe; Fasching, Peter A; Beckmann, Matthias W; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Li, Jingmei; Dörk, Thilo; Dürst, Matthias; Hillemanns, Peter; Runnebaum, Ingo; Amant, Frederic; Schrauwen, Stefanie; Zhao, Hui; Lambrechts, Diether; Depreeuw, Jeroen; Dowdy, Sean C; Goode, Ellen L; Fridley, Brooke L; Winham, Stacey J; Njølstad, Tormund S; Salvesen, Helga B; Trovik, Jone; Werner, Henrica M J; Ashton, Katie; Otton, Geoffrey; Proietto, Tony; Liu, Tao; Mints, Miriam; Tham, Emma; Li, Mulin Jun; Yip, Shun H; Wang, Junwen; Bolla, Manjeet K; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Wang, Qin; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Dunlop, Malcolm; Houlston, Richard; Palles, Claire; Hopper, John L; Peto, Julian; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Burwinkel, Barbara; Brenner, Hermann; Meindl, Alfons; Brauch, Hiltrud; Lindblom, Annika; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Couch, Fergus J; Giles, Graham G; Kristensen, Vessela N; Cox, Angela; Cunningham, Julie M; Pharoah, Paul D P; Dunning, Alison M; Edwards, Stacey L; Easton, Douglas F; Tomlinson, Ian; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2016-06-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis of three endometrial cancer genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and two follow-up phases totaling 7,737 endometrial cancer cases and 37,144 controls of European ancestry. Genome-wide imputation and meta-analysis identified five new risk loci of genome-wide significance at likely regulatory regions on chromosomes 13q22.1 (rs11841589, near KLF5), 6q22.31 (rs13328298, in LOC643623 and near HEY2 and NCOA7), 8q24.21 (rs4733613, telomeric to MYC), 15q15.1 (rs937213, in EIF2AK4, near BMF) and 14q32.33 (rs2498796, in AKT1, near SIVA1). We also found a second independent 8q24.21 signal (rs17232730). Functional studies of the 13q22.1 locus showed that rs9600103 (pairwise r(2) = 0.98 with rs11841589) is located in a region of active chromatin that interacts with the KLF5 promoter region. The rs9600103[T] allele that is protective in endometrial cancer suppressed gene expression in vitro, suggesting that regulation of the expression of KLF5, a gene linked to uterine development, is implicated in tumorigenesis. These findings provide enhanced insight into the genetic and biological basis of endometrial cancer.

  14. Genome-wide gene-environment interaction analysis for asbestos exposure in lung cancer susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Wei, Sheng; Wang, Li-E; McHugh, Michelle K; Han, Younghun; Xiong, Momiao; Amos, Christopher I; Spitz, Margaret R; Wei, Qingyi Wei

    2012-08-01

    Asbestos exposure is a known risk factor for lung cancer. Although recent genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified some novel loci for lung cancer risk, few addressed genome-wide gene-environment interactions. To determine gene-asbestos interactions in lung cancer risk, we conducted genome-wide gene-environment interaction analyses at levels of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), genes and pathways, using our published Texas lung cancer GWAS dataset. This dataset included 317 498 SNPs from 1154 lung cancer cases and 1137 cancer-free controls. The initial SNP-level P-values for interactions between genetic variants and self-reported asbestos exposure were estimated by unconditional logistic regression models with adjustment for age, sex, smoking status and pack-years. The P-value for the most significant SNP rs13383928 was 2.17×10(-6), which did not reach the genome-wide statistical significance. Using a versatile gene-based test approach, we found that the top significant gene was C7orf54, located on 7q32.1 (P = 8.90×10(-5)). Interestingly, most of the other significant genes were located on 11q13. When we used an improved gene-set-enrichment analysis approach, we found that the Fas signaling pathway and the antigen processing and presentation pathway were most significant (nominal P < 0.001; false discovery rate < 0.05) among 250 pathways containing 17 572 genes. We believe that our analysis is a pilot study that first describes the gene-asbestos interaction in lung cancer risk at levels of SNPs, genes and pathways. Our findings suggest that immune function regulation-related pathways may be mechanistically involved in asbestos-associated lung cancer risk.

  15. Cooperative Genome-Wide Analysis Shows Increased Homozygosity in Early Onset Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nalls, Michael A.; Martinez, Maria; Schulte, Claudia; Holmans, Peter; Gasser, Thomas; Hardy, John; Singleton, Andrew B.; Wood, Nicholas W.; Brice, Alexis; Heutink, Peter; Williams, Nigel; Morris, Huw R.

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) occurs in both familial and sporadic forms, and both monogenic and complex genetic factors have been identified. Early onset PD (EOPD) is particularly associated with autosomal recessive (AR) mutations, and three genes, PARK2, PARK7 and PINK1, have been found to carry mutations leading to AR disease. Since mutations in these genes account for less than 10% of EOPD patients, we hypothesized that further recessive genetic factors are involved in this disorder, which may appear in extended runs of homozygosity. We carried out genome wide SNP genotyping to look for extended runs of homozygosity (ROHs) in 1,445 EOPD cases and 6,987 controls. Logistic regression analyses showed an increased level of genomic homozygosity in EOPD cases compared to controls. These differences are larger for ROH of 9 Mb and above, where there is a more than three-fold increase in the proportion of cases carrying a ROH. These differences are not explained by occult recessive mutations at existing loci. Controlling for genome wide homozygosity in logistic regression analyses increased the differences between cases and controls, indicating that in EOPD cases ROHs do not simply relate to genome wide measures of inbreeding. Homozygosity at a locus on chromosome19p13.3 was identified as being more common in EOPD cases as compared to controls. Sequencing analysis of genes and predicted transcripts within this locus failed to identify a novel mutation causing EOPD in our cohort. There is an increased rate of genome wide homozygosity in EOPD, as measured by an increase in ROHs. These ROHs are a signature of inbreeding and do not necessarily harbour disease-causing genetic variants. Although there might be other regions of interest apart from chromosome 19p13.3, we lack the power to detect them with this analysis. PMID:22427796

  16. Genome-Wide Association and Transcriptome Analyses Reveal Candidate Genes Underlying Yield-determining Traits in Brassica napus

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Kun; Peng, Liu; Zhang, Chao; Lu, Junhua; Yang, Bo; Xiao, Zhongchun; Liang, Ying; Xu, Xingfu; Qu, Cunmin; Zhang, Kai; Liu, Liezhao; Zhu, Qinlong; Fu, Minglian; Yuan, Xiaoyan; Li, Jiana

    2017-01-01

    Yield is one of the most important yet complex crop traits. To improve our understanding of the genetic basis of yield establishment, and to identify candidate genes responsible for yield improvement in Brassica napus, we performed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for seven yield-determining traits [main inflorescence pod number (MIPN), branch pod number (BPN), pod number per plant (PNP), seed number per pod (SPP), thousand seed weight, main inflorescence yield (MIY), and branch yield], using data from 520 diverse B. napus accessions from two different yield environments. In total, we detected 128 significant single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 93 of which were revealed as novel by integrative analysis. A combination of GWAS and transcriptome sequencing on 21 haplotype blocks from samples pooled by four extremely high-yielding or low-yielding accessions revealed the differential expression of 14 crucial candiate genes (such as Bna.MYB83, Bna.SPL5, and Bna.ROP3) associated with multiple traits or containing multiple SNPs associated with the same trait. Functional annotation and expression pattern analyses further demonstrated that these 14 candiate genes might be important in developmental processes and biomass accumulation, thus affecting the yield establishment of B. napus. These results provide valuable information for understanding the genetic mechanisms underlying the establishment of high yield in B. napus, and lay the foundation for developing high-yielding B. napus varieties. PMID:28261256

  17. Genome-wide comparative analysis reveals similar types of NBS genes in hybrid Citrus sinensis genome and original Citrus clementine genome and provides new insights into non-TIR NBS genes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In this study, we identified and compared nucleotide-binding site (NBS) domain-containing genes from three Citrus genomes (C. clementina, C. sinensis from USA and C. sinensis from China). Phylogenetic analysis of all Citrus NBS genes across these three genomes revealed that there are three approxima...

  18. Genetic determinants of common epilepsies: a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background The epilepsies are a clinically heterogeneous group of neurological disorders. Despite strong evidence for heritability, genome-wide association studies have had little success in identification of risk loci associated with epilepsy, probably because of relatively small sample sizes and insufficient power. We aimed to identify risk loci through meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies for all epilepsy and the two largest clinical subtypes (genetic generalised epilepsy and focal epilepsy). Methods We combined genome-wide association data from 12 cohorts of individuals with epilepsy and controls from population-based datasets. Controls were ethnically matched with cases. We phenotyped individuals with epilepsy into categories of genetic generalised epilepsy, focal epilepsy, or unclassified epilepsy. After standardised filtering for quality control and imputation to account for different genotyping platforms across sites, investigators at each site conducted a linear mixed-model association analysis for each dataset. Combining summary statistics, we conducted fixed-effects meta-analyses of all epilepsy, focal epilepsy, and genetic generalised epilepsy. We set the genome-wide significance threshold at p<1·66 × 10−8. Findings We included 8696 cases and 26 157 controls in our analysis. Meta-analysis of the all-epilepsy cohort identified loci at 2q24.3 (p=8·71 × 10−10), implicating SCN1A, and at 4p15.1 (p=5·44 × 10−9), harbouring PCDH7, which encodes a protocadherin molecule not previously implicated in epilepsy. For the cohort of genetic generalised epilepsy, we noted a single signal at 2p16.1 (p=9·99 × 10−9), implicating VRK2 or FANCL. No single nucleotide polymorphism achieved genome-wide significance for focal epilepsy. Interpretation This meta-analysis describes a new locus not previously implicated in epilepsy and provides further evidence about the genetic architecture of these disorders, with the

  19. Genome-wide analysis of long-term evolutionary domestication in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Mark A.; Long, Anthony D.; Greenspan, Zachary S.; Greer, Lee F.; Burke, Molly K.; Villeponteau, Bryant; Matsagas, Kennedy C.; Rizza, Cristina L.; Mueller, Laurence D.; Rose, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Experimental evolutionary genomics now allows biologists to test fundamental theories concerning the genetic basis of adaptation. We have conducted one of the longest laboratory evolution experiments with any sexually-reproducing metazoan, Drosophila melanogaster. We used next-generation resequencing data from this experiment to examine genome-wide patterns of genetic variation over an evolutionary time-scale that approaches 1,000 generations. We also compared measures of variation within and differentiation between our populations to simulations based on a variety of evolutionary scenarios. Our analysis yielded no clear evidence of hard selective sweeps, whereby natural selection acts to increase the frequency of a newly-arising mutation in a population until it becomes fixed. We do find evidence for selection acting on standing genetic variation, as independent replicate populations exhibit similar population-genetic dynamics, without obvious fixation of candidate alleles under selection. A hidden-Markov model test for selection also found widespread evidence for selection. We found more genetic variation genome-wide, and less differentiation between replicate populations genome-wide, than arose in any of our simulated evolutionary scenarios. PMID:28004838

  20. Genome-wide association analysis of age-at-onset in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Kamboh, M. Ilyas; Barmada, M. Michael; Demirci, F. Yesim; Minster, Ryan L.; Carrasquillo, Minerva M.; Pankratz, V. Shane; Younkin, Steven G.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Sweet, Robert A.; Feingold, Eleanor; DeKosky, Steven T.; Lopez, Oscar L.

    2011-01-01

    The risk of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is strongly determined by genetic factors and recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified several genes for the disease risk. In addition to the disease risk, age-at-onset (AAO) of AD has also strong genetic component with an estimated heritability of 42%. Identification of AAO genes may help to understand the biological mechanisms that regulate the onset of the disease. Here we report the first GWAS focused on identifying genes for the AAO of AD. We performed a genome-wide meta analysis on 3 samples comprising a total of 2,222 AD cases. A total of ~2.5 million directly genotyped or imputed SNPs were analyzed in relation to AAO of AD. As expected, the most significant associations were observed in the APOE region on chromosome 19 where several SNPs surpassed the conservative genome-wide significant threshold (P<5E-08). The most significant SNP outside the APOE region was located in the DCHS2 gene on chromosome 4q31.3 (rs1466662; P=4.95E-07). There were 19 additional significant SNPs in this region at P<1E-04 and the DCHS2 gene is expressed in the cerebral cortex and thus is a potential candidate for affecting AAO in AD. These findings need to be confirmed in additional well-powered samples. PMID:22005931

  1. Host cell factors in HIV replication: meta-analysis of genome-wide studies.

    PubMed

    Bushman, Frederic D; Malani, Nirav; Fernandes, Jason; D'Orso, Iván; Cagney, Gerard; Diamond, Tracy L; Zhou, Honglin; Hazuda, Daria J; Espeseth, Amy S; König, Renate; Bandyopadhyay, Sourav; Ideker, Trey; Goff, Stephen P; Krogan, Nevan J; Frankel, Alan D; Young, John A T; Chanda, Sumit K

    2009-05-01

    We have analyzed host cell genes linked to HIV replication that were identified in nine genome-wide studies, including three independent siRNA screens. Overlaps among the siRNA screens were very modest (<7% for any pairwise combination), and similarly, only modest overlaps were seen in pairwise comparisons with other types of genome-wide studies. Combining all genes from the genome-wide studies together with genes reported in the literature to affect HIV yields 2,410 protein-coding genes, or fully 9.5% of all human genes (though of course some of these are false positive calls). Here we report an "encyclopedia" of all overlaps between studies (available at http://www.hostpathogen.org), which yielded a more extensively corroborated set of host factors assisting HIV replication. We used these genes to calculate refined networks that specify cellular subsystems recruited by HIV to assist in replication, and present additional analysis specifying host cell genes that are attractive as potential therapeutic targets.

  2. Genome-wide Association Analysis Identifies 14 New Risk Loci for Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Ripke, Stephan; O'Dushlaine, Colm; Chambert, Kimberly; Moran, Jennifer L; Kähler, Anna K; Akterin, Susanne; Bergen, Sarah; Collins, Ann L; Crowley, James J; Fromer, Menachem; Kim, Yunjung; Lee, Sang Hong; Magnusson, Patrik KE; Sanchez, Nick; Stahl, Eli A; Williams, Stephanie; Wray, Naomi R; Xia, Kai; Bettella, Francesco; Børglum, Anders D; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan K; Cormican, Paul; Craddock, Nick; de Leeuw, Christiaan; Durmishi, Naser; Gill, Michael; Golimbet, Vera; Hamshere, Marian L; Holmans, Peter; Hougaard, David M; Kendler, Kenneth S; Lin, Kuang; Morris, Derek W; Mors, Ole; Mortensen, Preben B; Neale, Benjamin M; O'Neill, Francis A; Owen, Michael J; Milovancevic, MilicaPejovic; Posthuma, Danielle; Powell, John; Richards, Alexander L; Riley, Brien P; Ruderfer, Douglas; Rujescu, Dan; Sigurdsson, Engilbert; Silagadze, Teimuraz; Smit, August B; Stefansson, Hreinn; Steinberg, Stacy; Suvisaari, Jaana; Tosato, Sarah; Verhage, Matthijs; Walters, James T; Bramon, Elvira; Corvin, Aiden P; O'Donovan, Michael C; Stefansson, Kari; Scolnick, Edward; Purcell, Shaun; McCarroll, Steve; Sklar, Pamela; Hultman, Christina M; Sullivan, Patrick F

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a heritable disorder with substantial public health impact. We conducted a multi-stage genome-wide association study (GWAS) for schizophrenia beginning with a Swedish national sample (5,001 cases, 6,243 controls) followed by meta-analysis with prior schizophrenia GWAS (8,832 cases, 12,067 controls) and finally by replication of SNPs in 168 genomic regions in independent samples (7,413 cases, 19,762 controls, and 581 trios). In total, 22 regions met genome-wide significance (14 novel and one previously implicated in bipolar disorder). The results strongly implicate calcium signaling in the etiology of schizophrenia, and include genome-wide significant results for CACNA1C and CACNB2 whose protein products interact. We estimate that ∼8,300 independent and predominantly common SNPs contribute to risk for schizophrenia and that these collectively account for most of its heritability. Common genetic variation plays an important role in the etiology of schizophrenia, and larger studies will allow more detailed understanding of this devastating disorder. PMID:23974872

  3. Genome-wide and parental allele-specific analysis of CTCF and cohesin DNA binding in mouse brain reveals a tissue-specific binding pattern and an association with imprinted differentially methylated regions.

    PubMed

    Prickett, Adam R; Barkas, Nikolaos; McCole, Ruth B; Hughes, Siobhan; Amante, Samuele M; Schulz, Reiner; Oakey, Rebecca J

    2013-10-01

    DNA binding factors are essential for regulating gene expression. CTCF and cohesin are DNA binding factors with central roles in chromatin organization and gene expression. We determined the sites of CTCF and cohesin binding to DNA in mouse brain, genome wide and in an allele-specific manner with high read-depth ChIP-seq. By comparing our results with existing data for mouse liver and embryonic stem (ES) cells, we investigated the tissue specificity of CTCF binding sites. ES cells have fewer unique CTCF binding sites occupied than liver and brain, consistent with a ground-state pattern of CTCF binding that is elaborated during differentiation. CTCF binding sites without the canonical consensus motif were highly tissue specific. In brain, a third of CTCF and cohesin binding sites coincide, consistent with the potential for many interactions between cohesin and CTCF but also many instances of independent action. In the context of genomic imprinting, CTCF and/or cohesin bind to a majority but not all differentially methylated regions, with preferential binding to the unmethylated parental allele. Whether the parental allele-specific methylation was established in the parental germlines or post-fertilization in the embryo is not a determinant in CTCF or cohesin binding. These findings link CTCF and cohesin with the control regions of a subset of imprinted genes, supporting the notion that imprinting control is mechanistically diverse.

  4. Motor sequencing deficit as an endophenotype of speech sound disorder: A genome-wide linkage analysis in a multigenerational family

    PubMed Central

    Peter, Beate; Matsushita, Mark; Raskind, Wendy H.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate a measure of motor sequencing deficit as a potential endophenotype of speech sound disorder (SSD) in a multigenerational family with evidence of familial SSD. Methods In a multigenerational family with evidence of a familial motor-based SSD, affectation status and a measure of motor sequencing during oral motor testing were obtained. To further investigate the role of motor sequencing as an endophenotype for genetic studies, parametric and nonparametric linkage analyses were conducted using a genome-wide panel of 404 microsatellites. Results In seven of the ten family members with available data, SSD affectation status and motor sequencing status coincided. Linkage analysis revealed four regions of interest, 6p21, 7q32, 7q36, and 8q24, primarily identified with the measure of motor sequencing ability. The 6p21 region overlaps with a locus implicated in rapid alternating naming in a recent genome-wide dyslexia linkage study. The 7q32 locus contains a locus implicated in dyslexia. The 7q36 locus borders on a gene known to affect component traits of language impairment. Conclusions Results are consistent with a motor-based endophenotype of SSD that would be informative for genetic studies. The linkage results in this first genome-wide study in a multigenerational family with SSD warrant follow-up in additional families and with fine mapping or next-generation approaches to gene identification. PMID:22517379

  5. Genome-Wide Association Analysis of the Anthocyanin and Carotenoid Contents of Rose Petals

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Dietmar F.; Schott, Rena T.; Voorrips, Roeland E.; Smulders, Marinus J. M.; Linde, Marcus; Debener, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Petal color is one of the key characteristics determining the attractiveness and therefore the commercial value of an ornamental crop. Here, we present the first genome-wide association study for the important ornamental crop rose, focusing on the anthocyanin and carotenoid contents in petals of 96 diverse tetraploid garden rose genotypes. Cultivated roses display a vast phenotypic and genetic diversity and are therefore ideal targets for association genetics. For marker analysis, we used a recently designed Axiom SNP chip comprising 68,000 SNPs with additionally 281 SSRs, 400 AFLPs and 246 markers from candidate genes. An analysis of the structure of the rose population revealed three subpopulations with most of the genetic variation between individual genotypes rather than between clusters and with a high average proportion of heterozygous loci. The mapping of markers significantly associated with anthocyanin and carotenoid content to the related Fragaria and Prunus genomes revealed clusters of associated markers indicating five genomic regions associated with the total anthocyanin content and two large clusters associated with the carotenoid content. Among the marker clusters associated with the phenotypes, we found several candidate genes with known functions in either the anthocyanin or the carotenoid biosynthesis pathways. Among others, we identified a glutathione-S-transferase, 4CL, an auxin response factor and F3'H as candidate genes affecting anthocyanin concentration, and CCD4 and Zeaxanthine epoxidase as candidates affecting the concentration of carotenoids. These markers are starting points for future validation experiments in independent populations as well as for functional genomic studies to identify the causal factors for the observed color phenotypes. Furthermore, validated markers may be interesting tools for marker-assisted selection in commercial breeding programmes in that they provide the tools to identify superior parental combinations that

  6. GDSL esterase/lipase genes in Brassica rapa L.: genome-wide identification and expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiangshu; Yi, Hankuil; Han, Ching-Tack; Nou, Ill-Sup; Hur, Yoonkang

    2016-04-01

    GDSL esterase/lipase proteins (GELPs), a very large subfamily of lipolytic enzymes, have been identified in microbes and many plants, but only a few have been characterized with respect to their roles in growth, development, and stress responses. In Brassica crops, as in many other species, genome-wide systematic analysis and functional studies of these genes are still lacking. As a first step to study their function in B. rapa ssp. pekinensis (Chinese cabbage), we comprehensively identified all GELP genes in the genome. We found a total of 121 Brassica rapa GDSL esterase/lipase protein genes (BrGELPs), forming three clades in the phylogenetic analysis (two major and one minor), with an asymmetrical chromosomal distribution. Most BrGELPs possess four strictly conserved residues (Ser-Gly-Asn-His) in four separate conserved regions, along with short conserved and clade-specific blocks, suggesting functional diversification of these proteins. Detailed expression profiling revealed that BrGELPs were expressed in various tissues, including floral organs, implying that BrGELPs play diverse roles in various tissues and during development. Ten percent of BrGELPs were specifically expressed in fertile buds, rather than male-sterile buds, implying their involvement in pollen development. Analyses of EXL6 (extracellular lipase 6) expression and its co-expressed genes in both B. rapa and Arabidopsis, as well as knockdown of this gene in Arabidopsis, revealed that this gene plays an important role in pollen development in both species. The data described in this study will facilitate future investigations of other BrGELP functions.

  7. Genome-Wide Binding of MBD2 Reveals Strong Preference for Highly Methylated Loci

    PubMed Central

    Menafra, Roberta; Brinkman, Arie B.; Matarese, Filomena; Franci, Gianluigi; Bartels, Stefanie J. J.; Nguyen, Luan; Shimbo, Takashi; Wade, Paul A.; Hubner, Nina C.; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G.

    2014-01-01

    MBD2 is a subunit of the NuRD complex that is postulated to mediate gene repression via recruitment of the complex to methylated DNA. In this study we adopted an MBD2 tagging-approach to study its genome wide binding characteristics. We show that in vivo MBD2 is mainly recruited to CpG island promoters that are highly methylated. Interestingly, MBD2 binds around 1 kb downstream of the transcription start site of a subset of ∼400 CpG island promoters that are characterized by the presence of active histone marks, RNA polymerase II (Pol2) and low to medium gene expression levels and H3K36me3 deposition. These tagged-MBD2 binding sites in MCF-7 show increased methylation in a cohort of primary breast cancers but not in normal breast samples, suggesting a putative role for MBD2 in breast cancer. PMID:24927503

  8. Genome-wide mapping reveals conservation of promoter DNA methylation following chicken domestication.

    PubMed

    Li, Qinghe; Wang, Yuanyuan; Hu, Xiaoxiang; Zhao, Yaofeng; Li, Ning

    2015-03-04

    It is well-known that environment influences DNA methylation, however, the extent of heritable DNA methylation variation following animal domestication remains largely unknown. Using meDIP-chip we mapped the promoter methylomes for 23,316 genes in muscle tissues of ancestral and domestic chickens. We systematically examined the variation of promoter DNA methylation in terms of different breeds, differentially expressed genes, SNPs and genes undergo genetic selection sweeps. While considerable changes in DNA sequence and gene expression programs were prevalent, we found that the inter-strain DNA methylation patterns were highly conserved in promoter region between the wild and domestic chicken breeds. Our data suggests a global preservation of DNA methylation between the wild and domestic chicken breeds in either a genome-wide or locus-specific scale in chick muscle tissues.

  9. Genome-Wide and Paternal Diversity Reveal a Recent Origin of Human Populations in North Africa

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Cruz, Begoña; Zalloua, Pierre; Benammar Elgaaied, Amel; Comas, David

    2013-01-01

    The geostrategic location of North Africa as a crossroad between three continents and as a stepping-stone outside Africa has evoked anthropological and genetic interest in this region. Numerous studies have described the genetic landscape of the human population in North Africa employing paternal, maternal, and biparental molecular markers. However, information from these markers which have different inheritance patterns has been mostly assessed independently, resulting in an incomplete description of the region. In this study, we analyze uniparental and genome-wide markers examining similarities or contrasts in the results and consequently provide a comprehensive description of the evolutionary history of North Africa populations. Our results show that both males and females in North Africa underwent a similar admixture history with slight differences in the proportions of admixture components. Consequently, genome-wide diversity show similar patterns with admixture tests suggesting North Africans are a mixture of ancestral populations related to current Africans and Eurasians with more affinity towards the out-of-Africa populations than to sub-Saharan Africans. We estimate from the paternal lineages that most North Africans emerged ∼15,000 years ago during the last glacial warming and that population splits started after the desiccation of the Sahara. Although most North Africans share a common admixture history, the Tunisian Berbers show long periods of genetic isolation and appear to have diverged from surrounding populations without subsequent mixture. On the other hand, continuous gene flow from the Middle East made Egyptians genetically closer to Eurasians than to other North Africans. We show that genetic diversity of today's North Africans mostly captures patterns from migrations post Last Glacial Maximum and therefore may be insufficient to inform on the initial population of the region during the Middle Paleolithic period. PMID:24312208

  10. Genome-wide and paternal diversity reveal a recent origin of human populations in North Africa.

    PubMed

    Fadhlaoui-Zid, Karima; Haber, Marc; Martínez-Cruz, Begoña; Zalloua, Pierre; Benammar Elgaaied, Amel; Comas, David

    2013-01-01

    The geostrategic location of North Africa as a crossroad between three continents and as a stepping-stone outside Africa has evoked anthropological and genetic interest in this region. Numerous studies have described the genetic landscape of the human population in North Africa employing paternal, maternal, and biparental molecular markers. However, information from these markers which have different inheritance patterns has been mostly assessed independently, resulting in an incomplete description of the region. In this study, we analyze uniparental and genome-wide markers examining similarities or contrasts in the results and consequently provide a comprehensive description of the evolutionary history of North Africa populations. Our results show that both males and females in North Africa underwent a similar admixture history with slight differences in the proportions of admixture components. Consequently, genome-wide diversity show similar patterns with admixture tests suggesting North Africans are a mixture of ancestral populations related to current Africans and Eurasians with more affinity towards the out-of-Africa populations than to sub-Saharan Africans. We estimate from the paternal lineages that most North Africans emerged ∼15,000 years ago during the last glacial warming and that population splits started after the desiccation of the Sahara. Although most North Africans share a common admixture history, the Tunisian Berbers show long periods of genetic isolation and appear to have diverged from surrounding populations without subsequent mixture. On the other hand, continuous gene flow from the Middle East made Egyptians genetically closer to Eurasians than to other North Africans. We show that genetic diversity of today's North Africans mostly captures patterns from migrations post Last Glacial Maximum and therefore may be insufficient to inform on the initial population of the region during the Middle Paleolithic period.

  11. A Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals Variants in ARL15 that Influence Adiponectin Levels

    PubMed Central

    Richards, J. Brent; Waterworth, Dawn; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Hivert, Marie-France; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Perry, John R. B.; Tanaka, Toshiko; Timpson, Nicholas John; Semple, Robert K.; Soranzo, Nicole; Song, Kijoung; Rocha, Nuno; Grundberg, Elin; Dupuis, Josée; Florez, Jose C.; Langenberg, Claudia; Prokopenko, Inga; Saxena, Richa; Sladek, Robert; Aulchenko, Yurii; Evans, David; Waeber, Gerard; Erdmann, Jeanette; Burnett, Mary-Susan; Sattar, Naveed; Devaney, Joseph; Willenborg, Christina; Hingorani, Aroon; Witteman, Jaquelin C. M.; Vollenweider, Peter; Glaser, Beate; Hengstenberg, Christian; Ferrucci, Luigi; Melzer, David; Stark, Klaus; Deanfield, John; Winogradow, Janina; Grassl, Martina; Hall, Alistair S.; Egan, Josephine M.; Thompson, John R.; Ricketts, Sally L.; König, Inke R.; Reinhard, Wibke; Grundy, Scott; Wichmann, H-Erich; Barter, Phil; Mahley, Robert; Kesaniemi, Y. Antero; Rader, Daniel J.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Epstein, Stephen E.; Stewart, Alexandre F. R.; Van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Schunkert, Heribert; Burling, Keith; Deloukas, Panos; Pastinen, Tomi; Samani, Nilesh J.; McPherson, Ruth; Davey Smith, George; Frayling, Timothy M.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Meigs, James B.

    2009-01-01

    The adipocyte-derived protein adiponectin is highly heritable and inversely associated with risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) and coronary heart disease (CHD). We meta-analyzed 3 genome-wide association studies for circulating adiponectin levels (n = 8,531) and sought validation of the lead single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 5 additional cohorts (n = 6,202). Five SNPs were genome-wide significant in their relationship with adiponectin (P≤5×10−8). We then tested whether these 5 SNPs were associated with risk of T2D and CHD using a Bonferroni-corrected threshold of P≤0.011 to declare statistical significance for these disease associations. SNPs at the adiponectin-encoding ADIPOQ locus demonstrated the strongest associations with adiponectin levels (P-combined = 9.2×10−19 for lead SNP, rs266717, n = 14,733). A novel variant in the ARL15 (ADP-ribosylation factor-like 15) gene was associated with lower circulating levels of adiponectin (rs4311394-G, P-combined = 2.9×10−8, n = 14,733). This same risk allele at ARL15 was also associated with a higher risk of CHD (odds ratio [OR] = 1.12, P = 8.5×10−6, n = 22,421) more nominally, an increased risk of T2D (OR = 1.11, P = 3.2×10−3, n = 10,128), and several metabolic traits. Expression studies in humans indicated that ARL15 is well-expressed in skeletal muscle. These findings identify a novel protein, ARL15, which influences circulating adiponectin levels and may impact upon CHD risk. PMID:20011104

  12. Genome-wide analysis of bZIP-encoding genes in maize.

    PubMed

    Wei, Kaifa; Chen, Juan; Wang, Yanmei; Chen, Yanhui; Chen, Shaoxiang; Lin, Yina; Pan, Si; Zhong, Xiaojun; Xie, Daoxin

    2012-12-01

    In plants, basic leucine zipper (bZIP) proteins regulate numerous biological processes such as seed maturation, flower and vascular development, stress signalling and pathogen defence. We have carried out a genome-wide identification and analysis of 125 bZIP genes that exist in the maize genome, encoding 170 distinct bZIP proteins. This family can be divided into 11 groups according to the phylogenetic relationship among the maize bZIP proteins and those in Arabidopsis and rice. Six kinds of intron patterns (a-f) within the basic and hinge regions are defined. The additional conserved motifs have been identified and present the group specificity. Detailed three-dimensional structure analysis has been done to display the sequence conservation and potential distribution of the bZIP domain. Further, we predict the DNA-binding pattern and the dimerization property on the basis of the characteristic features in the basic and hinge regions and the leucine zipper, respectively, which supports our classification greatly and helps to classify 26 distinct subfamilies. The chromosome distribution and the genetic analysis reveal that 58 ZmbZIP genes are located in the segmental duplicate regions in the maize genome, suggesting that the segment chromosomal duplications contribute greatly to the expansion of the maize bZIP family. Across the 60 different developmental stages of 11 organs, three apparent clusters formed represent three kinds of different expression patterns among the ZmbZIP gene family in maize development. A similar but slightly different expression pattern of bZIPs in two inbred lines displays that 22 detected ZmbZIP genes might be involved in drought stress. Thirteen pairs and 143 pairs of ZmbZIP genes show strongly negative and positive correlations in the four distinct fungal infections, respectively, based on the expression profile and Pearson's correlation coefficient analysis.

  13. Genome-wide identification and analysis of the MADS-box gene family in sesame.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xin; Wang, Linhai; Yu, Jingyin; Zhang, Yanxin; Li, Donghua; Zhang, Xiurong

    2015-09-10

    MADS-box genes encode transcription factors that play crucial roles in plant growth and development. Sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) is an oil crop that contributes to the daily oil and protein requirements of almost half of the world's population; therefore, a genome-wide analysis of the MADS-box gene family is needed. Fifty-seven MADS-box genes were identified from 14 linkage groups of the sesame genome. Analysis of phylogenetic relationships with Arabidopsis thaliana, Utricularia gibba and Solanum lycopersicum MADS-box genes was performed. Sesame MADS-box genes were clustered into four groups: 28 MIKC(c)-type, 5 MIKC(⁎)-type, 14 Mα-type and 10 Mγ-type. Gene structure analysis revealed from 1 to 22 exons of sesame MADS-box genes. The number of exons in type II MADS-box genes greatly exceeded the number in type I genes. Motif distribution analysis of sesame MADS-box genes also indicated that type II MADS-box genes contained more motifs than type I genes. These results suggested that type II sesame MADS-box genes had more complex structures. By analyzing expression profiles of MADS-box genes in seven sesame transcriptomes, we determined that MIKC(C)-type MADS-box genes played significant roles in sesame flower and seed development. Although most MADS-box genes in the same clade showed similar expression features, some gene functions were diversified from the orthologous Arabidopsis genes. This research will contribute to uncovering the role of MADS-box genes in sesame development.

  14. Genome-Wide Identification of Chromatin Transitional Regions Reveals Diverse Mechanisms Defining the Boundary of Facultative Heterochromatin

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guangyao; Zhou, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Due to the self-propagating nature of the heterochromatic modification H3K27me3, chromatin barrier activities are required to demarcate the boundary and prevent it from encroaching into euchromatic regions. Studies in Drosophila and vertebrate systems have revealed several important chromatin barrier elements and their respective binding factors. However, epigenomic data indicate that the binding of these factors are not exclusive to chromatin boundaries. To gain a comprehensive understanding of facultative heterochromatin boundaries, we developed a two-tiered method to identify the Chromatin Transitional Region (CTR), i.e. the nucleosomal region that shows the greatest transition rate of the H3K27me3 modification as revealed by ChIP-Seq. This approach was applied to identify CTRs in Drosophila S2 cells and human HeLa cells. Although many insulator proteins have been characterized in Drosophila, less than half of the CTRs in S2 cells are associated with known insulator proteins, indicating unknown mechanisms remain to be characterized. Our analysis also revealed that the peak binding of insulator proteins are usually 1–2 nucleosomes away from the CTR. Comparison of CTR-associated insulator protein binding sites vs. those in heterochromatic region revealed that boundary-associated binding sites are distinctively flanked by nucleosome destabilizing sequences, which correlates with significant decreased nucleosome density and increased binding intensities of co-factors. Interestingly, several subgroups of boundaries have enhanced H3.3 incorporation but reduced nucleosome turnover rate. Our genome-wide study reveals that diverse mechanisms are employed to define the boundaries of facultative heterochromatin. In both Drosophila and mammalian systems, only a small fraction of insulator protein binding sites co-localize with H3K27me3 boundaries. However, boundary-associated insulator binding sites are distinctively flanked by nucleosome destabilizing sequences, which

  15. Genome-wide analysis in endangered populations: a case study in Barbaresca sheep.

    PubMed

    Mastrangelo, S; Portolano, B; Di Gerlando, R; Ciampolini, R; Tolone, M; Sardina, M T

    2017-01-12

    Analysis of genomic data is becoming increasingly common in the livestock industry and the findings have been an invaluable resource for effective management of breeding programs in small and endangered populations. In this paper, with the goal of highlighting the potential of genomic analysis for small and endangered populations, genome-wide levels of linkage disequilibrium, measured as the squared correlation coefficient of allele frequencies at a pair of loci, effective population size, runs of homozygosity (ROH) and genetic diversity parameters, were estimated in Barbaresca sheep using Illumina OvineSNP50K array data. Moreover, the breed's genetic structure and its relationship with other breeds were investigated. Levels of pairwise linkage disequilibrium decreased with increasing distance between single nucleotide polymorphisms. An average correlation coefficient <0.25 was found for markers located up to 50 kb apart. Therefore, these results support the need to use denser single nucleotide polymorphism panels for high power association mapping and genomic selection efficiency in future breeding programs. The estimate of past effective population size ranged from 747 animals 250 generations ago to 28 animals five generations ago, whereas the contemporary effective population size was 25 animals. A total of 637 ROH were identified, most of which were short (67%) and ranged from 1 to 10 Mb. The genetic analyses revealed that the Barbaresca breed tended to display lower variability than other Sicilian breeds. Recent inbreeding was evident, according to the ROH analysis. All the investigated parameters showed a comparatively narrow genetic base and indicated an endangered status for Barbaresca. Multidimensional scaling, model-based clustering, measurement of population differentiation, neighbor networks and haplotype sharing distinguished Barbaresca from other breeds, showed a low level of admixture with the other breeds considered in this study, and indicated

  16. A Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals Genes Associated with Fusarium Ear Rot Resistance in a Maize Core Diversity Panel

    PubMed Central

    Zila, Charles T.; Samayoa, L. Fernando; Santiago, Rogelio; Butrón, Ana; Holland, James B.

    2013-01-01

    Fusarium ear rot is a common disease of maize that affects food and feed quality globally. Resistance to the disease is highly quantitative, and maize breeders have difficulty incorporating polygenic resistance alleles from unadapted donor sources into elite breeding populations without having a negative impact on agronomic performance. Identification of specific allele variants contributing to improved resistance may be useful to breeders by allowing selection of resistance alleles in coupling phase linkage with favorable agronomic characteristics. We report the results of a genome-wide association study to detect allele variants associated with increased resistance to Fusarium ear rot in a maize core diversity panel of 267 inbred lines evaluated in two sets of environments. We performed association tests with 47,445 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) while controlling for background genomic relationships with a mixed model and identified three marker loci significantly associated with disease resistance in at least one subset of environments. Each associated SNP locus had relatively small additive effects on disease resistance (±1.1% on a 0–100% scale), but nevertheless were associated with 3 to 12% of the genotypic variation within or across environment subsets. Two of three identified SNPs colocalized with genes that have been implicated with programmed cell death. An analysis of associated allele frequencies within the major maize subpopulations revealed enrichment for resistance alleles in the tropical/subtropical and popcorn subpopulations compared with other temperate breeding pools. PMID:24048647

  17. Genome wide transcriptome profiling of Fusarium oxysporum f sp. ciceris conidial germination reveals new insights into infection-related genes

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Mamta; Sengupta, Anindita; Ghosh, Raju; Agarwal, Gaurav; Tarafdar, Avijit; Nagavardhini, A; Pande, Suresh; Varshney, Rajeev K

    2016-01-01

    Vascular wilt caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceris (Foc) is a serious disease of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) accounting for approximately 10–15% annual crop loss. The fungus invades the plant via roots, colonizes the xylem vessels and prevents the upward translocation of water and nutrients. Infection is initiated by conidia that invade the host tissue often by penetration of intact epidermal cells. Here, we report the characterization of the transcriptome of Foc sequenced using Illumina Hiseq technology during its conidial germination at different time points. Genome-wide expression profiling revealed that genes linked to fungal development are transcribed in successive ways. Analysis showed that Foc have large sets of germination-related genes and families of genes encoding secreted effectors, cell wall/pectin-degrading enzymes, metabolism related enzymes, transporters and peptidases. We found that metabolism related enzymes are up-regulated at early time point whereas most transporters and secondary metabolites important for tissue colonization and pathogenicity are up-regulated later as evident from the qRT-PCR. The study demonstrated that early conidial germination in Foc is accompanied by rapid shifts in gene expression that prepare the fungus for germ tube outgrowth, host cell invasion and pathogenesis. This work lays the foundation for facilitating further research towards understanding this host-pathogen interaction. PMID:27853284

  18. Genome-Wide Comparison of Magnaporthe Species Reveals a Host-Specific Pattern of Secretory Proteins and Transposable Elements

    PubMed Central

    Gowda, Malali

    2016-01-01

    Blast disease caused by the Magnaporthe species is a major factor affecting the productivity of rice, wheat and millets. This study was aimed at generating genomic information for rice and non-rice Magnaporthe isolates to understand the extent of genetic variation. We have sequenced the whole genome of the Magnaporthe isolates, infecting rice (leaf and neck), finger millet (leaf and neck), foxtail millet (leaf) and buffel grass (leaf). Rice and finger millet isolates infecting both leaf and neck tissues were sequenced, since the damage and yield loss caused due to neck blast is much higher as compared to leaf blast. The genome-wide comparison was carried out to study the variability in gene content, candidate effectors, repeat element distribution, genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism and SNPs. The analysis of repeat element footprints revealed some genes such as naringenin, 2-oxoglutarate 3-dioxygenase being targeted by Pot2 and Occan, in isolates from different host species. Some repeat insertions were host-specific while other insertions were randomly shared between isolates. The distributions of repeat elements, secretory proteins, CAZymes and SNPs showed significant variation across host-specific lineages of Magnaporthe indicating an independent genome evolution orchestrated by multiple genomic factors. PMID:27658241

  19. A genome-wide association study reveals candidate genes for the supernumerary nipple phenotype in sheep (Ovis aries).

    PubMed

    Peng, W-F; Xu, S-S; Ren, X; Lv, F-H; Xie, X-L; Zhao, Y-X; Zhang, M; Shen, Z-Q; Ren, Y-L; Gao, L; Shen, M; Kantanen, J; Li, M-H

    2017-10-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have been widely applied in livestock to identify genes associated with traits of economic interest. Here, we conducted the first GWAS of the supernumerary nipple phenotype in Wadi sheep, a native Chinese sheep breed, based on Ovine Infinium HD SNP BeadChip genotypes in a total of 144 ewes (75 cases with four teats, including two normal and two supernumerary teats, and 69 control cases with two teats). We detected 63 significant SNPs at the chromosome-wise threshold. Additionally, one candidate region (chr1: 170.723-170.734 Mb) was identified by haplotype-based association tests, with one SNP (rs413490006) surrounding functional genes BBX and CD47 on chromosome 1 being commonly identified as significant by the two mentioned analyses. Moreover, Gene Ontology enrichment for the significant SNPs identified by the GWAS analysis was functionally clustered into the categories of receptor activity and synaptic membrane. In addition, pathway mapping revealed four promising pathways (Wnt, oxytocin, MAPK and axon guidance) involved in the development of the supernumerary nipple phenotype. Our results provide novel and important insights into the genetic mechanisms underlying the phenotype of supernumerary nipples in mammals, including humans. These findings may be useful for future breeding and genetics in sheep and other livestock. © 2017 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  20. Experimental evolution reveals genome-wide spectrum and dynamics of mutations in the rice blast fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Junhyun; Choi, Jaeyoung; Lee, Gir-Won; Dean, Ralph A; Lee, Yong-Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge on mutation processes is central to interpreting genetic analysis data as well as understanding the underlying nature of almost all evolutionary phenomena. However, studies on genome-wide mutational spectrum and dynamics in fungal pathogens are scarce, hindering our understanding of their evolution and biology. Here, we explored changes in the phenotypes and genome sequences of the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae during the forced in vitro evolution by weekly transfer of cultures on artificial media. Through combination of experimental evolution with high throughput sequencing technology, we found that mutations accumulate rapidly prior to visible phenotypic changes and that both genetic drift and selection seem to contribute to shaping mutational landscape, suggesting the buffering capacity of fungal genome against mutations. Inference of mutational effects on phenotypes through the use of T-DNA insertion mutants suggested that at least some of the DNA sequence mutations are likely associated with the observed phenotypic changes. Furthermore, our data suggest oxidative damages and UV as major sources of mutation during subcultures. Taken together, our work revealed important properties of original source of variation in the genome of the rice blast fungus. We believe that these results provide not only insights into stability of pathogenicity and genome evolution in plant pathogenic fungi but also a model in which evolution of fungal pathogens in natura can be comparatively investigated.

  1. A genome-wide scan for human obesity genes reveals a major susceptibility locus on chromosome 10.

    PubMed

    Hager, J; Dina, C; Francke, S; Dubois, S; Houari, M; Vatin, V; Vaillant, E; Lorentz, N; Basdevant, A; Clement, K; Guy-Grand, B; Froguel, P

    1998-11-01

    Obesity, a common multifactorial disorder, is a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes, hypertension and coronary heart disease (CHD). According to the definition of the World Health Organization (WHO), approximately 6-10% of the population in Westernized countries are considered obese. Epidemiological studies have shown that 30-70% of the variation in body weight may be attributable to genetic factors. To date, two genome-wide scans using different obesity-related quantitative traits have provided candidate regions for obesity. We have undertaken a genome-wide scan in affected sibpairs to identify chromosomal regions linked to obesity in a collection of French families. Model-free multipoint linkage analyses revealed evidence for linkage to a region on chromosome 10p (MLS=4.85). Two further loci on chromosomes 5cen-q and 2p showed suggestive evidence for linkage of serum leptin levels in a genome-wide context. The peak on chromosome 2 coincided with the region containing the gene (POMC) encoding pro-opiomelanocortin, a locus previously linked to leptin levels and fat mass in a Mexican-American population and shown to be mutated in obese humans. Our results suggest that there is a major gene on chromosome 10p implicated in the development of human obesity, and the existence of two further loci influencing leptin levels.

  2. Transcriptome profiling of the demosponge Amphimedon queenslandica reveals genome-wide events that accompany major life cycle transitions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The biphasic life cycle with pelagic larva and benthic adult stages is widely observed in the animal kingdom, including the Porifera (sponges), which are the earliest branching metazoans. The demosponge, Amphimedon queenslandica, undergoes metamorphosis from a free-swimming larva into a sessile adult that bears no morphological resemblance to other animals. While the genome of A. queenslandica contains an extensive repertoire of genes very similar to that of complex bilaterians, it is as yet unclear how this is drawn upon to coordinate changing morphological features and ecological demands throughout the sponge life cycle. Results To identify genome-wide events that accompany the pelagobenthic transition in A. queenslandica, we compared global gene expression profiles at four key developmental stages by sequencing the poly(A) transcriptome using SOLiD technology. Large-scale changes in transcription were observed as sponge larvae settled on the benthos and began metamorphosis. Although previous systematics suggest that the only clear homology between Porifera and other animals is in the embryonic and larval stages, we observed extensive use of genes involved in metazoan-associated cellular processes throughout the sponge life cycle. Sponge-specific transcripts are not over-represented in the morphologically distinct adult; rather, many genes that encode typical metazoan features, such as cell adhesion and immunity, are upregulated. Our analysis further revealed gene families with candidate roles in competence, settlement, and metamorphosis in the sponge, including transcription factors, G-protein coupled receptors and other signaling molecules. Conclusions This first genome-wide study of the developmental transcriptome in an early branching metazoan highlights major transcriptional events that accompany the pelagobenthic transition and point to a network of regulatory mechanisms that coordinate changes in morphology with shifting environmental demands

  3. Refining genome-wide linkage intervals using a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies loci influencing personality dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Najaf; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Hansell, Narelle K; Janssens, A Cecile JW; de Moor, Marleen HM; Madden, Pamela AF; Zorkoltseva, Irina V; Penninx, Brenda W; Terracciano, Antonio; Uda, Manuela; Tanaka, Toshiko; Esko, Tonu; Realo, Anu; Ferrucci, Luigi; Luciano, Michelle; Davies, Gail; Metspalu, Andres; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Deary, Ian J; Raikkonen, Katri; Bierut, Laura J; Costa, Paul T; Saviouk, Viatcheslav; Zhu, Gu; Kirichenko, Anatoly V; Isaacs, Aaron; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Willemsen, Gonneke; Heath, Andrew C; Pergadia, Michele L; Medland, Sarah E; Axenovich, Tatiana I; de Geus, Eco; Montgomery, Grant W; Wright, Margaret J; Oostra, Ben A; Martin, Nicholas G; Boomsma, Dorret I; van Duijn, Cornelia M

    2013-01-01

    Personality traits are complex phenotypes related to psychosomatic health. Individually, various gene finding methods have not achieved much success in finding genetic variants associated with personality traits. We performed a meta-analysis of four genome-wide linkage scans (N=6149 subjects) of five basic personality traits assessed with the NEO Five-Factor Inventory. We compared the significant regions from the meta-analysis of linkage scans with the results of a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) (N∼17 000). We found significant evidence of linkage of neuroticism to chromosome 3p14 (rs1490265, LOD=4.67) and to chromosome 19q13 (rs628604, LOD=3.55); of extraversion to 14q32 (ATGG002, LOD=3.3); and of agreeableness to 3p25 (rs709160, LOD=3.67) and to two adjacent regions on chromosome 15, including 15q13 (rs970408, LOD=4.07) and 15q14 (rs1055356, LOD=3.52) in the individual scans. In the meta-analysis, we found strong evidence of linkage of extraversion to 4q34, 9q34, 10q24 and 11q22, openness to 2p25, 3q26, 9p21, 11q24, 15q26 and 19q13 and agreeableness to 4q34 and 19p13. Significant evidence of association in the GWAS was detected between openness and rs677035 at 11q24 (P-value=2.6 × 10−06, KCNJ1). The findings of our linkage meta-analysis and those of the GWAS suggest that 11q24 is a susceptible locus for openness, with KCNJ1 as the possible candidate gene. PMID:23211697

  4. Refining genome-wide linkage intervals using a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies loci influencing personality dimensions.

    PubMed

    Amin, Najaf; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Hansell, Narelle K; Janssens, A Cecile J W; de Moor, Marleen H M; Madden, Pamela A F; Zorkoltseva, Irina V; Penninx, Brenda W; Terracciano, Antonio; Uda, Manuela; Tanaka, Toshiko; Esko, Tonu; Realo, Anu; Ferrucci, Luigi; Luciano, Michelle; Davies, Gail; Metspalu, Andres; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Deary, Ian J; Raikkonen, Katri; Bierut, Laura J; Costa, Paul T; Saviouk, Viatcheslav; Zhu, Gu; Kirichenko, Anatoly V; Isaacs, Aaron; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Willemsen, Gonneke; Heath, Andrew C; Pergadia, Michele L; Medland, Sarah E; Axenovich, Tatiana I; de Geus, Eco; Montgomery, Grant W; Wright, Margaret J; Oostra, Ben A; Martin, Nicholas G; Boomsma, Dorret I; van Duijn, Cornelia M

    2013-08-01

    Personality traits are complex phenotypes related to psychosomatic health. Individually, various gene finding methods have not achieved much success in finding genetic variants associated with personality traits. We performed a meta-analysis of four genome-wide linkage scans (N=6149 subjects) of five basic personality traits assessed with the NEO Five-Factor Inventory. We compared the significant regions from the meta-analysis of linkage scans with the results of a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) (N∼17 000). We found significant evidence of linkage of neuroticism to chromosome 3p14 (rs1490265, LOD=4.67) and to chromosome 19q13 (rs628604, LOD=3.55); of extraversion to 14q32 (ATGG002, LOD=3.3); and of agreeableness to 3p25 (rs709160, LOD=3.67) and to two adjacent regions on chromosome 15, including 15q13 (rs970408, LOD=4.07) and 15q14 (rs1055356, LOD=3.52) in the individual scans. In the meta-analysis, we found strong evidence of linkage of extraversion to 4q34, 9q34, 10q24 and 11q22, openness to 2p25, 3q26, 9p21, 11q24, 15q26 and 19q13 and agreeableness to 4q34 and 19p13. Significant evidence of association in the GWAS was detected between openness and rs677035 at 11q24 (P-value=2.6 × 10(-06), KCNJ1). The findings of our linkage meta-analysis and those of the GWAS suggest that 11q24 is a susceptible locus for openness, with KCNJ1 as the possible candidate gene.

  5. Genome-wide SNP analysis of the Systemic Capillary Leak Syndrome (Clarkson disease)

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhihui; Nagarajan, Vijayaraj; Sturdevant, Daniel E; Iwaki, Shoko; Chan, Eunice; Wisch, Laura; Young, Michael; Nelson, Celeste M; Porcella, Stephen F; Druey, Kirk M

    2013-01-01

    The Systemic Capillary Leak Syndrome (SCLS) is an extremely rare, orphan disease that resembles, and is frequently erroneously diagnosed as, systemic anaphylaxis. The disorder is characterized by repeated, transient, and seemingly unprovoked episodes of hypotensive shock and peripheral edema due to transient endothelial hyperpermeability. SCLS is often accompanied by a monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance (MGUS). Using Affymetrix Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) microarrays, we performed the first genome-wide SNP analysis of SCLS in a cohort of 12 disease subjects and 18 controls. Exome capture sequencing was performed on genomic DNA from nine of these patients as validation for the SNP-chip discoveries and de novo data generation. We identified candidate susceptibility loci for SCLS, which included a region flanking CAV3 (3p25.3) as well as SNP clusters in PON1 (7q21.3), PSORS1C1 (6p21.3), and CHCHD3 (7q33). Among the most highly ranked discoveries were gene-associated SNPs in the uncharacterized LOC100130480 gene (rs6417039, rs2004296). Top case-associated SNPs were observed in BTRC (rs12355803, 3rs4436485), ARHGEF18 (rs11668246), CDH13 (rs4782779), and EDG2 (rs12552348), which encode proteins with known or suspected roles in B cell function and/or vascular integrity. 61 SNPs that were significantly associated with SCLS by microarray analysis were also detected and validated by exome deep sequencing. Functional annotation of highly ranked SNPs revealed enrichment of cell projections, cell junctions and adhesion, and molecules containing pleckstrin homology, Ras/Rho regulatory, and immunoglobulin Ig-like C2/fibronectin type III domains, all of which involve mechanistic functions that correlate with the SCLS phenotype. These results highlight SNPs with potential relevance to SCLS. PMID:24808988

  6. Genome-Wide Analysis of Polycistronic MicroRNAs in Cultivated and Wild Rice

    PubMed Central

    Baldrich, Patricia; Hsing, Yue-Ie Caroline; San Segundo, Blanca

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that direct posttranscriptional gene silencing in eukaryotes. They are frequently clustered in the genomes of animals and can be independently transcribed or simultaneously transcribed into single polycistronic transcripts. Only a few miRNA clusters have been described in plants, and most of them are generated from independent transcriptional units. Here, we used a combination of bioinformatic tools and experimental analyses to discover new polycistronic miRNAs in rice. A genome-wide analysis of clustering patterns of MIRNA loci in the rice genome was carried out using a criterion of 3 kb as the maximal distance between two miRNAs. This analysis revealed 28 loci with the ability to form the typical hairpin structure of miRNA precursors in which 2 or more mature miRNAs mapped along the same structure. RT-PCR provided evidence for the polycistronic nature of seven miRNA precursors containing homologous or nonhomologous miRNA species. Polycistronic miRNAs and candidate polycistronic miRNAs are located across different rice chromosomes, except chromosome 12, and resided in both duplicated and nonduplicated chromosomal regions. Finally, most polycistronic and candidate polycistronic miRNAs showed a pattern of conservation in the genome of rice species with an AA genome. The diversity in the organization of MIR genes that are transcribed as polycistrons suggests a versatile mechanism for the control of gene expression in different biological processes and supports additional levels of complexity in miRNA functioning in plants. PMID:27190137

  7. Genome-wide Association Analysis Tracks Bacterial Leaf Blight Resistance Loci In Rice Diverse Germplasm.

    PubMed

    Dilla-Ermita, Christine Jade; Tandayu, Erwin; Juanillas, Venice Margarette; Detras, Jeffrey; Lozada, Dennis Nicuh; Dwiyanti, Maria Stefanie; Vera Cruz, Casiana; Mbanjo, Edwige Gaby Nkouaya; Ardales, Edna; Diaz, Maria Genaleen; Mendioro, Merlyn; Thomson, Michael J; Kretzschmar, Tobias

    2017-12-01

    A range of resistance loci against different races of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), the pathogen causing bacterial blight (BB) disease of rice, have been discovered and characterized. Several have been deployed in modern varieties, however, due to rapid evolution of Xoo, a number have already become ineffective. The continuous "arms race" between Xoo and rice makes it imperative to discover new resistance loci to enable durable deployment of multiple resistance genes in modern breeding lines. Rice diversity panels can be exploited as reservoirs of useful genetic variation for bacterial blight (BB) resistance. This study was conducted to identify loci associated to BB resistance, new genetic donors and useful molecular markers for marker-assisted breeding. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) of BB resistance using a diverse panel of 285 rice accessions was performed to identify loci that are associated with resistance to nine Xoo strains from the Philippines, representative of eight global races. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with differential resistance were identified in the diverse panel and a subset of 198 indica accessions. Strong associations were found for novel SNPs linked with known bacterial blight resistance Xa genes, from which high utility markers for tracking and selection of resistance genes in breeding programs were designed. Furthermore, significant associations of SNPs in chromosomes 6, 9, 11, and 12 did not overlap with known resistance loci and hence might prove to be novel sources of resistance. Detailed analysis revealed haplotypes that correlated with resistance and analysis of putative resistance alleles identified resistant genotypes as potential donors of new resistance genes. The results of the GWAS validated known genes underlying resistance and identified novel loci that provide useful targets for further investigation. SNP markers and genetic donors identified in this study will help plant breeders in

  8. Genome-Wide Analysis of miRNA targets in Brachypodium and Biomass Energy Crops

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Pamela J.

    2015-08-11

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) contribute to the control of numerous biological processes through the regulation of specific target mRNAs. Although the identities of these targets are essential to elucidate miRNA function, the targets are much more difficult to identify than the small RNAs themselves. Before this work, we pioneered the genome-wide identification of the targets of Arabidopsis miRNAs using an approach called PARE (German et al., Nature Biotech. 2008; Nature Protocols, 2009). Under this project, we applied PARE to Brachypodium distachyon (Brachypodium), a model plant in the Poaceae family, which includes the major food grain and bioenergy crops. Through in-depth global analysis and examination of specific examples, this research greatly expanded our knowledge of miRNAs and target RNAs of Brachypodium. New regulation in response to environmental stress or tissue type was found, and many new miRNAs were discovered. More than 260 targets of new and known miRNAs with PARE sequences at the precise sites of miRNA-guided cleavage were identified and characterized. Combining PARE data with the small RNA data also identified the miRNAs responsible for initiating approximately 500 phased loci, including one of the novel miRNAs. PARE analysis also revealed that differentially expressed miRNAs in the same family guide specific target RNA cleavage in a correspondingly tissue-preferential manner. The project included generation of small RNA and PARE resources for bioenergy crops, to facilitate ongoing discovery of conserved miRNA-target RNA regulation. By associating specific miRNA-target RNA pairs with known physiological functions, the research provides insights about gene regulation in different tissues and in response to environmental stress. This, and release of new PARE and small RNA data sets should contribute basic knowledge to enhance breeding and may suggest new strategies for improvement of biomass energy crops.

  9. Genome-Wide Identification, Characterization and Expression Analysis of the TCP Gene Family in Prunus mume.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuzhen; Xu, Zongda; Zhao, Kai; Yang, Weiru; Cheng, Tangren; Wang, Jia; Zhang, Qixiang

    2016-01-01

    TCP proteins, belonging to a plant-specific transcription factors family, are known to have great functions in plant development, especially flower and leaf development. However, there is little information about this gene family in Prunus mume, which is widely cultivated in China as an ornamental and fruit tree. Here a genome-wide analysis of TCP genes was performed to explore their evolution in P. mume. Nineteen PmTCPs were identified and three of them contained putative miR319 target sites. Phylogenetic and comprehensive bioinformatics analyses of these genes revealed that different types of TCP genes had undergone different evolutionary processes and the genes in the same clade had similar chromosomal location, gene structure, and conserved domains. Expression analysis of these PmTCPs indicated that there were diverse expression patterns among different clades. Most TCP genes were predominantly expressed in flower, leaf, and stem, and showed high expression levels in the different stages of flower bud differentiation, especially in petal formation stage and gametophyte development. Genes in TCP-P subfamily had main roles in both flower development and gametophyte development. The CIN genes in double petal cultivars might have key roles in the formation of petal, while they were correlated with gametophyte development in the single petal cultivar. The CYC/TB1 type genes were highly detected in the formation of petal and pistil. The less-complex flower types of P. mume might result from the fact that there were only two CYC type genes present in P. mume and a lack of CYC2 genes to control the identity of flower types. These results lay the foundation for further study on the functions of TCP genes during flower development.

  10. Genome-Wide Identification, Characterization and Expression Analysis of the TCP Gene Family in Prunus mume

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yuzhen; Xu, Zongda; Zhao, Kai; Yang, Weiru; Cheng, Tangren; Wang, Jia; Zhang, Qixiang

    2016-01-01

    TCP proteins, belonging to a plant-specific transcription factors family, are known to have great functions in plant development, especially flower and leaf development. However, there is little information about this gene family in Prunus mume, which is widely cultivated in China as an ornamental and fruit tree. Here a genome-wide analysis of TCP genes was performed to explore their evolution in P. mume. Nineteen PmTCPs were identified and three of them contained putative miR319 target sites. Phylogenetic and comprehensive bioinformatics analyses of these genes revealed that different types of TCP genes had undergone different evolutionary processes and the genes in the same clade had similar chromosomal location, gene structure, and conserved domains. Expression analysis of these PmTCPs indicated that there were diverse expression patterns among different clades. Most TCP genes were predominantly expressed in flower, leaf, and stem, and showed high expression levels in the different stages of flower bud differentiation, especially in petal formation stage and gametophyte development. Genes in TCP-P subfamily had main roles in both flower development and gametophyte development. The CIN genes in double petal cultivars might have key roles in the formation of petal, while they were correlated with gametophyte development in the single petal cultivar. The CYC/TB1 type genes were highly detected in the formation of petal and pistil. The less-complex flower types of P. mume might result from the fact that there were only two CYC type genes present in P. mume and a lack of CYC2 genes to control the identity of flower types. These results lay the foundation for further study on the functions of TCP genes during flower development. PMID:27630648

  11. Genome-wide Identification and Expression Analysis of the CDPK Gene Family in Grape, Vitis spp.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Han, Yong-Tao; Zhao, Feng-Li; Hu, Yang; Gao, Yu-Rong; Ma, Yan-Fei; Zheng, Yi; Wang, Yue-Jin; Wen, Ying-Qiang

    2015-06-30

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) play vital roles in plant growth and development, biotic and abiotic stress responses, and hormone signaling. Little is known about the CDPK gene family in grapevine. In this study, we performed a genome-wide analysis of the 12X grape genome (Vitis vinifera) and identified nineteen CDPK genes. Comparison of the structures of grape CDPK genes allowed us to examine their functional conservation and differentiation. Segmentally duplicated grape CDPK genes showed high structural conservation and contributed to gene family expansion. Additional comparisons between grape and Arabidopsis thaliana demonstrated that several grape CDPK genes occured in the corresponding syntenic blocks of Arabidopsis, suggesting that these genes arose before the divergence of grapevine and Arabidopsis. Phylogenetic analysis divided the grape CDPK genes into four groups. Furthermore, we examined the expression of the corresponding nineteen homologous CDPK genes in the Chinese wild grape (Vitis pseudoreticulata) under various conditions, including biotic stress, abiotic stress, and hormone treatments. The expression profiles derived from reverse transcription and quantitative PCR suggested that a large number of VpCDPKs responded to various stimuli on the transcriptional level, indicating their versatile roles in the responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. Moreover, we examined the subcellular localization of VpCDPKs by transiently expressing six VpCDPK-GFP fusion proteins in Arabidopsis mesophyll protoplasts; this revealed high variability consistent with potential functional differences. Taken as a whole, our data provide significant insights into the evolution and function of grape CDPKs and a framework for future investigation of grape CDPK genes.

  12. Genome-Wide Identification and Analysis of the TIFY Gene Family in Grape

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yucheng; Gao, Min; Singer, Stacy D.; Fei, Zhangjun; Wang, Hua; Wang, Xiping

    2012-01-01

    Background The TIFY gene family constitutes a plant-specific group of genes with a broad range of functions. This family encodes four subfamilies of proteins, including ZML, TIFY, PPD and JASMONATE ZIM-Domain (JAZ) proteins. JAZ proteins are targets of the SCFCOI1 complex, and function as negative regulators in the JA signaling pathway. Recently, it has been reported in both Arabidopsis and rice that TIFY genes, and especially JAZ genes, may be involved in plant defense against insect feeding, wounding, pathogens and abiotic stresses. Nonetheless, knowledge concerning the specific expression patterns and evolutionary history of plant TIFY family members is limited, especially in a woody species such as grape. Methodology/Principal Findings A total of two TIFY, four ZML, two PPD and 11 JAZ genes were identified in the Vitis vinifera genome. Phylogenetic analysis of TIFY protein sequences from grape, Arabidopsis and rice indicated that the grape TIFY proteins are more closely related to those of Arabidopsis than those of rice. Both segmental and tandem duplication events have been major contributors to the expansion of the grape TIFY family. In addition, synteny analysis between grape and Arabidopsis demonstrated that homologues of several grape TIFY genes were found in the corresponding syntenic blocks of Arabidopsis, suggesting that these genes arose before the divergence of lineages that led to grape and Arabidopsis. Analyses of microarray and quantitative real-time RT-PCR expression data revealed that grape TIFY genes are not a major player in the defense against biotrophic pathogens or viruses. However, many of these genes were responsive to JA and ABA, but not SA or ET.