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Sample records for genome-wide cytosine methylation

  1. Genome-Wide Discriminatory Information Patterns of Cytosine DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Robersy; Mackenzie, Sally A.

    2016-01-01

    Cytosine DNA methylation (CDM) is a highly abundant, heritable but reversible chemical modification to the genome. Herein, a machine learning approach was applied to analyze the accumulation of epigenetic marks in methylomes of 152 ecotypes and 85 silencing mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. In an information-thermodynamics framework, two measurements were used: (1) the amount of information gained/lost with the CDM changes IR and (2) the uncertainty of not observing a SNP LCR. We hypothesize that epigenetic marks are chromosomal footprints accounting for different ontogenetic and phylogenetic histories of individual populations. A machine learning approach is proposed to verify this hypothesis. Results support the hypothesis by the existence of discriminatory information (DI) patterns of CDM able to discriminate between individuals and between individual subpopulations. The statistical analyses revealed a strong association between the topologies of the structured population of Arabidopsis ecotypes based on IR and on LCR, respectively. A statistical-physical relationship between IR and LCR was also found. Results to date imply that the genome-wide distribution of CDM changes is not only part of the biological signal created by the methylation regulatory machinery, but ensures the stability of the DNA molecule, preserving the integrity of the genetic message under continuous stress from thermal fluctuations in the cell environment. PMID:27322251

  2. Genome-wide nucleosome map and cytosine methylation levels of an ancient human genome

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Jakob Skou; Valen, Eivind; Velazquez, Amhed M. Vargas; Parker, Brian J.; Rasmussen, Morten; Lindgreen, Stinus; Lilje, Berit; Tobin, Desmond J.; Kelly, Theresa K.; Vang, Søren; Andersson, Robin; Jones, Peter A.; Hoover, Cindi A.; Tikhonov, Alexei; Prokhortchouk, Egor; Rubin, Edward M.; Sandelin, Albin; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Krogh, Anders; Willerslev, Eske; Orlando, Ludovic

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic information is available from contemporary organisms, but is difficult to track back in evolutionary time. Here, we show that genome-wide epigenetic information can be gathered directly from next-generation sequence reads of DNA isolated from ancient remains. Using the genome sequence data generated from hair shafts of a 4000-yr-old Paleo-Eskimo belonging to the Saqqaq culture, we generate the first ancient nucleosome map coupled with a genome-wide survey of cytosine methylation levels. The validity of both nucleosome map and methylation levels were confirmed by the recovery of the expected signals at promoter regions, exon/intron boundaries, and CTCF sites. The top-scoring nucleosome calls revealed distinct DNA positioning biases, attesting to nucleotide-level accuracy. The ancient methylation levels exhibited high conservation over time, clustering closely with modern hair tissues. Using ancient methylation information, we estimated the age at death of the Saqqaq individual and illustrate how epigenetic information can be used to infer ancient gene expression. Similar epigenetic signatures were found in other fossil material, such as 110,000- to 130,000-yr-old bones, supporting the contention that ancient epigenomic information can be reconstructed from a deep past. Our findings lay the foundation for extracting epigenomic information from ancient samples, allowing shifts in epialleles to be tracked through evolutionary time, as well as providing an original window into modern epigenomics. PMID:24299735

  3. Genome-wide mapping of cytosine methylation revealed dynamic DNA methylation patterns associated with genes and centromeres in rice.

    PubMed

    Yan, Huihuang; Kikuchi, Shinji; Neumann, Pavel; Zhang, Wenli; Wu, Yufeng; Chen, Feng; Jiang, Jiming

    2010-08-01

    We conducted genome-wide mapping of cytosine methylation using methylcytosine immunoprecipitation combined with Illumina sequencing. The chromosomal distribution pattern of methylated DNA is similar to the heterochromatin distribution pattern on rice chromosomes. The DNA methylation patterns of rice genes are similar to those in Arabidopsis thaliana, including distinct methylation patterns asssociated with gene bodies and promoters. The DNA sequences in the core domains of rice Cen4, Cen5 and Cen8 showed elevated methylation levels compared with sequences in the pericentromeric regions. In addition, elevated methylation levels were associated with the DNA sequences in the CENH3-binding subdomains, compared with the sequences in the flanking H3 subdomains. In contrast, the centromeric domain of Cen11, which is composed exclusively of centromeric satellite DNA, is hypomethylated compared with the pericentromeric domains. Thus, the DNA sequences associated with functional centromeres can be either hypomethylated or hypermethylated. The methylation patterns of centromeric DNA appear to be correlated with the composition of the associated DNA sequences. We propose that both hypomethylation and hypermethylation of CENH3-associated DNA sequences can serve as epigenetic marks to distinguish where CENH3 deposition will occur within the surrounding H3 chromatin.

  4. Geminivirus AL2 and L2 proteins suppress transcriptional gene silencing and cause genome-wide reductions in cytosine methylation.

    PubMed

    Buchmann, R Cody; Asad, Shaheen; Wolf, Jamie N; Mohannath, Gireesha; Bisaro, David M

    2009-05-01

    Geminiviruses replicate single-stranded DNA genomes through double-stranded intermediates that associate with cellular histone proteins. Unlike RNA viruses, they are subject to RNA-directed methylation pathways that target viral chromatin and likely lead to transcriptional gene silencing (TGS). Here we present evidence that the related geminivirus proteins AL2 and L2 are able to suppress this aspect of host defense. AL2 and L2 interact with and inactivate adenosine kinase (ADK), which is required for efficient production of S-adenosyl methionine, an essential methyltransferase cofactor. We demonstrate that the viral proteins can reverse TGS of a green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgene in Nicotiana benthamiana when overexpressed from a Potato virus X vector and that reversal of TGS by geminiviruses requires L2 function. We also show that AL2 and L2 cause ectopic expression of endogenous Arabidopsis thaliana loci silenced by methylation in a manner that correlates with ADK inhibition. However, at one exceptional locus, ADK inhibition was insufficient and TGS reversal required the transcriptional activation domain of AL2. Using restriction-sensitive PCR and bisulfite sequencing, we showed that AL2-mediated TGS suppression is accompanied by reduced cytosine methylation. Finally, using a methylation-sensitive single-nucleotide extension assay, we showed that transgenic expression of AL2 or L2 causes global reduction in cytosine methylation. Our results provide further evidence that viral chromatin methylation is an important host defense and allow us to propose that as a countermeasure, geminivirus proteins reverse TGS by nonspecifically inhibiting cellular transmethylation reactions. To our knowledge, this is the first report that viral proteins can inhibit TGS. PMID:19279102

  5. Infection with a Virulent Strain of Wolbachia Disrupts Genome Wide-Patterns of Cytosine Methylation in the Mosquito Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Yixin H.; Woolfit, Megan; Huttley, Gavin A.; Rancès, Edwige; Caragata, Eric P.; Popovici, Jean; O'Neill, Scott L.; McGraw, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Cytosine methylation is one of several reversible epigenetic modifications of DNA that allow a greater flexibility in the relationship between genotype and phenotype. Methylation in the simplest models dampens gene expression by modifying regions of DNA critical for transcription factor binding. The capacity to methylate DNA is variable in the insects due to diverse histories of gene loss and duplication of DNA methylases. Mosquitoes like Drosophila melanogaster possess only a single methylase, DNMT2. Description Here we characterise the methylome of the mosquito Aedes aegypti and examine its relationship to transcription and test the effects of infection with a virulent strain of the endosymbiont Wolbachia on the stability of methylation patterns. Conclusion We see that methylation in the A. aegypti genome is associated with reduced transcription and is most common in the promoters of genes relating to regulation of transcription and metabolism. Similar gene classes are also methylated in aphids and honeybees, suggesting either conservation or convergence of methylation patterns. In addition to this evidence of evolutionary stability, we also show that infection with the virulent wMelPop Wolbachia strain induces additional methylation and demethylation events in the genome. While most of these changes seem random with respect to gene function and have no detected effect on transcription, there does appear to be enrichment of genes associated with membrane function. Given that Wolbachia lives within a membrane-bound vacuole of host origin and retains a large number of genes for transporting host amino acids, inorganic ions and ATP despite a severely reduced genome, these changes might represent an evolved strategy for manipulating the host environments for its own gain. Testing for a direct link between these methylation changes and expression, however, will require study across a broader range of developmental stages and tissues with methods that detect

  6. Genome-Wide Methylation Profiling of Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Rukova, B; Staneva, R; Hadjidekova, S; Stamenov, G; Milanova; Toncheva, D

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia is one of the major psychiatric disorders. It is a disorder of complex inheritance, involving both heritable and environmental factors. DNA methylation is an inheritable epigenetic modification that stably alters gene expression. We reasoned that genetic modifications that are a result of environmental stimuli could also make a contribution. We have performed 26 high-resolution genome-wide methylation array analyses to determine the methylation status of 27,627 CpG islands and compared the data between patients and healthy controls. Methylation profiles of DNAs were analyzed in six pools: 220 schizophrenia patients; 220 age-matched healthy controls; 110 female schizophrenia patients; 110 age-matched healthy females; 110 male schizophrenia patients; 110 age-matched healthy males. We also investigated the methylation status of 20 individual patient DNA samples (eight females and 12 males. We found significant differences in the methylation profile between schizophrenia and control DNA pools. We found new candidate genes that principally participate in apoptosis, synaptic transmission and nervous system development (GABRA2, LIN7B, CASP3). Methylation profiles differed between the genders. In females, the most important genes participate in apoptosis and synaptic transmission (XIAP, GABRD, OXT, KRT7), whereas in the males, the implicated genes in the molecular pathology of the disease were DHX37, MAP2K2, FNDC4 and GIPC1. Data from the individual methylation analyses confirmed, the gender-specific pools results. Our data revealed major differences in methylation profiles between schizophrenia patients and controls and between male and female patients. The dysregulated activity of the candidate genes could play a role in schizophrenia pathogenesis. PMID:25937794

  7. Genome-wide mapping of DNA methylation in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Ponts, Nadia; Fu, Lijuan; Harris, Elena Y.; Zhang, Jing; Chung, Duk-Won D.; Cervantes, Michael C.; Prudhomme, Jacques; Atanasova-Penichon, Vessela; Zehraoui, Enric; Bunnik, Evelien; Rodrigues, Elisandra M.; Lonardi, Stefano; Hicks, Glenn R.; Wang, Yinsheng; Le Roch, Karine G.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Cytosine DNA methylation is an epigenetic mark in most eukaryotic cells that regulates numerous processes, including gene expression and stress responses. We performed a genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. We mapped the positions of methylated cytosines and identified a single functional DNA methyltransferase, PfDNMT, that may mediate these genomic modifications. These analyses revealed that the malaria genome is asymmetrically methylated, in which only one DNA strand is methylated, and shares common features with undifferentiated plant and mammalian cells. Notably, core promoters are hypomethylated and transcript levels correlate with intra-exonic methylation. Additionally, there are sharp methylation transitions at nucleosome and exon-intron boundaries. These data suggest that DNA methylation could regulate virulence gene expression and transcription elongation. Furthermore, the broad range of action of DNA methylation and uniqueness of PfDNMT suggest that the methylation pathway is a potential target for anti-malarial strategies. PMID:24331467

  8. Information Thermodynamics of Cytosine DNA Methylation.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Robersy; Mackenzie, Sally A

    2016-01-01

    Cytosine DNA methylation (CDM) is a stable epigenetic modification to the genome and a widespread regulatory process in living organisms that involves multicomponent molecular machines. Genome-wide cytosine methylation patterning participates in the epigenetic reprogramming of a cell, suggesting that the biological information contained within methylation positions may be amenable to decoding. Adaptation to a new cellular or organismal environment also implies the potential for genome-wide redistribution of CDM changes that will ensure the stability of DNA molecules. This raises the question of whether or not we would be able to sort out the regulatory methylation signals from the CDM background ("noise") induced by thermal fluctuations. Here, we propose a novel statistical and information thermodynamic description of the CDM changes to address the last question. The physical basis of our statistical mechanical model was evaluated in two respects: 1) the adherence to Landauer's principle, according to which molecular machines must dissipate a minimum energy ε = kBT ln2 at each logic operation, where kB is the Boltzmann constant, and T is the absolute temperature and 2) whether or not the binary stretch of methylation marks on the DNA molecule comprise a language of sorts, properly constrained by thermodynamic principles. The study was performed for genome-wide methylation data from 152 ecotypes and 40 trans-generational variations of Arabidopsis thaliana and 93 human tissues. The DNA persistence length, a basic mechanical property altered by CDM, was estimated with values from 39 to 66.9 nm. Classical methylome analysis can be retrieved by applying information thermodynamic modelling, which is able to discriminate signal from noise. Our finding suggests that the CDM signal comprises a language scheme properly constrained by molecular thermodynamic principles, which is part of an epigenomic communication system that obeys the same thermodynamic rules as do current

  9. methylKit: a comprehensive R package for the analysis of genome-wide DNA methylation profiles.

    PubMed

    Akalin, Altuna; Kormaksson, Matthias; Li, Sheng; Garrett-Bakelman, Francine E; Figueroa, Maria E; Melnick, Ari; Mason, Christopher E

    2012-01-01

    DNA methylation is a chemical modification of cytosine bases that is pivotal for gene regulation, cellular specification and cancer development. Here, we describe an R package, methylKit, that rapidly analyzes genome-wide cytosine epigenetic profiles from high-throughput methylation and hydroxymethylation sequencing experiments. methylKit includes functions for clustering, sample quality visualization, differential methylation analysis and annotation features, thus automating and simplifying many of the steps for discerning statistically significant bases or regions of DNA methylation. Finally, we demonstrate methylKit on breast cancer data, in which we find statistically significant regions of differential methylation and stratify tumor subtypes. methylKit is available at http://code.google.com/p/methylkit. PMID:23034086

  10. Genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation in hepatoblastoma tissues

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Ximao; Liu, Baihui; Zheng, Shan; Dong, Kuiran; Dong, Rui

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation has a crucial role in cancer biology. In the present study, a genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation in hepatoblastoma (HB) tissues was performed to verify differential methylation levels between HB and normal tissues. As alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) has a critical role in HB, AFP methylation levels were also detected using pyrosequencing. Normal and HB liver tissue samples (frozen tissue) were obtained from patients with HB. Genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation in these tissues was performed using an Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip, and the results were confirmed with reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip demonstrated distinctively less methylation in HB tissues than in non-tumor tissues. In addition, methylation enrichment was observed in positions near the transcription start site of AFP, which exhibited lower methylation levels in HB tissues than in non-tumor liver tissues. Lastly, a significant negative correlation was observed between AFP messenger RNA expression and DNA methylation percentage, using linear Pearson's R correlation coefficients. The present results demonstrate differential methylation levels between HB and normal tissues, and imply that aberrant methylation of AFP in HB could reflect HB development. Expansion of these findings could provide useful insight into HB biology. PMID:27446465

  11. Genome-wide non-CpG methylation of the host genome during M. tuberculosis infection

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Garima; Sowpati, Divya Tej; Singh, Prakruti; Khan, Mehak Zahoor; Ganji, Rakesh; Upadhyay, Sandeep; Banerjee, Sharmistha; Nandicoori, Vinay Kumar; Khosla, Sanjeev

    2016-01-01

    A mammalian cell utilizes DNA methylation to modulate gene expression in response to environmental changes during development and differentiation. Aberrant DNA methylation changes as a correlate to diseased states like cancer, neurodegenerative conditions and cardiovascular diseases have been documented. Here we show genome-wide DNA methylation changes in macrophages infected with the pathogen M. tuberculosis. Majority of the affected genomic loci were hypermethylated in M. tuberculosis infected THP1 macrophages. Hotspots of differential DNA methylation were enriched in genes involved in immune response and chromatin reorganization. Importantly, DNA methylation changes were observed predominantly for cytosines present in non-CpG dinucleotide context. This observation was consistent with our previous finding that the mycobacterial DNA methyltransferase, Rv2966c, targets non-CpG dinucleotides in the host DNA during M. tuberculosis infection and reiterates the hypothesis that pathogenic bacteria use non-canonical epigenetic strategies during infection. PMID:27112593

  12. Genome-wide non-CpG methylation of the host genome during M. tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Garima; Sowpati, Divya Tej; Singh, Prakruti; Khan, Mehak Zahoor; Ganji, Rakesh; Upadhyay, Sandeep; Banerjee, Sharmistha; Nandicoori, Vinay Kumar; Khosla, Sanjeev

    2016-01-01

    A mammalian cell utilizes DNA methylation to modulate gene expression in response to environmental changes during development and differentiation. Aberrant DNA methylation changes as a correlate to diseased states like cancer, neurodegenerative conditions and cardiovascular diseases have been documented. Here we show genome-wide DNA methylation changes in macrophages infected with the pathogen M. tuberculosis. Majority of the affected genomic loci were hypermethylated in M. tuberculosis infected THP1 macrophages. Hotspots of differential DNA methylation were enriched in genes involved in immune response and chromatin reorganization. Importantly, DNA methylation changes were observed predominantly for cytosines present in non-CpG dinucleotide context. This observation was consistent with our previous finding that the mycobacterial DNA methyltransferase, Rv2966c, targets non-CpG dinucleotides in the host DNA during M. tuberculosis infection and reiterates the hypothesis that pathogenic bacteria use non-canonical epigenetic strategies during infection. PMID:27112593

  13. Genome-Wide Methylation Analyses in Glioblastoma Multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Rose K.; Chen, Yanwen; Guan, Xiaowei; Nousome, Darryl; Sharma, Charu; Canoll, Peter; Bruce, Jeffrey; Sloan, Andrew E.; Cortes, Etty; Vonsattel, Jean-Paul; Su, Tao; Delgado-Cruzata, Lissette; Gurvich, Irina; Santella, Regina M.; Ostrom, Quinn; Lee, Annette; Gregersen, Peter; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill

    2014-01-01

    Few studies had investigated genome-wide methylation in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Our goals were to study differential methylation across the genome in gene promoters using an array-based method, as well as repetitive elements using surrogate global methylation markers. The discovery sample set for this study consisted of 54 GBM from Columbia University and Case Western Reserve University, and 24 brain controls from the New York Brain Bank. We assembled a validation dataset using methylation data of 162 TCGA GBM and 140 brain controls from dbGAP. HumanMethylation27 Analysis Bead-Chips (Illumina) were used to interrogate 26,486 informative CpG sites in both the discovery and validation datasets. Global methylation levels were assessed by analysis of L1 retrotransposon (LINE1), 5 methyl-deoxycytidine (5m-dC) and 5 hydroxylmethyl-deoxycytidine (5hm-dC) in the discovery dataset. We validated a total of 1548 CpG sites (1307 genes) that were differentially methylated in GBM compared to controls. There were more than twice as many hypomethylated genes as hypermethylated ones. Both the discovery and validation datasets found 5 tumor methylation classes. Pathway analyses showed that the top ten pathways in hypomethylated genes were all related to functions of innate and acquired immunities. Among hypermethylated pathways, transcriptional regulatory network in embryonic stem cells was the most significant. In the study of global methylation markers, 5m-dC level was the best discriminant among methylation classes, whereas in survival analyses, high level of LINE1 methylation was an independent, favorable prognostic factor in the discovery dataset. Based on a pathway approach, hypermethylation in genes that control stem cell differentiation were significant, poor prognostic factors of overall survival in both the discovery and validation datasets. Approaches that targeted these methylated genes may be a future therapeutic goal. PMID:24586730

  14. Mobile small RNAs regulate genome-wide DNA methylation

    PubMed Central

    Lewsey, Mathew G.; Hardcastle, Thomas J.; Melnyk, Charles W.; Molnar, Attila; Valli, Adrián; Urich, Mark A.; Nery, Joseph R.; Baulcombe, David C.; Ecker, Joseph R.

    2016-01-01

    RNA silencing at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels regulates endogenous gene expression, controls invading transposable elements (TEs), and protects the cell against viruses. Key components of the mechanism are small RNAs (sRNAs) of 21–24 nt that guide the silencing machinery to their nucleic acid targets in a nucleotide sequence-specific manner. Transcriptional gene silencing is associated with 24-nt sRNAs and RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) at cytosine residues in three DNA sequence contexts (CG, CHG, and CHH). We previously demonstrated that 24-nt sRNAs are mobile from shoot to root in Arabidopsis thaliana and confirmed that they mediate DNA methylation at three sites in recipient cells. In this study, we extend this finding by demonstrating that RdDM of thousands of loci in root tissues is dependent upon mobile sRNAs from the shoot and that mobile sRNA-dependent DNA methylation occurs predominantly in non-CG contexts. Mobile sRNA-dependent non-CG methylation is largely dependent on the DOMAINS REARRANGED METHYLTRANSFERASES 1/2 (DRM1/DRM2) RdDM pathway but is independent of the CHROMOMETHYLASE (CMT)2/3 DNA methyltransferases. Specific superfamilies of TEs, including those typically found in gene-rich euchromatic regions, lose DNA methylation in a mutant lacking 22- to 24-nt sRNAs (dicer-like 2, 3, 4 triple mutant). Transcriptome analyses identified a small number of genes whose expression in roots is associated with mobile sRNAs and connected to DNA methylation directly or indirectly. Finally, we demonstrate that sRNAs from shoots of one accession move across a graft union and target DNA methylation de novo at normally unmethylated sites in the genomes of root cells from a different accession. PMID:26787884

  15. Mobile small RNAs regulate genome-wide DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Lewsey, Mathew G; Hardcastle, Thomas J; Melnyk, Charles W; Molnar, Attila; Valli, Adrián; Urich, Mark A; Nery, Joseph R; Baulcombe, David C; Ecker, Joseph R

    2016-02-01

    RNA silencing at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels regulates endogenous gene expression, controls invading transposable elements (TEs), and protects the cell against viruses. Key components of the mechanism are small RNAs (sRNAs) of 21-24 nt that guide the silencing machinery to their nucleic acid targets in a nucleotide sequence-specific manner. Transcriptional gene silencing is associated with 24-nt sRNAs and RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) at cytosine residues in three DNA sequence contexts (CG, CHG, and CHH). We previously demonstrated that 24-nt sRNAs are mobile from shoot to root in Arabidopsis thaliana and confirmed that they mediate DNA methylation at three sites in recipient cells. In this study, we extend this finding by demonstrating that RdDM of thousands of loci in root tissues is dependent upon mobile sRNAs from the shoot and that mobile sRNA-dependent DNA methylation occurs predominantly in non-CG contexts. Mobile sRNA-dependent non-CG methylation is largely dependent on the DOMAINS REARRANGED METHYLTRANSFERASES 1/2 (DRM1/DRM2) RdDM pathway but is independent of the CHROMOMETHYLASE (CMT)2/3 DNA methyltransferases. Specific superfamilies of TEs, including those typically found in gene-rich euchromatic regions, lose DNA methylation in a mutant lacking 22- to 24-nt sRNAs (dicer-like 2, 3, 4 triple mutant). Transcriptome analyses identified a small number of genes whose expression in roots is associated with mobile sRNAs and connected to DNA methylation directly or indirectly. Finally, we demonstrate that sRNAs from shoots of one accession move across a graft union and target DNA methylation de novo at normally unmethylated sites in the genomes of root cells from a different accession. PMID:26787884

  16. Genome-wide methylation study on depression: differential methylation and variable methylation in monozygotic twins

    PubMed Central

    Córdova-Palomera, A; Fatjó-Vilas, M; Gastó, C; Navarro, V; Krebs, M-O; Fañanás, L

    2015-01-01

    Depressive disorders have been shown to be highly influenced by environmental pathogenic factors, some of which are believed to exert stress on human brain functioning via epigenetic modifications. Previous genome-wide methylomic studies on depression have suggested that, along with differential DNA methylation, affected co-twins of monozygotic (MZ) pairs have increased DNA methylation variability, probably in line with theories of epigenetic stochasticity. Nevertheless, the potential biological roots of this variability remain largely unexplored. The current study aimed to evaluate whether DNA methylation differences within MZ twin pairs were related to differences in their psychopathological status. Data from the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 Beadchip was used to evaluate peripheral blood DNA methylation of 34 twins (17 MZ pairs). Two analytical strategies were used to identify (a) differentially methylated probes (DMPs) and (b) variably methylated probes (VMPs). Most DMPs were located in genes previously related to neuropsychiatric phenotypes. Remarkably, one of these DMPs (cg01122889) was located in the WDR26 gene, the DNA sequence of which has been implicated in major depressive disorder from genome-wide association studies. Expression of WDR26 has also been proposed as a biomarker of depression in human blood. Complementarily, VMPs were located in genes such as CACNA1C, IGF2 and the p38 MAP kinase MAPK11, showing enrichment for biological processes such as glucocorticoid signaling. These results expand on previous research to indicate that both differential methylation and differential variability have a role in the etiology and clinical manifestation of depression, and provide clues on specific genomic loci of potential interest in the epigenetics of depression. PMID:25918994

  17. Genome-Wide Identification and Comparative Analysis of Cytosine-5 DNA Methyltransferase and Demethylase Families in Wild and Cultivated Peanut

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pengfei; Gao, Chao; Bian, Xiaotong; Zhao, Shuzhen; Zhao, Chuanzhi; Xia, Han; Song, Hui; Hou, Lei; Wan, Shubo; Wang, Xingjun

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation plays important roles in genome protection, regulation of gene expression and is associated with plants development. Plant DNA methylation pattern was mediated by cytosine-5 DNA methyltransferase and demethylase. Although the genomes of AA and BB wild peanuts have been fully sequenced, these two gene families have not been studied. In this study we report the identification and analysis of putative cytosine-5 DNA methyltransferases (C5-MTases) and demethylases in AA and BB wild peanuts. Cytosine-5 DNA methyltransferases in AA and BB wild peanuts could be classified in MET, CMT, and DRM2 groups based on their domain organization. This result was supported by the gene and protein structural characteristics and phylogenetic analysis. We found that some wild peanut DRM2 members didn't contain UBA domain which was different from other plants such as Arabidopsis, maize and soybean. Five DNA demethylase encoding genes were found in AA genome and five in BB genome. The selective pressure analysis showed that wild peanut C5-MTase genes mainly underwent purifying selection but many positive selection sites can be detected. Conversely, DNA demethylase genes mainly underwent positive selection during evolution. Additionally, the expression dynamic of cytosine-5 DNA methyltransferase and demethylase genes in different cultivated peanut tissues were analyzed. Expression result showed that cold, heat or PEG stress could influence the expression level of C5-MTase and DNA demethylase genes in cultivated peanut. These results are useful for better understanding the complexity of these two gene families, and will facilitate epigenetic studies in peanut in the future. PMID:26870046

  18. Genome-Wide Identification and Comparative Analysis of Cytosine-5 DNA Methyltransferase and Demethylase Families in Wild and Cultivated Peanut.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pengfei; Gao, Chao; Bian, Xiaotong; Zhao, Shuzhen; Zhao, Chuanzhi; Xia, Han; Song, Hui; Hou, Lei; Wan, Shubo; Wang, Xingjun

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation plays important roles in genome protection, regulation of gene expression and is associated with plants development. Plant DNA methylation pattern was mediated by cytosine-5 DNA methyltransferase and demethylase. Although the genomes of AA and BB wild peanuts have been fully sequenced, these two gene families have not been studied. In this study we report the identification and analysis of putative cytosine-5 DNA methyltransferases (C5-MTases) and demethylases in AA and BB wild peanuts. Cytosine-5 DNA methyltransferases in AA and BB wild peanuts could be classified in MET, CMT, and DRM2 groups based on their domain organization. This result was supported by the gene and protein structural characteristics and phylogenetic analysis. We found that some wild peanut DRM2 members didn't contain UBA domain which was different from other plants such as Arabidopsis, maize and soybean. Five DNA demethylase encoding genes were found in AA genome and five in BB genome. The selective pressure analysis showed that wild peanut C5-MTase genes mainly underwent purifying selection but many positive selection sites can be detected. Conversely, DNA demethylase genes mainly underwent positive selection during evolution. Additionally, the expression dynamic of cytosine-5 DNA methyltransferase and demethylase genes in different cultivated peanut tissues were analyzed. Expression result showed that cold, heat or PEG stress could influence the expression level of C5-MTase and DNA demethylase genes in cultivated peanut. These results are useful for better understanding the complexity of these two gene families, and will facilitate epigenetic studies in peanut in the future.

  19. Genome-wide analysis of methylation in bovine clones by methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP).

    PubMed

    Kiefer, Hélène

    2015-01-01

    Methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP), when coupled to high-throughput sequencing or microarray hybridization, allows for the identification of methylated loci at a genome-wide scale. Genomic regions affected by incomplete reprogramming after nuclear transfer can potentially be delineated by comparing the MeDIP profiles of bovine clones and non-clones. This chapter presents a MeDIP protocol largely inspired from Mohn and colleagues (Mohn et al., Methods Mol Biol 507:55-64, 2009), with PCR primers specific for cattle, and when possible, overviews of experimental designs adapted to the comparison between clones and non-clones.

  20. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis identifies hypomethylated genes regulated by FOXP3 in human regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuxia; Maksimovic, Jovana; Naselli, Gaetano; Qian, Junyan; Chopin, Michael; Blewitt, Marnie E; Oshlack, Alicia; Harrison, Leonard C

    2013-10-17

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) prevent the emergence of autoimmune disease. Prototypic natural Treg (nTreg) can be reliably identified by demethylation at the Forkhead-box P3 (FOXP3) locus. To explore the methylation landscape of nTreg, we analyzed genome-wide methylation in human naive nTreg (rTreg) and conventional naive CD4(+) T cells (Naive). We detected 2315 differentially methylated cytosine-guanosine dinucleotides (CpGs) between these 2 cell types, many of which clustered into 127 regions of differential methylation (RDMs). Activation changed the methylation status of 466 CpGs and 18 RDMs in Naive but did not alter DNA methylation in rTreg. Gene-set testing of the 127 RDMs showed that promoter methylation and gene expression were reciprocally related. RDMs were enriched for putative FOXP3-binding motifs. Moreover, CpGs within known FOXP3-binding regions in the genome were hypomethylated. In support of the view that methylation limits access of FOXP3 to its DNA targets, we showed that increased expression of the immune suppressive receptor T-cell immunoglobulin and immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif domain (TIGIT), which delineated Treg from activated effector T cells, was associated with hypomethylation and FOXP3 binding at the TIGIT locus. Differential methylation analysis provides insight into previously undefined human Treg signature genes and their mode of regulation.

  1. Genome-wide methylation profiling identifies novel methylated genes in neuroblastoma tumors

    PubMed Central

    Olsson, Maja; Beck, Stephan; Kogner, Per; Martinsson, Tommy; Carén, Helena

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Neuroblastoma is a very heterogeneous tumor of childhood. The clinical spectra range from very aggressive metastatic disease to spontaneous regression, even without therapy. Aberrant DNA methylation pattern is a common feature of most cancers. For neuroblastoma, it has been demonstrated both for single genes as well as genome-wide, where a so-called methylator phenotype has been described. Here, we present a study using Illumina 450K methylation arrays on 60 neuroblastoma tumors. We show that aggressive tumors, characterized by International Neuroblastoma Risk Group (INRG) as stage M, are hypermethylated compared to low-grade tumors. On the contrary, INRG stage L tumors display more non-CpG methylation. The genes with the highest number of hypermethylated CpG sites in INRG M tumors are TERT, PCDHGA4, DLX5, and DLX6-AS1. Gene ontology analysis showed a representation of neuronal tumor relevant gene functions among the differentially methylated genes. For validation, we used a set of independent tumors previously analyzed with the Illumina 27K methylation arrays, which confirmed the differentially methylated sites. Top candidate genes with aberrant methylation were analyzed for altered gene expression through the R2 platform (http://r2.amc.nl), and for correlations between methylation and gene expression in a public dataset. Altered expression in nonsurvivors was found for the genes B3GALT4 and KIAA1949, CLIC5, DLX6-AS, TERT, and PIRT, and strongest correlations were found for TRIM36, KIAA0513, and PIRT. Our data indicate that methylation profiling can be used for patient stratification and informs on epigenetically deregulated genes with the potential of increasing our knowledge about the underlying mechanisms of tumor development. PMID:26786290

  2. Genome-wide methylation analysis identified sexually dimorphic methylated regions in hybrid tilapia

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Zi Yi; Xia, Jun Hong; Lin, Grace; Wang, Le; Lin, Valerie C. L.; Yue, Gen Hua

    2016-01-01

    Sexual dimorphism is an interesting biological phenomenon. Previous studies showed that DNA methylation might play a role in sexual dimorphism. However, the overall picture of the genome-wide methylation landscape in sexually dimorphic species remains unclear. We analyzed the DNA methylation landscape and transcriptome in hybrid tilapia (Oreochromis spp.) using whole genome bisulfite sequencing (WGBS) and RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq). We found 4,757 sexually dimorphic differentially methylated regions (DMRs), with significant clusters of DMRs located on chromosomal regions associated with sex determination. CpG methylation in promoter regions was negatively correlated with the gene expression level. MAPK/ERK pathway was upregulated in male tilapia. We also inferred active cis-regulatory regions (ACRs) in skeletal muscle tissues from WGBS datasets, revealing sexually dimorphic cis-regulatory regions. These results suggest that DNA methylation contribute to sex-specific phenotypes and serve as resources for further investigation to analyze the functions of these regions and their contributions towards sexual dimorphisms. PMID:27782217

  3. Epigenetic genome-wide association methylation in aging and longevity.

    PubMed

    Ben-Avraham, Danny; Muzumdar, Radhika H; Atzmon, Gil

    2012-10-01

    The aging phenotype is the result of a complex interaction between genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors. Evidence suggests that epigenetic changes (i.e., a set of reversible, heritable changes in gene function or other cell phenotype that occurs without a change in DNA sequence) may affect the aging process and may be one of the central mechanisms by which aging predisposes to many age-related diseases. The total number of altered methylation sites increases with increasing age, such that they could serve as marker for chronological age. This article systematically highlights the advances made in the field of epigenomics and their contribution to the understanding of the complex physiology of aging, lifespan and age-associated diseases.

  4. Genome-wide profiling of DNA methylation and gene expression in Crassostrea gigas male gametes

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Claire E.; Roberts, Steven B.

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation patterns and functions are variable across invertebrate taxa. In order to provide a better understanding of DNA methylation in the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas), we characterized the genome-wide DNA methylation profile in male gamete cells using whole-genome bisulfite sequencing. RNA-Seq analysis was performed to examine the relationship between DNA methylation and transcript expression. Methylation status of over 7.6 million CpG dinucleotides was described with a majority of methylated regions occurring among intragenic regions. Overall, 15% of the CpG dinucleotides were determined to be methylated and the mitochondrial genome lacked DNA methylation. Integrative analysis of DNA methylation and RNA-Seq data revealed a positive association between methylation status, both in gene bodies and putative promoter regions, and expression. This study provides a comprehensive characterization of the distribution of DNA methylation in the oyster male gamete tissue and suggests that DNA methylation is involved in gene regulatory activity. PMID:24987376

  5. Cytosine methylation profiling of cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Ehrich, Mathias; Turner, Julia; Gibbs, Peter; Lipton, Lara; Giovanneti, Mara; Cantor, Charles; van den Boom, Dirk

    2008-01-01

    DNA-methylation changes in human cancer are complex and vary between the different types of cancer. Capturing this epigenetic variability in an atlas of DNA-methylation changes will be beneficial for basic research as well as translational medicine. Hypothesis-free approaches that interrogate methylation patterns genome-wide have already generated promising results. However, these methods are still limited by their quantitative accuracy and the number of CpG sites that can be assessed individually. Here, we use a unique approach to measure quantitative methylation patterns in a set of >400 candidate genes. In this high-resolution study, we employed a cell-line model consisting of 59 cancer cell lines provided by the National Cancer Institute and six healthy control tissues for discovery of methylation differences in cancer-related genes. To assess the effect of cell culturing, we validated the results from colon cancer cell lines by using clinical colon cancer specimens. Our results show that a large proportion of genes (78 of 400 genes) are epigenetically altered in cancer. Although most genes show methylation changes in only one tumor type (35 genes), we also found a set of genes that changed in many different forms of cancer (seven genes). This dataset can easily be expanded to develop a more comprehensive and ultimately complete map of quantitative methylation changes. Our methylation data also provide an ideal starting point for further translational research where the results can be combined with existing large-scale datasets to develop an approach that integrates epigenetic, transcriptional, and mutational findings. PMID:18353987

  6. Genome-wide Mapping of Nucleosome Positioning and DNA Methylation Within Individual DNA Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yaping; Lay, Fides D.; Liang, Gangning; Berman, Benjamin P.; Jones, Peter A.; Kelly, Terry

    2012-01-01

    DNA methylation and nucleosome positioning work together to generate chromatin structures that regulate gene expression. Nucleosomes are typically mapped using nuclease digestion requiring significant amounts of material and varying enzyme concentrations. We have developed a method that uses a GpC methyltransferase (M.CviPI) and next generation sequencing to footprint nucleosome positioning genome-wide using less than 1 million cells, which does not suffer from sequence based biases associated with MNase digestion and retains endogenous DNA methylation information. Using a novel bioinformatics pipeline we identify chromatin configurations associated with a variety of functional genomic loci including distinct promoter types, enhancers, insulators, X-inactivated and imprinted genes. Importantly, DNA methylation and nucleosome positioning information are obtained from the same DNA molecule, giving the first genome-wide DNA methylation and nucleosome positioning correlation at the single molecule level that can be used to monitor disease progression and response to therapy.

  7. Genome-wide mapping of nucleosome positioning and DNA methylation within individual DNA molecules

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Theresa K.; Liu, Yaping; Lay, Fides D.; Liang, Gangning; Berman, Benjamin P.; Jones, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    DNA methylation and nucleosome positioning work together to generate chromatin structures that regulate gene expression. Nucleosomes are typically mapped using nuclease digestion requiring significant amounts of material and varying enzyme concentrations. We have developed a method (NOMe-seq) that uses a GpC methyltransferase (M.CviPI) and next generation sequencing to generate a high resolution footprint of nucleosome positioning genome-wide using less than 1 million cells while retaining endogenous DNA methylation information from the same DNA strand. Using a novel bioinformatics pipeline, we show a striking anti-correlation between nucleosome occupancy and DNA methylation at CTCF regions that is not present at promoters. We further show that the extent of nucleosome depletion at promoters is directly correlated to expression level and can accommodate multiple nucleosomes and provide genome-wide evidence that expressed non-CpG island promoters are nucleosome-depleted. Importantly, NOMe-seq obtains DNA methylation and nucleosome positioning information from the same DNA molecule, giving the first genome-wide DNA methylation and nucleosome positioning correlation at the single molecule, and thus, single cell level, that can be used to monitor disease progression and response to therapy. PMID:22960375

  8. Comprehensive analysis of genome-wide DNA methylation across human polycystic ovary syndrome ovary granulosa cell

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhaofeng; Wang, Linlin; Du, Linqing; Niu, Wenbin; Sun, Yingpu

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) affects approximately 7% of the reproductive-age women. A growing body of evidence indicated that epigenetic mechanisms contributed to the development of PCOS. The role of DNA modification in human PCOS ovary granulosa cell is still unknown in PCOS progression. Global DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation were detected between PCOS’ and controls’ granulosa cell. Genome-wide DNA methylation was profiled to investigate the putative function of DNA methylaiton. Selected genes expressions were analyzed between PCOS’ and controls’ granulosa cell. Our results showed that the granulosa cell global DNA methylation of PCOS patients was significant higher than the controls’. The global DNA hydroxymethylation showed low level and no statistical difference between PCOS and control. 6936 differentially methylated CpG sites were identified between control and PCOS-obesity. 12245 differential methylated CpG sites were detected between control and PCOS-nonobesity group. 5202 methylated CpG sites were significantly differential between PCOS-obesity and PCOS-nonobesity group. Our results showed that DNA methylation not hydroxymethylation altered genome-wide in PCOS granulosa cell. The different methylation genes were enriched in development protein, transcription factor activity, alternative splicing, sequence-specific DNA binding and embryonic morphogenesis. YWHAQ, NCF2, DHRS9 and SCNA were up-regulation in PCOS-obesity patients with no significance different between control and PCOS-nonobesity patients, which may be activated by lower DNA methylaiton. Global and genome-wide DNA methylation alteration may contribute to different genes expression and PCOS clinical pathology. PMID:27056885

  9. Genome-Wide DNA Methylation Patterns and Transcription Analysis in Sheep Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Couldrey, Christine; Brauning, Rudiger; Bracegirdle, Jeremy; Maclean, Paul; Henderson, Harold V.; McEwan, John C.

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation plays a central role in regulating many aspects of growth and development in mammals through regulating gene expression. The development of next generation sequencing technologies have paved the way for genome-wide, high resolution analysis of DNA methylation landscapes using methodology known as reduced representation bisulfite sequencing (RRBS). While RRBS has proven to be effective in understanding DNA methylation landscapes in humans, mice, and rats, to date, few studies have utilised this powerful method for investigating DNA methylation in agricultural animals. Here we describe the utilisation of RRBS to investigate DNA methylation in sheep Longissimus dorsi muscles. RRBS analysis of ∼1% of the genome from Longissimus dorsi muscles provided data of suitably high precision and accuracy for DNA methylation analysis, at all levels of resolution from genome-wide to individual nucleotides. Combining RRBS data with mRNAseq data allowed the sheep Longissimus dorsi muscle methylome to be compared with methylomes from other species. While some species differences were identified, many similarities were observed between DNA methylation patterns in sheep and other more commonly studied species. The RRBS data presented here highlights the complexity of epigenetic regulation of genes. However, the similarities observed across species are promising, in that knowledge gained from epigenetic studies in human and mice may be applied, with caution, to agricultural species. The ability to accurately measure DNA methylation in agricultural animals will contribute an additional layer of information to the genetic analyses currently being used to maximise production gains in these species. PMID:25010796

  10. Genome-Wide Analysis of DNA Methylation and Cigarette Smoking in a Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaoyan; Li, Jun; Deng, Siyun; Yu, Kuai; Liu, Xuezhen; Deng, Qifei; Sun, Huizhen; Zhang, Xiaomin; He, Meian; Guo, Huan; Chen, Weihong; Yuan, Jing; Zhang, Bing; Kuang, Dan; He, Xiaosheng; Bai, Yansen; Han, Xu; Liu, Bing; Li, Xiaoliang; Yang, Liangle; Jiang, Haijing; Zhang, Yizhi; Hu, Jie; Cheng, Longxian; Luo, Xiaoting; Mei, Wenhua; Zhou, Zhiming; Sun, Shunchang; Zhang, Liyun; Liu, Chuanyao; Guo, Yanjun; Zhang, Zhihong; Hu, Frank B.; Liang, Liming; Wu, Tangchun

    2016-01-01

    Background: Smoking is a risk factor for many human diseases. DNA methylation has been related to smoking, but genome-wide methylation data for smoking in Chinese populations is limited. Objectives: We aimed to investigate epigenome-wide methylation in relation to smoking in a Chinese population. Methods: We measured the methylation levels at > 485,000 CpG sites (CpGs) in DNA from leukocytes using a methylation array and conducted a genome-wide meta-analysis of DNA methylation and smoking in a total of 596 Chinese participants. We further evaluated the associations of smoking-related CpGs with internal polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) biomarkers and their correlations with the expression of corresponding genes. Results: We identified 318 CpGs whose methylation levels were associated with smoking at a genome-wide significance level (false discovery rate < 0.05), among which 161 CpGs annotated to 123 genes were not associated with smoking in recent studies of Europeans and African Americans. Of these smoking-related CpGs, methylation levels at 80 CpGs showed significant correlations with the expression of corresponding genes (including RUNX3, IL6R, PTAFR, ANKRD11, CEP135 and CDH23), and methylation at 15 CpGs was significantly associated with urinary 2-hydroxynaphthalene, the most representative internal monohydroxy-PAH biomarker for smoking. Conclusion: We identified DNA methylation markers associated with smoking in a Chinese population, including some markers that were also correlated with gene expression. Exposure to naphthalene, a byproduct of tobacco smoke, may contribute to smoking-related methylation. Citation: Zhu X, Li J, Deng S, Yu K, Liu X, Deng Q, Sun H, Zhang X, He M, Guo H, Chen W, Yuan J, Zhang B, Kuang D, He X, Bai Y, Han X, Liu B, Li X, Yang L, Jiang H, Zhang Y, Hu J, Cheng L, Luo X, Mei W, Zhou Z, Sun S, Zhang L, Liu C, Guo Y, Zhang Z, Hu FB, Liang L, Wu T. 2016. Genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation and cigarette smoking in Chinese. Environ

  11. Genome-wide quantitative assessment of variation in DNA methylation patterns

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Hehuang; Wang, Min; de Andrade, Alexandre; de F. Bonaldo, Maria; Galat, Vasil; Arndt, Kelly; Rajaram, Veena; Goldman, Stewart; Tomita, Tadanori; Soares, Marcelo B.

    2011-01-01

    Genomic DNA methylation contributes substantively to transcriptional regulations that underlie mammalian development and cellular differentiation. Much effort has been made to decipher the molecular mechanisms governing the establishment and maintenance of DNA methylation patterns. However, little is known about genome-wide variation of DNA methylation patterns. In this study, we introduced the concept of methylation entropy, a measure of the randomness of DNA methylation patterns in a cell population, and exploited it to assess the variability in DNA methylation patterns of Alu repeats and promoters. A few interesting observations were made: (i) within a cell population, methylation entropy varies among genomic loci; (ii) among cell populations, the methylation entropies of most genomic loci remain constant; (iii) compared to normal tissue controls, some tumors exhibit greater methylation entropies; (iv) Alu elements with high methylation entropy are associated with high GC content but depletion of CpG dinucleotides and (v) Alu elements in the intronic regions or far from CpG islands are associated with low methylation entropy. We further identified 12 putative allelic-specific methylated genomic loci, including four Alu elements and eight promoters. Lastly, using subcloned normal fibroblast cells, we demonstrated the highly variable methylation patterns are resulted from low fidelity of DNA methylation inheritance. PMID:21278160

  12. Genome-wide DNA methylation modified by soy phytoestrogens: role for epigenetic therapeutics in prostate cancer?

    PubMed

    Karsli-Ceppioglu, Seher; Ngollo, Marjolaine; Adjakly, Mawussi; Dagdemir, Aslihan; Judes, Gaëlle; Lebert, André; Boiteux, Jean-Paul; Penault-LLorca, Frédérique; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Guy, Laurent; Bernard-Gallon, Dominique

    2015-04-01

    In prostate cancer, DNA methylation is significantly associated with tumor initiation, progression, and metastasis. Previous studies have suggested that soy phytoestrogens might regulate DNA methylation at individual candidate gene loci and that they play a crucial role as potential therapeutic agents for prostate cancer. The purpose of our study was to examine the modulation effects of phytoestrogens on a genome-wide scale in regards to DNA methylation in prostate cancer. Prostate cancer cell lines DU-145 and LNCaP were treated with 40 μM of genistein and 110 μM of daidzein. DNMT inhibitor 5-azacytidine (2 μM) and the methylating agent budesonide (2 μM) were used to compare their demethylation/methylation effects with phytoestrogens. The regulatory effects of phytoestrogens on DNA methylation were analyzed by using a methyl-DNA immunoprecipitation method coupled with Human DNA Methylation Microarrays (MeDIP-chip). We observed that the methylation profiles of 58 genes were altered by genistein and daidzein treatments in DU-145 and LNCaP prostate cancer cells. In addition, the methylation frequencies of the MAD1L1, TRAF7, KDM4B, and hTERT genes were remarkably modified by genistein treatment. Our results suggest that the modulation effects of phytoestrogens on DNA methylation essentially lead to inhibition of cell growth and induction of apoptosis. Genome-wide methylation profiling reported here suggests that epigenetic regulation mechanisms and, by extension, epigenetics-driven novel therapeutic candidates warrant further consideration in future "omics" studies of prostate cancer.

  13. Genome-Wide DNA Methylation Profiles Indicate CD8+ T Cell Hypermethylation in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Bos, Steffan D.; Page, Christian M.; Andreassen, Bettina K.; Elboudwarej, Emon; Gustavsen, Marte W.; Briggs, Farren; Quach, Hong; Leikfoss, Ingvild S.; Bjølgerud, Anja; Berge, Tone; Harbo, Hanne F.; Barcellos, Lisa F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Determine whether MS-specific DNA methylation profiles can be identified in whole blood or purified immune cells from untreated MS patients. Methods Whole blood, CD4+ and CD8+ T cell DNA from 16 female, treatment naïve MS patients and 14 matched controls was profiled using the HumanMethylation450K BeadChip. Genotype data were used to assess genetic homogeneity of our sample and to exclude potential SNP-induced DNA methylation measurement errors. Results As expected, significant differences between CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells and whole blood DNA methylation profiles were observed, regardless of disease status. Strong evidence for hypermethylation of CD8+ T cell, but not CD4+ T cell or whole blood DNA in MS patients compared to controls was observed. Genome-wide significant individual CpG-site DNA methylation differences were not identified. Furthermore, significant differences in gene DNA methylation of 148 established MS-associated risk genes were not observed. Conclusion While genome-wide significant DNA methylation differences were not detected for individual CpG-sites, strong evidence for DNA hypermethylation of CD8+ T cells for MS patients was observed, indicating a role for DNA methylation in MS. Further, our results suggest that large DNA methylation differences for CpG-sites tested here do not contribute to MS susceptibility. In particular, large DNA methylation differences for CpG-sites within 148 established MS candidate genes tested in our study cannot explain missing heritability. Larger studies of homogenous MS patients and matched controls are warranted to further elucidate the impact of CD8+ T cell and more subtle DNA methylation changes in MS development and pathogenesis. PMID:25734800

  14. Genome-wide DNA methylation profiling of non-small cell lung carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) is a complex malignancy that owing to its heterogeneity and poor prognosis poses many challenges to diagnosis, prognosis and patient treatment. DNA methylation is an important mechanism of epigenetic regulation involved in normal development and cancer. It is a very stable and specific modification and therefore in principle a very suitable marker for epigenetic phenotyping of tumors. Here we present a genome-wide DNA methylation analysis of NSCLC samples and paired lung tissues, where we combine MethylCap and next generation sequencing (MethylCap-seq) to provide comprehensive DNA methylation maps of the tumor and paired lung samples. The MethylCap-seq data were validated by bisulfite sequencing and methyl-specific polymerase chain reaction of selected regions. Results Analysis of the MethylCap-seq data revealed a strong positive correlation between replicate experiments and between paired tumor/lung samples. We identified 57 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) present in all NSCLC tumors analyzed by MethylCap-seq. While hypomethylated DMRs did not correlate to any particular functional category of genes, the hypermethylated DMRs were strongly associated with genes encoding transcriptional regulators. Furthermore, subtelomeric regions and satellite repeats were hypomethylated in the NSCLC samples. We also identified DMRs that were specific to two of the major subtypes of NSCLC, adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas. Conclusions Collectively, we provide a resource containing genome-wide DNA methylation maps of NSCLC and their paired lung tissues, and comprehensive lists of known and novel DMRs and associated genes in NSCLC. PMID:22726460

  15. Genome-wide Mapping Reveals Conservation of Promoter DNA Methylation Following Chicken Domestication

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qinghe; Wang, Yuanyuan; Hu, Xiaoxiang; Zhao, Yaofeng; Li, Ning

    2015-01-01

    It is well-known that environment influences DNA methylation, however, the extent of heritable DNA methylation variation following animal domestication remains largely unknown. Using meDIP-chip we mapped the promoter methylomes for 23,316 genes in muscle tissues of ancestral and domestic chickens. We systematically examined the variation of promoter DNA methylation in terms of different breeds, differentially expressed genes, SNPs and genes undergo genetic selection sweeps. While considerable changes in DNA sequence and gene expression programs were prevalent, we found that the inter-strain DNA methylation patterns were highly conserved in promoter region between the wild and domestic chicken breeds. Our data suggests a global preservation of DNA methylation between the wild and domestic chicken breeds in either a genome-wide or locus-specific scale in chick muscle tissues. PMID:25735894

  16. Genome-wide mapping reveals conservation of promoter DNA methylation following chicken domestication.

    PubMed

    Li, Qinghe; Wang, Yuanyuan; Hu, Xiaoxiang; Zhao, Yaofeng; Li, Ning

    2015-01-01

    It is well-known that environment influences DNA methylation, however, the extent of heritable DNA methylation variation following animal domestication remains largely unknown. Using meDIP-chip we mapped the promoter methylomes for 23,316 genes in muscle tissues of ancestral and domestic chickens. We systematically examined the variation of promoter DNA methylation in terms of different breeds, differentially expressed genes, SNPs and genes undergo genetic selection sweeps. While considerable changes in DNA sequence and gene expression programs were prevalent, we found that the inter-strain DNA methylation patterns were highly conserved in promoter region between the wild and domestic chicken breeds. Our data suggests a global preservation of DNA methylation between the wild and domestic chicken breeds in either a genome-wide or locus-specific scale in chick muscle tissues.

  17. Exploring genome wide bisulfite sequencing for DNA methylation analysis in livestock: a technical assessment.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Rachael; Couldrey, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances made in "omics" technologies are contributing to a revolution in livestock selection and breeding practices. Epigenetic mechanisms, including DNA methylation are important determinants for the control of gene expression in mammals. DNA methylation research will help our understanding of how environmental factors contribute to phenotypic variation of complex production and health traits. High-throughput sequencing is a vital tool for the comprehensive analysis of DNA methylation, and bisulfite-based strategies coupled with DNA sequencing allows for quantitative, site-specific methylation analysis at the genome level or genome wide. Reduced representation bisulfite sequencing (RRBS) and more recently whole genome bisulfite sequencing (WGBS) have proven to be effective techniques for studying DNA methylation in both humans and mice. Here we report the development of RRBS and WGBS for use in sheep, the first application of this technology in livestock species. Important technical issues associated with these methodologies including fragment size selection and sequence depth are examined and discussed. PMID:24860595

  18. Genome-wide DNA Methylation Profiles of Small Intestine and Liver in Fast-growing and Slow-growing Weaning Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Woori; Kim, Jin-nam; Kim, Daewon; Hong, Jin Su; Jeong, Jae Hark; Kim, Heebal; Cho, Seoae; Kim, Yoo Yong

    2014-01-01

    Although growth rate is one of the main economic traits of concern in pig production, there is limited knowledge on its epigenetic regulation, such as DNA methylation. In this study, we conducted methyl-CpG binding domain protein-enriched genome sequencing (MBD-seq) to compare genome-wide DNA methylation profile of small intestine and liver tissue between fast- and slow-growing weaning piglets. The genome-wide methylation pattern between the two different growing groups showed similar proportion of CpG (regions of DNA where a cytosine nucleotide occurs next to a guanine nucleotide in the linear sequence) coverage, genomic regions, and gene regions. Differentially methylated regions and genes were also identified for downstream analysis. In canonical pathway analysis using differentially methylated genes, pathways (triacylglycerol pathway, some cell cycle related pathways, and insulin receptor signaling pathway) expected to be related to growth rate were enriched in the two organ tissues. Differentially methylated genes were also organized in gene networks related to the cellular development, growth, and carbohydrate metabolism. Even though further study is required, the result of this study may contribute to the understanding of epigenetic regulation in pig growth. PMID:25358311

  19. Genome-Wide DNA Methylation in Mixed Ancestry Individuals with Diabetes and Prediabetes from South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Pheiffer, Carmen; Humphries, Stephen E.; Gamieldien, Junaid; Erasmus, Rajiv T.

    2016-01-01

    Aims. To conduct a genome-wide DNA methylation in individuals with type 2 diabetes, individuals with prediabetes, and control mixed ancestry individuals from South Africa. Methods. We used peripheral blood to perform genome-wide DNA methylation analysis in 3 individuals with screen detected diabetes, 3 individuals with prediabetes, and 3 individuals with normoglycaemia from the Bellville South Community, Cape Town, South Africa, who were age-, gender-, body mass index-, and duration of residency-matched. Methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP) was performed by Arraystar Inc. (Rockville, MD, USA). Results. Hypermethylated DMRs were 1160 (81.97%) and 124 (43.20%), respectively, in individuals with diabetes and prediabetes when both were compared to subjects with normoglycaemia. Our data shows that genes related to the immune system, signal transduction, glucose transport, and pancreas development have altered DNA methylation in subjects with prediabetes and diabetes. Pathway analysis based on the functional analysis mapping of genes to KEGG pathways suggested that the linoleic acid metabolism and arachidonic acid metabolism pathways are hypomethylated in prediabetes and diabetes. Conclusions. Our study suggests that epigenetic changes are likely to be an early process that occurs before the onset of overt diabetes. Detailed analysis of DMRs that shows gradual methylation differences from control versus prediabetes to prediabetes versus diabetes in a larger sample size is required to confirm these findings. PMID:27555869

  20. Genome-Wide Expression of MicroRNAs Is Regulated by DNA Methylation in Hepatocarcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jing; Wang, Shuang; Siegel, Abby B.; Remotti, Helen; Wang, Qiao; Sirosh, Iryna; Santella, Regina M.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Previous studies, including ours, have examined the regulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) by DNA methylation, but whether this regulation occurs at a genome-wide level in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is unclear. Subjects/Methods. Using a two-phase study design, we conducted genome-wide screening for DNA methylation and miRNA expression to explore the potential role of methylation alterations in miRNAs regulation. Results. We found that expressions of 25 miRNAs were statistically significantly different between tumor and nontumor tissues and perfectly differentiated HCC tumor from nontumor. Six miRNAs were overexpressed, and 19 were repressed in tumors. Among 133 miRNAs with inverse correlations between methylation and expression, 8 miRNAs (6%) showed statistically significant differences in expression between tumor and nontumor tissues. Six miRNAs were validated in 56 additional paired HCC tissues, and significant inverse correlations were observed for miR-125b and miR-199a, which is consistent with the inactive chromatin pattern found in HepG2 cells. Conclusion. These data suggest that the expressions of miR-125b and miR-199a are dramatically regulated by DNA hypermethylation that plays a key role in hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:25861255

  1. Genome-wide DNA methylation variability in adolescent monozygotic twins followed since birth.

    PubMed

    Lévesque, Mélissa L; Casey, Kevin F; Szyf, Moshe; Ismaylova, Elmira; Ly, Victoria; Verner, Marie-Pier; Suderman, Matthew; Brendgen, Mara; Vitaro, Frank; Dionne, Ginette; Boivin, Michel; Tremblay, Richard E; Booij, Linda

    2014-10-01

    DNA methylation patterns are characterized by highly conserved developmental programs, but allow for divergent gene expression resulting from stochastic epigenetic drift or divergent environments. Genome-wide methylation studies in monozygotic (MZ) twins are providing insight into the extent of epigenetic variation that occurs, irrespective of genotype. However, little is known about the variability of DNA methylation patterns in adolescence, a period involving significant and rapid physical, emotional, social, and neurodevelopmental change. Here, we assessed genome-wide DNA methylation using the 450 K Illumina BeadChip in a sample of 37 MZ twin pairs followed longitudinally since birth to investigate: 1) the extent of variation in DNA methylation in identical genetic backgrounds in adolescence and; 2) whether these variations are randomly distributed or enriched in particular functional pathways. We also assessed stability of DNA methylation over 3-6 months to distinguish stable trait-like and variable state-like genes. A pathway analysis found high within-pair variability in genes associated with development, cellular mechanisms, tissue and cell morphology, and various disorders. Test-retest analyses performed in a sub-sample of 8 twin pairs demonstrated enrichment in gene pathways involved in organismal development, cellular growth and proliferation, cell signaling, and particular disorders. The variability found in functional gene pathways may plausibly underlie phenotypic differences in this adolescent MZ twin sample. Furthermore, we assessed stability of methylation over 3-6 months and found that some genes were stable while others were unstable, suggesting that the methylome remains dynamic in adolescence and that dynamic sites tend to be organized in certain gene pathways. PMID:25437055

  2. Genome-wide DNA methylation variability in adolescent monozygotic twins followed since birth

    PubMed Central

    Lévesque, Mélissa L; Casey, Kevin F; Szyf, Moshe; Ismaylova, Elmira; Ly, Victoria; Verner, Marie-Pier; Suderman, Matthew; Brendgen, Mara; Vitaro, Frank; Dionne, Ginette; Boivin, Michel; Tremblay, Richard E; Booij, Linda

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation patterns are characterized by highly conserved developmental programs, but allow for divergent gene expression resulting from stochastic epigenetic drift or divergent environments. Genome-wide methylation studies in monozygotic (MZ) twins are providing insight into the extent of epigenetic variation that occurs, irrespective of genotype. However, little is known about the variability of DNA methylation patterns in adolescence, a period involving significant and rapid physical, emotional, social, and neurodevelopmental change. Here, we assessed genome-wide DNA methylation using the 450 K Illumina BeadChip in a sample of 37 MZ twin pairs followed longitudinally since birth to investigate: 1) the extent of variation in DNA methylation in identical genetic backgrounds in adolescence and; 2) whether these variations are randomly distributed or enriched in particular functional pathways. We also assessed stability of DNA methylation over 3–6 months to distinguish stable trait-like and variable state-like genes. A pathway analysis found high within-pair variability in genes associated with development, cellular mechanisms, tissue and cell morphology, and various disorders. Test-retest analyses performed in a sub-sample of 8 twin pairs demonstrated enrichment in gene pathways involved in organismal development, cellular growth and proliferation, cell signaling, and particular disorders. The variability found in functional gene pathways may plausibly underlie phenotypic differences in this adolescent MZ twin sample. Furthermore, we assessed stability of methylation over 3–6 months and found that some genes were stable while others were unstable, suggesting that the methylome remains dynamic in adolescence and that dynamic sites tend to be organized in certain gene pathways. PMID:25437055

  3. Genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation in obese, lean, and miniature pig breeds

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yalan; Zhou, Rong; Mu, Yulian; Hou, Xinhua; Tang, Zhonglin; Li, Kui

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation is a crucial epigenetic modification involved in diverse biological processes. There is significant phenotypic variance between Chinese indigenous and western pig breeds. Here, we surveyed the genome-wide DNA methylation profiles of blood leukocytes from three pig breeds (Tongcheng, Landrace, and Wuzhishan) by methylated DNA immunoprecipitation sequencing. The results showed that DNA methylation was enriched in gene body regions and repetitive sequences. LINE/L1 and SINE/tRNA-Glu were the predominant methylated repeats in pigs. The methylation level in the gene body regions was higher than in the 5′ and 3′ flanking regions of genes. About 15% of CpG islands were methylated in the pig genomes. Additionally, 2,807, 2,969, and 5,547 differentially methylated genes (DMGs) were identified in the Tongcheng vs. Landrace, Tongcheng vs. Wuzhishan, and Landrace vs. Wuzhishan comparisons, respectively. A total of 868 DMGs were shared by the three contrasts. The DMGs were significantly enriched in development- and metabolism-related biological processes and pathways. Finally, we identified 32 candidate DMGs associated with phenotype variance in pigs. Our research provides a DNA methylome resource for pigs and furthers understanding of epigenetically regulated phenotype variance in mammals. PMID:27444743

  4. Effect of MTHFR Gene Polymorphism Impact on Atherosclerosis via Genome-Wide Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xuefeng; Zhang, Wei; Lu, Qun; Lei, Xinjun; Wang, Tingzhong; Han, Xuanmao; Ma, Aiqun

    2016-01-01

    Background Atherosclerosis seriously threats human health. Homocysteine is an independent risk factor closely related to DNA methylation. MTHFR C667T loci polymorphism is closely associated with homocysteine level. This study aimed to investigate the relationship among MTHFR C667T loci polymorphism, genome-wide methylation, and atherosclerosis. Material/Methods Blood sample was collected from 105 patients with coronary atherosclerosis and 105 healthy controls. Pyrosequencing methylation was used to detect LINE-1 methylation level. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction enzyme fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) was used to test MTHFR. Results LINE-1 methylation level in the patient group was significantly lower than in the controls (t=5.007, P<0.001). MTHFR C667T genotype distribution presented marked differences in the 2 groups. TT genotype carriers had significantly increased risk of atherosclerosis (OR=3.56, P=0.009). Three different genotypes of MTHFR C667T loci showed different LINE-1 methylation level between the 2 groups (P<0.01). LINE-1 methylation level in TT and CT genotype carriers was obviously lower than in CC genotype carriers (P<0.05). Conclusions MTHFR C667T loci polymorphism may affect atherosclerosis by regulating genome methylation level. PMID:26828698

  5. NSD1 mutations generate a genome-wide DNA methylation signature

    PubMed Central

    Choufani, S.; Cytrynbaum, C.; Chung, B. H. Y.; Turinsky, A. L.; Grafodatskaya, D.; Chen, Y. A.; Cohen, A. S. A.; Dupuis, L.; Butcher, D. T.; Siu, M. T.; Luk, H. M.; Lo, I. F. M.; Lam, S. T. S.; Caluseriu, O.; Stavropoulos, D. J.; Reardon, W.; Mendoza-Londono, R.; Brudno, M.; Gibson, W. T.; Chitayat, D.; Weksberg, R.

    2015-01-01

    Sotos syndrome (SS) represents an important human model system for the study of epigenetic regulation; it is an overgrowth/intellectual disability syndrome caused by mutations in a histone methyltransferase, NSD1. As layered epigenetic modifications are often interdependent, we propose that pathogenic NSD1 mutations have a genome-wide impact on the most stable epigenetic mark, DNA methylation (DNAm). By interrogating DNAm in SS patients, we identify a genome-wide, highly significant NSD1+/−-specific signature that differentiates pathogenic NSD1 mutations from controls, benign NSD1 variants and the clinically overlapping Weaver syndrome. Validation studies of independent cohorts of SS and controls assigned 100% of these samples correctly. This highly specific and sensitive NSD1+/− signature encompasses genes that function in cellular morphogenesis and neuronal differentiation, reflecting cardinal features of the SS phenotype. The identification of SS-specific genome-wide DNAm alterations will facilitate both the elucidation of the molecular pathophysiology of SS and the development of improved diagnostic testing. PMID:26690673

  6. Genome-Wide Binding of MBD2 Reveals Strong Preference for Highly Methylated Loci

    PubMed Central

    Menafra, Roberta; Brinkman, Arie B.; Matarese, Filomena; Franci, Gianluigi; Bartels, Stefanie J. J.; Nguyen, Luan; Shimbo, Takashi; Wade, Paul A.; Hubner, Nina C.; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G.

    2014-01-01

    MBD2 is a subunit of the NuRD complex that is postulated to mediate gene repression via recruitment of the complex to methylated DNA. In this study we adopted an MBD2 tagging-approach to study its genome wide binding characteristics. We show that in vivo MBD2 is mainly recruited to CpG island promoters that are highly methylated. Interestingly, MBD2 binds around 1 kb downstream of the transcription start site of a subset of ∼400 CpG island promoters that are characterized by the presence of active histone marks, RNA polymerase II (Pol2) and low to medium gene expression levels and H3K36me3 deposition. These tagged-MBD2 binding sites in MCF-7 show increased methylation in a cohort of primary breast cancers but not in normal breast samples, suggesting a putative role for MBD2 in breast cancer. PMID:24927503

  7. Genome-wide methylation analysis of tubulocystic and papillary renal cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Korabecna, M; Geryk, J; Hora, M; Steiner, P; Seda, O; Tesar, V

    2016-01-01

    Tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma (TRCC) represents a rare tumor with incidence lower than 1 % of all renal carcinomas. This study was undertaken to contribute to characterization of molecular signatures associated with TRCC and to compare them with the features of papillary renal cell carcinoma (PRCC) at the level of genome wide methylation analysis.We performed methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP) coupled with microarray analysis (Roche NimbleGen). Using the CHARM package, we compared the levels of gene methylation between paired samples of tumors and control renal tissues of each examined individual. We found significant global demethylation in all tumor samples in comparison with adjacent kidney tissues of normal histological appearance but no significant differences in gene methylation between the both compared tumor entities. Therefore we focused on characterization of differentially methylated regions between both tumors and control tissues. We found 42 differentially methylated genes.Hypermethylated genes for protocadherins (PCDHG) and genes coding for products associated with functions of plasma membrane were evaluated as significantly overrepresented among hypermethylated genes detected in both types of renal cell carcinomas.In our pilot study, we provide the first evidence that identical features in the process of carcinogenesis leading to TRCC and/or to PRCC may be found at the gene methylation level.

  8. H19 lncRNA alters DNA methylation genome wide by regulating S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jichun; Yang, Lihua; Zhong, Tianyu; Mueller, Martin; Men, Yi; Zhang, Na; Xie, Juanke; Giang, Karolyn; Chung, Hunter; Sun, Xueguang; Lu, Lingeng; Carmichael, Gordon G; Taylor, Hugh S; Huang, Yingqun

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is essential for mammalian development and physiology. Here we report that the developmentally regulated H19 lncRNA binds to and inhibits S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase (SAHH), the only mammalian enzyme capable of hydrolysing S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH). SAH is a potent feedback inhibitor of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM)-dependent methyltransferases that methylate diverse cellular components, including DNA, RNA, proteins, lipids and neurotransmitters. We show that H19 knockdown activates SAHH, leading to increased DNMT3B-mediated methylation of an lncRNA-encoding gene Nctc1 within the Igf2-H19-Nctc1 locus. Genome-wide methylation profiling reveals methylation changes at numerous gene loci consistent with SAHH modulation by H19. Our results uncover an unanticipated regulatory circuit involving broad epigenetic alterations by a single abundantly expressed lncRNA that may underlie gene methylation dynamics of development and diseases and suggest that this mode of regulation may extend to other cellular components. PMID:26687445

  9. Genome-wide site-specific differential methylation in the blood of individuals with Klinefelter Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Emily S.; Qiu, Weiliang; Morrow, Jarrett; Beaty, Terri H.; Hetmanski, Jacqueline; Make, Barry J.; Lomas, David A.; Silverman, Edwin K.; DeMeo, Dawn L.

    2015-01-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (KS) (47 XXY) is a common sex-chromosome aneuploidy with an estimated prevalence of 1 in every 660 male births. Investigations into the associations between DNA methylation and the highly variable clinical manifestations of KS have largely focused on the supernumerary X chromosome; systematic investigations of the epigenome have been limited. We obtained genome-wide DNA methylation data from peripheral blood using the Illumina HumanMethylation450K platform in 5 KS (47 XXY), 102 male (46 XY), and 113 female (46 XX) control subjects participating in the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) Gene Study. Empirical Bayes-mediated models were used to test for differential methylation by KS status. CpG sites with a false-discovery rate <0.05 from the first-generation HumanMethylation27K platform were further examined in an independent replication cohort of 2 KS subjects, 590 male, and 495 female controls drawn from the International COPD Genetics Network (ICGN). Differential methylation at sites throughout the genome were identified, including 86 CpG sites that were differentially methylated in KS subjects relative to both male and female controls. CpG sites annotated to the HEN1 methyltransferase homolog 1 (HENMT1), calcyclin-binding protein (CACYBP), and GTPase-activating protein (SH3 domain)-binding protein 1 (G3BP1) genes were among the “KS-specific” loci that were replicated in ICGN. We therefore conclude that site-specific differential methylation exists throughout the genome in KS. The functional impact and clinical relevance of these differentially methylated loci should be explored in future studies. PMID:25988574

  10. Exploring Genome-wide DNA Methylation Profiles Altered in Kashin-Beck Disease Using Infinium Human Methylation 450 Bead Chips.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiao Wei; Shi, Bo Hui; Lyu, Ai Li; Zhang, Feng; Zhou, Tian Tian; Guo, Xiong

    2016-07-01

    To understand how differentially methylated genes (DMGs) might affect the pathogenesis of Kashin-Beck disease (KBD). Genome-wide methylation profiling of whole blood from 12 matched KBD and controls pairs was performed using a high-resolution Infinium 450 K methylation array. In total, 97 CpG sites were differentially methylated in KBD compared to the normal controls; of these sites, 36 sites were significantly hypermethylated (covering 22 genes) and 61 sites were significantly hypomethylated (covering 34 genes). Of these genes, 14 significant pathways were identified, the most significant P value pathway was type I diabetes mellitus pathway and pathways associated with autoimmune diseases and inflammatory diseases were included in this study. Subsequently, 4 CpG sites in HLA-DRB1 were validated using bisulfite sequencing polymerase chain reaction (BSP) in articular cartilage, and the results showed significant differences in the methylation status between KBD and controls, consistent with the results of the high-resolution array. These results suggested that differences in genome-wide DNA methylation exist between KBD and the controls, and the biological pathways support the autoimmune disease and inflammatory disease hypothesis of KBD.

  11. Exploring Genome-wide DNA Methylation Profiles Altered in Kashin-Beck Disease Using Infinium Human Methylation 450 Bead Chips.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiao Wei; Shi, Bo Hui; Lyu, Ai Li; Zhang, Feng; Zhou, Tian Tian; Guo, Xiong

    2016-07-01

    To understand how differentially methylated genes (DMGs) might affect the pathogenesis of Kashin-Beck disease (KBD). Genome-wide methylation profiling of whole blood from 12 matched KBD and controls pairs was performed using a high-resolution Infinium 450 K methylation array. In total, 97 CpG sites were differentially methylated in KBD compared to the normal controls; of these sites, 36 sites were significantly hypermethylated (covering 22 genes) and 61 sites were significantly hypomethylated (covering 34 genes). Of these genes, 14 significant pathways were identified, the most significant P value pathway was type I diabetes mellitus pathway and pathways associated with autoimmune diseases and inflammatory diseases were included in this study. Subsequently, 4 CpG sites in HLA-DRB1 were validated using bisulfite sequencing polymerase chain reaction (BSP) in articular cartilage, and the results showed significant differences in the methylation status between KBD and controls, consistent with the results of the high-resolution array. These results suggested that differences in genome-wide DNA methylation exist between KBD and the controls, and the biological pathways support the autoimmune disease and inflammatory disease hypothesis of KBD. PMID:27554126

  12. Genome-wide DNA methylation levels and altered cortisol stress reactivity following childhood trauma in humans

    PubMed Central

    Houtepen, Lotte C.; Vinkers, Christiaan H.; Carrillo-Roa, Tania; Hiemstra, Marieke; van Lier, Pol A.; Meeus, Wim; Branje, Susan; Heim, Christine M.; Nemeroff, Charles B.; Mill, Jonathan; Schalkwyk, Leonard C.; Creyghton, Menno P.; Kahn, René S.; Joëls, Marian; Binder, Elisabeth B.; Boks, Marco P. M.

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation likely plays a role in the regulation of human stress reactivity. Here we show that in a genome-wide analysis of blood DNA methylation in 85 healthy individuals, a locus in the Kit ligand gene (KITLG; cg27512205) showed the strongest association with cortisol stress reactivity (P=5.8 × 10−6). Replication was obtained in two independent samples using either blood (N=45, P=0.001) or buccal cells (N=255, P=0.004). KITLG methylation strongly mediates the relationship between childhood trauma and cortisol stress reactivity in the discovery sample (32% mediation). Its genomic location, a CpG island shore within an H3K27ac enhancer mark, and the correlation between methylation in the blood and prefrontal cortex provide further evidence that KITLG methylation is functionally relevant for the programming of stress reactivity in the human brain. Our results extend preclinical evidence for epigenetic regulation of stress reactivity to humans and provide leads to enhance our understanding of the neurobiological pathways underlying stress vulnerability. PMID:26997371

  13. Genome-wide DNA methylation levels and altered cortisol stress reactivity following childhood trauma in humans.

    PubMed

    Houtepen, Lotte C; Vinkers, Christiaan H; Carrillo-Roa, Tania; Hiemstra, Marieke; van Lier, Pol A; Meeus, Wim; Branje, Susan; Heim, Christine M; Nemeroff, Charles B; Mill, Jonathan; Schalkwyk, Leonard C; Creyghton, Menno P; Kahn, René S; Joëls, Marian; Binder, Elisabeth B; Boks, Marco P M

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation likely plays a role in the regulation of human stress reactivity. Here we show that in a genome-wide analysis of blood DNA methylation in 85 healthy individuals, a locus in the Kit ligand gene (KITLG; cg27512205) showed the strongest association with cortisol stress reactivity (P=5.8 × 10(-6)). Replication was obtained in two independent samples using either blood (N=45, P=0.001) or buccal cells (N=255, P=0.004). KITLG methylation strongly mediates the relationship between childhood trauma and cortisol stress reactivity in the discovery sample (32% mediation). Its genomic location, a CpG island shore within an H3K27ac enhancer mark, and the correlation between methylation in the blood and prefrontal cortex provide further evidence that KITLG methylation is functionally relevant for the programming of stress reactivity in the human brain. Our results extend preclinical evidence for epigenetic regulation of stress reactivity to humans and provide leads to enhance our understanding of the neurobiological pathways underlying stress vulnerability. PMID:26997371

  14. Genome-wide DNA methylation levels and altered cortisol stress reactivity following childhood trauma in humans.

    PubMed

    Houtepen, Lotte C; Vinkers, Christiaan H; Carrillo-Roa, Tania; Hiemstra, Marieke; van Lier, Pol A; Meeus, Wim; Branje, Susan; Heim, Christine M; Nemeroff, Charles B; Mill, Jonathan; Schalkwyk, Leonard C; Creyghton, Menno P; Kahn, René S; Joëls, Marian; Binder, Elisabeth B; Boks, Marco P M

    2016-03-21

    DNA methylation likely plays a role in the regulation of human stress reactivity. Here we show that in a genome-wide analysis of blood DNA methylation in 85 healthy individuals, a locus in the Kit ligand gene (KITLG; cg27512205) showed the strongest association with cortisol stress reactivity (P=5.8 × 10(-6)). Replication was obtained in two independent samples using either blood (N=45, P=0.001) or buccal cells (N=255, P=0.004). KITLG methylation strongly mediates the relationship between childhood trauma and cortisol stress reactivity in the discovery sample (32% mediation). Its genomic location, a CpG island shore within an H3K27ac enhancer mark, and the correlation between methylation in the blood and prefrontal cortex provide further evidence that KITLG methylation is functionally relevant for the programming of stress reactivity in the human brain. Our results extend preclinical evidence for epigenetic regulation of stress reactivity to humans and provide leads to enhance our understanding of the neurobiological pathways underlying stress vulnerability.

  15. Genome-Wide DNA Methylation Analysis and Epigenetic Variations Associated with Congenital Aortic Valve Stenosis (AVS)

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishna, Uppala; Albayrak, Samet; Alpay-Savasan, Zeynep; Zeb, Amna; Turkoglu, Onur; Sobolewski, Paul; Bahado-Singh, Ray O.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart defect (CHD) is the most common cause of death from congenital anomaly. Among several candidate epigenetic mechanisms, DNA methylation may play an important role in the etiology of CHDs. We conducted a genome-wide DNA methylation analysis using an Illumina Infinium 450k human methylation assay in a cohort of 24 newborns who had aortic valve stenosis (AVS), with gestational-age matched controls. The study identified significantly-altered CpG methylation at 59 sites in 52 genes in AVS subjects as compared to controls (either hypermethylated or demethylated). Gene Ontology analysis identified biological processes and functions for these genes including positive regulation of receptor-mediated endocytosis. Consistent with prior clinical data, the molecular function categories as determined using DAVID identified low-density lipoprotein receptor binding, lipoprotein receptor binding and identical protein binding to be over-represented in the AVS group. A significant epigenetic change in the APOA5 and PCSK9 genes known to be involved in AVS was also observed. A large number CpG methylation sites individually demonstrated good to excellent diagnostic accuracy for the prediction of AVS status, thus raising possibility of molecular screening markers for this disorder. Using epigenetic analysis we were able to identify genes significantly involved in the pathogenesis of AVS. PMID:27152866

  16. A Genome-Wide Methylation Approach Identifies a New Hypermethylated Gene Panel in Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Keunsoo; Bae, Jin-Han; Han, Kyudong; Kim, Eun Soo; Kim, Tae-Oh; Yi, Joo Mi

    2016-01-01

    The cause of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is still unknown, but there is growing evidence that environmental factors such as epigenetic changes can contribute to the disease etiology. The aim of this study was to identify newly hypermethylated genes in ulcerative colitis (UC) using a genome-wide DNA methylation approach. Using an Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip array, we screened the DNA methylation changes in three normal colon controls and eight UC patients. Using these methylation profiles, 48 probes associated with CpG promoter methylation showed differential hypermethylation between UC patients and normal controls. Technical validations for methylation analyses in a larger series of UC patients (n = 79) were performed by methylation-specific PCR (MSP) and bisulfite sequencing analysis. We finally found that three genes (FAM217B, KIAA1614 and RIBC2) that were significantly elevating the promoter methylation levels in UC compared to normal controls. Interestingly, we confirmed that three genes were transcriptionally silenced in UC patient samples by qRT-PCR, suggesting that their silencing is correlated with the promoter hypermethylation. Pathway analyses were performed using GO and KEGG databases with differentially hypermethylated genes in UC. Our results highlight that aberrant hypermethylation was identified in UC patients which can be a potential biomarker for detecting UC. Moreover, pathway-enriched hypermethylated genes are possibly implicating important cellular function in the pathogenesis of UC. Overall, this study describes a newly hypermethylated gene panel in UC patients and provides new clinical information that can be used for the diagnosis and therapeutic treatment of IBD. PMID:27517910

  17. A Genome-Wide Methylation Approach Identifies a New Hypermethylated Gene Panel in Ulcerative Colitis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Keunsoo; Bae, Jin-Han; Han, Kyudong; Kim, Eun Soo; Kim, Tae-Oh; Yi, Joo Mi

    2016-01-01

    The cause of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is still unknown, but there is growing evidence that environmental factors such as epigenetic changes can contribute to the disease etiology. The aim of this study was to identify newly hypermethylated genes in ulcerative colitis (UC) using a genome-wide DNA methylation approach. Using an Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip array, we screened the DNA methylation changes in three normal colon controls and eight UC patients. Using these methylation profiles, 48 probes associated with CpG promoter methylation showed differential hypermethylation between UC patients and normal controls. Technical validations for methylation analyses in a larger series of UC patients (n = 79) were performed by methylation-specific PCR (MSP) and bisulfite sequencing analysis. We finally found that three genes (FAM217B, KIAA1614 and RIBC2) that were significantly elevating the promoter methylation levels in UC compared to normal controls. Interestingly, we confirmed that three genes were transcriptionally silenced in UC patient samples by qRT-PCR, suggesting that their silencing is correlated with the promoter hypermethylation. Pathway analyses were performed using GO and KEGG databases with differentially hypermethylated genes in UC. Our results highlight that aberrant hypermethylation was identified in UC patients which can be a potential biomarker for detecting UC. Moreover, pathway-enriched hypermethylated genes are possibly implicating important cellular function in the pathogenesis of UC. Overall, this study describes a newly hypermethylated gene panel in UC patients and provides new clinical information that can be used for the diagnosis and therapeutic treatment of IBD. PMID:27517910

  18. Natural CMT2 Variation Is Associated With Genome-Wide Methylation Changes and Temperature Seasonality

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xia; De Jonge, Jennifer; Forsberg, Simon K. G.; Pettersson, Mats E.; Sheng, Zheya; Hennig, Lars; Carlborg, Örjan

    2014-01-01

    As Arabidopsis thaliana has colonized a wide range of habitats across the world it is an attractive model for studying the genetic mechanisms underlying environmental adaptation. Here, we used public data from two collections of A. thaliana accessions to associate genetic variability at individual loci with differences in climates at the sampling sites. We use a novel method to screen the genome for plastic alleles that tolerate a broader climate range than the major allele. This approach reduces confounding with population structure and increases power compared to standard genome-wide association methods. Sixteen novel loci were found, including an association between Chromomethylase 2 (CMT2) and temperature seasonality where the genome-wide CHH methylation was different for the group of accessions carrying the plastic allele. Cmt2 mutants were shown to be more tolerant to heat-stress, suggesting genetic regulation of epigenetic modifications as a likely mechanism underlying natural adaptation to variable temperatures, potentially through differential allelic plasticity to temperature-stress. PMID:25503602

  19. Resource base influences genome-wide DNA methylation levels in wild baboons (Papio cynocephalus).

    PubMed

    Lea, Amanda J; Altmann, Jeanne; Alberts, Susan C; Tung, Jenny

    2016-04-01

    Variation in resource availability commonly exerts strong effects on fitness-related traits in wild animals. However, we know little about the molecular mechanisms that mediate these effects, or about their persistence over time. To address these questions, we profiled genome-wide whole-blood DNA methylation levels in two sets of wild baboons: (i) 'wild-feeding' baboons that foraged naturally in a savanna environment and (ii) 'Lodge' baboons that had ready access to spatially concentrated human food scraps, resulting in high feeding efficiency and low daily travel distances. We identified 1014 sites (0.20% of sites tested) that were differentially methylated between wild-feeding and Lodge baboons, providing the first evidence that resource availability shapes the epigenome in a wild mammal. Differentially methylated sites tended to occur in contiguous stretches (i.e., in differentially methylated regions or DMRs), in promoters and enhancers, and near metabolism-related genes, supporting their functional importance in gene regulation. In agreement, reporter assay experiments confirmed that methylation at the largest identified DMR, located in the promoter of a key glycolysis-related gene, was sufficient to causally drive changes in gene expression. Intriguingly, all dispersing males carried a consistent epigenetic signature of their membership in a wild-feeding group, regardless of whether males dispersed into or out of this group as adults. Together, our findings support a role for DNA methylation in mediating ecological effects on phenotypic traits in the wild and emphasize the dynamic environmental sensitivity of DNA methylation levels across the life course.

  20. Genome-wide age-related changes in DNA methylation and gene expression in human PBMCs.

    PubMed

    Steegenga, Wilma T; Boekschoten, Mark V; Lute, Carolien; Hooiveld, Guido J; de Groot, Philip J; Morris, Tiffany J; Teschendorff, Andrew E; Butcher, Lee M; Beck, Stephan; Müller, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Aging is a progressive process that results in the accumulation of intra- and extracellular alterations that in turn contribute to a reduction in health. Age-related changes in DNA methylation have been reported before and may be responsible for aging-induced changes in gene expression, although a causal relationship has yet to be shown. Using genome-wide assays, we analyzed age-induced changes in DNA methylation and their effect on gene expression with and without transient induction with the synthetic transcription modulating agent WY14,643. To demonstrate feasibility of the approach, we isolated peripheral blood mononucleated cells (PBMCs) from five young and five old healthy male volunteers and cultured them with or without WY14,643. Infinium 450K BeadChip and Affymetrix Human Gene 1.1 ST expression array analysis revealed significant differential methylation of at least 5 % (ΔYO > 5 %) at 10,625 CpG sites between young and old subjects, but only a subset of the associated genes were also differentially expressed. Age-related differential methylation of previously reported epigenetic biomarkers of aging including ELOVL2, FHL2, PENK, and KLF14 was confirmed in our study, but these genes did not display an age-related change in gene expression in PBMCs. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that differentially methylated genes that lack an age-related expression change predominantly represent genes involved in carcinogenesis and developmental processes, and expression of most of these genes were silenced in PBMCs. No changes in DNA methylation were found in genes displaying transiently induced changes in gene expression. In conclusion, aging-induced differential methylation often targets developmental genes and occurs mostly without change in gene expression.

  1. Genome-wide age-related changes in DNA methylation and gene expression in human PBMCs.

    PubMed

    Steegenga, Wilma T; Boekschoten, Mark V; Lute, Carolien; Hooiveld, Guido J; de Groot, Philip J; Morris, Tiffany J; Teschendorff, Andrew E; Butcher, Lee M; Beck, Stephan; Müller, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Aging is a progressive process that results in the accumulation of intra- and extracellular alterations that in turn contribute to a reduction in health. Age-related changes in DNA methylation have been reported before and may be responsible for aging-induced changes in gene expression, although a causal relationship has yet to be shown. Using genome-wide assays, we analyzed age-induced changes in DNA methylation and their effect on gene expression with and without transient induction with the synthetic transcription modulating agent WY14,643. To demonstrate feasibility of the approach, we isolated peripheral blood mononucleated cells (PBMCs) from five young and five old healthy male volunteers and cultured them with or without WY14,643. Infinium 450K BeadChip and Affymetrix Human Gene 1.1 ST expression array analysis revealed significant differential methylation of at least 5 % (ΔYO > 5 %) at 10,625 CpG sites between young and old subjects, but only a subset of the associated genes were also differentially expressed. Age-related differential methylation of previously reported epigenetic biomarkers of aging including ELOVL2, FHL2, PENK, and KLF14 was confirmed in our study, but these genes did not display an age-related change in gene expression in PBMCs. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that differentially methylated genes that lack an age-related expression change predominantly represent genes involved in carcinogenesis and developmental processes, and expression of most of these genes were silenced in PBMCs. No changes in DNA methylation were found in genes displaying transiently induced changes in gene expression. In conclusion, aging-induced differential methylation often targets developmental genes and occurs mostly without change in gene expression. PMID:24789080

  2. Genome-Wide DNA Methylation Changes between the Superficial and Deep Backfat Tissues of the Pig

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mingzhou; Wang, Tao; Wu, Honglong; Zhang, Jie; Zhou, Chaowei; Jiang, Anan; Li, Ruiqiang; Li, Xuewei

    2012-01-01

    Adipose tissue is not only a storage organ involved in fuel metabolism, but also an endocrine organ involved in the regulation of insulin sensitivity, thermogenesis, immunity, and inflammation. There are anatomical, cellular, molecular and physiological differences among adipose tissues deposited in different body sites. However, current understanding of the intrinsic differences between the sub-compartments of the subcutaneous adipose tissue remains rudimentary. Here, we analyzed the genome-wide DNA methylation differences between the porcine superficial and deep backfat tissues using methylated DNA immunoprecipitation combined with high-throughput sequencing. We show that the genes with differentially methylated regions in their promoter are mainly involved in the processes of “lipid metabolism” and “regulation of immune-related cytokines”. Compared with the deep backfat tissue, the promoters of genes related to the ‘positive regulation of cytokine production’ were significantly hypermethylated in the superficial backfat tissue, which reflects the intrinsic functional and metabolic differences between the sub-compartments of the subcutaneous adipose tissue. This study provides epigenetic evidence for functionally relevant methylation differences between different layers of porcine backfat tissues. PMID:22837681

  3. Genome-Wide Analysis of DNA Methylation and Fine Particulate Matter Air Pollution in Three Study Populations: KORA F3, KORA F4, and the Normative Aging Study

    PubMed Central

    Panni, Tommaso; Mehta, Amar J.; Schwartz, Joel D.; Baccarelli, Andrea A.; Just, Allan C.; Wolf, Kathrin; Wahl, Simone; Cyrys, Josef; Kunze, Sonja; Strauch, Konstantin; Waldenberger, Melanie; Peters, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Background: Epidemiological studies have reported associations between particulate matter (PM) concentrations and cancer and respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. DNA methylation has been identified as a possible link but so far it has only been analyzed in candidate sites. Objectives: We studied the association between DNA methylation and short- and mid-term air pollution exposure using genome-wide data and identified potential biological pathways for additional investigation. Methods: We collected whole blood samples from three independent studies—KORA F3 (2004–2005) and F4 (2006–2008) in Germany, and the Normative Aging Study (1999–2007) in the United States—and measured genome-wide DNA methylation proportions with the Illumina 450k BeadChip. PM concentration was measured daily at fixed monitoring stations and three different trailing averages were considered and regressed against DNA methylation: 2-day, 7-day and 28-day. Meta-analysis was performed to pool the study-specific results. Results: Random-effect meta-analysis revealed 12 CpG (cytosine-guanine dinucleotide) sites as associated with PM concentration (1 for 2-day average, 1 for 7-day, and 10 for 28-day) at a genome-wide Bonferroni significance level (p ≤ 7.5E-8); 9 out of these 12 sites expressed increased methylation. Through estimation of I2 for homogeneity assessment across the studies, 4 of these sites (annotated in NSMAF, C1orf212, MSGN1, NXN) showed p > 0.05 and I2 < 0.5: the site from the 7-day average results and 3 for the 28-day average. Applying false discovery rate, p-value < 0.05 was observed in 8 and 1,819 additional CpGs at 7- and 28-day average PM2.5 exposure respectively. Conclusion: The PM-related CpG sites found in our study suggest novel plausible systemic pathways linking ambient PM exposure to adverse health effect through variations in DNA methylation. Citation: Panni T, Mehta AJ, Schwartz JD, Baccarelli AA, Just AC, Wolf K, Wahl S, Cyrys J, Kunze S, Strauch K

  4. DNA Methylation in Newborns and Maternal Smoking in Pregnancy: Genome-wide Consortium Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Joubert, Bonnie R; Felix, Janine F; Yousefi, Paul; Bakulski, Kelly M; Just, Allan C; Breton, Carrie; Reese, Sarah E; Markunas, Christina A; Richmond, Rebecca C; Xu, Cheng-Jian; Küpers, Leanne K; Oh, Sam S; Hoyo, Cathrine; Gruzieva, Olena; Söderhäll, Cilla; Salas, Lucas A; Baïz, Nour; Zhang, Hongmei; Lepeule, Johanna; Ruiz, Carlos; Ligthart, Symen; Wang, Tianyuan; Taylor, Jack A; Duijts, Liesbeth; Sharp, Gemma C; Jankipersadsing, Soesma A; Nilsen, Roy M; Vaez, Ahmad; Fallin, M Daniele; Hu, Donglei; Litonjua, Augusto A; Fuemmeler, Bernard F; Huen, Karen; Kere, Juha; Kull, Inger; Munthe-Kaas, Monica Cheng; Gehring, Ulrike; Bustamante, Mariona; Saurel-Coubizolles, Marie José; Quraishi, Bilal M; Ren, Jie; Tost, Jörg; Gonzalez, Juan R; Peters, Marjolein J; Håberg, Siri E; Xu, Zongli; van Meurs, Joyce B; Gaunt, Tom R; Kerkhof, Marjan; Corpeleijn, Eva; Feinberg, Andrew P; Eng, Celeste; Baccarelli, Andrea A; Benjamin Neelon, Sara E; Bradman, Asa; Merid, Simon Kebede; Bergström, Anna; Herceg, Zdenko; Hernandez-Vargas, Hector; Brunekreef, Bert; Pinart, Mariona; Heude, Barbara; Ewart, Susan; Yao, Jin; Lemonnier, Nathanaël; Franco, Oscar H; Wu, Michael C; Hofman, Albert; McArdle, Wendy; Van der Vlies, Pieter; Falahi, Fahimeh; Gillman, Matthew W; Barcellos, Lisa F; Kumar, Ashish; Wickman, Magnus; Guerra, Stefano; Charles, Marie-Aline; Holloway, John; Auffray, Charles; Tiemeier, Henning W; Smith, George Davey; Postma, Dirkje; Hivert, Marie-France; Eskenazi, Brenda; Vrijheid, Martine; Arshad, Hasan; Antó, Josep M; Dehghan, Abbas; Karmaus, Wilfried; Annesi-Maesano, Isabella; Sunyer, Jordi; Ghantous, Akram; Pershagen, Göran; Holland, Nina; Murphy, Susan K; DeMeo, Dawn L; Burchard, Esteban G; Ladd-Acosta, Christine; Snieder, Harold; Nystad, Wenche; Koppelman, Gerard H; Relton, Caroline L; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Wilcox, Allen; Melén, Erik; London, Stephanie J

    2016-04-01

    Epigenetic modifications, including DNA methylation, represent a potential mechanism for environmental impacts on human disease. Maternal smoking in pregnancy remains an important public health problem that impacts child health in a myriad of ways and has potential lifelong consequences. The mechanisms are largely unknown, but epigenetics most likely plays a role. We formed the Pregnancy And Childhood Epigenetics (PACE) consortium and meta-analyzed, across 13 cohorts (n = 6,685), the association between maternal smoking in pregnancy and newborn blood DNA methylation at over 450,000 CpG sites (CpGs) by using the Illumina 450K BeadChip. Over 6,000 CpGs were differentially methylated in relation to maternal smoking at genome-wide statistical significance (false discovery rate, 5%), including 2,965 CpGs corresponding to 2,017 genes not previously related to smoking and methylation in either newborns or adults. Several genes are relevant to diseases that can be caused by maternal smoking (e.g., orofacial clefts and asthma) or adult smoking (e.g., certain cancers). A number of differentially methylated CpGs were associated with gene expression. We observed enrichment in pathways and processes critical to development. In older children (5 cohorts, n = 3,187), 100% of CpGs gave at least nominal levels of significance, far more than expected by chance (p value < 2.2 × 10(-16)). Results were robust to different normalization methods used across studies and cell type adjustment. In this large scale meta-analysis of methylation data, we identified numerous loci involved in response to maternal smoking in pregnancy with persistence into later childhood and provide insights into mechanisms underlying effects of this important exposure.

  5. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis in obsessive-compulsive disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Yue, Weihua; Cheng, Weiqiu; Liu, Zhaorui; Tang, Yi; Lu, Tianlan; Zhang, Dai; Tang, Muni; Huang, Yueqin

    2016-01-01

    Literatures have suggested that not only genetic but also environmental factors, interactively accounted for susceptibility of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). DNA methylation may regulate expression of genes as the heritable epigenetic modification. The examination for genome-wide DNA methylation was performed on blood samples from 65 patients with OCD, as well as 96 healthy control subjects. The DNA methylation was examined at over 485,000 CpG sites using the Illumina Infinium Human Methylation450 BeadChip. As a result, 8,417 probes corresponding to 2,190 unique genes were found to be differentially methylated between OCD and healthy control subjects. Of those genes, 4,013 loci were located in CpG islands and 2,478 were in promoter regions. These included BCYRN1, BCOR, FGF13, HLA-DRB1, ARX, etc., which have previously been reported to be associated with OCD. Pathway analyses indicated that regulation of actin cytoskeleton, cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), actin binding, transcription regulator activity, and other pathways might be further associated with risk of OCD. Unsupervised clustering analysis of the top 3,000 most variable probes revealed two distinct groups with significantly more people with OCD in cluster one compared with controls (67.74% of cases v.s. 27.13% of controls, Chi-square = 26.011, df = 1, P = 3.41E-07). These results strongly suggested that differential DNA methylation might play an important role in etiology of OCD. PMID:27527274

  6. DNA Methylation in Newborns and Maternal Smoking in Pregnancy: Genome-wide Consortium Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Joubert, Bonnie R.; Felix, Janine F.; Yousefi, Paul; Bakulski, Kelly M.; Just, Allan C.; Breton, Carrie; Reese, Sarah E.; Markunas, Christina A.; Richmond, Rebecca C.; Xu, Cheng-Jian; Küpers, Leanne K.; Oh, Sam S.; Hoyo, Cathrine; Gruzieva, Olena; Söderhäll, Cilla; Salas, Lucas A.; Baïz, Nour; Zhang, Hongmei; Lepeule, Johanna; Ruiz, Carlos; Ligthart, Symen; Wang, Tianyuan; Taylor, Jack A.; Duijts, Liesbeth; Sharp, Gemma C.; Jankipersadsing, Soesma A.; Nilsen, Roy M.; Vaez, Ahmad; Fallin, M. Daniele; Hu, Donglei; Litonjua, Augusto A.; Fuemmeler, Bernard F.; Huen, Karen; Kere, Juha; Kull, Inger; Munthe-Kaas, Monica Cheng; Gehring, Ulrike; Bustamante, Mariona; Saurel-Coubizolles, Marie José; Quraishi, Bilal M.; Ren, Jie; Tost, Jörg; Gonzalez, Juan R.; Peters, Marjolein J.; Håberg, Siri E.; Xu, Zongli; van Meurs, Joyce B.; Gaunt, Tom R.; Kerkhof, Marjan; Corpeleijn, Eva; Feinberg, Andrew P.; Eng, Celeste; Baccarelli, Andrea A.; Benjamin Neelon, Sara E.; Bradman, Asa; Merid, Simon Kebede; Bergström, Anna; Herceg, Zdenko; Hernandez-Vargas, Hector; Brunekreef, Bert; Pinart, Mariona; Heude, Barbara; Ewart, Susan; Yao, Jin; Lemonnier, Nathanaël; Franco, Oscar H.; Wu, Michael C.; Hofman, Albert; McArdle, Wendy; Van der Vlies, Pieter; Falahi, Fahimeh; Gillman, Matthew W.; Barcellos, Lisa F.; Kumar, Ashish; Wickman, Magnus; Guerra, Stefano; Charles, Marie-Aline; Holloway, John; Auffray, Charles; Tiemeier, Henning W.; Smith, George Davey; Postma, Dirkje; Hivert, Marie-France; Eskenazi, Brenda; Vrijheid, Martine; Arshad, Hasan; Antó, Josep M.; Dehghan, Abbas; Karmaus, Wilfried; Annesi-Maesano, Isabella; Sunyer, Jordi; Ghantous, Akram; Pershagen, Göran; Holland, Nina; Murphy, Susan K.; DeMeo, Dawn L.; Burchard, Esteban G.; Ladd-Acosta, Christine; Snieder, Harold; Nystad, Wenche; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Relton, Caroline L.; Jaddoe, Vincent W.V.; Wilcox, Allen; Melén, Erik; London, Stephanie J.

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications, including DNA methylation, represent a potential mechanism for environmental impacts on human disease. Maternal smoking in pregnancy remains an important public health problem that impacts child health in a myriad of ways and has potential lifelong consequences. The mechanisms are largely unknown, but epigenetics most likely plays a role. We formed the Pregnancy And Childhood Epigenetics (PACE) consortium and meta-analyzed, across 13 cohorts (n = 6,685), the association between maternal smoking in pregnancy and newborn blood DNA methylation at over 450,000 CpG sites (CpGs) by using the Illumina 450K BeadChip. Over 6,000 CpGs were differentially methylated in relation to maternal smoking at genome-wide statistical significance (false discovery rate, 5%), including 2,965 CpGs corresponding to 2,017 genes not previously related to smoking and methylation in either newborns or adults. Several genes are relevant to diseases that can be caused by maternal smoking (e.g., orofacial clefts and asthma) or adult smoking (e.g., certain cancers). A number of differentially methylated CpGs were associated with gene expression. We observed enrichment in pathways and processes critical to development. In older children (5 cohorts, n = 3,187), 100% of CpGs gave at least nominal levels of significance, far more than expected by chance (p value < 2.2 × 10−16). Results were robust to different normalization methods used across studies and cell type adjustment. In this large scale meta-analysis of methylation data, we identified numerous loci involved in response to maternal smoking in pregnancy with persistence into later childhood and provide insights into mechanisms underlying effects of this important exposure. PMID:27040690

  7. DNA Methylation in Newborns and Maternal Smoking in Pregnancy: Genome-wide Consortium Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Joubert, Bonnie R; Felix, Janine F; Yousefi, Paul; Bakulski, Kelly M; Just, Allan C; Breton, Carrie; Reese, Sarah E; Markunas, Christina A; Richmond, Rebecca C; Xu, Cheng-Jian; Küpers, Leanne K; Oh, Sam S; Hoyo, Cathrine; Gruzieva, Olena; Söderhäll, Cilla; Salas, Lucas A; Baïz, Nour; Zhang, Hongmei; Lepeule, Johanna; Ruiz, Carlos; Ligthart, Symen; Wang, Tianyuan; Taylor, Jack A; Duijts, Liesbeth; Sharp, Gemma C; Jankipersadsing, Soesma A; Nilsen, Roy M; Vaez, Ahmad; Fallin, M Daniele; Hu, Donglei; Litonjua, Augusto A; Fuemmeler, Bernard F; Huen, Karen; Kere, Juha; Kull, Inger; Munthe-Kaas, Monica Cheng; Gehring, Ulrike; Bustamante, Mariona; Saurel-Coubizolles, Marie José; Quraishi, Bilal M; Ren, Jie; Tost, Jörg; Gonzalez, Juan R; Peters, Marjolein J; Håberg, Siri E; Xu, Zongli; van Meurs, Joyce B; Gaunt, Tom R; Kerkhof, Marjan; Corpeleijn, Eva; Feinberg, Andrew P; Eng, Celeste; Baccarelli, Andrea A; Benjamin Neelon, Sara E; Bradman, Asa; Merid, Simon Kebede; Bergström, Anna; Herceg, Zdenko; Hernandez-Vargas, Hector; Brunekreef, Bert; Pinart, Mariona; Heude, Barbara; Ewart, Susan; Yao, Jin; Lemonnier, Nathanaël; Franco, Oscar H; Wu, Michael C; Hofman, Albert; McArdle, Wendy; Van der Vlies, Pieter; Falahi, Fahimeh; Gillman, Matthew W; Barcellos, Lisa F; Kumar, Ashish; Wickman, Magnus; Guerra, Stefano; Charles, Marie-Aline; Holloway, John; Auffray, Charles; Tiemeier, Henning W; Smith, George Davey; Postma, Dirkje; Hivert, Marie-France; Eskenazi, Brenda; Vrijheid, Martine; Arshad, Hasan; Antó, Josep M; Dehghan, Abbas; Karmaus, Wilfried; Annesi-Maesano, Isabella; Sunyer, Jordi; Ghantous, Akram; Pershagen, Göran; Holland, Nina; Murphy, Susan K; DeMeo, Dawn L; Burchard, Esteban G; Ladd-Acosta, Christine; Snieder, Harold; Nystad, Wenche; Koppelman, Gerard H; Relton, Caroline L; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Wilcox, Allen; Melén, Erik; London, Stephanie J

    2016-04-01

    Epigenetic modifications, including DNA methylation, represent a potential mechanism for environmental impacts on human disease. Maternal smoking in pregnancy remains an important public health problem that impacts child health in a myriad of ways and has potential lifelong consequences. The mechanisms are largely unknown, but epigenetics most likely plays a role. We formed the Pregnancy And Childhood Epigenetics (PACE) consortium and meta-analyzed, across 13 cohorts (n = 6,685), the association between maternal smoking in pregnancy and newborn blood DNA methylation at over 450,000 CpG sites (CpGs) by using the Illumina 450K BeadChip. Over 6,000 CpGs were differentially methylated in relation to maternal smoking at genome-wide statistical significance (false discovery rate, 5%), including 2,965 CpGs corresponding to 2,017 genes not previously related to smoking and methylation in either newborns or adults. Several genes are relevant to diseases that can be caused by maternal smoking (e.g., orofacial clefts and asthma) or adult smoking (e.g., certain cancers). A number of differentially methylated CpGs were associated with gene expression. We observed enrichment in pathways and processes critical to development. In older children (5 cohorts, n = 3,187), 100% of CpGs gave at least nominal levels of significance, far more than expected by chance (p value < 2.2 × 10(-16)). Results were robust to different normalization methods used across studies and cell type adjustment. In this large scale meta-analysis of methylation data, we identified numerous loci involved in response to maternal smoking in pregnancy with persistence into later childhood and provide insights into mechanisms underlying effects of this important exposure. PMID:27040690

  8. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis in obsessive-compulsive disorder patients

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Weihua; Cheng, Weiqiu; Liu, Zhaorui; Tang, Yi; Lu, Tianlan; Zhang, Dai; Tang, Muni; Huang, Yueqin

    2016-01-01

    Literatures have suggested that not only genetic but also environmental factors, interactively accounted for susceptibility of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). DNA methylation may regulate expression of genes as the heritable epigenetic modification. The examination for genome-wide DNA methylation was performed on blood samples from 65 patients with OCD, as well as 96 healthy control subjects. The DNA methylation was examined at over 485,000 CpG sites using the Illumina Infinium Human Methylation450 BeadChip. As a result, 8,417 probes corresponding to 2,190 unique genes were found to be differentially methylated between OCD and healthy control subjects. Of those genes, 4,013 loci were located in CpG islands and 2,478 were in promoter regions. These included BCYRN1, BCOR, FGF13, HLA-DRB1, ARX, etc., which have previously been reported to be associated with OCD. Pathway analyses indicated that regulation of actin cytoskeleton, cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), actin binding, transcription regulator activity, and other pathways might be further associated with risk of OCD. Unsupervised clustering analysis of the top 3,000 most variable probes revealed two distinct groups with significantly more people with OCD in cluster one compared with controls (67.74% of cases v.s. 27.13% of controls, Chi-square = 26.011, df = 1, P = 3.41E-07). These results strongly suggested that differential DNA methylation might play an important role in etiology of OCD. PMID:27527274

  9. Non-symmetrical cytosine methylation in tobacco pollen DNA.

    PubMed

    Oakeley, E J; Jost, J P

    1996-07-01

    We have detected sequence-specific non-symmetrical cytosine methylation within a 140 bp region of the promoter for the tobacco auxin-binding protein gene T85 in pollen DNA. Direct sequencing of the population of bisulphite reaction products showed that, in this region. 10 out of a possible 49 cytosine residues were methylated at a high frequency in pollen whereas the corresponding region from somatic cells (leaf DNA) did not show a detectable level of methylation. The context of these sites was 1 x m5CpTpC, 1 x m5CpGpT, 1 x m5CpCpT, 2 x m5CpTpT, 2 x m5CpGpG, and 3 x m5CpApT of which only m5CpGpG and m5CpGpT fitted the consensus sequence for symmetrical methylation in plants. PMID:8806424

  10. Epigenomics of Total Acute Sleep Deprivation in Relation to Genome-Wide DNA Methylation Profiles and RNA Expression.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Emil K; Boström, Adrian E; Mwinyi, Jessica; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2016-06-01

    Despite an established link between sleep deprivation and epigenetic processes in humans, it remains unclear to what extent sleep deprivation modulates DNA methylation. We performed a within-subject randomized blinded study with 16 healthy subjects to examine the effect of one night of total sleep deprivation (TSD) on the genome-wide methylation profile in blood compared with that in normal sleep. Genome-wide differences in methylation between both conditions were assessed by applying a paired regression model that corrected for monocyte subpopulations. In addition, the correlations between the methylation of genes detected to be modulated by TSD and gene expression were examined in a separate, publicly available cohort of 10 healthy male donors (E-GEOD-49065). Sleep deprivation significantly affected the DNA methylation profile both independently and in dependency of shifts in monocyte composition. Our study detected differential methylation of 269 probes. Notably, one CpG site was located 69 bp upstream of ING5, which has been shown to be differentially expressed after sleep deprivation. Gene set enrichment analysis detected the Notch and Wnt signaling pathways to be enriched among the differentially methylated genes. These results provide evidence that total acute sleep deprivation alters the methylation profile in healthy human subjects. This is, to our knowledge, the first study that systematically investigated the impact of total acute sleep deprivation on genome-wide DNA methylation profiles in blood and related the epigenomic findings to the expression data. PMID:27310475

  11. Epigenomics of Total Acute Sleep Deprivation in Relation to Genome-Wide DNA Methylation Profiles and RNA Expression

    PubMed Central

    Boström, Adrian E.; Mwinyi, Jessica; Schiöth, Helgi B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Despite an established link between sleep deprivation and epigenetic processes in humans, it remains unclear to what extent sleep deprivation modulates DNA methylation. We performed a within-subject randomized blinded study with 16 healthy subjects to examine the effect of one night of total sleep deprivation (TSD) on the genome-wide methylation profile in blood compared with that in normal sleep. Genome-wide differences in methylation between both conditions were assessed by applying a paired regression model that corrected for monocyte subpopulations. In addition, the correlations between the methylation of genes detected to be modulated by TSD and gene expression were examined in a separate, publicly available cohort of 10 healthy male donors (E-GEOD-49065). Sleep deprivation significantly affected the DNA methylation profile both independently and in dependency of shifts in monocyte composition. Our study detected differential methylation of 269 probes. Notably, one CpG site was located 69 bp upstream of ING5, which has been shown to be differentially expressed after sleep deprivation. Gene set enrichment analysis detected the Notch and Wnt signaling pathways to be enriched among the differentially methylated genes. These results provide evidence that total acute sleep deprivation alters the methylation profile in healthy human subjects. This is, to our knowledge, the first study that systematically investigated the impact of total acute sleep deprivation on genome-wide DNA methylation profiles in blood and related the epigenomic findings to the expression data. PMID:27310475

  12. Towards understanding the breast cancer epigenome: a comparison of genome-wide DNA methylation and gene expression data.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Sandeep K; Usmani, Nawaid; Michiels, Stefan; Metzger-Filho, Otto; Saini, Kamal S; Kovalchuk, Olga; Parliament, Matthew

    2016-01-19

    Until recently, an elevated disease risk has been ascribed to a genetic predisposition, however, exciting progress over the past years has discovered alternate elements of inheritance that involve epigenetic regulation. Epigenetic changes are heritably stable alterations that include DNA methylation, histone modifications and RNA-mediated silencing. Aberrant DNA methylation is a common molecular basis for a number of important human diseases, including breast cancer. Changes in DNA methylation profoundly affect global gene expression patterns. What is emerging is a more dynamic and complex association between DNA methylation and gene expression than previously believed. Although many tools have already been developed for analyzing genome-wide gene expression data, tools for analyzing genome-wide DNA methylation have not yet reached the same level of refinement. Here we provide an in-depth analysis of DNA methylation in parallel with gene expression data characteristics and describe the particularities of low-level and high-level analyses of DNA methylation data. Low-level analysis refers to pre-processing of methylation data (i.e. normalization, transformation and filtering), whereas high-level analysis is focused on illustrating the application of the widely used class comparison, class prediction and class discovery methods to DNA methylation data. Furthermore, we investigate the influence of DNA methylation on gene expression by measuring the correlation between the degree of CpG methylation and the level of expression and to explore the pattern of methylation as a function of the promoter region.

  13. Alterations in hepatic gene expression and genome-wide DNA methylation in rat offspring exposed to maternal obesity in utero

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adult offspring from obese (OB) rat dams gain greater body weight and fat mass than controls when fed HFD. At PND21, we examined energy expenditure (EE) (indirect calorimetry), hepatic gene expression (microarrays), and changes in genome-wide and global DNA methylation (enrichment-coupled DNA seque...

  14. Maternal gestational diabetes is associated with genome-wide DNA methylation variation in placenta and cord blood of exposed offspring.

    PubMed

    Finer, Sarah; Mathews, Chris; Lowe, Rob; Smart, Melissa; Hillman, Sara; Foo, Lin; Sinha, Ajay; Williams, David; Rakyan, Vardhman K; Hitman, Graham A

    2015-06-01

    Exposure of a developing foetus to maternal gestational diabetes (GDM) has been shown to programme future risk of diabetes and obesity. Epigenetic variation in foetal tissue may have a mechanistic role in metabolic disease programming through interaction of the pregnancy environment with gene function. We aimed to identify genome-wide DNA methylation variation in cord blood and placenta from offspring born to mothers with and without GDM. Pregnant women of South Asian origin were studied and foetal tissues sampled at term delivery. The Illumina HumanMethylation450 BeadChip was used to assay genome-wide DNA methylation in placenta and cord blood from 27 GDM exposed and 21 unexposed offspring. We identified 1485 cord blood and 1708 placenta methylation variable positions (MVPs) achieving genome-wide significance (adjusted P-value <0.05) with methylation differences of >5%. MVPs were disproportionately located within first exons. A bioinformatic co-methylation algorithm was used to detect consistent directionality of methylation in 1000 bp window around each MVP was observed at 74% of placenta and 59% of cord blood MVPs. KEGG pathway analysis showed enrichment of pathways involved in endocytosis, MAPK signalling and extracellular triggers to intracellular metabolic processes. Replication studies should integrate genomics and transcriptomics with longitudinal sampling to elucidate stability, determine causality for translation into biomarker and prevention studies. PMID:25634562

  15. Profiling Genome-wide Chromatin Methylation with Engineered Posttranslation Apparatus within Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui; Islam, Kabirul; Liu, Ying; Zheng, Weihong; Tang, Haiping; Lailler, Nathalie; Blum, Gil; Deng, Haiteng; Luo, Minkui

    2013-01-01

    Protein methyltransferases (PMTs) have emerged as important epigenetic regulators in myriad biological processes both in normal physiology and disease conditions. However, elucidating PMT-regulated epigenetic processes has been hampered by ambiguous knowledge about in vivo activities of individual PMTs particularly because of their overlapping but non-redundant functions. To address limitations of conventional approaches in mapping chromatin modification of specific PMTs, we have engineered the chromatin-modifying apparatus and formulated a novel technology, termed Clickable Chromatin Enrichment with parallel DNA sequencing (CliEn-seq), to probe genome-wide chromatin modification within living cells. The three-step approach of CliEn-seq involves in vivo synthesis of S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) analogues from cell-permeable methionine analogues by engineered SAM synthetase (methionine adenosyltransferase or MAT), in situ chromatin modification by engineered PMTs, subsequent enrichment and sequencing of the uniquely modified chromatins. Given critical roles of the chromatin-modifying enzymes in epigenetics and structural similarity among many PMTs, we envision that the CliEn-seq technology is generally applicable in deciphering chromatin methylation events of individual PMTs in diverse biological settings. PMID:23244065

  16. Persistence of cytosine methylation of DNA following fertilisation in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; O'Neill, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Normal development of the mammalian embryo requires epigenetic reprogramming of the genome. The level of cytosine methylation of CpG-rich (5meC) regions of the genome is a major epigenetic regulator and active global demethylation of 5meC throughout the genome is reported to occur within the first cell-cycle following fertilization. An enzyme or mechanism capable of catalysing such rapid global demethylation has not been identified. The mouse is a widely used model for studying developmental epigenetics. We have reassessed the evidence for this phenomenon of genome-wide demethylation following fertilisation in the mouse. We found when using conventional methods of immunolocalization that 5meC showed a progressive acid-resistant antigenic masking during zygotic maturation which gave the appearance of demethylation. Changing the unmasking strategy by also performing tryptic digestion revealed a persistence of a methylated state. Analysis of methyl binding domain 1 protein (MBD1) binding confirmed that the genome remained methylated following fertilisation. The maintenance of this methylated state over the first several cell-cycles required the actions of DNA methyltransferase activity. The study shows that any 5meC remodelling that occurs during early development is not explained by a global active loss of 5meC staining during the cleavage stage of development and global loss of methylation following fertilization is not a major component of epigenetic reprogramming in the mouse zygote.

  17. Genome-Wide Profiling of PARP1 Reveals an Interplay with Gene Regulatory Regions and DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Nalabothula, Narasimharao; Al-jumaily, Taha; Eteleeb, Abdallah M.; Flight, Robert M.; Xiaorong, Shao; Moseley, Hunter; Rouchka, Eric C.; Fondufe-Mittendorf, Yvonne N.

    2015-01-01

    Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP1) is a nuclear enzyme involved in DNA repair, chromatin remodeling and gene expression. PARP1 interactions with chromatin architectural multi-protein complexes (i.e. nucleosomes) alter chromatin structure resulting in changes in gene expression. Chromatin structure impacts gene regulatory processes including transcription, splicing, DNA repair, replication and recombination. It is important to delineate whether PARP1 randomly associates with nucleosomes or is present at specific nucleosome regions throughout the cell genome. We performed genome-wide association studies in breast cancer cell lines to address these questions. Our studies show that PARP1 associates with epigenetic regulatory elements genome-wide, such as active histone marks, CTCF and DNase hypersensitive sites. Additionally, the binding of PARP1 to chromatin genome-wide is mutually exclusive with DNA methylation pattern suggesting a functional interplay between PARP1 and DNA methylation. Indeed, inhibition of PARylation results in genome-wide changes in DNA methylation patterns. Our results suggest that PARP1 controls the fidelity of gene transcription and marks actively transcribed gene regions by selectively binding to transcriptionally active chromatin. These studies provide a platform for developing our understanding of PARP1’s role in gene regulation. PMID:26305327

  18. Genome-wide DNA methylation detection by MethylCap-seq and Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChips: an independent large-scale comparison

    PubMed Central

    De Meyer, Tim; Bady, Pierre; Trooskens, Geert; Kurscheid, Sebastian; Bloch, Jocelyne; Kros, Johan M.; Hainfellner, Johannes A.; Stupp, Roger; Delorenzi, Mauro; Hegi, Monika E.; Van Criekinge, Wim

    2015-01-01

    Two cost-efficient genome-scale methodologies to assess DNA-methylation are MethylCap-seq and Illumina’s Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChips (HM450). Objective information regarding the best-suited methodology for a specific research question is scant. Therefore, we performed a large-scale evaluation on a set of 70 brain tissue samples, i.e. 65 glioblastoma and 5 non-tumoral tissues. As MethylCap-seq coverages were limited, we focused on the inherent capacity of the methodology to detect methylated loci rather than a quantitative analysis. MethylCap-seq and HM450 data were dichotomized and performances were compared using a gold standard free Bayesian modelling procedure. While conditional specificity was adequate for both approaches, conditional sensitivity was systematically higher for HM450. In addition, genome-wide characteristics were compared, revealing that HM450 probes identified substantially fewer regions compared to MethylCap-seq. Although results indicated that the latter method can detect more potentially relevant DNA-methylation, this did not translate into the discovery of more differentially methylated loci between tumours and controls compared to HM450. Our results therefore indicate that both methodologies are complementary, with a higher sensitivity for HM450 and a far larger genome-wide coverage for MethylCap-seq, but also that a more comprehensive character does not automatically imply more significant results in biomarker studies. PMID:26482909

  19. Comparison of genome-wide and gene-specific DNA methylation between ART and naturally conceived pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Melamed, Nir; Choufani, Sanaa; Wilkins-Haug, Louise E; Koren, Gideon; Weksberg, Rosanna

    2015-01-01

    Data linking assisted reproductive technologies (ART) with aberrant DNA methylation is limited and inconclusive. In addition, most studies to date have analyzed only a small number of CpG sites and focused on methylation changes in placentas, while data on cord blood are scarce. Our aim was to compare DNA methylation in cord blood samples from ART (N = 10) and control pregnancies (N = 8) using a genome-wide approach with the Illumina® Infinium Human Methylation27 array, which interrogates 27,578 CpG sites. A total of 733 (2.7%) of the CpG sites were significantly differentially methylated between the 2 groups (P < 0.05), with an overall relative hypomethylation in the ART group (P < 0.001). Differences in DNA methylation were more pronounced for CpG sites in certain types of genomic locations and were related to baseline methylation levels and distance from CpG islands and transcription start sites. ART was associated with significantly higher variation in DNA methylation, suggesting that differences in DNA methylation between cases and controls may result from stochastic (or random) genome-wide changes in DNA methylation in ART pregnancies. We identified 24 candidate genes with 2 or more CpG sites that were significantly different between the IVF and control groups. The current study provides support for the hypothesis that ART or associated subfertility may be associated with genome-wide changes in DNA methylation, and these changes appear to be, at least in part, due to epigenetic instability in ART pregnancies. Further studies are required in order to determine the extent to which such ART-related epigenetic instability may have phenotypic consequences.

  20. Effects of cytosine methylation on DNA charge transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hihath, Joshua; Guo, Shaoyin; Zhang, Peiming; Tao, Nongjian

    2012-04-01

    The methylation of cytosine bases in DNA commonly takes place in the human genome and its abnormality can be used as a biomarker in the diagnosis of genetic diseases. In this paper we explore the effects of cytosine methylation on the conductance of DNA. Although the methyl group is a small chemical modification, and has a van der Waals radius of only 2 Å, its presence significantly changes the duplex stability, and as such may also affect the conductance properties of DNA. To determine if charge transport through the DNA stack is sensitive to this important biological modification we perform multiple conductance measurements on a methylated DNA molecule with an alternating G:C sequence and its non-methylated counterpart. From these studies we find a measurable difference in the conductance between the two types of molecules, and demonstrate that this difference is statistically significant. The conductance values of these molecules are also compared with a similar sequence that has been previously studied to help elucidate the charge transport mechanisms involved in direct DNA conductance measurements.

  1. Genome-wide DNA methylation patterns in naïve CD4+ T cells from patients with primary Sjögren’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Altorok, Nezam; Coit, Patrick; Hughes, Travis; Koelsch, Kristi A.; Stone, Donald U.; Rasmussen, Astrid; Radfar, Lida; Scofield, R. Hal; Sivils, Kathy L.; Farris, A. Darise; Sawalha, Amr H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Primary Sjögren’s syndrome (pSS) is a systemic autoimmune disease with incompletely understood etiology. Very little is known about the role of epigenetic dysregulation in the pathogenesis of pSS. Methods We performed a genome-wide DNA methylation study in naïve CD4+ T cells in eleven pSS patients compared to age-, sex-, and ethnicity-matched healthy controls. Cytosine methylation was quantified using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip array and validated using bisulfite sequencing. Results We identified 553 hypomethylated and 200 hypermethylated CpG sites in naïve CD4+ T cells from pSS patients compared to healthy matched controls, representing 311 hypomethylated and 115 hypermethylated gene regions. Hypomethylated genes in pSS include LTA, coding for Lymphotoxin α. Other relevant genes such as CD247, TNFRSF25, PTPRC, GSTM1 and PDCD1 were also hypomethylated. The interferon signature pathway was represented by hypomethylation of STAT1, IFI44L, USP18 and IFITM1. A group of genes encoding for members of the solute carrier proteins were differentially methylated. In addition, the transcription factor RUNX1 was hypermethylated in patients, suggesting a possible connection to lymphoma predisposition. Gene ontology (GO) analysis of hypomethylated genes demonstrated enrichment of genes involved in lymphocyte activation and immune response. GO terms for hypermethylated genes included antigen processing and presentation. Conclusion This is the first epigenome-wide DNA methylation study in pSS. Our data highlight a role for DNA methylation in pSS and identify disease-associated DNA methylation changes in several genes and pathways in naïve CD4+ T cells in pSS that may be involved in the pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:24574234

  2. Cytosine methylation of sperm DNA in horse semen after cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Aurich, Christine; Schreiner, Bettina; Ille, Natascha; Alvarenga, Marco; Scarlet, Dragos

    2016-09-15

    Semen processing may contribute to epigenetic changes in spermatozoa. We have therefore addressed changes in sperm DNA cytosine methylation induced by cryopreservation of stallion semen. The relative amount of 5-methylcytosine relative to the genomic cytosine content of sperm DNA was analyzed by ELISA. In experiment 1, raw semen (n = 6 stallions, one ejaculate each) was shock-frozen. Postthaw semen motility and membrane integrity were completely absent, whereas DNA methylation was similar in raw (0.4 ± 0.2%) and shock-frozen (0.3 ± 0.1%) semen (not significant). In experiment 2, three ejaculates per stallion (n = 6) were included. Semen quality and DNA methylation was assessed before addition of the freezing extender and after freezing-thawing with either Ghent (G) or BotuCrio (BC) extender. Semen motility, morphology, and membrane integrity were significantly reduced by cryopreservation but not influenced by the extender (e.g., total motility: G 69.5 ± 2.0, BC 68.4 ± 2.2%; P < 0.001 vs. centrifugation). Cryopreservation significantly (P < 0.01) increased the level of DNA methylation (before freezing 0.6 ± 0.1%, postthaw G 6.4 ± 3.7, BC 4.4 ± 1.5%; P < 0.01), but no differences between the freezing extenders were seen. The level of DNA methylation was not correlated to semen motility, morphology, or membrane integrity. The results demonstrate that semen processing for cryopreservation increases the DNA methylation level in stallion semen. We conclude that assessment of sperm DNA methylation allows for evaluation of an additional parameter characterizing semen quality. The lower fertility rates of mares after insemination with frozen-thawed semen may at least in part be explained by cytosine methylation of sperm-DNA induced by the cryopreservation procedure. PMID:27242182

  3. Role of epigenetics in human aging and longevity: genome-wide DNA methylation profile in centenarians and centenarians' offspring.

    PubMed

    Gentilini, Davide; Mari, Daniela; Castaldi, Davide; Remondini, Daniel; Ogliari, Giulia; Ostan, Rita; Bucci, Laura; Sirchia, Silvia M; Tabano, Silvia; Cavagnini, Francesco; Monti, Daniela; Franceschi, Claudio; Di Blasio, Anna Maria; Vitale, Giovanni

    2013-10-01

    The role of epigenetics in the modulation of longevity has not been studied in humans. To this aim, (1) we evaluated the DNA methylation from peripheral leukocytes of 21 female centenarians, their 21 female offspring, 21 offspring of both non-long-lived parents, and 21 young women through ELISA assay, pyrosequencing analysis of Alu sequences, and quantification of methylation in CpG repeats outside CpG islands; (2) we compared the DNA methylation profiles of these populations through Infinium array for genome-wide CpG methylation analysis. We observed an age-related decrease in global DNA methylation and a delay of this process in centenarians' offspring. Interestingly, literature data suggest a link between the loss of DNA methylation observed during aging and the development of age-associated diseases. Genome-wide methylation analysis evidenced DNA methylation profiles specific for aging and longevity: (1) aging-associated DNA hypermethylation occurs predominantly in genes involved in the development of anatomical structures, organs, and multicellular organisms and in the regulation of transcription; (2) genes involved in nucleotide biosynthesis, metabolism, and control of signal transmission are differently methylated between centenarians' offspring and offspring of both non-long-lived parents, hypothesizing a role for these genes in human longevity. Our results suggest that a better preservation of DNA methylation status, a slower cell growing/metabolism, and a better control in signal transmission through epigenetic mechanisms may be involved in the process of human longevity. These data fit well with the observations related to the beneficial effects of mild hypothyroidism and insulin-like growth factor I system impairment on the modulation of human lifespan.

  4. Racial differences in genome-wide methylation profiling and gene expression in breast tissues from healthy women.

    PubMed

    Song, Min-Ae; Brasky, Theodore M; Marian, Catalin; Weng, Daniel Y; Taslim, Cenny; Dumitrescu, Ramona G; Llanos, Adana A; Freudenheim, Jo L; Shields, Peter G

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is more common in European Americans (EAs) than in African Americans (AAs) but mortality from breast cancer is higher among AAs. While there are racial differences in DNA methylation and gene expression in breast tumors, little is known whether such racial differences exist in breast tissues of healthy women. Genome-wide DNA methylation and gene expression profiling was performed in histologically normal breast tissues of healthy women. Linear regression models were used to identify differentially-methylated CpG sites (CpGs) between EAs (n = 61) and AAs (n = 22). Correlations for methylation and expression were assessed. Biological functions of the differentially-methylated genes were assigned using the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Among 485 differentially-methylated CpGs by race, 203 were hypermethylated in EAs, and 282 were hypermethylated in AAs. Promoter-related differentially-methylated CpGs were more frequently hypermethylated in EAs (52%) than AAs (27%) while gene body and intergenic CpGs were more frequently hypermethylated in AAs. The differentially-methylated CpGs were enriched for cancer-associated genes with roles in cell death and survival, cellular development, and cell-to-cell signaling. In a separate analysis for correlation in EAs and AAs, different patterns of correlation were found between EAs and AAs. The correlated genes showed different biological networks between EAs and AAs; networks were connected by Ubiquitin C. To our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive genome-wide study to identify differences in methylation and gene expression between EAs and AAs in breast tissues from healthy women. These findings may provide further insights regarding the contribution of epigenetic differences to racial disparities in breast cancer. PMID:26680018

  5. Racial differences in genome-wide methylation profiling and gene expression in breast tissues from healthy women.

    PubMed

    Song, Min-Ae; Brasky, Theodore M; Marian, Catalin; Weng, Daniel Y; Taslim, Cenny; Dumitrescu, Ramona G; Llanos, Adana A; Freudenheim, Jo L; Shields, Peter G

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is more common in European Americans (EAs) than in African Americans (AAs) but mortality from breast cancer is higher among AAs. While there are racial differences in DNA methylation and gene expression in breast tumors, little is known whether such racial differences exist in breast tissues of healthy women. Genome-wide DNA methylation and gene expression profiling was performed in histologically normal breast tissues of healthy women. Linear regression models were used to identify differentially-methylated CpG sites (CpGs) between EAs (n = 61) and AAs (n = 22). Correlations for methylation and expression were assessed. Biological functions of the differentially-methylated genes were assigned using the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Among 485 differentially-methylated CpGs by race, 203 were hypermethylated in EAs, and 282 were hypermethylated in AAs. Promoter-related differentially-methylated CpGs were more frequently hypermethylated in EAs (52%) than AAs (27%) while gene body and intergenic CpGs were more frequently hypermethylated in AAs. The differentially-methylated CpGs were enriched for cancer-associated genes with roles in cell death and survival, cellular development, and cell-to-cell signaling. In a separate analysis for correlation in EAs and AAs, different patterns of correlation were found between EAs and AAs. The correlated genes showed different biological networks between EAs and AAs; networks were connected by Ubiquitin C. To our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive genome-wide study to identify differences in methylation and gene expression between EAs and AAs in breast tissues from healthy women. These findings may provide further insights regarding the contribution of epigenetic differences to racial disparities in breast cancer.

  6. Detection of Cytosine methylation in ancient DNA from five native american populations using bisulfite sequencing.

    PubMed

    Smith, Rick W A; Monroe, Cara; Bolnick, Deborah A

    2015-01-01

    While cytosine methylation has been widely studied in extant populations, relatively few studies have analyzed methylation in ancient DNA. Most existing studies of epigenetic marks in ancient DNA have inferred patterns of methylation in highly degraded samples using post-mortem damage to cytosines as a proxy for cytosine methylation levels. However, this approach limits the inference of methylation compared with direct bisulfite sequencing, the current gold standard for analyzing cytosine methylation at single nucleotide resolution. In this study, we used direct bisulfite sequencing to assess cytosine methylation in ancient DNA from the skeletal remains of 30 Native Americans ranging in age from approximately 230 to 4500 years before present. Unmethylated cytosines were converted to uracils by treatment with sodium bisulfite, bisulfite products of a CpG-rich retrotransposon were pyrosequenced, and C-to-T ratios were quantified for a single CpG position. We found that cytosine methylation is readily recoverable from most samples, given adequate preservation of endogenous nuclear DNA. In addition, our results indicate that the precision of cytosine methylation estimates is inversely correlated with aDNA preservation, such that samples of low DNA concentration show higher variability in measures of percent methylation than samples of high DNA concentration. In particular, samples in this study with a DNA concentration above 0.015 ng/μL generated the most consistent measures of cytosine methylation. This study presents evidence of cytosine methylation in a large collection of ancient human remains, and indicates that it is possible to analyze epigenetic patterns in ancient populations using direct bisulfite sequencing approaches. PMID:26016479

  7. Detection of Cytosine Methylation in Ancient DNA from Five Native American Populations Using Bisulfite Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Rick W. A.; Monroe, Cara; Bolnick, Deborah A.

    2015-01-01

    While cytosine methylation has been widely studied in extant populations, relatively few studies have analyzed methylation in ancient DNA. Most existing studies of epigenetic marks in ancient DNA have inferred patterns of methylation in highly degraded samples using post-mortem damage to cytosines as a proxy for cytosine methylation levels. However, this approach limits the inference of methylation compared with direct bisulfite sequencing, the current gold standard for analyzing cytosine methylation at single nucleotide resolution. In this study, we used direct bisulfite sequencing to assess cytosine methylation in ancient DNA from the skeletal remains of 30 Native Americans ranging in age from approximately 230 to 4500 years before present. Unmethylated cytosines were converted to uracils by treatment with sodium bisulfite, bisulfite products of a CpG-rich retrotransposon were pyrosequenced, and C-to-T ratios were quantified for a single CpG position. We found that cytosine methylation is readily recoverable from most samples, given adequate preservation of endogenous nuclear DNA. In addition, our results indicate that the precision of cytosine methylation estimates is inversely correlated with aDNA preservation, such that samples of low DNA concentration show higher variability in measures of percent methylation than samples of high DNA concentration. In particular, samples in this study with a DNA concentration above 0.015 ng/μL generated the most consistent measures of cytosine methylation. This study presents evidence of cytosine methylation in a large collection of ancient human remains, and indicates that it is possible to analyze epigenetic patterns in ancient populations using direct bisulfite sequencing approaches. PMID:26016479

  8. Genome-wide methylation profiling and a multiplex construction for the identification of body fluids using epigenetic markers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwan Young; An, Ja Hyun; Jung, Sang-Eun; Oh, Yu Na; Lee, Eun Young; Choi, Ajin; Yang, Woo Ick; Shin, Kyoung-Jin

    2015-07-01

    The identification of body fluids found at crime scenes can contribute to solving crimes by providing important insights into crime scene reconstruction. In the present study, body fluid-specific epigenetic marker candidates were identified from genome-wide DNA methylation profiling of 42 body fluid samples including blood, saliva, semen, vaginal fluid and menstrual blood using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip array. A total of 64 CpG sites were selected as body fluid-specific marker candidates by having more than 20% discrepancy in DNA methylation status between a certain type of body fluid and other types of body fluids and to have methylation or unmethylation pattern only in a particular type of body fluid. From further locus-specific methylation analysis in additional samples, 1 to 3 CpG sites were selected for each body fluid. Then, a multiplex methylation SNaPshot reaction was constructed to analyze methylation status of 8 body fluid-specific CpG sites. The developed multiplex reaction positively identifies blood, saliva, semen and the body fluid which originates from female reproductive organ in one reaction, and produces successful DNA methylation profiles in aged or mixed samples. Although it remains to be investigated whether this approach is more sensitive, more practical than RNA- or peptide-based assays and whether it can be successfully applied to forensic casework, the results of the present study will be useful for the forensic investigators dealing with body fluid samples. PMID:25796047

  9. Genome-wide methylation profiling and a multiplex construction for the identification of body fluids using epigenetic markers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwan Young; An, Ja Hyun; Jung, Sang-Eun; Oh, Yu Na; Lee, Eun Young; Choi, Ajin; Yang, Woo Ick; Shin, Kyoung-Jin

    2015-07-01

    The identification of body fluids found at crime scenes can contribute to solving crimes by providing important insights into crime scene reconstruction. In the present study, body fluid-specific epigenetic marker candidates were identified from genome-wide DNA methylation profiling of 42 body fluid samples including blood, saliva, semen, vaginal fluid and menstrual blood using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip array. A total of 64 CpG sites were selected as body fluid-specific marker candidates by having more than 20% discrepancy in DNA methylation status between a certain type of body fluid and other types of body fluids and to have methylation or unmethylation pattern only in a particular type of body fluid. From further locus-specific methylation analysis in additional samples, 1 to 3 CpG sites were selected for each body fluid. Then, a multiplex methylation SNaPshot reaction was constructed to analyze methylation status of 8 body fluid-specific CpG sites. The developed multiplex reaction positively identifies blood, saliva, semen and the body fluid which originates from female reproductive organ in one reaction, and produces successful DNA methylation profiles in aged or mixed samples. Although it remains to be investigated whether this approach is more sensitive, more practical than RNA- or peptide-based assays and whether it can be successfully applied to forensic casework, the results of the present study will be useful for the forensic investigators dealing with body fluid samples.

  10. Comparison of Gene Expression and Genome-Wide DNA Methylation Profiling between Phenotypically Normal Cloned Pigs and Conventionally Bred Controls

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shengting; Li, Jian; Lin, Lin; Nielsen, Anders Lade; Sørensen, Charlotte Brandt; Vajta, Gábor; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Xiuqing; Du, Yutao; Yang, Huanming; Bolund, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Animal breeding via Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer (SCNT) has enormous potential in agriculture and biomedicine. However, concerns about whether SCNT animals are as healthy or epigenetically normal as conventionally bred ones are raised as the efficiency of cloning by SCNT is much lower than natural breeding or In-vitro fertilization (IVF). Thus, we have conducted a genome-wide gene expression and DNA methylation profiling between phenotypically normal cloned pigs and control pigs in two tissues (muscle and liver), using Affymetrix Porcine expression array as well as modified methylation-specific digital karyotyping (MMSDK) and Solexa sequencing technology. Typical tissue-specific differences with respect to both gene expression and DNA methylation were observed in muscle and liver from cloned as well as control pigs. Gene expression profiles were highly similar between cloned pigs and controls, though a small set of genes showed altered expression. Cloned pigs presented a more different pattern of DNA methylation in unique sequences in both tissues. Especially a small set of genomic sites had different DNA methylation status with a trend towards slightly increased methylation levels in cloned pigs. Molecular network analysis of the genes that contained such differential methylation loci revealed a significant network related to tissue development. In conclusion, our study showed that phenotypically normal cloned pigs were highly similar with normal breeding pigs in their gene expression, but moderate alteration in DNA methylation aspects still exists, especially in certain unique genomic regions. PMID:22022462

  11. Genome-wide CpG island methylation and intergenic demethylation propensities vary among different tumor sites

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Tae; Wiemels, Joseph L.

    2016-01-01

    The epigenetic landscape of cancer includes both focal hypermethylation and broader hypomethylation in a genome-wide manner. By means of a comprehensive genomic analysis on 6637 tissues of 21 tumor types, we here show that the degrees of overall methylation in CpG island (CGI) and demethylation in intergenic regions, defined as ‘backbone’, largely vary among different tumors. Depending on tumor type, both CGI methylation and backbone demethylation are often associated with clinical, epidemiological and biological features such as age, sex, smoking history, anatomic location, histological type and grade, stage, molecular subtype and biological pathways. We found connections between CGI methylation and hypermutability, microsatellite instability, IDH1 mutation, 19p gain and polycomb features, and backbone demethylation with chromosomal instability, NSD1 and TP53 mutations, 5q and 19p loss and long repressive domains. These broad epigenetic patterns add a new dimension to our understanding of tumor biology and its clinical implications. PMID:26464434

  12. Esophageal Cancer Epigenomics and Integrome Analysis of Genome-Wide Methylation and Expression in High Risk Northeast Indian Population.

    PubMed

    Singh, Virendra; Singh, Laishram Chandreshwor; Vasudevan, Madavan; Chattopadhyay, Indranil; Borthakar, Bibhuti Bhusan; Rai, Avdhesh Kumar; Phukan, Rup Kumar; Sharma, Jagannath; Mahanta, Jagadish; Kataki, Amal Chandra; Kapur, Sujala; Saxena, Sunita

    2015-11-01

    Esophageal cancer is a major global health burden with a strong host-environment interaction component and epigenomics underpinnings that remain to be elucidated further. Certain populations such as the Northeast Indians suffer at a disproportionately higher rate from this devastating disease. Promoter methylation is correlated with transcriptional silencing of various genes in esophageal cancer. Very few studies on genome-wide methylation for esophageal cancer exist and yet, no one has carried out an integromics analysis of methylation and gene expression. In the present study, genome-wide methylation was measured in samples collected from the Northeast Indian population by Infinium 450k array, and integration of the methylation data was performed. To prepare a network of genes displaying enriched pathways, together with the list of genes exhibiting promoter hypermethylation or hypomethylation with inversely correlated expression, we performed an integrome analysis. We identified 23 Integrome network enriched genes with relevance to tumor progression and associated with the processes involved in metastasis such as cell adhesion, integrin signaling, cytoskeleton, and extracellular matrix organizations. These included four genes (PTK2, RND1, RND3, and UBL3) with promoter hypermethylation and downregulation, and 19 genes (SEMG2, CD97, CTNND2, CADM3, OMD, NEFM, FBN2, CTNNB1, DLX6, UGT2B4, CCDC80, PZP, SERPINA4, TNFSF13B, NPC1, COL1A1, TAC3, BMP8A, and IL22RA2) with promoter hypomethylation and upregulation. A Methylation Efficiency Index was further calculated for these genes; the top five gene with the highest index were COL1A1, TAC3, SERPINA4, TNFSF13B, and IL22RA2. In conclusion, we recommend that the circulatory proteins IL22RA2, TNFSF13B, SERPINA4, and TAC3 in serum of patients and disease-free healthy controls can be examined in the future as putative noninvasive biomarkers.

  13. Genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation in the sexual stage of the insect pathogenic fungus Cordyceps militaris.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-long; Wang, Zhang-xun; Liu, Chun; Wang, Si-bao; Huang, Bo

    2015-12-01

    DNA methylation is a basic epigenetic mechanism found in eukaryotes, but its patterns and roles vary significantly among diverse taxa. In fungi, DNA methylation has various effects on diverse biological processes. However, its function in the sexual development of fungi remains unclear. Cordyceps militaris, readily performs sexual reproduction and thus provides a remarkably rich model for understanding epigenetic processes in sexual development. Here, we surveyed the methylome of C. militaris at single-base resolution to assess DNA methylation patterns during sexual development using genomic bisulfite sequencing (BS-Seq). The results showed that approximately 0.4 % of cytosines are methylated, similar to the DNA methylation level (0.39 %) during asexual development. Importantly, we found that DNA methylation in the fungi undergoes global reprogramming during fungal development. Moreover, RNA-Seq analysis indicated that the differentially methylated regions (DMRs) have no correlation with the genes that have roles during fungal sexual development in C. militaris. These results provide a comprehensive characterization of DNA methylation in the sexual development of C. militaris, which will contribute to future investigations of epigenetics in fungi. PMID:26615747

  14. The CHH motif in sugar beet satellite DNA: a modulator for cytosine methylation.

    PubMed

    Zakrzewski, Falk; Schubert, Veit; Viehoever, Prisca; Minoche, André E; Dohm, Juliane C; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Weisshaar, Bernd; Schmidt, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    Methylation of DNA is important for the epigenetic silencing of repetitive DNA in plant genomes. Knowledge about the cytosine methylation status of satellite DNAs, a major class of repetitive DNA, is scarce. One reason for this is that arrays of tandemly arranged sequences are usually collapsed in next-generation sequencing assemblies. We applied strategies to overcome this limitation and quantified the level of cytosine methylation and its pattern in three satellite families of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) which differ in their abundance, chromosomal localization and monomer size. We visualized methylation levels along pachytene chromosomes with respect to small satellite loci at maximum resolution using chromosome-wide fluorescent in situ hybridization complemented with immunostaining and super-resolution microscopy. Only reduced methylation of many satellite arrays was obtained. To investigate methylation at the nucleotide level we performed bisulfite sequencing of 1569 satellite sequences. We found that the level of methylation of cytosine strongly depends on the sequence context: cytosines in the CHH motif show lower methylation (44-52%), while CG and CHG motifs are more strongly methylated. This affects the overall methylation of satellite sequences because CHH occurs frequently while CG and CHG are rare or even absent in the satellite arrays investigated. Evidently, CHH is the major target for modulation of the cytosine methylation level of adjacent monomers within individual arrays and contributes to their epigenetic function. This strongly indicates that asymmetric cytosine methylation plays a role in the epigenetic modification of satellite repeats in plant genomes.

  15. Genome-wide DNA methylation profiles changes associated with constant heat stress in pigs as measured by bisulfite sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Yue; Cui, Yanjun; Gu, Xianhong

    2016-01-01

    Heat stress affects muscle development and meat quality in food animals; however, little is known regarding its regulatory mechanisms at the epigenetic level, such as via DNA methylation. In this study, we aimed to compare the DNA methylation profiles between control and heat-stressed pigs to identify candidate genes for skeletal muscle development and meat quality. Whole-genome bisulfite sequencing was used to investigate the genome-wide DNA methylation patterns in the longissimus dorsi muscles of the pigs. Both groups showed similar proportions of methylation at CpG sites but exhibited different proportions at non-CpG sites. A total of 57,147 differentially methylated regions were identified between the two groups, which corresponded to 1,422 differentially methylated genes. Gene ontogeny and KEGG pathway analyses indicated that these were mainly involved in energy and lipid metabolism, cellular defense and stress responses, and calcium signaling pathways. This study revealed the global DNA methylation pattern of pig muscle between normal and heat stress conditions. The result of this study might contribute to a better understanding of epigenetic regulation in pig muscle development and meat quality. PMID:27264107

  16. A six months exercise intervention influences the genome-wide DNA methylation pattern in human adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Rönn, Tina; Volkov, Petr; Davegårdh, Cajsa; Dayeh, Tasnim; Hall, Elin; Olsson, Anders H; Nilsson, Emma; Tornberg, Asa; Dekker Nitert, Marloes; Eriksson, Karl-Fredrik; Jones, Helena A; Groop, Leif; Ling, Charlotte

    2013-06-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms are implicated in gene regulation and the development of different diseases. The epigenome differs between cell types and has until now only been characterized for a few human tissues. Environmental factors potentially alter the epigenome. Here we describe the genome-wide pattern of DNA methylation in human adipose tissue from 23 healthy men, with a previous low level of physical activity, before and after a six months exercise intervention. We also investigate the differences in adipose tissue DNA methylation between 31 individuals with or without a family history of type 2 diabetes. DNA methylation was analyzed using Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip, an array containing 485,577 probes covering 99% RefSeq genes. Global DNA methylation changed and 17,975 individual CpG sites in 7,663 unique genes showed altered levels of DNA methylation after the exercise intervention (q<0.05). Differential mRNA expression was present in 1/3 of gene regions with altered DNA methylation, including RALBP1, HDAC4 and NCOR2 (q<0.05). Using a luciferase assay, we could show that increased DNA methylation in vitro of the RALBP1 promoter suppressed the transcriptional activity (p = 0.03). Moreover, 18 obesity and 21 type 2 diabetes candidate genes had CpG sites with differences in adipose tissue DNA methylation in response to exercise (q<0.05), including TCF7L2 (6 CpG sites) and KCNQ1 (10 CpG sites). A simultaneous change in mRNA expression was seen for 6 of those genes. To understand if genes that exhibit differential DNA methylation and mRNA expression in human adipose tissue in vivo affect adipocyte metabolism, we silenced Hdac4 and Ncor2 respectively in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, which resulted in increased lipogenesis both in the basal and insulin stimulated state. In conclusion, exercise induces genome-wide changes in DNA methylation in human adipose tissue, potentially affecting adipocyte metabolism.

  17. A Six Months Exercise Intervention Influences the Genome-wide DNA Methylation Pattern in Human Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Rönn, Tina; Volkov, Petr; Davegårdh, Cajsa; Dayeh, Tasnim; Hall, Elin; Olsson, Anders H.; Nilsson, Emma; Tornberg, Åsa; Dekker Nitert, Marloes; Eriksson, Karl-Fredrik; Jones, Helena A.; Groop, Leif; Ling, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms are implicated in gene regulation and the development of different diseases. The epigenome differs between cell types and has until now only been characterized for a few human tissues. Environmental factors potentially alter the epigenome. Here we describe the genome-wide pattern of DNA methylation in human adipose tissue from 23 healthy men, with a previous low level of physical activity, before and after a six months exercise intervention. We also investigate the differences in adipose tissue DNA methylation between 31 individuals with or without a family history of type 2 diabetes. DNA methylation was analyzed using Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip, an array containing 485,577 probes covering 99% RefSeq genes. Global DNA methylation changed and 17,975 individual CpG sites in 7,663 unique genes showed altered levels of DNA methylation after the exercise intervention (q<0.05). Differential mRNA expression was present in 1/3 of gene regions with altered DNA methylation, including RALBP1, HDAC4 and NCOR2 (q<0.05). Using a luciferase assay, we could show that increased DNA methylation in vitro of the RALBP1 promoter suppressed the transcriptional activity (p = 0.03). Moreover, 18 obesity and 21 type 2 diabetes candidate genes had CpG sites with differences in adipose tissue DNA methylation in response to exercise (q<0.05), including TCF7L2 (6 CpG sites) and KCNQ1 (10 CpG sites). A simultaneous change in mRNA expression was seen for 6 of those genes. To understand if genes that exhibit differential DNA methylation and mRNA expression in human adipose tissue in vivo affect adipocyte metabolism, we silenced Hdac4 and Ncor2 respectively in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, which resulted in increased lipogenesis both in the basal and insulin stimulated state. In conclusion, exercise induces genome-wide changes in DNA methylation in human adipose tissue, potentially affecting adipocyte metabolism. PMID:23825961

  18. Genome-wide DNA methylation map of human neutrophils reveals widespread inter-individual epigenetic variation.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Aniruddha; Stockwell, Peter A; Rodger, Euan J; Duncan, Elizabeth J; Parry, Matthew F; Weeks, Robert J; Morison, Ian M

    2015-11-27

    The extent of variation in DNA methylation patterns in healthy individuals is not yet well documented. Identification of inter-individual epigenetic variation is important for understanding phenotypic variation and disease susceptibility. Using neutrophils from a cohort of healthy individuals, we generated base-resolution DNA methylation maps to document inter-individual epigenetic variation. We identified 12851 autosomal inter-individual variably methylated fragments (iVMFs). Gene promoters were the least variable, whereas gene body and upstream regions showed higher variation in DNA methylation. The iVMFs were relatively enriched in repetitive elements compared to non-iVMFs, and were associated with genome regulation and chromatin function elements. Further, variably methylated genes were disproportionately associated with regulation of transcription, responsive function and signal transduction pathways. Transcriptome analysis indicates that iVMF methylation at differentially expressed exons has a positive correlation and local effect on the inclusion of that exon in the mRNA transcript.

  19. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis identifies a metabolic memory profile in patient-derived diabetic foot ulcer fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Park, Lara K; Maione, Anna G; Smith, Avi; Gerami-Naini, Behzad; Iyer, Lakshmanan K; Mooney, David J; Veves, Aristidis; Garlick, Jonathan A

    2014-10-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) are a serious complication of diabetes. Previous exposure to hyperglycemic conditions accelerates a decline in cellular function through metabolic memory despite normalization of glycemic control. Persistent, hyperglycemia-induced epigenetic patterns are considered a central mechanism that activates metabolic memory; however, this has not been investigated in patient-derived fibroblasts from DFUs. We generated a cohort of patient-derived lines from DFU fibroblasts (DFUF), and site- and age-matched diabetic foot fibroblasts (DFF) and non-diabetic foot fibroblasts (NFF) to investigate global and genome-wide DNA methylation patterns using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry and the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450K array. DFFs and DFUFs demonstrated significantly lower global DNA methylation compared to NFFs (p = 0.03). Hierarchical clustering of differentially methylated probes (DMPs, p = 0.05) showed that DFFs and DFUFs cluster together and separately from NFFs. Twenty-five percent of the same probes were identified as DMPs when individually comparing DFF and DFUF to NFF. Functional annotation identified enrichment of DMPs associated with genes critical to wound repair, including angiogenesis (p = 0.07) and extracellular matrix assembly (p = 0.035). Identification of sustained DNA methylation patterns in patient-derived fibroblasts after prolonged passage in normoglycemic conditions demonstrates persistent metabolic memory. These findings suggest that epigenetic-related metabolic memory may also underlie differences in wound healing phenotypes and can potentially identify therapeutic targets.

  20. Comparison of the Genome-Wide DNA Methylation Profiles between Fast-Growing and Slow-Growing Broilers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenhui; Zheng, Xuejuan; Jia, Xinzheng; Nie, Qinghua; Zhang, Xiquan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Growth traits are important in poultry production, however, little is known for its regulatory mechanism at epigenetic level. Therefore, in this study, we aim to compare DNA methylation profiles between fast- and slow-growing broilers in order to identify candidate genes for chicken growth. Methylated DNA immunoprecipitation-sequencing (MeDIP-seq) was used to investigate the genome-wide DNA methylation pattern in high and low tails of Recessive White Rock (WRRh; WRRl) and that of Xinhua Chickens (XHh; XHl) at 7 weeks of age. The results showed that the average methylation density was the lowest in CGIs followed by promoters. Within the gene body, the methylation density of introns was higher than that of UTRs and exons. Moreover, different methylation levels were observed in different repeat types with the highest in LINE/CR1. Methylated CGIs were prominently distributed in the intergenic regions and were enriched in the size ranging 200–300 bp. In total 13,294 methylated genes were found in four samples, including 4,085 differentially methylated genes of WRRh Vs. WRRl, 5,599 of XHh Vs. XHl, 4,204 of WRRh Vs. XHh, as well as 7,301 of WRRl Vs. XHl. Moreover, 132 differentially methylated genes related to growth and metabolism were observed in both inner contrasts (WRRh Vs. WRRl and XHh Vs. XHl), whereas 129 differentially methylated genes related to growth and metabolism were found in both across-breed contrasts (WRRh Vs. XHh and WRRl Vs. XHl). Further analysis showed that overall 75 genes exhibited altered DNA methylation in all four contrasts, which included some well-known growth factors of IGF1R, FGF12, FGF14, FGF18, FGFR2, and FGFR3. In addition, we validate the MeDIP-seq results by bisulfite sequencing in some regions. Conclusions This study revealed the global DNA methylation pattern of chicken muscle, and identified candidate genes that potentially regulate muscle development at 7 weeks of age at methylation level. PMID:23441189

  1. Genome-wide profiles of methylation, microRNAs, and gene expression in chemoresistant breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    He, Dong-Xu; Gu, Feng; Gao, Fei; Hao, Jun-jun; Gong, Desheng; Gu, Xiao-Ting; Mao, Ai-Qin; Jin, Jian; Fu, Li; Ma, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Cancer chemoresistance is regulated by complex genetic and epigenetic networks. In this study, the features of gene expression, methylation, and microRNA (miRNA) expression were investigated with high-throughput sequencing in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells resistant to adriamycin (MCF-7/ADM) and paclitaxel (MCF-7/PTX). We found that: ① both of the chemoresistant cell lines had similar, massive changes in gene expression, methylation, and miRNA expression versus chemosensitive controls. ② Pairwise integration of the data highlighted sets of genes that were regulated by either methylation or miRNAs, and sets of miRNAs whose expression was controlled by DNA methylation in chemoresistant cells. ③ By combining the three sets of high-throughput data, we obtained a list of genes whose expression was regulated by both methylation and miRNAs in chemoresistant cells; ④ Expression of these genes was then validated in clinical breast cancer samples to generate a 17-gene signature that showed good predictive and prognostic power in triple-negative breast cancer patients receiving anthracycline-taxane-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy. In conclusion, our results have generated a new workflow for the integrated analysis of the effects of miRNAs and methylation on gene expression during the development of chemoresistance. PMID:27094684

  2. Neonatal Genome-Wide Methylation Patterns in Relation to Birth Weight in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Stephanie M.; Joubert, Bonnie R.; Wu, Michael C.; Olshan, Andrew F.; Håberg, Siri E.; Ueland, Per Magne; Nystad, Wenche; Nilsen, Roy M.; Vollset, Stein Emil; Peddada, Shyamal D.; London, Stephanie J.

    2014-01-01

    Although epigenetic regulation plays a critical role in embryonic development, few studies have examined the relationship of epigenome-wide methylation with fetal growth. Using the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip (Illumina, Inc., San Diego, California) in a substudy of 1,046 infants from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) enrolled between 1999 and 2008, we examined epigenome-wide cord blood DNA methylation in relation to birth weight. In multivariable-adjusted robust linear regression models, we identified differential methylation at 19 cytosine-guanine dinucleotides (CpGs) associated with either decreased (AT-rich interactive domain 5B (MRF1-like) (ARID5B), 2 CpGs) or increased (x-ray repair complementing defective repair in Chinese hamster cells 3 (XRCC3), 4 CpGs) birth weight. ARID5B knockout mice have less adipose tissue and significantly lower weight in the postnatal period. XRCC3 plays a key role in the maintenance of chromosome stability and the repair of DNA damage. Although there are fewer data on the other implicated genes, many of these genes have been shown to have roles in developmental processes. This constitutes the largest and most robust study of birth weight using an epigenome-wide methylation platform and offers potential insights into epigenetic mechanisms of fetal growth. PMID:24561991

  3. Genome-wide DNA methylation profiling of recurrent and non-recurrent chordomas

    PubMed Central

    Alholle, A; Brini, A T; Bauer, J; Gharanei, S; Niada, S; Slater, A; Gentle, D; Maher, E R; Jeys, L; Grimer, R; Sumathi, V P; Latif, F

    2015-01-01

    Chordomas are an aggressive rare type of malignant bone tumors arising from the remnant of the notochord. Chordomas occur mainly in vertebral bones and account for 1–4% of malignant bone tumors. Management and treatment of chordomas are difficult as they are resistant to conventional chemotherapy; therefore, they are mainly treated with surgery and radiation therapy. In this study, we performed DNA methylation profiling of 26 chordomas and normal nucleus pulposus samples plus UCH-1 chordoma cell line using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChips. Combined bisulfite restriction analysis and bisulfite sequencing was used to confirm the methylation data. Gene expression was analyzed using RT-PCR before and after 5-aza-2’-deoxycytidine (5-azaDC) treatment of chordoma cell lines. Analysis of the HumanMethylation450 BeadChip data led to the identification of 8,819 loci (2.9%) that were significantly differentially methylated (>0.2 average β-value difference) between chordomas and nucleus pulposus samples (adjusted P < 0.05). Among these, 5,868 probes (66.5%) were hypomethylated, compared to 2,951 (33.5%) loci that were hypermethylated in chordomas compared to controls. From the 2,951 differentially hypermethylated probes, 33.3% were localized in the promoter region (982 probes) and, among these, 104 probes showed cancer-specific hypermethylation. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis indicates that the cancer-specific differentially methylated loci are involved in various networks including cancer disease, nervous system development and function, cell death and survival, cellular growth, cellular development, and proliferation. Furthermore, we identified a subset of probes that were differentially methylated between recurrent and non-recurrent chordomas. BeadChip methylation data was confirmed for these genes and gene expression was shown to be upregulated in methylated chordoma cell lines after treatment with 5-azaDC. Understanding epigenetic changes in chordomas

  4. Genome-wide methylated CpG island profiles of melanoma cells reveal a melanoma coregulation network

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian-Liang; Mazar, Joseph; Zhong, Cuncong; Faulkner, Geoffrey J.; Govindarajan, Subramaniam S.; Zhang, Zhan; Dinger, Marcel E.; Meredith, Gavin; Adams, Christopher; Zhang, Shaojie; Mattick, John S.; Ray, Animesh; Perera, Ranjan J.

    2013-01-01

    Metastatic melanoma is a malignant cancer with generally poor prognosis, with no targeted chemotherapy. To identify epigenetic changes related to melanoma, we have determined genome-wide methylated CpG island distributions by next-generation sequencing. Melanoma chromosomes tend to be differentially methylated over short CpG island tracts. CpG islands in the upstream regulatory regions of many coding and noncoding RNA genes, including, for example, TERC, which encodes the telomerase RNA, exhibit extensive hypermethylation, whereas several repeated elements, such as LINE 2, and several LTR elements, are hypomethylated in advanced stage melanoma cell lines. By using CpG island demethylation profiles, and by integrating these data with RNA-seq data obtained from melanoma cells, we have identified a co-expression network of differentially methylated genes with significance for cancer related functions. Focused assays of melanoma patient tissue samples for CpG island methylation near the noncoding RNA gene SNORD-10 demonstrated high specificity. PMID:24129253

  5. Conservation of Dcm-mediated Cytosine DNA Methylation in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Militello, Kevin T.; Simon, Robert D.; Qureshi, Mehr; Maines, Robert; Van Horne, Michelle L.; Hennick, Stacy M.; Jayakar, Sangeeta K.; Pounder, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, cytosine DNA methylation is catalyzed by the Dcm (DNA cytosine methyltransferase) protein and occurs at the second cytosine in the sequence 5′CCWGG3′. Although the presence of cytosine DNA methylation was reported over 35 years ago, the biological role of 5-methylcytosine in E. coli remains unclear. In order to gain insight into the role of cytosine DNA methylation in E. coli, we: (a) screened the 72 strains of the ECOR collection and 90 recently isolated environmental samples for the presence of the full-length dcm gene using the polymerase chain reaction; (b) examined the same strains for the presence of 5-methylcytosine at 5′CCWGG3′ sites using a restriction enzyme isoschizomer digestion assay; and (c) quantified the levels of 5-methyl-2′-deoxycytidine in selected strains using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Dcm-mediated cytosine DNA methylation is conserved in all 162 strains examined, and the level of 5-methylcytosine ranges from 0.86% to 1.30% of the cytosines. We also demonstrate that Dcm reduces expression of ribosomal protein genes during stationary phase, and this may explain the highly conserved nature of this DNA modification pathway. PMID:22150247

  6. Genome wide DNA methylation profiles provide clues to the origin and pathogenesis of germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Rijlaarsdam, Martin A; Tax, David M J; Gillis, Ad J M; Dorssers, Lambert C J; Koestler, Devin C; de Ridder, Jeroen; Looijenga, Leendert H J

    2015-01-01

    The cell of origin of the five subtypes (I-V) of germ cell tumors (GCTs) are assumed to be germ cells from different maturation stages. This is (potentially) reflected in their methylation status as fetal maturing primordial germ cells are globally demethylated during migration from the yolk sac to the gonad. Imprinted regions are erased in the gonad and later become uniparentally imprinted according to fetal sex. Here, 91 GCTs (type I-IV) and four cell lines were profiled (Illumina's HumanMethylation450BeadChip). Data was pre-processed controlling for cross hybridization, SNPs, detection rate, probe-type bias and batch effects. The annotation was extended, covering snRNAs/microRNAs, repeat elements and imprinted regions. A Hidden Markov Model-based genome segmentation was devised to identify differentially methylated genomic regions. Methylation profiles allowed for separation of clusters of non-seminomas (type II), seminomas/dysgerminomas (type II), spermatocytic seminomas (type III) and teratomas/dermoid cysts (type I/IV). The seminomas, dysgerminomas and spermatocytic seminomas were globally hypomethylated, in line with previous reports and their demethylated precursor. Differential methylation and imprinting status between subtypes reflected their presumed cell of origin. Ovarian type I teratomas and dermoid cysts showed (partial) sex specific uniparental maternal imprinting. The spermatocytic seminomas showed uniparental paternal imprinting while testicular teratomas exhibited partial imprinting erasure. Somatic imprinting in type II GCTs might indicate a cell of origin after global demethylation but before imprinting erasure. This is earlier than previously described, but agrees with the totipotent/embryonic stem cell like potential of type II GCTs and their rare extra-gonadal localization. The results support the common origin of the type I teratomas and show strong similarity between ovarian type I teratomas and dermoid cysts. In conclusion, we identified

  7. A comparison of genome-wide DNA methylation patterns between different vascular tissues from patients with coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Nazarenko, Maria S; Markov, Anton V; Lebedev, Igor N; Freidin, Maxim B; Sleptcov, Aleksei A; Koroleva, Iuliya A; Frolov, Aleksei V; Popov, Vadim A; Barbarash, Olga L; Puzyrev, Valery P

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms of gene regulation in context of cardiovascular diseases are of considerable interest. So far, our current knowledge of the DNA methylation profiles for atherosclerosis affected and healthy human vascular tissues is still limited. Using the Illumina Infinium Human Methylation27 BeadChip, we performed a genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation in right coronary artery in the area of advanced atherosclerotic plaques, atherosclerotic-resistant internal mammary arteries, and great saphenous veins obtained from same patients with coronary heart disease. The resulting DNA methylation patterns were markedly different between all the vascular tissues. The genes hypomethylated in athero-prone arteries to compare with atherosclerotic-resistant arteries were predominately involved in regulation of inflammation and immune processes, as well as development. The great saphenous veins exhibited an increase of the DNA methylation age in comparison to the internal mammary arteries. Gene ontology analysis for genes harboring hypermethylated CpG-sites in veins revealed the enrichment for biological processes associated with the development. Four CpG-sites located within the MIR10B gene sequence and about 1 kb upstream of the HOXD4 gene were also confirmed as hypomethylated in the independent dataset of the right coronary arteries in the area of advanced atherosclerotic plaques in comparison with the other vascular tissues. The DNA methylation differences observed in vascular tissues of patients with coronary heart disease can provide new insights into the mechanisms underlying the development of pathology and explanation for the difference in graft patency after coronary artery bypass grafting surgery.

  8. Genome-Wide DNA Methylation Analysis Reveals a Potential Mechanism for the Pathogenesis and Development of Uterine Leiomyomas

    PubMed Central

    Maekawa, Ryo; Sato, Shun; Yamagata, Yoshiaki; Asada, Hiromi; Tamura, Isao; Lee, Lifa; Okada, Maki; Tamura, Hiroshi; Takaki, Eiichi; Nakai, Akira; Sugino, Norihiro

    2013-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis of uterine leiomyomas, the most common benign tumor in women, remains unclear. Since acquired factors such as obesity, hypertension and early menarche place women at greater risk for uterine leiomyomas, uterine leiomyomas may be associated with epigenetic abnormalities that are caused by unfavorable environmental exposures. Principal Findings Profiles of genome-wide DNA methylation and mRNA expression were investigated in leiomyomas and in myometrium with and without leiomyomas. Profiles of DNA methylation and mRNA expression in the myometrium with and without leiomyomas were quite similar while those in leiomyomas were distinct. We identified 120 genes whose DNA methylation and mRNA expression patterns differed between leiomyomas and the adjacent myometrium. The biological relevance of the aberrantly methylated and expressed genes was cancer process, including IRS1 that is related to transformation, and collagen-related genes such as COL4A1, COL4A2 and COL6A3. We also detected 22 target genes of estrogen receptor (ER) alpha, including apoptosis-related genes, that have aberrant DNA methylation in the promoter, suggesting that the aberrant epigenetic regulation of ER alpha-target genes contributes to the aberrant response to estrogen. Conclusions Aberrant DNA methylation and its related transcriptional aberration were associated with cancer processes, which may represent a critical initial mechanism that triggers transformation of a single tumor stem cell that will eventually develop into a monoclonal leiomyoma tumor. The aberrant epigenetic regulation of ER alpha-target genes also may contribute to the aberrant response to estrogen, which is involved in the development of uterine leiomyomas after menarche. PMID:23818951

  9. Genome-wide DNA methylation profiling reveals parity-associated hypermethylation of FOXA1.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sagar; Gu, Fei; Wang, Chou-Miin; Lin, Chun-Lin; Liu, Joseph; Wang, Howard; Ravdin, Peter; Hu, Yanfen; Huang, Tim H M; Li, Rong

    2014-10-01

    Early pregnancy in women by the age of 20 is known to have a profound effect on reduction of lifelong breast cancer risk as compared to their nulliparous counterparts. Additional pregnancies further enhance the protection against breast cancer development. Nationwide trend of delayed pregnancy may contribute to the recently reported increase in the incidence of advanced breast cancer among young women in this country. The underlying mechanism for the parity-associated reduction of breast cancer risk is not clearly understood. The purpose of the current study is to use whole-genome DNA methylation profiling to explore a potential association between parity and epigenetic changes in breast tissue from women with early parity and nulliparity. Breast tissue was collected from age-matched cancer-free women with early parity (age < 20; n = 15) or nulliparity (n = 13). The methyl-CpG binding domain-based capture-sequencing technology was used for whole-genome DNA methylation profiling. Potential parity-associated hypermethylated genes were further verified by locus-specific pyrosequencing, using an expanded cohort of parous (n = 19) and nulliparous (n = 16) women that included the initial samples used in the global analysis. Our study identified six genes that are hypermethylated in the parous group (P < 0.05). Pyrosequencing confirmed parity-associated hypermethylation at multiple CpG islands of the FOXA1 gene, which encodes a pioneer factor that facilitates chromatin binding of estrogen receptor α. Our work identifies several potential methylation biomarkers for parity-associated breast cancer risk assessment. In addition, the results are consistent with the notion that parity-associated epigenetic silencing of FOXA1 contributes to long-term attenuation of the estrogenic impact on breast cancer development.

  10. Borderline personality disorder and childhood maltreatment: a genome-wide methylation analysis.

    PubMed

    Prados, J; Stenz, L; Courtet, P; Prada, P; Nicastro, R; Adouan, W; Guillaume, S; Olié, E; Aubry, J-M; Dayer, A; Perroud, N

    2015-02-01

    Early life adversity plays a critical role in the emergence of borderline personality disorder (BPD) and this could occur through epigenetic programming. In this perspective, we aimed to determine whether childhood maltreatment could durably modify epigenetic processes by the means of a whole-genome methylation scan of BPD subjects. Using the Illumina Infinium® HumanMethylation450 BeadChip, global methylation status of DNA extracted from peripheral blood leucocytes was correlated to the severity of childhood maltreatment in 96 BPD subjects suffering from a high level of child adversity and 93 subjects suffering from major depressive disorder (MDD) and reporting a low rate of child maltreatment. Several CpGs within or near the following genes (IL17RA, miR124-3, KCNQ2, EFNB1, OCA2, MFAP2, RPH3AL, WDR60, CST9L, EP400, A2ML1, NT5DC2, FAM163A and SPSB2) were found to be differently methylated, either in BPD compared with MDD or in relation to the severity of childhood maltreatment. A highly relevant biological result was observed for cg04927004 close to miR124-3 that was significantly associated with BPD and severity of childhood maltreatment. miR124-3 codes for a microRNA (miRNA) targeting several genes previously found to be associated with BPD such as NR3C1. Our results highlight the potentially important role played by miRNAs in the etiology of neuropsychiatric disorders such as BPD and the usefulness of using methylome-wide association studies to uncover such candidate genes. Moreover, they offer new understanding of the impact of maltreatments on biological processes leading to diseases and may ultimately result in the identification of relevant biomarkers. PMID:25612291

  11. Meristem micropropagation of cassava (Manihot esculenta) evokes genome-wide changes in DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Kitimu, Shedrack R; Taylor, Julian; March, Timothy J; Tairo, Fred; Wilkinson, Mike J; Rodríguez López, Carlos M

    2015-01-01

    There is great interest in the phenotypic, genetic and epigenetic changes associated with plant in vitro culture known as somaclonal variation. In vitro propagation systems that are based on the use of microcuttings or meristem cultures are considered analogous to clonal cuttings and so widely viewed to be largely free from such somaclonal effects. In this study, we surveyed for epigenetic changes during propagation by meristem culture and by field cuttings in five cassava (Manihot esculenta) cultivars. Principal Co-ordinate Analysis of profiles generated by methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism revealed clear divergence between samples taken from field-grown cuttings and those recovered from meristem culture. There was also good separation between the tissues of field samples but this effect was less distinct among the meristem culture materials. Application of methylation-sensitive Genotype by sequencing identified 105 candidate epimarks that distinguish between field cutting and meristem culture samples. Cross referencing the sequences of these epimarks to the draft cassava genome revealed 102 sites associated with genes whose homologs have been implicated in a range of fundamental biological processes including cell differentiation, development, sugar metabolism, DNA methylation, stress response, photosynthesis, and transposon activation. We explore the relevance of these findings for the selection of micropropagation systems for use on this and other crops.

  12. Prenatal stress-induced programming of genome-wide promoter DNA methylation in 5-HTT-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Schraut, K G; Jakob, S B; Weidner, M T; Schmitt, A G; Scholz, C J; Strekalova, T; El Hajj, N; Eijssen, L M T; Domschke, K; Reif, A; Haaf, T; Ortega, G; Steinbusch, H W M; Lesch, K P; Van den Hove, D L

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin transporter gene (5-HTT/SLC6A4)-linked polymorphic region has been suggested to have a modulatory role in mediating effects of early-life stress exposure on psychopathology rendering carriers of the low-expression short (s)-variant more vulnerable to environmental adversity in later life. The underlying molecular mechanisms of this gene-by-environment interaction are not well understood, but epigenetic regulation including differential DNA methylation has been postulated to have a critical role. Recently, we used a maternal restraint stress paradigm of prenatal stress (PS) in 5-HTT-deficient mice and showed that the effects on behavior and gene expression were particularly marked in the hippocampus of female 5-Htt+/− offspring. Here, we examined to which extent these effects are mediated by differential methylation of DNA. For this purpose, we performed a genome-wide hippocampal DNA methylation screening using methylated-DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP) on Affymetrix GeneChip Mouse Promoter 1.0 R arrays. Using hippocampal DNA from the same mice as assessed before enabled us to correlate gene-specific DNA methylation, mRNA expression and behavior. We found that 5-Htt genotype, PS and their interaction differentially affected the DNA methylation signature of numerous genes, a subset of which showed overlap with the expression profiles of the corresponding transcripts. For example, a differentially methylated region in the gene encoding myelin basic protein (Mbp) was associated with its expression in a 5-Htt-, PS- and 5-Htt × PS-dependent manner. Subsequent fine-mapping of this Mbp locus linked the methylation status of two specific CpG sites to Mbp expression and anxiety-related behavior. In conclusion, hippocampal DNA methylation patterns and expression profiles of female prenatally stressed 5-Htt+/− mice suggest that distinct molecular mechanisms, some of which are promoter methylation-dependent, contribute to the behavioral effects of the 5-Htt

  13. Cytosine deaminations catalyzed by DNA cytosine methyltransferases are unlikely to be the major cause of mutational hot spots at sites of cytosine methylation in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Wyszynski, M; Gabbara, S; Bhagwat, A S

    1994-01-01

    Sites of cytosine methylation are hot spots for C to T mutations in Escherichia coli DNA. We have developed a genetic reversion assay that allows direct selection of C to T mutations at a site of methylation. Because the mutant gene is on a plasmid, this system can be used to study mutational effects of biochemical agents in vitro as well as in vivo. Using this system we show that in vitro an E. coli methyltransferase can cause C to U deaminations at a site of methylation. Reaction conditions that are known to inhibit a side reaction of the methyltransferase also suppress reversion frequency, suggesting that this side reaction is required for deamination. Furthermore, a mutation in the enzyme that eliminates its catalytic activity but not its ability to bind DNA eliminates the ability of the enzyme to cause C to U deaminations. Despite this, in vivo experiments strongly suggest that enzyme-catalyzed deaminations of cytosine do not play a major role in making methylation sites in E. coli hot spots for mutations. For example, although uracil-DNA glycosylase (Ung) suppresses the occurrence of mutations due to C to U deaminations, the frequency of C to T mutations at a methylation site remains high in ung+ cells. Furthermore, the reversion frequencies in ung+ and ung- cells are quite similar. Images PMID:8108447

  14. Genome-wide methylation analysis identifies differentially methylated CpG loci associated with severe obesity in childhood.

    PubMed

    Huang, R C; Garratt, E S; Pan, H; Wu, Y; Davis, E A; Barton, S J; Burdge, G C; Godfrey, K M; Holbrook, J D; Lillycrop, K A

    2015-01-01

    Childhood obesity is a major public health issue. Here we investigated whether differential DNA methylation was associated with childhood obesity. We studied DNA methylation profiles in whole blood from 78 obese children (mean BMI Z-score: 2.6) and 71 age- and sex-matched controls (mean BMI Z-score: 0.1). DNA samples from obese and control groups were pooled and analyzed using the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip array. Comparison of the methylation profiles between obese and control subjects revealed 129 differentially methylated CpG (DMCpG) loci associated with 80 unique genes that had a greater than 10% difference in methylation (P-value < 0.05). The top pathways enriched among the DMCpGs included developmental processes, immune system regulation, regulation of cell signaling, and small GTPase-mediated signal transduction. The associations between the methylation of selected DMCpGs with childhood obesity were validated using sodium bisulfite pyrosequencing across loci within the FYN, PIWIL4, and TAOK3 genes in individual subjects. Three CpG loci within FYN were hypermethylated in obese individuals (all P < 0.01), while obesity was associated with lower methylation of CpG loci within PIWIL4 (P = 0.003) and TAOK3 (P = 0.001). After building logistic regression models, we determined that a 1% increase in methylation in TAOK3, multiplicatively decreased the odds of being obese by 0.91 (95% CI: 0.86 - 0.97), and an increase of 1% methylation in FYN CpG3, multiplicatively increased the odds of being obese by 1.03 (95% CI: 0.99 - 1.07). In conclusion, these findings provide evidence that childhood obesity is associated with specific DNA methylation changes in whole blood, which may have utility as biomarkers of obesity risk.

  15. Pathway Analysis Using Information from Allele-Specific Gene Methylation in Genome-Wide Association Studies for Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Li-Chung; Kao, Chung-Feng; Shih, Wei-Liang; Kuo, Po-Hsiu

    2013-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BPD) is a complex psychiatric trait with high heritability. Despite efforts through conducting genome-wide association (GWA) studies, the success of identifying susceptibility loci for BPD has been limited, which is partially attributed to the complex nature of its pathogenesis. Pathway-based analytic strategy is a powerful tool to explore joint effects of gene sets within specific biological pathways. Additionally, to incorporate other aspects of genomic data into pathway analysis may further enhance our understanding for the underlying mechanisms for BPD. Patterns of DNA methylation play important roles in regulating gene expression and function. A commonly observed phenomenon, allele-specific methylation (ASM) describes the associations between genetic variants and DNA methylation patterns. The present study aimed to identify biological pathways that are involve in the pathogenesis of BPD while incorporating brain specific ASM information in pathway analysis using two large-scale GWA datasets in Caucasian populations. A weighting scheme was adopted to take ASM information into consideration for each pathway. After multiple testing corrections, we identified 88 and 15 enriched pathways for their biological relevance for BPD in the Genetic Association Information Network (GAIN) and the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium dataset, respectively. Many of these pathways were significant only when applying the weighting scheme. Three ion channel related pathways were consistently identified in both datasets. Results in the GAIN dataset also suggest for the roles of extracellular matrix in brain for BPD. Findings from Gene Ontology (GO) analysis exhibited functional enrichment among genes of non-GO pathways in activity of gated channel, transporter, and neurotransmitter receptor. We demonstrated that integrating different data sources with pathway analysis provides an avenue to identify promising and novel biological pathways for exploring the

  16. Roles of Distal and Genic Methylation in the Development of Prostate Tumorigenesis Revealed by Genome-wide DNA Methylation Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yao; Jadhav, Rohit Ramakant; Liu, Joseph; Wilson, Desiree; Chen, Yidong; Thompson, Ian M.; Troyer, Dean A.; Hernandez, Javier; Shi, Huidong; Leach, Robin J.; Huang, Tim H.-M.; Jin, Victor X.

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation at promoters is often linked to tumorigenesis. But many aspects of DNA methylation remain unexplored, including the individual roles of distal and gene body methylation, as well as their collaborative roles with promoter methylation. Here we performed a MBD-seq analysis on prostate specimens classified into low, high, and very high risk group based on Gleason score and TNM stages. We identified gene sets with differential methylation regions (DMRs) in Distal, TSS, gene body and TES. To understand the collaborative roles, TSS was compared with the other three DMRs, resulted in 12 groups of genes with collaborative differential methylation patterns (CDMPs). We found several groups of genes that show opposite methylation patterns in Distal and Genic regions compared to TSS region, and in general they are differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in tumors in TCGA RNA-seq data. IPA (Ingenuity Pathway Analysis) reveals AR/TP53 signaling network to be a major signaling pathway, and survival analysis indicates genes subsets significantly associated with prostate cancer recurrence. Our results suggest that DNA methylation in Distal and Genic regions also plays critical roles in contributing to prostate tumorigenesis, and may act either positively or negatively with TSSs to alter gene regulation in tumors. PMID:26924343

  17. Global cytosine methylation in Daphnia magna depends on genotype, environment, and their interaction.

    PubMed

    Asselman, Jana; De Coninck, Dieter I M; Vandegehuchte, Michiel B; Jansen, Mieke; Decaestecker, Ellen; De Meester, Luc; Vanden Bussche, Julie; Vanhaecke, Lynn; Janssen, Colin R; De Schamphelaere, Karel A C

    2015-05-01

    The authors characterized global cytosine methylation levels in 2 different genotypes of the ecotoxicological model organism Daphnia magna after exposure to a wide array of biotic and abiotic environmental stressors. The present study aimed to improve the authors' understanding of the role of cytosine methylation in the organism's response to environmental conditions. The authors observed a significant genotype effect, an environment effect, and a genotype × environment effect. In particular, global cytosine methylation levels were significantly altered after exposure to Triops predation cues, Microcystis, and sodium chloride compared with control conditions. Significant differences between the 2 genotypes were observed when animals were exposed to Triops predation cues, Microcystis, Cryptomonas, and sodium chloride. Despite the low global methylation rate under control conditions (0.49-0.52%), global cytosine methylation levels upon exposure to Triops demonstrated a 5-fold difference between the genotypes (0.21% vs 1.02%). No effects were found in response to arsenic, cadmium, fish, lead, pH of 5.5, pH of 8, temperature, hypoxia, and white fat cell disease. The authors' results point to the potential role of epigenetic effects under changing environmental conditions such as predation (i.e., Triops), diet (i.e., Cryptomonas and Microcystis), and salinity. The results of the present study indicate that, despite global cytosine methylation levels being low, epigenetic effects may be important in environmental studies on Daphnia.

  18. Improved reproducibility in genome-wide DNA methylation analysis for PAXgene-fixed samples compared with restored formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded DNA.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Gitte Brinch; Hager, Henrik; Hansen, Lise Lotte; Tost, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Formalin fixation has been the standard method for conservation of clinical specimens for decades. However, a major drawback is the high degradation of nucleic acids, which complicates its use in genome-wide analyses. Unbiased identification of biomarkers, however, requires genome-wide studies, precluding the use of the valuable archives of specimens with long-term follow-up data. Therefore, restoration protocols for DNA from formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples have been developed, although they are cost-intensive and time-consuming. An alternative to FFPE and snap-freezing is the PAXgene Tissue System, developed for simultaneous preservation of morphology, proteins, and nucleic acids. In the current study, we compared the performance of DNA from either PAXgene or formalin-fixed tissues to snap-frozen material for genome-wide DNA methylation analysis using the Illumina 450K BeadChip. Quantitative DNA methylation analysis demonstrated that the methylation profile in PAXgene-fixed tissues showed, in comparison with restored FFPE samples, a higher concordance with the profile detected in frozen samples. We demonstrate, for the first time, that DNA from PAXgene conserved tissue performs better compared with restored FFPE DNA in genome-wide DNA methylation analysis. In addition, DNA from PAXgene tissue can be directly used on the array without prior restoration, rendering the analytical process significantly more time- and cost-effective.

  19. Cytosine methylation of an ancient satellite family in the wild beet Beta procumbens.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Martin; Hense, Sarah; Minoche, André E; Dohm, Juliane C; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Schmidt, Thomas; Zakrzewski, Falk

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is an essential epigenetic feature for the regulation and maintenance of heterochromatin. Satellite DNA is a repetitive sequence component that often occurs in large arrays in heterochromatin of subtelomeric, intercalary and centromeric regions. Knowledge about the methylation status of satellite DNA is important for understanding the role of repetitive DNA in heterochromatization. In this study, we investigated the cytosine methylation of the ancient satellite family pEV in the wild beet Beta procumbens. The pEV satellite is widespread in species-specific pEV subfamilies in the genus Beta and most likely originated before the radiation of the Betoideae and Chenopodioideae. In B. procumbens, the pEV subfamily occurs abundantly and spans intercalary and centromeric regions. To uncover its cytosine methylation, we performed chromosome-wide immunostaining and bisulfite sequencing of pEV satellite repeats. We found that CG and CHG sites are highly methylated while CHH sites show only low levels of methylation. As a consequence of the low frequency of CG and CHG sites and the preferential occurrence of most cytosines in the CHH motif in pEV monomers, this satellite family displays only low levels of total cytosine methylation.

  20. Cytosine methylation of an ancient satellite family in the wild beet Beta procumbens.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Martin; Hense, Sarah; Minoche, André E; Dohm, Juliane C; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Schmidt, Thomas; Zakrzewski, Falk

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is an essential epigenetic feature for the regulation and maintenance of heterochromatin. Satellite DNA is a repetitive sequence component that often occurs in large arrays in heterochromatin of subtelomeric, intercalary and centromeric regions. Knowledge about the methylation status of satellite DNA is important for understanding the role of repetitive DNA in heterochromatization. In this study, we investigated the cytosine methylation of the ancient satellite family pEV in the wild beet Beta procumbens. The pEV satellite is widespread in species-specific pEV subfamilies in the genus Beta and most likely originated before the radiation of the Betoideae and Chenopodioideae. In B. procumbens, the pEV subfamily occurs abundantly and spans intercalary and centromeric regions. To uncover its cytosine methylation, we performed chromosome-wide immunostaining and bisulfite sequencing of pEV satellite repeats. We found that CG and CHG sites are highly methylated while CHH sites show only low levels of methylation. As a consequence of the low frequency of CG and CHG sites and the preferential occurrence of most cytosines in the CHH motif in pEV monomers, this satellite family displays only low levels of total cytosine methylation. PMID:24994030

  1. Role of DNA methylation in growth and differentiation in Physcomitrella patens and characterization of cytosine DNA methyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Malik, Garima; Dangwal, Meenakshi; Kapoor, Sanjay; Kapoor, Meenu

    2012-11-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation are known to regulate important developmental processes in higher eukaryotes. However, little is known about the necessity and role of this process in early land plants. Using the methyltransferase (MTase) inhibitor zebularine (1-(β-d-ribofuranosyl)-1,2-dihydropyrimidine-2-one), the impact of loss of genome-wide methylation on the overall development in Physcomitrella patens was analyzed. It is observed that various aspects of growth and differentiation during gametophyte development become aberrant. A search for the core molecular components of methylation machinery, cytosine DNA MTases, revealed the presence of seven loci in the P. patens genome. Five of the loci code for MTases that are similar to corresponding proteins in higher plants, while two MTases appear specific to P. patens and are closely related to human DNMT3a and DNMT3b, respectively. These proteins possess all the conserved catalytic motifs characteristic of MTases and a domain of unknown function, DUF3444. Association of these highly conserved motifs with a DUF has not been reported in any of the MTases known so far. All the seven genes are differentially but ubiquitously expressed in gametophytes at low levels. Subcellular localization of GFP-fused proteins shows patterns of distribution that can be correlated with their putative cellular functions. This work bridges the knowledge of MTases in P. patens and makes this simple model plant accessible for studies on epigenetic aspects that remain intractable in higher plants.

  2. Global DNA cytosine methylation as an evolving trait: phylogenetic signal and correlated evolution with genome size in angiosperms

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Conchita; Pérez, Ricardo; Bazaga, Pilar; Herrera, Carlos M.

    2015-01-01

    DNA cytosine methylation is a widespread epigenetic mechanism in eukaryotes, and plant genomes commonly are densely methylated. Genomic methylation can be associated with functional consequences such as mutational events, genomic instability or altered gene expression, but little is known on interspecific variation in global cytosine methylation in plants. In this paper, we compare global cytosine methylation estimates obtained by HPLC and use a phylogenetically-informed analytical approach to test for significance of evolutionary signatures of this trait across 54 angiosperm species in 25 families. We evaluate whether interspecific variation in global cytosine methylation is statistically related to phylogenetic distance and also whether it is evolutionarily correlated with genome size (C-value). Global cytosine methylation varied widely between species, ranging between 5.3% (Arabidopsis) and 39.2% (Narcissus). Differences between species were related to their evolutionary trajectories, as denoted by the strong phylogenetic signal underlying interspecific variation. Global cytosine methylation and genome size were evolutionarily correlated, as revealed by the significant relationship between the corresponding phylogenetically independent contrasts. On average, a ten-fold increase in genome size entailed an increase of about 10% in global cytosine methylation. Results show that global cytosine methylation is an evolving trait in angiosperms whose evolutionary trajectory is significantly linked to changes in genome size, and suggest that the evolutionary implications of epigenetic mechanisms are likely to vary between plant lineages. PMID:25688257

  3. Genome-wide epigenetic alterations in cloned bovine fetuses.

    PubMed

    Cezar, Gabriela Gebrin; Bartolomei, Marisa S; Forsberg, Erik J; First, Neal L; Bishop, Michael D; Eilertsen, Kenneth J

    2003-03-01

    To gain a better understanding of global methylation differences associated with development of nuclear transfer (NT)-generated cattle, we analyzed the genome-wide methylation status of spontaneously aborted cloned fetuses, cloned fetuses, and adult clones that were derived from transgenic and nontransgenic cumulus, genital ridge, and body cell lines. Cloned fetuses were recovered from ongoing normal pregnancies and were morphologically normal. Fetuses generated by artificial insemination (AI) were used as controls. In vitro fertilization (IVF) fetuses were compared with AI controls to assess effects of in vitro culture on the 5-methylcytosine content of fetal genomes. All of the fetuses were female. Skin biopsies were obtained from cloned and AI-generated adult cows. All of the adult clones were phenotypically normal and lactating and had no history of health or reproductive disorders. Genome-wide cytosine methylation levels were monitored by reverse-phase HPLC, and results indicated reduced levels of methylated cytosine in NT-generated fetuses. In contrast, no differences were observed between adult, lactating clones and similarly aged lactating cows produced by AI. These data imply that survivability of cloned cattle may be closely related to the global DNA methylation status. This is the first report to indicate that global methylation losses may contribute to the developmental failure of cloned bovine fetuses. PMID:12604655

  4. A genome-wide search for eigenetically regulated genes in zebra finch using MethylCap-seq and RNA-seq

    PubMed Central

    Steyaert, Sandra; Diddens, Jolien; Galle, Jeroen; De Meester, Ellen; De Keulenaer, Sarah; Bakker, Antje; Sohnius-Wilhelmi, Nina; Frankl-Vilches, Carolina; Van der Linden, Annemie; Van Criekinge, Wim; Vanden Berghe, Wim; De Meyer, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Learning and memory formation are known to require dynamic CpG (de)methylation and gene expression changes. Here, we aimed at establishing a genome-wide DNA methylation map of the zebra finch genome, a model organism in neuroscience, as well as identifying putatively epigenetically regulated genes. RNA- and MethylCap-seq experiments were performed on two zebra finch cell lines in presence or absence of 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine induced demethylation. First, the MethylCap-seq methodology was validated in zebra finch by comparison with RRBS-generated data. To assess the influence of (variable) methylation on gene expression, RNA-seq experiments were performed as well. Comparison of RNA-seq and MethylCap-seq results showed that at least 357 of the 3,457 AZA-upregulated genes are putatively regulated by methylation in the promoter region, for which a pathway analysis showed remarkable enrichment for neurological networks. A subset of genes was validated using Exon Arrays, quantitative RT-PCR and CpG pyrosequencing on bisulfite-treated samples. To our knowledge, this study provides the first genome-wide DNA methylation map of the zebra finch genome as well as a comprehensive set of genes of which transcription is under putative methylation control. PMID:26864856

  5. Cytosine Methylation Alteration in Natural Populations of Leymus chinensis Induced by Multiple Abiotic Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yingjie; Yang, Xuejiao; Wang, Huaying; Shi, Fengxue; Liu, Ying; Liu, Jushan; Li, Linfeng; Wang, Deli; Liu, Bao

    2013-01-01

    Background Human activity has a profound effect on the global environment and caused frequent occurrence of climatic fluctuations. To survive, plants need to adapt to the changing environmental conditions through altering their morphological and physiological traits. One known mechanism for phenotypic innovation to be achieved is environment-induced rapid yet inheritable epigenetic changes. Therefore, the use of molecular techniques to address the epigenetic mechanisms underpinning stress adaptation in plants is an important and challenging topic in biological research. In this study, we investigated the impact of warming, nitrogen (N) addition, and warming+nitrogen (N) addition stresses on the cytosine methylation status of Leymus chinensis Tzvel. at the population level by using the amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP), methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP) and retrotransposon based sequence-specific amplification polymorphism (SSAP) techniques. Methodology/Principal Findings Our results showed that, although the percentages of cytosine methylation changes in SSAP are significantly higher than those in MSAP, all the treatment groups showed similar alteration patterns of hypermethylation and hypomethylation. It meant that the abiotic stresses have induced the alterations in cytosine methylation patterns, and the levels of cytosine methylation changes around the transposable element are higher than the other genomic regions. In addition, the identification and analysis of differentially methylated loci (DML) indicated that the abiotic stresses have also caused targeted methylation changes at specific loci and these DML might have contributed to the capability of plants in adaptation to the abiotic stresses. Conclusions/Significance Our results demonstrated that abiotic stresses related to global warming and nitrogen deposition readily evoke alterations of cytosine methylation, and which may provide a molecular basis for rapid adaptation by

  6. Genome Wide Methylome Alterations in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Mullapudi, Nandita; Ye, Bin; Suzuki, Masako; Fazzari, Melissa; Han, Weiguo; Shi, Miao K; Marquardt, Gaby; Lin, Juan; Wang, Tao; Keller, Steven; Zhu, Changcheng; Locker, Joseph D; Spivack, Simon D

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant cytosine 5-methylation underlies many deregulated elements of cancer. Among paired non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC), we sought to profile DNA 5-methyl-cytosine features which may underlie genome-wide deregulation. In one of the more dense interrogations of the methylome, we sampled 1.2 million CpG sites from twenty-four NSCLC tumor (T)-non-tumor (NT) pairs using a methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme- based HELP-microarray assay. We found 225,350 differentially methylated (DM) sites in adenocarcinomas versus adjacent non-tumor tissue that vary in frequency across genomic compartment, particularly notable in gene bodies (GB; p<2.2E-16). Further, when DM was coupled to differential transcriptome (DE) in the same samples, 37,056 differential loci in adenocarcinoma emerged. Approximately 90% of the DM-DE relationships were non-canonical; for example, promoter DM associated with DE in the same direction. Of the canonical changes noted, promoter (PR) DM loci with reciprocal changes in expression in adenocarcinomas included HBEGF, AGER, PTPRM, DPT, CST1, MELK; DM GB loci with concordant changes in expression included FOXM1, FERMT1, SLC7A5, and FAP genes. IPA analyses showed adenocarcinoma-specific promoter DMxDE overlay identified familiar lung cancer nodes [tP53, Akt] as well as less familiar nodes [HBEGF, NQO1, GRK5, VWF, HPGD, CDH5, CTNNAL1, PTPN13, DACH1, SMAD6, LAMA3, AR]. The unique findings from this study include the discovery of numerous candidate The unique findings from this study include the discovery of numerous candidate methylation sites in both PR and GB regions not previously identified in NSCLC, and many non-canonical relationships to gene expression. These DNA methylation features could potentially be developed as risk or diagnostic biomarkers, or as candidate targets for newer methylation locus-targeted preventive or therapeutic agents. PMID:26683690

  7. Genome Wide Methylome Alterations in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Masako; Fazzari, Melissa; Han, Weiguo; Shi, Miao K.; Marquardt, Gaby; Lin, Juan; Wang, Tao; Keller, Steven; Zhu, Changcheng; Locker, Joseph D.; Spivack, Simon D.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant cytosine 5-methylation underlies many deregulated elements of cancer. Among paired non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC), we sought to profile DNA 5-methyl-cytosine features which may underlie genome-wide deregulation. In one of the more dense interrogations of the methylome, we sampled 1.2 million CpG sites from twenty-four NSCLC tumor (T)–non-tumor (NT) pairs using a methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme- based HELP-microarray assay. We found 225,350 differentially methylated (DM) sites in adenocarcinomas versus adjacent non-tumor tissue that vary in frequency across genomic compartment, particularly notable in gene bodies (GB; p<2.2E-16). Further, when DM was coupled to differential transcriptome (DE) in the same samples, 37,056 differential loci in adenocarcinoma emerged. Approximately 90% of the DM-DE relationships were non-canonical; for example, promoter DM associated with DE in the same direction. Of the canonical changes noted, promoter (PR) DM loci with reciprocal changes in expression in adenocarcinomas included HBEGF, AGER, PTPRM, DPT, CST1, MELK; DM GB loci with concordant changes in expression included FOXM1, FERMT1, SLC7A5, and FAP genes. IPA analyses showed adenocarcinoma-specific promoter DMxDE overlay identified familiar lung cancer nodes [tP53, Akt] as well as less familiar nodes [HBEGF, NQO1, GRK5, VWF, HPGD, CDH5, CTNNAL1, PTPN13, DACH1, SMAD6, LAMA3, AR]. The unique findings from this study include the discovery of numerous candidate The unique findings from this study include the discovery of numerous candidate methylation sites in both PR and GB regions not previously identified in NSCLC, and many non-canonical relationships to gene expression. These DNA methylation features could potentially be developed as risk or diagnostic biomarkers, or as candidate targets for newer methylation locus-targeted preventive or therapeutic agents. PMID:26683690

  8. The role of cytosine methylation on charge transport through a DNA strand

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Jianqing Anantram, M. P.; Govind, Niranjan

    2015-09-07

    Cytosine methylation has been found to play a crucial role in various biological processes, including a number of human diseases. The detection of this small modification remains challenging. In this work, we computationally explore the possibility of detecting methylated DNA strands through direct electrical conductance measurements. Using density functional theory and the Landauer-Büttiker method, we study the electronic properties and charge transport through an eight base-pair methylated DNA strand and its native counterpart. We first analyze the effect of cytosine methylation on the tight-binding parameters of two DNA strands and then model the transmission of the electrons and conductance through the strands both with and without decoherence. We find that the main difference of the tight-binding parameters between the native DNA and the methylated DNA lies in the on-site energies of (methylated) cytosine bases. The intra- and inter-strand hopping integrals between two nearest neighboring guanine base and (methylated) cytosine base also change with the addition of the methyl groups. Our calculations show that in the phase-coherent limit, the transmission of the methylated strand is close to the native strand when the energy is nearby the highest occupied molecular orbital level and larger than the native strand by 5 times in the bandgap. The trend in transmission also holds in the presence of the decoherence with the same rate. The lower conductance for the methylated strand in the experiment is suggested to be caused by the more stable structure due to the introduction of the methyl groups. We also study the role of the exchange-correlation functional and the effect of contact coupling by choosing coupling strengths ranging from weak to strong coupling limit.

  9. The role of cytosine methylation on charge transport through a DNA strand.

    PubMed

    Qi, Jianqing; Govind, Niranjan; Anantram, M P

    2015-09-01

    Cytosine methylation has been found to play a crucial role in various biological processes, including a number of human diseases. The detection of this small modification remains challenging. In this work, we computationally explore the possibility of detecting methylated DNA strands through direct electrical conductance measurements. Using density functional theory and the Landauer-Büttiker method, we study the electronic properties and charge transport through an eight base-pair methylated DNA strand and its native counterpart. We first analyze the effect of cytosine methylation on the tight-binding parameters of two DNA strands and then model the transmission of the electrons and conductance through the strands both with and without decoherence. We find that the main difference of the tight-binding parameters between the native DNA and the methylated DNA lies in the on-site energies of (methylated) cytosine bases. The intra- and inter-strand hopping integrals between two nearest neighboring guanine base and (methylated) cytosine base also change with the addition of the methyl groups. Our calculations show that in the phase-coherent limit, the transmission of the methylated strand is close to the native strand when the energy is nearby the highest occupied molecular orbital level and larger than the native strand by 5 times in the bandgap. The trend in transmission also holds in the presence of the decoherence with the same rate. The lower conductance for the methylated strand in the experiment is suggested to be caused by the more stable structure due to the introduction of the methyl groups. We also study the role of the exchange-correlation functional and the effect of contact coupling by choosing coupling strengths ranging from weak to strong coupling limit. PMID:26342369

  10. The role of cytosine methylation on charge transport through a DNA strand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Jianqing; Govind, Niranjan; Anantram, M. P.

    2015-09-01

    Cytosine methylation has been found to play a crucial role in various biological processes, including a number of human diseases. The detection of this small modification remains challenging. In this work, we computationally explore the possibility of detecting methylated DNA strands through direct electrical conductance measurements. Using density functional theory and the Landauer-Büttiker method, we study the electronic properties and charge transport through an eight base-pair methylated DNA strand and its native counterpart. We first analyze the effect of cytosine methylation on the tight-binding parameters of two DNA strands and then model the transmission of the electrons and conductance through the strands both with and without decoherence. We find that the main difference of the tight-binding parameters between the native DNA and the methylated DNA lies in the on-site energies of (methylated) cytosine bases. The intra- and inter-strand hopping integrals between two nearest neighboring guanine base and (methylated) cytosine base also change with the addition of the methyl groups. Our calculations show that in the phase-coherent limit, the transmission of the methylated strand is close to the native strand when the energy is nearby the highest occupied molecular orbital level and larger than the native strand by 5 times in the bandgap. The trend in transmission also holds in the presence of the decoherence with the same rate. The lower conductance for the methylated strand in the experiment is suggested to be caused by the more stable structure due to the introduction of the methyl groups. We also study the role of the exchange-correlation functional and the effect of contact coupling by choosing coupling strengths ranging from weak to strong coupling limit.

  11. Genomic DNA sequence and cytosine methylation changes of adult rice leaves after seeds space flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jinming

    In this study, cytosine methylation on CCGG site and genomic DNA sequence changes of adult leaves of rice after seeds space flight were detected by methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism (MSAP) and Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) technique respectively. Rice seeds were planted in the trial field after 4 days space flight on the shenzhou-6 Spaceship of China. Adult leaves of space-treated rice including 8 plants chosen randomly and 2 plants with phenotypic mutation were used for AFLP and MSAP analysis. Polymorphism of both DNA sequence and cytosine methylation were detected. For MSAP analysis, the average polymorphic frequency of the on-ground controls, space-treated plants and mutants are 1.3%, 3.1% and 11% respectively. For AFLP analysis, the average polymorphic frequencies are 1.4%, 2.9%and 8%respectively. Total 27 and 22 polymorphic fragments were cloned sequenced from MSAP and AFLP analysis respectively. Nine of the 27 fragments from MSAP analysis show homology to coding sequence. For the 22 polymorphic fragments from AFLP analysis, no one shows homology to mRNA sequence and eight fragments show homology to repeat region or retrotransposon sequence. These results suggest that although both genomic DNA sequence and cytosine methylation status can be effected by space flight, the genomic region homology to the fragments from genome DNA and cytosine methylation analysis were different.

  12. De novo cytosine methylation in the differentiating macronucleus of the stichotrichous ciliate Stylonychia lemnae

    PubMed Central

    Juranek, Stefan; Wieden, Hans-Joachim; Lipps, Hans J.

    2003-01-01

    Dramatic DNA reorganization and elimination processes occur during macronuclear differentiation in ciliates. In this study we analyzed whether cytosine methylation of specific sequences plays a functional role during DNA rearrangement. Three classes of sequences, macronuclear-destined sequences (MDSs, pCE7), members from a large family of transposon-like elements and micronuclear-specific sequences (pLJ01), differing in their structure and future destiny during nuclear differentiation, were studied in the micronucleus, the developing macronucleus and, when present, in the mature macronucleus. While the MDSs become processed to a 1.1 and 1.3 kb gene-sized macronuclear DNA molecule, the family of transposon-like elements represented by MaA81 becomes removed late in the course of polytene chromosome formation. The micronuclear-specific sequence pLJ01 is eliminated together with bulk micronuclear DNA during degradation of polytene chromosomes. No methylated cytosine could be detected in the vegetative macronucleus and no difference in methylation pattern was observed either between micronucleus and developing macronucleus in MDSs or in a micronuclear-specific sequence. However, a significant percentage of the cytosines contained in the transposon-like element becomes methylated de novo in the course of macronuclear differentiation. This is the first demonstration that cytosine methylation in specific sequences occurs during macronuclear differentiation and may provide a first step towards understanding epigenetic factors involved in DNA processing. PMID:12595545

  13. Cytosine methylation and hydroxymethylation mark DNA for elimination in Oxytricha trifallax

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cytosine methylation of DNA is conserved across eukaryotes and plays important functional roles regulating gene expression during differentiation and development in animals, plants and fungi. Hydroxymethylation was recently identified as another epigenetic modification marking genes important for pluripotency in embryonic stem cells. Results Here we describe de novo cytosine methylation and hydroxymethylation in the ciliate Oxytricha trifallax. These DNA modifications occur only during nuclear development and programmed genome rearrangement. We detect methylcytosine and hydroxymethylcytosine directly by high-resolution nano-flow UPLC mass spectrometry, and indirectly by immunofluorescence, methyl-DNA immunoprecipitation and bisulfite sequencing. We describe these modifications in three classes of eliminated DNA: germline-limited transposons and satellite repeats, aberrant DNA rearrangements, and DNA from the parental genome undergoing degradation. Methylation and hydroxymethylation generally occur on the same sequence elements, modifying cytosines in all sequence contexts. We show that the DNA methyltransferase-inhibiting drugs azacitidine and decitabine induce demethylation of both somatic and germline sequence elements during genome rearrangements, with consequent elevated levels of germline-limited repetitive elements in exconjugant cells. Conclusions These data strongly support a functional link between cytosine DNA methylation/hydroxymethylation and DNA elimination. We identify a motif strongly enriched in methylated/hydroxymethylated regions, and we propose that this motif recruits DNA modification machinery to specific chromosomes in the parental macronucleus. No recognizable methyltransferase enzyme has yet been described in O. trifallax, raising the possibility that it might employ a novel cytosine methylation machinery to mark DNA sequences for elimination during genome rearrangements. PMID:23075511

  14. The Role of Cytosine Methylation on Charge Transport through a DNA Strand

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Jianqing; Govind, Niranjan; Anantram, M. P.

    2015-09-04

    Cytosine methylation has been found to play a crucial role in various biological processes, including a number of human diseases. The detection of this small modifi-cation remains challenging. In this work, we computationally explore the possibility of detecting methylated DNA strands through direct electrical conductance measurements. Using density functional theory and the Landauer-Buttiker method, we study the electronic properties and charge transport through an eight base-pair methylated DNA strand and its native counterpart. Specifically, we compare the results generated with the widely used B3LYP exchange-correlation (XC) functional and CAM-B3LYP based tuned range-separated hybrid density functional. We first analyze the effect of cytosine methylation on the tight-binding parameters of two DNA strands and then model the transmission of the electrons and conductance through the strands both with and without decoherence. We find that with both functionals, the main difference of the tight-binding parameters between the native DNA and the methylated DNA lies in the on-site energies of (methylated) cytosine bases. The intra- and interstrand hopping integrals between two nearest neighboring guanine base and (methylated) cytosine base also change with the addition of the methyl groups. Our calculations show that in the phase-coherent limit, the transmission of the methylated strand is close to the native strand when the energy is nearby the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) level and larger than the native strand by 5 times in the bandgap. The trend in transmission also holds in the presence of the decoherence with both functionals. We also study the effect of contact coupling by choosing coupling strengths ranging from weak to strong coupling limit. Our results suggest that the effect of the two different functionals is to alter the on-site energies of the DNA bases at the HOMO level, while the transport properties don't depend much on the two functionals.

  15. 5'-Methyl-cytosine in the macronuclear DNA of Blepharisma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Salvini, M; Durante, M; Citti, L; Nobili, R

    1984-12-15

    Brief report on the presence of 5'-methyl-cytosine as a minor base (0.56%) in the macronuclear DNA of the ciliate protozoan Blepharisma japonicum. The evidence comes from electrophoresis of macronuclear DNA digested by appropriate restriction endonucleases and high-performance liquid chromatography.

  16. The effects of cytosine methylation on general transcription factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Jianshi; Lian, Tengfei; Gu, Chan; Yu, Kai; Gao, Yi Qin; Su, Xiao-Dong

    2016-07-01

    DNA methylation on CpG sites is the most common epigenetic modification. Recently, methylation in a non-CpG context was found to occur widely on genomic DNA. Moreover, methylation of non-CpG sites is a highly controlled process, and its level may vary during cellular development. To study non-CpG methylation effects on DNA/protein interactions, we have chosen three human transcription factors (TFs): glucocorticoid receptor (GR), brain and muscle ARNT-like 1 (BMAL1) - circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (CLOCK) and estrogen receptor (ER) with methylated or unmethylated DNA binding sequences, using single-molecule and isothermal titration calorimetry assays. The results demonstrated that these TFs interact with methylated DNA with different effects compared with their cognate DNA sequences. The effects of non-CpG methylation on transcriptional regulation were validated by cell-based luciferase assay at protein level. The mechanisms of non-CpG methylation influencing DNA-protein interactions were investigated by crystallographic analyses and molecular dynamics simulation. With BisChIP-seq assays in HEK-293T cells, we found that GR can recognize highly methylated sites within chromatin in cells. Therefore, we conclude that non-CpG methylation of DNA can provide a mechanism for regulating gene expression through directly affecting the binding of TFs.

  17. The effects of cytosine methylation on general transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jianshi; Lian, Tengfei; Gu, Chan; Yu, Kai; Gao, Yi Qin; Su, Xiao-Dong

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation on CpG sites is the most common epigenetic modification. Recently, methylation in a non-CpG context was found to occur widely on genomic DNA. Moreover, methylation of non-CpG sites is a highly controlled process, and its level may vary during cellular development. To study non-CpG methylation effects on DNA/protein interactions, we have chosen three human transcription factors (TFs): glucocorticoid receptor (GR), brain and muscle ARNT-like 1 (BMAL1) - circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (CLOCK) and estrogen receptor (ER) with methylated or unmethylated DNA binding sequences, using single-molecule and isothermal titration calorimetry assays. The results demonstrated that these TFs interact with methylated DNA with different effects compared with their cognate DNA sequences. The effects of non-CpG methylation on transcriptional regulation were validated by cell-based luciferase assay at protein level. The mechanisms of non-CpG methylation influencing DNA-protein interactions were investigated by crystallographic analyses and molecular dynamics simulation. With BisChIP-seq assays in HEK-293T cells, we found that GR can recognize highly methylated sites within chromatin in cells. Therefore, we conclude that non-CpG methylation of DNA can provide a mechanism for regulating gene expression through directly affecting the binding of TFs. PMID:27385050

  18. The effects of cytosine methylation on general transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jianshi; Lian, Tengfei; Gu, Chan; Yu, Kai; Gao, Yi Qin; Su, Xiao-Dong

    2016-07-07

    DNA methylation on CpG sites is the most common epigenetic modification. Recently, methylation in a non-CpG context was found to occur widely on genomic DNA. Moreover, methylation of non-CpG sites is a highly controlled process, and its level may vary during cellular development. To study non-CpG methylation effects on DNA/protein interactions, we have chosen three human transcription factors (TFs): glucocorticoid receptor (GR), brain and muscle ARNT-like 1 (BMAL1) - circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (CLOCK) and estrogen receptor (ER) with methylated or unmethylated DNA binding sequences, using single-molecule and isothermal titration calorimetry assays. The results demonstrated that these TFs interact with methylated DNA with different effects compared with their cognate DNA sequences. The effects of non-CpG methylation on transcriptional regulation were validated by cell-based luciferase assay at protein level. The mechanisms of non-CpG methylation influencing DNA-protein interactions were investigated by crystallographic analyses and molecular dynamics simulation. With BisChIP-seq assays in HEK-293T cells, we found that GR can recognize highly methylated sites within chromatin in cells. Therefore, we conclude that non-CpG methylation of DNA can provide a mechanism for regulating gene expression through directly affecting the binding of TFs.

  19. Genome-wide identification of mononuclear cell DNA methylation sites potentially affected by fish oil supplementation in young infants: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Lind, M V; Martino, D; Harsløf, L B S; Kyjovska, Z O; Kristensen, M; Lauritzen, L

    2015-10-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the effects of n-3LCPUFA might be mediated through epigenetic mechanisms, especially DNA-methylation, during pregnancy and early life. A randomized trial was conducted in 133 9-mo-old, infants who received 3.8g/day of fish oil (FO) or sunflower oil (SO) for 9 mo. In a subset of 12 children, buffy-coat DNA was extracted before and after intervention and analyzed on Illumina-Human-Methylation 450-arrays to explore genome-wide differences between the FO and SO groups. Genome-wide-methylation analysis did not reveal significant differences between groups after adjustment for multiple testing. However, analysis of the top-ranked CpG-sites revealed 43 CpG׳s that appear modified with an absolute difference in methylation of ≥10%. Methylation levels at these sites were associated with phenotypic changes mainly in blood pressure. In conclusion, our analyses suggest potential epigenome effects that might be associated with functional outcomes, yet the effect sizes were small and should be verified by additional investigation. PMID:26254087

  20. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis of neuroblastic tumors reveals clinically relevant epigenetic events and large-scale epigenomic alterations localized to telomeric regions.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Patrick G; Das, Sudipto; Bryan, Kenneth; Watters, Karen M; Alcock, Leah; Koster, Jan; Versteeg, Rogier; Stallings, Raymond L

    2011-05-15

    The downregulation of specific genes through DNA hypermethylation is a major hallmark of cancer, although the extent and genomic distribution of hypermethylation occurring within cancer genomes is poorly understood. We report on the first genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation alterations in different neuroblastic tumor subtypes and cell lines, revealing higher order organization and clinically relevant alterations of the epigenome. The methylation status of 33,485 discrete loci representing all annotated CpG islands and RefSeq gene promoters was assessed in primary neuroblastic tumors and cell lines. A comparison of genes that were hypermethylated exclusively in the clinically favorable ganglioneuroma/ganglioneuroblastoma tumors revealed that nine genes were associated with poor clinical outcome when overexpressed in the unfavorable neuroblastoma (NB) tumors. Moreover, an integrated DNA methylation and copy number analysis identified 80 genes that were recurrently concomitantly deleted and hypermethylated in NB, with 37 reactivated by 5-aza-deoxycytidine. Lower expression of four of these genes was correlated with poor clinical outcome, further implicating their inactivation in aggressive disease pathogenesis. Analysis of genome-wide hypermethylation patterns revealed 70 recurrent large-scale blocks of contiguously hypermethylated promoters/CpG islands, up to 590 kb in length, with a distribution bias toward telomeric regions. Genome-wide hypermethylation events in neuroblastic tumors are extensive and frequently occur in large-scale blocks with a significant bias toward telomeric regions, indicating that some methylation alterations have occurred in a coordinated manner. Our results indicate that methylation contributes toward the clinicopathological features of neuroblastic tumors, revealing numerous genes associated with poor patient survival in NB.

  1. Paramutation of the r1 locus of maize is associated with increased cytosine methylation.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, E L

    1998-01-01

    In paramutation two alleles of a gene interact so that one of the alleles is epigenetically silenced. The silenced state is then genetically transmissible for many generations. The large (220 kbp) multigenic complex R-r is paramutable: its level of expression is changed during paramutation. R-r was found to exhibit increases in its level of cytosine methylation (C-methylation) following paramutation. These C-methylation changes are localized to the 5' portions of the two genes in the complex that are most sensitive to paramutation. These methylation changes flank a small region called sigma that is thought to have been derived from a transposon named doppia. A mutant derivative of R-r that has a deletion of the sigma region fails to become methylated under conditions in which R-r is heavily methylated. This suggests that the presence of sigma sequences at the locus is required for the methylation changes that are observed following paramutation. PMID:9560410

  2. Genome-wide identification of endogenous RNA-directed DNA methylation loci associated with abundant 21-nucleotide siRNAs in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jian-Hua; Fang, Yuan-Yuan; Duan, Cheng-Guo; Fang, Rong-Xiang; Ding, Shou-Wei; Guo, Hui-Shan

    2016-01-01

    In Arabidopsis, the 24-nucleotide (nt) small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) mediates RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) and transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) of transposable elements (TEs). In the present study, we examined genome-wide changes in DNA methylation and siRNA accumulation in Arabidopsis induced by expression of the Cucumber mosaic virus silencing suppressor protein 2b known to directly bind to both the 21/24-nt siRNAs as well as their associated Argonaute proteins. We demonstrated a genome-wide reduction of CHH and CHG methylation in the 2b-transgenic plants. We found that 2b suppressed RdDM not only at the previously annotated loci directed by 24-nt siRNAs but also a new set of loci associated with 21/22-nt siRNAs. Further analysis showed that the reduced methylation of TEs and coding genes targeted by 21/22-nt siRNAs was associated with sequestration of the duplex siRNAs by the 2b protein but not with changes in either siRNA production or transcription. Notably, we detected both the deletion and/or the transposition of multicopy TEs associated with 2b-induced hypomethylation, suggesting potential TE reactivation. We propose that the silencing of many TEs in Arabidopsis is controlled by the 24- and 21-nt endogenous siRNAs analogous to Drosophila TE silencing by PIWI-interacting RNAs and siRNAs. PMID:27786269

  3. Genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation before-and after exercise in the thoroughbred horse with MeDIP-Seq.

    PubMed

    Gim, Jeong-An; Hong, Chang Pyo; Kim, Dae-Soo; Moon, Jae-Woo; Choi, Yuri; Eo, Jungwoo; Kwon, Yun-Jeong; Lee, Ja-Rang; Jung, Yi-Deun; Bae, Jin-Han; Choi, Bong-Hwan; Ko, Junsu; Song, Sanghoon; Ahn, Kung; Ha, Hong-Seok; Yang, Young Mok; Lee, Hak-Kyo; Park, Kyung-Do; Do, Kyoung-Tag; Han, Kyudong; Yi, Joo Mi; Cha, Hee-Jae; Ayarpadikannan, Selvam; Cho, Byung-Wook; Bhak, Jong; Kim, Heui-Soo

    2015-03-01

    Athletic performance is an important criteria used for the selection of superior horses. However, little is known about exercise-related epigenetic processes in the horse. DNA methylation is a key mechanism for regulating gene expression in response to environmental changes. We carried out comparative genomic analysis of genome-wide DNA methylation profiles in the blood samples of two different thoroughbred horses before and after exercise by methylated-DNA immunoprecipitation sequencing (MeDIP-Seq). Differentially methylated regions (DMRs) in the pre-and post-exercise blood samples of superior and inferior horses were identified. Exercise altered the methylation patterns. After 30 min of exercise, 596 genes were hypomethylated and 715 genes were hypermethylated in the superior horse, whereas in the inferior horse, 868 genes were hypomethylated and 794 genes were hypermethylated. These genes were analyzed based on gene ontology (GO) annotations and the exercise-related pathway patterns in the two horses were compared. After exercise, gene regions related to cell division and adhesion were hypermethylated in the superior horse, whereas regions related to cell signaling and transport were hypermethylated in the inferior horse. Analysis of the distribution of methylated CpG islands confirmed the hypomethylation in the gene-body methylation regions after exercise. The methylation patterns of transposable elements also changed after exercise. Long interspersed nuclear elements (LINEs) showed abundance of DMRs. Collectively, our results serve as a basis to study exercise-based reprogramming of epigenetic traits.

  4. Genome-wide profiling of DNA methylation provides insights into epigenetic regulation of fungal development in a plant pathogenic fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Junhyun; Choi, Jaeyoung; Lee, Gir-Won; Park, Sook-Young; Huh, Aram; Dean, Ralph A; Lee, Yong-Hwan

    2015-02-24

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic modification that regulates development of plants and mammals. To investigate the roles of DNA methylation in fungal development, we profiled genome-wide methylation patterns at single-nucleotide resolution during vegetative growth, asexual reproduction, and infection-related morphogenesis in a model plant pathogenic fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae. We found that DNA methylation occurs in and around genes as well as transposable elements and undergoes global reprogramming during fungal development. Such reprogramming of DNA methylation suggests that it may have acquired new roles other than controlling the proliferation of TEs. Genetic analysis of DNA methyltransferase deletion mutants also indicated that proper reprogramming in methylomes is required for asexual reproduction in the fungus. Furthermore, RNA-seq analysis showed that DNA methylation is associated with transcriptional silencing of transposable elements and transcript abundance of genes in context-dependent manner, reinforcing the role of DNA methylation as a genome defense mechanism. This comprehensive approach suggests that DNA methylation in fungi can be a dynamic epigenetic entity contributing to fungal development and genome defense. Furthermore, our DNA methylomes provide a foundation for future studies exploring this key epigenetic modification in fungal development and pathogenesis.

  5. An analytical pipeline for genomic representations used for cytosine methylation studies

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Reid F.; Reimers, Mark; Khulan, Batbayar; Gissot, Mathieu; Richmond, Todd A.; Chen, Quan; Zheng, Xin; Kim, Kami

    2016-01-01

    Motivation Representations of the genome can be generated by the selection of a subpopulation of restriction fragments using ligation-mediated PCR. Such representations form the basis for a number of high-throughput assays, including the HELP assay to study cytosine methylation. We find that HELP data analysis is complicated not only by PCR amplification heterogeneity but also by a complex and variable distribution of cytosine methylation. To address this, we created an analytical pipeline and novel normalization approach that improves concordance between microarray-derived data and single locus validation results, demonstrating the value of the analytical approach. A major influence on the PCR amplification is the size of the restriction fragment, requiring a quantile normalization approach that reduces the influence of fragment length on signal intensity. Here we describe all of the components of the pipeline, which can also be applied to data derived from other assays based on genomic representations. PMID:18353789

  6. Evolving insights on how cytosine methylation affects protein–DNA binding

    PubMed Central

    Dantas Machado, Ana Carolina; Zhou, Tianyin; Rao, Satyanarayan; Goel, Pragya; Rastogi, Chaitanya; Lazarovici, Allan; Bussemaker, Harmen J.

    2015-01-01

    Many anecdotal observations exist of a regulatory effect of DNA methylation on gene expression. However, in general, the underlying mechanisms of this effect are poorly understood. In this review, we summarize what is currently known about how this important, but mysterious, epigenetic mark impacts cellular functions. Cytosine methylation can abrogate or enhance interactions with DNA-binding proteins, or it may have no effect, depending on the context. Despite being only a small chemical change, the addition of a methyl group to cytosine can affect base readout via hydrophobic contacts in the major groove and shape readout via electrostatic contacts in the minor groove. We discuss the recent discovery that CpG methylation increases DNase I cleavage at adjacent positions by an order of magnitude through altering the local 3D DNA shape and the possible implications of this structural insight for understanding the methylation sensitivity of transcription factors (TFs). Additionally, 5-methylcytosines change the stability of nucleosomes and, thus, affect the local chromatin structure and access of TFs to genomic DNA. Given these complexities, it seems unlikely that the influence of DNA methylation on protein–DNA binding can be captured in a small set of general rules. Hence, data-driven approaches may be essential to gain a better understanding of these mechanisms. PMID:25319759

  7. Double restriction-enzyme digestion improves the coverage and accuracy of genome-wide CpG methylation profiling by reduced representation bisulfite sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Reduced representation bisulfite sequencing (RRBS) was developed to measure DNA methylation of high-CG regions at single base-pair resolution, and has been widely used because of its minimal DNA requirements and cost efficacy; however, the CpG coverage of genomic regions is restricted and important regions with low-CG will be ignored in DNA methylation profiling. This method could be improved to generate a more comprehensive representation. Results Based on in silico simulation of enzyme digestion of human and mouse genomes, we have optimized the current single-enzyme RRBS by applying double enzyme digestion in the library construction to interrogate more representative regions. CpG coverage of genomic regions was considerably increased in both high-CG and low-CG regions using the double-enzyme RRBS method, leading to more accurate detection of their average methylation levels and identification of differential methylation regions between samples. We also applied this double-enzyme RRBS method to comprehensively analyze the CpG methylation profiles of two colorectal cancer cell lines. Conclusion The double-enzyme RRBS increases the CpG coverage of genomic regions considerably over the previous single-enzyme RRBS method, leading to more accurate detection of their average methylation levels. It will facilitate genome-wide DNA methylation studies in multiple and complex clinical samples. PMID:23324053

  8. Genome-Wide Estimates of Mutation Rates and Spectrum in Schizosaccharomyces pombe Indicate CpG Sites are Highly Mutagenic Despite the Absence of DNA Methylation.

    PubMed

    Behringer, Megan G; Hall, David W

    2015-11-12

    We accumulated mutations for 1952 generations in 79 initially identical, haploid lines of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and then performed whole-genome sequencing to determine the mutation rates and spectrum. We captured 696 spontaneous mutations across the 79 mutation accumulation (MA) lines. We compared the mutation spectrum and rate to a recently published equivalent experiment on the same species, and to another model ascomycetous yeast, the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. While the two species are approximately 600 million years diverged from each other, they share similar life histories, genome size and genomic G/C content. We found that Sc. pombe and S. cerevisiae have similar mutation rates, but Sc. pombe exhibits a stronger insertion bias. Intriguingly, we observed an increased mutation rate at cytosine nucleotides, specifically CpG nucleotides, which is also seen in S. cerevisiae. However, the absence of methylation in Sc. pombe and the pattern of mutation at these sites, primarily C → A as opposed to C → T, strongly suggest that the increased mutation rate is not caused by deamination of methylated cytosines. This result implies that the high mutability of CpG dinucleotides in other species may be caused in part by a methylation-independent mechanism. Many of our findings mirror those seen in the recent study, despite the use of different passaging conditions, indicating that MA is a reliable method for estimating mutation rates and spectra.

  9. Genome-Wide Estimates of Mutation Rates and Spectrum in Schizosaccharomyces pombe Indicate CpG Sites are Highly Mutagenic Despite the Absence of DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Behringer, Megan G.; Hall, David W.

    2015-01-01

    We accumulated mutations for 1952 generations in 79 initially identical, haploid lines of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and then performed whole-genome sequencing to determine the mutation rates and spectrum. We captured 696 spontaneous mutations across the 79 mutation accumulation (MA) lines. We compared the mutation spectrum and rate to a recently published equivalent experiment on the same species, and to another model ascomycetous yeast, the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. While the two species are approximately 600 million years diverged from each other, they share similar life histories, genome size and genomic G/C content. We found that Sc. pombe and S. cerevisiae have similar mutation rates, but Sc. pombe exhibits a stronger insertion bias. Intriguingly, we observed an increased mutation rate at cytosine nucleotides, specifically CpG nucleotides, which is also seen in S. cerevisiae. However, the absence of methylation in Sc. pombe and the pattern of mutation at these sites, primarily C → A as opposed to C → T, strongly suggest that the increased mutation rate is not caused by deamination of methylated cytosines. This result implies that the high mutability of CpG dinucleotides in other species may be caused in part by a methylation-independent mechanism. Many of our findings mirror those seen in the recent study, despite the use of different passaging conditions, indicating that MA is a reliable method for estimating mutation rates and spectra. PMID:26564949

  10. Cytosine methylation of plastid genome in higher plants. Fact or artefact?

    PubMed

    Fojtová, M; Kovarík, A; Matyásek, R

    2001-03-01

    DNA methylation of chloroplast genome has been studied in a large variety of angiosperm species using restriction enzyme analysis of three genomic loci (totally encompassing about 10% of chloroplast genome) and bisulfite genomic sequencing of tobacco ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (large subunit) gene (rbcL). Except for CCWGG (W=A or T) sites that were partially refractory to the cleavage with methylation sensitive EcoRII in all loci, no cytosine methylation was found at the CCGG (MspI/HpaII) and several other restriction sites tested. However, EcoRII was unable to completely digest an unmethylated CCWGG site in the cloned rbcL gene on plasmid. Further a bisulfite genomic sequencing performed on EcoRII-restricted DNA failed to show any 5-methylcytosine either within or outside inspected EcoRII sites along the 3' end of rbcL coding region. In conclusion our results do not support evidence for methylated cytosine residues in plant chloroplast genomes and we suggest that results obtained with EcoRII should be interpreted with great care especially when small differences in methylation levels are analysed. PMID:11448733

  11. Genome wide analysis of DNA methylation and gene expression changes in the mouse lung following subchronic arsenate exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alterations in DNA methylation have been proposed as a mechanism for the complex toxicological effects of arsenic. In this study, whole genome DNA methylation and gene expression changes were evaluated in lungs from female mice exposed for 90 days to 50 ppm arsenate (As) in drink...

  12. Genome-wide DNA methylation profiling by modified reduced representation bisulfite sequencing in Brassica rapa suggests that epigenetic modifications play a key role in polyploid genome evolution.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xun; Ge, Xianhong; Wang, Jing; Tan, Chen; King, Graham J; Liu, Kede

    2015-01-01

    Brassica rapa includes some of the most important vegetables worldwide as well as oilseed crops. The complete annotated genome sequence confirmed its paleohexaploid origins and provides opportunities for exploring the detailed process of polyploid genome evolution. We generated a genome-wide DNA methylation profile for B. rapa using a modified reduced representation bisulfite sequencing (RRBS) method. This sampling represented 2.24% of all CG loci (2.5 × 10(5)), 2.16% CHG (2.7 × 10(5)), and 1.68% CHH loci (1.05 × 10(5)) (where H = A, T, or C). Our sampling of DNA methylation in B. rapa indicated that 52.4% of CG sites were present as (5m)CG, with 31.8% of CHG and 8.3% of CHH. It was found that genic regions of single copy genes had significantly higher methylation compared to those of two or three copy genes. Differences in degree of genic DNA methylation were observed in a hierarchical relationship corresponding to the relative age of the three ancestral subgenomes, primarily accounted by single-copy genes. RNA-seq analysis revealed that overall the level of transcription was negatively correlated with mean gene methylation content and depended on copy number or was associated with the different subgenomes. These results provide new insights into the role epigenetic variation plays in polyploid genome evolution, and suggest an alternative mechanism for duplicate gene loss.

  13. Genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation and gene expression patterns in purified, uncultured human liver cells and activated hepatic stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    Reiner, Andrew H.; Coll, Mar; Verhulst, Stefaan; Mannaerts, Inge; Øie, Cristina I.; Smedsrød, Bård; Najimi, Mustapha; Sokal, Etienne; Luttun, Aernout; Sancho-Bru, Pau; Collas, Philippe; van Grunsven, Leo A.

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Liver fibrogenesis – scarring of the liver that can lead to cirrhosis and liver cancer – is characterized by hepatocyte impairment, capillarization of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) and hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation. To date, the molecular determinants of a healthy human liver cell phenotype remain largely uncharacterized. Here, we assess the transcriptome and the genome-wide promoter methylome specific for purified, non-cultured human hepatocytes, LSECs and HSCs, and investigate the nature of epigenetic changes accompanying transcriptional changes associated with activation of HSCs. Material and methods Gene expression profile and promoter methylome of purified, uncultured human liver cells and culture-activated HSCs were respectively determined using Affymetrix HG-U219 genechips and by methylated DNA immunoprecipitation coupled to promoter array hybridization. Histone modification patterns were assessed at the single-gene level by chromatin immunoprecipitation and quantitative PCR. Results We unveil a DNA-methylation-based epigenetic relationship between hepatocytes, LSECs and HSCs despite their distinct ontogeny. We show that liver cell type-specific DNA methylation targets early developmental and differentiation-associated functions. Integrative analysis of promoter methylome and transcriptome reveals partial concordance between DNA methylation and transcriptional changes associated with human HSC activation. Further, we identify concordant histone methylation and acetylation changes in the promoter and putative novel enhancer elements of genes involved in liver fibrosis. Conclusions Our study provides the first epigenetic blueprint of three distinct freshly isolated, human hepatic cell types and of epigenetic changes elicited upon HSC activation. PMID:26353929

  14. Genome-wide DNA methylation profiling by modified reduced representation bisulfite sequencing in Brassica rapa suggests that epigenetic modifications play a key role in polyploid genome evolution

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xun; Ge, Xianhong; Wang, Jing; Tan, Chen; King, Graham J.; Liu, Kede

    2015-01-01

    Brassica rapa includes some of the most important vegetables worldwide as well as oilseed crops. The complete annotated genome sequence confirmed its paleohexaploid origins and provides opportunities for exploring the detailed process of polyploid genome evolution. We generated a genome-wide DNA methylation profile for B. rapa using a modified reduced representation bisulfite sequencing (RRBS) method. This sampling represented 2.24% of all CG loci (2.5 × 105), 2.16% CHG (2.7 × 105), and 1.68% CHH loci (1.05 × 105) (where H = A, T, or C). Our sampling of DNA methylation in B. rapa indicated that 52.4% of CG sites were present as 5mCG, with 31.8% of CHG and 8.3% of CHH. It was found that genic regions of single copy genes had significantly higher methylation compared to those of two or three copy genes. Differences in degree of genic DNA methylation were observed in a hierarchical relationship corresponding to the relative age of the three ancestral subgenomes, primarily accounted by single-copy genes. RNA-seq analysis revealed that overall the level of transcription was negatively correlated with mean gene methylation content and depended on copy number or was associated with the different subgenomes. These results provide new insights into the role epigenetic variation plays in polyploid genome evolution, and suggest an alternative mechanism for duplicate gene loss. PMID:26500672

  15. Genome-wide identification of DNA methylation provides insights into the association of gene expression in rice exposed to pesticide atrazine

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yi Chen; Feng, Sheng Jun; Zhang, Jing Jing; Luo, Fang; Zhang, Shuang; Yang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Atrazine (ATR) is a pesticide widely used for controlling weeds for crop production. Crop contamination with ATR negatively affects crop growth and development. This study presents the first genome-wide single-base-resolution maps of DNA methylation in ATR-exposed rice. Widespread differences were identified in CG and non-CG methylation marks between the ATR-exposed and ATR-free (control) rice. Most of DNA methyltransferases, histone methyltransferases and DNA demethylase were differentially regulated by ATR. We found more genes hypermethylated than those hypomethylated in the regions of upstream, genebody and downstream under ATR exposure. A stringent group of 674 genes (p < 0.05, two-fold change) with a strong preference of differential expression in ATR-exposed rice was identified. Some of the genes were identified in a subset of loss of function mutants defective in DNA methylation/demethylation. Provision of 5-azacytidine (AZA, inhibitor of DNA methylation) promoted the rice growth and reduced ATR content. By UPLC/Q-TOF-MS/MS, 8 degraded products and 9 conjugates of ATR in AZA-treated rice were characterized. Two of them has been newly identified in this study. Our data show that ATR-induced changes in DNA methylation marks are possibly involved in an epigenetic mechanism associated with activation of specific genes responsible for ATR degradation and detoxification. PMID:26739616

  16. Genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation during antagonism of DMOG to MnCl2-induced cytotoxicity in the mouse substantia nigra

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Nannan; Wei, Yang; Wang, Tan; Guo, Jifeng; Sun, Qiying; Hu, Yacen; Yan, Xinxiang; Zhu, Xiongwei; Tang, Beisha; Xu, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to excessive manganese (Mn) causes manganism, a progressive neurodegenerative disorder similar to idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (IPD). The detailed mechanisms of Mn neurotoxicity in nerve cells, especially in dopaminergic neurons are not yet fully understood. Meanwhile, it is unknown whether there exists a potential antagonist or effective drug for treating neuron damage in manganism. In the present study, we report the discovery of an HIF prolyl-hydroxylase inhibitor, DMOG [N-(2-Methoxy-2-oxoacetyl) glycine methyl ester], that can partially inhibit manganese toxicity not only in the neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y in vitro but also in a mouse model in vivo. A genome-wide methylation DNA analysis was performed using microarray hybridization. Intriguingly, DNA methylation in the promoter region of 226 genes was found to be regulated by MnCl2, while the methylation effects of MnCl2 could be restored with combinatorial DMOG treatment. Furthermore, we found that genes with converted promoter methylation during DMOG antagonism were associated across several categories of molecular function, including mitochondria integrity maintain, cell cycle and DNA damage response, and ion transportation. Collectively, our results serve as the basis of a mechanism analysis of neuron damage in manganism and may supply possible gene targets for clinical therapy. PMID:27380887

  17. Genome-wide DNA methylation profiling by modified reduced representation bisulfite sequencing in Brassica rapa suggests that epigenetic modifications play a key role in polyploid genome evolution.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xun; Ge, Xianhong; Wang, Jing; Tan, Chen; King, Graham J; Liu, Kede

    2015-01-01

    Brassica rapa includes some of the most important vegetables worldwide as well as oilseed crops. The complete annotated genome sequence confirmed its paleohexaploid origins and provides opportunities for exploring the detailed process of polyploid genome evolution. We generated a genome-wide DNA methylation profile for B. rapa using a modified reduced representation bisulfite sequencing (RRBS) method. This sampling represented 2.24% of all CG loci (2.5 × 10(5)), 2.16% CHG (2.7 × 10(5)), and 1.68% CHH loci (1.05 × 10(5)) (where H = A, T, or C). Our sampling of DNA methylation in B. rapa indicated that 52.4% of CG sites were present as (5m)CG, with 31.8% of CHG and 8.3% of CHH. It was found that genic regions of single copy genes had significantly higher methylation compared to those of two or three copy genes. Differences in degree of genic DNA methylation were observed in a hierarchical relationship corresponding to the relative age of the three ancestral subgenomes, primarily accounted by single-copy genes. RNA-seq analysis revealed that overall the level of transcription was negatively correlated with mean gene methylation content and depended on copy number or was associated with the different subgenomes. These results provide new insights into the role epigenetic variation plays in polyploid genome evolution, and suggest an alternative mechanism for duplicate gene loss. PMID:26500672

  18. MethylRAD: a simple and scalable method for genome-wide DNA methylation profiling using methylation-dependent restriction enzymes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shi; Lv, Jia; Zhang, Lingling; Dou, Jinzhuang; Sun, Yan; Li, Xue; Fu, Xiaoteng; Dou, Huaiqian; Mao, Junxia; Hu, Xiaoli; Bao, Zhenmin

    2015-11-01

    Characterization of dynamic DNA methylomes in diverse phylogenetic groups has attracted growing interest for a better understanding of the evolution of DNA methylation as well as its function and biological significance in eukaryotes. Sequencing-based methods are promising in fulfilling this task. However, none of the currently available methods offers the 'perfect solution', and they have limitations that prevent their application in the less studied phylogenetic groups. The recently discovered Mrr-like enzymes are appealing for new method development, owing to their ability to collect 32-bp methylated DNA fragments from the whole genome for high-throughput sequencing. Here, we have developed a simple and scalable DNA methylation profiling method (called MethylRAD) using Mrr-like enzymes. MethylRAD allows for de novo (reference-free) methylation analysis, extremely low DNA input (e.g. 1 ng) and adjustment of tag density, all of which are still unattainable for most widely used methylation profiling methods such as RRBS and MeDIP. We performed extensive analyses to validate the power and accuracy of our method in both model (plant Arabidopsis thaliana) and non-model (scallop Patinopecten yessoensis) species. We further demonstrated its great utility in identification of a gene (LPCAT1) that is potentially crucial for carotenoid accumulation in scallop adductor muscle. MethylRAD has several advantages over existing tools and fills a void in the current epigenomic toolkit by providing a universal tool that can be used for diverse research applications, e.g. from model to non-model species, from ordinary to precious samples and from small to large genomes, but at an affordable cost.

  19. MethylRAD: a simple and scalable method for genome-wide DNA methylation profiling using methylation-dependent restriction enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shi; Lv, Jia; Zhang, Lingling; Dou, Jinzhuang; Sun, Yan; Li, Xue; Fu, Xiaoteng; Dou, Huaiqian; Mao, Junxia; Hu, Xiaoli; Bao, Zhenmin

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of dynamic DNA methylomes in diverse phylogenetic groups has attracted growing interest for a better understanding of the evolution of DNA methylation as well as its function and biological significance in eukaryotes. Sequencing-based methods are promising in fulfilling this task. However, none of the currently available methods offers the ‘perfect solution’, and they have limitations that prevent their application in the less studied phylogenetic groups. The recently discovered Mrr-like enzymes are appealing for new method development, owing to their ability to collect 32-bp methylated DNA fragments from the whole genome for high-throughput sequencing. Here, we have developed a simple and scalable DNA methylation profiling method (called MethylRAD) using Mrr-like enzymes. MethylRAD allows for de novo (reference-free) methylation analysis, extremely low DNA input (e.g. 1 ng) and adjustment of tag density, all of which are still unattainable for most widely used methylation profiling methods such as RRBS and MeDIP. We performed extensive analyses to validate the power and accuracy of our method in both model (plant Arabidopsis thaliana) and non-model (scallop Patinopecten yessoensis) species. We further demonstrated its great utility in identification of a gene (LPCAT1) that is potentially crucial for carotenoid accumulation in scallop adductor muscle. MethylRAD has several advantages over existing tools and fills a void in the current epigenomic toolkit by providing a universal tool that can be used for diverse research applications, e.g. from model to non-model species, from ordinary to precious samples and from small to large genomes, but at an affordable cost. PMID:26581575

  20. Roux-En Y Gastric Bypass Surgery Induces Genome-Wide Promoter-Specific Changes in DNA Methylation in Whole Blood of Obese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Emil K.; Ernst, Barbara; Voisin, Sarah; Almén, Markus Sällman; Benedict, Christian; Mwinyi, Jessica; Fredriksson, Robert; Schultes, Bernd; Schiöth, Helgi B.

    2015-01-01

    Context DNA methylation has been proposed to play a critical role in many cellular and biological processes. Objective To examine the influence of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery on genome-wide promoter-specific DNA methylation in obese patients. Promoters are involved in the initiation and regulation of gene transcription. Methods Promoter-specific DNA methylation in whole blood was measured in 11 obese patients (presurgery BMI >35 kg/m2, 4 females), both before and 6 months after RYGB surgery, as well as once only in a control group of 16 normal-weight men. In addition, body weight and fasting plasma glucose were measured after an overnight fast. Results The mean genome-wide distance between promoter-specific DNA methylation of obese patients at six months after RYGB surgery and controls was shorter, as compared to that at baseline (p<0.001). Moreover, postsurgically, the DNA methylation of 51 promoters was significantly different from corresponding values that had been measured at baseline (28 upregulated and 23 downregulated, P<0.05 for all promoters, Bonferroni corrected). Among these promoters, an enrichment for genes involved in metabolic processes was found (n = 36, P<0.05). In addition, the mean DNA methylation of these 51 promoters was more similar after surgery to that of controls, than it had been at baseline (P<0.0001). When controlling for the RYGB surgery-induced drop in weight (-24% of respective baseline value) and fasting plasma glucose concentration (-16% of respective baseline value), the DNA methylation of only one out of 51 promoters (~2%) remained significantly different between the pre-and postsurgery time points. Conclusions Epigenetic modifications are proposed to play an important role in the development of and predisposition to metabolic diseases, including type II diabetes and obesity. Thus, our findings may form the basis for further investigations to unravel the molecular effects of gastric bypass surgery. Clinical Trial

  1. Cytosine DNA methylation is found in Drosophila melanogaster but absent in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and other yeast species.

    PubMed

    Capuano, Floriana; Mülleder, Michael; Kok, Robert; Blom, Henk J; Ralser, Markus

    2014-04-15

    The methylation of cytosine to 5-methylcytosine (5-meC) is an important epigenetic DNA modification in many bacteria, plants, and mammals, but its relevance for important model organisms, including Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster, is still equivocal. By reporting the presence of 5-meC in a broad variety of wild, laboratory, and industrial yeasts, a recent study also challenged the dogma about the absence of DNA methylation in yeast species. We would like to bring to attention that the protocol used for gas chromatography/mass spectrometry involved hydrolysis of the DNA preparations. As this process separates cytosine and 5-meC from the sugar phosphate backbone, this method is unable to distinguish DNA- from RNA-derived 5-meC. We employed an alternative LC-MS/MS protocol where by targeting 5-methyldeoxycytidine moieties after enzymatic digestion, only 5-meC specifically derived from DNA is quantified. This technique unambiguously identified cytosine DNA methylation in Arabidopsis thaliana (14.0% of cytosines methylated), Mus musculus (7.6%), and Escherichia coli (2.3%). Despite achieving a detection limit at 250 attomoles (corresponding to <0.00002 methylated cytosines per nonmethylated cytosine), we could not confirm any cytosine DNA methylation in laboratory and industrial strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Saccharomyces boulardii, Saccharomyces paradoxus, or Pichia pastoris. The protocol however unequivocally confirmed DNA methylation in adult Drosophila melanogaster at a value (0.034%) that is up to 2 orders of magnitude below the detection limit of bisulphite sequencing. Thus, 5-meC is a rare DNA modification in drosophila but absent in yeast.

  2. 5-methyl-cytosine and 5-hydroxy-methyl-cytosine in the genome of Biomphalaria glabrata, a snail intermediate host of Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Biomphalaria glabrata is the mollusc intermediate host for Schistosoma mansoni, a digenean flatworm parasite that causes human intestinal schistosomiasis. An estimated 200 million people in 74 countries suffer from schistosomiasis, in terms of morbidity this is the most severe tropical disease after malaria. Epigenetic information informs on the status of gene activity that is heritable, for which changes are reversible and that is not based on the DNA sequence. Epigenetic mechanisms generate variability that provides a source for potentially heritable phenotypic variation and therefore could be involved in the adaptation to environmental constraint. Phenotypic variations are particularly important in host-parasite interactions in which both selective pressure and rate of evolution are high. In this context, epigenetic changes are expected to be major drivers of phenotypic plasticity and co-adaptation between host and parasite. Consequently, with characterization of the genomes of invertebrates that are parasite vectors or intermediate hosts, it is also essential to understand how the epigenetic machinery functions to better decipher the interplay between host and parasite. Methods The CpGo/e ratios were used as a proxy to investigate the occurrence of CpG methylation in B. glabrata coding regions. The presence of DNA methylation in B. glabrata was also confirmed by several experimental approaches: restriction enzymatic digestion with isoschizomers, bisulfite conversion based techniques and LC-MS/MS analysis. Results In this work, we report that DNA methylation, which is one of the carriers of epigenetic information, occurs in B. glabrata; approximately 2% of cytosine nucleotides are methylated. We describe the methylation machinery of B. glabrata. Methylation occurs predominantly at CpG sites, present at high ratios in coding regions of genes associated with housekeeping functions. We also demonstrate by bisulfite treatment that methylation occurs in

  3. Effects of antenatal synthetic glucocorticoid on glucocorticoid receptor binding, DNA methylation, and genome-wide mRNA levels in the fetal male hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Crudo, Ariann; Petropoulos, Sophie; Suderman, Matthew; Moisiadis, Vasilis G; Kostaki, Alisa; Hallett, Michael; Szyf, Moshe; Matthews, Stephen G

    2013-11-01

    The endogenous glucocorticoid (GC) surge in late gestation plays a vital role in maturation of several organ systems. For this reason, pregnant women at risk of preterm labor are administered synthetic glucocorticoids (sGCs) to promote fetal lung development. Animal studies have shown that fetal sGC exposure can cause life-long changes in endocrine and metabolic function. We have previously shown that antenatal sGC treatment is associated with alterations in global DNA methylation and modifications to the hippocampal methylome and acetylome. In this study, we hypothesized that: 1) there are changes in the transcriptional landscape of the fetal hippocampus in late gestation, associated with the endogenous cortisol surge; 2) fetal sGC exposure alters genome-wide transcription in the hippocampus; and 3) these changes in transcription are associated with modified glucocorticoid receptor (GR) DNA binding and DNA methylation. sGC was administered as 2 courses on gestational days (GD) 40, 41, 50, and 51, and the hippocampi of fetal guinea pigs were examined before (GD52) and after (GD65) the endogenous cortisol surge (Term ∼GD67). We also analyzed fetal hippocampi 24 hours and 14 days following maternal sGC injections (n = 3-4/group). Genome-wide modification of transcription and GR DNA binding occurred in late gestation, in parallel with the normal GC surge. Further, sGC exposure had a substantial impact on the hippocampal transcriptome, GR-DNA binding, and DNA methylation at 24 hours and 14 days following the final sGC treatment. These data support the hypothesis that GC exposure in late gestation plays a significant role in modifying the transcriptional and epigenetic landscape of the developing fetal hippocampus and that substantial effects are evident for at least 2 weeks after sGC exposure.

  4. Genome-wide survey reveals predisposing diabetes type 2-related DNA methylation variations in human peripheral blood.

    PubMed

    Toperoff, Gidon; Aran, Dvir; Kark, Jeremy D; Rosenberg, Michael; Dubnikov, Tatyana; Nissan, Batel; Wainstein, Julio; Friedlander, Yechiel; Levy-Lahad, Ephrat; Glaser, Benjamin; Hellman, Asaf

    2012-01-15

    Inter-individual DNA methylation variations were frequently hypothesized to alter individual susceptibility to Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM). Sequence-influenced methylations were described in T2DM-associated genomic regions, but evidence for direct, sequence-independent association with disease risk is missing. Here, we explore disease-contributing DNA methylation through a stepwise study design: first, a pool-based, genome-scale screen among 1169 case and control individuals revealed an excess of differentially methylated sites in genomic regions that were previously associated with T2DM through genetic studies. Next, in-depth analyses were performed at selected top-ranking regions. A CpG site in the first intron of the FTO gene showed small (3.35%) but significant (P = 0.000021) hypomethylation of cases relative to controls. The effect was independent of the sequence polymorphism in the region and persists among individuals carrying the sequence-risk alleles. The odds of belonging to the T2DM group increased by 6.1% for every 1% decrease in methylation (OR = 1.061, 95% CI: 1.032-1.090), the odds ratio for decrease of 1 standard deviation of methylation (adjusted to gender) was 1.5856 (95% CI: 1.2824-1.9606) and the sensitivity (area under the curve = 0.638, 95% CI: 0.586-0.690; males = 0.675, females = 0.609) was better than that of the strongest known sequence variant. Furthermore, a prospective study in an independent population cohort revealed significant hypomethylation of young individuals that later progressed to T2DM, relative to the individuals who stayed healthy. Further genomic analysis revealed co-localization with gene enhancers and with binding sites for methylation-sensitive transcriptional regulators. The data showed that low methylation level at the analyzed sites is an early marker of T2DM and suggests a novel mechanism by which early-onset, inter-individual methylation variation at isolated non-promoter genomic sites predisposes to T2DM.

  5. Effects of cytosine methylation on DNA morphology: An atomic force microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Cassina, V; Manghi, M; Salerno, D; Tempestini, A; Iadarola, V; Nardo, L; Brioschi, S; Mantegazza, F

    2016-01-01

    Methylation is one of the most important epigenetic mechanisms in eukaryotes. As a consequence of cytosine methylation, the binding of proteins that are implicated in transcription to gene promoters is severely hindered, which results in gene regulation and, eventually, gene silencing. To date, the mechanisms by which methylation biases the binding affinities of proteins to DNA are not fully understood; however, it has been proposed that changes in double-strand conformations, such as stretching, bending, and over-twisting, as well as local variations in DNA stiffness/flexibility may play a role. The present work investigates, at the single molecule level, the morphological consequences of DNA methylation in vitro. By tracking the atomic force microscopy images of single DNA molecules, we characterize DNA conformations pertaining to two different degrees of methylation. In particular, we observe that methylation induces no relevant variations in DNA contour lengths, but produces measurable incremental changes in persistence lengths. Furthermore, we observe that for the methylated chains, the statistical distribution of angles along the DNA coordinate length is characterized by a double exponential decay, in agreement with what is predicted for polyelectrolytes. The results reported herein support the claim that the biological consequences of the methylation process, specifically difficulties in protein-DNA binding, are at least partially due to DNA conformation modifications.

  6. Genome-Wide DNA Methylation as an Epigenetic Consequence of Epstein-Barr Virus Infection of Immortalized Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Birdwell, Christine E.; Queen, Krista J.; Kilgore, Phillip C. S. R.; Rollyson, Phoebe; Trutschl, Marjan; Cvek, Urska

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The oral cavity is a persistent reservoir for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) with lifelong infection of resident epithelial and B cells. Infection of these cell types results in distinct EBV gene expression patterns regulated by epigenetic modifications involving DNA methylation and chromatin structure. Regulation of EBV gene expression relies on viral manipulation of the host epigenetic machinery that may result in long-lasting host epigenetic reprogramming. To identify epigenetic events following EBV infection, a transient infection model was established to map epigenetic changes in telomerase-immortalized oral keratinocytes. EBV-infected oral keratinocytes exhibited a predominantly latent viral gene expression program with some lytic or abortive replication. Calcium and methylcellulose-induced differentiation was delayed in EBV-positive clones and in clones that lost EBV compared to uninfected controls, indicating a functional consequence of EBV epigenetic modifications. Analysis of global cellular DNA methylation identified over 13,000 differentially methylated CpG residues in cells exposed to EBV compared to uninfected controls, with CpG island hypermethylation observed at several cellular genes. Although the vast majority of the DNA methylation changes were silent, 65 cellular genes that acquired CpG methylation showed altered transcript levels. Genes with increased transcript levels frequently acquired DNA methylation within the gene body while those with decreased transcript levels acquired DNA methylation near the transcription start site. Treatment with the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, decitabine, restored expression of some hypermethylated genes in EBV-infected and EBV-negative transiently infected clones. Overall, these observations suggested that EBV infection of keratinocytes leaves a lasting epigenetic imprint that can enhance the tumorigenic phenotype of infected cells. IMPORTANCE Here, we show that EBV infection of oral keratinocytes led to

  7. A Genome-Wide Scan Reveals Important Roles of DNA Methylation in Human Longevity by Regulating Age-Related Disease Genes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qi-Gang; Wu, Huan; Luo, Long-Hai; Kong, Qing-Peng

    2015-01-01

    It is recognized that genetic factors contribute to human longevity. Besides the hypothesis of existence of longevity genes, another suggests that a lower frequency of risk alleles decreases the incidence of age-related diseases in the long-lived people. However, the latter finds no support from recent genetic studies. Considering the crucial role of epigenetic modification in gene regulation, we then hypothesize that suppressing disease-related genes in longevity individuals is likely achieved by epigenetic modification, e.g. DNA methylation. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the genome-wide methylation profile in 4 Chinese female centenarians and 4 middle-aged controls using methyl-DNA immunoprecipitation sequencing. 626 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) were observed between both groups. Interestingly, genes with these DMRs were enriched in age-related diseases, including type-2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, stroke and Alzheimer’s disease. This pattern remains rather stable after including methylomes of two white individuals. Further analyses suggest that the observed DMRs likely have functional roles in regulating disease-associated gene expressions, with some genes [e.g. caspase 3 (CASP3)] being down-regulated whereas the others [i.e. interleukin 1 receptor, type 2 (IL1R2)] up-regulated. Therefore, our study suggests that suppressing the disease-related genes via epigenetic modification is an important contributor to human longevity. PMID:25793257

  8. Decoding the Regulatory Landscape of Ageing in Musculoskeletal Engineered Tissues Using Genome-Wide DNA Methylation and RNASeq.

    PubMed

    Peffers, Mandy Jayne; Goljanek-Whysall, Katarzyna; Collins, John; Fang, Yongxiang; Rushton, Michael; Loughlin, John; Proctor, Carole; Clegg, Peter David

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are capable of multipotent differentiation into connective tissues and as such are an attractive source for autologous cell-based regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. Epigenetic mechanisms, like DNA methylation, contribute to the changes in gene expression in ageing. However there was a lack of sufficient knowledge of the role that differential methylation plays during chondrogenic, osteogenic and tenogenic differentiation from ageing MSCs. This study undertook genome level determination of the effects of DNA methylation on expression in engineered tissues from chronologically aged MSCs. We compiled unique DNA methylation signatures from chondrogenic, osteogenic, and tenogenic engineered tissues derived from young; n = 4 (21.8 years ± 2.4 SD) and old; n = 4 (65.5 years±8.3SD) human MSCs donors using the Illumina HumanMethylation 450 Beadchip arrays and compared these to gene expression by RNA sequencing. Unique and common signatures of global DNA methylation were identified. There were 201, 67 and 32 chondrogenic, osteogenic and tenogenic age-related DE protein-coding genes respectively. Findings inferred the nature of the transcript networks was predominantly for 'cell death and survival', 'cell morphology', and 'cell growth and proliferation'. Further studies are required to validate if this gene expression effect translates to cell events. Alternative splicing (AS) was dysregulated in ageing with 119, 21 and 9 differential splicing events identified in chondrogenic, osteogenic and tenogenic respectively, and enrichment in genes associated principally with metabolic processes. Gene ontology analysis of differentially methylated loci indicated age-related enrichment for all engineered tissue types in 'skeletal system morphogenesis', 'regulation of cell proliferation' and 'regulation of transcription' suggesting that dynamic epigenetic modifications may occur in genes associated with shared and distinct pathways dependent

  9. Decoding the Regulatory Landscape of Ageing in Musculoskeletal Engineered Tissues Using Genome-Wide DNA Methylation and RNASeq

    PubMed Central

    Peffers, Mandy Jayne; Goljanek-Whysall, Katarzyna; Collins, John; Fang, Yongxiang; Rushton, Michael; Loughlin, John; Proctor, Carole; Clegg, Peter David

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are capable of multipotent differentiation into connective tissues and as such are an attractive source for autologous cell-based regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. Epigenetic mechanisms, like DNA methylation, contribute to the changes in gene expression in ageing. However there was a lack of sufficient knowledge of the role that differential methylation plays during chondrogenic, osteogenic and tenogenic differentiation from ageing MSCs. This study undertook genome level determination of the effects of DNA methylation on expression in engineered tissues from chronologically aged MSCs. We compiled unique DNA methylation signatures from chondrogenic, osteogenic, and tenogenic engineered tissues derived from young; n = 4 (21.8 years ± 2.4 SD) and old; n = 4 (65.5 years±8.3SD) human MSCs donors using the Illumina HumanMethylation 450 Beadchip arrays and compared these to gene expression by RNA sequencing. Unique and common signatures of global DNA methylation were identified. There were 201, 67 and 32 chondrogenic, osteogenic and tenogenic age-related DE protein-coding genes respectively. Findings inferred the nature of the transcript networks was predominantly for ‘cell death and survival’, ‘cell morphology’, and ‘cell growth and proliferation’. Further studies are required to validate if this gene expression effect translates to cell events. Alternative splicing (AS) was dysregulated in ageing with 119, 21 and 9 differential splicing events identified in chondrogenic, osteogenic and tenogenic respectively, and enrichment in genes associated principally with metabolic processes. Gene ontology analysis of differentially methylated loci indicated age-related enrichment for all engineered tissue types in ‘skeletal system morphogenesis’, ‘regulation of cell proliferation’ and ‘regulation of transcription’ suggesting that dynamic epigenetic modifications may occur in genes associated with shared and

  10. Removal of deaminated cytosines and detection of in vivo methylation in ancient DNA.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Adrian W; Stenzel, Udo; Meyer, Matthias; Krause, Johannes; Kircher, Martin; Pääbo, Svante

    2010-04-01

    DNA sequences determined from ancient organisms have high error rates, primarily due to uracil bases created by cytosine deamination. We use synthetic oligonucleotides, as well as DNA extracted from mammoth and Neandertal remains, to show that treatment with uracil-DNA-glycosylase and endonuclease VIII removes uracil residues from ancient DNA and repairs most of the resulting abasic sites, leaving undamaged parts of the DNA fragments intact. Neandertal DNA sequences determined with this protocol have greatly increased accuracy. In addition, our results demonstrate that Neandertal DNA retains in vivo patterns of CpG methylation, potentially allowing future studies of gene inactivation and imprinting in ancient organisms.

  11. Removal of deaminated cytosines and detection of in vivo methylation in ancient DNA.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Adrian W; Stenzel, Udo; Meyer, Matthias; Krause, Johannes; Kircher, Martin; Pääbo, Svante

    2010-04-01

    DNA sequences determined from ancient organisms have high error rates, primarily due to uracil bases created by cytosine deamination. We use synthetic oligonucleotides, as well as DNA extracted from mammoth and Neandertal remains, to show that treatment with uracil-DNA-glycosylase and endonuclease VIII removes uracil residues from ancient DNA and repairs most of the resulting abasic sites, leaving undamaged parts of the DNA fragments intact. Neandertal DNA sequences determined with this protocol have greatly increased accuracy. In addition, our results demonstrate that Neandertal DNA retains in vivo patterns of CpG methylation, potentially allowing future studies of gene inactivation and imprinting in ancient organisms. PMID:20028723

  12. Removal of deaminated cytosines and detection of in vivo methylation in ancient DNA

    PubMed Central

    Briggs, Adrian W.; Stenzel, Udo; Meyer, Matthias; Krause, Johannes; Kircher, Martin; Pääbo, Svante

    2010-01-01

    DNA sequences determined from ancient organisms have high error rates, primarily due to uracil bases created by cytosine deamination. We use synthetic oligonucleotides, as well as DNA extracted from mammoth and Neandertal remains, to show that treatment with uracil–DNA–glycosylase and endonuclease VIII removes uracil residues from ancient DNA and repairs most of the resulting abasic sites, leaving undamaged parts of the DNA fragments intact. Neandertal DNA sequences determined with this protocol have greatly increased accuracy. In addition, our results demonstrate that Neandertal DNA retains in vivo patterns of CpG methylation, potentially allowing future studies of gene inactivation and imprinting in ancient organisms. PMID:20028723

  13. Methylation of either cytosine in the recognition sequence CGCG inhibits ThaI cleavage of DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Strobl, J S; Thompson, E B

    1984-01-01

    ThaI (CGCG) sites which overlap HhaI (GCGC) sites in phi X174 and pBR322 DNA were methylated in vitro with HhaI methylase and S-adenosylmethionine to yield CGmCG, mCGCG or mCGmCG (5-methylcytosine, mC). Methylation of either cytosine in the ThaI recognition sequence rendered the DNA resistant to ThaI cleavage. Rat pituitary cell genomic DNA was digested with ThaI or 2 other known methylation-sensitive enzymes, AvaI or XhoI. After electrophoresis and ethidium bromide straining of the DNA, all 3 enzymes showed the infrequent DNA cleavage characteristic of methylation-sensitive enzymes. Comparison of pituitary growth hormone (GH) genes bearing strain-specific degrees of methylation showed the less methylated gene to be more frequently cut by either AvaI or ThaI. ThaI resistant sites in GH genes were cleaved by ThaI after exposing cells to 5-azacytidine, an inhibitor of DNA methylation. We conclude that ThaI is a useful restriction enzyme for the analysis of mC at CGCG sequences in eukaryotic DNA. Images PMID:6209609

  14. Trans-ancestry genome-wide association study identifies 12 genetic loci influencing blood pressure and implicates a role for DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Kato, Norihiro; Loh, Marie; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Verweij, Niek; Wang, Xu; Zhang, Weihua; Kelly, Tanika N; Saleheen, Danish; Lehne, Benjamin; Mateo Leach, Irene; Drong, Alexander W; Abbott, James; Wahl, Simone; Tan, Sian-Tsung; Scott, William R; Campanella, Gianluca; Chadeau-Hyam, Marc; Afzal, Uzma; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Bonder, Marc Jan; Chen, Peng; Dehghan, Abbas; Edwards, Todd L; Esko, Tõnu; Go, Min Jin; Harris, Sarah E; Hartiala, Jaana; Kasela, Silva; Kasturiratne, Anuradhani; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Kleber, Marcus E; Li, Huaixing; Mok, Zuan Yu; Nakatochi, Masahiro; Sapari, Nur Sabrina; Saxena, Richa; Stewart, Alexandre F R; Stolk, Lisette; Tabara, Yasuharu; Teh, Ai Ling; Wu, Ying; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Zhang, Yi; Aits, Imke; Da Silva Couto Alves, Alexessander; Das, Shikta; Dorajoo, Rajkumar; Hopewell, Jemma C; Kim, Yun Kyoung; Koivula, Robert W; Luan, Jian'an; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Nguyen, Quang N; Pereira, Mark A; Postmus, Iris; Raitakari, Olli T; Bryan, Molly Scannell; Scott, Robert A; Sorice, Rossella; Tragante, Vinicius; Traglia, Michela; White, Jon; Yamamoto, Ken; Zhang, Yonghong; Adair, Linda S; Ahmed, Alauddin; Akiyama, Koichi; Asif, Rasheed; Aung, Tin; Barroso, Inês; Bjonnes, Andrew; Braun, Timothy R; Cai, Hui; Chang, Li-Ching; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Chong, Yap-Seng; Collins, Rory; Courtney, Regina; Davies, Gail; Delgado, Graciela; Do, Loi D; Doevendans, Pieter A; Gansevoort, Ron T; Gao, Yu-Tang; Grammer, Tanja B; Grarup, Niels; Grewal, Jagvir; Gu, Dongfeng; Wander, Gurpreet S; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hazen, Stanley L; He, Jing; Heng, Chew-Kiat; Hixson, James E; Hofman, Albert; Hsu, Chris; Huang, Wei; Husemoen, Lise L N; Hwang, Joo-Yeon; Ichihara, Sahoko; Igase, Michiya; Isono, Masato; Justesen, Johanne M; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Kim, Young Jin; Kishimoto, Miyako; Koh, Woon-Puay; Kohara, Katsuhiko; Kumari, Meena; Kwek, Kenneth; Lee, Nanette R; Lee, Jeannette; Liao, Jiemin; Lieb, Wolfgang; Liewald, David C M; Matsubara, Tatsuaki; Matsushita, Yumi; Meitinger, Thomas; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Mills, Rebecca; Mononen, Nina; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nabika, Toru; Nakashima, Eitaro; Ng, Hong Kiat; Nikus, Kjell; Nutile, Teresa; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Ohnaka, Keizo; Parish, Sarah; Paternoster, Lavinia; Peng, Hao; Peters, Annette; Pham, Son T; Pinidiyapathirage, Mohitha J; Rahman, Mahfuzar; Rakugi, Hiromi; Rolandsson, Olov; Rozario, Michelle Ann; Ruggiero, Daniela; Sala, Cinzia F; Sarju, Ralhan; Shimokawa, Kazuro; Snieder, Harold; Sparsø, Thomas; Spiering, Wilko; Starr, John M; Stott, David J; Stram, Daniel O; Sugiyama, Takao; Szymczak, Silke; Tang, W H Wilson; Tong, Lin; Trompet, Stella; Turjanmaa, Väinö; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Uitterlinden, André G; Umemura, Satoshi; Vaarasmaki, Marja; van Dam, Rob M; van Gilst, Wiek H; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Viikari, Jorma S; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wang, Yiqin; Wang, Aili; Wilson, Rory; Wong, Tien-Yin; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Yamaguchi, Shuhei; Ye, Xingwang; Young, Robin D; Young, Terri L; Yuan, Jian-Min; Zhou, Xueya; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Ciullo, Marina; Clarke, Robert; Deloukas, Panos; Franke, Andre; Franks, Paul W; Franks, Steve; Friedlander, Yechiel; Gross, Myron D; Guo, Zhirong; Hansen, Torben; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jørgensen, Torben; Jukema, J Wouter; Kähönen, Mika; Kajio, Hiroshi; Kivimaki, Mika; Lee, Jong-Young; Lehtimäki, Terho; Linneberg, Allan; Miki, Tetsuro; Pedersen, Oluf; Samani, Nilesh J; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Toniolo, Daniela; Ahsan, Habibul; Allayee, Hooman; Chen, Yuan-Tsong; Danesh, John; Deary, Ian J; Franco, Oscar H; Franke, Lude; Heijman, Bastiaan T; Holbrook, Joanna D; Isaacs, Aaron; Kim, Bong-Jo; Lin, Xu; Liu, Jianjun; März, Winfried; Metspalu, Andres; Mohlke, Karen L; Sanghera, Dharambir K; Shu, Xiao-Ou; van Meurs, Joyce B J; Vithana, Eranga; Wickremasinghe, Ananda R; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H W; Yokota, Mitsuhiro; Zheng, Wei; Zhu, Dingliang; Vineis, Paolo; Kyrtopoulos, Soterios A; Kleinjans, Jos C S; McCarthy, Mark I; Soong, Richie; Gieger, Christian; Scott, James; Teo, Yik-Ying; He, Jiang; Elliott, Paul; Tai, E Shyong; van der Harst, Pim; Kooner, Jaspal S; Chambers, John C

    2015-11-01

    We carried out a trans-ancestry genome-wide association and replication study of blood pressure phenotypes among up to 320,251 individuals of East Asian, European and South Asian ancestry. We find genetic variants at 12 new loci to be associated with blood pressure (P = 3.9 × 10(-11) to 5.0 × 10(-21)). The sentinel blood pressure SNPs are enriched for association with DNA methylation at multiple nearby CpG sites, suggesting that, at some of the loci identified, DNA methylation may lie on the regulatory pathway linking sequence variation to blood pressure. The sentinel SNPs at the 12 new loci point to genes involved in vascular smooth muscle (IGFBP3, KCNK3, PDE3A and PRDM6) and renal (ARHGAP24, OSR1, SLC22A7 and TBX2) function. The new and known genetic variants predict increased left ventricular mass, circulating levels of NT-proBNP, and cardiovascular and all-cause mortality (P = 0.04 to 8.6 × 10(-6)). Our results provide new evidence for the role of DNA methylation in blood pressure regulation. PMID:26390057

  15. Genome-Wide Analysis of DNA Methylation, Copy Number Variation, and Gene Expression in Monozygotic Twins Discordant for Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Selmi, Carlo; Cavaciocchi, Francesca; Lleo, Ana; Cheroni, Cristina; De Francesco, Raffaele; Lombardi, Simone A.; De Santis, Maria; Meda, Francesca; Raimondo, Maria Gabriella; Crotti, Chiara; Folci, Marco; Zammataro, Luca; Mayo, Marlyn J.; Bach, Nancy; Shimoda, Shinji; Gordon, Stuart C.; Miozzo, Monica; Invernizzi, Pietro; Podda, Mauro; Scavelli, Rossana; Martin, Michelle R.; Seldin, Michael F.; LaSalle, Janine M.; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2014-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is an uncommon autoimmune disease with a homogeneous clinical phenotype that reflects incomplete disease concordance in monozygotic (MZ) twins. We have taken advantage of a unique collection consisting of genomic DNA and mRNA from peripheral blood cells of female MZ twins (n = 3 sets) and sisters of similar age (n = 8 pairs) discordant for disease. We performed a genome-wide study to investigate differences in (i) DNA methylation (using a custom tiled four-plex array containing tiled 50-mers 19,084 randomly chosen methylation sites), (ii) copy number variation (CNV) (with a chip including markers derived from the 1000 Genomes Project, all three HapMap phases, and recently published studies), and/or (iii) gene expression (by whole-genome expression arrays). Based on the results obtained from these three approaches we utilized quantitative PCR to compare the expression of candidate genes. Importantly, our data support consistent differences in discordant twins and siblings for the (i) methylation profiles of 60 gene regions, (ii) CNV of 10 genes, and (iii) the expression of 2 interferon-dependent genes. Quantitative PCR analysis showed that 17 of these genes are differentially expressed in discordant sibling pairs. In conclusion, we report that MZ twins and sisters discordant for PBC manifest particular epigenetic differences and highlight the value of the epigenetic study of twins. PMID:24734033

  16. Trans-ancestry genome-wide association study identifies 12 genetic loci influencing blood pressure and implicates a role for DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Kato, Norihiro; Loh, Marie; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Verweij, Niek; Wang, Xu; Zhang, Weihua; Kelly, Tanika N; Saleheen, Danish; Lehne, Benjamin; Mateo Leach, Irene; Drong, Alexander W; Abbott, James; Wahl, Simone; Tan, Sian-Tsung; Scott, William R; Campanella, Gianluca; Chadeau-Hyam, Marc; Afzal, Uzma; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Bonder, Marc Jan; Chen, Peng; Dehghan, Abbas; Edwards, Todd L; Esko, Tõnu; Go, Min Jin; Harris, Sarah E; Hartiala, Jaana; Kasela, Silva; Kasturiratne, Anuradhani; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Kleber, Marcus E; Li, Huaixing; Mok, Zuan Yu; Nakatochi, Masahiro; Sapari, Nur Sabrina; Saxena, Richa; Stewart, Alexandre F R; Stolk, Lisette; Tabara, Yasuharu; Teh, Ai Ling; Wu, Ying; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Zhang, Yi; Aits, Imke; Da Silva Couto Alves, Alexessander; Das, Shikta; Dorajoo, Rajkumar; Hopewell, Jemma C; Kim, Yun Kyoung; Koivula, Robert W; Luan, Jian'an; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Nguyen, Quang N; Pereira, Mark A; Postmus, Iris; Raitakari, Olli T; Bryan, Molly Scannell; Scott, Robert A; Sorice, Rossella; Tragante, Vinicius; Traglia, Michela; White, Jon; Yamamoto, Ken; Zhang, Yonghong; Adair, Linda S; Ahmed, Alauddin; Akiyama, Koichi; Asif, Rasheed; Aung, Tin; Barroso, Inês; Bjonnes, Andrew; Braun, Timothy R; Cai, Hui; Chang, Li-Ching; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Chong, Yap-Seng; Collins, Rory; Courtney, Regina; Davies, Gail; Delgado, Graciela; Do, Loi D; Doevendans, Pieter A; Gansevoort, Ron T; Gao, Yu-Tang; Grammer, Tanja B; Grarup, Niels; Grewal, Jagvir; Gu, Dongfeng; Wander, Gurpreet S; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hazen, Stanley L; He, Jing; Heng, Chew-Kiat; Hixson, James E; Hofman, Albert; Hsu, Chris; Huang, Wei; Husemoen, Lise L N; Hwang, Joo-Yeon; Ichihara, Sahoko; Igase, Michiya; Isono, Masato; Justesen, Johanne M; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Kim, Young Jin; Kishimoto, Miyako; Koh, Woon-Puay; Kohara, Katsuhiko; Kumari, Meena; Kwek, Kenneth; Lee, Nanette R; Lee, Jeannette; Liao, Jiemin; Lieb, Wolfgang; Liewald, David C M; Matsubara, Tatsuaki; Matsushita, Yumi; Meitinger, Thomas; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Mills, Rebecca; Mononen, Nina; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nabika, Toru; Nakashima, Eitaro; Ng, Hong Kiat; Nikus, Kjell; Nutile, Teresa; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Ohnaka, Keizo; Parish, Sarah; Paternoster, Lavinia; Peng, Hao; Peters, Annette; Pham, Son T; Pinidiyapathirage, Mohitha J; Rahman, Mahfuzar; Rakugi, Hiromi; Rolandsson, Olov; Rozario, Michelle Ann; Ruggiero, Daniela; Sala, Cinzia F; Sarju, Ralhan; Shimokawa, Kazuro; Snieder, Harold; Sparsø, Thomas; Spiering, Wilko; Starr, John M; Stott, David J; Stram, Daniel O; Sugiyama, Takao; Szymczak, Silke; Tang, W H Wilson; Tong, Lin; Trompet, Stella; Turjanmaa, Väinö; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Uitterlinden, André G; Umemura, Satoshi; Vaarasmaki, Marja; van Dam, Rob M; van Gilst, Wiek H; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Viikari, Jorma S; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wang, Yiqin; Wang, Aili; Wilson, Rory; Wong, Tien-Yin; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Yamaguchi, Shuhei; Ye, Xingwang; Young, Robin D; Young, Terri L; Yuan, Jian-Min; Zhou, Xueya; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Ciullo, Marina; Clarke, Robert; Deloukas, Panos; Franke, Andre; Franks, Paul W; Franks, Steve; Friedlander, Yechiel; Gross, Myron D; Guo, Zhirong; Hansen, Torben; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jørgensen, Torben; Jukema, J Wouter; Kähönen, Mika; Kajio, Hiroshi; Kivimaki, Mika; Lee, Jong-Young; Lehtimäki, Terho; Linneberg, Allan; Miki, Tetsuro; Pedersen, Oluf; Samani, Nilesh J; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Toniolo, Daniela; Ahsan, Habibul; Allayee, Hooman; Chen, Yuan-Tsong; Danesh, John; Deary, Ian J; Franco, Oscar H; Franke, Lude; Heijman, Bastiaan T; Holbrook, Joanna D; Isaacs, Aaron; Kim, Bong-Jo; Lin, Xu; Liu, Jianjun; März, Winfried; Metspalu, Andres; Mohlke, Karen L; Sanghera, Dharambir K; Shu, Xiao-Ou; van Meurs, Joyce B J; Vithana, Eranga; Wickremasinghe, Ananda R; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H W; Yokota, Mitsuhiro; Zheng, Wei; Zhu, Dingliang; Vineis, Paolo; Kyrtopoulos, Soterios A; Kleinjans, Jos C S; McCarthy, Mark I; Soong, Richie; Gieger, Christian; Scott, James; Teo, Yik-Ying; He, Jiang; Elliott, Paul; Tai, E Shyong; van der Harst, Pim; Kooner, Jaspal S; Chambers, John C

    2015-11-01

    We carried out a trans-ancestry genome-wide association and replication study of blood pressure phenotypes among up to 320,251 individuals of East Asian, European and South Asian ancestry. We find genetic variants at 12 new loci to be associated with blood pressure (P = 3.9 × 10(-11) to 5.0 × 10(-21)). The sentinel blood pressure SNPs are enriched for association with DNA methylation at multiple nearby CpG sites, suggesting that, at some of the loci identified, DNA methylation may lie on the regulatory pathway linking sequence variation to blood pressure. The sentinel SNPs at the 12 new loci point to genes involved in vascular smooth muscle (IGFBP3, KCNK3, PDE3A and PRDM6) and renal (ARHGAP24, OSR1, SLC22A7 and TBX2) function. The new and known genetic variants predict increased left ventricular mass, circulating levels of NT-proBNP, and cardiovascular and all-cause mortality (P = 0.04 to 8.6 × 10(-6)). Our results provide new evidence for the role of DNA methylation in blood pressure regulation.

  17. Trans-ancestry genome-wide association study identifies 12 genetic loci influencing blood pressure and implicates a role for DNA methylation

    PubMed Central

    Drong, Alexander W; Abbott, James; Wahl, Simone; Tan, Sian-Tsung; Scott, William R; Campanella, Gianluca; Chadeau-Hyam, Marc; Afzal, Uzma; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Bonder, Marc Jan; Chen, Peng; Dehghan, Abbas; Edwards, Todd L; Esko, Tõnu; Go, Min Jin; Harris, Sarah E; Hartiala, Jaana; Kasela, Silva; Kasturiratne, Anuradhani; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Kleber, Marcus E; Li, Huaixing; Yu Mok, Zuan; Nakatochi, Masahiro; Sapari, Nur Sabrina; Saxena, Richa; Stewart, Alexandre F R; Stolk, Lisette; Tabara, Yasuharu; Teh, Ai Ling; Wu, Ying; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Zhang, Yi; Aits, Imke; Da Silva Couto Alves, Alexessander; Das, Shikta; Dorajoo, Rajkumar; Hopewell, Jemma C; Kim, Yun Kyoung; Koivula, Robert W; Luan, Jian’an; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Nguyen, Quang N; Pereira, Mark A; Postmus, Iris; Raitakari, Olli T; Bryan, Molly Scannell; Scott, Robert A; Sorice, Rossella; Tragante, Vinicius; Traglia, Michela; White, Jon; Yamamoto, Ken; Zhang, Yonghong; Adair, Linda S; Ahmed, Alauddin; Akiyama, Koichi; Asif, Rasheed; Aung, Tin; Barroso, Inês; Bjonnes, Andrew; Braun, Timothy R; Cai, Hui; Chang, Li-Ching; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Chong, Yap-Seng; Collins, Rory; Courtney, Regina; Davies, Gail; Delgado, Graciela; Do, Loi D; Doevendans, Pieter A; Gansevoort, Ron T; Gao, Yu-Tang; Grammer, Tanja B; Grarup, Niels; Grewal, Jagvir; Gu, Dongfeng; Wander, Gurpreet S; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hazen, Stanley L; He, Jing; Heng, Chew-Kiat; Hixson, James E; Hofman, Albert; Hsu, Chris; Huang, Wei; Husemoen, Lise L N; Hwang, Joo-Yeon; Ichihara, Sahoko; Igase, Michiya; Isono, Masato; Justesen, Johanne M; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Kim, Young Jin; Kishimoto, Miyako; Koh, Woon-Puay; Kohara, Katsuhiko; Kumari, Meena; Kwek, Kenneth; Lee, Nanette R; Lee, Jeannette; Liao, Jiemin; Lieb, Wolfgang; Liewald, David C M; Matsubara, Tatsuaki; Matsushita, Yumi; Meitinger, Thomas; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Mills, Rebecca; Mononen, Nina; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nabika, Toru; Nakashima, Eitaro; Ng, Hong Kiat; Nikus, Kjell; Nutile, Teresa; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Ohnaka, Keizo; Parish, Sarah; Paternoster, Lavinia; Peng, Hao; Peters, Annette; Pham, Son T; Pinidiyapathirage, Mohitha J; Rahman, Mahfuzar; Rakugi, Hiromi; Rolandsson, Olov; Ann Rozario, Michelle; Ruggiero, Daniela; Sala, Cinzia F; Sarju, Ralhan; Shimokawa, Kazuro; Snieder, Harold; Sparsø, Thomas; Spiering, Wilko; Starr, John M; Stott, David J; Stram, Daniel O; Sugiyama, Takao; Szymczak, Silke; Tang, W H Wilson; Tong, Lin; Trompet, Stella; Turjanmaa, Väinö; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Uitterlinden, André G; Umemura, Satoshi; Vaarasmaki, Marja; van Dam, Rob M; van Gilst, Wiek H; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Viikari, Jorma S; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wang, Yiqin; Wang, Aili; Wilson, Rory; Wong, Tien-Yin; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Yamaguchi, Shuhei; Ye, Xingwang; Young, Robin D; Young, Terri L; Yuan, Jian-Min; Zhou, Xueya; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Ciullo, Marina; Clarke, Robert; Deloukas, Panos; Franke, Andre; Franks, Paul W; Franks, Steve; Friedlander, Yechiel; Gross, Myron D; Guo, Zhirong; Hansen, Torben; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jørgensen, Torben; Jukema, J Wouter; kähönen, Mika; Kajio, Hiroshi; Kivimaki, Mika; Lee, Jong-Young; Lehtimäki, Terho; Linneberg, Allan; Miki, Tetsuro; Pedersen, Oluf; Samani, Nilesh J; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Toniolo, Daniela; Ahsan, Habibul; Allayee, Hooman; Chen, Yuan-Tsong; Danesh, John; Deary, Ian J; Franco, Oscar H; Franke, Lude; Heijman, Bastiaan T; Holbrook, Joanna D; Isaacs, Aaron; Kim, Bong-Jo; Lin, Xu; Liu, Jianjun; März, Winfried; Metspalu, Andres; Mohlke, Karen L; Sanghera, Dharambir K; Shu, Xiao-Ou; van Meurs, Joyce B J; Vithana, Eranga; Wickremasinghe, Ananda R; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H W; Yokota, Mitsuhiro; Zheng, Wei; Zhu, Dingliang; Vineis, Paolo; Kyrtopoulos, Soterios A; Kleinjans, Jos C S; McCarthy, Mark I; Soong, Richie; Gieger, Christian; Scott, James

    2016-01-01

    We carried out a trans-ancestry genome-wide association and replication study of blood pressure phenotypes among up to 320,251 individuals of East Asian, European and South Asian ancestry. We find genetic variants at 12 new loci to be associated with blood pressure (P = 3.9 × 10−11 to 5.0 × 10−21). The sentinel blood pressure SNPs are enriched for association with DNA methylation at multiple nearby CpG sites, suggesting that, at some of the loci identified, DNA methylation may lie on the regulatory pathway linking sequence variation to blood pressure. The sentinel SNPs at the 12 new loci point to genes involved in vascular smooth muscle (IGFBP3, KCNK3, PDE3A and PRDM6) and renal (ARHGAP24, OSR1, SLC22A7 and TBX2) function. The new and known genetic variants predict increased left ventricular mass, circulating levels of NT-proBNP, and cardiovascular and all-cause mortality (P = 0.04 to 8.6 × 10−6). Our results provide new evidence for the role of DNA methylation in blood pressure regulation. PMID:26390057

  18. Isolation and genome-wide expression and methylation characterization of CD31+ cells from normal and malignant human prostate tissue

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wei; Hu, Qiang; Wang, Dan; Deeb, Kristin K.; Ma, Yingyu; Morrison, Carl D.; Liu, Song; Johnson, Candace S.; Trump, Donald L.

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are an important component involved in the angiogenesis. Little is known about the global gene expression and epigenetic regulation in tumor endothelial cells. The identification of gene expression and epigenetic difference between human prostate tumor-derived endothelial cells (TdECs) and those in normal tissues may uncover unique biological features of TdEC and facilitate the discovery of new anti-angiogenic targets. We established a method for isolation of CD31+ endothelial cells from malignant and normal prostate tissues obtained at prostatectomy. TdECs and normal-derived ECs (NdECs) showed >90% enrichment in primary culture and demonstrated microvascular endothelial cell characteristics such as cobblestone morphology in monolayer culture, diI-acetyl-LDL uptake and capillary-tube like formation in Matrigel®. In vitro primary cultures of ECs maintained expression of endothelial markers such as CD31, von Willebrand factor, intercellular adhesion molecule, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2. We then conducted a pilot study of transcriptome and methylome analysis of TdECs and matched NdECs from patients with prostate cancer. We observed a wide spectrum of differences in gene expression and methylation patterns in endothelial cells, between malignant and normal prostate tissues. Array-based expression and methylation data were validated by qRT-PCR and bisulfite DNA pyrosequencing. Further analysis of transcriptome and methylome data revealed a number of differentially expressed genes with loci whose methylation change is accompanied by an inverse change in gene expression. Our study demonstrates the feasibility of isolation of ECs from histologically normal prostate and prostate cancer via CD31+ selection. The data, although preliminary, indicates that there exist widespread differences in methylation and transcription between TdECs and NdECs. Interestingly, only a small

  19. Isolation and genome-wide expression and methylation characterization of CD31+ cells from normal and malignant human prostate tissue.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wei; Hu, Qiang; Wang, Dan; Deeb, Kristin K; Ma, Yingyu; Morrison, Carl D; Liu, Song; Johnson, Candace S; Trump, Donald L

    2013-09-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are an important component involved in the angiogenesis. Little is known about the global gene expression and epigenetic regulation in tumor endothelial cells. The identification of gene expression and epigenetic difference between human prostate tumor-derived endothelial cells (TdECs) and those in normal tissues may uncover unique biological features of TdEC and facilitate the discovery of new anti-angiogenic targets. We established a method for isolation of CD31+ endothelial cells from malignant and normal prostate tissue obtained at prostatectomy. TdECs and normal-derived ECs (NdECs) showed >90% enrichment in primary culture and demonstrated microvascular endothelial cell characteristics such as cobblestone morphology in monolayer culture, diI-acetyl-LDL uptake and capillary-tube like formation in Matrigel®. In vitro primary cultures of ECs maintained expression of endothelial markers such as CD31, von Willebrand factor, intercellular adhesion molecule, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2. We then conducted a pilot study of transcriptome and methylome analysis of TdECs and matched NdECs from patients with prostate cancer. We observed a wide spectrum of differences in gene expression and methylation patterns in endothelial cells, between malignant and normal prostate tissues. Array-based expression and methylation data were validated by qRT-PCR and bisulfite DNA pyrosequencing. Further analysis of transcriptome and methylome data revealed a number of differentially expressed genes with loci whose methylation change is accompanied by an inverse change in gene expression. Our study demonstrates the feasibility of isolation of ECs from histologically normal prostate and prostate cancer via CD31+ selection. The data, although preliminary, indicates that there exist widespread differences in methylation and transcription between TdECs and NdECs. Interestingly, only a small proportion

  20. Cytosine Methylation Associated with Repeat-Induced Point Mutation Causes Epigenetic Gene Silencing in Neurospora Crassa

    PubMed Central

    Irelan, J. T.; Selker, E. U.

    1997-01-01

    Repeated DNA sequences are frequently mutated during the sexual cycle in Neurospora crassa by a process named repeat-induced point mutation (RIP). RIP is often associated with methylation of cytosine residues in and around the mutated sequences. Here we demonstrate that this methylation can silence a gene located in nearby, unique sequences. A large proportion of strains that had undergone RIP of a linked duplication flanking a single-copy transgene, hph (hygromycin B phosphotransferase), showed partial silencing of hph. These strains were all heavily methylated throughout the single-copy hph sequences and the flanking sequences. Silencing was alleviated by preventing methylation, either by 5-azacytidine (5AC) treatment or by introduction of a mutation (eth-1) known to reduce intracellular levels of S-adenosylmethionine. Silenced strains exhibited spontaneous reactivation of hph at frequencies of 10(-4) to 0.5. Reactivated strains, as well as cells that were treated with 5AC, gave rise to cultures that were hypomethylated and partially hygromycin resistant, indicating that some of the original methylation was propagated by a maintenance mechanism. Gene expression levels were found to be variable within a population of clonally related cells, and this variation was correlated with epigenetically propagated differences in methylation patterns. PMID:9178002

  1. Methylated Cytosines Mutate to Transcription Factor Binding Sites that Drive Tetrapod Evolution

    PubMed Central

    He, Ximiao; Tillo, Desiree; Vierstra, Jeff; Syed, Khund-Sayeed; Deng, Callie; Ray, G. Jordan; Stamatoyannopoulos, John; FitzGerald, Peter C.; Vinson, Charles

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, the cytosine in CG dinucleotides is typically methylated producing 5-methylcytosine (5mC), a chemically less stable form of cytosine that can spontaneously deaminate to thymidine resulting in a T•G mismatched base pair. Unlike other eukaryotes that efficiently repair this mismatched base pair back to C•G, in mammals, 5mCG deamination is mutagenic, sometimes producing TG dinucleotides, explaining the depletion of CG dinucleotides in mammalian genomes. It was suggested that new TG dinucleotides generate genetic diversity that may be critical for evolutionary change. We tested this conjecture by examining the DNA sequence properties of regulatory sequences identified by DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHSs) in human and mouse genomes. We hypothesized that the new TG dinucleotides generate transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) that become tissue-specific DHSs (TS-DHSs). We find that 8-mers containing the CG dinucleotide are enriched in DHSs in both species. However, 8-mers containing a TG and no CG dinucleotide are preferentially enriched in TS-DHSs when compared with 8-mers with neither a TG nor a CG dinucleotide. The most enriched 8-mer with a TG and no CG dinucleotide in tissue-specific regulatory regions in both genomes is the AP-1 motif (TGAC/GTCAN), and we find evidence that TG dinucleotides in the AP-1 motif arose from CG dinucleotides. Additional TS-DHS-enriched TFBS containing the TG/CA dinucleotide are the E-Box motif (GCAGCTGC), the NF-1 motif (GGCA—TGCC), and the GR (glucocorticoid receptor) motif (G-ACA—TGT-C). Our results support the suggestion that cytosine methylation is mutagenic in tetrapods producing TG dinucleotides that create TFBS that drive evolution. PMID:26507798

  2. A Genome-Wide mQTL Analysis in Human Adipose Tissue Identifies Genetic Variants Associated with DNA Methylation, Gene Expression and Metabolic Traits.

    PubMed

    Volkov, Petr; Olsson, Anders H; Gillberg, Linn; Jørgensen, Sine W; Brøns, Charlotte; Eriksson, Karl-Fredrik; Groop, Leif; Jansson, Per-Anders; Nilsson, Emma; Rönn, Tina; Vaag, Allan; Ling, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the extent to which interactions between genetics and epigenetics may affect the risk of complex metabolic diseases and/or their intermediary phenotypes. We performed a genome-wide DNA methylation quantitative trait locus (mQTL) analysis in human adipose tissue of 119 men, where 592,794 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were related to DNA methylation of 477,891 CpG sites, covering 99% of RefSeq genes. SNPs in significant mQTLs were further related to gene expression in adipose tissue and obesity related traits. We found 101,911 SNP-CpG pairs (mQTLs) in cis and 5,342 SNP-CpG pairs in trans showing significant associations between genotype and DNA methylation in adipose tissue after correction for multiple testing, where cis is defined as distance less than 500 kb between a SNP and CpG site. These mQTLs include reported obesity, lipid and type 2 diabetes loci, e.g. ADCY3/POMC, APOA5, CETP, FADS2, GCKR, SORT1 and LEPR. Significant mQTLs were overrepresented in intergenic regions meanwhile underrepresented in promoter regions and CpG islands. We further identified 635 SNPs in significant cis-mQTLs associated with expression of 86 genes in adipose tissue including CHRNA5, G6PC2, GPX7, RPL27A, THNSL2 and ZFP57. SNPs in significant mQTLs were also associated with body mass index (BMI), lipid traits and glucose and insulin levels in our study cohort and public available consortia data. Importantly, the Causal Inference Test (CIT) demonstrates how genetic variants mediate their effects on metabolic traits (e.g. BMI, cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR)) via altered DNA methylation in human adipose tissue. This study identifies genome-wide interactions between genetic and epigenetic variation in both cis and trans positions influencing gene expression in adipose tissue and in vivo (dys)metabolic traits associated with the development of obesity and

  3. A Genome-Wide mQTL Analysis in Human Adipose Tissue Identifies Genetic Variants Associated with DNA Methylation, Gene Expression and Metabolic Traits

    PubMed Central

    Volkov, Petr; Olsson, Anders H.; Gillberg, Linn; Jørgensen, Sine W.; Brøns, Charlotte; Eriksson, Karl-Fredrik; Groop, Leif; Jansson, Per-Anders; Nilsson, Emma; Rönn, Tina; Vaag, Allan; Ling, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the extent to which interactions between genetics and epigenetics may affect the risk of complex metabolic diseases and/or their intermediary phenotypes. We performed a genome-wide DNA methylation quantitative trait locus (mQTL) analysis in human adipose tissue of 119 men, where 592,794 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were related to DNA methylation of 477,891 CpG sites, covering 99% of RefSeq genes. SNPs in significant mQTLs were further related to gene expression in adipose tissue and obesity related traits. We found 101,911 SNP-CpG pairs (mQTLs) in cis and 5,342 SNP-CpG pairs in trans showing significant associations between genotype and DNA methylation in adipose tissue after correction for multiple testing, where cis is defined as distance less than 500 kb between a SNP and CpG site. These mQTLs include reported obesity, lipid and type 2 diabetes loci, e.g. ADCY3/POMC, APOA5, CETP, FADS2, GCKR, SORT1 and LEPR. Significant mQTLs were overrepresented in intergenic regions meanwhile underrepresented in promoter regions and CpG islands. We further identified 635 SNPs in significant cis-mQTLs associated with expression of 86 genes in adipose tissue including CHRNA5, G6PC2, GPX7, RPL27A, THNSL2 and ZFP57. SNPs in significant mQTLs were also associated with body mass index (BMI), lipid traits and glucose and insulin levels in our study cohort and public available consortia data. Importantly, the Causal Inference Test (CIT) demonstrates how genetic variants mediate their effects on metabolic traits (e.g. BMI, cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR)) via altered DNA methylation in human adipose tissue. This study identifies genome-wide interactions between genetic and epigenetic variation in both cis and trans positions influencing gene expression in adipose tissue and in vivo (dys)metabolic traits associated with the development of obesity and

  4. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D in pregnancy and genome wide cord blood DNA methylation in two pregnancy cohorts (MoBa and ALSPAC).

    PubMed

    Suderman, M; Stene, L C; Bohlin, J; Page, C M; Holvik, K; Parr, C L; Magnus, M C; Håberg, S E; Joubert, B R; Wu, M C; London, S J; Relton, C; Nystad, W

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate whether maternal mid-pregnancy 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations are associated with cord blood DNA methylation. DNA methylation was assessed using the Illumina HumanMethylation450 BeadChip, and maternal plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D was measured in 819 mothers/newborn pairs participating in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort (MoBa) and 597 mothers/newborn pairs participating in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). Across 473,731CpG DNA methylation sites in cord blood DNA, none were strongly associated with maternal 25-hydroxyvitamin D after adjusting for multiple tests (false discovery rate (FDR)>0.5; 473,731 tests). A meta-analysis of the results from both cohorts, using the Fisher method for combining p-values, also did not strengthen findings (FDR>0.2). Further exploration of a set of CpG sites in the proximity of four a priori defined candidate genes (CYP24A1, CYP27B1, CYP27A1 and CYP2R1) did not result in any associations with FDR<0.05 (56 tests). In this large genome wide assessment of the potential influence of maternal vitamin D status on DNA methylation, we did not find any convincing associations in 1416 newborns. If true associations do exist, their identification might require much larger consortium studies, expanded genomic coverage, investigation of alternative cell types or measurements of 25-hydroxyvitamin D at different gestational time points. PMID:26953979

  5. Genome-wide DNA methylation identifies trophoblast invasion-related genes: Claudin-4 and Fucosyltransferase IV control mobility via altering matrix metalloproteinase activity.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yuxiang; Blair, John D; Yuen, Ryan K C; Robinson, Wendy P; von Dadelszen, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Previously we showed that extravillous cytotrophoblast (EVT) outgrowth and migration on a collagen gel explant model were affected by exposure to decidual natural killer cells (dNK). This study investigates the molecular causes behind this phenomenon. Genome wide DNA methylation of exposed and unexposed EVT was assessed using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip array (450 K array). We identified 444 differentially methylated CpG loci in dNK-treated EVT compared with medium control (P < 0.05). The genes associated with these loci had critical biological roles in cellular development, cellular growth and proliferation, cell signaling, cellular assembly and organization by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA). Furthermore, 23 mobility-related genes were identified by IPA from dNK-treated EVT. Among these genes, CLDN4 (encoding claudin-4) and FUT4 (encoding fucosyltransferase IV) were chosen for follow-up studies because of their biological relevance from research on tumor cells. The results showed that the mRNA and protein expressions of both CLDN4 and FUT4 in dNK-treated EVT were significantly reduced compared with control (P < 0.01 for both CLDN4 and FUT4 mRNA expression; P < 0.001 for CLDN4 and P < 0.01 for FUT4 protein expression), and were inversely correlated with DNA methylation. Knocking down CLDN4 and FUT4 by small interfering RNA reduced trophoblast invasion, possibly through the altered matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and/or MMP-9 expression and activity. Taken together, dNK alter EVT mobility at least partially in association with an alteration of DNA methylation profile. Hypermethylation of CLDN4 and FUT4 reduces protein expression. CLDN4 and FUT4 are representative genes that participate in modulating trophoblast mobility. PMID:25697377

  6. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D in pregnancy and genome wide cord blood DNA methylation in two pregnancy cohorts (MoBa and ALSPAC).

    PubMed

    Suderman, M; Stene, L C; Bohlin, J; Page, C M; Holvik, K; Parr, C L; Magnus, M C; Håberg, S E; Joubert, B R; Wu, M C; London, S J; Relton, C; Nystad, W

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate whether maternal mid-pregnancy 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations are associated with cord blood DNA methylation. DNA methylation was assessed using the Illumina HumanMethylation450 BeadChip, and maternal plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D was measured in 819 mothers/newborn pairs participating in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort (MoBa) and 597 mothers/newborn pairs participating in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). Across 473,731CpG DNA methylation sites in cord blood DNA, none were strongly associated with maternal 25-hydroxyvitamin D after adjusting for multiple tests (false discovery rate (FDR)>0.5; 473,731 tests). A meta-analysis of the results from both cohorts, using the Fisher method for combining p-values, also did not strengthen findings (FDR>0.2). Further exploration of a set of CpG sites in the proximity of four a priori defined candidate genes (CYP24A1, CYP27B1, CYP27A1 and CYP2R1) did not result in any associations with FDR<0.05 (56 tests). In this large genome wide assessment of the potential influence of maternal vitamin D status on DNA methylation, we did not find any convincing associations in 1416 newborns. If true associations do exist, their identification might require much larger consortium studies, expanded genomic coverage, investigation of alternative cell types or measurements of 25-hydroxyvitamin D at different gestational time points.

  7. Genome-wide DNA methylation identifies trophoblast invasion-related genes: Claudin-4 and Fucosyltransferase IV control mobility via altering matrix metalloproteinase activity

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yuxiang; Blair, John D.; Yuen, Ryan K.C.; Robinson, Wendy P.; von Dadelszen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Previously we showed that extravillous cytotrophoblast (EVT) outgrowth and migration on a collagen gel explant model were affected by exposure to decidual natural killer cells (dNK). This study investigates the molecular causes behind this phenomenon. Genome wide DNA methylation of exposed and unexposed EVT was assessed using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip array (450 K array). We identified 444 differentially methylated CpG loci in dNK-treated EVT compared with medium control (P < 0.05). The genes associated with these loci had critical biological roles in cellular development, cellular growth and proliferation, cell signaling, cellular assembly and organization by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA). Furthermore, 23 mobility-related genes were identified by IPA from dNK-treated EVT. Among these genes, CLDN4 (encoding claudin-4) and FUT4 (encoding fucosyltransferase IV) were chosen for follow-up studies because of their biological relevance from research on tumor cells. The results showed that the mRNA and protein expressions of both CLDN4 and FUT4 in dNK-treated EVT were significantly reduced compared with control (P < 0.01 for both CLDN4 and FUT4 mRNA expression; P < 0.001 for CLDN4 and P < 0.01 for FUT4 protein expression), and were inversely correlated with DNA methylation. Knocking down CLDN4 and FUT4 by small interfering RNA reduced trophoblast invasion, possibly through the altered matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and/or MMP-9 expression and activity. Taken together, dNK alter EVT mobility at least partially in association with an alteration of DNA methylation profile. Hypermethylation of CLDN4 and FUT4 reduces protein expression. CLDN4 and FUT4 are representative genes that participate in modulating trophoblast mobility. PMID:25697377

  8. Genome-wide DNA methylation identifies trophoblast invasion-related genes: Claudin-4 and Fucosyltransferase IV control mobility via altering matrix metalloproteinase activity.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yuxiang; Blair, John D; Yuen, Ryan K C; Robinson, Wendy P; von Dadelszen, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Previously we showed that extravillous cytotrophoblast (EVT) outgrowth and migration on a collagen gel explant model were affected by exposure to decidual natural killer cells (dNK). This study investigates the molecular causes behind this phenomenon. Genome wide DNA methylation of exposed and unexposed EVT was assessed using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip array (450 K array). We identified 444 differentially methylated CpG loci in dNK-treated EVT compared with medium control (P < 0.05). The genes associated with these loci had critical biological roles in cellular development, cellular growth and proliferation, cell signaling, cellular assembly and organization by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA). Furthermore, 23 mobility-related genes were identified by IPA from dNK-treated EVT. Among these genes, CLDN4 (encoding claudin-4) and FUT4 (encoding fucosyltransferase IV) were chosen for follow-up studies because of their biological relevance from research on tumor cells. The results showed that the mRNA and protein expressions of both CLDN4 and FUT4 in dNK-treated EVT were significantly reduced compared with control (P < 0.01 for both CLDN4 and FUT4 mRNA expression; P < 0.001 for CLDN4 and P < 0.01 for FUT4 protein expression), and were inversely correlated with DNA methylation. Knocking down CLDN4 and FUT4 by small interfering RNA reduced trophoblast invasion, possibly through the altered matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and/or MMP-9 expression and activity. Taken together, dNK alter EVT mobility at least partially in association with an alteration of DNA methylation profile. Hypermethylation of CLDN4 and FUT4 reduces protein expression. CLDN4 and FUT4 are representative genes that participate in modulating trophoblast mobility.

  9. Genome-wide profiling identifies a DNA methylation signature that associates with TET2 mutations in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Asmar, Fazila; Punj, Vasu; Christensen, Jesper; Pedersen, Marianne T.; Pedersen, Anja; Nielsen, Anders B.; Hother, Christoffer; Ralfkiaer, Ulrik; Brown, Peter; Ralfkiaer, Elisabeth; Helin, Kristian; Grønbæk, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    The discovery that the Ten-Eleven Translocation (TET) hydroxylases cause DNA demethylation has fundamentally changed the notion of how DNA methylation is regulated. Clonal analysis of the hematopoetic stem cell compartment suggests that TET2 mutations can be early events in hematologic cancers and recent investigations have shown TET2 mutations in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. However, the detection rates and the types of TET2 mutations vary, and the relation to global methylation patterns has not been investigated. Here, we show TET2 mutations in 12 of 100 diffuse large B-cell lymphomas with 7% carrying loss-of-function and 5% carrying missense mutations. Genome-wide methylation profiling using 450K Illumina arrays identified 315 differentially methylated genes between TET2 mutated and TET2 wild-type cases. TET2 mutations are primarily associated with hypermethylation within CpG islands (70%; P<0.0001), and at CpG-rich promoters (60%; P<0.0001) of genes involved in hematopoietic differentiation and cellular development. Hypermethylated loci in TET2 mutated samples overlap with the bivalent (H3K27me3/H3K4me3) silencing mark in human embryonic stem cells (P=1.5×10−30). Surprisingly, gene expression profiling showed that only 11% of the hypermethylated genes were down-regulated, among which there were several genes previously suggested to be tumor suppressors. A meta-analysis suggested that the 35 hypermethylated and down-regulated genes are associated with the activated B-cell-like type of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in other studies. In conclusion, our data suggest that TET2 mutations may cause aberrant methylation mainly of genes involved in hematopoietic development, which are silenced but poised for activation in human embryonic stem cells. PMID:23831920

  10. Effect of desiccation on the dynamics of genome-wide DNA methylation in orthodox seeds of Acer platanoides L.

    PubMed

    Plitta, Beata P; Michalak, Marcin; Bujarska-Borkowska, Barbara; Barciszewska, Mirosława Z; Barciszewski, Jan; Chmielarz, Paweł

    2014-12-01

    5-methylcytosine, an abundant epigenetic mark, plays an important role in the regulation of plant growth and development, but there is little information about stress-induced changes in DNA methylation in seeds. In the present study, changes in a global level of m5C were measured in orthodox seeds of Acer platanoides L. during seed desiccation from a WC of 1.04 to 0.05-0.06 g H2O g g(-1) dry mass (g g(-1)). Changes in the level of DNA methylation were measured using 2D TLC e based method. Quality of desiccated seeds was examined by germination and seedling emergence tests. Global m5C content (R2)increase was observed in embryonic axes isolated from seeds collected at a high WC of 1.04 g g(-1) after their desiccation to significantly lower WC of 0.17 and 0.19 g g(-1). Further desiccation of these seeds to a WC of 0.06 g g(-1), however, resulted in a significant DNA demethylation to R2 ¼ 11.52-12.22%. Similar m5C decrease was observed in seeds which undergo maturation drying on the tree and had four times lower initial WC of 0.27 g g(-1) at the time of harvest, as they were dried to a WC of 0.05 g g(-1). These data confirm that desiccation induces changes in seed m5C levels. Results were validated by seed lots derived from tree different A. platanoides provenances. It is plausible that sine wave-like alterations in m5C amount may represent a specific response of orthodox seeds to drying and play a relevant role in desiccation tolerance in seeds.

  11. Variation in cytosine methylation patterns during ploidy level conversions in Eragrostis curvula.

    PubMed

    Ochogavía, Ana C; Cervigni, Gerardo; Selva, Juan P; Echenique, Viviana C; Pessino, Silvina C

    2009-05-01

    In many species polyploidization involves rearrangements of the progenitor genomes, at both genetic and epigenetic levels. We analyzed the cytosine methylation status in a 'tetraploid-diploid-tetraploid' series of Eragrostis curvula with a common genetic background by using the MSAP (Methylation-sensitive Amplified Polymorphism) technique. Considerable levels of polymorphisms were detected during ploidy conversions. The total level of methylation observed was lower in the diploid genotype compared to the tetraploid ones. A significant proportion of the epigenetic modifications occurring during the tetraploid-diploid conversion reverted during the diploid-tetraploid one. Genetic and expression data from previous work were used to analyze correlation with methylation variation. All genetic, epigenetic and gene expression variation data correlated significantly when compared by pairs in simple Mantel tests. Dendrograms reflecting genetic, epigenetic and expression distances as well as principal coordinate analysis suggested that plants of identical ploidy levels present similar sets of data. Twelve (12) different genomic fragments displaying different methylation behavior during the ploidy conversions were isolated, sequenced and characterized.

  12. Tissue-Specific Differences in Cytosine Methylation and Their Association with Differential Gene Expression in Sorghum1[W

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meishan; Xu, Chunming; von Wettstein, Diter; Liu, Bao

    2011-01-01

    It has been well established that DNA cytosine methylation plays essential regulatory roles in imprinting gene expression in endosperm, and hence normal embryonic development, in the model plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Nonetheless, the developmental role of this epigenetic marker in cereal crops remains largely unexplored. Here, we report for sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) differences in relative cytosine methylation levels and patterns at 5′-CCGG sites in seven tissues (endosperm, embryo, leaf, root, young inflorescence, anther, and ovary), and characterize a set of tissue-specific differentially methylated regions (TDMRs). We found that the most enriched TDMRs in sorghum are specific for the endosperm and are generated concomitantly but imbalanced by decrease versus increase in cytosine methylation at multiple 5′-CCGG sites across the genome. This leads to more extensive demethylation in the endosperm than in other tissues, where TDMRs are mainly tissue nonspecific rather than specific to a particular tissue. Accordingly, relative to endosperm, the other six tissues showed grossly similar levels though distinct patterns of cytosine methylation, presumably as a result of a similar extent of concomitant decrease versus increase in cytosine methylation that occurred at variable genomic loci. All four tested TDMRs were validated by bisulfite genomic sequencing. Diverse sequences were found to underlie the TDMRs, including those encoding various known-function or predicted proteins, transposable elements, and those bearing homology to putative imprinted genes in maize (Zea mays). We further found that the expression pattern of at least some genic TDMRs was correlated with its tissue-specific methylation state, implicating a developmental role of DNA methylation in regulating tissue-specific or -preferential gene expression in sorghum. PMID:21632971

  13. Targeted genome-wide methylation and gene expression analyses reveal signaling pathways involved in ovarian dysfunction after developmental EDC exposure in rats.

    PubMed

    Zama, Aparna Mahakali; Uzumcu, Mehmet

    2013-02-01

    Transient exposure to methoxychlor (MXC), an environmental endocrine-disrupting chemical, during fetal and neonatal stages causes ovarian dysfunction in pubertal, adult, and aging animals. Adult animals have reduced number of ovulations and abnormal follicular composition associated with altered gene expression and DNA methylation patterns. To test the hypothesis that the ovarian epigenomic changes induced by MXC are detectable following the exposure period, leading to altered gene expression by adulthood, we conducted a targeted genome-wide methylation study using Nimblegen 3x720K CpG Island Plus RefSeq Promoter Arrays. Control (vehicle), low-dose MXC (20 μg/kg/day), or high-dose MXC (100 mg/kg/day) treatments were administered between Embryonic Day 19 and Postnatal Day (PND) 7. Ovaries were collected at PND 7 immediately after exposure or at adulthood, PND 60. Array hybridizations were conducted with genomic DNA after methylated DNA immunoprecipitation and the array data were analyzed. DNA methylation events were functionally annotated, and candidate loci common to all the treatments or unique to some treatments were identified. Specific loci encoding signaling molecules such as the regulatory subunit p85 of phosphoinositide-3-kinase, insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor, Harvey rat sarcoma viral oncogene, insulin receptor, and forkhead box protein O3 were identified to be hypermethylated in MXC-treated ovaries at PND 7 and/or PND 60. Examination of gene expression changes with TaqMan low-density arrays revealed that nearly 25% of the genes that were assayed were downregulated. These data demonstrate that key molecules in specific signaling pathways such as PTEN signaling, IGF-1 signaling, or rapid estrogen signaling are epigenetically altered in MXC-exposed ovaries, which is associated with ovarian dysfunction and female infertility.

  14. Tissue culture-induced transpositional activity of mPing is correlated with cytosine methylation in rice

    PubMed Central

    Ngezahayo, Frédéric; Xu, Chunming; Wang, Hongyan; Jiang, Lily; Pang, Jinsong; Liu, Bao

    2009-01-01

    Background mPing is an endogenous MITE in the rice genome, which is quiescent under normal conditions but can be induced towards mobilization under various stresses. The cellular mechanism responsible for modulating the activity of mPing remains unknown. Cytosine methylation is a major epigenetic modification in most eukaryotes, and the primary function of which is to serve as a genome defense system including taming activity of transposable elements (TEs). Given that tissue-culture is capable of inducing both methylation alteration and mPing transposition in certain rice genotypes, it provides a tractable system to investigate the possible relationship between the two phenomena. Results mPing transposition and cytosine methylation alteration were measured in callus and regenerated plants in three rice (ssp. indica) genotypes, V14, V27 and R09. All three genotypes showed transposition of mPing, though at various frequencies. Cytosine methylation alteration occurred both at the mPing-flanks and at random loci sampled globally in callus and regenerated plants of all three genotypes. However, a sharp difference in the changing patterns was noted between the mPing-flanks and random genomic loci, with a particular type of methylation modification, i.e., CNG hypermethylation, occurred predominantly at the mPing-flanks. Pearson's test on pairwise correlations indicated that mPing activity is positively correlated with specific patterns of methylation alteration at random genomic loci, while the element's immobility is positively correlated with methylation levels of the mPing's 5'-flanks. Bisulfite sequencing of two mPing-containing loci showed that whereas for the immobile locus loss of CG methylation in the 5'-flank was accompanied by an increase in CHG methylation, together with an overall increase in methylation of all three types (CG, CHG and CHH) in the mPing-body region, for the active locus erasure of CG methylation in the 5'-flank was not followed by such a

  15. Rapid alterations of gene expression and cytosine methylation in newly synthesized Brassica napus allopolyploids.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanhao; Zhong, Lan; Wu, Xiaoming; Fang, Xiaoping; Wang, Jianbo

    2009-02-01

    Allopolyploidy is an important speciation mechanism and is ubiquitous among plants. Brassica napus is a model system for studying the consequences of hybridization and polyploidization on allopolyploid genome. In this research, two sets of plant materials were used to investigate the transcriptomic and epigenetic changes in the early stages of allopolyploid formation. The first comparison was between a synthetic B. napus allotetraploid and its diploid progenitors, B. rapa (AA genome) and B. oleracea (CC genome). Using cDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism (cDNA-AFLP) and methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism (MSAP) approaches, ~4.09 and 6.84% of the sequences showed changes in gene expression and DNA methylation in synthesized B. napus compared to its diploid progenitors. The proportions of C-genome-specific gene silencing and DNA methylation alterations were significantly greater than those of A-genome-specific alterations. The second comparison was between amphihaploid and amphidiploid B. napus organs grown on synthesized dimorphic plants. About 0.73% of the cDNA-AFLP fragments and 1.94% of the MSAP fragments showed changes in gene expression and DNA methylation. We sequenced 103 fragments that differed in the synthetic/parental or the amphihaploid/amphidiploid cDNA-AFLP and MSAP comparisons. Sequence analysis revealed these fragments were involved in various biological pathways. Our results provided evidence for genome-wide changes in gene expression and DNA methylation occurring immediately after hybridization and polyploidization in synthetic B. napus. Moreover, this study contributed to the elucidation of genome doubling effects on responses of transcriptome and epigenetics in B. napus.

  16. Genome-wide screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae identifies vacuolar protein sorting, autophagy, biosynthetic, and tRNA methylation genes involved in life span regulation.

    PubMed

    Fabrizio, Paola; Hoon, Shawn; Shamalnasab, Mehrnaz; Galbani, Abdulaye; Wei, Min; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey; Longo, Valter D

    2010-07-15

    The study of the chronological life span of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which measures the survival of populations of non-dividing yeast, has resulted in the identification of homologous genes and pathways that promote aging in organisms ranging from yeast to mammals. Using a competitive genome-wide approach, we performed a screen of a complete set of approximately 4,800 viable deletion mutants to identify genes that either increase or decrease chronological life span. Half of the putative short-/long-lived mutants retested from the primary screen were confirmed, demonstrating the utility of our approach. Deletion of genes involved in vacuolar protein sorting, autophagy, and mitochondrial function shortened life span, confirming that respiration and degradation processes are essential for long-term survival. Among the genes whose deletion significantly extended life span are ACB1, CKA2, and TRM9, implicated in fatty acid transport and biosynthesis, cell signaling, and tRNA methylation, respectively. Deletion of these genes conferred heat-shock resistance, supporting the link between life span extension and cellular protection observed in several model organisms. The high degree of conservation of these novel yeast longevity determinants in other species raises the possibility that their role in senescence might be conserved.

  17. Epigenetic variation, inheritance, and parent-of-origin effects of cytosine methylation in maize (Zea mays).

    PubMed

    Lauria, Massimiliano; Piccinini, Sara; Pirona, Raul; Lund, Gertrud; Viotti, Angelo; Motto, Mario

    2014-03-01

    Pure epigenetic variation, or epigenetic variation that is independent of genetic context, may provide a mechanism for phenotypic variation in the absence of DNA mutations. To estimate the extent of pure epigenetic variation within and across generations and to identify the DNA regions targeted, a group of eight plants derived from a highly inbred line of maize (Zea mays) was analyzed by the methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP) technique. We found that cytosine methylation (mC) differences among individuals accounted for up to 7.4% of CCGG sites investigated by MSAP. Of the differentially methylated fragments (DMFs) identified in the S0 generation, ∼12% were meiotically inherited for at least six generations. We show that meiotically heritable mC variation was consistently generated for an average of 0.5% CCGG sites per generation and that it largely occurred somatically. We provide evidence that mC variation can be established and inherited in a parent-of-origin manner, given that the paternal lineage is more prone to both forward and reverse mC changes. The molecular characterization of selected DMFs revealed that the variation was largely determined by CG methylation changes that map within gene regions. The expression analysis of genes overlapping with DMFs did not reveal an obvious correlation between mC variation and transcription, reinforcing the idea that the primary function of gene-body methylation is not to control gene expression. Because this study focuses on epigenetic variation in field-grown plants, the data presented herein pertain to spontaneous epigenetic changes of the maize genome in a natural context.

  18. Genome-wide analysis of aberrant methylation in human breast cancer cells using methyl-DNA immunoprecipitation combined with high-throughput sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cancer cells undergo massive alterations to their DNA methylation patterns that result in aberrant gene expression and malignant phenotypes. However, the mechanisms that underlie methylome changes are not well understood nor is the genomic distribution of DNA methylation changes well characterized. Results Here, we performed methylated DNA immunoprecipitation combined with high-throughput sequencing (MeDIP-seq) to obtain whole-genome DNA methylation profiles for eight human breast cancer cell (BCC) lines and for normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC). The MeDIP-seq analysis generated non-biased DNA methylation maps by covering almost the entire genome with sufficient depth and resolution. The most prominent feature of the BCC lines compared to HMEC was a massively reduced methylation level particularly in CpG-poor regions. While hypomethylation did not appear to be associated with particular genomic features, hypermethylation preferentially occurred at CpG-rich gene-related regions independently of the distance from transcription start sites. We also investigated methylome alterations during epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in MCF7 cells. EMT induction was associated with specific alterations to the methylation patterns of gene-related CpG-rich regions, although overall methylation levels were not significantly altered. Moreover, approximately 40% of the epithelial cell-specific methylation patterns in gene-related regions were altered to those typical of mesenchymal cells, suggesting a cell-type specific regulation of DNA methylation. Conclusions This study provides the most comprehensive analysis to date of the methylome of human mammary cell lines and has produced novel insights into the mechanisms of methylome alteration during tumorigenesis and the interdependence between DNA methylome alterations and morphological changes. PMID:20181289

  19. Whole-exome sequencing and genome-wide methylation analyses identify novel disease associated mutations and methylation patterns in idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Christen Lykkegaard; Nielsen, Helene Myrtue; Kristensen, Lasse Sommer; Søgaard, Alexandra; Vikeså, Jonas; Jønson, Lars; Nielsen, Finn Cilius; Hasselbalch, Hans; Bjerrum, Ole Weis; Punj, Vasu; Grønbæk, Kirsten

    2015-12-01

    A thorough understanding of the idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome (IHES) and further optimization of diagnostic work-up procedures are warranted. We analyzed purified eosinophils from patients with IHES by next-generation whole-exome sequencing and compared DNA methylation profiles from reactive eosinophilic conditions to known clonal and suspected clonal eosinophilia. Somatic missense mutations in cancer-related genes were detected in three IHES patients. These included the spliceosome gene PUF60 and the cadherin gene CDH17. Furthermore, reactive eosinophilia samples could be differentiated from known- and suspected clonal eosinophilia samples based on 285 differentially methylated CpG sites corresponding to 128 differentially methylated genes. Using Ingenuity pathway analysis, we found that differentially methylated genes were highly enriched in functional pathways such as cancer, cell death and survival, and hematological disease. Our data show that a subset of IHES may be of clonal origin not related to the classical molecular aberrations of FGFR, PDGFRA/B, or T-cells, and that the initiating hits could be point mutations in a variety of genes, including spliceosome mutations or hypermethylated tumor suppressor genes. In addition, we identified a DNA methylation signature that is relevant for distinguishing clonal and suspected clonal eosinophilia from reactive eosinophilia per se, which may be useful in daily clinical work.

  20. MORC1 exhibits cross-species differential methylation in association with early life stress as well as genome-wide association with MDD

    PubMed Central

    Nieratschker, V; Massart, R; Gilles, M; Luoni, A; Suderman, M J; Krumm, B; Meier, S; Witt, S H; Nöthen, M M; Suomi, S J; Peus, V; Scharnholz, B; Dukal, H; Hohmeyer, C; Wolf, I A-C; Cirulli, F; Gass, P; Sütterlin, M W; Filsinger, B; Laucht, M; Riva, M A; Rietschel, M; Deuschle, M; Szyf, M

    2014-01-01

    Early life stress (ELS) is associated with increased vulnerability for diseases in later life, including psychiatric disorders. Animal models and human studies suggest that this effect is mediated by epigenetic mechanisms. In humans, epigenetic studies to investigate the influence of ELS on psychiatric phenotypes are limited by the inaccessibility of living brain tissue. Due to the tissue-specific nature of epigenetic signatures, it is impossible to determine whether ELS induced epigenetic changes in accessible peripheral cells, for example, blood lymphocytes, reflect epigenetic changes in the brain. To overcome these limitations, we applied a cross-species approach involving: (i) the analysis of CD34+ cells from human cord blood; (ii) the examination of blood-derived CD3+ T cells of newborn and adolescent nonhuman primates (Macaca mulatta); and (iii) the investigation of the prefrontal cortex of adult rats. Several regions in MORC1 (MORC family CW-type zinc finger 1; previously known as: microrchidia (mouse) homolog) were differentially methylated in response to ELS in CD34+ cells and CD3+ T cells derived from the blood of human and monkey neonates, as well as in CD3+ T cells derived from the blood of adolescent monkeys and in the prefrontal cortex of adult rats. MORC1 is thus the first identified epigenetic marker of ELS to be present in blood cell progenitors at birth and in the brain in adulthood. Interestingly, a gene-set-based analysis of data from a genome-wide association study of major depressive disorder (MDD) revealed an association of MORC1 with MDD. PMID:25158004

  1. Novel photodynamic effect of a psoralen-conjugated oligonucleotide for the discrimination of the methylation of cytosine in DNA.

    PubMed

    Yamayoshi, Asako; Matsuyama, Yohei; Kushida, Mikihiko; Kobori, Akio; Murakami, Akira

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation and demethylation significantly affect the deactivation and activation processes of gene expression significantly. In particular, C-5-methylation of cytosine in the CpG islands is important for the epigenetic modification in genes, which plays a key role in regulating gene expression. The determination of the location and frequency of DNA methylation is important for the elucidation of the mechanisms of cell differentiation and carcinogenesis. Here we designed a psoralen-conjugated oligonucleotide (PS-oligo) for the discrimination of 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) in DNA. The cross-linking behavior of psoralen derivatives with pyrimidine bases, such as thymine, uracil and cytosine has been well discussed, but there are no reports which have examined whether cross-linking efficiency of psoralen with cytosine would be changed with or without C-5 methylation. We found that the cross-linking efficiency of PS-oligo with target-DNA containing 5-mC was greatly increased compared to the case of target-DNA without 5-mC, approximately seven-fold higher. Here we report a new aspect of the photocross-linking behavior of psoralen with 5-mC that is applicable to a simple, sequence-specific and quantitative analysis for the discrimination of 5-mC in DNA, which can be applicable to study the epigenetic behavior of gene expressions.

  2. Characterization of cytosine methylated regions and 5-cytosine DNA methyltransferase (Ehmeth) in the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Ohad; Siman-Tov, Rama; Ankri, Serge

    2004-01-01

    The DNA methylation status of the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica was heretofore unknown. In the present study, we developed a new technique, based on the affinity of methylated DNA to 5-methylcytosine antibodies, to identify methylated DNA in this parasite. Ribosomal DNA and ribosomal DNA circles were isolated by this method and we confirmed the validity of our approach by sodium bisulfite sequencing. We also report the identification and the characterization of a gene, Ehmeth, encoding a DNA methyltransferase strongly homologous to the human DNA methyltransferase 2 (Dnmt2). Immunofluorescence microscopy using an antibody raised against a recombinant Ehmeth showed that Ehmeth is concentrated in the nuclei of trophozoites. The recombinant Ehmeth has a weak but significant methyltransferase activity when E.histolytica genomic DNA is used as substrate. 5-Azacytidine (5-AzaC), an inhibitor of DNA methyltransferase, was used to study in vivo the role of DNA methylation in E.histolytica. Genomic DNA of trophozoites grown with 5-AzaC (23 microM) was undermethylated and the ability of 5-AzaC-treated trophozoites to kill mammalian cells or to cause liver abscess in hamsters was strongly impaired.

  3. Spatial and Functional Relationships Among Pol V-Associated loci, Pol IV-Dependent siRNAs, and Cytosine Methylation in the Arabidopsis Epigenome

    SciTech Connect

    Wierzbicki, A. T.; Cocklin, Ross; Mayampurath, Anoop; Lister, Ryan; Rowley, M. J.; Gregory, Brian D.; Ecker, Joseph R.; Tang, Haixu; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2012-08-15

    Multisubunit RNA polymerases IV and V (Pols IV and V) mediate RNA-directed DNA methylation and transcriptional silencing of retrotransposons and heterochromatic repeats in plants. We identified genomic sites of Pol V occupancy in parallel with siRNA deep sequencing and methylcytosine mapping, comparing wild-type plants with mutants defective for Pol IV, Pol V, or both Pols IV and V. Approximately 60% of Pol V-associated regions encompass regions of 24-nucleotide (nt) siRNA complementarity and cytosine methylation, consistent with cytosine methylation being guided by base-pairing of Pol IV-dependent siRNAs with Pol V transcripts. However, 27% of Pol V peaks do not overlap sites of 24-nt siRNA biogenesis or cytosine methylation, indicating that Pol V alone does not specify sites of cytosine methylation. Surprisingly, the number of methylated CHH motifs, a hallmark of RNA-directed de novo methylation, is similar in wild-type plants and Pol IV or Pol V mutants. In the mutants, methylation is lost at 50%-60% of the CHH sites that are methylated in the wild type but is gained at new CHH positions, primarily in pericentromeric regions. These results indicate that Pol IV and Pol V are not required for cytosine methyltransferase activity but shape the epigenome by guiding CHH methylation to specific genomic sites.

  4. Impact of age, BMI and HbA1c levels on the genome-wide DNA methylation and mRNA expression patterns in human adipose tissue and identification of epigenetic biomarkers in blood.

    PubMed

    Rönn, Tina; Volkov, Petr; Gillberg, Linn; Kokosar, Milana; Perfilyev, Alexander; Jacobsen, Anna Louisa; Jørgensen, Sine W; Brøns, Charlotte; Jansson, Per-Anders; Eriksson, Karl-Fredrik; Pedersen, Oluf; Hansen, Torben; Groop, Leif; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet; Vaag, Allan; Nilsson, Emma; Ling, Charlotte

    2015-07-01

    Increased age, BMI and HbA1c levels are risk factors for several non-communicable diseases. However, the impact of these factors on the genome-wide DNA methylation pattern in human adipose tissue remains unknown. We analyzed the DNA methylation of ∼480 000 sites in human adipose tissue from 96 males and 94 females and related methylation to age, BMI and HbA1c. We also compared epigenetic signatures in adipose tissue and blood. Age was significantly associated with both altered DNA methylation and expression of 1050 genes (e.g. FHL2, NOX4 and PLG). Interestingly, many reported epigenetic biomarkers of aging in blood, including ELOVL2, FHL2, KLF14 and GLRA1, also showed significant correlations between adipose tissue DNA methylation and age in our study. The most significant association between age and adipose tissue DNA methylation was found upstream of ELOVL2. We identified 2825 genes (e.g. FTO, ITIH5, CCL18, MTCH2, IRS1 and SPP1) where both DNA methylation and expression correlated with BMI. Methylation at previously reported HIF3A sites correlated significantly with BMI in females only. HbA1c (range 28-46 mmol/mol) correlated significantly with the methylation of 711 sites, annotated to, for example, RAB37, TICAM1 and HLA-DPB1. Pathway analyses demonstrated that methylation levels associated with age and BMI are overrepresented among genes involved in cancer, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Our results highlight the impact of age, BMI and HbA1c on epigenetic variation of candidate genes for obesity, type 2 diabetes and cancer in human adipose tissue. Importantly, we demonstrate that epigenetic biomarkers in blood can mirror age-related epigenetic signatures in target tissues for metabolic diseases such as adipose tissue.

  5. Impact of age, BMI and HbA1c levels on the genome-wide DNA methylation and mRNA expression patterns in human adipose tissue and identification of epigenetic biomarkers in blood.

    PubMed

    Rönn, Tina; Volkov, Petr; Gillberg, Linn; Kokosar, Milana; Perfilyev, Alexander; Jacobsen, Anna Louisa; Jørgensen, Sine W; Brøns, Charlotte; Jansson, Per-Anders; Eriksson, Karl-Fredrik; Pedersen, Oluf; Hansen, Torben; Groop, Leif; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet; Vaag, Allan; Nilsson, Emma; Ling, Charlotte

    2015-07-01

    Increased age, BMI and HbA1c levels are risk factors for several non-communicable diseases. However, the impact of these factors on the genome-wide DNA methylation pattern in human adipose tissue remains unknown. We analyzed the DNA methylation of ∼480 000 sites in human adipose tissue from 96 males and 94 females and related methylation to age, BMI and HbA1c. We also compared epigenetic signatures in adipose tissue and blood. Age was significantly associated with both altered DNA methylation and expression of 1050 genes (e.g. FHL2, NOX4 and PLG). Interestingly, many reported epigenetic biomarkers of aging in blood, including ELOVL2, FHL2, KLF14 and GLRA1, also showed significant correlations between adipose tissue DNA methylation and age in our study. The most significant association between age and adipose tissue DNA methylation was found upstream of ELOVL2. We identified 2825 genes (e.g. FTO, ITIH5, CCL18, MTCH2, IRS1 and SPP1) where both DNA methylation and expression correlated with BMI. Methylation at previously reported HIF3A sites correlated significantly with BMI in females only. HbA1c (range 28-46 mmol/mol) correlated significantly with the methylation of 711 sites, annotated to, for example, RAB37, TICAM1 and HLA-DPB1. Pathway analyses demonstrated that methylation levels associated with age and BMI are overrepresented among genes involved in cancer, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Our results highlight the impact of age, BMI and HbA1c on epigenetic variation of candidate genes for obesity, type 2 diabetes and cancer in human adipose tissue. Importantly, we demonstrate that epigenetic biomarkers in blood can mirror age-related epigenetic signatures in target tissues for metabolic diseases such as adipose tissue. PMID:25861810

  6. Genome-wide DNA methylation profiling and its involved molecular pathways from one individual with thyroid malignant/benign tumor and hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Liang-Liang; Liu, Guo-Yan; Tzeng, Chi-Meng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: During development, methylation permanently changes gene activity, while aberrant gene methylation is key to human tumorigenesis. Gene methylation is an epigenetic event leading to gene silencing and some tumor suppressor genes that are aberrantly methylated in both thyroid cancer and benign thyroid tumor, suggesting a role for methylation in early thyroid tumorigenesis. Specific gene methylation occurs in certain types of thyroid cancer and depends on particular signaling pathways. Most reports rely on data from varied samples that vary tremendously with respect to methylation. Results: We observed that hyperplastic/malignant (H/M) thyroid tissue and benign/manligant (B/M) tissue had the most profoundly methylated loci compared to hyperplastic/benign (H/B) tissue. These loci are mapped to 863 genes (|Δβ value| > 0.15) in B/M and 1082 genes (|Δβ value| > 0.15) in H/M. After bioinformatic analysis, these genes were found to be involved in T-cell receptor signaling pathway (B/M) and Jak–Stat signaling pathways (H/M). Conclusion: Our study offers the most comprehensive DNA methylation data for thyroid disease to date, using 1 patient with 3 tissue types and high-resolution 450K arrays. Our data may lay the foundation for future identification of novel epigenetic targets or diagnosis of thyroid cancer. PMID:27583899

  7. 5′-Cytosine-Phosphoguanine (CpG) Methylation Impacts the Activity of Natural and Engineered Meganucleases

    PubMed Central

    Valton, Julien; Daboussi, Fayza; Leduc, Sophie; Molina, Rafael; Redondo, Pilar; Macmaster, Rachel; Montoya, Guillermo; Duchateau, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we asked whether CpG methylation could influence the DNA binding affinity and activity of meganucleases used for genome engineering applications. A combination of biochemical and structural approaches enabled us to demonstrate that CpG methylation decreases I-CreI DNA binding affinity and inhibits its endonuclease activity in vitro. This inhibition depends on the position of the methylated cytosine within the DNA target and was almost total when it is located inside the central tetrabase. Crystal structures of I-CreI bound to methylated cognate target DNA suggested a molecular basis for such inhibition, although the precise mechanism still has to be specified. Finally, we demonstrated that the efficacy of engineered meganucleases can be diminished by CpG methylation of the targeted endogenous site, and we proposed a rational design of the meganuclease DNA binding domain to alleviate such an effect. We conclude that although activity and sequence specificity of engineered meganucleases are crucial parameters, target DNA epigenetic modifications need to be considered for successful gene editions. PMID:22740697

  8. Cytosine methylation in CTF and Sp1 recognition sites of an HSV tk promoter: effects on transcription in vivo and on factor binding in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Hattar, J; Beard, P; Jiricny, J

    1989-01-01

    We methylated specific cytosine residues within or immediately around the CTF and Sp1 binding sites of the Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase promoter. The efficiency of transcription in vivo was reduced at least 50-fold compared with transcription from the unmethylated promoter. However, methylation within the CTF recognition site had no effect on the affinity of CTF for this site in vitro. Methylation of the Sp1 site resulted in only a small decrease in the affinity of this factor for its recognition site. In vivo studies showed that the same gene inserted in different vector DNAs was regulated differently by methylation in the promoter. These results show that cytosine methylation can inhibit transcription by a mechanism other than directly blocking the binding of transcription factors. Images PMID:2557588

  9. Genome-Wide DNA Methylation Analysis of Human Pancreatic Islets from Type 2 Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Donors Identifies Candidate Genes That Influence Insulin Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Dayeh, Tasnim; Volkov, Petr; Salö, Sofia; Hall, Elin; Nilsson, Emma; Olsson, Anders H.; Kirkpatrick, Clare L.; Wollheim, Claes B.; Eliasson, Lena; Rönn, Tina; Bacos, Karl; Ling, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    Impaired insulin secretion is a hallmark of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Epigenetics may affect disease susceptibility. To describe the human methylome in pancreatic islets and determine the epigenetic basis of T2D, we analyzed DNA methylation of 479,927 CpG sites and the transcriptome in pancreatic islets from T2D and non-diabetic donors. We provide a detailed map of the global DNA methylation pattern in human islets, β- and α-cells. Genomic regions close to the transcription start site showed low degrees of methylation and regions further away from the transcription start site such as the gene body, 3′UTR and intergenic regions showed a higher degree of methylation. While CpG islands were hypomethylated, the surrounding 2 kb shores showed an intermediate degree of methylation, whereas regions further away (shelves and open sea) were hypermethylated in human islets, β- and α-cells. We identified 1,649 CpG sites and 853 genes, including TCF7L2, FTO and KCNQ1, with differential DNA methylation in T2D islets after correction for multiple testing. The majority of the differentially methylated CpG sites had an intermediate degree of methylation and were underrepresented in CpG islands (∼7%) and overrepresented in the open sea (∼60%). 102 of the differentially methylated genes, including CDKN1A, PDE7B, SEPT9 and EXOC3L2, were differentially expressed in T2D islets. Methylation of CDKN1A and PDE7B promoters in vitro suppressed their transcriptional activity. Functional analyses demonstrated that identified candidate genes affect pancreatic β- and α-cells as Exoc3l silencing reduced exocytosis and overexpression of Cdkn1a, Pde7b and Sept9 perturbed insulin and glucagon secretion in clonal β- and α-cells, respectively. Together, our data can serve as a reference methylome in human islets. We provide new target genes with altered DNA methylation and expression in human T2D islets that contribute to perturbed insulin and glucagon secretion. These results highlight

  10. Accurate CpG and non-CpG cytosine methylation analysis by high-throughput locus-specific pyrosequencing in plants.

    PubMed

    How-Kit, Alexandre; Daunay, Antoine; Mazaleyrat, Nicolas; Busato, Florence; Daviaud, Christian; Teyssier, Emeline; Deleuze, Jean-François; Gallusci, Philippe; Tost, Jörg

    2015-07-01

    Pyrosequencing permits accurate quantification of DNA methylation of specific regions where the proportions of the C/T polymorphism induced by sodium bisulfite treatment of DNA reflects the DNA methylation level. The commercially available high-throughput locus-specific pyrosequencing instruments allow for the simultaneous analysis of 96 samples, but restrict the DNA methylation analysis to CpG dinucleotide sites, which can be limiting in many biological systems. In contrast to mammals where DNA methylation occurs nearly exclusively on CpG dinucleotides, plants genomes harbor DNA methylation also in other sequence contexts including CHG and CHH motives, which cannot be evaluated by these pyrosequencing instruments due to software limitations. Here, we present a complete pipeline for accurate CpG and non-CpG cytosine methylation analysis at single base-resolution using high-throughput locus-specific pyrosequencing. The devised approach includes the design and validation of PCR amplification on bisulfite-treated DNA and pyrosequencing assays as well as the quantification of the methylation level at every cytosine from the raw peak intensities of the Pyrograms by two newly developed Visual Basic Applications. Our method presents accurate and reproducible results as exemplified by the cytosine methylation analysis of the promoter regions of two Tomato genes (NOR and CNR) encoding transcription regulators of fruit ripening during different stages of fruit development. Our results confirmed a significant and temporally coordinated loss of DNA methylation on specific cytosines during the early stages of fruit development in both promoters as previously shown by WGBS. The manuscript describes thus the first high-throughput locus-specific DNA methylation analysis in plants using pyrosequencing.

  11. Accurate CpG and non-CpG cytosine methylation analysis by high-throughput locus-specific pyrosequencing in plants.

    PubMed

    How-Kit, Alexandre; Daunay, Antoine; Mazaleyrat, Nicolas; Busato, Florence; Daviaud, Christian; Teyssier, Emeline; Deleuze, Jean-François; Gallusci, Philippe; Tost, Jörg

    2015-07-01

    Pyrosequencing permits accurate quantification of DNA methylation of specific regions where the proportions of the C/T polymorphism induced by sodium bisulfite treatment of DNA reflects the DNA methylation level. The commercially available high-throughput locus-specific pyrosequencing instruments allow for the simultaneous analysis of 96 samples, but restrict the DNA methylation analysis to CpG dinucleotide sites, which can be limiting in many biological systems. In contrast to mammals where DNA methylation occurs nearly exclusively on CpG dinucleotides, plants genomes harbor DNA methylation also in other sequence contexts including CHG and CHH motives, which cannot be evaluated by these pyrosequencing instruments due to software limitations. Here, we present a complete pipeline for accurate CpG and non-CpG cytosine methylation analysis at single base-resolution using high-throughput locus-specific pyrosequencing. The devised approach includes the design and validation of PCR amplification on bisulfite-treated DNA and pyrosequencing assays as well as the quantification of the methylation level at every cytosine from the raw peak intensities of the Pyrograms by two newly developed Visual Basic Applications. Our method presents accurate and reproducible results as exemplified by the cytosine methylation analysis of the promoter regions of two Tomato genes (NOR and CNR) encoding transcription regulators of fruit ripening during different stages of fruit development. Our results confirmed a significant and temporally coordinated loss of DNA methylation on specific cytosines during the early stages of fruit development in both promoters as previously shown by WGBS. The manuscript describes thus the first high-throughput locus-specific DNA methylation analysis in plants using pyrosequencing. PMID:26072424

  12. Genome-wide DNA methylation study suggests epigenetic accessibility and transcriptional poising of interferon-regulated genes in naïve CD4+ T cells from lupus patients.

    PubMed

    Coit, Patrick; Jeffries, Matlock; Altorok, Nezam; Dozmorov, Mikhail G; Koelsch, Kristi A; Wren, Jonathan D; Merrill, Joan T; McCune, W Joseph; Sawalha, Amr H

    2013-06-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune disease characterized by multi-system involvement and autoantibody production. Abnormal T cell DNA methylation and type-I interferon play an important role in the pathogenesis of lupus. We performed a genome-wide DNA methylation study in two independent sets of lupus patients and matched healthy controls to characterize the DNA methylome in naïve CD4+ T cells in lupus. DNA methylation was quantified for over 485,000 methylation sites across the genome, and differentially methylated sites between lupus patients and controls were identified and then independently replicated. Gene expression analysis was also performed from the same cells to investigate the relationship between the DNA methylation changes observed and mRNA expression levels. We identified and replicated 86 differentially methylated CG sites between patients and controls in 47 genes, with the majority being hypomethylated. We observed significant hypomethylation in interferon-regulated genes in naïve CD4+ T cells from lupus patients, including IFIT1, IFIT3, MX1, STAT1, IFI44L, USP18, TRIM22 and BST2, suggesting epigenetic transcriptional accessibility in these genetic loci. Indeed, the majority of the hypomethylated genes (21 out of 35 hypomethylated genes) are regulated by type I interferon. The hypomethylation in interferon-regulated genes was not related to lupus disease activity. Gene expression analysis showed overexpression of these genes in total but not naïve CD4+ T cells from lupus patients. Our data suggest epigenetic "poising" of interferon-regulated genes in lupus naïve CD4+ T cells, argue for a novel pathogenic implication for abnormal T cell DNA methylation in lupus, and suggest a mechanism for type-I interferon hyper-responsiveness in lupus T cells.

  13. Influence of developmental lead exposure on expression of DNA methyltransferases and methyl cytosine-binding proteins in hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Schneider, J S; Kidd, S K; Anderson, D W

    2013-02-13

    Developmental exposure to lead (Pb) has adverse effects on cognitive functioning and behavior that can persist into adulthood. Exposures that occur during fetal or early life periods may produce changes in brain related to physiological re-programming from an epigenetic influence such as altered DNA methylation status. Since DNA methylation is regulated by DNA methyltransferases and methyl cytosine-binding proteins, this study assessed the extent to which developmental Pb exposure might affect expression of these proteins in the hippocampus. Long Evans dams were fed chow with or without added Pb acetate (0, 150, 375, 750 ppm) prior to breeding and remained on the same diet through weaning (perinatal exposure group). Other animals were exposed to the same doses of Pb but exposure started on postnatal day 1 and continued through weaning (early postnatal exposure group). All animals were euthanized on day 55 and hippocampi were removed. Western blot analyses showed significant effects of Pb exposure on DNMT1, DNMT3a, and MeCP2 expression, with effects often seen at the lowest level of exposure and modified by sex and developmental window of Pb exposure. These data suggest potential epigenetic effects of developmental Pb exposure on DNA methylation mediated at least in part through dysregulation of methyltransferases. PMID:23246732

  14. C(m)CGG methylation-independent parent-of-origin effects on genome-wide transcript levels in isogenic reciprocal F1 triploid plants.

    PubMed

    Donoghue, Mark T A; Fort, Antoine; Clifton, Rachel; Zhang, Xu; McKeown, Peter C; Voigt-Zielinksi, M L; Borevitz, Justin O; Spillane, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Triploid F1 hybrids generated via reciprocal interploidy crosses between genetically distinct parental plants can display parent-of-origin effects on gene expression or phenotypes. Reciprocal triploid F1 isogenic plants generated from interploidy crosses in the same genetic background allow investigation on parent-of-origin-specific (parental) genome-dosage effects without confounding effects of hybridity involving heterozygous mutations. Whole-genome transcriptome profiling was conducted on reciprocal F1 isogenic triploid (3x) seedlings of A. thaliana. The genetically identical reciprocal 3x genotypes had either an excess of maternally inherited 3x(m) or paternally inherited 3x(p) genomes. We identify a major parent-of-origin-dependent genome-dosage effect on transcript levels, whereby 602 genes exhibit differential expression between the reciprocal F1 triploids. In addition, using methylation-sensitive DNA tiling arrays, constitutive and polymorphic CG DNA methylation patterns at CCGG sites were analysed, which revealed that paternal-excess F1 triploid seedling C(m)CGG sites are overall hypermethylated. However, no correlation exists between C(m)CGG methylation polymorphisms and transcriptome dysregulation between the isogenic reciprocal F1 triploids. Overall, our study indicates that parental genome-dosage effects on the transcriptome levels occur in paternal-excess triploids, which are independent of C(m)CGG methylation polymorphisms. Such findings have implications for understanding parental effects and genome-dosage effects on gene expression and phenotypes in polyploid plants. PMID:24212467

  15. Genome-wide DNA methylation profiles and their replationship with mRNA and the microRNA transcriptome in bovine muscle tissue (Bos Taurine)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DNA methylation is a key epigenetic modification in mammals, having essential and important roles in muscle development. We sample longissimus thoracis tissues from a well-known elite native breed of Chinese Qinchuan cattle living within comparable environments at fetal and adult stages, using methy...

  16. Genome-wide methylation analysis in vestibular schwannomas shows putative mechanisms of gene expression modulation and global hypomethylation at the HOX gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Torres-Martín, Miguel; Lassaletta, Luis; de Campos, Jose M; Isla, Alberto; Pinto, Giovanny R; Burbano, Rommel R; Melendez, Bárbara; Castresana, Javier S; Rey, Juan A

    2015-04-01

    Schwannomas are tumors that develop from Schwann cells in the peripheral nerves and commonly arise from the vestibular nerve. Vestibular schwannomas can present unilaterally and sporadically or bilaterally when the tumor is associated with neurofibromatosis Type 2 (NF2) syndrome. The molecular hallmark of the disease is biallelic inactivation of the NF2 gene. The epigenetic signature of schwannomas remains poorly understood and is mostly limited to DNA methylation of the NF2 gene, whose altered expression due to epigenetic factors in this tumor is controversial. In this study, we tested the genomewide DNA methylation pattern of schwannomas to shed light on this epigenetic alteration in these particular tumors. The methodology used includes Infinium Human Methylation 450K BeadChip microarrays in a series of 36 vestibular schwannomas, 4 nonvestibular schwannomas, and 5 healthy nerves. Our results show a trend toward hypomethylation in schwannomas. Furthermore, homeobox (HOX) genes, located at four clusters in the genome, displayed hypomethylation in several CpG sites in the vestibular schwannomas but not in the nonvestibular schwannomas. Several microRNA (miRNA) and protein-coding genes were also found to be hypomethylated at promoter regions and were confirmed as upregulated by expression analysis; including miRNA-21, Met Proto-Oncogene (MET), and PMEPA1. We also detected methylation patterns that might be involved in alternative transcripts of several genes such as NRXN1 or MBP, which would increase the complexity of the methylation and expression patterns. Overall, our results show specific epigenetic signatures in several coding genes and miRNAs that could potentially be used as therapeutic targets. PMID:25533176

  17. Genomic Change, Retrotransposon Mobilization and Extensive Cytosine Methylation Alteration in Brassica napus Introgressions from Two Intertribal Hybridizations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xueli; Ge, Xianhong; Shao, Yujiao; Sun, Genlou; Li, Zaiyun

    2013-01-01

    Hybridization and introgression represent important means for the transfer and/or de novo origination of traits and play an important role in facilitating speciation and plant breeding. Two sets of introgression lines in Brassica napus L. were previously established by its intertribal hybridizations with two wild species and long-term selection. In this study, the methods of amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP), sequence-specific amplification polymorphism (SSAP) and methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP) were used to determine their genomic change, retrotransposon mobilization and cytosine methylation alteration in these lines. The genomic change revealed by the loss or gain of AFLP bands occurred for ∼10% of the total bands amplified in the two sets of introgressions, while no bands specific for wild species were detected. The new and absent SSAP bands appeared for 9 out of 11 retrotransposons analyzed, with low frequency of new bands and their total percentage of about 5% in both sets. MSAP analysis indicated that methylation changes were common in these lines (33.4–39.8%) and the hypermethylation was more frequent than hypomethylation. Our results suggested that certain extents of genetic and epigenetic alterations were induced by hybridization and alien DNA introgression. The cryptic mechanism of these changes and potential application of these lines in breeding were also discussed. PMID:23468861

  18. An Integrated Analysis of the Genome-Wide Profiles of DNA Methylation and mRNA Expression Defining the Side Population of a Human Malignant Mesothelioma Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myung-Chul; Kim, Na-Yon; Seo, Yu-Ri; Kim, Yongbaek

    2016-01-01

    Intratumoral heterogeneity is a hallmark of all cancers and functions as the major barrier against effective cancer therapy. In contrast to genetic mutations, the role of epigenetic modifications in the generation and maintenance of heterogeneous cancer cells remains largely undetermined. This study was performed to evaluate the epigenetic mechanisms involved in the tumor cell heterogeneity using side population (SP) and non-SP cells isolated from a human malignant mesothelioma (HMM) cell line. The subpopulations of cancer cells were analyzed by methylated DNA immunoprecipitation combined with high-throughput sequencing (MeDIP-seq) and RNA-seq methodology. The RNA-seq data were analyzed with the MeDIP-seq data in an integrated way to identify the epigenetically modified genes that defined the SP. Concomitant changes in mRNA expression and DNA methylation were found in 122 genes, including 118 down-regulated genes with hypermethylation and 4 up-regulated genes with hypomethylation. Gene ontology revealed that a large portion of the genes belonged to the groups of biological processes such as stem cell maintenance, stem cell development, stem cell differentiation, and the negative regulation of the developmental process. Among these genes, BNC1, RPS6KA3, TWSG1 and DUSP15 contained aberrant methylation in the CpG islands of the promoter region, indicating that the genes regulated by DNA methylation characterized a distinct subpopulation of HMM cells. The present study provided valuable information to shed light on the epigenetic contributions to the generation and maintenance of tumor cell heterogeneity. PMID:27698904

  19. An Integrated Analysis of the Genome-Wide Profiles of DNA Methylation and mRNA Expression Defining the Side Population of a Human Malignant Mesothelioma Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myung-Chul; Kim, Na-Yon; Seo, Yu-Ri; Kim, Yongbaek

    2016-01-01

    Intratumoral heterogeneity is a hallmark of all cancers and functions as the major barrier against effective cancer therapy. In contrast to genetic mutations, the role of epigenetic modifications in the generation and maintenance of heterogeneous cancer cells remains largely undetermined. This study was performed to evaluate the epigenetic mechanisms involved in the tumor cell heterogeneity using side population (SP) and non-SP cells isolated from a human malignant mesothelioma (HMM) cell line. The subpopulations of cancer cells were analyzed by methylated DNA immunoprecipitation combined with high-throughput sequencing (MeDIP-seq) and RNA-seq methodology. The RNA-seq data were analyzed with the MeDIP-seq data in an integrated way to identify the epigenetically modified genes that defined the SP. Concomitant changes in mRNA expression and DNA methylation were found in 122 genes, including 118 down-regulated genes with hypermethylation and 4 up-regulated genes with hypomethylation. Gene ontology revealed that a large portion of the genes belonged to the groups of biological processes such as stem cell maintenance, stem cell development, stem cell differentiation, and the negative regulation of the developmental process. Among these genes, BNC1, RPS6KA3, TWSG1 and DUSP15 contained aberrant methylation in the CpG islands of the promoter region, indicating that the genes regulated by DNA methylation characterized a distinct subpopulation of HMM cells. The present study provided valuable information to shed light on the epigenetic contributions to the generation and maintenance of tumor cell heterogeneity.

  20. DNA methylation by wheat cytosine DNA methyltransferase: modulation by protease inhibitor E-64.

    PubMed

    Vlasova, T I; Vanyushin, B F

    1998-06-01

    Cytosine DNA methyltransferase isolated from wheat seedlings and purified in the presence of metalloprotease and serine protease inhibitors has molecular mass and specific activity equal to about 85 kDa and 250 units/mg protein, respectively. Apparent K(m) for AdoMet and [I]50 for AdoHcy values are about 6 microM and 12 microM, respectively. The enzyme is active in wide pH range (pH 5.5-8.5) and is inhibited by NaCl. The enzyme rapidly loses its methyltransferase activity in the absence of substrates. Using the cysteine protease inhibitor E-64 it has been shown that rapid enzyme inactivation is caused by disappearance of essential enzyme SH-groups but is not due to proteolytic enzyme cleavage. PMID:9635138

  1. Genome-Wide DNA Methylation Profiling Reveals Epigenetic Changes in the Rat Nucleus Accumbens Associated With Cross-Generational Effects of Adolescent THC Exposure.

    PubMed

    Watson, Corey T; Szutorisz, Henrietta; Garg, Paras; Martin, Qammarah; Landry, Joseph A; Sharp, Andrew J; Hurd, Yasmin L

    2015-12-01

    Drug exposure during critical periods of development is known to have lasting effects, increasing one's risk for developing mental health disorders. Emerging evidence has also indicated the possibility for drug exposure to even impact subsequent generations. Our previous work demonstrated that adolescent exposure to Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main psychoactive component of marijuana (Cannabis sativa), in a Long-Evans rat model affects reward-related behavior and gene regulation in the subsequent (F1) generation unexposed to the drug. Questions, however, remained regarding potential epigenetic consequences. In the current study, using the same rat model, we employed Enhanced Reduced Representation Bisulfite Sequencing to interrogate the epigenome of the nucleus accumbens, a key brain area involved in reward processing. This analysis compared 16 animals with parental THC exposure and 16 without to characterize relevant systems-level changes in DNA methylation. We identified 1027 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) associated with parental THC exposure in F1 adults, each represented by multiple CpGs. These DMRs fell predominantly within introns, exons, and intergenic intervals, while showing a significant depletion in gene promoters. From these, we identified a network of DMR-associated genes involved in glutamatergic synaptic regulation, which also exhibited altered mRNA expression in the nucleus accumbens. These data provide novel insight into drug-related cross-generational epigenetic effects, and serve as a useful resource for investigators to explore novel neurobiological systems underlying drug abuse vulnerability.

  2. Mutation of the RDR1 gene caused genome-wide changes in gene expression, regional variation in small RNA clusters and localized alteration in DNA methylation in rice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Endogenous small (sm) RNAs (primarily si- and miRNAs) are important trans/cis-acting regulators involved in diverse cellular functions. In plants, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RDRs) are essential for smRNA biogenesis. It has been established that RDR2 is involved in the 24 nt siRNA-dependent RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) pathway. Recent studies have suggested that RDR1 is involved in a second RdDM pathway that relies mostly on 21 nt smRNAs and functions to silence a subset of genomic loci that are usually refractory to the normal RdDM pathway in Arabidopsis. Whether and to what extent the homologs of RDR1 may have similar functions in other plants remained unknown. Results We characterized a loss-of-function mutant (Osrdr1) of the OsRDR1 gene in rice (Oryza sativa L.) derived from a retrotransposon Tos17 insertion. Microarray analysis identified 1,175 differentially expressed genes (5.2% of all expressed genes in the shoot-tip tissue of rice) between Osrdr1 and WT, of which 896 and 279 genes were up- and down-regulated, respectively, in Osrdr1. smRNA sequencing revealed regional alterations in smRNA clusters across the rice genome. Some of the regions with altered smRNA clusters were associated with changes in DNA methylation. In addition, altered expression of several miRNAs was detected in Osrdr1, and at least some of which were associated with altered expression of predicted miRNA target genes. Despite these changes, no phenotypic difference was identified in Osrdr1 relative to WT under normal condition; however, ephemeral phenotypic fluctuations occurred under some abiotic stress conditions. Conclusions Our results showed that OsRDR1 plays a role in regulating a substantial number of endogenous genes with diverse functions in rice through smRNA-mediated pathways involving DNA methylation, and which participates in abiotic stress response. PMID:24980094

  3. Reduced activity of Arabidopsis chromosome-cohesion regulator gene CTF7/ECO1 alters cytosine methylation status and retrotransposon expression.

    PubMed

    Bolaños-Villegas, Pablo; Jauh, Guang-Yuh

    2015-01-01

    Multicellular organisms such as higher plants require timely regulation of DNA replication and cell division to grow and develop. Recent work in Arabidopsis has shown that chromosome segregation during meiosis and mitosis depends on the activity of several genes that in yeast are involved in the establishment of chromosomal cohesion. In this process, proteins of the structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) family tether chromosomes and establish inter- and intrachromosomal connections. In Arabidopsis, recruitment of SMC proteins and establishment of cohesion during key stages of the cell cycle depend on the activity of chromosome transmission fidelity 7/establishment of cohesion 1 (CTF7/ECO1). Here we show that loss of CTF7/ECO1 activity alters the status of cytosine methylation in both intergenic regions and transposon loci. An increase in expression was also observed for transposon copia28, which suggests a link between CTF7/ECO1 activity, DNA methylation and gene silencing. More work is needed to determine the mechanistic relationships that intervene in this process. PMID:26039473

  4. Reduced activity of Arabidopsis chromosome-cohesion regulator gene CTF7/ECO1 alters cytosine methylation status and retrotransposon expression

    PubMed Central

    Bolaños-Villegas, Pablo; Jauh, Guang-Yuh

    2015-01-01

    Multicellular organisms such as higher plants require timely regulation of DNA replication and cell division to grow and develop. Recent work in Arabidopsis has shown that chromosome segregation during meiosis and mitosis depends on the activity of several genes that in yeast are involved in the establishment of chromosomal cohesion. In this process, proteins of the STRUCTURAL MAINTENANCE OF CHROMOSOMES (SMC) family tether chromosomes and establish inter- and intrachromosomal connections. In Arabidopsis, recruitment of SMC proteins and establishment of cohesion during key stages of the cell cycle depend on the activity of CHROMOSOME TRANSMISSION FIDELITY 7/ESTABLISHMENT OF COHESION 1 (CTF7/ECO1). Here we show that loss of CTF7/ECO1 activity alters the status of cytosine methylation in both intergenic regions and transposon loci. An increase in expression was also observed for transposon copia28, which suggests a link between CTF7/ECO1 activity, DNA methylation and gene silencing. More work is needed to determine the mechanistic relationships that intervene in this process. PMID:26039473

  5. Hydration properties of natural and synthetic DNA sequences with methylated adenine or cytosine bases in the R.DpnI target and BDNF promoter studied by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Shanak, Siba; Helms, Volkhard

    2014-12-14

    Adenine and cytosine methylation are two important epigenetic modifications of DNA sequences at the levels of the genome and transcriptome. To characterize the differential roles of methylating adenine or cytosine with respect to their hydration properties, we performed conventional MD simulations and free energy perturbation calculations for two particular DNA sequences, namely the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) promoter and the R.DpnI-bound DNA that are known to undergo methylation of C5-methyl cytosine and N6-methyl adenine, respectively. We found that a single methylated cytosine has a clearly favorable hydration free energy over cytosine since the attached methyl group has a slightly polar character. In contrast, capping the strongly polar N6 of adenine with a methyl group gives a slightly unfavorable contribution to its free energy of solvation. Performing the same demethylation in the context of a DNA double-strand gave quite similar results for the more solvent-accessible cytosine but much more unfavorable results for the rather buried adenine. Interestingly, the same demethylation reactions are far more unfavorable when performed in the context of the opposite (BDNF or R.DpnI target) sequence. This suggests a natural preference for methylation in a specific sequence context. In addition, free energy calculations for demethylating adenine or cytosine in the context of B-DNA vs. Z-DNA suggest that the conformational B-Z transition of DNA transition is rather a property of cytosine methylated sequences but is not preferable for the adenine-methylated sequences investigated here.

  6. Hydration properties of natural and synthetic DNA sequences with methylated adenine or cytosine bases in the R.DpnI target and BDNF promoter studied by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanak, Siba; Helms, Volkhard

    2014-12-01

    Adenine and cytosine methylation are two important epigenetic modifications of DNA sequences at the levels of the genome and transcriptome. To characterize the differential roles of methylating adenine or cytosine with respect to their hydration properties, we performed conventional MD simulations and free energy perturbation calculations for two particular DNA sequences, namely the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) promoter and the R.DpnI-bound DNA that are known to undergo methylation of C5-methyl cytosine and N6-methyl adenine, respectively. We found that a single methylated cytosine has a clearly favorable hydration free energy over cytosine since the attached methyl group has a slightly polar character. In contrast, capping the strongly polar N6 of adenine with a methyl group gives a slightly unfavorable contribution to its free energy of solvation. Performing the same demethylation in the context of a DNA double-strand gave quite similar results for the more solvent-accessible cytosine but much more unfavorable results for the rather buried adenine. Interestingly, the same demethylation reactions are far more unfavorable when performed in the context of the opposite (BDNF or R.DpnI target) sequence. This suggests a natural preference for methylation in a specific sequence context. In addition, free energy calculations for demethylating adenine or cytosine in the context of B-DNA vs. Z-DNA suggest that the conformational B-Z transition of DNA transition is rather a property of cytosine methylated sequences but is not preferable for the adenine-methylated sequences investigated here.

  7. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis of Haloferax volcanii H26 and identification of DNA methyltransferase related PD-(D/E)XK nuclease family protein HVO_A0006

    PubMed Central

    Ouellette, Matthew; Jackson, Laura; Chimileski, Scott; Papke, R. Thane

    2015-01-01

    Restriction-modification (RM) systems have evolved to protect the cell from invading DNAs and are composed of two enzymes: a DNA methyltransferase and a restriction endonuclease. Although RM systems are present in both archaeal and bacterial genomes, DNA methylation in archaea has not been well defined. In order to characterize the function of RM systems in archaeal species, we have made use of the model haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii. A genomic DNA methylation analysis of H. volcanii strain H26 was performed using PacBio single molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing. This analysis was also performed on a strain of H. volcanii in which an annotated DNA methyltransferase gene HVO_A0006 was deleted from the genome. Sequence analysis of H26 revealed two motifs which are modified in the genome: Cm4TAG and GCAm6BN6VTGC. Analysis of the ΔHVO_A0006 strain indicated that it exhibited reduced adenine methylation compared to the parental strain and altered the detected adenine motif. However, protein domain architecture analysis and amino acid alignments revealed that HVO_A0006 is homologous only to the N-terminal endonuclease region of Type IIG RM proteins and contains a PD-(D/E)XK nuclease motif, suggesting that HVO_A0006 is a PD-(D/E)XK nuclease family protein. Further bioinformatic analysis of the HVO_A0006 gene demonstrated that the gene is rare among the Halobacteria. It is surrounded by two transposition genes suggesting that HVO_A0006 is a fragment of a Type IIG RM gene, which has likely been acquired through gene transfer, and affects restriction-modification activity by interacting with another RM system component(s). Here, we present the first genome-wide characterization of DNA methylation in an archaeal species and examine the function of a DNA methyltransferase related gene HVO_A0006. PMID:25904898

  8. Exposure of JB-6 mouse epidermal cells to 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate is not accompanied by a significant change in total DNA-cytosine methylation.

    PubMed

    Bondy, G P; Denhardt, D T

    1983-12-01

    The extent of methylation of the cytosine bases in DNA is believed to be a major factor influencing gene expression in eukaryotic cells. We have asked whether the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) alters the amount of 5-methylcytosine in DNA. The amount and relative distribution of 5-methylcytosine in the DNA of two subclones of the JB-6 mouse epidermal cell line were determined respectively by high performance liquid chromatography and digestion with the restriction enzymes MspI and HpaII. Exposure to TPA for up to several cell generations had no detectable effect on the degree of DNA methylation (3.9% of the total cytosine) in the two JB-6 lines or Friend erythroleukemia cells. Reduced methylation was readily detected in DNA extracted from cells exposed to 5-azacytidine. The data suggest that tumor promotion (at least that induced by TPA) is likely not the consequence of a generalized elevation or reduction in the amount of 5-methyl-cytosine in the DNA.

  9. Small RNA-mediated DNA (cytosine-5) methyltransferase 1 inhibition leads to aberrant DNA methylation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guoqiang; Estève, Pierre-Olivier; Chin, Hang Gyeong; Terragni, Jolyon; Dai, Nan; Corrêa, Ivan R.; Pradhan, Sriharsa

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian cells contain copious amounts of RNA including both coding and noncoding RNA (ncRNA). Generally the ncRNAs function to regulate gene expression at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. Among ncRNA, the long ncRNA and small ncRNA can affect histone modification, DNA methylation targeting and gene silencing. Here we show that endogenous DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) co-purifies with inhibitory ncRNAs. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) bind directly to DNMT1 with high affinity. The binding of miRNAs, such as miR-155-5p, leads to inhibition of DNMT1 enzyme activity. Exogenous miR-155-5p in cells induces aberrant DNA methylation of the genome, resulting in hypomethylation of low to moderately methylated regions. And small shift of hypermethylation of previously hypomethylated region was also observed. Furthermore, hypomethylation led to activation of genes. Based on these observations, overexpression of miR-155-5p resulted in aberrant DNA methylation by inhibiting DNMT1 activity, resulting in altered gene expression. PMID:25990724

  10. Genome-wide methylation profiling identifies an essential role of reactive oxygen species in pediatric glioblastoma multiforme and validates a methylome specific for H3 histone family 3A with absence of G-CIMP/isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Prerana; Pia Patric, Irene Rosita; Shukla, Sudhanshu; Pathak, Pankaj; Pal, Jagriti; Sharma, Vikas; Thinagararanjan, Sivaarumugam; Santosh, Vani; Suri, Vaishali; Sharma, Mehar Chand; Arivazhagan, Arimappamagan; Suri, Ashish; Gupta, Deepak; Somasundaram, Kumaravel; Sarkar, Chitra

    2014-01-01

    Background Pediatric glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is rare, and there is a single study, a seminal discovery showing association of histone H3.3 and isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH)1 mutation with a DNA methylation signature. The present study aims to validate these findings in an independent cohort of pediatric GBM, compare it with adult GBM, and evaluate the involvement of important functionally altered pathways. Methods Genome-wide methylation profiling of 21 pediatric GBM cases was done and compared with adult GBM data (GSE22867). We performed gene mutation analysis of IDH1 and H3 histone family 3A (H3F3A), status evaluation of glioma cytosine–phosphate–guanine island methylator phenotype (G-CIMP), and Gene Ontology analysis. Experimental evaluation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) association was also done. Results Distinct differences were noted between methylomes of pediatric and adult GBM. Pediatric GBM was characterized by 94 hypermethylated and 1206 hypomethylated cytosine–phosphate–guanine (CpG) islands, with 3 distinct clusters, having a trend to prognostic correlation. Interestingly, none of the pediatric GBM cases showed G-CIMP/IDH1 mutation. Gene Ontology analysis identified ROS association in pediatric GBM, which was experimentally validated. H3F3A mutants (36.4%; all K27M) harbored distinct methylomes and showed enrichment of processes related to neuronal development, differentiation, and cell-fate commitment. Conclusions Our study confirms that pediatric GBM has a distinct methylome compared with that of adults. Presence of distinct clusters and an H3F3A mutation–specific methylome indicate existence of epigenetic subgroups within pediatric GBM. Absence of IDH1/G-CIMP status further indicates that findings in adult GBM cannot be simply extrapolated to pediatric GBM and that there is a strong need for identification of separate prognostic markers. A possible role of ROS in pediatric GBM pathogenesis is demonstrated for the first time and

  11. Patterns of sequence loss and cytosine methylation within a population of newly resynthesized Brassica napus allopolyploids.

    PubMed

    Lukens, Lewis N; Pires, J Chris; Leon, Enrique; Vogelzang, Robert; Oslach, Lynne; Osborn, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Allopolyploid formation requires the adaptation of two nuclear genomes within a single cytoplasm, which may involve programmed genetic and epigenetic changes during the initial generations following genome fusion. To study the dynamics of genome change, we synthesized 49 isogenic Brassica napus allopolyploids and surveyed them with 76 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) probes and 30 simple sequence repeat (SSR) primer pairs. Here, we report on the types and distribution of genetic and epigenetic changes within the S(1) genotypes. We found that insertion/deletion (indel) events were rare, but not random. Of the 57,710 (54,383 RFLP and 3,327 SSR) parental fragments expected among the amphidiploids, we observed 56,676 or 99.9%. Three loci derived from Brassica rapa had indels, and one indel occurred repeatedly across 29% (14/49) of the lines. Loss of one parental fragment was due to the 400-bp reduction of a guanine-adenine dinucleotide repeat-rich sequence. In contrast to the 4% (3/76) RFLP probes that detected indels, 48% (35/73) detected changes in the CpG methylation status between parental genomes and the S1 lines. Some loci were far more likely than others to undergo epigenetic change, but the number of methylation changes within each synthetic polyploid was remarkably similar to others. Clear de novo methylation occurred at a much higher frequency than de novo demethylation within allopolyploid sequences derived from B. rapa. Our results suggest that there is little genetic change in the S(0) generation of resynthesized B. napus polyploids. In contrast, DNA methylation was altered extensively in a pattern that indicates tight regulation of epigenetic changes.

  12. Patterns of sequence loss and cytosine methylation within a population of newly resynthesized Brassica napus allopolyploids.

    PubMed

    Lukens, Lewis N; Pires, J Chris; Leon, Enrique; Vogelzang, Robert; Oslach, Lynne; Osborn, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Allopolyploid formation requires the adaptation of two nuclear genomes within a single cytoplasm, which may involve programmed genetic and epigenetic changes during the initial generations following genome fusion. To study the dynamics of genome change, we synthesized 49 isogenic Brassica napus allopolyploids and surveyed them with 76 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) probes and 30 simple sequence repeat (SSR) primer pairs. Here, we report on the types and distribution of genetic and epigenetic changes within the S(1) genotypes. We found that insertion/deletion (indel) events were rare, but not random. Of the 57,710 (54,383 RFLP and 3,327 SSR) parental fragments expected among the amphidiploids, we observed 56,676 or 99.9%. Three loci derived from Brassica rapa had indels, and one indel occurred repeatedly across 29% (14/49) of the lines. Loss of one parental fragment was due to the 400-bp reduction of a guanine-adenine dinucleotide repeat-rich sequence. In contrast to the 4% (3/76) RFLP probes that detected indels, 48% (35/73) detected changes in the CpG methylation status between parental genomes and the S1 lines. Some loci were far more likely than others to undergo epigenetic change, but the number of methylation changes within each synthetic polyploid was remarkably similar to others. Clear de novo methylation occurred at a much higher frequency than de novo demethylation within allopolyploid sequences derived from B. rapa. Our results suggest that there is little genetic change in the S(0) generation of resynthesized B. napus polyploids. In contrast, DNA methylation was altered extensively in a pattern that indicates tight regulation of epigenetic changes. PMID:16377753

  13. Genome-wide epigenetic modifications in cancer.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoon Jung; Claus, Rainer; Weichenhan, Dieter; Plass, Christoph

    2011-01-01

    Epigenetic alterations in cancer include changes in DNA methylation and associated histone modifications that influence the chromatin states and impact gene expression patterns. Due to recent technological advantages, the scientific community is now obtaining a better picture of the genome-wide epigenetic changes that occur in a cancer genome. These epigenetic alterations are associated with chromosomal instability and changes in transcriptional control which influence the overall gene expression differences seen in many human malignancies. In this review, we will briefly summarize our current knowledge of the epigenetic patterns and mechanisms of gene regulation in healthy tissues and relate this to what is known for cancer genomes. Our focus will be on DNA methylation. We will review the current standing of technologies that have been developed over recent years. This field is experiencing a revolution in the strategies used to measure epigenetic alterations, which includes the incorporation of next generation sequencing tools. We also will review strategies that utilize epigenetic information for translational purposes, with a special emphasis on the potential use of DNA methylation marks for early disease detection and prognosis. The review will close with an outlook on challenges that this field is facing.

  14. FadE: whole genome methylation analysis for multiple sequencing platforms.

    PubMed

    Souaiaia, Tade; Zhang, Zheng; Chen, Ting

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation plays a central role in genomic regulation and disease. Sodium bisulfite treatment (SBT) causes unmethylated cytosines to be sequenced as thymine, which allows methylation levels to reflected in the number of 'C'-'C' alignments covering reference cytosines. Di-base color reads produced by lifetech's SOLiD sequencer provide unreliable results when translated to bases because single sequencing errors effect the downstream sequence. We describe FadE, an algorithm to accurately determine genome-wide methylation rates directly in color or nucleotide space. FadE uses SBT unmethylated and untreated data to determine background error rates and incorporate them into a model which uses Newton-Raphson optimization to estimate the methylation rate and provide a credible interval describing its distribution at every reference cytosine. We sequenced two slides of human fibroblast cell-line bisulfite-converted fragment library with the SOLiD sequencer to investigate genome-wide methylation levels. FadE reported widespread differences in methylation levels across CpG islands and a large number of differentially methylated regions adjacent to genes which compares favorably to the results of an investigation on the same cell-line using nucleotide-space reads at higher coverage levels, suggesting that FadE is an accurate method to estimate genome-wide methylation with color or nucleotide reads. http://code.google.com/p/fade/.

  15. Aberrant Promoter Methylation at CpG Cytosines Induce the Upregulation of the E2F5 Gene in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Arshad; Ullah, Farman; Ali, Irum Sabir; Faraz, Ahmad; Khan, Mumtaz; Shah, Syed Tahir Ali; Ali, Nawab

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The promoter methylation status of cell cycle regulatory genes plays a crucial role in the regulation of the eukaryotic cell cycle. CpG cytosines are actively subjected to methylation during tumorigenesis, resulting in gain/loss of function. E2F5 gene has growth repressive activities; various studies suggest its involvement in tumorigenesis. This study aims to investigate the epigenetic regulation of E2F5 in breast cancer to better understand tumor biology. Methods The promoter methylation status of 50 breast tumor tissues and adjacent normal control tissues was analyzed. mRNA expression was determined using SYBR® green quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and methylation-specific PCR was performed for bisulfite-modified genomic DNA using E2F5-specific primers to assess promoter methylation. Data was statistically analyzed. Results Significant (p<0.001) upregulation was observed in E2F5 expression among tumor tissues, relative to the control group. These samples were hypo-methylated at the E2F5 promoter region in the tumor tissues, compared to the control. Change in the methylation status (Δmeth) was significantly lower (p=0.022) in the tumor samples, indicating possible involvement in tumorigenesis. Patients at the postmenopausal stage showed higher methylation (75%) than those at the premenopausal stage (23.1%). Interestingly, methylation levels gradually increased from the early to the advanced stages of the disease (p<0.001), which suggests a putative role of E2F5 methylation in disease progression that can significantly modulate tumor biology at more advanced stage and at postmenopausal age (Pearson's r=0.99 and 0.86, respectively). Among tissues with different histological status, methylation frequency was higher in invasive lobular carcinoma (80.0%), followed by invasive ductal carcinoma (46.7%) and ductal carcinoma in situ (20.0%). Conclusion Methylation is an important epigenetic factor that might be involved in the upregulation of E2F5

  16. Genome-wide redistribution of H3K27me3 is linked to genotoxic stress and defective growth

    PubMed Central

    Basenko, Evelina Y.; Sasaki, Takahiko; Ji, Lexiang; Prybol, Cameron J.; Burckhardt, Rachel M.; Schmitz, Robert J.; Lewis, Zachary A.

    2015-01-01

    H3K9 methylation directs heterochromatin formation by recruiting multiple heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1)-containing complexes that deacetylate histones and methylate cytosine bases in DNA. In Neurospora crassa, a single H3K9 methyltransferase complex, called the DIM-5,-7,-9, CUL4, DDB1 Complex (DCDC), is required for normal growth and development. DCDC-deficient mutants are hypersensitive to the genotoxic agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), but the molecular basis of genotoxic stress is unclear. We found that both the MMS sensitivity and growth phenotypes of DCDC-deficient strains are suppressed by mutation of embryonic ectoderm development or Su-(var)3-9; E(z); Trithorax (set)-7, encoding components of the H3K27 methyltransferase Polycomb repressive complex-2 (PRC2). Trimethylated histone H3K27 (H3K27me3) undergoes genome-wide redistribution to constitutive heterochromatin in DCDC- or HP1-deficient mutants, and introduction of an H3K27 missense mutation is sufficient to rescue phenotypes of DCDC-deficient strains. Accumulation of H3K27me3 in heterochromatin does not compensate for silencing; rather, strains deficient for both DCDC and PRC2 exhibit synthetic sensitivity to the topoisomerase I inhibitor Camptothecin and accumulate γH2A at heterochromatin. Together, these data suggest that PRC2 modulates the response to genotoxic stress. PMID:26578794

  17. Emerging technologies for studying DNA methylation for the molecular diagnosis of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Marzese, Diego M.; Hoon, Dave S.B.

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism that plays a key role in regulating gene expression and other functions. Although this modification is seen in different sequence contexts, the most frequently detected DNA methylation in mammals involves cytosine-guanine dinucleotides. Pathological alterations in DNA methylation patterns are described in a variety of human diseases, including cancer. Unlike genetic changes, DNA methylation is heavily influenced by subtle modifications in the cellular microenvironment. In all cancers, aberrant DNA methylation is involved in the alteration of a large number of oncological pathways with relevant theranostic utility. Several technologies for DNA methylation mapping were recently developed and successfully applied in cancer studies. The scope of these technologies varies from assessing a single cytosine-guanine locus to genome-wide distribution of DNA methylation. Here, we review the strengths and weaknesses of these approaches in the context of clinical utility for the molecular diagnosis of human cancers. PMID:25797072

  18. Does urea promote the bisulfite-mediated deamination of cytosine in DNA? Investigation aiming at speeding-up the procedure for DNA methylation analysis.

    PubMed

    Hayatsu, Hikoya; Tsuji, Katsumi; Negishi, Kazuo

    2006-01-01

    Methylation of cytosine in DNA at position 5 plays important roles in gene functions. Changes in the methylation status are linked to cancer. These studies have been developed on the basis of determining 5-methylcytosine residues [mC] in DNA. This analytical procedure uses the principle that bisulfite deaminates cytosine [C] but it deaminates mC only very slowly. Thus, 'bisulfite genomic sequencing' involves treatment of a given DNA sample with bisulfite followed by PCR amplification and sequencing, through which C residues in the original DNA are found as T and mC as C. In this procedure, a treatment with 3-5 M sodium bisulfite for 12-16 hr at 55 degrees C has been conventionally used. Recently, we were able to improve the efficiency of this procedure by introducing a highly concentrated (10 M) bisulfite solution. Aiming at further improvement of the procedure, we have now explored the effect of adding urea in this bisulfite treatment, as urea was reported to improve the deamination efficiency. Using 7.5 M ammonium bisulfite (pH 5.4) at 70 degrees C with or without the presence of 6 M urea, we performed deamination and sequencing of a DNA sample having known multiple CpG sites with mC. The deaminated DNAs were then subjected to PCR amplification followed by sequencing. In the 15 min-treated sample, the deamination extents were; C 96.5%, mC 1.1% for "bisulfite-only"; and C 90.3%, mC 1.4% for "bisulfite + urea". In the 30 min-treated sample, these values were; C 99.7%, mC 3.6% for "bisulfite only"; and C 99.7%, mC 2.1% for "bisulfite + urea". These results indicate that urea did not enhance the deamination efficiency. In the PCR, we did not observe significant improvements regarding the amounts of DNA necessary to obtain adequate amplification. Urea at 2 M, 4 M, and 8 M, showed no improvements. We conclude that urea gave no significant effect in the bisulfite genomic sequencing of the DNA used. PMID:17150821

  19. Deciphering a methylome: what can we read into patterns of DNA methylation?

    PubMed

    Flores, Kevin B; Amdam, Gro V

    2011-10-01

    The methylation of cytosines within cytosine-guanine (CG) dinucleotides is an epigenetic mark that can modify gene transcription. With the advent of high-throughput sequencing, it is possible to map methylomes, i.e. detect methylated CGs on a genome-wide scale. The methylomes sequenced to date reveal a divergence in prevalence and targeting of CG methylation between taxa, despite the conservation of the DNA methyltransferase enzymes that cause DNA methylation. Therefore, interspecific methylation usage is predicted to diverge. In various taxa, this tenet gains support from patterns of CG depletion that can be traced in DNA before methylomes are explicitly mapped. Depletion of CGs in methylated genomic regions is expected because methylated cytosines are subject to increased mutability caused by nucleotide deamination. However, the basis of diverging interspecific methylation usage is less clear. We use insights from the methylome of honeybees (Apis mellifera) to emphasize the possible importance of organismal life histories in explaining methylation usage and the accuracy of methylation prediction based on CG depletion. Interestingly, methylated genes in honeybees are more conserved across taxa than non-methylated genes despite the divergence in utilization of methylation and the increased mutability caused by deamination.

  20. A/T Run Geometry of B-form DNA Is Independent of Bound Methyl-CpG Binding Domain, Cytosine Methylation and Flanking Sequence.

    PubMed

    Chia, Jyh Yea; Tan, Wen Siang; Ng, Chyan Leong; Hu, Nien-Jen; Foo, Hooi Ling; Ho, Kok Lian

    2016-08-09

    DNA methylation in a CpG context can be recognised by methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) via its methyl-CpG binding domain (MBD). An A/T run next to a methyl-CpG maximises the binding of MeCP2 to the methylated DNA. The A/T run characteristics are reported here with an X-ray structure of MBD A140V in complex with methylated DNA. The A/T run geometry was found to be strongly stabilised by a string of conserved water molecules regardless of its flanking nucleotide sequences, DNA methylation and bound MBD. New water molecules were found to stabilise the Rett syndrome-related E137, whose carboxylate group is salt bridged to R133. A structural comparison showed no difference between the wild type and MBD A140V. However, differential scanning calorimetry showed that the melting temperature of A140V constructs in complex with methylated DNA was reduced by ~7 °C, although circular dichroism showed no changes in the secondary structure content for A140V. A band shift analysis demonstrated that the larger fragment of MeCP2 (A140V) containing the transcriptional repression domain (TRD) destabilises the DNA binding. These results suggest that the solution structure of MBD A140V may differ from the wild-type MBD although no changes in the biochemical properties of X-ray A140V were observed.

  1. A/T Run Geometry of B-form DNA Is Independent of Bound Methyl-CpG Binding Domain, Cytosine Methylation and Flanking Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Chia, Jyh Yea; Tan, Wen Siang; Ng, Chyan Leong; Hu, Nien-Jen; Foo, Hooi Ling; Ho, Kok Lian

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation in a CpG context can be recognised by methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) via its methyl-CpG binding domain (MBD). An A/T run next to a methyl-CpG maximises the binding of MeCP2 to the methylated DNA. The A/T run characteristics are reported here with an X-ray structure of MBD A140V in complex with methylated DNA. The A/T run geometry was found to be strongly stabilised by a string of conserved water molecules regardless of its flanking nucleotide sequences, DNA methylation and bound MBD. New water molecules were found to stabilise the Rett syndrome-related E137, whose carboxylate group is salt bridged to R133. A structural comparison showed no difference between the wild type and MBD A140V. However, differential scanning calorimetry showed that the melting temperature of A140V constructs in complex with methylated DNA was reduced by ~7 °C, although circular dichroism showed no changes in the secondary structure content for A140V. A band shift analysis demonstrated that the larger fragment of MeCP2 (A140V) containing the transcriptional repression domain (TRD) destabilises the DNA binding. These results suggest that the solution structure of MBD A140V may differ from the wild-type MBD although no changes in the biochemical properties of X-ray A140V were observed. PMID:27502833

  2. A/T Run Geometry of B-form DNA Is Independent of Bound Methyl-CpG Binding Domain, Cytosine Methylation and Flanking Sequence.

    PubMed

    Chia, Jyh Yea; Tan, Wen Siang; Ng, Chyan Leong; Hu, Nien-Jen; Foo, Hooi Ling; Ho, Kok Lian

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation in a CpG context can be recognised by methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) via its methyl-CpG binding domain (MBD). An A/T run next to a methyl-CpG maximises the binding of MeCP2 to the methylated DNA. The A/T run characteristics are reported here with an X-ray structure of MBD A140V in complex with methylated DNA. The A/T run geometry was found to be strongly stabilised by a string of conserved water molecules regardless of its flanking nucleotide sequences, DNA methylation and bound MBD. New water molecules were found to stabilise the Rett syndrome-related E137, whose carboxylate group is salt bridged to R133. A structural comparison showed no difference between the wild type and MBD A140V. However, differential scanning calorimetry showed that the melting temperature of A140V constructs in complex with methylated DNA was reduced by ~7 °C, although circular dichroism showed no changes in the secondary structure content for A140V. A band shift analysis demonstrated that the larger fragment of MeCP2 (A140V) containing the transcriptional repression domain (TRD) destabilises the DNA binding. These results suggest that the solution structure of MBD A140V may differ from the wild-type MBD although no changes in the biochemical properties of X-ray A140V were observed. PMID:27502833

  3. Methylation by a Unique α-class N4-Cytosine Methyltransferase Is Required for DNA Transformation of Caldicellulosiruptor bescii DSM6725

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Daehwan; Farkas, Joel; Huddleston, Jennifer R.; Olivar, Estefania; Westpheling, Janet

    2012-01-01

    Thermophilic microorganisms capable of using complex substrates offer special advantages for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to biofuels and bioproducts. Members of the Gram-positive bacterial genus Caldicellulosiruptor are anaerobic thermophiles with optimum growth temperatures between 65°C and 78°C and are the most thermophilic cellulolytic organisms known. In fact, they efficiently use biomass non-pretreated as their sole carbon source and in successive rounds of application digest 70% of total switchgrass substrate. The ability to genetically manipulate these organisms is a prerequisite to engineering them for use in conversion of these complex substrates to products of interest as well as identifying gene products critical for their ability to utilize non-pretreated biomass. Here, we report the first example of DNA transformation of a member of this genus, C. bescii. We show that restriction of DNA is a major barrier to transformation (in this case apparently absolute) and that methylation with an endogenous unique α-class N4-Cytosine methyltransferase is required for transformation of DNA isolated from E. coli. The use of modified DNA leads to the development of an efficient and reproducible method for DNA transformation and the combined frequencies of transformation and recombination allow marker replacement between non-replicating plasmids and chromosomal genes providing the basis for rapid and efficient methods of genetic manipulation. PMID:22928042

  4. Genome-wide nucleosome positioning during embryonic stem cell development.

    PubMed

    Teif, Vladimir B; Vainshtein, Yevhen; Caudron-Herger, Maïwen; Mallm, Jan-Philipp; Marth, Caroline; Höfer, Thomas; Rippe, Karsten

    2012-11-01

    We determined genome-wide nucleosome occupancies in mouse embryonic stem cells and their neural progenitor and embryonic fibroblast counterparts to assess features associated with nucleosome positioning during lineage commitment. Cell-type- and protein-specific binding preferences of transcription factors to sites with either low (Myc, Klf4 and Zfx) or high (Nanog, Oct4 and Sox2) nucleosome occupancy as well as complex patterns for CTCF were identified. Nucleosome-depleted regions around transcription start and transcription termination sites were broad and more pronounced for active genes, with distinct patterns for promoters classified according to CpG content or histone methylation marks. Throughout the genome, nucleosome occupancy was correlated with certain histone methylation or acetylation modifications. In addition, the average nucleosome repeat length increased during differentiation by 5-7 base pairs, with local variations for specific regions. Our results reveal regulatory mechanisms of cell differentiation that involve nucleosome repositioning. PMID:23085715

  5. Enhanced Reduced Representation Bisulfite Sequencing for Assessment of DNA Methylation at Base Pair Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Kacmarczyk, Thadeous J.; Ishii, Jennifer; Betel, Doron; Alonso, Alicia; Mason, Christopher E.; Figueroa, Maria E.; Melnick, Ari M.

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation pattern mapping is heavily studied in normal and diseased tissues. A variety of methods have been established to interrogate the cytosine methylation patterns in cells. Reduced representation of whole genome bisulfite sequencing was developed to detect quantitative base pair resolution cytosine methylation patterns at GC-rich genomic loci. This is accomplished by combining the use of a restriction enzyme followed by bisulfite conversion. Enhanced Reduced Representation Bisulfite Sequencing (ERRBS) increases the biologically relevant genomic loci covered and has been used to profile cytosine methylation in DNA from human, mouse and other organisms. ERRBS initiates with restriction enzyme digestion of DNA to generate low molecular weight fragments for use in library preparation. These fragments are subjected to standard library construction for next generation sequencing. Bisulfite conversion of unmethylated cytosines prior to the final amplification step allows for quantitative base resolution of cytosine methylation levels in covered genomic loci. The protocol can be completed within four days. Despite low complexity in the first three bases sequenced, ERRBS libraries yield high quality data when using a designated sequencing control lane. Mapping and bioinformatics analysis is then performed and yields data that can be easily integrated with a variety of genome-wide platforms. ERRBS can utilize small input material quantities making it feasible to process human clinical samples and applicable in a range of research applications. The video produced demonstrates critical steps of the ERRBS protocol. PMID:25742437

  6. Tomato yellow leaf curl virus resistance by Ty-1 involves increased cytosine methylation of viral genomes and is compromised by cucumber mosaic virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Butterbach, Patrick; Verlaan, Maarten G.; Dullemans, Annette; Lohuis, Dick; Visser, Richard G. F.; Bai, Yuling; Kormelink, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) and related begomoviruses are a major threat to tomato production worldwide and, to protect against these viruses, resistance genes from different wild tomato species are introgressed. Recently, the Ty-1 resistance gene was identified, shown to code for an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and to be allelic with Ty-3. Here we show that upon TYLCV challenging of resistant lines carrying Ty-1 or Ty-3, low virus titers were detected concomitant with the production of relatively high levels of siRNAs whereas, in contrast, susceptible tomato Moneymaker (MM) revealed higher virus titers but lower amounts of siRNAs. Comparative analysis of the spatial genomic siRNA distribution showed a consistent and subtle enrichment for siRNAs derived from the V1 and C3 genes in Ty-1 and Ty-3. In plants containing Ty-2 resistance the virus was hardly detectable, but the siRNA profile resembled the one observed in TYLCV-challenged susceptible tomato (MM). Furthermore, a relative hypermethylation of the TYLCV V1 promoter region was observed in genomic DNA collected from Ty-1 compared with that from (MM). The resistance conferred by Ty-1 was also effective against the bipartite tomato severe rugose begomovirus, where a similar genome hypermethylation of the V1 promoter region was discerned. However, a mixed infection of TYLCV with cucumber mosaic virus compromised the resistance. The results indicate that Ty-1 confers resistance to geminiviruses by increasing cytosine methylation of viral genomes, suggestive of enhanced transcriptional gene silencing. The mechanism of resistance and its durability toward geminiviruses under natural field conditions is discussed. PMID:25136118

  7. Tomato yellow leaf curl virus resistance by Ty-1 involves increased cytosine methylation of viral genomes and is compromised by cucumber mosaic virus infection.

    PubMed

    Butterbach, Patrick; Verlaan, Maarten G; Dullemans, Annette; Lohuis, Dick; Visser, Richard G F; Bai, Yuling; Kormelink, Richard

    2014-09-01

    Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) and related begomoviruses are a major threat to tomato production worldwide and, to protect against these viruses, resistance genes from different wild tomato species are introgressed. Recently, the Ty-1 resistance gene was identified, shown to code for an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and to be allelic with Ty-3. Here we show that upon TYLCV challenging of resistant lines carrying Ty-1 or Ty-3, low virus titers were detected concomitant with the production of relatively high levels of siRNAs whereas, in contrast, susceptible tomato Moneymaker (MM) revealed higher virus titers but lower amounts of siRNAs. Comparative analysis of the spatial genomic siRNA distribution showed a consistent and subtle enrichment for siRNAs derived from the V1 and C3 genes in Ty-1 and Ty-3. In plants containing Ty-2 resistance the virus was hardly detectable, but the siRNA profile resembled the one observed in TYLCV-challenged susceptible tomato (MM). Furthermore, a relative hypermethylation of the TYLCV V1 promoter region was observed in genomic DNA collected from Ty-1 compared with that from (MM). The resistance conferred by Ty-1 was also effective against the bipartite tomato severe rugose begomovirus, where a similar genome hypermethylation of the V1 promoter region was discerned. However, a mixed infection of TYLCV with cucumber mosaic virus compromised the resistance. The results indicate that Ty-1 confers resistance to geminiviruses by increasing cytosine methylation of viral genomes, suggestive of enhanced transcriptional gene silencing. The mechanism of resistance and its durability toward geminiviruses under natural field conditions is discussed. PMID:25136118

  8. Genome-wide association studies in neurology

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Meng-Shan; Jiang, Teng

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are a powerful tool for understanding the genetic underpinnings of human disease. In this article, we briefly review the role and findings of GWAS in common neurological diseases, including Stroke, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, migraine, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, frontotemporal lobar degeneration, restless legs syndrome, intracranial aneurysm, human prion diseases and moyamoya disease. We then discuss the present and future implications of these findings with regards to disease prediction, uncovering basic biology, and the development of potential therapeutic agents. PMID:25568877

  9. DNA Methylation: A Timeline of Methods and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Alan; Parle-McDermott, Anne

    2011-01-01

    DNA methylation is a biochemical process where a DNA base, usually cytosine, is enzymatically methylated at the 5-carbon position. An epigenetic modification associated with gene regulation, DNA methylation is of paramount importance to biological health and disease. Recently, the quest to unravel the Human Epigenome commenced, calling for a modernization of previous DNA methylation profiling techniques. Here, we describe the major developments in the methodologies used over the past three decades to examine the elusive epigenome (or methylome). The earliest techniques were based on the separation of methylated and unmethylated cytosines via chromatography. The following years would see molecular techniques being employed to indirectly examine DNA methylation levels at both a genome-wide and locus-specific context, notably immunoprecipitation via anti-5′methylcytosine and selective digestion with methylation-sensitive restriction endonucleases. With the advent of sodium bisulfite treatment of DNA, a deamination reaction that converts cytosine to uracil only when unmethylated, the epigenetic modification can now be identified in the same manner as a DNA base-pair change. More recently, these three techniques have been applied to more technically advanced systems such as DNA microarrays and next-generation sequencing platforms, bringing us closer to unveiling a complete human epigenetic profile. PMID:22303369

  10. Genome-wide identification of enhancer elements.

    PubMed

    Tulin, Sarah; Barsi, Julius C; Bocconcelli, Carlo; Smith, Joel

    2016-01-01

    We present a prospective genome-wide regulatory element database for the sea urchin embryo and the modified chromosome capture-related methodology used to create it. The method we developed is termed GRIP-seq for genome-wide regulatory element immunoprecipitation and combines features of chromosome conformation capture, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and paired-end next-generation sequencing with molecular steps that enrich for active cis-regulatory elements associated with basal transcriptional machinery. The first GRIP-seq database, available to the community, comes from S. purpuratus 24 hpf embryos and takes advantage of the extremely well-characterized cis-regulatory elements in this system for validation. In addition, using the GRIP-seq database, we identify and experimentally validate a novel, intronic cis-regulatory element at the onecut locus. We find GRIP-seq signal sensitively identifies active cis-regulatory elements with a high signal-to-noise ratio for both distal and intronic elements. This promising GRIP-seq protocol has the potential to address a rate-limiting step in resolving comprehensive, predictive network models in all systems.

  11. Genome-wide identification of enhancer elements.

    PubMed

    Tulin, Sarah; Barsi, Julius C; Bocconcelli, Carlo; Smith, Joel

    2016-01-01

    We present a prospective genome-wide regulatory element database for the sea urchin embryo and the modified chromosome capture-related methodology used to create it. The method we developed is termed GRIP-seq for genome-wide regulatory element immunoprecipitation and combines features of chromosome conformation capture, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and paired-end next-generation sequencing with molecular steps that enrich for active cis-regulatory elements associated with basal transcriptional machinery. The first GRIP-seq database, available to the community, comes from S. purpuratus 24 hpf embryos and takes advantage of the extremely well-characterized cis-regulatory elements in this system for validation. In addition, using the GRIP-seq database, we identify and experimentally validate a novel, intronic cis-regulatory element at the onecut locus. We find GRIP-seq signal sensitively identifies active cis-regulatory elements with a high signal-to-noise ratio for both distal and intronic elements. This promising GRIP-seq protocol has the potential to address a rate-limiting step in resolving comprehensive, predictive network models in all systems. PMID:27389984

  12. Genome-wide approaches to schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jubao; Sanders, Alan R; Gejman, Pablo V

    2010-09-30

    Schizophrenia (SZ) is a common and severe psychiatric disorder with both environmental and genetic risk factors, and a high heritability. After over 20 years of molecular genetics research, new molecular strategies, primarily genome-wide association studies (GWAS), have generated major tangible progress. This new data provides evidence for: (1) a number of chromosomal regions with common polymorphisms showing genome-wide association with SZ (the major histocompatibility complex, MHC, region at 6p22-p21; 18q21.2; and 2q32.1). The associated alleles present small odds ratios (the odds of a risk variant being present in cases vs. controls) and suggest causative involvement of gene regulatory mechanisms in SZ. (2) Polygenic inheritance. (3) Involvement of rare (<1%) and large (>100kb) copy number variants (CNVs). (4) A genetic overlap of SZ with autism and with bipolar disorder (BP) challenging the classical clinical classifications. Most new SZ findings (chromosomal regions and genes) have generated new biological leads. These new findings, however, still need to be translated into a better understanding of the underlying biology and into causal mechanisms. Furthermore, a considerable amount of heritability still remains unexplained (missing heritability). Deep resequencing for rare variants and system biology approaches (e.g., integrating DNA sequence and functional data) are expected to further improve our understanding of the genetic architecture of SZ and its underlying biology. PMID:20433910

  13. Genome-Wide Association Studies of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stadler, Zsofia K.; Thom, Peter; Robson, Mark E.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Kauff, Noah D.; Hurley, Karen E.; Devlin, Vincent; Gold, Bert; Klein, Robert J.; Offit, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of the inherited risk for cancer is an important component of preventive oncology. In addition to well-established syndromes of cancer predisposition, much remains to be discovered about the genetic variation underlying susceptibility to common malignancies. Increased knowledge about the human genome and advances in genotyping technology have made possible genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of human diseases. These studies have identified many important regions of genetic variation associated with an increased risk for human traits and diseases including cancer. Understanding the principles, major findings, and limitations of GWAS is becoming increasingly important for oncologists as dissemination of genomic risk tests directly to consumers is already occurring through commercial companies. GWAS have contributed to our understanding of the genetic basis of cancer and will shed light on biologic pathways and possible new strategies for targeted prevention. To date, however, the clinical utility of GWAS-derived risk markers remains limited. PMID:20585100

  14. Genome-wide Membrane Protein Structure Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Piccoli, Stefano; Suku, Eda; Garonzi, Marianna; Giorgetti, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    Transmembrane proteins allow cells to extensively communicate with the external world in a very accurate and specific way. They form principal nodes in several signaling pathways and attract large interest in therapeutic intervention, as the majority pharmaceutical compounds target membrane proteins. Thus, according to the current genome annotation methods, a detailed structural/functional characterization at the protein level of each of the elements codified in the genome is also required. The extreme difficulty in obtaining high-resolution three-dimensional structures, calls for computational approaches. Here we review to which extent the efforts made in the last few years, combining the structural characterization of membrane proteins with protein bioinformatics techniques, could help describing membrane proteins at a genome-wide scale. In particular we analyze the use of comparative modeling techniques as a way of overcoming the lack of high-resolution three-dimensional structures in the human membrane proteome. PMID:24403851

  15. Mosaicism for genome-wide paternal uniparental disomy with features of multiple imprinting disorders: diagnostic and management issues.

    PubMed

    Inbar-Feigenberg, Michal; Choufani, Sanaa; Cytrynbaum, Cheryl; Chen, Yi-An; Steele, Leslie; Shuman, Cheryl; Ray, Peter N; Weksberg, Rosanna

    2013-01-01

    Mosaicism for genome-wide paternal uniparental disomy (UPD) has been reported in only seven live born individuals to date. Clinical presentation includes manifestations of multiple paternal UPD syndromes with high variability, likely due to the variable levels of mosaicism in different somatic tissues. We report an eighth case in a female patient with mosaicism for genome-wide paternal UPD which highlights the complex clinical presentation. Our patient had features of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS), Angelman syndrome, and congenital hyperinsulinism. The clinical findings included prematurity, organomegaly, hemihyperplasia, developmental delay, benign tumors, and cystic lesions. The diagnosis in our patient was established utilizing microarray-based genome-wide DNA methylation analysis performed on leukocyte DNA. Targeted multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) analysis of chromosome regions 11p15 and 15q13 confirmed mosaicism for paternal UPD at these genomic regions. This case represents the first report of microarray-based genome-wide DNA methylation analysis in the diagnosis of genome-wide paternal UPD. The application of microarray-based genome-wide DNA methylation analysis on selected individuals with complex clinical presentations could be a valuable diagnostic tool to improve the detection rate of mosaic genome-wide paternal UPD. This approach, which screens many loci simultaneously, is more cost-effective and less labor-intensive than performing multiple targeted DNA methylation-based assays. Identification of individuals with mosaicism for genome-wide paternal UPD is an important goal as it confers a low recurrence risk for the family and identifies individuals who require surveillance due to increased tumor risk.

  16. Genome-wide analysis correlates Ayurveda Prakriti

    PubMed Central

    Govindaraj, Periyasamy; Nizamuddin, Sheikh; Sharath, Anugula; Jyothi, Vuskamalla; Rotti, Harish; Raval, Ritu; Nayak, Jayakrishna; Bhat, Balakrishna K.; Prasanna, B. V.; Shintre, Pooja; Sule, Mayura; Joshi, Kalpana S.; Dedge, Amrish P.; Bharadwaj, Ramachandra; Gangadharan, G. G.; Nair, Sreekumaran; Gopinath, Puthiya M.; Patwardhan, Bhushan; Kondaiah, Paturu; Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu; Valiathan, Marthanda Varma Sankaran; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy

    2015-01-01

    The practice of Ayurveda, the traditional medicine of India, is based on the concept of three major constitutional types (Vata, Pitta and Kapha) defined as “Prakriti”. To the best of our knowledge, no study has convincingly correlated genomic variations with the classification of Prakriti. In the present study, we performed genome-wide SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) analysis (Affymetrix, 6.0) of 262 well-classified male individuals (after screening 3416 subjects) belonging to three Prakritis. We found 52 SNPs (p ≤ 1 × 10−5) were significantly different between Prakritis, without any confounding effect of stratification, after 106 permutations. Principal component analysis (PCA) of these SNPs classified 262 individuals into their respective groups (Vata, Pitta and Kapha) irrespective of their ancestry, which represent its power in categorization. We further validated our finding with 297 Indian population samples with known ancestry. Subsequently, we found that PGM1 correlates with phenotype of Pitta as described in the ancient text of Caraka Samhita, suggesting that the phenotypic classification of India’s traditional medicine has a genetic basis; and its Prakriti-based practice in vogue for many centuries resonates with personalized medicine. PMID:26511157

  17. Genome-wide analysis correlates Ayurveda Prakriti.

    PubMed

    Govindaraj, Periyasamy; Nizamuddin, Sheikh; Sharath, Anugula; Jyothi, Vuskamalla; Rotti, Harish; Raval, Ritu; Nayak, Jayakrishna; Bhat, Balakrishna K; Prasanna, B V; Shintre, Pooja; Sule, Mayura; Joshi, Kalpana S; Dedge, Amrish P; Bharadwaj, Ramachandra; Gangadharan, G G; Nair, Sreekumaran; Gopinath, Puthiya M; Patwardhan, Bhushan; Kondaiah, Paturu; Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu; Valiathan, Marthanda Varma Sankaran; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy

    2015-10-29

    The practice of Ayurveda, the traditional medicine of India, is based on the concept of three major constitutional types (Vata, Pitta and Kapha) defined as "Prakriti". To the best of our knowledge, no study has convincingly correlated genomic variations with the classification of Prakriti. In the present study, we performed genome-wide SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) analysis (Affymetrix, 6.0) of 262 well-classified male individuals (after screening 3416 subjects) belonging to three Prakritis. We found 52 SNPs (p ≤ 1 × 10(-5)) were significantly different between Prakritis, without any confounding effect of stratification, after 10(6) permutations. Principal component analysis (PCA) of these SNPs classified 262 individuals into their respective groups (Vata, Pitta and Kapha) irrespective of their ancestry, which represent its power in categorization. We further validated our finding with 297 Indian population samples with known ancestry. Subsequently, we found that PGM1 correlates with phenotype of Pitta as described in the ancient text of Caraka Samhita, suggesting that the phenotypic classification of India's traditional medicine has a genetic basis; and its Prakriti-based practice in vogue for many centuries resonates with personalized medicine.

  18. [Profiles of DNA methylation in normal and cancer cells].

    PubMed

    Weber, Michaël

    2008-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the epigenetic mark DNA methylation is found exclusively at cytosine residues in the CpG islands of genes, transposons and intergenic DNA. Among functional roles, DNA methylation is essential for mammalian embryonic development, and is classically thought to function by stably silencing promoter activity. However, until recently, understanding of the distribution of cytosine methylation in the whole genome - and hence, identification of its targets - was very limited. High-throughput methodologies, including methylated DNA immunoprecipitation, have recently revealed genome-wide mapping of DNA methylation, and provided new and unexpected data. Clearly DNA methylation is selectively associated with some key promoters- and is not a prerequisite for promoter inactivation, since strong CpG island promoters are mostly unmethylated, even when inactive. Most germline-specific genes are methylated and permanently silenced in somatic cells, suggesting a role of this mark in maintaining somatic cellular identity. These large scale studies will also help understanding the deregulation of DNA methylation associated with cancer, among which unmethylation of germinal cells genes, and recent observtion of large hypomethylated regions in tumoral specimens. The next challenge will be to understand if these methylation changes occur randomly, or more likely are specified by oncogenes or linked to environmental pressure. PMID:18789220

  19. Genome-wide detection of genes targeted by non-Ig somatic hypermutation in lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yanwen; Soong, T David; Wang, Ling; Melnick, Ari M; Elemento, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    The processes of somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination introduced by activation-induced cytosine deaminase (AICDA) at the Immunoglobulin (Ig) loci are key steps for creating a pool of diversified antibodies in germinal center B cells (GCBs). Unfortunately, AICDA can also accidentally introduce mutations at bystander loci, particularly within the 5' regulatory regions of proto-oncogenes relevant to diffuse large B cell lymphomas (DLBCL). Since current methods for genomewide sequencing such as Exon Capture and RNAseq only target mutations in coding regions, to date non-Ig promoter SHMs have been studied only in a handful genes. We designed a novel approach integrating bioinformatics tools with next generation sequencing technology to identify regulatory loci targeted by SHM genome-wide. We observed increased numbers of SHM associated sequence variant hotspots in lymphoma cells as compared to primary normal germinal center B cells. Many of these SHM hotspots map to genes that have not been reported before as mutated, including BACH2, BTG2, CXCR4, CIITA, EBF1, PIM2, and TCL1A, etc., all of which have potential roles in B cell survival, differentiation, and malignant transformation. In addition, using BCL6 and BACH2 as examples, we demonstrated that SHM sites identified in these 5' regulatory regions greatly altered their transcription activities in a reporter assay. Our approach provides a first cost-efficient, genome-wide method to identify regulatory mutations and non-Ig SHM hotspots. PMID:22808135

  20. Genome-Wide Epigenetic Regulation of Gene Transcription in Maize Seeds

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Zhenguang; Guo, Wenzhu; Chen, Rumei; Wang, Lei; Zhao, Jun; Lang, Zhihong; Fan, Yunliu; Zhao, Jiuran; Zhang, Chunyi

    2015-01-01

    Background Epigenetic regulation is well recognized for its importance in gene expression in organisms. DNA methylation, an important epigenetic mark, has received enormous attention in recent years as it’s a key player in many biological processes. It remains unclear how DNA methylation contributes to gene transcription regulation in maize seeds. Here, we take advantage of recent technologies to examine the genome-wide association of DNA methylation with transcription of four types of DNA sequences, including protein-coding genes, pseudogenes, transposable elements, and repeats in maize embryo and endosperm, respectively. Results The methylation in CG, CHG and CHH contexts plays different roles in the control of gene expression. Methylation around the transcription start sites and transcription stop regions of protein-coding genes is negatively correlated, but in gene bodies positively correlated, to gene expression level. The upstream regions of protein-coding genes are enriched with 24-nt siRNAs and contain high levels of CHH methylation, which is correlated to gene expression level. The analysis of sequence content within CG, CHG, or CHH contexts reveals that only CHH methylation is affected by its local sequences, which is different from Arabidopsis. Conclusions In summary, we conclude that methylation-regulated transcription varies with the types of DNA sequences, sequence contexts or parts of a specific gene in maize seeds and differs from that in other plant species. Our study helps people better understand from a genome-wide viewpoint that how transcriptional expression is controlled by DNA methylation, one of the important factors influencing transcription, and how the methylation is associated with small RNAs. PMID:26469520

  1. Genome-wide errant targeting by Hairy

    PubMed Central

    Kok, Kurtulus; Ay, Ahmet; Li, Li M; Arnosti, David N

    2015-01-01

    Metazoan transcriptional repressors regulate chromatin through diverse histone modifications. Contributions of individual factors to the chromatin landscape in development is difficult to establish, as global surveys reflect multiple changes in regulators. Therefore, we studied the conserved Hairy/Enhancer of Split family repressor Hairy, analyzing histone marks and gene expression in Drosophila embryos. This long-range repressor mediates histone acetylation and methylation in large blocks, with highly context-specific effects on target genes. Most strikingly, Hairy exhibits biochemical activity on many loci that are uncoupled to changes in gene expression. Rather than representing inert binding sites, as suggested for many eukaryotic factors, many regions are targeted errantly by Hairy to modify the chromatin landscape. Our findings emphasize that identification of active cis-regulatory elements must extend beyond the survey of prototypical chromatin marks. We speculate that this errant activity may provide a path for creation of new regulatory elements, facilitating the evolution of novel transcriptional circuits. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06394.001 PMID:26305409

  2. Genome-Wide Scan Reveals Mutation Associated with Melanoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1999 Spotlight on Research 2012 July 2012 (historical) Genome-Wide Scan Reveals Mutation Associated with Melanoma A ... out to see if a technology called whole genome sequencing would help them find other genetic risk ...

  3. Mosaic paternal genome-wide uniparental isodisomy with down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Darcy, Diana; Atwal, Paldeep Singh; Angell, Cathy; Gadi, Inder; Wallerstein, Robert

    2015-10-01

    We report on a 6-month-old girl with two apparent cell lines; one with trisomy 21, and the other with paternal genome-wide uniparental isodisomy (GWUPiD), identified using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) based microarray and microsatellite analysis of polymorphic loci. The patient has Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) due to paternal uniparental disomy (UPD) at chromosome location 11p15 (UPD 11p15), which was confirmed through methylation analysis. Hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia is present, which is associated with paternal UPD 11p15.5; and she likely has medullary nephrocalcinosis, which is associated with paternal UPD 20, although this was not biochemically confirmed. Angelman syndrome (AS) analysis was negative but this testing is not completely informative; she has no specific features of AS. Clinical features of this patient include: dysmorphic features consistent with trisomy 21, tetralogy of Fallot, hemihypertrophy, swirled skin hyperpigmentation, hepatoblastoma, and Wilms tumor. Her karyotype is 47,XX,+21[19]/46,XX[4], and microarray results suggest that the cell line with trisomy 21 is biparentally inherited and represents 40-50% of the genomic material in the tested specimen. The difference in the level of cytogenetically detected mosaicism versus the level of mosaicism observed via microarray analysis is likely caused by differences in the test methodologies. While a handful of cases of mosaic paternal GWUPiD have been reported, this patient is the only reported case that also involves trisomy 21. Other GWUPiD patients have presented with features associated with multiple imprinted regions, as does our patient. PMID:26219535

  4. Genome-wide characteristics of de novo mutations in autism

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Ryan K C; Merico, Daniele; Cao, Hongzhi; Pellecchia, Giovanna; Alipanahi, Babak; Thiruvahindrapuram, Bhooma; Tong, Xin; Sun, Yuhui; Cao, Dandan; Zhang, Tao; Wu, Xueli; Jin, Xin; Zhou, Ze; Liu, Xiaomin; Nalpathamkalam, Thomas; Walker, Susan; Howe, Jennifer L.; Wang, Zhuozhi; MacDonald, Jeffrey R.; Chan, Ada; D’Abate, Lia; Deneault, Eric; Siu, Michelle T.; Tammimies, Kristiina; Uddin, Mohammed; Zarrei, Mehdi; Wang, Mingbang; Li, Yingrui; Wang, Jun; Wang, Jian; Yang, Huanming; Bookman, Matt; Bingham, Jonathan; Gross, Samuel S.; Loy, Dion; Pletcher, Mathew; Marshall, Christian R.; Anagnostou, Evdokia; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Weksberg, Rosanna; Fernandez, Bridget A; Roberts, Wendy; Szatmari, Peter; Glazer, David; Frey, Brendan J.; Ring, Robert H.; Xu, Xun; Scherer, Stephen W.

    2016-01-01

    De novo mutations (DNMs) are important in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), but so far analyses have mainly been on the ~1.5% of the genome encoding genes. Here, we performed whole genome sequencing (WGS) of 200 ASD parent-child trios and characterized germline and somatic DNMs. We confirmed that the majority of germline DNMs (75.6%) originated from the father, and these increased significantly with paternal age only (p=4.2×10−10). However, when clustered DNMs (those within 20kb) were found in ASD, not only did they mostly originate from the mother (p=7.7×10−13), but they could also be found adjacent to de novo copy number variations (CNVs) where the mutation rate was significantly elevated (p=2.4×10−24). By comparing DNMs detected in controls, we found a significant enrichment of predicted damaging DNMs in ASD cases (p=8.0×10−9; OR=1.84), of which 15.6% (p=4.3×10−3) and 22.5% (p=7.0×10−5) were in the non-coding or genic non-coding, respectively. The non-coding elements most enriched for DNM were untranslated regions of genes, boundaries involved in exon-skipping and DNase I hypersensitive regions. Using microarrays and a novel outlier detection test, we also found aberrant methylation profiles in 2/185 (1.1%) of ASD cases. These same individuals carried independently identified DNMs in the ASD risk- and epigenetic- genes DNMT3A and ADNP. Our data begins to characterize different genome-wide DNMs, and highlight the contribution of non-coding variants, to the etiology of ASD. PMID:27525107

  5. Chilling- and Freezing- Induced Alterations in Cytosine Methylation and Its Association with the Cold Tolerance of an Alpine Subnival Plant, Chorispora bungeana

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yuan; Liu, Lijun; Feng, Yanhao; Wei, Yunzhu; Yue, Xiule; He, Wenliang; Zhang, Hua; An, Lizhe

    2015-01-01

    Chilling (0–18°C) and freezing (<0°C) are two distinct types of cold stresses. Epigenetic regulation can play an important role in plant adaptation to abiotic stresses. However, it is not yet clear whether and how epigenetic modification (i.e., DNA methylation) mediates the adaptation to cold stresses in nature (e.g., in alpine regions). Especially, whether the adaptation to chilling and freezing is involved in differential epigenetic regulations in plants is largely unknown. Chorispora bungeana is an alpine subnival plant that is distributed in the freeze-thaw tundra in Asia, where chilling and freezing frequently fluctuate daily (24 h). To disentangle how C. bungeana copes with these intricate cold stresses through epigenetic modifications, plants of C. bungeana were treated at 4°C (chilling) and -4°C (freezing) over five periods of time (0–24 h). Methylation-sensitive amplified fragment-length polymorphism markers were used to investigate the variation in DNA methylation of C. bungeana in response to chilling and freezing. It was found that the alterations in DNA methylation of C. bungeana largely occurred over the period of chilling and freezing. Moreover, chilling and freezing appeared to gradually induce distinct DNA methylation variations, as the treatment went on (e.g., after 12 h). Forty-three cold-induced polymorphic fragments were randomly selected and further analyzed, and three of the cloned fragments were homologous to genes encoding alcohol dehydrogenase, UDP-glucosyltransferase and polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein. These candidate genes verified the existence of different expressive patterns between chilling and freezing. Our results showed that C. bungeana responded to cold stresses rapidly through the alterations of DNA methylation, and that chilling and freezing induced different DNA methylation changes. Therefore, we conclude that epigenetic modifications can potentially serve as a rapid and flexible mechanism for C. bungeana to

  6. Genome-wide analysis distinguishes hyperglycemia regulated epigenetic signatures of primary vascular cells

    PubMed Central

    Pirola, Luciano; Balcerczyk, Aneta; Tothill, Richard W.; Haviv, Izhak; Kaspi, Antony; Lunke, Sebastian; Ziemann, Mark; Karagiannis, Tom; Tonna, Stephen; Kowalczyk, Adam; Beresford-Smith, Bryan; Macintyre, Geoff; Kelong, Ma; Hongyu, Zhang; Zhu, Jingde; El-Osta, Assam

    2011-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that poor glycemic control mediates post-translational modifications to the H3 histone tail. We are only beginning to understand the dynamic role of some of the diverse epigenetic changes mediated by hyperglycemia at single loci, yet elevated glucose levels are thought to regulate genome-wide changes, and this still remains poorly understood. In this article we describe genome-wide histone H3K9/K14 hyperacetylation and DNA methylation maps conferred by hyperglycemia in primary human vascular cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) as well as CpG methylation (CpG) assays, followed by massive parallel sequencing (ChIP-seq and CpG-seq) identified unique hyperacetylation and CpG methylation signatures with proximal and distal patterns of regionalization associative with gene expression. Ingenuity knowledge-based pathway and gene ontology analyses indicate that hyperglycemia significantly affects human vascular chromatin with the transcriptional up-regulation of genes involved in metabolic and cardiovascular disease. We have generated the first installment of a reference collection of hyperglycemia-induced chromatin modifications using robust and reproducible platforms that allow parallel sequencing-by-synthesis of immunopurified content. We uncover that hyperglycemia-mediated induction of genes and pathways associated with endothelial dysfunction occur through modulation of acetylated H3K9/K14 inversely correlated with methyl-CpG content. PMID:21890681

  7. Cytosine methylation of tRNA-Asp by DNMT2 has a role in translation of proteins containing poly-Asp sequences.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Raghuvaran; Fierer, Jacob; Kaiser, Steffen; Helm, Mark; Jurkowski, Tomasz P; Jeltsch, Albert

    2015-01-01

    The Dnmt2 RNA methyltransferase catalyses the methylation of C38 in the anticodon loop of tRNA-Asp, but the molecular role of this methylation is unknown. Here, we report that mouse aspartyl-tRNA synthetase shows a four to fivefold preference for C38-methylated tRNA-Asp. Consistently, a 30% reduced charging level of tRNA-Asp was observed in Dnmt2 knockout (KO) murine embryonic fibroblast cells. Gene expression analysis with fluorescent reporter proteins fused to an N-terminal poly-Asp sequence showed that protein synthesis of poly-Asp-tagged reporter proteins was reduced in Dnmt2 KO cells as well. The same effect was observed with endogenous proteins containing poly-Asp sequences, indicating that Dnmt2-mediated C38 methylation of tRNA-Asp regulates the translation of proteins containing poly-Asp sequences. Gene ontology searches for proteins containing poly-Asp sequences in the human proteome showed that a significant number of these proteins have roles in transcriptional regulation and gene expression. Hence, the Dnmt2-mediated methylation of tRNA-Asp exhibits a post-transcriptional regulatory role by controlling the synthesis of a group of target proteins containing poly-Asp sequences.

  8. Cytosine methylation of tRNA-Asp by DNMT2 has a role in translation of proteins containing poly-Asp sequences

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, Raghuvaran; Fierer, Jacob; Kaiser, Steffen; Helm, Mark; Jurkowski, Tomasz P; Jeltsch, Albert

    2015-01-01

    The Dnmt2 RNA methyltransferase catalyses the methylation of C38 in the anticodon loop of tRNA-Asp, but the molecular role of this methylation is unknown. Here, we report that mouse aspartyl-tRNA synthetase shows a four to fivefold preference for C38-methylated tRNA-Asp. Consistently, a 30% reduced charging level of tRNA-Asp was observed in Dnmt2 knockout (KO) murine embryonic fibroblast cells. Gene expression analysis with fluorescent reporter proteins fused to an N-terminal poly-Asp sequence showed that protein synthesis of poly-Asp-tagged reporter proteins was reduced in Dnmt2 KO cells as well. The same effect was observed with endogenous proteins containing poly-Asp sequences, indicating that Dnmt2-mediated C38 methylation of tRNA-Asp regulates the translation of proteins containing poly-Asp sequences. Gene ontology searches for proteins containing poly-Asp sequences in the human proteome showed that a significant number of these proteins have roles in transcriptional regulation and gene expression. Hence, the Dnmt2-mediated methylation of tRNA-Asp exhibits a post-transcriptional regulatory role by controlling the synthesis of a group of target proteins containing poly-Asp sequences. PMID:27462411

  9. A Genome-Wide Association Study of a Biomarker of Nicotine Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Loukola, Anu; Buchwald, Jadwiga; Gupta, Richa; Palviainen, Teemu; Hällfors, Jenni; Tikkanen, Emmi; Korhonen, Tellervo; Ollikainen, Miina; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Ripatti, Samuli; Lehtimäki, Terho; Raitakari, Olli; Salomaa, Veikko; Rose, Richard J.; Tyndale, Rachel F.; Kaprio, Jaakko

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with fast nicotine metabolism typically smoke more and thus have a greater risk for smoking-induced diseases. Further, the efficacy of smoking cessation pharmacotherapy is dependent on the rate of nicotine metabolism. Our objective was to use nicotine metabolite ratio (NMR), an established biomarker of nicotine metabolism rate, in a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify novel genetic variants influencing nicotine metabolism. A heritability estimate of 0.81 (95% CI 0.70–0.88) was obtained for NMR using monozygotic and dizygotic twins of the FinnTwin cohort. We performed a GWAS in cotinine-verified current smokers of three Finnish cohorts (FinnTwin, Young Finns Study, FINRISK2007), followed by a meta-analysis of 1518 subjects, and annotated the genome-wide significant SNPs with methylation quantitative loci (meQTL) analyses. We detected association on 19q13 with 719 SNPs exceeding genome-wide significance within a 4.2 Mb region. The strongest evidence for association emerged for CYP2A6 (min p = 5.77E-86, in intron 4), the main metabolic enzyme for nicotine. Other interesting genes with genome-wide significant signals included CYP2B6, CYP2A7, EGLN2, and NUMBL. Conditional analyses revealed three independent signals on 19q13, all located within or in the immediate vicinity of CYP2A6. A genetic risk score constructed using the independent signals showed association with smoking quantity (p = 0.0019) in two independent Finnish samples. Our meQTL results showed that methylation values of 16 CpG sites within the region are affected by genotypes of the genome-wide significant SNPs, and according to causal inference test, for some of the SNPs the effect on NMR is mediated through methylation. To our knowledge, this is the first GWAS on NMR. Our results enclose three independent novel signals on 19q13.2. The detected CYP2A6 variants explain a strikingly large fraction of variance (up to 31%) in NMR in these study samples. Further, we provide evidence

  10. A Genome-Wide Association Study of a Biomarker of Nicotine Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Loukola, Anu; Buchwald, Jadwiga; Gupta, Richa; Palviainen, Teemu; Hällfors, Jenni; Tikkanen, Emmi; Korhonen, Tellervo; Ollikainen, Miina; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Ripatti, Samuli; Lehtimäki, Terho; Raitakari, Olli; Salomaa, Veikko; Rose, Richard J; Tyndale, Rachel F; Kaprio, Jaakko

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with fast nicotine metabolism typically smoke more and thus have a greater risk for smoking-induced diseases. Further, the efficacy of smoking cessation pharmacotherapy is dependent on the rate of nicotine metabolism. Our objective was to use nicotine metabolite ratio (NMR), an established biomarker of nicotine metabolism rate, in a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify novel genetic variants influencing nicotine metabolism. A heritability estimate of 0.81 (95% CI 0.70-0.88) was obtained for NMR using monozygotic and dizygotic twins of the FinnTwin cohort. We performed a GWAS in cotinine-verified current smokers of three Finnish cohorts (FinnTwin, Young Finns Study, FINRISK2007), followed by a meta-analysis of 1518 subjects, and annotated the genome-wide significant SNPs with methylation quantitative loci (meQTL) analyses. We detected association on 19q13 with 719 SNPs exceeding genome-wide significance within a 4.2 Mb region. The strongest evidence for association emerged for CYP2A6 (min p = 5.77E-86, in intron 4), the main metabolic enzyme for nicotine. Other interesting genes with genome-wide significant signals included CYP2B6, CYP2A7, EGLN2, and NUMBL. Conditional analyses revealed three independent signals on 19q13, all located within or in the immediate vicinity of CYP2A6. A genetic risk score constructed using the independent signals showed association with smoking quantity (p = 0.0019) in two independent Finnish samples. Our meQTL results showed that methylation values of 16 CpG sites within the region are affected by genotypes of the genome-wide significant SNPs, and according to causal inference test, for some of the SNPs the effect on NMR is mediated through methylation. To our knowledge, this is the first GWAS on NMR. Our results enclose three independent novel signals on 19q13.2. The detected CYP2A6 variants explain a strikingly large fraction of variance (up to 31%) in NMR in these study samples. Further, we provide evidence

  11. Genome-wide methylome analyses reveal novel epigenetic regulation patterns in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongsheng; Camarillo, Cynthia; Xu, Juan; Arana, Tania Bedard; Xiao, Yun; Zhao, Zheng; Chen, Hong; Ramirez, Mercedes; Zavala, Juan; Escamilla, Michael A; Armas, Regina; Mendoza, Ricardo; Ontiveros, Alfonso; Nicolini, Humberto; Magaña, Alvaro Antonio Jerez; Rubin, Lewis P; Li, Xia; Xu, Chun

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BP) are complex genetic disorders. Their appearance is also likely informed by as yet only partially described epigenetic contributions. Using a sequencing-based method for genome-wide analysis, we quantitatively compared the blood DNA methylation landscapes in SZ and BP subjects to control, both in an understudied population, Hispanics along the US-Mexico border. Remarkably, we identified thousands of differentially methylated regions for SZ and BP preferentially located in promoters 3'-UTRs and 5'-UTRs of genes. Distinct patterns of aberrant methylation of promoter sequences were located surrounding transcription start sites. In these instances, aberrant methylation occurred in CpG islands (CGIs) as well as in flanking regions as well as in CGI sparse promoters. Pathway analysis of genes displaying these distinct aberrant promoter methylation patterns showed enhancement of epigenetic changes in numerous genes previously related to psychiatric disorders and neurodevelopment. Integration of gene expression data further suggests that in SZ aberrant promoter methylation is significantly associated with altered gene transcription. In particular, we found significant associations between (1) promoter CGIs hypermethylation with gene repression and (2) CGI 3'-shore hypomethylation with increased gene expression. Finally, we constructed a specific methylation analysis platform that facilitates viewing and comparing aberrant genome methylation in human neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:25734057

  12. Genome-Wide Methylome Analyses Reveal Novel Epigenetic Regulation Patterns in Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongsheng; Camarillo, Cynthia; Xu, Juan; Arana, Tania Bedard; Xiao, Yun; Zhao, Zheng; Chen, Hong; Ramirez, Mercedes; Zavala, Juan; Escamilla, Michael A.; Armas, Regina; Mendoza, Ricardo; Ontiveros, Alfonso; Nicolini, Humberto; Jerez Magaña, Alvaro Antonio; Rubin, Lewis P.; Li, Xia; Xu, Chun

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BP) are complex genetic disorders. Their appearance is also likely informed by as yet only partially described epigenetic contributions. Using a sequencing-based method for genome-wide analysis, we quantitatively compared the blood DNA methylation landscapes in SZ and BP subjects to control, both in an understudied population, Hispanics along the US-Mexico border. Remarkably, we identified thousands of differentially methylated regions for SZ and BP preferentially located in promoters 3′-UTRs and 5′-UTRs of genes. Distinct patterns of aberrant methylation of promoter sequences were located surrounding transcription start sites. In these instances, aberrant methylation occurred in CpG islands (CGIs) as well as in flanking regions as well as in CGI sparse promoters. Pathway analysis of genes displaying these distinct aberrant promoter methylation patterns showed enhancement of epigenetic changes in numerous genes previously related to psychiatric disorders and neurodevelopment. Integration of gene expression data further suggests that in SZ aberrant promoter methylation is significantly associated with altered gene transcription. In particular, we found significant associations between (1) promoter CGIs hypermethylation with gene repression and (2) CGI 3′-shore hypomethylation with increased gene expression. Finally, we constructed a specific methylation analysis platform that facilitates viewing and comparing aberrant genome methylation in human neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:25734057

  13. Genome-wide methylome analyses reveal novel epigenetic regulation patterns in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongsheng; Camarillo, Cynthia; Xu, Juan; Arana, Tania Bedard; Xiao, Yun; Zhao, Zheng; Chen, Hong; Ramirez, Mercedes; Zavala, Juan; Escamilla, Michael A; Armas, Regina; Mendoza, Ricardo; Ontiveros, Alfonso; Nicolini, Humberto; Magaña, Alvaro Antonio Jerez; Rubin, Lewis P; Li, Xia; Xu, Chun

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BP) are complex genetic disorders. Their appearance is also likely informed by as yet only partially described epigenetic contributions. Using a sequencing-based method for genome-wide analysis, we quantitatively compared the blood DNA methylation landscapes in SZ and BP subjects to control, both in an understudied population, Hispanics along the US-Mexico border. Remarkably, we identified thousands of differentially methylated regions for SZ and BP preferentially located in promoters 3'-UTRs and 5'-UTRs of genes. Distinct patterns of aberrant methylation of promoter sequences were located surrounding transcription start sites. In these instances, aberrant methylation occurred in CpG islands (CGIs) as well as in flanking regions as well as in CGI sparse promoters. Pathway analysis of genes displaying these distinct aberrant promoter methylation patterns showed enhancement of epigenetic changes in numerous genes previously related to psychiatric disorders and neurodevelopment. Integration of gene expression data further suggests that in SZ aberrant promoter methylation is significantly associated with altered gene transcription. In particular, we found significant associations between (1) promoter CGIs hypermethylation with gene repression and (2) CGI 3'-shore hypomethylation with increased gene expression. Finally, we constructed a specific methylation analysis platform that facilitates viewing and comparing aberrant genome methylation in human neuropsychiatric disorders.

  14. A novel statistic for genome-wide interaction analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xuesen; Dong, Hua; Luo, Li; Zhu, Yun; Peng, Gang; Reveille, John D; Xiong, Momiao

    2010-09-23

    Although great progress in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has been made, the significant SNP associations identified by GWAS account for only a few percent of the genetic variance, leading many to question where and how we can find the missing heritability. There is increasing interest in genome-wide interaction analysis as a possible source of finding heritability unexplained by current GWAS. However, the existing statistics for testing interaction have low power for genome-wide interaction analysis. To meet challenges raised by genome-wide interactional analysis, we have developed a novel statistic for testing interaction between two loci (either linked or unlinked). The null distribution and the type I error rates of the new statistic for testing interaction are validated using simulations. Extensive power studies show that the developed statistic has much higher power to detect interaction than classical logistic regression. The results identified 44 and 211 pairs of SNPs showing significant evidence of interactions with FDR<0.001 and 0.001genome-wide interaction analysis is a valuable tool for finding remaining missing heritability unexplained by the current GWAS, and the developed novel statistic is able to search significant interaction between SNPs across the genome. Real data analysis showed that the results of genome-wide interaction analysis can be replicated in two independent studies.

  15. DNA Methylation in Basal Metazoans: Insights from Ctenophores.

    PubMed

    Dabe, Emily C; Sanford, Rachel S; Kohn, Andrea B; Bobkova, Yelena; Moroz, Leonid L

    2015-12-01

    Epigenetic modifications control gene expression without altering the primary DNA sequence. However, little is known about DNA methylation in invertebrates and its evolution. Here, we characterize two types of genomic DNA methylation in ctenophores, 5-methyl cytosine (5-mC) and the unconventional form of methylation 6-methyl adenine (6-mA). Using both bisulfite sequencing and an ELISA-based colorimetric assay, we experimentally confirmed the presence of 5-mC DNA methylation in ctenophores. In contrast to other invertebrates studied, Mnemiopsis leidyi has lower levels of genome-wide 5-mC methylation, but higher levels of 5-mC methylation in promoters when compared with gene bodies. Phylogenetic analysis showed that ctenophores have distinct forms of DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1); the zf-CXXC domain type, which localized DNMT1 to CpG sites, and is a metazoan specific innovation. We also show that ctenophores encode the full repertoire of putative enzymes for 6-mA DNA methylation, and these genes are expressed in the aboral organ of Mnemiopsis. Using an ELISA-based colorimetric assay, we experimentally confirmed the presence of 6-mA methylation in the genomes of three different species of ctenophores, M. leidyi, Beroe abyssicola, and Pleurobrachia bachei. The functional role of this novel epigenomic mark is currently unknown. In summary, despite their compact genomes, there is a wide variety of epigenomic mechanisms employed by basal metazoans that provide novel insights into the evolutionary origins of biological novelties.

  16. Methylation of cytosine at C5 in a CpG sequence context causes a conformational switch of a benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide-N2-guanine adduct in DNA from a minor groove alignment to intercalation with base displacement.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, N.; Lin, C.; Huang, X.; Kolbanovskiy, A.; Hingerty, Brian E; Amin, S.; Broyde, S.; Geactinov, N. E.; Patel, D. J.

    2005-03-01

    It is well known that CpG dinucleotide steps in DNA, which are highly methylated at the 5-position of cytosine (meC) in human tissues, exhibit a disproportionate number of mutations within certain codons of the p53 gene. There is ample published evidence indicating that the reactivity of guanine with anti-B[a]PDE (a metabolite of the environmental carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene) at CpG mutation hot spots is enhanced by the methylation of the cytosine residue flanking the target guanine residue on the 5'-side. In this work we demonstrate that such a methylation can also dramatically affect the conformational characteristics of an adduct derived from the reaction of one of the two enantiomers of anti-B[a]PDE with the exocyclic amino group of guanine ([BP]G adduct). A detailed NMR study indicates that the 10R (-)-trans-anti-[BP]G adduct undergoes a transition from a minor groove-binding alignment of the aromatic BP ring system in the unmethylated C-[BP]G sequence context, to an intercalative BP alignment with a concomitant displacement of the modified guanine residue into the minor groove in the methylated meC-[BP]G sequence context. By contrast, a minor groove-binding alignment was observed for the stereoisomeric 10S (+)-trans-anti-[BP]G adduct in both the C-[BP]G and meC-[BP]G sequence contexts. This remarkable conformational switch resulting from the presence of a single methyl group at the 5-position of the cytosine residue flanking the lesion on the 5'-side, is attributed to the hydrophobic effect of the methyl group that can stabilize intercalated adduct conformations in an adduct stereochemistry-dependent manner. Such conformational differences in methylated and unmethylated CpG sequences may be significant because of potential alterations in the cellular processing of the [BP]G adducts by DNA transcription, replication, and repair enzymes.

  17. Design and bioinformatics analysis of genome-wide CLIP experiments

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Xiao, Guanghua; Chu, Yongjun; Zhang, Michael Q.; Corey, David R.; Xie, Yang

    2015-01-01

    The past decades have witnessed a surge of discoveries revealing RNA regulation as a central player in cellular processes. RNAs are regulated by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) at all post-transcriptional stages, including splicing, transportation, stabilization and translation. Defects in the functions of these RBPs underlie a broad spectrum of human pathologies. Systematic identification of RBP functional targets is among the key biomedical research questions and provides a new direction for drug discovery. The advent of cross-linking immunoprecipitation coupled with high-throughput sequencing (genome-wide CLIP) technology has recently enabled the investigation of genome-wide RBP–RNA binding at single base-pair resolution. This technology has evolved through the development of three distinct versions: HITS-CLIP, PAR-CLIP and iCLIP. Meanwhile, numerous bioinformatics pipelines for handling the genome-wide CLIP data have also been developed. In this review, we discuss the genome-wide CLIP technology and focus on bioinformatics analysis. Specifically, we compare the strengths and weaknesses, as well as the scopes, of various bioinformatics tools. To assist readers in choosing optimal procedures for their analysis, we also review experimental design and procedures that affect bioinformatics analyses. PMID:25958398

  18. Genome-wide association mapping of soybean aphid resistance traits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean aphid is the most damaging insect pest of soybean in the Upper Midwest and is primarily controlled by insecticides. Soybean aphid resistance (i.e., Rag genes) has been documented in some soybean lines at chromosomes 6, 7, 13, and 16, but more sources of resistance are needed. Genome-wide ass...

  19. A super powerful method for genome wide association study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genome-Wide Association Studies shed light on the identification of genes underlying human diseases and agriculturally important traits. This potential has been shadowed by false positive findings. The Mixed Linear Model (MLM) method is flexible enough to simultaneously incorporate population struct...

  20. Aberrant DNA Methylation in Keratoacanthoma

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Hidemi

    2016-01-01

    Background Keratoacanthoma (KA) is a self-limiting epidermal tumor for which histopathological examination sometimes suggests malignancy. Based on inconsistent clinical views, KA can be regarded as both a benign tumor and a variant of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Aberrant DNA methylation frequently occurs in malignant tumors but it scarcely occurs in benign tumors. Whether aberrant methylation occurs in KA has not been previously examined. Objective The aim is to elucidate whether aberrant methylation of CpG islands (CGI) containing a high density of cytosine-guanine dinucleotide (CpG) sites occurs in KA. Methods Five SCC cell lines, two cultured samples of normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs), 18 clinical SCC samples, and 21 clinical KA samples were analyzed with Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChips, quantitative real-time methylation-specific PCR (RT-MSP) and/or bisulfite sequencing. Results Genome-wide analyses of NHEK, KA, and SCC indicated that there was a greater number of aberrantly hypermethylated CGIs in SCC than in KA and there were aberrantly hypermethylated CGIs which are common in both. Among the common hypermethylated CGIs, RT-MSP and bisulfite sequencing targeting CGIs located on CCDC17, PVR, and MAP3K11 gene bodies also showed that methylation levels were significantly higher in KA than in normal epidermis. Statistical analyses suggested that the methylation level of CGI located on PVR in SCC might be correlated to lymph node metastasis (P = 0.013, Mann-Whitney U test) and that the methylation level of CGI in MAP3K11 in KA might be correlated to age (P = 0.031, linear regression analysis). Conclusion Aberrant DNA methylation occurs in KA. PMID:27788211

  1. Massively expedited genome-wide heritability analysis (MEGHA).

    PubMed

    Ge, Tian; Nichols, Thomas E; Lee, Phil H; Holmes, Avram J; Roffman, Joshua L; Buckner, Randy L; Sabuncu, Mert R; Smoller, Jordan W

    2015-02-24

    The discovery and prioritization of heritable phenotypes is a computational challenge in a variety of settings, including neuroimaging genetics and analyses of the vast phenotypic repositories in electronic health record systems and population-based biobanks. Classical estimates of heritability require twin or pedigree data, which can be costly and difficult to acquire. Genome-wide complex trait analysis is an alternative tool to compute heritability estimates from unrelated individuals, using genome-wide data that are increasingly ubiquitous, but is computationally demanding and becomes difficult to apply in evaluating very large numbers of phenotypes. Here we present a fast and accurate statistical method for high-dimensional heritability analysis using genome-wide SNP data from unrelated individuals, termed massively expedited genome-wide heritability analysis (MEGHA) and accompanying nonparametric sampling techniques that enable flexible inferences for arbitrary statistics of interest. MEGHA produces estimates and significance measures of heritability with several orders of magnitude less computational time than existing methods, making heritability-based prioritization of millions of phenotypes based on data from unrelated individuals tractable for the first time to our knowledge. As a demonstration of application, we conducted heritability analyses on global and local morphometric measurements derived from brain structural MRI scans, using genome-wide SNP data from 1,320 unrelated young healthy adults of non-Hispanic European ancestry. We also computed surface maps of heritability for cortical thickness measures and empirically localized cortical regions where thickness measures were significantly heritable. Our analyses demonstrate the unique capability of MEGHA for large-scale heritability-based screening and high-dimensional heritability profile construction.

  2. Use of MSAP markers to analyse the effects of salt stress on DNA methylation in rapeseed (Brassica napus var. oleifera).

    PubMed

    Marconi, Gianpiero; Pace, Roberta; Traini, Alessandra; Raggi, Lorenzo; Lutts, Stanley; Chiusano, Marialuisa; Guiducci, Marcello; Falcinelli, Mario; Benincasa, Paolo; Albertini, Emidio

    2013-01-01

    Excessive soil salinity is a major ecological and agronomical problem, the adverse effects of which are becoming a serious issue in regions where saline water is used for irrigation. Plants can employ regulatory strategies, such as DNA methylation, to enable relatively rapid adaptation to new conditions. In this regard, cytosine methylation might play an integral role in the regulation of gene expression at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Rapeseed, which is the most important oilseed crop in Europe, is classified as being tolerant of salinity, although cultivars can vary substantially in their levels of tolerance. In this study, the Methylation Sensitive Amplified Polymorphism (MSAP) approach was used to assess the extent of cytosine methylation under salinity stress in salinity-tolerant (Exagone) and salinity-sensitive (Toccata) rapeseed cultivars. Our data show that salinity affected the level of DNA methylation. In particular methylation decreased in Exagone and increased in Toccata. Nineteen DNA fragments showing polymorphisms related to differences in methylation were sequenced. In particular, two of these were highly similar to genes involved in stress responses (Lacerata and trehalose-6-phosphatase synthase S4) and were chosen to further characterization. Bisulfite sequencing and quantitative RT-PCR analysis of selected MSAP loci showed that cytosine methylation changes under salinity as well as gene expression varied. In particular, our data show that salinity stress influences the expression of the two stress-related genes. Moreover, we quantified the level of trehalose in Exagone shoots and found that it was correlated to TPS4 expression and, therefore, to DNA methylation. In conclusion, we found that salinity could induce genome-wide changes in DNA methylation status, and that these changes, when averaged across different genotypes and developmental stages, accounted for 16.8% of the total site-specific methylation differences

  3. Use of MSAP Markers to Analyse the Effects of Salt Stress on DNA Methylation in Rapeseed (Brassica napus var. oleifera)

    PubMed Central

    Marconi, Gianpiero; Pace, Roberta; Traini, Alessandra; Raggi, Lorenzo; Lutts, Stanley; Chiusano, Marialuisa; Guiducci, Marcello; Falcinelli, Mario; Benincasa, Paolo; Albertini, Emidio

    2013-01-01

    Excessive soil salinity is a major ecological and agronomical problem, the adverse effects of which are becoming a serious issue in regions where saline water is used for irrigation. Plants can employ regulatory strategies, such as DNA methylation, to enable relatively rapid adaptation to new conditions. In this regard, cytosine methylation might play an integral role in the regulation of gene expression at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Rapeseed, which is the most important oilseed crop in Europe, is classified as being tolerant of salinity, although cultivars can vary substantially in their levels of tolerance. In this study, the Methylation Sensitive Amplified Polymorphism (MSAP) approach was used to assess the extent of cytosine methylation under salinity stress in salinity-tolerant (Exagone) and salinity-sensitive (Toccata) rapeseed cultivars. Our data show that salinity affected the level of DNA methylation. In particular methylation decreased in Exagone and increased in Toccata. Nineteen DNA fragments showing polymorphisms related to differences in methylation were sequenced. In particular, two of these were highly similar to genes involved in stress responses (Lacerata and trehalose-6-phosphatase synthase S4) and were chosen to further characterization. Bisulfite sequencing and quantitative RT-PCR analysis of selected MSAP loci showed that cytosine methylation changes under salinity as well as gene expression varied. In particular, our data show that salinity stress influences the expression of the two stress-related genes. Moreover, we quantified the level of trehalose in Exagone shoots and found that it was correlated to TPS4 expression and, therefore, to DNA methylation. In conclusion, we found that salinity could induce genome-wide changes in DNA methylation status, and that these changes, when averaged across different genotypes and developmental stages, accounted for 16.8% of the total site-specific methylation differences

  4. Use of MSAP markers to analyse the effects of salt stress on DNA methylation in rapeseed (Brassica napus var. oleifera).

    PubMed

    Marconi, Gianpiero; Pace, Roberta; Traini, Alessandra; Raggi, Lorenzo; Lutts, Stanley; Chiusano, Marialuisa; Guiducci, Marcello; Falcinelli, Mario; Benincasa, Paolo; Albertini, Emidio

    2013-01-01

    Excessive soil salinity is a major ecological and agronomical problem, the adverse effects of which are becoming a serious issue in regions where saline water is used for irrigation. Plants can employ regulatory strategies, such as DNA methylation, to enable relatively rapid adaptation to new conditions. In this regard, cytosine methylation might play an integral role in the regulation of gene expression at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Rapeseed, which is the most important oilseed crop in Europe, is classified as being tolerant of salinity, although cultivars can vary substantially in their levels of tolerance. In this study, the Methylation Sensitive Amplified Polymorphism (MSAP) approach was used to assess the extent of cytosine methylation under salinity stress in salinity-tolerant (Exagone) and salinity-sensitive (Toccata) rapeseed cultivars. Our data show that salinity affected the level of DNA methylation. In particular methylation decreased in Exagone and increased in Toccata. Nineteen DNA fragments showing polymorphisms related to differences in methylation were sequenced. In particular, two of these were highly similar to genes involved in stress responses (Lacerata and trehalose-6-phosphatase synthase S4) and were chosen to further characterization. Bisulfite sequencing and quantitative RT-PCR analysis of selected MSAP loci showed that cytosine methylation changes under salinity as well as gene expression varied. In particular, our data show that salinity stress influences the expression of the two stress-related genes. Moreover, we quantified the level of trehalose in Exagone shoots and found that it was correlated to TPS4 expression and, therefore, to DNA methylation. In conclusion, we found that salinity could induce genome-wide changes in DNA methylation status, and that these changes, when averaged across different genotypes and developmental stages, accounted for 16.8% of the total site-specific methylation differences

  5. DNA methylation and application in forensic sciences.

    PubMed

    Kader, Farzeen; Ghai, Meenu

    2015-04-01

    DNA methylation of cytosine residues is a stable epigenetic alteration, beginning as early as foetal development in the uterus and continuously evolving throughout life. DNA methylation as well as other epigenetic modifications such as chromatin remodelling and histone modifications are indispensable in mammalian development. Methylation is to a large extent influenced by the ageing process, diets and lifestyle choices. Our understanding of this crucial modification may even contribute to the treatment and prevention of age-related illnesses in the very near future. Genome-wide methylation analysis using high throughput DNA technologies has discovered numerous differentially methylated regions (tDMRs) which differ in levels of methylation in various cell types and tissues. TDMRs have been useful in various applications, particularly medicine and forensic sciences. Forensic scientists are constantly seeking exciting and novel methods to aid in the reconstruction of crime scenes, and the analysis of tDMRs represents a new and reliable technique to identify biological fluids and tissues found at the scene of a violent act. Not only has research been able to unequivocally identify various fluids and tissues, but methods to determine the sex, age and phenotype of donors has been developed. New tDMRs in genes are being searched for consistently to serve as novel markers in forensic DNA analysis. PMID:25732744

  6. DNA methylation and application in forensic sciences.

    PubMed

    Kader, Farzeen; Ghai, Meenu

    2015-04-01

    DNA methylation of cytosine residues is a stable epigenetic alteration, beginning as early as foetal development in the uterus and continuously evolving throughout life. DNA methylation as well as other epigenetic modifications such as chromatin remodelling and histone modifications are indispensable in mammalian development. Methylation is to a large extent influenced by the ageing process, diets and lifestyle choices. Our understanding of this crucial modification may even contribute to the treatment and prevention of age-related illnesses in the very near future. Genome-wide methylation analysis using high throughput DNA technologies has discovered numerous differentially methylated regions (tDMRs) which differ in levels of methylation in various cell types and tissues. TDMRs have been useful in various applications, particularly medicine and forensic sciences. Forensic scientists are constantly seeking exciting and novel methods to aid in the reconstruction of crime scenes, and the analysis of tDMRs represents a new and reliable technique to identify biological fluids and tissues found at the scene of a violent act. Not only has research been able to unequivocally identify various fluids and tissues, but methods to determine the sex, age and phenotype of donors has been developed. New tDMRs in genes are being searched for consistently to serve as novel markers in forensic DNA analysis.

  7. De novo DNA methylation of the paternal genome in 2-cell mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Ma, X S; Wang, X G; Qin, L; Song, C L; Lin, F; Song, J M; Zhu, C C; Liu, H L

    2014-10-27

    The developmental dynamics of DNA methylation events have been well studied. Active demethylation of the paternal genome occurs in the zygote, passive demethylation occurs during cleavage stages, and de novo methylation occurs by the blastocyst stage. It is believed that the paternal genome has lower levels of methylation during early development than the maternal genome. However, in this study, we provide direct and indirect evidence of genome-wide de novo DNA methylation of the paternal genome after the first cell cycle in mouse embryos. Although very little methylation was detected within the male pronucleus in zygotes, an intense methylation signal was clearly visible within the androgenetic 2-cell embryos. Moreover, the DNA methylation level of the paternal genome in the post-zygotic metaphase embryos was similar to that of the maternal genome. Using indirect immunofluorescence with an antibody to methylated lysine 9 in histone H3, we provided new evidence to support the concept of spatial compartmentalization of parental genomes in 2-cell mouse embryos. Nevertheless, the transient segregation of parental genomes was not observed by determining the DNA methylation distribution in the 2-cell embryos even though DNA methylation asymmetry between the maternal and paternal pronucleus existed in the 1-cell stage. The disappearance of separate immunofluorescence signals of 5-methyl cytosine in the 2-cell embryos might be attributed to the de novo methylation of the paternal genome during the first mitotic cycle.

  8. Designing DNA interstrand lock for locus-specific methylation detection in a nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Insoon; Wang, Yong; Reagan, Corbin; Fu, Yumei; Wang, Michael X.; Gu, Li-Qun

    2013-10-01

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic regulation of gene transcription. Locus-specific DNA methylation can be used as biomarkers in various diseases including cancer. Many methods have been developed for genome-wide methylation analysis, but molecular diagnotics needs simple tools to determine methylation states at individual CpG sites in a gene fragment. In this report, we utilized the nanopore single-molecule sensor to investigate a base-pair specific metal ion/nucleic acids interaction, and explored its potential application in locus-specific DNA methylation analysis. We identified that divalent Mercury ion (Hg2+) can selectively bind a uracil-thymine mismatch (U-T) in a dsDNA. The Hg2+ binding creates a reversible interstrand lock, called MercuLock, which enhances the hybridization strength by two orders of magnitude. Such MercuLock cannot be formed in a 5-methylcytosine-thymine mismatch (mC-T). By nanopore detection of dsDNA stability, single bases of uracil and 5-methylcytosine can be distinguished. Since uracil is converted from cytosine by bisulfite treatment, cytosine and 5'-methylcytosine can be discriminated. We have demonstrated the methylation analysis of multiple CpGs in a p16 gene CpG island. This single-molecule assay may have potential in detection of epigenetic cancer biomarkers in biofluids, with an ultimate goal for early diagnosis of cancer.

  9. The role of DNA methylation on Octopus vulgaris development and their perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Freije, Eva; Gestal, Camino; Castellanos-Martínez, Sheila; Morán, Paloma

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is a common regulator of gene expression and development in mammalian and other vertebrate genomes. DNA methylation has been studied so far in a few bivalve mollusk species, finding a wide spectrum of levels. We focused our study in the common octopus, Octopus vulgaris, an important organism for neuroscience, physiology and ethology research as well as for human consumption. We aim to confirm the existence of DNA methylation in O. vulgaris and ultimately, if methylation plays a role in gene regulation during octopus development. We used a genome-wide approach, methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP), firstly in four different tissues from the same specimens from adult benthonic individuals to test whether gene expression is regulated by methylation. Secondly, we tested the hypothesis that methylation underlies development by assessing MSAP patters from paralarvae to adult developmental stages. Our data indicate that octopus genome is widely methylated since clear differences can be observed, and the methylation pattern changes with the development. The statistical analyses showed significant differences in methylation pattern between paralarvae, where higher internal cytosine methylation is observed, and the three other post-hatching stages. This suggests an important role of cytosine methylation during the first step of development, when major morphological changes take place. However, methylation seems to have little effect on gene expression during the benthonic phase, since no significant effect was revealed in the analyses of molecular variance (AMOVA) performed. Our observations highlight the importance of epigenetic mechanisms in the first developmental steps of the common octopus and opens new perspectives to overcome high mortality rate during paralarvae growth. Thus, better understanding the molecular regulation patterns could lead to new approaches that increase the efficiency of husbandry of this emergent species for

  10. Genome-wide patterns of selection in 230 ancient Eurasians.

    PubMed

    Mathieson, Iain; Lazaridis, Iosif; Rohland, Nadin; Mallick, Swapan; Patterson, Nick; Roodenberg, Songül Alpaslan; Harney, Eadaoin; Stewardson, Kristin; Fernandes, Daniel; Novak, Mario; Sirak, Kendra; Gamba, Cristina; Jones, Eppie R; Llamas, Bastien; Dryomov, Stanislav; Pickrell, Joseph; Arsuaga, Juan Luís; de Castro, José María Bermúdez; Carbonell, Eudald; Gerritsen, Fokke; Khokhlov, Aleksandr; Kuznetsov, Pavel; Lozano, Marina; Meller, Harald; Mochalov, Oleg; Moiseyev, Vyacheslav; Guerra, Manuel A Rojo; Roodenberg, Jacob; Vergès, Josep Maria; Krause, Johannes; Cooper, Alan; Alt, Kurt W; Brown, Dorcas; Anthony, David; Lalueza-Fox, Carles; Haak, Wolfgang; Pinhasi, Ron; Reich, David

    2015-12-24

    Ancient DNA makes it possible to observe natural selection directly by analysing samples from populations before, during and after adaptation events. Here we report a genome-wide scan for selection using ancient DNA, capitalizing on the largest ancient DNA data set yet assembled: 230 West Eurasians who lived between 6500 and 300 bc, including 163 with newly reported data. The new samples include, to our knowledge, the first genome-wide ancient DNA from Anatolian Neolithic farmers, whose genetic material we obtained by extracting from petrous bones, and who we show were members of the population that was the source of Europe's first farmers. We also report a transect of the steppe region in Samara between 5600 and 300 bc, which allows us to identify admixture into the steppe from at least two external sources. We detect selection at loci associated with diet, pigmentation and immunity, and two independent episodes of selection on height. PMID:26595274

  11. Genome wide copy number analysis of single cells

    PubMed Central

    Baslan, Timour; Kendall, Jude; Rodgers, Linda; Cox, Hilary; Riggs, Mike; Stepansky, Asya; Troge, Jennifer; Ravi, Kandasamy; Esposito, Diane; Lakshmi, B.; Wigler, Michael; Navin, Nicholas; Hicks, James

    2016-01-01

    Summary Copy number variation (CNV) is increasingly recognized as an important contributor to phenotypic variation in health and disease. Most methods for determining CNV rely on admixtures of cells, where information regarding genetic heterogeneity is lost. Here, we present a protocol that allows for the genome wide copy number analysis of single nuclei isolated from mixed populations of cells. Single nucleus sequencing (SNS), combines flow sorting of single nuclei based on DNA content, whole genome amplification (WGA), followed by next generation sequencing to quantize genomic intervals in a genome wide manner. Multiplexing of single cells is discussed. Additionally, we outline informatic approaches that correct for biases inherent in the WGA procedure and allow for accurate determination of copy number profiles. All together, the protocol takes ~3 days from flow cytometry to sequence-ready DNA libraries. PMID:22555242

  12. Genome-wide association studies in Alzheimer's disease: a review.

    PubMed

    Tosto, Giuseppe; Reitz, Christiane

    2013-10-01

    Over the past decade, research aiming to disentangle the genetic underpinnings of late-onset Alzheimer's disease has mostly focused on the identification of common variants through genome-wide association studies. The identification of several new susceptibility genes through these efforts has reinforced the importance of amyloid precursor protein and tau metabolism in the cause of the disease and has implicated immune response, inflammation, lipid metabolism, endocytosis/intracellular trafficking, and cell migration in the cause of the disease. Ongoing and future large-scale genome-wide association studies, translational studies, and next-generation whole genome or whole exome sequencing efforts, hold the promise to map the specific causative variants in these genes, to identify several additional risk variants, including rare and structural variants, and to identify novel targets for genetic testing, prevention, and treatment.

  13. Genome-wide patterns of selection in 230 ancient Eurasians

    PubMed Central

    Mathieson, Iain; Lazaridis, Iosif; Rohland, Nadin; Mallick, Swapan; Patterson, Nick; Roodenberg, Songül Alpaslan; Harney, Eadaoin; Stewardson, Kristin; Fernandes, Daniel; Novak, Mario; Sirak, Kendra; Gamba, Cristina; Jones, Eppie R.; Llamas, Bastien; Dryomov, Stanislav; Pickrel, Joseph; Arsuaga, Juan Luís; de Castro, José María Bermúdez; Carbonell, Eudald; Gerritsen, Fokke; Khokhlov, Aleksandr; Kuznetsov, Pavel; Lozano, Marina; Meller, Harald; Mochalov, Oleg; Moiseyev, Vayacheslav; Rojo Guerra, Manuel A.; Roodenberg, Jacob; Vergès, Josep Maria; Krause, Johannes; Cooper, Alan; Alt, Kurt W.; Brown, Dorcas; Anthony, David; Lalueza-Fox, Carles; Haak, Wolfgang; Pinhasi, Ron; Reich, David

    2016-01-01

    Ancient DNA makes it possible to directly witness natural selection by analyzing samples from populations before, during and after adaptation events. Here we report the first scan for selection using ancient DNA, capitalizing on the largest genome-wide dataset yet assembled: 230 West Eurasians dating to between 6500 and 1000 BCE, including 163 with newly reported data. The new samples include the first genome-wide data from the Anatolian Neolithic culture whose genetic material we extracted from the DNA-rich petrous bone and who we show were members of the population that was the source of Europe’s first farmers. We also report a complete transect of the steppe region in Samara between 5500 and 1200 BCE that allows us to recognize admixture from at least two external sources into steppe populations during this period. We detect selection at loci associated with diet, pigmentation and immunity, and two independent episodes of selection on height. PMID:26595274

  14. Genome-Wide Significant Loci: How Important Are They?

    PubMed Central

    Björkegren, Johan L.M.; Kovacic, Jason C.; Dudley, Joel T.; Schadt, Eric E.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been extensively used to study common complex diseases such as coronary artery disease (CAD), revealing 153 suggestive CAD loci, of which at least 46 have been validated as having genome-wide significance. However, these loci collectively explain <10% of the genetic variance in CAD. Thus, we must address the key question of what factors constitute the remaining 90% of CAD heritability. We review possible limitations of GWAS, and contextually consider some candidate CAD loci identified by this method. Looking ahead, we propose systems genetics as a complementary approach to unlocking the CAD heritability and etiology. Systems genetics builds network models of relevant molecular processes by combining genetic and genomic datasets to ultimately identify key “drivers” of disease. By leveraging systems-based genetic approaches, we can help reveal the full genetic basis of common complex disorders, enabling novel diagnostic and therapeutic opportunities. PMID:25720628

  15. Genome-wide patterns of selection in 230 ancient Eurasians.

    PubMed

    Mathieson, Iain; Lazaridis, Iosif; Rohland, Nadin; Mallick, Swapan; Patterson, Nick; Roodenberg, Songül Alpaslan; Harney, Eadaoin; Stewardson, Kristin; Fernandes, Daniel; Novak, Mario; Sirak, Kendra; Gamba, Cristina; Jones, Eppie R; Llamas, Bastien; Dryomov, Stanislav; Pickrell, Joseph; Arsuaga, Juan Luís; de Castro, José María Bermúdez; Carbonell, Eudald; Gerritsen, Fokke; Khokhlov, Aleksandr; Kuznetsov, Pavel; Lozano, Marina; Meller, Harald; Mochalov, Oleg; Moiseyev, Vyacheslav; Guerra, Manuel A Rojo; Roodenberg, Jacob; Vergès, Josep Maria; Krause, Johannes; Cooper, Alan; Alt, Kurt W; Brown, Dorcas; Anthony, David; Lalueza-Fox, Carles; Haak, Wolfgang; Pinhasi, Ron; Reich, David

    2015-12-24

    Ancient DNA makes it possible to observe natural selection directly by analysing samples from populations before, during and after adaptation events. Here we report a genome-wide scan for selection using ancient DNA, capitalizing on the largest ancient DNA data set yet assembled: 230 West Eurasians who lived between 6500 and 300 bc, including 163 with newly reported data. The new samples include, to our knowledge, the first genome-wide ancient DNA from Anatolian Neolithic farmers, whose genetic material we obtained by extracting from petrous bones, and who we show were members of the population that was the source of Europe's first farmers. We also report a transect of the steppe region in Samara between 5600 and 300 bc, which allows us to identify admixture into the steppe from at least two external sources. We detect selection at loci associated with diet, pigmentation and immunity, and two independent episodes of selection on height.

  16. MERVL/Zscan4 Network Activation Results in Transient Genome-wide DNA Demethylation of mESCs.

    PubMed

    Eckersley-Maslin, Mélanie A; Svensson, Valentine; Krueger, Christel; Stubbs, Thomas M; Giehr, Pascal; Krueger, Felix; Miragaia, Ricardo J; Kyriakopoulos, Charalampos; Berrens, Rebecca V; Milagre, Inês; Walter, Jörn; Teichmann, Sarah A; Reik, Wolf

    2016-09-27

    Mouse embryonic stem cells are dynamic and heterogeneous. For example, rare cells cycle through a state characterized by decondensed chromatin and expression of transcripts, including the Zscan4 cluster and MERVL endogenous retrovirus, which are usually restricted to preimplantation embryos. Here, we further characterize the dynamics and consequences of this transient cell state. Single-cell transcriptomics identified the earliest upregulated transcripts as cells enter the MERVL/Zscan4 state. The MERVL/Zscan4 transcriptional network was also upregulated during induced pluripotent stem cell reprogramming. Genome-wide DNA methylation and chromatin analyses revealed global DNA hypomethylation accompanying increased chromatin accessibility. This transient DNA demethylation was driven by a loss of DNA methyltransferase proteins in the cells and occurred genome-wide. While methylation levels were restored once cells exit this state, genomic imprints remained hypomethylated, demonstrating a potential global and enduring influence of endogenous retroviral activation on the epigenome. PMID:27681430

  17. Genome-wide association studies in pediatric endocrinology.

    PubMed

    Dauber, Andrew; Hirschhorn, Joel N

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies are a powerful tool for understanding the genetic underpinnings of human disease. In this article, we briefly review the role and findings of GWA studies in type 1 diabetes, stature, pubertal timing, obesity, and vitamin D deficiency. We then discuss the present and future implications of these findings with regards to disease prediction, uncovering basic biology, and the development of novel therapeutic agents.

  18. Genome-wide association study of relative telomere length.

    PubMed

    Prescott, Jennifer; Kraft, Peter; Chasman, Daniel I; Savage, Sharon A; Mirabello, Lisa; Berndt, Sonja I; Weissfeld, Joel L; Han, Jiali; Hayes, Richard B; Chanock, Stephen J; Hunter, David J; De Vivo, Immaculata

    2011-05-10

    Telomere function is essential to maintaining the physical integrity of linear chromosomes and healthy human aging. The probability of forming proper telomere structures depends on the length of the telomeric DNA tract. We attempted to identify common genetic variants associated with log relative telomere length using genome-wide genotyping data on 3,554 individuals from the Nurses' Health Study and the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial that took part in the National Cancer Institute Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility initiative for breast and prostate cancer. After genotyping 64 independent SNPs selected for replication in additional Nurses' Health Study and Women's Genome Health Study participants, we did not identify genome-wide significant loci; however, we replicated the inverse association of log relative telomere length with the minor allele variant [C] of rs16847897 at the TERC locus (per allele β = -0.03, P = 0.003) identified by a previous genome-wide association study. We did not find evidence for an association with variants at the OBFC1 locus or other loci reported to be associated with telomere length. With this sample size we had >80% power to detect β estimates as small as ±0.10 for SNPs with minor allele frequencies of ≥0.15 at genome-wide significance. However, power is greatly reduced for β estimates smaller than ±0.10, such as those for variants at the TERC locus. In general, common genetic variants associated with telomere length homeostasis have been difficult to detect. Potential biological and technical issues are discussed.

  19. Genome-wide association study of schizophrenia in Ashkenazi Jews.

    PubMed

    Goes, Fernando S; McGrath, John; Avramopoulos, Dimitrios; Wolyniec, Paula; Pirooznia, Mehdi; Ruczinski, Ingo; Nestadt, Gerald; Kenny, Eimear E; Vacic, Vladimir; Peters, Inga; Lencz, Todd; Darvasi, Ariel; Mulle, Jennifer G; Warren, Stephen T; Pulver, Ann E

    2015-12-01

    Schizophrenia is a common, clinically heterogeneous disorder associated with lifelong morbidity and early mortality. Several genetic variants associated with schizophrenia have been identified, but the majority of the heritability remains unknown. In this study, we report on a case-control sample of Ashkenazi Jews (AJ), a founder population that may provide additional insights into genetic etiology of schizophrenia. We performed a genome-wide association analysis (GWAS) of 592 cases and 505 controls of AJ ancestry ascertained in the US. Subsequently, we performed a meta-analysis with an Israeli AJ sample of 913 cases and 1640 controls, followed by a meta-analysis and polygenic risk scoring using summary results from Psychiatric GWAS Consortium 2 schizophrenia study. The U.S. AJ sample showed strong evidence of polygenic inheritance (pseudo-R(2) ∼9.7%) and a SNP-heritability estimate of 0.39 (P = 0.00046). We found no genome-wide significant associations in the U.S. sample or in the combined US/Israeli AJ meta-analysis of 1505 cases and 2145 controls. The strongest AJ specific associations (P-values in 10(-6) -10(-7) range) were in the 22q 11.2 deletion region and included the genes TBX1, GLN1, and COMT. Supportive evidence (meta P < 1 × 10(-4) ) was also found for several previously identified genome-wide significant findings, including the HLA region, CNTN4, IMMP2L, and GRIN2A. The meta-analysis of the U.S. sample with the PGC2 results provided initial genome-wide significant evidence for six new loci. Among the novel potential susceptibility genes is PEPD, a gene involved in proline metabolism, which is associated with a Mendelian disorder characterized by developmental delay and cognitive deficits. PMID:26198764

  20. Targeted DNA methylation analysis by next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Masser, Dustin R; Stanford, David R; Freeman, Willard M

    2015-02-24

    The role of epigenetic processes in the control of gene expression has been known for a number of years. DNA methylation at cytosine residues is of particular interest for epigenetic studies as it has been demonstrated to be both a long lasting and a dynamic regulator of gene expression. Efforts to examine epigenetic changes in health and disease have been hindered by the lack of high-throughput, quantitatively accurate methods. With the advent and popularization of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies, these tools are now being applied to epigenomics in addition to existing genomic and transcriptomic methodologies. For epigenetic investigations of cytosine methylation where regions of interest, such as specific gene promoters or CpG islands, have been identified and there is a need to examine significant numbers of samples with high quantitative accuracy, we have developed a method called Bisulfite Amplicon Sequencing (BSAS). This method combines bisulfite conversion with targeted amplification of regions of interest, transposome-mediated library construction and benchtop NGS. BSAS offers a rapid and efficient method for analysis of up to 10 kb of targeted regions in up to 96 samples at a time that can be performed by most research groups with basic molecular biology skills. The results provide absolute quantitation of cytosine methylation with base specificity. BSAS can be applied to any genomic region from any DNA source. This method is useful for hypothesis testing studies of target regions of interest as well as confirmation of regions identified in genome-wide methylation analyses such as whole genome bisulfite sequencing, reduced representation bisulfite sequencing, and methylated DNA immunoprecipitation sequencing.

  1. Integrative genome-wide approaches in embryonic stem cell research.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinyue; Huang, Jing

    2010-10-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are derived from blastocysts. They can differentiate into the three embryonic germ layers and essentially any type of somatic cells. They therefore hold great potential in tissue regeneration therapy. The ethical issues associated with the use of human embryonic stem cells are resolved by the technical break-through of generating induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from various types of somatic cells. However, how ES and iPS cells self-renew and maintain their pluripotency is still largely unknown in spite of the great progress that has been made in the last two decades. Integrative genome-wide approaches, such as the gene expression microarray, chromatin immunoprecipitation based microarray (ChIP-chip) and chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by massive parallel sequencing (ChIP-seq) offer unprecedented opportunities to elucidate the mechanism of the pluripotency, reprogramming and DNA damage response of ES and iPS cells. This frontier article summarizes the fundamental biological questions about ES and iPS cells and reviews the recent advances in ES and iPS cell research using genome-wide technologies. To this end, we offer our perspectives on the future of genome-wide studies on stem cells.

  2. Genome-wide polymorphisms show unexpected targets of natural selection

    PubMed Central

    Pespeni, Melissa H.; Garfield, David A.; Manier, Mollie K.; Palumbi, Stephen R.

    2012-01-01

    Natural selection can act on all the expressed genes of an individual, leaving signatures of genetic differentiation or diversity at many loci across the genome. New power to assay these genome-wide effects of selection comes from associating multi-locus patterns of polymorphism with gene expression and function. Here, we performed one of the first genome-wide surveys in a marine species, comparing purple sea urchins, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, from two distant locations along the species' wide latitudinal range. We examined 9112 polymorphic loci from upstream non-coding and coding regions of genes for signatures of selection with respect to gene function and tissue- and ontogenetic gene expression. We found that genetic differentiation (FST) varied significantly across functional gene classes. The strongest enrichment occurred in the upstream regions of E3 ligase genes, enzymes known to regulate protein abundance during development and environmental stress. We found enrichment for high heterozygosity in genes directly involved in immune response, particularly NALP genes, which mediate pro-inflammatory signals during bacterial infection. We also found higher heterozygosity in immune genes in the southern population, where disease incidence and pathogen diversity are greater. Similar to the major histocompatibility complex in mammals, balancing selection may enhance genetic diversity in the innate immune system genes of this invertebrate. Overall, our results show that how genome-wide polymorphism data coupled with growing databases on gene function and expression can combine to detect otherwise hidden signals of selection in natural populations. PMID:21993504

  3. Significance of genome-wide association studies in molecular anthropology.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vipin; Khadgawat, Rajesh; Sachdeva, Mohinder Pal

    2009-12-01

    The successful advent of a genome-wide approach in association studies raises the hopes of human geneticists for solving a genetic maze of complex traits especially the disorders. This approach, which is replete with the application of cutting-edge technology and supported by big science projects (like Human Genome Project; and even more importantly the International HapMap Project) and various important databases (SNP database, CNV database, etc.), has had unprecedented success in rapidly uncovering many of the genetic determinants of complex disorders. The magnitude of this approach in the genetics of classical anthropological variables like height, skin color, eye color, and other genome diversity projects has certainly expanded the horizons of molecular anthropology. Therefore, in this article we have proposed a genome-wide association approach in molecular anthropological studies by providing lessons from the exemplary study of the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium. We have also highlighted the importance and uniqueness of Indian population groups in facilitating the design and finding optimum solutions for other genome-wide association-related challenges.

  4. Voxelwise genome-wide association study (vGWAS).

    PubMed

    Stein, Jason L; Hua, Xue; Lee, Suh; Ho, April J; Leow, Alex D; Toga, Arthur W; Saykin, Andrew J; Shen, Li; Foroud, Tatiana; Pankratz, Nathan; Huentelman, Matthew J; Craig, David W; Gerber, Jill D; Allen, April N; Corneveaux, Jason J; Dechairo, Bryan M; Potkin, Steven G; Weiner, Michael W; Thompson, Paul

    2010-11-15

    The structure of the human brain is highly heritable, and is thought to be influenced by many common genetic variants, many of which are currently unknown. Recent advances in neuroimaging and genetics have allowed collection of both highly detailed structural brain scans and genome-wide genotype information. This wealth of information presents a new opportunity to find the genes influencing brain structure. Here we explore the relation between 448,293 single nucleotide polymorphisms in each of 31,622 voxels of the entire brain across 740 elderly subjects (mean age+/-s.d.: 75.52+/-6.82 years; 438 male) including subjects with Alzheimer's disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, and healthy elderly controls from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). We used tensor-based morphometry to measure individual differences in brain structure at the voxel level relative to a study-specific template based on healthy elderly subjects. We then conducted a genome-wide association at each voxel to identify genetic variants of interest. By studying only the most associated variant at each voxel, we developed a novel method to address the multiple comparisons problem and computational burden associated with the unprecedented amount of data. No variant survived the strict significance criterion, but several genes worthy of further exploration were identified, including CSMD2 and CADPS2. These genes have high relevance to brain structure. This is the first voxelwise genome wide association study to our knowledge, and offers a novel method to discover genetic influences on brain structure.

  5. MethylC-seq library preparation for base-resolution whole-genome bisulfite sequencing.

    PubMed

    Urich, Mark A; Nery, Joseph R; Lister, Ryan; Schmitz, Robert J; Ecker, Joseph R

    2015-03-01

    Current high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies enable acquisition of billions of data points through which myriad biological processes can be interrogated, including genetic variation, chromatin structure, gene expression patterns, small RNAs and protein-DNA interactions. Here we describe the MethylC-sequencing (MethylC-seq) library preparation method, a 2-d protocol that enables the genome-wide identification of cytosine DNA methylation states at single-base resolution. The technique involves fragmentation of genomic DNA followed by adapter ligation, bisulfite conversion and limited amplification using adapter-specific PCR primers in preparation for sequencing. To date, this protocol has been successfully applied to genomic DNA isolated from primary cell culture, sorted cells and fresh tissue from over a thousand plant and animal samples.

  6. Experimental Approaches for Target Profiling of RNA Cytosine Methyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Khoddami, Vahid; Yerra, Archana; Cairns, Bradley R

    2015-01-01

    RNA cytosine methyltransferases (m(5)C-RMTs) constitute an important class of RNA-modifying enzymes, methylating specific cytosines within particular RNA targets in both coding and noncoding RNAs. Almost all organisms express at least one m(5)C-RMT, and vertebrates often express different types or variants of m(5)C-RMTs in different cell types. Deletion or mutation of particular m(5)C-RMTs is connected to severe pathological manifestations ranging from developmental defects to infertility and mental retardation. Some m(5)C-RMTs show spatiotemporal patterns of expression and activity requiring careful experimental design for their analysis in order to capture their context-dependent targets. An essential step for understanding the functions of both the enzymes and the modified cytosines is defining the one-to-one connection between particular m(5)C-RMTs and their target cytosines. Recent technological and methodological advances have provided researchers with new tools to comprehensively explore RNA cytosine methylation and methyltransferases. Here, we describe three complementary approaches applicable for both discovery and validation of candidate target sites of specific m(5)C-RMTs.

  7. Genome-Wide Association Study of Metabolic Syndrome in Koreans

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Seok Won; Chung, Myungguen; Park, Soo-Jung; Cho, Seong Beom

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (METS) is a disorder of energy utilization and storage and increases the risk of developing cardiovascular disease and diabetes. To identify the genetic risk factors of METS, we carried out a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for 2,657 cases and 5,917 controls in Korean populations. As a result, we could identify 2 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with genome-wide significance level p-values (<5 × 10-8), 8 SNPs with genome-wide suggestive p-values (5 × 10-8 ≤ p < 1 × 10-5), and 2 SNPs of more functional variants with borderline p-values (5 × 10-5 ≤ p < 1 × 10-4). On the other hand, the multiple correction criteria of conventional GWASs exclude false-positive loci, but simultaneously, they discard many true-positive loci. To reconsider the discarded true-positive loci, we attempted to include the functional variants (nonsynonymous SNPs [nsSNPs] and expression quantitative trait loci [eQTL]) among the top 5,000 SNPs based on the proportion of phenotypic variance explained by genotypic variance. In total, 159 eQTLs and 18 nsSNPs were presented in the top 5,000 SNPs. Although they should be replicated in other independent populations, 6 eQTLs and 2 nsSNP loci were located in the molecular pathways of LPL, APOA5, and CHRM2, which were the significant or suggestive loci in the METS GWAS. Conclusively, our approach using the conventional GWAS, reconsidering functional variants and pathway-based interpretation, suggests a useful method to understand the GWAS results of complex traits and can be expanded in other genomewide association studies. PMID:25705157

  8. Genome-wide association study of antisocial personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Rautiainen, M-R; Paunio, T; Repo-Tiihonen, E; Virkkunen, M; Ollila, H M; Sulkava, S; Jolanki, O; Palotie, A; Tiihonen, J

    2016-01-01

    The pathophysiology of antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) remains unclear. Although the most consistent biological finding is reduced grey matter volume in the frontal cortex, about 50% of the total liability to developing ASPD has been attributed to genetic factors. The contributing genes remain largely unknown. Therefore, we sought to study the genetic background of ASPD. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) and a replication analysis of Finnish criminal offenders fulfilling DSM-IV criteria for ASPD (N=370, N=5850 for controls, GWAS; N=173, N=3766 for controls and replication sample). The GWAS resulted in suggestive associations of two clusters of single-nucleotide polymorphisms at 6p21.2 and at 6p21.32 at the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region. Imputation of HLA alleles revealed an independent association with DRB1*01:01 (odds ratio (OR)=2.19 (1.53-3.14), P=1.9 × 10(-5)). Two polymorphisms at 6p21.2 LINC00951-LRFN2 gene region were replicated in a separate data set, and rs4714329 reached genome-wide significance (OR=1.59 (1.37-1.85), P=1.6 × 10(-9)) in the meta-analysis. The risk allele also associated with antisocial features in the general population conditioned for severe problems in childhood family (β=0.68, P=0.012). Functional analysis in brain tissue in open access GTEx and Braineac databases revealed eQTL associations of rs4714329 with LINC00951 and LRFN2 in cerebellum. In humans, LINC00951 and LRFN2 are both expressed in the brain, especially in the frontal cortex, which is intriguing considering the role of the frontal cortex in behavior and the neuroanatomical findings of reduced gray matter volume in ASPD. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing genome-wide significant and replicable findings on genetic variants associated with any personality disorder.

  9. Voxelwise genome-wide association study (vGWAS)

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Jason L.; Hua, Xue; Lee, Suh; Ho, April J.; Leow, Alex D.; Toga, Arthur W.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Shen, Li; Foroud, Tatiana; Pankratz, Nathan; Huentelman, Matthew J.; Craig, David W.; Gerber, Jill D.; Allen, April N.; Corneveaux, Jason J.; DeChairo, Bryan M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Weiner, Michael W.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2010-01-01

    The structure of the human brain is highly heritable, and is thought to be influenced by many common genetic variants, many of which are currently unknown. Recent advances in neuroimaging and genetics have allowed collection of both highly detailed structural brain scans and genome-wide genotype information. This wealth of information presents a new opportunity to find the genes influencing brain structure. Here we explore the relation between 448,293 single nucleotide polymorphisms in each of 31,622 voxels of the entire brain across 740 elderly subjects (mean age±s.d.: 75.52±6.82 years; 438 male) including subjects with Alzheimer's disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, and healthy elderly controls from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). We used tensor-based morphometry to measure individual differences in brain structure at the voxel level relative to a study-specific template based on healthy elderly subjects. We then conducted a genome-wide association at each voxel to identify genetic variants of interest. By studying only the most associated variant at each voxel, we developed a novel method to address the multiple comparisons problem and computational burden associated with the unprecedented amount of data. No variant survived the strict significance criterion, but several genes worthy of further exploration were identified, including CSMD2 and CADPS2. These genes have high relevance to brain structure. This is the first voxelwise genome wide association study to our knowledge, and offers a novel method to discover genetic influences on brain structure. PMID:20171287

  10. Genome-Wide Approaches to Drosophila Heart Development

    PubMed Central

    Frasch, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    The development of the dorsal vessel in Drosophila is one of the first systems in which key mechanisms regulating cardiogenesis have been defined in great detail at the genetic and molecular level. Due to evolutionary conservation, these findings have also provided major inputs into studies of cardiogenesis in vertebrates. Many of the major components that control Drosophila cardiogenesis were discovered based on candidate gene approaches and their functions were defined by employing the outstanding genetic tools and molecular techniques available in this system. More recently, approaches have been taken that aim to interrogate the entire genome in order to identify novel components and describe genomic features that are pertinent to the regulation of heart development. Apart from classical forward genetic screens, the availability of the thoroughly annotated Drosophila genome sequence made new genome-wide approaches possible, which include the generation of massive numbers of RNA interference (RNAi) reagents that were used in forward genetic screens, as well as studies of the transcriptomes and proteomes of the developing heart under normal and experimentally manipulated conditions. Moreover, genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments have been performed with the aim to define the full set of genomic binding sites of the major cardiogenic transcription factors, their relevant target genes, and a more complete picture of the regulatory network that drives cardiogenesis. This review will give an overview on these genome-wide approaches to Drosophila heart development and on computational analyses of the obtained information that ultimately aim to provide a description of this process at the systems level. PMID:27294102

  11. Genetics, Genome-Wide Association Studies, and Menarche.

    PubMed

    Witchel, Selma Feldman

    2016-07-01

    Puberty is characterized by maturation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, development of secondary sexual features, increased linear growth velocity, maturation of the epiphyses limiting additional growth, and achievement of menarche. The age at menarche appears to have a significant genetic component. With the advent of genome-wide association studies (GWASs), the genome has been interrogated to find associations between specific loci and age at menarche. It is apparent that multiple genetic loci, epigenetic mechanisms, and environmental factors modulate this biological event crucial for reproductive competence.

  12. Methodological challenges of genome-wide association analysis in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Teo, Yik-Ying; Small, Kerrin S.; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P.

    2013-01-01

    Medical research in Africa has yet to benefit from the advent of genome-wide association (GWA) analysis, partly because the genotyping tools and statistical methods that have been developed for European and Asian populations struggle to deal with the high levels of genome diversity and population structure in Africa. However, the haplotypic diversity of African populations might help to overcome one of the major roadblocks in GWA research, the fine mapping of causal variants. We review the methodological challenges and consider how GWA studies in Africa will be transformed by new approaches in statistical imputation and large-scale genome sequencing. PMID:20084087

  13. [Genome-wide association study for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis].

    PubMed

    Ogura, Yoji; Kou, Ikuyo; Scoliosis, Japan; Matsumoto, Morio; Watanabe, Kota; Ikegawa, Shiro

    2016-04-01

    Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis(AIS)is a polygenic disease. Genome-wide association studies(GWASs)have been performed for a lot of polygenic diseases. For AIS, we conducted GWAS and identified the first AIS locus near LBX1. After the discovery, we have extended our study by increasing the numbers of subjects and SNPs. In total, our Japanese GWAS has identified four susceptibility genes. GWASs for AIS have also been performed in the USA and China, which identified one and three susceptibility genes, respectively. Here we review GWASs in Japan and abroad and functional analysis to clarify the pathomechanism of AIS. PMID:27013625

  14. Genome-wide profiling of alternative splicing in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Mitchell K.P.; Esiri, Margaret M.; Tan, Michelle G.K.

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a highly regulated process which generates transcriptome and proteome diversity through the skipping or inclusion of exons within gene loci. Identification of aberrant alternative splicing associated with human diseases has become feasible with the development of new genomic technologies and powerful bioinformatics. We have previously reported genome-wide gene alterations in the neocortex of a well-characterized cohort of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and matched elderly controls using a commercial exon microarray platform [1]. Here, we provide detailed description of analyses aimed at identifying differential alternative splicing events associated with AD. PMID:26484111

  15. Genetics, Genome-Wide Association Studies, and Menarche.

    PubMed

    Witchel, Selma Feldman

    2016-07-01

    Puberty is characterized by maturation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, development of secondary sexual features, increased linear growth velocity, maturation of the epiphyses limiting additional growth, and achievement of menarche. The age at menarche appears to have a significant genetic component. With the advent of genome-wide association studies (GWASs), the genome has been interrogated to find associations between specific loci and age at menarche. It is apparent that multiple genetic loci, epigenetic mechanisms, and environmental factors modulate this biological event crucial for reproductive competence. PMID:27513021

  16. Genome-Wide Association Studies for Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongbin; Zhao, Han; Chen, Zi-Jiang

    2016-07-01

    Over the past several years, the field of reproductive medicine has witnessed great advances in genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), leading to identification of several promising genes involved in hormone action, type 2 diabetes, and cell proliferation. This review summarizes the key findings and discusses their potential implications with regard to genetic mechanisms of PCOS. Limitations of GWAS are evaluated, emphasizing the understanding of the reasons for variability in results between individual studies. Root causes of misinterpretations of GWASs are also addressed. Finally, the impact of GWAS on future directions of multi- and interdisciplinary studies is discussed. PMID:27513023

  17. [Genome-wide association study for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis].

    PubMed

    Ogura, Yoji; Kou, Ikuyo; Scoliosis, Japan; Matsumoto, Morio; Watanabe, Kota; Ikegawa, Shiro

    2016-04-01

    Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis(AIS)is a polygenic disease. Genome-wide association studies(GWASs)have been performed for a lot of polygenic diseases. For AIS, we conducted GWAS and identified the first AIS locus near LBX1. After the discovery, we have extended our study by increasing the numbers of subjects and SNPs. In total, our Japanese GWAS has identified four susceptibility genes. GWASs for AIS have also been performed in the USA and China, which identified one and three susceptibility genes, respectively. Here we review GWASs in Japan and abroad and functional analysis to clarify the pathomechanism of AIS.

  18. Genome-wide association studies and contribution to cardiovascular physiology

    PubMed Central

    Munroe, Patricia B.

    2015-01-01

    The study of family pedigrees with rare monogenic cardiovascular disorders has revealed new molecular players in physiological processes. Genome-wide association studies of complex traits with a heritable component may afford a similar and potentially intellectually richer opportunity. In this review we focus on the interpretation of genetic associations and the issue of causality in relation to known and potentially new physiology. We mainly discuss cardiometabolic traits as it reflects our personal interests, but the issues pertain broadly in many other disciplines. We also describe some of the resources that are now available that may expedite follow up of genetic association signals into observations on causal mechanisms and pathophysiology. PMID:26106147

  19. Genome-wide association studies and contribution to cardiovascular physiology.

    PubMed

    Munroe, Patricia B; Tinker, Andrew

    2015-09-01

    The study of family pedigrees with rare monogenic cardiovascular disorders has revealed new molecular players in physiological processes. Genome-wide association studies of complex traits with a heritable component may afford a similar and potentially intellectually richer opportunity. In this review we focus on the interpretation of genetic associations and the issue of causality in relation to known and potentially new physiology. We mainly discuss cardiometabolic traits as it reflects our personal interests, but the issues pertain broadly in many other disciplines. We also describe some of the resources that are now available that may expedite follow up of genetic association signals into observations on causal mechanisms and pathophysiology.

  20. A Genome-Wide Scenario of Terpene Pathways in Self-pollinated Artemisia annua.

    PubMed

    Ma, Dong-Ming; Wang, Zhilong; Wang, Liangjiang; Alejos-Gonzales, Fatima; Sun, Ming-An; Xie, De-Yu

    2015-11-01

    Scenarios of genes to metabolites in Artemisia annua remain uninvestigated. Here, we report the use of an integrated approach combining metabolomics, transcriptomics, and gene function analyses to characterize gene-to-terpene and terpene pathway scenarios in a self-pollinating variety of this species. Eighty-eight metabolites including 22 sesquiterpenes (e.g., artemisinin), 26 monoterpenes, two triterpenes, one diterpene and 38 other non-polar metabolites were identified from 14 tissues. These metabolites were differentially produced by leaves and flowers at lower to higher positions. Sequences from cDNA libraries of six tissues were assembled into 18 871 contigs and genome-wide gene expression profiles in tissues were strongly associated with developmental stages and spatial specificities. Sequence mining identified 47 genes that mapped to the artemisinin, non-amorphadiene sesquiterpene, monoterpene, triterpene, 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate and mevalonate pathways. Pearson correlation analysis resulted in network integration that characterized significant correlations of gene-to-gene expression patterns and gene expression-to-metabolite levels in six tissues simultaneously. More importantly, manipulations of amorpha-4,11-diene synthase gene expression not only affected the activity of this pathway toward artemisinin, artemisinic acid, and arteannuin b but also altered non-amorphadiene sesquiterpene and genome-wide volatile profiles. Such gene-to-terpene landscapes associated with different tissues are fundamental to the metabolic engineering of artemisinin. PMID:26192869

  1. Ras regulation of DNA-methylation and cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Patra, Samir Kumar

    2008-04-01

    Genome wide hypomethylation and regional hypermethylation of cancer cells and tissues remain a paradox, though it has received a convincing confirmation that epigenetic switching systems, including DNA-methylation represent a fundamental regulatory mechanism that has an impact on genome maintenance and gene transcription. Methylated cytosine residues of vertebrate DNA are transmitted by clonal inheritance through the strong preference of DNA methyltransferase, DNMT1, for hemimethylated-DNA. Maintenance of methylation patterns is necessary for normal development of mice, and aberrant methylation patterns are associated with many human tumours. DNMT1 interacts with many proteins during cell cycle progression, including PCNA, p53, EZH2 and HP1. Ras family of GTPases promotes cell proliferation by its oncogenic nature, which transmits signals by multiple pathways in both lipid raft dependent and independent fashion. DNA-methylation-mediated repression of DNA-repair protein O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) gene and increased rate of K-Ras mutation at codon for amino acids 12 and 13 have been correlated with a secondary role for Ras-effector homologues (RASSFs) in tumourigenesis. Lines of evidence suggest that DNA-methylation associated repression of tumour suppressors and apoptotic genes and ceaseless proliferation of tumour cells are regulated in part by Ras-signaling. Control of Ras GTPase signaling might reduce the aberrant methylation and accordingly may reduce the risk of cancer development.

  2. A Pooled Genome-Wide Association Study of Asperger Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Warrier, Varun; Chakrabarti, Bhismadev; Murphy, Laura; Chan, Allen; Craig, Ian; Mallya, Uma; Lakatošová, Silvia; Rehnstrom, Karola; Peltonen, Leena; Wheelwright, Sally; Allison, Carrie; Fisher, Simon E; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Asperger Syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental condition characterized by impairments in social interaction and communication, alongside the presence of unusually repetitive, restricted interests and stereotyped behaviour. Individuals with AS have no delay in cognitive and language development. It is a subset of Autism Spectrum Conditions (ASC), which are highly heritable and has a population prevalence of approximately 1%. Few studies have investigated the genetic basis of AS. To address this gap in the literature, we performed a genome-wide pooled DNA association study to identify candidate loci in 612 individuals (294 cases and 318 controls) of Caucasian ancestry, using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping version 6.0 array. We identified 11 SNPs that had a p-value below 1x10-5. These SNPs were independently genotyped in the same sample. Three of the SNPs (rs1268055, rs7785891 and rs2782448) were nominally significant, though none remained significant after Bonferroni correction. Two of our top three SNPs (rs7785891 and rs2782448) lie in loci previously implicated in ASC. However, investigation of the three SNPs in the ASC genome-wide association dataset from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium indicated that these three SNPs were not significantly associated with ASC. The effect sizes of the variants were modest, indicating that our study was not sufficiently powered to identify causal variants with precision.

  3. Genome-wide association study of blood pressure and hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Daniel; Ehret, Georg B.; Rice, Kenneth; Verwoert, Germaine C.; Launer, Lenore J.; Dehghan, Abbas; Glazer, Nicole L.; Morrison, Alanna C.; Johnson, Andrew D.; Aspelund, Thor; Aulchenko, Yurii; Lumley, Thomas; Köttgen, Anna; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Guo, Xiuqing; Arking, Dan E.; Mitchell, Gary F.; Mattace-Raso, Francesco U.S.; Smith, Albert V; Taylor, Kent; Scharpf, Robert B.; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Sijbrands, Eric J.G.; Bis, Joshua; Harris, Tamara B.; Ganesh, Santhi K.; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; Hofman, Albert; Rotter, Jerome I.; Coresh, Josef; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Heiss, Gerardo; Fox, Caroline S.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.M.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Wang, Thomas J.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Larson, Martin G.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Psaty, Bruce M.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.

    2010-01-01

    Blood pressure (BP) is a major cardiovascular disease risk factor. To date, few variants associated with inter-individual BP variation have been identified. A genome-wide association study of systolic (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP), and hypertension in the CHARGE Consortium (n=29,136) identified 13 SNPs for SBP, 20 for DBP, and 10 for hypertension at p <4×10-7. The top 10 loci for SBP and DBP were incorporated into a risk score; mean BP and prevalence of hypertension increased in relation to number of risk alleles carried. When 10 CHARGE SNPs for each trait were meta-analyzed jointly with the Global BPgen Consortium (n=34,433), four CHARGE loci attained genome-wide significance (p<5×10-8) for SBP (ATP2B1, CYP17A1, PLEKHA7, SH2B3), six for DBP (ATP2B1, CACNB2, CSK/ULK3, SH2B3, TBX3/TBX5, ULK4), and one for hypertension (ATP2B1). Identifying novel BP genes advances our understanding of BP regulation and highlights potential drug targets for the prevention or treatment of hypertension. PMID:19430479

  4. Phenome-wide analysis of genome-wide polygenic scores

    PubMed Central

    Krapohl, E; Euesden, J; Zabaneh, D; Pingault, J-B; Rimfeld, K; von Stumm, S; Dale, P S; Breen, G; O'Reilly, P F; Plomin, R

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide polygenic scores (GPS), which aggregate the effects of thousands of DNA variants from genome-wide association studies (GWAS), have the potential to make genetic predictions for individuals. We conducted a systematic investigation of associations between GPS and many behavioral traits, the behavioral phenome. For 3152 unrelated 16-year-old individuals representative of the United Kingdom, we created 13 GPS from the largest GWAS for psychiatric disorders (for example, schizophrenia, depression and dementia) and cognitive traits (for example, intelligence, educational attainment and intracranial volume). The behavioral phenome included 50 traits from the domains of psychopathology, personality, cognitive abilities and educational achievement. We examined phenome-wide profiles of associations for the entire distribution of each GPS and for the extremes of the GPS distributions. The cognitive GPS yielded stronger predictive power than the psychiatric GPS in our UK-representative sample of adolescents. For example, education GPS explained variation in adolescents' behavior problems (~0.6%) and in educational achievement (~2%) but psychiatric GPS were associated with neither. Despite the modest effect sizes of current GPS, quantile analyses illustrate the ability to stratify individuals by GPS and opportunities for research. For example, the highest and lowest septiles for the education GPS yielded a 0.5 s.d. difference in mean math grade and a 0.25 s.d. difference in mean behavior problems. We discuss the usefulness and limitations of GPS based on adult GWAS to predict genetic propensities earlier in development. PMID:26303664

  5. Genome-wide scans for footprints of natural selection

    PubMed Central

    Oleksyk, Taras K.; Smith, Michael W.; O'Brien, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Detecting recent selected ‘genomic footprints’ applies directly to the discovery of disease genes and in the imputation of the formative events that molded modern population genetic structure. The imprints of historic selection/adaptation episodes left in human and animal genomes allow one to interpret modern and ancestral gene origins and modifications. Current approaches to reveal selected regions applied in genome-wide selection scans (GWSSs) fall into eight principal categories: (I) phylogenetic footprinting, (II) detecting increased rates of functional mutations, (III) evaluating divergence versus polymorphism, (IV) detecting extended segments of linkage disequilibrium, (V) evaluating local reduction in genetic variation, (VI) detecting changes in the shape of the frequency distribution (spectrum) of genetic variation, (VII) assessing differentiating between populations (FST), and (VIII) detecting excess or decrease in admixture contribution from one population. Here, we review and compare these approaches using available human genome-wide datasets to provide independent verification (or not) of regions found by different methods and using different populations. The lessons learned from GWSSs will be applied to identify genome signatures of historic selective pressures on genes and gene regions in other species with emerging genome sequences. This would offer considerable potential for genome annotation in functional, developmental and evolutionary contexts. PMID:20008396

  6. Genome-Wide Patterns of Nucleotide Polymorphism in Domesticated Rice

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Ryan D; Boyko, Adam; Fledel-Alon, Adi; York, Thomas L; Polato, Nicholas R; Olsen, Kenneth M; Nielsen, Rasmus; McCouch, Susan R; Bustamante, Carlos D; Purugganan, Michael D

    2007-01-01

    Domesticated Asian rice (Oryza sativa) is one of the oldest domesticated crop species in the world, having fed more people than any other plant in human history. We report the patterns of DNA sequence variation in rice and its wild ancestor, O. rufipogon, across 111 randomly chosen gene fragments, and use these to infer the evolutionary dynamics that led to the origins of rice. There is a genome-wide excess of high-frequency derived single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in O. sativa varieties, a pattern that has not been reported for other crop species. We developed several alternative models to explain contemporary patterns of polymorphisms in rice, including a (i) selectively neutral population bottleneck model, (ii) bottleneck plus migration model, (iii) multiple selective sweeps model, and (iv) bottleneck plus selective sweeps model. We find that a simple bottleneck model, which has been the dominant demographic model for domesticated species, cannot explain the derived nucleotide polymorphism site frequency spectrum in rice. Instead, a bottleneck model that incorporates selective sweeps, or a more complex demographic model that includes subdivision and gene flow, are more plausible explanations for patterns of variation in domesticated rice varieties. If selective sweeps are indeed the explanation for the observed nucleotide data of domesticated rice, it suggests that strong selection can leave its imprint on genome-wide polymorphism patterns, contrary to expectations that selection results only in a local signature of variation. PMID:17907810

  7. A Pooled Genome-Wide Association Study of Asperger Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Warrier, Varun; Chakrabarti, Bhismadev; Murphy, Laura; Chan, Allen; Craig, Ian; Mallya, Uma; Lakatošová, Silvia; Rehnstrom, Karola; Peltonen, Leena; Wheelwright, Sally; Allison, Carrie; Fisher, Simon E; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Asperger Syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental condition characterized by impairments in social interaction and communication, alongside the presence of unusually repetitive, restricted interests and stereotyped behaviour. Individuals with AS have no delay in cognitive and language development. It is a subset of Autism Spectrum Conditions (ASC), which are highly heritable and has a population prevalence of approximately 1%. Few studies have investigated the genetic basis of AS. To address this gap in the literature, we performed a genome-wide pooled DNA association study to identify candidate loci in 612 individuals (294 cases and 318 controls) of Caucasian ancestry, using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping version 6.0 array. We identified 11 SNPs that had a p-value below 1x10-5. These SNPs were independently genotyped in the same sample. Three of the SNPs (rs1268055, rs7785891 and rs2782448) were nominally significant, though none remained significant after Bonferroni correction. Two of our top three SNPs (rs7785891 and rs2782448) lie in loci previously implicated in ASC. However, investigation of the three SNPs in the ASC genome-wide association dataset from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium indicated that these three SNPs were not significantly associated with ASC. The effect sizes of the variants were modest, indicating that our study was not sufficiently powered to identify causal variants with precision. PMID:26176695

  8. A Pooled Genome-Wide Association Study of Asperger Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Warrier, Varun; Chakrabarti, Bhismadev; Murphy, Laura; Chan, Allen; Craig, Ian; Mallya, Uma; Lakatošová, Silvia; Rehnstrom, Karola; Wheelwright, Sally; Allison, Carrie; Fisher, Simon E.; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Asperger Syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental condition characterized by impairments in social interaction and communication, alongside the presence of unusually repetitive, restricted interests and stereotyped behaviour. Individuals with AS have no delay in cognitive and language development. It is a subset of Autism Spectrum Conditions (ASC), which are highly heritable and has a population prevalence of approximately 1%. Few studies have investigated the genetic basis of AS. To address this gap in the literature, we performed a genome-wide pooled DNA association study to identify candidate loci in 612 individuals (294 cases and 318 controls) of Caucasian ancestry, using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping version 6.0 array. We identified 11 SNPs that had a p-value below 1x10-5. These SNPs were independently genotyped in the same sample. Three of the SNPs (rs1268055, rs7785891 and rs2782448) were nominally significant, though none remained significant after Bonferroni correction. Two of our top three SNPs (rs7785891 and rs2782448) lie in loci previously implicated in ASC. However, investigation of the three SNPs in the ASC genome-wide association dataset from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium indicated that these three SNPs were not significantly associated with ASC. The effect sizes of the variants were modest, indicating that our study was not sufficiently powered to identify causal variants with precision. PMID:26176695

  9. Genome-wide identification of hypoxia-induced enhancer regions

    PubMed Central

    Preston, Jessica L.; Randel, Melissa A.; Johnson, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a genome-wide method for de novo identification of enhancer regions. This approach enables massively parallel empirical investigation of DNA sequences that mediate transcriptional activation and provides a platform for discovery of regulatory modules capable of driving context-specific gene expression. The method links fragmented genomic DNA to the transcription of randomer molecule identifiers and measures the functional enhancer activity of the library by massively parallel sequencing. We transfected a Drosophila melanogaster library into S2 cells in normoxia and hypoxia, and assayed 4,599,881 genomic DNA fragments in parallel. The locations of the enhancer regions strongly correlate with genes up-regulated after hypoxia and previously described enhancers. Novel enhancer regions were identified and integrated with RNAseq data and transcription factor motifs to describe the hypoxic response on a genome-wide basis as a complex regulatory network involving multiple stress-response pathways. This work provides a novel method for high-throughput assay of enhancer activity and the genome-scale identification of 31 hypoxia-activated enhancers in Drosophila. PMID:26713262

  10. Genome-wide association study of Tourette Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Scharf, Jeremiah M.; Yu, Dongmei; Mathews, Carol A.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Stewart, S. Evelyn; Fagerness, Jesen A; Evans, Patrick; Gamazon, Eric; Edlund, Christopher K.; Service, Susan; Tikhomirov, Anna; Osiecki, Lisa; Illmann, Cornelia; Pluzhnikov, Anna; Konkashbaev, Anuar; Davis, Lea K; Han, Buhm; Crane, Jacquelyn; Moorjani, Priya; Crenshaw, Andrew T.; Parkin, Melissa A.; Reus, Victor I.; Lowe, Thomas L.; Rangel-Lugo, Martha; Chouinard, Sylvain; Dion, Yves; Girard, Simon; Cath, Danielle C; Smit, Jan H; King, Robert A.; Fernandez, Thomas; Leckman, James F.; Kidd, Kenneth K.; Kidd, Judith R.; Pakstis, Andrew J.; State, Matthew; Herrera, Luis Diego; Romero, Roxana; Fournier, Eduardo; Sandor, Paul; Barr, Cathy L; Phan, Nam; Gross-Tsur, Varda; Benarroch, Fortu; Pollak, Yehuda; Budman, Cathy L.; Bruun, Ruth D.; Erenberg, Gerald; Naarden, Allan L; Lee, Paul C; Weiss, Nicholas; Kremeyer, Barbara; Berrío, Gabriel Bedoya; Campbell, Desmond; Silgado, Julio C. Cardona; Ochoa, William Cornejo; Restrepo, Sandra C. Mesa; Muller, Heike; Duarte, Ana V. Valencia; Lyon, Gholson J; Leppert, Mark; Morgan, Jubel; Weiss, Robert; Grados, Marco A.; Anderson, Kelley; Davarya, Sarah; Singer, Harvey; Walkup, John; Jankovic, Joseph; Tischfield, Jay A.; Heiman, Gary A.; Gilbert, Donald L.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Robertson, Mary M.; Kurlan, Roger; Liu, Chunyu; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Singleton, Andrew; Hardy, John; Strengman, Eric; Ophoff, Roel; Wagner, Michael; Moessner, Rainald; Mirel, Daniel B.; Posthuma, Danielle; Sabatti, Chiara; Eskin, Eleazar; Conti, David V.; Knowles, James A.; Ruiz-Linares, Andres; Rouleau, Guy A.; Purcell, Shaun; Heutink, Peter; Oostra, Ben A.; McMahon, William; Freimer, Nelson; Cox, Nancy J.; Pauls, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a developmental disorder that has one of the highest familial recurrence rates among neuropsychiatric diseases with complex inheritance. However, the identification of definitive TS susceptibility genes remains elusive. Here, we report the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) of TS in 1285 cases and 4964 ancestry-matched controls of European ancestry, including two European-derived population isolates, Ashkenazi Jews from North America and Israel, and French Canadians from Quebec, Canada. In a primary meta-analysis of GWAS data from these European ancestry samples, no markers achieved a genome-wide threshold of significance (p<5 × 10−8); the top signal was found in rs7868992 on chromosome 9q32 within COL27A1 (p=1.85 × 10−6). A secondary analysis including an additional 211 cases and 285 controls from two closely-related Latin-American population isolates from the Central Valley of Costa Rica and Antioquia, Colombia also identified rs7868992 as the top signal (p=3.6 × 10−7 for the combined sample of 1496 cases and 5249 controls following imputation with 1000 Genomes data). This study lays the groundwork for the eventual identification of common TS susceptibility variants in larger cohorts and helps to provide a more complete understanding of the full genetic architecture of this disorder. PMID:22889924

  11. A genome-wide association study of aging.

    PubMed

    Walter, Stefan; Atzmon, Gil; Demerath, Ellen W; Garcia, Melissa E; Kaplan, Robert C; Kumari, Meena; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Milaneschi, Yuri; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tranah, Gregory J; Völker, Uwe; Yu, Lei; Arnold, Alice; Benjamin, Emelia J; Biffar, Reiner; Buchman, Aron S; Boerwinkle, Eric; Couper, David; De Jager, Philip L; Evans, Denis A; Harris, Tamara B; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hofman, Albert; Karasik, David; Kiel, Douglas P; Kocher, Thomas; Kuningas, Maris; Launer, Lenore J; Lohman, Kurt K; Lutsey, Pamela L; Mackenbach, Johan; Marciante, Kristin; Psaty, Bruce M; Reiman, Eric M; Rotter, Jerome I; Seshadri, Sudha; Shardell, Michelle D; Smith, Albert V; van Duijn, Cornelia; Walston, Jeremy; Zillikens, M Carola; Bandinelli, Stefania; Baumeister, Sebastian E; Bennett, David A; Ferrucci, Luigi; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kivimaki, Mika; Liu, Yongmei; Murabito, Joanne M; Newman, Anne B; Tiemeier, Henning; Franceschini, Nora

    2011-11-01

    Human longevity and healthy aging show moderate heritability (20%-50%). We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies from 9 studies from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology Consortium for 2 outcomes: (1) all-cause mortality, and (2) survival free of major disease or death. No single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was a genome-wide significant predictor of either outcome (p < 5 × 10(-8)). We found 14 independent SNPs that predicted risk of death, and 8 SNPs that predicted event-free survival (p < 10(-5)). These SNPs are in or near genes that are highly expressed in the brain (HECW2, HIP1, BIN2, GRIA1), genes involved in neural development and function (KCNQ4, LMO4, GRIA1, NETO1) and autophagy (ATG4C), and genes that are associated with risk of various diseases including cancer and Alzheimer's disease. In addition to considerable overlap between the traits, pathway and network analysis corroborated these findings. These findings indicate that variation in genes involved in neurological processes may be an important factor in regulating aging free of major disease and achieving longevity.

  12. Genome-wide association interaction analysis for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Gusareva, Elena S; Carrasquillo, Minerva M; Bellenguez, Céline; Cuyvers, Elise; Colon, Samuel; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Petersen, Ronald C; Dickson, Dennis W; Mahachie John, Jestinah M; Bessonov, Kyrylo; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Harold, Denise; Williams, Julie; Amouyel, Philippe; Sleegers, Kristel; Ertekin-Taner, Nilüfer; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Van Steen, Kristel; Ramirez, Alfredo

    2014-11-01

    We propose a minimal protocol for exhaustive genome-wide association interaction analysis that involves screening for epistasis over large-scale genomic data combining strengths of different methods and statistical tools. The different steps of this protocol are illustrated on a real-life data application for Alzheimer's disease (AD) (2259 patients and 6017 controls from France). Particularly, in the exhaustive genome-wide epistasis screening we identified AD-associated interacting SNPs-pair from chromosome 6q11.1 (rs6455128, the KHDRBS2 gene) and 13q12.11 (rs7989332, the CRYL1 gene) (p = 0.006, corrected for multiple testing). A replication analysis in the independent AD cohort from Germany (555 patients and 824 controls) confirmed the discovered epistasis signal (p = 0.036). This signal was also supported by a meta-analysis approach in 5 independent AD cohorts that was applied in the context of epistasis for the first time. Transcriptome analysis revealed negative correlation between expression levels of KHDRBS2 and CRYL1 in both the temporal cortex (β = -0.19, p = 0.0006) and cerebellum (β = -0.23, p < 0.0001) brain regions. This is the first time a replicable epistasis associated with AD was identified using a hypothesis free screening approach.

  13. A Genome-Wide Association Study of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Stefan; Atzmon, Gil; Demerath, Ellen W.; Garcia, Melissa E.; Kaplan, Robert C.; Kumari, Meena; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Milaneschi, Yuri; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tranah, Gregory J.; Völker, Uwe; Yu, Lei; Arnold, Alice; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Biffar, Reiner; Buchman, Aron S.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Couper, David; De Jager, Philip L.; Evans, Denis A.; Harris, Tamara B.; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hofman, Albert; Karasik, David; Kiel, Douglas P.; Kocher, Thomas; Kuningas, Maris; Launer, Lenore J.; Lohman, Kurt K.; Lutsey, Pamela L.; Mackenbach, Johan; Marciante, Kristin; Psaty, Bruce M.; Reiman, Eric M.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Seshadri, Sudha; Shardell, Michelle D.; Smith, Albert V.; van Duijn, Cornelia; Walston, Jeremy; Zillikens, M. Carola; Bandinelli, Stefania; Baumeister, Sebastian E.; Bennett, David A.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kivimaki, Mika; Liu, Yongmei; Murabito, Joanne M.; Newman, Anne B.; Tiemeier, Henning; Franceschini, Nora

    2011-01-01

    Human longevity and healthy aging show moderate heritability (20–50%). We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies from nine studies from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology Consortium for two outcomes: a) all-cause mortality and b) survival free of major disease or death. No single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was a genome-wide significant predictor of either outcome (p < 5 × 10−8). We found fourteen independent SNPs that predicted risk of death, and eight SNPs that predicted event-free survival (p < 10−5). These SNPs are in or near genes that are highly expressed in the brain (HECW2, HIP1, BIN2, GRIA1), genes involved in neural development and function (KCNQ4, LMO4, GRIA1, NETO1) and autophagy (ATG4C), and genes that are associated with risk of various diseases including cancer and Alzheimer’s disease. In addition to considerable overlap between the traits, pathway and network analysis corroborated these findings. These findings indicate that variation in genes involved in neurological processes may be an important factor in regulating aging free of major disease and achieving longevity. PMID:21782286

  14. Genome-wide association study of Tourette's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Scharf, J M; Yu, D; Mathews, C A; Neale, B M; Stewart, S E; Fagerness, J A; Evans, P; Gamazon, E; Edlund, C K; Service, S K; Tikhomirov, A; Osiecki, L; Illmann, C; Pluzhnikov, A; Konkashbaev, A; Davis, L K; Han, B; Crane, J; Moorjani, P; Crenshaw, A T; Parkin, M A; Reus, V I; Lowe, T L; Rangel-Lugo, M; Chouinard, S; Dion, Y; Girard, S; Cath, D C; Smit, J H; King, R A; Fernandez, T V; Leckman, J F; Kidd, K K; Kidd, J R; Pakstis, A J; State, M W; Herrera, L D; Romero, R; Fournier, E; Sandor, P; Barr, C L; Phan, N; Gross-Tsur, V; Benarroch, F; Pollak, Y; Budman, C L; Bruun, R D; Erenberg, G; Naarden, A L; Lee, P C; Weiss, N; Kremeyer, B; Berrío, G B; Campbell, D D; Cardona Silgado, J C; Ochoa, W C; Mesa Restrepo, S C; Muller, H; Valencia Duarte, A V; Lyon, G J; Leppert, M; Morgan, J; Weiss, R; Grados, M A; Anderson, K; Davarya, S; Singer, H; Walkup, J; Jankovic, J; Tischfield, J A; Heiman, G A; Gilbert, D L; Hoekstra, P J; Robertson, M M; Kurlan, R; Liu, C; Gibbs, J R; Singleton, A; Hardy, J; Strengman, E; Ophoff, R A; Wagner, M; Moessner, R; Mirel, D B; Posthuma, D; Sabatti, C; Eskin, E; Conti, D V; Knowles, J A; Ruiz-Linares, A; Rouleau, G A; Purcell, S; Heutink, P; Oostra, B A; McMahon, W M; Freimer, N B; Cox, N J; Pauls, D L

    2013-06-01

    Tourette's syndrome (TS) is a developmental disorder that has one of the highest familial recurrence rates among neuropsychiatric diseases with complex inheritance. However, the identification of definitive TS susceptibility genes remains elusive. Here, we report the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) of TS in 1285 cases and 4964 ancestry-matched controls of European ancestry, including two European-derived population isolates, Ashkenazi Jews from North America and Israel and French Canadians from Quebec, Canada. In a primary meta-analysis of GWAS data from these European ancestry samples, no markers achieved a genome-wide threshold of significance (P<5 × 10(-8)); the top signal was found in rs7868992 on chromosome 9q32 within COL27A1 (P=1.85 × 10(-6)). A secondary analysis including an additional 211 cases and 285 controls from two closely related Latin American population isolates from the Central Valley of Costa Rica and Antioquia, Colombia also identified rs7868992 as the top signal (P=3.6 × 10(-7) for the combined sample of 1496 cases and 5249 controls following imputation with 1000 Genomes data). This study lays the groundwork for the eventual identification of common TS susceptibility variants in larger cohorts and helps to provide a more complete understanding of the full genetic architecture of this disorder.

  15. Genome-wide association studies of suicidal behaviors: a review.

    PubMed

    Sokolowski, Marcus; Wasserman, Jerzy; Wasserman, Danuta

    2014-10-01

    Suicidal behaviors represent a fatal dimension of mental ill-health, involving both environmental and heritable (genetic) influences. The putative genetic components of suicidal behaviors have until recent years been mainly investigated by hypothesis-driven research (of "candidate genes"). But technological progress in genotyping has opened the possibilities towards (hypothesis-generating) genomic screens and novel opportunities to explore polygenetic perspectives, now spanning a wide array of possible analyses falling under the term Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS). Here we introduce and discuss broadly some apparent limitations but also certain developing opportunities of GWAS. We summarize the results from all the eight GWAS conducted up to date focused on suicidality outcomes; treatment emergent suicidal ideation (3 studies), suicide attempts (4 studies) and completed suicides (1 study). Clearly, there are few (if any) genome-wide significant and reproducible findings yet to be demonstrated. We then discuss and pinpoint certain future considerations in relation to sample sizes, the units of genetic associations used, study designs and outcome definitions, psychiatric diagnoses or biological measures, as well as the use of genomic sequencing. We conclude that GWAS should have a lot more potential to show in the case of suicidal outcomes, than what has yet been realized. PMID:25219938

  16. Genome-wide signals of positive selection in human evolution

    PubMed Central

    Enard, David; Messer, Philipp W.; Petrov, Dmitri A.

    2014-01-01

    The role of positive selection in human evolution remains controversial. On the one hand, scans for positive selection have identified hundreds of candidate loci, and the genome-wide patterns of polymorphism show signatures consistent with frequent positive selection. On the other hand, recent studies have argued that many of the candidate loci are false positives and that most genome-wide signatures of adaptation are in fact due to reduction of neutral diversity by linked deleterious mutations, known as background selection. Here we analyze human polymorphism data from the 1000 Genomes Project and detect signatures of positive selection once we correct for the effects of background selection. We show that levels of neutral polymorphism are lower near amino acid substitutions, with the strongest reduction observed specifically near functionally consequential amino acid substitutions. Furthermore, amino acid substitutions are associated with signatures of recent adaptation that should not be generated by background selection, such as unusually long and frequent haplotypes and specific distortions in the site frequency spectrum. We use forward simulations to argue that the observed signatures require a high rate of strongly adaptive substitutions near amino acid changes. We further demonstrate that the observed signatures of positive selection correlate better with the presence of regulatory sequences, as predicted by the ENCODE Project Consortium, than with the positions of amino acid substitutions. Our results suggest that adaptation was frequent in human evolution and provide support for the hypothesis of King and Wilson that adaptive divergence is primarily driven by regulatory changes. PMID:24619126

  17. Psychiatric genome-wide association study analyses implicate neuronal, immune and histone pathways

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of psychiatric disorders have identified multiple genetic associations with such disorders, but better methods are needed to derive the underlying biological mechanisms that these signals indicate. We sought to identify biological pathways in GWAS data from over 60,000 participants from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium. We developed an analysis framework to rank pathways that requires only summary statistics. We combined this score across disorders to find common pathways across three adult psychiatric disorders: schizophrenia, major depression and bipolar disorder. Histone methylation processes showed the strongest association, and we also found statistically significant evidence for associations with multiple immune and neuronal signaling pathways and with the postsynaptic density. Our study indicates that risk variants for psychiatric disorders aggregate in particular biological pathways and that these pathways are frequently shared between disorders. Our results confirm known mechanisms and suggest several novel insights into the etiology of psychiatric disorders. PMID:25599223

  18. Genome-wide chromatin and gene expression profiling during memory formation and maintenance in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Centeno, Tonatiuh Pena; Shomroni, Orr; Hennion, Magali; Halder, Rashi; Vidal, Ramon; Rahman, Raza-Ur; Bonn, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the formation and maintenance of memory requires epigenetic changes. In an effort to understand the spatio-temporal extent of learning and memory-related epigenetic changes we have charted genome-wide histone and DNA methylation profiles, in two different brain regions, two cell types, and three time-points, before and after learning. In this data descriptor we provide detailed information on data generation, give insights into the rationale of experiments, highlight necessary steps to assess data quality, offer guidelines for future use of the data and supply ready-to-use code to replicate the analysis results. The data provides a blueprint of the gene regulatory network underlying short- and long-term memory formation and maintenance. This ‘healthy’ gene regulatory network of learning can now be compared to changes in neurological or psychiatric diseases, providing mechanistic insights into brain disorders and highlighting potential therapeutic avenues. PMID:27727234

  19. Psychiatric genome-wide association study analyses implicate neuronal, immune and histone pathways.

    PubMed

    2015-02-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of psychiatric disorders have identified multiple genetic associations with such disorders, but better methods are needed to derive the underlying biological mechanisms that these signals indicate. We sought to identify biological pathways in GWAS data from over 60,000 participants from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium. We developed an analysis framework to rank pathways that requires only summary statistics. We combined this score across disorders to find common pathways across three adult psychiatric disorders: schizophrenia, major depression and bipolar disorder. Histone methylation processes showed the strongest association, and we also found statistically significant evidence for associations with multiple immune and neuronal signaling pathways and with the postsynaptic density. Our study indicates that risk variants for psychiatric disorders aggregate in particular biological pathways and that these pathways are frequently shared between disorders. Our results confirm known mechanisms and suggest several novel insights into the etiology of psychiatric disorders. PMID:25599223

  20. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling of human glioblastoma cells in response to ITE treatment.

    PubMed

    Kang, Bo; Zhou, Yanwen; Zheng, Min; Wang, Ying-Jie

    2015-09-01

    A ligand-activated transcription factor aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is recently revealed to play a key role in embryogenesis and tumorigenesis (Feng et al. [1], Safe et al. [2]) and 2-(1'H-indole-3'-carbonyl)-thiazole-4-carboxylic acid methyl ester (ITE) (Song et al. [3]) is an endogenous AhR ligand that possesses anti-tumor activity. In order to gain insights into how ITE acts via the AhR in embryogenesis and tumorigenesis, we analyzed the genome-wide transcriptional profiles of the following three groups of cells: the human glioblastoma U87 parental cells, U87 tumor sphere cells treated with vehicle (DMSO) and U87 tumor sphere cells treated with ITE. Here, we provide the details of the sample gathering strategy and show the quality controls and the analyses associated with our gene array data deposited into the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) under the accession code of GSE67986.

  1. Integrated, genome-wide screening for hypomethylated oncogenes in salivary gland adenoid cystic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Chunbo; Sun, Wenyue; Tan, Marietta; Glazer, Chad A.; Bhan, Sheetal; Zhong, Xiaoli; Fakhry, Carole; Sharma, Rajni; Westra, William H.; Hoque, Mohammad O.; Moskaluk, Christopher A.; Sidransky, David; Califano, Joseph A.; Ha, Patrick K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Salivary gland adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is a rare malignancy that is poorly understood. In order to look for relevant oncogene candidates under the control of promoter methylation, an integrated, genome-wide screen was performed. Experimental Design Global demethylation of normal salivary gland cell strains using 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-Aza dC) and Trichostatin A (TSA), followed by expression array analysis was performed. ACC-specific expression profiling was generated using expression microarray analysis of primary ACC and normal samples. Next, the two profiles were integrated to identify a subset of genes for further validation of promoter demethylation in ACC versus normal. Finally, promising candidates were further validated for mRNA, protein, and promoter methylation levels in larger ACC cohorts. Functional validation was then performed in cancer cell lines. Results We found 159 genes that were significantly re-expressed after 5-Aza dC/TSA treatment and overexpressed in ACC. After initial validation, eight candidates showed hypomethylation in ACC: AQP1, CECR1, C1QR1, CTAG2, P53AIP1, TDRD12, BEX1, and DYNLT3. Aquaporin 1 (AQP1) showed the most significant hypomethylation and was further validated. AQP1 hypomethylation in ACC was confirmed with two independent cohorts. Of note, there was significant overexpression of AQP1 in both mRNA and protein in the paraffin-embedded ACC cohort. Furthermore, AQP1 was up-regulated in 5-Aza dC/TSA treated SACC83. Lastly, AQP1 promoted cell proliferation and colony formation in SACC83. Conclusions Our integrated, genome-wide screening method proved to be an effective strategy for detecting novel oncogenes in ACC. AQP1 is a promising oncogene candidate for ACC and is transcriptionally regulated by promoter hypomethylation. PMID:21551254

  2. Genome-wide association study for acute otitis media in children identifies FNDC1 as disease contributing gene

    PubMed Central

    van Ingen, Gijs; Li, Jin; Goedegebure, André; Pandey, Rahul; Li, Yun Rose; March, Michael E.; Jaddoe, Vincent W. V.; Bakay, Marina; Mentch, Frank D.; Thomas, Kelly; Wei, Zhi; Chang, Xiao; Hain, Heather S.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Moll, Henriette A.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Raat, Hein; Baatenburg de Jong, Robert J.; Sleiman, Patrick M.; van der Schroeff, Marc P.; Hakonarson, Hakon

    2016-01-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) is among the most common pediatric diseases, and the most frequent reason for antibiotic treatment in children. Risk of AOM is dependent on environmental and host factors, as well as a significant genetic component. We identify genome-wide significance at a locus on 6q25.3 (rs2932989, Pmeta=2.15 × 10−09), and show that the associated variants are correlated with the methylation status of the FNDC1 gene (cg05678571, P=1.43 × 10−06), and further show it is an eQTL for FNDC1 (P=9.3 × 10−05). The mouse homologue, Fndc1, is expressed in middle ear tissue and its expression is upregulated upon lipopolysaccharide treatment. In this first GWAS of AOM and the largest OM genetic study to date, we identify the first genome-wide significant locus associated with AOM. PMID:27677580

  3. Genome-Wide Identification of Epigenetic Hotspots Potentially Related to Cardiovascular Risk in Adult Women after a Complicated Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Oudejans, Cees; Poutsma, Ankie; Michel, Omar; Mulders, Joyce; Visser, Allerdien; van Dijk, Marie; Nauta, Tessa; Bokslag, Anouk; Paulus, Walter; de Haas, Andreas; Koolwijk, Pieter; de Groot, Christianne J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The physiological demands of pregnancy on the maternal cardiovascular system can catapult women into a metabolic syndrome that predisposes to atherosclerosis in later life. We sought to identify the nature of the epigenomic changes associated with the increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in adult women following pre-eclampsia. Findings We assessed the genome wide epigenetic profile by methyl-C sequencing of monozygotic parous twin sister pairs discordant for a severe variant of pre-eclampsia. In the adult twin sisters at risk for CVD as a consequence of a complicated pregnancy, a set of 12 differentially methylated regions with at least 50% difference in methylation percentage and the same directional change was found to be shared between the affected twin sisters and significantly different compared to their unaffected monozygous sisters. Conclusion The current epigenetic marker set will permit targeted analysis of differentially methylated regions potentially related to CVD risk in large cohorts of adult women following complicated pregnancies. PMID:26870946

  4. Layers of epistasis: genome-wide regulatory networks and network approaches to genome-wide association studies

    PubMed Central

    Cowper-Sal·lari, Richard; Cole, Michael D.; Karagas, Margaret R.; Lupien, Mathieu; Moore, Jason H.

    2010-01-01

    The conceptual foundation of the genome-wide association study (GWAS) has advanced unchecked since its conception. A revision might seem premature as the potential of GWAS has not been fully realized. Multiple technical and practical limitations need to be overcome before GWAS can be fairly criticized. But with the completion of hundreds of studies and a deeper understanding of the genetic architecture of disease, warnings are being raised. The results compiled to date indicate that risk-associated variants lie predominantly in non-coding regions of the genome. Additionally, alternative methodologies are uncovering large and heterogeneous sets of rare variants underlying disease. The fear is that, even in its fulfilment, the current GWAS paradigm might be incapable of dissecting all kinds of phenotypes. In the following text we review several initiatives that aim to overcome these limitations. The overarching theme of these studies is the inclusion of biological knowledge to both the analysis and interpretation of genotyping data. GWAS is uninformed of biology by design and although there is some virtue in its simplicity it is also its most conspicuous deficiency. We propose a framework in which to integrate these novel approaches, both empirical and theoretical, in the form of a genome-wide regulatory network (GWRN). By processing experimental data into networks, emerging data types based on chromatin-immunoprecipitation are made computationally tractable. This will give GWAS re-analysis efforts the most current and relevant substrates, and root them firmly on our knowledge of human disease. PMID:21197657

  5. Genome-wide association study of antisocial personality disorder

    PubMed Central

    Rautiainen, M-R; Paunio, T; Repo-Tiihonen, E; Virkkunen, M; Ollila, H M; Sulkava, S; Jolanki, O; Palotie, A; Tiihonen, J

    2016-01-01

    The pathophysiology of antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) remains unclear. Although the most consistent biological finding is reduced grey matter volume in the frontal cortex, about 50% of the total liability to developing ASPD has been attributed to genetic factors. The contributing genes remain largely unknown. Therefore, we sought to study the genetic background of ASPD. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) and a replication analysis of Finnish criminal offenders fulfilling DSM-IV criteria for ASPD (N=370, N=5850 for controls, GWAS; N=173, N=3766 for controls and replication sample). The GWAS resulted in suggestive associations of two clusters of single-nucleotide polymorphisms at 6p21.2 and at 6p21.32 at the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region. Imputation of HLA alleles revealed an independent association with DRB1*01:01 (odds ratio (OR)=2.19 (1.53–3.14), P=1.9 × 10-5). Two polymorphisms at 6p21.2 LINC00951–LRFN2 gene region were replicated in a separate data set, and rs4714329 reached genome-wide significance (OR=1.59 (1.37–1.85), P=1.6 × 10−9) in the meta-analysis. The risk allele also associated with antisocial features in the general population conditioned for severe problems in childhood family (β=0.68, P=0.012). Functional analysis in brain tissue in open access GTEx and Braineac databases revealed eQTL associations of rs4714329 with LINC00951 and LRFN2 in cerebellum. In humans, LINC00951 and LRFN2 are both expressed in the brain, especially in the frontal cortex, which is intriguing considering the role of the frontal cortex in behavior and the neuroanatomical findings of reduced gray matter volume in ASPD. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing genome-wide significant and replicable findings on genetic variants associated with any personality disorder. PMID:27598967

  6. Genome-wide association study of antisocial personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Rautiainen, M-R; Paunio, T; Repo-Tiihonen, E; Virkkunen, M; Ollila, H M; Sulkava, S; Jolanki, O; Palotie, A; Tiihonen, J

    2016-01-01

    The pathophysiology of antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) remains unclear. Although the most consistent biological finding is reduced grey matter volume in the frontal cortex, about 50% of the total liability to developing ASPD has been attributed to genetic factors. The contributing genes remain largely unknown. Therefore, we sought to study the genetic background of ASPD. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) and a replication analysis of Finnish criminal offenders fulfilling DSM-IV criteria for ASPD (N=370, N=5850 for controls, GWAS; N=173, N=3766 for controls and replication sample). The GWAS resulted in suggestive associations of two clusters of single-nucleotide polymorphisms at 6p21.2 and at 6p21.32 at the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region. Imputation of HLA alleles revealed an independent association with DRB1*01:01 (odds ratio (OR)=2.19 (1.53-3.14), P=1.9 × 10(-5)). Two polymorphisms at 6p21.2 LINC00951-LRFN2 gene region were replicated in a separate data set, and rs4714329 reached genome-wide significance (OR=1.59 (1.37-1.85), P=1.6 × 10(-9)) in the meta-analysis. The risk allele also associated with antisocial features in the general population conditioned for severe problems in childhood family (β=0.68, P=0.012). Functional analysis in brain tissue in open access GTEx and Braineac databases revealed eQTL associations of rs4714329 with LINC00951 and LRFN2 in cerebellum. In humans, LINC00951 and LRFN2 are both expressed in the brain, especially in the frontal cortex, which is intriguing considering the role of the frontal cortex in behavior and the neuroanatomical findings of reduced gray matter volume in ASPD. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing genome-wide significant and replicable findings on genetic variants associated with any personality disorder. PMID:27598967

  7. Genome-wide association studies in pediatric chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Jayanta; Kanetsky, Peter A; Wuttke, Matthias; Köttgen, Anna; Schaefer, Franz; Wong, Craig S

    2016-08-01

    The genome-wide association study (GWAS) has become an established scientific method that provides an unbiased screen for genetic loci potentially associated with phenotypes of clinical interest, such as chronic kidney disease (CKD). Thus, GWAS provides opportunities to gain new perspectives regarding the genetic architecture of CKD progression by identifying new candidate genes and targets for intervention. As such, it has become an important arm of translational science providing a complementary line of investigation to identify novel therapeutics to treat CKD. In this review, we describe the method and the challenges of performing GWAS in the pediatric CKD population. We also provide an overview of successful GWAS for kidney disease, and we discuss the established pediatric CKD cohorts in North America and Europe that are poised to identify genetic risk variants associated with CKD progression.

  8. Biostatistical aspects of genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Andreas; König, Inke R; Thompson, John R

    2008-02-01

    To search the entire human genome for association is a novel and promising approach to unravelling the genetic basis of complex genetic diseases. In these genome-wide association studies (GWAs), several hundreds of thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are analyzed at the same time, posing substantial biostatistical and computational challenges. In this paper, we discuss a number of biostatistical aspects of GWAs in detail. We specifically consider quality control issues and show that signal intensity plots are a sine qua condition non in today's GWAs. Approaches to detect and adjust for population stratification are briefly examined. We discuss different strategies aimed at tackling the problem of multiple testing, including adjustment of p -values, the false positive report probability and the false discovery rate. Another aspect of GWAs requiring special attention is the search for gene-gene and gene-environment interactions. We finally describe multistage approaches to GWAs.

  9. Genome-wide transcription factor binding: beyond direct target regulation.

    PubMed

    MacQuarrie, Kyle L; Fong, Abraham P; Morse, Randall H; Tapscott, Stephen J

    2011-04-01

    The binding of transcription factors to specific DNA target sequences is the fundamental basis of gene regulatory networks. Chromatin immunoprecipitation combined with DNA tiling arrays or high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-chip and ChIP-seq, respectively) has been used in many recent studies that detail the binding sites of various transcription factors. Surprisingly, data from a variety of model organisms and tissues have demonstrated that transcription factors vary greatly in their number of genomic binding sites, and that binding events can significantly exceed the number of known or possible direct gene targets. Thus, current understanding of transcription factor function must expand to encompass what role, if any, binding might have outside of direct transcriptional target regulation. In this review, we discuss the biological significance of genome-wide binding of transcription factors and present models that can account for this phenomenon.

  10. Implications of genome-wide association studies in cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jai N; McLeod, Howard L; Innocenti, Federico

    2013-09-01

    Genome wide association studies (GWAS) provide an agnostic approach to identifying potential genetic variants associated with disease susceptibility, prognosis of survival and/or predictive of drug response. Although these techniques are costly and interpretation of study results is challenging, they do allow for a more unbiased interrogation of the entire genome, resulting in the discovery of novel genes and understanding of novel biological associations. This review will focus on the implications of GWAS in cancer therapy, in particular germ-line mutations, including findings from major GWAS which have identified predictive genetic loci for clinical outcome and/or toxicity. Lessons and challenges in cancer GWAS are also discussed, including the need for functional analysis and replication, as well as future perspectives for biological and clinical utility. Given the large heterogeneity in response to cancer therapeutics, novel methods of identifying mechanisms and biology of variable drug response and ultimately treatment individualization will be indispensable.

  11. [Peach genomics and genome-wide association study: a review].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiong-Wei; Jia, Hui-Juan; Gao, Zhong-Shan

    2013-10-01

    Peach (Prunus persica (L.) Batsch) is one of the most predominant stone fruits in Rosaceae family. The broad climate adaption, diverse cultivation region and good fruit taste make it one of the favorate fruits by consumers. Improving fruit quality and enhancing disease/pest resistance are always a focus for peach genetists and breeders to follow with interests. This paper reviews the main achievements on linkage map and physical map construction, development of various molecular markers, whole genome sequencing and transcriptome sequencing for peach in recent years, and also elaborates the applications of genome wide association study (GWAS) with high density SNP markers in peach and other plant crops. This review also provides a theoretical basis for GWAS analysis in the future study to identify high efficient markers of targeted traits for peach.

  12. Ultrafast laser nanosurgery in microfluidics for genome-wide screenings

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Yakar, Adela; Bourgeois, Frederic

    2009-01-01

    Summary The use of ultrafast laser pulses in surgery has allowed for unprecedented precision with minimal collateral damage to surrounding tissues. For these reasons, ultrafast laser nanosurgery, as an injury model, has gained tremendous momentum in experimental biology ranging from in-vitro manipulations of subcellular structures to in-vivo studies in whole living organisms. For example, femtosecond laser nanosurgery on such model organism as the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) has opened new opportunities for in-vivo nerve regeneration studies. Meanwhile, the development of novel microfluidic devices has brought the control in experimental environment to the level required for precise nanosurgery in various animal models. Merging microfluidics and laser nanosurgery has recently improved the specificities and increased the speed of laser surgeries enabling fast genome-wide screenings that can more readily decode the genetic map of various biological processes. PMID:19278850

  13. Genome-wide association studies in pharmacogenomics of antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Lin, Eugene; Lane, Hsien-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is one of the most common psychiatric disorders worldwide. Doctors must prescribe antidepressants based on educated guesses due to the fact that it is unmanageable to predict the effectiveness of any particular antidepressant in an individual patient. With the recent advent of scientific research, the genome-wide association study (GWAS) is extensively employed to analyze hundreds of thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms by high-throughput genotyping technologies. In addition to the candidate-gene approach, the GWAS approach has recently been utilized to investigate the determinants of antidepressant response to therapy. In this study, we reviewed GWAS studies, their limitations and future directions with respect to the pharmacogenomics of antidepressants in MDD.

  14. Progress of genome wide association study in domestic animals

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Domestic animals are invaluable resources for study of the molecular architecture of complex traits. Although the mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL) responsible for economically important traits in domestic animals has achieved remarkable results in recent decades, not all of the genetic variation in the complex traits has been captured because of the low density of markers used in QTL mapping studies. The genome wide association study (GWAS), which utilizes high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), provides a new way to tackle this issue. Encouraging achievements in dissection of the genetic mechanisms of complex diseases in humans have resulted from the use of GWAS. At present, GWAS has been applied to the field of domestic animal breeding and genetics, and some advances have been made. Many genes or markers that affect economic traits of interest in domestic animals have been identified. In this review, advances in the use of GWAS in domestic animals are described. PMID:22958308

  15. Quantitative prediction of genome-wide resource allocation in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Goelzer, Anne; Muntel, Jan; Chubukov, Victor; Jules, Matthieu; Prestel, Eric; Nölker, Rolf; Mariadassou, Mahendra; Aymerich, Stéphane; Hecker, Michael; Noirot, Philippe; Becher, Dörte; Fromion, Vincent

    2015-11-01

    Predicting resource allocation between cell processes is the primary step towards decoding the evolutionary constraints governing bacterial growth under various conditions. Quantitative prediction at genome-scale remains a computational challenge as current methods are limited by the tractability of the problem or by simplifying hypotheses. Here, we show that the constraint-based modeling method Resource Balance Analysis (RBA), calibrated using genome-wide absolute protein quantification data, accurately predicts resource allocation in the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis for a wide range of growth conditions. The regulation of most cellular processes is consistent with the objective of growth rate maximization except for a few suboptimal processes which likely integrate more complex objectives such as coping with stressful conditions and survival. As a proof of principle by using simulations, we illustrated how calibrated RBA could aid rational design of strains for maximizing protein production, offering new opportunities to investigate design principles in prokaryotes and to exploit them for biotechnological applications.

  16. Quality control for genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Gondro, Cedric; Lee, Seung Hwan; Lee, Hak Kyo; Porto-Neto, Laercio R

    2013-01-01

    This chapter overviews the quality control (QC) issues for SNP-based genotyping methods used in genome-wide association studies. The main metrics for evaluating the quality of the genotypes are discussed followed by a worked out example of QC pipeline starting with raw data and finishing with a fully filtered dataset ready for downstream analysis. The emphasis is on automation of data storage, filtering, and manipulation to ensure data integrity throughput the process and on how to extract a global summary from these high dimensional datasets to allow better-informed downstream analytical decisions. All examples will be run using the R statistical programming language followed by a practical example using a fully automated QC pipeline for the Illumina platform.

  17. Genome-wide genetic changes during modern breeding of maize.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yinping; Zhao, Hainan; Ren, Longhui; Song, Weibin; Zeng, Biao; Guo, Jinjie; Wang, Baobao; Liu, Zhipeng; Chen, Jing; Li, Wei; Zhang, Mei; Xie, Shaojun; Lai, Jinsheng

    2012-06-03

    The success of modern maize breeding has been demonstrated by remarkable increases in productivity over the last four decades. However, the underlying genetic changes correlated with these gains remain largely unknown. We report here the sequencing of 278 temperate maize inbred lines from different stages of breeding history, including deep resequencing of 4 lines with known pedigree information. The results show that modern breeding has introduced highly dynamic genetic changes into the maize genome. Artificial selection has affected thousands of targets, including genes and non-genic regions, leading to a reduction in nucleotide diversity and an increase in the proportion of rare alleles. Genetic changes during breeding happen rapidly, with extensive variation (SNPs, indels and copy-number variants (CNVs)) occurring, even within identity-by-descent regions. Our genome-wide assessment of genetic changes during modern maize breeding provides new strategies as well as practical targets for future crop breeding and biotechnology.

  18. Species Delimitation using Genome-Wide SNP Data

    PubMed Central

    Leaché, Adam D.; Fujita, Matthew K.; Minin, Vladimir N.; Bouckaert, Remco R.

    2014-01-01

    The multispecies coalescent has provided important progress for evolutionary inferences, including increasing the statistical rigor and objectivity of comparisons among competing species delimitation models. However, Bayesian species delimitation methods typically require brute force integration over gene trees via Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC), which introduces a large computation burden and precludes their application to genomic-scale data. Here we combine a recently introduced dynamic programming algorithm for estimating species trees that bypasses MCMC integration over gene trees with sophisticated methods for estimating marginal likelihoods, needed for Bayesian model selection, to provide a rigorous and computationally tractable technique for genome-wide species delimitation. We provide a critical yet simple correction that brings the likelihoods of different species trees, and more importantly their corresponding marginal likelihoods, to the same common denominator, which enables direct and accurate comparisons of competing species delimitation models using Bayes factors. We test this approach, which we call Bayes factor delimitation (*with genomic data; BFD*), using common species delimitation scenarios with computer simulations. Varying the numbers of loci and the number of samples suggest that the approach can distinguish the true model even with few loci and limited samples per species. Misspecification of the prior for population size θ has little impact on support for the true model. We apply the approach to West African forest geckos (Hemidactylus fasciatus complex) using genome-wide SNP data. This new Bayesian method for species delimitation builds on a growing trend for objective species delimitation methods with explicit model assumptions that are easily tested. [Bayes factor; model testing; phylogeography; RADseq; simulation; speciation.] PMID:24627183

  19. Genome-Wide Binding Patterns of Thyroid Hormone Receptor Beta

    PubMed Central

    Ayers, Stephen; Switnicki, Michal Piotr; Angajala, Anusha; Lammel, Jan; Arumanayagam, Anithachristy S.; Webb, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) receptors (TRs) play central roles in metabolism and are major targets for pharmaceutical intervention. Presently, however, there is limited information about genome wide localizations of TR binding sites. Thus, complexities of TR genomic distribution and links between TRβ binding events and gene regulation are not fully appreciated. Here, we employ a BioChIP approach to capture TR genome-wide binding events in a liver cell line (HepG2). Like other NRs, TRβ appears widely distributed throughout the genome. Nevertheless, there is striking enrichment of TRβ binding sites immediately 5′ and 3′ of transcribed genes and TRβ can be detected near 50% of T3 induced genes. In contrast, no significant enrichment of TRβ is seen at negatively regulated genes or genes that respond to unliganded TRs in this system. Canonical TRE half-sites are present in more than 90% of TRβ peaks and classical TREs are also greatly enriched, but individual TRE organization appears highly variable with diverse half-site orientation and spacing. There is also significant enrichment of binding sites for TR associated transcription factors, including AP-1 and CTCF, near TR peaks. We conclude that T3-dependent gene induction commonly involves proximal TRβ binding events but that far-distant binding events are needed for T3 induction of some genes and that distinct, indirect, mechanisms are often at play in negative regulation and unliganded TR actions. Better understanding of genomic context of TR binding sites will help us determine why TR regulates genes in different ways and determine possibilities for selective modulation of TR action. PMID:24558356

  20. Genome-Wide Association Studies for Comb Traits in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Meng; Dou, Taocun; Lu, Jian; Guo, Jun; Hu, Yuping; Yi, Guoqiang; Yuan, Jingwei; Sun, Congjiao; Wang, Kehua; Yang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    The comb, as a secondary sexual character, is an important trait in chicken. Indicators of comb length (CL), comb height (CH), and comb weight (CW) are often selected in production. DNA-based marker-assisted selection could help chicken breeders to accelerate genetic improvement for comb or related economic characters by early selection. Although a number of quantitative trait loci (QTL) and candidate genes have been identified with advances in molecular genetics, candidate genes underlying comb traits are limited. The aim of the study was to use genome-wide association (GWA) studies by 600 K Affymetrix chicken SNP arrays to detect genes that are related to comb, using an F2 resource population. For all comb characters, comb exhibited high SNP-based heritability estimates (0.61–0.69). Chromosome 1 explained 20.80% genetic variance, while chromosome 4 explained 6.89%. Independent univariate genome-wide screens for each character identified 127, 197, and 268 novel significant SNPs with CL, CH, and CW, respectively. Three candidate genes, VPS36, AR, and WNT11B, were determined to have a plausible function in all comb characters. These genes are important to the initiation of follicle development, gonadal growth, and dermal development, respectively. The current study provides the first GWA analysis for comb traits. Identification of the genetic basis as well as promising candidate genes will help us understand the underlying genetic architecture of comb development and has practical significance in breeding programs for the selection of comb as an index for sexual maturity or reproduction. PMID:27427764

  1. A genome-wide association study of anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Boraska, Vesna; Franklin, Christopher S; Floyd, James AB; Thornton, Laura M; Huckins, Laura M; Southam, Lorraine; Rayner, N William; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Klump, Kelly L; Treasure, Janet; Lewis, Cathryn M; Schmidt, Ulrike; Tozzi, Federica; Kiezebrink, Kirsty; Hebebrand, Johannes; Gorwood, Philip; Adan, Roger AH; Kas, Martien JH; Favaro, Angela; Santonastaso, Paolo; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando; Gratacos, Monica; Rybakowski, Filip; Dmitrzak-Weglarz, Monika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Keski-Rahkonen, Anna; Raevuori, Anu; Van Furth, Eric F; Landt, Margarita CT Slof-Op t; Hudson, James I; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted; Knudsen, Gun Peggy S; Monteleone, Palmiero; Kaplan, Allan S; Karwautz, Andreas; Hakonarson, Hakon; Berrettini, Wade H; Guo, Yiran; Li, Dong; Schork, Nicholas J.; Komaki, Gen; Ando, Tetsuya; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Esko, Tõnu; Fischer, Krista; Männik, Katrin; Metspalu, Andres; Baker, Jessica H; Cone, Roger D; Dackor, Jennifer; DeSocio, Janiece E; Hilliard, Christopher E; O'Toole, Julie K; Pantel, Jacques; Szatkiewicz, Jin P; Taico, Chrysecolla; Zerwas, Stephanie; Trace, Sara E; Davis, Oliver SP; Helder, Sietske; Bühren, Katharina; Burghardt, Roland; de Zwaan, Martina; Egberts, Karin; Ehrlich, Stefan; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate; Herzog, Wolfgang; Imgart, Hartmut; Scherag, André; Scherag, Susann; Zipfel, Stephan; Boni, Claudette; Ramoz, Nicolas; Versini, Audrey; Brandys, Marek K; Danner, Unna N; de Kovel, Carolien; Hendriks, Judith; Koeleman, Bobby PC; Ophoff, Roel A; Strengman, Eric; van Elburg, Annemarie A; Bruson, Alice; Clementi, Maurizio; Degortes, Daniela; Forzan, Monica; Tenconi, Elena; Docampo, Elisa; Escaramís, Geòrgia; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Lissowska, Jolanta; Rajewski, Andrzej; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Slopien, Agnieszka; Hauser, Joanna; Karhunen, Leila; Meulenbelt, Ingrid; Slagboom, P Eline; Tortorella, Alfonso; Maj, Mario; Dedoussis, George; Dikeos, Dimitris; Gonidakis, Fragiskos; Tziouvas, Konstantinos; Tsitsika, Artemis; Papezova, Hana; Slachtova, Lenka; Martaskova, Debora; Kennedy, James L.; Levitan, Robert D.; Yilmaz, Zeynep; Huemer, Julia; Koubek, Doris; Merl, Elisabeth; Wagner, Gudrun; Lichtenstein, Paul; Breen, Gerome; Cohen-Woods, Sarah; Farmer, Anne; McGuffin, Peter; Cichon, Sven; Giegling, Ina; Herms, Stefan; Rujescu, Dan; Schreiber, Stefan; Wichmann, H-Erich; Dina, Christian; Sladek, Rob; Gambaro, Giovanni; Soranzo, Nicole; Julia, Antonio; Marsal, Sara; Rabionet, Raquel; Gaborieau, Valerie; Dick, Danielle M; Palotie, Aarno; Ripatti, Samuli; Widén, Elisabeth; Andreassen, Ole A; Espeseth, Thomas; Lundervold, Astri; Reinvang, Ivar; Steen, Vidar M; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Mattingsdal, Morten; Ntalla, Ioanna; Bencko, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Navratilova, Marie; Gallinger, Steven; Pinto, Dalila; Scherer, Stephen; Aschauer, Harald; Carlberg, Laura; Schosser, Alexandra; Alfredsson, Lars; Ding, Bo; Klareskog, Lars; Padyukov, Leonid; Finan, Chris; Kalsi, Gursharan; Roberts, Marion; Logan, Darren W; Peltonen, Leena; Ritchie, Graham RS; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Estivill, Xavier; Hinney, Anke; Sullivan, Patrick F; Collier, David A; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Bulik, Cynthia M

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a complex and heritable eating disorder characterized by dangerously low body weight. Neither candidate gene studies nor an initial genome wide association study (GWAS) have yielded significant and replicated results. We performed a GWAS in 2,907 cases with AN from 14 countries (15 sites) and 14,860 ancestrally matched controls as part of the Genetic Consortium for AN (GCAN) and the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 3 (WTCCC3). Individual association analyses were conducted in each stratum and meta-analyzed across all 15 discovery datasets. Seventy-six (72 independent) SNPs were taken forward for in silico (two datasets) or de novo (13 datasets) replication genotyping in 2,677 independent AN cases and 8,629 European ancestry controls along with 458 AN cases and 421 controls from Japan. The final global meta-analysis across discovery and replication datasets comprised 5,551 AN cases and 21,080 controls. AN subtype analyses (1,606 AN restricting; 1,445 AN binge-purge) were performed. No findings reached genome-wide significance. Two intronic variants were suggestively associated: rs9839776 (P=3.01×10-7) in SOX2OT and rs17030795 (P=5.84×10-6) in PPP3CA. Two additional signals were specific to Europeans: rs1523921 (P=5.76×10-6) between CUL3 and FAM124B and rs1886797 (P=8.05×10-6) near SPATA13. Comparing discovery to replication results, 76% of the effects were in the same direction, an observation highly unlikely to be due to chance (P=4×10-6), strongly suggesting that true findings exist but that our sample, the largest yet reported, was underpowered for their detection. The accrual of large genotyped AN case-control samples should be an immediate priority for the field. PMID:24514567

  2. A genome-wide association study of anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Boraska, Vesna; Franklin, Christopher S; Floyd, James AB; Thornton, Laura M; Huckins, Laura M; Southam, Lorraine; Rayner, N William; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Klump, Kelly L; Treasure, Janet; Lewis, Cathryn M; Schmidt, Ulrike; Tozzi, Federica; Kiezebrink, Kirsty; Hebebrand, Johannes; Gorwood, Philip; Adan, Roger AH; Kas, Martien JH; Favaro, Angela; Santonastaso, Paolo; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando; Gratacos, Monica; Rybakowski, Filip; Dmitrzak-Weglarz, Monika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Keski-Rahkonen, Anna; Raevuori, Anu; Van Furth, Eric F; Slof-Op t Landt, Margarita CT; Hudson, James I; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted; Knudsen, Gun Peggy S; Monteleone, Palmiero; Kaplan, Allan S; Karwautz, Andreas; Hakonarson, Hakon; Berrettini, Wade H; Guo, Yiran; Li, Dong; Schork, Nicholas J.; Komaki, Gen; Ando, Tetsuya; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Esko, Tõnu; Fischer, Krista; Männik, Katrin; Metspalu, Andres; Baker, Jessica H; Cone, Roger D; Dackor, Jennifer; DeSocio, Janiece E; Hilliard, Christopher E; O’Toole, Julie K; Pantel, Jacques; Szatkiewicz, Jin P; Taico, Chrysecolla; Zerwas, Stephanie; Trace, Sara E; Davis, Oliver SP; Helder, Sietske; Bühren, Katharina; Burghardt, Roland; de Zwaan, Martina; Egberts, Karin; Ehrlich, Stefan; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate; Herzog, Wolfgang; Imgart, Hartmut; Scherag, André; Scherag, Susann; Zipfel, Stephan; Boni, Claudette; Ramoz, Nicolas; Versini, Audrey; Brandys, Marek K; Danner, Unna N; de Kovel, Carolien; Hendriks, Judith; Koeleman, Bobby PC; Ophoff, Roel A; Strengman, Eric; van Elburg, Annemarie A; Bruson, Alice; Clementi, Maurizio; Degortes, Daniela; Forzan, Monica; Tenconi, Elena; Docampo, Elisa; Escaramís, Geòrgia; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Lissowska, Jolanta; Rajewski, Andrzej; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Slopien, Agnieszka; Hauser, Joanna; Karhunen, Leila; Meulenbelt, Ingrid; Slagboom, P Eline; Tortorella, Alfonso; Maj, Mario; Dedoussis, George; Dikeos, Dimitris; Gonidakis, Fragiskos; Tziouvas, Konstantinos; Tsitsika, Artemis; Papezova, Hana; Slachtova, Lenka; Martaskova, Debora; Kennedy, James L.; Levitan, Robert D.; Yilmaz, Zeynep; Huemer, Julia; Koubek, Doris; Merl, Elisabeth; Wagner, Gudrun; Lichtenstein, Paul; Breen, Gerome; Cohen-Woods, Sarah; Farmer, Anne; McGuffin, Peter; Cichon, Sven; Giegling, Ina; Herms, Stefan; Rujescu, Dan; Schreiber, Stefan; Wichmann, H-Erich; Dina, Christian; Sladek, Rob; Gambaro, Giovanni; Soranzo, Nicole; Julia, Antonio; Marsal, Sara; Rabionet, Raquel; Gaborieau, Valerie; Dick, Danielle M; Palotie, Aarno; Ripatti, Samuli; Widén, Elisabeth; Andreassen, Ole A; Espeseth, Thomas; Lundervold, Astri; Reinvang, Ivar; Steen, Vidar M; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Mattingsdal, Morten; Ntalla, Ioanna; Bencko, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Navratilova, Marie; Gallinger, Steven; Pinto, Dalila; Scherer, Stephen; Aschauer, Harald; Carlberg, Laura; Schosser, Alexandra; Alfredsson, Lars; Ding, Bo; Klareskog, Lars; Padyukov, Leonid; Finan, Chris; Kalsi, Gursharan; Roberts, Marion; Logan, Darren W; Peltonen, Leena; Ritchie, Graham RS; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Estivill, Xavier; Hinney, Anke; Sullivan, Patrick F; Collier, David A; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Bulik, Cynthia M

    2013-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a complex and heritable eating disorder characterized by dangerously low body weight. Neither candidate gene studies nor an initial genome wide association study (GWAS) have yielded significant and replicated results. We performed a GWAS in 2,907 cases with AN from 14 countries (15 sites) and 14,860 ancestrally matched controls as part of the Genetic Consortium for AN (GCAN) and the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 3 (WTCCC3). Individual association analyses were conducted in each stratum and meta-analyzed across all 15 discovery datasets. Seventy-six (72 independent) SNPs were taken forward for in silico (two datasets) or de novo (13 datasets) replication genotyping in 2,677 independent AN cases and 8,629 European ancestry controls along with 458 AN cases and 421 controls from Japan. The final global meta-analysis across discovery and replication datasets comprised 5,551 AN cases and 21,080 controls. AN subtype analyses (1,606 AN restricting; 1,445 AN binge-purge) were performed. No findings reached genome-wide significance. Two intronic variants were suggestively associated: rs9839776 (P=3.01×10−7) in SOX2OT and rs17030795 (P=5.84×10−6) in PPP3CA. Two additional signals were specific to Europeans: rs1523921 (P=5.76×10−6) between CUL3 and FAM124B and rs1886797 (P=8.05×10−6) near SPATA13. Comparing discovery to replication results, 76% of the effects were in the same direction, an observation highly unlikely to be due to chance (P= 4×10−6), strongly suggesting that true findings exist but that our sample, the largest yet reported, was underpowered for their detection. The accrual of large genotyped AN case-control samples should be an immediate priority for the field. PMID:21079607

  3. Genome-wide association and genomic selection in animal breeding.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Ben; Goddard, Mike

    2010-11-01

    Results from genome-wide association studies in livestock, and humans, has lead to the conclusion that the effect of individual quantitative trait loci (QTL) on complex traits, such as yield, are likely to be small; therefore, a large number of QTL are necessary to explain genetic variation in these traits. Given this genetic architecture, gains from marker-assisted selection (MAS) programs using only a small number of DNA markers to trace a limited number of QTL is likely to be small. This has lead to the development of alternative technology for using the available dense single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) information, called genomic selection. Genomic selection uses a genome-wide panel of dense markers so that all QTL are likely to be in linkage disequilibrium with at least one SNP. The genomic breeding values are predicted to be the sum of the effect of these SNPs across the entire genome. In dairy cattle breeding, the accuracy of genomic estimated breeding values (GEBV) that can be achieved and the fact that these are available early in life have lead to rapid adoption of the technology. Here, we discuss the design of experiments necessary to achieve accurate prediction of GEBV in future generations in terms of the number of markers necessary and the size of the reference population where marker effects are estimated. We also present a simple method for implementing genomic selection using a genomic relationship matrix. Future challenges discussed include using whole genome sequence data to improve the accuracy of genomic selection and management of inbreeding through genomic relationships.

  4. A genome-wide association study of anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Boraska, V; Franklin, C S; Floyd, J A B; Thornton, L M; Huckins, L M; Southam, L; Rayner, N W; Tachmazidou, I; Klump, K L; Treasure, J; Lewis, C M; Schmidt, U; Tozzi, F; Kiezebrink, K; Hebebrand, J; Gorwood, P; Adan, R A H; Kas, M J H; Favaro, A; Santonastaso, P; Fernández-Aranda, F; Gratacos, M; Rybakowski, F; Dmitrzak-Weglarz, M; Kaprio, J; Keski-Rahkonen, A; Raevuori, A; Van Furth, E F; Slof-Op 't Landt, M C T; Hudson, J I; Reichborn-Kjennerud, T; Knudsen, G P S; Monteleone, P; Kaplan, A S; Karwautz, A; Hakonarson, H; Berrettini, W H; Guo, Y; Li, D; Schork, N J; Komaki, G; Ando, T; Inoko, H; Esko, T; Fischer, K; Männik, K; Metspalu, A; Baker, J H; Cone, R D; Dackor, J; DeSocio, J E; Hilliard, C E; O'Toole, J K; Pantel, J; Szatkiewicz, J P; Taico, C; Zerwas, S; Trace, S E; Davis, O S P; Helder, S; Bühren, K; Burghardt, R; de Zwaan, M; Egberts, K; Ehrlich, S; Herpertz-Dahlmann, B; Herzog, W; Imgart, H; Scherag, A; Scherag, S; Zipfel, S; Boni, C; Ramoz, N; Versini, A; Brandys, M K; Danner, U N; de Kovel, C; Hendriks, J; Koeleman, B P C; Ophoff, R A; Strengman, E; van Elburg, A A; Bruson, A; Clementi, M; Degortes, D; Forzan, M; Tenconi, E; Docampo, E; Escaramís, G; Jiménez-Murcia, S; Lissowska, J; Rajewski, A; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, N; Slopien, A; Hauser, J; Karhunen, L; Meulenbelt, I; Slagboom, P E; Tortorella, A; Maj, M; Dedoussis, G; Dikeos, D; Gonidakis, F; Tziouvas, K; Tsitsika, A; Papezova, H; Slachtova, L; Martaskova, D; Kennedy, J L; Levitan, R D; Yilmaz, Z; Huemer, J; Koubek, D; Merl, E; Wagner, G; Lichtenstein, P; Breen, G; Cohen-Woods, S; Farmer, A; McGuffin, P; Cichon, S; Giegling, I; Herms, S; Rujescu, D; Schreiber, S; Wichmann, H-E; Dina, C; Sladek, R; Gambaro, G; Soranzo, N; Julia, A; Marsal, S; Rabionet, R; Gaborieau, V; Dick, D M; Palotie, A; Ripatti, S; Widén, E; Andreassen, O A; Espeseth, T; Lundervold, A; Reinvang, I; Steen, V M; Le Hellard, S; Mattingsdal, M; Ntalla, I; Bencko, V; Foretova, L; Janout, V; Navratilova, M; Gallinger, S; Pinto, D; Scherer, S W; Aschauer, H; Carlberg, L; Schosser, A; Alfredsson, L; Ding, B; Klareskog, L; Padyukov, L; Courtet, P; Guillaume, S; Jaussent, I; Finan, C; Kalsi, G; Roberts, M; Logan, D W; Peltonen, L; Ritchie, G R S; Barrett, J C; Estivill, X; Hinney, A; Sullivan, P F; Collier, D A; Zeggini, E; Bulik, C M

    2014-10-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a complex and heritable eating disorder characterized by dangerously low body weight. Neither candidate gene studies nor an initial genome-wide association study (GWAS) have yielded significant and replicated results. We performed a GWAS in 2907 cases with AN from 14 countries (15 sites) and 14 860 ancestrally matched controls as part of the Genetic Consortium for AN (GCAN) and the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 3 (WTCCC3). Individual association analyses were conducted in each stratum and meta-analyzed across all 15 discovery data sets. Seventy-six (72 independent) single nucleotide polymorphisms were taken forward for in silico (two data sets) or de novo (13 data sets) replication genotyping in 2677 independent AN cases and 8629 European ancestry controls along with 458 AN cases and 421 controls from Japan. The final global meta-analysis across discovery and replication data sets comprised 5551 AN cases and 21 080 controls. AN subtype analyses (1606 AN restricting; 1445 AN binge-purge) were performed. No findings reached genome-wide significance. Two intronic variants were suggestively associated: rs9839776 (P=3.01 × 10(-7)) in SOX2OT and rs17030795 (P=5.84 × 10(-6)) in PPP3CA. Two additional signals were specific to Europeans: rs1523921 (P=5.76 × 10(-)(6)) between CUL3 and FAM124B and rs1886797 (P=8.05 × 10(-)(6)) near SPATA13. Comparing discovery with replication results, 76% of the effects were in the same direction, an observation highly unlikely to be due to chance (P=4 × 10(-6)), strongly suggesting that true findings exist but our sample, the largest yet reported, was underpowered for their detection. The accrual of large genotyped AN case-control samples should be an immediate priority for the field.

  5. A genome-wide association study of anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Boraska, V; Franklin, C S; Floyd, J A B; Thornton, L M; Huckins, L M; Southam, L; Rayner, N W; Tachmazidou, I; Klump, K L; Treasure, J; Lewis, C M; Schmidt, U; Tozzi, F; Kiezebrink, K; Hebebrand, J; Gorwood, P; Adan, R A H; Kas, M J H; Favaro, A; Santonastaso, P; Fernández-Aranda, F; Gratacos, M; Rybakowski, F; Dmitrzak-Weglarz, M; Kaprio, J; Keski-Rahkonen, A; Raevuori, A; Van Furth, E F; Slof-Op 't Landt, M C T; Hudson, J I; Reichborn-Kjennerud, T; Knudsen, G P S; Monteleone, P; Kaplan, A S; Karwautz, A; Hakonarson, H; Berrettini, W H; Guo, Y; Li, D; Schork, N J; Komaki, G; Ando, T; Inoko, H; Esko, T; Fischer, K; Männik, K; Metspalu, A; Baker, J H; Cone, R D; Dackor, J; DeSocio, J E; Hilliard, C E; O'Toole, J K; Pantel, J; Szatkiewicz, J P; Taico, C; Zerwas, S; Trace, S E; Davis, O S P; Helder, S; Bühren, K; Burghardt, R; de Zwaan, M; Egberts, K; Ehrlich, S; Herpertz-Dahlmann, B; Herzog, W; Imgart, H; Scherag, A; Scherag, S; Zipfel, S; Boni, C; Ramoz, N; Versini, A; Brandys, M K; Danner, U N; de Kovel, C; Hendriks, J; Koeleman, B P C; Ophoff, R A; Strengman, E; van Elburg, A A; Bruson, A; Clementi, M; Degortes, D; Forzan, M; Tenconi, E; Docampo, E; Escaramís, G; Jiménez-Murcia, S; Lissowska, J; Rajewski, A; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, N; Slopien, A; Hauser, J; Karhunen, L; Meulenbelt, I; Slagboom, P E; Tortorella, A; Maj, M; Dedoussis, G; Dikeos, D; Gonidakis, F; Tziouvas, K; Tsitsika, A; Papezova, H; Slachtova, L; Martaskova, D; Kennedy, J L; Levitan, R D; Yilmaz, Z; Huemer, J; Koubek, D; Merl, E; Wagner, G; Lichtenstein, P; Breen, G; Cohen-Woods, S; Farmer, A; McGuffin, P; Cichon, S; Giegling, I; Herms, S; Rujescu, D; Schreiber, S; Wichmann, H-E; Dina, C; Sladek, R; Gambaro, G; Soranzo, N; Julia, A; Marsal, S; Rabionet, R; Gaborieau, V; Dick, D M; Palotie, A; Ripatti, S; Widén, E; Andreassen, O A; Espeseth, T; Lundervold, A; Reinvang, I; Steen, V M; Le Hellard, S; Mattingsdal, M; Ntalla, I; Bencko, V; Foretova, L; Janout, V; Navratilova, M; Gallinger, S; Pinto, D; Scherer, S W; Aschauer, H; Carlberg, L; Schosser, A; Alfredsson, L; Ding, B; Klareskog, L; Padyukov, L; Courtet, P; Guillaume, S; Jaussent, I; Finan, C; Kalsi, G; Roberts, M; Logan, D W; Peltonen, L; Ritchie, G R S; Barrett, J C; Estivill, X; Hinney, A; Sullivan, P F; Collier, D A; Zeggini, E; Bulik, C M

    2014-10-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a complex and heritable eating disorder characterized by dangerously low body weight. Neither candidate gene studies nor an initial genome-wide association study (GWAS) have yielded significant and replicated results. We performed a GWAS in 2907 cases with AN from 14 countries (15 sites) and 14 860 ancestrally matched controls as part of the Genetic Consortium for AN (GCAN) and the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 3 (WTCCC3). Individual association analyses were conducted in each stratum and meta-analyzed across all 15 discovery data sets. Seventy-six (72 independent) single nucleotide polymorphisms were taken forward for in silico (two data sets) or de novo (13 data sets) replication genotyping in 2677 independent AN cases and 8629 European ancestry controls along with 458 AN cases and 421 controls from Japan. The final global meta-analysis across discovery and replication data sets comprised 5551 AN cases and 21 080 controls. AN subtype analyses (1606 AN restricting; 1445 AN binge-purge) were performed. No findings reached genome-wide significance. Two intronic variants were suggestively associated: rs9839776 (P=3.01 × 10(-7)) in SOX2OT and rs17030795 (P=5.84 × 10(-6)) in PPP3CA. Two additional signals were specific to Europeans: rs1523921 (P=5.76 × 10(-)(6)) between CUL3 and FAM124B and rs1886797 (P=8.05 × 10(-)(6)) near SPATA13. Comparing discovery with replication results, 76% of the effects were in the same direction, an observation highly unlikely to be due to chance (P=4 × 10(-6)), strongly suggesting that true findings exist but our sample, the largest yet reported, was underpowered for their detection. The accrual of large genotyped AN case-control samples should be an immediate priority for the field. PMID:24514567

  6. Genome-Wide Association Studies for Comb Traits in Chickens.

    PubMed

    Shen, Manman; Qu, Liang; Ma, Meng; Dou, Taocun; Lu, Jian; Guo, Jun; Hu, Yuping; Yi, Guoqiang; Yuan, Jingwei; Sun, Congjiao; Wang, Kehua; Yang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    The comb, as a secondary sexual character, is an important trait in chicken. Indicators of comb length (CL), comb height (CH), and comb weight (CW) are often selected in production. DNA-based marker-assisted selection could help chicken breeders to accelerate genetic improvement for comb or related economic characters by early selection. Although a number of quantitative trait loci (QTL) and candidate genes have been identified with advances in molecular genetics, candidate genes underlying comb traits are limited. The aim of the study was to use genome-wide association (GWA) studies by 600 K Affymetrix chicken SNP arrays to detect genes that are related to comb, using an F2 resource population. For all comb characters, comb exhibited high SNP-based heritability estimates (0.61-0.69). Chromosome 1 explained 20.80% genetic variance, while chromosome 4 explained 6.89%. Independent univariate genome-wide screens for each character identified 127, 197, and 268 novel significant SNPs with CL, CH, and CW, respectively. Three candidate genes, VPS36, AR, and WNT11B, were determined to have a plausible function in all comb characters. These genes are important to the initiation of follicle development, gonadal growth, and dermal development, respectively. The current study provides the first GWA analysis for comb traits. Identification of the genetic basis as well as promising candidate genes will help us understand the underlying genetic architecture of comb development and has practical significance in breeding programs for the selection of comb as an index for sexual maturity or reproduction. PMID:27427764

  7. A genome-wide association study of attempted suicide

    PubMed Central

    Willour, Virginia L.; Seifuddin, Fayaz; Mahon, Pamela B.; Jancic, Dubravka; Pirooznia, Mehdi; Steele, Jo; Schweizer, Barbara; Goes, Fernando S.; Mondimore, Francis M.; MacKinnon, Dean F.; Perlis, Roy H.; Lee, Phil Hyoun; Huang, Jie; Kelsoe, John R.; Shilling, Paul D.; Rietschel, Marcella; Nöthen, Markus; Cichon, Sven; Gurling, Hugh; Purcell, Shaun; Smoller, Jordan W.; Craddock, Nicholas; DePaulo, J. Raymond; Schulze, Thomas G.; McMahon, Francis J.; Zandi, Peter P.; Potash, James B.

    2011-01-01

    The heritable component to attempted and completed suicide is partly related to psychiatric disorders and also partly independent of them. While attempted suicide linkage regions have been identified on 2p11–12 and 6q25–26, there are likely many more such loci, the discovery of which will require a much higher resolution approach, such as the genome-wide association study (GWAS). With this in mind, we conducted an attempted suicide GWAS that compared the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotypes of 1,201 bipolar (BP) subjects with a history of suicide attempts to the genotypes of 1,497 BP subjects without a history of suicide attempts. 2,507 SNPs with evidence for association at p<0.001 were identified. These associated SNPs were subsequently tested for association in a large and independent BP sample set. None of these SNPs were significantly associated in the replication sample after correcting for multiple testing, but the combined analysis of the two sample sets produced an association signal on 2p25 (rs300774) at the threshold of genome-wide significance (p= 5.07 × 10−8). The associated SNPs on 2p25 fall in a large linkage disequilibrium block containing the ACP1 gene, a gene whose expression is significantly elevated in BP subjects who have completed suicide. Furthermore, the ACP1 protein is a tyrosine phosphatase that influences Wnt signaling, a pathway regulated by lithium, making ACP1 a functional candidate for involvement in the phenotype. Larger GWAS sample sets will be required to confirm the signal on 2p25 and to identify additional genetic risk factors increasing susceptibility for attempted suicide. PMID:21423239

  8. A genome-wide association study of attempted suicide.

    PubMed

    Willour, V L; Seifuddin, F; Mahon, P B; Jancic, D; Pirooznia, M; Steele, J; Schweizer, B; Goes, F S; Mondimore, F M; Mackinnon, D F; Perlis, R H; Lee, P H; Huang, J; Kelsoe, J R; Shilling, P D; Rietschel, M; Nöthen, M; Cichon, S; Gurling, H; Purcell, S; Smoller, J W; Craddock, N; DePaulo, J R; Schulze, T G; McMahon, F J; Zandi, P P; Potash, J B

    2012-04-01

    The heritable component to attempted and completed suicide is partly related to psychiatric disorders and also partly independent of them. Although attempted suicide linkage regions have been identified on 2p11-12 and 6q25-26, there are likely many more such loci, the discovery of which will require a much higher resolution approach, such as the genome-wide association study (GWAS). With this in mind, we conducted an attempted suicide GWAS that compared the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotypes of 1201 bipolar (BP) subjects with a history of suicide attempts to the genotypes of 1497 BP subjects without a history of suicide attempts. In all, 2507 SNPs with evidence for association at P<0.001 were identified. These associated SNPs were subsequently tested for association in a large and independent BP sample set. None of these SNPs were significantly associated in the replication sample after correcting for multiple testing, but the combined analysis of the two sample sets produced an association signal on 2p25 (rs300774) at the threshold of genome-wide significance (P=5.07 × 10(-8)). The associated SNPs on 2p25 fall in a large linkage disequilibrium block containing the ACP1 (acid phosphatase 1) gene, a gene whose expression is significantly elevated in BP subjects who have completed suicide. Furthermore, the ACP1 protein is a tyrosine phosphatase that influences Wnt signaling, a pathway regulated by lithium, making ACP1 a functional candidate for involvement in the phenotype. Larger GWAS sample sets will be required to confirm the signal on 2p25 and to identify additional genetic risk factors increasing susceptibility for attempted suicide. PMID:21423239

  9. Comparative analysis of genome-wide divergence, domestication footprints and genome-wide association study of root traits for Gossypium hirsutum and Gossypium barbadense

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Use of 10,129 singleton SNPs of known genomic location in tetraploid cotton provided unique opportunities to characterize genome-wide diversity among 440 Gossypium hirsutum and 219 G. barbadense cultivars and landrace accessions of widespread origin. Using genome-wide distributed SNPs, we examined ...

  10. SUVH1, a Su(var)3–9 family member, promotes the expression of genes targeted by DNA methylation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shaofang; Liu, Lin; Li, Shengben; Gao, Lei; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Kim, Yun Ju; Chen, Xuemei

    2016-01-01

    Transposable elements are found throughout the genomes of all organisms. Repressive marks such as DNA methylation and histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9) methylation silence these elements and maintain genome integrity. However, how silencing mechanisms are themselves regulated to avoid the silencing of genes remains unclear. Here, an anti-silencing factor was identified using a forward genetic screen on a reporter line that harbors a LUCIFERASE (LUC) gene driven by a promoter that undergoes DNA methylation. SUVH1, a Su(var)3–9 homolog, was identified as a factor promoting the expression of the LUC gene. Treatment with a cytosine methylation inhibitor completely suppressed the LUC expression defects of suvh1, indicating that SUVH1 is dispensable for LUC expression in the absence of DNA methylation. SUVH1 also promotes the expression of several endogenous genes with promoter DNA methylation. However, the suvh1 mutation did not alter DNA methylation levels at the LUC transgene or on a genome-wide scale; thus, SUVH1 functions downstream of DNA methylation. Histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) trimethylation was reduced in suvh1; in contrast, H3K9 methylation levels remained unchanged. This work has uncovered a novel, anti-silencing function for a member of the Su(var)3–9 family that has previously been associated with silencing through H3K9 methylation. PMID:26400170

  11. Tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl)phosphate Induces Genome-Wide Hypomethylation within Early Zebrafish Embryos

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl)phosphate (TDCIPP) is a high-production volume organophosphate-based plasticizer and flame retardant widely used within the United States. Using zebrafish as a model, the objectives of this study were to determine whether (1) TDCIPP inhibits DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) within embryonic nuclear extracts; (2) uptake of TDCIPP from 0.75 h postfertilization (hpf, 2-cell) to 2 hpf (64-cell) or 6 hpf (shield stage) leads to impacts on the early embryonic DNA methylome; and (3) TDCIPP-induced impacts on cytosine methylation are localized to CpG islands within intergenic regions. Within this study, 5-azacytidine (5-azaC, a DNMT inhibitor) was used as a positive control. Although 5-azaC significantly inhibited zebrafish DNMT, TDCIPP did not affect DNMT activity in vitro at concentrations as high as 500 μM. However, rapid embryonic uptake of 5-azaC and TDCIPP from 0.75 to 2 hpf resulted in chemical- and chromosome-specific alterations in cytosine methylation at 2 hpf. Moreover, TDCIPP exposure predominantly resulted in hypomethylation of positions outside of CpG islands and within intragenic (exon) regions of the zebrafish genome. Overall, these findings provide the foundation for monitoring DNA methylation dynamics within zebrafish as well as identifying potential associations among TDCIPP exposure, adverse health outcomes, and DNA methylation status within human populations. PMID:27574916

  12. Genome-wide dissection of the quorum sensing signalling pathway in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Mony, Binny M; MacGregor, Paula; Ivens, Alasdair; Rojas, Federico; Cowton, Andrew; Young, Julie; Horn, David; Matthews, Keith

    2014-01-30

    The protozoan parasites Trypanosoma brucei spp. cause important human and livestock diseases in sub-Saharan Africa. In mammalian blood, two developmental forms of the parasite exist: proliferative 'slender' forms and arrested 'stumpy' forms that are responsible for transmission to tsetse flies. The slender to stumpy differentiation is a density-dependent response that resembles quorum sensing in microbial systems and is crucial for the parasite life cycle, ensuring both infection chronicity and disease transmission. This response is triggered by an elusive 'stumpy induction factor' (SIF) whose intracellular signalling pathway is also uncharacterized. Laboratory-adapted (monomorphic) trypanosome strains respond inefficiently to SIF but can generate forms with stumpy characteristics when exposed to cell-permeable cAMP and AMP analogues. Exploiting this, we have used a genome-wide RNA interference library screen to identify the signalling components driving stumpy formation. In separate screens, monomorphic parasites were exposed to 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-cAMP (pCPT-cAMP) or 8-pCPT-2'-O-methyl-5'-AMP to select cells that were unresponsive to these signals and hence remained proliferative. Genome-wide Ion Torrent based RNAi target sequencing identified cohorts of genes implicated in each step of the signalling pathway, from purine metabolism, through signal transducers (kinases, phosphatases) to gene expression regulators. Genes at each step were independently validated in cells naturally capable of stumpy formation, confirming their role in density sensing in vivo. The putative RNA-binding protein, RBP7, was required for normal quorum sensing and promoted cell-cycle arrest and transmission competence when overexpressed. This study reveals that quorum sensing signalling in trypanosomes shares similarities to fundamental quiescence pathways in eukaryotic cells, its components providing targets for quorum-sensing interference-based therapeutics.

  13. Glutamate Networks Implicate Cognitive Impairments in Schizophrenia: Genome-Wide Association Studies of 52 Cognitive Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Ohi, Kazutaka; Hashimoto, Ryota; Ikeda, Masashi; Yamamori, Hidenaga; Yasuda, Yuka; Fujimoto, Michiko; Umeda-Yano, Satomi; Fukunaga, Masaki; Fujino, Haruo; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Iwase, Masao; Kazui, Hiroaki; Iwata, Nakao; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Takeda, Masatoshi

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive impairments are a core feature in patients with schizophrenia. These deficits could serve as effective tools for understanding the genetic architecture of schizophrenia. This study investigated whether genetic variants associated with cognitive impairments aggregate in functional gene networks related to the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Here, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of a range of cognitive phenotypes relevant to schizophrenia were performed in 411 healthy subjects. We attempted to replicate the GWAS data using 257 patients with schizophrenia and performed a meta-analysis of the GWAS findings and the replicated results. Because gene networks, rather than a single gene or genetic variant, may be strongly associated with the susceptibility to schizophrenia and cognitive impairments, gene-network analysis for genes in close proximity to the replicated variants was performed. We observed nominal associations between 3054 variants and cognitive phenotypes at a threshold of P < 1.0 × 10− 4. Of the 3054 variants, the associations of 191 variants were replicated in the replication samples (P < .05). However, no variants achieved genome-wide significance in a meta-analysis (P > 5.0 × 10− 8). Additionally, 115 of 191 replicated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have genes located within 10 kb of the SNPs (60.2%). These variants were moderately associated with cognitive phenotypes that ranged from P = 2.50 × 10− 5 to P = 9.40 × 10− 8. The genes located within 10 kb from the replicated SNPs were significantly grouped in terms of glutamate receptor activity (false discovery rate (FDR) q = 4.49 × 10− 17) and the immune system related to major histocompatibility complex class I (FDR q = 8.76 × 10− 11) networks. Our findings demonstrate that genetic variants related to cognitive trait impairment in schizophrenia are involved in the N-methyl-d-aspartate glutamate network. PMID:25537281

  14. Frontotemporal dementia and its subtypes: a genome-wide association study

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Raffaele; Hernandez, Dena G; Nalls, Michael A; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Kwok, John B J; Dobson-Stone, Carol; Brooks, William S; Schofield, Peter R; Halliday, Glenda M; Hodges, John R; Piguet, Olivier; Bartley, Lauren; Thompson, Elizabeth; Haan, Eric; Hernández, Isabel; Ruiz, Agustín; Boada, Mercè; Borroni, Barbara; Padovani, Alessandro; Cruchaga, Carlos; Cairns, Nigel J; Benussi, Luisa; Binetti, Giuliano; Ghidoni, Roberta; Forloni, Gianluigi; Galimberti, Daniela; Fenoglio, Chiara; Serpente, Maria; Scarpini, Elio; Clarimón, Jordi; Lleó, Alberto; Blesa, Rafael; Waldö, Maria Landqvist; Nilsson, Karin; Nilsson, Christer; Mackenzie, Ian R A; Hsiung, Ging-Yuek R; Mann, David M A; Grafman, Jordan; Morris, Christopher M; Attems, Johannes; Griffiths, Timothy D; McKeith, Ian G; Thomas, Alan J; Pietrini, P; Huey, Edward D; Wassermann, Eric M; Baborie, Atik; Jaros, Evelyn; Tierney, Michael C; Pastor, Pau; Razquin, Cristina; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Alonso, Elena; Perneczky, Robert; Diehl-Schmid, Janine; Alexopoulos, Panagiotis; Kurz, Alexander; Rainero, Innocenzo; Rubino, Elisa; Pinessi, Lorenzo; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; George-Hyslop, Peter St; Rossi, Giacomina; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Giaccone, Giorgio; Rowe, James B; Schlachetzki, J C M; Uphill, James; Collinge, John; Mead, S; Danek, Adrian; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M; Grossman, Murray; Trojanowsk, John Q; van der Zee, Julie; Deschamps, William; Van Langenhove, Tim; Cruts, Marc; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Cappa, Stefano F; Le Ber, Isabelle; Hannequin, Didier; Golfier, Véronique; Vercelletto, Martine; Brice, Alexis; Nacmias, Benedetta; Sorbi, Sandro; Bagnoli, Silvia; Piaceri, Irene; Nielsen, Jørgen E; Hjermind, Lena E; Riemenschneider, Matthias; Mayhaus, Manuel; Ibach, Bernd; Gasparoni, Gilles; Pichler, Sabrina; Gu, Wei; Rossor, Martin N; Fox, Nick C; Warren, Jason D; Spillantini, Maria Grazia; Morris, Huw R; Rizzu, Patrizia; Heutink, Peter; Snowden, Julie S; Rollinson, Sara; Richardson, Anna; Gerhard, Alexander; Bruni, Amalia C; Maletta, Raffaele; Frangipane, Francesca; Cupidi, Chiara; Bernardi, Livia; Anfossi, Maria; Gallo, Maura; Conidi, Maria Elena; Smirne, Nicoletta; Rademakers, Rosa; Baker, Matt; Dickson, Dennis W; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Petersen, Ronald C; Knopman, David; Josephs, Keith A; Boeve, Bradley F; Parisi, Joseph E; Seeley, William W; Miller, Bruce L; Karydas, Anna M; Rosen, Howard; van Swieten, John C; Dopper, Elise G P; Seelaar, Harro; Pijnenburg, Yolande AL; Scheltens, Philip; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Capozzo, Rosa; Novelli, Valeria; Puca, Annibale A; Franceschi, M; Postiglione, Alfredo; Milan, Graziella; Sorrentino, Paolo; Kristiansen, Mark; Chiang, Huei-Hsin; Graff, Caroline; Pasquier, Florence; Rollin, Adeline; Deramecourt, Vincent; Lebert, Florence; Kapogiannis, Dimitrios; Ferrucci, Luigi; Pickering-Brown, Stuart; Singleton, Andrew B; Hardy, John; Momeni, Parastoo

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a complex disorder characterised by a broad range of clinical manifestations, differential pathological signatures, and genetic variability. Mutations in three genes—MAPT, GRN, and C9orf72—have been associated with FTD. We sought to identify novel genetic risk loci associated with the disorder. Methods We did a two-stage genome-wide association study on clinical FTD, analysing samples from 3526 patients with FTD and 9402 healthy controls. All participants had European ancestry. In the discovery phase (samples from 2154 patients with FTD and 4308 controls), we did separate association analyses for each FTD subtype (behavioural variant FTD, semantic dementia, progressive non-fluent aphasia, and FTD overlapping with motor neuron disease [FTD-MND]), followed by a meta-analysis of the entire dataset. We carried forward replication of the novel suggestive loci in an independent sample series (samples from 1372 patients and 5094 controls) and then did joint phase and brain expression and methylation quantitative trait loci analyses for the associated (p<5 × 10−8) and suggestive single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Findings We identified novel associations exceeding the genome-wide significance threshold (p<5 × 10−8) that encompassed the HLA locus at 6p21.3 in the entire cohort. We also identified a potential novel locus at 11q14, encompassing RAB38/CTSC, for the behavioural FTD subtype. Analysis of expression and methylation quantitative trait loci data suggested that these loci might affect expression and methylation incis. Interpretation Our findings suggest that immune system processes (link to 6p21.3) and possibly lysosomal and autophagy pathways (link to 11q14) are potentially involved in FTD. Our findings need to be replicated to better define the association of the newly identified loci with disease and possibly to shed light on the pathomechanisms contributing to FTD. Funding The National Institute of

  15. Integrated genome-wide analysis of genomic changes and gene regulation in human adrenocortical tissue samples

    PubMed Central

    Gara, Sudheer Kumar; Wang, Yonghong; Patel, Dhaval; Liu-Chittenden, Yi; Jain, Meenu; Boufraqech, Myriem; Zhang, Lisa; Meltzer, Paul S.; Kebebew, Electron

    2015-01-01

    To gain insight into the pathogenesis of adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) and whether there is progression from normal-to-adenoma-to-carcinoma, we performed genome-wide gene expression, gene methylation, microRNA expression and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analysis in human adrenocortical tissue (normal, adrenocortical adenomas and ACC) samples. A pairwise comparison of normal, adrenocortical adenomas and ACC gene expression profiles with more than four-fold expression differences and an adjusted P-value < 0.05 revealed no major differences in normal versus adrenocortical adenoma whereas there are 808 and 1085, respectively, dysregulated genes between ACC versus adrenocortical adenoma and ACC versus normal. The majority of the dysregulated genes in ACC were downregulated. By integrating the CGH, gene methylation and expression profiles of potential miRNAs with the gene expression of dysregulated genes, we found that there are higher alterations in ACC versus normal compared to ACC versus adrenocortical adenoma. Importantly, we identified several novel molecular pathways that are associated with dysregulated genes and further experimentally validated that oncostatin m signaling induces caspase 3 dependent apoptosis and suppresses cell proliferation. Finally, we propose that there is higher number of genomic changes from normal-to-adenoma-to-carcinoma and identified oncostatin m signaling as a plausible druggable pathway for therapeutics. PMID:26446994

  16. Genome-Wide Epigenetic Studies in Human Disease: A Primer on -Omic Technologies.

    PubMed

    Yan, Huihuang; Tian, Shulan; Slager, Susan L; Sun, Zhifu; Ordog, Tamas

    2016-01-15

    Epigenetic information encoded in covalent modifications of DNA and histone proteins regulates fundamental biological processes through the action of chromatin regulators, transcription factors, and noncoding RNA species. Epigenetic plasticity enables an organism to respond to developmental and environmental signals without genetic changes. However, aberrant epigenetic control plays a key role in pathogenesis of disease. Normal epigenetic states could be disrupted by detrimental mutations and expression alteration of chromatin regulators or by environmental factors. In this primer, we briefly review the epigenetic basis of human disease and discuss how recent discoveries in this field could be translated into clinical diagnosis, prevention, and treatment. We introduce platforms for mapping genome-wide chromatin accessibility, nucleosome occupancy, DNA-binding proteins, and DNA methylation, primarily focusing on the integration of DNA methylation and chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing technologies into disease association studies. We highlight practical considerations in applying high-throughput epigenetic assays and formulating analytical strategies. Finally, we summarize current challenges in sample acquisition, experimental procedures, data analysis, and interpretation and make recommendations on further refinement in these areas. Incorporating epigenomic testing into the clinical research arsenal will greatly facilitate our understanding of the epigenetic basis of disease and help identify novel therapeutic targets.

  17. Integrated genome-wide analysis of genomic changes and gene regulation in human adrenocortical tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Gara, Sudheer Kumar; Wang, Yonghong; Patel, Dhaval; Liu-Chittenden, Yi; Jain, Meenu; Boufraqech, Myriem; Zhang, Lisa; Meltzer, Paul S; Kebebew, Electron

    2015-10-30

    To gain insight into the pathogenesis of adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) and whether there is progression from normal-to-adenoma-to-carcinoma, we performed genome-wide gene expression, gene methylation, microRNA expression and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analysis in human adrenocortical tissue (normal, adrenocortical adenomas and ACC) samples. A pairwise comparison of normal, adrenocortical adenomas and ACC gene expression profiles with more than four-fold expression differences and an adjusted P-value < 0.05 revealed no major differences in normal versus adrenocortical adenoma whereas there are 808 and 1085, respectively, dysregulated genes between ACC versus adrenocortical adenoma and ACC versus normal. The majority of the dysregulated genes in ACC were downregulated. By integrating the CGH, gene methylation and expression profiles of potential miRNAs with the gene expression of dysregulated genes, we found that there are higher alterations in ACC versus normal compared to ACC versus adrenocortical adenoma. Importantly, we identified several novel molecular pathways that are associated with dysregulated genes and further experimentally validated that oncostatin m signaling induces caspase 3 dependent apoptosis and suppresses cell proliferation. Finally, we propose that there is higher number of genomic changes from normal-to-adenoma-to-carcinoma and identified oncostatin m signaling as a plausible druggable pathway for therapeutics.

  18. Comparative analysis of methods for genome-wide nucleosome cartography.

    PubMed

    Quintales, Luis; Vázquez, Enrique; Antequera, Francisco

    2015-07-01

    Nucleosomes contribute to compacting the genome into the nucleus and regulate the physical access of regulatory proteins to DNA either directly or through the epigenetic modifications of the histone tails. Precise mapping of nucleosome positioning across the genome is, therefore, essential to understanding the genome regulation. In recent years, several experimental protocols have been developed for this purpose that include the enzymatic digestion, chemical cleavage or immunoprecipitation of chromatin followed by next-generation sequencing of the resulting DNA fragments. Here, we compare the performance and resolution of these methods from the initial biochemical steps through the alignment of the millions of short-sequence reads to a reference genome to the final computational analysis to generate genome-wide maps of nucleosome occupancy. Because of the lack of a unified protocol to process data sets obtained through the different approaches, we have developed a new computational tool (NUCwave), which facilitates their analysis, comparison and assessment and will enable researchers to choose the most suitable method for any particular purpose. NUCwave is freely available at http://nucleosome.usal.es/nucwave along with a step-by-step protocol for its use. PMID:25296770

  19. Insights into kidney diseases from genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Wuttke, Matthias; Köttgen, Anna

    2016-09-01

    Over the past decade, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have considerably improved our understanding of the genetic basis of kidney function and disease. Population-based studies, used to investigate traits that define chronic kidney disease (CKD), have identified >50 genomic regions in which common genetic variants associate with estimated glomerular filtration rate or urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio. Case-control studies, used to study specific CKD aetiologies, have yielded risk loci for specific kidney diseases such as IgA nephropathy and membranous nephropathy. In this Review, we summarize important findings from GWAS and clinical and experimental follow-up studies. We also compare risk allele frequency, effect sizes, and specificity in GWAS of CKD-defining traits and GWAS of specific CKD aetiologies and the implications for study design. Genomic regions identified in GWAS of CKD-defining traits can contain causal genes for monogenic kidney diseases. Population-based research on kidney function traits can therefore generate insights into more severe forms of kidney diseases. Experimental follow-up studies have begun to identify causal genes and variants, which are potential therapeutic targets, and suggest mechanisms underlying the high allele frequency of causal variants. GWAS are thus a useful approach to advance knowledge in nephrology.

  20. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis of 150 cell samples.

    PubMed

    Irimia, Daniel; Mindrinos, Michael; Russom, Aman; Xiao, Wenzhong; Wilhelmy, Julie; Wang, Shenglong; Heath, Joe Don; Kurn, Nurith; Tompkins, Ronald G; Davis, Ronald W; Toner, Mehmet

    2009-01-01

    A major challenge in molecular biology is interrogating the human transcriptome on a genome wide scale when only a limited amount of biological sample is available for analysis. Current methodologies using microarray technologies for simultaneously monitoring mRNA transcription levels require nanogram amounts of total RNA. To overcome the sample size limitation of current technologies, we have developed a method to probe the global gene expression in biological samples as small as 150 cells, or the equivalent of approximately 300 pg total RNA. The new method employs microfluidic devices for the purification of total RNA from mammalian cells and ultra-sensitive whole transcriptome amplification techniques. We verified that the RNA integrity is preserved through the isolation process, accomplished highly reproducible whole transcriptome analysis, and established high correlation between repeated isolations of 150 cells and the same cell culture sample. We validated the technology by demonstrating that the combined microfluidic and amplification protocol is capable of identifying biological pathways perturbed by stimulation, which are consistent with the information recognized in bulk-isolated samples.

  1. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis of 150 cell samples†

    PubMed Central

    Russom, Aman; Xiao, Wenzhong; Wilhelmy, Julie; Wang, Shenglong; Heath, Joe Don; Kurn, Nurith; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Davis, Ronald W.; Toner, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    A major challenge in molecular biology is interrogating the human transcriptome on a genome wide scale when only a limited amount of biological sample is available for analysis. Current methodologies using microarray technologies for simultaneously monitoring mRNA transcription levels require nanogram amounts of total RNA. To overcome the sample size limitation of current technologies, we have developed a method to probe the global gene expression in biological samples as small as 150 cells, or the equivalent of approximately 300 pg total RNA. The new method employs microfluidic devices for the purification of total RNA from mammalian cells and ultra-sensitive whole transcriptome amplification techniques. We verified that the RNA integrity is preserved through the isolation process, accomplished highly reproducible whole transcriptome analysis, and established high correlation between repeated isolations of 150 cells and the same cell culture sample. We validated the technology by demonstrating that the combined microfluidic and amplification protocol is capable of identifying biological pathways perturbed by stimulation, which are consistent with the information recognized in bulk-isolated samples. PMID:20023796

  2. Genome-wide significant risk associations for mucinous ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kelemen, Linda E; Lawrenson, Kate; Tyrer, Jonathan; Li, Qiyuan; Lee, Janet M; Seo, Ji-Heui; Phelan, Catherine M; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Spindler, Tassja J; Aben, Katja K H; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia

    2015-08-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified several risk associations for ovarian carcinomas but not for mucinous ovarian carcinomas (MOCs). Our analysis of 1,644 MOC cases and 21,693 controls with imputation identified 3 new risk associations: rs752590 at 2q13 (P = 3.3 × 10(-8)), rs711830 at 2q31.1 (P = 7.5 × 10(-12)) and rs688187 at 19q13.2 (P = 6.8 × 10(-13)). We identified significant expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) associations for HOXD9 at 2q31.1 in ovarian (P = 4.95 × 10(-4), false discovery rate (FDR) = 0.003) and colorectal (P = 0.01, FDR = 0.09) tumors and for PAX8 at 2q13 in colorectal tumors (P = 0.03, FDR = 0.09). Chromosome conformation capture analysis identified interactions between the HOXD9 promoter and risk-associated SNPs at 2q31.1. Overexpressing HOXD9 in MOC cells augmented the neoplastic phenotype. These findings provide the first evidence for MOC susceptibility variants and insights into the underlying biology of the disease. PMID:26075790

  3. Genome-wide discovery of DNA polymorphism in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Park, Soomin; Yu, Hee-Ju; Mun, Jeong-Hwan; Lee, Seung-Chan

    2010-02-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and/or insertion/deletions (InDels) are frequent sequence variations in the plant genome, which can be developed as molecular markers for genetic studies on crop improvement. The ongoing Brassica rapa genome sequencing project has generated vast amounts of sequence data useful in genetic research. Here, we report a genome-wide survey of DNA polymorphisms in the B. rapa genome based on the 557 bacterial artificial clone sequences of B. rapa ssp. pekinensis cv. Chiifu. We identified and characterized 21,311 SNPs and 6,753 InDels in the gene space of the B. rapa genome by re-sequencing 1,398 sequence-tagged sites (STSs) in eight genotypes. Comparison of our findings with a B. rapa genetic linkage map confirmed that STS loci were distributed randomly over the B. rapa whole genome. In the 1.4 Mb of aligned sequences, mean nucleotide polymorphism and diversity were theta = 0.00890 and pi = 0.00917, respectively. Additionally, the nucleotide diversity in introns was almost three times greater than that in exons, and the frequency of observed InDel was almost 17 times higher in introns than in exons. Information regarding SNPs/InDels obtained here will provide an important resource for genetic studies and breeding programs of B. rapa.

  4. Genome-wide association study and premature ovarian failure.

    PubMed

    Christin-Maitre, S; Tachdjian, G

    2010-05-01

    Premature ovarian failure (POF) is defined as an amenorrhea for more than 4months, associated with elevated gonadotropins, usually higher than 20mIU/ml, occurring in a woman before the age of 40. Some candidate genes have been identified in the past 15years, such as FOXL2, FSHR, BMP15, GDF9, Xfra premutation. However, POF etiology remains unknown in more than 90% of cases. The first strategy to identify candidate gene, apart from studying genes involved in ovarian failure in animal models, relies on the study of X chromosome deletions and X;autosome translocations in patients. The second strategy is based on linkage analysis, the third one on Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) array. The latest strategy relies on Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS). This technique consists in screening single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in patients and controls. So far, three studies have been performed and have identified different loci potentially linked to POF, such as PTHB1 and ADAMTS19. However, replications in independent cohorts need to be performed. GWAS studies on large cohorts of women with POF should find new candidate genes in the near future.

  5. Genome-wide discovery of maternal effect variants

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Many phenotypes may be influenced by the prenatal environment of the mother and/or maternal care, and these maternal effects may have a heritable component. We have implemented in the computer program SOLAR a variance components-based method for detecting indirect effects of maternal genotype on offspring phenotype. Of six phenotypes measured in three generations of the Framingham Heart Study, height showed the strongest evidence (P = 0.02) of maternal effect. We conducted a genome-wide association analysis for height, testing both the direct effect of the focal individual's genotype and the indirect effect of the maternal genotype. Offspring height showed suggestive evidence of association with maternal genotype for two single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the trafficking protein particle complex 9 gene TRAPPC9 (NIBP), which plays a role in neuronal NF-κB signalling. This work establishes a methodological framework for identifying genetic variants that may influence the contribution of the maternal environment to offspring phenotypes. PMID:20018008

  6. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis of human epidermal melanocytes

    PubMed Central

    Haltaufderhyde, Kirk D.; Oancea, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Because human epidermal melanocytes (HEMs) provide critical protection against skin cancer, sunburn, and photoaging, a genome-wide perspective of gene expression in these cells is vital to understanding human skin physiology. In this study we performed high throughput sequencing of HEMs to obtain a complete data set of transcript sizes, abundances, and splicing. As expected, we found that melanocyte specific genes that function in pigmentation were among the highest expressed genes. We analyzed receptor, ion channel and transcription factor gene families to get a better understanding of the cell signalling pathways used by melanocytes. We also performed a comparative transcriptomic analysis of lightly versus darkly pigmented HEMs and found 16 genes differentially expressed in the two pigmentation phenotypes; of those, only one putative melanosomal transporter (SLC45A2) has known function in pigmentation. In addition, we found 166 genes with splice isoforms expressed exclusively in one pigmentation phenotype, 17 of which are genes involved in signal transduction. Our melanocyte transcriptome study provides a comprehensive view and may help identify novel pigmentation genes and potential pharmacological targets. PMID:25451175

  7. Genome-wide profiling of forum domains in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Tchurikov, Nickolai A.; Kretova, Olga V.; Sosin, Dmitri V.; Zykov, Ivan A.; Zhimulev, Igor F.; Kravatsky, Yuri V.

    2011-01-01

    Forum domains are stretches of chromosomal DNA that are excised from eukaryotic chromosomes during their spontaneous non-random fragmentation. Most forum domains are 50–200 kb in length. We mapped forum domain termini using FISH on polytene chromosomes and we performed genome-wide mapping using a Drosophila melanogaster genomic tiling microarray consisting of overlapping 3 kb fragments. We found that forum termini very often correspond to regions of intercalary heterochromatin and regions of late replication in polytene chromosomes. We found that forum domains contain clusters of several or many genes. The largest forum domains correspond to the main clusters of homeotic genes inside BX-C and ANTP-C, cluster of histone genes and clusters of piRNAs. PRE/TRE and transcription factor binding sites often reside inside domains and do not overlap with forum domain termini. We also found that about 20% of forum domain termini correspond to small chromosomal regions where Ago1, Ago2, small RNAs and repressive chromatin structures are detected. Our results indicate that forum domains correspond to big multi-gene chromosomal units, some of which could be coordinately expressed. The data on the global mapping of forum domains revealed a strong correlation between fragmentation sites in chromosomes, particular sets of mobile elements and regions of intercalary heterochromatin. PMID:21247882

  8. Genome-wide association study of selenium concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Fornage, Myriam; Foy, Millennia; Xun, Pengcheng; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Morris, Steve; Chasman, Daniel I.; Hu, Frank B.; Rimm, Eric B.; Kraft, Peter; Jordan, Joanne M.; Mozaffarian, Dariush; He, Ka

    2015-01-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential trace element in human nutrition, but its role in certain health conditions, particularly among Se sufficient populations, is controversial. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) of blood Se concentrations previously identified a locus at 5q14 near BHMT. We performed a GW meta-analysis of toenail Se concentrations, which reflect a longer duration of exposure than blood Se concentrations, including 4162 European descendants from four US cohorts. Toenail Se was measured using neutron activation analysis. We identified a GW-significant locus at 5q14 (P < 1 × 10−16), the same locus identified in the published GWAS of blood Se based on independent cohorts. The lead single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) explained ∼1% of the variance in toenail Se concentrations. Using GW-summary statistics from both toenail and blood Se, we observed statistical evidence of polygenic overlap (P < 0.001) and meta-analysis of results from studies of either trait (n = 9639) yielded a second GW-significant locus at 21q22.3, harboring CBS (P < 4 × 10−8). Proteins encoded by genes at 5q14 and 21q22.3 function in homocysteine (Hcy) metabolism, and index SNPs for each have previously been associated with betaine and Hcy levels in GWAS. Our findings show evidence of a genetic link between Se and Hcy pathways, both involved in cardiometabolic disease. PMID:25343990

  9. Genome-wide association studies and infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Bowcock, Anne M

    2010-01-01

    The identification of genetic variants predisposing to complex diseases and phenotypes represent a challenge for geneticists in the early part of the 21st century. These are not simple Mendelian disorders caused by single mutations, such as cystic fibrosis or Huntington's disease, but common diseases that are usually polygenic in origin. The predisposing genes can be susceptibility factors or protective factors. One example of such a complex disease is the inflammatory skin disease psoriasis. However, another example could be protection from an infectious disease. Both of these phenotypes are due in part to the presence of low-risk variants in the host. Moreover, all of these complex phenotypes require environmental triggers as well and, in the case of infectious diseases, these are pathogens. In the case of other common diseases such as cardiovascular disease the triggers are often lifestyle-related issues such as diet or exercise. Genome-wide association studies are now identifying some of these genetic susceptibility factors. PMID:20370638

  10. A genome-wide association study in multiple system atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Sailer, Anna; Nalls, Michael A.; Schulte, Claudia; Federoff, Monica; Price, T. Ryan; Lees, Andrew; Ross, Owen A.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Mok, Kin; Mencacci, Niccolo E.; Schottlaender, Lucia; Chelban, Viorica; Ling, Helen; O'Sullivan, Sean S.; Wood, Nicholas W.; Traynor, Bryan J.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Federoff, Howard J.; Mhyre, Timothy R.; Morris, Huw R.; Deuschl, Günther; Quinn, Niall; Widner, Hakan; Albanese, Alberto; Infante, Jon; Bhatia, Kailash P.; Poewe, Werner; Oertel, Wolfgang; Höglinger, Günter U.; Wüllner, Ullrich; Goldwurm, Stefano; Pellecchia, Maria Teresa; Ferreira, Joaquim; Tolosa, Eduardo; Bloem, Bastiaan R.; Rascol, Olivier; Meissner, Wassilios G.; Hardy, John A.; Revesz, Tamas; Holton, Janice L.; Gasser, Thomas; Wenning, Gregor K.; Singleton, Andrew B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify genetic variants that play a role in the pathogenesis of multiple system atrophy (MSA), we undertook a genome-wide association study (GWAS). Methods: We performed a GWAS with >5 million genotyped and imputed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 918 patients with MSA of European ancestry and 3,864 controls. MSA cases were collected from North American and European centers, one third of which were neuropathologically confirmed. Results: We found no significant loci after stringent multiple testing correction. A number of regions emerged as potentially interesting for follow-up at p < 1 × 10−6, including SNPs in the genes FBXO47, ELOVL7, EDN1, and MAPT. Contrary to previous reports, we found no association of the genes SNCA and COQ2 with MSA. Conclusions: We present a GWAS in MSA. We have identified several potentially interesting gene loci, including the MAPT locus, whose significance will have to be evaluated in a larger sample set. Common genetic variation in SNCA and COQ2 does not seem to be associated with MSA. In the future, additional samples of well-characterized patients with MSA will need to be collected to perform a larger MSA GWAS, but this initial study forms the basis for these next steps. PMID:27629089

  11. Genome-Wide Association Studies of the Human Gut Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Emily R; Cusanovich, Darren A; Michelini, Katelyn; Barreiro, Luis B; Ober, Carole; Gilad, Yoav

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial composition of the human fecal microbiome is influenced by many lifestyle factors, notably diet. It is less clear, however, what role host genetics plays in dictating the composition of bacteria living in the gut. In this study, we examined the association of ~200K host genotypes with the relative abundance of fecal bacterial taxa in a founder population, the Hutterites, during two seasons (n = 91 summer, n = 93 winter, n = 57 individuals collected in both). These individuals live and eat communally, minimizing variation due to environmental exposures, including diet, which could potentially mask small genetic effects. Using a GWAS approach that takes into account the relatedness between subjects, we identified at least 8 bacterial taxa whose abundances were associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms in the host genome in each season (at genome-wide FDR of 20%). For example, we identified an association between a taxon known to affect obesity (genus Akkermansia) and a variant near PLD1, a gene previously associated with body mass index. Moreover, we replicate a previously reported association from a quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping study of fecal microbiome abundance in mice (genus Lactococcus, rs3747113, P = 3.13 x 10-7). Finally, based on the significance distribution of the associated microbiome QTLs in our study with respect to chromatin accessibility profiles, we identified tissues in which host genetic variation may be acting to influence bacterial abundance in the gut. PMID:26528553

  12. Genome-Wide Association Studies of the Human Gut Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, Emily R.; Cusanovich, Darren A.; Michelini, Katelyn; Barreiro, Luis B.; Ober, Carole; Gilad, Yoav

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial composition of the human fecal microbiome is influenced by many lifestyle factors, notably diet. It is less clear, however, what role host genetics plays in dictating the composition of bacteria living in the gut. In this study, we examined the association of ~200K host genotypes with the relative abundance of fecal bacterial taxa in a founder population, the Hutterites, during two seasons (n = 91 summer, n = 93 winter, n = 57 individuals collected in both). These individuals live and eat communally, minimizing variation due to environmental exposures, including diet, which could potentially mask small genetic effects. Using a GWAS approach that takes into account the relatedness between subjects, we identified at least 8 bacterial taxa whose abundances were associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms in the host genome in each season (at genome-wide FDR of 20%). For example, we identified an association between a taxon known to affect obesity (genus Akkermansia) and a variant near PLD1, a gene previously associated with body mass index. Moreover, we replicate a previously reported association from a quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping study of fecal microbiome abundance in mice (genus Lactococcus, rs3747113, P = 3.13 x 10−7). Finally, based on the significance distribution of the associated microbiome QTLs in our study with respect to chromatin accessibility profiles, we identified tissues in which host genetic variation may be acting to influence bacterial abundance in the gut. PMID:26528553

  13. Genome-Wide Mapping of Yeast RNA Polymerase II Termination

    PubMed Central

    Schaughency, Paul; Merran, Jonathan; Corden, Jeffry L.

    2014-01-01

    Yeast RNA polymerase II (Pol II) terminates transcription of coding transcripts through the polyadenylation (pA) pathway and non-coding transcripts through the non-polyadenylation (non-pA) pathway. We have used PAR-CLIP to map the position of Pol II genome-wide in living yeast cells after depletion of components of either the pA or non-pA termination complexes. We show here that Ysh1, responsible for cleavage at the pA site, is required for efficient removal of Pol II from the template. Depletion of Ysh1 from the nucleus does not, however, lead to readthrough transcription. In contrast, depletion of the termination factor Nrd1 leads to widespread runaway elongation of non-pA transcripts. Depletion of Sen1 also leads to readthrough at non-pA terminators, but in contrast to Nrd1, this readthrough is less processive, or more susceptible to pausing. The data presented here provide delineation of in vivo Pol II termination regions and highlight differences in the sequences that signal termination of different classes of non-pA transcripts. PMID:25299594

  14. Assessing Predictive Properties of Genome-Wide Selection in Soybeans.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Alencar; Muir, William M; Rainey, Katy Martin

    2016-01-01

    Many economically important traits in plant breeding have low heritability or are difficult to measure. For these traits, genomic selection has attractive features and may boost genetic gains. Our goal was to evaluate alternative scenarios to implement genomic selection for yield components in soybean (Glycine max L. merr). We used a nested association panel with cross validation to evaluate the impacts of training population size, genotyping density, and prediction model on the accuracy of genomic prediction. Our results indicate that training population size was the factor most relevant to improvement in genome-wide prediction, with greatest improvement observed in training sets up to 2000 individuals. We discuss assumptions that influence the choice of the prediction model. Although alternative models had minor impacts on prediction accuracy, the most robust prediction model was the combination of reproducing kernel Hilbert space regression and BayesB. Higher genotyping density marginally improved accuracy. Our study finds that breeding programs seeking efficient genomic selection in soybeans would best allocate resources by investing in a representative training set. PMID:27317786

  15. Comparative analysis of methods for genome-wide nucleosome cartography.

    PubMed

    Quintales, Luis; Vázquez, Enrique; Antequera, Francisco

    2015-07-01

    Nucleosomes contribute to compacting the genome into the nucleus and regulate the physical access of regulatory proteins to DNA either directly or through the epigenetic modifications of the histone tails. Precise mapping of nucleosome positioning across the genome is, therefore, essential to understanding the genome regulation. In recent years, several experimental protocols have been developed for this purpose that include the enzymatic digestion, chemical cleavage or immunoprecipitation of chromatin followed by next-generation sequencing of the resulting DNA fragments. Here, we compare the performance and resolution of these methods from the initial biochemical steps through the alignment of the millions of short-sequence reads to a reference genome to the final computational analysis to generate genome-wide maps of nucleosome occupancy. Because of the lack of a unified protocol to process data sets obtained through the different approaches, we have developed a new computational tool (NUCwave), which facilitates their analysis, comparison and assessment and will enable researchers to choose the most suitable method for any particular purpose. NUCwave is freely available at http://nucleosome.usal.es/nucwave along with a step-by-step protocol for its use.

  16. Evolution of mate choice for genome-wide heterozygosity.

    PubMed

    Fromhage, Lutz; Kokko, Hanna; Reid, Jane M

    2009-03-01

    The extent to which indirect genetic benefits can drive the evolution of directional mating preferences for more ornamented mates, and the mechanisms that maintain such preferences without depleting genetic variance, remain key questions in evolutionary ecology. We used an individual-based genetic model to examine whether a directional preference for mates with higher genome-wide heterozygosity (H), and consequently greater ornamentation, could evolve and be maintained in the absence of direct fitness benefits of mate choice. We specifically considered finite populations of varying size and spatial genetic structure, in which parent-offspring resemblance in heterozygosity could provide an indirect benefit of mate choice. A directional preference for heterozygous mates evolved under broad conditions, even given a substantial direct cost of mate choice, low mutation rate, and stochastic variation in the link between individual heterozygosity and ornamentation. Furthermore, genetic variance was retained under directional sexual selection. Preference evolution was strongest in smaller populations, but weaker in populations with greater internal genetic structure in which restricted dispersal increased local inbreeding among offspring of neighboring females that all preferentially mated with the same male. These results suggest that directional preferences for heterozygous or outbred mates could evolve and be maintained in finite populations in the absence of direct fitness benefits, suggesting a novel resolution to the lek paradox.

  17. Genome-wide significant risk associations for mucinous ovarian carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kelemen, Linda E.; Lawrenson, Kate; Tyrer, Jonathan; Li, Qiyuan; M. Lee, Janet; Seo, Ji-Heui; Phelan, Catherine M.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqin; Spindler, Tassja J.; Aben, Katja K.H.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Baker, Helen; Bandera, Elisa V.; Bean, Yukie; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brinton, Louise A.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bruinsma, Fiona; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian G.; Carty, Karen; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chen, Y. Ann; Chen, Zhihua; Cook, Linda S.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Cybulski, Cezary; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Dennis, Joe; Dicks, Ed; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Dörk, Thilo; du Bois, Andreas; Dürst, Matthias; Eccles, Diana; Easton, Douglas T.; Edwards, Robert P.; Eilber, Ursula; Ekici, Arif B.; Engelholm, Svend Aage; Fasching, Peter A.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham G.; Glasspool, Rosalind; Goode, Ellen L.; Goodman, Marc T.; Grownwald, Jacek; Harrington, Patricia; Harter, Philipp; Hasmad, Hanis Nazihah; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Hillemanns, Peter; Hogdall, Estrid; Hogdall, Claus; Hosono, Satoyo; Iversen, Edwin S.; Jakubowska, Anna; Jensen, Allan; Ji, Bu-Tian; Karlan, Beth Y; Kellar, Melissa; Kelley, Joseph L.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Krakstad, Camilla; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D.; Lee, Alice W.; Lele, Shashi; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A.; Liang, Dong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R.; McNeish, Iain; Menon, Usha; Modugno, Francesmary; Moes-Sosnowska, Joanna; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Narod, Steven A.; Nedergaard, Lotte; Ness, Roberta B.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Azmi, Mat Adenan Noor; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Orsulic, Sandra; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Paul, James; Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Pike, Malcolm C.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Ramus, Susan J.; Risch, Harvey A.; Rosen, Barry; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Rzepecka, Iwona K.; Salvesen, Helga B.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Schwaab, Ira; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shvetsov, Yurii B; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sieh, Weiva; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C.; Sucheston, Lara; Tangen, Ingvild L.; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L.; Thompson, Pamela J; Tworoger, Shelley S.; van Altena, Anne M.; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Vergote, Ignace; Vierkant, Robert A.; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Walsh, Christine; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S.; Wicklund, Kristine G.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Wlodzimierz, Sawicki; Woo, Yin-Ling; Wu, Xifeng; Wu, Anna H.; Yang, Hannah; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Sellers, Thomas A.; Freedman, Matthew L.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D.; Gayther, Simon A.; Berchuck, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified several risk associations for ovarian carcinomas (OC) but not for mucinous ovarian carcinomas (MOC). Genotypes from OC cases and controls were imputed into the 1000 Genomes Project reference panel. Analysis of 1,644 MOC cases and 21,693 controls identified three novel risk associations: rs752590 at 2q13 (P = 3.3 × 10−8), rs711830 at 2q31.1 (P = 7.5 × 10−12) and rs688187 at 19q13.2 (P = 6.8 × 10−13). Expression Quantitative Trait Locus (eQTL) analysis in ovarian and colorectal tumors (which are histologically similar to MOC) identified significant eQTL associations for HOXD9 at 2q31.1 in ovarian (P = 4.95 × 10−4, FDR = 0.003) and colorectal (P = 0.01, FDR = 0.09) tumors, and for PAX8 at 2q13 in colorectal tumors (P = 0.03, FDR = 0.09). Chromosome conformation capture analysis identified interactions between the HOXD9 promoter and risk SNPs at 2q31.1. Overexpressing HOXD9 in MOC cells augmented the neoplastic phenotype. These findings provide the first evidence for MOC susceptibility variants and insights into the underlying biology of the disease. PMID:26075790

  18. Genome-Wide Silencing in Drosophila Captures Conserved Apoptotic Effectors

    PubMed Central

    Chew, Su Kit; Chen, Po; Link, Nichole; Galindo, Kathleen A.; Pogue, Kristi; Abrams, John M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Apoptosis is a conserved form of programmed cell death (PCD) firmly established in the etiology, pathogenesis and treatment of many human diseases. Central to the core machinery of apoptosis are the caspases and their proximal regulators. Current models for caspase control envision a balance of opposing elements, with variable contributions from positive regulators and negative regulators among different cell types and species1. To advance a comprehensive view of components that support caspase-dependent cell death, we conducted a genome-wide silencing screen in the Drosophila model. Our strategy combined a library of dsRNAs together with a chemical antagonist of Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins (IAPs) that simulates the action of native regulators in the Reaper/Smac family2. A highly validated set of targets necessary for death provoked by multiple stimuli was identified. Among these, Tango7 is advanced here as a novel effector. Cells depleted for this gene resisted apoptosis at a step prior to induction of effector caspase activity and directed silencing of Tango7 in the animal prevented caspase-dependent PCD. Unlike known apoptosis regulators in this model3, Tango7 activity did not influence stimulus-dependent loss of Drosophila IAP1 (DIAP1) but, instead, regulated levels of the apical caspase Dronc. Likewise, the human Tango7 counterpart, PCID1, similarly impinged on caspase 9, revealing a novel regulatory axis impacting the apoptosome. PMID:19483676

  19. Genome-Wide Analysis of Human Metapneumovirus Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Il; Park, Sehee; Lee, Ilseob; Park, Kwang Sook; Kwak, Eun Jung; Moon, Kwang Mee; Lee, Chang Kyu; Bae, Joon-Yong; Park, Man-Seong; Song, Ki-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) has been described as an important etiologic agent of upper and lower respiratory tract infections, especially in young children and the elderly. Most of school-aged children might be introduced to HMPVs, and exacerbation with other viral or bacterial super-infection is common. However, our understanding of the molecular evolution of HMPVs remains limited. To address the comprehensive evolutionary dynamics of HMPVs, we report a genome-wide analysis of the eight genes (N, P, M, F, M2, SH, G, and L) using 103 complete genome sequences. Phylogenetic reconstruction revealed that the eight genes from one HMPV strain grouped into the same genetic group among the five distinct lineages (A1, A2a, A2b, B1, and B2). A few exceptions of phylogenetic incongruence might suggest past recombination events, and we detected possible recombination breakpoints in the F, SH, and G coding regions. The five genetic lineages of HMPVs shared quite remote common ancestors ranging more than 220 to 470 years of age with the most recent origins for the A2b sublineage. Purifying selection was common, but most protein genes except the F and M2-2 coding regions also appeared to experience episodic diversifying selection. Taken together, these suggest that the five lineages of HMPVs maintain their individual evolutionary dynamics and that recombination and selection forces might work on shaping the genetic diversity of HMPVs. PMID:27046055

  20. Genome-wide association study of aggressive behaviour in chicken

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenhui; Zheng, Ming; Abdalla, Bahareldin Ali; Zhang, Zhe; Xu, Zhenqiang; Ye, Qiao; Xu, Haiping; Luo, Wei; Nie, Qinghua; Zhang, Xiquan

    2016-01-01

    In the poultry industry, aggressive behaviour is a large animal welfare issue all over the world. To date, little is known about the underlying genetics of the aggressive behaviour. Here, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to explore the genetic mechanism associated with aggressive behaviour in chickens. The GWAS results showed that a total of 33 SNPs were associated with aggressive behaviour traits (P < 4.6E-6). rs312463697 on chromosome 4 was significantly associated with aggression (P = 2.10905E-07), and it was in the intron region of the sortilin-related VPS10 domain containing receptor 2 (SORCS2) gene. In addition, biological function analysis of the nearest 26 genes around the significant SNPs was performed with Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. An interaction network contained 17 genes was obtained and SORCS2 was involved in this network, interacted with nerve growth factor (NGF), nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR), dopa decarboxylase (L-dopa) and dopamine. After knockdown of SORCS2, the mRNA levels of NGF, L-dopa and dopamine receptor genes DRD1, DRD2, DRD3 and DRD4 were significantly decreased (P < 0.05). In summary, our data indicated that SORCS2 might play an important role in chicken aggressive behaviour through the regulation of dopaminergic pathways and NGF. PMID:27485826

  1. Genome-wide linkage-disequilibrium profiles from single individuals.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Michael; Xu, Sen; Maruki, Takahiro; Jiang, Xiaoqian; Pfaffelhuber, Peter; Haubold, Bernhard

    2014-09-01

    Although the analysis of linkage disequilibrium (LD) plays a central role in many areas of population genetics, the sampling variance of LD is known to be very large with high sensitivity to numbers of nucleotide sites and individuals sampled. Here we show that a genome-wide analysis of the distribution of heterozygous sites within a single diploid genome can yield highly informative patterns of LD as a function of physical distance. The proposed statistic, the correlation of zygosity, is closely related to the conventional population-level measure of LD, but is agnostic with respect to allele frequencies and hence likely less prone to outlier artifacts. Application of the method to several vertebrate species leads to the conclusion that >80% of recombination events are typically resolved by gene-conversion-like processes unaccompanied by crossovers, with the average lengths of conversion patches being on the order of one to several kilobases in length. Thus, contrary to common assumptions, the recombination rate between sites does not scale linearly with distance, often even up to distances of 100 kb. In addition, the amount of LD between sites separated by <200 bp is uniformly much greater than can be explained by the conventional neutral model, possibly because of the nonindependent origin of mutations within this spatial scale. These results raise questions about the application of conventional population-genetic interpretations to LD on short spatial scales and also about the use of spatial patterns of LD to infer demographic histories.

  2. Genome-wide association study of aggressive behaviour in chicken.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenhui; Zheng, Ming; Abdalla, Bahareldin Ali; Zhang, Zhe; Xu, Zhenqiang; Ye, Qiao; Xu, Haiping; Luo, Wei; Nie, Qinghua; Zhang, Xiquan

    2016-08-03

    In the poultry industry, aggressive behaviour is a large animal welfare issue all over the world. To date, little is known about the underlying genetics of the aggressive behaviour. Here, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to explore the genetic mechanism associated with aggressive behaviour in chickens. The GWAS results showed that a total of 33 SNPs were associated with aggressive behaviour traits (P < 4.6E-6). rs312463697 on chromosome 4 was significantly associated with aggression (P = 2.10905E-07), and it was in the intron region of the sortilin-related VPS10 domain containing receptor 2 (SORCS2) gene. In addition, biological function analysis of the nearest 26 genes around the significant SNPs was performed with Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. An interaction network contained 17 genes was obtained and SORCS2 was involved in this network, interacted with nerve growth factor (NGF), nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR), dopa decarboxylase (L-dopa) and dopamine. After knockdown of SORCS2, the mRNA levels of NGF, L-dopa and dopamine receptor genes DRD1, DRD2, DRD3 and DRD4 were significantly decreased (P < 0.05). In summary, our data indicated that SORCS2 might play an important role in chicken aggressive behaviour through the regulation of dopaminergic pathways and NGF.

  3. Genome-wide association studies in pharmacogenetics research debate

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Kent R; Cheng, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Will genome-wide association studies (GWAS) ‘work’ for pharmacogenetics research? This question was the topic of a staged debate, with pro and con sides, aimed to bring out the strengths and weaknesses of GWAS for pharmacogenetics studies. After a full day of seminars at the Fifth Statistical Analysis Workshop of the Pharmacogenetics Research Network, the lively debate was held – appropriately – at Goonies Comedy Club in Rochester (MN, USA). The pro side emphasized that the many GWAS successes for identifying genetic variants associated with disease risk show that it works; that the current genotyping platforms are efficient, with good imputation methods to fill in missing data; that its global assessment is always a success even if no significant associations are detected; and that genetic effects are likely to be large because humans have not evolved in a drug-therapy environment. By contrast, the con side emphasized that we have limited knowledge of the complexity of the genome; limited clinical phenotypes compromise studies; the likely multifactorial nature of drug response clouding the small genetic effects; and limitations of sample size and replication studies in pharmacogenetic studies. Lively and insightful discussions emphasized further research efforts that might benefit GWAS in pharmacogenetics. PMID:20235786

  4. Genome-wide association study of aggressive behaviour in chicken.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenhui; Zheng, Ming; Abdalla, Bahareldin Ali; Zhang, Zhe; Xu, Zhenqiang; Ye, Qiao; Xu, Haiping; Luo, Wei; Nie, Qinghua; Zhang, Xiquan

    2016-01-01

    In the poultry industry, aggressive behaviour is a large animal welfare issue all over the world. To date, little is known about the underlying genetics of the aggressive behaviour. Here, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to explore the genetic mechanism associated with aggressive behaviour in chickens. The GWAS results showed that a total of 33 SNPs were associated with aggressive behaviour traits (P < 4.6E-6). rs312463697 on chromosome 4 was significantly associated with aggression (P = 2.10905E-07), and it was in the intron region of the sortilin-related VPS10 domain containing receptor 2 (SORCS2) gene. In addition, biological function analysis of the nearest 26 genes around the significant SNPs was performed with Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. An interaction network contained 17 genes was obtained and SORCS2 was involved in this network, interacted with nerve growth factor (NGF), nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR), dopa decarboxylase (L-dopa) and dopamine. After knockdown of SORCS2, the mRNA levels of NGF, L-dopa and dopamine receptor genes DRD1, DRD2, DRD3 and DRD4 were significantly decreased (P < 0.05). In summary, our data indicated that SORCS2 might play an important role in chicken aggressive behaviour through the regulation of dopaminergic pathways and NGF. PMID:27485826

  5. Genome-Wide Analysis of Polyadenylation Events in Schmidtea mediterranea

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmanan, Vairavan; Bansal, Dhiru; Kulkarni, Jahnavi; Poduval, Deepak; Krishna, Srikar; Sasidharan, Vidyanand; Anand, Praveen; Seshasayee, Aswin; Palakodeti, Dasaradhi

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotes, 3′ untranslated regions (UTRs) play important roles in regulating posttranscriptional gene expression. The 3′UTR is defined by regulated cleavage/polyadenylation of the pre-mRNA. The advent of next-generation sequencing technology has now enabled us to identify these events on a genome-wide scale. In this study, we used poly(A)-position profiling by sequencing (3P-Seq) to capture all poly(A) sites across the genome of the freshwater planarian, Schmidtea mediterranea, an ideal model system for exploring the process of regeneration and stem cell function. We identified the 3′UTRs for ∼14,000 transcripts and thus improved the existing gene annotations. We found 97 transcripts, which are polyadenylated within an internal exon, resulting in the shrinking of the ORF and loss of a predicted protein domain. Around 40% of the transcripts in planaria were alternatively polyadenylated (ApA), resulting either in an altered 3′UTR or a change in coding sequence. We identified specific ApA transcript isoforms that were subjected to miRNA mediated gene regulation using degradome sequencing. In this study, we also confirmed a tissue-specific expression pattern for alternate polyadenylated transcripts. The insights from this study highlight the potential role of ApA in regulating the gene expression essential for planarian regeneration. PMID:27489207

  6. Genome-Wide Specific Selection in Three Domestic Sheep Breeds

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jiaxve; Wu, Mingming; Ma, Xiaomeng; Liu, Zhen; Liu, Ruizao; Zhao, Fuping; Wei, Caihong; Du, Lixin

    2015-01-01

    Background Commercial sheep raised for mutton grow faster than traditional Chinese sheep breeds. Here, we aimed to evaluate genetic selection among three different types of sheep breed: two well-known commercial mutton breeds and one indigenous Chinese breed. Results We first combined locus-specific branch lengths and di statistical methods to detect candidate regions targeted by selection in the three different populations. The results showed that the genetic distances reached at least medium divergence for each pairwise combination. We found these two methods were highly correlated, and identified many growth-related candidate genes undergoing artificial selection. For production traits, APOBR and FTO are associated with body mass index. For meat traits, ALDOA, STK32B and FAM190A are related to marbling. For reproduction traits, CCNB2 and SLC8A3 affect oocyte development. We also found two well-known genes, GHR (which affects meat production and quality) and EDAR (associated with hair thickness) were associated with German mutton merino sheep. Furthermore, four genes (POL, RPL7, MSL1 and SHISA9) were associated with pre-weaning gain in our previous genome-wide association study. Conclusions Our results indicated that combine locus-specific branch lengths and di statistical approaches can reduce the searching ranges for specific selection. And we got many credible candidate genes which not only confirm the results of previous reports, but also provide a suite of novel candidate genes in defined breeds to guide hybridization breeding. PMID:26083354

  7. How to interpret a genome-wide association study.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Thomas A; Manolio, Teri A

    2008-03-19

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies use high-throughput genotyping technologies to assay hundreds of thousands of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and relate them to clinical conditions and measurable traits. Since 2005, nearly 100 loci for as many as 40 common diseases and traits have been identified and replicated in GWA studies, many in genes not previously suspected of having a role in the disease under study, and some in genomic regions containing no known genes. GWA studies are an important advance in discovering genetic variants influencing disease but also have important limitations, including their potential for false-positive and false-negative results and for biases related to selection of study participants and genotyping errors. Although these studies are clearly many steps removed from actual clinical use, and specific applications of GWA findings in prevention and treatment are actively being pursued, at present these studies mainly represent a valuable discovery tool for examining genomic function and clarifying pathophysiologic mechanisms. This article describes the design, interpretation, application, and limitations of GWA studies for clinicians and scientists for whom this evolving science may have great relevance.

  8. DNA methylation and differential gene regulation in photoreceptor cell death

    PubMed Central

    Farinelli, P; Perera, A; Arango-Gonzalez, B; Trifunovic, D; Wagner, M; Carell, T; Biel, M; Zrenner, E; Michalakis, S; Paquet-Durand, F; Ekström, P A R

    2014-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) defines a group of inherited degenerative retinal diseases causing progressive loss of photoreceptors. To this day, RP is still untreatable and rational treatment development will require a thorough understanding of the underlying cell death mechanisms. Methylation of the DNA base cytosine by DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) is an important epigenetic factor regulating gene expression, cell differentiation, cell death, and survival. Previous studies suggested an involvement of epigenetic mechanisms in RP, and in this study, increased cytosine methylation was detected in dying photoreceptors in the rd1, rd2, P23H, and S334ter rodent models for RP. Ultrastructural analysis of photoreceptor nuclear morphology in the rd1 mouse model for RP revealed a severely altered chromatin structure during retinal degeneration that coincided with an increased expression of the DNMT isozyme DNMT3a. To identify disease-specific differentially methylated DNA regions (DMRs) on a genomic level, we immunoprecipitated methylated DNA fragments and subsequently analyzed them with a targeted microarray. Genome-wide comparison of DMRs between rd1 and wild-type retina revealed hypermethylation of genes involved in cell death and survival as well as cell morphology and nervous system development. When correlating DMRs with gene expression data, we found that hypermethylation occurred alongside transcriptional repression. Consistently, motif analysis showed that binding sites of several important transcription factors for retinal physiology were hypermethylated in the mutant model, which also correlated with transcriptional silencing of their respective target genes. Finally, inhibition of DNMTs in rd1 organotypic retinal explants using decitabine resulted in a substantial reduction of photoreceptor cell death, suggesting inhibition of DNA methylation as a potential novel treatment in RP. PMID:25476906

  9. Transient decreases in methylation at 5'-cCGG-3' sequences in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) meristem DNA during progression of tubers through dormancy precede the resumption of sprout growth.

    PubMed

    Law, R David; Suttle, Jeffrey C

    2003-02-01

    The 5-methylcytosine (5mC) content in DNA of tuber meristems isolated from field-grown potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.) was determined during a 7-month storage period at 3 degrees C for three growing/postharvest seasons. No significant changes in 5mC levels were noted genome-wide or within 5'-CG-3' dinucleotide sequences, 5'-CG-3' islands or 5'-CA(T)G-3' trinucleotide sequences during storage. However, a consistent but transient 50-70% decrease in methylation at both cytosines within 5'-CCGG-3' sequences was detected that peaked 112-194 days after harvest. This result was corroborated by methylation-sensitive amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis of meristem DNA. Similar to tuber meristems undergoing progression through natural dormancy, premature chemical termination of dormancy resulted in rapid, transient 5'-CCGG-3' demethylation in meristem DNA. Minimum methylation levels at this sequence preceded initiation of high levels of de novo DNA synthesis by two days. Cytosine methylation status was also followed in in vitro-generated potato microtubers during 7 months of post-harvest storage. As in DNA from tuber bud meristems, no changes in genome-wide 5mC content or methylation at 5'-CA(T)G-3' or 5'-CG-3' island sequences were noted in microtuber DNA. However, there was a transient 46% drop in methylation at 5'-CG-3' dinucleotides concomitant with minimum levels of 5'-CCGG-3' methylation (30-60% below those in dormant microtubers) 57-98 days after harvest. As microtubers exited dormancy, there were sustained three- and seven-fold increases in RNA and DNA synthesis rates, peaking on or after 98 days of storage, respectively. Together, these data demonstrate that demethylation of 5'-CCGG-3' sequences occurs independently of tuber age during dormancy progression and precedes transcriptional activation of genes leading to cell division and meristem growth in potatoes.

  10. A Genome-wide Association Study of Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Renton, Alan E.; Pliner, Hannah A.; Provenzano, Carlo; Evoli, Amelia; Ricciardi, Roberta; Nalls, Michael A.; Marangi, Giuseppe; Abramzon, Yevgeniya; Arepalli, Sampath; Chong, Sean; Hernandez, Dena G.; Johnson, Janel O.; Bartoccioni, Emanuela; Scuderi, Flavia; Maestri, Michelangelo; Raphael Gibbs, J.; Errichiello, Edoardo; Chiò, Adriano; Restagno, Gabriella; Sabatelli, Mario; Macek, Mark; Scholz, Sonja W.; Corse, Andrea; Chaudhry, Vinay; Benatar, Michael; Barohn, Richard J.; McVey, April; Pasnoor, Mamatha; Dimachkie, Mazen M.; Rowin, Julie; Kissel, John; Freimer, Miriam; Kaminski, Henry J.; Sanders, Donald B.; Lipscomb, Bernadette; Massey, Janice M.; Chopra, Manisha; Howard, James F.; Koopman, Wilma J.; Nicolle, Michael W.; Pascuzzi, Robert M.; Pestronk, Alan; Wulf, Charlie; Florence, Julaine; Blackmore, Derrick; Soloway, Aimee; Siddiqi, Zaeem; Muppidi, Srikanth; Wolfe, Gil; Richman, David; Mezei, Michelle M.; Jiwa, Theresa; Oger, Joel; Drachman, Daniel B.; Traynor, Bryan J.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Myasthenia gravis is a chronic, autoimmune, neuromuscular disease characterized by fluctuating weakness of voluntary muscle groups. Although genetic factors are known to play a role in this neuroimmunological condition, the genetic etiology underlying myasthenia gravis is not well understood. OBJECTIVE To identify genetic variants that alter susceptibility to myasthenia gravis, we performed a genome-wide association study. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS DNA was obtained from 1032 white individuals from North America diagnosed as having acetylcholine receptor antibody–positive myasthenia gravis and 1998 race/ethnicity-matched control individuals from January 2010 to January 2011. These samples were genotyped on Illumina OmniExpress single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays. An independent cohort of 423 Italian cases and 467 Italian control individuals were used for replication. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES We calculated P values for association between 8114394 genotyped and imputed variants across the genome and risk for developing myasthenia gravis using logistic regression modeling. A threshold P value of 5.0 × 10−8 was set for genome-wide significance after Bonferroni correction for multiple testing. RESULTS In the over all case-control cohort, we identified association signals at CTLA4 (rs231770; P = 3.98 × 10−8; odds ratio, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.25–1.49), HLA-DQA1 (rs9271871; P = 1.08 × 10−8; odds ratio, 2.31; 95% CI, 2.02 – 2.60), and TNFRSF11A (rs4263037; P = 1.60 × 10−9; odds ratio, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.29–1.53). These findings replicated for CTLA4 and HLA-DQA1 in an independent cohort of Italian cases and control individuals. Further analysis revealed distinct, but overlapping, disease-associated loci for early- and late-onset forms of myasthenia gravis. In the late-onset cases, we identified 2 association peaks: one was located in TNFRSF11A (rs4263037; P = 1.32 × 10−12; odds ratio, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.44–1.68) and the other was detected

  11. Multicentric Genome-Wide Association Study for Primary Spontaneous Pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Abrantes, Patrícia; Francisco, Vânia; Teixeira, Gilberto; Monteiro, Marta; Neves, João; Norte, Ana; Robalo Cordeiro, Carlos; Moura e Sá, João; Reis, Ernestina; Santos, Patrícia; Oliveira, Manuela; Sousa, Susana; Fradinho, Marta; Malheiro, Filipa; Negrão, Luís

    2016-01-01

    Despite elevated incidence and recurrence rates for Primary Spontaneous Pneumothorax (PSP), little is known about its etiology, and the genetics of idiopathic PSP remains unexplored. To identify genetic variants contributing to sporadic PSP risk, we conducted the first PSP genome-wide association study. Two replicate pools of 92 Portuguese PSP cases and of 129 age- and sex-matched controls were allelotyped in triplicate on the Affymetrix Human SNP Array 6.0 arrays. Markers passing quality control were ranked by relative allele score difference between cases and controls (|RASdiff|), by a novel cluster method and by a combined Z-test. 101 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected using these three approaches for technical validation by individual genotyping in the discovery dataset. 87 out of 94 successfully tested SNPs were nominally associated in the discovery dataset. Replication of the 87 technically validated SNPs was then carried out in an independent replication dataset of 100 Portuguese cases and 425 controls. The intergenic rs4733649 SNP in chromosome 8 (between LINC00824 and LINC00977) was associated with PSP in the discovery (P = 4.07E-03, ORC[95% CI] = 1.88[1.22–2.89]), replication (P = 1.50E-02, ORC[95% CI] = 1.50[1.08–2.09]) and combined datasets (P = 8.61E-05, ORC[95% CI] = 1.65[1.29–2.13]). This study identified for the first time one genetic risk factor for sporadic PSP, but future studies are warranted to further confirm this finding in other populations and uncover its functional role in PSP pathogenesis. PMID:27203581

  12. Genome-wide analysis of condensin binding in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Condensins are multi-subunit protein complexes that are essential for chromosome condensation during mitosis and meiosis, and play key roles in transcription regulation during interphase. Metazoans contain two condensins, I and II, which perform different functions and localize to different chromosomal regions. Caenorhabditis elegans contains a third condensin, IDC, that is targeted to and represses transcription of the X chromosome for dosage compensation. Results To understand condensin binding and function, we performed ChIP-seq analysis of C. elegans condensins in mixed developmental stage embryos, which contain predominantly interphase nuclei. Condensins bind to a subset of active promoters, tRNA genes and putative enhancers. Expression analysis in kle-2-mutant larvae suggests that the primary effect of condensin II on transcription is repression. A DNA sequence motif, GCGC, is enriched at condensin II binding sites. A sequence extension of this core motif, AGGG, creates the condensin IDC motif. In addition to differences in recruitment that result in X-enrichment of condensin IDC and condensin II binding to all chromosomes, we provide evidence for a shared recruitment mechanism, as condensin IDC recruiter SDC-2 also recruits condensin II to the condensin IDC recruitment sites on the X. In addition, we found that condensin sites overlap extensively with the cohesin loader SCC-2, and that SDC-2 also recruits SCC-2 to the condensin IDC recruitment sites. Conclusions Our results provide the first genome-wide view of metazoan condensin II binding in interphase, define putative recruitment motifs, and illustrate shared loading mechanisms for condensin IDC and condensin II. PMID:24125077

  13. Susceptibility to Chronic Mucus Hypersecretion, a Genome Wide Association Study

    PubMed Central

    Dijkstra, Akkelies E.; Smolonska, Joanna; van den Berge, Maarten; Wijmenga, Ciska; Zanen, Pieter; Luinge, Marjan A.; Platteel, Mathieu; Lammers, Jan-Willem; Dahlback, Magnus; Tosh, Kerrie; Hiemstra, Pieter S.; Sterk, Peter J.; Spira, Avi; Vestbo, Jorgen; Nordestgaard, Borge G.; Benn, Marianne; Nielsen, Sune F.; Dahl, Morten; Verschuren, W. Monique; Picavet, H. Susan J.; Smit, Henriette A.; Owsijewitsch, Michael; Kauczor, Hans U.; de Koning, Harry J.; Nizankowska-Mogilnicka, Eva; Mejza, Filip; Nastalek, Pawel; van Diemen, Cleo C.; Cho, Michael H.; Silverman, Edwin K.; Crapo, James D.; Beaty, Terri H.; Lomas, David A.; Bakke, Per; Gulsvik, Amund; Bossé, Yohan; Obeidat, M. A.; Loth, Daan W.; Lahousse, Lies; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Hofman, Andre; Stricker, Bruno H.; Brusselle, Guy G.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Brouwer, Uilke; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Vonk, Judith M.; Nawijn, Martijn C.; Groen, Harry J. M.; Timens, Wim; Boezen, H. Marike; Postma, Dirkje S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic mucus hypersecretion (CMH) is associated with an increased frequency of respiratory infections, excess lung function decline, and increased hospitalisation and mortality rates in the general population. It is associated with smoking, but it is unknown why only a minority of smokers develops CMH. A plausible explanation for this phenomenon is a predisposing genetic constitution. Therefore, we performed a genome wide association (GWA) study of CMH in Caucasian populations. Methods GWA analysis was performed in the NELSON-study using the Illumina 610 array, followed by replication and meta-analysis in 11 additional cohorts. In total 2,704 subjects with, and 7,624 subjects without CMH were included, all current or former heavy smokers (≥20 pack-years). Additional studies were performed to test the functional relevance of the most significant single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). Results A strong association with CMH, consistent across all cohorts, was observed with rs6577641 (p = 4.25×10−6, OR = 1.17), located in intron 9 of the special AT-rich sequence-binding protein 1 locus (SATB1) on chromosome 3. The risk allele (G) was associated with higher mRNA expression of SATB1 (4.3×10−9) in lung tissue. Presence of CMH was associated with increased SATB1 mRNA expression in bronchial biopsies from COPD patients. SATB1 expression was induced during differentiation of primary human bronchial epithelial cells in culture. Conclusions Our findings, that SNP rs6577641 is associated with CMH in multiple cohorts and is a cis-eQTL for SATB1, together with our additional observation that SATB1 expression increases during epithelial differentiation provide suggestive evidence that SATB1 is a gene that affects CMH. PMID:24714607

  14. Genome-Wide Approaches for RNA Structure Probing.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Ian M; Berkowitz, Nathan D; Gosai, Sager J; Gregory, Brian D

    2016-01-01

    RNA molecules of all types fold into complex secondary and tertiary structures that are important for their function and regulation. Structural and catalytic RNAs such as ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and transfer RNA (tRNA) are central players in protein synthesis, and only function through their proper folding into intricate three-dimensional structures. Studies of messenger RNA (mRNA) regulation have also revealed that structural elements embedded within these RNA species are important for the proper regulation of their total level in the transcriptome. More recently, the discovery of microRNAs (miRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) has shed light on the importance of RNA structure to genome, transcriptome, and proteome regulation. Due to the relatively small number, high conservation, and importance of structural and catalytic RNAs to all life, much early work in RNA structure analysis mapped out a detailed view of these molecules. Computational and physical methods were used in concert with enzymatic and chemical structure probing to create high-resolution models of these fundamental biological molecules. However, the recent expansion in our knowledge of the importance of RNA structure to coding and regulatory RNAs has left the field in need of faster and scalable methods for high-throughput structural analysis. To address this, nuclease and chemical RNA structure probing methodologies have been adapted for genome-wide analysis. These methods have been deployed to globally characterize thousands of RNA structures in a single experiment. Here, we review these experimental methodologies for high-throughput RNA structure determination and discuss the insights gained from each approach. PMID:27256381

  15. Genome-wide association study of sleep in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sleep is a highly conserved behavior, yet its duration and pattern vary extensively among species and between individuals within species. The genetic basis of natural variation in sleep remains unknown. Results We used the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP) to perform a genome-wide association (GWA) study of sleep in D. melanogaster. We identified candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with differences in the mean as well as the environmental sensitivity of sleep traits; these SNPs typically had sex-specific or sex-biased effects, and were generally located in non-coding regions. The majority of SNPs (80.3%) affecting sleep were at low frequency and had moderately large effects. Additive models incorporating multiple SNPs explained as much as 55% of the genetic variance for sleep in males and females. Many of these loci are known to interact physically and/or genetically, enabling us to place them in candidate genetic networks. We confirmed the role of seven novel loci on sleep using insertional mutagenesis and RNA interference. Conclusions We identified many SNPs in novel loci that are potentially associated with natural variation in sleep, as well as SNPs within genes previously known to affect Drosophila sleep. Several of the candidate genes have human homologues that were identified in studies of human sleep, suggesting that genes affecting variation in sleep are conserved across species. Our discovery of genetic variants that influence environmental sensitivity to sleep may have a wider application to all GWA studies, because individuals with highly plastic genotypes will not have consistent phenotypes. PMID:23617951

  16. Genome-wide examination of myoblast cell cycle withdrawal duringdifferentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Xun; Collier, John Michael; Hlaing, Myint; Zhang, Leanne; Delshad, Elizabeth H.; Bristow, James; Bernstein, Harold S.

    2002-12-02

    Skeletal and cardiac myocytes cease division within weeks of birth. Although skeletal muscle retains limited capacity for regeneration through recruitment of satellite cells, resident populations of adult myocardial stem cells have not been identified. Because cell cycle withdrawal accompanies myocyte differentiation, we hypothesized that C2C12 cells, a mouse myoblast cell line previously used to characterize myocyte differentiation, also would provide a model for studying cell cycle withdrawal during differentiation. C2C12 cells were differentiated in culture medium containing horse serum and harvested at various time points to characterize the expression profiles of known cell cycle and myogenic regulatory factors by immunoblot analysis. BrdU incorporation decreased dramatically in confluent cultures 48 hr after addition of horse serum, as cells started to form myotubes. This finding was preceded by up-regulation of MyoD, followed by myogenin, and activation of Bcl-2. Cyclin D1 was expressed in proliferating cultures and became undetectable in cultures containing 40 percent fused myotubes, as levels of p21(WAF1/Cip1) increased and alpha-actin became detectable. Because C2C12 myoblasts withdraw from the cell cycle during myocyte differentiation following a course that recapitulates this process in vivo, we performed a genome-wide screen to identify other gene products involved in this process. Using microarrays containing approximately 10,000 minimally redundant mouse sequences that map to the UniGene database of the National Center for Biotechnology Information, we compared gene expression profiles between proliferating, differentiating, and differentiated C2C12 cells and verified candidate genes demonstrating differential expression by RT-PCR. Cluster analysis of differentially expressed genes revealed groups of gene products involved in cell cycle withdrawal, muscle differentiation, and apoptosis. In addition, we identified several genes, including DDAH2 and Ly

  17. Assessing statistical significance in multivariable genome wide association analysis

    PubMed Central

    Buzdugan, Laura; Kalisch, Markus; Navarro, Arcadi; Schunk, Daniel; Fehr, Ernst; Bühlmann, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Although Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS) genotype a very large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), the data are often analyzed one SNP at a time. The low predictive power of single SNPs, coupled with the high significance threshold needed to correct for multiple testing, greatly decreases the power of GWAS. Results: We propose a procedure in which all the SNPs are analyzed in a multiple generalized linear model, and we show its use for extremely high-dimensional datasets. Our method yields P-values for assessing significance of single SNPs or groups of SNPs while controlling for all other SNPs and the family wise error rate (FWER). Thus, our method tests whether or not a SNP carries any additional information about the phenotype beyond that available by all the other SNPs. This rules out spurious correlations between phenotypes and SNPs that can arise from marginal methods because the ‘spuriously correlated’ SNP merely happens to be correlated with the ‘truly causal’ SNP. In addition, the method offers a data driven approach to identifying and refining groups of SNPs that jointly contain informative signals about the phenotype. We demonstrate the value of our method by applying it to the seven diseases analyzed by the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC). We show, in particular, that our method is also capable of finding significant SNPs that were not identified in the original WTCCC study, but were replicated in other independent studies. Availability and implementation: Reproducibility of our research is supported by the open-source Bioconductor package hierGWAS. Contact: peter.buehlmann@stat.math.ethz.ch Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27153677

  18. Genephony: a knowledge management tool for genome-wide research

    PubMed Central

    Nuzzo, Angelo; Riva, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    Background One of the consequences of the rapid and widespread adoption of high-throughput experimental technologies is an exponential increase of the amount of data produced by genome-wide experiments. Researchers increasingly need to handle very large volumes of heterogeneous data, including both the data generated by their own experiments and the data retrieved from publicly available repositories of genomic knowledge. Integration, exploration, manipulation and interpretation of data and information therefore need to become as automated as possible, since their scale and breadth are, in general, beyond the limits of what individual researchers and the basic data management tools in normal use can handle. This paper describes Genephony, a tool we are developing to address these challenges. Results We describe how Genephony can be used to manage large datesets of genomic information, integrating them with existing knowledge repositories. We illustrate its functionalities with an example of a complex annotation task, in which a set of SNPs coming from a genotyping experiment is annotated with genes known to be associated to a phenotype of interest. We show how, thanks to the modular architecture of Genephony and its user-friendly interface, this task can be performed in a few simple steps. Conclusion Genephony is an online tool for the manipulation of large datasets of genomic information. It can be used as a browser for genomic data, as a high-throughput annotation tool, and as a knowledge discovery tool. It is designed to be easy to use, flexible and extensible. Its knowledge management engine provides fine-grained control over individual data elements, as well as efficient operations on large datasets. PMID:19728881

  19. Improved Statistics for Genome-Wide Interaction Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ueki, Masao; Cordell, Heather J.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, Wu and colleagues [1] proposed two novel statistics for genome-wide interaction analysis using case/control or case-only data. In computer simulations, their proposed case/control statistic outperformed competing approaches, including the fast-epistasis option in PLINK and logistic regression analysis under the correct model; however, reasons for its superior performance were not fully explored. Here we investigate the theoretical properties and performance of Wu et al.'s proposed statistics and explain why, in some circumstances, they outperform competing approaches. Unfortunately, we find minor errors in the formulae for their statistics, resulting in tests that have higher than nominal type 1 error. We also find minor errors in PLINK's fast-epistasis and case-only statistics, although theory and simulations suggest that these errors have only negligible effect on type 1 error. We propose adjusted versions of all four statistics that, both theoretically and in computer simulations, maintain correct type 1 error rates under the null hypothesis. We also investigate statistics based on correlation coefficients that maintain similar control of type 1 error. Although designed to test specifically for interaction, we show that some of these previously-proposed statistics can, in fact, be sensitive to main effects at one or both loci, particularly in the presence of linkage disequilibrium. We propose two new “joint effects” statistics that, provided the disease is rare, are sensitive only to genuine interaction effects. In computer simulations we find, in most situations considered, that highest power is achieved by analysis under the correct genetic model. Such an analysis is unachievable in practice, as we do not know this model. However, generally high power over a wide range of scenarios is exhibited by our joint effects and adjusted Wu statistics. We recommend use of these alternative or adjusted statistics and urge caution when using Wu et al

  20. Genome-wide inference of regulatory networks in Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The onset of antibiotics production in Streptomyces species is co-ordinated with differentiation events. An understanding of the genetic circuits that regulate these coupled biological phenomena is essential to discover and engineer the pharmacologically important natural products made by these species. The availability of genomic tools and access to a large warehous