Science.gov

Sample records for genotoxic effects induced

  1. Evaluation of protective effect of amifostine on dacarbazine induced genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Etebari, M; Jafarian-Dehkordi, A; Lame, V

    2015-01-01

    Anticancer therapy with alkylating agents has been used for many years. Dacarbazine (DTIC) as an alkylating agent is used alone or in combination with other chemotherapy drugs. In order to inhibit the formation of secondary cancers resulting from chemotherapy with DTIC, preventional strategies is necessary. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the genoprotective effect of amifostine on the genotoxic effects of DTIC in cell culture condition. To determine the optimum genotoxic concentration of DTIC, HepG2 cells were incubated with various DTIC concentrations including 5, 10 and 20 μg/ml for 2 h and the genotoxic effects were evaluated by the comet assay. The result of this part of the study showed that incubation of HepG2 cells with DTIC at 5 μg/ml was sufficient to produce genotoxic effect. In order to determine the protective effects of amifostine on genotoxicity induced by DTIC, HepG2 cells were incubated with different concentrations of amifostine (2, 3 and 5 mg/ml) for 1 h which was followed by incubation with DTIC at 5 μg/ml for 2 h. One hour incubation of cells with different concentrations of amifostine before incubation with DITC indicated that at least 5 mg/ml concentration of amifostine can prevent genotoxic effects induced by DTIC on HepG2 cells under described condition. In conclusion amifostine could prevent DNA damage induced by DTIC on HepG2 cells.

  2. Evaluation of protective effect of amifostine on dacarbazine induced genotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Etebari, M.; Jafarian-Dehkordi, A.; Lame, V.

    2015-01-01

    Anticancer therapy with alkylating agents has been used for many years. Dacarbazine (DTIC) as an alkylating agent is used alone or in combination with other chemotherapy drugs. In order to inhibit the formation of secondary cancers resulting from chemotherapy with DTIC, preventional strategies is necessary. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the genoprotective effect of amifostine on the genotoxic effects of DTIC in cell culture condition. To determine the optimum genotoxic concentration of DTIC, HepG2 cells were incubated with various DTIC concentrations including 5, 10 and 20 μg/ml for 2 h and the genotoxic effects were evaluated by the comet assay. The result of this part of the study showed that incubation of HepG2 cells with DTIC at 5 μg/ml was sufficient to produce genotoxic effect. In order to determine the protective effects of amifostine on genotoxicity induced by DTIC, HepG2 cells were incubated with different concentrations of amifostine (2, 3 and 5 mg/ml) for 1 h which was followed by incubation with DTIC at 5 μg/ml for 2 h. One hour incubation of cells with different concentrations of amifostine before incubation with DITC indicated that at least 5 mg/ml concentration of amifostine can prevent genotoxic effects induced by DTIC on HepG2 cells under described condition. In conclusion amifostine could prevent DNA damage induced by DTIC on HepG2 cells. PMID:26430459

  3. Genotoxic and anti-genotoxic effects of esculin and its oligomer fractions against mitomycin C-induced DNA damages in mice.

    PubMed

    Mokdad Bzeouich, Imen; Mustapha, Nadia; Maatouk, Mouna; Ghedira, Kamel; Ghoul, Mohamed; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila

    2016-12-01

    Mitomycin C is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic drugs against various solid tumors. However, despite its wide spectrum of clinical benefits, this agent is capable of inducing various types of genotoxicity. In this study, we investigated the effect of esculin and its oligomer fractions (E1, E2 and E3) against mitomycin C induced genotoxicity in liver and kidney cells isolated from Balb/C mice using the comet assay. Esculin and its oligomer fractions were not genotoxic at the tested doses (20 mg/kg and 40 mg/kg b.w). A significant decrease in DNA damages was observed, suggesting a protective role of esculin and its oligomer fractions against the genotoxicity induced by mitomycin C on liver and kidney cells. Moreover, esculin and its oligomer fractions did not induce an increase of malondialdehyde levels.

  4. Effects of fullerenol nanoparticles on acetamiprid induced cytoxicity and genotoxicity in cultured human lung fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Çavaş, Tolga; Çinkılıç, Nilüfer; Vatan, Özgür; Yılmaz, Dilek

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of water soluble fullerene (fullerenol) nanoparticles on the in vitro genotoxicity induced by the insecticide acetamiprid. Healthy human lung cells (IMR-90) were treated with fullerenol C60(OH)n (n: 18-22) alone and in combination with acetamiprid for 24h. The micronucleus test, comet assay and γ-H2AX foci formation assays were used as genotoxicity endpoints. Cytotoxicity was evaluated using the clonogenic assay. The maximum tested concentration of fullerenol (1.600 μg/ml) induced 77% survival where as the lowest concentration (25 μg/ml) was not cytotoxic where as acetamiprid was cytotoxic. Fullerenol did not induce genotoxicity at tested concentrations (50-1600 μg/L). On the other hand, acetamiprid (>50 μM) significantly induced formation of micronuclei, and double and single stranded DNA breaks in IMR-90 cells. For simultaneous exposure studies, two non-cytotoxic concentrations (50 and 200 μg/ml) of fullerenol and three cytotoxic concentrations of acetamiprid (100, 200 and 400 μM) were selected. As a result, we observed that co-exposure with fullerenol significantly reduced the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of acetamiprid in IMR-90 cells. Our results indicated the protective effect of water soluble fullerene particles on herbicide induced genotoxicity.

  5. Modulatory Effect of Betulinic Acid on the Genotoxicity Induced by Different Mutagens in V79 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Acésio, Nathália Oliveira; de Oliveira, Pollyanna Francielli; Mastrocola, Daiane Fernanda Pereira; Lima, Ildercílio Mota de Souza; Munari, Carla Carolina; Sato, Vânia Luiza Ferreira Lucatti; Souza, Andressa Aparecida Silva; Flauzino, Lúzio Gabriel Bocalon; Cunha, Wilson Roberto; Tavares, Denise Crispim

    2016-01-01

    Betulinic acid (BA) is a pentacyclic triterpene that can be isolated from many medicinal plants around the world. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic potential of BA and its effect on the genotoxicity induced by different mutagens in V79 cells using the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay. Different BA concentrations were combined with methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), doxorubicin (DXR), camptothecin (CPT), and etoposide (VP-16). The frequencies of micronuclei in cultures treated with different BA concentrations did not differ from those of the negative control. Treatment with BA and MMS resulted in lower micronucleus frequencies than those observed for cultures treated with MMS alone. On the other hand, a significant increase in micronucleus frequencies was observed in cultures treated with BA combined with DXR or VP-16 when compared to these mutagens alone. The results showed no effect of BA on CPT-induced genotoxicity. Therefore, BA was not genotoxic under the present experimental conditions and exerted a different influence on the genotoxicity induced by different mutagens. The modulatory effect of BA depends on the type of mutagen and concentrations used. PMID:27195016

  6. Protective Effects of Quercetin against Dimethoate-Induced Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity in Allium sativum Test.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Waseem; Shaikh, Sibhghatulla; Nazam, Nazia; Lone, Mohammad Iqbal

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation was directed to study the possible protective activity of quercetin-a natural antioxidant against dimethoate-induced cyto- and genotoxicity in meristematic cells of Allium sativum. So far there is no report on the biological properties of quercetin in plant test systems. Chromosome breaks, multipolar anaphase, stick chromosome, and mitotic activity were undertaken in the current study as markers of cyto- and genotoxicity. Untreated control, quercetin controls (@ 5, 10 and 20 μg/mL for 3 h), and dimethoate exposed groups (@ 100 and 200 μg/mL for 3 h) were maintained. For protection against cytogenotoxicity, the root tip cells treated with dimethoate at 100 and 200 μg/mL for 3 h and quercetin treatment at 5, 10, and 20 μg/mL for 16 h, prior to dimethoate treatment, were undertaken. Quercetin was found to be neither cytotoxic nor genotoxic in Allium sativum control at these doses. A significant increase (P < 0.05) in chromosomal aberrations was noted in dimethoate treated Allium. Pretreatment of Allium sativum with quercetin significantly (P < 0.05) reduced dimethoate-induced genotoxicity and cytotoxicity in meristematic cells, and these effects were dose dependent. In conclusion, quercetin has a protective role in the abatement of dimethoate-induced cyto- and genotoxicity in the meristematic cells of Allium sativum that resides, at least in part, on its antioxidant effects.

  7. Protective Effects of Quercetin against Dimethoate-Induced Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity in Allium sativum Test

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Waseem; Shaikh, Sibhghatulla; Nazam, Nazia; Lone, Mohammad Iqbal

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation was directed to study the possible protective activity of quercetin—a natural antioxidant against dimethoate-induced cyto- and genotoxicity in meristematic cells of Allium sativum. So far there is no report on the biological properties of quercetin in plant test systems. Chromosome breaks, multipolar anaphase, stick chromosome, and mitotic activity were undertaken in the current study as markers of cyto- and genotoxicity. Untreated control, quercetin controls (@ 5, 10 and 20 μg/mL for 3 h), and dimethoate exposed groups (@ 100 and 200 μg/mL for 3 h) were maintained. For protection against cytogenotoxicity, the root tip cells treated with dimethoate at 100 and 200 μg/mL for 3 h and quercetin treatment at 5, 10, and 20 μg/mL for 16 h, prior to dimethoate treatment, were undertaken. Quercetin was found to be neither cytotoxic nor genotoxic in Allium sativum control at these doses. A significant increase (P < 0.05) in chromosomal aberrations was noted in dimethoate treated Allium. Pretreatment of Allium sativum with quercetin significantly (P < 0.05) reduced dimethoate-induced genotoxicity and cytotoxicity in meristematic cells, and these effects were dose dependent. In conclusion, quercetin has a protective role in the abatement of dimethoate-induced cyto- and genotoxicity in the meristematic cells of Allium sativum that resides, at least in part, on its antioxidant effects. PMID:27379342

  8. THE EFFECTS OF HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN 70 (HSP70) AND EXPOSURE PROTOCOL ON ARSENITE INDUCED GENOTOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Effects of Heat Shock Protein 70 (Hsp70) and Exposure Protocol on Arsenite Induced Genotoxicity

    Barnes, J.A.1,2, Collins, B.W.2, Dix, D.J.3 and Allen J.W2.
    1National Research Council, 2Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, 3Reproductive Toxicology Division, Office...

  9. EFFECT OF EXPOSURE PROTOCOL AND HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN EXPRESSION ON ARSENITE INDUCED GENOTOXICITY IN MCF-7 BREAST CANCER CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory


    Effect of exposure protocol and heat shock protein expression on arsenite induced genotoxicity in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    The genotoxic effects of arsenic (As) are well accepted, yet its mechanism of action is not clearly defined. Heat-shock proteins (HSPs) protect...

  10. Protective effect of boric acid on lead- and cadmium-induced genotoxicity in V79 cells.

    PubMed

    Ustündağ, Aylin; Behm, Claudia; Föllmann, Wolfram; Duydu, Yalçin; Degen, Gisela H

    2014-06-01

    The toxic heavy metals cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) are important environmental pollutants which can cause serious damage to human health. As the metal ions (Cd(2+) and Pb(2+)) accumulate in the organism, there is special concern regarding chronic toxicity and damage to the genetic material. Metal-induced genotoxicity has been attributed to indirect mechanisms, such as induction of oxidative stress and interference with DNA repair. Boron is a naturally occurring element and considered to be an essential micronutrient, although the cellular activities of boron compounds remain largely unexplored. The present study has been conducted to evaluate potential protective effects of boric acid (BA) against genotoxicity induced by cadmium chloride (CdCl2) and lead chloride (PbCl2) in V79 cell cultures. Cytotoxicity assays (neutral red uptake and cell titer blue assay) served to determine suitable concentrations for subsequent genotoxicity assays. Chromosomal damage and DNA strand breaks were assessed by micronucleus tests and comet assays. Both PbCl2 and CdCl2 (at 3, 5 and 10 µM) were shown to induce concentration-dependent increases in micronucleus frequencies and DNA strand breaks in V79 cells. BA itself was not cytotoxic (up to 300 µM) and showed no genotoxic effects. Pretreatment of cells with low levels of BA (2.5 and 10 µM) was found to strongly reduce the genotoxic effects of the tested metals. Based on the findings of this in vitro study, it can be suggested that boron provides an efficient protection against the induction of DNA strand breaks and micronuclei by lead and cadmium. Further studies on the underlying mechanisms for the protective effect of boron are needed.

  11. Genotoxicity Induced by Foetal and Infant Exposure to Magnetic Fields and Modulation of Ionising Radiation Effects

    PubMed Central

    Udroiu, Ion; Antoccia, Antonio; Tanzarella, Caterina; Giuliani, Livio; Pacchierotti, Francesca; Cordelli, Eugenia; Eleuteri, Patrizia; Villani, Paola; Sgura, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    Background Few studies have investigated the toxicity and genotoxicity of extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF) during prenatal and neonatal development. These phases of life are characterized by cell proliferation and differentiation, which might make them sensitive to environmental stressors. Although in vitro evidences suggest that ELF-MF may modify the effects of ionizing radiation, no research has been conducted so far in vivo on the genotoxic effects of ELF-MF combined with X-rays. Aim and methods Aim of this study was to investigate in somatic and germ cells the effects of chronic ELF-MF exposure from mid gestation until weaning, and any possible modulation produced by ELF-MF exposure on ionizing radiation-induced damage. Mice were exposed to 50 Hz, 65 μT magnetic field, 24 hours/day, for a total of 30 days, starting from 12 days post-conception. Another group was irradiated with 1 Gy X-rays immediately before ELF-MF exposure, other groups were only X-irradiated or sham-exposed. Micronucleus test on blood erythrocytes was performed at multiple times from 1 to 140 days after birth. Additionally, 42 days after birth, genotoxic and cytotoxic effects on male germ cells were assessed by comet assay and flow cytometric analysis. Results ELF-MF exposure had no teratogenic effect and did not affect survival, growth and development. The micronucleus test indicated that ELF-MF induced a slight genotoxic damage only after the maximum exposure time and that this effect faded away in the months following the end of exposure. ELF-MF had no effects on ionizing radiation (IR)-induced genotoxicity in erythrocytes. Differently, ELF–MF appeared to modulate the response of male germ cells to X-rays with an impact on proliferation/differentiation processes. These results point to the importance of tissue specificity and development on the impact of ELF-MF on the early stages of life and indicate the need of further research on the molecular mechanisms underlying

  12. Inhalation of formaldehyde does not induce systemic genotoxic effects in rats.

    PubMed

    Speit, Günter; Zeller, Jasmin; Schmid, Oliver; Elhajouji, Azeddine; Ma-Hock, Lan; Neuss, Simone

    2009-01-01

    reticulocytes with micronuclei (MN) was determined. The positive control substances induced a significant effect in the genotoxicity tests and thus demonstrated the sensitivity of the test systems. FA did not induce any significant effect in any of the genotoxicity tests performed. It can be concluded that inhalation of FA in a 28-day study with FA concentrations up to 15 ppm does not lead to systemic genotoxic effects in the blood of rats.

  13. Protective Effect of Onion Extract on Bleomycin-Induced Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity in Human Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yoon Hee; Lee, Joong Won; Woo, Hae Dong; Lee, Sunyeong; Kim, Yang Jee; Lee, Younghyun; Shin, Sangah; Joung, Hyojee; Chung, Hai Won

    2016-01-01

    Following one of the world’s largest nuclear accidents, occured at Fukushima, Japan in 2011, a significant scientific effort has focused on minimizing the potential adverse health effects due to radiation exposure. The use of natural dietary antioxidants to reduce the risk of radiation-induced oxidative DNA damage is a simple strategy for minimizing radiation-related cancer rates and improving overall health. The onion is among the richest sources of dietary flavonoids and is an important food for increasing their overall intake. Therefore, we examined the effect of an onion extract on cyto- and geno-toxicity in human lymphocytes treated with bleomycin (BLM), a radiomimetic agent. In addition, we measured the frequency of micronuclei (MN) and DNA damage following treatment with BLM using a cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay and a single cell gel electrophoresis assay. We observed a significant increase in cell viability in lymphocytes treated with onion extract then exposed to BLM compared to cells treated with BLM alone. The frequency of BLM induced MN and DNA damage increased in a dose-dependent manner; however, when lymphocytes were pretreated with onion extract (10 and 20 μL/mL), the frequency of BLM-induced MN was decreased at all doses of BLM and DNA damage was decreased at 3 μg/mL of BLM. These results suggest that onion extract may have protective effects against BLM-induced cyto- and genotoxicity in human lymphocytes. PMID:26907305

  14. Protective Effect of Onion Extract on Bleomycin-Induced Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity in Human Lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yoon Hee; Lee, Joong Won; Woo, Hae Dong; Lee, Sunyeong; Kim, Yang Jee; Lee, Younghyun; Shin, Sangah; Joung, Hyojee; Chung, Hai Won

    2016-02-19

    Following one of the world's largest nuclear accidents, occured at Fukushima, Japan in 2011, a significant scientific effort has focused on minimizing the potential adverse health effects due to radiation exposure. The use of natural dietary antioxidants to reduce the risk of radiation-induced oxidative DNA damage is a simple strategy for minimizing radiation-related cancer rates and improving overall health. The onion is among the richest sources of dietary flavonoids and is an important food for increasing their overall intake. Therefore, we examined the effect of an onion extract on cyto- and geno-toxicity in human lymphocytes treated with bleomycin (BLM), a radiomimetic agent. In addition, we measured the frequency of micronuclei (MN) and DNA damage following treatment with BLM using a cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay and a single cell gel electrophoresis assay. We observed a significant increase in cell viability in lymphocytes treated with onion extract then exposed to BLM compared to cells treated with BLM alone. The frequency of BLM induced MN and DNA damage increased in a dose-dependent manner; however, when lymphocytes were pretreated with onion extract (10 and 20 μL/mL), the frequency of BLM-induced MN was decreased at all doses of BLM and DNA damage was decreased at 3 μg/mL of BLM. These results suggest that onion extract may have protective effects against BLM-induced cyto- and genotoxicity in human lymphocytes.

  15. Protective effects of boron on cyclophosphamide induced lipid peroxidation and genotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Ince, Sinan; Kucukkurt, Ismail; Demirel, Hasan Huseyin; Acaroz, Damla Arslan; Akbel, Erten; Cigerci, Ibrahim Hakki

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possible protective effect of boron (B) on cyclophosphamide (CYC) induced oxidative stress in rats. Totally, thirty Wistar albino male rats were fed standard rodent diet and divided into 5 equal groups: physiological saline was given intraperitoneally (i.p.) to the control group (vehicle treated), to the second group only 75 mg kg(-1) CYC was given i.p. on the 14th d, and boron was administered (5, 10, and 20 mg kg(-1), i.p.) to the other groups for 14 d and CYC (75 mg kg(-1), i.p.) on the 14th d. CYC caused increase of malondialdehyde and decrease of glutathione levels, decrease of superoxide dismutase activities in erythrocyte and tissues, decrease of erythrocyte, heart, lung, and brain catalase, and plasma antioxidant activities. Also, CYC treatment caused to DNA damage in mononuclear leukocytes. Moreover, B exhibited protective action against the CYC-induced histopathological changes in tissues. However, treatment of B decreased severity of CYC-induced lipid peroxidation and genotoxicity on tissues. In conclusion, B has ameliorative effects against CYC-induced lipid peroxidation and genotoxicity by enhancing antioxidant defence mechanism in rat.

  16. Protective effects of curcumin against genotoxicity induced by 131-iodine in human cultured lymphocyte cells

    PubMed Central

    Shafaghati, Nayereh; Hedayati, Monireh; Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jalal

    2014-01-01

    Background: 131-radioiodine has been widely used as an effective radionuclide for treatment of patients with thyroid diseases. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the radioprotective effects of curcumin as a natural product that protects against the genotoxic effects of 131I in human cultured lymphocytes. Materials and Methods: Whole blood samples from human volunteers were incubated with curcumin at doses of 5, 10, and 50 μg/mL. After 1-hour incubation, the lymphocytes were incubated with 131I (100 μCi/1.5 ml) for 2 hours. The lymphocyte cultures were then mitogenically stimulated to allow for evaluation of the number of micronuclei in cytokinesis-blocked binucleated cells. Results: Incubation of lymphocytes with 131I at dose 100 μCi/1.5 mL induced genotoxicity shown by increase in micronuclei frequency in human lymphocytes. Curcumin at 5, 10, and 50 μg/mL doses significantly reduced the micronuclei frequency. Maximal protective effects and greatest decrease in micronuclei frequency were observed when whole blood was incubated with 50 μg/mL dose of curcumin with 52%. Conclusion: This study has important implications for patients undergoing 131I therapy. Our results indicate a protective role for curcumin against the genetic damage and side effects induced by 131I administration. PMID:24914274

  17. Protective effect of hawthorn extract against genotoxicity induced by methyl methanesulfonate in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jalal; Azadbakht, Mohammad; Tanha, Mohammad; Mahmodzadeh, Aziz; Mohammadifar, Sohila

    2011-05-01

    The preventive effect of hawthorn (Crataegus microphylla) fruit extract against genotoxicity induced by methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) has been investigated in human cultured blood lymphocytes. Peripheral blood samples were collected from human volunteers at 0 (10 minutes before), and at 1 and 2 hours after a single oral ingestion of 1 g hawthorn powder extract. At each time point, the whole blood was treated in vitro with MMS (200 µmol) at 24 hours after cell culture, and then the lymphocytes were cultured with mitogenic stimulation to determine the micronuclei in cytokinesis-blocked binucleated cells. The lymphocytes treated with hawthorn and MMS to exhibit a significant decreasing in the incidence of micronucleated binucleated cells, as compared with similarly MMS-treated lymphocytes from blood samples collected at 0 hour. The maximum protection and decreasing in frequency of micronuclei (36%) was observed at 1 hour after ingestion of hawthorn extract. The high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis showed that hawthorn contained chlorogenic acid, epicatechin and hyperoside. It is obvious that hawthorn, particularly flavonoids constituents with antioxidative activity, reduced the oxidative stress and genotoxicity induced by toxic compounds. This set of data may have an important application for the protection of human lymphocyte from the genetic damage and side effects induced by chemicals hazardous in people.

  18. Long-term exposure of rabbits to imidaclorpid as quantified in blood induces genotoxic effect.

    PubMed

    Stivaktakis, Polychronis D; Kavvalakis, Matthaios P; Tzatzarakis, Manolis N; Alegakis, Athanasios K; Panagiotakis, Michael N; Fragkiadaki, Persefoni; Vakonaki, Elena; Ozcagli, Eren; Hayes, Wallace A; Rakitskii, Valerii N; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M

    2016-04-01

    The present in-vivo study focuses on the genotoxic effect of the neonicotinoid pesticide imidacloprid (IMI) in rabbits. The purpose of the study was to establish a possible relationship between exposure to the pesticide (dose and duration) and genotoxicity. Furthermore, an analytical method for the simultaneous determination of IMI and its major metabolite 6-chloronicotinic acid (6-ClNA) in blood was developed and validated. The isolation of the two analytes from blood was performed by liquid-liquid extraction with dichloromethane. Analysis was performed by Liquid Chromatography - Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization - Mass Spectrometry (LC-APCI-MS). The method was applied on the determination of IMI and 6-ClNA in serum samples obtained from rabbits fed with the insecticide at two low doses. Furthermore, parameters of genotoxicity and cytotoxicity were evaluated by measuring binucleated cells with micronuclei (BNMN), micronuclei (MN) and the Cytokinesis Block Proliferation Index (CBPI), in lymphocytes of exposed rabbits. The results revealed a genotoxic effect of IMI for both exposed groups. There were statistically significant differences in the frequencies of BNMN and MN between control and exposed groups but there was no dose-dependence, neither time-dependence of the genotoxic effect for the administered doses. This is the first time that long term exposure to IMI in rabbits was studied for the determination of its genotoxic effect. The genotoxic effect of IMI as it is depicted by the current study is in accordance with previous studies.

  19. Radioprotective Effect of Achillea millefolium L Against Genotoxicity Induced by Ionizing Radiation in Human Normal Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shahani, Somayeh; Rostamnezhad, Mostafa; Ghaffari-rad, Vahid; Ghasemi, Arash; Allahverdi Pourfallah, Tayyeb

    2015-01-01

    The radioprotective effect of Achillea millefolium L (ACM) extract was investigated against genotoxicity induced by ionizing radiation (IR) in human lymphocytes. Peripheral blood samples were collected from human volunteers and incubated with the methanolic extract of ACM at different concentrations (10, 50, 100, and 200 μg/mL) for 2 hours. At each dose point, the whole blood was exposed in vitro to 2.5 Gy of X-ray and then the lymphocytes were cultured with mitogenic stimulation to determine the micronuclei in cytokinesis-blocked binucleated cell. Antioxidant capacity of the extract was determined using free radical-scavenging method. The treatment of lymphocytes with the extract showed a significant decrease in the incidence of micronuclei binucleated cells, as compared with similarly irradiated lymphocytes without any extract treatment. The maximum protection and decrease in frequency of micronuclei were observed at 200 μg/mL of ACM extract which completely protected genotoxicity induced by IR in human lymphocytes. Achillea millefolium extract exhibited concentration-dependent radical-scavenging activity on 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl free radicals. These data suggest that the methanolic extract of ACM may play an important role in the protection of normal tissues against genetic damage induced by IR. PMID:26675116

  20. Radioprotective effect of chicory seeds against genotoxicity induced by ionizing radiation in human normal lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Hosseinimehr, S J; Ghaffari-Rad, V; Rostamnezhad, M; Ghasemi, A; Allahverdi Pourfallah, T; Shahani, S

    2015-08-17

    The search for less-toxic radioprotective agents has led to a growing trend towards natural products. Protective effect of the methanolic extract of chicory seeds (MCS) was investigated against genotoxicity induced by ionizing radiation in human lymphocytes. Human peripheral blood samples were collected and incubated with MCS at different concentrations (10, 50, 100, and 200 μg/mL) for two hours. The whole blood samples were exposed in vitro to X-ray at dose 2.5 Gy. Then, the lymphocytes were cultured with mitogenic stimulation to determine the micronucleus in cytokinesis blocked binucleated cell. The methanolic extract at all doses significantly reduced the frequency of micronuclei in binucleated lymphocytes, as compared with similarly irradiated lymphocytes without any extract treatment. The maximum protection was observed at 200 μg/mL of MCS, it completely protected genotoxicity induced by ionizing radiation in human lymphocytes. The extract exhibited a concentration-dependent radical scavenging activity on 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl free radicals. HPLC analysis of MCS showed this extract is containing chlorogenic acid as a phenolic compound. These data suggest that the radioprotective effect of methanolic extract of chicory seeds can be attributed to the presence of phenolic compounds such as chlorogenic acid which act as antioxidant agents.

  1. Protective effects of acerola juice on genotoxicity induced by iron in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Horta, Roberta Nunes; Kahl, Vivian Francilia Silva; Sarmento, Merielen da Silva; Nunes, Marisa Fernanda Silva; Porto, Carem Rejane Maglione; de Andrade, Vanessa Moraes; Ferraz, Alexandre de Barros Falcão; Silva, Juliana Da

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Metal ions such as iron can induce DNA damage by inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress. Vitamin C is one of the most widely consumed antioxidants worldwide, present in many fruits and vegetables, especially inMalpighia glabra L., popularly known as acerola, native to Brazil. Acerola is considered a functional fruit due to its high antioxidant properties and phenolic contents, and therefore is consumed to prevent diseases or as adjuvant in treatment strategies. Here, the influence of ripe and unripe acerola juices on iron genotoxicity was analyzed in vivo using the comet assay and micronucleus test. The comet assay results showed that acerola juice exerted no genotoxic or antigenotoxic activity. Neither ripe nor unripe acerola juices were mutagenic to animals treated with juices, in micronucleus test. However, when compared to iron group, the pre-treatment with acerola juices exerted antimutagenic activity, decreasing significantly micronucleus mean values in bone marrow. Stage of ripeness did not influence the interaction of acerola compounds with DNA, and both ripe and unripe acerola juices exerted protective effect over DNA damage generated by iron. PMID:27007905

  2. Protective effect of Selenium nanoparticle against cyclophosphamide induced hepatotoxicity and genotoxicity in Swiss albino mice.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Arin; Basu, Abhishek; Ghosh, Prosenjit; Biswas, Jaydip; Bhattacharya, Sudin

    2014-08-01

    Cyclophosphamide (CP) is the most commonly used chemotherapeutic drug for various types of cancer. However, its use causes severe cytotoxicity to normal cells in human. It is well known that the undesirable side effects are caused due to the formation of reactive oxygen species. Selenium is an essential micronutrient for both animals and humans and has antioxidant and membrane stabilizing property, but selenium is also toxic above certain level. Nano selenium has been well proved to be less toxic than inorganic selenium as well as certain organoselenium compounds. The objective of the study is to evaluate the protective role of Nano-Se against CP-induced hepatotoxicity and genotoxicity in Swiss albino mice. CP was administered intraperitoneally (25 mg/kg b.w.) and Nano-Se was given by oral gavages (2 mg Se/kg b.w.) in concomitant and pretreatment scheme. Intraperitoneal administration of CP induced hepatic damage as indicated by the serum marker enzymes aspartate and alanine transaminases and increased the malonaldehyde level, depleted the glutathione content and antioxidant enzyme activity (glutathione peroxidase, glutathione-s-transferase, superoxide dismutase and catalase), and induced DNA damage and chromosomal aberration. Oral administration of Nano-Se caused a significant reduction in malonaldehyde, ROS level and glutathione levels, restoration of antioxidant enzyme activity, reduction in chromosomal aberration in bone marrow, and DNA damage in lymphocytes and also in bone marrow. Moreover, the chemoprotective efficiency of Nano-Se against CP induced toxicity was confirmed by histopathological evaluation. The results support the protective effect of Nano-Se against CP-induced hepatotoxicity and genotoxicity.

  3. Antimutagenic Effect of Dioscorea Pentaphylla on Genotoxic Effect Induced By Methyl Methanesulfonate in the Drosophila Wing Spot Test

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, G.; Hosetti, B. B.; Dhananjaya, B. L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Plants as dietary sources are known to have several chemoprotective agents. Dioscorea pentaphylla is an important medicinal plant, which is often used as edible food. This study was undertaken to evaluate the antigenotoxic potential of D. pentaphylla extracts on the genotoxic effect induced by methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) in the Drosophila wing spot test. Materials and Methods: The somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) was carried out in Drosophila melanogaster. In transheterogyous larvae, multiple wing hair (mwh 3-0.3) and flare (flr3-38.8) genes were used as markers of the extent of mutagenicity. Results: It was observed thatall the three extracts (petroleum ether, choloroform, and ethyl alcohol) in the combined treatment had significantly inhibited the effect of MMS-induced genotoxic effects. When compared to others, the ethanol extract showed a very significant antimutagenic activity. Conclusion: The compounds that are present in the extracts may directly interact with the methyl radical groups of MMS and inactivate them by chemical reaction. It is also possible that the compounds in the extract compete to interact with the nucleophilic sites in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), thus altering the binding of the mutagen to these sites. Although our results indicate that the compounds present in the extracts may directly interact with the methyl radical groups of MMS and inactivate them by chemical reaction, it may also be quite interesting to investigate through the other different mechanisms by which D. pentaphylla could interfere in vivo on the effect of genotoxic agents. PMID:25948963

  4. EFFECTS OF HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN 70 (HSP70) ON ARSENITE INDUCED GENOTOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic (As), a human carcinogen, is known to be genotoxic although its mechanism(s) of action for tumorigenesis is not well understood. Among the toxicity-related properties of this chemical are its clastogenic and aneugenic activities, as well as its capacity for inducing stres...

  5. Natural Antioxidants Against Arsenic-Induced Genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Munesh; Lalit, Minakshi; Thakur, Rajesh

    2016-03-01

    Arsenic is present in water, soil, and air in organic as well as in inorganic forms. However, inorganic arsenic is more toxic than organic and can cause many diseases including cancers in humans. Its genotoxic effect is considered as one of its carcinogenic actions. Arsenic can cause DNA strand breaks, deletion mutations, micronuclei formation, DNA-protein cross-linking, sister chromatid exchange, and DNA repair inhibition. Evidences indicate that arsenic causes DNA damage by generation of reactive free radicals. Nutritional supplementation of antioxidants has been proven highly beneficial against arsenic genotoxicity in experimental animals. Recent studies suggest that antioxidants protect mainly by reducing excess free radicals via restoring the activities of cellular enzymatic as well as non-enzymatic antioxidants and decreasing the oxidation processes such as lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation. The purpose of this review is to summarize the recent literature on arsenic-induced genotoxicity and its mitigation by naturally derived antioxidants in various biological systems.

  6. Nickel oxide nanoparticles induce inflammation and genotoxic effect in lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Capasso, Laura; Camatini, Marina; Gualtieri, Maurizio

    2014-04-07

    Nickel oxide nanoparticles (NiONPs) toxicity has been evaluated in the human pulmonary epithelial cell lines: BEAS-2B and A549. The nanoparticles, used at the doses of 20, 40, 60, 80, 100 μg/ml, induced a significant reduction of cell viability and an increase of apoptotic and necrotic cells at 24h. A significant release of interleukin-6 and -8 was assessed after 24h of treatment, even intracellular ROS increased already at 45 min after exposure. The results obtained evidenced that the cytokines release was dependent on mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK) cascade through the induction of NF-kB pathway. NiONPs induced cell cycle alteration in both the cell lines even in different phases and these modifications may be induced by the NPs genotoxic effect, suggested by the nuclear translocation of phospho-ATM and phospho-ATR. Our results confirm the cytotoxic and pro-inflammatory potential of NiONPs. Moreover their ability in inducing DNA damage responses has been demonstrated. Such effects were present in A549 cells which internalize the NPs and BEAS-2B cells in which endocytosis has not been observed.

  7. Protective effect of grapefruit juice on the teratogenic and genotoxic damage induced by cadmium in mice.

    PubMed

    Argüelles, Nancy; Alvarez-González, Isela; Chamorro, Germán; Madrigal-Bujaidar, Eduardo

    2012-10-01

    In the present study, we injected pregnant mice at Day 7 of gestation with cadmium chloride (CC) (1.5 mg/kg) intraperitoneally and determined its effect on the frequency of fetal malformations at Day 17 of pregnancy. On the same day, we also determined the level of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MNPEs) and of micronucleated normochromatic erythrocytes (MNNEs) in blood cells of both the mothers and their fetuses. A significant increase in the number of malformations was found, mainly exencephaly, micrognathia, ablephary, microphthalmia, and clubfoot, as well as a significant increase in the amount of MNPEs and MNNEs. In addition, pregnant mice were administered grapefruit juice (GJ) orally from Days 0 to 17 of the experiment (from 200 to 800 μL/g) to evaluate the potential of the juice in preventing the damage induced by CC. We found a dose-dependent decrease in the number of visceral and skeletal malformations, as well as in the number of MNPEs and MNNEs, in both the mothers and their fetuses. Furthermore, we determined the level of DNA oxidation by measuring levels of the adduct 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, and we found a significant increase in such level induced by CC; in contrast, there was a significant decrease when we added GJ. Therefore, the observed teratogenic and genotoxic protection can probably be related with the antioxidant potential of GJ.

  8. Tartrazine induces structural and functional aberrations and genotoxic effects in vivo.

    PubMed

    Khayyat, Latifa; Essawy, Amina; Sorour, Jehan; Soffar, Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Tartrazine is a synthetic organic azo dye widely used in food and pharmaceutical products. The current study aimed to evaluate the possible adverse effect of this coloring food additive on renal and hepatic structures and functions. Also, the genotoxic potential of tartrazine on white blood cells was investigated using comet assay. Twenty adult male Wistar rats were grouped into two groups of 10 each, control- and tartrazine-treated groups. The control group was administered orally with water alone. The experimental group was administered orally with tartrazine (7.5 mg/kg, b.wt.). Our results showed a marked increase in the levels of ALT, AST, ALP, urea, uric acid, creatinine, MDA and NO, and a decreased level of total antioxidants in the serum of rats dosed with tartrazine compared to controls. On the other hand, administration of tartrazine was associated with severe histopathological and cellular alterations of rat liver and kidney tissues and induced DNA damage in leucocytes as detected by comet assay. Taken together, the results showed that tartrazine intake may lead to adverse health effects.

  9. Tartrazine induces structural and functional aberrations and genotoxic effects in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Khayyat, Latifa; Sorour, Jehan; Soffar, Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Tartrazine is a synthetic organic azo dye widely used in food and pharmaceutical products. The current study aimed to evaluate the possible adverse effect of this coloring food additive on renal and hepatic structures and functions. Also, the genotoxic potential of tartrazine on white blood cells was investigated using comet assay. Twenty adult male Wistar rats were grouped into two groups of 10 each, control- and tartrazine-treated groups. The control group was administered orally with water alone. The experimental group was administered orally with tartrazine (7.5 mg/kg, b.wt.). Our results showed a marked increase in the levels of ALT, AST, ALP, urea, uric acid, creatinine, MDA and NO, and a decreased level of total antioxidants in the serum of rats dosed with tartrazine compared to controls. On the other hand, administration of tartrazine was associated with severe histopathological and cellular alterations of rat liver and kidney tissues and induced DNA damage in leucocytes as detected by comet assay. Taken together, the results showed that tartrazine intake may lead to adverse health effects. PMID:28243541

  10. Investigation of the cytotoxic, genotoxic, and apoptosis-inducing effects of estragole isolated from fennel (Foeniculum vulgare).

    PubMed

    Villarini, Milena; Pagiotti, Rita; Dominici, Luca; Fatigoni, Cristina; Vannini, Samuele; Levorato, Sara; Moretti, Massimo

    2014-04-25

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate, in the HepG2 human hepatoma cell line, the in vitro cytotoxic, genotoxic, and apoptotic activities of estragole (1), contained in the essential oil of Foeniculum vulgare (fennel) and suspected to induce hepatic tumors in susceptible strains of mice. Toward this end, an MTT cytotoxicity assay, a trypan blue dye exclusion test, a double-staining (acridine orange and DAPI) fluorescence viability assay, a single-cell microgel-electrophoresis (comet) assay, a mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) assay, and a DNA fragmentation analysis were conducted. In terms of potential genotoxic effects, the comet assay indicated that estragole (1) was not able to induce DNA damage nor apoptosis under the experimental conditions used.

  11. Genotoxic effects of metronidazole.

    PubMed

    Elizondo, G; Gonsebatt, M E; Salazar, A M; Lares, I; Santiago, P; Herrera, J; Hong, E; Ostrosky-Wegman, P

    1996-09-13

    Metronidazole (MTZ) is an effective agent used in the treatment of parasitic infections. Its genotoxic effects have been shown in a variety of prokaryotic systems; however, negative results have been reported in human in vivo studies. Due to its wide spread use, a study was performed to evaluate the chromosomal aberration frequencies in peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures from 10 individuals, before and after metronidazole treatment. A significant increase in the percentage of cells with chromatid and isochromatid breaks was observed after metronidazole treatment (1500 mg per day for 10 days). The percentages of cells with aberrations did not correlate with the levels of MTZ found in plasma. Individual variability was observed with respect to both the induction of aberrations and the concentration of MTZ in plasma. They could represent differences at the metabolic level, since metronidazole is known to be biotransformed by a polymorphic P450 cytochrome, and its metabolites have shown mutagenic activity.

  12. Genotoxicity and cytotoxicity evaluation of oenothein B and its protective effect against mitomycin C-induced mutagenic action.

    PubMed

    Silva, Cinthia Aparecida; Silva, Carolina Ribeiro; Véras, Jefferson Hollanda; Chen-Chen, Lee; Ferri, Pedro Henrique; Santos, Suzana da Costa

    2014-06-01

    The natural product oenothein B (OeB), a dimeric macrocyclic ellagitannin, has a wide range of biological activities, such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-viral, antifungal, and antitumor. However, investigations concerning its genotoxicity have not been carried out. This study assessed the cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and protective effects of oenothein B using in vitro SOS-Inductest and in vivo mouse bone marrow micronucleus (MN) assay through oral and intraperitonial routes. In both assays oenothein B did not produce genotoxic effects in any of doses tested; in contrast, cytotoxic effect in cells was detected only in mice groups treated by both routes and exposed for 24 and 48h. Antigenotoxic and anticytotoxic activities of oenothein B were evaluated using both assays in combination with mitomycin C (MMC), a bioreductive alkylating agent. In the MN assay, a significant reduction was observed in MN frequency in all groups co-treated with MMC and OeB compared to those which received only MMC. Anticytotoxicity was observed in mice groups exposed to OeB and MMC for 24 and 48h. In the SOS-Inductest, oenothein B failed to show antigenotoxic and anticytotoxic effects; thus, it undoubtedly showed an in vivo protective activity against primary DNA damage induced by mitomycin C.

  13. Mechanisms of fiber-induced genotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Jaurand, M C

    1997-01-01

    The mechanisms of particle-induced genotoxicity have been investigated mainly with asbestos fibers. The results are summarized and discussed in this paper. DNA damage can be produced by oxidoreduction processes generated by fibers. The extent of damage yield depends on experimental conditions: if iron is present, either on fibers or in the medium, damage is increased. However, iron reactivity does not explain all the results obtained in cell-free systems, as breakage of plasmid DNA was not directly associated with the amount of iron released by the fibers. The proximity of DNA to the site of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is important because these species have an extremely short half-life. Damage to cellular DNA can be produced by oxidoreduction processes that originate from cells during phagocytosis. Secondary molecules that are more stable than ROS are probably involved in DNA damage. Oxidoreduction reactions originating from cells can induce mutations. Genotoxicity is also demonstrated by chromosomal damage associated with impaired mitosis, as evidenced by chromosome missegregation, spindle changes, alteration of cell cycle progression, formation of aneuploid and polyploid cells, and nuclear disruption. In some of these processes, the particle state and fiber dimensions are considered important parameters in the generation of genotoxic effects. PMID:9400703

  14. Genotoxic Effects Induced by Cd(+2), Cr(+6), Cu(+2) in the Gill and Liver of Odontesthes bonariensis (Piscies, Atherinopsidae).

    PubMed

    Gasulla, J; Picco, S J; Carriquiriborde, P; Dulout, F N; Ronco, A E; de Luca, J C

    2016-05-01

    Genotoxic effects of Cd(+2), Cr(+6), and Cu(+2) on the gill and liver of the Argentinean Silverside (Odontesthes bonariensis) were studied using the comet assay and in relation with the metal tissue accumulation. Fish were exposed to three waterborne concentrations of each metal for 2 and 16 days. Genotoxicity was assessed by the single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay). After 2 days, significant increase of the genetic damage index (GDI) was only observed in the gill of fish exposed to Cr(+6) and Cu(+2), and the LOECs were 2160 nM and 921.1 nM, respectively. The gill LOEC for Cd(+2) by 16 days was 9.4 nM. In the liver, LOECs were obtained only for Cd(+2) and Cr(+6) and were 9.4 and 2160 nM, respectively. The three metals were able to induce genotoxic effects at environmentally relevant concentrations and the gill was the most sensitive organ.

  15. Folk medicine Terminalia catappa and its major tannin component, punicalagin, are effective against bleomycin-induced genotoxicity in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, P S; Li, J H; Liu, T Y; Lin, T C

    2000-05-01

    Terminalia catappa L. is a popular folk medicine for preventing hepatoma and treating hepatitis in Taiwan. In this paper, we examined the protective effects of T. catappa leaf water extract (TCE) and its major tannin component, punicalagin, on bleomycin-induced genotoxicity in cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells. Pre-treatment with TCE or punicalagin prevented bleomycin-induced hgprt gene mutations and DNA strand breaks. TCE and punicalagin suppressed the generation of bleomycin-induced intracellular free radicals, identified as superoxides and hydrogen peroxides. The effectiveness of TCE and punicalagin against bleomycin-induced genotoxicity could be, at least in part, due to their antioxidative potentials.

  16. Effect of recombinant human erythropoietin on mitomycin C-induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity in rat kidney and heart tissues.

    PubMed

    Rjiba-Touati, K; Ayed-Boussema, I; Guedri, Y; Achour, A; Bacha, H; Abid-Essefi, S

    2016-01-01

    Mitomycin C (MMC) is an antineoplastic agent used for the treatment of several human malignancies. Nevertheless, the prolonged use of the drug may result in a serious heart and kidney injuries. Recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) has recently been shown to exert an important cytoprotective effect in experimental brain injury and ischemic acute renal failure. The aim of the present work is to investigate the cardioprotective and renoprotective effects of rhEPO against MMC-induced oxidative damage and genotoxicity. Our results showed that MMC induced oxidative stress and DNA damage. rhEPO administration in any treatment conditions decreased oxidative damage induced by MMC. It reduced malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl levels. rhEPO ameliorated reduced glutathione plus oxidized glutathione modulation and the increased catalase activity after MMC treatment. Furthermore, rhEPO restored DNA damage caused by MMC. We concluded that rhEPO administration especially in pretreatment condition protected rats against MMC-induced heart and renal oxidative stress and genotoxicity.

  17. Disperse Red 1 (textile dye) induces cytotoxic and genotoxic effects in mouse germ cells.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Fábio Henrique; Bustos-Obregon, Eduardo; Salvadori, Daisy Maria Fávero

    2015-06-01

    Disperse Red 1 (DR1), which is widely used in the textile industry, is an azo dye that contributes to the toxicity and pollution of wastewater. To assess the toxic effects of DR1 on reproduction, sexually mature male mice (Mus musculus, strain CF-1) were orally (gavage) treated with single doses of the compound at 20, 100 and 500 mg/kg body weight. Testicular features and sperm parameters were evaluated 8.3, 16.6 and 24.9 days after treatments. In addition to testicular toxicity caused by the dye, the data clearly showed an increased frequency of sperm with abnormal morphology and decreased fertility. An increased amount of DNA damage was also detected in testis cells 16.6 and 24.9 days after treatments with 100 and 500 mg/kg. This study demonstrated the toxic and genotoxic effects of DR1, indicating the harmful activity of this dye on reproductive health.

  18. Safrole-2',3'-oxide induces cytotoxic and genotoxic effects in HepG2 cells and in mice.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Su-yin; Lee, Pei-yi; Lai, Ming-tsung; Shen, Li-ching; Chung, Wen-sheng; Huang, Hui-fen; Wu, Kuen-yuh; Wu, Hsiu-ching

    2011-12-24

    Safrole-2',3'-oxide (SAFO) is a reactive electrophilic metabolite of the hepatocarcinogen safrole, the main component of sassafras oil. Safrole occurs naturally in a variety of spices and herbs, including the commonly used Chinese medicine Xi xin (Asari Radix et Rhizoma) and Dong quai (Angelica sinensis). SAFO is the most mutagenic metabolite of safrole tested in the Ames test. However, little or no data are available on the genotoxicity of SAFO in mammalian systems. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of SAFO in human HepG2 cells and male FVB mice. Using MTT assay, SAFO exhibited a dose- and time-dependent cytotoxic effect in HepG2 cells with TC(50) values of 361.9μM and 193.2μM after 24 and 48h exposure, respectively. In addition, treatment with SAFO at doses of 125μM and higher for 24h in HepG2 cells resulted in a 5.1-79.6-fold increase in mean Comet tail moment by the alkaline Comet assay and a 2.6-7.8-fold increase in the frequency of micronucleated binucleated cells by the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay. Furthermore, repeated intraperitoneal administration of SAFO (15, 30, 45, and 60mg/kg) to mice every other day for a total of twelve doses caused a significant dose-dependent increase in mean Comet tail moment in peripheral blood leukocytes (13.3-43.4-fold) and in the frequency of micronucleated reticulocytes (1.5-5.8-fold). Repeated administration of SAFO (60mg/kg) to mice caused liver lesions manifested as a rim of ballooning degeneration of hepatocytes immediately surrounding the central vein. Our data clearly demonstrate that SAFO significantly induced cytotoxicity, DNA strand breaks, micronuclei formation both in human cells in vitro and in mice. More studies are needed to explore the role SAFO plays in safrole-induced genotoxicity.

  19. Effect of β-carotene on catechol-induced genotoxicity in vitro: evidence of both enhanced and reduced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Åsgård, R; Hellman, B

    2013-09-01

    Intake of antioxidants from the diet has been recognized to have beneficial health effects, but the potential benefit of taking antioxidants such as β-carotene as supplements is controversial. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the potential protective effects of a physiologically relevant concentration (2 μM) of β-carotene on the DNA damaging effects of catechol in mouse lymphoma L5178Y cells. Two different exposure protocols were used: simultaneous exposure to β-carotene and catechol for 3 h; and exposure to catechol for 3 h after 18 h pre-treatment with the vitamin. DNA damage was evaluated using the comet assay (employing one procedure for general damage, and another procedure, which also included oxidative DNA damage). Independent of exposure protocol and procedure for comet assay, β-carotene did not increase the basal level of DNA damage. However, at the highest concentration of catechol (1 mM), β-carotene was found to clearly increase the level of catechol-induced DNA damage, especially in the pre-treated cells. Interestingly, an opposite effect was observed at lower concentrations of catechol, but the β-carotene related reduction of catechol-induced genotoxicity was significant (P < 0.05) only for the procedure including oxidative damage induced by 0.5 mM catechol. Taken together our results indicate that β- carotene can both reduce and enhance the DNA damaging effects of a genotoxic agent such as catechol. This indicates that it is the level of catechol-induced DNA damage that seems to determine whether β-carotene should be regarded as a beneficial or detrimental agent when it comes to its use as a dietary supplement.

  20. Carbamates: A study on genotoxic, cytotoxic, and apoptotic effects induced in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells.

    PubMed

    Soloneski, Sonia; Kujawski, Maciej; Scuto, Anna; Larramendy, Marcelo L

    2015-08-01

    In vitro effects of the carbamates pirimicarb and zineb and their formulations Aficida® (50% pirimicarb) and Azzurro® (70% zineb), respectively, were evaluated in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells. Whereas the cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus cytome assay was employed to test for genotoxicity, MTT, neutral red (NR), and apoptosis evaluation were used as tests for estimating cell viability and succinic dehydrogenase activity, respectively. Concentrations tested were 10-300 μg/ml for pirimicarb and Aficida®, and 1-50 μg/ml for zineb and Azzurro®. All compounds were able to increase the frequency of micronuclei. A marked reduction in the nuclear division index was observed after treatment with 5 μg/ml of zineb and Azzurro® and 10 μg/ml of Azzurro®. Alterations in the cellular morphology not allowing the recognition of binucleated cells exposed to 300 μg/ml pirimicarb and Aficida® as well as 10-50 μg/ml zineb and Azzurro®. All four compounds induced inhibition of both cell viability and succinic dehydrogenase activity and trigger apoptosis in CHO-K1 cells, at least when exposed for 24 h. The data herein demonstrate the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects exerted by these carbamates and reveal the potential risk factor of these pesticides, still extensively used worldwide, for both human health and the environment.

  1. In vivo protective effect of Uridine, a pyrimidine nucleoside, on genotoxicity induced by Levodopa/Carbidopa in mice.

    PubMed

    Orenlili Yaylagul, Esra; Cansev, Mehmet; Celikler Kasimogullari, Serap

    2015-08-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder that affects millions of people all over the world. Motor symptoms of PD are most commonly controlled by L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (Levodopa, L-DOPA), a precursor of dopamine, plus a peripherally-acting aromatic-L-amino-acid decarboxylase (dopa decarboxylase) inhibitor, such as carbidopa. However, chronic treatment with a combination of Levodopa plus carbidopa has been demonstrated to cause a major complication, namely abnormal involuntary movements. On the other hand, the effect of this treatment on bone marrow cells is unknown. Therefore, in this study, we aimed to investigate possible genotoxic effects of Levodopa and Carbidopa using male Balb/C mice. Our results showed that Levodopa alone or in combination with carbidopa caused genotoxicity in in vivo micronucleus test (mouse bone marrow) and Comet assay (blood cells). Furthermore, we showed that simultaneous administration of uridine, a pyrimidine nucleoside, reversed the genotoxic effect of Levodopa and Carbidopa in both assays. Our data show for the first time that Levodopa plus carbidopa combination causes genotoxicity which is reversed by uridine treatment. These findings might enhance our understanding for the complications of a common Parkinson's treatment and confer benefit in terms of reducing a possible genotoxic effect of this treatment.

  2. Modulatory effects of catechin hydrate against genotoxicity, oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis induced by benzo(a)pyrene in mice.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Ayaz; Ali, Rashid; Ali, Nemat; Hasan, Syed Kazim; Bernwal, Preeti; Afzal, Shekh Mohammad; Vafa, Abul; Sultana, Sarwat

    2016-06-01

    Benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P], a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) is a strong mutagen and potent carcinogen. The aim of the present study was to investigate the efficacy of catechin hydrate against B(a)P induced genotoxicity, oxidative stress, inflammation, apoptosis and to explore its underlying molecular mechanisms in the lungs of Swiss albino mice. Administration of B(a)P (125 mg/kg b. wt., p. o.) increased the activities of toxicity markers such as LPO, LDH and B(a)P metabolizing enzymes [NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (CYPOR) and microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH)] with subsequent decrease in the activities of tissue anti-oxidant armory (SOD, CAT, GPx, GR, GST, QR and GSH). It also caused DNA damage and activation of apoptotic and inflammatory pathway by upregulation of TNF-α, IL-6, NF-kB, COX-2, p53, bax, caspase-3 and down regulating Bcl-2. However, pre-treatment with catechin at a dose of 20 and 40 mg/kg significantly decreased LDH, LPO, B(a)P metabolizing enzymes and increased anti-oxidant armory as well as regulated apoptosis and inflammation in lungs. Histological results also supported the protective effects of catechin. The findings of the present studies suggested that catechin as an effective natural product attenuates B(a)P induced lung toxicity.

  3. Effect of probiotic fermented milk and chlorophyllin on gene expressions and genotoxicity during AFB₁-induced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Verma, Vinod; Nagpal, Ravinder; Kumar, Ashok; Gautam, Sanjeev K; Behare, Pradip V; Grover, Chand R; Aggarwal, Praveen K

    2011-12-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the chemopreventive effect of probiotic fermented milk and chlorophyllin on aflatoxin B₁ (AFB₁) induced hepatocellular carcinoma. In vivo trials were conducted on 200 Wistar rats allocated to eight groups. Rats in the positive control group were given intraperitoneal injection of aflatoxin B₁ at 450 μg/kg body weight twice a week for 6 weeks. The rats were sacrificed and dissected at 25th week of the experiment, and comet assay was carried out in hepatic cells to assess the genotoxicity or DNA damage. The tumour incidence was decreased by approximately one-third than AFB₁ control group. The expression of c-myc bax, bcl-2, cyclin D1, p53 and rasp-21 genes was also studied. A significant (P<0.05) reduction in DNA damage was observed in probiotic fermented milk with chlorophyllin group as compared to aflatoxin B₁ control group. The c-myc, bcl-2, cyclin D1 and rasp-21 level was found to be highest in AFB₁ control group as compared to the treatment group. The results advocate the enhanced protective potential of probiotic fermented milk and chlorophyllin against AFB₁-induced molecular alterations in hepatic cells during carcinogenesis.

  4. Differential effect of manool--a diterpene from Salvia officinalis, on genotoxicity induced by methyl methanesulfonate in V79 and HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Nicolella, Heloiza Diniz; de Oliveira, Pollyanna Francielli; Munari, Carla Carolina; Costa, Gizela Faleiros Dias; Moreira, Monique Rodrigues; Veneziani, Rodrigo Cassio Sola; Tavares, Denise Crispim

    2014-10-01

    Salvia officinalis (sage) is a perennial woody subshrub native to the Mediterranean region that is commonly used as a condiment and as an anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and antimicrobial agent due to its biological activities. Manool is the most abundant micro-metabolite found in Salvia officinalis essential oils and extracts. We therefore decided to evaluate the cytotoxic, genotoxic and antigenotoxic potential of manool in Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts (V79) and human hepatoma cells (HepG2). Cytotoxicity was assessed by the colony-forming assay in V79 cells and toxic effects were observed at concentrations of up to 8.0 μg/mL. The micronucleus test was used to evaluate the genotoxicity and antigenotoxicity of manool in V79 and HepG2 cells at concentrations of 0.5-6.0 μg/mL and 0.5-8.0 μg/mL, respectively. For evaluation of antigenotoxicity, the concentrations of manool were combined with methyl methanesulfonate (MMS, 44 μg/mL). The results showed a significant increase in the frequency of micronuclei in cultures of both cell lines treated with the highest concentration tested, demonstrating a genotoxic effect. On the other hand, manool exhibited a protective effect against chromosome damage induced by MMS in HepG2 cells, but not in V79 cells. These data suggest that some manool metabolite may be responsible for the antigenotoxic effect observed in HepG2 cells.

  5. Hoechst 33342 stain and u.v. laser exposure do not induce genotoxic effects in flow-sorted boar spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Parrilla, I; Vázquez, J M; Cuello, C; Gil, M A; Roca, J; Di Berardino, D; Martínez, E A

    2004-11-01

    Sex selection by flow cytometry/cell sorting involves the staining of spermatozoa with Hoechst 33342 in combination with the impact of a u.v. laser beam, two potentially mutagenic agents. A phenotypic and cytogenetic study of lymphocytes of piglets born after insemination with spermatozoa stained with Hoechst 33342 and from piglets obtained from stain-sorted spermatozoa was performed to evaluate the genotoxic effect of Hoechst 33342 staining and u.v. laser irradiation on the offspring. Lymphocytes from piglets born after insemination with unstained spermatozoa, but from the same ejaculate, were used as a control group. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from these piglets were cultured following a standard cell culture protocol. Cells were then collected by centrifugation, subjected to hypotonic solution and fixed and dropped onto slides. Sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) and chromosome aberrations (CAs: including chromosome and chromatid breaks) per cell were scored in 50-s division metaphase spreads from each donor. Reproductive parameters and litter performance of all inseminations performed were also recorded in all groups. Data were analyzed by ANOVA. No significant increase (P > 0.05) of SCE and CA frequencies were observed in piglets born from stained spermatozoa or from stain-sorted spermatozoa with respect to controls (untreated sperm). The results indicated that no mutagenic effect on spermatozoa, expressed as increases in the incidence of abnormalities in the resulting offspring and also as increases in SCE and CA frequencies on lymphocytes from these individuals, was induced by the staining of boar spermatozoa with Hoechst 33342, nor by combination of staining with laser impact during flow cytometry.

  6. Comparison of the genotoxic effects induced by 50 Hz extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields and 1800 MHz radiofrequency electromagnetic fields in GC-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Duan, Weixia; Liu, Chuan; Zhang, Lei; He, Mindi; Xu, Shangcheng; Chen, Chunhai; Pi, Huifeng; Gao, Peng; Zhang, Yanwen; Zhong, Min; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou

    2015-03-01

    Extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) and radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) have been considered to be possibly carcinogenic to humans. However, their genotoxic effects remain controversial. To make experiments controllable and results comparable, we standardized exposure conditions and explored the potential genotoxicity of 50 Hz ELF-EMF and 1800 MHz RF-EMF. A mouse spermatocyte-derived GC-2 cell line was intermittently (5 min on and 10 min off) exposed to 50 Hz ELF-EMF at an intensity of 1, 2 or 3 mT or to RF-EMF in GSM-Talk mode at the specific absorption rates (SAR) of 1, 2 or 4 W/kg. After exposure for 24 h, we found that neither ELF-EMF nor RF-EMF affected cell viability using Cell Counting Kit-8. Through the use of an alkaline comet assay and immunofluorescence against γ-H2AX foci, we found that ELF-EMF exposure resulted in a significant increase of DNA strand breaks at 3 mT, whereas RF-EMF exposure had insufficient energy to induce such effects. Using a formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG)-modified alkaline comet assay, we observed that RF-EMF exposure significantly induced oxidative DNA base damage at a SAR value of 4 W/kg, whereas ELF-EMF exposure did not. Our results suggest that both ELF-EMF and RF-EMF under the same experimental conditions may produce genotoxicity at relative high intensities, but they create different patterns of DNA damage. Therefore, the potential mechanisms underlying the genotoxicity of different frequency electromagnetic fields may be different.

  7. The modifying effect of selenium and vitamins A, C, and E on the genotoxicity induced by sunset yellow in male mice.

    PubMed

    Sayed, Hanaa M; Fouad, Dalia; Ataya, Farid S; Hassan, Nagwa H A; Fahmy, Maha A

    2012-05-15

    The use of food additives in various products is growing up. It has attracted the attention towards the possible correlation between the mutagenic potential of food additives and various human diseases. This work evaluated the protective role of selenium and vitamins A, C and E (selenium ACE)(1) against the genotoxic effects induced by a synthetic food additive, sunset yellow, in mice. Six groups were studied including two control groups (negative and positive control), two groups are given single dose of sunset yellow (either 0.325, 0.65 or 1.3mg/kg body weight(2) alone or with selenium ACE) and two groups are given sunset yellow daily for 1, 2 or 3 weeks (0.325mg/kg b.wt./day alone or with selenium ACE), respectively. The study examined the induction of sister chromatid exchanges (SCE's)(3) in bone-marrow cells, chromosomal aberration in somatic (bone-marrow) and germ cells (spermatocytes) after single and repeated oral treatment, and the induction of morphological sperm abnormalities. The results showed that sunset yellow had genotoxic effects as indicated by increased frequency of SCE's, by chromosomal aberrations in both somatic and germ cells, and by increased morphological sperm abnormalities and DNA fragmentation. The results also indicated that the oral administration of selenium ACE significantly reduced the genotoxic effects of sunset yellow, a result that may support the use of antioxidants as chemopreventive agents in many applications.

  8. Dexrazoxane mitigates epirubicin-induced genotoxicity in mice bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Attia, Sabry M; Ahmad, Sheikh F; Saquib, Quaiser; Harisa, Gamaleldin I; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A; Bakheet, Saleh A

    2016-03-01

    Dexrazoxane is the only clinically approved cardioprotectant against anthracyclines-induced cardiotoxicity. Thus, detailed evaluation of the genotoxic potential of dexrazoxane and anthracyclines combination is essential to provide more insights into genotoxic and anti-genotoxic alterations that may play a role in the development of the secondary malignancies after treatment with anthracyclines. Thus, our aim was to determine whether non-genotoxic doses of dexrazoxane in combination with the anthracycline, epirubicin can modulate epirubicin-induced genotoxicity and apoptosis in somatic cells. Bone marrow micronucleus test complemented with fluorescence in situ hybridization assay and comet assay were performed to assess the genotoxicity of dexrazoxane and/or epirubicin. Apoptosis was analysed by using the annexin V assay and the occurrence of the hypodiploid DNA content. Generation of reactive oxygen species was also assessed in bone marrow by using the oxidant-sensing fluorescent probe 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate. Dexrazoxane was neither genotoxic nor apoptogenic in mice at a single dose of 75 or 150mg/kg. Moreover, it has been shown that dexrazoxane affords significant protection against epirubicin-induced genotoxicity and apoptosis in the bone marrow cells in a dose-dependent manner. Epirubicin induced marked generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species and prior administration of dexrazoxane ahead of epirubicin challenge ameliorated accumulation of these free radicals. It is thus concluded that dexrazoxane can be safely combined with epirubicin and that pre-treatment with dexrazoxane attenuates epirubicin-induced generation of reactive oxygen species and subsequent genotoxicity and apoptosis. Thus, epirubicin-induced genotoxicity can be effectively mitigated by using dexrazoxane.

  9. DNA damage and oxidative stress induced by CeO2 nanoparticles in human dermal fibroblasts: Evidence of a clastogenic effect as a mechanism of genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Benameur, Laila; Auffan, Mélanie; Cassien, Mathieu; Liu, Wei; Culcasi, Marcel; Rahmouni, Hidayat; Stocker, Pierre; Tassistro, Virginie; Bottero, Jean-Yves; Rose, Jérôme; Botta, Alain; Pietri, Sylvia

    2015-01-01

    The broad range of applications of cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles (nano-CeO2) has attracted industrial interest, resulting in greater exposures to humans and environmental systems in the coming years. Their health effects and potential biological impacts need to be determined for risk assessment. The aims of this study were to gain insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the genotoxic effects of nano-CeO2 in relation with their physicochemical properties. Primary human dermal fibroblasts were exposed to environmentally relevant doses of nano-CeO2 (mean diameter, 7 nm; dose range, 6 × 10(-5)-6 × 10(-3) g/l corresponding to a concentration range of 0.22-22 µM) and DNA damages at the chromosome level were evaluated by genetic toxicology tests and compared to that induced in cells exposed to micro-CeO2 particles (mean diameter, 320 nm) under the same conditions. For this purpose, cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay in association with immunofluorescence staining of centromere protein A in micronuclei were used to distinguish between induction of structural or numerical chromosome changes (i.e. clastogenicity or aneuploidy). The results provide the first evidence of a genotoxic effect of nano-CeO2, (while not significant with micro-CeO2) by a clastogenic mechanism. The implication of oxidative mechanisms in this genotoxic effect was investigated by (i) assessing the impact of catalase, a hydrogen peroxide inhibitor, and (ii) by measuring lipid peroxidation and glutathione status and their reversal by application of N-acetylcysteine, a precusor of glutathione synthesis in cells. The data are consistent with the implication of free radical-related mechanisms in the nano-CeO2-induced clastogenic effect, that can be modulated by inhibition of cellular hydrogen peroxide release.

  10. Effectiveness of activated carbon and Egyptian montmorillonite in the protection against deoxynivalenol-induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Wahhab, Mosaad A; El-Kady, Ahmed A; Hassan, Aziza M; Abd El-Moneim, Omaima M; Abdel-Aziem, Sekena H

    2015-09-01

    This study was conducted to prepare and characterize activated carbon (AC) and to evaluate its protective effect against deoxynivalenol (DON) toxicity in rats compared to Egyptian montmorillonite (EM). AC was prepared using a single-step chemical activation with phosphoric acid (H3PO4). The resulted AC has a high surface area and a high total pore volume. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 6 groups (n = 10) and treated for 3 weeks as follow: the control group, the groups fed AC or EM-supplemented diet (0.5% w/w), the group treated orally with DON (5 mg/kg b.w.) and the groups fed AC or EM-supplemented diet and treated with DON. Blood and liver samples were collected for different analyses. Treatment with DON increased liver function enzymes, lipid peroxidation, tumor necrosis factor α, DNA fragmentation, decreased hepatic glutathione content, up regulating mRNA Fas and TNF-α genes expression and increased micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes and normochromatic erythrocytes in bone marrow. Co-treatment of DON plus AC or EM succeeded to normalize the levels of the biochemical parameters, reduced the cytotoxicity of bone marrow and ameliorated the hepatic genotoxicity. Moreover, AC was more effective than EM and has a high affinity to adsorb DON and to reduce its cytotoxicity and genotoxicity.

  11. Chemopreventive effects of (-)-hinokinin against 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced genotoxicity and preneoplastic lesions in rat colon.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Lilian C; Furtado, Ricardo A; Bertanha, Humberto C C; Tomazella, Iara M; Costa, Eveline S; Bastos, Jairo K; Andrade e Silva, Márcio L; Tavares, Denise C

    2014-10-24

    (-)-Hinokinin (1) is a dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan obtained by the partial synthesis of (-)-cubebin. This study reports the antigenotoxic and anticarcinogenic potential of 1 by the comet and aberrant crypt focus assays in the peripheral blood and colon of 4-5-week-old Wistar rats, respectively. The rats were exposed to 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (40 mg/kg) and were treated by gavage with doses of 10, 20, and 40 mg/kg of 1. The results showed that the dose of 40 mg/kg was neither genotoxic nor carcinogenic. In the comet assay, all 1 doses displayed antigenotoxic effects. In addition, this compound (20 and 40 mg/kg) exhibited an anticarcinogenic effect in the aberrant crypt focus assay.

  12. Chemopreventive effects of Furan-2-yl-3-pyridin-2-yl-propenone against 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-inducible genotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Yong Pil; Han, Eun Hee; Choi, Jae Ho; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Lee, Kyung Jin; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Lee, Eung Seok; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2008-05-01

    1-Furan-2-yl-3-pyridin-2-yl-propenone (FPP-3) is an anti-inflammatory agent with a propenone moiety and chemically synthesized recently. In this study, we examined the chemopreventive effect of FPP-3 on 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced genotoxicity in MCF-7 cells. FPP-3 reduced the formation of the DMBA-DNA adduct. DMBA-induced CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 gene expression and enzyme activity were inhibited by FPP-3. It inhibited DMBA-induced aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) transactivation and DMBA-inducible nuclear localization of the AhR. Induction of detoxifying phase II genes by chemopreventive agents represents a coordinated protective response against oxidative stress and neoplastic effects of carcinogens. Transcription factor NF-E2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) regulates antioxidant response element (ARE) of phase II detoxifying and antioxidant enzymes, such as glutathione S-transferase (GST) and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (QR). FPP-3 increased the expression and enzymatic activity of GST and QR. Moreover, FPP-3 increased transcriptional activity of GST and QR. GST and QR induction and Nrf2 translocation by FPP-3 were blocked by the PKC inhibitor Goe6983, and the p38 inhibitor SB203580. These results reflected a partial role of PKC{delta} and p38 signaling in FPP-3-mediated GSTA and QR induction through nuclear translocation of Nrf2. Classically, chemopreventive agents either inhibit CYP metabolizing enzyme or induce phase II detoxifying enzymes. These results suggest that FPP-3 has a potent protective effect against DMBA-induced genotoxicity through modulating phase I and II enzymes and that it has potential as a chemopreventive agent.

  13. Ameliorative effects of thyme and calendula extracts alone or in combination against aflatoxins-induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Aziem, Sekena H; Hassan, Aziza M; El-Denshary, Ezzeldein S; Hamzawy, Mohamed A; Mannaa, Fathia A; Abdel-Wahhab, Mosaad A

    2014-05-01

    The aims of the current work were to evaluate the hepatoprotective effect of calendula flowers and/or thyme leave extracts on aflatoxins (AFs)-induced oxidative stress, genotoxicity and alteration of p53 bax and bcl2 gene expressions. Eighty male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into eight equal groups including: the control group, the group fed AFs-contaminated diet (2.5 mg/kg diet) for 5 weeks, the groups treated orally with thyme and/or calendula extract (0.5 g/kg b.w) for 6 weeks and the groups pretreated orally with thyme and/or calendula extract 1 week before and during AFs treatment for further 5 weeks. Blood, liver and bone marrow samples were collected for biochemical analysis, gene expression, DNA fragmentation and micronucleus assay. The results showed that AFs induced significant alterations in oxidative stress markers, increased serum AFP and inflammatory cytokine, percentage of DNA fragmentation, the expression of pro-apoptotic gene p53 and bax accompanied with a decrease in the expression of bcl2. Animals treated with the extracts 1 week before AFs treatment showed a significant decrease in oxidative damage markers, micronucleated cells, DNA fragmentation and modulation of the expression of pro-apoptotic genes. These results suggested that both calendula and thyme extracts had anti-genotoxic effects due to their higher content of total phenolic compounds.

  14. Chemopreventive effects of silymarin against 1,2-dimethylhydrazine plus dextran sodium sulfate-induced inflammation-associated carcinogenicity and genotoxicity in the colon of gpt delta rats.

    PubMed

    Toyoda-Hokaiwado, Naomi; Yasui, Yumiko; Muramatsu, Mina; Masumura, Kenichi; Takamune, Makiko; Yamada, Masami; Ohta, Toshihiro; Tanaka, Takuji; Nohmi, Takehiko

    2011-10-01

    Silymarin, a natural flavonoid from the seeds of milk thistle, is used for chemoprevention against various cancers in clinical settings and in experimental models. To examine the chemopreventive mechanisms of silymarin against colon cancer, we investigated suppressive effects of silymarin against carcinogenicity and genotoxicity induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) plus dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) in the colon of F344 gpt delta transgenic rats. Male gpt delta rats were given a single subcutaneous injection of 40 mg/kg DMH and followed by 1.5% DSS in drinking water for a week. They were fed diets containing silymarin for 4 weeks, starting 1 week before DMH injection and samples were collected at 4, 20 and 32 weeks after the DMH treatment. Silymarin at doses of 100 and 500 p.p.m. suppressed the tumor formation in a dose-dependent manner and the reduction was statistically significant. In the mutation assays, DMH plus DSS enhanced the gpt mutant frequency (MF) in the colon, and the silymarin treatments reduced the MFs by 20%. Silymarin also reduced the genotoxicity of DMH in a dose-dependent manner in bacterial mutation assay with Salmonella typhimurium YG7108, a sensitive strain to alkylating agents, and the maximum reduction was >80%. These results suggest that silymarin is chemopreventive against DMH/DSS-induced inflammation-associated colon carcinogenesis and silymarin might act as an antigenotoxic agent, in part.

  15. Tempol protects human lymphocytes from genotoxicity induced by cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    Khabour, Omar F; Alzoubi, Karem H; Mfady, Doa’a S; Alasseiri, Mohammed; Hasheesh, Taghrid F

    2014-01-01

    The use of cisplatin in treatments of human malignancies is limited by its side effects that include DNA damage and the subsequent risk of developing secondary cancer. In this study, we examined the possible protective effect of Tempol against DNA damage induced by cisplatin in human lymphocytes using chromosomal aberrations (CAs) and sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) assays. Cisplatin induced significant elevation in the frequencies of CAs and SCEs in cultured human lymphocytes (P < 0.01). Treatment of lymphocytes with Tempol significantly lowered CAs and SCEs induced by cisplatin. Tempol alone did not affect spontaneous levels of SCEs and CAs observed in the control group (P > 0.05). In conclusion, Tempol protects human lymphocytes against genotoxicity induced by the anticancer drug cisplatin. PMID:24955171

  16. Assessment of isorhamnetin 3-O-neohesperidoside from Acacia salicina: protective effects toward oxidation damage and genotoxicity induced by aflatoxin B1 and nifuroxazide.

    PubMed

    Bouhlel, Ines; Limem, Ilef; Skandrani, Ines; Nefatti, Aicha; Ghedira, Kamel; Dijoux-Franca, Marie-Genevieve; Leila, Chekir-Ghedira

    2010-08-01

    Antioxidant activity of isorhamnetin 3-O-neohesperidoside, isolated from the leaves of Acacia salicina, was determined by the ability of this compound to inhibit xanthine oxidase activity and to scavenge the free radical 2,2'-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS(.-)) diammonium salt. Antigenotoxic activity was assessed using the SOS chromotest assay. This compound has the ability to scavenge the ABTS(.+) radical by a hydrogen donating mechanism. We also envisaged the study of the antioxidant effect of this compound by the enzymatic xanthine/xanthine oxidase (X/XOD) assay. Results indicated that isorhamnetin 3-O-neohesperidoside was a potent inhibitor of xanthine oxidase and superoxide anion scavengers. Moreover, this compound induced an inhibitory activity against nifuroxazide and aflatoxine B1 (AFB1) induced genotoxicity. Taken together, these observations provide evidence that isorhamnetin 3-O-neohesperidoside isolated from the leaves of A. salicina is able to protect cells against the consequences of oxidative stress.

  17. Nongenotoxic effects and a reduction of the DXR-induced genotoxic effects of Helianthus annuus Linné (sunflower) seeds revealed by micronucleus assays in mouse bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This research evaluated the genotoxicity of oil and tincture of H. annuus L. seeds using the micronucleus assay in bone marrow of mice. The interaction between these preparations and the genotoxic effects of doxorubicin (DXR) was also analysed (antigenotoxicity test). Methods Experimental groups were evaluated at 24-48 h post treatment with N-Nitroso-N-ethylurea (positive control – NEU), DXR (chemotherapeutic), NaCl (negative control), a sunflower tincture (THALS) and two sources of sunflower oils (POHALS and FOHALS). Antigenotoxic assays were carried out using the sunflower tincture and oils separately and in combination with NUE or DXR. Results For THALS, analysis of the MNPCEs showed no significant differences between treatment doses (250–2,000 mg.Kg-1) and NaCl. A significant reduction in MNPCE was observed when THALS (2,000 mg.Kg-1) was administered in combination with DXR (5 mg.Kg-1). For POHALS or FOHALS, analysis of the MNPCEs also showed no significant differences between treatment doses (250–2,000 mg.Kg-1) and NaCl. However, the combination DXR + POHALS (2,000 mg.Kg-1) or DXR + FOHALS (2,000 mg.Kg-1) not contributed to the MNPCEs reduction. Conclusions This research suggests absence of genotoxicity of THALS, dose-, time- and sex-independent, and its combination with DXR can reduce the genotoxic effects of DXR. POHALS and FOHALS also showed absence of genotoxicity, but their association with DXR showed no antigenotoxic effects. PMID:24694203

  18. Laser pyrolysis products: sampling procedures, cytotoxic and genotoxic effects.

    PubMed

    Stocker, B; Meier, T; Fliedner, T M; Plappert, U

    1998-01-30

    The use of lasers in medical applications has grown enormously in the last few years. Recent chemical analysis of the laser pyrolysis products revealed that aerosols generated by pyrolytic decomposition of tissue could be health hazards. Therefore we analysed the genotoxic and mutagenic effects of laser pyrolysis products from different types of porcine tissue. The tissues were irradiated with a surgical CO2 laser and the generated aerosols were sampled as particulate fractions as well as low and highly volatile fractions. Then human leukocytes were incubated with the pyrolysis products and subjected to the comet assay. The results of the comet assay indicated the pyrolysis products being inducers of DNA damage. The ability to induce genotoxic effects turned out to be strongly dependent on the type of tissue that had been irradiated during laser treatment. To check whether the pyrolysis products also have mutagenic properties the Salmonella mutagenicity assay was performed. The particulate aerosol fractions of skin, muscle tissue and liver tissue clearly proved to be mutagenic in TA98 in the presence of S9 mix. There was no mutagenic effect detectable without metabolic activation. In conclusion, our experiments showed that the laser pyrolysis products originating from porcine tissues induced very potent genotoxic as well as mutagenic effects and therefore they could be potential health hazards for humans.

  19. Protective effect of cactus cladode extract against cisplatin induced oxidative stress, genotoxicity and apoptosis in balb/c mice: combination with phytochemical composition

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cis-Platinum (II) (cis-diammine dichloroplatinum; CDDP) is a potent antitumor compound widely used for the treatment of many malignancies. An important side-effect of CDDP is nephrotoxicity. The cytotoxic action of this drug is often thought to induce oxidative stress and be associated with its ability to bind DNA to form CDDP–DNA adducts and apoptosis in kidney cells. In this study, the protective effect of cactus cladode extract (CCE) against CDDP-induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity were investigated in mice. We also looked for levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), catalase activity, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, chromosome aberrations (CA) test, SOS Chromotest, expressions of p53, bax and bcl2 in kidney and we also analyzed several parameters of renal function markers toxicity such as serum biochemical analysis. Methods Adult, healthy balb/c (20–25 g) male mice aged of 4–5 weeks were pre-treated by intraperitonial administration of CCE (50 mg/Kg.b.w) for 2 weeks. Control animals were treated 3 days a week for 4 weeks by intraperitonial administration of 100 μg/Kg.b.w CDDP. Animals which treated by CDDP and CCE were divided into two groups: the first group was administrated CCE 2 hours before each treatment with CDDP 3 days a week for 4 weeks. The second group was administrated without pre-treatment with CCE but this extract was administrated 24 hours after each treatment with CDDP 3 days a week for 4 weeks. Results Our results showed that CDDP induced significant alterations in all tested oxidative stress markers. In addition it induced CA in bone morrow cells, increased the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins p53 and bax and decreased the expression of anti-apoptotic protein bcl2 in kidney. On the other hand, CDDP significantly increased the levels of urea and creatinine and decreased the levels of albumin and total protein.The treatment of CCE before or after treatment with CDDP showed, (i) a total reduction

  20. Exercise preconditioning modulates genotoxicity induced by doxorubicin in multiple organs of rats.

    PubMed

    Martins, Renato Almeida; Minari, André Luis; Chaves, Marcelo Donizetti; dos Santos, Ronaldo Wagner Thomatieli; Barbisan, Luis Fernando; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of exercise in multiple organs of rats treated with doxorubicin. Male adult Wistar rats were distributed into the following groups: sedentary + NaCl; exercise + NaCl; sedentary + doxorubicin; and exercise + doxorubicin. Animals were sacrificed 2 days following injections. Central fragments from heart, liver, and kidney were collected and minced in 0.9% NaCl being cellular suspensions used for the single-cell gel (comet) assay. The results showed that exercise was able to prevent genotoxicity induced by doxorubicin in heart cells. By contrast, exercise was not able to prevent genotoxicity induced by doxorubicin in liver cells. The same occurred to kidney cells, i.e. no statistically significant differences (p > 0.05) were found when compared with groups not exposed to doxorubicin. Taken together, our results support the idea that exercise could contribute to the protective effect against genotoxicity induced by doxorubicin in heart cells.

  1. Effects of cellular non-protein sulfhydryl depletion in radiation induced oncogenic transformation and genotoxicity in mouse C/sub 3/H 10T1/2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hei, T.K.; Geard, C.R.; Hall, E.J.

    1984-08-01

    A study was made of the effects of cellular non-protein sulfhydryl (NPSH) depletion on cytotoxicity, cell cycle kinetics, oncogenic transformation and sister chromatid exchange (SCE) in C/sub 3/H 10T1/2 cells. Using DL-Buthionine S-R-Sulfoximine (BSO) to deplete thiols, it was found spectrophotometrically that less than 5% of control NPSH level remained in the cells after 24-hour treatment under aerated conditions. Such NPSH depleted cells, when subject to a 3 Gy ..gamma..-ray treatment, were found to have no radiosensitizing response either in terms of cell survival or oncogenic transformation. In addition, decreased levels of NPSH had no effect on spontaneous or radiation-induced SCE nor were cell cycle kinetics additionally altered. Therefore, the inability of NPSH depletion to alter ..gamma..-ray induced cellular transformation was unrelated to any possible effect of BSO on the cell cycle. These results suggest that such depletion may result in little or no additional oncogenic or genotoxic effects on aerated normal tissues.

  2. Genotoxic effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heim, Julia; Felder, Eva; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz; Kaltbeitzel, Anke; Heinrich, Ulf Ruediger; Brochhausen, Christoph; Mailänder, Volker; Tremel, Wolfgang; Brieger, Juergen

    2015-05-01

    The potential toxicity of nanoparticles has currently provoked public and scientific discussions, and attempts to develop generally accepted handling procedures for nanoparticles are under way. The investigation of the impact of nanoparticles on human health is overdue and reliable test systems accounting for the special properties of nanomaterials must be developed. Nanoparticular zinc oxide (ZnO) may be internalised through ambient air or the topical application of cosmetics, only to name a few, with unpredictable health effects. Therefore, we analysed the determinants of ZnO nanoparticle (NP) genotoxicity. ZnO NPs (15-18 nm in diameter) were investigated at concentrations of 0.1, 10 and 100 μg mL-1 using the cell line A549. Internalised NPs were only infrequently detectable by TEM, but strongly increased Zn2+ levels in the cytoplasm and even more in the nuclear fraction, as measured by atom absorption spectroscopy, indicative of an internalised zinc and nuclear accumulation. We observed a time and dosage dependent reduction of cellular viability after ZnO NP exposure. ZnCl2 exposure to cells induced similar impairments of cellular viability. Complexation of Zn2+ with diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) resulted in the loss of toxicity of NPs, indicating the relevant role of Zn2+ for ZnO NP toxicity. Foci analyses showed the induction of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) by ZnO NPs and increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Treatment of the cells with the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) resulted in strongly decreased intracellular ROS levels and reduced DNA damage. However, a slow increase of ROS after ZnO NP exposure and reduced but not quashed DSBs after NAC-treatment suggest that Zn2+ may exert genotoxic activities without the necessity of preceding ROS-induction. Our data indicate that ZnO NP toxicity is a result of cellular Zn2+ intake. Subsequently increased ROS-levels cause DNA damage. However, we found evidence for

  3. Genotoxic and mutagenic effects of sewage sludge on higher plants.

    PubMed

    Corrêa Martins, Maria Nilza; de Souza, Victor Ventura; Souza, Tatiana da Silva

    2016-02-01

    Sewage treatment yields sludge, which is often used as a soil amendment in agriculture and crop production. Although the sludge contains elevated concentrations of macro and micronutrients, high levels of inorganic and organic compounds with genotoxic and mutagenic properties are present in sludge. Application of sludge in agriculture is a pathway for direct contact of crops to toxic chemicals. The objective of this study was to compile information related to the genotoxic and mutagenic effects of sewage sludge in different plant species. In addition, data are presented on toxicological effects in animals fed with plants grown in soils supplemented with sewage sludge. Despite the benefits of using sewage sludge as organic fertilizer, the data showcased in this review suggest that this residue can induce genetic damage in plants. This review alerts potential risks to health outcomes after the intake of food cultivated in sewage sludge-amended soils.

  4. Protective effects of garlic sulfur compounds against DNA damage induced by direct- and indirect-acting genotoxic agents in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Belloir, C; Singh, V; Daurat, C; Siess, M H; Le Bon, A M

    2006-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the antigenotoxic activity of several garlic organosulfur compounds (OSC) in the human hepatoma cell line HepG2, using comet assay. The OSC selected were allicin (DADSO), diallyl sulfide (DAS), diallyl disulfide (DADS), S-allyl cysteine (SAC) and allyl mercaptan (AM). To explore their potential mechanisms of action, two approaches were performed: (i) a pre-treatment protocol which allowed study of the possible modulation of drug metabolism enzymes by OSC before treatment of the cells with the genotoxic agent; (ii) a co-treatment protocol by which the ability of OSC to scavenge direct-acting compounds was assessed. Preliminary studies showed that, over the concentration range tested (5-100 microM), the studied OSC neither affected cell viability nor induced DNA damage by themselves. In the pre-treatment protocol, aflatoxin B1 genotoxicity was significantly reduced by all the OSC tested except AM. DADS was the most efficient OSC in reducing benzo(a)pyrene genotoxicity. SAC and AM significantly decreased DNA breaks in HepG2 cells treated with dimethylnitrosamine. Additionally, all the OSC studied were shown to decrease the genotoxicity of the direct-acting compounds, hydrogen peroxide and methyl methanesulfonate. This study demonstrated that garlic OSC displayed antigenotoxic activity in human metabolically competent cells.

  5. Genotoxic effects of sunlight-activated waste waters

    SciTech Connect

    Strniste, G.F.; Chen, D.J.; Okinaka, R.T.

    1981-01-01

    Natural sunlight induces a genotoxic response in cultured CHO cells pre-treated with shale oil retort process water. Near ultraviolet light (NUV) component of the solar spectrum is the apparent radiation responsible for photoactivation. Cultured human skin fibroblasts are acutely sensitive to the genotoxic effects of photoactivated process water. The mutagenic potential of photoactivated process water in human cells is the same as that witnessed for an equivalent killing dose of the potent skin carcinogen FUV. DNA repair processes are involved in modulating genotoxic effects of this photo-induced process. The exact magnitude of the potential health-related and environmental risks resulting from photoactivation of retort process waters and other oil shale by-products is unassessed at this time. Our demonstration that a significant rate of mutation occurs in cultured human cells exposed to high dilutions of process waters and fluences of NUV comparable to that encountered during nominal exposure to sunlight suggests that such assessment is a prerequisite to minimal risk development of our oil shale resources.

  6. Curcumin attenuates quinocetone-induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity in human hepatocyte L02 cells.

    PubMed

    Dai, Chongshan; Tang, Shusheng; Li, Daowen; Zhao, Kena; Xiao, Xilong

    2015-01-01

    Quinocetone (QCT), a new quinoxaline 1,4-dioxides, has been used as antimicrobial feed additive in China. Potential genotoxicity of QCT was concerned as a public health problem. This study aimed to investigate the protective effect of curcumin on QCT-induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity in human hepatocyte L02 cells. Cell viability and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), biomarkers of oxidative stress including superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and glutathione (GSH) level were measured. Meanwhile, comet assay and micronucleus assay were carried out to evaluate genotoxicity. The results showed that, compared to the control group, QCT at the concentration ranges of 2-16 μg/mL significantly decreased L02 cell viability, which was significantly attenuated with curcumin pretreatment (2.5 and 5 μM). In addition, QCT significantly increased cell oxidative stress, characterized by increases of intracellular ROS level, while decreased endogenous antioxidant biomarkers GSH level and SOD activity (all p < 0.05 or 0.01). Curcumin pretreatment significantly attenuated ROS formation, inhibited the decreases of SOD activity and GSH level. Furthermore, curcumin significantly reduced QCT-induced DNA fragments and micronuclei formation. These data suggest that curcumin could attenuate QCT-induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in L02 cells, which may be attributed to ROS scavenging and anti-oxidative ability of curcumin. Importantly, consumption of curcumin may be a plausible way to prevent quinoxaline 1,4-dioxides-mediated oxidative stress and genotoxicity in human or animals.

  7. DNA damage as an indicator of pollutant-induced genotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Shugart, L.R.

    1989-01-01

    Biological monitoring is an approach of considerable interest to scientists in the field of environmental genotoxicity who are investigating the effects of hazardous substances on the biota. In essence the technique involves an evaluation of various types of responses in living organisms for their potential to identify exposure to dangerous substances and to define or to predict subsequent deleterious effects. The rationale for the selection of DNA damage as an indicator of exposure to genotoxic agents is based mainly on the mechanisms of action of chemicals that are known mutagens and carcinogens. An alkaline unwinding assay that detects excess strand breakage within the DNA polymer was applied to sunfish in a local stream as a biological monitor for environmental genotoxicity due to industrial pollution. The study was conducted over a period of 15 months and the temporal and spatial aspects of the data were evaluated for the effect of remedial action. 16 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Protective effects of melatonin-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules on paraquat-induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in a pulmonary cell line.

    PubMed

    Charão, Mariele F; Baierle, Marília; Gauer, Bruna; Goethel, Gabriela; Fracasso, Rafael; Paese, Karina; Brucker, Natália; Moro, Angela M; Bubols, Guilherme B; Dias, Bruna B; Matte, Ursula S; Guterres, Silvia S; Pohlmann, Adriana R; Garcia, Solange C

    2015-06-01

    Many acute poisonings lack effective and specific antidotes. Due to both intentional and accidental exposures, paraquat (PQ) causes thousands of deaths annually, especially by pulmonary fibrosis. Melatonin (Mel), when incorporated into lipid-core nanocapsules (Mel-LNC), has enhanced antioxidant properties. The effects of such a formulation have not yet been studied with respect to mitigation of PQ- induced cytotoxicity and DNA damage. Here, we have tested whether Mel-LNC can ameliorate PQ-induced toxicity in the A549 alveolar epithelial cell line. Physicochemical characterization of the formulations was performed. Cellular uptake was measured using nanocapsules marked with rhodamine B. Cell viability was determined by the MTT assay and DNA damage was assessed by the comet assay. The enzyme-modified comet assay with endonuclease III (Endo III) and formamidopyrimidine glycosylase (FPG) were used to investigate oxidative DNA damage. Incubation with culture medium for 24h did not alter the granulometric profile of Mel-LNC formulations. Following treatment (3 and 24h), red fluorescence was detected around the cell nucleus, indicating internalization of the formulation. Melatonin solution (Mel), Mel-LNC, and LNC did not have significant effects on cell viability or DNA damage. Pre-treatment with Mel-LNC enhanced cell viability and showed a remarkable reduction in % DNA in tail compared to the PQ group; this was not observed in cells pre-treated with Mel. PQ induces oxidative DNA damage detected with the enzyme-modified comet assay. Mel-LNC reduced this damage more effectively than did Mel. In summary, Mel-LNC is better than Mel at protecting A549 cells from the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of PQ.

  9. INDUCIBLE HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN (HSP70-1) PROTECTS MCF-7 CELLS FROM THE CYTOTOXIC AND GENOTOXIC EFFECTS OF ARSENITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) belong to the highly conserved family of stress proteins and are induced following exposure to arsenic. Elevated HSPs protect against cellular damage from heat but it is unclear wether HSP induction alters the damaging effects of environmental chemical ...

  10. Xanthine oxidoreductase is required for genotoxic stress-induced NKG2D ligand expression and gemcitabine-mediated antitumor activity

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiulong; Rao, Geetha; Li, Yi

    2016-01-01

    MICA/B (the major histocompatibility antigen-related chain A and B) and Rae I are stress-inducible ligands for the immune-receptor NKG2D. Mechanisms by which genotoxic stress and DNA damage induce the expression of NKG2D ligands remain incompletely understood. Here, we report that inhibition of xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) activity by allopurinol or inhibition of XOR expression by gene knockdown abrogated genotoxic stress-induced expression of MICA/B and Rae I in three tumor cell lines. XOR knockdown also blocked gemcitabine-mediated antitumor activity in an orthotopic syngeneic mouse model of breast cancer. As a rate-limiting enzyme in the purine catabolic pathway, XOR generates two end-products, uric acid and reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS scavenging had an insignificant effect on genotoxic drug-induced MICA/B expression but modestly inhibited radiation-induced MICA/B expression. Exogenous uric acid (in the form of monosodium urate) induced MICA/B expression by activating the MAP kinase pathway. Allopurinol blocked genotoxic stress-induced MAP kinase activation. Our study provides mechanistic insights into genotoxic stress-induced activation of the MAP kinase pathway and suggests that XOR is required for genotoxic stress-induced NKG2D ligand expression and gemcitabine-mediated antitumor activity. PMID:27494876

  11. The mitigating effect of Citrullus colocynthis (L.) fruit extract against genotoxicity induced by cyclophosphamide in mice bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Shokrzadeh, Mohammad; Chabra, Aroona; Naghshvar, Farshad; Ahmadi, Amirhossein

    2013-01-01

    Possible genoprotective effect of Citrullus colocynthis (L.) (CCT) fruits extract against cyclophosphamide- (CP-)induced DNA damage in mice bone marrow cells was evaluated using micronucleus assay, as an index of induced chromosomal damage. Mice were preadministered with different doses of CCT via intraperitoneal injection for 7 consecutive days followed by injection with CP (70 mg/kg b.w.) 1 hr after the last injection of CCT. After 24 hr, mice were scarified to evaluate the frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MnPCEs). In addition, the number of polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs) among 1000 normochromatic erythrocytes (NCEs) per animal was recorded to evaluate bone marrow. Pretreatment with CCT significantly reduced the number of MnPCEs induced by CP in bone marrow cells (P < 0.0001). At 200 mg/kg, CCT had a maximum chemoprotective effect and reduced the number of MnPCEs by 6.37-fold and completely normalized the mitotic activity. CCT also led to marked proliferation and hypercellularity of immature myeloid elements after mice were treated with CP and mitigated the bone marrow suppression. Our study revealed that CCT has an antigenotoxic effect against CP-induced oxidative DNA damage in mice. Therefore, it could be used concomitantly as a supplement to protect people undergoing chemotherapy.

  12. High-throughput genotoxicity assay identifies antioxidants as inducers of DNA damage response and cell death

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Jennifer T.; Sakamuru, Srilatha; Huang, Ruili; Teneva, Nedelina; Simmons, Steven O.; Xia, Menghang; Tice, Raymond R.; Austin, Christopher P.; Myung, Kyungjae

    2012-01-01

    Human ATAD5 is a biomarker for identifying genotoxic compounds because ATAD5 protein levels increase posttranscriptionally in response to DNA damage. We screened over 4,000 compounds with a cell-based quantitative high-throughput ATAD5-luciferase assay detecting genotoxic compounds. We identified 22 antioxidants, including resveratrol, genistein, and baicalein, that are currently used or investigated for the treatment of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, osteopenia, osteoporosis, and chronic hepatitis, as well as for antiaging. Treatment of dividing cells with these compounds induced DNA damage and resulted in cell death. Despite their genotoxic effects, resveratrol, genistein, and baicalein did not cause mutagenesis, which is a major side effect of conventional anticancer drugs. Furthermore, resveratrol and genistein killed multidrug-resistant cancer cells. We therefore propose that resveratrol, genistein, and baicalein are attractive candidates for improved chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:22431602

  13. Protective effect of Nigella sativa seeds against spermatocyte chromosomal aberrations and genotoxicity induced by carbon tetrachloride in mice.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Moneim, Ashraf M; Essawy, Amina E; Hamed, Sherifa S; Abou-Gabal, Ashgan A; Alzergy, Aglal A

    2017-03-21

    Nigella sativa is a well-known dietary antioxidant and a valuable inhibitor of clastogenesis and carcinogenesis. The purpose of the present work was to investigate the effects of N. sativa seeds against chromosomal aberrations in primary spermatocytes and early embryonic lethality induced by CCl4 hepatotoxin in Swiss albino mice. One hundred male Swiss albino mice were randomly divided into five groups. Groups I, II, and III received only normal saline, olive oil, and aqueous suspension of N. sativa seeds (50 mg/kg b.w.), while groups IV and V were orally given CCl4 dissolved in olive oil at a dose level of 1.9 (¼ LD50) alone and with aqueous suspension of N. sativa seeds (50 mg/kg b.w.) alternately. Aqueous extract of N. sativa significantly reduced the elevated frequency of chromosomal aberrations induced by CCl4 in mouse primary spermatocytes. For the male-dominant lethal test, four males from each group (control and experimental) were used and each male was mated for 13 days to two untreated virgin females. On days 14-16 after breeding, all the females were evaluated for incidence of pregnancy, live implants, and fetal deaths. Treatment with 1/4 LD50 of CCl4 induced positive dominant lethal mutation, reflecting a high rate of deformations in male germ cells. Interestingly, no dominant lethal mutations were recorded in females mated to male mice treated with CCl4 plus N. sativa. Under the experimental conditions of this study, our results highlight the beneficial role of N. sativa against CCl4-induced mutagenicity.

  14. Mercury-induced genotoxicity in marine diatom (Chaetoceros tenuissimus).

    PubMed

    Sarker, Subhodeep; Desai, Somashekhar R; Verlecar, Xivanand N; Sarker, Munmun Saha; Sarkar, A

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we present an evaluation of genotoxic responses in marine diatom, Chaetoceros tenuissimus, isolated from Kandla Creek (lat 23.03° N, long 70.22° E), Gujarat, India, in terms of impairment of DNA integrity as a function of their exposure to elevated levels of mercury (Hg) under laboratory conditions. DNA integrity in C. tenuissimus was determined by partial alkaline unwinding assay. To our knowledge, this is the first such genotoxicity study to be conducted on marine diatom cultures towards understanding the relationship between Hg toxicity and DNA damage. Furthermore, we studied the impact of Hg on the growth of C. tenuissimus as a function of their exposure to enhanced levels of Hg in terms of decreasing chlorophyll a (chl a) concentrations. The data show the genotoxic effect of Hg on the growth of C. tenuissimus as well as DNA integrity to a great extent. Based on the results of our investigations, it is suggested that C. tenuissimus can be used as sentinel species for bio-monitoring of pollution due to genotoxic contaminants.

  15. Protective effects of vanadium against DMH-induced genotoxicity and carcinogenesis in rat colon: removal of O(6)-methylguanine DNA adducts, p53 expression, inducible nitric oxide synthase downregulation and apoptotic induction.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Shaonly; Swamy, Viswanath; Suresh, D; Rajkumar, M; Rana, Basabi; Rana, Ajay; Chatterjee, Malay

    2008-02-29

    Previous studies have shown that dietary micronutrient vanadium can protect neoplastic development induced by chemical carcinogens. Current investigation is an attempt to evaluate the role of vanadium (4.27 micro mol/l) in inhibiting 1,2 dimethyhydrazine (DMH) (20 mg/kg body weight) induced rat colon carcinogenesis. We investigated the effect of vanadium against the formation of DMH-induced O(6)-methylguanine (O(6)-Meg) DNA adduct, a potent cytotoxic and mutagenic agent for colon cancer. Supplementation of vanadium significantly reduced the hepatic (P<0.05), and colonic (at three sequential time points; ANOVA, F=4.96, P<0.05) O(6)-Meg DNA adduct levels in rats, indicating vanadium's potency in limiting the initiation event of colon carcinogenesis. Removal of initiated and damaged precancerous cells by apoptosis can prevent tumorigenesis and further malignancy. DNA fragmentation study revealed the vanadium-mediated apoptotic induction in colon tumors. The increased value of apoptotic index (AI) (62.27%; P<0.01) in subsequent TUNEL assay further confirmed the apoptosis induction by vanadium. This paralleled the nuclear immunoexpression of p53. A significant positive correlation between p53 immunoexpression and AI (P=0.0026, r=0.83, r(2)=0.69) links its association with vanadium-mediated apoptotic induction. Vanadium treatment also abated the mRNA expression of iNOS (54.03%), reflecting its protective effect against nitric oxide-mediated genotoxicity and colon tumorigenesis. These studies cumulatively provide strong evidence for the inhibitory actions of vanadium against DMH-induced genotoxicity and carcinogenesis in rat colon.

  16. Protective Effects of the Flavonoid Chrysin against Methylmercury-Induced Genotoxicity and Alterations of Antioxidant Status, In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Manzolli, Eduardo Scandinari; Serpeloni, Juliana Mara; Bastos, Jairo Kennup; Antunes, Lusânia Maria Greggi; Barbosa, Fernando; Barcelos, Gustavo Rafael Mazzaron

    2015-01-01

    The use of phytochemicals has been widely used as inexpensive approach for prevention of diseases related to oxidative damage due to its antioxidant properties. One of dietary flavonoids is chrysin (CR), found mainly in passion fruit, honey, and propolis. Methylmercury (MeHg) is a toxic metal whose main toxic mechanism is oxidative damage. Thus, the study aimed to evaluate the antioxidant effects of CR against oxidative damage induced by MeHg in Wistar rats. Animals were treated with MeHg (30 µg/kg/bw) in presence and absence of CR (0.10, 1.0, and 10 mg/kg/bw) by gavage for 45 days. Glutathione (GSH) in blood was quantified spectrophotometrically and for monitoring of DNA damage, comet assay was used in leukocytes and hepatocytes. MeHg led to a significant increase in the formation of comets; when the animals were exposed to the metal in the presence of CR, higher concentrations of CR showed protective effects. Moreover, exposure to MeHg decreased the levels of GSH and GSH levels were restored in the animals that received CR plus MeHg. Taken together the findings of the present work indicate that consumption of flavonoids such as CR may protect humans against the adverse health effects caused by MeHg. PMID:25810809

  17. Inhibitory effects of Baccharis dracunculifolia on 1,2-dimethylhidrazine-induced genotoxicity and preneoplastic lesions in rat colon.

    PubMed

    Munari, Carla C; Furtado, Ricardo A; Santiago, Mirian L; Manhas, Simony S; Bastos, Jairo K; Tavares, Denise C

    2014-07-01

    Baccharis dracunculifolia (Asteraceae), the main botanical source of green propolis, also known as 'alecrim-do-campo' and 'vassourinha', is a shrub of the Brazilian 'cerrado' and is native to the South and Southeast of Brazil. The effects of B. dracunculifolia ethyl acetate extract (Bd-EAE) were evaluated on the 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced DNA damage and aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in the colon of male Wistar rats by the comet and ACF assays, respectively. The animals were treated by gavage with doses of 6, 12, and 24 mg/kg body weight/day. Animals were also administered a single subcutaneous injection of 40 mg/kg DMH and were killed after 4 h for evaluation of DNA damage. Also, two doses of 40 mg/kg of DMH were administered weekly for 2 weeks, and animals were killed 2 weeks after the last injection for evaluation of ACF development in the colon. The results showed a significant reduction in the frequency of DNA damage and ACF in the group treated with the Bd-EAE plus DMH in comparison with those treated with DMH alone, suggesting that Bd-EAE reduced DNA damage and suppressed the formation of ACF and also exerted a protective affect against colon carcinogenesis.

  18. Quercetin protects human peripheral blood mononuclear cells from OTA-induced oxidative stress, genotoxicity, and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Periasamy, Ramyaa; Kalal, Iravathy Goud; Krishnaswamy, Rajashree; Viswanadha, VijayaPadma

    2016-07-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is one of the most abundant food-contaminating mycotoxins world wide, and is detrimental to human and animal health. This study evaluated the protective effect of quercetin against OTA-induced cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and inflammatory response in lymphocytes. Cytotoxicity determined by MTT assay revealed IC20 value of OTA to be 20 µM, which was restored to near control values by pretreatment with quercetin. Oxidative stress parameters such as antioxidant enzymes, LPO and PCC levels indicated that quercetin exerted a protective effect on OTA-induced oxidative stress. Quercetin exerted an antigenotoxic effect on OTA-induced genotoxicity, by significantly reducing the number of structural aberrations in chromosomes and comet parameters like, % olive tail moment from 2.76 ± 0.02 to 0.56 ± 0.02 and % tail DNA from 56.23 ± 2.56 to 12.36 ± 0.56 as determined by comet assay. OTA-induced NO, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-8 were significantly reduced in the quercetin pretreated samples indicating its anti-inflammatory role. Our results demonstrate for the first time that quercetin exerts a cytoprotective effect against OTA-induced oxidative stress, genotoxicity, and inflammation in lymphocytes. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 855-865, 2016.

  19. Evaluation of the protective effect of ascorbic acid on nitrite- and nitrosamine-induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in human hepatoma line.

    PubMed

    Erkekoglu, Pinar; Baydar, Terken

    2010-02-01

    Nitrites are ubiquitous environmental contaminants present in drinking water and foods. Nitrosamines can be formed endogenously from nitrate and nitrite and secondary amines or may be present in food, tobacco smoke, and drinking water. The major goal of this work was to evaluate the cytotoxic, reactive oxygen species (ROS)-producing and genotoxic effects of nitrite and nitrosamines and the possible protection by ascorbic acid in HepG2 cells. It was found that nitrite, N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA), and N-nitrosomorpholine (NMOR) decreased cell viability, increased intracellular ROS production, and caused genotoxicity. Compared to untreated cells as determined by alkaline Comet assay, nitrite, NDMA, NDEA, and NMOR raised the tail intensity up to 1.18-, 3.79-, 4.24-, and 4.16-fold, respectively. Ascorbic acid (AA, 10 microM) increased cell viability and reduced ROS production significantly (p < 0.05). Additionally, AA treatment decreased the tail intensity caused by nitrite, NDMA, NDEA, and NMOR to 33.74%, 58.6%, 44.32%, and 43.97%, respectively. It can be concluded that ascorbic acid was able to reduce both tail intensity and tail moment in all of the nitrosamine treatments, particularly in NDMA. AA protected HepG2 cells against genotoxic effects caused by nitrosamines. This protection might be through different mechanisms, some of which are not still understood in depth. The future interest will be to understand which pathways are influenced by antioxidants, particularly by AA, and the outcomes of this prevention in other cell line types.

  20. Argentine folk medicine: genotoxic effects of Chenopodiaceae family.

    PubMed

    Gadano, A B; Gurni, A A; Carballo, M A

    2006-01-16

    Chenopodium ambrosioides L. and Chenopodium multifidum L. (Chenopodiaceae), common name: Paico, are medicinal plants. They are aromatic shrubs growing in South America. For centuries, they have been used due to its medicinal properties. However, there are few reports in literature about the genotoxic effects of these plants. There for, the aim of these work is the evaluation of genetic damage induced by decoction and infusion of this plants which were assayed in different concentrations (1, 10, 100, 1,000 microL extract/mL culture), by addition of the extract to human lymphocyte cell cultures, negative controls were included. The endpoints evaluated were chromosomal aberrations (CA), sister chromatid exchanges (SCE), cell proliferation kinetics (CPK) and mitotic index (MI). The repeated measure analysis of variance was used for statistic evaluation of the results. The results showed: (a) statistical increase in the percentage of cells with CA and in the frequency of SCE when cultures were exposed to both aromatic plants, (b) a decrease in MI of both Paicos assayed, although no modification in the CPK values was observed, (c) no effect was noticed in the analysis of Chenopodium album L., which was used as negative control of the essential oil. These results suggest a cyto and genotoxic effect of Chenopodium ambrosioides and Chenopodium multifidum aqueous extracts related to the essential oil of the plant (as Chenopodium album did not perform).

  1. Histopathological and genotoxic effects of chlorpyrifos in rats.

    PubMed

    Ezzi, Lobna; Belhadj Salah, Imen; Haouas, Zohra; Sakly, Amina; Grissa, Intissar; Chakroun, Sana; Kerkeni, Emna; Hassine, Mohsen; Mehdi, Meriem; Ben Cheikh, Hassen

    2016-03-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of chlorpyrifos's sub-acute exposure on male rats. Two groups with six animals each were orally treated, respectively, with 3.1 mg/kg b w and 6.2 mg/kg b w of chlorpyrifos during 4 weeks. The genotoxic effect of chlopyrifos was investigated using the comet assay and the micronucleus test. Some hematological and liver's histopathological changes were also evaluated. Results revealed that chlorpyrifos induced histopathological alterations in liver parenchyma. The lymphoid infiltration observed in liver sections and the increase in white blood cells parameter are signs of inflammation. A significant increase in the platelet' count and in polychromatic erythrocytes/normochromatic erythrocytes (PCE/NCE) ratio was observed in chlorpyrifos-treated groups which could be due to the stimulatory effect of chlorpyrifos on cell formation in the bone marrow at lower doses. In addition, the increase of bone marrow micronucleus percentage and the comet tail length revealed a genotoxic potential of chlorpyrifos in vivo.

  2. Oxidative stress and genotoxicity induced by ketorolac on the common carp Cyprinus carpio.

    PubMed

    Galar-Martínez, M; García-Medina, S; Gómez-Olivan, L M; Pérez-Coyotl, I; Mendoza-Monroy, D J; Arrazola-Morgain, R E

    2016-09-01

    The nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug ketorolac is extensively used in the treatment of acute postoperative pain. This pharmaceutical has been found at concentrations of 0.2-60 µg/L in diverse water bodies around the world; however, its effects on aquatic organisms remain unknown. The present study, evaluated the oxidative stress and genotoxicity induced by sublethal concentrations of ketorolac (1 and 60 µg/L) on liver, brain, and blood of the common carp Cyprinus carpio. This toxicant induced oxidative damage (increased lipid peroxidation, hydroperoxide content, and protein carbonyl content) as well as changes in antioxidant status (superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase activity) in liver and brain of carp. In blood, ketorolac increased the frequency of micronuclei and is therefore genotoxic for the test species. The effects observed were time and concentration dependent. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 1035-1043, 2016.

  3. Glutathione level regulates HNE-induced genotoxicity in human erythroleukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Umesh C.S.; Ramana, Kota V.; Awasthi, Yogesh C.; Srivastava, Satish K.

    2008-03-01

    4-Hydroxy-trans-2-nonenal (HNE) is one of the most abundant and toxic lipid aldehydes formed during lipid peroxidation by reactive oxygen species. We have investigated the genotoxic effects of HNE and its regulation by cellular glutathione (GSH) levels in human erythroleukemia (K562) cells. Incubation of K562 cells with HNE (5-10 {mu}M) significantly elicited a 3- to 5-fold increased DNA damage in a time- and dose-dependent manner as measured by comet assay. Depletion of GSH in cells by L-buthionine-[S,R]-sulfoximine (BSO) significantly increased HNE-induced DNA damage, whereas supplementation of GSH by incubating the cells with GSH-ethyl ester significantly decreased HNE-induced genotoxicity. Further, overexpression of mGSTA4-4, a HNE-detoxifying GST isozyme, significantly prevented HNE-induced DNA damage in cells, and ablation of GSTA4-4 and aldose reductase with respective siRNAs further augmented HNE-induced DNA damage. These results suggest that the genotoxicity of HNE is highly dependent on cellular GSH/GST/AR levels and favorable modulation of the aldehyde detoxification system may help in controlling the oxidative stress-induced complications.

  4. Fruit extract of the medicinal plant Crataegus oxyacantha exerts genotoxic and mutagenic effects in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    de Quadros, Ana Paula Oliveira; Mazzeo, Dania Elisa Christofoletti; Marin-Morales, Maria Aparecida; Perazzo, Fábio Ferreira; Rosa, Paulo Cesar Pires; Maistro, Edson Luis

    2017-02-17

    Crataegus oxyacantha, a plant of the Rosaceae family also known "English hawthorn, haw, maybush, or whitethorn," has long been used for medicinal purposes such as digestive disorders, hyperlipidemia, dyspnea, inducing diuresis, and preventing kidney stones. However, the predominant use of this plant has been to treat cardiovascular disorders. Due to a lack of studies on the genotoxicity of C. oxyacantha, this investigation was undertaken to determine whether its fruit extract exerts cytotoxic, genotoxic, or clastogenic/aneugenic effects in leukocytes and HepG2 (liver hepatocellular carcinoma) cultured human cells, or mutagenic effects in TA100 and TA98 strains of Salmonella typhimurium bacterium. Genotoxicity analysis showed that the extract produced no marked genotoxic effects at concentrations of 2.5 or 5 µg/ml in either cell type; however, at concentrations of 10 µg/ml or higher significant DNA damage was detected. The micronucleus test also demonstrated that concentrations of 10 µg/ml or higher produced clastogenic/aneugenic responses. In the Ames test, the extract induced mutagenic effects in TA98 strain of S. typhimurium with metabolic activation at all tested concentrations (2.5 to 500 µg/ml). Data indicate that, under certain experimental conditions, the fruit extract of C. oxyacantha exerts genotoxic and clastogenic/aneugenic effects in cultured human cells, and with metabolism mutagenicity occurs in bacteria cells.

  5. Circadian variation of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity induced by an immunosuppressive agent "Mycophenolate Mofetil" in rats.

    PubMed

    Dridi, Ichrak; Grissa, Intissar; Ezzi, Lobna; Chakroun, Sana; Ben-Cherif, Wafa; Haouas, Zohra; Aouam, Karim; Ben-Attia, Mossadok; Reinberg, Alain; Boughattas, Naceur A

    2016-01-01

    Immunosuppressive drugs such as Mycophenolate Mofetil (MMF) are used to suppress the immune system activity in transplant patients and reduce the risk of organ rejection. The present study investigates whether the potential cytotoxicity and genotoxicity varied according to MMF dosing-time in Wistar Rat. A potentially toxic MMF dose (300 mg/kg) was acutely administered by the i.p. route in rats at four different circadian stages (1, 7, 13 and 19 hours after light onset, HALO). Rats were sacrificed 3 days following injection, blood and bone marrow were removed for determination of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity analysis. The genotoxic effect of this pro-drug was investigated using the comet assay and the micronucleus test. Hematological changes were also evaluated according to circadian dosing time. MMF treatment induced a significant decrease at 7 HALO in red blood cells, in the hemoglobin rate and in white blood cells. These parameters followed a circadian rhythm in controls or in treated rats with an acrophase located at the end of the light-rest phase. A significant, thrombocytopenia was observed according to MMF circadian dosing time. Furthermore, abnormally shaped red cells, sometimes containing micronuclei, poikilocytotic in red cells and hypersegmented neutrophil nuclei were observed with MMF treatment. The micronucleus test revealed damage to chromosomes in rat bone marrow; the comet assay showed significant DNA damage. This damage varied according to circadian MMF dosing time. The injection of MMF in the middle of the dark-activity phase produced a very mild hematological toxicity and low genotoxicity. Conversely, it induced maximum hematological toxicity and genotoxicity when the administration occurred in the middle of the light-rest phase, which is physiologically analogous to the end of the activity of the diurnal phase in human patients.

  6. Evaluation of the Bronchorelaxant, Genotoxic, and Antigenotoxic Effects of Cassia alata L.

    PubMed Central

    Ouédraogo, M.; Da, F. L.; Fabré, A.; Konaté, K.; Dibala, C. I.; Carreyre, H.; Thibaudeau, S.; Coustard, J.-M.; Vandebrouck, C.; Bescond, J.; Belemtougri, R. G.

    2013-01-01

    Aqueous-ethanolic extract of Cassia alata (AECal) and its derived fractions obtained through liquid-liquid fractionation were evaluated for their bronchorelaxant, genotoxic, and antigenotoxic effects. Contractile activity of rats' tracheas in the presence of tested materials, as well as its modifications with different inhibitors and blockers, was isometrically recorded. The antigenotoxic potential of AECal was evaluated on cyclophosphamide- (CP-) induced genotoxicity in the rat. Animals were pretreated with the extract, then liver comet assay was performed. AECal and its chloroformic fractions (CF-AECal) relaxed the contraction induced by Ach, but both were significantly less potent in inhibiting contraction induced by KCl (30 mM; 80 mM). Propranolol, indomethacin, L-NAME, methylene blue, and glibenclamide did not modify the relaxant effect of CF-AECal. TEA altered the response of trachea to CF-AECal. CF-AECal caused a rightward shift without affecting the Emax in cumulative concentration-response curves of Ach only at low concentrations. In animals pretreated with the extract, the percentage of CP-induced DNA damage decreased. Our results suggest that (1) muscarinic receptors contribute at least in part to the relaxant effects of CF-AECal; (2) CF-AECal interferes with membrane polarization; and (3) AECal is not genotoxic in vivo and contains chemopreventive phytoconstituents offering protection against CP-induced genotoxicity. PMID:23710211

  7. V79-hCYP2E1-hSULT1A1, a cell line for the sensitive detection of genotoxic effects induced by carbohydrate pyrolysis products and other food-borne chemicals.

    PubMed

    Glatt, Hansruedi; Schneider, Heiko; Liu, Yungang

    2005-02-07

    We recently constructed a Chinese hamster V79-derived cell line that stably expresses human cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2E1 and human sulphotransferase (SULT) 1A1. These enzymes are involved in the bioactivation of numerous promutagens/procarcinogens, but are not taken into account in standard in vitro mutagenicity assays. Various carbohydrate pyrolysis products and other food contaminants that induce tumours or preneoplastic lesions in laboratory animals are inactive or only weakly active in standard in vitro genotoxicity assays. This is the case for acrylamide, furan, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, nitrofen and N-nitrosodimethylamine. These compounds were investigated for induction of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) in V79-hCYP2E1-hSULT1A1 cells. All test compounds showed positive results over a wide concentration range, starting at 0.01 microM for N-nitrosodimethylamine, 3 microM for furan, 12.5 microM for nitrofen, 20 microM for 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, and 200 microM for acrylamide. The concentration-response curve of furan was unusual, as this compound induced a statistically significant, but rather constant and weak increase in SCE over an extremely wide concentration range (3-16,000 microM). Furan was slightly less active, whereas the remaining compounds were much less active in the parental V79 cell line than in V79-hCYP2E1-hSULT1A1 cells. Compared to many other genotoxic effects, the study of SCE only requires small numbers of cells (and incubation volumes) and usually is detected even at low concentrations of the genotoxicant. Therefore, induction of SCE in V79-hCYP2E1-hSULT1A1 cells may be useful in the genotoxicity testing of preparations of heated food and in their bioassay-directed fractionation.

  8. Pb low doses induced genotoxicity in Lactuca sativa plants.

    PubMed

    Silva, S; Silva, P; Oliveira, H; Gaivão, I; Matos, M; Pinto-Carnide, O; Santos, C

    2017-03-01

    Soil and water contamination by lead (Pb) remains a topic of great concern, particularly regarding crop production. The admissible Pb values in irrigation water in several countries range from ≈0.1 to ≈5 mg L(-1). In order to evaluate putative effects of Pb within legal doses on crops growth, we exposed Lactuca sativa seeds and seedlings to increasing doses of Pb(NO3)2 up to 20 mg L(-1). The OECD parameter seed germination and seedling/plant growth were not affected by any of the Pb-concentrations used. However, for doses higher than 5 mg L(-1) significant DNA damage was detected: Comet assay detected DNA fragmentation at ≥ 5 mg L(-1) and presence of micronuclei (MN) were detected for 20 mg L(-1). Also, cell cycle impairment was observed for doses as low as 0.05 mg L(-1) and 0.5 mg L(-1) (mostly G2 arrest). Our data show that for the low doses of Pb used, the OECD endpoints were not able to detect toxicity, while more sensitive endpoints (related with DNA damage and mitotic/interphase disorders) identified genotoxic and cytostatic effects. Furthermore, the nature of the genotoxic effect was dependent on the concentration. Finally, we recommend that MN test and the comet assay should be included as sensitive endpoints in (eco)toxicological assays.

  9. An antidote for imazalil-induced genotoxicity in vitro: the lichen, Dermatocarpon intestiniforme (Körber) Hasse.

    PubMed

    Türkez, H; Aydin, Elanur; Aslan, A

    2012-09-01

    Imazalil (IMA), a commonly used fungicide in both agricultural and clinical domains, is suspected to produce serious toxic effects in vertebrates. In recent years, a number of studies have suggested that lichens might be easily accessible sources of natural drugs that could be used as a possible food supplement. Extensive research is being performed to explore the importance of lichen species, which are known to contain a variety of pharmacological active compounds. In this context, the antigenotoxic effect of aqueous Dermatocarpon intestiniforme (Körber) Hasse. extract (DIE) was studied against the genotoxic damage induced by IMA on cultured human lymphocytes (n = 6) using chromosomal aberration (CA) and micronucleus (MN) as cytogenetic endpoints. Human peripheral lymphocytes were treated in vitro with varying concentrations of DIE (0, 25, 50 and 100 μg/ml), tested in combination with IMA (336 μg/ml). DIE alone were not genotoxic and when combined with IMA treatment, it reduced the frequency of CAs and the rate of MNs. A clear dose-dependent decrease in the genotoxic damage of IMA was observed, suggesting a genoprotective role of DIE. The results of the present study suggest that this plant extract per se does not have a genotoxic potential, but can alleviate the genotoxicity of IMA on cultured human lymphocytes. In conclusion our findings may have an important application for the protection of cultured human lymphocyte from the genetic damage and side effects induced by medical and agricultural chemicals hazardous for people.

  10. Genotoxic effects of boric acid and borax in zebrafish, Danio rerio using alkaline comet assay

    PubMed Central

    Gülsoy, Nagihan; Yavas, Cüneyd; Mutlu, Özal

    2015-01-01

    The present study is conducted to determine the potential mechanisms of Boron compounds, boric acid (BA) and borax (BX), on genotoxicity of zebrafish Danio rerio for 24, 48, 72 and 96-hours acute exposure (level:1, 4, 16, 64 mg/l BA and BX) in semi-static bioassay experiment. For that purpose, peripheral erythrocytes were drawn from caudal vein and Comet assay was applied to assess genotoxicity. Acute (96 hours) exposure and high concentrations of boric acid and borax increases % tail DNA and Olive tail moment. Genotoxicity was found for BA as concentration-dependent and BX as concentration and time dependent manner. In general, significant effects (P < 0,05) on both concentrations and exposure times were observed in experimental groups. DNA damage was highest at 96 h and 24 h for all BX and BA concentrations, respectively in peripheral blood of D. rerio. For the first time, our study demonstrates the effect of waterborne BA and BX exposure on genotoxicity at the molecular level, which may contribute to understanding the mechanism of boric acid and borax-induced genotoxicity in fish. PMID:26862320

  11. Genotoxic effects of boric acid and borax in zebrafish, Danio rerio using alkaline comet assay.

    PubMed

    Gülsoy, Nagihan; Yavas, Cüneyd; Mutlu, Özal

    2015-01-01

    The present study is conducted to determine the potential mechanisms of Boron compounds, boric acid (BA) and borax (BX), on genotoxicity of zebrafish Danio rerio for 24, 48, 72 and 96-hours acute exposure (level:1, 4, 16, 64 mg/l BA and BX) in semi-static bioassay experiment. For that purpose, peripheral erythrocytes were drawn from caudal vein and Comet assay was applied to assess genotoxicity. Acute (96 hours) exposure and high concentrations of boric acid and borax increases % tail DNA and Olive tail moment. Genotoxicity was found for BA as concentration-dependent and BX as concentration and time dependent manner. In general, significant effects (P < 0,05) on both concentrations and exposure times were observed in experimental groups. DNA damage was highest at 96 h and 24 h for all BX and BA concentrations, respectively in peripheral blood of D. rerio. For the first time, our study demonstrates the effect of waterborne BA and BX exposure on genotoxicity at the molecular level, which may contribute to understanding the mechanism of boric acid and borax-induced genotoxicity in fish.

  12. Assessment of genotoxic effects of flumorph by the comet assay in mice organs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, T; Zhao, Q; Zhang, Y; Ning, J

    2014-03-01

    The present study investigated the genotoxic effects of flumorph in various organs (brain, liver, spleen, kidney and sperm) of mice. The DNA damage, measured as comet tail length (µm), was determined using the alkaline comet assay. The comet assay is a sensitive assay for the detection of genotoxicity caused by flumorph using mice as a model. Statistically significant increases in comet assay for both dose-dependent and duration-dependent DNA damage were observed in all the organs assessed. The organs exhibited the maximum DNA damage in 96 h at 54 mg/kg body weight. Brain showed maximum DNA damage followed by spleen > kidney > liver > sperm. Our data demonstrated that flumorph had induced systemic genotoxicity in mammals as it caused DNA damage in all tested vital organs, especially in brain and spleen.

  13. Genotoxic effects of cadmium chloride and azadirachtin treated singly and in combination in fish.

    PubMed

    Chandra, P; Khuda-Bukhsh, A R

    2004-06-01

    The genotoxic effects of cadmium chloride (CdCl(2)) and azadirachtin (Aza) were assessed singly and conjointly in a fish, Oreochromis mossambicus, with endpoints such as chromosome aberrations, abnormal red cell nuclei, abnormal sperm morphology, and protein content (both qualitative and quantitative) of selected tissues, namely, muscle, heart, eye, brain, gill, liver, spleen, and kidney. The primary objectives were, first, to examine if CdCl(2), a common pollutant, and Aza, a natural product of the neem plant used extensively as an 'ecofriendly' agent for many purposes, had any genotoxic effect of their own on nontarget aquatic organisms of economic importance; and second, if Aza could have any ameliorating effect on CdCl(2)-induced genotoxicity in O. mossambicus tissues. As compared with distilled water-treated controls, both CdCl(2) and Aza induced genotoxicity in O. mossambicus, the former in greater quantity than that produced by Aza. However, Cd-induced toxicity in O. mossambicus appeared to be ameliorated to some extent by Aza.

  14. Current Studies into the Genotoxic Effects of Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Cheng-Teng; Li, Jasmine J.; Bay, Boon-Huat; Yung, Lin-Yue Lanry

    2010-01-01

    Nanotechnology has created opportunities for engineers to manufacture superior and more efficient devices and products. Nanomaterials (NMs) are now widely used in consumer products as well as for research applications. However, while the lists of known toxic effects of nanomaterials and nanoparticles (NPs) continue to grow, there is still a vast gap in our knowledge about the genotoxicity of NMs. In this paper, we highlight some NMs of interest and discuss the current in vivo and in vitro studies into genotoxic effects of NMs. PMID:20936181

  15. Epigenetic alterations induced by genotoxic occupational and environmental human chemical carcinogens: A systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    Chappell, Grace; Pogribny, Igor P.; Guyton, Kathryn Z.; Rusyn, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that epigenetic alterations play an important role in chemically-induced carcinogenesis. Although the epigenome and genome may be equally important in carcinogenicity, the genotoxicity of chemical agents and exposure-related transcriptomic responses have been more thoroughly studied and characterized. To better understand the evidence for epigenetic alterations of human carcinogens, and the potential association with genotoxic endpoints, we conducted a systematic review of published studies of genotoxic carcinogens that reported epigenetic endpoints. Specifically, we searched for publications reporting epigenetic effects for the 28 agents and occupations included in Monograph Volume 100F of the International Agency for the Research on Cancer (IARC) that were classified as “carcinogenic to humans” (Group 1) with strong evidence of genotoxic mechanisms of carcinogenesis. We identified a total of 158 studies that evaluated epigenetic alterations for 12 of these 28 carcinogenic agents and occupations (1,3-butadiene, 4-aminobiphenyl, aflatoxins, benzene, benzidine, benzo[a]pyrene, coke production, formaldehyde, occupational exposure as a painter, sulfur mustard, and vinyl chloride). Aberrant DNA methylation was most commonly studied, followed by altered expression of non-coding RNAs and histone changes (totaling 85, 59 and 25 studies, respectively). For 3 carcinogens (aflatoxins, benzene and benzo[a]pyrene), 10 or more studies reported epigenetic effects. However, epigenetic studies were sparse for the remaining 9 carcinogens; for 4 agents, only 1 or 2 published reports were identified. While further research is needed to better identify carcinogenesis-associated epigenetic perturbations for many potential carcinogens, published reports on specific epigenetic endpoints can be systematically identified and increasingly incorporated in cancer hazard assessments. PMID:27234561

  16. Epigenetic alterations induced by genotoxic occupational and environmental human chemical carcinogens: A systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Chappell, Grace; Pogribny, Igor P; Guyton, Kathryn Z; Rusyn, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that epigenetic alterations play an important role in chemically-induced carcinogenesis. Although the epigenome and genome may be equally important in carcinogenicity, the genotoxicity of chemical agents and exposure-related transcriptomic responses have been more thoroughly studied and characterized. To better understand the evidence for epigenetic alterations of human carcinogens, and the potential association with genotoxic endpoints, we conducted a systematic review of published studies of genotoxic carcinogens that reported epigenetic endpoints. Specifically, we searched for publications reporting epigenetic effects for the 28 agents and occupations included in Monograph Volume 100F of the International Agency for the Research on Cancer (IARC) that were classified as "carcinogenic to humans" (Group 1) with strong evidence of genotoxic mechanisms of carcinogenesis. We identified a total of 158 studies that evaluated epigenetic alterations for 12 of these 28 carcinogenic agents and occupations (1,3-butadiene, 4-aminobiphenyl, aflatoxins, benzene, benzidine, benzo[a]pyrene, coke production, formaldehyde, occupational exposure as a painter, sulfur mustard, and vinyl chloride). Aberrant DNA methylation was most commonly studied, followed by altered expression of non-coding RNAs and histone changes (totaling 85, 59 and 25 studies, respectively). For 3 carcinogens (aflatoxins, benzene and benzo[a]pyrene), 10 or more studies reported epigenetic effects. However, epigenetic studies were sparse for the remaining 9 carcinogens; for 4 agents, only 1 or 2 published reports were identified. While further research is needed to better identify carcinogenesis-associated epigenetic perturbations for many potential carcinogens, published reports on specific epigenetic endpoints can be systematically identified and increasingly incorporated in cancer hazard assessments.

  17. Genotoxicity induced by Taenia solium and its reduction by immunization with calreticulin in a hamster model of taeniosis.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Ana María; Mendlovic, Fela; Cruz-Rivera, Mayra; Chávez-Talavera, Oscar; Sordo, Monserrat; Avila, Guillermina; Flisser, Ana; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia

    2013-06-01

    Genotoxicity induced by neurocysticercosis has been demonstrated in vitro and in vivo in humans. The adult stage of Taenia solium lodges in the small intestine and is the main risk factor to acquire neurocysticercosis, nevertheless its carcinogenic potential has not been evaluated. In this study, we determined the genotoxic effect of T. solium infection in the hamster model of taeniosis. In addition, we assessed the effect of oral immunization with recombinant T. solium calreticulin (rTsCRT) plus cholera toxin as adjuvant on micronuclei induction, as this protein has been shown to induce 33-44% protection in the hamster model of taeniosis. Blood samples were collected from the orbital venous plexus of noninfected and infected hamsters at different days postinfection, as well as from orally immunized animals, to evaluate the frequency of micronucleated reticulocytes as a measure of genotoxicity induced by parasite exposure and rTsCRT vaccination. Our results indicate that infection with T. solium caused time-dependent DNA damage in vivo and that rTsCRT immunization reduced the genotoxic damage induced by the presence of the tapeworms.

  18. Genotoxic effects of nickel, trivalent and hexavalent chromium on the Eisenia fetida earthworm.

    PubMed

    Bigorgne, Emilie; Cossu-Leguille, Carole; Bonnard, Marc; Nahmani, Johanne

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to examine genotoxic effects of nickel (Ni=105 mg kg(-1)), trivalent and hexavalent chromium (Cr=491 mg kg(-1)) on the Eisenia fetida earthworm after 2 and 4d of exposure to two different spiked soils (an artificial (OECD) and a natural one). DNA damages were evaluated on the earthworm's coelomocytes using the comet assay. After an exposure into OECD spiked soils, Ni did not induce genotoxic effect whereas Cr(III) and Cr(VI) revealed to be genotoxic after 2d of exposure. After 4d of exposure, only Cr(VI) still induced significant damages. In natural spiked soils, nickel and Cr(III) revealed to be genotoxic after 2 and 4d of exposure. Concerning Cr(VI) toxicity, all the earthworms died after 1d of exposure. These results underline the importance to take into account the nature and the speciation of metallic pollutants, although the experiment has been performed on spiked soil with higher bioavailibity than in contaminated natural soil.

  19. Genotoxic and developmental effects in sea urchins are sensitive indicators of effects of genotoxic chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S.L. . Energy and Environment Division); Hose, J.E. . Dept. of Biology); Knezovich, J.P. . Health and Ecological Assessment Division)

    1994-07-01

    Purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) gametes and embryos were exposed to three known mutagenic chemicals (phenol, benzidine,and pentachlorophenol) over concentration ranges bracketing the effect levels for fertilization success. Normal development and cytogenetic effects (anaphase aberrations) were assessed after the cultures were allowed to develop for 48 h. Using radiolabeled chemicals, the authors also characterized concentrations in the test water as well as doses in the embryos following 2- and 48-h exposures. The authors observed dose responses for all chemicals and all responses, except for phenol, which showed no significant effect on development. Fertilization success was never the most sensitive end point. anaphase aberrations were the most sensitive response for phenol, with an LOEC of 2.5 mg/L exposure concentration. Anaphase aberrations and development were equivalent in sensitivity for benzidine within the tested dose range, and an LOEC of <0.1 mg/L was observed. Development was the most sensitive reasons for pentachlorophenol (LOEC 1 mg/L). the LOEC values for this study were generally lower than comparable data for aquatic life or human health protection. The authors conclude that genotoxicity and development evaluations should be included in environmental management applications and that tests developed primarily for human health protection do not reliably predict the effects of toxic substances on aquatic life.

  20. Exposure to sorbitol during lactation causes metabolic alterations and genotoxic effects in rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Felipe S; Araujo-Lima, Carlos F; Aiub, Claudia A F; Felzenszwalb, Israel

    2016-10-17

    Sorbitol is a polyol used by the food industry as a sweetener. Women are consuming diet and light products containing sorbitol during pregnancy and in the postnatal period to prevent themselves from excessive weight gain and maintain a slim body. Although there is no evidence for the genotoxicity of sorbitol in the perinatal period, this study focused on evaluating the effects of the maternal intake of sorbitol on the biochemical and toxicological parameters of lactating Wistar rat offspring after 14days of mother-to-offspring exposure. A dose-dependent reduction of offspring length was observed. An increase in sorbitol levels determined in the milk was also observed. However, we detected an inverse relationship between the exposition dose in milk fructose and triacylglycerols concentrations. There was an increase in the plasmatic levels of ALT, AST and LDLc and a decrease in proteins, cholesterol and glucose levels in the offspring. Sorbitol exposure caused hepatocyte genotoxicity, including micronuclei induction. Maternal sorbitol intake induced myelotoxicity and myelosuppression in their offspring. The Comet assay of the blood cells detected a dose-dependent genotoxic response within the sorbitol-exposed offspring. According to our results, sorbitol is able to induce important metabolic alterations and genotoxic responses in the exposed offspring.

  1. Cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of two hair dyes used in the formulation of black color.

    PubMed

    Tafurt-Cardona, Yaliana; Suares-Rocha, Paula; Fernandes, Thaís Cristina Casimiro; Marin-Morales, Maria Aparecida

    2015-12-01

    According to the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), some hair dyes are considered mutagenic and carcinogenic in in vitro assays and exposed human populations. Epidemiological studies indicate that hairdressers occupationally exposed to hair dyes have a higher risk of developing bladder cancer. In Brazil, 26% of the adults use hair dye. In this study, we investigated the toxic effects of two hair dyes, Basic Red 51 (BR51) and Basic Brown 17 (BB17), which are temporary dyes of the azo group (R-N=N-R'), used in the composition of the black hair dye. To this end, MTT and trypan blue assays (cytotoxicity), comet and micronucleus assay (genotoxicity) were applied, with HepG2 cells. For cytotoxic assessment, dyes were tested in serial dilutions, being the highest concentrations those used in the commercial formula for hair dyes. For genotoxic assessment concentrations were selected according to cell viability. Results showed that both dyes induced significant cytotoxic and genotoxic effects in the cells, in concentrations much lower than those used in the commercial formula. Genotoxic effects could be related to the azo structure present in the composition of the dyes, which is known as mutagenic and carcinogenic. These results point to the hazard of the hair dye exposure to human health.

  2. Protective effect of lactofermented red beetroot juice against aberrant crypt foci formation, genotoxicity of fecal water and oxidative stress induced by 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b] pyridine in rats model.

    PubMed

    Klewicka, Elżbieta; Nowak, Adriana; Zduńczyk, Zenon; Juśkiewicz, Jerzy; Cukrowska, Bożena

    2012-11-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of beetroot juice fermented by Lactobacillus brevis 0944 and Lactobacillus paracasei 0920 (FBJ) on carcinogen induction of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in rat colon. 2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b] pyridine (PhIP) was used as carcinogen, which was administrated intragastrically at a dose of 10 μg/day, every day of the experiment. Additionally, we investigated the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of fecal water from experimental animals in the Caco-2 cell line, evaluated by MTT test and the comet assay, respectively, as well as by the count of bacteria adhered to colon epithelium assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Oxidative stress in rats was expressed by measuring serum antioxidant status and the level of malondialdehyde in the kidneys and liver. The experimental rats were divided into four groups based on diet type: basal diet, basal diet supplemented with FBJ, basal diet and PhIP treatment, and basal diet supplemented with FBJ and PhIP treatment. FBJ significantly reduced the number of ACF in PhIP-treated rats (from 59 ± 18 to 26 ± 4). Moreover, the number of extensive aberrations (more than 4 crypts in a focus) decreased from 52 ± 18 to 18 ± 4. Fecal water obtained from rats fed with a PhIP-containing diet induced pronounced cytotoxic and genotoxic effects in Caco-2 cells, but FBJ supplementation of the diet abolished these effects. In groups fed dietary PhP and FBJ the latter was found to increase the antioxidant status of serum from 40% to 66% depending on the fraction. Reduced concentration of malondialdehyde was found only in the kidneys of rats fed with PhIP and FBJ. FBJ present in the diet of rats causes a reduction of MDA in the kidneys from 118.7 nmol/g tissue to 100 nmol/g tissue. The presence of FBJ in the diet of rats significantly increased the count of bacteria, including Lactobacillus/Enterococcus and Bacteroides-Prevotella group adhered to colonic epithelium. In conclusion

  3. Anodically Grown Titania Nanotube Induced Cytotoxicity has Genotoxic Origins

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, M. Sheikh; Torabi, Aida; Paulose, Maggie; Kumar, D. Sakthi; Varghese, Oomman K.

    2017-01-01

    Nanoarchitectures of titania (TiO2) have been widely investigated for a number of medical applications including implants and drug delivery. Although titania is extensively used in the food, drug and cosmetic industries, biocompatibility of nanoscale titania is still under careful scrutiny due to the conflicting reports on its interaction with cellular matter. For an accurate insight, we performed in vitro studies on the response of human dermal fibroblast cells toward pristine titania nanotubes fabricated by anodic oxidation. The nanotubes at low concentrations were seen to induce toxicity to the cells, whereas at higher concentrations the cell vitality remained on par with controls. Further investigations revealed an increase in the G0 phase cell population depicting that majority of cells were in the resting rather than active phase. Though the mitochondrial set-up did not exhibit any signs of stress, significantly enhanced reactive oxygen species production in the nuclear compartment was noted. The TiO2 nanotubes were believed to have gained access to the nuclear machinery and caused increased stress leading to genotoxicity. This interesting property of the nanotubes could be utilized to kill cancer cells, especially if the nanotubes are functionalized for a specific target, thus eliminating the need for any chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:28165491

  4. Sewage sludge does not induce genotoxicity and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Paula Regina Pereira; Barbisan, Luis Fernando; Dagli, Maria Lúcia Zaidan; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento

    2012-07-01

    Through a series of experiments, the genotoxic/mutagenic and carcinogenic potential of sewage sludge was assessed. Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to four groups: Group 1 - negative control; Group 2 - liver carcinogenesis initiated by diethylnitrosamine (DEN; 200 mg/kg i.p.); Group 3 and G4-liver carcinogenesis initiated by DEN and fed 10,000 ppm or 50,000 ppm of sewage sludge. The animals were submitted to a 70% partial hepatectomy at the 3(rd) week. Livers were processed for routine histological analysis and immunohistochemistry, in order to detect glutathione S-transferase positive altered hepatocyte foci (GST-P(+) AHF). Peripheral blood samples for the comet assay were obtained from the periorbital plexus immediately prior to sacrificing. Polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs) were analyzed in femoral bone-marrow smears, and the frequencies of those micronucleated (MNPCEs) registered. There was no sewage-sludge-induced increase in frequency of either DNA damage in peripheral blood leucocytes, or MNPCEs in the femoral bone marrow. Also, there was no increase in the levels of DNA damage, in the frequency of MNPCEs, and in the development of GST-P AHF when compared with the respective control group.

  5. Anodically Grown Titania Nanotube Induced Cytotoxicity has Genotoxic Origins.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, M Sheikh; Torabi, Aida; Paulose, Maggie; Kumar, D Sakthi; Varghese, Oomman K

    2017-02-06

    Nanoarchitectures of titania (TiO2) have been widely investigated for a number of medical applications including implants and drug delivery. Although titania is extensively used in the food, drug and cosmetic industries, biocompatibility of nanoscale titania is still under careful scrutiny due to the conflicting reports on its interaction with cellular matter. For an accurate insight, we performed in vitro studies on the response of human dermal fibroblast cells toward pristine titania nanotubes fabricated by anodic oxidation. The nanotubes at low concentrations were seen to induce toxicity to the cells, whereas at higher concentrations the cell vitality remained on par with controls. Further investigations revealed an increase in the G0 phase cell population depicting that majority of cells were in the resting rather than active phase. Though the mitochondrial set-up did not exhibit any signs of stress, significantly enhanced reactive oxygen species production in the nuclear compartment was noted. The TiO2 nanotubes were believed to have gained access to the nuclear machinery and caused increased stress leading to genotoxicity. This interesting property of the nanotubes could be utilized to kill cancer cells, especially if the nanotubes are functionalized for a specific target, thus eliminating the need for any chemotherapeutic agents.

  6. Anodically Grown Titania Nanotube Induced Cytotoxicity has Genotoxic Origins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, M. Sheikh; Torabi, Aida; Paulose, Maggie; Kumar, D. Sakthi; Varghese, Oomman K.

    2017-02-01

    Nanoarchitectures of titania (TiO2) have been widely investigated for a number of medical applications including implants and drug delivery. Although titania is extensively used in the food, drug and cosmetic industries, biocompatibility of nanoscale titania is still under careful scrutiny due to the conflicting reports on its interaction with cellular matter. For an accurate insight, we performed in vitro studies on the response of human dermal fibroblast cells toward pristine titania nanotubes fabricated by anodic oxidation. The nanotubes at low concentrations were seen to induce toxicity to the cells, whereas at higher concentrations the cell vitality remained on par with controls. Further investigations revealed an increase in the G0 phase cell population depicting that majority of cells were in the resting rather than active phase. Though the mitochondrial set-up did not exhibit any signs of stress, significantly enhanced reactive oxygen species production in the nuclear compartment was noted. The TiO2 nanotubes were believed to have gained access to the nuclear machinery and caused increased stress leading to genotoxicity. This interesting property of the nanotubes could be utilized to kill cancer cells, especially if the nanotubes are functionalized for a specific target, thus eliminating the need for any chemotherapeutic agents.

  7. Sewage sludge does not induce genotoxicity and carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Paula Regina Pereira; Barbisan, Luis Fernando; Dagli, Maria Lúcia Zaidan; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento

    2012-01-01

    Through a series of experiments, the genotoxic/mutagenic and carcinogenic potential of sewage sludge was assessed. Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to four groups: Group 1 - negative control; Group 2 - liver carcinogenesis initiated by diethylnitrosamine (DEN; 200 mg/kg i.p.); Group 3 and G4-liver carcinogenesis initiated by DEN and fed 10,000 ppm or 50,000 ppm of sewage sludge. The animals were submitted to a 70% partial hepatectomy at the 3rd week. Livers were processed for routine histological analysis and immunohistochemistry, in order to detect glutathione S-transferase positive altered hepatocyte foci (GST-P+ AHF). Peripheral blood samples for the comet assay were obtained from the periorbital plexus immediately prior to sacrificing. Polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs) were analyzed in femoral bone-marrow smears, and the frequencies of those micronucleated (MNPCEs) registered. There was no sewage-sludge-induced increase in frequency of either DNA damage in peripheral blood leucocytes, or MNPCEs in the femoral bone marrow. Also, there was no increase in the levels of DNA damage, in the frequency of MNPCEs, and in the development of GST-P AHF when compared with the respective control group. PMID:23055806

  8. Red meat intake-induced increases in fecal water genotoxicity correlate with pro-carcinogenic gene expression changes in the human colon.

    PubMed

    Hebels, Dennie G A J; Sveje, Kirstine M; de Kok, Marloes C; van Herwijnen, Marcel H M; Kuhnle, Gunter G C; Engels, Leopold G J B; Vleugels-Simon, Carla B E M; Mares, Wout G N; Pierik, Marieke; Masclee, Ad A M; Kleinjans, Jos C S; de Kok, Theo M C M

    2012-02-01

    Red meat consumption is associated with an increased colorectal cancer (CRC) risk, which may be due to an increased endogenous formation of genotoxic N-nitroso compounds (NOCs). To assess the impact of red meat consumption on potential risk factors of CRC, we investigated the effect of a 7-day dietary red meat intervention in human subjects on endogenous NOC formation and fecal water genotoxicity in relation to genome-wide transcriptomic changes induced in colonic tissue. The intervention showed no effect on fecal NOC excretion but fecal water genotoxicity significantly increased in response to red meat intake. Colonic inflammation caused by inflammatory bowel disease, which has been suggested to stimulate endogenous nitrosation, did not influence fecal NOC excretion or fecal water genotoxicity. Transcriptomic analyses revealed that genes significantly correlating with the increase in fecal water genotoxicity were involved in biological pathways indicative of genotoxic effects, including modifications in DNA damage repair, cell cycle, and apoptosis pathways. Moreover, WNT signaling and nucleosome remodeling pathways were modulated which are implicated in human CRC development. We conclude that the gene expression changes identified in this study corroborate the genotoxic potential of diets high in red meat and point towards a potentially increased CRC risk in humans.

  9. Therapeutic efficacies of Coriandrum sativum aqueous extract against metronidazole-induced genotoxicity in Channa punctatus peripheral erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Talapatra, Soumendra Nath; Dasgupta, Subham; Guha, Gunjan; Auddy, Moumita; Mukhopadhyay, Aniruddha

    2010-12-01

    Metronidazole (MTZ), a nitroimidazole drug, is primarily used as an anti-protozoan or an anti-bacterial agent in humans, although its genotoxic and carcinogenic effects have been widely reported, particularly in aquatic organisms. MTZ may induce DNA damages through single-strand breaks, modification of bases, DNA-DNA and DNA-protein cross-links, ultimately leading to apoptosis or necrosis. Here, we have assessed the genotoxicity of MTZ in the peripheral erythrocytes of Channa punctatus, using micronucleation (MN) and binucleation (BN) as genotoxicity markers. The therapeutic potential of aqueous extract of Coriandrum sativum against MTZ-induced genotoxicity has also been examined. The results show significant (P<0.05) increase in both MN and BN formation due to MTZ treatment. Such aberrations were higher in smaller fish samples for a particular dosage of MTZ, as established by correlation analysis between fish body weight and MN/BN count at P<0.05. However, such degenerative damages were found to be alleviated by a great extent due to treatment with C. sativum leaf extract. Hence, we establish that MTZ can produce considerable degrees of micronucleus and binucleus formation in peripheral erythrocytes of C. punctatus, and such deleterious effect of MTZ treatment can be mitigated by aqueous extract of C. sativum leaves.

  10. Mutagenic and genotoxic effects of Guelma's urban wastewater, Algeria.

    PubMed

    Tabet, Mouna; Abda, Ahlem; Benouareth, Djamel E; Liman, Recep; Konuk, Muhsin; Khallef, Messaouda; Taher, Ali

    2015-02-01

    Assessment of water pollution and its effect upon river biotic communities and human health is indispensable to develop control and management strategies. In this study, the mutagenicity and genotoxicity of urban wastewater of the city of Guelma in Algeria were examined between April 2012 and April 2013. For this, two biological tests, namely Amesand chromosomal aberrations (CA) test in Allium cepa root tips were employed on the samples collected from five different sampling stages (S1-S5). In Ames test, two strains of Salmonella typhimurium TA98 and TA100 with or without metabolic activation (S9-mix) were used. All water samples were found to be mutagenic to S. typhimurium TA98 with or without S9-mix. A significant decrease in mitotic index (MI) was observed with a decrease in the percentage of cells in the prophase and an increase in the telophase. Main aberrations observed were anaphase bridges, disturbed anaphase-telophase cells, vagrants and stickiness in anaphase-telophase cells. All treatments of wastewater in April 2012, at S5 in July 2012, at S1 and S5 in November 2012, at S5 in February 2013, and at S1 in April 2013 induced CA when compared to the negative control. Some physicochemical parameters and heavy metals (Cd, Pb, and Cu) were also recorded in the samples examined.

  11. Detection of genotoxic effects of drinking water disinfection by-products using Vicia faba bioassay.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yu; Tan, Li; Zhang, Shao-Hui; Zuo, Yu-Ting; Han, Xue; Liu, Na; Lu, Wen-Qing; Liu, Ai-Lin

    2017-01-01

    Plant-based bioassays have gained wide use among the toxicological and/or ecotoxicological assessment procedures because of their simplicity, sensitivity, low cost, and reliability. The present study describes the use of Vicia faba (V. faba) micronucleus (MN) test and V. faba comet assay in the evaluation of the genotoxic potential of disinfection by-products (DBPs) commonly found in chlorine-disinfected drinking water. Five haloacetic acids and three halogenated acetonitriles were chosen as representatives of DBPs in this study because they are of potentially great public health risk. Results of the MN test indicated that monochloroacetic acid (MCA), monobromoacetic acid (MBA), dichloroacetic acid (DCA), dibromoacetic acid (DBA), trichloroacetic acid (TCA), and trichloroacetonitrile (TCAN) caused a statistically significant increase in MN frequency in V. faba root tip cells. However, no genotoxic response was observed for dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN) and dibromoacetonitrile (DBAN). Results of the comet assay showed that all tested DBPs induced a statistically significant increase in genomic DNA damage to V. faba root tip cells. On considering the capacity to detect genomic damage of a different nature, we suggest that a combination of V. faba MN test and V. faba comet assay is a useful tool for the detection of genotoxic effects of DBPs. It is worthy of assessing the feasibility of using V. faba comet assay combined with V. faba MN test to screen for the genotoxic activity of chlorinated drinking water in future work.

  12. The efficiency of combined CaO/electrochemical treatment in removal of acid mine drainage induced toxicity and genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Radić, Sandra; Vujčić, Valerija; Cvetković, Želimira; Cvjetko, Petra; Oreščanin, Višnja

    2014-01-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is a by-product of the mining industry that has a detrimental effect on aquatic plant and animal life due to high load of heavy metals and sulfates. In the present study, the toxic and genotoxic potential of AMD prior to and following combination of neutralization/electrocoagulation processes was evaluated using several bioassays and selected parameters. Regardless of pH correction of AMD prior to Daphnia bioassay, high acute toxicity was observed in Daphnia magna. The mine leachate also induced strong phyto-, cyto- and genotoxicity to Allium cepa roots. Short term exposure to AMD inhibited duckweed growth and chlorophyll a content and simultaneously promoted lipid peroxidation and DNA damage despite duckweed capability to upregulate antioxidative defense mechanisms. The results show that observed (geno)toxicity could be related to oxidative stress most probably induced by toxic metal action. However, influence of low pH as a contributing factor in the phytotoxicity of AMD cannot be excluded. The application of combined treatment eliminated genotoxicity and was highly efficient in reducing toxicity of AMD. Thus, the method seems to be suitable for treatment of AMD waters enabling their safe discharge to an aquatic environment.

  13. Genotoxic effects in wild rodents (Rattus rattus and Mus musculus) in an open coal mining area.

    PubMed

    León, Grethel; Pérez, Lyda Espitia; Linares, Juan Carlos; Hartmann, Andreas; Quintana, Milton

    2007-06-15

    Coal is a mixture of a variety of compounds containing mutagenic and carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Exposure to coal is considered as an important non-cellular and cellular source of reactive oxygen species that can induce DNA damage. In addition, spontaneous combustion can occur in coal mining areas, further releasing compounds with detrimental effects on the environment. In this study the comet assay was used to investigate potential genotoxic effects of coal mining activities in peripheral blood cells of the wild rodents Rattus rattus and Mus musculus. The study was conducted in a coal mining area of the Municipio de Puerto Libertador, South West of the Departamento de Cordoba, Colombia. Animals from two areas in the coal mining zone and a control area located in the Municipio de Lorica were investigated. The results showed evidence that exposure to coal results in elevated primary DNA lesions in blood cells of rodents. Three different parameters for DNA damage were assessed, namely, DNA damage index, migration length and percentage damaged cells. All parameters showed statistically significantly higher values in mice and rats from the coal mining area in comparison to the animals from the control area. The parameter "DNA Damage Index" was found to be most sensitive and to best indicate a genotoxic hazard. Both species investigated were shown to be sensitive indicators of environmental genotoxicity caused by coal mining activities. In summary, our study constitutes the first investigation of potential genotoxic effects of open coal mining carried out in Puerto Libertador. The investigations provide a guide for measures to evaluate genotoxic hazards, thereby contributing to the development of appropriate measures and regulations for more careful operations during coal mining.

  14. Genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of testosterone cypionate (deposteron(®)).

    PubMed

    Meireles, José Roberto C; Oliveira, Susie V; Costa-Neto, Antônio O; Cerqueira, Eneida M M

    2013-05-15

    The indiscriminate use of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) has motivated researchers to investigate the mutagenic action of these substances. The present study, using the mouse bone marrow micronucleus test, evaluates the genotoxic potential of testosterone cypionate (deposteron). Male Swiss mice received intramuscular injections of deposteron at three doses. The animals were sacrificed 24, 48, or 72h after treatment and bone marrow was removed immediately, followed by scoring to count the micronuclei in 2000 polychromatic erythrocytes (PCE). Two hundred erythrocytes/animal were analyzed to determine the PCE-NCE (normochromatic erythrocyte) relationship and to determine the cytotoxic effects. The animals treated with deposteron at the highest dose presented greater numbers of micronuclei. The highest dose caused a decrease in the PCE/NCE relationship, indicating a cytotoxic effect. We conclude that deposteron is genotoxic and cytotoxic in mice.

  15. Genotoxicity and growth inhibition effects of aniline on wheat.

    PubMed

    Tao, Nan; Liu, Guanyi; Bai, Lu; Tang, Lu; Guo, Changhong

    2017-02-01

    Aniline is a synthetic compound widely used in industrial and pesticide production, which can lead to environmental pollution. Its high concentration in rivers and lakes is hazardous to aquatic species. Although the mechanism of aniline toxicity has been studied extensively in animals and algae, little is known about its genotoxicity in plants. In this study, we investigated the genotoxicity effects of aniline on wheat root tip cells. The mitotic index of wheat root tip cells decreased when the aniline test concentration was higher than 10 mg L(-1). The frequency of micronucleus and chromosomal aberrations increased at aniline concentrations ranging between 5 and 100 mg L(-1), and reached 23.3‰ ± 0.3‰ and 8.9‰ ± 0.68‰, respectively, at an aniline concentration of 100 mg L(-1). These values were sevenfold higher than those in the control group. The wheat seedlings showed various growth toxicity effects under different concentrations of aniline. The shoot height, root length, fresh weight, and dry weight of wheat seedlings decreased at aniline test concentrations ranging between 25 and 200 mg L(-1). At 200 mg L(-1) aniline, the dry weight was only one-third that of the control group. Overall, the findings of this study provide evidence that aniline is a serious environmental pollutant causing deleterious genotoxic effects on wheat root tip cells and growth toxic effects on wheat seedlings. However, understanding the mechanisms that underlie aniline genotoxicity in plants needs further study.

  16. Curcumin attenuates acrylamide-induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in HepG2 cells by ROS scavenging.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jun; Liu, Yong; Jia, Li; Jiang, Li-Ping; Geng, Cheng-Yan; Yao, Xiao-Feng; Kong, Ying; Jiang, Bao-Na; Zhong, Lai-Fu

    2008-12-24

    Acrylamide (AA), a proven rodent carcinogen, has recently been discovered in foods heated at high temperatures. This finding raises public health concerns. In our previous study, we found that AA caused DNA fragments and increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and induced genotoxicity and weak cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells. Presently, curcumin, a natural antioxidant compound present in turmeric was evaluated for its protective effects. The results showed that curcumin at the concentration of 2.5 microg/mL significantly reduced AA-induced ROS production, DNA fragments, micronuclei formation, and cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells. The effect of PEG-catalase on protecting against AA-induced cytotoxicity suggests that AA-induced cytotoxicity is directly dependent on hydrogen peroxide production. These data suggest that curcumin could attenuate the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity induced by AA in HepG2 cells. The protection is probably mediated by an antioxidant protective mechanism. Consumption of curcumin may be a plausible way to prevent AA-mediated genotoxicity.

  17. Investigation of antigenotoxic potential of Syzygium cumini extract (SCE) on cyclophosphamide-induced genotoxicity and oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Pankaj; Patel, Rakesh K; Tripathi, Rina; Kanzariya, Nilesh R

    2013-10-01

    The present study investigated the protective effects of Syzygium cumini extract (SCE; 100 and 200 mg/kg) against genotoxicity and oxidative stress (OS) induced by cyclophosphamide (CP) in mice. Animals were received 14 days pretreatment (oral) of SCE, followed by induction of genotoxicity by CP (40 mg/kg), 24 hours before sacrifice. Mice bone marrow chromosomal aberration assay, micronucleus assay, and sperm abnormality assay were employed for the study. Activities of hepatic antioxidant enzymes were also investigated. Phytochemical investigation was done to determine total phenolic and flavonoid content in SCE. Results showed that CP produced a significant increase in average percentage of aberrant metaphases and chromosomal aberrations (CAs) excluding gap, and micronuclei (MN) formation in polychromatic erythrocytes produced cytotoxicity in mouse bone marrow cells and induced abnormal sperms in a male germ line. CP also markedly inhibited the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and reduced glutahione (GSH) and increased malondialdehyde (MDA) content. Pretreatments with SCE significantly inhibited the frequencies of aberrant metaphases, CAs, MN formation, and cytotoxicity in mouse bone marrow cells induced by CP. SCE also produced a significant reduction of abnormal sperm and antagonized the reduction of CP-induced SOD, CAT, and GSH activities and inhibited increased MDA content in the liver. Total phenolic content present in SCE was 24.68%, whereas total flavonoids were calculated as 3.80%. SCE has a protective effect against genotoxicity and OS induced by CP.

  18. Oxidative and genotoxic effects of 900 MHz electromagnetic fields in the earthworm Eisenia fetida.

    PubMed

    Tkalec, Mirta; Stambuk, Anamaria; Srut, Maja; Malarić, Krešimir; Klobučar, Göran I V

    2013-04-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) can have various biological effects. In this study the oxidative and genotoxic effects were investigated in earthworms Eisenia fetida exposed in vivo to RF-EMF at the mobile phone frequency (900 MHz). Earthworms were exposed to the homogeneous RF-EMF at field levels of 10, 23, 41 and 120 V m(-1) for a period of 2h using a Gigahertz Transversal Electromagnetic (GTEM) cell. At the field level of 23 V m(-1) the effect of longer exposure (4h) and field modulation (80% AM 1 kHz sinusoidal) was investigated as well. All exposure treatments induced significant genotoxic effect in earthworms coelomocytes detected by the Comet assay, demonstrating DNA damaging capacity of 900 MHz electromagnetic radiation. Field modulation additionally increased the genotoxic effect. Moreover, our results indicated the induction of antioxidant stress response in terms of enhanced catalase and glutathione reductase activity as a result of the RF-EMF exposure, and demonstrated the generation of lipid and protein oxidative damage. Antioxidant responses and the potential of RF-EMF to induce damage to lipids, proteins and DNA differed depending on the field level applied, modulation of the field and duration of E. fetida exposure to 900 MHz electromagnetic radiation. Nature of detected DNA lesions and oxidative stress as the mechanism of action for the induction of DNA damage are discussed.

  19. Effects of radiation and vitamin C treatment on metronidazole genotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Das Roy, Lopamudra; Giri, Sarbani; Singh, Supriya; Giri, Anirudha

    2013-05-15

    The impact of exposure to low dose radiation (LDR) on human health is not clear. Besides, cross adaptation or sensitization with pharmaceutical agents may modify the risk of LDR. In the present study, we analyzed the interaction of radiation and metronidazole (MTZ) in inducing chromosome aberration (CA) and micronucleus (MN) in the bone marrow cells of Balb/C mice in vivo. Further, we evaluated the efficacy of vitamin C to reduce MTZ induced genotoxicity. We found that 10, 20 and 40mg/kg of MTZ induced dose dependent increase in the frequency of CA (r=0.9923, P<0.01) as well as MN (r=0.9823, P<0.05) in polychromatic erythrocytes. However, MTZ did not affect the ratio of polychromatic erythrocytes to normochromatic erythrocytes indicating lack of cytotoxicity. Supplementation with vitamin C prior to MTZ treatment significantly reduced the frequency of CA (P<0.001) as well as MN (P<0.001). Radiation (0.5Gy) exposure prior to MTZ treatment produced a less than additive (for CA) to additive (for MN) effects. However, radiation exposure following MTZ treatment produced additive (for CA) and synergistic (for MN) effects. Further, vitamin C pre-treatment also reduced the genotoxicity indices following the combined treatment of MTZ and radiation. Our findings suggest that MTZ may sensitize bone marrow cells to radiation exposure and enhances genotoxicity. We recommend more studies on the interaction of LDR and marketed pharmaceuticals to minimize possible harmful outcomes through appropriate precautionary measures.

  20. Toxicity and genotoxicity in Astyanax bimaculatus (Characidae) induced by microcystins from a bloom of Microcystis spp

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Studies of genotoxicity in fish caused by cyanobacterial microcystins can be useful both in determining the sensitivity of native species, as well as comparing exposure routes. The genotoxicity caused by the microcystins LR and LA from a bloom collected in a eutrophic lake, was revealed in the fish Astyanaxbimaculatus, a native species from South America. LC50 (72 h) was determined as 242.81 μg L -1 and LD50 (72 h) as 49.19 μg kg -1 bw. There was a significant increase of DNA damage in peripheral erythrocytes, following intraperitoneal injection (ip) with tested concentrations of 24.58 μg kg -1 bw and 36.88 μg kg -1 bw, as well as through body exposure to a concentration of 103.72 μg L -1 . Micronucleus (MN) induction was observed after ip injections of 24.58 μg kg -1 bw and 36.88 μg kg -1 bw for 72 h, as well as following body exposure for 72 at 103.72 μg L -1 . Thus, both exposure routes resulted in MN induction and DNA damage. Apoptosis-necrosis testing was carried out only by ip injection with concentrations of 24.58 μg kg -1 bw and 36.88 μg kg- 1 bw. Exposure to microcystins at lower concentrations induced more apoptosis than necrosis in peripheral erythrocytes, whereas exposure at higher concentrations gave rise to both conditions. Thus, Astyanax bimaculatus can be considered as a species sensitive to the genotoxic effects caused by microcystins. PMID:21637586

  1. Genotoxic effect of ethacrynic acid and impact of antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Ward, William M; Hoffman, Jared D; Loo, George

    2015-07-01

    It is known that ethacrynic acid (EA) decreases the intracellular levels of glutathione. Whether the anticipated oxidative stress affects the structural integrity of DNA is unknown. Therefore, DNA damage was assessed in EA-treated HCT116 cells, and the impact of several antioxidants was also determined. EA caused both concentration-dependent and time-dependent DNA damage that eventually resulted in cell death. Unexpectedly, the DNA damage caused by EA was intensified by either ascorbic acid or trolox. In contrast, EA-induced DNA damage was reduced by N-acetylcysteine and by the iron chelator, deferoxamine. In elucidating the DNA damage, it was determined that EA increased the production of reactive oxygen species, which was inhibited by N-acetylcysteine and deferoxamine but not by ascorbic acid and trolox. Also, EA decreased glutathione levels, which were inhibited by N-acetylcysteine. But, ascorbic acid, trolox, and deferoxamine neither inhibited nor enhanced the capacity of EA to decrease glutathione. Interestingly, the glutathione synthesis inhibitor, buthionine sulfoxime, lowered glutathione to a similar degree as EA, but no noticeable DNA damage was found. Nevertheless, buthionine sulfoxime potentiated the glutathione-lowering effect of EA and intensified the DNA damage caused by EA. Additionally, in examining redox-sensitive stress gene expression, it was found that EA increased HO-1, GADD153, and p21mRNA expression, in association with increased nuclear localization of Nrf-2 and p53 proteins. In contrast to ascorbic acid, trolox, and deferoxamine, N-acetylcysteine suppressed the EA-induced upregulation of GADD153, although not of HO-1. Overall, it is concluded that EA has genotoxic properties that can be amplified by certain antioxidants.

  2. Dry olive leaf extract counteracts L-thyroxine-induced genotoxicity in human peripheral blood leukocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Topalović, Dijana Žukovec; Živković, Lada; Čabarkapa, Andrea; Djelić, Ninoslav; Bajić, Vladan; Dekanski, Dragana; Spremo-Potparević, Biljana

    2015-01-01

    The thyroid hormones change the rate of basal metabolism, modulating the consumption of oxygen and causing production of reactive oxygen species, which leads to the development of oxidative stress and DNA strand breaks. Olive (Olea europaea L.) leaf contains many potentially bioactive compounds, making it one of the most potent natural antioxidants. The objective of this study was to evaluate the genotoxicity of L-thyroxine and to investigate antioxidative and antigenotoxic potential of the standardized oleuropein-rich dry olive leaf extract (DOLE) against hydrogen peroxide and L-thyroxine-induced DNA damage in human peripheral blood leukocytes by using the comet assay. Various concentrations of the extract were tested with both DNA damage inducers, under two different experimental conditions, pretreatment and posttreatment. Results indicate that L-thyroxine exhibited genotoxic effect and that DOLE displayed protective effect against thyroxine-induced genotoxicity. The number of cells with DNA damage, was significantly reduced, in both pretreated and posttreated samples (P < 0.05). Comparing the beneficial effect of all tested concentrations of DOLE, in both experimental protocols, it appears that extract was more effective in reducing DNA damage in the pretreatment, exhibiting protective role against L-thyroxine effect. This feature of DOLE can be explained by its capacity to act as potent free radical scavenger.

  3. Dry Olive Leaf Extract Counteracts L-Thyroxine-Induced Genotoxicity in Human Peripheral Blood Leukocytes In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Žukovec Topalović, Dijana; Živković, Lada; Čabarkapa, Andrea; Djelić, Ninoslav; Bajić, Vladan; Spremo-Potparević, Biljana

    2015-01-01

    The thyroid hormones change the rate of basal metabolism, modulating the consumption of oxygen and causing production of reactive oxygen species, which leads to the development of oxidative stress and DNA strand breaks. Olive (Olea europaea L.) leaf contains many potentially bioactive compounds, making it one of the most potent natural antioxidants. The objective of this study was to evaluate the genotoxicity of L-thyroxine and to investigate antioxidative and antigenotoxic potential of the standardized oleuropein-rich dry olive leaf extract (DOLE) against hydrogen peroxide and L-thyroxine-induced DNA damage in human peripheral blood leukocytes by using the comet assay. Various concentrations of the extract were tested with both DNA damage inducers, under two different experimental conditions, pretreatment and posttreatment. Results indicate that L-thyroxine exhibited genotoxic effect and that DOLE displayed protective effect against thyroxine-induced genotoxicity. The number of cells with DNA damage, was significantly reduced, in both pretreated and posttreated samples (P < 0.05). Comparing the beneficial effect of all tested concentrations of DOLE, in both experimental protocols, it appears that extract was more effective in reducing DNA damage in the pretreatment, exhibiting protective role against L-thyroxine effect. This feature of DOLE can be explained by its capacity to act as potent free radical scavenger. PMID:25789081

  4. Evaluation of genotoxic effects of the herbicide dicamba using in vivo and in vitro test systems

    SciTech Connect

    Perocco, P.; Ancora, G.; Rani, P.; Valenti, A.M.; Mazzullo, M.; Colacci, A.; Grilli, S. )

    1990-01-01

    The genotoxic effects of the herbicide dicamba have been studied by measuring (1) the unwinding rate of liver DNA from intraperitoneally treated rats (fluorimetric assay); (2) DNA repair as unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) induced in cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HPBL); and (3) sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) in HPBL. Results show that dicamba is capable of inducing DNA damage since it significantly increases the unwinding rate of rat liver DNA in vivo and also induces UDS in HPBL in vitro in the presence of exogenous metabolic activation (S-9 mix). Furthermore, dicamba causes a very slight increase in SCE frequency in HPBL in vitro.

  5. Capsaicin-induced genotoxic stress does not promote apoptosis in A549 human lung and DU145 prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lewinska, Anna; Jarosz, Paulina; Czech, Joanna; Rzeszutek, Iwona; Bielak-Zmijewska, Anna; Grabowska, Wioleta; Wnuk, Maciej

    2015-02-01

    Capsaicin is the major pungent component of the hot chili peppers of the genus Capsicum, which are consumed worldwide as a food additive. More recently, the selective action of capsaicin against cancer cells has been reported. Capsaicin was found to induce apoptosis and inhibit proliferation of a wide range of cancer cells in vitro, whereas being inactive against normal cells. As data on capsaicin-induced genotoxicity are limited and the effects of capsaicin against human lung A549 and DU145 prostate cancer cells were not explored in detail, we were interested in determining whether capsaicin-associated genotoxicity may also provoke A549 and DU145 cell death. Capsaicin-induced decrease in metabolic activity and cell proliferation, and changes in the cell cycle were limited to high concentrations used (≥ 100 μM), whereas, at lower concentrations, capsaicin stimulated both DNA double strand breaks and micronuclei production. Capsaicin was unable to provoke apoptotic cell death when used up to 250 μM concentrations. Capsaicin induced oxidative stress, but was ineffective in provoking the dissipation of the mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential. A different magnitude of p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1) recruitment contributed to diverse capsaicin-induced genotoxic effects in DU145 and A549 cells. Capsaicin was also found to be a DNA hypermethylating agent in A549 cells. In summary, we have shown that genotoxic effects of capsaicin may contribute to limited susceptibility of DU145 and A549 cancer cells to apoptosis in vitro, which may question the usefulness of capsaicin-based anticancer therapy, at least in a case of lung and prostate cancer.

  6. Arsenic-Induced Genotoxicity and Genetic Susceptibility to Arsenic-Related Pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Faita, Francesca; Cori, Liliana; Bianchi, Fabrizio; Andreassi, Maria Grazia

    2013-01-01

    The arsenic (As) exposure represents an important problem in many parts of the World. Indeed, it is estimated that over 100 million individuals are exposed to arsenic, mainly through a contamination of groundwaters. Chronic exposure to As is associated with adverse effects on human health such as cancers, cardiovascular diseases, neurological diseases and the rate of morbidity and mortality in populations exposed is alarming. The purpose of this review is to summarize the genotoxic effects of As in the cells as well as to discuss the importance of signaling and repair of arsenic-induced DNA damage. The current knowledge of specific polymorphisms in candidate genes that confer susceptibility to arsenic exposure is also reviewed. We also discuss the perspectives offered by the determination of biological markers of early effect on health, incorporating genetic polymorphisms, with biomarkers for exposure to better evaluate exposure-response clinical relationships as well as to develop novel preventative strategies for arsenic- health effects. PMID:23583964

  7. Chlorpyrifos-based insecticides induced genotoxic and cytotoxic effects in the ten spotted live-bearer fish, Cnesterodon decemmaculatus (Jenyns, 1842).

    PubMed

    Vera-Candioti, Josefina; Soloneski, Sonia; Larramendy, Marcelo L

    2014-12-01

    Mortality, genotoxicity, and cytotoxicity of the 48% chlorpyrifos (CPF)-based formulations Lorsban* 48E(®) and CPF Zamba(®) were evaluated on Cnesterodon decemmaculatus (Jenyns, 1842) (Pisces, Poeciliidae) under laboratory conditions. Induction of micronucleus (MN) and alterations in the erythrocyte/erythroblast frequencies were employed as end points for genotoxicity and cytotoxicity, respectively. For Lorsban* 48E(®) , mean values of 0.13 and 0.03 mg/L were determined for LC50 at 24 and 96 h, respectively, and these concentrations reached mean values of 0.40 and 0.21 mg/L for CPF Zamba(®) . Mortality values increased as a positive linear function of the CPF Zamba(®) concentrations, but not for Lorsban* 48E(®) concentrations. There was no significant relationship between mortality and exposure time within the 0-96 h period for both formulations. LC50 values indicated that the fish were seven fold more sensitive to Lorsban* 48E(®) than to CPF Zamba(®) . Lorsban* 48E(®) within the concentration range of 0.008-0.025 mg/L increased MN frequency at both 48 and 96 h of treatment. Similar results were also observed when fish were exposed to 0.052-0.155 mg/L of CPF Zamba(®) , regardless of the exposure time. Cellular cytotoxicity was found after Lorsban* 48E(®) and CPF Zamba(®) treatments for all concentrations and time exposures, estimated by a decrease in the frequency of mature erythrocytes and a concomitant enhanced frequency of erythroblasts in circulating blood. Furthermore, our results demonstrated that Lorsban* 48E(®) and CPF Zamba(®) should be considered as CPF-based commercial formulations with marked genotoxic and cytotoxic properties.

  8. Investigation of antimutagenic potential of Foeniculum vulgare essential oil on cyclophosphamide induced genotoxicity and oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Pankaj; Tripathi, Rina; Patel, Rakesh K; Pancholi, Shyam S

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated the protective effects of Foeniculum vulgare (fennel) essential oil (FEO) against genotoxicity induced by cyclophosphamide (CP). Mice bone marrow chromosomal aberration (CA), micronucleus, and sperm abnormality assays were employed to measure genotoxicity and cytotoxicity, respectively. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione (GSH), catalase (CAT), and malondialdehyde (MDA) content in the liver were also investigated spectrophotometrically. Animals were administered two different doses of FEO (1 and 2 mL/kg) continuously for 3 days at intervals of 24 hours by the oral route before tissue sampling. The results showed that CP produced a significant increase in the average percentage of aberrant metaphases and CAs, excluding gap and micronuclei formation in polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs), produced cytotoxicity in mouse bone marrow cells, and induced abnormal sperms in the male germ line. CP also markedly inhibited the activities of SOD, CAT, and GSH and increased MDA content. Pretreatments with FEO significantly inhibited the frequencies of aberrant metaphases, CAs, micronuclei formation, and cytotoxicity in mouse bone marrow cells induced by CP and also produced a significant reduction of abnormal sperm and antagonized the reduction of CP-induced SOD, CAT, and GSH activities and inhibited increased MDA content in the liver. FEO inhibits genotoxicity and oxidative stress induced by CP.

  9. Genotoxic and biochemical changes in Baccharis trimera induced by coal contamination.

    PubMed

    Menezes, A P S; Da Silva, J; Rossato, R R; Santos, M S; Decker, N; Da Silva, F R; Cruz, C; Dihl, R R; Lehmann, M; Ferraz, A B F

    2015-04-01

    The processing and combustion of coal in thermal power plants release anthropogenic chemicals into the environment. Baccharis trimera is a common plant used in folk medicine that grows readily in soils degraded by coal mining activities. This shrub bioaccumulates metals released into the environment, and thus its consumption may be harmful to health. The purpose of this study was to investigate the phytochemical profile, antioxidant capacity (DPPH), genotoxic (comet assay) and mutagenic potential (CBMN-cyt) in V79 cells of B. trimera aqueous extracts in the coal-mining region of Candiota (Bt-AEC), and in Bagé, a city that does not experience the effects of exposure to coal (Bt-AEB, a reference site). In the comet assay, only Bt-AEC was genotoxic at the highest doses (0.8mg/mL and 1.6mg/mL), compared to the control. For extracts from both areas, mutagenic effects were observed at higher concentrations compared to the control. The cell damage parameters were significantly high in both extracts; however, more striking values were observed for Bt-AEC, up to the dose of 0.8mg/mL. In chemical analysis, no variation was observed in the contents of flavonoids and phenolic compounds, neither the antioxidant activity, which may suggest that DNA damage observed in V79 cells was induced by the presence of coal contaminants absorbed by the plant.

  10. Genotoxic effects of ethylene oxide, propylene oxide and epichlorohydrin in humans: update review (1990-2001).

    PubMed

    Kolman, Ada; Chovanec, Miroslav; Osterman-Golkar, Siv

    2002-12-01

    Ethylene oxide (EtO), propylene oxide (PO) and epichlorohydrin (ECH) are important industrial chemicals widely used as intermediates for various synthetic products. EtO and PO are also environmental pollutants. In this review we summarize data published during the period 1990-2001 concerning both the genotoxic and carcinogenic effects of these epoxides in humans. The use of DNA and hemoglobin adducts as biomarkers of exposure and the role of polymorphism, as well as confounding factors, are discussed. We have also included recent in vitro data comprising genotoxic effects induced by EtO, PO and ECH in mammalian cells. The uncertainties regarding cancer risk estimation still persist, in spite of the large database collected.

  11. Evaluation of Hypoglycemic and Genotoxic Effect of Polyphenolic Bark Extract from Quercus sideroxyla

    PubMed Central

    Soto-García, Marcela; Rosales-Castro, Martha; Escalona-Cardoso, Gerardo N.

    2016-01-01

    Quercus sideroxyla is a wood species whose bark has phenolic compound and should be considered to be bioactive; the hypoglycemic and genotoxic properties of Q. sideroxyla bark were evaluated in this study. Total phenolic compound was determined in crude extract (CE) and organic extract (OE). The OE has the highest amount of phenols (724.1 ± 12.0 GAE/g). Besides, both CE and OE demonstrated effect over the inhibition of α-amylase in vitro. Hypoglycemic activity was assessed by glucose tolerance curve and the area under curve (UAC); OE showed the highest hypoglycemic activity. In addition, diabetes was induced by streptozotocin (65 mg/kg) and the extracts (50 mg/kg) were administered for 10 days; OE showed hypoglycemic effect compared with diabetic control and decreased hepatic lipid peroxidation. Acute toxicity and genotoxicity were evaluated in CE; results of acute toxicity did not show any mortality. Besides, the comet assay showed that CE at a dose of 100 mg/kg did not show any genotoxic effect when evaluated at 24 h, whereas it induced slight damage at 200 mg/kg, with the formation of type 1 comets. PMID:27867402

  12. Sodium arsenite induced changes in survival, growth, metamorphosis and genotoxicity in the Indian cricket frog (Rana limnocharis).

    PubMed

    Singha, Utsab; Pandey, Neelam; Boro, Freeman; Giri, Sarbani; Giri, Anirudha; Biswas, Somava

    2014-10-01

    Arsenic contamination of the environment is a matter of great concern. Understanding the effects of arsenic on aquatic life will act as biological early warning system to assess how arsenic could shape the biodiversity in the affected areas. Rapid decline in amphibian population in recent decades is a cause of major concern. Over the years, amphibians have been recognized as excellent bio-indicators of environmental related stress. In the present study, we examined the toxic and genotoxic effects of sodium arsenite in the tadpoles of the Indian cricket frog (Rana limnocharis). Sodium arsenite at different concentrations (0, 50, 100, 200 and 400 μg L(-1)) neither induced lethality nor significantly altered body weight at metamorphosis. However, it accelerated the rate of metamorphosis at higher concentrations, reduced body size (snout-vent length) and induced developmental deformities such as loss of limbs. Besides, at concentration ranges between 100 and 400 μg L(-1), sodium arsenite induced statistically significant genotoxicity at 24, 48, 72 and 96 h of the exposure in a concentration-dependent manner. However, it did not show time effects as the highest frequency was found between 48 and 72 h which remained steady subsequently. The genotoxicity was confirmed by comet assay in the whole blood cells. These findings suggest that arsenic at environmentally relevant concentrations has significant sub-lethal effects on R.limnocharis, which may have long-term fitness consequence to the species and may have similar implications in other aquatic life too.

  13. Assessment of the Genotoxic Effects of High Peak-Power Pulsed Electromagnetic Fields

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-06-01

    the Genotoxic Effects of High Peak-Power Pulsed Electromagnetic Fields 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5d. TASK NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Dr... Genotoxic Effects of High Peak-Power Pulsed Electromagnetic Fields (EMFs) (From 1 June 2002 to 31 May 2003 for 12 months) Nikolai Konstantinovich Chemeris...International Science and Technology Center (ISTC), Moscow. 2 ISTC 2350 Assessment of the Genotoxic Effects of High Peak-Power Pulsed Electromagnetic Fields

  14. Genotoxic effects of glyphosate or paraquat on earthworm coelomocytes.

    PubMed

    Muangphra, Ptumporn; Kwankua, Wimon; Gooneratne, Ravi

    2014-06-01

    The potential genotoxicity (nuclear anomalies, damage to single-strand DNA) and pinocytic adherence activity of two (glyphosate-based and paraquat-based) commercial herbicides to earthworm coelomocytes (immune cells in the coelomic cavity) were assessed. Coelomocytes were extracted from earthworms (Pheretima peguana) exposed to concentrations induces both clastogenic and aneugenic effects on earthworm coelomocytes whereas glyphosate causes only aneugenic effects and therefore does not pose a risk of gene mutation in this earthworm.

  15. Carbon black nanoparticle instillation induces sustained inflammation and genotoxicity in mouse lung and liver

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Widespread occupational exposure to carbon black nanoparticles (CBNPs) raises concerns over their safety. CBNPs are genotoxic in vitro but less is known about their genotoxicity in various organs in vivo. Methods We investigated inflammatory and acute phase responses, DNA strand breaks (SB) and oxidatively damaged DNA in C57BL/6 mice 1, 3 and 28 days after a single instillation of 0.018, 0.054 or 0.162 mg Printex 90 CBNPs, alongside sham controls. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid was analyzed for cellular composition. SB in BAL cells, whole lung and liver were assessed using the alkaline comet assay. Formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG) sensitive sites were assessed as an indicator of oxidatively damaged DNA. Pulmonary and hepatic acute phase response was evaluated by Saa3 mRNA real-time quantitative PCR. Results Inflammation was strongest 1 and 3 days post-exposure, and remained elevated for the two highest doses (i.e., 0.054 and 0.162 mg) 28 days post-exposure (P < 0.001). SB were detected in lung at all doses on post-exposure day 1 (P < 0.001) and remained elevated at the two highest doses until day 28 (P < 0.05). BAL cell DNA SB were elevated relative to controls at least at the highest dose on all post-exposure days (P < 0.05). The level of FPG sensitive sites in lung was increased throughout with significant increases occurring on post-exposure days 1 and 3, in comparison to controls (P < 0.001-0.05). SB in liver were detected on post-exposure days 1 (P < 0.001) and 28 (P < 0.001). Polymorphonuclear (PMN) cell counts in BAL correlated strongly with FPG sensitive sites in lung (r = 0.88, P < 0.001), whereas no such correlation was observed with SB (r = 0.52, P = 0.08). CBNP increased the expression of Saa3 mRNA in lung tissue on day 1 (all doses), 3 (all doses) and 28 (0.054 and 0.162 mg), but not in liver. Conclusions Deposition of CBNPs in lung induces inflammatory and genotoxic effects in mouse lung that persist considerably after the

  16. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in liver cells induced by cobalt nanoparticles and ions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Y. K.; Deng, X. X.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The cytotoxicity induced by cobalt ions (Co2+) and cobalt nanoparticles (Co-NPs) which released following the insertion of a total hip prosthesis, has been reported. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms. In this study, we investigate the toxic effect of Co2+ and Co-NPs on liver cells, and explain further the potential mechanisms. Methods Co-NPs were characterised for size, shape, elemental analysis, and hydrodynamic diameter, and were assessed by Transmission Electron Microscope, Scanning Electron Microscope, Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy and Dynamic Light Scattering. BRL-3A cells were used in this study. Cytotoxicity was evaluated by MTT and lactate dehydrogenase release assay. In order to clarify the potential mechanisms, reactive oxygen species, Bax/Bcl-2 mRNA expression, IL-8 mRNA expression and DNA damage were assessed on BRL-3A cells after Co2+ or Co-NPs treatment. Results Results showed cytotoxic effects of Co2+ and Co-NPs were dependent upon time and dosage, and the cytotoxicity of Co-NPs was greater than that of Co2+. In addition, Co-NPs elicited a significant (p < 0.05) reduction in cell viability with a concomitant increase in lactic dehydrogenase release, reactive oxygen species generation, IL-8 mRNA expression, Bax/Bcl-2 mRNA expression and DNA damage after 24 hours of exposure. Conclusion Co-NPs induced greater cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in BRL-3A cells than Co2+. Cell membrane damage, oxidative stress, immune inflammation and DNA damage may play an important role in the effects of Co-NPs on liver cells. Cite this article: Y. K. Liu, X. X. Deng, H.L. Yang. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in liver cells induced by cobalt nanoparticles and ions. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:461–469. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.510.BJR-2016-0016.R1. PMID:27754833

  17. Testing systems for biologic markers of genotoxic exposure and effect

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, M.L.

    1986-11-19

    Societal interest in genotoxicity stems from two concerns: the fear of carcinogenesis secondary to somatic mutation; and the fear of birth defects and decreasing genetic fitness secondary to heritable mutation. There is a pressing need to identify agents that can cause these effects, to understand the underlying dose-response relationships, to identify exposed populations, and to estimate both the magnitude of exposure and the risk of adverse health effects in such populations. Biologic markers refer either to evidence in surrogate organisms, or to the expressions of exposure and effect in human populations. 21 refs.

  18. Randomly amplified polymorphic-DNA analysis for detecting genotoxic effects of Boron on maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Sakcali, M Serdal; Kekec, Guzin; Uzonur, Irem; Alpsoy, Lokman; Tombuloglu, Huseyin

    2015-08-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the genotoxic effect of boron (B) on maize using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) method. Experimental design was conducted under 0, 5, 10, 25, 50, 100, 125, and 150 ppm B exposures, and physiological changes have revealed a sharp decrease in root growth rates from 28% to 85%, starting from 25 ppm to 150 ppm, respectively. RAPD-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis shows that DNA alterations are clearly observed from beginning to 100 ppm. B-induced inhibition in root growth had a positive correlation with DNA alterations. Total soluble protein, root and stem lengths, and B content analysis in root and leaves encourage these results as a consequence. These preliminary findings reveal that B causes chromosomal aberration and genotoxic effects on maize. Meanwhile, usage of RAPD-PCR technique is a suitable biomarker to detect genotoxic effect of B on maize and other crops for the future.

  19. Acute effects of a prooxidant herbicide on the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: Screening cytotoxicity and genotoxicity endpoints.

    PubMed

    Esperanza, Marta; Cid, Ángeles; Herrero, Concepción; Rioboo, Carmen

    2015-08-01

    Since recent evidence has demonstrated that many types of chemicals exhibit oxidative and/or genotoxic potential on living organisms, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and DNA damage are currently the best accepted paradigms to assess the potential hazardous biological effects of a wide range of contaminants. The goal of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity of different cytotoxicity and genotoxicity responses on the model microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii exposed to the prooxidant herbicide paraquat. In addition to the growth endpoint, cell viability, mitochondrial membrane potential and presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were assayed as potential markers of cytotoxicity using flow cytometry (FCM). To study the effects of paraquat on C. reinhardtii DNA, several genotoxicity approaches were implemented for the first time in an ecotoxicological study on microalgae. Oxidative DNA base damage was analysed by measuring the oxidative DNA lesion 8-OHdG by FCM. DNA fragmentation was analysed by different methods: comet assay, and cell cycle analysis by FCM, with a particular focus on the presence of subG1-nuclei. Finally, effects on morphology of nuclei were monitored through DAPI staining. The evaluation of these endpoints showed that several physiological and biochemical parameters reacted to oxidative stress disturbances with greater sensitivity than integrative parameters such as growth rates or cell viability. The experiments revealed concentration-dependent cytotoxicity (ROS formation, depolarization of mitochondrial membrane), genotoxicity (oxidative DNA damage, DNA strand breakage, alterations in nuclear morphology), and cell cycle disturbances (subG1-nuclei, decrease of 4N population) in paraquat-treated cells. Overall, the genotoxicity results indicate that the production of ROS caused by exposure to paraquat induces oxidative DNA damage followed by DNA single- and double-strand breaks and cell cycle alterations, possibly leading to apoptosis

  20. Identification of specific mRNA signatures as fingerprints for carcinogenesis in mice induced by genotoxic and nongenotoxic hepatocarcinogens.

    PubMed

    Kossler, Nadine; Matheis, Katja A; Ostenfeldt, Nina; Bach Toft, Dorthe; Dhalluin, Stéphane; Deschl, Ulrich; Kalkuhl, Arno

    2015-02-01

    Long-term rodent carcinogenicity studies for evaluation of chemicals and pharmaceuticals concerning their carcinogenic potential to humans are currently receiving critical revision. Additional data from mechanistic studies can support cancer risk assessment by clarifying the underlying mode of action. In the course of the IMI MARCAR project, a European consortium of EFPIA partners and academics, which aims to identify biomarkers for nongenotoxic carcinogenesis, a toxicogenomic mouse liver database was generated. CD-1 mice were orally treated for 3 and 14 days with 3 known genotoxic hepatocarcinogens: C.I. Direct Black 38, Dimethylnitrosamine and 4,4'-Methylenedianiline; 3 nongenotoxic hepatocarcinogens: 1,4-Dichlorobenzene, Phenobarbital sodium and Piperonyl butoxide; 4 nonhepatocarcinogens: Cefuroxime sodium, Nifedipine, Prazosin hydrochloride and Propranolol hydrochloride; and 3 compounds that show ambiguous results in genotoxicity testing: Cyproterone acetate, Thioacetamide and Wy-14643. By liver mRNA expression analysis using individual animal data, we identified 64 specific biomarker candidates for genotoxic carcinogens and 69 for nongenotoxic carcinogens for male mice at day 15. The majority of genotoxic carcinogen biomarker candidates possess functions in DNA damage response (eg, apoptosis, cell cycle progression, DNA repair). Most of the identified nongenotoxic carcinogen biomarker candidates are involved in regulation of cell cycle progression and apoptosis. The derived biomarker lists were characterized with respect to their dependency on study duration and gender and were successfully used to characterize carcinogens with ambiguous genotoxicity test results, such as Wy-14643. The identified biomarker candidates improve the mechanistic understanding of drug-induced effects on the mouse liver that result in hepatocellular adenomas and/or carcinomas in 2-year mouse carcinogenicity studies.

  1. Early Genotoxic and Cytotoxic Effects of the Toxic Dinoflagellate Prorocentrum lima in the Mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis

    PubMed Central

    Prego-Faraldo, María Verónica; Valdiglesias, Vanessa; Laffon, Blanca; Mendez, Josefina; Eirin-Lopez, Jose M.

    2016-01-01

    Okadaic acid (OA) and dinophysistoxins (DTXs) are the main toxins responsible for diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP) intoxications during harmful algal blooms (HABs). Although the genotoxic and cytotoxic responses to OA have been evaluated in vitro, the in vivo effects of these toxins have not yet been fully explored. The present work fills this gap by evaluating the in vivo effects of the exposure to the DSP-toxin-producing dinoflagellate Prorocentrum lima during the simulation of an early HAB episode in the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. The obtained results revealed that in vivo exposure to this toxic microalgae induced early genotoxicity in hemocytes, as a consequence of oxidative DNA damage. In addition, the DNA damage observed in gill cells seems to be mainly influenced by exposure time and P. lima concentration, similarly to the case of the oxidative damage found in hemocytes exposed in vitro to OA. In both cell types, the absence of DNA damage at low toxin concentrations is consistent with the notion suggesting that this level of toxicity does not disturb the antioxidant balance. Lastly, in vivo exposure to growing P. lima cell densities increased apoptosis but not necrosis, probably due to the presence of a high number of protein apoptosis inhibitors in molluscs. Overall, this work sheds light into the in vivo genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of P. lima. In doing so, it also demonstrates for the first time the potential of the modified (OGG1) comet assay for assessing oxidative DNA damage caused by marine toxins in marine invertebrates. PMID:27231936

  2. Early Genotoxic and Cytotoxic Effects of the Toxic Dinoflagellate Prorocentrum lima in the Mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    PubMed

    Prego-Faraldo, María Verónica; Valdiglesias, Vanessa; Laffon, Blanca; Mendez, Josefina; Eirin-Lopez, Jose M

    2016-05-24

    Okadaic acid (OA) and dinophysistoxins (DTXs) are the main toxins responsible for diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP) intoxications during harmful algal blooms (HABs). Although the genotoxic and cytotoxic responses to OA have been evaluated in vitro, the in vivo effects of these toxins have not yet been fully explored. The present work fills this gap by evaluating the in vivo effects of the exposure to the DSP-toxin-producing dinoflagellate Prorocentrum lima during the simulation of an early HAB episode in the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. The obtained results revealed that in vivo exposure to this toxic microalgae induced early genotoxicity in hemocytes, as a consequence of oxidative DNA damage. In addition, the DNA damage observed in gill cells seems to be mainly influenced by exposure time and P. lima concentration, similarly to the case of the oxidative damage found in hemocytes exposed in vitro to OA. In both cell types, the absence of DNA damage at low toxin concentrations is consistent with the notion suggesting that this level of toxicity does not disturb the antioxidant balance. Lastly, in vivo exposure to growing P. lima cell densities increased apoptosis but not necrosis, probably due to the presence of a high number of protein apoptosis inhibitors in molluscs. Overall, this work sheds light into the in vivo genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of P. lima. In doing so, it also demonstrates for the first time the potential of the modified (OGG1) comet assay for assessing oxidative DNA damage caused by marine toxins in marine invertebrates.

  3. Genotoxic effect of ethacrynic acid and impact of antioxidants

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, William M.; Hoffman, Jared D.; Loo, George

    2015-07-01

    It is known that ethacrynic acid (EA) decreases the intracellular levels of glutathione. Whether the anticipated oxidative stress affects the structural integrity of DNA is unknown. Therefore, DNA damage was assessed in EA-treated HCT116 cells, and the impact of several antioxidants was also determined. EA caused both concentration-dependent and time-dependent DNA damage that eventually resulted in cell death. Unexpectedly, the DNA damage caused by EA was intensified by either ascorbic acid or trolox. In contrast, EA-induced DNA damage was reduced by N-acetylcysteine and by the iron chelator, deferoxamine. In elucidating the DNA damage, it was determined that EA increased the production of reactive oxygen species, which was inhibited by N-acetylcysteine and deferoxamine but not by ascorbic acid and trolox. Also, EA decreased glutathione levels, which were inhibited by N-acetylcysteine. But, ascorbic acid, trolox, and deferoxamine neither inhibited nor enhanced the capacity of EA to decrease glutathione. Interestingly, the glutathione synthesis inhibitor, buthionine sulfoxime, lowered glutathione to a similar degree as EA, but no noticeable DNA damage was found. Nevertheless, buthionine sulfoxime potentiated the glutathione-lowering effect of EA and intensified the DNA damage caused by EA. Additionally, in examining redox-sensitive stress gene expression, it was found that EA increased HO-1, GADD153, and p21mRNA expression, in association with increased nuclear localization of Nrf-2 and p53 proteins. In contrast to ascorbic acid, trolox, and deferoxamine, N-acetylcysteine suppressed the EA-induced upregulation of GADD153, although not of HO-1. Overall, it is concluded that EA has genotoxic properties that can be amplified by certain antioxidants. - Highlights: • Ethacrynic acid (EA) caused cellular DNA damage. • EA-induced DNA damage was potentiated by ascorbic acid or trolox. • EA increased ROS production, not inhibited by ascorbic acid or trolox. • EA

  4. Genotoxic effects of starvation and dimethoate in haemocytes and midgut gland cells of wolf spider Xerolycosa nemoralis (Lycosidae).

    PubMed

    Wilczek, Grażyna; Mędrzak, Monika; Augustyniak, Maria; Wilczek, Piotr; Stalmach, Monika

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the genotoxic effects of starvation and dimethoate (organophosphate insecticide) in female and male wolf spiders Xerolycosa nemoralis (Lycosidae) exposed to the stressors under laboratory conditions. DNA damage was measured in haemocytes and midgut gland cells using the comet assay. In response to the two stressing factors, both cell types showed %TDNA, tail length (TL) and OTM values higher in males than in females. Level of DNA damage in haemocytes was greater than in midgut gland cells. In both sexes, the strongest genotoxicity was recorded at single application of dimethoate. After five-time exposure to the pesticide, genotoxic effects of a single dose were sustained in males and reduced to the control level in females. Starvation stress was well tolerated by the females, in which neither cell type was affected by DNA damage. However, in male haemocytes food deprivation induced severe DNA damage, what suggests suppression of the defence potential at prolonged starvation periods.

  5. Comparison of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity induced by the extracts of methanol and gasoline engine exhausts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zunzhen; Che, Wangjun; Liang, Ying; Wu, Mei; Li, Na; Shu, Ya; Liu, Fang; Wu, Desheng

    2007-09-01

    Gasoline engine exhaust has been considered a major source of air pollution in China, and methanol is considered as a potential substitute for gasoline fuel. In this study, the genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of organic extracts of condensate, particulate matters (PM) and semivolatile organic compounds (SVOC) of gasoline and absolute methanol engine exhaust were examined by using MTT assay, micronucleus assay, comet assay and Ames test. The results have showed that gasoline engine exhaust exhibited stronger cytotoxicity to human lung carcinoma cell lines (A549 cell) than methanol engine exhaust. Furthermore, gasoline engine exhaust increased micronucleus formation, induced DNA damage in A549 cells and increased TA98 revertants in the presence of metabolic activating enzymes in a concentration-dependent manner. In contrast, methanol engine exhaust failed to exhibit these adverse effects. The results suggest methanol may be used as a cleaner fuel for automobile.

  6. Genotoxicity to human cells induced by air particulates isolated during the Kuwait oil fires

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsey, K.T.; Xia, F.; Christiani, D.C.; Liber, H.L.; Spengler, J.D.; Dockery, D.W. ); Bodell, W.J. )

    1994-01-01

    In an effort to examine the potential of exposure to soot from the 1991 oil fires in the Kuwait desert for inducing genetic effects we studied the in vitro genotoxicity of this materials. Air particulates isolated near the Kuwait oil fires were studied using three assays. Dose-dependent increases were observed for both sister chromatid exchanges in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and mutation at the hprt locus in the metabolically competent human lymphoblast cell line AHH-1. Similar magnitudes of response were seen using these two assays when testing a standard air particulate sample which had been isolated from the Washington, DC, area. Using the [sup 32]P-postlabeling assay, no increase in DNA adduct formation was observed in AHH-1 cells treated with particulates isolated from sampling in Kuwait. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Comparative specificities of Calreticulin Transacetylase to O-acetyl, N-acetyl and S-acetyl derivative of 4-methylcoumarins and their inhibitory effect on AFB1-induced genotoxicity in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ajit; Ponnan, Prija; Raj, Hanumantharao G; Parmar, Virinder S; Saso, Luciano

    2013-02-01

    We have earlier conclusively established the Calreticulin Transacetylase (CRTAase) catalyzed modifications of functional proteins such as cytochrome-P450-linked mixed function oxidases (Cyt-P450-linked MFOs), NADPH cytochrome c reductase, and glutathione S-transferase by acetoxy derivatives of polyphenols. In this study, we have investigated the comparative specificities of CRTAase to N-acetyl derivative, 7-acetamido-4-methylcoumarin (7-N-AMC), O-acetyl derivative, 7-acetoxy-4-methylcoumarin (7-AMC), S-acetyl derivative, 7-thioacetyl-4-methycoumarin (7-S-AMC) and their parent compounds in the modulation of catalytic activities of aforesaid proteins. Special attention concentrated on the comparative inhibitory effect of aforesaid acetyl moiety on Cyt-P450-linked MFOs such as 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD), pentoxyresorufin O-dealkylase (PROD) and aflatoxin B(1) (AFB(1))-induced genotoxicity in vitro and in vivo. The results clearly indicated that N-acetyl and O-acetyl derivatives were better substrates for CRTAase while the S-acetyl was found to be a poorer substrate. Our study involving atomic charge, charge density and molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) calculations indicated the pivotal role of electronegativity and charge distribution values of O, N and S atoms of the acetyl group at C-7 position of the 4-methylcoumarins in CRTAase activity. These facts reinforce our hypothesis that the CRTAase catalyzed modifications of the catalytic activities of aforesaid proteins by acetyl derivative of 4-methylcoumarins is probably due to acetylation of these proteins.

  8. Evolved Cellular Mechanisms to Respond to Genotoxic Insults: Implications for Radiation-Induced Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Fleenor, Courtney J.; Higa, Kelly; Weil, Michael M.; DeGregori, James

    2015-01-01

    Human exposure to ionizing radiation is highly associated with adverse health effects, including reduced hematopoietic cell function and increased risk of carcinogenesis. The hematopoietic deficits manifest across blood cell types and persist for years after radiation exposure, suggesting a long-lived and multi-potent cellular reservoir for radiation-induced effects. As such, research has focused on identifying both the immediate and latent hematopoietic stem cell responses to radiation exposure. Radiation-associated effects on hematopoietic function and malignancy development have generally been attributed to the direct induction of mutations resulting from radiation-induced DNA damage. Other studies have illuminated the role of cellular programs that both limit and enhance radiation-induced tissue phenotypes and carcinogenesis. In this review, distinct but collaborative cellular responses to genotoxic insults are highlighted, with an emphasis on how these programmed responses impact hematopoietic cellular fitness and competition. These radiation-induced cellular programs include apoptosis, senescence and impaired self-renewal within the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) pool. In the context of sporadic DNA damage to a cell, these cellular responses act in concert to restore tissue function and prevent selection for adaptive oncogenic mutations. But in the contexts of whole-tissue exposure or whole-body exposure to genotoxins, such as radiotherapy or chemotherapy, we propose that these programs can contribute to long-lasting tissue impairment and increased carcinogenesis. PMID:26414506

  9. Genotoxic effects of the o-phenylphenol metabolites phenylhydroquinone and phenylbenzoquinone in V79 cells.

    PubMed

    Lambert, A C; Eastmond, D A

    1994-10-01

    o-Phenylphenol (OPP) and its sodium salt, sodium o-phenylphenate are broad spectrum fungicides and disinfectants with widespread usage. Both chemicals have been reported to induce cancer in the kidney and urinary bladder of Fischer 344 rats. Recently it has been proposed that the metabolic activation of OPP occurs via a two-step process involving the cytochrome P450-mediated formation of phenylhydroquinone (PHQ) in the liver and a prostaglandin H synthase-mediated oxidation of PHQ to phenylbenzoquinone (PBQ) in the urinary tract. In order to further investigate the metabolic activation and genotoxic effects of OPP, we have investigated the ability of PHQ and PBQ to induce micronuclei and mutations at the HGPRT locus in a prostaglandin H synthase-containing V79 Chinese hamster lung fibroblast cell line. In arachidonic acid-supplemented V79 cells, PHQ induced a significant increase in micronuclei whereas no increase was observed in cells in the absence of arachidonic acid supplementation. Immunofluorescent labeling of centromeric proteins with the CREST antibody indicated that the arachidonic acid-dependent induction of micronuclei by PHQ was due almost entirely to micronuclei containing whole chromosomes which had failed to segregate properly during mitosis. The induction of micronuclei by PHQ was significantly inhibited by treatment of the cells with indomethacin, aspirin, ascorbic acid, dithiothreitol and reduced glutathione supporting a role for prostaglandin H synthase in the genotoxic effects of PHQ. No increase in 6-thioguanine-resistant cells was observed in cells treated with PHQ or PBQ. This arachidonic acid-dependent conversion of PHQ to a genotoxic species is consistent with the hypothesis that a prostaglandin H synthase-mediated activation of PHQ may be involved in OPP- and SOPP-induced urinary tract carcinogenesis and also suggests that the induction of aneuploidy may play an important role in OPP-induced tumorigenesis.

  10. Effects of soil pH on the Vicia-micronucleus genotoxicity assay.

    PubMed

    Dhyèvre, Adrien; Foltête, Anne Sophie; Aran, Delphine; Muller, Serge; Cotelle, Sylvie

    2014-11-01

    In the field of contaminated sites and soil management, chemical analyses only bring typological data about pollution. As far as bioavailability and effects on organisms are concerned, we need ecotoxicology tools. In this domain, among many existing tests, we chose to study genotoxicity because it is a short-term endpoint with long-term consequences. The aim of this study is to assess the effects of soil pH on the results of the Vicia faba root tip micronucleus test for the two following reasons: (i) to define the pH range within which the test can be performed without modifying the soil to be tested, within the framework of the ISO standard of the test and (ii) to provides information about the effects of the pH on the genotoxic potential of soils. In this context, we modified the pH of a standard soil with HCl or NaOH and we spiked the matrix with copper (2, 4 and 8 mmol kg(-1) dry soil) or with maleic hydrazide, an antigerminative chemical (5, 10 and 20 μmol kg(-1) dry soil). We concluded that the pH had no effect on the mitotic index or micronucleus frequency in the root cells of the negative controls: extreme pH values did not induce micronucleus formation in root cells. Moreover, according to our results, the Vicia-micronucleus test can be performed with pH values ranging between 3.2 and 9.0, but in the ISO 29200 "Soil quality--assessment of genotoxic effects on higher plants--V. faba micronucleus test" we recommended to use a control soil with a pH value ranging between 5 and 8 for a more accurate assessment of chemical genotoxicity. We also found that acid pH could increase the genotoxic potential of pollutants, especially heavy metals. With hydrazide maleic spiked soil, plants were placed in a situation of double stress, i.e. toxicity caused by extreme pH values and toxicity induced by the pollutant.

  11. Larval Exposure to Chlorpyrifos Affects Nutritional Physiology and Induces Genotoxicity in Silkworm Philosamia ricini (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae)

    PubMed Central

    Kalita, Moni K.; Haloi, Kishor; Devi, Dipali

    2016-01-01

    Chlorpyrifos is a most widely used organophosphate insecticide because of its cost effectiveness and degradable nature. However, this pesticide enters and contaminates the environment either by direct application, spray drifts or crop run off and shows adverse effect on the non-targeted organisms. Philosamia ricini (eri silkworm), one of the most exploited, domesticated and commercialized non mulberry silkworm is known for mass production of eri silk. The silkworm larvae get exposed to pesticide residues on the leaves of food plants. The present study investigates the effect of commercial formulation of chlorpyrifos (Pyrifos-20 EC) on eri silkworm. Initially the LC50 value of chlorpyrifos was determined at 24–96 h and further experiments were carried out with sub lethal concentrations of the chlorpyrifos after 24 h of exposure period. The potential toxicity of chlorpyrifos was evaluated as a fuction of metabolism and nutritional physiology in 3rd, 4th, and 5th instar larvae. Alteration in histoarchitecture of 5th instar eri silkworm gut exposed to sub lethal concentration of chlorpyrifos formulation was also studied. Chlorpyrifos induced genotoxicity in silkworm hemocytes was also investigated by single cell gel electrophoresis, micronuclei assay, and apoptosis assay. Herein, LC50 values of chlorpyrifos were calculated as 3.83, 3.35, 2.68, and 2.35 mg/L at 24, 48, 72, and 96h respectively. A significant decrease in trehalose activity along with digestive enzyme activity was observed in chlorpyrifos affected groups (P < 0.05). Further, genotoxicity study revealed higher tail percentage, tail length and tail moment of the damage DNA in chlorpyrifos exposed groups (P < 0.001). Moreover, at 2.0 mg/L concentration, ~10 fold increases in tail length was observed as compared to the control. Results showed activation of caspase activity following 24 h chlorpyrifos exposure (1.5 and 2.0 mg/L) in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, in control group less number of apoptotic

  12. Larval Exposure to Chlorpyrifos Affects Nutritional Physiology and Induces Genotoxicity in Silkworm Philosamia ricini (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae).

    PubMed

    Kalita, Moni K; Haloi, Kishor; Devi, Dipali

    2016-01-01

    Chlorpyrifos is a most widely used organophosphate insecticide because of its cost effectiveness and degradable nature. However, this pesticide enters and contaminates the environment either by direct application, spray drifts or crop run off and shows adverse effect on the non-targeted organisms. Philosamia ricini (eri silkworm), one of the most exploited, domesticated and commercialized non mulberry silkworm is known for mass production of eri silk. The silkworm larvae get exposed to pesticide residues on the leaves of food plants. The present study investigates the effect of commercial formulation of chlorpyrifos (Pyrifos-20 EC) on eri silkworm. Initially the LC50 value of chlorpyrifos was determined at 24-96 h and further experiments were carried out with sub lethal concentrations of the chlorpyrifos after 24 h of exposure period. The potential toxicity of chlorpyrifos was evaluated as a fuction of metabolism and nutritional physiology in 3rd, 4th, and 5th instar larvae. Alteration in histoarchitecture of 5th instar eri silkworm gut exposed to sub lethal concentration of chlorpyrifos formulation was also studied. Chlorpyrifos induced genotoxicity in silkworm hemocytes was also investigated by single cell gel electrophoresis, micronuclei assay, and apoptosis assay. Herein, LC50 values of chlorpyrifos were calculated as 3.83, 3.35, 2.68, and 2.35 mg/L at 24, 48, 72, and 96h respectively. A significant decrease in trehalose activity along with digestive enzyme activity was observed in chlorpyrifos affected groups (P < 0.05). Further, genotoxicity study revealed higher tail percentage, tail length and tail moment of the damage DNA in chlorpyrifos exposed groups (P < 0.001). Moreover, at 2.0 mg/L concentration, ~10 fold increases in tail length was observed as compared to the control. Results showed activation of caspase activity following 24 h chlorpyrifos exposure (1.5 and 2.0 mg/L) in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, in control group less number of apoptotic

  13. Magnetite Nanoparticles Induce Genotoxicity in the Lungs of Mice via Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Totsuka, Yukari; Ishino, Kousuke; Kato, Tatsuya; Goto, Sumio; Tada, Yukie; Nakae, Dai; Watanabe, Masatoshi; Wakabayashi, Keiji

    2014-01-01

    Nanomaterials are useful for their characteristic properties and are commonly used in various fields. Nanosized-magnetite (MGT) is widely utilized in medicinal and industrial fields, whereas their toxicological properties are not well documented. A safety assessment is thus urgently required for MGT, and genotoxicity is one of the most serious concerns. In the present study, we examined genotoxic effects of MGT using mice and revealed that DNA damage analyzed by a comet assay in the lungs of imprinting control region (ICR) mice intratracheally instilled with a single dose of 0.05 or 0.2 mg/animal of MGT was approximately two- to three-fold higher than that of vehicle-control animals. Furthermore, in gpt delta transgenic mice, gpt mutant frequency (MF) in the lungs of the group exposed to four consecutive doses of 0.2 mg MGT was significantly higher than in the control group. Mutation spectrum analysis showed that base substitutions were predominantly induced by MGT, among which G:C to A:T transition and G:C to T:A transversion were the most significant. To clarify the mechanism of mutation caused by MGT, we analyzed the formation of DNA adducts in the lungs of mice exposed to MGT. DNA was extracted from lungs of mice 3, 24, 72 and 168 h after intratracheal instillation of 0.2 mg/body of MGT, and digested enzymatically. 8-Oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) and lipid peroxide-related DNA adducts were quantified by stable isotope dilution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Compared with vehicle control, these DNA adduct levels were significantly increased in the MGT-treated mice. In addition to oxidative stress- and inflammation related-DNA adduct formations, inflammatory cell infiltration and focal granulomatous formations were also observed in the lungs of MGT-treated mice. Based on these findings, it is suggested that inflammatory responses are probably involved in the genotoxicity induced by MGT in the lungs of mice.

  14. Necdin modulates proliferative cell survival of human cells in response to radiation-induced genotoxic stress

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The finite replicative lifespan of cells, termed cellular senescence, has been proposed as a protective mechanism against the proliferation of oncogenically damaged cells, that fuel cancer. This concept is further supported by the induction of premature senescence, a process which is activated when an oncogene is expressed in normal primary cells as well as following intense genotoxic stresses. Thus, deregulation of genes that control this process, like the tumor suppressor p53, may contribute to promoting cancer by allowing cells to bypass senescence. A better understanding of the genes that contribute to the establishment of senescence is therefore warranted. Necdin interacts with p53 and is also a p53 target gene, although the importance of Necdin in the p53 response is not clearly understood. Methods In this study, we first investigated Necdin protein expression during replicative senescence and premature senescence induced by gamma irradiation and by the overexpression of oncogenic RasV12. Gain and loss of function experiments were used to evaluate the contribution of Necdin during the senescence process. Results Necdin expression declined during replicative aging of IMR90 primary human fibroblasts or following induction of premature senescence. Decrease in Necdin expression seemed to be a consequence of the establishment of senescence since the depletion of Necdin in human cells did not induce a senescence-like growth arrest nor a flat morphology or SA-β-galactosidase activity normally associated with senescence. Similarly, overexpression of Necdin did not affect the life span of IMR90 cells. However, we demonstrate that in normal human cells, Necdin expression mimicked the effect of p53 inactivation by increasing radioresistance. Conclusion This result suggests that Necdin potentially attenuate p53 signaling in response to genotoxic stress in human cells and supports similar results describing an inhibitory function of Necdin over p53-dependent

  15. Assessment of Cr(VI)-Induced Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity Using High Content Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Chad M.; Fedorov, Yuriy; Brown, Daniel D.; Suh, Mina; Proctor, Deborah M.; Kuriakose, Liz; Haws, Laurie C.; Harris, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Oral exposure to high concentrations of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] induces intestinal redox changes, villus cytotoxicity, crypt hyperplasia, and intestinal tumors in mice. To assess the effects of Cr(VI) in a cell model relevant to the intestine, undifferentiated (proliferating) and differentiated (confluent) Caco-2 cells were treated with Cr(VI), hydrogen peroxide or rotenone for 2–24 hours. DNA damage was then assessed by nuclear staining intensity of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and phosphorylated histone variant H2AX (γ-H2AX) measured by high content analysis methods. In undifferentiated Caco-2, all three chemicals increased 8-OHdG and γ-H2AX staining at cytotoxic concentrations, whereas only 8-OHdG was elevated at non-cytotoxic concentrations at 24 hr. Differentiated Caco-2 were more resistant to cytotoxicity and DNA damage than undifferentiated cells, and there were no changes in apoptotic markers p53 or annexin-V. However, Cr(VI) induced a dose-dependent translocation of the unfolded protein response transcription factor ATF6 into the nucleus. Micronucleus (MN) formation was assessed in CHO-K1 and A549 cell lines. Cr(VI) increased MN frequency in CHO-K1 only at highly cytotoxic concentrations. Relative to the positive control Mitomycin-C, Cr(VI) only slightly increased MN frequency in A549 at mildly cytotoxic concentrations. The results demonstrate that Cr(VI) genotoxicity correlates with cytotoxic concentrations, and that H2AX phosphorylation occurs at higher concentrations than oxidative DNA damage in proliferating Caco-2 cells. The findings suggest that in vitro genotoxicity of Cr(VI) is primarily oxidative in nature at low concentrations. Implications for in vivo intestinal toxicity of Cr(VI) will be discussed. PMID:22905163

  16. Genotoxic Effect in Autoimmune Diseases Evaluated by the Micronucleus Test Assay: Our Experience and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Bugarín, Olivia; Macriz Romero, Nicole; Ramos Ibarra, María Luisa; Flores-García, Aurelio; Valdez Aburto, Penélope; Zavala-Cerna, María Guadalupe

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (AD) are classified into organ-specific, systemic, and mixed; all forms of AD share a high risk for cancer development. In AD a destructive immune response induced by autoreactive lymphocytes is started and continues with the production of autoantibodies against different targets; furthermore apoptosis failure and loss of balance in oxidative stress as a consequence of local or systemic inflammation are common features seen in AD as well. Micronucleus (MN) assay can be performed in order to evaluate loss of genetic material in a clear, accurate, fast, simple, and minimally invasive test. The MN formation in the cytoplasm of cells that have undergone proliferation is a consequence of DNA fragmentation during mitosis and the appearance of small additional nuclei during interphase. The MN test, widely accepted for in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity research, provides a sensitive marker of genomic damage associated to diverse conditions. In here, we present a review of our work and other published papers concerning genotoxic effect in AD, identified by means of the MN assay, with the aim of proposing this tool as a possible early biomarker for genotoxic damage, which is a consequence of disease progression. Additionally this biomarker could be used for follow-up, to asses genome damage associated to therapies. PMID:26339592

  17. Cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of dioxacarb by human peripheral blood lymphocytes CAs and Allium test.

    PubMed

    Eren, Yasin; Erdoğmuş, Sevim Feyza; Akyıl, Dilek; Özkara, Arzu; Konuk, Muhsin; Sağlam, Esra

    2015-12-01

    Dioxacarb (Elecron, Famid) is a phenyl methylcarbamate insecticide and in vitro cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of this pesticide on human peripheral blood lymphocytes and Allium root meristematic cells were investigated by chromosomal aberrations (CAs) and Allium test. Human lymphocytes were treated with 62.5, 125, 250 and 500 ppm doses of dioxacarb for CAs. CA/cell, abnormal cell % and mitotic index % (MI %) data were obtained from these concentrations in 24 and 48 h treatment periods. Dioxacarb did not increase the CA/cell frequency significantly, so this insecticide was not identified as genotoxic. But it was found cytotoxic especially at 250 and 500 ppm concentrations because of the reduced the MI % and increased the abnormal cell %. In Allium test, 25 ppm (EC50/2), 50 ppm (EC50) and 100 ppm (EC50 × 2) concentrations were used for root growth inhibition (EC50 determination) and Allium mitotic index (MI) determination tests. The used concentrations of dioxacarb induced dose-dependent inhibition of MI and root growth on root meristems. Mitotic inhibition of dioxacarb was found significantly higher than for the positive control. These Allium results indicated the high cytotoxicity of dioxacarb. The present study is the first research on cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of dioxacarb by human lymphocyte CAs and Allium test.

  18. Genotoxic Effect in Autoimmune Diseases Evaluated by the Micronucleus Test Assay: Our Experience and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Torres-Bugarín, Olivia; Macriz Romero, Nicole; Ramos Ibarra, María Luisa; Flores-García, Aurelio; Valdez Aburto, Penélope; Zavala-Cerna, María Guadalupe

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (AD) are classified into organ-specific, systemic, and mixed; all forms of AD share a high risk for cancer development. In AD a destructive immune response induced by autoreactive lymphocytes is started and continues with the production of autoantibodies against different targets; furthermore apoptosis failure and loss of balance in oxidative stress as a consequence of local or systemic inflammation are common features seen in AD as well. Micronucleus (MN) assay can be performed in order to evaluate loss of genetic material in a clear, accurate, fast, simple, and minimally invasive test. The MN formation in the cytoplasm of cells that have undergone proliferation is a consequence of DNA fragmentation during mitosis and the appearance of small additional nuclei during interphase. The MN test, widely accepted for in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity research, provides a sensitive marker of genomic damage associated to diverse conditions. In here, we present a review of our work and other published papers concerning genotoxic effect in AD, identified by means of the MN assay, with the aim of proposing this tool as a possible early biomarker for genotoxic damage, which is a consequence of disease progression. Additionally this biomarker could be used for follow-up, to asses genome damage associated to therapies.

  19. Investigation of co-genotoxic effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields in vivo.

    PubMed

    Verschaeve, L; Heikkinen, P; Verheyen, G; Van Gorp, U; Boonen, F; Vander Plaetse, F; Maes, A; Kumlin, T; Mäki-Paakkanen, J; Puranen, L; Juutilainen, J

    2006-05-01

    We investigated the possible combined genotoxic effects of radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields (900 MHz, amplitude modulated at 217 Hz, mobile phone signal) with the drinking water mutagen and carcinogen 3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone (MX). Female rats were exposed to RF fields for a period of 2 years for 2 h per day, 5 days per week at average whole-body specific absorption rates of 0.3 or 0.9 W/kg. MX was given in the drinking water at a concentration of 19 microg/ml. Blood samples were taken at 3, 6 and 24 months of exposure and brain and liver samples were taken at the end of the study (24 months). DNA damage was assessed in all samples using the alkaline comet assay, and micronuclei were determined in erythrocytes. We did not find significant genotoxic activity of MX in blood and liver cells. However, MX induced DNA damage in rat brain. Co-exposures to MX and RF radiation did not significantly increase the response of blood, liver and brain cells compared to MX exposure only. In conclusion, this 2-year animal study involving long-term exposures to RF radiation and MX did not provide any evidence for enhanced genotoxicity in rats exposed to RF radiation.

  20. In vitro and in vivo genotoxic effects of somatic cell nuclear transfer cloned cattle meat.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nam-Jin; Yang, Byoung-Chul; Jung, Yu-Ri; Lee, Jung-Won; Im, Gi-Sun; Seong, Hwan-Hoo; Park, Jin-Ki; Kang, Jong-Koo; Hwang, Seongsoo

    2011-09-01

    Although the nutritional composition and health status after consumption of the meat and milk derived from both conventionally bred (normal) and somatic cell nuclear transferred (cloned) animals and their progeny are not different, little is known about their food safeties like genetic toxicity. This study is performed to examine both in vitro (bacterial mutation and chromosome aberration) and in vivo (micronucleus) genotoxicity studies of cloned cattle meat. The concentrations of both normal and cloned cattle meat extracts (0-10×) were tested to five strains of bacteria (Salmonella typhimurium: TA98, TA100, TA1535, and TA1537; Escherichia coli: WP2uvrA) for bacterial mutation and to Chinese hamster lung (CHL/IU) cells for chromosome aberration, respectively. For micronucleus test, ICR mice were divided into five dietary groups: commercial pellets (control), pellets containing 5% (N-5) and 10% (N-10) normal cattle meat, and pellets containing 5% (C-5) and 10% (C-10) cloned cattle meat. No test substance-related genotoxicity was noted in the five bacterial strains, CHL/IU cells, or mouse bone marrow cells, suggesting that the cloned cattle meat potentially may be safe in terms of mutagenic hazards. Thus, it can be postulated that the cloned cattle meat do not induce any harmful genotoxic effects in vitro and in vivo.

  1. Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles Induce Oxidative Stress and Genotoxicity in Human Skin Melanoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Ali, Daoud; Alarifi, Saud; Alkahtani, Saad; AlKahtane, Abdullah A; Almalik, Abdulaziz

    2015-04-01

    Extensive applications of cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles require a better understanding of their possible effects on human health. However, data demonstrating the effect of CeO2 nanoparticles on the human skin melanoma cell remain scanty. In the current study, we determined the mechanism through which CeO2 nanoparticles (APS <25 nm) induce toxicity in human skin melanoma cells (A375). The MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] and neutral red uptake assays showed concentration and time-dependent cytotoxicity of CeO2 nanoparticles in A375 cells. CeO2 nanoparticles significantly induced the generation reactive oxygen species (ROS) and malondialdehyde, superoxide dismutase, and decreased glutathione levels in A375 cells. It was also observed that the CeO2 nanoparticles induced chromosomal condensation and caspase-3 activity. CeO2 nanoparticles exposed cells revealed the formation of DNA double-strand breakage as measured by percent tail DNA and olive tail moment through comet assay. The decline of cell viability, production of ROS, and DNA damage in A375 cells specifies that CeO2 nanoparticles have less capable to induce cyto and genotoxicity.

  2. Genotoxic effects of borax on cultured lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Pongsavee, Malinee

    2009-03-01

    The effect of borax on human chromosomes was analyzed in this study. Venous blood from 30 male students at Thammasat University, Thailand (age 18-25 years) was collected for lymphocyte cell cultures. This experiment was divided into two groups: the first group was the control group and the second group was the experimental group. The lymphocyte cells in the control group were cultured without borax. The experimental group was divided into four subgroups. The lymphocyte cells in each experimental subgroup were cultured with different concentrations of borax (0.1 mg/ml, 0.15 mg/ml, 0.2 mg/ml and 0.3 mg/ml). Human chromosomes were studied for abnormalities through Giemsa-staining and G-banding. The results show that the numbers of metaphase plates (the metaphase plate which contained 46 chromosomes; 46, XY) and metaphase chromosomes were reduced when lymphocyte cells were cultured with 0.15 mg/ml (57.2%), 0.2 mg/ml (50.8%) and 0.3 mg/ml (42.3%) concentrations of borax. There was a statistically significant difference between the control and experimental subgroups (p < 0.05). Sister chromatid separation was found in the 0.3 mg/ml borax concentration experimental subgroup. This shows that borax (at 0.15, 0.2 and 0.3 mg/ml concentrations) affects the cell and human chromosomes (both numerical and structural abnormalities). Borax may cause human chromosome abnormalities and lead to genetic defects.

  3. Genotoxic effects of two-generational selenium deficiency in mouse somatic and testicular cells.

    PubMed

    Graupner, Anne; Instanes, Christine; Andersen, Jill M; Brandt-Kjelsen, Anicke; Dertinger, Stephen D; Salbu, Brit; Brunborg, Gunnar; Olsen, Ann-Karin

    2015-03-01

    Many studies have investigated genotoxic effects of high Se diets but very few have addressed the genotoxicity of Se deprivation and its consequences in germ cells and none in somatic cells. To address these data gaps, C57BL/6 male mice were subjected to Se deprivation starting in the parental generation, i.e. before conception. Mice were given a diet of either low (0.01mg Se/kg diet) or normal (0.23mg Se/kg diet) Se content. Ogg1-deficient (Ogg1 (-/-) ) mice were used as a sensitive model towards oxidative stress due to their reduced capacity to repair oxidised purines. Ogg1 (-/-) mice also mimic the repair characteristics of human post-meiotic male germ cells which have a reduced ability to repair such lesions. The genotoxicity of Se deficiency was addressed by measuring DNA lesions with the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (+ Fpg to detect oxidised DNA lesions) in somatic cells (nucleated blood cells and lung cells) and male germ cells (testicular cells). Total Se concentration in liver and GPx activity in plasma and testicular cells were measured. Gene mutation was evaluated by an erythrocyte-based Pig-a assay. We found that Se deprivation of F1 from their conception and until early adulthood led to the induction of DNA lesions in testicular and lung cells expressed as significantly increased levels of DNA lesions, irrespective of the mouse genotype. In blood cells, Se levels did not appear to affect DNA lesions or mutant cell frequencies. The results suggest that the testis was the most sensitive tissue. Thus, genotoxicity induced by the low Se diet in the spermatozoal genome has potential implications for the offspring.

  4. Evaluation of genotoxic effects caused by extracts of chlorinated drinking water using a combination of three different bioassays.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qiang; Zhang, Shao-Hui; Liao, Jing; Miao, Dong-Yue; Wang, Xin-Yi; Yang, Pan; Yun, Luo-Jia; Liu, Ai-Lin; Lu, Wen-Qing

    2015-10-15

    Potential genotoxic effects of chlorinated drinking water now are of a great concern. In this study, raw water, finished water, and tap water from a water plant in Wuhan, China were collected in two different sampling times of the year (January and July). Genotoxic effects of water extracts were evaluated using a combination of three different bioassays: SOS/umu test, HGPRT gene mutation assay, and micronucleus assay, which were separately used to detect DNA damage, gene mutation, and chromosome aberration. The results of three different bioassays showed that all water samples in January and July induced at least one types of genotoxic effects, of which the DNA-damage effects were all detectable. The levels of DNA-damage effects and gene-mutation effects of finished water and tap water in January were higher than those in July. Chlorination could increase the DNA-damage effects of drinking water in January and the gene-mutation effects of drinking water in both January and July, but did not increase the chromosome-aberration effects of drinking water in both January and July. Our results highlighted the importance of using a combination of different bioassays to evaluate the genotoxicity of water samples in different seasons.

  5. Specific uptake and genotoxicity induced by polystyrene nanobeads with distinct surface chemistry on human lung epithelial cells and macrophages.

    PubMed

    Paget, Vincent; Dekali, Samir; Kortulewski, Thierry; Grall, Romain; Gamez, Christelle; Blazy, Kelly; Aguerre-Chariol, Olivier; Chevillard, Sylvie; Braun, Anne; Rat, Patrice; Lacroix, Ghislaine

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticle surface chemistry is known to play a crucial role in interactions with cells and their related cytotoxic effects. As inhalation is a major route of exposure to nanoparticles, we studied specific uptake and damages of well-characterized fluorescent 50 nm polystyrene (PS) nanobeads harboring different functionalized surfaces (non-functionalized, carboxylated and aminated) on pulmonary epithelial cells and macrophages (Calu-3 and THP-1 cell lines respectively). Cytotoxicity of in mass dye-labeled functionalized PS nanobeads was assessed by xCELLigence system and alamarBlue viability assay. Nanobeads-cells interactions were studied by video-microscopy, flow cytometry and also confocal microscopy. Finally ROS generation was assessed by glutathione depletion dosages and genotoxicity was assessed by γ-H2Ax foci detection, which is considered as the most sensitive technique for studying DNA double strand breaks. The uptake kinetic was different for each cell line. All nanobeads were partly adsorbed and internalized, then released by Calu-3 cells, while THP-1 macrophages quickly incorporated all nanobeads which were located in the cytoplasm rather than in the nuclei. In parallel, the genotoxicity study reported that only aminated nanobeads significantly increased DNA damages in association with a strong depletion of reduced glutathione in both cell lines. We showed that for similar nanoparticle concentrations and sizes, aminated polystyrene nanobeads were more cytotoxic and genotoxic than unmodified and carboxylated ones on both cell lines. Interestingly, aminated polystyrene nanobeads induced similar cytotoxic and genotoxic effects on Calu-3 epithelial cells and THP-1 macrophages, for all levels of intracellular nanoparticles tested. Our results strongly support the primordial role of nanoparticles surface chemistry on cellular uptake and related biological effects. Moreover our data clearly show that nanoparticle internalization and observed adverse effects

  6. Specific Uptake and Genotoxicity Induced by Polystyrene Nanobeads with Distinct Surface Chemistry on Human Lung Epithelial Cells and Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Kortulewski, Thierry; Grall, Romain; Gamez, Christelle; Blazy, Kelly; Aguerre-Chariol, Olivier; Chevillard, Sylvie; Braun, Anne; Rat, Patrice; Lacroix, Ghislaine

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticle surface chemistry is known to play a crucial role in interactions with cells and their related cytotoxic effects. As inhalation is a major route of exposure to nanoparticles, we studied specific uptake and damages of well-characterized fluorescent 50 nm polystyrene (PS) nanobeads harboring different functionalized surfaces (non-functionalized, carboxylated and aminated) on pulmonary epithelial cells and macrophages (Calu-3 and THP-1 cell lines respectively). Cytotoxicity of in mass dye-labeled functionalized PS nanobeads was assessed by xCELLigence system and alamarBlue viability assay. Nanobeads-cells interactions were studied by video-microscopy, flow cytometry and also confocal microscopy. Finally ROS generation was assessed by glutathione depletion dosages and genotoxicity was assessed by γ-H2Ax foci detection, which is considered as the most sensitive technique for studying DNA double strand breaks. The uptake kinetic was different for each cell line. All nanobeads were partly adsorbed and internalized, then released by Calu-3 cells, while THP-1 macrophages quickly incorporated all nanobeads which were located in the cytoplasm rather than in the nuclei. In parallel, the genotoxicity study reported that only aminated nanobeads significantly increased DNA damages in association with a strong depletion of reduced glutathione in both cell lines. We showed that for similar nanoparticle concentrations and sizes, aminated polystyrene nanobeads were more cytotoxic and genotoxic than unmodified and carboxylated ones on both cell lines. Interestingly, aminated polystyrene nanobeads induced similar cytotoxic and genotoxic effects on Calu-3 epithelial cells and THP-1 macrophages, for all levels of intracellular nanoparticles tested. Our results strongly support the primordial role of nanoparticles surface chemistry on cellular uptake and related biological effects. Moreover our data clearly show that nanoparticle internalization and observed adverse effects

  7. DNA methyltransferase I is a mediator of doxorubicin-induced genotoxicity in human cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Hwee Hong; Porter, Alan George

    2009-05-01

    Doxorubicin can induce the formation of extra-nuclear bodies during mitosis termed micronuclei but the underlying causes remain unknown. Here, we show that sub-lethal exposure to doxorubicin-induced micronuclei formation in human cancer cells but not in non-tumorigenic cells. Occurrence of micronuclei coincided with stability of DNMT1 upon doxorubicin assault, and DNMT1 was localized to the micronuclei structures. Furthermore, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine-mediated DNMT1 depletion or siDNMT1 knock-down attenuated the frequency of doxorubicin-induced micronucleated cells. Human DNMT1{sup -/-} cells displayed significantly fewer micronuclei compared to DNMT1{sup +/+} cells when challenged with doxorubicin, providing additional evidence for the involvement of DNMT1 in mediating such chromosomal aberrations. Collectively, our results demonstrate a role for DNMT1 in promoting DNA damage-induced genotoxicity in human cancer cells. DNMT1, recently identified as a candidate for doxorubicin-mediated cytotoxicity, is over-expressed in various cancer cell types. We propose that DNMT1 levels in tumor cells may determine the effectiveness of doxorubicin in chemotherapy.

  8. Mangiferin: A xanthone attenuates mercury chloride induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Kaivalya, Mudholkar; Nageshwar Rao, B N; Satish Rao, B S

    2011-01-01

    Mangiferin (MGN), a dietary C-glucosylxanthone present in Mangifera indica, is known to possess a spectrum of beneficial pharmacological properties. This study demonstrates antigenotoxic potential of MGN against mercuric chloride (HgCl2)-induced genotoxicity in HepG2 cell line. Treatment of HepG2 cells with various concentrations of HgCl2 for 3 h caused a dose-dependent increase in micronuclei frequency and elevation in DNA strand breaks (olive tail moment and tail DNA). Pretreatment with MGN significantly (p < 0.01) inhibited HgCl2 -induced (20 µM for 30 h) DNA damage. An optimal antigenotoxic effect of MGN, both in micronuclei and comet assay, was observed at a concentration of 50 µM. Furthermore, HepG2 cells treated with various concentrations of HgCl2 resulted in a dose-dependent increase in the dichlorofluorescein fluorescence, indicating an increase in the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, MGN by itself failed to generate ROS at a concentration of 50 µM, whereas it could significantly decrease HgCl2 -induced ROS. Our study clearly demonstrates that MGN pretreatment reduced the HgCl2-induced DNA damage in HepG2 cells, thus demonstrating the genoprotective potential of MGN, which is mediated mainly by the inhibition of oxidative stress.

  9. Nanoceria have no genotoxic effect on human lens epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierscionek, Barbara K.; Li, Yuebin; Yasseen, Akeel A.; Colhoun, Liza M.; Schachar, Ronald A.; Chen, Wei

    2010-01-01

    There are no treatments for reversing or halting cataract, a disease of the structural proteins in the eye lens, that has associations with other age-related degenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease. The incidence of cataract and associated conditions is increasing as the average age of the population rises. Protein folding diseases are difficult to assess in vivo as proteins and their age-related changes are assessed after extraction. Nanotechnology can be used to investigate protein changes in the intact lens as well as for a potential means of drug delivery. Nanoparticles, such as cerium oxide (CeO2) which have antioxidant properties, may even be used as a means of treating cataract directly. Prior to use in treatments, nanoparticle genotoxicity must be tested to assess the extent of any DNA or chromosomal damage. Sister chromatid exchanges were measured and DNA damage investigated using the alkaline COMET assay on cultured human lens epithelial cells, exposed to 5 and 10 µg ml-1 of CeO2 nanoparticles (nanoceria). Nanoceria at these dosages did not cause any DNA damage or significant increases in the number of sister chromatid exchanges. The absence of genotoxic effects on lens cells suggests that nanoceria, in the doses and exposures tested in this study, are not deleterious to the eye lens and have the potential for use in studying structural alterations, in developing non-surgical cataract treatments and in investigating other protein folding diseases.

  10. Antiproliferative and genotoxic effects of Mikania glomerata (Asteraceae).

    PubMed

    Dalla Nora, Gracieli; Pastori, Tamara; Laughinghouse, Haywood Dail; Do Canto-Dorow, Thais Scotti; Tedesco, Solange Bosio

    2010-12-01

    Mikania glomerata is a plant used in Brazilian traditional medicine, known as 'guaco'. It possesses anti-inflammatory properties and the aqueous extracts of its leaves are indicated for the treatment of diseases of the respiratory tract. This study aimed at evaluating the antiproliferative and genotoxic effect of Mikania glomerata leaf infusions on the cell cycle of onion. The material used was collected in the native environment from Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. Aqueous extracts through infusions were prepared in two concentrations: 4g/L (usual concentration) and 16g/L (4x more concentrated) of each of the populations. Two groups of four onion bulbs for each plant population were used plus a control group. The rootlets were fixed in ethanol-acetic acid (3:1), conserved in ethanol 70% and slides were prepared using the squashing technique colored with orcein 2%. The cells were observed and analyzed during cell cycle. Per group of bulbs, 2000 cells were analyzed, and the mean values of the cell number of each of the phases of the cell cycle were calculated, determining the mitotic index (MI). Statistic analyses of the data were carried out by the x2 ( p= 0.05) test. We conclude that M. glomerata presents both antiproliferative and genotoxic activity.

  11. Molecular and structural changes induced by essential oils treatments in Vicia faba roots detected by genotoxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Sturchio, Elena; Boccia, Priscilla; Zanellato, Miriam; Meconi, Claudia; Donnarumma, Lucia; Mercurio, Giuseppe; Mecozzi, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Over the last few years, there has been an increased interest in exploiting allelopathy in organic agriculture. The aim of this investigation was to examine the effects of essential oil mixtures in order to establish their allelopathic use in agriculture. Two mixtures of essential oils consisting respectively of tea tree oil (TTO) and clove plus rosemary (C + R) oils were tested. Phytotoxicity and genotoxicity tests on the root meristems of Vicia faba minor were performed. A phytotoxic influence was particularly relevant for C + R mixture, while genotoxicity tests revealed significant results with both C + R oil mixture and TTO. Phenotypic analysis on Vicia faba minor primary roots following C + R oil mixture treatment resulted in callose production, an early symptom attributed to lipid peroxidation. The approach described in this study, based on genotoxicity bioassays, might identify specific DNA damage induced by essential oil treatments. These tests may represent a powerful method to evaluate potential adverse effects of different mixtures of essential oils that might be useful in alternative agriculture. Future studies are focusing on the positive synergism of more complex mixtures of essential oils in order to reduce concentrations of potentially toxic components while at the same time maintaining efficacy in antimicrobial and antifungal management.

  12. Anti-genotoxic effect of Aloysia triphylla infusion against acrylamide-induced DNA damage as shown by the comet assay technique.

    PubMed

    Zamorano-Ponce, E; Morales, C; Ramos, D; Sepúlveda, C; Cares, S; Rivera, P; Fernández, J; Carballo, M A

    2006-02-28

    Aloysia triphylla a perennial, bushy plant originally from South America has long been used in traditional medicine. Its aqueous extract contains considerable amounts of polyphenolic compounds, namely flavonoids and phenolic acids. In view of the interest in natural phenolic compounds as antioxidant in preventive medicine, this study was undertaken to investigate the chemoprotective effects of cedron leaves infusion against the genetic damage induced by acrylamide (AA) by using the alkaline version of the comet assay technique. Mice were separated in nine groups (eight animals each): (I) untreated, (II) negative control, (III) treated with infusion of cedron leaves 5%, 20 days twice a day, (IV) treated with AA (5 mg/kg b.w.), (V) treated with AA (20 mg/kg b.w.), (VI) treated with AA (30 mg/kg b.w.), (VII) treated with AA (50 mg/kg b.w.), (VIII) pretreated with infusion and treated with AA (50 mg/kg b.w.) and (IX) positive control (cyclophosphamide, 20 mg/kg b.w.). Three hundred blast cells were digitally evaluated per animal from three different slides (100 each). Media of tail moment (TM) values were analyzed by ANOVA test. No statistical differences (p>0.05) were found between untreated animals, negative control and infusion-treated mice. A single dose of AA-induced genetic damage as revealed by a statistically significant increase in TM values (p<0.01). Pretreatment with infusion prior to AA injection significantly reduces the capacity of AA to induce genetic damage. In these conditions, tail moments values did not differ from data obtained in negative control (p>0.05) and exhibit statistical differences from animals treated only with AA (p<0.01). Cell viability was at least 90% in all cases as measured by the trypan blue exclusion method. The ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) method reveals that the plasma of infusion-treated mice has a significantly higher antioxidant capacity than plasma from controls (p<0.01). The results suggest that the infusion

  13. Genotoxicity of organic extracts from atmospheric particles

    SciTech Connect

    Courtois, Y.A.; Min, S.; Lachenal, C.; Jacquot-Deschamps, J.M.; Callais, F.; Festy, B.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments to evaluate the genotoxic potentialities of urban air particles sampled in Paris (France) after organic solvent extraction have been carried out using four in vitro genotoxicity tests. The two bacterial tests (the Ames test and the SOS Chromotest) demonstrate the genotoxicity of the organic extracts of atmospheric particles; two additional tests (induction of 6-thioguanine mutants and sister chromatid exchanges), carried out on V79 Chinese hamster cells, also confirm these potentialities. These results show clearly that particulate organic extracts induce point mutations in both bacteria and mammalian cells, or the cellular response (SOS repair) to these mutations in bacteria; likewise, they are responsible for clastogenic effects in mammalian cells. Genotoxicity is due either to direct genotoxic chemicals or to active metabolic products of the action of microsomal enzymes. The optimalization of testing procedures is discussed in order to appreciate the contribution of genotoxicity tests to the study of atmospheric pollution.

  14. Nitric oxide mitigates arsenic-induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity in Vicia faba L.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Pratiksha; Singh, A K

    2015-09-01

    The protective effects of nitric oxide (NO) against arsenic (As)-induced structural disturbances in Vicia faba have been investigated. As treatment (0.25, 0.50, and 1 mM) resulted in a declined growth of V. faba seedlings. Arsenic treatment stimulates the activity of SOD and CAT while the activities of APX and GST content were decreased. The oxidative stress markers such as superoxide radical, hydrogen peroxide and malondialdehyde (lipid peroxidation) contents were enhanced by As. Overall results revealed that significant accumulation of As suppressed growth, photosynthesis, antioxidant enzymes (SOD, CAT, APX, and GST activity), mitotic index, and induction of different chromosomal abnormalities, hence led to oxidative stress. The concentration of SNP (0.02 mM) was very effective in counteracting the adverse effect of As toxicity. These abnormalities use partially or fully reversed by a simultaneous application of As and NO donor and sodium nitroprusside and has an ameliorating effect against As-induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity in V. faba roots.

  15. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity induced by coal and coal fly ash particles samples in V79 cells.

    PubMed

    León-Mejía, Grethel; Silva, Luis F O; Civeira, Matheus S; Oliveira, Marcos L S; Machado, Miriana; Villela, Izabel Vianna; Hartmann, Andreas; Premoli, Suziane; Corrêa, Dione Silva; Da Silva, Juliana; Henriques, João Antônio Pêgas

    2016-12-01

    Exposure to coal and coal ashes can cause harmful effects in in vitro and in vivo systems, mainly by the induction of oxidative damage. The aim of this work was to assess cytotoxic and genotoxic effects using the V79 cell line treated with coal and coal fly ash particles derived from a coal power plant located in Santa Catarina, Brazil. Two coal samples (COAL11 and COAL16) and two coal fly ash samples (CFA11 and CFA16) were included in this study. COAL16 was co-firing with a mixture of fuel oil and diesel oil. The comet assay data showed that exposure of V79 cells to coal and coal fly ash particles induced primary DNA lesions. Application of lesion-specific endonucleases (FPG and ENDO III) demonstrated increased DNA effects indicating the presence of high amounts of oxidative DNA lesions. The cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome assay analysis showed that exposure of V79 cells to high concentrations of coal and coal fly ash particles induced cytotoxic effects (apoptosis and necrosis) and chromosomal instability (nucleoplasmic bridges, nuclear buds, and micronucleus (MN) formation). These results may be associated with compounds contained in the surface of the particles as hazardous elements, ultrafine/nanoparticles, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) which were detected in the samples. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  16. Sex-related effects of imidacloprid modulated by piperonyl butoxide and menadione in rats. Part II: genotoxic and cytotoxic potential.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Mehmet; Sevgiler, Yusuf; Buyukleyla, Mehmet; Yardimci, Mustafa; Yilmaz, Mehmet; Rencuzogullari, Eyyup

    2016-01-01

    Despite its intended use, imidacloprid causes genotoxic and cytotoxic effects in mammals, especially in the presence of metabolic activation systems. The aim of this study was to determine to which extent these effects are sex related and how its metabolism modulators piperonyl butoxide and menadione affect its toxicity. Male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with the intraperitoneal LD50 dose of imidacloprid alone (170 mg/kg) or pretreated with piperonyl butoxide (100 mg/kg) and menadione (25 mg/kg) for 12 and 24 h. Structural chromosome aberrations, abnormal cells and mitotic index were determined microscopically in bone marrow cells. Male rats showed susceptibility to the genotoxic effects of imidacloprid. Piperonyl butoxide was effective in countering this effect only at 24 h, whereas menadione exacerbated imidacloprid-induced genotoxicity. Piperonyl butoxide and menadione pretreatments increased the percentage of structural chromosome aberrations and abnormal cells in females. Imidacloprid decreased the mitotic index, whereas pretreatment with piperonyl butoxide and menadione showed improvement in both sexes. We believe that CYP450-mediated metabolism of imidacloprid is under the hormonal control and therefore that its genotoxicity is sex related. Piperonyl butoxide pretreatment also showed sex-related modulation. The hormonal effects on imidacloprid biotransformation require further investigation.

  17. Three-Dimensional, Transgenic Cell Models to Quantify Space Genotoxic Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, S. R.; Sognier, M. A.; Wu, H.; Pingerelli, P. L.; Glickman, B. W.; Dawson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The space environment contains radiation and chemical agents known to be mutagenic and carcinogenic to humans. Additionally, microgravity is a complicating factor that may modify or synergize induced genotoxic effects. Most in vitro models fail to use human cells (making risk extrapolation to humans more difficult), overlook the dynamic effect of tissue intercellular interactions on genotoxic damage, and lack the sensitivity required to measure low-dose effects. Currently a need exists for a model test system that simulates cellular interactions present in tissue, and can be used to quantify genotoxic damage induced by low levels of radiation and chemicals, and extrapolate assessed risk to humans. A state-of-the-art, three-dimensional, multicellular tissue equivalent cell culture model will be presented. It consists of mammalian cells genetically engineered to contain multiple copies of defined target genes for genotoxic assessment,. NASA-designed bioreactors were used to coculture mammalian cells into spheroids, The cells used were human mammary epithelial cells (H184135) and Stratagene's (Austin, Texas) Big Blue(TM) Rat 2 lambda fibroblasts. The fibroblasts were genetically engineered to contain -a high-density target gene for mutagenesis (60 copies of lacl/LacZ per cell). Tissue equivalent spheroids were routinely produced by inoculation of 2 to 7 X 10(exp 5) fibroblasts with Cytodex 3 beads (150 micrometers in diameter). at a 20:1 cell:bead ratio, into 50-ml HARV bioreactors (Synthecon, Inc.). Fibroblasts were cultured for 5 days, an equivalent number of epithelial cells added, and the fibroblast/epithelial cell coculture continued for 21 days. Three-dimensional spheroids with diameters ranging from 400 to 600 micrometers were obtained. Histological and immunohistochemical Characterization revealed i) both cell types present in the spheroids, with fibroblasts located primarily in the center, surrounded by epithelial cells; ii) synthesis of extracellular matrix

  18. Propolis-induced genotoxicity and antigenotoxicity in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Denise Crispim; Mazzaron Barcelos, Gustavo Rafael; Silva, Lívia Ferreira; Chacon Tonin, Conception Cortez; Bastos, Jairo Kenupp

    2006-10-01

    Propolis has been used in folk medicine since ancient times and is known for its antimicrobial, antiparasitic, antiviral, anti-inflammatory, antitumoral and antioxidant properties. In view of the great therapeutic interest in propolis and the small number of studies regarding its mechanism of action, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the mutagenic and antimutagenic effects of propolis using Chinese hamster ovary cells. Parameters such as the frequency of chromosome aberrations and mitotic index were analyzed. The results showed that, on one hand, the highest propolis tested concentration displayed a small but significant increase in the frequency of chromosome aberrations, and on the other hand, it was observed that the lowest tested concentration significantly reduced the chromosome damage induced by the chemotherapeutic agent doxorubicin. The present results indicate that propolis shows the characteristic of a "Janus" compound, i.e., propolis is genotoxic at higher concentrations, while at lower concentrations it display a chemopreventive effect on doxorubicin-induced mutagenicity. Flavonoids may be the components of propolis responsible for its both mutagenic and antimutagenic effects, once these compounds may act either as pro-oxidant or as free radicals scavenger, depending on its concentration.

  19. Celecoxib mitigates genotoxicity induced by ionizing radiation in human blood lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jalal; Fathi, Mahdieh; Ghasemi, Arash; Shiadeh, Seyedeh Nesa Rezaeian; Pourfallah, Tayyeb Allahverdi

    2017-01-01

    Ionizing radiation causes DNA damage and chromosome abbreviations on normal cells. The radioprotective effect of celecoxib (CLX) was investigated against genotoxicity induced by ionizing radiation in cultured human blood lymphocytes. Peripheral blood samples were collected from human volunteers and were incubated at different concentrations at 1, 5, 10 and 50 μM of CLX for two hours. At each dose point, the whole blood was exposed in vitro to 150 cGy of X-ray, and then the lymphocytes were cultured with mitogenic stimulation to determine the micronucleus frequency in cytokinesis blocked binucleated lymphocytes. Incubation of the whole blood with CLX exhibited a significant decrease in the incidence of micronuclei in lymphocytes induced by ionizing radiation, as compared with similarly irradiated lymphocytes without CLX treatment. The maximum reduction on the frequency of micronuclei was observed at 50 μM of CLX (65% decrease). This data may have an important possible application for the protection of human lymphocytes from the genetic damage induced by ionizing irradiation in human exposed to radiation. PMID:28255318

  20. Genotoxic and Cytotoxic Effects of Antiretroviral Combinations in Mice Bone Marrow

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Commonly used guidelines for the management of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection (highly active antiretroviral therapy, HAART) include drug combinations such as tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) + lamivudine (3TC) and combivir [zidovudine (AZT) + 3TC] + efavirenz (EFV). These combinations may enhance the genotoxic effects induced by such drugs individually, since the therapy requires lifelong adherence and the drugs have unknown effects during treatment. Thus, the evaluation of the benefits and risks of HAART is of great importance. In order to assess the cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of three concentrations of each of the antiretroviral combinations TDF + 3TC (800 + 400, 1600 + 800, and 3200 + 1600 mg/kg body weight, BW) and combivir + EFV (200 + 100 + 400, 400 + 200 + 800, and 800 + 400 + 1600 mg/kg BW) after two exposure periods (24 h and 48 h), in the present study the in vivo comet assay (single-cell gel electrophoresis) and the mouse bone marrow micronucleus test were used. Neither TDF + 3TC nor combivir + EFV induced DNA damage at any concentrations tested after 24 h or 48 h using the comet assay. After 24 h, both combinations increased the micronucleus frequency at all concentrations tested. After 48 h, combivir + EFV increased the micronucleated polychromatic erythrocyte (MNPCE) frequency at the two highest concentrations tested. Polychromatic erythrocytes (PCE)/normochromatic erythrocytes (NCE) ratio was high for both combinations, suggesting that they can be mitogenic. Since genotoxicity may be related to carcinogenesis, it is necessary to conduct further studies to verify the long-term mutagenic effects of these drugs. PMID:27806085

  1. Genotoxic effects of environmental endocrine disruptors on the aquatic insect Chironomus riparius evaluated using the comet assay.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Paz, Pedro; Morales, Mónica; Martínez-Guitarte, José Luis; Morcillo, Gloria

    2013-12-12

    Genotoxicity is one of the most important toxic endpoints in chemical toxicity testing and environmental risk assessment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic potential of various environmental pollutants frequently found in aquatic environments and characterized by their endocrine disrupting activity. Monitoring of DNA damage was undertaken after in vivo exposures of the aquatic larvae of the midge Chironomus riparius, a model organism that represents an abundant and ecologically relevant macroinvertebrate, widely used in freshwater toxicology. DNA-induced damage, resulting in DNA fragmentation, was quantified by the comet assay after short (24 h) and long (96 h) exposures to different concentrations of the selected toxicants: bisphenol A (BPA), nonylphenol (NP), pentachlorophenol (PCP), tributyltin (TBT) and triclosan (TCS). All five compounds were found to have genotoxic activity as demonstrated by significant increases in all the comet parameters (%DNA in tail, tail length, tail moment and Olive tail moment) at all tested concentrations. Persistent exposure did not increase the extent of DNA damage, except for TCS at the highest concentration, but generally there was a reduction in DNA damage thought to be associated with the induction of the detoxification processes and repairing mechanisms. Comparative analysis showed differences in the genotoxic potential between the chemicals, as well as significant time and concentration-dependent variations, which most likely reflect differences in the ability to repair DNA damage under the different treatments. The present report demonstrates the sensitivity of the benthic larvae of C. riparius to these environmental genotoxins suggesting its potential as biomonitor organism in freshwater ecosystems. The results obtained about the DNA-damaging potential of these environmental pollutants reinforce the need for additional studies on the genotoxicity of endocrine active substances that, by linking genotoxic

  2. Exploring the Molecular Mechanisms of Nickel-Induced Genotoxicity and Carcinogenicity: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Keyuna S.; Buchner, Virginia; Tchounwou, Paul B.

    2011-01-01

    Nickel, a naturally occurring element that exists in various mineral forms, is mainly found in soil and sediment, and its mobilization is influenced by the physicochemical properties of the soil. Industrial sources of nickel include metallurgical processes such as electroplating, alloy production, stainless steel, and nickel-cadmium batteries. Nickel industries, oil- and coal-burning power plants, and trash incinerators have been implicated in its release into the environment. In humans, nickel toxicity is influenced by the route of exposure, dose, and solubility of the nickel compound. Lung inhalation is the major route of exposure for nickel-induced toxicity. Nickel may also be ingested or absorbed through the skin. The primary target organs are the kidneys and lungs. Other organs such as the liver, spleen, heart and testes may also be affected to a lesser extent. Although the most common health effect is an allergic reaction, research has also demonstrated that nickel is carcinogenic to humans. The focus of the present review is on recent research concerning the molecular mechanisms of nickel-induced genotoxicity and carcinogenicity. We first present a background on the occurrence of nickel in the environment, human exposure, and human health effects. PMID:21905451

  3. Oxidative Stress, Cytotoxicity, and Genotoxicity Induced by Methyl Parathion in Human Gingival Fibroblasts: Protective Role of Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate.

    PubMed

    Argentin, Gabriella; Divizia, Maurizio; Cicchetti, Rosadele

    2015-01-01

    Organophosphorous (OP) compounds are pesticides frequently released into the environment because of extensive use in agriculture. Among these, methyl parathion (mPT) recently received attention as a consequence of illegal use. The predominant route of human exposure to mPT is via inhalation, but inadvertent consumption of contaminated foods and water may also occur. The goal of this study was to investigate the in vitro effects of mPT on cells in the oral cavity and evaluate the potential protective role of epigallocathechin-3-gallate (EGCG) on these effects. Human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) were exposed to 10, 50, or 100 μ g/ml mPT for 24 h and assessed for oxidative stress, as evidenced by reactive generation of oxygen species (ROS), induction of apoptotic cell death, DNA damage (comet assay and cytochinesis-block micronucleus test), and nitric oxide (NO) production. The results showed that mPT produced significant oxidative stress, cytotoxicity, and genotoxicity and increased NO levels through stimulation of inducible NO synthase expression. Finally, data demonstrated that EGCG (10, 25, or 50 μ M) was able to inhibit the pesticide-induced effects on all parameters studied. Data indicate that cytotoxic and genotoxic effects may be associated with oxidative stress induced by mPT observed in HGF cultures and that EGCG plays a protective role via antioxidant activities.

  4. Iron induced genotoxicity: attenuation by vitamin C and its optimization

    PubMed Central

    Parveen, Nuzhat; Ahmad, Shoeb

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin C (VC) is a well-known antioxidant and strong free radical scavenger. Its antioxidant activity is useful for protection of cellular macromolecules, particularly DNA, from oxidative damage induced by different agents. This study was undertaken to evaluate the optimum level of VC in attenuating the chromosome aberrations (CAs) and DNA damage after iron sulfate (FeSO4) acute administration in Wistar rats. The results exhibited that the increase of CAs and DNA damage induced by FeSO4, 200 mg Fe/kg, could be reduced significantly by VC pretreatment at the dose of 500 mg/kg (p<0.001), but not in the 100 mg/kg group. The findings provide evidence that VC at the dose of 500 mg/kg exerted a possible protective effect against FeSO4 induced CAs and DNA damage. The possible mechanisms of VC may be attributed to its property as a free radical scavenger or to its indirect action in reducing the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS). PMID:26109893

  5. Enzymatic adaptations to arsenic-induced oxidative stress in Zea mays and genotoxic effect of arsenic in root tips of Vicia faba and Zea mays.

    PubMed

    Duquesnoy, Isabelle; Champeau, Gabrielle Marie; Evray, Germaine; Ledoigt, Gérard; Piquet-Pissaloux, Agnès

    2010-01-01

    Agronomic plant species may display physiological and biochemical responses to oxidative stress caused by heavy metals and metalloids. Zea mays plants were grown hydroponically for eight days at different concentrations of As (0, 134 and 668 μM) and at different pH (4, 7 and 9). Metabolic variations in response to As toxicity were measured using physiological parameters and antioxidant enzymatic activities. A significant decrease in SOD activity was observed in the leaves and roots of Z. mays with the majority of As treatments. As decreased G-POX activity less in leaves than in roots. An increase in the concentration of As increased APX activity in leaves and roots, except As(V) at pH 4 and pH 9 in the leaves and As(III) at pH 9 in the roots, when there was a significant decrease in APX activity at low As concentrations. After exposure to As(V), CAT activity was the same as in the control. As(III) led to an increase in CAT activity in leaves and to a decrease in roots. With increasing concentrations of As(III), CAT activity increased in both leaves and roots whatever the pH. To obtain more detailed knowledge on the effects of arsenate and arsenite exposure on Vicia faba and Z. mays, root meristems were also examined. Roots were fed hydroponically with 134, 334, 534 and 668 μM arsenate or arsenite and 4 × 10(-3)M of maleic hydrazide as positive control, at three different pH. Physiological parameters, the mitotic index and micronuclei frequencies were evaluated in root meristems. At all three pH, the highest As(V) and As(III) concentrations induced a substantial modification in root colour, increased root thickness with stiffening, and reduced root length. High concentrations also caused a significant decrease in the mitotic index, and micronucleus chromosomic aberrations were observed in the root meristems of both species.

  6. Enhanced cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of gadolinium following ELF-EMF irradiation in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seunghyun; Lee, Younghyun; Lee, Sunyeong; Choi, Young Joo; Chung, Hai Won

    2014-10-01

    There are many studies of Gd nephrotoxicity and neurotoxicity, whereas research on cyto- and genotoxicity in normal human lymphocytes is scarce. It is important to investigate the effect of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) on Gd toxicity, as patients are co-exposed to Gd and ELF-EMF generated by MRI scanners. We investigated the cytotoxicity and genotoixcity of Gd and the possible enhancing effect of ELF-EMF on Gd toxicity in cultured human lymphocytes by performing a micronuclei (MN) assay, trypan blue dye exclusion, single cell gel electrophoresis, and apoptosis analyses using flow cytometry. Isolated lymphocytes were exposed to 0.2-1.2 mM of Gd only or in combination with a 60-Hz ELF-EMF of 0.8-mT field strength. Exposing human lymphocytes to Gd resulted in a concentration- and time-dependent decrease in cell viability and an increase in MN frequency, single strand DNA breakage, apoptotic cell death, and ROS production. ELF-EMF (0.8 mT) exposure also increased cell death, MN frequency, olive tail moment, and apoptosis induced by Gd treatment alone. These results suggest that Gd induces DNA damage and apoptotic cell death in human lymphocytes and that ELF-EMF enhances the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of Gd.

  7. Evolution of genotoxicity test methods in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sofuni, Toshio

    2017-01-01

    The evolution of methods to assess genotoxicity of test compounds is thought to be one of the important subjects in The Japanese Environmental and Mutagen Society (JEMS). In 1970, the Ministry of Education of Japan (at that time) organized a research group (Organizer: Y. Tazima, National Institute of Genetics), and started a systematic research on the genotoxic effects induced by chemical substances. Considering the importance of this issue through the outcomes of the research group, JEMS was established in 1972, and President Tazima organized the 1st annual meeting in the August in Tokyo with the participation of experts in this field working in national institutes, universities and others in Japan. The discovery that food additives possessed genotoxic potential triggered various scientific activities in the field of genotoxicity. Another important point was the correlation between genotoxicity and carcinogenicity, in which the establishment of the reverse mutation assay played an important role. Other critical factors, such as side effects of drugs, occupational cancer, and environmental pollution due to genotoxic chemicals, emphasized the importance of genotoxicity tests for human safety. The tests performed to assess genotoxicity from 1960s to 1980s will be described to understand that many different genotoxic methodologies were discussed in these periods.

  8. Arsenic-induced genotoxicity in Nile tilapia (Orechromis niloticus); the role of Spirulina platensis extract.

    PubMed

    Sayed, Alaa El-Din H; Elbaghdady, Heba Allah M; Zahran, Eman

    2015-12-01

    Arsenic (As) is one of the most relevant environmental global single substance toxicants that have long been regarded as a carcinogenic and genotoxic potential. In this respect, we evaluated the cytogenetic effect of arsenic exposure in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), in terms of erythrocyte alteration, apoptosis, and induction of micronuclei. Spirulina platensis (SP) is a filamentous cyanobacterium microalgae with potent dietary phytoantioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancerous properties supplementation. The protective role of Spirulina as supplementary feeds was studied in Nile tilapia (O. niloticus) against arsenic-induced cytogenotoxicity. Four groups were assigned as control group (no SP or As), As group (exposed to water-born As in the form of NaAsO2 at 7 ppm), SP1 (SP at 7.5% + As at the same level of exposure), and SP2 (SP at 10% + As at the same level of exposure). As-treated group had a significant increase in all cytogenetic analyses including erythrocyte alteration, apoptosis, and induction of micronuclei after 2 weeks with continuous increase in response after 3 weeks. The combined treatment of Spirulina at two different concentrations of 7.5 and 10% had significantly declined the induction of erythrocyte alteration, apoptosis, and micronuclei formation induced by arsenic intoxication.

  9. Effect of the nano-bio interface on the genotoxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles and associated cellular responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Raju Yashaswi

    Several toxicological studies have shown that titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2), one of the most widely produced engineered nanoparticles, can induce genotoxicity; however, potential adverse health effects associated with their physicochemical properties are not fully understood. Proteins in a biological medium can adsorb to the surface of the nanoparticle resulting in the formation of a protein corona that can alter the physicochemical properties of the particle. Furthermore, the protein corona may impact the interaction between nanoparticles and cells, referred to as the nano-bio interface, effecting the uptake, distribution, and toxicity of the particles. Despite the potential influence of the composition of the biological medium on the physicochemical properties and genotoxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles, the majority of studies have not examined systematically the influence of medium composition on protein corona, genotoxicity, and cellular responses. In this dissertation we tested the overall hypothesis that titanium dioxide nanoparticles in medium that produces the smallest agglomerates would be taken up into cells and induce genotoxicity, and that exposure would initiate the signaling of key mediators of a DNA damage and inflammation response. Three major findings were shown in this study: 1) Protein corona formation on the surface of nano-TiO2 can impact the nano-bio interface and change cellular interaction. 2) Smaller agglomerates of nano-TiO2 are taken up more by cells without inducing cell cycle arrest, thereby allowing induced DNA damage to be processed into micronuclei in BEAS-2B cells. 3) Nano-TiO 2 in medium that facilitates increased cellular interaction induces the upregulation of the ATM-Chk2 DNA damage response (similar to ionizing radiation) and NF-kappaB inflammation pathways. Taken together, our research provides a systematic examination of the physicochemical properties, genotoxicity, and cellular responses induced by

  10. Genotoxicity induced by Roundup® (Glyphosate) in tegu lizard (Salvator merianae) embryos.

    PubMed

    Schaumburg, Laura G; Siroski, Pablo A; Poletta, Gisela L; Mudry, Marta D

    2016-06-01

    Environmental contaminants produce multiple adverse consequences at individual, population and ecosystem levels. High volumes of agrochemicals applied to great variety of crops, together with agricultural expansion, generate great concerns due to the impact for the environment and large risk implicated for wildlife. The lack of data on these threats is striking. The tegu lizard (Salvator merianae) is one of the species that live in environments under contaminant effects. Several characteristics allow proposing this species as a potential sentinel organism for the monitoring of pesticides in their habitat. The present study is the first report about genotoxicity in tegu lizard neonates after embryonic exposure to Roundup® (glyphosate 66.2%). The micronucleus test (MN), nuclear abnormalities (NAs) assay and comet assay (CA) were used as biomarkers of genotoxic effects induced in erythrocytes by topical exposure of the eggs to the glyphosate commercial formulation Roundup® (RU), in laboratory controlled conditions. A total of 96 eggs were distributed in six groups exposed to RU (50, 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600μg/egg), one positive control (PC; 200μg cyclophosphamide/egg) and one negative control (NC; distilled water). No teratogenic effects were observed in any of the exposed or control neonates. A significant increase in DNA damage was observed in all concentrations higher than 100μg/egg with respect to NC (p<0.05). However, no statistical differences were found in the frequencies of MN and NAs in any group exposed to RU compared to the NC. No statistically significant differences were found in the size of the lizards at birth or after six months post-exposure (p>0.05). Our results provide new information about the undesirable effects of the glyphosate-based herbicide formulations RU on this lizard species that inhabits areas permanently exposed to several pesticide formulations. We consider of utmost necessity a strict regulation of the agrochemical application

  11. Beryllium metal I. experimental results on acute oral toxicity, local skin and eye effects, and genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Strupp, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The toxicity of soluble metal compounds is often different from that of the parent metal. Since no reliable data on acute toxicity, local effects, and mutagenicity of beryllium metal have ever been generated, beryllium metal powder was tested according to the respective Organisation for Economical Co-Operation and Development (OECD) guidelines. Acute oral toxicity of beryllium metal was investigated in rats and local effects on skin and eye in rabbits. Skin-sensitizing properties were investigated in guinea pigs (maximization method). Basic knowledge about systemic bioavailability is important for the design of genotoxicity tests on poorly soluble substances. Therefore, it was necessary to experimentally compare the capacities of beryllium chloride and beryllium metal to form ions under simulated human lung conditions. Solubility of beryllium metal in artificial lung fluid was low, while solubility in artificial lysosomal fluid was moderate. Beryllium chloride dissolution kinetics were largely different, and thus, metal extracts were used in the in vitro genotoxicity tests. Genotoxicity was investigated in vitro in a bacterial reverse mutagenicity assay, a mammalian cell gene mutation assay, a mammalian cell chromosome aberration assay, and an unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) assay. In addition, cell transformation was tested in a Syrian hamster embryo cell assay, and potential inhibition of DNA repair was tested by modification of the UDS assay. Beryllium metal was found not to be mutagenic or clastogenic based on the experimental in vitro results. Furthermore, treatment with beryllium metal extracts did not induce DNA repair synthesis, indicative of no DNA-damaging potential of beryllium metal. A cell-transforming potential and a tendency to inhibit DNA repair when the cell is severely damaged by an external stimulus were observed. Beryllium metal was also found not to be a skin or eye irritant, not to be a skin sensitizer, and not to have relevant acute oral

  12. Beryllium Metal I. Experimental Results on Acute Oral Toxicity, Local Skin and Eye Effects, and Genotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Strupp, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The toxicity of soluble metal compounds is often different from that of the parent metal. Since no reliable data on acute toxicity, local effects, and mutagenicity of beryllium metal have ever been generated, beryllium metal powder was tested according to the respective Organisation for Economical Co-Operation and Development (OECD) guidelines. Acute oral toxicity of beryllium metal was investigated in rats and local effects on skin and eye in rabbits. Skin-sensitizing properties were investigated in guinea pigs (maximization method). Basic knowledge about systemic bioavailability is important for the design of genotoxicity tests on poorly soluble substances. Therefore, it was necessary to experimentally compare the capacities of beryllium chloride and beryllium metal to form ions under simulated human lung conditions. Solubility of beryllium metal in artificial lung fluid was low, while solubility in artificial lysosomal fluid was moderate. Beryllium chloride dissolution kinetics were largely different, and thus, metal extracts were used in the in vitro genotoxicity tests. Genotoxicity was investigated in vitro in a bacterial reverse mutagenicity assay, a mammalian cell gene mutation assay, a mammalian cell chromosome aberration assay, and an unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) assay. In addition, cell transformation was tested in a Syrian hamster embryo cell assay, and potential inhibition of DNA repair was tested by modification of the UDS assay. Beryllium metal was found not to be mutagenic or clastogenic based on the experimental in vitro results. Furthermore, treatment with beryllium metal extracts did not induce DNA repair synthesis, indicative of no DNA-damaging potential of beryllium metal. A cell-transforming potential and a tendency to inhibit DNA repair when the cell is severely damaged by an external stimulus were observed. Beryllium metal was also found not to be a skin or eye irritant, not to be a skin sensitizer, and not to have relevant acute oral

  13. Effect of dietary meat and fish on endogenous nitrosation, inflammation and genotoxicity of faecal water.

    PubMed

    Joosen, Annemiek M C P; Lecommandeur, Emmanuelle; Kuhnle, Gunter G C; Aspinall, Sue M; Kap, Lisanne; Rodwell, Sheila A

    2010-05-01

    N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids have been associated with reduced colon tumorigenesis. However, their association with colorectal cancer incidence is not conclusive. We investigated the influence of isocaloric replacement of red meat with fatty fish on endogenous nitrosation, inflammation and genotoxicity of faecal water in apparently healthy human volunteers on controlled diets. Fourteen volunteers consumed a high red meat, a combined red meat/fish and a high fish diet for 8 days each. Faecal homogenates were analysed for haem, nitroso compounds (NOC) and calprotectin and associated supernatants for genotoxicity. Both faecal NOC and haem excretion decreased with more fish and less meat in the diet. Nitrosyl iron (FeNO) was the main contributor to total NOC on all diets. The proportion of other NOC increased with more fish and less meat in the diet (P = 0.01), resulting in a non-statistically significant decrease in the proportion of FeNO on the fish diet. There was no statistically significant difference in faecal calprotectin (P = 0.54) and faecal water-induced DNA strand breaks and oxidized purines and pyrimidines between the diets (P > 0.36). Increasing fish intake and reducing the intake of red meat does not seem to have an effect on inflammation and faecal water-induced (oxidative) DNA damage; however, it does reduce the formation of mutagenic and potentially carcinogenic NOC and may as such beneficially affect colorectal risk.

  14. Cytotoxic, Genotoxic, and Neurotoxic Effects of Mg, Pb, and Fe on Pheochromocytoma (PC-12) Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Talia; Liu, Yi-Ming; Tchounwou, Paul B.

    2014-01-01

    Metals such as lead (Pb), magnesium (Mg), and iron (Fe) are ubiquitous in the environment as a result of natural occurrence and anthropogenic activities. Although Mg, Fe and others are considered essential elements, high level of exposure has been associated with severe adverse health effects including cardiovascular, hematological, nephrotoxic, hepatotoxic, and neurologic abnormalities in humans. In the present study we hypothesized that Mg, Pb, and Fe are cytotoxic, genotoxic and neurotoxic, and their toxicity is mediated through oxidative stress and alteration in protein expression. To test the hypothesis, we used the pheochromocytoma (PC-12) cell line as a neuro cell model and performed the LDH assay for cell viability, Comet assay for DNA damage, Western blot for oxidative stress, and HPLC-MS to assess the concentration levels of neurological biomarkers such as glutamate, dopamine (DA), and 3-methoxytyramine (3-MT). The results of this study clearly show that Mg, Pb, and Fe, respectively in the form of MgSO4, Pb(NO3)2, FeCl2, and FeCl3 induce cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, and genotoxicity in PC-12 cells. In addition, exposure to these metallic compounds caused significant changes in the concentration levels of glutamate, dopamine, and 3-MT in PC-12 cells. Taken together the findings suggest that MgSO4, Pb(NO3)2, FeCl2, and FeCl3 have the potential to induce substantial toxicity to PC-12 cells. PMID:24942330

  15. Genotoxic and clastogenic effects of monohaloacetic acid drinking water disinfection by-products in primary human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Escobar-Hoyos, Luisa F; Hoyos-Giraldo, Luz Stella; Londoño-Velasco, Elizabeth; Reyes-Carvajal, Ingrid; Saavedra-Trujillo, Diana; Carvajal-Varona, Silvio; Sánchez-Gómez, Adalberto; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Plewa, Michael J

    2013-06-15

    The haloacetic acids (HAAs) are the second-most prevalent class of drinking water disinfection by-products formed by chemical disinfectants. Previous studies have determined DNA damage and repair of HAA-induced lesions in mammalian and human cell lines; however, little is known of the genomic DNA and chromosome damage induced by these compounds in primary human cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic and clastogenic effects of the monoHAA disinfection by-products in primary human lymphocytes. All monoHAAs were genotoxic in primary human lymphocytes, the rank order of genotoxicity and cytotoxicity was IAA > BAA > CAA. After 6 h of repair time, only 50% of the DNA damage (maximum decrease in DNA damage) was repaired compared to the control. This demonstrates that primary human lymphocytes are less efficient in repairing the induced damage by monoHAAs than previous studies with mammalian cell lines. In addition, the monoHAAs induced an increase in the chromosome aberration frequency as a measurement of the clastogenic effect of these compounds. These results coupled with genomic technologies in primary human cells and other mammalian non-cancerous cell lines may lead to the identification of biomarkers that may be employed in feedback loops to aid water chemists and engineers in the overall goal of producing safer drinking water.

  16. Evaluation of genotoxicity and DNA protective effects of mangiferin, a glucosylxanthone isolated from Mangifera indica L. stem bark extract.

    PubMed

    Rodeiro, I; Hernandez, S; Morffi, J; Herrera, J A; Gómez-Lechón, M J; Delgado, R; Espinosa-Aguirre, J J

    2012-09-01

    Mangiferin is a glucosylxantone isolated from Mangifera indica L. stem bark. Several studies have shown its pharmacological properties which make it a promising candidate for putative therapeutic use. This study was focused to investigate the in vitro genotoxic effects of mangiferin in the Ames test, SOS Chromotest and Comet assay. The genotoxic effects in bone marrow erythrocytes from NMRI mice orally treated with mangiferin (2000 mg/kg) were also evaluated. Additionally, its potential antimutagenic activity against several mutagens in the Ames test and its effects on CYP1A1 activity were assessed. Mangiferin (50-5000 μg/plate) did not increased the frequency of reverse mutations in the Ames test, nor induced primary DNA damage (5-1000 μg/mL) to Escherichia coli PQ37 cells under the SOS Chromotest. It was observed neither single strand breaks nor alkali-labile sites in blood peripheral lymphocytes or hepatocytes after 1h exposition to 10-500 μg/mL of mangiferin under the Comet assay. Furthermore, micronucleus studies showed mangiferin neither induced cytotoxic activity nor increased the frequency of micronucleated/binucleated cells in mice bone marrow. In short, mangiferin did not induce cytotoxic or genotoxic effects but it protect against DNA damage which would be associated with its antioxidant properties and its capacity to inhibit CYP enzymes.

  17. Green fluorescent protein-based biosensor for detecting SOS-inducing activity of genotoxic compounds.

    PubMed

    Kostrzynska, Magdalena; Leung, Kam T; Lee, Hung; Trevors, Jack T

    2002-01-01

    Increasing levels of environmental pollution demand specific and sensitive methods for detection of genotoxic agents in water, food products and environmental samples. Tests for genotoxicity assessment are often based on biosensor strains that respond to DNA damage induced by chemicals. In the present study, fluorescent reporter Escherichia coli strains have been developed, which contain a plasmid-borne transcriptional fusion between the DNA-damage inducible recA promoter and the green fluorescent protein gene (gfp) or a gene encoding a red-shifted, higher intensity GFP variant (mutant 3). GFP-based biosensors allowed the detection of a dose-dependent response to genotoxic agents such as mitomycin C (MMC), N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) and nalidixic acid (NA). A reporter strain carrying recA'-gfp mutant 3 fusion gave more dramatic and sensitive response than a strain containing the wild-type gfp. These results indicate that recA'-gfp mutant 3-based biosensor is potentially useful for detection of genotoxins.

  18. Chemopreventive effect of cactus Opuntia ficus indica on oxidative stress and genotoxicity of aflatoxin B1

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is potent hepatotoxic and hepatocarcinogenic agent. In aflatoxicosis, oxidative stress is a common mechanism contributing to initiation and progression of hepatic damage. The aim of this work was to evaluate the hepatoprotective effect of cactus cladode extract (CCE) on aflatoxin B1-induced liver damage in mice by measuring malondialdehyde (MDA) level, the protein carbonyls generation and the heat shock proteins Hsp 70 and Hsp 27 expressions in liver. We also looked for an eventual protective effect against AFB1-induced genotoxicity as determined by chromosome aberrations test, SOS Chromotest and DNA fragmentation assay. We further evaluated the modulation of p53, bax and bcl2 protein expressions in liver. Methods Adult, healthy balbC (20-25 g) male mice were pre-treated by intraperitonial administration of CCE (50 mg/Kg.b.w) for 2 weeks. Control animals were treated 3 days a week for 4 weeks by intraperitonial administration of 250 μg/Kg.b.w AFB1. Animals treated by AFB1 and CCE were divided into two groups: the first group was administrated CCE 2 hours before each treatment with AFB1 3 days a week for 4 weeks. The second group was administrated without pre-treatment with CCE but this extract was administrated 24 hours after each treatment with AFB1 3 days a week for 4 weeks. Results Our results clearly showed that AFB1 induced significant alterations in oxidative stress markers. In addition, it has a genotoxic potential and it increased the expression of pro apoptotic proteins p53 and bax and decreased the expression of bcl2. The treatment of CCE before or after treatment with AFB1, showed (i) a total reduction of AFB1 induced oxidative damage markers, (ii) an anti-genotoxic effect resulting in an efficient prevention of chromosomal aberrations and DNA fragmentation compared to the group treated with AFB1 alone (iii) restriction of the effect of AFB1 by differential modulation of the expression of p53 which decreased as well as its

  19. The in vitro genotoxic effect of Tucuma (Astrocaryum aculeatum), an Amazonian fruit rich in carotenoids.

    PubMed

    de Souza Filho, Olmiro Cezimbra; Sagrillo, Michele Rorato; Garcia, Luiz Filipe Machado; Machado, Alencar Kolinski; Cadoná, Francine; Ribeiro, Euler Esteves; Duarte, Marta Maria Medeiros Frescura; Morel, Ademir Farias; da Cruz, Ivana Beatrice Mânica

    2013-11-01

    Tucuma (Astrocaryum aculeatum) is an Amazonian fruit that presents high levels of carotenoids and other bioactive compounds such as quercetin. The extracts of tucuma peel and pulp present strong antioxidant activity which illustrate an elevated concentration that causes cytotoxic effects in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). This study performed additional investigations to analyze the potential genotoxic effects of the tucuma extracts on PBMCs. The genotoxicity was evaluated by DNA fragmentation, Comet assay, and chromosomal instability G-band assays. The acute tucuma extract treatment showed genoprotective effects against DNA denaturation when compared with untreated PBMC cells. However, in the experiments with 24 and 72 h treatments to tucuma treatments, we observed low genotoxicity through a concentration of 100 μg/mL, some genotoxic effects related to intermediary concentrations (100-500 μg/mL), and more pronounced genotoxic effects on higher tucuma extract concentrations. After 24 h of treatment, the reactive oxygen species were similar among treatments and PBMC control groups. However, the caspase-1 activity related to the apoptosis and pyroptosis process increased significantly in higher tucuma concentrations. In summary, tucuma extracts, despite their higher antioxidant content and antioxidant activity, would present PBMCs genotoxic effects that are dependent on concentration and time exposition. These results need to be considered in future in vitro and in vivo studies of tucuma effects.

  20. Histopathological, oxidative damage, biochemical, and genotoxicity alterations in hepatic rats exposed to deltamethrin: modulatory effects of garlic (Allium sativum).

    PubMed

    Ncir, Marwa; Ben Salah, Ghada; Kamoun, Hassen; Makni Ayadi, Fatma; Khabir, Abdelmajid; El Feki, Abdelfattah; Saoudi, Mongi

    2016-06-01

    Deltamethrin is a pesticide widely used as a synthetic pyrethroid. The aim of this study was undertaken to investigate the effects of deltamethrin to induce oxidative stress and changes in biochemical parameters, hepatotoxicity and genotoxicity in female rats following a short-term (30 days) oral exposure and attenuation of these effects by Allium sativum extract. Indeed, Allium sativum is known to be a good antioxidant food resource which helps destroy free radical particles. Our results showed that deltamethrin treatment caused an increase in liver enzyme activities of aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH); and hepatic lipid peroxidation (LPO) level. However, it induced a decrease in activities of hepatic catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) (p < 0.01). Allium sativum extract normalized significantly (p < 0.01) the mentioned parameters in deltamethrin-treated rats. For genotoxic evaluation, deltamethrin treatment showed a significant increase in frequencies of micronucleus in bone-marrow cells. Micronucleus formation is an indicator of chromosomal damage which has been increasingly used to detect the genotoxic potential of environmental pests. The present study showed that Allium sativum diminished the adverse effects induced by this synthetic pyrethroid insecticide.

  1. Antigenotoxic effect of green-synthesised silver nanoparticles from Ocimum sanctum leaf extract against cyclophosphamide induced genotoxicity in human lymphocytes—in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijaya, P. P.; Rekha, B.; Mathew, Anu Thersa; Syed Ali, M.; Yogananth, N.; Anuradha, V.; Kalitha Parveen, P.

    2014-04-01

    The present study was aimed to identify the antigenotoxic effect of bio-synthesised silver nanoparticles (SNP) of Ocimum sanctum leaf extract against cyclophosphamide (CP). We tested the antigenotoxic effect of bio-synthesized silver nanoparticles of O. sanctum leaf extract on human lymphocytes against CP by using chromosomal aberration assay (CAA). Silver nanoparticles was first synthesized from fresh leaf extract of O. sanctum and characterised. Their quality was checked by XRD technique and morphology by SEM. Three different doses of the bio-synthesised SNPs namely, 50, 100 and 200 μl/ml were selected and CP (100 μg/ml) was used as a positive control for CAA. CP administration to human lymphocytes culture caused reduction in mitotic index (MI) and increase in chromosomal damages. The three doses (50, 100 and 200 μl/ml) significantly ( P < 0.005) reduced the chromosomal damages by CP and there was increase in MI. The biological way of synthesising SNPs has advantages like cost effectiveness and eco-friendly. Also the bio-synthesised SNPs of O. sanctum leaf extract was found to be an powerful genoprotectant. Furthermore works are to be carried out in future to find the extract mechanism of its genoprotective nature.

  2. Effects of konjac glucomannan, inulin and cellulose on acute colonic responses to genotoxic azoxymethane.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wen-Tzu; Yang, Lien-Chuan; Chen, Hsiao-Ling

    2014-07-15

    Mice were fed low-fibre, or that supplemented with soluble fibre (konjac glucomannan, KGM; inulin), or insoluble fibre (cellulose) to determine how these three fibres modulated the acute colonic responses to an azoxymethane (AOM) treatment. Results indicated that KGM and inulin exerted greater anti-genotoxic effects compared to cellulose and up-regulated the gene expressions of glutathione S-transferase and antioxidant enzymes. The apoptotic index in the distal colon was the greatest and the expression of Bcl-2 was the lowest in the KGM group 24h after the AOM treatment. On the other hand, the proliferative index and expression of Cyclin D1 were lower in all fibre groups. Furthermore, KGM increased cecal short-chain fatty acid contents, and both KGM and inulin increased fecal probiotic concentrations. This study suggested that soluble fibres were more effective than cellulose on ameliorating AOM-induced genotoxicity by up-regulating antioxidant enzyme genes, and enhancing epithelium apoptosis by down-regulating Bcl-2.

  3. [Genotoxicity effect of organic pollutants in Meiliang Bay of Taihu Lake on microalga Euglena gracilis].

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang-Yu; Cui, Yi-Bin; Hu, Chang-Wei; Qian, Xin; Kong, Zhi-Ming; Li, Mei

    2009-11-01

    Organic pollutant ingredients and content of water samples from Taihu Lake were analyzed by GC-MS. Results showed that Taihu Lake was already contaminated by the organic pollutant, and 15 kinds of targeted organic pollutants were detected. At lower concentrations (1 time), organic pollutants could not have notable effect on the growth of Euglena gracilis, but could increase the content of photosynthetic pigment. At higher concentrations (5, 10 times), organic pollutants restrained the growth of E. gracilis remarkably, and decreased the content of photosynthetic pigment. Activities of SOD and POD increased with the content of organic pollutants. It is indicated that organic pollution could induce activities of antioxidation enzymes in E. gracilis. TOM and TM for the genotoxicity assay increased and DNA damage was found. In higher concentration groups, DNA damage was serious and had an obvious dose-effect relationship. It is indicated that Meiliang bay water may have potential mutagenicity. Comet assay combined with SOD analysis was of value to genotoxic monitoring of polluted water and was a suitable biomarker for organic pollutants in water.

  4. Genotoxicity of neutrons in Drosophila melanogaster. Somatic mutation and recombination induced by reactor neutrons.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Rincón, J; Delfín-Loya, A; Ureña-Núñez, F; Paredes, L C; Zambrano-Achirica, F; Graf, U

    2005-08-01

    This paper describes the observation of a direct relationship between the absorbed doses of neutrons and the frequencies of somatic mutation and recombination using the wing somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) of Drosophila melanogaster. This test was used for evaluating the biological effects induced by neutrons from the Triga Mark III reactor of Mexico. Two different reactor power levels were used, 300 and 1000 kW, and two absorbed doses were tested for each power level: 1.6 and 3.2 Gy for 300 kW and 0.84 and 1.7 Gy for 1000 kW. A linear relationship was observed between the absorbed dose and the somatic mutation and recombination frequencies. Furthermore, these frequencies were dependent on larval age: In 96-h-old larvae, the frequencies were increased considerably but the sizes of the spots were smaller than in 72-h-old larvae. The analysis of the balancer-heterozygous progeny showed a linear absorbed dose- response relationship, although the responses were clearly lower than found in the marker-trans-heterozygous flies. Approximately 65% of the genotoxicity observed is due to recombinational events. The results of the study indicate that thermal and fast neutrons are both mutagenic and recombinagenic in the D. melanogaster wing SMART, and that the frequencies are dependent on neutron dose, reactor power, and the age of the treated larvae.

  5. Cyto-genotoxic effects of smoke from commercial filter and non-filter cigarettes on human bronchial and pulmonary cells.

    PubMed

    Cavallo, Delia; Ursini, Cinzia L; Fresegna, Anna M; Maiello, Raffaele; Ciervo, Aureliano; Ferrante, Riccardo; Buresti, Giuliana; Iavicoli, Sergio

    2013-01-20

    Cigarette smoke is a complex mixture of chemicals, some of which are known as carcinogens. The cyto-genotoxic effects of cigarette-smoke extract (CSE) from commercial cigarettes without (A and B) and with filter (C and D) were evaluated at different CSE concentrations on A549 and BEAS-2B cells. The particle content of the cigarette smoke and the metal composition of the CSE were also analyzed. The cells were exposed to 1-10% of the CSE from one cigarette per experiment. Cytotoxicity was evaluated by use of the MTT assay after 24h, and the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay after 30min and 24h. The Fpg-modified comet assay was used to evaluate direct-oxidative DNA damage on cells exposed for 30min. As expected, unfiltered cigarette smoke (particularly from the B cigarette) contained a higher number of particles than filtered smoke. With smoke extract from the B cigarette we found a decrease in cell viability only in BEAS-2B cells. The results of the LDH test showed membrane damage for B-cigarette smoke extract, particularly in BEAS-2B cells. Extracts from unfiltered cigarette smoke induced significant direct DNA damage, to a larger extent in A549 cells. Filtered cigarette-smoke extract induced a significant direct DNA damage at 5-10%. A significant induction of oxidative DNA damage was found at the highest CSE concentration in both cell types (by smoke extracts from B and C cigarettes in A549 cells, and from A and D cigarettes in BEAS-2B cells). Smoke extracts from filter cigarettes induced less direct DNA damage than those from unfiltered cigarettes in A549 cells, probably due to a protective effect of filter. In BEAS-2B cells the smoke extract from the B-cigarette showed the highest genotoxic effect, with a concentration-dependent trend. These findings show a higher cyto-genotoxicity for smoke extracts from the B-cigarette and oxidative effects for those from the A and D cigarettes, particularly in BEAS-2B cells. Moreover, there was a higher responsiveness of A549

  6. Evaluation of genotoxic and cytotoxic effects in human peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed in vitro to neonicotinoid insecticides news.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Segura, María Elena; Gómez-Arroyo, Sandra; Villalobos-Pietrini, Rafael; Martínez-Valenzuela, Carmen; Carbajal-López, Yolanda; Calderón-Ezquerro, María Del Carmen; Cortés-Eslava, Josefina; García-Martínez, Rocío; Flores-Ramírez, Diana; Rodríguez-Romero, María Isabel; Méndez-Pérez, Patricia; Bañuelos-Ruíz, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Calypso (thiacloprid), Poncho (clothianidin), Gaucho (imidacloprid), and Jade (imidacloprid) are commercial neonicotinoid insecticides, a new class of agrochemicals in México. However, genotoxic and cytotoxic studies have not been performed. In the present study, human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were exposed in vitro to different concentrations of the four insecticides. The genotoxic and cytotoxic effects were evaluated using the alkaline comet and trypan blue dye exclusion assays. DNA damage was evaluated using two genotoxicity parameters: tail length and comet frequency. Exposure to 9.5 × 10(-6) to 5.7 × 10(-5) M Jade; 2.8 × 10(-4) to 1.7 × 10(-3) M Gaucho; 0.6 × 10(-1) to 1.4 × 10(-1) M Calypso; 1.2 × 10(-1) to 9.5 × 10(-1) M Poncho for 2 h induced a significant increase DNA damage with a concentration-dependent relationship. Jade was the most genotoxic of the four insecticides studied. Cytotoxicity was observed in cells exposed to 18 × 10(-3) M Jade, 2.0 × 10(-3) M Gaucho, 2.0 × 10(-1) M Calypso, 1.07 M Poncho, and cell death occurred at 30 × 10(-3) M Jade, 3.3 × 10(-3) M Gaucho, 2.8 × 10(-1) M Calypso, and 1.42 M Poncho. This study provides the first report of genotoxic and cytotoxic effects in PBL following in vitro exposure to commercial neonicotinoid insecticides.

  7. Evaluation of Genotoxic and Cytotoxic Effects in Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes Exposed In Vitro to Neonicotinoid Insecticides News

    PubMed Central

    Calderón-Segura, María Elena; Gómez-Arroyo, Sandra; Villalobos-Pietrini, Rafael; Martínez-Valenzuela, Carmen; Carbajal-López, Yolanda; Calderón-Ezquerro, María del Carmen; Cortés-Eslava, Josefina; García-Martínez, Rocío; Flores-Ramírez, Diana; Rodríguez-Romero, María Isabel; Méndez-Pérez, Patricia; Bañuelos-Ruíz, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Calypso (thiacloprid), Poncho (clothianidin), Gaucho (imidacloprid), and Jade (imidacloprid) are commercial neonicotinoid insecticides, a new class of agrochemicals in México. However, genotoxic and cytotoxic studies have not been performed. In the present study, human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were exposed in vitro to different concentrations of the four insecticides. The genotoxic and cytotoxic effects were evaluated using the alkaline comet and trypan blue dye exclusion assays. DNA damage was evaluated using two genotoxicity parameters: tail length and comet frequency. Exposure to 9.5 × 10−6 to 5.7 × 10−5 M Jade; 2.8 × 10−4 to 1.7 × 10−3 M Gaucho; 0.6 × 10−1 to 1.4 × 10−1 M Calypso; 1.2 × 10−1 to 9.5 × 10−1 M Poncho for 2 h induced a significant increase DNA damage with a concentration-dependent relationship. Jade was the most genotoxic of the four insecticides studied. Cytotoxicity was observed in cells exposed to 18 × 10−3 M Jade, 2.0 × 10−3 M Gaucho, 2.0 × 10−1 M Calypso, 1.07 M Poncho, and cell death occurred at 30 × 10−3 M Jade, 3.3 × 10−3 M Gaucho, 2.8 × 10−1 M Calypso, and 1.42 M Poncho. This study provides the first report of genotoxic and cytotoxic effects in PBL following in vitro exposure to commercial neonicotinoid insecticides. PMID:22545045

  8. No effects of chlorophyllin on IQ (2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]-quinoline)-genotoxicity and -DNA adduct formation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Negishi, Tomoe; Shinoda, Aki; Ishizaki, Nao; Hayatsu, Hikoya; Sugiyama, Chitose

    2004-02-01

    Previously we demonstrated that chlorophyllin suppressed the genotoxicities of many carcinogens. However, the genotoxicity of IQ (2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline), a carcinogenic heterocyclic amine, was not suppressed in Drosophila. On the contrary, it has been reported that chrolophyllin suppressed the genotoxicity of IQ in rodents, rainbow trout and Salmonella. We demonstrated that the chlorophyllin-induced suppression of MeIQx (2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline)-genotoxicity was associated with a decrease in MeIQx-DNA adduct formation in Drosophila larval DNA. MeIQx represents another type of heterocyclic amine and is similar to IQ in structure. In this study we utilized (32)P-postlabeling to examine whether chlorophyllin reduced IQ-DNA adduct formation in Drosophila DNA in the same way as MeIQx. The results revealed that the formation of IQ-DNA adducts was unaffected by treatment with chlorophyllin. This was consistent with the absence of any inhibitory effect on genotoxicity as observed in the Drosophila repair test. These results suggest that IQ-behavior in Drosophila is not affected by chlorophyllin, indicating that the process of IQ-DNA adduct formation followed by expression of genotoxicity in Drosophila may be different from that in other organisms.

  9. Phyllanthus orbicularis aqueous extract: cytotoxic, genotoxic, and antimutagenic effects in the CHO cell line.

    PubMed

    Sànchez-Lamar, A; Fiore, M; Cundari, E; Ricordy, R; Cozzi, R; De Salvia, R

    1999-12-15

    The present work evaluates the cytotoxic, genotoxic, and antimutagenic effects of Phyllanthus orbicularis (plant of genus Phyllantus) aqueous extract in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. P. orbicularis aqueous extracts are used in Cuban traditional medicine for their antiviral activity against Hepatitis B virus and A and B flu virus. The cytotoxicity of the extract was tested by means of colony-forming ability and growth-inhibition assays as well as by measuring the mitotic index. Apoptosis induction and cell-cycle kinetics were analyzed by cytofluorimetric methods. Chromosome aberration assays were performed to study the genotoxic and antimutagenic activity of the extract. Results show that doses of up to 100 microg/ml of the extract did not induce any cytotoxic effects. Cell survival and mitotic index decreased significantly at doses higher than 100 microg/ml as a function of dose as well as of treatment time. Moreover, continuous treatments of up to 18 h induced the appearance of a significant number of apoptotic cells. Following a 3-h exposure to a dose of 750 microg/ml, cells accumulated significantly in G(2)-M phase and remained blocked in G(1-) and G(2)-M phases after several posttreatments in fresh growth medium. The aqueous extract alone did not induce chromosome aberrations but, in combined treatment with H(2)O(2), significantly reduced H(2)O(2)-induced chromosome aberrations. Flow cytometric analysis of DCFH intracellular oxidation showed that the extract decreased the oxidizing power of H(2)O(2.) This ability could possibly explain the extract's antigenotoxic activity. Absence of cytotoxicity at the lower tested doses and the antimutagenic properties of the extract stimulate the interest in studying possible new pharmaceutical uses of P. orbicularis.

  10. A permethrin/allethrin mixture induces genotoxicity and cytotoxicity in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Chavez, Lucio A; Sordo, Monserrat; Calderon-Aranda, Emma; Castañeda-Saucedo, Eduardo; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia; Moreno-Godinez, Ma Elena

    2015-01-01

    Two pyrethroids, permethrin and allethrin, are often combined for large-scale use in public health programs to control vector-borne diseases. In this study, the genotoxic potential of a commercial formulation of permethrin and allethrin was examined using cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). Genotoxicity was evaluated using the cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome (CBMN cyt) assay by measuring the frequency of micronuclei (MN), nuclear division index (NDI), formation of nucleoplasmic bridges (NPB) and nuclear buds (NBUD), as well as apoptotic and necrotic cells. Human PBL were treated with different concentrations of a permethrin/allethrin mixture (1/0.01, 5/0.07, and 10/0.14 μg/ml) for 24 or 36 h. The highest concentration (10/0.14 μg/ml) of permethrin/allethrin mixture significantly increased MN frequency and percent apoptotic cells after incubations for 24 or 36 h. The NDI was markedly decreased in response to treatment with 5/0.07 or 10/0.14 μg/ml permethrin/allethrin for both 24 and 36 h. Exposure to the permethrin/allethrin mixture did not significantly alter formation of NBUD, NPB, or percent necrotic cells. The MN frequency was significantly correlated with the number of apoptotic and necrotic cells but inversely correlated with NDI. Data demonstrated that a mixture of permethrin and allethrin induced concentration- and time-dependent cytotoxic and genotoxic damage to human PBL in vitro.

  11. Genotoxic effects of fumes from asphalt modified with waste plastic and tall oil pitch.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Hanna K; Väänänen, Virpi; Järventaus, Hilkka; Suhonen, Satu; Nygren, Jonas; Hämeilä, Mervi; Valtonen, Jarkko; Heikkilä, Pirjo; Norppa, Hannu

    2008-05-31

    As the use of recycled materials and industrial by-products in asphalt mixtures is increasing, we investigated if recycled additives modify the genotoxicity of fumes emitted from asphalt. Fumes were generated in the laboratory at paving temperature from stone-mastic asphalt (SMA) and from SMA modified with waste plastic (90% polyethylene, 10% polypropylene) and tall oil pitch (SMA-WPT). In addition, fumes from SMA, SMA-WPT, asphalt concrete (AC), and AC modified with waste plastic and tall oil pitch (AC-WPT) were collected at paving sites. The genotoxicity of the fumes was studied by analysis of DNA damage (measured in the comet assay) and micronucleus formation in human bronchial epithelial BEAS 2B cells in vitro and by counting mutations in Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98 and YG1024. DNA damage was also assessed in buccal leukocytes from road pavers before and after working with SMA, SMA-WPT, AC, and AC-WPT. The chemical composition of the emissions was analysed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The SMA-WPT fume generated in the laboratory induced a clear increase in DNA damage in BEAS 2B cells without metabolic activation. The laboratory-generated SMA fume increased the frequency of micronucleated BEAS 2B cells without metabolic activation. None of the asphalt fumes collected at the paving sites produced DNA damage with or without metabolic activation. Fumes from SMA and SMA-WPT from the paving sites increased micronucleus frequency without metabolic activation. None of the asphalt fumes studied showed mutagenic activity in Salmonella. No statistically significant differences in DNA damage in buccal leukocytes were detected between the pre- and post-shift samples collected from the road pavers. However, a positive correlation was found between DNA damage and the urinary metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) after work shift, which suggested an association between occupational exposures during road paving and genotoxic effects. Our

  12. Molecular modifications induced by inorganic arsenic in Vicia faba investigated by FTIR, FTNIR spectroscopy and genotoxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Boccia, P; Meconi, C; Mecozzi, M; Sturchio, E

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) through drinking water is a major public health concern affecting most countries. Epidemiologic studies showed a significant association between consumption of iAs through drinking water and different types of cancer. However, the exact mechanisms underlying As-induced cancer and other diseases are not yet well understood. The aim of this study is to determine the effects of exposure iAs (20 or 30 mg/L) on Vicia faba seedlings in terms of phytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and spectroscopy by investigation of molecular modifications using infrared (FTIR) and near infrared (FTNIR) spectroscopy. Further, the mitigation effects of a precursor of glutathione (GSH), N-acetylcysteine (NAC), were also assessed. Spectroscopic and genotoxicity analysis demonstrated that specific molecular changes were directly correlated with iAs exposure. Comet assay in Vicia faba showed significant effects at concentrations of 20 and 30 mg/L, depending on the structural changes involving nucleic acids as identified by FTIR and FTNIR spectroscopy. Results of phytotoxicity and micronuclei tests were significant only at higher iAs concentrations (30 mg/L), where an antioxidant effect of NAC was noted. The two spectroscopic techniques demonstrated molecular modifications predominantly associated with chemical interactions of iAs with biomolecules such as nucleic acids, carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins in Vicia faba. Our findings suggest that further studies are required to better understand the mechanisms underlying toxicity produced by different As chemical forms in vegetal and agricultural species.

  13. Genotoxic effects of produced waters in mosquito fish (Gambusia affinis).

    PubMed

    Caliani, Ilaria; Porcelloni, Serena; Mori, Gabriele; Frenzilli, Giada; Ferraro, Maria; Marsili, Letizia; Casini, Silvia; Fossi, Maria Cristina

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the potential genotoxic effects of produced water (PW) from an Italian on-shore oil plant. Produced water is a complex mixture containing residual hydrocarbons, trace elements, naturally occurring radioactive material and potentially toxic treatment chemicals such as biocides, dispersants, detergents and scale inhibitors used in oil production. The test organism, mosquito fish (Gambusia affinis), was divided into male and female groups and exposed for 8 days in the laboratory to 50% concentrations of different produced waters: PW before treatment and after settling treatment. The fish were also exposed to lower concentrations (10%) of the same PW for 30 days. DNA damage was evaluated in erythrocytes by single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet assay) and micronucleus test, while an oxidative stress biomarker, was assessed. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) metabolites in bile were also evaluated. A higher sensitivity in biomarker responses was found in females in comparison to males. An increase in DNA strand breaks was observed in both genders after 30 days exposure and a statistically significant increase of micronucleated cells was found in females after 8 days exposure. A positive correlation between presence of micronucleated cells and PAH metabolites in bile was also observed.

  14. Study of the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of the α-, β-, and γ- Hexachlorocyclohexane isomers in human lymphocyte cells using the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay.

    PubMed

    Ennaceur, Soukaina

    2017-01-01

    The genotoxic potential of hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) isomers (α-, β-, and γ-) which are organochlorine pesticides was tested in peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures from two donors by using the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay. Micronucleus (MN) frequency, binucleated cells with micronucleus (BNMN), and cytokinesis-blocked proliferation index (CBPI) were determined as genotoxic and cytotoxic endpoints. At the concentration ranges tested (12.5-100 μg.L (-1)), all HCH isomers induced dose-dependent cytotoxic effects, γ-HCH being the most toxic. This isomer was also able to induce significant increase in MN frequency and BNMN cells indicating a genotoxic potential at 50 and 100 μg.L (-1). The genotoxic test of β-HCH showed a positive induction of MN and BNMN cells at the highest concentration of 100 μg.L (-1) and a significant cytotoxicity at 50 μg.L (-1). Under the experimental condition used, α-HCH was unable to induce any significant increase in MN frequency confirming that α-HCH is a non-genotoxic agent.

  15. Effects of chemical agent injections on genotoxicity of wastewater in a microfiltration-reverse osmosis membrane process for wastewater reuse.

    PubMed

    Tang, Fang; Hu, Hong-Ying; Wu, Qian-Yuan; Tang, Xin; Sun, Ying-Xue; Shi, Xiao-Lei; Huang, Jing-Jing

    2013-09-15

    With combined microfiltration (MF)/ultrafiltration (UF) and reverse osmosis (RO) process being widely used in municipal wastewater reclamation, RO concentrate with high level genotoxicity is becoming a potential risk to water environment. In this study, wastewater genotoxicity in a MF-RO process for municipal wastewater reclamation and also the effects of chemical agent injections were evaluated by SOS/umu genotoxicity test. The genotoxicity of RO concentrate ranged 500-559 μg 4-NQO (4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide)/L and 12-22 μg 4-NQO/mg DOC, was much higher than that of RO influent. Further research suggested that Kathon biocide was a key chemical agent associated with the genotoxicity increase. Kathon biocide used in RO system was highly genotoxic in vitro and Kathon biocide retained in RO system could contribute to a higher genotoxicity of RO concentrate. Hence, treatments for biocides before discharging are necessary. Chlorination of secondary effluent could significantly decrease the genotoxicity and increasing chlorine dosage could be an efficacious method to decrease the genotoxicity of RO concentrate. According to the result of the experiment, the dosage of chlorine in dual-membrane process could be set to about 2.5 mg Cl₂/L. The effect of antiscalant (2-phosphomobutane-1,2,4-tricarboxylic acid) was also investigated; it turned out to have no effect on genotoxicity.

  16. A mechanism for 1,4-Benzoquinone-induced genotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Son, Mi Young; Deng, Chu-Xia; Hoeijmarkers, Jan H.; Rebel, Vivienne I.; Hasty, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Benzene is a common environmental toxin and its metabolite, 1-4-Benzoquinone (BQ) causes hematopoietic cancers like myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). BQ has not been comprehensively assessed for its impact on genome maintenance, limiting our understanding of the true health risks associated with benzene exposure and our ability to identify people with increased sensitivity to this genotoxin. Here we analyze the impact BQ exposure has on wild type and DNA repair-defective mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells and wild type human cells. We find that double strand break (DSB) repair and replication fork maintenance pathways including homologous recombination (HR) and Fanconi anemia (FA) suppress BQ toxicity. BQ-induced damage efficiently stalls replication forks, yet poorly induces ATR/DNA-PKCS responses. Furthermore, the pattern of BQ-induced γH2AX and 53BP1foci is consistent with the formation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1)-stabilized regressed replication forks. At a biochemical level, BQ inhibited topoisomerase 1 (topo1)-mediated DNA ligation and nicking in vitro; thus providing mechanism for the cellular phenotype. These data are consistent with a model that proposes BQ interferes with type I topoisomerase's ability to maintain replication fork restart and progression leading to chromosomal instability that has the potential to cause hematopoietic cancers like MDS and AML. PMID:27340773

  17. Cadmium induces apoptosis and genotoxicity in rainbow trout hepatocytes through generation of reactive oxygene species.

    PubMed

    Risso-de Faverney, C; Devaux, A; Lafaurie, M; Girard, J P; Bailly, B; Rahmani, R

    2001-06-01

    Cadmium poses a serious environmental threat in aquatic ecosystems but the mechanisms of its toxicity remain unclear. The purpose of this work was first to determine whether cadmium induced apoptosis in trout hepatocytes, second to determine whether or not reactive oxygen species (ROS) were involved in cadmium-induced apoptosis and genotoxicity. Hepatocytes exposed to increasing cadmium concentrations (in the range of 1-10 microM) showed a molecular hallmark of apoptosis which is the fragmentation of the nuclear DNA into oligonucleosomal-length fragments, resulting from an activation of endogenous endonucleases and recognized as a 'DNA ladder' on conventional agarose gel electrophoresis. Exposure of hepatocytes to cadmium led clearly to the DEVD-dependent protease activation, acting upstream from the endonucleases and considered as central mediators of apoptosis. DNA strand breaks in cadmium-treated trout hepatocytes was assessed using the comet assay, a rapid and sensitive single-cell gel electrophoresis technique used to detect DNA primary damage in individual cells. Simultaneous treatment of trout hepatocytes with cadmium and the nitroxide radical TEMPO used as a ROS scavenger, reduced significantly DNA fragmentation, DEVD-related protease activity and DNA strand breaks formation. These results lead to a working hypothesis that cadmium-induced apoptosis and DNA strand breaks in trout hepatocytes are partially triggered by the generation of ROS. Additional studies are required for proposing a mechanistic model of cadmium-induced apoptosis and genotoxicity in trout liver cells, in underlying the balance between DNA damage and cellular defence systems in fish.

  18. Nitroxide TEMPO: a genotoxic and oxidative stress inducer in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoqing; Mittelstaedt, Roberta A; Guo, Lei; Shaddock, Joseph G; Heflich, Robert H; Bigger, Anita H; Moore, Martha M; Mei, Nan

    2013-08-01

    2,2,6,6-Tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO) is a low molecular weight nitroxide and stable free radical. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of TEMPO in mammalian cells using the mouse lymphoma assay (MLA) and in vitro micronucleus assay. In the absence of metabolic activation (S9), 3mM TEMPO produced significant cytotoxicity and marginal mutagenicity in the MLA; in the presence of S9, treatment of mouse lymphoma cells with 1-2mM TEMPO resulted in dose-dependent decreases of the relative total growth and increases in mutant frequency. Treatment of TK6 human lymphoblastoid cells with 0.9-2.3mM TEMPO increased the frequency of both micronuclei (a marker for clastogenicity) and hypodiploid nuclei (a marker of aneugenicity) in a dose-dependent manner; greater responses were produced in the presence of S9. Within the dose range tested, TEMPO induced reactive oxygen species and decreased glutathione levels in mouse lymphoma cells. In addition, the majority of TEMPO-induced mutants had loss of heterozygosity at the Tk locus, with allele loss of ⩽34Mbp. These results indicate that TEMPO is mutagenic in the MLA and induces micronuclei and hypodiploid nuclei in TK6 cells. Oxidative stress may account for part of the genotoxicity induced by TEMPO in both cell lines.

  19. In vitro assessment of the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of boiled juice (tucupi) from Manihot esculenta Crantz roots.

    PubMed

    Cunha, L A; Mota, T C; Cardoso, P C S; Alcântara, D D F Á; Burbano, R M R; Guimarães, A C; Khayat, A S; Rocha, C A M; Bahia, M O

    2016-10-05

    The population of Pará (a state in Brazil) has a very characteristic food culture, as a majority of the carbohydrates consumed are obtained from cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) derivatives. Tucupi is the boiled juice of cassava roots that plays a major role in the culinary footprint of Pará. Before boiling, this juice is known as manipueira and contains linamarin, a toxic glycoside that can decompose to hydrogen cyanide. In this study, the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of tucupi on cultured human lymphocytes were assessed using the comet assay and detection of apoptosis and necrosis by differential fluorescent staining with acridine orange-ethidium bromide. Tucupi concentrations (v/v) were determined using the methylthiazole tetrazolium biochemical test. Concentrations of tucupi that presented no genotoxic effects (2, 4, 8, and 16%) were used in our experiments. The results showed that under our study conditions, tucupi exerted no genotoxic effects; however, cytotoxic effects were observed with cell death mainly induced by necrosis. These effects may be related to the presence of hydrogen cyanide in the juice.

  20. Determining oxidative and non-oxidative genotoxic effects driven by estuarine sediment contaminants on a human hepatoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Pinto, M; Costa, P M; Louro, H; Costa, M H; Lavinha, J; Caeiro, S; Silva, M J

    2014-04-15

    Estuarine sediments may be reservoirs of hydrophilic and hydrophobic pollutants, many of which are acknowledged genotoxicants, pro-mutagens and even potential carcinogens for humans. Still, studies aiming at narrowing the gap between ecological and human health risk of sediment-bound contaminant mixtures are scarce. Taking an impacted estuary as a case study (the Sado, SW Portugal), HepG2 (human hepatoma) cells were exposed in vitro for 48 h to extracts of sediments collected from two areas (urban/industrial and Triverine/agricultural), both contaminated by distinct mixtures of organic and inorganic toxicants, among which are found priority mutagens such as benzo[a]pyrene. Comparatively to a control test, extracts of sediments from both impacted areas produced deleterious effects in a dose-response manner. However, sediment extracts from the industrial area caused lower replication index plus higher cytotoxicity and genotoxicity (concerning total DNA strand breakage and clastogenesis), with emphasis on micronucleus induction. On the other hand, extracts from the rural area induced the highest oxidative damage to DNA, as revealed by the FPG (formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase) enzyme in the Comet assay. Although the estuary, on its whole, has been classified as moderately contaminated, the results suggest that the sediments from the industrial area are significantly genotoxic and, furthermore, elicit permanent chromosome damage, thus potentially being more mutagenic than those from the rural area. The results are consistent with contamination by pro-mutagens like polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), potentiated by metals. The sediments from the agriculture-influenced area likely owe their genotoxic effects to metals and other toxicants, probably pesticides and fertilizers, and able to induce reactive oxygen species without the formation of DNA strand breakage. The findings suggest that the mixtures of contaminants present in the assayed sediments are genotoxic

  1. Lead-induced genotoxicity to Vicia faba L. roots in relation with metal cell uptake and initial speciation.

    PubMed

    Shahid, M; Pinelli, E; Pourrut, B; Silvestre, J; Dumat, C

    2011-01-01

    Formation of organometallic complexes in soil solution strongly influence metals phytoavailability. However, only few studies deal with the influence of metal speciation both on plant uptake and genotoxicity. In the present study, Vicia faba seedlings were exposed for 6h in controlled hydroponic conditions to 5 μM of lead nitrate alone and chelated to varying degrees by different organic ligands. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and citric acid were, respectively, chosen as models of humic substances and low weight organic acids present in natural soil solutions. Visual Minteq software was used to estimate free lead cations concentration and ultimately to design the experimental layout. For all experimental conditions, both micronucleus test and measure of lead uptake by plants were finally performed. Chelation of Pb by EDTA, a strong chelator, dose-dependently increased the uptake in V. faba roots while its genotoxicity was significantly reduced, suggesting a protective role of EDTA. A weak correlation was observed between total lead concentration absorbed by roots and genotoxicity (r(2)=0.65). In contrast, a strong relationship (r(2)=0.93) exists between Pb(2+) concentration in exposure media and genotoxicity in the experiment performed with EDTA. Citric acid induced labile organometallic complexes did not demonstrate any significant changes in lead genotoxicity or uptake. These results demonstrate that metal speciation knowledge could improve the interpretation of V. faba genotoxicity test performed to test soil quality.

  2. Acute and chronic effects of erythromycin exposure on oxidative stress and genotoxicity parameters of Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, S; Antunes, S C; Correia, A T; Nunes, B

    2016-03-01

    Erythromycin (ERY) is a macrolide antibiotic used in human and veterinary medicine, and has been detected in various aquatic compartments. Recent studies have indicated that this compound can exert biological activity on non-target organisms environmentally exposed. The present study aimed to assess the toxic effects of ERY in Oncorhynchus mykiss after acute and chronic exposures. The here adopted strategy involved exposure to three levels of ERY, the first being similar to concentrations reported to occur in the wild, thus ecologically relevant. Catalase (CAT), total glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GRed) activities and lipid peroxidation (TBARS levels) were quantified as oxidative stress biomarkers in gills and liver. Genotoxic endpoints, reflecting different types of genetic damage in blood cells, were also determined, by performing analysis of genetic damage (determination of the genetic damage index, GDI, measured by comet assay) and of erythrocytic nuclear abnormalities (ENAs). The results suggest the occurrence of a mild, but significant, oxidative stress scenario in gills. For acutely exposed organisms, significant alterations were observed in CAT and GRed activities, and also in TBARS levels, which however are modifications with uncertain biological interpretation, despite indicating involvement of an oxidative effect and response. After chronic exposure, a significant decrease of CAT activity, increase of GPx activity and TBARS levels in gills was noticed. In liver, significant decrease in TBARS levels were observed in both exposures. Comet and ENAs assays indicated significant increases on genotoxic damage of O. mykiss, after erythromycin exposures. This set of data (acute and chronic) suggests that erythromycin has the potential to induce DNA strand breaks in blood cells, and demonstrate the induction of chromosome breakage and/or segregational abnormalities. Overall results indicate that both DNA damaging effects induced by

  3. Acute dyskerin depletion triggers cellular senescence and renders osteosarcoma cells resistant to genotoxic stress-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Ping; Mobasher, Maral E.; Alawi, Faizan

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • Dyskerin depletion triggers cellular senescence in U2OS osteosarcoma cells. • Dyskerin-depleted cells are resistant to apoptosis induced by genotoxic stress. • Chromatin relaxation sensitizes dyskerin-depleted cells to apoptosis. - Abstract: Dyskerin is a conserved, nucleolar RNA-binding protein implicated in an increasing array of fundamental cellular processes. Germline mutation in the dyskerin gene (DKC1) is the cause of X-linked dyskeratosis congenita (DC). Conversely, wild-type dyskerin is overexpressed in sporadic cancers, and high-levels may be associated with poor prognosis. It was previously reported that acute loss of dyskerin function via siRNA-mediated depletion slowed the proliferation of transformed cell lines. However, the mechanisms remained unclear. Using human U2OS osteosarcoma cells, we show that siRNA-mediated dyskerin depletion induced cellular senescence as evidenced by proliferative arrest, senescence-associated heterochromatinization and a senescence-associated molecular profile. Senescence can render cells resistant to apoptosis. Conversely, chromatin relaxation can reverse the repressive effects of senescence-associated heterochromatinization on apoptosis. To this end, genotoxic stress-induced apoptosis was suppressed in dyskerin-depleted cells. In contrast, agents that induce chromatin relaxation, including histone deacetylase inhibitors and the DNA intercalator chloroquine, sensitized dyskerin-depleted cells to apoptosis. Dyskerin is a core component of the telomerase complex and plays an important role in telomere homeostasis. Defective telomere maintenance resulting in premature senescence is thought to primarily underlie the pathogenesis of X-linked DC. Since U2OS cells are telomerase-negative, this leads us to conclude that loss of dyskerin function can also induce cellular senescence via mechanisms independent of telomere shortening.

  4. Enhanced metallothionein gene expression is associated with protection from cadmium-induced genotoxity in cultured rat liver cells

    SciTech Connect

    Coogan, T.P.; Bare, R.M.; Bjornson, E.J.; Waalkes, M.P. )

    1994-01-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are low-molecular-weight, cysteine-rich proteins that appear to play an important role in the cellular defense system against cadmium toxicity. Although substantial evidence exists demonstrating a reduction in cadmium toxicity concomitant with MT induction, little is known about the possible effects of stimulation of MT synthesis on cadmium-induced genotoxicity. Thus, the alkaline elution technique was used to assess single-strand DNA damage (SSD) in TRL-1215 cells, a liver-derived cell line shown to have inducible MT Gene expression. The SSD accumulated over a 2-h time period in a time-dependent manner following exposure to 500 [mu]M CdCl[sub 2]. Low concentration cadmium pretreatment (10 [mu]M CdCl[sub 2], 24 h) provided protection against the genotoxicity of high-concentration cadmium (500 [mu]M CdCl[sub 2], 2 h). A 2-h exposure to 500 [mu]M CdCl[sub 2], had no effect on viability, as assessed using a tetrazolium-dye based assay, in cells from either the pretreated or nonpretreated group. Metallothionein was induced in a time-dependent manner by low-concentration cadmium pretreatment: Exposure for 24 and 48 h resulted in 3.3- and 6.4-fold increases, respectively. In addition, a 24-h exposure to low-concentration cadmium resulted in an increase in MT-I gene expression. Cadmium accumulation was 2.6-fold greater in low-concentration cadmium-pretreated cells as compared to non-pretreated cells. These data demonstrate that low-concentration cadmium pretreatment provides protection against cadmium-induced single-strand DNA damage and support the hypothesis that this protection is due to stimulation of MT gene expression. 38 refs., 6 figs.

  5. Mechanistic evaluation of Ginkgo biloba leaf extract-induced genotoxicity in L5178Y cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Haixia; Guo, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Suhui; Dial, Stacey L; Guo, Lei; Manjanatha, Mugimane G; Moore, Martha M; Mei, Nan

    2014-06-01

    Ginkgo biloba has been used for many thousand years as a traditional herbal remedy and its extract has been consumed for many decades as a dietary supplement. Ginkgo biloba leaf extract is a complex mixture with many constituents, including flavonol glycosides and terpene lactones. The National Toxicology Program 2-year cancer bioassay found that G. biloba leaf extract targets the liver, thyroid gland, and nose of rodents; however, the mechanism of G. biloba leaf extract-associated carcinogenicity remains unclear. In the current study, the in vitro genotoxicity of G. biloba leaf extract and its eight constituents was evaluated using the mouse lymphoma assay (MLA) and Comet assay. The underlying mechanisms of G. biloba leaf extract-associated genotoxicity were explored. Ginkgo biloba leaf extract, quercetin, and kaempferol resulted in a dose-dependent increase in the mutant frequency and DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Western blot analysis confirmed that G. biloba leaf extract, quercetin, and kaempferol activated the DNA damage signaling pathway with increased expression of γ-H2AX and phosphorylated Chk2 and Chk1. In addition, G. biloba leaf extract produced reactive oxygen species and decreased glutathione levels in L5178Y cells. Loss of heterozygosity analysis of mutants indicated that G. biloba leaf extract, quercetin, and kaempferol treatments resulted in extensive chromosomal damage. These results indicate that G. biloba leaf extract and its two constituents, quercetin and kaempferol, are mutagenic to the mouse L5178Y cells and induce DSBs. Quercetin and kaempferol likely are major contributors to G. biloba leaf extract-induced genotoxicity.

  6. Long-term exposures to low doses of titanium dioxide nanoparticles induce cell transformation, but not genotoxic damage in BEAS-2B cells.

    PubMed

    Vales, Gerard; Rubio, Laura; Marcos, Ricard

    2015-01-01

    There is a great interest in a better knowledge of the health effects caused by nanomaterials exposures and, in particular to those induced by titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) due to its high use and increasing presence in the environment. To add new information on its potential genotoxic/carcinogenic risk, we have carried out experiments using chronic exposures (up to 4 weeks), low doses, and the BEAS-2B cell line that, as a human bronchial epithelium cells, can be considered a good cell target. Cell uptake has been assessed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and flow cytometry (FC); genotoxicity was evaluated using the comet and the micronucleus (MN) assays; and cell-transforming ability was evaluated using the soft-agar assay to detect anchorage-independent cell growth. Results show an important cell uptake at all the tested doses and sampling times used (except for 1 µg/mL and 24-h exposure). Nevertheless, no genotoxic effects were observed in the comet and in the MN assays. This lack of genotoxic effect agrees with the FC results showing no induction of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), the data from the comet assay with formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG) enzyme showing no induction of oxidized bases, and the lack of induction of expression of heme-oxygenase (HO-1) gene both at the RNA and protein level. On the contrary, significant increases in the number of clones growing in an anchorage-independent way were observed. This study would indicate a potential carcinogenic risk associated to nano-TiO2 exposure, not mediated by a genotoxic mechanism.

  7. FOLATE DEFICIENCY ENHANCES ARSENIC-INDUCED GENOTOXICITY IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Folate deficiency increases background levels of DNA damage and can enhance the mutagenicity of chemical agents. Duplicate experiments were performed to investigate the effect of dietary folate deficiency on arsenic induction of micronuclei (MN) in peripheral blood cells. Male C5...

  8. The Genotoxic and Cytotoxic Effects of Bisphenol-A (BPA) in MCF-7 Cell Line and Amniocytes.

    PubMed

    Aghajanpour-Mir, Seyed Mohsen; Zabihi, Ebrahim; Akhavan-Niaki, Haleh; Keyhani, Elahe; Bagherizadeh, Iman; Biglari, Sajjad; Behjati, Farkhondeh

    2016-01-01

    Bisphenol-A (BPA) is an industrial xenoestrogen used widely in our living environment. Recently, several studies suggested that BPA has destructive effects on DNA and chromosomes in normal body cells via estrogen receptors (ER). Therefore, BPA could be considered as an important mediator in many diseases such as cancer. However, there are still many controversial issues which need clarification. In this study, we investigated the BPA-induced chromosomal damages in MCF-7 cell line, ER-positive and negative amniocyte cells. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity effects of BPA were also compared between these three cell groups. Expression of estrogen receptors was determined using immunocytochemistry technique. The cell cytotoxicity of BPA was measured by MTT assay. Classic cytogenetic technique was carried out for the investigation of chromosome damage. BPA, in addition to cytotoxicity, had remarkable genotoxicity at concentrations close to the traceable levels in tissues or biological fluids. Although some differences were observed in the amount of damages between ER-positive and negative fetal cells, interestingly, these differences were not significant. The present study showed that BPA could lead to chromosomal aberrations in both ER-dependent and independent pathways at some concentrations or in cell types yet not reported. Also, BPA could probably be considered as a facilitator for some predisposed cells to be cancerous by raising the chromosome instability levels. Finally, estrogen receptor seems to have a different role in cytotoxicity and genotoxicity effects.

  9. Genotoxic stress-induced expression of p53 and apoptosis in leukemic clam hemocytes with cytoplasmically sequestered p53.

    PubMed

    Böttger, Stefanie; Jerszyk, Emily; Low, Ben; Walker, Charles

    2008-02-01

    In nature, the soft shell clam, Mya arenaria, develops a fatal blood cancer in which a highly conserved homologue for wild-type human p53 protein is rendered nonfunctional by cytoplasmic sequestration. In untreated leukemic clam hemocytes, p53 is complexed throughout the cytoplasm with overexpressed variants for both clam homologues (full-length variant, 1,200-fold and truncated variant, 620-fold above normal clam hemocytes) of human mortalin, an Hsp70 family protein. In vitro treatment with etoposide only and in vivo treatment with either etoposide or mitoxantrone induces DNA damage, elevates expression (600-fold) and promotes nuclear translocation of p53, and results in apoptosis of leukemic clam hemocytes. Pretreatment with wheat germ agglutinin followed by etoposide treatment induces DNA damage and elevates p53 expression (893-fold) but does not overcome cytoplasmic sequestration of p53 or induce apoptosis. We show that leukemic clam hemocytes have an intact p53 pathway, and that maintenance of this tumor phenotype requires nuclear absence of p53, resulting from its localization in the cytoplasm of leukemic clam hemocytes. The effects of these topoisomerase II poisons may result as mortalin-based cytoplasmic tethering is overwhelmed by de novo expression of p53 protein after DNA damage induced by genotoxic stress. Soft shell clam leukemia provides excellent in vivo and in vitro models for developing genotoxic and nongenotoxic cancer therapies for reactivating p53 transcription in human and other animal cancers displaying mortalin-based cytoplasmic sequestration of the p53 tumor suppressor, such as colorectal cancers and primary and secondary glioblastomas, though not apparently leukemias or lymphomas.

  10. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles induce genotoxicity but not mutagenicity in golden mussel Limnoperna fortunei.

    PubMed

    Girardello, Francine; Custódio Leite, Camila; Vianna Villela, Izabel; da Silva Machado, Miriana; Luiz Mendes Juchem, André; Roesch-Ely, Mariana; Neves Fernandes, Andreia; Salvador, Mirian; Antonio Pêgas Henriques, João

    2016-01-01

    The widespread use of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NP) in consumer products is the cause of its appearance in wastewater and effluents, reaching the aquatic environment. The evaluation of the biological impact of TiO2-NP and the need to understand its ecotoxicological impact to the aquatic ecosystem are of major concern. Bivalve mollusks may represent a target group for nanoparticle toxicity. Limnoperna fortunei (golden mussel), a freshwater bivalve organism that has been employed in biomonitoring environmental conditions. Comet assay, micronucleus test and oxidative damage to lipids and proteins were performed after the golden mussel was exposed to TiO2-NP (1, 5, 10 and 50μgmL(-1)). The results demonstrate that TiO2-NP can damage the DNA of haemocytes after 2h of exposure and the genotoxic activity significantly increased after 4h exposure to TiO2-NP, at all the TiO2-NP concentrations. TiO2-NP was ineffective in causing mutagenicity in the haemolymph cells of golden mussel. The increase in the lipid peroxidation levels and carbonyl proteins after the exposure to TiO2-NP indicates the induction of oxidative stress at 2h exposure with similar results to all TiO2-NP concentrations, but these effects did not occur at 4h exposure. These results demonstrated that, although TiO2-NP is not mutagenic to golden mussel, it does induce DNA damage and oxidative stress in these organisms.

  11. Mercury heavy-metal-induced physiochemical changes and genotoxic alterations in water hyacinths [Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.)].

    PubMed

    Malar, Srinivasan; Sahi, Shivendra Vikram; Favas, Paulo J C; Venkatachalam, Perumal

    2015-03-01

    Mercury heavy metal pollution has become an important environmental problem worldwide. Accumulation of mercury ions by plants may disrupt many cellular functions and block normal growth and development. To assess mercury heavy metal toxicity, we performed an experiment focusing on the responses of Eichhornia crassipes to mercury-induced oxidative stress. E. crassipes seedlings were exposed to varying concentrations of mercury to investigate the level of mercury ions accumulation, changes in growth patterns, antioxidant defense mechanisms, and DNA damage under hydroponics system. Results showed that plant growth rate was significantly inhibited (52 %) at 50 mg/L treatment. Accumulation of mercury ion level were 1.99 mg/g dry weight, 1.74 mg/g dry weight, and 1.39 mg/g dry weight in root, leaf, and petiole tissues, respectively. There was a decreasing trend for chlorophyll a, b, and carotenoids with increasing the concentration of mercury ions. Both the ascorbate peroxidase and malondialdehyde contents showed increased trend in leaves and roots up to 30 mg/L mercury treatment and slightly decreased at the higher concentrations. There was a positive correlation between heavy metal dose and superoxide dismutase, catalase, and peroxidase antioxidative enzyme activities which could be used as biomarkers to monitor pollution in E. crassipes. Due to heavy metal stress, some of the normal DNA bands were disappeared and additional bands were amplified compared to the control in the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) profile. Random amplified polymorphic DNA results indicated that genomic template stability was significantly affected by mercury heavy metal treatment. We concluded that DNA changes determined by random amplified polymorphic DNA assay evolved a useful molecular marker for detection of genotoxic effects of mercury heavy metal contamination in plant species.

  12. Influence of Mikania laevigata Extract over the Genotoxicity Induced by Alkylating Agents

    PubMed Central

    Nicolau, Vanessa; de Aguiar Amaral, Patrícia; de Andrade, Vanessa Moraes

    2013-01-01

    Medicinal plants are still widely used worldwide; yet for some species, little or no information is available concerning their biological activity, specially their genotoxic and antimutagenic potential. Mikania laevigata (Asteraceae) is a native plant from South America, and its extracts are largely used to treat respiratory complaints. The aim of the present work was then to evaluate, in vivo, the potential biological activity of M. laevigata on the genotoxicity induced by methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and cyclophosphamide (CP), using the comet assay. Male CF1 mice were divided into groups of 5-6 animals, received by gavage 0.1 mL/10 g body wt of water, Mikania laevigata extract (MLE), MMS, and CP. Results showed that treatment with 200 mg/kg of the MLE previously to MMS and CP administration, respectively, reduced the damage index (DI) in 52% and 60%, when compared to DI at 24 h. Pretreatment also reduced the damage frequency (DF) in 56% (MMS) and 58% (CP), compared to DF at 24 h. MLE administration has been shown to protect mouse DNA from damage induced by alkylating agents; this corroborates to the biological activities of M. laevigata and points towards the need of plant compounds isolation to proceed with further studies. PMID:23724299

  13. Genotoxic effects of the insecticide cypermethrin on the root meristem cells of sunflowers (Helianthus annuus L.).

    PubMed

    Inceer, Huseyin; Hayirlioglu-Ayaz, Sema; Ozcan, Melahat

    2009-11-01

    In this study, the genotoxic effects of the insecticide cypermethrin on the root meristem cells of sunflowers (Helianthus annuus L.) were investigated. The roots were treated with 10- 25- 50- and 100-ppm concentrations of cypermethrin for 6, 12 and 24 h. The mitotic index and mitotic abnormalities were determined in both control and test groups. The cypermethrin showed a marked mitodepressive action on mitosis. The types of mitotic abnormalities included disturbed metaphase, c-mitosis, stickiness, laggards and chromatid bridges. A pronounced toxic effect was observed at the 50-ppm concentration. Cypermethrin may have genotoxic effects on sunflowers.

  14. Comparison of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity effects of silver nanoparticles on human cervix and breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Juarez-Moreno, K; Gonzalez, E B; Girón-Vazquez, N; Chávez-Santoscoy, R A; Mota-Morales, J D; Perez-Mozqueda, L L; Garcia-Garcia, M R; Pestryakov, A; Bogdanchikova, N

    2016-11-04

    The wide application of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) has pointed out the need to evaluate their potential risk and toxic effects on human health. Herein, the cytotoxic effects of Argovit™ AgNPs were evaluated on eight cancer cell lines. Further cytotoxic studies were performed in gynecological cancer cell lines from cervical (HeLa) and breast (MDA-MB-231 and MCF7) cancer. In both cases, the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of AgNPs produced the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) after 24 h of incubation, but it was not statistically significant compared with untreated cells. However, HeLa, MDA-MB-231, and MCF7 cells treated with the maximal IC of AgNPs induced the formation of ROS either at 12 or 24 h of incubation. Genotoxicity achieved by comet assay in HeLa, MDA-MB-231, and MCF7 cells revealed that exposure to IC50 of AgNPs does not induced noticeable DNA damage in the cells. However, the IC of AgNPs provoked severe DNA damage after 12 and 24 h of exposure. We conclude that, Argovit (polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated AgNPs) induce a cytotoxic effect in a time and dose-dependent manner in all the eight cancer cell lines tested. Nevertheless, the genotoxic effect is mainly restricted by the concentration effect. The results contribute to explore new therapeutic applications of AgNPs for malignances in murine models and to study in deep the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of AgNPs in healthy cells at the surrounding tissue of the neoplasia.

  15. Effect of particle size and dispersion status on cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of zinc oxide in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Roszak, Joanna; Catalán, Julia; Järventaus, Hilkka; Lindberg, Hanna K; Suhonen, Satu; Vippola, Minnamari; Stępnik, Maciej; Norppa, Hannu

    2016-07-01

    Data available on the genotoxicity of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) are controversial. Here, we examined the effects of particle size and dispersion status on the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of nanosized and fine ZnO, in the presence and absence of bovine serum albumin (BSA; 0.06%) in human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells. Dynamic light scattering analysis showed the most homogenous dispersions in water alone for nanosized ZnO and in water with BSA for fine ZnO. After a 48-h treatment, both types of ZnO were cytotoxic within a similar, narrow dose range (1.5-3.0μg/cm(2)) and induced micronuclei at a near toxic dose range (1.25-1.75μg/cm(2)), both with and without BSA. In the comet assay, nanosized ZnO (1.25-1.5μg/cm(2)), in the absence of BSA, caused a statistically significant increase in DNA damage after 3-h and 6-h treatments, while fine ZnO did not. Our findings may be explained by better uptake or faster intracellular dissolution of nanosized ZnO without BSA during short treatments (3-6h; the comet assay), with less differences between the two ZnO forms after longer treatments (>48h; the in vitro micronucleus test). As ZnO is genotoxic within a narrow dose range partly overlapping with cytotoxic doses, small experimental differences e.g. in the dispersion of ZnO particles may have a substantial effect on the genotoxicity of the nominal doses added to the cell culture.

  16. Sall2 is required for proapoptotic Noxa expression and genotoxic stress-induced apoptosis by doxorubicin

    PubMed Central

    Escobar, D; Hepp, M I; Farkas, C; Campos, T; Sodir, N M; Morales, M; Álvarez, C I; Swigart, L; Evan, G I; Gutiérrez, J L; Nishinakamura, R; Castro, A F; Pincheira, R

    2015-01-01

    The Sall2 transcription factor is deregulated in several cancers; however, little is known about its cellular functions, including its target genes. Recently, we demonstrated that p53 directly regulates Sall2 expression under genotoxic stress. Here, we investigated the role of Sall2 in the context of cellular response to genotoxic stress. In addition, we further examined the Sall2-p53 relationship during genotoxic stress in primary mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs), which are derived from Sall2 knockout mice separately, or in combination with the p53ERTAM knock-in mice. We found that the levels of Sall2 mRNA and protein are dynamically modulated in response to doxorubicin. At early times of stress, Sall2 is downregulated, but increases under extension of the stress in a p53-independent manner. Based on caspase-3/7 activities, expression of cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, expression of cleaved caspase-3 and induction of proapoptotic proteins, Sall2 expression was correlated with cellular apoptosis. Consequently, Sall2−/− MEFs have decreased apoptosis, which relates with increased cell viability in response to doxorubicin. Importantly, Sall2 was required for apoptosis even in the presence of fully activated p53. Searching for putative Sall2 targets that could mediate its role in apoptosis, we identified proapoptotic NOXA/PMAIP1 (phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate-induced protein 1). We demonstrated that Sall2 positively regulates Noxa promoter activity. Conserved putative Sall2-binding sites at the NOXA promoter were validated in vitro by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and in vivo by ChIP experiments, identifying NOXA as a novel Sall2 target. In agreement, induction of Noxa protein and mRNA in response to doxorubicin was significantly decreased in Sall2−/− MEFs. In addition, studies in leukemia Jurkat T cells support the existence of the Sall2/Noxa axis, and the significance of this axis on the apoptotic response to doxorubicin in cancer cells. Our

  17. Genotoxic effect of Lythrum salicaria extract determined by the mussel micronucleus test.

    PubMed

    Eck-Varanka, Bettina; Kováts, Nóra; Hubai, Katalin; Paulovits, Gábor; Ferincz, Árpád; Horváth, Eszter

    2015-12-01

    A wide range of aquatic plants have been proven to release allelochemicals, of them phenolics and tannin are considered rather widely distributed. Tannins, however, have been demonstrated to have genotoxic capacity. In our study genotoxic potential of Lythrum salicaria L. (Purple Loosestrife, family Lythraceae) was assessed by the mussel micronucleus test, using Unio pictorum. In parallel, total and hydrolysable tannin contents were determined. Results clearly show that the extract had a high hydrolysable tannin content and significant mutagenic effect. As L. salicaria has been long used in traditional medicine for chronic diarrhoea, dysentery, leucorrhoea and blood-spitting, genotoxic potential of the plant should be evaluated not only with regard to potential effects in the aquatic ecosystem, but also assessing its safe use as a medicinal herb.

  18. Deoxynivalenol induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Yu, Miao; Fu, Juan; Bao, Wei; Wang, Di; Hao, Liping; Yao, Ping; Nüssler, Andreas K; Yan, Hong; Liu, Liegang

    2014-02-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is one of the most common mycotoxins. The aim of this study consists in using diverse cellular and molecular assays to evaluate cytotoxicity, genotoxicity as well as oxidative damage and to investigate their mechanisms in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. The human lymphocytes were cultured in eight different doses of DON (0, 6.25, 12.5, 25, 50, 100, 250 and 500 ng/mL) during 6, 12 and 24 h. DON was able to decrease cell viability and cause damage to the membrane, the chromosomes or the DNA at all times of culture. It was also able to induce lipid peroxidation and raise the levels of 8-OHdG and ROS in 6, 12 and 24 h. The results of the RT-PCR and the Western Blot indicated that DON is able to enhance mRNA or protein expressions of DNA repair genes and HO-1 in 6 h and to inhibit these expressions in 24 h. DON potentially triggers genotoxicity in human lymphocytes. This mechanism is probably related to depletion of antioxidase and oxidative damage to the DNA that reduced expression of HO-1, thereby inhibiting the ability of DNA repair.

  19. Non-genotoxic carcinogen exposure induces defined changes in the 5-hydroxymethylome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Induction and promotion of liver cancer by exposure to non-genotoxic carcinogens coincides with epigenetic perturbations, including specific changes in DNA methylation. Here we investigate the genome-wide dynamics of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) as a likely intermediate of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) demethylation in a DNA methylation reprogramming pathway. We use a rodent model of non-genotoxic carcinogen exposure using the drug phenobarbital. Results Exposure to phenobarbital results in dynamic and reciprocal changes to the 5mC/5hmC patterns over the promoter regions of a cohort of genes that are transcriptionally upregulated. This reprogramming of 5mC/5hmC coincides with characteristic changes in the histone marks H3K4me2, H3K27me3 and H3K36me3. Quantitative analysis of phenobarbital-induced genes that are involved in xenobiotic metabolism reveals that both DNA modifications are lost at the transcription start site, while there is a reciprocal relationship between increasing levels of 5hmC and loss of 5mC at regions immediately adjacent to core promoters. Conclusions Collectively, these experiments support the hypothesis that 5hmC is a potential intermediate in a demethylation pathway and reveal precise perturbations of the mouse liver DNA methylome and hydroxymethylome upon exposure to a rodent hepatocarcinogen. PMID:23034186

  20. Cytotoxicity, oxidative stress and genotoxicity induced by glass fibers on human alveolar epithelial cell line A549.

    PubMed

    Rapisarda, Venerando; Loreto, Carla; Ledda, Caterina; Musumeci, Giuseppe; Bracci, Massimo; Santarelli, Lory; Renis, Marcella; Ferrante, Margherita; Cardile, Venera

    2015-04-01

    Man-made vitreous fibers have been widely used as insulation material as asbestos substitutes; however their morphology and composition raises concerns. In 1988 the International Agency for Research on Cancer classified fiberglass, rock wool, slag wool, and ceramic fibers as Group 2B, i.e. possibly carcinogenic to humans. In 2002 it reassigned fiberglass, rock and slag wool, and continuous glass filaments to Group 3, not classifiable as carcinogenic to humans. The aim of this study was to verify the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects and oxidative stress production induced by in vitro exposure of human alveolar epithelial cells A549 to glass fibers with a predominant diameter <3 μm (97%) and length >5 μm (93%). A549 cells were incubated with 5, 50, or 100 μg/ml (2.1, 21, and 42 μg/cm(2), respectively) of glass fibers for 72 h. Cytotoxicity and DNA damage were tested by the MTT and the Comet assay, respectively. Oxidative stress was determined by measuring inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression by Western blotting, production of nitric oxide (NO) with Griess reagent, and concentration of reactive oxygen species by fluorescent quantitative analysis with 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein-diacetate (DCFH-DA). The results showed that glass fiber exposure significantly reduced cell viability and increased DNA damage and oxidative stress production in a concentration-dependent manner, demonstrating that glass fibers exert cytotoxic and genotoxic effects related to increased oxidative stress on the human alveolar cell line A549.

  1. New insights in the acute toxic/genotoxic effects of CuO nanoparticles in the in vivo Drosophila model.

    PubMed

    Alaraby, Mohamed; Hernández, Alba; Marcos, Ricard

    2016-08-01

    Metal oxide nanoparticles are highly reactive from the biological point of view and, for this reason, it exists important reservations in regard human health impact. We used Drosophila as a promising in vivo model to diagnose the biological effects of copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO-NPs). Due to the potential role of ions release the effects of CuO-NPs were compared with those induced by copper sulfate, CuSO4. A wide battery of approaches has been used including toxicity, cell and body internalization, induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as well as changes in gene expression, related to both general stress and alterations in the intestinal barrier, and genotoxicity. The obtained results show that CuO-NPs have the ability to be distributed inside midgut cells and translocate to the general body compartment (internal hemolymph) interacting with hemocytes. Its exposure leads to reduced larval growth, decreased flies viability, delaying their emergency periods, especially at higher doses (2 and 10 mM). Moreover, deregulation of stress genes including antioxidant genes, and genes involved in wound healing were also observed. In this point it should be emphasized the novelty of using genes such as Duox, Upd3, PPO2, and Hml to determine injury on the intestinal barrier. On the other hand, CuO-NPs had non-genotoxic potential, in agreement with their inability to increase ROS production. In general dissolved copper produced higher toxic/genotoxic effects than those induced by CuO-NPs which would indicate that copper ions alone are more important in inducing harmful effects than copper nanoparticles itself.

  2. Sam68/KHDRBS1 is critical for colon tumorigenesis by regulating genotoxic stress-induced NF-κB activation

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Kai; Sun, Xin; Wier, Eric M; Hodgson, Andrea; Liu, Yue; Sears, Cynthia L; Wan, Fengyi

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB)-mediated transcription is an important mediator for cellular responses to DNA damage. Genotoxic agents trigger a 'nuclear-to-cytoplasmic' NF-κB activation signaling pathway; however, the early nuclear signaling cascade linking DNA damage and NF-κB activation is poorly understood. Here we report that Src-associated-substrate-during-mitosis-of-68kDa/KH domain containing, RNA binding, signal transduction associated 1 (Sam68/KHDRBS1) is a key NF-κB regulator in genotoxic stress-initiated signaling pathway. Sam68 deficiency abolishes DNA damage-stimulated polymers of ADP-ribose (PAR) production and the PAR-dependent NF-κB transactivation of anti-apoptotic genes. Sam68 deleted cells are hypersensitive to genotoxicity caused by DNA damaging agents. Upregulated Sam68 coincides with elevated PAR production and NF-κB-mediated anti-apoptotic transcription in human and mouse colon cancer. Knockdown of Sam68 sensitizes human colon cancer cells to genotoxic stress-induced apoptosis and genetic deletion of Sam68 dampens colon tumor burden in mice. Together our data reveal a novel function of Sam68 in the genotoxic stress-initiated nuclear signaling, which is crucial for colon tumorigenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15018.001 PMID:27458801

  3. Ochratoxin A-induced cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and reactive oxygen species in kidney cells: An integrative approach of complementary endpoints.

    PubMed

    Costa, João G; Saraiva, Nuno; Guerreiro, Patrícia S; Louro, Henriqueta; Silva, Maria J; Miranda, Joana P; Castro, Matilde; Batinic-Haberle, Ines; Fernandes, Ana S; Oliveira, Nuno G

    2016-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a well-known nephrotoxic and potential carcinogenic agent but no consensus about the molecular mechanisms underlying its deleterious effects has been reached yet. The aim of this study is to integrate several endpoints concerning OTA-induced toxicological effects in Vero kidney cells in order to obtain additional mechanistic data, especially regarding the influence of reactive oxygen species (ROS). One innovative aspect of this work is the use of the superoxide dismutase mimic (SODm) MnTnHex-2-PyP as a mechanistic tool to clarify the involvement of oxidative stress in OTA toxicity. The results showed concentration and time-dependent cytotoxic effects of OTA (crystal violet, neutral red and LDH leakage assays). While the SODm mildly increased cell viability, trolox and ascorbic acid had no effect with regards to this endpoint. OTA induced micronuclei formation. Using the FPG modified comet assay, OTA modestly increased the % of DNA in tail, revealing the presence of oxidative DNA lesions. This mycotoxin increased apoptosis, which was attenuated by SODm. In addition, the SODm decreased the ROS accumulation observed in DHE assay. Taken together, our data suggest that ROS partially contribute to the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of OTA, although other mechanisms may be relevant in OTA-induced deleterious effects.

  4. Pirimicarb-based formulation-induced genotoxicity and cytotoxicity in the freshwater fish Cnesterodon decemmaculatus (Jenyns, 1842) (Pisces, Poeciliidae).

    PubMed

    Vera-Candioti, Josefina; Soloneski, Sonia; Larramendy, Marcelo L

    2015-11-01

    We analyzed the aspects of lethality, genotoxicity, and cytotoxicity in the ten spotted live-bearer exposed under laboratory conditions to the pirimicarb-based formulation Patton Flow® (50% active ingredient (a.i.)). Acute effects were evaluated using different end points for lethality, genotoxicity, and cytotoxicity. Median lethal concentration (LC50) estimation was employed as a bioassay for lethality, whereas micronucleus (MN) induction and alterations in erythrocyte/erythroblast frequency were used as end points for genotoxicity and cytotoxicity, respectively. Results demonstrated an LC5096h value of 88 mg/L. Patton Flow® increased the MN frequency in fish erythrocytes after 48 h of exposure at a concentration of 66 mg/L, whereas a concentration range of 22-66 mg/L was able to exert the same genotoxic effect at 96 h of treatment. Furthermore, cytotoxicity was also observed by alterations in erythrocyte/erythroblast frequencies within the concentration range of 22-66 mg/L, regardless of the exposure time. Our current observations provide evidence that Patton Flow® (50% a.i.) should be considered a clear lethal, cytotoxic, and genotoxic agent on Cnesterodon decemmaculatus. Thus, repeated applications of this carbamic insecticide can enter the aquatic environment and exert deleterious effects on aquatic organisms other than the evaluated species C. decemmaculatus.

  5. Genotoxic effects of sodium arsenite and sodium arsenate after chronic exposure of Drosophila melanogaster larvae

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos-Morales, P.; Ordaz, M.G.; Munoz, A.

    1995-11-01

    Two arsenic compounds, namely: NaAsO{sub 2} (Sodium Arsenite) and Na{sub 2}HAsO{sub 4} (Sodium Arsenate) were tested for its chronic effect in somatic cells of Drosophila melanogaster. In a previous study in Drosophila we found that both compounds induced SLRL mutations, but failed to induce sex chromosome loss. In the SMART, after acute exposure, only sodium arsenite was positive when cells of the wings were used; however, both were positives in cells of the eyes of Drosophila. The genotoxicity of both compounds localized mainly on somatic cells, in agreement with reports on the carcinogenicity potential of arsenical compounds. The Somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) was run employing cells of the wing imaginal discs from flr{sup 3}/mwh larvae. First instar larvae (24 {plus_minus} 4 h) were treated during 96 hours with sodium arsenite [0.015-4.0 ppm], and sodium arsenate [0.2-10 ppm], negative control was treated with distilled water. The frequency of spots by wing induced by the two arsenic salts were compared with control according with Frei and Wuergler procedure. Data show that sodium arsenite tested negative at all concentrations, but sodium arsenate tested positive at 0.8, 2 and 10 ppm (P<0.05). This results were consistent with the co-mutagenic role of sodium arsenite, but show that sodium arsenate was mutagenic in Drosophila test system under chronic exposure.

  6. Egyptian sweet marjoram leaves protect against genotoxicity, immunosuppression and other complications induced by cyclophosphamide in albino rats.

    PubMed

    Ramadan, Gamal; El-Beih, Nadia M; Zahra, Mai M

    2012-09-28

    Cyclophosphamide (CP) is one of the most popular alkylating anticancer drugs that show a high therapeutic index, despite the widespread side effects and toxicity particularly in high-dose regimens and long-term use. Here, we evaluated and compared the efficacy of two different doses (50 and 100 mg/kg body weight, given orally for 30 consecutive days) of Egyptian sweet marjoram leaf powder (MLP) and marjoram leaf aqueous extract (MLE) in alleviating the genotoxicity, immunosuppression and other complications induced by CP in non-tumour-bearing albino rats. The present study showed (probably for the first time) that both MLP and MLE significantly alleviated (P < 0·05-0·001) most side effects and toxicity of CP-treated rats including the increase in chromosomal aberrations of bone marrow cells and serum malondialdehyde level, the decrease in the level of serum Ig, the delayed type of hypersensitivity response as also the weights and cellularity of lymphoid organs, and myelosuppression, leucopenia, macrocytic normochromic anaemia as well as thrombocytopenia by reactivating the non-enzymic (reduced glutathione) and enzymic (catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione S-transferase, superoxide dismutase) antioxidant system and increasing the mitotic index of bone marrow cells. The modulatory effects of marjoram leaves shown in the present study were dose dependent in most cases and much higher in MLE (21-23 % for all parameters taken together). In addition, the doses used in the present study were considered safe. In conclusion, sweet marjoram leaves (especially in the form of a herbal tea) may be useful as an immunostimulant and in reducing genotoxicity in patients under chemotherapeutic interventions.

  7. 2-hydroxylethyl methacrylate (HEMA), a tooth restoration component, exerts its genotoxic effects in human gingival fibroblasts trough methacrylic acid, an immediate product of its degradation.

    PubMed

    Szczepanska, Joanna; Poplawski, Tomasz; Synowiec, Ewelina; Pawlowska, Elzbieta; Chojnacki, Cezary J; Chojnacki, Jan; Blasiak, Janusz

    2012-02-01

    HEMA (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate), a methacrylate commonly used in dentistry, was reported to induce genotoxic effects, but their mechanism is not fully understood. HEMA may be degraded by the oral cavity esterases or through mechanical stress following the chewing process. Methacrylic acid (MAA) is the primary product of HEMA degradation. In the present work we compared cytotoxic and genotoxic effects induced by HEMA and MAA in human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs). A 6-h exposure to HEMA or MAA induced a weak decrease in the viability of HGFs. Neither HEMA nor MAA induced strand breaks in the isolated plasmid DNA, but both compounds evoked DNA damage in HGFs, as evaluated by the alkaline comet assay. Oxidative modifications to the DNA bases were monitored by the DNA repair enzymes Endo III and Fpg. DNA damage induced by HEMA and MAA was not persistent and was removed during a 120 min repair incubation. Results from the neutral comet assay indicated that both compounds induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and they were confirmed by the γ-H2AX assay. Both compounds induced apoptosis and perturbed the cell cycle. Therefore, methacrylic acid, a product of HEMA degradation, may be involved in its cytotoxic and genotoxic action.

  8. Cytostatic and genotoxic effect of temephos in human lymphocytes and HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Benitez-Trinidad, A B; Herrera-Moreno, J F; Vázquez-Estrada, G; Verdín-Betancourt, F A; Sordo, M; Ostrosky-Wegman, P; Bernal-Hernández, Y Y; Medina-Díaz, I M; Barrón-Vivanco, B S; Robledo-Marenco, M L; Salazar, A M; Rojas-García, A E

    2015-06-01

    Temephos is an organophosphorus pesticide that is used in control campaigns against Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, which transmit dengue. In spite of the widespread use of temephos, few studies have examined its genotoxic potential. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxic, cytostatic and genotoxic effects of temephos in human lymphocytes and hepatoma cells (HepG2). The cytotoxicity was evaluated with simultaneous staining (FDA/EtBr). The cytostatic and genotoxic effects were evaluated using comet assays and the micronucleus technique. We found that temephos was not cytotoxic in either lymphocytes or HepG2 cells. Regarding the cytostatic effect in human lymphocytes, temephos (10 μM) caused a significant decrease in the percentage of binucleated cells and in the nuclear division index as well as an increase in the apoptotic cell frequency, which was not the case for HepG2 cells. The comet assay showed that temephos increased the DNA damage levels in human lymphocytes, but it did not increase the MN frequency. In contrast, in HepG2 cells, temephos increased the tail length, tail moment and MN frequency in HepG2 cells compared to control cells. In conclusion, temephos causes stable DNA damage in HepG2 cells but not in human lymphocytes. These findings suggest the importance of temephos biotransformation in its genotoxic effect.

  9. IS THE DOSE-RESPONSE LINEAR OR NONLINEAR FOR GENOTOXIC EFFECTS?

    EPA Science Inventory

    IS THE DOSE-RESPONSE LINEAR OR NONLINEAR FOR GENOTOXIC EFFECTS?
    Preston, RJ. Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, NHEERL, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711

    For considerations of cancer risk assessment from exposure to environmenta...

  10. Soil genotoxicity induced by successive applications of chlorothalonil under greenhouse conditions.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiangxiang; Cui, Ning; Zhou, Wei; Khorram, Mahdi Safaei; Wang, Donghong; Yu, Yunlong

    2014-05-01

    Greenhouse production of vegetables has been developed rapidly in China. High temperature and humidity inside the greenhouse make this environment more suitable for fast reproduction of fungal diseases. Fungicides are among the chemicals used extensively in the greenhouse to prevent crops from invasive infections by phytopathogens; however, little is known about the accumulation of fungicides in soil and their effect on soil quality under greenhouse conditions. In the present study, the accumulation of the fungicide chlorothalonil (CT) and its toxic metabolite hydroxy-chlorothalonil (HCT) in soil as well as their related soil genotoxicity under greenhouse conditions was investigated. The results indicated that both CT and HCT accumulated in soil with repeated applications of CT, and the accumulation level was strongly correlated to application dosage and its frequency. In addition, soil genotoxicity, which was measured by Vicia faba, also increased with the accumulation of CT and HCT, and the main contributor to this phenomenon was CT rather than HCT. The data demonstrated that successive applications of fungicides may result in their accumulation in soil and thus a decline in soil quality.

  11. Titanium dioxide food additive (E171) induces ROS formation and genotoxicity: contribution of micro and nano-sized fractions.

    PubMed

    Proquin, Héloïse; Rodríguez-Ibarra, Carolina; Moonen, Carolyn G J; Urrutia Ortega, Ismael M; Briedé, Jacob J; de Kok, Theo M; van Loveren, Henk; Chirino, Yolanda I

    2017-01-01

    Since 1969, the European Union approves food-grade titanium dioxide (TiO2), also known as E171 colouring food additive. E171 is a mixture of micro-sized particles (MPs) and nano-sized particles (NPs). Previous studies have indicated adverse effects of oral exposure to E171, i.e. facilitation of colon tumour growth. This could potentially be partially mediated by the capacity to induce reactive oxygen species (ROS). The aim of the present study is to determine whether E171 exposure induces ROS formation and DNA damage in an in vitro model using human Caco-2 and HCT116 cells and to investigate the contribution of the separate MPs and NPs TiO2 fractions to these effects. After suspension of the particles in Hanks' balanced salt solution buffer and cell culture medium with either bovine serum albumin (BSA) or foetal bovine serum, characterization of the particles was performed by dynamic light scattering, ROS formation was determined by electron spin/paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and DNA damage was determined by the comet and micronucleus assays. The results showed that E171, MPs and NPs are stable in cell culture medium with 0.05% BSA. The capacity for ROS generation in a cell-free environment was highest for E171, followed by NPs and MPs. Only MPs were capable to induce ROS formation in exposed Caco-2 cells. E171, MPs and NPs all induced single-strand DNA breaks. Chromosome damage was shown to be induced by E171, as tested with the micronucleus assay in HCT116 cells. In conclusion, E171 has the capability to induce ROS formation in a cell-free environment and E171, MPs and NPs have genotoxic potential. The capacity of E171 to induce ROS formation and DNA damage raises concerns about potential adverse effects associated with E171 (TiO2) in food.

  12. Zinc inhibits aflatoxin B1-induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in human hepatocytes (HepG2 cells).

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuan; Lv, Yangjun; Huang, Kunlun; Luo, Yunbo; Xu, Wentao

    2016-06-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) has strong carcinogenicity. Consumption of AFB1-contaminated agricultural products and the occurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma have received widespread attention. The aim of this paper was to investigate whether zinc supplementation could inhibit AFB1-induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in HepG2 cells and the mechanism of this inhibition. Our data suggest that zinc sources can relieve a certain degree of AFB1-induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity by protecting against apoptotic body formation and DNA strand breaks, affecting S phase cell cycle arrest, reducing 8-OHdG formation, inhibiting global DNA hypomethylation and regulating gene expression in antioxidation, zinc-association and apoptosis processes. Consequently, zinc stabilizes the integrity of DNA and improves cell survival. These data provides new insights into the protective role of zinc in alleviating AFB1-induced cytotoxicity and mediating epigenetic changes in hepatocytes, demonstrating that zinc sources have detoxification properties in mycotoxin-induced toxicity.

  13. Genotoxic effect of Physalis angulata L. (Solanaceae) extract on human lymphocytes treated in vitro.

    PubMed

    Alves dos Santos, Raquel; Cabral, Teresinha Rosa; Cabral, Isabel Rosa; Antunes, Lusânia Maria; Pontes Andrade, Cristiane; Cerqueira dos Santos Cardoso, Plínio; de Oliveira Bahia, Marcelo; Pessoa, Claudia; Martins do Nascimento, José Luis; Rodríguez Burbano, Rommel; Takahashi, Catarina Satie

    2008-08-01

    Physalis angulata L (Solanaceae) is a medicinal plant from North of Brazil, whose different extracts and infusions are commonly used in the popular medicine for the treatment of malaria, asthma, hepatitis, dermatitis and rheumatism. However, the genotoxic effects of P. angulata on human cells is not well known. The main purpose of the present study was to evaluate the in vitro genotoxic effects of aqueous extract of P. angulata using the comet assay and the micronucleus assay in human lymphocytes provided from 6 healthy donors. Treatments with P. angulata extracts were performed in vitro in order to access the extent of DNA damage. The comet assay has shown that treatments with P. angulata at 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0 and 6.0 microg/mL in culture medium were genotoxic. Lymphocytes treated with P. angulata at the concentrations of 3.0 and 6.0 microg/mL in culture medium showed a statistically significant increase in the frequency of micronucleus (p<0.05), however, the cytokinesis blocked proliferation index (CBPI) was not decreased after P. angulata treatment. In conclusion, the present work demonstrated the genotoxic effects of P. angulata extract on human lymphocytes in vitro.

  14. Cyto-genotoxic and oxidative effects of a continuous UV-C treatment of liquid egg products.

    PubMed

    Mendes de Souza, Poliana; Briviba, Karlis; Müller, Alexandra; Fernández, Avelina; Stahl, Mario

    2013-06-01

    UV-C treatment of food is a promising non-thermal processing technology to improve food safety and preservation. Most of the chemical constituents of food absorb UV-C light that can lead to chemical modifications and quality changes. This work investigated the effects of UV-C treatment of liquid egg products on lipid, protein oxidations and potential cyto- and genotoxic effects on intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. Egg preparations (egg white, yolk, liquid whole egg) were treated with UV-C (254 nm, volumetric doses between 0 and 115,619 J L(-1)) using a commercial UV-C processing unit equipped with a Dean Flow reactor. UV-C treatment at high doses (from 32,181 J L(-1), about 2 times higher than that needed to inactivate 5 log of relevant microorganisms) showed an increased lipid oxidation in egg yolk and slight effects in liquid whole eggs; this was confirmed by slightly but not statistically significant increased peroxide values. UV-C induced also slight protein damage, characterised by the total sulfhydryl group reduction. These UV-C-induced oxidative modifications in egg preparations however did not cause any increase in the cyto- or genotoxic (DNA strand breaks) effects in intestinal Caco-2 cells.

  15. Sulforaphane inhibits CYP1A1 activity and promotes genotoxicity induced by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Fangxing; Zhuang, Shulin; Zhang, Chao; Dai, Heping; Liu, Weiping

    2013-06-15

    Increasing environmental pollution by carcinogens such as some of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) has prompted growing interest in searching for chemopreventive compounds which are readily obtainable. Sulforaphane (SFN) is isolated from cruciferous vegetables and has the potentials to reduce carcinogenesis through various pathways. In this study, we studied the effects of SFN on CYP1A1 activity and genotoxicity induced by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). The results showed that SFN inhibited TCDD-induced CYP1A1 activity in H4IIE cells by directly inhibiting CYP1A1 activity, probably through binding to aryl hydrocarbon receptor and/or CYP1A1 revealed by molecular docking. However, SFN promoted TCDD-induced DNA damage in yeast cells and reduced the viability of initiated yeast cells. Besides, it is surprising that SFN also failed to reduce genotoxicity induced by other genotoxic reagents which possess different mechanisms to lead to DNA damage. Currently, it is difficult to predict whether SFN has the potentials to reduce the risk of TCDD based on the conflicting observations in the study. Therefore, further studies should be urgent to reveal the function and mechanism of SFN in the stress of such POPs on human health. - Highlights: • Sulforaphane inhibited TCDD-induced CYP1A1 activity in H4IIE cells. • Sulforaphane may bind to aryl hydrocarbon receptor and/or CYP1A1. • Sulforaphane promoted TCDD-induced DNA damage in yeast cells. • Sulforaphane may promote DNA damage by DNA strand breaks or DNA alkylation.

  16. Cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of abamectin, chlorfenapyr, and imidacloprid on CHOK1 cells.

    PubMed

    Al-Sarar, Ali S; Abobakr, Yasser; Bayoumi, Alaa E; Hussein, Hamdy I

    2015-11-01

    The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of abamectin, chlorfenapyr, and imidacloprid have been evaluated on the Chinese hamster ovary (CHOK1) cells. Neutral red incorporation (NRI), total cellular protein content (TCP), and methyl tetrazolium (MTT) assays were followed to estimate the mid-point cytotoxicity values, NRI50, TCP50, and MTT50, respectively. The effects of the sublethal concentration (NRI25) on glutathione S-transferase (GST), glutathione reductase (GRD), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), and total glutathione content have been evaluated in the presence and absence of reduced glutathione (GSH), vitamin C, and vitamin E. The genotoxicity was evaluated using chromosomal aberrations (CA), micronucleus (MN) formation, and DNA fragmentation techniques in the presence and absence of the metabolic activation system, S9 mix. Abamectin was the most cytotoxic pesticide followed by chlorfenapyr, while imidacloprid was the least cytotoxic one. The glutathione redox cycle components were altered by the tested pesticides in the absence and presence of the tested antioxidants. The results of genotoxicity indicate that abamectin, chlorfenapyr, and imidacloprid have potential genotoxic effects on CHOK1 cells under the experimental conditions.

  17. Potential genotoxic effects of melted snow from an urban area revealed by the Allium cepa test.

    PubMed

    Blagojević, Jelena; Stamenković, Gorana; Vujosević, Mladen

    2009-09-01

    The presence of well-known atmospheric pollutants is regularly screened for in large towns but knowledge about the effects of mixtures of different pollutants and especially their genotoxic potential is largely missing. Since falling snow collects pollutants from the air, melted snow samples could be suitable for evaluating potential genotoxicity. For this purpose the Allium cepa anaphase-telophase test was used to analyse melted snow samples from Belgrade, the capital city of Serbia. Samples of snow were taken at two sites, characterized by differences in pollution intensity, in three successive years. At the more polluted site the analyses showed a very high degree of both toxicity and genotoxicity in the first year of the study corresponding to the effects of the known mutagen used as the positive control. At the other site the situation was much better but not without warning signals. The results showed that standard analyses for the presence of certain contaminants in the air do not give an accurate picture of the possible consequences of urban air pollution because the genotoxic potential remains hidden. The A. cepa test has been demonstrated to be very convenient for evaluation of air pollution through analyses of melted snow samples.

  18. Evaluation of effects of melatonin and caffeic acid phenethyl ester on acute potassium dichromate toxicity and genotoxicity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Cengiz, Mujgan; Alansal, Nurnisa Oya; Tuncdemir, Matem; Tanriverdi, Gamze; Bayoglu, Burcu

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to investigate the possible protective effects of melatonin and caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) on potassium dichromate (K2 Cr2O7)-induced nephrotoxicity and genotoxicity. Methods: A total of 40 Wistar albino rats were divided into five groups: control, K2Cr2O7(K2Cr2O715 mg/kg, one dose, i.p.), K2Cr2O7 + melatonin, K2Cr2O7 + CAPE, and K2Cr2O7 + melatonin + CAPE. Urine and blood samples were collected from rats before scarification. One kidney was collected for histopathological studies, and the other was stored at −80°C for further determination of catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), glutathione S-transferase (GST), and glutathione reductase (GR) levels with spectrophotometric method. Comet assay was used to evaluate the genotoxicity. Results: We observed a significant amelioration in genotoxicity by melatonin and simultaneous melatonin + CAPE treatment compared to K2Cr2O7 group (p1, p2< 0.05). SOD, CAT, GSH, GST, and MDA levels did not change when compared with controls. When K2Cr2O7 applied group was treated with melatonin and CAPE, neither melatonin nor CAPE made any changes in kidney GSH, GST, SOD, and MDA levels (P > 0.05). We noted that treatment with CAPE and melatonin + CAPE together caused a significant decrease in renal tissue damage, an upregulation in the kidney CAT levels (P < 0.05) and a slight healing at GR levels when compared with the K2Cr2O7 group. Conclusion: Our results revealed, CAPE and melatonin may have protective effects on K2Cr2O7 induced nephrotoxicity and cellular damage in rats. PMID:27756952

  19. Genotoxicity of 1,4-benzoquinone and 1,4-naphthoquinone in relation to effects on glutathione and NAD(P)H levels in V79 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewig, G.; Dogra, S.; Glatt, H. )

    1989-07-01

    1,4-Benzoquinone is cytotoxic in V79 Chinese hamster cells and induces gene mutations and micronuclei. The cell-damaging effects of quinones are usually attributed to thiol depletion, oxidation of NAD(P)H, and redox-cycling involving the formation of semiquinone radicals and reactive oxygen species. To elucidate the role of these mechanisms in the genotoxicity of 1,4-benzoquinone, the authors measured various genotoxic effects, cytotoxicity, and the levels of glutathione, NADPH, NADH, and their oxidized forms all in the same experiment. 1,4-Naphthoquinone, which does not induce gene mutations in V79 cells, was investigated for comparative reasons. The quinones had a similar effect on the levels of cofactors. Total glutathione was depleted, but levels of oxidized glutathione were slightly increased. The levels of NADPH and NADH were reduced at high concentrations of the quinones with a simultaneous increase in the levels of NADP{sup +} and NAD{sup +}. Both compounds induced micronuclei, but neither increased the frequency of sister chromatid exchange. Only 1,4-benzoquinone induced gene mutations. They conclude that (a) induction of micronuclei and glutathione depletion by the two quinones are not linked casually, (b) 1,4-benzoquinone induces gene mutations by a mechanism different from oxidative stress and glutathione depletion, and (c) glutathione does not fully protect the cells against the genotoxicity of quinones.

  20. Nicotine derived genotoxic effects in human primary parotid gland cells as assessed in vitro by comet assay, cytokinesis-block micronucleus test and chromosome aberrations test.

    PubMed

    Ginzkey, Christian; Steussloff, Gudrun; Koehler, Christian; Burghartz, Marc; Scherzed, Agmal; Hackenberg, Stephan; Hagen, Rudolf; Kleinsasser, Norbert H

    2014-08-01

    Genotoxic effects of nicotine were described in different human cells including salivary gland cells. Based on the high nicotine concentration in saliva of smokers or patients using therapeutic nicotine patches, the current study was performed to evaluate the genotoxic potential of nicotine in human salivary gland cells. Therefore, primary salivary gland cells from 10 patients undergoing parotid gland surgery were exposed to nicotine concentrations between 1 μM and 1000 μM for 1 h in the absence of exogenous metabolic activation. The acinar phenotype was proven by immunofluorescent staining of alpha-amylase. Genotoxic effects were evaluated using the Comet assay, the micronucleus test and the chromosome aberration test. Cytotoxicity and apoptosis were determined by trypan blue exclusion test and Caspase-3 assay. Nicotine was able to induce genotoxic effects in all three assays. The chromosome aberration test was the most sensitive and increases in numerical and structural (chromatid-type and chromosome-type) aberrations were seen at ≥1 μM, whereas increases in micronuclei frequency were detected at 10 μM and DNA damage as measured in the Comet assay was noted at >100 μM. No cytotoxic damage or influence of apoptosis could be demonstrated. Nicotine as a possible risk factor for tumor initiation in salivary glands is still discussed controversially. Our results demonstrated the potential of nicotine to induce genotoxic effects in salivary gland cells. These results were observed at saliva nicotine levels similar to those found after oral or transdermal exposure to nicotine and suggest the necessity of careful monitoring of the use of nicotine in humans.

  1. Evaluation of cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of Benodanil by using Allium and Micronucleus assays.

    PubMed

    Akyıl, Dilek; Özkara, Arzu; Erdoğmuş, S Feyza; Eren, Yasin; Konuk, Muhsin; Sağlam, Esra

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential cytotoxic effects of Benodanil fungicide by employing both mitotic index (MI) and mitotic phases on the root meristem cells of Allium cepa and genotoxic effects by using in vitro micronucleus assay (MN) in human peripheral blood lymphocyte. In the Allium root growth inhibition test, the EC50 value was first determined as 25 ppm. Then, 2 × EC50 value (50 ppm), EC50 value (25 ppm), and 1/2 × EC50 value (12.5 ppm) were tested with different treatment periods (24, 48, and 72 h). Both negative and positive controls were also used in parallel experiments. We obtained that mitotic index and prophase index decreased when compared with the control in all concentrations. In the micronucleus assay, lymphocytes were treated with various concentrations (250, 500, 750, and 1000 µg/ml) of Benodanil for 24 and 48 h. The results showed that Benodanil did not induce MN frequency in all concentrations of both treatment periods. Additionally, it was determined that this pesticide decreased nuclear division index (NDI) significantly. It was concluded that Benodanil has a cytotoxic effects depending on decreasing of MI and NDI.

  2. The cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of metalaxy-M on earthworms (Eisenia fetida).

    PubMed

    Liu, Tong; Zhu, Lusheng; Han, Yingnan; Wang, Jinhua; Wang, Jun; Zhao, Yan

    2014-10-01

    As the main optical isomer of metalaxyl, metalaxyl-M has been widely used worldwide in recent years because of its notable effect on the prevention and control of crop diseases. Together with the toxicity and degradation of metalaxyl-M, the chemical has attracted the attention of researchers. The present study examined the toxic effects of metalaxyl-M on earthworms at 0 mg kg(-1) , 0.1 mg kg(-1) , 1 mg kg(-1) , and 3 mg kg(-1) on days 7, 14, 21 and 28 after exposure. The results showed that metalaxyl-M could cause an obvious increase in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) when the concentration was higher than 0.1 mg kg(-1) , which led to lipid peroxidation in earthworms. Metalaxyl-M can induce DNA damage in earthworms, and the level of DNA damage markedly increased with increasing the concentration of metalaxyl-M. Metalaxyl-M also has a serious influence on the activities of antioxidant enzymes, which results in irreversible oxidative damage in cells. The changes of these indicators all indicated that metalaxyl-M may cause cytotoxic and genotoxic effects on earthworms.

  3. Lilium compounds kaempferol and jatropham can modulate cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of radiomimetic zeocin in plants and human lymphocytes In vitro.

    PubMed

    Jovtchev, Gabriele; Gateva, Svetla; Stankov, Alexander

    2016-06-01

    Organisms are constantly exposed to the detrimental effect of environmental DNA-damaging agents. The harmful effects of environmental genotoxins could be decreased in a viable way by antimutagenesis. One of the modern approaches to reduce the mutagenic burden is based on exogenous natural and synthetic compounds that possess protective and antimutagenic potential against genotoxins. The natural compounds kaempferol and jatropham isolated from Lilium candidum were tested with respect to their potential to protect cells against the radiomimetic zeocin, as well as to their cytotoxic and genotoxic activities in two types of experimental eukaryotic test systems: Hordeum vulgare and human lymphocytes in vitro. Mitotic index (MI) was used as an endpoint for cytotoxicity; the frequency of chromosome aberrations (MwA) and the number of induced micronuclei (MN), as endpoints for genotoxicity/clastogenicity. Formation of aberration "hot spots" was also used as an indicator for genotoxicity in H. vulgare. Both kaempferol and jatropham were shown to possess a potential to modulate and decrease the cytotoxic and genotoxic/clastogenic effect of zeocin depending on the experimental design and the test system. Our data could be useful for health research programs, particularly in clarifying the pharmacological potential and activity of natural plant compounds. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 751-764, 2016.

  4. Low-Dose Radiation and Genotoxic Chemicals Can Protect Against Stochastic Biological Effects

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Bobby R.; Walker, Dale M.; Walker, Vernon E.

    2004-01-01

    A protective apoptosis-mediated (PAM) process that is turned on in mammalian cells by low-dose photon (X and γ) radiation and appears to also be turned on by the genotoxic chemical ethylene oxide is discussed. Because of the PAM process, exposure to low-dose photon radiation (and possibly also some genotoxic chemicals) can lead to a reduction in the risk of stochastic effects such as problematic mutations, neoplastic transformation (an early step in cancer occurrence), and cancer. These findings indicate a need to revise the current low-dose risk assessment paradigm for which risk of cancer is presumed to increase linearly with dose (without a threshold) after exposure to any amount of a genotoxic agent such as ionizing radiation. These findings support a view seldom mentioned in the past, that cancer risk can actually decrease, rather than increase, after exposure to low doses of photon radiation and possibly some other genotoxic agents. The PAM process (a form of natural protection) may contribute substantially to cancer prevention in humans and other mammals. However, new research is needed to improve our understanding of the process. The new research could unlock novel strategies for optimizing cancer prevention and novel protocols for low-dose therapy for cancer. With low-dose cancer therapy, normal tissue could be spared from severe damage while possibly eliminating the cancer. PMID:19330143

  5. Protective effect of lactofermented beetroot juice against aberrant crypt foci formation and genotoxicity of fecal water in rats.

    PubMed

    Klewicka, Elżbieta; Nowak, Adriana; Zduńczyk, Zenon; Cukrowska, Bożena; Błasiak, Janusz

    2012-09-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of beetroot juice fermented by Lactobacillus brevis 0944 and Lactobacillus paracasei 0920 (FBJ) on carcinogen induction of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in rat colon. N-Nitroso-N-methylurea (MNU) was used as carcinogen, which was administrated intragastrically at a dose of 50 mg/kg on the 23rd and 26th day of the experiment. Additionally, we investigated the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of fecal water from experimental animals in the Caco 2 cell line, evaluated by MTT/NRU tests and the comet assay, respectively, as well as by the count of bacteria adhered to colon epithelium assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization and DAPI staining. The experimental rats were divided into four groups based on diet type: basal diet, basal diet supplemented with FBJ, basal diet and MNU treatment, and basal diet supplemented with FBJ and MNU treatment. FBJ significantly reduced the number of ACF in MNU-treated rats (from 55±18 to 21±6). Moreover, the number of extensive aberrations (more than 4 crypts in a focus) decreased from 45±21 to 7±4. Fecal water obtained from rats fed with an MNU-containing diet induced pronounced cytotoxic and genotoxic effects in Caco 2 cells, but FBJ supplementation of the diet abolished these effects. The presence of FBJ in the diet significantly increased the count of bacteria, including Lactobacillus/Enterococcus, adhered to colonic epithelium. In conclusion, supplementation of the diet with lactofermented beetroot juice may provide protection against precancerous aberrant crypt formation and reduce the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of fecal water.

  6. SB202190 affects cell response to hydroxyurea-induced genotoxic stress in root meristems of Vicia faba.

    PubMed

    Winnicki, Konrad; Maszewski, Janusz

    2012-11-01

    Genotoxic stress caused by a variety of chemical and physical agents may lead to DNA breaks and genome instability. Response to DNA damage depends on ATM/ATR sensor kinases and their downstream proteins, which arrange cell cycle checkpoints. Activation of ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated)/ATR (ATM and Rad 3-related) signaling pathway triggers cell cycle arrest (by keeping cyclin-Cdk complexes inactive), combined with gamma-phosphorylation of histone H2A.X and induction of DNA repair processes. However, genotoxic stress activates also mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) which may control the functions of checkpoint proteins both directly, by post-translational modifications, or indirectly, by regulation of their expression. Our results indicate that in root meristem cells of Vicia faba, MAP kinase signaling pathway takes part in response to hydroxyurea-induced genotoxic stress. It is shown that SB202190, an inhibitor of p38 MAP kinase, triggers PCC (premature chromosome condensation) more rapidly, but only if cell cycle checkpoints are alleviated by caffeine. Since SB202190 and, independently, caffeine reduces HU-mediated histone H4 Lys5 acetylation, it may be that there is a cooperation of MAP kinase signaling pathways and ATM/ATR-dependent checkpoints during response to genotoxic stress.

  7. Evaluation of titanium dioxide nanocrystal-induced genotoxicity by the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay and the Drosophila wing spot test.

    PubMed

    Reis, Érica de Melo; Rezende, Alexandre Azenha Alves de; Oliveira, Pollyanna Francielli de; Nicolella, Heloiza Diniz; Tavares, Denise Crispim; Silva, Anielle Christine Almeida; Dantas, Noelio Oliveira; Spanó, Mário Antônio

    2016-10-01

    Titanium dioxide nanocrystals (TiO2 NCs) crystalline structures include anatase, rutile and brookite. This study evaluated the genotoxic effects of 3.4 and 6.2 nm anatase TiO2 NCs and 78.0 nm predominantly rutile TiO2 NCs through an in vitro micronucleus (MN) assay using V79 cells and an in vivo somatic mutation and recombination test in Drosophila wings. The MN assay was performed with nontoxic concentrations of TiO2 NCs. Only anatase (3.4 nm) at the highest concentration (120 μM) induced genotoxicity in V79 cells. In the in vivo test, Drosophila melanogaster larvae obtained from standard (ST) or high bioactivation (HB) crosses were treated with TiO2 NCs. In the ST cross, no mutagenic effects were observed. However, in the HB cross, TiO2 NCs (3.4 nm) were mutagenic at 1.5625 and 3.125 mM, while 78.0 nm NCs increased mutant spots at all concentrations tested except 3.125 mM. Only the smallest anatase TiO2 NCs induced mutagenic effects in vitro and in vivo. For rutile TiO2 NCs, no clastogenic/aneugenic effects were observed in the MN assay. However, they were mutagenic in Drosophila. Therefore, both anatase and rutile TiO2 NCs induced mutagenicity. Further research is necessary to clarify the TiO2 NCs genotoxic/mutagenic action mechanisms.

  8. Cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of aqueous extracts of five medicinal plants on Allium cepa Linn.

    PubMed

    Akinboro, A; Bakare, A A

    2007-07-25

    The cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of aqueous extracts of five medicinal plants: Azadirachta indica (A. Juss), Morinda lucida (Benth.), Cymbopogon citratus (DC Stapf.), Mangifera indica (Linn.) and Carica papaya (Linn.) was evaluated using the Allium cepa assay. The extracts were prepared with tap water as practised locally. Onion bulbs were exposed to 1, 5, 10, 25 and 50%; and 1, 2.5, 5, 10 and 20% concentrations (v/v) of each of the extracts for macroscopic and microscopic analyses, respectively. There was concentration-dependent and statistically significant (P<0.05) inhibition of root growth by the extracts when compared with the control. The EC(50) obtained for decoctions of Azadirachta indica. Cymbopogon citratus, Mangifera indica and Carica papaya were 0.6, 3.0, 1.4 and 0.8%, respectively. It was 2.6 and 0.8% for the squeezed extracts of Azadirachta indica and Morinda lucida, respectively. All the tested extracts were observed to have mitodepressive effects on cell division and induced mitotic spindle disturbance in Allium cepa. These results suggest an inhibitory, mitodepressive and turbagenic activities of the aqueous extracts on Allium cepa.

  9. Anemia and genotoxicity induced by sub-chronic intragastric treatment of rats with titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Grissa, Intissar; Elghoul, Jaber; Ezzi, Lobna; Chakroun, Sana; Kerkeni, Emna; Hassine, Mohsen; El Mir, Lassaad; Mehdi, Meriem; Ben Cheikh, Hassen; Haouas, Zohra

    2015-12-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) are widely used for their whiteness and opacity. We investigated the hematological effects and genotoxicity of anatase TiO2 NPs following sub-chronic oral gavage treatment. TiO2-NPs were characterized by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Wistar rats were treated with anatase TiO2 NPs by intragastric administration for 60 days. Hematological analysis showed a significant decrease in RBC and HCT and a significant increase in MCV, PLT, MPV and WBC at higher doses. Furthermore, abnormally shaped red cells, sometimes containing micronuclei, and hyper-segmented neutrophil nuclei were observed with TiO2 NPs treatment. The micronucleus test revealed damage to chromosomes in rat bone marrow at 100 and 200mg/kg bw; the comet assay showed significant DNA damage at the same doses.

  10. Modulation of flyash-induced genotoxicity in Vicia faba by vermicomposting.

    PubMed

    Jain, Kavindra; Singh, Jitendra; Chauhan, L K S; Murthy, R C; Gupta, S K

    2004-09-01

    Cytogenetic effects of pre- and postvermicomposted flyash samples were evaluated on the root meristem cells of Vicia faba. Seedlings of V. faba were directly sown in flyash and cow dung-soil mixtures (20%, 40%, 60%, and 80%) and the lateral roots grown in these test mixtures were sampled at 5 days. Negative control was run parallel in cow dung-soil (CS) mixture alone. One set of flyash-cow dung-soil (FCS) mixture was subjected to vermicomposting by introducing Eisenia foetida species of earthworms for 30 days and the cytogenetic effects were reinvestigated through V. faba root meristems. Chemical analysis carried out prior to vermicomposting revealed high concentrations of heavy metals such as Cr, Cu, Pb, Zn, and Ni in FCS samples. CS samples also showed the presence of these metals. Cytogenetic examinations of root meristems exposed to the FCS mixtures showed significant inhibition of mitotic index (MI), induction of chromosome aberrations (CA), and a significantly increased frequency of mitotic aberrations (MA). The increase of the aberrations was dependent on the flyash concentrations. Roots grown in CS samples also showed chromosomal and MAs; however, the percentage was lower than that observed with FCS and also statistically nonsignificant. Cytogenetic analysis of vermicomposted samples of FCS revealed a 15-45% decline in the aberration frequencies whereas chemical analysis showed a 10-50% decline in the metal concentrations, viz. Cr, Cu, Pb, Zn, and Ni, which indicates E. foetida a potential accumulator of heavy metals and the decline in metal concentrations may be the cause of the decrease in aberration frequencies. The present study indicates the genotoxicity potential of flyash and also the feasibility of vermicomposting for cleanup of metal-contaminated soil to mitigate the toxicity/genotoxicity.

  11. Environmental effects of dredging: Methods for the assessment of the genotoxic effects of environmental contaminants. Glossary and references. Technical notes

    SciTech Connect

    Honeycutt, M.E.; Jarvis, A.S.; McFarland, V.A.

    1995-07-01

    This technical note is the third in a series of three that outline and describe the principal methods that have been developed to test the potential of environmental contaminants to cause mutagenic, carcinogenic, and teratogenic effects. The first in this series (EEDP-04-24) describes methods used to discern genotoxic effects at the sub cellular level, while the second (EEDP-04-25) describes methods used to discern genotoxic effects at the cellular and organ/organism level. Recent literature citations for each topic referenced in this series of technical notes are provided in this technical note, in addition to a glossary of terms. The information in these technical notes is intended to provide Corps of Engineers personnel with a working knowledge of the terminology and conceptual basis of genotoxicity testing. To develop an improved understanding of the concepts of genotoxicity, readers are encouraged to review A Primer in Genotoxicity (Jarvis, Reilly, and Lutz 1993), presented in Volume D-93-3 of the Environmental Effects of Dredging information exchange bulletin.

  12. Genotoxic effects of the alkaloids harman and harmine assessed by comet assay and chromosome aberration test in mammalian cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Boeira, J M; da Silva, J; Erdtmann, B; Henriques, J A

    2001-12-01

    Harman and harmine are beta-carboline alkaloids which are present in plants widely used in medical practice, in beverages used for religious purposes in Brazil, as well as in tobacco smoke and over cooked food. In view of the controversial results observed in the literature about the mutagenic effects of these alkaloids, we studied their cytotoxic and genotoxic effects in V79 Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts in vitro using single-cell gel assay, Comet assay, either in the presence or in absence of an exogenous metabolic activation system (S9-mix), and by the chromosome aberration test without S9-mix. Harmine was more cytotoxic than harman. Both harman and harmine increased aberrant cell frequency and induced DNA damage by the Comet assay. These results suggest that harman and harmine are genotoxic in V79 cells, probably as a consequence of their ability to induce DNA strand breaks.

  13. Determination of genotoxic effects of Imazethapyr herbicide in Allium cepa root cells by mitotic activity, chromosome aberration, and comet assay.

    PubMed

    Liman, Recep; Ciğerci, İbrahim Hakkı; Öztürk, Nur Serap

    2015-02-01

    Imazethapyr (IM) is an imidazolinone herbicide that is currently used for broad-spectrum weed control in soybean and other legume crops. In this study, cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of IM were investigated by using mitotic index (MI), mitotic phases, chromosomal abnormalities (CAs) and DNA damage on the root meristem cells of Allium cepa. In Allium root growth inhibition test, EC50 value was determined as 20 ppm, and 0.5xEC50, EC50 and 2xEC50 concentrations of IM herbicide were introduced to onion tuber roots. Distilled water and methyl methane sulfonate (MMS, 10 mg/L) were used as a negative and positive control, respectively. As A. cepa cell cycle is 24 hours, so, application process was carried out for 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours. All the applied doses decreased MIs compared to control group and these declines were found to be statistically meaningful. Analysis of the chromosomes showed that 10 ppm IM except for 48 h induced CAs but 40 ppm IM except for 72 h decreased CAs. DNA damage was found significantly higher in 20 and 40 ppm of IM compared to the control in comet assay. These results indicated that IM herbicide exhibits cytotoxic activity but not genotoxic activity (except 10 ppm) and induced DNA damage in a dose dependent manner in A. cepa root meristematic cells.

  14. Genotoxic Effects of Culture Media on Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Prakash Bangalore, Megha; Adhikarla, Syama; Mukherjee, Odity; Panicker, Mitradas M.

    2017-01-01

    Culture conditions play an important role in regulating the genomic integrity of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells (HPSCs). We report that HPSCs cultured in Essential 8 (E8) and mTeSR, two widely used media for feeder-free culturing of HPSCs, had many fold higher levels of ROS and higher mitochondrial potential than cells cultured in Knockout Serum Replacement containing media (KSR). HPSCs also exhibited increased levels of 8-hydroxyguanosine, phospho-histone-H2a.X and p53, as well as increased sensitivity to γ-irradiation in these two media. HPSCs in E8 and mTeSR had increased incidence of changes in their DNA sequence, indicating genotoxic stress, in addition to changes in nucleolar morphology and number. Addition of antioxidants to E8 and mTeSR provided only partial rescue. Our results suggest that it is essential to determine cellular ROS levels in addition to currently used criteria i.e. pluripotency markers, differentiation into all three germ layers and normal karyotype through multiple passages, in designing culture media. PMID:28176872

  15. An evidence-based review of the genotoxic and reproductive effects of sulfur mustard.

    PubMed

    Khan, Fazlullah; Niaz, Kamal; Ismail Hassan, Fatima; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2017-03-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a chemical warfare agent which is cytotoxic in nature, and at the molecular level, SM acts as DNA alkylating agent leading to genotoxic and reproductive effects. Mostly, the exposed areas of the body are the main targets for SM; however, it also adversely affects various tissues of the body and ultimately exhibits long-term complications including genotoxic and reproductive effects, even in the next generations. The effect of SM on reproductive system is the reason behind male infertility. The chronic genotoxic and reproductive complications of SM have been observed in the next generation, such as reproductive hormones disturbances, testicular atrophy, deficiency of sperm cells, retarded growth of sperm and male infertility. SM exerts toxic effects through various mechanisms causing reproductive dysfunction. The key mechanisms include DNA alkylation, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) depletion. However, the exact molecular mechanism of such long-term effects of SM is still unclear. In general, DNA damage, cell death and defects in the cell membrane are frequently observed in SM-exposed individuals. SM can activate various cellular and molecular mechanisms related to oxidative stress (OS) and inflammatory responses throughout the reproductive system, which can cause decreased spermatogenesis and impaired sperm quality via damage to tissue function and structure. Moreover, the toxic effects of SM on the reproductive system as well as the occurrence of male infertility among exposed war troopers in the late exposure phase is still uncertain. The chronic effects of SM exposure in parents can cause congenital defects in their children. In this review, we aimed to investigate chronic genotoxic and reproductive effects of SM and their molecular mechanisms in the next generations.

  16. No-observed effect levels for carcinogenicity and for in vivo mutagenicity of a genotoxic carcinogen.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, Manabu; Morimura, Keiichirou; Wanibuchi, Hideki; Wei, Min; Okochi, Eriko; Ushijima, Toshikazu; Takaoka, Kunio; Fukushima, Shoji

    2004-10-01

    To elucidate the relationship between in vivo carcinogenic and mutagenic potentials of genotoxic carcinogens, low doses were tested in the livers of Big Blue transgenic rats with 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx). Male Big Blue rats were fed a diet containing 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1, 10, or 100 ppm of MeIQx for 16 weeks, and the frequencies of lacI mutants and glutathione S-transferase placental form (GST-P) positive foci in the liver were determined. The mutation frequencies significantly increased at doses of 10 and 100 ppm, and GST-P positive foci significantly increased at a dose of 100 ppm. However, no statistical increases in both frequencies were observed at lower doses. MeIQx most frequently induced G frameshifts, followed by G to T transversions. Thus, no observed effect level (NOEL) was demonstrated for both carcinogenicity in terms of preneoplastic lesion induction and in vivo mutagenicity of MeIQx, and the NOEL for in vivo mutagenicity was lower than that for carcinogenicity.

  17. Inhibition of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine induced colon genotoxicity in rats by the administration of probiotic curd.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arvind; Singh, Nikhlesh Kumar; Sinha, Pushpalata Rabindra

    2010-03-01

    Epidemiologic and experimental studies suggest that the probiotic organisms are effective in preventing colon carcinogenesis, which is the major cause of mortality and morbidity in western countries. Keeping this in view, a curd (a common Indian fermented milk product) was prepared by the addition of probiotic cultures Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei and curd culture Lactococcus lactis biovar. diacetylactis. In present study, we have evaluated the anti tumor effect of probiotic curd by monitoring the DNA damage through comet assay. The rats were allocated to four groups, first group was DMH control group, second group was probiotic curd group in which probiotic curd was given along with DMH (1,2-dimethylhydrazine) injection, third group was normal curd group in which normal curd was given along with DMH injection and fourth group was normal control group. Animals received subcutaneous injection of DMH dissolved in normal saline at a dose rate of 20 mg/kg body weight, once weekly for 15 weeks. The rats were dissected at 40th week of experiment and comet assay was done in colonic cells to assess the DNA damage. A significant reduction in DNA damage (54.7%) was observed in probiotic curd group as compared to DMH control group (88.1%). The probiotic curd was effective to significantly reduce the L:W ratio in comparison to DMH control group and normal curd. The results of present study show the protective effects of probiotic curd against DMH induced genotoxicity in colonic cells.

  18. Effects of boric acid and borax on titanium dioxide genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Turkez, Hasan

    2008-07-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) is a potential carcinogenic/mutagenic agent although it is used in many areas including medical industries and cosmetics. Boron (as boric acid and borax) has also well-described biological effects and therapeutic benefits. In a previous study, sister-chromatid exchanges (SCEs) and micronuclei (MN) rates were assessed in control and TiO(2)-treated (1, 2, 3, 5, 7.5 and 10 microm) human whole blood cultures. The results showed that the rates of SCE (at 2, 3, 5, 7.5 and 10 microm) and MN (at 5, 7.5 and 10 microm) formation in peripheral lymphocytes were increased significantly by TiO(2) compared with the controls. The present study also investigated the genetic effects of boric acid and borax (2.5, 5 and 10 microm) on cultures with and without TiO(2) addition. No significant increase in SCE and MN frequencies were observed at all concentrations of boron compounds. However, TiO(2)-induced SCE and MN could be reduced significantly by the presence of boric acid and borax. In conclusion, this study indicated for the first time that boric acid and borax led to an increased resistance of DNA to damage induced by TiO(2).

  19. Silica nanoparticles and biological dispersants: genotoxic effects on A549 lung epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, David M.; Varet, Julia; Johnston, Helinor; Chrystie, Alison; Stone, Vicki

    2015-10-01

    Silica nanoparticle exposure could be intentional (e.g. medical application or food) or accidental (e.g. occupational inhalation). On entering the body, particles become coated with specific proteins depending on the route of entry. The ability of silica particles of different size and charge (non-functionalized 50 and 200 nm and aminated 50 and 200 nm) to cause genotoxic effects in A549 lung epithelial cells was investigated. Using the modified comet assay and the micronucleus assay, we examined the effect of suspending the particles in different dispersion media [RPMI or Hanks' balanced salt solution (HBSS), supplemented with bovine serum albumin (BSA), lung lining fluid (LLF) or serum] to determine if this influenced the particle's activity. Particle characterisation suggested that the particles were reasonably well dispersed in the different media, with the exception of aminated 50 nm particles which showed evidence of agglomeration. Plain 50, 200 nm and aminated 50 nm particles caused significant genotoxic effects in the presence of formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase when dispersed in HBSS or LLF. These effects were reduced when the particles were dispersed in BSA and serum. There was no significant micronucleus formation produced by any of the particles when suspended in any of the dispersants. The data suggest that silica particles can produce a significant genotoxic effect according to the comet assay in A549 cells, possibly driven by an oxidative stress-dependent mechanism which may be modified depending on the choice of dispersant employed.

  20. Genotoxic Effects of Superconducting Static Magnetic Fields (SMFs) on Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Pollen Mother Cells (PMCs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pingping; Yin, Ruochun; Chen, Zhiyou; Wu, Lifang; Yu, Zengliang

    2007-04-01

    The effects of superconducting static magnetic fields (SMFs) on the pollen mother cells (PMCs) of wheat were investigated in order to evaluate the possible genotoxic effect of such non-ionizing radiation. The seeds of wheat were exposed to static magnetic fields with either different magnetic flux densities (0, 1, 3, 5 and 7 Tesla) for 5 h or different durations (1, 3 and 5 h) at a magnetic flux density of 7 Tesla. The seeds were germinated at 23oC after exposure and the seedlings were transplanted into the field. The PMCs from young wheat ears were taken and slides were made following the conventional method. The genotoxic effect was evaluated in terms of micronucleus (MN), chromosomal bridge, lagging chromosome and fragments in PMCs. Although the exposed groups of a low field intensity (below 5 Tesla) showed no statistically significant difference in the aberration frequency compared with the unexposed control groups and sham exposed groups, a significant increase in the chromosomal bridge, lagging chromosome, triple-polar segregation or micronucleus was observed at a field strength of 5 Tesla or 7 Tesla, respectively. The analysis of dose-effect relationships indicated that the increased frequency of meiotic abnormal cells correlated with the flux density of the magnetic field and duration, but no linear relationship was observed. Such statistically significant differences indicated a potential genotoxic effect of high static magnetic fields above 5 T.

  1. Comparison of genotoxic and inflammatory effects of particles generated by wood combustion, a road simulator and collected from street and subway.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Hanna L; Ljungman, Anders G; Lindbom, John; Möller, Lennart

    2006-09-10

    The health effects of exposure to airborne particles are of increasing concern in society. In order to protect public health, a clarification of the toxic properties of particles from different sources is of importance. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the genotoxicity and the ability to induce inflammatory mediators of nine different particle types from wood and pellets combustion, from tire-road wear and collected from an urban street and a subway station. The comet assay was used to assess genotoxicity after exposure of the human lung cell line A549. Inflammatory effects were measured as induction of IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-alpha after exposure of human macrophages. We found that all particles tested caused DNA damage and those from the subway caused more damage than the other particles (p<0.001) likely due to redox-active iron. In contrast, particles collected from an urban street were most potent to induce inflammatory cytokines. Particles from tire-road wear collected using a road simulator were genotoxic and able to induce cytokines. Finally, more effective combustion of wood led to less emission of particles, but those emitted did not show less toxicity in this study.

  2. The Combined Toxic and Genotoxic Effects of Cd and As to Plant Bioindicator Trifolium repens L

    PubMed Central

    Ghiani, Alessandra; Fumagalli, Pietro; Nguyen Van, Tho; Gentili, Rodolfo; Citterio, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate combined toxic and genotoxic effects of cadmium (Cd) and arsenic (As) on white clover, a pollutant sensitive plant frequently used as environmental bioindicator. Plants were exposed to soil spiked with increasing concentrations of cadmium sulfate (20, 40 and 60 mg Kg−1) or sodium arsenite (5, 10 and 20 mg Kg−1) as well as with their combinations. Metal(loid) bioavailability was assessed after soil contamination, whereas plant growth, metal(loid) concentration in plant organs and DNA damage were measured at the end of plant exposition. Results showed that individual and joint toxicity and genotoxicity were related to the concentration of Cd and As measured in plant organs, and that As concentration was the most relevant variable. Joint effects on plant growth were additive or synergistic, whereas joint genotoxic effects were additive or antagonistic. The interaction between Cd and As occurred at both soil and plant level. In soil the presence of As limited the bioavailability of Cd, whereas the presence of Cd increased the bioavailability of As. Nevertheless only As biovailability determined the amount of As absorbed by plants. The amount of Cd absorbed by plant was not linearly correlated with the fraction of bioavailable Cd in soil suggesting the involvement of additional factors, such as plant uptake mechanisms. These results reveal that the simultaneous presence in soil of Cd and As, although producing an additive or synergistic toxic effect on Trifolium repens L. growth, generates a lower DNA damage. PMID:24914541

  3. Anti-genotoxic effects in mice after the interaction between coffee and dietary constituents.

    PubMed

    Abraham, S K

    1996-01-01

    The interaction between coffee (100 mg freeze-dried home brew/kg body weight) and dietary constituents was assessed for anti-genotoxic effects against cyclophosphamide, N-methyl-N-nitro-N- nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), N-nitroso-N-ethylurea, mitomycin C and urethane (URE) in the mouse bone marrow micronucleus test. Combinations of dietary constituents consisting of (1) chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, ellagic acid and ferulic acid, (2) beta-carotene, curcumin and alpha-tocopherol, (3) chlorogenic acid, curcumin, alpha-tocopherol, anethole and eugenol, and (4) beta-carotene, curcumin, ellagic acid and chlorogenic acid were used in this study. Before the genotoxin was injected i.p., identical groups of mice were orally administered either vehicle control, coffee, dietary constituents, or coffee plus dietary constituents. Co-administration of coffee with the dietary constituents enhanced the anti-genotoxic effect compared with that of either coffee or the dietary constituents alone. Two-factor analysis of variance of the data suggests that there is a significant synergistic interaction between coffee and the dietary constituents for anti-genotoxic effects against MNNG (combination 1 and 2) and URE (combination 4).

  4. Genotoxic effects of water pollution on two fish species living in Karasu River, Erzurum, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Yazıcı, Zehra; Sişman, Turgay

    2014-11-01

    Karasu River, which is the only river in the Erzurum plain, is the source of the Euphrates River (Eastern Anatolia of Turkey). The river is in a serious environmental situation as a result of pollution by agricultural and industrial sewage and domestic discharges. The present study aims to evaluate genotoxic effects of toxic metals in chub, Leuciscus cephalus, and transcaucasian barb, Capoeta capoeta, collected from contaminated site of the Karasu River, in comparison with fish from an unpolluted reference site. Heavy metal concentrations in surface water of the river were determined. The condition factor (CF) was taken as a general biomarker of the health of the fish, and genotoxicity assays such as micronucleus (MN) and other nuclear abnormalities (NA) were carried out on the fish species studied. MN and NA such as kidney-shaped nucleus, notched nucleus, binucleated, lobed nucleus, and blebbed nucleus were assessed in peripheral blood erythrocytes, gill epithelial cells, and liver cells of the fish. A significant decrease in CF values associated with a significant elevation in MN and NA frequencies was observed in fish collected from the polluted sites compared with those from the reference site. Results of the current study show the significance of integrating a set of biomarkers to identify the effects of anthropogenic pollution. High concentrations of heavy metals have a potential genotoxic effects, and the toxicity is possibly related to industrial, agricultural, and domestic activities.

  5. Inhibition of cadmium- induced genotoxicity and histopathological changes in Nile tilapia fish by Egyptian and Tunisian montmorillonite clay.

    PubMed

    Mahrous, Karima F; Hassan, Aziza M; Radwan, Hasnaa A; Mahmoud, M A

    2015-09-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is an important inorganic toxicant widely distributed in the environment because of its various industrial uses. The aims of the current study were to investigate the efficacy of purified Egyptian and Tunisian montmorillonite clays (EMC and TMC) to inhibit genotoxicity and histological alterations induced by cadmium chloride (CdCl2) utilizing the Nile tilapia fish as an in vivo model. Chromosomal aberrations (CAs), micronucleus (MN) frequencies and DNA fingerprinting profile were genotoxic end points and histopathological changes that were used in this investigation. Six groups of fish were treated for 2 weeks and included control group, CdCl2-treated group and groups treated with EMC or TMC alone or in combination with CdCl2. The present results revealed that, treatment of fish with CdCl2 exhibited significant increased in the number of micronucleated erythrocytes (MnRBCs), frequency of CAs and instability of genomic DNA. Treatment of EMC and TMC in combination with CdCl2 significantly reduced the frequency of MnRBCs by the percentage of 53.28% and 60.77% and the frequency of CAs by 43.91% and 52.17% respectively. As well as, normalized DNA fingerprinting profile and significantly improved histopathological picture induced by Cadmium treatment. It is worth mention that both clays have the ability to tightly bind CdCl2 and decreased its cytotoxicity and genotoxicity; however, Tunisian clay was more efficient in binding with the CdCl2 than Egyptian clay.

  6. Single Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation Induces Genotoxicity in Adult Zebrafish and its Non-Irradiated Progeny.

    PubMed

    Lemos, J; Neuparth, T; Trigo, M; Costa, P; Vieira, D; Cunha, L; Ponte, F; Costa, P S; Metello, L F; Carvalho, A P

    2017-02-01

    This study investigated to what extent a single exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation can induce genotoxic damage in irradiated adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) and its non-irradiated F1 progeny. Four groups of adult zebrafish were irradiated with a single dose of X-rays at 0 (control), 100, 500 and 1000 mGy, respectively, and couples of each group were allowed to reproduce following irradiation. Blood of parental fish and whole-body offspring were analysed by the comet assay for detection of DNA damage. The level of DNA damage in irradiated parental fish increased in a radiation dose-dependent manner at day 1 post-irradiation, but returned to the control level thereafter. The level of DNA damage in the progeny was directly correlated with the parental irradiation dose. Results highlight the genotoxic risk of a single exposure to low-dose ionizing radiation in irradiated individuals and also in its non-irradiated progeny.

  7. Genotoxic effects of Bismuth (III) oxide nanoparticles by Allium and Comet assay.

    PubMed

    Liman, Recep

    2013-09-01

    Genotoxic effects of Bismuth (III) oxide nanoparticles (BONPs) were investigated on the root cells of Allium cepa by Allium and Comet assay. A. cepa roots were treated with the aqueous dispersions of BONPs at five different concentrations (12.5, 25, 50, 75, and 100ppm) for 4h. Exposure of BONPs significantly increased mitotic index (MI) except 12.5ppm, total chromosomal aberrations (CAs) in Allium test. While stickiness chromosome laggards, disturbed anaphase-telophase and anaphase bridges were observed in anaphase-telophase cells, pro-metaphase and c-metaphase in other cells. A significant increase in DNA damage was also observed at all concentrations of BONPs except 12.5ppm by Comet assay. The results were also analyzed statistically by using SPSS for Windows; Duncan's multiple range test was performed. These results indicate that BONPs exhibit genotoxic activity in A. cepa root meristematic cells.

  8. Genotoxic effects of commercial formulations of Chlorpyrifos and Tebuconazole on green algae.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Ricardo Santiago; Di Marzio, Walter Darío; Sáenz, María Elena

    2015-01-01

    The alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis assay (comet assay) was used for the study of the genotoxic effects of insecticide Chlorpyrifos and fungicide Tebuconazole (commercial formulations) on two freshwater green algae species, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Nannocloris oculata, after 24 h of exposure. The percentage of DNA in tail of migrating nucleoids was taken as an endpoint of DNA impairment. Cell viability was measured by fluorometric detection of chlorophyll "a" in vivo and the determination of cell auto-fluorescence. Only the higher concentration of Chlorpyrifos tested resulted to affect significantly the cell viability of P. subcapitata, whereas cells of N. oculata were not affected. Tebuconazole assayed concentrations (3 and 6 mg/l) did not affect cell viability of both species. The results of comet assay on P. subcapitata showed that Chlorpyrifos concentration evaluated (0.8 mg/l) exerted a genotoxic effects; while for the other specie a concentration of 10 mg/l was needed. Tebuconazole was genotoxic at 3 and 6 mg/l for both species. The comet assay evidenced damage at the level of DNA simple strains molecule at pesticide concentrations were cytotoxicity was not evident, demonstrating that algae are models to take into account in ecological risk assessments for aquatic environments.

  9. In vitro evaluation of genotoxic effects under magnetic resonant coupling wireless power transfer.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Kohei; Shinohara, Naoki; Miyakoshi, Junji

    2015-04-07

    Wireless power transfer (WPT) technology using the resonant coupling phenomenon has been widely studied, but there are very few studies concerning the possible relationship between WPT exposure and human health. In this study, we investigated whether exposure to magnetic resonant coupling WPT has genotoxic effects on WI38VA13 subcloned 2RA human fibroblast cells. WPT exposure was performed using a helical coil-based exposure system designed to transfer power with 85.4% efficiency at a 12.5-MHz resonant frequency. The magnetic field at the positions of the cell culture dishes is approximately twice the reference level for occupational exposure as stated in the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) guidelines. The specific absorption rate at the positions of the cell culture dishes matches the respective reference levels stated in the ICNIRP guidelines. For assessment of genotoxicity, we studied cell growth, cell cycle distribution, DNA strand breaks using the comet assay, micronucleus formation, and hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene mutation, and did not detect any significant effects between the WPT-exposed cells and control cells. Our results suggest that WPT exposure under the conditions of the ICNIRP guidelines does not cause detectable cellular genotoxicity.

  10. Cyto-/genotoxic effect of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots in human lung adenocarcinoma cells for potential photodynamic UV therapy applications.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young Joo; Kim, Yang Jee; Lee, Joong Won; Lee, Younghyun; Lim, Yong-Beom; Chung, Hai Won

    2012-03-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are luminescent nanoparticles (NPs) with promising potential in numerous medical applications, but there remain persistent human health and safety concerns. Although the cytotoxic effects of QDs have been extensively investigated, their genotoxic effects remain under-explored. This study scrutinized the cyto- and genotoxic effects of QDs with a Cadmium selenide/Zinc sulfide (CdSe/ZnS) core/shell, and suggests comprehensive guidelines for the application of QDs in cancer therapy. QDs were used to treat A549 cells in the presence and absence of ultraviolet A/B (UVA/UVB) irradiation. QD-induced cell death was evaluated by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), apoptosis, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays, as well as by real-time PCR analysis of differential mRNA levels of genes, such as ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), p53, and caspase-9, involved in apoptosis. The genotoxic effect of CdSe/ZnS QDs was measured in human cancer cells, for the first time, by comet and micronucleus assays. Treatment with CdSe/ZnS QDs and UVB irradiation resulted in the most severe extent of cell death, indicating strong induction of phototoxicity by CdSe/ZnS QDs in the presence of UVB. Both apoptotic and necrotic cell death were observed upon QDs and UVB combined treatment. The induction of Olive tail moments and micronuclei formation was also most significant when CdSe/ZnS QDs and UVB irradiation were combined. Our results on the genotoxic effect and mechanistic details of CdSe/ZnS QD-induced cell death suggest that UVB irradiation is the most effective method for increasing the potency of QDs during photodynamic cancer therapy.

  11. Environmental effects of dredging, initial comparisons of six assays for the assessment of sediment genotoxicity. Technical note

    SciTech Connect

    McFarland, V.A.; Honeycutt, M.; Jarvis, S.

    1995-01-01

    This technical note reports and compares initial results of six genotoxicity bioassays applied to dredged sediments and describes progress toward development of a testing protocol to aid in regulatory decisionmaking when genotoxic chemicals are an issue of concern. The Long-term Effects of Dredging Operations Program work unit Genotoxicity of Contaminated Dredged Material was initiated in fiscal year 1990 to develop methods for assessing the genotoxic potential of dredged sediments. The impetus driving this new research and development effort was specific regulatory language in section 103 of the Ocean Dumping Act (Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act (MPRSA) of 1972) prohibiting the open-water discharge of mutagenic, carcinogenic, or teratogenic substances in other than trace amounts, and language less specific but of similar intent in section 404 of the Clean Water Act (CWA).

  12. Copper-induced oxidative damage, antioxidant response and genotoxicity in Lycopersicum esculentum Mill. and Cucumis sativus L.

    PubMed

    İşeri, Özlem Darcansoy; Körpe, Didem Aksoy; Yurtcu, Erkan; Sahin, Feride Iffet; Haberal, Mehmet

    2011-09-01

    Adequate copper (Cu(2+)) concentrations are required for plants; however, at higher concentrations it can also cause multiple toxic effects. In the present study, lipid peroxidation, hydrogen peroxide levels as well as ascorbate peroxidase (APX: EC 1/11/1/11) and catalase (CAT: EC 1.11.1.6) activities were determined in Lycopersicum esculentum Mill. and Cucumis sativus L. seedlings after 7-day exposure to copper sulfate. In addition, DNA damage in these two crops was assessed by measuring micronucleus (MN) frequency and tail moments (TM) as determined by Comet assay. Inhibitory copper concentrations (EC(50): 30 and 5.5 ppm for L. esculentum and C. sativus, respectively) were determined according to dose-dependent root inhibition curves, and EC(50) and 2×EC(50) were applied. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and H(2)O(2) levels significantly increased in all groups studied. CAT activity increased in treatment groups of C. sativus. APX activity increased in L. esculentum seedlings due to 2×EC(50) treatment. Reductions in mitotic indices (MI) represented Cu(2+)dependent root growth inhibition in all treatment groups studied. According to TMs and MN frequencies, copper exposure induced significant DNA damage (p < 0.05) in all study groups, whereas the DNA damage induced was dose dependent in C. sativus roots. In conclusion, Cu(2+)induced oxidative damage, elevations in H(2)O(2) levels and alterations in APX and CAT activities, as well as significant DNA damage in nuclei of both study groups. To our knowledge, this is the first comparative and comprehensive study demonstrating the effects of copper on two different plant species at relevant cytotoxic concentrations at both biochemical and genotoxicity levels with multiple end points.

  13. No evidence for genotoxic effects from 24 h exposure of human leukocytes to 1.9 GHz radiofrequency fields.

    PubMed

    McNamee, J P; Bellier, P V; Gajda, G B; Lavallée, B F; Marro, L; Lemay, E; Thansandote, A

    2003-05-01

    The current study extends our previous investigations of 2-h radiofrequency (RF)-field exposures on genotoxicity in human blood cell cultures by examining the effect of 24-h continuous-wave (CW) and pulsed-wave (PW) 1.9 GHz RF-field exposures on both primary DNA damage and micronucleus induction in human leukocyte cultures. Mean specific absorption rates (SARs) ranged from 0 to 10 W/kg, and the temperature within the cultures was maintained at 37.0 +/- 1.0 degrees C for the duration of the 24-h exposure period. No significant differences in primary DNA damage were observed between the sham-treated controls and any of the CW or PW 1.9 GHz RF-field-exposed cultures when processed immediately after the exposure period by the alkaline comet assay. Similarly, no significant differences were observed in the incidence of micronuclei, incidence of micronucleated binucleated cells, frequency of binucleated cells, or proliferation index between the sham-treated controls and any of the CW or PW 1.9 GHz RF-field-exposed cultures. In conclusion, the current study found no evidence of 1.9 GHz RF-field-induced genotoxicity in human blood cell cultures after a 24-h exposure period.

  14. Long-term genotoxic effects of immunosuppressive drugs on lymphocytes of kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Lizotti Cilião, Heloísa; Batista de Oliveira Camargo-Godoy, Rossana; Mazzaron Barcelos, Gustavo Rafael; Zanuto, Amanda; Daher Alvares Delfino, Vinicius; de Syllos Cólus, Ilce Mara

    2016-08-01

    Immunosuppressive therapy can prevent rejection after organ transplantation. However, increased cancer risk is a serious complication among patients undergoing such therapy. We have evaluated whether prolonged use of immunosuppressive drugs is genotoxic. DNA instability was assessed, using the comet and micronucleus assays, in blood lymphocytes of 76 kidney transplant patients. DNA damage detected by the comet assay increased with time after transplantation. The estimated glomerular filtration rate of the patients did not influence the incidence of DNA damage. No association between micronucleated mononucleated cells and time elapsed after transplantation was observed. Our results suggest that prolonged use of immunosuppressive drugs in kidney transplant patients can induce genetic instability.

  15. Further evidence against a direct genotoxic mode of action for arsenic-induced cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Catherine B.; Leszczynska, Joanna; Hickey, Christina; Rossman, Toby G.

    2007-08-01

    Arsenic in drinking water, a mixture of arsenite and arsenate, is associated with increased skin and other cancers in Asia and Latin America, but not the United States. Arsenite alone in drinking water does not cause skin cancers in experimental animals; therefore, it is not a complete carcinogen in skin. We recently showed that low concentrations of arsenite enhanced the tumorigenicity of solar UV irradiation in hairless mice, suggesting arsenic cocarcinogenesis with sunlight in skin cancer and perhaps with different carcinogenic partners for lung and bladder tumors. Cocarcinogenic mechanisms could include blocking DNA repair, stimulating angiogenesis, altering DNA methylation patterns, dysregulating cell cycle control, induction of aneuploidy and blocking apoptosis. Arsenicals are documented clastogens but not strong mutagens, with weak mutagenic activity reported at highly toxic concentrations of inorganic arsenic. Previously, we showed that arsenite, but not monomethylarsonous acid (MMA[III]), induced delayed mutagenesis in HOS cells. Here, we report new data on the mutagenicity of the trivalent methylated arsenic metabolites MMA(III) and dimethylarsinous acid [DMA(III)] at the gpt locus in Chinese hamster G12 cells. Both methylated arsenicals seemed mutagenic with apparent sublinear dose responses. However, significant mutagenesis occurred only at highly toxic concentrations of MMA(III). Most mutants induced by MMA(III) and DMA(III) exhibited transgene deletions. Some non-deletion mutants exhibited altered DNA methylation. A critical discussion of cell survival leads us to conclude that clastogenesis occurs primarily at highly cytotoxic arsenic concentrations, casting further doubt as to whether a genotoxic mode of action (MOA) for arsenicals is supportable.

  16. Cdk5 activator-binding protein C53 regulates apoptosis induced by genotoxic stress via modulating the G2/M DNA damage checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hai; Luo, Shouqing; Li, Honglin

    2005-05-27

    In response to DNA damage, the cellular decision of life versus death involves an intricate network of multiple factors that play critical roles in regulation of DNA repair, cell cycle, and cell death. DNA damage checkpoint proteins are crucial for maintaining DNA integrity and normal cellular functions, but they may also reduce the effectiveness of cancer treatment. Here we report the involvement of Cdk5 activator p35-binding protein C53 in regulation of apoptosis induced by genotoxic stress through modulating Cdk1-cyclin B1 function. C53 was originally identified as a Cdk5 activator p35-binding protein and a caspase substrate. Importantly, our results demonstrated that C53 deficiency conferred partial resistance to genotoxic agents such as etoposide and x-ray irradiation, whereas ectopic expression of C53 rendered cells susceptible to multiple genotoxins that usually trigger G(2)/M arrest. Furthermore, we found that Cdk1 activity was required for etoposide-induced apoptosis of HeLa cells. Overexpression of C53 promoted Cdk1 activity and nuclear accumulation of cyclin B1, whereas C53 deficiency led to more cytoplasmic retention of cyclin B1, suggesting that C53 acts as a pivotal player in modulating the G(2)/M DNA damage checkpoint. Finally, C53 and cyclin B1 co-localize and associate in vivo, indicating a direct role of C53 in regulating the Cdk1-cyclin B1 complex. Taken together, our results strongly indicate that in response to genotoxic stress, C53 serves as an important regulatory component of the G(2)/M DNA damage checkpoint. By overriding the G(2)/M checkpoint-mediated inhibition of Cdk1-cyclin B1 function, ectopic expression of C53 may represent a novel approach for chemo- and radio-sensitization of cancer cells.

  17. Genotoxic effects of catmint (Nepeta meyeri Benth.) essential oils on some weed and crop plants.

    PubMed

    Kekeç, Güzin; Mutlu, Salih; Alpsoy, Lokman; Sakçali, M Serdal; Atici, Ökkes

    2013-07-01

    This study investigates the genotoxicity of the essential oils extracted from the aerial parts of catmint (Nepeta meyeri Benth.) against two weeds (Bromus danthoniae and Lactuca serriola) and two crop plants (Brassica napus and Zea mays). The essential oils of N. meyeri analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry contained 14 compounds, with 4aα, 7α, 7aβ-nepetalactone (83.4%), 4aα, 7α, and 7aα-nepetalactone (8.83%) as the major components. The oils were diluted (25, 50, 100, and 150 ppm) and the solutions were applied to seeds or leaves of these plants. The study compared the germination percentage and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) results with the control group. The results showed that the oils had a strong inhibitory activity and caused a change in RAPD profiles in terms of variation in band intensity, loss of bands, and appearance of new bands compared with the control group. The results suggested that RAPD analysis could be applied as a suitable biomarker assay for the detection of genotoxic effects of plant allelochemicals. This study indicates the genotoxical potential of N. meyeri essential oils on weed and crop plants.

  18. Evaluation of genotoxic effect of silver nanoparticles (Ag-Nps) in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavares, Priscila; Balbinot, Fernanda; de Oliveira, Hugo Martins; Fagundes, Gabriela Elibio; Venâncio, Mireli; Ronconi, João Vitor Vieira; Merlini, Aline; Streck, Emílio L.; da Silva Paula, Marcos Marques; de Andrade, Vanessa Moraes

    2012-03-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) are the most prominent nanoproducts. Due to their antimicrobial activity, they have been incorporated in different materials, such as catheters, clothes, electric home appliance, and many others. The genotoxicity of Ag-NPs (5-45 nm), in different concentrations and times of exposure, was evaluated by the comet assay in in vitro and in vivo conditions, respectively, using human peripheral blood and Swiss mice. The results showed the genotoxic effect of Ag-NPs in vitro , in all the doses tested in the initial hour of exposure, possibly through the reactive oxygen species generation. Nevertheless, the values for this damage decrease with time, indicating that the DNA may have been restored by the repair system. In the in vivo conditions, we found no genotoxicity of Ag-NPs in any hour of exposure and any dose investigated, which can be attributed to the activation of a cellular antioxidant network and the hydrophobic nature of Ag-NPs. Now, it is absolutely necessary to investigate the role of Ag-NPs in different cell lines in vivo.

  19. Assessing the genotoxicity of two commonly occurring byproducts of water disinfection: Chloral hydrate and bromal hydrate.

    PubMed

    Manasfi, Tarek; De Méo, Michel; Di Giorgio, Carole; Coulomb, Bruno; Boudenne, Jean-Luc

    2017-01-01

    Water disinfection treatments result in the formation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) that have been linked to adverse human health outcomes including higher incidence of bladder and colorectal cancer. However, data about the genotoxicity of DBPs is limited to only a small fraction of compounds. Chloral hydrate (CH) and bromal hydrate (BH) are two trihaloacetaldehydes commonly detected in disinfected waters, but little is known about their genotoxicity, especially BH. We investigated the genotoxicity of CH and BH using a test battery that includes three in vitro genotoxicity assays. We conducted the Ames test using Salmonella bacterial strains TA97a, TA98, TA100 and TA102, and the alkaline comet assay and the micronucleus test both using Chinese hamster ovary cells. We carried out the tests in the absence and presence of the metabolic fraction S9 mix. CH did not exhibit statistically significant genotoxic effects in any of the three assays. In contrast, BH exhibited mutagenic activity in the Salmonella strain TA100 and induced statistically significant DNA lesions in CHO cells as appeared in the comet assay. The genotoxic potential of BH in both assays decreased in the presence of the metabolic fraction S9 mix. BH did not induce chromosomal damage in CHO cells. Our results show that BH exhibited genotoxic activity by causing mutations and primary DNA damage while CH did not induce genotoxic effects. Our findings highlight concerns about the higher genotoxicity of brominated DBPs in comparison to their chlorinated analogues.

  20. Genotoxic effects of bisphenol A on somatic cells of female mice, alone and in combination with X-rays.

    PubMed

    Gajowik, Aneta; Radzikowska, Joanna; Dobrzyńska, Małgorzata M

    2013-10-09

    Bisphenol A (BPA), a monomer used in the manufacture of epoxy, polycarbonate, and polystyrene resins, is a xenoestrogen present in many consumer products. We investigated the effects of 2-week exposure to BPA, either alone or in combination with X-rays, on the induction of DNA damage in somatic cells of female mice in vivo. The micronucleus and alkaline comet assays were used to evaluate genotoxicity. BPA induced DNA strand breaks in lung cells but not in bone marrow lymphocytes, liver, kidney, or spleen cells. Induction of micronuclei was observed only in polychromatic reticulocytes of peripheral blood. Levels of damage following combination exposure to ionizing radiation plus BPA depended on tissue, assay, and time.

  1. Genotoxic effects of three selected black toner powders and their dimethyl sulfoxide extracts in cultured human epithelial A549 lung cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gminski, Richard; Decker, Katharina; Heinz, Christina; Seidel, Albrecht; Könczöl, Mathias; Goldenberg, Ella; Grobéty, Bernard; Ebner, Winfried; Gieré, Reto; Mersch-Sundermann, Volker

    2011-05-01

    Until now, the adverse effects of toner powders on humans have been considered to be minimal. However, several recent reports have suggested possible significant adverse health effects from toner dust inhalation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic potential of black toner powders in vitro. For the study of DNA damage, A549 cells were exposed to toner-powder suspensions and to their DMSO extracts, and then subjected to the comet assay and to the in-vitro cytokinesis block micronucleus test (CB-MNvit). Cytotoxic effects of the toner samples were assessed by the erythrosin B assay. Furthermore, size, shape, and composition of the toner powders were investigated. None of the three toner powders or their DMSO extracts reduced cell viability; however, they did induce DNA damage and formed micronuclei at concentrations from 80 to 400 μg cm(-2) , although to a varying extent. All toner powders contain considerable amounts of the pigments carbon black and magnetite (Fe(3) O(4) ) as well as small amounts of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The overall results of our in-vitro study suggest that the investigated toner-powder samples are not cytotoxic but genotoxic. From the results of the physical and chemical characterization, we conclude that metals and metalloids as components of magnetite, or PAHs as components of the carbon-bearing material, are responsible for the genotoxic effects. Further research is necessary to determine the relevance of these in-vitro observations for private and occupational toner powder exposure.

  2. Monitoring of genotoxicity in marine zooplankton induced by toxic metals in Ennore estuary, Southeast coast of India.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Prasun; Thirunavukkarasu, Subramani; Godhantaraman, Nallamuthu; Munuswamy, Natesan

    2014-11-15

    The present study provides preliminary in-situ data on genetic integrity of marine zooplankton. Paracalanus parvus, Oithona rigida and Euterpina acutifrons were collected during four different seasons (summer, pre-monsoon, monsoon and post-monsoon) from 2011 to 2012 in Ennore and Kovalum estuaries. DNA damage levels in different zooplankton were analyzed by comet assay and were correlated with different environmental stressors. Spatial and temporal variations in DNA damage was observed in all the species. Zooplankton from Ennore estuary showed significantly lower genetic integrity. Particulate, sediment, and zooplankton fractions of Pb, Ni, Cu, Cr and Co were associated with high DNA damage during the period of lowest pH, salinity and dissolved oxygen. Zn and Cd showed lower genotoxic impact than the other metals. Feeding modes strongly influenced the genetic integrity in the zooplankton species studied. These results support the use of comet assay as a tool in effectively monitoring genotoxicity in marine plankton communities.

  3. Effects of light on the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of benzo(a)pyrene and an oil refinery effluent in the newt

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, M.; l`Haridon, J.

    1994-12-31

    The genotoxicity and/or toxicity of benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) were evaluated under different lighting conditions in larvae and embryos of the newt Pleurodeles waltl. Visible light alone, UVA alone, or BaP alone had no toxic effects on the larvae. Conversely, toxic effects were observed in animals exposed to BaP + daylight, or BaP + UVA. The genotoxicity of BaP (50 ppb) was halved by its previous exposure to UVA, and was abolished at the lowest concentration (12.5 ppb). In other experiments, the larvae were exposed alternatively to BaP or Irr BaP (18 hours in dark) and UVA (6 hr in water), every day for 8 days. All animals that had accumulated non-irradiated BaP (50 ppb) showed signs of severe toxicity, and 90% died before the end of the test. On the other hand, irradiated BaP (50 ppb) was a 4-fold less toxic and half as genotoxic as non-irradiated BaP. In addition, exposure of the animals to UVA alone for 4 days prior to treatment with BaP did not affect the genotoxicity or toxicity of this hydrocarbon. In the dark, the embryotoxicity of BaP was markedly attenuated by the presence of the jelly coats. Although UVA alone did not affect growth of the embryos, the toxicity of BaP was enhanced by the combined action of the two agents together or in succession (BaP + UVA or BaP then UVA). Larvae were treated with an oil refinery effluent (EF). At 125 ml/l, EF was not found to be genotoxic in the dark. However, in animals exposed to both EF and UVA, there was a progressive increase in level of micronucleated erythrocytes with increasing duration of daily exposure to UVA. Moreover, the genotoxic potential of irradiated EF + UVA was systematically below that of non-irradiated EF + UVA for all durations of exposure to ultraviolet light. Irradiation of this type of effluent might help reduce its harmful effects on aquatic species. Our results also suggest that metabolic activation is not necessary for hydrocarbons to induce toxic effects. 51 refs., 5 tabs., 3 figs.

  4. Genotoxicity and Cytotoxicity Evaluation of the Neolignan Analogue 2-(4-Nitrophenoxy)-1Phenylethanone and its Protective Effect Against DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Hanusch, Alex Lucas; de Oliveira, Guilherme Roberto; de Sabóia-Morais, Simone Maria Teixeira; Machado, Rafael Cosme; dos Anjos, Murilo Machado; Chen Chen, Lee

    2015-01-01

    Neolignans are secondary metabolites found in various groups of Angiosperms. They belong to a class of natural compounds with great diversity of chemical structures and pharmacological activities. These compounds are formed by linking two phenylpropanoid units. Several compounds that have ability to prevent genetic damage have been isolated from plants, and can be used to prevent or delay the development of tumor cells. Genetic toxicology evaluation is widely used in risk assessment of new drugs in preclinical screening tests. In this study, we evaluated the genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of the neolignan analogue 2-(4-nitrophenoxy)-1-phenylethanone (4NF) and its protective effect against DNA damage using the mouse bone marrow micronucleus test and the comet assay in mouse peripheral blood. Our results showed that this neolignan analogue had no genotoxic activity and was able to reduce induced damage both in mouse bone marrow and peripheral blood. Although the neolignan analogue 4NF was cytotoxic, it reduced cyclophosphamide-induced cytotoxicity. In conclusion, it showed no genotoxic action, but exhibited cytotoxic, antigenotoxic, and anticytotoxic activities. PMID:26554835

  5. Toxic effects of 4-methylthio-3-butenyl isothiocyanate (Raphasatin) in the rat urinary bladder without genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Isamu; Cho, Young-Man; Hirata, Tadashi; Toyoda, Takeshi; Akagi, Jun-Ichi; Nakamura, Yasushi; Sasaki, Azusa; Nakamura, Takako; Okamoto, Shigehisa; Shirota, Koji; Suetome, Noboru; Nishikawa, Akiyoshi; Ogawa, Kumiko

    2017-04-01

    We recently reported that 4-methylthio-3-butenyl isothiocyanate (MTBITC) exerts chemopreventive effects on the rat esophageal carcinogenesis model at a low dose of 80 ppm in a diet. In contrast, some isothiocyanates (ITCs) have been reported to cause toxic effects, promotion activity, and/or carcinogenic potential in the urinary bladder of rats. In the present study, we investigated whether MTBITC had toxic effects in the urinary bladder similar to other ITCs, such as phenethyl ITC (PEITC). First, to examine the early toxicity of MTBITC, rats were fed a diet supplemented with 100, 300 or 1000 ppm MTBITC for 14 days. Treatment with 1000 ppm MTBITC caused increased organ weights and histopathological changes in the urinary bladder, producing lesions similar to those of 1000 ppm PEITC. In contrast, rats treated with 100 or 300 ppm MTBITC showed no signs of toxicity. Additionally, we performed in vivo genotoxicity studies to clarify whether MTBITC may exhibit a carcinogenic potential through a genotoxic mechanism in rats. Rats were treated with MTBITC for 3 days at doses of 10, 30 or 90 mg kg(-1) body weight by gavage, and comet assays in the urinary bladder and micronucleus assays in the bone marrow were performed. No genotoxic changes were observed after treatment with MTBITC at all doses. Overall, these results suggested that the effects of MTBITC in the rat urinary bladder are less than those of PEITC, but that MTBITC could have toxic effects through a nongenotoxic mechanism in the urinary bladder of rats at high doses. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. [Research Progress in Genotoxic Effects of Degradation Products, Cobalt, Chromium Ions and Nanoparticles from Metal-on-metal Prostheses on Cells].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hao; Han, Qinglin; Liu, Fan

    2015-04-01

    Cobalt or chromium alloys are the most common clinical materials of prosthesis and there have been some investigators at home and abroad have done related researches about the genotoxic effects of cobalt and chromium ions and nanoparticles. People have certain understanding about the mechanism of production of ions as well as their influence on cells. However, chromium or cobalt nanoparticles genotoxicity related research is still in its preliminary stage. In each stage, the mechanisms, from creating of the particles, through entering cells, until finally causing genotoxic, are still contained many problems to be solved. This article reviews the research progress in mechanisms of production and genotoxic effects of cobalt, chromium ions and nanoparticles.

  7. Monitoring of benzene-exposed workers for genotoxic effects of benzene: improved-working-condition-related decrease in the frequencies of chromosomal aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Tompa, A; Major, J; Jakab, M G

    1994-01-16

    The genotoxic effects of benzene were assessed in peripheral blood lymphocytes of 49 workers occupationally exposed to benzene (3-68.7 mg/m3 in the work environment) for 0-2, 2-10 and more than 10 years (10, 22 and 17 workers, respectively). Chromosomal aberrations, SCEs and UV-induced DNA synthesis were used as indicators of genotoxic effects. Most of the workers were followed up in 1991 and 1992, while the benzene concentrations were reduced to 1-18.4 mg/m3 air. Considered overall, in the "exposed" groups, the frequencies of chromosomal aberrations were significantly higher than in controls thus providing evidence for the clastogenic effects of benzene. However, there seems to be no correlation between aberration frequencies and the duration of prior exposure to benzene. In 1991 and 1992, when the benzene concentrations were brought down, there was a concomitant decrease in the frequencies of chromosomal aberrations; in 1992 the decrease reached one third to one half of the initial frequencies, values still higher than in the controls. With the other genotoxic end-points, the changes were small and not consistent.

  8. Evaluation of the in vivo genotoxic effects of gamma radiation on the peripheral blood leukocytes of head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kadam, Samit B; Shyama, Soorambail K; Almeida, Valentine G

    2013-04-15

    The present study aimed to evaluate the genotoxic effects of ionizing radiation on non-target cells of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (HNSCC) patients exposed to various cumulative doses of gamma rays during radiotherapy. The ten patients (P1-P10) were treated with cobalt 60 gamma radiation (External Beam Radiotherapy) for a period of five to six weeks with a daily fraction of 2Gy for 5 days each week. The genotoxic effects of radiation (single strand breaks - SSBs) in these patients were analyzed using the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) technique, with the Olive Tail Moment (OTM) as the critical parameter. A sample of each patient's peripheral blood before starting with radiotherapy (pre-therapy) served as the control, and blood collected at weekly time intervals during the course of the radiotherapy served as treated (10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60Gy) samples. In vivo radiosensitivity of these patients, as indicated by SSB's after the cumulative radiation doses at the various times, was assessed using Student's t-test. Significant DNA damage relative to the individual patient's pre-therapy baseline data was observed in all patients. Inter-individual variation of the genotoxic effects was analyzed using two-way ANOVA. The correlation between doses for the means of smoker and non-smoker patients was calculated using the Pearson test. The results of this study may indicate the need to reduce the daily radiotherapy dose further to prevent genotoxic effects on non-target cells, thus improving safety. Furthermore, these results may indicate that the estimation of DNA damage following exposure to a gamma radiation, as measured by the comet assay in whole blood leukocytes, can be used to screen human populations for radiation-induced genetic damage at the molecular level.

  9. High-throughput genotoxicity assay identifies antioxidants as inducers of DNA damage response and cell death

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human ATAD5 is an excellent biomarker for identifying genotoxic compounds because ATADS protein levels increase post-transcriptionally following exposure to a variety of DNA damaging agents. Here we report a novel quantitative high-throughput ATAD5-Iuciferase assay that can moni...

  10. Cytogenetic and genotoxic effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles on root cells of Allium cepa.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Mamta; Khan, S Sudheer; Pakrashi, Sunandan; Mukherjee, Amitava; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan

    2011-06-15

    Increasing use of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NP) in consumer products may enhance its release into the environment. Phytotoxicity study is important to understand its possible environmental impact. Allium cepa (Onion bulb) is the best model organism to study genetic toxicology of nanoparticles. Here we have reported cytogenetic and genotoxic effects of ZnO NPs on the root cells of A. cepa. The effects of ZnO NPs on the mitotic index (MI), micronuclei index (MN index), chromosomal aberration index, and lipid peroxidation were determined through the hydroponic culturing of A. cepa. A. cepa roots were treated with the dispersions of ZnO NPs at four different concentrations (25, 50, 75, and 100 μg ml(-1)). With the increasing concentrations of ZnO NPs MI decreased with the increase of pycnotic cells, on the other hand MN and chromosomal aberration index increased. The frequency of micronucleated cells was higher in ZnO NPs treated cells as compared to control (deionized distilled water). The number of cells in each mitotic phase changed upon ZnO NPs treatment. The effect of ZnO NPs on lipid peroxidation as examined by measuring TBARS concentration was evident at all the concentrations compared to bulk ZnO. The TEM image showed internalization of ZnO NPs like particles. SEM image of treated A. cepa demonstrated that the internalized nanoparticles agglomerated depending on the physico-chemical environment inside the cell. Our results demonstrated that ZnO NPs can be a clastogenic/genotoxic and cytotoxic agent. In conclusion, the A. cepa cytogenetic test can be used for the genotoxicity monitoring of novel nanomaterials like ZnO NPs, which is used in many consumer products.

  11. Cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of extract of particulate emission from a gasoline-powered engine

    SciTech Connect

    Hadnagy, W.; Seemayer, N.H.

    1988-01-01

    Extract of particulate matter (EPM) from gasoline engine exhaust has been investigated for cytotoxic and genotoxic effects in the concentration range 0.16-10 micrograms/ml by means of short-term bioassays using mammalian cell culture systems. Cytotoxicity is demonstrated by a strong dose-dependent reduction of cloning efficiency after treatment of V79 cells with EPM. Employing the dye exclusion test with erythrosin B, no considerable loss of cell viability was observed. Using the same cell system, EPM revealed a highly increased number of aberrant mitoses, whereby the occurrence of C mitoses and metaphases with chromosome clusters was especially pronounced. This effect led to mitotic arrest as shown by a highly increased mitotic index at 5 and 10 micrograms/ml EPM. The results indicate disturbances of the mitotic spindle in a way similar to the known spindle poison colcemid. As a consequence of spindle disturbances, EPM produced numerical chromosome alterations such as aneuploidy and polyploidy. Cytogenetic analyses using human lymphocyte cultures treated with EPM revealed a slight increase of chromosomal aberrations at 10 micrograms/ml and a dose-dependent induction of sister chromatid exchanges in the range 2.5-10 micrograms/ml. At least, EPM showed a dose-dependent increase in the cell transformation assay using SV 40-infected Syrian hamster kidney cultures. The great variety of cytotoxic and genotoxic effects found with EPM suggests a potential health hazard to human populations exposed to gasoline engine exhaust. The possible contribution to cytotoxic and genotoxic activity by organolead compounds derived from antiknock additives is discussed.

  12. Synergistic and antagonistic effects on genotoxicity of chemicals commonly found in hazardous waste sites

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, T.H.; Sandhu, S.S.; Peng, Y.; Chen, T.D.; Kim, T.W.

    1992-01-01

    Synergistic and antagonistic effects on genotoxicity of mixtures of four chemicals; i.e., lead tetraacetate (LTA), arsenic trioxide (ATO), dieldrin (DED), and tetrachloroethylene (TCE), were evaluated by the Tradescantia-micronucleus (Trad-MCN) assay. The chemicals were mixed in ratios of 1:1, 1:2 and 2:1 for mixtures of two chemicals and 1:1:1 each for three chemicals. The concentration of stock solution of these chemicals was around the minimum effective dose (MED) or below the MED for these chemicals as reported by Sandhu et al. (1989). Treatments were applied to plant cuttings by hydroponic uptake of the mixed solutions through the stems of the plant for 30 h followed by fixation of the flower buds in aceto-alcohol (1:3 ratio) without a recovery period. Microslides were prepared for scoring MCN frequencies. Results of two series of repeated experiments indicated that all mixtures of LTA/ATO exhibited antagonistic effects. On the other hand, all mixtures of TCE and DED exhibited synergistic effect. These data indicate that for evaluating biological hazards at chemical waste sites, it is prudent to evaluate the genotoxicity of complex chemical mixtures as these exist in nature because the biological effects based on evaluating individual chemicals may not be true predictors of the interactive effects of the pollutants.

  13. Effect of buprenorphine on genotoxicity evaluation of chemicals by the rat liver micronucleus test with partial hepatectomy.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Satoru; Nagata, Mayumi; Hattori, Chiharu; Takasaki, Wataru

    2015-02-01

    In the view of animal welfare considerations, we investigated the suitability of modifying the rat liver micronucleus test with partial hepatectomy to include administration of an analgesic drug to minimize pain and distress as much as possible. The effects of the analgesic, buprenorphine, on the genotoxicity evaluation of structural chromosome aberration inducers (cyclophosphamide, diethylnitrosamine and 1,2-dimethylhydrazine) and numerical chromosome aberration inducers (colchicine and carbendazim) were examined. The genotoxicants were given orally to 8-week-old male F344 rats a day before or after partial hepatectomy and hepatocytes were isolated 4 days after the partial hepatectomy. Buprenorphine was injected subcutaneously twice a day with at least a 6-hr interval for 2 days from just after partial hepatectomy. As results, buprenorphine caused neither change in clinical signs (except for one animal death) nor increase in the incidence of micronucleated hepatocytes of vehicle treated animals. In the case of concomitant treatment of buprenorphine and a genotoxicant, one out of 8 animals died in each group given buprenorphine with cyclophosphamide, carbendazim or colchicine (lower dose level only). Slight changes in clinical signs were noted in the group given buprenorphine with cyclophosphamide or carbendazim. A statistically significant increase in the incidence of micronucleated hepatocytes was obtained in concomitant treatment of buprenorphine and genotoxicant compared with genotoxicant alone for 1,2-dimethylhydrazine, colchicine and carbendazim. It is concluded that use of buprenorphine as an analgesic drug to minimize pain and distress for rats that are given partial hepatectomy is not appropriate under the present experimental conditions, because it could enhance the general toxicity and genotoxicity of the test chemical.

  14. Assessing the genotoxic effects of two lipid peroxidation products (4-oxo-2-nonenal and 4-hydroxy-hexenal) in haemocytes and midgut cells of Drosophila melanogaster larvae.

    PubMed

    Demir, Eşref; Marcos, Ricard

    2017-03-22

    Lipid peroxidation products can induce tissue damage and are implicated in diverse pathological conditions, including aging, atherosclerosis, brain disorders, cancer, lung and various liver disorders. Since in vivo studies produce relevant information, we have selected Drosophila melanogaster as a suitable in vivo model to characterise the potential risks associated to two lipid peroxidation products namely 4-oxo-2-nonenal (4-ONE) and 4-hydroxy-hexenal (4-HHE). Toxicity, intracellular reactive oxygen species production, and genotoxicity were the end-points evaluated. Haemocytes and midgut cells were the evaluated targets. Results showed that both compounds penetrate the intestine of the larvae, affecting midgut cells, and reaching haemocytes. Significant genotoxic effects, as determined by the comet assay, were observed in both selected cell targets in a concentration/time dependent manner. This study highlights the importance of D. melanogaster as a model organism in the study of the different biological effects caused by lipid peroxidation products entering via ingestion. This is the first study reporting genotoxicity data in haemocytes and midgut cells of D. melanogaster larvae for the two selected compounds.

  15. Lack of genotoxic effect of food dyes amaranth, sunset yellow and tartrazine and their metabolites in the gut micronucleus assay in mice.

    PubMed

    Poul, Martine; Jarry, Gérard; Elhkim, Mostafa Ould; Poul, Jean-Michel

    2009-02-01

    The food dyes amaranth, sunset yellow and tartrazine were administered twice, at 24h intervals, by oral gavage to mice and assessed in the in vivo gut micronucleus test for genotoxic effects (frequency of micronucleated cells) and toxicity (apoptotic and mitotic cells). The concentrations of each compound and their main metabolites (sulfanilic acid and naphthionic acid) were measured in faeces during a 24-h period after single oral administrations of the food dyes to mice. Parent dye compounds and their main aromatic amine metabolites were detected in significant amounts in the environment of colonic cells. Acute oral exposure to food dye additives amaranth, sunset yellow and tartrazine did not induce genotoxic effect in the micronucleus gut assay in mice at doses up to 2000 mg/kg b.w. Food dyes administration increased the mitotic cells at all dose levels when compared to controls. These results suggest that the transient DNA damages previously observed in the colon of mice treated by amaranth and tartrazine by the in vivo comet assay [Sasaki, Y.F., Kawaguchi, S., Kamaya, A., Ohshita, M., Kabasawa, K., Iwama, K., Taniguchi, K., Tsuda, S., 2002. The comet assay with 8 mouse organs: results with 39 currently used food additives. Mutat. Res. 519, 103-119] are unable to be fixed in stable genotoxic lesions and might be partly explained by local cytotoxicity of the dyes.

  16. The genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of nimesulide in the mouse bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Rina; Tripathi, Pankaj; Pancholi, Shyam S; Patel, Chhagan N

    2014-07-01

    Genotoxicity of nimesulide (NM) was evaluated by employing bone marrow (BM) chromosomal aberration (CA) and micronucleus assays in Swiss albino mice. For BM CA assay, mice of either sex were treated orally with 1.5, 2.5 and 5 mg body weight solution of NM in 0.2 mL of 0.05% CMC (carboxy methyl cellulose) daily for 4, 13, 28 and 40 weeks. Treatment induced dose-dependent and significantly depressed mitotic activity and increase in CAs per cell in the BM cells after 13 weeks of treatment at all dose levels. In micronucleus assay, male mice were treated orally with the same dose levels and sampling durations as for CA assay. Treatment increased the percentage of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes frequency and showed a statistically significant reduction in polychromatic erythrocyte/normochromatic erythrocyte ratio, as compared to control groups. Cyclophosphamide (40 mg/kg) was used as clastogen (positive control) and yielded the expected positive results. Cytotoxicity was observed in the 8-week recovery period after 40 weeks of dosing, but it was not significant. On the basis of these findings, it may be concluded that in the long term, NM, or its biotransformed product, is genotoxic and cytotoxic for BM cells of mice in vivo.

  17. Antiproliferative and genotoxic effects of nature identical and artificial synthetic food additives of aroma and flavor.

    PubMed

    Nunes, R D M; Sales, I M S; Silva, S I O; Sousa, J M C; Peron, A P

    2016-07-25

    This study aimed to analyze the antiproliferative and genotoxic potential of synthetic food flavorings, nature identical passion fruit and artificial vanilla. This assessment used root meristem cells of Allium cepa L., in exposure times of 24 and 48 hours and using doses of 0.2; 0.4 and 0.6 mL. Roots were fixed in Carnoy's solution, hydrolyzed in hydrochloric acid, stained with acetic orcein and analyzed with optical microscope at 400× magnification, 5,000 cells for each treatment. For data analysis, it was used Chi-square test at 5%. Doses of 0.2 mL at ET 48 h; 0.4 and 0.6 mL at ET 24 and 48 h of passion fruit flavor, and the three doses of the vanilla flavor at ET 24 and 48 h significantly reduced the cell division rate in the meristems of roots, proving to be cytotoxic. Doses of 0.2; 0.4 and 0.6 mL of the passion fruit additive, and the three doses of vanilla tested, in the two exposure times, induced mitotic spindle changes and micronuclei formation in the cells of the test organism used, proving to be genotoxic. Therefore, under the studied conditions, flavoring solutions of vanilla and passion fruit, marketed nationally and internationally, significantly altered the functioning of the cell cycle in root meristem cells of A. cepa.

  18. Determination of genotoxic effects of boron and zinc on Zea mays using protein and random amplification of polymorphic DNA analyses.

    PubMed

    Erturk, Filiz Aygun; Nardemir, Gokce; Hilal, A Y; Arslan, Esra; Agar, Guleray

    2015-11-01

    In this research, we aimed to determine genotoxic effects of boron (B) and zinc (Zn) on Zea mays by using total soluble protein content and random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analyses. For the RAPD analysis, 16 RAPD primers were found to produce unique polymorphic band profiles on treated maize seedlings. With increased Zn and B concentrations, increased polymorphism rate was observed, while genomic template stability and total soluble protein content decreased. The treatment with Zn was more effective than that of B groups on the levels of total proteins. The obtained results from this study revealed that the total soluble protein levels and RAPD profiles were performed as endpoints of genotoxicity and these analyses can offer useful biomarker assays for the evaluation of genotoxic effects on Zn and B polluted plants.

  19. Lack of genotoxic effect in workers exposed to very low doses of 1,3-butadiene.

    PubMed

    Lovreglio, Piero; Bukvic, Nenad; Fustinoni, Silvia; Ballini, Andrea; Drago, Ignazio; Foà, Vito; Guanti, Ginevra; Soleo, Leonardo

    2006-06-01

    1,3-Butadiene (BD), a probable carcinogen to humans, has been shown to have an ill-defined genotoxicity in occupationally exposed workers. In the present study, the influence of exposure to very low doses of BD and to cigarette smoking was investigated on some cytogenetic endpoints, namely, sister chromatid exchanges (SCE), chromosomal aberrations (CA) and cells with a high frequency of SCE (HFC), in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Twenty-seven male workers employed in a petrochemical plant and 26 matched controls were included in the study. As regards the airborne BD values, there was a significant difference between exposed (median BD value 1.5, min-max 0.2-69.0 microg/m3) and non-exposed workers (median BD value 0.4, min-max <0.1-3.8 microg/m3). Genotoxic biomarkers were not able to distinguish between the two groups. The frequency of SCE was higher in smokers than in non-smokers (p=0.001), with a positive correlation between the number of cigarettes smoked per day and both SCE (r=0.4; p=0.004) and HFC frequency (r=0.3; p=0.04). Multiple regression analysis confirmed the influence of cigarette smoking on the level of SCE and HFC, while these parameters were not affected by personal exposure to BD. Overall, the biomarkers of genotoxic effect investigated in our study were not able to discriminate between workers with a very low exposure to BD and controls, while it was possible to distinguish between smokers and non-smokers on the basis of SCE.

  20. CDC42 Gtpase Activation Affects Hela Cell DNA Repair and Proliferation Following UV Radiation-Induced Genotoxic Stress.

    PubMed

    Ascer, Liv G; Magalhaes, Yuli T; Espinha, Gisele; Osaki, Juliana H; Souza, Renan C; Forti, Fabio L

    2015-09-01

    Cell division control protein 42 (CDC42) homolog is a small Rho GTPase enzyme that participates in such processes as cell cycle progression, migration, polarity, adhesion, and transcription. Recent studies suggest that CDC42 is a potent tumor suppressor in different tissues and is related to aging processes. Although DNA damage is crucial in aging, a potential role for CDC42 in genotoxic stress remains to be explored. Migration, survival/proliferation and DNA damage/repair experiments were performed to demonstrate CDC42 involvement in the recovery of HeLa cells exposed to ultraviolet radiation-induced stress. Sub-lines of HeLa cells ectopically expressing the constitutively active CDC42-V12 mutant were generated to examine whether different CDC42-GTP backgrounds might reflect different sensitivities to UV radiation. Our results show that CDC42 constitutive activation does not interfere with HeLa cell migration after UV radiation. However, the minor DNA damage exhibited by the CDC42-V12 mutant exposed to UV radiation most likely results in cell cycle arrest at the G2/M checkpoint and reduced proliferation and survival. HeLa cells and Mock clones, which express endogenous wild-type CDC42 and show normal activity, are more resistant to UV radiation. None of these effects are altered by pharmacological CDC42 inhibition. Finally, the phosphorylation status of the DNA damage response proteins γ-H2AX and p-Chk1 was found to be delayed and attenuated, respectively, in CDC42-V12 clones. In conclusion, the sensitivity of HeLa cells to ultraviolet radiation increases with CDC42 over-activation due to inadequate DNA repair signaling, culminating in G2/M cell accumulation, which is translated into reduced cellular proliferation and survival.

  1. Estimation of TiO₂ nanoparticle-induced genotoxicity persistence and possible chronic gastritis-induction in mice.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Hanan Ramadan Hamad

    2015-09-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles are widely used as a food additive and coloring agent in many consumer products however limited data is available on the nano-TiO2 induced genotoxicity persistence. Thus, this study investigated the persistence of nano-TiO2 induced genotoxicity and possible induction of chronic gastritis in mice. The mice were orally administered 5, 50 or 500 mg/kg body weight nano-TiO2 for five consecutive days, and then mice from each dosage group were sacrificed 24 h or one or two weeks after the last treatment. The administration of nano-TiO2 resulted in persistent apoptotic DNA fragmentation and mutations in p53 exons (5-8) as well as significant persistent elevations in malondialdehyde and nitric oxide levels and decreases in the reduced glutathione level and catalase activity compared with the control mice in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Necrosis and inflammation were evident upon histological examination. These findings could be attributed to the persistent accumulation of nano-TiO2 at the tested doses at all three time points. Based on these findings, we conclude that the administration of nano-TiO2, even at low doses, leads to persistent accumulation of nano-TiO2 in mice, resulting in persistent inflammation, apoptosis and oxidative stress, ultimately leading to the induction of chronic gastritis.

  2. Genotoxic effect of cadmium in okra seedlings: comparative investigation with population parameters and molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Semra Soydam; Basaran, Esin; Cansaran-Duman, Demet; Aras, Sümer

    2013-11-01

    Plants are considered as good bioindicators because of their significant role in food chain transfer. They are also easy to grow, adaptable to environmental stresses and can be used for assaying a range of environmental conditions in different habitats. Thus, many plant species have been used as bioindicators. In order to evaluate the genotoxic effect of cadmium, okra (Abelmoschus esculontus L.) seedlings were treated with different concentrations (30, 60, 120 mg I(-1)) of cadmium and investigated for their population parameters such as inhibition of root growth; total soluble protein content, dry weight and also the impact of metal on the genetic material by RAPD analysis. Root growth and total soluble protein content in okra seedlings were reduced with increased Cd concentrations. RAPD analysis indicated formation of new bands mostly at 60 and 120 mg I(-1) Cd treatments. Altered DNA band patterns and population parameters after Cd treatments suggest that okra could be used as an indicator to reveal the effects of genotoxic agents.

  3. Genotoxic effects of Tabebuia impetiginosa (Mart. Ex DC.) Standl. (Lamiales, Bignoniaceae) extract in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Lemos, Odilon A.; Sanches, Júlio C.M.; Silva, Ícaro E.F.; Silva, Márcio L.A.; Vinhólis, Adriana H.C.; Felix, Mireille A.P.; Santos, Raquel A.; Cecchi, Andréa O.

    2012-01-01

    Tabebuia sp. is native to tropical rain forests throughout Central and South America. Although the biological and pharmacological effects of bark extracts have been intensely studied, little is known on the extract obtained from the flower. Herein, the genotoxic potential of a flower extract from T. impetiginosa (“ipê roxo”) on the blood and liver cells of Wistar rats was evaluated. Experimental procedures involved only male animals. Graduated concentrations of the extract, viz., 100, 300 and 500 mg kg−1 of body weight, were gavage-administered and 24 h latter cells were collected and processed for analysis. With the exception of the 100 mg kg−1 dose, a significant increase in DNA damage was noted, when compared with a negative control group. Although the genotoxic potential of this extract was higher in liver cells, the response in both tissues was related to dose-dependency. Even though DNA damage can be corrected before conversion into mutations, further study is recommended to arrive at a better understanding of incurred biological effects. PMID:22888300

  4. Genotoxic effects of Tabebuia impetiginosa (Mart. Ex DC.) Standl. (Lamiales, Bignoniaceae) extract in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Lemos, Odilon A; Sanches, Júlio C M; Silva, Icaro E F; Silva, Márcio L A; Vinhólis, Adriana H C; Felix, Mireille A P; Santos, Raquel A; Cecchi, Andréa O

    2012-04-01

    Tabebuia sp. is native to tropical rain forests throughout Central and South America. Although the biological and pharmacological effects of bark extracts have been intensely studied, little is known on the extract obtained from the flower. Herein, the genotoxic potential of a flower extract from T. impetiginosa ("ipê roxo") on the blood and liver cells of Wistar rats was evaluated. Experimental procedures involved only male animals. Graduated concentrations of the extract, viz., 100, 300 and 500 mg kg(-1) of body weight, were gavage-administered and 24 h latter cells were collected and processed for analysis. With the exception of the 100 mg kg(-1) dose, a significant increase in DNA damage was noted, when compared with a negative control group. Although the genotoxic potential of this extract was higher in liver cells, the response in both tissues was related to dose-dependency. Even though DNA damage can be corrected before conversion into mutations, further study is recommended to arrive at a better understanding of incurred biological effects.

  5. Cytotoxic and Genotoxic Effects of Acephate on Human Sperm

    PubMed Central

    Dhanushka, M. A. Thamali

    2017-01-01

    Extensive use of organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) could alter semen quality and sperm DNA at different stages of spermatogenesis. Acephate is a highly toxic extensively used OP and, therefore, we aimed to evaluate the effects of acephate on human semen quality and sperm DNA integrity. Sperm collected from healthy males were exposed to 0, 50, 100, and 200 μg/mL of acephate and incubated for 1 h, 2 h, and 3 h. Subsequently, sperm motility, vitality, functional integrity of plasma membrane, sperm capacitation, and DNA damage were examined. Result showed a significant decline of the motility at 100 μg/mL after 3 h and with 200 μg/mL after 1 h, 2 h, and 3 h. Viability was significantly reduced at 200 μg/mL after 2 h and 3 h. Functional integrity was significantly affected at 100 μg/mL after 3h and in 200 μg/mL dose after 2 h and 3h. Similarly, sperm capacitation was significantly affected at 200 μg/mL after 1 h, 2 h, and 3 h and at 100 μg/mL at 3 h. DNA damage was significantly increased only in 200 μg/mL dose after 3 h. The study suggests that exposure to acephate may result in alterations of sperm structure and function thus contributing towards deteriorating in human semen quality triggering infertility. PMID:28392800

  6. Early genotoxic effects in gill cells and haemocytes of Dreissena polymorpha exposed to cadmium, B[a]P and a combination of B[a]P and Cd.

    PubMed

    Vincent-Hubert, Françoise; Arini, Adeline; Gourlay-Francé, Catherine

    2011-07-14

    The aim of this study was to assess the genotoxic potential of environmentally relevant concentrations of Cd on the zebra mussel, an important freshwater sentinel organism, and to determine the stability of DNA damage in gill cells and haemocytes. The oxidative DNA damage and the co-genotoxicity of Cd in combination with B[a]P were investigated. We measured DNA damage in haemocytes and gill cells of zebra mussels exposed for 11 days to a constant concentration of Cd (10μg/L), B[a]P (10μg/L) or the two combined chemicals (10μg/L+1μg/L). Enzymatic dissociation of gills with dispase gave the lower percentage DNA in tail, compared with collagenase/dispase or collagenase. Bioaccumulation of cadmium in the soft tissues of mussels exposed to CdCl(2) or CdCl(2)+B[a]P increased in a time-dependent manner indicating that both exposures were effective. Cd (10μg/L) is genotoxic only during the first 3 days of exposure in gill cells, while in haemocytes the genotoxicity of Cd was observed later. B[a]P (10μg/L) induced an early increase of DNA damage in gill cells (after 10h and 1 day), while in both gill cells and haemocytes, B[a]P caused a marked increase of DNA damage after 3 days of exposure. The Cd+B[a]P mixture decreased the DNA-damaging effect of Cd and B[a]P in both cell types. Cd induced an increase of DNA damage in Fpg-treated slides, indicating that Cd contributed to oxidative DNA damage. Cadmium induced a cytogenetic effect in gill cells, assessed by the number of micronuclei, throughout the duration of the exposure, while B[a]P did not induce any cytogenetic effect. B[a]P, Cd and Cd+B[a]P induced a transient increase in the number of bi-nucleated cells. Our data clearly show that gills are more sensitive to Cd and B[a]P, which makes them more suitable for future bio-monitoring studies.

  7. Genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of Sunset Yellow and Brilliant Blue, colorant food additives, on human blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Kus, Esra; Eroglu, Halil Erhan

    2015-01-01

    The synthetic dyes over fifty are used in many areas including the food industry around the world. Sunset Yellow FCF and Brilliant Blue FCF are used as colorant food additives in many food products. The present study investigated the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of Sunset Yellow and Brilliant Blue. Genotoxic and cytotoxic activities of the food additives were evaluated in lymphocyte cell cultures using mitotic index, replication index and micronucleus assay. Mitotic index frequencies and replication index values were decreased and micronucleus frequency was increased with increasing concentrations of Sunset Yellow and Brilliant Blue. The changes in mitotic index and micronucleus are statistically significant (p<0.05). The results show that the Sunset Yellow and Brilliant Blue can have cytotoxic and genotoxic potential. It care must be taken when using these materials as a food additive.

  8. The effect of long term storage on tobacco smoke particulate matter in in vitro genotoxicity and cytotoxicity assays.

    PubMed

    Crooks, I; Dillon, D M; Scott, J K; Ballantyne, M; Meredith, C

    2013-03-01

    Particulate matter (PM) collected from mainstream tobacco smoke is a test article commonly used for in vitro genotoxicity and cytotoxicity testing of combustible tobacco products. However, little published data exists concerning the stability of PM. We completed a 2 year study to quantify the effect of PM storage at -80 °C, on the genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of PM generated from 3R4F and M4A reference cigarettes. The Ames test, Micronucleus assay (MNvit), Mouse Lymphoma assay (MLA) and the Neutral Red Uptake assay (NRU) were used. The majority of M4A and 3R4F PMs were genotoxic and cytotoxic at the timepoints tested. Some minor but statistically significant differences were observed for stored versus freshly prepared PM, but the magnitude of changes were within the variability observed for repeat testing.

  9. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity induced in vitro by solvent-extractable organic matter of size-segregated urban particulate matter.

    PubMed

    Velali, Ekaterini; Papachristou, Eleni; Pantazaki, Anastasia; Choli-Papadopoulou, Theodora; Argyrou, Nikoleta; Tsourouktsoglou, Theodora; Lialiaris, Stergios; Constantinidis, Alexandros; Lykidis, Dimitrios; Lialiaris, Thedore S; Besis, Athanasios; Voutsa, Dimitra; Samara, Constantini

    2016-11-01

    Three organic fractions of different polarity, including a non polar organic fraction (NPOF), a moderately polar organic fraction (MPOF), and a polar organic fraction (POF) were obtained from size-segregated (<0.49, 0.49-0.97, 0.97-3 and >3 μm) urban particulate matter (PM) samples, and tested for cytotoxicity and genotoxicity using a battery of in vitro assays. The cytotoxicity induced by the organic PM fractions was measured by the mitochondrial dehydrogenase (MTT) cell viability assay applied on MRC-5 human lung epithelial cells. DNA damages were evaluated through the comet assay, determination of the poly(ADP-Ribose) polymerase (PARP) activity, and the oxidative DNA adduct 8-hydroxy-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) formation, while pro-inflammatory effects were assessed by determination of the tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) mediator release. In addition, the Sister Chromatid Exchange (SCE) inducibility of the solvent-extractable organic matter was measured on human peripheral lymphocyte. Variations of responses were assessed in relation to the polarity (hence the expected composition) of the organic PM fractions, particle size, locality, and season. Organic PM fractions were found to induce rather comparable Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of PM appeared to be rather independent from the polarity of the extractable organic PM matter (EOM) with POF often being relatively more toxic than NPOF or MPOF. All assays indicated stronger mass-normalized bioactivity for fine than coarse particles peaking in the 0.97-3 and/or the 0.49-0.97 μm size ranges. Nevertheless, the air volume-normalized bioactivity in all assays was highest for the <0.49 μm size range highlighting the important human health risk posed by the inhalation of these quasi-ultrafine particles.

  10. Nandrolone androgenic hormone presents genotoxic effects in different cells of mice.

    PubMed

    do Carmo, Carolina Almeida; Gonçalves, Álvaro Luiz Martini; Salvadori, Daisy Maria Fávero; Maistro, Edson Luis

    2012-10-01

    Nandrolone is an androgenic-anabolic steroid (AAS) with diverse medical applications but taken indiscriminately by some to rapidly increase muscle mass. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic and clastogenic potential of nandrolone (deca-durabolin®) in vivo in different cells of mice, using the comet assay and micronucleus test, respectively. The animals received subcutaneous injection of the three doses of the steroid (1.0, 2.5 and 5.0 mg kg⁻¹ body weight). Cytotoxicity was assessed by scoring 200 consecutive total polychromatic (PCE) and normochromatic (NCE) erythrocytes (PCE-NCE ratio). The results showed a significant dose-related increase in the frequency of DNA damage in leukocytes, liver, bone marrow, brain and testicle cells at the three tested doses and a significant increase of the micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes at all tested doses. Under our experimental conditions, the nandrolone steroid hormone showed genotoxic and clastogenic effects when administered subcutaneously to mice.

  11. Determination of the genotoxic effects of Convolvulus arvensis extracts on corn (Zea mays L.) seeds.

    PubMed

    Sunar, Serap; Yildirim, Nalan; Aksakal, Ozkan; Agar, Guleray

    2013-06-01

    In this research, the methanolic extracts of Convolvulus arvensis were tested for genotoxic and inhibitor activity on the total soluble protein content and the genomic template stability against corn Zea mays L. seed. The methanol extracts of leaf, stem and root of C. arvensis were diluted to 50, 75 and 100 μl concentrations and applied to corn seed. The total soluble protein and genomic template stability results were compared with the control. The results showed that especially 100 μl extracts of diluted leaf, stem and root had a strong inhibitory activity on the genomic template stability. The changes occurred in random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) profiles of C. arvensis extract treatment included variation in band intensity, loss of bands and appearance of new bands compared with control. Also, the results obtained from this study revealed that the increase in the concentrations of C. arvensis extract increased the total soluble protein content in maize. The results suggested that RAPD analysis and total protein analysis could be applied as a suitable biomarker assay for the detection of genotoxic effects of plant allelochemicals.

  12. Determination of AChE levels and genotoxic effects in farmers occupationally exposed to pesticides.

    PubMed

    Naravaneni, Rambabu; Jamil, Kaiser

    2007-09-01

    Pesticides can cause cytogenetic effects and lower the acetyl cholinesterase (AChE) levels in farmers exposed to pesticides. In this study, 210 farmers exposed to pesticides and 160 non-exposed individuals were enrolled for determining the genotoxicity and AChE levels. The AChE levels were determined in plasma and RBC lysate from blood samples collected from farmers and control subjects. AChE (true and pseudo) estimation done by the colorimetric method revealed that there was a progressive fall in both the RBC and plasma AChE levels in exposed individuals compared to unexposed individuals, which correlated with the severity of exposure (253.5 versus 311.1 and 142.3 versus 152.1; P < 0.001). Cytogenetic studies showed an increase in DNA damage and higher chromosomal aberrations (CAs) in exposed farmers compared to the control subjects (26.13 versus 07.61 and 21.37 versus 1.52; P < 0.001). When comparing the AChE levels with DNA damage and structural CA frequencies, there was a negative linear correlation. Therefore based on these findings, it is concluded that genotoxic biomarkers like CA frequencies, DNA damage data along with AChE levels are important parameters for determining farmer's health who are exposed to pesticides in any situation.

  13. Effects of age, species difference, antibiotics and toxicants on intestinal enzyme activity and genotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, R.W.; George, S.E.; Kohan, M.J.; Allison, J.C. . Health Effects Research Lab.); Chang, J.; Long, J.E.; Duffy, M.C. ); Dekker, J.P.; Forehand, L.R. )

    1993-08-01

    Altered intestinal enzyme activity significantly affects the biotransformation and toxicity of many xenobiotics. This article summarizes research, supported by the US Air Force Bioenvironmental Hazards Research Program, that employs a novel gas-liquid chromatographic assay to investigate the effects of age, species difference, antibiotics, and environmental chemicals on enzyme activity in various regions of the intestinal tract. Significant research findings include the following: (a) age-dependent alterations in enzyme activity in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of the developing animal that suggest a changing susceptibility to toxicants during this period; (b) discovery of previously unreported mucosal enzymes in the small intestine that are present in germ-free rats and are not susceptible to antibiotics; (c) markedly greater intestinal nitroreductase activity and significantly higher bioactivation of the procarcinogen 2,6-dinitrotoluene (DNT) in CD-1 mice than in Fischer 344 rats; (d) significantly altered intestinal enzyme activity in rats pretreated with lindane, pentachlorophenol, 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T), or Aroclor 1254; (e) potentiated DNT genotoxicity by Aroclor 1254 and pentachlorophenol pretreatment; and (f) a transient antagonism of DNT genotoxicity by 2,4,5-T pretreatment. Enzyme activity in the small intestine may have greater toxicological importance than previously thought in the biotransformation of environmental chemicals and as an indicator of change in the microbial flora.

  14. Evaluation of genotoxicity and effects on reproduction of nonylphenol in Oreochromis niloticus (Pisces: Cichlidae).

    PubMed

    Rivero, Carla L G; Barbosa, Antônio C; Ferreira, Maria Fernanda N; Dorea, José G; Grisolia, Cesar K

    2008-11-01

    Nonylphenol ethoxylate (NPE) is widely used as a component of detergents, paints, pesticides, and many other products. In the aquatic environment NPE breakdown to 4-nonylphenol (NP), which is more stable and persistent. NP is estrogenic in fish, avian, and mammals and is described as an environmental pollutant with endocrine disruptor characteristics. The genotoxicity of NP was evaluated through micronuclei assay and single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet assay) in peripheral erythrocytes of Oreochromis niloticus exposed in vivo. The study on reproductive development was also carried out in male and female gonads of O. niloticus. Lethal concentration (LC 50%) of 0.032 ml l(-1) was previously determined. We ran assays with O. niloticus exposed to concentrations of 1.0, 10.0, and 16.0 microl l(-1) of NP diluted in water. Our results showed that NP was not genotoxic. However, 3-day exposure to NP in concentrations of 1.0, 10.0, and 16.0 microl l(-1) of water increased the frequency of reproductive stages in males and females. The histology of the reproductive tract of the treated fish was significantly altered in females treated with 16.0 microl l(-1) of water when compared to controls. Analogous estrogenic effects were observed, such as accelerated maturation of oocytes and spermatogenesis. These results showed that the O. niloticus reproductive system is sensitive to NP estrogenicity.

  15. Potential pulmonary effects of engineered carbon nanotubes: in vitro genotoxic effects.

    PubMed

    Sargent, Linda M; Reynolds, Steven H; Castranova, Vincent

    2010-12-01

    The development of novel engineered nano-sized materials is a rapidly emerging technology with many applications in medicine and industry. In vitro and in vivo studies have suggested many deleterious effects of carbon nanotube exposure including granulomatous inflammation, release of cytosolic enzymes, pulmonary fibrosis, reactive oxygen damage, cellular atypia, DNA fragmentation, mutation and errors in chromosome number as well as mitotic spindle disruption. The physical properties of the carbon nanotubes make respiratory exposure to workers likely during the production or use of commercial products. Many of the investigations of the genotoxicity of carbon nanotubes have focused on reactive oxygen mediated DNA damage; however, the long thin tubular-shaped carbon nanotubes have a striking similarity to cellular microtubules. The similarity of carbon nanotubes to microtubules suggests a potential to interact with cellular biomolecules, such as the mitotic spindle, as well as the motor proteins that separate the chromosomes during cell division. Disruption of centrosomes and mitotic spindles would result in monopolar, tripolar, and quadrapolar divisions of chromosomes. The resulting aneuploidy is a key mechanism in the potential carcinogenicity of carbon nanotubes.

  16. Differential sensitivities of bone marrow, spleen and thymus to genotoxicity induced by environmentally relevant concentrations of arsenite.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huan; McClain, Shea; Medina, Sebastian; Lauer, Fredine T; Douillet, Christelle; Liu, Ke Jian; Hudson, Laurie G; Stýblo, Miroslav; Burchiel, Scott W

    2016-11-16

    It is known in humans and mouse models, that drinking water exposures to arsenite (As(+3)) leads to immunotoxicity. Previously, our group showed that certain types of immune cells are extremely sensitive to arsenic induced genotoxicity. In order to see if cells from different immune organs have differential sensitivities to As(+3), and if the sensitivities correlate with the intracellular concentrations of arsenic species, male C57BL/6J mice were dosed with 0, 100 and 500ppb As(+3)via drinking water for 30d. Oxidation State Specific Hydride Generation- Cryotrapping- Inductively Coupled Plasma- Mass Spectrometry (HG- CT- ICP- MS) was applied to analyze the intracellular arsenic species and concentrations in bone marrow, spleen and thymus cells isolated from the exposed mice. A dose-dependent increase in intracellular monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(+3)) was observed in both bone marrow and thymus cells, but not spleen cells. The total arsenic and MMA(+3) levels were correlated with an increase in DNA damage in bone marrow and thymus cells. An in vitro treatment of 5, 50 and 500nM As(+3) and MMA(+3) revealed that bone marrow cells are most sensitive to As(+3) treatment, and MMA(+3) is more genotoxic than As(+3). These results suggest that the differential sensitivities of the three immune organs to As(+3) exposure are due to the different intracellular arsenic species and concentrations, and that MMA(+3) may play a critical role in immunotoxicity.

  17. Pyruvate remediation of cell stress and genotoxicity induced by haloacetic acid drinking water disinfection by-products.

    PubMed

    Dad, Azra; Jeong, Clara H; Pals, Justin A; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Plewa, Michael J

    2013-10-01

    Monohaloacetic acids (monoHAAs) are a major class of drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) and are cytotoxic, genotoxic, mutagenic, and teratogenic. We propose a model of toxic action based on monoHAA-mediated inhibition of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) as a target cytosolic enzyme. This model predicts that GAPDH inhibition by the monoHAAs will lead to a severe reduction of cellular ATP levels and repress the generation of pyruvate. A loss of pyruvate will lead to mitochondrial stress and genomic DNA damage. We found a concentration-dependent reduction of ATP in Chinese hamster ovary cells after monoHAA treatment. ATP reduction per pmol monoHAA followed the pattern of iodoacetic acid (IAA) > bromoacetic acid (BAA) > chloroacetic acid (CAA), which is the pattern of potency observed with many toxicological endpoints. Exogenous supplementation with pyruvate enhanced ATP levels and attenuated monoHAA-induced genomic DNA damage as measured with single cell gel electrophoresis. These data were highly correlated with the SN 2 alkylating potentials of the monoHAAs and with the induction of toxicity. The results from this study strongly support the hypothesis that GAPDH inhibition and the possible subsequent generation of reactive oxygen species is linked with the cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, teratogenicity, and neurotoxicity of these DBPs.

  18. Differential effects of Glycyrrhiza species on genotoxic estrogen metabolism: licochalcone A downregulates P450 1B1 whereas isoliquiritigenin stimulates

    PubMed Central

    Dunlap, Tareisha L.; Wang, Shuai; Simmler, Charlotte; Chen, Shao-Nong; Pauli, Guido F.; Dietz, Birgit M.; Bolton, Judy L.

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen chemical carcinogenesis involves 4-hydroxylation of estrone/estradiol (E1/E2) by P450 1B1, generating catechol and quinone genotoxic metabolites that cause DNA mutations and initiate/promote breast cancer. Inflammation enhances this effect by up-regulating P450 1B1. The present study tested the three authenticated medicinal species of licorice, [Glycyrrhiza glabra (GG), G. uralensis (GU), and G. inflata (GI)], used by women as dietary supplements, for their anti-inflammatory activities and their ability to modulate estrogen metabolism. The pure compounds, liquiritigenin (LigF), its chalcone isomer isoliquiritigenin (LigC), and the GI specific licochalcone A (LicA) were also tested. The licorice extracts and compounds were evaluated for anti-inflammatory activity by measuring inhibition of iNOS activity in macrophage cells: GI > GG > GU and LigC ≅ LicA > LigF. The Michael acceptor chalcone LicA, is likely responsible for the anti-inflammatory activity of GI. A sensitive LC-MS/MS assay was employed to quantify estrogen metabolism by measuring 2-MeOE1 as non-toxic and 4-MeOE1 as genotoxic biomarkers in the non-tumorigenic human mammary epithelial cell line, MCF-10A. GG, GU, and LigC increased 4-MeOE1, whereas GI and LicA inhibited 2- and 4-MeOE1 levels. GG, GU (5 μg/mL), and LigC (1 μM) also enhanced P450 1B1 expression and activities, which was further increased by inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IFN-γ). LicA (1 μM, 10 μM) decreased cytokine- and TCDD-induced, P450 1B1 gene expression and TCDD-induced xenobiotic response element luciferase reporter (IC50=12.3 μM), suggesting an antagonistic effect on the aryl hydrocarbon receptor, which regulates P450 1B1. Similarly, GI (5 μg/mL) reduced cytokine- and TCDD-induced P450 1B1 gene expression. Collectively, these data suggest that of the three licorice species that are used in botanical supplements, GI represents the most promising chemopreventive licorice extract for women’s health. Additionally

  19. Lack of genotoxic mechanisms in early-stage furan-induced hepatocellular tumorigenesis in gpt delta rats.

    PubMed

    Hibi, Daisuke; Yokoo, Yu; Suzuki, Yuta; Ishii, Yuji; Jin, Meilan; Kijima, Aki; Nohmi, Takehiko; Nishikawa, Akiyoshi; Umemura, Takashi

    2017-02-01

    Furan has been used as an intermediate in the chemical-manufacturing industry and has been shown to contaminate various foods. Although furan induces hepatocellular tumors in rodents, equivocal results from in vitro and in vivo mutagenicity tests have caused controversy regarding the involvement of genotoxic mechanisms in furan-induced carcinogenesis. In the present study, to elucidate the possible mechanisms underlying furan-induced hepatocarcinogenesis, a comprehensive medium-term analysis was conducted using gpt delta rats treated with furan at carcinogenic doses for 13 weeks. In the liver, the frequencies of gpt and Spi(-) mutants derived mainly from point and deletion mutations, respectively, were not changed, and there were no furan-specific gpt mutations in furan-treated rats. In contrast, the number and area of glutathione S-transferase placental form (GST-P)- positive foci were significantly increased in the high-dose group. Also, the ratio of PCNA-positive hepatocytes was significantly elevated in the same group, as supported by significant increases in cyclin d1 and cyclin e1 mRNA levels. Thus, it is highly probable that cell proliferation, but not genotoxic mechanisms, contribute to the development of GST-P foci in furan-treated rats. Based on the close relationship between GST-P and neoplastic hepatocytes, these data allowed us to hypothesize that cell proliferation following signal transduction other than the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/ERK pathway may play a crucial role in early-stage furan-induced hepatocarcinogenesis. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Toxic and genotoxic effects of the 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D)-based herbicide on the Neotropical fish Cnesterodon decemmaculatus.

    PubMed

    Ruiz de Arcaute, C; Soloneski, S; Larramendy, M L

    2016-06-01

    Acute toxicity and genotoxicity of the 54.8% 2,4-D-based commercial herbicide DMA® were assayed on Cnesterodon decemmaculatus (Pisces, Poeciliidae). Whereas lethal effect was used as the end point for mortality, frequency of micronuclei (MNs), other nuclear abnormalities and primary DNA damage evaluated by the single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assay were employed as end points for genotoxicity. Mortality studies demonstrated an LC50 96 h value of 1008 mg/L (range, 929-1070) of 2,4-D. Behavioral changes, e.g., gathering at the bottom of the aquarium, slowness in motion, slow reaction and abnormal swimming were observed. Exposure to 2,4-D within the 252-756 mg/L range increased the frequency of MNs in fish exposed for both 48 and 96 h. Whereas blebbed nuclei were induced in treatments lasting for 48 and 96 h, notched nuclei were only induced in fish exposed for 96 h. Regardless of both concentration and exposure time, 2,4-D did not induce lobed nuclei and binucleated erythrocytes. In addition, we found that exposure to 2,4-D within the 252-756 mg/L range increased the genetic damage index in treatments lasting for either 48 and 96 h. The results represent the first experimental evidence of the lethal and several sublethal effects, including behavioral alterations and two genotoxic properties namely the induction of MNs and primary DNA strand breaks, exerted by 2,4-D on an endemic organism as C. decemmaculatus.

  1. Genotoxicity investigations on nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Oesch, Franz; Landsiedel, Robert

    2012-07-01

    This review is based on the lecture presented at the April 2010 nanomaterials safety assessment Postsatellite to the 2009 EUROTOX Meeting and summarizes genotoxicity investigations on nanomaterials published in the open scientific literature (up to 2008). Special attention is paid to the relationship between particle size and positive versus negative outcome, as well as the dependence of the outcome on the test used. Salient conclusions and outstanding recommendations emerging from the information summarized in this review are as follows: recognize that nanomaterials are not all the same; therefore know and document what nanomaterial has been tested and in what form; take nanomaterials specific properties into account; in order to make your results comparable with those of others and on other nanomaterials: use or at least include in your studies standardized methods; use in vivo studies to put in vitro results into perspective; take uptake and distribution of the nanomaterial into account; and in order to become able to make extrapolations to risk for human: learn about the mechanism of nanomaterials genotoxic effects. Past experience with standard non-nanosubstances already had shown that mechanisms of genotoxic effects can be complex and their elucidation can be demanding, while there often is an immediate need to assess the genotoxic hazard. Thus, a practical and pragmatic approach to genotoxicity investigations of novel nanomaterials is the use of a battery of standard genotoxicity testing methods covering a wide range of mechanisms. Application of these standard methods to nanomaterials demands, however, adaptations, and the interpretation of results from the genotoxicity testing of nanomaterials needs additional considerations exceeding those used for standard size materials.

  2. Glyphosate, alachor and maleic hydrazide have genotoxic effect on Trigonella foenum-graecum L.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Sazada; Meghvansi, Mukesh K; Khan, Shoukat Saeed

    2012-05-01

    In the present study effects of herbicides glyphosate (GP), alachlor (AL) and maleic hydrazide (MH) is studied on mitotic cells of Trigonella foenum-graecum L. Seeds of T. foenum-graecum L. treated with a series of concentrations ranging from 0.1%, 0.2%, 0.3%, 0.4% and 0.5% for 1, 2 and 6 h and their effect on mitotic index and chromosomal aberrations was studied. The results indicate that these herbicides reduced mitotic index in dose-dependent manner. In addition, increase in the percentage of abnormal mitotic plates was observed in herbicide treated groups which was both concentration and time dependent. Commonly observed abnormalities were c-mitosis, laggards, bridges, stickiness, c-anaphase, precocious separation, un-equal distribution and fragments. The result of the present investigation indicates that commonly used herbicides GP, AL and MH have significant genotoxic effect on T. foenum-graecum plant.

  3. In Vivo Effects of Vanadium Pentoxide and Antioxidants (Ascorbic Acid and Alpha-Tocopherol) on Apoptotic, Cytotoxic, and Genotoxic Damage in Peripheral Blood of Mice

    PubMed Central

    García-Rodríguez, María del Carmen; Hernández-Cortés, Lourdes Montserrat; Altamirano-Lozano, Mario Agustín

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of vanadium pentoxide (V2O5), ascorbic acid (AA), and alpha-tocopherol (α-TOH) on apoptotic, cytotoxic, and genotoxic activity. Groups of five Hsd:ICR mice were treated with the following: (a) vehicle, distilled water; (b) vehicle, corn oil; (c) AA, 100 mg/kg intraperitoneally (ip); (d) α-TOH, 20 mg/kg by gavage; (e) V2O5, 40 mg/kg by ip injection; (f) AA + V2O5; and (g) α-TOH + V2O5. Genotoxic damage was evaluated by examining micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MN-PCE) obtained from the caudal vein at 0, 24, 48, and 72 h after treatments. Induction of apoptosis and cell viability were assessed at 48 h after treatment in nucleated cells of peripheral blood. Treatment with AA alone reduced basal MN-PCE, while V2O5 treatment marginally increased MN-PCE at all times after injection. Antioxidants treatments prior to V2O5 administration decreased MN-PCE compared to the V2O5 group, with the most significant effect in the AA + V2O5 group. The apoptotic cells increased with all treatments, suggesting that this process may contribute to the elimination of the cells with V2O5-induced DNA damage (MN-PCE). The necrotic cells only increased in the V2O5 group. Therefore, antioxidants such as AA and α-TOH can be used effectively to protect or reduce the genotoxic effects induced by vanadium compounds like V2O5. PMID:27413422

  4. Cell-Based Genotoxicity Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reifferscheid, Georg; Buchinger, Sebastian

    Genotoxicity test systems that are based on bacteria display an important role in the detection and assessment of DNA damaging chemicals. They belong to the basic line of test systems due to their easy realization, rapidness, broad applicability, high sensitivity and good reproducibility. Since the development of the Salmonella microsomal mutagenicity assay by Ames and coworkers in the early 1970s, significant development in bacterial genotoxicity assays was achieved and is still a subject matter of research. The basic principle of the mutagenicity assay is a reversion of a growth inhibited bacterial strain, e.g., due to auxotrophy, back to a fast growing phenotype (regain of prototrophy). Deeper knowledge of the ­mutation events allows a mechanistic understanding of the induced DNA-damage by the utilization of base specific tester strains. Collections of such specific tester strains were extended by genetic engineering. Beside the reversion assays, test systems utilizing the bacterial SOS-response were invented. These methods are based on the fusion of various SOS-responsive promoters with a broad variety of reporter genes facilitating numerous methods of signal detection. A very important aspect of genotoxicity testing is the bioactivation of ­xenobiotics to DNA-damaging compounds. Most widely used is the extracellular metabolic activation by making use of rodent liver homogenates. Again, genetic engineering allows the construction of highly sophisticated bacterial tester strains with significantly enhanced sensitivity due to overexpression of enzymes that are involved in the metabolism of xenobiotics. This provides mechanistic insights into the toxification and detoxification pathways of xenobiotics and helps explaining the chemical nature of hazardous substances in unknown mixtures. In summary, beginning with "natural" tester strains the rational design of bacteria led to highly specific and sensitive tools for a rapid, reliable and cost effective ­genotoxicity

  5. Evaluation of genotoxic effects of surface waters using a battery of bioassays indicating different mode of action.

    PubMed

    Han, Yingnan; Li, Na; Oda, Yoshimitsu; Ma, Mei; Rao, Kaifeng; Wang, Zijian; Jin, Wei; Hong, Gang; Li, Zhiguo; Luo, Yi

    2016-11-01

    With the burgeoning contamination of surface waters threatening human health, the genotoxic effects of surface waters have received much attention. Because mutagenic and carcinogenic compounds in water cause tumors by different mechanisms, a battery of bioassays that each indicate a different mode of action (MOA) is required to evaluate the genotoxic effects of contaminants in water samples. In this study, 15 water samples from two source water reservoirs and surrounding rivers in Shijiazhuang city of China were evaluated for genotoxic effects. Target chemical analyses of 14 genotoxic pollutants were performed according to the Environmental quality standards for surface water of China. Then, the in vitro cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay, based on a high-content screening technique, was used to detect the effect of chromosome damage. The SOS/umu test using strain TA1535/pSK1002 was used to detect effects on SOS repair of gene expression. Additionally, two other strains, NM2009 and NM3009, which are highly sensitive to aromatic amines and nitroarenes, respectively, were used in the SOS/umu test to avoid false negative results. In the water samples, only two of the genotoxic chemicals listed in the water standards were detected in a few samples, with concentrations that were below water quality standards. However, positive results for the CBMN assay were observed in two river samples, and positive results for the induction of umuC gene expression in TA1535/pSK1002 were observed in seven river samples. Moreover, positive results were observed for NM2009 with S9 and NM3009 without S9 in some samples that had negative results using the strain TA1535/pSK1002. Based on the results with NM2009 and NM3009, some unknown or undetected aromatic amines and nitroarenes were likely in the source water reservoirs and the surrounding rivers. Furthermore, these compounds were most likely the causative pollutants for the genotoxic effect of these water samples. Therefore

  6. ASSESSING HUMAN EXPOSURE AND GENOTOXIC EFFECTS IN HUMAN EXFOLIATED EPITHELIA FROM INDIVDUALS IVING IN AN ENDEMIC REGION IN INNER MONGOLAI

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pilot study was conducted to characterize arsenic exposure and genotoxic effects in Ba Men located in West Central Inner Mongolia in an attempt to identify biomarkers useful for assessing health risk resulting from chronic arsenic exposure. The study subjects included 19 high ...

  7. Determination of Genotoxic Effects of Hookah Smoking by Micronucleus and Chromosome Aberration Methods

    PubMed Central

    Eker, Ebru Derici; Koyuncu, Hayri; Şahin, Nefise Özlen; Yüksel, Altan; Berköz, Mehmet; Diler, Songul Budak; Akgül, Sema Altan

    2016-01-01

    Background Use of a hookah (a type of water pipe) is a traditional way of smoking tobacco, particularly in the Middle East. In Turkey, its popularity has been growing in recent years, especially among young people. It is known that cigarette smoking has genotoxic effects and causes mutations, but no comprehensive study has been done on the genotoxic effects of hookah usage, particularly in Turkey. Material/Methods We collected peripheral blood/buccal smear samples from 30 subjects who did not smoke cigarettes but who regularly smoke a hookah an average of 2 times per week, and from 30 control subjects who had never smoked cigarettes or a hookah. Chromosome analyses were performed on the samples obtained from peripheral blood of each individual, 25 metaphase plaques were counted for each, and chromosome/chromatid breakage/gap parameters were evaluated. Micronucleus analysis was done on buccal smear samples and micronucleus/binucleus parameters were investigated by counting 2000 cells of each individual. Results Chromosome breakage ratios were found to be 0.64±0.86 and 0.46±0.71 in the study and control groups, respectively, while chromatid breakage ratios were 0.53±0.83 and 0.53±0.71; fragment ratios were 0.82±1.24 and 0.21±0.49 (p<0.05); and gap ratios were 0.57±0.83 and 0.18±0.53 (p<0.05), respectively. Micronucleus ratio was 6.03±2.06 and 4.43±2.27 (p<0.05) in the study and control groups, respectively, and binucleus ratios were 8.53±3.23 and 12.15±5.18, respectively (p<0.05). Conclusions Results of our study reveal significant statistical differences between the individuals who smoked hookah and those who did not in terms of fragment, gap, micronucleus, and binucleus parameters, suggesting that smoking a hookah may cause genotoxic effects. PMID:27869111

  8. Analysis of the Genotoxic Effects of Mobile Phone Radiation using Buccal Micronucleus Assay: A Comparative Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Narendra Nath; Sreedhar, Gadiputi; Mukherjee, Saikat

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Micronucleus (MN) is considered to be a reliable marker for genotoxic damage and it determines the presence and the extent of the chromosomal damage. The MN is formed due to DNA damage or chromosomal disarrangements. The MN has a close association with cancer incidences. In the new era, mobile phones are constantly gaining popularity specifically in the young generation, but this device uses radiofrequency radiation that may have a possible carcinogenic effect. The available reports related to the carcinogenic effect of mobile radiation on oral mucosa are contradictory. Aim To explore the effects of mobile phone radiation on the MN frequency in oral mucosal cells. Materials and Methods The subjects were divided into two major groups: low mobile phone users and high mobile phone users. Subjects who used their mobile phone since less than five years and less than three hours a week comprised of the first group and those who used their mobile since more than five years and more than 10 hours a week comprised of the second group. Net surfing and text messaging was not considered in this study. Exfoliated buccal mucosal cells were collected from both the groups and the cells were stained with DNA-specific stain acridine orange. Thousand exfoliated buccal mucosal cells were screened and the cells which were positive for micronuclei were counted. The micronucleus frequency was represented as mean±SD, and unpaired Student t-test was used for intergroup comparisons. Results The number of micronucleated cells/ 1000 exfoliated buccal mucosal cells was found to be significantly increased in high mobile phone users group than the low mobile phone users group. The use of mobile phone with the associated complaint of warmth around the ear showed a maximum increase in the number of micronucleated cells /1000 exfoliated buccal mucosal cells. Conclusion Mobile phone radiation even in the permissible range when used for longer duration causes significant genotoxicity

  9. Studies on the genotoxic effect of beryllium chloride and the possible protective role of selenium/vitamins A, C and E.

    PubMed

    Fahmy, Maha A; Hassan, Nagwa H A; Farghaly, Ayman A; Hassan, Entesar E S

    2008-04-30

    The genotoxic potential of beryllium chloride (BeCl2) was evaluated in vivo in mice using different endpoints. Chromosomal aberrations in bone marrow cells and in spermatocytes as well as sperm abnormalities were determined in the tested mice. The protective role of an orally administered drug consisting of selenium and vitamins A, C and E (selenium-ACE) was also studied. For analysis of chromosomal aberrations, both single and repeated oral treatments for a period of 3 weeks were performed. The doses used were 93.75, 187.50, 375, and 750 mg BeCl2/kg bw, which corresponds to 1/16, 1/8, 1/4, and 1/2 of the experimental LD50. BeCl2 induced a statistically significant increase in the percentage of chromosomal aberrations in both somatic and germ cells, with a dose- and time-response. The percentage of induced chromosomal aberrations was significantly reduced in all BeCl2-treated groups after oral administration of selenium-ACE. Beryllium chloride also induced a significant increase in the percentage of abnormal sperm. This percentage reached values of 9.62 +/- 0.32 and 5.56 +/- 0.31 in mice treated with the highest test dose of BeCl2 and with BeCl2+selenium-ACE, respectively, compared with 1.96 +/- 0.14 for the control. In conclusion, the results demonstrate the genotoxic effect of beryllium chloride and confirm the protective role of selenium-ACE against the genotoxicity of beryllium chloride.

  10. Determination of chemical composition and genotoxic effects of essential oil obtained from Nepeta nuda on Zea mays seedlings.

    PubMed

    Bozari, Sedat; Agar, Guleray; Aksakal, Ozkan; Erturk, Filiz A; Yanmis, Derya

    2013-05-01

    We aimed to determine the genotoxic potential of essential oil (EO) obtained from Nepeta nuda. The chemical content of EO was measured via gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The most abundant contents were 4aα,7β,7aα-nepetalactone (18.10%), germacrene (15.68%) and elemol (14.38%). For genotoxic effects of EO, Zea mays' seeds were exposed to four different concentrations of this oil. Inhibition of root and stem growth were observed with an increase in EO concentrations. Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) method was used to determine the genotoxic effects of EO. Some changes occurred in RAPD profiles of germinated EO-treated seeds. Even though total soluble protein quantity vary, the data observed from the protein profiles of sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) showed that there was a little differentiation between band profiles of treated samples and control group. We concluded that the basis of interactions between plants, like allelopathy, may be related with genotoxic effects of EO.

  11. Cobalt and antimony: genotoxicity and carcinogenicity.

    PubMed

    De Boeck, Marlies; Kirsch-Volders, Micheline; Lison, Dominique

    2003-12-10

    The purpose of this review is to summarise the data concerning genotoxicity and carcinogenicity of Co and Sb. Both metals have multiple industrial and/or therapeutical applications, depending on the considered species. Cobalt is used for the production of alloys and hard metal (cemented carbide), diamond polishing, drying agents, pigments and catalysts. Occupational exposure to cobalt may result in adverse health effects in different organs or tissues. Antimony trioxide is primarily used as a flame retardant in rubber, plastics, pigments, adhesives, textiles, and paper. Antimony potassium tartrate has been used worldwide as an anti-shistosomal drug. Pentavalent antimony compounds have been used for the treatment of leishmaniasis. Co(II) ions are genotoxic in vitro and in vivo, and carcinogenic in rodents. Co metal is genotoxic in vitro. Hard metal dust, of which occupational exposure is linked to an increased lung cancer risk, is proven to be genotoxic in vitro and in vivo. Possibly, production of active oxygen species and/or DNA repair inhibition are mechanisms involved. Given the recently provided proof for in vitro and in vivo genotoxic potential of hard metal dust, the mechanistic evidence of elevated production of active oxygen species and the epidemiological data on increased cancer risk, it may be advisable to consider the possibility of a new evaluation by IARC. Both trivalent and pentavalent antimony compounds are generally negative in non-mammalian genotoxicity tests, while mammalian test systems usually give positive results for Sb(III) and negative results for Sb(V) compounds. Assessment of the in vivo potential of Sb2O3 to induce chromosome aberrations (CA) gave conflicting results. Animal carcinogenicity data were concluded sufficient for Sb2O3 by IARC. Human carcinogenicity data is difficult to evaluate given the frequent co-exposure to arsenic. Possible mechanisms of action, including potential to produce active oxygen species and to interfere with

  12. Cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of tambjamine D, an alkaloid isolated from the nudibranch Tambja eliora, on Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Bruno C; Júnior, Hélio V N; Seleghim, Mirna H R; Berlinck, Roberto G S; Cunha, Geanne M A; Moraes, Manoel O; Pessoa, Claudia

    2008-08-11

    Marine organisms have been shown to be potential sources of bioactive compounds with pharmaceutical applications. Previous chemical investigation of the nudibranch Tambja eliora led to the isolation of the alkaloid tambjamine D. Tambjamines have been isolated from marine sources and belong to the family of 4-methoxypyrrolic-derived natural products, which display promising immunosuppressive and cytotoxic properties. Their ability to intercalate DNA and their pro-oxidant activity may be related to some of the biological effects of the 4-methoxypyrrolic alkaloids. The aim of the present investigation was to determine the cytotoxic, pro-oxidant and genotoxic properties of tambjamine D in V79 Chinese hamster lung fibroblast cells. Tambjamine D displayed a potent cytotoxic effect in V79 cells (IC50 1.2 microg/mL) evaluated by the MTT assay. Based on the MTT result, V79 cells were treated with different concentrations of tambjamine D (0.6, 1.2, 2.4 and 4.8 microg/mL). After 24h, tambjamine D reduced the number of viable cells in a concentration-dependent way at all concentrations tested, assessed by the trypan blue dye exclusion test. The hemolytic assay showed that the cytotoxic activity of tambjamine D was not related to membrane disruption (EC50>100 microg/mL). Tambjamine D increased the number of apoptotic cells in a concentration-dependent manner at all concentrations tested according to acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining, showing that the alkaloid cytotoxic effect was related to the induction of apoptosis. MTT reduction was stimulated by tambjamine D, which may indicate the generation of reactive oxygen species. Accordingly, treatment of cells with tambjamine D increased nitrite/nitrate at all concentrations and TBARS production starting at the concentration corresponding to the IC50. Tambjamine D, also, induced DNA strand breaks and increased the micronucleus cell frequency as evaluated by comet and micronucleus tests, respectively, at all concentrations

  13. In Vivo and In Vitro Genotoxic and Epigenetic Effects of Two Types of Cola Beverages and Caffeine: A Multiassay Approach.

    PubMed

    Mateo-Fernández, Marcos; Merinas-Amo, Tania; Moreno-Millán, Miguel; Alonso-Moraga, Ángeles; Demyda-Peyrás, Sebastián

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the biological and food safety of two different beverages: Classic Coca Cola™ (CCC) and Caffeine-Free Coca Cola (CFCC). To this end, we determined the genotoxicological and biological effects of different doses of lyophilised CCC and CFCC and Caffeine (CAF), the main distinctive constituent. Their toxic/antitoxic, genotoxic/antigenotoxic, and chronic toxicity (lifespan assay) effects were determined in vivo using the Drosophila model. Their cytotoxic activities were determined using the HL-60 in vitro cancer model. In addition, clastogenic DNA toxicity was measured using internucleosomal fragmentation and SCGE assays. Their epigenetic effects were assessed on the HL-60 methylation status using some repetitive elements. The experimental results showed a slight chemopreventive effect of the two cola beverages against HL-60 leukaemia cells, probably mediated by nonapoptotic mechanisms. Finally, CCC and CAF induced a global genome hypomethylation evaluated in LINE-1 and Alu M1 repetitive elements. Overall, we demonstrated for the first time the safety of this famous beverage in in vivo and in vitro models.

  14. In Vivo and In Vitro Genotoxic and Epigenetic Effects of Two Types of Cola Beverages and Caffeine: A Multiassay Approach

    PubMed Central

    Merinas-Amo, Tania; Moreno-Millán, Miguel; Alonso-Moraga, Ángeles; Demyda-Peyrás, Sebastián

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the biological and food safety of two different beverages: Classic Coca Cola™ (CCC) and Caffeine-Free Coca Cola (CFCC). To this end, we determined the genotoxicological and biological effects of different doses of lyophilised CCC and CFCC and Caffeine (CAF), the main distinctive constituent. Their toxic/antitoxic, genotoxic/antigenotoxic, and chronic toxicity (lifespan assay) effects were determined in vivo using the Drosophila model. Their cytotoxic activities were determined using the HL-60 in vitro cancer model. In addition, clastogenic DNA toxicity was measured using internucleosomal fragmentation and SCGE assays. Their epigenetic effects were assessed on the HL-60 methylation status using some repetitive elements. The experimental results showed a slight chemopreventive effect of the two cola beverages against HL-60 leukaemia cells, probably mediated by nonapoptotic mechanisms. Finally, CCC and CAF induced a global genome hypomethylation evaluated in LINE-1 and Alu M1 repetitive elements. Overall, we demonstrated for the first time the safety of this famous beverage in in vivo and in vitro models. PMID:27471731

  15. Chemical composition and in vitro cytotoxic, genotoxic effects of essential oil from Urtica dioica L.

    PubMed

    Gül, Süleyman; Demirci, Betül; Başer, Kemal Hüsnü Can; Akpulat, H Aşkin; Aksu, Pinar

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the chemical composition of Urtica dioica essential oil, and to evaluate its cytotoxic and genotoxic effects, using cytogenetic tests such as the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay and chromosomal aberration analysis in human lymphocyte cultures in vitro. GC-MS analysis of U. dioica essential oil identified 43 compounds, representing 95.8% of the oil. GC and GC-MS analysis of the essential oil of U. dioica revealed that carvacrol (38.2%), carvone (9.0%), naphthalene (8.9%), (E)-anethol (4.7%), hexahydrofarnesyl acetone (3.0%), (E)-geranyl acetone (2.9%), (E)-β-ionone (2.8%) and phytol (2.7%) are the main components, comprising 72.2% of the oil. A significant correlation was found between the concentration of essential oil and the following: chromosomal aberrations, micronuclei frequency, apoptotic cells, necrotic cells, and binucleated cells.

  16. Investigation of the genotoxic effect of pesticides on greenhouse workers' lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Piperakis, Stylianos M; Kontogianni, Konstantia; Karanastasi, Georgia; Iakovidou-Kritsi, Zafiroula; Cebulska-Wasilewska, Antonina; Piperakis, Michael M

    2009-03-01

    In the present study, the genotoxic effects of commonly applied pesticides were evaluated using the alkaline comet assay (pH > 13). The amount of DNA damage (% DNA in tail) in peripheral lymphocytes of 49 male agricultural workers from Southern Poland were measured and compared to 50 men from the same area who had no previous occupational exposure to pesticides. No statistically significant differences in basal DNA damage were found between the study groups. In addition, exposure of peripheral blood lymphocytes to hydrogen peroxide (100 and 150 microM) or gamma-irradiation (2.5 or 4.2 Gy) led to a similar degree of additional DNA damage and subsequent repair (for 2 hr) for all studied populations. In conclusion, our results indicate that the greenhouse workers who participated in this study had no detectable increased DNA damage or alteration in their cellular response to DNA damage in comparison to our control population.

  17. Evaluation of genotoxic effects of oral exposure to aluminum oxide nanomaterials in rat bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanyam, A; Sailaja, N; Mahboob, M; Rahman, M F; Misra, S; Hussain, Saber M; Grover, Paramjit

    2009-05-31

    Nanomaterials have novel properties and functions because of their small size. The unique nature of nanomaterials may be associated with potentially toxic effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vivo genotoxicity of rats exposed with Aluminum oxide nanomaterials. Hence in the present study, the genotoxicity of Aluminum oxide nanomaterials (30 and 40 nm) and its bulk material was studied in bone marrow of female Wistar rats using chromosomal aberration and micronucleus assays. The rats were administered orally with the doses of 500, 1000 and 2000 mg/kg bw. Statistically significant genotoxicity was observed with Aluminum oxide 30 and 40 nm with micronucleus as well as chromosomal aberration assays. Significantly (p < 0.05 or p < 0.001) increased frequency of MN was observed with 1000 and 2000 mg/kg bw dose levels of Aluminum oxide 30 nm (9.4 +/- 1.87 and 15.2 +/- 2.3, respectively) and Aluminum oxide 40 nm (8.1 +/- 1.8 and 13.9 +/- 2.21, respectively) over control (2.5 +/- 0.7) at 30 h. Likewise, at 48 h sampling time a significant (p < 0.05 or p < 0.001) increase in frequency of MN was evident at 1000 and 2000 mg/kg bw dose levels of Aluminum oxide 30 nm (10.6 +/- 1.68 and 16.6 +/- 2.66, respectively) and Aluminum oxide 40 nm (9.0 +/- 1.38 and 14.7 +/- 1.68, respectively) compared to control (1.8 +/- 0.75). Significantly increased frequencies (p < 0.05 or p < 0.001) of chromosomal aberrations were observed with Aluminum oxide 30 nm (1000 and 2000 mg/kg bw) and Aluminum oxide 40 nm (2000 mg/kg bw) in comparison to control at 18 and 24 h. Further, since there is need for information on the toxicokinetics of nanomaterials, determination of these properties of the nanomaterials was carried out in different tissues, urine and feces using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). A significant size dependent accumulation of Aluminum oxide nanomaterials occurred in different tissues, urine and feces of rats as shown by ICP-MS data. The results

  18. Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells affect the cell cycle arrest effect of genotoxic agents on acute lymphocytic leukemia cells via p21 down-regulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiran; Hu, Kaimin; Hu, Yongxian; Liu, Lizhen; Wang, Binsheng; Huang, He

    2014-09-01

    The effect of bone marrow microenvironment on the cell cycle of acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and the underlying mechanism has not been elucidated. In this study, we found that in normal condition, bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) had no significant effect on the cell cycle and apoptosis of ALL; in the condition when the cell cycle of ALL was blocked by genotoxic agents, BM-MSCs could increase the S-phase cell ratio and decrease the G2/M phase ratio of ALL. Besides, BM-MSCs could protect ALL cells from drug-induced apoptosis. Then, we proved that BM-MSCs affect the cell cycle arrest effect of genotoxic agents on ALL cells via p21 down-regulation. Moreover, our results indicated that activation of Wnt/β-catenin and Erk pathways might be involved in the BM-MSC-induced down-regulation of p21 in ALL cells. Targeting microenvironment-related signaling pathway may therefore be a potential novel approach for ALL therapy.

  19. Genotoxic Effects in Swimmers Exposed to Disinfection By-products in Indoor Swimming Pools

    PubMed Central

    Kogevinas, Manolis; Villanueva, Cristina M.; Font-Ribera, Laia; Liviac, Danae; Bustamante, Mariona; Espinoza, Felicidad; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J.; Espinosa, Aina; Fernandez, Pilar; DeMarini, David M.; Grimalt, Joan O.; Grummt, Tamara; Marcos, Ricard

    2010-01-01

    Background Exposure to disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water has been associated with cancer risk. A recent study (Villanueva et al. 2007; Am J Epidemiol 165:148–156) found an increased bladder cancer risk among subjects attending swimming pools relative to those not attending. Objectives We evaluated adults who swam in chlorinated pools to determine whether exposure to DBPs in pool water is associated with biomarkers of genotoxicity. Methods We collected blood, urine, and exhaled air samples from 49 nonsmoking adult volunteers before and after they swam for 40 min in an indoor chlorinated pool. We estimated associations between the concentrations of four trihalomethanes (THMs) in exhaled breath and changes in micronuclei (MN) and DNA damage (comet assay) in peripheral blood lymphocytes before and 1 hr after swimming; urine mutagenicity (Ames assay) before and 2 hr after swimming; and MN in exfoliated urothelial cells before and 2 weeks after swimming. We also estimated associations and interactions with polymorphisms in genes related to DNA repair or to DBP metabolism. Results After swimming, the total concentration of the four THMs in exhaled breath was seven times higher than before swimming. The change in the frequency of micronucleated lymphocytes after swimming increased in association with higher exhaled concentrations of the brominated THMs (p = 0.03 for bromodichloromethane, p = 0.05 for chlorodibromomethane, p = 0.01 for bromoform) but not chloroform. Swimming was not associated with DNA damage detectable by the comet assay. Urine mutagenicity increased significantly after swimming, in association with the higher concentration of exhaled bromoform (p = 0.004). We found no significant associations with changes in micronucleated urothelial cells. Conclusions Our findings support potential genotoxic effects of exposure to DBPs from swimming pools. The positive health effects gained by swimming could be increased by reducing the potential health

  20. Analysis of Genotoxic and Cytotoxic Responses Induced by Simulated Space Radiation Qualities by Use of Recombinant Bacteria Carrying a Dual-Function Dual-Reporter Construct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Hellweg, Christine; Zahoor, Ahmed; Testard, Isabelle; Reitz, Guenther

    Along with the long-term space exploration come various potential health risks due to unique physical factors of the space environment. Space radiation is one of the primary environmental hazards associated with space flight. In order to deal with space-related risk radiation exposure must be properly characterised and quantified, and biological effects of charged particles have to be analysed in ground based research, especially as astronauts are subjected to a differing radiation quality in space than they receive on Earth. For risk assessment, the mutagenic potential of the heavy ion component of the galactic cosmic radiation is of major concern for tumour induction as radiation late effects. The recombinant SWITCH test is based on TA1535 Salmonella typhimurium cells transformed with a dual-function dual-reporter vector harbouring (a) the genes for bioluminescence production from Photobacterium leiognathi under the control of a DNA-damage inducible promoter and (b) the gene for green fluorescent protein from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria under the control of a constitutive promoter. Suchlike genetically modified organism report on the presence of genotoxic conditions by dose dependent increase of bioluminescence induction and on the presence of cytotoxic conditions by dose dependent decrease in GFP fluorescence. By this, it is possible to analyse bacterial inactivation and mutation induction by ionizing radiation in parallel in the same cell within short time. Experiments with heavy ions have been performed with the SWITCH test at GANIL with the following accelerated heavy ions: 35 MeV/u (72 keV/µm) and 75 MeV/u (37 keV/µm) carbon, 95 MeV/u argon (377 keV/µm), 95 MeV/u neon (98 keV/µm), 75 MeV/u nickel (967 keV/µm) and 29 MeV/u lead (10238 keV/µm). The results obtained clearly show that the numbers of hits (particles per cm2 ) necessary to inactivate the bacteria (cytotoxicity) depend on LET. The higher the ionisation capacity of the accelerated ion, the

  1. Protective role of vitamins A, C, and E against the genotoxic damage induced by aflatoxin B1 in cultured human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Alpsoy, L; Agar, G; Ikbal, M

    2009-04-01

    In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effect of vitamins A, C, and E against aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) on blood cultures in relation to induction of sister chromatid exchange (SCE). The results indicated genotoxic and mutagenic damage in cultured human lymphocytes exposed to AFB1. The results showed that 5 microM concentration of AFB1 increased SCE. When vitamins A, C, and E were added to AFB1, the frequency of SCE decreased. These results suggest that vitamins A, C, and E could effectively inhibit AFB1-induced SCE, which may partially responsible for its mutagenic effect of AFB1. Besides, the protective effect of vitamins A, C, and E against AFB1 was increased in a dose-dependent manner (i.e., as the doses increased, their protective effects also increased). There was a significant decrease in the SCE frequency in AFB1-treated group compared with the groups receiving AFB1 and also vitamins A, C, and E. The most effective concentration was 100 microM vitamin C, and the lowest effective concentration was 0.5 microM vitamin A. Vitamin C has the most effective concentration of 100 microM, and vitamin A has the lowest effective concentration of 0.5 microM. The order of the decreasing effect of the SCE frequency of vitamins was as follows: vitamin C > vitamin E > vitamin A.

  2. Effect of O6-Alkylguanine-DNA Alkyltransferase on Genotoxicity of Epihalohydrins

    PubMed Central

    Kalapila, Aley G.; Loktionova, Natalia A.; Pegg, Anthony E.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) on the toxicity and mutagenicity of epihalohydrins was studied. AGT is a DNA repair protein that protects cells from agents that produce genotoxic O6-alkylguanine lesions by transferring the alkyl group to an internal cysteine residue (Cys145 in human AGT) in a single-step. This cysteine acceptor site is highly reactive and epihalohydrins reacted readily with AGT at this site with a halide order of reactivity of Br > Cl > F. AGT expression in bacterial cells caused a very large increase in the mutagenicity and cytotoxicity of epibromohydrin. The mutations were almost all G:C to A:T transitions. Epichlorohydrin also augmented AGT-mediated mutagenesis but to a lesser extent than epibromohydrin. In vitro experiments showed that AGT was covalently cross-linked to DNA in the presence of epibromohydrin and that this conjugation occurred predominantly at Cys145, and to a smaller extent at Cys150, a less reactive residue also located within the active site pocket. Two pathways yielding the AGT-DNA adduct were found to occur. The predominant mechanism results in an AGT-epihalohydrin intermediate, which, facilitated by the DNA binding properties of AGT, then reacts covalently with DNA. The second pathway involves an initial reactive DNA-epihalohydrin intermediate that subsequently reacts with AGT. Our results show that the paradoxical AGT-mediated increase in genotoxicity which has previously been shown to occur with dihaloalkanes, butadiene diepoxide and nitrogen mustards, also occurs with epihalohydrins and is likely to contribute to their toxicity and mutagenicity. PMID:19472322

  3. Genotoxicity of swine effluents.

    PubMed

    Techio, V H; Stolberg, J; Kunz, A; Zanin, E; Perdomo, C C

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed at the investigation of genotoxic effects of swine effluents from different stages of a treatment system for swine wastes through bioassay of stamen hairs and micronuclei in Tradescantia (clone BNL 4430). No significant differences (p≥0.05) regarding the genic mutations were found in the bioassay of stamen hairs, independently of the effluent analysed. For the genotoxicity test with micronuclei, the plants exposed to raw wastes, to sludge, and to effluent of the biodigester have presented higher rates of chromosomal damages (micronuclei), with significant differences in relation to the control group and other effluent of the waste treatment system (p≤0.05). The association between the chemical parameters and the genotoxicity data have shown that the variables COD and TKN have presented significant correlation (p≤0.05) with the number of mutagenic events in the tetrads.

  4. In vivo genotoxic interactions among three phenolic benzene metabolites.

    PubMed

    Marrazzini, A; Chelotti, L; Barrai, I; Loprieno, N; Barale, R

    1994-11-01

    Three benzene metabolites, hydroquinone (HQ), cathecol (CAT) and phenol (PHE) were studied to define their possible interaction in inducing micronuclei (Mn) in mouse bone marrow polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs). HQ and CAT, administered separately, induced Mn while PHE showed no genotoxic effects. Binary and ternary mixtures of two or three metabolites gave different results, causing considerable increase or decrease in Mn induction. HQ and PHE, in binary mixtures, as well as PHE and CAT, increased Mn synergistically, while HQ and CAT interacted negatively. The genotoxicity of ternary mixtures was mainly the consequence of two metabolites: HQ and CAT. The maximal effect obtained is far below the induction of Mn consequent to benzene treatment. These data suggest that toxic and genotoxic effects of benzene alone could be the result of more complex interactions among these and other metabolites.

  5. Genotoxic and reprotoxic effects of tritium and external gamma irradiation on aquatic animals.

    PubMed

    Adam-Guillermin, Christelle; Pereira, Sandrine; Della-Vedova, Claire; Hinton, Tom; Garnier-Laplace, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    Aquatic ecosystems are chronically exposed to natural radioactivity or to artificial radionuclides released by human activities (e.g., nuclear medicine and biology,nuclear industry, military applications). Should the nuclear industry expand in the future, radioactive environmental releases, under normal operating conditions or accidental ones, are expected to increase, which raises public concerns about possible consequences on the environment and human health. Radionuclide exposures may drive macromolecule alterations, and among macromolecules DNA is the major target for ionizing radiations. DNA damage, if not correctly repaired, may induce mutations, teratogenesis, and reproductive effects. As such, damage at the molecular level may have consequences at the population level. In this review, we present an overview of the literature dealing with the effects of radionuclides on DNA, development, and reproduction of aquatic organisms. The review focuses on the main radionuclides that are released by nuclear power plants under normal operating conditions, γ emitters and tritium. Additionally, we fitted nonlinear curves to the dose-response data provided in the reviewed publications and manuscripts, and thus obtained endpoints commonly associated with ecotoxicological studies, such as the EDR(10). These were then used as a common metric for comparing the values and data published in the literature.The effects of tritium on aquatic organisms were reviewed for dose rates that ranged from 29 nGy/day to 29 Gy/day. Although beta emission from tritium decay presents a rather special risk of damage to DNA, genotoxicity-induced by tritium has been scarcely studied. Most of the effects studied have related to reproduction and development. Species sensitivity and the form of tritium present are important factors that drive the ecotoxicity of tritium. We have concluded from this review that invertebrates are more sensitive to the effects of tritium than are vertebrates

  6. Determination of genotoxic effects of methidathion alkaline hydrolysis in human lymphocytes using the micronucleus assay and square-wave voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Stivaktakis, Polychronis D; Giannakopoulos, Evangelos; Vlastos, Dimitris; Matthopoulos, Demetrios P

    2017-02-01

    The interaction of pesticides with environmental factors, such as pH, may result in alterations of their physicochemical properties and should be taken into consideration in regard to their classification. This study investigates the genotoxicity of methidathion and its alkaline hydrolysis by-products in cultured human lymphocytes, using the square-wave voltammetry (square wave-adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry (SW-AdCSV) technique) and the cytokinesis block micronucleus assay (CBMN assay). According to the SW-AdCSV data the alkaline hydrolysis of methidathion results in two new molecules, one non-electro-active and a second electro-active which is more genotoxic than methidathion itself in cultured human lymphocytes, inducing higher micronuclei frequencies. The present study confirms the SW-AdCSV technique as a voltammetric method which can successfully simulates the electrodynamics of the cellular membrane.

  7. Genotoxic effects of the carbamate insecticide Pirimor-50® in Vicia faba root tip meristems and human lymphocyte culture after direct application and treatment with its metabolic extracts.

    PubMed

    Valencia-Quintana, Rafael; Gómez-Arroyo, Sandra; Sánchez-Alarcón, Juana; Milić, Mirta; Olivares, José Luis Gómez; Waliszewski, Stefan M; Cortés-Eslava, Josefina; Villalobos-Pietrini, Rafael; Calderón-Segura, María Elena

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate genotoxic effects of Pirimor-50®, a pirimicarb-based formulation (50 % active ingredient), in human lymphocyte cultures and Vicia faba root meristems. Furthermore, the objective was to examine a combined influence of insecticide treatment with mammalian microsomal S9 and vegetal S10 metabolic fractions or S10 mix metabolic transformation extracts (after Vicia faba primary roots treatment with Pirimor-50®). We used sister chromatid exchange assay-SCE and measured cell cycle progression and proliferation (proportion of M1-M3 metaphases and replication index ratio-RI). Two processes were used for plant promutagen activation: in vivo activation-Pirimor-50® was applied for 4 h to the plant and then S10 mix was added to lymphocytes; and, in vitro activation-lymphocytes were treated with Pirimor-50® and S10 or S9 for 2 h. Direct treatment induced significantly higher SCE frequencies in meristems at 0.01 mg mL-1. In lymphocytes, significantly higher SCE was at 1 mg mL-1 with decrease in RI and M1-M3 metaphase proportions at 0.5 mg mL-1 and cell division stop at 2.5 mg mL1. S10 mix lymphocyte treatment showed significantly elevated SCE values at 2-2.5 mg mL-1, with cell death at 3 mg mL-1. Lymphocyte treatment with Pirimor-50® together with S9 or S10 showed slightly elevated SCE frequency but had a significant influence on RI decrease, with lowest values in S9 treatment. Since no data are available on the genotoxicity of Pirimor-50®, this study is one of the first to evaluate and compare its direct effect in two bioassays, animal and vegetal, and also the effect of plant and animal metabolism on its genotoxic potential.

  8. Environmental effects of dredging. Evaluation of sediment genotoxicity. Workshop summary and conclusions. Technical notes

    SciTech Connect

    1990-10-01

    This Technical Note summarizes the proceedings of a workshop that was held March 6-8,1990, at the Environmental Laboratory, US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station. The purpose of the workshop was to gain guidance from recognized authorities for the development of sediment bioassays of genotoxicity, that is, mutagenicity, carcinogenicity, immunotoxicity, teratogenicity, and histopathologic potential. The conclusions of the workshop are being used to identify existing genotoxicity bioassays that show promise for application in evaluating sediments, to recommend modifications for testing sediments, and to help direct subsequent research and development of bioassays of genotoxicity by the US Army Corps of Engineers.

  9. An in vitro study on the genotoxic effect of substituted furans in cells transfected with human metabolizing enzymes: 2,5-dimethylfuran and furfuryl alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Huffman, Minor P.; Høie, Anja H.; Svendsen, Camilla; Brunborg, Gunnar; Murkovic, Michael; Glatt, Hansruedi; Husøy, Trine

    2016-01-01

    2,5-Dimethylfuran (DMF) and furfuryl alcohol (FFA) are two substituted furans that are formed during the processing of foods and have also been used as food flavorings. DMF and FFA are proposed to be bioactivated by human sulfotransferases (SULTs) which are not expressed in conventional cell lines used for genotoxicity testing. Therefore, in addition to the standard V79 cell line, we used a transfected V79 derived cell line co-expressing human cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2E1 and human SULT1A1 to assess the genotoxicity of DMF and FFA. The alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assay was used to detect DNA damage in the form of single strand breaks and alkali-labile sites after exposure to DMF (0.5h; 0.5, 1, 1.5 or 2mM) or FFA (3h; 1, 3, 6 or 15mM). DMF induced DNA damage in V79 cells in a concentration-dependent manner irrespective of the expression of human CYP2E1 and SULT1A1. Almost no increase in the level of DNA damage was detected after exposure to FFA, except for a weak effect at the highest concentration in the transfected cell line. The results suggest that DNA damage in V79 cells from exposure to DMF detected by the alkaline SCGE assay is independent of human CYP2E1 and SULT1A1, and the genotoxic effect of FFA, as assessed by SCGE, is minimal in V79 cells. PMID:27226491

  10. Lymphocyte Oxidative Stress/Genotoxic Effects Are Related to Serum IgG and IgA Levels in Coke Oven Workers

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Meili; Li, Yongfei; Zheng, Aqun; Xue, Xiaochang; Chen, Lan; Kong, Yu

    2014-01-01

    We investigated oxidative stress/genotoxic effects levels, immunoglobulin levels, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) levels exposed in 126 coke oven workers and in 78 control subjects, and evaluated the association between oxidative stress/genotoxic effects levels and immunoglobulin levels. Significant differences were observed in biomarkers, including 1-hydroxypyrene levels, employment time, percentages of alcohol drinkers, MDA, 8-OHdG levels, CTL levels and CTM, MN, CA frequency, and IgG, IgA levels between the control and exposed groups. Slightly higher 1-OHP levels in smoking users were observed. For the dose-response relationship of IgG, IgA, IgM, and IgE by 1-OHP, each one percentage increase in urinary 1-OHP generates a 0.109%, 0.472%, 0.051%, and 0.067% decrease in control group and generates a 0.312%, 0.538%, 0.062%, and 0.071% decrease in exposed group, respectively. Except for age, alcohol and smoking status, IgM, and IgE, a significant correlation in urinary 1-OHP and other biomarkers in the total population was observed. Additionally, a significant negative correlation in genotoxic/oxidative damage biomarkers of MDA, 8-OH-dG, CTL levels, and immunoglobins of IgG and IgA levels, especially in coke oven workers, was found. These data suggest that oxidative stress/DNA damage induced by PAHs may play a role in toxic responses for PAHs in immunological functions. PMID:25136686

  11. An in vitro study on the genotoxic effect of substituted furans in cells transfected with human metabolizing enzymes: 2,5-dimethylfuran and furfuryl alcohol.

    PubMed

    Huffman, Minor P; Høie, Anja H; Svendsen, Camilla; Brunborg, Gunnar; Murkovic, Michael; Glatt, Hansruedi; Husøy, Trine

    2016-09-01

    2,5-Dimethylfuran (DMF) and furfuryl alcohol (FFA) are two substituted furans that are formed during the processing of foods and have also been used as food flavorings. DMF and FFA are proposed to be bioactivated by human sulfotransferases (SULTs) which are not expressed in conventional cell lines used for genotoxicity testing. Therefore, in addition to the standard V79 cell line, we used a transfected V79 derived cell line co-expressing human cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2E1 and human SULT1A1 to assess the genotoxicity of DMF and FFA. The alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assay was used to detect DNA damage in the form of single strand breaks and alkali-labile sites after exposure to DMF (0.5h; 0.5, 1, 1.5 or 2mM) or FFA (3h; 1, 3, 6 or 15mM). DMF induced DNA damage in V79 cells in a concentration-dependent manner irrespective of the expression of human CYP2E1 and SULT1A1. Almost no increase in the level of DNA damage was detected after exposure to FFA, except for a weak effect at the highest concentration in the transfected cell line. The results suggest that DNA damage in V79 cells from exposure to DMF detected by the alkaline SCGE assay is independent of human CYP2E1 and SULT1A1, and the genotoxic effect of FFA, as assessed by SCGE, is minimal in V79 cells.

  12. Assessment of the cytotoxic, genotoxic and mutagenic effects of the commercial black dye in Allium cepa cells before and after bacterial biodegradation treatment.

    PubMed

    Ventura-Camargo, Bruna de Campos; de Angelis, Dejanira de Franceschi; Marin-Morales, Maria Aparecida

    2016-10-01

    The present study evaluated the cytotoxic, genotoxic and mutagenic actions of different concentrations (50 and 200 μg/L) of BDCP (Black Dye Commercial Product) used by textile industries, before and after bacterial biodegradation, by the conventional staining cytogenetic technique and NOR-banding in Allium cepa cells. Differences in the chromosomal and nuclear aberrations and alterations in the number of nucleoli were observed in cells exposed to BDCP with and without the microbial treatment. The significant frequencies of chromosome and nuclear aberrations noted in the tests with bacterially biodegraded BDCP indicate that the metabolites generated by degradation are more genotoxic than the chemical itself. Losses of genetic material characterize a type of alteration that was mainly associated with the action of the original BDCP, whereas chromosome stickiness, nuclear buds and binucleated cells were the aberrations that were preferentially induced by BDCP metabolites after biodegradation. The significant frequencies of cell death observed in the tests with biodegraded BDCP also show the cytotoxic effects of the BDCP metabolites. The reduction in the total frequency of altered cells after the recovery treatments showed that the test organism A. cepa has the ability to recover from damage induced by BDCP and its metabolites after the exposure conditions are normalized.

  13. Genotoxic Effects of Titanium Dioxide and Cerium Dioxide Nanoparticles in Human Respiratory Epithelial Cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    The nanomaterial industry has recently seen rapid growth, therefore, the risk assessment of human exposure to nanomaterials in consumer products is of paramount importance. The genotoxicity of nanomaterials is a fundamental aspect of hazard identification and regulatory guidance....

  14. METABOLISM, MICROFLORA EFFECTS, AND GENOTOXICITY IN HALOACETIC ACID-TREATED CULTURES OF RAT CECAL MICROBIOTA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Haloacetic acids are by-products of drinking water disinfection. Several compounds in this class are genotoxic and have been identified as rodent hepatocarcinogens. Enzymes produced by the normal intestinal bacteria can transform some promutagens and procarcinogens to their bio...

  15. Normalization of nano-sized TiO2-induced clastogenicity, genotoxicity and mutagenicity by chlorophyllin administration in mice brain, liver, and bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    El-Ghor, Akmal A; Noshy, Magda M; Galal, Ahmad; Mohamed, Hanan Ramadan H

    2014-11-01

    The intensive uses of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles in sunscreens, toothpaste, sweats, medications, etc. making humans exposed to it daily by not little amounts and also increased its risks including genotoxicity. Thus, the present study was designed as one way to reduce nano-titanium-induced clastogenicity, genotoxicity, and mutagenicity in mice by co-administration of the free radical scavenger chlorophyllin (CHL). In addition, markers of oxidative stress were detected to shed more light on mechanism(s) underlying nano-sized TiO2 genotoxicity. Male mice were exposed to multiple injection into the abdominal cavity for five consecutive days with either CHL (40 mg/kg bw/day), or each of three dose levels of nano-sized TiO2 (500, 1000, or 2000 mg/kg bw/day) alone, or both simultaneously and sacrificed by cervical dislocation 24 h after the last treatment. After CHL co-administration, the observed dose-dependent genotoxicity of TiO2 nanoparticles indicated by the significant elevations in frequencies of both micronuclei and DNA damage induction was significantly decreased and returned to the negative control level. The observed induced mutations in p53 exons 5, 7, & 8 and 5 & 8 in the liver and brain, respectively, were declined in most cases. Moreover, CHL significantly decreased hepatic malondialdehyde level and significantly increased glutathione level and superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase activities that were significantly disrupted in animal groups treated with nano-TiO2 alone. In conclusion, the evidenced in vivo genotoxicity of nano-TiO2 in the present study was normalized after CHL co-administration which supports the previously suggested oxidative stress as the possible mechanism for titanium toxicity.

  16. Differential resistance of human embryonic stem cells and somatic cell types to hydrogen peroxide-induced genotoxicity may be dependent on innate basal intracellular ROS levels.

    PubMed

    Vinoth, Kumar Jayaseelan; Manikandan, Jayapal; Sethu, Swaminathan; Balakrishnan, Lakshmidevi; Heng, Alexis; Lu, Kai; Poonepalli, Anuradha; Hande, Manoor Prakash; Cao, Tong

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells (hESC) displayed higher resistance to oxidative and genotoxic stress compared to somatic cells, but did not further probe the underlying mechanisms. Using H₂O₂-induced genotoxicity as a model, this study investigated whether higher resistance of hESC to oxidative and genotoxic stress could be due to lower innate basal intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), as compared to their differentiated fibroblastic progenies (H1F) and two other somatic cell types - human embryonic palatal mesenchymal (HEPM) cells and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). Comet assay demonstrated that undifferentiated hESC consistently sustained lower levels of DNA damage upon acute exposure to H₂O₂ for 30 min, compared to somatic cells. DCFDA and HE staining with flow cytometry showed that undifferentiated hESC had lower innate basal intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species compared to somatic cells, which could lead to their higher resistance to genotoxic stress upon acute exposure to H₂O₂.

  17. Comparison of cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of plutonium-239 alpha particles and mobile phone GSM 900 radiation in the Allium cepa test.

    PubMed

    Pesnya, Dmitry S; Romanovsky, Anton V

    2013-01-20

    The goal of this study was to compare the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of plutonium-239 alpha particles and GSM 900 modulated mobile phone (model Sony Ericsson K550i) radiation in the Allium cepa test. Three groups of bulbs were exposed to mobile phone radiation during 0 (sham), 3 and 9h. A positive control group was treated during 20min with plutonium-239 alpha-radiation. Mitotic abnormalities, chromosome aberrations, micronuclei and mitotic index were analyzed. Exposure to alpha-radiation from plutonium-239 and exposure to modulated radiation from mobile phone during 3 and 9h significantly increased the mitotic index. GSM 900 mobile phone radiation as well as alpha-radiation from plutonium-239 induced both clastogenic and aneugenic effects. However, the aneugenic activity of mobile phone radiation was more pronounced. After 9h of exposure to mobile phone radiation, polyploid cells, three-groups metaphases, amitoses and some unspecified abnormalities were detected, which were not registered in the other experimental groups. Importantly, GSM 900 mobile phone radiation increased the mitotic index, the frequency of mitotic and chromosome abnormalities, and the micronucleus frequency in a time-dependent manner. Due to its sensitivity, the A. cepa test can be recommended as a useful cytogenetic assay to assess cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields.

  18. Mechanisms of the genotoxicity of crocidolite asbestos in mammalian cells: implication from mutation patterns induced by reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, An; Zhou, Hongning; Yu, Dennis Zengliang; Hei, Tom K

    2002-01-01

    Asbestos is an important environmental carcinogen in the United States and remains the primary occupational concern in many developing countries; however, the underlying mechanisms of its genotoxicity are not known. We showed previously that asbestos is a potent gene and chromosomal mutagen in mammalian cells and that it induces mostly multilocus deletions. Furthermore, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are associated with the mutagenic process. To evaluate the contribution of ROS to the mutagenicity of asbestos, we examined their generation, particularly hydrogen peroxide, and compared the types of mutants induced by crocidolite fibers with those generated by H(2)O(2 )in human-hamster hybrid (A(L)) cells. Using confocal scanning microscopy together with the radical probe 5,6 -chloromethy-2,7 -dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (CM-H(2)DCFDA), we found that asbestos induces a dose-dependent increase in the level of ROS among fiber-treated A(L) cells, which is suppressed by concurrent treatment with dimethyl sulfoxide. Using N-acetyl-3,7-dihydroxyphenoxazine (Amplex Red reagent) together with horseradish peroxidase, we further demonstrated that there was a dose-dependent induction of H(2)O(2) in crocidolite-treated A(L) cells. The amount of H(2)O(2 )induced by asbestos reached a plateau at a dose of 6 microg/cm(2). Concurrent treatment with catalase (1,000 U/mL) inhibited this induction by 7- to 8-fold. Mutation spectrum analysis showed that the types of CD59(-) mutants induced by crocidolite fibers were similar to those induced by equitoxic doses of H(2)O(2). These results provide direct evidence that the mutagenicity of asbestos is mediated by ROS in mammalian cells. PMID:12361925

  19. Effects of SO2 or NOx on toxic and genotoxic properties of chemical carcinogens. II. Short term in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Pool, B L; Brendler, S; Klein, R G; Monarca, S; Pasquini, R; Schmezer, P; Zeller, W J

    1988-07-01

    Short term in vivo studies were performed to study biological effects of the common air pollutants SO2 or NOx and their influence on the genotoxic activities of nitrosamines. Hepatocytes and lung cells were isolated from Sprague-Dawley rats which had inhaled 50 p.p.m. of SO2 or NOx for 2 weeks. After incubating the cells for 1 h, genotoxicity was determined in hepatocytes by measuring DNA single-strand breaks induced by N-nitroso-acetoxymethylmethylamine, N-nitrosodimethylamine and N-nitrosomethylbenzylamine. Parameters of toxicity (trypan blue exclusion and leakage of serum enzymes) were determined in both liver and lung cells also following 1 h incubation. The activities of aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH), nitrosodimethylamine demethylase (NDMA-D) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) were determined in subcellular microsomal fractions isolated from lung and liver tissues. Finally, as a measure of overall toxicity, the activities of various serum enzymes were determined in the blood serum of the rats. It was found that the induction of DNA single-strand breaks by three nitrosamines was decreased in hepatocytes from SO2-treated animals. The viability of rat hepatocytes and of rat lung cells, as determined by trypan blue exclusion, was similar in all three treatment groups immediately after isolation, as well as after 1 h incubation with DMSO or with the nitrosamines. In contrast, the leakage of enzymes was different in hepatocytes of SO2-treated rats, since lactate dehydrogenase activity was decreased. Leakage of enzymes from the lung cells did not differ from group to group, but was lower than from hepatocytes. Foreign compound metabolizing enzymes were mainly decreased in NOx-treated animals, namely AHH, NDMA-D and GST in liver and GST in the lung. For SO2-treated animals NDMA-D was increased in liver and GST was decreased in lung. Blood serum enzyme levels were not greatly different from each other, except for lactate dehydrogenase which was elevated in SO2

  20. Vigna unguiculata modulates cholesterol induced cardiac markers, genotoxicity and gene expressions profile in an experimental rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Janeesh, P A; Abraham, Annie

    2013-04-25

    Vigna unguiculata (VU) leaves are edible and used as a leafy vegetable in cuisine from traditional times in India. This study was designed to investigate the cardioprotective effect of VU in cholesterol fed rabbits. The animals were randomly divided into 4 groups of 6 animals each and the experimental period was 3 months. Group I-ND [normal diet 40 g feed], Group II-ND + FVU [flavanoid fraction of Vigna unguiculata (150 mg kg (-1) per body weight)], Group III-ND + CH [cholesterol (400 mg)] and Group IV-ND + CH (400 mg) +FVU (150 mg kg(-1) per body weight). After the experimental period, animals were sacrificed and the various parameters, such as cardiac markers, toxicity parameters, genotoxicity and gene expression, were investigated. Cholesterol feeding causes a significant increase in the levels of cardiac marker enzymes, namely lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine phospokinase (CPK), atherogenic index, toxicity parameters like serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (SGOT) and serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase (SGPT) were elevated. Antioxidant enzyme levels were decreased, lipid peroxidation products in heart tissue and inflammatory markers, namely cyclooxygenase (COX2) and lipooxygenase (LOX15) in peripheral blood monocytes (PBMCs), were significantly increased. A genotoxicity study using a Comet assay and gene expression by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of transforming growth factor-b1 (TGF-b1) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) from heart tissue showed an altered expression in the disease group. The supplementation of the flavonoid fraction of Vigna unguiculata leaves (FVU) in the CH + FVU group caused the reversal of the above parameters and cardiotoxicity to near normal when compared with the CH group and FVU. This study revealed the cardioprotective nature of Vigna unguiculata in preventing cardiovascular diseases and this effect is attributed to the presence of antioxidants and the antihyperlipidemic properties of the

  1. The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of soluble and particulate cobalt in human lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hong; Smith, Leah J; Holmes, Amie L; Zheng, Tongzhang; Pierce Wise, John

    2016-05-01

    Cobalt is a toxic metal used in various industrial applications leading to adverse lung effects by inhalation. Cobalt is considered a possible human carcinogen with the lung being a primary target. However, few studies have considered cobalt-induced toxicity in human lung cells, especially normal lung epithelial cells. Therefore, in this study, we sought to determine the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of particulate and soluble cobalt in normal primary human lung epithelial cells. Cobalt oxide and cobalt chloride were used as representative particulate and soluble cobalt compounds, respectively. Exposure to both particulate and soluble cobalt induced a concentration-dependent increase in cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and intracellular cobalt ion levels. Based on intracellular cobalt ion levels, we found that soluble and particulate cobalt induced similar cytotoxicity while soluble cobalt was more genotoxic than particulate cobalt. These data indicate that cobalt compounds are cytotoxic and genotoxic to human lung epithelial cells.

  2. Effect of Low-Dose Selenium Supplementation on the Genotoxicity, Tissue Injury and Survival of Mice Exposed to Acute Whole-Body Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Verma, Prachi; Kunwar, Amit; Indira Priyadarsini, K

    2017-02-11

    The aim of the present study is to evaluate the radioprotective effect of low-dose selenium supplementation (multiple administrations) on radiation toxicities and mortality induced by lethal dose of whole-body irradiation (WBI). For this, BALB/c mice received sodium selenite (4 μg/kg body wt) intraperitoneally for five consecutive days and subjected to WBI at an absorbed dose of 8 Gy ((60)Co, 1 Gy/min). Administration of sodium selenite was continued even during the post irradiation days three times a week till the end of the experiment. The radioprotective effect was evaluated in terms of the improvement in 30 days post irradiation survival, protection from DNA damage, and biochemical and histological changes in radiosensitive organs. The results indicated that low-dose sodium selenite administration did not protect the mice from radiation-induced hematopoietic and gastrointestinal injuries and subsequent mortality. However, it significantly prevented the radiation-induced genotoxicity or DNA damage in peripheral leukocytes. Further sodium selenite administration modulated the messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of GPx1, GPx2, and GPx4 in the spleen and intestine differentially and led to a significant increase in GPx activity (∼1.5 to 2-folds) in these organs. In line with this observation, sodium selenite administration reduced the level of lipid peroxidation in the intestine. In conclusion, our study shows that low-dose sodium selenite supplementation can be an effective strategy to prevent WBI-induced genotoxicity but may not have an advantage against mortality sustained during nuclear emergencies.

  3. Evaluation of the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of benchmark multi-walled carbon nanotubes in relation to their physicochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Louro, Henriqueta; Pinhão, Mariana; Santos, Joana; Tavares, Ana; Vital, Nádia; Silva, Maria João

    2016-11-16

    To contribute with scientific evidence to the grouping strategy for the safety assessment of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), this work describes the investigation of the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of four benchmark MWCNTs in relation to their physicochemical characteristics, using two types of human respiratory cells. The cytotoxic effects were analysed using the clonogenic assay and replication index determination. A 48h-exposure of cells revealed that NM-401 was the only cytotoxic MWCNT in both cell lines, but after 8-days exposure, the clonogenic assay in A549 cells showed cytotoxic effects for all the tested MWCNTs. Correlation analysis suggested an association between the MWCNTs size in cell culture medium and cytotoxicity. No induction of DNA damage was observed after any MWCNTs in any cell line by the comet assay, while the micronucleus assay revealed that both NM-401 and NM-402 were genotoxic in A549 cells. NM-401 and NM-402 are the two longest MWCNTs analyzed in this work, suggesting that length may be determinant for genotoxicity. No induction of micronuclei was observed in BBEAS-2Beas-2B cell line and the different effect in both cell lines is explained in view of the size-distribution of MWCNTs in the cell culture medium, rather than cell's specificities.

  4. The effect of a novel tobacco process on the in vitro cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of cigarette smoke particulate matter.

    PubMed

    Combes, R; Scott, K; Dillon, D; Meredith, C; McAdam, K; Proctor, C

    2012-09-01

    Some of the toxic effects of smoking have been attributed to the combustion of nitrogenous protein in tobacco. The effects of a treatment which reduces tobacco's protein nitrogen level, on the in vitro cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of cigarette smoke particulate matter (PM), were measured. PMs were tested in the Neutral Red Uptake (NRU) test; the Salmonella mutagenicity assay (SAL); the mouse lymphoma mammalian cell mutation assay (MLA) and the in vitro micronucleus test (IVMNT). PMs from all of the cigarettes were cytotoxic and genotoxic. PM obtained from smoking treated tobacco, showed a small, consistent and statistically significant reduced mutagenicity (revertants/μg) in TA98 with post-mitochondrial supernatant (S9). No consistent quantitative or qualitative differences were detected in the other tests. The data are discussed in relation to published information on smoke chemistry obtained from cigarettes made of tobacco treated using this technique. The observations confirm that the method did not give rise to any new qualitative or quantitative cytotoxic or genotoxic effects, and may have reduced PM's bacterial mutagenicity in TA98 with S9. Further toxicity testing is warranted, to investigate the effects of the tobacco treatment in more detail and add to the data already obtained.

  5. Interplay between Smoking-induced Genotoxicity and Altered Signaling in Pancreatic Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Batra, Surinder K.

    2012-01-01

    Despite continuous research efforts directed at early diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer (PC), the status of patients affected by this deadly malignancy remains dismal. Its notoriety with regard to lack of early diagnosis and resistance to the current chemotherapeutics is due to accumulating signaling abnormalities. Hoarding experimental and epidemiological evidences have established a direct correlation between cigarette smoking and PC risk. The cancer initiating/promoting nature of cigarette smoke can be attributed to its various constituents including nicotine, which is the major psychoactive component, and several other toxic constituents, such as nitrosamines, 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. These predominant smoke-constituents initiate a series of oncogenic events facilitating epigenetic alterations, self-sufficiency in growth signals, evasion of apoptosis, sustained angiogenesis, and metastasis. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underpinning these events is crucial for the prevention and therapeutic intervention against PC. This review presents various interconnected signal transduction cascades, the smoking-mediated genotoxicity, and genetic polymorphisms influencing the susceptibility for smoking-mediated PC development by modulating pivotal biological aspects such as cell defense/tumor suppression, inflammation, DNA repair, as well as tobacco-carcinogen metabolization. Additionally, it provides a large perspective toward tumor biology and the therapeutic approaches against PC by targeting one or several steps of smoking-mediated signaling cascades. PMID:22623649

  6. Can the comet assay be used reliably to detect nanoparticle-induced genotoxicity?

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Hanna L; Di Bucchianico, Sebastiano; Collins, Andrew R; Dusinska, Maria

    2015-03-01

    The comet assay is a sensitive method to detect DNA strand breaks as well as oxidatively damaged DNA at the level of single cells. Today the assay is commonly used in nano-genotoxicology. In this review we critically discuss possible interactions between nanoparticles (NPs) and the comet assay. Concerns for such interactions have arisen from the occasional observation of NPs in the "comet head", which implies that NPs may be present while the assay is being performed. This could give rise to false positive or false negative results, depending on the type of comet assay endpoint and NP. For most NPs, an interaction that substantially impacts the comet assay results is unlikely. For photocatalytically active NPs such as TiO2 , on the other hand, exposure to light containing UV can lead to increased DNA damage. Samples should therefore not be exposed to such light. By comparing studies in which both the comet assay and the micronucleus assay have been used, a good consistency between the assays was found in general (69%); consistency was even higher when excluding studies on TiO2 NPs (81%). The strong consistency between the comet and micronucleus assays for a range of different NPs-even though the two tests measure different endpoints-implies that both can be trusted in assessing the genotoxicity of NPs, and that both could be useful in a standard battery of test methods.

  7. Considerations on photochemical genotoxicity: report of the International Workshop on Genotoxicity Test Procedures Working Group.

    PubMed

    Gocke, E; Müller, L; Guzzie, P J; Brendler-Schwaab, S; Bulera, S; Chignell, C F; Henderson, L M; Jacobs, A; Murli, H; Snyder, R D; Tanaka, N

    2000-01-01

    Recent toxicological observations have caused concern regarding the need to test, for example, pharmaceuticals and cosmetic products for photochemical genotoxicity. The objective of this report is to give assistance on how to adapt existing test methods to investigate the potential of light-absorbing compounds to induce genotoxic effects on photoactivation. In general, the Organization for Economic Co-Operation & Economic Development (OECD) draft guideline on in vitro phototoxicity testing served as a basis for consideration. Concomitant exposure of the cells to the test compound and solar simulated light was considered appropriate as the initial, basic test condition. Optimization of the exposure scheme, e.g., a change of the irradiation spectrum, might be indicated depending on the initial test results. Selection of test compound concentrations should be based on results obtained with the dark version of the respective test system but might have to be modified if phototoxic effects are observed. Selection of the irradiation dose has to be performed individually for each test system based on dose-effect studies. The irradiation should induce per se a small, reproducible toxic or genotoxic effect. The report includes a specification of necessary controls, discusses factors that might have an impact on the irradiation characteristics, and gives a rationale for the omission of an external metabolic activation system. It also addresses the question that physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties might trigger the need to test a chemical for photochemical genotoxicity. Relevant experimental observations are presented to back up the recommendations. The working group did not reach a consensus as to whether a single, adequately perfomed in vitro test for clastogenicity would be sufficient to exclude a photogenotoxic liability or whether a test battery including a gene mutation assay would be needed for product safety testing regarding photochemical genotoxicity.

  8. Effect of Brazilian propolis (AF-08) on genotoxicity, cytotoxicity and clonogenic death of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells irradiated with (60)Co gamma-radiation.

    PubMed

    Santos, Geyza Spigoti; Tsutsumi, Shigetoshi; Vieira, Daniel Perez; Bartolini, Paolo; Okazaki, Kayo

    2014-03-01

    The present study was conducted in order to evaluate the effect of Brazilian propolis (AF-08; 5, 10, 15, 30, 50, 100, and 200μg/mL) in protecting CHO-K1 cells against genotoxic and cytotoxic damage and clonogenic death induced by (60)Co gamma-radiation (1.0, 2.0, 4.0, and 6.0Gy). For this purpose, three interlinked endpoints were analyzed: induction of DNA damage by use of the micronucleus (MN) test (genotoxic damage), cell viability by means of the MTS assay, and differential staining (cytotoxic damage) and clonogenic death via the colony-formation test (cytotoxic damage). The MN test revealed that propolis alone (5-100μg/mL) was not genotoxic up to 100μg/mL and that 30μg/mL of propolis reduced the radiation-induced DNA damage (∼56% reduction, p<0.05), exhibiting a radio-protective effect on irradiated CHO-K1 cells. On the other hand, analysis of cytotoxicity showed that a concentration of 50μg/mL presented a significant proliferative effect (p<0.001) when associated with radiation, decreasing the percentage of necrotic cells (p<0.01). No mediated cytotoxic effect was found, but the concentration of 200μg/mL was toxic when analyzed at 24 and 48h via the differential staining technique, but not at 72h after irradiation, analyzed with the MTS assay. Differential staining also showed that necrosis was the main death modality in irradiated cells and that apoptosis was induced only at the toxic concentration of propolis (200μg/mL). Concerning the clonogenic capacity, a concentration of 50μg/mL also exhibited a significant stimulating effect on cell proliferation (p<0.001), in agreement with the data from differential staining. Taken together, these data suggest that the use of propolis AF-08 for the prevention of the adverse effects of ionizing radiation is promising. Nevertheless, additional investigations are necessary for a better understanding of potential applications of propolis to improve human health.

  9. Evaluating the Effects of Bioremediation on Genotoxicity of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Soil Using Genetically Engineered, Higher Eukaryotic Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jing; Nakamura, Jun; Richardson, Stephen D.; Aitken, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Bioremediation is one of the commonly applied remediation strategies at sites contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). However, remediation goals are typically based on removal of the target contaminants rather than on broader measures related to health risks. We investigated changes in the toxicity and genotoxicity of PAH-contaminated soil from a former manufactured-gas plant site before and after two simulated bioremediation processes: a sequencing batch bioreactor system and a continuous-flow column system. Toxicity and genotoxicity of the residues from solvent extracts of the soil were determined by the chicken DT40 B-lymphocyte isogenic cell line and its DNA-repair-deficient mutants. Although both bioremediation processes significantly removed PAHs from the contaminated soil (bioreactor 69% removal; column 84% removal), bioreactor treatment resulted in an increase in toxicity and genotoxicity over the course of a treatment cycle, whereas long-term column treatment resulted in a decrease in toxicity and genotoxicity. However, when screening with a battery of DT40 mutants for genotoxicity profiling, we found that column treatment induced DNA damage types that were not observed in untreated soil. Toxicity and genotoxicity bioassays can supplement chemical analysis-based risk assessment for contaminated soil when evaluating the efficacy of bioremediation. PMID:22443351

  10. Effects of chronic exposure to benzalkonium chloride in Oncorhynchus mykiss: cholinergic neurotoxicity, oxidative stress, peroxidative damage and genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Antunes, S C; Nunes, B; Rodrigues, S; Nunes, R; Fernandes, J; Correia, A T

    2016-07-01

    Benzalkonium chloride (BAC) is one of the most used conservatives in pharmaceutical preparations. However, its use is limited to a small set of external use formulations, due to its high toxicity. Benzalkonium chloride effects are related to the potential exertion of deleterious effects, mediated via oxidative stress and through interaction with membrane enzymes, leading to cellular damage. To address the ecotoxicity of this specific compound rainbow trouts were chronically exposed to BAC at environmental relevant concentrations (ranging from 0.100 to 1.050mg/L), and the biological response of cholinergic neurotoxicity, modulation of the antioxidant defense, phase II metabolism, lipid peroxidation and genotoxicity was studied. The obtained results showed a dual pattern of antioxidant response, with significant alterations in catalase activity (starting at 0.180mg/L), and lipid peroxidation, for intermediate (0.180 and 0.324mg/L) concentrations. No significant alterations occurred for glutathione-S-transferases activity. An unexpected increased of the acetylcholinesterase activity was also recorded for the individuals exposed to higher concentrations of BAC (starting at 0.180mg/L). Furthermore, exposure to BAC resulted in the establishment of genotoxic alterations, observable (for the specific case of the comet assay results) for all tested BAC concentrations. However, and considering that the oxidative response was not devisable, other mechanisms may be involved in the genotoxic effects reported here.

  11. Cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of areca nut-related compounds in cultured human buccal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sundqvist, K; Liu, Y; Nair, J; Bartsch, H; Arvidson, K; Grafström, R C

    1989-10-01

    Because betel quid chewing has been linked to the development of oral cancer, pathobiological effects of an aqueous areca nut extract, four areca nut alkaloids (arecoline, guvacoline, guvacine, and arecaidine), and four nitrosated derivatives [N-nitrosoguvacoline, N-nitrosoguvacine, 3-(N-nitrosomethylamino)propionaldehyde and 3-(N-nitrosomethylamino)propionitrile] have been investigated using cultured human buccal epithelial cells. Areca nut extract in a dose-dependent manner decreases cell survival, vital dye accumulation, and membrane integrity, and it causes formation of both DNA single strand breaks and DNA protein cross-links. Depletion of cellular free low-molecular-weight thiols also occurs, albeit at quite toxic concentrations. Comparisons of the areca nut-related N-nitroso compounds and their precursor alkaloids, at concentrations up to 5 mM, indicate that 3-(N-nitrosomethylamino)propionaldehyde is the most potent on a molar basis to decrease both survival and thiol content and to cause significant formation of DNA single strand breaks. Arecoline, guvacoline, or N-nitrosoguvacoline decreases survival and cellular thiols, whereas arecaidine, guvacine, N-nitrosoguvacine, and 3-(N-nitrosomethylamino)propionitrile have only minor effects on these variables. Taken together, the present studies indicate that aqueous extract and, in particular, one N-nitroso compound related to areca nut, i.e., 3-(N-nitrosomethylamino)propionaldehyde, are highly cytotoxic and genotoxic to cultured human buccal epithelial cells, of potential importance in the induction of tumors in betel quid chewers.

  12. A multispecies study to assess the toxic and genotoxic effect of pharmaceuticals: furosemide and its photoproduct.

    PubMed

    Isidori, Marina; Nardelli, Angela; Parrella, Alfredo; Pascarella, Luigia; Previtera, Lucio

    2006-05-01

    Pharmaceutical products for humans and animals, as well as their related metabolites end up in the aquatic environment after use. Recent investigations show that concentrations of pharmaceuticals are detectable in the order of ng/l-mug/l in municipal wastewater, groundwater and also drinking water. Little is known about the effects, and the hazard of long-term exposure to low concentrations of pharmaceuticals for non-target aquatic organisms. This study was designed to assess the ecotoxicity of furosemide, a potent diuretic agent, and its photoproduct in the aquatic environment. Bioassays were performed on bacteria, algae, rotifers and microcrustaceans to assess acute and chronic toxicity, while the SOS Chromotest and the Ames test were utilized to detect the genotoxic potential of the investigated compounds. A first approach to risk characterization was to calculate the environmental impact of furosemide by measured environmental concentration and predicted no effect concentration ratio (MEC/PNEC). To do so we used occurrence data reported in the literature and our toxicity results. The results showed that acute toxicity was in the order of mg/l for the crustaceans and absent for bacteria and rotifers. Chronic exposure to these compounds caused inhibition of growth population on the consumers, while the algae did not seem to be affected. A mutagenic potential was found for the photoproduct compared to the parental compound suggesting that byproducts ought to be considered in the environmental assessment of drugs. The risk calculated for furosemide suggested its harmlessness on the aquatic compartment.

  13. Bioeffects of Static Magnetic Fields: Oxidative Stress, Genotoxic Effects, and Cancer Studies

    PubMed Central

    Ghodbane, Soumaya; Lahbib, Aida; Sakly, Mohsen; Abdelmelek, Hafedh

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of static magnetic fields (SMFs) with living organisms is a rapidly growing field of investigation. The magnetic fields (MFs) effect observed with radical pair recombination is one of the well-known mechanisms by which MFs interact with biological systems. Exposure to SMF can increase the activity, concentration, and life time of paramagnetic free radicals, which might cause oxidative stress, genetic mutation, and/or apoptosis. Current evidence suggests that cell proliferation can be influenced by a treatment with both SMFs and anticancer drugs. It has been recently found that SMFs can enhance the anticancer effect of chemotherapeutic drugs; this may provide a new strategy for cancer therapy. This review focuses on our own data and other data from the literature of SMFs bioeffects. Three main areas of investigation have been covered: free radical generation and oxidative stress, apoptosis and genotoxicity, and cancer. After an introduction on SMF classification and medical applications, the basic phenomena to understand the bioeffects are described. The scientific literature is summarized, integrated, and critically analyzed with the help of authoritative reviews by recognized experts; international safety guidelines are also cited. PMID:24027759

  14. Modulation of genotoxic effects in asbestos-exposed primary human mesothelial cells by radical scavengers, metal chelators and a glutathione precursor.

    PubMed

    Poser, Ina; Rahman, Qamar; Lohani, Mohtashim; Yadav, Santosh; Becker, Hans-Henner; Weiss, Dieter G; Schiffmann, Dietmar; Dopp, Elke

    2004-04-11

    The genotoxicity of asbestos fibers is generally mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and by insufficient antioxidant protection. To further elucidate which radicals are involved in asbestos-mediated genotoxicity and to which extent, we have carried out experiments with the metal chelators deferoxamine (DEF) and phytic acid (PA), and with the radical scavengers superoxide dismutase (SOD), dimethylthiourea (DMTU) and the glutathione precursor Nacystelyn trade mark (NAL). We investigated the influence of these compounds on the potency of crocidolite, an amphibole asbestos fiber with a high iron content (27%), and chrysotile, a serpentine asbestos fiber with a low iron content (2%), to induce micronuclei (MN) in human mesothelial cells (HMC) after an exposure time of 24-72 h. Our results show that the number of crocidolite-induced MN is significantly reduced after pretreatment of fibers with PA and DEF. This effect was not observed with chrysotile. In contrast, simultaneous treatment of cells with asbestos and the OH*scavenging DMTU or the O2- -scavenging SOD significantly decreased the number of MN induced by chrysotile and crocidolite. In particular, DMTU almost completely suppressed micronucleus induction by both fiber types. A similar effect was observed in the presence of the H(2)O(2)-scavenging NAL after chrysotile treatment of HMC. By means of kinetochore analysis, it could be shown that the number of clastogenic events is decreased after PA and DEF pretreatment of fibers as well as after application of the above-mentioned scavengers. Our results show that chrysotile asbestos induces an increased release of H(2)O(2) in contrast to crocidolite. Also, the iron content of the fiber plays an important role in radical formation, but nevertheless, chrysotile produces oxy radicals to a similar extent as crocidolite, probably by phagocytosis-mediated oxidative bursting.

  15. Application of random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) to detect genotoxic effect of trifluralin on maize (Zea mays).

    PubMed

    Bozari, Sedat; Aksakal, Ozkan

    2013-04-01

    Trifluralin is a widely used dinitroaniline herbicide throughout the world. However, limited efforts have been made to study its genotoxic effects on different plants. The present study aimed to evaluate the herbicide's genotoxic potential on maize (Zea mays) by using the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique. For this purpose, maize seedlings were treated with aqueous solutions of trifluralin at concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 3 ppm for 7 days. In the RAPD analyses, 15 primers were used and 91 bands were obtained, with an average of 6.06 bands per primer in the control seedlings. After trifluralin treatment, significant changes were observed in RAPD profiles. These changes included loss of normal bands and appearance of new bands, in comparison to the control group, and they were dose dependent. In addition, root growth and total soluble protein level in trifluralin-treated seedlings were analyzed and compared for genomic template stability (GTS), which was performed for the qualitative measurement of changes in randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) profiles. The results showed that GTS, root growth, and total soluble protein content of the seedlings gradually decreased with an increase in trifluralin concentration. These findings suggest that the RAPD technique is a useful biomarker assay to evaluate the genotoxic effects of herbicides on plants.

  16. Molecular determination of genotoxic effects of cobalt and nickel on maize (Zea mays L.) by RAPD and protein analyses.

    PubMed

    Erturk, Filiz Aygun; Ay, Hilal; Nardemir, Gokce; Agar, Guleray

    2013-08-01

    Assessment of DNA damages stemming from toxic chemicals is an important issue in terms of genotoxicology. In this study, maize (Zea mays L.) seedlings were used for screening the genotoxic effects of cobalt (Co) and nickel (Ni) treatments at various concentrations (5 mM, 10 mM, 20 mM and 40 mM). For this purpose, randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique was applied to genomic DNA extracted from metal-exposed and unexposed plant materials. Besides, changes in total protein contents were screened by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis. For RAPD analysis, 16 RAPD primers were found to produce unique polymorphic band profiles on different concentrations of Co-/Ni-treated maize seedlings. Increased polymorphism resulting from the appearance of new bands or disappearance of normal bands was observed with increasing concentration of Co and Ni treatments. Genomic template stability, a qualitative measurement of changes in RAPD patterns of genomic DNA, decreased with increasing metal concentration. In SDS-PAGE analysis, it was observed that the total soluble protein content decreased by Co treatment, while it increased by Ni treatment. The results obtained from this study revealed that RAPD profiles and total soluble protein levels can be applied to detect genotoxicity, and these analyses can offer useful biomarker assays for the evaluation of genotoxic effects on Co- and Ni-polluted plants.

  17. Determination of genotoxic effects of copper sulphate and cobalt chloride in Allium cepa root cells by chromosome aberration and comet assays.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Mustafa; Ciğerci, Ibrahim Hakki; Konuk, Muhsin; Fidan, A Fatih; Terzi, Hakan

    2009-05-01

    We used the anaphase-telophase chromosome aberration and comet (Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis, SCGE) assays to evaluate the genotoxic effects of copper sulphate (CS) and cobalt chloride (CC) chemicals prepared in two concentrations (EC(50), 2xEC(50)), using methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) as a positive control and untreated cells as a negative control. In Allium root growth inhibition test, EC(50) values for CS and CC are 1.5 and 5.5 ppm, respectively. Mitotic index (MI) decreased in all concentrations tested of CS and CC compared to the control at each exposure time. The bridge, stickiness, vagrant chromosomes, fragments, c-anaphase and multipolarity chromosome aberrations were observed in anaphase-telophase cells. The total chromosome aberrations were more frequent with an increasing in the exposure time and the concentrations of both chemicals. The genotoxicity of CS and CC in Allium cepa root cells was analyzed using a mild alkaline comet assay at pH 12.3, which allows the detection of single strand breaks. In all the concentrations, CS and CC induced a significant increase (P<0.05) in DNA damage. No significant difference was found between positive control (300+/-5.81) and 3 ppm CS (280+/-4.61). The methods used are applicable for biological monitoring of environmental pollutants.

  18. In vivo assessment of genotoxic effects of Annona squamosa seed extract in rats.

    PubMed

    Grover, Paramjit; Singh, S P; Prabhakar, P V; Reddy, Utkarsh A; Balasubramanyam, A; Mahboob, M; Rahman, M F; Misra, Sunil

    2009-08-01

    Widespread use of pesticides represents a potential risk to human and environmental health. Hence, biopesticides from plants are some of the future strategies for plant protection. In this regard, a seed extract of Annona squamosa was prepared and found to be a promising pesticide. In order to establish the inherent toxicity and non-target safety required for registration and marketing of pesticides, toxicological studies are conducted. The genotoxicity potential was evaluated in rats with 75, 150 and 300 mg/kg Annona squamosa by the comet assay in leucocytes, micronucleus and chromosomal aberration tests in bone marrow. We also studied the effects of 300 mg/kg of extract on lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione level and glutathione S transferase activity in liver, lungs, brain, kidneys, heart and spleen of treated rats. The comet assay showed a statistically significant dose related increase in DNA migration. The micronucleus and chromosomal aberration tests revealed a significant induction in frequency of micronuclei and chromosomal aberrations at 150 and 300 mg/kg. Annona squamosa treatment significantly enhanced lipid peroxidation, decreased glutathione and glutathione S transferase levels revealing the oxidative stress condition. Our results warrant careful use of Annona squamosa seed extract as a biopesticide till more tests are carried out.

  19. Genotoxic effects of prenatal exposure to levetiracetam during pregnancy on rat offsprings.

    PubMed

    Tural, Sengul; Tekcan, Akin; Elbistan, Mehmet; Karakuş, Nevin; Ozyurek, Hamit; Kara, Nurten

    2015-01-01

    Levetiracetam is a new-generation antiepileptic drug initially approved as an adjunctive treatment for patients with refractory partial seizures and is now also used as a monotherapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic effects of levetiracetam exposure during pregnancy on rat offsprings. In this study, we used the newborn pups of rats exposed to levetiracetam during pregnancy. Thirty Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups. The mother rats of groups 1 and 2 were treated with different doses of levetiracetam (25 mg/kg/d and 50 mg/kg/d) from gestational days 1 to 18 during pregnancy. Group 3 (control group) was not treated with any drug. In vivo sister chromatid exchange (SCE) induction and in vivo micronucleus formation were assessed. Bone marrow from rat pups were used for investigation. As a result of this study, levetiracetam exposure did not alter SCE frequencies or the mean of number of micronuclei in the prenatal period (p>0.05). Levetiracetam did not cause miscarriage during pregnancy in mother rats. The present study highlighted fetal safety after prenatal exposure to levetiracetam.

  20. In vitro cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of dibutyltin dichloride and dibutylgermanium dichloride

    SciTech Connect

    Li, A.P.; Dahl, A.R.; Hill, J.O.

    1982-01-01

    The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of dibutyltin dichloride (DBTC) and dibutylgermanium dichloride (DBGC) were studied with in vitro tests. DBTC was approximately 1000-fold higher in cytotoxicity and genotoxicity than DBGC. Both compounds decreased the antibody production by lymphocytes in vitro at noncytotoxic doses, which may explain the immunosuppressive effect of the compounds in vivo. Both compounds induced mutation in Chinese hamster ovary cells, therefore suggesting that they are potentially carcinogenic.

  1. Cytotoxic, genotoxic and mutagenic effects of sewage sludge on Allium cepa.

    PubMed

    Corrêa Martins, Maria Nilza; de Souza, Victor Ventura; da Silva Souza, Tatiana

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to ascertain the cytotoxic, genotoxic and mutagenic potential of sewage sludge using Allium cepa bioassay. Solubilized and crude sludge from two sewage treatment stations (STSs), herein named JM and M, were tested. In addition, sanitized, crude and solubilized sludge were also analyzed from STS M. The treatments showed positive response to phytotoxicity, cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and/or mutagenicity. Despite negative results for MN F1 (micronuclei counted in F1 root cells, derived from meristematic cells), the monitoring of genotoxic and mutagenic activities of sewage sludge are recommended because in agricultural areas this residue is applied in large scale and continuously. Based on our results we advise caution in the use of sewage sludge in agricultural soils.

  2. Genotoxic effects of bitumen fumes in Big Blue transgenic rat lung.

    PubMed

    Bottin, Marie Claire; Gate, Laurent; Rihn, Bertrand; Micillino, Jean Claude; Nathalie, Monhoven; Martin, Aurélie; Nunge, Hervé; Morel, Georges; Wrobel, Richard; Ayi-Fanou, Lucie; Champmartin, Catherine; Keith, Gérard; Binet, Stéphane

    2006-04-11

    Road paving workers are exposed to bitumen fumes (CAS No. 8052-42-4), a complex mixture of volatile compounds and particles containing carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. However, epidemiological and experimental animal studies failed to draw unambiguous conclusions concerning their toxicity. In order to gain better insights on their genotoxic potential, we used an experimental design able to generate bitumen fumes at road paving temperature (temperature: 170 degrees C, total particulate matter: 100mg/m3) and perform a nose-only exposure of Big Blue transgenic rodents 6h/day for five consecutive days. The mutagenic properties of bitumen fumes were determined by analyzing the mutation frequency and spectrum of the neutral reporter gene cII inserted into the rodent genome. We previously observed in mouse lung, that bitumen fumes did not induce an increase of cII mutants, a modification of the mutation spectrum, nor the formation of DNA adducts. Since DNA adducts were found in the lungs of rats exposed to asphalt fumes in similar conditions, we decided to carry out an analogous experiment with Big Blue rats. A DNA adduct was detected 3 and 30 days after the end of treatment suggesting that these genetic alterations were quite steady. Thirty days after exposure, the cII mutant frequency was similar in control and exposed rats. In addition, a slight but not significant modification of the mutation spectrum associated with an increase of G:C to T:A and A:T to C:G transversions was noticeable in the treated animals. Then, these data failed to demonstrate a pulmonary mutagenic potential for bitumen fumes generated at road paving temperature in our experimental conditions despite the presence of a DNA adduct. These results may provide information concerning the pulmonary mechanism of action of this aerosol and may contribute to the occupational health hazard assessment.

  3. Effect of treatment media on the agglomeration of titanium dioxide nanoparticles: impact on genotoxicity, cellular interaction, and cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Raju Y; Wallace, Kathleen; Daniel, Kaitlin M; Tennant, Alan H; Zucker, Robert M; Strickland, Jenna; Dreher, Kevin; Kligerman, Andrew D; Blackman, Carl F; Demarini, David M

    2013-03-26

    The widespread use of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles in consumer products increases the probability of exposure to humans and the environment. Although TiO2 nanoparticles have been shown to induce DNA damage (comet assay) and chromosome damage (micronucleus assay, MN) in vitro, no study has systematically assessed the influence of medium composition on the physicochemical characteristics and genotoxicity of TiO2 nanoparticles. We assessed TiO2 nanoparticle agglomeration, cellular interaction, induction of genotoxicity, and influence on cell cycle in human lung epithelial cells using three different nanoparticle-treatment media: keratinocyte growth medium (KGM) plus 0.1% bovine serum albumin (KB); a synthetic broncheoalveolar lavage fluid containing PBS, 0.6% bovine serum albumin and 0.001% surfactant (DM); or KGM with 10% fetal bovine serum (KF). The comet assay showed that TiO2 nanoparticles induced similar amounts of DNA damage in all three media, independent of the amount of agglomeration, cellular interaction, or cell-cycle changes measured by flow cytometry. In contrast, TiO2 nanoparticles induced MN only in KF, which is the medium that facilitated the lowest amount of agglomeration, the greatest amount of nanoparticle cellular interaction, and the highest population of cells accumulating in S phase. These results with TiO2 nanoparticles in KF demonstrate an association between medium composition, particle uptake, and nanoparticle interaction with cells, leading to chromosomal damage as measured by the MN assay.

  4. Silver nanoparticles: correlating nanoparticle size and cellular uptake with genotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Kimberly S.; Peeler, David J.; Casey, Brendan J.; Dair, Benita J.; Elespuru, Rosalie K.

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this research was to develop a better understanding of the pertinent physico-chemical properties of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) that affect genotoxicity, specifically how cellular uptake influences a genotoxic cell response. The genotoxicity of AgNPs was assessed for three potential mechanisms: mutagenicity, clastogenicity and DNA strand-break-based DNA damage. Mutagenicity (reverse mutation assay) was assessed in five bacterial strains of Salmonella typhimurium and Echerichia coli, including TA102 that is sensitive to oxidative DNA damage. AgNPs of all sizes tested (10, 20, 50 and 100nm), along with silver nitrate (AgNO3), were negative for mutagenicity in bacteria. No AgNPs could be identified within the bacteria cells using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), indicating these bacteria lack the ability to actively uptake AgNPs 10nm or larger. Clastogenicity (flow cytometry-based micronucleus assay) and intermediate DNA damage (DNA strand breaks as measured in the Comet assay) were assessed in two mammalian white blood cell lines: Jurkat Clone E6-1 and THP-1. It was observed that micronucleus and Comet assay end points were inversely correlated with AgNP size, with smaller NPs inducing a more genotoxic response. TEM results indicated that AgNPs were confined within intracellular vesicles of mammalian cells and did not penetrate the nucleus. The genotoxicity test results and the effect of AgNO3 controls suggest that silver ions may be the primary, and perhaps only, cause of genotoxicity. Furthermore, since AgNO3 was not mutagenic in the gram-negative bacterial Ames strains tested, the lack of bacterial uptake of the AgNPs may not be the major reason for the lack of genotoxicity observed. PMID:25964273

  5. Silver nanoparticles: correlating nanoparticle size and cellular uptake with genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Butler, Kimberly S; Peeler, David J; Casey, Brendan J; Dair, Benita J; Elespuru, Rosalie K

    2015-07-01

    The focus of this research was to develop a better understanding of the pertinent physico-chemical properties of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) that affect genotoxicity, specifically how cellular uptake influences a genotoxic cell response. The genotoxicity of AgNPs was assessed for three potential mechanisms: mutagenicity, clastogenicity and DNA strand-break-based DNA damage. Mutagenicity (reverse mutation assay) was assessed in five bacterial strains of Salmonella typhimurium and Echerichia coli, including TA102 that is sensitive to oxidative DNA damage. AgNPs of all sizes tested (10, 20, 50 and 100nm), along with silver nitrate (AgNO3), were negative for mutagenicity in bacteria. No AgNPs could be identified within the bacteria cells using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), indicating these bacteria lack the ability to actively uptake AgNPs 10nm or larger. Clastogenicity (flow cytometry-based micronucleus assay) and intermediate DNA damage (DNA strand breaks as measured in the Comet assay) were assessed in two mammalian white blood cell lines: Jurkat Clone E6-1 and THP-1. It was observed that micronucleus and Comet assay end points were inversely correlated with AgNP size, with smaller NPs inducing a more genotoxic response. TEM results indicated that AgNPs were confined within intracellular vesicles of mammalian cells and did not penetrate the nucleus. The genotoxicity test results and the effect of AgNO3 controls suggest that silver ions may be the primary, and perhaps only, cause of genotoxicity. Furthermore, since AgNO3 was not mutagenic in the gram-negative bacterial Ames strains tested, the lack of bacterial uptake of the AgNPs may not be the major reason for the lack of genotoxicity observed.

  6. [Modified DNA-halo method for assessment of DNA damage induced by various genotoxic agents].

    PubMed

    Smetanina, N M; Pustovalova, M V; Osipov, A N

    2013-01-01

    Using a modified DNA-halo method single-strand breaks and DNA alkaline-labile site induction were stud- ied in human peripheral blood lymphocytes after a short-term (up to 10 min) exposure in vitro to X-rays, hy- drogen peroxide and long-wave ultraviolet light (365 ± 10 nm). It was shown that the dose-effect dependence in thee X-ray dose range of 0.3-2 Gy approximates by a linear function of y = 0.25 + 0.42x (R2 = 0.98), where y is a DNA-halo index in standardized units, x--a radiation dose in Gy. The effect of "saturation" was ob- served in the range of 2-5 Gy. Under exposure to hydrogen peroxide up to a concentration of 25 μmol/L, the dose-effect is described by a linear function y = 0.23 + 0.033x (R2 = 0.96), where y is the DNA-halo index in standardized units, x--hydrogen peroxide concentration in μmol/L. UV exposure induced a linear in- crease of the DNA-halo index in the dose range of 2-10 kJ/m2 (y = 0.26 + 0.032x (R2 = 0.99), where y is theDNA-halo index in standardized units, x--a radiation dose in kJ/m2). In summary, the described modi- fication of the DNA-halo method provides a simple, sensitive, well reproducible and rapid assay for the anal- ysis of DNA single-strand breaks and alkaline-labile sites in living cells.

  7. Alumina at 50 and 13 nm nanoparticle sizes have potential genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qinli; Wang, Haiyang; Ge, Cuicui; Duncan, Jeremy; He, Kaihong; Adeosun, Samuel O; Xi, Huaxin; Peng, Huiting; Niu, Qiao

    2017-03-24

    Although nanomaterials have the potential to improve human life, their sideline effects on human health seem to be inevitable and still are unknown. Some studies have investigated the genotoxicity of alumina nanoparticles (AlNPs); however, this effect is still unclear due to insufficient evaluation and conflicting results. Using a battery of standard genotoxic assays, the present study offers evidence of the genotoxicity associated with aluminum oxide (alumina) at NP sizes of 50 and 13 nm, when compared with bulk alumina (10 μm). The genotoxicity induced by alumina at bulk and NP sizes was evaluated with Ames test, comet test, micronucleus assay and sperm deformity test. The mechanism related to the induction of reactive oxygen species was explored as well. Our results showed that AlNPs (13 and 50 nm) were able to enter cells and induced DNA damage, micronucleus in bone marrow, sperm deformation and reactive oxygen species induction in a time-, dose- and size-dependent manner. Therefore, we conclude that AlNPs (13 and 50 nm), rather than bulk alumina, induce markers of genotoxicity in mice, with oxidative stress as a potential mechanism driving these genotoxic effects. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Beryllium: genotoxicity and carcinogenicity.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Terry; Bowser, Darlene

    2003-12-10

    Beryllium (Be) has physical-chemical properties, including low density and high tensile strength, which make it useful in the manufacture of products ranging from space shuttles to golf clubs. Despite its utility, a number of standard setting agencies have determined that beryllium is a carcinogen. Only a limited number of studies, however, have addressed the underlying mechanisms of the carcinogenicity and mutagenicity of beryllium. Importantly, mutation and chromosomal aberration assays have yielded somewhat contradictory results for beryllium compounds and whereas bacterial tests were largely negative, mammalian test systems showed evidence of beryllium-induced mutations, chromosomal aberrations, and cell transformation. Although inter-laboratory differences may play a role in the variability observed in genotoxicity assays, it is more likely that the different chemical forms of beryllium have a significant effect on mutagenicity and carcinogenicity. Because workers are predominantly exposed to airborne particles which are generated during the machining of beryllium metal, ceramics, or alloys, testing of the mechanisms of the mutagenic and carcinogenic activity of beryllium should be performed with relevant chemical forms of beryllium.

  9. Genotoxic potential of glyphosate formulations: mode-of-action investigations.

    PubMed

    Heydens, William F; Healy, Charles E; Hotz, Kathy J; Kier, Larry D; Martens, Mark A; Wilson, Alan G E; Farmer, Donna R

    2008-02-27

    A broad array of in vitro and in vivo assays has consistently demonstrated that glyphosate and glyphosate-containing herbicide formulations (GCHF) are not genotoxic. Occasionally, however, related and contradictory data are reported, including findings of mouse liver and kidney DNA adducts and damage following intraperitoneal (ip) injection. Mode-of-action investigations were therefore undertaken to determine the significance of these contradictory data while concurrently comparing results from ip and oral exposures. Exposure by ip injection indeed produced marked hepatic and renal toxicity, but oral administration did not. The results suggest that ip injection of GCHF may induce secondary effects mediated by local toxicity rather than genotoxicity. Furthermore, these results continue to support the conclusion that glyphosate and GCHF are not genotoxic under exposure conditions that are relevant to animals and humans.

  10. Evaluation of Stage-Dependent Genotoxic Effect of Roundup(®) (Glyphosate) on Caiman latirostris Embryos.

    PubMed

    Burella, Pamela Mariana; Simoniello, Maria Fernanda; Poletta, Gisela Laura

    2017-01-01

    The agricultural expansion over the past decades, along with the associated increase in the use of pesticides, represents a high risk for many wild species. Caiman latirostris is a South American caiman with many features that make it highly vulnerable to pesticide exposure. Considering previous finding on the genotoxicity of the glyphosate-based formulation Roundup(®) in this species, the aim of this study was to evaluate the possible stage-dependent effect of this compound on C. latirostris embryos through the Comet assay (CA), micronuclei (MN), and nuclear abnormalities (NA) tests. Caiman eggs were exposed to three effective concentrations of Roundup® (750, 1250, 1750 µg/egg) in three different stages of the incubation period (total duration 70 ± 3 days at 31 ± 2 °C) of approximately 23 days each. A statistically significant difference in DNA damage determined by the CA was found between groups exposed to different concentrations of RU (p < 0.05) and the negative control, but no difference was observed among the three stages of exposure within any treatment (p > 0.05). There was no differences in the MN or NA frequencies between the different groups and the negative control (p > 0.05), nor among the different stages within each treatment. The results obtained in this study indicate that RU produce DNA damage on C. latirostris embryos independently of the developmental stage where the exposure occurs, implying an important risk for the species during all its period of development, when pesticide application is at maximum rate.

  11. Evaluation of the genotoxicity/mutagenicity and antigenotoxicity/antimutagenicity induced by propolis and Baccharis dracunculifolia, by in vitro study with HTC cells.

    PubMed

    Roberto, Matheus Mantuanelli; Matsumoto, Sílvia Tamie; Jamal, Cláudia Masrouah; Malaspina, Osmar; Marin-Morales, Maria Aparecida

    2016-06-01

    The ethanolic extract of propolis, especially the Brazilian green type, is widely and mainly used for therapeutic purposes despite the lack of knowledge about its effects and its cellular mode of action. This type of propolis, derived from Baccharis dracunculifolia (alecrim-do-campo), has been extensively commercialized and the consumers use it to enhance health. This work aimed to assess the genotoxic/mutagenic and antigenotoxic/antimutagenic potentials of the ethanolic extracts of Brazilian green propolis and of B. dracunculifolia, on mammalian cells. It was not observed genotoxic and mutagenic effects by both extracts. After evaluate the exposure of the cells to each extract with a recognized mutagen, simultaneously, the results showed a significant reduction on DNA damage. The experiment carried out with a pre-incubation period was more effective than without incubation test, showing that the tested extracts were able to inactivate the mutagen before it could react with the DNA.

  12. Involvement of Oxidative Stress in Methyl Parathion and Parathion-Induced Toxicity and Genotoxicity to Human Liver Carcinoma (HepG2) Cells

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Falicia L.; Yedjou, Clement G.; Tchounwou, Paul B.

    2013-01-01

    Methyl parathion (C8H10NO5PS) and parathion (C10H14NO5PS) are both organophosphate insecticides (OPI) widely used for household and agricultural applications. They are known for their ability to irreversibly inhibit acetylcholinesterase which often leads to a profound effect on the nervous system of exposed organisms. Many recently published studies have indicated that human exposure to OPI may be associated with neurologic, hematopoietic, cardiovascular, and reproductive adverse effects. Studies have also linked OPI exposure to a number of degenerative diseases including Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Also, oxidative stress (OS) has been reported as a possible mechanism of OPI toxicity in humans. Hence, the aim of the present investigation was to use human liver carcinoma (HepG2) cells as a test model to evaluate the role of OS in methyl parathion- and parathion-induced toxicity. To achieve this goal, we performed the MTT [3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay for cell viability, lipid peroxidation assay for malondialdehyde (MDA) production, and Comet assay for DNA damage, respectively. Results from MTT assay indicated that methyl parathion and parathion gradually reduce the viability of HepG2 cells in a dose-dependent manner, showing 48 h-LD50 values of 26.20 mM and 23.58 mM, respectively. Lipid peroxidation assay resulted in a significant increase (p<0.05) of MDA level in methyl parathion- and parathion-treated HepG2 cells compared to controls, suggesting that OS plays a key role in OPI-induced toxicity. Comet assay indicated a significant increase in genotoxicity at higher concentrations of OPI exposure. Overall, we found that methyl-parathion is slightly less toxic than parathion to HepG2 cells. The cytotoxic effect of these OPI was found to be associated, at least in part, with oxidative cell/tissue damage. PMID:21544925

  13. Involvement of oxidative stress in methyl parathion and parathion-induced toxicity and genotoxicity to human liver carcinoma (HepG₂) cells.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Falicia L; Yedjou, Clement G; Tchounwou, Paul B

    2013-06-01

    Methyl parathion (C₈H₁₀NO₅PS) and parathion (C₁₀H14 NO₅PS) are both organophosphate insecticides (OPI) widely used for household and agricultural applications. They are known for their ability to irreversibly inhibit acetylcholinesterase which often leads to a profound effect on the nervous system of exposed organisms. Many recently published studies have indicated that human exposure to OPI may be associated with neurologic, hematopoietic, cardiovascular, and reproductive adverse effects. Studies have also linked OPI exposure to a number of degenerative diseases including Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Also, oxidative stress (OS) has been reported as a possible mechanism of OPI toxicity in humans. Hence, the aim of the present investigation was to use human liver carcinoma (HepG₂) cells as a test model to evaluate the role of OS in methyl parathion- and parathion-induced toxicity. To achieve this goal, we performed the MTT [3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay for cell viability, lipid peroxidation assay for malondialdehyde (MDA) production, and Comet assay for DNA damage, respectively. Results from MTT assay indicated that methyl parathion and parathion gradually reduce the viability of HepG₂ cells in a dose-dependent manner, showing 48 h-LD₅₀ values of 26.20 mM and 23.58 mM, respectively. Lipid peroxidation assay resulted in a significant increase (P < 0.05) of MDA level in methyl parathion- and parathion-treated HepG₂ cells compared with controls, suggesting that OS plays a key role in OPI-induced toxicity. Comet assay indicated a significant increase in genotoxicity at higher concentrations of OPI exposure. Overall, we found that methyl-parathion is slightly less toxic than parathion to HepG₂ cells. The cytotoxic effect of these OPI was found to be associated, at least in part, with oxidative cell/tissue damage.

  14. Inorganic arsenic: A non-genotoxic carcinogen.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Samuel M; Chowdhury, Aparajita; Arnold, Lora L

    2016-11-01

    Inorganic arsenic induces a variety of toxicities including cancer. The mode of action for cancer and non-cancer effects involves the metabolic generation of trivalent arsenicals and their reaction with sulfhydryl groups within critical proteins in various cell types which leads to the biological response. In epithelial cells, the response is cell death with consequent regenerative proliferation. If this continues for a long period of time, it can result in an increased risk of cancer. Arsenicals do not react with DNA. There is evidence for indirect genotoxicity in various in vitro and in vivo systems, but these involve exposures at cytotoxic concentrations and are not the basis for cancer development. The resulting markers of genotoxicity could readily be due to the cytotoxicity rather than an effect on the DNA itself. Evidence for genotoxicity in humans has involved detection of chromosomal aberrations, sister chromatid exchanges in lymphocytes and micronucleus formation in lymphocytes, buccal mucosal cells, and exfoliated urothelial cells in the urine. Numerous difficulties have been identified in the interpretation of such results, including inadequate assessment of exposure to arsenic, measurement of micronuclei, and potential confounding factors such as tobacco exposure, folate deficiency, and others. Overall, the data strongly supports a non-linear dose response for the effects of inorganic arsenic. In various in vitro and in vivo models and in human epidemiology studies there appears to be a threshold for biological responses, including cancer.

  15. Role of recombinant human erythropoietin loading chitosan-tripolyphosphate nanoparticles in busulfan-induced genotoxicity: Analysis of DNA fragmentation via comet assay in cultured HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Ghassemi-Barghi, Nasrin; Varshosaz, Jaleh; Etebari, Mahmoud; Jafarian Dehkordi, Abbas

    2016-10-01

    Busulfan is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic agents used for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia. Busulfan is involved in secondary malignancy due to its genotoxic potential in normal tissues. As an alkylating agent busulfan can cause DNA damage by cross-linking DNAs and DNA and proteins, induces senescence in normal cells via transient depletion of intracellular glutathione (GSH) and subsequently by a continuous increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Erythropoietin, a glycoprotein widely used against drug induced anemia in cancerous patients and regulates hematopoiesis, has been shown to exert an important cyto-protective effect in many tissues. Recombinant human erythropoietin has been demonstrated to directly limit cell injury and ROS generation during oxidative stress. Furthermore, rhEPO decreased levels of pro-apoptotic factor (Bax) and also increased expression of the anti-apoptotic factor Bcl2. According to EPO's short half-life and requirements for the frequently administration, finding the new strategies to attenuate its side effects is important. The aim of this study was to explore whether rhEPO loading chitosan-tripolyphosphate nanoparticles protects against busulfan-induced genotoxicity in HepG2 cells. For this purpose cells were incubated with busulfan alone, regular rhEPO alone and regular rhEPO and CS-TPP-EPO nanoparticles along with busulfan in pre and co-treatment condition. Our results showed that busulfan induced a noticeable genotoxic effects in HepG2 cells (p<0.0001). Both regular rhEPO and CS-TPP-EPO nanoparticles reduced the effects of busulfan significantly (p<0.0001) by reduction of the level of DNA damage via blocking ROS generation, and enhancement intracellular glutathione levels. CS-TPP-EPO nanoparticles were more effective than regular rhEPO in both pre and co-treatment conditions. In conclusion, our results show that administration of rhEPO and CS-TPP-EPO nanoparticles especially in the pre

  16. Surface modification does not influence the genotoxic and inflammatory effects of TiO2 nanoparticles after pulmonary exposure by instillation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wallin, Håkan; Kyjovska, Zdenka O.; Poulsen, Sarah S.; Jacobsen, Nicklas R.; Saber, Anne T.; Bengtson, Stefan; Jackson, Petra; Vogel, Ulla

    2017-01-01

    The influence of surface charge of nanomaterials on toxicological effects is not yet fully understood. We investigated the inflammatory response, the acute phase response and the genotoxic effect of two different titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) following a single intratracheal instillation. NRCWE-001 was unmodified rutile TiO2 with endogenous negative surface charge, whereas NRCWE-002 was surface modified to be positively charged. C57BL/6J BomTac mice received 18, 54 and 162 µg/mouse and were humanely killed 1, 3 and 28 days post-exposure. Vehicle controls were tested alongside for comparison. The cellular composition and protein concentration were determined in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid as markers for an inflammatory response. Pulmonary and systemic genotoxicity was analysed by the alkaline comet assay as DNA strand breaks in BAL cells, lung and liver tissue. The pulmonary and hepatic acute phase response was analysed by Saa3 mRNA levels in lung tissue or Saa1 mRNA levels in liver tissue by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Instillation of NRCWE-001 and -002 both induced a dose-dependent neutrophil influx into the lung lining fluid and Saa3 mRNA levels in lung tissue at all assessed time points. There was no statistically significant difference between NRCWE-001 and NRCWE-002. Exposure to both TiO2 NPs induced increased levels of DNA strand breaks in lung tissue at all doses 1 and 28 days post-exposure and NRCWE-002 at the low and middle dose 3 days post-exposure. The DNA strand break levels were statistically significantly different for NRCWE-001 and -002 for liver and for BAL cells, but no consistent pattern was observed. In conclusion, functionalisation of reactive negatively charged rutile TiO2 to positively charged did not consistently influence pulmonary toxicity of the studied TiO2 NPs. PMID:27658823

  17. Biomonitoring of genotoxic effects and elemental accumulation derived from air pollution in community urban gardens.

    PubMed

    Amato-Lourenco, Luís Fernando; Lobo, Debora Jã A; Guimarães, Eliane T; Moreira, Tiana Carla Lopes; Carvalho-Oliveira, Regiani; Saiki, Mitiko; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento; Mauad, Thais

    2017-01-01

    Urban gardening is a growing global phenomenon with a positive impact on society. Despite several associated benefits, growing vegetables in urban gardens that are localized in highly polluted areas poses questions about the safety of the produced food. Therefore, the identification of risk factors that result in possible deleterious effects to human health is important for realizing all of the benefits to society. We evaluated the use of two biomonitoring methods in ten urban gardens of Sao Paulo city and one control site: the micronuclei frequencies for early tetrads of Tradescantia pallida (Rose) Hunt. cv. "Purpurea" Boom (hereafter, Trad-MCN) as a short-term indicator of genotoxic response and tree barks to quantify the accumulation of traffic-related chemical elements as a long-term biomarker of air pollution in urban gardens. Mature plants of Tradescantia pallida were exposed in each garden, and their inflorescences were sampled over three months. A random set of 300 early tetrads in 13 to 21 slides per garden were evaluated for micronuclei frequencies. Elemental concentrations in 428 tree barks samples from 107 different trees in the areas surrounding urban gardens were quantified using an energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer. The frequency of Trad-MCN has a significant correlation with traffic variables and chemical elements related to road dust and tailpipe emissions deposited in tree barks. Negative associations between Trad-MCN and both the distance through traffic and the presence of vertical obstacles were observed in the community gardens. The Mn/Zn concentrations in tree barks were associated with increased Trad-MCN.

  18. Genotoxic effects of 1 GeV/amu Fe ions in mouse kidney epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronenberg, A.; Gauny, S. S.; Connolly, L.; Turker, M.

    Human exploration of space places individuals in environments where they are exposed to charged particle radiation. The goal of our studies is to assess the genotoxic and mutagenic effects of high energy Fe ions (1 GeV/amu) in kidney epithelial cells of the mouse irradiated either in vitro or in vivo. The initial study focused on establishing the toxicity of these heavy ions (LET=159 keV/micron) in two Aprt heterozygous kidney epithelial cell lines: K06 cells derived from a C57BL6/129Sv animal, and clone 4a cells derived from a C57BL6/DBA2 animal. Cells were exposed in vitro to graded doses of Fe ions (0-300 cGy) and the toxicity of the treatment was established using colony forming assays. Experiments were performed in triplicate at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The results indicate that Fe ions are toxic to mouse kidney epithelial cells and that no shoulder is observed on the survival curve for cells from either genetic background. The clone 4a cells were more sensitive to Fe ion exposures than the K06 cells. The D(37) for clone 4a cells was 92 cGy and the D(10) was 212 cGy. The more resistant K06 cells had a D(37) of 192 cGy and an estimated D(10) of 388 cGy. Parallel experiments are underway to establish the RBE's for cell killing for these two cell lines. Supported by NASA grant T-403X to A. Kronenberg

  19. Evaluation of the genotoxic effects of a folk medicine, Petiveria alliacea (Anamu).

    PubMed

    Hoyos, L S; Au, W W; Heo, M Y; Morris, D L; Legator, M S

    1992-07-01

    Crude extract from a plant known as Petiveria alliacea (Anamu) is used extensively as folk medicine in developing countries like Colombia, South America. Although the plant is known to contain toxic ingredients potential adverse health effects from its use have not been adequately evaluated. We investigated its genotoxic activities by conducting a sister chromatid exchange (SCE) assay using cells in vitro and in vivo. Lymphocytes from humans were treated at 24 h after initiation of culture for 6 h with alcohol extract from the folk medicine. Concentrations of 0, 10, 100, 250, 275, 500, 750, and 1000 micrograms/ml of the extract were used. Significant dose-dependent increase of SCE (3.7-7.4 SCE per cell) were observed (analysis of variances, p less than 0.01). Delay in cell proliferation but not inhibition of mitosis was also observed. In another experiment, mice were exposed once orally to 1x, 200x, 300x and 400x the human daily consumption dose of Anamu. The induction of sister chromatid exchanges in bone marrow cells were investigated. We observed a significant dose dependent increase of SCE compared with the saline control (2.15-4.53; p less than 0.01) and compared with the solvent control (3.04-4.53; p less than 0.01). Our data suggest, therefore, that the folk medicine contains mutagenic and potentially carcinogenic agents although the medicine is not a potent mutagen. Individuals who consume large amounts of this drug may be at risk for development of health problems. Further studies with cells from exposed individuals and from experimental animals should be conducted to provide a better evaluation of health risk from the use of this drug.

  20. Genotoxic effects of cadmium and influence on fitness components of Lymantria dispar caterpillars.

    PubMed

    Matić, Dragana; Vlahović, Milena; Kolarević, Stoimir; Perić Mataruga, Vesna; Ilijin, Larisa; Mrdaković, Marija; Vuković Gačić, Branka

    2016-11-01

    The current study extends our previous findings concerning the sensitivity of Lymantria dispar larvae to cadmium in light of ecotoxicological risk assessment. Here we report the results of the comet assay performed for the first time on this species. We examined the chronic effects of two cadmium concentrations (50 and 100 μg Cd/g dry food) on DNA integrity and haemocyte viability, as well as on fitness-related traits (larval mass and development duration parameters). All parameters were assessed individually and then used to calculate the integrated biomarker response (IBR) index. Egg-masses of L. dispar were collected from two locations in Serbia - the uncontaminated Homolje mountains and a metal-polluted area near Bor copper mines, smelter and refinery. Distinctive patterns in the response of these populations to cadmium exposure were noticed. In haemocytes of larvae from the pollution-free location both cadmium treatments increased the level of DNA damage, although in a similar range. Haemocyte viability and larval mass were reduced, while duration of the fourth instar and total development time were prolonged in a concentration-dependent manner. Cadmium tolerance was noticeable in the population from the metal-contaminated site at all organizational levels. Nevertheless, haemocyte viability in that population was reduced by the stronger treatment. Haemocyte viability was recognized as a promising biomarker due to the evident response of both populations to dietary cadmium. Genotoxicity, fitness-related traits and the IBR index could be used for biomonitoring of sensitive populations not previously exposed to metals.

  1. Combined genotoxic effects of a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (B(a)P) and an heterocyclic amine (PhIP) in relation to colorectal carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jamin, Emilien L; Riu, Anne; Douki, Thierry; Debrauwer, Laurent; Cravedi, Jean-Pierre; Zalko, Daniel; Audebert, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal neoplasia is the third most common cancer worldwide. Environmental factors such as diet are known to be involved in the etiology of this cancer. Several epidemiological studies have suggested that specific neo-formed mutagenic compounds related to meat consumption are an underlying factor involved in the association between diet and colorectal cancer. Heterocyclic amines (HCAs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are known mutagens and possible human carcinogens formed at the same time in meat during cooking processes. We studied the genotoxicity of the model PAH benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P) and HCA 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), alone or in mixture, using the mouse intestinal cell line Apc(Min/+), mimicking the early step of colorectal carcinogenesis, and control Apc(+/+) cells. The genotoxicity of B(a)P and PhIP was investigated using both cell lines, through the quantification of B(a)P and PhIP derived DNA adducts, as well as the use of a genotoxic assay based on histone H2AX phosphorylation quantification. Our results demonstrate that heterozygous Apc mutated cells are more effective to metabolize B(a)P. We also established in different experiments that PhIP and B(a)P were more genotoxic on Apc (Min/+) cells compared to Apc (+/+) . Moreover when tested in mixture, we observed a combined genotoxicity of B(a)P and PhIP on the two cell lines, with an increase of PhIP derived DNA adducts in the presence of B(a)P. Because of their genotoxic effects observed on heterozygous Apc mutated cells and their possible combined genotoxic effects, both B(a)P and PhIP, taken together, could be implicated in the observed association between meat consumption and colorectal cancer.

  2. Flooding modifies the genotoxic effects of pollution on a worm, a mussel and two fish species from the Sava River.

    PubMed

    Aborgiba, Mustafa; Kostić, Jovana; Kolarević, Stoimir; Kračun-Kolarević, Margareta; Elbahi, Samia; Knežević-Vukčević, Jelena; Lenhardt, Mirjana; Paunović, Momir; Gačić, Zoran; Vuković-Gačić, Branka

    2016-01-01

    Extreme hydrological events, such as water scarcity and flooding, can modify the effect of other stressors present in aquatic environment, which could result in the significant changes in the ecosystem functioning. Presence and interaction of various stressors (genotoxic pollutants) in the environment can influence the integrity of DNA molecules in aquatic organisms which can be negatively reflected on the individual, population and community levels. Therefore, in this study we have investigated the impact of flooding, in terms of genotoxicity, on organisms belonging to different trophic levels. The study was carried out on the site situated in the lower stretch of the Sava River which faced devastating effects of severe flooding in May 2014. The flooding occurred during our field experiment and this event provided a unique opportunity to assess its influence to the environment. The in situ effects of this specific situation were monitored by measuring physical, chemical and microbiological parameters of water, and by comparing the level of DNA damage in coelomocytes and haemocytes of freshwater worms Branchiura sowerbyi, haemocytes of freshwater mussels Unio tumidus and blood cells of freshwater fish Abramis bjoerkna/Abramis sapa, by means of the comet assay. Our study indicated that the flooding had a significant impact on water quality by decreasing the amount and discharge rate of urban wastewaters but simultaneously introducing contaminants from the nearby fly ash disposal field into river by runoff, which had diverse effects on the level of DNA damage in the studied organisms. This indicates that the assessment of genotoxic pollution in situ is strongly affected by the choice of the bioindicator organism.

  3. Flow-cytometric determination of genotoxic effects of exposure to petroleum in mink and sea otters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bickham, J.W.; Mazet, J.A.; Blake, J.; Smolen, M.J.; Lou, Y.; Ballachey, B.E.

    1998-01-01

    Three experiments were conducted to investigate the genotoxic effects of crude oil on mink and sea otters, In the first experiment, the effects on mink of chronic exposure to weathered Prudhoe Bay crude oil were studied, Female mink were fed a diet that included weathered crude oil for a period of 3 weeks prior to mating, during pregnancy and until weaning. Kits were exposed through lactation and by diet after weaning until 4 months of age. Kidney and liver tissues of the kits were examined using flow cytometry (FCM) and it was found that the genome size was increased in kidney samples from the experimental group compared to the control group. This effect was probably due to some type of DNA amplification and it could have been inherited from the exposed mothers or have been a somatic response to oil exposure in the pups, No evidence of clastogenic effects, as measured by the coefficient of variation (CV) of the G(1) peak, was found in kidney or liver tissue. In the second experiment, yearling female mink were exposed either by diet or externally to crude oil or bunker C fuel oil. Evidence for clastogenic damage was found in spleen tissue for the exposure groups, but not in kidney tissue. No evidence of increased genome size was observed. In the third experiment, blood was obtained from wild-caught sea otters in Prince William Sound. The sea otters represented two populations: one from western Prince William Sound that was potentially exposed to oil from the Exxon Valdez oil spill and a reference population from eastern Prince William Sound that did not receive oil from the spill. The spill had occurred 1.5 years prior to obtaining the blood samples. Although the mean CVs did not differ between the populations, the exposed population had a significantly higher variance of CV measurements and five out of 15 animals from the exposed population had CVs higher than the 95% confidence limits of the reference population, It is concluded that FCM is a sensitive indicator

  4. Co-exposure to aluminum and acrylamide disturbs expression of metallothionein, proinflammatory cytokines and induces genotoxicity: Biochemical and histopathological changes in the kidney of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Ghorbel, Imen; Maktouf, Sameh; Fendri, Nesrine; Jamoussi, Kamel; Ellouze Chaabouni, Semia; Boudawara, Tahia; Zeghal, Najiba

    2016-09-01

    The individual toxic effects of aluminum and acrylamide are known but there is no data on their combined effects. The present study investigates the toxic effects after combined exposure to these toxicants on: (i) oxidative stress during combined chronic exposure to aluminum and acrylamide on kidney function (ii) correlation of oxidative stress with metallothionein (MT) and inflammatory cytokines expression, DNA damage, and histopathological changes. Rats were exposed to aluminum (50 mg/kg body weight) in drinking water and acrylamide (20 mg/kg body weight) by gavage either individually or in combination for 3 weeks. Exposure rats to aluminum chloride or acrylamide alone and in combination induced nephrotoxicity, as evidenced by a decrease in the 24-h urine volume and uric acid levels in plasma and an increase of plasma creatinine, urea, and blood urea nitrogen levels. Nephrotoxicity was objectified by a significant increase in malondialdehyde level, advanced oxidation protein, and protein carbonyl contents, whereas reduced glutathione, nonprotein thiol, vitamin C levels, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase activities showed a significant decline. Superoxide dismutase activity and its gene expression were increased. Aluminum and acrylamide co-exposure exhibited synergism in various biochemical variables and also in DNA damage. Kidney total MT levels and genes expression of MT1, MT2, and proinflammatory cytokines were increased. All these changes were supported by histopathological observations. Co-exposure to aluminum and acrylamide exhibited synergism and more pronounced toxic effects compared with their individual effects based on various biochemical variables, genotoxic, and histopathological changes. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 1044-1058, 2016.

  5. Genotoxic, Cytotoxic, Antigenotoxic, and Anticytotoxic Effects of Sulfonamide Chalcone Using the Ames Test and the Mouse Bone Marrow Micronucleus Test

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Flávio Fernandes Veloso; Bernardes, Aline; Perez, Caridad Noda; Silva, Daniela de Melo e

    2015-01-01

    Chalcones present several biological activities and sulfonamide chalcone derivatives have shown important biological applications, including antitumor activity. In this study, genotoxic, cytotoxic, antigenotoxic, and anticytotoxic activities of the sulfonamide chalcone N-{4-[3-(4-nitrophenyl)prop-2-enoyl]phenyl} benzenesulfonamide (CPN) were assessed using the Salmonella typhimurium reverse mutation test (Ames test) and the mouse bone marrow micronucleus test. The results showed that CPN caused a small increase in the number of histidine revertant colonies in S. typhimurium strains TA98 and TA100, but not statistically significant (p > 0.05). The antimutagenicity test showed that CPN significantly decreased the number of His+ revertants in strain TA98 at all doses tested (p < 0.05), whereas in strain TA100 this occurred only at doses higher than 50 μg/plate (p < 0.05). The results of the micronucleus test indicated that CPN significantly increased the frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MNPCE) at 24 h and 48 h, revealing a genotoxic effect of this compound. Also, a significant decrease in polychromatic/normochromatic erythrocyte ratio (PCE/NCE) was observed at the higher doses of CPN at 24 h and 48 h (p < 0.05), indicating its cytotoxic action. CPN co-administered with mitomycin C (MMC) significantly decreased the frequency of MNPCE at almost all doses tested at 24 h (p < 0.05), showing its antigenotoxic activity, and also presented a small decrease in MNPCE at 48 h (p > 0.05). Additionally, CPN co-administered with MMC significantly increased PCE/NCE ratio at all doses tested, demonstrating its anticytotoxic effect. In summary, CPN presented genotoxic, cytotoxic, antigenotoxic, and anticytotoxic properties. PMID:26335560

  6. Genotoxic, Cytotoxic, Antigenotoxic, and Anticytotoxic Effects of Sulfonamide Chalcone Using the Ames Test and the Mouse Bone Marrow Micronucleus Test.

    PubMed

    Silva, Carolina Ribeiro E; Borges, Flávio Fernandes Veloso; Bernardes, Aline; Perez, Caridad Noda; Silva, Daniela de Melo E; Chen-Chen, Lee

    2015-01-01

    Chalcones present several biological activities and sulfonamide chalcone derivatives have shown important biological applications, including antitumor activity. In this study, genotoxic, cytotoxic, antigenotoxic, and anticytotoxic activities of the sulfonamide chalcone N-{4-[3-(4-nitrophenyl)prop-2-enoyl]phenyl} benzenesulfonamide (CPN) were assessed using the Salmonella typhimurium reverse mutation test (Ames test) and the mouse bone marrow micronucleus test. The results showed that CPN caused a small increase in the number of histidine revertant colonies in S. typhimurium strains TA98 and TA100, but not statistically significant (p > 0.05). The antimutagenicity test showed that CPN significantly decreased the number of His+ revertants in strain TA98 at all doses tested (p < 0.05), whereas in strain TA100 this occurred only at doses higher than 50 μg/plate (p < 0.05). The results of the micronucleus test indicated that CPN significantly increased the frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MNPCE) at 24 h and 48 h, revealing a genotoxic effect of this compound. Also, a significant decrease in polychromatic/normochromatic erythrocyte ratio (PCE/NCE) was observed at the higher doses of CPN at 24 h and 48 h (p < 0.05), indicating its cytotoxic action. CPN co-administered with mitomycin C (MMC) significantly decreased the frequency of MNPCE at almost all doses tested at 24 h (p < 0.05), showing its antigenotoxic activity, and also presented a small decrease in MNPCE at 48 h (p > 0.05). Additionally, CPN co-administered with MMC significantly increased PCE/NCE ratio at all doses tested, demonstrating its anticytotoxic effect. In summary, CPN presented genotoxic, cytotoxic, antigenotoxic, and anticytotoxic properties.

  7. Three-Dimensional Transgenic Cell Models to Quantify Space Genotoxic Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, S.; Wu, H.; Pingerelli, P.; Glickman, B.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we describe a three-dimensional, multicellular tissue-equivalent model, produced in NASA-designed, rotating wall bioreactors using mammalian cells engineered for genomic containment of mUltiple copies of defined target genes for genotoxic assessment. The Rat 2(lambda) fibroblasts (Stratagene, Inc.) were genetically engineered to contain high-density target genes for mutagenesis. Stable three-dimensional, multicellular spheroids were formed when human mammary epithelial cells and Rat 2(lambda) fibroblasts were cocultured on Cytodex 3 Beads in a rotating wall bioreactor. The utility of this spheroidal model for genotoxic assessment was indicated by a linear dose response curve and by results of gene sequence analysis of mutant clones from 400micron diameter spheroids following low-dose, high-energy, neon radiation exposure

  8. Effects of coal combustion residues on survival, antioxidant potential, and genotoxicity resulting from full-lifecycle exposure of grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio Holthius).

    PubMed

    Kuzmick, Danika M; Mitchelmore, Carys L; Hopkins, William A; Rowe, Christopher L

    2007-02-01

    Coal combustion residues (CCRs), largely derived from coal-fired electrical generation, are rich in numerous trace elements that have the potential to induce sublethal effects including oxidative stress, alterations in antioxidant status and DNA single strand breaks (SSB). CCRs are frequently discharged into natural and man-made aquatic systems. As the effects of CCRs have received relatively little attention in estuarine systems, the estuarine grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio, was chosen for this study. Grass shrimp were exposed in the laboratory to CCR-enriched sediments and food over a full life cycle. Survival to metamorphosis was significantly reduced in CCR-exposed larvae (17+/-4 versus 70+/-13% in the controls) but not in the juveniles or adults. The COMET assay, a general but sensitive assay for genotoxicity, was used to quantify DNA SSB in the adults. Total antioxidant potential was examined to assess the overall antioxidant scavenging capacity of CCR-exposed and non-exposed adult grass shrimp. Grass shrimp exposed to CCR significantly accumulated selenium and cadmium compared to unexposed shrimp, although an inverse relationship was seen for mercury accumulation. Chronic CCR exposure caused DNA SSB in hepatopancreas cells, as evidenced by the significantly increased percent tail DNA, tail moment, and tail length as compared to reference shrimp. However, no significant difference was observed in total antioxidant potential. Our findings suggest that genotoxicity may be an important mode of toxicity of CCR, and that DNA SSB may serve as a useful biomarker of exposure and effect of this very common, complex waste stream.

  9. Exposure to runoff from coal-tar-sealed pavement induces genotoxicity and impairment of DNA repair capacity in the RTL-W1 fish liver cell line

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kienzler, Aude; Mahler, Barbara J.; Van Metre, Peter C.; Schweigert, Nathalie; Devaux, Alain; Bony, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Coal-tar-based (CTB) sealcoat, frequently applied to parking lots and driveways in North America, contains elevated concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and related compounds. The RTL-W1 fish liver cell line was used to investigate two endpoints (genotoxicity and DNA-repair-capacity impairment) associated with exposure to runoff from asphalt pavement with CTB sealcoat or with an asphalt-based sealcoat hypothesized to contain about 7% CTB sealcoat (AS-blend). Genotoxic potential was assessed by the Formamido pyrimidine glycosylase (Fpg)-modified comet assay for 1:10 and 1:100 dilutions of runoff samples collected from 5 h to 36 d following sealcoat application. DNA-repair capacity was assessed by the base excision repair comet assay for 1:10 dilution of samples collected 26 h and 36 d following application. Both assays were run with and without co-exposure to ultraviolet-A radiation (UVA). With co-exposure to UVA, genotoxic effects were significant for both dilutions of CTB runoff for three of four sample times, and for some samples of AS-blend runoff. Base excision repair was significantly impaired for CTB runoff both with and without UVA exposure, and for AS-blend runoff only in the absence of UVA. This study is the first to investigate the effects of exposure to the complex mixture of chemicals in coal tar on DNA repair capacity. The results indicate that co-exposure to runoff from CT-sealcoated pavement and UVA as much as a month after sealcoat application has the potential to cause genotoxicity and impair DNA repair capacity.

  10. Genotoxicity of monosodium glutamate.

    PubMed

    Ataseven, Nazmiye; Yüzbaşıoğlu, Deniz; Keskin, Ayten Çelebi; Ünal, Fatma

    2016-05-01

    Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is one of the most widely used flavor enhancers throughout the world. The aim of this study is to investigate the genotoxic potential of MSG by using chromosome aberrations (CAs), sister-chromatid exchanges (SCEs), cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus (CBMN), and random amplified polymorphic DNA-polimerase chain reaction (RAPD-PCR) in cultured human lymphocytes and alkaline comet assays in isolated human lymphocytes, which were incubated with six concentrations (250, 500, 1000, 2000, 4000 and 8000 μg/mL) of MSG. The result of this study indicated that MSG significantly and dose dependently increased the frequencies of CAs, SCE and MN in all treatments and times, compared with control. However, the replication (RI) and nuclear division indices (NDI) were not affected. In this paper, in vitro genotoxic effects of the MSG was also investigated on human peripheral lymphocytes by analysing the RAPD-PCR with arbitrary 10-mer primers. The changes occurring in RAPD profiles after MSG treatment include increase or decrease in band intensity and gain or loss of bands. In the comet assay, this additive caused DNA damage at all concentrations in isolated human lymphocytes after 1-h in vitro exposure. Our results demonstrate that MSG is genotoxic to the human peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro.

  11. Effect of a base-catalyzed dechlorination process on the genotoxicity of PCB-contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    DeMarini, D.M.; Houk, V.S.; Kornel, A.; Rogers, C.J.

    1992-01-01

    We evaluated the genotoxicity of dichloromethane (DCM) extracts of PCB-contaminated soil before and after the soil had been treated by a base-catalyzed dechlorination process, which involved heating a mixture of the soil, polyethylene glycol, and sodium hydroxide to 250-350 C. This dechlorination process reduced by over 99% the PCB concentration in the soil, which was initially 2,200 ppm. The DCM extracts of both control and treated soils were not mutagenic in strain TA100 of Salmonella, but they were mutagenic in strain TA98. The base-catalyzed dechlorination process reduced the mutagenic potency of the soil by approximately one-half. The DCM extracts of the soils before and after treatment were equally genotoxic in a prophage-induction assay in E. coli, which detects some chlorinated organic carcinogens that were not detected by the Salmonella mutagenicity assay. These results show that treatment of PCB-contaminated soil by this base-catalyzed dechlorination process did not increase the genotoxicity of the soil.

  12. Arsenic Is A Genotoxic Carcinogen

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic is a recognized human carcinogen; however, there is controversy over whether or not it should be considered a genotoxic carcinogen. Many possible modes of action have been proposed on how arsenic induces cancer, including inhibiting DNA repair, altering methylation patter...

  13. Investigation of genotoxic effect of taxol plus radiation on mice bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Ozkan, Lütfi; Egeli, Unal; Tunca, Berrin; Aydemir, Nilüfer; Ceçener, Gülşah; Akpinar, Gürler; Ergül, Emel; Cimen, Ciğdem; Ozuysal, Sema; Kahraman-Cetintaş, Sibel; Engin, Kayihan; Ahmed, Mansoor M

    2002-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the genotoxic effect of taxol, radiation, or taxol plus radiation on highly proliferative normal tissue-bone marrow cells of Swiss albino mice. Swiss-albino mice, 3-4 months old, were used in this study. Taxol was administered bolus intravenously through the tail vein. Radiation was given by using a linear accelerator. There were four treatment categories, which had a total of 34 groups. Each group consisted of five animals. The first was the control category that had one group (n = 5). The second treatment category was taxol alone, which had three groups as per taxol dose alone (n = 15). The third treatment category was radiation alone, which had three groups as per the radiation dose (n = 15). The fourth treatment category was taxol plus radiation, which had 27 groups as per combined radiation dose plus taxol dose concentration and as per pre-treatment timing sequence of taxol before radiation (n = 135). Mice were sacrificed 24 h after taxol or radiation or combined administration using ether anesthesia. The cells were then dropped on two labeled slides, flamed, air dried, and stained in 7% Giemsa; 20-30 well-spread mitotic metaphases were analyzed for each animal; the cells with chromosome breaks, acentric fragments, and rearrangements were evaluated on x1,000 magnification with light microscope (Zeiss axioplan). The mitotic index was determined by counting the number of mitotic cells among 1,000 cells per animal. Differences between groups were evaluated with Student's t-test statistically. Taxol caused a dose-dependent increase in chromosomal aberrations (P = 0.027). Similarly, radiation caused a dose-dependent increase in chromosomal aberrations (P = 0.003) and decreased mitotic index (P = 0.002). In combination, there were a small enhancements at the 40 mg/kg taxol dose level and at 0.25 and 0.5 Gy radiation doses in the 48 h group. However, an increase in chromosomal aberrations was observed after 48 hours of taxol exposure

  14. Evaluation of genotoxicity using automated detection of γH2AX in metabolically competent HepaRG cells.

    PubMed

    Quesnot, Nicolas; Rondel, Karine; Audebert, Marc; Martinais, Sophie; Glaise, Denise; Morel, Fabrice; Loyer, Pascal; Robin, Marie-Anne

    2016-01-01

    The in situ detection of γH2AX was recently reported to be a promising biomarker of genotoxicity. In addition, the human HepaRG hepatoma cells appear to be relevant for investigating hepatic genotoxicity since they express most of drug metabolizing enzymes and a wild type p53. The aim of this study was to determine whether the automated in situ detection of γH2AX positive HepaRG cells could be relevant for evaluation of genotoxicity after single or long-term repeated in vitro exposure compared to micronucleus assay. Metabolically competent HepaRG cells were treated daily with environmental contaminants and genotoxicity was evaluated after 1, 7 and 14 days. Using these cells, we confirmed the genotoxicity of aflatoxin B1 and benzo(a)pyrene and demonstrated that dimethylbenzanthracene, fipronil and endosulfan previously found genotoxic with comet or micronucleus assays also induced γH2AX phosphorylation. Furthermore, we showed that fluoranthene and bisphenol A induced γH2AX while no effect had been previously reported in HepG2 cells. In addition, induction of γH2AX was observed with some compounds only after 7 days, highlighting the importance of studying long-term effects of low doses of contaminants. Together, our data demonstrate that automated γH2AX detection in metabolically competent HepaRG cells is a suitable high-through put genotoxicity screening assay.

  15. Selective inhibition by aspirin and naproxen of mainstream cigarette smoke-induced genotoxicity and lung tumors in female mice.

    PubMed

    Balansky, Roumen; Ganchev, Gancho; Iltcheva, Marietta; Micale, Rosanna T; La Maestra, Sebastiano; D'Oria, Chiara; Steele, Vernon E; De Flora, Silvio

    2016-05-01

    The role of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in smoke-related lung carcinogenesis is still controversial. We have developed and validated a murine model for evaluating the tumorigenicity of mainstream cigarette smoke (MCS) and its modulation by chemopreventive agents. In the present study, the protective effects of the nonselective cyclooxygenase inhibitors aspirin and naproxen were investigated by using a total of 277 Swiss H neonatal mice of both genders. Groups of mice were exposed whole-body to MCS during the first 4 months of life, followed by an additional 3.5 months in filtered air in order to allow a better growth of tumors. Aspirin (1600 mg/kg diet) and naproxen (320 mg/kg diet) were given after weanling until the end of the experiment. After 4 months of exposure, MCS significantly enhanced the frequency of micronucleated normochromatic erythrocytes in the peripheral blood of mice, and naproxen prevented such systemic genotoxic damage in female mice. After 7.5 months, exposure of mice to MCS resulted in the formation of lung tumors, both benign and malignant, and in several other histopathological lesions detectable both in the respiratory tract and in the urinary tract. Aspirin and, even more sharply, naproxen significantly inhibited the formation of lung tumors in MCS-exposed mice, but this protective effect selectively occurred in female mice only. These results lend support to the views that estrogens are involved in smoke-related pulmonary carcinogenesis and that NSAIDs have antiestrogenic properties. The two NSAIDs proved to be safe and efficacious in the experimental model used.

  16. Genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of 60Co gamma-rays and 90Sr/90Y beta-rays on Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1).

    PubMed

    Murakami, Daniella; Suzuki, Miriam Fussae; da Silva Dias, Mauro; Okazaki, Kayo

    2004-07-01

    Among various types of ionizing radiation, the beta emitter radionuclides are involved in many sectors of human activity, such as nuclear medicine, nuclear industries and biomedicine, with a consequently increased risk of accidental, occupational or therapeutic exposure. Despite their recognized importance, there is little information about the effect of beta particles at the cellular level when compared to other types of ionizing radiation. Thus, the objective of the present study was to evaluate the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of (90)Sr/(90)Y-a pure, highly energetic beta source-on Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and to compare them with data obtained with (60)Co. CHO cells irradiated with different doses of (60)Co (0.34 Gy min(-1)) and (90)Sr/(90)Y (0.23 Gy min(-1)) were processed for analysis of clonogenic death, induction of micronuclei (MN) and interphase death. The survival curves obtained for both types of radiation were fitted by the exponential quadratic model and were found to be similar. Also, the cytogenetic results showed similar frequencies of radio-induced MN between gamma and beta radiations and the MN distribution pattern among cells did not follow the expected Poisson probability pattern. The relative variance values were significantly higher in cells irradiated with (90)Sr/(90)Y than with (60)Co in all exposure doses. The irradiated cells showed more necrotic cells 72 h and 96 h after exposure to beta than to gamma radiation. In general, the (90)Sr/(90)Y beta-radiation was more damaging than (60)Co gamma-rays. The data obtained also demonstrated the need to use several parameters for a better estimate of cellular sensitivity to the action of genotoxic agents, which would be important in terms of radiobiology, oncology and therapeutics.

  17. Baicalein protects mice against radiation-induced DNA damages and genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Nitin Motilal

    2013-07-01

    Baicalein is the major flavonoid extracted from the root of Scutellaria baicaleins. This flavonoid is used extensively in Chinese herbal medicine. In the present study baicalein is evaluated for its radioprotective properties. Human blood cells when exposed to the γ-radiation ex vivo in presence of baicalein underwent the reduced DNA damage compared to the control. Baicalein administration prior to the whole-body γ-radiation (4 Gy) exposure of mice resulted in protecting the damage to the DNA as measured in their blood cells by alkaline comet assay. Mice when exposed to the radiation (whole body; 1.7 Gy) resulted in damage to the bone marrow as measured by micronucleated reticulocyte (MNRET) formation. Baicalein pre-treatment reduces the radiation induced damage to the bone marrow cells, as there was decrease in the percentage MNRET formation. These findings indicate radio-protecting ability of baicalein.

  18. Reduction in fluoride-induced genotoxicity in mouse bone marrow cells after substituting high fluoride-containing water with safe drinking water.

    PubMed

    Podder, Santosh; Chattopadhyay, Ansuman; Bhattacharya, Shelley

    2011-10-01

    Treatment of mice with 15 mg l(-1) sodium fluoride (NaF) for 30 days increased the number of cell death, chromosomal aberrations (CAs) and 'cells with chromatid breaks' (aberrant cells) compared with control. The present study was intended to determine whether the fluoride (F)-induced genotoxicity could be reduced by substituting high F-containing water after 30 days with safe drinking water, containing 0.1 mg F ions l(-1). A significant fall in percentage of CAs and aberrant cells after withdrawal of F-treatment following 30 days of safe water treatment in mice was observed which was highest after 90 days, although their levels still remained significantly high compared with the control group. This observation suggests that F-induced genotoxicity could be reduced by substituting high F-containing water with safe drinking water. Further study is warranted with different doses and extended treatment of safe water to determine whether the induced damages could be completely reduced or not.

  19. Evaluation of the genotoxicity of process stream extracts from a coal gasification system

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, R.W.; Benson, J.M.; Li, A.P.; Henderson, R.F.; Brooks, A.L.

    1984-01-01

    Extracts of three complex organic environmental mixtures, two from an experimental coal gasifier (a raw gas and a clean gas sample) and one from a coke oven main, were examined for genotoxicity. Three short-term genotoxicity assay systems were used: Ames Salmonella typhimurium reverse mutation assay, Chinese hamster ovary cell/hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (CHO/HGPRT) gene locus mutation assay, and the Chinese hamster lung primary culture/sister chromatid exchange (CHL/SCE) assay. Aroclor-1254-induced rat liver homogenate fraction (S-9) was required to observe genotoxicity in both gene locus mutation assays (CHO/HGPRT and Ames). The relative survival of CHO cells exposed to extracts was highest in cells exposed to clean gas samples, with the raw gas sample being the most cytotoxic either with or without the addition of S-9. All three complex mixtures induced sister chromatid exchanges in primary lung cell cultures without the addition of S-9. The relative genotoxicity ranking of the samples varied between the mammalian and prokaryotic assay systems. The results of all three assays indicate that the cleanup process used in the experimental gasifier was effective in decreasing the genotoxic materials in the process stream. These data also reemphasize the necessity of evaluating genotoxicity of complex mixtures in a variety of short-term systems.

  20. Cypermethrin Formulation (Ustad-10 EC) Induces Genotoxicity via Apoptosis, Affects Nutritional Physiology, and Modulates Immune Response in Silkworm Philosamia ricini (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae).

    PubMed

    Kalita, Moni Kankana; Haloi, Kishor; Devi, Dipali

    2017-03-25

    Cypermethrin is a pyrethroid insecticide with high insecticidal activity, low mammalian toxicity, and biodegradability. The present study aimed to determine the acute toxicity and evaluate the secondary toxic effects of a commercial formulation of cypermethrin on silkworm Philosamia ricini Hutt of Northeast India. The potential genotoxicity of cypermethrin on silkworm hemocyte was examined by comet assay, caspase activation, and annexin V affinity assay. Alteration in nutritional physiology and histoarchitecture of the gut region was evaluated. Additionally, immunotoxicological effect of cypermethrin was studied by phenoloxidase (PO), lysozyme assay, and abundance of circulating hemocytes. The LC50 value at 24-, 48-, 72-, and 96-h exposure period was recorded as 185.96, 105.34, 72.42, and 58.41 µg/liter, respectively. Approximately sevenfold increase in mean comet tail length was observed at 24 h posttreatment with sublethal concentrations of cypermethrin. Cypermethrin also induced apoptosis and activated caspase reaction in silkworm hemocytes. Moreover, a significant decrease in digestive enzyme activity was observed at higher concentrations of cypermethrin. In cypermethrin-exposed groups, alteration in histoarchitecture was also observed in the form of ruptured microvilli and thin, deformed, fused mucous layer. The PO enzyme and lysozyme enzyme activity was also altered with sublethal concentration of cypermethrin. Total hemocyte count was reduced to 10587.10, 10052.30, 9234.30, and 8842.60 per mm3 with 10, 20, 30, and 40 µg/liter, respectively. The results offer new insights into the negative consequences of very low concentrations of cypermethrin formulations on nonmulberry silkworm of Northeast India.

  1. Evaluation of the Genotoxic and Physiological Effects of Decabromodiphenyl Ether (BDE-209) and Dechlorane Plus (DP) Flame Retardants in Marine Mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis).

    PubMed

    Barón, Enrique; Dissanayake, Awantha; Vilà-Cano, Judit; Crowther, Charlotte; Readman, James W; Jha, Awadhesh N; Eljarrat, Ethel; Barceló, Damià

    2016-03-01

    Dechlorane Plus (DP) is a proposed alternative to the legacy flame retardant decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209), a major component of Deca-BDE formulations. In contrast to BDE-209, toxicity data for DP are scarce and often focused on mice. Validated dietary in vivo exposure of the marine bivalve (Mytilus galloprovincialis) to both flame retardants did not induce effects at the physiological level (algal clearance rate), but induced DNA damage, as determined by the comet assay, at all concentrations tested. Micronuclei formation was induced by both DP and BDE-209 at the highest exposure concentrations (100 and 200 μg/L, respectively, at 18% above controls). DP caused effects similar to those by BDE-209 but at lower exposure concentrations (5.6, 56, and 100 μg/L for DP and 56, 100, and 200 μg/L for BDE-209). Moreover, bioaccumulation of DP was shown to be concentration dependent, in contrast to BDE-209. The results described suggest that DP poses a greater genotoxic potential than BDE-209.

  2. Hematopoietic cells from Gadd45a- and Gadd45b-deficient mice are sensitized to genotoxic-stress-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Mamta; Gupta, Shiv K; Balliet, Arthur G; Hollander, Mary Christine; Fornace, Albert J; Hoffman, Barbara; Liebermann, Dan A

    2005-11-03

    Gadd45a, gadd45b and gadd45g (Gadd45/MyD118/CR6) are genes that are rapidly induced by genotoxic stress. However, the exact function of Gadd45 proteins in the response of mammalian cells to genotoxic stress is unclear. Here, advantage was taken of gadd45a- and gadd45b-deficient mice to determine the role gadd45a and gadd45b play in the response of bone marrow (BM) cells to genotoxic stress. BM cells from gadd45a- and gadd45b-deficient mice were observed to be more sensitive to ultraviolet radiation chemotherapy (UVC), VP-16 and daunorubicin (DNR)-induced apoptosis compared to wild-type (wt) cells. The increased apoptosis in gadd45a- and gadd45b-deficient cells was evident also by enhanced activation of caspase-3 and poly-ADP-ribose polymerase cleavage and decreased expression of c-inhibitor of apoptotic protein-1, Bcl-2, Bcl-xL compared to wt cells. Reintroduction of gadd45 into gadd45-deficient BM cells restored the wt apoptotic phenotype. Both gadd45a- and gadd45b-deficient BM cells also displayed defective G2/M arrest following exposure to UVC and VP-16, but not to DNR, indicating the existence of different G2/M checkpoints that are either dependent or independent of gadd45. Taken together, these findings identify gadd45a and gadd45b as anti-apoptotic genes that increase the survival of hematopoietic cells following exposure to UV radiation and certain anticancer drugs.

  3. Cytotoxic and genotoxic activities of waters and sediments from highway and parking lot runoffs.

    PubMed

    Haile, Tadele Measho; Mišík, Miroslav; Grummt, Tamara; Halh, Al-Serori; Pichler, Clemens; Knasmueller, Siegfried; Fuerhacker, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The genotoxicity of water and sediment samples from stormwater treatment systems and water from urban highway runoff was tested in the Salmonella/microsome assays with Salmonella typhimurium, micronucleus assay (Trad-MN) with plants and with human-derived liver cells (HepG2), or comet assay with HepG2. Cytotoxicity of water samples was studied using either reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, cell proliferation or dye exclusion assay in HepG2. Concentrations of several contaminants in the tested samples were also measured. Results suggested that urban highway runoff exposed to severe vehicle traffic emissions caused genotoxic effects in comet assay and in Trad-MN assays. Sediments induced either mutagenic effects in strain YG1024 or genotoxic effects in Trad-MN assay. These effects could be due to the presence of nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (NPAHs) which possess carcinogenic and mutagenic properties. Influent and effluents of stormwater treatment systems did not induce genotoxic activity or effects on HepG2 cell viability; however, the influents were able to induce ROS generation and cell proliferation in HepG2 cells. As the methods require a sterile filtration of the water samples, this could have also removed particulate-associated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and resulted in a less pronounced induction of genotoxicity, as would be expected by PAH contamination.

  4. A FLUORESCENCE-BASED SCREENING ASSAY FOR DNA DAMAGE INDUCED BY GENOTOXIC INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The possibility of deliberate or accidental release of toxic chemicals in industrial, commercial or residential settings has indicated a need for rapid, cost-effective and versatile monitoring methods to prevent exposures to humans and ecosystems. Because many toxic industrial c...

  5. Genotoxic Effects of Low- and High-LET Radiation on Human Epithelial Cells Grown in 2-D Versus 3-D Culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Z. S.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Huff, J. L.

    2011-01-01

    Risk estimation for radiation-induced cancer relies heavily on human epidemiology data obtained from terrestrial irradiation incidents from sources such as medical and occupational exposures as well as from the atomic bomb survivors. No such data exists for exposures to the types and doses of high-LET radiation that will be encountered during space travel; therefore, risk assessment for space radiation requires the use of data derived from cell culture and animal models. The use of experimental models that most accurately replicate the response of human tissues is critical for precision in risk projections. This work compares the genotoxic effects of radiation on normal human epithelial cells grown in standard 2-D monolayer culture compared to 3-D organotypic co-culture conditions. These 3-D organotypic models mimic the morphological features, differentiation markers, and growth characteristics of fully-differentiated normal human tissue and are reproducible using defined components. Cultures were irradiated with 2 Gy low-LET gamma rays or varying doses of high-LET particle radiation and genotoxic damage was measured using a modified cytokinesis block micronucleus assay. Our results revealed a 2-fold increase in residual damage in 2 Gy gamma irradiated cells grown under organotypic culture conditions compared to monolayer culture. Irradiation with high-LET particle radiation gave similar results, while background levels of damage were comparable under both scenarios. These observations may be related to the phenomenon of "multicellular resistance" where cancer cells grown as 3-D spheroids or in vivo exhibit an increased resistance to killing by chemotherapeutic agents compared to the same cells grown in 2-D culture. A variety of factors are likely involved in mediating this process, including increased cell-cell communication, microenvironment influences, and changes in cell cycle kinetics that may promote survival of damaged cells in 3-D culture that would

  6. Genotoxicity effect, antioxidant and biomechanical correlation: experimental study of agarose-chitosan bone graft substitute in New Zealand white rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Jebahi, Samira; Ben Saleh, Ghada; Saoudi, Mongi; Besaleh, Salma; Oudadesse, Hassane; Mhadbi, Moufida; Rebai, Tarek; Keskes, Hassib; El Feki, Abdelfattah

    2014-08-01

    Bone loss associated with skeletal trauma or metabolic diseases often requires bone grafting. In such situations, a biomaterial is necessary for migrated cells to produce new tissue. In this study, agarose-chitosan was implanted in the femoral condyle of New Zealand White rabbits that were divided into three groups: Group I was used as control; Groups II and III were used as implanted tissue with agarose-chitosan and presenting empty defects, respectively. This study evaluated the agarose-chitosan biocompatibility by determining the in vivo genotoxicity, oxidative stress balance that correlated with the hardness mechanical property. Moreover, the histopathological and quantitative elements analyzed by using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry were determined. After 30 days of implantation, the in vivo analysis of genotoxicity showed that agarose-chitosan did not induce chromosome aberration or micronucleus damage. A significant decrease in thiobarbituric and acid-reactive substance was observed after agarose-chitosan implantation in the bone tissue. Superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase were significantly enhanced in agarose-chitosan-treated group compared with that of control group. A negative correlation coefficient of the mechanical property with malonyldialdehyde level was detected (R = -0.998). The histological study exhibited a significantly increased angiogenesis and newly formed tissue. No presence of inflammatory process, necrotic or fibrous tissue was detected. Major and trace elements such as Ca, P, Zn, Mg and Fe were increased significantly in the newly formed bone. These findings show that agarose-chitosan biomaterial implantation might be effective for treating trauma and bone regeneration.

  7. Evaluation of genotoxic effects in human fibroblasts after intermittent exposure to 50 Hz electromagnetic fields: a confirmatory study.

    PubMed

    Scarfí, Maria Rosaria; Sannino, Anna; Perrotta, Alessandro; Sarti, Maurizio; Mesirca, Pietro; Bersani, Ferdinando

    2005-09-01

    The aim of this investigation was to confirm the main results reported in recent studies on the induction of genotoxic effects in human fibroblasts exposed to 50 Hz intermittent (5 min field on/10 min field off) sinusoidal electromagnetic fields. For this purpose, the induction of DNA single-strand breaks was evaluated by applying the alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE)/comet assay. To extend the study and validate the results, in the same experimental conditions, the potential genotoxicity was also tested by exposing the cells to a 50 Hz powerline signal (50 Hz frequency plus its harmonics). The cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay was applied after 24 h intermittent exposure to both sinusoidal and powerline signals to obtain information on cell cycle kinetics. The experiments were carried out on human diploid fibroblasts (ES-1). For each experimental run, exposed and sham-exposed samples were set up; positive controls were also provided by treating cells with hydrogen peroxide or mitomycin C for the comet or micronucleus assay, respectively. No statistically significant difference was detected in exposed compared to sham-exposed samples in any of the experimental conditions tested (P > 0.05). In contrast, the positive controls showed a statistically significant increase in DNA damage in all cases, as expected. Accordingly, our findings do not confirm the results reported previously for either comet induction or an increase in micronucleus frequency.

  8. In vitro assessment of genotoxic effects of electric arc furnace dust on human lymphocytes using the alkaline comet assay.

    PubMed

    Garaj-Vrhovac, Vera; Orescanin, Visnja; Ruk, Damir; Gajski, Goran

    2009-02-15

    In vitro genotoxic effects of leachates of electric arc furnace dust (EAFD) on human peripheral lymphocytes, assessed prior and following the treatment with a strong alkaline solution were investigated using the alkaline comet assay. Prior and following the treatment, lymphocytes were incubated with leachate of EAFD for 6 and 24 hours at 37 degrees C. Negative controls were also included. Mean values of the tail lengths established in the samples treated with the leachate stemming from the original dust for 6 and 24 hours, were 15.70 microm and 16.78 microm, respectively, as compared to 12.33 microm found in the control sample. Slight, but significant increase in the tail length was also found with the dust treated with a strong alkaline solution (13.37 microm and 13.60 microm). In case of high heavy metal concentrations (the extract of the original furnace dust), the incubation period was revealed to be of significance as well. The obtained results lead to the conclusion that alkaline comet assay could be used as a rapid, sensitive and low-cost tool when assessing genotoxicity of various waste materials, such as leachates of the electric arc furnace dust.

  9. Genotoxic and histopathological biomarkers for assessing the effects of magnetic exfoliated vermiculite and exfoliated vermiculite in Danio rerio.

    PubMed

    Cáceres-Vélez, Paolin Rocio; Fascineli, Maria Luiza; Grisolia, Cesar Koppe; de Oliveira Lima, Emília Celma; Sousa, Marcelo Henrique; de Morais, Paulo César; Bentes de Azevedo, Ricardo

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic exfoliated vermiculite is a synthetic nanocomposite that quickly and efficiently absorbs organic compounds such as oil from water bodies. It was developed primarily to mitigate pollution, but the possible adverse impacts of its application have not yet been evaluated. In this context, the acute toxicity of magnetic exfoliated vermiculite and exfoliated vermiculite was herein assessed by genotoxic and histopathological biomarkers in zebrafish (Danio rerio). DNA fragmentation was statistically significant for all groups exposed to the magnetic exfoliated vermiculite and for fish exposed to the highest concentration (200mg/L) of exfoliated vermiculite, whereas the micronucleus frequency, nuclear abnormalities and histopathological alterations were not statistically significant for the fish exposed to these materials. In the intestinal lumen, epithelial cells and goblet cells, we found the presence of magnetic exfoliated vermiculite and exfoliated vermiculite, but no alterations or presence of the materials-test in the gills or liver were observed. Our findings suggest that the use of magnetic exfoliated vermiculite and exfoliated vermiculite during standard ecotoxicological assays caused DNA damage in D. rerio, whose alterations may be likely to be repaired, indicating that the magnetic nanoparticles have the ability to promote genotoxic damage, such as DNA fragmentation, but not mutagenic effects.

  10. In vivo genotoxic effects of smoking and occupational lead exposure in printing press workers.

    PubMed

    Rajah, T; Ahuja, Y R

    1995-02-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the genotoxicity of a combination exposure to lead and smoking in workers from the printing industry and also to examine the possible interaction between the two agents. Individuals were classified into 4 different groups: control group, lead-exposed group, smokers and the double-exposure group. Chromosomal analysis was carried out according to conventional methods. Our preliminary study shows that lead-exposed individuals had a significantly increased frequency of sister chromatid exchanges. Further, double exposure to smoking and lead inhibits mitosis.