Science.gov

Sample records for genotoxic effects induced

  1. Evaluation of protective effect of amifostine on dacarbazine induced genotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Etebari, M.; Jafarian-Dehkordi, A.; Lame, V.

    2015-01-01

    Anticancer therapy with alkylating agents has been used for many years. Dacarbazine (DTIC) as an alkylating agent is used alone or in combination with other chemotherapy drugs. In order to inhibit the formation of secondary cancers resulting from chemotherapy with DTIC, preventional strategies is necessary. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the genoprotective effect of amifostine on the genotoxic effects of DTIC in cell culture condition. To determine the optimum genotoxic concentration of DTIC, HepG2 cells were incubated with various DTIC concentrations including 5, 10 and 20 μg/ml for 2 h and the genotoxic effects were evaluated by the comet assay. The result of this part of the study showed that incubation of HepG2 cells with DTIC at 5 μg/ml was sufficient to produce genotoxic effect. In order to determine the protective effects of amifostine on genotoxicity induced by DTIC, HepG2 cells were incubated with different concentrations of amifostine (2, 3 and 5 mg/ml) for 1 h which was followed by incubation with DTIC at 5 μg/ml for 2 h. One hour incubation of cells with different concentrations of amifostine before incubation with DITC indicated that at least 5 mg/ml concentration of amifostine can prevent genotoxic effects induced by DTIC on HepG2 cells under described condition. In conclusion amifostine could prevent DNA damage induced by DTIC on HepG2 cells. PMID:26430459

  2. Evaluation of protective effect of amifostine on dacarbazine induced genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Etebari, M; Jafarian-Dehkordi, A; Lame, V

    2015-01-01

    Anticancer therapy with alkylating agents has been used for many years. Dacarbazine (DTIC) as an alkylating agent is used alone or in combination with other chemotherapy drugs. In order to inhibit the formation of secondary cancers resulting from chemotherapy with DTIC, preventional strategies is necessary. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the genoprotective effect of amifostine on the genotoxic effects of DTIC in cell culture condition. To determine the optimum genotoxic concentration of DTIC, HepG2 cells were incubated with various DTIC concentrations including 5, 10 and 20 μg/ml for 2 h and the genotoxic effects were evaluated by the comet assay. The result of this part of the study showed that incubation of HepG2 cells with DTIC at 5 μg/ml was sufficient to produce genotoxic effect. In order to determine the protective effects of amifostine on genotoxicity induced by DTIC, HepG2 cells were incubated with different concentrations of amifostine (2, 3 and 5 mg/ml) for 1 h which was followed by incubation with DTIC at 5 μg/ml for 2 h. One hour incubation of cells with different concentrations of amifostine before incubation with DITC indicated that at least 5 mg/ml concentration of amifostine can prevent genotoxic effects induced by DTIC on HepG2 cells under described condition. In conclusion amifostine could prevent DNA damage induced by DTIC on HepG2 cells.

  3. Dragon's blood Croton palanostigma induces genotoxic effects in mice.

    PubMed

    Maistro, Edson Luis; Ganthous, Giulia; Machado, Marina da Silva; Zermiani, Tailyn; Andrade, Sérgio Faloni de; Rosa, Paulo Cesar Pires; Perazzo, Fabio Ferreira

    2013-05-20

    Dragon's blood is a dark-red sap produced by species from the genus Croton (Euphorbiaceae), which has been used as a famous traditional medicine since ancient times in many countries, with scarce data about its safe use in humans. In this research, we studied genotoxicity and clastogenicity of Croton palanostigma sap using the comet assay and micronucleus test in cells of mice submitted to acute treatment. HPLC analysis was performed to identify the main components of the sap. The sap was administered by oral gavage at doses of 300 mg/kg, 1,000 mg/kg and 2,000 mg/kg. For the analysis, the comet assay was performed on the leukocytes and liver cells collected 24h after treatment, and the micronucleus test (MN) on bone marrow cells. Cytotoxicity was assessed by scoring 200 consecutive polychromatic (PCE) and normochromatic (NCE) erythrocytes (PCE/NCE ratio). The alkaloid taspine was the main compound indentified in the crude sap of Croton palanostigma. The results of the genotoxicity assessment show that all sap doses tested produced genotoxic effects in leukocytes and liver cells and also produced clastogenic/aneugenic effects in bone marrow cells of mice at the two higher doses tested. The PCE/NCE ratio indicated no cytotoxicity. The data obtained suggest caution in the use of Croton palanostigma sap by humans considering its risk of carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Raw data of the effects of Chlorogenic acid in 3-Nitropropionic acid induced toxicity and genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Norberto, Alarcón-Herrera; Saúl, Flores-Maya; Belén, Bellido; García-Bores Ana, M; Ernesto, Mendoza; Guillermo, Ávila-Acevedo; Elizabeth, Hernández-Echeagaray

    2017-10-01

    The raw data showed in this article comes from the published research article entitled "Protective effects of Chlorogenic acid in 3-Nitropropionic acid induced toxicity and genotoxicity" Food Chem Toxicol. 2017 May 3. pii: S0278-6915(17)30226-0. DOI:10.1016/j.fct.2017.04.048. [1]. Data illustrates antitoxic and antigenotoxic effects of Chlorogenic acid (CGA) on toxicity and genotoxicity produced by the in vivo treatment with mitochondria toxin 3-Nitropropionic acid (3-NP) in mice. Toxicity and genotoxicity was evaluated in erythrocytes of peripheral blood through the micronuclei assay. Data was share at the Elsevier repository under the reference number FCT9033.

  5. Genotoxic and anti-genotoxic effects of esculin and its oligomer fractions against mitomycin C-induced DNA damages in mice.

    PubMed

    Mokdad Bzeouich, Imen; Mustapha, Nadia; Maatouk, Mouna; Ghedira, Kamel; Ghoul, Mohamed; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila

    2016-12-01

    Mitomycin C is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic drugs against various solid tumors. However, despite its wide spectrum of clinical benefits, this agent is capable of inducing various types of genotoxicity. In this study, we investigated the effect of esculin and its oligomer fractions (E1, E2 and E3) against mitomycin C induced genotoxicity in liver and kidney cells isolated from Balb/C mice using the comet assay. Esculin and its oligomer fractions were not genotoxic at the tested doses (20 mg/kg and 40 mg/kg b.w). A significant decrease in DNA damages was observed, suggesting a protective role of esculin and its oligomer fractions against the genotoxicity induced by mitomycin C on liver and kidney cells. Moreover, esculin and its oligomer fractions did not induce an increase of malondialdehyde levels.

  6. Effects of fullerenol nanoparticles on acetamiprid induced cytoxicity and genotoxicity in cultured human lung fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Çavaş, Tolga; Çinkılıç, Nilüfer; Vatan, Özgür; Yılmaz, Dilek

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of water soluble fullerene (fullerenol) nanoparticles on the in vitro genotoxicity induced by the insecticide acetamiprid. Healthy human lung cells (IMR-90) were treated with fullerenol C60(OH)n (n: 18-22) alone and in combination with acetamiprid for 24h. The micronucleus test, comet assay and γ-H2AX foci formation assays were used as genotoxicity endpoints. Cytotoxicity was evaluated using the clonogenic assay. The maximum tested concentration of fullerenol (1.600 μg/ml) induced 77% survival where as the lowest concentration (25 μg/ml) was not cytotoxic where as acetamiprid was cytotoxic. Fullerenol did not induce genotoxicity at tested concentrations (50-1600 μg/L). On the other hand, acetamiprid (>50 μM) significantly induced formation of micronuclei, and double and single stranded DNA breaks in IMR-90 cells. For simultaneous exposure studies, two non-cytotoxic concentrations (50 and 200 μg/ml) of fullerenol and three cytotoxic concentrations of acetamiprid (100, 200 and 400 μM) were selected. As a result, we observed that co-exposure with fullerenol significantly reduced the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of acetamiprid in IMR-90 cells. Our results indicated the protective effect of water soluble fullerene particles on herbicide induced genotoxicity.

  7. Protective effects of chlorogenic acid in 3-nitropropionic acid induced toxicity and genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Alarcón-Herrera, Norberto; Flores-Maya, Saúl; Bellido, Belén; García-Bores, Ana M; Mendoza, Ernesto; Ávila-Acevedo, Guillermo; Hernández-Echeagaray, Elizabeth

    2017-05-03

    Mitochondrial inhibition with the toxin 3-Nitropropionic acid (3-NP) has been used to study the underlying mechanisms in striatal neurodegeneration, but few experiments have evaluated its toxicity and genotoxicity of in vivo administration. Furthermore, different antioxidant molecules may prevent degeneration induced by the toxic effects of 3-NP. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the toxicity and genotoxicity induced by 3-NP (15 mg/kg) in the micronuclei assay method; also, we assessed chlorogenic acid (CGA, 100 mg/kg) for its anti-toxic and anti-genotoxic effect in damage produced by in vivo treatment with 3-NP. 3-NP induced toxicity and genotoxicity. CGA administered as a co-treatment with 3-NP (3-NP + CA) reduced toxicity by 32.76%, as a pre-treatment for 5 days only, followed by 3-NP treatment (P/CA, 3-NP) inhibiting toxicity by 24.04%, or as a pre-treatment, plus a co-treatment with 3-NP (P/CA, 3-NP + CA) avoided any toxic effect. CGA alone did not exhibit any toxic effect. Only P/CGA, 3-NP + CGA group, avoided toxicity and genotoxicity, suggesting that CGA could be suitable to prevent, reduce or delay toxicity and cell death. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Modulatory Effect of Betulinic Acid on the Genotoxicity Induced by Different Mutagens in V79 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Acésio, Nathália Oliveira; de Oliveira, Pollyanna Francielli; Mastrocola, Daiane Fernanda Pereira; Lima, Ildercílio Mota de Souza; Munari, Carla Carolina; Sato, Vânia Luiza Ferreira Lucatti; Souza, Andressa Aparecida Silva; Flauzino, Lúzio Gabriel Bocalon; Cunha, Wilson Roberto; Tavares, Denise Crispim

    2016-01-01

    Betulinic acid (BA) is a pentacyclic triterpene that can be isolated from many medicinal plants around the world. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic potential of BA and its effect on the genotoxicity induced by different mutagens in V79 cells using the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay. Different BA concentrations were combined with methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), doxorubicin (DXR), camptothecin (CPT), and etoposide (VP-16). The frequencies of micronuclei in cultures treated with different BA concentrations did not differ from those of the negative control. Treatment with BA and MMS resulted in lower micronucleus frequencies than those observed for cultures treated with MMS alone. On the other hand, a significant increase in micronucleus frequencies was observed in cultures treated with BA combined with DXR or VP-16 when compared to these mutagens alone. The results showed no effect of BA on CPT-induced genotoxicity. Therefore, BA was not genotoxic under the present experimental conditions and exerted a different influence on the genotoxicity induced by different mutagens. The modulatory effect of BA depends on the type of mutagen and concentrations used. PMID:27195016

  9. Protective Effects of Quercetin against Dimethoate-Induced Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity in Allium sativum Test

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Waseem; Shaikh, Sibhghatulla; Nazam, Nazia; Lone, Mohammad Iqbal

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation was directed to study the possible protective activity of quercetin—a natural antioxidant against dimethoate-induced cyto- and genotoxicity in meristematic cells of Allium sativum. So far there is no report on the biological properties of quercetin in plant test systems. Chromosome breaks, multipolar anaphase, stick chromosome, and mitotic activity were undertaken in the current study as markers of cyto- and genotoxicity. Untreated control, quercetin controls (@ 5, 10 and 20 μg/mL for 3 h), and dimethoate exposed groups (@ 100 and 200 μg/mL for 3 h) were maintained. For protection against cytogenotoxicity, the root tip cells treated with dimethoate at 100 and 200 μg/mL for 3 h and quercetin treatment at 5, 10, and 20 μg/mL for 16 h, prior to dimethoate treatment, were undertaken. Quercetin was found to be neither cytotoxic nor genotoxic in Allium sativum control at these doses. A significant increase (P < 0.05) in chromosomal aberrations was noted in dimethoate treated Allium. Pretreatment of Allium sativum with quercetin significantly (P < 0.05) reduced dimethoate-induced genotoxicity and cytotoxicity in meristematic cells, and these effects were dose dependent. In conclusion, quercetin has a protective role in the abatement of dimethoate-induced cyto- and genotoxicity in the meristematic cells of Allium sativum that resides, at least in part, on its antioxidant effects. PMID:27379342

  10. Protective Effects of Quercetin against Dimethoate-Induced Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity in Allium sativum Test.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Waseem; Shaikh, Sibhghatulla; Nazam, Nazia; Lone, Mohammad Iqbal

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation was directed to study the possible protective activity of quercetin-a natural antioxidant against dimethoate-induced cyto- and genotoxicity in meristematic cells of Allium sativum. So far there is no report on the biological properties of quercetin in plant test systems. Chromosome breaks, multipolar anaphase, stick chromosome, and mitotic activity were undertaken in the current study as markers of cyto- and genotoxicity. Untreated control, quercetin controls (@ 5, 10 and 20 μg/mL for 3 h), and dimethoate exposed groups (@ 100 and 200 μg/mL for 3 h) were maintained. For protection against cytogenotoxicity, the root tip cells treated with dimethoate at 100 and 200 μg/mL for 3 h and quercetin treatment at 5, 10, and 20 μg/mL for 16 h, prior to dimethoate treatment, were undertaken. Quercetin was found to be neither cytotoxic nor genotoxic in Allium sativum control at these doses. A significant increase (P < 0.05) in chromosomal aberrations was noted in dimethoate treated Allium. Pretreatment of Allium sativum with quercetin significantly (P < 0.05) reduced dimethoate-induced genotoxicity and cytotoxicity in meristematic cells, and these effects were dose dependent. In conclusion, quercetin has a protective role in the abatement of dimethoate-induced cyto- and genotoxicity in the meristematic cells of Allium sativum that resides, at least in part, on its antioxidant effects.

  11. THE EFFECTS OF HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN 70 (HSP70) AND EXPOSURE PROTOCOL ON ARSENITE INDUCED GENOTOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Effects of Heat Shock Protein 70 (Hsp70) and Exposure Protocol on Arsenite Induced Genotoxicity

    Barnes, J.A.1,2, Collins, B.W.2, Dix, D.J.3 and Allen J.W2.
    1National Research Council, 2Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, 3Reproductive Toxicology Division, Office...

  12. THE EFFECTS OF HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN 70 (HSP70) AND EXPOSURE PROTOCOL ON ARSENITE INDUCED GENOTOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Effects of Heat Shock Protein 70 (Hsp70) and Exposure Protocol on Arsenite Induced Genotoxicity

    Barnes, J.A.1,2, Collins, B.W.2, Dix, D.J.3 and Allen J.W2.
    1National Research Council, 2Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, 3Reproductive Toxicology Division, Office...

  13. EFFECT OF EXPOSURE PROTOCOL AND HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN EXPRESSION ON ARSENITE INDUCED GENOTOXICITY IN MCF-7 BREAST CANCER CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory


    Effect of exposure protocol and heat shock protein expression on arsenite induced genotoxicity in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    The genotoxic effects of arsenic (As) are well accepted, yet its mechanism of action is not clearly defined. Heat-shock proteins (HSPs) protect...

  14. EFFECT OF EXPOSURE PROTOCOL AND HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN EXPRESSION ON ARSENITE INDUCED GENOTOXICITY IN MCF-7 BREAST CANCER CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory


    Effect of exposure protocol and heat shock protein expression on arsenite induced genotoxicity in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    The genotoxic effects of arsenic (As) are well accepted, yet its mechanism of action is not clearly defined. Heat-shock proteins (HSPs) protect...

  15. Protective effect of boric acid on lead- and cadmium-induced genotoxicity in V79 cells.

    PubMed

    Ustündağ, Aylin; Behm, Claudia; Föllmann, Wolfram; Duydu, Yalçin; Degen, Gisela H

    2014-06-01

    The toxic heavy metals cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) are important environmental pollutants which can cause serious damage to human health. As the metal ions (Cd(2+) and Pb(2+)) accumulate in the organism, there is special concern regarding chronic toxicity and damage to the genetic material. Metal-induced genotoxicity has been attributed to indirect mechanisms, such as induction of oxidative stress and interference with DNA repair. Boron is a naturally occurring element and considered to be an essential micronutrient, although the cellular activities of boron compounds remain largely unexplored. The present study has been conducted to evaluate potential protective effects of boric acid (BA) against genotoxicity induced by cadmium chloride (CdCl2) and lead chloride (PbCl2) in V79 cell cultures. Cytotoxicity assays (neutral red uptake and cell titer blue assay) served to determine suitable concentrations for subsequent genotoxicity assays. Chromosomal damage and DNA strand breaks were assessed by micronucleus tests and comet assays. Both PbCl2 and CdCl2 (at 3, 5 and 10 µM) were shown to induce concentration-dependent increases in micronucleus frequencies and DNA strand breaks in V79 cells. BA itself was not cytotoxic (up to 300 µM) and showed no genotoxic effects. Pretreatment of cells with low levels of BA (2.5 and 10 µM) was found to strongly reduce the genotoxic effects of the tested metals. Based on the findings of this in vitro study, it can be suggested that boron provides an efficient protection against the induction of DNA strand breaks and micronuclei by lead and cadmium. Further studies on the underlying mechanisms for the protective effect of boron are needed.

  16. Genotoxicity Induced by Foetal and Infant Exposure to Magnetic Fields and Modulation of Ionising Radiation Effects

    PubMed Central

    Udroiu, Ion; Antoccia, Antonio; Tanzarella, Caterina; Giuliani, Livio; Pacchierotti, Francesca; Cordelli, Eugenia; Eleuteri, Patrizia; Villani, Paola; Sgura, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    Background Few studies have investigated the toxicity and genotoxicity of extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF) during prenatal and neonatal development. These phases of life are characterized by cell proliferation and differentiation, which might make them sensitive to environmental stressors. Although in vitro evidences suggest that ELF-MF may modify the effects of ionizing radiation, no research has been conducted so far in vivo on the genotoxic effects of ELF-MF combined with X-rays. Aim and methods Aim of this study was to investigate in somatic and germ cells the effects of chronic ELF-MF exposure from mid gestation until weaning, and any possible modulation produced by ELF-MF exposure on ionizing radiation-induced damage. Mice were exposed to 50 Hz, 65 μT magnetic field, 24 hours/day, for a total of 30 days, starting from 12 days post-conception. Another group was irradiated with 1 Gy X-rays immediately before ELF-MF exposure, other groups were only X-irradiated or sham-exposed. Micronucleus test on blood erythrocytes was performed at multiple times from 1 to 140 days after birth. Additionally, 42 days after birth, genotoxic and cytotoxic effects on male germ cells were assessed by comet assay and flow cytometric analysis. Results ELF-MF exposure had no teratogenic effect and did not affect survival, growth and development. The micronucleus test indicated that ELF-MF induced a slight genotoxic damage only after the maximum exposure time and that this effect faded away in the months following the end of exposure. ELF-MF had no effects on ionizing radiation (IR)-induced genotoxicity in erythrocytes. Differently, ELF–MF appeared to modulate the response of male germ cells to X-rays with an impact on proliferation/differentiation processes. These results point to the importance of tissue specificity and development on the impact of ELF-MF on the early stages of life and indicate the need of further research on the molecular mechanisms underlying

  17. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity induced by photothermal effects of colloidal gold nanorods.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young Joo; Kim, Yang Jee; Lee, Joong Won; Lee, Younghyun; Lee, Sunyeong; Lim, Yong-Beom; Chung, Hai Won

    2013-06-01

    Gold nanorods (Au NRs) that absorb near-infrared (NIR) light have great potential in the field of nanomedicine. Photothermal therapy (PTT), a very attractive cancer therapy in nanomedicine, combines nanomaterials and light. The aim of this study was to elucidate the molecular mechanism involved in Au NR-mediated cytotoxic, genotoxic, and other biological responses, in the presence or absence of NIR irradiation. Specifically, cell death mode, generation of reactive oxygen species, DNA damage, apoptotic gene expression, and cell morphological changes induced by Au NRs under NIR irradiation were evaluated in cancer cells. In human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cells (A549 cells), mild necrosis via DNA damage was induced by NIR responsive Au NRs. Unlike in the cancer cells, cell viability of normal human lymphocyte was not affected by the combined treatment of Au NRs and NIR irradiation. This study delineates differential cytotoxic and genotoxic susceptibility of cancer and normal cells during photothermal treatment of Au NRs. In conclusion, our results suggest that the photothermal cyto-/genotoxic activity of Au NRs is an effective method for cancer therapy in human lung cancer cells.

  18. Fipronil-induced genotoxicity and DNA damage in vivo: Protective effect of vitamin E.

    PubMed

    Badgujar, P C; Selkar, N A; Chandratre, G A; Pawar, N N; Dighe, V D; Bhagat, S T; Telang, A G; Vanage, G R

    2017-05-01

    Fipronil, an insecticide of the phenylpyrazole class has been classified as a carcinogen by United States Environmental Protection Agency, yet very limited information is available about its genotoxic effects. Adult male and female animals were gavaged with various doses of fipronil (2.5, 12.5, and 25 mg/kg body weight (bw)) to evaluate micronucleus test (mice), chromosome aberration (CA), and comet assay (rats), respectively. Cyclophosphamide (40 mg/kg bw; intraperitoneal) was used as positive control. Another group of animals were pretreated with vitamin E orally (400 mg/kg bw) for 5 days prior to administration of fipronil (12.5 mg/kg). Fipronil exposure in both male and female mice caused significant increase in the frequency of micronuclei (MN) in polychromatic erythrocytes. Similarly, structural CAs in bone marrow cells and DNA damage in the lymphocytes was found to be significantly higher in the male and female rats exposed to fipronil as compared to their respective controls. The average degree of protection (male and female animals combined together) shown by pretreatment of vitamin E against fipronil-induced genotoxicity was 63.28%: CAs; 47.91%: MN formation; and 74.70%: DNA damage. Findings of this study demonstrate genotoxic nature of fipronil regardless of gender effect and documents protective role of vitamin E.

  19. Inhalation of formaldehyde does not induce systemic genotoxic effects in rats.

    PubMed

    Speit, Günter; Zeller, Jasmin; Schmid, Oliver; Elhajouji, Azeddine; Ma-Hock, Lan; Neuss, Simone

    2009-01-01

    reticulocytes with micronuclei (MN) was determined. The positive control substances induced a significant effect in the genotoxicity tests and thus demonstrated the sensitivity of the test systems. FA did not induce any significant effect in any of the genotoxicity tests performed. It can be concluded that inhalation of FA in a 28-day study with FA concentrations up to 15 ppm does not lead to systemic genotoxic effects in the blood of rats.

  20. Protective Effect of Onion Extract on Bleomycin-Induced Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity in Human Lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yoon Hee; Lee, Joong Won; Woo, Hae Dong; Lee, Sunyeong; Kim, Yang Jee; Lee, Younghyun; Shin, Sangah; Joung, Hyojee; Chung, Hai Won

    2016-02-19

    Following one of the world's largest nuclear accidents, occured at Fukushima, Japan in 2011, a significant scientific effort has focused on minimizing the potential adverse health effects due to radiation exposure. The use of natural dietary antioxidants to reduce the risk of radiation-induced oxidative DNA damage is a simple strategy for minimizing radiation-related cancer rates and improving overall health. The onion is among the richest sources of dietary flavonoids and is an important food for increasing their overall intake. Therefore, we examined the effect of an onion extract on cyto- and geno-toxicity in human lymphocytes treated with bleomycin (BLM), a radiomimetic agent. In addition, we measured the frequency of micronuclei (MN) and DNA damage following treatment with BLM using a cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay and a single cell gel electrophoresis assay. We observed a significant increase in cell viability in lymphocytes treated with onion extract then exposed to BLM compared to cells treated with BLM alone. The frequency of BLM induced MN and DNA damage increased in a dose-dependent manner; however, when lymphocytes were pretreated with onion extract (10 and 20 μL/mL), the frequency of BLM-induced MN was decreased at all doses of BLM and DNA damage was decreased at 3 μg/mL of BLM. These results suggest that onion extract may have protective effects against BLM-induced cyto- and genotoxicity in human lymphocytes.

  1. Protective Effect of Onion Extract on Bleomycin-Induced Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity in Human Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yoon Hee; Lee, Joong Won; Woo, Hae Dong; Lee, Sunyeong; Kim, Yang Jee; Lee, Younghyun; Shin, Sangah; Joung, Hyojee; Chung, Hai Won

    2016-01-01

    Following one of the world’s largest nuclear accidents, occured at Fukushima, Japan in 2011, a significant scientific effort has focused on minimizing the potential adverse health effects due to radiation exposure. The use of natural dietary antioxidants to reduce the risk of radiation-induced oxidative DNA damage is a simple strategy for minimizing radiation-related cancer rates and improving overall health. The onion is among the richest sources of dietary flavonoids and is an important food for increasing their overall intake. Therefore, we examined the effect of an onion extract on cyto- and geno-toxicity in human lymphocytes treated with bleomycin (BLM), a radiomimetic agent. In addition, we measured the frequency of micronuclei (MN) and DNA damage following treatment with BLM using a cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay and a single cell gel electrophoresis assay. We observed a significant increase in cell viability in lymphocytes treated with onion extract then exposed to BLM compared to cells treated with BLM alone. The frequency of BLM induced MN and DNA damage increased in a dose-dependent manner; however, when lymphocytes were pretreated with onion extract (10 and 20 μL/mL), the frequency of BLM-induced MN was decreased at all doses of BLM and DNA damage was decreased at 3 μg/mL of BLM. These results suggest that onion extract may have protective effects against BLM-induced cyto- and genotoxicity in human lymphocytes. PMID:26907305

  2. Protective effects of boron on cyclophosphamide induced lipid peroxidation and genotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Ince, Sinan; Kucukkurt, Ismail; Demirel, Hasan Huseyin; Acaroz, Damla Arslan; Akbel, Erten; Cigerci, Ibrahim Hakki

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possible protective effect of boron (B) on cyclophosphamide (CYC) induced oxidative stress in rats. Totally, thirty Wistar albino male rats were fed standard rodent diet and divided into 5 equal groups: physiological saline was given intraperitoneally (i.p.) to the control group (vehicle treated), to the second group only 75 mg kg(-1) CYC was given i.p. on the 14th d, and boron was administered (5, 10, and 20 mg kg(-1), i.p.) to the other groups for 14 d and CYC (75 mg kg(-1), i.p.) on the 14th d. CYC caused increase of malondialdehyde and decrease of glutathione levels, decrease of superoxide dismutase activities in erythrocyte and tissues, decrease of erythrocyte, heart, lung, and brain catalase, and plasma antioxidant activities. Also, CYC treatment caused to DNA damage in mononuclear leukocytes. Moreover, B exhibited protective action against the CYC-induced histopathological changes in tissues. However, treatment of B decreased severity of CYC-induced lipid peroxidation and genotoxicity on tissues. In conclusion, B has ameliorative effects against CYC-induced lipid peroxidation and genotoxicity by enhancing antioxidant defence mechanism in rat.

  3. Protective effects of curcumin against genotoxicity induced by 131-iodine in human cultured lymphocyte cells

    PubMed Central

    Shafaghati, Nayereh; Hedayati, Monireh; Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jalal

    2014-01-01

    Background: 131-radioiodine has been widely used as an effective radionuclide for treatment of patients with thyroid diseases. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the radioprotective effects of curcumin as a natural product that protects against the genotoxic effects of 131I in human cultured lymphocytes. Materials and Methods: Whole blood samples from human volunteers were incubated with curcumin at doses of 5, 10, and 50 μg/mL. After 1-hour incubation, the lymphocytes were incubated with 131I (100 μCi/1.5 ml) for 2 hours. The lymphocyte cultures were then mitogenically stimulated to allow for evaluation of the number of micronuclei in cytokinesis-blocked binucleated cells. Results: Incubation of lymphocytes with 131I at dose 100 μCi/1.5 mL induced genotoxicity shown by increase in micronuclei frequency in human lymphocytes. Curcumin at 5, 10, and 50 μg/mL doses significantly reduced the micronuclei frequency. Maximal protective effects and greatest decrease in micronuclei frequency were observed when whole blood was incubated with 50 μg/mL dose of curcumin with 52%. Conclusion: This study has important implications for patients undergoing 131I therapy. Our results indicate a protective role for curcumin against the genetic damage and side effects induced by 131I administration. PMID:24914274

  4. Protective effect of hawthorn extract against genotoxicity induced by methyl methanesulfonate in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jalal; Azadbakht, Mohammad; Tanha, Mohammad; Mahmodzadeh, Aziz; Mohammadifar, Sohila

    2011-05-01

    The preventive effect of hawthorn (Crataegus microphylla) fruit extract against genotoxicity induced by methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) has been investigated in human cultured blood lymphocytes. Peripheral blood samples were collected from human volunteers at 0 (10 minutes before), and at 1 and 2 hours after a single oral ingestion of 1 g hawthorn powder extract. At each time point, the whole blood was treated in vitro with MMS (200 µmol) at 24 hours after cell culture, and then the lymphocytes were cultured with mitogenic stimulation to determine the micronuclei in cytokinesis-blocked binucleated cells. The lymphocytes treated with hawthorn and MMS to exhibit a significant decreasing in the incidence of micronucleated binucleated cells, as compared with similarly MMS-treated lymphocytes from blood samples collected at 0 hour. The maximum protection and decreasing in frequency of micronuclei (36%) was observed at 1 hour after ingestion of hawthorn extract. The high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis showed that hawthorn contained chlorogenic acid, epicatechin and hyperoside. It is obvious that hawthorn, particularly flavonoids constituents with antioxidative activity, reduced the oxidative stress and genotoxicity induced by toxic compounds. This set of data may have an important application for the protection of human lymphocyte from the genetic damage and side effects induced by chemicals hazardous in people.

  5. CCl4 induced genotoxicity and DNA oxidative damages in rats: hepatoprotective effect of Sonchus arvensis.

    PubMed

    Alkreathy, Huda Mohammad; Khan, Rahmat Ali; Khan, Muhammad Rashid; Sahreen, Sumaira

    2014-11-21

    Sonchus arvesis is traditionally reported in various human ailments including hepatotoxicity in Pakistan. Presently we designed to assess the protective effects of methanolic extract of Sonchus arvesis against carbon tetrachloride induced genotoxicity and DNA oxidative damages in hepatic tissues of experimental rats. 36 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 6 groups to evaluate the hepatoprotective effects of Sonchus arvensis against CCl4 induced genotoxicity, DNA damages and antioxidant depletion. Rats of normal control group were given free access of food and water add labitum. Group II rats received 3 ml/kg of CCl4 (30% in olive oil v/v) via the intraperitoneal route twice a week for four weeks. Group III and IV received 1 ml of 100 mg/kg b.w. and 200 mg/kg b.w. SME via gavage after 48 h of CCl4 treatment whereas group V was given 1 ml of silymarin (100 mg/kg b.w.) after 48 h of CCl4 treatment. Group VI only received 200 mg/kg b.w. SME. Protective effects of SME were checked by measuring serum markers, activities of antioxidant enzymes, genotoxicity and DNA dmages. Results of the present study showed that treatment of SME reversed the activities of serum marker enzymes and cholesterol profile as depleted with CCl4 treatment. Activities of endogenous antioxidant enzymes of liver tissue homogenate; catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSHpx), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and glutathione reductase (GSR) were reduced with administration of CCl4, which were returned to the control level with SME treatment. CCl4-induced hepatic cirrhosis decreased hepatic glutathione (GSH) and increased lipid peroxidative products (TBARS), were normalized by treatment with SME. Moreover, administration of CCl4 caused genotoxicity and DNA fragmentation which were significantly restored towards the normal level with SME. These results reveal that treatment of SME may be useful in the prevention of hepatic stress.

  6. Long-term exposure of rabbits to imidaclorpid as quantified in blood induces genotoxic effect.

    PubMed

    Stivaktakis, Polychronis D; Kavvalakis, Matthaios P; Tzatzarakis, Manolis N; Alegakis, Athanasios K; Panagiotakis, Michael N; Fragkiadaki, Persefoni; Vakonaki, Elena; Ozcagli, Eren; Hayes, Wallace A; Rakitskii, Valerii N; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M

    2016-04-01

    The present in-vivo study focuses on the genotoxic effect of the neonicotinoid pesticide imidacloprid (IMI) in rabbits. The purpose of the study was to establish a possible relationship between exposure to the pesticide (dose and duration) and genotoxicity. Furthermore, an analytical method for the simultaneous determination of IMI and its major metabolite 6-chloronicotinic acid (6-ClNA) in blood was developed and validated. The isolation of the two analytes from blood was performed by liquid-liquid extraction with dichloromethane. Analysis was performed by Liquid Chromatography - Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization - Mass Spectrometry (LC-APCI-MS). The method was applied on the determination of IMI and 6-ClNA in serum samples obtained from rabbits fed with the insecticide at two low doses. Furthermore, parameters of genotoxicity and cytotoxicity were evaluated by measuring binucleated cells with micronuclei (BNMN), micronuclei (MN) and the Cytokinesis Block Proliferation Index (CBPI), in lymphocytes of exposed rabbits. The results revealed a genotoxic effect of IMI for both exposed groups. There were statistically significant differences in the frequencies of BNMN and MN between control and exposed groups but there was no dose-dependence, neither time-dependence of the genotoxic effect for the administered doses. This is the first time that long term exposure to IMI in rabbits was studied for the determination of its genotoxic effect. The genotoxic effect of IMI as it is depicted by the current study is in accordance with previous studies.

  7. Radioprotective Effect of Achillea millefolium L Against Genotoxicity Induced by Ionizing Radiation in Human Normal Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shahani, Somayeh; Rostamnezhad, Mostafa; Ghaffari-rad, Vahid; Ghasemi, Arash; Allahverdi Pourfallah, Tayyeb

    2015-01-01

    The radioprotective effect of Achillea millefolium L (ACM) extract was investigated against genotoxicity induced by ionizing radiation (IR) in human lymphocytes. Peripheral blood samples were collected from human volunteers and incubated with the methanolic extract of ACM at different concentrations (10, 50, 100, and 200 μg/mL) for 2 hours. At each dose point, the whole blood was exposed in vitro to 2.5 Gy of X-ray and then the lymphocytes were cultured with mitogenic stimulation to determine the micronuclei in cytokinesis-blocked binucleated cell. Antioxidant capacity of the extract was determined using free radical-scavenging method. The treatment of lymphocytes with the extract showed a significant decrease in the incidence of micronuclei binucleated cells, as compared with similarly irradiated lymphocytes without any extract treatment. The maximum protection and decrease in frequency of micronuclei were observed at 200 μg/mL of ACM extract which completely protected genotoxicity induced by IR in human lymphocytes. Achillea millefolium extract exhibited concentration-dependent radical-scavenging activity on 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl free radicals. These data suggest that the methanolic extract of ACM may play an important role in the protection of normal tissues against genetic damage induced by IR. PMID:26675116

  8. Radioprotective effect of chicory seeds against genotoxicity induced by ionizing radiation in human normal lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Hosseinimehr, S J; Ghaffari-Rad, V; Rostamnezhad, M; Ghasemi, A; Allahverdi Pourfallah, T; Shahani, S

    2015-08-17

    The search for less-toxic radioprotective agents has led to a growing trend towards natural products. Protective effect of the methanolic extract of chicory seeds (MCS) was investigated against genotoxicity induced by ionizing radiation in human lymphocytes. Human peripheral blood samples were collected and incubated with MCS at different concentrations (10, 50, 100, and 200 μg/mL) for two hours. The whole blood samples were exposed in vitro to X-ray at dose 2.5 Gy. Then, the lymphocytes were cultured with mitogenic stimulation to determine the micronucleus in cytokinesis blocked binucleated cell. The methanolic extract at all doses significantly reduced the frequency of micronuclei in binucleated lymphocytes, as compared with similarly irradiated lymphocytes without any extract treatment. The maximum protection was observed at 200 μg/mL of MCS, it completely protected genotoxicity induced by ionizing radiation in human lymphocytes. The extract exhibited a concentration-dependent radical scavenging activity on 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl free radicals. HPLC analysis of MCS showed this extract is containing chlorogenic acid as a phenolic compound. These data suggest that the radioprotective effect of methanolic extract of chicory seeds can be attributed to the presence of phenolic compounds such as chlorogenic acid which act as antioxidant agents.

  9. Protective effects of acerola juice on genotoxicity induced by iron in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Horta, Roberta Nunes; Kahl, Vivian Francilia Silva; Sarmento, Merielen da Silva; Nunes, Marisa Fernanda Silva; Porto, Carem Rejane Maglione; de Andrade, Vanessa Moraes; Ferraz, Alexandre de Barros Falcão; Silva, Juliana Da

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Metal ions such as iron can induce DNA damage by inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress. Vitamin C is one of the most widely consumed antioxidants worldwide, present in many fruits and vegetables, especially inMalpighia glabra L., popularly known as acerola, native to Brazil. Acerola is considered a functional fruit due to its high antioxidant properties and phenolic contents, and therefore is consumed to prevent diseases or as adjuvant in treatment strategies. Here, the influence of ripe and unripe acerola juices on iron genotoxicity was analyzed in vivo using the comet assay and micronucleus test. The comet assay results showed that acerola juice exerted no genotoxic or antigenotoxic activity. Neither ripe nor unripe acerola juices were mutagenic to animals treated with juices, in micronucleus test. However, when compared to iron group, the pre-treatment with acerola juices exerted antimutagenic activity, decreasing significantly micronucleus mean values in bone marrow. Stage of ripeness did not influence the interaction of acerola compounds with DNA, and both ripe and unripe acerola juices exerted protective effect over DNA damage generated by iron. PMID:27007905

  10. Protective effects of Vernonia amygdalina against sodium arsenite-induced genotoxicity in rat

    PubMed Central

    Adetutu, Adewale; Oyewo, Emmanuel Bukoye; Adesokan, Ayoade A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Contamination of the environment with arsenic (As) from both human and natural sources is known as a global problem. This study investigated the chemoprotective potential of Vernonia amygdalina leave extract against sodium arsenite-induced genotoxicity and hepatotoxicity. Materials and Methods: Genotoxic effects were evaluated in the rat bone marrow using micronuclei. The gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities were assayed in rat serum. Results: Pre-treatment with extract of V. amygdalina at doses 5 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg significantly decreased the frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs). The GGT and ALP activities were elevated more than fourfold, in the liver of rats treated with sodium arsenite, while it was reduced almost to half when the sodium arsenit-treated rats were fed fresh V. amgdalina leave extracts The phytochemical constituents of V. amygdalina assayed in this study may be responsible for high radical scavenging of the DPPH free radical observed. Conclusion: The present results indicate that V. amygdalina extract is capable of suppressing the chromosomal aberration induced by sodium arsenite in rat. Thus, V. amygdalina may be a potent chemoprotective agent against the toxicity of sodium arsenite in rats. PMID:23900237

  11. Protective effect of Selenium nanoparticle against cyclophosphamide induced hepatotoxicity and genotoxicity in Swiss albino mice.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Arin; Basu, Abhishek; Ghosh, Prosenjit; Biswas, Jaydip; Bhattacharya, Sudin

    2014-08-01

    Cyclophosphamide (CP) is the most commonly used chemotherapeutic drug for various types of cancer. However, its use causes severe cytotoxicity to normal cells in human. It is well known that the undesirable side effects are caused due to the formation of reactive oxygen species. Selenium is an essential micronutrient for both animals and humans and has antioxidant and membrane stabilizing property, but selenium is also toxic above certain level. Nano selenium has been well proved to be less toxic than inorganic selenium as well as certain organoselenium compounds. The objective of the study is to evaluate the protective role of Nano-Se against CP-induced hepatotoxicity and genotoxicity in Swiss albino mice. CP was administered intraperitoneally (25 mg/kg b.w.) and Nano-Se was given by oral gavages (2 mg Se/kg b.w.) in concomitant and pretreatment scheme. Intraperitoneal administration of CP induced hepatic damage as indicated by the serum marker enzymes aspartate and alanine transaminases and increased the malonaldehyde level, depleted the glutathione content and antioxidant enzyme activity (glutathione peroxidase, glutathione-s-transferase, superoxide dismutase and catalase), and induced DNA damage and chromosomal aberration. Oral administration of Nano-Se caused a significant reduction in malonaldehyde, ROS level and glutathione levels, restoration of antioxidant enzyme activity, reduction in chromosomal aberration in bone marrow, and DNA damage in lymphocytes and also in bone marrow. Moreover, the chemoprotective efficiency of Nano-Se against CP induced toxicity was confirmed by histopathological evaluation. The results support the protective effect of Nano-Se against CP-induced hepatotoxicity and genotoxicity.

  12. The genotoxic effects of DNA lesions induced by artificial UV-radiation and sunlight.

    PubMed

    Schuch, André Passaglia; Menck, Carlos Frederico Martins

    2010-06-01

    Solar radiation sustains and affects all life forms on Earth. The increase in solar UV-radiation at environmental levels, due to depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer, highlights serious issues of social concern. This becomes still more dramatic in tropical and subtropical regions where radiation-intensity is still higher. Thus, there is the need to evaluate the harmful effects of solar UV-radiation on the DNA molecule as a basis for assessing the risks involved for human health, biological productivity and ecosystems. In order to evaluate the profile of DNA damage induced by this form of radiation and its genotoxic effects, plasmid DNA samples were exposed to artificial-UV lamps and directly to sunlight. The induction of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photoproducts (CPDs) and oxidative DNA damage in these molecules were evaluated by means of specific DNA repair enzymes. On the other hand, the biological effects of such lesions were determined through the analysis of the DNA inactivation rate and mutation frequency, after replication of the damaged pCMUT vector in an Escherichia coliMBL50 strain. The results indicated the induction of a significant number of CPDs after exposure to increasing doses of UVC, UVB, UVA radiation and sunlight. Interestingly, these photoproducts are those lesions that better correlate with plasmid inactivation as well as mutagenesis, and the oxidative DNA damages induced present very low correlation with these effects. The results indicated that DNA photoproducts play the main role in the induction of genotoxic effects by artificial UV-radiation sources and sunlight. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Antimutagenic Effect of Dioscorea Pentaphylla on Genotoxic Effect Induced By Methyl Methanesulfonate in the Drosophila Wing Spot Test

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, G.; Hosetti, B. B.; Dhananjaya, B. L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Plants as dietary sources are known to have several chemoprotective agents. Dioscorea pentaphylla is an important medicinal plant, which is often used as edible food. This study was undertaken to evaluate the antigenotoxic potential of D. pentaphylla extracts on the genotoxic effect induced by methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) in the Drosophila wing spot test. Materials and Methods: The somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) was carried out in Drosophila melanogaster. In transheterogyous larvae, multiple wing hair (mwh 3-0.3) and flare (flr3-38.8) genes were used as markers of the extent of mutagenicity. Results: It was observed thatall the three extracts (petroleum ether, choloroform, and ethyl alcohol) in the combined treatment had significantly inhibited the effect of MMS-induced genotoxic effects. When compared to others, the ethanol extract showed a very significant antimutagenic activity. Conclusion: The compounds that are present in the extracts may directly interact with the methyl radical groups of MMS and inactivate them by chemical reaction. It is also possible that the compounds in the extract compete to interact with the nucleophilic sites in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), thus altering the binding of the mutagen to these sites. Although our results indicate that the compounds present in the extracts may directly interact with the methyl radical groups of MMS and inactivate them by chemical reaction, it may also be quite interesting to investigate through the other different mechanisms by which D. pentaphylla could interfere in vivo on the effect of genotoxic agents. PMID:25948963

  14. EFFECTS OF HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN 70 (HSP70) ON ARSENITE INDUCED GENOTOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic (As), a human carcinogen, is known to be genotoxic although its mechanism(s) of action for tumorigenesis is not well understood. Among the toxicity-related properties of this chemical are its clastogenic and aneugenic activities, as well as its capacity for inducing stres...

  15. EFFECTS OF HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN 70 (HSP70) ON ARSENITE INDUCED GENOTOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic (As), a human carcinogen, is known to be genotoxic although its mechanism(s) of action for tumorigenesis is not well understood. Among the toxicity-related properties of this chemical are its clastogenic and aneugenic activities, as well as its capacity for inducing stres...

  16. Natural Antioxidants Against Arsenic-Induced Genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Munesh; Lalit, Minakshi; Thakur, Rajesh

    2016-03-01

    Arsenic is present in water, soil, and air in organic as well as in inorganic forms. However, inorganic arsenic is more toxic than organic and can cause many diseases including cancers in humans. Its genotoxic effect is considered as one of its carcinogenic actions. Arsenic can cause DNA strand breaks, deletion mutations, micronuclei formation, DNA-protein cross-linking, sister chromatid exchange, and DNA repair inhibition. Evidences indicate that arsenic causes DNA damage by generation of reactive free radicals. Nutritional supplementation of antioxidants has been proven highly beneficial against arsenic genotoxicity in experimental animals. Recent studies suggest that antioxidants protect mainly by reducing excess free radicals via restoring the activities of cellular enzymatic as well as non-enzymatic antioxidants and decreasing the oxidation processes such as lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation. The purpose of this review is to summarize the recent literature on arsenic-induced genotoxicity and its mitigation by naturally derived antioxidants in various biological systems.

  17. Nickel oxide nanoparticles induce inflammation and genotoxic effect in lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Capasso, Laura; Camatini, Marina; Gualtieri, Maurizio

    2014-04-07

    Nickel oxide nanoparticles (NiONPs) toxicity has been evaluated in the human pulmonary epithelial cell lines: BEAS-2B and A549. The nanoparticles, used at the doses of 20, 40, 60, 80, 100 μg/ml, induced a significant reduction of cell viability and an increase of apoptotic and necrotic cells at 24h. A significant release of interleukin-6 and -8 was assessed after 24h of treatment, even intracellular ROS increased already at 45 min after exposure. The results obtained evidenced that the cytokines release was dependent on mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK) cascade through the induction of NF-kB pathway. NiONPs induced cell cycle alteration in both the cell lines even in different phases and these modifications may be induced by the NPs genotoxic effect, suggested by the nuclear translocation of phospho-ATM and phospho-ATR. Our results confirm the cytotoxic and pro-inflammatory potential of NiONPs. Moreover their ability in inducing DNA damage responses has been demonstrated. Such effects were present in A549 cells which internalize the NPs and BEAS-2B cells in which endocytosis has not been observed.

  18. Water-soluble fraction of petroleum induces genotoxicity and morphological effects in fat snook (Centropomus parallelus).

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Laila Carine Campos; Delunardo, Frederico Augusto Cariello; Simões, Larissa Novaes; Paulino, Marcelo Gustavo; Vargas, Thais Souza; Fernandes, Marisa Narciso; Scherer, Rodrigo; Chippari-Gomes, Adriana Regina

    2017-10-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbons are one of the primary organic chemicals found in water bodies, and the water-soluble fraction of petroleum (WSFP) may be responsible for much of the toxic effects. In the present study, genotoxicity assays and histopathological analysis of the gills were analyzed for two experimental protocols: 1) Juvenile Centropomus parallelus were exposed to different concentrations of WFSP (0%, 25%, 50% and 75%) for 96h; 2) A second fish group was exposed to 50% WFSP for 168h followed by a post-exposure period for 168h in clean water (recovery). The total benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene and xylene (BTEX) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations at time 0 were 254μgL(-1) and 4.72μgL(-1) in 25%; 552.9μgL(-1) and 9.36μgL(-1) in 50%; and 842.4μgL(-1) and 9.97μgL(-1) in 75% WSFP, respectively. Based on the alkaline comet assay, the damage index (DI) values of fish exposed to 25% WSFP for 96h were significantly higher than those in the control group, and in the micronucleus test, the higher damage values were found in fish exposed to 75% WSFP. Furthermore, this last genotoxic test showed recovery after 168h. At all concentrations of WSFP, several histopathological changes were observed, and overall, most of these changes observed in the gills were classified as proliferative changes and represented a protective mechanism against pollutant uptake. Based on the recovery experiment, the damage was also significantly reduced after recovery. Our results showed that short-term exposure to WSFP compounds triggered cellular alterations in C. parallelus, but total recovery did not occur with time. Additionally, the different periods of exposure were not sufficient to induce severe gill damage in C. parallelus. Moreover, this fish demonstrated its usefulness as a sentinel species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Arsenic-induced biochemical and genotoxic effects and distribution in tissues of Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Patlolla, Anita K; Todorov, Todor I; Tchounwou, Paul B; van der Voet, Gijsbert; Centeno, Jose A

    2012-11-01

    Arsenic (As) is a well documented human carcinogen. However, its mechanisms of toxic action and carcinogenic potential in animals have not been conclusive. In this research, we investigated the biochemical and genotoxic effects of As and studied its distribution in selected tissues of Sprague-Dawley rats. Four groups of six male rats, each weighing approximately 60 ± 2 g, were injected intraperitoneally, once a day for 5 days with doses of 5, 10, 15, 20 mg/kg bw of arsenic trioxide. A control group was also made of 6 animals injected with distilled water. Following anaesthetization, blood was collected and enzyme analysis was performed by spectrophotometry following standard protocols. At the end of experimentation, the animals were sacrificed, and the lung, liver, brain and kidney were collected 24 h after the fifth day treatment. Chromosome and micronuclei preparation was obtained from bone marrow cells. Arsenic exposure significantly increased (p<0.05) the activities of plasma alanine aminotransferase-glutamate pyruvate transaminase (ALT/GPT), and aspartate aminotransferase-glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (AST/GOT), as well as the number of structural chromosomal aberrations (SCA) and frequency of micronuclei (MN) in the bone marrow cells. In contrast, the mitotic index in these cells was significantly reduced (p<0.05). These findings indicate that aminotransferases are candidate biomarkers for arsenic-induced hepatotoxicity. Our results also demonstrate that As has a strong genotoxic potential, as measured by the bone marrow SCA and MN tests in Sprague-Dawley rats. Total arsenic concentrations in tissues were measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). A dynamic reaction cell (DRC) with hydrogen gas was used to eliminate the ArCl interference at mass 75, in the measurement of total As. Total As doses in tissues tended to correlate with specific exposure levels.

  20. Arsenic-induced biochemical and genotoxic effects and distribution in tissues of Sprague-Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    Patlolla, Anita K.; Todorov, Todor I.; Tchounwou, Paul B.; van der Voet, Gijsbert; Centeno, Jose A.

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic (As) is a well documented human carcinogen. However, its mechanisms of toxic action and carcinogenic potential in animals have not been conclusive. In this research, we investigated the biochemical and genotoxic effects of As and studied its distribution in selected tissues of Sprague-Dawley rats. Four groups of six male rats, each weighing approximately 60 ± 2 g, were injected intraperitoneally, once a day for 5 days with doses of 5, 10, 15, 20 mg/kg bw of arsenic trioxide. A control group was also made of 6 animals injected with distilled water. Following anaesthetization, blood was collected and enzyme analysis was performed by spectrophotometry following standard protocols. At the end of experimentation, the animals were sacrificed, and the lung, liver, brain and kidney were collected 24 h after the fifth day treatment. Chromosome and micronuclei preparation was obtained from bone marrow cells. Arsenic exposure significantly increased (p<0.05) the activities of plasma alanine aminotransferase-glutamate pyruvate transaminase (ALT/GPT), and aspartate aminotransferase-glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (AST/GOT), as well as the number of structural chromosomal aberrations (SCA) and frequency of micronuclei (MN) in the bone marrow cells. In contrast, the mitotic index in these cells was significantly reduced (p<0.05). These findings indicate that aminotransferases are candidate biomarkers for arsenic-induced hepatotoxicity. Our results also demonstrate that As has a strong genotoxic potential, as measured by the bone marrow SCA and MN tests in Sprague-Dawley rats. Total arsenic concentrations in tissues were measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). A dynamic reaction cell (DRC) with hydrogen gas was used to eliminate the ArCl interference at mass 75, in the measurement of total As. Total As doses in tissues tended to correlate with specific exposure levels. PMID:23175155

  1. Arsenic-induced biochemical and genotoxic effects and distribution in tissues of Sprague-Dawley rats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patlolla, Anita K.; Todorov, Todor; Tchounwou, Paul B.; van der Voet, Gijsbert; Centeno, Jose A.

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic (As) is a well documented human carcinogen. However, its mechanisms of toxic action and carcinogenic potential in animals have not been conclusive. In this research, we investigated the biochemical and genotoxic effects of As and studied its distribution in selected tissues of Sprague–Dawley rats. Four groups of six male rats, each weighing approximately 60 ± 2 g, were injected intraperitoneally, once a day for 5 days with doses of 5, 10, 15, 20 mg/kg BW of arsenic trioxide. A control group was also made of 6 animals injected with distilled water. Following anaesthetization, blood was collected and enzyme analysis was performed by spectrophotometry following standard protocols. At the end of experimentation, the animals were sacrificed, and the lung, liver, brain and kidney were collected 24 h after the fifth day treatment. Chromosome and micronuclei preparation was obtained from bone marrow cells. Arsenic exposure significantly increased (p < 0.05) the activities of plasma alanine aminotransferase–glutamate pyruvate transaminase (ALT/GPT), and aspartate aminotransferase–glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (AST/GOT), as well as the number of structural chromosomal aberrations (SCA) and frequency of micronuclei (MN) in the bone marrow cells. In contrast, the mitotic index in these cells was significantly reduced (p < 0.05). These findings indicate that aminotransferases are candidate biomarkers for arsenic-induced hepatotoxicity. Our results also demonstrate that As has a strong genotoxic potential, as measured by the bone marrow SCA and MN tests in Sprague–Dawley rats. Total arsenic concentrations in tissues were measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). A dynamic reaction cell (DRC) with hydrogen gas was used to eliminate the ArCl interference at mass 75, in the measurement of total As. Total As doses in tissues tended to correlate with specific exposure levels.

  2. Protective effect of grapefruit juice on the teratogenic and genotoxic damage induced by cadmium in mice.

    PubMed

    Argüelles, Nancy; Alvarez-González, Isela; Chamorro, Germán; Madrigal-Bujaidar, Eduardo

    2012-10-01

    In the present study, we injected pregnant mice at Day 7 of gestation with cadmium chloride (CC) (1.5 mg/kg) intraperitoneally and determined its effect on the frequency of fetal malformations at Day 17 of pregnancy. On the same day, we also determined the level of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MNPEs) and of micronucleated normochromatic erythrocytes (MNNEs) in blood cells of both the mothers and their fetuses. A significant increase in the number of malformations was found, mainly exencephaly, micrognathia, ablephary, microphthalmia, and clubfoot, as well as a significant increase in the amount of MNPEs and MNNEs. In addition, pregnant mice were administered grapefruit juice (GJ) orally from Days 0 to 17 of the experiment (from 200 to 800 μL/g) to evaluate the potential of the juice in preventing the damage induced by CC. We found a dose-dependent decrease in the number of visceral and skeletal malformations, as well as in the number of MNPEs and MNNEs, in both the mothers and their fetuses. Furthermore, we determined the level of DNA oxidation by measuring levels of the adduct 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, and we found a significant increase in such level induced by CC; in contrast, there was a significant decrease when we added GJ. Therefore, the observed teratogenic and genotoxic protection can probably be related with the antioxidant potential of GJ.

  3. Oxygenated water does not induce genotoxic effects in the comet assay.

    PubMed

    Speit, Günter; Schütz, Petra; Trenz, Kristina; Rothfuss, Andreas

    2002-07-21

    Drinking of oxygenated water (i.e. water with increased concentration of physically dissolved oxygen) is said to improve oxygen availability of the body and will do the consumer good. However, increased oxygen concentrations can also lead to an increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). If antioxidant defences are not completely efficient, ROS can cause cell injury including DNA damage. We therefore investigated whether drinking of oxygenated water can lead to increased DNA damage in peripheral blood cells of test subjects. We also tested whether direct exposure of V79 Chinese hamster cells to oxygenated medium or oxygenated Hank's solution for various time periods induces DNA damage. Induction of DNA damage was measured with the alkaline comet assay (single cell gel electrophoresis). The comet assay, in particular the modification with FPG post-treatment for the determination of oxidative DNA base damage, has been proven to be extremely sensitive for the detection of oxygen-induced DNA damage. However, both the in vivo and the in vitro studies with the comet assay in the absence and presence of FPG post-treatment did not provide evidence for a genotoxic effect of oxygenated water.

  4. Tartrazine induces structural and functional aberrations and genotoxic effects in vivo.

    PubMed

    Khayyat, Latifa; Essawy, Amina; Sorour, Jehan; Soffar, Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Tartrazine is a synthetic organic azo dye widely used in food and pharmaceutical products. The current study aimed to evaluate the possible adverse effect of this coloring food additive on renal and hepatic structures and functions. Also, the genotoxic potential of tartrazine on white blood cells was investigated using comet assay. Twenty adult male Wistar rats were grouped into two groups of 10 each, control- and tartrazine-treated groups. The control group was administered orally with water alone. The experimental group was administered orally with tartrazine (7.5 mg/kg, b.wt.). Our results showed a marked increase in the levels of ALT, AST, ALP, urea, uric acid, creatinine, MDA and NO, and a decreased level of total antioxidants in the serum of rats dosed with tartrazine compared to controls. On the other hand, administration of tartrazine was associated with severe histopathological and cellular alterations of rat liver and kidney tissues and induced DNA damage in leucocytes as detected by comet assay. Taken together, the results showed that tartrazine intake may lead to adverse health effects.

  5. Tartrazine induces structural and functional aberrations and genotoxic effects in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Khayyat, Latifa; Sorour, Jehan; Soffar, Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Tartrazine is a synthetic organic azo dye widely used in food and pharmaceutical products. The current study aimed to evaluate the possible adverse effect of this coloring food additive on renal and hepatic structures and functions. Also, the genotoxic potential of tartrazine on white blood cells was investigated using comet assay. Twenty adult male Wistar rats were grouped into two groups of 10 each, control- and tartrazine-treated groups. The control group was administered orally with water alone. The experimental group was administered orally with tartrazine (7.5 mg/kg, b.wt.). Our results showed a marked increase in the levels of ALT, AST, ALP, urea, uric acid, creatinine, MDA and NO, and a decreased level of total antioxidants in the serum of rats dosed with tartrazine compared to controls. On the other hand, administration of tartrazine was associated with severe histopathological and cellular alterations of rat liver and kidney tissues and induced DNA damage in leucocytes as detected by comet assay. Taken together, the results showed that tartrazine intake may lead to adverse health effects. PMID:28243541

  6. Genotoxic effects of metronidazole.

    PubMed

    Elizondo, G; Gonsebatt, M E; Salazar, A M; Lares, I; Santiago, P; Herrera, J; Hong, E; Ostrosky-Wegman, P

    1996-09-13

    Metronidazole (MTZ) is an effective agent used in the treatment of parasitic infections. Its genotoxic effects have been shown in a variety of prokaryotic systems; however, negative results have been reported in human in vivo studies. Due to its wide spread use, a study was performed to evaluate the chromosomal aberration frequencies in peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures from 10 individuals, before and after metronidazole treatment. A significant increase in the percentage of cells with chromatid and isochromatid breaks was observed after metronidazole treatment (1500 mg per day for 10 days). The percentages of cells with aberrations did not correlate with the levels of MTZ found in plasma. Individual variability was observed with respect to both the induction of aberrations and the concentration of MTZ in plasma. They could represent differences at the metabolic level, since metronidazole is known to be biotransformed by a polymorphic P450 cytochrome, and its metabolites have shown mutagenic activity.

  7. Investigation of the cytotoxic, genotoxic, and apoptosis-inducing effects of estragole isolated from fennel (Foeniculum vulgare).

    PubMed

    Villarini, Milena; Pagiotti, Rita; Dominici, Luca; Fatigoni, Cristina; Vannini, Samuele; Levorato, Sara; Moretti, Massimo

    2014-04-25

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate, in the HepG2 human hepatoma cell line, the in vitro cytotoxic, genotoxic, and apoptotic activities of estragole (1), contained in the essential oil of Foeniculum vulgare (fennel) and suspected to induce hepatic tumors in susceptible strains of mice. Toward this end, an MTT cytotoxicity assay, a trypan blue dye exclusion test, a double-staining (acridine orange and DAPI) fluorescence viability assay, a single-cell microgel-electrophoresis (comet) assay, a mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) assay, and a DNA fragmentation analysis were conducted. In terms of potential genotoxic effects, the comet assay indicated that estragole (1) was not able to induce DNA damage nor apoptosis under the experimental conditions used.

  8. [Association of genotoxic and teratogenic effects induced by cyclophosphamide and their modification with afobazole].

    PubMed

    Shreder, O V; Shreder, E D; Durnev, A D; Seredenin, S B

    2011-01-01

    Intact rat embryonic and placental tissues were found to have a characteristic ratio of cells with different degrees of DNA fragmentation. The genotoxic effect of cyclophosphamide was shown to be accompanied by a quantitative deviation from the control group established ratio of different cell types. A relationship was found between the abnormal ratio of different cell types in the embryonic and placental tissues and the occurrence of embryonic morphological abnormalities. The antimutagen afobazole (1, 10, and 100 mg/kg) was ascertained to be able to lower genotoxic effects in the embryonic and placental tissues and their related malformations. It is presumed that it is promising to use DNA damage index in the embryonic and placental cells as a biomarker of the course of embryogenesis and as a basis for devising an indicator test for rapid screening of potential teratogens.

  9. Baccharin prevents genotoxic effects induced by methyl methanesulfonate and hydrogen peroxide in V79 cells.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Pollyanna Francielli; Leandro, Luis Fernando; Montanheiro, Giovana; Bastos, Jairo Kenupp; da Silva Filho, Ademar Alves; Tavares, Denise Crispim

    2012-08-01

    Baccharin is one of the major chemical compounds isolated from the aerial parts of Baccharis dracunculifolia DC (Asteraceae), a native plant of South America and the most important botanical source of the Brazilian green propolis that has been used in alternative medicine to treat inflammation, liver disorders, and stomach ulcers. The present study was carried out in V79 cells to determine the possible genotoxic and antigenotoxic activities of baccharin utilizing comet and micronucleus assays, where 2 known mutagenic agents with different mechanisms of DNA damage were used as positive controls. The V79 cells were treated with concentrations of baccharin (0.25, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 μg/mL) and for to investigate the antigenotoxicity these concentrations were associated with methyl methanesulfonate (MMS; 200 μM-comet assay and 400 μM-micronucleus assay) or hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2;) 50 μM-comet assay and 100 μM-micronucleus assay). Statistically significant differences in the rate of DNA damage were observed in cultures treated with the highest concentration of baccharin when compared to the control group, but this difference was not found in the micronucleus assay. The results also showed that the frequencies of DNA damage and micronuclei induced by MMS and H(2)O(2) were significantly reduced after treatment with baccharin. The baccharin showed a chemoprevention effect and can be the chemical compound responsible for the antigenotoxicity also demonstrated by the B. dracunculifolia. The antioxidant potential of baccharin may be related to its chemoprevention activity induced against both genomic and chromosomal damages. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  10. [Fibers glass induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity].

    PubMed

    Proietti, L; Giallongo, A; Zakrzewska, A M; Ammoscato, I; Lombardo, L; Frasca, G; Cardile, V

    2007-01-01

    Man-made vitrous fibers, have been widely used as a substitute for asbestos, as an insulation material. However the fibrous morphology of MMVFs raises concern about potential health hazard. The aim of our study was to assess cytotoxic and genotoxic effects induced on a human alveolar cell line A549 by exposure to glass wool fibers (GW). Cells were exposed for 72 h to 5, 50, 100 microg/ml of glass wool, after incubation the cell viability was determined by a MTT reduction assay. The genotoxic effect was studies by Comet test. An undamaged cell appeared as a nucleoid and a cell with damaged DNA as a comet. Measurement of Comet parameters: % DNA in the tail, tail length and tail momente (the product of relative tail intensity and lenght, that provides a parameter of DNA damage) were obtained from the analysis. A MTT assay indicated that glass wool caused a decrease in cell viability and this decrease was concentration-dependent. The results of the Comet test for DNA damage detection indicated in cell exposed to glass wool fibers a significant increase of mean TM value. All these results provide that the glass wool fibers can induce cytotoxicity and genotoxicity

  11. Mechanisms of fiber-induced genotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Jaurand, M C

    1997-01-01

    The mechanisms of particle-induced genotoxicity have been investigated mainly with asbestos fibers. The results are summarized and discussed in this paper. DNA damage can be produced by oxidoreduction processes generated by fibers. The extent of damage yield depends on experimental conditions: if iron is present, either on fibers or in the medium, damage is increased. However, iron reactivity does not explain all the results obtained in cell-free systems, as breakage of plasmid DNA was not directly associated with the amount of iron released by the fibers. The proximity of DNA to the site of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is important because these species have an extremely short half-life. Damage to cellular DNA can be produced by oxidoreduction processes that originate from cells during phagocytosis. Secondary molecules that are more stable than ROS are probably involved in DNA damage. Oxidoreduction reactions originating from cells can induce mutations. Genotoxicity is also demonstrated by chromosomal damage associated with impaired mitosis, as evidenced by chromosome missegregation, spindle changes, alteration of cell cycle progression, formation of aneuploid and polyploid cells, and nuclear disruption. In some of these processes, the particle state and fiber dimensions are considered important parameters in the generation of genotoxic effects. PMID:9400703

  12. Genotoxicity and cytotoxicity evaluation of oenothein B and its protective effect against mitomycin C-induced mutagenic action.

    PubMed

    Silva, Cinthia Aparecida; Silva, Carolina Ribeiro; Véras, Jefferson Hollanda; Chen-Chen, Lee; Ferri, Pedro Henrique; Santos, Suzana da Costa

    2014-06-01

    The natural product oenothein B (OeB), a dimeric macrocyclic ellagitannin, has a wide range of biological activities, such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-viral, antifungal, and antitumor. However, investigations concerning its genotoxicity have not been carried out. This study assessed the cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and protective effects of oenothein B using in vitro SOS-Inductest and in vivo mouse bone marrow micronucleus (MN) assay through oral and intraperitonial routes. In both assays oenothein B did not produce genotoxic effects in any of doses tested; in contrast, cytotoxic effect in cells was detected only in mice groups treated by both routes and exposed for 24 and 48h. Antigenotoxic and anticytotoxic activities of oenothein B were evaluated using both assays in combination with mitomycin C (MMC), a bioreductive alkylating agent. In the MN assay, a significant reduction was observed in MN frequency in all groups co-treated with MMC and OeB compared to those which received only MMC. Anticytotoxicity was observed in mice groups exposed to OeB and MMC for 24 and 48h. In the SOS-Inductest, oenothein B failed to show antigenotoxic and anticytotoxic effects; thus, it undoubtedly showed an in vivo protective activity against primary DNA damage induced by mitomycin C.

  13. RETRACTED: Glyphosate herbicide induces genotoxic effect and physiological disturbances in Bulinus truncatus snails.

    PubMed

    Bakry, Fayez A; Ismail, Somaya M; Abd El-Atti, Mahmoud S

    2015-09-01

    Herbicides are being used in agriculture for controlling noxious weed. Glyphosate is a herbicide that is widely applied to cereal crops in Egypt and is used in controlling a very broad spectrum of weeds. The present study was designed to investigate the response of the snail Bulinus truncatus as a bioindicator for physiological and molecular aspects of B. truncatus snails after exposure to sublethal concentrations of glyphosate for two weeks. In treating snails, glucose concentration (GL) in the haemolymph as well as lactate (LT) in soft tissues of treated snails increased, while glycogen (GN), pyruvate (PV), total protein (TP), nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) levels in snail's tissues decreased. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione reductase (GR), thioredoxin reductase (TrxR), glycogen phosphorylase (GP), glucose-6-phosphatase (G-6-Pase), succinic dehydrogenase (SDH) and lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) enzymes in homogenate of snail's tissues were reduced in response to the treatment with the herbicide, while lipid peroxide (LP), sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH) and transaminases (GOT and GPT) activity increased (P < 0.001). The changes in the number, position and intensity of DNA bands induced by glyphosate herbicide may be attributed to the fact that the herbicide can induce genotoxicity through DNA damage. Thus, the present result indicated that the genotoxicity products at low concentration and for long time treatment showed the hazard of herbicide addiction on man's life. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Genotoxic Effects Induced by Cd(+2), Cr(+6), Cu(+2) in the Gill and Liver of Odontesthes bonariensis (Piscies, Atherinopsidae).

    PubMed

    Gasulla, J; Picco, S J; Carriquiriborde, P; Dulout, F N; Ronco, A E; de Luca, J C

    2016-05-01

    Genotoxic effects of Cd(+2), Cr(+6), and Cu(+2) on the gill and liver of the Argentinean Silverside (Odontesthes bonariensis) were studied using the comet assay and in relation with the metal tissue accumulation. Fish were exposed to three waterborne concentrations of each metal for 2 and 16 days. Genotoxicity was assessed by the single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay). After 2 days, significant increase of the genetic damage index (GDI) was only observed in the gill of fish exposed to Cr(+6) and Cu(+2), and the LOECs were 2160 nM and 921.1 nM, respectively. The gill LOEC for Cd(+2) by 16 days was 9.4 nM. In the liver, LOECs were obtained only for Cd(+2) and Cr(+6) and were 9.4 and 2160 nM, respectively. The three metals were able to induce genotoxic effects at environmentally relevant concentrations and the gill was the most sensitive organ.

  15. Folk medicine Terminalia catappa and its major tannin component, punicalagin, are effective against bleomycin-induced genotoxicity in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, P S; Li, J H; Liu, T Y; Lin, T C

    2000-05-01

    Terminalia catappa L. is a popular folk medicine for preventing hepatoma and treating hepatitis in Taiwan. In this paper, we examined the protective effects of T. catappa leaf water extract (TCE) and its major tannin component, punicalagin, on bleomycin-induced genotoxicity in cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells. Pre-treatment with TCE or punicalagin prevented bleomycin-induced hgprt gene mutations and DNA strand breaks. TCE and punicalagin suppressed the generation of bleomycin-induced intracellular free radicals, identified as superoxides and hydrogen peroxides. The effectiveness of TCE and punicalagin against bleomycin-induced genotoxicity could be, at least in part, due to their antioxidative potentials.

  16. Effect of recombinant human erythropoietin on mitomycin C-induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity in rat kidney and heart tissues.

    PubMed

    Rjiba-Touati, K; Ayed-Boussema, I; Guedri, Y; Achour, A; Bacha, H; Abid-Essefi, S

    2016-01-01

    Mitomycin C (MMC) is an antineoplastic agent used for the treatment of several human malignancies. Nevertheless, the prolonged use of the drug may result in a serious heart and kidney injuries. Recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) has recently been shown to exert an important cytoprotective effect in experimental brain injury and ischemic acute renal failure. The aim of the present work is to investigate the cardioprotective and renoprotective effects of rhEPO against MMC-induced oxidative damage and genotoxicity. Our results showed that MMC induced oxidative stress and DNA damage. rhEPO administration in any treatment conditions decreased oxidative damage induced by MMC. It reduced malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl levels. rhEPO ameliorated reduced glutathione plus oxidized glutathione modulation and the increased catalase activity after MMC treatment. Furthermore, rhEPO restored DNA damage caused by MMC. We concluded that rhEPO administration especially in pretreatment condition protected rats against MMC-induced heart and renal oxidative stress and genotoxicity.

  17. Disperse Red 1 (textile dye) induces cytotoxic and genotoxic effects in mouse germ cells.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Fábio Henrique; Bustos-Obregon, Eduardo; Salvadori, Daisy Maria Fávero

    2015-06-01

    Disperse Red 1 (DR1), which is widely used in the textile industry, is an azo dye that contributes to the toxicity and pollution of wastewater. To assess the toxic effects of DR1 on reproduction, sexually mature male mice (Mus musculus, strain CF-1) were orally (gavage) treated with single doses of the compound at 20, 100 and 500 mg/kg body weight. Testicular features and sperm parameters were evaluated 8.3, 16.6 and 24.9 days after treatments. In addition to testicular toxicity caused by the dye, the data clearly showed an increased frequency of sperm with abnormal morphology and decreased fertility. An increased amount of DNA damage was also detected in testis cells 16.6 and 24.9 days after treatments with 100 and 500 mg/kg. This study demonstrated the toxic and genotoxic effects of DR1, indicating the harmful activity of this dye on reproductive health.

  18. Effect of β-carotene on catechol-induced genotoxicity in vitro: evidence of both enhanced and reduced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Åsgård, R; Hellman, B

    2013-09-01

    Intake of antioxidants from the diet has been recognized to have beneficial health effects, but the potential benefit of taking antioxidants such as β-carotene as supplements is controversial. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the potential protective effects of a physiologically relevant concentration (2 μM) of β-carotene on the DNA damaging effects of catechol in mouse lymphoma L5178Y cells. Two different exposure protocols were used: simultaneous exposure to β-carotene and catechol for 3 h; and exposure to catechol for 3 h after 18 h pre-treatment with the vitamin. DNA damage was evaluated using the comet assay (employing one procedure for general damage, and another procedure, which also included oxidative DNA damage). Independent of exposure protocol and procedure for comet assay, β-carotene did not increase the basal level of DNA damage. However, at the highest concentration of catechol (1 mM), β-carotene was found to clearly increase the level of catechol-induced DNA damage, especially in the pre-treated cells. Interestingly, an opposite effect was observed at lower concentrations of catechol, but the β-carotene related reduction of catechol-induced genotoxicity was significant (P < 0.05) only for the procedure including oxidative damage induced by 0.5 mM catechol. Taken together our results indicate that β- carotene can both reduce and enhance the DNA damaging effects of a genotoxic agent such as catechol. This indicates that it is the level of catechol-induced DNA damage that seems to determine whether β-carotene should be regarded as a beneficial or detrimental agent when it comes to its use as a dietary supplement.

  19. Carbamates: A study on genotoxic, cytotoxic, and apoptotic effects induced in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells.

    PubMed

    Soloneski, Sonia; Kujawski, Maciej; Scuto, Anna; Larramendy, Marcelo L

    2015-08-01

    In vitro effects of the carbamates pirimicarb and zineb and their formulations Aficida® (50% pirimicarb) and Azzurro® (70% zineb), respectively, were evaluated in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells. Whereas the cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus cytome assay was employed to test for genotoxicity, MTT, neutral red (NR), and apoptosis evaluation were used as tests for estimating cell viability and succinic dehydrogenase activity, respectively. Concentrations tested were 10-300 μg/ml for pirimicarb and Aficida®, and 1-50 μg/ml for zineb and Azzurro®. All compounds were able to increase the frequency of micronuclei. A marked reduction in the nuclear division index was observed after treatment with 5 μg/ml of zineb and Azzurro® and 10 μg/ml of Azzurro®. Alterations in the cellular morphology not allowing the recognition of binucleated cells exposed to 300 μg/ml pirimicarb and Aficida® as well as 10-50 μg/ml zineb and Azzurro®. All four compounds induced inhibition of both cell viability and succinic dehydrogenase activity and trigger apoptosis in CHO-K1 cells, at least when exposed for 24 h. The data herein demonstrate the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects exerted by these carbamates and reveal the potential risk factor of these pesticides, still extensively used worldwide, for both human health and the environment.

  20. In vivo protective effect of Uridine, a pyrimidine nucleoside, on genotoxicity induced by Levodopa/Carbidopa in mice.

    PubMed

    Orenlili Yaylagul, Esra; Cansev, Mehmet; Celikler Kasimogullari, Serap

    2015-08-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder that affects millions of people all over the world. Motor symptoms of PD are most commonly controlled by L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (Levodopa, L-DOPA), a precursor of dopamine, plus a peripherally-acting aromatic-L-amino-acid decarboxylase (dopa decarboxylase) inhibitor, such as carbidopa. However, chronic treatment with a combination of Levodopa plus carbidopa has been demonstrated to cause a major complication, namely abnormal involuntary movements. On the other hand, the effect of this treatment on bone marrow cells is unknown. Therefore, in this study, we aimed to investigate possible genotoxic effects of Levodopa and Carbidopa using male Balb/C mice. Our results showed that Levodopa alone or in combination with carbidopa caused genotoxicity in in vivo micronucleus test (mouse bone marrow) and Comet assay (blood cells). Furthermore, we showed that simultaneous administration of uridine, a pyrimidine nucleoside, reversed the genotoxic effect of Levodopa and Carbidopa in both assays. Our data show for the first time that Levodopa plus carbidopa combination causes genotoxicity which is reversed by uridine treatment. These findings might enhance our understanding for the complications of a common Parkinson's treatment and confer benefit in terms of reducing a possible genotoxic effect of this treatment.

  1. Safrole-2',3'-oxide induces cytotoxic and genotoxic effects in HepG2 cells and in mice.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Su-yin; Lee, Pei-yi; Lai, Ming-tsung; Shen, Li-ching; Chung, Wen-sheng; Huang, Hui-fen; Wu, Kuen-yuh; Wu, Hsiu-ching

    2011-12-24

    Safrole-2',3'-oxide (SAFO) is a reactive electrophilic metabolite of the hepatocarcinogen safrole, the main component of sassafras oil. Safrole occurs naturally in a variety of spices and herbs, including the commonly used Chinese medicine Xi xin (Asari Radix et Rhizoma) and Dong quai (Angelica sinensis). SAFO is the most mutagenic metabolite of safrole tested in the Ames test. However, little or no data are available on the genotoxicity of SAFO in mammalian systems. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of SAFO in human HepG2 cells and male FVB mice. Using MTT assay, SAFO exhibited a dose- and time-dependent cytotoxic effect in HepG2 cells with TC(50) values of 361.9μM and 193.2μM after 24 and 48h exposure, respectively. In addition, treatment with SAFO at doses of 125μM and higher for 24h in HepG2 cells resulted in a 5.1-79.6-fold increase in mean Comet tail moment by the alkaline Comet assay and a 2.6-7.8-fold increase in the frequency of micronucleated binucleated cells by the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay. Furthermore, repeated intraperitoneal administration of SAFO (15, 30, 45, and 60mg/kg) to mice every other day for a total of twelve doses caused a significant dose-dependent increase in mean Comet tail moment in peripheral blood leukocytes (13.3-43.4-fold) and in the frequency of micronucleated reticulocytes (1.5-5.8-fold). Repeated administration of SAFO (60mg/kg) to mice caused liver lesions manifested as a rim of ballooning degeneration of hepatocytes immediately surrounding the central vein. Our data clearly demonstrate that SAFO significantly induced cytotoxicity, DNA strand breaks, micronuclei formation both in human cells in vitro and in mice. More studies are needed to explore the role SAFO plays in safrole-induced genotoxicity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Modulatory effects of catechin hydrate against genotoxicity, oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis induced by benzo(a)pyrene in mice.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Ayaz; Ali, Rashid; Ali, Nemat; Hasan, Syed Kazim; Bernwal, Preeti; Afzal, Shekh Mohammad; Vafa, Abul; Sultana, Sarwat

    2016-06-01

    Benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P], a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) is a strong mutagen and potent carcinogen. The aim of the present study was to investigate the efficacy of catechin hydrate against B(a)P induced genotoxicity, oxidative stress, inflammation, apoptosis and to explore its underlying molecular mechanisms in the lungs of Swiss albino mice. Administration of B(a)P (125 mg/kg b. wt., p. o.) increased the activities of toxicity markers such as LPO, LDH and B(a)P metabolizing enzymes [NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (CYPOR) and microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH)] with subsequent decrease in the activities of tissue anti-oxidant armory (SOD, CAT, GPx, GR, GST, QR and GSH). It also caused DNA damage and activation of apoptotic and inflammatory pathway by upregulation of TNF-α, IL-6, NF-kB, COX-2, p53, bax, caspase-3 and down regulating Bcl-2. However, pre-treatment with catechin at a dose of 20 and 40 mg/kg significantly decreased LDH, LPO, B(a)P metabolizing enzymes and increased anti-oxidant armory as well as regulated apoptosis and inflammation in lungs. Histological results also supported the protective effects of catechin. The findings of the present studies suggested that catechin as an effective natural product attenuates B(a)P induced lung toxicity.

  3. The radioprotective effect of metformin against cytotoxicity and genotoxicity induced by ionizing radiation in cultured human blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Cheki, Mohsen; Shirazi, Alireza; Mahmoudzadeh, Aziz; Bazzaz, Javad Tavakkoly; Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jalal

    2016-10-01

    Metformin is a widely prescribed drug used in the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes. In this study, the radioprotective effect of metformin was investigated against cytotoxicity and genotoxicity induced by ionizing radiation (IR) in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Human lymphocytes were treated with metformin at concentrations 10 and 50μM for 2h and irradiated with 6MV X-rays. The radiation antagonistic potential of metformin was assessed by MTT [3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiaozolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H tetrazolium bromide] assay, chromosomal aberration (CA) analysis, cytokinesis blocked micronucleus (CBMN) assay, and flow cytometry. Observations demonstrated a radiation-dose-dependent decrease in the percentage of cell viability after 24h. It was found that pretreatment with metformin (10 and 50μM) increased the percentage of cell viability. A highly significant dose modifying factor (DMF) 1.35 and 1.42 was observed for 10 and 50μM metformin, respectively. Metformin (10 and 50μM) pretreatment significantly decreased the frequency of dicentrics (DCs), acentric fragments (AFs), rings (RIs), micronuclei (MN), and nucleoplasmic bridges (NPBs) in irradiated human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Also, treatment with metformin (10 and 50μM) without irradiation did not increase the number of MN, NPBs, DCs, AFs, RIs, and did not show a cytostatic effect in the human peripheral blood lymphocytes. On the other hand, metformin treatment (10 and 50μM) 2h prior to irradiation significantly reduced X-radiation-induced apoptotic incidence in human lymphocytes. The present study demonstrates metformin to be an effective radioprotector against DNA damage and apoptosis induced by IR in human lymphocytes. These data have an important application for the protection of lymphocytes from the genetic damage and side-effects induced by radiotherapy in cancer patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of probiotic fermented milk and chlorophyllin on gene expressions and genotoxicity during AFB₁-induced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Verma, Vinod; Nagpal, Ravinder; Kumar, Ashok; Gautam, Sanjeev K; Behare, Pradip V; Grover, Chand R; Aggarwal, Praveen K

    2011-12-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the chemopreventive effect of probiotic fermented milk and chlorophyllin on aflatoxin B₁ (AFB₁) induced hepatocellular carcinoma. In vivo trials were conducted on 200 Wistar rats allocated to eight groups. Rats in the positive control group were given intraperitoneal injection of aflatoxin B₁ at 450 μg/kg body weight twice a week for 6 weeks. The rats were sacrificed and dissected at 25th week of the experiment, and comet assay was carried out in hepatic cells to assess the genotoxicity or DNA damage. The tumour incidence was decreased by approximately one-third than AFB₁ control group. The expression of c-myc bax, bcl-2, cyclin D1, p53 and rasp-21 genes was also studied. A significant (P<0.05) reduction in DNA damage was observed in probiotic fermented milk with chlorophyllin group as compared to aflatoxin B₁ control group. The c-myc, bcl-2, cyclin D1 and rasp-21 level was found to be highest in AFB₁ control group as compared to the treatment group. The results advocate the enhanced protective potential of probiotic fermented milk and chlorophyllin against AFB₁-induced molecular alterations in hepatic cells during carcinogenesis.

  5. Protective effects of selenocystine against γ-radiation-induced genotoxicity in Swiss albino mice.

    PubMed

    Kunwar, Amit; Jayakumar, S; Bhilwade, H N; Bag, P P; Bhatt, H; Chaubey, R C; Priyadarsini, K I

    2011-05-01

    Selenocystine (CysSeSeCys), a diselenide aminoacid exhibiting glutathione peroxidase-like activity and selective antitumor effects, was examined for in vivo antigenotoxic and antioxidant activity in Swiss albino mice after exposure to a sublethal dose (5 Gy) of γ-radiation. For this, CysSeSeCys was administered intraperitoneally (i.p.) to mice at a dosage of 0.5 mg/kg body weight for 5 consecutive days prior to whole-body γ-irradiation. When examined in the hepatic tissue, CysSeSeCys administration reduced the DNA damage at 30 min after radiation exposure by increasing the rate of DNA repair. Since antigenotoxic agents could alter the expression of genes involved in cell cycle arrest and DNA repair, the transcriptional changes in p53, p21 and GADD45α were monitored in the hepatic tissue by real-time PCR. The results show that CysSeSeCys alone causes moderate induction of these three genes. However, CysSeSeCys pretreatment resulted in a suppression of radiation-induced enhancement of p21 and GADD45α expression, but did not affect p53 expression. Further analysis of radiation-induced oxidative stress markers in the same tissue indicated that CysSeSeCys significantly inhibits lipid peroxidation and prevents the depletion of antioxidant enzymes and glutathione (GSH) levels. Additionally, it also prevents radiation-induced DNA damage in other radiation sensitive cellular systems like peripheral leukocytes and bone marrow, which was evident by a decrease in comet parameters and micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (mn-PCEs) frequency, respectively. Based on these observations, it is concluded that CysSeSeCys exhibits antigenotoxic effects, reduces radiation-induced oxidative stress, and is a promising candidate for future exploration as a radioprotector.

  6. Silica nanoparticles administered at the maximum tolerated dose induce genotoxic effects through an inflammatory reaction while gold nanoparticles do not.

    PubMed

    Downs, Thomas R; Crosby, Meredith E; Hu, Ting; Kumar, Shyam; Sullivan, Ashley; Sarlo, Katherine; Reeder, Bob; Lynch, Matt; Wagner, Matthew; Mills, Tim; Pfuhler, Stefan

    2012-06-14

    While the collection of genotoxicity data and insights into potential mechanisms of action for nano-sized particulate materials (NPs) are steadily increasing, there is great uncertainty whether current standard assays are suitable to appropriately characterize potential risks. We investigated the effects of NPs in an in vivo Comet/micronucleus (MN) combination assay and in an in vitro MN assay performed with human blood. We also incorporated additional endpoints into the in vivo study in an effort to delineate primary from secondary mechanisms. Amorphous silica NPs (15 and 55 nm) were chosen for their known reactivity, while gold nano/microparticles (2, 20, and 200 nm) were selected for their wide size range and lower reactivity. DNA damage in liver, lung and blood cells and micronuclei in circulating reticulocytes were measured after 3 consecutive intravenous injections to male Wistar rats at 48, 24 and 4h before sacrifice. Gold nano/microparticles were negative for MN induction in vitro and in vivo, and for the induction of DNA damage in all tissues. Silica particles, however, caused a small but reproducible increase in DNA damage and micronucleated reticulocytes when tested at their maximum tolerated dose (MTD). No genotoxic effects were observed at lower doses, and the in vitro MN assay was also negative. We hypothesize that silica NPs initiate secondary genotoxic effects through release of inflammatory cell-derived oxidants, similar to that described for crystalline silica (quartz). Such a mechanism is supported by the occurrence of increased neutrophilic infiltration, necrosis, and apoptotic cells in the liver, and induction of inflammatory markers TNF-α and IL-6 in plasma at the MTDs. These results were fairly consistent between silica NPs and the quartz control, thereby strengthening the argument that silica NPs may act in a similar, thresholded manner. The observed profile is supportive of a secondary genotoxicity mechanism that is driven by inflammation

  7. Differential effect of manool--a diterpene from Salvia officinalis, on genotoxicity induced by methyl methanesulfonate in V79 and HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Nicolella, Heloiza Diniz; de Oliveira, Pollyanna Francielli; Munari, Carla Carolina; Costa, Gizela Faleiros Dias; Moreira, Monique Rodrigues; Veneziani, Rodrigo Cassio Sola; Tavares, Denise Crispim

    2014-10-01

    Salvia officinalis (sage) is a perennial woody subshrub native to the Mediterranean region that is commonly used as a condiment and as an anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and antimicrobial agent due to its biological activities. Manool is the most abundant micro-metabolite found in Salvia officinalis essential oils and extracts. We therefore decided to evaluate the cytotoxic, genotoxic and antigenotoxic potential of manool in Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts (V79) and human hepatoma cells (HepG2). Cytotoxicity was assessed by the colony-forming assay in V79 cells and toxic effects were observed at concentrations of up to 8.0 μg/mL. The micronucleus test was used to evaluate the genotoxicity and antigenotoxicity of manool in V79 and HepG2 cells at concentrations of 0.5-6.0 μg/mL and 0.5-8.0 μg/mL, respectively. For evaluation of antigenotoxicity, the concentrations of manool were combined with methyl methanesulfonate (MMS, 44 μg/mL). The results showed a significant increase in the frequency of micronuclei in cultures of both cell lines treated with the highest concentration tested, demonstrating a genotoxic effect. On the other hand, manool exhibited a protective effect against chromosome damage induced by MMS in HepG2 cells, but not in V79 cells. These data suggest that some manool metabolite may be responsible for the antigenotoxic effect observed in HepG2 cells.

  8. Hoechst 33342 stain and u.v. laser exposure do not induce genotoxic effects in flow-sorted boar spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Parrilla, I; Vázquez, J M; Cuello, C; Gil, M A; Roca, J; Di Berardino, D; Martínez, E A

    2004-11-01

    Sex selection by flow cytometry/cell sorting involves the staining of spermatozoa with Hoechst 33342 in combination with the impact of a u.v. laser beam, two potentially mutagenic agents. A phenotypic and cytogenetic study of lymphocytes of piglets born after insemination with spermatozoa stained with Hoechst 33342 and from piglets obtained from stain-sorted spermatozoa was performed to evaluate the genotoxic effect of Hoechst 33342 staining and u.v. laser irradiation on the offspring. Lymphocytes from piglets born after insemination with unstained spermatozoa, but from the same ejaculate, were used as a control group. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from these piglets were cultured following a standard cell culture protocol. Cells were then collected by centrifugation, subjected to hypotonic solution and fixed and dropped onto slides. Sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) and chromosome aberrations (CAs: including chromosome and chromatid breaks) per cell were scored in 50-s division metaphase spreads from each donor. Reproductive parameters and litter performance of all inseminations performed were also recorded in all groups. Data were analyzed by ANOVA. No significant increase (P > 0.05) of SCE and CA frequencies were observed in piglets born from stained spermatozoa or from stain-sorted spermatozoa with respect to controls (untreated sperm). The results indicated that no mutagenic effect on spermatozoa, expressed as increases in the incidence of abnormalities in the resulting offspring and also as increases in SCE and CA frequencies on lymphocytes from these individuals, was induced by the staining of boar spermatozoa with Hoechst 33342, nor by combination of staining with laser impact during flow cytometry.

  9. Comparison of the genotoxic effects induced by 50 Hz extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields and 1800 MHz radiofrequency electromagnetic fields in GC-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Duan, Weixia; Liu, Chuan; Zhang, Lei; He, Mindi; Xu, Shangcheng; Chen, Chunhai; Pi, Huifeng; Gao, Peng; Zhang, Yanwen; Zhong, Min; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou

    2015-03-01

    Extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) and radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) have been considered to be possibly carcinogenic to humans. However, their genotoxic effects remain controversial. To make experiments controllable and results comparable, we standardized exposure conditions and explored the potential genotoxicity of 50 Hz ELF-EMF and 1800 MHz RF-EMF. A mouse spermatocyte-derived GC-2 cell line was intermittently (5 min on and 10 min off) exposed to 50 Hz ELF-EMF at an intensity of 1, 2 or 3 mT or to RF-EMF in GSM-Talk mode at the specific absorption rates (SAR) of 1, 2 or 4 W/kg. After exposure for 24 h, we found that neither ELF-EMF nor RF-EMF affected cell viability using Cell Counting Kit-8. Through the use of an alkaline comet assay and immunofluorescence against γ-H2AX foci, we found that ELF-EMF exposure resulted in a significant increase of DNA strand breaks at 3 mT, whereas RF-EMF exposure had insufficient energy to induce such effects. Using a formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG)-modified alkaline comet assay, we observed that RF-EMF exposure significantly induced oxidative DNA base damage at a SAR value of 4 W/kg, whereas ELF-EMF exposure did not. Our results suggest that both ELF-EMF and RF-EMF under the same experimental conditions may produce genotoxicity at relative high intensities, but they create different patterns of DNA damage. Therefore, the potential mechanisms underlying the genotoxicity of different frequency electromagnetic fields may be different.

  10. The modifying effect of selenium and vitamins A, C, and E on the genotoxicity induced by sunset yellow in male mice.

    PubMed

    Sayed, Hanaa M; Fouad, Dalia; Ataya, Farid S; Hassan, Nagwa H A; Fahmy, Maha A

    2012-05-15

    The use of food additives in various products is growing up. It has attracted the attention towards the possible correlation between the mutagenic potential of food additives and various human diseases. This work evaluated the protective role of selenium and vitamins A, C and E (selenium ACE)(1) against the genotoxic effects induced by a synthetic food additive, sunset yellow, in mice. Six groups were studied including two control groups (negative and positive control), two groups are given single dose of sunset yellow (either 0.325, 0.65 or 1.3mg/kg body weight(2) alone or with selenium ACE) and two groups are given sunset yellow daily for 1, 2 or 3 weeks (0.325mg/kg b.wt./day alone or with selenium ACE), respectively. The study examined the induction of sister chromatid exchanges (SCE's)(3) in bone-marrow cells, chromosomal aberration in somatic (bone-marrow) and germ cells (spermatocytes) after single and repeated oral treatment, and the induction of morphological sperm abnormalities. The results showed that sunset yellow had genotoxic effects as indicated by increased frequency of SCE's, by chromosomal aberrations in both somatic and germ cells, and by increased morphological sperm abnormalities and DNA fragmentation. The results also indicated that the oral administration of selenium ACE significantly reduced the genotoxic effects of sunset yellow, a result that may support the use of antioxidants as chemopreventive agents in many applications.

  11. Dexrazoxane mitigates epirubicin-induced genotoxicity in mice bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Attia, Sabry M; Ahmad, Sheikh F; Saquib, Quaiser; Harisa, Gamaleldin I; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A; Bakheet, Saleh A

    2016-03-01

    Dexrazoxane is the only clinically approved cardioprotectant against anthracyclines-induced cardiotoxicity. Thus, detailed evaluation of the genotoxic potential of dexrazoxane and anthracyclines combination is essential to provide more insights into genotoxic and anti-genotoxic alterations that may play a role in the development of the secondary malignancies after treatment with anthracyclines. Thus, our aim was to determine whether non-genotoxic doses of dexrazoxane in combination with the anthracycline, epirubicin can modulate epirubicin-induced genotoxicity and apoptosis in somatic cells. Bone marrow micronucleus test complemented with fluorescence in situ hybridization assay and comet assay were performed to assess the genotoxicity of dexrazoxane and/or epirubicin. Apoptosis was analysed by using the annexin V assay and the occurrence of the hypodiploid DNA content. Generation of reactive oxygen species was also assessed in bone marrow by using the oxidant-sensing fluorescent probe 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate. Dexrazoxane was neither genotoxic nor apoptogenic in mice at a single dose of 75 or 150mg/kg. Moreover, it has been shown that dexrazoxane affords significant protection against epirubicin-induced genotoxicity and apoptosis in the bone marrow cells in a dose-dependent manner. Epirubicin induced marked generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species and prior administration of dexrazoxane ahead of epirubicin challenge ameliorated accumulation of these free radicals. It is thus concluded that dexrazoxane can be safely combined with epirubicin and that pre-treatment with dexrazoxane attenuates epirubicin-induced generation of reactive oxygen species and subsequent genotoxicity and apoptosis. Thus, epirubicin-induced genotoxicity can be effectively mitigated by using dexrazoxane.

  12. Effectiveness of activated carbon and Egyptian montmorillonite in the protection against deoxynivalenol-induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Wahhab, Mosaad A; El-Kady, Ahmed A; Hassan, Aziza M; Abd El-Moneim, Omaima M; Abdel-Aziem, Sekena H

    2015-09-01

    This study was conducted to prepare and characterize activated carbon (AC) and to evaluate its protective effect against deoxynivalenol (DON) toxicity in rats compared to Egyptian montmorillonite (EM). AC was prepared using a single-step chemical activation with phosphoric acid (H3PO4). The resulted AC has a high surface area and a high total pore volume. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 6 groups (n = 10) and treated for 3 weeks as follow: the control group, the groups fed AC or EM-supplemented diet (0.5% w/w), the group treated orally with DON (5 mg/kg b.w.) and the groups fed AC or EM-supplemented diet and treated with DON. Blood and liver samples were collected for different analyses. Treatment with DON increased liver function enzymes, lipid peroxidation, tumor necrosis factor α, DNA fragmentation, decreased hepatic glutathione content, up regulating mRNA Fas and TNF-α genes expression and increased micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes and normochromatic erythrocytes in bone marrow. Co-treatment of DON plus AC or EM succeeded to normalize the levels of the biochemical parameters, reduced the cytotoxicity of bone marrow and ameliorated the hepatic genotoxicity. Moreover, AC was more effective than EM and has a high affinity to adsorb DON and to reduce its cytotoxicity and genotoxicity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. DNA damage and oxidative stress induced by CeO2 nanoparticles in human dermal fibroblasts: Evidence of a clastogenic effect as a mechanism of genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Benameur, Laila; Auffan, Mélanie; Cassien, Mathieu; Liu, Wei; Culcasi, Marcel; Rahmouni, Hidayat; Stocker, Pierre; Tassistro, Virginie; Bottero, Jean-Yves; Rose, Jérôme; Botta, Alain; Pietri, Sylvia

    2015-01-01

    The broad range of applications of cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles (nano-CeO2) has attracted industrial interest, resulting in greater exposures to humans and environmental systems in the coming years. Their health effects and potential biological impacts need to be determined for risk assessment. The aims of this study were to gain insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the genotoxic effects of nano-CeO2 in relation with their physicochemical properties. Primary human dermal fibroblasts were exposed to environmentally relevant doses of nano-CeO2 (mean diameter, 7 nm; dose range, 6 × 10(-5)-6 × 10(-3) g/l corresponding to a concentration range of 0.22-22 µM) and DNA damages at the chromosome level were evaluated by genetic toxicology tests and compared to that induced in cells exposed to micro-CeO2 particles (mean diameter, 320 nm) under the same conditions. For this purpose, cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay in association with immunofluorescence staining of centromere protein A in micronuclei were used to distinguish between induction of structural or numerical chromosome changes (i.e. clastogenicity or aneuploidy). The results provide the first evidence of a genotoxic effect of nano-CeO2, (while not significant with micro-CeO2) by a clastogenic mechanism. The implication of oxidative mechanisms in this genotoxic effect was investigated by (i) assessing the impact of catalase, a hydrogen peroxide inhibitor, and (ii) by measuring lipid peroxidation and glutathione status and their reversal by application of N-acetylcysteine, a precusor of glutathione synthesis in cells. The data are consistent with the implication of free radical-related mechanisms in the nano-CeO2-induced clastogenic effect, that can be modulated by inhibition of cellular hydrogen peroxide release.

  14. [IN VIVO EFFECT OF RED WINE UNDILUTED, DILUTED (75%) AND ALCOHOL-FREE ON THE GENOTOXIC DAMAGE INDUCED BY POTENTIAL CARCINOGENIC METALS: CHROMIUM [VI

    PubMed

    García Rodríguez, María del Carmen; Mateos Nava, Rodrigo Aníbal; Altamirano Lozano, Mario

    2015-10-01

    the carcinogenesis may be initiated and promoted by the oxidative DNA damage. The compounds of chrome (Cr [VI]) cause oxidative stress (EOx) and are recognized as carcinogens in humans. In this sense, it is proposed that drinks with a high antioxidative potential, such as red wine, may have protective or modulatory effects on the oxidative DNA damage. to study the effects of the administration in vivo of undiluted, diluted (75%) and alcohol-free red wine on the genotoxic damage induced by carcinogenic metals (Cr [VI]), by evaluating the micronucleus (MN) in polychromatic erythrocytes (EPC) in mice (CD-1). it was randomly organized the follow groups: (i) control, (ii) undiluted, diluted and alcohol-free red wine (free access), (iii) CrO3 (20 mg/kg by intraperitoneal route) and (iv) CrO3-red wine. The evaluations were made in blood samples obtained from the caudal vein, in which it was identified the MN and EPC before, during and after treatments. the red wine (diluted and alcohol-free) was capable of decreasing the averages of MN induced by CrO3, demonstrating its modular capacity in vivo in the oxidative DNA damage caused by EOx-induced carcinogens. The administration of only undiluted red wine presented toxic effects. our results raises expectations on the use of substances like the red wine for the protection or modulation of genotoxic damage, encouraging its application in the carcinogenic and mutagenic processes. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of potential genotoxic/cytotoxic effects induced by epoxiconazole and fenpropimorph-based fungicide in bovine lymphocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Drážovská, Monika; Šiviková, Katarína; Holečková, Beáta; Dianovský, Ján; Galdíková, Martina; Schwarzbacherová, Viera

    2016-11-01

    Potential genotoxic/cytotoxic effects of the epoxiconazole/fenpropimorph-based fungicide were investigated using single cell gel electrophoresis and cytogenetic assays: chromosomal aberrations, sister chromatid exchanges, micronuclei and fluorescence in situ hybridization in cultured bovine lymphocytes. No statistically significant elevations of DNA damage and increases in cytogenetic endpoints were seen. However, evident cytotoxic effect presented as a decrease in mitotic and proliferation indices were recorded after exposure of bovine lymphocytes to the fungicide for 24 and 48 h at concentrations ranging from 3 to 15 µg mL(-1) (P < 0.05, P < 0.01, P < 0.001). Similarly, for 24 h an inhibition in the cytokinesis block proliferation index (CBPI) was obtained after exposure to the fungicide at concentrations ranging from 1.5 to 15 µg mL(-1) (P < 0.01, P < 0.001) in each donor.

  16. Chemopreventive effects of (-)-hinokinin against 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced genotoxicity and preneoplastic lesions in rat colon.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Lilian C; Furtado, Ricardo A; Bertanha, Humberto C C; Tomazella, Iara M; Costa, Eveline S; Bastos, Jairo K; Andrade e Silva, Márcio L; Tavares, Denise C

    2014-10-24

    (-)-Hinokinin (1) is a dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan obtained by the partial synthesis of (-)-cubebin. This study reports the antigenotoxic and anticarcinogenic potential of 1 by the comet and aberrant crypt focus assays in the peripheral blood and colon of 4-5-week-old Wistar rats, respectively. The rats were exposed to 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (40 mg/kg) and were treated by gavage with doses of 10, 20, and 40 mg/kg of 1. The results showed that the dose of 40 mg/kg was neither genotoxic nor carcinogenic. In the comet assay, all 1 doses displayed antigenotoxic effects. In addition, this compound (20 and 40 mg/kg) exhibited an anticarcinogenic effect in the aberrant crypt focus assay.

  17. Ameliorative effects of thyme and calendula extracts alone or in combination against aflatoxins-induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Aziem, Sekena H; Hassan, Aziza M; El-Denshary, Ezzeldein S; Hamzawy, Mohamed A; Mannaa, Fathia A; Abdel-Wahhab, Mosaad A

    2014-05-01

    The aims of the current work were to evaluate the hepatoprotective effect of calendula flowers and/or thyme leave extracts on aflatoxins (AFs)-induced oxidative stress, genotoxicity and alteration of p53 bax and bcl2 gene expressions. Eighty male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into eight equal groups including: the control group, the group fed AFs-contaminated diet (2.5 mg/kg diet) for 5 weeks, the groups treated orally with thyme and/or calendula extract (0.5 g/kg b.w) for 6 weeks and the groups pretreated orally with thyme and/or calendula extract 1 week before and during AFs treatment for further 5 weeks. Blood, liver and bone marrow samples were collected for biochemical analysis, gene expression, DNA fragmentation and micronucleus assay. The results showed that AFs induced significant alterations in oxidative stress markers, increased serum AFP and inflammatory cytokine, percentage of DNA fragmentation, the expression of pro-apoptotic gene p53 and bax accompanied with a decrease in the expression of bcl2. Animals treated with the extracts 1 week before AFs treatment showed a significant decrease in oxidative damage markers, micronucleated cells, DNA fragmentation and modulation of the expression of pro-apoptotic genes. These results suggested that both calendula and thyme extracts had anti-genotoxic effects due to their higher content of total phenolic compounds.

  18. Chemopreventive effects of Furan-2-yl-3-pyridin-2-yl-propenone against 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-inducible genotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Yong Pil; Han, Eun Hee; Choi, Jae Ho; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Lee, Kyung Jin; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Lee, Eung Seok; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2008-05-01

    1-Furan-2-yl-3-pyridin-2-yl-propenone (FPP-3) is an anti-inflammatory agent with a propenone moiety and chemically synthesized recently. In this study, we examined the chemopreventive effect of FPP-3 on 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced genotoxicity in MCF-7 cells. FPP-3 reduced the formation of the DMBA-DNA adduct. DMBA-induced CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 gene expression and enzyme activity were inhibited by FPP-3. It inhibited DMBA-induced aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) transactivation and DMBA-inducible nuclear localization of the AhR. Induction of detoxifying phase II genes by chemopreventive agents represents a coordinated protective response against oxidative stress and neoplastic effects of carcinogens. Transcription factor NF-E2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) regulates antioxidant response element (ARE) of phase II detoxifying and antioxidant enzymes, such as glutathione S-transferase (GST) and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (QR). FPP-3 increased the expression and enzymatic activity of GST and QR. Moreover, FPP-3 increased transcriptional activity of GST and QR. GST and QR induction and Nrf2 translocation by FPP-3 were blocked by the PKC inhibitor Goe6983, and the p38 inhibitor SB203580. These results reflected a partial role of PKC{delta} and p38 signaling in FPP-3-mediated GSTA and QR induction through nuclear translocation of Nrf2. Classically, chemopreventive agents either inhibit CYP metabolizing enzyme or induce phase II detoxifying enzymes. These results suggest that FPP-3 has a potent protective effect against DMBA-induced genotoxicity through modulating phase I and II enzymes and that it has potential as a chemopreventive agent.

  19. Chemopreventive effects of Furan-2-yl-3-pyridin-2-yl-propenone against 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-inducible genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Yong Pil; Han, Eun Hee; Choi, Jae Ho; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Lee, Kyung Jin; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Lee, Eung Seok; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2008-05-01

    1-Furan-2-yl-3-pyridin-2-yl-propenone (FPP-3) is an anti-inflammatory agent with a propenone moiety and chemically synthesized recently. In this study, we examined the chemopreventive effect of FPP-3 on 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced genotoxicity in MCF-7 cells. FPP-3 reduced the formation of the DMBA-DNA adduct. DMBA-induced CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 gene expression and enzyme activity were inhibited by FPP-3. It inhibited DMBA-induced aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) transactivation and DMBA-inducible nuclear localization of the AhR. Induction of detoxifying phase II genes by chemopreventive agents represents a coordinated protective response against oxidative stress and neoplastic effects of carcinogens. Transcription factor NF-E2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) regulates antioxidant response element (ARE) of phase II detoxifying and antioxidant enzymes, such as glutathione S-transferase (GST) and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (QR). FPP-3 increased the expression and enzymatic activity of GST and QR. Moreover, FPP-3 increased transcriptional activity of GST and QR. GST and QR induction and Nrf2 translocation by FPP-3 were blocked by the PKC inhibitor Gö6983, and the p38 inhibitor SB203580. These results reflected a partial role of PKC delta and p38 signaling in FPP-3-mediated GSTA and QR induction through nuclear translocation of Nrf2. Classically, chemopreventive agents either inhibit CYP metabolizing enzyme or induce phase II detoxifying enzymes. These results suggest that FPP-3 has a potent protective effect against DMBA-induced genotoxicity through modulating phase I and II enzymes and that it has potential as a chemopreventive agent.

  20. Tempol protects human lymphocytes from genotoxicity induced by cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    Khabour, Omar F; Alzoubi, Karem H; Mfady, Doa’a S; Alasseiri, Mohammed; Hasheesh, Taghrid F

    2014-01-01

    The use of cisplatin in treatments of human malignancies is limited by its side effects that include DNA damage and the subsequent risk of developing secondary cancer. In this study, we examined the possible protective effect of Tempol against DNA damage induced by cisplatin in human lymphocytes using chromosomal aberrations (CAs) and sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) assays. Cisplatin induced significant elevation in the frequencies of CAs and SCEs in cultured human lymphocytes (P < 0.01). Treatment of lymphocytes with Tempol significantly lowered CAs and SCEs induced by cisplatin. Tempol alone did not affect spontaneous levels of SCEs and CAs observed in the control group (P > 0.05). In conclusion, Tempol protects human lymphocytes against genotoxicity induced by the anticancer drug cisplatin. PMID:24955171

  1. Chemopreventive effects of silymarin against 1,2-dimethylhydrazine plus dextran sodium sulfate-induced inflammation-associated carcinogenicity and genotoxicity in the colon of gpt delta rats.

    PubMed

    Toyoda-Hokaiwado, Naomi; Yasui, Yumiko; Muramatsu, Mina; Masumura, Kenichi; Takamune, Makiko; Yamada, Masami; Ohta, Toshihiro; Tanaka, Takuji; Nohmi, Takehiko

    2011-10-01

    Silymarin, a natural flavonoid from the seeds of milk thistle, is used for chemoprevention against various cancers in clinical settings and in experimental models. To examine the chemopreventive mechanisms of silymarin against colon cancer, we investigated suppressive effects of silymarin against carcinogenicity and genotoxicity induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) plus dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) in the colon of F344 gpt delta transgenic rats. Male gpt delta rats were given a single subcutaneous injection of 40 mg/kg DMH and followed by 1.5% DSS in drinking water for a week. They were fed diets containing silymarin for 4 weeks, starting 1 week before DMH injection and samples were collected at 4, 20 and 32 weeks after the DMH treatment. Silymarin at doses of 100 and 500 p.p.m. suppressed the tumor formation in a dose-dependent manner and the reduction was statistically significant. In the mutation assays, DMH plus DSS enhanced the gpt mutant frequency (MF) in the colon, and the silymarin treatments reduced the MFs by 20%. Silymarin also reduced the genotoxicity of DMH in a dose-dependent manner in bacterial mutation assay with Salmonella typhimurium YG7108, a sensitive strain to alkylating agents, and the maximum reduction was >80%. These results suggest that silymarin is chemopreventive against DMH/DSS-induced inflammation-associated colon carcinogenesis and silymarin might act as an antigenotoxic agent, in part.

  2. Genotoxicity Induced by Dental Materials: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Daniel Araki; Yujra, Veronica Quispe; DE Moura, Carolina Foot Gomes; Handan, Bianca Andrade; DE Barros Viana, Milena; Yamauchi, Liria Yuri; Castelo, Paula Midori; Aguiar, Odair

    2017-08-01

    Genotoxicity is the capacity of an agent to produce damage in the DNA molecule. Considering the strong evidence for a relationship between genetic damage and carcinogenesis, evaluation of genotoxicity induced by dental materials is necessary for elucidating the true health risks to patients and professionals. The purpose of this article was to provide a comprehensive review of genotoxicity induced by dental materials. All published data showed some evidence of genotoxicity, especially related to dental bleaching, restorative materials and endodontic compounds. Certainly, such information will be added to that already established for regulatory purposes as a safe way to promote oral healthcare and prevent oral carcinogenesis. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  3. Assessment of isorhamnetin 3-O-neohesperidoside from Acacia salicina: protective effects toward oxidation damage and genotoxicity induced by aflatoxin B1 and nifuroxazide.

    PubMed

    Bouhlel, Ines; Limem, Ilef; Skandrani, Ines; Nefatti, Aicha; Ghedira, Kamel; Dijoux-Franca, Marie-Genevieve; Leila, Chekir-Ghedira

    2010-08-01

    Antioxidant activity of isorhamnetin 3-O-neohesperidoside, isolated from the leaves of Acacia salicina, was determined by the ability of this compound to inhibit xanthine oxidase activity and to scavenge the free radical 2,2'-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS(.-)) diammonium salt. Antigenotoxic activity was assessed using the SOS chromotest assay. This compound has the ability to scavenge the ABTS(.+) radical by a hydrogen donating mechanism. We also envisaged the study of the antioxidant effect of this compound by the enzymatic xanthine/xanthine oxidase (X/XOD) assay. Results indicated that isorhamnetin 3-O-neohesperidoside was a potent inhibitor of xanthine oxidase and superoxide anion scavengers. Moreover, this compound induced an inhibitory activity against nifuroxazide and aflatoxine B1 (AFB1) induced genotoxicity. Taken together, these observations provide evidence that isorhamnetin 3-O-neohesperidoside isolated from the leaves of A. salicina is able to protect cells against the consequences of oxidative stress.

  4. Nongenotoxic effects and a reduction of the DXR-induced genotoxic effects of Helianthus annuus Linné (sunflower) seeds revealed by micronucleus assays in mouse bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This research evaluated the genotoxicity of oil and tincture of H. annuus L. seeds using the micronucleus assay in bone marrow of mice. The interaction between these preparations and the genotoxic effects of doxorubicin (DXR) was also analysed (antigenotoxicity test). Methods Experimental groups were evaluated at 24-48 h post treatment with N-Nitroso-N-ethylurea (positive control – NEU), DXR (chemotherapeutic), NaCl (negative control), a sunflower tincture (THALS) and two sources of sunflower oils (POHALS and FOHALS). Antigenotoxic assays were carried out using the sunflower tincture and oils separately and in combination with NUE or DXR. Results For THALS, analysis of the MNPCEs showed no significant differences between treatment doses (250–2,000 mg.Kg-1) and NaCl. A significant reduction in MNPCE was observed when THALS (2,000 mg.Kg-1) was administered in combination with DXR (5 mg.Kg-1). For POHALS or FOHALS, analysis of the MNPCEs also showed no significant differences between treatment doses (250–2,000 mg.Kg-1) and NaCl. However, the combination DXR + POHALS (2,000 mg.Kg-1) or DXR + FOHALS (2,000 mg.Kg-1) not contributed to the MNPCEs reduction. Conclusions This research suggests absence of genotoxicity of THALS, dose-, time- and sex-independent, and its combination with DXR can reduce the genotoxic effects of DXR. POHALS and FOHALS also showed absence of genotoxicity, but their association with DXR showed no antigenotoxic effects. PMID:24694203

  5. Ameliorative effects of gallic acid, quercetin and limonene on urethane-induced genotoxicity and oxidative stress in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Nagpal, Isha; Abraham, Suresh K

    2017-05-01

    The main objective of our present work was to ascertain the efficacy of Drosophila melanogaster model for assessing antigenotoxic and antioxidant effects of dietary phytochemicals gallic acid (GA), quercetin (QC) and limonene (Lim) against urethane (URE), a genotoxic environmental carcinogen. Oregon-K (ORK) adult male flies were fed GA, QC and Lim in combination with URE (20 mM) in 10% sucrose for 72 h. Third instar larvae were fed instant medium containing the above phytochemicals and URE for 24 h. Sex-linked recessive lethal (SLRL) test and assays for estimating glutathione content (GSH), glutathione S-transferase (GST), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and lipid peroxidation (MDA content) were performed. Adult feeding experiments demonstrated that co-treatment of flies with URE and the test phytochemicals has significantly decreased the frequencies of SLRL mutations in all the germ cell stages when compared to that with URE alone. Larval feeding experiments also showed a similar pattern. The above results correlate well with antioxidative potentials of the test agents where we observed the elevated enzymatic levels with a significant reduction in MDA level in Drosophila larvae. The results further suggest that the dietary phytochemicals have an antioxidant and antimutagenic property which can be assessed using D. melanogaster.

  6. Laser pyrolysis products: sampling procedures, cytotoxic and genotoxic effects.

    PubMed

    Stocker, B; Meier, T; Fliedner, T M; Plappert, U

    1998-01-30

    The use of lasers in medical applications has grown enormously in the last few years. Recent chemical analysis of the laser pyrolysis products revealed that aerosols generated by pyrolytic decomposition of tissue could be health hazards. Therefore we analysed the genotoxic and mutagenic effects of laser pyrolysis products from different types of porcine tissue. The tissues were irradiated with a surgical CO2 laser and the generated aerosols were sampled as particulate fractions as well as low and highly volatile fractions. Then human leukocytes were incubated with the pyrolysis products and subjected to the comet assay. The results of the comet assay indicated the pyrolysis products being inducers of DNA damage. The ability to induce genotoxic effects turned out to be strongly dependent on the type of tissue that had been irradiated during laser treatment. To check whether the pyrolysis products also have mutagenic properties the Salmonella mutagenicity assay was performed. The particulate aerosol fractions of skin, muscle tissue and liver tissue clearly proved to be mutagenic in TA98 in the presence of S9 mix. There was no mutagenic effect detectable without metabolic activation. In conclusion, our experiments showed that the laser pyrolysis products originating from porcine tissues induced very potent genotoxic as well as mutagenic effects and therefore they could be potential health hazards for humans.

  7. [Bacterial pigment prodigiosin and its genotoxic effects].

    PubMed

    Gur'ianov, I D; Karamova, N S; Iusupova, D V; Gnezdilov, O I; Koshkarova, L A

    2013-01-01

    The prodigiosin preparation was isolated and purified from Serratia marcescens ATCC 9986, using chromatographic methods. The analysis of the preparation by TLC, NMR-spectrometry and mass-spectrometry allowed to confirm the red pigment fraction as the prodigiosin and detect its purity. Originally, the specific features of the toxic and genotoxic effects of prodigiosin and the possibility of induction of mutations by pigment in the cells of Salmonella typhimurium TA 100 (Ames test) and chromosome damage of mammalian erythroblasts have been determined.

  8. Exercise preconditioning modulates genotoxicity induced by doxorubicin in multiple organs of rats.

    PubMed

    Martins, Renato Almeida; Minari, André Luis; Chaves, Marcelo Donizetti; dos Santos, Ronaldo Wagner Thomatieli; Barbisan, Luis Fernando; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of exercise in multiple organs of rats treated with doxorubicin. Male adult Wistar rats were distributed into the following groups: sedentary + NaCl; exercise + NaCl; sedentary + doxorubicin; and exercise + doxorubicin. Animals were sacrificed 2 days following injections. Central fragments from heart, liver, and kidney were collected and minced in 0.9% NaCl being cellular suspensions used for the single-cell gel (comet) assay. The results showed that exercise was able to prevent genotoxicity induced by doxorubicin in heart cells. By contrast, exercise was not able to prevent genotoxicity induced by doxorubicin in liver cells. The same occurred to kidney cells, i.e. no statistically significant differences (p > 0.05) were found when compared with groups not exposed to doxorubicin. Taken together, our results support the idea that exercise could contribute to the protective effect against genotoxicity induced by doxorubicin in heart cells.

  9. Protective effect of cactus cladode extract against cisplatin induced oxidative stress, genotoxicity and apoptosis in balb/c mice: combination with phytochemical composition

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cis-Platinum (II) (cis-diammine dichloroplatinum; CDDP) is a potent antitumor compound widely used for the treatment of many malignancies. An important side-effect of CDDP is nephrotoxicity. The cytotoxic action of this drug is often thought to induce oxidative stress and be associated with its ability to bind DNA to form CDDP–DNA adducts and apoptosis in kidney cells. In this study, the protective effect of cactus cladode extract (CCE) against CDDP-induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity were investigated in mice. We also looked for levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), catalase activity, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, chromosome aberrations (CA) test, SOS Chromotest, expressions of p53, bax and bcl2 in kidney and we also analyzed several parameters of renal function markers toxicity such as serum biochemical analysis. Methods Adult, healthy balb/c (20–25 g) male mice aged of 4–5 weeks were pre-treated by intraperitonial administration of CCE (50 mg/Kg.b.w) for 2 weeks. Control animals were treated 3 days a week for 4 weeks by intraperitonial administration of 100 μg/Kg.b.w CDDP. Animals which treated by CDDP and CCE were divided into two groups: the first group was administrated CCE 2 hours before each treatment with CDDP 3 days a week for 4 weeks. The second group was administrated without pre-treatment with CCE but this extract was administrated 24 hours after each treatment with CDDP 3 days a week for 4 weeks. Results Our results showed that CDDP induced significant alterations in all tested oxidative stress markers. In addition it induced CA in bone morrow cells, increased the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins p53 and bax and decreased the expression of anti-apoptotic protein bcl2 in kidney. On the other hand, CDDP significantly increased the levels of urea and creatinine and decreased the levels of albumin and total protein.The treatment of CCE before or after treatment with CDDP showed, (i) a total reduction

  10. Effects of cellular non-protein sulfhydryl depletion in radiation induced oncogenic transformation and genotoxicity in mouse C/sub 3/H 10T1/2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hei, T.K.; Geard, C.R.; Hall, E.J.

    1984-08-01

    A study was made of the effects of cellular non-protein sulfhydryl (NPSH) depletion on cytotoxicity, cell cycle kinetics, oncogenic transformation and sister chromatid exchange (SCE) in C/sub 3/H 10T1/2 cells. Using DL-Buthionine S-R-Sulfoximine (BSO) to deplete thiols, it was found spectrophotometrically that less than 5% of control NPSH level remained in the cells after 24-hour treatment under aerated conditions. Such NPSH depleted cells, when subject to a 3 Gy ..gamma..-ray treatment, were found to have no radiosensitizing response either in terms of cell survival or oncogenic transformation. In addition, decreased levels of NPSH had no effect on spontaneous or radiation-induced SCE nor were cell cycle kinetics additionally altered. Therefore, the inability of NPSH depletion to alter ..gamma..-ray induced cellular transformation was unrelated to any possible effect of BSO on the cell cycle. These results suggest that such depletion may result in little or no additional oncogenic or genotoxic effects on aerated normal tissues.

  11. Genotoxic effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heim, Julia; Felder, Eva; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz; Kaltbeitzel, Anke; Heinrich, Ulf Ruediger; Brochhausen, Christoph; Mailänder, Volker; Tremel, Wolfgang; Brieger, Juergen

    2015-05-01

    The potential toxicity of nanoparticles has currently provoked public and scientific discussions, and attempts to develop generally accepted handling procedures for nanoparticles are under way. The investigation of the impact of nanoparticles on human health is overdue and reliable test systems accounting for the special properties of nanomaterials must be developed. Nanoparticular zinc oxide (ZnO) may be internalised through ambient air or the topical application of cosmetics, only to name a few, with unpredictable health effects. Therefore, we analysed the determinants of ZnO nanoparticle (NP) genotoxicity. ZnO NPs (15-18 nm in diameter) were investigated at concentrations of 0.1, 10 and 100 μg mL-1 using the cell line A549. Internalised NPs were only infrequently detectable by TEM, but strongly increased Zn2+ levels in the cytoplasm and even more in the nuclear fraction, as measured by atom absorption spectroscopy, indicative of an internalised zinc and nuclear accumulation. We observed a time and dosage dependent reduction of cellular viability after ZnO NP exposure. ZnCl2 exposure to cells induced similar impairments of cellular viability. Complexation of Zn2+ with diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) resulted in the loss of toxicity of NPs, indicating the relevant role of Zn2+ for ZnO NP toxicity. Foci analyses showed the induction of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) by ZnO NPs and increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Treatment of the cells with the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) resulted in strongly decreased intracellular ROS levels and reduced DNA damage. However, a slow increase of ROS after ZnO NP exposure and reduced but not quashed DSBs after NAC-treatment suggest that Zn2+ may exert genotoxic activities without the necessity of preceding ROS-induction. Our data indicate that ZnO NP toxicity is a result of cellular Zn2+ intake. Subsequently increased ROS-levels cause DNA damage. However, we found evidence for

  12. Genotoxic and mutagenic effects of sewage sludge on higher plants.

    PubMed

    Corrêa Martins, Maria Nilza; de Souza, Victor Ventura; Souza, Tatiana da Silva

    2016-02-01

    Sewage treatment yields sludge, which is often used as a soil amendment in agriculture and crop production. Although the sludge contains elevated concentrations of macro and micronutrients, high levels of inorganic and organic compounds with genotoxic and mutagenic properties are present in sludge. Application of sludge in agriculture is a pathway for direct contact of crops to toxic chemicals. The objective of this study was to compile information related to the genotoxic and mutagenic effects of sewage sludge in different plant species. In addition, data are presented on toxicological effects in animals fed with plants grown in soils supplemented with sewage sludge. Despite the benefits of using sewage sludge as organic fertilizer, the data showcased in this review suggest that this residue can induce genetic damage in plants. This review alerts potential risks to health outcomes after the intake of food cultivated in sewage sludge-amended soils.

  13. Protective effects of garlic sulfur compounds against DNA damage induced by direct- and indirect-acting genotoxic agents in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Belloir, C; Singh, V; Daurat, C; Siess, M H; Le Bon, A M

    2006-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the antigenotoxic activity of several garlic organosulfur compounds (OSC) in the human hepatoma cell line HepG2, using comet assay. The OSC selected were allicin (DADSO), diallyl sulfide (DAS), diallyl disulfide (DADS), S-allyl cysteine (SAC) and allyl mercaptan (AM). To explore their potential mechanisms of action, two approaches were performed: (i) a pre-treatment protocol which allowed study of the possible modulation of drug metabolism enzymes by OSC before treatment of the cells with the genotoxic agent; (ii) a co-treatment protocol by which the ability of OSC to scavenge direct-acting compounds was assessed. Preliminary studies showed that, over the concentration range tested (5-100 microM), the studied OSC neither affected cell viability nor induced DNA damage by themselves. In the pre-treatment protocol, aflatoxin B1 genotoxicity was significantly reduced by all the OSC tested except AM. DADS was the most efficient OSC in reducing benzo(a)pyrene genotoxicity. SAC and AM significantly decreased DNA breaks in HepG2 cells treated with dimethylnitrosamine. Additionally, all the OSC studied were shown to decrease the genotoxicity of the direct-acting compounds, hydrogen peroxide and methyl methanesulfonate. This study demonstrated that garlic OSC displayed antigenotoxic activity in human metabolically competent cells.

  14. Genotoxic effects of sunlight-activated waste waters

    SciTech Connect

    Strniste, G.F.; Chen, D.J.; Okinaka, R.T.

    1981-01-01

    Natural sunlight induces a genotoxic response in cultured CHO cells pre-treated with shale oil retort process water. Near ultraviolet light (NUV) component of the solar spectrum is the apparent radiation responsible for photoactivation. Cultured human skin fibroblasts are acutely sensitive to the genotoxic effects of photoactivated process water. The mutagenic potential of photoactivated process water in human cells is the same as that witnessed for an equivalent killing dose of the potent skin carcinogen FUV. DNA repair processes are involved in modulating genotoxic effects of this photo-induced process. The exact magnitude of the potential health-related and environmental risks resulting from photoactivation of retort process waters and other oil shale by-products is unassessed at this time. Our demonstration that a significant rate of mutation occurs in cultured human cells exposed to high dilutions of process waters and fluences of NUV comparable to that encountered during nominal exposure to sunlight suggests that such assessment is a prerequisite to minimal risk development of our oil shale resources.

  15. Selenium pretreatment attenuates formaldehyde-induced genotoxicity in A549 cell lines.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yu-Qin; Chen, Xin; Dai, Juan; Jiang, Zhong-Fa; Li, Ning; Zhang, Ben-Yan; Zhang, Zhi-Bing

    2014-11-01

    Formaldehyde is a major industrial chemical and has been extensively used in the manufacture of synthetic resins and chemicals. Numerous studies indicate that formaldehyde can induce various genotoxic effects in vitro and in vivo. A recent study indicated that formaldehyde impaired antioxidant cellular defences and enhanced lipid peroxidation. Selenium is an important antioxidant. We hypothesized that reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lipid peroxidation are involved in formaldehyde-induced genotoxicity in human lung cancer cell line, A549 cell line. To test the hypothesis, we investigated the effects of selenium on formaldehyde-induced genotoxicity in A549 cell lines. The results indicated that exposure to formaldehyde showed the induction of DNA-protein cross-links (DPCs). Formaldehyde significantly increased the malondialdehyde levels and decreased the activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase. In addition, the activations of necrosis factor-κB (NF-κB) and activator protein 1 (AP-1) were induced by the formaldehyde treatment. The pretreatment with selenium counteracted the formaldehyde-induced oxidative stress, ameliorated DPCs and attenuated the activation of NF-κB and AP-1 in A549 cell lines. All the results suggested that the pretreatment with selenium attenuated the formaldehyde-induced genotoxicity through its ROS scavenging and anti-DPCs effects in A549 cell lines. © The Author(s) 2012.

  16. Curcumin attenuates quinocetone-induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity in human hepatocyte L02 cells.

    PubMed

    Dai, Chongshan; Tang, Shusheng; Li, Daowen; Zhao, Kena; Xiao, Xilong

    2015-01-01

    Quinocetone (QCT), a new quinoxaline 1,4-dioxides, has been used as antimicrobial feed additive in China. Potential genotoxicity of QCT was concerned as a public health problem. This study aimed to investigate the protective effect of curcumin on QCT-induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity in human hepatocyte L02 cells. Cell viability and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), biomarkers of oxidative stress including superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and glutathione (GSH) level were measured. Meanwhile, comet assay and micronucleus assay were carried out to evaluate genotoxicity. The results showed that, compared to the control group, QCT at the concentration ranges of 2-16 μg/mL significantly decreased L02 cell viability, which was significantly attenuated with curcumin pretreatment (2.5 and 5 μM). In addition, QCT significantly increased cell oxidative stress, characterized by increases of intracellular ROS level, while decreased endogenous antioxidant biomarkers GSH level and SOD activity (all p < 0.05 or 0.01). Curcumin pretreatment significantly attenuated ROS formation, inhibited the decreases of SOD activity and GSH level. Furthermore, curcumin significantly reduced QCT-induced DNA fragments and micronuclei formation. These data suggest that curcumin could attenuate QCT-induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in L02 cells, which may be attributed to ROS scavenging and anti-oxidative ability of curcumin. Importantly, consumption of curcumin may be a plausible way to prevent quinoxaline 1,4-dioxides-mediated oxidative stress and genotoxicity in human or animals.

  17. DNA damage as an indicator of pollutant-induced genotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Shugart, L.R.

    1989-01-01

    Biological monitoring is an approach of considerable interest to scientists in the field of environmental genotoxicity who are investigating the effects of hazardous substances on the biota. In essence the technique involves an evaluation of various types of responses in living organisms for their potential to identify exposure to dangerous substances and to define or to predict subsequent deleterious effects. The rationale for the selection of DNA damage as an indicator of exposure to genotoxic agents is based mainly on the mechanisms of action of chemicals that are known mutagens and carcinogens. An alkaline unwinding assay that detects excess strand breakage within the DNA polymer was applied to sunfish in a local stream as a biological monitor for environmental genotoxicity due to industrial pollution. The study was conducted over a period of 15 months and the temporal and spatial aspects of the data were evaluated for the effect of remedial action. 16 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Protective effects of melatonin-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules on paraquat-induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in a pulmonary cell line.

    PubMed

    Charão, Mariele F; Baierle, Marília; Gauer, Bruna; Goethel, Gabriela; Fracasso, Rafael; Paese, Karina; Brucker, Natália; Moro, Angela M; Bubols, Guilherme B; Dias, Bruna B; Matte, Ursula S; Guterres, Silvia S; Pohlmann, Adriana R; Garcia, Solange C

    2015-06-01

    Many acute poisonings lack effective and specific antidotes. Due to both intentional and accidental exposures, paraquat (PQ) causes thousands of deaths annually, especially by pulmonary fibrosis. Melatonin (Mel), when incorporated into lipid-core nanocapsules (Mel-LNC), has enhanced antioxidant properties. The effects of such a formulation have not yet been studied with respect to mitigation of PQ- induced cytotoxicity and DNA damage. Here, we have tested whether Mel-LNC can ameliorate PQ-induced toxicity in the A549 alveolar epithelial cell line. Physicochemical characterization of the formulations was performed. Cellular uptake was measured using nanocapsules marked with rhodamine B. Cell viability was determined by the MTT assay and DNA damage was assessed by the comet assay. The enzyme-modified comet assay with endonuclease III (Endo III) and formamidopyrimidine glycosylase (FPG) were used to investigate oxidative DNA damage. Incubation with culture medium for 24h did not alter the granulometric profile of Mel-LNC formulations. Following treatment (3 and 24h), red fluorescence was detected around the cell nucleus, indicating internalization of the formulation. Melatonin solution (Mel), Mel-LNC, and LNC did not have significant effects on cell viability or DNA damage. Pre-treatment with Mel-LNC enhanced cell viability and showed a remarkable reduction in % DNA in tail compared to the PQ group; this was not observed in cells pre-treated with Mel. PQ induces oxidative DNA damage detected with the enzyme-modified comet assay. Mel-LNC reduced this damage more effectively than did Mel. In summary, Mel-LNC is better than Mel at protecting A549 cells from the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of PQ.

  19. Exposure of Vicia faba and Pisum sativum to copper-induced genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Souguir, D; Ferjani, E; Ledoigt, G; Goupil, P

    2008-11-01

    The potential genotoxicity of Cu(2+) was investigated in Vicia faba and Pisum sativum seedlings in hydroponic culture conditions. Cu(2+) caused a dose-dependent increase in micronuclei frequencies in both plant models. Cytological analysis of root tips cells showed clastogenic and aneugenic effects of this heavy metal on V. faba root meristems. Cu(2+) induced chromosomal alterations at the lowest concentration used (2.5 mM) when incubated for 42 h, indicating the potent mutagenic effect of this ion. A spectrum of chromosomal abnormalities was observed in V. faba root meristems, illustrating the genotoxic events leading to micronuclei formation.

  20. INDUCIBLE HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN (HSP70-1) PROTECTS MCF-7 CELLS FROM THE CYTOTOXIC AND GENOTOXIC EFFECTS OF ARSENITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) belong to the highly conserved family of stress proteins and are induced following exposure to arsenic. Elevated HSPs protect against cellular damage from heat but it is unclear wether HSP induction alters the damaging effects of environmental chemical ...

  1. INDUCIBLE HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN (HSP70-1) PROTECTS MCF-7 CELLS FROM THE CYTOTOXIC AND GENOTOXIC EFFECTS OF ARSENITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) belong to the highly conserved family of stress proteins and are induced following exposure to arsenic. Elevated HSPs protect against cellular damage from heat but it is unclear wether HSP induction alters the damaging effects of environmental chemical ...

  2. Xanthine oxidoreductase is required for genotoxic stress-induced NKG2D ligand expression and gemcitabine-mediated antitumor activity

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiulong; Rao, Geetha; Li, Yi

    2016-01-01

    MICA/B (the major histocompatibility antigen-related chain A and B) and Rae I are stress-inducible ligands for the immune-receptor NKG2D. Mechanisms by which genotoxic stress and DNA damage induce the expression of NKG2D ligands remain incompletely understood. Here, we report that inhibition of xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) activity by allopurinol or inhibition of XOR expression by gene knockdown abrogated genotoxic stress-induced expression of MICA/B and Rae I in three tumor cell lines. XOR knockdown also blocked gemcitabine-mediated antitumor activity in an orthotopic syngeneic mouse model of breast cancer. As a rate-limiting enzyme in the purine catabolic pathway, XOR generates two end-products, uric acid and reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS scavenging had an insignificant effect on genotoxic drug-induced MICA/B expression but modestly inhibited radiation-induced MICA/B expression. Exogenous uric acid (in the form of monosodium urate) induced MICA/B expression by activating the MAP kinase pathway. Allopurinol blocked genotoxic stress-induced MAP kinase activation. Our study provides mechanistic insights into genotoxic stress-induced activation of the MAP kinase pathway and suggests that XOR is required for genotoxic stress-induced NKG2D ligand expression and gemcitabine-mediated antitumor activity. PMID:27494876

  3. Anti-genotoxic ability of α-tocopherol and Anthocyanin to counteract fish DNA damage induced by musk xylene.

    PubMed

    Rocco, Lucia; Mottola, Filomena; Santonastaso, Marianna; Saputo, Valentina; Cusano, Elena; Costagliola, Domenico; Suero, Teresa; Pacifico, Severina; Stingo, Vincenzo

    2015-11-01

    Many compounds released into the environment are able to interact with genetic material. The main purpose of genetic toxicology is to investigate the adverse effects of genotoxic molecules such as reduced fitness, changes in gene frequencies and their impact on genetic diversity in populations following genotoxic exposure. However, the ecological effects of many genotoxic compounds remain poorly understood. The aim of this research was to evaluate the genotoxic activity of an artificial musk (musk xylene, MX) and the potential anti-genotoxicity against this chemical compound of two antioxidant substances (α-tocopherol and an anthocyanins enriched extract). The studies were performed both in vivo and in vitro, using the teleost Danio rerio and the DLEC (Dicentrarchus labrax embryonic cells) cell line. We carried out the exposure to these substances at different times. DNA and cell damage and their possible repair were detected by various experimental approaches: DNA strand breaks (Comet Assay), degree of apoptosis (Diffusion Assay) and molecular alterations at the genomic level (RAPD-PCR technique). Data were collected and analyzed for statistical significance using the Student's t test. The results of this study showed that MX exhibited a genotoxic activity even after short exposure times. The anti-genotoxicity experiments evidenced that both α-tocopherol and Anthocyanin were able to contrast the genotoxic effects induced by MX, both in vivo and in vitro.

  4. The Mitigating Effect of Citrullus colocynthis (L.) Fruit Extract against Genotoxicity Induced by Cyclophosphamide in Mice Bone Marrow Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chabra, Aroona; Naghshvar, Farshad; Ahmadi, Amirhossein

    2013-01-01

    Possible genoprotective effect of Citrullus colocynthis (L.) (CCT) fruits extract against cyclophosphamide- (CP-)induced DNA damage in mice bone marrow cells was evaluated using micronucleus assay, as an index of induced chromosomal damage. Mice were preadministered with different doses of CCT via intraperitoneal injection for 7 consecutive days followed by injection with CP (70 mg/kg b.w.) 1 hr after the last injection of CCT. After 24 hr, mice were scarified to evaluate the frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MnPCEs). In addition, the number of polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs) among 1000 normochromatic erythrocytes (NCEs) per animal was recorded to evaluate bone marrow. Pretreatment with CCT significantly reduced the number of MnPCEs induced by CP in bone marrow cells (P < 0.0001). At 200 mg/kg, CCT had a maximum chemoprotective effect and reduced the number of MnPCEs by 6.37-fold and completely normalized the mitotic activity. CCT also led to marked proliferation and hypercellularity of immature myeloid elements after mice were treated with CP and mitigated the bone marrow suppression. Our study revealed that CCT has an antigenotoxic effect against CP-induced oxidative DNA damage in mice. Therefore, it could be used concomitantly as a supplement to protect people undergoing chemotherapy. PMID:24324391

  5. The mitigating effect of Citrullus colocynthis (L.) fruit extract against genotoxicity induced by cyclophosphamide in mice bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Shokrzadeh, Mohammad; Chabra, Aroona; Naghshvar, Farshad; Ahmadi, Amirhossein

    2013-01-01

    Possible genoprotective effect of Citrullus colocynthis (L.) (CCT) fruits extract against cyclophosphamide- (CP-)induced DNA damage in mice bone marrow cells was evaluated using micronucleus assay, as an index of induced chromosomal damage. Mice were preadministered with different doses of CCT via intraperitoneal injection for 7 consecutive days followed by injection with CP (70 mg/kg b.w.) 1 hr after the last injection of CCT. After 24 hr, mice were scarified to evaluate the frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MnPCEs). In addition, the number of polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs) among 1000 normochromatic erythrocytes (NCEs) per animal was recorded to evaluate bone marrow. Pretreatment with CCT significantly reduced the number of MnPCEs induced by CP in bone marrow cells (P < 0.0001). At 200 mg/kg, CCT had a maximum chemoprotective effect and reduced the number of MnPCEs by 6.37-fold and completely normalized the mitotic activity. CCT also led to marked proliferation and hypercellularity of immature myeloid elements after mice were treated with CP and mitigated the bone marrow suppression. Our study revealed that CCT has an antigenotoxic effect against CP-induced oxidative DNA damage in mice. Therefore, it could be used concomitantly as a supplement to protect people undergoing chemotherapy.

  6. High-throughput genotoxicity assay identifies antioxidants as inducers of DNA damage response and cell death

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Jennifer T.; Sakamuru, Srilatha; Huang, Ruili; Teneva, Nedelina; Simmons, Steven O.; Xia, Menghang; Tice, Raymond R.; Austin, Christopher P.; Myung, Kyungjae

    2012-01-01

    Human ATAD5 is a biomarker for identifying genotoxic compounds because ATAD5 protein levels increase posttranscriptionally in response to DNA damage. We screened over 4,000 compounds with a cell-based quantitative high-throughput ATAD5-luciferase assay detecting genotoxic compounds. We identified 22 antioxidants, including resveratrol, genistein, and baicalein, that are currently used or investigated for the treatment of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, osteopenia, osteoporosis, and chronic hepatitis, as well as for antiaging. Treatment of dividing cells with these compounds induced DNA damage and resulted in cell death. Despite their genotoxic effects, resveratrol, genistein, and baicalein did not cause mutagenesis, which is a major side effect of conventional anticancer drugs. Furthermore, resveratrol and genistein killed multidrug-resistant cancer cells. We therefore propose that resveratrol, genistein, and baicalein are attractive candidates for improved chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:22431602

  7. Utilization of isolated marine mussel cells as an in vitro model to assess xenobiotics induced genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y F; Chen, S Y; Qu, M J; Adeleye, A O; Di, Y N

    2017-10-01

    Freshly isolated cells are used as an ideal experimental model in in vitro toxicology analysis, especially the detection of diverse xenobiotics induced genotoxic effects. In present study, heavy metals (Zn, Cu, Cd, Pb) and PCBs were selected as representative xenobiotics to verify the ability of in vitro model in assessing genotoxic effects in cells of marine mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis). DNA damage and chromosome aberration were assessed in freshly isolated cells from haemolymph, gill and digestive gland by single cell gel electrophoresis and micronucleus assay respectively. Gill cells showed more sensitive to Zn exposure among three types of cells, indicating tissue-specific genotoxicity. Significantly higher DNA aberrations were induced by Cu in haemocytes compared to Cd and Pb, indicating chemical-specific genotoxicity. An additive effect was detected after combined heavy metals and PCBs exposure, suggesting the interaction of selected xenobiotics. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to study the complex effects of organic and/or inorganic contaminants using freshly isolated cells from marine mussels. Genetic responses are proved to occur and maintained in vitro in relation to short-term xenobiotics induced stresses. The utilization of the in vitro model could provide a rapid tool to investigate the comprehensive toxic effects in marine invertebrates and monitor environmental health. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Protective effect of Nigella sativa seeds against spermatocyte chromosomal aberrations and genotoxicity induced by carbon tetrachloride in mice.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Moneim, Ashraf M; Essawy, Amina E; Hamed, Sherifa S; Abou-Gabal, Ashgan A; Alzergy, Aglal A

    2017-04-01

    Nigella sativa is a well-known dietary antioxidant and a valuable inhibitor of clastogenesis and carcinogenesis. The purpose of the present work was to investigate the effects of N. sativa seeds against chromosomal aberrations in primary spermatocytes and early embryonic lethality induced by CCl4 hepatotoxin in Swiss albino mice. One hundred male Swiss albino mice were randomly divided into five groups. Groups I, II, and III received only normal saline, olive oil, and aqueous suspension of N. sativa seeds (50 mg/kg b.w.), while groups IV and V were orally given CCl4 dissolved in olive oil at a dose level of 1.9 (¼ LD50) alone and with aqueous suspension of N. sativa seeds (50 mg/kg b.w.) alternately. Aqueous extract of N. sativa significantly reduced the elevated frequency of chromosomal aberrations induced by CCl4 in mouse primary spermatocytes. For the male-dominant lethal test, four males from each group (control and experimental) were used and each male was mated for 13 days to two untreated virgin females. On days 14-16 after breeding, all the females were evaluated for incidence of pregnancy, live implants, and fetal deaths. Treatment with 1/4 LD50 of CCl4 induced positive dominant lethal mutation, reflecting a high rate of deformations in male germ cells. Interestingly, no dominant lethal mutations were recorded in females mated to male mice treated with CCl4 plus N. sativa. Under the experimental conditions of this study, our results highlight the beneficial role of N. sativa against CCl4-induced mutagenicity.

  9. Relationship between genotoxicity and oxidative stress induced by mercury on common carp (Cyprinus carpio) tissues.

    PubMed

    García-Medina, Sandra; Galar-Martínez, Marcela; Gómez-Oliván, Leobardo Manuel; Ruiz-Lara, Karina; Islas-Flores, Hariz; Gasca-Pérez, Eloy

    2017-09-21

    Mercury is one of the most toxic metals in aquatic systems since it is able to induce neurobehavioral disorders as well as renal and gastrointestinal tract damage. The common carp Cyprinus carpio is an important species from both an ecological and economic viewpoint as it is consumed in many countries, the top producers being Mexico, China, India and Japan. The present study aimed to evaluate the relation between Hg-induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity in diverse tissues of C. carpio. Specimens were exposed to 0.01mgHg/L (the maximum permissible limit for aquatic life protection), and lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyl content and the activity of antioxidant enzymes were evaluated at 96h. Micronuclei frequency and DNA damage by comet assay were determined at 12, 24, 48, 72 and 96h. Hg induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity on exposed fish, since inhibition of antioxidant enzymes activity and increases in lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and micronuclei frequency occurred. Blood, gill and liver were more susceptible to oxidative stress, while blood were more sensitive to genotoxicity. In conclusion, Hg at concentrations equal to the maximum permissible limit for aquatic life protection induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity on C. carpio, and these two effects prove to be correlated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Mercury-induced genotoxicity in marine diatom (Chaetoceros tenuissimus).

    PubMed

    Sarker, Subhodeep; Desai, Somashekhar R; Verlecar, Xivanand N; Sarker, Munmun Saha; Sarkar, A

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we present an evaluation of genotoxic responses in marine diatom, Chaetoceros tenuissimus, isolated from Kandla Creek (lat 23.03° N, long 70.22° E), Gujarat, India, in terms of impairment of DNA integrity as a function of their exposure to elevated levels of mercury (Hg) under laboratory conditions. DNA integrity in C. tenuissimus was determined by partial alkaline unwinding assay. To our knowledge, this is the first such genotoxicity study to be conducted on marine diatom cultures towards understanding the relationship between Hg toxicity and DNA damage. Furthermore, we studied the impact of Hg on the growth of C. tenuissimus as a function of their exposure to enhanced levels of Hg in terms of decreasing chlorophyll a (chl a) concentrations. The data show the genotoxic effect of Hg on the growth of C. tenuissimus as well as DNA integrity to a great extent. Based on the results of our investigations, it is suggested that C. tenuissimus can be used as sentinel species for bio-monitoring of pollution due to genotoxic contaminants.

  11. Protective Effects of the Flavonoid Chrysin against Methylmercury-Induced Genotoxicity and Alterations of Antioxidant Status, In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Manzolli, Eduardo Scandinari; Serpeloni, Juliana Mara; Bastos, Jairo Kennup; Antunes, Lusânia Maria Greggi; Barbosa, Fernando; Barcelos, Gustavo Rafael Mazzaron

    2015-01-01

    The use of phytochemicals has been widely used as inexpensive approach for prevention of diseases related to oxidative damage due to its antioxidant properties. One of dietary flavonoids is chrysin (CR), found mainly in passion fruit, honey, and propolis. Methylmercury (MeHg) is a toxic metal whose main toxic mechanism is oxidative damage. Thus, the study aimed to evaluate the antioxidant effects of CR against oxidative damage induced by MeHg in Wistar rats. Animals were treated with MeHg (30 µg/kg/bw) in presence and absence of CR (0.10, 1.0, and 10 mg/kg/bw) by gavage for 45 days. Glutathione (GSH) in blood was quantified spectrophotometrically and for monitoring of DNA damage, comet assay was used in leukocytes and hepatocytes. MeHg led to a significant increase in the formation of comets; when the animals were exposed to the metal in the presence of CR, higher concentrations of CR showed protective effects. Moreover, exposure to MeHg decreased the levels of GSH and GSH levels were restored in the animals that received CR plus MeHg. Taken together the findings of the present work indicate that consumption of flavonoids such as CR may protect humans against the adverse health effects caused by MeHg. PMID:25810809

  12. Protective effects of the flavonoid chrysin against methylmercury-induced genotoxicity and alterations of antioxidant status, in vivo.

    PubMed

    Manzolli, Eduardo Scandinari; Serpeloni, Juliana Mara; Grotto, Denise; Bastos, Jairo Kennup; Antunes, Lusânia Maria Greggi; Barbosa Junior, Fernando; Barcelos, Gustavo Rafael Mazzaron

    2015-01-01

    The use of phytochemicals has been widely used as inexpensive approach for prevention of diseases related to oxidative damage due to its antioxidant properties. One of dietary flavonoids is chrysin (CR), found mainly in passion fruit, honey, and propolis. Methylmercury (MeHg) is a toxic metal whose main toxic mechanism is oxidative damage. Thus, the study aimed to evaluate the antioxidant effects of CR against oxidative damage induced by MeHg in Wistar rats. Animals were treated with MeHg (30 µg/kg/bw) in presence and absence of CR (0.10, 1.0, and 10 mg/kg/bw) by gavage for 45 days. Glutathione (GSH) in blood was quantified spectrophotometrically and for monitoring of DNA damage, comet assay was used in leukocytes and hepatocytes. MeHg led to a significant increase in the formation of comets; when the animals were exposed to the metal in the presence of CR, higher concentrations of CR showed protective effects. Moreover, exposure to MeHg decreased the levels of GSH and GSH levels were restored in the animals that received CR plus MeHg. Taken together the findings of the present work indicate that consumption of flavonoids such as CR may protect humans against the adverse health effects caused by MeHg.

  13. Protective effects of vanadium against DMH-induced genotoxicity and carcinogenesis in rat colon: removal of O(6)-methylguanine DNA adducts, p53 expression, inducible nitric oxide synthase downregulation and apoptotic induction.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Shaonly; Swamy, Viswanath; Suresh, D; Rajkumar, M; Rana, Basabi; Rana, Ajay; Chatterjee, Malay

    2008-02-29

    Previous studies have shown that dietary micronutrient vanadium can protect neoplastic development induced by chemical carcinogens. Current investigation is an attempt to evaluate the role of vanadium (4.27 micro mol/l) in inhibiting 1,2 dimethyhydrazine (DMH) (20 mg/kg body weight) induced rat colon carcinogenesis. We investigated the effect of vanadium against the formation of DMH-induced O(6)-methylguanine (O(6)-Meg) DNA adduct, a potent cytotoxic and mutagenic agent for colon cancer. Supplementation of vanadium significantly reduced the hepatic (P<0.05), and colonic (at three sequential time points; ANOVA, F=4.96, P<0.05) O(6)-Meg DNA adduct levels in rats, indicating vanadium's potency in limiting the initiation event of colon carcinogenesis. Removal of initiated and damaged precancerous cells by apoptosis can prevent tumorigenesis and further malignancy. DNA fragmentation study revealed the vanadium-mediated apoptotic induction in colon tumors. The increased value of apoptotic index (AI) (62.27%; P<0.01) in subsequent TUNEL assay further confirmed the apoptosis induction by vanadium. This paralleled the nuclear immunoexpression of p53. A significant positive correlation between p53 immunoexpression and AI (P=0.0026, r=0.83, r(2)=0.69) links its association with vanadium-mediated apoptotic induction. Vanadium treatment also abated the mRNA expression of iNOS (54.03%), reflecting its protective effect against nitric oxide-mediated genotoxicity and colon tumorigenesis. These studies cumulatively provide strong evidence for the inhibitory actions of vanadium against DMH-induced genotoxicity and carcinogenesis in rat colon.

  14. Cell cycle perturbations and genotoxic effects in human primary fibroblasts induced by low-energy protons and X/gamma-rays.

    PubMed

    Antoccia, Antonio; Sgura, Antonella; Berardinelli, Francesco; Cavinato, Maria; Cherubini, Roberto; Gerardi, Silvia; Tanzarella, Caterina

    2009-09-01

    The effect of graded doses of high-linear energy transfer (LET) low-energy protons to induce cycle perturbations and genotoxic damage was investigated in normal human fibroblasts. Furthermore, such effects were compared with those produced by low-LET radiations. HFFF2, human primary fibroblasts were exposed to either protons (LET = 28.5 keV/microm) or X/gamma-rays, and endpoints related to cell cycle kinetics and DNA damage analysed. Following both type of irradiations, unsynchronized cells suffered an inhibition to entry into S-phase for doses of 1-4 Gy and remained arrested in the G(1)-phase for several days. The levels of induction of regulator proteins, such as TP53 and CDKN1A showed a clear LET-dependence. DSB induction and repair as measured by scoring for gamma-H2AX foci indicated that protons, with respect to X-rays, yielded a lower number of DSBs per Gy, which showed a slower kinetics of disappearance. Such result was in agreement with the extent of MN induction in binucleated cells after X-irradiation. No significant differences between the two types of radiations were observed with the clonogenic assay, resulting anyway the slope of gamma-ray curve higher than that the proton one. In conclusion, in normal human primary fibroblasts cell cycle arrest at the G(1)/S transition can be triggered shortly after irradiation and maintained for several hours post-irradiation of both protons and X-rays. DNA damage produced by protons appears less amenable to be repaired and could be transformed in cytogenetic damage in the form of MN.

  15. Inhibitory effects of Baccharis dracunculifolia on 1,2-dimethylhidrazine-induced genotoxicity and preneoplastic lesions in rat colon.

    PubMed

    Munari, Carla C; Furtado, Ricardo A; Santiago, Mirian L; Manhas, Simony S; Bastos, Jairo K; Tavares, Denise C

    2014-07-01

    Baccharis dracunculifolia (Asteraceae), the main botanical source of green propolis, also known as 'alecrim-do-campo' and 'vassourinha', is a shrub of the Brazilian 'cerrado' and is native to the South and Southeast of Brazil. The effects of B. dracunculifolia ethyl acetate extract (Bd-EAE) were evaluated on the 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced DNA damage and aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in the colon of male Wistar rats by the comet and ACF assays, respectively. The animals were treated by gavage with doses of 6, 12, and 24 mg/kg body weight/day. Animals were also administered a single subcutaneous injection of 40 mg/kg DMH and were killed after 4 h for evaluation of DNA damage. Also, two doses of 40 mg/kg of DMH were administered weekly for 2 weeks, and animals were killed 2 weeks after the last injection for evaluation of ACF development in the colon. The results showed a significant reduction in the frequency of DNA damage and ACF in the group treated with the Bd-EAE plus DMH in comparison with those treated with DMH alone, suggesting that Bd-EAE reduced DNA damage and suppressed the formation of ACF and also exerted a protective affect against colon carcinogenesis.

  16. Quercetin protects human peripheral blood mononuclear cells from OTA-induced oxidative stress, genotoxicity, and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Periasamy, Ramyaa; Kalal, Iravathy Goud; Krishnaswamy, Rajashree; Viswanadha, VijayaPadma

    2016-07-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is one of the most abundant food-contaminating mycotoxins world wide, and is detrimental to human and animal health. This study evaluated the protective effect of quercetin against OTA-induced cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and inflammatory response in lymphocytes. Cytotoxicity determined by MTT assay revealed IC20 value of OTA to be 20 µM, which was restored to near control values by pretreatment with quercetin. Oxidative stress parameters such as antioxidant enzymes, LPO and PCC levels indicated that quercetin exerted a protective effect on OTA-induced oxidative stress. Quercetin exerted an antigenotoxic effect on OTA-induced genotoxicity, by significantly reducing the number of structural aberrations in chromosomes and comet parameters like, % olive tail moment from 2.76 ± 0.02 to 0.56 ± 0.02 and % tail DNA from 56.23 ± 2.56 to 12.36 ± 0.56 as determined by comet assay. OTA-induced NO, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-8 were significantly reduced in the quercetin pretreated samples indicating its anti-inflammatory role. Our results demonstrate for the first time that quercetin exerts a cytoprotective effect against OTA-induced oxidative stress, genotoxicity, and inflammation in lymphocytes. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 855-865, 2016.

  17. Genotoxic effect of ozone in human peripheral blood leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Llera, Silvia; González-Hernández, Yanela; Prieto-González, E A; Azoy, Angel

    2002-05-27

    The genotoxic effect of ozone was studied in human leukocytes in vitro, using the single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assay. Cell treatment for 1 h at 37 degrees C with 0.9-5.3 mM O(3) resulted in a dose-dependent increase of DNA damage, comparable to that induced by 4-40 mM of H(2)O(2), used as a positive control. This effect of ozone was reversed by post-treatment incubation of the cells for 45-90 min at 37 degrees C, and prevented by pre-incubation of the cells with catalase (20 microg/ml). These results demonstrate that O(3) induces DNA-damage in primary human leukocytes. The damage is rapidly repaired, and probably mediated by the formation of H(2)O(2).

  18. Histopathological and genotoxic effects of chlorpyrifos in rats.

    PubMed

    Ezzi, Lobna; Belhadj Salah, Imen; Haouas, Zohra; Sakly, Amina; Grissa, Intissar; Chakroun, Sana; Kerkeni, Emna; Hassine, Mohsen; Mehdi, Meriem; Ben Cheikh, Hassen

    2016-03-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of chlorpyrifos's sub-acute exposure on male rats. Two groups with six animals each were orally treated, respectively, with 3.1 mg/kg b w and 6.2 mg/kg b w of chlorpyrifos during 4 weeks. The genotoxic effect of chlopyrifos was investigated using the comet assay and the micronucleus test. Some hematological and liver's histopathological changes were also evaluated. Results revealed that chlorpyrifos induced histopathological alterations in liver parenchyma. The lymphoid infiltration observed in liver sections and the increase in white blood cells parameter are signs of inflammation. A significant increase in the platelet' count and in polychromatic erythrocytes/normochromatic erythrocytes (PCE/NCE) ratio was observed in chlorpyrifos-treated groups which could be due to the stimulatory effect of chlorpyrifos on cell formation in the bone marrow at lower doses. In addition, the increase of bone marrow micronucleus percentage and the comet tail length revealed a genotoxic potential of chlorpyrifos in vivo.

  19. Argentine folk medicine: genotoxic effects of Chenopodiaceae family.

    PubMed

    Gadano, A B; Gurni, A A; Carballo, M A

    2006-01-16

    Chenopodium ambrosioides L. and Chenopodium multifidum L. (Chenopodiaceae), common name: Paico, are medicinal plants. They are aromatic shrubs growing in South America. For centuries, they have been used due to its medicinal properties. However, there are few reports in literature about the genotoxic effects of these plants. There for, the aim of these work is the evaluation of genetic damage induced by decoction and infusion of this plants which were assayed in different concentrations (1, 10, 100, 1,000 microL extract/mL culture), by addition of the extract to human lymphocyte cell cultures, negative controls were included. The endpoints evaluated were chromosomal aberrations (CA), sister chromatid exchanges (SCE), cell proliferation kinetics (CPK) and mitotic index (MI). The repeated measure analysis of variance was used for statistic evaluation of the results. The results showed: (a) statistical increase in the percentage of cells with CA and in the frequency of SCE when cultures were exposed to both aromatic plants, (b) a decrease in MI of both Paicos assayed, although no modification in the CPK values was observed, (c) no effect was noticed in the analysis of Chenopodium album L., which was used as negative control of the essential oil. These results suggest a cyto and genotoxic effect of Chenopodium ambrosioides and Chenopodium multifidum aqueous extracts related to the essential oil of the plant (as Chenopodium album did not perform).

  20. Evaluation of the protective effect of ascorbic acid on nitrite- and nitrosamine-induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in human hepatoma line.

    PubMed

    Erkekoglu, Pinar; Baydar, Terken

    2010-02-01

    Nitrites are ubiquitous environmental contaminants present in drinking water and foods. Nitrosamines can be formed endogenously from nitrate and nitrite and secondary amines or may be present in food, tobacco smoke, and drinking water. The major goal of this work was to evaluate the cytotoxic, reactive oxygen species (ROS)-producing and genotoxic effects of nitrite and nitrosamines and the possible protection by ascorbic acid in HepG2 cells. It was found that nitrite, N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA), and N-nitrosomorpholine (NMOR) decreased cell viability, increased intracellular ROS production, and caused genotoxicity. Compared to untreated cells as determined by alkaline Comet assay, nitrite, NDMA, NDEA, and NMOR raised the tail intensity up to 1.18-, 3.79-, 4.24-, and 4.16-fold, respectively. Ascorbic acid (AA, 10 microM) increased cell viability and reduced ROS production significantly (p < 0.05). Additionally, AA treatment decreased the tail intensity caused by nitrite, NDMA, NDEA, and NMOR to 33.74%, 58.6%, 44.32%, and 43.97%, respectively. It can be concluded that ascorbic acid was able to reduce both tail intensity and tail moment in all of the nitrosamine treatments, particularly in NDMA. AA protected HepG2 cells against genotoxic effects caused by nitrosamines. This protection might be through different mechanisms, some of which are not still understood in depth. The future interest will be to understand which pathways are influenced by antioxidants, particularly by AA, and the outcomes of this prevention in other cell line types.

  1. Genotoxicity of antiobesity drug orlistat and effect of caffeine intervention: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Manoswini; Ghosh, Ilika; Jana, Aditi; Ghosh, Manosij; Mukherjee, Anita

    2017-07-01

    Obesity is a major global health problem associated with various adverse effects. Pharmacological interventions are often necessary for the management of obesity. Orlistat is an FDA-approved antiobesity drug which is a potent inhibitor of intestinal lipases. In the current study, orlistat was evaluated for its genotoxic potential in human lymphocyte cells in vitro and was compared with that of another antiobesity drug sibutramine, presently withdrawn from market due its undesirable health effects. Caffeine intake may be an additional burden in people using anorectic drugs, therefore, further work is needed to be carried out to evaluate the possible effects of caffeine on orlistat-induced DNA damage. Human lymphocytes were exposed to orlistat (250, 500 and 1000 μg/ml), sibutramine (250, 500 and 1000 μg/ml) and caffeine (25, 50, 75, 100, 125 and 150 μg/ml) to assess their genotoxicity by comet assay in vitro. In addition, lymphocytes were co-incubated with caffeine (50, 75 and 100 μg/ml) and a single concentration of orlistat (250 μg/ml). Orlistat and sibutramine were genotoxic at all concentrations tested, sibutramine being more genotoxic. Caffeine was found to be genotoxic at concentrations 125 μg/ml and above. Co-treatment of orlistat with non-genotoxic concentrations (50, 75 and 100 μg/ml) of caffeine lead to a decrease in DNA damage. Orlistat can induce DNA damage in human lymphocytes in vitro and caffeine was found to reduce orlistat-induced genotoxicity.

  2. Oxidative stress and genotoxicity induced by ketorolac on the common carp Cyprinus carpio.

    PubMed

    Galar-Martínez, M; García-Medina, S; Gómez-Olivan, L M; Pérez-Coyotl, I; Mendoza-Monroy, D J; Arrazola-Morgain, R E

    2016-09-01

    The nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug ketorolac is extensively used in the treatment of acute postoperative pain. This pharmaceutical has been found at concentrations of 0.2-60 µg/L in diverse water bodies around the world; however, its effects on aquatic organisms remain unknown. The present study, evaluated the oxidative stress and genotoxicity induced by sublethal concentrations of ketorolac (1 and 60 µg/L) on liver, brain, and blood of the common carp Cyprinus carpio. This toxicant induced oxidative damage (increased lipid peroxidation, hydroperoxide content, and protein carbonyl content) as well as changes in antioxidant status (superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase activity) in liver and brain of carp. In blood, ketorolac increased the frequency of micronuclei and is therefore genotoxic for the test species. The effects observed were time and concentration dependent. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 1035-1043, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Glutathione level regulates HNE-induced genotoxicity in human erythroleukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Umesh C.S.; Ramana, Kota V.; Awasthi, Yogesh C.; Srivastava, Satish K.

    2008-03-01

    4-Hydroxy-trans-2-nonenal (HNE) is one of the most abundant and toxic lipid aldehydes formed during lipid peroxidation by reactive oxygen species. We have investigated the genotoxic effects of HNE and its regulation by cellular glutathione (GSH) levels in human erythroleukemia (K562) cells. Incubation of K562 cells with HNE (5-10 {mu}M) significantly elicited a 3- to 5-fold increased DNA damage in a time- and dose-dependent manner as measured by comet assay. Depletion of GSH in cells by L-buthionine-[S,R]-sulfoximine (BSO) significantly increased HNE-induced DNA damage, whereas supplementation of GSH by incubating the cells with GSH-ethyl ester significantly decreased HNE-induced genotoxicity. Further, overexpression of mGSTA4-4, a HNE-detoxifying GST isozyme, significantly prevented HNE-induced DNA damage in cells, and ablation of GSTA4-4 and aldose reductase with respective siRNAs further augmented HNE-induced DNA damage. These results suggest that the genotoxicity of HNE is highly dependent on cellular GSH/GST/AR levels and favorable modulation of the aldehyde detoxification system may help in controlling the oxidative stress-induced complications.

  4. Fruit extract of the medicinal plant Crataegus oxyacantha exerts genotoxic and mutagenic effects in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    de Quadros, Ana Paula Oliveira; Mazzeo, Dania Elisa Christofoletti; Marin-Morales, Maria Aparecida; Perazzo, Fábio Ferreira; Rosa, Paulo Cesar Pires; Maistro, Edson Luis

    2017-01-01

    Crataegus oxyacantha, a plant of the Rosaceae family also known "English hawthorn, haw, maybush, or whitethorn," has long been used for medicinal purposes such as digestive disorders, hyperlipidemia, dyspnea, inducing diuresis, and preventing kidney stones. However, the predominant use of this plant has been to treat cardiovascular disorders. Due to a lack of studies on the genotoxicity of C. oxyacantha, this investigation was undertaken to determine whether its fruit extract exerts cytotoxic, genotoxic, or clastogenic/aneugenic effects in leukocytes and HepG2 (liver hepatocellular carcinoma) cultured human cells, or mutagenic effects in TA100 and TA98 strains of Salmonella typhimurium bacterium. Genotoxicity analysis showed that the extract produced no marked genotoxic effects at concentrations of 2.5 or 5 µg/ml in either cell type; however, at concentrations of 10 µg/ml or higher significant DNA damage was detected. The micronucleus test also demonstrated that concentrations of 10 µg/ml or higher produced clastogenic/aneugenic responses. In the Ames test, the extract induced mutagenic effects in TA98 strain of S. typhimurium with metabolic activation at all tested concentrations (2.5 to 500 µg/ml). Data indicate that, under certain experimental conditions, the fruit extract of C. oxyacantha exerts genotoxic and clastogenic/aneugenic effects in cultured human cells, and with metabolism mutagenicity occurs in bacteria cells.

  5. Circadian variation of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity induced by an immunosuppressive agent "Mycophenolate Mofetil" in rats.

    PubMed

    Dridi, Ichrak; Grissa, Intissar; Ezzi, Lobna; Chakroun, Sana; Ben-Cherif, Wafa; Haouas, Zohra; Aouam, Karim; Ben-Attia, Mossadok; Reinberg, Alain; Boughattas, Naceur A

    2016-01-01

    Immunosuppressive drugs such as Mycophenolate Mofetil (MMF) are used to suppress the immune system activity in transplant patients and reduce the risk of organ rejection. The present study investigates whether the potential cytotoxicity and genotoxicity varied according to MMF dosing-time in Wistar Rat. A potentially toxic MMF dose (300 mg/kg) was acutely administered by the i.p. route in rats at four different circadian stages (1, 7, 13 and 19 hours after light onset, HALO). Rats were sacrificed 3 days following injection, blood and bone marrow were removed for determination of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity analysis. The genotoxic effect of this pro-drug was investigated using the comet assay and the micronucleus test. Hematological changes were also evaluated according to circadian dosing time. MMF treatment induced a significant decrease at 7 HALO in red blood cells, in the hemoglobin rate and in white blood cells. These parameters followed a circadian rhythm in controls or in treated rats with an acrophase located at the end of the light-rest phase. A significant, thrombocytopenia was observed according to MMF circadian dosing time. Furthermore, abnormally shaped red cells, sometimes containing micronuclei, poikilocytotic in red cells and hypersegmented neutrophil nuclei were observed with MMF treatment. The micronucleus test revealed damage to chromosomes in rat bone marrow; the comet assay showed significant DNA damage. This damage varied according to circadian MMF dosing time. The injection of MMF in the middle of the dark-activity phase produced a very mild hematological toxicity and low genotoxicity. Conversely, it induced maximum hematological toxicity and genotoxicity when the administration occurred in the middle of the light-rest phase, which is physiologically analogous to the end of the activity of the diurnal phase in human patients.

  6. Evaluation of the Bronchorelaxant, Genotoxic, and Antigenotoxic Effects of Cassia alata L.

    PubMed

    Ouédraogo, M; Da, F L; Fabré, A; Konaté, K; Dibala, C I; Carreyre, H; Thibaudeau, S; Coustard, J-M; Vandebrouck, C; Bescond, J; Belemtougri, R G

    2013-01-01

    Aqueous-ethanolic extract of Cassia alata (AECal) and its derived fractions obtained through liquid-liquid fractionation were evaluated for their bronchorelaxant, genotoxic, and antigenotoxic effects. Contractile activity of rats' tracheas in the presence of tested materials, as well as its modifications with different inhibitors and blockers, was isometrically recorded. The antigenotoxic potential of AECal was evaluated on cyclophosphamide- (CP-) induced genotoxicity in the rat. Animals were pretreated with the extract, then liver comet assay was performed. AECal and its chloroformic fractions (CF-AECal) relaxed the contraction induced by Ach, but both were significantly less potent in inhibiting contraction induced by KCl (30 mM; 80 mM). Propranolol, indomethacin, L-NAME, methylene blue, and glibenclamide did not modify the relaxant effect of CF-AECal. TEA altered the response of trachea to CF-AECal. CF-AECal caused a rightward shift without affecting the E max in cumulative concentration-response curves of Ach only at low concentrations. In animals pretreated with the extract, the percentage of CP-induced DNA damage decreased. Our results suggest that (1) muscarinic receptors contribute at least in part to the relaxant effects of CF-AECal; (2) CF-AECal interferes with membrane polarization; and (3) AECal is not genotoxic in vivo and contains chemopreventive phytoconstituents offering protection against CP-induced genotoxicity.

  7. Evaluation of the Bronchorelaxant, Genotoxic, and Antigenotoxic Effects of Cassia alata L.

    PubMed Central

    Ouédraogo, M.; Da, F. L.; Fabré, A.; Konaté, K.; Dibala, C. I.; Carreyre, H.; Thibaudeau, S.; Coustard, J.-M.; Vandebrouck, C.; Bescond, J.; Belemtougri, R. G.

    2013-01-01

    Aqueous-ethanolic extract of Cassia alata (AECal) and its derived fractions obtained through liquid-liquid fractionation were evaluated for their bronchorelaxant, genotoxic, and antigenotoxic effects. Contractile activity of rats' tracheas in the presence of tested materials, as well as its modifications with different inhibitors and blockers, was isometrically recorded. The antigenotoxic potential of AECal was evaluated on cyclophosphamide- (CP-) induced genotoxicity in the rat. Animals were pretreated with the extract, then liver comet assay was performed. AECal and its chloroformic fractions (CF-AECal) relaxed the contraction induced by Ach, but both were significantly less potent in inhibiting contraction induced by KCl (30 mM; 80 mM). Propranolol, indomethacin, L-NAME, methylene blue, and glibenclamide did not modify the relaxant effect of CF-AECal. TEA altered the response of trachea to CF-AECal. CF-AECal caused a rightward shift without affecting the E max in cumulative concentration-response curves of Ach only at low concentrations. In animals pretreated with the extract, the percentage of CP-induced DNA damage decreased. Our results suggest that (1) muscarinic receptors contribute at least in part to the relaxant effects of CF-AECal; (2) CF-AECal interferes with membrane polarization; and (3) AECal is not genotoxic in vivo and contains chemopreventive phytoconstituents offering protection against CP-induced genotoxicity. PMID:23710211

  8. V79-hCYP2E1-hSULT1A1, a cell line for the sensitive detection of genotoxic effects induced by carbohydrate pyrolysis products and other food-borne chemicals.

    PubMed

    Glatt, Hansruedi; Schneider, Heiko; Liu, Yungang

    2005-02-07

    We recently constructed a Chinese hamster V79-derived cell line that stably expresses human cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2E1 and human sulphotransferase (SULT) 1A1. These enzymes are involved in the bioactivation of numerous promutagens/procarcinogens, but are not taken into account in standard in vitro mutagenicity assays. Various carbohydrate pyrolysis products and other food contaminants that induce tumours or preneoplastic lesions in laboratory animals are inactive or only weakly active in standard in vitro genotoxicity assays. This is the case for acrylamide, furan, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, nitrofen and N-nitrosodimethylamine. These compounds were investigated for induction of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) in V79-hCYP2E1-hSULT1A1 cells. All test compounds showed positive results over a wide concentration range, starting at 0.01 microM for N-nitrosodimethylamine, 3 microM for furan, 12.5 microM for nitrofen, 20 microM for 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, and 200 microM for acrylamide. The concentration-response curve of furan was unusual, as this compound induced a statistically significant, but rather constant and weak increase in SCE over an extremely wide concentration range (3-16,000 microM). Furan was slightly less active, whereas the remaining compounds were much less active in the parental V79 cell line than in V79-hCYP2E1-hSULT1A1 cells. Compared to many other genotoxic effects, the study of SCE only requires small numbers of cells (and incubation volumes) and usually is detected even at low concentrations of the genotoxicant. Therefore, induction of SCE in V79-hCYP2E1-hSULT1A1 cells may be useful in the genotoxicity testing of preparations of heated food and in their bioassay-directed fractionation.

  9. Pb low doses induced genotoxicity in Lactuca sativa plants.

    PubMed

    Silva, S; Silva, P; Oliveira, H; Gaivão, I; Matos, M; Pinto-Carnide, O; Santos, C

    2017-03-01

    Soil and water contamination by lead (Pb) remains a topic of great concern, particularly regarding crop production. The admissible Pb values in irrigation water in several countries range from ≈0.1 to ≈5 mg L(-1). In order to evaluate putative effects of Pb within legal doses on crops growth, we exposed Lactuca sativa seeds and seedlings to increasing doses of Pb(NO3)2 up to 20 mg L(-1). The OECD parameter seed germination and seedling/plant growth were not affected by any of the Pb-concentrations used. However, for doses higher than 5 mg L(-1) significant DNA damage was detected: Comet assay detected DNA fragmentation at ≥ 5 mg L(-1) and presence of micronuclei (MN) were detected for 20 mg L(-1). Also, cell cycle impairment was observed for doses as low as 0.05 mg L(-1) and 0.5 mg L(-1) (mostly G2 arrest). Our data show that for the low doses of Pb used, the OECD endpoints were not able to detect toxicity, while more sensitive endpoints (related with DNA damage and mitotic/interphase disorders) identified genotoxic and cytostatic effects. Furthermore, the nature of the genotoxic effect was dependent on the concentration. Finally, we recommend that MN test and the comet assay should be included as sensitive endpoints in (eco)toxicological assays.

  10. An antidote for imazalil-induced genotoxicity in vitro: the lichen, Dermatocarpon intestiniforme (Körber) Hasse.

    PubMed

    Türkez, H; Aydin, Elanur; Aslan, A

    2012-09-01

    Imazalil (IMA), a commonly used fungicide in both agricultural and clinical domains, is suspected to produce serious toxic effects in vertebrates. In recent years, a number of studies have suggested that lichens might be easily accessible sources of natural drugs that could be used as a possible food supplement. Extensive research is being performed to explore the importance of lichen species, which are known to contain a variety of pharmacological active compounds. In this context, the antigenotoxic effect of aqueous Dermatocarpon intestiniforme (Körber) Hasse. extract (DIE) was studied against the genotoxic damage induced by IMA on cultured human lymphocytes (n = 6) using chromosomal aberration (CA) and micronucleus (MN) as cytogenetic endpoints. Human peripheral lymphocytes were treated in vitro with varying concentrations of DIE (0, 25, 50 and 100 μg/ml), tested in combination with IMA (336 μg/ml). DIE alone were not genotoxic and when combined with IMA treatment, it reduced the frequency of CAs and the rate of MNs. A clear dose-dependent decrease in the genotoxic damage of IMA was observed, suggesting a genoprotective role of DIE. The results of the present study suggest that this plant extract per se does not have a genotoxic potential, but can alleviate the genotoxicity of IMA on cultured human lymphocytes. In conclusion our findings may have an important application for the protection of cultured human lymphocyte from the genetic damage and side effects induced by medical and agricultural chemicals hazardous for people.

  11. Genotoxic effects of boric acid and borax in zebrafish, Danio rerio using alkaline comet assay.

    PubMed

    Gülsoy, Nagihan; Yavas, Cüneyd; Mutlu, Özal

    2015-01-01

    The present study is conducted to determine the potential mechanisms of Boron compounds, boric acid (BA) and borax (BX), on genotoxicity of zebrafish Danio rerio for 24, 48, 72 and 96-hours acute exposure (level:1, 4, 16, 64 mg/l BA and BX) in semi-static bioassay experiment. For that purpose, peripheral erythrocytes were drawn from caudal vein and Comet assay was applied to assess genotoxicity. Acute (96 hours) exposure and high concentrations of boric acid and borax increases % tail DNA and Olive tail moment. Genotoxicity was found for BA as concentration-dependent and BX as concentration and time dependent manner. In general, significant effects (P < 0,05) on both concentrations and exposure times were observed in experimental groups. DNA damage was highest at 96 h and 24 h for all BX and BA concentrations, respectively in peripheral blood of D. rerio. For the first time, our study demonstrates the effect of waterborne BA and BX exposure on genotoxicity at the molecular level, which may contribute to understanding the mechanism of boric acid and borax-induced genotoxicity in fish.

  12. Genotoxic effects of boric acid and borax in zebrafish, Danio rerio using alkaline comet assay

    PubMed Central

    Gülsoy, Nagihan; Yavas, Cüneyd; Mutlu, Özal

    2015-01-01

    The present study is conducted to determine the potential mechanisms of Boron compounds, boric acid (BA) and borax (BX), on genotoxicity of zebrafish Danio rerio for 24, 48, 72 and 96-hours acute exposure (level:1, 4, 16, 64 mg/l BA and BX) in semi-static bioassay experiment. For that purpose, peripheral erythrocytes were drawn from caudal vein and Comet assay was applied to assess genotoxicity. Acute (96 hours) exposure and high concentrations of boric acid and borax increases % tail DNA and Olive tail moment. Genotoxicity was found for BA as concentration-dependent and BX as concentration and time dependent manner. In general, significant effects (P < 0,05) on both concentrations and exposure times were observed in experimental groups. DNA damage was highest at 96 h and 24 h for all BX and BA concentrations, respectively in peripheral blood of D. rerio. For the first time, our study demonstrates the effect of waterborne BA and BX exposure on genotoxicity at the molecular level, which may contribute to understanding the mechanism of boric acid and borax-induced genotoxicity in fish. PMID:26862320

  13. Assessment of genotoxic effects of flumorph by the comet assay in mice organs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, T; Zhao, Q; Zhang, Y; Ning, J

    2014-03-01

    The present study investigated the genotoxic effects of flumorph in various organs (brain, liver, spleen, kidney and sperm) of mice. The DNA damage, measured as comet tail length (µm), was determined using the alkaline comet assay. The comet assay is a sensitive assay for the detection of genotoxicity caused by flumorph using mice as a model. Statistically significant increases in comet assay for both dose-dependent and duration-dependent DNA damage were observed in all the organs assessed. The organs exhibited the maximum DNA damage in 96 h at 54 mg/kg body weight. Brain showed maximum DNA damage followed by spleen > kidney > liver > sperm. Our data demonstrated that flumorph had induced systemic genotoxicity in mammals as it caused DNA damage in all tested vital organs, especially in brain and spleen.

  14. Genotoxic effects of cadmium chloride and azadirachtin treated singly and in combination in fish.

    PubMed

    Chandra, P; Khuda-Bukhsh, A R

    2004-06-01

    The genotoxic effects of cadmium chloride (CdCl(2)) and azadirachtin (Aza) were assessed singly and conjointly in a fish, Oreochromis mossambicus, with endpoints such as chromosome aberrations, abnormal red cell nuclei, abnormal sperm morphology, and protein content (both qualitative and quantitative) of selected tissues, namely, muscle, heart, eye, brain, gill, liver, spleen, and kidney. The primary objectives were, first, to examine if CdCl(2), a common pollutant, and Aza, a natural product of the neem plant used extensively as an 'ecofriendly' agent for many purposes, had any genotoxic effect of their own on nontarget aquatic organisms of economic importance; and second, if Aza could have any ameliorating effect on CdCl(2)-induced genotoxicity in O. mossambicus tissues. As compared with distilled water-treated controls, both CdCl(2) and Aza induced genotoxicity in O. mossambicus, the former in greater quantity than that produced by Aza. However, Cd-induced toxicity in O. mossambicus appeared to be ameliorated to some extent by Aza.

  15. Dissociation of the genotoxic and growth inhibitory effects of selenium.

    PubMed

    Lu, J; Jiang, C; Kaeck, M; Ganther, H; Vadhanavikit, S; Ip, C; Thompson, H

    1995-07-17

    The effects of forms of selenium compounds that enter the cellular selenium metabolic pathway at different points were investigated in a mouse mammary carcinoma cell line. The goal of these experiments was to determine if the genotoxicity of selenium, defined as its ability to induce DNA single-strand breaks, could be dissociated from activities proposed to account for its cancer inhibitory activity. The results demonstrated that growth inhibition, measured as inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of cell death, was induced by all the forms of selenium evaluated. However, sodium selenite and sodium selenide, which are metabolized predominantly to hydrogen selenide, caused the rapid induction of DNA single-strand breaks as an early event that preceded growth inhibition. Interestingly methylselenocyanate and Se-methylselenocysteine, which are initially metabolized predominantly to methylselenol, induced growth inhibition in the absence of DNA single-strand breakage. Differences in the time course of selenium retention, in the occurrence of membrane damage, and in the induction of morphological changes by selenite versus methylselenocyanate were noted. Collectively, these data indicate that different pathways affecting cell proliferation and cell death are induced depending on whether selenium undergoes metabolism predominantly to hydrogen selenide or to methylselenol.

  16. Current Studies into the Genotoxic Effects of Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Cheng-Teng; Li, Jasmine J.; Bay, Boon-Huat; Yung, Lin-Yue Lanry

    2010-01-01

    Nanotechnology has created opportunities for engineers to manufacture superior and more efficient devices and products. Nanomaterials (NMs) are now widely used in consumer products as well as for research applications. However, while the lists of known toxic effects of nanomaterials and nanoparticles (NPs) continue to grow, there is still a vast gap in our knowledge about the genotoxicity of NMs. In this paper, we highlight some NMs of interest and discuss the current in vivo and in vitro studies into genotoxic effects of NMs. PMID:20936181

  17. Municipal sludge leachate-induced genotoxicity in mice--a subacute study.

    PubMed

    Tewari, Anamika; Chauhan, L K S; Kumar, Dinesh; Gupta, S K

    2005-11-10

    Inappropriate disposal of municipal sludge (MS) results in the leaching of toxic metals and organic chemicals, which can contaminate the surface and ground water leading to the serious health hazards. In this study, the genotoxic potential of the leachate prepared from MS sample was examined in mouse bone marrow cells through chromosomal aberrations (CA), micronucleus test (MT) and comet assay. Analysis of metals and physicochemical parameters of the leachate was also carried out to correlate the genotoxic results. The dried sludge showed high concentrations of heavy metals, viz. Cr, Cu, Pb and Ni. However, in 10% leachate, concentrations of these metals were manifold lower than that of obtained in dried sludge. Male mice orally gavaged to leachates (0.1-0.4 ml/mouse/day) for 15 days revealed significant (P<0.01, P<0.001) inhibition of mitotic index (MI) and induction of chromatid/chromosome fragments and breaks in all the treatment groups. The effect was observed to be dose-dependent. Treatment of mice with leachates also induced significant (P<0.001) frequencies of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MNPCE). The results of comet assay revealed a statistically significant (P<0.05 and <0.01) DNA damage in bone marrow cells exposed to 0.2-0.4 ml/mouse/day. Findings of the present study indicate that the constant exposure of MS leachate can cause genotoxic effects in mammals and suggest risks in human population.

  18. Genotoxicity induced by monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(+3)) in mouse thymic developing T cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huan; Medina, Sebastian; Lauer, Fredine T; Douillet, Christelle; Liu, Ke Jian; Stýblo, Miroslav; Burchiel, Scott W

    2017-09-05

    Drinking water exposure to arsenic is known to cause immunotoxicity. Our previous studies demonstrated that monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(+3)) was the major arsenical species presented in mouse thymus cells after a 30 d drinking water exposure to arsenite (As(+3)). MMA(+3) was also showed to be ten times more toxic than As(+3) on the suppression of IL-7/STAT5 signaling in the double negative (DN) thymic T cells. In order to examine the genotoxicity induced by low to moderate doses of MMA(+3), isolated mouse thymus cells were treated with 5, 50 and 500nMMMA(+3) for 18h in vitro. MMA(+3) suppressed the proliferation of thymus cells in a dose dependent manner. MMA(+3) at 5nM induced DNA damage in DN not double positive (DP) cells. Differential sensitivity to double strand breaks and reactive oxygen species generation was noticed between DN and DP cells at 50nM, but the effects were not seen at the high dose (500nM). A stronger apoptotic effect induced by MMA(+3) was noticed in DN cells than DP cells at low doses (5 and 50nM), which was negated by the strong apoptosis induction at the high dose (500nM). Analysis of intracellular MMA(+3) concentrations in DN and DP cells, revealed that more MMA(+3) accumulated in the DN cells after the in vitro treatment. Collectively, these results suggested that MMA(+3) could directly induce strong genotoxicity in the early developing T cells in the thymus. The DN cells were much more sensitive to MMA(+3) induced genotoxicity and apoptosis than DP cells, probably due to the higher intracellular levels of MMA(+3). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of doxorubicin and silymarin on human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Yurtcu, E; İşeri, Öd; Sahin, Fi

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of doxorubicin, silymarin, or in combination on HepG2 cells for 24 and 48 h. Both doxorubicin and silymarin caused dose-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation. After 48 h of treatment, doxorubicin application caused dramatically increased ratio of apoptotic cells. Both 24 and 48 h of silymarin and doxorubicin-silymarin combination caused significant increases in the rate of apoptotic cells. Applications of doxorubicin and silymarin separately for 24 h led to deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damages. After 48 h of incubation, doxorubicin-induced genotoxic damage was 2-fold higher than the silymarin-induced damage. After 24 and 48 h, DNA damage in response to combined applications of doxorubicin and silymarin was indifferent from silymarin- and doxorubicin-induced damage respectively. There was not any difference in genotoxicity levels between incubation periods in combined applications of doxorubicin and silymarin. Lipid peroxidation levels increased in all applications. Biopharmacotherapy with chemotherapeutic agents are of interest in the issue of adjuvant therapy. Here, we demonstrate in vitro potential genotoxic and cytotoxic antitumor effect of silymarin on HepG2 cells at achievable plasma level concentrations. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. Epigenetic alterations induced by genotoxic occupational and environmental human chemical carcinogens: A systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    Chappell, Grace; Pogribny, Igor P.; Guyton, Kathryn Z.; Rusyn, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that epigenetic alterations play an important role in chemically-induced carcinogenesis. Although the epigenome and genome may be equally important in carcinogenicity, the genotoxicity of chemical agents and exposure-related transcriptomic responses have been more thoroughly studied and characterized. To better understand the evidence for epigenetic alterations of human carcinogens, and the potential association with genotoxic endpoints, we conducted a systematic review of published studies of genotoxic carcinogens that reported epigenetic endpoints. Specifically, we searched for publications reporting epigenetic effects for the 28 agents and occupations included in Monograph Volume 100F of the International Agency for the Research on Cancer (IARC) that were classified as “carcinogenic to humans” (Group 1) with strong evidence of genotoxic mechanisms of carcinogenesis. We identified a total of 158 studies that evaluated epigenetic alterations for 12 of these 28 carcinogenic agents and occupations (1,3-butadiene, 4-aminobiphenyl, aflatoxins, benzene, benzidine, benzo[a]pyrene, coke production, formaldehyde, occupational exposure as a painter, sulfur mustard, and vinyl chloride). Aberrant DNA methylation was most commonly studied, followed by altered expression of non-coding RNAs and histone changes (totaling 85, 59 and 25 studies, respectively). For 3 carcinogens (aflatoxins, benzene and benzo[a]pyrene), 10 or more studies reported epigenetic effects. However, epigenetic studies were sparse for the remaining 9 carcinogens; for 4 agents, only 1 or 2 published reports were identified. While further research is needed to better identify carcinogenesis-associated epigenetic perturbations for many potential carcinogens, published reports on specific epigenetic endpoints can be systematically identified and increasingly incorporated in cancer hazard assessments. PMID:27234561

  1. Epigenetic alterations induced by genotoxic occupational and environmental human chemical carcinogens: A systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Chappell, Grace; Pogribny, Igor P; Guyton, Kathryn Z; Rusyn, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that epigenetic alterations play an important role in chemically-induced carcinogenesis. Although the epigenome and genome may be equally important in carcinogenicity, the genotoxicity of chemical agents and exposure-related transcriptomic responses have been more thoroughly studied and characterized. To better understand the evidence for epigenetic alterations of human carcinogens, and the potential association with genotoxic endpoints, we conducted a systematic review of published studies of genotoxic carcinogens that reported epigenetic endpoints. Specifically, we searched for publications reporting epigenetic effects for the 28 agents and occupations included in Monograph Volume 100F of the International Agency for the Research on Cancer (IARC) that were classified as "carcinogenic to humans" (Group 1) with strong evidence of genotoxic mechanisms of carcinogenesis. We identified a total of 158 studies that evaluated epigenetic alterations for 12 of these 28 carcinogenic agents and occupations (1,3-butadiene, 4-aminobiphenyl, aflatoxins, benzene, benzidine, benzo[a]pyrene, coke production, formaldehyde, occupational exposure as a painter, sulfur mustard, and vinyl chloride). Aberrant DNA methylation was most commonly studied, followed by altered expression of non-coding RNAs and histone changes (totaling 85, 59 and 25 studies, respectively). For 3 carcinogens (aflatoxins, benzene and benzo[a]pyrene), 10 or more studies reported epigenetic effects. However, epigenetic studies were sparse for the remaining 9 carcinogens; for 4 agents, only 1 or 2 published reports were identified. While further research is needed to better identify carcinogenesis-associated epigenetic perturbations for many potential carcinogens, published reports on specific epigenetic endpoints can be systematically identified and increasingly incorporated in cancer hazard assessments.

  2. Genotoxicity induced by Taenia solium and its reduction by immunization with calreticulin in a hamster model of taeniosis.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Ana María; Mendlovic, Fela; Cruz-Rivera, Mayra; Chávez-Talavera, Oscar; Sordo, Monserrat; Avila, Guillermina; Flisser, Ana; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia

    2013-06-01

    Genotoxicity induced by neurocysticercosis has been demonstrated in vitro and in vivo in humans. The adult stage of Taenia solium lodges in the small intestine and is the main risk factor to acquire neurocysticercosis, nevertheless its carcinogenic potential has not been evaluated. In this study, we determined the genotoxic effect of T. solium infection in the hamster model of taeniosis. In addition, we assessed the effect of oral immunization with recombinant T. solium calreticulin (rTsCRT) plus cholera toxin as adjuvant on micronuclei induction, as this protein has been shown to induce 33-44% protection in the hamster model of taeniosis. Blood samples were collected from the orbital venous plexus of noninfected and infected hamsters at different days postinfection, as well as from orally immunized animals, to evaluate the frequency of micronucleated reticulocytes as a measure of genotoxicity induced by parasite exposure and rTsCRT vaccination. Our results indicate that infection with T. solium caused time-dependent DNA damage in vivo and that rTsCRT immunization reduced the genotoxic damage induced by the presence of the tapeworms.

  3. Genotoxic and developmental effects in sea urchins are sensitive indicators of effects of genotoxic chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S.L. . Energy and Environment Division); Hose, J.E. . Dept. of Biology); Knezovich, J.P. . Health and Ecological Assessment Division)

    1994-07-01

    Purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) gametes and embryos were exposed to three known mutagenic chemicals (phenol, benzidine,and pentachlorophenol) over concentration ranges bracketing the effect levels for fertilization success. Normal development and cytogenetic effects (anaphase aberrations) were assessed after the cultures were allowed to develop for 48 h. Using radiolabeled chemicals, the authors also characterized concentrations in the test water as well as doses in the embryos following 2- and 48-h exposures. The authors observed dose responses for all chemicals and all responses, except for phenol, which showed no significant effect on development. Fertilization success was never the most sensitive end point. anaphase aberrations were the most sensitive response for phenol, with an LOEC of 2.5 mg/L exposure concentration. Anaphase aberrations and development were equivalent in sensitivity for benzidine within the tested dose range, and an LOEC of <0.1 mg/L was observed. Development was the most sensitive reasons for pentachlorophenol (LOEC 1 mg/L). the LOEC values for this study were generally lower than comparable data for aquatic life or human health protection. The authors conclude that genotoxicity and development evaluations should be included in environmental management applications and that tests developed primarily for human health protection do not reliably predict the effects of toxic substances on aquatic life.

  4. Dose-response assessment of naphthalene-induced genotoxicity and glutathione detoxication in human TK6 lymphoblasts.

    PubMed

    Recio, Leslie; Shepard, Kim G; Hernández, Lya G; Kedderis, Gregory L

    2012-04-01

    The dose-response relationship for the induction of micronuclei (MN) and the impact of glutathione (GSH) detoxication on naphthalene-induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity were investigated in human TK6 cells. TK6 cells were exposed to 10 concentrations ranging from 0.0625 to 30μM naphthalene in the presence of β-naphthoflavone- and phenobarbital (βNP/PB)-induced rat liver S9 with a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-generating system. Three approaches were used to identify a no-observed-effect level (NOEL) for naphthalene-induced genotoxicity: (1) laboratory criteria of ≥ twofold increase over the concurrent solvent controls (NOEL = 10μM), (2) ANOVA with Bonferroni correction (NOEL = 2.5μM), and (3) the benchmark dose approach (BMCL(10) = 3.35μM). The NOEL and point of departure micronucleus frequency for naphthalene-induced MN are between the tested naphthalene concentrations of 2.5-10.0μM in this experimental system. Supplementation of the exposure system with physiological relevant concentrations of 5mM GSH eliminated naphthalene-induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity; no increased cytotoxicity or genotoxicity was observed at concentrations of up to 500μM naphthalene in the presence of GSH compared with 2.5-10.0μM in the absence of GSH. Naphthalene bioactivation by βNP/PB-induced rat liver S9 exhibits a nonlinear dose-response for the induction of MN in TK6 cells with a NOEL of 2.5-10μM that in the presence of GSH is shifted upward greater than 50- to 200-fold. These data demonstrate a nonlinear dose-response for naphthalene-induced genotoxicity that is eliminated by GSH, and both observations should be considered when assessing human risk from naphthalene exposures.

  5. Genotoxic effects of nickel, trivalent and hexavalent chromium on the Eisenia fetida earthworm.

    PubMed

    Bigorgne, Emilie; Cossu-Leguille, Carole; Bonnard, Marc; Nahmani, Johanne

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to examine genotoxic effects of nickel (Ni=105 mg kg(-1)), trivalent and hexavalent chromium (Cr=491 mg kg(-1)) on the Eisenia fetida earthworm after 2 and 4d of exposure to two different spiked soils (an artificial (OECD) and a natural one). DNA damages were evaluated on the earthworm's coelomocytes using the comet assay. After an exposure into OECD spiked soils, Ni did not induce genotoxic effect whereas Cr(III) and Cr(VI) revealed to be genotoxic after 2d of exposure. After 4d of exposure, only Cr(VI) still induced significant damages. In natural spiked soils, nickel and Cr(III) revealed to be genotoxic after 2 and 4d of exposure. Concerning Cr(VI) toxicity, all the earthworms died after 1d of exposure. These results underline the importance to take into account the nature and the speciation of metallic pollutants, although the experiment has been performed on spiked soil with higher bioavailibity than in contaminated natural soil.

  6. Acute toxicity, cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and antigenotoxic effects of a cellulosic exopolysaccharide obtained from sugarcane molasses.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Flávia Cristina Morone; De-Oliveira, Ana Cecília A X; De-Carvalho, Rosangela R; Gomes-Carneiro, Maria Regina; Coelho, Deise R; Lima, Salvador Vilar C; Paumgartten, Francisco José R; Aguiar, José Lamartine A

    2016-02-10

    The acute toxicity, cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and antigenotoxic effects of BC were studied. Cytotoxicity of BC was evaluated in cultured C3A hepatoma cells (HepG2/C3A) using a lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity assay. Acute toxicity was tested in adults Wistar rats treated with a single dose of BC. The genotoxicity of BC was evaluated in vivo by the micronucleus assay. BC (0.33-170 μg/mL) added to C3A cell culture medium caused no elevation in LDH release over the background level recorded in untreated cell wells. The treatment with the BC in a single oral dose (2000 mg/kg body weight) caused no deaths or signs of toxicity. BC attenuated CP-induced and inhibition the incidence of MNPCE (female: 46.94%; male: 22.7%) and increased the ratio of PCE/NCE (female: 46.10%; male: 35.25%). There was no alteration in the LDH release in the wells where C3A cells were treated with increasing concentrations of BC compared to the wells where the cells received the cell culture medium only (background of approximately 20% cell death), indicated that in the dose range tested BC was not cytotoxic. BC was not cytotoxic, genotoxic or acutely toxic. BC attenuated CP-induced genotoxic and myelotoxic effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Genotoxic and mutagenic effects of guarana (Paullinia cupana) in prokaryotic organisms.

    PubMed

    da Fonseca, C A; Leal, J; Costa, S S; Leitão, A C

    1994-05-01

    Aqueous extracts of Paullinia cupana (guarana), a species that belongs to the Sapindaceae family, were analyzed for the presence of genotoxic activities in bacterial cells. The extracts of guarana were genotoxic as assessed by lysogenic induction in Escherichia coli and they were also able to induce mutagenesis in Salmonella typhimurium. Addition of S9 microsomal fraction, catalase, superoxide dismutase or thiourea counteracted the genotoxic activity of guarana, suggesting that oxygen reactive species play an essential role in the genotoxicity of aqueous guarana extracts. The genotoxic activity in the extracts was related to the presence of a molecular complex formed by caffeine and a flavonoid (catechin or epicatechin) in the presence of potassium.

  8. Exposure to sorbitol during lactation causes metabolic alterations and genotoxic effects in rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Felipe S; Araujo-Lima, Carlos F; Aiub, Claudia A F; Felzenszwalb, Israel

    2016-10-17

    Sorbitol is a polyol used by the food industry as a sweetener. Women are consuming diet and light products containing sorbitol during pregnancy and in the postnatal period to prevent themselves from excessive weight gain and maintain a slim body. Although there is no evidence for the genotoxicity of sorbitol in the perinatal period, this study focused on evaluating the effects of the maternal intake of sorbitol on the biochemical and toxicological parameters of lactating Wistar rat offspring after 14days of mother-to-offspring exposure. A dose-dependent reduction of offspring length was observed. An increase in sorbitol levels determined in the milk was also observed. However, we detected an inverse relationship between the exposition dose in milk fructose and triacylglycerols concentrations. There was an increase in the plasmatic levels of ALT, AST and LDLc and a decrease in proteins, cholesterol and glucose levels in the offspring. Sorbitol exposure caused hepatocyte genotoxicity, including micronuclei induction. Maternal sorbitol intake induced myelotoxicity and myelosuppression in their offspring. The Comet assay of the blood cells detected a dose-dependent genotoxic response within the sorbitol-exposed offspring. According to our results, sorbitol is able to induce important metabolic alterations and genotoxic responses in the exposed offspring. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Modulation of doxorubicin-induced genotoxicity by squalene in Balb/c mice.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Bhilwade Hari; Tatewaki, Naoto; Giridharan, Vijayasree Vayalanellore; Nishida, Hiroshi; Konishi, Tetsuya

    2010-11-01

    The present study aims to evaluate the protective effect of squalene against the genotoxicity of the chemotherapeutic agent doxorubicin (Dox) using two genotoxicity assays, the micronucleus assay and the comet assay. Different groups of mice were fed squalene at the doses of 1 and 4 mmol g(-1) body weight (100 or 400 μl as squalene oil) either at 4 h before or 1 h after Dox (20 mg kg(-1)) treatment. 24 h after the Dox treatment, bone marrow erythrocytes were evaluated for the incidence of micronuclei, and the induced DNA strand breaks were examined in heart tissue by the alkaline comet assay. As expected, Dox significantly induced micronuclei in polychromatic (immature) erythrocytes, as well as in total erythrocytes. The frequency of Dox-induced micronucleated erythrocytes was significantly reduced in the mice treated with squalene both before and after Dox administration. Squalene itself obviously did not induce any micronuclei in bone marrow erythrocytes. The comet assay also demonstrated a significant increase in DNA damage, especially DNA single strand breaks in the Dox-treated group of mice as compared to the control. The Dox-induced DNA damage was also effectively reduced by squalene when it was administered either before or after the Dox treatment. Squalene did not induce any significant DNA damage by itself. Compared to the pre-treatment of squalene, post treatment gave rise to more effective prevention against Dox-induced DNA damage. The data suggest that the complimentary use of squalene with Dox will be beneficial to reduce the adverse effect of Dox in cancer chemotherapy, such as the increased incidence of undesirable mutagenic side effects.

  10. Cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of two hair dyes used in the formulation of black color.

    PubMed

    Tafurt-Cardona, Yaliana; Suares-Rocha, Paula; Fernandes, Thaís Cristina Casimiro; Marin-Morales, Maria Aparecida

    2015-12-01

    According to the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), some hair dyes are considered mutagenic and carcinogenic in in vitro assays and exposed human populations. Epidemiological studies indicate that hairdressers occupationally exposed to hair dyes have a higher risk of developing bladder cancer. In Brazil, 26% of the adults use hair dye. In this study, we investigated the toxic effects of two hair dyes, Basic Red 51 (BR51) and Basic Brown 17 (BB17), which are temporary dyes of the azo group (R-N=N-R'), used in the composition of the black hair dye. To this end, MTT and trypan blue assays (cytotoxicity), comet and micronucleus assay (genotoxicity) were applied, with HepG2 cells. For cytotoxic assessment, dyes were tested in serial dilutions, being the highest concentrations those used in the commercial formula for hair dyes. For genotoxic assessment concentrations were selected according to cell viability. Results showed that both dyes induced significant cytotoxic and genotoxic effects in the cells, in concentrations much lower than those used in the commercial formula. Genotoxic effects could be related to the azo structure present in the composition of the dyes, which is known as mutagenic and carcinogenic. These results point to the hazard of the hair dye exposure to human health. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Anodically Grown Titania Nanotube Induced Cytotoxicity has Genotoxic Origins

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, M. Sheikh; Torabi, Aida; Paulose, Maggie; Kumar, D. Sakthi; Varghese, Oomman K.

    2017-01-01

    Nanoarchitectures of titania (TiO2) have been widely investigated for a number of medical applications including implants and drug delivery. Although titania is extensively used in the food, drug and cosmetic industries, biocompatibility of nanoscale titania is still under careful scrutiny due to the conflicting reports on its interaction with cellular matter. For an accurate insight, we performed in vitro studies on the response of human dermal fibroblast cells toward pristine titania nanotubes fabricated by anodic oxidation. The nanotubes at low concentrations were seen to induce toxicity to the cells, whereas at higher concentrations the cell vitality remained on par with controls. Further investigations revealed an increase in the G0 phase cell population depicting that majority of cells were in the resting rather than active phase. Though the mitochondrial set-up did not exhibit any signs of stress, significantly enhanced reactive oxygen species production in the nuclear compartment was noted. The TiO2 nanotubes were believed to have gained access to the nuclear machinery and caused increased stress leading to genotoxicity. This interesting property of the nanotubes could be utilized to kill cancer cells, especially if the nanotubes are functionalized for a specific target, thus eliminating the need for any chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:28165491

  12. Anodically Grown Titania Nanotube Induced Cytotoxicity has Genotoxic Origins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, M. Sheikh; Torabi, Aida; Paulose, Maggie; Kumar, D. Sakthi; Varghese, Oomman K.

    2017-02-01

    Nanoarchitectures of titania (TiO2) have been widely investigated for a number of medical applications including implants and drug delivery. Although titania is extensively used in the food, drug and cosmetic industries, biocompatibility of nanoscale titania is still under careful scrutiny due to the conflicting reports on its interaction with cellular matter. For an accurate insight, we performed in vitro studies on the response of human dermal fibroblast cells toward pristine titania nanotubes fabricated by anodic oxidation. The nanotubes at low concentrations were seen to induce toxicity to the cells, whereas at higher concentrations the cell vitality remained on par with controls. Further investigations revealed an increase in the G0 phase cell population depicting that majority of cells were in the resting rather than active phase. Though the mitochondrial set-up did not exhibit any signs of stress, significantly enhanced reactive oxygen species production in the nuclear compartment was noted. The TiO2 nanotubes were believed to have gained access to the nuclear machinery and caused increased stress leading to genotoxicity. This interesting property of the nanotubes could be utilized to kill cancer cells, especially if the nanotubes are functionalized for a specific target, thus eliminating the need for any chemotherapeutic agents.

  13. Sewage sludge does not induce genotoxicity and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Paula Regina Pereira; Barbisan, Luis Fernando; Dagli, Maria Lúcia Zaidan; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento

    2012-07-01

    Through a series of experiments, the genotoxic/mutagenic and carcinogenic potential of sewage sludge was assessed. Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to four groups: Group 1 - negative control; Group 2 - liver carcinogenesis initiated by diethylnitrosamine (DEN; 200 mg/kg i.p.); Group 3 and G4-liver carcinogenesis initiated by DEN and fed 10,000 ppm or 50,000 ppm of sewage sludge. The animals were submitted to a 70% partial hepatectomy at the 3(rd) week. Livers were processed for routine histological analysis and immunohistochemistry, in order to detect glutathione S-transferase positive altered hepatocyte foci (GST-P(+) AHF). Peripheral blood samples for the comet assay were obtained from the periorbital plexus immediately prior to sacrificing. Polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs) were analyzed in femoral bone-marrow smears, and the frequencies of those micronucleated (MNPCEs) registered. There was no sewage-sludge-induced increase in frequency of either DNA damage in peripheral blood leucocytes, or MNPCEs in the femoral bone marrow. Also, there was no increase in the levels of DNA damage, in the frequency of MNPCEs, and in the development of GST-P AHF when compared with the respective control group.

  14. Sewage sludge does not induce genotoxicity and carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Paula Regina Pereira; Barbisan, Luis Fernando; Dagli, Maria Lúcia Zaidan; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento

    2012-01-01

    Through a series of experiments, the genotoxic/mutagenic and carcinogenic potential of sewage sludge was assessed. Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to four groups: Group 1 - negative control; Group 2 - liver carcinogenesis initiated by diethylnitrosamine (DEN; 200 mg/kg i.p.); Group 3 and G4-liver carcinogenesis initiated by DEN and fed 10,000 ppm or 50,000 ppm of sewage sludge. The animals were submitted to a 70% partial hepatectomy at the 3rd week. Livers were processed for routine histological analysis and immunohistochemistry, in order to detect glutathione S-transferase positive altered hepatocyte foci (GST-P+ AHF). Peripheral blood samples for the comet assay were obtained from the periorbital plexus immediately prior to sacrificing. Polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs) were analyzed in femoral bone-marrow smears, and the frequencies of those micronucleated (MNPCEs) registered. There was no sewage-sludge-induced increase in frequency of either DNA damage in peripheral blood leucocytes, or MNPCEs in the femoral bone marrow. Also, there was no increase in the levels of DNA damage, in the frequency of MNPCEs, and in the development of GST-P AHF when compared with the respective control group. PMID:23055806

  15. Anodically Grown Titania Nanotube Induced Cytotoxicity has Genotoxic Origins.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, M Sheikh; Torabi, Aida; Paulose, Maggie; Kumar, D Sakthi; Varghese, Oomman K

    2017-02-06

    Nanoarchitectures of titania (TiO2) have been widely investigated for a number of medical applications including implants and drug delivery. Although titania is extensively used in the food, drug and cosmetic industries, biocompatibility of nanoscale titania is still under careful scrutiny due to the conflicting reports on its interaction with cellular matter. For an accurate insight, we performed in vitro studies on the response of human dermal fibroblast cells toward pristine titania nanotubes fabricated by anodic oxidation. The nanotubes at low concentrations were seen to induce toxicity to the cells, whereas at higher concentrations the cell vitality remained on par with controls. Further investigations revealed an increase in the G0 phase cell population depicting that majority of cells were in the resting rather than active phase. Though the mitochondrial set-up did not exhibit any signs of stress, significantly enhanced reactive oxygen species production in the nuclear compartment was noted. The TiO2 nanotubes were believed to have gained access to the nuclear machinery and caused increased stress leading to genotoxicity. This interesting property of the nanotubes could be utilized to kill cancer cells, especially if the nanotubes are functionalized for a specific target, thus eliminating the need for any chemotherapeutic agents.

  16. Protective effect of lactofermented red beetroot juice against aberrant crypt foci formation, genotoxicity of fecal water and oxidative stress induced by 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b] pyridine in rats model.

    PubMed

    Klewicka, Elżbieta; Nowak, Adriana; Zduńczyk, Zenon; Juśkiewicz, Jerzy; Cukrowska, Bożena

    2012-11-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of beetroot juice fermented by Lactobacillus brevis 0944 and Lactobacillus paracasei 0920 (FBJ) on carcinogen induction of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in rat colon. 2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b] pyridine (PhIP) was used as carcinogen, which was administrated intragastrically at a dose of 10 μg/day, every day of the experiment. Additionally, we investigated the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of fecal water from experimental animals in the Caco-2 cell line, evaluated by MTT test and the comet assay, respectively, as well as by the count of bacteria adhered to colon epithelium assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Oxidative stress in rats was expressed by measuring serum antioxidant status and the level of malondialdehyde in the kidneys and liver. The experimental rats were divided into four groups based on diet type: basal diet, basal diet supplemented with FBJ, basal diet and PhIP treatment, and basal diet supplemented with FBJ and PhIP treatment. FBJ significantly reduced the number of ACF in PhIP-treated rats (from 59 ± 18 to 26 ± 4). Moreover, the number of extensive aberrations (more than 4 crypts in a focus) decreased from 52 ± 18 to 18 ± 4. Fecal water obtained from rats fed with a PhIP-containing diet induced pronounced cytotoxic and genotoxic effects in Caco-2 cells, but FBJ supplementation of the diet abolished these effects. In groups fed dietary PhP and FBJ the latter was found to increase the antioxidant status of serum from 40% to 66% depending on the fraction. Reduced concentration of malondialdehyde was found only in the kidneys of rats fed with PhIP and FBJ. FBJ present in the diet of rats causes a reduction of MDA in the kidneys from 118.7 nmol/g tissue to 100 nmol/g tissue. The presence of FBJ in the diet of rats significantly increased the count of bacteria, including Lactobacillus/Enterococcus and Bacteroides-Prevotella group adhered to colonic epithelium. In conclusion

  17. Early genotoxic response and accumulation induced by waterborne copper, lead, and arsenic in European seabass, Dicentrarchus labrax.

    PubMed

    Canalejo, Antonio; Diaz-de-Alba, Margarita; Granado-Castro, M Dolores; Cordoba, Francisco; Espada-Bellido, Estrella; Galindo-Riaño, M Dolores; Torronteras, Rafael

    2016-02-01

    Cu, Pb, and As, which are among the most abundant metals in the aquatic environment, are also among the most health-threatened by causing diverse cellular injuries. The aim of this study was to assess and compare the potential early induction of genotoxic effects after waterborne Cu, Pb, and As exposure in European seabass, Dicentrarchus labrax, a commercial widely cultured fish, using the micronucleus (MN) assay in peripheral blood erythrocytes. Fish were exposed under laboratory conditions to nominal solutions ranging 0-10 mg/L for 24 and 96 h. Furthermore, actual metal ion concentrations were measured by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) or differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry (DPASV) in water and four fish tissues differentially related to environmental exposition and metal accumulation, i.e. the gills, liver, muscle, and brain. Dose-dependent increases of micronuclei (MNi) frequency were observed after these very short exposures; based on measured metal concentrations in water, the genotoxic effect ordered as Cu > As > Pb. Significant genotoxic effect at 0.009 mg/L Cu, 0.57 mg/L Pb, and 0.01 mg/L As was seen. For Cu and Pb these are only slightly higher, but for As it is notably lower than the USEPA criteria of maximum concentration to prevent acute toxicity in aquatic organisms. Furthermore, genotoxicity was differentially related to metal accumulation. MNi frequency correlated positively with the content of Pb in all the organs, with the content of As in liver and gills and only with the content of Cu in the brain. In conclusion, our findings raised environmental concerns because these depicted a genotoxic potential of Cu, Pb, and As after a very short exposure to low but environmentally relevant concentrations, too close to regulatory thresholds. In addition, the MN test in D. labrax could be considered an early biomarker of genotoxicity induced by these metals in fish.

  18. Red meat intake-induced increases in fecal water genotoxicity correlate with pro-carcinogenic gene expression changes in the human colon.

    PubMed

    Hebels, Dennie G A J; Sveje, Kirstine M; de Kok, Marloes C; van Herwijnen, Marcel H M; Kuhnle, Gunter G C; Engels, Leopold G J B; Vleugels-Simon, Carla B E M; Mares, Wout G N; Pierik, Marieke; Masclee, Ad A M; Kleinjans, Jos C S; de Kok, Theo M C M

    2012-02-01

    Red meat consumption is associated with an increased colorectal cancer (CRC) risk, which may be due to an increased endogenous formation of genotoxic N-nitroso compounds (NOCs). To assess the impact of red meat consumption on potential risk factors of CRC, we investigated the effect of a 7-day dietary red meat intervention in human subjects on endogenous NOC formation and fecal water genotoxicity in relation to genome-wide transcriptomic changes induced in colonic tissue. The intervention showed no effect on fecal NOC excretion but fecal water genotoxicity significantly increased in response to red meat intake. Colonic inflammation caused by inflammatory bowel disease, which has been suggested to stimulate endogenous nitrosation, did not influence fecal NOC excretion or fecal water genotoxicity. Transcriptomic analyses revealed that genes significantly correlating with the increase in fecal water genotoxicity were involved in biological pathways indicative of genotoxic effects, including modifications in DNA damage repair, cell cycle, and apoptosis pathways. Moreover, WNT signaling and nucleosome remodeling pathways were modulated which are implicated in human CRC development. We conclude that the gene expression changes identified in this study corroborate the genotoxic potential of diets high in red meat and point towards a potentially increased CRC risk in humans.

  19. Genotoxic effects of dental panoramic radiograph in children.

    PubMed

    El-Ashiry, Eman A; Abo-Hager, Eman A; Gawish, Abeer S

    2010-01-01

    This study was completed to evaluate chromosomal damage (micronucleus) and cellular death in exfoliated buccal mucosa cells taken from healthy children following exposure to panoramic radiation during dental radiography. Twenty children who underwent panoramic dental radiography for diagnostic purposes were included. Cytological preparations were stained with Feulgen stain, identified under light microscopy. Micronuclei, apoptotic nuclear alterations (condensed chromatin, karyorrhexis, pyknosis) and necrosis (karyolysis) were scored. showed no statistically significant differences in children's micronucleated oral mucosa cells before and after panoramic dental X-Ray exposure. On the other hand, there was a statistically significant increase in nuclear alterations closely related to genotoxicity such as condensed chromatin, karyorrhexis and pyknosis, while karyolysis of oral mucosal cells did not show significant increase after panoramic X-Ray exposure. Dental panoramic radiography may not be a factor that induces chromosomal damage, but is able to promote genotoxicity in children.

  20. Therapeutic efficacies of Coriandrum sativum aqueous extract against metronidazole-induced genotoxicity in Channa punctatus peripheral erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Talapatra, Soumendra Nath; Dasgupta, Subham; Guha, Gunjan; Auddy, Moumita; Mukhopadhyay, Aniruddha

    2010-12-01

    Metronidazole (MTZ), a nitroimidazole drug, is primarily used as an anti-protozoan or an anti-bacterial agent in humans, although its genotoxic and carcinogenic effects have been widely reported, particularly in aquatic organisms. MTZ may induce DNA damages through single-strand breaks, modification of bases, DNA-DNA and DNA-protein cross-links, ultimately leading to apoptosis or necrosis. Here, we have assessed the genotoxicity of MTZ in the peripheral erythrocytes of Channa punctatus, using micronucleation (MN) and binucleation (BN) as genotoxicity markers. The therapeutic potential of aqueous extract of Coriandrum sativum against MTZ-induced genotoxicity has also been examined. The results show significant (P<0.05) increase in both MN and BN formation due to MTZ treatment. Such aberrations were higher in smaller fish samples for a particular dosage of MTZ, as established by correlation analysis between fish body weight and MN/BN count at P<0.05. However, such degenerative damages were found to be alleviated by a great extent due to treatment with C. sativum leaf extract. Hence, we establish that MTZ can produce considerable degrees of micronucleus and binucleus formation in peripheral erythrocytes of C. punctatus, and such deleterious effect of MTZ treatment can be mitigated by aqueous extract of C. sativum leaves.

  1. Mutagenic and genotoxic effects of Guelma's urban wastewater, Algeria.

    PubMed

    Tabet, Mouna; Abda, Ahlem; Benouareth, Djamel E; Liman, Recep; Konuk, Muhsin; Khallef, Messaouda; Taher, Ali

    2015-02-01

    Assessment of water pollution and its effect upon river biotic communities and human health is indispensable to develop control and management strategies. In this study, the mutagenicity and genotoxicity of urban wastewater of the city of Guelma in Algeria were examined between April 2012 and April 2013. For this, two biological tests, namely Amesand chromosomal aberrations (CA) test in Allium cepa root tips were employed on the samples collected from five different sampling stages (S1-S5). In Ames test, two strains of Salmonella typhimurium TA98 and TA100 with or without metabolic activation (S9-mix) were used. All water samples were found to be mutagenic to S. typhimurium TA98 with or without S9-mix. A significant decrease in mitotic index (MI) was observed with a decrease in the percentage of cells in the prophase and an increase in the telophase. Main aberrations observed were anaphase bridges, disturbed anaphase-telophase cells, vagrants and stickiness in anaphase-telophase cells. All treatments of wastewater in April 2012, at S5 in July 2012, at S1 and S5 in November 2012, at S5 in February 2013, and at S1 in April 2013 induced CA when compared to the negative control. Some physicochemical parameters and heavy metals (Cd, Pb, and Cu) were also recorded in the samples examined.

  2. The role of intracellular redox imbalance in nanomaterial induced cellular damage and genotoxicity: a review.

    PubMed

    Kermanizadeh, Ali; Chauché, Caroline; Brown, David M; Loft, Steffen; Møller, Peter

    2015-03-01

    The terms oxidative stress, free radical generation, and intracellular antioxidant protection have become part of everyday nanotoxicology terminology. In recent years, an ever increasing number of in vitro and in vivo studies have implicated disruptions to the redox balance and oxidative stress as one of the main contributors to nanomaterial (NM) induced adverse effects. One of the most important and widely investigated of these effects is genotoxicity. In general, systems that defend an organism against oxidative damage to DNA are very complex and include prevention of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, neutralizing ROS (scavengers), enzymatic nucleotide pool sanitation, and DNA repair. This review discusses the importance of the maintenance of the redox balance in this context before examining studies that have investigated engineered NM induced redox imbalance and genotoxicity. Furthermore, we identify data gaps, and highlight a number of issues that exist with the methodologies that are routinely utilized to investigate intracellular ROS production or anti-oxidant depletion. We conclude that for a large number of engineered NM types changes in the redox balance toward oxidative stress are normally associated with DNA damage. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Genotoxicity biomarkers in the assessment of heavy metal effects in mussels: experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Bolognesi, C; Landini, E; Roggieri, P; Fabbri, R; Viarengo, A

    1999-01-01

    Heavy metals are stable and persistent environmental contaminants. The range of metal concentrations is generally below acute thresholds in coastal areas, where recognition of chronic sublethal effects is more relevant. Evidence of long-term adverse effects, such as cancer, due to heavy metals in marine animals comes from a number of field and experimental studies. The mechanism of metal carcinogenicity remains largely unknown, although several lines of experimental evidence suggest that a genotoxic effect may be involved. The aim of our study was to evaluate the sensitivity of genotoxicity tests, alkaline elution and micronucleus test, as biomarkers for the detection of heavy metals in mussels as the sentinel species. Experimental studies were carried out on Mytilus galloprovincialis exposed in aquarium (5 days) to different concentrations of three selected metal salts, CuCl2 (5, 10, 20, 40, 80 micrograms/l/a), CdCl2 (1.84, 18.4, 184 micrograms/l/a), and HgCl2 (32 micrograms/l/a), and to a mixture of equimolar doses of the three metals to study the results of their joint action. Metallothionein quantitation was used as a marker of metal exposure. Lysosomal membrane stability was applied to evaluate the influence of physiological status on genotoxic damage. The ranking of genotoxic potential was in decreasing order: Hg > Cu > Cd. Cu and Hg caused an increase of DNA single-strand breaks and micronuclei frequency. Cd induced a statistical increase of DNA damage, but gave negative results with the micronucleus test. A relationship between genotoxic effects and metallothionein content was observed. Reduction in lysosomal membrane stability with the increasing concentration of heavy metals was also evident. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Detection of genotoxic effects of drinking water disinfection by-products using Vicia faba bioassay.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yu; Tan, Li; Zhang, Shao-Hui; Zuo, Yu-Ting; Han, Xue; Liu, Na; Lu, Wen-Qing; Liu, Ai-Lin

    2017-01-01

    Plant-based bioassays have gained wide use among the toxicological and/or ecotoxicological assessment procedures because of their simplicity, sensitivity, low cost, and reliability. The present study describes the use of Vicia faba (V. faba) micronucleus (MN) test and V. faba comet assay in the evaluation of the genotoxic potential of disinfection by-products (DBPs) commonly found in chlorine-disinfected drinking water. Five haloacetic acids and three halogenated acetonitriles were chosen as representatives of DBPs in this study because they are of potentially great public health risk. Results of the MN test indicated that monochloroacetic acid (MCA), monobromoacetic acid (MBA), dichloroacetic acid (DCA), dibromoacetic acid (DBA), trichloroacetic acid (TCA), and trichloroacetonitrile (TCAN) caused a statistically significant increase in MN frequency in V. faba root tip cells. However, no genotoxic response was observed for dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN) and dibromoacetonitrile (DBAN). Results of the comet assay showed that all tested DBPs induced a statistically significant increase in genomic DNA damage to V. faba root tip cells. On considering the capacity to detect genomic damage of a different nature, we suggest that a combination of V. faba MN test and V. faba comet assay is a useful tool for the detection of genotoxic effects of DBPs. It is worthy of assessing the feasibility of using V. faba comet assay combined with V. faba MN test to screen for the genotoxic activity of chlorinated drinking water in future work.

  5. The efficiency of combined CaO/electrochemical treatment in removal of acid mine drainage induced toxicity and genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Radić, Sandra; Vujčić, Valerija; Cvetković, Želimira; Cvjetko, Petra; Oreščanin, Višnja

    2014-01-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is a by-product of the mining industry that has a detrimental effect on aquatic plant and animal life due to high load of heavy metals and sulfates. In the present study, the toxic and genotoxic potential of AMD prior to and following combination of neutralization/electrocoagulation processes was evaluated using several bioassays and selected parameters. Regardless of pH correction of AMD prior to Daphnia bioassay, high acute toxicity was observed in Daphnia magna. The mine leachate also induced strong phyto-, cyto- and genotoxicity to Allium cepa roots. Short term exposure to AMD inhibited duckweed growth and chlorophyll a content and simultaneously promoted lipid peroxidation and DNA damage despite duckweed capability to upregulate antioxidative defense mechanisms. The results show that observed (geno)toxicity could be related to oxidative stress most probably induced by toxic metal action. However, influence of low pH as a contributing factor in the phytotoxicity of AMD cannot be excluded. The application of combined treatment eliminated genotoxicity and was highly efficient in reducing toxicity of AMD. Thus, the method seems to be suitable for treatment of AMD waters enabling their safe discharge to an aquatic environment. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Significant differences in genotoxicity induced by retrovirus integration in human T cells and induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Weiyan; Wang, Yingjia; Chang, Tammy; Huang, He; Yee, Jiing-Kuan

    2013-04-25

    Retrovirus is frequently used in the genetic modification of mammalian cells and the establishment of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) via cell reprogramming. Vector-induced genotoxicity could induce profound effect on the physiology and function of these stem cells and their differentiated progeny. We analyzed retrovirus-induced genotoxicity in somatic cell Jurkat and two iPSC lines. In Jurkat cells, retrovirus frequently activated host gene expression and gene activation was not dependent on the distance between the integration site and the transcription start site of the host gene. In contrast, retrovirus frequently down-regulated host gene expression in iPSCs, possibly due to the action of chromatin silencing that spreads from the provirus to the nearby host gene promoter. Our data raises the issue that some of the phenotypic variability observed among iPSC clones derived from the same parental cell line may be caused by retrovirus-induced gene expression changes rather than by the reprogramming process itself. It also underscores the importance of characterizing retrovirus integration and carrying out risk assessment of iPSCs before they can be applied in basic research and clinics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Genotoxic effects in wild rodents (Rattus rattus and Mus musculus) in an open coal mining area.

    PubMed

    León, Grethel; Pérez, Lyda Espitia; Linares, Juan Carlos; Hartmann, Andreas; Quintana, Milton

    2007-06-15

    Coal is a mixture of a variety of compounds containing mutagenic and carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Exposure to coal is considered as an important non-cellular and cellular source of reactive oxygen species that can induce DNA damage. In addition, spontaneous combustion can occur in coal mining areas, further releasing compounds with detrimental effects on the environment. In this study the comet assay was used to investigate potential genotoxic effects of coal mining activities in peripheral blood cells of the wild rodents Rattus rattus and Mus musculus. The study was conducted in a coal mining area of the Municipio de Puerto Libertador, South West of the Departamento de Cordoba, Colombia. Animals from two areas in the coal mining zone and a control area located in the Municipio de Lorica were investigated. The results showed evidence that exposure to coal results in elevated primary DNA lesions in blood cells of rodents. Three different parameters for DNA damage were assessed, namely, DNA damage index, migration length and percentage damaged cells. All parameters showed statistically significantly higher values in mice and rats from the coal mining area in comparison to the animals from the control area. The parameter "DNA Damage Index" was found to be most sensitive and to best indicate a genotoxic hazard. Both species investigated were shown to be sensitive indicators of environmental genotoxicity caused by coal mining activities. In summary, our study constitutes the first investigation of potential genotoxic effects of open coal mining carried out in Puerto Libertador. The investigations provide a guide for measures to evaluate genotoxic hazards, thereby contributing to the development of appropriate measures and regulations for more careful operations during coal mining.

  8. Genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of testosterone cypionate (deposteron(®)).

    PubMed

    Meireles, José Roberto C; Oliveira, Susie V; Costa-Neto, Antônio O; Cerqueira, Eneida M M

    2013-05-15

    The indiscriminate use of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) has motivated researchers to investigate the mutagenic action of these substances. The present study, using the mouse bone marrow micronucleus test, evaluates the genotoxic potential of testosterone cypionate (deposteron). Male Swiss mice received intramuscular injections of deposteron at three doses. The animals were sacrificed 24, 48, or 72h after treatment and bone marrow was removed immediately, followed by scoring to count the micronuclei in 2000 polychromatic erythrocytes (PCE). Two hundred erythrocytes/animal were analyzed to determine the PCE-NCE (normochromatic erythrocyte) relationship and to determine the cytotoxic effects. The animals treated with deposteron at the highest dose presented greater numbers of micronuclei. The highest dose caused a decrease in the PCE/NCE relationship, indicating a cytotoxic effect. We conclude that deposteron is genotoxic and cytotoxic in mice.

  9. Exposure to lambda-cyhalothrin, a synthetic pyrethroid, increases reactive oxygen species production and induces genotoxicity in rat peripheral blood.

    PubMed

    Fetoui, Hamadi; Feki, Ameni; Salah, Ghada Ben; Kamoun, Hassen; Fakhfakh, Feiza; Gdoura, Radhouane

    2015-05-01

    Lambda-cyhalothrin (LTC) is a synthetic pyrethroid with a broad spectrum of insecticidal and acaricidal activities used to control a wide range of insect pests in a variety of applications. However, there is little known about its adverse effects, in particular those related to its genotoxicity in humans. To elucidate the genotoxicity mechanisms of LTC, the micronuclei (MN) frequencies, the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), erythrocyte osmotic fragility, nitrite (NO) formation, protein carbonyl (PCO) levels and malondialdehyde (MDA) production were evaluated for a period of 7, 14 and 21 days. Our results show that exposure rat to LTC (1/10DL50 = 6.23 mg/kg) for a period of 7, 14 and 21 days induced a noticeable genotoxic effect in rat peripheral blood evidenced by a significant increase in the frequency of MN only at day 21 of treatment. Significant differences between the two groups were observed in erythrocyte osmotic fragility. Further, a significant (p < 0.01) increase in ROS contents, NO formation, PCO levels and lipid peroxidation in erythrocytes were observed at different times of treatments, suggesting the implication of oxidative stress in its toxicity. These results confirm the genotoxic and the pro-oxidant effects of LTC in rat peripheral blood. © The Author(s) 2013.

  10. Genotoxicity and growth inhibition effects of aniline on wheat.

    PubMed

    Tao, Nan; Liu, Guanyi; Bai, Lu; Tang, Lu; Guo, Changhong

    2017-02-01

    Aniline is a synthetic compound widely used in industrial and pesticide production, which can lead to environmental pollution. Its high concentration in rivers and lakes is hazardous to aquatic species. Although the mechanism of aniline toxicity has been studied extensively in animals and algae, little is known about its genotoxicity in plants. In this study, we investigated the genotoxicity effects of aniline on wheat root tip cells. The mitotic index of wheat root tip cells decreased when the aniline test concentration was higher than 10 mg L(-1). The frequency of micronucleus and chromosomal aberrations increased at aniline concentrations ranging between 5 and 100 mg L(-1), and reached 23.3‰ ± 0.3‰ and 8.9‰ ± 0.68‰, respectively, at an aniline concentration of 100 mg L(-1). These values were sevenfold higher than those in the control group. The wheat seedlings showed various growth toxicity effects under different concentrations of aniline. The shoot height, root length, fresh weight, and dry weight of wheat seedlings decreased at aniline test concentrations ranging between 25 and 200 mg L(-1). At 200 mg L(-1) aniline, the dry weight was only one-third that of the control group. Overall, the findings of this study provide evidence that aniline is a serious environmental pollutant causing deleterious genotoxic effects on wheat root tip cells and growth toxic effects on wheat seedlings. However, understanding the mechanisms that underlie aniline genotoxicity in plants needs further study.

  11. Sulforaphane mitigates genotoxicity induced by radiation and anticancer drugs in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Katoch, Omika; Kumar, Arun; Adhikari, Jawahar S; Dwarakanath, Bilikere S; Agrawala, Paban K

    2013-12-12

    Sulforaphane, present in cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, is a dietary anticancer agent. Sulforaphane, added 2 or 20 h following phytohemaglutinin stimulation to cultured peripheral blood lymphocytes of individuals accidentally exposed to mixed γ and β-radiation, reduced the micronucleus frequency by up to 70%. Studies with whole blood cultures obtained from healthy volunteers confirmed the ability of sulforaphane to ameliorate γ-radiation-induced genotoxicity and to reduce micronucleus induction by other DNA-damaging anticancer agents, such as bleomycin and doxorubicin. This reduction in genotoxicity in lymphocytes treated at the G(0) or G(1) stage suggests a role for sulforaphane in modulating DNA repair. Sulforaphane also countered the radiation-induced increase in lymphocyte HDAC activity, to control levels, when cells were treated 2 h after exposure, and enhanced histone H4 acetylation status. Sulforaphane post-irradiation treatment enhanced the CD 34(+)Lin(-) cell population in culture. Sulforaphane has therapeutic potential for management of the late effects of radiation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Oxidative and genotoxic effects of 900 MHz electromagnetic fields in the earthworm Eisenia fetida.

    PubMed

    Tkalec, Mirta; Stambuk, Anamaria; Srut, Maja; Malarić, Krešimir; Klobučar, Göran I V

    2013-04-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) can have various biological effects. In this study the oxidative and genotoxic effects were investigated in earthworms Eisenia fetida exposed in vivo to RF-EMF at the mobile phone frequency (900 MHz). Earthworms were exposed to the homogeneous RF-EMF at field levels of 10, 23, 41 and 120 V m(-1) for a period of 2h using a Gigahertz Transversal Electromagnetic (GTEM) cell. At the field level of 23 V m(-1) the effect of longer exposure (4h) and field modulation (80% AM 1 kHz sinusoidal) was investigated as well. All exposure treatments induced significant genotoxic effect in earthworms coelomocytes detected by the Comet assay, demonstrating DNA damaging capacity of 900 MHz electromagnetic radiation. Field modulation additionally increased the genotoxic effect. Moreover, our results indicated the induction of antioxidant stress response in terms of enhanced catalase and glutathione reductase activity as a result of the RF-EMF exposure, and demonstrated the generation of lipid and protein oxidative damage. Antioxidant responses and the potential of RF-EMF to induce damage to lipids, proteins and DNA differed depending on the field level applied, modulation of the field and duration of E. fetida exposure to 900 MHz electromagnetic radiation. Nature of detected DNA lesions and oxidative stress as the mechanism of action for the induction of DNA damage are discussed.

  13. Curcumin attenuates acrylamide-induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in HepG2 cells by ROS scavenging.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jun; Liu, Yong; Jia, Li; Jiang, Li-Ping; Geng, Cheng-Yan; Yao, Xiao-Feng; Kong, Ying; Jiang, Bao-Na; Zhong, Lai-Fu

    2008-12-24

    Acrylamide (AA), a proven rodent carcinogen, has recently been discovered in foods heated at high temperatures. This finding raises public health concerns. In our previous study, we found that AA caused DNA fragments and increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and induced genotoxicity and weak cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells. Presently, curcumin, a natural antioxidant compound present in turmeric was evaluated for its protective effects. The results showed that curcumin at the concentration of 2.5 microg/mL significantly reduced AA-induced ROS production, DNA fragments, micronuclei formation, and cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells. The effect of PEG-catalase on protecting against AA-induced cytotoxicity suggests that AA-induced cytotoxicity is directly dependent on hydrogen peroxide production. These data suggest that curcumin could attenuate the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity induced by AA in HepG2 cells. The protection is probably mediated by an antioxidant protective mechanism. Consumption of curcumin may be a plausible way to prevent AA-mediated genotoxicity.

  14. Investigation of antigenotoxic potential of Syzygium cumini extract (SCE) on cyclophosphamide-induced genotoxicity and oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Pankaj; Patel, Rakesh K; Tripathi, Rina; Kanzariya, Nilesh R

    2013-10-01

    The present study investigated the protective effects of Syzygium cumini extract (SCE; 100 and 200 mg/kg) against genotoxicity and oxidative stress (OS) induced by cyclophosphamide (CP) in mice. Animals were received 14 days pretreatment (oral) of SCE, followed by induction of genotoxicity by CP (40 mg/kg), 24 hours before sacrifice. Mice bone marrow chromosomal aberration assay, micronucleus assay, and sperm abnormality assay were employed for the study. Activities of hepatic antioxidant enzymes were also investigated. Phytochemical investigation was done to determine total phenolic and flavonoid content in SCE. Results showed that CP produced a significant increase in average percentage of aberrant metaphases and chromosomal aberrations (CAs) excluding gap, and micronuclei (MN) formation in polychromatic erythrocytes produced cytotoxicity in mouse bone marrow cells and induced abnormal sperms in a male germ line. CP also markedly inhibited the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and reduced glutahione (GSH) and increased malondialdehyde (MDA) content. Pretreatments with SCE significantly inhibited the frequencies of aberrant metaphases, CAs, MN formation, and cytotoxicity in mouse bone marrow cells induced by CP. SCE also produced a significant reduction of abnormal sperm and antagonized the reduction of CP-induced SOD, CAT, and GSH activities and inhibited increased MDA content in the liver. Total phenolic content present in SCE was 24.68%, whereas total flavonoids were calculated as 3.80%. SCE has a protective effect against genotoxicity and OS induced by CP.

  15. Effects of radiation and vitamin C treatment on metronidazole genotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Das Roy, Lopamudra; Giri, Sarbani; Singh, Supriya; Giri, Anirudha

    2013-05-15

    The impact of exposure to low dose radiation (LDR) on human health is not clear. Besides, cross adaptation or sensitization with pharmaceutical agents may modify the risk of LDR. In the present study, we analyzed the interaction of radiation and metronidazole (MTZ) in inducing chromosome aberration (CA) and micronucleus (MN) in the bone marrow cells of Balb/C mice in vivo. Further, we evaluated the efficacy of vitamin C to reduce MTZ induced genotoxicity. We found that 10, 20 and 40mg/kg of MTZ induced dose dependent increase in the frequency of CA (r=0.9923, P<0.01) as well as MN (r=0.9823, P<0.05) in polychromatic erythrocytes. However, MTZ did not affect the ratio of polychromatic erythrocytes to normochromatic erythrocytes indicating lack of cytotoxicity. Supplementation with vitamin C prior to MTZ treatment significantly reduced the frequency of CA (P<0.001) as well as MN (P<0.001). Radiation (0.5Gy) exposure prior to MTZ treatment produced a less than additive (for CA) to additive (for MN) effects. However, radiation exposure following MTZ treatment produced additive (for CA) and synergistic (for MN) effects. Further, vitamin C pre-treatment also reduced the genotoxicity indices following the combined treatment of MTZ and radiation. Our findings suggest that MTZ may sensitize bone marrow cells to radiation exposure and enhances genotoxicity. We recommend more studies on the interaction of LDR and marketed pharmaceuticals to minimize possible harmful outcomes through appropriate precautionary measures.

  16. Toxicity and genotoxicity in Astyanax bimaculatus (Characidae) induced by microcystins from a bloom of Microcystis spp

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Studies of genotoxicity in fish caused by cyanobacterial microcystins can be useful both in determining the sensitivity of native species, as well as comparing exposure routes. The genotoxicity caused by the microcystins LR and LA from a bloom collected in a eutrophic lake, was revealed in the fish Astyanaxbimaculatus, a native species from South America. LC50 (72 h) was determined as 242.81 μg L -1 and LD50 (72 h) as 49.19 μg kg -1 bw. There was a significant increase of DNA damage in peripheral erythrocytes, following intraperitoneal injection (ip) with tested concentrations of 24.58 μg kg -1 bw and 36.88 μg kg -1 bw, as well as through body exposure to a concentration of 103.72 μg L -1 . Micronucleus (MN) induction was observed after ip injections of 24.58 μg kg -1 bw and 36.88 μg kg -1 bw for 72 h, as well as following body exposure for 72 at 103.72 μg L -1 . Thus, both exposure routes resulted in MN induction and DNA damage. Apoptosis-necrosis testing was carried out only by ip injection with concentrations of 24.58 μg kg -1 bw and 36.88 μg kg- 1 bw. Exposure to microcystins at lower concentrations induced more apoptosis than necrosis in peripheral erythrocytes, whereas exposure at higher concentrations gave rise to both conditions. Thus, Astyanax bimaculatus can be considered as a species sensitive to the genotoxic effects caused by microcystins. PMID:21637586

  17. Genotoxic effect of ethacrynic acid and impact of antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Ward, William M; Hoffman, Jared D; Loo, George

    2015-07-01

    It is known that ethacrynic acid (EA) decreases the intracellular levels of glutathione. Whether the anticipated oxidative stress affects the structural integrity of DNA is unknown. Therefore, DNA damage was assessed in EA-treated HCT116 cells, and the impact of several antioxidants was also determined. EA caused both concentration-dependent and time-dependent DNA damage that eventually resulted in cell death. Unexpectedly, the DNA damage caused by EA was intensified by either ascorbic acid or trolox. In contrast, EA-induced DNA damage was reduced by N-acetylcysteine and by the iron chelator, deferoxamine. In elucidating the DNA damage, it was determined that EA increased the production of reactive oxygen species, which was inhibited by N-acetylcysteine and deferoxamine but not by ascorbic acid and trolox. Also, EA decreased glutathione levels, which were inhibited by N-acetylcysteine. But, ascorbic acid, trolox, and deferoxamine neither inhibited nor enhanced the capacity of EA to decrease glutathione. Interestingly, the glutathione synthesis inhibitor, buthionine sulfoxime, lowered glutathione to a similar degree as EA, but no noticeable DNA damage was found. Nevertheless, buthionine sulfoxime potentiated the glutathione-lowering effect of EA and intensified the DNA damage caused by EA. Additionally, in examining redox-sensitive stress gene expression, it was found that EA increased HO-1, GADD153, and p21mRNA expression, in association with increased nuclear localization of Nrf-2 and p53 proteins. In contrast to ascorbic acid, trolox, and deferoxamine, N-acetylcysteine suppressed the EA-induced upregulation of GADD153, although not of HO-1. Overall, it is concluded that EA has genotoxic properties that can be amplified by certain antioxidants.

  18. Studies on the effect of ascorbic acid and selenium on the genotoxicity of nitrofurans: nitrofurazone and furazolidone.

    PubMed

    Gajewska, J; Szczypka, M; Tudek, B; Szymczyk, T

    1990-10-01

    The genotoxic properties of nitrofurazone and furazolidone were studied using the Ames test and SOS-chromotest. Both compounds were found to act as strong mutagens on the TA97 and TA102 strains of S. typhimurium and to induce the SOS-repair system in the PQ37 strain of E. coli. A good concordance was found between the mutagenic activity and the ability to induce the SOS system. Ascorbic acid and sodium selenite only very slightly lowered the genotoxic effect of the 2 nitrofurans studied both in the Ames test and in the SOS-chromotest.

  19. Dry olive leaf extract counteracts L-thyroxine-induced genotoxicity in human peripheral blood leukocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Topalović, Dijana Žukovec; Živković, Lada; Čabarkapa, Andrea; Djelić, Ninoslav; Bajić, Vladan; Dekanski, Dragana; Spremo-Potparević, Biljana

    2015-01-01

    The thyroid hormones change the rate of basal metabolism, modulating the consumption of oxygen and causing production of reactive oxygen species, which leads to the development of oxidative stress and DNA strand breaks. Olive (Olea europaea L.) leaf contains many potentially bioactive compounds, making it one of the most potent natural antioxidants. The objective of this study was to evaluate the genotoxicity of L-thyroxine and to investigate antioxidative and antigenotoxic potential of the standardized oleuropein-rich dry olive leaf extract (DOLE) against hydrogen peroxide and L-thyroxine-induced DNA damage in human peripheral blood leukocytes by using the comet assay. Various concentrations of the extract were tested with both DNA damage inducers, under two different experimental conditions, pretreatment and posttreatment. Results indicate that L-thyroxine exhibited genotoxic effect and that DOLE displayed protective effect against thyroxine-induced genotoxicity. The number of cells with DNA damage, was significantly reduced, in both pretreated and posttreated samples (P < 0.05). Comparing the beneficial effect of all tested concentrations of DOLE, in both experimental protocols, it appears that extract was more effective in reducing DNA damage in the pretreatment, exhibiting protective role against L-thyroxine effect. This feature of DOLE can be explained by its capacity to act as potent free radical scavenger.

  20. Dry Olive Leaf Extract Counteracts L-Thyroxine-Induced Genotoxicity in Human Peripheral Blood Leukocytes In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Žukovec Topalović, Dijana; Živković, Lada; Čabarkapa, Andrea; Djelić, Ninoslav; Bajić, Vladan; Spremo-Potparević, Biljana

    2015-01-01

    The thyroid hormones change the rate of basal metabolism, modulating the consumption of oxygen and causing production of reactive oxygen species, which leads to the development of oxidative stress and DNA strand breaks. Olive (Olea europaea L.) leaf contains many potentially bioactive compounds, making it one of the most potent natural antioxidants. The objective of this study was to evaluate the genotoxicity of L-thyroxine and to investigate antioxidative and antigenotoxic potential of the standardized oleuropein-rich dry olive leaf extract (DOLE) against hydrogen peroxide and L-thyroxine-induced DNA damage in human peripheral blood leukocytes by using the comet assay. Various concentrations of the extract were tested with both DNA damage inducers, under two different experimental conditions, pretreatment and posttreatment. Results indicate that L-thyroxine exhibited genotoxic effect and that DOLE displayed protective effect against thyroxine-induced genotoxicity. The number of cells with DNA damage, was significantly reduced, in both pretreated and posttreated samples (P < 0.05). Comparing the beneficial effect of all tested concentrations of DOLE, in both experimental protocols, it appears that extract was more effective in reducing DNA damage in the pretreatment, exhibiting protective role against L-thyroxine effect. This feature of DOLE can be explained by its capacity to act as potent free radical scavenger. PMID:25789081

  1. Evaluation of genotoxic effects of the herbicide dicamba using in vivo and in vitro test systems

    SciTech Connect

    Perocco, P.; Ancora, G.; Rani, P.; Valenti, A.M.; Mazzullo, M.; Colacci, A.; Grilli, S. )

    1990-01-01

    The genotoxic effects of the herbicide dicamba have been studied by measuring (1) the unwinding rate of liver DNA from intraperitoneally treated rats (fluorimetric assay); (2) DNA repair as unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) induced in cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HPBL); and (3) sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) in HPBL. Results show that dicamba is capable of inducing DNA damage since it significantly increases the unwinding rate of rat liver DNA in vivo and also induces UDS in HPBL in vitro in the presence of exogenous metabolic activation (S-9 mix). Furthermore, dicamba causes a very slight increase in SCE frequency in HPBL in vitro.

  2. Capsaicin-induced genotoxic stress does not promote apoptosis in A549 human lung and DU145 prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lewinska, Anna; Jarosz, Paulina; Czech, Joanna; Rzeszutek, Iwona; Bielak-Zmijewska, Anna; Grabowska, Wioleta; Wnuk, Maciej

    2015-02-01

    Capsaicin is the major pungent component of the hot chili peppers of the genus Capsicum, which are consumed worldwide as a food additive. More recently, the selective action of capsaicin against cancer cells has been reported. Capsaicin was found to induce apoptosis and inhibit proliferation of a wide range of cancer cells in vitro, whereas being inactive against normal cells. As data on capsaicin-induced genotoxicity are limited and the effects of capsaicin against human lung A549 and DU145 prostate cancer cells were not explored in detail, we were interested in determining whether capsaicin-associated genotoxicity may also provoke A549 and DU145 cell death. Capsaicin-induced decrease in metabolic activity and cell proliferation, and changes in the cell cycle were limited to high concentrations used (≥ 100 μM), whereas, at lower concentrations, capsaicin stimulated both DNA double strand breaks and micronuclei production. Capsaicin was unable to provoke apoptotic cell death when used up to 250 μM concentrations. Capsaicin induced oxidative stress, but was ineffective in provoking the dissipation of the mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential. A different magnitude of p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1) recruitment contributed to diverse capsaicin-induced genotoxic effects in DU145 and A549 cells. Capsaicin was also found to be a DNA hypermethylating agent in A549 cells. In summary, we have shown that genotoxic effects of capsaicin may contribute to limited susceptibility of DU145 and A549 cancer cells to apoptosis in vitro, which may question the usefulness of capsaicin-based anticancer therapy, at least in a case of lung and prostate cancer.

  3. Arsenic-Induced Genotoxicity and Genetic Susceptibility to Arsenic-Related Pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Faita, Francesca; Cori, Liliana; Bianchi, Fabrizio; Andreassi, Maria Grazia

    2013-01-01

    The arsenic (As) exposure represents an important problem in many parts of the World. Indeed, it is estimated that over 100 million individuals are exposed to arsenic, mainly through a contamination of groundwaters. Chronic exposure to As is associated with adverse effects on human health such as cancers, cardiovascular diseases, neurological diseases and the rate of morbidity and mortality in populations exposed is alarming. The purpose of this review is to summarize the genotoxic effects of As in the cells as well as to discuss the importance of signaling and repair of arsenic-induced DNA damage. The current knowledge of specific polymorphisms in candidate genes that confer susceptibility to arsenic exposure is also reviewed. We also discuss the perspectives offered by the determination of biological markers of early effect on health, incorporating genetic polymorphisms, with biomarkers for exposure to better evaluate exposure-response clinical relationships as well as to develop novel preventative strategies for arsenic- health effects. PMID:23583964

  4. Genotoxic and biochemical changes in Baccharis trimera induced by coal contamination.

    PubMed

    Menezes, A P S; Da Silva, J; Rossato, R R; Santos, M S; Decker, N; Da Silva, F R; Cruz, C; Dihl, R R; Lehmann, M; Ferraz, A B F

    2015-04-01

    The processing and combustion of coal in thermal power plants release anthropogenic chemicals into the environment. Baccharis trimera is a common plant used in folk medicine that grows readily in soils degraded by coal mining activities. This shrub bioaccumulates metals released into the environment, and thus its consumption may be harmful to health. The purpose of this study was to investigate the phytochemical profile, antioxidant capacity (DPPH), genotoxic (comet assay) and mutagenic potential (CBMN-cyt) in V79 cells of B. trimera aqueous extracts in the coal-mining region of Candiota (Bt-AEC), and in Bagé, a city that does not experience the effects of exposure to coal (Bt-AEB, a reference site). In the comet assay, only Bt-AEC was genotoxic at the highest doses (0.8mg/mL and 1.6mg/mL), compared to the control. For extracts from both areas, mutagenic effects were observed at higher concentrations compared to the control. The cell damage parameters were significantly high in both extracts; however, more striking values were observed for Bt-AEC, up to the dose of 0.8mg/mL. In chemical analysis, no variation was observed in the contents of flavonoids and phenolic compounds, neither the antioxidant activity, which may suggest that DNA damage observed in V79 cells was induced by the presence of coal contaminants absorbed by the plant.

  5. Investigation of antimutagenic potential of Foeniculum vulgare essential oil on cyclophosphamide induced genotoxicity and oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Pankaj; Tripathi, Rina; Patel, Rakesh K; Pancholi, Shyam S

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated the protective effects of Foeniculum vulgare (fennel) essential oil (FEO) against genotoxicity induced by cyclophosphamide (CP). Mice bone marrow chromosomal aberration (CA), micronucleus, and sperm abnormality assays were employed to measure genotoxicity and cytotoxicity, respectively. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione (GSH), catalase (CAT), and malondialdehyde (MDA) content in the liver were also investigated spectrophotometrically. Animals were administered two different doses of FEO (1 and 2 mL/kg) continuously for 3 days at intervals of 24 hours by the oral route before tissue sampling. The results showed that CP produced a significant increase in the average percentage of aberrant metaphases and CAs, excluding gap and micronuclei formation in polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs), produced cytotoxicity in mouse bone marrow cells, and induced abnormal sperms in the male germ line. CP also markedly inhibited the activities of SOD, CAT, and GSH and increased MDA content. Pretreatments with FEO significantly inhibited the frequencies of aberrant metaphases, CAs, micronuclei formation, and cytotoxicity in mouse bone marrow cells induced by CP and also produced a significant reduction of abnormal sperm and antagonized the reduction of CP-induced SOD, CAT, and GSH activities and inhibited increased MDA content in the liver. FEO inhibits genotoxicity and oxidative stress induced by CP.

  6. Chlorpyrifos-based insecticides induced genotoxic and cytotoxic effects in the ten spotted live-bearer fish, Cnesterodon decemmaculatus (Jenyns, 1842).

    PubMed

    Vera-Candioti, Josefina; Soloneski, Sonia; Larramendy, Marcelo L

    2014-12-01

    Mortality, genotoxicity, and cytotoxicity of the 48% chlorpyrifos (CPF)-based formulations Lorsban* 48E(®) and CPF Zamba(®) were evaluated on Cnesterodon decemmaculatus (Jenyns, 1842) (Pisces, Poeciliidae) under laboratory conditions. Induction of micronucleus (MN) and alterations in the erythrocyte/erythroblast frequencies were employed as end points for genotoxicity and cytotoxicity, respectively. For Lorsban* 48E(®) , mean values of 0.13 and 0.03 mg/L were determined for LC50 at 24 and 96 h, respectively, and these concentrations reached mean values of 0.40 and 0.21 mg/L for CPF Zamba(®) . Mortality values increased as a positive linear function of the CPF Zamba(®) concentrations, but not for Lorsban* 48E(®) concentrations. There was no significant relationship between mortality and exposure time within the 0-96 h period for both formulations. LC50 values indicated that the fish were seven fold more sensitive to Lorsban* 48E(®) than to CPF Zamba(®) . Lorsban* 48E(®) within the concentration range of 0.008-0.025 mg/L increased MN frequency at both 48 and 96 h of treatment. Similar results were also observed when fish were exposed to 0.052-0.155 mg/L of CPF Zamba(®) , regardless of the exposure time. Cellular cytotoxicity was found after Lorsban* 48E(®) and CPF Zamba(®) treatments for all concentrations and time exposures, estimated by a decrease in the frequency of mature erythrocytes and a concomitant enhanced frequency of erythroblasts in circulating blood. Furthermore, our results demonstrated that Lorsban* 48E(®) and CPF Zamba(®) should be considered as CPF-based commercial formulations with marked genotoxic and cytotoxic properties.

  7. Genotoxic effects of ethylene oxide, propylene oxide and epichlorohydrin in humans: update review (1990-2001).

    PubMed

    Kolman, Ada; Chovanec, Miroslav; Osterman-Golkar, Siv

    2002-12-01

    Ethylene oxide (EtO), propylene oxide (PO) and epichlorohydrin (ECH) are important industrial chemicals widely used as intermediates for various synthetic products. EtO and PO are also environmental pollutants. In this review we summarize data published during the period 1990-2001 concerning both the genotoxic and carcinogenic effects of these epoxides in humans. The use of DNA and hemoglobin adducts as biomarkers of exposure and the role of polymorphism, as well as confounding factors, are discussed. We have also included recent in vitro data comprising genotoxic effects induced by EtO, PO and ECH in mammalian cells. The uncertainties regarding cancer risk estimation still persist, in spite of the large database collected.

  8. Evaluation of Hypoglycemic and Genotoxic Effect of Polyphenolic Bark Extract from Quercus sideroxyla

    PubMed Central

    Soto-García, Marcela; Rosales-Castro, Martha; Escalona-Cardoso, Gerardo N.

    2016-01-01

    Quercus sideroxyla is a wood species whose bark has phenolic compound and should be considered to be bioactive; the hypoglycemic and genotoxic properties of Q. sideroxyla bark were evaluated in this study. Total phenolic compound was determined in crude extract (CE) and organic extract (OE). The OE has the highest amount of phenols (724.1 ± 12.0 GAE/g). Besides, both CE and OE demonstrated effect over the inhibition of α-amylase in vitro. Hypoglycemic activity was assessed by glucose tolerance curve and the area under curve (UAC); OE showed the highest hypoglycemic activity. In addition, diabetes was induced by streptozotocin (65 mg/kg) and the extracts (50 mg/kg) were administered for 10 days; OE showed hypoglycemic effect compared with diabetic control and decreased hepatic lipid peroxidation. Acute toxicity and genotoxicity were evaluated in CE; results of acute toxicity did not show any mortality. Besides, the comet assay showed that CE at a dose of 100 mg/kg did not show any genotoxic effect when evaluated at 24 h, whereas it induced slight damage at 200 mg/kg, with the formation of type 1 comets. PMID:27867402

  9. Assessment of the Genotoxic Effects of High Peak-Power Pulsed Electromagnetic Fields

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-06-01

    the Genotoxic Effects of High Peak-Power Pulsed Electromagnetic Fields 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5d. TASK NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Dr... Genotoxic Effects of High Peak-Power Pulsed Electromagnetic Fields (EMFs) (From 1 June 2002 to 31 May 2003 for 12 months) Nikolai Konstantinovich Chemeris...International Science and Technology Center (ISTC), Moscow. 2 ISTC 2350 Assessment of the Genotoxic Effects of High Peak-Power Pulsed Electromagnetic Fields

  10. Evaluation of mutagenic and genotoxic activities of lobeline and its modulation on genomic instability induced by ethanol.

    PubMed

    da Costa E Silva, Liana Dantas; Rodrigues, Laise Carla Lima Verde; Dos Santos, Viviane Ramos; da Costa Allgayer, Mariangela; de Barros Falcão Ferraz, Alexandre; Rolla, Helena Campos; Pereira, Patrícia; Picada, Jaqueline Nascimento

    2014-05-17

    Lobeline is a natural alkaloid derived from Lobelia inflata that has been investigated as a clinical candidate for the treatment of alcoholism. In a pre-clinical trial, lobeline decreased the preference for and consumption of ethanol, due to the modulation of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. However, the interaction between lobeline and ethanol is poorly known and thus there are safety concerns. The present study was conducted to evaluate the mutagenic and genotoxic effects of lobeline and assess its modulation of ethanol-induced toxicological effects. CF-1 male mice were divided into five groups. Groups received an intraperitoneal injection of saline solution, lobeline (5 or 10mg/kg), ethanol (2.5 g/kg), or lobeline plus ethanol, once a day for three consecutive days. Genotoxicity was evaluated in peripheral blood using the alkaline comet assay. The mutagenicity was evaluated using both Salmonella/microsome assay in TA1535, TA97a, TA98, TA100, and TA102 Salmonella typhimurium strains and the micronucleus test in bone marrow. Possible liver and kidney injuries were evaluated using biochemical analysis. Lobeline did not show genotoxic or mutagenic effects and did not increase the ethanol-induced genotoxic effects in blood. Lobeline also protected blood cells against oxidative damage induced by hydrogen peroxide. Biochemical parameters were not altered, indicating no liver or kidney injuries or alterations in lipid and carbohydrate metabolisms. These findings suggest that lobeline does not induce gene or chromosomal mutations, and that this lack of genetic toxicity is maintained in the presence of ethanol, providing further evidence of the safety of this drug to treat alcohol dependence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Genotoxic effects of glyphosate or paraquat on earthworm coelomocytes.

    PubMed

    Muangphra, Ptumporn; Kwankua, Wimon; Gooneratne, Ravi

    2014-06-01

    The potential genotoxicity (nuclear anomalies, damage to single-strand DNA) and pinocytic adherence activity of two (glyphosate-based and paraquat-based) commercial herbicides to earthworm coelomocytes (immune cells in the coelomic cavity) were assessed. Coelomocytes were extracted from earthworms (Pheretima peguana) exposed to concentrations induces both clastogenic and aneugenic effects on earthworm coelomocytes whereas glyphosate causes only aneugenic effects and therefore does not pose a risk of gene mutation in this earthworm.

  12. Carbon black nanoparticle instillation induces sustained inflammation and genotoxicity in mouse lung and liver

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Widespread occupational exposure to carbon black nanoparticles (CBNPs) raises concerns over their safety. CBNPs are genotoxic in vitro but less is known about their genotoxicity in various organs in vivo. Methods We investigated inflammatory and acute phase responses, DNA strand breaks (SB) and oxidatively damaged DNA in C57BL/6 mice 1, 3 and 28 days after a single instillation of 0.018, 0.054 or 0.162 mg Printex 90 CBNPs, alongside sham controls. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid was analyzed for cellular composition. SB in BAL cells, whole lung and liver were assessed using the alkaline comet assay. Formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG) sensitive sites were assessed as an indicator of oxidatively damaged DNA. Pulmonary and hepatic acute phase response was evaluated by Saa3 mRNA real-time quantitative PCR. Results Inflammation was strongest 1 and 3 days post-exposure, and remained elevated for the two highest doses (i.e., 0.054 and 0.162 mg) 28 days post-exposure (P < 0.001). SB were detected in lung at all doses on post-exposure day 1 (P < 0.001) and remained elevated at the two highest doses until day 28 (P < 0.05). BAL cell DNA SB were elevated relative to controls at least at the highest dose on all post-exposure days (P < 0.05). The level of FPG sensitive sites in lung was increased throughout with significant increases occurring on post-exposure days 1 and 3, in comparison to controls (P < 0.001-0.05). SB in liver were detected on post-exposure days 1 (P < 0.001) and 28 (P < 0.001). Polymorphonuclear (PMN) cell counts in BAL correlated strongly with FPG sensitive sites in lung (r = 0.88, P < 0.001), whereas no such correlation was observed with SB (r = 0.52, P = 0.08). CBNP increased the expression of Saa3 mRNA in lung tissue on day 1 (all doses), 3 (all doses) and 28 (0.054 and 0.162 mg), but not in liver. Conclusions Deposition of CBNPs in lung induces inflammatory and genotoxic effects in mouse lung that persist considerably after the

  13. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in liver cells induced by cobalt nanoparticles and ions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Y. K.; Deng, X. X.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The cytotoxicity induced by cobalt ions (Co2+) and cobalt nanoparticles (Co-NPs) which released following the insertion of a total hip prosthesis, has been reported. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms. In this study, we investigate the toxic effect of Co2+ and Co-NPs on liver cells, and explain further the potential mechanisms. Methods Co-NPs were characterised for size, shape, elemental analysis, and hydrodynamic diameter, and were assessed by Transmission Electron Microscope, Scanning Electron Microscope, Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy and Dynamic Light Scattering. BRL-3A cells were used in this study. Cytotoxicity was evaluated by MTT and lactate dehydrogenase release assay. In order to clarify the potential mechanisms, reactive oxygen species, Bax/Bcl-2 mRNA expression, IL-8 mRNA expression and DNA damage were assessed on BRL-3A cells after Co2+ or Co-NPs treatment. Results Results showed cytotoxic effects of Co2+ and Co-NPs were dependent upon time and dosage, and the cytotoxicity of Co-NPs was greater than that of Co2+. In addition, Co-NPs elicited a significant (p < 0.05) reduction in cell viability with a concomitant increase in lactic dehydrogenase release, reactive oxygen species generation, IL-8 mRNA expression, Bax/Bcl-2 mRNA expression and DNA damage after 24 hours of exposure. Conclusion Co-NPs induced greater cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in BRL-3A cells than Co2+. Cell membrane damage, oxidative stress, immune inflammation and DNA damage may play an important role in the effects of Co-NPs on liver cells. Cite this article: Y. K. Liu, X. X. Deng, H.L. Yang. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in liver cells induced by cobalt nanoparticles and ions. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:461–469. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.510.BJR-2016-0016.R1. PMID:27754833

  14. Testing systems for biologic markers of genotoxic exposure and effect

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, M.L.

    1986-11-19

    Societal interest in genotoxicity stems from two concerns: the fear of carcinogenesis secondary to somatic mutation; and the fear of birth defects and decreasing genetic fitness secondary to heritable mutation. There is a pressing need to identify agents that can cause these effects, to understand the underlying dose-response relationships, to identify exposed populations, and to estimate both the magnitude of exposure and the risk of adverse health effects in such populations. Biologic markers refer either to evidence in surrogate organisms, or to the expressions of exposure and effect in human populations. 21 refs.

  15. Genotoxic effects of cisplatin in somatic tissue of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    Third instar larvae of Drosophila melanogaster transdihybrid for mwh and flr were exposed to varying concentrations of cisplatin by feeding on dry media wetted with aqueous solutions of the test compound. Larval feeding continued until pupation, and surviving transdihybrid adults were collected seven days following commencement of feeding. Wings of adults were removed and scored under 400X magnification for the presence of twin spots and single spots comprised of clones of cells possessing malformed wing hairs. Cisplatin was found to induce both twin spots and single spots, and significant linear concentration-response relationships were obtained with respect to the induction of all endpoints. This capacity to induce mitotic exchange in the somatic tissue of Drosophila compares well with the compound's reported ability to induce chromosome breaks in Drosophila germ cells. However, not all compounds possess similar genotoxic profiles in the somatic an germ tissue of Drosophila.

  16. Role of Zucchini and Its Distinctive Components in the Modulation of Degenerative Processes: Genotoxicity, Anti-Genotoxicity, Cytotoxicity and Apoptotic Effects

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Valdivieso, Damián; Font, Rafael; Fernández-Bedmar, Zahira; Merinas-Amo, Tania; Gómez, Pedro; Alonso-Moraga, Ángeles

    2017-01-01

    Zucchini (Cucurbita pepo subsp. pepo) is a seasonal vegetable with high nutritional and medical values. Many useful properties of this fruit are attributed to bioactive compounds. Zucchini fruits (“Yellow” and “Light Green” varieties) and four distinctive components (lutein, β-carotene, zeaxanthin and dehydroascorbic acid) were selected. Firstly, the lutein, β-carotene, zeaxanthin and dehydroascorbic acid contents were determined in these fruits. Then, in order to evaluate the safety and suitability of their use, different assays were carried out: (i) genotoxicity and anti-genotoxicity tests to determine the safety and DNA-protection against hydrogen peroxide; (ii) cytotoxicity; and (iii) DNA fragmentation and Annexin V/PI (Propidium Iodide) assays to evaluate the pro-apoptotic effect. Results showed that: (i) all the substances were non-genotoxic; (ii) all the substances were anti-genotoxic except the highest concentration of lutein; (iii) “Yellow” zucchini epicarp and mesocarp exhibited the highest cytotoxic activity (IC50 > 0.1 mg/mL and 0.2 mg/mL, respectively); and (iv) “Light Green” zucchini skin induced internucleosomal DNA fragmentation, β-carotene being the possible molecule responsible for its pro-apoptotic activity. To sum up, zucchini fruit could play a positive role in human health and nutrition due to this fruit and its components were safe, able to inhibit significantly the H2O2-induced damage and exhibit anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities toward HL60 (human promyelocytic leukemia cells) tumor cells. The information generated from this research should be considered when selecting potential accessions for breeding program purposes. PMID:28708122

  17. Role of Zucchini and Its Distinctive Components in the Modulation of Degenerative Processes: Genotoxicity, Anti-Genotoxicity, Cytotoxicity and Apoptotic Effects.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Valdivieso, Damián; Font, Rafael; Fernández-Bedmar, Zahira; Merinas-Amo, Tania; Gómez, Pedro; Alonso-Moraga, Ángeles; Del Río-Celestino, Mercedes

    2017-07-14

    Zucchini (Cucurbita pepo subsp. pepo) is a seasonal vegetable with high nutritional and medical values. Many useful properties of this fruit are attributed to bioactive compounds. Zucchini fruits ("Yellow" and "Light Green" varieties) and four distinctive components (lutein, β-carotene, zeaxanthin and dehydroascorbic acid) were selected. Firstly, the lutein, β-carotene, zeaxanthin and dehydroascorbic acid contents were determined in these fruits. Then, in order to evaluate the safety and suitability of their use, different assays were carried out: (i) genotoxicity and anti-genotoxicity tests to determine the safety and DNA-protection against hydrogen peroxide; (ii) cytotoxicity; and (iii) DNA fragmentation and Annexin V/PI (Propidium Iodide) assays to evaluate the pro-apoptotic effect. Results showed that: (i) all the substances were non-genotoxic; (ii) all the substances were anti-genotoxic except the highest concentration of lutein; (iii) "Yellow" zucchini epicarp and mesocarp exhibited the highest cytotoxic activity (IC50 > 0.1 mg/mL and 0.2 mg/mL, respectively); and (iv) "Light Green" zucchini skin induced internucleosomal DNA fragmentation, β-carotene being the possible molecule responsible for its pro-apoptotic activity. To sum up, zucchini fruit could play a positive role in human health and nutrition due to this fruit and its components were safe, able to inhibit significantly the H₂O₂-induced damage and exhibit anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities toward HL60 (human promyelocytic leukemia cells) tumor cells. The information generated from this research should be considered when selecting potential accessions for breeding program purposes.

  18. Organic honey supplementation reverses pesticide-induced genotoxicity by modulating DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Alleva, Renata; Manzella, Nicola; Gaetani, Simona; Ciarapica, Veronica; Bracci, Massimo; Caboni, Maria Fiorenza; Pasini, Federica; Monaco, Federica; Amati, Monica; Borghi, Battista; Tomasetti, Marco

    2016-10-01

    Glyphosate (GLY) and organophosphorus insecticides such as chlorpyrifos (CPF) may cause DNA damage and cancer in exposed individuals through mitochondrial dysfunction. Polyphenols ubiquitously present in fruits and vegetables, have been viewed as antioxidant molecules, but also influence mitochondrial homeostasis. Here, honey containing polyphenol compounds was evaluated for its potential protective effect on pesticide-induced genotoxicity. Honey extracts from four floral organic sources were evaluated for their polyphenol content, antioxidant activity, and potential protective effects on pesticide-related mitochondrial destabilization, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species formation, and DNA damage response in human bronchial epithelial and neuronal cells. The protective effect of honey was, then evaluated in a residential population chronically exposed to pesticides. The four honey types showed a different polyphenol profile associated with a different antioxidant power. The pesticide-induced mitochondrial dysfunction parallels ROS formation from mitochondria (mtROS) and consequent DNA damage. Honey extracts efficiently inhibited pesticide-induced mtROS formation, and reduced DNA damage by upregulation of DNA repair through NFR2. Honey supplementation enhanced DNA repair activity in a residential population chronically exposed to pesticides, which resulted in a marked reduction of pesticide-induced DNA lesions. These results provide new insight regarding the effect of honey containing polyphenols on pesticide-induced DNA damage response. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Randomly amplified polymorphic-DNA analysis for detecting genotoxic effects of Boron on maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Sakcali, M Serdal; Kekec, Guzin; Uzonur, Irem; Alpsoy, Lokman; Tombuloglu, Huseyin

    2015-08-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the genotoxic effect of boron (B) on maize using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) method. Experimental design was conducted under 0, 5, 10, 25, 50, 100, 125, and 150 ppm B exposures, and physiological changes have revealed a sharp decrease in root growth rates from 28% to 85%, starting from 25 ppm to 150 ppm, respectively. RAPD-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis shows that DNA alterations are clearly observed from beginning to 100 ppm. B-induced inhibition in root growth had a positive correlation with DNA alterations. Total soluble protein, root and stem lengths, and B content analysis in root and leaves encourage these results as a consequence. These preliminary findings reveal that B causes chromosomal aberration and genotoxic effects on maize. Meanwhile, usage of RAPD-PCR technique is a suitable biomarker to detect genotoxic effect of B on maize and other crops for the future.

  20. Acute effects of a prooxidant herbicide on the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: Screening cytotoxicity and genotoxicity endpoints.

    PubMed

    Esperanza, Marta; Cid, Ángeles; Herrero, Concepción; Rioboo, Carmen

    2015-08-01

    Since recent evidence has demonstrated that many types of chemicals exhibit oxidative and/or genotoxic potential on living organisms, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and DNA damage are currently the best accepted paradigms to assess the potential hazardous biological effects of a wide range of contaminants. The goal of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity of different cytotoxicity and genotoxicity responses on the model microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii exposed to the prooxidant herbicide paraquat. In addition to the growth endpoint, cell viability, mitochondrial membrane potential and presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were assayed as potential markers of cytotoxicity using flow cytometry (FCM). To study the effects of paraquat on C. reinhardtii DNA, several genotoxicity approaches were implemented for the first time in an ecotoxicological study on microalgae. Oxidative DNA base damage was analysed by measuring the oxidative DNA lesion 8-OHdG by FCM. DNA fragmentation was analysed by different methods: comet assay, and cell cycle analysis by FCM, with a particular focus on the presence of subG1-nuclei. Finally, effects on morphology of nuclei were monitored through DAPI staining. The evaluation of these endpoints showed that several physiological and biochemical parameters reacted to oxidative stress disturbances with greater sensitivity than integrative parameters such as growth rates or cell viability. The experiments revealed concentration-dependent cytotoxicity (ROS formation, depolarization of mitochondrial membrane), genotoxicity (oxidative DNA damage, DNA strand breakage, alterations in nuclear morphology), and cell cycle disturbances (subG1-nuclei, decrease of 4N population) in paraquat-treated cells. Overall, the genotoxicity results indicate that the production of ROS caused by exposure to paraquat induces oxidative DNA damage followed by DNA single- and double-strand breaks and cell cycle alterations, possibly leading to apoptosis

  1. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes induce cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in human lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Cavallo, Delia; Fanizza, Carla; Ursini, Cinzia Lucia; Casciardi, Stefano; Paba, Emilia; Ciervo, Aureliano; Fresegna, Anna Maria; Maiello, Raffaele; Marcelloni, Anna Maria; Buresti, Giuliana; Tombolini, Francesca; Bellucci, Stefano; Iavicoli, Sergio

    2012-06-01

    The increasing use of nanomaterials in consumer products highlights the importance of understanding their potential toxic effects. We evaluated cytotoxic and genotoxic/oxidative effects induced by commercial multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on human lung epithelial (A549) cells treated with 5, 10, 40 and 100 µg ml⁻¹ for different exposure times. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis, MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide] and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays were performed to evaluate cytotoxicity. Fpg-modified comet assay was used to evaluate direct-oxidative DNA damage. LDH leakage was detected after 2, 4 and 24 h of exposure and viability reduction was revealed after 24 h. SEM analysis, performed after 4 and 24 h exposure, showed cell surface changes such as lower microvilli density, microvilli structure modifications and the presence of holes in plasma membrane. We found an induction of direct DNA damage after each exposure time and at all concentrations, statistically significant at 10 and 40 µg ml⁻¹ after 2 h, at 5, 10, 100 µg ml⁻¹ after 4 h and at 10 µg ml⁻¹ after 24 h exposure. However, oxidative DNA damage was not found. The results showed an induction of early cytotoxic effects such as loss of membrane integrity, surface morphological changes and MWCNT agglomerate entrance at all concentrations. We also demonstrated the ability of MWCNTs to induce early genotoxicity. This study emphasizes the suitability of our approach to evaluating simultaneously the early response of the cell membrane and DNA to different MWCNT concentrations and exposure times in cells of target organ. The findings contribute to elucidation of the mechanism by which MWCNTs cause toxic effects in an in vitro experimental model.

  2. Identification of specific mRNA signatures as fingerprints for carcinogenesis in mice induced by genotoxic and nongenotoxic hepatocarcinogens.

    PubMed

    Kossler, Nadine; Matheis, Katja A; Ostenfeldt, Nina; Bach Toft, Dorthe; Dhalluin, Stéphane; Deschl, Ulrich; Kalkuhl, Arno

    2015-02-01

    Long-term rodent carcinogenicity studies for evaluation of chemicals and pharmaceuticals concerning their carcinogenic potential to humans are currently receiving critical revision. Additional data from mechanistic studies can support cancer risk assessment by clarifying the underlying mode of action. In the course of the IMI MARCAR project, a European consortium of EFPIA partners and academics, which aims to identify biomarkers for nongenotoxic carcinogenesis, a toxicogenomic mouse liver database was generated. CD-1 mice were orally treated for 3 and 14 days with 3 known genotoxic hepatocarcinogens: C.I. Direct Black 38, Dimethylnitrosamine and 4,4'-Methylenedianiline; 3 nongenotoxic hepatocarcinogens: 1,4-Dichlorobenzene, Phenobarbital sodium and Piperonyl butoxide; 4 nonhepatocarcinogens: Cefuroxime sodium, Nifedipine, Prazosin hydrochloride and Propranolol hydrochloride; and 3 compounds that show ambiguous results in genotoxicity testing: Cyproterone acetate, Thioacetamide and Wy-14643. By liver mRNA expression analysis using individual animal data, we identified 64 specific biomarker candidates for genotoxic carcinogens and 69 for nongenotoxic carcinogens for male mice at day 15. The majority of genotoxic carcinogen biomarker candidates possess functions in DNA damage response (eg, apoptosis, cell cycle progression, DNA repair). Most of the identified nongenotoxic carcinogen biomarker candidates are involved in regulation of cell cycle progression and apoptosis. The derived biomarker lists were characterized with respect to their dependency on study duration and gender and were successfully used to characterize carcinogens with ambiguous genotoxicity test results, such as Wy-14643. The identified biomarker candidates improve the mechanistic understanding of drug-induced effects on the mouse liver that result in hepatocellular adenomas and/or carcinomas in 2-year mouse carcinogenicity studies.

  3. Early Genotoxic and Cytotoxic Effects of the Toxic Dinoflagellate Prorocentrum lima in the Mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    PubMed

    Prego-Faraldo, María Verónica; Valdiglesias, Vanessa; Laffon, Blanca; Mendez, Josefina; Eirin-Lopez, Jose M

    2016-05-24

    Okadaic acid (OA) and dinophysistoxins (DTXs) are the main toxins responsible for diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP) intoxications during harmful algal blooms (HABs). Although the genotoxic and cytotoxic responses to OA have been evaluated in vitro, the in vivo effects of these toxins have not yet been fully explored. The present work fills this gap by evaluating the in vivo effects of the exposure to the DSP-toxin-producing dinoflagellate Prorocentrum lima during the simulation of an early HAB episode in the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. The obtained results revealed that in vivo exposure to this toxic microalgae induced early genotoxicity in hemocytes, as a consequence of oxidative DNA damage. In addition, the DNA damage observed in gill cells seems to be mainly influenced by exposure time and P. lima concentration, similarly to the case of the oxidative damage found in hemocytes exposed in vitro to OA. In both cell types, the absence of DNA damage at low toxin concentrations is consistent with the notion suggesting that this level of toxicity does not disturb the antioxidant balance. Lastly, in vivo exposure to growing P. lima cell densities increased apoptosis but not necrosis, probably due to the presence of a high number of protein apoptosis inhibitors in molluscs. Overall, this work sheds light into the in vivo genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of P. lima. In doing so, it also demonstrates for the first time the potential of the modified (OGG1) comet assay for assessing oxidative DNA damage caused by marine toxins in marine invertebrates.

  4. Early Genotoxic and Cytotoxic Effects of the Toxic Dinoflagellate Prorocentrum lima in the Mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis

    PubMed Central

    Prego-Faraldo, María Verónica; Valdiglesias, Vanessa; Laffon, Blanca; Mendez, Josefina; Eirin-Lopez, Jose M.

    2016-01-01

    Okadaic acid (OA) and dinophysistoxins (DTXs) are the main toxins responsible for diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP) intoxications during harmful algal blooms (HABs). Although the genotoxic and cytotoxic responses to OA have been evaluated in vitro, the in vivo effects of these toxins have not yet been fully explored. The present work fills this gap by evaluating the in vivo effects of the exposure to the DSP-toxin-producing dinoflagellate Prorocentrum lima during the simulation of an early HAB episode in the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. The obtained results revealed that in vivo exposure to this toxic microalgae induced early genotoxicity in hemocytes, as a consequence of oxidative DNA damage. In addition, the DNA damage observed in gill cells seems to be mainly influenced by exposure time and P. lima concentration, similarly to the case of the oxidative damage found in hemocytes exposed in vitro to OA. In both cell types, the absence of DNA damage at low toxin concentrations is consistent with the notion suggesting that this level of toxicity does not disturb the antioxidant balance. Lastly, in vivo exposure to growing P. lima cell densities increased apoptosis but not necrosis, probably due to the presence of a high number of protein apoptosis inhibitors in molluscs. Overall, this work sheds light into the in vivo genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of P. lima. In doing so, it also demonstrates for the first time the potential of the modified (OGG1) comet assay for assessing oxidative DNA damage caused by marine toxins in marine invertebrates. PMID:27231936

  5. Genotoxic effect of ethacrynic acid and impact of antioxidants

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, William M.; Hoffman, Jared D.; Loo, George

    2015-07-01

    It is known that ethacrynic acid (EA) decreases the intracellular levels of glutathione. Whether the anticipated oxidative stress affects the structural integrity of DNA is unknown. Therefore, DNA damage was assessed in EA-treated HCT116 cells, and the impact of several antioxidants was also determined. EA caused both concentration-dependent and time-dependent DNA damage that eventually resulted in cell death. Unexpectedly, the DNA damage caused by EA was intensified by either ascorbic acid or trolox. In contrast, EA-induced DNA damage was reduced by N-acetylcysteine and by the iron chelator, deferoxamine. In elucidating the DNA damage, it was determined that EA increased the production of reactive oxygen species, which was inhibited by N-acetylcysteine and deferoxamine but not by ascorbic acid and trolox. Also, EA decreased glutathione levels, which were inhibited by N-acetylcysteine. But, ascorbic acid, trolox, and deferoxamine neither inhibited nor enhanced the capacity of EA to decrease glutathione. Interestingly, the glutathione synthesis inhibitor, buthionine sulfoxime, lowered glutathione to a similar degree as EA, but no noticeable DNA damage was found. Nevertheless, buthionine sulfoxime potentiated the glutathione-lowering effect of EA and intensified the DNA damage caused by EA. Additionally, in examining redox-sensitive stress gene expression, it was found that EA increased HO-1, GADD153, and p21mRNA expression, in association with increased nuclear localization of Nrf-2 and p53 proteins. In contrast to ascorbic acid, trolox, and deferoxamine, N-acetylcysteine suppressed the EA-induced upregulation of GADD153, although not of HO-1. Overall, it is concluded that EA has genotoxic properties that can be amplified by certain antioxidants. - Highlights: • Ethacrynic acid (EA) caused cellular DNA damage. • EA-induced DNA damage was potentiated by ascorbic acid or trolox. • EA increased ROS production, not inhibited by ascorbic acid or trolox. • EA

  6. The Effects of Arsenic Trioxide on DNA Synthesis and Genotoxicity in Human Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Jacqueline J.; Graham, Barbara; Walker, Alice M.; Tchounwou, Paul B.; Rogers, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Colon cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Recent studies in our laboratory have demonstrated that arsenic trioxide is cytotoxic in human colon cancer (HT-29), lung (A549) and breast (MCF-7) carcinoma cells. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the effects of arsenic trioxide on DNA synthesis and the possible genotoxic effects on human colon cancer cells. HT-29 cells were cultured according to standard protocol, followed by exposure to various doses (0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 μg/mL) of arsenic trioxide for 24 h. The proliferative response (DNA synthesis) to arsenic trioxide was assessed by [3H]thymidine incorporation. The genotoxic effects of arsenic-induced DNA damage in a human colon cancer cell line was evaluated by the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis. Results indicated that arsenic trioxide affected DNA synthesis in HT-29 cells in a biphasic manner; showing a slight but not significant increase in cell proliferation at lower levels of exposure (2, 4 and 6 μg/mL) followed by a significant inhibition of cell proliferation at higher doses (i.e., 8 and 10 μg/mL). The study also confirmed that arsenic trioxide exposure caused genotoxicity as revealed by the significant increase in DNA damage, comet tail-lengths, and tail moment when compared to non-exposed cells. Results of the [3H]thymidine incorporation assay and comet assay revealed that exposure to arsenic trioxide affected DNA synthesis and exhibited genotoxic effects in human colon cancer cells. PMID:20623008

  7. Genotoxic effects of starvation and dimethoate in haemocytes and midgut gland cells of wolf spider Xerolycosa nemoralis (Lycosidae).

    PubMed

    Wilczek, Grażyna; Mędrzak, Monika; Augustyniak, Maria; Wilczek, Piotr; Stalmach, Monika

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the genotoxic effects of starvation and dimethoate (organophosphate insecticide) in female and male wolf spiders Xerolycosa nemoralis (Lycosidae) exposed to the stressors under laboratory conditions. DNA damage was measured in haemocytes and midgut gland cells using the comet assay. In response to the two stressing factors, both cell types showed %TDNA, tail length (TL) and OTM values higher in males than in females. Level of DNA damage in haemocytes was greater than in midgut gland cells. In both sexes, the strongest genotoxicity was recorded at single application of dimethoate. After five-time exposure to the pesticide, genotoxic effects of a single dose were sustained in males and reduced to the control level in females. Starvation stress was well tolerated by the females, in which neither cell type was affected by DNA damage. However, in male haemocytes food deprivation induced severe DNA damage, what suggests suppression of the defence potential at prolonged starvation periods.

  8. Comparison of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity induced by the extracts of methanol and gasoline engine exhausts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zunzhen; Che, Wangjun; Liang, Ying; Wu, Mei; Li, Na; Shu, Ya; Liu, Fang; Wu, Desheng

    2007-09-01

    Gasoline engine exhaust has been considered a major source of air pollution in China, and methanol is considered as a potential substitute for gasoline fuel. In this study, the genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of organic extracts of condensate, particulate matters (PM) and semivolatile organic compounds (SVOC) of gasoline and absolute methanol engine exhaust were examined by using MTT assay, micronucleus assay, comet assay and Ames test. The results have showed that gasoline engine exhaust exhibited stronger cytotoxicity to human lung carcinoma cell lines (A549 cell) than methanol engine exhaust. Furthermore, gasoline engine exhaust increased micronucleus formation, induced DNA damage in A549 cells and increased TA98 revertants in the presence of metabolic activating enzymes in a concentration-dependent manner. In contrast, methanol engine exhaust failed to exhibit these adverse effects. The results suggest methanol may be used as a cleaner fuel for automobile.

  9. Genotoxicity to human cells induced by air particulates isolated during the Kuwait oil fires

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsey, K.T.; Xia, F.; Christiani, D.C.; Liber, H.L.; Spengler, J.D.; Dockery, D.W. ); Bodell, W.J. )

    1994-01-01

    In an effort to examine the potential of exposure to soot from the 1991 oil fires in the Kuwait desert for inducing genetic effects we studied the in vitro genotoxicity of this materials. Air particulates isolated near the Kuwait oil fires were studied using three assays. Dose-dependent increases were observed for both sister chromatid exchanges in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and mutation at the hprt locus in the metabolically competent human lymphoblast cell line AHH-1. Similar magnitudes of response were seen using these two assays when testing a standard air particulate sample which had been isolated from the Washington, DC, area. Using the [sup 32]P-postlabeling assay, no increase in DNA adduct formation was observed in AHH-1 cells treated with particulates isolated from sampling in Kuwait. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  10. [Genotoxic effects of heavy metals and their salts in an experiment on Drosophila and mammals].

    PubMed

    Chopikashvili, L V; Bobyleva, L A; Zolotareva, G N

    1989-01-01

    Analysis of data on the influence of different metals (cadmium, cobalt, molybdenum) on the Drosophila melanogaster cells has revealed a considerable genotoxic effect of cadmium salts which manifests in the high percentage of cells elimination at the early stages of spermatogenesis--the premeiotic cells. The modifying effect of molybdenum in the combination with cadmium and molybdenum decreasing the percentage of the progeny fall may be induced by activation of the reparation systems. In the bone marrow cells of mice Cd ions modify cytogenetic effects of the AB preparation, intensifying its mutagenic activity in some cases.

  11. Comparative specificities of Calreticulin Transacetylase to O-acetyl, N-acetyl and S-acetyl derivative of 4-methylcoumarins and their inhibitory effect on AFB1-induced genotoxicity in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ajit; Ponnan, Prija; Raj, Hanumantharao G; Parmar, Virinder S; Saso, Luciano

    2013-02-01

    We have earlier conclusively established the Calreticulin Transacetylase (CRTAase) catalyzed modifications of functional proteins such as cytochrome-P450-linked mixed function oxidases (Cyt-P450-linked MFOs), NADPH cytochrome c reductase, and glutathione S-transferase by acetoxy derivatives of polyphenols. In this study, we have investigated the comparative specificities of CRTAase to N-acetyl derivative, 7-acetamido-4-methylcoumarin (7-N-AMC), O-acetyl derivative, 7-acetoxy-4-methylcoumarin (7-AMC), S-acetyl derivative, 7-thioacetyl-4-methycoumarin (7-S-AMC) and their parent compounds in the modulation of catalytic activities of aforesaid proteins. Special attention concentrated on the comparative inhibitory effect of aforesaid acetyl moiety on Cyt-P450-linked MFOs such as 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD), pentoxyresorufin O-dealkylase (PROD) and aflatoxin B(1) (AFB(1))-induced genotoxicity in vitro and in vivo. The results clearly indicated that N-acetyl and O-acetyl derivatives were better substrates for CRTAase while the S-acetyl was found to be a poorer substrate. Our study involving atomic charge, charge density and molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) calculations indicated the pivotal role of electronegativity and charge distribution values of O, N and S atoms of the acetyl group at C-7 position of the 4-methylcoumarins in CRTAase activity. These facts reinforce our hypothesis that the CRTAase catalyzed modifications of the catalytic activities of aforesaid proteins by acetyl derivative of 4-methylcoumarins is probably due to acetylation of these proteins.

  12. Effects of soil pH on the Vicia-micronucleus genotoxicity assay.

    PubMed

    Dhyèvre, Adrien; Foltête, Anne Sophie; Aran, Delphine; Muller, Serge; Cotelle, Sylvie

    2014-11-01

    In the field of contaminated sites and soil management, chemical analyses only bring typological data about pollution. As far as bioavailability and effects on organisms are concerned, we need ecotoxicology tools. In this domain, among many existing tests, we chose to study genotoxicity because it is a short-term endpoint with long-term consequences. The aim of this study is to assess the effects of soil pH on the results of the Vicia faba root tip micronucleus test for the two following reasons: (i) to define the pH range within which the test can be performed without modifying the soil to be tested, within the framework of the ISO standard of the test and (ii) to provides information about the effects of the pH on the genotoxic potential of soils. In this context, we modified the pH of a standard soil with HCl or NaOH and we spiked the matrix with copper (2, 4 and 8 mmol kg(-1) dry soil) or with maleic hydrazide, an antigerminative chemical (5, 10 and 20 μmol kg(-1) dry soil). We concluded that the pH had no effect on the mitotic index or micronucleus frequency in the root cells of the negative controls: extreme pH values did not induce micronucleus formation in root cells. Moreover, according to our results, the Vicia-micronucleus test can be performed with pH values ranging between 3.2 and 9.0, but in the ISO 29200 "Soil quality--assessment of genotoxic effects on higher plants--V. faba micronucleus test" we recommended to use a control soil with a pH value ranging between 5 and 8 for a more accurate assessment of chemical genotoxicity. We also found that acid pH could increase the genotoxic potential of pollutants, especially heavy metals. With hydrazide maleic spiked soil, plants were placed in a situation of double stress, i.e. toxicity caused by extreme pH values and toxicity induced by the pollutant. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Genotoxic effects of the o-phenylphenol metabolites phenylhydroquinone and phenylbenzoquinone in V79 cells.

    PubMed

    Lambert, A C; Eastmond, D A

    1994-10-01

    o-Phenylphenol (OPP) and its sodium salt, sodium o-phenylphenate are broad spectrum fungicides and disinfectants with widespread usage. Both chemicals have been reported to induce cancer in the kidney and urinary bladder of Fischer 344 rats. Recently it has been proposed that the metabolic activation of OPP occurs via a two-step process involving the cytochrome P450-mediated formation of phenylhydroquinone (PHQ) in the liver and a prostaglandin H synthase-mediated oxidation of PHQ to phenylbenzoquinone (PBQ) in the urinary tract. In order to further investigate the metabolic activation and genotoxic effects of OPP, we have investigated the ability of PHQ and PBQ to induce micronuclei and mutations at the HGPRT locus in a prostaglandin H synthase-containing V79 Chinese hamster lung fibroblast cell line. In arachidonic acid-supplemented V79 cells, PHQ induced a significant increase in micronuclei whereas no increase was observed in cells in the absence of arachidonic acid supplementation. Immunofluorescent labeling of centromeric proteins with the CREST antibody indicated that the arachidonic acid-dependent induction of micronuclei by PHQ was due almost entirely to micronuclei containing whole chromosomes which had failed to segregate properly during mitosis. The induction of micronuclei by PHQ was significantly inhibited by treatment of the cells with indomethacin, aspirin, ascorbic acid, dithiothreitol and reduced glutathione supporting a role for prostaglandin H synthase in the genotoxic effects of PHQ. No increase in 6-thioguanine-resistant cells was observed in cells treated with PHQ or PBQ. This arachidonic acid-dependent conversion of PHQ to a genotoxic species is consistent with the hypothesis that a prostaglandin H synthase-mediated activation of PHQ may be involved in OPP- and SOPP-induced urinary tract carcinogenesis and also suggests that the induction of aneuploidy may play an important role in OPP-induced tumorigenesis.

  14. Evolved Cellular Mechanisms to Respond to Genotoxic Insults: Implications for Radiation-Induced Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Fleenor, Courtney J.; Higa, Kelly; Weil, Michael M.; DeGregori, James

    2015-01-01

    Human exposure to ionizing radiation is highly associated with adverse health effects, including reduced hematopoietic cell function and increased risk of carcinogenesis. The hematopoietic deficits manifest across blood cell types and persist for years after radiation exposure, suggesting a long-lived and multi-potent cellular reservoir for radiation-induced effects. As such, research has focused on identifying both the immediate and latent hematopoietic stem cell responses to radiation exposure. Radiation-associated effects on hematopoietic function and malignancy development have generally been attributed to the direct induction of mutations resulting from radiation-induced DNA damage. Other studies have illuminated the role of cellular programs that both limit and enhance radiation-induced tissue phenotypes and carcinogenesis. In this review, distinct but collaborative cellular responses to genotoxic insults are highlighted, with an emphasis on how these programmed responses impact hematopoietic cellular fitness and competition. These radiation-induced cellular programs include apoptosis, senescence and impaired self-renewal within the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) pool. In the context of sporadic DNA damage to a cell, these cellular responses act in concert to restore tissue function and prevent selection for adaptive oncogenic mutations. But in the contexts of whole-tissue exposure or whole-body exposure to genotoxins, such as radiotherapy or chemotherapy, we propose that these programs can contribute to long-lasting tissue impairment and increased carcinogenesis. PMID:26414506

  15. Reduction of doxorubicin-induced genotoxicity by Handroanthus impetiginosus in mouse bone marrow revealed by micronucleus assay.

    PubMed

    Boriollo, M F G; Silva, T A; Rodrigues-Netto, M F; Silva, J J; Marques, M B; Dias, C T S; Höfling, J F; Resck, M C C; Oliveira, N M S

    2017-07-10

    Handroanthus impetiginosus has long been used in traditional medicine and various studies have determined the presence of bioactive chemical compounds and potential phytotherapeutics. In this study, the genotoxicity of the lyophilized tincture of H. impetiginosus bark (THI) was evaluated in mouse bone marrow using micronucleus assays. The interaction between THI and genotoxic effects induced by the chemotherapeutic agent, doxorubicin (DXR), was also analyzed. Experimental groups were evaluated 24 to 48 h after treatment with N-nitroso-N-ethylurea (NEU; 50 mg/kg), DXR (5 mg/kg), sodium chloride (NaCl; 150 mM), and THI (0.5-2 g/kg). Antigenotoxic assays were carried out using THI (0.5 g/kg) in combination with NEU or DXR. Analysis of the micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MNPCEs) indicated no significant differences between treatment doses of THI (0.5-2 g/kg) and NaCl. Polychromatic erythrocyte (PCE) to normochromatic erythrocyte (NCE) ratios did not indicate any statistical differences between DXR and THI or NaCl, but there were differences between THI and NaCl. A significant reduction in MNPCEs and PCE/NCE ratios was observed when THI was administered in combination with DXR. This study suggested the absence of THI genotoxicity that was dose-, time-, and gender-independent and the presence of moderate systemic toxicity that was dose-independent, but time- and gender-dependent. The combination of THI and DXR also suggested antigenotoxic effects, indicating that THI reduced genotoxic effects induced by chemotherapeutic agents.

  16. Efficacy of crocin and safranal as protective agents against genotoxic stress induced by gamma radiation, urethane and procarbazine in mice.

    PubMed

    Koul, A; Abraham, S K

    2017-01-01

    Crocin (CRO) and safranal (SAF) are bioactive constituents of saffron (dried stigma of Crocus sativus flower), an expensive spice with medicinal properties. Aqueous extract of saffron is known for its antigenotoxic effect against environmental genotoxins/carcinogens. However, there is need to identify saffron constituents responsible for this antigenotoxic effect. The aim of our investigation was to ascertain the role of CRO and SAF as inhibitors of in vivo genotoxic stress. For this purpose, Swiss albino mice were pretreated with CRO (50-mg/kg body weight (bw))/SAF (0.025- and 0.25-ml/kg bw) by gavage for 2 days. Thereafter, the pretreated mice were exposed to the genotoxic agents: (1) gamma radiation (GR; 2 Gy), (2) urethane (URE; 800 mg/kg) and (3) procarbazine (PCB; 60 mg/kg). In addition, CRO (50 mg/kg) was co-administered with the nitrosation reaction mixture of methylurea (MU; 300-mg/kg bw) + sodium nitrite (15 mg/kg) which can form N-nitroso-N-MU in the stomach. Genotoxic damage was measured by performing the bone marrow micronucleus test. Results obtained demonstrated significant reductions in the incidence of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes in the bone marrow of mice pretreated with CRO/SAF before exposure to the above DNA damaging agents, GR, URE and PCB. Co-administration of CRO with the nitrosation reaction mixture led to significant decrease in genotoxicity when compared to nitrosation reaction mixture alone. Histopathological studies revealed that these saffron constituents reduced testicular cell damage induced by the test genotoxins. The cell-free DNA-nicking assay using pBR322 DNA showed significant protective effects of CRO against hydroxyl radical-induced strand breaks.

  17. Larval Exposure to Chlorpyrifos Affects Nutritional Physiology and Induces Genotoxicity in Silkworm Philosamia ricini (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae)

    PubMed Central

    Kalita, Moni K.; Haloi, Kishor; Devi, Dipali

    2016-01-01

    Chlorpyrifos is a most widely used organophosphate insecticide because of its cost effectiveness and degradable nature. However, this pesticide enters and contaminates the environment either by direct application, spray drifts or crop run off and shows adverse effect on the non-targeted organisms. Philosamia ricini (eri silkworm), one of the most exploited, domesticated and commercialized non mulberry silkworm is known for mass production of eri silk. The silkworm larvae get exposed to pesticide residues on the leaves of food plants. The present study investigates the effect of commercial formulation of chlorpyrifos (Pyrifos-20 EC) on eri silkworm. Initially the LC50 value of chlorpyrifos was determined at 24–96 h and further experiments were carried out with sub lethal concentrations of the chlorpyrifos after 24 h of exposure period. The potential toxicity of chlorpyrifos was evaluated as a fuction of metabolism and nutritional physiology in 3rd, 4th, and 5th instar larvae. Alteration in histoarchitecture of 5th instar eri silkworm gut exposed to sub lethal concentration of chlorpyrifos formulation was also studied. Chlorpyrifos induced genotoxicity in silkworm hemocytes was also investigated by single cell gel electrophoresis, micronuclei assay, and apoptosis assay. Herein, LC50 values of chlorpyrifos were calculated as 3.83, 3.35, 2.68, and 2.35 mg/L at 24, 48, 72, and 96h respectively. A significant decrease in trehalose activity along with digestive enzyme activity was observed in chlorpyrifos affected groups (P < 0.05). Further, genotoxicity study revealed higher tail percentage, tail length and tail moment of the damage DNA in chlorpyrifos exposed groups (P < 0.001). Moreover, at 2.0 mg/L concentration, ~10 fold increases in tail length was observed as compared to the control. Results showed activation of caspase activity following 24 h chlorpyrifos exposure (1.5 and 2.0 mg/L) in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, in control group less number of apoptotic

  18. Larval Exposure to Chlorpyrifos Affects Nutritional Physiology and Induces Genotoxicity in Silkworm Philosamia ricini (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae).

    PubMed

    Kalita, Moni K; Haloi, Kishor; Devi, Dipali

    2016-01-01

    Chlorpyrifos is a most widely used organophosphate insecticide because of its cost effectiveness and degradable nature. However, this pesticide enters and contaminates the environment either by direct application, spray drifts or crop run off and shows adverse effect on the non-targeted organisms. Philosamia ricini (eri silkworm), one of the most exploited, domesticated and commercialized non mulberry silkworm is known for mass production of eri silk. The silkworm larvae get exposed to pesticide residues on the leaves of food plants. The present study investigates the effect of commercial formulation of chlorpyrifos (Pyrifos-20 EC) on eri silkworm. Initially the LC50 value of chlorpyrifos was determined at 24-96 h and further experiments were carried out with sub lethal concentrations of the chlorpyrifos after 24 h of exposure period. The potential toxicity of chlorpyrifos was evaluated as a fuction of metabolism and nutritional physiology in 3rd, 4th, and 5th instar larvae. Alteration in histoarchitecture of 5th instar eri silkworm gut exposed to sub lethal concentration of chlorpyrifos formulation was also studied. Chlorpyrifos induced genotoxicity in silkworm hemocytes was also investigated by single cell gel electrophoresis, micronuclei assay, and apoptosis assay. Herein, LC50 values of chlorpyrifos were calculated as 3.83, 3.35, 2.68, and 2.35 mg/L at 24, 48, 72, and 96h respectively. A significant decrease in trehalose activity along with digestive enzyme activity was observed in chlorpyrifos affected groups (P < 0.05). Further, genotoxicity study revealed higher tail percentage, tail length and tail moment of the damage DNA in chlorpyrifos exposed groups (P < 0.001). Moreover, at 2.0 mg/L concentration, ~10 fold increases in tail length was observed as compared to the control. Results showed activation of caspase activity following 24 h chlorpyrifos exposure (1.5 and 2.0 mg/L) in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, in control group less number of apoptotic

  19. Magnetite Nanoparticles Induce Genotoxicity in the Lungs of Mice via Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Totsuka, Yukari; Ishino, Kousuke; Kato, Tatsuya; Goto, Sumio; Tada, Yukie; Nakae, Dai; Watanabe, Masatoshi; Wakabayashi, Keiji

    2014-01-01

    Nanomaterials are useful for their characteristic properties and are commonly used in various fields. Nanosized-magnetite (MGT) is widely utilized in medicinal and industrial fields, whereas their toxicological properties are not well documented. A safety assessment is thus urgently required for MGT, and genotoxicity is one of the most serious concerns. In the present study, we examined genotoxic effects of MGT using mice and revealed that DNA damage analyzed by a comet assay in the lungs of imprinting control region (ICR) mice intratracheally instilled with a single dose of 0.05 or 0.2 mg/animal of MGT was approximately two- to three-fold higher than that of vehicle-control animals. Furthermore, in gpt delta transgenic mice, gpt mutant frequency (MF) in the lungs of the group exposed to four consecutive doses of 0.2 mg MGT was significantly higher than in the control group. Mutation spectrum analysis showed that base substitutions were predominantly induced by MGT, among which G:C to A:T transition and G:C to T:A transversion were the most significant. To clarify the mechanism of mutation caused by MGT, we analyzed the formation of DNA adducts in the lungs of mice exposed to MGT. DNA was extracted from lungs of mice 3, 24, 72 and 168 h after intratracheal instillation of 0.2 mg/body of MGT, and digested enzymatically. 8-Oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) and lipid peroxide-related DNA adducts were quantified by stable isotope dilution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Compared with vehicle control, these DNA adduct levels were significantly increased in the MGT-treated mice. In addition to oxidative stress- and inflammation related-DNA adduct formations, inflammatory cell infiltration and focal granulomatous formations were also observed in the lungs of MGT-treated mice. Based on these findings, it is suggested that inflammatory responses are probably involved in the genotoxicity induced by MGT in the lungs of mice.

  20. Genotoxic and enzymatic effects of fluoranthene in microsomes and freshly isolated hepatocytes from sole (Solea solea).

    PubMed

    Wessel, N; Ménard, D; Pichavant-Rafini, K; Ollivier, H; Le Goff, J; Burgeot, T; Akcha, F

    2012-02-01

    The fluoranthene (Fluo) is one of the most abundant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in human food and in marine compartments. However, the existing data on its genotoxicity is poor and controversial. The aim of this study was to assess in vitro the potential genotoxicity of Fluo in sole and its possible effect on CYP450 modulation. Freshly isolated hepatocytes were exposed for 24 h to a range of Fluo concentrations from 0.5 to 50 μM in both culture flasks and microplate wells. The ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity was measured as an indicator of the activity of the cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1). The genotoxic effects were evaluated by measuring both DNA strand breaks and DNA adducts by the alkaline comet assay and the postlabeling technique respectively. Calf thymus DNA was also exposed to Fluo in the presence of sole liver microsomes in order to check for Fluo DNA adduct formation. In sole hepatocytes, Fluo was shown to induce a decrease in the EROD activity in a concentration-dependent manner. A significant genotoxic effect was observed in terms of DNA strand breakage from an exposure concentration of 5 μM: despite a concentration-dependent effect was observed, it did not follow a linear dose-response. The response was similar whatever the way of exposure in flasks or in wells. One reproducible adduct was detected in the hepatocytes exposed to the highest concentrations of Fluo. The formation of Fluo adducts was confirmed by the detection of one reproducible adduct following in vitro exposure of calf thymus DNA to 100 and 200 μM of Fluo in the presence of sole microsomes. These results demonstrate the potential of sole hepatocytes to metabolize Fluo in 24 h into reactive species, able to induce genotoxicity by DNA strand breakage and DNA adduct formation. Moreover, a miniaturized cell exposure system was validated for further experiments using fewer amounts of hepatocytes and contaminants, and allowing exposure to PAH metabolites. Copyright

  1. Assessment of Cr(VI)-Induced Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity Using High Content Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Chad M.; Fedorov, Yuriy; Brown, Daniel D.; Suh, Mina; Proctor, Deborah M.; Kuriakose, Liz; Haws, Laurie C.; Harris, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Oral exposure to high concentrations of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] induces intestinal redox changes, villus cytotoxicity, crypt hyperplasia, and intestinal tumors in mice. To assess the effects of Cr(VI) in a cell model relevant to the intestine, undifferentiated (proliferating) and differentiated (confluent) Caco-2 cells were treated with Cr(VI), hydrogen peroxide or rotenone for 2–24 hours. DNA damage was then assessed by nuclear staining intensity of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and phosphorylated histone variant H2AX (γ-H2AX) measured by high content analysis methods. In undifferentiated Caco-2, all three chemicals increased 8-OHdG and γ-H2AX staining at cytotoxic concentrations, whereas only 8-OHdG was elevated at non-cytotoxic concentrations at 24 hr. Differentiated Caco-2 were more resistant to cytotoxicity and DNA damage than undifferentiated cells, and there were no changes in apoptotic markers p53 or annexin-V. However, Cr(VI) induced a dose-dependent translocation of the unfolded protein response transcription factor ATF6 into the nucleus. Micronucleus (MN) formation was assessed in CHO-K1 and A549 cell lines. Cr(VI) increased MN frequency in CHO-K1 only at highly cytotoxic concentrations. Relative to the positive control Mitomycin-C, Cr(VI) only slightly increased MN frequency in A549 at mildly cytotoxic concentrations. The results demonstrate that Cr(VI) genotoxicity correlates with cytotoxic concentrations, and that H2AX phosphorylation occurs at higher concentrations than oxidative DNA damage in proliferating Caco-2 cells. The findings suggest that in vitro genotoxicity of Cr(VI) is primarily oxidative in nature at low concentrations. Implications for in vivo intestinal toxicity of Cr(VI) will be discussed. PMID:22905163

  2. Necdin modulates proliferative cell survival of human cells in response to radiation-induced genotoxic stress

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The finite replicative lifespan of cells, termed cellular senescence, has been proposed as a protective mechanism against the proliferation of oncogenically damaged cells, that fuel cancer. This concept is further supported by the induction of premature senescence, a process which is activated when an oncogene is expressed in normal primary cells as well as following intense genotoxic stresses. Thus, deregulation of genes that control this process, like the tumor suppressor p53, may contribute to promoting cancer by allowing cells to bypass senescence. A better understanding of the genes that contribute to the establishment of senescence is therefore warranted. Necdin interacts with p53 and is also a p53 target gene, although the importance of Necdin in the p53 response is not clearly understood. Methods In this study, we first investigated Necdin protein expression during replicative senescence and premature senescence induced by gamma irradiation and by the overexpression of oncogenic RasV12. Gain and loss of function experiments were used to evaluate the contribution of Necdin during the senescence process. Results Necdin expression declined during replicative aging of IMR90 primary human fibroblasts or following induction of premature senescence. Decrease in Necdin expression seemed to be a consequence of the establishment of senescence since the depletion of Necdin in human cells did not induce a senescence-like growth arrest nor a flat morphology or SA-β-galactosidase activity normally associated with senescence. Similarly, overexpression of Necdin did not affect the life span of IMR90 cells. However, we demonstrate that in normal human cells, Necdin expression mimicked the effect of p53 inactivation by increasing radioresistance. Conclusion This result suggests that Necdin potentially attenuate p53 signaling in response to genotoxic stress in human cells and supports similar results describing an inhibitory function of Necdin over p53-dependent

  3. Investigation of co-genotoxic effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields in vivo.

    PubMed

    Verschaeve, L; Heikkinen, P; Verheyen, G; Van Gorp, U; Boonen, F; Vander Plaetse, F; Maes, A; Kumlin, T; Mäki-Paakkanen, J; Puranen, L; Juutilainen, J

    2006-05-01

    We investigated the possible combined genotoxic effects of radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields (900 MHz, amplitude modulated at 217 Hz, mobile phone signal) with the drinking water mutagen and carcinogen 3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone (MX). Female rats were exposed to RF fields for a period of 2 years for 2 h per day, 5 days per week at average whole-body specific absorption rates of 0.3 or 0.9 W/kg. MX was given in the drinking water at a concentration of 19 microg/ml. Blood samples were taken at 3, 6 and 24 months of exposure and brain and liver samples were taken at the end of the study (24 months). DNA damage was assessed in all samples using the alkaline comet assay, and micronuclei were determined in erythrocytes. We did not find significant genotoxic activity of MX in blood and liver cells. However, MX induced DNA damage in rat brain. Co-exposures to MX and RF radiation did not significantly increase the response of blood, liver and brain cells compared to MX exposure only. In conclusion, this 2-year animal study involving long-term exposures to RF radiation and MX did not provide any evidence for enhanced genotoxicity in rats exposed to RF radiation.

  4. In vitro and in vivo genotoxic effects of somatic cell nuclear transfer cloned cattle meat.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nam-Jin; Yang, Byoung-Chul; Jung, Yu-Ri; Lee, Jung-Won; Im, Gi-Sun; Seong, Hwan-Hoo; Park, Jin-Ki; Kang, Jong-Koo; Hwang, Seongsoo

    2011-09-01

    Although the nutritional composition and health status after consumption of the meat and milk derived from both conventionally bred (normal) and somatic cell nuclear transferred (cloned) animals and their progeny are not different, little is known about their food safeties like genetic toxicity. This study is performed to examine both in vitro (bacterial mutation and chromosome aberration) and in vivo (micronucleus) genotoxicity studies of cloned cattle meat. The concentrations of both normal and cloned cattle meat extracts (0-10×) were tested to five strains of bacteria (Salmonella typhimurium: TA98, TA100, TA1535, and TA1537; Escherichia coli: WP2uvrA) for bacterial mutation and to Chinese hamster lung (CHL/IU) cells for chromosome aberration, respectively. For micronucleus test, ICR mice were divided into five dietary groups: commercial pellets (control), pellets containing 5% (N-5) and 10% (N-10) normal cattle meat, and pellets containing 5% (C-5) and 10% (C-10) cloned cattle meat. No test substance-related genotoxicity was noted in the five bacterial strains, CHL/IU cells, or mouse bone marrow cells, suggesting that the cloned cattle meat potentially may be safe in terms of mutagenic hazards. Thus, it can be postulated that the cloned cattle meat do not induce any harmful genotoxic effects in vitro and in vivo.

  5. Cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of dioxacarb by human peripheral blood lymphocytes CAs and Allium test.

    PubMed

    Eren, Yasin; Erdoğmuş, Sevim Feyza; Akyıl, Dilek; Özkara, Arzu; Konuk, Muhsin; Sağlam, Esra

    2015-12-01

    Dioxacarb (Elecron, Famid) is a phenyl methylcarbamate insecticide and in vitro cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of this pesticide on human peripheral blood lymphocytes and Allium root meristematic cells were investigated by chromosomal aberrations (CAs) and Allium test. Human lymphocytes were treated with 62.5, 125, 250 and 500 ppm doses of dioxacarb for CAs. CA/cell, abnormal cell % and mitotic index % (MI %) data were obtained from these concentrations in 24 and 48 h treatment periods. Dioxacarb did not increase the CA/cell frequency significantly, so this insecticide was not identified as genotoxic. But it was found cytotoxic especially at 250 and 500 ppm concentrations because of the reduced the MI % and increased the abnormal cell %. In Allium test, 25 ppm (EC50/2), 50 ppm (EC50) and 100 ppm (EC50 × 2) concentrations were used for root growth inhibition (EC50 determination) and Allium mitotic index (MI) determination tests. The used concentrations of dioxacarb induced dose-dependent inhibition of MI and root growth on root meristems. Mitotic inhibition of dioxacarb was found significantly higher than for the positive control. These Allium results indicated the high cytotoxicity of dioxacarb. The present study is the first research on cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of dioxacarb by human lymphocyte CAs and Allium test.

  6. Genotoxic Effect in Autoimmune Diseases Evaluated by the Micronucleus Test Assay: Our Experience and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Torres-Bugarín, Olivia; Macriz Romero, Nicole; Ramos Ibarra, María Luisa; Flores-García, Aurelio; Valdez Aburto, Penélope; Zavala-Cerna, María Guadalupe

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (AD) are classified into organ-specific, systemic, and mixed; all forms of AD share a high risk for cancer development. In AD a destructive immune response induced by autoreactive lymphocytes is started and continues with the production of autoantibodies against different targets; furthermore apoptosis failure and loss of balance in oxidative stress as a consequence of local or systemic inflammation are common features seen in AD as well. Micronucleus (MN) assay can be performed in order to evaluate loss of genetic material in a clear, accurate, fast, simple, and minimally invasive test. The MN formation in the cytoplasm of cells that have undergone proliferation is a consequence of DNA fragmentation during mitosis and the appearance of small additional nuclei during interphase. The MN test, widely accepted for in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity research, provides a sensitive marker of genomic damage associated to diverse conditions. In here, we present a review of our work and other published papers concerning genotoxic effect in AD, identified by means of the MN assay, with the aim of proposing this tool as a possible early biomarker for genotoxic damage, which is a consequence of disease progression. Additionally this biomarker could be used for follow-up, to asses genome damage associated to therapies.

  7. Genotoxic Effect in Autoimmune Diseases Evaluated by the Micronucleus Test Assay: Our Experience and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Bugarín, Olivia; Macriz Romero, Nicole; Ramos Ibarra, María Luisa; Flores-García, Aurelio; Valdez Aburto, Penélope; Zavala-Cerna, María Guadalupe

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (AD) are classified into organ-specific, systemic, and mixed; all forms of AD share a high risk for cancer development. In AD a destructive immune response induced by autoreactive lymphocytes is started and continues with the production of autoantibodies against different targets; furthermore apoptosis failure and loss of balance in oxidative stress as a consequence of local or systemic inflammation are common features seen in AD as well. Micronucleus (MN) assay can be performed in order to evaluate loss of genetic material in a clear, accurate, fast, simple, and minimally invasive test. The MN formation in the cytoplasm of cells that have undergone proliferation is a consequence of DNA fragmentation during mitosis and the appearance of small additional nuclei during interphase. The MN test, widely accepted for in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity research, provides a sensitive marker of genomic damage associated to diverse conditions. In here, we present a review of our work and other published papers concerning genotoxic effect in AD, identified by means of the MN assay, with the aim of proposing this tool as a possible early biomarker for genotoxic damage, which is a consequence of disease progression. Additionally this biomarker could be used for follow-up, to asses genome damage associated to therapies. PMID:26339592

  8. Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles Induce Oxidative Stress and Genotoxicity in Human Skin Melanoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Ali, Daoud; Alarifi, Saud; Alkahtani, Saad; AlKahtane, Abdullah A; Almalik, Abdulaziz

    2015-04-01

    Extensive applications of cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles require a better understanding of their possible effects on human health. However, data demonstrating the effect of CeO2 nanoparticles on the human skin melanoma cell remain scanty. In the current study, we determined the mechanism through which CeO2 nanoparticles (APS <25 nm) induce toxicity in human skin melanoma cells (A375). The MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] and neutral red uptake assays showed concentration and time-dependent cytotoxicity of CeO2 nanoparticles in A375 cells. CeO2 nanoparticles significantly induced the generation reactive oxygen species (ROS) and malondialdehyde, superoxide dismutase, and decreased glutathione levels in A375 cells. It was also observed that the CeO2 nanoparticles induced chromosomal condensation and caspase-3 activity. CeO2 nanoparticles exposed cells revealed the formation of DNA double-strand breakage as measured by percent tail DNA and olive tail moment through comet assay. The decline of cell viability, production of ROS, and DNA damage in A375 cells specifies that CeO2 nanoparticles have less capable to induce cyto and genotoxicity.

  9. Genotoxic effects of borax on cultured lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Pongsavee, Malinee

    2009-03-01

    The effect of borax on human chromosomes was analyzed in this study. Venous blood from 30 male students at Thammasat University, Thailand (age 18-25 years) was collected for lymphocyte cell cultures. This experiment was divided into two groups: the first group was the control group and the second group was the experimental group. The lymphocyte cells in the control group were cultured without borax. The experimental group was divided into four subgroups. The lymphocyte cells in each experimental subgroup were cultured with different concentrations of borax (0.1 mg/ml, 0.15 mg/ml, 0.2 mg/ml and 0.3 mg/ml). Human chromosomes were studied for abnormalities through Giemsa-staining and G-banding. The results show that the numbers of metaphase plates (the metaphase plate which contained 46 chromosomes; 46, XY) and metaphase chromosomes were reduced when lymphocyte cells were cultured with 0.15 mg/ml (57.2%), 0.2 mg/ml (50.8%) and 0.3 mg/ml (42.3%) concentrations of borax. There was a statistically significant difference between the control and experimental subgroups (p < 0.05). Sister chromatid separation was found in the 0.3 mg/ml borax concentration experimental subgroup. This shows that borax (at 0.15, 0.2 and 0.3 mg/ml concentrations) affects the cell and human chromosomes (both numerical and structural abnormalities). Borax may cause human chromosome abnormalities and lead to genetic defects.

  10. Genotoxic effects of two-generational selenium deficiency in mouse somatic and testicular cells.

    PubMed

    Graupner, Anne; Instanes, Christine; Andersen, Jill M; Brandt-Kjelsen, Anicke; Dertinger, Stephen D; Salbu, Brit; Brunborg, Gunnar; Olsen, Ann-Karin

    2015-03-01

    Many studies have investigated genotoxic effects of high Se diets but very few have addressed the genotoxicity of Se deprivation and its consequences in germ cells and none in somatic cells. To address these data gaps, C57BL/6 male mice were subjected to Se deprivation starting in the parental generation, i.e. before conception. Mice were given a diet of either low (0.01mg Se/kg diet) or normal (0.23mg Se/kg diet) Se content. Ogg1-deficient (Ogg1 (-/-) ) mice were used as a sensitive model towards oxidative stress due to their reduced capacity to repair oxidised purines. Ogg1 (-/-) mice also mimic the repair characteristics of human post-meiotic male germ cells which have a reduced ability to repair such lesions. The genotoxicity of Se deficiency was addressed by measuring DNA lesions with the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (+ Fpg to detect oxidised DNA lesions) in somatic cells (nucleated blood cells and lung cells) and male germ cells (testicular cells). Total Se concentration in liver and GPx activity in plasma and testicular cells were measured. Gene mutation was evaluated by an erythrocyte-based Pig-a assay. We found that Se deprivation of F1 from their conception and until early adulthood led to the induction of DNA lesions in testicular and lung cells expressed as significantly increased levels of DNA lesions, irrespective of the mouse genotype. In blood cells, Se levels did not appear to affect DNA lesions or mutant cell frequencies. The results suggest that the testis was the most sensitive tissue. Thus, genotoxicity induced by the low Se diet in the spermatozoal genome has potential implications for the offspring.

  11. Evaluation of genotoxic effects caused by extracts of chlorinated drinking water using a combination of three different bioassays.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qiang; Zhang, Shao-Hui; Liao, Jing; Miao, Dong-Yue; Wang, Xin-Yi; Yang, Pan; Yun, Luo-Jia; Liu, Ai-Lin; Lu, Wen-Qing

    2015-10-15

    Potential genotoxic effects of chlorinated drinking water now are of a great concern. In this study, raw water, finished water, and tap water from a water plant in Wuhan, China were collected in two different sampling times of the year (January and July). Genotoxic effects of water extracts were evaluated using a combination of three different bioassays: SOS/umu test, HGPRT gene mutation assay, and micronucleus assay, which were separately used to detect DNA damage, gene mutation, and chromosome aberration. The results of three different bioassays showed that all water samples in January and July induced at least one types of genotoxic effects, of which the DNA-damage effects were all detectable. The levels of DNA-damage effects and gene-mutation effects of finished water and tap water in January were higher than those in July. Chlorination could increase the DNA-damage effects of drinking water in January and the gene-mutation effects of drinking water in both January and July, but did not increase the chromosome-aberration effects of drinking water in both January and July. Our results highlighted the importance of using a combination of different bioassays to evaluate the genotoxicity of water samples in different seasons. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Nanoceria have no genotoxic effect on human lens epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierscionek, Barbara K.; Li, Yuebin; Yasseen, Akeel A.; Colhoun, Liza M.; Schachar, Ronald A.; Chen, Wei

    2010-01-01

    There are no treatments for reversing or halting cataract, a disease of the structural proteins in the eye lens, that has associations with other age-related degenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease. The incidence of cataract and associated conditions is increasing as the average age of the population rises. Protein folding diseases are difficult to assess in vivo as proteins and their age-related changes are assessed after extraction. Nanotechnology can be used to investigate protein changes in the intact lens as well as for a potential means of drug delivery. Nanoparticles, such as cerium oxide (CeO2) which have antioxidant properties, may even be used as a means of treating cataract directly. Prior to use in treatments, nanoparticle genotoxicity must be tested to assess the extent of any DNA or chromosomal damage. Sister chromatid exchanges were measured and DNA damage investigated using the alkaline COMET assay on cultured human lens epithelial cells, exposed to 5 and 10 µg ml-1 of CeO2 nanoparticles (nanoceria). Nanoceria at these dosages did not cause any DNA damage or significant increases in the number of sister chromatid exchanges. The absence of genotoxic effects on lens cells suggests that nanoceria, in the doses and exposures tested in this study, are not deleterious to the eye lens and have the potential for use in studying structural alterations, in developing non-surgical cataract treatments and in investigating other protein folding diseases.

  13. Antiproliferative and genotoxic effects of Mikania glomerata (Asteraceae).

    PubMed

    Dalla Nora, Gracieli; Pastori, Tamara; Laughinghouse, Haywood Dail; Do Canto-Dorow, Thais Scotti; Tedesco, Solange Bosio

    2010-12-01

    Mikania glomerata is a plant used in Brazilian traditional medicine, known as 'guaco'. It possesses anti-inflammatory properties and the aqueous extracts of its leaves are indicated for the treatment of diseases of the respiratory tract. This study aimed at evaluating the antiproliferative and genotoxic effect of Mikania glomerata leaf infusions on the cell cycle of onion. The material used was collected in the native environment from Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. Aqueous extracts through infusions were prepared in two concentrations: 4g/L (usual concentration) and 16g/L (4x more concentrated) of each of the populations. Two groups of four onion bulbs for each plant population were used plus a control group. The rootlets were fixed in ethanol-acetic acid (3:1), conserved in ethanol 70% and slides were prepared using the squashing technique colored with orcein 2%. The cells were observed and analyzed during cell cycle. Per group of bulbs, 2000 cells were analyzed, and the mean values of the cell number of each of the phases of the cell cycle were calculated, determining the mitotic index (MI). Statistic analyses of the data were carried out by the x2 ( p= 0.05) test. We conclude that M. glomerata presents both antiproliferative and genotoxic activity.

  14. Genotoxic effect of formocresol pulp therapy of deciduous teeth.

    PubMed

    Lucas Leite, Ana Catarina Gaioso; Rosenblatt, Aronita; da Silva Calixto, Merilane; da Silva, Cirlene Maria; Santos, Neide

    2012-08-30

    To investigate whether formocresol, in Buckley's original formulation, used for pulp therapy of deciduous teeth, can have a genotoxic effect. Genotoxicity was tested in lymphocyte cultures from the peripheral blood of children aged 5-10y, in Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil. This was a case-control study. The sample comprised 40 children who had primary teeth with non-vital pulps. Two venous blood samples (6-8ml) were collected from each child, the first prior to pulp therapy (control group) and the second 24h after pulp therapy (experimental group). Lymphocyte cultures were grown in 78% RPMI 1640 medium, 20% fetal bovine serum, 2% phytohemagglutinin. The lymphocytes were assessed for chromosomal aberrations; each sample involved analysis of 100 metaphases. There was a statistically significant difference between the control and treated groups for the isochromatid gap (p<0.001), chromatid break (p<0.009), isochromatid break (p<0.046), other chromosomal alterations (p<0.001), and for total aberrations. In view of these results, caution in the use of formocresol in pediatric dentistry is recommended. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Specific uptake and genotoxicity induced by polystyrene nanobeads with distinct surface chemistry on human lung epithelial cells and macrophages.

    PubMed

    Paget, Vincent; Dekali, Samir; Kortulewski, Thierry; Grall, Romain; Gamez, Christelle; Blazy, Kelly; Aguerre-Chariol, Olivier; Chevillard, Sylvie; Braun, Anne; Rat, Patrice; Lacroix, Ghislaine

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticle surface chemistry is known to play a crucial role in interactions with cells and their related cytotoxic effects. As inhalation is a major route of exposure to nanoparticles, we studied specific uptake and damages of well-characterized fluorescent 50 nm polystyrene (PS) nanobeads harboring different functionalized surfaces (non-functionalized, carboxylated and aminated) on pulmonary epithelial cells and macrophages (Calu-3 and THP-1 cell lines respectively). Cytotoxicity of in mass dye-labeled functionalized PS nanobeads was assessed by xCELLigence system and alamarBlue viability assay. Nanobeads-cells interactions were studied by video-microscopy, flow cytometry and also confocal microscopy. Finally ROS generation was assessed by glutathione depletion dosages and genotoxicity was assessed by γ-H2Ax foci detection, which is considered as the most sensitive technique for studying DNA double strand breaks. The uptake kinetic was different for each cell line. All nanobeads were partly adsorbed and internalized, then released by Calu-3 cells, while THP-1 macrophages quickly incorporated all nanobeads which were located in the cytoplasm rather than in the nuclei. In parallel, the genotoxicity study reported that only aminated nanobeads significantly increased DNA damages in association with a strong depletion of reduced glutathione in both cell lines. We showed that for similar nanoparticle concentrations and sizes, aminated polystyrene nanobeads were more cytotoxic and genotoxic than unmodified and carboxylated ones on both cell lines. Interestingly, aminated polystyrene nanobeads induced similar cytotoxic and genotoxic effects on Calu-3 epithelial cells and THP-1 macrophages, for all levels of intracellular nanoparticles tested. Our results strongly support the primordial role of nanoparticles surface chemistry on cellular uptake and related biological effects. Moreover our data clearly show that nanoparticle internalization and observed adverse effects

  16. Specific Uptake and Genotoxicity Induced by Polystyrene Nanobeads with Distinct Surface Chemistry on Human Lung Epithelial Cells and Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Kortulewski, Thierry; Grall, Romain; Gamez, Christelle; Blazy, Kelly; Aguerre-Chariol, Olivier; Chevillard, Sylvie; Braun, Anne; Rat, Patrice; Lacroix, Ghislaine

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticle surface chemistry is known to play a crucial role in interactions with cells and their related cytotoxic effects. As inhalation is a major route of exposure to nanoparticles, we studied specific uptake and damages of well-characterized fluorescent 50 nm polystyrene (PS) nanobeads harboring different functionalized surfaces (non-functionalized, carboxylated and aminated) on pulmonary epithelial cells and macrophages (Calu-3 and THP-1 cell lines respectively). Cytotoxicity of in mass dye-labeled functionalized PS nanobeads was assessed by xCELLigence system and alamarBlue viability assay. Nanobeads-cells interactions were studied by video-microscopy, flow cytometry and also confocal microscopy. Finally ROS generation was assessed by glutathione depletion dosages and genotoxicity was assessed by γ-H2Ax foci detection, which is considered as the most sensitive technique for studying DNA double strand breaks. The uptake kinetic was different for each cell line. All nanobeads were partly adsorbed and internalized, then released by Calu-3 cells, while THP-1 macrophages quickly incorporated all nanobeads which were located in the cytoplasm rather than in the nuclei. In parallel, the genotoxicity study reported that only aminated nanobeads significantly increased DNA damages in association with a strong depletion of reduced glutathione in both cell lines. We showed that for similar nanoparticle concentrations and sizes, aminated polystyrene nanobeads were more cytotoxic and genotoxic than unmodified and carboxylated ones on both cell lines. Interestingly, aminated polystyrene nanobeads induced similar cytotoxic and genotoxic effects on Calu-3 epithelial cells and THP-1 macrophages, for all levels of intracellular nanoparticles tested. Our results strongly support the primordial role of nanoparticles surface chemistry on cellular uptake and related biological effects. Moreover our data clearly show that nanoparticle internalization and observed adverse effects

  17. DNA methyltransferase I is a mediator of doxorubicin-induced genotoxicity in human cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Hwee Hong; Porter, Alan George

    2009-05-01

    Doxorubicin can induce the formation of extra-nuclear bodies during mitosis termed micronuclei but the underlying causes remain unknown. Here, we show that sub-lethal exposure to doxorubicin-induced micronuclei formation in human cancer cells but not in non-tumorigenic cells. Occurrence of micronuclei coincided with stability of DNMT1 upon doxorubicin assault, and DNMT1 was localized to the micronuclei structures. Furthermore, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine-mediated DNMT1 depletion or siDNMT1 knock-down attenuated the frequency of doxorubicin-induced micronucleated cells. Human DNMT1{sup -/-} cells displayed significantly fewer micronuclei compared to DNMT1{sup +/+} cells when challenged with doxorubicin, providing additional evidence for the involvement of DNMT1 in mediating such chromosomal aberrations. Collectively, our results demonstrate a role for DNMT1 in promoting DNA damage-induced genotoxicity in human cancer cells. DNMT1, recently identified as a candidate for doxorubicin-mediated cytotoxicity, is over-expressed in various cancer cell types. We propose that DNMT1 levels in tumor cells may determine the effectiveness of doxorubicin in chemotherapy.

  18. Mangiferin: A xanthone attenuates mercury chloride induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Kaivalya, Mudholkar; Nageshwar Rao, B N; Satish Rao, B S

    2011-01-01

    Mangiferin (MGN), a dietary C-glucosylxanthone present in Mangifera indica, is known to possess a spectrum of beneficial pharmacological properties. This study demonstrates antigenotoxic potential of MGN against mercuric chloride (HgCl2)-induced genotoxicity in HepG2 cell line. Treatment of HepG2 cells with various concentrations of HgCl2 for 3 h caused a dose-dependent increase in micronuclei frequency and elevation in DNA strand breaks (olive tail moment and tail DNA). Pretreatment with MGN significantly (p < 0.01) inhibited HgCl2 -induced (20 µM for 30 h) DNA damage. An optimal antigenotoxic effect of MGN, both in micronuclei and comet assay, was observed at a concentration of 50 µM. Furthermore, HepG2 cells treated with various concentrations of HgCl2 resulted in a dose-dependent increase in the dichlorofluorescein fluorescence, indicating an increase in the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, MGN by itself failed to generate ROS at a concentration of 50 µM, whereas it could significantly decrease HgCl2 -induced ROS. Our study clearly demonstrates that MGN pretreatment reduced the HgCl2-induced DNA damage in HepG2 cells, thus demonstrating the genoprotective potential of MGN, which is mediated mainly by the inhibition of oxidative stress.

  19. Molecular and structural changes induced by essential oils treatments in Vicia faba roots detected by genotoxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Sturchio, Elena; Boccia, Priscilla; Zanellato, Miriam; Meconi, Claudia; Donnarumma, Lucia; Mercurio, Giuseppe; Mecozzi, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Over the last few years, there has been an increased interest in exploiting allelopathy in organic agriculture. The aim of this investigation was to examine the effects of essential oil mixtures in order to establish their allelopathic use in agriculture. Two mixtures of essential oils consisting respectively of tea tree oil (TTO) and clove plus rosemary (C + R) oils were tested. Phytotoxicity and genotoxicity tests on the root meristems of Vicia faba minor were performed. A phytotoxic influence was particularly relevant for C + R mixture, while genotoxicity tests revealed significant results with both C + R oil mixture and TTO. Phenotypic analysis on Vicia faba minor primary roots following C + R oil mixture treatment resulted in callose production, an early symptom attributed to lipid peroxidation. The approach described in this study, based on genotoxicity bioassays, might identify specific DNA damage induced by essential oil treatments. These tests may represent a powerful method to evaluate potential adverse effects of different mixtures of essential oils that might be useful in alternative agriculture. Future studies are focusing on the positive synergism of more complex mixtures of essential oils in order to reduce concentrations of potentially toxic components while at the same time maintaining efficacy in antimicrobial and antifungal management.

  20. Genotoxic damage in Solea senegalensis exposed to sediments from the Sado Estuary (Portugal): effects of metallic and organic contaminants.

    PubMed

    Costa, Pedro M; Lobo, Jorge; Caeiro, Sandra; Martins, Marta; Ferreira, Ana M; Caetano, Miguel; Vale, Carlos; Delvalls, T Angel; Costa, Maria H

    2008-06-30

    Juvenile Solea senegalensis (Senegalese sole) were exposed to freshly collected sediments from three sites of the Sado Estuary (West-Portuguese coast) in 28-day laboratory assays in order to assess the ecological risk from sediment contaminants, by measuring two genotoxicity biomarkers in peripheral blood: the percentage of Erythrocyte Nuclear Abnormalities (ENA) by use of an adaptation of the micronucleus test, and the percentage of DNA strand-breakage (DNA-SB) with the Comet assay. Sediments were surveyed for metallic (Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd and Pb) and organic (PAHs (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls) and DDTs (dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane)) contaminants. Sediments from site A (farthest from hotspots of contamination) were found to be the least contaminated and weaker inducers of genotoxic damage, whereas sediments from sites B (urban influence) and C (affected by industrial effluents and agricultural runoffs) were responsible for a very significant increase in both ENA and DNA-SB, site B being most contaminated with metals and site C mainly with organic pollutants, especially PAHs and PCBs . Analysis of genotoxic effects showed a strong correlation between the concentrations of PAHs and PCBs and both biomarkers at sampling times T(14) and T(28), while the amounts of Cu, As, Cd and Pb were less strongly correlated, and at T(28) only, with ENA and DNA-SB. These results show that organic contaminants in sediment are stronger and faster acting genotoxic stressors. The results also suggest that metals may have an inhibitory effect on genotoxicity when interacting with organic contaminants, at least during early exposure. ENA and DNA-SB do not show a linear relationship, but a strong correlation exists between the overall increase in genotoxicity caused by exposure to sediment, confirming that they are different, and possibly non-linked effects that respond similarly to exposure. Although the Comet assay showed enhanced

  1. Neurologic dysfunction and genotoxicity induced by low levels of chlorpyrifos.

    PubMed

    Muller, Mariel; Hess, Leonardo; Tardivo, Agostina; Lajmanovich, Rafael; Attademo, Andres; Poletta, Gisela; Simoniello, Maria Fernanda; Yodice, Agustina; Lavarello, Simona; Chialvo, Dante; Scremin, Oscar

    2014-12-01

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is an organophosphorus cholinesterase inhibitor widely used as an insecticide. Neuro and genotoxicity of this agent were evaluated following daily subcutaneous injections at 0.1, 1 and 10mg/kg or its vehicle to laboratory rats during one week, at the end of which somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) and power spectrum of the electroencephalogram (EEGp) were recorded under urethane anesthesia. In another group of conscious animals, auditory startle reflex (ASR) was evaluated followed, after euthanasia, with measurements of plasma B-esterases, and genotoxicity with the alkaline comet assay (ACA) at the same CPF doses. The results indicated a CPF dose related inhibition of B-esterases. Enhanced inhibition of the ASR by a subthreshold pre-pulse was observed at all doses and ACA showed a significant higher DNA damage than vehicle controls in animals exposed to 10mg/kg CPF. A trend to higher frequencies of EEGp and an increase in amplitude of the first negative wave of the SEP were found at all doses. The first positive wave of the SEP decreased at the CPF dose of 10mg/kg. In summary, a shift to higher EEG frequencies and alterations of somatosensory and auditory input to the central nervous system were sensitive manifestations of CPF toxicity, associated with depression of B-esterases. The changes in electrical activity of the cerebral cortex and DNA damage observed at doses that do not elicit overt toxicity may be useful in the detection of CPF exposure before clinical signs appear. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Genotoxicity of organic extracts from atmospheric particles

    SciTech Connect

    Courtois, Y.A.; Min, S.; Lachenal, C.; Jacquot-Deschamps, J.M.; Callais, F.; Festy, B.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments to evaluate the genotoxic potentialities of urban air particles sampled in Paris (France) after organic solvent extraction have been carried out using four in vitro genotoxicity tests. The two bacterial tests (the Ames test and the SOS Chromotest) demonstrate the genotoxicity of the organic extracts of atmospheric particles; two additional tests (induction of 6-thioguanine mutants and sister chromatid exchanges), carried out on V79 Chinese hamster cells, also confirm these potentialities. These results show clearly that particulate organic extracts induce point mutations in both bacteria and mammalian cells, or the cellular response (SOS repair) to these mutations in bacteria; likewise, they are responsible for clastogenic effects in mammalian cells. Genotoxicity is due either to direct genotoxic chemicals or to active metabolic products of the action of microsomal enzymes. The optimalization of testing procedures is discussed in order to appreciate the contribution of genotoxicity tests to the study of atmospheric pollution.

  3. Anti-genotoxic effect of Aloysia triphylla infusion against acrylamide-induced DNA damage as shown by the comet assay technique.

    PubMed

    Zamorano-Ponce, E; Morales, C; Ramos, D; Sepúlveda, C; Cares, S; Rivera, P; Fernández, J; Carballo, M A

    2006-02-28

    Aloysia triphylla a perennial, bushy plant originally from South America has long been used in traditional medicine. Its aqueous extract contains considerable amounts of polyphenolic compounds, namely flavonoids and phenolic acids. In view of the interest in natural phenolic compounds as antioxidant in preventive medicine, this study was undertaken to investigate the chemoprotective effects of cedron leaves infusion against the genetic damage induced by acrylamide (AA) by using the alkaline version of the comet assay technique. Mice were separated in nine groups (eight animals each): (I) untreated, (II) negative control, (III) treated with infusion of cedron leaves 5%, 20 days twice a day, (IV) treated with AA (5 mg/kg b.w.), (V) treated with AA (20 mg/kg b.w.), (VI) treated with AA (30 mg/kg b.w.), (VII) treated with AA (50 mg/kg b.w.), (VIII) pretreated with infusion and treated with AA (50 mg/kg b.w.) and (IX) positive control (cyclophosphamide, 20 mg/kg b.w.). Three hundred blast cells were digitally evaluated per animal from three different slides (100 each). Media of tail moment (TM) values were analyzed by ANOVA test. No statistical differences (p>0.05) were found between untreated animals, negative control and infusion-treated mice. A single dose of AA-induced genetic damage as revealed by a statistically significant increase in TM values (p<0.01). Pretreatment with infusion prior to AA injection significantly reduces the capacity of AA to induce genetic damage. In these conditions, tail moments values did not differ from data obtained in negative control (p>0.05) and exhibit statistical differences from animals treated only with AA (p<0.01). Cell viability was at least 90% in all cases as measured by the trypan blue exclusion method. The ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) method reveals that the plasma of infusion-treated mice has a significantly higher antioxidant capacity than plasma from controls (p<0.01). The results suggest that the infusion

  4. Nitric oxide mitigates arsenic-induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity in Vicia faba L.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Pratiksha; Singh, A K

    2015-09-01

    The protective effects of nitric oxide (NO) against arsenic (As)-induced structural disturbances in Vicia faba have been investigated. As treatment (0.25, 0.50, and 1 mM) resulted in a declined growth of V. faba seedlings. Arsenic treatment stimulates the activity of SOD and CAT while the activities of APX and GST content were decreased. The oxidative stress markers such as superoxide radical, hydrogen peroxide and malondialdehyde (lipid peroxidation) contents were enhanced by As. Overall results revealed that significant accumulation of As suppressed growth, photosynthesis, antioxidant enzymes (SOD, CAT, APX, and GST activity), mitotic index, and induction of different chromosomal abnormalities, hence led to oxidative stress. The concentration of SNP (0.02 mM) was very effective in counteracting the adverse effect of As toxicity. These abnormalities use partially or fully reversed by a simultaneous application of As and NO donor and sodium nitroprusside and has an ameliorating effect against As-induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity in V. faba roots.

  5. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity induced by coal and coal fly ash particles samples in V79 cells.

    PubMed

    León-Mejía, Grethel; Silva, Luis F O; Civeira, Matheus S; Oliveira, Marcos L S; Machado, Miriana; Villela, Izabel Vianna; Hartmann, Andreas; Premoli, Suziane; Corrêa, Dione Silva; Da Silva, Juliana; Henriques, João Antônio Pêgas

    2016-12-01

    Exposure to coal and coal ashes can cause harmful effects in in vitro and in vivo systems, mainly by the induction of oxidative damage. The aim of this work was to assess cytotoxic and genotoxic effects using the V79 cell line treated with coal and coal fly ash particles derived from a coal power plant located in Santa Catarina, Brazil. Two coal samples (COAL11 and COAL16) and two coal fly ash samples (CFA11 and CFA16) were included in this study. COAL16 was co-firing with a mixture of fuel oil and diesel oil. The comet assay data showed that exposure of V79 cells to coal and coal fly ash particles induced primary DNA lesions. Application of lesion-specific endonucleases (FPG and ENDO III) demonstrated increased DNA effects indicating the presence of high amounts of oxidative DNA lesions. The cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome assay analysis showed that exposure of V79 cells to high concentrations of coal and coal fly ash particles induced cytotoxic effects (apoptosis and necrosis) and chromosomal instability (nucleoplasmic bridges, nuclear buds, and micronucleus (MN) formation). These results may be associated with compounds contained in the surface of the particles as hazardous elements, ultrafine/nanoparticles, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) which were detected in the samples. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  6. Sex-related effects of imidacloprid modulated by piperonyl butoxide and menadione in rats. Part II: genotoxic and cytotoxic potential.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Mehmet; Sevgiler, Yusuf; Buyukleyla, Mehmet; Yardimci, Mustafa; Yilmaz, Mehmet; Rencuzogullari, Eyyup

    2016-01-01

    Despite its intended use, imidacloprid causes genotoxic and cytotoxic effects in mammals, especially in the presence of metabolic activation systems. The aim of this study was to determine to which extent these effects are sex related and how its metabolism modulators piperonyl butoxide and menadione affect its toxicity. Male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with the intraperitoneal LD50 dose of imidacloprid alone (170 mg/kg) or pretreated with piperonyl butoxide (100 mg/kg) and menadione (25 mg/kg) for 12 and 24 h. Structural chromosome aberrations, abnormal cells and mitotic index were determined microscopically in bone marrow cells. Male rats showed susceptibility to the genotoxic effects of imidacloprid. Piperonyl butoxide was effective in countering this effect only at 24 h, whereas menadione exacerbated imidacloprid-induced genotoxicity. Piperonyl butoxide and menadione pretreatments increased the percentage of structural chromosome aberrations and abnormal cells in females. Imidacloprid decreased the mitotic index, whereas pretreatment with piperonyl butoxide and menadione showed improvement in both sexes. We believe that CYP450-mediated metabolism of imidacloprid is under the hormonal control and therefore that its genotoxicity is sex related. Piperonyl butoxide pretreatment also showed sex-related modulation. The hormonal effects on imidacloprid biotransformation require further investigation.

  7. Three-Dimensional, Transgenic Cell Models to Quantify Space Genotoxic Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, S. R.; Sognier, M. A.; Wu, H.; Pingerelli, P. L.; Glickman, B. W.; Dawson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The space environment contains radiation and chemical agents known to be mutagenic and carcinogenic to humans. Additionally, microgravity is a complicating factor that may modify or synergize induced genotoxic effects. Most in vitro models fail to use human cells (making risk extrapolation to humans more difficult), overlook the dynamic effect of tissue intercellular interactions on genotoxic damage, and lack the sensitivity required to measure low-dose effects. Currently a need exists for a model test system that simulates cellular interactions present in tissue, and can be used to quantify genotoxic damage induced by low levels of radiation and chemicals, and extrapolate assessed risk to humans. A state-of-the-art, three-dimensional, multicellular tissue equivalent cell culture model will be presented. It consists of mammalian cells genetically engineered to contain multiple copies of defined target genes for genotoxic assessment,. NASA-designed bioreactors were used to coculture mammalian cells into spheroids, The cells used were human mammary epithelial cells (H184135) and Stratagene's (Austin, Texas) Big Blue(TM) Rat 2 lambda fibroblasts. The fibroblasts were genetically engineered to contain -a high-density target gene for mutagenesis (60 copies of lacl/LacZ per cell). Tissue equivalent spheroids were routinely produced by inoculation of 2 to 7 X 10(exp 5) fibroblasts with Cytodex 3 beads (150 micrometers in diameter). at a 20:1 cell:bead ratio, into 50-ml HARV bioreactors (Synthecon, Inc.). Fibroblasts were cultured for 5 days, an equivalent number of epithelial cells added, and the fibroblast/epithelial cell coculture continued for 21 days. Three-dimensional spheroids with diameters ranging from 400 to 600 micrometers were obtained. Histological and immunohistochemical Characterization revealed i) both cell types present in the spheroids, with fibroblasts located primarily in the center, surrounded by epithelial cells; ii) synthesis of extracellular matrix

  8. Three-Dimensional, Transgenic Cell Models to Quantify Space Genotoxic Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, S. R.; Sognier, M. A.; Wu, H.; Pingerelli, P. L.; Glickman, B. W.; Dawson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The space environment contains radiation and chemical agents known to be mutagenic and carcinogenic to humans. Additionally, microgravity is a complicating factor that may modify or synergize induced genotoxic effects. Most in vitro models fail to use human cells (making risk extrapolation to humans more difficult), overlook the dynamic effect of tissue intercellular interactions on genotoxic damage, and lack the sensitivity required to measure low-dose effects. Currently a need exists for a model test system that simulates cellular interactions present in tissue, and can be used to quantify genotoxic damage induced by low levels of radiation and chemicals, and extrapolate assessed risk to humans. A state-of-the-art, three-dimensional, multicellular tissue equivalent cell culture model will be presented. It consists of mammalian cells genetically engineered to contain multiple copies of defined target genes for genotoxic assessment,. NASA-designed bioreactors were used to coculture mammalian cells into spheroids, The cells used were human mammary epithelial cells (H184135) and Stratagene's (Austin, Texas) Big Blue(TM) Rat 2 lambda fibroblasts. The fibroblasts were genetically engineered to contain -a high-density target gene for mutagenesis (60 copies of lacl/LacZ per cell). Tissue equivalent spheroids were routinely produced by inoculation of 2 to 7 X 10(exp 5) fibroblasts with Cytodex 3 beads (150 micrometers in diameter). at a 20:1 cell:bead ratio, into 50-ml HARV bioreactors (Synthecon, Inc.). Fibroblasts were cultured for 5 days, an equivalent number of epithelial cells added, and the fibroblast/epithelial cell coculture continued for 21 days. Three-dimensional spheroids with diameters ranging from 400 to 600 micrometers were obtained. Histological and immunohistochemical Characterization revealed i) both cell types present in the spheroids, with fibroblasts located primarily in the center, surrounded by epithelial cells; ii) synthesis of extracellular matrix

  9. The genotoxic effect of radiofrequency waves on mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Karaca, Emin; Durmaz, Burak; Aktug, Huseyin; Altug, Huseyin; Yildiz, Teoman; Guducu, Candan; Irgi, Melis; Koksal, Mehtap Gulcihan Cinar; Ozkinay, Ferda; Gunduz, Cumhur; Cogulu, Ozgur

    2012-01-01

    Concerns about the health effects of radiofrequency (RF) waves have been raised because of the gradual increase in usage of cell phones, and there are scientific questions and debates about the safety of those instruments in daily life. The aim of this study is to evaluate the genotoxic effects of RF waves in an experimental brain cell culture model. Brain cell cultures of the mice were exposed to 10.715 GHz with specific absorbtion rate (SAR) 0.725 W/kG signals for 6 h in 3 days at 25°C to check for the changes in the micronucleus (MNi) assay and in the expression of 11 proapoptotic and antiapoptotic genes. It was found that MNi rate increased 11-fold and STAT3 expression decreased 7-fold in the cell cultures which were exposed to RF. Cell phones which spread RF may damage DNA and change gene expression in brain cells.

  10. Propolis-induced genotoxicity and antigenotoxicity in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Denise Crispim; Mazzaron Barcelos, Gustavo Rafael; Silva, Lívia Ferreira; Chacon Tonin, Conception Cortez; Bastos, Jairo Kenupp

    2006-10-01

    Propolis has been used in folk medicine since ancient times and is known for its antimicrobial, antiparasitic, antiviral, anti-inflammatory, antitumoral and antioxidant properties. In view of the great therapeutic interest in propolis and the small number of studies regarding its mechanism of action, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the mutagenic and antimutagenic effects of propolis using Chinese hamster ovary cells. Parameters such as the frequency of chromosome aberrations and mitotic index were analyzed. The results showed that, on one hand, the highest propolis tested concentration displayed a small but significant increase in the frequency of chromosome aberrations, and on the other hand, it was observed that the lowest tested concentration significantly reduced the chromosome damage induced by the chemotherapeutic agent doxorubicin. The present results indicate that propolis shows the characteristic of a "Janus" compound, i.e., propolis is genotoxic at higher concentrations, while at lower concentrations it display a chemopreventive effect on doxorubicin-induced mutagenicity. Flavonoids may be the components of propolis responsible for its both mutagenic and antimutagenic effects, once these compounds may act either as pro-oxidant or as free radicals scavenger, depending on its concentration.

  11. Genotoxic and Cytotoxic Effects of Antiretroviral Combinations in Mice Bone Marrow

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Commonly used guidelines for the management of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection (highly active antiretroviral therapy, HAART) include drug combinations such as tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) + lamivudine (3TC) and combivir [zidovudine (AZT) + 3TC] + efavirenz (EFV). These combinations may enhance the genotoxic effects induced by such drugs individually, since the therapy requires lifelong adherence and the drugs have unknown effects during treatment. Thus, the evaluation of the benefits and risks of HAART is of great importance. In order to assess the cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of three concentrations of each of the antiretroviral combinations TDF + 3TC (800 + 400, 1600 + 800, and 3200 + 1600 mg/kg body weight, BW) and combivir + EFV (200 + 100 + 400, 400 + 200 + 800, and 800 + 400 + 1600 mg/kg BW) after two exposure periods (24 h and 48 h), in the present study the in vivo comet assay (single-cell gel electrophoresis) and the mouse bone marrow micronucleus test were used. Neither TDF + 3TC nor combivir + EFV induced DNA damage at any concentrations tested after 24 h or 48 h using the comet assay. After 24 h, both combinations increased the micronucleus frequency at all concentrations tested. After 48 h, combivir + EFV increased the micronucleated polychromatic erythrocyte (MNPCE) frequency at the two highest concentrations tested. Polychromatic erythrocytes (PCE)/normochromatic erythrocytes (NCE) ratio was high for both combinations, suggesting that they can be mitogenic. Since genotoxicity may be related to carcinogenesis, it is necessary to conduct further studies to verify the long-term mutagenic effects of these drugs. PMID:27806085

  12. Celecoxib mitigates genotoxicity induced by ionizing radiation in human blood lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jalal; Fathi, Mahdieh; Ghasemi, Arash; Shiadeh, Seyedeh Nesa Rezaeian; Pourfallah, Tayyeb Allahverdi

    2017-01-01

    Ionizing radiation causes DNA damage and chromosome abbreviations on normal cells. The radioprotective effect of celecoxib (CLX) was investigated against genotoxicity induced by ionizing radiation in cultured human blood lymphocytes. Peripheral blood samples were collected from human volunteers and were incubated at different concentrations at 1, 5, 10 and 50 μM of CLX for two hours. At each dose point, the whole blood was exposed in vitro to 150 cGy of X-ray, and then the lymphocytes were cultured with mitogenic stimulation to determine the micronucleus frequency in cytokinesis blocked binucleated lymphocytes. Incubation of the whole blood with CLX exhibited a significant decrease in the incidence of micronuclei in lymphocytes induced by ionizing radiation, as compared with similarly irradiated lymphocytes without CLX treatment. The maximum reduction on the frequency of micronuclei was observed at 50 μM of CLX (65% decrease). This data may have an important possible application for the protection of human lymphocytes from the genetic damage induced by ionizing irradiation in human exposed to radiation. PMID:28255318

  13. Sodium arsenite induced changes in survival, growth, metamorphosis and genotoxicity in the Indian cricket frog (Rana limnocharis).

    PubMed

    Singha, Utsab; Pandey, Neelam; Boro, Freeman; Giri, Sarbani; Giri, Anirudha; Biswas, Somava

    2014-10-01

    Arsenic contamination of the environment is a matter of great concern. Understanding the effects of arsenic on aquatic life will act as biological early warning system to assess how arsenic could shape the biodiversity in the affected areas. Rapid decline in amphibian population in recent decades is a cause of major concern. Over the years, amphibians have been recognized as excellent bio-indicators of environmental related stress. In the present study, we examined the toxic and genotoxic effects of sodium arsenite in the tadpoles of the Indian cricket frog (Rana limnocharis). Sodium arsenite at different concentrations (0, 50, 100, 200 and 400 μg L(-1)) neither induced lethality nor significantly altered body weight at metamorphosis. However, it accelerated the rate of metamorphosis at higher concentrations, reduced body size (snout-vent length) and induced developmental deformities such as loss of limbs. Besides, at concentration ranges between 100 and 400 μg L(-1), sodium arsenite induced statistically significant genotoxicity at 24, 48, 72 and 96 h of the exposure in a concentration-dependent manner. However, it did not show time effects as the highest frequency was found between 48 and 72 h which remained steady subsequently. The genotoxicity was confirmed by comet assay in the whole blood cells. These findings suggest that arsenic at environmentally relevant concentrations has significant sub-lethal effects on R.limnocharis, which may have long-term fitness consequence to the species and may have similar implications in other aquatic life too. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Genotoxic effects of environmental endocrine disruptors on the aquatic insect Chironomus riparius evaluated using the comet assay.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Paz, Pedro; Morales, Mónica; Martínez-Guitarte, José Luis; Morcillo, Gloria

    2013-12-12

    Genotoxicity is one of the most important toxic endpoints in chemical toxicity testing and environmental risk assessment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic potential of various environmental pollutants frequently found in aquatic environments and characterized by their endocrine disrupting activity. Monitoring of DNA damage was undertaken after in vivo exposures of the aquatic larvae of the midge Chironomus riparius, a model organism that represents an abundant and ecologically relevant macroinvertebrate, widely used in freshwater toxicology. DNA-induced damage, resulting in DNA fragmentation, was quantified by the comet assay after short (24 h) and long (96 h) exposures to different concentrations of the selected toxicants: bisphenol A (BPA), nonylphenol (NP), pentachlorophenol (PCP), tributyltin (TBT) and triclosan (TCS). All five compounds were found to have genotoxic activity as demonstrated by significant increases in all the comet parameters (%DNA in tail, tail length, tail moment and Olive tail moment) at all tested concentrations. Persistent exposure did not increase the extent of DNA damage, except for TCS at the highest concentration, but generally there was a reduction in DNA damage thought to be associated with the induction of the detoxification processes and repairing mechanisms. Comparative analysis showed differences in the genotoxic potential between the chemicals, as well as significant time and concentration-dependent variations, which most likely reflect differences in the ability to repair DNA damage under the different treatments. The present report demonstrates the sensitivity of the benthic larvae of C. riparius to these environmental genotoxins suggesting its potential as biomonitor organism in freshwater ecosystems. The results obtained about the DNA-damaging potential of these environmental pollutants reinforce the need for additional studies on the genotoxicity of endocrine active substances that, by linking genotoxic

  15. Exploring the Molecular Mechanisms of Nickel-Induced Genotoxicity and Carcinogenicity: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Keyuna S.; Buchner, Virginia; Tchounwou, Paul B.

    2011-01-01

    Nickel, a naturally occurring element that exists in various mineral forms, is mainly found in soil and sediment, and its mobilization is influenced by the physicochemical properties of the soil. Industrial sources of nickel include metallurgical processes such as electroplating, alloy production, stainless steel, and nickel-cadmium batteries. Nickel industries, oil- and coal-burning power plants, and trash incinerators have been implicated in its release into the environment. In humans, nickel toxicity is influenced by the route of exposure, dose, and solubility of the nickel compound. Lung inhalation is the major route of exposure for nickel-induced toxicity. Nickel may also be ingested or absorbed through the skin. The primary target organs are the kidneys and lungs. Other organs such as the liver, spleen, heart and testes may also be affected to a lesser extent. Although the most common health effect is an allergic reaction, research has also demonstrated that nickel is carcinogenic to humans. The focus of the present review is on recent research concerning the molecular mechanisms of nickel-induced genotoxicity and carcinogenicity. We first present a background on the occurrence of nickel in the environment, human exposure, and human health effects. PMID:21905451

  16. Iron induced genotoxicity: attenuation by vitamin C and its optimization

    PubMed Central

    Parveen, Nuzhat; Ahmad, Shoeb

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin C (VC) is a well-known antioxidant and strong free radical scavenger. Its antioxidant activity is useful for protection of cellular macromolecules, particularly DNA, from oxidative damage induced by different agents. This study was undertaken to evaluate the optimum level of VC in attenuating the chromosome aberrations (CAs) and DNA damage after iron sulfate (FeSO4) acute administration in Wistar rats. The results exhibited that the increase of CAs and DNA damage induced by FeSO4, 200 mg Fe/kg, could be reduced significantly by VC pretreatment at the dose of 500 mg/kg (p<0.001), but not in the 100 mg/kg group. The findings provide evidence that VC at the dose of 500 mg/kg exerted a possible protective effect against FeSO4 induced CAs and DNA damage. The possible mechanisms of VC may be attributed to its property as a free radical scavenger or to its indirect action in reducing the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS). PMID:26109893

  17. Oxidative Stress, Cytotoxicity, and Genotoxicity Induced by Methyl Parathion in Human Gingival Fibroblasts: Protective Role of Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate.

    PubMed

    Argentin, Gabriella; Divizia, Maurizio; Cicchetti, Rosadele

    2015-01-01

    Organophosphorous (OP) compounds are pesticides frequently released into the environment because of extensive use in agriculture. Among these, methyl parathion (mPT) recently received attention as a consequence of illegal use. The predominant route of human exposure to mPT is via inhalation, but inadvertent consumption of contaminated foods and water may also occur. The goal of this study was to investigate the in vitro effects of mPT on cells in the oral cavity and evaluate the potential protective role of epigallocathechin-3-gallate (EGCG) on these effects. Human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) were exposed to 10, 50, or 100 μ g/ml mPT for 24 h and assessed for oxidative stress, as evidenced by reactive generation of oxygen species (ROS), induction of apoptotic cell death, DNA damage (comet assay and cytochinesis-block micronucleus test), and nitric oxide (NO) production. The results showed that mPT produced significant oxidative stress, cytotoxicity, and genotoxicity and increased NO levels through stimulation of inducible NO synthase expression. Finally, data demonstrated that EGCG (10, 25, or 50 μ M) was able to inhibit the pesticide-induced effects on all parameters studied. Data indicate that cytotoxic and genotoxic effects may be associated with oxidative stress induced by mPT observed in HGF cultures and that EGCG plays a protective role via antioxidant activities.

  18. Enzymatic adaptations to arsenic-induced oxidative stress in Zea mays and genotoxic effect of arsenic in root tips of Vicia faba and Zea mays.

    PubMed

    Duquesnoy, Isabelle; Champeau, Gabrielle Marie; Evray, Germaine; Ledoigt, Gérard; Piquet-Pissaloux, Agnès

    2010-01-01

    Agronomic plant species may display physiological and biochemical responses to oxidative stress caused by heavy metals and metalloids. Zea mays plants were grown hydroponically for eight days at different concentrations of As (0, 134 and 668 μM) and at different pH (4, 7 and 9). Metabolic variations in response to As toxicity were measured using physiological parameters and antioxidant enzymatic activities. A significant decrease in SOD activity was observed in the leaves and roots of Z. mays with the majority of As treatments. As decreased G-POX activity less in leaves than in roots. An increase in the concentration of As increased APX activity in leaves and roots, except As(V) at pH 4 and pH 9 in the leaves and As(III) at pH 9 in the roots, when there was a significant decrease in APX activity at low As concentrations. After exposure to As(V), CAT activity was the same as in the control. As(III) led to an increase in CAT activity in leaves and to a decrease in roots. With increasing concentrations of As(III), CAT activity increased in both leaves and roots whatever the pH. To obtain more detailed knowledge on the effects of arsenate and arsenite exposure on Vicia faba and Z. mays, root meristems were also examined. Roots were fed hydroponically with 134, 334, 534 and 668 μM arsenate or arsenite and 4 × 10(-3)M of maleic hydrazide as positive control, at three different pH. Physiological parameters, the mitotic index and micronuclei frequencies were evaluated in root meristems. At all three pH, the highest As(V) and As(III) concentrations induced a substantial modification in root colour, increased root thickness with stiffening, and reduced root length. High concentrations also caused a significant decrease in the mitotic index, and micronucleus chromosomic aberrations were observed in the root meristems of both species.

  19. Evolution of genotoxicity test methods in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sofuni, Toshio

    2017-01-01

    The evolution of methods to assess genotoxicity of test compounds is thought to be one of the important subjects in The Japanese Environmental and Mutagen Society (JEMS). In 1970, the Ministry of Education of Japan (at that time) organized a research group (Organizer: Y. Tazima, National Institute of Genetics), and started a systematic research on the genotoxic effects induced by chemical substances. Considering the importance of this issue through the outcomes of the research group, JEMS was established in 1972, and President Tazima organized the 1st annual meeting in the August in Tokyo with the participation of experts in this field working in national institutes, universities and others in Japan. The discovery that food additives possessed genotoxic potential triggered various scientific activities in the field of genotoxicity. Another important point was the correlation between genotoxicity and carcinogenicity, in which the establishment of the reverse mutation assay played an important role. Other critical factors, such as side effects of drugs, occupational cancer, and environmental pollution due to genotoxic chemicals, emphasized the importance of genotoxicity tests for human safety. The tests performed to assess genotoxicity from 1960s to 1980s will be described to understand that many different genotoxic methodologies were discussed in these periods.

  20. Genotoxic effect of Pb and Cd on in vitro cultures of Sphagnum palustre: An evaluation by ISSR markers.

    PubMed

    Sorrentino, Maria Cristina; Capozzi, Fiore; Giordano, Simonetta; Spagnuolo, Valeria

    2017-08-01

    In the present work, the genotoxic effect of cadmium and lead supplied in a laboratory trial, was investigated for the first time in the moss Sphagnum palustre, by ISSR molecular markers. A total of 169 reproducible bands were obtained with 12 primers, ten of which gave polymorphisms (i.e., appearance/disappearance of bands), indicating a clear genotoxic effect induced by the metals. Both metals induced a decrease of the genome template stability in a dose dependent manner. At concentration >10(-5) Cd also induced a general toxic effect in S. palustre, leading to chlorophyll degradation and moss death. Moreover, we followed the fate of supplied heavy metals into the moss tissue by SEM-EDX to see if they entered the cells. SEM-EDX observations on moss cultures treated with equimolar concentrations of the two metals showed that most Pb precipitated in form of particles on moss surface, while Cd did not aggregate in particles and was not found on moss surface. In light of these findings, we concluded that probably Pb induced a genotoxic effect at lower intracellular concentrations than Cd. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Enhanced cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of gadolinium following ELF-EMF irradiation in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seunghyun; Lee, Younghyun; Lee, Sunyeong; Choi, Young Joo; Chung, Hai Won

    2014-10-01

    There are many studies of Gd nephrotoxicity and neurotoxicity, whereas research on cyto- and genotoxicity in normal human lymphocytes is scarce. It is important to investigate the effect of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) on Gd toxicity, as patients are co-exposed to Gd and ELF-EMF generated by MRI scanners. We investigated the cytotoxicity and genotoixcity of Gd and the possible enhancing effect of ELF-EMF on Gd toxicity in cultured human lymphocytes by performing a micronuclei (MN) assay, trypan blue dye exclusion, single cell gel electrophoresis, and apoptosis analyses using flow cytometry. Isolated lymphocytes were exposed to 0.2-1.2 mM of Gd only or in combination with a 60-Hz ELF-EMF of 0.8-mT field strength. Exposing human lymphocytes to Gd resulted in a concentration- and time-dependent decrease in cell viability and an increase in MN frequency, single strand DNA breakage, apoptotic cell death, and ROS production. ELF-EMF (0.8 mT) exposure also increased cell death, MN frequency, olive tail moment, and apoptosis induced by Gd treatment alone. These results suggest that Gd induces DNA damage and apoptotic cell death in human lymphocytes and that ELF-EMF enhances the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of Gd.

  2. Arsenic-induced genotoxicity in Nile tilapia (Orechromis niloticus); the role of Spirulina platensis extract.

    PubMed

    Sayed, Alaa El-Din H; Elbaghdady, Heba Allah M; Zahran, Eman

    2015-12-01

    Arsenic (As) is one of the most relevant environmental global single substance toxicants that have long been regarded as a carcinogenic and genotoxic potential. In this respect, we evaluated the cytogenetic effect of arsenic exposure in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), in terms of erythrocyte alteration, apoptosis, and induction of micronuclei. Spirulina platensis (SP) is a filamentous cyanobacterium microalgae with potent dietary phytoantioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancerous properties supplementation. The protective role of Spirulina as supplementary feeds was studied in Nile tilapia (O. niloticus) against arsenic-induced cytogenotoxicity. Four groups were assigned as control group (no SP or As), As group (exposed to water-born As in the form of NaAsO2 at 7 ppm), SP1 (SP at 7.5% + As at the same level of exposure), and SP2 (SP at 10% + As at the same level of exposure). As-treated group had a significant increase in all cytogenetic analyses including erythrocyte alteration, apoptosis, and induction of micronuclei after 2 weeks with continuous increase in response after 3 weeks. The combined treatment of Spirulina at two different concentrations of 7.5 and 10% had significantly declined the induction of erythrocyte alteration, apoptosis, and micronuclei formation induced by arsenic intoxication.

  3. Deltamethrin-induced genotoxicity and testicular injury in rats: comparison with biopesticide.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Manal F; Mohamed, Hanaa M

    2012-10-01

    Deltamethrin is a synthetic pyrethroid insecticide used extensively in pest control. Aim of the current study was to investigate the ability of deltamethrin-based commercial formulation to induce genotoxicity and testicular injury in rats in comparison to the use of the biopesticide; Bacillus thuringiensis. Rats were divided into three groups: Group I (DEL) received deltamethrin, 5 mg/kgb.w./day orally, in corn oil. Group II (Biopesticide, B. thuringiensis) received oral suspension of the biopesticide at daily dose of 8400 mg/kgb.w./day. Group III (Control) received appropriate volume of corn oil. After 4 weeks, deltamethrin-treated rats showed decreased serum testosterone, luteinizing and follicle-stimulating hormone levels. Testicular total oxidant capacity (TOC), poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and DNA damage were significantly increased. Significant increase in bone marrow chromosomal aberrations, induced by deltamethrin, including chromatid breaks, deletions, fragments and gaps was also observed. RT-PCR demonstrated significant up-regulation in testicular mRNA for glutathione-s-transferase and heat-shock protein-70 (HSP-70) whereas steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) mRNA was down-regulated after deltamethrin exposure. Oral administration of the biopesticide, under the condition of our study, was found to be safe when compared to the deleterious effect of deltamethrin in rats. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Genotoxic and inflammatory effects of depleted uranium particles inhaled by rats.

    PubMed

    Monleau, Marjorie; De Méo, Michel; Paquet, François; Chazel, Valérie; Duménil, Gérard; Donnadieu-Claraz, Marie

    2006-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) is a radioactive heavy metal coming from the nuclear industry and used in numerous military applications. Uranium inhalation can lead to the development of fibrosis and neoplasia in the lungs. As little is known concerning the molecular processes leading to these pathological effects, some of the events in terms of genotoxicity and inflammation were investigated in rats exposed to DU by inhalation. Our results show that exposure to DU by inhalation resulted in DNA strand breaks in broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) cells and in increase of inflammatory cytokine expression and production of hydroperoxides in lung tissue suggesting that the DNA damage was in part a consequence of the inflammatory processes and oxidative stress. The effects seemed to be linked to the doses, were independent of the solubility of uranium compounds and correlating with the type of inhalation. Repeated inhalations seemed to induce an effect of potentiation in BAL cells and also in kidney cells. Comet assay in neutral conditions revealed that DNA damage in BAL cells was composed partly by double strands breaks suggesting that radiation could contribute to DU genotoxic effects in vivo. All these in vivo results contribute to a better understanding of the pathological effect of DU inhalation.

  5. Lack of genotoxic effects in hematopoietic and gastrointestinal cells of mice receiving chromium(VI) with the drinking water.

    PubMed

    De Flora, Silvio; D'Agostini, Francesco; Balansky, Roumen; Micale, Rosanna; Baluce, Barbara; Izzotti, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    Chromium(VI) is genotoxic when tested in vitro or injected parenterally in such a way to escape detoxification mechanisms. However, its genotoxicity and potential carcinogenicity are lost, depending on dose and administration route, due to efficient reduction in body fluids and nontarget cells. Chromium(VI) is a Group 1 IARC carcinogen, but only in the respiratory tract and in well-defined occupational settings that involved heavy exposures. Recently, concern has been expressed that oral chromium(VI) may be a gastric carcinogen. We demonstrated that administration of very high doses of chromium(VI) with the drinking water does not induce any clastogenic effect in hematopoietic cells of adult mice and their fetuses. Thereafter, we investigated whether administration of chromium(VI) with the drinking water may induce local genotoxic effects in the gastrointestinal tract. Sodium dichromate dihydrate was administered to mice for 9 consecutive months, at doses corresponding to 5 and 20 mg chromium(VI)/l, which exceed drinking water standards by 100 and 400 times, respectively. Under these conditions, chromium(VI) failed to enhance the frequency of DNA-protein crosslinks and did not cause oxidative DNA damage, measured in terms of 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine, in the forestomach, glandular stomach and duodenum. When cells from the same organs were isolated and challenged in vitro with chromium(VI), as positive controls, the same genotoxicity biomarkers were evidently affected. Thus, consistently with the knowledge accumulated in 50 years of research on chromium(VI) kinetics and metabolism, oral chromium(VI) appears to be devoid of genotoxicity in the gastrointestinal tract. After 9 months, we did not observe any variation of tumor yield in skin, lung, forestomach, glandular stomach, and duodenum of chromium(VI)-treated mice. These results are discussed in the light of literature data, also including a recent 2-year carcinogenicity study performed by the National Toxicology

  6. Effect of the nano-bio interface on the genotoxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles and associated cellular responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Raju Yashaswi

    Several toxicological studies have shown that titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2), one of the most widely produced engineered nanoparticles, can induce genotoxicity; however, potential adverse health effects associated with their physicochemical properties are not fully understood. Proteins in a biological medium can adsorb to the surface of the nanoparticle resulting in the formation of a protein corona that can alter the physicochemical properties of the particle. Furthermore, the protein corona may impact the interaction between nanoparticles and cells, referred to as the nano-bio interface, effecting the uptake, distribution, and toxicity of the particles. Despite the potential influence of the composition of the biological medium on the physicochemical properties and genotoxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles, the majority of studies have not examined systematically the influence of medium composition on protein corona, genotoxicity, and cellular responses. In this dissertation we tested the overall hypothesis that titanium dioxide nanoparticles in medium that produces the smallest agglomerates would be taken up into cells and induce genotoxicity, and that exposure would initiate the signaling of key mediators of a DNA damage and inflammation response. Three major findings were shown in this study: 1) Protein corona formation on the surface of nano-TiO2 can impact the nano-bio interface and change cellular interaction. 2) Smaller agglomerates of nano-TiO2 are taken up more by cells without inducing cell cycle arrest, thereby allowing induced DNA damage to be processed into micronuclei in BEAS-2B cells. 3) Nano-TiO 2 in medium that facilitates increased cellular interaction induces the upregulation of the ATM-Chk2 DNA damage response (similar to ionizing radiation) and NF-kappaB inflammation pathways. Taken together, our research provides a systematic examination of the physicochemical properties, genotoxicity, and cellular responses induced by

  7. Genotoxicity induced by Roundup® (Glyphosate) in tegu lizard (Salvator merianae) embryos.

    PubMed

    Schaumburg, Laura G; Siroski, Pablo A; Poletta, Gisela L; Mudry, Marta D

    2016-06-01

    Environmental contaminants produce multiple adverse consequences at individual, population and ecosystem levels. High volumes of agrochemicals applied to great variety of crops, together with agricultural expansion, generate great concerns due to the impact for the environment and large risk implicated for wildlife. The lack of data on these threats is striking. The tegu lizard (Salvator merianae) is one of the species that live in environments under contaminant effects. Several characteristics allow proposing this species as a potential sentinel organism for the monitoring of pesticides in their habitat. The present study is the first report about genotoxicity in tegu lizard neonates after embryonic exposure to Roundup® (glyphosate 66.2%). The micronucleus test (MN), nuclear abnormalities (NAs) assay and comet assay (CA) were used as biomarkers of genotoxic effects induced in erythrocytes by topical exposure of the eggs to the glyphosate commercial formulation Roundup® (RU), in laboratory controlled conditions. A total of 96 eggs were distributed in six groups exposed to RU (50, 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600μg/egg), one positive control (PC; 200μg cyclophosphamide/egg) and one negative control (NC; distilled water). No teratogenic effects were observed in any of the exposed or control neonates. A significant increase in DNA damage was observed in all concentrations higher than 100μg/egg with respect to NC (p<0.05). However, no statistical differences were found in the frequencies of MN and NAs in any group exposed to RU compared to the NC. No statistically significant differences were found in the size of the lizards at birth or after six months post-exposure (p>0.05). Our results provide new information about the undesirable effects of the glyphosate-based herbicide formulations RU on this lizard species that inhabits areas permanently exposed to several pesticide formulations. We consider of utmost necessity a strict regulation of the agrochemical application

  8. Using the micronucleus assay to detect genotoxic effects of metal ions.

    PubMed Central

    Bérces, J; Otos, M; Szirmai, S; Crane-Uruena, C; Köteles, G J

    1993-01-01

    The lymphocyte micronucleus assay was used to measure the average frequency of micronuclei in a population and thus assess genotoxic effects. Data from 174 persons give an average value of 16.4 +/- 7.3, and a slight age-dependence was observed. To detect combined environmental mutagen injuries the micronucleus assay was used to study the effects of metal compounds. Cadmium ions increased the micronucleus frequency linearly after incubation with whole blood in vitro with 10(6)-10(-3) M concentrations for 30 min. Similarly, a linear increase in micronucleus frequency was detected with 10(-3)-10(-1) M mercury ions. Concerning the biological effect of selenium, it was found that neither sodium selenite nor selenium dioxide induced increases at concentrations of 10(-7)-10(-6) M; 10(-5) M caused a slight increase; 10(-4) M, however, destroyed the cells. These results suggest that the human lymphocyte micronucleus test can be used to assess genotoxic injuries due to environmental effects in human lymphocytes. PMID:8143600

  9. Beryllium Metal I. Experimental Results on Acute Oral Toxicity, Local Skin and Eye Effects, and Genotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Strupp, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The toxicity of soluble metal compounds is often different from that of the parent metal. Since no reliable data on acute toxicity, local effects, and mutagenicity of beryllium metal have ever been generated, beryllium metal powder was tested according to the respective Organisation for Economical Co-Operation and Development (OECD) guidelines. Acute oral toxicity of beryllium metal was investigated in rats and local effects on skin and eye in rabbits. Skin-sensitizing properties were investigated in guinea pigs (maximization method). Basic knowledge about systemic bioavailability is important for the design of genotoxicity tests on poorly soluble substances. Therefore, it was necessary to experimentally compare the capacities of beryllium chloride and beryllium metal to form ions under simulated human lung conditions. Solubility of beryllium metal in artificial lung fluid was low, while solubility in artificial lysosomal fluid was moderate. Beryllium chloride dissolution kinetics were largely different, and thus, metal extracts were used in the in vitro genotoxicity tests. Genotoxicity was investigated in vitro in a bacterial reverse mutagenicity assay, a mammalian cell gene mutation assay, a mammalian cell chromosome aberration assay, and an unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) assay. In addition, cell transformation was tested in a Syrian hamster embryo cell assay, and potential inhibition of DNA repair was tested by modification of the UDS assay. Beryllium metal was found not to be mutagenic or clastogenic based on the experimental in vitro results. Furthermore, treatment with beryllium metal extracts did not induce DNA repair synthesis, indicative of no DNA-damaging potential of beryllium metal. A cell-transforming potential and a tendency to inhibit DNA repair when the cell is severely damaged by an external stimulus were observed. Beryllium metal was also found not to be a skin or eye irritant, not to be a skin sensitizer, and not to have relevant acute oral

  10. Beryllium metal I. experimental results on acute oral toxicity, local skin and eye effects, and genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Strupp, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The toxicity of soluble metal compounds is often different from that of the parent metal. Since no reliable data on acute toxicity, local effects, and mutagenicity of beryllium metal have ever been generated, beryllium metal powder was tested according to the respective Organisation for Economical Co-Operation and Development (OECD) guidelines. Acute oral toxicity of beryllium metal was investigated in rats and local effects on skin and eye in rabbits. Skin-sensitizing properties were investigated in guinea pigs (maximization method). Basic knowledge about systemic bioavailability is important for the design of genotoxicity tests on poorly soluble substances. Therefore, it was necessary to experimentally compare the capacities of beryllium chloride and beryllium metal to form ions under simulated human lung conditions. Solubility of beryllium metal in artificial lung fluid was low, while solubility in artificial lysosomal fluid was moderate. Beryllium chloride dissolution kinetics were largely different, and thus, metal extracts were used in the in vitro genotoxicity tests. Genotoxicity was investigated in vitro in a bacterial reverse mutagenicity assay, a mammalian cell gene mutation assay, a mammalian cell chromosome aberration assay, and an unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) assay. In addition, cell transformation was tested in a Syrian hamster embryo cell assay, and potential inhibition of DNA repair was tested by modification of the UDS assay. Beryllium metal was found not to be mutagenic or clastogenic based on the experimental in vitro results. Furthermore, treatment with beryllium metal extracts did not induce DNA repair synthesis, indicative of no DNA-damaging potential of beryllium metal. A cell-transforming potential and a tendency to inhibit DNA repair when the cell is severely damaged by an external stimulus were observed. Beryllium metal was also found not to be a skin or eye irritant, not to be a skin sensitizer, and not to have relevant acute oral

  11. Cytotoxic, Genotoxic, and Neurotoxic Effects of Mg, Pb, and Fe on Pheochromocytoma (PC-12) Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Talia; Liu, Yi-Ming; Tchounwou, Paul B.

    2014-01-01

    Metals such as lead (Pb), magnesium (Mg), and iron (Fe) are ubiquitous in the environment as a result of natural occurrence and anthropogenic activities. Although Mg, Fe and others are considered essential elements, high level of exposure has been associated with severe adverse health effects including cardiovascular, hematological, nephrotoxic, hepatotoxic, and neurologic abnormalities in humans. In the present study we hypothesized that Mg, Pb, and Fe are cytotoxic, genotoxic and neurotoxic, and their toxicity is mediated through oxidative stress and alteration in protein expression. To test the hypothesis, we used the pheochromocytoma (PC-12) cell line as a neuro cell model and performed the LDH assay for cell viability, Comet assay for DNA damage, Western blot for oxidative stress, and HPLC-MS to assess the concentration levels of neurological biomarkers such as glutamate, dopamine (DA), and 3-methoxytyramine (3-MT). The results of this study clearly show that Mg, Pb, and Fe, respectively in the form of MgSO4, Pb(NO3)2, FeCl2, and FeCl3 induce cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, and genotoxicity in PC-12 cells. In addition, exposure to these metallic compounds caused significant changes in the concentration levels of glutamate, dopamine, and 3-MT in PC-12 cells. Taken together the findings suggest that MgSO4, Pb(NO3)2, FeCl2, and FeCl3 have the potential to induce substantial toxicity to PC-12 cells. PMID:24942330

  12. Effect of dietary meat and fish on endogenous nitrosation, inflammation and genotoxicity of faecal water.

    PubMed

    Joosen, Annemiek M C P; Lecommandeur, Emmanuelle; Kuhnle, Gunter G C; Aspinall, Sue M; Kap, Lisanne; Rodwell, Sheila A

    2010-05-01

    N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids have been associated with reduced colon tumorigenesis. However, their association with colorectal cancer incidence is not conclusive. We investigated the influence of isocaloric replacement of red meat with fatty fish on endogenous nitrosation, inflammation and genotoxicity of faecal water in apparently healthy human volunteers on controlled diets. Fourteen volunteers consumed a high red meat, a combined red meat/fish and a high fish diet for 8 days each. Faecal homogenates were analysed for haem, nitroso compounds (NOC) and calprotectin and associated supernatants for genotoxicity. Both faecal NOC and haem excretion decreased with more fish and less meat in the diet. Nitrosyl iron (FeNO) was the main contributor to total NOC on all diets. The proportion of other NOC increased with more fish and less meat in the diet (P = 0.01), resulting in a non-statistically significant decrease in the proportion of FeNO on the fish diet. There was no statistically significant difference in faecal calprotectin (P = 0.54) and faecal water-induced DNA strand breaks and oxidized purines and pyrimidines between the diets (P > 0.36). Increasing fish intake and reducing the intake of red meat does not seem to have an effect on inflammation and faecal water-induced (oxidative) DNA damage; however, it does reduce the formation of mutagenic and potentially carcinogenic NOC and may as such beneficially affect colorectal risk.

  13. Effects of single and multi walled carbon nanotubes on macrophages: cyto and genotoxicity and electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Di Giorgio, Maria Laura; Di Bucchianico, Sebastiano; Ragnelli, Anna Maria; Aimola, Pierpaolo; Santucci, Sandro; Poma, Anna

    2011-05-18

    Production of nanotechnology-based materials is increasing worldwide: it is essential to evaluate their potential toxicity. Among these nanomaterials, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have tremendous potential in many areas of research and applications. We have investigated the cyto- and genotoxic effects of single and multi-walled CNTs (SWCNTs, MWCNTs) and carbon black (CB) on the mouse macrophage cell line RAW 264.7. Specifically we have investigated inflammatory response, release of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, cell death (both necrosis and apoptosis), chromosomal aberrations and cellular ultrastructural alteration caused by CB, MWCNTs and SWCNTs. Our data confirm that both CNTs and CB are cyto and geno-toxic to RAW 264.7 mouse macrophages. CNTs exposure induced ROS release, necrosis and chromosomal aberrations but did not cause an inflammatory response. In addition CNTs induce ultrastructural damage and apoptosis. CNTs penetrate the cell membrane and individual MWCNTs are seen associated with the nuclear envelope. 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparative efficacy of two microdoses of a potentized homoeopathic drug, Cadmium Sulphoricum, in reducing genotoxic effects produced by cadmium chloride in mice: a time course study

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Swapna S; Mallick, Palash P; Rahman Khuda-Bukhsh, Anisur AR

    2001-01-01

    Background Cadmium poisoning in the environment has assumed an alarming problem in recent years. Effective antimutagenic agents which can reverse or combat cadmium induced genotoxicity in mice have not yet been reported. Therefore, in the present study, following the homeopathic principle of "like cures like", we tested the efficacy of two potencies of a homeopathic drug, Cadmium Sulphoricum (Cad Sulph), in reducing the genotoxic effects of Cadmium chloride in mice. Another objective was to determine the relative efficacy of three administrative modes, i.e. pre-, post- and combined pre and post-feeding of the homeopathic drugs. For this, healthy mice, Mus musculus, were intraperitoneally injected with 0.008% solution of CdCl2 @ 1 ml/100 gm of body wt (i.e. 0.8 mcg/gm of bw), and assessed for the genotoxic effects through such studies as chromosome aberrations (CA), micronucleated erythrocytes (MNE), mitotic index (MI) and sperm head anomaly (SHA), keeping suitable succussed alcohol fed (positive) and CdCl2 untreated normal (negative) controls. The CdCl2 treated mice were divided into 3 subgroups, which were orally administered with the drug prior to, after and both prior to and after injection of CdCl2 at specific fixation intervals and their genotoxic effects were analyzed. Results While the CA, MNE and SHA were reduced in the drug fed series as compared to their respective controls, the MI showed an apparent increase. The combined pre- and post-feeding of Cad Sulph showed maximum reduction of the genotoxic effects. Conclusions Both Cad Sulph-30 and 200 were able to combat cadmium induced genotoxic effects in mice and that combined pre- and post-feeding mode of administration was found to be most effective in reducing the genotoxic effect of CdCl2 followed by the post-feeding mode. PMID:11737881

  15. Genotoxic and clastogenic effects of monohaloacetic acid drinking water disinfection by-products in primary human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Escobar-Hoyos, Luisa F; Hoyos-Giraldo, Luz Stella; Londoño-Velasco, Elizabeth; Reyes-Carvajal, Ingrid; Saavedra-Trujillo, Diana; Carvajal-Varona, Silvio; Sánchez-Gómez, Adalberto; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Plewa, Michael J

    2013-06-15

    The haloacetic acids (HAAs) are the second-most prevalent class of drinking water disinfection by-products formed by chemical disinfectants. Previous studies have determined DNA damage and repair of HAA-induced lesions in mammalian and human cell lines; however, little is known of the genomic DNA and chromosome damage induced by these compounds in primary human cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic and clastogenic effects of the monoHAA disinfection by-products in primary human lymphocytes. All monoHAAs were genotoxic in primary human lymphocytes, the rank order of genotoxicity and cytotoxicity was IAA > BAA > CAA. After 6 h of repair time, only 50% of the DNA damage (maximum decrease in DNA damage) was repaired compared to the control. This demonstrates that primary human lymphocytes are less efficient in repairing the induced damage by monoHAAs than previous studies with mammalian cell lines. In addition, the monoHAAs induced an increase in the chromosome aberration frequency as a measurement of the clastogenic effect of these compounds. These results coupled with genomic technologies in primary human cells and other mammalian non-cancerous cell lines may lead to the identification of biomarkers that may be employed in feedback loops to aid water chemists and engineers in the overall goal of producing safer drinking water.

  16. Evaluation of genotoxicity and DNA protective effects of mangiferin, a glucosylxanthone isolated from Mangifera indica L. stem bark extract.

    PubMed

    Rodeiro, I; Hernandez, S; Morffi, J; Herrera, J A; Gómez-Lechón, M J; Delgado, R; Espinosa-Aguirre, J J

    2012-09-01

    Mangiferin is a glucosylxantone isolated from Mangifera indica L. stem bark. Several studies have shown its pharmacological properties which make it a promising candidate for putative therapeutic use. This study was focused to investigate the in vitro genotoxic effects of mangiferin in the Ames test, SOS Chromotest and Comet assay. The genotoxic effects in bone marrow erythrocytes from NMRI mice orally treated with mangiferin (2000 mg/kg) were also evaluated. Additionally, its potential antimutagenic activity against several mutagens in the Ames test and its effects on CYP1A1 activity were assessed. Mangiferin (50-5000 μg/plate) did not increased the frequency of reverse mutations in the Ames test, nor induced primary DNA damage (5-1000 μg/mL) to Escherichia coli PQ37 cells under the SOS Chromotest. It was observed neither single strand breaks nor alkali-labile sites in blood peripheral lymphocytes or hepatocytes after 1h exposition to 10-500 μg/mL of mangiferin under the Comet assay. Furthermore, micronucleus studies showed mangiferin neither induced cytotoxic activity nor increased the frequency of micronucleated/binucleated cells in mice bone marrow. In short, mangiferin did not induce cytotoxic or genotoxic effects but it protect against DNA damage which would be associated with its antioxidant properties and its capacity to inhibit CYP enzymes.

  17. Green fluorescent protein-based biosensor for detecting SOS-inducing activity of genotoxic compounds.

    PubMed

    Kostrzynska, Magdalena; Leung, Kam T; Lee, Hung; Trevors, Jack T

    2002-01-01

    Increasing levels of environmental pollution demand specific and sensitive methods for detection of genotoxic agents in water, food products and environmental samples. Tests for genotoxicity assessment are often based on biosensor strains that respond to DNA damage induced by chemicals. In the present study, fluorescent reporter Escherichia coli strains have been developed, which contain a plasmid-borne transcriptional fusion between the DNA-damage inducible recA promoter and the green fluorescent protein gene (gfp) or a gene encoding a red-shifted, higher intensity GFP variant (mutant 3). GFP-based biosensors allowed the detection of a dose-dependent response to genotoxic agents such as mitomycin C (MMC), N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) and nalidixic acid (NA). A reporter strain carrying recA'-gfp mutant 3 fusion gave more dramatic and sensitive response than a strain containing the wild-type gfp. These results indicate that recA'-gfp mutant 3-based biosensor is potentially useful for detection of genotoxins.

  18. Mechanistic insights into the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity induced by glycidamide in human mammary cells.

    PubMed

    Bandarra, Susana; Fernandes, Ana S; Magro, Inês; Guerreiro, Patrícia S; Pingarilho, Marta; Churchwell, Mona I; Gil, Octávia Monteiro; Batinic-Haberle, Ines; Gonçalves, Sandrina; Rueff, José; Miranda, Joana P; Marques, M Matilde; Beland, Frederick A; Castro, Matilde; Gaspar, Jorge F; Oliveira, Nuno G

    2013-11-01

    Acrylamide (AA) is a well-known industrial chemical classified as a probable human carcinogen. Benign and malignant tumours at different sites, including the mammary gland, have been reported in rodents exposed to AA. This xenobiotic is also formed in many carbohydrate-rich foods prepared at high temperatures. For this reason, AA is an issue of concern in terms of human cancer risk. The epoxide glycidamide (GA) is thought to be the ultimate genotoxic AA metabolite. Despite extensive experimental and epidemiological data focused on AA-induced breast cancer, there is still lack of information on the deleterious effects induced by GA in mammary cells. The work reported here addresses the characterisation and modulation of cytotoxicity, generation of reactive oxygen species, formation of micronuclei (MN) and quantification of specific GA-DNA adducts in human MCF10A epithelial cells exposed to GA. The results show that GA significantly induces MN, impairs cell proliferation kinetics and decreases cell viability at high concentrations by mechanisms not involving oxidative stress. KU55933, an inhibitor of ataxia telangiectasia mutated kinase, enhanced the cytotoxicity of GA (P < 0.05), supporting a role of this enzyme in regulating the repair of GA-induced DNA lesions. Moreover, even at low GA levels, N7-GA-Gua adducts were generated in a linear dose-response manner in MCF10A cells. These results confirm that human mammary cells are susceptible to GA toxicity and reinforce the need for additional studies to clarify the potential correlation between dietary AA exposure and breast cancer risk in human populations.

  19. Assessment of Potential In vitro Genotoxic and Cytotoxic Effects of Bupropion Hydrochloride (Wellbutrin) in Human Peripheral Lymphocytes and Human Cortical Neuron.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Saurabh Kumar; Nathawat, Lokendra Singh; Damani, Priyankka; Choksi, Arpan Kumar; Banik, Arpita; Sinha, Kriti; Bhattacharya, Aditi Sarkar

    2013-01-01

    Wellbutrin (bupropion hydrochloride; WB), an anti-depressant of the aminoketone class is new highly selective norepinephrine and dopamine reuptake inhibitor; it is effective in the treatment of patients with major depression. To investigate the in vitro effects of WB in human cultured peripheral blood lymphocytes and human cortical neural (HCN2) cell lines, micronucleus, sister chromatid exchange analysis, cellular viability, and comet assays were employed. The present study is to our knowledge, the first report on WB genotoxicity in cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes and its cytotoxicity in the HCN2 cell line. We have also investigated the genotoxic potential of WB to induce chromosomal aberrations. WB-induced cytotoxicity (measured as reduction of the nuclear division index) possibly prevented the division of damaged cells. We conclude that although, WB exerts potential genotoxic effects in cultured lymphocytes, its cytogenetic effects are very unlikely to occur in blood cultures of WB-administered subjects.

  20. The in vitro genotoxic effect of Tucuma (Astrocaryum aculeatum), an Amazonian fruit rich in carotenoids.

    PubMed

    de Souza Filho, Olmiro Cezimbra; Sagrillo, Michele Rorato; Garcia, Luiz Filipe Machado; Machado, Alencar Kolinski; Cadoná, Francine; Ribeiro, Euler Esteves; Duarte, Marta Maria Medeiros Frescura; Morel, Ademir Farias; da Cruz, Ivana Beatrice Mânica

    2013-11-01

    Tucuma (Astrocaryum aculeatum) is an Amazonian fruit that presents high levels of carotenoids and other bioactive compounds such as quercetin. The extracts of tucuma peel and pulp present strong antioxidant activity which illustrate an elevated concentration that causes cytotoxic effects in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). This study performed additional investigations to analyze the potential genotoxic effects of the tucuma extracts on PBMCs. The genotoxicity was evaluated by DNA fragmentation, Comet assay, and chromosomal instability G-band assays. The acute tucuma extract treatment showed genoprotective effects against DNA denaturation when compared with untreated PBMC cells. However, in the experiments with 24 and 72 h treatments to tucuma treatments, we observed low genotoxicity through a concentration of 100 μg/mL, some genotoxic effects related to intermediary concentrations (100-500 μg/mL), and more pronounced genotoxic effects on higher tucuma extract concentrations. After 24 h of treatment, the reactive oxygen species were similar among treatments and PBMC control groups. However, the caspase-1 activity related to the apoptosis and pyroptosis process increased significantly in higher tucuma concentrations. In summary, tucuma extracts, despite their higher antioxidant content and antioxidant activity, would present PBMCs genotoxic effects that are dependent on concentration and time exposition. These results need to be considered in future in vitro and in vivo studies of tucuma effects.

  1. Chemopreventive effect of cactus Opuntia ficus indica on oxidative stress and genotoxicity of aflatoxin B1

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is potent hepatotoxic and hepatocarcinogenic agent. In aflatoxicosis, oxidative stress is a common mechanism contributing to initiation and progression of hepatic damage. The aim of this work was to evaluate the hepatoprotective effect of cactus cladode extract (CCE) on aflatoxin B1-induced liver damage in mice by measuring malondialdehyde (MDA) level, the protein carbonyls generation and the heat shock proteins Hsp 70 and Hsp 27 expressions in liver. We also looked for an eventual protective effect against AFB1-induced genotoxicity as determined by chromosome aberrations test, SOS Chromotest and DNA fragmentation assay. We further evaluated the modulation of p53, bax and bcl2 protein expressions in liver. Methods Adult, healthy balbC (20-25 g) male mice were pre-treated by intraperitonial administration of CCE (50 mg/Kg.b.w) for 2 weeks. Control animals were treated 3 days a week for 4 weeks by intraperitonial administration of 250 μg/Kg.b.w AFB1. Animals treated by AFB1 and CCE were divided into two groups: the first group was administrated CCE 2 hours before each treatment with AFB1 3 days a week for 4 weeks. The second group was administrated without pre-treatment with CCE but this extract was administrated 24 hours after each treatment with AFB1 3 days a week for 4 weeks. Results Our results clearly showed that AFB1 induced significant alterations in oxidative stress markers. In addition, it has a genotoxic potential and it increased the expression of pro apoptotic proteins p53 and bax and decreased the expression of bcl2. The treatment of CCE before or after treatment with AFB1, showed (i) a total reduction of AFB1 induced oxidative damage markers, (ii) an anti-genotoxic effect resulting in an efficient prevention of chromosomal aberrations and DNA fragmentation compared to the group treated with AFB1 alone (iii) restriction of the effect of AFB1 by differential modulation of the expression of p53 which decreased as well as its

  2. Flavan-3-ol compounds prevent pentylenetetrazol-induced oxidative damage in rats without producing mutations and genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Scola, Gustavo; Scheffel, Thamiris; Gambato, Gabriela; Freitas, Suzana; Dani, Caroline; Funchal, Claudia; Gomez, Rosane; Coitinho, Adriana; Salvador, Mirian

    2013-02-08

    Seizure disorder is a chronic condition in the brain that affects approximately 50 million people worldwide. Oxidative stress plays a crucial role in the pathophysiology of this disorder and can cause neuronal injury. Approximately one in three treated patients suffers from seizures regardless of pharmacological intervention, which results in oxidative damage. The present study aims to investigate the possible protective effect of antioxidant-rich Vitis labrusca extract on pentylenetetrazol-induced oxidative damage in Wistar rats. Possible behavioral alterations, genotoxic and mutagenic effects of the extract were also evaluated. The results showed that V. labrusca extract provides a significant protective effect against oxidative damage to lipids and proteins induced by pentylenetetrazol in the cerebral cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus and liver of rats. Also, the extract did not alter locomotor behavior. Moreover, it was non-genotoxic and non-mutagenic. Our results suggest the possibility of using V. labrusca extract as a therapeutic agent to minimize neuronal damage associated with seizures. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Genotoxic and inflammatory effects of nanofibrillated cellulose in murine lungs.

    PubMed

    Catalán, Julia; Rydman, Elina; Aimonen, Kukka; Hannukainen, Kati-Susanna; Suhonen, Satu; Vanhala, Esa; Moreno, Carlos; Meyer, Valérie; Perez, Denilson da Silva; Sneck, Asko; Forsström, Ulla; Højgaard, Casper; Willemoes, Martin; Winther, Jacob R; Vogel, Ulla; Wolff, Henrik; Alenius, Harri; Savolainen, Kai M; Norppa, Hannu

    2017-01-01

    Nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) is a sustainable and renewable nanomaterial, with diverse potential applications in the paper and medical industries. As NFC consists of long fibres of high aspect ratio, we examined here whether TEMPO-(2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-piperidin-1-oxyl) oxidised NFC (length 300-1000nm, thickness 10-25nm), administrated by a single pharyngeal aspiration, could be genotoxic to mice, locally in the lungs or systemically in the bone marrow. Female C57Bl/6 mice were treated with four different doses of NFC (10, 40, 80 and 200 µg/mouse), and samples were collected 24h later. DNA damage was assessed by the comet assay in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and lung cells, and chromosome damage by the bone marrow erythrocyte micronucleus assay. Inflammation was evaluated by BAL cell counts and analysis of cytokines and histopathological alterations in the lungs. A significant induction of DNA damage was observed at the two lower doses of NFC in lung cells, whereas no increase was seen in BAL cells. No effect was detected in the bone marrow micronucleus assay, either. NFC increased the recruitment of inflammatory cells to the lungs, together with a dose-dependent increase in mRNA expression of tumour necrosis factor α, interleukins 1β and 6, and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 5, although there was no effect on the levels of the respective proteins. The histological analysis showed a dose-related accumulation of NFC in the bronchi, the alveoli and some in the cytoplasm of macrophages. In addition, neutrophilic accumulation in the alveolar lung space was observed with increasing dose. Our findings showed that NFC administered by pharyngeal aspiration caused an acute inflammatory response and DNA damage in the lungs, but no systemic genotoxic effect in the bone marrow. The present experimental design did not, however, allow us to determine whether the responses were transient or could persist for a longer time. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University

  4. Histopathological, oxidative damage, biochemical, and genotoxicity alterations in hepatic rats exposed to deltamethrin: modulatory effects of garlic (Allium sativum).

    PubMed

    Ncir, Marwa; Ben Salah, Ghada; Kamoun, Hassen; Makni Ayadi, Fatma; Khabir, Abdelmajid; El Feki, Abdelfattah; Saoudi, Mongi

    2016-06-01

    Deltamethrin is a pesticide widely used as a synthetic pyrethroid. The aim of this study was undertaken to investigate the effects of deltamethrin to induce oxidative stress and changes in biochemical parameters, hepatotoxicity and genotoxicity in female rats following a short-term (30 days) oral exposure and attenuation of these effects by Allium sativum extract. Indeed, Allium sativum is known to be a good antioxidant food resource which helps destroy free radical particles. Our results showed that deltamethrin treatment caused an increase in liver enzyme activities of aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH); and hepatic lipid peroxidation (LPO) level. However, it induced a decrease in activities of hepatic catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) (p < 0.01). Allium sativum extract normalized significantly (p < 0.01) the mentioned parameters in deltamethrin-treated rats. For genotoxic evaluation, deltamethrin treatment showed a significant increase in frequencies of micronucleus in bone-marrow cells. Micronucleus formation is an indicator of chromosomal damage which has been increasingly used to detect the genotoxic potential of environmental pests. The present study showed that Allium sativum diminished the adverse effects induced by this synthetic pyrethroid insecticide.

  5. Antigenotoxic effect of green-synthesised silver nanoparticles from Ocimum sanctum leaf extract against cyclophosphamide induced genotoxicity in human lymphocytes—in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijaya, P. P.; Rekha, B.; Mathew, Anu Thersa; Syed Ali, M.; Yogananth, N.; Anuradha, V.; Kalitha Parveen, P.

    2014-04-01

    The present study was aimed to identify the antigenotoxic effect of bio-synthesised silver nanoparticles (SNP) of Ocimum sanctum leaf extract against cyclophosphamide (CP). We tested the antigenotoxic effect of bio-synthesized silver nanoparticles of O. sanctum leaf extract on human lymphocytes against CP by using chromosomal aberration assay (CAA). Silver nanoparticles was first synthesized from fresh leaf extract of O. sanctum and characterised. Their quality was checked by XRD technique and morphology by SEM. Three different doses of the bio-synthesised SNPs namely, 50, 100 and 200 μl/ml were selected and CP (100 μg/ml) was used as a positive control for CAA. CP administration to human lymphocytes culture caused reduction in mitotic index (MI) and increase in chromosomal damages. The three doses (50, 100 and 200 μl/ml) significantly ( P < 0.005) reduced the chromosomal damages by CP and there was increase in MI. The biological way of synthesising SNPs has advantages like cost effectiveness and eco-friendly. Also the bio-synthesised SNPs of O. sanctum leaf extract was found to be an powerful genoprotectant. Furthermore works are to be carried out in future to find the extract mechanism of its genoprotective nature.

  6. [Genotoxicity effect of organic pollutants in Meiliang Bay of Taihu Lake on microalga Euglena gracilis].

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang-Yu; Cui, Yi-Bin; Hu, Chang-Wei; Qian, Xin; Kong, Zhi-Ming; Li, Mei

    2009-11-01

    Organic pollutant ingredients and content of water samples from Taihu Lake were analyzed by GC-MS. Results showed that Taihu Lake was already contaminated by the organic pollutant, and 15 kinds of targeted organic pollutants were detected. At lower concentrations (1 time), organic pollutants could not have notable effect on the growth of Euglena gracilis, but could increase the content of photosynthetic pigment. At higher concentrations (5, 10 times), organic pollutants restrained the growth of E. gracilis remarkably, and decreased the content of photosynthetic pigment. Activities of SOD and POD increased with the content of organic pollutants. It is indicated that organic pollution could induce activities of antioxidation enzymes in E. gracilis. TOM and TM for the genotoxicity assay increased and DNA damage was found. In higher concentration groups, DNA damage was serious and had an obvious dose-effect relationship. It is indicated that Meiliang bay water may have potential mutagenicity. Comet assay combined with SOD analysis was of value to genotoxic monitoring of polluted water and was a suitable biomarker for organic pollutants in water.

  7. Effects of konjac glucomannan, inulin and cellulose on acute colonic responses to genotoxic azoxymethane.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wen-Tzu; Yang, Lien-Chuan; Chen, Hsiao-Ling

    2014-07-15

    Mice were fed low-fibre, or that supplemented with soluble fibre (konjac glucomannan, KGM; inulin), or insoluble fibre (cellulose) to determine how these three fibres modulated the acute colonic responses to an azoxymethane (AOM) treatment. Results indicated that KGM and inulin exerted greater anti-genotoxic effects compared to cellulose and up-regulated the gene expressions of glutathione S-transferase and antioxidant enzymes. The apoptotic index in the distal colon was the greatest and the expression of Bcl-2 was the lowest in the KGM group 24h after the AOM treatment. On the other hand, the proliferative index and expression of Cyclin D1 were lower in all fibre groups. Furthermore, KGM increased cecal short-chain fatty acid contents, and both KGM and inulin increased fecal probiotic concentrations. This study suggested that soluble fibres were more effective than cellulose on ameliorating AOM-induced genotoxicity by up-regulating antioxidant enzyme genes, and enhancing epithelium apoptosis by down-regulating Bcl-2. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Bioassay of genotoxic effects of environmental particles in a feeding ciliate.

    PubMed Central

    Smith-Sonneborn, J; Palizzi, R A; McCann, E A; Fisher, G L

    1983-01-01

    The ciliated protozoan, Paramecium, can be used to quantitate cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of ingested complex environmental particles. Cytotoxicity is quantitated by the increased proportion of treated versus control cells which do not retain their capacity for normal cell replication. Genotoxic effects are assessed by the increased fraction of nonviable offspring from treated versus control parent cells after the self-fertilization process of autogamy. Since these cells ingest nonnutrient respirable-sized particles, biological activity of intracellular extraction of dusts and fly ash can be compared before and after extraction with polar and nonpolar solvents. Previous studies indicated that coal fly ash was mutagenic in these eukaryotic cells. Mutagenicity of coal fly ash was not detectable after extraction with a concentration of HCl known to remove nonmatrix trace elements. These results suggested that this ciliate bioassay might be a detector of mineral mutagens. Fine particles of the carcinogenic nickel compounds, alpha-nickel subsulfide, and beta-nickel sulfide were compared for their biological activity in this bioassay. Both nickel compounds were ingested by the ciliates and induced heritable damage in the progeny of the treated parent cells. PMID:6641654

  9. Cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of silver nanoparticle/carboxymethyl cellulose on Allium cepa.

    PubMed

    Becaro, Aline A; Siqueira, Maria Célia; Puti, Fernanda C; de Moura, Marcia Regina; Correa, Daniel S; Marconcini, José Manoel; Mattoso, Luiz H C; Ferreira, Marcos David

    2017-07-01

    Several mutagenic agents may be present in substances released in the environment, which may cause serious environmental impacts. Among these substances, there is a special concern regarding the widespread use of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) in several products due to their widely known bactericidal properties, including in the medical field and the food industry (e.g., active packaging). The assessment of the effects of AgNP released in the environment, having different concentrations, sizes, and being associated or not to other types of materials, including polymers, is therefore essential. In this research, the objective was to evaluate the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of AgNP (size range between 2 and 8 nm) on root meristematic cells of Allium cepa (A. cepa). Tests were carried out in the presence of colloidal solution of AgNP and AgNP mixed with carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), using distinct concentrations of AgNP. As a result, when compared to control samples, AgNP induced a mitotic index decrease and an increase of chromosomal aberration number for two studied concentrations. When AgNP was in the presence of CMC, no cytotoxic potential was verified, but only the genotoxic potential for AgNP dispersion having concentration of 12.4 ppm.

  10. Genotoxic effects of X-rays on keratinized mucosa cells during panoramic dental radiography.

    PubMed

    Cerqueira, E M M; Meireles, J R C; Lopes, M A; Junqueira, V C; Gomes-Filho, I S; Trindade, S; Machado-Santelli, G M

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic effects of X-rays on epithelial gingival cells during panoramic dental radiography using a differentiated protocol for the micronucleus test. 40 healthy individuals who underwent this procedure for diagnostic purposes on request from their dentists agreed to participate in this study. All of them answered a questionnaire before the examination. Epithelial gingival cells were obtained from the keratinized mucosa of the upper dental arcade by gentle scraping with a cervical brush immediately before exposure and 10 days later. Cytological preparations were stained according to the Feulgen-Rossenbeck reaction, counterstained with fast green 1% for 1 min and analysed under a light microscope. Micronuclei, nuclear projections (broken eggs) and degenerative nuclear alterations (pyknosis, karyolysis, karyorrhexis and condensed chromatin) were scored. The frequency of micronuclei was significantly higher after exposure (P < 0.05), as were the frequencies of nuclear alterations indicative of apoptosis (P < 0.001). These results indicate that X-ray radiation emitted during panoramic dental radiography induces a genotoxic effect on epithelial gingival cells that increases the frequency of chromosomal damage and nuclear alterations indicative of apoptosis.

  11. Genotoxicity of neutrons in Drosophila melanogaster. Somatic mutation and recombination induced by reactor neutrons.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Rincón, J; Delfín-Loya, A; Ureña-Núñez, F; Paredes, L C; Zambrano-Achirica, F; Graf, U

    2005-08-01

    This paper describes the observation of a direct relationship between the absorbed doses of neutrons and the frequencies of somatic mutation and recombination using the wing somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) of Drosophila melanogaster. This test was used for evaluating the biological effects induced by neutrons from the Triga Mark III reactor of Mexico. Two different reactor power levels were used, 300 and 1000 kW, and two absorbed doses were tested for each power level: 1.6 and 3.2 Gy for 300 kW and 0.84 and 1.7 Gy for 1000 kW. A linear relationship was observed between the absorbed dose and the somatic mutation and recombination frequencies. Furthermore, these frequencies were dependent on larval age: In 96-h-old larvae, the frequencies were increased considerably but the sizes of the spots were smaller than in 72-h-old larvae. The analysis of the balancer-heterozygous progeny showed a linear absorbed dose- response relationship, although the responses were clearly lower than found in the marker-trans-heterozygous flies. Approximately 65% of the genotoxicity observed is due to recombinational events. The results of the study indicate that thermal and fast neutrons are both mutagenic and recombinagenic in the D. melanogaster wing SMART, and that the frequencies are dependent on neutron dose, reactor power, and the age of the treated larvae.

  12. Cyto-genotoxic effects of smoke from commercial filter and non-filter cigarettes on human bronchial and pulmonary cells.

    PubMed

    Cavallo, Delia; Ursini, Cinzia L; Fresegna, Anna M; Maiello, Raffaele; Ciervo, Aureliano; Ferrante, Riccardo; Buresti, Giuliana; Iavicoli, Sergio

    2013-01-20

    Cigarette smoke is a complex mixture of chemicals, some of which are known as carcinogens. The cyto-genotoxic effects of cigarette-smoke extract (CSE) from commercial cigarettes without (A and B) and with filter (C and D) were evaluated at different CSE concentrations on A549 and BEAS-2B cells. The particle content of the cigarette smoke and the metal composition of the CSE were also analyzed. The cells were exposed to 1-10% of the CSE from one cigarette per experiment. Cytotoxicity was evaluated by use of the MTT assay after 24h, and the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay after 30min and 24h. The Fpg-modified comet assay was used to evaluate direct-oxidative DNA damage on cells exposed for 30min. As expected, unfiltered cigarette smoke (particularly from the B cigarette) contained a higher number of particles than filtered smoke. With smoke extract from the B cigarette we found a decrease in cell viability only in BEAS-2B cells. The results of the LDH test showed membrane damage for B-cigarette smoke extract, particularly in BEAS-2B cells. Extracts from unfiltered cigarette smoke induced significant direct DNA damage, to a larger extent in A549 cells. Filtered cigarette-smoke extract induced a significant direct DNA damage at 5-10%. A significant induction of oxidative DNA damage was found at the highest CSE concentration in both cell types (by smoke extracts from B and C cigarettes in A549 cells, and from A and D cigarettes in BEAS-2B cells). Smoke extracts from filter cigarettes induced less direct DNA damage than those from unfiltered cigarettes in A549 cells, probably due to a protective effect of filter. In BEAS-2B cells the smoke extract from the B-cigarette showed the highest genotoxic effect, with a concentration-dependent trend. These findings show a higher cyto-genotoxicity for smoke extracts from the B-cigarette and oxidative effects for those from the A and D cigarettes, particularly in BEAS-2B cells. Moreover, there was a higher responsiveness of A549

  13. Evaluation of Genotoxic and Cytotoxic Effects in Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes Exposed In Vitro to Neonicotinoid Insecticides News

    PubMed Central

    Calderón-Segura, María Elena; Gómez-Arroyo, Sandra; Villalobos-Pietrini, Rafael; Martínez-Valenzuela, Carmen; Carbajal-López, Yolanda; Calderón-Ezquerro, María del Carmen; Cortés-Eslava, Josefina; García-Martínez, Rocío; Flores-Ramírez, Diana; Rodríguez-Romero, María Isabel; Méndez-Pérez, Patricia; Bañuelos-Ruíz, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Calypso (thiacloprid), Poncho (clothianidin), Gaucho (imidacloprid), and Jade (imidacloprid) are commercial neonicotinoid insecticides, a new class of agrochemicals in México. However, genotoxic and cytotoxic studies have not been performed. In the present study, human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were exposed in vitro to different concentrations of the four insecticides. The genotoxic and cytotoxic effects were evaluated using the alkaline comet and trypan blue dye exclusion assays. DNA damage was evaluated using two genotoxicity parameters: tail length and comet frequency. Exposure to 9.5 × 10−6 to 5.7 × 10−5 M Jade; 2.8 × 10−4 to 1.7 × 10−3 M Gaucho; 0.6 × 10−1 to 1.4 × 10−1 M Calypso; 1.2 × 10−1 to 9.5 × 10−1 M Poncho for 2 h induced a significant increase DNA damage with a concentration-dependent relationship. Jade was the most genotoxic of the four insecticides studied. Cytotoxicity was observed in cells exposed to 18 × 10−3 M Jade, 2.0 × 10−3 M Gaucho, 2.0 × 10−1 M Calypso, 1.07 M Poncho, and cell death occurred at 30 × 10−3 M Jade, 3.3 × 10−3 M Gaucho, 2.8 × 10−1 M Calypso, and 1.42 M Poncho. This study provides the first report of genotoxic and cytotoxic effects in PBL following in vitro exposure to commercial neonicotinoid insecticides. PMID:22545045

  14. Evaluation of genotoxic and cytotoxic effects in human peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed in vitro to neonicotinoid insecticides news.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Segura, María Elena; Gómez-Arroyo, Sandra; Villalobos-Pietrini, Rafael; Martínez-Valenzuela, Carmen; Carbajal-López, Yolanda; Calderón-Ezquerro, María Del Carmen; Cortés-Eslava, Josefina; García-Martínez, Rocío; Flores-Ramírez, Diana; Rodríguez-Romero, María Isabel; Méndez-Pérez, Patricia; Bañuelos-Ruíz, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Calypso (thiacloprid), Poncho (clothianidin), Gaucho (imidacloprid), and Jade (imidacloprid) are commercial neonicotinoid insecticides, a new class of agrochemicals in México. However, genotoxic and cytotoxic studies have not been performed. In the present study, human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were exposed in vitro to different concentrations of the four insecticides. The genotoxic and cytotoxic effects were evaluated using the alkaline comet and trypan blue dye exclusion assays. DNA damage was evaluated using two genotoxicity parameters: tail length and comet frequency. Exposure to 9.5 × 10(-6) to 5.7 × 10(-5) M Jade; 2.8 × 10(-4) to 1.7 × 10(-3) M Gaucho; 0.6 × 10(-1) to 1.4 × 10(-1) M Calypso; 1.2 × 10(-1) to 9.5 × 10(-1) M Poncho for 2 h induced a significant increase DNA damage with a concentration-dependent relationship. Jade was the most genotoxic of the four insecticides studied. Cytotoxicity was observed in cells exposed to 18 × 10(-3) M Jade, 2.0 × 10(-3) M Gaucho, 2.0 × 10(-1) M Calypso, 1.07 M Poncho, and cell death occurred at 30 × 10(-3) M Jade, 3.3 × 10(-3) M Gaucho, 2.8 × 10(-1) M Calypso, and 1.42 M Poncho. This study provides the first report of genotoxic and cytotoxic effects in PBL following in vitro exposure to commercial neonicotinoid insecticides.

  15. Genotoxicity Effects in Freshwater Fish from a Brazilian Impacted River.

    PubMed

    de Jesus, Isac Silva; Cestari, Marta Margarete; Bezerra, Marcos de Almeida; Affonso, Paulo Roberto Antunes de Mello

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluated the incidence of nuclear abnormalities (NA) in four fish species from an impacted river in Northeastern Brazil, characterized by accumulation of heavy metals and organic sewage. Two carnivores (Serrasalmus brandtii and Hoplias malabaricus) and two omnivore species (Oreochromis niloticus and Geophagus brasiliensis), used as food sources by local populations, were collected during the dry and the rainy season along Contas River basin. Nuclear abnormalities (bulbs, binuclei, lobes, micronuclei, notches, and vacuoles) were reported in all fish samples, with high occurrence in S. brandtii and H. malabaricus, species commonly found in local fish markets. This result agrees with previous analyses of accumulation of trace metals in both species, suggesting an association of genotoxic effects and biomagnification. Moreover, native specimens collected near urban areas presented higher frequencies of NA while O. niloticus seems to be more tolerant to environmental contamination. Therefore, effective policies are required to reduce the contamination of Contas River, since pollution by xenobiotics are potential threats to both local biodiversity and human population.

  16. No effects of chlorophyllin on IQ (2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]-quinoline)-genotoxicity and -DNA adduct formation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Negishi, Tomoe; Shinoda, Aki; Ishizaki, Nao; Hayatsu, Hikoya; Sugiyama, Chitose

    2004-02-01

    Previously we demonstrated that chlorophyllin suppressed the genotoxicities of many carcinogens. However, the genotoxicity of IQ (2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline), a carcinogenic heterocyclic amine, was not suppressed in Drosophila. On the contrary, it has been reported that chrolophyllin suppressed the genotoxicity of IQ in rodents, rainbow trout and Salmonella. We demonstrated that the chlorophyllin-induced suppression of MeIQx (2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline)-genotoxicity was associated with a decrease in MeIQx-DNA adduct formation in Drosophila larval DNA. MeIQx represents another type of heterocyclic amine and is similar to IQ in structure. In this study we utilized (32)P-postlabeling to examine whether chlorophyllin reduced IQ-DNA adduct formation in Drosophila DNA in the same way as MeIQx. The results revealed that the formation of IQ-DNA adducts was unaffected by treatment with chlorophyllin. This was consistent with the absence of any inhibitory effect on genotoxicity as observed in the Drosophila repair test. These results suggest that IQ-behavior in Drosophila is not affected by chlorophyllin, indicating that the process of IQ-DNA adduct formation followed by expression of genotoxicity in Drosophila may be different from that in other organisms.

  17. Phyllanthus orbicularis aqueous extract: cytotoxic, genotoxic, and antimutagenic effects in the CHO cell line.

    PubMed

    Sànchez-Lamar, A; Fiore, M; Cundari, E; Ricordy, R; Cozzi, R; De Salvia, R

    1999-12-15

    The present work evaluates the cytotoxic, genotoxic, and antimutagenic effects of Phyllanthus orbicularis (plant of genus Phyllantus) aqueous extract in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. P. orbicularis aqueous extracts are used in Cuban traditional medicine for their antiviral activity against Hepatitis B virus and A and B flu virus. The cytotoxicity of the extract was tested by means of colony-forming ability and growth-inhibition assays as well as by measuring the mitotic index. Apoptosis induction and cell-cycle kinetics were analyzed by cytofluorimetric methods. Chromosome aberration assays were performed to study the genotoxic and antimutagenic activity of the extract. Results show that doses of up to 100 microg/ml of the extract did not induce any cytotoxic effects. Cell survival and mitotic index decreased significantly at doses higher than 100 microg/ml as a function of dose as well as of treatment time. Moreover, continuous treatments of up to 18 h induced the appearance of a significant number of apoptotic cells. Following a 3-h exposure to a dose of 750 microg/ml, cells accumulated significantly in G(2)-M phase and remained blocked in G(1-) and G(2)-M phases after several posttreatments in fresh growth medium. The aqueous extract alone did not induce chromosome aberrations but, in combined treatment with H(2)O(2), significantly reduced H(2)O(2)-induced chromosome aberrations. Flow cytometric analysis of DCFH intracellular oxidation showed that the extract decreased the oxidizing power of H(2)O(2.) This ability could possibly explain the extract's antigenotoxic activity. Absence of cytotoxicity at the lower tested doses and the antimutagenic properties of the extract stimulate the interest in studying possible new pharmaceutical uses of P. orbicularis.

  18. A permethrin/allethrin mixture induces genotoxicity and cytotoxicity in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Chavez, Lucio A; Sordo, Monserrat; Calderon-Aranda, Emma; Castañeda-Saucedo, Eduardo; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia; Moreno-Godinez, Ma Elena

    2015-01-01

    Two pyrethroids, permethrin and allethrin, are often combined for large-scale use in public health programs to control vector-borne diseases. In this study, the genotoxic potential of a commercial formulation of permethrin and allethrin was examined using cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). Genotoxicity was evaluated using the cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome (CBMN cyt) assay by measuring the frequency of micronuclei (MN), nuclear division index (NDI), formation of nucleoplasmic bridges (NPB) and nuclear buds (NBUD), as well as apoptotic and necrotic cells. Human PBL were treated with different concentrations of a permethrin/allethrin mixture (1/0.01, 5/0.07, and 10/0.14 μg/ml) for 24 or 36 h. The highest concentration (10/0.14 μg/ml) of permethrin/allethrin mixture significantly increased MN frequency and percent apoptotic cells after incubations for 24 or 36 h. The NDI was markedly decreased in response to treatment with 5/0.07 or 10/0.14 μg/ml permethrin/allethrin for both 24 and 36 h. Exposure to the permethrin/allethrin mixture did not significantly alter formation of NBUD, NPB, or percent necrotic cells. The MN frequency was significantly correlated with the number of apoptotic and necrotic cells but inversely correlated with NDI. Data demonstrated that a mixture of permethrin and allethrin induced concentration- and time-dependent cytotoxic and genotoxic damage to human PBL in vitro.

  19. Genotoxic effects of fumes from asphalt modified with waste plastic and tall oil pitch.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Hanna K; Väänänen, Virpi; Järventaus, Hilkka; Suhonen, Satu; Nygren, Jonas; Hämeilä, Mervi; Valtonen, Jarkko; Heikkilä, Pirjo; Norppa, Hannu

    2008-05-31

    As the use of recycled materials and industrial by-products in asphalt mixtures is increasing, we investigated if recycled additives modify the genotoxicity of fumes emitted from asphalt. Fumes were generated in the laboratory at paving temperature from stone-mastic asphalt (SMA) and from SMA modified with waste plastic (90% polyethylene, 10% polypropylene) and tall oil pitch (SMA-WPT). In addition, fumes from SMA, SMA-WPT, asphalt concrete (AC), and AC modified with waste plastic and tall oil pitch (AC-WPT) were collected at paving sites. The genotoxicity of the fumes was studied by analysis of DNA damage (measured in the comet assay) and micronucleus formation in human bronchial epithelial BEAS 2B cells in vitro and by counting mutations in Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98 and YG1024. DNA damage was also assessed in buccal leukocytes from road pavers before and after working with SMA, SMA-WPT, AC, and AC-WPT. The chemical composition of the emissions was analysed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The SMA-WPT fume generated in the laboratory induced a clear increase in DNA damage in BEAS 2B cells without metabolic activation. The laboratory-generated SMA fume increased the frequency of micronucleated BEAS 2B cells without metabolic activation. None of the asphalt fumes collected at the paving sites produced DNA damage with or without metabolic activation. Fumes from SMA and SMA-WPT from the paving sites increased micronucleus frequency without metabolic activation. None of the asphalt fumes studied showed mutagenic activity in Salmonella. No statistically significant differences in DNA damage in buccal leukocytes were detected between the pre- and post-shift samples collected from the road pavers. However, a positive correlation was found between DNA damage and the urinary metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) after work shift, which suggested an association between occupational exposures during road paving and genotoxic effects. Our

  20. Genotoxic effects of 3 T magnetic resonance imaging in cultured human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joong Won; Kim, Myeong Seong; Kim, Yang Jee; Choi, Young Joo; Lee, Younghyun; Chung, Hai Won

    2011-10-01

    The clinical and preclinical use of high-field intensity (HF, 3 T and above) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners have significantly increased in the past few years. However, potential health risks are implied in the MRI and especially HF MRI environment due to high-static magnetic fields, fast gradient magnetic fields, and strong radiofrequency electromagnetic fields. In this study, the genotoxic potential of 3 T clinical MRI scans in cultured human lymphocytes in vitro was investigated by analyzing chromosome aberrations (CA), micronuclei (MN), and single-cell gel electrophoresis. Human lymphocytes were exposed to electromagnetic fields generated during MRI scanning (clinical routine brain examination protocols: three-channel head coil) for 22, 45, 67, and 89 min. We observed a significant increase in the frequency of single-strand DNA breaks following exposure to a 3 T MRI. In addition, the frequency of both CAs and MN in exposed cells increased in a time-dependent manner. The frequencies of MN in lymphocytes exposed to complex electromagnetic fields for 0, 22, 45, 67, and 89 min were 9.67, 11.67, 14.67, 18.00, and 20.33 per 1000 cells, respectively. Similarly, the frequencies of CAs in lymphocytes exposed for 0, 45, 67, and 89 min were 1.33, 2.33, 3.67, and 4.67 per 200 cells, respectively. These results suggest that exposure to 3 T MRI induces genotoxic effects in human lymphocytes. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Genotoxic effects of produced waters in mosquito fish (Gambusia affinis).

    PubMed

    Caliani, Ilaria; Porcelloni, Serena; Mori, Gabriele; Frenzilli, Giada; Ferraro, Maria; Marsili, Letizia; Casini, Silvia; Fossi, Maria Cristina

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the potential genotoxic effects of produced water (PW) from an Italian on-shore oil plant. Produced water is a complex mixture containing residual hydrocarbons, trace elements, naturally occurring radioactive material and potentially toxic treatment chemicals such as biocides, dispersants, detergents and scale inhibitors used in oil production. The test organism, mosquito fish (Gambusia affinis), was divided into male and female groups and exposed for 8 days in the laboratory to 50% concentrations of different produced waters: PW before treatment and after settling treatment. The fish were also exposed to lower concentrations (10%) of the same PW for 30 days. DNA damage was evaluated in erythrocytes by single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet assay) and micronucleus test, while an oxidative stress biomarker, was assessed. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) metabolites in bile were also evaluated. A higher sensitivity in biomarker responses was found in females in comparison to males. An increase in DNA strand breaks was observed in both genders after 30 days exposure and a statistically significant increase of micronucleated cells was found in females after 8 days exposure. A positive correlation between presence of micronucleated cells and PAH metabolites in bile was also observed.

  2. MWCNT uptake in Allium cepa root cells induces cytotoxic and genotoxic responses and results in DNA hyper-methylation.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Manosij; Bhadra, Sreetama; Adegoke, Aremu; Bandyopadhyay, Maumita; Mukherjee, Anita

    2015-04-01

    Advances in nanotechnology have led to the large-scale production of nanoparticles, which, in turn, increases the chances of environmental exposure. While humans (consumers/workers) are primarily at risk of being exposed to the adverse effect of nanoparticles, the effect on plants and other components of the environment cannot be ignored. The present work investigates the cytotoxic, genotoxic, and epigenetic (DNA methylation) effect of MWCNT on the plant system- Allium cepa. MWCNT uptake in root cells significantly altered cellular morphology. Membrane integrity and mitochondrial function were also compromised. The nanotubes induced significant DNA damage, micronucleus formation and chromosome aberration. DNA laddering assay revealed the formation of internucleosomal fragments, which is indicative of apoptotic cell death. This finding was confirmed by an accumulation of cells in the sub-G0 phase of the cell cycle. An increase in CpG methylation was observed using the isoschizomers MspI/HpaII. HPLC analysis of DNA samples revealed a significant increase in the levels of 5-methyl-deoxy-cytidine (5mdC). These results confirm the cyto-genotoxic effect of MWCNT in the plant system and simultaneously highlight the importance of this epigenetic study in nanoparticle toxicity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Molecular modifications induced by inorganic arsenic in Vicia faba investigated by FTIR, FTNIR spectroscopy and genotoxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Boccia, P; Meconi, C; Mecozzi, M; Sturchio, E

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) through drinking water is a major public health concern affecting most countries. Epidemiologic studies showed a significant association between consumption of iAs through drinking water and different types of cancer. However, the exact mechanisms underlying As-induced cancer and other diseases are not yet well understood. The aim of this study is to determine the effects of exposure iAs (20 or 30 mg/L) on Vicia faba seedlings in terms of phytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and spectroscopy by investigation of molecular modifications using infrared (FTIR) and near infrared (FTNIR) spectroscopy. Further, the mitigation effects of a precursor of glutathione (GSH), N-acetylcysteine (NAC), were also assessed. Spectroscopic and genotoxicity analysis demonstrated that specific molecular changes were directly correlated with iAs exposure. Comet assay in Vicia faba showed significant effects at concentrations of 20 and 30 mg/L, depending on the structural changes involving nucleic acids as identified by FTIR and FTNIR spectroscopy. Results of phytotoxicity and micronuclei tests were significant only at higher iAs concentrations (30 mg/L), where an antioxidant effect of NAC was noted. The two spectroscopic techniques demonstrated molecular modifications predominantly associated with chemical interactions of iAs with biomolecules such as nucleic acids, carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins in Vicia faba. Our findings suggest that further studies are required to better understand the mechanisms underlying toxicity produced by different As chemical forms in vegetal and agricultural species.

  4. Evaluation of the genotoxicity induced by the fungicide fenarimol in mammalian and plant cells by use of the single-cell gel electrophoresis assay.

    PubMed

    Poli, P; de Mello, M A; Buschini, A; de Castro, V L S S; Restivo, F M; Rossi, C; Zucchi, T M A D

    2003-09-09

    Fenarimol, a systemic pyrimidine carbinol fungicide, is considered to be not genotoxic or weakly genotoxic, although the available toxicological data are controversial and incomplete. Our results obtained in vitro with leukocytes of two different rodent species (rat and mouse) show that fenarimol affects DNA, as detected by the single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE, Comet) assay. This fungicide is able to induce DNA damage in a dose-related manner, with significant effectiveness at 36 nM, but without significant interspecies differences. Simultaneous exposure of rat leukocytes to fenarimol (36-290 nM) and a model genotoxic compound (50 microg/ml bleomycin) produced a supra-additive cytotoxic and genotoxic effect. This supports previous findings suggesting possible co-toxic, co-mutagenic, cancer-promoting and co-carcinogenic potential of fenarimol, and modification of the effects of other xenobiotics found to be influenced by this agrotoxic chemical, with consequent different toxicological events. The potential for DNA strand breaks to act as a biomarker of genetic toxicity in plants in vivo was also considered, in view of the fact that higher plants represent reliable sensors in an ecosystem. Significant DNA breakage was observed in the nuclei of Impatiens balsamina leaves after in vivo treatment with fenarimol (145 nM, 1h). More than 50% of the cells showed such DNA damage.

  5. Study of the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of the α-, β-, and γ- Hexachlorocyclohexane isomers in human lymphocyte cells using the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay.

    PubMed

    Ennaceur, Soukaina

    2017-01-01

    The genotoxic potential of hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) isomers (α-, β-, and γ-) which are organochlorine pesticides was tested in peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures from two donors by using the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay. Micronucleus (MN) frequency, binucleated cells with micronucleus (BNMN), and cytokinesis-blocked proliferation index (CBPI) were determined as genotoxic and cytotoxic endpoints. At the concentration ranges tested (12.5-100 μg.L (-1)), all HCH isomers induced dose-dependent cytotoxic effects, γ-HCH being the most toxic. This isomer was also able to induce significant increase in MN frequency and BNMN cells indicating a genotoxic potential at 50 and 100 μg.L (-1). The genotoxic test of β-HCH showed a positive induction of MN and BNMN cells at the highest concentration of 100 μg.L (-1) and a significant cytotoxicity at 50 μg.L (-1). Under the experimental condition used, α-HCH was unable to induce any significant increase in MN frequency confirming that α-HCH is a non-genotoxic agent.

  6. Effects of chemical agent injections on genotoxicity of wastewater in a microfiltration-reverse osmosis membrane process for wastewater reuse.

    PubMed

    Tang, Fang; Hu, Hong-Ying; Wu, Qian-Yuan; Tang, Xin; Sun, Ying-Xue; Shi, Xiao-Lei; Huang, Jing-Jing

    2013-09-15

    With combined microfiltration (MF)/ultrafiltration (UF) and reverse osmosis (RO) process being widely used in municipal wastewater reclamation, RO concentrate with high level genotoxicity is becoming a potential risk to water environment. In this study, wastewater genotoxicity in a MF-RO process for municipal wastewater reclamation and also the effects of chemical agent injections were evaluated by SOS/umu genotoxicity test. The genotoxicity of RO concentrate ranged 500-559 μg 4-NQO (4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide)/L and 12-22 μg 4-NQO/mg DOC, was much higher than that of RO influent. Further research suggested that Kathon biocide was a key chemical agent associated with the genotoxicity increase. Kathon biocide used in RO system was highly genotoxic in vitro and Kathon biocide retained in RO system could contribute to a higher genotoxicity of RO concentrate. Hence, treatments for biocides before discharging are necessary. Chlorination of secondary effluent could significantly decrease the genotoxicity and increasing chlorine dosage could be an efficacious method to decrease the genotoxicity of RO concentrate. According to the result of the experiment, the dosage of chlorine in dual-membrane process could be set to about 2.5 mg Cl₂/L. The effect of antiscalant (2-phosphomobutane-1,2,4-tricarboxylic acid) was also investigated; it turned out to have no effect on genotoxicity.

  7. A mechanism for 1,4-Benzoquinone-induced genotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Son, Mi Young; Deng, Chu-Xia; Hoeijmarkers, Jan H.; Rebel, Vivienne I.; Hasty, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Benzene is a common environmental toxin and its metabolite, 1-4-Benzoquinone (BQ) causes hematopoietic cancers like myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). BQ has not been comprehensively assessed for its impact on genome maintenance, limiting our understanding of the true health risks associated with benzene exposure and our ability to identify people with increased sensitivity to this genotoxin. Here we analyze the impact BQ exposure has on wild type and DNA repair-defective mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells and wild type human cells. We find that double strand break (DSB) repair and replication fork maintenance pathways including homologous recombination (HR) and Fanconi anemia (FA) suppress BQ toxicity. BQ-induced damage efficiently stalls replication forks, yet poorly induces ATR/DNA-PKCS responses. Furthermore, the pattern of BQ-induced γH2AX and 53BP1foci is consistent with the formation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1)-stabilized regressed replication forks. At a biochemical level, BQ inhibited topoisomerase 1 (topo1)-mediated DNA ligation and nicking in vitro; thus providing mechanism for the cellular phenotype. These data are consistent with a model that proposes BQ interferes with type I topoisomerase's ability to maintain replication fork restart and progression leading to chromosomal instability that has the potential to cause hematopoietic cancers like MDS and AML. PMID:27340773

  8. A mechanism for 1,4-Benzoquinone-induced genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Son, Mi Young; Deng, Chu-Xia; Hoeijmarkers, Jan H; Rebel, Vivienne I; Hasty, Paul

    2016-07-19

    Benzene is a common environmental toxin and its metabolite, 1-4-Benzoquinone (BQ) causes hematopoietic cancers like myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). BQ has not been comprehensively assessed for its impact on genome maintenance, limiting our understanding of the true health risks associated with benzene exposure and our ability to identify people with increased sensitivity to this genotoxin. Here we analyze the impact BQ exposure has on wild type and DNA repair-defective mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells and wild type human cells. We find that double strand break (DSB) repair and replication fork maintenance pathways including homologous recombination (HR) and Fanconi anemia (FA) suppress BQ toxicity. BQ-induced damage efficiently stalls replication forks, yet poorly induces ATR/DNA-PKCS responses. Furthermore, the pattern of BQ-induced γH2AX and 53BP1foci is consistent with the formation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1)-stabilized regressed replication forks. At a biochemical level, BQ inhibited topoisomerase 1 (topo1)-mediated DNA ligation and nicking in vitro; thus providing mechanism for the cellular phenotype. These data are consistent with a model that proposes BQ interferes with type I topoisomerase's ability to maintain replication fork restart and progression leading to chromosomal instability that has the potential to cause hematopoietic cancers like MDS and AML.

  9. Organic extracts of urban air pollution particulate matter (PM2.5)-induced genotoxicity and oxidative stress in human lung bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B cells).

    PubMed

    Oh, Seung Min; Kim, Ha Ryong; Park, Yong Joo; Lee, Soo Yeun; Chung, Kyu Hyuck

    2011-08-16

    Traffic is a major source of particulate matter (PM), and ultrafine particulates and traffic intensity probably contribute significantly to PM-related health effects. As a strong relationship between air pollution and motor vehicle-originated pollutants has been shown to exist, air pollution genotoxicity studies of urban cities are steadily increasing. In Korea, the death rate caused by lung cancer is the most rapidly increased cancer death rate in the past 10 years. In this study, genotoxicity of PM2.5 (<2.5μm in aerodynamic diameter particles) collected from the traffic area in Suwon City, Korea, was studied using cultured human lung bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) as a model system for the potential inhalation health effects. Organic extract of PM2.5 (CE) generated significant DNA breakage and micronucleus formation in a dose-dependent manner (1μg/cm(3)-50μg/cm(3)). In the acid-base-neutral fractionation of PM2.5, neutral samples including the aliphatic (F3), aromatic (F4) and slightly polar (F5) fractions generated significant DNA breakage and micronucleus formation. These genotoxic effects were significantly blocked by scavenging agents [superoxide dismutase (SOD), sodium selenite (SS), mannitol (M), catalase (CAT)]. In addition, in the modified Comet assay using endonucleases (FPG and ENDOIII), CE and its fractions (F3, F4, and F5) increased DNA breakage compared with control groups, indicating that CE and fractions of PM2.5 induced oxidative DNA damage. These results clearly suggest that PM2.5 collected in the Suwon traffic area has genotoxic effects and that reactive oxygen species may play a distinct role in these effects. In addition, aliphatic/chlorinated hydrocarbons, PAH/alkylderivatives, and nitro-PAH/ketones/quinones may be important causative agents of the genotoxic effects. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Determination of cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of naphthalene, 1-naphthol and 2-naphthol on human lymphocyte culture.

    PubMed

    Kapuci, Mete; Ulker, Zeynep; Gurkan, Sezin; Alpsoy, Lokman

    2014-02-01

    Naphthalene, a bicyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, has toxic effects on animals and humans. Although recent studies stressed on the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of naphthalene and its metabolites on eukaryotic cells, there is a big controversy among the results of these studies. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of naphthalene and its metabolites on the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in the human lymphocytes in the culture. The genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of naphthalene and its metabolites, 1-naphthol and 2-naphthol, were studied using cytotoxicity test (lactate dehydrogenase and cell proliferation (WST-1) assays) and DNA fragmentation assay (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay). Naphthalene and its metabolites had no significant cytotoxic effect on treated samples when compared with untreated ones. This result was also confirmed by WST-1 assay. In the TUNEL assay, DNA fragmentation was induced significantly by all concentrations of naphthalene and 2-naphthol and 50 and 100 µM concentrations of 1-naphthol (p < 0.05 or 0.001). In the DNA fragmentation, the most effective dose of 2-naphthol (63%) was 100 µM, when compared with negative control group (13%). These results suggest that naphthalene and its metabolites, 1-naphthol and 2-naphthol, may cause DNA damage on human lymphocytes.

  11. Cadmium induces apoptosis and genotoxicity in rainbow trout hepatocytes through generation of reactive oxygene species.

    PubMed

    Risso-de Faverney, C; Devaux, A; Lafaurie, M; Girard, J P; Bailly, B; Rahmani, R

    2001-06-01

    Cadmium poses a serious environmental threat in aquatic ecosystems but the mechanisms of its toxicity remain unclear. The purpose of this work was first to determine whether cadmium induced apoptosis in trout hepatocytes, second to determine whether or not reactive oxygen species (ROS) were involved in cadmium-induced apoptosis and genotoxicity. Hepatocytes exposed to increasing cadmium concentrations (in the range of 1-10 microM) showed a molecular hallmark of apoptosis which is the fragmentation of the nuclear DNA into oligonucleosomal-length fragments, resulting from an activation of endogenous endonucleases and recognized as a 'DNA ladder' on conventional agarose gel electrophoresis. Exposure of hepatocytes to cadmium led clearly to the DEVD-dependent protease activation, acting upstream from the endonucleases and considered as central mediators of apoptosis. DNA strand breaks in cadmium-treated trout hepatocytes was assessed using the comet assay, a rapid and sensitive single-cell gel electrophoresis technique used to detect DNA primary damage in individual cells. Simultaneous treatment of trout hepatocytes with cadmium and the nitroxide radical TEMPO used as a ROS scavenger, reduced significantly DNA fragmentation, DEVD-related protease activity and DNA strand breaks formation. These results lead to a working hypothesis that cadmium-induced apoptosis and DNA strand breaks in trout hepatocytes are partially triggered by the generation of ROS. Additional studies are required for proposing a mechanistic model of cadmium-induced apoptosis and genotoxicity in trout liver cells, in underlying the balance between DNA damage and cellular defence systems in fish.

  12. Nitroxide TEMPO: a genotoxic and oxidative stress inducer in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoqing; Mittelstaedt, Roberta A; Guo, Lei; Shaddock, Joseph G; Heflich, Robert H; Bigger, Anita H; Moore, Martha M; Mei, Nan

    2013-08-01

    2,2,6,6-Tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO) is a low molecular weight nitroxide and stable free radical. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of TEMPO in mammalian cells using the mouse lymphoma assay (MLA) and in vitro micronucleus assay. In the absence of metabolic activation (S9), 3mM TEMPO produced significant cytotoxicity and marginal mutagenicity in the MLA; in the presence of S9, treatment of mouse lymphoma cells with 1-2mM TEMPO resulted in dose-dependent decreases of the relative total growth and increases in mutant frequency. Treatment of TK6 human lymphoblastoid cells with 0.9-2.3mM TEMPO increased the frequency of both micronuclei (a marker for clastogenicity) and hypodiploid nuclei (a marker of aneugenicity) in a dose-dependent manner; greater responses were produced in the presence of S9. Within the dose range tested, TEMPO induced reactive oxygen species and decreased glutathione levels in mouse lymphoma cells. In addition, the majority of TEMPO-induced mutants had loss of heterozygosity at the Tk locus, with allele loss of ⩽34Mbp. These results indicate that TEMPO is mutagenic in the MLA and induces micronuclei and hypodiploid nuclei in TK6 cells. Oxidative stress may account for part of the genotoxicity induced by TEMPO in both cell lines.

  13. In vitro assessment of the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of boiled juice (tucupi) from Manihot esculenta Crantz roots.

    PubMed

    Cunha, L A; Mota, T C; Cardoso, P C S; Alcântara, D D F Á; Burbano, R M R; Guimarães, A C; Khayat, A S; Rocha, C A M; Bahia, M O

    2016-10-05

    The population of Pará (a state in Brazil) has a very characteristic food culture, as a majority of the carbohydrates consumed are obtained from cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) derivatives. Tucupi is the boiled juice of cassava roots that plays a major role in the culinary footprint of Pará. Before boiling, this juice is known as manipueira and contains linamarin, a toxic glycoside that can decompose to hydrogen cyanide. In this study, the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of tucupi on cultured human lymphocytes were assessed using the comet assay and detection of apoptosis and necrosis by differential fluorescent staining with acridine orange-ethidium bromide. Tucupi concentrations (v/v) were determined using the methylthiazole tetrazolium biochemical test. Concentrations of tucupi that presented no genotoxic effects (2, 4, 8, and 16%) were used in our experiments. The results showed that under our study conditions, tucupi exerted no genotoxic effects; however, cytotoxic effects were observed with cell death mainly induced by necrosis. These effects may be related to the presence of hydrogen cyanide in the juice.

  14. Determining oxidative and non-oxidative genotoxic effects driven by estuarine sediment contaminants on a human hepatoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Pinto, M; Costa, P M; Louro, H; Costa, M H; Lavinha, J; Caeiro, S; Silva, M J

    2014-04-15

    Estuarine sediments may be reservoirs of hydrophilic and hydrophobic pollutants, many of which are acknowledged genotoxicants, pro-mutagens and even potential carcinogens for humans. Still, studies aiming at narrowing the gap between ecological and human health risk of sediment-bound contaminant mixtures are scarce. Taking an impacted estuary as a case study (the Sado, SW Portugal), HepG2 (human hepatoma) cells were exposed in vitro for 48 h to extracts of sediments collected from two areas (urban/industrial and Triverine/agricultural), both contaminated by distinct mixtures of organic and inorganic toxicants, among which are found priority mutagens such as benzo[a]pyrene. Comparatively to a control test, extracts of sediments from both impacted areas produced deleterious effects in a dose-response manner. However, sediment extracts from the industrial area caused lower replication index plus higher cytotoxicity and genotoxicity (concerning total DNA strand breakage and clastogenesis), with emphasis on micronucleus induction. On the other hand, extracts from the rural area induced the highest oxidative damage to DNA, as revealed by the FPG (formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase) enzyme in the Comet assay. Although the estuary, on its whole, has been classified as moderately contaminated, the results suggest that the sediments from the industrial area are significantly genotoxic and, furthermore, elicit permanent chromosome damage, thus potentially being more mutagenic than those from the rural area. The results are consistent with contamination by pro-mutagens like polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), potentiated by metals. The sediments from the agriculture-influenced area likely owe their genotoxic effects to metals and other toxicants, probably pesticides and fertilizers, and able to induce reactive oxygen species without the formation of DNA strand breakage. The findings suggest that the mixtures of contaminants present in the assayed sediments are genotoxic

  15. Lead-induced genotoxicity to Vicia faba L. roots in relation with metal cell uptake and initial speciation.

    PubMed

    Shahid, M; Pinelli, E; Pourrut, B; Silvestre, J; Dumat, C

    2011-01-01

    Formation of organometallic complexes in soil solution strongly influence metals phytoavailability. However, only few studies deal with the influence of metal speciation both on plant uptake and genotoxicity. In the present study, Vicia faba seedlings were exposed for 6h in controlled hydroponic conditions to 5 μM of lead nitrate alone and chelated to varying degrees by different organic ligands. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and citric acid were, respectively, chosen as models of humic substances and low weight organic acids present in natural soil solutions. Visual Minteq software was used to estimate free lead cations concentration and ultimately to design the experimental layout. For all experimental conditions, both micronucleus test and measure of lead uptake by plants were finally performed. Chelation of Pb by EDTA, a strong chelator, dose-dependently increased the uptake in V. faba roots while its genotoxicity was significantly reduced, suggesting a protective role of EDTA. A weak correlation was observed between total lead concentration absorbed by roots and genotoxicity (r(2)=0.65). In contrast, a strong relationship (r(2)=0.93) exists between Pb(2+) concentration in exposure media and genotoxicity in the experiment performed with EDTA. Citric acid induced labile organometallic complexes did not demonstrate any significant changes in lead genotoxicity or uptake. These results demonstrate that metal speciation knowledge could improve the interpretation of V. faba genotoxicity test performed to test soil quality.

  16. Acute and chronic effects of erythromycin exposure on oxidative stress and genotoxicity parameters of Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, S; Antunes, S C; Correia, A T; Nunes, B

    2016-03-01

    Erythromycin (ERY) is a macrolide antibiotic used in human and veterinary medicine, and has been detected in various aquatic compartments. Recent studies have indicated that this compound can exert biological activity on non-target organisms environmentally exposed. The present study aimed to assess the toxic effects of ERY in Oncorhynchus mykiss after acute and chronic exposures. The here adopted strategy involved exposure to three levels of ERY, the first being similar to concentrations reported to occur in the wild, thus ecologically relevant. Catalase (CAT), total glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GRed) activities and lipid peroxidation (TBARS levels) were quantified as oxidative stress biomarkers in gills and liver. Genotoxic endpoints, reflecting different types of genetic damage in blood cells, were also determined, by performing analysis of genetic damage (determination of the genetic damage index, GDI, measured by comet assay) and of erythrocytic nuclear abnormalities (ENAs). The results suggest the occurrence of a mild, but significant, oxidative stress scenario in gills. For acutely exposed organisms, significant alterations were observed in CAT and GRed activities, and also in TBARS levels, which however are modifications with uncertain biological interpretation, despite indicating involvement of an oxidative effect and response. After chronic exposure, a significant decrease of CAT activity, increase of GPx activity and TBARS levels in gills was noticed. In liver, significant decrease in TBARS levels were observed in both exposures. Comet and ENAs assays indicated significant increases on genotoxic damage of O. mykiss, after erythromycin exposures. This set of data (acute and chronic) suggests that erythromycin has the potential to induce DNA strand breaks in blood cells, and demonstrate the induction of chromosome breakage and/or segregational abnormalities. Overall results indicate that both DNA damaging effects induced by

  17. Differential genotoxic and epigenotoxic effects of graphene family nanomaterials (GFNs) in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Nivedita; Yang, JiSu; Choi, Jinhee

    2016-03-01

    The widespread applications of graphene family nanomaterials (GFNs) raised the considerable concern over human health and environment. The cyto-genotoxic potentiality of GFNs has attracted much more attention, albeit the potential effects on the cellular epigenome remain largely unknown. The effects of GFNs on cellular genome were evaluated with single and double stranded DNA damage and DNA repair gene expressions while the effects on epigenome was accomplished by addressing the global DNA methylation and expression of DNA methylation machineries at non-cytotoxic to moderately cytotoxic doses in in vitro system. We used five different representatives of GFNs-pristine (GNP-Prist), carboxylated (GNP-COOH) and aminated (GNP-NH2) graphene nanoplatelets as well as single layer (SLGO) and few layer (FLGO) graphene oxide. The order of single stranded DNA damage was observed as GNP-Prist ≥ GNP-COOH>GNP-NH2≥FLGO>SLGO at 10mg/L and marked dose dependency was found in SLGO. The GFNs possibly caused genotoxicity by affecting nucleotide excision repair and non-homologus end joining repair systems. Besides, dose dependent increase in global DNA methylation (hypermethylation) were observed in SLGO/FLGO exposure and conversely, GNPs treatment caused hypomethylation following the order as GNP-COOH>GNP-NH2 ≥ GNP-Prist. The decrements of DNA methyltransferase (DNMT3B gene) and methyl-CpG binding domain protein (MBD1) genes were probably the cause of global hypomethylation induced by GNPs. Conversely, the de novo methylation through the up-regulation of DNMT3B and MBD1 genes gave rise to the global DNA hypermethylation in SLGO/FLGO treated cells. In general, the GFNs induced genotoxicity and alterations of global DNA methylation exhibited compounds type specificity with differential physico-chemical properties. Taken together, our study suggests that the GFNs could cause more subtle changes in gene expression programming by modulating DNA methylation status and this information

  18. Acute dyskerin depletion triggers cellular senescence and renders osteosarcoma cells resistant to genotoxic stress-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Ping; Mobasher, Maral E.; Alawi, Faizan

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • Dyskerin depletion triggers cellular senescence in U2OS osteosarcoma cells. • Dyskerin-depleted cells are resistant to apoptosis induced by genotoxic stress. • Chromatin relaxation sensitizes dyskerin-depleted cells to apoptosis. - Abstract: Dyskerin is a conserved, nucleolar RNA-binding protein implicated in an increasing array of fundamental cellular processes. Germline mutation in the dyskerin gene (DKC1) is the cause of X-linked dyskeratosis congenita (DC). Conversely, wild-type dyskerin is overexpressed in sporadic cancers, and high-levels may be associated with poor prognosis. It was previously reported that acute loss of dyskerin function via siRNA-mediated depletion slowed the proliferation of transformed cell lines. However, the mechanisms remained unclear. Using human U2OS osteosarcoma cells, we show that siRNA-mediated dyskerin depletion induced cellular senescence as evidenced by proliferative arrest, senescence-associated heterochromatinization and a senescence-associated molecular profile. Senescence can render cells resistant to apoptosis. Conversely, chromatin relaxation can reverse the repressive effects of senescence-associated heterochromatinization on apoptosis. To this end, genotoxic stress-induced apoptosis was suppressed in dyskerin-depleted cells. In contrast, agents that induce chromatin relaxation, including histone deacetylase inhibitors and the DNA intercalator chloroquine, sensitized dyskerin-depleted cells to apoptosis. Dyskerin is a core component of the telomerase complex and plays an important role in telomere homeostasis. Defective telomere maintenance resulting in premature senescence is thought to primarily underlie the pathogenesis of X-linked DC. Since U2OS cells are telomerase-negative, this leads us to conclude that loss of dyskerin function can also induce cellular senescence via mechanisms independent of telomere shortening.

  19. Enhanced metallothionein gene expression is associated with protection from cadmium-induced genotoxity in cultured rat liver cells

    SciTech Connect

    Coogan, T.P.; Bare, R.M.; Bjornson, E.J.; Waalkes, M.P. )

    1994-01-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are low-molecular-weight, cysteine-rich proteins that appear to play an important role in the cellular defense system against cadmium toxicity. Although substantial evidence exists demonstrating a reduction in cadmium toxicity concomitant with MT induction, little is known about the possible effects of stimulation of MT synthesis on cadmium-induced genotoxicity. Thus, the alkaline elution technique was used to assess single-strand DNA damage (SSD) in TRL-1215 cells, a liver-derived cell line shown to have inducible MT Gene expression. The SSD accumulated over a 2-h time period in a time-dependent manner following exposure to 500 [mu]M CdCl[sub 2]. Low concentration cadmium pretreatment (10 [mu]M CdCl[sub 2], 24 h) provided protection against the genotoxicity of high-concentration cadmium (500 [mu]M CdCl[sub 2], 2 h). A 2-h exposure to 500 [mu]M CdCl[sub 2], had no effect on viability, as assessed using a tetrazolium-dye based assay, in cells from either the pretreated or nonpretreated group. Metallothionein was induced in a time-dependent manner by low-concentration cadmium pretreatment: Exposure for 24 and 48 h resulted in 3.3- and 6.4-fold increases, respectively. In addition, a 24-h exposure to low-concentration cadmium resulted in an increase in MT-I gene expression. Cadmium accumulation was 2.6-fold greater in low-concentration cadmium-pretreated cells as compared to non-pretreated cells. These data demonstrate that low-concentration cadmium pretreatment provides protection against cadmium-induced single-strand DNA damage and support the hypothesis that this protection is due to stimulation of MT gene expression. 38 refs., 6 figs.

  20. Mechanistic evaluation of Ginkgo biloba leaf extract-induced genotoxicity in L5178Y cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Haixia; Guo, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Suhui; Dial, Stacey L; Guo, Lei; Manjanatha, Mugimane G; Moore, Martha M; Mei, Nan

    2014-06-01

    Ginkgo biloba has been used for many thousand years as a traditional herbal remedy and its extract has been consumed for many decades as a dietary supplement. Ginkgo biloba leaf extract is a complex mixture with many constituents, including flavonol glycosides and terpene lactones. The National Toxicology Program 2-year cancer bioassay found that G. biloba leaf extract targets the liver, thyroid gland, and nose of rodents; however, the mechanism of G. biloba leaf extract-associated carcinogenicity remains unclear. In the current study, the in vitro genotoxicity of G. biloba leaf extract and its eight constituents was evaluated using the mouse lymphoma assay (MLA) and Comet assay. The underlying mechanisms of G. biloba leaf extract-associated genotoxicity were explored. Ginkgo biloba leaf extract, quercetin, and kaempferol resulted in a dose-dependent increase in the mutant frequency and DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Western blot analysis confirmed that G. biloba leaf extract, quercetin, and kaempferol activated the DNA damage signaling pathway with increased expression of γ-H2AX and phosphorylated Chk2 and Chk1. In addition, G. biloba leaf extract produced reactive oxygen species and decreased glutathione levels in L5178Y cells. Loss of heterozygosity analysis of mutants indicated that G. biloba leaf extract, quercetin, and kaempferol treatments resulted in extensive chromosomal damage. These results indicate that G. biloba leaf extract and its two constituents, quercetin and kaempferol, are mutagenic to the mouse L5178Y cells and induce DSBs. Quercetin and kaempferol likely are major contributors to G. biloba leaf extract-induced genotoxicity.

  1. Biochemical and genotoxic effect of triclosan on earthworms (Eisenia fetida) using contact and soil tests.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dasong; Xie, Xiujie; Zhou, Qixing; Liu, Yao

    2012-07-01

    Triclosan (TCS) is a broad-spectrum bactericide that is used for a variety of antimicrobial functions. TCS is frequently detected in the terrestrial environment due to application of sewage sludge to agricultural land. In the present study, 48-h paper contact and 28-day spiked soil tests were conducted to examine the toxic effects of TCS on the antioxidative and genetic indices of earthworms (Eisenia fetida). The activity of antioxidative enzymes (superoxide dismutase, SOD; catalase, CAT) and the content of the lipid peroxidation product (malondialdehyde, MDA) were determined as biomarkers of oxidative stress in E. fetida. Moreover, single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) was used as a biomarker of genotoxicity. The results showed that triclosan induced a significant increase (P < 0.05) in antioxidative enzyme activities and MDA content. Of all of the biomarkers examined, CAT activity was most sensitive to TCS, and the CAT activity increased significantly (P < 0.05) at bactericidal concentrations of 7.86 ng cm⁻² in the contact test and 10 mg kg⁻¹ in the spiked soil test. The comet assay showed that TCS treatments significantly induced (P < 0.05) DNA damage in E. fetida, and that 78.6 ng cm⁻² caused significant genotoxic effects in the acute test (48 h). Clear dose-dependent DNA damage to E. fetida was observed both in contact and spiked soil tests. These results imply that TCS may have potential biochemical and genetic toxicity toward earthworms (E. fetida). A battery of biomarkers covering multiple molecular targets of acute toxicity can be combined to better understand the impacts of TCS on E. fetida. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Genotoxic effects of Roundup Full II® on lymphocytes of Chaetophractus villosus (Xenarthra, Mammalia): In vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Luaces, Juan Pablo; Rossi, Luis Francisco; Chirino, Mónica Gabriela; Browne, Melanie; Merani, María Susana; Mudry, Marta Dolores

    2017-01-01

    In Argentina, Chaetophractus villosus has a wide distribution that overlaps with agricultural areas where soybean is the predominant crop. In such areas the pesticide Roundup Full II® (RU) is widely applied. The genotoxic effect of its active ingredient glyphosate (RU is 66.2% glyphosate) on the peripheral blood lymphocytes of C. villosus was tested over a range of concentrations (280, 420, 560, 1120 μmol/L). Culture medium without glyphosate served as negative control, while medium containing mitomycin C served as positive control. Genetic damage was characterized in terms of the percentage of cells with chromosome aberrations (CA), the mean number of sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) per cell, and the modification of cell proliferation kinetics via the calculation of the replication index. Significant increases (p < 0.0001) were seen in the CA frequency and the mean number of SCEs per cell compared to negative controls at all the RU concentrations tested. Chromatid breaks, the only form of CA observed, under the 560 μmol/L RU conditions and in presence of mitomycin C were four to five times more common than at lower concentrations, while no viable cells were seen in the 1120 μmol/L treatment. The mean number of SCEs per cell was significantly higher under the 280 μmol/L RU conditions than the 420 or 560 μmol/L RU conditions; cells cultivated in the presence of MMC also showed significantly more SCEs. All the RU concentrations tested (except in the 1120 μmol/L RU treatment [no viable cells]) induced a significant reduction in the replication index (p < 0.0001). The present results confirm the genotoxic effects of RU on C. villosus lymphocytes in vitro, strongly suggesting that exposure to RU could induce DNA damage in C. villosus wildlife.

  3. Genotoxic effects of Roundup Full II® on lymphocytes of Chaetophractus villosus (Xenarthra, Mammalia): In vitro studies

    PubMed Central

    Chirino, Mónica Gabriela; Browne, Melanie; Mudry, Marta Dolores

    2017-01-01

    In Argentina, Chaetophractus villosus has a wide distribution that overlaps with agricultural areas where soybean is the predominant crop. In such areas the pesticide Roundup Full II® (RU) is widely applied. The genotoxic effect of its active ingredient glyphosate (RU is 66.2% glyphosate) on the peripheral blood lymphocytes of C. villosus was tested over a range of concentrations (280, 420, 560, 1120 μmol/L). Culture medium without glyphosate served as negative control, while medium containing mitomycin C served as positive control. Genetic damage was characterized in terms of the percentage of cells with chromosome aberrations (CA), the mean number of sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) per cell, and the modification of cell proliferation kinetics via the calculation of the replication index. Significant increases (p < 0.0001) were seen in the CA frequency and the mean number of SCEs per cell compared to negative controls at all the RU concentrations tested. Chromatid breaks, the only form of CA observed, under the 560 μmol/L RU conditions and in presence of mitomycin C were four to five times more common than at lower concentrations, while no viable cells were seen in the 1120 μmol/L treatment. The mean number of SCEs per cell was significantly higher under the 280 μmol/L RU conditions than the 420 or 560 μmol/L RU conditions; cells cultivated in the presence of MMC also showed significantly more SCEs. All the RU concentrations tested (except in the 1120 μmol/L RU treatment [no viable cells]) induced a significant reduction in the replication index (p < 0.0001). The present results confirm the genotoxic effects of RU on C. villosus lymphocytes in vitro, strongly suggesting that exposure to RU could induce DNA damage in C. villosus wildlife. PMID:28817615

  4. FOLATE DEFICIENCY ENHANCES ARSENIC-INDUCED GENOTOXICITY IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Folate deficiency increases background levels of DNA damage and can enhance the mutagenicity of chemical agents. Duplicate experiments were performed to investigate the effect of dietary folate deficiency on arsenic induction of micronuclei (MN) in peripheral blood cells. Male C5...

  5. FOLATE DEFICIENCY ENHANCES ARSENIC-INDUCED GENOTOXICITY IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Folate deficiency increases background levels of DNA damage and can enhance the mutagenicity of chemical agents. Duplicate experiments were performed to investigate the effect of dietary folate deficiency on arsenic induction of micronuclei (MN) in peripheral blood cells. Male C5...

  6. Long-term exposures to low doses of titanium dioxide nanoparticles induce cell transformation, but not genotoxic damage in BEAS-2B cells.

    PubMed

    Vales, Gerard; Rubio, Laura; Marcos, Ricard

    2015-01-01

    There is a great interest in a better knowledge of the health effects caused by nanomaterials exposures and, in particular to those induced by titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) due to its high use and increasing presence in the environment. To add new information on its potential genotoxic/carcinogenic risk, we have carried out experiments using chronic exposures (up to 4 weeks), low doses, and the BEAS-2B cell line that, as a human bronchial epithelium cells, can be considered a good cell target. Cell uptake has been assessed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and flow cytometry (FC); genotoxicity was evaluated using the comet and the micronucleus (MN) assays; and cell-transforming ability was evaluated using the soft-agar assay to detect anchorage-independent cell growth. Results show an important cell uptake at all the tested doses and sampling times used (except for 1 µg/mL and 24-h exposure). Nevertheless, no genotoxic effects were observed in the comet and in the MN assays. This lack of genotoxic effect agrees with the FC results showing no induction of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), the data from the comet assay with formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG) enzyme showing no induction of oxidized bases, and the lack of induction of expression of heme-oxygenase (HO-1) gene both at the RNA and protein level. On the contrary, significant increases in the number of clones growing in an anchorage-independent way were observed. This study would indicate a potential carcinogenic risk associated to nano-TiO2 exposure, not mediated by a genotoxic mechanism.

  7. Monohalogenated acetamide-induced cellular stress and genotoxicity are related to electrophilic softness and thiol/thiolate reactivity.

    PubMed

    Pals, Justin A; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Plewa, Michael J; Xia, Menghang; Attene-Ramos, Matias S

    2017-08-01

    Haloacetamides (HAMs) are cytotoxic, genotoxic, and mutagenic byproducts of drinking water disinfection. They are soft electrophilic compounds that form covalent bonds with the free thiol/thiolate in cysteine residues through an SN2 reaction mechanism. Toxicity of the monohalogenated HAMs (iodoacetamide, IAM; bromoacetamide, BAM; or chloroacetamide, CAM) varied depending on the halogen substituent. The aim of this research was to investigate how the halogen atom affects the reactivity and toxicological properties of HAMs, measured as induction of oxidative/electrophilic stress response and genotoxicity. Additionally, we wanted to determine how well in silico estimates of electrophilic softness matched thiol/thiolate reactivity and in vitro toxicological endpoints. Each of the HAMs significantly induced nuclear Rad51 accumulation and ARE signaling activity compared to a negative control. The rank order of effect was IAM>BAM>CAM for Rad51, and BAM≈IAM>CAM for ARE. In general, electrophilic softness and in chemico thiol/thiolate reactivity provided a qualitative indicator of toxicity, as the softer electrophiles IAM and BAM were more thiol/thiolate reactive and were more toxic than CAM. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. The Genotoxic and Cytotoxic Effects of Bisphenol-A (BPA) in MCF-7 Cell Line and Amniocytes.

    PubMed

    Aghajanpour-Mir, Seyed Mohsen; Zabihi, Ebrahim; Akhavan-Niaki, Haleh; Keyhani, Elahe; Bagherizadeh, Iman; Biglari, Sajjad; Behjati, Farkhondeh

    2016-01-01

    Bisphenol-A (BPA) is an industrial xenoestrogen used widely in our living environment. Recently, several studies suggested that BPA has destructive effects on DNA and chromosomes in normal body cells via estrogen receptors (ER). Therefore, BPA could be considered as an important mediator in many diseases such as cancer. However, there are still many controversial issues which need clarification. In this study, we investigated the BPA-induced chromosomal damages in MCF-7 cell line, ER-positive and negative amniocyte cells. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity effects of BPA were also compared between these three cell groups. Expression of estrogen receptors was determined using immunocytochemistry technique. The cell cytotoxicity of BPA was measured by MTT assay. Classic cytogenetic technique was carried out for the investigation of chromosome damage. BPA, in addition to cytotoxicity, had remarkable genotoxicity at concentrations close to the traceable levels in tissues or biological fluids. Although some differences were observed in the amount of damages between ER-positive and negative fetal cells, interestingly, these differences were not significant. The present study showed that BPA could lead to chromosomal aberrations in both ER-dependent and independent pathways at some concentrations or in cell types yet not reported. Also, BPA could probably be considered as a facilitator for some predisposed cells to be cancerous by raising the chromosome instability levels. Finally, estrogen receptor seems to have a different role in cytotoxicity and genotoxicity effects.

  9. Sulforaphane inhibits CYP1A1 activity and promotes genotoxicity induced by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fangxing; Zhuang, Shulin; Zhang, Chao; Dai, Heping; Liu, Weiping

    2013-06-15

    Increasing environmental pollution by carcinogens such as some of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) has prompted growing interest in searching for chemopreventive compounds which are readily obtainable. Sulforaphane (SFN) is isolated from cruciferous vegetables and has the potentials to reduce carcinogenesis through various pathways. In this study, we studied the effects of SFN on CYP1A1 activity and genotoxicity induced by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). The results showed that SFN inhibited TCDD-induced CYP1A1 activity in H4IIE cells by directly inhibiting CYP1A1 activity, probably through binding to aryl hydrocarbon receptor and/or CYP1A1 revealed by molecular docking. However, SFN promoted TCDD-induced DNA damage in yeast cells and reduced the viability of initiated yeast cells. Besides, it is surprising that SFN also failed to reduce genotoxicity induced by other genotoxic reagents which possess different mechanisms to lead to DNA damage. Currently, it is difficult to predict whether SFN has the potentials to reduce the risk of TCDD based on the conflicting observations in the study. Therefore, further studies should be urgent to reveal the function and mechanism of SFN in the stress of such POPs on human health. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Genotoxic stress-induced expression of p53 and apoptosis in leukemic clam hemocytes with cytoplasmically sequestered p53.

    PubMed

    Böttger, Stefanie; Jerszyk, Emily; Low, Ben; Walker, Charles

    2008-02-01

    In nature, the soft shell clam, Mya arenaria, develops a fatal blood cancer in which a highly conserved homologue for wild-type human p53 protein is rendered nonfunctional by cytoplasmic sequestration. In untreated leukemic clam hemocytes, p53 is complexed throughout the cytoplasm with overexpressed variants for both clam homologues (full-length variant, 1,200-fold and truncated variant, 620-fold above normal clam hemocytes) of human mortalin, an Hsp70 family protein. In vitro treatment with etoposide only and in vivo treatment with either etoposide or mitoxantrone induces DNA damage, elevates expression (600-fold) and promotes nuclear translocation of p53, and results in apoptosis of leukemic clam hemocytes. Pretreatment with wheat germ agglutinin followed by etoposide treatment induces DNA damage and elevates p53 expression (893-fold) but does not overcome cytoplasmic sequestration of p53 or induce apoptosis. We show that leukemic clam hemocytes have an intact p53 pathway, and that maintenance of this tumor phenotype requires nuclear absence of p53, resulting from its localization in the cytoplasm of leukemic clam hemocytes. The effects of these topoisomerase II poisons may result as mortalin-based cytoplasmic tethering is overwhelmed by de novo expression of p53 protein after DNA damage induced by genotoxic stress. Soft shell clam leukemia provides excellent in vivo and in vitro models for developing genotoxic and nongenotoxic cancer therapies for reactivating p53 transcription in human and other animal cancers displaying mortalin-based cytoplasmic sequestration of the p53 tumor suppressor, such as colorectal cancers and primary and secondary glioblastomas, though not apparently leukemias or lymphomas.

  11. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles induce genotoxicity but not mutagenicity in golden mussel Limnoperna fortunei.

    PubMed

    Girardello, Francine; Custódio Leite, Camila; Vianna Villela, Izabel; da Silva Machado, Miriana; Luiz Mendes Juchem, André; Roesch-Ely, Mariana; Neves Fernandes, Andreia; Salvador, Mirian; Antonio Pêgas Henriques, João

    2016-01-01

    The widespread use of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NP) in consumer products is the cause of its appearance in wastewater and effluents, reaching the aquatic environment. The evaluation of the biological impact of TiO2-NP and the need to understand its ecotoxicological impact to the aquatic ecosystem are of major concern. Bivalve mollusks may represent a target group for nanoparticle toxicity. Limnoperna fortunei (golden mussel), a freshwater bivalve organism that has been employed in biomonitoring environmental conditions. Comet assay, micronucleus test and oxidative damage to lipids and proteins were performed after the golden mussel was exposed to TiO2-NP (1, 5, 10 and 50μgmL(-1)). The results demonstrate that TiO2-NP can damage the DNA of haemocytes after 2h of exposure and the genotoxic activity significantly increased after 4h exposure to TiO2-NP, at all the TiO2-NP concentrations. TiO2-NP was ineffective in causing mutagenicity in the haemolymph cells of golden mussel. The increase in the lipid peroxidation levels and carbonyl proteins after the exposure to TiO2-NP indicates the induction of oxidative stress at 2h exposure with similar results to all TiO2-NP concentrations, but these effects did not occur at 4h exposure. These results demonstrated that, although TiO2-NP is not mutagenic to golden mussel, it does induce DNA damage and oxidative stress in these organisms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of genotoxicity induced by exposure to antineoplastic drugs in lymphocytes of oncology nurses and pharmacists.

    PubMed

    El-Ebiary, Ahmad A; Abuelfadl, Arwa A; Sarhan, Naglaa I

    2013-03-01

    The hazards of handling antineoplastic drugs have been raised and discussed in several studies. Introduction of new antineoplastics together with abuse of safety standards have contributed to the exposure risk for personnel who handle these substances. Interactions of antineoplastic drugs with biological structures vary according to the drug(s) and the individual's genetic susceptibility. This study was carried out to evaluate the genome damage induced by exposure to antineoplastic drugs in nurses (n = 20) and pharmacists (n = 18) working in the Oncology Department of Tanta Cancer Center. Thirty subjects matched in age, gender and smoking habit were selected as controls. Both chromosomal aberration analysis and micronucleus assay were used to evaluate genome damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes of the study subjects. The numbers of aberrant lymphocytes, as well as chromosomal aberration and micronuclei frequencies, were significantly increased in exposed personnel in comparison to matched controls. Compared with pharmacists, nurses showed notably higher level of chromosome damage. On the other hand, no significant difference in micronuclei frequency was observed between nurses and pharmacists. Correlation analyses pointed to the influence of age and duration of occupational exposure on the level of chromosome damage among exposed subjects. The results of this study confirmed that handling antineoplastic drugs without appropriate precautions imposed a genotoxic risk for exposed healthcare workers. These results address the need for regular biomonitoring of exposed personnel. In addition, they call attention to the need for proper implementation of intervention measures aiming to eliminate or significantly reduce worker exposure and prevent untoward biological effects. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Mercury heavy-metal-induced physiochemical changes and genotoxic alterations in water hyacinths [Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.)].

    PubMed

    Malar, Srinivasan; Sahi, Shivendra Vikram; Favas, Paulo J C; Venkatachalam, Perumal

    2015-03-01

    Mercury heavy metal pollution has become an important environmental problem worldwide. Accumulation of mercury ions by plants may disrupt many cellular functions and block normal growth and development. To assess mercury heavy metal toxicity, we performed an experiment focusing on the responses of Eichhornia crassipes to mercury-induced oxidative stress. E. crassipes seedlings were exposed to varying concentrations of mercury to investigate the level of mercury ions accumulation, changes in growth patterns, antioxidant defense mechanisms, and DNA damage under hydroponics system. Results showed that plant growth rate was significantly inhibited (52 %) at 50 mg/L treatment. Accumulation of mercury ion level were 1.99 mg/g dry weight, 1.74 mg/g dry weight, and 1.39 mg/g dry weight in root, leaf, and petiole tissues, respectively. There was a decreasing trend for chlorophyll a, b, and carotenoids with increasing the concentration of mercury ions. Both the ascorbate peroxidase and malondialdehyde contents showed increased trend in leaves and roots up to 30 mg/L mercury treatment and slightly decreased at the higher concentrations. There was a positive correlation between heavy metal dose and superoxide dismutase, catalase, and peroxidase antioxidative enzyme activities which could be used as biomarkers to monitor pollution in E. crassipes. Due to heavy metal stress, some of the normal DNA bands were disappeared and additional bands were amplified compared to the control in the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) profile. Random amplified polymorphic DNA results indicated that genomic template stability was significantly affected by mercury heavy metal treatment. We concluded that DNA changes determined by random amplified polymorphic DNA assay evolved a useful molecular marker for detection of genotoxic effects of mercury heavy metal contamination in plant species.

  14. Influence of Mikania laevigata Extract over the Genotoxicity Induced by Alkylating Agents

    PubMed Central

    Nicolau, Vanessa; de Aguiar Amaral, Patrícia; de Andrade, Vanessa Moraes

    2013-01-01

    Medicinal plants are still widely used worldwide; yet for some species, little or no information is available concerning their biological activity, specially their genotoxic and antimutagenic potential. Mikania laevigata (Asteraceae) is a native plant from South America, and its extracts are largely used to treat respiratory complaints. The aim of the present work was then to evaluate, in vivo, the potential biological activity of M. laevigata on the genotoxicity induced by methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and cyclophosphamide (CP), using the comet assay. Male CF1 mice were divided into groups of 5-6 animals, received by gavage 0.1 mL/10 g body wt of water, Mikania laevigata extract (MLE), MMS, and CP. Results showed that treatment with 200 mg/kg of the MLE previously to MMS and CP administration, respectively, reduced the damage index (DI) in 52% and 60%, when compared to DI at 24 h. Pretreatment also reduced the damage frequency (DF) in 56% (MMS) and 58% (CP), compared to DF at 24 h. MLE administration has been shown to protect mouse DNA from damage induced by alkylating agents; this corroborates to the biological activities of M. laevigata and points towards the need of plant compounds isolation to proceed with further studies. PMID:23724299

  15. Effect of organic tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) extract on the genotoxicity of doxorubicin in the Drosophila wing spot test

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The consumption of organic tomatoes (ORTs) reduces the risk of harmful effects to humans and the environment caused by exposure to toxic agrochemicals. In this study, we used the somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) of wing spots in Drosophila melanogaster to evaluate the genotoxicity of ORT and the effect of cotreatment with ORT on the genotoxicity of Doxorubicin® (DXR, a cancer chemotherapeutic agent) that is mediated by free radical formation. Standard (ST) cross larvae were treated chronically with solutions containing 25%, 50% or 100% of an aqueous extract of ORT, in the absence and presence of DXR (0.125 mg/mL), and the number of mutant spots on the wings of emergent flies was counted. ORT alone was not genotoxic but enhanced the toxicity of DXR when administered concomitantly with DXR. The ORT-enhanced frequency of spots induced by DXR may have resulted from the interaction of ORT with the enzymatic systems that catalyze the metabolic detoxification of this drug. PMID:21637658

  16. Genotoxic effects of the insecticide cypermethrin on the root meristem cells of sunflowers (Helianthus annuus L.).

    PubMed

    Inceer, Huseyin; Hayirlioglu-Ayaz, Sema; Ozcan, Melahat

    2009-11-01

    In this study, the genotoxic effects of the insecticide cypermethrin on the root meristem cells of sunflowers (Helianthus annuus L.) were investigated. The roots were treated with 10- 25- 50- and 100-ppm concentrations of cypermethrin for 6, 12 and 24 h. The mitotic index and mitotic abnormalities were determined in both control and test groups. The cypermethrin showed a marked mitodepressive action on mitosis. The types of mitotic abnormalities included disturbed metaphase, c-mitosis, stickiness, laggards and chromatid bridges. A pronounced toxic effect was observed at the 50-ppm concentration. Cypermethrin may have genotoxic effects on sunflowers.

  17. Assessment of genotoxic effects in nurses handling cytostatic drugs.

    PubMed

    Ladeira, C; Viegas, S; Pádua, M; Gomes, M; Carolino, E; Gomes, M C; Brito, M

    2014-01-01

    Several antineoplastic drugs have been classified as carcinogens by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) on the basis of epidemiological findings, animal carcinogenicity data, and outcomes of in vitro genotoxicity studies. 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU), which is easily absorbed through the skin, is the most frequently used antineoplastic agent in Portuguese hospitals and therefore may be used as an indicator of surface contamination. The aims of the present investigation were to (1) examine surface contamination by 5-FU and (2) assess the genotoxic risk using cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay in nurses from two Portuguese hospitals. The study consisted of 2 groups: 27 nurses occupationally exposed to cytostatic agents (cases) and 111 unexposed individuals (controls). Peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were collected in order to measure micronuclei (MN) in both groups. Hospital B showed a higher numerical level of contamination but not significantly different from Hospital A. However; Hospital A presented the highest value of contamination and also a higher proportion of contaminated samples. The mean frequency of MN was significantly higher in exposed workers compared with controls. No significant differences were found among MN levels between the two hospitals. The analysis of confounding factors showed that age is a significant variable in MN frequency occurrence. Data suggest that there is a potential genotoxic damage related to occupational exposure to cytostatic drugs in oncology nurses.

  18. Comparison of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity effects of silver nanoparticles on human cervix and breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Juarez-Moreno, K; Gonzalez, E B; Girón-Vazquez, N; Chávez-Santoscoy, R A; Mota-Morales, J D; Perez-Mozqueda, L L; Garcia-Garcia, M R; Pestryakov, A; Bogdanchikova, N

    2016-11-04

    The wide application of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) has pointed out the need to evaluate their potential risk and toxic effects on human health. Herein, the cytotoxic effects of Argovit™ AgNPs were evaluated on eight cancer cell lines. Further cytotoxic studies were performed in gynecological cancer cell lines from cervical (HeLa) and breast (MDA-MB-231 and MCF7) cancer. In both cases, the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of AgNPs produced the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) after 24 h of incubation, but it was not statistically significant compared with untreated cells. However, HeLa, MDA-MB-231, and MCF7 cells treated with the maximal IC of AgNPs induced the formation of ROS either at 12 or 24 h of incubation. Genotoxicity achieved by comet assay in HeLa, MDA-MB-231, and MCF7 cells revealed that exposure to IC50 of AgNPs does not induced noticeable DNA damage in the cells. However, the IC of AgNPs provoked severe DNA damage after 12 and 24 h of exposure. We conclude that, Argovit (polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated AgNPs) induce a cytotoxic effect in a time and dose-dependent manner in all the eight cancer cell lines tested. Nevertheless, the genotoxic effect is mainly restricted by the concentration effect. The results contribute to explore new therapeutic applications of AgNPs for malignances in murine models and to study in deep the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of AgNPs in healthy cells at the surrounding tissue of the neoplasia.

  19. Effect of particle size and dispersion status on cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of zinc oxide in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Roszak, Joanna; Catalán, Julia; Järventaus, Hilkka; Lindberg, Hanna K; Suhonen, Satu; Vippola, Minnamari; Stępnik, Maciej; Norppa, Hannu

    2016-07-01

    Data available on the genotoxicity of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) are controversial. Here, we examined the effects of particle size and dispersion status on the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of nanosized and fine ZnO, in the presence and absence of bovine serum albumin (BSA; 0.06%) in human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells. Dynamic light scattering analysis showed the most homogenous dispersions in water alone for nanosized ZnO and in water with BSA for fine ZnO. After a 48-h treatment, both types of ZnO were cytotoxic within a similar, narrow dose range (1.5-3.0μg/cm(2)) and induced micronuclei at a near toxic dose range (1.25-1.75μg/cm(2)), both with and without BSA. In the comet assay, nanosized ZnO (1.25-1.5μg/cm(2)), in the absence of BSA, caused a statistically significant increase in DNA damage after 3-h and 6-h treatments, while fine ZnO did not. Our findings may be explained by better uptake or faster intracellular dissolution of nanosized ZnO without BSA during short treatments (3-6h; the comet assay), with less differences between the two ZnO forms after longer treatments (>48h; the in vitro micronucleus test). As ZnO is genotoxic within a narrow dose range partly overlapping with cytotoxic doses, small experimental differences e.g. in the dispersion of ZnO particles may have a substantial effect on the genotoxicity of the nominal doses added to the cell culture.

  20. Sall2 is required for proapoptotic Noxa expression and genotoxic stress-induced apoptosis by doxorubicin

    PubMed Central

    Escobar, D; Hepp, M I; Farkas, C; Campos, T; Sodir, N M; Morales, M; Álvarez, C I; Swigart, L; Evan, G I; Gutiérrez, J L; Nishinakamura, R; Castro, A F; Pincheira, R

    2015-01-01

    The Sall2 transcription factor is deregulated in several cancers; however, little is known about its cellular functions, including its target genes. Recently, we demonstrated that p53 directly regulates Sall2 expression under genotoxic stress. Here, we investigated the role of Sall2 in the context of cellular response to genotoxic stress. In addition, we further examined the Sall2-p53 relationship during genotoxic stress in primary mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs), which are derived from Sall2 knockout mice separately, or in combination with the p53ERTAM knock-in mice. We found that the levels of Sall2 mRNA and protein are dynamically modulated in response to doxorubicin. At early times of stress, Sall2 is downregulated, but increases under extension of the stress in a p53-independent manner. Based on caspase-3/7 activities, expression of cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, expression of cleaved caspase-3 and induction of proapoptotic proteins, Sall2 expression was correlated with cellular apoptosis. Consequently, Sall2−/− MEFs have decreased apoptosis, which relates with increased cell viability in response to doxorubicin. Importantly, Sall2 was required for apoptosis even in the presence of fully activated p53. Searching for putative Sall2 targets that could mediate its role in apoptosis, we identified proapoptotic NOXA/PMAIP1 (phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate-induced protein 1). We demonstrated that Sall2 positively regulates Noxa promoter activity. Conserved putative Sall2-binding sites at the NOXA promoter were validated in vitro by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and in vivo by ChIP experiments, identifying NOXA as a novel Sall2 target. In agreement, induction of Noxa protein and mRNA in response to doxorubicin was significantly decreased in Sall2−/− MEFs. In addition, studies in leukemia Jurkat T cells support the existence of the Sall2/Noxa axis, and the significance of this axis on the apoptotic response to doxorubicin in cancer cells. Our

  1. Genotoxic effect of Lythrum salicaria extract determined by the mussel micronucleus test.

    PubMed

    Eck-Varanka, Bettina; Kováts, Nóra; Hubai, Katalin; Paulovits, Gábor; Ferincz, Árpád; Horváth, Eszter

    2015-12-01

    A wide range of aquatic plants have been proven to release allelochemicals, of them phenolics and tannin are considered rather widely distributed. Tannins, however, have been demonstrated to have genotoxic capacity. In our study genotoxic potential of Lythrum salicaria L. (Purple Loosestrife, family Lythraceae) was assessed by the mussel micronucleus test, using Unio pictorum. In parallel, total and hydrolysable tannin contents were determined. Results clearly show that the extract had a high hydrolysable tannin content and significant mutagenic effect. As L. salicaria has been long used in traditional medicine for chronic diarrhoea, dysentery, leucorrhoea and blood-spitting, genotoxic potential of the plant should be evaluated not only with regard to potential effects in the aquatic ecosystem, but also assessing its safe use as a medicinal herb.

  2. Deoxynivalenol induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Yu, Miao; Fu, Juan; Bao, Wei; Wang, Di; Hao, Liping; Yao, Ping; Nüssler, Andreas K; Yan, Hong; Liu, Liegang

    2014-02-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is one of the most common mycotoxins. The aim of this study consists in using diverse cellular and molecular assays to evaluate cytotoxicity, genotoxicity as well as oxidative damage and to investigate their mechanisms in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. The human lymphocytes were cultured in eight different doses of DON (0, 6.25, 12.5, 25, 50, 100, 250 and 500 ng/mL) during 6, 12 and 24 h. DON was able to decrease cell viability and cause damage to the membrane, the chromosomes or the DNA at all times of culture. It was also able to induce lipid peroxidation and raise the levels of 8-OHdG and ROS in 6, 12 and 24 h. The results of the RT-PCR and the Western Blot indicated that DON is able to enhance mRNA or protein expressions of DNA repair genes and HO-1 in 6 h and to inhibit these expressions in 24 h. DON potentially triggers genotoxicity in human lymphocytes. This mechanism is probably related to depletion of antioxidase and oxidative damage to the DNA that reduced expression of HO-1, thereby inhibiting the ability of DNA repair.

  3. Non-genotoxic carcinogen exposure induces defined changes in the 5-hydroxymethylome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Induction and promotion of liver cancer by exposure to non-genotoxic carcinogens coincides with epigenetic perturbations, including specific changes in DNA methylation. Here we investigate the genome-wide dynamics of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) as a likely intermediate of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) demethylation in a DNA methylation reprogramming pathway. We use a rodent model of non-genotoxic carcinogen exposure using the drug phenobarbital. Results Exposure to phenobarbital results in dynamic and reciprocal changes to the 5mC/5hmC patterns over the promoter regions of a cohort of genes that are transcriptionally upregulated. This reprogramming of 5mC/5hmC coincides with characteristic changes in the histone marks H3K4me2, H3K27me3 and H3K36me3. Quantitative analysis of phenobarbital-induced genes that are involved in xenobiotic metabolism reveals that both DNA modifications are lost at the transcription start site, while there is a reciprocal relationship between increasing levels of 5hmC and loss of 5mC at regions immediately adjacent to core promoters. Conclusions Collectively, these experiments support the hypothesis that 5hmC is a potential intermediate in a demethylation pathway and reveal precise perturbations of the mouse liver DNA methylome and hydroxymethylome upon exposure to a rodent hepatocarcinogen. PMID:23034186

  4. [Evaluation of genotoxicity induced by repetitive administration of local anaesthetics: an experimental study in rats].

    PubMed

    Nai, Gisele Alborghetti; de Oliveira, Mariliza Casanova; de Oliveira Tavares, Graziela; Pereira, Laís Fabrício Fonseca; Soares, Nádia Derli Salvador Lemes; Silva, Patrícia Gatti

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies regarding the effects of some local anaesthetics have suggested that these agents can cause genetic damage. However, they have not been tested for genotoxicity related to repetitive administration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic potential of local anaesthetics upon repetitive administration. 80 male Wistar rats were divided into: group A - 16 rats intraperitoneally injected with lidocaine hydrochloride 2%; group B - 16 rats IP injected with mepivacaine 2%; group C - 16 rats intraperitoneally injected with articaine 4%; group D - 16 rats IP injected with prilocaine 3% (6.0mg/kg); group E - 8 rats subcutaneously injected with a single dose of cyclophosphamide; and group F - 8 rats intraperitoneally injected with saline. Eight rats from groups A to D received a single dose of anaesthetic on Day 1 of the experiment; the remaining rats were dosed once a day for 5 days. The median number of micronuclei in the local anaesthetics groups exposed for 1 or 5 days ranged from 0.00 to 1.00, in the cyclophosphamide-exposed group was 10.00, and the negative control group for 1 and 5 days was 1.00 and 0.00, respectively (p<0.0001). A significant difference in the number of micronuclei was observed between the cyclophosphamide group and all local anaesthetic groups (p=0.0001), but not between the negative control group and the local anaesthetic groups (p>0.05). No genotoxicity effect was observed upon repetitive exposure to any of the local anaesthetics evaluated. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. Silymarin and dimercaptosuccinic acid ameliorate lead-induced nephrotoxicity and genotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Alcaraz-Contreras, Y; Mendoza-Lozano, R P; Martínez-Alcaraz, E R; Martínez-Alfaro, M; Gallegos-Corona, M A; Ramírez-Morales, M A; Vázquez-Guevara, M A

    2016-04-01

    We studied the effect of silymarin and dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), a chelating agent that was administered individually or in combination against lead (Pb) toxicity in rats. Wistar rats (200 ± 20) were randomly divided into five groups. Group A served as a control. Groups B-E were exposed to 2000 ppm of lead acetate in drinking water for 8 weeks. Group B served as a positive control. Group C received silymarin (100 mg kg(-1) orally) for 8 weeks. Group D received DMSA (75 mg kg(-1) orally) once daily for the last 5 days of treatment. Group E received DMSA and silymarin as groups C and D, respectively. The effect of Pb was evaluated and accordingly the treatments on blood lead levels (BLLs), renal system, and genotoxic effects were calculated using comet assay. The BLLs were significantly increased following the exposition of lead acetate. The administration of silymarin and DMSA provided reduction in BLLs. Silymarin and DMSA provided significant protection on the genotoxic effect of Pb. The toxic effect of Pb on kidneys was also studied. Our data suggest that silymarin and DMSA improve the renal histopathological lesions. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Cytotoxicity, oxidative stress and genotoxicity induced by glass fibers on human alveolar epithelial cell line A549.

    PubMed

    Rapisarda, Venerando; Loreto, Carla; Ledda, Caterina; Musumeci, Giuseppe; Bracci, Massimo; Santarelli, Lory; Renis, Marcella; Ferrante, Margherita; Cardile, Venera

    2015-04-01

    Man-made vitreous fibers have been widely used as insulation material as asbestos substitutes; however their morphology and composition raises concerns. In 1988 the International Agency for Research on Cancer classified fiberglass, rock wool, slag wool, and ceramic fibers as Group 2B, i.e. possibly carcinogenic to humans. In 2002 it reassigned fiberglass, rock and slag wool, and continuous glass filaments to Group 3, not classifiable as carcinogenic to humans. The aim of this study was to verify the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects and oxidative stress production induced by in vitro exposure of human alveolar epithelial cells A549 to glass fibers with a predominant diameter <3 μm (97%) and length >5 μm (93%). A549 cells were incubated with 5, 50, or 100 μg/ml (2.1, 21, and 42 μg/cm(2), respectively) of glass fibers for 72 h. Cytotoxicity and DNA damage were tested by the MTT and the Comet assay, respectively. Oxidative stress was determined by measuring inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression by Western blotting, production of nitric oxide (NO) with Griess reagent, and concentration of reactive oxygen species by fluorescent quantitative analysis with 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein-diacetate (DCFH-DA). The results showed that glass fiber exposure significantly reduced cell viability and increased DNA damage and oxidative stress production in a concentration-dependent manner, demonstrating that glass fibers exert cytotoxic and genotoxic effects related to increased oxidative stress on the human alveolar cell line A549. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Sam68/KHDRBS1 is critical for colon tumorigenesis by regulating genotoxic stress-induced NF-κB activation

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Kai; Sun, Xin; Wier, Eric M; Hodgson, Andrea; Liu, Yue; Sears, Cynthia L; Wan, Fengyi

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB)-mediated transcription is an important mediator for cellular responses to DNA damage. Genotoxic agents trigger a 'nuclear-to-cytoplasmic' NF-κB activation signaling pathway; however, the early nuclear signaling cascade linking DNA damage and NF-κB activation is poorly understood. Here we report that Src-associated-substrate-during-mitosis-of-68kDa/KH domain containing, RNA binding, signal transduction associated 1 (Sam68/KHDRBS1) is a key NF-κB regulator in genotoxic stress-initiated signaling pathway. Sam68 deficiency abolishes DNA damage-stimulated polymers of ADP-ribose (PAR) production and the PAR-dependent NF-κB transactivation of anti-apoptotic genes. Sam68 deleted cells are hypersensitive to genotoxicity caused by DNA damaging agents. Upregulated Sam68 coincides with elevated PAR production and NF-κB-mediated anti-apoptotic transcription in human and mouse colon cancer. Knockdown of Sam68 sensitizes human colon cancer cells to genotoxic stress-induced apoptosis and genetic deletion of Sam68 dampens colon tumor burden in mice. Together our data reveal a novel function of Sam68 in the genotoxic stress-initiated nuclear signaling, which is crucial for colon tumorigenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15018.001 PMID:27458801

  8. New insights in the acute toxic/genotoxic effects of CuO nanoparticles in the in vivo Drosophila model.

    PubMed

    Alaraby, Mohamed; Hernández, Alba; Marcos, Ricard

    2016-08-01

    Metal oxide nanoparticles are highly reactive from the biological point of view and, for this reason, it exists important reservations in regard human health impact. We used Drosophila as a promising in vivo model to diagnose the biological effects of copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO-NPs). Due to the potential role of ions release the effects of CuO-NPs were compared with those induced by copper sulfate, CuSO4. A wide battery of approaches has been used including toxicity, cell and body internalization, induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as well as changes in gene expression, related to both general stress and alterations in the intestinal barrier, and genotoxicity. The obtained results show that CuO-NPs have the ability to be distributed inside midgut cells and translocate to the general body compartment (internal hemolymph) interacting with hemocytes. Its exposure leads to reduced larval growth, decreased flies viability, delaying their emergency periods, especially at higher doses (2 and 10 mM). Moreover, deregulation of stress genes including antioxidant genes, and genes involved in wound healing were also observed. In this point it should be emphasized the novelty of using genes such as Duox, Upd3, PPO2, and Hml to determine injury on the intestinal barrier. On the other hand, CuO-NPs had non-genotoxic potential, in agreement with their inability to increase ROS production. In general dissolved copper produced higher toxic/genotoxic effects than those induced by CuO-NPs which would indicate that copper ions alone are more important in inducing harmful effects than copper nanoparticles itself.

  9. Ochratoxin A-induced cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and reactive oxygen species in kidney cells: An integrative approach of complementary endpoints.

    PubMed

    Costa, João G; Saraiva, Nuno; Guerreiro, Patrícia S; Louro, Henriqueta; Silva, Maria J; Miranda, Joana P; Castro, Matilde; Batinic-Haberle, Ines; Fernandes, Ana S; Oliveira, Nuno G

    2016-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a well-known nephrotoxic and potential carcinogenic agent but no consensus about the molecular mechanisms underlying its deleterious effects has been reached yet. The aim of this study is to integrate several endpoints concerning OTA-induced toxicological effects in Vero kidney cells in order to obtain additional mechanistic data, especially regarding the influence of reactive oxygen species (ROS). One innovative aspect of this work is the use of the superoxide dismutase mimic (SODm) MnTnHex-2-PyP as a mechanistic tool to clarify the involvement of oxidative stress in OTA toxicity. The results showed concentration and time-dependent cytotoxic effects of OTA (crystal violet, neutral red and LDH leakage assays). While the SODm mildly increased cell viability, trolox and ascorbic acid had no effect with regards to this endpoint. OTA induced micronuclei formation. Using the FPG modified comet assay, OTA modestly increased the % of DNA in tail, revealing the presence of oxidative DNA lesions. This mycotoxin increased apoptosis, which was attenuated by SODm. In addition, the SODm decreased the ROS accumulation observed in DHE assay. Taken together, our data suggest that ROS partially contribute to the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of OTA, although other mechanisms may be relevant in OTA-induced deleterious effects.

  10. Pirimicarb-based formulation-induced genotoxicity and cytotoxicity in the freshwater fish Cnesterodon decemmaculatus (Jenyns, 1842) (Pisces, Poeciliidae).

    PubMed

    Vera-Candioti, Josefina; Soloneski, Sonia; Larramendy, Marcelo L

    2015-11-01

    We analyzed the aspects of lethality, genotoxicity, and cytotoxicity in the ten spotted live-bearer exposed under laboratory conditions to the pirimicarb-based formulation Patton Flow® (50% active ingredient (a.i.)). Acute effects were evaluated using different end points for lethality, genotoxicity, and cytotoxicity. Median lethal concentration (LC50) estimation was employed as a bioassay for lethality, whereas micronucleus (MN) induction and alterations in erythrocyte/erythroblast frequency were used as end points for genotoxicity and cytotoxicity, respectively. Results demonstrated an LC5096h value of 88 mg/L. Patton Flow® increased the MN frequency in fish erythrocytes after 48 h of exposure at a concentration of 66 mg/L, whereas a concentration range of 22-66 mg/L was able to exert the same genotoxic effect at 96 h of treatment. Furthermore, cytotoxicity was also observed by alterations in erythrocyte/erythroblast frequencies within the concentration range of 22-66 mg/L, regardless of the exposure time. Our current observations provide evidence that Patton Flow® (50% a.i.) should be considered a clear lethal, cytotoxic, and genotoxic agent on Cnesterodon decemmaculatus. Thus, repeated applications of this carbamic insecticide can enter the aquatic environment and exert deleterious effects on aquatic organisms other than the evaluated species C. decemmaculatus.

  11. Genotoxicity of drinking water treated with different disinfectants and effects of disinfection conditions detected by umu-test.

    PubMed

    Nie, Xuebiao; Liu, Wenjun; Zhang, Liping; Liu, Qing

    2017-06-01

    The genotoxicity of drinking water treated with 6 disinfection methods and the effects of disinfection conditions were investigated using the umu-test. The pretreatment procedure of samples for the umu-test was optimized for drinking water analysis. The results of the umu-test were in good correlation with those of the Ames-test. The genotoxicity and production of haloacetic acids (HAAs) were the highest for chlorinated samples. UV+chloramination is the safest disinfection method from the aspects of genotoxicity, HAA production and inactivation effects. For chloramination, the effects of the mass ratio of Cl2 to N of chloramine on genotoxicity were also studied. The changes of genotoxicity were different from those of HAA production, which implied that HAA production cannot represent the genotoxic potential of water. The genotoxicity per chlorine decay of chlorination and chloramination had similar trends, indicating that the reaction of organic matters and chlorine made a great contribution to the genotoxicity. The results of this study are of engineering significance for optimizing the operation of waterworks. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Genotoxic effects of sodium arsenite and sodium arsenate after chronic exposure of Drosophila melanogaster larvae

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos-Morales, P.; Ordaz, M.G.; Munoz, A.

    1995-11-01

    Two arsenic compounds, namely: NaAsO{sub 2} (Sodium Arsenite) and Na{sub 2}HAsO{sub 4} (Sodium Arsenate) were tested for its chronic effect in somatic cells of Drosophila melanogaster. In a previous study in Drosophila we found that both compounds induced SLRL mutations, but failed to induce sex chromosome loss. In the SMART, after acute exposure, only sodium arsenite was positive when cells of the wings were used; however, both were positives in cells of the eyes of Drosophila. The genotoxicity of both compounds localized mainly on somatic cells, in agreement with reports on the carcinogenicity potential of arsenical compounds. The Somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) was run employing cells of the wing imaginal discs from flr{sup 3}/mwh larvae. First instar larvae (24 {plus_minus} 4 h) were treated during 96 hours with sodium arsenite [0.015-4.0 ppm], and sodium arsenate [0.2-10 ppm], negative control was treated with distilled water. The frequency of spots by wing induced by the two arsenic salts were compared with control according with Frei and Wuergler procedure. Data show that sodium arsenite tested negative at all concentrations, but sodium arsenate tested positive at 0.8, 2 and 10 ppm (P<0.05). This results were consistent with the co-mutagenic role of sodium arsenite, but show that sodium arsenate was mutagenic in Drosophila test system under chronic exposure.

  13. Egyptian sweet marjoram leaves protect against genotoxicity, immunosuppression and other complications induced by cyclophosphamide in albino rats.

    PubMed

    Ramadan, Gamal; El-Beih, Nadia M; Zahra, Mai M

    2012-09-28

    Cyclophosphamide (CP) is one of the most popular alkylating anticancer drugs that show a high therapeutic index, despite the widespread side effects and toxicity particularly in high-dose regimens and long-term use. Here, we evaluated and compared the efficacy of two different doses (50 and 100 mg/kg body weight, given orally for 30 consecutive days) of Egyptian sweet marjoram leaf powder (MLP) and marjoram leaf aqueous extract (MLE) in alleviating the genotoxicity, immunosuppression and other complications induced by CP in non-tumour-bearing albino rats. The present study showed (probably for the first time) that both MLP and MLE significantly alleviated (P < 0·05-0·001) most side effects and toxicity of CP-treated rats including the increase in chromosomal aberrations of bone marrow cells and serum malondialdehyde level, the decrease in the level of serum Ig, the delayed type of hypersensitivity response as also the weights and cellularity of lymphoid organs, and myelosuppression, leucopenia, macrocytic normochromic anaemia as well as thrombocytopenia by reactivating the non-enzymic (reduced glutathione) and enzymic (catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione S-transferase, superoxide dismutase) antioxidant system and increasing the mitotic index of bone marrow cells. The modulatory effects of marjoram leaves shown in the present study were dose dependent in most cases and much higher in MLE (21-23 % for all parameters taken together). In addition, the doses used in the present study were considered safe. In conclusion, sweet marjoram leaves (especially in the form of a herbal tea) may be useful as an immunostimulant and in reducing genotoxicity in patients under chemotherapeutic interventions.

  14. Kerosene soot genotoxicity: enhanced effect upon co-exposure with chrysotile asbestos in Syrian hamster embryo fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Lohani, M; Dopp, E; Weiss, D G; Schiffmann, D; Rahman, Q

    2000-04-03

    Epidemiological and experimental studies have suggested an enhancement of asbestos-induced bronchogenic carcinoma by cigarette smoke. Further, our recent experimental and epidemiological studies have indicated that besides smoking, several other compounds including kerosene soot may accelerate disease processes in asbestos-exposed animals as well as in the humans. Incomplete combustion of kerosene oil generates large volumes of soot, which contains various polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and aliphatic compounds. As reported earlier, exposure to kerosene soot is known to cause biochemical and pathological changes in the pulmonary tissue, which may cause cardiopulmonary disorders. In this study we investigated genotoxic effects caused by kerosene soot and chrysotile asbestos as well as co-exposure of kerosene soot and chrysotile using Syrian hamster embryo fibroblasts (SHE). The micronucleus assay revealed a significant increase of induced micronuclei (MN), (Pinduced up to 110 MN/1000 cells (chrysotile alone: 80 MN/1000 cells; concentrations: 1 microg/cm(2), exposure times: 66 h). Kinetochore staining revealed mainly clastogenic effects in all cases (soot: 21.3% CRMN(+); chrysotile: 27%; soot+chrysotile: 27.6%; control: 20.8%). This is the first study showing that kerosene soot is not only genotoxic but it can also elevate the genotoxic potential of chrysotile asbestos. This information may be of importance for workers occupationally exposed to asbestos and domestically exposed to kerosene soot.

  15. Emerging Disinfection Byproducts, Halobenzoquinones: Effects of Isomeric Structure and Halogen Substitution on Cytotoxicity, Formation of Reactive Oxygen Species, and Genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinhua; Moe, Birget; Vemula, Sai; Wang, Wei; Li, Xing-Fang

    2016-07-05

    Halobenzoquinones (HBQs) are a structurally diverse class of water disinfection byproducts. Here, we report a systematic study on the effects of isomeric structure and the type and number of halogen substitutions of HBQs on their cytotoxicity, formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and genotoxicity. Dynamic responses and IC50 histograms were obtained using real-time cell analysis, clearly ranking the cytotoxicity of the HBQs in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells. Strong isomeric structure effects were shown with 2,5-HBQ isomers inducing greater cytotoxicity than their corresponding 2,6-HBQ isomers (P < 0.05). HBQ-halogen substitution groups also influence cytotoxicity, as cytotoxicity increases across the dihalogenated HBQs: iodo- > bromo- > chloro-HBQs (P < 0.05). Determination of HBQ-induced ROS further supports isomeric structure and halogen substitution effects. HBQ-induced genotoxicity was shown as increased levels of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine and p53 protein. Pearson correlation analysis of the HBQ toxicity measurements with their physicochemical parameters demonstrates that dipole moment and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy are two major structural influences on toxicity (r = -0.721 or -0.766, P < 0.05). Dipole moment also correlates with isomer toxicity. This study suggests that formation and occurrence of highly toxic iodo-HBQs and 2,5-HBQs warrant further investigation to fully assess the impact of HBQs in drinking water.

  16. 2-hydroxylethyl methacrylate (HEMA), a tooth restoration component, exerts its genotoxic effects in human gingival fibroblasts trough methacrylic acid, an immediate product of its degradation.

    PubMed

    Szczepanska, Joanna; Poplawski, Tomasz; Synowiec, Ewelina; Pawlowska, Elzbieta; Chojnacki, Cezary J; Chojnacki, Jan; Blasiak, Janusz

    2012-02-01

    HEMA (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate), a methacrylate commonly used in dentistry, was reported to induce genotoxic effects, but their mechanism is not fully understood. HEMA may be degraded by the oral cavity esterases or through mechanical stress following the chewing process. Methacrylic acid (MAA) is the primary product of HEMA degradation. In the present work we compared cytotoxic and genotoxic effects induced by HEMA and MAA in human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs). A 6-h exposure to HEMA or MAA induced a weak decrease in the viability of HGFs. Neither HEMA nor MAA induced strand breaks in the isolated plasmid DNA, but both compounds evoked DNA damage in HGFs, as evaluated by the alkaline comet assay. Oxidative modifications to the DNA bases were monitored by the DNA repair enzymes Endo III and Fpg. DNA damage induced by HEMA and MAA was not persistent and was removed during a 120 min repair incubation. Results from the neutral comet assay indicated that both compounds induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and they were confirmed by the γ-H2AX assay. Both compounds induced apoptosis and perturbed the cell cycle. Therefore, methacrylic acid, a product of HEMA degradation, may be involved in its cytotoxic and genotoxic action.

  17. IS THE DOSE-RESPONSE LINEAR OR NONLINEAR FOR GENOTOXIC EFFECTS?

    EPA Science Inventory

    IS THE DOSE-RESPONSE LINEAR OR NONLINEAR FOR GENOTOXIC EFFECTS?
    Preston, RJ. Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, NHEERL, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711

    For considerations of cancer risk assessment from exposure to environmenta...

  18. Cytostatic and genotoxic effect of temephos in human lymphocytes and HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Benitez-Trinidad, A B; Herrera-Moreno, J F; Vázquez-Estrada, G; Verdín-Betancourt, F A; Sordo, M; Ostrosky-Wegman, P; Bernal-Hernández, Y Y; Medina-Díaz, I M; Barrón-Vivanco, B S; Robledo-Marenco, M L; Salazar, A M; Rojas-García, A E

    2015-06-01

    Temephos is an organophosphorus pesticide that is used in control campaigns against Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, which transmit dengue. In spite of the widespread use of temephos, few studies have examined its genotoxic potential. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxic, cytostatic and genotoxic effects of temephos in human lymphocytes and hepatoma cells (HepG2). The cytotoxicity was evaluated with simultaneous staining (FDA/EtBr). The cytostatic and genotoxic effects were evaluated using comet assays and the micronucleus technique. We found that temephos was not cytotoxic in either lymphocytes or HepG2 cells. Regarding the cytostatic effect in human lymphocytes, temephos (10 μM) caused a significant decrease in the percentage of binucleated cells and in the nuclear division index as well as an increase in the apoptotic cell frequency, which was not the case for HepG2 cells. The comet assay showed that temephos increased the DNA damage levels in human lymphocytes, but it did not increase the MN frequency. In contrast, in HepG2 cells, temephos increased the tail length, tail moment and MN frequency in HepG2 cells compared to control cells. In conclusion, temephos causes stable DNA damage in HepG2 cells but not in human lymphocytes. These findings suggest the importance of temephos biotransformation in its genotoxic effect. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Soil genotoxicity induced by successive applications of chlorothalonil under greenhouse conditions.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiangxiang; Cui, Ning; Zhou, Wei; Khorram, Mahdi Safaei; Wang, Donghong; Yu, Yunlong

    2014-05-01

    Greenhouse production of vegetables has been developed rapidly in China. High temperature and humidity inside the greenhouse make this environment more suitable for fast reproduction of fungal diseases. Fungicides are among the chemicals used extensively in the greenhouse to prevent crops from invasive infections by phytopathogens; however, little is known about the accumulation of fungicides in soil and their effect on soil quality under greenhouse conditions. In the present study, the accumulation of the fungicide chlorothalonil (CT) and its toxic metabolite hydroxy-chlorothalonil (HCT) in soil as well as their related soil genotoxicity under greenhouse conditions was investigated. The results indicated that both CT and HCT accumulated in soil with repeated applications of CT, and the accumulation level was strongly correlated to application dosage and its frequency. In addition, soil genotoxicity, which was measured by Vicia faba, also increased with the accumulation of CT and HCT, and the main contributor to this phenomenon was CT rather than HCT. The data demonstrated that successive applications of fungicides may result in their accumulation in soil and thus a decline in soil quality. © 2014 SETAC.

  20. Zinc inhibits aflatoxin B1-induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in human hepatocytes (HepG2 cells).

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuan; Lv, Yangjun; Huang, Kunlun; Luo, Yunbo; Xu, Wentao

    2016-06-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) has strong carcinogenicity. Consumption of AFB1-contaminated agricultural products and the occurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma have received widespread attention. The aim of this paper was to investigate whether zinc supplementation could inhibit AFB1-induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in HepG2 cells and the mechanism of this inhibition. Our data suggest that zinc sources can relieve a certain degree of AFB1-induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity by protecting against apoptotic body formation and DNA strand breaks, affecting S phase cell cycle arrest, reducing 8-OHdG formation, inhibiting global DNA hypomethylation and regulating gene expression in antioxidation, zinc-association and apoptosis processes. Consequently, zinc stabilizes the integrity of DNA and improves cell survival. These data provides new insights into the protective role of zinc in alleviating AFB1-induced cytotoxicity and mediating epigenetic changes in hepatocytes, demonstrating that zinc sources have detoxification properties in mycotoxin-induced toxicity.

  1. Genotoxic effect of Physalis angulata L. (Solanaceae) extract on human lymphocytes treated in vitro.

    PubMed

    Alves dos Santos, Raquel; Cabral, Teresinha Rosa; Cabral, Isabel Rosa; Antunes, Lusânia Maria; Pontes Andrade, Cristiane; Cerqueira dos Santos Cardoso, Plínio; de Oliveira Bahia, Marcelo; Pessoa, Claudia; Martins do Nascimento, José Luis; Rodríguez Burbano, Rommel; Takahashi, Catarina Satie

    2008-08-01

    Physalis angulata L (Solanaceae) is a medicinal plant from North of Brazil, whose different extracts and infusions are commonly used in the popular medicine for the treatment of malaria, asthma, hepatitis, dermatitis and rheumatism. However, the genotoxic effects of P. angulata on human cells is not well known. The main purpose of the present study was to evaluate the in vitro genotoxic effects of aqueous extract of P. angulata using the comet assay and the micronucleus assay in human lymphocytes provided from 6 healthy donors. Treatments with P. angulata extracts were performed in vitro in order to access the extent of DNA damage. The comet assay has shown that treatments with P. angulata at 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0 and 6.0 microg/mL in culture medium were genotoxic. Lymphocytes treated with P. angulata at the concentrations of 3.0 and 6.0 microg/mL in culture medium showed a statistically significant increase in the frequency of micronucleus (p<0.05), however, the cytokinesis blocked proliferation index (CBPI) was not decreased after P. angulata treatment. In conclusion, the present work demonstrated the genotoxic effects of P. angulata extract on human lymphocytes in vitro.

  2. Titanium dioxide food additive (E171) induces ROS formation and genotoxicity: contribution of micro and nano-sized fractions.

    PubMed

    Proquin, Héloïse; Rodríguez-Ibarra, Carolina; Moonen, Carolyn G J; Urrutia Ortega, Ismael M; Briedé, Jacob J; de Kok, Theo M; van Loveren, Henk; Chirino, Yolanda I

    2017-01-01

    Since 1969, the European Union approves food-grade titanium dioxide (TiO2), also known as E171 colouring food additive. E171 is a mixture of micro-sized particles (MPs) and nano-sized particles (NPs). Previous studies have indicated adverse effects of oral exposure to E171, i.e. facilitation of colon tumour growth. This could potentially be partially mediated by the capacity to induce reactive oxygen species (ROS). The aim of the present study is to determine whether E171 exposure induces ROS formation and DNA damage in an in vitro model using human Caco-2 and HCT116 cells and to investigate the contribution of the separate MPs and NPs TiO2 fractions to these effects. After suspension of the particles in Hanks' balanced salt solution buffer and cell culture medium with either bovine serum albumin (BSA) or foetal bovine serum, characterization of the particles was performed by dynamic light scattering, ROS formation was determined by electron spin/paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and DNA damage was determined by the comet and micronucleus assays. The results showed that E171, MPs and NPs are stable in cell culture medium with 0.05% BSA. The capacity for ROS generation in a cell-free environment was highest for E171, followed by NPs and MPs. Only MPs were capable to induce ROS formation in exposed Caco-2 cells. E171, MPs and NPs all induced single-strand DNA breaks. Chromosome damage was shown to be induced by E171, as tested with the micronucleus assay in HCT116 cells. In conclusion, E171 has the capability to induce ROS formation in a cell-free environment and E171, MPs and NPs have genotoxic potential. The capacity of E171 to induce ROS formation and DNA damage raises concerns about potential adverse effects associated with E171 (TiO2) in food.

  3. Cytotoxic and genotoxic effect in RTG-2 cell line exposed to selected biocides used in the disinfection of cooling towers.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Fortún, S; Llorente, M T; Castaño, A

    2008-05-01

    The cytotoxic and genotoxic effects induced by trichloroisocyanuric acid, Oxone, and sodium bromide, active principles included in formulations for cleaning and disinfection of cooling towers, were studied on RTG-2 cell line. Neutral red assay was used to determine the cellular viability. Toxicity ranking based on IC(50) values found that trichloroisocyanuric acid was the most cytotoxic biocide tested followed by Oxone, whereas sodium bromide resulted in a very low cytotoxicity. DNA damage has been evaluated on RTG-2 cultures by means of an in vitro assay based on the ability of PicoGreen fluorochrome to interact preferentially with dsDNA, and the results indicated that trichloroisocyanuric acid induced DNA strand breaks at concentrations above 1.2 mg/l, equivalent to 1/50-EC(50(48)), whereas exposures to Oxone and sodium bromide did not induce DNA damage at the maximal concentrations tested (1/10-EC(50(48))). These results confirm the suitability of this method for the screening of genotoxic effects of this type of aquatic pollutants, and we suggest their use in environmental risk assessment procedures.

  4. Evidence for the role of nitric oxide in antiapoptotic and genotoxic effect of nicotine on human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Argentin, Gabriella; Cicchetti, Rosadele

    2006-11-01

    Resistance to apoptosis is essential for cancer survival and plays a critical role in carcinogenesis. Growing evidence suggests that nicotine can act as a tumor promoter, impairing apoptotic process in certain types of human cancer cell lines. Our previous study revealed in human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) a concomitant antiapoptotic and genotoxic effect of nicotine, manifested by the attenuation of staurosporine (STP)-induced apoptosis and the increase of micronucleus frequency. The present report provides evidence that nitric oxide (NO) is critically involved in these actions. In vitro treatment with sodium nitroprusside as NO donor showed that NO produced similar effects as those observed with nicotine: it caused DNA damage and partially prevented apoptosis induced by staurosporine. Exposure of HGFs to nicotine, at concentrations similar to those found in the blood of habitual smokers, leads to the production of NO associated with the induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression. Experiments using an inhibitor of iNOS, N-monomethyl-L-arginine (NMA), together with nicotine confirmed the involvement of NO in the drug action, abrogating completely cell death and a good part of the genotoxicity. Finally, we show by different approaches that the inhibition of cell death by nicotine through NO release is related to modulation of caspase-1 activation.

  5. Cyto-genotoxic and oxidative effects of a continuous UV-C treatment of liquid egg products.

    PubMed

    Mendes de Souza, Poliana; Briviba, Karlis; Müller, Alexandra; Fernández, Avelina; Stahl, Mario

    2013-06-01

    UV-C treatment of food is a promising non-thermal processing technology to improve food safety and preservation. Most of the chemical constituents of food absorb UV-C light that can lead to chemical modifications and quality changes. This work investigated the effects of UV-C treatment of liquid egg products on lipid, protein oxidations and potential cyto- and genotoxic effects on intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. Egg preparations (egg white, yolk, liquid whole egg) were treated with UV-C (254 nm, volumetric doses between 0 and 115,619 J L(-1)) using a commercial UV-C processing unit equipped with a Dean Flow reactor. UV-C treatment at high doses (from 32,181 J L(-1), about 2 times higher than that needed to inactivate 5 log of relevant microorganisms) showed an increased lipid oxidation in egg yolk and slight effects in liquid whole eggs; this was confirmed by slightly but not statistically significant increased peroxide values. UV-C induced also slight protein damage, characterised by the total sulfhydryl group reduction. These UV-C-induced oxidative modifications in egg preparations however did not cause any increase in the cyto- or genotoxic (DNA strand breaks) effects in intestinal Caco-2 cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of abamectin, chlorfenapyr, and imidacloprid on CHOK1 cells.

    PubMed

    Al-Sarar, Ali S; Abobakr, Yasser; Bayoumi, Alaa E; Hussein, Hamdy I

    2015-11-01

    The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of abamectin, chlorfenapyr, and imidacloprid have been evaluated on the Chinese hamster ovary (CHOK1) cells. Neutral red incorporation (NRI), total cellular protein content (TCP), and methyl tetrazolium (MTT) assays were followed to estimate the mid-point cytotoxicity values, NRI50, TCP50, and MTT50, respectively. The effects of the sublethal concentration (NRI25) on glutathione S-transferase (GST), glutathione reductase (GRD), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), and total glutathione content have been evaluated in the presence and absence of reduced glutathione (GSH), vitamin C, and vitamin E. The genotoxicity was evaluated using chromosomal aberrations (CA), micronucleus (MN) formation, and DNA fragmentation techniques in the presence and absence of the metabolic activation system, S9 mix. Abamectin was the most cytotoxic pesticide followed by chlorfenapyr, while imidacloprid was the least cytotoxic one. The glutathione redox cycle components were altered by the tested pesticides in the absence and presence of the tested antioxidants. The results of genotoxicity indicate that abamectin, chlorfenapyr, and imidacloprid have potential genotoxic effects on CHOK1 cells under the experimental conditions.

  7. Potential genotoxic effects of melted snow from an urban area revealed by the Allium cepa test.

    PubMed

    Blagojević, Jelena; Stamenković, Gorana; Vujosević, Mladen

    2009-09-01

    The presence of well-known atmospheric pollutants is regularly screened for in large towns but knowledge about the effects of mixtures of different pollutants and especially their genotoxic potential is largely missing. Since falling snow collects pollutants from the air, melted snow samples could be suitable for evaluating potential genotoxicity. For this purpose the Allium cepa anaphase-telophase test was used to analyse melted snow samples from Belgrade, the capital city of Serbia. Samples of snow were taken at two sites, characterized by differences in pollution intensity, in three successive years. At the more polluted site the analyses showed a very high degree of both toxicity and genotoxicity in the first year of the study corresponding to the effects of the known mutagen used as the positive control. At the other site the situation was much better but not without warning signals. The results showed that standard analyses for the presence of certain contaminants in the air do not give an accurate picture of the possible consequences of urban air pollution because the genotoxic potential remains hidden. The A. cepa test has been demonstrated to be very convenient for evaluation of air pollution through analyses of melted snow samples.

  8. Sulforaphane inhibits CYP1A1 activity and promotes genotoxicity induced by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Fangxing; Zhuang, Shulin; Zhang, Chao; Dai, Heping; Liu, Weiping

    2013-06-15

    Increasing environmental pollution by carcinogens such as some of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) has prompted growing interest in searching for chemopreventive compounds which are readily obtainable. Sulforaphane (SFN) is isolated from cruciferous vegetables and has the potentials to reduce carcinogenesis through various pathways. In this study, we studied the effects of SFN on CYP1A1 activity and genotoxicity induced by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). The results showed that SFN inhibited TCDD-induced CYP1A1 activity in H4IIE cells by directly inhibiting CYP1A1 activity, probably through binding to aryl hydrocarbon receptor and/or CYP1A1 revealed by molecular docking. However, SFN promoted TCDD-induced DNA damage in yeast cells and reduced the viability of initiated yeast cells. Besides, it is surprising that SFN also failed to reduce genotoxicity induced by other genotoxic reagents which possess different mechanisms to lead to DNA damage. Currently, it is difficult to predict whether SFN has the potentials to reduce the risk of TCDD based on the conflicting observations in the study. Therefore, further studies should be urgent to reveal the function and mechanism of SFN in the stress of such POPs on human health. - Highlights: • Sulforaphane inhibited TCDD-induced CYP1A1 activity in H4IIE cells. • Sulforaphane may bind to aryl hydrocarbon receptor and/or CYP1A1. • Sulforaphane promoted TCDD-induced DNA damage in yeast cells. • Sulforaphane may promote DNA damage by DNA strand breaks or DNA alkylation.

  9. Evaluation of effects of melatonin and caffeic acid phenethyl ester on acute potassium dichromate toxicity and genotoxicity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Cengiz, Mujgan; Alansal, Nurnisa Oya; Tuncdemir, Matem; Tanriverdi, Gamze; Bayoglu, Burcu

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to investigate the possible protective effects of melatonin and caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) on potassium dichromate (K2 Cr2O7)-induced nephrotoxicity and genotoxicity. Methods: A total of 40 Wistar albino rats were divided into five groups: control, K2Cr2O7(K2Cr2O715 mg/kg, one dose, i.p.), K2Cr2O7 + melatonin, K2Cr2O7 + CAPE, and K2Cr2O7 + melatonin + CAPE. Urine and blood samples were collected from rats before scarification. One kidney was collected for histopathological studies, and the other was stored at −80°C for further determination of catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), glutathione S-transferase (GST), and glutathione reductase (GR) levels with spectrophotometric method. Comet assay was used to evaluate the genotoxicity. Results: We observed a significant amelioration in genotoxicity by melatonin and simultaneous melatonin + CAPE treatment compared to K2Cr2O7 group (p1, p2< 0.05). SOD, CAT, GSH, GST, and MDA levels did not change when compared with controls. When K2Cr2O7 applied group was treated with melatonin and CAPE, neither melatonin nor CAPE made any changes in kidney GSH, GST, SOD, and MDA levels (P > 0.05). We noted that treatment with CAPE and melatonin + CAPE together caused a significant decrease in renal tissue damage, an upregulation in the kidney CAT levels (P < 0.05) and a slight healing at GR levels when compared with the K2Cr2O7 group. Conclusion: Our results revealed, CAPE and melatonin may have protective effects on K2Cr2O7 induced nephrotoxicity and cellular damage in rats. PMID:27756952

  10. Application of fish cell lines for evaluating the chromium induced cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Taju, G; Abdul Majeed, S; Nambi, K S N; Sahul Hameed, A S

    2017-10-01

    In the present study, we hypothesize that cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and oxidative stress play a key role in chromium induced toxicity in SISS, SISK, IEE, IEK, IEG, SICH and ICG cell lines after 24 h exposure. Three fish species namely Lates calcarifer, Etroplus suratensis and Catla catla were exposed to the concentrations of 0, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 mg/L of chromium for 96 h under static conditions for conducting acute toxicity tests. LC50 was then calculated. The percentage cell survival was assessed by multiple endpoints such as MTT, NR, AB and CB assays in the seven fish cell lines exposed to different concentrations of chromium and EC50 values of all the four endpoints were calculated. High significances were noted in the correlations between each in vitro cytotoxicity assays and in vivo mortality data. Cell shrinkage, cell detachment, vacuolations and cell swelling at the highest concentration of chromium (50 mg/L) were seen on microscopic examination of cell morphology. Comet assay and Hoechst staining were carried out to assess DNA damage and nuclear fragmentation in the seven fish lines exposed to chromium. The results of antioxidant parameters obtained indicate a significant reduction in the level of catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione S-transferase and Glutathione peroxidase, and increased level of lipid peroxidation in all the cell lines exposed to chromium. These results confirm that fish cell lines could be used as an alternative to whole fish for cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and oxidative stress assessment in chromium toxicity studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Genotoxicity of 1,4-benzoquinone and 1,4-naphthoquinone in relation to effects on glutathione and NAD(P)H levels in V79 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewig, G.; Dogra, S.; Glatt, H. )

    1989-07-01

    1,4-Benzoquinone is cytotoxic in V79 Chinese hamster cells and induces gene mutations and micronuclei. The cell-damaging effects of quinones are usually attributed to thiol depletion, oxidation of NAD(P)H, and redox-cycling involving the formation of semiquinone radicals and reactive oxygen species. To elucidate the role of these mechanisms in the genotoxicity of 1,4-benzoquinone, the authors measured various genotoxic effects, cytotoxicity, and the levels of glutathione, NADPH, NADH, and their oxidized forms all in the same experiment. 1,4-Naphthoquinone, which does not induce gene mutations in V79 cells, was investigated for comparative reasons. The quinones had a similar effect on the levels of cofactors. Total glutathione was depleted, but levels of oxidized glutathione were slightly increased. The levels of NADPH and NADH were reduced at high concentrations of the quinones with a simultaneous increase in the levels of NADP{sup +} and NAD{sup +}. Both compounds induced micronuclei, but neither increased the frequency of sister chromatid exchange. Only 1,4-benzoquinone induced gene mutations. They conclude that (a) induction of micronuclei and glutathione depletion by the two quinones are not linked casually, (b) 1,4-benzoquinone induces gene mutations by a mechanism different from oxidative stress and glutathione depletion, and (c) glutathione does not fully protect the cells against the genotoxicity of quinones.

  12. Nicotine derived genotoxic effects in human primary parotid gland cells as assessed in vitro by comet assay, cytokinesis-block micronucleus test and chromosome aberrations test.

    PubMed

    Ginzkey, Christian; Steussloff, Gudrun; Koehler, Christian; Burghartz, Marc; Scherzed, Agmal; Hackenberg, Stephan; Hagen, Rudolf; Kleinsasser, Norbert H

    2014-08-01

    Genotoxic effects of nicotine were described in different human cells including salivary gland cells. Based on the high nicotine concentration in saliva of smokers or patients using therapeutic nicotine patches, the current study was performed to evaluate the genotoxic potential of nicotine in human salivary gland cells. Therefore, primary salivary gland cells from 10 patients undergoing parotid gland surgery were exposed to nicotine concentrations between 1 μM and 1000 μM for 1 h in the absence of exogenous metabolic activation. The acinar phenotype was proven by immunofluorescent staining of alpha-amylase. Genotoxic effects were evaluated using the Comet assay, the micronucleus test and the chromosome aberration test. Cytotoxicity and apoptosis were determined by trypan blue exclusion test and Caspase-3 assay. Nicotine was able to induce genotoxic effects in all three assays. The chromosome aberration test was the most sensitive and increases in numerical and structural (chromatid-type and chromosome-type) aberrations were seen at ≥1 μM, whereas increases in micronuclei frequency were detected at 10 μM and DNA damage as measured in the Comet assay was noted at >100 μM. No cytotoxic damage or influence of apoptosis could be demonstrated. Nicotine as a possible risk factor for tumor initiation in salivary glands is still discussed controversially. Our results demonstrated the potential of nicotine to induce genotoxic effects in salivary gland cells. These results were observed at saliva nicotine levels similar to those found after oral or transdermal exposure to nicotine and suggest the necessity of careful monitoring of the use of nicotine in humans.

  13. Influence of fetal bovine serum on cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of lectins in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Faheina-Martins, Glaucia Veríssimo; da Silveira, Alethéia Lacerda; Ramos, Márcio Viana; Marques-Santos, Luís Fernando; Araujo, Demetrius Antonio Machado

    2011-01-01

    Canavalia ensiformis (ConA), Canavalia brasiliensis (Conbr), and Cratylia floribunda (CFL) lectins have exhibited glucose-mannose binding specificity. We investigated the effect of fetal bovine serum (FBS) concentrations (1, 5, 10, and 20%) on the cytotoxic effect of these lectins against breast tumor cell line MCF-7. Cell viability was examined using the MTT reduction assay. When cells were grown in a medium supplemented with a higher serum concentration (10 or 20%), all lectins were much less toxic. When we used 1% FBS, it was possible to achieve a concentration-dependent activity by all examined lectins, with an IC(50) of 3.5, 25, and 60 µg/mL for ConA, Conbr, and CFL, respectively. All lectins incubated with 1% FBS induced apoptosis and DNA damage in MCF-7 cells. We conclude that ConA, Conbr, and CFL lectins' cytotoxic and genotoxic effects were observed only at low concentrations of serum. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Evaluation of cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of Benodanil by using Allium and Micronucleus assays.

    PubMed

    Akyıl, Dilek; Özkara, Arzu; Erdoğmuş, S Feyza; Eren, Yasin; Konuk, Muhsin; Sağlam, Esra

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential cytotoxic effects of Benodanil fungicide by employing both mitotic index (MI) and mitotic phases on the root meristem cells of Allium cepa and genotoxic effects by using in vitro micronucleus assay (MN) in human peripheral blood lymphocyte. In the Allium root growth inhibition test, the EC50 value was first determined as 25 ppm. Then, 2 × EC50 value (50 ppm), EC50 value (25 ppm), and 1/2 × EC50 value (12.5 ppm) were tested with different treatment periods (24, 48, and 72 h). Both negative and positive controls were also used in parallel experiments. We obtained that mitotic index and prophase index decreased when compared with the control in all concentrations. In the micronucleus assay, lymphocytes were treated with various concentrations (250, 500, 750, and 1000 µg/ml) of Benodanil for 24 and 48 h. The results showed that Benodanil did not induce MN frequency in all concentrations of both treatment periods. Additionally, it was determined that this pesticide decreased nuclear division index (NDI) significantly. It was concluded that Benodanil has a cytotoxic effects depending on decreasing of MI and NDI.

  15. The cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of metalaxy-M on earthworms (Eisenia fetida).

    PubMed

    Liu, Tong; Zhu, Lusheng; Han, Yingnan; Wang, Jinhua; Wang, Jun; Zhao, Yan

    2014-10-01

    As the main optical isomer of metalaxyl, metalaxyl-M has been widely used worldwide in recent years because of its notable effect on the prevention and control of crop diseases. Together with the toxicity and degradation of metalaxyl-M, the chemical has attracted the attention of researchers. The present study examined the toxic effects of metalaxyl-M on earthworms at 0 mg kg(-1) , 0.1 mg kg(-1) , 1 mg kg(-1) , and 3 mg kg(-1) on days 7, 14, 21 and 28 after exposure. The results showed that metalaxyl-M could cause an obvious increase in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) when the concentration was higher than 0.1 mg kg(-1) , which led to lipid peroxidation in earthworms. Metalaxyl-M can induce DNA damage in earthworms, and the level of DNA damage markedly increased with increasing the concentration of metalaxyl-M. Metalaxyl-M also has a serious influence on the activities of antioxidant enzymes, which results in irreversible oxidative damage in cells. The changes of these indicators all indicated that metalaxyl-M may cause cytotoxic and genotoxic effects on earthworms. © 2014 SETAC.

  16. Low-Dose Radiation and Genotoxic Chemicals Can Protect Against Stochastic Biological Effects

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Bobby R.; Walker, Dale M.; Walker, Vernon E.

    2004-01-01

    A protective apoptosis-mediated (PAM) process that is turned on in mammalian cells by low-dose photon (X and γ) radiation and appears to also be turned on by the genotoxic chemical ethylene oxide is discussed. Because of the PAM process, exposure to low-dose photon radiation (and possibly also some genotoxic chemicals) can lead to a reduction in the risk of stochastic effects such as problematic mutations, neoplastic transformation (an early step in cancer occurrence), and cancer. These findings indicate a need to revise the current low-dose risk assessment paradigm for which risk of cancer is presumed to increase linearly with dose (without a threshold) after exposure to any amount of a genotoxic agent such as ionizing radiation. These findings support a view seldom mentioned in the past, that cancer risk can actually decrease, rather than increase, after exposure to low doses of photon radiation and possibly some other genotoxic agents. The PAM process (a form of natural protection) may contribute substantially to cancer prevention in humans and other mammals. However, new research is needed to improve our understanding of the process. The new research could unlock novel strategies for optimizing cancer prevention and novel protocols for low-dose therapy for cancer. With low-dose cancer therapy, normal tissue could be spared from severe damage while possibly eliminating the cancer. PMID:19330143

  17. Lilium compounds kaempferol and jatropham can modulate cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of radiomimetic zeocin in plants and human lymphocytes In vitro.

    PubMed

    Jovtchev, Gabriele; Gateva, Svetla; Stankov, Alexander

    2016-06-01

    Organisms are constantly exposed to the detrimental effect of environmental DNA-damaging agents. The harmful effects of environmental genotoxins could be decreased in a viable way by antimutagenesis. One of the modern approaches to reduce the mutagenic burden is based on exogenous natural and synthetic compounds that possess protective and antimutagenic potential against genotoxins. The natural compounds kaempferol and jatropham isolated from Lilium candidum were tested with respect to their potential to protect cells against the radiomimetic zeocin, as well as to their cytotoxic and genotoxic activities in two types of experimental eukaryotic test systems: Hordeum vulgare and human lymphocytes in vitro. Mitotic index (MI) was used as an endpoint for cytotoxicity; the frequency of chromosome aberrations (MwA) and the number of induced micronuclei (MN), as endpoints for genotoxicity/clastogenicity. Formation of aberration "hot spots" was also used as an indicator for genotoxicity in H. vulgare. Both kaempferol and jatropham were shown to possess a potential to modulate and decrease the cytotoxic and genotoxic/clastogenic effect of zeocin depending on the experimental design and the test system. Our data could be useful for health research programs, particularly in clarifying the pharmacological potential and activity of natural plant compounds. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 751-764, 2016.

  18. Neuroprotection elicited by P2Y13 receptors against genotoxic stress by inducing DUSP2 expression and MAPK signaling recovery.

    PubMed

    Morente, Verónica; Pérez-Sen, Raquel; Ortega, Felipe; Huerta-Cepas, Jaime; Delicado, Esmerilda G; Miras-Portugal, M Teresa

    2014-09-01

    Nucleotides activating P2Y13 receptors display neuroprotective actions against different apoptotic stimuli in cerebellar granule neurons. In the present study, P2Y13 neuroprotection was analyzed in conditions of genotoxic stress. Exposure to cisplatin and UV radiation induced caspase-3-dependent apoptotic cell death, and p38 MAPK signaling de-regulation. Pre-treatment with P2Y13 nucleotide agonist, 2methyl-thio-ADP (2MeSADP), restored granule neuron survival and prevented p38 long-lasting activation induced by cytotoxic treatments. Microarray gene expression analysis in 2MeSADP-stimulated cells revealed over-representation of genes related to protein phosphatase activity. Among them, dual-specificity phosphatase-2, DUSP2, was validated as a transcriptional target for P2Y13 receptors by QPCR. This effect could explain 2MeSADP ability to dephosphorylate a DUSP2 substrate, p38, reestablishing the inactive form. In addition, cisplatin-induced p38 sustained activation correlated perfectly with progressive reduction in DUSP2 expression. In conclusion, P2Y13 receptors regulate DUSP2 expression and contribute to p38 signaling homeostasis and survival in granule neurons. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of genotoxic and antigenotoxic effects of boron by the somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) on Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Sarıkaya, Rabia; Erciyas, Kamile; Kara, Muhammed Isa; Sezer, Ufuk; Erciyas, Ali Fuat; Ay, Sinan

    2016-10-01

    In this study, different concentrations of boron have been evaluated for genotoxic and antigenotoxic properties by using the somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) on Drosophila melanogaster. The treatment concentrations were chosen to a pretest. Third-instar larvae trans-heterozygous for two genetic markers, multiple wing hair (mwh) and flare (flr3), were treated at different concentrations (0.1, 5, 10, 20, and 40 mg/mL) of boron. In addition to investigating antigenotoxic effects, the same boron concentrations were co-administered with 0.1 mM Ethyl Methane Sulfonate (EMS). Distilled water was used as a negative control; 0.1 mM of EMS was used as a positive control. For the chronic feeding study, small plastic vials were prepared with 1.5 g of dry Drosophila Instant Medium and 5 mL of the respective test solution. Hundreds of trans-heterozygous larvae were embedded into this medium. Feeding ended with pupation of the surviving larvae. After metamorphosis, all surviving flies were collected and stored in a 70% ethanol solution. Preparation and microscopic analyses of wing were made after the treatment. Then the observed mutations were classified according to size and type of mutation per wing. Results indicated that there is no significant genotoxic effect with all of the boron concentrations. In addition, the antigenotoxic activities of boron against EMS were tested. Results indicated that all boron concentrations (0.1, 5, 10, 20 and 40 mg/mL) were able to abolish the genotoxic effects induced by the EMS. It is suggested that the observed effects can be linked to the antioxidant properties of boron. Moreover, these in vivo results will contribute to the antigenotoxicity database of boron.

  20. Protective effect of lactofermented beetroot juice against aberrant crypt foci formation and genotoxicity of fecal water in rats.

    PubMed

    Klewicka, Elżbieta; Nowak, Adriana; Zduńczyk, Zenon; Cukrowska, Bożena; Błasiak, Janusz

    2012-09-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of beetroot juice fermented by Lactobacillus brevis 0944 and Lactobacillus paracasei 0920 (FBJ) on carcinogen induction of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in rat colon. N-Nitroso-N-methylurea (MNU) was used as carcinogen, which was administrated intragastrically at a dose of 50 mg/kg on the 23rd and 26th day of the experiment. Additionally, we investigated the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of fecal water from experimental animals in the Caco 2 cell line, evaluated by MTT/NRU tests and the comet assay, respectively, as well as by the count of bacteria adhered to colon epithelium assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization and DAPI staining. The experimental rats were divided into four groups based on diet type: basal diet, basal diet supplemented with FBJ, basal diet and MNU treatment, and basal diet supplemented with FBJ and MNU treatment. FBJ significantly reduced the number of ACF in MNU-treated rats (from 55±18 to 21±6). Moreover, the number of extensive aberrations (more than 4 crypts in a focus) decreased from 45±21 to 7±4. Fecal water obtained from rats fed with an MNU-containing diet induced pronounced cytotoxic and genotoxic effects in Caco 2 cells, but FBJ supplementation of the diet abolished these effects. The presence of FBJ in the diet significantly increased the count of bacteria, including Lactobacillus/Enterococcus, adhered to colonic epithelium. In conclusion, supplementation of the diet with lactofermented beetroot juice may provide protection against precancerous aberrant crypt formation and reduce the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of fecal water.

  1. SB202190 affects cell response to hydroxyurea-induced genotoxic stress in root meristems of Vicia faba.

    PubMed

    Winnicki, Konrad; Maszewski, Janusz

    2012-11-01

    Genotoxic stress caused by a variety of chemical and physical agents may lead to DNA breaks and genome instability. Response to DNA damage depends on ATM/ATR sensor kinases and their downstream proteins, which arrange cell cycle checkpoints. Activation of ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated)/ATR (ATM and Rad 3-related) signaling pathway triggers cell cycle arrest (by keeping cyclin-Cdk complexes inactive), combined with gamma-phosphorylation of histone H2A.X and induction of DNA repair processes. However, genotoxic stress activates also mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) which may control the functions of checkpoint proteins both directly, by post-translational modifications, or indirectly, by regulation of their expression. Our results indicate that in root meristem cells of Vicia faba, MAP kinase signaling pathway takes part in response to hydroxyurea-induced genotoxic stress. It is shown that SB202190, an inhibitor of p38 MAP kinase, triggers PCC (premature chromosome condensation) more rapidly, but only if cell cycle checkpoints are alleviated by caffeine. Since SB202190 and, independently, caffeine reduces HU-mediated histone H4 Lys5 acetylation, it may be that there is a cooperation of MAP kinase signaling pathways and ATM/ATR-dependent checkpoints during response to genotoxic stress.

  2. Genotoxic effects of camphorquinone and DMT on human oral and intestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Wessels, Miriam; Rimkus, Julia; Leyhausen, Gabriele; Volk, Joachim; Geurtsen, Werner

    2015-10-01

    Released components of oral biomaterials can leach into the oral cavity and may subsequently reach the gastrointestinal tract. Camphorquinone (CQ) is the most common used photoinitiator in resinous restorative materials and is often combined with the co-initiator N,N-dimethyl-p-toluidine (DMT). It has been shown that CQ exerts cytotoxic effects, at least partially due to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Objective of this study was to examine the cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of CQ in human oral keratinocytes (OKF6/TERT2) and immortalized epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma cells (Caco-2). Furthermore, the effects of visible-light irradiation and the co-initiator DMT were investigated as well as the generation of ROS, the potential protective effect of glutathione (GSH) and a recovery period of CQ-treated Caco-2 cells. The alkaline comet assay was used to determine DNA damage. Additionally, an enzyme modified comet assay was applied, which detects 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoguanine), a reliable marker for oxidative stress. Our data revealed that high concentrations of CQ induced DNA lesions in OKF6/TERT2 cells. This DNA damage is at least partly caused by the generation of 8-oxoguanine. In addition, CQ and DMT increased ROS formation and induced DNA damage in Caco-2 cells. CQ-treatment resulted in generation of 8-oxoguanine. The antioxidant GSH efficiently prevented CQ-associated DNA damage. Furthermore, a recovery following CQ-treatment significantly reduced DNA damage. We conclude that CQ-induced DNA damage is caused by oxidative stress in oral and intestinal cells. These lesions can be prevented and possibly repaired by GSH-treatment and recovery of cells after the photoinitiator is removed from cultures. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Anemia and genotoxicity induced by sub-chronic intragastric treatment of rats with titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Grissa, Intissar; Elghoul, Jaber; Ezzi, Lobna; Chakroun, Sana; Kerkeni, Emna; Hassine, Mohsen; El Mir, Lassaad; Mehdi, Meriem; Ben Cheikh, Hassen; Haouas, Zohra

    2015-12-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) are widely used for their whiteness and opacity. We investigated the hematological effects and genotoxicity of anatase TiO2 NPs following sub-chronic oral gavage treatment. TiO2-NPs were characterized by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Wistar rats were treated with anatase TiO2 NPs by intragastric administration for 60 days. Hematological analysis showed a significant decrease in RBC and HCT and a significant increase in MCV, PLT, MPV and WBC at higher doses. Furthermore, abnormally shaped red cells, sometimes containing micronuclei, and hyper-segmented neutrophil nuclei were observed with TiO2 NPs treatment. The micronucleus test revealed damage to chromosomes in rat bone marrow at 100 and 200mg/kg bw; the comet assay showed significant DNA damage at the same doses.

  4. Cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of aqueous extracts of five medicinal plants on Allium cepa Linn.

    PubMed

    Akinboro, A; Bakare, A A

    2007-07-25

    The cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of aqueous extracts of five medicinal plants: Azadirachta indica (A. Juss), Morinda lucida (Benth.), Cymbopogon citratus (DC Stapf.), Mangifera indica (Linn.) and Carica papaya (Linn.) was evaluated using the Allium cepa assay. The extracts were prepared with tap water as practised locally. Onion bulbs were exposed to 1, 5, 10, 25 and 50%; and 1, 2.5, 5, 10 and 20% concentrations (v/v) of each of the extracts for macroscopic and microscopic analyses, respectively. There was concentration-dependent and statistically significant (P<0.05) inhibition of root growth by the extracts when compared with the control. The EC(50) obtained for decoctions of Azadirachta indica. Cymbopogon citratus, Mangifera indica and Carica papaya were 0.6, 3.0, 1.4 and 0.8%, respectively. It was 2.6 and 0.8% for the squeezed extracts of Azadirachta indica and Morinda lucida, respectively. All the tested extracts were observed to have mitodepressive effects on cell division and induced mitotic spindle disturbance in Allium cepa. These results suggest an inhibitory, mitodepressive and turbagenic activities of the aqueous extracts on Allium cepa.

  5. Evaluation of titanium dioxide nanocrystal-induced genotoxicity by the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay and the Drosophila wing spot test.

    PubMed

    Reis, Érica de Melo; Rezende, Alexandre Azenha Alves de; Oliveira, Pollyanna Francielli de; Nicolella, Heloiza Diniz; Tavares, Denise Crispim; Silva, Anielle Christine Almeida; Dantas, Noelio Oliveira; Spanó, Mário Antônio

    2016-10-01

    Titanium dioxide nanocrystals (TiO2 NCs) crystalline structures include anatase, rutile and brookite. This study evaluated the genotoxic effects of 3.4 and 6.2 nm anatase TiO2 NCs and 78.0 nm predominantly rutile TiO2 NCs through an in vitro micronucleus (MN) assay using V79 cells and an in vivo somatic mutation and recombination test in Drosophila wings. The MN assay was performed with nontoxic concentrations of TiO2 NCs. Only anatase (3.4 nm) at the highest concentration (120 μM) induced genotoxicity in V79 cells. In the in vivo test, Drosophila melanogaster larvae obtained from standard (ST) or high bioactivation (HB) crosses were treated with TiO2 NCs. In the ST cross, no mutagenic effects were observed. However, in the HB cross, TiO2 NCs (3.4 nm) were mutagenic at 1.5625 and 3.125 mM, while 78.0 nm NCs increased mutant spots at all concentrations tested except 3.125 mM. Only the smallest anatase TiO2 NCs induced mutagenic effects in vitro and in vivo. For rutile TiO2 NCs, no clastogenic/aneugenic effects were observed in the MN assay. However, they were mutagenic in Drosophila. Therefore, both anatase and rutile TiO2 NCs induced mutagenicity. Further research is necessary to clarify the TiO2 NCs genotoxic/mutagenic action mechanisms.

  6. Modulation of flyash-induced genotoxicity in Vicia faba by vermicomposting.

    PubMed

    Jain, Kavindra; Singh, Jitendra; Chauhan, L K S; Murthy, R C; Gupta, S K

    2004-09-01

    Cytogenetic effects of pre- and postvermicomposted flyash samples were evaluated on the root meristem cells of Vicia faba. Seedlings of V. faba were directly sown in flyash and cow dung-soil mixtures (20%, 40%, 60%, and 80%) and the lateral roots grown in these test mixtures were sampled at 5 days. Negative control was run parallel in cow dung-soil (CS) mixture alone. One set of flyash-cow dung-soil (FCS) mixture was subjected to vermicomposting by introducing Eisenia foetida species of earthworms for 30 days and the cytogenetic effects were reinvestigated through V. faba root meristems. Chemical analysis carried out prior to vermicomposting revealed high concentrations of heavy metals such as Cr, Cu, Pb, Zn, and Ni in FCS samples. CS samples also showed the presence of these metals. Cytogenetic examinations of root meristems exposed to the FCS mixtures showed significant inhibition of mitotic index (MI), induction of chromosome aberrations (CA), and a significantly increased frequency of mitotic aberrations (MA). The increase of the aberrations was dependent on the flyash concentrations. Roots grown in CS samples also showed chromosomal and MAs; however, the percentage was lower than that observed with FCS and also statistically nonsignificant. Cytogenetic analysis of vermicomposted samples of FCS revealed a 15-45% decline in the aberration frequencies whereas chemical analysis showed a 10-50% decline in the metal concentrations, viz. Cr, Cu, Pb, Zn, and Ni, which indicates E. foetida a potential accumulator of heavy metals and the decline in metal concentrations may be the cause of the decrease in aberration frequencies. The present study indicates the genotoxicity potential of flyash and also the feasibility of vermicomposting for cleanup of metal-contaminated soil to mitigate the toxicity/genotoxicity.

  7. Environmental effects of dredging: Methods for the assessment of the genotoxic effects of environmental contaminants. Glossary and references. Technical notes

    SciTech Connect

    Honeycutt, M.E.; Jarvis, A.S.; McFarland, V.A.

    1995-07-01

    This technical note is the third in a series of three that outline and describe the principal methods that have been developed to test the potential of environmental contaminants to cause mutagenic, carcinogenic, and teratogenic effects. The first in this series (EEDP-04-24) describes methods used to discern genotoxic effects at the sub cellular level, while the second (EEDP-04-25) describes methods used to discern genotoxic effects at the cellular and organ/organism level. Recent literature citations for each topic referenced in this series of technical notes are provided in this technical note, in addition to a glossary of terms. The information in these technical notes is intended to provide Corps of Engineers personnel with a working knowledge of the terminology and conceptual basis of genotoxicity testing. To develop an improved understanding of the concepts of genotoxicity, readers are encouraged to review A Primer in Genotoxicity (Jarvis, Reilly, and Lutz 1993), presented in Volume D-93-3 of the Environmental Effects of Dredging information exchange bulletin.

  8. Genotoxic Effects of Culture Media on Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Prakash Bangalore, Megha; Adhikarla, Syama; Mukherjee, Odity; Panicker, Mitradas M.

    2017-01-01

    Culture conditions play an important role in regulating the genomic integrity of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells (HPSCs). We report that HPSCs cultured in Essential 8 (E8) and mTeSR, two widely used media for feeder-free culturing of HPSCs, had many fold higher levels of ROS and higher mitochondrial potential than cells cultured in Knockout Serum Replacement containing media (KSR). HPSCs also exhibited increased levels of 8-hydroxyguanosine, phospho-histone-H2a.X and p53, as well as increased sensitivity to γ-irradiation in these two media. HPSCs in E8 and mTeSR had increased incidence of changes in their DNA sequence, indicating genotoxic stress, in addition to changes in nucleolar morphology and number. Addition of antioxidants to E8 and mTeSR provided only partial rescue. Our results suggest that it is essential to determine cellular ROS levels in addition to currently used criteria i.e. pluripotency markers, differentiation into all three germ layers and normal karyotype through multiple passages, in designing culture media. PMID:28176872

  9. Genotoxic effects of the alkaloids harman and harmine assessed by comet assay and chromosome aberration test in mammalian cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Boeira, J M; da Silva, J; Erdtmann, B; Henriques, J A

    2001-12-01

    Harman and harmine are beta-carboline alkaloids which are present in plants widely used in medical practice, in beverages used for religious purposes in Brazil, as well as in tobacco smoke and over cooked food. In view of the controversial results observed in the literature about the mutagenic effects of these alkaloids, we studied their cytotoxic and genotoxic effects in V79 Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts in vitro using single-cell gel assay, Comet assay, either in the presence or in absence of an exogenous metabolic activation system (S9-mix), and by the chromosome aberration test without S9-mix. Harmine was more cytotoxic than harman. Both harman and harmine increased aberrant cell frequency and induced DNA damage by the Comet assay. These results suggest that harman and harmine are genotoxic in V79 cells, probably as a consequence of their ability to induce DNA strand breaks.

  10. Textile effluents induce biomarkers of acute toxicity, oxidative stress, and genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Grinevicius, Valdelúcia M A S; Geremias, Reginaldo; Laus, Rogério; Bettega, Karina F; Laranjeiras, Mauro C M; Fávere, Valfredo T; Wilhelm Filho, Danilo; Pedrosa, Rozangela C

    2009-08-01

    The present work consists of a comparative evaluation of the toxicity of a nonremediated textile effluent (NRTE) with an effluent remediated by a pulverized chitosan system (RCTS) or by a conventional effluent process (remediated biologic and physico-chemical effluent [RBPC]). Acute toxicity assays, oxidative stress biomarkers, physico-chemical parameters, and genotoxicity indices were analyzed to achieve the toxicity of all effluents. After RCTS treatment, approximately 80% of dyes were removed, together with a significant decreased of the metal content, compared with a relatively increase in metal content after RBPC treatment. RBPC and RCTS treatments did not cause acute toxicity to Vibrio fischeri and Artemia sp., whereas RBPC caused acute toxicity to Daphnia magna but RCTS did not. Compared with NRTE, chitosan remediation decreased oxidative stress biomarkers, such as the contents of lipoperoxidation (measured as thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances [TBARS], 29.9%) and the reduced form of glutathione (GSH; 73.5%) levels in D. rerio, whereas animals exposed to RBPC showed enhanced TBARS (57.2%) and decreased GSH concentrations (56.4%). RCTS and RBPC remediation elicited catalase activity induction (161.8% and 127.3%, respectively) compared with NRTE. Accordingly, DNA fragmentation and micronucleus frequency in D. rerio decreased after remediation with RBPC or RCTS compared with NRTE, but RCTS treatment was more effective than RBPC in decreasing genotoxicity (90.5% and 73.8% decrease in DNA fragmentation and 67.8% and 50.4% decrease in micronucleus frequency, respectively). The results indicate that chitosan adsorption system is a useful tool for textile effluent remediation compared with the conventional remediation by biologic and physico-chemical processes.

  11. Determination of genotoxic effects of Imazethapyr herbicide in Allium cepa root cells by mitotic activity, chromosome aberration, and comet assay.

    PubMed

    Liman, Recep; Ciğerci, İbrahim Hakkı; Öztürk, Nur Serap

    2015-02-01

    Imazethapyr (IM) is an imidazolinone herbicide that is currently used for broad-spectrum weed control in soybean and other legume crops. In this study, cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of IM were investigated by using mitotic index (MI), mitotic phases, chromosomal abnormalities (CAs) and DNA damage on the root meristem cells of Allium cepa. In Allium root growth inhibition test, EC50 value was determined as 20 ppm, and 0.5xEC50, EC50 and 2xEC50 concentrations of IM herbicide were introduced to onion tuber roots. Distilled water and methyl methane sulfonate (MMS, 10 mg/L) were used as a negative and positive control, respectively. As A. cepa cell cycle is 24 hours, so, application process was carried out for 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours. All the applied doses decreased MIs compared to control group and these declines were found to be statistically meaningful. Analysis of the chromosomes showed that 10 ppm IM except for 48 h induced CAs but 40 ppm IM except for 72 h decreased CAs. DNA damage was found significantly higher in 20 and 40 ppm of IM compared to the control in comet assay. These results indicated that IM herbicide exhibits cytotoxic activity but not genotoxic activity (except 10 ppm) and induced DNA damage in a dose dependent manner in A. cepa root meristematic cells.

  12. An evidence-based review of the genotoxic and reproductive effects of sulfur mustard.

    PubMed

    Khan, Fazlullah; Niaz, Kamal; Ismail Hassan, Fatima; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2017-03-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a chemical warfare agent which is cytotoxic in nature, and at the molecular level, SM acts as DNA alkylating agent leading to genotoxic and reproductive effects. Mostly, the exposed areas of the body are the main targets for SM; however, it also adversely affects various tissues of the body and ultimately exhibits long-term complications including genotoxic and reproductive effects, even in the next generations. The effect of SM on reproductive system is the reason behind male infertility. The chronic genotoxic and reproductive complications of SM have been observed in the next generation, such as reproductive hormones disturbances, testicular atrophy, deficiency of sperm cells, retarded growth of sperm and male infertility. SM exerts toxic effects through various mechanisms causing reproductive dysfunction. The key mechanisms include DNA alkylation, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) depletion. However, the exact molecular mechanism of such long-term effects of SM is still unclear. In general, DNA damage, cell death and defects in the cell membrane are frequently observed in SM-exposed individuals. SM can activate various cellular and molecular mechanisms related to oxidative stress (OS) and inflammatory responses throughout the reproductive system, which can cause decreased spermatogenesis and impaired sperm quality via damage to tissue function and structure. Moreover, the toxic effects of SM on the reproductive system as well as the occurrence of male infertility among exposed war troopers in the late exposure phase is still uncertain. The chronic effects of SM exposure in parents can cause congenital defects in their children. In this review, we aimed to investigate chronic genotoxic and reproductive effects of SM and their molecular mechanisms in the next generations.

  13. No-observed effect levels for carcinogenicity and for in vivo mutagenicity of a genotoxic carcinogen.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, Manabu; Morimura, Keiichirou; Wanibuchi, Hideki; Wei, Min; Okochi, Eriko; Ushijima, Toshikazu; Takaoka, Kunio; Fukushima, Shoji

    2004-10-01

    To elucidate the relationship between in vivo carcinogenic and mutagenic potentials of genotoxic carcinogens, low doses were tested in the livers of Big Blue transgenic rats with 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx). Male Big Blue rats were fed a diet containing 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1, 10, or 100 ppm of MeIQx for 16 weeks, and the frequencies of lacI mutants and glutathione S-transferase placental form (GST-P) positive foci in the liver were determined. The mutation frequencies significantly increased at doses of 10 and 100 ppm, and GST-P positive foci significantly increased at a dose of 100 ppm. However, no statistical increases in both frequencies were observed at lower doses. MeIQx most frequently induced G frameshifts, followed by G to T transversions. Thus, no observed effect level (NOEL) was demonstrated for both carcinogenicity in terms of preneoplastic lesion induction and in vivo mutagenicity of MeIQx, and the NOEL for in vivo mutagenicity was lower than that for carcinogenicity.

  14. Diversity Outbred Mice Identify Population-Based Exposure Thresholds and Genetic Factors that Influence Benzene-Induced Genotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Gatti, Daniel M.; Morgan, Daniel L.; Kissling, Grace E.; Shockley, Keith R.; Knudsen, Gabriel A.; Shepard, Kim G.; Price, Herman C.; King, Deborah; Witt, Kristine L.; Pedersen, Lars C.; Munger, Steven C.; Svenson, Karen L.; Churchill, Gary A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Inhalation of benzene at levels below the current exposure limit values leads to hematotoxicity in occupationally exposed workers. Objective We sought to evaluate Diversity Outbred (DO) mice as a tool for exposure threshold assessment and to identify genetic factors that influence benzene-induced genotoxicity. Methods We exposed male DO mice to benzene (0, 1, 10, or 100 ppm; 75 mice/exposure group) via inhalation for 28 days (6 hr/day for 5 days/week). The study was repeated using two independent cohorts of 300 animals each. We measured micronuclei frequency in reticulocytes from peripheral blood and bone marrow and applied benchmark concentration modeling to estimate exposure thresholds. We genotyped the mice and performed linkage analysis. Results We observed a dose-dependent increase in benzene-induced chromosomal damage and estimated a benchmark concentration limit of 0.205 ppm benzene using DO mice. This estimate is an order of magnitude below the value estimated using B6C3F1 mice. We identified a locus on Chr 10 (31.87 Mb) that contained a pair of overexpressed sulfotransferases that were inversely correlated with genotoxicity. Conclusions The genetically diverse DO mice provided a reproducible response to benzene exposure. The DO mice display interindividual variation in toxicity response and, as such, may more accurately reflect the range of response that is observed in human populations. Studies using DO mice can localize genetic associations with high precision. The identification of sulfotransferases as candidate genes suggests that DO mice may provide additional insight into benzene-induced genotoxicity. Citation French JE, Gatti DM, Morgan DL, Kissling GE, Shockley KR, Knudsen GA, Shepard KG, Price HC, King D, Witt KL, Pedersen LC, Munger SC, Svenson KL, Churchill GA. 2015. Diversity Outbred mice identify population-based exposure thresholds and genetic factors that influence benzene-induced genotoxicity. Environ Health Perspect 123:237

  15. Inhibition of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine induced colon genotoxicity in rats by the administration of probiotic curd.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arvind; Singh, Nikhlesh Kumar; Sinha, Pushpalata Rabindra

    2010-03-01

    Epidemiologic and experimental studies suggest that the probiotic organisms are effective in preventing colon carcinogenesis, which is the major cause of mortality and morbidity in western countries. Keeping this in view, a curd (a common Indian fermented milk product) was prepared by the addition of probiotic cultures Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei and curd culture Lactococcus lactis biovar. diacetylactis. In present study, we have evaluated the anti tumor effect of probiotic curd by monitoring the DNA damage through comet assay. The rats were allocated to four groups, first group was DMH control group, second group was probiotic curd group in which probiotic curd was given along with DMH (1,2-dimethylhydrazine) injection, third group was normal curd group in which normal curd was given along with DMH injection and fourth group was normal control group. Animals received subcutaneous injection of DMH dissolved in normal saline at a dose rate of 20 mg/kg body weight, once weekly for 15 weeks. The rats were dissected at 40th week of experiment and comet assay was done in colonic cells to assess the DNA damage. A significant reduction in DNA damage (54.7%) was observed in probiotic curd group as compared to DMH control group (88.1%). The probiotic curd was effective to significantly reduce the L:W ratio in comparison to DMH control group and normal curd. The results of present study show the protective effects of probiotic curd against DMH induced genotoxicity in colonic cells.

  16. Potential anti-genotoxic effect of sodium butyrate to modulate induction of DNA damage by tamoxifen citrate in rat bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    El-Shorbagy, Haidan M

    2017-02-01

    Sodium butyrate (SB) is one of the histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi's) that is recently evidenced to have a prooxidant activity and an ability to reduce hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage. Since the majority of estrogen receptor positive breast cancer patients are treated with tamoxifen citrate (TC), which exerts well established oxidative and genotoxic effects, thus the basic objective of this study is to determine whether SB could ameliorate or curate tamoxifen citrate-induced oxidative DNA damage and genotoxic effect in vivo through up-regulation of some antioxidant enzymes. The individual and combined effects of SB and TC have been examined on rat bone marrow cells, using Micronucleus assays (MN), Comet assay, DNA fragmentation, expression of some antioxidant genes using Real time-PCR and finally, oxidative stress analysis. SB significantly increased the mitotic activity (P < 0.05), while TC induced marked micronuclei and oxidative DNA damage, in the SB post-treatment group, the combination of SB (300 mg/kg) and TC (40 mg/kg) was able to decrease the induction of MN and oxidative DNA damage through up-regulation of Cat, Sod and Gpx1 genes significantly at (P < 0.05) more efficiently than that in the SB pre-treatment one. Therefore, we postulate that SB can be used therapeutically in combination with TC treatment to modulate TC genotoxic effect by reducing its oxidative stress, and thus being an appropriate agonist agent to combine with TC than each compound alone.

  17. Effects of boric acid and borax on titanium dioxide genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Turkez, Hasan

    2008-07-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) is a potential carcinogenic/mutagenic agent although it is used in many areas including medical industries and cosmetics. Boron (as boric acid and borax) has also well-described biological effects and therapeutic benefits. In a previous study, sister-chromatid exchanges (SCEs) and micronuclei (MN) rates were assessed in control and TiO(2)-treated (1, 2, 3, 5, 7.5 and 10 microm) human whole blood cultures. The results showed that the rates of SCE (at 2, 3, 5, 7.5 and 10 microm) and MN (at 5, 7.5 and 10 microm) formation in peripheral lymphocytes were increased significantly by TiO(2) compared with the controls. The present study also investigated the genetic effects of boric acid and borax (2.5, 5 and 10 microm) on cultures with and without TiO(2) addition. No significant increase in SCE and MN frequencies were observed at all concentrations of boron compounds. However, TiO(2)-induced SCE and MN could be reduced significantly by the presence of boric acid and borax. In conclusion, this study indicated for the first time that boric acid and borax led to an increased resistance of DNA to damage induced by TiO(2). 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd

  18. Cytotoxic and Genotoxic effects of Arsenic and Lead on Human Adipose Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells (AMSCs).

    PubMed

    Shakoori, Ar; Ahmad, A

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic and lead, known to have genotoxic and mutagenic effects, are ubiquitously distributed in the environment. The presence of arsenic in drinking water has been a serious health problem in many countries. Human exposure to these metals has also increased due to rapid industrialization and their use in formulation of many products. Liposuction material is a rich source of stem cells. In the present study cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of these metals were tested on adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells (AMSCs). Cells were exposed to 1-10 μg/ml and 10-100 μg/ml concentration of arsenic and lead, respectively, for 6, 12, 24 and 48 h. The cytotoxic effects were measured by neutral red uptake assay, while the genotoxic effects were tested by comet assay. The growth of cells decreased with increasing concentration and the duration of exposure to arsenic. Even the morphology of cells was changed; they became round at 10 μg /ml of arsenic. The cell growth was also decreased after exposure to lead, though it proved to be less toxic when cells were exposed for longer duration. The cell morphology remained unchanged. DNA damage was observed in the metal treated cells. Different parameters of comet assay were investigated for control and treated cells which indicated more DNA damage in arsenic treated cells compared to that of lead. Intact nuclei were observed in control cells. Present study clearly demonstrates that both arsenic and lead have cytotoxic and genotoxic effects on AMSCs, though arsenic compared to lead has more deleterious effects on AMSCs.

  19. Cytotoxic and Genotoxic effects of Arsenic and Lead on Human Adipose Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells (AMSCs)

    PubMed Central

    Shakoori, AR; Ahmad, A

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic and lead, known to have genotoxic and mutagenic effects, are ubiquitously distributed in the environment. The presence of arsenic in drinking water has been a serious health problem in many countries. Human exposure to these metals has also increased due to rapid industrialization and their use in formulation of many products. Liposuction material is a rich source of stem cells. In the present study cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of these metals were tested on adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells (AMSCs). Cells were exposed to 1-10 μg/ml and 10-100 μg/ml concentration of arsenic and lead, respectively, for 6, 12, 24 and 48 h. The cytotoxic effects were measured by neutral red uptake assay, while the genotoxic effects were tested by comet assay. The growth of cells decreased with increasing concentration and the duration of exposure to arsenic. Even the morphology of cells was changed; they became round at 10 μg /ml of arsenic. The cell growth was also decreased after exposure to lead, though it proved to be less toxic when cells were exposed for longer duration. The cell morphology remained unchanged. DNA damage was observed in the metal treated cells. Different parameters of comet assay were investigated for control and treated cells which indicated more DNA damage in arsenic treated cells compared to that of lead. Intact nuclei were observed in control cells. Present study clearly demonstrates that both arsenic and lead have cytotoxic and genotoxic effects on AMSCs, though arsenic compared to lead has more deleterious effects on AMSCs. PMID:24693207

  20. Silica nanoparticles and biological dispersants: genotoxic effects on A549 lung epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, David M.; Varet, Julia; Johnston, Helinor; Chrystie, Alison; Stone, Vicki

    2015-10-01

    Silica nanoparticle exposure could be intentional (e.g. medical application or food) or accidental (e.g. occupational inhalation). On entering the body, particles become coated with specific proteins depending on the route of entry. The ability of silica particles of different size and charge (non-functionalized 50 and 200 nm and aminated 50 and 200 nm) to cause genotoxic effects in A549 lung epithelial cells was investigated. Using the modified comet assay and the micronucleus assay, we examined the effect of suspending the particles in different dispersion media [RPMI or Hanks' balanced salt solution (HBSS), supplemented with bovine serum albumin (BSA), lung lining fluid (LLF) or serum] to determine if this influenced the particle's activity. Particle characterisation suggested that the particles were reasonably well dispersed in the different media, with the exception of aminated 50 nm particles which showed evidence of agglomeration. Plain 50, 200 nm and aminated 50 nm particles caused significant genotoxic effects in the presence of formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase when dispersed in HBSS or LLF. These effects were reduced when the particles were dispersed in BSA and serum. There was no significant micronucleus formation produced by any of the particles when suspended in any of the dispersants. The data suggest that silica particles can produce a significant genotoxic effect according to the comet assay in A549 cells, possibly driven by an oxidative stress-dependent mechanism which may be modified depending on the choice of dispersant employed.

  1. Genotoxic Effects of Superconducting Static Magnetic Fields (SMFs) on Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Pollen Mother Cells (PMCs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pingping; Yin, Ruochun; Chen, Zhiyou; Wu, Lifang; Yu, Zengliang

    2007-04-01

    The effects of superconducting static magnetic fields (SMFs) on the pollen mother cells (PMCs) of wheat were investigated in order to evaluate the possible genotoxic effect of such non-ionizing radiation. The seeds of wheat were exposed to static magnetic fields with either different magnetic flux densities (0, 1, 3, 5 and 7 Tesla) for 5 h or different durations (1, 3 and 5 h) at a magnetic flux density of 7 Tesla. The seeds were germinated at 23oC after exposure and the seedlings were transplanted into the field. The PMCs from young wheat ears were taken and slides were made following the conventional method. The genotoxic effect was evaluated in terms of micronucleus (MN), chromosomal bridge, lagging chromosome and fragments in PMCs. Although the exposed groups of a low field intensity (below 5 Tesla) showed no statistically significant difference in the aberration frequency compared with the unexposed control groups and sham exposed groups, a significant increase in the chromosomal bridge, lagging chromosome, triple-polar segregation or micronucleus was observed at a field strength of 5 Tesla or 7 Tesla, respectively. The analysis of dose-effect relationships indicated that the increased frequency of meiotic abnormal cells correlated with the flux density of the magnetic field and duration, but no linear relationship was observed. Such statistically significant differences indicated a potential genotoxic effect of high static magnetic fields above 5 T.

  2. Genotoxic effects of water from São Francisco River, Brazil, in Astyanax paranae.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Diego Luis; Barcelos, Gustavo Rafael Mazzaron; d'Arce, Luciana Paula Grégio

    2014-09-01

    Aquatic monitoring is an important tool for identifying potential compounds in rivers that may damage the environment. Here, we evaluate the potential genotoxic effects of water samples from São Francisco River (Brazil) using the micronuclei (MN) assay in resident species, Astyanax paranae. Four seasonal collections occurred between the years 2009 and 2010, at three locations between two nearby cities in the region. It was clearly observed an increase of MN frequency in fish caught in the river. This result is most likely due to the sewage contamination from the treatment plant, the waste pesticides from crops and the lack of riparian vegetation along the river, especially during the winter when there was a significant increase in the frequencies of MN. These results indicate that compounds in waters from São Francisco River may have genotoxic effects and consequently, cause damage to the environment as well as to human health.

  3. Comparison of genotoxic and inflammatory effects of particles generated by wood combustion, a road simulator and collected from street and subway.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Hanna L; Ljungman, Anders G; Lindbom, John; Möller, Lennart

    2006-09-10

    The health effects of exposure to airborne particles are of increasing concern in society. In order to protect public health, a clarification of the toxic properties of particles from different sources is of importance. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the genotoxicity and the ability to induce inflammatory mediators of nine different particle types from wood and pellets combustion, from tire-road wear and collected from an urban street and a subway station. The comet assay was used to assess genotoxicity after exposure of the human lung cell line A549. Inflammatory effects were measured as induction of IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-alpha after exposure of human macrophages. We found that all particles tested caused DNA damage and those from the subway caused more damage than the other particles (p<0.001) likely due to redox-active iron. In contrast, particles collected from an urban street were most potent to induce inflammatory cytokines. Particles from tire-road wear collected using a road simulator were genotoxic and able to induce cytokines. Finally, more effective combustion of wood led to less emission of particles, but those emitted did not show less toxicity in this study.

  4. Genotoxic effects of vinclozolin on the aquatic insect Chironomus riparius (Diptera, Chironomidae).

    PubMed

    Aquilino, Mónica; Sánchez-Argüello, Paloma; Martínez-Guitarte, José-Luis

    2017-10-05

    Vinclozolin (Vz) is a pollutant found in aquatic environments whose antiandrogenic effects in reproduction are well known in mammals. Although its reproductive effects have been less studied in invertebrates, other effects, including genotoxicity, have been described. Therefore, in this work, we studied the genotoxic effects of Vz in the freshwater benthic invertebrate Chironomus riparius. DNA damage was evaluated with the comet assay (tail area, olive moment, tail moment and % DNA in tail), and the transcriptional levels of different genes involved in DNA repair (ATM, NLK and XRCC1) and apoptosis (DECAY) were measured by RT-PCR. Fourth instar larvae of C. riparius, were exposed to Vz for 24 h at 20 and 200 μg/L. The Vz exposures affected the DNA integrity in this organism, since a dose-response relationship occurred, with DNA strand breaks significantly increased with increased dose for tail area, olive moment and tail moment parameters. Additionally, the lower concentration of Vz produced a significant induction of the transcripts of three genes under study (ATM, NLK and XRCC1) showing the activation of the cellular repair mechanism. In contrast, the expression of these genes with the highest concentration were downregulated, indicating failure of the cellular repair mechanism, which would explain the higher DNA damage. These data report for the first time the alterations of Vz on gene transcription of an insect and confirm the potential genotoxicity of this compound on freshwater invertebrates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The Combined Toxic and Genotoxic Effects of Cd and As to Plant Bioindicator Trifolium repens L

    PubMed Central

    Ghiani, Alessandra; Fumagalli, Pietro; Nguyen Van, Tho; Gentili, Rodolfo; Citterio, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate combined toxic and genotoxic effects of cadmium (Cd) and arsenic (As) on white clover, a pollutant sensitive plant frequently used as environmental bioindicator. Plants were exposed to soil spiked with increasing concentrations of cadmium sulfate (20, 40 and 60 mg Kg−1) or sodium arsenite (5, 10 and 20 mg Kg−1) as well as with their combinations. Metal(loid) bioavailability was assessed after soil contamination, whereas plant growth, metal(loid) concentration in plant organs and DNA damage were measured at the end of plant exposition. Results showed that individual and joint toxicity and genotoxicity were related to the concentration of Cd and As measured in plant organs, and that As concentration was the most relevant variable. Joint effects on plant growth were additive or synergistic, whereas joint genotoxic effects were additive or antagonistic. The interaction between Cd and As occurred at both soil and plant level. In soil the presence of As limited the bioavailability of Cd, whereas the presence of Cd increased the bioavailability of As. Nevertheless only As biovailability determined the amount of As absorbed by plants. The amount of Cd absorbed by plant was not linearly correlated with the fraction of bioavailable Cd in soil suggesting the involvement of additional factors, such as plant uptake mechanisms. These results reveal that the simultaneous presence in soil of Cd and As, although producing an additive or synergistic toxic effect on Trifolium repens L. growth, generates a lower DNA damage. PMID:24914541

  6. The genotoxic effects of benzo[a]pyrene and methamidophos on black porgy evaluated by comet assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rixian; Hong, Huasheng; Wang, Xinhong; Wang, Kejian; Wang, Chunguang

    2005-12-01

    In this study, two common pollutants (benzo[a]pyrene and methamidophos) in marine environment were tested by comet assay for their inducement of in vivo genotoxic effect to the blood cells of black porgy ( Acanthopagrus schlegeli). The fish was exposed to 2 μg/L of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) and methamidophos, and their mixture. The assay was performed on whole blood at 2 h, 5 h, 24 h and 96 h exposure intervals. A significant increase in DNA damage was observed in each treatment with the pollutants. Additive effect of BaP and methamidophos was also found in the experiment. However, the decrease ratios of DNA damage for 5 h and 96 h exposure interals compared with 2 h and 24 h exposure ones, respectively, were noticed. This phenomenon may be explained by the function of repairing process via enzyme cytochrome P450 in the animal. Evidence of the genotoxicity of organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) on marine fish are discussed in this paper.

  7. Control and target gene selection for studies on UV-induced genotoxicity in whales

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    on the capacity of wildlife to resolve or limit UV-induced damage. The proposed target genes are HSP70, P53 and KIN, known to be involved in genotoxic stress pathways, and whose expression patterns can be accurately assessed by using two stable control genes, RPL4 and RPS18. PMID:23837727

  8. Control and target gene selection for studies on UV-induced genotoxicity in whales.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Levasseur, Laura M; Gendron, Diane; Knell, Robert J; Acevedo-Whitehouse, Karina

    2013-07-09

    resolve or limit UV-induced damage. The proposed target genes are HSP70, P53 and KIN, known to be involved in genotoxic stress pathways, and whose expression patterns can be accurately assessed by using two stable control genes, RPL4 and RPS18.

  9. Anti-genotoxic effects in mice after the interaction between coffee and dietary constituents.

    PubMed

    Abraham, S K

    1996-01-01

    The interaction between coffee (100 mg freeze-dried home brew/kg body weight) and dietary constituents was assessed for anti-genotoxic effects against cyclophosphamide, N-methyl-N-nitro-N- nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), N-nitroso-N-ethylurea, mitomycin C and urethane (URE) in the mouse bone marrow micronucleus test. Combinations of dietary constituents consisting of (1) chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, ellagic acid and ferulic acid, (2) beta-carotene, curcumin and alpha-tocopherol, (3) chlorogenic acid, curcumin, alpha-tocopherol, anethole and eugenol, and (4) beta-carotene, curcumin, ellagic acid and chlorogenic acid were used in this study. Before the genotoxin was injected i.p., identical groups of mice were orally administered either vehicle control, coffee, dietary constituents, or coffee plus dietary constituents. Co-administration of coffee with the dietary constituents enhanced the anti-genotoxic effect compared with that of either coffee or the dietary constituents alone. Two-factor analysis of variance of the data suggests that there is a significant synergistic interaction between coffee and the dietary constituents for anti-genotoxic effects against MNNG (combination 1 and 2) and URE (combination 4).

  10. Genotoxic effects of water pollution on two fish species living in Karasu River, Erzurum, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Yazıcı, Zehra; Sişman, Turgay

    2014-11-01

    Karasu River, which is the only river in the Erzurum plain, is the source of the Euphrates River (Eastern Anatolia of Turkey). The river is in a serious environmental situation as a result of pollution by agricultural and industrial sewage and domestic discharges. The present study aims to evaluate genotoxic effects of toxic metals in chub, Leuciscus cephalus, and transcaucasian barb, Capoeta capoeta, collected from contaminated site of the Karasu River, in comparison with fish from an unpolluted reference site. Heavy metal concentrations in surface water of the river were determined. The condition factor (CF) was taken as a general biomarker of the health of the fish, and genotoxicity assays such as micronucleus (MN) and other nuclear abnormalities (NA) were carried out on the fish species studied. MN and NA such as kidney-shaped nucleus, notched nucleus, binucleated, lobed nucleus, and blebbed nucleus were assessed in peripheral blood erythrocytes, gill epithelial cells, and liver cells of the fish. A significant decrease in CF values associated with a significant elevation in MN and NA frequencies was observed in fish collected from the polluted sites compared with those from the reference site. Results of the current study show the significance of integrating a set of biomarkers to identify the effects of anthropogenic pollution. High concentrations of heavy metals have a potential genotoxic effects, and the toxicity is possibly related to industrial, agricultural, and domestic activities.

  11. Inhibition of cadmium- induced genotoxicity and histopathological changes in Nile tilapia fish by Egyptian and Tunisian montmorillonite clay.

    PubMed

    Mahrous, Karima F; Hassan, Aziza M; Radwan, Hasnaa A; Mahmoud, M A

    2015-09-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is an important inorganic toxicant widely distributed in the environment because of its various industrial uses. The aims of the current study were to investigate the efficacy of purified Egyptian and Tunisian montmorillonite clays (EMC and TMC) to inhibit genotoxicity and histological alterations induced by cadmium chloride (CdCl2) utilizing the Nile tilapia fish as an in vivo model. Chromosomal aberrations (CAs), micronucleus (MN) frequencies and DNA fingerprinting profile were genotoxic end points and histopathological changes that were used in this investigation. Six groups of fish were treated for 2 weeks and included control group, CdCl2-treated group and groups treated with EMC or TMC alone or in combination with CdCl2. The present results revealed that, treatment of fish with CdCl2 exhibited significant increased in the number of micronucleated erythrocytes (MnRBCs), frequency of CAs and instability of genomic DNA. Treatment of EMC and TMC in combination with CdCl2 significantly reduced the frequency of MnRBCs by the percentage of 53.28% and 60.77% and the frequency of CAs by 43.91% and 52.17% respectively. As well as, normalized DNA fingerprinting profile and significantly improved histopathological picture induced by Cadmium treatment. It is worth mention that both clays have the ability to tightly bind CdCl2 and decreased its cytotoxicity and genotoxicity; however, Tunisian clay was more efficient in binding with the CdCl2 than Egyptian clay.

  12. Genotoxic effects of Bismuth (III) oxide nanoparticles by Allium and Comet assay.

    PubMed

    Liman, Recep

    2013-09-01

    Genotoxic effects of Bismuth (III) oxide nanoparticles (BONPs) were investigated on the root cells of Allium cepa by Allium and Comet assay. A. cepa roots were treated with the aqueous dispersions of BONPs at five different concentrations (12.5, 25, 50, 75, and 100ppm) for 4h. Exposure of BONPs significantly increased mitotic index (MI) except 12.5ppm, total chromosomal aberrations (CAs) in Allium test. While stickiness chromosome laggards, disturbed anaphase-telophase and anaphase bridges were observed in anaphase-telophase cells, pro-metaphase and c-metaphase in other cells. A significant increase in DNA damage was also observed at all concentrations of BONPs except 12.5ppm by Comet assay. The results were also analyzed statistically by using SPSS for Windows; Duncan's multiple range test was performed. These results indicate that BONPs exhibit genotoxic activity in A. cepa root meristematic cells.

  13. Single Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation Induces Genotoxicity in Adult Zebrafish and its Non-Irradiated Progeny.

    PubMed

    Lemos, J; Neuparth, T; Trigo, M; Costa, P; Vieira, D; Cunha, L; Ponte, F; Costa, P S; Metello, L F; Carvalho, A P

    2017-02-01

    This study investigated to what extent a single exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation can induce genotoxic damage in irradiated adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) and its non-irradiated F1 progeny. Four groups of adult zebrafish were irradiated with a single dose of X-rays at 0 (control), 100, 500 and 1000 mGy, respectively, and couples of each group were allowed to reproduce following irradiation. Blood of parental fish and whole-body offspring were analysed by the comet assay for detection of DNA damage. The level of DNA damage in irradiated parental fish increased in a radiation dose-dependent manner at day 1 post-irradiation, but returned to the control level thereafter. The level of DNA damage in the progeny was directly correlated with the parental irradiation dose. Results highlight the genotoxic risk of a single exposure to low-dose ionizing radiation in irradiated individuals and also in its non-irradiated progeny.

  14. Genotoxic effects of commercial formulations of Chlorpyrifos and Tebuconazole on green algae.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Ricardo Santiago; Di Marzio, Walter Darío; Sáenz, María Elena

    2015-01-01

    The alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis assay (comet assay) was used for the study of the genotoxic effects of insecticide Chlorpyrifos and fungicide Tebuconazole (commercial formulations) on two freshwater green algae species, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Nannocloris oculata, after 24 h of exposure. The percentage of DNA in tail of migrating nucleoids was taken as an endpoint of DNA impairment. Cell viability was measured by fluorometric detection of chlorophyll "a" in vivo and the determination of cell auto-fluorescence. Only the higher concentration of Chlorpyrifos tested resulted to affect significantly the cell viability of P. subcapitata, whereas cells of N. oculata were not affected. Tebuconazole assayed concentrations (3 and 6 mg/l) did not affect cell viability of both species. The results of comet assay on P. subcapitata showed that Chlorpyrifos concentration evaluated (0.8 mg/l) exerted a genotoxic effects; while for the other specie a concentration of 10 mg/l was needed. Tebuconazole was genotoxic at 3 and 6 mg/l for both species. The comet assay evidenced damage at the level of DNA simple strains molecule at pesticide concentrations were cytotoxicity was not evident, demonstrating that algae are models to take into account in ecological risk assessments for aquatic environments.

  15. In vitro evaluation of genotoxic effects under magnetic resonant coupling wireless power transfer.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Kohei; Shinohara, Naoki; Miyakoshi, Junji

    2015-04-07

    Wireless power transfer (WPT) technology using the resonant coupling phenomenon has been widely studied, but there are very few studies concerning the possible relationship between WPT exposure and human health. In this study, we investigated whether exposure to magnetic resonant coupling WPT has genotoxic effects on WI38VA13 subcloned 2RA human fibroblast cells. WPT exposure was performed using a helical coil-based exposure system designed to transfer power with 85.4% efficiency at a 12.5-MHz resonant frequency. The magnetic field at the positions of the cell culture dishes is approximately twice the reference level for occupational exposure as stated in the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) guidelines. The specific absorption rate at the positions of the cell culture dishes matches the respective reference levels stated in the ICNIRP guidelines. For assessment of genotoxicity, we studied cell growth, cell cycle distribution, DNA strand breaks using the comet assay, micronucleus formation, and hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene mutation, and did not detect any significant effects between the WPT-exposed cells and control cells. Our results suggest that WPT exposure under the conditions of the ICNIRP guidelines does not cause detectable cellular genotoxicity.

  16. Environmental effects of dredging, initial comparisons of six assays for the assessment of sediment genotoxicity. Technical note

    SciTech Connect

    McFarland, V.A.; Honeycutt, M.; Jarvis, S.

    1995-01-01

    This technical note reports and compares initial results of six genotoxicity bioassays applied to dredged sediments and describes progress toward development of a testing protocol to aid in regulatory decisionmaking when genotoxic chemicals are an issue of concern. The Long-term Effects of Dredging Operations Program work unit Genotoxicity of Contaminated Dredged Material was initiated in fiscal year 1990 to develop methods for assessing the genotoxic potential of dredged sediments. The impetus driving this new research and development effort was specific regulatory language in section 103 of the Ocean Dumping Act (Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act (MPRSA) of 1972) prohibiting the open-water discharge of mutagenic, carcinogenic, or teratogenic substances in other than trace amounts, and language less specific but of similar intent in section 404 of the Clean Water Act (CWA).

  17. Detection of genotoxic effects of heavy metal contaminated soils with plant bioassays.

    PubMed

    Knasmüller, S; Gottmann, E; Steinkellner, H; Fomin, A; Pickl, C; Paschke, A; Göd, R; Kundi, M

    1998-12-03

    Aim of the present study was the development of a bioassay which enables the detection of genotoxic effects of heavy metal contaminated soils. In the first part of the present study, the data base on metal effects in plant bioassays was extended. Four metal salts, namely Cr(VI)O3, Cr(III)Cl3, Ni(II)Cl2 and Sb(III)Cl3 were tested comparatively in MN tests with pollen tetrad cells of Tradescantia clone #4430 and in meristematic root tip cells of Vicia faba. With Cr6+ and Ni2+, clear-cut dose-effects were observed in a range between 0.75 and 10.0 mM, whereas this was not the case with Cr3+ (range tested 1.25-10 mM) and Sb3+ (range 0.30-5.25 mM). In Vicia, negative results were obtained with the four metal salts under all conditions of test. To compare the mutagenic potencies of the metals, the increases of the regression curves (k-values) were calculated, they indicate the number of MN induced per mM in 100 tetrad cells. The corresponding values for Cr6+ and Ni2+ are 0.87 and 1.05, respectively. It appears that the Tradescantia system is in particular sensitive towards those metal species which cause DNA damage in animals and man such as Cr6+, Cd2+, Ni2+, and Zn2+, whereas no clear positive results were obtained with less harmful metal ions such as Cu2+, Cr3+ or Sb3+. In the second part of the study, the mutagenic effects of four metal contaminated soils and two types of standardized leachates (pH 4.0 and pH 7.0) of these soils were tested in Tradescantia and in Vicia. In addition, chemical analyses were carried out to determine the metal concentrations in the soils and in the extracts. Two of the samples contained highly elevated levels of a number of metals (Zn, Pb, Cu, Cd, Sb, As), one soil came from the Central Austrian Alps and contained high As levels only. Direct exposure of the Tradescantia plants in the soils resulted in a drastic increase of the MN frequencies over the background. The lowest effect was seen with the Slovakian soil which contained in

  18. Cyto-/genotoxic effect of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots in human lung adenocarcinoma cells for potential photodynamic UV therapy applications.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young Joo; Kim, Yang Jee; Lee, Joong Won; Lee, Younghyun; Lim, Yong-Beom; Chung, Hai Won

    2012-03-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are luminescent nanoparticles (NPs) with promising potential in numerous medical applications, but there remain persistent human health and safety concerns. Although the cytotoxic effects of QDs have been extensively investigated, their genotoxic effects remain under-explored. This study scrutinized the cyto- and genotoxic effects of QDs with a Cadmium selenide/Zinc sulfide (CdSe/ZnS) core/shell, and suggests comprehensive guidelines for the application of QDs in cancer therapy. QDs were used to treat A549 cells in the presence and absence of ultraviolet A/B (UVA/UVB) irradiation. QD-induced cell death was evaluated by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), apoptosis, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays, as well as by real-time PCR analysis of differential mRNA levels of genes, such as ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), p53, and caspase-9, involved in apoptosis. The genotoxic effect of CdSe/ZnS QDs was measured in human cancer cells, for the first time, by comet and micronucleus assays. Treatment with CdSe/ZnS QDs and UVB irradiation resulted in the most severe extent of cell death, indicating strong induction of phototoxicity by CdSe/ZnS QDs in the presence of UVB. Both apoptotic and necrotic cell death were observed upon QDs and UVB combined treatment. The induction of Olive tail moments and micronuclei formation was also most significant when CdSe/ZnS QDs and UVB irradiation were combined. Our results on the genotoxic effect and mechanistic details of CdSe/ZnS QD-induced cell death suggest that UVB irradiation is the most effective method for increasing the potency of QDs during photodynamic cancer therapy.

  19. No evidence for genotoxic effects from 24 h exposure of human leukocytes to 1.9 GHz radiofrequency fields.

    PubMed

    McNamee, J P; Bellier, P V; Gajda, G B; Lavallée, B F; Marro, L; Lemay, E; Thansandote, A

    2003-05-01

    The current study extends our previous investigations of 2-h radiofrequency (RF)-field exposures on genotoxicity in human blood cell cultures by examining the effect of 24-h continuous-wave (CW) and pulsed-wave (PW) 1.9 GHz RF-field exposures on both primary DNA damage and micronucleus induction in human leukocyte cultures. Mean specific absorption rates (SARs) ranged from 0 to 10 W/kg, and the temperature within the cultures was maintained at 37.0 +/- 1.0 degrees C for the duration of the 24-h exposure period. No significant differences in primary DNA damage were observed between the sham-treated controls and any of the CW or PW 1.9 GHz RF-field-exposed cultures when processed immediately after the exposure period by the alkaline comet assay. Similarly, no significant differences were observed in the incidence of micronuclei, incidence of micronucleated binucleated cells, frequency of binucleated cells, or proliferation index between the sham-treated controls and any of the CW or PW 1.9 GHz RF-field-exposed cultures. In conclusion, the current study found no evidence of 1.9 GHz RF-field-induced genotoxicity in human blood cell cultures after a 24-h exposure period.

  20. Copper-induced oxidative damage, antioxidant response and genotoxicity in Lycopersicum esculentum Mill. and Cucumis sativus L.

    PubMed

    İşeri, Özlem Darcansoy; Körpe, Didem Aksoy; Yurtcu, Erkan; Sahin, Feride Iffet; Haberal, Mehmet

    2011-09-01

    Adequate copper (Cu(2+)) concentrations are required for plants; however, at higher concentrations it can also cause multiple toxic effects. In the present study, lipid peroxidation, hydrogen peroxide levels as well as ascorbate peroxidase (APX: EC 1/11/1/11) and catalase (CAT: EC 1.11.1.6) activities were determined in Lycopersicum esculentum Mill. and Cucumis sativus L. seedlings after 7-day exposure to copper sulfate. In addition, DNA damage in these two crops was assessed by measuring micronucleus (MN) frequency and tail moments (TM) as determined by Comet assay. Inhibitory copper concentrations (EC(50): 30 and 5.5 ppm for L. esculentum and C. sativus, respectively) were determined according to dose-dependent root inhibition curves, and EC(50) and 2×EC(50) were applied. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and H(2)O(2) levels significantly increased in all groups studied. CAT activity increased in treatment groups of C. sativus. APX activity increased in L. esculentum seedlings due to 2×EC(50) treatment. Reductions in mitotic indices (MI) represented Cu(2+)dependent root growth inhibition in all treatment groups studied. According to TMs and MN frequencies, copper exposure induced significant DNA damage (p < 0.05) in all study groups, whereas the DNA damage induced was dose dependent in C. sativus roots. In conclusion, Cu(2+)induced oxidative damage, elevations in H(2)O(2) levels and alterations in APX and CAT activities, as well as significant DNA damage in nuclei of both study groups. To our knowledge, this is the first comparative and comprehensive study demonstrating the effects of copper on two different plant species at relevant cytotoxic concentrations at both biochemical and genotoxicity levels with multiple end points.

  1. Long-term genotoxic effects of immunosuppressive drugs on lymphocytes of kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Lizotti Cilião, Heloísa; Batista de Oliveira Camargo-Godoy, Rossana; Mazzaron Barcelos, Gustavo Rafael; Zanuto, Amanda; Daher Alvares Delfino, Vinicius; de Syllos Cólus, Ilce Mara

    2016-08-01

    Immunosuppressive therapy can prevent rejection after organ transplantation. However, increased cancer risk is a serious complication among patients undergoing such therapy. We have evaluated whether prolonged use of immunosuppressive drugs is genotoxic. DNA instability was assessed, using the comet and micronucleus assays, in blood lymphocytes of 76 kidney transplant patients. DNA damage detected by the comet assay increased with time after transplantation. The estimated glomerular filtration rate of the patients did not influence the incidence of DNA damage. No association between micronucleated mononucleated cells and time elapsed after transplantation was observed. Our results suggest that prolonged use of immunosuppressive drugs in kidney transplant patients can induce genetic instability.

  2. Further evidence against a direct genotoxic mode of action for arsenic-induced cancer

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Catherine B.; Leszczynska, Joanna; Hickey, Christina; Rossman, Toby G.

    2007-01-01

    Arsenic in drinking water, a mixture of arsenite and arsenate, is associated with increased skin and other cancers in Asia and Latin America, but not the United States. Arsenite alone in drinking water does not cause skin cancers in experimental animals, therefore it is not a complete carcinogen in skin. We recently showed that low concentrations of arsenite enhanced the tumorigenicity of solar UV irradiation in hairless mice, suggesting arsenic co-carcinogenesis with sunlight in skin cancer and perhaps with different carcinogenic partners for lung and bladder tumors. Cocarcinogenic mechanisms could include: blocking DNA repair, stimulating angiogenesis, altering DNA methylation patterns, dysregulating cell cycle control, induction of aneuploidy, and blocking apoptosis. Arsenicals are documented clastogens but not strong mutagens, with weak mutagenic activity reported at highly toxic concentrations of inorganic arsenic. Previously, we showed that arsenite, but not monomethylarsonous acid (MMA[III]), induced delayed mutagenesis in HOS cells. Here, we report new data on the mutagenicity of the trivalent methylated arsenic metabolites MMA(III) and dimethylarsinous acid [DMA(III)] at the gpt locus in Chinese hamster G12 cells. Both methylated arsenicals seemed mutagenic with apparent sublinear dose responses. However, significant mutagenesis occurred only at highly toxic concentrations of MMA(III). Most mutants induced by MMA(III) and DMA(III) mutants exhibited transgene deletions. Some non-deletion mutants exhibited altered DNA methylation. A critical discussion of cell survival leads us to conclude that clastogenesis occurs primarily at highly cytotoxic arsenic concentrations, casting further doubt as to whether a genotoxic mode of action (MOA) for arsenicals is supportable. PMID:17316729

  3. Further evidence against a direct genotoxic mode of action for arsenic-induced cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Catherine B.; Leszczynska, Joanna; Hickey, Christina; Rossman, Toby G.

    2007-08-01

    Arsenic in drinking water, a mixture of arsenite and arsenate, is associated with increased skin and other cancers in Asia and Latin America, but not the United States. Arsenite alone in drinking water does not cause skin cancers in experimental animals; therefore, it is not a complete carcinogen in skin. We recently showed that low concentrations of arsenite enhanced the tumorigenicity of solar UV irradiation in hairless mice, suggesting arsenic cocarcinogenesis with sunlight in skin cancer and perhaps with different carcinogenic partners for lung and bladder tumors. Cocarcinogenic mechanisms could include blocking DNA repair, stimulating angiogenesis, altering DNA methylation patterns, dysregulating cell cycle control, induction of aneuploidy and blocking apoptosis. Arsenicals are documented clastogens but not strong mutagens, with weak mutagenic activity reported at highly toxic concentrations of inorganic arsenic. Previously, we showed that arsenite, but not monomethylarsonous acid (MMA[III]), induced delayed mutagenesis in HOS cells. Here, we report new data on the mutagenicity of the trivalent methylated arsenic metabolites MMA(III) and dimethylarsinous acid [DMA(III)] at the gpt locus in Chinese hamster G12 cells. Both methylated arsenicals seemed mutagenic with apparent sublinear dose responses. However, significant mutagenesis occurred only at highly toxic concentrations of MMA(III). Most mutants induced by MMA(III) and DMA(III) exhibited transgene deletions. Some non-deletion mutants exhibited altered DNA methylation. A critical discussion of cell survival leads us to conclude that clastogenesis occurs primarily at highly cytotoxic arsenic concentrations, casting further doubt as to whether a genotoxic mode of action (MOA) for arsenicals is supportable.

  4. Evaluation of genotoxic effect of silver nanoparticles (Ag-Nps) in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavares, Priscila; Balbinot, Fernanda; de Oliveira, Hugo Martins; Fagundes, Gabriela Elibio; Venâncio, Mireli; Ronconi, João Vitor Vieira; Merlini, Aline; Streck, Emílio L.; da Silva Paula, Marcos Marques; de Andrade, Vanessa Moraes

    2012-03-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) are the most prominent nanoproducts. Due to their antimicrobial activity, they have been incorporated in different materials, such as catheters, clothes, electric home appliance, and many others. The genotoxicity of Ag-NPs (5-45 nm), in different concentrations and times of exposure, was evaluated by the comet assay in in vitro and in vivo conditions, respectively, using human peripheral blood and Swiss mice. The results showed the genotoxic effect of Ag-NPs in vitro , in all the doses tested in the initial hour of exposure, possibly through the reactive oxygen species generation. Nevertheless, the values for this damage decrease with time, indicating that the DNA may have been restored by the repair system. In the in vivo conditions, we found no genotoxicity of Ag-NPs in any hour of exposure and any dose investigated, which can be attributed to the activation of a cellular antioxidant network and the hydrophobic nature of Ag-NPs. Now, it is absolutely necessary to investigate the role of Ag-NPs in different cell lines in vivo.

  5. Genotoxic effects of catmint (Nepeta meyeri Benth.) essential oils on some weed and crop plants.

    PubMed

    Kekeç, Güzin; Mutlu, Salih; Alpsoy, Lokman; Sakçali, M Serdal; Atici, Ökkes

    2013-07-01

    This study investigates the genotoxicity of the essential oils extracted from the aerial parts of catmint (Nepeta meyeri Benth.) against two weeds (Bromus danthoniae and Lactuca serriola) and two crop plants (Brassica napus and Zea mays). The essential oils of N. meyeri analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry contained 14 compounds, with 4aα, 7α, 7aβ-nepetalactone (83.4%), 4aα, 7α, and 7aα-nepetalactone (8.83%) as the major components. The oils were diluted (25, 50, 100, and 150 ppm) and the solutions were applied to seeds or leaves of these plants. The study compared the germination percentage and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) results with the control group. The results showed that the oils had a strong inhibitory activity and caused a change in RAPD profiles in terms of variation in band intensity, loss of bands, and appearance of new bands compared with the control group. The results suggested that RAPD analysis could be applied as a suitable biomarker assay for the detection of genotoxic effects of plant allelochemicals. This study indicates the genotoxical potential of N. meyeri essential oils on weed and crop plants.

  6. Cdk5 activator-binding protein C53 regulates apoptosis induced by genotoxic stress via modulating the G2/M DNA damage checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hai; Luo, Shouqing; Li, Honglin

    2005-05-27

    In response to DNA damage, the cellular decision of life versus death involves an intricate network of multiple factors that play critical roles in regulation of DNA repair, cell cycle, and cell death. DNA damage checkpoint proteins are crucial for maintaining DNA integrity and normal cellular functions, but they may also reduce the effectiveness of cancer treatment. Here we report the involvement of Cdk5 activator p35-binding protein C53 in regulation of apoptosis induced by genotoxic stress through modulating Cdk1-cyclin B1 function. C53 was originally identified as a Cdk5 activator p35-binding protein and a caspase substrate. Importantly, our results demonstrated that C53 deficiency conferred partial resistance to genotoxic agents such as etoposide and x-ray irradiation, whereas ectopic expression of C53 rendered cells susceptible to multiple genotoxins that usually trigger G(2)/M arrest. Furthermore, we found that Cdk1 activity was required for etoposide-induced apoptosis of HeLa cells. Overexpression of C53 promoted Cdk1 activity and nuclear accumulation of cyclin B1, whereas C53 deficiency led to more cytoplasmic retention of cyclin B1, suggesting that C53 acts as a pivotal player in modulating the G(2)/M DNA damage checkpoint. Finally, C53 and cyclin B1 co-localize and associate in vivo, indicating a direct role of C53 in regulating the Cdk1-cyclin B1 complex. Taken together, our results strongly indicate that in response to genotoxic stress, C53 serves as an important regulatory component of the G(2)/M DNA damage checkpoint. By overriding the G(2)/M checkpoint-mediated inhibition of Cdk1-cyclin B1 function, ectopic expression of C53 may represent a novel approach for chemo- and radio-sensitization of cancer cells.

  7. Phytotoxic and genotoxic effects of ZnO nanoparticles on garlic (Allium sativum L.): a morphological study.

    PubMed

    Shaymurat, Talgar; Gu, Jianxiu; Xu, Changshan; Yang, Zhikun; Zhao, Qing; Liu, Yuxue; Liu, Yichun

    2012-05-01

    The effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) on the root growth, root apical meristem mitosis and mitotic aberrations of garlic (Allium sativum L.) were investigated. ZnO NPs caused a concentration-dependent inhibition of root length. When treated with 50 mg/L ZnO NPs for 24 h, the root growth of garlic was completely blocked. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) was estimated to be 15 mg/L. The mitosis index was also decreased in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. ZnO NPs also induced several kinds of mitotic aberrations, mainly consisted of chromosome stickiness, bridges, breakages and laggings. The total percentage of abnormal cells increased with the increase of ZnO NPs concentration and the prolongation of treatment time. The investigation provided new information for the possible genotoxic effects of ZnO NPs on plants.

  8. Assessing the genotoxicity of two commonly occurring byproducts of water disinfection: Chloral hydrate and bromal hydrate.

    PubMed

    Manasfi, Tarek; De Méo, Michel; Di Giorgio, Carole; Coulomb, Bruno; Boudenne, Jean-Luc

    2017-01-01

    Water disinfection treatments result in the formation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) that have been linked to adverse human health outcomes including higher incidence of bladder and colorectal cancer. However, data about the genotoxicity of DBPs is limited to only a small fraction of compounds. Chloral hydrate (CH) and bromal hydrate (BH) are two trihaloacetaldehydes commonly detected in disinfected waters, but little is known about their genotoxicity, especially BH. We investigated the genotoxicity of CH and BH using a test battery that includes three in vitro genotoxicity assays. We conducted the Ames test using Salmonella bacterial strains TA97a, TA98, TA100 and TA102, and the alkaline comet assay and the micronucleus test both using Chinese hamster ovary cells. We carried out the tests in the absence and presence of the metabolic fraction S9 mix. CH did not exhibit statistically significant genotoxic effects in any of the three assays. In contrast, BH exhibited mutagenic activity in the Salmonella strain TA100 and induced statistically significant DNA lesions in CHO cells as appeared in the comet assay. The genotoxic potential of BH in both assays decreased in the presence of the metabolic fraction S9 mix. BH did not induce chromosomal damage in CHO cells. Our results show that BH exhibited genotoxic activity by causing mutations and primary DNA damage while CH did not induce genotoxic effects. Our findings highlight concerns about the higher genotoxicity of brominated DBPs in comparison to their chlorinated analogues.

  9. Physicochemical properties, in vitro cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of PM1.0 and PM2.5 from Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yajuan; Wu, Yizhao; Wang, Yali; Li, Yinsheng; Jin, Chengyu

    2017-07-05

    Exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM) links with a variety of respiratory diseases. However, compared with coarse particles (PM10) and fine particles (PM2.5), submicrometer particles (PM1.0) may be a more important indicator of human health risks. In this study, the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of PM1.0 samples from Shanghai were examined using A549 cells, and compared with the effects of PM2.5, to better understand the health effects of PM1.0 in this area. The PM1.0 and PM2.5 samples were characterized for morphology, water-soluble inorganic ions, organic and elemental carbon, and metal elements. The cytotoxicity of PMs was measured using cell viability and cell membrane damage assays. The genotoxic effects of PMs were determined using the comet assay, and DNA damage was quantified using olive tail moment (OTM) values. The physicochemical characterization indicated that PM1.0 was enriched in carbonaceous elements and hazardous metals (Al, Zn, Pb, Mn, Cu, and V), whereas PM2.5 was more abundant in large, irregular mineral particles. The biological results revealed that both PM1.0 and PM2.5 could induce significant cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in A549 cells, and that exposure to PM1.0 caused more extensive toxic effects than exposure to PM2.5. The greater cytotoxic effects of PM1.0 can be attributed to the combined effects of size and chemical composition, whereas the genotoxic effects of PM1.0 may be mainly associated with chemical species.

  10. Genotoxic effects of exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) in HL-60 cells are not reproducible.

    PubMed

    Speit, Günter; Gminski, Richard; Tauber, Rudolf

    2013-08-15

    Conflicting results have been published regarding the induction of genotoxic effects by exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF). Various results indicating a genotoxic potential of RF-EMF were reported by the collaborative EU-funded REFLEX (Risk Evaluation of Potential Environmental Hazards From Low Energy Electromagnetic Field Exposure Using Sensitive in vitro Methods) project. There has been a long-lasting scientific debate about the reliability of the reported results and an attempt to reproduce parts of the results obtained with human fibroblasts failed. Another part of the REFLEX study was performed in Berlin with the human lymphoblastoid cell line HL-60; genotoxic effects of RF-EMF were measured by means of the comet assay and the micronucleus test. The plausibility and reliability of these results were also questioned. In order to contribute to a clarification of the biological significance of the reported findings, a repeat study was performed, involving scientists of the original study. Comet-assay experiments and micronucleus tests were performed under the same experimental conditions that had led to genotoxic effects in the REFLEX study. Here we report that the attempts to reproduce the induction of genotoxic effects by RF-EMF in HL-60 cells failed. No genotoxic effects of RF-EMF were measured in the repeat experiments. We could not find an explanation for the conflicting results. However, the negative repeat experiments suggest that the biological significance of genotoxic effects of RF-EMF reported by the REFLEX study should be re-assessed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Genotoxic effects of bisphenol A on somatic cells of female mice, alone and in combination with X-rays.

    PubMed

    Gajowik, Aneta; Radzikowska, Joanna; Dobrzyńska, Małgorzata M

    2013-10-09

    Bisphenol A (BPA), a monomer used in the manufacture of epoxy, polycarbonate, and polystyrene resins, is a xenoestrogen present in many consumer products. We investigated the effects of 2-week exposure to BPA, either alone or in combination with X-rays, on the induction of DNA damage in somatic cells of female mice in vivo. The micronucleus and alkaline comet assays were used to evaluate genotoxicity. BPA induced DNA strand breaks in lung cells but not in bone marrow lymphocytes, liver, kidney, or spleen cells. Induction of micronuclei was observed only in polychromatic reticulocytes of peripheral blood. Levels of damage following combination exposure to ionizing radiation plus BPA depended on tissue, assay, and time. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Monitoring of genotoxicity in marine zooplankton induced by toxic metals in Ennore estuary, Southeast coast of India.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Prasun; Thirunavukkarasu, Subramani; Godhantaraman, Nallamuthu; Munuswamy, Natesan

    2014-11-15

    The present study provides preliminary in-situ data on genetic integrity of marine zooplankton. Paracalanus parvus, Oithona rigida and Euterpina acutifrons were collected during four different seasons (summer, pre-monsoon, monsoon and post-monsoon) from 2011 to 2012 in Ennore and Kovalum estuaries. DNA damage levels in different zooplankton were analyzed by comet assay and were correlated with different environmental stressors. Spatial and temporal variations in DNA damage was observed in all the species. Zooplankton from Ennore estuary showed significantly lower genetic integrity. Particulate, sediment, and zooplankton fractions of Pb, Ni, Cu, Cr and Co were associated with high DNA damage during the period of lowest pH, salinity and dissolved oxygen. Zn and Cd showed lower genotoxic impact than the other metals. Feeding modes strongly influenced the genetic integrity in the zooplankton species studied. These results support the use of comet assay as a tool in effectively monitoring genotoxicity in marine plankton communities.

  13. Genotoxic effects of three selected black toner powders and their dimethyl sulfoxide extracts in cultured human epithelial A549 lung cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gminski, Richard; Decker, Katharina; Heinz, Christina; Seidel, Albrecht; Könczöl, Mathias; Goldenberg, Ella; Grobéty, Bernard; Ebner, Winfried; Gieré, Reto; Mersch-Sundermann, Volker

    2011-05-01

    Until now, the adverse effects of toner powders on humans have been considered to be minimal. However, several recent reports have suggested possible significant adverse health effects from toner dust inhalation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic potential of black toner powders in vitro. For the study of DNA damage, A549 cells were exposed to toner-powder suspensions and to their DMSO extracts, and then subjected to the comet assay and to the in-vitro cytokinesis block micronucleus test (CB-MNvit). Cytotoxic effects of the toner samples were assessed by the erythrosin B assay. Furthermore, size, shape, and composition of the toner powders were investigated. None of the three toner powders or their DMSO extracts reduced cell viability; however, they did induce DNA damage and formed micronuclei at concentrations from 80 to 400 μg cm(-2) , although to a varying extent. All toner powders contain considerable amounts of the pigments carbon black and magnetite (Fe(3) O(4) ) as well as small amounts of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The overall results of our in-vitro study suggest that the investigated toner-powder samples are not cytotoxic but genotoxic. From the results of the physical and chemical characterization, we conclude that metals and metalloids as components of magnetite, or PAHs as components of the carbon-bearing material, are responsible for the genotoxic effects. Further research is necessary to determine the relevance of these in-vitro observations for private and occupational toner powder exposure.

  14. Effects of light on the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of benzo(a)pyrene and an oil refinery effluent in the newt

    SciTech Connect

    Fer